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Sample records for a-cyclodextrin inclusion compounds

  1. Inclusion compound of vitamin B13 in ?-Cyclodextrin. Structural investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacso, Irina; Borodi, Gheorghe; F?rca?, Sorin I.; Bratu, Ioan

    2009-08-01

    Structural characterization of inclusion compound of vitamin B13 (orotic acid) with ?-cyclodextrin (?-CD) prepared by different methods (kneading, co-precipitation and freeze-drying) has been performed by using FTIR spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction and DSC, FTIR data being compared with molecular modeling of these supramolecular architectures.

  2. Formation and Characteristics of Acrylonitrile/Urea Inclusion Compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Jun-ting; Wang, Yu-song; Pang, Wen-min; Shi, Lei; Lu, Fei

    The formation process and composition of the acrylonitrile/urea inclusion compounds (AN/UIC) with different aging times and AN/urea molar feed ratios are studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). It is suggested that DSC could be one of the helpful methods to determine the guest/host ratio and the heat of decomposition. Meanwhile, the guest/host ratio and heat of deformation are obtained, which are 1.17 and 5361.53 J/mol, respectively. It is suggested AN molecules included in urea canal lattice may be packed flat against each other. It is found that the formation of AN/UIC depends on the aging time. XRD results reveal that once AN molecules enter urea lattice, AN/UIC are formed, which possess the final structure. When AN molecules are sufficient, the length of AN molecular arrays in urea canals increases as aging time prolonging until urea tunnels are saturated by AN.

  3. High-pressure/low-temperature neutron scattering of gas inclusion compounds: Progress and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yusheng; Xu, Hongwu; Daemen, Luke L.; Lokshin, Konstantin; Tait, Kimberly T.; Mao, Wendy L.; Luo, Junhua; Currier, Robert P.; Hickmott, Donald D.

    2007-01-01

    Alternative energy resources such as hydrogen and methane gases are becoming increasingly important for the future economy. A major challenge for using hydrogen is to develop suitable materials to store it under a variety of conditions, which requires systematic studies of the structures, stability, and kinetics of various hydrogen-storing compounds. Neutron scattering is particularly useful for these studies. We have developed high-pressure/low-temperature gas/fluid cells in conjunction with neutron diffraction and inelastic neutron scattering instruments allowing in situ and real-time examination of gas uptake/release processes. We studied the formation of methane and hydrogen clathrates, a group of inclusion compounds consisting of frameworks of hydrogen-bonded H2O molecules with gas molecules trapped inside the cages. Our results reveal that clathrate can store up to four hydrogen molecules in each of its large cages with an intermolecular H2–H2 distance of only 2.93 ?. This distance is much shorter than that in the solid/metallic hydrogen (3.78 ?), suggesting a strong densification effect of the clathrate framework on the enclosed hydrogen molecules. The framework-pressurizing effect is striking and may exist in other inclusion compounds such as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Owing to the enormous variety and flexibility of their frameworks, inclusion compounds may offer superior properties for storage of hydrogen and/or hydrogen-rich molecules, relative to other types of compounds. We have investigated the hydrogen storage properties of two MOFs, Cu3[Co(CN)6]2 and Cu3(BTC)2 (BTC = benzenetricarboxylate), and our preliminary results demonstrate that the developed neutron-scattering techniques are equally well suited for studying MOFs and other inclusion compounds. PMID:17389387

  4. Synthesis and spectral investigation of Al(III) catechin/?-cyclodextrin and Al(III) quercetin/?-cyclodextrin inclusion compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Karina; Nikolaou, Sofia; De Giovani, Wagner F.

    2008-06-01

    Al-catechin/?-cyclodextrin and Al-quercetin/?-cyclodextrin (?-CD) inclusion compounds were synthesized and characterized by IR, UV-vis, 1H and 13C NMR and TG and DTA analyses. Because quercetin is sparingly soluble in water, the stability constants of the Al-quercetin/?-CD and Al-catechin/?-CD compounds were determined by phase solubility studies. The A L-type diagrams indicated the formation of 1:1 inclusion compounds and allowed calculation of the stability constants. The thermodynamic parameters were obtained from the dependence of the stability constants on temperature and results indicated that the formation of the inclusion compounds is an enthalpically driven process. The thermal decomposition of the solid Al-quercetin/?-CD and Al-catechin/?-CD inclusion compounds took place at different stages, compared with the respective precursors, proving that an inclusion complexation process really occurred.

  5. Inclusion compound of vitamin B6 in ?-CD. Physico-chemical and structural investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodi, Gheorghe; Kacso, Irina; Farca?, Sorin I.; Bratu, Ioan

    2009-08-01

    Structural and physico-chemical characterization of supramolecular assembly of vitamin B6 with ?-cyclodextrin (?-CD) prepared by different methods (kneading, co-precipitation and freeze-drying) has been performed by using several spectroscopic techniques (FTIR, 1H NMR, UV-Vis), powder X-ray diffraction and DSC in order to evidence the inclusion compound formation. An analysis of the chemical shifts observed in the 1H-NMR spectra and of the vibrational frequency shifts led to the tentative conclusion that the vitamin B6 probably enters the cyclodextrin torus when forming the ?-CD-vitamin B6 inclusion complex.

  6. Inclusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, Jeanne H., Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This theme journal issue focuses on current activities of the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services which stress inclusion of students with disabilities in the mainstream. It begins with a message from the Assistant Secretary, Robert R. Davila which examines the full meaning of an "inclusive" education. Next, Barbara Buswell and…

  7. A Cyclodextrin-Based Photoresponsive Molecular Gate that Functions Independently of Either Solvent or Potentially Competitive Guests.

    PubMed

    Loh, Ka-Heng; Smith, Nicole M; Onagi, Hideki; Lincoln, Stephen F; Easton, Christopher J

    2015-11-01

    The photoinduced interconversion between cinnamido-substituted cyclodextrins constitutes a gating switch through which the substituent moves to open or block access to the cyclodextrin cavity. Most unusually for a cyclodextrin-based device, the operation of this gate is solvent-independent and unaffected by potentially competitive guests. It occurs in MeOH and DMSO, as well as in water. This contrasts with other cyclodextrin inclusion phenomena that are usually driven by hydrophobic effects and limited to aqueous media. PMID:26317394

  8. Physicochemical and molecular modeling studies of cefixime-L-arginine-cyclodextrin ternary inclusion compounds.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Priyanka; Petkar, Bhushan; Pore, Yogesh; Kulkarni, Anita; Burade, Kishorkumar

    2013-11-01

    In an attempt to improve the physicochemical properties of cefixime (CEF), its supramolecular inclusion compounds were prepared with ?-cyclodextrin (?CD) and hydroxypropyl-?-cyclodextrin (HP?CD) in presence and/or absence of ternary component L-arginine (ARG) using spray drying technique. Initially, the phase solubility studies revealed a stoichiometry of 1:1 molar ratio with an AL-type of phase solubility curve. The stability constants of binary systems were remarkably improved in presence of ARG, indicating positive effect of its addition. The inclusion complexes were characterized by FTIR, XRPD, DSC, SEM, particle size analysis, and dissolution studies. Further, molecular mechanic (MM) calculations were performed to investigate the possible orientations of CEF inside ?CD cavity in presence and/or absence of ternary component. In case of physicochemical studies, the ternary systems performed well as a result of comprehensive effect of ternary complexation and particle size reduction achieved by a spray drying technology. PMID:24053809

  9. Deuteron NMR studies of guest motion in alkanoic acid urea inclusion compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vold, Robert L.; Hoatson, Gina L.; Subramanian, Raju

