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1

Efficacy and safety of purified botulinum toxin type A (Dysport ®) for the treatment of benign essential blepharospasm: A randomized, placebo-controlled, phase II trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

The majority of studies on the effects of botulinum toxin in blepharospasm patients have been small or unblinded. Our large-scale, multicenter, randomized clinical trial on the efficacy and safety of botulinum toxin (Dysport®; 40, 80, and 120 units\\/eye) versus placebo in bilateral benign essential blepharospasm (BEB) supported the high efficacy and good safety profile of Dysport®, with improvement in functional

Daniel Truong; Cynthia Comella; Hubert H. Fernandez; William G. Ondo

2008-01-01

2

Blepharospasm: long-term treatment with either Botox(®), Xeomin (®) or Dysport (®).  

PubMed

Botulinum toxin (BT) therapy is the treatment of choice for blepharospasm (BPS). Currently available BT type A drugs include Botox(®), Dysport(®) and Xeomin(®). Until now, there are few long-term studies on BT therapy for BPS. This is the first long-term study comparing all three major BT drugs. We collected treatment, efficacy and adverse effect data on BPS patients treated with either Botox(®), Dysport(®) or Xeomin(®) for at least eight consecutive treatments. Two hundred and eighty-eight patients (208 females, 80 males, age 62 ± 12 years) were included in this study. The treatment time was 11.2 ± 4.1 years covering 10,701 injection series. Doses were 47 ± 10 MU for Botox(®), 120 ± 35 MU for Dysport(®) and 62 ± 11 MU for Xeomin(®) (Botox(®) dose vs Xeomin(®) dose: p < 0.001, unpaired t test). 85 % of all patients had stable doses. The onset of the therapeutic effect was after 6.1 ± 3.3 days and its duration lasted 10.2 ± 3.5 weeks. The Global Clinical Improvement (GCI, 0 = no, 1 = slight, 2 = moderate, 3 = marked improvement in severity and function) as estimated by the patient was 2.5 ± 0.6. It was stable in 90 % of the patients. Adverse effect frequency was 3.0 % (ptosis 2.3 %, dry eye 0.5 %, diplopia 0.2 %). None of these findings was significantly different between Botox(®), Dysport(®) and Xeomin(®). Our study, one of the largest studies on BT therapy of BPS and the study with the longest follow-up, confirms that BT therapy produces robust clinical improvement which is stable throughout the treatment time. Therapeutic effects start after 6.1 days and last for about 10 weeks before they start to vanish. With this, they are approximately 2 weeks shorter than the recommended inter-injection interval. Adverse effects were rare, mild and always transient. BT therapy is a safe and effective treatment for BSP. Shorter inter-injection intervals may improve therapeutic results. PMID:25059456

Kollewe, Katja; Mohammadi, Bahram; Köhler, Steffen; Pickenbrock, Heidrun; Dengler, Reinhard; Dressler, Dirk

2015-03-01

3

Dysport and Botox at a Ratio of 2.5:1 Units in Cervical Dystonia: A Double-Blind, Randomized Study  

PubMed Central

We aimed to compare Dysport (abobotulinumtoxinA, Ipsen Biopharm, Slough, UK) and Botox (onabotulinumtoxinA, Allergan, Irvine, CA, USA) at a 2.5:1 ratio in the treatment of cervical dystonia (CD). A Dysport/Botox ratio of lower than 3:1 was suggested as a more appropriate conversion ratio, considering its higher efficacy and more frequent incidence of adverse effects not only in the treatment of CD but also in other focal movement disorders. A randomized, double-blind, multicenter, non-inferiority, two-period crossover study was done in CD, with a duration of at least 18 months. Patients were randomly assigned to treatment for the first period with Dysport or Botox, and they were followed up for 16 weeks after the injection. After a 4-week washout period, they were switched to the other formulation and then followed up for 16 weeks. The primary outcome was the changes in the Tsui scale between the baseline value and that at 1 month after each injection. A total of 103 patients were enrolled, and 94 completed the study. Mean changes in the Tsui scale between baseline and 4 weeks after each injection tended to favor Botox; however, this was not statistically significant (4.0?±?3.9 points for the Dysport treatment vs. 4.8?±?4.1 points for Botox; 95% confidence interval, ?0.1-1.7; P?=?0.091). The mean change of the Toronto western spasmodic torticollis rating scale score, the proportion of improvement in clinical global impression and patient global impression, and the incidences of adverse events were not significantly different between the two treatments. With regard to safety and efficacy, Dysport was not inferior to Botox in patients with CD at a conversion factor of 2.5:1. [http//clinicaltrial.gov: NCT00950664] © The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. PMID:25476727

Yun, Ji Young; Kim, Jae Woo; Kim, Hee-Tae; Chung, Sun Ju; Kim, Jong-Min; Cho, Jin Whan; Lee, Jee-Young; Lee, Ha Neul; You, Sooyeoun; Oh, Eungseok; Jeong, Heejeong; Kim, Young Eun; Kim, Han-Joon; Lee, Won Yong; Jeon, Beom S

2015-01-01

4

Respective potencies of Botox and Dysport: a double blind, randomised, crossover study in cervical dystonia  

PubMed Central

Objectives: Botulinum toxin type A is a potent neuromuscular paralyzing agent used in various disorders including cervical dystonia. Two preparations of botulinum toxin are now commercially available ( Dysport and Botox), but much controversy remains about their respective potencies. The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy of Botox with two different ratios of Dysport. Methods: A double blind, randomised, three period cross over study involving 54 patients with cervical dystonia was performed. The patients received the following treatments in a randomised order: Botox at the usually effective dose, Dysport at a dose of 1:3 (conversion factor of 3 between Botox and Dysport units—that is, one Botox unit=three Dysport units) and at a dose of 1:4 (conversion factor of four). The improvement of the Tsui (primary outcome criteria) and of the TWSTRS pain scales between baseline and a control visit 1 month after each of the three injections, as well as the incidence of adverse events, were assessed. Results: Comparison of the Tsui scores and of the TWSTRS pain scores showed a better effect on impairment and pain with Dysport 1:3 (p=0.02 and 0.04, respectively) and 1:4 (p=0.01 and 0.02, respectively) than with Botox. The number of adverse events was higher with both Dysport treatments. The most frequent adverse event was dysphagia, found in 3%, 15.6%, and 17.3% (Botox, Dysport 1:3 and 1:4, respectively) of the patients. No adverse event required withdrawal of therapy or specific management. Conclusions: Dysport 1:3 (and Dysport 1:4 to a greater extent) is more efficient than Botox for both impairment and pain in cervical dystonia although with a somewhat higher incidence of minor adverse effects. This strongly suggests that the most appropriate conversion factor between Botox and Dysport units is less than 3 in cervical dystonia. PMID:11909903

Ranoux, D; Gury, C; Fondarai, J; Mas, J; Zuber, M

2002-01-01

5

AbobotulinumtoxinA (Dysport) dosing in cervical dystonia: an exploratory analysis of two large open-label extension studies.  

PubMed

Treatment with botulinum toxin-A is recommended as first-line treatment for cervical dystonia (CD). In clinical practice many factors appear to influence dose adjustment and the retreatment regimen; however, there is little information available in the literature regarding the evolution of dosing over treatment cycles. We report on two similarly designed, long-term, multicenter, open-label extension studies of Dysport for the treatment of CD, which followed 500 U fixed-dose placebo-controlled trials. Both studies specified a fixed 500 U dose for the first open-label treatment cycle, with dose adjustment in subsequent treatment cycles according to the clinical response. These analyses include 218 patients who entered the two studies; doses in the subsequent treatment cycles ranged between 250 and 1,000 U. During open-label treatment, all treatment cycles resulted in improvements in mean Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS) total scores. However, increasing the dose of Dysport above the initial 500 U dose was not observed to result in an incremental improvement in response as measured by the TWSTRS. No individual patient characteristic was found to reliably predict the use of higher doses at each treatment cycle. Dysport was generally well tolerated with no major differences in the incidence of adverse events (AEs) observed with different doses. Dysphagia was considered an AE of special interest and dysphagia data from the open-label studies were combined with two Phase II studies. Analysis of this enhanced database indicates that unilateral injections of >150 U into the sternocleidomastoid muscle is associated with a higher dysphagia risk. Thus, limiting the dose in the sternocleidomastoid may help reduce the incidence of dysphagia. PMID:22878514

Hauser, Robert A; Truong, Daniel; Hubble, Jean; Coleman, Chandra; Beffy, Jean-Luc; Chang, Stephen; Picaut, Philippe

2013-02-01

6

A review of AbobotulinumtoxinA (Dysport).  

PubMed

AbobotulinumtoxinA was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2009 as the second botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNTA) for use in facial aesthetics. This article provides an overview of abobotulinumtoxinA's applications and indications as well as safety and efficacy data. AbobotulinumtoxinA is generally well tolerated. Adverse events from abobotulinumtoxinA are similar to those reported with other BoNTA products. Clinical applications of the product are also discussed in this article. Information on handling, storage, and dosing is provided. PMID:23515194

Lorenc, Z Paul; Kenkel, Jeffrey M; Fagien, Steven; Hirmand, Haideh; Nestor, Mark S; Sclafani, Anthony P; Sykes, Jonathan M; Waldorf, Heidi A

2013-03-01

7

A Double-Blind Randomised Placebo-Controlled Evaluation of Three Doses of Botulinum Toxin Type A (Dysport®) in the Treatment of Spastic Equinovarus Deformity after Stroke  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background\\/Objectives: Calf muscle hypertonicity following stroke may impair walking rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to assess botulinum toxin (Dysport®) in post-stroke calf spasticity. Methods: A prospective, multicentre, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-ranging study was performed to evaluate dysport at 500, 1,000 or 1,500 units in 234 stroke patients. They were assessed at 4-week intervals over 12 weeks. Results: The primary

S. J. Pittock; A. P. Moore; O. Hardiman; E. Ehler; M. Kovac; J. Bojakowski; I. al Khawaja; M. Brozman; A. Skorometz; J. Slawek; G. Reichel; A. Stenner; S. Timerbaeva; Z. Stelmasiak; U. A. Zifko; B. Bhakta; E. Coxon

2003-01-01

8

Factors affecting the health-related quality of life of patients with cervical dystonia and impact of treatment with abobotulinumtoxinA (Dysport): results from a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study  

PubMed Central

Objective To describe the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) burden of cervical dystonia (CD) and report on the HRQOL and patient perception of treatment benefits of abobotulinumtoxinA (Dysport). Design The safety and efficacy of a single injection of abobotulinumtoxinA for CD treatment were evaluated in a previously reported international, multicenter, double-blind, randomised trial. HRQOL measures were assessed in the trial and have not been previously reported. Setting Movement disorder clinics in the USA and Russia. Participants Patients had to have a diagnosis of CD with symptoms for at least 18?months, as well as a total Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS) score of at least 30; a Severity domain score of at least 15; and a Disability domain score of at least 3. Key exclusion criteria included treatment with botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) or botulinum toxin type B (BoNT-B) within 16?weeks of enrolment. Interventions Patients were randomised to receive either 500 U abobotulinumtoxinA (n=55) or placebo (n=61). Primary and secondary outcome measures Efficacy assessments included TWSTRS total (primary end point) and subscale scores at weeks 0, 4, 8, 12; a pain visual analogue scale at weeks 0 and 4; and HRQOL assessed by the SF-36 Health Survey (SF-36; secondary end point) at weeks 0 and 8. Results Patients with CD reported significantly greater impairment for all SF-36 domains relative to US norms. Patients treated with abobotulinumtoxinA reported significantly greater improvements in Physical Functioning, Role Physical, Bodily Pain, General Health and Role Emotional domains than placebo patients (p?0.03 for all). The TWSTRS was significantly correlated with Physical Functioning, Role Physical and Bodily Pain scores, for those on active treatment. Conclusions CD has a marked impact on HRQOL. Treatment with a single abobotulinumtoxinA injection results in significant improvement in patients’ HRQOL. Trial registration number The trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, numbers NCT00257660 and NCT00288509. PMID:25324317

Mordin, Margaret; Masaquel, Catherine; Abbott, Chandra; Copley-Merriman, Catherine

2014-01-01

9

Clinical Scenario Clinical Challenge  

E-print Network

Clinical Scenario 1 #12;Clinical Challenge VINCI ­ VA Informatics and Computing Infrastructure #12Phone 4S and 5 2011 may well be the year that AI finally gets real traction in the medical informatics

10

Systematic Literature Review of AbobotulinumtoxinA in Clinical Trials for Adult Upper Limb Spasticity  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Objective The aim of this study was to elucidate clinical trial efficacy, safety, and dosing practices of abobotulinumtoxinA (ABO) treatment in adult patients with upper limb spasticity (ULS). Methods A systematic literature review was performed to identify randomized controlled trials and other comparative clinical studies of ABO in the treatment of adult ULS published in English between January 1991 and January 2013. Medical literature databases (PubMed, Cochrane Library, and EMBASE) were searched, and a total of 295 records were identified. Of these, 12 primary publications that evaluated ABO for the management of ULS were included in the final data report. Synthesis Total ABO doses ranged between 500 and 1500 U for ULS. Most of the studies in ULS showed statistically significant benefits (reduction in muscle tone based on Ashworth score) of ABO vs. placebo. Statistical significance was reached for most evaluations of spasticity using the Modified Ashworth Scale. Statistically significant effects on active movement and pain were demonstrated, albeit less consistently. ABO was generally well tolerated across the individual studies; most adverse events reported were considered unrelated to treatment. Adverse events considered associated with ABO treatment included fatigue, tiredness, arm pain, skin rashes, flu-like symptoms, worsening of spasm, and weakness. Conclusions On the basis of data extracted from 12 randomized clinical studies, a strong evidence base (9/12 studies) exists for the use of ABO to reduce ULS caused by stroke. PMID:25299523

Dashtipour, Khashayar; Chen, Jack J.; Walker, Heather W.; Lee, Michael Y.

2015-01-01

11

CLINICAL BIOCHEMISTRY  

EPA Science Inventory

Assessment of the health status of animals through measurement of cellular, biochemical, and macromolecular constituents in blood, secretions, and excretions has been variously referred to as clinical chemistry, clinical biochemistry, or clinical pathology. he genesis of this dis...

12

Clinical Trials  

MedlinePLUS

Clinical Trials What is a clinical trial? A clinical trial is a study carried out in human volunteers to help doctors learn more about the human body and ... work. What can I gain from joining a clinical trial? You will: • Take a more active role in ...

13

Clinical Trials  

MedlinePLUS

Clinical trials are research studies that test how well new medical approaches work in people. Each study answers ... prevent, screen for, diagnose, or treat a disease. Clinical trials may also compare a new treatment to a ...

14

Clinical Trials  

Cancer.gov

Information about actively enrolling, ongoing, and completed clinical trials of cancer prevention, early detection, and supportive care, including phase I, II, and III agent and action trials and clinical trials management.

15

Clinical Trials  

Cancer.gov

ACRIN is funded to improve the quality and utility of imaging in cancer research and cancer care through expert, multi-institutional clinical evaluation of discoveries and technological innovations relevant to imaging science as applied in clinical oncology.

16

Clinical Nurse Leader (CNL) Option Clinical Manual  

E-print Network

Clinical Nurse Leader (CNL) Option Clinical Manual 2011-2012 Reviewed August, 2011 Associate Dean...................................................................................................................................1 Clinical Nurse Leader Major Role Function? ........................................................................................2 Clinical Nurse Leader

Dyer, Bill

17

Clinical Trials  

MedlinePLUS

... after the clinical trial ends? If I have bipolar disorder, what will happen if the treatment makes ... friends before participating in any trial. Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance does not endorse nor recommend any ...

18

Clinical Research  

MedlinePLUS

... maintains a robust drug development pipeline to tackle cystic fibrosis from every angle. These new therapies can only ... people who need them most, many people with cystic fibrosis are needed to participate in clinical trials. Learn ...

19

Clinical Semantics  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a We discuss the challenge of efficient and flexible clinical informatics and provide initial results on how to tackle the computerized\\u000a management of the complex and diverse information space of clinical medicine through an approach coined as open information\\u000a management. The approach builds on natural language as the core information management tool in place of formal, structured\\u000a representation. The chapter discusses

Jari Yli-Hietanen; Samuli Niiranen

20

Study design and methods of the BoTULS trial: a randomised controlled trial to evaluate the clinical effect and cost effectiveness of treating upper limb spasticity due to stroke with botulinum toxin type A  

PubMed Central

Background Following a stroke, 55–75% of patients experience upper limb problems in the longer term. Upper limb spasticity may cause pain, deformity and reduced function, affecting mood and independence. Botulinum toxin is used increasingly to treat focal spasticity, but its impact on upper limb function after stroke is unclear. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical and cost effectiveness of botulinum toxin type A plus an upper limb therapy programme in the treatment of post stroke upper limb spasticity. Methods Trial design : A multi-centre open label parallel group randomised controlled trial and economic evaluation. Participants : Adults with upper limb spasticity at the shoulder, elbow, wrist or hand and reduced upper limb function due to stroke more than 1 month previously. Interventions : Botulinum toxin type A plus upper limb therapy (intervention group) or upper limb therapy alone (control group). Outcomes : Outcome assessments are undertaken at 1, 3 and 12 months. The primary outcome is upper limb function one month after study entry measured by the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT). Secondary outcomes include: spasticity (Modified Ashworth Scale); grip strength; dexterity (Nine Hole Peg Test); disability (Barthel Activities of Daily Living Index); quality of life (Stroke Impact Scale, Euroqol EQ-5D) and attainment of patient-selected goals (Canadian Occupational Performance Measure). Health and social services resource use, adverse events, use of other antispasticity treatments and patient views on the treatment will be compared. Participants are clinically reassessed at 3, 6 and 9 months to determine the need for repeat botulinum toxin type A and/or therapy. Randomisation : A web based central independent randomisation service. Blinding : Outcome assessments are undertaken by an assessor who is blinded to the randomisation group. Sample size : 332 participants provide 80% power to detect a 15% difference in treatment successes between intervention and control groups. Treatment success is defined as improvement of 3 points for those with a baseline ARAT of 0–3 and 6 points for those with ARAT of 4–56. Trial registration ISRCTN78533119 EudraCT 2004-002427-40 CTA 17136/0230/001 Funding National Institute for Health Research, Health Technology Assessment Programme. Ipsen Ltd provide botulinum toxin type A (Dysport®). PMID:18947418

Rodgers, Helen; Shaw, Lisa; Price, Christopher; van Wijck, Frederike; Barnes, Michael; Graham, Laura; Ford, Gary; Shackley, Phil; Steen, Nick

2008-01-01

21

Clinical biochemistry  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objectives of the biochemical studies conducted for the Apollo program were (1) to provide routine laboratory data for assessment of preflight crew physical status and for postflight comparisons; (2) to detect clinical or pathological abnormalities which might have required remedial action preflight; (3) to discover as early as possible any infectious disease process during the postflight quarantine periods following certain missions; and (4) to obtain fundamental medical knowledge relative to man's adjustment to and return from the space flight environment. The accumulated data presented suggest that these requirements were met by the program described. All changes ascribed to the space flight environment were subtle, whereas clinically significant changes were consistent with infrequent illnesses unrelated to the space flight exposure.

Alexander, W. C.; Leach, C. S.; Fischer, C. L.

1975-01-01

22

Memory clinics  

PubMed Central

Memory clinics were first described in the 1980s. They have become accepted worldwide as useful vehicles for improving practice in the identification, investigation, and treatment of memory disorders, including dementia. They are provided in various settings, the setting determining clientele and practice. All aim to facilitate referral from GPs, other specialists, or by self referral, in the early stages of impairment, and to avoid the stigma associated with psychiatric services. They bring together professionals with a range of skills for the benefit of patients, carers, and colleagues, and contribute to health promotion, health education, audit, and research, as well as service to patients. PMID:16517802

Jolley, D; Benbow, S M; Grizzell, M

2006-01-01

23

Clinical Trials  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This patient education program explains clinical trials and answers some frequently asked questions. This is a MedlinePlus Interactive Health Tutorial from the National Library of Medicine, designed and developed by the Patient Education Institute. NOTE: The tutorial requires a special Flash plug-in, version 4 or above. If you do not have Flash, you will be prompted to obtain a free download of the software before you start the tutorial. You will also need an Acrobat Reader, available as a free download, in order to view the Reference Summary.

24

Clinical neuroimaging  

SciTech Connect

Designed for practicing neurologists and neurosurgeons, this reference focuses on the newest techniques in computed assisted tomography. Text material covers basic principles of computed tomography, as well as the clinical advantages and disadvantages of each modality. The anatomical and/or physiological processes measured by XCT, PET, SPECT and MRI are first discussed in terms of the normal patient, and then applied to the diagnosis and treatment of patients with neurological disease (primarily of the brain). Emphasis is placed on areas of difficult diagnosis, such as differentiating recurrent tumor from radiation necrosis, early diagnosis of dementia, selection of patients for extracranial-intracranial bypass procedures, and localization of epileptic foci.

Gilman, S.; Mazziotta, J.C.

1989-01-01

25

Billings Clinic, Billings, Montana  

Cancer.gov

Billings Clinic, Billings, Montana Billings Clinic Cancer Center 2800 Tenth Avenue North Billings, Montana 59101 www.billingsclinic.com • E. James Duncan, President, Billings Clinic Foundation • W. Thomas Purcell, MD, Director, Billings Clinic

26

Hypothyroidism in Clinical Practice  

PubMed Central

Background: Hypothyroidism is the most common endocrine disease that was seen in the clinical practice especially for family physicians. Methods: This review article covered the important practical clinical issues for managing overt hypothyroidism, subclinical hypothyroidism and hypothyroidism during pregnancy. Conclusions: The clinical issues were addressed by clinical scenario followed by questions and stressed on the important clinical points. PMID:25161963

Qari, Faiza

2014-01-01

27

A clinical librarian can support clinical governance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tests the feasibility of an outreach clinical librarian service in an acute hospital setting, providing quality filtered research evidence at the point of clinical need. The design was based on a six-month pilot with professional librarians attending clinical meetings responding to information needs raised there by providing appraised summaries of the published evidence, with full text and bibliographic material as

Claire J. Honeybourne; Janet Harrison

2001-01-01

28

Clinical Trials Reporting Program  

Cancer.gov

Clinical Trials Reporting Program This site contains information that will help you understand NCI's Clinical Trials Reporting Program (CTRP). About CTRP Outlines the background and objectives of NCI's Clinical Trials Reporting Program (CTRP) How to Register

29

Clinical Trials Reporting Program  

Cancer.gov

The Clinical Trial Reporting Program is a comprehensive database of all NCI-supported clinical trials. The database exists to identify gaps in clinical research andduplicative studies, prioritization and enhance patient accrual to trials by making physicians aware of relevant opportunities for participation in clinical trials.

30

Search for Clinical Trials  

Cancer.gov

$data$data Search for Clinical Trials Clinical Trial Questions?Get Help:1-800-4-CANCERLiveHelp online chat Popular Resources Help Using the NCI Clinical Trials Search Form How to Find a Cancer Treatment Trial: A 10-Step Guide Learn About Clinical Trials About

31

Restoring the Clinical Record.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Contends that recording has become an administrative rather than a clinical activity, retroactive rather than proactive, bringing its usefulness to clinical practice in question. Presents suggestions for improving the clinical record and for returning it to its proper place as a vital component of clinical practice. (LLL)

Kagle, Jill Doner

1984-01-01

32

Find International Clinical Trials  

Cancer.gov

Find International Clinical Trials Search for Clinical Trials Search NCI's list of 8,000+ clinical trials now accepting participants, or use more search options to search the set of 19,000+ clinical trials that are no longer recruiting. Search Tip:The

33

Treatment of clinical mastitis.  

PubMed

In summary, culture-based therapy and severity levels are key to management of clinical mastitis. Antibiotic therapy should be strongly considered for gram-positive clinical mastitis. Antibiotic therapy is not necessary for mild-to-moderate gram-negative clinical mastitis. Antibiotic therapy is warranted for practically all severe clinical mastitis as well as fluids and anti-inflammatory drugs. Clinical mastitis cases due to yeast and fungal pathogens or no growth isolates do not warrant antibiotic therapy. PMID:22664208

Roberson, Jerry R

2012-07-01

34

Find a Free Clinic  

MedlinePLUS

... FIND A CLINIC DONATE NOW CONTACT - VOLUNTEER Mailing List Join Our Email List for Free NAFC Newsletters * Leave this field blank ... Issues Resources Clinic Resources Infographic Job Listings Journal List Partners About Us About the NAFC What is ...

35

Considering Clinical Trials  

MedlinePLUS

... transplant can treat SCID Transplant outcomes for SCID Sickle cell disease (SCD) Symptoms of SCD How transplant ... a clinical trial, also known as a research study. Clinical trials have led to greatly improved survival ...

36

Spina Bifida Clinic Directory  

MedlinePLUS

... SB Professionals LisServ Get Social SB Latino Camps Scholarships Chapters Journey Clinics Support Groups & Play Dates Ribbon ... top National Resource Center SB Clinics SB Camps Scholarships SBA Chapters Resource Directory Stay Connected Learn about ...

37

Clinical Librarianship. CE 668.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This course text outlines the objectives and content for a professional continuing education course on clinical medical librarianship. Following an introduction to the course, the history of clinical librarianship and several programs are described. The third section offers guidelines for setting goals and objectives for a clinical librarian…

Mosby, Margaret A.; Naisawald, Gretchen

38

Women in Clinical Trials  

MedlinePLUS

... run clinical trials. FDA, other government agencies, and review boards set rules to protect people who participate in clinical trials. FDA also inspects some clinical trials for products regulated by ... is safe and effective. FDA reviews the information for certain kinds of new products ...

39

Learn About Clinical Trials  

Cancer.gov

Perhaps you are thinking about participating in a clinical trial. Or maybe you have a friend or family member with cancer and are wondering if a clinical trial is right for them. This section contains basic information about clinical trials, things to think about when deciding to take part and questions to ask your doctor.

40

Thyroid Cancer - Featured Clinical Trials  

Cancer.gov

Thyroid Cancer - Featured Clinical Trials The following list shows Featured Clinical Trials for a specific type of cancer. You may also want to view: Multiple Cancer Types - Featured Clinical Trials Supportive Care - Featured Clinical Trials

41

Skin Cancer - Featured Clinical Trials  

Cancer.gov

Skin Cancer - Featured Clinical Trials The following list shows Featured Clinical Trials for a specific type of cancer. You may also want to view: Multiple Cancer Types - Featured Clinical Trials Supportive Care - Featured Clinical Trials

42

Clinical Trial Information Management  

Cancer.gov

An interoperable clinical trial information technology platform can facilitate the reporting, analysis, and sharing of clinical trial data across sites. Clinical trials using consistent Common Data Elements and standard Case Report Forms modules will improve study start-up times and facilitate data collection. A widely recognized credentialing system can eliminate the need to reestablish credentials for personnel and sites each time a trial is initiated.

43

AIDSinfo: Clinical Trials  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The US Department of Health and Human Services offers information on the clinical trials studying HIV and AIDS at this website. Visitors can search the clinical trials by category or keywords. For each study, users can discover the purpose, conditions, eligibility, publications, and additional information. Students and educators can find an overview of the components of an AIDS clinical trial. The website supplies the latest clinical trials news and links to related websites. Frequent visitors can quickly browse the trials that have been listed at the website in the last 30 days.

44

Veterinary Clinical Trials  

MedlinePLUS

... coronoid processes Spinal cord injuries Acute disc herniations Testing pancreatic function Searchable Clinical Trials Database For Cancer In Pet Animals sponsored by the Veterinary Cooperative Oncology Group (VCOG) ...

45

Student Health Clinics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses important issues concerning the design of student health clinics, including convenient access, privacy and security, showers and sinks, durability and safety, and special considerations. (EV)

Jelliffe, James H.; Schipp, Michael K.

2002-01-01

46

Clinical decision modeling system  

PubMed Central

Background Decision analysis techniques can be applied in complex situations involving uncertainty and the consideration of multiple objectives. Classical decision modeling techniques require elicitation of too many parameter estimates and their conditional (joint) probabilities, and have not therefore been applied to the problem of identifying high-performance, cost-effective combinations of clinical options for diagnosis or treatments where many of the objectives are unknown or even unspecified. Methods We designed a Java-based software resource, the Clinical Decision Modeling System (CDMS), to implement Naďve Decision Modeling, and provide a use case based on published performance evaluation measures of various strategies for breast and lung cancer detection. Because cost estimates for many of the newer methods are not yet available, we assume equal cost. Our use case reveals numerous potentially high-performance combinations of clinical options for the detection of breast and lung cancer. Results Naďve Decision Modeling is a highly practical applied strategy which guides investigators through the process of establishing evidence-based integrative translational clinical research priorities. CDMS is not designed for clinical decision support. Inputs include performance evaluation measures and costs of various clinical options. The software finds trees with expected emergent performance characteristics and average cost per patient that meet stated filtering criteria. Key to the utility of the software is sophisticated graphical elements, including a tree browser, a receiver-operator characteristic surface plot, and a histogram of expected average cost per patient. The analysis pinpoints the potentially most relevant pairs of clinical options ('critical pairs') for which empirical estimates of conditional dependence may be critical. The assumption of independence can be tested with retrospective studies prior to the initiation of clinical trials designed to estimate clinical impact. High-performance combinations of clinical options may exist for breast and lung cancer detection. Conclusion The software could be found useful in simplifying the objective-driven planning of complex integrative clinical studies without requiring a multi-attribute utility function, and it could lead to efficient integrative translational clinical study designs that move beyond simple pair wise competitive studies. Collaborators, who traditionally might compete to prioritize their own individual clinical options, can use the software as a common framework and guide to work together to produce increased understanding on the benefits of using alternative clinical combinations to affect strategic and cost-effective clinical workflows. PMID:17697328

Shi, Haiwen; Lyons-Weiler, James

2007-01-01

47

Clinical Laboratory Helper.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This curriculum guide provides competencies and tasks for the position of clinical laboratory helper; it serves as both a career exploration experience and/or entry-level employment training. A list of 25 validated competencies and tasks covers careers from entry level to those that must be mastered to earn an associate degree in clinical

Szucs, Susan C.; And Others

48

The NASA Clinic System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA maintains on site occupational health clinics at all Centers and major facilities NASA maintains an on-site clinic that offers comprehensive health care to astronauts at the Johnson Space Center NASA deploys limited health care capability to space and extreme environments Focus is always on preventive health care

Scarpa, Philip J.; Williams, Richard

2009-01-01

49

Naltrexone: clinical data  

Microsoft Academic Search

History Most medications used in the treatment of psychiatric disorders were discovered by clinical serendipity rather than as laboratory models translated to clinical use. Naltrexone took a different path. It was the subject of intense study during the 1970s as scientists scrambled to understand the functions of the newly discovered endogenous opioid system by specifically blocking opiate receptors with naloxone

Charles P. O’Brien; Helen M. Pettinati; David W. Oslin

50

Building clinical pathways.  

PubMed

TQM principles change the work environment so that point-of-service personnel can improve health care delivery to patients. The clinical pathway process starts with the principles of TQM. In the era of managed care, health care resources can be managed effectively using a clinical pathway. The multidisciplinary team has the opportunity to improve the health care services provided to patients. PMID:9847822

Leininger, S M

1998-01-01

51

Hypnosis and Clinical Pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hypnosis has been demonstrated to reduce analogue pain, and studies on the mechanisms of laboratory pain reduction have provided useful applications to clinical populations. Studies showing central nervous system activity during hypnotic procedures offer preliminary information concerning possible physiological mechanisms of hypnotic analgesia. Randomized controlled studies with clinical populations indicate that hypnosis has a reliable and significant impact on acute

David R. Patterson; Mark P. Jensen

2003-01-01

52

Clinical magnetic resonance imaging  

SciTech Connect

This book presents clinical applications of magnetic resonance imaging with a strong clinical orientation. Covers technique, instrumentation, and contrast agents. Describes MRI of the neck, brain, heart, spine, TMJ and orbit, chest abdomen, pelvis, and the joints. Also includes a high field atlas of the central nervous system.

Brady, T.J.; Edelman, R.R.

1988-01-01

53

Situated clinical cognition  

Microsoft Academic Search

The features characterizing study of clinical cognition in situ are formulated as: Re-cognition of context, culture, history and affect. Socializing and phenomenalistic elements are again included in the research agenda. Interest for representations: an analysis level is reserved for the symbols, rules and images relevant to define in models of clinical cognition. De-emphasis on computer modeling: investigations focus on the

Toomas Timpka

1995-01-01

54

CLINICAL TRIALS.GOV  

EPA Science Inventory

ClinicalTrials.gov provides patients, family members, health care professionals, and members of the public easy access to information on clinical trials for a wide range of diseases and conditions. The U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), through its National Library of Medi...

55

Respecialization in clinical psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Surveyed 371 departments that offer graduate programs in psychology to determine their current respecialization efforts. Program directors from 43 departments indicated that they are currently involved in respecialization efforts, 26 of these in clinical psychology. A 2nd questionnaire was sent to the 149 students identified as having been involved in clinical respecialization, and responses were received from 65. Results show

George Stricker; James W. Hull; Jan Woodring

1984-01-01

56

Clinical Imaging Steering Committee  

Cancer.gov

The Clinical Imaging Steering Committee (CISC) was established in December of 2010. CISC members include Cooperative Groups and other NCI sponsored networks imaging representatives, as well as other clinicians, translational scientists, biostatisticians, patient advocates, and NCI staff who support or are involved with cancer clinical imaging research.

57

Clinical research in neuropsychiatry.  

PubMed

This paper presents the thesis that rapidly developing areas of knowledge in neuroscience will rekindle interest in neuropsychiatry, and increase scientific and clinical interaction between psychiatrists and neurologists in teaching hospitals. A neuropsychiatric clinical research unit at the National Institute of Mental Health is described. Examples of research conducted on the unit illustrate areas of biological science that are likely to increase the interface between psychiatry and neurology. Hopefully, the explosion of knowledge in the basic neurosciences in the last decade will be followed in this decade by clinical research of increasing specificity and sophistication of central nervous system disorders. PMID:6137436

Ebert, M H; Goldman, D; Nee, L E

1983-07-01

58

Automation in Clinical Microbiology  

PubMed Central

Historically, the trend toward automation in clinical pathology laboratories has largely bypassed the clinical microbiology laboratory. In this article, we review the historical impediments to automation in the microbiology laboratory and offer insight into the reasons why we believe that we are on the cusp of a dramatic change that will sweep a wave of automation into clinical microbiology laboratories. We review the currently available specimen-processing instruments as well as the total laboratory automation solutions. Lastly, we outline the types of studies that will need to be performed to fully assess the benefits of automation in microbiology laboratories. PMID:23515547

Ledeboer, Nathan A.

2013-01-01

59

Teaching Clinical Psychology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Teaching Clinical Psychology, created by Dr. John Suler of Rider University, is devoted to �sharing ideas and resources for teaching clinical psychology.� Helpful for students and educators in the fields of mental health and human services counseling, this site contains practical in-class exercises, such as an exercise which illustrates what it is like to share secrets with strangers, and syllabi for courses in the clinical psychology curriculum. There are also larger projects for students, including an in-depth analysis of a psychotherapy case study and a role-play project which has students administer, score, and interpret a series of psychological tests given to a classmate.

Suler, John R., 1955-

60

Clinical Trials: Cancer  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The US National Institutes of Health's National Cancer Institute provides this site, a gateway to clinical trials information. Central to the site is access to PDQ (Physician Data Query), a searchable database of over 1,500 cancer trials. PDQ can be searched by up to ten diagnostic and geographic variables, as well as by trials added to the database in the last month. Retrieved information includes rationale, purpose, eligibility, treatment, and contact information, as well as relevant links to a glossary and clinical trial abstracts. In addition, the site contains information on defining clinical trials, deciding whether to participate in one, and a budding cancer research news section.

1998-01-01

61

Integrated Clinical Experience 1 & 2 Clinical Skills Assessment Report Guidelines  

E-print Network

consistently demonstrates performance above the expected level based on the current stage of their clinical and linguistically . . .) Professionalism Appropriate attire Demonstrate initiative Accepts and responds1 Integrated Clinical Experience 1 & 2 Clinical Skills Assessment Report Guidelines Spring

Weber, David J.

62

OCCAM - Clinical Trials  

Cancer.gov

A clinical trial is one of the final stages of a long and careful cancer research process. Studies include cancer patients to find out whether promising approaches to cancer prevention, diagnosis, and treatment are safe and effective.

63

Children and Clinical Studies  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... for screen reader users > A documentary video for parents about enrolling their child in a clinical study. ... devices specific to children. NEW VIDEO! Messages for Parents and Caregivers Pediatric clinician-researchers, doctors, and nurses ...

64

Informed Consent (Clinical Trials)  

MedlinePLUS

... Search for Clinical Trials NCI Publications Espańol Informed Consent Informed consent is a process through which you learn details ... ensuring patient safety in research. During the informed consent process, the research team, which is made up ...

65

Types of Clinical Trials  

Cancer.gov

Information about the several types of cancer clinical trials, including treatment trials, prevention trials, screening trials, supportive and palliative care trials. Each type of trial is designed to answer different research questions.

66

Clinical Trial Basics  

MedlinePLUS

... medical importance. Results from clinical trials are often published in peer-reviewed scientific journals. Peer review is ... which experts review the report before it is published to ensure that the analysis and conclusions are ...

67

Learn about Clinical Studies  

MedlinePLUS

... the benefits and risks of therapeutic, preventative, or diagnostic products or interventions. Clinical trials provide the basis for the development and marketing of new drugs, biological products, and medical devices. ...

68

CIB — Clinical Alerts  

Cancer.gov

Skip to Content Home | Investigator Resources | Protocol Development | Initiatives/Programs/Collaborations | Links to More Resources | Funding Opportunities | About CTEP Home | Sitemap | Contact CTEP Search this site Clinical Investigations Branch

69

[Clinical guidelines for epilepsy].  

PubMed

Many international guidelines for epilepsy from the countries in Europe, USA and Asia have been published since the introduction of evidence-based medicine. In Japan, the clinical guidelines for epilepsy management were published by the Japanese Society of Neurology (JSN) in 2002 and 2010. The clinical guideline for epilepsy 2010 primarily targets general practitioners treating epilepsy patients. The Japan Epilepsy Society has been publishing 16 guidelines for several topics since 2005. The clinical guideline for epilepsy 2010 recommends that carbamazepine can be regarded for new onset partial epilepsy and sodium valproate is for new onset generalized epilepsy as anti-epileptic drug (AED) monotherapy. The new AEDs received approval by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan, mainly in the add-on treatment of adults with partial epilepsy. The clinical guideline for epilepsy 2010 will contribute to improvement in the management of epilepsy in Japan. PMID:24912279

Tsuji, Sadatoshi

2014-05-01

70

Clinical specular microscopy  

SciTech Connect

This book provides the general ophthalmologist with a guide to the clinical applications of specular microscopy. Important material is included on laser injury, cataract surgery, corneal transplants, glaucoma, uveitis, and trauma.

Hirst, L.W.; Laing, R.A.

1987-01-01

71

What Are Clinical Trials?  

Cancer.gov

Whether you are a cancer survivor, someone who is touched by cancer, or someone who works with people with cancer, this presentation will help answer some of the most important questions you may have about clinical trials.

72

Clinical Trials Management  

Cancer.gov

The Division of Cancer Prevention supports clinical trials funded by investigator-initiated grants. Investigators using this funding mechanism need to refer to requirements from NCI's Division of Extramural Activities including their publication The Grants Process Book.

73

Lacaziosis - unusual clinical presentation*  

PubMed Central

Lacaziosis or Jorge Lobo's disease is a fungal, granulomatous, chronic infectious disease caused by Lacazia loboi, which usually affects the skin and subcutaneous tissue. It is characterized by slow evolution and a variety of cutaneous manifestations with the most common clinical expression being nodular keloid lesions that predominate in exposed areas. We report the case of a patient who had an unusual clinical presentation, with a single-plated lesion on the back. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of Lacaziosis.

de Sousa, Pétra Pereira; Schettini, Antonio Pedro Mendes; Rodrigues, Carlos Alberto Chirano; Westphal, Danielle Cristine

2015-01-01

74

[Clinical experiences with noxiptilin].  

PubMed

Noxiptilin (Elronon) proved to be a good bipolar thymoleptic agent in the clinical test at 3 special clinics. Its stimulating effect on the psychomotor function is more pronounced than its sedative action. Therefore, in cases with the anxious, agitated depressive syndrome the additional therapy with a neuroleptic agent or a sedative tranquilizer may be favourable. N. is well tolerated even at a higher age. The side effects are the same as those of other known thymoleptics. PMID:947276

König, L; Lange, E; Rossner, M; Liefke, T; Uhlig, B; Kursawe, H K; Lungwitz, J

1976-04-01

75

Falsificationism and clinical trials.  

PubMed

The relevance of the philosophy of Sir Karl Popper to the planning, conduct and analysis of clinical trials is examined. It is shown that blinding and randomization can only be regarded as valuable for the purpose of refuting universal hypotheses. The purpose of inclusion criteria is also examined. It is concluded that a misplaced belief in induction is responsible for many false notions regarding clinical trials. PMID:1792462

Senn, S J

1991-11-01

76

Center for Clinical Research preparation,  

E-print Network

Center for Clinical Research FINANCIAL SERVICES Budget preparation, review, and reconciliation Clinical Research Units, Nursing, Nutrition, Specimen Processing, Assays Key Personnel Lewis Smith, MD Ken to clinical research challenges · Study recruitment/enrollment · Budget development and reconciliation (e

Contractor, Anis

77

HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials  

MedlinePLUS

... safe and effective in people. What is an HIV/AIDS clinical trial? HIV/AIDS clinical trials help ... related to HIV Can anyone participate in an HIV/AIDS clinical trial? It depends on the study. ...

78

Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation  

PubMed Central

Current challenges exist to widespread clinical implementation of genomic medicine and pharmacogenetics. The University of Florida (UF) Health Personalized Medicine Program (PMP) is a pharmacist-led, multidisciplinary initiative created in 2011 within the UF Clinical Translational Science Institute. Initial efforts focused on pharmacogenetics, with long-term goals to include expansion to disease-risk prediction and disease stratification. Herein we describe the processes for development of the program, the challenges that were encountered and the clinical acceptance by clinicians of the genomic medicine implementation. The initial clinical implementation of the UF PMP began in June 2012 and targeted clopidogrel use and the CYP2C19 genotype in patients undergoing left heart catheterization and percutaneous-coronary intervention (PCI). After 1 year, 1,097 patients undergoing left heart catheterization were genotyped preemptively, and 291 of those underwent subsequent PCI. Genotype results were reported to the medical record for 100% of genotyped patients. Eighty patients who underwent PCI had an actionable genotype, with drug therapy changes implemented in 56 individuals. Average turnaround time from blood draw to genotype result entry in the medical record was 3.5 business days. Seven different third party payors, including Medicare, reimbursed for the test during the first month of billing, with an 85% reimbursement rate for outpatient claims that were submitted in the first month. These data highlight multiple levels of success in clinical implementation of genomic medicine. PMID:24616371

WEITZEL, KRISTIN W.; ELSEY, AMANDA R.; LANGAEE, TAIMOUR Y.; BURKLEY, BENJAMIN; NESSL, DAVID R.; OBENG, ANIWAA OWUSU; STALEY, BENJAMIN J.; DONG, HUI-JIA; ALLAN, ROBERT W.; LIU, J. FELIX; COOPER-DEHOFF, RHONDA M.; ANDERSON, R. DAVID; CONLON, MICHAEL; CLARE-SALZLER, MICHAEL J.; NELSON, DAVID R.; JOHNSON, JULIE A.

2014-01-01

79

Gateways to clinical trials.  

PubMed

Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity(R), the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: (Z)-4-Hydroxytamoxifen, [18F]-FPS; Adalimumab, alefacept, alemtuzumab, alfimeprase, aprepitant, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Belatacept, bortezomib; C340, caspofungin acetate, clazosentan sodium, Cypher; Darbepoetin alfa, DB-289, decitabine, dronedarone hydrochloride, duloxetine hydrochloride; Eletriptan, entecavir, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, eszopiclone, etoricoxib; Gaboxadol, gadofosveset sodium, galiximab, gemifloxacin mesilate, glutamine; Human insulin; I-131 ch-TNT-1/B, indiplon, inhaled insulin, isatoribine; L-Arginine hydrochloride, liposomal doxorubicin, lopinavir/ritonavir, lumiracoxib; Magnesium sulfate; Natalizumab; Olmesartan medoxomil, omapatrilat, OncoVEX (GM-CSF); rDNA insulin, rupatadine fumarate; Sorafenib; Tadalafil, teduglutide, temsirolimus, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, tiotropium bromide; Valdecoxib, vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate. PMID:16357953

Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

2005-11-01

80

Pediatric anthrax clinical management.  

PubMed

Anthrax is a zoonotic disease caused by Bacillus anthracis, which has multiple routes of infection in humans, manifesting in different initial presentations of disease. Because B anthracis has the potential to be used as a biological weapon and can rapidly progress to systemic anthrax with high mortality in those who are exposed and untreated, clinical guidance that can be quickly implemented must be in place before any intentional release of the agent. This document provides clinical guidance for the prophylaxis and treatment of neonates, infants, children, adolescents, and young adults up to the age of 21 (referred to as "children") in the event of a deliberate B anthracis release and offers guidance in areas where the unique characteristics of children dictate a different clinical recommendation from adults. PMID:24777226

Bradley, John S; Peacock, Georgina; Krug, Steven E; Bower, William A; Cohn, Amanda C; Meaney-Delman, Dana; Pavia, Andrew T

2014-05-01

81

Gateways to Clinical Trials.  

PubMed

Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Albinterferon alfa-2b, ARRY-142886, Asenapine maleate; Bazedoxifene acetate, Bevacizumab; Caspofungin acetate, Certolizumab pegol, Custirsen sodium; Darifenacin hydrobromide; Ecogramostim, EndoTAG-1, Enzastaurin hydrochloride; HER2Bi; Lapatinib ditosylate, L-BLP-25; Micafungin sodium; O6-Benzylguanine, Odanacatib; Pazopanib hydrochloride, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Posaconazole; Sagopilone, Satraplatin; Tanespimycin, Tremelimumab; Vatalanib succinate, Voriconazole; Zoledronic acid monohydrate, ZP-10A. PMID:19229381

Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

2008-11-01

82

Inositol safety: clinical evidences.  

PubMed

Myo-inositol is a six carbon cyclitol that contains five equatorial and one axial hydroxyl groups. Myo-inositol has been classified as an insulin sensitizing agent and it is commonly used in the treatment of the Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS). However, despite its wide clinical use, there is still scarce information on the myo-inositol safety and/or side effects. The aim of the present review was to summarize and discuss available data on the myo-inositol safety both in non-clinical and clinical settings. The main outcome was that only the highest dose of myo-inositol (12 g/day) induced mild gastrointestinal side effects such as nausea, flatus and diarrhea. The severity of side effects did not increase with the dosage. PMID:21845803

Carlomagno, G; Unfer, V

2011-08-01

83

Marking out the clinical expert/clinical leader/clinical scholar: perspectives from nurses in the clinical arena  

PubMed Central

Background Clinical scholarship has been conceptualised and theorised in the nursing literature for over 30 years but no research has captured nurses’ clinicians’ views on how it differs or is the same as clinical expertise and clinical leadership. The aim of this study was to determine clinical nurses’ understanding of the differences and similarities between the clinical expert, clinical leader and clinical scholar. Methods A descriptive interpretative qualitative approach using semi-structured interviews with 18 practising nurses from Australia, Canada and England. The audio-taped interviews were transcribed and the text coded for emerging themes. The themes were sorted into categories of clinical expert, clinical leader and clinical scholarship as described by the participants. These themes were then compared and contrasted and the essential elements that characterise the nursing roles of the clinical expert, clinical leader and clinical scholar were identified. Results Clinical experts were seen as linking knowledge to practice with some displaying clinical leadership and scholarship. Clinical leadership is seen as a positional construct with a management emphasis. For the clinical scholar they linked theory and practice and encouraged research and dissemination of knowledge. Conclusion There are distinct markers for the roles of clinical expert, clinical leader and clinical scholar. Nurses working in one or more of these roles need to work together to improve patient care. An ‘ideal nurse’ may be a blending of all three constructs. As nursing is a practice discipline its scholarship should be predominantly based on clinical scholarship. Nurses need to be encouraged to go beyond their roles as clinical leaders and experts to use their position to challenge and change through the propagation of knowledge to their community. PMID:23587282

2013-01-01

84

Hybrid Technologies Clinics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource was developed by Lansing Community College (LCC) to educate first responders, technicians, and the general public on the operation, technology, and safety concerns related to electric and hybrid electric vehicles (EVs and HEVs). The materials included were used in three separate clinics hosted at LCC and were developed with seed funding from the CAAT. Included materials are four presentations, an EV/HEV identification lab, and two additional documents relating to electricity and EV/HEV batteries. The titles of the three clinics are as follows: (1) Hybrid and Electric Vehicle First Responder Procedures, (2) Service Hybrid Vehicles Safely, and (3) Hybrid and Electric Drive Trains and Types of Batteries.

