Science.gov

Sample records for a-abo dysport clinical

  1. Botulinum neurotoxin type A-ABO (Dysport): clinical indications and practice guide.

    PubMed

    Matarasso, Alan; Shafer, David

    2009-11-01

    The key points to remember about abobotulinumtoxinA are as follows: BoNTA-ABO (abobotulinumtoxinA [Dysport]; Medicis Aesthetics, Scottsdale, AZ) and BoNTA-ONA (onabotulinumtoxin A [Botox Cosmetic]; Allergan, Irvine, CA) are both derivatives of botulinum toxin A produced from different strains of the bacterium Clostridium botulinum through proprietary manufacturing processes, and both are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). BoNTA-ABO and BoNTA-ONA, which are both type A botulinum toxins, should be further differentiated from Myobloc (Solstice Neurosciences, San Francisco, CA), which is the only FDA-approved type B botulinum toxin. BoNTA-ABO, as with other derivatives of botulinum toxin, produces a chemodenervation of the muscle by preventing the release and binding of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular endplate. The paralytic effect of BoNTA-ABO, as with other derivatives of botulinum toxin, produces a relaxation of the underlying muscle with the associated benefit of reducing dynamic rhytids of the overlying skin. BoNTA-ABO units are not interchangeable with BoNTA-ONA units. An understanding of the proper dosing and familiarity with the use of either botulinum toxin in aesthetic applications is required to produce results that are both safe and consistent. Spread of the toxin is dependent on solution volume and injection technique (physically pushing the toxin from the area of injection). Diffusion of the toxin is largely dependent on toxin dose and receptor concentration; unbound toxin moves down a concentration gradient. Beyond the treatment of glabellar rhytids, there are few, if any, randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled studies on the aesthetic uses of BoNTA-ABO. This guide summarizes what is known and serves as a basis for clinical use and continued understanding. PMID:19945008

  2. Conversion Ratio between Botox®, Dysport®, and Xeomin® in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Scaglione, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin has revolutionized the treatment of spasticity and is now administered worldwide. There are currently three leading botulinum neurotoxin type A products available in the Western Hemisphere: onabotulinum toxin-A (ONA) Botox®, abobotulinum toxin-A (ABO), Dysport®, and incobotulinum toxin A (INCO, Xeomin®). Although the efficacies are similar, there is an intense debate regarding the comparability of various preparations. Here we will address the clinical issues of potency and conversion ratios, as well as safety issues such as toxin spread and immunogenicity, to provide guidance for BoNT-A use in clinical practice. INCO was shown to be as effective as ONA with a comparable adverse event profile when a clinical conversion ratio of 1:1 was used. The available clinical and preclinical data suggest that a conversion ratio ABO:ONA of 3:1—or even lower—could be appropriate for treating spasticity, cervical dystonia, and blepharospasm or hemifacial spasm. A higher conversion ratio may lead to an overdosing of ABO. While uncommon, distant spread may occur; however, several factors other than the pharmaceutical preparation are thought to affect spread. Finally, whereas the three products have similar efficacy when properly dosed, ABO has a better cost-efficacy profile. PMID:26959061

  3. Does Reduction of Number of Intradetrusor Injection Sites of aboBoNTA (Dysport®) Impact Efficacy and Safety in a Rat Model of Neurogenic Detrusor Overactivity?

    PubMed Central

    Huynh Le Maux, Amélie; Pignol, Bernadette; Behr-Roussel, Delphine; Blachon, Jean-Luc; Chabrier, Pierre-Etienne; Compagnie, Sandrine; Picaut, Philippe; Bernabé, Jacques; Giuliano, François; Denys, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Intradetrusor injections of Botulinum toxin A—currently onabotulinumtoxinA—is registered as a second-line treatment to treat neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO). The common clinical practice is 30 × 1 mL injections in the detrusor; however, protocols remain variable and standardization is warranted. The effect of reducing the number of injection sites of Dysport® abobotulinumtoxinA (aboBoNTA) was assessed in the spinal cord-injured rat (SCI). Nineteen days post-spinalization, female rats received intradetrusor injections of saline or aboBoNTA 22.5 U distributed among four or eight sites. Two days after injection, continuous cystometry was performed in conscious rats. Efficacy of aboBoNTA 22.5 U was assessed versus aggregated saline groups on clinically-relevant parameters: maximal pressure, bladder capacity, compliance, voiding efficiency, as well as amplitude, frequency, and volume threshold for nonvoiding contractions (NVC). AboBoNTA 22.5 U significantly decreased maximal pressure, without affecting voiding efficiency. Injected in four sites, aboBoNTA significantly increased bladder capacity and compliance while only the latter when in eight sites. AboBoNTA significantly reduced NVC frequency and amplitude. This preclinical investigation showed similar inhibiting effects of aboBoNTA despite the number of sites reduction. Further studies are warranted to optimize dosing schemes to improve the risk-benefit ratio of BoNTA-based treatment modalities for NDO and further idiopathic overactive bladder. PMID:26694464

  4. AbobotulinumtoxinA (Dysport) dosing in cervical dystonia: an exploratory analysis of two large open-label extension studies.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Robert A; Truong, Daniel; Hubble, Jean; Coleman, Chandra; Beffy, Jean-Luc; Chang, Stephen; Picaut, Philippe

    2013-02-01

    Treatment with botulinum toxin-A is recommended as first-line treatment for cervical dystonia (CD). In clinical practice many factors appear to influence dose adjustment and the retreatment regimen; however, there is little information available in the literature regarding the evolution of dosing over treatment cycles. We report on two similarly designed, long-term, multicenter, open-label extension studies of Dysport for the treatment of CD, which followed 500 U fixed-dose placebo-controlled trials. Both studies specified a fixed 500 U dose for the first open-label treatment cycle, with dose adjustment in subsequent treatment cycles according to the clinical response. These analyses include 218 patients who entered the two studies; doses in the subsequent treatment cycles ranged between 250 and 1,000 U. During open-label treatment, all treatment cycles resulted in improvements in mean Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS) total scores. However, increasing the dose of Dysport above the initial 500 U dose was not observed to result in an incremental improvement in response as measured by the TWSTRS. No individual patient characteristic was found to reliably predict the use of higher doses at each treatment cycle. Dysport was generally well tolerated with no major differences in the incidence of adverse events (AEs) observed with different doses. Dysphagia was considered an AE of special interest and dysphagia data from the open-label studies were combined with two Phase II studies. Analysis of this enhanced database indicates that unilateral injections of >150 U into the sternocleidomastoid muscle is associated with a higher dysphagia risk. Thus, limiting the dose in the sternocleidomastoid may help reduce the incidence of dysphagia. PMID:22878514

  5. An open-label cohort study of the improvement of quality of life and pain in de novo cervical dystonia patients after injections with 500 U botulinum toxin A (Dysport)

    PubMed Central

    Hefter, H; Benecke, R; Erbguth, F; Jost, W; Reichel, G; Wissel, J

    2013-01-01

    Objectives It remains to be determined whether the benefits of botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) on cervical dystonia (CD) motor symptoms extend to improvements in patient's quality of life (QoL). This analysis of a large, multicentre study was conducted with the aim of investigating changes in QoL and functioning among de novo patients receiving 500 U BoNT-A (abobotulinumtoxinA; Dysport) for the treatment of the two most frequent forms of CD, predominantly torticollis and laterocollis. Design A prospective, open-label study of Dysport (500 U; Ipsen Biopharm Ltd) administered according to a defined intramuscular injection algorithm. Setting German and Austrian outpatient clinics. Participants 516 male and female patients (aged ≥18 years) with de novo CD. The majority of patients had torticollis (78.1%). 35 patients had concomitant depression (MedDRA-defined). Main outcome measures Change from baseline to weeks 4 and 12 in Craniocervical Dystonia Questionnaire (CDQ-24) total and subscale scores, patient diary items (‘day-to-day capacities and activities’, ‘pain’ and ‘duration of pain’) and global assessment of pain. Results Significant improvements were observed in CDQ-24 total and subscale scores at week 4 and were sustained up to week 12 (p<0.001). Changes in CDQ-24 scores did not significantly differ between the torticollis and laterocollis groups or between patients with or without depression. There were also significant reductions in patient diary item scores for activities of daily living, pain and pain duration at weeks 4 and 12 (p<0.001). Pain relief (less or no pain) was reported by 66% and 74.1% of patients at weeks 4 and 12, respectively. Changes in pain parameters demonstrated a positive relationship with change in Tsui score. Conclusions After standardised open-label treatment with Dysport 500 U, improvements in QoL and pain intensity up to 12 weeks in patients with CD were observed. PMID:23604344

  6. Clinical differences between botulinum neurotoxin type A and B.

    PubMed

    Bentivoglio, Anna Rita; Del Grande, Alessandra; Petracca, Martina; Ialongo, Tamara; Ricciardi, Lucia

    2015-12-01

    In humans, the therapeutic use of botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) is well recognized and continuously expanding. Four BoNTs are widely available for clinical practice: three are serotype A and one is serotype B: onabotulinumtoxinA (A/Ona), abobotulinumtoxinA (A/Abo) and incobotulinumtoxinA (A/Inco), rimabotulinumtoxinB (B/Rima). A/Abo, A/Inco, A/Ona and B/Rima are all licensed worldwide for cervical dystonia. In addition, the three BoNT/A products are approved for blepharospasm and focal dystonias, spasticity, hemifacial spasm, hyperhidrosis and facial lines, with remarkable regional differences. These toxin brands differ for specific activity, packaging, constituents, excipient, and storage. Comparative literature assessing the relative safety and efficacy of different BoNT products is limited, most data come from reports on small samples, and only a few studies meet criteria of evidence-based medicine. One study compared the effects of BoNT/A and BoNT/B on muscle activity of healthy volunteers, showing similar neurophysiological effects with a dose ratio of 1:100. In cervical dystonia, when comparing the effects of BoNT/A and BoNT/B, results are more variable, some studies reporting roughly similar peak effect and overall duration (at a ratio of 1:66, others reporting substantially shorter duration of BoNT/B than BoNT/A (at a ratio 1/24). Although the results of clinical studies are difficult to compare for methodological differences (dose ratio, study design, outcome measures), it is widely accepted that: BoNT/B is clinically effective using appropriate doses as BoNT/A (1:40-50), injections are generally more painful, in most of the studies on muscular conditions, efficacy is shorter, and immunogenicity higher. Since the earliest clinical trials, it has been reported that autonomic side effects are more frequent after BoNT/B injections, and this observation encouraged the use of BoNT/B for sialorrhea, hyperhidrosis and other non-motor symptoms. In these

  7. Systematic Literature Review of AbobotulinumtoxinA in Clinical Trials for Blepharospasm and Hemifacial Spasm

    PubMed Central

    Dashtipour, Khashayar; Chen, Jack J.; Frei, Karen; Nahab, Fatta; Tagliati, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim was to elucidate clinical trial efficacy, safety, and dosing practices of abobotulinumtoxinA (ABO) treatment in adult patients with blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm. To date, most literature reviews for blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm have examined the effectiveness of all botulinum neurotoxin type A products as a class. However, differences in dosing units and recommended schemes provide a clear rationale for reviewing each product separately. Methods A systematic literature review was performed to identify randomized controlled trials and other comparative clinical studies of ABO in the treatment of blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm published in English between January 1991 and March 2015. Medical literature databases (PubMed, Cochrane library, EMBASE) were searched. A total of five primary publications that evaluated ABO for the management of blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm were identified and summarized. Results Data included 374 subjects with blepharospasm and 172 subjects with hemifacial spasm treated with ABO. Total ABO doses ranged between 80 and 340 U for blepharospasm and 25 and 85 U for hemifacial spasm, depending on the severity of the clinical condition. All studies showed statistically significant benefits for the treatment of blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm. ABO was generally well tolerated across the individual studies. Adverse events considered to be associated with ABO treatment included: ptosis, tearing, blurred vision, double vision, dry eyes, and facial weakness. Discussion These data from 5 randomized clinical studies represents the available evidence base of ABO in blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm. Future studies in this area will add to this evidence base. PMID:26566457

  8. Systematic Literature Review of AbobotulinumtoxinA in Clinical Trials for Adult Upper Limb Spasticity

    PubMed Central

    Dashtipour, Khashayar; Chen, Jack J.; Walker, Heather W.; Lee, Michael Y.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The aim of this study was to elucidate clinical trial efficacy, safety, and dosing practices of abobotulinumtoxinA (ABO) treatment in adult patients with upper limb spasticity (ULS). Methods A systematic literature review was performed to identify randomized controlled trials and other comparative clinical studies of ABO in the treatment of adult ULS published in English between January 1991 and January 2013. Medical literature databases (PubMed, Cochrane Library, and EMBASE) were searched, and a total of 295 records were identified. Of these, 12 primary publications that evaluated ABO for the management of ULS were included in the final data report. Synthesis Total ABO doses ranged between 500 and 1500 U for ULS. Most of the studies in ULS showed statistically significant benefits (reduction in muscle tone based on Ashworth score) of ABO vs. placebo. Statistical significance was reached for most evaluations of spasticity using the Modified Ashworth Scale. Statistically significant effects on active movement and pain were demonstrated, albeit less consistently. ABO was generally well tolerated across the individual studies; most adverse events reported were considered unrelated to treatment. Adverse events considered associated with ABO treatment included fatigue, tiredness, arm pain, skin rashes, flu-like symptoms, worsening of spasm, and weakness. Conclusions On the basis of data extracted from 12 randomized clinical studies, a strong evidence base (9/12 studies) exists for the use of ABO to reduce ULS caused by stroke. PMID:25299523

  9. Systematic Literature Review of AbobotulinumtoxinA in Clinical Trials for Lower Limb Spasticity.

    PubMed

    Dashtipour, Khashayar; Chen, Jack J; Walker, Heather W; Lee, Michael Y

    2016-01-01

    To elucidate clinical trial efficacy, safety, and dosing practices of AbobotulinumtoxinA (ABO) treatment in adult patients with lower limb spasticity.A systematic literature review was performed to identify randomized controlled trials of ABO in the treatment of adult lower limb spasticity.Of the 295 records identified, 6 primary publications evaluated ABO for the management of lower limb spasticity of various etiologies and were evaluated. Total ABO doses ranged between 500 and 2000 U for lower limb spasticity, depending on the muscles injected. All studies in lower limb spasticity showed statistically significant reduction in muscle tone based on Modified Ashworth Scale of ABO versus placebo. Significant effects on active movement and pain were demonstrated albeit less consistently. ABO was generally well tolerated across the individual studies; most adverse events reported were considered unrelated to treatment. Treatment-related adverse events included but not limited to fatigue, local pain at injection site, hypertonia, dry mouth, weakness of the noninjected muscle, abnormal gait, and urinary tract infection.These data from 6 randomized clinical studies provide the beginnings of an evidence base for the use of ABO to reduce lower limb spasticity. Ongoing studies in this area will add to this evidence base. PMID:26765447

  10. Systematic Literature Review of AbobotulinumtoxinA in Clinical Trials for Lower Limb Spasticity

    PubMed Central

    Dashtipour, Khashayar; Chen, Jack J.; Walker, Heather W.; Lee, Michael Y.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To elucidate clinical trial efficacy, safety, and dosing practices of AbobotulinumtoxinA (ABO) treatment in adult patients with lower limb spasticity. A systematic literature review was performed to identify randomized controlled trials of ABO in the treatment of adult lower limb spasticity. Of the 295 records identified, 6 primary publications evaluated ABO for the management of lower limb spasticity of various etiologies and were evaluated. Total ABO doses ranged between 500 and 2000 U for lower limb spasticity, depending on the muscles injected. All studies in lower limb spasticity showed statistically significant reduction in muscle tone based on Modified Ashworth Scale of ABO versus placebo. Significant effects on active movement and pain were demonstrated albeit less consistently. ABO was generally well tolerated across the individual studies; most adverse events reported were considered unrelated to treatment. Treatment-related adverse events included but not limited to fatigue, local pain at injection site, hypertonia, dry mouth, weakness of the noninjected muscle, abnormal gait, and urinary tract infection. These data from 6 randomized clinical studies provide the beginnings of an evidence base for the use of ABO to reduce lower limb spasticity. Ongoing studies in this area will add to this evidence base. PMID:26765447

  11. CLINICAL BIOCHEMISTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessment of the health status of animals through measurement of cellular, biochemical, and macromolecular constituents in blood, secretions, and excretions has been variously referred to as clinical chemistry, clinical biochemistry, or clinical pathology. he genesis of this dis...

  12. Clinical Research and Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    ... you can get involved. Doing your own clinical research project? Then select the Guidance for Clinical Researchers link to learn more about the NICHD's clinical research processes and policies. Last Reviewed: 03/06/2012 ...

  13. Clinical Preceptor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardipee, Sheila; Clemens, Glenna

    A clinical preceptor is an employed registered nurse in a clinical facility who supervises and evaluates a student's performance independent of a clinical instructor. This manual is intended to assist the clinical preceptor, especially the preceptor dealing with re-entry nursing students. It encompasses a practical approach with actual situations…

  14. Study design and methods of the BoTULS trial: a randomised controlled trial to evaluate the clinical effect and cost effectiveness of treating upper limb spasticity due to stroke with botulinum toxin type A

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, Helen; Shaw, Lisa; Price, Christopher; van Wijck, Frederike; Barnes, Michael; Graham, Laura; Ford, Gary; Shackley, Phil; Steen, Nick

    2008-01-01

    Background Following a stroke, 55–75% of patients experience upper limb problems in the longer term. Upper limb spasticity may cause pain, deformity and reduced function, affecting mood and independence. Botulinum toxin is used increasingly to treat focal spasticity, but its impact on upper limb function after stroke is unclear. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical and cost effectiveness of botulinum toxin type A plus an upper limb therapy programme in the treatment of post stroke upper limb spasticity. Methods Trial design : A multi-centre open label parallel group randomised controlled trial and economic evaluation. Participants : Adults with upper limb spasticity at the shoulder, elbow, wrist or hand and reduced upper limb function due to stroke more than 1 month previously. Interventions : Botulinum toxin type A plus upper limb therapy (intervention group) or upper limb therapy alone (control group). Outcomes : Outcome assessments are undertaken at 1, 3 and 12 months. The primary outcome is upper limb function one month after study entry measured by the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT). Secondary outcomes include: spasticity (Modified Ashworth Scale); grip strength; dexterity (Nine Hole Peg Test); disability (Barthel Activities of Daily Living Index); quality of life (Stroke Impact Scale, Euroqol EQ-5D) and attainment of patient-selected goals (Canadian Occupational Performance Measure). Health and social services resource use, adverse events, use of other antispasticity treatments and patient views on the treatment will be compared. Participants are clinically reassessed at 3, 6 and 9 months to determine the need for repeat botulinum toxin type A and/or therapy. Randomisation : A web based central independent randomisation service. Blinding : Outcome assessments are undertaken by an assessor who is blinded to the randomisation group. Sample size : 332 participants provide 80% power to detect a 15% difference in treatment successes between

  15. Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    Clinical trials are research studies that test how well new medical approaches work in people. Each study answers ... prevent, screen for, diagnose, or treat a disease. Clinical trials may also compare a new treatment to a ...

  16. Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    Clinical trials are research studies that test how well new medical approaches work in people. Each study ... prevent, screen for, diagnose, or treat a disease. Clinical trials may also compare a new treatment to ...

  17. Clinical challenge.

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    Questions for this month's clinical challenge are based on articles in this issue. The clinical challenge is endorsed by the RACGP Quality Improvement and Continuing Professional Development (QI&CPD) program and has been allocated four Category 2 points (Activity ID:59922). Answers to this clinical challenge are available immediately following successful completion online at http://gplearning.racgp.org.au. Clinical challenge quizzes may be completed at any time throughout the 2014-16 triennium; therefore, the previous months' answers are not published. Each of the questions or incomplete statements below is followed by four suggested answers or completions. Select the most appropriate statement as your answer. PMID:27606376

  18. Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    ... of visits, and any adjustments to treatment. (back) Requirements for Participation Admission into a clinical trial is based on a rigid set of requirements. You must be diagnosed with the illness that ...

  19. Clinical neuroimaging

    SciTech Connect

    Theodore, W.H.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains chapters on neuroimaging. Included are the following chapters: diagnostic neuroimaging in stroke, position emission tomography in cerebrovascular disease: clinical applications, and neuroradiologic work-up of brain tumors.

  20. CLINICAL PEARL

    PubMed Central

    Mazefsky, Carla A.; Minshew, Nancy J.

    2013-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders are defined behaviorally by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) IV-TR based on abnormal development in social interaction and communication and restricted, repetitive, and stereotyped patterns of behaviors and interests that are evident before the age of 3. After decades of debate, research has demonstrated that the distinctions among autism, Asperger disorder, and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified are neither clinically reliable nor based on valid neurobiological or genetic differences. The fifth edition of the DSM therefore proposes to collapse all of the clinical syndromes under the single diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). PMID:23186793

  1. Clinical cytomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tárnok, Attila; Mittag, Anja; Lenz, Dominik

    2006-02-01

    The goal of predictive medicine is the detection of changes in patient's state prior to the clinical manifestation of the deterioration of the patients current status. Therefore, both the diagnostic of diseases like cancer, coronary atherosclerosis or congenital heart failure and the prognosis of the effect specific therapeutics on patients outcome are the main fields of predictive medicine. Clinical Cytomcs is based on the analysis of specimens from the patient by Cytomic technologies that are mainly imaging based techniques and their combinations with other assays. Predictive medicine aims at the recognition of the "fate" of each individual patients in order to yield unequivocal indications for decision making (i.e. how does the patient respond to therapy, react to medication etc.). This individualized prediction is based on the Predictive Medicine by Clinical Cytomics concept. These considerations have recently stimulated the idea of the Human Cytome Project. A major focus of the Human Cytome Project is multiplexed cy-tomic analysis of individual cells of the patient, extraction of predictive information and individual prediction that merges into individualized therapy. Although still at the beginning, Clinical Cytomics is a promising new field that may change therapy in the near future for the benefit of the patients.

  2. Clinical biochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, W. C.; Leach, C. S.; Fischer, C. L.

    1975-01-01

    The objectives of the biochemical studies conducted for the Apollo program were (1) to provide routine laboratory data for assessment of preflight crew physical status and for postflight comparisons; (2) to detect clinical or pathological abnormalities which might have required remedial action preflight; (3) to discover as early as possible any infectious disease process during the postflight quarantine periods following certain missions; and (4) to obtain fundamental medical knowledge relative to man's adjustment to and return from the space flight environment. The accumulated data presented suggest that these requirements were met by the program described. All changes ascribed to the space flight environment were subtle, whereas clinically significant changes were consistent with infrequent illnesses unrelated to the space flight exposure.

  3. Memory clinics

    PubMed Central

    Jolley, D; Benbow, S M; Grizzell, M

    2006-01-01

    Memory clinics were first described in the 1980s. They have become accepted worldwide as useful vehicles for improving practice in the identification, investigation, and treatment of memory disorders, including dementia. They are provided in various settings, the setting determining clientele and practice. All aim to facilitate referral from GPs, other specialists, or by self referral, in the early stages of impairment, and to avoid the stigma associated with psychiatric services. They bring together professionals with a range of skills for the benefit of patients, carers, and colleagues, and contribute to health promotion, health education, audit, and research, as well as service to patients. PMID:16517802

  4. Clinical neuroimaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, S.; Mazziotta, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    Designed for practicing neurologists and neurosurgeons, this reference focuses on the newest techniques in computed assisted tomography. Text material covers basic principles of computed tomography, as well as the clinical advantages and disadvantages of each modality. The anatomical and/or physiological processes measured by XCT, PET, SPECT and MRI are first discussed in terms of the normal patient, and then applied to the diagnosis and treatment of patients with neurological disease (primarily of the brain). Emphasis is placed on areas of difficult diagnosis, such as differentiating recurrent tumor from radiation necrosis, early diagnosis of dementia, selection of patients for extracranial-intracranial bypass procedures, and localization of epileptic foci.

  5. Clinical arthrography

    SciTech Connect

    Arndt, R.; Horns, J.W.; Gold, R.H.; Blaschke, D.D.

    1985-01-01

    This book deals with the method and interpretation of arthrography of the shoulder, knee, ankle, elbow, hip, wrist, and metacarpophalangeal, interphalangeal, and temporomandibular joints. The emphasis is on orthopaedic disorders, usually of traumatic origin, which is in keeping with the application of arthrography in clinical practice. Other conditions, such as inflammatory and degenerative diseases, congenital disorders and, in the case of the hip, arthrography of reconstructive joint surgery, are included. Each chapter is devoted to one joint and provides a comprehensive discussion on the method of arthrography, including single and double contrast techniques where applicable, normal radiographic anatomy, and finally, the interpretation of the normal and the abnormal arthrogram.

  6. Writing clinical scenarios for clinical science questions.

    PubMed

    Smith, Phil Em; Mucklow, John C

    2016-04-01

    Written knowledge assessments for physicians in training typically involve multiple-choice questions that use a clinical scenario in a single-best-answer format. The Royal College of Physicians Part 1 MRCP(UK) examination includes basic sciences themes that are challenging to assess through a clinical scenario. A realistic clinical setting based on everyday clinical practice and integral to the question is the clearest demonstration that the knowledge being assessed is clinically relevant. However, without special attention to detail, the scenario in a clinical science question can appear redundant or artificial. Reading unnecessary material frustrates candidates and threatens the reputation of the assessment. In this paper we discuss why a clinical scenario is important for basic science questions and offer advice on setting realistic and plausible clinical scenarios for such questions. PMID:27037383

  7. Hypothyroidism in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Qari, Faiza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hypothyroidism is the most common endocrine disease that was seen in the clinical practice especially for family physicians. Methods: This review article covered the important practical clinical issues for managing overt hypothyroidism, subclinical hypothyroidism and hypothyroidism during pregnancy. Conclusions: The clinical issues were addressed by clinical scenario followed by questions and stressed on the important clinical points. PMID:25161963

  8. Clinical professional governance for detailed clinical models.

    PubMed

    Goossen, William; Goossen-Baremans, Anneke

    2013-01-01

    This chapter describes the need for Detailed Clinical Models for contemporary Electronic Health Systems, data exchange and data reuse. It starts with an explanation of the components related to Detailed Clinical Models with a brief summary of knowledge representation, including terminologies representing clinic relevant "things" in the real world, and information models that abstract these in order to let computers process data about these things. Next, Detailed Clinical Models are defined and their purpose is described. It builds on existing developments around the world and accumulates in current work to create a technical specification at the level of the International Standards Organization. The core components of properly expressed Detailed Clinical Models are illustrated, including clinical knowledge and context, data element specification, code bindings to terminologies and meta-information about authors, versioning among others. Detailed Clinical Models to date are heavily based on user requirements and specify the conceptual and logical levels of modelling. It is not precise enough for specific implementations, which requires an additional step. However, this allows Detailed Clinical Models to serve as specifications for many different kinds of implementations. Examples of Detailed Clinical Models are presented both in text and in Unified Modelling Language. Detailed Clinical Models can be positioned in health information architectures, where they serve at the most detailed granular level. The chapter ends with examples of projects that create and deploy Detailed Clinical Models. All have in common that they can often reuse materials from earlier projects, and that strict governance of these models is essential to use them safely in health care information and communication technology. Clinical validation is one point of such governance, and model testing another. The Plan Do Check Act cycle can be applied for governance of Detailed Clinical Models

  9. Rationale for Clinical Supervision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cogan, Morris L.

    1976-01-01

    The author, one of the originators and developers of the clinical supervision process, offered a cogent rationale for clinical supervision. He defined clinical supervision and discussed the psychological-sociological basis for its practice. (Editor)

  10. ClinicalTrials.gov

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health ClinicalTrials.gov is a registry and results database of publicly and privately supported clinical studies of ... This Site ClinicalTrials.gov Background About the Results Database History, Policies, and Laws Media/Press Resources Linking ...

  11. Governance of clinical research.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, Michael; Tremaine, William J

    2012-03-01

    We review the principal methods and issues in the governance of clinical research: oversight of human research by federal offices, certification of clinical trial centers, management of conflict of interest in clinical research, and trial registration and reporting. PMID:22388015

  12. Being a Clinical Educator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgs, Joy; Mcallister, Lindy

    2007-01-01

    What is it like to be a clinical educator? How do clinical educators experience and describe their continuing journey of becoming a clinical educator? Within the model developed in this research, dimensions of being a clinical educator were identified. These dimensions include (a) having a sense of self (and the impact of bringing self into the…

  13. Managing clinical grant costs.

    PubMed

    Glass, Harold E; Hollander, Karen

    2009-05-01

    The rapidly increasing cost of pharmaceutical R&D presents a major challenge for the industry. This paper examines one aspect of that spending, clinical grants, and presents ways that pharmaceutical companies can best manage those expenditures. The first part of the paper examines the role of clinical grant payments as a motivation for clinical trial participation. The second part outlines a number of current management practices for controlling clinical grant costs. Financial compensation is an important matter for many physicians conducting clinical trials, especially those in office-based practices and those conducting phase 4 clinical trials. Since financial considerations are important to most types of investigators, and there is no compelling evidence that paying at high rates insures timely performance or quality data, companies engaging clinical investigators must manage their clinical grant funds as effectively as possible. Sound financial management requires that clinical development professionals appreciate the complex relationship between the pharmaceutical company and the physicians who serve as clinical investigators on that company's clinical trials. Sensible financial management of clinical grants also demands that sponsor companies get the most value for their clinical grant spending. Ultimately, good clinical grant management requires an attitude that combines good business sense with an understanding that pharmaceutical R&D strives to bring to market new drugs that can help patient populations around the world. Investigators are medical contractors in clinical trials, and while they are engaged in their vital research, they are a part of the research process that must be carefully budgeted and managed. Society, pharmaceutical companies, clinical investigators, and patients will reap the benefits of adequately budgeted, and well managed clinical grants. PMID:19470309

  14. Clinical Trials in Vision Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Trials in Vision Research Clinical Trials in Vision Research Clinical studies depend on people who volunteer. ... about the treatment. How are clinical trials in vision different from other clinical trials? Eyes are one ...

  15. Spina Bifida Clinic Directory

    MedlinePlus

    ... genitourinary-reconstruction Cleveland Clinic (pediatric) 9500 Euclid Avenue S-60 Cleveland, OH 44195 Phone: 216-445-5579 Fax: ... for Adults Adult Spina Bifida Clinic (adult only) 60 Township Line Rd. Elkins Park, PA 19027 (215) ...

  16. Fertility Clinic Success Rates

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2013 Assisted Reproductive Technology Fertility Clinic Success Rates Report Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir 2013 ART Fertility Clinic Success Rates Report [PDF - 1MB] Bookmarks and thumbnails are available within ...

  17. Research Areas: Clinical Trials

    Cancer.gov

    Information about NCI programs and initiatives that sponsor, conduct, develop, or support clinical trials, including NCI’s Clinical Trial Network (NCTN) and NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) initiatives.

  18. Clinical nuclear medicine. [Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Matin, P.

    1981-01-01

    ''Clinical Nuclear Medicine'' is an update to the author's ''Handbook of Clinical Nuclear Medicine.'' Sections on placental imaging, bone marrow imaging, biliary tract imaging and scintigraphy are included in the volume. (JMT)

  19. Research Areas - Clinical Trials

    Cancer.gov

    Information about NCI programs and initiatives that sponsor, conduct, develop, or support clinical trials, including NCI’s Clinical Trial Network (NCTN) and NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) initiatives.

  20. Clinical governance and pathology

    PubMed Central

    Crook, M

    2002-01-01

    This article looks at clinical governance and pathology. Clinical governance should be an important tool in seeking quality improvement within the Natinal Health Service. But how as pathologists should we go about it? PMID:11896066

  1. The Effective Clinical Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wink, Diane M.

    1995-01-01

    Examines the common problems with clinical conferences and suggests approaches to maximize student learning. Suggests that an effective clinical conference has three characteristics: (1) it is a group event; (2) it contributes to the achievement of course and clinical objectives; and (3) it provides a setting for students to explore personal…

  2. Clinical document architecture.

    PubMed

    Heitmann, Kai

    2003-01-01

    The Clinical Document Architecture (CDA), a standard developed by the Health Level Seven organisation (HL7), is an ANSI approved document architecture for exchange of clinical information using XML. A CDA document is comprised of a header with associated vocabularies and a body containing the structural clinical information. PMID:15061557

  3. University cardiology clinic.

    PubMed

    Borozanov, V

    2013-01-01

    In distant 1972, within framework of the Internal Clinic, a cardiologic department was organized which was soon, on 29.XII.1974, transformed into the Cardiology Clinic, later the Institute for Heart Diseases, and in 2008 was renamed the University Cardiology Clinic. The greater part of its foundation was possible owing to Prof. Dimitar Arsov and Prof. Radovan Percinkovski, who was the clinic's first director in the period from 1974 to 1984. In 1985, the Clinic moved into its own new building, and in that way was physically detached from the Internal Clinics. Until its move to the new building, the Clinic functioned in the Internal Clinics building, organized as an outpatient polyclinic and inpatient infirmary department with clinical beds, a coronary intensive care unit and a haemodynamics laboratory equipped with the most modern equipment of that time. Today the Clinic functions through two integral divisions: an inpatient infirmary department which comprises an intensive coronary care unit and fourteen wards which altogether have 139 clinical beds, and the diagnostic centre which comprises an emergency clinic and day hospital, a communal and consultative outpatients' clinic functioning on a daily basis, through which some 300-350 patients pass every day, and diagnostic laboratories with a capacity of nearly 100 non-invasive and 20-30 invasive diagnostic procedures daily. The Clinic is a teaching base, and its doctors are educators of students at the Medical, Dental and Pharmacy Faculties, and also of students at the High School for Nurses and X-ray technicians, but also for those in Internal Medicine and especially Cardiology. The Clinic is also a base for scientific Masters' and post-doctoral studies, and such higher degrees are achieved not only by doctors who work here, but also by doctors from Medical Centres both in the country and abroad. Doctors working in this institution publish widely, not only a great number of books and monographs, but also original

  4. Assessing clinical pragmatism.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Lynn A

    1998-03-01

    "Clinical pragmatism" is an important new method of moral problem-solving in clinical practice. This method draws on the pragmatic philosophy of John Dewey and recommends an experimental approach to solving moral problems in clinical practice. Although the method may shed some light on how clinicians and their patients ought to interact when moral problems are at hand, it nonetheless is deficient in a number of respects. Clinical pragmatism fails to explain adequately how moral poblems can be solved experimentally, it underestimates the relevance and importance of judgment in clinical ethics, and it presents a questionable account of the role that moral principles should play in moral problem solving. PMID:11656751

  5. [Randomized clinical trials and real clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Heerlein, Andrés

    2009-01-01

    One of the emerging problems in modern medicine is that part of its highly efficacious treatments do not show significant effectiveness in real world systems of care. Efficacy studies address the appropriate dosages, short term response and feasibility of treatments in carefully selected populations, but they do not necessarily provide information for decisions in clinical practice. This review aims to present strengths and limitations of different methodological types of trials and to offer an overview of how knowledge from clinical trials can be used for clinical practice. The important effect of funding source on the outcome of randomized controlled trials is discussed. Some key questions in the treatment assessment of depression, schizophrenia and different medical conditions are discussed, with a focus on the possibilities and restrictions of translating clinical trial results into real-world settings. Empirical evidence shows that although randomized controlled trials are the gold standard for proving efficacy of a therapeutic procedure they often suffer from funding source bias and from lack of generalizability. Effectiveness studies evaluate effects of treatments under conditions approximating usual care. Another key area that can be addressed by effectiveness studies is the impact on important health policy measures such as disability days, days of work or medical costs, etc. Conclusions show that the future assessment of treatment regimes for clinical utility requires less biased efficacy studies and more effectiveness studies addressing major issues from all relevant perspectives. PMID:19543562

  6. Development of clinical sites.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Mary

    2015-02-01

    Clinical experiences are vital to all types of healthcare educational programs. Supervised clinical experiences provide the opportunity for the learner to apply didactic knowledge and theory to real world situations and hone skills necessary for entry into practice. Nurse anesthesia programs utilize a wide variety of clinical sites to expose student registered nurse anesthetists to experiences that will prepare them clinically, academically and professionally to enter practice as a Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist. This article describes the process of developing a clinical site. A thorough evaluation will determine the types of experiences meant to be offered at the site, the resources available to house and educate the students, and how to evaluate the effectiveness of the clinical site. Open communication between the clinical coordinator and the program director or designee is essential to ensure success of the clinical site. The Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs has resources available to guide those interested in becoming a clinical site, as well as for program administrators who seek to add new experiences to their programs. PMID:25842629

  7. Operating Outpatient Clinics in 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohannan, Harry M.

    1984-01-01

    The future of dental school clinic operations is discussed including change within dental education, factors influencing change, and some predicted changes. Fundamental change can be predicted in educational philosophy, responsibility for clinical care, clinic facilities, clinic operation, and faculty. (MLW)

  8. American Association for Clinical Chemistry

    MedlinePlus

    ... indispensable patient care tool. Learn more IN CLINICAL CHEMISTRY ddPCR Quantification of Lymphoma Mutations Researchers have developed ... Online Harmonization.net Commission on Accreditation in Clinical Chemistry American Board of Clinical Chemistry Clinical Chemistry Trainee ...

  9. Clinical management of hypophosphatasia

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Summary HPP is a rare disease that manifests in different ways across the life course. Accurate diagnosis depends upon the use of appropriate age-related normative data. A new therapy is undergoing clinical trials; the preliminary published data is encouraging, but the scope of clinical application remains to be determined. PMID:26604944

  10. CLINICAL TRIALS.GOV

    EPA Science Inventory

    ClinicalTrials.gov provides patients, family members, health care professionals, and members of the public easy access to information on clinical trials for a wide range of diseases and conditions. The U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), through its National Library of Medi...

  11. Multispecialty Clinic Practice

    PubMed Central

    Margolin, David A.; Beck, David E.

    2011-01-01

    A multispecialty clinic practice is a common practice arrangement for colorectal surgeons. This type of practice has a variety of features, both positive and negative. The authors explore location, practice patterns, lifestyles, compensation, and academic opportunities associated with a multispecialty clinic practice. This information can assist younger surgeons in choosing a practice opportunity and guide experienced surgeons through their career progression. PMID:22654568

  12. The NASA Clinic System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarpa, Philip J.; Williams, Richard

    2009-01-01

    NASA maintains on site occupational health clinics at all Centers and major facilities NASA maintains an on-site clinic that offers comprehensive health care to astronauts at the Johnson Space Center NASA deploys limited health care capability to space and extreme environments Focus is always on preventive health care

  13. Clinical coding. Code breakers.

    PubMed

    Mathieson, Steve

    2005-02-24

    --The advent of payment by results has seen the role of the clinical coder pushed to the fore in England. --Examinations for a clinical coding qualification began in 1999. In 2004, approximately 200 people took the qualification. --Trusts are attracting people to the role by offering training from scratch or through modern apprenticeships. PMID:15768716

  14. Clinical Application of Electrocardiography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brammell, H. L.; Orr, William

    The scalar electrocardiogram (ECG) is one of the most important and commonly used clinical tools in medicine. A detailed description of the recordings of cardiac electrical activity made by the ECG is presented, and the vast numbers of uses made with the data provided by this diagnostic tool are cited. Clinical applications of the ECG are listed.…

  15. In the clinic. Perimenopause.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Megan; Batur, Pelin; DeSapri, Kristi Tough

    2015-02-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of Perimenopause focusing on prevention, diagnosis, treatment, practice improvement, and patient information. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including ACP Smart Medicine and MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic from these primary sources in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of science writers and physician writers. Editorial consultants from ACP Smart Medicine and MKSAP provide expert review of the content. Readers who are interested in these primary resources for more detail can consult http://smartmedicine.acponline.org, http://mksap.acponline.org, and other resources referenced in each issue of In the Clinic. PMID:25643316

  16. [Bioethics in clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Gonzaléz, Miguel; Herreros, Benjamín

    2015-01-01

    Bioethics has grown exponentially in recent decades. Its most important schools include principlism, casuistry, virtue ethics and the ethics of care. These schools are not exclusive. Within bioethics, clinical ethics addresses the inherent clinical practice ethical problems, problems which are many and very varied. Bioethics training is essential for clinicians to address these bioethics' problems. But even the professionals are trained, there are problems that cannot be solved individually and require advisory groups in clinical ethics: clinical ethics committees. These committees are also responsible for education in bioethics in health institutions. Clinical bioethics is a practical discipline, oriented to address specific problems, so its development is necessary to improve the decision making in such complex problems, inevitable problems in healthcare. PMID:25680645

  17. In the Clinic. Dementia.

    PubMed

    Rabins, Peter V; Blass, David M

    2014-08-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of dementia, focusing on prevention, diagnosis, treatment, practice improvement, and patient information. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including ACP Smart Medicine and MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic from these primary sources in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of science writers and physician writers. Editorial consultants from ACP Smart Medicine and MKSAP provide expert review of the content. Readers who are interested in these primary resources for more detail can consult http://smartmedicine.acponline.org, https://mksap.acponline.org/, and other resources referenced in each issue of In the Clinic. PMID:25089871

  18. In the clinic: hypertension.

    PubMed

    Weir, Matthew R

    2014-12-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of Hypertension focusing on prevention, diagnosis, treatment, practice improvement, and patient information. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including ACP Smart Medicine and MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic from these primary sources in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of science writers and physician writers. Editorial consultants from ACP Smart Medicine and MKSAP provide expert review of the content. Readers who are interested in these primary resources for more detail can consult http://smartmedicine.acponline.org, http://mksap.acponline.org, and other resources referenced in each issue of In the Clinic. PMID:25437425

  19. In the clinic. Insomnia.

    PubMed

    Masters, Philip A

    2014-10-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of Insomnia focusing on prevention, diagnosis, treatment, practice improvement, and patient information. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including ACP Smart Medicine and MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic from these primary sources in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of science writers and physician writers. Editorial consultants from ACP Smart Medicine and MKSAP provide expert review of the content. Readers who are interested in these primary resources for more detail can consult http://smartmedicine.acponline.org, http://mksap.acponline.org, and other resources referenced in each issue of In the Clinic. PMID:25285559

  20. In the clinic. Constipation.

    PubMed

    Shah, Brijen J; Rughwani, Nisha; Rose, Suzanne

    2015-04-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of constipation, focusing on prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and patient information. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including ACP Smart Medicine and MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic from these primary sources in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of science writers and physician writers. Editorial consultants from ACP Smart Medicine and MKSAP provide expert review of the content. Readers who are interested in these primary resources for more detail can consult http://smartmedicine.acponline.org, http://mksap.acponline.org, and other resources referenced in each issue of In the Clinic. PMID:25845017

  1. Clinical Pathway for Thyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Villar del Moral, Jesús María; Soria Aledo, Víctor; Colina Alonso, Alberto; Flores Pastor, Benito; Gutiérrez Rodríguez, María Teresa; Ortega Serrano, Joaquín; Parra Hidalgo, Pedro; Ros López, Susana

    2015-05-01

    Clinical pathways are care plans applicable to patient care procedures that present variations in practice and a predictable clinical course. They are designed not as a substitute for clinical judgment, but rather as a means to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the procedures. This clinical pathway is the result of a collaborative work of the Sections of Endocrine Surgery and Quality Management of the Spanish Association of Surgeons. It attempts to provide a framework for standardizing the performance of thyroidectomy, the most frequently performed operation in endocrine surgery. Along with the usual documents of clinical pathways (temporary matrix, variance tracking and information sheets, assessment indicators and a satisfaction questionnaire) it includes a review of the scientific evidence around different aspects of pre, intra and postoperative management. Among others, antibiotic and antithrombotic prophylaxis, preoperative preparation in hyperthyroidism, intraoperative neuromonitoring and systems for obtaining hemostasis are included, along with management of postoperative hypocalcemia. PMID:25732107

  2. [Clinical management. Clinical management units. Management agreements].

    PubMed

    Ortega Moreno, A

    2003-12-01

    Clinical management (CM) as a concept includes different innovating experiences in health care services management among developed countries, which were initiated during the late eighties and the first nineties. They were mostly due to the concern that political leaders had about their financial viability. CM, as far as it is understood in Spain, is an organizing model which considers the patient as the centre of the health system. It is guided towards disease, looking for continuous assistance and facilitates an autonomous management together with decentralization at the time of taking decisions. It involves professionals whose clinical practice, based on guides, medical records and care planning, incorporate the knowledge and methodology of "evidence based medicine". Clinical management units (CMU) are organizational types of CM, which implantation is spreading rapidly in the different national health care systems. They include a person who assumes responsibility for them, who act as the hospital directorship interlocutor and are autonomous at the time of managing the allocated resources related to their medical programmes and services. They have an information system adapted to their own needs and an outcome evaluation system which allows them "process" re-engineering. CMU's strengths and weaknesses are highly dependent on the professionals that integrate them. The CMU responsible carries out a management contract with the hospital directorship in which CMU competences, directorship's obligations, essential aspects to meet agreed goals, an outcome evaluation system and an incentives scheme are included. PMID:15206333

  3. Clinical Microbiology Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Sintchenko, Vitali; Rauch, Carol A.; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The clinical microbiology laboratory has responsibilities ranging from characterizing the causative agent in a patient's infection to helping detect global disease outbreaks. All of these processes are increasingly becoming partnered more intimately with informatics. Effective application of informatics tools can increase the accuracy, timeliness, and completeness of microbiology testing while decreasing the laboratory workload, which can lead to optimized laboratory workflow and decreased costs. Informatics is poised to be increasingly relevant in clinical microbiology, with the advent of total laboratory automation, complex instrument interfaces, electronic health records, clinical decision support tools, and the clinical implementation of microbial genome sequencing. This review discusses the diverse informatics aspects that are relevant to the clinical microbiology laboratory, including the following: the microbiology laboratory information system, decision support tools, expert systems, instrument interfaces, total laboratory automation, telemicrobiology, automated image analysis, nucleic acid sequence databases, electronic reporting of infectious agents to public health agencies, and disease outbreak surveillance. The breadth and utility of informatics tools used in clinical microbiology have made them indispensable to contemporary clinical and laboratory practice. Continued advances in technology and development of these informatics tools will further improve patient and public health care in the future. PMID:25278581

  4. Design of clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Rollo, David; Machado, Sanjay; Ceschin, Mauro

    2010-09-01

    Clinical trial design for nuclear medicine diagnostic imaging radiopharmaceuticals must include a design for preclinical safety studies. These studies should establish that the investigational product (IP) does not have a toxic effect. As a further requirement, radiopharmaceutical clinical trials include a human study (phase 1) that provides biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and radiation dosimetry information. These studies demonstrate to the Food and Drug Administration that the IP either meets or exceeds the toxicology and radiation exposure safety limits. Satisfying this requirement can result in the Food and Drug Administration approving the performance of late-phase (phase 2/3) clinical trials that are designed to validate the clinical efficacy of the diagnostic imaging agent in patients who have a confirmed diagnosis for the intended application. Emphasis is placed on the most typical trial design for diagnostic imaging agents that use a comparator to demonstrate that the new IP is similar in efficacy to an established standard comparator. Such trials are called equivalence, or noninferiority, trials that attempt to show that the new IP is not less effective than the comparator by more than a statistically defined amount. Importantly, the trial design must not inappropriately favor one diagnostic imaging agent over the other. Bias is avoided by the use of a core laboratory with expert physicians who are not involved in the trial for interpreting and objectively scoring the image sets obtained at the clinical trial sites. Clinical trial design must also follow Good Clinical Practice (GCP) guidelines. GCP stipulates the clinical trial process, including protocol and Case Report Form design, analyses planning, as well as analyzing and preparing interim and final clinical trial/study reports. PMID:20674592

  5. Alagille syndrome: clinical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Maha; Kamath, Binita M; Chitayat, David

    2016-01-01

    Alagille syndrome is an autosomal dominant, complex multisystem disorder characterized by the presence of three out of five major clinical criteria: cholestasis with bile duct paucity on liver biopsy, congenital cardiac defects (with particular involvement of the pulmonary arteries), posterior embryotoxon in the eye, characteristic facial features, and butterfly vertebrae. Renal and vascular abnormalities can also occur. Inter- and intrafamilial variabilities in the clinical manifestations are common. We reviewed the clinical features and management as well as the molecular basis of Alagille syndrome. PMID:27418850

  6. Alagille syndrome: clinical perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Maha; Kamath, Binita M; Chitayat, David

    2016-01-01

    Alagille syndrome is an autosomal dominant, complex multisystem disorder characterized by the presence of three out of five major clinical criteria: cholestasis with bile duct paucity on liver biopsy, congenital cardiac defects (with particular involvement of the pulmonary arteries), posterior embryotoxon in the eye, characteristic facial features, and butterfly vertebrae. Renal and vascular abnormalities can also occur. Inter- and intrafamilial variabilities in the clinical manifestations are common. We reviewed the clinical features and management as well as the molecular basis of Alagille syndrome. PMID:27418850

  7. Automation in Clinical Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Ledeboer, Nathan A.

    2013-01-01

    Historically, the trend toward automation in clinical pathology laboratories has largely bypassed the clinical microbiology laboratory. In this article, we review the historical impediments to automation in the microbiology laboratory and offer insight into the reasons why we believe that we are on the cusp of a dramatic change that will sweep a wave of automation into clinical microbiology laboratories. We review the currently available specimen-processing instruments as well as the total laboratory automation solutions. Lastly, we outline the types of studies that will need to be performed to fully assess the benefits of automation in microbiology laboratories. PMID:23515547

  8. Clinical specular microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hirst, L.W.; Laing, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    This book provides the general ophthalmologist with a guide to the clinical applications of specular microscopy. Important material is included on laser injury, cataract surgery, corneal transplants, glaucoma, uveitis, and trauma.

  9. The Perfect Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Bril, V

    2016-01-01

    Multiple phase III clinical trials have failed to show disease-modifying benefits for diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy (DSP) and this may be due to the design of the clinical trials. The perfect clinical trial in DSP would enroll sufficiently large numbers of patients having early or minimal disease, as demonstrated by nerve conduction studies (NCS). These patients would be treated with an intervention given at an effective and well-tolerated dose for a sufficient duration of time to show change in the end points selected. For objective or surrogate measures such as NCS and for some small fiber measures, the duration needed to show positive change may be as brief as 6-12 months, but subsequently, trials lasting 5-8 years will be required to demonstrate clinical benefits. PMID:27133143

  10. Clinically based implant selection.

    PubMed

    Fugazzotto, P A

    1999-01-01

    A hierarchy of implant selection is presented, based on overcoming specific clinical challenges in a variety of situations, including maximization of the esthetic, comfort, and functional potentials of therapy. PMID:10709488

  11. Clinical Trials - Participants

    MedlinePlus

    ... participating in was reviewed by an IRB. Further Reading For more information about research protections, see: Office ... data and decide whether the results have medical importance. Results from clinical trials are often published in ...

  12. Learn about Clinical Studies

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the care of future patients by providing information about the benefits and risks of therapeutic, preventative, or diagnostic products or interventions. Clinical trials provide the basis for the development and marketing of new drugs, biological products, and medical devices. ...

  13. Participating in Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... experimental drug, therapy, medical device, lifestyle change, or test will help treat, find, or prevent a disease. A clinical trial may compare experimental products or tests to those already available or may compare existing ...

  14. Find a Free Clinic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dental, Medical, Rx's www.amissionofmercy.org A Storehouse Free. Medical Ministries 675 E Lexington Rd Mocksville , NC ... E-mail: Info@nafcclinics.org National Association of Free & Charitable Clinics © 2016

  15. Hepatitis C: Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Public Home » Hepatitis C » Treatment Decisions Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... can I find out about participating in a hepatitis C clinical trial? Many trials are being conducted ...

  16. Outpatient preanaesthesia evaluation clinics.

    PubMed

    Lew, E; Pavlin, D J; Amundsen, L

    2004-11-01

    In recent years, there has been a paradigm shift from an inpatient to outpatient preanaesthesia evaluation. This has been driven by rising healthcare costs and the increasing popularity of ambulatory and same-day admission surgery. These outpatient preanaesthesia clinics play an important role in enhancing the cost-effectiveness of the perioperative process. This review describes the structure of modern outpatient preanaesthesia evaluation clinics, and the associated benefits, limitations and controversies. PMID:15510321

  17. Lacaziosis - unusual clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Pétra Pereira de; Schettini, Antonio Pedro Mendes; Rodrigues, Carlos Alberto Chirano; Westphal, Danielle Cristine

    2015-01-01

    Lacaziosis or Jorge Lobo's disease is a fungal, granulomatous, chronic infectious disease caused by Lacazia loboi, which usually affects the skin and subcutaneous tissue. It is characterized by slow evolution and a variety of cutaneous manifestations with the most common clinical expression being nodular keloid lesions that predominate in exposed areas. We report the case of a patient who had an unusual clinical presentation, with a single-plated lesion on the back. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of Lacaziosis. PMID:25831004

  18. Clinical careers film.

    PubMed

    2015-09-01

    Those interested in developing clinical academic careers might be interested in a short animated film by Health Education England (HEE) and the National Institute for Health Research. The three-minute film, a frame from which is shown below, describes the sort of opportunities that are on offer to all professionals as part of the HEE's clinical academic careers framework. You can view the film on YouTube at tinyurl.com/pelb95c. PMID:26309005

  19. The Calgary Youth Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Arthur H.

    1971-01-01

    This is a report of the findings gathered from the study of youthful patients presenting at a clinic set up in response to the need felt after a rock festival was held in Calgary. The clinic was staffed by volunteers, and the response was so good that some volunteers had to be turned away. One night per week was found to be sufficient time to meet the demand. Findings were assessed according to age and place of residence. PMID:20468673

  20. Considering retail health clinics.

    PubMed

    Mullin, Kathy

    2009-12-01

    By gaining increasing acceptance from consumers and traditional providers, retail-based convenient care clinics have moved from the innovative fringe into the mainstream of healthcare delivery. Nationwide, resourceful administrators are experimenting with retail-based delivery systems, using the clinic's unique attributes to promote wellness, expand accessibility, reduce delivery costs, and enhance brand recognition. This article takes an in-depth look at the convenient care business model, pertinent regulatory issues, and some of the associated benefits and concerns. PMID:19955967

  1. MTA: A Clinical Review

    PubMed Central

    Tawil, Peter Z; Duggan, Derek J.; Galicia, Johnah C.