    1998-05-01

    The orientation dependence of deuteron relaxation times of Zeeman (T1Z) and quadrupole (T1Q) order have been measured in the temperature range -30 to +45 °C for polycrystalline urea inclusion compounds containing alkyl deuterated octanoic acid-d18, dodecanoic acid-d23, and hexadecanoic acid-d31. These data were fitted to a model, based on Redfield relaxation theory, which incorporates rapid rotation about the long molecular axis and slower, limited angle libration of individual CD bonds about a perpendicular axis. The activation energies for rotational diffusion about the long axis are 17.4±0.8 kJ/mol for octanoic acid-d18, 14.4±0.6 kJ/mol for dodecanoic acid-d23, and 22.5±0.4 kJ/mol for hexadecanoic acid-d31 guests. These values are larger than those for alkane guests with the same number of carbon atoms, and they increase more rapidly with increasing chain length. Quadrupole coupling constants, determined at room temperature from measurements on large single crystals, are consistent with a small gauche population near the methyl end of the alkanoic acid chains. Analytic models which relate the measured quadrupole coupling constants and relaxation times to conformational probabilities and dynamics require the assumption that rotations about individual C-C bonds are uncorrelated. Newtonian molecular dynamics simulations reveal that this incorrect assumption introduces significant error.

  10. A theoretical study of conformational aspects and energy transfer between terthiophene and quinquethiophene in perhydrotriphenylene inclusion compounds.

    PubMed

    Vásquez, Sergio O

    2008-09-21

    A theoretical study of models with supramolecular architecture of co-inclusion compounds based on the host perhydrotriphenylene and guests terthiophene and quinquethiophene (PHTP:T3,T5) is carried out to elucidate in detail the conformational aspects of the oligomeric guest species in the PHTP matrix host. The factors that direct the geometry, location and separation of terthiophene and quinquethiophene within the channels of the PHTP host have been studied using semi-empirical and ab initio calculations. The movement of the guests inside the channel is subject to constraints preventing free rotations or axial displacements along the nanochannel. Optimal arrangement and the general trend of the relative order between T3 and T5 in the (PHTP:T3,T5) co-inclusion compound is obtained. Furthermore, excited state calculations allow the explanation of the spectral shifts of the included species in terms of the planarization of their geometries. An analysis of the energy transfer processes between the T3-T5 donor-acceptor pair based on the configurational details of the co-inclusion compound conclude that efficient transfer proceeds only through two different and perpendicular windows for the T3 --> T5 transfer. The results emphasize the importance for better understanding of the directional details of the energy transfer mechanisms in this kind of one-dimensional systems. PMID:18766244

  11. Preparation and study on the inclusion complexes of two tanshinone compounds with ?-cyclodextrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuexian, Fan; Junfen, Li; Chuan, Dong

    2005-01-01

    Solid inclusion complexes of two tanshinones (Tans): tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA), tanshinone I (Tan I) with ?-cyclodextrin (?-CD) were synthesized by coprecipitation method. The solid inclusion complexes were characterized by using several analytical techniques: 1H NMR spectra, IR spectra and thermal analysis. Stoichiometry of the inclusion complexes of Tans with ?-CD or HP-?-CD is 1:1 which was investigated in solution. The formation constants of the complexes were determined by UV spectrophotometry. For same kind of CD, the stability was in the order: Tan IIA > Tan I; for same guest, the stability was in the order: HP-?-CD > ?-CD. The effect of temperature on the inclusion interaction was examined and the thermodynamic parameters of inclusion process, ? G, ? H, ? S were determined as well. The experimental results indicate that the inclusion process was an exothermic and enthalpy-driven process accompanied with a negative entropic contribution. The inclusion interaction between CD and Tans satisfied the law of enthalpy-entropy compensation.

  12. Polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins, dibenzofurans, and biphenyls: inclusion in the toxicity equivalency factor concept for dioxin-like compounds.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Martin; Denison, Michael S; Birnbaum, Linda S; Devito, Michael J; Fiedler, Heidelore; Falandysz, Jerzy; Rose, Martin; Schrenk, Dieter; Safe, Stephen; Tohyama, Chiharu; Tritscher, Angelika; Tysklind, Mats; Peterson, Richard E

    2013-06-01

    In 2011, a joint World Health Organization (WHO) and United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) expert consultation took place, during which the possible inclusion of brominated analogues of the dioxin-like compounds in the WHO Toxicity Equivalency Factor (TEF) scheme was evaluated. The expert panel concluded that polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PBDDs), dibenzofurans (PBDFs), and some dioxin-like biphenyls (dl-PBBs) may contribute significantly in daily human background exposure to the total dioxin toxic equivalencies (TEQs). These compounds are also commonly found in the aquatic environment. Available data for fish toxicity were evaluated for possible inclusion in the WHO-UNEP TEF scheme (van den Berg et al., 1998). Because of the limited database, it was decided not to derive specific WHO-UNEP TEFs for fish, but for ecotoxicological risk assessment, the use of specific relative effect potencies (REPs) from fish embryo assays is recommended. Based on the limited mammalian REP database for these brominated compounds, it was concluded that sufficient differentiation from the present TEF values of the chlorinated analogues (van den Berg et al., 2006) was not possible. However, the REPs for PBDDs, PBDFs, and non-ortho dl-PBBs in mammals closely follow those of the chlorinated analogues, at least within one order of magnitude. Therefore, the use of similar interim TEF values for brominated and chlorinated congeners for human risk assessment is recommended, pending more detailed information in the future. PMID:23492812

  13. Polybrominated Dibenzo-p-Dioxins, Dibenzofurans, and Biphenyls: Inclusion in the Toxicity Equivalency Factor Concept for Dioxin-Like Compounds

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Martin

    2013-01-01

    In 2011, a joint World Health Organization (WHO) and United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) expert consultation took place, during which the possible inclusion of brominated analogues of the dioxin-like compounds in the WHO Toxicity Equivalency Factor (TEF) scheme was evaluated. The expert panel concluded that polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PBDDs), dibenzofurans (PBDFs), and some dioxin-like biphenyls (dl-PBBs) may contribute significantly in daily human background exposure to the total dioxin toxic equivalencies (TEQs). These compounds are also commonly found in the aquatic environment. Available data for fish toxicity were evaluated for possible inclusion in the WHO-UNEP TEF scheme (van den Berg et al., 1998). Because of the limited database, it was decided not to derive specific WHO-UNEP TEFs for fish, but for ecotoxicological risk assessment, the use of specific relative effect potencies (REPs) from fish embryo assays is recommended. Based on the limited mammalian REP database for these brominated compounds, it was concluded that sufficient differentiation from the present TEF values of the chlorinated analogues (van den Berg et al., 2006) was not possible. However, the REPs for PBDDs, PBDFs, and non-ortho dl-PBBs in mammals closely follow those of the chlorinated analogues, at least within one order of magnitude. Therefore, the use of similar interim TEF values for brominated and chlorinated congeners for human risk assessment is recommended, pending more detailed information in the future. PMID:23492812

  14. Determination of endocrine disrupting compounds using temperature-dependent inclusion chromatography: I. Optimization of separation protocol.