Lansing Community College

85

Hypomagnesemia: a clinical perspective  

PubMed Central

Although magnesium is involved in a wide spectrum of vital functions in normal human physiology, the significance of hypomagnesemia and necessity for its treatment are under-recognized and underappreciated in clinical practice. In the current review, we first present an overview of the clinical significance of hypomagnesemia and normal magnesium metabolism, with a focus on renal magnesium handling. Subsequently, we review the literature for both congenital and acquired hypomagnesemic conditions that affect the various steps in normal magnesium metabolism. Finally, we present an approach to the routine evaluation and suggested management of hypomagnesemia. PMID:24966690

Pham, Phuong-Chi T; Pham, Phuong-Anh T; Pham, Son V; Pham, Phuong-Truc T; Pham, Phuong-Mai T; Pham, Phuong-Thu T

2014-01-01

86

Mayo Clinic: Fitness Center  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Mayo Clinic offers a wide range of outreach services for the general public, including websites providing basic information about cancer, smoking cessation techniques, and others. Their online Fitness Center website will be a real boon to anyone who is looking to pick up some basic fitness awareness, learn about strength training, or read up on sports nutrition. First-time visitors can start by reading through the "Fitness Basics" area, which answers common questions like "Why exercise?" and also provides information on getting warmed up before exercising. Visitors can also sign up for the Mayo Clinic's free e-newsletter, "Housecall".

87

ClinicalTrials.gov  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Announced by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) on February 29, this new site offers information on over 4,000 federal and private medical studies involving patients and others at more than 47,000 locations nationwide. Aimed at patients, family members, and the interested public, the database can be searched by keyword or browsed by condition or sponsor. Returns include study title, sponsor, location, design and purpose, eligibility criteria, and contact information. Additional resources at the site include a User's Guide, a backgrounder on clinical trials, and links to several related NIH sites. ClinicalTrials.gov will be updated frequently and will remain confidential (no registration is required).

88

Clinical Nurse Leader Option Master of Nursing  

E-print Network

Clinical Nurse Leader Option Master of Nursing Graduate Degree Program Clinical Manual 2012....................................................................................................................1 Clinical Nurse Leader Major Role Function?.........................................................................2 Clinical Nurse Leader

Dyer, Bill

89

FAQ for Patients (Clinical Trials)  

MedlinePLUS

... What is a cooperative group? What is a clinical trial? Why participate in a clinical trial? What costs will insurance pay? What happens if ... treatment is assigned? How can I join a clinical trial? I'm in a clinical trial but I' ...

90

Professional Doctorate in Clinical Psychology  

E-print Network

Professional Doctorate in Clinical Psychology Programme information #12;www.bath.ac.uk/psychology/clinical #12;Professional Doctorate in Clinical Psychology Introduction and overview from the Programme Director As the most recently established Doctorate in Clinical Psychology the Bath team has combined well

Burton, Geoffrey R.

91

Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology  

E-print Network

in Cocaine Users After Controlling for Marijuana and Alcohol Use Nehal P. Vadhan, Catherine E. Myers, Elysia Controlling for Marijuana and Alcohol Use. Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology. Advance online Controlling for Marijuana and Alcohol Use Nehal P. Vadhan Columbia University College of Physicians

Gluck, Mark

92

Designing Clinical Remediation Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Elements and considerations in the provision of effective remediation for optometry students not achieving in clinical competence are discussed. Remediation of technical, cognitive, and noncognitive skills are included. A course in professional communication offered by the Pennsylvania College of Optometry is described. (MSE)

Oleszewski, Susan C.

1989-01-01

93

Stanford Hospital and Clinics  

E-print Network

that are being studied for new indications (or doses, strengths, frequency, or uses). Off-label useStanford Hospital and Clinics I. PURPOSE Investigational Drugs: Investigational Drugs and Biologics for the proper control, storage, use and handling of investigational drugs and biologics to ensure that adequate

Puglisi, Joseph

94

Clinical studies in Italy.  

PubMed

The requirements for conducting medical device clinical studies in Europe are not identical in all Member States. That is, variations exist in the way that the requirements in the European Directives are interpreted and enforced. This article provides an overview of the requirements that currently apply in Italy. PMID:20058650

Donawa, Maria

2009-01-01

95

Computerized Clinical Simulations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes technique involved in designing a clinical simulation problem for the allied health field of respiratory therapy; discusses the structure, content, and scoring categories of the simulation; and provides a sample program which illustrates a programming technique in BASIC, including a program listing and a sample flowchart. (MBR)

Reinecker, Lynn

1985-01-01

96

Pharmacology and Clinical Pharmacology  

E-print Network

Pharmacology and Clinical Pharmacology Handbook 2014 #12;Pharmacology involves the study. The study of pharmacology requires understanding normal body functions (biochemistry and physiology) and the disturbances that occur (pathology). Pharmacology is the basis of much of the research and development of new

Auckland, University of

97

Clinical Mastery of Hypnosis.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Hypnosis is an increasingly popular clinical intervention. The number of training courses in hypnosis is growing each year. Research on hypnosis training appears to show that limited exposure to training, as is typical in the common 3 to 5 day format of mass training, produces limited results. Only when training is extended over time do the…

Horevitz, Richard P.

98

Clinical application of pharmacogenomics.  

PubMed

The purpose of this review is to discuss the clinical application of pharmacogenomics for select drug therapies (eg, proton pump inhibitors [PPIs], codeine, and carbamazepine) and to highlight limitations and challenges that preclude implementation of pharmacogenomics into clinical practice. Genetic polymorphisms of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes and the presence of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B*1502 allele influence drug disposition and/or response. A portion of PPI pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic variability can be explained by CYP2C19 genotype. However, conflicting evidence exists related to Helicobacter pylori cure rates based on CYP2C19 genotype. For codeine, adverse drug reactions in neonates through breast-feeding from CYP2D6 ultra-rapid metabolizers have been reported. However, there is lack of conclusive evidence regarding the overall influence of CYP2D6 polymorphisms on codeine efficacy and toxicity. Although CYP2C19 and CYP2D6 genotyping tests are available, clinical utility remains low. The presence of the HLA-B*1502 allele is associated with carbamazepine-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and/or toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN). Pharmacogenomic testing is required prior to initiating carbamazepine in high-risk patients. Lack of sufficient resources, provider knowledge, and ethical, legal, and social issues are several limitations and challenges to implementing pharmacogenomic testing in clinical practice. PMID:22689709

Ma, Joseph D; Lee, Kelly C; Kuo, Grace M

2012-08-01

99

Clinical Trials Guidelines  

Cancer.gov

Consensus Recommendations for the Use of 18F-FDG PET as an Indicator of Therapeutic Response in Patients in National Cancer Institute Trials, Shankar LK, Hoffman JM, Bacharach S, Graham MM, et al. J Nucl Med (2006) 47:1059-1066. Print This Page Clinical

100

Clinical Investigations Branch (CIB)  

Cancer.gov

Meg Mooney, MD, MBA is the Chief of the Clinical Investigations Branch (CIB) of the Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (CTEP), Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis, at the NCI and oversees adult sarcoma cancer therapeutics. She was formerly the Interim Director of the Office of Evidence-Based Surgery at the American College of Surgeons in Chicago, Illinois.

101

Clinical management of dementia  

Microsoft Academic Search

The clinical management of dementia is multi-faceted, and the individual can receive optimal treatment and care only if the underlying structure exists to enable this to be achieved. This relies on the services in place in hospital and primary care NHS trusts, social services, the voluntary sector and private-sector care providers, and the cohesive coordination of these organizations. When focusing

Clive Ballard; Jane Fossey

102

Clinical management of dementia  

Microsoft Academic Search

The clinical management of dementia is multi-faceted, and the individual can receive optimal treatment and care only if the underlying structure exists to enable this to be achieved. This relies on the services in place in hospital and primary care NHS trusts, social services, the voluntary sector and private-sector care providers, and the cohesive coordination of these organizations. When focusing

Clive Ballard; Jane Fossey

2004-01-01

103

The Unstructured Clinical Interview  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In mental health, family, and community counseling settings, master's-level counselors engage in unstructured clinical interviewing to develop diagnoses based on the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed., text rev.; "DSM-IV-TR"; American Psychiatric Association, 2000). Although counselors receive education about…

Jones, Karyn Dayle

2010-01-01

104

CLINICAL CANCER CANCER CENTER  

E-print Network

's Cancer Center at 900 Blake Wilbur Drive, 1st oor. · The Head and Neck cancer and Skin cancer/ MelanomaSTANFORD CLINICAL CANCER CENTER STANFORD CANCER CENTER NEW PATIENT INFORMATION PACKET Helping you get ready for your appointment cancer.stanford.edu/newpatient #12;ELCOME to the Stanford Cancer Center

Bejerano, Gill

105

Practice of Clinical Supervision.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Clinical supervision remained grounded in empirical inquiry as late as Morris Cogan's writings on the subject in 1973. With the acknowledgment of Thomas Kuhn's (1962) paradigm shift, educational theory and practice developed interpretive methodologies. An interpretive reflection on Cogan's rationale offers insights into the current, matured…

Holland, Patricia E.

1988-01-01

106

Student Clinic Patient Benefits  

E-print Network

-8770. After-Hours Care In the event of a dental emergency during non-clinic hours, please contact your student their medical or dental health and information contained in their patient record. · emergency care provided by dental hygienists and general dentists, patients also have access to on-site specialists

107

Debating Clinical Utility  

Microsoft Academic Search

The clinical utility of genetic tests is determined by the outcomes following test use. Like other measures of value, it is often contested. Stakeholders may have different views about benefits and risks and about the importance of social versus health outcomes. They also commonly disagree about the evidence needed to determine whether a test is effective in achieving a specific

W. Burke; A.-M. Laberge

2010-01-01

108

Clinical Trials Helpful information  

E-print Network

, the most appropriate standard treatment. Talk with your doctor The more you know about cancer clinical trials, the easier your choice will be. We encourage you to have conversations with your doctor about all asked questions We hope the following questions and answers will provide you with a basic understanding

Ferrara, Katherine W.

109

Mary EmilyMary EmilyMary Emily Clinical NutritionClinical NutritionClinical Nutrition  

E-print Network

of creating a facility dedicated to human nutrition experimentation using precisely controlled dietsMary EmilyMary EmilyMary Emily Clinical NutritionClinical NutritionClinical Nutrition Research Unit Our Facility The Mary Emily Clinical Nutrition Research Unit was developed in 1995 with the objective

Barthelat, Francois

110

Clinical vaccine development.  

PubMed

Vaccination is regarded as one of the biggest triumphs in the history of medicine. We are living in the most successful period of vaccine development. The accumulation of multidisciplinary knowledge and the investment of massive funding have enabled the development of vaccines against many infectious diseases as well as other diseases including malignant tumors. The paradigm of clinical vaccine evaluation and licensure has also been modernized based on scientific improvements and historical experience. However, there remain a number of hurdles to overcome. Continuous efforts are focused on increasing the efficacy and reducing the risks related to vaccine use. Cutting-edge knowledge about immunology and microbiology is being rapidly translated to vaccine development. Thus, physicians and others involved in the clinical development of vaccines should have sufficient understanding of the recent developmental trends in vaccination and the diseases of interest. PMID:25648742

Han, Seunghoon

2015-01-01

111

Clinical Math Tutorial  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The American Mathematical Association of Two-Year Colleges (AMATYC) has compiled a collection of mathematics resources related to various subjects and disciplines. â??Math Across the Community College Curriculumâ?ť is the title of the collection, which includes great math resources and applications for educators and students alike. This resource, from Darlene Winnington, Catherine Keenan, Joan Wolf, and Ruth Collins of Delaware Technical and Community College, focuses on the application of math to the health sciences, and specifically clinical nursing. A course overview outlines the goals of the course, and learning outcome. A link to the course website provides videos and resources to help â??pre-clinical nursing students understand conceptual math they will be utilizing in dosage calculations.â?ť This is a great resource for students and teachers, and can be easily implemented in the classroom.

Collins, Ruth

112

Models for transition clinics.  

PubMed

Transition is a purposeful, planned process that addresses the medical, psychosocial, educational, and vocational needs of adolescents and young adults with chronic medical conditions, as they advance from a pediatric and family-centered to an adult, individual focused health care provider. This article describes some of the models for transition clinics or services for epilepsy in five countries (Canada, France, Colombia, Germany, and the United Kingdom). These models include joint adult and pediatric clinics, algorithm-driven service, and a check list system in the context of pediatric care. Evaluation of these models is limited, and it is not possible to choose an optimal program. The attitude and motivation of health care providers may be the most important elements. PMID:25209087

Carrizosa, Jaime; An, Isabelle; Appleton, Richard; Camfield, Peter; Von Moers, Arpad

2014-08-01

113

Clinical vaccine development  

PubMed Central

Vaccination is regarded as one of the biggest triumphs in the history of medicine. We are living in the most successful period of vaccine development. The accumulation of multidisciplinary knowledge and the investment of massive funding have enabled the development of vaccines against many infectious diseases as well as other diseases including malignant tumors. The paradigm of clinical vaccine evaluation and licensure has also been modernized based on scientific improvements and historical experience. However, there remain a number of hurdles to overcome. Continuous efforts are focused on increasing the efficacy and reducing the risks related to vaccine use. Cutting-edge knowledge about immunology and microbiology is being rapidly translated to vaccine development. Thus, physicians and others involved in the clinical development of vaccines should have sufficient understanding of the recent developmental trends in vaccination and the diseases of interest. PMID:25648742

2015-01-01

114

Achieving clinical excellence.  

PubMed

Clinical excellence can be divided into three defining categories: procedures, systems, and communications. Six steps have been introduced to guide our journey. New systems will produce less stressful, more profitable dentistry, and with this commitment to clinical excellence, patient care will improve automatically. Evaluating our practices and making the necessary changes will bring significant rewards. In Designing the Future, Visions and Strategies, I state, "Maximum efficiency, profitability, and security, the rewards of business momentum, come only to those who start paddling early. To avoid dead water, we must view business strategies in the context of social, technological, and economic currents. It's the difference between actively engaging trends and being destroyed by them." PMID:11413618

Austin, C J

2000-01-01

115

Applied clinical engineering  

SciTech Connect

This book demonstrates how clinical engineering has applied engineering principles to the development and use of complex medical devices for the diagnosis and treatment of the sick and injured. It discusses the proper utilization of medical devices and equipment in the health-care industry and provides understanding of complex engineering systems, and their uses in the modern hospital or other health-care facility.

Feinberg, B.

1986-01-01

116

Bordetella petrii Clinical Isolate  

Microsoft Academic Search

67-year-old man visited an emergency dental clinic, where he complained of toothache in the lower right mandibular quadrant. Examination showed a root-filled lower right canine tooth that was mobile and tender to per- cussion. The tooth was extracted uneventfully under local anesthesia. The patient returned after several days with pain at the extraction site. A localized alveolar osteitis was diagnosed,

Norman K. Fry; John Duncan; Henry Malnick; Marina Warner; Andrew J. Smith; Margaret S. Jackson; Ashraf Ayoub

2005-01-01

117

Clinical Problem Solving  

PubMed Central

This review demonstrates the unique advantages of sonography in the oncologic setting. Although computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography–computed tomography are primary imaging modalities for evaluation of the oncologic patient, sonography is useful for evaluation of various conditions and clinical scenarios associated with cancer. The following article will illustrate the utility of sonography at a tertiary cancer center for diagnosis and problem solving. PMID:24371094

Cooley, Christine; Nishino, Mizuki; Jagannathan, Jyothi; Ramaiya, Nikhil; Di Salvo, Donald; Krajewski, Katherine M.

2014-01-01

118

Clinical patterns of phytodermatitis.  

PubMed

Exposure to plants is very common, through leisure or professional activity. In addition, plant products and botanic extracts are increasingly present in the environment. Cutaneous adverse reactions to plants and their derivatives occur fairly frequently, and establishing the correct diagnosis is not always easy. The astute clinician relies on a detailed history and a careful skin examination to substantiate his opinion. This article reviews the characteristic clinical patterns of phyto- and phytophotodermatitis and some less common presentations. PMID:19580924

Sasseville, Denis

2009-07-01

119

Rural health clinics infrastructure  

SciTech Connect

The author discusses programs which were directed at the installation of photovoltaic power systems in rural health clinics. The objectives included: vaccine refrigeration; ice pack freezing; lighting; communications; medical appliances; sterilization; water purification; and income generation. The paper discusses two case histories, one in the Dominican Republic and one in Colombia. The author summarizes the results of the programs, both successes and failures, and offers an array of conclusions with regard to the implementation of future programs of this general nature.

Olson, K.

1997-12-01

120

Gateways to clinical trials.  

PubMed

Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Aciclovir, alemtuzumab, alendronic acid sodium salt, alicaforsen sodium, alteplase, amifostine hydrate, antithymocyte globulin (equine), aspirin, atorvastatin calcium, azathioprine; Bacillus Calmette-Guérin, basiliximab, bicalutamide, bimatoprost, BMS-214662, brimonidine tartrate, buprenorphine hydrochloride; Cabergoline, carbamazepine, carboplatin, ciclosporine, cisplatin, cyclophosphamide; Daclizumab, desmopressin acetate, dihydroergotamine mesylate, dorzolamide hydrochloride, doxorubicin, dutasteride; Everolimus; Fluocinolone acetonide, frovatriptan, FTY-720, fulvestrant; Gabapentin, galantamine hydrobromide, ganciclovir, gemcitabine, glatiramer acetate; Hydrocodone bitartrate; Interferon beta, interferon beta-1a, interferon beta-1b, ipratropium bromide; Ketotifen; Lamivudine, latanoprost, levodopa, lidocaine hydrochloride, lonafarnib; Metformin hydrochloride, methylprednisolone, metoclopramide hydrochloride, mirtazapine, mitoxantrone hydrochloride, modafinil, muromonab-CD3, mycophenolate mofetil; NS-2330; Olopatadine hydrochloride, omalizumab, oxcarbazepine, oxycodone hydrochloride; Paclitaxel, paracetamol, piribedil, pramipexole hydrochloride, pravastatin sodium, prednisone; Quetiapine fumarate; Raloxifene hydrochloride, rituximab, rizatriptan sulfate, Ro-63-8695, ropinirole hydrochloride, rosiglitazone maleate; Simvastatin, siplizumab, sirolimus; Tacrolimus, tegaserod maleate, timolol maleate, tiotropium bromide, tipifarnib, tizanidine hydrochloride, tolterodine tartrate, topiramate, travoprost; Unoprostone isopropyl ester; Valganciclovir hydrochloride, visilizumab; Zidovudine. PMID:12224444

Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

2002-01-01

121

Gateways to clinical trials.  

PubMed

Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables can be retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abacavir sulfate, abarelix, abciximab, acarbose, alefacept, alteplase, amisulpride, amoxicillin trihydrate, apomorphine hydrochloride, aprepitant, argatroban monohydrate, aspirin, atenolol; Betamethasone dipropionate, betamethasone valerate, bicalutamide, bleomycin sulfate; Calcium carbonate, candesartan cilexetil, celecoxib, cetirizine hydrochloride, cisplatin, clarithromycin, clavulanate potassium, clomethiazole edisilate, clopidogrel hydrogensulfate, cyclophosphamide, chorionic gonadotropin (human); Dalteparin sodium, desloratadine, dexamethasone, doxorubicin, DPC-083; Efalizumab, efavirenz, enoxaparin sodium, eprosartan mesilate, etanercept, etoposide, ezetimibe; Faropenem daloxate, fenofibrate, fluocinolone acetonide, flutamide, fluvastatin sodium, follitropin beta, fondaparinux sodium; Gabapentin, glibenclamide, goserelin, granisetron hydrochloride; Haloperidol, hydrochlorothiazide; Imiquimod, interferon beta-1a, irbesartan, iseganan hydrochloride; L-758298, lamivudine, lanoteplase, leflunomide, leuprorelin acetate, loratadine, losartan potassium; Melagatran, metformin hydrochloride, methotrexate, metronidazole, micafungin sodium, mitoxantrone hydrochloride; Nelfinavir mesilate, neutral insulin injection, nizatidine; Olopatadine hydrochloride, omeprazole, ondansetron hydrochloride; Pamidronate sodium, paracetamol, paroxetine hydrochloride, perindopril, pimecrolimus, pioglitazone hydrochloride, piroxicam, pleconaril, pralmorelin, pravastatin sodium, prednisolone, prednisone, propofol; Raloxifene hydrochloride, ranpirnase, remifentanil hydrochloride, risedronate sodium, risperidone, rofecoxib, ropinirole hydrochloride, rosuvastatin calcium; Sevoflurane, sildenafil citrate, simvastatin, somatropin; Tacrolimus, tamoxifen citrate, telmisartan, temozolomide, thiopental sodium, tinzaparin sodium, tirofiban hydrochloride, treosulfan, triamcinolone acetonide; Urokinase; Valsartan, vardenafil, vincristine; Warfarin sodium; Ximelagatran; Zidovudine. PMID:12092009

Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

2002-05-01

122

Gateways to clinical trials.  

PubMed

Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses, which has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the world's first drug discovery and development portal, providing information on study design, treatments, conclusions and references. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abacavir sulfate; abciximab; abetimus sodium; adalimumab; aldesleukin; almotriptan; alteplase; amisulpride; amitriptyline hydrochloride; amoxicillin trihydrate; atenolol; atorvastatin calcium; atrasentan; Beclometasone dipropionate; bosentan; Captopril; ceftriaxone sodium; cerivastatin sodium; cetirizine hydrochloride; cisplatin; citalopram hydrobromide; Dalteparin sodium; darusentan; desirudin; digoxin; Efalizumab; enoxaparin sodium; ertapenem sodium; esomeprazole magnesium; estradiol; ezetimibe; Famotidine; farglitazar; fluorouracil; fluticasone propionate; fosamprenavir sodium; Glibenclamide; glucosamine sulfate; Heparin sodium; HSPPC-96; hydrochlorothiazide; Imatinib mesilate; implitapide; Lamivudine; lansoprazole; lisinopril; losartan potassium; l-Propionylcarnitine; Melagatran; metformin hydrochloride; methotrexate; methylsulfinylwarfarin; Nateglinide; norethisterone; Olmesartan medoxomil; omalizumab; omapatrilat; omeprazole; oseltamivir phosphate; oxatomide; Pantoprazole; piperacillin sodium; pravastatin sodium; Quetiapine hydrochloride; Rabeprazole sodium; raloxifene hydrochloride; ramosetron hydrochloride; ranolazine; rasburicase; reboxetine mesilate; recombinant somatropin; repaglinide; reteplase; rosiglitazone; rosiglitazone maleate; rosuvastatin calcium; Sertraline; simvastatin; sumatriptan succinate; Tazobactam sodium; tenecteplase; tibolone; tinidazole; tolterodine tartrate; troglitazone; Uniprost; Warfarin sodium; Ximelagatran. PMID:11980386

Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

2002-01-01

123

Gateways to clinical trials.  

PubMed

Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: ABT-510, ABX-EGF, acetyldinaline, ACIDFORM, acyline, afeletecan hydrochloride, anecortave acetate, apolizumab, l-arginine hydrochloride, asimadoline, atazanavir sufate, atlizumab; BMS-181176, BMS-188667; CAB-175, carnosine, CDP-870, CEP-701, CEP-7055, CGC-1072, ChimeriVax-JE, ciclesonide, cilomilast, clofarabine, combretastatin A-4 phosphate, cryptophycin 52; Duloxetine hydrochloride; E-5564, eculizumab, elcometrine, emtricitabine, ENO, epratuzumab, eszopiclone, everolimus; Fampridine, flurbiprofen nitroxybutyl ester; Garenoxacin mesilate, gestodene, GI-181771, gimatecan, gomiliximab; Halofuginone hydrobromide, hGH, hLM609; ICA-17043, IL-1 receptor type II, IMC-1C11, iodine (I131) tositumomab, irofulven, ISAtx-247; J591; L-778123, lanthanum carbonate Lasofoxifene tartrate, LDP-02, LE-AON, leteprinim potassium, lintuzumab, liraglutide, lubiprostone, lumiracoxib, lurtotecan, LY-450108, LY-451395; MAb G250, magnesium sulfate, MDX-210, melatonin, 2-methoxy-estradiol, monophosphoryl lipid A; NM-3, nolpitantium besilate; Ocinaplon, olpadronic acid sodium salt, oral heparin; Palonosetron hydrochloride, pemetrexed disodium, PI-88, picoplatin, plevitrexed, polyphenon E, pramlintide acetate, pregabalin, prinomastat, pyrazoloacridine; Resiniferatoxin, rhEndostatin, roxifiban acetate; S-18886, siplizumab, sitaxsentan sodium, solifenacin succinate, SU-11248, SU-6668; Talampanel, TAPgen, testosterone transdermal gel, trabectedin; VEGF-2 gene therapy, visilizumab; ZD-6416, ZD-6474. PMID:12949633

Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

2003-01-01

124

Gateways to Clinical Trials.  

PubMed

Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Adalimumab, aeroDose insulin inhaler, agomelatine, alendronic acid sodium salt, aliskiren fumarate, alteplase, amlodipine, aspirin, atazanavir; Bacillus Calmette-Guérin, basiliximab, BQ-788, bupropion hydrochloride; Cabergoline, caffeine citrate, carbamazepine, carvedilol, celecoxib, cyclosporine, clopidogrel hydrogensulfate, colestyramine; Dexamethasone, diclofenac sodium, digoxin, dipyridamole, docetaxel, dutasteride; Eletriptan, enfuvirtidie, eplerenone, ergotamine tartrate, esomeprazole magnesium, estramustine phosphate sodium; Finasteride, fluticasone propionate, fosinopril sodium; Ganciclovir, GBE-761-ONC, glatiramer acetate, gliclazide, granulocyte-CSF; Heparin sodium, human isophane insulin (pyr), Hydrochlorothiazide; Ibuprofen, inhaled insulin, interferon alfa, interferon beta-1a; Laminvudine, lansoprazole, lisinopril, lonafarnib, losartan potassium, lumiracoxib; MAb G250, meloxicam methotrexate, methylprednisolone aceponate, mitomycin, mycophenolate mofetil; Naproxen sodium, natalizumab, nelfinavir mesilate, nemifitide ditriflutate, nimesulide; Omalizumab, omapatrilat, omeprazole, oxybutynin chloride; Pantoprazole sodium, paracetamol, paroxetine, pentoxifylline, pergolide mesylate, permixon, phVEGF-A165, pramipexole hydrochloride, prasterone, prednisone, probucol, propiverine hydrochloride; Rabeprazole sodium, resiniferatoxin, risedronate sodium, risperidone, rofecoxib rosiglitazone maleate, ruboxistaurin mesilate hydrate; Selegiline transdermal system, sertraline, sildenafil citrate, streptokinase; Tadalafil, tamsulosin hydrochloride, technosphere/Insulin, tegaserod maleate, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, testosterone heptanoate, testosterone undecanoate, tipifarnib, tolterodine tartrate, topiramate, troglitazone; Ursodeoxycholic acid; Valdecoxib, valsartan, vardenafil, venlafaxine hydrochloride, VX-745. PMID:12428432

Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

2002-09-01

125

Gateways to clinical trials.  

PubMed

Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 131-I-chlorotoxin; Ad5CMV-p53, adalimumab, albumin interferon alfa, alemtuzumab, aliskiren fumarate, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, anakinra, AR-C126532, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, brimonidine tartrate/timolol maleate; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, cangrelor tetrasodium, cetuximab, ciclesonide, cinacalcet hydrochloride, collagen-PVP, Cypher; Darbepoetin alfa, darusentan, dasatinib, denosumab, desloratadine, dexosome vaccine (lung cancer), dexrazoxane, dextromethorphan/quinidine sulfate, duloxetine hydrochloride; ED-71, eel calcitonin, efalizumab, entecavir, etoricoxib; Falciparum merozoite protein-1/AS02A, fenretinide, fondaparinux sodium; gamma-Hydroxybutyrate sodium, gefitinib, ghrelin (human); hLM609; Icatibant acetate, imatinib mesylate, ipsapirone, irofulven; LBH-589, LE-AON, levocetirizine, LY-450139; Malaria vaccine, mapatumumab, motexafin gadolinium, muraglitazar, mycophenolic acid sodium salt; nab-paclitaxel, nelarabine; O6-Benzylguanine, olmesartan medoxomil, orbofiban acetate; Panitumumab, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pemetrexed disodium, peptide YY3-36, pleconaril, prasterone, pregabalin; Ranolazine, rebimastat, recombinant malaria vaccine, rosuvastatin calcium; SQN-400; Taxus, tegaserod maleate, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, teriparatide, troxacitabine; Valganciclovir hydrochloride, Val-Tyr sardine peptidase, VNP-40101M, vorinostat. PMID:16845450

Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

2006-06-01

126

Gateways to clinical trials.  

PubMed

Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity. prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 131I-chTNT; Abatacept, adalimumab, alemtuzumab, APC-8015, aprepitant, atazanavir sulfate, atomoxetine hydrochloride, azimilide hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, bortezomib, bosentan, buserelin; Caspofungin acetate, CC-4047, ChAGCD3, ciclesonide, clopidogrel, curcumin, Cypher; Dabigatran etexilate, dapoxetine hydrochloride, darbepoetin alfa, darusentan, denosumab, DMXB-Anabaseine, drospirenone, drospirenone/estradiol, duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; Edodekin alfa, efaproxiral sodium, elaidic acid-cytarabine, erlotinib hydrochloride, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, eszopiclone, etonogestrel/testosterone decanoate, exenatide; Fulvestrant; Gefitinib, glycine, GVS-111; Homoharringtonine; ICC-1132, imatinib mesylate, iodine (I131) tositumomab, i.v. gamma-globulin; Levetiracetam, levocetirizine, lintuzumab, liposomal nystatin, lumiracoxib, lurtotecan; Manitimus, mapatumumab, melatonin, micafungin sodium, mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Oblimersen sodium, OGX-011, olmesartan medoxomil, omalizumab, omapatrilat, oral insulin; Parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), pasireotide, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, phVEGF-A165, pimecrolimus, pitavastatin calcium, plerixafor hydrochloride, posaconazole, pramlintide acetate, prasterone, pregabalin, PT-141; Quercetin; Ranolazine, rosuvastatin calcium, rubitecan, rupatadine fumarate; Sardomozide, sunitinib malate; Tadalafil, talactoferrin alfa, tegaserod maleate, telithromycin, testosterone transdermal patch, TH-9507, tigecycline, tiotropium bromide, tipifarnib, tocilizumab, treprostinil sodium; Valdecoxib, vandetanib, vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate, voriconazole. PMID:16395422

Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

2005-12-01

127

Gateways to clinical trials.  

PubMed

Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abetimus sodium, ademetionine, agalsidase alfa, agalsidase beta, alemtuzumab, alfimeprase, AMG-162, androgel, anidulafungin, antigastrin therapeutic vaccine, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Bazedoxifene acetate, bevacizumab, bosentan; Caldaret hydrate, canfosfamide hydrochloride, choriogonadotropin alfa, ciclesonide, combretastatin A-4 phosphate, CY-2301; Darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin hydrobromide, decitabine, degarelix acetate, duloxetine hydrochloride; ED-71, enclomiphene citrate, eplerenone, epratuzumab, escitalopram oxalate, eszopiclone, ezetimibe; Fingolimod hydrochloride, FP-1096; HMR-3339A, HSV-TK/GCV gene therapy, human insulin, HuOKT3gamma1(Ala234-Ala235); Idursulfase, imatinib mesylate, indiplon, InnoVax C insulin glargine, insulin glulisine, irofulven; Labetuzumab, lacosamide, lanthanum carbonate, LyphoDerm, Lyprinol; Magnesium sulfate, metelimumab, methylphenidate hydrochloride; Natalizumab, NO-aspirin; OROS(R); PC-515, pegaptanib sodium, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, pemetrexed disodium, peptide YY3-36, posaconazole, pregabalin, PT-141, pyridoxamine; R-744, ramelteon, ranelic acid distrontium salt, rebimastat, repinotan hydrochloride, rhC1, rhGAD65, rosiglitazone maleate/metformin hydrochloride; Sardomozide, solifenacin succinate; Tadalafil, taxus, telavancin, telithromycin, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, teriparatide, testosterone transdermal patch, tetomilast, tirapazamine, torcetrapib; Valspodar, vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate, vildagliptin; Yttrium Y90 epratuzumab; Ziprasidone hydrochloride. PMID:15672123

Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

2004-12-01

128

Gateways to clinical trials.  

PubMed

Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abacavir sulfate, abarelix, adalimumab, adefovir dipivoxil, AdGVVEGF121.10, anastrozole, anecortave acetate, aripiprazole, asulacrine isethionate, atazanavir, ATL-962, 16-Aza-epothilone B; Bevacizumab, bicalutamide, blonanserin, BMS-188667, bosentan; Celecoxib, celmoleukin, cetuximab, cilomilast, cinacalcet hydrochloride, CNTF(Ax15), colesevelam hydrochloride; Daclizumab, delavirdine mesilate, desogestrel, desoxyepothilone B, dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride, duloxetine hydrochloride; Ecogramostim, emtricitabine, epalrestat, escitalopram oxalate, examorelin, exendin-4, ezetimibe; Fidarestat, frovatriptan; HIV-1 Immunogen; Iloperidone, insulin detemir, insulin lispro, irinotecan hydrochloride; Keratinocyte growth factor; Lasofoxifene tartrate, levetiracetam, levormeloxifene, levosimendan, lumiracoxib, LY-307161 SR; Memantine hydrochloride, MEN-10755, metformin hydrochloride, metreleptin, motexafin gadolinium; Naratriptan hydrochloride, natalizumab, nesiritide, nicotine, NN-2211, NN-414; Olanzapine, omalizumab; Pegaptanib sodium, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pegvisomant, pimecrolimus, pirfenidone, pramlintide acetate prasterone, pregabalin; Quetiapine fumarate; Rabeprazole sodium, raloxifene hydrochloride, raltitrexed, rDNA insulin, rFGF-2, risedronate sodium, rofecoxib, roflumilast, rosiglitazone maleate; SN-22995; Tacrolimus, tadalafil, tegaserod maleate, tiotropium bromide, tomoxetine hydrochloride, trastuzumab, trimegestone; Voglibose, Voriconazole; Ziprasidone hydrochloride. PMID:12616707

Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

2002-11-01

129

Gateways to clinical trials.  

PubMed

Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in the current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: AAV-NGFbeta, aprepitant, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride; beta-Methyl-6-chloromelatonin, BMS-214662, bortezomib, bosentan; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, CEA-TRICOM, cetuximab, ciclesonide, clofarabine, Cypher; Dalbavancin, darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin hydrobromide, desloratadine, Dexamet, drospirenone, drospirenone/ethinylestradiol, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; Ecogramostim, efalizumab, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, eszopiclone; Fenretinide; Gefitinib, gestodene, ghrelin (human); hMaxi-K, human papillomavirus vaccine; Imatinib mesylate, indiplon, iodine (i131) tositumomab, irofulven, ISS-1018; Lasofoxifene tartrate, levodopa/carbidopa/entacapone, liposomal doxorubicin; Nemifitide ditriflutate, nesiritide; Omalizumab; Pegfilgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, phVEGF-A165, pimecrolimus, pramlintide acetate; Rasburicase, rimonabant hydrochloride; Satraplatin, St. John's Wort extract, sunitinib malate; Tadalafil, tanaproget, Taxus, tiotropium bromide, treprostinil sodium; Valdecoxib, vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate; Ximelagatran; Zileuton. PMID:16258596

Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

2005-09-01

130

Gateways to clinical trials.  

PubMed

Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abacavir sulfate, adalimumab, AERx morphine sulphate, alefacept, alemtuzumab, alendronic acid sodium salt, alicaforsen sodium, almotriptan, amprenavir, aripiprazole, atenolol, atorvastatin calcium; BSYX-A110; Cantuzumab mertansine, capravirine, CDP-571, CDP-870, celecoxib; Delavirdine mesilate, docetaxel, dofetilide, donepezil hydrochloride, duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride, dydrogesterone; Efavirenz, emtricitabine, enjuvia, enteryx, epristeride, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, etanercept, etonogestrel, etoricoxib; Fesoterodine, finasteride, flt3ligand; Galantamine hydrobromide, gemtuzumab ozogamicin, genistein, gepirone hydrochloride; Indinavir sulfate, infliximab; Lamivudine, lamivudine/zidovudine/abacavir sulfate, leteprinim potassium, levetiracetam, liposomal doxorubicin, lopinavir, lopinavir/ritonavir, losartan potassium; MCC-465, MRA; Nebivolol, nesiritide, nevirapine; Olanzapine, OROS(R)-Methylphenidate hydrochloride; Peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, Pimecrolimus, polyethylene glycol 3350, pramlintide acetate, pregabalin, PRO-2000; Risedronate sodium, risperidone, ritonavir, rituximab, rivastigmine tartrate, rofecoxib, rosuvastatin calcium; Saquinavir mesilate, Stavudine; Tacrolimus, tadalafil, tamsulosin hydrochloride, telmisartan, tomoxetine hydrochloride, treprostinil sodium, trimegestone, trimetrexate; Valdecoxib, venlafaxine hydrochloride; Zoledronic acid monohydrate. PMID:12616965

Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

2002-12-01

131

Reuse of Clinical Data  

PubMed Central

Summary Objectives To provide an overview of the benefits of clinical data collected as a by-product of the care process, the potential problems with large aggregations of these data, the policy frameworks that have been formulated, and the major challenges in the coming years. Methods This report summarizes some of the major observations from AMIA and IMIA conferences held on this admittedly broad topic from 2006 through 2013. This report also includes many unsupported opinions of the author. Results The benefits of aggregating larger and larger sets of routinely collected clinical data are well documented and of great societal benefit. These large data sets will probably never answer all possible clinical questions for methodological reasons. Non-traditional sources of health data that are patient-sources will pose new data science challenges. Conclusions If we ever hope to have tools that can rapidly provide evidence for daily practice of medicine we need a science of health data perhaps modeled after the science of astronomy. PMID:25123722

2014-01-01

132

Basic and clinical immunology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Progress in immunology continues to grow exponentially every year. New applications of this knowledge are being developed for a broad range of clinical conditions. Conversely, the study of primary and secondary immunodeficiencies is helping to elucidate the intricate mechanisms of the immune system. We have selected a few of the most significant contributions to the fields of basic and clinical immunology published between October 2001 and October 2002. Our choice of topics in basic immunology included the description of T-bet as a determinant factor for T(H)1 differentiation, the role of the activation-induced cytosine deaminase gene in B-cell development, the characterization of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells, and the use of dynamic imaging to study MHC class II transport and T-cell and dendritic cell membrane interactions. Articles related to clinical immunology that were selected for review include the description of immunodeficiency caused by caspase 8 deficiency; a case series report on X-linked agammaglobulinemia; the mechanism of action, efficacy, and complications of intravenous immunoglobulin; mechanisms of autoimmunity diseases; and advances in HIV pathogenesis and vaccine development. We also reviewed two articles that explore the possible alterations of the immune system caused by spaceflights, a new field with increasing importance as human space expeditions become a reality in the 21st century.

Chinen, Javier; Shearer, William T.

2003-01-01

133

Gateways to clinical trials.  

PubMed

Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 2F5, 2G12, abetimus sodium, ABI-007, adalimumab, adefovir dipivoxil, AE-941, alefacept, altropane, aminolevulinic acid hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, aminopterin, anakinra, aprinocarsen sodium, atazanavir, atlizumab, atomoxetine hydrochloride; B7-1 vaccine, bevacizumab, biricodar dicitrate, BMS-188667, brasofensine sulfate, bryostatin 1; cantuzumab mertansine, CHS-828, cinacalcet hydrochloride, cipamfylline, creatine, CVT-3146; darbepoetin alfa, DITPA, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride; edatrexate, efalizumab, ENMD-0997, epoetin, erlosamide, esomeprazole magnesium, etiprednol dicloacetate, etoricoxib, everolimus, ezetimibe; fampridine, fenretinide, FTY-720; IGF-I/IGFBP-3, IL-1 cytokine trap, ilodecakin, interferon beta, ISIS-104838, ISIS-2503, ISIS-5132, ivabradine hydrochloride; lafutidine, lanthanum carbonate, l-Arginine hydrochloride, LEA29Y, lerdelimumab, levetiracetam, levobupivacaine hydrochloride, levosimendan, lopinavir; melagatran, mibefradil hydrochloride, miglustat, morphine-6-glucuronide; nesiritide; omalizumab, omapatrilat; p24-VLP, parecoxib sodium, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pegsunercept, pitavastatin calcium, plevitrexed, prasterone, pregabalin, PRO-2000, prucalopride; rapacuronium bromide, rebimastat, RGA-0853, rubitecan, ruboxistaurin mesilate hydrate, RWJ-67657; S-16020-2, sarizotan, SLV-306, stiripentol; TA-CIN, tenecteplase, teriparatide, tezacitabine, tipifarnib, trabectedin, troglitazone; valdecoxib, vardenafil; Z-338, ziconotide. PMID:12808477

Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

2003-05-01

134

Gateways to clinical trials.  

PubMed

Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issues focuses on the following selection of drugs: 4'-Thio-ara-C, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate; ABT-089, AD-237, AF-37702, alvocidib hydrochloride, apricitabine, armodafinil, atrasentan, AVE-5883, avian influenza vaccine, azimilide hydrochloride; Banoxantrone, BIBF-1120; CD34+ cells, certolizumab pegol, CHIR-258, cilansetron, CoFactor, CX-3543, cystemustine; D-003, dexloxiglumide, DMXB-anabaseine; Ecogramostim, elcometrine, elcometrine/ethinylestradiol, etravirine; Fenretinide, fingolimod hydrochloride, fospropofol disodium; Gaboxadol, gestodene, glutamine; Human insulin, hyaluronic acid; Incyclinide, indacaterol, ispronicline, istradefylline; Labradimil, lamifiban, lapatinib, L-arginine hydrochloride, liposomal cisplatin, liposome encapsulated paclitaxel, LY-517717; Manidipine hydrochloride/delapril hydrochloride, maraviroc, MBP(82-98), MD-0727, MDX-214, melanotan I, MMR vaccine; Nacystelyn, nalfurafine hydrochloride, nibentan, nilotinib, NK-105; OBI-1, oblimersen sodium, olmesartan medoxomil, olmesartan medoxomil/hydrochlorothiazide, oregovomab; Pexelizumab, PG-116800, PG-CPT, PHA-794428, prasugrel; RC-3095, rDNA insulin, RFB4(dsFv)-PE38, rhEndostatin, rhenium Re-186 etidronate, rhGM-CSF, roflumilast, romidepsin; Sarcosine, SGLU1, SGN-40, succinobucol; TAU, teduglutide, telatinib, tesofensine, tipifarnib, tirapazamine, TKA-731, tolvaptan, trabectedin; Vaccimel, vatalanib succinate, velafermin, vildagliptin, vinflunine; XP-19986; YM-155. PMID:17344945

Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

2007-01-01

135

The Empirical Clinical Psychology Department: Administration of Clinical Services  

Microsoft Academic Search

Can clinical psychology be scientific while operating comprehensively? Or are the reports of success with behavior modification wards merely isolated demonstration projects having no relevance to the whole of clinical psychology? The authors believe that relevant data on this question can be obtained through an attempt to direct a large clinical psychology department in such a way as to require

Robert W. Wildman

1974-01-01

136

"Clinical Reasoning Theater": A New Approach to Clinical Reasoning Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a new approach to clinical reasoning education called clinical reasoning theater (CRT). With students as the audience, the doctor's clinical reasoning skills are modeled in CRT when he or she thinks aloud during conversations with the patient. Preliminary results of students' evaluations of the relevance of CRT reveal that they…

Borleffs, Jan C. C.; Custers, Eugene J. F. M.; van Gijn, Jan; ten Gate, Olle Th. J.

2003-01-01

137

A clinical academic practice partnership: a clinical education redesign.  

PubMed

The clinical academic practice partnership (CAPP), a clinical redesign based on the dedicated education unit concept, was developed and implemented by large, private school of nursing in collaboration with 4 clinical partners to provide quality clinical education, to explore new clinical models for the future, and to test an innovative clinical education design. An executive steering committee consisting of nursing leaders and educators from the school of nursing and the clinical institutions was established as the decision-making and planning components, with several collaborative task forces initiated to conduct the work and to accomplish the goals. This article will describe methods to initiate and to organize the key elements of this dedicated education unit-type clinical model, providing examples and an overview of the steps and elements needed as the development proceeded. After 18 months of implementation in 4 different nursing programs in 4 different clinical institutions, the clinical redesign has shown to be a positive initiative, with students actively requesting CAPP units for their clinical experiences. Preliminary findings and outcomes will be discussed, along with nursing education implications for this new clinical redesign. PMID:23706965

Jeffries, Pamela R; Rose, Linda; Belcher, Anne E; Dang, Deborah; Hochuli, Jo Fava; Fleischmann, Debbie; Gerson, Linda; Greene, Mary Ann; Jordan, Elizabeth Betty T; Krohn, Vicki L; Sartorius-Merganthaler, Susan; Walrath, Jo M

2013-01-01

138

Terminal Behavioral Objectives for Teaching Clinical Toxicology to Clinical Pharmacists  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As a first step in the development of a competency-based clinical toxicology clerkship, a set of terminal behavioral objectives were developed that reflect the anticipated role that clinical pharmacists should play as part of the clinical toxicology team. The evaluation approaches used at the University of Utah are presented. (LBH)

Veltri, Joseph C.; And Others

1976-01-01

139

Development and Clinical Outcomes of a Dialectical Behavior Therapy Clinic  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The authors describe the first 6 months of a dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) clinic operated by trainees in a general adult psychiatry residency program. The purpose of this report is to provide a model for the creation and maintenance of a formalized resident DBT clinic. Methods: Residents participated in the DBT clinic, attended a…

Lajoie, Travis; Sonkiss, Joshua; Rich, Anne

2011-01-01

140

Audit: the third clinical science?  

PubMed Central

In summary, we believe that if clinical audit is accepted and prosecuted as the third clinical science, it has the potential to deliver substantial benefits to patients and health professionals. PMID:10136832

Russell, I T; Wilson, B J

1992-01-01

141

What Is a Clinical Trial?  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... a clinical trial? Clinical trials evaluate promising new cancer treatments or methods, from radiation and chemotherapy to ... the effects of research treatmenton various types of cancer. Once researchers are satisfied that the treatment has ...

142

Clinical Trials in Vision Research  

MedlinePLUS

... nih.gov Clinical trials in vision research have led to new medications, surgeries, and methods for disease ... your questions. Clinical trials in vision research have led to new medications, surgeries, and methods for disease ...

143

Multi-Modality Clinical Trials  

Cancer.gov

CDRP Program Update UPMC McKeesport Program Steering Committee RTOG Meeting Toronto, Canada June 23rd, 2006 Overview Multi-modality & RT trials clinical trials UPMC Cancer Center Initiatives Clinical trials accrual Navigators update TELESYNERGY update Mentors

144

Clinical Trials and Older People  

MedlinePLUS

... perfect. Based on many years of experience and learning, Congress has passed laws to protect study participants. ... clinics, or universities. If you are interested in learning more about clinical research and older people, you ...

145

Gateways to clinical trials.  

PubMed

Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 101M, 166Ho-DOTMP, 3-AP; Abatacept, abetimus sodium, ACR-16, adefovir dipivoxil, alefacept, AMD-070, aminolevulinic acid hexyl ester, anatumomab mafenatox, anti-CTLA-4 MAb, antigastrin therapeutic vaccine, AP-12009, AP-23573, APC-8024, aripiprazole, ATL-962, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, bimatoprost, bortezomib, bosentan, BR-1; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, cinacalcet hydrochloride, clofazimine, colchicine, cold-adapted influenza vaccine trivalent, CRM197; Desloratadine, desoxyepothilone B, diethylhomospermine; Edodekin alfa, efalizumab, elcometrine, eletriptan, enfuvirtide, entecavir, EP-2101, eplerenone, erlotinib hydrochloride, etoricoxib, everolimus, exherin, ezetimibe; Febuxostat, fluorescein lisicol, fosamprenavir calcium, frovatriptan; Hemoglobin raffimer, HSPPC-96, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, IRX-2, istradefylline, IV gamma-globulin, ixabepilone; Kahalalide F; L-759274, levodopa/carbidopa/entacapone, licofelone, lonafarnib, lopinavir, lurtotecan, LY-156735; MAb G250, mecasermin, melatonin, midostaurin, muraglitazar; Nesiritide, nitronaproxen; O6-Benzylguanine, olmesartan medoxomil, olmesartan medoxomil/hydrochlorothiazide, omapatrilat, oral insulin; Parecoxib sodium, PCK-3145, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ ribavirin, pemetrexed disodium, peptide YY3-36, PG-CPT, phenoxodiol, pimecrolimus, posaconazole; Rasagiline mesilate, rDNA insulin, RG228, rimonabant hydrochloride, rosuvastatin calcium, rotigotine hydrochloride; S-3304, safinamide mesilate, salcaprozic acid sodium salt, SDZ-SID-791, SGN-30, soblidotin, squalamine; Telmisartan/hydrochlorothiazide, testosterone gel, TF(c)-KLH conjugate vaccine, TH-9507, theraloc, tipifarnib, tocilizumab, travoprost; ValboroPro, valdecoxib, veglin, voriconazole; Ximelagatran. PMID:15538546

Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

2004-09-01

146

Gateways to clinical trials.  