    2016-01-01

    MTA has been a revolutionary material in endodontics. Since it’s introduction in the 1990’s several studies have demonstrated its use in several clinical applications. MTA has been extensively studied and is currently used for perforation repairs, apexifications, regenerative procedures, apexogenesis, pulpotomies & pulp capping. This article will review the history, composition, research findings and clinical applications of this versatile material. PMID:25821936

  2. Clinical Studies with Epothilones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altmann, Karl-Heinz

    As indicated in previous chapters, epothilone research so far has delivered seven new chemical entities that have been advanced to clinical trials in humans (Fig. 1). However, the amount of clinical data publicly available at this time strongly varies between individual compounds, depending on their development stage, but also on the general publication policy of the developing company. The compound that has been most comprehensively characterized in the clinical literature is ixabepilone (BMS-247550), for which trial results have been described in a number of articles in peer-reviewed journals and which has been granted FDA approval for two clinical indications on Oct. 16, 2007. For all other compounds, most of the information on clinical trials is available only in abstract form. In all these cases it remains uncertain, whether the content of these abstracts fully reflects the content of the subsequent (poster or oral) presentations at the corresponding meeting; in fact, it seems likely that additional data will have been included in the actual meeting presentations that may not have been available at the time of abstract submission. As this is unknown to the author, such additional information cannot be considered in this chapter, which is solely based on information documented in accessible abstracts or journal publications. It should also be kept in mind that the interpretation of data from ongoing clinical trials or forward looking statements based on data from completed trials are always preliminary in character.

  3. Good Clinical Practice Training

    PubMed Central

    Arango, Jaime; Chuck, Tina; Ellenberg, Susan S.; Foltz, Bridget; Gorman, Colleen; Hinrichs, Heidi; McHale, Susan; Merchant, Kunal; Shapley, Stephanie; Wild, Gretchen

    2016-01-01

    Good Clinical Practice (GCP) is an international standard for the design, conduct, performance, monitoring, auditing, recording, analyses, and reporting of clinical trials. The goal of GCP is to ensure the protection of the rights, integrity, and confidentiality of clinical trial participants and to ensure the credibility and accuracy of data and reported results. In the United States, trial sponsors generally require investigators to complete GCP training prior to participating in each clinical trial to foster GCP and as a method to meet regulatory expectations (ie, sponsor’s responsibility to select qualified investigators per 21 CFR 312.50 and 312.53(a) for drugs and biologics and 21 CFR 812.40 and 812.43(a) for medical devices). This training requirement is often extended to investigative site staff, as deemed relevant by the sponsor, institution, or investigator. Those who participate in multiple clinical trials are often required by sponsors to complete repeated GCP training, which is unnecessarily burdensome. The Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative convened a multidisciplinary project team involving partners from academia, industry, other researchers and research staff, and government to develop recommendations for streamlining current GCP training practices. Recommendations drafted by the project team, including the minimum key training elements, frequency, format, and evidence of training completion, were presented to a broad group of experts to foster discussion of the current issues and to seek consensus on proposed solutions. PMID:27390628

  4. Clinical toxinology specialty training.

    PubMed

    White, Julian

    2013-07-01

    Clinical toxinology is the medical discipline dealing with the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of toxin diseases caused by exposure to venomous animals and poisonous animals, plants and mushrooms. Currently there is no national or international organisation accrediting or training doctors in this discipline, but the role of the IST in this area is the subject of a recently approved revised Constitution. A few courses covering some aspects of clinical toxinology exist, either with limited curricula, or with only a minor clinical focus, or with a very regional, non-global focus. The only comprehensive clinical toxinology course is the one provided in Adelaide, Australia, running regularly since 1997. This course may form the nucleus from which IST can develop a global accredited training scheme in clinical toxinology. Such a scheme will require input from diverse global regions and will be far more comprehensive and over a much longer time than the current Short Course, though may incorporate the Short Course in some way, or a derivative of it. Accreditation of medical expertise in clinical toxinology will be required at the national level and this might be accomplished by the IST working with existing national medical specialty organisations and governments, with the IST supervising the training and accreditation requirements and the national organisations providing the framework for registration of medical expertise at the local level. PMID:23524067

  5. Overview of Botulinum Toxins for Aesthetic Uses.

    PubMed

    Gart, Michael S; Gutowski, Karol A

    2016-07-01

    Botulinum toxin type A (BTA) can be used for facial aesthetics. The 3 currently available BTA types include onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox; Botox Cosmetic, Allergan, Irvine, CA), abobotulinumtoxinA (Dysport; Ipsen, Ltd, Berkshire, UK), and incobotulinumtoxinA (Xeomin; Merz Pharmaceuticals, Frankfurt, Germany). The mechanism of action and clinical uses for treatment of dynamic lines of the forehead, brow, glabella, lateral orbit, nose, and lips are presented, as well as treatment of masseter hypertrophy, platysmal bands, and improvements of the perioral region. Specific BTA injection sites and suggested doses are presented. PMID:27363760

  6. Clinical Supervision: A Conceptual Framework.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krajewski, Robert J.

    1982-01-01

    Various views of clinical supervision are analyzed and examined. The "process" definition of clinical supervision emphasizes an eight-step cycle of supervision. Clinical supervision as "concept" is also considered and seven conceptual elements are examined. (JN)

  7. How Do Clinical Trials Work?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Clinical Trial Websites How Do Clinical Trials Work? If you take part in a clinical trial, ... kol). This plan explains how the trial will work. The trial is led by a principal investigator ( ...

  8. Clinical Usefulness of Arbekacin

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Arbekacin is a broad-spectrum aminoglycoside used to treat methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Arbekacin has antibacterial activities against high-level gentamicin-resistant Enterococci, multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii et al. Here, we reviewed in vitro data on arbekacin in Staphylococci and Gram-negative microorganisms. We also reviewed clinical studies for clinical efficacy and microbiologic efficacy data in patients with identified MRSA and suspected MRSA infections. The overall clinical efficacy ranged from 66.7% to 89.7%. The microbiologic efficacy rate ranged from 46.2% to 83%. In comparative studies between arbekacin and glycopeptides, arbekacin was similar to other glycopeptides with respect to clinical and microbiological efficacy rates. Combination trials with other antibiotics suggest that arbekacin will be a promising strategy to control Enterococcus spp. multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa. The major adverse reaction was nephrotoxicity/hepatotoxicity, but patients recovered from most adverse reactions without any severe complications. Based on these results, arbekacin could be a good alternative to vancomycin/teicoplanin in MRSA treatment. Finally, therapeutic drug monitoring is recommended to maximize clinical efficacy and decrease nephrotoxicity. PMID:27104010

  9. Clinical Usefulness of Arbekacin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Hoon; Lee, Chang-Seop

    2016-03-01

    Arbekacin is a broad-spectrum aminoglycoside used to treat methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Arbekacin has antibacterial activities against high-level gentamicin-resistant Enterococci, multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii et al. Here, we reviewed in vitro data on arbekacin in Staphylococci and Gram-negative microorganisms. We also reviewed clinical studies for clinical efficacy and microbiologic efficacy data in patients with identified MRSA and suspected MRSA infections. The overall clinical efficacy ranged from 66.7% to 89.7%. The microbiologic efficacy rate ranged from 46.2% to 83%. In comparative studies between arbekacin and glycopeptides, arbekacin was similar to other glycopeptides with respect to clinical and microbiological efficacy rates. Combination trials with other antibiotics suggest that arbekacin will be a promising strategy to control Enterococcus spp. multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa. The major adverse reaction was nephrotoxicity/hepatotoxicity, but patients recovered from most adverse reactions without any severe complications. Based on these results, arbekacin could be a good alternative to vancomycin/teicoplanin in MRSA treatment. Finally, therapeutic drug monitoring is recommended to maximize clinical efficacy and decrease nephrotoxicity. PMID:27104010

  10. Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation

    PubMed Central

    WEITZEL, KRISTIN W.; ELSEY, AMANDA R.; LANGAEE, TAIMOUR Y.; BURKLEY, BENJAMIN; NESSL, DAVID R.; OBENG, ANIWAA OWUSU; STALEY, BENJAMIN J.; DONG, HUI-JIA; ALLAN, ROBERT W.; LIU, J. FELIX; COOPER-DEHOFF, RHONDA M.; ANDERSON, R. DAVID; CONLON, MICHAEL; CLARE-SALZLER, MICHAEL J.; NELSON, DAVID R.; JOHNSON, JULIE A.

    2014-01-01

    Current challenges exist to widespread clinical implementation of genomic medicine and pharmacogenetics. The University of Florida (UF) Health Personalized Medicine Program (PMP) is a pharmacist-led, multidisciplinary initiative created in 2011 within the UF Clinical Translational Science Institute. Initial efforts focused on pharmacogenetics, with long-term goals to include expansion to disease-risk prediction and disease stratification. Herein we describe the processes for development of the program, the challenges that were encountered and the clinical acceptance by clinicians of the genomic medicine implementation. The initial clinical implementation of the UF PMP began in June 2012 and targeted clopidogrel use and the CYP2C19 genotype in patients undergoing left heart catheterization and percutaneous-coronary intervention (PCI). After 1 year, 1,097 patients undergoing left heart catheterization were genotyped preemptively, and 291 of those underwent subsequent PCI. Genotype results were reported to the medical record for 100% of genotyped patients. Eighty patients who underwent PCI had an actionable genotype, with drug therapy changes implemented in 56 individuals. Average turnaround time from blood draw to genotype result entry in the medical record was 3.5 business days. Seven different third party payors, including Medicare, reimbursed for the test during the first month of billing, with an 85% reimbursement rate for outpatient claims that were submitted in the first month. These data highlight multiple levels of success in clinical implementation of genomic medicine. PMID:24616371

  11. Neonatal clinical pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Allegaert, Karel; van de Velde, Marc; van den Anker, John

    2013-01-01

    Effective and safe drug administration in neonates should be based on integrated knowledge on the evolving physiological characteristics of the infant who will receive the drug, and the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of a given drug. Consequently, clinical pharmacology in neonates is as dynamic and diverse as the neonates we admit to our units while covariates explaining the variability are at least as relevant as median estimates. The unique setting of neonatal clinical pharmacology will be highlighted based on the hazards of simple extrapolation of maturational drug clearance when only based on ‘adult’ metabolism (propofol, paracetamol). Secondly, maturational trends are not at the same pace for all maturational processes. This will be illustrated based on the differences between hepatic and renal maturation (tramadol, morphine, midazolam). Finally, pharmacogenetics should be tailored to neonates, not just mirror adult concepts. Because of this diversity, clinical research in the field of neonatal clinical pharmacology is urgently needed, and facilitated through PK/PD modeling. In addition, irrespective of already available data to guide pharmacotherapy, pharmacovigilance is needed to recognize specific side effects. Consequently, paediatric anesthesiologists should consider to contribute to improved pharmacotherapy through clinical trial design and collaboration, as well as reporting on adverse effects of specific drugs. PMID:23617305

  12. Gait analysis: clinical facts.

    PubMed

    Baker, Richard; Esquenazi, Alberto; Benedetti, Maria G; Desloovere, Kaat

    2016-08-01

    Gait analysis is a well-established tool for the quantitative assessment of gait disturbances providing functional diagnosis, assessment for treatment planning, and monitoring of disease progress. There is a large volume of literature on the research use of gait analysis, but evidence on its clinical routine use supports a favorable cost-benefit ratio in a limited number of conditions. Initially gait analysis was introduced to clinical practice to improve the management of children with cerebral palsy. However, there is good evidence to extend its use to patients with various upper motor neuron diseases, and to lower limb amputation. Thereby, the methodology for properly conducting and interpreting the exam is of paramount relevance. Appropriateness of gait analysis prescription and reliability of data obtained are required in the clinical environment. This paper provides an overview on guidelines for managing a clinical gait analysis service and on the principal clinical domains of its application: cerebral palsy, stroke, traumatic brain injury and lower limb amputation. PMID:27618499

  13. Pediatric Anthrax Clinical Management

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, John S.; Peacock, Georgina; Krug, Steven E.; Bower, William A.; Cohn, Amanda C.; Meaney-Delman, Dana; Pavia, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Anthrax is a zoonotic disease caused by Bacillus anthracis, which has multiple routes of infection in humans, manifesting in different initial presentations of disease. Because B anthracis has the potential to be used as a biological weapon and can rapidly progress to systemic anthrax with high mortality in those who are exposed and untreated, clinical guidance that can be quickly implemented must be in place before any intentional release of the agent. This document provides clinical guidance for the prophylaxis and treatment of neonates, infants, children, adolescents, and young adults up to the age of 21 (referred to as “children”) in the event of a deliberate B anthracis release and offers guidance in areas where the unique characteristics of children dictate a different clinical recommendation from adults. PMID:24777226

  14. Frailty in Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Cesari, Matteo; Vellas, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Frailty is a geriatric syndrome characterized by reduced homeostatic reserves, exposing the organism to extreme vulnerability to endogenous and exogenous stressors. Since disability is considered as an almost irreversible condition at advanced age, frailty has been indicated as a promising target for specific interventions in order to prevent disability. From a theoretical viewpoint, the concept of frailty has been well established, but its operationalization is still subject to controversy. This impediment leads to the postponement of the integration of frailty in the clinical setting. In the present article, we discuss the main issues regarding the frailty syndrome in the clinical setting, describe possible solutions (especially on the basis of our experience derived from the frailty clinic we have set up in Toulouse, France), and present the most relevant research perspectives in the field. PMID:26485035

  15. [Terminology in clinical bioethics].

    PubMed

    Herreros, Benjamín; Moreno-Milán, Beatriz; Pacho-Jiménez, Eloy; Real de Asua, Diego; Roa-Castellanos, Ricardo Andrés; Valentia, Emanuele

    2015-01-01

    In this article some of the most relevant terms in clinical bioethics are defined. The terms were chosen based on three criteria: impact on the most important problems in clinical bioethics, difficulty in understanding, and need to clarify their meaning. For a better understanding, the terms were grouped into 5 areas: general concepts (conflict of values, deliberation, conflict of interest, conscientious objection); justice (justice, distributive justice, models of justice, triage); clinical matters (information, competency, capability, informed consent, mature minor, coercion, secrecy, privacy, confidentiality, professional secrecy); end of life (prior instructions, limitation of therapeutic efforts, professional obstinacy, futility, palliative care, palliative sedation, principle of double effect, euthanasia, assisted suicide, persistent vegetative state, minimally conscious state, locked-in syndrome, brain death), and beginning of life (assisted reproduction, genetic counseling, preimplantation genetic diagnosis). PMID:26506495

  16. Clinical syndromes of mastalgia.

    PubMed

    Preece, P E; Mansel, R E; Bolton, P M; Hughes, L M; Baum, M; Gravelle, I H

    1976-09-25

    232 patients attending a breast clinic with breast pain as the primary presenting symptom were studied prospectively to define clinical syndromes and to attempt to elucidate aetiological factors. Those women in whom mastalgia was a minor aspect of their complaint, or who were primarily seeking reassurance that they did not have cancer, were excluded. Most mastalgia patients could be placed into well-defined subgroups on the basis of clinical, radiological, and pathological features. After excluding causes of pain arising outside the breast, six specific groups with widely differing aetiological bases were defined, leaving only 7% unclassified lithout known aetiology. The six defined groups were cyclical pronounced mastalgia, (believed to be hormonally based), duct ectasia. Tietze syndrome, trauma, sclerosing adenosis, and cancer. Psychological factors were found to be less important than has been previously suggested. Classification of patients with mastalgia into homogeneous subgroups is a prerequisite of any therapeutic study. PMID:60528

  17. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-11-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity(R), the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: (Z)-4-Hydroxytamoxifen, [18F]-FPS; Adalimumab, alefacept, alemtuzumab, alfimeprase, aprepitant, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Belatacept, bortezomib; C340, caspofungin acetate, clazosentan sodium, Cypher; Darbepoetin alfa, DB-289, decitabine, dronedarone hydrochloride, duloxetine hydrochloride; Eletriptan, entecavir, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, eszopiclone, etoricoxib; Gaboxadol, gadofosveset sodium, galiximab, gemifloxacin mesilate, glutamine; Human insulin; I-131 ch-TNT-1/B, indiplon, inhaled insulin, isatoribine; L-Arginine hydrochloride, liposomal doxorubicin, lopinavir/ritonavir, lumiracoxib; Magnesium sulfate; Natalizumab; Olmesartan medoxomil, omapatrilat, OncoVEX (GM-CSF); rDNA insulin, rupatadine fumarate; Sorafenib; Tadalafil, teduglutide, temsirolimus, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, tiotropium bromide; Valdecoxib, vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate. PMID:16357953

  18. Improving Clinical Communication

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Julie; Coiera, Enrico

    2000-01-01

    Recent research has studied the communication behaviors of clinical hospital workers and observed a tendency for these workers to use communication behaviors that were often inefficient. Workers were observed to favor synchronous forms of communication, such as telephone calls and chance face-to-face meetings with colleagues, even when these channels were not effective. Synchronous communication also contributes to a highly interruptive working environment, increasing the potential for clinical errors to be made. This paper reviews these findings from a cognitive psychological perspective, focusing on current understandings of how human memory functions and on the potential consequences of interruptions on the ability to work effectively. It concludes by discussing possible communication technology interventions that could be introduced to improve the clinical communication environment and suggests directions for future research. PMID:10984464

  19. Pharmacogenomics in the clinic

    PubMed Central

    Relling, Mary V.; Evans, William E.

    2015-01-01

    Preface After decades of discovery, inherited variation in approximately 20 genes affecting about 80 medications has been identified as actionable in the clinic. Additional somatically acquired genomic variants direct the choice of “targeted” anticancer drugs for individual patients. Current efforts that focus on the processes required to appropriately act on pharmacogenomic variability in the clinic are systematically moving pharmacogenomics from discovery to implementation as an evidenced-based strategy for improving the use of medications, thereby providing an important cornerstone for precision medicine. PMID:26469045

  20. Clinical pharmacology and malaria.

    PubMed

    Breckenridge, A M; Winstanley, P A

    1997-10-01

    The role of clinical pharmacology in improving the prevention and treatment of malaria is reviewed. A series of general and specific issues is discussed, concentrating on risk-benefit and cost-effectiveness. The techniques of clinical pharmacokinetics play an important role in the optimal use of drugs and this is illustrated by studies on quinine and proguanil. In discussing amodiaquine toxicity, the role of the pharmacologist and the chemist in designing out drug toxicity lends hope for producing a new generation of antimalarial drugs. PMID:9625927

  1. Managing clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Barbara; Kenyon, Sara; Shakur, Haleema

    2010-01-01

    Managing clinical trials, of whatever size and complexity, requires efficient trial management. Trials fail because tried and tested systems handed down through apprenticeships have not been documented, evaluated or published to guide new trialists starting out in this important field. For the past three decades, trialists have invented and reinvented the trial management wheel. We suggest that to improve the successful, timely delivery of important clinical trials for patient benefit, it is time to produce standard trial management guidelines and develop robust methods of evaluation. PMID:20626885

  2. Toward transparent clinical policies.

    PubMed

    Shiffman, Richard N; Marcuse, Edgar K; Moyer, Virginia A; Neuspiel, Daniel R; Hodgson, Elizabeth Susan; Glade, Gordon; Harbaugh, Norman; Miller, Marlene R; Sevilla, Xavier; Simpson, Lisa; Takata, Glenn

    2008-03-01

    Clinical policies of professional societies such as the American Academy of Pediatrics are valued highly, not only by clinicians who provide direct health care to children but also by many others who rely on the professional expertise of these organizations, including parents, employers, insurers, and legislators. The utility of a policy depends, in large part, on the degree to which its purpose and basis are clear to policy users, an attribute known as the policy's transparency. This statement describes the critical importance and special value of transparency in clinical policies, guidelines, and recommendations; helps identify obstacles to achieving transparency; and suggests several approaches to overcome these obstacles. PMID:18310217

  3. Clinical dimensions of masochism.

    PubMed

    Kernberg, O F

    1988-01-01

    In this paper, I propose a general classification of masochistic psychopathology and describe relations between this clinical domain and other types of psychopathology. My main objective is to provide an outline relevant for diagnostic, prognostic, and treatment considerations of masochistic pathology. This includes descriptions of and relations among a wide variety of masochistic phenomena from the depressive-masochistic personality to extreme forms of self-destructiveness. Ego organization, object relations, superego development, narcissistic organization, and polymorphous perverse infantile sexuality are considered as codeterminants of the levels and clinical features of masochistic pathology. Finally, the relations between masochistic pathology and negative therapeutic reactions are reexamined. PMID:3235758

  4. Genetic Tests:Clinical Validity and Clinical Utility

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Wylie

    2014-01-01

    When evaluating the appropriate use of new genetic tests, clinicians and health care policymakers must consider the accuracy with which a test identifies a patient’s clinical status (clinical validity) and the risks and benefits resulting from test use (clinical utility). Genetic tests in current use vary in accuracy and potential to improve health outcomes, and these test properties may be influenced by testing technology and the clinical setting in which the test is used. This unit defines clinical validity and clinical utility, provides examples, and considers the implications of these test properties for clinical practice. PMID:24763995

  5. Marking out the clinical expert/clinical leader/clinical scholar: perspectives from nurses in the clinical arena

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical scholarship has been conceptualised and theorised in the nursing literature for over 30 years but no research has captured nurses’ clinicians’ views on how it differs or is the same as clinical expertise and clinical leadership. The aim of this study was to determine clinical nurses’ understanding of the differences and similarities between the clinical expert, clinical leader and clinical scholar. Methods A descriptive interpretative qualitative approach using semi-structured interviews with 18 practising nurses from Australia, Canada and England. The audio-taped interviews were transcribed and the text coded for emerging themes. The themes were sorted into categories of clinical expert, clinical leader and clinical scholarship as described by the participants. These themes were then compared and contrasted and the essential elements that characterise the nursing roles of the clinical expert, clinical leader and clinical scholar were identified. Results Clinical experts were seen as linking knowledge to practice with some displaying clinical leadership and scholarship. Clinical leadership is seen as a positional construct with a management emphasis. For the clinical scholar they linked theory and practice and encouraged research and dissemination of knowledge. Conclusion There are distinct markers for the roles of clinical expert, clinical leader and clinical scholar. Nurses working in one or more of these roles need to work together to improve patient care. An ‘ideal nurse’ may be a blending of all three constructs. As nursing is a practice discipline its scholarship should be predominantly based on clinical scholarship. Nurses need to be encouraged to go beyond their roles as clinical leaders and experts to use their position to challenge and change through the propagation of knowledge to their community. PMID:23587282

  6. Clinical reasoning of nursing students on clinical placement: Clinical educators' perceptions.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Sharyn; Arthur, Carol

    2016-05-01

    Graduate nurses may have knowledge and adequate clinical psychomotor skills however they have been identified as lacking the clinical reasoning skills to deliver safe, effective care suggesting contemporary educational approaches do not always facilitate the development of nursing students' clinical reasoning. While nursing literature explicates the concept of clinical reasoning and develops models that demonstrate clinical reasoning, there is very little published about nursing students and clinical reasoning during clinical placements. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten clinical educators to gain an understanding of how they recognised, developed and appraised nursing students' clinical reasoning while on clinical placement. This study found variability in the clinical educators' conceptualisation, recognition, and facilitation of students' clinical reasoning. Although most of the clinical educators conceptualised clinical reasoning as a process those who did not demonstrated the greatest variability in the recognition and facilitation of students' clinical reasoning. The clinical educators in this study also described being unable to adequately appraise a student's clinical reasoning during clinical placement with the use of the current performance assessment tool. PMID:27235568

  7. ClinicalAccess: a clinical decision support tool.

    PubMed

    Crowell, Karen; Vardell, Emily

    2015-01-01

    ClinicalAccess is a new clinical decision support tool that uses a question-and-answer format to mirror clinical decision-making strategies. The unique format of ClinicalAccess delivers concise, authoritative answers to more than 120,000 clinical questions. This column presents a review of the product, a sample search, and a comparison with other point-of-care search engines. PMID:25927513

  8. Clinical Nuclear Pharmacy Clerkship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunson, George L.; Christopherson, William J., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The School of Pharmacy, University of the Pacific, and the Pharmacy Service, Letterman Army Medical Center, initiated a 15-week clinical nuclear pharmacy clerkship in 1975. It includes basic nuclear medical science, technical competency, professional competency, and special interest emphasis. (LBH)

  9. Shuffling Adaptive Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Gokhale, Sanjay G; Gokhale, Sankalp

    2016-01-01

    Clinical trials are interventional studies on human beings, designed to test the hypothesis for diagnostic techniques, treatments, and disease preventions. Any novel medical technology should be evaluated for its efficacy and safety by clinical trials. The costs associated with developing drugs have increased dramatically over the past decade, and fewer drugs are obtaining regulatory approval. Because of this, the pharmaceutical industry is continually exploring new ways of improving drug developments, and one area of focus is adaptive clinical trial designs. Adaptive designs, which allow for some types of prospectively planned mid-study changes, can improve the efficiency of a trial and maximize the chance of success without undermining validity and integrity of the trial. However it is felt that in adaptive trials; perhaps by using accrued data the actual patient population after the adaptations could deviate from the originally target patient population and so to overcome this drawback; special methods like Bayesian Statistics, predicted probability are used to deduce data-analysis. Here, in this study, mathematical model of a new adaptive design (shuffling adaptive trial) is suggested which uses real-time data, and because there is no gap between expected and observed data, statistical modifications are not needed. Results are obviously clinically relevant. PMID:23751329

  10. [Clinical examination of vertigo].

    PubMed

    Topka, Helge Roland

    2016-07-01

    Acute vertigo may originate from peripheral or central vestibular disorders. As central vestibular symptoms may indicate severe brainstem or cerebellar ischemia, rapid clinical differentiation is required. To this end, evaluation of spontaneous or gaze-evoked nystagm, head-impulse test as well identification of skew deviation are most helpful. PMID:27464281

  11. Clinically isolated syndromes.

    PubMed

    Miller, David H; Chard, Declan T; Ciccarelli, Olga

    2012-02-01

    Clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) is a term that describes a first clinical episode with features suggestive of multiple sclerosis (MS). It usually occurs in young adults and affects optic nerves, the brainstem, or the spinal cord. Although patients usually recover from their presenting episode, CIS is often the first manifestation of MS. The most notable risk factors for MS are clinically silent MRI lesions and CSF oligoclonal bands; weak or uncertain risk factors include vitamin D deficiency, Epstein-Barr virus infection, smoking, HLA genes, and miscellaneous immunological abnormalities. Diagnostic investigations including MRI aim to exclude alternative causes and to define the risk for MS. MRI findings incorporated into diagnostic criteria in the past decade enable MS to be diagnosed at or soon after CIS presentation. The course of MS after CIS is variable: after 15-20 years, a third of patients have a benign course with minimal or no disability and a half will have developed secondary progressive MS with increasing disability. Prediction of the long-term course at disease onset is unreliable. Disease-modifying treatments delay the development from CIS to MS. Their use in CIS is limited by uncertain long-term clinical prognosis and treatment benefits and adverse effects, although they have the potential to prevent or delay future tissue damage, including demyelination and axonal loss. Targets for future therapeutic progress are to achieve safe and effective long-term immunomodulation with neuroprotection and repair. PMID:22265211

  12. Achieving clinical integration.

    PubMed

    Redding, John

    2013-11-01

    To develop an effective and sustainable clinically integrated network (CIN) that positions a healthcare organization for value-based payment and other effects of healthcare reform, leaders of CIN initiatives should: Embrace progress rather than perfection; Constrain the development timeline by project managing in reverse; Ensure that physician leaders play an oversight role in the development process. PMID:24340650

  13. Clinical Intuition at Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks-Tarlow, Terry

    2014-01-01

    A clinical psychologist and consulting psychotherapist discusses how elements of play, inherent in the intuition required in analysis, can provide a cornerstone for serious therapeutic work. She argues that many aspects of play--its key roles in human development, individual growth, and personal creativity, among others--can help therapists and…

  14. Computerized Clinical Simulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinecker, Lynn

    1985-01-01

    Describes technique involved in designing a clinical simulation problem for the allied health field of respiratory therapy; discusses the structure, content, and scoring categories of the simulation; and provides a sample program which illustrates a programming technique in BASIC, including a program listing and a sample flowchart. (MBR)

  15. The Unstructured Clinical Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Karyn Dayle

    2010-01-01

    In mental health, family, and community counseling settings, master's-level counselors engage in unstructured clinical interviewing to develop diagnoses based on the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed., text rev.; "DSM-IV-TR"; American Psychiatric Association, 2000). Although counselors receive education about…

  16. Clinical Mastery of Hypnosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horevitz, Richard P.

    Hypnosis is an increasingly popular clinical intervention. The number of training courses in hypnosis is growing each year. Research on hypnosis training appears to show that limited exposure to training, as is typical in the common 3 to 5 day format of mass training, produces limited results. Only when training is extended over time do the…

  17. Clinical Trials: CSDRG Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logemann, Jeri A.

    2004-01-01

    Recent importance placed upon efficacy research has spawned the development of the Communication Sciences and Disorders Clinical Trials Research Group (CSDRG). This group, funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), was organized by the American Speech Language and Hearing Association to address the need for more treatment efficacy research…

  18. Designing Clinical Remediation Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oleszewski, Susan C.

    1989-01-01

    Elements and considerations in the provision of effective remediation for optometry students not achieving in clinical competence are discussed. Remediation of technical, cognitive, and noncognitive skills are included. A course in professional communication offered by the Pennsylvania College of Optometry is described. (MSE)

  19. Clinical Definitions of Melioidosis

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Allen C.; Currie, Bart J.; Dance, David A. B.; Funnell, Simon G. P.; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Simpson, Andrew J. H.; Peacock, Sharon J.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical definitions of melioidosis and inhalation-acquired melioidosis (Burkholderia pseudomallei infection) are described together with the evidence used to develop these definitions. Such definitions support accurate public health reporting, preparedness planning for deliberate B. pseudomallei release, design of experimental models, and categorization of naturally acquired melioidosis. PMID:23468355

  20. Clinical Practicum Before Graduation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crancer, Joann; And Others

    1975-01-01

    A culminating six-week clinical experience eases the transition of associates degree nursing students into the role of staff nurse and offers them potential employment opportunities. Data collected during the three years that one practicum has been offered have implications for possible curriculum revisions; others show the practicum's growth and…

  1. Integrated clinical information system.

    PubMed

    Brousseau, G

    1995-01-01

    SIDOCI (Système Informatisé de DOnnées Cliniques Intégrées) is a Canadian joint venture introducing newly-operating paradigms into hospitals. The main goal of SIDOCI is to maintain the quality of care in todayUs tightening economy. SIDOCI is a fully integrated paperless patient-care system which automates and links all information about a patient. Data is available on-line and instantaneously to doctors, nurses, and support staff in the format that best suits their specific requirements. SIDOCI provides a factual and chronological summary of the patient's progress by drawing together clinical information provided by all professionals working with the patient, regardless of their discipline, level of experience, or physical location. It also allows for direct entry of the patient's information at the bedside. Laboratory results, progress notes, patient history and graphs are available instantaneously on screen, eliminating the need for physical file transfers. The system, incorporating a sophisticated clinical information database, an intuitive graphical user interface, and customized screens for each medical discipline, guides the user through standard procedures. Unlike most information systems created for the health care industry, SIDOCI is longitudinal, covering all aspects of the health care process through its link to various vertical systems already in place. A multidisciplinary team has created a clinical dictionary that provides the user with most of the information she would normally use: symptoms, signs, diagnoses, allergies, medications, interventions, etc. This information is structured and displayed in such a manner that health care professionals can document the clinical situation at the touch of a finger. The data is then encoded into the patient's file. Once encoded, the structured data is accessible for research, statistics, education, and quality assurance. This dictionary complies with national and international nomenclatures. It also

  2. Exchanging clinical knowledge via Internet.

    PubMed

    Buchan, I E; Hanka, R

    1997-11-01

    The need for effective and efficient exchange of clinical knowledge is increasing. Paper based methods for managing clinical knowledge are not meeting the demand for knowledge and this has undoubtedly contributed to the widely reported failures of clinical guidelines. Internet affords both opportunities and dangers for clinical knowledge. Systems such as Wax have demonstrated the importance of intuitive structure in the management of knowledge. We report on a new initiative for the global management of clinical knowledge. PMID:9506390

  3. Models for transition clinics.

    PubMed

    Carrizosa, Jaime; An, Isabelle; Appleton, Richard; Camfield, Peter; Von Moers, Arpad

    2014-08-01

    Transition is a purposeful, planned process that addresses the medical, psychosocial, educational, and vocational needs of adolescents and young adults with chronic medical conditions, as they advance from a pediatric and family-centered to an adult, individual focused health care provider. This article describes some of the models for transition clinics or services for epilepsy in five countries (Canada, France, Colombia, Germany, and the United Kingdom). These models include joint adult and pediatric clinics, algorithm-driven service, and a check list system in the context of pediatric care. Evaluation of these models is limited, and it is not possible to choose an optimal program. The attitude and motivation of health care providers may be the most important elements. PMID:25209087

  4. Clinical development of siltuximab.

    PubMed

    Davis, Christine C; Shah, Katherine S; Lechowicz, Mary Jo

    2015-07-01

    Siltuximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody targeting interleukin-6 (IL-6), which in the fall of 2014 became the first FDA-approved treatment of the rare disease idiopathic multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD). MCD is a non-clonal lymphoproliferative disorder in which common symptoms include fever, night sweats, weight loss, and fatigue. Symptoms are driven by an overall hypercytokinemia, predominantly IL-6. While under clinical development, siltuximab was studied in several other disease states including multiple myeloma, non-Hodgkin lymphomas, and several solid tumors in which it did not demonstrate significant benefit. The efficacy of siltuximab in MCD is mainly confined to systemic symptomatic response and quality of life benefits with minimal complete responses and approximately 30 % partial responses, by radiographic criteria. Siltuximab treatment therefore is important in the overall treatment of this rare disease state. This review focuses on the clinical development and pharmaceutical approval of siltuximab. PMID:25986720

  5. Narcolepsy: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Leschziner, Guy

    2014-10-01

    Despite the classic tetrad of clinical features that typify it, narcolepsy remains much under-diagnosed, in part, because of the wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes, but also because of its insidious onset, usually in a young person. The median time to diagnosis from first symptoms remains very long, around 10 years in the UK. Conversely, in the specialist setting, it is likely over-diagnosed, largely because of failure to exclude other causes of hypersomnia. There is an over-reliance on a biological marker of the condition, the multiple sleep latency test (MSLT), which, like many tests, has a significant false-positive and false-negative rate. This review aims to discuss some of the difficulties in achieving a diagnosis, interpretation of investigations, differential diagnosis, and appropriate management of patients with narcolepsy. PMID:24830461

  6. Voriconazole in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Mikulska, Małgorzata; Novelli, Andrea; Aversa, Franco; Cesaro, Simone; de Rosa, Francesco Giuseppe; Girmenia, Corrado; Micozzi, Alessandra; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Viscoli, Claudio

    2012-12-01

    Invasive fungal diseases are associated with significant morbidity and mortality in immunocompromized patients. Voriconazole is the first line treatment of invasive aspergillosis, and has been successfully used in other invasive fungal infections, such as candidiasis, fusariosis or scedosporidiosis. Voriconazole has non-linear pharmacokinetics and undergoes extensive hepatic metabolism by the cytochrome P450 system that depends on age, genetic factors, and interactions with other drugs. Thus, significant interpatient variability is observed after administration of the same dose. Additionally, the therapeutic window is narrow, with high risk of side effects at serum levels 3-5 times higher than the minimal threshold for efficacy. Therefore, the knowledge of pharmacological properties, metabolism, interactions, dosage indications in various populations and side effects is crucial. Therapeutic drug monitoring can help maximize the efficacy and minimize the risk of toxicity. Pharmacological, mycological and clinical aspects of the treatment with voriconazole are summarized in order to optimize its use in daily clinical practice. PMID:23174096

  7. Clinical vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination is regarded as one of the biggest triumphs in the history of medicine. We are living in the most successful period of vaccine development. The accumulation of multidisciplinary knowledge and the investment of massive funding have enabled the development of vaccines against many infectious diseases as well as other diseases including malignant tumors. The paradigm of clinical vaccine evaluation and licensure has also been modernized based on scientific improvements and historical experience. However, there remain a number of hurdles to overcome. Continuous efforts are focused on increasing the efficacy and reducing the risks related to vaccine use. Cutting-edge knowledge about immunology and microbiology is being rapidly translated to vaccine development. Thus, physicians and others involved in the clinical development of vaccines should have sufficient understanding of the recent developmental trends in vaccination and the diseases of interest. PMID:25648742

  8. Clinical ethics and happiness.

    PubMed

    Devettere, R J

    1993-02-01

    Most contemporary accounts of clinical ethics do not explain why clinicians should be ethical. Those few that do attempt an explanation usually claim that clinicians should be ethical because ethical behavior provides an important good for the patient--better care. Both these approaches ignore the customary traditional reason for being ethical, namely, the good of the moral agent. This good was commonly called 'happiness'. The following article shows how the personal happiness of the moral agent provided a major reason for being ethical in the ancient philosophical and biblical traditions and how it continues to play a role in the more modern rights-based, Kantian and utilitarian theories. This history suggests that the personal happiness of the clinician, rightly understood, is a legitimate and important goal of clinical ethics. PMID:8433049

  9. Clinical features of actinomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Bonnefond, Simon; Catroux, Mélanie; Melenotte, Cléa; Karkowski, Ludovic; Rolland, Ludivine; Trouillier, Sébastien; Raffray, Loic

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Actinomycosis is a rare heterogeneous anaerobic infection with misleading clinical presentations that delay diagnosis. A significant number of misdiagnosed cases have been reported in specific localizations, but studies including various forms of actinomycosis have rarely been published. We performed a multicenter retrospective chart review of laboratory-confirmed actinomycosis cases from January 2000 until January 2014. We described clinical characteristics, diagnostic procedures, differential diagnosis, and management of actinomycosis of clinical significance. Twenty-eight patients were included from 6 hospitals in France. Disease was diagnosed predominately in the abdomen/pelvis (n = 9), orocervicofacial (n = 5), cardiothoracic (n = 5), skeletal (n = 3), hematogenous (n = 3), soft tissue (n = 2), and intracranially (n = 1). Four patients (14%) were immunocompromised. In most cases (92 %), the diagnosis of actinomycosis was not suspected on admission, as clinical features were not specific. Diagnosis was obtained from either microbiology (50%, n = 14) or histopathology (42%, n = 12), or from both methods (7%, n = 2). Surgical biopsy was needed for definite diagnosis in 71% of cases (n = 20). Coinfection was found in 13 patients (46%), among which 3 patients were diagnosed from histologic criteria only. Two-thirds of patients were treated with amoxicillin. Median duration of antibiotics was 120 days (interquartile range 60–180), whereas the median follow-up time was 12 months (interquartile range 5.25–18). Two patients died. This study highlights the distinct and miscellaneous patterns of actinomycosis to prompt accurate diagnosis and earlier treatments, thus improving the outcome. Surgical biopsy should be performed when possible while raising histologist's and microbiologist's awareness of possible actinomycosis to enhance the chance of diagnosis and use specific molecular methods. PMID:27311002

  10. Clinical multiphoton FLIM tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten

    2012-03-01

    This paper gives an overview on current clinical high resolution multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging in volunteers and patients. Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) in Life Sciences was introduced in Jena/Germany in 1988/89 based on a ZEISS confocal picosecond dye laser scanning microscope equipped with a single photon counting unit. The porphyrin distribution in living cells and living tumor-bearing mice was studied with high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolution. Ten years later, time-gated cameras were employed to detect dental caries in volunteers based on one-photon excitation of autofluorescent bacteria with long fluorescence lifetimes. Nowadays, one-photon FLIM based on picosecond VIS laser diodes are used to study ocular diseases in humans. Already one decade ago, first clinical twophoton FLIM images in humans were taken with the certified clinical multiphoton femtosecond laser tomograph DermaInspectTM. Multiphoton tomographs with FLIM modules are now operating in hospitals at Brisbane, Tokyo, Berlin, Paris, London, Modena and other European cities. Multiple FLIM detectors allow spectral FLIM with a temporal resolution down to 20 ps (MCP) / 250 ps (PMT) and a spectral resolution of 10 nm. Major FLIM applications include the detection of intradermal sunscreen and tattoo nanoparticles, the detection of different melanin types, the early diagnosis of dermatitis and malignant melanoma, as well as the measurement of therapeutic effects in pateints suffering from dermatitis. So far, more than 1,000 patients and volunteers have been investigated with the clinical multiphoton FLIM tomographs DermaInspectTM and MPTflexTM.

  11. Rural health clinics infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, K.

    1997-12-01

    The author discusses programs which were directed at the installation of photovoltaic power systems in rural health clinics. The objectives included: vaccine refrigeration; ice pack freezing; lighting; communications; medical appliances; sterilization; water purification; and income generation. The paper discusses two case histories, one in the Dominican Republic and one in Colombia. The author summarizes the results of the programs, both successes and failures, and offers an array of conclusions with regard to the implementation of future programs of this general nature.

  12. Sedation in clinical oncology.

    PubMed

    González Barón, Manuel; Gómez Raposo, César; Pinto Marín, Alvaro

    2005-08-01

    The clinical status of terminal cancer patients is very complex and is affected by several severe symptoms, of extended duration, changing with time and of multifactorial origin. When there are no reasonable cancer treatments specifically able to modify the natural history of the disease, symptom control acquires priority and favours the possible better adaptation to the general inexorable deterioration related to the neoplasic progression. Despite the important advances in Palliative Medicine, symptoms are frequently observed that are intolerable for the patient and which do not respond to usual palliative measures. This situation, characterised by rapid deterioration of the patient, very often heralds, implicitly or explicitly, approaching death. The intolerable nature and being refractory to treatment indicates to the health-care team, on many occasions, the need for sedation of the patient. The requirement for sedation of the cancer patient is a situation that does not allow for an attitude of doubt regarding maintenance of the patient in unnecessary suffering for more than a reasonable time. Given the undoubted clinical difficulty in its indication, it is important to have explored at an earlier stage all usual treatments possible and the grade of response, commensurate with the patient's values and desires. Sedation consists of the deliberate administration of drugs in minimum doses and combinations required not only to reduce the consciousness of the patients but also to achieve adequate alleviation of one or more refractory symptoms, and with the prior consent given by the patient explicitly, or implicitly or delegated. Sedation is accepted as ethically warranted when considering the imperative of palliation and its administration and, whenever contemplated, the arguments that justify them are clear recorded in the clinical history. It is not an easy decision for the physician since, traditionally, the training has been "for the fight to save life

  13. Pharmacovigilance using Clinical Text.

    PubMed

    Lependu, Paea; Iyer, Srinivasan V; Bauer-Mehren, Anna; Harpaz, Rave; Ghebremariam, Yohannes T; Cooke, John P; Shah, Nigam H

    2013-01-01

    The current state of the art in post-marketing drug surveillance utilizes voluntarily submitted reports of suspected adverse drug reactions. We present data mining methods that transform unstructured patient notes taken by doctors, nurses and other clinicians into a de-identified, temporally ordered, patient-feature matrix using standardized medical terminologies. We demonstrate how to use the resulting high-throughput data to monitor for adverse drug events based on the clinical notes in the EHR. PMID:24303315

  14. Clinically Available Pharmacogenomics Tests

    PubMed Central

    Flockhart, DA; Skaar, T; Berlin, DS; Klein, TE; Nguyen, AT

    2009-01-01

    The development of robust and clinically valuable pharmacogenomic tests has been anticipated to be one of the first tangible results of the Human Genome Project. Despite both obvious and unanticipated obstacles, a number of tests have now become available in various practice settings. Lessons can be learned from examination of these tests, the evidence that has catalyzed their use, their value to prescribers, and their merit as tools for personalizing therapeutics. PMID:19369936

  15. Reuse of Clinical Data

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives To provide an overview of the benefits of clinical data collected as a by-product of the care process, the potential problems with large aggregations of these data, the policy frameworks that have been formulated, and the major challenges in the coming years. Methods This report summarizes some of the major observations from AMIA and IMIA conferences held on this admittedly broad topic from 2006 through 2013. This report also includes many unsupported opinions of the author. Results The benefits of aggregating larger and larger sets of routinely collected clinical data are well documented and of great societal benefit. These large data sets will probably never answer all possible clinical questions for methodological reasons. Non-traditional sources of health data that are patient-sources will pose new data science challenges. Conclusions If we ever hope to have tools that can rapidly provide evidence for daily practice of medicine we need a science of health data perhaps modeled after the science of astronomy. PMID:25123722

  16. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2002-11-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abacavir sulfate, abarelix, adalimumab, adefovir dipivoxil, AdGVVEGF121.10, anastrozole, anecortave acetate, aripiprazole, asulacrine isethionate, atazanavir, ATL-962, 16-Aza-epothilone B; Bevacizumab, bicalutamide, blonanserin, BMS-188667, bosentan; Celecoxib, celmoleukin, cetuximab, cilomilast, cinacalcet hydrochloride, CNTF(Ax15), colesevelam hydrochloride; Daclizumab, delavirdine mesilate, desogestrel, desoxyepothilone B, dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride, duloxetine hydrochloride; Ecogramostim, emtricitabine, epalrestat, escitalopram oxalate, examorelin, exendin-4, ezetimibe; Fidarestat, frovatriptan; HIV-1 Immunogen; Iloperidone, insulin detemir, insulin lispro, irinotecan hydrochloride; Keratinocyte growth factor; Lasofoxifene tartrate, levetiracetam, levormeloxifene, levosimendan, lumiracoxib, LY-307161 SR; Memantine hydrochloride, MEN-10755, metformin hydrochloride, metreleptin, motexafin gadolinium; Naratriptan hydrochloride, natalizumab, nesiritide, nicotine, NN-2211, NN-414; Olanzapine, omalizumab; Pegaptanib sodium, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pegvisomant, pimecrolimus, pirfenidone, pramlintide acetate prasterone, pregabalin; Quetiapine fumarate; Rabeprazole sodium, raloxifene hydrochloride, raltitrexed, rDNA insulin, rFGF-2, risedronate sodium, rofecoxib, roflumilast, rosiglitazone maleate; SN-22995; Tacrolimus, tadalafil, tegaserod maleate, tiotropium bromide, tomoxetine hydrochloride, trastuzumab, trimegestone; Voglibose, Voriconazole; Ziprasidone hydrochloride. PMID:12616707

  17. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2002-05-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables can be retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abacavir sulfate, abarelix, abciximab, acarbose, alefacept, alteplase, amisulpride, amoxicillin trihydrate, apomorphine hydrochloride, aprepitant, argatroban monohydrate, aspirin, atenolol; Betamethasone dipropionate, betamethasone valerate, bicalutamide, bleomycin sulfate; Calcium carbonate, candesartan cilexetil, celecoxib, cetirizine hydrochloride, cisplatin, clarithromycin, clavulanate potassium, clomethiazole edisilate, clopidogrel hydrogensulfate, cyclophosphamide, chorionic gonadotropin (human); Dalteparin sodium, desloratadine, dexamethasone, doxorubicin, DPC-083; Efalizumab, efavirenz, enoxaparin sodium, eprosartan mesilate, etanercept, etoposide, ezetimibe; Faropenem daloxate, fenofibrate, fluocinolone acetonide, flutamide, fluvastatin sodium, follitropin beta, fondaparinux sodium; Gabapentin, glibenclamide, goserelin, granisetron hydrochloride; Haloperidol, hydrochlorothiazide; Imiquimod, interferon beta-1a, irbesartan, iseganan hydrochloride; L-758298, lamivudine, lanoteplase, leflunomide, leuprorelin acetate, loratadine, losartan potassium; Melagatran, metformin hydrochloride, methotrexate, metronidazole, micafungin sodium, mitoxantrone hydrochloride; Nelfinavir mesilate, neutral insulin injection, nizatidine; Olopatadine hydrochloride, omeprazole, ondansetron hydrochloride; Pamidronate sodium, paracetamol, paroxetine hydrochloride, perindopril, pimecrolimus, pioglitazone hydrochloride, piroxicam, pleconaril, pralmorelin, pravastatin sodium, prednisolone, prednisone, propofol; Raloxifene hydrochloride, ranpirnase, remifentanil hydrochloride, risedronate sodium, risperidone, rofecoxib, ropinirole

  18. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-09-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in the current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: AAV-NGFbeta, aprepitant, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride; beta-Methyl-6-chloromelatonin, BMS-214662, bortezomib, bosentan; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, CEA-TRICOM, cetuximab, ciclesonide, clofarabine, Cypher; Dalbavancin, darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin hydrobromide, desloratadine, Dexamet, drospirenone, drospirenone/ethinylestradiol, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; Ecogramostim, efalizumab, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, eszopiclone; Fenretinide; Gefitinib, gestodene, ghrelin (human); hMaxi-K, human papillomavirus vaccine; Imatinib mesylate, indiplon, iodine (i131) tositumomab, irofulven, ISS-1018; Lasofoxifene tartrate, levodopa/carbidopa/entacapone, liposomal doxorubicin; Nemifitide ditriflutate, nesiritide; Omalizumab; Pegfilgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, phVEGF-A165, pimecrolimus, pramlintide acetate; Rasburicase, rimonabant hydrochloride; Satraplatin, St. John's Wort extract, sunitinib malate; Tadalafil, tanaproget, Taxus, tiotropium bromide, treprostinil sodium; Valdecoxib, vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate; Ximelagatran; Zileuton. PMID:16258596

  19. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-03-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 3-AP, 667-coumate, 9-aminocamptothecin; Ad5CMV-p53, AES-14, alefacept, anecortave acetate, APC-8024, APD-356, asoprisnil; Bevacizumab, bimakalim, bimatoprost, BLP-25, BR-1; Caspofungin acetate, cetuximab, cypher; Darbepoetin alfa, dexanabinol, dextromethorphan/quinidine sulfate, DNA.HIVA; Efaproxiral sodium, ertapenem sodium; Frovatriptan; HuMax-EGFr, HYB-2055, gamma-hydroxybutyrate sodium, Id-KLH vaccine, imatinib mesylate; Lapatinib, lonafarnib, Motexafin lutetium, MVA.HIVA, mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Nesiritide, NS-2330; Olmesartan medoxomil; Peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, pemetrexed disodium, perifosine, pimecrolimus, pregabalin; QbG-10; Ralfinamide, rasburicase, rFGF-2, Ro-31-7453; Sitaxsentan sodium, sorafenib; Tadalafil, TC-1734, telmisartan/hydrochlorothiazide, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, thymus nuclear protein, tipifarnib; Vandetanib, vibriolysin, vildagliptin, voriconazole. PMID:15834466

  20. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-12-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abetimus sodium, ademetionine, agalsidase alfa, agalsidase beta, alemtuzumab, alfimeprase, AMG-162, androgel, anidulafungin, antigastrin therapeutic vaccine, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Bazedoxifene acetate, bevacizumab, bosentan; Caldaret hydrate, canfosfamide hydrochloride, choriogonadotropin alfa, ciclesonide, combretastatin A-4 phosphate, CY-2301; Darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin hydrobromide, decitabine, degarelix acetate, duloxetine hydrochloride; ED-71, enclomiphene citrate, eplerenone, epratuzumab, escitalopram oxalate, eszopiclone, ezetimibe; Fingolimod hydrochloride, FP-1096; HMR-3339A, HSV-TK/GCV gene therapy, human insulin, HuOKT3gamma1(Ala234-Ala235); Idursulfase, imatinib mesylate, indiplon, InnoVax C insulin glargine, insulin glulisine, irofulven; Labetuzumab, lacosamide, lanthanum carbonate, LyphoDerm, Lyprinol; Magnesium sulfate, metelimumab, methylphenidate hydrochloride; Natalizumab, NO-aspirin; OROS(R); PC-515, pegaptanib sodium, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, pemetrexed disodium, peptide YY3-36, posaconazole, pregabalin, PT-141, pyridoxamine; R-744, ramelteon, ranelic acid distrontium salt, rebimastat, repinotan hydrochloride, rhC1, rhGAD65, rosiglitazone maleate/metformin hydrochloride; Sardomozide, solifenacin succinate; Tadalafil, taxus, telavancin, telithromycin, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, teriparatide, testosterone transdermal patch, tetomilast, tirapazamine, torcetrapib; Valspodar, vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate, vildagliptin; Yttrium Y90 epratuzumab; Ziprasidone hydrochloride. PMID:15672123

  1. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-06-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 131-I-chlorotoxin; Ad5CMV-p53, adalimumab, albumin interferon alfa, alemtuzumab, aliskiren fumarate, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, anakinra, AR-C126532, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, brimonidine tartrate/timolol maleate; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, cangrelor tetrasodium, cetuximab, ciclesonide, cinacalcet hydrochloride, collagen-PVP, Cypher; Darbepoetin alfa, darusentan, dasatinib, denosumab, desloratadine, dexosome vaccine (lung cancer), dexrazoxane, dextromethorphan/quinidine sulfate, duloxetine hydrochloride; ED-71, eel calcitonin, efalizumab, entecavir, etoricoxib; Falciparum merozoite protein-1/AS02A, fenretinide, fondaparinux sodium; gamma-Hydroxybutyrate sodium, gefitinib, ghrelin (human); hLM609; Icatibant acetate, imatinib mesylate, ipsapirone, irofulven; LBH-589, LE-AON, levocetirizine, LY-450139; Malaria vaccine, mapatumumab, motexafin gadolinium, muraglitazar, mycophenolic acid sodium salt; nab-paclitaxel, nelarabine; O6-Benzylguanine, olmesartan medoxomil, orbofiban acetate; Panitumumab, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pemetrexed disodium, peptide YY3-36, pleconaril, prasterone, pregabalin; Ranolazine, rebimastat, recombinant malaria vaccine, rosuvastatin calcium; SQN-400; Taxus, tegaserod maleate, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, teriparatide, troxacitabine; Valganciclovir hydrochloride, Val-Tyr sardine peptidase, VNP-40101M, vorinostat. PMID:16845450