    PubMed

    Zarzycki, Pawe? K; W?odarczyk, Elzbieta; Baran, Micha? J

    2009-10-30

    In the present work we optimised the separation of battery of key UV non-transparent low-molecular-mass compounds having possible endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) activity or which may be used as the endocrine effect biomarkers. Simple optimization strategy was based on strong temperature effect that is driven by electrostatic interactions between macrocyclic mobile phase additives like cyclodextrins and eluted components of interest under C18 stationary phase and acetonitrile/water mobile phase conditions. Particularly, the effect of temperature involving native beta-cyclodextrin and its hydroxypropyl derivative to improve separation of number of natural (d-equilenin, equilin, estetrol, estriol, estrone, 17beta-estradiol, 17alpha-hydroxyprogesterone, 20alpha-hydroxyprogesterone, cortisol, cortisone, progesterone, testosterone, tetrahydrocortisol and tetrahydrocortisone) and artificial steroids (ethynylestradiol, norgestrel isomers, medroxyprogesterone, mestranol, methyltestosterone, norethindrone, 17alpha-estradiol) as well as non-steroidal compounds (diethylstilbesterol, bisphenol A, 4-tert-butylphenol, dimethyl phthalate, dibutyl phthalate and dioctyl phthalate) was investigated. It has been found that successful isocratic separation of 27 chemicals can be achieved using acetonitrile/water eluents modified with beta-cyclodextrin or hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin at concentration of 10 mM and temperature of 47 degrees C. Separation protocol is simple, reliable, direct and non-radioactive and may be easily adapted for rapid separation and quantification of wide range of given steroids and related EDCs in environmental samples, particularly those that are characterised by unstable biological matrix and components of interest load. PMID:19362314

  15. Inclusion compounds between ?-, ?- and ?-cyclodextrins: iron II lactate: a theoretical and experimental study using diffusion coefficients and molecular mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leite, Rosiley A.; Lino, Antonio C. S.; Takahata, Yuji

    2003-01-01

    The inclusion compounds between iron II lactate and three different cyclodextrins (CDs) were studied by means of experimental and theoretical data. The importance of iron II in the human metabolism effort the necessity of a minimum concentration to the human life. Malnutrition is one great problem in social politics of many countries on the world. The possibility to the development of novel medicines with the iron II species stable look for an increase on the efficiency for this kind of aid. Kinetics measurements confirm the possibility to stop the oxidation reaction. It was the first indication of efficient molecular encapsulation. Diffusion coefficient measurements were carried out by Taylor-Aris diffusion technique. The decrease of diffusion coefficients measured for iron II lactate when alone and forming the inclusion complexes was obtained for all hosts molecules used. Molecular Mechanics calculations were performed to elucidate the perfect arrange of iron II lactate inside CDs cavity. No great differences were obtained to the binding energy for the different hosts. Using the software HyperChem6.03v MM+, AMBER94 and OPLS Forced Fields for iron atom in two chemical environments (a) vacuum and (b) with addition of 250 water molecules (MM+). The solvent treatment was decisive to the order of stability. This order was ?-CD>?-CD>?-CD, the same order of solubility in water. The results contained in this work confirm the possibility to protect iron II lactate against oxidation.

  16. An orally active angiotensin-(1-7) inclusion compound and exercise training produce similar cardiovascular effects in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Bertagnolli, Mariane; Casali, Karina R; De Sousa, Frederico B; Rigatto, Katya; Becker, Lenice; Santos, Sergio H S; Dias, Lucinara D; Pinto, Graziela; Dartora, Daniela R; Schaan, Beatriz D; Milan, Ruben Dario Sinisterra; Irigoyen, Maria Claudia; Santos, Robson A S

    2014-01-01

    Low angiotensin-(1-7) (Ang-(1-7)) concentration is observed in some cardiovascular diseases and exercise training seems to restore its concentration in the heart. Recently, a novel formulation of an orally active Ang-(1-7) included in hydroxy-propyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HPB-CD) was developed and chronically administered in experimental models of cardiovascular diseases. The present study examined whether chronic administration of HPB-CD/Ang-(1-7) produces beneficial cardiovascular effects in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), as well as to compare the results obtained with those produced by exercise training. Male SHR (15-week old) were divided in control (tap water) or treated with HPB-CD/Ang-(1-7) (corresponding to 30?gkg(-1)day(-1) of Ang-(1-7)) by gavage, concomitantly or not to exercise training (treadmill, 10 weeks). After chronic treatment, hemodynamic, morphometric and molecular analysis in the heart were performed. Chronic HPB-CD/Ang-(1-7) decreased arterial blood pressure (BP) and heart rate in SHR. The inclusion compound significantly improved left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic pressure, restored the maximum and minimum derivatives (dP/dT) and decreased cardiac hypertrophy index in SHR. Chronic treatment improved autonomic control by attenuating sympathetic modulation on heart and vessels and the SAP variability, as well as increasing parasympathetic modulation and HR variability. Overall results were similar to those obtained with exercise training. These results show that chronic treatment with the HPB-CD/Ang-(1-7) inclusion compound produced beneficial effects in SHR resembling the ones produced by exercise training. This observation reinforces the potential cardiovascular therapeutic effect of this novel peptide formulation. PMID:24262271

  17. A cyclodextrin dimer as a supramolecular reaction platform for aqueous organometallic catalysis.

    PubMed

    Blaszkiewicz, Claire; Bricout, Hervé; Léonard, Estelle; Len, Christophe; Landy, David; Cézard, Christine; Djedaïni-Pilard, Florence; Monflier, Eric; Tilloy, Sébastien

    2013-08-11

    A reaction platform based on a cyclodextrin dimer, which is able to simultaneously include a substrate in one cavity and an organometallic catalyst into the other, proved to be highly efficient for aqueous hydroformylation reaction of higher olefins. PMID:23804025

  18. Preparation and antitumor effects of glaucocalyxin A-?-cyclodextrin clathrate

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chong; Qu, Yan; Jia, Yan-Long; Shang, Xiao-Jun; Bai, Su-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To improve the water solubility of glaucocalyxin A (GLA) by the preparation of glaucocalyxin A ?-cyclodextrin clathrate (GLA-?-CD) and to investigate the inhibitory effect of GLA-?-CD on tumor growth in S180 cell xenografts. Materials and methods: GLA-?-CD, ?-cyclodextrin (?-CD) and GLA were combined at a mass ratio of 1:1, dissolved in 60°C water by stirring. GLA completely entrapped by the ?-CD was verified by differential thermal analysis, the GLA content was determined. Phase solubility, solubility, and in vitro dissolution rate experiments were performed. The S180 xenograft mouse model was used to observe the tumor inhibitory effects of GLA-?-CD and GLA, and the TUNEL assay was used to detect differences in their rates of tumor cell apoptosis induction. Results: After combination with ?-CD, the solubility of GLA-?-CD was 21.78-fold greater than that of GLA. The in vitro dissolution rate of GLA-?-CD was significantly greater than that of GLA, and reached more than 90% in 20 min. Furthermore, GLA-?-CD was more effective than GLA as an inhibitor of S180 tumor cells; the inhibitory rate of the high-dose group reached 57.26%, which was 54.11% greater than the inhibitory rate of the GLA group at the same dose. In addition, GLA-?-CD induced tumor cell apoptosis more effectively than did GLA. Conclusion: The water solubility of GLA significantly increased in combination with ?-CD resulting in the production of GLA-?-CD. Furthermore, GLA-?-CD was more effective than GLA as an inducer of S180 tumor cell apoptosis and an inhibitor of tumor growth. PMID:26550426

  19. Volatile organic compound flux from manure of cattle fed diets differing in grain processing method and co-product inclusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hales, Kristin; Parker, David B.; Cole, N. Andy