PubMed

Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abarelix, ABX-EGF, ademetionine, agomelatine, AMGN-0007, 9-aminocamptothecin, AN-9, anecortave acetate, anidulafungin, AOD-9604, apolizumab, apomate, L-arginine hydrochloride, arzoxifene hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, BP-897, BufferGel; Capravirine, carboxyamidotriazole, carnosine, CC-4047, CEP-701, cerivastatin sodium, clofarabine, conivaptan hydrochloride, CP-461, CS-003; Daptomycin, darifenacin, decitabine, deferasirox, duloxetine hydrochloride; Eberconazole, Ecyd, efalizumab, eglumegad hydrate, EMD-72000, (-)-epigallocatechin gallate, exatecan mesilate, exenatide; Fampridine, fenretinide, ferumoxtran-10; Gadofosveset sodium, garenoxacin mesilate, genistein, glutamine, GPI-15715; Hexyl insulin M2, human insulin, HYB-165; Indisulam, irofulven; KRN-5500, L-796568, laurocapram, lidocaine/prilocaine, lonafarnib, lotrafiban; Melagatran, melatonin, 2-methoxyestradiol, metreleptin, motexafin gadoliniu, motexafin lutetium; Natalizumab, nelarabine, NO-aspirin, NSC-683864; ONO-6126; Pemetrexed disodium, pexelizumab, pirfenidone, PncCRM9, polyglutamate paclitaxel, pramlintide acetate pregabalin, PRO-2000; Ragaglitazar, ramelteon, rasagiline mesilate, rDNA insulin, recombinant glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36) amide, recombinant human parathyroid hormone (1-84), reolysin RG228, roflumilast, roxifiban acetate, RPI-4610, rubitecan; Safinamide mesilate, solifenacin succinate, SRL-172; T-138067, tafenoquine succinate, tecadenoson, TER-286, tesaglitazar, tetrathiomolybdate, tezosentan disodium, TheraCIM, tigecycline, tipifarnib, tolvaptan, trabectedin, tributyrin, trimegestone, troxacitabine; UCN-01, urokinase alfa; Vinflunine, viscum fraxini 2; Xcellerated T cells, ximelagatran. PMID:14685303

Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

2003-11-01

147

Clinical controversies: Pediatric tumors  

PubMed Central

Despite the claim in the published literature, the introduction of proton therapy for children is not analogous to the evolution of conformal photon irradiation relying on the understanding of the impact of altered dose distributions. The differences in radiobiological effect when comparing photons to protons means that we are comparing a known entity to an unknown entity: the dose-volume histogram for proton therapy might mean something substantially different than the dose-volume histogram for photon therapy. The multifaceted difference between the two modalities supports the argument for careful evaluation, follow-up and clinical trials with adverse event monitoring when using proton therapy in children. We review the current data on the outcome of proton therapy in a range of pediatric tumours and compare them to the often excellent results of photon therapy in the setting of multidisciplinary management of childhood cancer. It is hoped that the apparent dosimetric advantage of proton therapy over photons will lead to improved indications for therapy, disease control and functional outcomes. While physical dose distribution is of clear importance, the multimodality management of children by an expert pediatric oncology team and the availability of ancillary measures that improve the quality of treatment delivery may be more important than the actual beam. In addition, current estimates of the benefit of proton therapy over photon therapy based on toxicity reduction will only be realized when survivorship has been achieved. Once substantive data proton therapy data become available, it will be necessary to demonstrate benefit in clinically relevant outcome measures in comparison to best existing photon outcome data. Such an effort will require improved funding and appreciation for late effects research. Only real clinical outcome data combined with better understanding of the radiobiological differences between protons and photons will help us to further reduce side effects in children and exploit the full curative potential of this relatively new modality. PMID:23473686

Merchant, Thomas E.

2013-01-01

148

Gateways to clinical trials.  

PubMed

Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abiraterone acetate, Ad5CMV-p53, adefovir dipivoxil, AE-941, ambrisentan, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride, atrasentan; BCH-10618, bimatoprost, BMS-184476, BMS-275183, BMS-387032, botulinum toxin type B, BR-1, BR96-Doxorubicin; Capravirine, caspofungin acetate, cinacalcet hydrochloride; Darbepoetin alfa, desloratadine, dextrin sulfate, DJ-927, duloxetine hydrochloride; Elacridar, emtricitabine, eplerenone, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, ESP-24217, etoricoxib, exenatide, ezetimibe; Ferumoxtran-10, fondaparinux sodium, fosamprenavir calcium; GS-7904L, GW-5634; HMN-214, human insulin; IC-14, imatinib mesylate, indiplon, insulin glargine, insulinotropin, iseganan hydrochloride; Lanthanum carbonate, L-Arginine hydrochloride, LEA29Y, lenalidomide, LE-SN38, lestaurtinib, L-MDAM, lometrexol, lopinavir, lopinavir/ritonavir; Magnesium sulfate, maraviroc, mepolizumab, metreleptin, milataxel, MNA-715, morphine hydrochloride; Nesiritide, neutrophil-inhibitory factor, NK-911; Olanzapine/fluoxetine hydrochloride, olmesartan medoxomil, omalizumab, ortataxel, oxycodone hydrochloride/ibuprofen; Panitumumab, patupilone, PC-515, PD-MAGE-3 Vaccine, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ ribavirin, pemetrexed disodium, pimecrolimus, prasugrel, pregabalin, PRO-2000; Rosuvastatin calcium, RPR-113090; sabarubicin hydrochloride, safinamide mesilate, SB-715992, sitaxsentan sodium, soblidotin, synthadotin; Tadalafil, taltobulin, temsirolimus, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine, testosterone gel, tigecycline, tipranavir, tirapazamine, trabectedin, travoprost; UCN-01; Vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate; XB-947; Yttrium 90 (90Y) ibritumomab tiuxetan. PMID:15605126

Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

2004-10-01

149

Gateways to clinical trials.  

PubMed

Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 131-I-Chlorotoxin, 423557; Abatacept, Ad.Egr.TNF.11D, Adalimumab, AE-941, Ambrisentan, AMR-001, Anacetrapib, Anakinra, Aripiprazole, Atazanavir sulfate; BAY-639044, Bazedoxifene acetate, Belimumab, Bevacizumab, Bortezomib, Botulinum toxin type B, Brivaracetam, Bucindolol hydrochloride; Carfilzomib, Carisbamate, CCX-282, CD20Bi, Ceftobiprole, Certolizumab pegol, CF-101, Cinacalcet hydrochloride, Cypher; Darifenacin hydrobromide, Degarelix acetate, Denosumab, Desvenlafaxine succinate, Dexlansoprazole, Dexverapamil, Drotrecogin alfa (activated), Duloxetine hydrochloride, Dutasteride; Efalizumab, EPs-7630, Escitalopram oxalate, Etoricoxib; Fluticasone furoate, Fondaparinux sodium, Fospropofol disodium; Hexadecyloxypropyl-cidofovir, HIV gp120/NefTat/AS02A, HPV-6/11/16/18; INCB-18424, Incyclinide, Inhalable human insulin, Insulin detemir; KNS-760704, KW-0761; Lacosamide, Lenalidomide, Levetiracetam, Licofelone, Lidocaine/prilocaine; mAb 216, MEDI-528, Men ACWY, Meningococcal C-CRM197 vaccine, Methylnaltrexone bromide; Nemifitide ditriflutate, Nicotine conjugate vaccine, Nilotinib hydrochloride monohydrate; Octaparin; Parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), Pegaptanib octasodium, Pitrakinra, Prasterone, Pregabalin; Ranelic acid distrontium salt, Rasagiline mesilate, Retigabine, Rimonabant, RTS,S/AS02D; Sarcosine, Sitaxentan sodium, Solifenacin succinate, Sunitinib malate; Taranabant, Taxus, Teduglutide, Teriparatide, Ticagrelor, Travoprost, TRU-015; USlipristal acetate, Urocortin 2; Vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate; YM-155, Yttrium 90 (90Y) ibritumomab tiuxetan; Zanolimumab, Zoledronic acid monohydrate, Zotarolimus, Zotarolimus-eluting stent. PMID:18560631

Moral, M A; Tomillero, A

2008-03-01

150

Gateways to clinical trials.  

PubMed

Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials reported in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs:[188Re]-HDD; A-179578, adalimumab, AK-602, albumin interferon alfa, alfimeprase, amelubant, anakinra, anti-CD2 MAb, APD-356, aripiprazole, atvogen; Bimatoprost, bimosiamose, BLP-25, brivaracetam; Caspofungin acetate, cilansetron, CMV vaccine (bivalent), conivaptan hydrochloride, Cypher; Darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin hydrobromide, D-D4FC, decitabine, dnaJP1, doranidazole, dronedarone hydrochloride; Efalizumab, efaproxiral sodium, emtricitabine, Endeavor, entecavir, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, etoricoxib, etravirine, ezetimibe; Fampridine, fenretinide, ferumoxtran-10, forodesine hydrochloride; Gantacurium chloride, gemi-floxacin mesilate, Glyminox, GW-501516; HBV-ISS, hepavir B, human insulin, HuMax-CD20, hyaluronic acid, HyCAMP; Icatibant, IDEA-070, IGN-311, imatinib mesylate, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, insulin glulisine; Lapatinib, lasofoxifene tartrate, LB-80380, liarozole fumarate, liposome encapsulated doxorubicin, lumiracoxib, LY-570310; MC-1, melatonin, merimepodib, metanicotine, midostaurin; Natalizumab, nicotine conjugate vaccine, NYVAC-HIV C; Patupilone, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, pelitinib, Peru-15, pexelizumab, PHP, pimecrolimus, prednisolone sodium metasulfobenzoate; Recombinant alfa1-antitrypsin (AAT), retigabine, rHA influenza vaccine, rifalazil, rofecoxib, rosiglitazone maleate/Metformin hydrochloride, rostaporfin, rosuvastatin calcium, rubitecan; Selenite sodium, semilente insulin, SMP-797, sorafenib; Talampanel, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, TER-199, tiotropium bromide, torcetrapib, treprostinil sodium, TTA; ValboroPro, valdecoxib, val-mCyd, valtorcitabine dihydrochloride: XP-828L. PMID:15834459

Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

2005-01-01

151

Gateways to clinical trials.  

PubMed

Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: A-007, A6, adalimumab, adenosine triphosphate, alefacept, alemtuzumab, AllerVax Ragweed, amphora, anakinra, angiotensin-(1-7), anidulafungin, apomine, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride, avanafil; BAL-8557, becatecarin, bevacizumab, biphasic insulin aspart, BMS-188797, bortezomib, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, brivudine; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, caspofungin acetate, catumaxomab, certolizumab pegol, cetuximab, CG-0070, ciclesonide, cinacalcet hydrochloride, clindamycin phosphate/benzoyl peroxide, cryptophycin 52, Cypher; Dabigatran etexilate, darapladib, darbepoetin alfa, decitabine, deferasirox, desloratadine, dexanabinol, dextromethorphan/quinidine sulfate, DMF, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride; E-7010, edaravone, efalizumab, emtricitabine, entecavir, eplerenone, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, estradiol valerate/dienogest, eszopiclone, exenatide, ezetimibe; Fondaparinux sodium, fulvestrant; Gefitinib, gestodene, GYKI-16084; Hyaluronic acid, hydralazine hydrochloride/isosorbide dinitrate; Imatinib mesylate, indiplon, insulin glargine; Juzen-taiho-to; Lamivudine/zidovudine/abacavir sulfate, L-arginine hydrochloride, lasofoxifene tartrate, L-BLP-25, lenalidomide, levocetirizine, levodopa/carbidopa/entacapone, lexatumumab, lidocaine/prilocaine, lubiprostone, lumiracoxib; MAb-14.18, mitoquidone; Natalizumab, neridronic acid, neuradiab; Olpadronic acid sodium salt, omalizumab; p53-DC vaccine, parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pemetrexed disodium, perifosine, pimecrolimus, prasterone, prasugrel, PRO-2000, Pseudostat; R24, rasburicase, RHAMM R3 peptide, rilonacept, rosuvastatin calcium, rotavirus vaccine, rufinamide; Sabarubicin hydrochloride, SHL-749, sirolimus-eluting stent, SLx-2101, sodium butyrate, sorafenib, SU-6668; TachoSil, tadalafil, taxus, tegaserod maleate, telbivudine, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, teriparatide, tetramethylpyrazine, teverelix, tiotropium bromide, tipifarnib, tirapazamine, tolvaptan, TransvaxTM hepatitis C vaccine, treprostinil sodium; Valganciclovir hydrochloride, valsartan/amlodipine, vandetanib, vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate, vatalanib succinate, veglin, voriconazole; Yttrium 90 (90Y) ibritumomab tiuxetan; Zileuton, zotarolimus, zotarolimus-eluting stent. PMID:17003851

Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

2006-09-01

152

Gateways to clinical trials.  

PubMed

Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Know- ledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: ABI-007, Ad.Egr.TNF.11D, adefovir dipivoxil, AdPEDF.11, AES-14, albumex, alefacept, alemtuzumab, aliskiren fumarate, alvimopan hydrate, aAminolevulinic acid hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, anakinra, anti-IL-12 MAb, aprepitant, atazanavir sulfate, atrasentan, avanafil; Banoxantrone, BG-12, bimatoprost, bortezomib, bosentan; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, caspofungin acetate, CBT-1, ciclesonide, clofarabine, conivaptan hydrochloride, CpG-7909, C-Vax, Cypher; DA-8159, DAC:GLP-1, darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin, duloxetine hydrochloride; Eculizumab, efalizumab, efaproxiral sodium, EGF vaccine, eletriptan, epratuzumab, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, ETC-642, etoricoxib, everolimus, exenatide; Gefitinib, IV gamma-globulin; Human insulin, gamma-hydroxybutyrate sodium; IDN-6556, iguratimod, imatinib mesylate, indiplon, ixabepilone; Laquinimod, LB-80380, lidocaine/prilocaineliraglutide, lopinavir, lopinavir/ritonavir, lucinactant; MAb-14.18, melatonin, MLN-591-DM1; NC-531, neridronic acid, nesiritide, neutrophil-inhibitory factor, niacin/lovastatin; Oblimersen sodium, olcegepant, oral Insulin, ORV-105; Palonosetron hydrochloride, PAmAb, pegaptanib sodium, peginterferon alfa-2a, pegvisomant, perifosine, pexelizumab, phenoxodiol, phenserine tartrate, pimecrolimus, pramlintide acetate, pregabalin, PRO-542, prostate cancer vaccine, PT-141; Ramelteon, rasagiline mesilate, rDNA insulin, reslizumab, rh-Lactoferrin, ribamidine hydrochloride, rosuvastatin calcium; S-8184l, SC-1, sorafenib, St. John's Wort extract, SU-11248; Taxus, telbivudine, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, teriparatide, testosterone gel, tezosentan disodium, tipifarnib, tolvaptan, trabectedin, travoprost, travoprost/timolol, treprostinil sodium; Vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate; Xcellerated T cells, XR-5944; Yttrium 90 (90Y) ibritumomab tiuxetan; Ziconotide. PMID:15349141

Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

2004-01-01

153

Gateways to clinical trials.  

PubMed

Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity. prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: ABX-IL-8, Acclaim, adalimumab, AGI-1067, alagebrium chloride, alemtuzumab, Alequel, Androgel, anti-IL-12 MAb, AOD-9604, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Biphasic insulin aspart, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, bovine lactoferrin, brivudine; Cantuzumab mertansine, CB-1954, CDB-4124, CEA-TRICOM, choriogonadotropin alfa, cilansetron, CpG-10101, CpG-7909, CTL-102, CTL-102/CB-1954; DAC:GRF, darbepoetin alfa, davanat-1, decitabine, del-1 Genemedicine, dexanabinol, dextofisopam, dnaJP1, dronedarone hydrochloride, dutasteride; Ecogramostim, eletriptan, emtricitabine, EPI-hNE-4, eplerenone, eplivanserin fumarate, erlotinib hydrochloride, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, esomeprazole magnesium, etoricoxib, ezetimibe; Falecalcitriol, fingolimod hydrochloride; Gepirone hydrochloride; HBV-ISS, HSV-2 theracine, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, Indiplon, insulin glargine, ISAtx-247; L612 HuMAb, levodopa/carbidopa/entacapone, lidocaine/prilocaine, LL-2113AD, lucinactant, LY-156735; Meclinertant, metelimumab, morphine hydrochloride, morphine-6-glucuronide; Natalizumab, nimotuzumab, NX-1207, NYVAC-HIV C; Omalizumab, onercept, osanetant; PABA, palosuran sulfate, parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), parecoxib sodium, PBI-1402, PCK-3145, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, pemetrexed disodium, pimecrolimus, PINC, pregabalin; Ramelteon, rasagiline mesilate, rasburicase, rimonabant hydrochloride, RO-0098557, rofecoxib, rosiglitazone maleate/metformin hydrochloride; Safinamide mesilate, SHL-749, sitaxsentan sodium, sparfosic acid, SprayGel, squalamine, St. John's Wort extract, synthetic human secretin; Taxus, telavancin hydrochloride, telithromycin, temoporfin, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine, teriparatide, testosterone gel, TG-1024, tirapazamine, travoprost, travoprost/timolol; Valdecoxib, valganciclovir hydrochloride, voriconazole; Ximelagatran. PMID:15834452

Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

2005-04-01

154

Gateways to clinical trials.  

PubMed

Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Thomson Reuters Integrity(SM), the drug discovery and development portal, http://www.thomsonreutersintegrity.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 17-Hydroxyprogesterone caproate; Abacavir sulfate/lamivudine, Aclidinium bromide, Adalimumab, Adefovir, Alemtuzumab, Alkaline phosphatase, Amlodipine, Apilimod mesylate, Aripiprazole, Axitinib, Azacitidine; Belotecan hydrochloride, Berberine iodide, Bevacizumab, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Bryostatin 1; Calcipotriol/hydrocortisone, Carglumic acid, Certolizumab pegol, Cetuximab, Cinacalcet hydrochloride, Cixutumumab, Coumarin, Custirsen sodium; Darbepoetin alfa, Darifenacin hydrobromide, Darunavir, Dasatinib, Denibulin hydrochloride, Denosumab, Diacetylmorphine, Dulanermin, Duloxetine hydrochloride; Ecogramostim, Enfuvirtide, Entecavir, Enzastaurin hydrochloride, Eplerenone, Escitalopram oxalate, Esomeprazole sodium, Etravirine, Everolimus, Ezetimibe; Fenofibrate/pravastatin sodium, Ferric carboxymaltose, Flavangenol, Fondaparinux sodium; Glutamine, GSK-1024850A; Hepatitis B hyperimmunoglobulin, Hib-MenC, HIV-LIPO-5; Immunoglobulin intravenous (human), Indacaterol maleate, Indibulin, Indium 111 (ąąąIn) ibritumomab tiuxetan, Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 Monovalent vaccine, Inhalable human insulin, Insulin glulisine; Lapatinib ditosylate, Leucovorin/UFT; Maraviroc, Mecasermin, MMR-V, Morphine hydrochloride, Morphine sulfate/naltrexone hydrochloride, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Naproxen/esomeprazole magnesium, Natalizumab; Oncolytic HSV; Paliperidone, PAN-811, Paroxetine, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, Pegvisomant, Pemetrexed disodium, Pimecrolimus, Posaconazole, Pregabalin; Raltegravir potassium, Ranelic acid distrontium salt, Rasburicase, Rilpivirine hydrochloride; Sertindole, Sivelestat sodium hydrate, Sorafenib, Sumatriptan succinate/naproxen sodium, Sunitinib malate; Tafluprost, Telithromycin, Temsirolimus, Tenofovir disoproxil fumavate, Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine, Teriparatide, Ticagrelor, Tigecycline, Tipranavir, Tirapazamine, Trimetrexate; Ulipristal acetate; Valganciclovir hydrochloride, Vicriviroc, Vorinostat; Yttrium 90 (90Y) ibritumomab tiuxetan. PMID:21225012

Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

2010-12-01

155

Gateways to clinical trials.  

PubMed

Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Thomson Reuters Integrity(SM), the drug discovery and development portal, http://www.thomsonreutersintegrity.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abatacept, Adalimumab, AdCD40L, Adefovir, Aleglitazar, Aliskiren fumarate, AM-103, Aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, Amlodipine, Anakinra, Aprepitant, Aripiprazole, Atazanavir sulfate, Axitinib; Belimumab, Bevacizumab, Bimatoprost, Bortezomib, Bupropion/naltrexone; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, Certolizumab pegol, Ciclesonide, CYT-997; Darbepoetin alfa, Darunavir, Dasatinib, Desvenlafaxine succinate, Dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride cogramostim; Eltrombopag olamine, Emtricitabine, Escitalopram oxalate, Eslicarbazepine acetate, Eszopiclone, Etravirine, Everolimus-eluting coronary stent, Exenatide, Ezetimibe; Fenretinide, Filibuvir, Fludarabine; Golimumab; Hepatitis B hyperimmunoglobulin, HEV-239, HP-802-247, HPV-16/18 AS04, HPV-6/11/16/18, Human albumin, Human gammaglobulin; Imatinib mesylate, Inotuzumab ozogamicin, Invaplex 50 vaccine; Lapatinib ditosylate, Lenalidomide, Liposomal doxorubicin, Lopinavir, Lumiliximab, LY-686017; Maraviroc, Mecasermin rinfabate; Narlaprevir; Ocrelizumab, Oral insulin, Oritavancin, Oxycodone hydrochloride/naloxone; Paclitaxel-eluting stent, Palonosetron hydrochloride, PAN-811, Paroxetine, Pazopanib hydrochloride, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Pemetrexed disodium, Pertuzumab, Pitavastatin calcium, Posaconazole, Pregabalin, Prucalopride succinate; Raltegravir potassium, Ranibizumab, RHAMM R3 peptide, Rosuvastatin calcium; Salclobuzic acid sodium salt, SCY-635, Selenate sodium, Semapimod hydrochloride, Silodosin, Siltuximab, Silybin, Sirolimus-eluting stent, SIR-Spheres, Sunitinib malate; Tapentadol hydrochloride, Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, Tocilizumab, Tositumomab/iodine (I131) tositumomab, Trabectedin, TransVax™ hepatitis C vaccine; Ustekinumab; V-260, Valspodar, Varenicline tartrate, VCL-IPT1, Vildagliptin, VRC-HIVADV014-00-VP, VRC-HIVDNA009-00-VP, VRC-HIVDNA016-00-VP; Yttrium 90 (90Y) ibritumomab tiuxetan, Yttrium Y90 Epratuzumab; Zibotentan, Zotarolimus-eluting stent. PMID:21225019

Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

2010-11-01

156

Gateways to clinical trials.  

PubMed

Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prouse Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 101M, 3F8; Abatacept, ABT-263, Adalimumab, AG-7352, Agatolimod sodium, Alfimeprase, Aliskiren fumarate, Alvimopan hydrate, Aminolevulinic acid hexyl ester, Ammonium tetrathiomolybdate, Anakinra, Aripiprazole, AS-1404, AT-9283, Atomoxetine hydrochloride, AVE-1642, AVE-9633, Axitinib, AZD-0530; Becocalcidiol, Belotecan hydrochloride, Bevacizumab, BG-9928, BIBF-1120, BMS-275183, Bortezomib, Bosentan; Catumaxomab, Cetuximab, CHR-2797, Ciclesonide, Clevidipine, Cypher, Cytarabine/daunorubicin; Darifenacin hydrobromide, Darunavir, Denosumab, Desvenlafaxine succinate, Disufenton sodium, Duloxetine hydrochloride, Dutasteride; Eculizumab, Efalizumab, Eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid, Eplerenone, Epratuzumab, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Escitalopram oxalate, Ethynylcytidine, Etravirine, Everolimus, Ezetimibe; Fulvestrant; Garenoxacin mesilate, Gefitinib, Gestodene; HI-164, Hydralazine hydrochloride/isosorbide dinitrate; Icatibant acetate, ICX-RHY, Idraparinux sodium, Indacaterol, Ispronicline, Ivabradine hydrochloride, Ixabepilone; KB-2115, KW-2449; L-791515, Lapatinib ditosylate, LGD-4665, Licofelone, Liposomal doxorubicin, Lisdexamfetamine mesilate, Lumiracoxib; Methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin-beta, Miglustat, Mipomersen sodium, Mitumprotimut-T, MK-0822A, MK-0974; Nelarabine; Obatoclax mesylate, Olmesartan medoxomil, Olmesartan medoxomil/hydrochlorothiazide; Paliperidone, Palonosetron hydrochloride, Panitumumab, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Pemetrexed disodium, Perospirone hydrochloride, Pertuzumab, Pimecrolimus, Pitrakinra, Pixantrone maleate, Posaconazole, Pregabalin; Quercetin; RALGA, Raltegravir potassium, Ranelic acid distrontium salt, rhHistone 1.3, Rimonabant, Rivaroxaban, Rosuvastatin calcium, RTS,S/SBAS2; Satraplatin, SNDX-275, Sodium butyrate, Solifenacin succinate, Sorafenib, SU-14813, Sunitinib malate; Tadalafil, Tafenoquine succinate, Tamatinib fosdium, Taxus, Telbivudine, Telmisartan/hydrochlorothiazide, Temsirolimus, Tiotropium bromide, Tipranavir, Tocilizumab, Trabectedin, Tramadol hydrochloride/acetaminophen; Ulipristal acetate, Uracil, Ursodeoxycholyltaurine; Valdecoxib, Vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate, Varenicline tartrate, Vildagliptin, Vinflunine, Vitespen, Vorinostat; ZK-EPO, Zoledronic acid monohydrate. PMID:18389098

Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X

2008-01-01

157

Gateways to clinical trials.  

PubMed

Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: AAV1/SERCA2a, Abacavir sulfate/lamivudine, Adalimumab, Aliskiren fumarate, Ambrisentan, Aripiprazole, AT-7519, Atazanavir sulfate, Atomoxetine hydrochloride, Azacitidine, Azelnidipine; Besifloxacin hydrochloride, Bevacizumab, Bioabsorbable everolimus-eluting coronary stent, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Budesonide/formoterol fumarate; CAIV-T, Carisbamate, Casopitant mesylate, Certolizumab pegol, Cetuximab, Ciclesonide, Ciprofloxacin/dexamethasone, CTCE-9908; Dalcetrapib, Darunavir, Deferasirox, Desloratadine, Disitertide, Drotrecogin alfa (activated), DTA-H19, Duloxetine hydrochloride, Dutasteride; Ecogramostim, Efalizumab, Emtricitabine, Eribulin mesilate, Escitalopram oxalate, Eszopiclone, EUR-1008, Everolimus-eluting coronary stent, Exenatide; Fampridine, Fluticasone furoate, Formoterol fumarate/fluticasone propionate, Fosamprenavir calcium, Fulvestrant; Gabapentin enacarbil, GS-7904L; HPV-6/11/16/18, Human Secretin, Hydralazine hydrochloride/isosorbide dinitrate; Imatinib mesylate, Imexon, Inalimarev/Falimarev, Indacaterol, Indacaterol maleate, Inhalable human insulin, Insulin detemir, Insulin glargine, Ixabepilone; L-Alanosine, Lapatinib ditosylate, Lenalidomide, Levocetirizine dihydrochloride, Liraglutide, Lisdexamfetamine mesilate, Lopinavir, Loratadine/montelukast sodium, Lutropin alfa; MeNZB, Mepolizumab, Micafungin sodium, Morphine hydrochloride; Nabiximols, Nikkomycin Z; Olmesartan medoxomil, Omalizumab; Paclitaxel-eluting stent, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Perifosine, PF-489791, Plitidepsin, Posaconazole, Pregabalin; QAX-576; Raltegravir potassium, Ramelteon, Rasagiline mesilate, Recombinant human relaxin H2, rhGAD65, Rivaroxaban, Rosuvastatin calcium, Rotigotine; Saxagliptin, SCH-530348, Sirolimus-eluting stent, SLIT-amikacin, Sorafenib, Sotrastaurin, SR-16234, Sulforaphane; Tadalafil, Tanespimycin, Tapentadol hydrochloride, Teriparatide, Tesofensine, Tiotropium bromide, Tipifarnib, Tirapazamine, TMC-207, Tocilizumab, Tolvaptan, Tosedostat, Treprostinil sodium; Ustekinumab; Varespladib methyl, Vicriviroc, Vildagliptin, Vildagliptin/metformin hydrochloride, Volociximab, Voriconazole; Ziconotide, Ziprasidone hydrochloride. PMID:19907722

Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

2009-09-01

158

Gateways to clinical trials.  

PubMed

Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abetimus sodium, Ad5-FGF4, adeno-Interferon gamma, AE-941, AERx, alemtuzumab, alicaforsen sodium, almotriptan, alpharadin, anakinra, anatumomab mafenatox, ANG-453, anti-CTLA-4 Mab, AP-12009, aprepitant, aripiprazole, arsenic trioxide, astemizole, atlizumab, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, BG-9928, BMS-188667, botulinum toxin type B, BufferGel; Caffeine, CDP-870, cetuximab, cilomilast, ciluprevir, clofarabine, continuous erythropoiesis receptor activator, CP-461; Darbepoetin alfa, deferasirox, desloratadine, desoxyepothilone B, diflomotecan, dolasetron, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride; ED-71, efalizumab, efaproxiral sodium, EKB-569, eletriptan, EMD-72000, enfuvirtide, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, etoricoxib; Fampridine, ferumoxytol, fondaparinux sodium; Gadofosveset sodium, gastrazole, gefitinib, gemtuzumab ozogamicin, gepirone hydrochloride glutamine; hLM609, HSPPC-96, human insulin; IDD-1, imatinib mesylate, indisulam, inhaled insulin, ixabepilone; Keratinocyte growth factor; Lapatinib, laquinimod, LDP-02, LE-SN38, levetiracetam, levosimendan, licofelone, liposomal doxorubicin, liposomal NDDP, lopinavir, lumiracoxib, LY-156735; Morphine hydrochloride, morphine-6-glucuronide, motexafin gadolinium, MS-27-275, MVA-5T4, MVA-Muc1-IL-2; Nemifitide ditriflutate, neridronic acid nitronaproxen, NSC-683864, NSC-703940, NVP-LAF-237; Oblimersen sodium, ocinaplon, oncomyc-NG, OPC-28326, ortataxel, ospemifene; Palonosetron hydrochloride, PEG-filgrastim peginterferon alfa-2(a), peginterferon alfa-2b, pegsunercept, pemetrexed disodium, pregabalin, prilocaine, pyridoxamine; RDP-58, recombinant glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36) amide, recombinant human ApoA-I milano/phospholipid complex; SB-715992, soblidotin, sodium dichloroacetate, St. John's Wort extract; TAS-102, terfenadine, TG-1024, TG-5001, 4'-Thio-ara-C, tipranavir, topixantrone hydrochloride, trabectedin, transdermal selegiline, trimethoprim, troxacitabine, TT-232; Vatalanib succinate, vinflunine; Ximelagatran; Ziprasidone hydrochloride, Zoledronic acid monohydrate. PMID:14988742

Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

2004-01-01

159

Gateways to clinical trials.  

PubMed

Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs:(R)-Flurbiprofen, 90Yttrium-DOTA-huJ591; ABT-510, ACP-103, Ad5-FGF4, adalimumab, ademetionine, AG-7352, alemtuzumab, Amb a 1 ISS-DNA, anakinra, apaziquone, aprepitant, aripiprazole, atazanavir sulfate; BAL-8557, bevacizumab, BMS-188797, bortezomib, bosentan, brivudine; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, cannabidiol, caspofungin acetate, catumaxomab, CERE-120, cetuximab, ciclesonide, cilomilast, cizolirtine citrate, Cypher, cystemustine; Dalbavancin, darifenacin hydrobromide, dasatinib, deferasirox, denosumab, desmoteplase, dihydrexidine, dimethyl fumarate, dutasteride, DW-166HC; Eculizumab, enfuvirtide, entecavir, epratuzumab, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, eszopiclone, etoricoxib, everolimus; Fallypride, febuxostat, fenretinide, fesoterodine, fingolimod hydrochloride; Gabapentin enacarbil, gefitinib; hMaxi-K, human papillomavirus vaccine, HYAL-CT1101; Imatinib mesylate, indiplon, inolimomab, ISAtx-247; J591; Lacosamide, landiolol, lasofoxifene tartrate, lestaurtinib, lidocaine/prilocaine, linezolid, lixivaptan, lonafarnib, lopinavir, lopinavir/ritonavir, lumiracoxib; Natalizumab, nesiritide; OC-108, omalizumab, onercept, OSC; Palifermin, palonosetron hydrochloride, parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), parecoxib sodium, PD-MAGE-3 vaccine, PEG-filgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pegsunercept, pelitinib, pitavastatin calcium, plerixafor hydrochloride, posaconazole, prasterone sulfate, pregabalin; Ramelteon, ranelic acid distrontium salt, rasburicase, rosuvastatin calcium, rotigotine, RSD-1235, rufinamide, rupatadine fumarate; Sarizotan hydrochloride, SHL-749, sirolimus-eluting stent, solifenacin succinate, sunitinib malate; Tadalafil, talampanel, tasidotin hydrochloride, Taxus, tegaserod maleate, telavancin hydrochloride, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, tiotropium bromide, tocilizumab, tositumomab, treprostinil sodium, tridolgosir hydrochloride, TTS-CD3; Ularitide; Valdecoxib, Val-Tyr sardine peptidase, vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate, voriconazole; Yttrium (90Y) edotreotide, Yttrium 90 (90Y) ibritumomab tiuxetan; Zileuton, zucapsaicin. PMID:16894408

Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

2006-01-01

160

Gateways to clinical trials.  

PubMed

Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: ABT-510, adalimumab, alefacept, ambrisentan, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, armodafinil, aselizumab, asenapine maleate, azelnidipine; Bevacizumab, bexarotene, bimosiamose, biphasic insulin aspart, bortezomib, bosentan, BQ-123; C340, cannabidiol, caspofungin acetate, CC-4047, certolizumab pegol, cetuximab, ciclesonide, cilansetron, Cypher; Dabigatran etexilate, darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin hydrobromide, desloratadine, dexosome vaccine (melanoma), dimethyl fumarate, dronabinol/cannabidiol, drospirenone, drospirenone/estradiol, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; Efalizumab, eglumetad hydrate, emoxipin hydrochloride, eplerenone, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, etonogestrel/ethinylestradiol; Garenoxacin mesilate, gamma-hydroxybutyrate sodium, gefitinib; H5N1 pandemic influenza vaccine, human growth hormone-(177-191), human insulin; Indacaterol, INKP-100, INKP-102, insulin glargine, i.v. gamma-globulin; KLH; Lapatinib, L-arginine hydrochloride, lasofoxifene tartrate, levocetirizine, licochalcone A, LMI vaccine, lomefloxacin, lubiprostone, lumiracoxib; Miglustat, mycograb; Natalizumab, NCX-4016, nortopixantrone hydrochloride; Olmesartan medoxomil, omalizumab, oral insulin, OrM3; Parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), parecoxib sodium, PCK-3145, PEG-filgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2a, pemetrexed disodium, pexelizumab, photochlor, pimecrolimus, pneumococcal 7-valent conjugate vaccine, polyphenon E; R-126638, R-411, resveratrol, roflumilast, RS-86, ruboxistaurin mesilate hydrate, rupatadine fumarate; Sipuleucel-T, somatropin, St. John's Wort extract; Tadalafil, Taxus, telbivudine, telithromycin, temsirolimus, teriparatide, teverelix, tigecycline, tiotropium bromide, tolterodine, tolvaptan, treprostinil sodium, typhoid vaccine; Vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate, vildagliptin, voriconazole; Ximelagatran; Zanolimumab, zileuton. PMID:16541195

Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

2006-01-01

161

Gateways to clinical trials.  

PubMed

Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity(R), the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Activated protein C concentrate, Ad-CD154, Adeno-Interferon gamma, alemtuzumab, APC-8024, 9-aminocamptothecin, aprepitant, l-arginine hydrochloride, aripiprazole, arsenic trioxide, asimadoline; O6-Benzylguanine, bevacizumab, Bi-20, binodenoson, biphasic insulin aspart, bivatuzumab, 186Re-bivatuzumab, BMS-181176, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, BQ-123, bryostatin 1; Carboxy- amidotriazole, caspofungin acetate, CB-1954, CC-4047, CDP-860, cerivastatin sodium, clevidipine, CTL-102; 3,4-DAP, darbepoetin alfa, decitabine, desloratadine, DHA-paclitaxel, duloxetine hydrochloride; Efalizumab, EGF vaccine, eletriptan, eniluracil, ENMD-0997, eplerenone, eplivanserin, erlosamide, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, esomeprazole magnesium, eszopiclone, everolimus, exatecan mesilate, exenatide, ezetimibe; Fondaparinux sodium, FR-901228, FTY-720; Gefitinib, gemtuzumab ozogamicin, gepirone hydrochloride; Hexyl insulin M2, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, iodine (I131) tositumomab, ISV-205, ivabradine hydrochloride, ixabepilone; Levetiracetam, levocetirizine, linezolid, liposomal NDDP, lonafarnib, lopinavir, LY-156735; Mafosfamide cyclohexylamine salt, magnesium sulfate, maxacalcitol, meclinertant, melagatran, melatonin, MENT, mepolizumab, micafungin sodium, midostaurin, motexafin gadolinium; Nesiritide, NS-1209, NSC-601316, NSC-683864; Osanetant; Palonosetron hydrochloride, parecoxib sodium, pegaptanib sodium, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pegylated OB protein, pemetrexed disodium, perillyl alcohol, picoplatin, pimecrolimus, pixantrone maleate, plevitrexed, polyglutamate paclitaxel, posurdex, pramlintide acetate, prasterone, pregabalin; Rasburicase, rimonabant hydrochloride, rostaporfin, rosuvastatin calcium; SDZ-SID-791, sibrotuzumab, sorafenib, SU-11248; Tadalafil, targinine, tegaserod maleate, telithromycin, TheraCIM, tigecycline, tiotropium bromide, tipifarnib, tirapazamine, treprostinil sodium; Valdecoxib, Valganciclovir hydrochloride, Vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate; Ximelagatran; Zofenopril calcium, Zoledronic acid monohydrate. PMID:15071612

Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

2004-03-01

162

Gateways to clinical trials.  

PubMed

Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abetimus sodium, adefovir dipivoxil, AGI-1067, alefacept, alemtuzumab, ALVAC-p53, aminolevulinic acid hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, Anti-CTLA-4 Mab, AOD-9604, apafant, aprinocarsen sodium, arsenic trioxide; Balaglitazone, BIM-23190, bimatoprost, bortezomib, bosentan, BR-1; Canertinib dihydrochloride, CDP-850, cevimeline hydrochloride, cinacalcet hydrochloride, clenoliximab, clevudine, CN-787; D-003, darusentan, deferasirox, desloratadine dexanabinol, duloxetine hydrochloride; E-5564, edaravone, efaproxiral sodium, elvucitabine emfilermin, EN-101, enfuvirtide, entecavir, epithalon, eplerenone, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, esomeprazole magnesium, eszopiclone, etilefrine pivalate hydrochloride etoricoxib, everolimus, exenatide; Fidarestat, fondaparinux sodium; Ganstigmine hydrochloride; Homoharringtonine, HuMax-IL-15, hyperimmune IVIG; Imatinib mesylate, IMC-1C11, Inhaled insulin, irofulven, iseganan hydrochloride, ISIS-14803, ISIS-5132, ivabradine hydrochloride; Keratinocyte growth factor; Lafutidine, lanthanum carbonate, LAS-34475, levocetirizine, liraglutide, LY-307161 SR; Magnesium sulfate, maribavir, melatonin, mycobacterium cell wall complex; NN-414, NO-aspirin, nociceptin, nolomirole hydrochloride; Olmesartan medoxomil oral insulin, ospemifene; PDX, perillyl alcohol, pimecrolimus, pitavastatin calcium, pramlintide acetate, prasterone, pregabalin, PRO-542, PV-701, pyrazoloacridine; R-744, ranelic acid distrontium salt, rasburicase, rDNA insulin, resiniferatoxin, reslizumab, ridogrel, riplizumab ropivacaine, rosuvastatin calcium, roxifiban acetate, ruboxistaurin mesilate hydrate; Satraplatin, Sch-58500, semaxanib, sitaxsentan sodium, SMP-114, SU-6668; Teriparatide, tetrathiomolybdate, tipifarnib, tolvaptan, travoprost, treprostinil sodium; Valdecoxib, valganciclovir hydrochloride, vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate, vatalanib succinate; Ximelagatran; Z-335, ziprasidone hydrochloride, zoledronic acid monohydrate, ZYC-00101. PMID:14571286

Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

2003-09-01

163

Gateways to clinical trials.  

PubMed

Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Intergrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 249553, 2-Methoxyestradiol; Abatacept, Adalimumab, Adefovir dipivoxil, Agalsidase beta, Albinterferon alfa-2b, Aliskiren fumarate, Alovudine, Amdoxovir, Amlodipine besylate/atorvastatin calcium, Amrubicin hydrochloride, Anakinra, AQ-13, Aripiprazole, AS-1404, Asoprisnil, Atacicept, Atrasentan; Belimumab, Bevacizumab, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Botulinum toxin type B, Brivaracetam; Catumaxomab, Cediranib, Cetuximab, cG250, Ciclesonide, Cinacalcet hydrochloride, Curcumin, Cypher; Darbepoetin alfa, Denosumab, Dihydrexidine; Eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid, Entecavir, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Escitalopram oxalate, Etoricoxib, Everolimus, Ezetimibe; Febuxostat, Fenspiride hydrochloride, Fondaparinux sodium; Gefitinib, Ghrelin (human), GSK-1562902A; HSV-tk/GCV; Iclaprim, Imatinib mesylate, Imexon, Indacaterol, Insulinotropin, ISIS-112989; L-Alanosine, Lapatinib ditosylate, Laropiprant; Methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin-beta, Mipomersen sodium, Motexafin gadolinium; Natalizumab, Nimotuzumab; OSC, Ozarelix; PACAP-38, Paclitaxel nanoparticles, Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein-(1-36), Pasireotide, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Pemetrexed disodium, Pertuzumab, Picoplatin, Pimecrolimus, Pitavastatin calcium, Plitidepsin; Ranelic acid distrontium salt, Ranolazine, Recombinant human relaxin H2, Regadenoson, RFB4(dsFv)-PE38, RO-3300074, Rosuvastatin calcium; SIR-Spheres, Solifenacin succinate, Sorafenib, Sunitinib malate; Tadalafil, Talabostat, Taribavirin hydrochloride, Taxus, Temsirolimus, Teriparatide, Tiotropium bromide, Tipifarnib, Tirapazamine, Tocilizumab; UCN-01, Ularitide, Uracil, Ustekinumab; V-260, Vandetanib, Vatalanib succinate, Vernakalant hydrochloride, Vorinostat; YM-155; Zileuton, Zoledronic acid monohydrate. PMID:18200333

Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

2007-12-01

164

Gateways to clinical trials.  

PubMed

Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com/. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Adalimumab, adenosine triphosphate, alemtuzumab, alendronate sodium/cholecalciferol, aliskiren fumarate, AMGN-0007, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, anakinra, anidulafungin, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, bosentan; Calcipotriol/beta methasone dipropionate, caldaret hydrate, caspofungin acetate, cetuximab, cinacalcet hydrochloride, clopidogrel, cocaine-BSA conjugate, conivaptan hydrochloride, Cypher; Darbepoetin alfa, delmitide, desloratadine, desmoteplase, desoxyepothilone B, disufenton sodium, DU-176b, duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; EBV-specific CTLs, ecogramostim, edodekin alfa, efalizumab, eletriptan, emtricitabine, entecavir, erlotinib hydrochloride, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, etoricoxib, everolimus, ezetimibe; Fanapanel, fondaparinux sodium; Gefitinib, GTI-2040, GW-501516; Her2 E75-peptide vaccine, human insulin; Ibogaine, icatibant acetate, Id-KLH vaccine, imatinib mesylate, immune globulin subcutaneous [human], indacaterol, inolimomab, ipilimumab, i.v. gamma-globulin, ivabradine hydrochloride, ixabepilone; Lacosamide, lanthanum carbonate, lenalidomide, levocetirizine, levodopa methyl ester hydrochloride/carbidopa, levodopa/carbidopa/entacapone, lidocaine/prilocaine; Maraviroc, mecasermin, melevodopa hydrochloride, mepolizumab, mitumomab; Nesiritide; Omalizumab, oral insulin; Parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), patupilone, pegaptanib sodium, PEG-filgrastim, pemetrexed disodium, photochlor, pimecrolimus, posaconazole, prasterone, prasugrel, pregabalin, prilocaine, PRX-00023; QS-21; Ranibizumab, ranirestat, rhodamine 123, rotigaptide; Sarcosine, sirolimus-eluting stent, sitaxsentan sodium, solifenacin succinate, Staphylococcus aureus vaccine; Tadalafil, talactoferrin alfa, talaporfin sodium, Taxus, tecadenoson, tegaserod maleate, telithromycin, temsirolimus, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, teriparatide, terutroban sodium, tesaglitazar, tesmilifene hydrochloride, TG-100115, tigecycline, torcetrapib; Ularitide; Valproic acid, sodium, voriconazole; Zotarolimus, zotarolimus-eluting stent. PMID:16801985

Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

2006-05-01

165

Gateways to clinical trials.  

PubMed

Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity(R), the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: ABI-007, adalimumab, adefovir dipivoxil, alefacept, alemtuzumab, 3-AP, AP-12009, APC-8015, L-Arginine hydrochloride, aripiprazole, arundic acid, avasimibe; Bevacizumab, bivatuzumab, BMS-181176, BMS-184476, BMS-188797, bortezomib, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, BQ-123, BRL-55730, bryostatin 1; CEP-1347, cetuximab, cinacalcet hydrochloride, CP-461, CpG-7909; D-003, dabuzalgron hydrochloride, darbepoetin alfa, desloratadine, desoxyepothilone B, dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride, DHA-paclitaxel, diflomotecan, DN-101, DP-b99, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, duramycin; Eculizumab, Efalizumab, EKB-569, elcometrine, enfuvirtide, eplerenone, erlotinib hydrochloride, ertapenem sodium, eszopiclone, everolimus, exatecan mesilate, ezetimibe; Fenretinide, fosamprenavir calcium, frovatriptan; GD2L-KLH conjugate vaccine, gefitinib, glufosfamide, GTI-2040; Hexyl insulin M2, human insulin, hydroquinone, gamma-Hydroxybutyrate sodium; IL-4(38-37)-PE38KDEL, imatinib mesylate, indisulam, inhaled insulin, ixabepilone; KRN-5500; LY-544344; MDX-210, melatonin, mepolizumab, motexafin gadolinium; Natalizumab, NSC-330507, NSC-683864; 1-Octanol, omalizumab, ortataxel; Pagoclone, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pemetrexed disodium, phenoxodiol, pimecrolimus, plevitrexed, polyphenon E, pramlintide acetate, prasterone, pregabalin, PX-12; QS-21; Ragaglitazar, ranelic acid distrontium salt, RDP-58, recombinant glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36) amide, repinotan hydrochloride, rhEndostatin, rh-Lactoferrin, (R)-roscovitine; S-8184, semaxanib, sitafloxacin hydrate, sitaxsentan sodium, sorafenib, synthadotin; Tadalafil, tesmilifene hydrochloride, theratope, tipifarnib, tirapazamine, topixantrone hydrochloride, trabectedin, traxoprodil, Tri-Luma; Valdecoxib, valganciclovir hydrochloride, vinflunine; Ximelagatran; Ziconotide. PMID:15148527

Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

2004-04-01

166

Research Problems in Clinical Diagnosis.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discussed problems and deficiencies in past research on clinical diagnosis, pertaining to sampling problems with regard to clinical subjects studied, adequacy of control groups, base rates, clinical versus statistical significance, lack of cross-validation, and problems due to reliance on inadequate schemes of classification. Future research is…

Garfield, Sol L.