  2. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2002-01-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses, which has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the world's first drug discovery and development portal, providing information on study design, treatments, conclusions and references. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abacavir sulfate; abciximab; abetimus sodium; adalimumab; aldesleukin; almotriptan; alteplase; amisulpride; amitriptyline hydrochloride; amoxicillin trihydrate; atenolol; atorvastatin calcium; atrasentan; Beclometasone dipropionate; bosentan; Captopril; ceftriaxone sodium; cerivastatin sodium; cetirizine hydrochloride; cisplatin; citalopram hydrobromide; Dalteparin sodium; darusentan; desirudin; digoxin; Efalizumab; enoxaparin sodium; ertapenem sodium; esomeprazole magnesium; estradiol; ezetimibe; Famotidine; farglitazar; fluorouracil; fluticasone propionate; fosamprenavir sodium; Glibenclamide; glucosamine sulfate; Heparin sodium; HSPPC-96; hydrochlorothiazide; Imatinib mesilate; implitapide; Lamivudine; lansoprazole; lisinopril; losartan potassium; l-Propionylcarnitine; Melagatran; metformin hydrochloride; methotrexate; methylsulfinylwarfarin; Nateglinide; norethisterone; Olmesartan medoxomil; omalizumab; omapatrilat; omeprazole; oseltamivir phosphate; oxatomide; Pantoprazole; piperacillin sodium; pravastatin sodium; Quetiapine hydrochloride; Rabeprazole sodium; raloxifene hydrochloride; ramosetron hydrochloride; ranolazine; rasburicase; reboxetine mesilate; recombinant somatropin; repaglinide; reteplase; rosiglitazone; rosiglitazone maleate; rosuvastatin calcium; Sertraline; simvastatin; sumatriptan succinate; Tazobactam sodium; tenecteplase; tibolone; tinidazole; tolterodine tartrate; troglitazone; Uniprost; Warfarin sodium; Ximelagatran. PMID:11980386

  3. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-12-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity. prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 131I-chTNT; Abatacept, adalimumab, alemtuzumab, APC-8015, aprepitant, atazanavir sulfate, atomoxetine hydrochloride, azimilide hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, bortezomib, bosentan, buserelin; Caspofungin acetate, CC-4047, ChAGCD3, ciclesonide, clopidogrel, curcumin, Cypher; Dabigatran etexilate, dapoxetine hydrochloride, darbepoetin alfa, darusentan, denosumab, DMXB-Anabaseine, drospirenone, drospirenone/estradiol, duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; Edodekin alfa, efaproxiral sodium, elaidic acid-cytarabine, erlotinib hydrochloride, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, eszopiclone, etonogestrel/testosterone decanoate, exenatide; Fulvestrant; Gefitinib, glycine, GVS-111; Homoharringtonine; ICC-1132, imatinib mesylate, iodine (I131) tositumomab, i.v. gamma-globulin; Levetiracetam, levocetirizine, lintuzumab, liposomal nystatin, lumiracoxib, lurtotecan; Manitimus, mapatumumab, melatonin, micafungin sodium, mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Oblimersen sodium, OGX-011, olmesartan medoxomil, omalizumab, omapatrilat, oral insulin; Parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), pasireotide, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, phVEGF-A165, pimecrolimus, pitavastatin calcium, plerixafor hydrochloride, posaconazole, pramlintide acetate, prasterone, pregabalin, PT-141; Quercetin; Ranolazine, rosuvastatin calcium, rubitecan, rupatadine fumarate; Sardomozide, sunitinib malate; Tadalafil, talactoferrin alfa, tegaserod maleate, telithromycin, testosterone transdermal patch, TH-9507, tigecycline, tiotropium bromide, tipifarnib, tocilizumab, treprostinil sodium; Valdecoxib, vandetanib

  4. Myocarditis in Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Sinagra, Gianfranco; Anzini, Marco; Pereira, Naveen L; Bussani, Rossana; Finocchiaro, Gherardo; Bartunek, Jozef; Merlo, Marco

    2016-09-01

    Myocarditis is a polymorphic disease characterized by great variability in clinical presentation and evolution. Patients presenting with severe left ventricular dysfunction and life-threatening arrhythmias represent a demanding challenge for the clinician. Modern techniques of cardiovascular imaging and the exhaustive molecular evaluation of the myocardium with endomyocardial biopsy have provided valuable insight into the pathophysiology of this disease, and several clinical registries have unraveled the disease's long-term evolution and prognosis. However, uncertainties persist in crucial practical issues in the management of patients. This article critically reviews current information for evidence-based management, offering a rational and practical approach to patients with myocarditis. For this review, we searched the PubMed and MEDLINE databases for articles published from January 1, 1980, through December 31, 2015, using the following terms: myocarditis, inflammatory cardiomyopathy, and endomyocardial biopsy. Articles were selected for inclusion if they represented primary data or were review articles published in high-impact journals. In particular, a risk-oriented approach is proposed. The different patterns of presentation of myocarditis are classified as low-, intermediate-, and high-risk syndromes according to the most recent evidence on prognosis, clinical findings, and both invasive and noninvasive testing, and appropriate management strategies are proposed for each risk class. PMID:27489051

  5. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2002-12-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abacavir sulfate, adalimumab, AERx morphine sulphate, alefacept, alemtuzumab, alendronic acid sodium salt, alicaforsen sodium, almotriptan, amprenavir, aripiprazole, atenolol, atorvastatin calcium; BSYX-A110; Cantuzumab mertansine, capravirine, CDP-571, CDP-870, celecoxib; Delavirdine mesilate, docetaxel, dofetilide, donepezil hydrochloride, duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride, dydrogesterone; Efavirenz, emtricitabine, enjuvia, enteryx, epristeride, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, etanercept, etonogestrel, etoricoxib; Fesoterodine, finasteride, flt3ligand; Galantamine hydrobromide, gemtuzumab ozogamicin, genistein, gepirone hydrochloride; Indinavir sulfate, infliximab; Lamivudine, lamivudine/zidovudine/abacavir sulfate, leteprinim potassium, levetiracetam, liposomal doxorubicin, lopinavir, lopinavir/ritonavir, losartan potassium; MCC-465, MRA; Nebivolol, nesiritide, nevirapine; Olanzapine, OROS(R)-Methylphenidate hydrochloride; Peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, Pimecrolimus, polyethylene glycol 3350, pramlintide acetate, pregabalin, PRO-2000; Risedronate sodium, risperidone, ritonavir, rituximab, rivastigmine tartrate, rofecoxib, rosuvastatin calcium; Saquinavir mesilate, Stavudine; Tacrolimus, tadalafil, tamsulosin hydrochloride, telmisartan, tomoxetine hydrochloride, treprostinil sodium, trimegestone, trimetrexate; Valdecoxib, venlafaxine hydrochloride; Zoledronic acid monohydrate. PMID:12616965

  6. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2003-12-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abetimus sodium, adalimumab, alefacept, alemtuzumab, almotriptan, AMGN-0007, anakinra, anti-CTLA-4 Mab, L-arginine hydrochloride, arzoxifene hydrochloride, astemizole, atazanavir sulfate, atlizumab; Belimumab, BG-9928, binodenoson, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, bovine lactoferrin, BufferGel; Caspofungin acetate, ciclesonide,cilomilast, ciluprevir, clofarabine, CVT-3146; Darbepoetin alfa, desloratadine, diflomotecan, doripenem, dronedarone hydrochloride, drotrecogin alfa (activated), DT388-GM-CSF, duloxetine hydrochloride, E-5564, efalizumab, enfuvirtide, esomeprazole magnesium, estradiol acetate, ETC-642, exenatide, exisulind, ezetimib; Febuxostat; Gallium maltolate, ganirelix acetate, garenoxacin mesilate, gefitinib; H11, HuMax; IL-15, IDD-1, IGIV-C, imatinib mesylate, ISIS-14803, ITF-1697, ivabradine hydrochloride; KRN-5500; L-365260, levetiracetam, levosimendan, licofelone, linezolid, LJP-1082, lopinavir lumiracoxib; MCC-478, melatonin, morphine hydrochloride, morphine-6-glucuronide, moxidectin; N-Acetylcarnosine, natalizumab, NM-702, NNC-05-1869, NSC-703940; Ocinaplon OM-89, omalizumab, omeprazole/ sodium bicarbonate, OPC-28326, ospemifene; PEG-filgrastim peginterferon alfa-2a, pegsunercept, pirfenidone, pralmorelin, pregabalin; Recombinant glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36) amide, repifermin, RSD-1235; S-8184, selodenoson, sodium dichloroacetate, suberanilohydroxamic acid; TAS-102, terfenadine, teriparatide, tipranavir troxacitabine; Ximelagatran; YM-337. PMID:14735233

  7. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2003-04-01

    Gateways to clinical trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 5A8; Agomelatine, alefacept, almotriptan, anakinra, APC-8015, atazanavir, atomoxetine hydrochloride, azimilide hydrochloride; Bicifadine; Cannabidiol, caspofungin acetate, CAT-213, CGP-51901, ciclesonide, cipamfylline; Darbepoetin alfa, desloratadine, dibotermin alfa, DX-9065a; Ecogramostim, efalizumab, eletriptan, eniluracil, EPI-KAL2, erlosamide, ertapenem sodium, etilevodopa, etoricoxib, ezetimibe; Fosamprenavir calcium, fosamprenavir sodium, fumagillin; Gadofosveset sodium, gefitinib, gemtuzumab ozogamicin; HSPPC-96, human papillomavirus vaccine; Icatibant Id-KLH, imatinib mesylate, INS-37217, iodine (I131) tositumomab; LAS-34475, levobupivacaine hydrochloride, levocetirizine, linezolid, 131I-lipiodol, lonafarnib, lopinavir, LY-450108; Magnetites, MBI-594AN, melagatran, melatonin, mepolizumab, mycophenolic acid sodium salt; NC-100100; 1-Octanol, omalizumab, omapatrilat, onercept; PEG-filgrastim, (PE)HRG21, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pleconaril, pneumococcal 7-valent conjugate vaccine, prasterone; Ranelic acid distrontium salt, rasagiline mesilate, reslizumab, rFGF-2, rhOP-1, rosuvastatin calcium, roxifiban acetate; Sitaxsentan sodium, sodium lauryl sulfate; Tadalafil, telithromycin, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, tipranavir, TMC-114, tucaresol; Valdecoxib, voriconazole; Ximelagatran; Zofenopril calcium, zosuquidar trihydrochloride. PMID:12743628

  8. Basic and clinical immunology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinen, Javier; Shearer, William T.

    2003-01-01

    Progress in immunology continues to grow exponentially every year. New applications of this knowledge are being developed for a broad range of clinical conditions. Conversely, the study of primary and secondary immunodeficiencies is helping to elucidate the intricate mechanisms of the immune system. We have selected a few of the most significant contributions to the fields of basic and clinical immunology published between October 2001 and October 2002. Our choice of topics in basic immunology included the description of T-bet as a determinant factor for T(H)1 differentiation, the role of the activation-induced cytosine deaminase gene in B-cell development, the characterization of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells, and the use of dynamic imaging to study MHC class II transport and T-cell and dendritic cell membrane interactions. Articles related to clinical immunology that were selected for review include the description of immunodeficiency caused by caspase 8 deficiency; a case series report on X-linked agammaglobulinemia; the mechanism of action, efficacy, and complications of intravenous immunoglobulin; mechanisms of autoimmunity diseases; and advances in HIV pathogenesis and vaccine development. We also reviewed two articles that explore the possible alterations of the immune system caused by spaceflights, a new field with increasing importance as human space expeditions become a reality in the 21st century.

  9. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2003-10-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity(R), the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 3,4-DAP; Adefovir dipivoxil, ADL-10-0101, alefacept, alemtuzumab, alosetron hydrochloride, ALT-711, aprepitant, atazanavir sulfate, atlizumab, atvogen; Bortezomib; CETP vaccine, clevudine, crofelemer; DAC:GLP-1, darbepoetin alfa, decitabine, drotrecogin alfa (activated), DX-9065a; E-7010, edodekin alfa, emivirine, emtricitabine, entecavir, erlosamide, erlotinib hydrochloride, everolimus, exenatide; Fondaparinux sodium, frovatriptan, fulvestrant; Gemtuzumab ozogamicin, gestodene; Homoharringtonine, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, indiplon, indium 111 (111In) ibritumomab tiuxetan, inhaled insulin, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, ivabradine hydrochloride; Lanthanum carbonate, lapatinib, LAS-34475, levetiracetam, liraglutide, lumiracoxib; Maxacalcitol, melagatran, micafungin sodium; Natalizumab, NSC-640488; Oblimersen sodium; Parecoxib sodium, PEG-filgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2(a), peginterferon alfa-2b, pexelizumab, pimecrolimus, pleconaril, pramlintide acetate, pregabalin, prucalopride; rAHF-PFM, Ranelic acid distrontium salt, ranolazine, rDNA insulin, recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin, rhGM-CSF, roxifiban acetate, RSD-1235, rubitecan, ruboxistaurin mesilate hydrate; SC-51, squalamine; Tegaserod maleate, telbivudine, tesaglitazar, testosterone gel, tezosentan disodium, tipranavir; Vatalanib succinate; Ximelagatran; Yttrium 90 (90Y) ibritumomab tiuxetan; Zoledronic acid monohydrate. PMID:14671684

  10. Clinical Assay Development Support - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI’s Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis and the Cancer Diagnosis Program announce a request for applications for the Clinical Assay Development Program (CADP) for investigators seeking clinical assay development and validation resources.

  11. Assuring Quality Control of Clinical Education in Multiple Clinical Affiliates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Judith A.

    A plan was developed to assure equivalency of clinical education among the medical laboratory technician (MLT) programs affiliated with Sandhills Community College. The plan was designed by faculty to monitor the quality of clinical courses offered by the clinical affiliates. The major strategies were to develop competencies, slide/tape modules, a…

  12. Development and Clinical Outcomes of a Dialectical Behavior Therapy Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lajoie, Travis; Sonkiss, Joshua; Rich, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe the first 6 months of a dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) clinic operated by trainees in a general adult psychiatry residency program. The purpose of this report is to provide a model for the creation and maintenance of a formalized resident DBT clinic. Methods: Residents participated in the DBT clinic, attended a…

  13. "Clinical Reasoning Theater": A New Approach to Clinical Reasoning Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borleffs, Jan C. C.; Custers, Eugene J. F. M.; van Gijn, Jan; ten Gate, Olle Th. J.

    2003-01-01

    Describes a new approach to clinical reasoning education called clinical reasoning theater (CRT). With students as the audience, the doctor's clinical reasoning skills are modeled in CRT when he or she thinks aloud during conversations with the patient. Preliminary results of students' evaluations of the relevance of CRT reveal that they…

  14. Terminal Behavioral Objectives for Teaching Clinical Toxicology to Clinical Pharmacists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veltri, Joseph C.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    As a first step in the development of a competency-based clinical toxicology clerkship, a set of terminal behavioral objectives were developed that reflect the anticipated role that clinical pharmacists should play as part of the clinical toxicology team. The evaluation approaches used at the University of Utah are presented. (LBH)

  15. A clinical academic practice partnership: a clinical education redesign.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, Pamela R; Rose, Linda; Belcher, Anne E; Dang, Deborah; Hochuli, Jo Fava; Fleischmann, Debbie; Gerson, Linda; Greene, Mary Ann; Jordan, Elizabeth Betty T; Krohn, Vicki L; Sartorius-Merganthaler, Susan; Walrath, Jo M

    2013-01-01

    The clinical academic practice partnership (CAPP), a clinical redesign based on the dedicated education unit concept, was developed and implemented by large, private school of nursing in collaboration with 4 clinical partners to provide quality clinical education, to explore new clinical models for the future, and to test an innovative clinical education design. An executive steering committee consisting of nursing leaders and educators from the school of nursing and the clinical institutions was established as the decision-making and planning components, with several collaborative task forces initiated to conduct the work and to accomplish the goals. This article will describe methods to initiate and to organize the key elements of this dedicated education unit-type clinical model, providing examples and an overview of the steps and elements needed as the development proceeded. After 18 months of implementation in 4 different nursing programs in 4 different clinical institutions, the clinical redesign has shown to be a positive initiative, with students actively requesting CAPP units for their clinical experiences. Preliminary findings and outcomes will be discussed, along with nursing education implications for this new clinical redesign. PMID:23706965

  16. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2007-12-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Intergrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 249553, 2-Methoxyestradiol; Abatacept, Adalimumab, Adefovir dipivoxil, Agalsidase beta, Albinterferon alfa-2b, Aliskiren fumarate, Alovudine, Amdoxovir, Amlodipine besylate/atorvastatin calcium, Amrubicin hydrochloride, Anakinra, AQ-13, Aripiprazole, AS-1404, Asoprisnil, Atacicept, Atrasentan; Belimumab, Bevacizumab, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Botulinum toxin type B, Brivaracetam; Catumaxomab, Cediranib, Cetuximab, cG250, Ciclesonide, Cinacalcet hydrochloride, Curcumin, Cypher; Darbepoetin alfa, Denosumab, Dihydrexidine; Eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid, Entecavir, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Escitalopram oxalate, Etoricoxib, Everolimus, Ezetimibe; Febuxostat, Fenspiride hydrochloride, Fondaparinux sodium; Gefitinib, Ghrelin (human), GSK-1562902A; HSV-tk/GCV; Iclaprim, Imatinib mesylate, Imexon, Indacaterol, Insulinotropin, ISIS-112989; L-Alanosine, Lapatinib ditosylate, Laropiprant; Methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin-beta, Mipomersen sodium, Motexafin gadolinium; Natalizumab, Nimotuzumab; OSC, Ozarelix; PACAP-38, Paclitaxel nanoparticles, Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein-(1-36), Pasireotide, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Pemetrexed disodium, Pertuzumab, Picoplatin, Pimecrolimus, Pitavastatin calcium, Plitidepsin; Ranelic acid distrontium salt, Ranolazine, Recombinant human relaxin H2, Regadenoson, RFB4(dsFv)-PE38, RO-3300074, Rosuvastatin calcium; SIR-Spheres, Solifenacin succinate, Sorafenib, Sunitinib malate; Tadalafil, Talabostat, Taribavirin hydrochloride, Taxus, Temsirolimus, Teriparatide, Tiotropium bromide, Tipifarnib, Tirapazamine, Tocilizumab; UCN-01, Ularitide

  17. Gateways to Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2002-04-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the world's first drug discovery and development portal, and provides information on study design, treatments, conclusions and references. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abiciximab, acetylcholine chloride, acetylcysteine, alefacept, alemtuzumab, alicaforsen, alteplase, aminopterin, amoxicillin sodium, amphotericin B, anastrozole, argatroban monohydrate, arsenic trioxide, aspirin, atazanavir, atorvastatin, augmerosen, azathioprine; Benzylpenicillin, BMS-284756, botulinum toxin type A, botulinum toxin type B, BQ-123, budesonide, BXT-51072; Calcium folinate, carbamazepine, carboplatin, carmustine, ceftriaxone sodium, cefuroxime axetil, chorionic gonadotropin (human), cimetidine, ciprofloxacin hydrochloride, cisplatin, citalopram hydrobromide, cladribine, clarithromycin, clavulanic acid, clofarabine, clopidogrel hydrogensulfate, clotrimazole, CNI-1493, colesevelam hydrochloride, cyclophosphamide, cytarabine; Dalteparin sodium, daptomycin, darbepoetin alfa, debrisoquine sulfate, dexrazoxane, diaziquone, didanosine, docetaxel, donezepil, doxorubicin hydrochloride liposome injection, DX-9065a; Eberconazole, ecogramostim, eletriptan, enoxaparin sodium, epoetin, epoprostenol sodium, erlizumab, ertapenem sodium, ezetimibe; Fampridine, fenofibrate, filgrastim, fluconazole, fludarabine phosphate, fluorouracil, 5-fluorouracil/epinephrine, fondaparinux sodium, formoterol fumarate; Gabapentin, gemcitabine, gemfibrozil, glatiramer; Heparin sodium, homoharringtonine; Ibuprofen, iloprost, imatinib mesilate, imiquimod, interferon alpha-2b, interferon alpha-2c, interferon-beta; KW-6002; Lamotrigine, lanoteplase, metoprolol tartrate, mitoxantrone hydrochloride; Naproxen sodium, naratriptan, Natalizumab, nelfinavir mesilate

  18. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2010-11-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Thomson Reuters Integrity(SM), the drug discovery and development portal, http://www.thomsonreutersintegrity.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abatacept, Adalimumab, AdCD40L, Adefovir, Aleglitazar, Aliskiren fumarate, AM-103, Aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, Amlodipine, Anakinra, Aprepitant, Aripiprazole, Atazanavir sulfate, Axitinib; Belimumab, Bevacizumab, Bimatoprost, Bortezomib, Bupropion/naltrexone; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, Certolizumab pegol, Ciclesonide, CYT-997; Darbepoetin alfa, Darunavir, Dasatinib, Desvenlafaxine succinate, Dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride cogramostim; Eltrombopag olamine, Emtricitabine, Escitalopram oxalate, Eslicarbazepine acetate, Eszopiclone, Etravirine, Everolimus-eluting coronary stent, Exenatide, Ezetimibe; Fenretinide, Filibuvir, Fludarabine; Golimumab; Hepatitis B hyperimmunoglobulin, HEV-239, HP-802-247, HPV-16/18 AS04, HPV-6/11/16/18, Human albumin, Human gammaglobulin; Imatinib mesylate, Inotuzumab ozogamicin, Invaplex 50 vaccine; Lapatinib ditosylate, Lenalidomide, Liposomal doxorubicin, Lopinavir, Lumiliximab, LY-686017; Maraviroc, Mecasermin rinfabate; Narlaprevir; Ocrelizumab, Oral insulin, Oritavancin, Oxycodone hydrochloride/naloxone; Paclitaxel-eluting stent, Palonosetron hydrochloride, PAN-811, Paroxetine, Pazopanib hydrochloride, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Pemetrexed disodium, Pertuzumab, Pitavastatin calcium, Posaconazole, Pregabalin, Prucalopride succinate; Raltegravir potassium, Ranibizumab, RHAMM R3 peptide, Rosuvastatin calcium; Salclobuzic acid sodium salt, SCY-635, Selenate sodium, Semapimod hydrochloride, Silodosin, Siltuximab, Silybin, Sirolimus-eluting stent, SIR-Spheres, Sunitinib malate; Tapentadol hydrochloride, Tenofovir disoproxil

  19. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-04-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity(R), the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: ABI-007, adalimumab, adefovir dipivoxil, alefacept, alemtuzumab, 3-AP, AP-12009, APC-8015, L-Arginine hydrochloride, aripiprazole, arundic acid, avasimibe; Bevacizumab, bivatuzumab, BMS-181176, BMS-184476, BMS-188797, bortezomib, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, BQ-123, BRL-55730, bryostatin 1; CEP-1347, cetuximab, cinacalcet hydrochloride, CP-461, CpG-7909; D-003, dabuzalgron hydrochloride, darbepoetin alfa, desloratadine, desoxyepothilone B, dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride, DHA-paclitaxel, diflomotecan, DN-101, DP-b99, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, duramycin; Eculizumab, Efalizumab, EKB-569, elcometrine, enfuvirtide, eplerenone, erlotinib hydrochloride, ertapenem sodium, eszopiclone, everolimus, exatecan mesilate, ezetimibe; Fenretinide, fosamprenavir calcium, frovatriptan; GD2L-KLH conjugate vaccine, gefitinib, glufosfamide, GTI-2040; Hexyl insulin M2, human insulin, hydroquinone, gamma-Hydroxybutyrate sodium; IL-4(38-37)-PE38KDEL, imatinib mesylate, indisulam, inhaled insulin, ixabepilone; KRN-5500; LY-544344; MDX-210, melatonin, mepolizumab, motexafin gadolinium; Natalizumab, NSC-330507, NSC-683864; 1-Octanol, omalizumab, ortataxel; Pagoclone, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pemetrexed disodium, phenoxodiol, pimecrolimus, plevitrexed, polyphenon E, pramlintide acetate, prasterone, pregabalin, PX-12; QS-21; Ragaglitazar, ranelic acid distrontium salt, RDP-58, recombinant glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36) amide, repinotan hydrochloride, rhEndostatin, rh-Lactoferrin, (R)-roscovitine; S-8184, semaxanib, sitafloxacin hydrate, sitaxsentan sodium, sorafenib, synthadotin

  20. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2003-01-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 81C6; Adefovir dipivoxil, Agalsidase alfa, AGM-1470, albumin interferon alfa, alefacept, alosetron hydrochloride, anakinra, anti-CTLA-4 Mab, aprepitant, aripiprazole, atazanavir; BAY-43-9006, BBR-3438, beta-L-Fd4C, bimatoprost, bortezomib, bosentanBR96-doxorubicin; Caspofungin acetate, ciclesonide, cilengitide, cilomilast, COL-1621, COL-3, CpG-7909, cyclosporine; DCVax-Brain, dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride, dexosome vaccine (melanoma), donepezil hydrochloride, drotrecogin alfa (activated), DTI-015, [99Tc]-DTPA-mannosyldextran, duloxetine hydrochloride; Emivirine, emtricitabine, entecavir, epothilone B, estradiol-MNP, etonogestrel/etonogestrel/ethinylestradiol, etoricoxib; Febuxostat, fondaparinux sodium, fosamprenavir calcium; Gefitinib, GVS-111; Heparinase I, HspE7, human alpha-glucosidase, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, INGN-241, interferon alfa B/D hybrid, interferon alfa Biphasix, ISIS-14803; Lanicemine hydrochloride, 1311-lipiodol, liposome-encapsulated mitoxantrone, lixivaptan, lumiracoxib, lupus-AHP, LY-466700; Marimastat, MEN-10755, micafungin sodium; Nitronaproxen, NSC-683864 Omalizumab, oral insulin; Palonosetron hydrochloride, peginterferon alfa-2a, pimecrolimus, pralnacasan, pramlintide acetate, pregabalin, pyrazoloacridine; R-165335, ranolazine, risperidone, RPR-109881;, RSD-1235, Satraplatin, seocalcitol, sertindole, SMART anti-interferon gamma antibody, sulfasalazine; T-138067, TAK-013, tegaserod maleate, telithromycin, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, teriparatide, tiotropium bromide, tipifarnib, TP-38; Valdecoxib, vatalanib succinate, voriconazole; ZD-9331. PMID:12690708

  1. Philosophy of clinical psychopharmacology.

    PubMed

    Aragona, Massimiliano

    2013-03-01

    The renewal of the philosophical debate in psychiatry is one exciting news of recent years. However, its use in psychopharmacology may be problematic, ranging from self-confinement into the realm of values (which leaves the evidence-based domain unchallenged) to complete rejection of scientific evidence. In this paper philosophy is conceived as a conceptual audit of clinical psychopharmacology. Its function is to criticise the epistemological and methodological problems of current neopositivist, ingenuously realist and evidence-servant psychiatry from within the scientific stance and with the aim of aiding psychopharmacologists in practicing a more self-aware, critical and possibly useful clinical practice. Three examples are discussed to suggest that psychopharmacological practice needs conceptual clarification. At the diagnostic level it is shown that the crisis of the current diagnostic system and the problem of comorbidity strongly influence psychopharmacological results, new conceptualizations more respondent to the psychopharmacological requirements being needed. Heterogeneity of research samples, lack of specificity of psychotropic drugs, difficult generalizability of results, need of a phenomenological study of drug-induced psychopathological changes are discussed herein. At the methodological level the merits and limits of evidence-based practice are considered, arguing that clinicians should know the best available evidence but that guidelines should not be constrictive (due to several methodological biases and rhetorical tricks of which the clinician should be aware, sometimes respondent to extra-scientific, economical requests). At the epistemological level it is shown that the clinical stance is shaped by implicit philosophical beliefs about the mind/body problem (reductionism, dualism, interactionism, pragmatism), and that philosophy can aid physicians to be more aware of their beliefs in order to choose the most useful view and to practice coherently

  2. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-06-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 101M; Adalimumab, adefovir dipivoxil, adenosine triphosphate, albumin interferon alfa, alefacept, alemtuzumab, aminolevulinic acid hexyl ester, autologous renal tumor vaccine, azimilide hydrochloride; Bortezomib, bosentan, BR-1; C340, cantuzumab mertansine, caspofungin acetate, CGP-36742, CHAMPION everolimus-eluting coronary stent, cypher; Dalbavancin, darbepoetin alfa, desloratadine, duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; Efalizumab, emtricitabine, enfuvirtide, erlosamide, ertapenem sodium, everolimus, ezetimibe; Flesinoxan hydrochloride, fosamprenavir calcium, FR-901228, frovatriptan; Gadofosveset sodium, gadomer-17, galiximab, gamma-hydroxybutyrate sodium, gefitinib; HuOKT3gamma1(Ala234-Ala235); IDN-6556, imatinib mesylate, iodine (I131) tositumomab, iseganan hydrochloride, ixabepilone; Keratinocyte growth factor; LB-80380, levocetirizine, liposomal doxorubicin, LMB-9, lopinavir, lopinavir/ritonavir, lumiracoxib, lurtotecan; Mecasermin, midostaurin, morphine hydrochloride; Natalizumab, nelfinavir, nesiritide, niacin/lovastatin; Olcegepant, omalizumab, oregovomab; Parecoxib sodium, PEG-filgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ ribavirin, perospirone hydrochloride, pexelizumab, pimecrolimus, prinomastat; Resiquimod, rhIGFBP-3, rhIGF-I/rhIGFBP-3, ritanserin, ro-31-7453, rosuvastatin calcium; SCIO-469, SDZ-SID-791, SU-11248, suberanilohydroxamic acid; Tadalafil, taxus, telithromycin, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, TER-286, tezosentan disodium, TH-9507, tipifarnib, tipranavir, tolvaptan, tramadol hydrochloride/acetaminophen, travoprost, treprostinil sodium, tucaresol

  3. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-05-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com/. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Adalimumab, adenosine triphosphate, alemtuzumab, alendronate sodium/cholecalciferol, aliskiren fumarate, AMGN-0007, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, anakinra, anidulafungin, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, bosentan; Calcipotriol/beta methasone dipropionate, caldaret hydrate, caspofungin acetate, cetuximab, cinacalcet hydrochloride, clopidogrel, cocaine-BSA conjugate, conivaptan hydrochloride, Cypher; Darbepoetin alfa, delmitide, desloratadine, desmoteplase, desoxyepothilone B, disufenton sodium, DU-176b, duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; EBV-specific CTLs, ecogramostim, edodekin alfa, efalizumab, eletriptan, emtricitabine, entecavir, erlotinib hydrochloride, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, etoricoxib, everolimus, ezetimibe; Fanapanel, fondaparinux sodium; Gefitinib, GTI-2040, GW-501516; Her2 E75-peptide vaccine, human insulin; Ibogaine, icatibant acetate, Id-KLH vaccine, imatinib mesylate, immune globulin subcutaneous [human], indacaterol, inolimomab, ipilimumab, i.v. gamma-globulin, ivabradine hydrochloride, ixabepilone; Lacosamide, lanthanum carbonate, lenalidomide, levocetirizine, levodopa methyl ester hydrochloride/carbidopa, levodopa/carbidopa/entacapone, lidocaine/prilocaine; Maraviroc, mecasermin, melevodopa hydrochloride, mepolizumab, mitumomab; Nesiritide; Omalizumab, oral insulin; Parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), patupilone, pegaptanib sodium, PEG-filgrastim, pemetrexed disodium, photochlor, pimecrolimus, posaconazole, prasterone, prasugrel, pregabalin, prilocaine, PRX-00023; QS-21; Ranibizumab, ranirestat, rhodamine 123, rotigaptide; Sarcosine, sirolimus

  4. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-03-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity(R), the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Activated protein C concentrate, Ad-CD154, Adeno-Interferon gamma, alemtuzumab, APC-8024, 9-aminocamptothecin, aprepitant, l-arginine hydrochloride, aripiprazole, arsenic trioxide, asimadoline; O6-Benzylguanine, bevacizumab, Bi-20, binodenoson, biphasic insulin aspart, bivatuzumab, 186Re-bivatuzumab, BMS-181176, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, BQ-123, bryostatin 1; Carboxy- amidotriazole, caspofungin acetate, CB-1954, CC-4047, CDP-860, cerivastatin sodium, clevidipine, CTL-102; 3,4-DAP, darbepoetin alfa, decitabine, desloratadine, DHA-paclitaxel, duloxetine hydrochloride; Efalizumab, EGF vaccine, eletriptan, eniluracil, ENMD-0997, eplerenone, eplivanserin, erlosamide, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, esomeprazole magnesium, eszopiclone, everolimus, exatecan mesilate, exenatide, ezetimibe; Fondaparinux sodium, FR-901228, FTY-720; Gefitinib, gemtuzumab ozogamicin, gepirone hydrochloride; Hexyl insulin M2, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, iodine (I131) tositumomab, ISV-205, ivabradine hydrochloride, ixabepilone; Levetiracetam, levocetirizine, linezolid, liposomal NDDP, lonafarnib, lopinavir, LY-156735; Mafosfamide cyclohexylamine salt, magnesium sulfate, maxacalcitol, meclinertant, melagatran, melatonin, MENT, mepolizumab, micafungin sodium, midostaurin, motexafin gadolinium; Nesiritide, NS-1209, NSC-601316, NSC-683864; Osanetant; Palonosetron hydrochloride, parecoxib sodium, pegaptanib sodium, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pegylated OB protein, pemetrexed disodium, perillyl alcohol, picoplatin, pimecrolimus, pixantrone maleate, plevitrexed

  5. Shared clinical decision making

    PubMed Central

    AlHaqwi, Ali I.; AlDrees, Turki M.; AlRumayyan, Ahmad; AlFarhan, Ali I.; Alotaibi, Sultan S.; AlKhashan, Hesham I.; Badri, Motasim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine preferences of patients regarding their involvement in the clinical decision making process and the related factors in Saudi Arabia. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in a major family practice center in King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, between March and May 2012. Multivariate multinomial regression models were fitted to identify factors associated with patients preferences. Results: The study included 236 participants. The most preferred decision-making style was shared decision-making (57%), followed by paternalistic (28%), and informed consumerism (14%). The preference for shared clinical decision making was significantly higher among male patients and those with higher level of education, whereas paternalism was significantly higher among older patients and those with chronic health conditions, and consumerism was significantly higher in younger age groups. In multivariate multinomial regression analysis, compared with the shared group, the consumerism group were more likely to be female [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) =2.87, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.31-6.27, p=0.008] and non-dyslipidemic (AOR=2.90, 95% CI: 1.03-8.09, p=0.04), and the paternalism group were more likely to be older (AOR=1.03, 95% CI: 1.01-1.05, p=0.04), and female (AOR=2.47, 95% CI: 1.32-4.06, p=0.008). Conclusion: Preferences of patients for involvement in the clinical decision-making varied considerably. In our setting, underlying factors that influence these preferences identified in this study should be considered and tailored individually to achieve optimal treatment outcomes. PMID:26620990

  6. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-01-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: ABT-510, adalimumab, alefacept, ambrisentan, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, armodafinil, aselizumab, asenapine maleate, azelnidipine; Bevacizumab, bexarotene, bimosiamose, biphasic insulin aspart, bortezomib, bosentan, BQ-123; C340, cannabidiol, caspofungin acetate, CC-4047, certolizumab pegol, cetuximab, ciclesonide, cilansetron, Cypher; Dabigatran etexilate, darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin hydrobromide, desloratadine, dexosome vaccine (melanoma), dimethyl fumarate, dronabinol/cannabidiol, drospirenone, drospirenone/estradiol, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; Efalizumab, eglumetad hydrate, emoxipin hydrochloride, eplerenone, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, etonogestrel/ethinylestradiol; Garenoxacin mesilate, gamma-hydroxybutyrate sodium, gefitinib; H5N1 pandemic influenza vaccine, human growth hormone-(177-191), human insulin; Indacaterol, INKP-100, INKP-102, insulin glargine, i.v. gamma-globulin; KLH; Lapatinib, L-arginine hydrochloride, lasofoxifene tartrate, levocetirizine, licochalcone A, LMI vaccine, lomefloxacin, lubiprostone, lumiracoxib; Miglustat, mycograb; Natalizumab, NCX-4016, nortopixantrone hydrochloride; Olmesartan medoxomil, omalizumab, oral insulin, OrM3; Parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), parecoxib sodium, PCK-3145, PEG-filgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2a, pemetrexed disodium, pexelizumab, photochlor, pimecrolimus, pneumococcal 7-valent conjugate vaccine, polyphenon E; R-126638, R-411, resveratrol, roflumilast, RS-86, ruboxistaurin mesilate hydrate, rupatadine fumarate; Sipuleucel-T, somatropin, St. John's Wort extract; Tadalafil, Taxus

  7. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-01-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs:(R)-Flurbiprofen, 90Yttrium-DOTA-huJ591; ABT-510, ACP-103, Ad5-FGF4, adalimumab, ademetionine, AG-7352, alemtuzumab, Amb a 1 ISS-DNA, anakinra, apaziquone, aprepitant, aripiprazole, atazanavir sulfate; BAL-8557, bevacizumab, BMS-188797, bortezomib, bosentan, brivudine; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, cannabidiol, caspofungin acetate, catumaxomab, CERE-120, cetuximab, ciclesonide, cilomilast, cizolirtine citrate, Cypher, cystemustine; Dalbavancin, darifenacin hydrobromide, dasatinib, deferasirox, denosumab, desmoteplase, dihydrexidine, dimethyl fumarate, dutasteride, DW-166HC; Eculizumab, enfuvirtide, entecavir, epratuzumab, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, eszopiclone, etoricoxib, everolimus; Fallypride, febuxostat, fenretinide, fesoterodine, fingolimod hydrochloride; Gabapentin enacarbil, gefitinib; hMaxi-K, human papillomavirus vaccine, HYAL-CT1101; Imatinib mesylate, indiplon, inolimomab, ISAtx-247; J591; Lacosamide, landiolol, lasofoxifene tartrate, lestaurtinib, lidocaine/prilocaine, linezolid, lixivaptan, lonafarnib, lopinavir, lopinavir/ritonavir, lumiracoxib; Natalizumab, nesiritide; OC-108, omalizumab, onercept, OSC; Palifermin, palonosetron hydrochloride, parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), parecoxib sodium, PD-MAGE-3 vaccine, PEG-filgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pegsunercept, pelitinib, pitavastatin calcium, plerixafor hydrochloride, posaconazole, prasterone sulfate, pregabalin; Ramelteon, ranelic acid distrontium salt, rasburicase, rosuvastatin calcium, rotigotine, RSD-1235, rufinamide, rupatadine fumarate; Sarizotan hydrochloride, SHL-749

  8. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Moral, M A; Tomillero, A

    2008-03-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 131-I-Chlorotoxin, 423557; Abatacept, Ad.Egr.TNF.11D, Adalimumab, AE-941, Ambrisentan, AMR-001, Anacetrapib, Anakinra, Aripiprazole, Atazanavir sulfate; BAY-639044, Bazedoxifene acetate, Belimumab, Bevacizumab, Bortezomib, Botulinum toxin type B, Brivaracetam, Bucindolol hydrochloride; Carfilzomib, Carisbamate, CCX-282, CD20Bi, Ceftobiprole, Certolizumab pegol, CF-101, Cinacalcet hydrochloride, Cypher; Darifenacin hydrobromide, Degarelix acetate, Denosumab, Desvenlafaxine succinate, Dexlansoprazole, Dexverapamil, Drotrecogin alfa (activated), Duloxetine hydrochloride, Dutasteride; Efalizumab, EPs-7630, Escitalopram oxalate, Etoricoxib; Fluticasone furoate, Fondaparinux sodium, Fospropofol disodium; Hexadecyloxypropyl-cidofovir, HIV gp120/NefTat/AS02A, HPV-6/11/16/18; INCB-18424, Incyclinide, Inhalable human insulin, Insulin detemir; KNS-760704, KW-0761; Lacosamide, Lenalidomide, Levetiracetam, Licofelone, Lidocaine/prilocaine; mAb 216, MEDI-528, Men ACWY, Meningococcal C-CRM197 vaccine, Methylnaltrexone bromide; Nemifitide ditriflutate, Nicotine conjugate vaccine, Nilotinib hydrochloride monohydrate; Octaparin; Parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), Pegaptanib octasodium, Pitrakinra, Prasterone, Pregabalin; Ranelic acid distrontium salt, Rasagiline mesilate, Retigabine, Rimonabant, RTS,S/AS02D; Sarcosine, Sitaxentan sodium, Solifenacin succinate, Sunitinib malate; Taranabant, Taxus, Teduglutide, Teriparatide, Ticagrelor, Travoprost, TRU-015; USlipristal acetate, Urocortin 2; Vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate; YM-155, Yttrium 90 (90Y) ibritumomab tiuxetan; Zanolimumab, Zoledronic acid monohydrate, Zotarolimus

  9. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-09-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: A-007, A6, adalimumab, adenosine triphosphate, alefacept, alemtuzumab, AllerVax Ragweed, amphora, anakinra, angiotensin-(1-7), anidulafungin, apomine, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride, avanafil; BAL-8557, becatecarin, bevacizumab, biphasic insulin aspart, BMS-188797, bortezomib, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, brivudine; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, caspofungin acetate, catumaxomab, certolizumab pegol, cetuximab, CG-0070, ciclesonide, cinacalcet hydrochloride, clindamycin phosphate/benzoyl peroxide, cryptophycin 52, Cypher; Dabigatran etexilate, darapladib, darbepoetin alfa, decitabine, deferasirox, desloratadine, dexanabinol, dextromethorphan/quinidine sulfate, DMF, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride; E-7010, edaravone, efalizumab, emtricitabine, entecavir, eplerenone, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, estradiol valerate/dienogest, eszopiclone, exenatide, ezetimibe; Fondaparinux sodium, fulvestrant; Gefitinib, gestodene, GYKI-16084; Hyaluronic acid, hydralazine hydrochloride/isosorbide dinitrate; Imatinib mesylate, indiplon, insulin glargine; Juzen-taiho-to; Lamivudine/zidovudine/abacavir sulfate, L-arginine hydrochloride, lasofoxifene tartrate, L-BLP-25, lenalidomide, levocetirizine, levodopa/carbidopa/entacapone, lexatumumab, lidocaine/prilocaine, lubiprostone, lumiracoxib; MAb-14.18, mitoquidone; Natalizumab, neridronic acid, neuradiab; Olpadronic acid sodium salt, omalizumab; p53-DC vaccine, parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pemetrexed disodium, perifosine, pimecrolimus, prasterone, prasugrel, PRO-2000

  10. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2010-12-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Thomson Reuters Integrity(SM), the drug discovery and development portal, http://www.thomsonreutersintegrity.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 17-Hydroxyprogesterone caproate; Abacavir sulfate/lamivudine, Aclidinium bromide, Adalimumab, Adefovir, Alemtuzumab, Alkaline phosphatase, Amlodipine, Apilimod mesylate, Aripiprazole, Axitinib, Azacitidine; Belotecan hydrochloride, Berberine iodide, Bevacizumab, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Bryostatin 1; Calcipotriol/hydrocortisone, Carglumic acid, Certolizumab pegol, Cetuximab, Cinacalcet hydrochloride, Cixutumumab, Coumarin, Custirsen sodium; Darbepoetin alfa, Darifenacin hydrobromide, Darunavir, Dasatinib, Denibulin hydrochloride, Denosumab, Diacetylmorphine, Dulanermin, Duloxetine hydrochloride; Ecogramostim, Enfuvirtide, Entecavir, Enzastaurin hydrochloride, Eplerenone, Escitalopram oxalate, Esomeprazole sodium, Etravirine, Everolimus, Ezetimibe; Fenofibrate/pravastatin sodium, Ferric carboxymaltose, Flavangenol, Fondaparinux sodium; Glutamine, GSK-1024850A; Hepatitis B hyperimmunoglobulin, Hib-MenC, HIV-LIPO-5; Immunoglobulin intravenous (human), Indacaterol maleate, Indibulin, Indium 111 (¹¹¹In) ibritumomab tiuxetan, Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 Monovalent vaccine, Inhalable human insulin, Insulin glulisine; Lapatinib ditosylate, Leucovorin/UFT; Maraviroc, Mecasermin, MMR-V, Morphine hydrochloride, Morphine sulfate/naltrexone hydrochloride, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Naproxen/esomeprazole magnesium, Natalizumab; Oncolytic HSV; Paliperidone, PAN-811, Paroxetine, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, Pegvisomant, Pemetrexed disodium, Pimecrolimus, Posaconazole, Pregabalin; Raltegravir potassium, Ranelic acid distrontium salt, Rasburicase, Rilpivirine

  11. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-01-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Know- ledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: ABI-007, Ad.Egr.TNF.11D, adefovir dipivoxil, AdPEDF.11, AES-14, albumex, alefacept, alemtuzumab, aliskiren fumarate, alvimopan hydrate, aAminolevulinic acid hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, anakinra, anti-IL-12 MAb, aprepitant, atazanavir sulfate, atrasentan, avanafil; Banoxantrone, BG-12, bimatoprost, bortezomib, bosentan; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, caspofungin acetate, CBT-1, ciclesonide, clofarabine, conivaptan hydrochloride, CpG-7909, C-Vax, Cypher; DA-8159, DAC:GLP-1, darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin, duloxetine hydrochloride; Eculizumab, efalizumab, efaproxiral sodium, EGF vaccine, eletriptan, epratuzumab, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, ETC-642, etoricoxib, everolimus, exenatide; Gefitinib, IV gamma-globulin; Human insulin, gamma-hydroxybutyrate sodium; IDN-6556, iguratimod, imatinib mesylate, indiplon, ixabepilone; Laquinimod, LB-80380, lidocaine/prilocaineliraglutide, lopinavir, lopinavir/ritonavir, lucinactant; MAb-14.18, melatonin, MLN-591-DM1; NC-531, neridronic acid, nesiritide, neutrophil-inhibitory factor, niacin/lovastatin; Oblimersen sodium, olcegepant, oral Insulin, ORV-105; Palonosetron hydrochloride, PAmAb, pegaptanib sodium, peginterferon alfa-2a, pegvisomant, perifosine, pexelizumab, phenoxodiol, phenserine tartrate, pimecrolimus, pramlintide acetate, pregabalin, PRO-542, prostate cancer vaccine, PT-141; Ramelteon, rasagiline mesilate, rDNA insulin, reslizumab, rh-Lactoferrin, ribamidine hydrochloride, rosuvastatin calcium; S-8184l, SC-1, sorafenib, St. John's Wort extract, SU-11248; Taxus, telbivudine, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, teriparatide

  12. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-09-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 101M, 166Ho-DOTMP, 3-AP; Abatacept, abetimus sodium, ACR-16, adefovir dipivoxil, alefacept, AMD-070, aminolevulinic acid hexyl ester, anatumomab mafenatox, anti-CTLA-4 MAb, antigastrin therapeutic vaccine, AP-12009, AP-23573, APC-8024, aripiprazole, ATL-962, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, bimatoprost, bortezomib, bosentan, BR-1; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, cinacalcet hydrochloride, clofazimine, colchicine, cold-adapted influenza vaccine trivalent, CRM197; Desloratadine, desoxyepothilone B, diethylhomospermine; Edodekin alfa, efalizumab, elcometrine, eletriptan, enfuvirtide, entecavir, EP-2101, eplerenone, erlotinib hydrochloride, etoricoxib, everolimus, exherin, ezetimibe; Febuxostat, fluorescein lisicol, fosamprenavir calcium, frovatriptan; Hemoglobin raffimer, HSPPC-96, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, IRX-2, istradefylline, IV gamma-globulin, ixabepilone; Kahalalide F; L-759274, levodopa/carbidopa/entacapone, licofelone, lonafarnib, lopinavir, lurtotecan, LY-156735; MAb G250, mecasermin, melatonin, midostaurin, muraglitazar; Nesiritide, nitronaproxen; O6-Benzylguanine, olmesartan medoxomil, olmesartan medoxomil/hydrochlorothiazide, omapatrilat, oral insulin; Parecoxib sodium, PCK-3145, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ ribavirin, pemetrexed disodium, peptide YY3-36, PG-CPT, phenoxodiol, pimecrolimus, posaconazole; Rasagiline mesilate, rDNA insulin, RG228, rimonabant hydrochloride, rosuvastatin calcium, rotigotine hydrochloride; S-3304, safinamide mesilate, salcaprozic acid sodium salt, SDZ-SID-791, SGN-30, soblidotin

  13. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2009-09-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: AAV1/SERCA2a, Abacavir sulfate/lamivudine, Adalimumab, Aliskiren fumarate, Ambrisentan, Aripiprazole, AT-7519, Atazanavir sulfate, Atomoxetine hydrochloride, Azacitidine, Azelnidipine; Besifloxacin hydrochloride, Bevacizumab, Bioabsorbable everolimus-eluting coronary stent, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Budesonide/formoterol fumarate; CAIV-T, Carisbamate, Casopitant mesylate, Certolizumab pegol, Cetuximab, Ciclesonide, Ciprofloxacin/dexamethasone, CTCE-9908; Dalcetrapib, Darunavir, Deferasirox, Desloratadine, Disitertide, Drotrecogin alfa (activated), DTA-H19, Duloxetine hydrochloride, Dutasteride; Ecogramostim, Efalizumab, Emtricitabine, Eribulin mesilate, Escitalopram oxalate, Eszopiclone, EUR-1008, Everolimus-eluting coronary stent, Exenatide; Fampridine, Fluticasone furoate, Formoterol fumarate/fluticasone propionate, Fosamprenavir calcium, Fulvestrant; Gabapentin enacarbil, GS-7904L; HPV-6/11/16/18, Human Secretin, Hydralazine hydrochloride/isosorbide dinitrate; Imatinib mesylate, Imexon, Inalimarev/Falimarev, Indacaterol, Indacaterol maleate, Inhalable human insulin, Insulin detemir, Insulin glargine, Ixabepilone; L-Alanosine, Lapatinib ditosylate, Lenalidomide, Levocetirizine dihydrochloride, Liraglutide, Lisdexamfetamine mesilate, Lopinavir, Loratadine/montelukast sodium, Lutropin alfa; MeNZB, Mepolizumab, Micafungin sodium, Morphine hydrochloride; Nabiximols, Nikkomycin Z; Olmesartan medoxomil, Omalizumab; Paclitaxel-eluting stent, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Perifosine, PF-489791, Plitidepsin, Posaconazole, Pregabalin; QAX-576; Raltegravir potassium, Ramelteon, Rasagiline

  14. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2003-09-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abetimus sodium, adefovir dipivoxil, AGI-1067, alefacept, alemtuzumab, ALVAC-p53, aminolevulinic acid hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, Anti-CTLA-4 Mab, AOD-9604, apafant, aprinocarsen sodium, arsenic trioxide; Balaglitazone, BIM-23190, bimatoprost, bortezomib, bosentan, BR-1; Canertinib dihydrochloride, CDP-850, cevimeline hydrochloride, cinacalcet hydrochloride, clenoliximab, clevudine, CN-787; D-003, darusentan, deferasirox, desloratadine dexanabinol, duloxetine hydrochloride; E-5564, edaravone, efaproxiral sodium, elvucitabine emfilermin, EN-101, enfuvirtide, entecavir, epithalon, eplerenone, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, esomeprazole magnesium, eszopiclone, etilefrine pivalate hydrochloride etoricoxib, everolimus, exenatide; Fidarestat, fondaparinux sodium; Ganstigmine hydrochloride; Homoharringtonine, HuMax-IL-15, hyperimmune IVIG; Imatinib mesylate, IMC-1C11, Inhaled insulin, irofulven, iseganan hydrochloride, ISIS-14803, ISIS-5132, ivabradine hydrochloride; Keratinocyte growth factor; Lafutidine, lanthanum carbonate, LAS-34475, levocetirizine, liraglutide, LY-307161 SR; Magnesium sulfate, maribavir, melatonin, mycobacterium cell wall complex; NN-414, NO-aspirin, nociceptin, nolomirole hydrochloride; Olmesartan medoxomil oral insulin, ospemifene; PDX, perillyl alcohol, pimecrolimus, pitavastatin calcium, pramlintide acetate, prasterone, pregabalin, PRO-542, PV-701, pyrazoloacridine; R-744, ranelic acid distrontium salt, rasburicase, rDNA insulin, resiniferatoxin, reslizumab, ridogrel, riplizumab ropivacaine, rosuvastatin calcium, roxifiban acetate, ruboxistaurin mesilate

  15. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X

    2008-01-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prouse Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 101M, 3F8; Abatacept, ABT-263, Adalimumab, AG-7352, Agatolimod sodium, Alfimeprase, Aliskiren fumarate, Alvimopan hydrate, Aminolevulinic acid hexyl ester, Ammonium tetrathiomolybdate, Anakinra, Aripiprazole, AS-1404, AT-9283, Atomoxetine hydrochloride, AVE-1642, AVE-9633, Axitinib, AZD-0530; Becocalcidiol, Belotecan hydrochloride, Bevacizumab, BG-9928, BIBF-1120, BMS-275183, Bortezomib, Bosentan; Catumaxomab, Cetuximab, CHR-2797, Ciclesonide, Clevidipine, Cypher, Cytarabine/daunorubicin; Darifenacin hydrobromide, Darunavir, Denosumab, Desvenlafaxine succinate, Disufenton sodium, Duloxetine hydrochloride, Dutasteride; Eculizumab, Efalizumab, Eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid, Eplerenone, Epratuzumab, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Escitalopram oxalate, Ethynylcytidine, Etravirine, Everolimus, Ezetimibe; Fulvestrant; Garenoxacin mesilate, Gefitinib, Gestodene; HI-164, Hydralazine hydrochloride/isosorbide dinitrate; Icatibant acetate, ICX-RHY, Idraparinux sodium, Indacaterol, Ispronicline, Ivabradine hydrochloride, Ixabepilone; KB-2115, KW-2449; L-791515, Lapatinib ditosylate, LGD-4665, Licofelone, Liposomal doxorubicin, Lisdexamfetamine mesilate, Lumiracoxib; Methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin-beta, Miglustat, Mipomersen sodium, Mitumprotimut-T, MK-0822A, MK-0974; Nelarabine; Obatoclax mesylate, Olmesartan medoxomil, Olmesartan medoxomil/hydrochlorothiazide; Paliperidone, Palonosetron hydrochloride, Panitumumab, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Pemetrexed disodium, Perospirone hydrochloride, Pertuzumab, Pimecrolimus, Pitrakinra, Pixantrone maleate, Posaconazole, Pregabalin; Quercetin; RALGA, Raltegravir