    2015-01-01

    Odor emissions from livestock production have become increasingly important in the past decade. Odors derived from animal feeding operations are caused by odorous VOC emitted from the mixture of feces and urine, as well as feed and silage which may be experiencing microbial fermentation. Distillers grains are a by-product of corn grain fermentation used to produce fuel ethanol, and this industry has grown rapidly throughout the U.S. in past years. Therefore, the use of wet distillers grains with solubles (WDGS) in feedlot cattle diets has also increased. The objective of this research was to determine specific VOC emissions from feces and urine or a mixture of both, from cattle fed steam flaked or dry-rolled corn (DRC)-based diets containing either 0% or 30% WDGS. Flux of dimethyl trisulfide was greater from feces of cattle fed DRC than steam-flaked corn (SFC) diets. No other differences in flux from feces were detected across dietary treatments for phenol, 4-methylphenol, indole, skatole, dimethyl disulfide, and flux of volatile fatty acids (VFA) such as acetic, propionic, isobutyric, butyric, isovaleric, and valeric acids (P > 0.15). Flux of skatole, acetic acid, and valeric acid from urine was greater for cattle fed SFC than DRC diets (P < 0.05). Moreover, dimethyl disulfide flux was greater for cattle fed DRC vs. SFC diets (P = 0.05). When evaluating WDGS inclusion in the diet, flux of acetic acid and heptanoic acid from urine was greater when cattle were fed diets containing 0% WDGS than 30% WDGS (P < 0.05). When combining urine and feces in the ratio in which they were excreted from the animal, flux of propionic acid was greater when cattle were fed DRC vs. SFC diets (P = 0.05). Based on these results, the majority of the VOC, VFA, and odor flux from cattle feeding operations is from the urine. Therefore, dietary strategies to reduce odor from cattle feeding facilities should primarily focus on reducing excretion of odorous compounds in the urine.

  20. Compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzumura, Akitoshi; Watanabe, Masaki; Nagasako, Naoyuki; Asahi, Ryoji

    2014-06-01

    Recently, Cu-based chalcogenides such as Cu3SbSe4, Cu2Se, and Cu2SnSe3 have attracted much attention because of their high thermoelectric performance and their common feature of very low thermal conductivity. However, for practical use, materials without toxic elements such as selenium are preferable. In this paper, we report Se-free Cu3SbS4 thermoelectric material and improvement of its figure of merit ( ZT) by chemical substitutions. Substitutions of 3 at.% Ag for Cu and 2 at.% Ge for Sb lead to significant reductions in the thermal conductivity by 37% and 22%, respectively. These substitutions do not sacrifice the power factor, thus resulting in enhancement of the ZT value. The sensitivity of the thermal conductivity to chemical substitutions in these compounds is discussed in terms of the calculated phonon dispersion and previously proposed models for Cu-based chalcogenides. To improve the power factor, we optimize the hole carrier concentration by substitution of Ge for Sb, achieving a power factor of 16 ?W/cm K2 at 573 K, which is better than the best reported for Se-based Cu3SbSe4 compounds.

  1. A compound Ca-, Al-rich inclusion from CV3 chondrite Northwest Africa 3118: Implications for understanding processes during CAI formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, Marina A.; Lorenz, Cyril A.; Krot, Alexander N.; MacPherson, Glenn J.

    2015-09-01

    A calcium-aluminum-rich inclusion 3N from the Northwest Africa (NWA) 3118 CV3 carbonaceous chondrite is a unique cm-sized compound object, primarily a forsterite-bearing type B (FoB) CAI, that encloses at least 26 smaller CAIs of different types, including compact type A (CTA), B, C, and an ultra-refractory inclusion. Relative to typical type A and B CAIs found elsewhere, the bulk compositions of the types A and B CAIs within 3N more closely match the bulk compositions predicted by equilibrium condensation of a gas of solar composition. Being trapped within the FoB melt may have protected them from melt evaporation that affected most "stand-alone" CAIs. 3N originated either as an aggregate of many smaller (mostly types A, B, C) CAIs plus accreted Fo-bearing material (like an amoeboid olivine aggregate) which experienced partial melting of the whole, or else as a FoB melt droplet that collided with and trapped many smaller solid CAIs. In the former case, 3N recorded the earliest accretion of pebble-sized bodies known. In the latter case, the presence of a large number of individual refractory inclusions within 3N suggests a very high local density of refractory solids in the immediate region of the host CAI during the brief time while it was melted. Collisions would have occurred on time scales of hours at most, assuming a melt solidification interval for the host CAI of 300-400 °C (maximum) and a cooling rate of ~10 °C/h.

  2. Highly efficient cyclosarin degradation mediated by a ?-cyclodextrin derivative containing an oxime-derived substituent

    PubMed Central

    Zengerle, Michael; Brandhuber, Florian; Schneider, Christian; Worek, Franz; Reiter, Georg

    2011-01-01

    Summary The potential of appropriately substituted cyclodextrins to act as scavengers for neurotoxic organophosphonates under physiological conditions was evaluated. To this end, a series of derivatives containing substituents with an aldoxime or a ketoxime moiety along the narrow opening of the ?-cyclodextrin cavity was synthesized, and the ability of these compounds to reduce the inhibitory effect of the neurotoxic organophosphonate cyclosarin on its key target, acetylcholinesterase, was assessed in vitro. All compounds exhibited a larger effect than native ?-cyclodextrin, and characteristic differences were noted. These differences in activity were correlated with the structural and electronic parameters of the substituents. In addition, the relatively strong effect of the cyclodextrin derivatives on cyclosarin degradation and, in particular, the observed enantioselectivity are good indications that noncovalent interactions between the cyclodextrin ring and the substrate, presumably involving the inclusion of the cyclohexyl moiety of cyclosarin into the cyclodextrin cavity, contribute to the mode of action. Among the nine compounds investigated, one exhibited remarkable activity, completely preventing acetylcholinesterase inhibition by the (?)-enantiomer of cyclosarin within seconds under the conditions of the assay. Thus, these investigations demonstrate that decoration of cyclodextrins with appropriate substituents represents a promising approach for the development of scavengers able to detoxify highly toxic nerve agents. PMID:22238531

  3. Fully quantal calculation of H2 translation-rotation states in the (p-H2)2@51264 clathrate hydrate inclusion compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felker, Peter M.

    2014-11-01

    The quantal translation-rotation (TR) states of the (p-H2)2@51264 clathrate hydrate inclusion compound have been computed. The ten-dimensional problem (in the rigid-cage and rigid-H2 approximation) is solved by first approximating the H2 moieties as spherically symmetric and solving for their 6D translational eigenstates. These are then combined with H2 free rotational states in a product basis that is used to diagonalize the full TR hamiltonian. The computed low-energy eigenstates have translational components that are essentially identical to the 6D translational eigenstates and rotational components that are 99.9% composed of rotationally unexcited H2 moieties. In other words, TR coupling is minimal for the low-energy states of the species. The low-energy level structure is found to be substantially more congested than that of the more tightly packed (p-H2)4@51264 clathrate species. The level structure is also shown to be understandable in terms of a model of (H2)2 as a semirigid diatomic species consisting of two spherically symmetric H2 pseudo-atoms.

  4. Inclusion of ferrocene in a cyclodextrin-functionalized layered metal hydroxide: a new organometallic--organic-LDH nanohybrid.