1978-01-01

167

REFERRAL FORM PHONOLOGICAL AWARENESS CLINIC  

E-print Network

REFERRAL FORM PHONOLOGICAL AWARENESS CLINIC Concerns regarding communication Please return this form to: Clinical Administrator Email: clinic@cmds.canterbury.ac.nz Department of Communication/s: Home Phone: Work Phone: Mobile Phone: Email: Preferred method of contact during the day: (Between 9am

Hickman, Mark

168

Finding an imaging clinical trial  

Cancer.gov

Information about imaging clinical trials and clinical trials in general is available from the Cancer Information Service (CIS). Information specialists at the CIS use PDQ, the NCI's cancer information database, to identify and provide detailed information about specific ongoing clinical trials.

169

Clinical Instruction for Professional Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To present the principles of adult learning and mentoring to help clinical instructors better educate athletic training students (ATSs) during their clinical experiences, with the end result being a better prepared, competent entry-level practitioner. Background: The principles of adult learning must be applied to ATS clinical education…

Gardner, Greg; Sexton, Patrick; Guyer, M. Susan; Willeford, K. Sean; Levy, Linda S.; Barnum, Mary G.; Fincher, A. Louise

2009-01-01

170

Comfrey: A Clinical Overview  

PubMed Central

Comfrey has a centuries-old tradition as a medicinal plant. Today, multiple randomized controlled trials have demonstrated the efficacy and safety of comfrey preparations for the topical treatment of pain, inflammation and swelling of muscles and joints in degenerative arthritis, acute myalgia in the back, sprains, contusions and strains after sports injuries and accidents, also in children aged 3 or 4 and over. This paper provides information on clinical trials and non-interventional studies published on comfrey to date and further literature, substantiating the fact that topical comfrey preparations are a valuable therapy option for the treatment of painful muscle and joint complaints. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:22359388

Staiger, Christiane

2012-01-01

171

Likelihood and clinical trials.  

PubMed

The history of the application of statistical theory to the analysis of clinical trials is reviewed. The current orthodoxy is a somewhat illogical hybrid of the original theory of significance tests of Edgeworth, Karl Pearson, and Fisher, and the subsequent decision theory approach of Neyman, Egon Pearson, and Wald. This hegemony is under threat from Bayesian statisticians. A third approach is that of likelihood, stemming from the work of Fisher and Barnard. This approach is illustrated using hypothetical data from the Lancet articles by Bradford Hill, which introduced clinicians to statistical theory. PMID:10760630

Hill, G; Forbes, W; Kozak, J; MacNeill, I

2000-03-01

172

Clinical biochemistry of dihydrotestosterone.  

PubMed

Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) is the most potent natural androgen in humans. There has been an increasing interest in this androgen and its role in the development of primary and secondary sexual characteristics as well as its potential roles in diseases ranging from prostate and breast cancer to Alzheimer's disease. Despite the range of pathologies shown to involve DHT there is little evidence for measurement of serum DHT in the management of these diseases. In this review we describe the physiology of DHT production and action, summarize current concepts in the role of DHT in the pathogenesis of various disorders of sexual development, compare current methods for the measurement of DHT and conclude on the clinical utility of DHT measurement. The clinical indications for the measurement of DHT in serum are: investigation of 5? reductase deficiency in infants with ambiguous genitalia and palpable gonads; men with delayed puberty and/or undescended testes; and to confirm the presence of active testicular tissue. Investigation is aided by the use of human chorionic gonadotrophin stimulation. Due to paucity of published data on this procedure, it is important to follow guidelines prescribed by the laboratory performing the analysis to ensure accurate interpretation. PMID:23431485

Marchetti, Paula M; Barth, Julian H

2013-03-01

173

[Clinical experience with Leponex].  

PubMed

Until now the "neuroleptic threshold" (Haase) was considered to be the efficiency criterion of the antipsychotic effect of a neuroleptic substance and it was thought therefore that the extrapyramidal symptoms were a necessary although undesired side effect. The benodiazepine derivative Leponex developed by Sandox - Basel upsets this view because it has an excellent antipsychotic effect without creating definite extrapyramidal symptoms. It is noted for its quick soporfic effect after only a few minutes, for subdueing psychopathological productivity in a very impressive way, for acting rapidly on the "plus"-symptomatology typical of psychosis, as early as in the first days of treatment, and for its equally visible effect on the "minus"-symptoms, typical of psychosis, in the last third of an average period of treatment lasting 40 days. The clinic using Leponex (Dresden, Halle, Brandenburg-Görden) belonged to the clinical application programme of the Sandox - Basel firm. The article gives a summary of essential results and particulars about the treatment. A detailed evaluation of the case sheets which are at present being statistically reviewed will be given in the next paper. PMID:1208707

Lange, E; König, L; Kühne, G E; Liefke, T

1975-06-01

174

Clinical image processing engine  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Our group provides clinical image processing services to various institutes at NIH. We develop or adapt image processing programs for a variety of applications. However, each program requires a human operator to select a specific set of images and execute the program, as well as store the results appropriately for later use. To improve efficiency, we design a parallelized clinical image processing engine (CIPE) to streamline and parallelize our service. The engine takes DICOM images from a PACS server, sorts and distributes the images to different applications, multithreads the execution of applications, and collects results from the applications. The engine consists of four modules: a listener, a router, a job manager and a data manager. A template filter in XML format is defined to specify the image specification for each application. A MySQL database is created to store and manage the incoming DICOM images and application results. The engine achieves two important goals: reduce the amount of time and manpower required to process medical images, and reduce the turnaround time for responding. We tested our engine on three different applications with 12 datasets and demonstrated that the engine improved the efficiency dramatically.

Han, Wei; Yao, Jianhua; Chen, Jeremy; Summers, Ronald

2009-02-01

175

Gateways to clinical trials.  

PubMed

Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate; ACP-103, Ad.Egr.TNF.11 D, adalimumab, AF-IL 12, AIDSVAX gp120 B/B, alefacept, alemtuzumab, a-Galactosylceramide, ALVAC vCP 1452, alvimopan hydrate, alvocidib hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, anakinra, anidulafungin, antarelix, aprepitant, aripiprazole, arsenic sulfide, asoprisnil, atazanavir sulfate, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, bimatoprost, BMS-184476, bortezomib, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, BrachySil, brivudine; Caffeine, calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, cannabidiol, capsaicin for injection, caspofungin acetate, CC-4047, cetuximab, CGP-36742, clofazimine, CpG-7909, Cypher; Darbepoetin alfa, dextromethorphan/quinidine sulfate, dimethylfumarate, dronabinol/cannabidiol, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; Ecogramostim, efalizumab, eletriptan, emtricitabine, enfuvirtide, eplerenone, esomeprazole magnesium, estradiol acetate, eszopiclone, etoricoxib, exenatide, ezetimibe, ezetimibe/simvastatin; Fampridine, fondaparinux sodium, fosamprenavir calcium; Gefitinib, GPI-0100; hA 20, HTU-PA, human insulin, HuOKT 3 gamma 1(Ala 234-Ala 235), hyaluronic acid; Icatibant, imatinib mesylate, Indiplon, INKP-100, INKP-102, iodine (I131) tositumomab, istradefylline, IV gamma-globulin, ivabradine hydrochloride, ixabepilone; Lacosamide, landiolol, lanthanum carbonate, lasofoxifene tartrate, LB-80380, lenalidomide, lidocaine/tetracaine, linezolid, liposomal doxorubicin, liposomal vincristine sulfate, lopinavir, lopinavir/ritonavir, lumiracoxib, lurtotecan; Maribavir, morphine glucuronide, MVA-5 T 4; NBI-56418, NCX-4016, nesiritide, nicotine conjugate vaccine, NSC-330507; Oglufanide, omalizumab, oxipurinol; Palifermin, palonosetron hydrochloride, parecoxib sodium, PEG-filgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, PEGylated interferon alfacon-1, perospirone hydrochloride, pimecrolimus, pixantrone maleate, plerixafor hydrochloride, PowderJect lidocaine, pradefovir mesylate, prasterone, pregabalin, Prostvac VF, PT-141, PTC-124, pyridoxamine; QS-21, quercetin; R-126638, R-411, ralfinamide, rasagiline mesilate, rF-PSA, RG-2077, rhThrombin, rimonabant hydrochloride, rofecoxib, rosuvastatin calcium, rotigotine hydrochloride, rV-PSA; S-18886, S-303, seocalcitol, SGN-40, sitaxsentan sodium, SPP-301, St. John's Wort extract; Tadalafil, taxus, telithromycin, tenatoprazole, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, testosterone MDTS, testosterone transdermal patch, tgAAC-09, TH-9507, thioacetazone, tipifarnib, TQ-1011, trabectedin, travoprost, trimethoprim; Valdecoxib, valganciclovir hydrochloride, valopicitabine, voriconazole; Xcellerated T cells. PMID:16179960

Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

2005-01-01

176

Gateways to clinical trials.  

PubMed

Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com.This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: ABT-263, AC-2307, Aclidinium bromide, Adefovir dipivoxil, ADH-1, Agatolimod sodium, Alefacept, Aliskiren fumarate, Aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, Anakinra, Apaziquone, Aprepitant, Aripiprazole, ASM-8, Atiprimod hydrochloride, AVE-0277, AVE-1642, AVE-8062, Axitinib, Azacitidine, AZD-0530; Bazedoxifene acetate, Bevacizumab, Bexarotene, BI-2536, Biphasic insulin aspart, BMS-387032, BMS-663513, Bortezomib, BQ-123, Brivanib alaninate, BSI-201; Caspofungin acetate, CDX-110, Cetuximab, Ciclesonide, CR-011, Cypher; Daptomycin, Darbepoetin alfa, Dasatinib, Decitabine, Deferasirox, Denosumab, Dexlansoprazole, Dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride, DNA-Hsp65 vaccine, Dovitinib, Drotrecogin alfa (activated), DTaP-HBV-IPV/Hibvaccine, DTaP-IPV-HB-PRP-T, Duloxetine hydrochloride, Dutasteride; Ecogramostim, Elacytarabine, Emtricitabine, Endothelin, Entecavir, Eplivanserin fumarate, Escitalopram oxalate, Everolimus, Ezetimibe, Ezetimibe/simvastatin; Farletuzumab, Fesoterodine fumarate, Fibrin sealant (human), Fulvestrant; Gefitinib, Gemtuzumab ozogamicin, Glufosfamide, GSK-1562902A; Hib-TT; Imatinib mesylate, IMC-11F8, Imidazoacridinone, IMP-321, INCB-18424, Indiplon, Indisulam, INNO-406, Irinotecan hydrochloride/Floxuridine, ITF-2357, Ixabepilone; KRN-951; Lasofoxifene tartrate; Lenalidomide, LGD-4665, Lonafarnib, Lubiprostone, Lumiliximab; MDX-1100, Melan-A/MART-1/gp100/IFN-alfa, Methyl-CDDO, Metreleptin, MLN-2704, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Na-ASP-2, Naproxcinod, Nilotinib hydrochloride monohydrate, NPI-2358; Oblimersen sodium, Odanacatib; Paclitaxel nanoparticles, PAN-811, Panobinostat, PBI-1402, PC-515, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Pemetrexed disodium, Perillyl alcohol, Perphenazine 4-aminobutyrate, PeviPRO/breast cancer, PF-03814735, PHA-739358, Pimecrolimus, Plitidepsin, Posaconazole, Prasterone, Prasugrel, Pregabalin, Prucalopride, PRX-08066; rAAV2-TNFR:Fc, Ranelic acid distrontium salt, Ranibizumab, rCD154-CLL, Retapamulin, RTS,S/SBAS2, rV-PSA-TRICOM/rF-PSA-TRICOM; SG-2000, Sinecatechins, Sirolimus-eluting stent, Sorafenib, SP-1640, Strontium malonate, Succinobucol, Sunitinib malate; Taxus, Teduglutide, Telavancin hydrochloride, Telbivudine, Telmisartan/hydrochlorothiazide, Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine, Tocilizumab; Ustekinumab; V-5 Immunitor, Voriconazole, Vorinostat; Xience V, XL-184, XL-647, XL-765; Y-39983, Zibotentan. PMID:18985183

Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

2008-09-01

177

Gateways to clinical trials.  

PubMed

Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issues focuses on the following selection of drugs: (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate, (-)-gossypol, 2-deoxyglucose, 3,4-DAP, 7-monohydroxyethylrutoside; Ad5CMV-p53, adalimumab, adefovir dipivoxil, ADH-1, alemtuzumab, aliskiren fumarate, alvocidib hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, amrubicin hydrochloride, AN-152, anakinra, anecortave acetate, antiasthma herbal medicine intervention, AP-12009, AP-23573, apaziquone, aprinocarsen sodium, AR-C126532, AR-H065522, aripiprazole, armodafinil, arzoxifene hydrochloride, atazanavir sulfate, atilmotin, atomoxetine hydrochloride, atorvastatin, avanafil, azimilide hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, biphasic insulin aspart, BMS-214662, BN-83495, bortezomib, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B; Caspofungin acetate, cetuximab, chrysin, ciclesonide, clevudine, clofarabine, clopidogrel, CNF-1010, CNTO-328, CP-751871, CX-717, Cypher; Dapoxetine hydrochloride, darifenacin hydrobromide, dasatinib, deferasirox, dextofisopam, dextromethorphan/quinidine sulfate, diclofenac, dronedarone hydrochloride, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; Edaravone, efaproxiral sodium, emtricitabine, entecavir, eplerenone, epratuzumab, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, etoricoxib, ezetimibe, ezetimibe/simvastatin; Finrozole, fipamezole hydrochloride, fondaparinux sodium, fulvestrant; Gabapentin enacarbil, gaboxadol, gefitinib, gestodene, ghrelin (human); Human insulin, human papillomavirus vaccine; Imatinib mesylate, immunoglobulin intravenous (human), indiplon, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, insulin glulisine, intranasal insulin, istradefylline, i.v. gamma-globulin, ivabradine hydrochloride, ixabepilone; LA-419, lacosamide, landiolol, lanthanum carbonate, lidocaine/prilocaine, liposomal cisplatin, lutropin alfa; Matuzumab, MBP(82-98), mecasermin, MGCD-0103, MMR-V, morphine hydrochloride, mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Natalizumab, NCX-4016, neridronic acid, nesiritide, nilotinib, NSC-330507; O6-benzylguanine, olanzapine/fluoxetine hydrochloride, omalizumab; Panitumumab, parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), parecoxib sodium, PEG-filgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pegvisomant, pemetrexed disodium, perospirone hydrochloride, pexelizumab, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, pneumococcal 7-valent conjugate vaccine, posaconazole, pramiconazole, prasugrel, pregabalin, prilocaine; rAAV-GAD65, raclopride, rasagiline mesilate, retapamulin, rosuvastatin calcium, rotigotine, rufinamide; SarCNU, SB-743921, SHL-749, sirolimus-eluting stent, sitaxsentan sodium, sorafenib; TachoSil, tadalafil, talampanel, Taxus, tegaserod maleate, telithromycin, telmisartan/hydrochlorothiazide, temsirolimus, tenatoprazole, teriflunomide, tetrathiomolybdate, ticilimumab, timcodar dimesilate, tipifarnib, tirapazamine, TPI, tramiprosate, trifluridine/TPI, trimethoprim; Ularitide, Urocortin 2; Valdecoxib, valganciclovir hydrochloride, valproate magnesium, valspodar, vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate, vitespen, vofopitant hydrochloride, volociximab, vorinostat; Yttrium 90 (90Y) ibritumomab tiuxetan; Ziprasidone hydrochloride, zotarolimus, zotarolimus-eluting stent. PMID:17136234

Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

2006-10-01

178

Gateways to clinical trials.  

PubMed

Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 131I-labetuzumab; Abacavir sulfate, abatacept, adalimumab, ademetionine, adjuvanted influenza vaccine, alefacept, alemtuzumab, amlodipine, amphotericin B, anakinra, aripiprazole, aspirin, axitinib; Betamethasone dipropionate, bevacizumab, biphasic insulin aspart, bortezomib, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, BQ-123; Calcium folinate, canertinib dihydrochloride, carboplatin, carmustine, cetirizine hydrochloride, cetuximab, cholecalciferol, ciclesonide, ciclosporin, cinacalcet hydrochloride, cisplatin, clarithromycin, clofazimine, cold-adapted influenza vaccine trivalent, CpG-7909; Darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin hydrobromide, DB-289, desloratadine, Dexamet, dicycloverine hydrochloride, dimethyl fumarate, docetaxel, dolastatin 10, drospirenone, drospirenone/estradiol, duloxetine hydrochloride; Ecogramostim, edotecarin, efaproxiral sodium, enalapril maleate, epoetin beta, epoprostenol sodium, epratuzumab, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, estradiol, etanercept; Fluconazole, fludarabine phosphate, fluorouracil; Gefitinib, gemcitabine, Ghrelin (human), glibenclamide, glimepiride, GTI-2040; Haloperidol, human insulin, hydrocortisone probutate; Imatinib mesylate, indisulam, influenza vaccine, inhaled insulin, insulin aspart, insulin glulisine, insulin lispro, irinotecan, ispronicline; Lamivudine, lamivudine/zidovudine/abacavir sulfate, lapatinib, letrozole, levocetirizine, lomustine, lonafarnib, lumiracoxib;Magnesium sulfate, MD-1100, melphalan, metformin hydrochloride, methotrexate, metoclopramide hydrochloride, mitiglinide calcium hydrate, monophosphoryl lipid A, montelukast sodium, motexafin gadolinium, mycophenolate mofetil, mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Nitisinone; Omalizumab, omapatrilat, ONYX-015, oxaliplatin; Paclitaxel, paclitaxel nanoparticles, panitumumab, parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, pertuzumab, phosphatidylcholine-rich phospholipid mixture, pimecrolimus, pioglitazone hydrochloride, pramlintide acetate, prasterone; QR-333; Ranelic acid distrontium salt, ranolazine, rasagiline mesilate, RFB4(dsFv)-PE38, ribavirin, rifabutin, risperidone, rituximab, rofecoxib, rosiglitazone maleate, rosiglitazone maleate/metformin hydrochloride, rotavirus vaccine; S-236, salmeterol xinafoate, sarizotan hydrochloride, sildenafil, sildenafil citrate, sunitinib malate; Tadalafil, tegaserod maleate, temozolomide, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, teriparatide, tiotropium bromide, tipifarnib, trabectedin, treprostinil sodium; Vandetanib, vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate, vatalanib succinate, vinflunine, virosome influenza vaccine, voriconazole; Zidovudine. PMID:16636723

Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

2006-03-01

179

Fibromyalgia: a clinical update.  

PubMed

Fibromyalgia is a common chronic syndrome defined by core symptoms of widespread pain, fatigue, and sleep disturbance. Other common symptoms include cognitive difficulty, headache, paresthesia, and morning stiffness. Fibromyalgia is increasingly understood as 1 of several disorders that are referred to as central sensitivity syndromes; these disorders share underlying causes and clinical features. Tender points are often detected in patients with fibromyalgia and were formerly required for diagnosis. Newly proposed criteria, however, rely on patients' reports of widespread pain and other somatic symptoms to establish the diagnosis of fibromyalgia. The management of fibromyalgia requires a multidimensional approach including patient education, cognitive behavioral therapy, exercise, and pharmacologic therapy. The present review provides an update on these various aspects of treating a patient with fibromyalgia. PMID:24005088

Hawkins, Robert A

2013-09-01

180

[Nomegestrol acetate: clinical pharmacology].  

PubMed

Progestogens are used in clinical practice in some conditions. Their effects depend on their chemical structure, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, with important differences among various progestogens. Generally, progestins are classified according to their parent molecule, of which often they keep some features. Derivatives of 19-nor-progesterone are characterized by high selectivity of action on progestin receptor. In particular, nomegestrol acetate (NomAc) shows an important progestational potency, neutral gluco-lipid profile, and antigonadotropic activity. It is used for treating menstrual cycle disorders and for hormone replacement therapy in menopause in association with an estrogen. In future, thanks to its antigonadotropic activity, NomAc will be used in estroprogestin combinations in fertile women, thus taking advantage of its tolerability profile and obtaining numerous non-contraceptive benefits as well. PMID:19749678

Lello, S

2009-10-01

181

Clinical radiation nephropathy  

SciTech Connect

An analysis of the normal tissue effects of irradiation of the kidney is presented. Various clinical syndromes resulting from treatment are described as well as the potential cellular basis for these findings. Effects of concurrent and/or sequential treatment with irradiation and various chemotherapeutic agents are discussed and the impact of these agents on toxicity presented. Adverse consequences of renal treatment in the child is described and possible radiation effects on so-called compensatory hypertrophy following nephrectomy presented. Renal consequences described to date of bone marrow transplantation programs utilizing irradiation are also presented. The necessity of a dose-volume histogram analysis approach to analyzing renal toxic effects in patients followed for long (>10 year) periods is essential in developing accurate guidelines of renal tolerance. 53 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

Cassady, J.R. [Univ. of Arizona Health Sciences Center, Tucson, AZ (United States)] [Univ. of Arizona Health Sciences Center, Tucson, AZ (United States)

1995-03-30

182

Clinical Skills Online  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

New doctors and those studying to practice medicine may need a bit of assistance as they prepare to administer direct care to patients. The Clinical Skills Online website was created to offer some helpful videos for such persons, and was funded by the United Kingdom's Higher Education Academy Subject Centre for Medicine, Dentistry and Veterinary Medicine. The thirteen videos are all available at no cost. They cover topics like History Taking, Thyroid Examination, and Abdominal Examination. The videos contain precise language and are designed to complement existing formal medical training. Needless to say, there is a disclaimer on the website that highlights the terms under which these videos should be used. It's a nice resource for those entering a range of health care professions, and it's worth sharing with others in the field.

2010-01-01

183

Clinical techniques of invertebrates.  

PubMed

This article highlights techniques and equipment needed to successfully restrain, diagnose, and treat gastropods (including snails and slugs) and arthropods (including spiders, scorpions, honey-bees, cockroaches, silkworms, phasmids, centipedes, and millipedes). A review of current clinical techniques for invertebrates kept as pets and those kept for agricultural use is provided. The specific techniques of restraint, assessment of hydration, fluid therapy, diagnostic sampling, imaging, exoskeleton repair, ectoparasite control and removal, euthanasia, and postmortem examination are reviewed for use in the invertebrate patient. The authors intend this article to stimulate further research and reporting on appropriate and humane techniques for use in these species and to increase the ability of the veterinary practitioner to successfully attend to these animals. PMID:16759944

Braun, Matthew E; Heatley, J Jill; Chitty, John

2006-05-01

184

Clinical salt deficits.  

PubMed

Salt retention or salt deficit has a bearing on the body fluid volume. Both states are clinically difficult to recognize and quantitate. Salt deficit is particularly cumbersome in that regard since orthostatic blood pressure, heart rate changes, and simple physical inspection are inaccurate and unreliable. Salt deficit can be acute such as after hemorrhage or massive diarrhea, or more chronic as observed in Addison's disease, failure of renal sodium chloride transporters, drug-related effects, or distal nephron disease. Molecular genetics has given us important new insights into salt deficit syndromes. Recent recognition of a novel sodium storage compartment involving sodium binding to proteoglycans adds to the overall complexity of these syndromes. PMID:25471347

Luft, Friedrich C

2015-03-01

185

Gateways to clinical trials.  

PubMed

Gateways to clinical trials is a guide to the most recent trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity(R), the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: (+)-Dapoxetine hydrochloride, (S)-Tenatoprazole sodium salt monohydrate 19-28z, Acotiamide hydrochloride hydrate, ADV-TK, AE-37, Aflibercept, Albinterferon alfa-2b, Aliskiren fumarate, Asenapine maleate, Axitinib; Bavituximab, Becatecarin, beta-1,3/1,6-Glucan, Bevacizumab, Bremelanotide; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, Casopitant mesylate, Catumaxomab, CDX-110, Cediranib, CMD-193, Cositecan; Darinaparsin, Denosumab, DP-b99, Duloxetine hydrochloride; E75, Ecogramostim, Elacytarabine, EMD-273063, EndoTAG-1, Enzastaurin hydrochloride, Eplerenone, Eribulin mesilate, Esomeprazole magnesium, Etravirine, Everolimus, Ezetimibe; Faropenem daloxate, Febuxostat, Fenretinide; Ghrelin (human); I-131 ch-TNT-1/B, I-131-3F8, Iclaprim, Iguratimod, Iloperidone, Imatinib mesylate, Inalimarev/Falimarev, Indacaterol, Ipilimumab, Iratumumab, Ispinesib mesylate, Ixabepilone; Lapatinib ditosylate, Laquinimod sodium, Larotaxel dehydrate, Linezolid, LOR-2040; Mapatumumab, MKC-1, Motesanib diphosphate, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; NK-012; Olanzapine pamoate, Oncolytic HSV, Ortataxel; Paclitaxel nanoparticles, Paclitaxel poliglumex, Paliperidone palmitate, Panitumumab, Patupilone, PCV-9, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Pertuzumab, Picoplatin, Pimavanserin tartrate, Pimecrolimus, Plerixafor hydrochloride, PM-02734, Poly I:CLC, PR1, Prasugrel, Pregabalin, Progesterone caproate, Prucalopride, Pumosetrag hydrochloride; RAV-12, RB-006, RB-007, Recombinant human erythropoietin alfa, Rimonabant, Romidepsin; SAR-109659, Satraplatin, Sodium butyrate; Tadalafil, Talampanel, Tanespimycin, Tarenflurbil, Tariquidar, Taurine, Tecovirimat, Telatinib, Telavancin hydrochloride, Telcagepant, Terameprocol, Tesofensine, Tetrodotoxin, Tezampanel, Tipifarnib, TPI-287, Tremelimumab; Valspodar, Vatalanib succinate, VCL-CB01, vCP1452, Vorinostat; XL-228; Ziprasidone hydrochloride. PMID:19088949

Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

2008-10-01

186

Clinical trials in children.  

PubMed

The imperative to undertake randomised trials in children arises from extraordinary advances in basic biomedical sciences, needing a matching commitment to translational research if child health is to reap the benefits from this new knowledge. Unfortunately, many prescribed treatments for children have not been adequately tested in children, sometimes resulting in harmful treatments being given and beneficial treatments being withheld. Government, industry, funding agencies, and clinicians are responsible for research priorities being adult-focused because of the greater burden of disease in adults, coupled with financial and marketing considerations. This bias has meant that the equal rights of children to participate in trials has not always been recognised. This is changing, however, as the need for clinical trials in children has been increasingly recognised by the scientific community and broader public, leading to new legislation in some countries making trials of interventions mandatory in children as well as adults before drug approval is given. Trials in children are more challenging than those in adults. The pool of eligible children entering trials is often small because many conditions are uncommon in children, and the threshold for gaining consent is often higher and more complex because parents have to make decisions about trial participation on behalf of their child. Uncertain about what is best, despite supporting the notion of trials in principle, parents and paediatricians generally opt for the new intervention or for standard care rather than trial participation. In this review, we explore issues relating to trial participation for children and suggest some strategies for improving the conduct of clinical trials involving children. PMID:15337409

Caldwell, Patrina H Y; Murphy, Sharon B; Butow, Phyllis N; Craig, Jonathan C

187

An Opportunity to Bridge the Gap Between Clinical Research and Clinical Practice: Implications for Clinical Training  

PubMed Central

Clinical researchers and clinical practitioners share a goal of increasing the integration of research and clinical practice, which is reflected in an evidence-based practice (EBP) approach to psychology. The EBP framework involves the integration of research findings with clinical expertise and client characteristics, values, and preferences, and consequently provides an important foundation for conducting clinically relevant research, as well as empirically based and clinically sensitive practice. Given the critical role that early training can play in the integration of science and practice and in promoting the future of the field, the present article addresses predoctoral training programs as a context for adopting an EBP approach to clinical work. We address training in the three components of EBP and provide suggestions for curriculum development and practicum training that we hope will contribute to bridging the gap between research and practice. PMID:22642520

Hershenberg, Rachel; Drabick, Deborah A. G.; Vivian, Dina

2013-01-01

188

Clinical significance of translocation.  

PubMed Central

The gastrointestinal tract, besides being the organ responsible for nutrient absorption, is also a metabolic and immunological system, functioning as an effective barrier against endotoxin and bacteria in the intestinal lumen. The passage of viable bacteria from the gastrointestinal tract through the epithelial mucosa is called bacterial translocation. Equally important may be the passage of bacterial endotoxin through the mucosal barrier. This article reviews the evidence that translocation of both endotoxin and bacteria is of clinical significance. It summarises recent published works indicating that translocation of endotoxin in minute amounts is a physiological important phenomenon to boost the reticuloendothelial system (RES), especially the Kupffer cells, in the liver. Breakdown of both the mucosal barrier and the RES capacity results in systemic endotoxaemia. Systemic endotoxaemia results in organ dysfunction, impairs the mucosal barrier, the clotting system, the immune system, and depresses Kupffer cell function. If natural defence mechanisms such as lipopolysaccharide binding protein, high density lipoprotein, in combination with the RES, do not respond properly, dysfunction of the gut barrier results in bacterial translocation. Extensive work on bacterial translocation has been performed in animal models and occurs notably in haemorrhagic shock, thermal injury, protein malnutrition, endotoxaemia, trauma, and intestinal obstruction. It is difficult to extrapolate these results to humans and its clinical significance is not clear. The available data show that the resultant infection remains important in the development of sepsis, especially in the critically ill patient. Uncontrolled infection is, however, neither necessary nor sufficient to account for the development of multiple organ failure. A more plausible sequelae is that bacterial translocation is a later phenomenon of multiple organ failure, and not its initiator. It is hypothesized that multiple organ failure is more probably triggered by the combination of tissue damage and systemic endotoxaemia. Endotoxaemia, as seen in trauma patients especially during the first 24 hours, in combination with tissue elicits a systemic inflammation, called Schwartzmann reaction. Interferon gamma, a T cell produced cytokine, is thought to play a pivotal part in the pathogenesis of this reaction. This reaction might occur only if the endotoxin induced cytokines like tumour necrosis factor and interleukin 1, act on target cells prepared by interferon gamma. After exposure to interferon gamma target cells become more sensitive to stimuli like endotoxin, thus boosting the inflammatory cycle. Clearly, following this line of reasoning, minor tissue damage or retroperitoneal haematoma combined with systemic endotoxaemia could elicit this reaction. The clinically observed failure of multiple organ systems might thus be explained by the interaction of tissue necrosis and high concentrations of endotoxin because of translocation. Future therapeutic strategies could therefore focus more on binding endotoxin in the gut before the triggering event, for example before major surgery. Such a strategy could be combined with the start of early enteral feeding, which has been shown in animal studies to have a beneficial effect on intestinal mucosal barrier function and in traumatized patients to reduce the incidence of septic complications. PMID:8125386

Van Leeuwen, P A; Boermeester, M A; Houdijk, A P; Ferwerda, C C; Cuesta, M A; Meyer, S; Wesdorp, R I

1994-01-01

189

Gateways to clinical trials.  

PubMed

Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abiraterone acetate, acyline, adalimumab, adenosine triphosphate, AEE-788, AIDSVAX gp120 B/B, AK-602, alefacept, alemtuzumab, alendronic acid sodium salt, alicaforsen sodium, alprazolam, amdoxovir, AMG-162, aminolevulinic acid hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, aminophylline hydrate, anakinra, anecortave acetate, anti-CTLA-4 MAb, APC-8015, aripiprazole, aspirin, atazanavir sulfate, atomoxetine hydrochloride, atorvastatin calcium, atrasentan, AVE-5883, AZD-2171; Betamethasone dipropionate, bevacizumab, bimatoprost, biphasic human insulin (prb), bortezomib, BR-A-657, BRL-55730, budesonide, busulfan; Calcipotriol, calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, calcium folinate, capecitabine, capravirine, carmustine, caspofungin acetate, cefdinir, certolizumab pegol, CG-53135, chlorambucil, ciclesonide, ciclosporin, cisplatin, clofarabine, clopidogrel hydrogensulfate, clozapine, co-trimoxazole, CP-122721, creatine, CY-2301, cyclophosphamide, cypher, cytarabine, cytolin; D0401, darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin hydrobromide, DASB, desipramine hydrochloride, desloratadine, desvenlafaxine succinate, dexamethasone, didanosine, diquafosol tetrasodium, docetaxel, doxorubicin hydrochloride, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; Ecallantide, efalizumab, efavirenz, eletriptan, emtricitabine, enfuvirtide, enoxaparin sodium, estramustine phosphate sodium, etanercept, ethinylestradiol, etonogestrel, etonogestrel/ethinylestradiol, etoposide, exenatide; Famciclovir, fampridine, febuxostat, filgrastim, fludarabine phosphate, fluocinolone acetonide, fluorouracil, fluticasone propionate, fluvastatin sodium, fondaparinux sodium; Gaboxadol, gamma-hydroxybutyrate sodium, gefitinib, gelclair, gemcitabine, gemfibrozil, glibenclamide, glyminox; Haloperidol, heparin sodium, HPV 16/HPV 18 vaccine, human insulin, human insulin; Icatibant, imatinib mesylate, indium 111 (111In) ibritumomab tiuxetan, infliximab, INKP-100, iodine (I131) tositumomab, IoGen, ipratropium bromide, ixabepilone; L-870810, lamivudine, lapatinib, laquinimod, latanoprost, levonorgestrel, licochalcone a, liposomal doxorubicin, lopinavir, lopinavir/ritonavir, lorazepam, lovastatin; Maraviroc, maribavir, matuzumab, MDL-100907, melphalan, methotrexate, methylprednisolone, mitomycin, mitoxantrone hydrochloride, MK-0431, MN-001, MRKAd5 HIV-1 gag/pol/nef, MRKAd5gag, MVA.HIVA, MVA-BN Nef, MVA-Muc1-IL-2, mycophenolate mofetil; Nelfinavir mesilate, nesiritide, NSC-330507; Olanzapine, olmesartan medoxomil, omalizumab, oral insulin, osanetant; PA-457, paclitaxel, paroxetine, paroxetine hydrochloride, PCK-3145, PEG-filgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, perillyl alcohol, pexelizumab, pimecrolimus, pitavastatin calcium, porfiromycin, prasterone, prasugrel, pravastatin sodium, prednisone, pregabalin, prinomastat, PRO-2000, propofol, prostate cancer vaccine; Rasagiline mesilate, rhBMP-2/ACS, rhBMP-2/BCP, rhC1, ribavirin, rilpivirine, ritonavir, rituximab, Ro-26-9228, rosuvastatin calcium, rosuvastatin sodium, rubitecan; Selodenoson, simvastatin, sirolimus, sitaxsentan sodium, sorafenib, SS(dsFv)-PE38, St. John's Wort extract, stavudine; Tacrolimus, tadalafil, tafenoquine succinate, talaglumetad, tanomastat, taxus, tegaserod maleate, telithromycin, tempol, tenofovir, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, testosterone enanthate, TH-9507, thalidomide, tigecycline, timolol maleate, tiotropium bromide, tipifarnib, torcetrapib, trabectedin, travoprost, travoprost/timolol, treprostinil sodium; Valdecoxib, vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate, varenicline, VEGF-2 gene therapy, venlafaxine hydrochloride, vildagliptin, vincristine sulfate, voriconazole, VRX-496, VX-385; Warfarin sodium; Ximelagatran; Yttrium 9

Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

2005-06-01

190

Find Alzheimer's Disease and Related Clinical Trials  

MedlinePLUS

... National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR Find Alzheimer's Disease and Related Clinical Trials To find clinical trials ... 4380. See all clinical trials currently recruiting Featured Alzheimer's Disease Clinical Trials Alzheimer's Prevention Registry Anti-Amyloid Treatment ...

191

OBJECTIVES OF TRAINING CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY TRAINING  

E-print Network

OBJECTIVES OF TRAINING CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY TRAINING PROGRAM DEPARTMENT OF LABORATORY MEDICINE AND PATHOLOGY FACULTY OF MEDICINE AND DENTISTRY #12;University of Alberta, Clinical Microbiology Training Program 2014 Clinical Microbiology Training Program Objectives: 2014 Property of: Clinical Microbiology

MacMillan, Andrew

192

Other Gastrointestinal Cancers - Featured Clinical Trials  

Cancer.gov

Other Gastrointestinal Cancers - Featured Clinical Trials The following list shows Featured Clinical Trials for a specific type of cancer. You may also want to view: Multiple Cancer Types - Featured Clinical Trials Supportive Care - Featured Clinical

193

American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists  

MedlinePLUS

... Educational Services 2015 Call for Abstracts AACE Annual Meeting Abstracts Clinical Symposia Coding Courses and Webinars Meetings Calendar AACE Annual Meeting Endocrine University Upcoming Meetings ...

194

Clinical Research: A Globalized Network  

PubMed Central

Clinical research has become increasingly globalized, but the extent of globalization has not been assessed. To describe the globalization of clinical research, we used all (n?=?13,208) multinational trials registered at ClinicalTrials.gov to analyzed geographic connections among individual countries. Our findings indicate that 95% (n?=?185) of all countries worldwide have participated in multinational clinical research. Growth in the globalization of clinical research peaked in 2009, suggesting that the global infrastructure that supports clinical research might have reached its maximum capacity. Growth in the globalization of clinical research is attributable to increased involvement of non-traditional markets, particularly in South America and Asia. Nevertheless, Europe is the most highly interconnected geographic region (60.64% of global connections), and collectively, Europe, North America, and Asia comprise more than 85% of all global connections. Therefore, while the expansion of clinical trials into non-traditional markets has increased over the last 20 years and connects countries across the globe, traditional markets still dominate multinational clinical research, which appears to have reached a maximum global capacity. PMID:25517976

Richter, Trevor A.

2014-01-01

195

Clinical diagnosis of gastrocnemius tightness.  

PubMed

The diagnosis of gastrocnemius tightness is primarily clinical using the Silfverskiold test, which shows an equinus deformity at the ankle with the knee extended but that disappears with the knee flexed. The manner in which the Silfverskiold test is performed must be consistent with respect to the applied strength of the maneuver, correction of a flexible hindfoot valgus deformity while performing the test, and reproducibility. Although this is a diagnosis based on the clinical examination, this article presents additional clinical signs that can help to make the diagnosis when the retraction is not clinically evident. These include knee recurvatum, hip flexion, lumbar hyperlordosis, and forefoot overload. PMID:25456715

Barouk, Pierre; Barouk, Louis Samuel

2014-12-01

196

OFFICE OF CLINICAL LEGAL EDUCATION IN-HOUSE CLINICS  

E-print Network

employment, pending job applications, and community work. Having this information will enable us to determine select a Clinic as their first choice will be given preference over students who select that Clinic as their second or lower choice. (For example, if two students have not enrolled before and are both graduating

Raina, Ramesh

197

Clinical trial variability: Quality control in a randomized clinical trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

IntroductionA major issue in clinical trials in manual medicine is treatment variability. The challenge is to insure that the bounded treatment options are both representative of field practitioner behavior and consistent among research clinicians. This investigation assesses the treatment comparability of field practitioners and research clinicians, for a flexion-distraction treatment procedure, as quality control for a randomized clinical trial.

Marion McGregor; Jerrilyn A. Cambron; James Jedlicka; M. Ram Gudavalli

2009-01-01

198

Clinical Issues in Pain Management Clinical Issues in Pain Management  

E-print Network

#12;Clinical Issues in Pain Management: Chronic Pain Chronic Pain Typically begins with an acute of chronic pain Chronic benign pain Recurrent acute pain Chronic progressive pain #12;Clinical Issues in Pain Management: Chronic Pain Chronic benign pain Persists more than 6 months Varies in severity

Meagher, Mary

199

Clinical definition of sarcopenia  

PubMed Central

Summary Sarcopenia is a condition characterized by loss of skeletal muscle mass and function. Although it is primarily a disease of the elderly, its development may be associated with conditions that are not exclusively seen in older persons. Sarcopenia is a syndrome characterized by progressive and generalized loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength and it is strictly correlated with physical disability, poor quality of life and death. Risk factors for sarcopenia include age, gender and level of physical activity. In conditions such as malignancy, rheumatoid arthritis and aging, lean body mass is lost while fat mass may be preserved or even increased. The loss in muscle mass may be associated with increased body fat so that despite normal weight there is marked weakness, this is a condition called sarcopenic obesity. There is an important correlation between inactivity and losses of muscle mass and strength, this suggests that physical activity should be a protective factor for the prevention but also the management of sarcopenia. Furthermore one of the first step to be taken for a person with sarcopenia or clinical frailty is to ensure that the sarcopenic patient is receiving correct and sufficient nutrition. Sarcopenia has a greater effect on survival. It should be important to prevent or postpone as much as possible the onset of this condition, to enhance survival and to reduce the demand for long-term care. Interventions for sarcopenia need to be developed with most attention on exercise and nutritional interventions. PMID:25568649

Santilli, Valter; Bernetti, Andrea; Mangone, Massimiliano; Paoloni, Marco

2014-01-01

200

Clinical management of pruritus.  

PubMed

The care of patients with chronic pruritus as a symptom of a wide variety of underlying diseases continues to confront dermatologists with diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. However, a structured history and a physical examination may already substantially help in narrowing down the number of potential differential diagnoses. Apart form reducing the intensity of pruritus, identification and appropriate treatment of the underlying disease are important needs of patients. If these goals doesn't lead to improvement of itch, current guidelines provide a number of topical and systemic therapies for symptomatic treatment. Various skin lesions (for example, xerosis caused by irritant substances, secondary scratch lesions) prompt patients to consult a dermatologist, but most cases require an interdisciplinary therapeutic approach to identify potential internal medicine, neurologic, or psychosomatic aspects. Although great strides have been made in basic research, specific therapies are still rare, and a precise knowledge of the legal framework for the implementation of guidelines (for example, off-label use) is essential. This CME article gives an overview of the causes of and treatment options for chronic pruritus and discusses both advances in basic research as well as progress in clinical knowledge. PMID:25631127

Ständer, Sonja; Zeidler, Claudia; Magnolo, Nina; Raap, Ulrike; Mettang, Thomas; Kremer, Andreas E; Weisshaar, Elke; Augustin, Matthias

2015-02-01

201

Clinical biochemistry of aluminum  

SciTech Connect

Aluminum toxicity has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of clinical disorders in patients with chronic renal failure on long-term intermittent hemodialysis treatment. The predominant disorders have been those involving either bone (osteomalacic dialysis osteodystrophy) or brain (dialysis encephalopathy). In nonuremic patients, an increased brain aluminum concentration has been implicated as a neurotoxic agent in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and was associated with experimental neurofibrillary degeneration in animals. The brain aluminum concentrations of patients dying with the syndrome of dialysis encephalopathy (dialysis dementia) are significantly higher than in dialyzed patients without the syndrome and in nondialyzed patients. Two potential sources for the increased tissue content of aluminum in patients on hemodialysis have been proposed: (1) intestinal absorption from aluminum containing phosphate-binding gels, and (2) transfer across the dialysis membrane from aluminum in the water used to prepare the dialysate. These findings, coupled with our everyday exposure to the ubiquitous occurrence of aluminum in nature, have created concerns over the potential toxicity of this metal.

King, S.W.; Savory, J.; Wills, M.R.

1981-05-01

202

Advances in clinical cardiology.  

PubMed

Multiple, potentially practice-changing cardiology trials have been presented or published over the past year. In this paper, we summarize and place in clinical context, new data regarding management of acute coronary syndrome and ST-elevation myocardial infarction (copeptin assessment, otamixaban, cangrelor, prasugrel, sodium nitrite, inclacumab, ranolazine, preventive coronary intervention of non-culprit lesions, immediate thrombolytic therapy versus transfer for primary intervention), new coronary intervention data (thrombectomy, radial access, pressure wire fractional flow reserve, antiplatelet therapy duration and gene-guidance, permanent and biodegradable polymers, coronary bifurcation and strategies), and coronary artery bypass data (off pump vs. on pump). Latest trials in trans-aortic valve implantation, heart failure (eplerenone, aliskiren, spironolactone, sildenafil, dopamine, nesiritide, omecamtiv mecarbil, the algisyl left ventricular augmentation device, and echo-guided cardiac resynchronization), atrial fibrillation (edoxaban, dabigatran, and ablation), cardiac arrest (hypothermia, LUCAS™ mechanical chest compression), and cardiovascular prevention (vitamins, renal denervation for resistant hypertension, renal artery stenting, saxagliptin, alogliptin, and gastric banding) are also discussed. PMID:25074280

McNeice, Andrew H; McAleavey, Neil M; Menown, Ian B A

2014-08-01

203

The clinical encounter revisited.  

PubMed

The patient-physician encounter is the pivotal starting point of any healthcare delivery, but it is subject to multiple process breakdowns and prevalent suboptimal performance. An overview of the techniques and components of a successful encounter valid for every setting and readily applicable is presented, stressing 7 rules: (1) ensuring optimal environment, tools, and teamwork; (2) viewing each encounter not only as a cognitive/biomedical challenge, but also as a personal one, and a learning opportunity; (3) adopting an attitude of curiosity, concentration, compassion, and commitment, and maintaining a systematic, orderly approach; (4) "simple is beautiful"-making the most of the basic clinical data and their many unique advantages; (5) minding "the silent dimension"-being attentive to the patient's identity and emotions; (6) following the "Holy Trinity" of gathering all information, consulting databases/colleagues, and tailoring gained knowledge to the individual patient; and (7) using the encounter as a "window of opportunity" to further the patient's health-not just the major problem, by addressing screening and prevention; promoting health literacy and shared decision-making; and establishing proper follow-up. Barriers to implementation identified can be overcome by continuous educational interventions. A high-quality encounter sets a virtuous cycle of patient-provider interaction and results in increasing satisfaction, adherence, and improved health outcomes. PMID:24333201

Schattner, Ami

2014-04-01

204

77 FR 35407 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request: Clinical Mythteries: A Video Game About Clinical Trials  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Request: Clinical Mythteries: A Video Game About Clinical Trials SUMMARY: In compliance...Title: Clinical Mythteries: A Video Game About Clinical Trials. Type of Information...engaging, informational ``serious video game'' for adolescents about clinical...

2012-06-13

205

Clinical Cytogenetics Two-Year Fellowship  

E-print Network

seminar Medical Genetics Grand Rounds P.M. Lab Research & Clinical Training Lab Research & Clinical noon seminar Medical Genetics Grand Rounds P.M. Lab Research & Clinical Training Lab Research Research & Clinical Training Lab Research & Clinical Training Lab Research & Clinical Training Lab Research

Finley Jr., Russell L.

206

Quality improvement in clinical documentation: does clinical governance work?  

PubMed Central

Introduction The quality of nursing documentation is still a challenge in the nursing profession and, thus, in the health care industry. One major quality improvement program is clinical governance, whose mission is to continuously improve the quality of patient care and overcome service quality problems. The aim of this study was to identify whether clinical governance improves the quality of nursing documentation. Methods A quasi-experimental method was used to show nursing documentation quality improvement after a 2-year clinical governance implementation. Two hundred twenty random nursing documents were assessed structurally and by content using a valid and reliable researcher made checklist. Results There were no differences between a nurse’s demographic data before and after 2 years (P>0.05) and the nursing documentation score did not improve after a 2-year clinical governance program. Conclusion Although some efforts were made to improve nursing documentation through clinical governance, these were not sufficient and more attempts are needed. PMID:24324339

Dehghan, Mahlegha; Dehghan, Dorsa; Sheikhrabori, Akbar; Sadeghi, Masoume; Jalalian, Mehrdad

2013-01-01

207

Providing semantic interoperability between clinical care and clinical research domains.  