  16. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-10-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abiraterone acetate, Ad5CMV-p53, adefovir dipivoxil, AE-941, ambrisentan, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride, atrasentan; BCH-10618, bimatoprost, BMS-184476, BMS-275183, BMS-387032, botulinum toxin type B, BR-1, BR96-Doxorubicin; Capravirine, caspofungin acetate, cinacalcet hydrochloride; Darbepoetin alfa, desloratadine, dextrin sulfate, DJ-927, duloxetine hydrochloride; Elacridar, emtricitabine, eplerenone, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, ESP-24217, etoricoxib, exenatide, ezetimibe; Ferumoxtran-10, fondaparinux sodium, fosamprenavir calcium; GS-7904L, GW-5634; HMN-214, human insulin; IC-14, imatinib mesylate, indiplon, insulin glargine, insulinotropin, iseganan hydrochloride; Lanthanum carbonate, L-Arginine hydrochloride, LEA29Y, lenalidomide, LE-SN38, lestaurtinib, L-MDAM, lometrexol, lopinavir, lopinavir/ritonavir; Magnesium sulfate, maraviroc, mepolizumab, metreleptin, milataxel, MNA-715, morphine hydrochloride; Nesiritide, neutrophil-inhibitory factor, NK-911; Olanzapine/fluoxetine hydrochloride, olmesartan medoxomil, omalizumab, ortataxel, oxycodone hydrochloride/ibuprofen; Panitumumab, patupilone, PC-515, PD-MAGE-3 Vaccine, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ ribavirin, pemetrexed disodium, pimecrolimus, prasugrel, pregabalin, PRO-2000; Rosuvastatin calcium, RPR-113090; sabarubicin hydrochloride, safinamide mesilate, SB-715992, sitaxsentan sodium, soblidotin, synthadotin; Tadalafil, taltobulin, temsirolimus, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine, testosterone gel, tigecycline, tipranavir, tirapazamine, trabectedin

  17. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-10-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate, (Z)-4-hydroxytamoxifen; Ad.muIFN-beta AD-237, adalimumab, adefovir dipivoxil, agalsidase alfa, alemtuzumab, almotriptan, ALVAC vCP1452, alvimopan hydrate, ambrisentan, anakinra, anti-IFN-gamma MAb; Bimatoprost, BMS-188797, BMS-214662, bortezomib, bosentan, bovine lactoferrin; Caffeine, canertinib dihydrochloride, canfosfamide hydrochloride, cannabidiol, caspofungin acetate, cetuximab, cH36, ChimeriVax-JE, ciclesonide, cilansetron, cinacalcet hydrochloride, clopidogrel, CpG-7909, Cypher; Daptomycin, darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin hydrobromide, decitabine, denufosol tetrasodium, Dexamet, diindolemethane, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, DX-9065a; E-7010, edaravone, efalizumab, eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid, elacridar, eletriptan, emtricitabine, epratuzumab, erlotinib hydrochloride, ertapenem sodium, eszopiclone, everolimus, ezetimibe; Fludarabine, fondaparinux sodium; gamma-Hydroxybutyrate sodium, gavestinel sodium, gefitinib, granisetron-Biochronomer; Human Albumin, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, indiplon, interleukin-2 XL, isatoribine, ISS-1018, i.v. gamma-globulin, ivabradine hydrochloride, ixabepilone; Lanthanum carbonate, L-arginine hydrochloride, liposomal doxorubicin, LY-450139; Magnesium sulfate, melatonin, motexafin gadolinium, mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Natalizumab, nesiritide, niacin/lovastatin; OGX-011, olmesartan medoxomil, omalizumab, ospemifene; PACAP38, panitumumab, parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), parecoxib sodium, patupilone, pegfilgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b

  18. Clinical pharmacology of deferasirox.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Chiaki

    2014-08-01

    Iron accumulation is a consequence of regular red cell transfusions, and can occur as a result of ineffective erythropoiesis secondary to increased intestinal iron absorption, in patients with various anemias. Without appropriate treatment, iron overload can lead to increased morbidity and mortality. Deferasirox is an oral iron chelator effective for reduction of body iron in iron-overloaded patients with transfusion-dependent anemias and non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia, with a well-established safety profile. This review summarizes the clinical pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and drug-drug interaction profile of deferasirox, and the claims supporting once-daily dosing for effective chelation. Sustained labile plasma iron suppression is observed with no rebound between doses, protecting organs from potential tissue damage. Increased iron excretion positively correlates with increased deferasirox exposure; to optimize iron removal transfusional iron intake, body iron burden and safety parameters should also be considered. Deferasirox dispersible tablets should be taken ≥30 min before food due to an effect of food on bioavailability. Dosing is consistent across pediatric and adult patients and there is no ethnic sensitivity. Dose adjustment is required for patients with hepatic impairment and may be considered upon coadministration with strong uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase inducers or bile acid sequestrants (coadministration should be avoided where possible), and patients should be monitored upon coadministration with cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4/5, CYP2C8, or CYP1A2 substrates. Coadministration with hydroxyurea, a fetal hemoglobin modulator, does not appear to impact deferasirox pharmacokinetics. In summary, a substantial body of clinical and pharmacokinetic data are available for deferasirox to guide its optimal use in multiple patient populations and clinical circumstances. PMID:24996374

  19. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-01-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abetimus sodium, Ad5-FGF4, adeno-Interferon gamma, AE-941, AERx, alemtuzumab, alicaforsen sodium, almotriptan, alpharadin, anakinra, anatumomab mafenatox, ANG-453, anti-CTLA-4 Mab, AP-12009, aprepitant, aripiprazole, arsenic trioxide, astemizole, atlizumab, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, BG-9928, BMS-188667, botulinum toxin type B, BufferGel; Caffeine, CDP-870, cetuximab, cilomilast, ciluprevir, clofarabine, continuous erythropoiesis receptor activator, CP-461; Darbepoetin alfa, deferasirox, desloratadine, desoxyepothilone B, diflomotecan, dolasetron, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride; ED-71, efalizumab, efaproxiral sodium, EKB-569, eletriptan, EMD-72000, enfuvirtide, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, etoricoxib; Fampridine, ferumoxytol, fondaparinux sodium; Gadofosveset sodium, gastrazole, gefitinib, gemtuzumab ozogamicin, gepirone hydrochloride glutamine; hLM609, HSPPC-96, human insulin; IDD-1, imatinib mesylate, indisulam, inhaled insulin, ixabepilone; Keratinocyte growth factor; Lapatinib, laquinimod, LDP-02, LE-SN38, levetiracetam, levosimendan, licofelone, liposomal doxorubicin, liposomal NDDP, lopinavir, lumiracoxib, LY-156735; Morphine hydrochloride, morphine-6-glucuronide, motexafin gadolinium, MS-27-275, MVA-5T4, MVA-Muc1-IL-2; Nemifitide ditriflutate, neridronic acid nitronaproxen, NSC-683864, NSC-703940, NVP-LAF-237; Oblimersen sodium, ocinaplon, oncomyc-NG, OPC-28326, ortataxel, ospemifene; Palonosetron hydrochloride, PEG-filgrastim peginterferon alfa-2(a), peginterferon alfa-2b, pegsunercept, pemetrexed disodium, pregabalin, prilocaine, pyridoxamine; RDP

  20. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-04-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity. prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: ABX-IL-8, Acclaim, adalimumab, AGI-1067, alagebrium chloride, alemtuzumab, Alequel, Androgel, anti-IL-12 MAb, AOD-9604, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Biphasic insulin aspart, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, bovine lactoferrin, brivudine; Cantuzumab mertansine, CB-1954, CDB-4124, CEA-TRICOM, choriogonadotropin alfa, cilansetron, CpG-10101, CpG-7909, CTL-102, CTL-102/CB-1954; DAC:GRF, darbepoetin alfa, davanat-1, decitabine, del-1 Genemedicine, dexanabinol, dextofisopam, dnaJP1, dronedarone hydrochloride, dutasteride; Ecogramostim, eletriptan, emtricitabine, EPI-hNE-4, eplerenone, eplivanserin fumarate, erlotinib hydrochloride, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, esomeprazole magnesium, etoricoxib, ezetimibe; Falecalcitriol, fingolimod hydrochloride; Gepirone hydrochloride; HBV-ISS, HSV-2 theracine, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, Indiplon, insulin glargine, ISAtx-247; L612 HuMAb, levodopa/carbidopa/entacapone, lidocaine/prilocaine, LL-2113AD, lucinactant, LY-156735; Meclinertant, metelimumab, morphine hydrochloride, morphine-6-glucuronide; Natalizumab, nimotuzumab, NX-1207, NYVAC-HIV C; Omalizumab, onercept, osanetant; PABA, palosuran sulfate, parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), parecoxib sodium, PBI-1402, PCK-3145, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, pemetrexed disodium, pimecrolimus, PINC, pregabalin; Ramelteon, rasagiline mesilate, rasburicase, rimonabant hydrochloride, RO-0098557, rofecoxib, rosiglitazone maleate/metformin hydrochloride; Safinamide mesilate, SHL-749, sitaxsentan sodium, sparfosic acid, SprayGel, squalamine, St. John's Wort

  1. Aphasia in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Kertesz, Andrew

    1983-01-01

    Aphasia is a central language impairment with word finding and comprehension deficit and paraphasias. The highlights of the essential language tests and the classification based on a scorable assessment are presented. The clinical syndromes of Broca's, global, Wernicke, conduction, anomic and transcortical aphasias are detailed with definition, localization, and prognosis. Modality specific disorders associated with aphasic syndromes are discussed. The management of the aphasic patient, consisting of informed support and coordination of available services, is often the responsibility of the family physician. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:21286589

  2. Gorham's disease: clinical case☆

    PubMed Central

    Sá, Pedro; Marques, Pedro; Oliveira, Carolina; Rodrigues, André Sá; Amorim, Nelson; Pinto, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Gorham's disease, also known as idiopathic massive osteolysis, is a rare pathological condition characterized by vascular proliferation that results in destruction and reabsorption of the bone matrix, of unknown etiology. It was first described by Jackson in 1838, but it was Gorham and Stout, in 1955, who defined this disease as a specific entity. It has variable clinical presentation and generally has progressive behavior. Controversy continues regarding the treatment and there is no standard treatment. This pathological condition generally presents a favorable prognosis. Here, a case of Gorham's disease with involvement of the left hip is presented, in a male patient without relevant antecedents. PMID:26229923

  3. Likelihood and clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Hill, G; Forbes, W; Kozak, J; MacNeill, I

    2000-03-01

    The history of the application of statistical theory to the analysis of clinical trials is reviewed. The current orthodoxy is a somewhat illogical hybrid of the original theory of significance tests of Edgeworth, Karl Pearson, and Fisher, and the subsequent decision theory approach of Neyman, Egon Pearson, and Wald. This hegemony is under threat from Bayesian statisticians. A third approach is that of likelihood, stemming from the work of Fisher and Barnard. This approach is illustrated using hypothetical data from the Lancet articles by Bradford Hill, which introduced clinicians to statistical theory. PMID:10760630

  4. [Rickettsiosis: a clinical approach].

    PubMed

    Boillat, N; Greub, G

    2007-05-16

    Rickettsiosis are zoonotic diseases transmitted to humans by arthropods. Prevalence of imported disease increases in parallel to the frequency of international travel. Clinical presentation is characterised by fever, headache and rash. Delay in the initiation of an antibiotic treatment efficient on Rickettsia spp. may have fatal impact on evolution. Serology is the more widely used diagnostic test. However, it only provides retrospective diagnosis. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunohistochemistry may provide early diagnosis. Doxycyclin is the first-line treatment and should be given empirically as soon as a rickettsial disease is suspected. PMID:17585624

  5. Clinical applications of angiocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodge, H. T.; Sandler, H.

    1974-01-01

    Several tables are presented giving left ventricular (LV) data for normal patients and patients with heart disease of varied etiologies, pointing out the salient features. Graphs showing LV pressure-volume relationships (compliance) are presented and discussed. The method developed by Rackley et al. (1964) for determining left ventricular mass in man is described, and limitations to the method are discussed. Some clinical methods for determining LV oxygen consumption are briefly described, and the relation of various abnormalities of ventricular performance to coronary artery disease and ischemic heart disease is characterized.

  6. Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... RDCRN? Aims of the Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network Contact Us RDCRN Members Login Accessibility Disclaimer The Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network is an initiative of the Office of Rare ...

  7. Are Clinical Studies for You?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page > Participate in Clinical Studies If you are thinking about participating in a Clinical Study at NIH, ... medical care and activities of daily living. In thinking about the risks of research, it is helpful ...

  8. AIDS Clinical Trials Group Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... Center Statistical and Data Management Center Glossaries Sites Clinical Trials About the Trial Process Trials Open to Enrollment Recent Study Results Access to Published Data Clinical Trials Resources Committees Executive Scientific Resource Community General Information ...

  9. Gaining approval for clinical research.

    PubMed

    Cobb, Vanessa; Srinivasan, Neil; Lambiase, Pier

    2016-07-01

    Set-up and delivery of a clinical research project can be complicated and difficult. This article introduces the regulatory processes involved in gaining approval for clinical research and discusses the obstacles that may be encountered. PMID:27388381

  10. American Society of Clinical Oncology

    MedlinePlus

    ... Profiling Utilization Registry (TAPUR) Study is a non-randomized clinical trial aiming to describe the performance of ... Profiling Utilization Registry (TAPUR) Study is a non-randomized clinical trial aiming to describe the performance of ...

  11. Clinical Issues-March 2016.

    PubMed

    Burlingame, Byron L; Chambers, Kerrie

    2016-03-01

    Increasing ambient room temperature Key words: OR temperature, core temperature, unplanned hypothermia, ambient room temperature, thermoregulation. Clinical alarm management Key words: alarm fatigue, clinical alarms, alert alarms. PMID:26924373

  12. Glycemic variability: Clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Satya Krishna, Surabhi Venkata; Kota, Sunil K.; Modi, Kirtikumar D.

    2013-01-01

    Glycemic control and its benefits in preventing microvascular diabetic complications are convincingly proved by various prospective trials. Diabetes control and complications trial (DCCT) had reported variable glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) as a cause of increased microvascular complications in conventional glycemic control group versus intensive one. However, in spite of several indirect evidences, its link with cardiovascular events or macrovascular complications is still not proved. Glycemic variability (GV) is one more tool to explain relation between hyperglycemia and increased cardiovascular risk in diabetic patients. In fact GV along with fasting blood sugar, postprandial blood sugar, HbA1C, and quality of life has been proposed to form glycemic pentad, which needs to be considered in diabetes management. Postprandial spikes in blood glucose as well as hypoglycemic events, both are blamed for increased cardiovascular events in Type 2 diabetics. GV includes both these events and hence minimizing GV can prevent future cardiovascular events. Modern diabetes management modalities including improved sulfonylureas, glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-based therapy, newer basal insulins, and modern insulin pumps address the issue of GV effectively. This article highlights mechanism, clinical implications, and measures to control GV in clinical practice. PMID:23961476

  13. Naltrexone: its clinical utility.

    PubMed

    Ginzburg, H M

    Naltrexone is a long-acting orally-administered opioid antagonist that has demonstrated clinical utility as an adjunct in the outpatient treatment of opioid abuse. Naltrexone can be administered on a daily, twice a week or three times a week regimen, based on the clinical needs of the patient, and the therapeutic goals of the patient and therapist. Because naltrexone is unscheduled under the Controlled Substances Act, any licensed physician can prescribe this drug. This decentralized therapeutic approach for the highly motivated patient permits a ready separation between the patient's drug using friends and his or her current activities. The patients most likely to benefit from naltrexone therapy are employed, married, stabilized on low-dose methadone prior to detoxification, or detoxified from their opioid dependency 7 or more days previously, and are highly motivated to be maintained on a nonopioid chemotherapeutic agent. Naltrexone does not cure dependency. It does assist clinicians in dealing with the medical, psychological and economic problems associated with primary opioid abuse. Naltrexone will work well only when it is part of a larger therapeutic regimen which is tailored to the individual needs of the patient. PMID:3832903

  14. Thiamin in Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Frank, Laura L

    2015-07-01

    Thiamin is a water-soluble vitamin also known as vitamin B1. Its biologically active form, thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP), is a cofactor in macronutrient metabolism. In addition to its coenzyme roles, TPP plays a role in nerve structure and function as well as brain metabolism. Signs and symptoms of thiamin deficiency (TD) include lactic acidosis, peripheral neuropathy, ataxia, and ocular changes (eg, nystagmus). More advanced symptoms include confabulation and memory loss and/or psychosis, resulting in Wernicke's encephalopathy and/or Wernicke's Korsakoff syndrome, respectively. The nutrition support clinician should be aware of patients who may be at risk for TD. Risk factors include those patients with malnutrition due to 1 or more nutrition-related etiologies: decreased nutrient intake, increased nutrient losses, or impaired nutrient absorption. Clinical scenarios such as unexplained heart failure or lactic acidosis, renal failure with dialysis, alcoholism, starvation, hyperemesis gravidarum, or bariatric surgery may increase the risk for TD. Patients who are critically ill and require nutrition support may also be at risk for TD, especially those who are given intravenous dextrose void of thiamin repletion. Furthermore, understanding thiamin's role as a potential therapeutic agent for diabetes, some inborn errors of metabolism, and neurodegenerative diseases warrants further research. This tutorial describes the absorption, digestion, and metabolism of thiamin. Issues pertaining to thiamin in clinical practice will be described, and evidence-based practice suggestions for the prevention and treatment of TD will be discussed. PMID:25564426

  15. Constructing clinical science.

    PubMed

    Gaspare de Santo, Natale; Bisaccia, Carmela; Cirillo, Massimo; Salvatore de Santo, Luca; Richet, Gabriel

    2005-01-01

    Clinical practice became clinical science in the years 1720-1820. There were many reasons for this transformation. The discoveries by Santorio Santorio, William Harvey, Marcello Malpighi, Giovanni Alfonso Borelli, Lorenzo Bellini, Thomas Sydenham, Giovanni Maria Lancisi, were perceived by students who asked for changes in the medical curriculum. In 1761 Morgagni centered the study of diseases on morbid anatomy, a way to control at autopsy the validity of diagnosis. J.P. Frank who worked on public health and John Locke who supported a method of scientific reasoning based on asking questions were also instrumental for changes. Hospitals, formerly hospices for the poor, became places for curing and healing. Military hospitals represented models to be followed. In Vienna Marie Therese inaugurated the Allegemein Krankenhaus in 1785. In revolutionary France Fourcroy with the law Frimaire An III, 1794 gave a new rationale. Medicine and surgery were unified in the curriculum. Basic sciences were introduced. Dissection became compulsory, practical teaching became the rule. But it was with John Hunter, Domenico Cotugno and P. Joseph Desault that the great advancement was achieved. They were anatomists and therefore they made the knowledge of human body the core of medical curriculum. However experimentation on animals, as well as practical bedside teaching at the hospital also became important. Through their work hospitals and universities were associated in a common goal. PMID:16285082

  16. Biomedical Knowledge and Clinical Expertise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boshuizen, Henny P. A.; Schmidt, Henk G.

    A study examined the application and availability of clinical and biomedical knowledge in the clinical reasoning of physicians as well as possible mechanisms responsible for changes in the organization of clinical and biomedical knowledge in the development from novice to expert. Subjects were 28 students (10 second year, 8 fourth year, and 10…

  17. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-03-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 131I-labetuzumab; Abacavir sulfate, abatacept, adalimumab, ademetionine, adjuvanted influenza vaccine, alefacept, alemtuzumab, amlodipine, amphotericin B, anakinra, aripiprazole, aspirin, axitinib; Betamethasone dipropionate, bevacizumab, biphasic insulin aspart, bortezomib, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, BQ-123; Calcium folinate, canertinib dihydrochloride, carboplatin, carmustine, cetirizine hydrochloride, cetuximab, cholecalciferol, ciclesonide, ciclosporin, cinacalcet hydrochloride, cisplatin, clarithromycin, clofazimine, cold-adapted influenza vaccine trivalent, CpG-7909; Darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin hydrobromide, DB-289, desloratadine, Dexamet, dicycloverine hydrochloride, dimethyl fumarate, docetaxel, dolastatin 10, drospirenone, drospirenone/estradiol, duloxetine hydrochloride; Ecogramostim, edotecarin, efaproxiral sodium, enalapril maleate, epoetin beta, epoprostenol sodium, epratuzumab, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, estradiol, etanercept; Fluconazole, fludarabine phosphate, fluorouracil; Gefitinib, gemcitabine, Ghrelin (human), glibenclamide, glimepiride, GTI-2040; Haloperidol, human insulin, hydrocortisone probutate; Imatinib mesylate, indisulam, influenza vaccine, inhaled insulin, insulin aspart, insulin glulisine, insulin lispro, irinotecan, ispronicline; Lamivudine, lamivudine/zidovudine/abacavir sulfate, lapatinib, letrozole, levocetirizine, lomustine, lonafarnib, lumiracoxib;Magnesium sulfate, MD-1100, melphalan, metformin hydrochloride, methotrexate, metoclopramide hydrochloride, mitiglinide calcium hydrate, monophosphoryl lipid A, montelukast sodium, motexafin gadolinium

  18. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2008-09-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com.This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: ABT-263, AC-2307, Aclidinium bromide, Adefovir dipivoxil, ADH-1, Agatolimod sodium, Alefacept, Aliskiren fumarate, Aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, Anakinra, Apaziquone, Aprepitant, Aripiprazole, ASM-8, Atiprimod hydrochloride, AVE-0277, AVE-1642, AVE-8062, Axitinib, Azacitidine, AZD-0530; Bazedoxifene acetate, Bevacizumab, Bexarotene, BI-2536, Biphasic insulin aspart, BMS-387032, BMS-663513, Bortezomib, BQ-123, Brivanib alaninate, BSI-201; Caspofungin acetate, CDX-110, Cetuximab, Ciclesonide, CR-011, Cypher; Daptomycin, Darbepoetin alfa, Dasatinib, Decitabine, Deferasirox, Denosumab, Dexlansoprazole, Dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride, DNA-Hsp65 vaccine, Dovitinib, Drotrecogin alfa (activated), DTaP-HBV-IPV/Hibvaccine, DTaP-IPV-HB-PRP-T, Duloxetine hydrochloride, Dutasteride; Ecogramostim, Elacytarabine, Emtricitabine, Endothelin, Entecavir, Eplivanserin fumarate, Escitalopram oxalate, Everolimus, Ezetimibe, Ezetimibe/simvastatin; Farletuzumab, Fesoterodine fumarate, Fibrin sealant (human), Fulvestrant; Gefitinib, Gemtuzumab ozogamicin, Glufosfamide, GSK-1562902A; Hib-TT; Imatinib mesylate, IMC-11F8, Imidazoacridinone, IMP-321, INCB-18424, Indiplon, Indisulam, INNO-406, Irinotecan hydrochloride/Floxuridine, ITF-2357, Ixabepilone; KRN-951; Lasofoxifene tartrate; Lenalidomide, LGD-4665, Lonafarnib, Lubiprostone, Lumiliximab; MDX-1100, Melan-A/MART-1/gp100/IFN-alfa, Methyl-CDDO, Metreleptin, MLN-2704, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Na-ASP-2, Naproxcinod, Nilotinib hydrochloride monohydrate, NPI-2358; Oblimersen sodium, Odanacatib; Paclitaxel nanoparticles, PAN-811, Panobinostat, PBI-1402, PC-515, Peginterferon alfa

  19. Cannabinoids in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Williamson, E M; Evans, F J

    2000-12-01

    Cannabis has a potential for clinical use often obscured by unreliable and purely anecdotal reports. The most important natural cannabinoid is the psychoactive tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC); others include cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabigerol (CBG). Not all the observed effects can be ascribed to THC, and the other constituents may also modulate its action; for example CBD reduces anxiety induced by THC. A standardised extract of the herb may be therefore be more beneficial in practice and clinical trial protocols have been drawn up to assess this. The mechanism of action is still not fully understood, although cannabinoid receptors have been cloned and natural ligands identified. Cannabis is frequently used by patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) for muscle spasm and pain, and in an experimental model of MS low doses of cannabinoids alleviated tremor. Most of the controlled studies have been carried out with THC rather than cannabis herb and so do not mimic the usual clincal situation. Small clinical studies have confirmed the usefulness of THC as an analgesic; CBD and CBG also have analgesic and antiinflammatory effects, indicating that there is scope for developing drugs which do not have the psychoactive properties of THC. Patients taking the synthetic derivative nabilone for neurogenic pain actually preferred cannabis herb and reported that it relieved not only pain but the associated depression and anxiety. Cannabinoids are effective in chemotherapy-induced emesis and nabilone has been licensed for this use for several years. Currently, the synthetic cannabinoid HU211 is undergoing trials as a protective agent after brain trauma. Anecdotal reports of cannabis use include case studies in migraine and Tourette's syndrome, and as a treatment for asthma and glaucoma. Apart from the smoking aspect, the safety profile of cannabis is fairly good. However, adverse reactions include panic or anxiety attacks, which are worse in the elderly and in women, and less

  20. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-10-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issues focuses on the following selection of drugs: (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate, (-)-gossypol, 2-deoxyglucose, 3,4-DAP, 7-monohydroxyethylrutoside; Ad5CMV-p53, adalimumab, adefovir dipivoxil, ADH-1, alemtuzumab, aliskiren fumarate, alvocidib hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, amrubicin hydrochloride, AN-152, anakinra, anecortave acetate, antiasthma herbal medicine intervention, AP-12009, AP-23573, apaziquone, aprinocarsen sodium, AR-C126532, AR-H065522, aripiprazole, armodafinil, arzoxifene hydrochloride, atazanavir sulfate, atilmotin, atomoxetine hydrochloride, atorvastatin, avanafil, azimilide hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, biphasic insulin aspart, BMS-214662, BN-83495, bortezomib, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B; Caspofungin acetate, cetuximab, chrysin, ciclesonide, clevudine, clofarabine, clopidogrel, CNF-1010, CNTO-328, CP-751871, CX-717, Cypher; Dapoxetine hydrochloride, darifenacin hydrobromide, dasatinib, deferasirox, dextofisopam, dextromethorphan/quinidine sulfate, diclofenac, dronedarone hydrochloride, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; Edaravone, efaproxiral sodium, emtricitabine, entecavir, eplerenone, epratuzumab, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, etoricoxib, ezetimibe, ezetimibe/simvastatin; Finrozole, fipamezole hydrochloride, fondaparinux sodium, fulvestrant; Gabapentin enacarbil, gaboxadol, gefitinib, gestodene, ghrelin (human); Human insulin, human papillomavirus vaccine; Imatinib mesylate, immunoglobulin intravenous (human), indiplon, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, insulin glulisine, intranasal insulin, istradefylline, i.v. gamma

  1. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-01-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate; ACP-103, Ad.Egr.TNF.11 D, adalimumab, AF-IL 12, AIDSVAX gp120 B/B, alefacept, alemtuzumab, a-Galactosylceramide, ALVAC vCP 1452, alvimopan hydrate, alvocidib hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, anakinra, anidulafungin, antarelix, aprepitant, aripiprazole, arsenic sulfide, asoprisnil, atazanavir sulfate, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, bimatoprost, BMS-184476, bortezomib, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, BrachySil, brivudine; Caffeine, calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, cannabidiol, capsaicin for injection, caspofungin acetate, CC-4047, cetuximab, CGP-36742, clofazimine, CpG-7909, Cypher; Darbepoetin alfa, dextromethorphan/quinidine sulfate, dimethylfumarate, dronabinol/cannabidiol, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; Ecogramostim, efalizumab, eletriptan, emtricitabine, enfuvirtide, eplerenone, esomeprazole magnesium, estradiol acetate, eszopiclone, etoricoxib, exenatide, ezetimibe, ezetimibe/simvastatin; Fampridine, fondaparinux sodium, fosamprenavir calcium; Gefitinib, GPI-0100; hA 20, HTU-PA, human insulin, HuOKT 3 gamma 1(Ala 234-Ala 235), hyaluronic acid; Icatibant, imatinib mesylate, Indiplon, INKP-100, INKP-102, iodine (I131) tositumomab, istradefylline, IV gamma-globulin, ivabradine hydrochloride, ixabepilone; Lacosamide, landiolol, lanthanum carbonate, lasofoxifene tartrate, LB-80380, lenalidomide, lidocaine/tetracaine, linezolid, liposomal doxorubicin, liposomal vincristine sulfate, lopinavir, lopinavir/ritonavir, lumiracoxib, lurtotecan; Maribavir, morphine glucuronide, MVA-5 T

  2. Genetic and Mechanistic Evaluation for the Mixed-Field Agglutination in B3 Blood Type with IVS3+5G>A ABO Gene Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei-Ting; Sun, Chien-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Background The ABO blood type B3 is the most common B subtype in the Chinese population with a frequency of 1/900. Although IVS3+5G>A (rs55852701) mutation of B gene has been shown to associate with the development of B3 blood type, genetic and mechanistic evaluation for the unique mixed-field agglutination phenotype has not yet been completely addressed. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we analyzed 16 cases of confirmed B3 individuals and found that IVS3+5G>A attributes to all cases of B3. RT-PCR analyses revealed the presence of at least 7 types of aberrant B3 splicing transcripts with most of the transcripts causing early termination and producing non-functional protein during translation. The splicing transcript without exon 3 that was predicted to generate functional B3 glycosyltransferase lacking 19 amino acids at the N-terminal segment constituted only 0.9% of the splicing transcripts. Expression of the B3 cDNA with exon 3 deletion in the K562 erythroleukemia cells revealed that the B3 glycosyltransferase had only 40% of B1 activity in converting H antigen to B antigen. Notably, the typical mixed-field agglutination of B3-RBCs can be mimicked by adding anti-B antibody to the K562-B3 cells. Conclusions/Significance This study thereby demonstrates that both aberrant splicing of B transcripts and the reduced B3 glycosyltransferase activity contribute to weak B expression and the mixed-field agglutination of B3, adding to the complexity for the regulatory mechanisms of ABO gene expression. PMID:22624005

  3. [Nomegestrol acetate: clinical pharmacology].

    PubMed

    Lello, S

    2009-10-01

    Progestogens are used in clinical practice in some conditions. Their effects depend on their chemical structure, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, with important differences among various progestogens. Generally, progestins are classified according to their parent molecule, of which often they keep some features. Derivatives of 19-nor-progesterone are characterized by high selectivity of action on progestin receptor. In particular, nomegestrol acetate (NomAc) shows an important progestational potency, neutral gluco-lipid profile, and antigonadotropic activity. It is used for treating menstrual cycle disorders and for hormone replacement therapy in menopause in association with an estrogen. In future, thanks to its antigonadotropic activity, NomAc will be used in estroprogestin combinations in fertile women, thus taking advantage of its tolerability profile and obtaining numerous non-contraceptive benefits as well. PMID:19749678

  4. Possession: a clinical enigma

    PubMed Central

    Gadit, Amin

    2011-01-01

    This is a case of a 21-year-old lady who presented with history of episodes where she would display extraordinary strength while becoming aggressive towards her family members, speak in foreign language and display bizarre behaviour. The episode would last for 15–20 min and would resolve spontaneously. She would always claim amnesia for the event. This would remain irritable in the intervening period. The frequency of such episodes is at least three times a week. The family members took her to several faith healers with no improvement in her condition. On the suggestion of a family friend, the patient was brought in for consultation in the psychiatric clinic. The patient remained a diagnostic dilemma though there has been some reduction in intensity of such episodes on psychotropic medication. Unfortunately, there is no remission in episodes. PMID:22701065

  5. Clinical pharmacokinetics of anticonvulsants.

    PubMed

    Hvidberg, E F; Dam, M

    1976-01-01

    Anticonvulsant therapy was among the first areas to benefit from clinical pharmacokinetic studies. The most important advantage is that the frequent interindividual variation in the plasma level/dose ratio for these drugs can be circumvented by plasma level monitoring. For several anticonvulsants the brain concentration is shown to parallel the plasma concentration. Phenytoin (diphenylhydantoin) is stil the most important anticonvulsant and the one for which kinetics have been thoroughly investigated in man. These investigations have revealed several reasons for the wellknown difficulties in using this drug clinically. The absorption rate and fraction are very much dependent on the pharmaceutical preparation, and changes of brand may alter the plasma level of phenytoin in spite of unaltered dose. The elimination capacity is saturable causing dose dependent kinetics, which again means disproportional changes in plasma level with changes in dose. Great individual variations exist in the rate of metabolism, and several pharmacokinetic drug interactions are known. As an optimum therapeutic plasma concentration range has been established monitoring plasma levels must be strongly advocated. Interpretation of plasma levels in uraemic patients must take into account decreased protein binding of the drug. Carbamazepine is probably as effective as phenytoin. The elimination is a first order process, but the rate of metabolism increases after a few weeks' treatment. An active metabolite (epoxide) may be the cause of some side-effects. Combined treatment with other anticonvulsant drugs decreases the half-life and more frequent dosing may be necessary. An optimum therapeutic concentration range has been suggested and plasma monitoring is advocated, along with that of the active metabolite, the epoxide. Phenobarbitone is still much used but its kinetics have been investigated to a lesser extent. The main problem is the variability in the rate of elimination. In children the half

  6. [Osteoporosis: a clinical perspective].

    PubMed

    Matikainen, Niina

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is defined by decreased bone density and microarchitectural deterioration that predispose to fragility fractures. The WHO diagnostic criteria of osteoporosis require bone densitometry but treatment is possible on the basis of high clinical fracture risk and can be assessed by the FRAX risk algorithm. All those subject to fracture risk should be advised about proper basic treatment of osteoporosis, including exercise, prevention of falls, smoking cessation, avoidance of alcohol intake, and dietary or supplemental abundance of calcium and vitamin D. Underlying diseases must be studied after diagnosis of osteoporosis even if treatment is initiated without densitometry. When indicated, specific osteoporosis therapy includes bisphosphonates, denosumab, teriparatide, strontium ranelate or SERMs. In hypogonadism, gonadal steroids may be indicated alone or in addition to a specific treatment. Treatment effect and continuation are assessed after 2 to 5 years. PMID:27400591

  7. Neurogenic neuroprotection: clinical perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, Mauricio; Fonoff, Erich Talamoni; Bor-Seng-Shu, Edson; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Chadi, Gerson

    2012-01-01

    Summary Neurogenic neuroprotection is a promising approach for treating patients with ischemic brain lesions. In rats, stimulation of the deep brain nuclei has been shown to reduce the volume of focal infarction. In this context, protection of neural tissue can be a rapid intervention that has a relatively long-lasting effect, making fastigial nucleus stimulation (FNS) a potentially valuable method for clinical application. Although the mechanisms of neuroprotection induced by FNS remain partially unclear, important data have been presented in the last two decades. A 1-h electrical FNS reduced, by 59%, infarctions triggered by permanent occlusion of the middle cerebral artery in Fisher rats. The acute effect of electrical FNS is likely mediated by a prolonged opening of potassium channels, and the sustained effect appears to be linked to inhibition of the apoptotic cascade. A better understanding of the neuronal circuitry underlying neurogenic neuroprotection may contribute to improving neurological outcomes in ischemic brain insults. PMID:23597434

  8. Clinical echocardiography - an overview.

    PubMed Central

    Lalani, A. V.; Lee, S. J.

    1976-01-01

    Echocardiography is a new diagnostic technique for noninvasive assessment of the size, structure and function of the heart, using pulsed ultrasound. The physical principles underlying the generation of the ultrasonic signal for diagnostic use and the three modes (A, B and M) of displaying the reflected "echo" signal are briefly discussed. A full echographic study of the heart includes evaluation of the dimensions and patterns of movement of its various structures and chambers. The normal anatomic relations and echographic appearances of these structures and the changes they undergo in some of the more commonly recognized clinical conditions are described. Assessment of output and contractile behaviour of the left ventricle and recognition of various congenital heart defects are two of the more recent applications of this technique. Two-dimensional sector and multiscanning devices permit several areas of the heart to be visualized simultaneously in "real time". Images FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 FIG. 7 FIG. 8 FIG. 9 FIG. 10 PMID:130201

  9. [Anamnesis and clinical examination].

    PubMed

    Grüne, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Anamnesis and clinical examination are the key functions of medical doctors to reveal the health problems of their patients. The correct assessment and handoff of these informations are the preconditions for a specific and cost saving diagnostic and therapy. The handoff can be made orally, in written form analogue or digital. The examination and documentation should be conducted in the order specified for every patient to avoid mistakes. New digital programs help to reach this aim but absorb the time of the medical doctor and depart him from the patients. Nurses and medical doctors should perform the rounds together for a mutually acquisition of information. This conduces towards a single-minded and cost-effectively diagnostic and therapy. PMID:26710199

  10. Comfrey: A Clinical Overview

    PubMed Central

    Staiger, Christiane

    2012-01-01

    Comfrey has a centuries-old tradition as a medicinal plant. Today, multiple randomized controlled trials have demonstrated the efficacy and safety of comfrey preparations for the topical treatment of pain, inflammation and swelling of muscles and joints in degenerative arthritis, acute myalgia in the back, sprains, contusions and strains after sports injuries and accidents, also in children aged 3 or 4 and over. This paper provides information on clinical trials and non-interventional studies published on comfrey to date and further literature, substantiating the fact that topical comfrey preparations are a valuable therapy option for the treatment of painful muscle and joint complaints. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:22359388

  11. Insurance in clinical research

    PubMed Central

    Ghooi, Ravindra B.; Divekar, Deepa

    2014-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Sponsors need to pay for management of all serious adverse events suffered by subjects in a clinical trial and to compensate for injuries or deaths related to the trial. This study examines if insurance policies of trials, cover all contingencies that require reimbursement or compensation. Materials and Methods: Insurance policies of trials submitted to Sahyadri Hospitals between January 2013 and December 2013 were studied, with respect to the policy period, the limit of liability, deductibles, and preconditions if any. Results: All the policies studied had some deficiencies, in one respect or the other and none had a provision to pay full compensation if required. Some insurers have put in preconditions that could jeopardize the payment of compensation to subjects. Conclusions: Insurances are complicated documents, and need to be critically examined by the ethics committee before approval of the study documents. PMID:25276622

  12. Clinical Reasoning Terms Included in Clinical Problem Solving Exercises?

    PubMed

    Musgrove, John L; Morris, Jason; Estrada, Carlos A; Kraemer, Ryan R

    2016-05-01

    Background Published clinical problem solving exercises have emerged as a common tool to illustrate aspects of the clinical reasoning process. The specific clinical reasoning terms mentioned in such exercises is unknown. Objective We identified which clinical reasoning terms are mentioned in published clinical problem solving exercises and compared them to clinical reasoning terms given high priority by clinician educators. Methods A convenience sample of clinician educators prioritized a list of clinical reasoning terms (whether to include, weight percentage of top 20 terms). The authors then electronically searched the terms in the text of published reports of 4 internal medicine journals between January 2010 and May 2013. Results The top 5 clinical reasoning terms ranked by educators were dual-process thinking (weight percentage = 24%), problem representation (12%), illness scripts (9%), hypothesis generation (7%), and problem categorization (7%). The top clinical reasoning terms mentioned in the text of 79 published reports were context specificity (n = 20, 25%), bias (n = 13, 17%), dual-process thinking (n = 11, 14%), illness scripts (n = 11, 14%), and problem representation (n = 10, 13%). Context specificity and bias were not ranked highly by educators. Conclusions Some core concepts of modern clinical reasoning theory ranked highly by educators are mentioned explicitly in published clinical problem solving exercises. However, some highly ranked terms were not used, and some terms used were not ranked by the clinician educators. Effort to teach clinical reasoning to trainees may benefit from a common nomenclature of clinical reasoning terms. PMID:27168884

  13. Evidence and Clinical Trials.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Steven N.

    1989-11-01

    This dissertation explores the use of a mathematical measure of statistical evidence, the log likelihood ratio, in clinical trials. The methods and thinking behind the use of an evidential measure are contrasted with traditional methods of analyzing data, which depend primarily on a p-value as an estimate of the statistical strength of an observed data pattern. It is contended that neither the behavioral dictates of Neyman-Pearson hypothesis testing methods, nor the coherency dictates of Bayesian methods are realistic models on which to base inference. The use of the likelihood alone is applied to four aspects of trial design or conduct: the calculation of sample size, the monitoring of data, testing for the equivalence of two treatments, and meta-analysis--the combining of results from different trials. Finally, a more general model of statistical inference, using belief functions, is used to see if it is possible to separate the assessment of evidence from our background knowledge. It is shown that traditional and Bayesian methods can be modeled as two ends of a continuum of structured background knowledge, methods which summarize evidence at the point of maximum likelihood assuming no structure, and Bayesian methods assuming complete knowledge. Both schools are seen to be missing a concept of ignorance- -uncommitted belief. This concept provides the key to understanding the problem of sampling to a foregone conclusion and the role of frequency properties in statistical inference. The conclusion is that statistical evidence cannot be defined independently of background knowledge, and that frequency properties of an estimator are an indirect measure of uncommitted belief. Several likelihood summaries need to be used in clinical trials, with the quantitative disparity between summaries being an indirect measure of our ignorance. This conclusion is linked with parallel ideas in the philosophy of science and cognitive psychology.

  14. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2008-10-01

    Gateways to clinical trials is a guide to the most recent trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity(R), the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: (+)-Dapoxetine hydrochloride, (S)-Tenatoprazole sodium salt monohydrate 19-28z, Acotiamide hydrochloride hydrate, ADV-TK, AE-37, Aflibercept, Albinterferon alfa-2b, Aliskiren fumarate, Asenapine maleate, Axitinib; Bavituximab, Becatecarin, beta-1,3/1,6-Glucan, Bevacizumab, Bremelanotide; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, Casopitant mesylate, Catumaxomab, CDX-110, Cediranib, CMD-193, Cositecan; Darinaparsin, Denosumab, DP-b99, Duloxetine hydrochloride; E75, Ecogramostim, Elacytarabine, EMD-273063, EndoTAG-1, Enzastaurin hydrochloride, Eplerenone, Eribulin mesilate, Esomeprazole magnesium, Etravirine, Everolimus, Ezetimibe; Faropenem daloxate, Febuxostat, Fenretinide; Ghrelin (human); I-131 ch-TNT-1/B, I-131-3F8, Iclaprim, Iguratimod, Iloperidone, Imatinib mesylate, Inalimarev/Falimarev, Indacaterol, Ipilimumab, Iratumumab, Ispinesib mesylate, Ixabepilone; Lapatinib ditosylate, Laquinimod sodium, Larotaxel dehydrate, Linezolid, LOR-2040; Mapatumumab, MKC-1, Motesanib diphosphate, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; NK-012; Olanzapine pamoate, Oncolytic HSV, Ortataxel; Paclitaxel nanoparticles, Paclitaxel poliglumex, Paliperidone palmitate, Panitumumab, Patupilone, PCV-9, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Pertuzumab, Picoplatin, Pimavanserin tartrate, Pimecrolimus, Plerixafor hydrochloride, PM-02734, Poly I:CLC, PR1, Prasugrel, Pregabalin, Progesterone caproate, Prucalopride, Pumosetrag hydrochloride; RAV-12, RB-006, RB-007, Recombinant human erythropoietin alfa, Rimonabant, Romidepsin; SAR-109659, Satraplatin, Sodium butyrate; Tadalafil, Talampanel, Tanespimycin, Tarenflurbil, Tariquidar

  15. Guidelines for School-Based Clinics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Population Options, Washington, DC.

    The school-based clinic is a primary health care facility located within or on the campus of a public school. The suggested requirements for a school-based clinic are enumerated in five sections dealing with: (1) clinic organization; (2) clinic staff; (3) clinic services; (4) clinic recordkeeping and evaluation; and (5) clinic facilities and…

  16. An Opportunity to Bridge the Gap Between Clinical Research and Clinical Practice: Implications for Clinical Training

    PubMed Central

    Hershenberg, Rachel; Drabick, Deborah A. G.; Vivian, Dina

    2013-01-01

    Clinical researchers and clinical practitioners share a goal of increasing the integration of research and clinical practice, which is reflected in an evidence-based practice (EBP) approach to psychology. The EBP framework involves the integration of research findings with clinical expertise and client characteristics, values, and preferences, and consequently provides an important foundation for conducting clinically relevant research, as well as empirically based and clinically sensitive practice. Given the critical role that early training can play in the integration of science and practice and in promoting the future of the field, the present article addresses predoctoral training programs as a context for adopting an EBP approach to clinical work. We address training in the three components of EBP and provide suggestions for curriculum development and practicum training that we hope will contribute to bridging the gap between research and practice. PMID:22642520

  17. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-06-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abiraterone acetate, acyline, adalimumab, adenosine triphosphate, AEE-788, AIDSVAX gp120 B/B, AK-602, alefacept, alemtuzumab, alendronic acid sodium salt, alicaforsen sodium, alprazolam, amdoxovir, AMG-162, aminolevulinic acid hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, aminophylline hydrate, anakinra, anecortave acetate, anti-CTLA-4 MAb, APC-8015, aripiprazole, aspirin, atazanavir sulfate, atomoxetine hydrochloride, atorvastatin calcium, atrasentan, AVE-5883, AZD-2171; Betamethasone dipropionate, bevacizumab, bimatoprost, biphasic human insulin (prb), bortezomib, BR-A-657, BRL-55730, budesonide, busulfan; Calcipotriol, calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, calcium folinate, capecitabine, capravirine, carmustine, caspofungin acetate, cefdinir, certolizumab pegol, CG-53135, chlorambucil, ciclesonide, ciclosporin, cisplatin, clofarabine, clopidogrel hydrogensulfate, clozapine, co-trimoxazole, CP-122721, creatine, CY-2301, cyclophosphamide, cypher, cytarabine, cytolin; D0401, darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin hydrobromide, DASB, desipramine hydrochloride, desloratadine, desvenlafaxine succinate, dexamethasone, didanosine, diquafosol tetrasodium, docetaxel, doxorubicin hydrochloride, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; Ecallantide, efalizumab, efavirenz, eletriptan, emtricitabine, enfuvirtide, enoxaparin sodium, estramustine phosphate sodium, etanercept, ethinylestradiol, etonogestrel, etonogestrel/ethinylestradiol, etoposide, exenatide; Famciclovir, fampridine, febuxostat, filgrastim, fludarabine phosphate, fluocinolone acetonide, fluorouracil, fluticasone propionate

  18. [Clinical autopsy evaluation].

    PubMed

    Sakugawa, H; Saito, A

    1999-01-01

    The hospital autopsy rate in Japan dropped from 63.5 per cent in 1972 to 20.9 per cent in 1995. This reduction is attributable to declining interest by clinicians, surgeons and pathologists. The decline is a very serious problem, because the autopsy contributes to what has been called "quality control" of medical care. However, the method of autopsy should change along with advances in diagnostic technology or various changes in the circumstances surrounding medical practice. The most important problem at present is that autopsies require both time and effort. Delayed autopsy reports by pathologists may result in declined interest by clinicians and thus limit the benefits. To shorten the time delay for autopsy reports, clinicians must clarify their clinical questions concerning the deceased patient so that pathologists can readily identify the patients' problems and determine the causes more promptly, clearly and diplomatically. Other suggestions for improvement include the following: the reports should be simpler; the concept that all autopsies must be complete should be eliminated; a hospital accreditor must emphasize that clinicians intend to gain more precise diagnoses by obtaining post-mortem tissues of various organs using biopsy instruments. In addition, communication between pathologists and clinicians must be active to determine the pathogenesis of disease. PMID:10067363

  19. The clinical encounter revisited.

    PubMed

    Schattner, Ami

    2014-04-01

    The patient-physician encounter is the pivotal starting point of any healthcare delivery, but it is subject to multiple process breakdowns and prevalent suboptimal performance. An overview of the techniques and components of a successful encounter valid for every setting and readily applicable is presented, stressing 7 rules: (1) ensuring optimal environment, tools, and teamwork; (2) viewing each encounter not only as a cognitive/biomedical challenge, but also as a personal one, and a learning opportunity; (3) adopting an attitude of curiosity, concentration, compassion, and commitment, and maintaining a systematic, orderly approach; (4) "simple is beautiful"-making the most of the basic clinical data and their many unique advantages; (5) minding "the silent dimension"-being attentive to the patient's identity and emotions; (6) following the "Holy Trinity" of gathering all information, consulting databases/colleagues, and tailoring gained knowledge to the individual patient; and (7) using the encounter as a "window of opportunity" to further the patient's health-not just the major problem, by addressing screening and prevention; promoting health literacy and shared decision-making; and establishing proper follow-up. Barriers to implementation identified can be overcome by continuous educational interventions. A high-quality encounter sets a virtuous cycle of patient-provider interaction and results in increasing satisfaction, adherence, and improved health outcomes. PMID:24333201

  20. Clinical definition of sarcopenia

    PubMed Central

    Santilli, Valter; Bernetti, Andrea; Mangone, Massimiliano; Paoloni, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Summary Sarcopenia is a condition characterized by loss of skeletal muscle mass and function. Although it is primarily a disease of the elderly, its development may be associated with conditions that are not exclusively seen in older persons. Sarcopenia is a syndrome characterized by progressive and generalized loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength and it is strictly correlated with physical disability, poor quality of life and death. Risk factors for sarcopenia include age, gender and level of physical activity. In conditions such as malignancy, rheumatoid arthritis and aging, lean body mass is lost while fat mass may be preserved or even increased. The loss in muscle mass may be associated with increased body fat so that despite normal weight there is marked weakness, this is a condition called sarcopenic obesity. There is an important correlation between inactivity and losses of muscle mass and strength, this suggests that physical activity should be a protective factor for the prevention but also the management of sarcopenia. Furthermore one of the first step to be taken for a person with sarcopenia or clinical frailty is to ensure that the sarcopenic patient is receiving correct and sufficient nutrition. Sarcopenia has a greater effect on survival. It should be important to prevent or postpone as much as possible the onset of this condition, to enhance survival and to reduce the demand for long-term care. Interventions for sarcopenia need to be developed with most attention on exercise and nutritional interventions. PMID:25568649

  1. Pediatric DXA: clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Sparke, Paul; Henwood, Maria J.

    2007-01-01

    Normal bone mineral accrual requires adequate dietary intake of calcium, vitamin D and other nutrients; hepatic and renal activation of vitamin D; normal hormone levels (thyroid, parathyroid, reproductive and growth hormones); and neuromuscular functioning with sufficient stress upon the skeleton to induce bone deposition. The presence of genetic or acquired diseases and the therapies that are used to treat them can also impact bone health. Since the introduction of clinical DXA in pediatrics in the early 1990s, there has been considerable investigation into the causes of low bone mineral density (BMD) in children. Pediatricians have also become aware of the role adequate bone mass accrual in childhood has in preventing osteoporotic fractures in late adulthood. Additionally, the availability of medications to improve BMD has increased with the development of bisphosphonates. These factors have led to the increased utilization of DXA in pediatrics. This review summarizes much of the previous research regarding BMD in children and is meant to assist radiologists and clinicians with DXA utilization and interpretation. PMID:17431606

  2. [The geriatric university clinic].

    PubMed

    Stähelin, H B

    1995-01-01

    The very old are the fastest growing population group. Medical progress allows more autonomy and better quality of life for the elderly. Traditional medical concepts are, however, only partly suited for dealing with age-associated problems. Medical education responds to these new requirements in a limited way. Interdisciplinary teamwork is a prerequisite in treating the multimorbid, acutely ill elderly patient. The task of the university is not only the development and implementation of high-tech medicine, but first of all a comprehensive training in medicine, including geriatrics. The Geriatric University Clinic therefore offers pre- and postgraduate training in geriatrics, but also in related disciplines by promoting teaching and research. In order to attain these goals, the geriatric acute ward was created for acutely ill, very old, multimorbid, frail elderly patients. A geriatric ward for rehabilitation complements this ward. A consultation service offers geriatric know-how to all other services. A special task is the early diagnosis and treatment of dementia in an outpatient service. The aim is to prevent chronification by early intervention and to reestablish satisfactory function and autonomy. PMID:7780809

  3. Clinical Practice. Postmenopausal Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Black, Dennis M; Rosen, Clifford J

    2016-01-21

    Key Clinical Points Postmenopausal Osteoporosis Fractures and osteoporosis are common, particularly among older women, and hip fractures can be devastating. Treatment is generally recommended in postmenopausal women who have a bone mineral density T score of -2.5 or less, a history of spine or hip fracture, or a Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX) score indicating increased fracture risk. Bisphosphonates (generic) and denosumab reduce the risk of hip, nonvertebral, and vertebral fractures; bisphosphonates are commonly used as first-line treatment in women who do not have contraindications. Teriparatide reduces the risk of nonvertebral and vertebral fractures. Osteonecrosis of the jaw and atypical femur fractures have been reported with treatment but are rare. The benefit-to-risk ratio for osteoporosis treatment is strongly positive for most women with osteoporosis. Because benefits are retained after discontinuation of alendronate or zoledronic acid, drug holidays after 5 years of alendronate therapy or 3 years of zoledronic acid therapy may be considered for patients at lower risk for fracture. PMID:26789873

  4. Cherubism: best clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Cherubism is a skeletal dysplasia characterized by bilateral and symmetric fibro-osseous lesions limited to the mandible and maxilla. In most patients, cherubism is due to dominant mutations in the SH3BP2 gene on chromosome 4p16.3. Affected children appear normal at birth. Swelling of the jaws usually appears between 2 and 7 years of age, after which, lesions proliferate and increase in size until puberty. The lesions subsequently begin to regress, fill with bone and remodel until age 30, when they are frequently not detectable. Fibro-osseous lesions, including those in cherubism have been classified as quiescent, non-aggressive and aggressive on the basis of clinical behavior and radiographic findings. Quiescent cherubic lesions are usually seen in older patients and do not demonstrate progressive growth. Non-aggressive lesions are most frequently present in teenagers. Lesions in the aggressive form of cherubism occur in young children and are large, rapidly growing and may cause tooth displacement, root resorption, thinning and perforation of cortical bone. Because cherubism is usually self-limiting, operative treatment may not be necessary. Longitudinal observation and follow-up is the initial management in most cases. Surgical intervention with curettage, contouring or resection may be indicated for functional or aesthetic reasons. Surgical procedures are usually performed when the disease becomes quiescent. Aggressive lesions that cause severe functional problems such as airway obstruction justify early surgical intervention. PMID:22640403

  5. Advances in clinical cardiology.

    PubMed

    McNeice, Andrew H; McAleavey, Neil M; Menown, Ian B A

    2014-08-01

    Multiple, potentially practice-changing cardiology trials have been presented or published over the past year. In this paper, we summarize and place in clinical context, new data regarding management of acute coronary syndrome and ST-elevation myocardial infarction (copeptin assessment, otamixaban, cangrelor, prasugrel, sodium nitrite, inclacumab, ranolazine, preventive coronary intervention of non-culprit lesions, immediate thrombolytic therapy versus transfer for primary intervention), new coronary intervention data (thrombectomy, radial access, pressure wire fractional flow reserve, antiplatelet therapy duration and gene-guidance, permanent and biodegradable polymers, coronary bifurcation and strategies), and coronary artery bypass data (off pump vs. on pump). Latest trials in trans-aortic valve implantation, heart failure (eplerenone, aliskiren, spironolactone, sildenafil, dopamine, nesiritide, omecamtiv mecarbil, the algisyl left ventricular augmentation device, and echo-guided cardiac resynchronization), atrial fibrillation (edoxaban, dabigatran, and ablation), cardiac arrest (hypothermia, LUCAS™ mechanical chest compression), and cardiovascular prevention (vitamins, renal denervation for resistant hypertension, renal artery stenting, saxagliptin, alogliptin, and gastric banding) are also discussed. PMID:25074280

  6. The Dynamo Clinical Trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    2016-04-01

    The Dynamo Clinical Trial evaluates long-term stellar magnetic health through periodic X-ray examinations (by the Chandra Observatory). So far, there are only three subjects enrolled in the DTC: Alpha Centauri A (a solar-like G dwarf), Alpha Cen B (an early K dwarf, more active than the Sun), and Alpha Canis Majoris A (Procyon, a mid-F subgiant similar in activity to the Sun). Of these, Procyon is a new candidate, so it is too early to judge how it will fare. Of the other two, Alpha Cen B has responded well, with a steady magnetic heartbeat of about 8 years duration. The sickest of the bunch, Alpha Cen A, was in magnetic cardiac arrest during 2005-2010, but has begun responding to treatment in recent years, and seems to be successfully cycling again, perhaps achieving a new peak of magnetic health in the 2016 time frame. If this is the case, it has been 20 years since A's last healthful peak, significantly longer than the middle-aged Sun's 11-year magnetic heartbeat, but perhaps in line with Alpha Cen A's more senescent state (in terms of "relative evolutionary age," apparently an important driver of activity). (By the way, don't miss the exciting movie of the Alpha Cen stars' 20-year X-ray dance.)