    PubMed

    Mohanambe, L; Vasudevan, S

    2005-04-01

    Cyclodextrin cavities have been grafted into a layered metal hydroxide to create hydrophobic nanopockets within the galleries of the inorganic solid. Neutral ferrocene molecules can be included within the grafted cavities by partitioning from a polar solvent to generate a new organometallic-organic-inorganic hybrid. The included ferrocene has been characterized by electronic and Raman spectroscopy. The capability of the cyclodextrin-functionalized solid to separate hydrophobic and hydrophilic derivatives of ferrocene is demonstrated. PMID:15792443

  5. Enhanced mineralization of diuron using a cyclodextrin-based bioremediation technology.

    PubMed

    Villaverde, Jaime; Posada-Baquero, Rosa; Rubio-Bellido, Marina; Laiz, Leonila; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo; Sanchez-Trujillo, María A; Morillo, Esmeralda

    2012-10-10

    The phenylurea herbicide diuron [N-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-N,N-dimethylurea] is widely used in a broad range of herbicide formulations and, consequently, it is frequently detected as a major soil and water contaminant in areas where there is extensive use. Diuron has the unfortunate combination of being strongly adsorbed by soil organic matter particles and, hence, slowly degraded in the environment due to its reduced bioavailability. N-Phenylurea herbicides seem to be biodegraded in soil, but it must be kept in mind that this biotic or abiotic degradation could lead to accumulation of very toxic derived compounds, such as 3,4-dichloroaniline. Research was conducted to find procedures that might result in an increase in the bioavailability of diuron in contaminated soils, through solubility enhancement. For this purpose a double system composed of hydroxypropyl-?-cyclodextrin (HPBCD), which is capable of forming inclusion complexes in solution, and a two-member bacterial consortium formed by the diuron-degrading Arthrobacter sulfonivorans (Arthrobacter sp. N2) and the linuron-degrading Variovorax soli (Variovorax sp. SRS16) was used. This consortium can achieve a complete biodegradation of diuron to CO2 with regard to that observed in the absence of the CD solution, where only a 45% biodegradation was observed. The cyclodextrin-based bioremediation technology here described shows for the first time an almost complete mineralization of diuron in a soil system, in contrast to previous incomplete mineralization based on single or consortium bacterial degradation. PMID:22985203

  6. Development of a cyclodextrin-based aqueous cyclosporin A eye drop formulations.

    PubMed

    Jóhannsdóttir, Sunna; Jansook, Phatsawee; Stefánsson, Einar; Loftsson, Thorsteinn

    2015-09-30

    Cyclosporin A (CyA) is a lipophilic, cyclic polypeptide drug with anti-inflammatory properties. It is used in topical treatment of dry eyes and is now commercially available in oil based surfactant containing eye drops. Surfactants can irritate the eye surface causing burning, itching and irritation of the conjunctiva, and oil-based drops can result in blurred vision. Thus, the aim of this study was to develop surfactant free aqueous 0.05% (w/v) CyA eye drops where the drug is present in an aqueous vehicle containing CyA/cyclodextrin (CyA/CD) nanoparticles. The effects of the natural ?-, ?- and ?-cyclodextrins (?CD, ?CD and ?CD), as well as of the water soluble hydroxypropyl derivatives of ?CD and ?CD (HP?CD, HP?CD) and randomly methylated ?CD (RM?CD), were determined in pure water. ?CD had the best solubilizing effect increasing the solubility of CyA above 0.05% upon addition of only 5% (w/v) ?CD. ?CD did not have as good solubilizing effect but was tested further due to its superior ability to form nanoparticles and its favorable toxicological profile. Seven eye drop formulations were prepared and tested. All contained 0.05% (w/v) CyA in addition to polyvinyl alcohol, benzalkonium chloride, disodium edetate and various amounts of CD (?CD, ?CD and mixtures thereof). When the formulation contained only ?CD most of the drug was dissolved but some small aggregates were formed with hydrodynamic diameter of about 6 and 155 nm. When the formulation contained only ?CD negligible CyA/CD complexation occurred with most of the drug present as solid CyA particles. When the formulation contained a mixture of ?CD and ?CD, where ?CD concentration was at least 3% (w/v), the entire drug content was dissolved in the media under formation of relatively large (100-2000 nm) CyA/CD nanoparticles. ?CD solubilized the drug while ?CD enhanced nanoparticle formation. The effect of polyvinyl alcohol, benzalkonium chloride and disodium edetate on the nanoparticle formation was also investigated and shown to have positive effect on the aggregate formation. PMID:26220650

  7. Structural and dynamic aspects of hydrogen-bonded complexes and inclusion compounds containing alpha,omega-dicyanoalkanes and urea, investigated by solid-state 13C and 2H NMR techniques.

    PubMed

    Aliev, Abil E; Harris, Kenneth D M; Champkin, Philip H

    2005-12-15

    Solid-state 13C NMR and 2H NMR techniques have been used to investigate structural and dynamic properties of the 1,4-dicyanobutane/urea and 1,5-dicyanopentane/urea 1:1 hydrogen-bonded complexes and the 1,6-dicyanohexane/urea inclusion compound. The pure crystalline phase of urea has also been investigated. The 13C NMR studies have focused on 13C chemical shift anisotropy and second-order quadrupolar effects (arising from 13C-14N interaction) for the urea molecules and the cyano groups of the alpha,omega-dicyanoalkanes. Parameters describing these interactions are derived and are discussed in relation to the known structural properties of these materials. Comparison of 13C chemical shift anisotropies of the cyano carbons and rates of 13C dipolar dephasing suggest that 1,4-dicyanobutane and 1,5-dicyanopentane are effectively static, whereas 1,6-dicyanohexane has greater mobility. 2H NMR line shape analysis for the 1,4-dicyanobutane/urea-d4 and 1,5-dicyanopentane/urea-d4 complexes indicates that the only motion of the urea molecules that is effective on the 2H NMR time scale is a rapid libration about the C=O bond over an angular range of about 26 degrees . For the 1,6-dicyanohexane/urea-d4 inclusion compound, the 2H NMR line shape is consistent with a motion comprising 180 degrees jumps about the C=O bond at rates that are intermediate on the 2H NMR time scale. In addition, rapid libration about the C=O bond also occurs over an angular range of about 20 degrees . The dynamic properties of the urea molecules in these materials are compared with those of urea molecules in other crystalline environments. PMID:16375305

  8. Alginate beads as a carrier for omeprazole/SBA-15 inclusion compound: A step towards the development of personalized paediatric dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Del Gaudio, Pasquale; De Cicco, Felicetta; Sansone, Francesca; Aquino, Rita Patrizia; Adami, Renata; Ricci, Maurizio; Giovagnoli, Stefano

    2015-11-20

    The treatment of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) shows several issues among paediatric patients. This work aims to the formulation of enteric alginate beads loaded with omeprazole (OME) allowing age- and weight-related personalized dosages in children. OME was entrapped in SBA-15 mesoporous compound, characterized and loaded into alginate beads by prilling at different OME and alginate concentrations. The beads resulted of homogeneous size, spherical morphology and very consistent in drug loading and distribution. Formulations demonstrated limited swelling and release (about 10%) in simulated gastric fluid (SGF) after 2h and a prolonged release in simulated intestinal fluid (SIF), till 6h, due to a mixed diffusion-case II transport mechanism. The beads were superior to the market product, which showed lower release in SGF but immediate dissolution in SIF. The high alginate beads uniformity and release properties make them a potential novel tool for a personalized treatment of GERD in children. PMID:26344303

  9. Exploring flubendazole formulations for use in sheep. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of a cyclodextrin-based solution