PubMed

Improving the efficiency with which clinical research studies are conducted can lead to faster medication innovation and decreased time to market for new drugs. To increase this efficiency, the parties involved in a regulated clinical research study, namely, the sponsor, the clinical investigator and the regulatory body, each with their own software applications, need to exchange data seamlessly. However, currently, the clinical research and the clinical care domains are quite disconnected because each use different standards and terminology systems. In this article, we describe an initial implementation of the Semantic Framework developed within the scope of SALUS project to achieve interoperability between the clinical research and the clinical care domains. In our Semantic Framework, the core ontology developed for semantic mediation is based on the shared conceptual model of both of these domains provided by the BRIDG initiative. The core ontology is then aligned with the extracted semantic models of the existing clinical care and research standards as well as with the ontological representations of the terminology systems to create a model of meaning for enabling semantic mediation. Although SALUS is a research and development effort rather than a product, the current SALUS knowledge base contains around 4.7 million triples representing BRIDG DAM, HL7 CDA model, CDISC standards and several terminology ontologies. In order to keep the reasoning process within acceptable limits without sacrificing the quality of mediation, we took an engineering approach by developing a number of heuristic mechanisms. The results indicate that it is possible to build a robust and scalable semantic framework with a solid theoretical foundation for achieving interoperability between the clinical research and clinical care domains. PMID:23008263

Laleci, Gokce Banu; Yuksel, Mustafa; Dogac, Asuman

2013-03-01

208

Clinical trials of homoeopathy.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE--To establish whether there is evidence of the efficacy of homoeopathy from controlled trials in humans. DESIGN--Criteria based meta-analysis. Assessment of the methodological quality of 107 controlled trials in 96 published reports found after an extensive search. Trials were scored using a list of predefined criteria of good methodology, and the outcome of the trials was interpreted in relation to their quality. SETTING--Controlled trials published world wide. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Results of the trials with the best methodological quality. Trials of classical homoeopathy and several modern varieties were considered separately. RESULTS--In 14 trials some form of classical homoeopathy was tested and in 58 trials the same single homoeopathic treatment was given to patients with comparable conventional diagnosis. Combinations of several homoeopathic treatments were tested in 26 trials; isopathy was tested in nine trials. Most trials seemed to be of very low quality, but there were many exceptions. The results showed a positive trend regardless of the quality of the trial or the variety of homeopathy used. Overall, of the 105 trials with interpretable results, 81 trials indicated positive results whereas in 24 trials no positive effects of homoeopathy were found. The results of the review may be complicated by publication bias, especially in such a controversial subject as homoeopathy. CONCLUSIONS--At the moment the evidence of clinical trials is positive but not sufficient to draw definitive conclusions because most trials are of low methodological quality and because of the unknown role of publication bias. This indicates that there is a legitimate case for further evaluation of homoeopathy, but only by means of well performed trials. PMID:1825800

Kleijnen, J; Knipschild, P; ter Riet, G

1991-01-01

209

Clinical aspects of telemedicine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Communication among physicians is an essential in order to combine our experiences for the elucidation and application of new knowledge and for the accurate and uniform application of established medical practice. This communication requires an adequate understanding of the culture of the patient and the social context of disease and indeed the culture of the physician. Malnutrition in Bangladesh means caloric insufficiency, and a program to lower cholesterol would be impertinent, while a program to enhance the nutrition of patients in Texas by an international effort to import more grain would be ludicrous. In the same vein a public health effort to combat alcoholic cirrhosis in Mecca would be as silly as a program to increase fiber in the diet of the Bantu. Clinical communication must acknowledge the culture of the issue at hand and the differences in the experiential base of the physicians. Not only do geography and culture affect the potential differences in the experiential bases, but the world utilizes very different traditions of education and science in training physicians. We are influenced by the diseases we treat, and learn to look for the expected at least as much as we are attentive to the unexpected. A physician in Siberia would be much more likely to recognize frostbite than one from Buenos Aires, and the Argentine doctor would much more likely consider Chaga's Disease to explain abdominal pain than a colleague in Zurich. Beyond these obvious issues in communication among physicians we must deal with the many languages and idioms used in the world. An overview of using Telemedicine SpaceBridge after the earthquake in the Republic of Armenia in 1988 is presented.

Merrell, Ronald C.

1991-01-01

210

Clinical review: Severe asthma  

PubMed Central

Severe asthma, although difficult to define, includes all cases of difficult/therapy-resistant disease of all age groups and bears the largest part of morbidity and mortality from asthma. Acute, severe asthma, status asthmaticus, is the more or less rapid but severe asthmatic exacerbation that may not respond to the usual medical treatment. The narrowing of airways causes ventilation perfusion imbalance, lung hyperinflation, and increased work of breathing that may lead to ventilatory muscle fatigue and life-threatening respiratory failure. Treatment for acute, severe asthma includes the administration of oxygen, ?2-agonists (by continuous or repetitive nebulisation), and systemic corticosteroids. Subcutaneous administration of epinephrine or terbutaline should be considered in patients not responding adequately to continuous nebulisation, in those unable to cooperate, and in intubated patients not responding to inhaled therapy. The exact time to intubate a patient in status asthmaticus is based mainly on clinical judgment, but intubation should not be delayed once it is deemed necessary. Mechanical ventilation in status asthmaticus supports gas-exchange and unloads ventilatory muscles until aggressive medical treatment improves the functional status of the patient. Patients intubated and mechanically ventilated should be appropriately sedated, but paralytic agents should be avoided. Permissive hypercapnia, increase in expiratory time, and promotion of patient-ventilator synchronism are the mainstay in mechanical ventilation of status asthmaticus. Close monitoring of the patient's condition is necessary to obviate complications and to identify the appropriate time for weaning. Finally, after successful treatment and prior to discharge, a careful strategy for prevention of subsequent asthma attacks is imperative. PMID:11940264

Papiris, Spyros; Kotanidou, Anastasia; Malagari, Katerina; Roussos, Charis

2002-01-01

211

Programmatic Essential Functions Clinical Trials  

E-print Network

professional ethical demeanor o Develop and display professional ethics in clinical research investigations. o1 7-13 Programmatic Essential Functions Clinical Trials Programmatic Standards Observational to be successful in that particular allied health professional role. The following standards pertain to particular

Cheng, Mei-Fang

212

Role Modeling for Clinical Educators.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To become better role models, higher educators in institutions of clinical education should be conscious of the behaviors they demonstrate and the broad range of activities and attitudes that students observe and emulate, including clinical competence, professional demeanor, doctor-patient interactions, ethical values, and social consciousness.…

Ettinger, Ellen Richter

1991-01-01

213

The Myth of Clinical Judgement.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Professions that provide services to people with disabilities typically do so from a clinical perspective. Yet in areas such as education and residential policy, clinical judgment is limited by the influences of nonclinical forces, such as economics, bureaucratic exigency, politics, service traditions, and societal prejudice. (Author/BJV)

Biklen, Douglas

1988-01-01

214

Developmental thermography [4]: clinical evaluation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the data examples for clinical application of the authors' original thermographic techniques named developmental thermography (DT); (1) triple aspect thermography (TAT), (2) multiple aspect thermography (MAT) and (3) panoramic thermography (PT). Appropriate examples for the advantageous application for each technique of DT are selected and the specific advantages are discussed. The greatest advantage in the clinical application

Akinori Nagasawa; Kazuichi Katoh

1993-01-01

215

The clinical use of hypnosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reviews recent experimental evidence on the hypnotic treatment of obesity, cigarette smoking, alcoholism, clinical pain, warts, and asthma. It is concluded that although hypnosis may be effective with addictive behavior, the therapeutic success is attributable to nonhypnotic factors. In contrast, hypnosis appears to be of unique value in the treatment of clinical pain, warts, and asthma. Differential effectiveness may be

Thomas A. Wadden; Charles H. Anderton

1982-01-01

216

Abortion clinic violence as terrorism  

Microsoft Academic Search

Violence against abortion clinics and other activities directed toward patients and staff of abortion facilities have been termed terrorism by the pro?choice movement. However, the Federal Bureau of Investigation denies that these actions are terrorism. Instances of abortion clinic violence for 1982–1987 were examined in order to determine whether there is a correspondence between these incidents and definitions or models

Michele Wilson; John Lynxwiler

1988-01-01

217

INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL RESEARCH TRAINING  

E-print Network

and rewarding research career. David H. Roberts, MD Dean for External Education Harvard Medical School 2 | Ha from Harvard Medical School · Have forged new collaborations with peers · Be equipped with the skillsINTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL RESEARCH TRAINING The Harvard Medical School Introduction to Clinical

Corey, David P.

218

The clinical decision support consortium.  

PubMed

Clinical decision support (CDS) can impact the outcomes of care when used at the point of care in electronic medical records (EMR). CDS has been shown to increase quality and patient safety, improve adherence to guidelines for prevention and treatment, and avoid medication errors. Systematic reviews have shown that CDS can be useful across a variety of clinical purposes and topics. Despite broad national policy objectives to increase EMR adoption in the US, current adoption of advanced clinical decision support is limited due to a variety of reasons, including: limited implementation of EMR, CPOE, PHR, etc., difficulty developing clinical practice guidelines ready for implementation in EMR, lack of standards, absence of a central repository or knowledge resource, poor support for CDS in commercial EMRs, challenges in integrating CDS into the clinical workflow, and limited understanding of organizational and cultural issues relating to clinical decision support. To better understand and overcome these barriers, and accelerate the translation of clinical practice guideline knowledge into CDS in EMRs, the CDS Consortium is established to assess, define, demonstrate, and evaluate best practices for knowledge management and clinical decision support in healthcare information technology at scale - across multiple ambulatory care settings and EHR technology platforms. PMID:19745260

Middleton, Blackford

2009-01-01

219

The Clinical Decision Support Consortium  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract.Clinical decision support (CDS) can impact the outcomes of care when used at the point of care in el ectronic medical re cords (EMR). CDS has been shown to increase quality and patientsafety, improve adherence to guidelines for prevention and treatment, and avoid medication errors. S ystematic reviews have shown,that CDS can be useful across a va riety of clinical

Blackford Middleton

2009-01-01

220

Northeast Association for Clinical Microbiology  

E-print Network

Northeast Association for Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Disease 28th Annual Meeting May 21 School Boston, MA Katharine Bossart, PhD Lawrence Madoff, MD Assistant Professor of Microbiology Director, Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Medical Director, Clinical Microbiology and Molecular Molecular

Mekalanos, John

221

Mental Health Clinic Intake Assessment  

E-print Network

Mental Health Clinic Intake Assessment Welcome to the Mental Health Clinic at Boynton Health or ADHD evaluation for review prior to scheduling your first medication appointment in the Mental Health). Contact the Medical Social Worker for resources­ 612-624-8182. · Long Term Therapy: The Mental Health

Weiblen, George D

222

Mindfulness Meditation in Clinical Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The practice of mindfulness is increasingly being integrated into contemporary clinical psychology. Based in Buddhist philosophy and subsequently integrated into Western health care in the contexts of psychotherapy and stress management, mindfulness meditation is evolving as a systematic clinical intervention. This article describes…

Salmon, Paul; Sephton, Sandra; Weissbecker, Inka; Hoover, Katherine; Ulmer, Christi; Studts, Jamie L.

2004-01-01

223

Clinical trials of Herceptin® (trastuzumab)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report summarises the clinical efficacy and safety findings from clinical trials of the new anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody Herceptin® (trastuzumab). Data from pivotal trials indicate that trastuzumab is active when added to chemotherapy in patients with advanced metastatic breast cancer. In particular, the combination significantly prolonged the median time to disease progression, increased the overall response rate, increased the duration

J. Baselga

2001-01-01

224

Clinical Disorders of Phosphorus Metabolism  

PubMed Central

Deranged phosphorus metabolism is commonly encountered in clinical medicine. Disturbances in phosphate intake, excretion and transcellular shift account for the abnormal serum levels. As a result of the essential role played by phosphate in intracellular metabolism, the clinical manifestations of hypophosphatemia and hyperphosphatemia are extensive. An understanding of the pathophysiology of various phosphate disorders is helpful in guiding therapeutic decisions. Images PMID:3321712

Yu, George C.; Lee, David B. N.

1987-01-01

225

NIH Clinical Center Organizational Chart  

E-print Network

NIH Clinical Center Organizational Chart May 2014 DIRECTOR John I. Gallin, MD Chief Operating Officer Deputy Director for Educational Chief, Laboratory for Informatics Chief, Radiology and Imaging Chief Nurse Officer Chief Financial Officer Chief, Department of Bioethics Deputy Director for Clinical

226

Computerized Clinical Electroencephalography in Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent developments in the field of computerized clinical electroencephalography (EEG) are surveyed, with particular reference to techniques of analysis of background (stationary) EEG activity, transient (nonstationary) activity, and to integrated systems for multichannel clinical EEG's. A variety of approaches have been used for the basic EEG analyses. For background activity, the fast Fourier transform (FFT) and autoregressive approaches have predominated.

John S. Barlow

1979-01-01

227

Clinical Trials in Vision Research  

E-print Network

research have led to new medications, surgeries, and methods for disease detection. #12;Contents Clinical at NEI 22 #12;Clinical trials in vision research have led to new medications, surgeries, and methods in vision research have led to new medications, surgeries, and methods for disease detection that have saved

Bandettini, Peter A.

228

Nanotechnology in clinical laboratory diagnostics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nanotechnology–the creation and utilization of materials, devices, and systems through the control of matter on the nanometer–has been applied to molecular diagnostics. This article reviews nanobiotechnologies that are clinically relevant and have the potential to be incorporated in clinical laboratory diagnosis. Nanotechnologies enable the diagnosis at single cell and molecule level and some of these can be incorporated in the

Kewal K. Jain

2005-01-01

229

A Workshop in Clinical Teaching  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A one-day workshop for medical faculty (but also adapted for nursing and allied health instructors) has been designed that incorporates both attitudinal and cognitive objectives, including learning the characteristics of effective clinical teaching, evaluating an observed clinical teaching situation, and applying the characteristics of effective…

Stritter, Frank T.; Hain, Jack H.

1977-01-01

230

Clinical intervention research in nursing.  

PubMed

As a healthcare profession nursing has a duty to develop practices that contribute to the health and well being of patients. The aim of this paper is to discuss current issues in clinical research within nursing. The paper defines clinical interventions research as a theoretically based, integrated and sequential approach to clinical knowledge generation. The paper provides specific criteria for defining a clinical intervention together with an overview of the stages involved in clinical research from problem identification to implementing knowledge in practice. The paper also explored the extent to which nursing research was focussed on clinical issues, through a snapshot review of all the original research papers in Europe's three leading nursing research journals. In total of 517 different papers were included and classified in the review. Of these 88% (n=455) were classified as non-clinical intervention and 12% (n=62) as clinical intervention studies. The paper examined the intervention studies in detail examining: the underpinning theory; linkage to previous (pre-clinical) work; evidence of granularity; protocol clarity (generalisable and parsimonious); the phase of knowledge development; and evidence of safety (adverse event reporting). The paper discusses some of the shortcomings of interventions research in nursing and suggests a number of ideas to help address these problems, including: a consensus statement on interventions research in nursing; a register of nursing intervention studies; the need for nursing to develop clinical research areas in which to develop potential interventions (nursing laboratories); and a call for nursing researchers to publish more research in nursing specific journals. PMID:18930228

Forbes, Angus

2009-04-01

231

Clinical pharmacokinetics of metformin.  

PubMed

The biguanide metformin (dimethylbiguanide) is an oral antihyperglycaemic agent widely used in the management of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Considerable renewal of interest in this drug has been observed in recent years. Metformin can be determined in biological fluids by various methods, mainly using high performance liquid chromatography, which allows pharmacokinetic studies in healthy volunteers and diabetic patients. Metformin disposition is apparently unaffected by the presence of diabetes and only slightly affected by the use of different oral formulations. Metformin has an absolute oral bioavailability of 40 to 60%, and gastrointestinal absorption is apparently complete within 6 hours of ingestion. An inverse relationship was observed between the dose ingested and the relative absorption with therapeutic doses ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 g, suggesting the involvement of an active, saturable absorption process. Metformin is rapidly distributed following absorption and does not bind to plasma proteins. No metabolites or conjugates of metformin have been identified. The absence of liver metabolism clearly differentiates the pharmacokinetics of metformin from that of other biguanides, such as phenformin. Metformin undergoes renal excretion and has a mean plasma elimination half-life after oral administration of between 4.0 and 8.7 hours. This elimination is prolonged in patients with renal impairment and correlates with creatinine clearance. There are only scarce data on the relationship between plasma metformin concentrations and metabolic effects. Therapeutic levels may be 0.5 to 1.0 mg/L in the fasting state and 1 to 2 mg/L after a meal, but monitoring has little clinical value except when lactic acidosis is suspected or present. Indeed, when lactic acidosis occurs in metformin-treated patients, early determination of the metformin plasma concentration appears to be the best criterion for assessing the involvement of the drug in this acute condition. After confirmation of the diagnosis, treatment should rapidly involve forced diuresis or haemodialysis, both of which favour rapid elimination of the drug. Although serious, lactic acidosis due to metformin is rare and may be minimised by strict adherence to prescribing guidelines and contraindications, particularly the presence of renal failure. Finally, only very few drug interactions have been described with metformin in healthy volunteers. Plasma levels may be reduced by guar gum and alpha-glucosidase inhibitors and increased by cimetidine, but no data are yet available in the diabetic population. PMID:8743335

Scheen, A J

1996-05-01

232

Reconceptualising clinical pathway system design.  

PubMed

Increased patient throughput and patient acuity resulting from the introduction of prospective funding mechanisms, such as Case Mix (based on the Diagnosis Related Groups) for in-patient acute care, raised serious concerns about compromising quality of care delivered to patients. The paper clinical pathway has been introduced as a tool to streamline documentation, implement standardised clinical management protocols and improve quality of care provided to patients. However, the checklist format and its lack of connection to clinical data reflecting changes in patient status have imposed severe limitations on the ability of clinical pathway to be used as an effective information management and decision support tool. This is the first of two papers reporting on a research effort that was undertaken to identify, validate and address the limitations of paper clinical pathways. A set of functional specifications and a functional model were developed following the initial exploratory study. The work led to a set of reconceptualised system (CCPMS) design guidelines for the development of a robust computerised clinical pathway management system that could provide dynamic information management and decision support to clinicians in response to changing patient clinical status. The second paper will report on the features and benefits demonstrated by the CCPMS prototype. Implications to nursing brought about by the introduction of such a tool will also be explored. PMID:15484629

Chu, S

2001-01-01

233

Social media in clinical trials.  

PubMed

Social media has potential in clinical trials for pointing out trial issues, addressing barriers, educating, and engaging multiple groups involved in cancer clinical research. Social media is being used in clinical trials to highlight issues such as poor accrual and barriers; educate potential participants and physicians about clinical trial options; and is a potential indirect or direct method to improve accrual. We are moving from a passive "push" of information to patients to a "pull" of patients requesting information. Patients and advocates are often driving an otherwise reluctant health care system into communication. Online patient communities are creating new information repositories. Potential clinical trial participants are using the Twittersphere and other sources to learn about potential clinical trial options. We are seeing more organized patient-centric and patient-engaged forums with the potential to crowd source to improve clinical trial accrual and design. This is an evolving process that will meet many individual, institutional, and regulatory obstacles as we move forward in a changed research landscape. PMID:24857086

Thompson, Michael A

2014-01-01

234

NIH Clinical Center Clinical Center Skype Request Form  

E-print Network

using Skype to communicate sensitive information (e.g., patient data, research data, security of the Clinical Center where images and/or private verbal conversations by CC staff, patients, or patient families

235

Children and Clinical Studies: Why Clinical Studies Are Important  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... several ways: it uncovers the best dose of medicines to prevent harmful effects or under-treatment; it ... clinical research in children help us understand how medicines affect children's brains and bodies as they grow ...

236

Binge eating disorder: from clinical research to clinical practice.  

PubMed

This case report describes the clinical course of a young woman suffering from binge eating disorder (BED) associated with obesity. It illustrates the efficacy of different medications in the treatment of BED and related conditions and is followed by the comments and clinical observations of 2 practicing psychiatrists. The issues described in this paper have important clinical implications and are topical, given that BED is now recognized as a specific disorder in the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition classification system, but neither the US Food and Drug Administration nor any other regulatory agency has yet approved a drug for treatment of this disease, despite its very prevalent and disabling nature. Growing evidence from the fields of psychopathology and neurobiology, including preclinical and clinical studies, converges to support the idea that "overeating" has much in common with other behavioral addictions, and substance abuse treatment agents may show promise for the treatment of BED. PMID:25629882

Goracci, Arianna; Casamassima, Francesco; Iovieno, Nadia; di Volo, Silvia; Benbow, Jim; Bolognesi, Simone; Fagiolini, Andrea

2015-01-01

237

Endpoints in cancer clinical trials.  

PubMed

Endpoints are measurable clinical and biological findings that are used for the development and assessment of treatment options. In the treatment of cancer, endpoints can be classified into two categories: "patient-centered clinical endpoints" including overall survival (OS) and health-related quality of life (QoL), and "tumor-centered clinical endpoints" such as progression-free survival. Surrogate endpoints are tumor-centered clinical endpoints that can be used as substitutes for patient-centered clinical endpoints, particularly OS. The choice of endpoints in oncology trials is a major problem. The published Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) best-practice guidelines encourage the reporting of clearly defined primary and secondary outcome measures. OS is the gold standard of endpoints but as increasing numbers of effective salvage treatments become available for many types of cancer, much larger numbers of patients are included; this requires a longer follow-up period and increases the cost of clinical trials. Thus, tumor-centered clinical endpoints that can be assessed earlier and used as surrogates for overall survival are increasingly studied, but most of them currently lack standardized definitions to enable cross comparison of results among different clinical trials and they have not been validated as surrogate endpoints. In addition, the variability of their definition can strongly impact the trial's conclusions by affecting both statistical power and estimation. In this context, QoL constitutes an available and useful surrogate endpoint for trials to ensure treatment benefit from both the patient and public health points of view. Methodological research should be pursued to develop standard outcome definitions for use in cancer clinical trials and to define a standardized longitudinal analysis of QoL data. PMID:24440056

Fiteni, F; Westeel, V; Pivot, X; Borg, C; Vernerey, D; Bonnetain, F

2014-02-01

238

Clinical Impact Associated with Corrected Results in Clinical Microbiology Testing  

Microsoft Academic Search

We developed a strategy to determine the clinical impact associated with errors in clinical microbiology testing. Over a 9-month period, we used a sequential three-stage method to prospectively evaluate 480 consecutive corrected microbiology laboratory reports. The three stages were physician review of the corrected report, medical record review, and interview with the clinician(s) taking care of the patient. Of the

Shan Yuan; Michael L. Astion; Jeff Schapiro; Ajit P. Limaye

2005-01-01

239

Clinical Application of Ocular Imaging  

PubMed Central

The broadening frontier of technology used in ocular imaging is continuously affecting the landscape of clinical eye care. With each wave of enhanced imaging modalities, the field faces the difficulties of optimally incorporating these devices into the clinic. Ocular imaging devices have been widely incorporated into clinical management after their diagnostic capabilities have been documented in a wide range of ocular disease. In this review we are presenting the main commercially available devices for imaging of the posterior segment of the eye. PMID:22488266

Nadler, Zach; Wollstein, Gadi; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Schuman, Joel S.

2012-01-01

240

Critical appraisal of clinical guidelines.  

PubMed

Utilization of clinical guidelines is gaining in popularity due to their significant impact on clinical practice. While a plethora of guidelines exist, many are lacking in quality, based on current critical appraisal standards. It then becomes necessary for the end users of the guidelines to adopt or develop those that are deemed adequate for implementation. This often requires that users possess critical appraisal skills as they become proficient in discerning between guidelines of varying quality. This article provides direction and tools to support the critical appraisal process in the adoption of clinical guidelines. PMID:20838314

Netsch, Debra S; Kluesner, Jean A

2010-01-01

241

?-Thalassemia Intermedia: A Clinical Perspective  

PubMed Central

Our understanding of the molecular and pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the disease process in patients with ?-thalassemia intermedia has substantially increased over the past decade. Earlier studies observed that patients with ?-thalassemia intermedia experience a clinical-complications profile that is different from that in patients with ?-thalassemia major. In this article, a variety of clinical morbidities are explored, and their associations with the underlying disease pathophysiology and risk factors are examined. These involve several organs and organ systems including the vasculature, heart, liver, endocrine glands, bone, and the extramedullary hematopoietic system. The effects of some therapeutic interventions on the development of clinical complications are also discussed. PMID:22762026

Musallam, Khaled M.; Taher, Ali T.; Rachmilewitz, Eliezer A.

2012-01-01

242

Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium  

Cancer.gov

The Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) is a comprehensive and coordinated effort to accelerate the understanding of the molecular basis of cancer through the application of robust, quantitative, proteomic technologies and workflows.

243

Breast Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials  

Cancer.gov

Programs and Projects Breast Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials Ongoing Phase I/II Prevention Trials Funded and Monitored by the Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group (BGCRG) Principal Investigator Funding Mechanism Title of Award

244

American Association for Clinical Chemistry  

MedlinePLUS

... Image credit: martynowi_cz/Thinkstock) Read more Making miRNA Analysis More Accessible Researchers have developed a method ... used immunoassay analyzers and aid efforts to implement miRNA biomarkers in the clinic. (Image credit: net_efekt/ ...

245

Clinical supervision and practice nurses.  

PubMed

practice nurses need clinical supervision to help them keep abreast of their expanding primary care role. Ali Farquharson, Gail Trotter and Sheila Nimmo report on a project that set out to provide a support model. PMID:9731148

Farquharson, A; Trotter, G; Nimmo, S

246

Clinical Trials Monitoring Branch (CTMB)  

Cancer.gov

Skip to Content Home | Investigator Resources | Protocol Development | Initiatives/Programs/Collaborations | Links to More Resources | Funding Opportunities | About CTEP Home | Sitemap | Contact CTEP Search this site Clinical Trials Monitoring Branch

247

Are Clinical Studies for You?  

MedlinePLUS

If you are thinking about participating in a Clinical Study at NIH, the information on this page may provide a starting point for ... medical care and activities of daily living. In thinking about the risks of research, it is helpful ...

248

Recent developments in clinical photography.  

PubMed

A system comprising a clinical camera, specialized retractors, and a new occlusal mirror are described to maximize the quality of both intra-oral and extra-oral photography in the multi-user situation. PMID:10592153

Sandler, J; Murray, A

1999-12-01

249

What Makes Clinical Research Ethical?  

E-print Network

Baltimore #12;Clianical Research: Goals EmanuelEJ. JAMA2000;283:2701-2711. · The overarching objective Protection of Subject Welfare/Rights #12;Clinical Research: 7 Ethical Requirements(EmanuelEJ.JAMA2000

Weber, David J.

250

Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network  

MedlinePLUS

... Colitis (EC) Eosinophilic Gastrointestinal Disorders (EGIDs) [ go to web site ] [+] CReATe: Clinical Research in ALS and Related Disorders for Therapeutic Development Consortium Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) Frontotemporal dementia (ALS- ...

251

Paget's disease: a clinical review.  

PubMed

Paget's disease was first described more than 150 years ago, but the exact cause is still unknown--genes and the environment are both important. This article explores the basic science and clinical aspects of this intriguing condition. PMID:25585180

Shah, Mukul; Shahid, Farhan; Chakravarty, Kuntal

2015-01-01

252

HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials  

MedlinePLUS

... Therapeutic Vaccines Clinical Trial News Tuesday, February 24, 2015 CDC Statement on IPERGAY Trial of Pre-Exposure ... Who Have Sex with Men Wednesday, February 18, 2015 NIH-Sponsored HIV Vaccine Trial Launches in South ...

253

Uterine Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials  

Cancer.gov

Programs and Projects Uterine Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials Ongoing Phase I/II Prevention Trials Funded and Monitored by the Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group (BGCRG) Principal Investigator Funding Mechanism Title of Award

254

Clinical Data Interchange Standards - CDISC  

Cancer.gov

Other Vendors Biotech Regulatory Patients CROs CDISC Proprietary May 2002 6 Benefits of Standardization in our Industry z Reduce time and cost associated with clinical trials for drug development z Facilitate business processes among biopharmaceutical companies, CROs, EDC vendors, clinical laboratories z Facilitate reviews of regulatory submissions z Increase familiarity with common data elements, reducing training requirements z Improve data quality CDISC Proprietary May 2002 7 What is CDISC, and what is the history?

255

Who sponsors imaging clinical trials?  

Cancer.gov

American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN)ACRIN is an international cooperative group sponsored by NCI's Cancer Imaging Program (CIP) as well as philanthropies. Through clinical trials of diagnostic imaging and image-guided therapeutic technologies, ACRIN's goal is to generate information that will lengthen and improve the quality of the lives of cancer patients. ACRIN's clinical trials address both existing and emerging technologies as they apply to cancer screening, diagnosis, staging, imaging as a biomarker, and image-guided treatment.

256

Cleveland Clinic Next Generation Neuroimaging  

SciTech Connect

This was an award to purchase equipment for state-of-the-art MRI radiofrequency coils. There was no personnel effort or construction as a part of this project. This report details the final status of the approved budget items for this project. All approved budget items were successfully delivered and installed. The equipment provided to Cleveland Clinic under this project will allow Cleveland Clinic researchers to build imaging equipment with improved capability to investigate brain disorders.

Lowe, Mark

2009-09-30

257

Clinical scoring system for hypothyroidism  

Microsoft Academic Search

A clinical scoring system for hypothyroidism was evaluated against an established “gold standard” (low serum thyroxine and\\u000a elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone) in 52 adults in a peripheral hospital and in 53 adults in a endocrinology referral clinic.\\u000a Using a score of 0 as a cutoff point, the scoring system selected patients with hypothyroidism from the referral center for\\u000a further biochemical evaluation;

M. S. Seshadri; Benjamin U. Samuel; A. S. Kanagasabapathy; A. M. Cherian

1989-01-01

258

Quality Assurance for Clinical Trials  

PubMed Central

Cooperative groups, of which the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group is one example, conduct national clinical trials that often involve the use of radiation therapy. In preparation for such a trial, the cooperative group prepares a protocol to define the goals of the trial, the rationale for its design, and the details of the treatment procedure to be followed. The Radiological Physics Center (RPC) is one of several quality assurance (QA) offices that is charged with assuring that participating institutions deliver doses that are clinically consistent and comparable. The RPC does this by conducting a variety of independent audits and credentialing processes. The RPC has compiled data showing that credentialing can help institutions comply with the requirements of a cooperative group clinical protocol. Phantom irradiations have been demonstrated to exercise an institution’s procedures for planning and delivering advanced external beam techniques (1–3). Similarly, RPC data indicate that a rapid review of patient treatment records or planning procedures can improve compliance with clinical trials (4). The experiences of the RPC are presented as examples of the contributions that a national clinical trials QA center can make to cooperative group trials. These experiences illustrate the critical need for comprehensive QA to assure that clinical trials are successful and cost-effective. The RPC is supported by grants CA 10953 and CA 81647 from the National Cancer Institute, NIH, DHHS. PMID:24392352

Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Haworth, Annette; Followill, David S.

2013-01-01

259

Toward improved implementation of evidence-based clinical algorithms: clinical practice guidelines, clinical decision rules, and clinical pathways.  

PubMed

This is a summary of the consensus-building workshop entitled "Guideline Implementation and Clinical Pathways," convened May 15, 2007, at the Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference, "Knowledge Translation in Emergency Medicine: Establishing a Research Agenda and Guide Map for Evidence Uptake." A new term, "evidence-based clinical algorithms" is suggested to encompass evidence-based information codified into clinical pathways, clinical practice guidelines, and clinical decision rules. Examples of poor knowledge translation (KT) relevant to the specialty of emergency medicine are identified, followed by brief descriptions of important research and concepts that inform the research recommendations. Four broad themes for research to improve the KT of evidence-based clinical algorithms are suggested: organizational factors, cognitive factors, social factors, and motivational factors. In all cases, research regarding optimizing KT for the subthemes identified by Glasziou and Haynes, "getting the evidence straight," and "getting the evidence used," are interwoven into the thematic research recommendations. Consensus was reached that the majority of research efforts to evaluate means to improve KT need to be centered on the factors that show promise to enhance "getting the evidence used," focused especially on organizational factors. PMID:17967964

Gaddis, Gary M; Greenwald, Peter; Huckson, Sue

2007-11-01

260

Clinical engagement: improving healthcare together.  

PubMed

Clinical engagement can achieve lasting change in the delivery of healthcare. In October 2011, Healthcare Improvement Scotland formulated a clinical engagement strategy to ensure that a progressive and sustainable approach to engaging healthcare professionals is firmly embedded in its health improvement and public assurance activities. The strategy was developed using a 90-day process, combining an evidence base of best practice and feedback from semi-structured interviews and focus groups. The strategy aims to create a culture where clinicians view working with Healthcare Improvement Scotland as a worthwhile venture, which offers a number of positive benefits such as training, career development and research opportunities. The strategy works towards developing a respectful partnership between Healthcare Improvement Scotland, the clinical community and key stakeholders whereby clinicians' contributions are recognised in a non-financial reward system. To do this, the organisation needs a sustainable infrastructure and an efficient, cost-effective approach to clinical engagement. There are a number of obstacles to achieving successful clinical engagement and these must be addressed as key drivers in its implementation. The implementation of the strategy is supported by an action and resource plan, and its impact will be monitored by a measurement plan to ensure the organisation reviews its approaches towards clinical engagement. PMID:24434856

Riches, E; Robson, B

2014-02-01

261

Cancer Clinical Investigator Team Leadership Award (CCITLA)  

Cancer.gov

NCI’s Cancer Clinical Investigator Team Leadership Awards (CCITLAs) recognize mid-career clinical investigators at NCI-designated Cancer Centers working to improve the lives of people with cancer through clinical trials.

262

Where do imaging clinical trials take place?  

Cancer.gov

Imaging clinical trials take place in doctor's offices, cancer centers, other medical centers, community hospitals and clinics, and veterans' and military hospitals in cities and towns across the United States and in other countries. Imaging clinical

263

76 FR 45577 - Clinical Investigator Training Course  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...manufacturing information) that supports initial clinical trials in humans. Presentations will also discuss the role of clinical pharmacology in early clinical studies and how this information is used in the design of subsequent studies. On November 8, 2011,...

2011-07-29

264

75 FR 57472 - Clinical Investigator Training Course  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...manufacturing information) that supports initial clinical trials in humans. Presentations will also discuss the role of clinical pharmacology in early clinical studies and how this information is used in the design of subsequent studies. On November 9, 2010,...

2010-09-21

265

The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCE&M) online, featuring original works in clinical practice and applied clinical research, begins January 1997 (Vol 82), abstracts from February 1975 (Vol 40), and tables of contents from September 1965.

266

42 CFR 70.9 - Vaccination clinics.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Vaccination clinics. 70.9 Section 70.9 Public Health...INTERSTATE QUARANTINE § 70.9 Vaccination clinics. (a) The Director may establish vaccination clinics, through contract or otherwise,...

2013-10-01

267

42 CFR 70.9 - Vaccination clinics.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Vaccination clinics. 70.9 Section 70.9 Public Health...INTERSTATE QUARANTINE § 70.9 Vaccination clinics. (a) The Director may establish vaccination clinics, through contract or otherwise,...

2012-10-01

268

42 CFR 70.9 - Vaccination clinics.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vaccination clinics. 70.9 Section 70.9 Public Health...INTERSTATE QUARANTINE § 70.9 Vaccination clinics. (a) The Director may establish vaccination clinics, through contract or otherwise,...

2010-10-01

269

42 CFR 70.9 - Vaccination clinics.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Vaccination clinics. 70.9 Section 70.9 Public Health...INTERSTATE QUARANTINE § 70.9 Vaccination clinics. (a) The Director may establish vaccination clinics, through contract or otherwise,...

2014-10-01

270

42 CFR 70.9 - Vaccination clinics.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Vaccination clinics. 70.9 Section 70.9 Public Health...INTERSTATE QUARANTINE § 70.9 Vaccination clinics. (a) The Director may establish vaccination clinics, through contract or otherwise,...

2011-10-01

271

CLINICAL AND TRANSLATIONAL SCIENCE INSTITUTE CLINICAL RESEARCH AND INFORMATICS: TRANSLATION INTO QUALITY  

E-print Network

CLINICAL AND TRANSLATIONAL SCIENCE INSTITUTE CLINICAL RESEARCH AND INFORMATICS: TRANSLATION the Clinical Research and Informatics: Translation into Quality (CRITiQ) pilot project program INTO QUALITY PILOT PROJECT PROGRAM Program Goals The Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) has

Sibille, Etienne

272

An evaluation model for clinical information systems: clinical imaging systems.  

PubMed

1. INTRODUCTION. Electronic patient records and other complex clinical information systems are difficult to evaluate. Integrated clinical imaging systems are a case in point. This paper suggests five criteria for a comprehensive evaluation of a complex clinical computer information system: 1) focus on a variety of technical, economic, and organizational concerns; 2) use multiple methods; 3) be longitudinal; 4) be formative as well as summative; and 5) be modifiable. 2. A MODEL COMPREHENSIVE EVALUATION PLAN. A model evaluation plan based on these criteria was developed for evaluating a clinical imaging system, but it provides a useful approach for a comprehensive evaluation of other complex clinical information systems. This plan consisted of three major phases. Phase 1 was to identify evaluation research questions and issues through literature synthesis and ethnographic interviews and observations. Evaluators interviewed key system users, potential users, developers, and other stakeholders. Also, evaluators observed the system being used. Phase 2 was to document system use through critical incident reporting and also by generating user profiles or by survey questionnaires. Phase 3 was to evaluate the system in context, so as to study it in different units and departments, in different wards and clinics, and at meetings, conferences, and rounds, etc. The proposed plan meets the above criteria. The plan employs multiple methods, intended to address a variety of evaluation questions and issues. It allows for longitudinal evaluation because phases should be repeated at periodic intervals so as to capture data at different times. The plan provides feedback for formative evaluation because each phase of the plan results in a product or output for individuals to use when making decisions concerning the system. These outputs can also serve as input to other phases and to a periodic refinement and validation of the evaluation plan. These modifications would also help ensure that the evaluation captures both anticipated and unanticipated concerns. In addition, the phases need not be performed sequentially. The order may be rearranged and some phases can be conducted concurrently. 3. AN EXAMPLE. A preliminary evaluation was conducted at the 700-bed Washington D.C. medical center run by the United States Department of Veterans Affairs [1, 2]. The evaluation used interviews and observations to document benefits of the imaging system--particularly clinical benefits--as identified by clinicians who used it. The clinical staff identified benefits they believed occurred in all the areas of an academic medical center: patient care, education, research, and administration. These benefits can be translated into cost savings, productivity improvements, and managerial and organizational benefits. PMID:8591374

Kaplan, B

1995-01-01

273

Malaria Diagnostics in Clinical Trials  

PubMed Central

Malaria diagnostics are widely used in epidemiologic studies to investigate natural history of disease and in drug and vaccine clinical trials to exclude participants or evaluate efficacy. The Malaria Laboratory Network (MLN), managed by the Office of HIV/AIDS Network Coordination, is an international working group with mutual interests in malaria disease and diagnosis and in human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome clinical trials. The MLN considered and studied the wide array of available malaria diagnostic tests for their suitability for screening trial participants and/or obtaining study endpoints for malaria clinical trials, including studies of HIV/malaria co-infection and other malaria natural history studies. The MLN provides recommendations on microscopy, rapid diagnostic tests, serologic tests, and molecular assays to guide selection of the most appropriate test(s) for specific research objectives. In addition, this report provides recommendations regarding quality management to ensure reproducibility across sites in clinical trials. Performance evaluation, quality control, and external quality assessment are critical processes that must be implemented in all clinical trials using malaria tests. PMID:24062484

Murphy, Sean C.; Shott, Joseph P.; Parikh, Sunil; Etter, Paige; Prescott, William R.; Stewart, V. Ann

2013-01-01

274

Bayesian Clinical Trials in Action  

PubMed Central

Although the frequentist paradigm has been the predominant approach to clinical trial design since the 1940s, it has several notable limitations. The alternative Bayesian paradigm has been greatly enhanced by advancements in computational algorithms and computer hardware. Compared to its frequentist counterpart, the Bayesian framework has several unique advantages, and its incorporation into clinical trial design is occurring more frequently. Using an extensive literature review to assess how Bayesian methods are used in clinical trials, we find them most commonly used for dose finding, efficacy monitoring, toxicity monitoring, diagnosis/decision making, and for studying pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics. The additional infrastructure required for implementing Bayesian methods in clinical trials may include specialized software programs to run the study design, simulation, and analysis, and Web-based applications, which are particularly useful for timely data entry and analysis. Trial success requires not only the development of proper tools but also timely and accurate execution of data entry, quality control, adaptive randomization, and Bayesian computation. The relative merit of the Bayesian and frequentist approaches continues to be the subject of debate in statistics. However, more evidence can be found showing the convergence of the two camps, at least at the practical level. Ultimately, better clinical trial methods lead to more efficient designs, lower sample sizes, more accurate conclusions, and better outcomes for patients enrolled in the trials. Bayesian methods offer attractive alternatives for better trials. More such trials should be designed and conducted to refine the approach and demonstrate its real benefit in action. PMID:22711340

Lee, J. Jack; Chu, Caleb T.

2012-01-01

275

Hypercalcemic crisis: a clinical review.  

PubMed

Hypercalcemia is a common metabolic perturbation. However, hypercalcemic crisis is an unusual endocrine emergency, with little clinical scientific data to support therapeutic strategy. We review the relevant scientific English literature on the topic and review current management strategies after conducting a PubMed, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar search for articles published between 1930 and June 2014 using specific keywords: "hypercalcemic crisis," "hyperparathyroid crisis," "parathyroid storm," "severe primary hyperparathyroidism," "acute hyperparathyroidism," and "severe hypercalcemia" for articles pertaining to the diagnosis, epidemiology, clinical presentation, and treatment strategies. Despite extensive clinical experience, large and well-designed clinical studies to direct appropriate clinical care are lacking. Nonetheless, morbidity and mortality rates have substantially decreased since early series reported almost universal fatality. Improved outcomes can be attributed to modern diagnostic capabilities, leading to earlier diagnosis, along with the recognition that primary hyperparathyroidism is the most common etiology for hypercalcemic crisis. Hypercalcemic crisis is an unusual endocrine emergency that portends excellent outcomes if rapid diagnosis, medical treatment, and definitive surgical treatment are expedited. PMID:25447624

Ahmad, Shazia; Kuraganti, Gayatri; Steenkamp, Devin

2015-03-01

276

Clinical utility of quantitative imaging.  

PubMed

Quantitative imaging (QI) is increasingly applied in modern radiology practice, assisting in the clinical assessment of many patients and providing a source of biomarkers for a spectrum of diseases. QI is commonly used to inform patient diagnosis or prognosis, determine the choice of therapy, or monitor therapy response. Because most radiologists will likely implement some QI tools to meet the patient care needs of their referring clinicians, it is important for all radiologists to become familiar with the strengths and limitations of QI. The Association of University Radiologists Radiology Research Alliance Quantitative Imaging Task Force has explored the clinical application of QI and summarizes its work in this review. We provide an overview of the clinical use of QI by discussing QI tools that are currently used in clinical practice, clinical applications of these tools, approaches to reporting of QI, and challenges to implementing QI. It is hoped that these insights will help radiologists recognize the tangible benefits of QI to their patients, their referring clinicians, and their own radiology practice. PMID:25442800

Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Mendiratta-Lala, Mishal; Bartholmai, Brian J; Ganeshan, Dhakshinamoorthy; Abramson, Richard G; Burton, Kirsteen R; Yu, John-Paul J; Scalzetti, Ernest M; Yankeelov, Thomas E; Subramaniam, Rathan M; Lenchik, Leon

2015-01-01

277

Clinical trials with complementary therapies.  

PubMed

As interest in complementary and alternative therapies grows, nurses can expect to be asked for advice regarding their use, but there are few clinical studies on which nurses can base their responses. Conducting research with complementary therapies is therefore important for nursing, but there are some pitfalls in doing research with these products, particularly if one is using standard clinical-trials methods. In this article, the authors outline some of those pitfalls based on their experience conducting a clinical trial to examine the effects of elk velvet antler on symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. They discuss design issues related to justification, method, and ethics and explore some important regulatory issues of which nurses should be aware. Some recommendations are presented to help nurses engaging in such research to avoid problems that could interfere with the smooth conduct of their studies. PMID:15695580

Oberle, Kathleen; Allen, Marion N

2005-03-01

278

Developmental thermography [4]: clinical evaluation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents the data examples for clinical application of the authors' original thermographic techniques named developmental thermography (DT); (1) triple aspect thermography (TAT), (2) multiple aspect thermography (MAT) and (3) panoramic thermography (PT). Appropriate examples for the advantageous application for each technique of DT are selected and the specific advantages are discussed. The greatest advantage in the clinical application of DT is the capability of simultaneous display of the thermogram over even the entire aspect of a subject, and so DT has a lot of advantages in clinical application. Error free and wide coverage in DT are especially useful for the diagnosis of cancer. DT is expected to contribute to future advance of medical thermology.

Nagasawa, Akinori; Katoh, Kazuichi

1993-06-01

279

Clinical microbiology of coryneform bacteria.  

PubMed Central

Coryneform bacteria are aerobically growing, asporogenous, non-partially-acid-fast, gram-positive rods of irregular morphology. Within the last few years, there has been a massive increase in the number of publications related to all aspects of their clinical microbiology. Clinical microbiologists are often confronted with making identifications within this heterogeneous group as well as with considerations of the clinical significance of such isolates. This review provides comprehensive information on the identification of coryneform bacteria and outlines recent changes in taxonomy. The following genera are covered: Corynebacterium, Turicella, Arthrobacter, Brevibacterium, Dermabacter. Propionibacterium, Rothia, Exiguobacterium, Oerskovia, Cellulomonas, Sanguibacter, Microbacterium, Aureobacterium, "Corynebacterium aquaticum," Arcanobacterium, and Actinomyces. Case reports claiming disease associations of coryneform bacteria are critically reviewed. Minimal microbiological requirements for publications on disease associations of coryneform bacteria are proposed. PMID:8993861

Funke, G; von Graevenitz, A; Clarridge, J E; Bernard, K A

1997-01-01

280

Clinical utility of curcumin extract.  

PubMed

Turmeric root has been used medicinally in China and India for thousands of years. The active components are thought to be the curcuminoids, primarily curcumin, which is commonly available worldwide as a standardized extract. This article reviews the pharmacology of curcuminoids, their use and efficacy, potential adverse effects, and dosage and standardization. Preclinical studies point to mechanisms of action that are predominantly anti-inflammatory and antineoplastic, while early human clinical trials suggest beneficial effects for dyspepsia, peptic ulcer, inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, uveitis, orbital pseudotumor, and pancreatic cancer. Curcumin is well-tolerated; the most common side effects are nausea and diarrhea. Theoretical interactions exist due to purported effects on metabolic enzymes and transport proteins, but clinical reports do not support any meaningful interactions. Nonetheless, caution, especially with chemotherapy agents, is advised. Late-phase clinical trials are still needed to confirm most beneficial effects. PMID:23594449

Asher, Gary N; Spelman, Kevin

2013-01-01

281

[Scientific concepts in clinical medicine].  

PubMed

The understanding of the scientific basis and the theory of knowledge are surprisingly heterogeneous in practical and clinical medicine. It is frequently influenced or based on the philosophical theory of critical rationalism founded by Sir Karl Popper. Because the theory of knowledge and the understanding of scientific truth is the central basis for cautious and good clinical practise it is necessary to discuss both points to avoid unscientific auto-immunisation against critique in a type of medicine that regards herself as science-based. Evidence-based medicine would not be possible without interpretation and explanation of existing data into the individual treatment context. Besides an inductive or deductive logic the historical and situative side-conditions of the gathering of knowledge and of experiments are of central importance for their interpretation and their relevance in clinical practice. This historical and situative context warrants reflection but must also be paid attention to in the reflections on medical ethics. PMID:14648440

Rogler, G

2003-11-28

282

Clinical heterogeneity in ethylmalonic encephalopathy.  

PubMed

Ethylmalonic encephalopathy is a recently described inborn error of metabolism characterized clinically by developmental delay and regression, recurrent petechiae, orthostatic acrocyanosis, and chronic diarrhea. We describe monochorionic twins presenting with hypotonia in infancy and diagnosed with ethylmalonic encephalopathy on the basis of biochemical findings. They are compound heterozygote for missense mutations in ETHE1. Magnetic resonance imaging changes affecting the white matter, corpus callosum, and basal ganglia were seen in both patients. At 10 years of age, they have severe axial hypotonia but never displayed petechiae, orthostatic acrocyanosis, or chronic diarrhea. Their clinical courses differ markedly; one had an episode of coma when she was 3 years old and now has spastic quadraparesis and cannot speak. The other can freely use her upper extremities, her pyramidal syndrome being mostly limited to the lower extremities, and can speak 2 languages. These patients illustrate the clinical heterogeneity of ethylmalonic encephalopathy, even in monochorionic twins. PMID:19289697

Pigeon, Nicole; Campeau, Philippe M; Cyr, Denis; Lemieux, Bernard; Clarke, Joe T R

2009-08-01

283

Quality Assessment for Clinical Proteomics  

PubMed Central

Proteomics has emerged from the labs of technologists to enter widespread application in clinical contexts. This transition, however, has been hindered by overstated early claims of accuracy, concerns about reproducibility, and the challenges of handling batch effects properly. New efforts have produced sets of performance metrics and measurements of variability that establish sound expectations for experiments in clinical proteomics. As researchers begin incorporating these metrics in a quality by design paradigm, the variability of individual steps in experimental pipelines will be reduced, regularizing overall outcomes. This review discusses the evolution of quality assessment in 2D gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry-based proteomic profiling, tandem mass spectrometry-based protein inventories, and proteomic quantitation. Taken together, the advances in each of these technologies are establishing databases that will be increasingly useful for decision-making in clinical experimentation. PMID:23246537

Tabb, David L.