  7. Clinical definition of sarcopenia.

    PubMed

    Santilli, Valter; Bernetti, Andrea; Mangone, Massimiliano; Paoloni, Marco

    2014-09-01

    Sarcopenia is a condition characterized by loss of skeletal muscle mass and function. Although it is primarily a disease of the elderly, its development may be associated with conditions that are not exclusively seen in older persons. Sarcopenia is a syndrome characterized by progressive and generalized loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength and it is strictly correlated with physical disability, poor quality of life and death. Risk factors for sarcopenia include age, gender and level of physical activity. In conditions such as malignancy, rheumatoid arthritis and aging, lean body mass is lost while fat mass may be preserved or even increased. The loss in muscle mass may be associated with increased body fat so that despite normal weight there is marked weakness, this is a condition called sarcopenic obesity. There is an important correlation between inactivity and losses of muscle mass and strength, this suggests that physical activity should be a protective factor for the prevention but also the management of sarcopenia. Furthermore one of the first step to be taken for a person with sarcopenia or clinical frailty is to ensure that the sarcopenic patient is receiving correct and sufficient nutrition. Sarcopenia has a greater effect on survival. It should be important to prevent or postpone as much as possible the onset of this condition, to enhance survival and to reduce the demand for long-term care. Interventions for sarcopenia need to be developed with most attention on exercise and nutritional interventions. PMID:25568649

  8. Ethics in clinical research.

    PubMed

    Garattini, Silvio; Bertele', Vittorio

    2009-10-01

    R&D of new drugs is driven by pharmaceutical companies that invest considerable amounts of money for this purpose. This may introduce bias, to emphasize the clinical value of drugs to be allowed onto the market. Bias is caused by methodological flaws including the population under study, the choice of inadequate comparators or of their dosage, the adoption of surrogate or composite endpoints, the decision to publish mainly positive findings or to overlook some safety concerns, etc. All this happens in a legal context that requires no added value for new drugs to be approved for the market. This encourages the use of placebo even when active comparators are available, or the search for non-inferiority of new products in comparison with active comparators. Superiority over placebo and non-inferiority to active comparators may allow drugs onto the market that are in fact less active (or safe, tolerable, convenient, etc.) than those already available, usually with consolidated properties and lower costs. In addition, they do not meet patients' or physicians' needs of defining the place in therapy and respective roles of new and available treatments. The current legislative and regulatory setting seems designed to meet commercial interests rather than public health needs. PMID:19664839

  9. Clinical biochemistry of aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    King, S.W.; Savory, J.; Wills, M.R.

    1981-05-01

    Aluminum toxicity has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of clinical disorders in patients with chronic renal failure on long-term intermittent hemodialysis treatment. The predominant disorders have been those involving either bone (osteomalacic dialysis osteodystrophy) or brain (dialysis encephalopathy). In nonuremic patients, an increased brain aluminum concentration has been implicated as a neurotoxic agent in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and was associated with experimental neurofibrillary degeneration in animals. The brain aluminum concentrations of patients dying with the syndrome of dialysis encephalopathy (dialysis dementia) are significantly higher than in dialyzed patients without the syndrome and in nondialyzed patients. Two potential sources for the increased tissue content of aluminum in patients on hemodialysis have been proposed: (1) intestinal absorption from aluminum containing phosphate-binding gels, and (2) transfer across the dialysis membrane from aluminum in the water used to prepare the dialysate. These findings, coupled with our everyday exposure to the ubiquitous occurrence of aluminum in nature, have created concerns over the potential toxicity of this metal.

  10. Clinical management of pruritus.

    PubMed

    Ständer, Sonja; Zeidler, Claudia; Magnolo, Nina; Raap, Ulrike; Mettang, Thomas; Kremer, Andreas E; Weisshaar, Elke; Augustin, Matthias

    2015-02-01

    The care of patients with chronic pruritus as a symptom of a wide variety of underlying diseases continues to confront dermatologists with diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. However, a structured history and a physical examination may already substantially help in narrowing down the number of potential differential diagnoses. Apart form reducing the intensity of pruritus, identification and appropriate treatment of the underlying disease are important needs of patients. If these goals doesn't lead to improvement of itch, current guidelines provide a number of topical and systemic therapies for symptomatic treatment. Various skin lesions (for example, xerosis caused by irritant substances, secondary scratch lesions) prompt patients to consult a dermatologist, but most cases require an interdisciplinary therapeutic approach to identify potential internal medicine, neurologic, or psychosomatic aspects. Although great strides have been made in basic research, specific therapies are still rare, and a precise knowledge of the legal framework for the implementation of guidelines (for example, off-label use) is essential. This CME article gives an overview of the causes of and treatment options for chronic pruritus and discusses both advances in basic research as well as progress in clinical knowledge. PMID:25631127

  11. Overview of Clinical Cytogenetics.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Patrick R; Carroll, Andrew J; Korf, Bruce R

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome analysis is one of the first approaches to genetic testing and remains a key component of genetic analysis of constitutional and somatic genetic disorders. Numerical or unbalanced structural chromosome abnormalities usually lead to multiple congenital anomalies. Sometimes these are compatible with live birth, usually resulting in severe cognitive and physical handicaps; other times they result in miscarriage or stillbirth. Chromosome rearrangements also occur as somatic changes in malignancies. Identification of constitutional chromosomal anomalies (anomalies present in most or all cells of the body and/or the germline) can provide important information for genetic counseling. In this unit, we introduce chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA), which is a relatively recent addition to cytogenetic technologies, and has become the recommended first-tier testing method for patients with developmental delay, intellectual disability, autism, and/or multiple congenital anomalies. We also discuss non-invasive prenatal testing/screening (NIPTS), which uses circulating cell-free fetal DNA (cfDNA) from maternal plasma to rapidly screen for autosomal and sex-chromosome aneuploidies. Cytogenetic analysis of tumors is helpful in diagnosis and in monitoring the effects of treatment. The protocols in this chapter cover the clinical study of chromosomes in nonmalignant tissues. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27037488

  12. Turnaround for the Denver Clinic.

    PubMed

    Norris, M J

    1981-01-01

    By renovating its facility, the Denver Clinic was able to meet the needs of its present patient population and attract new patients. Marketing techniques were employed to redesign the facility and to capitalize on the clinic's competitive edge in the Denver market. Useful information is offered to other clinics who are considering facility renovation and on the advantages group practices have in the medical market plan. PMID:10252836

  13. Modern Management of Clinical Chorioamnionitis

    PubMed Central

    Knuppel, Robert A.

    1995-01-01

    Clinical chorioamnionitis continues to contribute to fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality. Significant advances have been made in the last 20 years in understanding the pathophysiologic processes leading to chorioamnionitis. This review addresses the history, incidence, pathophysiology, host defenses, risk factors, diagnosis, and maternal and neonatal management of clinically evident chorioamnionitis. After a detailed review of the physiologic processes leading to clinical chorioamnionitis and sepsis, we present a modern management scheme designed to optimize perinatal outcome for both mother and fetus. PMID:18476034

  14. Is a clinical sociolinguistics possible?

    PubMed

    Ball, M J

    1992-01-01

    This paper considers the idea of developing a clinical sociolinguistics. Various areas of the field are examined, and the importance of the 'core' area of the correlation of non-linguistic variables with linguistic variables stressed. Issues concerning language and class, region, sex, age and context of utterance are investigated, together with the implications for clinical linguistics. Finally, the difficulty of integrating such issues into clinical assessment is explored, and a tentative step forward suggested along the lines of a 'clinical sociolinguistic checklist'. PMID:20672890

  15. Clinical governance and external audit.

    PubMed

    Glazebrook, S G; Buchanan, J G

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a model of clinical governance that was developed at South Auckland Health during the period 1995 to 2000. Clinical quality and safety are core objectives. A multidisciplinary Clinical Board is responsible for the development and publicising of sound clinical policies together with monitoring the effects of their implementation on quality and safety. The Clinical Board has several committees, including an organization-wide Continuous Quality Improvement Committee to enhance the explicit nature of the quality system in terms of structure, staff awareness and involvement, and to develop the internal audit system. The second stream stems from the Chief Medical Officer and clinical directors in a clinical management sense. The Audit Committee of the Board of Directors covers both clinical and financial audit. The reporting lines back to that committee are described and the role of the external auditor of clinical standards is explained. The aim has been to create a supportive culture where quality initiatives and innovation can flourish, and where the emphasis is not on censure but improvement. PMID:11422717

  16. [Critical reading of clinical trials].

    PubMed

    Aptel, F; Cucherat, M; Blumen-Ohana, E; Denis, P

    2011-12-01

    Clinical trials are playing an increasingly crucial role in modern evidence based medicine, allowing for rigorous scientific evaluation of treatment strategies and validation of patient care. The results of clinical trials often form the rational basis from which physicians draw information used to adapt their therapeutic practices. Critical reading and analysis of trials involves the assessment of whether the available data provide enough credible evidence that the treatment will result in a clinically significant and relevant improvement. Evaluating the quality of a clinical trial is a process that draws upon sometimes complex methodological and statistical concepts, with which the reader should nonetheless be familiar in order to come to impartial conclusions regarding the raw data presented in the clinical trials. The goal of the current article is to review the methodological and statistical concepts required for the design and interpretation of clinical trials, so as to allow for a critical analysis of publications or presentations of clinical trials. The first section describes the major methodological principles of clinical trial design required for a rigorous evaluation of the treatment benefit, as well as the various pitfalls or biases that could lead to erroneous conclusions. The second section briefly describes the main statistical tests used in clinical trials, as well as certain situations that may increase the risk of false positive findings (type 1 error), such as multiple, subgroup, intermediate and non-inferiority analysis. PMID:21992992

  17. Clinical research in allied health.

    PubMed

    Selker, L G

    1994-01-01

    Allied health professionals in nutrition and medical dietetics, occupational therapy, physical therapy, and speech-language pathology and audiology play both unique and key cross-cutting roles in the furtherance of clinical research. Clinical research in nutrition and medical dietetics uniquely focuses on food nutrient intake and the metabolic utilization of nutrients. Clinical research in occupational therapy has a special focus on the relationship of impairment to disability, the adaptation to disability and the maximization of function. Physical therapy clinical research uniquely targets movement dysfunction and its evaluation and treatment within the context of quality and effective care. Clinical research in speech-language pathology and audiology is singular in its focus on deafness and hearing disorders, voice, speech, language and related disorders, and intersections among these and other neurological and physical conditions. Thus, all of these disciplines are making unique contributions to clinical research. Clinical research in these allied health professions is much more than the above specific foci. Inasmuch as these disciplines are rooted in practice, their contributions to research are inherently clinical. Many, if not most, of these contributions represent further validations of clinical practice or its underlying knowledge base. This means that, at a macro level, clinical research in allied health is very much "applied" research. Within allied health clinical research, this emphasis is redoubled at the "person," or individual level, where considerable attention is given to concepts of function and effectiveness. Clinical research in allied health has played a key cross-cutting role through its emphasis on collaboration. Possibly due to their professional maturation within multidisciplinary academic units, allied health professionals have demonstrated a level of comfort with multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary collaborations unique within many

  18. In the Clinic. Smoking Cessation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manish S; Steinberg, Michael B

    2016-03-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of smoking cessation, focusing on health consequences of smoking, prevention of smoking-related disease, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers. PMID:26926702

  19. In the Clinic. Alcohol Use.

    PubMed

    Edelman, E Jennifer; Fiellin, David A

    2016-01-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of alcohol use, focusing on health benefits, harms, prevention, screening, diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers. PMID:26747315

  20. Integrating Academic and Clinical Learning Using a Clinical Swallowing Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Daniel E.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes an experiential learning activity designed to integrate classroom knowledge and a clinical swallowing assessment. Twenty master's-level graduate students in a dysphagia course conducted a clinical swallowing assessment with a resident of an independent retirement community. The exercise was designed to allow students an…

  1. Clinical pharmacokinetics of metformin.

    PubMed

    Graham, Garry G; Punt, Jeroen; Arora, Manit; Day, Richard O; Doogue, Matthew P; Duong, Janna K; Furlong, Timothy J; Greenfield, Jerry R; Greenup, Louise C; Kirkpatrick, Carl M; Ray, John E; Timmins, Peter; Williams, Kenneth M

    2011-02-01

    variants of OCTs and other cation transporters on the pharmacokinetics of metformin appears small and the subsequent effects on clinical response are also limited. However, intersubject differences in the levels of expression of OCT1 and OCT3 in the liver are very large and may contribute more to the variations in the hepatic uptake and clinical effect of metformin. Lactic acidosis is the feared adverse effect of the biguanide drugs but its incidence is very low in patients treated with metformin. We suggest that the mean plasma concentrations of metformin over a dosage interval be maintained below 2.5 mg/L in order to minimize the development of this adverse effect. PMID:21241070

  2. Lasers in clinical ophthalmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Paulo A.

    1992-03-01

    The clinical application of lasers in ophthalmology is schematized, showing for each anatomic eye structure, pathologies that may be treated through this procedure. In the cornea, the unusual laser practice for suture removals and the promising possibility of the excimer laser in refractive surgery are discussed. In the iris, the camerular angle, and the ciliary body, the laser application is essentially used to treat the glaucoma and other situations that are not so frequent. The capsulotomy with YAG LASER is used in the treatment of structures related with crystalline and, at least, the treatment of the retina and choroid pathology is expanded. A. A. explained the primordial interest and important of laser in the diabetic retinopathy treatment and some results in patients with more than 5 years of evolution are: 55 of the patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (RDP) treated for more than 5 years noticed their vision improved or stabilized; 5 years after treating patients with PDR, 49.3 had their vision stabilized or even improved, provided the diabetics had declared itself more than 20 years ago, versus 61.7 provided the diabetics had declared itself less than 20 years before; finally, 53.8 of the patients under 40-years-old when the diabetics was diagnosed, had their vision improved or at least stabilized 5 years after the beginning of the treatment. On the other side, when patients were over 40 years old when the diabetics was diagnosed percentage increased to 55.9. This study was established in the follow-up of 149 cases over 10 years.

  3. Clinical aspects of telemedicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrell, Ronald C.

    1991-01-01

    Communication among physicians is an essential in order to combine our experiences for the elucidation and application of new knowledge and for the accurate and uniform application of established medical practice. This communication requires an adequate understanding of the culture of the patient and the social context of disease and indeed the culture of the physician. Malnutrition in Bangladesh means caloric insufficiency, and a program to lower cholesterol would be impertinent, while a program to enhance the nutrition of patients in Texas by an international effort to import more grain would be ludicrous. In the same vein a public health effort to combat alcoholic cirrhosis in Mecca would be as silly as a program to increase fiber in the diet of the Bantu. Clinical communication must acknowledge the culture of the issue at hand and the differences in the experiential base of the physicians. Not only do geography and culture affect the potential differences in the experiential bases, but the world utilizes very different traditions of education and science in training physicians. We are influenced by the diseases we treat, and learn to look for the expected at least as much as we are attentive to the unexpected. A physician in Siberia would be much more likely to recognize frostbite than one from Buenos Aires, and the Argentine doctor would much more likely consider Chaga's Disease to explain abdominal pain than a colleague in Zurich. Beyond these obvious issues in communication among physicians we must deal with the many languages and idioms used in the world. An overview of using Telemedicine SpaceBridge after the earthquake in the Republic of Armenia in 1988 is presented.

  4. Liver angioscintigraphy: clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Dragoteanu, Mircea; Cotul, Sabin O; Pîgleşan, Cecilia; Tamaş, Stefan

    2004-03-01

    Liver angioscintigraphy (LAS) is a radio-isotope method for the investigation of liver perfusion and its alteration in various hepatic diseases. It measures the arterial and portal venous fractions of total liver blood flow. The percentage of liver blood flow supplied by hepatic artery is estimated mathematically by the hepatic perfusion index (HPI), normally between 25 % and 40 %. The decrease of portal blood flow in liver cirrhosis is compensated ("buffer" mechanisms) by increased arterial supply, with higher HPI value. For a patient with chronic liver disease, HPI over 50% suggests arterialization of hepatic perfusion, guiding the diagnose to liver cirrhosis. Splenic curve is completing the diagnostic information of the hepatic curve. Corroborated with per rectal scintigraphy and liver SPECT, LAS offers a good hemodynamic staging of chronic inflammatory liver diseases. Malignant tumors (primitive or metastases) increase the arterial supply of the liver and decrease the portal flow, HPI being over 50% (currently 65 % - 90 %). Benign tumors do not change portal/arterial liver blood flow ratio. SPECT or non-scintigraphic morphological investigations increase the diagnostic value of LAS for primitive liver tumors. Liver cancer occurring on cirrhosis is a limitative factor for LAS. Hepatic metastases increase the arterial perfusion (and HPI value) very quickly, before their size allows morphologic imaging diagnosis. LAS is therefore an early method to diagnose liver metastases being especially used in colorectal cancer. Other clinical applications of LAS are: follow up of liver toxicity of drugs, evaluation of portal vein permeability, post surgery follow up of the liver tumor patients. PMID:15054528

  5. History of Clinical Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    The emergence of transplantation has seen the development of increasingly potent immunosuppressive agents, progressively better methods of tissue and organ preservation, refinements in histocompatibility matching, and numerous innovations in surgical techniques. Such efforts in combination ultimately made it possible to successfully engraft all of the organs and bone marrow cells in humans. At a more fundamental level, however, the transplantation enterprise hinged on two seminal turning points. The first was the recognition by Billingham, Brent, and Medawar in 1953 that it was possible to induce chimerism-associated neonatal tolerance deliberately. This discovery escalated over the next 15 years to the first successful bone marrow transplantations in humans in 1968. The second turning point was the demonstration during the early 1960s that canine and human organ allografts could self-induce tolerance with the aid of immunosuppression. By the end of 1962, however, it had been incorrectly concluded that turning points one and two involved different immune mechanisms. The error was not corrected until well into the 1990s. In this historical account, the vast literature that sprang up during the intervening 30 years has been summarized. Although admirably documenting empiric progress in clinical transplantation, its failure to explain organ allograft acceptance predestined organ recipients to lifetime immunosuppression and precluded fundamental changes in the treatment policies. After it was discovered in 1992 that long-surviving organ transplant recipients had persistent microchimerism, it was possible to see the mechanistic commonality of organ and bone marrow transplantation. A clarifying central principle of immunology could then be synthesized with which to guide efforts to induce tolerance systematically to human tissues and perhaps ultimately to xenografts. PMID:10833242

  6. Clinical trials of homoeopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Kleijnen, J; Knipschild, P; ter Riet, G

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To establish whether there is evidence of the efficacy of homoeopathy from controlled trials in humans. DESIGN--Criteria based meta-analysis. Assessment of the methodological quality of 107 controlled trials in 96 published reports found after an extensive search. Trials were scored using a list of predefined criteria of good methodology, and the outcome of the trials was interpreted in relation to their quality. SETTING--Controlled trials published world wide. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Results of the trials with the best methodological quality. Trials of classical homoeopathy and several modern varieties were considered separately. RESULTS--In 14 trials some form of classical homoeopathy was tested and in 58 trials the same single homoeopathic treatment was given to patients with comparable conventional diagnosis. Combinations of several homoeopathic treatments were tested in 26 trials; isopathy was tested in nine trials. Most trials seemed to be of very low quality, but there were many exceptions. The results showed a positive trend regardless of the quality of the trial or the variety of homeopathy used. Overall, of the 105 trials with interpretable results, 81 trials indicated positive results whereas in 24 trials no positive effects of homoeopathy were found. The results of the review may be complicated by publication bias, especially in such a controversial subject as homoeopathy. CONCLUSIONS--At the moment the evidence of clinical trials is positive but not sufficient to draw definitive conclusions because most trials are of low methodological quality and because of the unknown role of publication bias. This indicates that there is a legitimate case for further evaluation of homoeopathy, but only by means of well performed trials. PMID:1825800

  7. Clinical management of constipation.

    PubMed

    Lennard-Jones, J E

    1993-10-01

    First, it is important to find out whether the patient is complaining of infrequent defaecation, excessive straining at defaecation, abdominal pain or bloating, a general sense of malaise attributed to constipation, soiling, or a combination of more than one symptom. Second, one must decide if there is a definable abnormality as a cause of the symptom(s). Is the colon apparently normal or is its lumen widened (megacolon)? Is the upper gut normal or is there evidence of neuropathy or myopathy? Is the ano-rectum normal or is there evidence of a weak pelvic floor, mucosal prolapse, major rectocele, an internal intussusception or solitary rectal ulcer? Is there any systemic component such as hypothyroidism, hypercalcaemia, neurological or psychiatric disorder or relevant drug therapy? Choice of treatment will depend on this clinical evaluation. The range of treatments available is: Reassurance and stop current treatment: Patients with a bowel obsession may take laxatives or rectal preparations regularly without need. Increase dietary fibre: Most cases of 'simple' constipation respond to increased dietary fibre, possibly with an added supplement of natural bran. Toilet training and altered routine of life: Young people particularly may need to recognise the call to stool and alter their daily routine to permit and encourage regular defaecation. Medicinal bulking agent: Ispaghula, methyl cellulose, concentrated wheat germ or bran, and similar preparations are useful when patients with a normal colon find it difficult to take adequate dietary fibre. These preparations increase the bulk of stool and soften its consistency. They may be useful for those patients with the constipated form of irritable bowel syndrome.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8234432

  8. Providing semantic interoperability between clinical care and clinical research domains.

    PubMed

    Laleci, Gokce Banu; Yuksel, Mustafa; Dogac, Asuman

    2013-03-01

    Improving the efficiency with which clinical research studies are conducted can lead to faster medication innovation and decreased time to market for new drugs. To increase this efficiency, the parties involved in a regulated clinical research study, namely, the sponsor, the clinical investigator and the regulatory body, each with their own software applications, need to exchange data seamlessly. However, currently, the clinical research and the clinical care domains are quite disconnected because each use different standards and terminology systems. In this article, we describe an initial implementation of the Semantic Framework developed within the scope of SALUS project to achieve interoperability between the clinical research and the clinical care domains. In our Semantic Framework, the core ontology developed for semantic mediation is based on the shared conceptual model of both of these domains provided by the BRIDG initiative. The core ontology is then aligned with the extracted semantic models of the existing clinical care and research standards as well as with the ontological representations of the terminology systems to create a model of meaning for enabling semantic mediation. Although SALUS is a research and development effort rather than a product, the current SALUS knowledge base contains around 4.7 million triples representing BRIDG DAM, HL7 CDA model, CDISC standards and several terminology ontologies. In order to keep the reasoning process within acceptable limits without sacrificing the quality of mediation, we took an engineering approach by developing a number of heuristic mechanisms. The results indicate that it is possible to build a robust and scalable semantic framework with a solid theoretical foundation for achieving interoperability between the clinical research and clinical care domains. PMID:23008263

  9. Two Approaches to Clinical Supervision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Eugene M.

    Criteria are established for a definition of "clinical supervision" and the effectiveness of such supervisory programs in a student teaching context are considered. Two differing genres of clinical supervision are constructed: "supervision by pattern analysis" is contrasted with "supervision by performance objectives." An outline of procedural…

  10. Clinical Guidelines. Dental Hygiene Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branson, Bonnie

    This manual contains information concerning the policies and procedures of the Southern Illinois University-Carbondale Dental Hygiene Clinic. The manual is presented in a question/answer format for the information and convenience of dental hygiene students in the program, and is intended to answer their questions concerning clinical policies and…

  11. Clinical Applications of Otoacoustic Emissions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lonsbury-Martin, Brenda L.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This tutorial paper examines the potential of otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) in diagnostic audiology. It discusses classification of OAEs, basic properties of various types of OAEs, and clinical applications. It concludes that both transiently evoked and distortion product OAEs have beneficial clinical application resulting from their objectivity,…

  12. Clinical application of radiolabelled platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, C. )

    1990-01-01

    This book presents papers on the clinical applications of radiolabelled platelets. The papers are grouped into six sections on platelet labelling techniques, radiolabelled platelets in cardiology, monitoring of antiplatelet therapy, platelet scintigraphy in stroke patients, platelet scintigraphy in angiology, and platelet scintigraphy in hematology and other clinical applications, including renal transplant rejection.

  13. Role Modeling for Clinical Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ettinger, Ellen Richter

    1991-01-01

    To become better role models, higher educators in institutions of clinical education should be conscious of the behaviors they demonstrate and the broad range of activities and attitudes that students observe and emulate, including clinical competence, professional demeanor, doctor-patient interactions, ethical values, and social consciousness.…

  14. Clinical Teacher Preparation: A Retrospective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitford, Betty Lou; Villaume, Susan Kidd

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we explore how teacher preparation programs have developed from the mid-1800s to present day, emphasizing changes in the clinical component. Drawing from the history of teacher education from the normal schools of the 19th century to present-day interest in clinically based preparation, we first review the migration of teacher…

  15. COMPETING COMMITMENTS in CLINICAL TRIALS

    PubMed Central

    Lidz, Charles W.; Appelbaum, Paul S.; Joffe, Steven; Albert, Karen; Rosenbaum, Jill; Simon, Lorna

    2013-01-01

    Most discussion about clinical care in clinical trials has concerned whether subjects’ care may be compromised by research procedures. The possibility that clinical researchers might give priority to helping their “patients” even if that required deviating from the imperatives of the research protocol largely has been ignored. We conducted an on-line survey with clinical researchers, including physicians, research nurses and other research staff, to assess the ways and frequency with which clinical trials may be at risk for being compromised by clinical researchers’ attempting to address the clinical needs of subjects. The survey covered recruitment, clinical management while in the trial, and termination decisions. It produced a 72.0% response rate. Over 20% of respondents agreed that researchers should deviate from the protocol to improve subjects’ care; 28% reported that medications restricted by the protocol were given; 21% reported that subjects who were not eligible had been recruited; and 9% said subjects had been retained in a trial despite meeting termination criteria. Some respondents reported that these deviations from the protocol happened many times. The ramifications of these findings are discussed. PMID:19873835

  16. Clinical Disorders of Phosphorus Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yu, George C.; Lee, David B. N.

    1987-01-01

    Deranged phosphorus metabolism is commonly encountered in clinical medicine. Disturbances in phosphate intake, excretion and transcellular shift account for the abnormal serum levels. As a result of the essential role played by phosphate in intracellular metabolism, the clinical manifestations of hypophosphatemia and hyperphosphatemia are extensive. An understanding of the pathophysiology of various phosphate disorders is helpful in guiding therapeutic decisions. Images PMID:3321712

  17. Mindfulness Meditation in Clinical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmon, Paul; Sephton, Sandra; Weissbecker, Inka; Hoover, Katherine; Ulmer, Christi; Studts, Jamie L.

    2004-01-01

    The practice of mindfulness is increasingly being integrated into contemporary clinical psychology. Based in Buddhist philosophy and subsequently integrated into Western health care in the contexts of psychotherapy and stress management, mindfulness meditation is evolving as a systematic clinical intervention. This article describes…

  18. Evaluating Nursing Students' Clinical Performance.

    PubMed

    Koharchik, Linda; Weideman, Yvonne L; Walters, Cynthia A; Hardy, Elaine

    2015-10-01

    This article is one in a series on the roles of adjunct clinical faculty and preceptors, who teach nursing students to apply knowledge in clinical settings. This article describes aspects of the student evaluation process, which should involve regular feedback and clearly stated performance expectations. PMID:26402292

  19. In the clinic. Plantar fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Young, Craig

    2012-01-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of plantar fasciitis focusing on prevention, diagnosis, treatment, practice improvement, and patient information. Readers can complete the accompanying CME quiz for 1.5 credits. Only ACP members and individual subscribers can access the electronic features of In the Clinic. Non-subscribers who wish to access this issue of In the Clinic can elect "Pay for View." Subscribers can receive 1.5 category 1 CME credits by completing the CME quiz that accompanies this issue of In the Clinic. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including PIER (Physicians' Information and Education Resource) and MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic from these primary sources in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing division and with assistance of science writers and physician writers. Editorial consultants from PIER and MKSAP provide expert review of the content. Readers who are interested in these primary resources for more detail can consult www.acponline.org, http://pier.acponline.org, and other resources referenced within each issue of In the Clinic. PMID:22213510

  20. Clinical Grading in Psychiatric Clerkships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briscoe, Gregory W.; Carlson, David L.; Fore Arcand, Lisa; Levine, Ruth E.; Cohen, Mitchell J.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The clinical grade assessment is the most frequently used and heavily weighted component in the overall assessment of U.S. psychiatry clerkship students, yet the topic is understudied. The authors aimed to learn more about the nature, perceived virtues, and deficiencies of the clinical grade evaluation. Methods: A 26-item questionnaire…

  1. PROFESSIONAL INTEGRATION AND CLINICAL RESEARCH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WARD, TED W.

    THE RATIONALE OF A CLINICAL APPROACH TO RESEARCH ON TEACHER BEHAVIOR IS SET FORTH TOGETHER WITH INDICATION OF DIFFICULTIES. IN ONE CLINICAL STUDY, RECORDS OF FOCUSED OBSERVATIONS OF TEACHER BEHAVIOR WERE REVIEWED BY A SPECIALIST IN LEARNING AND A SPECIALIST IN SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY IN RELATION TO RESEARCH FROM THESE FIELDS. TEACHER DECISIONS PROVED…

  2. Evaluating Clinical Teaching in Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irby, David; Rakestraw, Philip

    1981-01-01

    Medical students have been rating clinical teaching in an obstetrics and gynecology clerkship at the University of Washington using an assessment form designed to reflect six factors of clinical teaching effectiveness. High interrater reliability and the utility of the data for faculty development and advancement are discussed. (Author/JMD)

  3. Clinical pharmacokinetics of molsidomine.

    PubMed

    Rosenkranz, B; Winkelmann, B R; Parnham, M J

    1996-05-01

    Molsidomine is a prodrug for the formation of nitric oxide (NO). Its pharmacokinetics are characterised by rapid absorption and hydrolysis, taking a short time to achieve maximal systemic concentrations of both the parent compound and its active metabolite, SIN-1. The time to peak plasma drug concentration (tmax) is 1 to 2 hours. The bioavailability of the parent compound after oral administration in tablet form is 44 to 59%, but further metabolism to release NO and form polar metabolites is rapid; the half-life (t-1/2) of SIN-1 is 1 to 2 hours. Urinary excretion accounts for more than 90% of the part of the administered dose of molsidomine which is not excreted unchanged. Protein binding of the parent compound is very low (3 to 11%) and its volume of distribution (Vd) corresponds to the range of bodyweight. Single-dose studies (1, 2 and 4 mg) have revealed linear pharmacokinetics, and multiple dose studies in healthy individuals (2 mg 3 times daily for 7 days) and coronary artery disease (CAD) patients (4 mg 4 times daily for 4 weeks) do not show any accumulation of the drug. A study in young and elderly individuals indicated that the first-pass effect is decreased and t-1/2 prolonged with age, resulting in an increased area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) of molsidomine and SIN-1. In patients with liver disease and congestive heart failure similar changes were observed, but much less so in patients with CAD. Clearance was also impaired in patients with liver disease, but the pharmacokinetics of molsidomine were not markedly altered by impaired renal function. In general, due to a large therapeutic dose range, dosage adjustments are not required on the basis of clinical experience. In certain patients a lower starting dose may be recommended, such as in those with impaired liver or kidney function, in congestive heart failure or in the presence of concomitant treatment with other vasoactive compounds. A linear dose-effect relationship is observed with

  4. Clinical pharmacokinetics of dapsone.

    PubMed

    Zuidema, J; Hilbers-Modderman, E S; Merkus, F W

    1986-01-01

    Dapsone (DDS) has for about 4 decades been the most important antileprosy drug. Concentrations of dapsone and its monoacetyl metabolite, MADDS, can be determined in biological media by high-performance liquid chromatography. After oral administration, the drug is slowly absorbed, the maximum concentration in plasma being reached at about 4 hours, with an absorption half-life of about 1.1 hours. However, the extent of absorption has not been adequately determined. The elimination half-life of dapsone is about 30 hours. The drug shows linear pharmacokinetics within the therapeutic range and the time-course after oral administration fits a 2-compartment model. The concentration-time profile of dapsone after parenteral administration is reviewed. Of clinical importance is the development of a new long acting injection, which permits monthly supervised administration as recommended by the World Health Organization. Following dapsone injection in gluteal subcutaneous adipose tissue, a sufficiently sustained absorption for this purpose has been reported. Dapsone is about 70 to 90% protein bound and its monoacetylated metabolite (MADDS) is almost completely protein bound. The volume of distribution of dapsone is estimated to be 1.5 L/kg. It is distributed in most tissues, but M. leprae living in the Schwann cells of the nerves might be unaffected. Dapsone crosses the placenta and is excreted in breast milk and saliva. Dapsone is extensively metabolised. Dapsone, some MADDS and their hydroxylated metabolites are found in urine, partly conjugated as N-glucuronides and N-sulphates. The acetylation ratio (MADDS:dapsone) shows a genetically determined bimodal distribution and allows the definition of 'slow' and 'rapid' acetylators. As enterohepatic circulation occurs, the elimination half-life of dapsone is markedly decreased after oral administration of activated charcoal. This permits successful treatment in cases of intoxication. The daily dose of dapsone in leprosy is 50 to

  5. Hybrid 10 Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gantz, Bruce J.; Hansen, Marlan R.; Turner, Christopher W.; Oleson, Jacob J.; Reiss, Lina A.; Parkinson, Aaron J.

    2010-01-01

    Acoustic plus electric (electric-acoustic) speech processing has been successful in highlighting the important role of articulation information in consonant recognition in those adults that have profound high-frequency hearing loss at frequencies greater than 1500 Hz and less than 60% discrimination scores. Eighty-seven subjects were enrolled in an adult Hybrid multicenter Food and Drug Administration clinical trial. Immediate hearing preservation was accomplished in 85/87 subjects. Over time (3 months to 5 years), some hearing preservation was maintained in 91% of the group. Combined electric-acoustic processing enabled most of this group of volunteers to gain improved speech understanding, compared to their preoperative hearing, with bilateral hearing aids. Most have preservation of low-frequency acoustic hearing within 15 dB of their preoperative pure tone levels. Those with greater losses (> 30 dB) also benefited from the combination of electric-acoustic speech processing. Postoperatively, in the electric-acoustic processing condition, loss of low-frequency hearing did not correlate with improvements in speech perception scores in quiet. Sixteen subjects were identified as poor performers in that they did not achieve a significant improvement through electric-acoustic processing. A multiple regression analysis determined that 91% of the variance in the poorly performing group can be explained by the preoperative speech recognition score and duration of deafness. Signal-to-noise ratios for speech understanding in noise improved more than 9 dB in some individuals in the electric-acoustic processing condition. The relation between speech understanding in noise thresholds and residual low-frequency acoustic hearing is significant (r = 0.62; p < 0.05). The data suggest that, in general, the advantages gained for speech recognition in noise by preserving residual hearing exist, unless the hearing loss approaches profound levels. Preservation of residual low

  6. New Technologies in Clinical Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Wolk, Donna M.; Dunne, W. Michael

    2011-01-01

    Rapid identification of microorganisms in the clinical microbiology laboratory can be of great value for selection of optimal patient management strategies for infections caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, mycobacteria, and parasites. Rapid identification of microorganisms in clinical samples enables expedient de-escalation from broad-spectrum agents to targeted antimicrobial therapy. The switch to tailored therapy minimizes risks of antibiotics, namely, disruption of normal flora, toxic side effects, and selective pressure. There is a critical need for new technologies in clinical microbiology, particularly for bloodstream infections, in which associated mortality is among the highest of all infections. Just as importantly, there is a need for the clinical laboratory community to embrace the practices of evidence-based interventional laboratory medicine and collaborate in translational research projects to establish the clinical utility, cost benefit, and impact of new technologies.

  7. Towards clinical bioethics (or a return to clinical ethics?).

    PubMed

    Petrini, C

    2013-01-01

    Medical ethics has traditionally been oriented towards the clinical setting. Since the middle of the last century, however, various circumstances (associated mainly, though not exclusively, with rapid advances in technology and knowledge) have considerably broadened both the field of enquiry and the scope of this discipline. This is due partly to the overlap between medical ethics and bioethics, which in recent decades has acquired its own identity and concerns a multitude of ethical aspects in the biomedical field. Clinical ethics taps into the vast wealth of deontology, so that it has no need for additional criteria or principles, or for the definition of new values: rather, it recognizes the need to apply existing criteria, principles and values to contingent circumstances and contexts. A special role is reserved for ethics committees and, above all, for clinical ethics consultants, although in some countries the former are concerned mainly with authorisations for clinical trials. Clinical ethics consultants, however, may have a more incisive influence in clinical decisions: the special requisites and skills they need have been defined and discussed in various documents which are mentioned briefly in the present article. The presence of these consultants does not exonerate clinical physicians from their responsibilities or from liability for their decisions, in the formation of which they must refer constantly to codes of professional ethics. PMID:24424236

  8. Enhancing clinical evidence by proactively building quality into clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Meeker-O’Connell, Ann; Glessner, Coleen; Behm, Mark; Mulinde, Jean; Roach, Nancy; Sweeney, Fergus; Tenaerts, Pamela; Landray, Martin J

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stakeholders across the clinical trial enterprise have expressed concern that the current clinical trial enterprise is unsustainable. The cost and complexity of trials have continued to increase, threatening our ability to generate reliable evidence essential for making appropriate decisions concerning the benefits and harms associated with clinical interventions. Overcoming this inefficiency rests on improving protocol design, trial planning, and quality oversight. Methods: The Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative convened a project to evaluate methods to prospectively build quality into the scientific and operational design of clinical trials (“quality-by-design”), such that trials are feasible to conduct and important errors are prevented rather than remediated. A working group evaluated aspects of trial design and oversight and developed the Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative quality-by-design principles document, outlining a series of factors generally relevant to the reliability of trial conclusions and to patient safety. These principles were then applied and further refined during a series of hands-on workshops to evaluate their utility in facilitating proactive, cross-functional dialogue, and decision-making about trial design and planning. Following these workshops, independent qualitative interviews were conducted with 19 workshop attendees to explore the potential challenges for implementing a quality-by-design approach to clinical trials. The Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative project team subsequently developed recommendations and an online resource guide to support implementation of this approach. Conclusion: The Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative quality-by-design principles provide a framework for assuring that clinical trials adequately safeguard participants and provide reliable information on which to make decisions on the effects of treatments. The quality-by-design workshops highlighted the value of

  9. Implications of Look AHEAD for Clinical Trials and Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Wing, Rena R.

    2014-01-01

    Look AHEAD was a randomized clinical trial designed to examine the long-term health effects of weight loss in overweight and obese individuals with type 2 diabetes. The primary result was that the incidence of cardiovascular events over a median follow up of 9.6 years was not reduced in the intensive lifestyle group relative to the control group. This finding is discussed, with emphasis on its implications for design of clinical trials and clinical treatment of obese people with type 2 diabetes. PMID:24853636

  10. Creating clinical trial designs that incorporate clinical outcome assessments.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Mark R; Rubinstein, Lawrence; Lesser, Glenn

    2016-03-01

    Clinical outcome assessments (COAs) are increasingly being used in determining the efficacy of new treatment regimens. This was typified in the recent use of a symptom-based instrument combined with an organ-based measure of response for the approval of ruxolitinib in myelofibrosis. There are challenges in incorporating these COAs into clinical trials, including designating the level of priority, incorporating these measures into a combined or composite endpoint, and dealing with issues related to compliance and interpretation of results accounting for missing data. This article describes the results of a recent panel discussion that attempted to address these issues and provide guidance to the incorporation of COAs into clinical trials, including novel statistical designs, so that the testing of new treatments in patients with cancers of the central nervous system can incorporate these important clinical endpoints. PMID:26989129

  11. Binge eating disorder: from clinical research to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Goracci, Arianna; Casamassima, Francesco; Iovieno, Nadia; di Volo, Silvia; Benbow, Jim; Bolognesi, Simone; Fagiolini, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    This case report describes the clinical course of a young woman suffering from binge eating disorder (BED) associated with obesity. It illustrates the efficacy of different medications in the treatment of BED and related conditions and is followed by the comments and clinical observations of 2 practicing psychiatrists. The issues described in this paper have important clinical implications and are topical, given that BED is now recognized as a specific disorder in the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition classification system, but neither the US Food and Drug Administration nor any other regulatory agency has yet approved a drug for treatment of this disease, despite its very prevalent and disabling nature. Growing evidence from the fields of psychopathology and neurobiology, including preclinical and clinical studies, converges to support the idea that "overeating" has much in common with other behavioral addictions, and substance abuse treatment agents may show promise for the treatment of BED. PMID:25629882

  12. Different Clinical Presentations of Brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Hasanjani Roushan, Mohammad Reza; Ebrahimpour, Soheil; Moulana, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background Brucellosis is one of the important multi-organ zoonotic infectious diseases. The forms of the clinical course of brucellosis in humans are acute, sub-acute and chronic. Objectives The present study aimed to retrospectively analyze the clinical characteristics and complications in the clinical forms of human brucellosis in Iran. Patients and Methods The population included 957 patients admitted in the infectious diseases clinic affiliated to Babol University of Medical Sciences, Babol, Iran, within the past two decades. Data for the patients were obtained and documented in questionnaires. Patients were divided into three groups according to their history, symptoms and clinical presentation time: acute (0 - 2 months), sub-acute (3 - 12 months), and chronic (> 1 year). Results Most of the patients (73.8%) were in the acute stages of brucellosis, 22.6% had sub-acute brucellosis and 3.7% had chronic brucellosis. The most frequently observed symptoms were arthralgia (71%), sweating (66.7%), fever (57.2%) and backache (39.3%). The most common complication was arthritis (13.2%) in this study. Conclusions This infection was observed with a diversity of clinical manifestations. Therefore, diagnostic difficulty because of the various clinical presentations and the way to find undiagnosed complications should be investigated in the differential diagnosis of other diseases. PMID:27284398

  13. Social media in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Social media has potential in clinical trials for pointing out trial issues, addressing barriers, educating, and engaging multiple groups involved in cancer clinical research. Social media is being used in clinical trials to highlight issues such as poor accrual and barriers; educate potential participants and physicians about clinical trial options; and is a potential indirect or direct method to improve accrual. We are moving from a passive "push" of information to patients to a "pull" of patients requesting information. Patients and advocates are often driving an otherwise reluctant health care system into communication. Online patient communities are creating new information repositories. Potential clinical trial participants are using the Twittersphere and other sources to learn about potential clinical trial options. We are seeing more organized patient-centric and patient-engaged forums with the potential to crowd source to improve clinical trial accrual and design. This is an evolving process that will meet many individual, institutional, and regulatory obstacles as we move forward in a changed research landscape. PMID:24857086

  14. Personalizing medicine with clinical pharmacogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Stuart A.

    2012-01-01

    Clinical genetic testing has grown substantially over the past 30 years as the causative mutations for Mendelian diseases have been identified, particularly aided in part by the recent advances in molecular-based technologies. Importantly, the adoption of new tests and testing strategies (e.g., diagnostic confirmation, prenatal testing, and population-based carrier screening) has often been met with caution and careful consideration before clinical implementation, which facilitates the appropriate use of new genetic tests. Although the field of pharmacogenetics was established in the 1950s, clinical testing for constitutional pharmacogenetic variants implicated in interindividual drug response variability has only recently become available to help clinicians guide pharmacotherapy, in part due to US Food and Drug Administration-mediated product insert revisions that include pharmacogenetic information for selected drugs. However, despite pharmacogenetic associations with adverse outcomes, physician uptake of clinical pharmacogenetic testing has been slow. Compared with testing for Mendelian diseases, pharmacogenetic testing for certain indications can have a lower positive predictive value, which is one reason for underutilization. A number of other barriers remain with implementing clinical pharmacogenetics, including clinical utility, professional education, and regulatory and reimbursement issues, among others. This review presents some of the current opportunities and challenges with implementing clinical pharmacogenetic testing. PMID:22095251

  15. Clinical Genetic Testing in Gastroenterology

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Russell P; Chung, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    Rapid advances in genetics have led to an increased understanding of the genetic determinants of human disease, including many gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. Coupled with a proliferation of genetic testing services, this has resulted in a clinical landscape where commercially available genetic tests for GI disorders are now widely available. In this review, we discuss the current status of clinical genetic testing for GI illnesses, review the available testing options, and briefly discuss indications for and practical aspects of such testing. Our goal is to familiarize the practicing gastroenterologist with this rapidly changing and important aspect of clinical care. PMID:27124700

  16. Critical appraisal of clinical guidelines.

    PubMed

    Netsch, Debra S; Kluesner, Jean A

    2010-01-01

    Utilization of clinical guidelines is gaining in popularity due to their significant impact on clinical practice. While a plethora of guidelines exist, many are lacking in quality, based on current critical appraisal standards. It then becomes necessary for the end users of the guidelines to adopt or develop those that are deemed adequate for implementation. This often requires that users possess critical appraisal skills as they become proficient in discerning between guidelines of varying quality. This article provides direction and tools to support the critical appraisal process in the adoption of clinical guidelines. PMID:20838314

  17. CMA Infobase: clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Roberta Bronson

    2008-01-01

    The CMA Infobase is a free Web-based resource that contains evidence-based clinical practice guidelines. The database is maintained by the Canadian Medical Association (CMA) and is available on its Web site. The CMA Infobase currently contains 1,200-plus clinical practice guidelines either developed or endorsed by an authoritative health care organization located in Canada. It is an alternative source of free clinical practice guidelines to the National Guideline Clearinghouse. This column will cover the basics of CMA Infobase, including searching, special features, and available resources which complement the database. PMID:19042721

  18. Data fraud in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    George, Stephen L; Buyse, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Highly publicized cases of fabrication or falsification of data in clinical trials have occurred in recent years and it is likely that there are additional undetected or unreported cases. We review the available evidence on the incidence of data fraud in clinical trials, describe several prominent cases, present information on motivation and contributing factors and discuss cost-effective ways of early detection of data fraud as part of routine central statistical monitoring of data quality. Adoption of these clinical trial monitoring procedures can identify potential data fraud not detected by conventional on-site monitoring and can improve overall data quality. PMID:25729561

  19. [Clinical characteristics of cluster headache].

    PubMed

    Jelencsik, I; Kovács, K; Csanda, E

    1989-05-28

    The authors describe in detail the clinical characteristics of 48 patients suffering from cluster headache. They investigate the question of nomenclature and survey the clinical forms of diagnosis. They deal with differential diagnosis comparing migraine, trigeminal neuralgia and headaches origin from systemic illness. They point out that the clinical characteristics of their patients co-responding to the data in the literature. They emphasize that the precise anamnesis can result the diagnosis of this type of headache which is the basis of the treatment. PMID:2503799

  20. 42 CFR 405.2450 - Clinical psychologist and clinical social worker services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Clinical psychologist and clinical social worker... § 405.2450 Clinical psychologist and clinical social worker services. (a) For clinical psychologist or...) Of a type that the clinical psychologist or clinical social worker who furnishes the services...

  1. 42 CFR 405.2450 - Clinical psychologist and clinical social worker services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Clinical psychologist and clinical social worker... § 405.2450 Clinical psychologist and clinical social worker services. (a) For clinical psychologist or...) Of a type that the clinical psychologist or clinical social worker who furnishes the services...

  2. Neurofibromatosis: part 2--clinical management.

    PubMed

    Batista, Pollyanna Barros; Bertollo, Eny Maria Goloni; Costa, Danielle de Souza; Eliam, Lucas; Cunha, Karin Soares Gonçalves; Cunha-Melo, José Renan; Darrigo Junior, Luiz Guilherme; Geller, Mauro; Gianordoli-Nascimento, Ingrid Faria; Madeira, Luciana Gonçalves; Mendes, Hérika Martins; Miranda, Débora Marques de; Mata-Machado, Nikolas Andre; Morato, Eric Grossi; Pavarino, Érika Cristina; Pereira, Luciana Baptista; Rezende, Nilton Alves de; Rodrigues, Luíza de Oliveira; Sette, Jorge Bezerra Cavalcanti

    2015-06-01

    Part 1 of this guideline addressed the differential diagnosis of the neurofibromatoses (NF): neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) and schwannomatosis (SCH). NF shares some features such as the genetic origin of the neural tumors and cutaneous manifestations, and affects nearly 80 thousand Brazilians. Increasing scientific knowledge on NF has allowed better clinical management and reduced rate of complications and morbidity, resulting in higher quality of life for NF patients. Most medical doctors are able to perform NF diagnosis, but the wide range of clinical manifestations and the inability to predict the onset or severity of new features, consequences, or complications make NF management a real clinical challenge, requiring the support of different specialists for proper treatment and genetic counseling, especially in NF2 and SCH. The present text suggests guidelines for the clinical management of NF, with emphasis on NF1. PMID:26083891

  3. The clinical management of hyponatraemia.

    PubMed

    Williams, David M; Gallagher, Maire; Handley, Joel; Stephens, Jeffrey W

    2016-07-01

    Hyponatraemia is the most common electrolyte disorder seen in clinical practice and the consequences can range from minor symptoms to life-threatening complications including seizures and cardiorespiratory distress. These effects occur as a result of fluid shifts due to deranged serum tonicity and subsequent cerebral oedema. The appropriate assessment and management of patients with hyponatraemia is not always achieved in clinical practice, which is partly related to challenges in teaching with limited clinical guidance. Recently, the European Society of Endocrinology, European Society of Intensive Care Medicine and European Renal Association-European Dialysis and Transplant Association produced clinical practice guidelines to focus on appropriate investigation and management of these patients. Within this manuscript, we highlight the key points from these guidelines, which are most pertinent to doctors of all specialties to improve the care of patients with this common electrolyte disorder. PMID:27044859

  4. Checklist for clinical readiness published

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists from NCI, together with collaborators from outside academic centers, have developed a checklist of criteria to evaluate the readiness of complex molecular tests that will guide decisions made during clinical trials. The checklist focuses on tes

  5. British Association of Clinical Anatomists

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    The Annual General Meeting of the British Association of Clinical Anatomists for 1983 was held at the Royal College of Surgeons of England on 14th January 1983. The following are abstracts of the papers presented. PMID:19310890

  6. [Internet use in clinical trials].

    PubMed

    Refolo, P; Sacchini, D; Minacori, R; Spagnolo, A G

    2014-01-01

    Recruiting patients is a critical point of today's clinical research and, along the years, several solutions have been proposed, even if their efficacy seems to be doubtful. On the other hand, nowadays, Internet represents a great opportunity for improving clinical trial recruitments. Nevertheless, on-line recruitment services (e-recruitment) could ensure some advantages (such as facilitating interaction between supply and demand of clinical research, time and money savings/optimizations, data entry errors reduction), but also raise some issues (such as those related to sampling, information, consent, real identity of participants and risks for data breaches). The article debates on the difficulties to recruit patients for clinical research, in general, and e-recruitment particularly, discussing some ethical issues raised by internet enrolment. PMID:24589968

  7. Inquiry Teaching in Clinical Periodontics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heins, Paul J.; Mackenzie, Richard S.

    1987-01-01

    An adaptation of the inquiry method of teaching, which develops skills of information retrieval and reasoning through systematic questioning by the teacher, is proposed for instruction in clinical periodontics. (MSE)

  8. American Society for Clinical Pathology

    MedlinePlus

    ... With the National Cancer Institute for Inaugural Global Pathology Conference March 2016 OneLab Memo ASCP Action Alert - ... 2016 Copyright © 2016 by American Society for Clinical Pathology. All Rights Reserved. Terms of Use About ASCP ...

  9. American Society for Clinical Pathology

    MedlinePlus

    ... Science Letter to Council of Deans: State of Pathology Training in Medical School Help Chart the Future ... Need Copyright © 2016 by American Society for Clinical Pathology. All Rights Reserved. Terms of Use About ASCP ...

  10. CLINICAL ASPECTS OF VETERINARY LISTERIOSIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This invited presentation updates the clinical aspects of Listeria monocytogenes in food animals. It summarizes the epidemiology and diagnostic methods. Virtually all domesticated animal species are susceptible to listeric infection, with a large proportion of healthy asymptomatic animals shedding...