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Flubendazole (FLBZ) is a poor water solubility broad-spectrum BZD methylcarbamate anthelmintic compound. Cyclodextrins (CDs) are usually used to increase aqueous solubility of poor hydrosoluble compounds. The comparative in vitro aqueous solubility of FLBZ and other BZD anthelmintics in the presence of hydroxypropyl-?-cyclodextrin (HP?CD) was evaluated in the current work. Additionally, the comparative pharmacokinetic behaviour of FLBZ (and its metabolites) administered by the intraruminal (i.r.) or intraabomasal (i.a.) routes to sheep as either an aqueous CDs-based solution or a conventional carboximethylcellulose (CMC) suspension was assessed. Drug solubility studies involving albendazole, mebendazole, oxfendazole and FLBZ were performed in an aqueous solution (pH 1.2 or 7.4) with or without HP?CD (10%, w/v). The pharmacokinetic study involved two experiments. Experiment 1: In a crossover study, sheep received either a FLBZ-CDs solution (n = 3) or a FLBZ-CMC suspension (n = 3) by the i.r. route (3.8?mg/kg). The treatment Groups were reversed after a 21-days washout period. Experiment 2: sheep (n = 4) were treated by the i.a. route with the FLBZ-CDs solution (3.8?mg/kg). Plasma and abomasal fluid samples were collected between 0 and 72?h post-treatment. Samples were analysed by HPLC. Results Improvement of FLBZ aqueous solubility due to CDs resulted markedly higher than that observed for mebendazole and albendazole. However, oppositely to what was expected, the absorption-related pharmacokinetic parameters did not show any marked formulation-dependant effect. After the i.a. administration of FLBZ, the AUC and the Tmax of the parent compound were significantly (P < 0.05) reduced, which is consistent with ruminal bypass. Conclusion The administration of FLBZ as a CDs-based solution, does not seem to achieve great practical relevance for parasite control in sheep. PMID:22640491

  10. Fully quantal calculation of H{sub 2} translation-rotation states in the (p-H{sub 2}){sub 2}@5{sup 12}6{sup 4} clathrate hydrate inclusion compound

    SciTech Connect

    Felker, Peter M.

    2014-11-14

    The quantal translation-rotation (TR) states of the (p-H{sub 2}){sub 2}@5{sup 12}6{sup 4} clathrate hydrate inclusion compound have been computed. The ten-dimensional problem (in the rigid-cage and rigid-H{sub 2} approximation) is solved by first approximating the H{sub 2} moieties as spherically symmetric and solving for their 6D translational eigenstates. These are then combined with H{sub 2} free rotational states in a product basis that is used to diagonalize the full TR hamiltonian. The computed low-energy eigenstates have translational components that are essentially identical to the 6D translational eigenstates and rotational components that are 99.9% composed of rotationally unexcited H{sub 2} moieties. In other words, TR coupling is minimal for the low-energy states of the species. The low-energy level structure is found to be substantially more congested than that of the more tightly packed (p-H{sub 2}){sub 4}@5{sup 12}6{sup 4} clathrate species. The level structure is also shown to be understandable in terms of a model of (H{sub 2}){sub 2} as a semirigid diatomic species consisting of two spherically symmetric H{sub 2} pseudo-atoms.

  11. Determination of endocrine disrupting compounds using temperature-dependent inclusion chromatography: II. Fast screening of free steroids and related low-molecular-mass compounds fraction in the environmental samples derived from surface waters, treated and untreated sewage waters as well as activated sludge material.

    PubMed

    Zarzycki, Pawe? K; W?odarczyk, Elzbieta; Baran, Micha? J

    2009-10-30

    In the present work solid-phase extraction protocol based on C18 tubes and organic water washing solvents as well as isocratic HPLC procedure focused on quantification of free steroids and related low-molecular-mass endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs), characterized by different polarity varied from estetrol to progesterone, were studied. Described separation method involves temperature-dependent inclusion chromatography with mobile phase modified with beta-cyclodextrin. Using such analytical approach the environmental samples derived from Baltic Sea, selected lakes and rivers of the Middle Pomerania in northern part of Poland as well as untreated and treated sewage water from municipal sewage treatment plant near Koszalin were analyzed. Moreover, some preliminary data concerning estriol, testosterone and equilin biodegradation involving activated sludge material were reported. Cluster and principal components analysis of the acquired data sets confirms a high separation and quantification throughput of the solid-phase extraction and isocratic HPLC protocols presented. The method can be useful for simple and rapid classification of the environmental samples characterized by different sources of EDCs loading. The results of this work extend the utility of temperature-dependent inclusion chromatography as an inexpensive, efficient and accurate analytical tool appropriate for characterisation and quantification of complex environmental samples. PMID:19356767

  12. Chemical Microsensors For Detection Of Explosives And Chemical Warfare Agents

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Xiaoguang (Los Alamos, NM); Swanson, Basil I. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2001-11-13

    An article of manufacture is provided including a substrate having an oxide surface layer and a layer of a cyclodextrin derivative chemically bonded to said substrate, said layer of a cyclodextrin derivative adapted for the inclusion of selected compounds, e.g., nitro-containing organic compounds, therewith. Such an article can be a chemical microsensor capable of detecting a resultant mass change from inclusion of the nitro-containing organic compound.

  13. Energy transfer in nanostructured oligothiophene inclusion compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bongiovanni, G.; Botta, C.; Di Silvestro, G.; Loi, M. A.; Mura, A.; Tubino, R.

    2001-09-01

    Resonant energy transfers from terthiophene (T3) to quinquethiophene (T5) oligomers embedded in the nanochannels of perhydrotriphenylene (PHTP) crystals are studied by cw and femtosecond spectroscopy. The stringent geometry imposed by the host results in a very peculiar supramolecular organization of the guest molecules consisting of parallel linear arrays of chromophores. This provides a unique opportunity to make a quantitative analysis of the energy transfer phenomena and in particular to distinguish between heterotransfers and homotransfers. The experimental data fitted by a suitable theoretical analysis indicate that homotransfers become important in the long time dynamics and that the heterotransfer rate is satisfactorily described by the analytical solution obtained by assuming a continuous intermolecular spacing.

  14. Inclusion Body Myositis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Inclusion Body Myositis Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Inclusion Body Myositis? Inclusion body myositis (IBM) is one of a ...

  15. Inclusion and Museums: Developing Inclusive Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepherd, Hannah

    2009-01-01

    Recent policy on inclusion has had an impact on the development of museum galleries and related educational provision. Museums are used as learning organisations and, as such, need to consider how to create an inclusive environment. However, inclusive provision for people with learning difficulties in museums tends to be isolated and small scale,…

  16. Inclusive Education in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu-Tien, Wu

    2007-01-01

    As an echo of the worldwide movement of inclusive education and because of the conviction of inclusive ideas, special education in Taiwan is moving toward a goal of inclusion, though not necessarily full inclusion. While its terminology is as yet undesignated, principles and strategies are significantly reflected in the Special Education Act and…

  17. Limits to Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Janne Hedegaard

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I will argue that a theoretical identification of the limit to inclusion is needed in the conceptual identification of inclusion. On the one hand, inclusion is formulated as a vision that is, in principle, limitless. On the other hand, there seems to be an agreement that inclusion has a limit in the pedagogical practice. However,…

  18. A newly synthesized compound, 4'-geranyloxyferulic acid-N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester suppresses inflammation-associated colorectal carcinogenesis in male mice.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Masahito; Kochi, Takahiro; Shirakami, Yohei; Genovese, Salvatore; Epifano, Francesco; Fiorito, Serena; Mori, Takayuki; Tanaka, Takuji; Moriwaki, Hisataka