2013-01-01

284

Clinical anatomy of the hand.  

PubMed

This article reviews the underlying anatomy of trigger finger and thumb (fibrous digital pulleys, sesamoid bones), flexor tenosynovitis, de Quervain's syndrome, Dupuytren's contracture, some hand deformities in rheumatoid arthritis, the carpal tunnel syndrome and the ulnar nerve compression at Guyon's canal. Some important syndromes and structures have not been included but such are the nature of these seminars. Rather than being complete, we aim at creating a system in which clinical cases are used to highlight the pertinent anatomy and, in the most important part of the seminar, these pertinent items are demonstrated by cross examination of participants and teachers. Self learning is critical for generating interest and expanding knowledge of clinical anatomy. Just look at your own hand in various positions, move it, feel it, feel also your forearms while you move the fingers, do this repeatedly and inquisitively and after a few tries you will have developed not only a taste, but also a lifelong interest in clinical anatomy. PMID:23219083

Vargas, Angélica; Chiapas-Gasca, Karla; Hernández-Díaz, Cristina; Canoso, Juan J; Saavedra, Miguel Ángel; Navarro-Zarza, José Eduardo; Villaseńor-Ovies, Pablo; Kalish, Robert A

285

Demonstrating Clinical Effectiveness for Individual Practitioners and Clinics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The need for clinician accountability is here, and it is here to stay. Practicing therapy in the context of managed behavioral health care now necessitates accountability for treatment decisions and outcome on the part of the psychotherapist. Suggestions for tracking individual clinical change data are illustrated through the treatment of a chronically depressed client. The implications of tracking and then

Glenn M. Callaghan

2001-01-01

286

Clinical Scientists Improving Clinical Practices: In Thoughts and Actions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: In this article, the author comments on aspects of Kamhi's (2014) article, which caused the author to think more deeply about definitions of language, theories of learning, and how these two core components of intervention prepare clinical scientists as they search the literature for new knowledge. Interprofessional collaborative…

Apel, Kenn

2014-01-01

287

Advisory Council for Clinical Research Clinical Research Coordinator Certification Exam  

E-print Network

professionals referred to as research nurses, trial nurses, site coordinators, etc., perform tasks such as the eligibility requirements and pass the exam will be certified as having met the ACRP standards for becoming a Certified Clinical Research Coordinator (CCRC® ). Qualifications Employees of NU, NMFF, NMH, RIC

Chisholm, Rex L.

288

Advisory Council for Clinical Research Clinical Research Coordinator Certification Exam  

E-print Network

professionals referred to as research nurses, trial nurses, site coordinators, etc., perform tasks such as effectively. Candidates who meet the eligibility requirements and pass the exam will be certified as having met the ACRP standards for becoming a Certified Clinical Research Coordinator (CCRC® ). Qualifications

Chisholm, Rex L.

289

Death Anxiety in Clinical and Non-Clinical Groups  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Arabic Scale of Death Anxiety (ASDA) was administered, individually, to 7 groups (N=765) of Egyptian normal participants (non-clinical), anxiety disorder patients, and patients suffering from schizophrenia (males and females), and addicts (males only). They were generally matched as groups according to age, occupation, and education. The…

Abdel-Khalek, Ahmed M.

2005-01-01

290

Clinical role of bisphosphonate therapy  

PubMed Central

Bisphosphonates (BPs) are synthetic analogues of pyrophosphate. They inhibit bone resorption and are therefore widely used in disorders where there are increases or disruptions in bone resorption. This includes postmenopausal osteoporosis, glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis, Paget’s disease of bone, and malignancy-related bone loss. To best understand the clinical application of BPs, an understanding of their pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics is important. This review describes the structure, pharmacology and mode of action of BPs, focusing on their role in clinical practice. Controversies and side effects surrounding their use will also be discussed. PMID:23071416

Hampson, Geeta; Fogelman, Ignac

2012-01-01

291

Clinical applications of pathogen phylogenies.  

PubMed

Innovative sequencing techniques now allow the routine access of whole genomes of pathogens, generating vast amounts of data. Phylogenetic trees are a common method for synthesizing this information. Unfortunately, these trees are often seen only as a visual support to guide researchers, thus neglecting the value of employing phylogenetic techniques to perform hypothesis testing on clinical questions. These include investigating how a pathogen spreads within a patient, or whether the infection severity (often measured by virus load) is controlled by viral genetics. Advances in methodology mean the time is ripe for combining phylogenies with clinical data to better understand and fight infectious diseases. PMID:24794010

Hartfield, Matthew; Murall, Carmen Lía; Alizon, Samuel

2014-07-01

292

Handbook of clinical nursing practice  

SciTech Connect

Written in outline format, this reference will help nurses further their understanding of advanced nursing procedures. Information is provided on the physiological, psychological, environmental, and safety considerations of nursing activities associated with diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Special consideration is given to the areas of pediatric nursing, nursing assessment, and selected radiologic and nuclear medicine procedures for each system. Contents: Clinical Introduction. Clinical Nursing Practice: Focus on Basics. Focus on Cardiovascular Function. Focus on Respiratory Function. Focus on Gastrointestinal Function. Focus on Renal and Genito-Urological Function. Focus on Neuro-Skeletal and Muscular Function. Appendices.

Asheervath, J.; Blevins, D.R.

1986-01-01

293

Recombinant erythropoietin in clinical practice  

PubMed Central

The introduction of recombinant human erythropoietin (RHuEPO) has revolutionised the treatment of patients with anaemia of chronic renal disease. Clinical studies have demonstrated that RHuEPO is also useful in various non-uraemic conditions including haematological and oncological disorders, prematurity, HIV infection, and perioperative therapies. Besides highlighting both the historical and functional aspects of RHuEPO, this review discusses the applications of RHuEPO in clinical practice and the potential problems of RHuEPO treatment. PMID:12897214

Ng, T; Marx, G; Littlewood, T; Macdougall, I

2003-01-01

294

New developments in clinical CARS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We combined two-photon fluorescence and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging in a clinical hybrid multiphoton tomograph for in vivo imaging of human skin. The clinically approved TPEF/CARS system provides simultaneous imaging of endogenous fluorophores and non-fluorescent lipids. The Stokes laser for the two-beam configuration of CARS is based on spectral broadening of femtosecond laser pulses in a photonic crystal fiber (PCF). We report on the highly flexible medical TPEF/CARS tomograph MPTflex®-CARS with an articulated arm and first in vivo measurements on human skin.

Weinigel, Martin; Breunig, Hans Georg; Kellner-Höfer, Marcel; Bückle, Rainer; Darvin, Maxim; Lademann, Juergen; König, Karsten

2013-02-01

295

Electrochemical Sensors for Clinic Analysis  

PubMed Central

Demanded by modern medical diagnosis, advances in microfabrication technology have led to the development of fast, sensitive and selective electrochemical sensors for clinic analysis. This review addresses the principles behind electrochemical sensor design and fabrication, and introduces recent progress in the application of electrochemical sensors to analysis of clinical chemicals such as blood gases, electrolytes, metabolites, DNA and antibodies, including basic and applied research. Miniaturized commercial electrochemical biosensors will form the basis of inexpensive and easy to use devices for acquiring chemical information to bring sophisticated analytical capabilities to the non-specialist and general public alike in the future.

Wang, You; Xu, Hui; Zhang, Jianming; Li, Guang

2008-01-01

296

[Cutaneous leishmaniosis: unusual clinical manifestation].  

PubMed

Clinical manifestations of leishmaniasis are diverse and related to the infecting species, its relationship with the environment and the host immune response. A case of late Andean cutaneous leishmaniasis with extensive manifestation is presented. The case was confirmed through microbiological and immunological studies; identification was performed by cytochrome b gene sequencing and the species was determined as Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis. The patient was treated with sodium stibogluconate and at the end of therapy the patient showed clinical improvement of the lesions. It is recommended to consider leishmaniasis in differential diagnosis when treating atypical dermatological chronic ulcers. PMID:25418662

Sandoval-Juárez, Aidé; Minaya-Gómez, Gloria; Rojas-Palomino, Nyshon; Falconi, Eduardo; Cáceres, Omar

2014-01-01

297

UNIVERSITY OF GLASGOW DOCTORATE IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF GLASGOW DOCTORATE IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAMME HANDBOOK 2013--2014 APPENDICES #12;DOCTORATE IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY HANDBOOK Page 140 INDEX OF APPENDICES Appendix 2.1 Doctoral Programme Of Clinical Competence (Sample) ........173 Appendix 6.6 Log Book Of Clinical Activity (Sample

Guo, Zaoyang

298

Starting a job as adjunct clinical instructor.  

PubMed

This article is the second in a new quarterly series on the roles of adjunct clinical faculty and preceptors, who teach nursing students to apply knowledge in clinical settings. Topics will include the preparation of clinical instructors and preceptors for these roles, the student evaluation process, and overcoming challenges that can come with teaching in the clinical field and with adjunct teaching. PMID:25075704

Koharchik, Linda; Jakub, Karen

2014-08-01

299

Fostering clinical reasoning in nursing students.  

PubMed

This article is one in a series on the roles of adjunct clinical faculty and preceptors, who teach nursing students to apply knowledge in clinical settings. This article describes why it's important that nursing students develop clinical reasoning skills and how clinical nursing instructors can help them learn these skills. PMID:25545533

Koharchik, Linda; Caputi, Linda; Robb, Meigan; Culleiton, Alicia L

2015-01-01

300

NCI’s National Clinical Trials Enterprise  

Cancer.gov

The NCI’s national clinical trials program supports both small early-phase clinical trials and large-scale clinical trials. This program has changed the face of clinical oncology, establishing the safety and efficacy of many therapies now commonly used to treat patients with cancer.

301

Situational Supervision for Athletic Training Clinical Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduction: The medical education model provides the basis for athletic training students to learn theoretical and practical skills. Clinical rotations are completed where they apply what they have learned under the direct supervision of a clinical instructor (CI) or approved clinical instructor (ACI). Approved clinical instructors are taught…

Levy, Linda S.; Gardner, Greg; Barnum, Mary G.; Willeford, K. Sean; Sexton, Patrick; Guyer, M. Susan; Fincher, A. Louise

2009-01-01

302

Clinical Pharmacy Education in China  

PubMed Central

Pharmacy education in China focuses on pharmaceutical sciences, with the bachelor of science (BS) of pharmacy as the entry-level degree. Pharmacy practice curricula in these programs are centered on compounding, dispensing, pharmacy administration, and laboratory experiences, which are the traditional responsibilities for pharmacists. Additional graduate-level training is available at the master of science (MS) and the doctor of philosophy (PhD) levels, most of which concentrate on drug discovery and drug development research. Presently, the emphasis in practice is beginning to shift to clinical pharmacy. With this change, additional degree offerings are being developed to meet the growing demand for clinical pharmacists. There is also interest in developing more clinical skills in practicing pharmacists through additional non-degree training. The Ministry of Education is considering a proposal for an entry-level professional degree of master and/or doctor in clinical pharmacy similar to the doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) degree in the United States. PMID:19325949

Ryan, Melody; Yang, Li; Nie, Xiao-Yan; Zhai, Suo-Di; Shi, Lu-Wen; Lubawy, William C.

2008-01-01

303

Informed Clinical Opinion. NECTAC Notes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The term "informed clinical opinion" appears in the regulatory requirements for the implementation of Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) as an integral part of an eligibility determination. It must be included in evaluation and assessment procedures, since it is a necessary safeguard against eligibility determination…

Shackelford, Jo

304

Clinical relevance of protein C  

Microsoft Academic Search

Protein C is, after activation by thrombin, a potent inhibitor of blood coagulation. An isolated deficiency of protein C increases the risk of thrombosis. The two forms of protein C deficiency, the heterozygous and the homozygous deficiency state, have different clinical features. Patients with heterozygous protein C deficiency are at a high risk to develop venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism.

I. Pabinger; E. Deutsch

1986-01-01

305

Ethical dilemmas in clinical genetics.  

PubMed Central

This paper discusses the results of a survey of medical and paramedical opinion relating to various difficult ethical issues in clinical genetics. These include the confidentiality of the doctor-patient relationship, prenatal diagnosis and termination, and Huntington's chorea. It is suggested that this method provides a useful means of assessing what is ethically acceptable in contemporary society. PMID:6234396

Young, I D

1984-01-01

306

Bone scanning in clinical practice  

SciTech Connect

The topics covered in this book include the history of bone scanning, mechanisms of uptake of diphosphonate in bone, the normal bone scan, and the role of bone scanning in clinical practice. The aim of this book is to provide a source of reference relating to bone scan imaging for all those who are interested in the skeleton.

Fogelman, I. (Guys Hospital, London (GB))

1987-01-01

307

Microwave applications in clinical medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   Over the last fifty years, energy has been applied to various human tissues for both the diagnosis and therapy of numerous\\u000a diseases. However, in general, the medical community remains uninformed about the many potential applications of this energy\\u000a source. We review the many areas in which microwave energy has shown clinical utility.

J. C. Lantis II; K. L. Carr; R. Grabowy; R. J. Connolly; S. D. Schwaitzberg

1998-01-01

308

Microwave applications in clinical medicine.  

PubMed

Over the last fifty years, energy has been applied to various human tissues for both the diagnosis and therapy of numerous diseases. However, in general, the medical community remains uninformed about the many potential applications of this energy source. We review the many areas in which microwave energy has shown clinical utility. PMID:9479737

Lantis, J C; Carr, K L; Grabowy, R; Connolly, R J; Schwaitzberg, S D

1998-02-01

309

Bronchiectasis: CT\\/clinical correlations  

Microsoft Academic Search

The association between bronchiectasis and human immunodeficiency virus infection, the resurgence of tuberculosis, especially in urban and immunocompromised patients, and the recognition of bronchiectasis as a manifestation of rejection in the transplant population are emerging clinical settings in which establishing the diagnosis of bronchiectasis is becoming increasingly important. High-resolution CT, by virtue of its well-established accuracy, is currently accepted as

Georgeann McGuinness; David P Naidich

1995-01-01

310

Clinical manifestations of essential tremor  

Microsoft Academic Search

A clinical study of 42 patients with essential tremor is presented. In the case of 12 patients the family history strongly suggested an autosomal dominant mode of transmission, in four the mode of inheritance was indeterminate, and the remaining 26 patients were sporadic cases without an established genetic basis. The tremor involved the upper extremities in 41 patients, the head

Edmund Critchley

1972-01-01

311

Clinical Computing: Enriching the Canopy  

PubMed Central

A convincing case has been made for the use of Web-enabled technologies in clinical practice1, to provide seamless access to information that resides in multiple systems. Following is a description of University Health Network's experience in using this approach to integrate departmental systems into a comprehensive Electronic Patient Record.

Tripp, Bryan; Morgan, Matthew W.

2000-01-01

312

[Homeopathy confronted with clinical research].  

PubMed

Homeopathy is a medical practice using medications characterized by four basic principles: similitude, dilution, dynamization, and personalization. To date, there is no scientific evidence supporting any of these principles. For this reason, careful examination of clinical evaluation of homeotherapy trials is the only pragmatic way of evaluating the value of the "homeopathic pharmacy". Many clinical trials have been conducted over the last decade. Clinical trials are not however a prerequisite for marketing these medications since the legal authorities do not require proof of efficacy for marketing authorization. Unfortunately, these trials which are rarely favorable, often present methodological biases which compromise the readability of results and the validity of conclusions. Both meta-analyses and individual trials performed in a broad spectrum of clinical situations exclude severe disease and do not provide data suggesting these products are effective or produce effects reproducible from one team to another or over time. For this reason, and at the present state of our knowledge, their use cannot be recommended. The public authorities should now require the demonstration of efficacy before awarding marketing approval for homeopathic medications. PMID:15976692

Chast, Fr

2005-06-01

313

Proton radiography for clinical applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Proton imaging is not yet applied as a clinical routine, although its advantages have been demonstrated. In the context of quality assurance in proton therapy, proton images can be used to verify the correct positioning of the patient and to control the range of protons. Proton computed tomography (pCT) is a 3D imaging method appropriate for planning and verification of

C. Talamonti; V. Reggioli; M. Bruzzi; M. Bucciolini; C. Civinini; L. Marrazzo; D. Menichelli; S. Pallotta; N. Randazzo; V. Sipala; G. A. P. Cirrone; M. Petterson; N. Blumenkrantz; J. Feldt; J. Heimann; D. Lucia; A. Seiden; D. C. Williams; H. F.-W. Sadrozinski; V. Bashkirov; R. Schulte

2010-01-01

314

Outpatient clinics without the paperwork.  

PubMed

Chicago's MacNeal Health Network made several smart moves to get physician buy-in for a computer-based patient record system in its outpatient clinics. It didn't take long before paper-based patient records all but disappeared. PMID:10167512

Hagland, M

1997-05-01

315

DIVISION OF PEDIATRIC CLINICAL RESEARCH  

E-print Network

Pediatric Preventative Cardiovascular Laboratory Education Pediatric Integrative Medicine Center Pediatric of diseases in clinical populations Public Health Disease prevention and health promotion Mechanisms in child health research #12;Goals (1) To promote cutting-edge research that will result in improved child

Shyu, Mei-Ling

316

Teaching Techniques in Clinical Chemistry.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This master's thesis presents several instructional methods and techniques developed for each of eleven topics or subject areas in clinical chemistry: carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism, diagnostic enzymology, endocrinology, toxicology, quality control, electrolytes, acid base balance, hepatic function, nonprotein nitrogenous compounds, and…

Wilson, Diane

317

Clinical Imaging Steering Committee Roster  

Cancer.gov

Clinical Imaging Steering Committee Roster Chair Steven M. Larson, M.D.Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer CenterNew York, NY Neil M. Rofsky, M.D.UT Southwestern Medical CenterDallas, TX Members Laurence H. Baker, D.O.University of MichiganAnn Arbor, MI David

318

Clinical Imaging Steering Committee Roster  

Cancer.gov

Clinical Imaging Steering Committee Roster Chair Steven M. Larson, M.D. Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center New York, NY Neil M. Rofsky, M.D. UT Southwestern Medical Center Dallas, TX Members Jeffrey Abrams, M.D. Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program National

319

Clinical Implications of Attachment Theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Among the clinical implications of attachment theory are the ideas of the therapist as a secure base, internalization of a secure base, and feeling understood as an aspect of secure attachment. I also discuss some issues that need to be integrated into attachment theory, namely, survivor guilt and loyalty to early objects, and the relation between attachment pattern and oedipal

Morris Eagle

2003-01-01

320

Clinical heterogeneity in ethylmalonic encephalopathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ethylmalonic encephalopathy is a recently described inborn error of metabolism characterized clinically by developmental delay and regression, recurrent petechiae, orthostatic acrocyanosis, and chronic diarrhea. We describe monochorionic twins presenting with hypotonia in infancy and diagnosed with ethylmalonic encephalopathy on the basis of biochemical findings. They are compound heterozygote for missense mutations in ETHE1. Magnetic resonance imaging changes affecting the white

Nicole Pigeon; Philippe M. Campeau; Denis Cyr; Bernard Lemieux; Joe T. R. Clarke

2009-01-01

321

Establishing Standards for Clinical Preparation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the increased recognition of the nurse practitioner role and emphasis on health care cost containment. Describes a clinical practice data collection tool that can be used in a variety of settings for evaluating nurse practitioner preparation. The instrument is included. (JOW)

Monninger, Elizabeth; Fullerton, Judith T.

1984-01-01

322

Pioneering Research Powering Clinical Outcomes  

E-print Network

Pioneering Research Powering Clinical Outcomes AnnuAl RepoRt of ContRACts And GRAnts, 2011 #12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Letter from Nancy Ridenour, PhD, RN, APRN, BC, FAAN, Dean, College of Nursing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 College of Nursing, Improving Access to Primary Care

New Mexico, University of

323

Research News Clinical Investigation Center  

E-print Network

Research News Clinical Investigation Center Winter 2013 Advancing Veterinary and Human Medicine to one limb and has not metastasized. · Owners are willing to pursue amputation and chemotherapy previous surgery, chemotherapy, or radiation treatments for the osteosarcoma. The study covers the costs

Blanchette, Robert A.

324

Novel Investigational Agents & Clinical Trials  

E-print Network

Bexarotene, denileukin diftitox, IFN vorinostat, romidepsin (single or combination) Single-agent chemotherapy overall clinical benefit RCTs are strongly recommended #12;Era of targeted therapies Huge impact.g., CD4, CD25, CD30, CD40, CD52, CD158k, CCR4) Tumor proliferation, metabolism, survival, progression

Kay, Mark A.

325

Patient Safety in Clinical Trials  

Cancer.gov

Information for patients, their families and friends, and the general public about how the rights and safety of people who take part in clinical trials are protected. Learn about informed consent, institutional review boards (IRB's), and how trials are closely monitored for safety.

326

A clinical perspective on dying  

PubMed Central

There is continuing need for dissemination of already available, clinically useful knowledge concerning the psychological needs of the seriously ill and dying. Against the changing social context of dying, some of our erroneous assumptions about these patients are explored and the genuine fears and personal needs are discussed. The implications of this knowledge for medical education are recognized. PMID:5074753

Janes, Robert G.

1972-01-01

327

Clinical Judgment in Science: Reply  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents replies to comments published by M. S. Schulz and R. J. Waldinger, J. M. Wood and M. T. Nezworski, and H. N. Garb and W. M. Grove on the original article by D. Westen and J. Weinberger. Schulz and Waldinger (2005) make the important point that just as researchers can capitalize on the knowledge of experienced clinical observers…

Westen, Drew; Weinberger, Joel

2005-01-01

328

The Future of Clinical Dentistry.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discussion of the future of clinical dentistry looks at a variety of influences, including historical development factors; demographic trends; the role of the Human Genome Project in the development of scientific knowledge; a paradigm shift in approaches to oral infection and systemic disease; advancing technology; and reforms resulting from these…

Slavkin, Harold C.

1998-01-01

329

Cell Stem Cell Clinical Progress  

E-print Network

Cell Stem Cell Clinical Progress Rapid Expansion of Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells by Automated implementations of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and their deriva- tives further increase interest in strategies the marked improvements that control of feed- back signaling can offer primary stem cell culture

Zandstra, Peter W.

330

Innovations in clinical trials informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper will investigate innovations in information management for use in clinical trials. The application typifies a complex, adaptive, distributed and information-rich environment for which continuous innovation is necessary. Organisational innovation is highlighted as well as the technical innovations in workflow processes and their representation as an integrated set of web services. Benefits realization uncovers further innovations in the business

Ron Summers; Hiten Vyas; Nilesh Dudhal; Neil F. Doherty; Crispin R. Coombs; Mark Hepworth

2008-01-01

331

Clinical virology in real time  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ability to detect nucleic acids has had and still has a major impact on diagnostics in clinical virology. Both quantitative and qualitative techniques, whether signal or target amplification based systems, are currently used routinely in most if not all virology laboratories. Technological improvements, from automated sample isolation to real time amplification technology, have given the ability to develop and

Hubert G. M Niesters

2002-01-01

332

How clinical decisions are made  

PubMed Central

There is much variation in the implementation of the best available evidence into clinical practice. These gaps between evidence and practice are often a result of multiple individual decisions. When making a decision, there is so much potentially relevant information available, it is impossible to know or process it all (so called ‘bounded rationality’). Usually, a limited amount of information is selected to reach a sufficiently satisfactory decision, a process known as satisficing. There are two key processes used in decision making: System 1 and System 2. System 1 involves fast, intuitive decisions; System 2 is a deliberate analytical approach, used to locate information which is not instantly recalled. Human beings unconsciously use System 1 processing whenever possible because it is quicker and requires less effort than System 2. In clinical practice, gaps between evidence and practice can occur when a clinician develops a pattern of knowledge, which is then relied on for decisions using System 1 processing, without the activation of a System 2 check against the best available evidence from high quality research. The processing of information and decision making may be influenced by a number of cognitive biases, of which the decision maker may be unaware. Interventions to encourage appropriate use of System 1 and System 2 processing have been shown to improve clinical decision making. Increased understanding of decision making processes and common sources of error should help clinical decision makers to minimize avoidable mistakes and increase the proportion of decisions that are better. PMID:22738381

Bate, Louise; Hutchinson, Andrew; Underhill, Jonathan; Maskrey, Neal

2012-01-01

333

Case studies in clinical transformation.  

PubMed

Keys to success in undertaking clinical transformation initiatives include: Payer alignment. Robust technology (e.g., tools that can migrate patient data into disease registries). Commitment to making the investments and process changes needed to support population health management. Partnerships with local employers. Small steps toward greater value. PMID:25647915

Butcher, Lola

2014-11-01

334

Autism: Clinical and Research Issues.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This text examines the characteristics that define autism: impairments in communication; abnormal social development; and clinically significant odd behaviors. Specific chapters include: (1) Neural Mechanisms in Autism (Andrew W. Zimmerman and Barry Gordon); (2) Epidemiology of Autism and Other Pervasive Developmental Disorders: Current…

Accardo, Pasquale J., Ed.; Magnusen, Christy, Ed.; Capute, Arnold J., Ed.

335

Clinic  

E-print Network

Metropolitan Psychotherapy Associates is a full service, multi-disciplinary group practice that provides: Individual psychotherapy Group psychotherapy Premarital therapy Couples therapy Child, adolescent, and family therapy Play therapy Career guidance Supervision and professional training for therapists Consultation for therapists and their clients Psychological testing Professional training Specialties include: Childhood trauma and neglect Attachment disorders Chronic illness and adjustment Dissociative disorders Characterological disorders Addiction and recovery Sexual addictions Eating disorders Relationship and intimacy issues Gay and Lesbian issues Perinatal loss Psychomotor therapy EMDR Adult ADHD Psychodynamic psychotherapy

North Druid; Hills Road

2001-01-01

336

Clamping down on clinic violence.  

PubMed

The editorial remarked that anti abortion groups using violence must be stopped through legislation currently under consideration by the House and Senate of the US Congress. An important distinction is made between expressing freedom of speech on a deeply held belief and intimidation and violence that directly impacts on the rights of others. Women's health clinics where abortions are performed have repeatedly been the setting for intimidation and violence. There have been over 1000 reports of violence against these facilities and the people working at abortion centers since 1977. The most extreme act was the March 1993 murder of Dr. David Gunn outside a Pensacola, Florida, clinic and the wounding in August 1993 of a doctor in Wichita, Kansas. Unfortunately, the clinic violence not only interfere with abortion seekers, but also interferes with normal routine procedures such as Pap smears, prenatal care, well baby visits, and contraceptive counseling. Politically motivated violence antagonizes many women who rely on these clinics as the only source of care. The House and Senate bills would make it a federal criminal act to use force or physical obstruction to prevent a woman from getting an abortion or to damage a medical facility that provides abortion-related services. The Senate voted November 16, 1993 and the House vote will follow within the week. Anti abortion activists have cited the change to a pro-choice president as one of the reasons for the increase in violence against clinics, which amounted to a tripling of acts between 1990 and 1992. It is quixotic that movement to protect life would use extreme acts such as murder to protect life. Persuasion and appeals to hearts and minds would serve the abortion foes better as a viable strategy in the exercise of their right of free speech. PMID:12345222

1993-11-16

337

The use of clinical utility assessments in early clinical development.  

PubMed

A quickly realizable benefit of model-based drug development is in reducing uncertainty in risk/benefit, comprising individually of safety and effectiveness, two key attributes of a product evaluated for regulatory approval, marketing, and use. In this review, we investigate gaps and opportunities in using fundamental decision analytic principles in drug development and present a quantitative clinical pharmacology framework for the application of such aids for early clinical development decision making. We anticipate that implementation of such emerging tools will enable sufficient scientific understanding of the two attributes to facilitate the early termination of compounds with less than desirable risk/benefit profiles and continuance of compounds with acceptable risk/benefit profiles. PMID:19145490

Khan, Anis A; Perlstein, Itay; Krishna, Rajesh

2009-03-01

338

Clinical multiphoton tomography and clinical two-photon microendoscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on applications of high-resolution clinical multiphoton tomography based on the femtosecond laser system DermaInspectTM with its flexible mirror arm in Australia, Asia, and Europe. Applications include early detection of melanoma, in situ tracing of pharmacological and cosmetical compounds including ZnO nanoparticles in the epidermis and upper dermis, the determination of the skin aging index SAAID as well as the study of the effects of anti-aging products. In addition, first clinical studies with novel rigid high-NA two-photon 1.6 mm GRIN microendoscopes have been conducted to study the effect of wound healing in chronic wounds (ulcus ulcera) as well as to perform intrabody imaging with subcellular resolution in small animals.

König, Karsten; Bückle, Rainer; Weinigel, Martin; Elsner, Peter; Kaatz, Martin

2009-02-01

339

Clinical and histologic characteristics of clinically unsuspected melanomas.  

PubMed

Thin melanomas are recognized and captured by clinicians at an alarming rate, whereas thick melanomas remain underrecognized. Improved recognition of thick melanomas will require further understanding of their clinical and histologic characteristics at various stages of development because emerging data suggest that the thin melanomas being captured today may not represent the forerunners of the thick melanomas. In this retrospective analysis, pathology requisition forms from melanomas diagnosed by histopathology were examined for submitted clinical diagnosis, patient characteristics, melanoma thickness, and biopsy method. Three hundred eighty-five melanomas were identified from 2003 to 2011. Most lesions (71.7%) were clinically suspected to be melanocytic. The mean depth in this group was 0.62mm. Of the unsuspected cases (28.3%), the most common submitted diagnoses were basal cell carcinomas and seborrheic keratoses, consistent with previous reports. The mean depth in the unsuspected group was 1.64mm, and more frequently extended to the deep margin (51.8% vs 25.4% of the time). Shave biopsy was the overwhelming preferred method of biopsy (79.5% overall). Compared with thin melanomas, thick melanomas are underrecognized by physicians due to their lack of characteristic morphologic features; consequently, they are more frequently associated with suboptimal biopsies. PMID:24559571

Hermes, Heidi M; Sahu, Joya; Schwartz, Laurel R; Lee, Jason B

2014-01-01

340

Use of Clinical Alerting to Improve the Collection of Clinical Research Data Krystl Haerian, MD, 1  

E-print Network

Use of Clinical Alerting to Improve the Collection of Clinical Research Data Krystl Haerian, MD, 1 Development 2 Department of Clinical Research Informatics National Institutes of Health Clinical Center the potential to adversely impact the conclusions drawn from clinical research. We prospectively studied

Cimino, James J.

341

77 FR 13513 - Modernizing the Regulation of Clinical Trials and Approaches to Good Clinical Practice; Public...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Clinical Trials and Approaches to Good Clinical Practice...clinical trials and approaches to good clinical practice...from a broad group of stakeholders on the scope and direction...or before close of business on April 2, 2012...evaluating its regulatory approach to clinical trial...

2012-03-07

342

Area of Concentration in Clinical Research The Committee on Clinical & Translational Science  

E-print Network

CCTS 42000 introduction to Clinical Research informatics hSTD 38000 health Status AssessmentArea of Concentration in Clinical Research The Committee on Clinical & Translational Science CliniCAl of clinical research include epidemiological and behavioral studies; outcomes and health services research

Mateo, Jill M.

343

Clinical equipoise: actual or hypothetical disagreement?  

PubMed

In his influential 1987 essay, "Equipoise and The Ethics of Randomized Clinical Research," Benjamin Freedman argued that Charles Fried's theoretical equipoise requirement threatened clinical research because it was overwhelmingly fragile and rendered unethical too many randomized clinical trials. Freedman, therefore, proposed an alternative requirement, the clinical equipoise requirement, which is now considered to be the fundamental or guiding principle concerning the ethics of enrolling patients in randomized clinical trials. In this essay I argue that Freedman's clinical equipoise requirement is ambiguous and can be interpreted in (at least) two different ways. I furthermore claim that, ironically, the best interpretation of the clinical equipoise requirement opens Freedman to the same objection that he leveled against Fried twenty-five years ago; namely, that it (Freedman's clinical equipoise requirement) renders unethical too many randomized clinical trials. PMID:23878347

Gelfand, Scott

2013-12-01

344

Clinical Role of Hybrid Imaging.  

PubMed

Recent technological advances have fueled the growth in hybrid radionuclide and CT imaging of the heart. Noninvasive imaging studies are reliable means to diagnose coronary artery disease (CAD), stratify risk, and guide clinical management. Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy is a robust, widely available noninvasive modality for the evaluation of ischemia from known or suspected CAD. Cardiac CT (coronary artery calcium score and coronary CT angiography) has emerged as a clinically robust noninvasive anatomic imaging test, capable of rapidly diagnosing or excluding obstructive CAD. Both anatomic and functional modalities have strengths and weaknesses, and can complement each other by offering integrated structural and physiologic information. As we discuss below, in selected patients, hybrid imaging may facilitate more accurate diagnosis, risk stratification, and management in a "one-stop shop" setting. PMID:23467390

Hsiao, Edward M; Ali, Bilal; Dorbala, Sharmila

2010-10-01

345

Clinical value of bone densitometry.  

PubMed

The purpose of this article is to provide insight into the long-standing controversy over the clinical value of noninvasive measurement of bone mass. Results of recent studies have increasingly supported the judicious use of bone densitometry as a clinical tool [1]. These reports contradict editorials on the limitations of bone densitometry that have appeared in a variety of subspecialty publications [2,3]. The importance of bone mass measurement is underscored by the lack of success in predicting bone density from various combinations of anthropometric and historical variables. Growing evidence suggests that densitometry is a useful tool for determining which women near menopause are at risk for osteoporosis and, therefore, are candidates for estrogen-replacement therapy. This article summarizes current concepts on the subject and attempts to prove that bone densitometry is a beneficial and indicated procedure for selected patients. PMID:8010199

Sartoris, D J

1994-07-01

346

Clinical biomarkers of angiogenesis inhibition  

PubMed Central

Introduction An expanding understanding of the importance of angiogenesis in oncology and the development of numerous angiogenesis inhibitors are driving the search for biomarkers of angiogenesis. We review currently available candidate biomarkers and surrogate markers of anti-angiogenic agent effect. Discussion A number of invasive, minimally invasive, and non-invasive tools are described with their potential benefits and limitations. Diverse markers can evaluate tumor tissue or biological fluids, or specialized imaging modalities. Conclusions The inclusion of these markers into clinical trials may provide insight into appropriate dosing for desired biological effects, appropriate timing of additional therapy, prediction of individual response to an agent, insight into the interaction of chemotherapy and radiation following exposure to these agents, and perhaps most importantly, a better understanding of the complex nature of angiogenesis in human tumors. While many markers have potential for clinical use, it is not yet clear which marker or combination of markers will prove most useful. PMID:18414993

Brown, Aaron P.; Citrin, Deborah E.; Camphausen, Kevin A.

2009-01-01

347

Proton therapy in clinical practice  

PubMed Central

Radiation dose escalation and acceleration improves local control but also increases toxicity. Proton radiation is an emerging therapy for localized cancers that is being sought with increasing frequency by patients. Compared with photon therapy, proton therapy spares more critical structures due to its unique physics. The physical properties of a proton beam make it ideal for clinical applications. By modulating the Bragg peak of protons in energy and time, a conformal radiation dose with or without intensity modulation can be delivered to the target while sparing the surrounding normal tissues. Thus, proton therapy is ideal when organ preservation is a priority. However, protons are more sensitive to organ motion and anatomy changes compared with photons. In this article, we review practical issues of proton therapy, describe its image-guided treatment planning and delivery, discuss clinical outcome for cancer patients, and suggest challenges and the future development of proton therapy. PMID:21527064

Liu, Hui; Chang, Joe Y.

2011-01-01

348

Safety Monitoring in Clinical Trials  

PubMed Central

Monitoring patient safety during clinical trials is a critical component throughout the drug development life-cycle. Pharmaceutical sponsors must work proactively and collaboratively with all stakeholders to ensure a systematic approach to safety monitoring. The regulatory landscape has evolved with increased requirements for risk management plans, risk evaluation and minimization strategies. As the industry transitions from passive to active safety surveillance activities, there will be greater demand for more comprehensive and innovative approaches that apply quantitative methods to accumulating data from all sources, ranging from the discovery and preclinical through clinical and post-approval stages. Statistical methods, especially those based on the Bayesian framework, are important tools to help provide objectivity and rigor to the safety monitoring process. PMID:24300399

Yao, Bin; Zhu, Li; Jiang, Qi; Xia, H. Amy

2013-01-01

349

Clinical features of Friedreich ataxia.  

PubMed

Friedreich ataxia, the most common hereditary ataxia, affects approximately 1 per 29,000 white individuals. In about 98% of these individuals, it is due to homozygosity for a GAA trinucleotide repeat expansion in intron 1 of FXN; in the other 2%, it is due to compound heterozygosity for a GAA expansion and point mutation or deletion. The condition affects multiple sites in the central and peripheral nervous system as well as a number of other organ systems, resulting in multiple signs and symptoms. Onset of this autosomal recessive condition is usually in the first 2 decades of life. Major clinical features include progressive ataxia, absent lower limb reflexes, upgoing plantar responses, and peripheral sensory neuropathy. The main nonneurological sites of morbidity are the heart, resulting in cardiomyopathy, and the pancreas, resulting in diabetes mellitus. In this review, we provide an overview of the clinical features of Friedreich ataxia and discuss differential diagnoses. PMID:22752493

Delatycki, Martin B; Corben, Louise A

2012-09-01

350

Clinical features of taxane neuropathy.  

PubMed

Sensory neuropathy is the dose-limiting toxicity of paclitaxel and also impacts on the use of docetaxel and other taxanes. The cause of this adverse effect has to do with their mechanism of action against microtubules and its interaction with neuronal cytoskeletal components. The variability of this toxicity is defined by several factors including disease type, taxane class, schedule and dose of the specific drug, patient demographics, and use of taxanes in combination regimens (especially with the platinums that are also neurotoxic). Prevention of life-long neuropathy is only produced if the causative drug is halted--treatments to reverse toxicity have shown only minimal improvement. This review investigates trials defining the clinical factors that determine the therapeutic window of taxanes and the enhanced susceptibility to this toxicity. In addition, case vignettes illustrate the range of clinical manifestations of this toxicity during taxane administration. PMID:24300917

Kudlowitz, David; Muggia, Franco

2014-05-01

351

Dendritic cell immunotherapy: clinical outcomes  

PubMed Central

The use of tumour-associated antigens for cancer immunotherapy studies is exacerbated by tolerance to these self-antigens. Tolerance may be broken by using ex vivo monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) pulsed with self-antigens. Targeting tumour-associated antigens directly to DCs in vivo is an alternative and simpler strategy. The identification of cell surface receptors on DCs, and targeting antigens to DC receptors, has become a popular approach for inducing effective immune responses against cancer antigens. Many years ago, we demonstrated that targeting the mannose receptor on macrophages using the carbohydrate mannan to DCs led to appropriate immune responses and tumour protection in animal models. We conducted Phase I, I/II and II, clinical trials demonstrating the effectiveness of oxidised mannan-MUC1 in patients with adenocarcinomas. Here we summarise DC targeting approaches and their efficacy in human clinical trials. PMID:25505969

Apostolopoulos, Vasso; Pietersz, Geoffrey A; Tsibanis, Anastasios; Tsikkinis, Annivas; Stojanovska, Lily; McKenzie, Ian FC; Vassilaros, Stamatis

2014-01-01

352

Pleuroparenchymal Fibroelastosis: Its Clinical Characteristics  

PubMed Central

Pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis (PPFE) is a rare pulmonary fibrosis that is clinically characterized by upper-lobe predominant fibrosis. PPFE is a slowly progressive disorder and its first symptom is dyspnea or dry cough. Chest pain because of pneumothorax may be the first symptom in some patients. Patients with PPFE are slender with a flat rib cage or abnormally narrowed anterior–posterior thoracic dimension. Decreases in forced vital capacity, total lung capacity, and diffusing capacity are respiratory-function characteristics of PPFE, similar to those seen in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). The most remarkable difference in clinical features between PPFE and IPF is imaging findings, with upper-lobe-predominant lesions in PPFE and lower-lobe-predominant lesions in IPF. PMID:24578677

Watanabe, Kentaro

2013-01-01

353

Mayo Clinic Library education programs.  

PubMed Central

The health-related sciences programs of Mayo Foundation, including those related to librarianship, are conducted in an internationally known center for medical education, clinical practice, and medical research. Students have access to all the educational resources of Mayo Clinic. Appointees to the programs enjoy the benefits of more than half a century of experience in medical education that includes the training of residents, research fellows, interns, and medical students. The health-related sciences programs, like the Mayo Graduate School of Medicine and the Mayo Medical School, are part of the Division of Education of the Mayo Foundation, a nonprofit charitable corporation responsible for the support and conduct of education and research as an integral part of medical and health care. PMID:1148445

Key, J D

1975-01-01

354

Clinical toxicology and military application.  

PubMed

The changing operational tempo and types of deployment have, since the end of the Cold War, required a change in CBRN training. The threat from weapons of mass destruction has been replaced with the threat from improvised explosive devices and insurgent attempts to develop asymmetric weapons to target military and civilian populations. In addition exposure to hazardous materials as well as environmental hazards and natural toxins requires a greater awareness of the necessary supportive and definitive management. Developing a cadre of specialists with an interest in toxicology and environmental medicine, within either emergency or acute medicine, would be advantageous to deployed units as well as specialised units, including those tasked in support of UK homeland security. An established pathway for sub-specialisation in clinical toxicology does not yet exist. With the establishment of the College of Emergency Medicine, as well as the Acute Medicine Society and Intensive Care Society further development of clinical toxicology is likely. PMID:17310611

Bland, S A

2006-01-01

355

Clinical Endophenotypes for Bipolar Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Although twin, family, and adoption studies demonstrate that bipolar disorder (BPD) is substantially heritable, the molecular\\u000a genetic basis for this illness remains elusive. Given evidence that genes predisposing to BPD may be transmitted without expression\\u000a of the clinical phenotype, interest has arisen in developing endophenotypes – indicators of processes mediating between genotype\\u000a and phenotype. Patients with BPD have subtle neuropsychological

David C. Glahn; Katherine E. Burdick

356

Managing clinical research permissions electronically  

PubMed Central

Background One mechanism to increase participation in research is to solicit potential research participants’ general willingness to be recruited into clinical trials. Such research permissions and consents typically are collected on paper upon patient registration. We describe a novel method of capturing this information electronically. Purpose The objective is to enable the collection of research permissions and informed consent data electronically to permit tracking of potential research participants’ interest in current and future research involvement and to provide a foundation for facilitating the research workflow. Methods The project involved systematic analysis focused on key areas, including existing business practices, registration processes, and permission collection workflows, and ascertaining best practices for presenting consent information to users via tablet technology and capturing permissions data. Analysis was followed by an iterative software development cycle with feedback from subject matter experts and users. Results An initial version of the software was piloted at one institution in South Carolina for a period of 1 year, during which consents and permission were collected during 2524 registrations of patients. The captured research permission data were transmitted to a clinical data warehouse. The software was later released as an open-source package that can be adopted for use by other institutions. Limitations There are significant ethical, legal, and informatics challenges that must be addressed at an institution to deploy such a system. We have not yet assessed the long-term impact of the system on recruitment of patients to clinical trials. Conclusions We propose that by improving the ability to track willing potential research participants, we can improve recruitment into clinical trials and, in the process, improve patient education by introducing multimedia to informed consent documents. PMID:23785065

Sanderson, Iain C; Obeid, Jihad S; Madathil, Kapil Chalil; Gerken, Katherine; Fryar, Katrina; Rugg, Daniel; Alstad, Colin E; Alexander, Randall; Brady, Kathleen T; Gramopadhye, Anand K; Moskowitz, Jay

2014-01-01

357

Conflict in the dialysis clinic.  

PubMed

Conflict is common in healthcare settings and can affect the functioning of a dialysis clinic. Unresolved conflict can decrease staff productivity and teamwork, and potentially decrease the quality of patient care. This article discusses the causes and effects of conflict, describes the five basic conflict-handling styles that can be useful when dealing with conflict (avoidance, accommodation, competing, compromise, and collaboration), and provides resources for resolving patient-provider conflict. PMID:25244891

Payton, Jennifer

2014-01-01

358

Harnessing neuroplasticity for clinical applications  

PubMed Central

Neuroplasticity can be defined as the ability of the nervous system to respond to intrinsic or extrinsic stimuli by reorganizing its structure, function and connections. Major advances in the understanding of neuroplasticity have to date yielded few established interventions. To advance the translation of neuroplasticity research towards clinical applications, the National Institutes of Health Blueprint for Neuroscience Research sponsored a workshop in 2009. Basic and clinical researchers in disciplines from central nervous system injury/stroke, mental/addictive disorders, paediatric/developmental disorders and neurodegeneration/ageing identified cardinal examples of neuroplasticity, underlying mechanisms, therapeutic implications and common denominators. Promising therapies that may enhance training-induced cognitive and motor learning, such as brain stimulation and neuropharmacological interventions, were identified, along with questions of how best to use this body of information to reduce human disability. Improved understanding of adaptive mechanisms at every level, from molecules to synapses, to networks, to behaviour, can be gained from iterative collaborations between basic and clinical researchers. Lessons can be gleaned from studying fields related to plasticity, such as development, critical periods, learning and response to disease. Improved means of assessing neuroplasticity in humans, including biomarkers for predicting and monitoring treatment response, are needed. Neuroplasticity occurs with many variations, in many forms, and in many contexts. However, common themes in plasticity that emerge across diverse central nervous system conditions include experience dependence, time sensitivity and the importance of motivation and attention. Integration of information across disciplines should enhance opportunities for the translation of neuroplasticity and circuit retraining research into effective clinical therapies. PMID:21482550

Sur, Mriganka; Dobkin, Bruce H.; O'Brien, Charles; Sanger, Terence D.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Rumsey, Judith M.; Hicks, Ramona; Cameron, Judy; Chen, Daofen; Chen, Wen G.; Cohen, Leonardo G.; deCharms, Christopher; Duffy, Charles J.; Eden, Guinevere F.; Fetz, Eberhard E.; Filart, Rosemarie; Freund, Michelle; Grant, Steven J.; Haber, Suzanne; Kalivas, Peter W.; Kolb, Bryan; Kramer, Arthur F.; Lynch, Minda; Mayberg, Helen S.; McQuillen, Patrick S.; Nitkin, Ralph; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Reuter-Lorenz, Patricia; Schiff, Nicholas; Sharma, Anu; Shekim, Lana; Stryker, Michael; Sullivan, Edith V.; Vinogradov, Sophia

2011-01-01

359

Clinical applications in molecular imaging  

Microsoft Academic Search

Molecular imaging is aimed at the noninvasive in vivo characterization and measurement of processes at a cellular and molecular\\u000a level with clinical imaging methods. Contrast agents are constructed to target markers that are specific either for certain\\u000a diseases or for functional states of specialized tissues. Efforts are currently focused mainly on processes involved in angiogenesis,\\u000a inflammation, and apoptosis. Cell tracking

Carola Heneweer; Jan Grimm

2011-01-01

360

ABM clinical protocol #20: Engorgement.  

PubMed

A central goal of The Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine is the development of clinical protocols for managing common medical problems that may impact breastfeeding success. These protocols serve only as guidelines for the care of breastfeeding mothers and infants and do not delineate an exclusive course of treatment or serve as standards of medical care. Variations in treatment may be appropriate according to the needs of an individual patient. PMID:19517578

Berens, Pam

2009-06-01

361

Mannosidosis. Clinical and biochemical study.  