  11. Clinical Trials and Older People

    MedlinePlus

    ... have a much wider applicability. Researchers need the participation of older people in their clinical trials so ... contact with questions about the study or your participation. Control group —the group of participants who get ...

  12. Clinical leaders of the future.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2016-08-10

    Putting ideas for management improvement into practice is one of the core tenets of the RCN's clinical leadership programme It's a transformational experience,' says RCN interim head of education Anne Corrin. 'The change is personal and professional.' PMID:27507391

  13. BMPs and their clinical potentials

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Meejung; Choe, Senyon

    2012-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling in diseases is the subject of an overwhelming array of studies. BMPs are excellent targets for treatment of various clinical disorders. Several BMPs have already been shown to be clinically beneficial in the treatment of a variety of conditions, including BMP-2 and BMP-7 that have been approved for clinical application in nonunion bone fractures and spinal fusions. With the use of BMPs increasingly accepted in spinal fusion surgeries, other therapeutic approaches targeting BMP signaling are emerging beyond applications to skeletal disorders. These approaches can further utilize next-generation therapeutic tools such as engineered BMPs and ex vivo-conditioned cell therapies. In this review, we focused to provide insights into such clinical potentials of BMPs in metabolic and vascular diseases, and in cancer. PMID:22026995

  14. Clinical aspects of crew health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, W. R.; Zieglschmid, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    Medical procedures and findings for Apollo astronauts in the preflight, inflight, and postflight phases of the Apollo missions are described in detail. Preflight medical examinations, inflight monitoring and medications, crew illnesses, and clinical findings are summarized.

  15. Cleveland Clinic Next Generation Neuroimaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, Mark

    2009-09-30

    This was an award to purchase equipment for state-of-the-art MRI radiofrequency coils. There was no personnel effort or construction as a part of this project. This report details the final status of the approved budget items for this project. All approved budget items were successfully delivered and installed. The equipment provided to Cleveland Clinic under this project will allow Cleveland Clinic researchers to build imaging equipment with improved capability to investigate brain disorders.

  16. Fat embolism: a clinical diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Miller, J D

    1987-01-01

    Fat embolism causes a distinctive clinical syndrome usually seen in trauma victims with long bone fractures. Clinical findings include hyperthermia, respiratory distress, petechiae and retinal fat emboli. Neurologic changes include decreased sensorium, decerebrate posturing and seizure activity. Chest radiographs commonly demonstrate bilateral fluffy infiltrates. Laboratory abnormalities include hypoxemia, respiratory alkalosis, anemia and hypocalcemia. Treatment consists of general supportive care with vigorous pulmonary therapy. Most patients have a good recovery. PMID:3799415

  17. Quality Assurance for Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Haworth, Annette; Followill, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Cooperative groups, of which the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group is one example, conduct national clinical trials that often involve the use of radiation therapy. In preparation for such a trial, the cooperative group prepares a protocol to define the goals of the trial, the rationale for its design, and the details of the treatment procedure to be followed. The Radiological Physics Center (RPC) is one of several quality assurance (QA) offices that is charged with assuring that participating institutions deliver doses that are clinically consistent and comparable. The RPC does this by conducting a variety of independent audits and credentialing processes. The RPC has compiled data showing that credentialing can help institutions comply with the requirements of a cooperative group clinical protocol. Phantom irradiations have been demonstrated to exercise an institution’s procedures for planning and delivering advanced external beam techniques (1–3). Similarly, RPC data indicate that a rapid review of patient treatment records or planning procedures can improve compliance with clinical trials (4). The experiences of the RPC are presented as examples of the contributions that a national clinical trials QA center can make to cooperative group trials. These experiences illustrate the critical need for comprehensive QA to assure that clinical trials are successful and cost-effective. The RPC is supported by grants CA 10953 and CA 81647 from the National Cancer Institute, NIH, DHHS. PMID:24392352

  18. Ubiquitous Multicriteria Clinic Recommendation System.

    PubMed

    Chen, Toly

    2016-05-01

    Advancements in information, communication, and sensor technologies have led to new opportunities in medical care and education. Patients in general prefer visiting the nearest clinic, attempt to avoid waiting for treatment, and have unequal preferences for different clinics and doctors. Therefore, to enable patients to compare multiple clinics, this study proposes a ubiquitous multicriteria clinic recommendation system. In this system, patients can send requests through their cell phones to the system server to obtain a clinic recommendation. Once the patient sends this information to the system, the system server first estimates the patient's speed according to the detection results of a global positioning system. It then applies a fuzzy integer nonlinear programming-ordered weighted average approach to assess four criteria and finally recommends a clinic with maximal utility to the patient. The proposed methodology was tested in a field experiment, and the experimental results showed that it is advantageous over two existing methods in elevating the utilities of recommendations. In addition, such an advantage was shown to be statistically significant. PMID:26984357

  19. Birth Control in Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, J.; Beyer, B. K.; Chadwick, K.; De Schaepdrijver, L.; Desai, M.; Enright, B.; Foster, W.; Hui, J. Y.; Moffat, G. J.; Tornesi, B.; Van Malderen, K.; Wiesner, L.; Chen, C. L.

    2015-01-01

    The Health and Environmental Sciences Institute (HESI) Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology Technical Committee sponsored a pharmaceutical industry survey on current industry practices for contraception use during clinical trials. The objectives of the survey were to improve our understanding of the current industry practices for contraception requirements in clinical trials, the governance processes set up to promote consistency and/or compliance with contraception requirements, and the effectiveness of current contraception practices in preventing pregnancies during clinical trials. Opportunities for improvements in current practices were also considered. The survey results from 12 pharmaceutical companies identified significant variability among companies with regard to contraception practices and governance during clinical trials. This variability was due primarily to differences in definitions, areas of scientific uncertainty or misunderstanding, and differences in company approaches to enrollment in clinical trials. The survey also revealed that few companies collected data in a manner that would allow a retrospective understanding of the reasons for failure of birth control during clinical trials. In this article, suggestions are made for topics where regulatory guidance or scientific publications could facilitate best practice. These include provisions for a pragmatic definition of women of childbearing potential, guidance on how animal data can influence the requirements for male and female birth control, evidence-based guidance on birth control and pregnancy testing regimes suitable for low- and high-risk situations, plus practical methods to ascertain the risk of drug-drug interactions with hormonal contraceptives. PMID:27042398

  20. On the Merits of Clinical Judgment: Comment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garb, Howard N.; Grove, William M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents comments on the article by D. Westen and J. Weinberger , which criticized academic clinical psychologists for being cynical about clinical judgment and clinical practice. In the authors' view, it seems unlikely that more than a few academic clinical psychologists believe that they have little to learn from clinical practice or…

  1. Clinical Leadership: A Call to Action.

    PubMed

    Grindel, Cecelia Gatson

    2016-01-01

    Clinical nurses are expected to assume leadership roles to enhance patient care and assure efficient work processes. Dimensions of clinical leadership and the essential knowledge and skills of the clinical leader are described. PMID:27044123

  2. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Cancer Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    ... patients. Currently, what cancer clinical trials are the NCI and medical community sponsoring involving CAM modalities? Cancer CAM clinical trials are listed in NCI’s PDQ ® (Physician Data Query) computer database of clinical ...

  3. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Cancer Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    ... patients. Currently, what cancer clinical trials are the NCI and medical community sponsoring involving CAM modalities? Cancer CAM clinical trials are listed in NCI's PDQ ® (Physician Data Query) computer database of clinical ...

  4. Malaria diagnostics in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Sean C; Shott, Joseph P; Parikh, Sunil; Etter, Paige; Prescott, William R; Stewart, V Ann

    2013-11-01

    Malaria diagnostics are widely used in epidemiologic studies to investigate natural history of disease and in drug and vaccine clinical trials to exclude participants or evaluate efficacy. The Malaria Laboratory Network (MLN), managed by the Office of HIV/AIDS Network Coordination, is an international working group with mutual interests in malaria disease and diagnosis and in human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome clinical trials. The MLN considered and studied the wide array of available malaria diagnostic tests for their suitability for screening trial participants and/or obtaining study endpoints for malaria clinical trials, including studies of HIV/malaria co-infection and other malaria natural history studies. The MLN provides recommendations on microscopy, rapid diagnostic tests, serologic tests, and molecular assays to guide selection of the most appropriate test(s) for specific research objectives. In addition, this report provides recommendations regarding quality management to ensure reproducibility across sites in clinical trials. Performance evaluation, quality control, and external quality assessment are critical processes that must be implemented in all clinical trials using malaria tests. PMID:24062484

  5. Clinical utility of quantitative imaging.

    PubMed

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Mendiratta-Lala, Mishal; Bartholmai, Brian J; Ganeshan, Dhakshinamoorthy; Abramson, Richard G; Burton, Kirsteen R; Yu, John-Paul J; Scalzetti, Ernest M; Yankeelov, Thomas E; Subramaniam, Rathan M; Lenchik, Leon

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative imaging (QI) is increasingly applied in modern radiology practice, assisting in the clinical assessment of many patients and providing a source of biomarkers for a spectrum of diseases. QI is commonly used to inform patient diagnosis or prognosis, determine the choice of therapy, or monitor therapy response. Because most radiologists will likely implement some QI tools to meet the patient care needs of their referring clinicians, it is important for all radiologists to become familiar with the strengths and limitations of QI. The Association of University Radiologists Radiology Research Alliance Quantitative Imaging Task Force has explored the clinical application of QI and summarizes its work in this review. We provide an overview of the clinical use of QI by discussing QI tools that are currently used in clinical practice, clinical applications of these tools, approaches to reporting of QI, and challenges to implementing QI. It is hoped that these insights will help radiologists recognize the tangible benefits of QI to their patients, their referring clinicians, and their own radiology practice. PMID:25442800

  6. Clinical Utility of Quantitative Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Mendiratta-Lala, Mishal; Bartholmai, Brian J.; Ganeshan, Dhakshinamoorthy; Abramson, Richard G.; Burton, Kirsteen R.; Yu, John-Paul J.; Scalzetti, Ernest M.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Subramaniam, Rathan M.; Lenchik, Leon

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative imaging (QI) is increasingly applied in modern radiology practice, assisting in the clinical assessment of many patients and providing a source of biomarkers for a spectrum of diseases. QI is commonly used to inform patient diagnosis or prognosis, determine the choice of therapy, or monitor therapy response. Because most radiologists will likely implement some QI tools to meet the patient care needs of their referring clinicians, it is important for all radiologists to become familiar with the strengths and limitations of QI. The Association of University Radiologists Radiology Research Alliance Quantitative Imaging Task Force has explored the clinical application of QI and summarizes its work in this review. We provide an overview of the clinical use of QI by discussing QI tools that are currently employed in clinical practice, clinical applications of these tools, approaches to reporting of QI, and challenges to implementing QI. It is hoped that these insights will help radiologists recognize the tangible benefits of QI to their patients, their referring clinicians, and their own radiology practice. PMID:25442800

  7. Malaria Diagnostics in Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Sean C.; Shott, Joseph P.; Parikh, Sunil; Etter, Paige; Prescott, William R.; Stewart, V. Ann

    2013-01-01

    Malaria diagnostics are widely used in epidemiologic studies to investigate natural history of disease and in drug and vaccine clinical trials to exclude participants or evaluate efficacy. The Malaria Laboratory Network (MLN), managed by the Office of HIV/AIDS Network Coordination, is an international working group with mutual interests in malaria disease and diagnosis and in human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome clinical trials. The MLN considered and studied the wide array of available malaria diagnostic tests for their suitability for screening trial participants and/or obtaining study endpoints for malaria clinical trials, including studies of HIV/malaria co-infection and other malaria natural history studies. The MLN provides recommendations on microscopy, rapid diagnostic tests, serologic tests, and molecular assays to guide selection of the most appropriate test(s) for specific research objectives. In addition, this report provides recommendations regarding quality management to ensure reproducibility across sites in clinical trials. Performance evaluation, quality control, and external quality assessment are critical processes that must be implemented in all clinical trials using malaria tests. PMID:24062484

  8. Clinical Epidemiology Unit - overview of research areas

    Cancer.gov

    Clinical Epidemiology Unit (CEU) conducts etiologic research with potential clinical and public health applications, and leads studies evaluating population-based early detection and cancer prevention strategies

  9. Challenges in Developing Clinical Workstation

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanan, Venkatesh; Vedula, Venumadhav

    2008-09-26

    Over the years, medical imaging has become very common and data intensive. New technology is needed to help visualize and analyze these large, complex data sets, especially in an acute care situation where time is of the essence. Also it is very important to present the data in an efficient and simple manner to aid the clinical decision making processes. There is a need for a clinical workstation that handles data from different modalities and performs the necessary post- processing operations on the data in order to enhance the image quality and improve the reliability of diagnosis. This paper briefly explains clinical workstation, emphasizing the requirements and challenges in design and architecture for the development of such systems.

  10. Clinical development of Ebola vaccines.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Saranya

    2015-09-01

    The ongoing outbreak of Ebola virus disease in West Africa highlighted the lack of a licensed drug or vaccine to combat the disease and has renewed the urgency to develop a pipeline of Ebola vaccines. A number of different vaccine platforms are being developed by assessing preclinical efficacy in animal models and expediting clinical development. Over 15 different vaccines are in preclinical development and 8 vaccines are now in different stages of clinical evaluation. These vaccines include DNA vaccines, virus-like particles and viral vectors such as live replicating vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV), human and chimpanzee adenovirus, and vaccinia virus. Recently, in preliminary results reported from the first phase III trial of an Ebola vaccine, the rVSV-vectored vaccine showed promising efficacy. This review charts this rapidly advancing area of research focusing on vaccines in clinical development and discusses the future opportunities and challenges faced in the licensure and deployment of Ebola vaccines. PMID:26668751

  11. [Scientific concepts in clinical medicine].

    PubMed

    Rogler, G

    2003-11-28

    The understanding of the scientific basis and the theory of knowledge are surprisingly heterogeneous in practical and clinical medicine. It is frequently influenced or based on the philosophical theory of critical rationalism founded by Sir Karl Popper. Because the theory of knowledge and the understanding of scientific truth is the central basis for cautious and good clinical practise it is necessary to discuss both points to avoid unscientific auto-immunisation against critique in a type of medicine that regards herself as science-based. Evidence-based medicine would not be possible without interpretation and explanation of existing data into the individual treatment context. Besides an inductive or deductive logic the historical and situative side-conditions of the gathering of knowledge and of experiments are of central importance for their interpretation and their relevance in clinical practice. This historical and situative context warrants reflection but must also be paid attention to in the reflections on medical ethics. PMID:14648440

  12. Clinical microbiology of coryneform bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Funke, G; von Graevenitz, A; Clarridge, J E; Bernard, K A

    1997-01-01

    Coryneform bacteria are aerobically growing, asporogenous, non-partially-acid-fast, gram-positive rods of irregular morphology. Within the last few years, there has been a massive increase in the number of publications related to all aspects of their clinical microbiology. Clinical microbiologists are often confronted with making identifications within this heterogeneous group as well as with considerations of the clinical significance of such isolates. This review provides comprehensive information on the identification of coryneform bacteria and outlines recent changes in taxonomy. The following genera are covered: Corynebacterium, Turicella, Arthrobacter, Brevibacterium, Dermabacter. Propionibacterium, Rothia, Exiguobacterium, Oerskovia, Cellulomonas, Sanguibacter, Microbacterium, Aureobacterium, "Corynebacterium aquaticum," Arcanobacterium, and Actinomyces. Case reports claiming disease associations of coryneform bacteria are critically reviewed. Minimal microbiological requirements for publications on disease associations of coryneform bacteria are proposed. PMID:8993861

  13. Clinical utility of curcumin extract.

    PubMed

    Asher, Gary N; Spelman, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Turmeric root has been used medicinally in China and India for thousands of years. The active components are thought to be the curcuminoids, primarily curcumin, which is commonly available worldwide as a standardized extract. This article reviews the pharmacology of curcuminoids, their use and efficacy, potential adverse effects, and dosage and standardization. Preclinical studies point to mechanisms of action that are predominantly anti-inflammatory and antineoplastic, while early human clinical trials suggest beneficial effects for dyspepsia, peptic ulcer, inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, uveitis, orbital pseudotumor, and pancreatic cancer. Curcumin is well-tolerated; the most common side effects are nausea and diarrhea. Theoretical interactions exist due to purported effects on metabolic enzymes and transport proteins, but clinical reports do not support any meaningful interactions. Nonetheless, caution, especially with chemotherapy agents, is advised. Late-phase clinical trials are still needed to confirm most beneficial effects. PMID:23594449

  14. Social aspects of clinical errors.

    PubMed

    Richman, Joel; Mason, Tom; Mason-Whitehead, Elizabeth; McIntosh, Annette; Mercer, Dave

    2009-08-01

    Clinical errors, whether committed by doctors, nurses or other professions allied to healthcare, remain a sensitive issue requiring open debate and policy formulation in order to reduce them. The literature suggests that the issues underpinning errors made by healthcare professionals involve concerns about patient safety, professional disclosure, apology, litigation, compensation, processes of recording and policy development to enhance quality service. Anecdotally, we are aware of narratives of minor errors, which may well have been covered up and remain officially undisclosed whilst the major errors resulting in damage and death to patients alarm both professionals and public with resultant litigation and compensation. This paper attempts to unravel some of these issues by highlighting the historical nature of clinical errors and drawing parallels to contemporary times by outlining the 'compensation culture'. We then provide an overview of what constitutes a clinical error and review the healthcare professional strategies for managing such errors. PMID:19201405

  15. Who attends family planning clinics?

    PubMed

    Chick, P; Nixon, J

    1984-08-01

    Data were obtained from 1,810 consecutive women who attended a central metropolitan (Brisbane) Family Planning Clinic during a 5 week period in 1982. Young women in particular formed the major client group with 32% being under 20 years of age. The client population was skewed towards women of upper socioeconomic status (SES). There was no SES disproportion in the use of oral contraceptives or IUD's. However, diaphragm use occurred disproportionately in women of upper SES groups; postcoital contraception was sought by and limited to, women of SES classes A and B only. The clinic satisfied a need for women with a history of failed or absent contraception and 15% had already had a termination of pregnancy by the time they first presented at the clinic. PMID:6596088

  16. Clinical development of Ebola vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Sridhar, Saranya

    2015-01-01

    The ongoing outbreak of Ebola virus disease in West Africa highlighted the lack of a licensed drug or vaccine to combat the disease and has renewed the urgency to develop a pipeline of Ebola vaccines. A number of different vaccine platforms are being developed by assessing preclinical efficacy in animal models and expediting clinical development. Over 15 different vaccines are in preclinical development and 8 vaccines are now in different stages of clinical evaluation. These vaccines include DNA vaccines, virus-like particles and viral vectors such as live replicating vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV), human and chimpanzee adenovirus, and vaccinia virus. Recently, in preliminary results reported from the first phase III trial of an Ebola vaccine, the rVSV-vectored vaccine showed promising efficacy. This review charts this rapidly advancing area of research focusing on vaccines in clinical development and discusses the future opportunities and challenges faced in the licensure and deployment of Ebola vaccines. PMID:26668751

  17. Clinical imaging of the pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    May, G.; Gardiner, R.

    1987-01-01

    Featuring more than 300 high-quality radiographs and scan images, clinical imaging of the pancreas systematically reviews all appropriate imaging modalities for diagnosing and evaluating a variety of commonly encountered pancreatic disorders. After presenting a succinct overview of pancreatic embryology, anatomy, and physiology, the authors establish the clinical indications-including postoperative patient evaluation-for radiologic examination of the pancreas. The diagnostic capabilities and limitations of currently available imaging techniques for the pancreas are thoroughly assessed, with carefully selected illustrations depicting the types of images and data obtained using these different techniques. The review of acute and chronic pancreatitis considers the clinical features and possible complications of their variant forms and offers guidance in selecting appropriate imaging studies.

  18. The web of clinical data.

    PubMed

    Gori, M; Campiani, G; Rossi, A; Setacci, C

    2014-07-17

    Eric J. Topol, in his popular book, "The creative destruction of medicine: How the Digital Revolution Will Create Better Health Care", claims that medicine will inevitably be Schumpetered in the coming years. Interestingly, while we can afford to digitize the genome, to record any single heartbeat, and provide real--time measures of myriads of medical data, we are still missing a crucial catalyzer for strongly accelerating the Schumpetering: The "Web of Clinical Data". In this paper, we hypothesized its birth as the outcome of a viral collection of anonymized personal health records, that are made publicly available to scientists and professionals in medicine. Such a universal collection would not represent only a truly paradigm shift on the access to clinical data, but it would open the doors to the new grand challenge of building decision support systems that operate on a universal repository on the basis of the content of the health records and on clinical similarities. PMID:25030048

  19. Clinical practice guideline series update.

    PubMed

    Blissitt, Patricia A

    2013-10-01

    Approximately 20 per 100,000 people in the United States are currently living with myasthenia gravis (MG). MG is a chronic condition that occurs in all genders, ethnicities, and ages. The result of a defect at the neuromuscular junction, MG is characterized by fluctuating muscle weakness and fatigue. The purpose of the first edition of this American Association of Neuroscience Nurses' Clinical Practice Guideline is to summarize what is currently known about MG and to provide the reader with nursing-specific recommendations based on supporting evidence from nursing and other disciplines. Nursing Management of the Patient with Myasthenia Gravis includes information on epidemiology; types and classification of MG; pathophysiology; clinical features; clinical course; diagnostic tests; assessment; pharmacological, immunological, and surgical management; and the nurses' pivotal role in the care of the patient with MG. PMID:24025471

  20. Death Anxiety in Clinical and Non-Clinical Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdel-Khalek, Ahmed M.

    2005-01-01

    The Arabic Scale of Death Anxiety (ASDA) was administered, individually, to 7 groups (N=765) of Egyptian normal participants (non-clinical), anxiety disorder patients, and patients suffering from schizophrenia (males and females), and addicts (males only). They were generally matched as groups according to age, occupation, and education. The…

  1. Physicians Reentering Clinical Practice: Characteristics and Clinical Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grace, Elizabeth S.; Korinek, Elizabeth J.; Weitzel, Lindsay B.; Wentz, Dennis K.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Limited information exists to describe physicians who return to practice after absences from patient care. The Center for Personalized Education for Physicians (CPEP) is an independent, not-for-profit organization that provides clinical competency assessment and educational programs for physicians, including those reentering…

  2. Clinical Scientists Improving Clinical Practices: In Thoughts and Actions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apel, Kenn

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In this article, the author comments on aspects of Kamhi's (2014) article, which caused the author to think more deeply about definitions of language, theories of learning, and how these two core components of intervention prepare clinical scientists as they search the literature for new knowledge. Interprofessional collaborative…

  3. Gatekeepers for pragmatic clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Whicher, Danielle M; Miller, Jennifer E; Dunham, Kelly M; Joffe, Steven

    2015-10-01

    To successfully implement a pragmatic clinical trial, investigators need access to numerous resources, including financial support, institutional infrastructure (e.g. clinics, facilities, staff), eligible patients, and patient data. Gatekeepers are people or entities who have the ability to allow or deny access to the resources required to support the conduct of clinical research. Based on this definition, gatekeepers relevant to the US clinical research enterprise include research sponsors, regulatory agencies, payers, health system and other organizational leadership, research team leadership, human research protections programs, advocacy and community groups, and clinicians. This article provides a framework to help guide gatekeepers' decision-making related to the use of resources for pragmatic clinical trials. Relevant ethical considerations for gatekeepers include (1) concern for the interests of individuals, groups, and communities affected by the gatekeepers' decisions, including protection from harm and maximization of benefits; (2) advancement of organizational mission and values; and (3) stewardship of financial, human, and other organizational resources. Separate from these ethical considerations, gatekeepers' actions will be guided by relevant federal, state, and local regulations. This framework also suggests that to further enhance the legitimacy of their decision-making, gatekeepers should adopt transparent processes that engage relevant stakeholders when feasible and appropriate. We apply this framework to the set of gatekeepers responsible for making decisions about resources necessary for pragmatic clinical trials in the United States, describing the relevance of the criteria in different situations and pointing out where conflicts among the criteria and relevant regulations may affect decision-making. Recognition of the complex set of considerations that should inform decision-making will guide gatekeepers in making justifiable choices regarding

  4. 42 CFR 405.2450 - Clinical psychologist and clinical social worker services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Clinical psychologist and clinical social worker... § 405.2450 Clinical psychologist and clinical social worker services. (a) For clinical psychologist or clinical social worker professional services to be payable under this subpart, the services must be—...

  5. 42 CFR 405.2450 - Clinical psychologist and clinical social worker services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Clinical psychologist and clinical social worker... § 405.2450 Clinical psychologist and clinical social worker services. (a) For clinical psychologist or clinical social worker professional services to be payable under this subpart, the services must be—...

  6. Clinical management of pulmonary sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ying; Lower, Elyse E; Li, Huiping; Baughman, Robert P

    2016-05-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem disease for which diagnosis relies on the integration of clinical, radiologic, laboratory, and pathologic information. Assessment of clinical features is an important part of the disease evaluation. Computer Tomography provides information not available on routine chest roentgenogram which can assist diagnosing and establishing extent of disease. Monitoring for pulmonary and extra-pulmonary disease facilitates disease management. Patients with quality of life affecting symptoms or threatened end organ damage require systemic treatment which can be recommended in a stepwise fashion. Here, we provide guidance for the initial assessment, disease monitoring, and treatment recommendations for pulmonary and extra pulmonary disease. PMID:26959110

  7. Cancer nanotherapeutics in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Lytton-Jean, Abigail K R; Kauffman, Kevin J; Kaczmarek, James C; Langer, Robert

    2015-01-01

    To be legally sold in the United States, all drugs must go through the FDA approval process. This chapter introduces the FDA approval process and describes the clinical trials required for a drug to gain approval. We then look at the different cancer nanotherapeutics and in vivo diagnostics that are currently in clinical trials or have already received approval. These nanotechnologies are catagorized and described based on the delivery vehicle: liposomes, polymer micelles, albumin-bound chemotherapeutics, polymer-bound chemotherapeutics, and inorganic particles. PMID:25895874

  8. Handbook of clinical nursing practice

    SciTech Connect

    Asheervath, J.; Blevins, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Written in outline format, this reference will help nurses further their understanding of advanced nursing procedures. Information is provided on the physiological, psychological, environmental, and safety considerations of nursing activities associated with diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Special consideration is given to the areas of pediatric nursing, nursing assessment, and selected radiologic and nuclear medicine procedures for each system. Contents: Clinical Introduction. Clinical Nursing Practice: Focus on Basics. Focus on Cardiovascular Function. Focus on Respiratory Function. Focus on Gastrointestinal Function. Focus on Renal and Genito-Urological Function. Focus on Neuro-Skeletal and Muscular Function. Appendices.

  9. Oral cysticercosis: a clinical dilemma.

    PubMed

    Wanjari, Sangeeta Panjab; Patidar, Kalpana A; Parwani, Rajkumar N; Tekade, Satyajitraje A

    2013-01-01

    Cysticercosis is a potentially fatal parasitic disease caused by cysticercus cellulosae, the larval stage of Taenia solium. Oral cysticercosis is a rare entity and represents difficulty in clinical diagnosis. This article reports two cases of oral cysticercosis involving buccal and labial mucosa. Both the cases presented with solitary, nodular swelling that had been clinically diagnosed as a mucocele. Histopathology of excisional biopsy revealed it to be cysticercosis. Single, cystic nodular swelling of oral cavity may be the only evidence of cysticercosis and may present first to dentist. These cases emphasise the role of dentist and thorough histopathological examination in the early diagnosis of disease that can prevent potential systemic complication. PMID:23580668

  10. Oral cysticercosis: a clinical dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Wanjari, Sangeeta Panjab; Patidar, Kalpana A; Parwani, Rajkumar N; Tekade, Satyajitraje A

    2013-01-01

    Cysticercosis is a potentially fatal parasitic disease caused by cysticercus cellulosae, the larval stage of Taenia solium. Oral cysticercosis is a rare entity and represents difficulty in clinical diagnosis. This article reports two cases of oral cysticercosis involving buccal and labial mucosa. Both the cases presented with solitary, nodular swelling that had been clinically diagnosed as a mucocele. Histopathology of excisional biopsy revealed it to be cysticercosis. Single, cystic nodular swelling of oral cavity may be the only evidence of cysticercosis and may present first to dentist. These cases emphasise the role of dentist and thorough histopathological examination in the early diagnosis of disease that can prevent potential systemic complication. PMID:23580668

  11. Electrochemical Sensors for Clinic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, You; Xu, Hui; Zhang, Jianming; Li, Guang

    2008-01-01

    Demanded by modern medical diagnosis, advances in microfabrication technology have led to the development of fast, sensitive and selective electrochemical sensors for clinic analysis. This review addresses the principles behind electrochemical sensor design and fabrication, and introduces recent progress in the application of electrochemical sensors to analysis of clinical chemicals such as blood gases, electrolytes, metabolites, DNA and antibodies, including basic and applied research. Miniaturized commercial electrochemical biosensors will form the basis of inexpensive and easy to use devices for acquiring chemical information to bring sophisticated analytical capabilities to the non-specialist and general public alike in the future.

  12. New developments in clinical CARS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinigel, Martin; Breunig, Hans Georg; Kellner-Höfer, Marcel; Bückle, Rainer; Darvin, Maxim; Lademann, Juergen; König, Karsten

    2013-02-01

    We combined two-photon fluorescence and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging in a clinical hybrid multiphoton tomograph for in vivo imaging of human skin. The clinically approved TPEF/CARS system provides simultaneous imaging of endogenous fluorophores and non-fluorescent lipids. The Stokes laser for the two-beam configuration of CARS is based on spectral broadening of femtosecond laser pulses in a photonic crystal fiber (PCF). We report on the highly flexible medical TPEF/CARS tomograph MPTflex®-CARS with an articulated arm and first in vivo measurements on human skin.

  13. [Clinical aspects of trigeminal neuralgia].

    PubMed

    Laurent, B; Keravel, Y; Sindou, M

    2009-04-01

    Primary trigeminal neuralgia, termed "classical" in the international nomenclature, is an epilepsy-like disease. Diagnosis is easy when the disorder typical in presentation, based on clinical features and responsiveness to anticonvulsants. However, diagnosis can be difficult when atypical and/or in the long-duration forms. Furthermore, trigeminal neuralgia - even if typical in its clinical aspects - may be caused by a specific lesion and reveal a pathology. In other words, it may be symptomatic (secondary). Imaging, especially MRI, is of prime importance in identifying the cause and guiding the appropriate treatment. PMID:19328503

  14. Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors: Clinical Review

    PubMed Central

    Remick, Ronald A.; Froese, Colleen

    1990-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are effective antidepressant agents. They are increasingly and effectively used in a number of other psychiatric and non-psychiatric medical syndromes. Their potential for serious toxicity (i.e., hypertensive reaction) is far less than original reports suggest, and newer reversible substrate-specific MAOIs may offer even less toxicity. The author reviews the pharmacology, mechanism of action, clinical indications, and dosing strategies of MAOIs. The common MAOI side-effects (hypotension, weight gain, sexual dysfunction, insomnia, daytime sedation, myoclonus, and hypertensive episodes) are described and management techniques suggested. Recent clinical developments involving MAOIs are outlined. PMID:21233984

  15. Recombinant erythropoietin in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Ng, T; Marx, G; Littlewood, T; Macdougall, I

    2003-01-01

    The introduction of recombinant human erythropoietin (RHuEPO) has revolutionised the treatment of patients with anaemia of chronic renal disease. Clinical studies have demonstrated that RHuEPO is also useful in various non-uraemic conditions including haematological and oncological disorders, prematurity, HIV infection, and perioperative therapies. Besides highlighting both the historical and functional aspects of RHuEPO, this review discusses the applications of RHuEPO in clinical practice and the potential problems of RHuEPO treatment. PMID:12897214

  16. Clinical myths of forensic neuropsychology.

    PubMed

    Greiffenstein, Manfred F

    2009-02-01

    Clinical myths and lore are unfounded beliefs that still influence practice decisions. I examine the validity of six beliefs commonly encountered in forensic neuropsychology practice: the admissibility of test batteries; avoidance of practice effects; forewarning insures good effort; average deficits in bright persons; 15% chronic impairment in mild brain injury; and examiner bias causing malingering. I show these beliefs are invalid because of material misunderstandings of case law and literature, falsification by empirical findings, and lack of authoritative sources. The benefits, costs, and persistence of clinical myths are discussed. PMID:18609338

  17. Supervisees' Perception of Clinical Supervision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Supervisors must become aware of the possible conflicts that could arise during clinical supervision. It is important that supervisors communicate their roles and expectations effectively with their supervisees. This paper supports the notion that supervision is a mutual agreement between the supervisee and the supervisor and the roles of…

  18. Clinical applications of breath testing

    PubMed Central

    Paschke, Kelly M; Mashir, Alquam

    2010-01-01

    Breath testing has the potential to benefit the medical field as a cost-effective, non-invasive diagnostic tool for diseases of the lung and beyond. With growing evidence of clinical worth, standardization of methods, and new sensor and detection technologies the stage is set for breath testing to gain considerable attention and wider application in upcoming years. PMID:21173863

  19. Clinical Approach to Teacher Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tipton, William

    This manual, prepared for the state of Washington, provides tools and strategies aimed at assisting building administrators in clinical approaches to teacher evaluation. The first section provides preliminary thoughts on the evaluation process and discusses the two major problems: acceptance and time. The second section discusses the sources and…

  20. Autism: Clinical and Research Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Accardo, Pasquale J., Ed.; Magnusen, Christy, Ed.; Capute, Arnold J., Ed.

    This text examines the characteristics that define autism: impairments in communication; abnormal social development; and clinically significant odd behaviors. Specific chapters include: (1) Neural Mechanisms in Autism (Andrew W. Zimmerman and Barry Gordon); (2) Epidemiology of Autism and Other Pervasive Developmental Disorders: Current…

  1. Gentamicin in the Clinical Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillers, De-Ann M.; Schleiss, Mark R.

    2005-01-01

    Gentamicin is an aminoglycoside antibiotic that has been a mainstay in pediatric care for decades. Although new antibiotics are constantly under development, gentamicin continues to play an important role in clinical medicine. Although this may be surprising in the context of evidence of an association with hearing loss, both on a toxicity and a…

  2. Temporomandibular joint multidisciplinary team clinic.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nabeela; Poate, Tim; Nacher-Garcia, Cristina; Pugh, Nicola; Cowgill, Helen; Page, Lisa; Matthews, N Shaun

    2014-11-01

    Patients with dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) commonly present to oral and maxillofacial departments and are increasingly being managed by a subspecialist group of surgeons. We review the outcomes of patients attending a specialist TMJ multidisciplinary team (MDT) clinic. All patients are simultaneously reviewed by a consultant oral and maxillofacial surgeon, consultant in oral medicine, specialist physiotherapist, and maxillofacial prosthetist, and they can also see a consultant liaison psychiatrist. They are referred from primary, secondary, and tertiary care when medical and surgical treatment in the routine TMJ clinic has failed, and are triaged by the attending maxillofacial surgeon. On discharge they are returned to the care of the referring practitioner. We review the outcomes of patients attending this clinic over a 2-year period and show improvements in pain scores and maximal incisal opening, as well as quality of life outcome measures. All units in the UK with an interest in the management of diseases of the TMJ should consider establishing this type of clinic and should use available resources and expertise to maximise outcomes. PMID:25179688

  3. How clinical decisions are made

    PubMed Central

    Bate, Louise; Hutchinson, Andrew; Underhill, Jonathan; Maskrey, Neal

    2012-01-01

    There is much variation in the implementation of the best available evidence into clinical practice. These gaps between evidence and practice are often a result of multiple individual decisions. When making a decision, there is so much potentially relevant information available, it is impossible to know or process it all (so called ‘bounded rationality’). Usually, a limited amount of information is selected to reach a sufficiently satisfactory decision, a process known as satisficing. There are two key processes used in decision making: System 1 and System 2. System 1 involves fast, intuitive decisions; System 2 is a deliberate analytical approach, used to locate information which is not instantly recalled. Human beings unconsciously use System 1 processing whenever possible because it is quicker and requires less effort than System 2. In clinical practice, gaps between evidence and practice can occur when a clinician develops a pattern of knowledge, which is then relied on for decisions using System 1 processing, without the activation of a System 2 check against the best available evidence from high quality research. The processing of information and decision making may be influenced by a number of cognitive biases, of which the decision maker may be unaware. Interventions to encourage appropriate use of System 1 and System 2 processing have been shown to improve clinical decision making. Increased understanding of decision making processes and common sources of error should help clinical decision makers to minimize avoidable mistakes and increase the proportion of decisions that are better. PMID:22738381

  4. The Future of Clinical Dentistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavkin, Harold C.

    1998-01-01

    Discussion of the future of clinical dentistry looks at a variety of influences, including historical development factors; demographic trends; the role of the Human Genome Project in the development of scientific knowledge; a paradigm shift in approaches to oral infection and systemic disease; advancing technology; and reforms resulting from these…

  5. Clinical aspects of myasthenia explained.

    PubMed

    Verschuuren, Jan J G M; Palace, Jackie; Gilhus, Nils Erik

    2010-08-01

    Myasthenia gravis and myasthenic syndromes are diseases of the neuromuscular junction. Autoantibodies and toxins to or mutations in one of the synaptic proteins are the main causes of dysfunction. Myasthenic phenotypes can be classified according to the basic aetiological mechanisms or divided depending on the clinical phenotype. PMID:20380587

  6. Clinical competence in pain assessment.

    PubMed

    Sjöström, B; Jakobsson, E; Haljamäe, H

    2000-10-01

    Our knowledge about the content of the clinical knowledge used by nurses in a surgical recovery unit for assessment of postoperative pain is fairly limited. The aim of the present study was to analyse and describe the variations of nurses' conceptions of the impact of clinical experience on competence in post-operative pain assessment. The informants consist of critical care nurses. A phenomenographical approach has been applied to tape-recorded interview data. The results reveal that clinical competence in pain assessment was described in three categories: (a) to be able to see; (b) to be able to differentiate; (c) to be able to give. The observations articulate what nurses perceive that they have learnt from experience in performing many clinical pain assessments and point to some difficulties in using a single-data source for the development of valid and truthful professional knowledge. In the development of professional experience, it is of the utmost importance to be able to change perspective from what is most frequent and general to what is special and unique, to base one's standpoint on the individual patient's experience and integrate this with previous professional experience. PMID:11000601

  7. Clinical Judgment in Science: Reply

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westen, Drew; Weinberger, Joel

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents replies to comments published by M. S. Schulz and R. J. Waldinger, J. M. Wood and M. T. Nezworski, and H. N. Garb and W. M. Grove on the original article by D. Westen and J. Weinberger. Schulz and Waldinger (2005) make the important point that just as researchers can capitalize on the knowledge of experienced clinical observers…

  8. Transforming Staff through Clinical Supervision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfeifer, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    In order to continue to do great work with challenging youth, teachers should know that learning helps them be better professionals. Clinical supervision is one of the vehicles used. In a Re-ED program, those who work directly with youth (called teacher-counselors) are the primary agents of change. This makes it necessary to equip them with the…

  9. Teaching Techniques in Clinical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Diane

    This master's thesis presents several instructional methods and techniques developed for each of eleven topics or subject areas in clinical chemistry: carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism, diagnostic enzymology, endocrinology, toxicology, quality control, electrolytes, acid base balance, hepatic function, nonprotein nitrogenous compounds, and…

  10. [Clinical manifestations of cerebellar ataxias].

    PubMed

    Abdulkerimov, Kh T

    2003-01-01

    The analysis of clinical manifestations and focal symptoms in 18 patients with cerebellar ataxia (CA) has shown that these markers are not sufficient for making an accurate diagnosis in all CA cases. It is recommended to verify an ataxia form with objective methods, computed stabilography, in particular. PMID:12958853

  11. Clinical Bioinformatics: challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Network Tools and Applications in Biology (NETTAB) Workshops are a series of meetings focused on the most promising and innovative ICT tools and to their usefulness in Bioinformatics. The NETTAB 2011 workshop, held in Pavia, Italy, in October 2011 was aimed at presenting some of the most relevant methods, tools and infrastructures that are nowadays available for Clinical Bioinformatics (CBI), the research field that deals with clinical applications of bioinformatics. Methods In this editorial, the viewpoints and opinions of three world CBI leaders, who have been invited to participate in a panel discussion of the NETTAB workshop on the next challenges and future opportunities of this field, are reported. These include the development of data warehouses and ICT infrastructures for data sharing, the definition of standards for sharing phenotypic data and the implementation of novel tools to implement efficient search computing solutions. Results Some of the most important design features of a CBI-ICT infrastructure are presented, including data warehousing, modularity and flexibility, open-source development, semantic interoperability, integrated search and retrieval of -omics information. Conclusions Clinical Bioinformatics goals are ambitious. Many factors, including the availability of high-throughput "-omics" technologies and equipment, the widespread availability of clinical data warehouses and the noteworthy increase in data storage and computational power of the most recent ICT systems, justify research and efforts in this domain, which promises to be a crucial leveraging factor for biomedical research. PMID:23095472

  12. Clinical Spectrum of Propionic Acidaemia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the clinical features, physical findings, diagnosis, and laboratory parameters of the patients with propionic acidaemia (PA). Methods. The records of diagnosed cases of propionic acidaemia were reviewed, retrospectively. Results. Twenty-six patients with PA had 133 admissions. The majority (85%) of the patients exhibited clinical manifestations in the 1st week of life. Regarding clinical features, lethargy, fever, poor feeding, vomiting, dehydration, muscular hypotonia, respiratory symptoms, encephalopathy, disturbance of tone and reflexes, and malnutrition were observed in 51–92% admissions. Metabolic crises, respiratory diseases, hyperammonaemia, metabolic acidosis, hypoalbuminaemia, and hypocalcaemia were observed in 30–96% admissions. Pancytopenia, ketonuria, hypoproteinemia, hypoglycaemia, and mildly disturbed liver enzymes were found in 12–41% admissions. Generalised brain oedema was detected in 17% and cerebral atrophy in 25% admissions. Gender-wise odd ratio analysis showed value of 1.9 for lethargy, 1.99 for respiratory diseases, 0.55 for anaemia, and 1.82 for hypocalcaemia. Conclusion. Propionic acidaemia usually presents with wide spectrum of clinical features and disturbances of laboratory parameters in early neonatal age. It is associated with significant complications which deteriorate the patients' quality of life. Perhaps with early diagnosis of the disease and in time intervention, these may be preventable. PMID:24288598

  13. Nonverbal Interventions in Clinical Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shadish, William R., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A comparison of nonverbal with verbal clinical group interventions suggested that some traditional self-report devices show less differentiation between these two interventions than do measures of group cohesion. A strong, replicable manipulation tested these findings, which were consistent with previous research. (Author/BEF)

  14. Clinical spectrum of propionic acidaemia.

    PubMed

    Rafique, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the clinical features, physical findings, diagnosis, and laboratory parameters of the patients with propionic acidaemia (PA). Methods. The records of diagnosed cases of propionic acidaemia were reviewed, retrospectively. Results. Twenty-six patients with PA had 133 admissions. The majority (85%) of the patients exhibited clinical manifestations in the 1st week of life. Regarding clinical features, lethargy, fever, poor feeding, vomiting, dehydration, muscular hypotonia, respiratory symptoms, encephalopathy, disturbance of tone and reflexes, and malnutrition were observed in 51-92% admissions. Metabolic crises, respiratory diseases, hyperammonaemia, metabolic acidosis, hypoalbuminaemia, and hypocalcaemia were observed in 30-96% admissions. Pancytopenia, ketonuria, hypoproteinemia, hypoglycaemia, and mildly disturbed liver enzymes were found in 12-41% admissions. Generalised brain oedema was detected in 17% and cerebral atrophy in 25% admissions. Gender-wise odd ratio analysis showed value of 1.9 for lethargy, 1.99 for respiratory diseases, 0.55 for anaemia, and 1.82 for hypocalcaemia. Conclusion. Propionic acidaemia usually presents with wide spectrum of clinical features and disturbances of laboratory parameters in early neonatal age. It is associated with significant complications which deteriorate the patients' quality of life. Perhaps with early diagnosis of the disease and in time intervention, these may be preventable. PMID:24288598

  15. Clinical Pharmacy Education in China

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Melody; Yang, Li; Nie, Xiao-Yan; Zhai, Suo-Di; Shi, Lu-Wen; Lubawy, William C.

    2008-01-01

    Pharmacy education in China focuses on pharmaceutical sciences, with the bachelor of science (BS) of pharmacy as the entry-level degree. Pharmacy practice curricula in these programs are centered on compounding, dispensing, pharmacy administration, and laboratory experiences, which are the traditional responsibilities for pharmacists. Additional graduate-level training is available at the master of science (MS) and the doctor of philosophy (PhD) levels, most of which concentrate on drug discovery and drug development research. Presently, the emphasis in practice is beginning to shift to clinical pharmacy. With this change, additional degree offerings are being developed to meet the growing demand for clinical pharmacists. There is also interest in developing more clinical skills in practicing pharmacists through additional non-degree training. The Ministry of Education is considering a proposal for an entry-level professional degree of master and/or doctor in clinical pharmacy similar to the doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) degree in the United States. PMID:19325949

  16. Clinical Supervision: History, Practice, Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Robert; Miller, Kathleen

    1987-01-01

    There is a natural link between clinical supervision and its current interest in effective teaching. Describes how the process affects practice in schools today. Lists Morris Cogan's eight phases of supervision and Madeline Hunter's seven steps in the development of an effective teaching lesson. Includes five references. (Author/MD)

  17. Clinical Trials in Noninfectious Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jane S.; Knickelbein, Jared E.; Nussenblatt, Robert B.; Sen, H. Nida

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of noninfectious uveitis continues to remain a challenge for many ophthalmologists. Historically, clinical trials in uveitis have been sparse, and thus, most treatment decisions have largely been based on clinical experience and consensus guidelines. The current treatment paradigm favors initiation then tapering of corticosteroids with addition of steroid-sparing immunosuppressive agents for persistence or recurrence of disease. Unfortunately, in spite of a multitude of highly unfavorable systemic effects, corticosteroids are still regarded as the mainstay of treatment for many patients with chronic and refractory noninfectious uveitis. However, with the success of other conventional and biologic immunomodulatory agents in treating systemic inflammatory and autoimmune conditions, interest in targeted treatment strategies for uveitis has been renewed. Multiple clinical trials on steroid-sparing immunosuppressive agents, biologic agents, intraocular corticosteroid implants, and topical ophthalmic solutions have already been completed, and many more are ongoing. This review discusses the results and implications of these clinical trials investigating both alternative and novel treatment options for noninfectious uveitis. PMID:26035763

  18. Clinical manifestations of cerebellar disease.

    PubMed

    Javalkar, Vijayakumar; Khan, Misbba; Davis, Debra E

    2014-11-01

    Clinical manifestations of cerebellar disease include ataxia and tremor, as well as nystagmus, dysarthria, and cognitive dysfunction. Recognition of the cerebellar pattern of disease can aid in the prompt and correct diagnosis and lead to appropriate treatment and rehabilitation to minimize disability. PMID:25439285

  19. The clinical efficacy of medetomidine.

    PubMed

    Vähä-Vahe, T

    1989-01-01

    Studies on the clinical efficacy of medetomidine, a novel alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonist, are reviewed. Medetomidine has been shown to produce a reliable state of sedation, relaxation and recumbency suitable for small animal practice. In dogs, the optimal clinical dose for examinations, clinical procedures and minor surgical interventions seems to be 30-40 micrograms/kg intramusculary and in cats 80-110 micrograms/kg. Other effects of medetomidine reported include bradycardia, nausea and vomiting. Occasional muscle jerkings have been also reported after medetomidine injection. In special investigations, medetomidine has successfully been used in wound suturation and ovariohysterectomy in dogs and for sedation in dogs with heart diseases. Medetomidine-ketamine combination has been shown to be useful for anesthesia and immobilization in cats and zoo animals. The medetomidine-fentanyl combination was tested in dog: The administration of fentanyl increased the sedation and analgesia obtained with medetomidine. Medetomidine appears to be a potent sedative and analgesic agent for clinical use. PMID:2571266

  20. Reestablishing Clinical Psychology's Subjective Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunsberger, Peter Hume

    2007-01-01

    Comments on the report by the APA Presidential Task Force on Evidence-Based Practice (see record 2006-05893-001) entitled Evidence-based practice in psychology. The Task Force is to be commended for their report valuing evidence from "clinical expertise" on a par with "research data" (p. 272) in guiding psychological practices. The current author…

  1. Therapeutic Communication and Clinical Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karns, Phyllis J.; Schwab, Therese A.

    1982-01-01

    The use of interpersonal skills can greatly enhance the learning process, not only by reducing stress, but also by significantly increasing cognitive growth in students. The authors review these findings and discuss their application to teaching in the clinical area. (CT)

  2. Using Disguised Clinical Case Material

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kantrowitz, Judy L.

    2010-01-01

    When, why, and how clinicians decide to write about clients are ethical concerns. There are risks and potential clinical ramifications as well as responsibilities for how these decisions are made. On the basis of 141 interviews with psychoanalysts who have published in 3 major national and international psychoanalytic journals, the author explores…

  3. Clinical manifestation of mitochondrial diseases.

    PubMed

    Magner, Martin; Kolářová, Hana; Honzik, Tomáš; Švandová, Ivana; Zeman, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders (MD) represent a clinically, biochemically and genetically heterogeneous group of diseases associated with dysfunction of the oxidative phosphorylation system and pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. Our aim was to illustrate the most common clinical presentation of MD on the example of selected diseases and syndromes. The minimal prevalence of MD is estimated as 1 to 5,000. MD may manifest at any age since birth until late-adulthood with acute manifestation or as a chronic progressive disease. Virtually any organ may be impaired, but the organs with the highest energetic demands are most frequently involved, including brain, muscle, heart and liver. Some MD may manifest as a characteristic cluster of clinical features (e.g. MELAS syndrome, Kearns-Sayre syndrome). Diagnostics includes detailed history, the comprehensive clinical examination, results of specialized examinations (especially cardiology, visual fundus examination, brain imaging, EMG), laboratory testing of body fluids (lactate, aminoacids, organic acids), and analysis of bioptic samples of muscle, skin, and liver, eventually. Normal lactate level in blood does not exclude the possibility of MD. Although the aimed molecular genetic analyses may be indicated in some of mitochondrial diseases, the methods of next generation sequencing come into focus. Examples of treatment are arginine supplementation in MELAS syndrome, ketogenic diet in pyruvate oxidation disorders or quinone analogs in patients with LHON. Conclusion: The clinical suspicion of a mitochondrial disorder is often delayed, or the disease remains undiagnosed. The correct diagnosis and adequate treatment can improve prognosis of the patient. Access to genetic counseling is also of great importance. PMID:26982751

  4. [Quality control in clinical trials].

    PubMed

    Fukushima, M

    1996-01-01

    Quality control (QC) in clinical trials means the procedures which insure protection of human subjects from research risk, reliability of the data, and thereby assures internal consistency. This has been developed since 1970s in the US, by establishing various regulations which are now called GCP. From the viewpoint of total QC, it should be emphasized that rigorous review of protocol by the Institutional Review Board and obtaining Informed Consent are prerequisites for insuring the quality of the given trial at high scientific level. When pursuing a clinical trial, first of all, facilities of the institutions and the ability of investigators must be of high quality. For this reason, at each institution previous data related to trials should be thoroughly reviewed and analyzed prior to developing a protocol. Educational courses in QC in clinical practice are invaluable. QC of diagnosis means, for example, central pathology review and standardization of diagnostic procedures and process. Secondly, at each institution, data managers collect the data and submit them to the central office at the indicated time. In order to evolve clinical trial, continuous education for data managers and expansion of their job are encouraged. Thirdly, at the statistical center independent from the research group office, subject-specific data managers, the biostatistical staff, must check submitted forms for completeness, consistency and accuracy. Finally, at the data analysis, quality evaluation of the research should also be carried out. Throughout the trial, monitoring and audit are particularly important to assure quality. The sponsor has the responsibility of monitoring the trial and make rigorous onsite visits, and the individual study group also have a monitoring program, while the FDA and the NCI audit by themselves. The purpose of audit is not only to assure data reliability but also to check out patient compliance to drug, education as to regulations and rules of clinical

  5. SOUTH SANTA CLARA COUNTY MIGRANT TREATMENT CLINIC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SKILLICORN, STANLEY A.

    IN THE SUMMER OF 1965, A MIGRANT HEALTH CLINIC WAS STARTED IN THE SOUTHERN PART OF SANTA CLARA COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. THE CLINIC DIFFERS FROM THE PUBLIC HEALTH DEPARTMENT'S CLINICS BY OFFERING TREATMENT AND MEDICATION, INSTEAD OF ONLY PREVENTIVE SERVICES. THE ENTIRE STAFF, FROM DOCTORS TO BABY-SITTERS, VOLUNTEERS ITS TIME, AND THE CLINIC IS NOW OPEN…

  6. Starting a job as adjunct clinical instructor.

    PubMed

    Koharchik, Linda; Jakub, Karen

    2014-08-01

    This article is the second in a new quarterly series on the roles of adjunct clinical faculty and preceptors, who teach nursing students to apply knowledge in clinical settings. Topics will include the preparation of clinical instructors and preceptors for these roles, the student evaluation process, and overcoming challenges that can come with teaching in the clinical field and with adjunct teaching. PMID:25075704

  7. Situational Supervision for Athletic Training Clinical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Linda S.; Gardner, Greg; Barnum, Mary G.; Willeford, K. Sean; Sexton, Patrick; Guyer, M. Susan; Fincher, A. Louise

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: The medical education model provides the basis for athletic training students to learn theoretical and practical skills. Clinical rotations are completed where they apply what they have learned under the direct supervision of a clinical instructor (CI) or approved clinical instructor (ACI). Approved clinical instructors are taught…

  8. HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Prevention HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials (Last updated 9/15/2015; last reviewed 9/15/2015) Key Points HIV/AIDS clinical trials are ... and effective in people. What is an HIV/AIDS clinical trial? HIV/AIDS clinical trials help researchers ...

  9. 76 FR 45577 - Clinical Investigator Training Course

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-29

    ... clinical trials; improve the ] quality of clinical trials; and enhance the safety of trial participants.... Background Clinical trial investigators play a critical role in the development of medical products. They... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Clinical Investigator Training Course AGENCY: Food and...