    2014-08-15

    We previously reported the cancer chemopreventive activity of 4'-geranyloxyferulic acid (GOFA, Miyamoto et al., Nutr Cancer 2008; 60:675-84) and a ?-cyclodextrin inclusion compound of GOFA (Tanaka et al., Int J Cancer 2010; 126:830-40) in colitis-related colorectal carcinogenesis. In our study, the chemopreventive effects of a newly synthesized GOFA-containing compound, GOFA-N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), which inhibits inducible nitric oxide (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX) enzymes, were investigated using a colitis-associated mouse colorectal carcinogenesis model with azoxymethane (AOM) and dextran sodium sulfate (DSS). The dietary administration of GOFA-L-NAME after the AOM and DSS treatments significantly reduced the multiplicity of adenocarcinomas (inhibition rates: 100 ppm, 84%, p < 0.001; 500 ppm, 94%, p < 0.001) compared with the AOM + DSS group. Dietary GOFA-L-NAME significantly decreased the proliferation (p < 0.001) and increased the apoptosis (p < 0.001) of colonic adenocarcinoma cells. A subsequent short-term experiment revealed that dietary GOFA-L-NAME decreased the mRNA expression of inflammatory enzymes, such as iNOS and COX-2, and proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-?, interleukin (IL)-1?, IL-6 and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2 in the colonic mucosa of mice that received 1.5% DSS in their drinking water for 7 days. Our findings indicate that GOFA-L-NAME is able to inhibit colitis-associated colon carcinogenesis by modulating inflammation, proliferation, apoptosis and the expression of proinflammatory cytokines in mice. PMID:24474144

  19. Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer

    Dilley, Lorie

    2013-01-01

    Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

  20. Rethinking Inclusion: Schoolwide Applications

    E-print Network

    Sailor, Wayne; Roger, Blair

    2005-03-01

    Efforts to bring about a unified system of educational supports and services from the standpoint of special education have focused primarily on the concept of inclusion. Various models of inclusion have suffered from a variety of ills, including a...

  1. Student Inclusive Campus Survey

    E-print Network

    Queitsch, Christine

    Student Inclusive Campus Survey Spring 2015: Executive Summary Dr. Terryl Ross Director cannonr@uw.edu Ismael Fajardo ifajardo@uw.edu #12;2 Student Inclusive Campus Survey Spring 2014 Campus Survey Spring 2014-2015: Executive Summary Overview The Student Inclusive Campus Survey

  2. Towards Inclusive Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gafoor, K. Abdul

    2010-01-01

    Social inclusion is the process that will enable every person in society to participate in normal activities of societies they live in, including education, employment, public services and social recreational activities. For the development of an inclusive society, preparation of younger generation also needs to be inclusive. Our schools must…

  3. [Inclusive Recreation and Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyne, Linda A., Ed.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This feature issue focuses on inclusive recreation for persons with developmental disabilities and their families. The articles provide information about the benefits of inclusive recreation for individuals and families, the challenges in attempting to create or access community recreation services that offer inclusive programs, and strategies…

  4. Antiferromagnetic inclusions in lunar glass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorpe, A.N.; Senftle, F.E.; Briggs, Charles; Alexander, Corrine

    1974-01-01

    The magnetic susceptibility of 11 glass spherules from the Apollo 15, 16, and 17 fines and two specimens of a relatively large glass spherical shell were studied as a function of temperature from room temperature to liquid helium temperatures. All but one specimen showed the presence of antiferromagnetic inclusions. Closely spaced temperature measurements of the magnetic susceptibility below 77 K on five of the specimens showed antiferromagnetic temperature transitions (Ne??el transitions). With the exception of ilmenite in one specimen, these transitions did not correspond to any transitions in known antiferromagnetic compounds. ?? 1974.

  5. Embracing Inclusive Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Anne

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the extent to which initial teacher education (ITE) programmes contribute to the development of inclusive attitudes, values and practices. Inclusive education is the entitlement of all children and young people to quality education, irrespective of their differences or dispositions. It is about embracing educational values of…

  6. Conclusions on Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, John

    2004-01-01

    An inclusion classroom is defined as one that is tasked with mainstreaming special education students into a population of general education students. In this brief article, the author, a high school mathematics teacher, shares his personal experiences in teaching in an inclusion classroom. A primary focus is his relationship with the special…

  7. The Inclusion Facilitator's Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorgensen, Cheryl M.; Schuh, Mary C.; Nisbet, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Inclusion facilitators are educators who do more than teach children with disabilities--they advocate for change in schools and communities, sparking a passion for inclusion in teachers, administrators, and families and giving them the practical guidance they need to make it work. This is an essential new role in today's schools, and this guide…

  8. High efficiency transformation of stevioside into a single mono-glycosylated product using a cyclodextrin glucanotransferase from Paenibacillus sp. CGMCC 5316.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xuejian; Yang, Jinshui; Li, Baozhen; Yuan, Hongli

    2015-12-01

    Stevioside is a non-caloric, natural, high-intensity sweetener. However, the bitter aftertaste of stevioside restricts its utilization for human consumption and limits its application in the food industry. In this study, a high efficiency enzymatic modification system was investigated to improve stevioside taste quality. A cyclodextrin glucanotransferase (CGTase) producing strain Paenibacillus sp. CGMCC 5316 was isolated from Stevia planting soil. With starch as glycosyl donor, this CGTase can transform stevioside into a single specific product which is an isomer of rebaudioside A and identified as mono-glycosylated stevioside . The taste of stevioside is improved noticeably by generating mono-glycosylated stevioside, which possesses a sucrose-like taste and has sweetness increased significantly by 35.4 %. Next, the parameters influencing CGTase production were optimized. Compared to initial conditions, CGTase activity increased by 214.7 % under optimum conditions of 3.9 g/L starch, 17.9 g/L tryptone, and 67.6 h of culture time, and the transglycosylation rate of stevioside was remarkably increased by 284.8 %, reaching 85.6 %. This CGTase modification system provides a promising solution for improving the sweetness and taste quality of stevioside. The efficiency of CGTase transformation can be greatly increased by optimizing the culture conditions of Paenibacillus sp. CGMCC 5316. PMID:26395638

  9. Stochastic evolution inclusions 

    E-print Network

    Bocharov, Boris

    2010-01-01

    This work is concerned with an evolution inclusion of a form, in a triple of spaces \\V -> H -> V*", where U is a continuous non-decreasing process, M is a locally square-integrable martingale and the operators A ...

  10. Linguistic Diversity and Social Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piller, Ingrid; Takahashi, Kimie

    2011-01-01

    This introduction provides the framework for the special issue by describing the social inclusion agenda of neoliberal market democracies. While the social inclusion agenda has been widely adopted, social inclusion policies are often blind to the ways in which language proficiency and language ideologies mediate social inclusion in linguistically…

  11. Nanotubular Toughening Inclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Cheol (Inventor); Working, Dennis C. (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Conventional toughening agents are typically rubbery materials or small molecular weight molecules, which mostly sacrifice the intrinsic properties of a matrix such as modulus, strength, and thermal stability as side effects. On the other hand, high modulus inclusions tend to reinforce elastic modulus very efficiently, but not the strength very well. For example, mechanical reinforcement with inorganic inclusions often degrades the composite toughness, encountering a frequent catastrophic brittle failure triggered by minute chips and cracks. Thus, toughening generally conflicts with mechanical reinforcement. Carbon nanotubes have been used as efficient reinforcing agents in various applications due to their combination of extraordinary mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties. Moreover, nanotubes can elongate more than 20% without yielding or breaking, and absorb significant amounts of energy during deformation, which enables them to also be an efficient toughening agent, as well as excellent reinforcing inclusion. Accordingly, an improved toughening method is provided by incorporating nanotubular inclusions into a host matrix, such as thermoset and thermoplastic polymers or ceramics without detrimental effects on the matrix's intrinsic physical properties.

  12. Penile Epidermal Inclusion Cyst

    PubMed Central

    El-Shazly, M.; Ghobashy, A.; Allam, A.; Alenezy, T.; Alenezy, N.; Yordanov, E.; Hathout, B.; Albunnai, R.