PubMed Central

The clinical, radiological, and biochemical features of 2 male children with mannosidosis are described. Superficially they appeared to suffer from Hurler's syndrome, but the facies, eye signs, radiological and cytological features were atypical. Excess urinary oligosaccharides were found by thin-layer chromatography. The diagnosis was confirmed by determining the acidic alpha-mannosidase activity of leucocytes and cultured skin fibroblasts. Prenatal diagnosis is possible from cultured amniotic cells. Images Fig. 1 p939-a Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:606170

Milla, P J; Black, I E; Patrick, A D; Hugh-Jones, K; Oberholzer, V

1977-01-01

362

Post-mortem clinical pharmacology  

PubMed Central

Clinical pharmacology assumes that deductions can be made about the concentrations of drugs from a knowledge of the pharmacokinetic parameters in an individual; and that the effects are related to the measured concentration. Post-mortem changes render the assumptions of clinical pharmacology largely invalid, and make the interpretation of concentrations measured in post-mortem samples difficult or impossible. Qualitative tests can show the presence of substances that were not present in life, and can fail to detect substances that led to death. Quantitative analysis is subject to error in itself, and because post-mortem concentrations vary in largely unpredictable ways with the site and time of sampling, as a result of the phenomenon of post-mortem redistribution. Consequently, compilations of ‘lethal concentrations’ are misleading. There is a lack of adequate studies of the true relationship between fatal events and the concentrations that can be measured subsequently, but without such studies, clinical pharmacologists and others should be wary of interpreting post-mortem measurements. PMID:18637886

Ferner, R E

2008-01-01

363

Clinical Trials in Head Injury  

PubMed Central

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains a major public health problem globally. In the United States the incidence of closed head injuries admitted to hospitals is conservatively estimated to be 200 per 100,000 population, and the incidence of penetrating head injury is estimated to be 12 per 100,000, the highest of any developed country in the world. This yields an approximate number of 500,000 new cases each year, a sizeable proportion of which demonstrate signficant long-term disabilities. Unfortunately, there is a paucity of proven therapies for this disease. For a variety of reasons, clinical trials for this condition have been difficult to design and perform. Despite promising pre-clinical data, most of the trials that have been performed in recent years have failed to demonstrate any significant improvement in outcomes. The reasons for these failures have not always been apparent and any insights gained were not always shared. It was therefore feared that we were running the risk of repeating our mistakes. Recognizing the importance of TBI, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) sponsored a workshop that brought together experts from clinical, research, and pharmaceutical backgrounds. This workshop proved to be very informative and yielded many insights into previous and future TBI trials. This paper is an attempt to summarize the key points made at the workshop. It is hoped that these lessons will enhance the planning and design of future efforts in this important field of research. PMID:12042091

NARAYAN, RAJ K.; MICHEL, MARY ELLEN; Ansell, Beth; Baethmann, Alex; Biegon, Anat; Bracken, Michael B.; Bullock, M. Ross; Choi, Sung C.; Clifton, Guy L.; Contant, Charles F.; Coplin, William M.; Dietrich, W. Dalton; Ghajar, Jamshid; Grady, Sean M.; Grossman, Robert G.; Hall, Edward D.; Heetderks, William; Hovda, David A.; Jallo, Jack; Katz, Russell L.; Knoller, Nachshon; Kochanek, Patrick M.; Maas, Andrew I.; Majde, Jeannine; Marion, Donald W.; Marmarou, Anthony; Marshall, Lawrence F.; McIntosh, Tracy K.; Miller, Emmy; Mohberg, Noel; Muizelaar, J. Paul; Pitts, Lawrence H.; Quinn, Peter; Riesenfeld, Gad; Robertson, Claudia S.; Strauss, Kenneth I.; Teasdale, Graham; Temkin, Nancy; Tuma, Ronald; Wade, Charles; Walker, Michael D.; Weinrich, Michael; Whyte, John; Wilberger, Jack; Young, A. Byron; Yurkewicz, Lorraine

2006-01-01

364

Ultrasound enhanced thrombolysis: Clinical evidence  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Phase II CLOTBUST randomized clinical trial (Houston, Barcelona, Edmonton, Calgary) evaluated patients with acute ischemic stroke due to intracranial occlusion and treated with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (TPA) within 3 h of symptom onset. Randomization: monitoring with pulsed wave 2 MHz transcranial Doppler (TCD) (Target) or placebo monitoring (Control). Safety: symptomatic bleeding to the brain (sICH). Primary end-point: complete recanalization on TCD or dramatic clinical recovery by the total NIHSS score <3, or improvement by >10 NIHSS points within 2 hours after TPA bolus. All projected 126 patients were randomized 1:1 to target (median NIHSS 16) or control (NIHSS 17). sICH: 4.8% Target, 4.8% Controls. Primary end-point was achieved by 31 (49%, Target) versus 19 (30%, Control), p<0.03. At 3 months, 22 (42% Target) and 14 (29% Control) patients achieved favorable outcomes. Continuous TCD monitoring of intracranial occlusion safely augments TPA-induced arterial recanalization, and 2 MHz diagnostic ultrasound has a positive biological activity that aids systemic thrombolytic therapy. For the first time in clinical medicine, the CLOTBUST trial provides the evidence that ultrasound enhances thrombolytic activity of a drug in humans thereby confirming intense multi-disciplinary experimental research conducted worldwide for the past 30 years.

Alexandrov, Andrei V.

2005-04-01

365

Clinical economics in clinical trials: the measurement of cost and outcomes in the assessment of clinical services through clinical trials.  

PubMed

As the population ages and more expensive high-technology services become available, health care costs continue to spiral upward. Because the financial resources for health care are limited, economic analysis can help to evaluate expenditures and set priorities. Economic analysis of medical technology or medical care evaluates a medical service by comparing its dollar cost with its dollar benefit (cost-benefit), by measuring its dollar cost in relation to its outcomes (cost-effectiveness) as well as in relation to its utility or quality-adjusted outcomes (cost-utility), or simply by tabulating the costs involved (cost-identification). Direct costs are generated as services are provided. In addition, patients' productivity is affected, and these costs can be considered, especially in determining the benefit of a service that decreases morbidity or mortality. Intangible costs are those of pain, suffering, and grief. The point of view, or perspective, of the study determines the costs and benefits that will be measured in the analysis. Sensitivity analysis, which can evaluate the stability of the conclusions to the data used, is an important assessment within economic analysis. Economic analysis of new pharmaceutical therapies is increasingly being incorporated into clinical trials. Although there are some limitations of pharmacoeconomic information in clinical studies of drug safety and efficacy, these trials are often the only opportunity for economic data collection before adoption and reimbursement decisions are made. Validation after the drug has been introduced should complement economic information developed from clinical trials. PMID:10206013

Schulman, K A; Ohishi, A; Park, J; Glick, H A; Eisenberg, J M

1999-03-01

366

A clinical approach to pharmacogenetics.  

PubMed

Taking into account the high frequency of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in the clinic and taking into account the growing knowledge of the genetic mechanisms underlying some of these ADRs, we believe that every clinician should know at least the basic principles of pharmacogenetics. However, our experience is that many clinicians are unaware of the potential contribution of pharmacogenetic testing and have not implemented this new modality in their daily practice. We present a case of Stevens-Johnson syndrome in a patient treated with carbamazepine. Following the pathways of clinical reasoning, we describe the possibilities of pharmacogenetic testing in the clinic (HLA-B*1502 and HLA-A*3101 in our patient). We describe the pharmacological and pharmacogenetic aspects relevant for the clinician's daily practice (the existence of ADR subtypes, cytochrome P450, drug-drug interactions, genetic variations, CYP450 and HLA genotyping). Based on the Dutch top 100 of most prescribed drugs, we provide data on CYP450 and HLA genotypes relevant to those 100 most commonly used drugs. We discuss the availability and costs of pharmacogenetic testing, show a calculation of the 'number needed to genotype' and, based on these data, we propose a decision model for pharmacogenetic testing by clinicians. PMID:23712814

de Graaff, L C G; van Schaik, R H N; van Gelder, T

2013-04-01

367

Can research influence clinical practice?  

PubMed

After briefly reviewing the unfavourable reception accorded empirical research by parts of the psychoanalytic community, as well as some of the benefits to clinical practice of analysts being involved in research activities, the author examines whether the findings of process and outcome research in psychotherapy and psychoanalysis can help identify the most appropriate forms of intervention for producing therapeutic change, given the specific condition of the patient and the relationship that the individual establishes with the analyst. He argues that research findings can influence clinical practice on various levels and in different areas, and goes on to examine a number of related issues: the specificity of therapeutic interventions versus the relevance of common curative factors; the dyadic conception of technique and ways of understanding the therapeutic action of the treatment alliance; and the strategic or heuristic conception in psychoanalytic therapy. Finally, the author presents clinical material with the aim of illustrating how the knowledge acquired through research can be applied to psychoanalytic treatment. PMID:17537698

Jiménez, Juan Pablo

2007-06-01

368

Clinical Applications of Gallium-68  

PubMed Central

Gallium-68 is a positron-emitting radioisotope that is produced from a 68Ge/68Ga generator. As such it is conveniently used, decoupling radiopharmacies from the need for a cyclotron on site. Gallium-68-labeled peptides have been recognized as a new class of radiopharmaceuticals showing fast target localization and blood clearance. 68Ga-DOTATOC, 8Ga-DOTATATE, 68Ga-DOTANOC, are the most prominent radiopharmaceuticals currently in use for imaging and differentiating lesions of various somatostatin receptor subtypes, overexpressed in many neuroendocrine tumors. There has been a tremendous increase in the number of clinical studies with 68Ga over the past few years around the world, including within the United States. An estimated ~10,000 scans are being performed yearly in Europe at about 100 centers utilizing 68Ga-labeled somatostatin analogs within clinical trials. Two academic sites within the US have also begun to undertake human studies. This review will focus on the clinical experience of selected, well-established and recently applied 68Ga-labeled imaging agents used in nuclear medicine. PMID:23522791

Banerjee, Sangeeta Ray; Pomper, Martin G.

2013-01-01

369

Genomic sequencing in clinical trials  

PubMed Central

Human genome sequencing is the process by which the exact order of nucleic acid base pairs in the 24 human chromosomes is determined. Since the completion of the Human Genome Project in 2003, genomic sequencing is rapidly becoming a major part of our translational research efforts to understand and improve human health and disease. This article reviews the current and future directions of clinical research with respect to genomic sequencing, a technology that is just beginning to find its way into clinical trials both nationally and worldwide. We highlight the currently available types of genomic sequencing platforms, outline the advantages and disadvantages of each, and compare first- and next-generation techniques with respect to capabilities, quality, and cost. We describe the current geographical distributions and types of disease conditions in which these technologies are used, and how next-generation sequencing is strategically being incorporated into new and existing studies. Lastly, recent major breakthroughs and the ongoing challenges of using genomic sequencing in clinical research are discussed. PMID:22206293

2011-01-01

370

Pre-clinical diastolic dysfunction.  

PubMed

Pre-clinical diastolic dysfunction (PDD) has been broadly defined as left ventricular diastolic dysfunction without the diagnosis of congestive heart failure (HF) and with normal systolic function. PDD is an entity that remains poorly understood, yet has definite clinical significance. Although few original studies have focused on PDD, it has been shown that PDD is prevalent, and that there is a clear progression from PDD to symptomatic HF including dyspnea, edema, and fatigue. In diabetic patients and in patients with coronary artery disease or hypertension, it has been shown that patients with PDD have a significantly higher risk of progression to heart failure and death compared with patients without PDD. Because of these findings and the increasing prevalence of the heart failure epidemic, it is clear that an understanding of PDD is essential to decreasing patients' morbidity and mortality. This review will focus on what is known concerning pre-clinical diastolic dysfunction, including definitions, staging, epidemiology, pathophysiology, and the natural history of the disease. In addition, given the paucity of trials focused on PDD treatment, studies targeting risk factors associated with the development of PDD and therapeutic trials for heart failure with preserved ejection fraction will be reviewed. PMID:24291270

Wan, Siu-Hin; Vogel, Mark W; Chen, Horng H

2014-02-11

371

[Clinical cytology: why and how?].  

PubMed

Clinical cytology is a morphological diagnostic profession, which has not been properly utilized in current medicine, primarily due to inadequate awareness among physicians of its diagnostic possibilities and advantages. The purpose of this historical review of clinical cytology and its diagnostic role is to contribute to higher awareness of the current possibilities offered by cytologic diagnosis and its future development in the era of technological progress and medical striking into profitability, with its negative connotations. The main features of cytologic diagnosis, i.e. non-aggressiveness, simplicity, promptness and accuracy, should be maintained while following new technological possibilities. Standard cytomorphology provides a basis for deciding on using additional technologies (cytochemistry, immunocytochemistry, flow cytometry, molecular analysis and cytogenetics) after thorough microscopic analysis, on cytologic samples or/and cytologic smears. The conditio sine qua non for that purpose is appropriate education of cytologists and cytotechnologists as well as appropriate organization of cytology in the healthcare system. As in the historical development of clinical cytology, enthusiasts are necessary to maintain and even improve all its possibilities to the benefit of our patients. PMID:24979879

Znidarci?, Zeljka

2013-12-01

372

Standardisation of neonatal clinical practice.  

PubMed

The International Fetal and Newborn Growth Consortium for the 21(st) Century (INTERGROWTH-21(st) ) is a large-scale, population-based, multicentre project involving health institutions from eight geographically diverse countries, which aims to assess fetal, newborn and preterm growth under optimal conditions. Given the multicentre nature of the project and the expected number of preterm births, it is vital that all centres follow the same standardised clinical care protocols to assess and manage preterm infants, so as to ensure maximum validity of the resulting standards as indicators of growth and nutrition with minimal confounding. Moreover, it is well known that evidence-based clinical practice guidelines can reduce the delivery of inappropriate care and support the introduction of new knowledge into clinical practice. The INTERGROWTH-21(st) Neonatal Group produced an operations manual, which reflects the consensus reached by members of the group regarding standardised definitions of neonatal morbidities and the minimum standards of care to be provided by all centres taking part in the project. The operational definitions and summary management protocols were developed by consensus through a Delphi process based on systematic reviews of relevant guidelines and management protocols by authoritative bodies. This paper describes the process of developing the Basic Neonatal Care Manual, as well as the morbidity definitions and standardised neonatal care protocols applied across all the INTERGROWTH-21(st) participating centres. Finally, thoughts about implementation strategies are presented. PMID:23841879

Bhutta, Z A; Giuliani, F; Haroon, A; Knight, H E; Albernaz, E; Batra, M; Bhat, B; Bertino, E; McCormick, K; Ochieng, R; Rajan, V; Ruyan, P; Cheikh Ismail, L; Paul, V

2013-09-01

373

Placebo Effects: Biological, Clinical and Ethical Advances  

PubMed Central

For many years, placebos have been conceptualised by their inert content and their use as controls in clinical trials and treatments in clinical practice. Recent research demonstrates that placebo effects are genuine psychobiological phenomenon attributable to the overall therapeutic context, and that placebo effects can be robust in both laboratory and clinical settings. Evidence has also emerged that placebo effects can exist in clinical practice, even if no placebo is given. Further promotion and integration of laboratory and clinical research will allow advances in the ethical harnessing of placebo mechanisms that are inherent in routine clinical care and the potential use of treatments to primarily promote placebo effects. PMID:20171404

Kaptchuk, Ted J; Miller, Franklin; Benedetti, Fabrizio

2010-01-01

374

Clinical Instructor Responsibilities The APTA has detailed voluntary guidelines for clinical instructors. The guidelines  

E-print Network

: · Clinical competence and legal and ethical behavior that meets or exceeds student's clinical internship in a collegial manner that demonstrates unconditionalClinical Instructor Responsibilities The APTA has detailed voluntary

Contractor, Anis

375

Chapter 28. Computational Physiology and Clinical Inference Computational Physiology and Clinical Inference  

E-print Network

Chapter 28. Computational Physiology and Clinical Inference 28-1 Computational Physiology of the research in RLE's Computational Physiology and Clinical Inference (CPCI) Group are to enhance patient monitoring, improve clinical decision-making, and better understand physiological and pathophysiological

376

21 CFR 862.3200 - Clinical toxicology calibrator.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Clinical toxicology calibrator. 862.3200 Section 862.3200...MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems § 862.3200 Clinical...

2010-04-01

377

21 CFR 862.3280 - Clinical toxicology control material.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Clinical toxicology control material. 862.3280 Section 862...MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems § 862.3280 Clinical...

2010-04-01

378

Perspectives on Clinical Informatics: Integrating Large-Scale Clinical, Genomic, and Health Information for Clinical Care  

PubMed Central

The advances in electronic medical records (EMRs) and bioinformatics (BI) represent two significant trends in healthcare. The widespread adoption of EMR systems and the completion of the Human Genome Project developed the technologies for data acquisition, analysis, and visualization in two different domains. The massive amount of data from both clinical and biology domains is expected to provide personalized, preventive, and predictive healthcare services in the near future. The integrated use of EMR and BI data needs to consider four key informatics areas: data modeling, analytics, standardization, and privacy. Bioclinical data warehouses integrating heterogeneous patient-related clinical or omics data should be considered. The representative standardization effort by the Clinical Bioinformatics Ontology (CBO) aims to provide uniquely identified concepts to include molecular pathology terminologies. Since individual genome data are easily used to predict current and future health status, different safeguards to ensure confidentiality should be considered. In this paper, we focused on the informatics aspects of integrating the EMR community and BI community by identifying opportunities, challenges, and approaches to provide the best possible care service for our patients and the population. PMID:24465229

Choi, In Young; Kim, Tae-Min; Kim, Myung Shin; Mun, Seong K.

2013-01-01

379

Translating materials design to the clinic  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Many materials-based therapeutic systems have reached the clinic or are in clinical trials. Here we describe materials design principles and the construction of delivery vehicles, as well as their adaptation and evaluation for human use.

Hubbell, Jeffrey A.; Langer, Robert

2013-11-01

380

Clinical Trials and Translational Research Advisory Committee  

Cancer.gov

CCCT supports the NCI Clinical Trials and Translational Research Advisory Committee (CTAC), an external oversight committee that advises NCI leadership on ways to enhance NCI's clinical and translational research enterprises.

381

Survival of nonprofit community health clinics  

E-print Network

not present in either private enterprise or state agencies. This comparison case study examines three clinics, one surviving clinic and two that did not survive, to find patterns that characterize organizational success and survival. Theories about public...

Schemmer, Ruth Ann

2006-08-16

382

National Institutes of Health, Clinical Center  

MedlinePLUS

... Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Contact us | Site Map | Staff Only About the Clinical Center Search the Studies Patient Information Education & Training Researchers & Physicians News & Events Staff Directory Dr. John I. Gallin Director, Clinical Center, National Institutes ...

383

Opportunity for Clinical Assay Development Support  

Cancer.gov

The NCI’s Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis and the Cancer Diagnosis Program announce a request for applications for the Clinical Assay Development Program (CADP) for investigators seeking clinical assay development and validation resources.

384

20-Year Community Clinical Oncology Programs  

Cancer.gov

Community Clinical Oncology Program Celebrates 20 Years of Research 20-Year Community Clinical Oncology Programs CCOPs that have been continuously funded since 1983: Carle Cancer Center CCOP, Urbana, Illinois Columbus CCOP, Columbus, Ohio Dayton

385

Sickle Cell Clinics, Contacts, and Resources  

MedlinePLUS

... 3932 Dr. Majed Jerordi Telephone: (318) 675-7267 Satellite Clinics: Alexandria CSHS Office (318) 487-5266 Monroe CSHS Office (318) 362-5211 UMC Sickle Cell Clinic Univeristy Medical Center P.O Box 4016C ...

386

78 FR 63988 - Clinical Investigator Training Course  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...investigators in understanding what preclinical and clinical information is needed...ethical obligations of clinical research, and acceptable scientific and...investigator's brochure,'' i.e., the preclinical information (toxicology,...

2013-10-25

387

77 FR 60440 - Clinical Investigator Training Course  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...investigators in understanding what preclinical and clinical information is needed...ethical obligations of clinical research, and acceptable scientific and...investigator's brochure,'' i.e., the preclinical information (toxicology,...

2012-10-03

388

An ontology model for clinical documentation templates  

E-print Network

There are various kinds of clinical documents used in a hospital or clinic setting. With the emergence of Electronic Medical Records, efforts are being made to computerize these documents in a structured fashion in order ...

George, Joyce, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01

389

Clinical Research Informatics Systems Project Final Report  

E-print Network

Clinical Research Informatics Systems Project Final Report March 29, 2010 Rev. 8.30.2010 Report Orientation Checklist (Draft)................................XII #12;Clinical Research Informatics Systems Submitted to: Dr. Joyce Mitchell Chair, Department of Medical Informatics Associate Vice President, Health

Provancher, William

390

The globalization of clinical drug development  

E-print Network

Industry-sponsored clinical research of investigational drugs (also called clinical development) has traditionally been carried out in relatively developed countries in the North American, Western European, and Pacific ...

Thiers, Fabio Albuquerque

2006-01-01

391

78 FR 13351 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request: Clinical Mythteries: A Video Game About Clinical Trials  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Request: Clinical Mythteries: A Video Game About Clinical Trials SUMMARY: Under the...Title: Clinical Mythteries: A Video Game About Clinical Trials. Type of Information...engaging, informational ``serious video game'' for adolescents about clinical...

2013-02-27

392

What is a clinical fact? Clinical psychoanalysis as inductive method.  

PubMed

This paper is an inquiry into the nature of clinical facts in psychoanalysis. The attainment of representability of psychic reality being requisite for insight, the author examines inductive processes on the part of both analyst and analysand, which are to be considered proper aspects of the study of clinical facts. It is argued that the analyst chooses his interpretations guided in good measure by nonverbal material, based on how he intuits that he is 'used' by the analysand and the ways the analysand feels 'used' by him; such nonverbal clues on the nature of the unconscious relational 'frames' operating in sessions guide him to select relevant associations from the universe of the analysand's verbal utterances. He thus comes to voice his interpretations, purveying a 'mapping' of psychic reality that typically makes use of a new viewpoint for description. Insight is achieved when the analysand attains ostensive refutation or redefinition of his unconscious 'theories' about the relationship, and this happens only in concrete individual situations, when the effects of his relational unconscious 'theories' come to be contrasted observationally in diverse 'screens', perceptual and mnemic, against the background of the analyst's neutrality: in such a way unconscious 'theories' attain the Pcs.-Cs. domain of the 'no'. PMID:7713672

Ahumada, J L

1994-12-01

393

Dose-response relationship in clinical oncology  

SciTech Connect

The relationship of dose (and dose rate) to response and toxicity in clinical oncology is reviewed. The concepts expressed by some authors in dose-response studies in animal and human systems are reviewed briefly. Dose rate and tactics of conducting clinical studies are reviewed for both radiotherapy and various types of chemotherapeutic treatment. Examples are given from clinical studies in Hodgkin's disease, acute leukemia, and breast cancer that may prove useful in planning future clinical studies.

Gehan, E.A.

1984-09-15

394

Advantages of Multiplex Proteomics in Clinical Immunology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Clinical multiplex diagnostic proteomics is the application of proteomic technologies to improve a patient’s clinical outcomes.\\u000a The future holds impact potential for testing prognosis, diagnosis, and drug therapy, while monitoring efficacious treatment\\u000a with qualitative and quantitative data. Multiplex clinical diagnostic use of novel biomarkers in body fluids to confirm presence\\u000a and severity of clinical disease states, holds great promise for

Peter Lea; Edward Keystone; Sasi Mudumba; Anthony Kahama; Shi-Fa Ding; Jennifer Hansen; Azar A. Azad; Sihe Wang; Deborah Weber

2011-01-01

395

Clinical guideline: management of gastroparesis.  

PubMed

This guideline presents recommendations for the evaluation and management of patients with gastroparesis. Gastroparesis is identified in clinical practice through the recognition of the clinical symptoms and documentation of delayed gastric emptying. Symptoms from gastroparesis include nausea, vomiting, early satiety, postprandial fullness, bloating, and upper abdominal pain. Management of gastroparesis should include assessment and correction of nutritional state, relief of symptoms, improvement of gastric emptying and, in diabetics, glycemic control. Patient nutritional state should be managed by oral dietary modifications. If oral intake is not adequate, then enteral nutrition via jejunostomy tube needs to be considered. Parenteral nutrition is rarely required when hydration and nutritional state cannot be maintained. Medical treatment entails use of prokinetic and antiemetic therapies. Current approved treatment options, including metoclopramide and gastric electrical stimulation (GES, approved on a humanitarian device exemption), do not adequately address clinical need. Antiemetics have not been specifically tested in gastroparesis, but they may relieve nausea and vomiting. Other medications aimed at symptom relief include unapproved medications or off-label indications, and include domperidone, erythromycin (primarily over a short term), and centrally acting antidepressants used as symptom modulators. GES may relieve symptoms, including weekly vomiting frequency, and the need for nutritional supplementation, based on open-label studies. Second-line approaches include venting gastrostomy or feeding jejunostomy; intrapyloric botulinum toxin injection was not effective in randomized controlled trials. Most of these treatments are based on open-label treatment trials and small numbers. Partial gastrectomy and pyloroplasty should be used rarely, only in carefully selected patients. Attention should be given to the development of new effective therapies for symptomatic control. PMID:23147521

Camilleri, Michael; Parkman, Henry P; Shafi, Mehnaz A; Abell, Thomas L; Gerson, Lauren

2013-01-01

396

Clinical Guideline: Management of Gastroparesis  

PubMed Central

This guideline presents recommendations for the evaluation and management of patients with gastroparesis. Gastroparesis is identified in clinical practice through the recognition of the clinical symptoms and documentation of delayed gastric emptying. Symptoms from gastroparesis include nausea, vomiting, early satiety, postprandial fullness, bloating, and upper abdominal pain. Management of gastroparesis should include assessment and correction of nutritional state, relief of symptoms, improvement of gastric emptying and, in diabetics, glycemic control. Patient nutritional state should be managed by oral dietary modifications. If oral intake is not adequate, then enteral nutrition via jejunostomy tube needs to be considered. Parenteral nutrition is rarely required when hydration and nutritional state cannot be maintained. Medical treatment entails use of prokinetic and antiemetic therapies. Current approved treatment options, including metoclopramide and gastric electrical stimulation (GES, approved on a humanitarian device exemption), do not adequately address clinical need. Antiemetics have not been specifically tested in gastroparesis, but they may relieve nausea and vomiting. Other medications aimed at symptom relief include unapproved medications or off-label indications, and include domperidone, erythromycin (primarily over a short term), and centrally acting antidepressants used as symptom modulators. GES may relieve symptoms, including weekly vomiting frequency, and the need for nutritional supplementation, based on open-label studies. Second-line approaches include venting gastrostomy or feeding jejunostomy; intrapyloric botulinum toxin injection was not effective in randomized controlled trials. Most of these treatments are based on open-label treatment trials and small numbers. Partial gastrectomy and pyloroplasty should be used rarely, only in carefully selected patients. Attention should be given to the development of new effective therapies for symptomatic control. PMID:23147521

Camilleri, Michael; Parkman, Henry P.; Shafi, Mehnaz A.; Abell, Thomas L.; Gerson, Lauren

2013-01-01

397

Cough: an unmet clinical need  

PubMed Central

Cough is among the most common complaints for which patients worldwide seek medical attention. Thus, the evaluation and treatment of cough result in tremendous financial expenditure and consumption of health care resources. Yet, despite the clinical significance of cough, research efforts aimed at improving diagnostic capabilities and developing more effective therapeutic agents have been, to date, disappointing in their limited scope and outcomes. Acute cough due to the common cold represents the most common type of cough. Currently, available medications for the symptomatic management of acute cough are inadequate due to lack of proven efficacy and/or their association with undesirable or intolerable side effects at anti-tussive doses. Subacute cough, often representing a prolonged post-viral response, is typically refractory to standard anti-tussive therapy. Few clinical trials have evaluated therapeutic options for subacute cough. Diagnostic challenges facing the clinician in the management of chronic cough include the determination of whether symptoms of upper airway cough syndrome (formerly, postnasal drip syndrome) or gastro-oesophageal reflux disease are indeed the underlying cause of cough. Chronic, refractory unexplained (formerly, idiopathic) cough must be distinguished from cough that has not been fully evaluated and treated according to current guideline recommendations. Eagerly awaited are new safe and effective anti-tussive agents for use when cough suppression is desired, regardless of underlying aetiology of cough, as well as practical, validated ambulatory cough counters to aid clinical assessment and future research in the field of cough. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Respiratory Pharmacology. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2011.163.issue-1 PMID:21198555

Dicpinigaitis, Peter V

2011-01-01

398

Searching the Clinical Fitness Landscape  

PubMed Central

Widespread unexplained variations in clinical practices and patient outcomes suggest major opportunities for improving the quality and safety of medical care. However, there is little consensus regarding how to best identify and disseminate healthcare improvements and a dearth of theory to guide the debate. Many consider multicenter randomized controlled trials to be the gold standard of evidence-based medicine, although results are often inconclusive or may not be generally applicable due to differences in the contexts within which care is provided. Increasingly, others advocate the use “quality improvement collaboratives”, in which multi-institutional teams share information to identify potentially better practices that are subsequently evaluated in the local contexts of specific institutions, but there is concern that such collaborative learning approaches lack the statistical rigor of randomized trials. Using an agent-based model, we show how and why a collaborative learning approach almost invariably leads to greater improvements in expected patient outcomes than more traditional approaches in searching simulated clinical fitness landscapes. This is due to a combination of greater statistical power and more context-dependent evaluation of treatments, especially in complex terrains where some combinations of practices may interact in affecting outcomes. The results of our simulations are consistent with observed limitations of randomized controlled trials and provide important insights into probable reasons for effectiveness of quality improvement collaboratives in the complex socio-technical environments of healthcare institutions. Our approach illustrates how modeling the evolution of medical practice as search on a clinical fitness landscape can aid in identifying and understanding strategies for improving the quality and safety of medical care. PMID:23166791

Eppstein, Margaret J.; Horbar, Jeffrey D.; Buzas, Jeffrey S.; Kauffman, Stuart A.

2012-01-01

399

Urological diagnosis using clinical PACS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Urological diagnosis using fluoroscopy images has traditionally been performed using radiographic films. Images are generally acquired in conjunction with the application of a contrast agent, processed to create analog films, and inspected to ensure satisfactory image quality prior to being provided to a radiologist for reading. In the case of errors the entire process must be repeated. In addition, the radiologist must then often go to a particular reading room, possibly in a remote part of the healthcare facility, to read the images. The integration of digital fluoroscopy modalities with clinical PACS has the potential to significantly improve the urological diagnosis process by providing high-speed access to images at a variety of locations within a healthcare facility without costly film processing. The PACS additionally provides a cost-effective and reliable means of long-term storage and allows several medical users to simultaneously view the same images at different locations. The installation of a digital data interface between the existing clinically operational PACS at the University of Virginia Health Sciences Center and a digital urology fluoroscope is described. Preliminary user interviews that have been conducted to determine the clinical effectiveness of PACS workstations for urological diagnosis are discussed. The specific suitability of the workstation medium is discussed, as are overall advantages and disadvantages of the hardcopy and softcopy media in terms of efficiency, timeliness and cost. Throughput metrics and some specific parameters of gray-scale viewing stations and the expected system impacts resulting from the integration of a urology fluoroscope with PACS are also discussed.

Mills, Stephen F.; Spetz, Kevin S.; Dwyer, Samuel J., III

1995-05-01

400

Clinical quality standards for radiotherapy  

PubMed Central

Aim of the study The technological progress that is currently being witnessed in the areas of diagnostic imaging, treatment planning systems and therapeutic equipment has caused radiotherapy to become a high-tech and interdisciplinary domain involving staff of various backgrounds. This allows steady improvement in therapy results, but at the same time makes the diagnostic, imaging and therapeutic processes more complex and complicated, requiring every stage of those processes to be planned, organized, controlled and improved so as to assure high quality of services provided. The aim of this paper is to present clinical quality standards for radiotherapy as developed by the author. Material and methods In order to develop the quality standards, a comparative analysis was performed between European and Polish legal acts adopted in the period of 1980-2006 and the universal industrial ISO 9001:2008 standard, defining requirements for quality management systems, and relevant articles published in 1984-2009 were reviewed, including applicable guidelines and recommendations of American, international, European and Polish bodies, such as the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), the European Society for Radiotherapy & Oncology (ESTRO), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and the Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI) on quality assurance and management in radiotherapy. Results As a result, 352 quality standards for radiotherapy were developed and categorized into the following three groups: 1 – organizational standards; 2 – physico-technical standards and 3 – clinical standards. Conclusion Proposed clinical quality standards for radiotherapy can be used by any institution using ionizing radiation for medical purposes. However, standards are of value only if they are implemented, reviewed, audited and improved, and if there is a clear mechanism in place to monitor and address failure to meet agreed standards. PMID:23788854

2012-01-01

401

Measuring Clinical Significance in Rehabilitation Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Measurement of clinically significant change is critical for rehabilitation research because it can enhance the credibility of rehabilitation efforts and guide evidence-based practices. The practical appeal of clinically significant change is that it can bridge research and clinical practice by focusing on individual rather than group differences.…

Johnson, Erica K.; Dow, Christian; Lynch, Ruth T.; Hermann, Bruce P.

2006-01-01

402

3 Introduction 4 Training in Clinical Psychology  

E-print Network

1 2 Contacts 3 Introduction 4 Training in Clinical Psychology 4 Entry Requirements 6 Scholarship Justice Psychology 16 Overview of Programme 40 Clinical Placements 41 Profile of Employment Post to give an overview of the Clinical Psychology Programme. Information contained in this publication

Hickman, Mark

403

UNIVERSITY OF GLASGOW DOCTORATE IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF GLASGOW DOCTORATE IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAMME HANDBOOK 2013--2014 The University of Glasgow, charity no. SC004401 #12;#12;DOCTORATE IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY HANDBOOK Page 3 TABLE OF CONTENTS 3.2 The Doctorate In Clinical Psychology .................................................... 19 3

Guo, Zaoyang

404

Microwave and radiofrequency techniques for clinical hyperthermia.  

PubMed

Biological and practical constraints on the use of clinical hyperthermia for the management of cancer are discussed. Commonly used electromagnetic techniques for producing clinical hyperthermia are reviewed and compared. Innovative engineering designs leading to the realization of an integrated, safe and reliable clinical hyperthermia system are also presented. PMID:6950753

Cheung, A Y

1982-03-01

405

September 16, 2010 Volunteers for Flu Clinic  

E-print Network

September 16, 2010 Volunteers for Flu Clinic The Health System's Non-Clinical Labor Pool is coordinating employee volunteers to assist with the kick off of Employee Health Services Flu Vaccination Season. Two Flu Clinics will be conducted simultaneously on Friday, October 1, 2010 at the PSSB courtyard

Leistikow, Bruce N.

406

Clinical Facts, Turning Points and Complexity Theory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this paper, I explore how we might link ideas about clinical facts to current issues in child psychotherapy research. I consider what our understanding of clinical facts might contribute to our research methods and how our research methods might better represent the clinical facts. The paper introduces a selection of psychoanalytic writers'…

Lush, Margaret

2011-01-01

407

The Heart Failure Bridge Clinic Quality  

E-print Network

The Heart Failure Bridge Clinic Quality Improvement Project My project involved working with my failure case manager. The heart failure bridge clinic (HFBC), is a standalone clinic that was created for patients, with the primary diagnosis of congestive heart failure (CHF), to be seen in an outpatient setting

von der Heydt, Rüdiger

408

Cancer CAM Clinical Trials-OCCAM  

Cancer.gov

Visit NCI's Featured Clinical Trials to view CAM related clinical trials featured in the NCI Cancer Bulletin. Enter complementary in the Search Featured Trials box on the left side of the Web page to retrieve the current CAM related featured clinical trial summaries.

409

Japan's clinic physicians and their behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper examines the behavior of the Japanese general practitioner or clinic physician. Clinic physicians in Japan are entrepreneurs who own and operate their own clinics with either no beds or less than 20 beds. They have been the prime providers of Japan's health care, and they are represented by the politically powerful Japan Medical Association. General practitioners are reimbursed

Maratoshi A. Abe

1985-01-01

410

Clinical Psychology: A Research and Development Model.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this paper is to present a clinical research and development (R and D) model along with the rationale for its implementation and a sample training program for clinical psychologists. Although it may be possible to correct some problems by a clearer restatement of the scientist-professional model, a new model of clinical R and D has…

Broskowski, Anthony

411

NCI's Clinical Trials Programs and Initiatives  

Cancer.gov

Information about NCI programs and initiatives that sponsor, conduct, develop, or support clinical trials, including NCI’s Clinical Trial Network (NCTN) and NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) initiatives to transform cancer clinical trials to be more flexible and responsive to the rapid advances being made in oncologic sciences.

412

Studienordnung fr den weiterbildenden Masterstudiengang ,,Clinical Dental  

E-print Network

Studienordnung für den weiterbildenden Masterstudiengang ,,Clinical Dental CAD/CAM" an der Ernst Masterstudiengang ,,Clinical Dental CAD/CAM" als Satzung: Inhaltsverzeichnis § 1 Geltungsbereich § 2 Studium § 3 Clinical Dental CAD/CAM vom 3. Dezember 2009. * Mittl.bl. BM M-V S. 511 Soweit für Funktionsbezeichnungen

Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität

413

Role strain of clinical nursing faculty  

Microsoft Academic Search

A survey was conducted of 226 clinical faculty from associate (ADN) and baccalaureate (BSN) degree programs in the Midwest. The purpose of the research was to examine role strain among clinical nursing faculty. Although clinical faculty experienced overall a low degree of role strain, they reported role overload and conflict. BSN faculty had more interrole conflict (t = 2.57, df

Marilyn H. Oermann

1998-01-01

414

Clinical Subtypes of Alzheimer’s Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Alzheimer's disease (AD) can present as a variety of clinical profiles. Although the most common presentation is that of a progressive amnestic disorder with subsequent involvement of other cognitive functions and personality alterations, there are numerous other clinical profiles. AD can present as a focal cortical degenerative syndrome with the clinical features dependent on the regions of the brain involved.

R. C. Petersen

1998-01-01

415

How to implement change in clinical practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Changing clinical practice is a major challenge. It is not acceptable simply to send out a new clinical guideline or care pathway and expect there to be a change in practice. This paper addresses the problems associated with the development of a clinical guideline and sets out a clear strategy for dissemination, implementation and evaluation in a way that should

Colin V. E Powell

2003-01-01

416

DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF CLINICAL TRIALS  

E-print Network

should be able to: · Explain the key features of randomized controlled clinical trials and what the importance of randomization and the different methods of random allocation used in clinical trials · Solve theoretical problems related to the design and analysis of clinical trials 3 #12;Relation

Blennerhassett, Peter

417

Serving Inland Rural Communities through University Clinics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: To effectively provide clinical placements for students and increase healthcare options for rural communities, an investigation of university clinics was conducted. Method: This project adopted a consultative inquiry strategy and involved two processes: (1) a review of literature; and (2) interviews with existing health sciences clinic staff.…

Allan, Julaine; Pope, Rod; O'Meara, Peter; Higgs, Joy; Kent, Jenny

2011-01-01

418

42 CFR 440.90 - Clinic services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Clinic services. 440.90 Section 440.90 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE...SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...Definitions § 440.90 Clinic services. Clinic...

2010-10-01

419

42 CFR 440.90 - Clinic services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Clinic services. 440.90 Section 440.90 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE...SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...Definitions § 440.90 Clinic services. Clinic...

2013-10-01

420

42 CFR 440.90 - Clinic services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Clinic services. 440.90 Section 440.90 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE...SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...Definitions § 440.90 Clinic services. Clinic...

2011-10-01

421

42 CFR 440.90 - Clinic services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Clinic services. 440.90 Section 440.90 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE...SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...Definitions § 440.90 Clinic services. Clinic...

2012-10-01

422

42 CFR 440.90 - Clinic services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Clinic services. 440.90 Section 440.90 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE...SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...Definitions § 440.90 Clinic services. Clinic...

2014-10-01

423

Clinical and technological transition in breast cancer  

PubMed Central

This article is a summary of the conference “Clinical and technological transition in breast cancer” that took place in the Congress of the Spanish Society of Radiation Oncology, placed in Vigo (Spain) on June 21, 2013. Hugo Marsiglia and Philip Poortmanns were the speakers, the first discussed about “Clinical and technological transition” and the second about “EORTC clinical trials and protocols”. PMID:24416578

Poortmans, Philip; Marsiglia, Hugo; De las Heras, Manuel; Algara, Manuel

2013-01-01

424

Clinical epidemiology of testicular germ cell tumors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Clinical epidemiology is sometimes called the basic science of clinical medicine. In terms of the pathogenesis of testicular germ cell tumors (GCTs), clinical epidemiology analyzes suspected risk factors. The present review highlights the risk factors established so far and briefly summarizes those factors currently under investigation. In analogy to the methods of evidence based medicine, this review attributes levels of

K.-P. Dieckmann; U. Pichlmeier

2004-01-01

425

Speech & Hearing Clinic College of Science  

E-print Network

Speech & Hearing Clinic College of Science Department of Communication Disorders How to contact us: Please contact the Speech and Hearing Clinic during business hours to make an appointment. Clinical will tell you what we have learned about your child's speech and language and phonological awareness skills

Hickman, Mark

426

Potential bias in ophthalmic pharmaceutical clinical trials  

PubMed Central

To make clinicians aware of potential sources of error in ophthalmic pharmaceutical clinical trials that can lead to erroneous interpretation of results, a critical review of the study design of various pharmaceutical ophthalmic clinical trials was completed. Discrepancies as a result of study shortcomings may explain observed differences between reported ophthalmic trial data and observed clinical results. PMID:19668731

Varner, Paul

2008-01-01

427

National Institutes of Health Clinical Center Strategic  

E-print Network

.cc.nih.gov 3 Message from the Clinical Center Director We enter 2014 amid both exciting and challenging times and Develops Plans CC Prepares Budget NIH Advisory Board for Clinical Research NIH Clinical Center Governing Board NIH Steering Committee IC Directors NIH Director Programmaticrequi

428

Challenges and Opportunities in Clinical Research Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The growth and visibility of clinical research informatics has increased significantly over the last several years. National informatics research and development projects such as the NCI's caBIG initiative and the NIH's broad-ranging CTSA program have brought to light numerous challenges and opportunities specific to clinical research informatics. During the AMIA 2006 Annual Symposium, the Clinical Trials Working Group (CTWG) hosted

Philip R. O. Payne; Peter J. Embi; Christopher G. Chute; Ida Sim; Douglas Fridmsa; Charles Jaffe

429

Clinical and Radiologic Manifestations of Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary: Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) is an inflammatory interstitial lung disease caused by recurring exposure to a variety of occupational and environmental antigens. It features widely variable clinical, radiologic, and histopathologic findings. Because the clinical findings of HP mimic multiple other diseases, a high degree of clinical suspicion and a thorough occupational and environmental history are essential for accurate diagnosis. There

Craig S. Glazer; Cecile S. Rose; David A. Lynch

430

WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY HOCKEY GIRLS SKILLS CLINICS  

E-print Network

WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY HOCKEY GIRLS SKILLS CLINICS CLINIC 1: Saturday & Sunday, October 27.wesleyan.edu/athletics/wihockey/index.html TO SIGN UP QUESTIONS? CALL 860-685-2904 OR EMAIL JAMCKENNA@WESLEYAN.EDU #12;WESLEYAN HOCKEY GIRLS SKILLS ________________________ to participate in the WESLEYAN HOCKEY GIRLS SKILLS CLINIC offered by Wesleyan University beginning on or about

Royer, Dana

431

A format for scripted clinical oral examinations.  

PubMed

A format for scripted clinical oral examination in general medicine is presented. Using this format, untutored pairs of teachers were consistent in grading third-year clerkship students. This measure of performance appeared to evaluate an aspect of clinical skills not assessed by the National Board Medical Examination or clinical performance assessments. Acceptance by teachers was good. PMID:8336562

Elks, M L; Sawyer, J W

1993-03-01

432

Leishmaniasis: clinical syndromes and treatment  

PubMed Central

Leishmaniasis is a global term for cutaneous and visceral anthroponotic and zoonotic diseases caused by the vector-borne parasites of the genus Leishmania. These diseases afflict at least 2 million people each year with more than 350 million at risk in 98 countries worldwide. These are diseases mostly of the impoverished making prevention, diagnosis and treatment difficult. Therapy of leishmaniasis ranges from local treatment of cutaneous lesions to systemic, often toxic, therapy for disseminated cutaneous, mucocutaneous and deadly visceral disease. This review is a summary of the clinical syndromes caused by Leishmania and treatment regimens currently used for various forms of leishmaniasis. PMID:23744570

Satoskar, A.R.

2014-01-01

433

Hypothermia as a clinical neuroprotectant.  

PubMed

Applying therapeutic hypothermia (TH) for the purposes of neuroprotection, originally termed "hibernation," started nearly 100 years ago. Because TH cooling systems have improved to the point where it is practical and safe for general application, interest in providing such treatment in conditions such as spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, stroke, and cardiac arrest has increased. This article reviews the mechanisms by which TH mitigates secondary neurologic injury, the clinical scenarios where TH is being applied, and reviews selected published studies using TH for central nervous system neuroprotection. PMID:25064786

Sherman, Andrew L; Wang, Michael Y

2014-08-01

434

Computer applications in clinical psychology  

E-print Network

The computer-assisted analysis is not currently a novelty, but a necessity in all areas of psychology. A number of studies that examine the limits of the computer assisted and analyzed interpretations, also its advantages. A series of studies aim to assess how the computer assisting programs are able to establish a diagnosis referring to the presence of certain mental disorders. We will present the results of one computer application in clinical psychology regarding the assessment of Theory of Mind capacity by animation.

Zamo?teanu, Alina Oana

2012-01-01

435

Evaluation of clinical practice guidelines.  

PubMed Central

Compared with the current focus on the development of clinical practice guidelines the effort devoted to their evaluation is meagre. Yet the ultimate success of guidelines depends on routine evaluation. Three types of evaluation are identified: evaluation of guidelines under development and before dissemination and implementation, evaluation of health care programs in which guidelines play a central role, and scientific evaluation, through studies that provide the scientific knowledge base for further evolution of guidelines. Identification of evaluation and program goals, evaluation design and a framework for evaluation planning are discussed. PMID:7489550

Basinski, A S

1995-01-01

436

Clinical associations of Dupuytren's disease  

PubMed Central

Dupuytren's disease (DD) is a common progressive fibrotic condition affecting the palmar and digital fascia. Although its management is undertaken by hand surgeons, it is commonly seen by other doctors as an incidental finding. In many cases it is believed to be associated with other medical conditions, although the evidence for such associations is not always clear. This review considers the evidence behind these associations and discusses the aetiology of DD. By doing so, it is hoped that this review will permit a better understanding of the relevance of DD as a clinical sign. PMID:15998816

Hart, M; Hooper, G

2005-01-01

437

Introduction to veterinary clinical oncology  

SciTech Connect

Veterinary clinical oncology involves a multidisciplinary approach to the recognition and management of spontaneously occurring neoplasms of domestic animals. This requires some knowledge of the causes, incidence, and natural course of malignant disease as it occurs in domestic species. The purpose of this course is to acquaint you with the more common neoplastic problems you will encounter in practice, so that you can offer your clients an informed opinion regarding prognosis and possible therapeutic modalities. A major thrust will be directed toward discussing and encouraging treatment/management of malignant disease. Multimodality therapy will be stressed. 10 refs., 3 tabs.

Weller, R.E.

1991-10-01

438

Facial diplegia: a clinical dilemma.  

PubMed

Bilateral facial paralysis is a rare clinical entity and presents as a diagnostic challenge. Unlike its unilateral counterpart facial diplegia is seldom secondary to Bell's palsy. Occurring at a frequency of 0.3% to 2% of all facial palsies it often indicates ominous medical conditions. Guillian-Barre syndrome needs to be considered as a differential in all given cases of facial diplegia where timely treatment would be rewarding. Here a case of bilateral facial palsy due to Guillian-Barre syndrome with atypical presentation is reported. PMID:24761505

Chakrabarti, Debaprasad; Roy, Mukut; Bhattacharyya, Amrit K

2013-06-01

439

Informatics and the Clinical Laboratory  

PubMed Central

The nature of pathology services is changing under the combined pressures of increasing workloads, cost constraints and technological advancement. In the face of this, laboratory systems need to meet new demands for data exchange with clinical electronic record systems for test requesting and results reporting. As these needs develop, new challenges are emerging especially with respect to the format and content of the datasets which are being exchanged. If the potential for the inclusion of intelligent systems in both these areas is to be realised, the continued dialogue between clinicians and laboratory information specialists is of paramount importance. Requirements of information technology (IT) in pathology, now extend well beyond the provision of purely analytical data. With the aim of achieving seamless integration of laboratory data into the total clinical pathway, ‘Informatics’ – the art and science of turning data into useful information – is becoming increasingly important in laboratory medicine. Informatics is a powerful tool in pathology – whether in implementing processes for pathology modernisation, introducing new diagnostic modalities (e.g. proteomics, genomics), providing timely and evidence-based disease management, or enabling best use of limited and often costly resources. Providing appropriate information to empowered and interested patients – which requires critical assessment of the ever-increasing volume of information available – can also benefit greatly from appropriate use of informatics in enhancing self-management of long term conditions. The increasing demands placed on pathology information systems in the context of wider developmental change in healthcare delivery are explored in this review. General trends in medical informatics are reflected in current priorities for laboratory medicine, including the need for unified electronic records, computerised order entry, data security and recovery, and audit. We conclude that there is a need to rethink the architecture of pathology systems and in particular to address the changed environment in which electronic patient record systems are maturing rapidly. The opportunity for laboratory-based informaticians to work collaboratively with clinical systems developers to embed clinically intelligent decision support systems should not be missed. PMID:25336763

Jones, Richard G; Johnson, Owen A; Batstone, Gifford

2014-01-01

440

Clinical recommendation: pediatric lichen sclerosus.  