  10. The use of clinical utility assessments in early clinical development.

    PubMed

    Khan, Anis A; Perlstein, Itay; Krishna, Rajesh

    2009-03-01

    A quickly realizable benefit of model-based drug development is in reducing uncertainty in risk/benefit, comprising individually of safety and effectiveness, two key attributes of a product evaluated for regulatory approval, marketing, and use. In this review, we investigate gaps and opportunities in using fundamental decision analytic principles in drug development and present a quantitative clinical pharmacology framework for the application of such aids for early clinical development decision making. We anticipate that implementation of such emerging tools will enable sufficient scientific understanding of the two attributes to facilitate the early termination of compounds with less than desirable risk/benefit profiles and continuance of compounds with acceptable risk/benefit profiles. PMID:19145490

  11. Clinical multiphoton tomography and clinical two-photon microendoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Bückle, Rainer; Weinigel, Martin; Elsner, Peter; Kaatz, Martin

    2009-02-01

    We report on applications of high-resolution clinical multiphoton tomography based on the femtosecond laser system DermaInspectTM with its flexible mirror arm in Australia, Asia, and Europe. Applications include early detection of melanoma, in situ tracing of pharmacological and cosmetical compounds including ZnO nanoparticles in the epidermis and upper dermis, the determination of the skin aging index SAAID as well as the study of the effects of anti-aging products. In addition, first clinical studies with novel rigid high-NA two-photon 1.6 mm GRIN microendoscopes have been conducted to study the effect of wound healing in chronic wounds (ulcus ulcera) as well as to perform intrabody imaging with subcellular resolution in small animals.

  12. Future Clinical Trials in DIPG: Bringing Epigenetics to the Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Morales La Madrid, Andres; Hashizume, Rintaro; Kieran, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    In spite of major recent advances in diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) molecular characterization, this body of knowledge has not yet translated into better treatments. To date, more than 250 clinical trials evaluating radiotherapy along with conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy as well as newer biologic agents have failed to improve the dismal outcome when compared to palliative radiation alone. The biology of DIPG remained unknown until recently when the neurosurgical expertise along with the recognition by the scientific and clinical community of the importance of tissue sampling at diagnosis; ideally, in the context of a clinical trial and by trained neurosurgical teams to maximize patient safety. These pre-treatment tumor samples, and others coming from tissue obtained post-mortem, have yielded new insights into DIPG molecular pathogenesis. We now know that DIPG comprises a heterogeneous disease with variable molecular phenotypes, different from adult high-grade glioma, other non-pontine pediatric high-grade gliomas, and even between pontine gliomas. The discovery of histone H3.3 or H3.1 mutations has been an important step forward in understanding tumor formation, maintenance, and progression. Pharmacologic reversal of DIPG histone demethylation therefore offers an important potential intervention strategy for the treatment of DIPG. To date, clinical trials of newly diagnosed or progressive DIPG with epigenetic (histone) modifiers have been unsuccessful. Whether this failure represents limited activity of the agents used, their CNS penetration, redundant pathways within the tumor, or the possibility that histone mutations are necessary only to initiate DIPGs but not maintain their growth, suggest that a great deal still needs to be elucidated in both the underlying biology of these pathways and the drugs designed to target them. In this review, we will discuss the role of both epigenetic and genetic mutations within DIPG and the development of treatment

  13. Clinical toxicology and military application.

    PubMed

    Bland, S A

    2006-01-01

    The changing operational tempo and types of deployment have, since the end of the Cold War, required a change in CBRN training. The threat from weapons of mass destruction has been replaced with the threat from improvised explosive devices and insurgent attempts to develop asymmetric weapons to target military and civilian populations. In addition exposure to hazardous materials as well as environmental hazards and natural toxins requires a greater awareness of the necessary supportive and definitive management. Developing a cadre of specialists with an interest in toxicology and environmental medicine, within either emergency or acute medicine, would be advantageous to deployed units as well as specialised units, including those tasked in support of UK homeland security. An established pathway for sub-specialisation in clinical toxicology does not yet exist. With the establishment of the College of Emergency Medicine, as well as the Acute Medicine Society and Intensive Care Society further development of clinical toxicology is likely. PMID:17310611

  14. [Thoracic nocardiosis - a clinical report].

    PubMed

    Vale, Artur; Guerra, Miguel; Martins, Daniel; Lameiras, Angelina; Miranda, José; Vouga, Luís

    2014-01-01

    Nocardia genus microorganisms are ubiquitous, Gram positive aerobic bacterias, responsible for disease mainly in immunocompromised hosts, with cellular immune response commitment. Inhalation is the main form of transmition and pulmonary disease is the most frequent presentation. Dissemination may occur by contiguity and also via hematogenous. The clinical and imaging presentation is not specific, and diagnosis is obtained after identification of Nocardia bacteria in biological samples. Since there are no reliable studies that indicate the best therapeutic option, treatment should be individualized and based on antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Surgical drainage should also be considered in all patients. The authors present a clinical case of a patient with thoracic nocardiosis, and make a short literature review on the theme. PMID:25596394

  15. Fluorescence photodiagnosis in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Moghissi, K; Stringer, M R; Dixon, Kate

    2008-12-01

    Fluorescence diagnosis has become an important method of investigation in clinical practice particularly in identification and localisation of pre and early cancerous lesions as well as image guided therapy. The method relies on the principle of differential fluorescence emission between abnormal and normal tissues in response to excitation by a specific wavelength of light within the visible spectrum range. In clinical practice two types of fluorescence diagnostic methods are used, namely autofluorescence and drug-induced fluorescence. The former relies on the differential fluorescence of "native" fluorophores whereas the latter requires a photosensitiser which enhances the differential fluorescence emission of the normal versus the abnormal tissues. Development and advances in fibreoptic, endoscopic instrumentation currently permit fluorescence endoscopy to be carried out in a number of situations. PMID:19356662

  16. The ethics of clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Nardini, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decades, randomised controlled trials (RCTs) have prevailed over clinical judgement, case reports, and observational studies and became the gold evidential standard in medicine. Furthermore, during the same time frame, RCTs became a crucial part of the regulatory process whereby a new therapeutic can gain access to the drug market. Today, clinical trials are large and tightly regulated enterprises that have to comply with ethical requirements while maintaining high epistemic standards, a balance that becomes increasingly difficult as the research questions become more sophisticated. In this review, the author will discuss some of the most important ethical issues surrounding RCTs, with an eye to the most recent debates and the context of oncological research in particular. PMID:24482672

  17. Tuberculosis vaccines in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Rosalind; McShane, Helen

    2011-01-01

    Effective prophylactic and/or therapeutic vaccination is a key strategy for controlling the global TB epidemic. The partial effectiveness of the existing TB vaccine, bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG), suggests effective vaccination is possible and highlights the need for an improved vaccination strategy. Clinical trials are evaluating both modifications to the existing BCG immunization methods and also novel TB vaccines, designed to replace or boost BCG. Candidate vaccines in clinical development include live mycobacterial vaccines designed to replace BCG, subunit vaccines designed to boost BCG and therapeutic vaccines designed as an adjunct to chemotherapy. There is a great need for validated animal models, identification of immunological biomarkers of protection and field sites with the capacity for large-scale efficacy testing in order to develop and license a novel TB vaccine or regimen. PMID:21604985

  18. [Regulatory burden of clinical research].

    PubMed

    Smeets, Edgar

    2015-01-01

    A few recent reports in both daily newspapers and interviews indicate that investigators working on trials in the Netherlands are experiencing too much red-tape, that regulations are getting too strict, and that they are being asked to do things which, in their view, are not really important. This impairs their efforts in delivering good research. Analysis shows that no new legislation has been introduced since the implementation of the EU Clinical Trial Directive in 2004. Over this 8-year period, the number of clinical research projects submitted nationwide has remained almost steady at approximately 1,800 per year. Of these a steady 42% are investigator-initiated studies. Recent new guidance from the FDA and MHRA indicates that over-interpretation of rules has indeed occurred. The newly promoted risk-based methodologies allow things to change. A potentially 'leaner' way forward has also been discussed. PMID:25761295

  19. Clinics in diagnostic imaging (168).

    PubMed

    Lai, Yusheng Keefe; Mahmood, Rameysh Danovani

    2016-05-01

    A 16-year-old Chinese male patient presented with constipation lasting five days, colicky abdominal pain, lethargy, weakness and body aches. He was able to pass flatus. Abdominal radiography showed a distended stomach causing inferior displacement of the transverse colon. Computed tomography revealed a dilated oesophagus, stomach and duodenum up to its third portion, with a short aortomesenteric distance and narrow angle. There was also consolidation in the lungs bilaterally. Based on the constellation of clinical and imaging findings, a diagnosis of superior mesenteric artery syndrome complicated by aspiration pneumonia was made. The patient was subsequently started on intravenous hydration, nasogastric tube aspiration and antibiotics. Following stabilisation of his acute condition, a nasojejunal feeding tube was inserted and a feeding plan was implemented to promote weight gain. The clinical presentation, differentials, diagnosis and treatment of superior mesenteric artery syndrome are discussed. PMID:27212130

  20. Clinical manifestations of celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Green, Peter H R; Krishnareddy, Suneeta; Lebwohl, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-based condition affecting multiple organ systems. Clinical manifestations are manifold in form and number due to the multisystem nature of CD. There has been a progressive change in the clinical manifestations over the recent decades with fewer patients, both adults and children, presenting with a diarrheal, classical form. This, in children, is seen in only the youngest, while growth issues, screening at-risk groups and recurrent abdominal pain are the most common modes of presentation among children. Among adults, diarrhea is the most common presentation followed by anemia. Screening at-risk groups, metabolic bone disease and incidental recognition at endoscopy performed for reflux are the other main modes of presentation. The bulk of those with CD remain undiagnosed. The symptoms are often common, and increased medical education should lead to greater awareness in the medical community and an increased rate of diagnosis. PMID:25925914

  1. Proton therapy in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Chang, Joe Y.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation dose escalation and acceleration improves local control but also increases toxicity. Proton radiation is an emerging therapy for localized cancers that is being sought with increasing frequency by patients. Compared with photon therapy, proton therapy spares more critical structures due to its unique physics. The physical properties of a proton beam make it ideal for clinical applications. By modulating the Bragg peak of protons in energy and time, a conformal radiation dose with or without intensity modulation can be delivered to the target while sparing the surrounding normal tissues. Thus, proton therapy is ideal when organ preservation is a priority. However, protons are more sensitive to organ motion and anatomy changes compared with photons. In this article, we review practical issues of proton therapy, describe its image-guided treatment planning and delivery, discuss clinical outcome for cancer patients, and suggest challenges and the future development of proton therapy. PMID:21527064

  2. Clinics in diagnostic imaging (168)

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Yusheng Keefe; Mahmood, Rameysh Danovani

    2016-01-01

    A 16-year-old Chinese male patient presented with constipation lasting five days, colicky abdominal pain, lethargy, weakness and body aches. He was able to pass flatus. Abdominal radiography showed a distended stomach causing inferior displacement of the transverse colon. Computed tomography revealed a dilated oesophagus, stomach and duodenum up to its third portion, with a short aortomesenteric distance and narrow angle. There was also consolidation in the lungs bilaterally. Based on the constellation of clinical and imaging findings, a diagnosis of superior mesenteric artery syndrome complicated by aspiration pneumonia was made. The patient was subsequently started on intravenous hydration, nasogastric tube aspiration and antibiotics. Following stabilisation of his acute condition, a nasojejunal feeding tube was inserted and a feeding plan was implemented to promote weight gain. The clinical presentation, differentials, diagnosis and treatment of superior mesenteric artery syndrome are discussed. PMID:27212130

  3. Career opportunities in clinical engineering.

    PubMed

    Morse, W A

    1992-01-01

    The varied career opportunities open to clinical engineers are described in this paper. Many of these opportunities are within the medical device industry in research, development, manufacturing design, regulatory activities, production, operations, sales, marketing, service, and management. Additional opportunities are available in hospitals, with the Veterans Administration, or working as an entrepreneur or a consultant. Each of these careers requires specific training and skills, and they all require a fundamental scientific knowledge of physical principles and mathematics. Research and management, however, require different educational preparation. The research emphasis should be on theoretical principles and creativity; the management emphasis should be on financial and labor problems. In all clinical engineering careers, the individual is a problem solver. PMID:10120058

  4. Clinical biomarkers of angiogenesis inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Aaron P.; Citrin, Deborah E.; Camphausen, Kevin A.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction An expanding understanding of the importance of angiogenesis in oncology and the development of numerous angiogenesis inhibitors are driving the search for biomarkers of angiogenesis. We review currently available candidate biomarkers and surrogate markers of anti-angiogenic agent effect. Discussion A number of invasive, minimally invasive, and non-invasive tools are described with their potential benefits and limitations. Diverse markers can evaluate tumor tissue or biological fluids, or specialized imaging modalities. Conclusions The inclusion of these markers into clinical trials may provide insight into appropriate dosing for desired biological effects, appropriate timing of additional therapy, prediction of individual response to an agent, insight into the interaction of chemotherapy and radiation following exposure to these agents, and perhaps most importantly, a better understanding of the complex nature of angiogenesis in human tumors. While many markers have potential for clinical use, it is not yet clear which marker or combination of markers will prove most useful. PMID:18414993

  5. Exercise Dose in Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Wasfy, Meagan M; Baggish, Aaron L

    2016-06-01

    There is wide variability in the physical activity patterns of the patients in contemporary clinical cardiovascular practice. This review is designed to address the impact of exercise dose on key cardiovascular risk factors and on mortality. We begin by examining the body of literature that supports a dose-response relationship between exercise and cardiovascular disease risk factors, including plasma lipids, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and obesity. We next explore the relationship between exercise dose and mortality by reviewing the relevant epidemiological literature underlying current physical activity guideline recommendations. We then expand this discussion to critically examine recent data pertaining to the impact of exercise dose at the lowest and highest ends of the spectrum. Finally, we provide a framework for how the key concepts of exercise dose can be integrated into clinical practice. PMID:27267537

  6. Clinical manifestations in trisomy 9.

    PubMed

    Kannan, T P; Hemlatha, S; Ankathil, R; Zilfalil, B A

    2009-07-01

    Complete trisomy 9 is a lethal diagnosis and most fetuses diagnosed thus die prenatally or during the early postnatal period and majority of such cases have been known to end in spontaneous abortion in the first trimester itself. One such rare survival of fetus ending in normal delivery and surviving until 20 days is reported here detailing the clinical manifestations of the child during the period of survival. The salient clinical features observed were small face, wide fontanel, prominent occiput, micrognathia, low set ears, upslanting palpebral fissures, high arched palate, short sternum, overlapping fingers, limited hip abduction, rocker bottom feet, heart murmurs and also webbed neck, characteristic of this trisomy 9 syndrome. PMID:19475342

  7. Mayo Clinic Zebrafish Facility Overview.

    PubMed

    Leveque, Ryan E; Clark, Karl J; Ekker, Stephen C

    2016-07-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a premier nonmammalian vertebrate model organism. This small aquatic fish is utilized in multiple disciplines in the Mayo Clinic community and by many laboratories around the world because of its biological similarity to humans, its advanced molecular genetics, the elucidation of its genome sequence, and the ever-expanding and outstanding new biological tools now available to the zebrafish researcher. The Mayo Clinic Zebrafish Facility (MCZF) houses ∼2,000 tanks annotated using an in-house, Internet cloud-based bar-coding system tied to our established zfishbook.org web infrastructure. Paramecia are the primary food source for larval fish rearing, using a simplified culture protocol described herein. The MCZF supports the specific ongoing research in a variety of laboratories, while also serving as a local hub for new scientists as they learn to tap into the potential of this model system for understanding normal development, disease, and as models of health. PMID:27023741

  8. Identifying and managing clinical responsibility.

    PubMed

    Armitage, Mary; Shaw, Kirstyn; Drew, Peter

    2008-04-01

    Clinical responsibility is an area that requires extensive consideration and development to align with other changes in healthcare in the NHS. Increasing levels of litigation and investigation into the practice of medical practitioners have highlighted the need for clearer guidance for doctors. Using hypothetical case studies, this project explored the understandings and experiences of physicians and potential solutions in areas where there was ambiguity in clinical responsibility. In addition, existing policy and practice within trusts throughout the UK was analysed. The output from the focus group discussion and policy analysis led to the recommendations and guidance for doctors outlined in this paper, with the aim of illustrating the central themes that both doctors and trusts need to address in the future. PMID:18478855

  9. Positive interventions in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Tayyab

    2009-05-01

    Mainstream psychotherapy has made huge strides in treating symptoms and disorders, but it has largely overlooked happiness as a therapeutic goal despite frequently hearing from clients, "Doctor, I want to be happy." This issue of Journal of Clinical Psychology: In Session describes a number of positive interventions for specific clinical problems, such as depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, loss, grief, and relationship distress. Although the name may suggest it, positive interventions do not imply that rest of psychotherapies are negative. Neither are negatives denied nor minimized. Distinct from self-help recipes proffering instant changes, positive psychology interventions refer to systematic approaches to overcome challenges by using clients' strengths and assets. A hybrid psychotherapy-coaching model and strength-based assessment can ask a client "What is right with you?" All articles are supplemented with rich case illustrations. PMID:19294745

  10. Clinical characteristics of CHARGE syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ahn, B S; Oh, S Y

    1998-12-01

    CHARGE syndrome, first described by Pagon, was named for its six major clinical features. They are: coloboma of the eye, heart defects, atresia of the choanae, retarded growth and development including CNS anomalies, genital hypoplasia and/or urinary tract anomalies, and ear anomalies and/or hearing loss. We experienced three cases of CHARGE syndrome who displayed ocular coloboma, heart defects, retarded growth and development, and external ear anomalies, and we also review the previously reported literature concerning CHARGE syndrome. PMID:10188375

  11. Beryllium disease: a clinical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, H.L.

    1980-02-01

    A relatively new occupational disease, beryllium poisoning, is discussed. The history of this respiratory disease among workers after beryllium exposure from extraction and alloy manufacturing is not well documented in the US Attempts by industry to delay investigations into beryllium toxicity are described. The specific incidents occurring at a fluorescent lamp manufacturing plant in Salem, Massachusetts are presented. Clinical observations of chronic beryllium disease are discussed. Symptoms are described. The current status of diagnosis and treatment of beryllium poisoning is presented.

  12. [CLINICAL ASPECTS OF SEPTIC ENCEPHALOPATHY].

    PubMed

    Fesenko, O V; Sinopal'nikov, A I; Filatov, V V; Danishevsky, S V; Styrt, E A

    2016-01-01

    Septic encephalopathy is a form of general cerebral dysfunction caused by a systemic inflammatory reaction. Its investigation encounters enormous difficulties for the lack of reliable biological markers of neuronal lesions and methods for the evaluation of consciousness in severely ill patients. Hence, the importance of correct clinical interpretation of the character and magnitude of CNS activity. Examples are presented demonstrating the difficulty of interpreting disorders in CNS activity associated with evere community-acquired pneumonia. PMID:27172727

  13. Conflict in the dialysis clinic.

    PubMed

    Payton, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Conflict is common in healthcare settings and can affect the functioning of a dialysis clinic. Unresolved conflict can decrease staff productivity and teamwork, and potentially decrease the quality of patient care. This article discusses the causes and effects of conflict, describes the five basic conflict-handling styles that can be useful when dealing with conflict (avoidance, accommodation, competing, compromise, and collaboration), and provides resources for resolving patient-provider conflict. PMID:25244891

  14. Educational innovations in clinical pharmacogenomics.

    PubMed

    Perry, C G; Maloney, K A; Beitelshees, A L; Jeng, Ljb; Ambulos, N P; Shuldiner, A R; Blitzer, M G

    2016-06-01

    Genetic and genomic discovery is revolutionizing medicine at an extraordinary pace, leading to a better understanding of disease and improved treatments for patients. This advanced pace of discovery presents an urgency to expand medical school curricula to include genetic and genomic testing (including pharmacogenomics), and integration of genomic medicine into clinical practice. Consequently, organizations and healthcare authorities have charged medical schools with training future physicians to be competent in their knowledge of genomic implementation. PMID:26875057

  15. Clinical Genetic Testing in Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    New technologies for mutation detection in the human genome have greatly increased our understanding of epilepsy genetics. Application of genomic technologies in the clinical setting allows for more efficient genetic diagnosis in some patients; therefore, it is important to understand the types of tests available and the types of mutations that can be detected. Making a genetic diagnosis improves overall patient care by enhancing prognosis and recurrence risk counseling and informing treatment decisions. PMID:26316867

  16. Harnessing neuroplasticity for clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Sur, Mriganka; Dobkin, Bruce H.; O'Brien, Charles; Sanger, Terence D.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Rumsey, Judith M.; Hicks, Ramona; Cameron, Judy; Chen, Daofen; Chen, Wen G.; Cohen, Leonardo G.; deCharms, Christopher; Duffy, Charles J.; Eden, Guinevere F.; Fetz, Eberhard E.; Filart, Rosemarie; Freund, Michelle; Grant, Steven J.; Haber, Suzanne; Kalivas, Peter W.; Kolb, Bryan; Kramer, Arthur F.; Lynch, Minda; Mayberg, Helen S.; McQuillen, Patrick S.; Nitkin, Ralph; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Reuter-Lorenz, Patricia; Schiff, Nicholas; Sharma, Anu; Shekim, Lana; Stryker, Michael; Sullivan, Edith V.; Vinogradov, Sophia

    2011-01-01

    Neuroplasticity can be defined as the ability of the nervous system to respond to intrinsic or extrinsic stimuli by reorganizing its structure, function and connections. Major advances in the understanding of neuroplasticity have to date yielded few established interventions. To advance the translation of neuroplasticity research towards clinical applications, the National Institutes of Health Blueprint for Neuroscience Research sponsored a workshop in 2009. Basic and clinical researchers in disciplines from central nervous system injury/stroke, mental/addictive disorders, paediatric/developmental disorders and neurodegeneration/ageing identified cardinal examples of neuroplasticity, underlying mechanisms, therapeutic implications and common denominators. Promising therapies that may enhance training-induced cognitive and motor learning, such as brain stimulation and neuropharmacological interventions, were identified, along with questions of how best to use this body of information to reduce human disability. Improved understanding of adaptive mechanisms at every level, from molecules to synapses, to networks, to behaviour, can be gained from iterative collaborations between basic and clinical researchers. Lessons can be gleaned from studying fields related to plasticity, such as development, critical periods, learning and response to disease. Improved means of assessing neuroplasticity in humans, including biomarkers for predicting and monitoring treatment response, are needed. Neuroplasticity occurs with many variations, in many forms, and in many contexts. However, common themes in plasticity that emerge across diverse central nervous system conditions include experience dependence, time sensitivity and the importance of motivation and attention. Integration of information across disciplines should enhance opportunities for the translation of neuroplasticity and circuit retraining research into effective clinical therapies. PMID:21482550

  17. Managing clinical research permissions electronically

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, Iain C; Obeid, Jihad S; Madathil, Kapil Chalil; Gerken, Katherine; Fryar, Katrina; Rugg, Daniel; Alstad, Colin E; Alexander, Randall; Brady, Kathleen T; Gramopadhye, Anand K; Moskowitz, Jay

    2014-01-01

    Background One mechanism to increase participation in research is to solicit potential research participants’ general willingness to be recruited into clinical trials. Such research permissions and consents typically are collected on paper upon patient registration. We describe a novel method of capturing this information electronically. Purpose The objective is to enable the collection of research permissions and informed consent data electronically to permit tracking of potential research participants’ interest in current and future research involvement and to provide a foundation for facilitating the research workflow. Methods The project involved systematic analysis focused on key areas, including existing business practices, registration processes, and permission collection workflows, and ascertaining best practices for presenting consent information to users via tablet technology and capturing permissions data. Analysis was followed by an iterative software development cycle with feedback from subject matter experts and users. Results An initial version of the software was piloted at one institution in South Carolina for a period of 1 year, during which consents and permission were collected during 2524 registrations of patients. The captured research permission data were transmitted to a clinical data warehouse. The software was later released as an open-source package that can be adopted for use by other institutions. Limitations There are significant ethical, legal, and informatics challenges that must be addressed at an institution to deploy such a system. We have not yet assessed the long-term impact of the system on recruitment of patients to clinical trials. Conclusions We propose that by improving the ability to track willing potential research participants, we can improve recruitment into clinical trials and, in the process, improve patient education by introducing multimedia to informed consent documents. PMID:23785065

  18. Post-mortem clinical pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Ferner, R E

    2008-01-01

    Clinical pharmacology assumes that deductions can be made about the concentrations of drugs from a knowledge of the pharmacokinetic parameters in an individual; and that the effects are related to the measured concentration. Post-mortem changes render the assumptions of clinical pharmacology largely invalid, and make the interpretation of concentrations measured in post-mortem samples difficult or impossible. Qualitative tests can show the presence of substances that were not present in life, and can fail to detect substances that led to death. Quantitative analysis is subject to error in itself, and because post-mortem concentrations vary in largely unpredictable ways with the site and time of sampling, as a result of the phenomenon of post-mortem redistribution. Consequently, compilations of ‘lethal concentrations’ are misleading. There is a lack of adequate studies of the true relationship between fatal events and the concentrations that can be measured subsequently, but without such studies, clinical pharmacologists and others should be wary of interpreting post-mortem measurements. PMID:18637886

  19. [Clinical cytology: why and how?].

    PubMed

    Znidarcić, Zeljka

    2013-12-01

    Clinical cytology is a morphological diagnostic profession, which has not been properly utilized in current medicine, primarily due to inadequate awareness among physicians of its diagnostic possibilities and advantages. The purpose of this historical review of clinical cytology and its diagnostic role is to contribute to higher awareness of the current possibilities offered by cytologic diagnosis and its future development in the era of technological progress and medical striking into profitability, with its negative connotations. The main features of cytologic diagnosis, i.e. non-aggressiveness, simplicity, promptness and accuracy, should be maintained while following new technological possibilities. Standard cytomorphology provides a basis for deciding on using additional technologies (cytochemistry, immunocytochemistry, flow cytometry, molecular analysis and cytogenetics) after thorough microscopic analysis, on cytologic samples or/and cytologic smears. The conditio sine qua non for that purpose is appropriate education of cytologists and cytotechnologists as well as appropriate organization of cytology in the healthcare system. As in the historical development of clinical cytology, enthusiasts are necessary to maintain and even improve all its possibilities to the benefit of our patients. PMID:24979879

  20. Automatic segmentation of clinical texts.

    PubMed

    Apostolova, Emilia; Channin, David S; Demner-Fushman, Dina; Furst, Jacob; Lytinen, Steven; Raicu, Daniela

    2009-01-01

    Clinical narratives, such as radiology and pathology reports, are commonly available in electronic form. However, they are also commonly entered and stored as free text. Knowledge of the structure of clinical narratives is necessary for enhancing the productivity of healthcare departments and facilitating research. This study attempts to automatically segment medical reports into semantic sections. Our goal is to develop a robust and scalable medical report segmentation system requiring minimum user input for efficient retrieval and extraction of information from free-text clinical narratives. Hand-crafted rules were used to automatically identify a high-confidence training set. This automatically created training dataset was later used to develop metrics and an algorithm that determines the semantic structure of the medical reports. A word-vector cosine similarity metric combined with several heuristics was used to classify each report sentence into one of several pre-defined semantic sections. This baseline algorithm achieved 79% accuracy. A Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier trained on additional formatting and contextual features was able to achieve 90% accuracy. Plans for future work include developing a configurable system that could accommodate various medical report formatting and content standards. PMID:19965054

  1. Ultrasound enhanced thrombolysis: Clinical evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, Andrei V.

    2005-04-01

    Phase II CLOTBUST randomized clinical trial (Houston, Barcelona, Edmonton, Calgary) evaluated patients with acute ischemic stroke due to intracranial occlusion and treated with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (TPA) within 3 h of symptom onset. Randomization: monitoring with pulsed wave 2 MHz transcranial Doppler (TCD) (Target) or placebo monitoring (Control). Safety: symptomatic bleeding to the brain (sICH). Primary end-point: complete recanalization on TCD or dramatic clinical recovery by the total NIHSS score <3, or improvement by >10 NIHSS points within 2 hours after TPA bolus. All projected 126 patients were randomized 1:1 to target (median NIHSS 16) or control (NIHSS 17). sICH: 4.8% Target, 4.8% Controls. Primary end-point was achieved by 31 (49%, Target) versus 19 (30%, Control), p<0.03. At 3 months, 22 (42% Target) and 14 (29% Control) patients achieved favorable outcomes. Continuous TCD monitoring of intracranial occlusion safely augments TPA-induced arterial recanalization, and 2 MHz diagnostic ultrasound has a positive biological activity that aids systemic thrombolytic therapy. For the first time in clinical medicine, the CLOTBUST trial provides the evidence that ultrasound enhances thrombolytic activity of a drug in humans thereby confirming intense multi-disciplinary experimental research conducted worldwide for the past 30 years.

  2. Clinical features of gastroenteropancreatic tumours

    PubMed Central

    Czarnywojtek, Agata; Bączyk, Maciej; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna; Fischbach, Jakub; Wrotkowska, Elżbieta; Ruchała, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) endocrine tumours (carcinoids and pancreatic islet cell tumours) are composed of multipotent neuroendocrine cells that exhibit a unique ability to produce, store, and secrete biologically active substances and cause distinct clinical syndromes. The classification of GEP tumours as functioning or non-functioning is based on the presence of symptoms that accompany these syndromes secondary to the secretion of hormones, neuropeptides and/or neurotransmitters (functioning tumours). Non-functioning tumours are considered to be neoplasms of neuroendocrine differentiation that are not associated with obvious symptoms attributed to the hypersecretion of metabolically active substances. However, a number of these tumours are either capable of producing low levels of such substances, which can be detected by immunohistochemistry but are insufficient to cause symptoms related to a clinical syndrome, or alternatively, they may secrete substances that are either metabolically inactive or inappropriately processed. In some cases, GEP tumours are not associated with the production of any hormone or neurotransmitter. Both functioning and non-functioning tumours can also produce symptoms due to mass effects compressing vital surrounding structures. Gastroenteropancreatic tumours are usually classified further according to the anatomic site of origin: foregut (including respiratory tract, thymus, stomach, duodenum, and pancreas), midgut (including small intestine, appendix, and right colon), and hindgut (including transverse colon, sigmoid, and rectum). Within these subgroups the biological and clinical characteristics of the tumours vary considerably, but this classification is still in use because a significant number of previous studies, mainly observational, have used it extensively. PMID:26516377

  3. Genomic sequencing in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Human genome sequencing is the process by which the exact order of nucleic acid base pairs in the 24 human chromosomes is determined. Since the completion of the Human Genome Project in 2003, genomic sequencing is rapidly becoming a major part of our translational research efforts to understand and improve human health and disease. This article reviews the current and future directions of clinical research with respect to genomic sequencing, a technology that is just beginning to find its way into clinical trials both nationally and worldwide. We highlight the currently available types of genomic sequencing platforms, outline the advantages and disadvantages of each, and compare first- and next-generation techniques with respect to capabilities, quality, and cost. We describe the current geographical distributions and types of disease conditions in which these technologies are used, and how next-generation sequencing is strategically being incorporated into new and existing studies. Lastly, recent major breakthroughs and the ongoing challenges of using genomic sequencing in clinical research are discussed. PMID:22206293

  4. Clinical Manifestations of Spontaneous Pneumomediastinum

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soo Jin; Park, Ji Ye; Jung, Joonho; Park, Seong Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background Spontaneous pneumomediastinum (SPM) is an uncommon disorder with only a few reported clinical studies. The goals of this study were to investigate the clinical manifestations and the natural course of SPM, as well as examine the current available treatment options for SPM. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 91 patients diagnosed with SPM between January 2008 and June 2015. Results The mean age of the patients was 22.7±13.2 years, and 67 (73.6%) were male. Chest pain (58, 37.2%) was the predominant symptom. The most frequent precipitating factor before developing SPM was a cough (15.4%), but the majority of patients (51, 56.0%) had no precipitating factors. Chest X-ray was diagnostic in 44 patients (48.4%), and chest computed tomography (CT) showed mediastinal air in all cases. Esophagography (10, 11.0%), esophagoduodenoscopy (1, 1.1%), and bronchoscopy (5, 5.5%) were performed selectively due to clinical suspicion, but no abnormal findings that implicated organ injury were documented. Twelve patients (13.2%) were discharged after a visit to the emergency room, and the others were admitted and received conservative treatment. The mean length of hospital stay was 3.0±1.6 days. There were no complications related to SPM except for recurrence in 2 patients (2.2%). Conclusion SPM responds well to conservative treatment and follows a benign natural course. Hospitalization and aggressive treatment can be performed in selective cases. PMID:27525238

  5. Pharmacogenomics in cardiovascular clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Shah, R; Darne, B; Atar, D; Abadie, E; Adams, K F; Zannad, F

    2004-12-01

    Genomics - having quickly emerged as the central discipline in basic science and biomedical research - is poised to take the center stage in clinical medicine as well over the next few decades. Although there is no specific regulatory guideline on the application of pharmacogenetics to drug development, some recommendations are already included in several published guidelines on drug development. The patients more likely to provide the most valuable information on the specific contribution of a given gene or its variant are those who fail to respond to a drug ('therapeutic failures') and those who develop toxicity to the drug. However, before drawing definite conclusions on subgroups following pharmacogenomic analyses, one must be aware of disease classification, data collection, and how much is known about the disease process. It seems reasonable to collect genomic DNA from all patients enrolled in clinical drug trials (along with appropriate consent to permit pharmacogenetic studies) for the purpose of post hoc analyses. One exception to post hoc genomic analysis is when patients with a specific genotype are excluded from randomization into a clinical trial. Physicians will need to understand the concept of genetic variability, its interactions with the environment (e.g. drug-drug or drug-disease interactions), and its implication for patient care. PMID:15548243

  6. Can research influence clinical practice?

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Juan Pablo

    2007-06-01

    After briefly reviewing the unfavourable reception accorded empirical research by parts of the psychoanalytic community, as well as some of the benefits to clinical practice of analysts being involved in research activities, the author examines whether the findings of process and outcome research in psychotherapy and psychoanalysis can help identify the most appropriate forms of intervention for producing therapeutic change, given the specific condition of the patient and the relationship that the individual establishes with the analyst. He argues that research findings can influence clinical practice on various levels and in different areas, and goes on to examine a number of related issues: the specificity of therapeutic interventions versus the relevance of common curative factors; the dyadic conception of technique and ways of understanding the therapeutic action of the treatment alliance; and the strategic or heuristic conception in psychoanalytic therapy. Finally, the author presents clinical material with the aim of illustrating how the knowledge acquired through research can be applied to psychoanalytic treatment. PMID:17537698

  7. Medicine and clinical skills laboratories.

    PubMed

    Al-Elq, Abdulmohsen H

    2007-05-01

    The main objective of the medical curriculum is to provide medical students with knowledge, skills and attitudes required for their practice. A decade ago, the UK Medical Council issued a report called "Tomorrow's Doctors"(1) which called for the reduction in the factual content of the medical course with the promotion of problem-based and self-dedicated learning. This report was the basis for a move toward an extensive reform of the medical and nursing curricula. The new reformed curricula enhanced the integrated medical teaching and emphasized the teaching and learning of clinical skills. However, there were still concerns about the standards and appropriateness of the skills of new medical graduates.(2)The changes in the teaching and learning methods, the radical changes in the health care delivery and the rapid growth of technology challenged the traditional way of clinical skills development and led to the emergence of clinical skills laboratories (CSLs) in the medical education of many medical and nursing schools. With the proliferation of the CSLs, it is important to evaluate and introduce the reader to their applications, bearing in mind the paucity of information on this subject particularly over the last couple of years. This article is based on literature review. PMID:23012147

  8. Clinical grade expansion of MSCs.

    PubMed

    Capelli, C; Pedrini, O; Valgardsdottir, R; Da Roit, F; Golay, J; Introna, M

    2015-12-01

    Producing advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP) according to Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) guidelines represents a global challenge for the expansion of cells intended for human use. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from different sources are one of the most actively developed cell type for a variety of clinical applications in cellular therapy. Complying with GMP means defining accurately both the production process and the release criteria required for a final safe product. We have here reported our manufacturing experience on 103 consecutive clinical-grade in vitro expansions of both bone marrow-derived and umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stromal cells together with description of methods and reagents utilized in our Cell Factory. The same animal- and serum-free medium, additioned with human platelet lysate, has been used for all the expansions performed. This is the largest experience published so far with this alternative and clinical-grade reagent (compared to the traditional fetal bovine serum) and shows the feasibility and the reproducibility of the method. Indeed, we have been able to produce a sufficient number of MSCs to treat 57 patients so far, enrolled in 7 different experimental phase I/II protocols. PMID:26092523

  9. Clinical Trials in Head Injury

    PubMed Central

    NARAYAN, RAJ K.; MICHEL, MARY ELLEN; Ansell, Beth; Baethmann, Alex; Biegon, Anat; Bracken, Michael B.; Bullock, M. Ross; Choi, Sung C.; Clifton, Guy L.; Contant, Charles F.; Coplin, William M.; Dietrich, W. Dalton; Ghajar, Jamshid; Grady, Sean M.; Grossman, Robert G.; Hall, Edward D.; Heetderks, William; Hovda, David A.; Jallo, Jack; Katz, Russell L.; Knoller, Nachshon; Kochanek, Patrick M.; Maas, Andrew I.; Majde, Jeannine; Marion, Donald W.; Marmarou, Anthony; Marshall, Lawrence F.; McIntosh, Tracy K.; Miller, Emmy; Mohberg, Noel; Muizelaar, J. Paul; Pitts, Lawrence H.; Quinn, Peter; Riesenfeld, Gad; Robertson, Claudia S.; Strauss, Kenneth I.; Teasdale, Graham; Temkin, Nancy; Tuma, Ronald; Wade, Charles; Walker, Michael D.; Weinrich, Michael; Whyte, John; Wilberger, Jack; Young, A. Byron; Yurkewicz, Lorraine

    2006-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains a major public health problem globally. In the United States the incidence of closed head injuries admitted to hospitals is conservatively estimated to be 200 per 100,000 population, and the incidence of penetrating head injury is estimated to be 12 per 100,000, the highest of any developed country in the world. This yields an approximate number of 500,000 new cases each year, a sizeable proportion of which demonstrate signficant long-term disabilities. Unfortunately, there is a paucity of proven therapies for this disease. For a variety of reasons, clinical trials for this condition have been difficult to design and perform. Despite promising pre-clinical data, most of the trials that have been performed in recent years have failed to demonstrate any significant improvement in outcomes. The reasons for these failures have not always been apparent and any insights gained were not always shared. It was therefore feared that we were running the risk of repeating our mistakes. Recognizing the importance of TBI, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) sponsored a workshop that brought together experts from clinical, research, and pharmaceutical backgrounds. This workshop proved to be very informative and yielded many insights into previous and future TBI trials. This paper is an attempt to summarize the key points made at the workshop. It is hoped that these lessons will enhance the planning and design of future efforts in this important field of research. PMID:12042091

  10. Variability in Clinical Integration Achieved by Athletic Training Students across Different Clinical Sport Assignments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodge, Thomas M.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Bowman, Thomas G.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Clinical integration impacts athletic training students' (ATSs) motivation and persistence. Research has yet to elucidate the manner in which different clinical placements can influence clinical integration. Objective: To examine differences in the levels of clinical integration achieved by ATSs across various clinical sport assignments.…

  11. Clinical Preceptors' Perspectives on Clinical Education in Post-Professional Athletic Training Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phan, Kelvin; McCarty, Cailee W.; Mutchler, Jessica M.; Van Lunen, Bonnie

    2012-01-01

    Context: Clinical education is the interaction between a clinical preceptor and student within the clinical setting to help the student progress as a clinician. Post-professional athletic training clinical education is especially important to improve these students' clinical knowledge and skills. However, little research has been conducted to…

  12. Evaluating steroidal contraceptives: pre-clinical and clinical approaches.

    PubMed

    Berry, C L

    1988-05-01

    The Special Program of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction of the World Health Organization held a meeting in Geneva in February of 1987 to review the results of animal and human studies analyzing contraceptive steroids. In reviewing this data, assessment of pre-clinical toxicology and human risk would be possible. The studies reviewed included: studies on steroid exposure and breast disease, the protective factor of combined oral contraceptives (OC) (against ovarian cancer), hormonal contraceptives and cervical cancer, the relationship of gall bladder disease to OC use, congenital malformations and steroid hormone, OC use and its effect on breast milk and other topics. Basic principles on pre-clinical testing were adopted. These included: 1) the establishment of safety is a joint responsibility of experimental toxicology and clinical pharmacology. 2) Testing should include detailed analysis of the hormonal effect of new types in several animal species. 3) Species specific data should be collected. 4) Studies to detect cumulative toxicity should be performed. 5) Reproductive toxicity should concentrate on exposure throughout the embryonic period. 6) In vivo and in vitro tests should be conducted to investigate the mutagenic potential of new contraceptive steroids. 7) Long-term carcinogenicity study should be performed, preferably on the rat. 8) When new delivery systems are used to administer established steroidal contraceptives, experimental safety studies should assess potential interactions with the system and on the possibility of adverse effects of the delivery system. 9) Post-registration surveillance is on integral part of the risk assessment process. PMID:3391619

  13. Perspectives on Clinical Informatics: Integrating Large-Scale Clinical, Genomic, and Health Information for Clinical Care

    PubMed Central

    Choi, In Young; Kim, Tae-Min; Kim, Myung Shin; Mun, Seong K.

    2013-01-01

    The advances in electronic medical records (EMRs) and bioinformatics (BI) represent two significant trends in healthcare. The widespread adoption of EMR systems and the completion of the Human Genome Project developed the technologies for data acquisition, analysis, and visualization in two different domains. The massive amount of data from both clinical and biology domains is expected to provide personalized, preventive, and predictive healthcare services in the near future. The integrated use of EMR and BI data needs to consider four key informatics areas: data modeling, analytics, standardization, and privacy. Bioclinical data warehouses integrating heterogeneous patient-related clinical or omics data should be considered. The representative standardization effort by the Clinical Bioinformatics Ontology (CBO) aims to provide uniquely identified concepts to include molecular pathology terminologies. Since individual genome data are easily used to predict current and future health status, different safeguards to ensure confidentiality should be considered. In this paper, we focused on the informatics aspects of integrating the EMR community and BI community by identifying opportunities, challenges, and approaches to provide the best possible care service for our patients and the population. PMID:24465229

  14. Perspectives on clinical informatics: integrating large-scale clinical, genomic, and health information for clinical care.

    PubMed

    Choi, In Young; Kim, Tae-Min; Kim, Myung Shin; Mun, Seong K; Chung, Yeun-Jun

    2013-12-01

    The advances in electronic medical records (EMRs) and bioinformatics (BI) represent two significant trends in healthcare. The widespread adoption of EMR systems and the completion of the Human Genome Project developed the technologies for data acquisition, analysis, and visualization in two different domains. The massive amount of data from both clinical and biology domains is expected to provide personalized, preventive, and predictive healthcare services in the near future. The integrated use of EMR and BI data needs to consider four key informatics areas: data modeling, analytics, standardization, and privacy. Bioclinical data warehouses integrating heterogeneous patient-related clinical or omics data should be considered. The representative standardization effort by the Clinical Bioinformatics Ontology (CBO) aims to provide uniquely identified concepts to include molecular pathology terminologies. Since individual genome data are easily used to predict current and future health status, different safeguards to ensure confidentiality should be considered. In this paper, we focused on the informatics aspects of integrating the EMR community and BI community by identifying opportunities, challenges, and approaches to provide the best possible care service for our patients and the population. PMID:24465229

  15. [International clinical trials: perspectives of clinical research coordinators].

    PubMed

    Aotani, Eriko

    2007-02-01

    There are several different task roles among the co-medicals who are involved in international clinical trials (ICTs). In this review article, several issues related with ICTs from the view point of clinical research coordinators (CRCs) will be discussed. The discussions include interview results from eight CRCs of four institutions who have been involved in ICTs, current status of education for co-medicals in the field of ICTs, and future perspectives of ICTs from the CRC's view point. The following topics are especially focused in the discussion. 1) It is necessary to establish the infra-structure for free discussion among the ICT team so that opinions of co-medicals as the operation managers of the participating institutions can be openly shared and importantly taken into account. 2) It is also important for co-medicals to conduct research studies to clarify the problems in the current ICT support systems. 3) Lastly, the significance of early involvement of CRCs into the ICT protocol development must be emphasized, because the quality of protocols will be better improved by the practical insight of CRCs, and consequently, the accomplishment of the ICT, such as the speed and the data quality, may be accelerated. PMID:17301551

  16. Rewards and advancements for clinical pharmacists.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, S Diane; Kane-Gill, Sandra L; Ng, Tien M H; Melroy, Joel T; Hess, Mary M; Tallian, Kimberly; Trujillo, Toby C; Vermeulen, Lee C

    2010-01-01

    The American College of Clinical Pharmacy charged the Clinical Practice Affairs Committee to review and update the College's 1995 White Paper, "Rewards and Advancements for Clinical Pharmacy Practitioners." Because of the limited data on the present state of rewards and advancements for clinical pharmacists, an online survey of "front-line" clinical pharmacists and pharmacy managers was conducted (1126 total respondents, 14% response rate). The resulting White Paper discusses motivators and existing systems of rewards and advancements for clinical pharmacists, as well as perceived barriers to implementation of these systems. Clinical pharmacists reported work-life balance, a challenging position, and opportunities for professional advancement as the most important factors for career success. At the time of the survey, financial rewards appeared not to be a major motivator for clinical pharmacists. Managers underestimated the importance that clinical pharmacists place on work-life balance and favorable work schedules. Although almost two thirds of the clinical pharmacists surveyed had not developed a professional development plan, 84% indicated an interest in career planning. Both clinical pharmacists and managers rated the lack of a clear reward and advancement structure as the most important barrier to effective systems of rewards and advancements. Pharmacy managers and administrators are encouraged to develop effective systems of rewards and advancements for clinical pharmacists that positively impact patient care and the institution's mission; these systems will benefit the clinical pharmacist, the health care institution, and the patient. PMID:20030483

  17. Clinical Supervision Skills: Managing the Clinical Environment. Health Occupations Clinical Teacher Education Series for Secondary and Post-Secondary Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, Mary Lou; And Others

    This learning module, which is part of a staff development program for health occupations clinical instructors, discusses the process of managing the physical clinical environment and students' experiences within the clinical environment. It includes learning activities dealing with various aspects of managing the physical environment and student…

  18. Writing software for the clinic.

    PubMed

    Rosen, I I

    1998-03-01

    Medical physicists often write computer programs to support scientific, educational, and clinical endeavors. Errors in scientific and educational software can waste time and effort by producing meaningless results, but errors in clinical software can contribute to patient injuries. Although the ultimate goal of error-free software is impossible to achieve except in very small programs, there are many good design, implementation, and testing practices that can be used by small development groups to significantly reduce errors, improve quality, and reduce maintenance. The software development process should include four basic steps: specifications, design, implementation, and testing. A specifications document defining what the software is intended to do is valuable for clearly delimiting the scope of the project and providing a benchmark for evaluating the final product. Keep the software design simple and straightforward. Document assumptions, and check them. Emphasize maintainability, portability, and reliability rather than speed. Use layers to isolate the application from hardware and the operating system. Plan for upgrades. Expect the software to be used in unplanned ways. Whenever possible, be generous with RAM and disk storage; hardware is cheaper than development and maintenance. During implementation, use well-known algorithms whenever possible. Use prototypes to try out ideas. Use generic modules, version numbering, unique file names, defensive programming, and operating system and language/compiler defaults. Avoid binary data files and clever tricks. Remember that real numbers are not exact in a computer. Get it right before making it faster. Document the software extensively. Test continuously during development; the later a problem is found, the more it costs to fix. Use a written procedure to test the final product exactly as a typical user would run it. Allow no changes after clinical release. Expect to spend at least an additional 50% of the initial

  19. Clinical nutrition and drug interactions

    PubMed Central

    Ekincioğlu, Aygin Bayraktar; Demirkan, Kutay

    2013-01-01

    A drug’s plasma level, pharmacological effects or side effects, elimination, physicochemical properties or stability could be changed by interactions of drug-drug or drug-nutrition products in patients who receive enteral or parenteral nutritional support. As a result, patients might experience ineffective outcomes or unexpected effects of therapy (such as drug toxicity, embolism). Stability or incompatibility problems between parenteral nutrition admixtures and drugs might lead to alterations in expected therapeutic responses from drug and/or parenteral nutrition, occlusion in venous catheter or symptoms or mortality due to infusion of composed particles. Compatibilities between parenteral nutrition and drugs are not always guaranteed in clinical practice. Although the list of compatibility or incompatibilities of drugs are published for the use of clinicians in their practices, factors such as composition of parenteral nutrition admixture, drug concentration, contact time in catheter, temperature of the environment and exposure to light could change the status of compatibilities between drugs and nutrition admixtures. There could be substantial clinical changes occurring in the patient’s nutritional status and pharmacological effects of drugs due to interactions between enteral nutrition and drugs. Drug toxicity and ineffective nutritional support might occur as a result of those predictable interactions. Although administration of drugs via feeding tube is a complex and problematic route for drug usage, it is possible to minimise the risk of tube occlusion, decreased effects of drug and drug toxicity by using an appropriate technique. Therefore, it is important to consider pharmacological dosage forms of drugs while administering drugs via a feeding tube. In conclusion, since the pharmacists are well-experienced and more knowledgeable professionals in drugs and drug usage compared to other healthcare providers, it is suggested that provision of information

  20. Urological diagnosis using clinical PACS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Stephen F.; Spetz, Kevin S.; Dwyer, Samuel J., III

    1995-05-01

    Urological diagnosis using fluoroscopy images has traditionally been performed using radiographic films. Images are generally acquired in conjunction with the application of a contrast agent, processed to create analog films, and inspected to ensure satisfactory image quality prior to being provided to a radiologist for reading. In the case of errors the entire process must be repeated. In addition, the radiologist must then often go to a particular reading room, possibly in a remote part of the healthcare facility, to read the images. The integration of digital fluoroscopy modalities with clinical PACS has the potential to significantly improve the urological diagnosis process by providing high-speed access to images at a variety of locations within a healthcare facility without costly film processing. The PACS additionally provides a cost-effective and reliable means of long-term storage and allows several medical users to simultaneously view the same images at different locations. The installation of a digital data interface between the existing clinically operational PACS at the University of Virginia Health Sciences Center and a digital urology fluoroscope is described. Preliminary user interviews that have been conducted to determine the clinical effectiveness of PACS workstations for urological diagnosis are discussed. The specific suitability of the workstation medium is discussed, as are overall advantages and disadvantages of the hardcopy and softcopy media in terms of efficiency, timeliness and cost. Throughput metrics and some specific parameters of gray-scale viewing stations and the expected system impacts resulting from the integration of a urology fluoroscope with PACS are also discussed.

  1. Clinical quality standards for radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study The technological progress that is currently being witnessed in the areas of diagnostic imaging, treatment planning systems and therapeutic equipment has caused radiotherapy to become a high-tech and interdisciplinary domain involving staff of various backgrounds. This allows steady improvement in therapy results, but at the same time makes the diagnostic, imaging and therapeutic processes more complex and complicated, requiring every stage of those processes to be planned, organized, controlled and improved so as to assure high quality of services provided. The aim of this paper is to present clinical quality standards for radiotherapy as developed by the author. Material and methods In order to develop the quality standards, a comparative analysis was performed between European and Polish legal acts adopted in the period of 1980-2006 and the universal industrial ISO 9001:2008 standard, defining requirements for quality management systems, and relevant articles published in 1984-2009 were reviewed, including applicable guidelines and recommendations of American, international, European and Polish bodies, such as the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), the European Society for Radiotherapy & Oncology (ESTRO), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and the Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI) on quality assurance and management in radiotherapy. Results As a result, 352 quality standards for radiotherapy were developed and categorized into the following three groups: 1 – organizational standards; 2 – physico-technical standards and 3 – clinical standards. Conclusion Proposed clinical quality standards for radiotherapy can be used by any institution using ionizing radiation for medical purposes. However, standards are of value only if they are implemented, reviewed, audited and improved, and if there is a clear mechanism in place to monitor and address failure to meet agreed standards. PMID:23788854

  2. Cough: an unmet clinical need

    PubMed Central

    Dicpinigaitis, Peter V

    2011-01-01

    Cough is among the most common complaints for which patients worldwide seek medical attention. Thus, the evaluation and treatment of cough result in tremendous financial expenditure and consumption of health care resources. Yet, despite the clinical significance of cough, research efforts aimed at improving diagnostic capabilities and developing more effective therapeutic agents have been, to date, disappointing in their limited scope and outcomes. Acute cough due to the common cold represents the most common type of cough. Currently, available medications for the symptomatic management of acute cough are inadequate due to lack of proven efficacy and/or their association with undesirable or intolerable side effects at anti-tussive doses. Subacute cough, often representing a prolonged post-viral response, is typically refractory to standard anti-tussive therapy. Few clinical trials have evaluated therapeutic options for subacute cough. Diagnostic challenges facing the clinician in the management of chronic cough include the determination of whether symptoms of upper airway cough syndrome (formerly, postnasal drip syndrome) or gastro-oesophageal reflux disease are indeed the underlying cause of cough. Chronic, refractory unexplained (formerly, idiopathic) cough must be distinguished from cough that has not been fully evaluated and treated according to current guideline recommendations. Eagerly awaited are new safe and effective anti-tussive agents for use when cough suppression is desired, regardless of underlying aetiology of cough, as well as practical, validated ambulatory cough counters to aid clinical assessment and future research in the field of cough. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Respiratory Pharmacology. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2011.163.issue-1 PMID:21198555

  3. Searching the Clinical Fitness Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Eppstein, Margaret J.; Horbar, Jeffrey D.; Buzas, Jeffrey S.; Kauffman, Stuart A.