PubMed

Lichen sclerosus is a chronic inflammatory condition affecting the anogenital region that may present in the prepubertal or adolescent patient. Clinical presentations include significant pruritus, labial adhesions, and loss of pigmentation. Treatment includes topical anti-inflammatory agents and long-term follow-up as there is a high risk of recurrence and an increased risk of vulvar cancer in adult women with history of lichen sclerosus. These recommendations are intended for pediatricians, gynecologists, nurse practitioners and others who care for pediatric/adolescent girls in order to facilitate diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24602304

Bercaw-Pratt, Jennifer L; Boardman, Lori A; Simms-Cendan, Judith S

2014-04-01

441

Informatics and the clinical laboratory.  

PubMed

The nature of pathology services is changing under the combined pressures of increasing workloads, cost constraints and technological advancement. In the face of this, laboratory systems need to meet new demands for data exchange with clinical electronic record systems for test requesting and results reporting. As these needs develop, new challenges are emerging especially with respect to the format and content of the datasets which are being exchanged. If the potential for the inclusion of intelligent systems in both these areas is to be realised, the continued dialogue between clinicians and laboratory information specialists is of paramount importance. Requirements of information technology (IT) in pathology, now extend well beyond the provision of purely analytical data. With the aim of achieving seamless integration of laboratory data into the total clinical pathway, 'Informatics' - the art and science of turning data into useful information - is becoming increasingly important in laboratory medicine. Informatics is a powerful tool in pathology - whether in implementing processes for pathology modernisation, introducing new diagnostic modalities (e.g. proteomics, genomics), providing timely and evidence-based disease management, or enabling best use of limited and often costly resources. Providing appropriate information to empowered and interested patients - which requires critical assessment of the ever-increasing volume of information available - can also benefit greatly from appropriate use of informatics in enhancing self-management of long term conditions. The increasing demands placed on pathology information systems in the context of wider developmental change in healthcare delivery are explored in this review. General trends in medical informatics are reflected in current priorities for laboratory medicine, including the need for unified electronic records, computerised order entry, data security and recovery, and audit. We conclude that there is a need to rethink the architecture of pathology systems and in particular to address the changed environment in which electronic patient record systems are maturing rapidly. The opportunity for laboratory-based informaticians to work collaboratively with clinical systems developers to embed clinically intelligent decision support systems should not be missed. PMID:25336763

Jones, Richard G; Johnson, Owen A; Batstone, Gifford

2014-08-01

442

Rosacea: clinical presentation and pathophysiology.  

PubMed

Acne rosacea is one of the most common diagnoses seen in the clinical dermatologic practice. The classic presentation of rosacea, acneiform papules, and pustules on a background of telangiectasia, is often easily identified by primary care physicians, patients, or their similarly afflicted friends or family members. However, rosacea actually represents a spectrum of disease from chronic skin hypersensitivity and flushing to rhinophyma. Although the pathogenesis of rosacea remains unknown, it is important to understand its various presentations and possible etiologies prior to developing individualized treatment protocols. PMID:16468286

Diamantis, Stephanie; Waldorf, Heidi A

2006-01-01

443

Phenotypic mapping and clinical ideology  

SciTech Connect

Scientists have been trying to determine whether the main clinical findings in the 4p deletion syndrome are due to a deletion of one small critical segment, or whether deletions of some particular segments of 4p are responsible for different phenotypic manifestations. This is the basic issue for the whole group of autosomal deletion syndromes, as well as for our understanding of mechanisms of the origin of the abnormal phenotype. All circumstances need to be taken into consideration when trying to apply molecular methods for the mapping of phenotypic findings in the 4p deletion or in any other autosomal deletion syndrome. 8 refs.

Lurie, I.W.; Opitz, J.M. [Foundaton for Developmental and Medical Genetics, Helena, MT (United States)

1995-07-17

444

Clinical neurogenetics: autism spectrum disorders.  

PubMed

Autism spectrum disorders are neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by deficits in social interactions, communication, and repetitive or restricted interests. There is strong evidence that de novo or inherited genetic alterations play a critical role in causing Autism Spectrum Disorders, but non-genetic causes, such as in utero infections, may also play a role. Magnetic resonance imaging based and autopsy studies indicate that early rapid increase in brain size during infancy could underlie the deficits in a large subset of subjects. Clinical studies show benefits for both behavioral and pharmacological treatment strategies. Genotype-specific treatments have the potential for improving outcome in the future. PMID:24176418

Mehta, Sunil Q; Golshani, Peyman

2013-11-01

445

Meningitis, Clinical Presentation of Tetanus  

PubMed Central

Background. Tetanus is an acute disease caused by a neurotoxin produced by Clostridium tetani. Tetanus immunization has been available since the late 1930s but sporadic cases still occur, usually in incompletely vaccinated or unvaccinated individuals. Case Report. An elderly previously vaccinated female contracted tetanus following foot injury. Clinically she presented with meningitis causing diagnostic and therapeutic delays. Why Should Physician Be Aware of This? Even in developed countries the differential diagnosis of meningitis, especially in the elderly, should include tetanus. Treatment in intensive care unit is required. General population might benefit from vaccine boosters and education on this potentially fatal disease.

Moniuszko, Anna; Zajkowska, Agata; Tumiel, Ewa; Rutkowski, Krzysztof; Pancewicz, S?awomir; Rutkowski, Ryszard; Zdrodowska, Agnieszka; Zajkowska, Joanna

2015-01-01

446

New clinical pathways for keratoconus  

PubMed Central

Pre-2000, the clinical management of keratoconus centred on rigid contact lens fitting when spectacle corrected acuity was no longer adequate, and transplantation where contact lens wear failed. Over the last decade, outcome data have accumulated for new interventions including corneal collagen crosslinking, intracorneal ring implantation, topographic phototherapeutic keratectomy, and phakic intraocular lens implantation. We review the current evidence base for these interventions and their place in new management pathways for keratoconus under two key headings: corneal shape stabilisation and visual rehabilitation. PMID:23258309

Gore, D M; Shortt, A J; Allan, B D

2013-01-01

447

Capital planning for clinical integration.  

PubMed

When assessing the financial implications of a physician alignment and clinical integration initiative, a hospital should measure the initiative's potential ROI, perhaps best using a combination of net present value and payback period. The hospital should compare its own historical and projected performance with rating agency median benchmarks for key financial indicators of profitability, debt service, capital and cash flow, and liquidity. The hospital should also consider potential indirect benefits, such as retained outpatient/ancillary revenue, increased inpatient revenue, improved cost control, and improved quality and reporting transparency. PMID:21548429

Grauman, Daniel M; Neff, Gerald; Johnson, Molly Martha

2011-04-01

448

Computer-Directed Clinical Analyzer  

Microsoft Academic Search

0.69, 1.02, 1.18; 5.4, 1.2, 1.09; 0.83, 0.77, 0.86; 5.9, 1.0, 0.86; 6.4, 5.2, 2.1; 3.7, 1.5, 1.3; 0.0, 1.4, 0.97; and 1.2, 1.3, 0.75. Day-to-day precision, similarly evaluated during 101-164 days, met accepted criteria for clinically acceptable precision. Carry-over for each of the eight tests was < 1 % . Instrument reliability has been excel- lent, and training time

Willa Collinge; Pattie Hashimoto; Jackie Worrall

449

Tardive diskinesia: a clinical interpretation.  

PubMed

This paper discusses various clinical conditions with oral diskinetic movements and proposes, on the basis of clinical evidence, an interpretation of drug-induced oral diskinesia as a conditioned response to local aversive stimuli related to drug use (local side effects), or other factors such as missing teeth and ill-fitting dentures. There is an accompanying anxiety associated with the aversive stimulus or with difficulties in verbal expression, as in the case of brain damaged patients. The diskinetic movements are initially Voluntary movements aiming at removing the aversive stimulus (stage of voluntary movements). If they succeed in reducing the accompanying anxiety, the reduction of anxiety reinforces the diskinetic response. In a subsequent stage, these movements lose their laborious voluntary quality and become automatic (stage of automatic movements). In a final stage, the diskinetic movements become instrumental in reducing anxiety in the absence of the aversive stimulus (stage of instrumentalization). The question is raised whether drug-induced oral diskinesia can be placed under the general rubric of tics, as a special drug-induced form of it. PMID:17894085

Siomopoulos, V

1974-03-01

450

[What's new in clinical dermatology?].  

PubMed

This year more than 3000 medical articles referenced in PubMed concerned dermatology. Our critical analysis covers different fields of dermatology: including epidemiology, clinical, diagnostic and prognostic factors. AIDS is 30 years old and the national HIV/AIDS plan for 2010-2014 recommends generalized screening facilitated by the introduction of rapid tests for diagnostic orientation. In infectious diseases, novelties concern polyomavirus, HTLV-1, leprosy, staphylococcus infections, resistance to antibiotics and scabies. Diseases of the scalp consecutive to practices of black women hairstyles were the subject of important articles. There were two important developments in acne: first, a simplified and more operational classification, secondly a suicidal risk associated with severe forms. Lymphocyte Th-17 immunity is involved in clinical phenomena either by excess (genetic or drug) or default (genetic causes). Allergology: in several studies, false negative patch tests have been published. The natural history of nevi is specified by three important articles. Serological tests to practice in cases of dermatomyositis and bullous pemphigoid are specified. PMID:22202643

Couppié, P

2011-12-01

451

Proton radiography for clinical applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Proton imaging is not yet applied as a clinical routine, although its advantages have been demonstrated. In the context of quality assurance in proton therapy, proton images can be used to verify the correct positioning of the patient and to control the range of protons. Proton computed tomography (pCT) is a 3D imaging method appropriate for planning and verification of proton radiation treatments, because it allows evaluating the distributions of proton stopping power within the tissues and can be directly utilized when the patient is in the actual treatment position. The aim of the PRoton IMAging experiment, supported by INFN, and the PRIN 2006 project, supported by MIUR, is to realize a proton computed radiography (pCR) prototype for reconstruction of proton images from a single projection in order to validate the technique with pre-clinical studies and, eventually, to conceive the configuration of a complete pCT system. A preliminary experiment performed at the 250 MeV proton synchrotron of Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) allowed acquisition of experimental data before the completion of PRIMA project's prototype. In this paper, the results of the LLUMC experiment are reported and the reconstruction of proton images of two phantoms is discussed.

Talamonti, C.; Reggioli, V.; Bruzzi, M.; Bucciolini, M.; Civinini, C.; Marrazzo, L.; Menichelli, D.; Pallotta, S.; Randazzo, N.; Sipala, V.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Petterson, M.; Blumenkrantz, N.; Feldt, J.; Heimann, J.; Lucia, D.; Seiden, A.; Williams, D. C.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Bashkirov, V.; Schulte, R.

2010-01-01

452

Behavioral analysis of clinical judgment.  

PubMed

Research on clinical judgment has produced conflicting information about effects of training on predictive accuracy, effects of the information available to the clinician, the correlates of accurate judgment, as well as the stability of such judgments. Such conflicting findings are largely related to lack of an adequate methodology. The present study examined the accuracy of judges making longitudinal clinical judgments with systematic increments in available information. Six judges, two non-experienced first-year graduate students in psychology, two medium-experienced practicum students, and two advanced interns, were asked to make discriminations between test protocols belonging to men convicted of first and second degree murder and men convicted of crimes against property. A discriminant function analysis classified 83% of these protocols accurately. Levels of information were increased in four phases. Most of the judges discriminated at a 50% accuracy level. No substantial increment in accuracy across phases was found. Judges of low accuracy discriminated best with the addition of the statistical findings. Daily judgments remained stable within the guessing range. PMID:1012859

Perez, F I

1976-12-01

453

Clinical approach to posttraumatic epilepsy.  

PubMed

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the most common causes of acquired epilepsy, and posttraumatic epilepsy (PTE) results in significant somatic and psychosocial morbidity. The risk of developing PTE relates directly to TBI severity, but the latency to first seizure can be decades after the inciting trauma. Given this "silent period," much work has focused on identification of molecular and radiographic biomarkers for risk stratification and on development of therapies to prevent epileptogenesis. Clinical management requires vigilant neurologic surveillance and recognition of the heterogeneous endophenotypes associated with PTE. Appropriate treatment of patients who have or are at risk for seizures varies as a function of time after TBI, and the clinician's armamentarium includes an ever-expanding diversity of pharmacological and surgical options. Most recently, neuromodulation with implantable devices has emerged as a promising therapeutic strategy for some patients with refractory PTE. Here, we review the epidemiology, diagnostic considerations, and treatment options for PTE and develop a roadmap for providers encountering this challenging clinical entity. PMID:25714868

Rao, Vikram R; Parko, Karen L

2015-02-01

454

Clinical utility of likelihood ratios.  

PubMed

Test-performance characteristics can be derived from a simple 2x2 table displaying the dichotomous relationship between a positive or negative test result and the presence or absence of a target disorder. Sensitivity and specificity, including a summary display of their reciprocal relationship as a receiver operating characteristics curve, are relatively stable test characteristics. Unfortunately, they represent an inversion of customary clinical logic and fail to tell us precisely what we wish to know. Predictive values, on the other hand, provide us with the requisite information but-because they are vulnerable to variation in disease prevalence-are numerically unstable. Likelihood ratios (LRs), in contrast, combine the stability of sensitivity and specificity to provide an omnibus index of test performance far more useful than its constituent parts. Application of Bayes' theorem to LRs produces the following summary equation: Clinically estimated pretest odds of disease x LR=Posttest odds of disease. This simple equation illustrates a concordance between the mathematical properties of likelihood ratios and the central strategy underlying diagnostic testing: the revision of disease probability. PMID:9506499

Gallagher, E J

1998-03-01

455

Intraocular lymphoma: a clinical perspective  

PubMed Central

Primary vitreoretinal lymphoma (PVRL) is a rare malignancy that is speculated to arise extraocularly, and preferentially invade and flourish in the ocular and CNS microenvironments. The eye is involved in about 20% of primary central nervous system lymphomas, but the brain is eventually involved in about 80% of PVRL. Most are B-cell lymphomas with small numbers of T-cell lymphomas metastatic to the vitreous and retina. Metastatic systemic B-cell lymphoma usually involves choroid. Primary choroidal lymphoma is rare. Intraocular lymphoma can usually be distinguished from uveitis clinically, although there are overlaps, which may be pronounced in eyes with a large component of reactive inflammation related to tumor surveillance and control. There are controversies in diagnosis and treatment. Diagnosis through examination of ocular fluid is technically difficult and can utilize cytology, immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, molecular detection of gene rearrangements, and cytokine profiling. Treatment of intraocular lymphoma without detectable CNS disease could consist of a full course of systemic chemotherapy with ocular adjunctive treatment, or ocular treatment alone depending on the preference of the clinical center. In ocular only cases where the vitreous has been debulked to improve vision and there is no sight-threatening involvement of the RPE, orbital irradiation or intravitreal chemotherapy stabilizes the intraocular process but does not seem to modify the CNS component, which can present symptomatically in an advanced state. This is a highly malignant disease with a poor prognosis. Close collaboration with a pathologist and oncologist, and good communication with patients is essential. PMID:23196650

Davis, J L

2013-01-01

456

Bearing values on clinical decisions.  

PubMed

Psychiatry is more value-laden than any other field of medicine because it is concerned of human experience and behavior. It is natural that psychiatry should recognize the role of values, alongside facts, in all areas of clinical practice-diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation. There is a considerable concern on the development and the current form of evidence-based psychiatry whether this being sufficient in decision making in complex environment of mental health services of today. Psychiatric diagnosis derived from observed symptoms silence the interpersonal dialogues. The clinical encounter is narrowly focused on the forms instead of contents, meanings and background of human mental distress. We need a complementary value model, value-based approach, which runs parallel to evidence-based psychiatry. Value-based approach, like evidence-based, is a resource for effective decision-making in psychiatric practice. It starts from equal respect for all values, individual patients, their families and communities, and the recognition of the fact that various value terms already exist in DSM or ICD diagnostic systems. To respect values, psychiatry must step down to be equal with service users. Current development of mental health services are based on the principles of patient centered decision-making and multidisciplinary teamwork. This should provide basis for value-based as well as fact-based psychiatric practice. PMID:20384192

Lee, Ho Young

2010-01-01

457

Clinical Decision-Support Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a After reading this chapter, you should know the answers to these questions:\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a • \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a What are three requirements for an excellent decision-making system?\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a • \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a What are three decision-support roles for computers in clinical medicine?\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a • \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a How has the use of computers for clinical decision support evolved since the1960s?\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a • \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a What is a knowledge-based system?\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a • \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a What influences account for the gradual

Mark A. Musen; Yuval Shahar; Edward H. Shortliffe

458

Clinical use of profiled hemodialysis.  

PubMed

The new population on dialysis today consists mainly of high risk patients (the elderly, diabetics, etc.) with high cardiovascular scores, and such vascular pathology is the most important predisposing factor for the occurrence of a frequent intradialytic clinical complication, vascular instability syndrome, which covers a range of clinical problems. Recently a new dialysis technique, profiled hemodialysis (PHD), has been set up and proposed for routine use. PHD consists of the clinical use of preestablished individual dialysis profiles aimed at antagonizing the changes in intradialytic plasma osmolarity by continuous modulation of dialysate sodium concentration throughout the whole extracorporeal session. In particular, PHD aims at reducing the fall of plasma osmolarity in the first half of the session (when it is higher) by reducing the sodium removal rate through increasing its dialysate concentration while taking into account the desired individual sodium balance to be reached at the end of the session. In this work, we report clinical experience with PHD compared to standard hemodialysis with constant sodium dialysate (SHD) in terms of its efficacy to maintain a more stable intradialytic blood volume (BV) and more stable hemodynamics. The PHD used in this work has been implemented by a mathematical model for computing the individual dialysate sodium profile which we have recently validated (Ursino M, Coli L, La Manna G, Grilli Cicilioni M, Dalmastri V, Guidicissi A, Masotti P, Avanzolini G, Stefani S, Bonomini V. A simple mathematical model of intradialytic sodium kinetics: "in vivo" validation during hemodialysis with constant or variable sodium. Int J Artif Organs 1996;19:393-403.). Eleven uremic patients affected by hypotension at the beginning of dialysis treatment were studied. Each patient first underwent an SHD treatment and 1 week later a PHD treatment. The 2 extracorporeal sessions (one on SHD and the other on PHD) were performed in each individual patient under identical operative conditions including the sodium mass removal by the end of the session and the ultrafiltration rate. The crit line and Doppler echocardiography were used to determine BV, cardiac output (CO), and stroke volume (SV) throughout the sessions. The mean blood pressure (MBP) and heart rate (HR) were simultaneously monitored. PHD was associated with a more stable intradialytic BV and more stable hemodynamics compared to SHD. The higher stability of BV and cardiac function (in terms of SV and CO maintenance) which was obtained above all in the first half of the PHD session was associated with a higher stability of the MBP and the HR. This resulted in an enhancement in cardiovascular tolerance to ultrafiltration throughout the session in all tested patients. In contrast, SHD in the same patients was characterized by early significant changes in BV and cardiovascular parameters resulting in a significant decrease of the MBP and a significant increase of the HR throughout the session and also 1 h after the end of dialysis. Our results indicate that PHD may represent an efficient approach for the treatment of patients suffering from intradialytic vascular instability. If long-term clinical practice confirms the efficacy of PHD in controlling dialysis intolerance symptoms, it will have great scope as a routine procedure. PMID:9754456

Colě, L; Bonomini, M; La Manna, G; Dalmastri, V; Ursino, M; Ivanovich, P; Bonomini, V

1998-09-01

459

Image-based Biomarkers in Clinical Practice  

PubMed Central

The growth of functional and metabolically informative imaging is eclipsing anatomic imaging alone, in clinical practice. The recognition that MR and PET-based treatment planning and response assessment are essential components of clinical practice and furthermore offer the potential of quantitative analysis is important. To extract the greatest benefit from these imaging techniques will require refining the best combinations of multimodality imaging through well designed clinical trials that employ robust image-analysis tools and require substantial computer based infrastructure. Through these changes and enhancements, image-based biomarkers will enhance clinical decision making and accelerate the progress that is made through clinical trial research. PMID:21356483

Bayouth, John E.; Casavant, Thomas L.; Graham, Michael M.; Sonka, Milan; Muruganandham, Manickam; Buatti, John M.

2014-01-01

460

Clinical research informatics: a conceptual perspective  

PubMed Central

Clinical research informatics is the rapidly evolving sub-discipline within biomedical informatics that focuses on developing new informatics theories, tools, and solutions to accelerate the full translational continuum: basic research to clinical trials (T1), clinical trials to academic health center practice (T2), diffusion and implementation to community practice (T3), and ‘real world’ outcomes (T4). We present a conceptual model based on an informatics-enabled clinical research workflow, integration across heterogeneous data sources, and core informatics tools and platforms. We use this conceptual model to highlight 18 new articles in the JAMIA special issue on clinical research informatics. PMID:22523344

Weng, Chunhua

2012-01-01

461

Respiratory microbiota: addressing clinical questions, informing clinical practice  

PubMed Central

Over the last decade, technological advances have revolutionised efforts to understand the role played by microbes in airways disease. With the application of ever more sophisticated techniques, the literature has become increasingly inaccessible to the non-specialist reader, potentially hampering the translation of these gains into improvements in patient care. In this article, we set out the key principles underpinning microbiota research in respiratory contexts and provide practical guidance on how best such studies can be designed, executed and interpreted. We examine how an understanding of the respiratory microbiota both challenges fundamental assumptions and provides novel clinical insights into lung disease, and we set out a number of important targets for ongoing research. PMID:25035125

Rogers, Geraint B; Shaw, Dominick; Marsh, Robyn L; Carroll, Mary P; Serisier, David J; Bruce, Kenneth D

2015-01-01

462

Respiratory microbiota: addressing clinical questions, informing clinical practice.  

PubMed

Over the last decade, technological advances have revolutionised efforts to understand the role played by microbes in airways disease. With the application of ever more sophisticated techniques, the literature has become increasingly inaccessible to the non-specialist reader, potentially hampering the translation of these gains into improvements in patient care. In this article, we set out the key principles underpinning microbiota research in respiratory contexts and provide practical guidance on how best such studies can be designed, executed and interpreted. We examine how an understanding of the respiratory microbiota both challenges fundamental assumptions and provides novel clinical insights into lung disease, and we set out a number of important targets for ongoing research. PMID:25035125

Rogers, Geraint B; Shaw, Dominick; Marsh, Robyn L; Carroll, Mary P; Serisier, David J; Bruce, Kenneth D

2015-01-01

463

"Clinical" Significance: "Clinical" Significance and "Practical" Significance are NOT the Same Things  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Clinical significance is an important concept in research, particularly in education and the social sciences. The present article first compares clinical significance to other measures of "significance" in statistics. The major methods used to determine clinical significance are explained and the strengths and weaknesses of clinical significance…

Peterson, Lisa S.

2008-01-01

464

Mercer Veterinary Clinic for Pets of the Homeless All About Mercer Clinic  

E-print Network

Mercer Veterinary Clinic for Pets of the Homeless All About Mercer Clinic Mercer Veterinary Clinic for the Pets of the Homeless Mercer Veterinary Clinic for the Homeless is a 501(C)3 non-profit, student an array of services to the homeless. In addition to improving the lives of the pets of the homeless

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

465

MOTIVES AND CLINICAL DEPRESSION 1 Running head: MOTIVES AND CLINICAL DEPRESSION  

E-print Network

MOTIVES AND CLINICAL DEPRESSION 1 Running head: MOTIVES AND CLINICAL DEPRESSION Implicit motives, explicit motives, and motive-related life events in clinical depression Marie-Luise Neumann Klinikum 85 20880, email: Oliver.Schultheiss@fau.de #12;MOTIVES AND CLINICAL DEPRESSION 2 Abstract Past

Schultheiss, Oliver C.

466

Clinical career ladders: Hamot Medical Center.  

PubMed

The clinical career ladder program for pharmacists at Hamot Medical Center (HMC), a 500-bed not-for-profit community teaching hospital, is described. Between 1980 and 1989 a career ladder at HMC evolved from an idea to an established program with parallel administrative, business, and clinical tracks. The development of the career ladder mirrored the growth of clinical programs and the diversification of pharmaceutical services. A formal plan for a clinical ladder was developed when the first satellite pharmacy opened in 1984. An entry-level pharmacist at HMC starts with a six-month period during which he or she learns the drug distribution system and prepares for several certification tests. The employee is then promoted to staff pharmacist. Staff pharmacists are promoted to clinical pharmacist II (CP II) upon meeting requirements for competence in a broad range of clinical skills and knowledge. Candidates for the position of clinical pharmacist specialist (CP I) must have either a minimum of three years of experience as a CP II or a Pharm.D. degree and have established an area of clinical expertise. A CP I can progress to assistant and associate director positions as vacancies occur. The clinical ladder has enhanced job satisfaction and encouraged the development of clinical practitioners who provide improved care. Problems have included time constraints, competition for positions, and management of incentives. A parallel career ladder program with a clinical track has enhanced the growth of pharmacy practice at HMC and improved the quality of pharmaceutical care. PMID:2589340

Meyer, J D; Chrymko, M M; Kelly, W N

1989-11-01

467

Defining the clinical course of multiple sclerosis  

PubMed Central

Accurate clinical course descriptions (phenotypes) of multiple sclerosis (MS) are important for communication, prognostication, design and recruitment of clinical trials, and treatment decision-making. Standardized descriptions published in 1996 based on a survey of international MS experts provided purely clinical phenotypes based on data and consensus at that time, but imaging and biological correlates were lacking. Increased understanding of MS and its pathology, coupled with general concern that the original descriptors may not adequately reflect more recently identified clinical aspects of the disease, prompted a re-examination of MS disease phenotypes by the International Advisory Committee on Clinical Trials of MS. While imaging and biological markers that might provide objective criteria for separating clinical phenotypes are lacking, we propose refined descriptors that include consideration of disease activity (based on clinical relapse rate and imaging findings) and disease progression. Strategies for future research to better define phenotypes are also outlined. PMID:24871874

Reingold, Stephen C.; Cohen, Jeffrey A.; Cutter, Gary R.; Sřrensen, Per Soelberg; Thompson, Alan J.; Wolinsky, Jerry S.; Balcer, Laura J.; Banwell, Brenda; Barkhof, Frederik; Bebo, Bruce; Calabresi, Peter A.; Clanet, Michel; Comi, Giancarlo; Fox, Robert J.; Freedman, Mark S.; Goodman, Andrew D.; Inglese, Matilde; Kappos, Ludwig; Kieseier, Bernd C.; Lincoln, John A.; Lubetzki, Catherine; Miller, Aaron E.; Montalban, Xavier; O'Connor, Paul W.; Petkau, John; Pozzilli, Carlo; Rudick, Richard A.; Sormani, Maria Pia; Stüve, Olaf; Waubant, Emmanuelle; Polman, Chris H.

2014-01-01

468

[Clinical evaluation of a hyperferritinemia].  

PubMed

A hyperferritinemia has to be interpreted in relation with age and sex. The clinical evaluation begins with the interpretation of transferrine saturation which has to be controlled with a second fasting blood test. In case of high transferrine saturation associated with hyperferritinemia, HFE testing has first to be realized since the first diagnosis suspected is a HFE hemochromatosis. In case of normal transferrine saturation associated with a hyperferritinemia, the more frequent diagnosis is a metabolic syndrome, an inflammatory syndrome, a syndrome of cellular lysis or an excessive alcohol consumption. In case of HFE hemochromatosis, phlebotomy prevents complications. The goal is to obtain and to maintain a normal-low ferritin level. In case of metabolic syndrome, phlebotomy could be useful in case of high hepatic iron concentration measured with MRI or in case of on-alcoholic steato-hepatitis. PMID:22795836

Sogni, Philippe; Buffet, Catherine

2013-04-01

469

Gynecomastia: Clinical evaluation and management  

PubMed Central

Gynecomastia is the benign enlargement of male breast glandular tissue and is the most common breast condition in males. At least 30% of males will be affected during their life. Since it causes anxiety, psychosocial discomfort and fear of breast cancer, early diagnostic evaluation is important and patients usually seek medical attention. Gynecomastia was reported to cause an imbalance between estrogen and androgen action or an increased estrogen to androgen ratio, due to increased estrogen production, decreased androgen production or both. Evaluation of gynecomastia must include a detailed medical history, clinical examination, specific blood tests, imaging and tissue sampling. Individual treatment requirements can range from simple reassurance to medical treatment or even surgery. The main aim of any intervention is to relieve the symptoms and exclude other etiological factors. PMID:24741509

Cuhaci, Neslihan; Polat, Sefika Burcak; Evranos, Berna; Ersoy, Reyhan; Cakir, Bekir

2014-01-01

470

In vitro maturation: Clinical applications  

PubMed Central

Oocyte in vitro maturation (IVM) is an assisted reproductive technology in which oocytes are retrieved from the antral follicles of unstimulated or minimally stimulated ovaries. IVM of human oocytes has emerged as a promising procedure. This new technology has advantages over controlled ovarian stimulation such as reduction of costs, simplicity, and elimination of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. By elimination or reduction of gonadotropin stimulation, IVM offers eligible infertile couples a safe and convenient form of treatment, and IVM outcomes are currently comparable in safety and efficacy to those of conventional in vitro fertilization. IVM has been applied mainly in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome or ultrasound-only polycystic ovaries, but with time, the indications for IVM have expanded to other uncommon situations such as fertility preservation, as well as to normal responders. In this review, the current clinical experiences with IVM will be described. PMID:24505559

Lim, Kyung Sil; Chae, Soo Jin; Choo, Chang Woo; Ku, Yeon Hee; Lee, Hye Jun; Hur, Chang Young; Lim, Jin Ho

2013-01-01

471

Clinical considerations for biosimilar antibodies  

PubMed Central

Biosimilar agents are approximate copies of branded biologic therapies. Since the first biosimilar was authorized in the European Union in 2006, fifteen additional agents have been approved by the European Medicines Agency, including two biosimilar monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Biosimilar mAbs represent a distinct class given their large molecular size, complex protein structure, and post-translational modifications. While guidelines have been established for the development, approval, and use of biosimilars, further scrutiny and discussion is necessary to fully understand their potential impact on clinical outcomes. This review takes a critical look at the structural complexity of biosimilar mABs, the feasibility of indication extrapolation, the impact of product variability on immunogenicity, the importance of comprehensive pharmacovigilance, and the potential for ongoing pharmacoeconomic impact.

Mellstedt, Hĺkan

2013-01-01

472

Clinical anatomy of the knee.  

PubMed

The clinical anatomy of several pain syndromes of the knee is herein discussed. These include the iliotibial tract syndrome, the anserine syndrome, bursitis of the medial collateral ligament, Baker's cyst, popliteus tendon tenosynovitis and bursitis of the deep infrapatellar bursa. These syndromes are reviewed in terms of the structures involved and their role in knee physiology. All of the discussed structures can be identified in their normal state and more so when they are affected by disease. The wealth of information gained by cross examination of the medial, lateral, posterior and anterior aspects of the knee brings to life knowledge acquired at the dissection table, from anatomical drawings and from virtual images. PMID:23219082

Saavedra, Miguel Ángel; Navarro-Zarza, José Eduardo; Villaseńor-Ovies, Pablo; Canoso, Juan J; Vargas, Angélica; Chiapas-Gasca, Karla; Hernández-Díaz, Cristina; Kalish, Robert A

473

Clinical management of progressive myopia  

PubMed Central

Myopia has been increasing in prevalence throughout the world, reaching over 90% in some East Asian populations. There is increasing evidence that whereas genetics clearly have an important role, the type of visual environment to which one is exposed to likely influences the onset, progression, and cessation of myopia. Consequently, attempts to either modify the environment or to reduce the exposure of the eye to various environmental stimuli to eye growth through the use of various optical devices are well under way at research centers around the globe. The most promising of current treatments include low-percentage atropine, bifocal soft contact lenses, orthokeratology, and multifocal spectacles. These methods are discussed briefly and are then categorized in terms of their expected degree of myopia progression control. A clinical strategy is presented for selecting the most effective treatment for the appropriate type of patient at the optimal stage of refractive development to achieve the maximum control of myopia progression. PMID:24357844

Aller, T A

2014-01-01

474

Qualitative research in clinical epidemiology.  

PubMed

This chapter has been written to specifically address the usefulness of qualitative research for the practice of clinical epidemiology. The methods of grounded theory to facilitate understanding of human behavior and construction of monitoring scales for use in quantitative studies are discussed. In end-stage renal disease patients receiving long-term hemodialysis, a qualitative study used grounded theory to generate a multilayered classification system, which culminated in a substantive theory on living with end-stage renal disease and hemodialysis. The qualitative data base was re-visited for the purpose of scale development and led to the Patient Perception of Hemodialysis Scale (PPHS). The quantitative study confirmed that the PPHS was psychometrically valid and reliable and supported the major premises of the substantive theory. PMID:25694318

Gregory, Deborah M; Way, Christine Y

2015-01-01

475

Clinics in diagnostic imaging (150).  

PubMed

Spontaneous spinal epidural haematoma is a rarely encountered cause of back pain. It often leads to cauda equina syndrome, necessitating emergency spinal surgery. We report the case of a 19-year-old Chinese man who presented with pain in the lower back, which started after he had carried some heavy boxes. He denied a history of fall or trauma. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed a hyperintense biconvex-shaped lesion in the posterior epidural space on both T1- and T2-weighted sequences, diagnostic of a spinal epidural haematoma. The patient, who was admitted and managed conservatively, had gradual resolution of his pain. No neurological deficit was detected on discharge or on follow-up. Repeat MR imaging showed total resolution of the lumbar spinal epidural haematoma. The clinical characteristics, MR imaging features, diagnosis and management of spontaneous spinal epidural haematoma are discussed. PMID:24356751

Mahmud, Nor Azam; Singh, Dinesh R; Wong, Steven B S; Peh, Wilfred C G

2013-12-01

476

Clinical Pharmacology in Sleep Medicine  

PubMed Central

The basic treatment goals of pharmacological therapies in sleep medicine are to improve waking function by either improving sleep or by increasing energy during wakefulness. Stimulants to improve waking function include amphetamine derivatives, modafinil, and caffeine. Sleep aids encompass several classes, from benzodiazepine hypnotics to over-the-counter antihistamines. Other medications used in sleep medicine include those initially used in other disorders, such as epilepsy, Parkinson's disease, and psychiatric disorders. As these medications are prescribed or encountered by providers in diverse fields of medicine, it is important to recognize the distribution of adverse effects, drug interaction profiles, metabolism, and cytochrome substrate activity. In this paper, we review the pharmacological armamentarium in the field of sleep medicine to provide a framework for risk-benefit considerations in clinical practice. PMID:23213564

Proctor, Ashley; Bianchi, Matt T.

2012-01-01

477

Ethics: problems of clinical conduct.  

PubMed

The study provides a framework for ethical medical conduct. A number of articles of International Law, the Italian Constitution, the Penal Code and the Medical Code of Conduct have therefore been taken into consideration. Art. 32 of the Italian Constitution, relating to the ''right to health'' is examined, paying particular attention to certain parts, and is related to Art. 35 of the European Union Charter of Fundamental Rights. In considering Art. 43 of the Penal Code, which addresses the psychological element of criminal acts, reference is made to the Medical Code of Conduct and to the Hippocratic Oath. The considerations made point up the importance of a relationship of trust and esteem between doctor and patient in clinical practice, and that this approach must be cultivated starting from the first year of university studies. PMID:16215531

Luglié, P F; Campus, G; Lai, V

2005-09-01

478

Nuclear medicine in clinical oncology  

SciTech Connect

The authors in this collection present contributions embracing the whole field of nuclear medical methods for the diagnosis and therapy of malignant tumors. They report not only on experiences with well-tried methods but also on new radiopharmaceuticals and their clinical significance. Current developments in radioimmunological procedures are discussed at length with regard both to radioimmune scintigraphy and the use of tumor markers in vitro, and to possibilities for tumor therapy. General reviews of the present state-of-the-art in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) diagnostics in the form of computed nuclear spin tomography and in vivo spectrometry are provided. Contents: Introduction and Basic Considerations. - Technical Principles. - Diagnostic Use of Radiopharmaceuticals. - Radioimmuno-detection. - Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging and In Vivo Spectroscopy. - Positron Emission Tomography. - Use of Tumor Markers in Vivo. - Therapeutic Use of Radiopharmaceuticals Including Labelled Antibodies. - Experimental Approaches and Future Aspects. - Subject Index.

Winkler, C.

1986-01-01

479

Representing Clinical Guidelines in GLIF  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective: An evaluation of the cognitive processes used in the translation of a clinical guideline from text into an encoded form so that it can be shared among medical institutions. Design: A comparative study at three sites regarding the generation of individual and collaborative representations of a guideline for the management of encephalopathy using the GuideLine Interchange Format (GLIF) developed by members of the InterMed Collaboratory. Measurements: Using theories and methods of cognitive science, the study involves a detailed analysis of the cognitive processes used in generating representations in GLIF. The resulting process-outcome measures are used to compare subjects with various types of computer science or clinical expertise and from different institutions. Results: Consistent with prior studies of text comprehension and expertise, the variability in strategies was found to be dependent on the degree of prior experience and knowledge of the domain. Differing both in content and structure, the representations developed by physicians were found to have additional information and organization not explicitly stated in the guidelines, reflecting the physicians' understanding of the underlying pathophysiology. The computer scientists developed more literal representations of the guideline; additions were mostly limited to specifications mandated by the logic of GLIF itself. Collaboration between physicians and computer scientists resulted in consistent representations that were more than the sum of the separate parts, in that both domain-specific knowledge of medicine and generic knowledge of guideline structure were seamlessly integrated. Conclusion: Because of the variable construction of guideline representations, understanding the processes and limitations involved in their generation is important in developing strategies to construct shared representations that are both accurate and efficient. The encoded guidelines developed by teams that include both clinicians and experts in computer-based representations are preferable to those developed by individuals of either type working alone. PMID:9760394

Patel, Vimla L.; Allen, Vanessa G.; Arocha, José F.; Shortliffe, Edward H.

1998-01-01

480

Clinics: Norplant cost chokes services.  

PubMed

Norplant sales are booming, but some family planning officials are complaining that the contraceptive device's manufacturer, Wyeth Ayerst, should reduce Norplant's price so that all women can afford it. Under current national health policy and practice, rich women can afford to buy Norplant if they want it, while Medicaid will cover the cost for poor women. Women who do not have enough money to pay the median upfront fee of $580 for the device, yet are not covered by Medicaid, however, have to do without. The fee of $580 includes insertion charges and is, over the five-year period for which Norplant remains functional, less expensive than other modern methods of contraception. Wyeth has invested considerable resources into product materials, training, and counseling, and is not about to reduce its prices. Even public family planning clinics pay the $300 retail price of the Norplant rods despite the fact that all other contraceptives are sold to such clinics at a discount. Women caught in the middle can somehow find enough money for Norplant if they truly desire the method. For extreme cases where physicians have patients who cannot afford the contraceptive and are not covered by insurance, Wyeth helped create the Norplant Foundation to which it has contributed $5.6 million over the last two years and donated 10,000 sets of the implant. The Alan Guttmacher Institute has otherwise suggested providing Norplant on an installment pay plan. The article notes that family planning programs in developing countries run by USAID or the UN receive Norplant for an average of $23 from the Finland-based international manufacturer, Leiras Oy. The paper also points out that women who have Norplant inserted through private insurance coverage or Medicaid may no longer be employed or have lost Medicaid coverage because of increased income when the time comes to remove the implant. Norplant removal generally costs $150. PMID:12319135

1993-01-01

481

Human Schistosomiasis: Clinical Perspective: Review  

PubMed Central

The clinical manifestations of schistosomiasis pass by acute, sub acute and chronic stages that mirror the immune response to infection. The later includes in succession innate, TH1 and TH2 adaptive stages, with an ultimate establishment of concomitant immunity. Some patients may also develop late complications, or suffer the sequelae of co-infection with other parasites, bacteria or viruses. Acute manifestations are species-independent; occur during the early stages of invasion and migration, where infection-naivety and the host’s racial and genetic setting play a major role. Sub acute manifestations occur after maturity of the parasite and settlement in target organs. They are related to the formation of granulomata around eggs or dead worms, primarily in the lower urinary tract with Schistosoma haematobium, and the colon and rectum with Schistosoma mansoni, Schistosoma japonicum, Schistosoma intercalatum and Schistosoma mekongi infection. Secondary manifestations during this stage may occur in the kidneys, liver, lungs or other ectopic sites. Chronic morbidity is attributed to the healing of granulomata by fibrosis and calcification at the sites of oval entrapment, deposition of schistosomal antigen-antibody complexes in the renal glomeruli or the development of secondary amyloidosis. Malignancy may complicate the chronic lesions in the urinary bladder or colon. Co-infection with salmonella or hepatitis viruses B or C may confound the clinical picture of schistosomiasis, while the latter may have a negative impact on the course of other co-infections as malaria, leishmaniasis and HIV. Prevention of schistosomiasis is basically geared around education and periodic mass treatment, an effective vaccine being still experimental. Praziquantel is the drug of choice in the treatment of active infection by any species, with a cure rate of 80%. Other antischistosomal drugs include metrifonate for S. haematobium, oxamniquine for S. mansoni and Artemether and, possibly, Mirazid for both. Surgical treatment may be needed for fibrotic lesions. PMID:25685450

Barsoum, Rashad S.; Esmat, Gamal; El-Baz, Tamer

2013-01-01

482

Clinical physiology: a successful academic and clinical discipline is threatened in Sweden  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Clinical physiologists in Sweden are physicians (the majority with a PhD degree) with thorough training in system physiology and pathophysiology. They investigate patients in a functional approach and are engaged in basic and applied physiology teaching and research. In 1954, clinical physiology was founded as an independent academic and clinical discipline by the Swedish government to ensure "contact between routine clinical work and the scientific progression." Up until 2008, clinical physiology was an independent clinical discipline but was then made a subdiscipline to radiology, a fundamentally different discipline. Individuals wishing to become clinical physiologists are required to be trained and certified as European radiologists, after which training and certification as clinical physiologists may be pursued. This means that radiologists without training in clinical physiology have become gatekeepers for future clinical physiologists. Unfortunately, this development takes place at a time when research and education in preclinical integrative physiology have diminished in favor of other organizational levels, such as cellular and molecular biology. The responsibilities for education and research in integrative human physiology have therefore mainly been transferred to clinical physiologists. Clinical physiology has been a successful independent clinical discipline in Sweden for the past 55 years and could serve as a model for other countries. Unless clinical physiologists regain control over their own discipline, systems physiology as a knowledge base and resource for patient care, education, and research will be severely impaired.

HĂĄkan Arheden (Lund University Hospital Clinical Physiology)

2009-12-01

483

Why are clinical trials necessary in India?  

PubMed

Clinical trials are emerging as an important activity in India as it is an essential component of the drug discovery and development program to which India is committed. The only robust way to evaluate a new medicine is by doing properly designed clinical trials. In addition to advancing science, clinical trials offer myriad benefits to the participants. The recent hue that created in India about clinical trials is probably an exaggeration of facts. However, these points to the need for ensuring proper compliance with the regulatory norms and proper training of concerned personnel in good clinical practice (GCP). This will ensure that India continues to reap the benefits of clinical trials and also become a world leader in this field. PMID:24741480

Poongothai, Subramani; Unnikrishnan, Ranjit; Balasubramanian, Jeyakumar; Nair, Mohan Damodaran; Mohan, Viswanathan

2014-04-01

484

Biomarkers and Surrogate Endpoints In Clinical Trials  

PubMed Central

One of the most important considerations in designing clinical trials is the choice of outcome measures. These outcome measures could be clinically meaningful endpoints that are direct measures of how patients feel, function and survive. Alternatively, indirect measures, such as biomarkers that include physical signs of disease, laboratory measures and radiological tests, often are considered as replacement endpoints or “surrogates” for clinically meaningful endpoints. We discuss the definitions of clinically meaningful endpoints and surrogate endpoints, and provide examples from recent clinical trials. We provide insight into why indirect measures such as biomarkers may fail to provide reliable evidence about the benefit-to-risk profile of interventions. We also discuss the nature of evidence that is important in assessing whether treatment effects on a biomarker reliably predict effects on a clinically meaningful endpoint, and provide insights into why this reliability is specific to the context of use of the biomarker. . PMID:22711298

Fleming, Thomas R.; Powers, John H

2012-01-01

485

[Hazard, risk and harm in clinical trials].  

PubMed

Investigators and other stakeholders involved in clinical trials are not aware about all possible harms, hazards and risks related to this activity. Different categories of harms may occur during clinical trials like: physical (injury, illness, pain, suffering, or discomfort), psychological, social, economic, legal, dignitary and relational. Clinical trial participants are not the only one stakeholder exposed to different types of hazards. Among others the most important are: investigators, sponsors, centers (where clinical trials are conducted), contract research organizations and bioethics committees. Regardless of multiple hazards, substantial harms are discovered relatively rare. This situation could be explained by a small number of high risk potential clinical trials and low social awareness about different types of possible harms. Proper education should ameliorate our knowledge about hazards, risks and harms in clinical trials. PMID:18942326

Czarkowski, Marek

2008-08-01

486

Ethics of clinical trials in Nigeria  

PubMed Central

The conduct of clinical trials for the development and licensing of drugs is a very important aspect of healthcare. Drug research, development and promotion have grown to a multi-billion dollar global business. Like all areas of human endeavour involving generation and control of huge financial resources, it could be subject to deviant behaviour, sharp business practices and unethical practices. The main objective of this review is to highlight potential ethical challenges in the conduct of clinical trials in Nigeria and outline ways in which these can be avoided. Current international and national regulatory and ethical guidelines are reviewed to illustrate the requirements for ethical conduct of clinical trials. Past experiences of unethical conduct of clinical trials especially in developing countries along with the increasing globalisation of research makes it imperative that all players should be aware of the ethical challenges in clinical trials and the benchmarks for ethical conduct of clinical research in Nigeria. PMID:25013247

Okonta, Patrick I.

2014-01-01

487

Ethics of clinical trials in Nigeria.  

PubMed

The conduct of clinical trials for the development and licensing of drugs is a very important aspect of healthcare. Drug research, development and promotion have grown to a multi-billion dollar global business. Like all areas of human endeavour involving generation and control of huge financial resources, it could be subject to deviant behaviour, sharp business practices and unethical practices. The main objective of this review is to highlight potential ethical challenges in the conduct of clinical trials in Nigeria and outline ways in which these can be avoided. Current international and national regulatory and ethical guidelines are reviewed to illustrate the requirements for ethical conduct of clinical trials. Past experiences of unethical conduct of clinical trials especially in developing countries along with the increasing globalisation of research makes it imperative that all players should be aware of the ethical challenges in clinical trials and the benchmarks for ethical conduct of clinical research in Nigeria. PMID:25013247

Okonta, Patrick I

2014-05-01

488

Clinical Productivity System - A Decision Support Model  

E-print Network

Purpose: This goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of a data-driven clinical productivity system that leverages Electronic Health Record (EHR) data to provide productivity decision support functionality in a real-world clinical setting. The system was implemented for a large behavioral health care provider seeing over 75,000 distinct clients a year. Design/methodology/approach: The key metric in this system is a "VPU", which simultaneously optimizes multiple aspects of clinical care. The resulting mathematical value of clinical productivity was hypothesized to tightly link the organization's performance to its expectations and, through transparency and decision support tools at the clinician level, affect significant changes in productivity, quality, and consistency relative to traditional models of clinical productivity. Findings: In only 3 months, every single variable integrated into the VPU system showed significant improvement, including a 30% rise in revenue, 10% rise in clinical percentage, a...

Bennett, Casey C

2012-01-01

489

21 CFR 862.2860 - Mass spectrometer for clinical use.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments...spectrometer for clinical use is a device intended to identify inorganic or organic compounds (e.g., lead, mercury,...

2011-04-01

490

21 CFR 862.2860 - Mass spectrometer for clinical use.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments...spectrometer for clinical use is a device intended to identify inorganic or organic compounds (e.g., lead, mercury,...

2013-04-01

491

21 CFR 862.2860 - Mass spectrometer for clinical use.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments...spectrometer for clinical use is a device intended to identify inorganic or organic compounds (e.g., lead, mercury,...

2014-04-01

492

21 CFR 862.2860 - Mass spectrometer for clinical use.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments...spectrometer for clinical use is a device intended to identify inorganic or organic compounds (e.g., lead, mercury,...

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493

Is There a Need for Clinical Neuroskepticism?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Clinical neuroethics and neuroskepticism are recent entrants to the vocabulary of neuroethics. Clinical neuroethics has been\\u000a used to distinguish problems of clinical relevance arising from developments in brain science from problems arising in neuroscience\\u000a research proper. Neuroskepticism has been proposed as a counterweight to claims about the value and likely implications of\\u000a developments in neuroscience. These two emergent streams of

Eran Klein