    2012-01-01

    Widespread unexplained variations in clinical practices and patient outcomes suggest major opportunities for improving the quality and safety of medical care. However, there is little consensus regarding how to best identify and disseminate healthcare improvements and a dearth of theory to guide the debate. Many consider multicenter randomized controlled trials to be the gold standard of evidence-based medicine, although results are often inconclusive or may not be generally applicable due to differences in the contexts within which care is provided. Increasingly, others advocate the use “quality improvement collaboratives”, in which multi-institutional teams share information to identify potentially better practices that are subsequently evaluated in the local contexts of specific institutions, but there is concern that such collaborative learning approaches lack the statistical rigor of randomized trials. Using an agent-based model, we show how and why a collaborative learning approach almost invariably leads to greater improvements in expected patient outcomes than more traditional approaches in searching simulated clinical fitness landscapes. This is due to a combination of greater statistical power and more context-dependent evaluation of treatments, especially in complex terrains where some combinations of practices may interact in affecting outcomes. The results of our simulations are consistent with observed limitations of randomized controlled trials and provide important insights into probable reasons for effectiveness of quality improvement collaboratives in the complex socio-technical environments of healthcare institutions. Our approach illustrates how modeling the evolution of medical practice as search on a clinical fitness landscape can aid in identifying and understanding strategies for improving the quality and safety of medical care. PMID:23166791

  4. Clinical Guideline: Management of Gastroparesis

    PubMed Central

    Camilleri, Michael; Parkman, Henry P.; Shafi, Mehnaz A.; Abell, Thomas L.; Gerson, Lauren

    2013-01-01

    This guideline presents recommendations for the evaluation and management of patients with gastroparesis. Gastroparesis is identified in clinical practice through the recognition of the clinical symptoms and documentation of delayed gastric emptying. Symptoms from gastroparesis include nausea, vomiting, early satiety, postprandial fullness, bloating, and upper abdominal pain. Management of gastroparesis should include assessment and correction of nutritional state, relief of symptoms, improvement of gastric emptying and, in diabetics, glycemic control. Patient nutritional state should be managed by oral dietary modifications. If oral intake is not adequate, then enteral nutrition via jejunostomy tube needs to be considered. Parenteral nutrition is rarely required when hydration and nutritional state cannot be maintained. Medical treatment entails use of prokinetic and antiemetic therapies. Current approved treatment options, including metoclopramide and gastric electrical stimulation (GES, approved on a humanitarian device exemption), do not adequately address clinical need. Antiemetics have not been specifically tested in gastroparesis, but they may relieve nausea and vomiting. Other medications aimed at symptom relief include unapproved medications or off-label indications, and include domperidone, erythromycin (primarily over a short term), and centrally acting antidepressants used as symptom modulators. GES may relieve symptoms, including weekly vomiting frequency, and the need for nutritional supplementation, based on open-label studies. Second-line approaches include venting gastrostomy or feeding jejunostomy; intrapyloric botulinum toxin injection was not effective in randomized controlled trials. Most of these treatments are based on open-label treatment trials and small numbers. Partial gastrectomy and pyloroplasty should be used rarely, only in carefully selected patients. Attention should be given to the development of new effective therapies for

  5. Clinical uses of radiolabeled platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Datz, F.L.; Christian, P.E.; Baker, W.J.

    1985-12-01

    Platelets were first successfully radiolabeled in 1953. At that time, investigators were primarily interested in developing a technique to accurately measure platelet life span in both normal and thrombocytopenic patients. Studies using platelets labeled with /sup 51/Cr have shown shortened platelet survival times in a number of diseases including idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, coronary artery disease, and diabetes mellitus. More recently, labels such as /sup 111/In have been developed that allow in vivo imaging of platelets. Indium-111 platelets are being used to better understand the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis, thrombophlebitis, pulmonary embolism and clotting disorders, and to improve the clinical diagnosis of these diseases.

  6. [100 years' of clinical electrocardiography].

    PubMed

    Bergovec, Mijo

    2003-01-01

    In 1903 Willem Einthoven published in Pflügers Arch his classic article on the investigation of human electrocardiogram by his string galvanometer. Many historians of medicine, Einthoven also marked that publication as the beginning of clinical electrocardiography. Many investigators like Galvani, Manteucci, Kölliker, Müller, Lipmann, Waller, Ader, Einthoven, Lewis, Wilson and others participated in creation and development of electrocardiogram. From that time electrocardiogram quickly became, and has remained the most essential diagnostic laboratory tool in investigation of heart diseases. The aim of this article is to remind us of the beginning of this part of cardiology 100 years ago. PMID:15209030

  7. Phenotypic mapping and clinical ideology

    SciTech Connect

    Lurie, I.W.; Opitz, J.M.

    1995-07-17

    Scientists have been trying to determine whether the main clinical findings in the 4p deletion syndrome are due to a deletion of one small critical segment, or whether deletions of some particular segments of 4p are responsible for different phenotypic manifestations. This is the basic issue for the whole group of autosomal deletion syndromes, as well as for our understanding of mechanisms of the origin of the abnormal phenotype. All circumstances need to be taken into consideration when trying to apply molecular methods for the mapping of phenotypic findings in the 4p deletion or in any other autosomal deletion syndrome. 8 refs.

  8. Clinical applications of skin substitutes.

    PubMed

    Nyame, Theodore T; Chiang, H Abraham; Orgill, Dennis P

    2014-08-01

    A unique understanding of the components of mammalian skin has led to the development of numerous skin substitutes. These skin substitutes attempt to compensate for functional and physiologic deficits present in damaged tissue. Skin substitutes, when appropriately applied in optimized settings, offer a promising solution to difficult wound management. The body of literature on skin substitutes increases as the understanding of tissue engineering and molecular biology expands. Given the high cost of these products, future randomized large prospective studies are needed to guide the clinical applications of skin substitutes. PMID:25085091

  9. [Psychiatry at the maternal clinic].

    PubMed

    Ammälä, Antti-Jussi

    2015-01-01

    Various mental disorders are encountered at the maternal clinic. Pregnancy predisposes to some mental disorders, most commonly depressive and anxiety disorders. The recognition of substance use disorders during pregnancy is very important, but difficult owing to the associated disgrace. An eating disorder with an onset preceding the pregnancy may cause problems for growth and development of the fetus and should thus be identified early enough. The rare but severe postpartum psychosis may often break out only after discharge from the maternity hospital. Drug therapy during pregnancy requires careful consideration and clear-cut reasoning. PMID:26237899

  10. Clinical management of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David R

    2013-05-01

    Pressure ulcers are chronic and difficult to heal. Pressure-reducing devices are clearly superior to a standard hospital mattress in preventing pressure ulcers, but only limited evidence and clinical intuition supports pressure-reducing devices in improving the healing rate of pressure ulcers. Local wound treatment should aim at maintaining a moist wound environment. The choice of a particular dressing depends on wound characteristics, such as the amount of exudate, dead space, or wound location. Nutritional status should be addressed as a process of good care. Debridement may improve time to a clean wound bed, but no clearly superior approach has been demonstrated. PMID:23571035

  11. Hypothermia as a clinical neuroprotectant.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Andrew L; Wang, Michael Y

    2014-08-01

    Applying therapeutic hypothermia (TH) for the purposes of neuroprotection, originally termed "hibernation," started nearly 100 years ago. Because TH cooling systems have improved to the point where it is practical and safe for general application, interest in providing such treatment in conditions such as spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, stroke, and cardiac arrest has increased. This article reviews the mechanisms by which TH mitigates secondary neurologic injury, the clinical scenarios where TH is being applied, and reviews selected published studies using TH for central nervous system neuroprotection. PMID:25064786

  12. Nocardiosis: Updates and Clinical Overview

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Nocardia, a gram-positive bacillus with the microscopic appearance of branching hyphae, can produce considerable disease in the appropriate host. The taxonomy of Nocardia continues to evolve; more than 50 species have been described. Early recognition and effective therapy are imperative to achieve successful outcomes. Although nocardiosis typically occurs in patients with cell-mediated immunosuppressive conditions, infection may occasionally develop in immunocompetent patients as well. This review addresses the microbiology of Nocardia, risk factors for infection, clinical presentations, and management strategies. PMID:22469352

  13. Meningitis, clinical presentation of tetanus.

    PubMed

    Moniuszko, Anna; Zajkowska, Agata; Tumiel, Ewa; Rutkowski, Krzysztof; Czupryna, Piotr; Pancewicz, Sławomir; Rutkowski, Ryszard; Zdrodowska, Agnieszka; Zajkowska, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Background. Tetanus is an acute disease caused by a neurotoxin produced by Clostridium tetani. Tetanus immunization has been available since the late 1930s but sporadic cases still occur, usually in incompletely vaccinated or unvaccinated individuals. Case Report. An elderly previously vaccinated female contracted tetanus following foot injury. Clinically she presented with meningitis causing diagnostic and therapeutic delays. Why Should Physician Be Aware of This? Even in developed countries the differential diagnosis of meningitis, especially in the elderly, should include tetanus. Treatment in intensive care unit is required. General population might benefit from vaccine boosters and education on this potentially fatal disease. PMID:25789186

  14. Capital planning for clinical integration.

    PubMed

    Grauman, Daniel M; Neff, Gerald; Johnson, Molly Martha

    2011-04-01

    When assessing the financial implications of a physician alignment and clinical integration initiative, a hospital should measure the initiative's potential ROI, perhaps best using a combination of net present value and payback period. The hospital should compare its own historical and projected performance with rating agency median benchmarks for key financial indicators of profitability, debt service, capital and cash flow, and liquidity. The hospital should also consider potential indirect benefits, such as retained outpatient/ancillary revenue, increased inpatient revenue, improved cost control, and improved quality and reporting transparency. PMID:21548429

  15. Introduction to veterinary clinical oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1991-10-01

    Veterinary clinical oncology involves a multidisciplinary approach to the recognition and management of spontaneously occurring neoplasms of domestic animals. This requires some knowledge of the causes, incidence, and natural course of malignant disease as it occurs in domestic species. The purpose of this course is to acquaint you with the more common neoplastic problems you will encounter in practice, so that you can offer your clients an informed opinion regarding prognosis and possible therapeutic modalities. A major thrust will be directed toward discussing and encouraging treatment/management of malignant disease. Multimodality therapy will be stressed. 10 refs., 3 tabs.

  16. Clinical recommendation: pediatric lichen sclerosus.

    PubMed

    Bercaw-Pratt, Jennifer L; Boardman, Lori A; Simms-Cendan, Judith S

    2014-04-01

    Lichen sclerosus is a chronic inflammatory condition affecting the anogenital region that may present in the prepubertal or adolescent patient. Clinical presentations include significant pruritus, labial adhesions, and loss of pigmentation. Treatment includes topical anti-inflammatory agents and long-term follow-up as there is a high risk of recurrence and an increased risk of vulvar cancer in adult women with history of lichen sclerosus. These recommendations are intended for pediatricians, gynecologists, nurse practitioners and others who care for pediatric/adolescent girls in order to facilitate diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24602304

  17. Informatics and the Clinical Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Richard G; Johnson, Owen A; Batstone, Gifford

    2014-01-01

    The nature of pathology services is changing under the combined pressures of increasing workloads, cost constraints and technological advancement. In the face of this, laboratory systems need to meet new demands for data exchange with clinical electronic record systems for test requesting and results reporting. As these needs develop, new challenges are emerging especially with respect to the format and content of the datasets which are being exchanged. If the potential for the inclusion of intelligent systems in both these areas is to be realised, the continued dialogue between clinicians and laboratory information specialists is of paramount importance. Requirements of information technology (IT) in pathology, now extend well beyond the provision of purely analytical data. With the aim of achieving seamless integration of laboratory data into the total clinical pathway, ‘Informatics’ – the art and science of turning data into useful information – is becoming increasingly important in laboratory medicine. Informatics is a powerful tool in pathology – whether in implementing processes for pathology modernisation, introducing new diagnostic modalities (e.g. proteomics, genomics), providing timely and evidence-based disease management, or enabling best use of limited and often costly resources. Providing appropriate information to empowered and interested patients – which requires critical assessment of the ever-increasing volume of information available – can also benefit greatly from appropriate use of informatics in enhancing self-management of long term conditions. The increasing demands placed on pathology information systems in the context of wider developmental change in healthcare delivery are explored in this review. General trends in medical informatics are reflected in current priorities for laboratory medicine, including the need for unified electronic records, computerised order entry, data security and recovery, and audit. We conclude that

  18. Clinics in diagnostic imaging (167)

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Tien Jin; Aljefri, Ahmad Mohammad; Elliott, Marc Bruce; Nicolaou, Savvas

    2016-01-01

    A 59-year-old woman who had previously undergone an anatomic left total shoulder arthroplasty presented with increasing left shoulder pain and significant reduction in motion of the left shoulder joint. No evidence of prosthetic loosening or periprosthetic fracture was detected on the radiographs or fluoroscopic arthrogram images. Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) images revealed evidence of loosening of the glenoid component and secondary rotator cuff failure. This case illustrates how a combination of detailed clinical history, careful physical examination and DECT arthrogram evaluation may be used to identify complications of an anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty. PMID:27075207

  19. Informatics and the clinical laboratory.

    PubMed

    Jones, Richard G; Johnson, Owen A; Batstone, Gifford

    2014-08-01

    The nature of pathology services is changing under the combined pressures of increasing workloads, cost constraints and technological advancement. In the face of this, laboratory systems need to meet new demands for data exchange with clinical electronic record systems for test requesting and results reporting. As these needs develop, new challenges are emerging especially with respect to the format and content of the datasets which are being exchanged. If the potential for the inclusion of intelligent systems in both these areas is to be realised, the continued dialogue between clinicians and laboratory information specialists is of paramount importance. Requirements of information technology (IT) in pathology, now extend well beyond the provision of purely analytical data. With the aim of achieving seamless integration of laboratory data into the total clinical pathway, 'Informatics' - the art and science of turning data into useful information - is becoming increasingly important in laboratory medicine. Informatics is a powerful tool in pathology - whether in implementing processes for pathology modernisation, introducing new diagnostic modalities (e.g. proteomics, genomics), providing timely and evidence-based disease management, or enabling best use of limited and often costly resources. Providing appropriate information to empowered and interested patients - which requires critical assessment of the ever-increasing volume of information available - can also benefit greatly from appropriate use of informatics in enhancing self-management of long term conditions. The increasing demands placed on pathology information systems in the context of wider developmental change in healthcare delivery are explored in this review. General trends in medical informatics are reflected in current priorities for laboratory medicine, including the need for unified electronic records, computerised order entry, data security and recovery, and audit. We conclude that there is a

  20. Update on clinically isolated syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thouvenot, Éric

    2015-04-01

    Optic neuritis, myelitis and brainstem syndrome accompanied by a symptomatic MRI T2 or FLAIR hyperintensity and T1 hypointensity are highly suggestive of multiple sclerosis (MS) in young adults. They are called "clinically isolated syndrome" (CIS) and correspond to the typical first multiple sclerosis (MS) episode, especially when associated with other asymptomatic demyelinating lesions, without clinical, radiological and immunological sign of differential diagnosis. After a CIS, the delay of apparition of a relapse, which corresponds to the conversion to clinically definite MS (CDMS), varies from several months to more than 10 years (10-15% of cases, generally called benign RRMS). This delay is generally associated with the number and location of demyelinating lesions of the brain and spinal cord and the results of CSF analysis. Several studies comparing different MRI criteria for dissemination in space and dissemination in time of demyelinating lesions, two hallmarks of MS, provided enough substantial data to update diagnostic criteria for MS after a CIS. In the last revision of the McDonald's criteria in 2010, diagnostic criteria were simplified and now the diagnosis can be made by a single initial scan that proves the presence of active asymptomatic lesions (with gadolinium enhancement) and of unenhanced lesions. However, time to conversion remains highly unpredictable for a given patient and CIS can remain isolated, especially for idiopathic unilateral optic neuritis or myelitis. Univariate analyses of clinical, radiological, biological or electrophysiological characteristics of CIS patients in small series identified numerous risk factors of rapid conversion to MS. However, large series of CIS patients analyzing several characteristics of CIS patients and the influence of disease modifying therapies brought important information about the risk of CDMS or RRMS over up to 20 years of follow-up. They confirmed the importance of the initial MRI pattern of

  1. Clinical application of bio ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anu, Sharma; Gayatri, Sharma

    2016-05-01

    Ceramics are the inorganic crystalline material. These are used in various field such as biomedical, electrical, electronics, aerospace, automotive and optical etc. Bio ceramics are the one of the most active areas of research. Bio ceramics are the ceramics which are biocompatible. The unique properties of bio ceramics make them an attractive option for medical applications and offer some potential advantages over other materials. During the past three decades, a number of major advances have been made in the field of bio ceramics. This review focuses on the use of these materials in variety of clinical scenarios.

  2. Clinical Pharmacy Education in a Dental Pharmacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helling, Dennis K.; Walker, John A.

    1978-01-01

    A clinical pharmacy training program for undergraduate students developed at the University of Iowa provides conjoint training of pharmacy and dental students in the clinic areas and pharmacy at the College of Dentistry. (LBH)

  3. [A review of international clinical trial registration].

    PubMed

    Yu, He; Liu, Jian-ping

    2007-05-01

    Clinical trials play a critical role in medical research. However, only a few clinical trials conducted at present have been registered at various clinical trial registries. Clinical trial registration can prevent bias in these registered trials effectively and avoid unnecessary waste of resources due to meaningless repeats. Moreover, it will benefit the development of evidence-based medicine, and promote human welfare. Great attention has been paid to the importance and necessity of clinical trial registration. This review briefly introduced the definition, justification, contents, history, current status of clinical trial registration, and introduced the information regarding important international clinical trial registries in detail. Clinical trial registration should be developed toward a transparent, compulsory and comprehensive stage. PMID:17498477

  4. Why Most Clinical Research Is Not Useful.

    PubMed

    Ioannidis, John P A

    2016-06-01

    John Ioannidis argues that problem base, context placement, information gain, pragmatism, patient centeredness, value for money, feasibility, and transparency define useful clinical research. He suggests most clinical research is not useful and reform is overdue. PMID:27328301

  5. [Vertical fractures: apropos of 2 clinical cases].

    PubMed

    Félix Mañes Ferrer, J; Micò Muñoz, P; Sánchez Cortés, J L; Paricio Martín, J J; Miñana Laliga, R

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the study is to present a clinical review of the vertical root fractures. Two clinical cases are presented to demonstrates the criteria for obtaining a correct diagnosis of vertical root fractures. PMID:1659859

  6. The unintended consequences of clinical trials regulations.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Alex D; Conway, David I; Macdonald, Tom M; McInnes, Gordon T

    2009-11-01

    Alex McMahon and colleagues critique the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) guidance on good clinical practice (GCP), arguing that it is having a disastrous effect on noncommerical randomized clinical trials in Europe. PMID:19918557

  7. Clinical Trials | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Information about actively enrolling, ongoing, and completed clinical trials of cancer prevention, early detection, and supportive care, including phase I, II, and III agent and action trials and clinical trials management. |

  8. Clinical Trials: Key to Medical Progress

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Clinical Trials: Key to Medical Progress Past Issues / Summer 2008 ... this page please turn Javascript on. Photo iStock Clinical trials are research studies that test how well new ...

  9. Case studies in clinical practice development.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Romi; Lipman, John; Murphy, Timothy P

    2005-03-01

    By asking identical questions of several successful practitioners of clinical interventional radiology, a snapshot of the current and future status of interventional radiology as a clinical discipline is presented. PMID:21326672

  10. In the Clinic. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kleopa, Kleopas A

    2015-09-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of carpal tunnel syndrome, focusing on screening and prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers. PMID:26322711

  11. In the Clinic. Substance Use Disorders.

    PubMed

    Pace, Christine A; Samet, Jeffrey H

    2016-04-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of substance use disorders, focusing on epidemiology, prevention, diagnosis, complications, and management. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers. PMID:27043992

  12. In the Clinic. Restless Legs Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bertisch, Suzanne

    2015-11-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of restless legs syndrome, focusing on diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers. PMID:26524584

  13. Body composition in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Andreoli, Angela; Garaci, Francesco; Cafarelli, Francesco Pio; Guglielmi, Giuseppe

    2016-08-01

    Nutritional status is the results of nutrients intake, absorption and utilization, able to influence physiological and pathological conditions. Nutritional status can be measured for individuals with different techniques, such as CT Body Composition, quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Ultrasound, Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry and Bioimpendance. Because obesity is becoming a worldwide epidemic, there is an increasing interest in the study of body composition to monitor conditions and delay in development of obesity-related diseases. The emergence of these evidence demonstrates the need of standard assessment of nutritional status based on body weight changes, playing an important role in several clinical setting, such as in quantitative measurement of tissues and their fluctuations in body composition, in survival rate, in pathologic condition and illnesses. Since body mass index has been shown to be an imprecise measurement of fat-free and fat mass, body cell mass and fluids, providing no information if weight changes, consequently there is the need to find a better way to evaluate body composition, in order to assess fat-free and fat mass with weight gain and loss, and during ageing. Monitoring body composition can be very useful for nutritional and medical interventional. This review is focused on the use of Body Composition in Clinical Practice. PMID:26971404

  14. Interaction between clinic and laboratory.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Elina; Joutsi-Korhonen, Lotta; Lassila, Riitta

    2011-01-01

    Clinicians order laboratory tests to diagnose, monitor, and screen for diseases, to evaluate or confirm previously abnormal results and to develop prognoses. The rigorous quality assurance programs, large automated processes and economic constraints may induce direct challenges to tailored diagnosis. Clinicians will have to gain an understanding of the underlying principles of laboratory technologies without losing their ability to practice 'the art of medicine' at their primary focus - the patient. Specialized laboratory services and expertise play especially important roles in coagulation hematology. Assays are technically demanding and often based on functional properties of proteins, producing results that are far more than plain numbers. Interpretation of laboratory data poses many challenges, such as pre-analytical and patient-dependent factors, of which the laboratory is often not well informed, but which the clinicians are required to take into account. The laboratory scientist needs to understand the multiple clinical circumstances causing variance or interference in the laboratory results. Direct interaction between clinic and laboratory is needed. When laboratory-specific issues are uncertain to the clinician, the laboratory scientist should become the clinician's primary consultant. The better the education and knowledge of both directions, the better the outcome. Regular multidisciplinary rounds by the clinicians and the laboratory scientists are of great benefit. This interaction at its best fosters research and development by identifying new mechanisms and tools. PMID:21193109

  15. Tremelimumab: research and clinical development

    PubMed Central

    Comin-Anduix, Begoña; Escuin-Ordinas, Helena; Ibarrondo, Francisco Javier

    2016-01-01

    The immune checkpoint therapy is a relatively recent strategy that aims to tweak the immune system to effectively attack cancer cells. The understanding of the immune responses and their regulation at the intracellular level and the development of fully humanized monoclonal antibodies are the pillars of an approach that could elicit durable clinical responses and even remission in some patients with cancer. Most of the immune checkpoints that regulate the T-cell responses (activation and inhibition) operate through proteins present on the cytoplasmic membrane of the immune cells. Therefore, specific antibodies capable of blocking the inhibitory signals should lead to unrestrained immune responses that supersede the inhibitory mechanisms, which are naturally present in the tumor microenviroment. The best-known and most successful targets for immune checkpoint therapy are the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 and programmed cell death-1 coreceptors. Tremelimumab (CP-675,206) is a fully humanized monoclonal antibody specific for cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4, which has been successfully used to treat patients with metastatic melanoma and some other cancers. Although still a work in progress, the use of tremelimumab as an immune checkpoint therapeutic agent is a promising approach alone or in combination with other anticancer drugs. Here, we review the use of this antibody in a number of clinical trials against solid tumors. PMID:27042127

  16. Clinical pharmacokinetics of ibuprofen arginine.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Dario; Clementi, Emilio

    2010-11-01

    Currently, several ibuprofen compounds are available on the market, mainly differing in terms of pharmaceutical composition that influence the pharmacokinetic profile and eventually the onset of drug action. This review will mainly deal with the clinical pharmacokinetics of ibuprofen arginine, an alternative formulation specifically designed to improve the absorption of ibuprofen. Indeed, available data from studies in healthy volunteers have consistently shown that the formulation of ibuprofen arginine is characterized by prompt absorption of ibuprofen as compared to the conventional formulation at all tested doses with higher peak plasma concentration and lower Tmax values. This trend has been confirmed also in studies dealing with chiral ibuprofen pharmacokinetics. Most importantly, the shortening in the absorption time observed either with racemic mixture or with the S(+)-enantiomer of ibuprofen arginine did not imply a faster drug elimination eventually leading to inadequate daily drug exposure, as documented by T1/2 and AUC values being comparable to those measured with the free acid form. Taken together, the pharmacokinetic/dynamic characteristics of ibuprofen arginine can be considered particularly favorable for several clinical conditions, such as moderate/severe pain, in which a rapid pharmacologic effect is required. PMID:20925647

  17. Clinical Neurophysiology of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Amodio, Piero; Montagnese, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) has relevant impact on the quality of life of patients and their caregivers and causes relevant costs because of hospitalizations and work days lost. Its quantification is important to perform adequate clinical trials on this relevant complication of cirrhosis and portal-systemic shunting. Clinical neurophysiology, which detects functional alterations of the nervous system, has been applied to the study of HE for over 60 years. This review aims at summarizing and clarifying the role of neurophysiologic techniques in the study of HE. Methods A narrative review was performed aiming at interpreting the cited papers and the techniques on the basis of their physiological and pathophysiological meaning. Results The potential role of EEG, quantified EEG, evoked potentials—both exogenous, endogenous and motor—have been clarified to the reader that may be unfamiliar with neurophysiology. Conclusions The EEG, reflecting the oscillatory changes of neural network is the preferable tool to detect and monitor HE, with the exception of its most severe stage, when EEG flattens. SSEP and MEP have indication to detect and monitor transmission alterations that are likely related to myelin changes and microedema. PMID:26041960

  18. Sixty years of clinical electroencephalography.

    PubMed

    Karbowski, K

    1990-01-01

    As a result of painstaking studies carried out over a period of almost 30 years, the German neurologist and psychiatrist Hans Berger, of Jena, published the first paper on the human electroencephalogram (Uber das Elektrenkephalogramm des Menschen') in 1929. Clinical electroencephalography, which reached a zenith in the 1950s and 1960s, increased the range of diagnostic techniques available for a series of brain diseases and revolutionized the study of epilepsy. Today, conventional electroencephalography no longer yields startling scientific discoveries. Nor can it complete with computer tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, in the diagnosis of structural disorders of the brain. In spite of this, the scope of its uses continues to increase and it remains an indispensable instrument of neurophysiological diagnosis, especially in its capacity as a 'seismograph' of the brain. The trend that is apparent throughout the world to cut back clinical electroencephalographic units in favor of other neurophysiological investigative techniques is both unjustified and dangerous. If it continues, it will inevitably lead to a decline in epileptology, which is an essential part of the work of many different medical specialists both in practice and in hospitals. PMID:2192889

  19. Clinical approach to posttraumatic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Rao, Vikram R; Parko, Karen L

    2015-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the most common causes of acquired epilepsy, and posttraumatic epilepsy (PTE) results in significant somatic and psychosocial morbidity. The risk of developing PTE relates directly to TBI severity, but the latency to first seizure can be decades after the inciting trauma. Given this "silent period," much work has focused on identification of molecular and radiographic biomarkers for risk stratification and on development of therapies to prevent epileptogenesis. Clinical management requires vigilant neurologic surveillance and recognition of the heterogeneous endophenotypes associated with PTE. Appropriate treatment of patients who have or are at risk for seizures varies as a function of time after TBI, and the clinician's armamentarium includes an ever-expanding diversity of pharmacological and surgical options. Most recently, neuromodulation with implantable devices has emerged as a promising therapeutic strategy for some patients with refractory PTE. Here, we review the epidemiology, diagnostic considerations, and treatment options for PTE and develop a roadmap for providers encountering this challenging clinical entity. PMID:25714868

  20. Developing clinical trials for biosimilars.

    PubMed

    Bui, Lynne A; Taylor, Carrie

    2014-02-01

    Biosimilars offer the prospect of providing efficacious and safe treatment options for many diseases, including cancer, while potentially increasing accessibility with greater affordability relative to biologics. Because biologics are large, complex molecules that cannot be exactly duplicated, biosimilars cannot be considered "generic" versions of biologic drugs. This review will examine important considerations for biosimilar clinical trials. Since the aim of biosimilar manufacturing is to produce a molecule highly similar to the reference biologic, a comparability exercise is needed to demonstrate similarity with the reference biologic product based on physicochemical characterization. In vitro analytical studies and in vivo studies as well as pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) assessments also are conducted. Lastly, because it may not be possible to fully characterize a biosimilar in relation to its reference biologic, robust pharmacovigilance strategies are utilized to ensure that any matters in regard to safety can be monitored. Other key topics will be discussed, including regulatory guidance for the evaluation of biosimilars, clinical trial design considerations, and whether data submitted for the approval of a biosimilar for one indication can be extrapolated to other indications for which the reference biologic is approved. European and Canadian experiences in biosimilar development will be reviewed. PMID:24560024

  1. Clinical status of benzoporphyrin derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Julia G.; Chan, Agnes H.; Strong, H. Andrew

    1996-01-01

    Benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A (BPD) is currently in Phase II clinical trials for the treatment of cutaneous malignancies (basal cell carcinoma and cutaneous metastases) and psoriasis. Results to date suggest that this photosensitizer has potential in both of these areas. Recently, a clinical trial with BPD was initiated for the treatment of age related macular degeneration, a neovascular condition in the eye which leads to blindness. BPD is a lipophilic photosensitizer which is rapidly taken up by activated cells and the vascular endothelium of neovasculature. The PDT effects seen with BPD appear to be a combination of vascular occlusion and direct killing of target cells. Since many diseases involve either activated cells and/or neovasculature, PDT with photosensitizer with characteristics like those of BPD, has applications far wider than oncology. A new area of interest involving photosensitizers is that of immune modulation. A number of photosensitizers have been shown to effect immune modulation in animal models of immune dysfunction including autoimmunity (rheumatoid arthritis, lupus), cutaneous hypersensitivity and allografts. BPD and PHOTOFRINR have both been shown to be effective in ameliorating arthritic symptoms in a number of animal models. The mechanisms by which immune modulation is affected in these studies still remains to be resolved.

  2. Developing a Critical Practice of Clinical Supervision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smyth, W. John

    1985-01-01

    The etymology of the term "clinical supervision" is discussed. How clinical supervision can be used with teachers as an active force toward reform and change is then examined. Through clinical supervision teachers can assist each other to gain control over their own professional lives and destinies. (RM)

  3. Implementing Peer Evaluation of Clinical Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laske, Rita Ann

    2013-01-01

    Clinical education provides the nursing student opportunities to learn the practice of nursing. In the clinical setting, the nursing student applies classroom knowledge to the real patient care situation. The clinical instructor facilitates this important process by assisting students to integrate knowledge into their practice, improve their…

  4. Clinical Trials Management | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Information for researchers about developing, reporting, and managing NCI-funded cancer prevention clinical trials. Protocol Information Office The central clearinghouse for clinical trials management within the Division of Cancer Prevention.Read more about the Protocol Information Office. | Information for researchers about developing, reporting, and managing NCI-funded cancer prevention clinical trials.

  5. Clinical Facts, Turning Points and Complexity Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lush, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, I explore how we might link ideas about clinical facts to current issues in child psychotherapy research. I consider what our understanding of clinical facts might contribute to our research methods and how our research methods might better represent the clinical facts. The paper introduces a selection of psychoanalytic writers'…

  6. Clinical Computer Applications in Mental Health

    PubMed Central

    Greist, John H.; Klein, Marjorie H.; Erdman, Harold P.; Jefferson, James W.

    1982-01-01

    Direct patient-computer interviews were among the earliest applications of computing in medicine. Yet patient interviewing and other clinical applications have lagged behind fiscal/administrative uses. Several reasons for delays in the development and implementation of clinical computing programs and their resolution are discussed. Patient interviewing, clinician consultation and other applications of clinical computing in mental health are reviewed.

  7. Clinical Psychology: A Research and Development Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broskowski, Anthony

    The purpose of this paper is to present a clinical research and development (R and D) model along with the rationale for its implementation and a sample training program for clinical psychologists. Although it may be possible to correct some problems by a clearer restatement of the scientist-professional model, a new model of clinical R and D has…

  8. Effective Mentoring in the Clinical Setting.

    PubMed

    Shellenbarger, Teresa; Robb, Meigan

    2016-04-01

    This article is one in a series on the roles of adjunct clinical faculty and preceptors, who teach nursing students and new graduates to apply knowledge in clinical settings. This article describes mentoring strategies clinical instructors and preceptors can use to help ease novice nurses' transition to practice. PMID:27011145

  9. 42 CFR 70.9 - Vaccination clinics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Vaccination clinics. 70.9 Section 70.9 Public... INTERSTATE QUARANTINE § 70.9 Vaccination clinics. (a) The Director may establish vaccination clinics, through contract or otherwise, authorized to administer vaccines and/or other prophylaxis. (b) A vaccination...

  10. 42 CFR 70.9 - Vaccination clinics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Vaccination clinics. 70.9 Section 70.9 Public... INTERSTATE QUARANTINE § 70.9 Vaccination clinics. (a) The Director may establish vaccination clinics, through contract or otherwise, authorized to administer vaccines and/or other prophylaxis. (b) A vaccination...

  11. 42 CFR 70.9 - Vaccination clinics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Vaccination clinics. 70.9 Section 70.9 Public... INTERSTATE QUARANTINE § 70.9 Vaccination clinics. (a) The Director may establish vaccination clinics, through contract or otherwise, authorized to administer vaccines and/or other prophylaxis. (b) A vaccination...

  12. 42 CFR 70.9 - Vaccination clinics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Vaccination clinics. 70.9 Section 70.9 Public... INTERSTATE QUARANTINE § 70.9 Vaccination clinics. (a) The Director may establish vaccination clinics, through contract or otherwise, authorized to administer vaccines and/or other prophylaxis. (b) A vaccination...

  13. 42 CFR 70.9 - Vaccination clinics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vaccination clinics. 70.9 Section 70.9 Public... INTERSTATE QUARANTINE § 70.9 Vaccination clinics. (a) The Director may establish vaccination clinics, through contract or otherwise, authorized to administer vaccines and/or other prophylaxis. (b) A vaccination...

  14. Promoting Collaborative Teaching in Clinical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prystowsky, Jay B.; DaRosa, Debra A.; Thompson, Jason A.

    2001-01-01

    Surveyed clinical clerkship directors at a large medical school to determine which patient problems they regarded as critical or important to know. Found a significant overlap of the clinical curriculum between clerkships, suggesting multiple opportunities for faculty collaboration in clinical education. (EV)

  15. 77 FR 60440 - Clinical Investigator Training Course

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ... access to electrical outlets. I. Background Clinical trial investigators play a critical role in the... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Clinical Investigator Training Course AGENCY: Food and Drug... are cosponsoring a 3- day training course for clinical investigators on scientific, ethical,...

  16. 75 FR 57472 - Clinical Investigator Training Course

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-21

    ... days in advance. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Clinical trial investigators play a critical role in the... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Clinical Investigator Training Course AGENCY: Food and Drug... Programs, in cosponsorship with the Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative (CTTI), is announcing a...

  17. 78 FR 63988 - Clinical Investigator Training Course

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... enhance the safety of trial participants. Senior FDA staff will communicate directly with clinical.... Background Clinical trial investigators play a critical role in the development of medical products. They... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Clinical Investigator Training Course AGENCY: Food and...

  18. Designing a Curriculum for Clinical Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henning, John E.; Erb, Dorothy J.; Randles, Halle Schoener; Fults, Nanette; Webb, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a collaborative effort among five teacher preparation programs to create a conceptual tool designed to put clinical experiences at the center of our programs. The authors refer to the resulting product as a clinical curriculum. The clinical curriculum describes a developmental sequence of clinical…

  19. Clinical Mental Health Counselor Handbook & Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullard, Bonnie; Lawless, Linda; Williams, Midge; Bergstrom, Deborah

    This handbook and study guide were developed as a textbook to be used as a review course for preparation for the clinical licensing examination. It presents a summary of a graduate level academic program in clinical mental health counseling. It contains 17 chapters on clinical information; 4 chapters on test taking; 2 types of sample tests; and 3…

  20. Serving Inland Rural Communities through University Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allan, Julaine; Pope, Rod; O'Meara, Peter; Higgs, Joy; Kent, Jenny

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To effectively provide clinical placements for students and increase healthcare options for rural communities, an investigation of university clinics was conducted. Method: This project adopted a consultative inquiry strategy and involved two processes: (1) a review of literature; and (2) interviews with existing health sciences clinic staff.…

  1. Math Clinic Purposes: Organization or Values?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelhardt, Jon M.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses three purposes of mathematics clinics, indicating that the resultant organizational structure of a particular clinic and the underlying values are intimately related to the identified purposes and that the precise character of a clinic is based on the relative emphasis ascribed to the different purposes. (JN)

  2. A mixed treatment comparison to compare the efficacy and safety of botulinum toxin treatments for cervical dystonia.

    PubMed

    Han, Yi; Stevens, Andrea L; Dashtipour, Khashayar; Hauser, Robert A; Mari, Zoltan

    2016-04-01

    A systematic pair-wise comparison of all available botulinum toxin serotype A and B treatments for cervical dystonia (CD) was conducted, as direct head-to-head clinical trial comparisons are lacking. Five botulinum toxin products: Dysport(®) (abobotulinumtoxinA), Botox(®) (onabotulinumtoxinA), Xeomin(®) (incobotulinumtoxinA), Prosigne(®) (Chinese botulinum toxin serotype A) and Myobloc(®) (rimabotulinumtoxinB) have demonstrated efficacy for managing CD. A pair-wise efficacy and safety comparison was performed for all toxins based on literature-reported clinical outcomes. Multi-armed randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were identified for inclusion using a systematic literature review, and assessed for comparability based on patient population and efficacy outcome measures. The Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS) was selected as the efficacy outcome measurement for assessment. A mixed treatment comparison (MTC) was conducted using a Bayesian hierarchical model allowing indirect comparison of the interventions. Due to the limitation of available clinical data, this study only investigated the main effect of toxin treatments without explicitly considering potential confounding factors such as gender and formulation differences. There was reasonable agreement between the number of unconstrained data points, residual deviance and pair-wise results. This research suggests that all botulinum toxin serotype A and serotype B treatments were effective compared to placebo in treating CD, with the exception of Prosigne. Based on this MTC analysis, there is no significant efficacy difference between Dysport, Botox, Xeomin and Myobloc at week four post injection. Of the adverse events measured, neither dysphagia nor injection site pain was significantly greater in the treatment or placebo groups. PMID:26914922

  3. Clinical research informatics: a conceptual perspective

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Chunhua

    2012-01-01

    Clinical research informatics is the rapidly evolving sub-discipline within biomedical informatics that focuses on developing new informatics theories, tools, and solutions to accelerate the full translational continuum: basic research to clinical trials (T1), clinical trials to academic health center practice (T2), diffusion and implementation to community practice (T3), and ‘real world’ outcomes (T4). We present a conceptual model based on an informatics-enabled clinical research workflow, integration across heterogeneous data sources, and core informatics tools and platforms. We use this conceptual model to highlight 18 new articles in the JAMIA special issue on clinical research informatics. PMID:22523344

  4. Clinical Growth: An Evolutionary Concept Analysis.

    PubMed

    Barkimer, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Clinical growth is an essential component of nursing education, although challenging to evaluate. Considering the paradigm shift toward constructivism and student-centered learning, clinical growth requires an examination within contemporary practices. A concept analysis of clinical growth in nursing education produced defining attributes, antecedents, and consequences. Attributes included higher-level thinking, socialization, skill development, self-reflection, self-investment, interpersonal communication, and linking theory to practice. Identification of critical attributes allows educators to adapt to student-centered learning in the clinical environment. These findings allow educators to determine significant research questions, develop situation-specific theories, and identify strategies to enhance student learning in the clinical environment. PMID:27490885

  5. Understanding clinical nursing education: An exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Dahlke, Sherry; O'Connor, Maureen; Hannesson, Teresa; Cheetham, Karleen

    2016-03-01

    Clinical experiences are recognized as a critical aspect of nursing education, highlighting the importance of the perspectives of those providing clinical instruction. The aim of this mixed methods descriptive study was to discover the knowledge and guidance needs of preceptors and clinical faculty who provide clinical instruction to Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) students. Fifteen clinical faculty and 17 preceptors were surveyed using a questionnaire developed and piloted by the researchers. Although preceptors and clinical faculty reported a high level of knowledge and confidence in their ability to guide student nurses, they also identified the need for additional support for their teaching roles. Analysis of the qualitative data provided insights into what helped and what hindered clinical instruction, as well as what could enhance clinical instruction. The development, implementation, and evaluation of formal education and mentorship processes for preceptors and clinical faculty are recommended in order to meet these knowledge and guidance gaps. Further research is also needed to explore how to clinical instruction could be tailored to the capacity of those engaged in the experiences and to clinical environments. PMID:26775165

  6. Clinical misconduct among South Korean nursing students.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Jun; Park, Seungmi; Jang, In-Sun

    2014-12-01

    This study examines the extent and predictors of unethical clinical behaviors among nursing students in South Korea. From survey data of 345 undergraduate nursing students, unethical clinical behaviors were examined with respect to 11 individual characteristics, frequency and perceived seriousness of classroom cheating, two factors of individual attitude, and four contextual factors. Qualitative data from two focus group interviews were analyzed to explore reasons for and contexts of unethical clinical behaviors. About sixty-six percent of the participants engaged in one or more unethical clinical behaviors over a one-semester period. The prevalence of such behaviors varied widely from 1.7% to 40.9% and was related to the type of nursing program, the number of clinical practicum semesters completed, ethical attitudes toward cheating behaviors, the frequency of cheating on assignments, the frequency of cheating on exams, the perceived prevalence of cheating by peers, and prior knowledge of academic integrity. According to the regression analysis, the last four variables explained 29.4% of the variance in the prevalence of unethical clinical behaviors. In addition, multiple reasons and possible interventions for clinical misconduct were reported during the focus group interviews. Unlike cheating in the classroom, clinical misconduct was strongly induced by clinical nurses and poor clinical practice environments. In sum, unethical clinical behaviors were widespread among the participants and need to be corrected. PMID:24837816

  7. Clinical judgement and the medical profession

    PubMed Central

    Kienle, Gunver S; Kiene, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Clinical judgment is a central element of the medical profession, essential for the performance of the doctor, and potentially generating information also for other clinicians and for scientists and health care managers. The recently renewed interest in clinical judgement is primarily engaged with its role in communication, diagnosis and decision making. Beyond this issue, the present article highlights the interrelations between clinical judgement, therapy assessment and medical professionalism. Methods Literature review and theory development. Results The article presents different methodological approaches to causality assessment in clinical studies and in clinical judgement, and offers criteria for clinical single case causality. The article outlines models of medical professionalism such as technical rationality and practice epistemology, and characterizes features of professional expertise such as tacit knowledge, reflection in action, and gestalt cognition. Conclusions Consequences of a methodological and logistical advancement of clinical judgment are discussed, both in regard to medical progress and to the renewel of the cognitive basis of the medical profession. PMID:20973873

  8. Defining the clinical course of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Reingold, Stephen C.; Cohen, Jeffrey A.; Cutter, Gary R.; Sørensen, Per Soelberg; Thompson, Alan J.; Wolinsky, Jerry S.; Balcer, Laura J.; Banwell, Brenda; Barkhof, Frederik; Bebo, Bruce; Calabresi, Peter A.; Clanet, Michel; Comi, Giancarlo; Fox, Robert J.; Freedman, Mark S.; Goodman, Andrew D.; Inglese, Matilde; Kappos, Ludwig; Kieseier, Bernd C.; Lincoln, John A.; Lubetzki, Catherine; Miller, Aaron E.; Montalban, Xavier; O'Connor, Paul W.; Petkau, John; Pozzilli, Carlo; Rudick, Richard A.; Sormani, Maria Pia; Stüve, Olaf; Waubant, Emmanuelle; Polman, Chris H.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate clinical course descriptions (phenotypes) of multiple sclerosis (MS) are important for communication, prognostication, design and recruitment of clinical trials, and treatment decision-making. Standardized descriptions published in 1996 based on a survey of international MS experts provided purely clinical phenotypes based on data and consensus at that time, but imaging and biological correlates were lacking. Increased understanding of MS and its pathology, coupled with general concern that the original descriptors may not adequately reflect more recently identified clinical aspects of the disease, prompted a re-examination of MS disease phenotypes by the International Advisory Committee on Clinical Trials of MS. While imaging and biological markers that might provide objective criteria for separating clinical phenotypes are lacking, we propose refined descriptors that include consideration of disease activity (based on clinical relapse rate and imaging findings) and disease progression. Strategies for future research to better define phenotypes are also outlined. PMID:24871874

  9. Target population for clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Studenski, S

    2016-01-01

    The target population for clinical trials aimed at sarcopenia depends on the goals of treatment and the expected natural history of sarcopenia. Based on a natural history where loss of muscle mass and/or quality leads to loss of strength, and eventually to reduced mobility and functional dependence, treatment goals can be defined for both preventive and therapeutic interventions. For example, a target population with low muscle mass and poor strength could be treated to prevent the onset of mobility disability, or a target population with low muscle mass and poor strength with mobility disability could be treated therapeutically to improve mobility. Eligibility for a trial should also be based on careful consideration of factors that affect 1) the ability to respond to treatment, 2) the safety of treatment, 3) expected prevalence and 4) feasibility. PMID:19657558

  10. [Xenotransplantation, soon a clinical reality?].

    PubMed

    Sgroi, Antonino; Baertschiger, Reto M; Morel, Philippe; Buhler, Leo H

    2007-06-27

    Organ transplantation has encountered great development during the 80's. However, the number of organ donations and transplantations performed stabilized during the 90ies, with a concomitant increase of patients on the waiting list. Xenotransplantation, i.e. the use of animal organs for transplantation to humans, is one among various alternatives to human organ donation. Xenotransplantation offers several advantages, e.g. it would be possible to transplant all patients at an early stage of their disease. The main barriers to xenotransplantation are the strong immunological responses that human develop against animal antigens and zoonoses. To overcome these hurdles, genetically modified pigs have been engineered by cloning and could allow the initiation of new clinical trials in a near future. PMID:17708231

  11. Gestational diabetes: A clinical update

    PubMed Central

    Kampmann, Ulla; Madsen, Lene Ring; Skajaa, Gitte Oeskov; Iversen, Ditte Smed; Moeller, Niels; Ovesen, Per

    2015-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is increasing in prevalence in tandem with the dramatic increase in the prevalence of overweight and obesity in women of childbearing age. Much controversy surrounds the diagnosis and management of gestational diabetes, emphasizing the importance and relevance of clarity and consensus. If newly proposed criteria are adopted universally a significantly growing number of women will be diagnosed as having GDM, implying new therapeutic challenges to avoid foetal and maternal complications related to the hyperglycemia of gestational diabetes. This review provides an overview of clinical issues related to GDM, including the challenges of screening and diagnosis, the pathophysiology behind GDM, the treatment and prevention of GDM and the long and short term consequences of gestational diabetes for both mother and offspring. PMID:26240703

  12. Vardenafil: update on clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Pryor, J

    2002-02-01

    Vardenafil, a potent and selective phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor, has entered phase 3 clinical trials. Pharmacodynamic studies showed that the maximum plasma concentration after oral administration of 20-40 mg of vardenafil occurred in 0.7-0.9 h, the half-life was 4-5 h, and negligible amounts remained in the circulation after 24 h. The efficacy of vardenafil compared with placebo was shown in RigiScan studies, a phase 2 study involving 601 men with mild-to-severe erectile dysfunction for at least 6 months, and a phase 3 study involving 452 diabetic men. Adverse effects were not severe and tended to decrease with time. PMID:11850738

  13. Clinical encounters with internet pornography.

    PubMed

    Kalman, Thomas P

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Pornography, if understood to involve the depiction of sexual activity, organs, and experiences, is perhaps as old as human civilization itself. Historically linked to various technological innovations, pornography viewing in the Internet age has reached epic proportions, with large numbers of individuals taking advantage of ease of access, affordability, and presumed anonymity to explore sexual material online. Within the mental health professions substantial research exists on the effects of viewing general pornography; however, the distinctive effects of the marriage of pornography and cyberspace is only beginning to be examined. In addition to reviewing some historical and statistical material about pornography and the relevant psychiatric and psychoanalytic literature, four detailed clinical vignettes are presented to illustrate the types of problems related to Internet pornography use that are being presented to practicing psychotherapists. PMID:19113956

  14. Clinical challenges in mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Goligher, Ewan C; Ferguson, Niall D; Brochard, Laurent J

    2016-04-30

    Mechanical ventilation supports gas exchange and alleviates the work of breathing when the respiratory muscles are overwhelmed by an acute pulmonary or systemic insult. Although mechanical ventilation is not generally considered a treatment for acute respiratory failure per se, ventilator management warrants close attention because inappropriate ventilation can result in injury to the lungs or respiratory muscles and worsen morbidity and mortality. Key clinical challenges include averting intubation in patients with respiratory failure with non-invasive techniques for respiratory support; delivering lung-protective ventilation to prevent ventilator-induced lung injury; maintaining adequate gas exchange in severely hypoxaemic patients; avoiding the development of ventilator-induced diaphragm dysfunction; and diagnosing and treating the many pathophysiological mechanisms that impair liberation from mechanical ventilation. Personalisation of mechanical ventilation based on individual physiological characteristics and responses to therapy can further improve outcomes. PMID:27203509

  15. Clinical neurology and executive dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Filley, C M

    2000-01-01

    Executive function is a uniquely human ability that permits an individual to plan, carry out, and monitor a sequence of actions that is intended to accomplish a goal. This crucial neurobehavioral capacity depends on the integrity of the frontal lobes, most importantly the dorsolateral prefrontal cortices and their connections. Executive dysfunction is associated with a wide range of neurologic disorders that affect these regions. In this paper, executive dysfunction is considered from the perspective of behavioral neurology, and the lesion method is employed to illustrate this impairment in a diverse group of disorders. Frontal system damage leading to disturbed executive function is common and clinically significant. Recognition of this syndrome is critical for ensuring the correct diagnosis, accurate prognosis, and appropriate treatment of affected patients. Executive dysfunction also represents an intriguing aspect of brain-behavior relationships and offers important insights into one of the highest cerebral functions. PMID:10879543

  16. Gynecomastia: Clinical evaluation and management

    PubMed Central

    Cuhaci, Neslihan; Polat, Sefika Burcak; Evranos, Berna; Ersoy, Reyhan; Cakir, Bekir

    2014-01-01

    Gynecomastia is the benign enlargement of male breast glandular tissue and is the most common breast condition in males. At least 30% of males will be affected during their life. Since it causes anxiety, psychosocial discomfort and fear of breast cancer, early diagnostic evaluation is important and patients usually seek medical attention. Gynecomastia was reported to cause an imbalance between estrogen and androgen action or an increased estrogen to androgen ratio, due to increased estrogen production, decreased androgen production or both. Evaluation of gynecomastia must include a detailed medical history, clinical examination, specific blood tests, imaging and tissue sampling. Individual treatment requirements can range from simple reassurance to medical treatment or even surgery. The main aim of any intervention is to relieve the symptoms and exclude other etiological factors. PMID:24741509

  17. Expert Systems in Clinical Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Winstanley, Trevor; Courvalin, Patrice

    2011-01-01

    Summary: This review aims to discuss expert systems in general and how they may be used in medicine as a whole and clinical microbiology in particular (with the aid of interpretive reading). It considers rule-based systems, pattern-based systems, and data mining and introduces neural nets. A variety of noncommercial systems is described, and the central role played by the EUCAST is stressed. The need for expert rules in the environment of reset EUCAST breakpoints is also questioned. Commercial automated systems with on-board expert systems are considered, with emphasis being placed on the “big three”: Vitek 2, BD Phoenix, and MicroScan. By necessity and in places, the review becomes a general review of automated system performances for the detection of specific resistance mechanisms rather than focusing solely on expert systems. Published performance evaluations of each system are drawn together and commented on critically. PMID:21734247

  18. Introducing students to clinical audit.

    PubMed

    Parkes, Jacqueline; O'Dell, Cindy

    2015-11-01

    It is more than a decade since the UK Central Council for Nursing Midwifery and Health Visiting said that engaging with clinical audit is 'the business of every registered practitioner', yet there appears to be little evidence that nursing has embraced the process. To address this issue, Northampton General Hospital and the University of Northampton implemented a pilot project in which two third-year adult nursing students worked on a 'real life' audit. Supported by the hospital's audit department, and supervised by academic tutors with the relevant experience, the students worked on a pressure-ulcer care audit for their final year dissertation. This article describes the process undertaken by the hospital audit team and the university academic team to develop the pilot project and support the students. Based on the positive evaluations, the university has extended the project to a second phase, incorporating two new partner organisations. PMID:26508069

  19. [The fibroid as clinical problem].

    PubMed

    Calaf, Joaquín; Arqué, Maria; Porta, Oriol; D'Angelo, Emanuela

    2013-07-01

    Uterine fibroids are the most common benign tumours that affect women of reproductive age and they represent the main indication for surgery for benign uterine pathology. In 25% of cases, they become clinically apparent, causing heavy menstrual bleeding, pelvic pain and/or infertility. Therefore, fibroids have a notable impact on the economic costs for the health system and also on the quality of life of the women they afflict. Although MRI is the most precise technique to diagnose fibroids, ultrasound remains the most cost-effective method. Surgery has been the treatment of choice for years, and several minimally invasive procedures have recently been developed. There are a wide variety of conservative medical treatment options, which are continually expanding. Research on the biology of these tumours can lead to new therapeutic options for the management of fibroids as we better understand the role that growth factors and genetic mutations play in them. PMID:24314560

  20. Loneliness: Clinical Import and Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Cacioppo, Stephanie; Grippo, Angela J.; London, Sarah; Goossens, Luc; Cacioppo, John T.

    2014-01-01

    In 1978, when the Task Panel report to the US President’s Commission on Mental Health emphasized the importance of improving health care and easing the pain of those suffering from emotional distress syndromes including loneliness, few anticipated that this issue would still need to be addressed 40 years later. A meta-analysis (Masi et al., 2011) on the efficacy of treatments to reduce loneliness identified a need for well-controlled randomized clinical trials focusing on the rehabilitation of maladaptive social cognition. We review assessments of loneliness and build on this meta-analysis to discuss the efficacy of various treatments for loneliness. With the advances made over the past 5 years in the identification of the psychobiological and pharmaceutical mechanisms associated with loneliness and maladaptive social cognition, there is increasing evidence for the potential efficacy of integrated interventions that combine (social) cognitive behavioral therapy with short-term adjunctive pharmacological treatments. PMID:25866548