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of epidermal inclusion cyst in a 32-year-old male. This was a complication of circumcision that was neglected over years to form stones and urethrocutaneous fistula. Complete excision of the cyst and repair of the fistula were performed successfully. Histopathological examination confirmed our diagnosis. PMID:22693677

  13. Raising Achievement through Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Persson, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    In 2007, Swedish authorities introduced open publication of comparisons of students' results at the end of compulsory school. In this study, we investigated a municipality that had succeeded in breaking a negative trend from a bottom position in the ranking in 2007 to a top position in 2010, apparently through inclusive practices. The purpose…

  14. Developing Inclusive Teachers from an Inclusive Curricular Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Opertti, Renato; Brady, Jayne

    2011-01-01

    This article defines inclusive education in light of the Education for All agenda. It then describes key considerations for developing inclusive teachers from the perspective of an inclusive curriculum which seeks to address the needs of all learners. It concludes by outlining several key policy discussion areas which must be addressed if…

  15. Full Inclusion: Dream or Reality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morse, Timothy E.; Santos, Karen

    1995-01-01

    Recently, a major debate has arisen between full-inclusion advocates and their critics. Morse maintains that full inclusion is the only way to ensure that mandates of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act are carried out. Santos argues that inclusion must be tempered by alternative arrangements that best serve an individual child's…

  16. Inclusive Education in South Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Yong-Wook

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the current implementation of inclusive education in South Korea and discuss its challenges. The history of special education is first described followed by an introduction to policies relevant to special and inclusive education. Next, a critical discussion of the state of inclusive education follows built…

  17. Gas chromatographic analysis of volatiles in fluid and gas inclusions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrawes, F.; Holzer, G.; Roedder, E.; Gibson, E.K., Jr.; Oro, J.

    1984-01-01

    Most geological samples and some synthetic materials contain fluid inclusions. These inclusions preserve for us tiny samples of the liquid and/or the gas phase that was present during formation, although in some cases they may have undergone significant changes from the original material. Studies of the current composition of the inclusions provide data on both the original composition and the change since trapping. These inclusions are seldom larger than 1 millimeter in diameter. The composition varies from a single major compound (e.g., water) in a single phase to a very complex mixture in one or more phases. The concentration of some of the compounds present may be at trace levels. We present here some analyses of inclusions in a variety of geological samples, including diamonds. We used a sample crusher and a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) system to analyze for organic and inorganic volatiles present as major to trace constituents in inclusions. The crusher is a hardened stainless-steel piston cylinder apparatus with tungsten carbide crusing surfaces, and is operated in a pure helium atmosphere at a controlled temperature. Samples ranging from 1 mg to 1 g were crushed and the released volatiles were analyzed using multi-chromatographic columns and detectors, including the sensitive helium ionization detector. Identification of the GC peaks was carried out by GC-MS. This combination of procedures has been shown to provide geochemically useful information on the process involved in the history of the samples analyzed. ?? 1984.

  18. Polybenzimidazole compounds

    DOEpatents

    Klaehn, John R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Peterson, Eric S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wertsching, Alan K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Orme, Christopher J. (Shelley, ID); Luther, Thomas A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jones, Michael G. (Pocatello, ID)

    2010-08-10

    A PBI compound that includes imidazole nitrogens, at least a portion of which are substituted with an organic-inorganic hybrid moiety. At least 85% of the imidazole nitrogens may be substituted. The organic-inorganic hybrid moiety may be an organosilane moiety, for example, (R)Me.sub.2SiCH.sub.2--, where R is selected from among methyl, phenyl, vinyl, and allyl. The PBI compound may exhibit similar thermal properties in comparison to the unsubstituted PBI. The PBI compound may exhibit a solubility in an organic solvent greater than the solubility of the unsubstituted PBI. The PBI compound may be included in separatory media. A substituted PBI synthesis method may include providing a parent PBI in a less than 5 wt % solvent solution. Substituting may occur at about room temperature and/or at about atmospheric pressure. Substituting may use at least five equivalents in relation to the imidazole nitrogens to be substituted or, preferably, about fifteen equivalents.

  19. Polybenzimidazole compounds

    DOEpatents

    Klaehn, John R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Peterson, Eric S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Orme, Christopher J. (Shelley, ID); Jones, Michael G. (Chubbuck, ID); Wertsching, Alan K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Luther, Thomas A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Trowbridge, Tammy L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-11-22

    A PBI compound includes imidazole nitrogens at least a portion of which are substituted with a moiety containing a carbonyl group, the substituted imidazole nitrogens being bonded to carbon of the carbonyl group. At least 85% of the nitrogens may be substituted. The carbonyl-containing moiety may include RCO--, where R is alkoxy or haloalkyl. The PBI compound may exhibit a first temperature marking an onset of weight loss corresponding to reversion of the substituted PBI that is less than a second temperature marking an onset of decomposition of an otherwise identical PBI compound without the substituted moiety. The PBI compound may be included in separatory media. A substituted PBI synthesis method may include providing a parent PBI in a less than 5 wt % solvent solution. Substituting may use more than 5 equivalents in relation to the imidazole nitrogens to be substituted.

  20. Social Inclusion and People with Intellectual Disability and Challenging Behaviour: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigby, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Background: Social inclusion is central to disability policies internationally. The high risk of social exclusion for people with intellectual disability is compounded for those with challenging behaviour. Method: A systematic literature review examined how social inclusion of people with intellectual disability and challenging behaviour has been…

  1. Properties of High Amylose Starch-Beeswax Inclusion Complexes Prepared by Steam Jet Cooking

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Amylose is known to form inclusion complexes with a large number of polar and non-polar organic compounds including fatty acids. Amylose inclusion complexes are proposed to be employed as carrier for delivering ligands with desired functional properties in food and nutritional supplement products. ...

  2. Singing and social inclusion.

    PubMed

    Welch, Graham F; Himonides, Evangelos; Saunders, Jo; Papageorgi, Ioulia; Sarazin, Marc

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing body of neurological, cognitive, and social psychological research to suggest the possibility of positive transfer effects from structured musical engagement. In particular, there is evidence to suggest that engagement in musical activities may impact on social inclusion (sense of self and of being socially integrated). Tackling social exclusion and promoting social inclusion are common concerns internationally, such as in the UK and the EC, and there are many diverse Government ministries and agencies globally that see the arts in general and music in particular as a key means by which social needs can be addressed. As part of a wider evaluation of a national, Government-sponsored music education initiative for Primary-aged children in England ("Sing Up"), opportunity was taken by the authors, at the request of the funders, to assess any possible relationship between (a) children's developing singing behavior and development and (b) their social inclusion (sense of self and of being socially integrated). Subsequently, it was possible to match data from n = 6087 participants, drawn from the final 3 years of data collection (2008-2011), in terms of each child's individually assessed singing ability (based on their singing behavior of two well-known songs to create a "normalized singing score") and their written responses to a specially-designed questionnaire that included a set of statements related to children's sense of being socially included to which the children indicated their level of agreement on a seven-point Likert scale. Data analyses suggested that the higher the normalized singing development rating, the more positive the child's self-concept and sense of being socially included, irrespective of singer age, sex and ethnicity. PMID:25120514

  3. Singing and social inclusion

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Graham F.; Himonides, Evangelos; Saunders, Jo; Papageorgi, Ioulia; Sarazin, Marc

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing body of neurological, cognitive, and social psychological research to suggest the possibility of positive transfer effects from structured musical engagement. In particular, there is evidence to suggest that engagement in musical activities may impact on social inclusion (sense of self and of being socially integrated). Tackling social exclusion and promoting social inclusion are common concerns internationally, such as in the UK and the EC, and there are many diverse Government ministries and agencies globally that see the arts in general and music in particular as a key means by which social needs can be addressed. As part of a wider evaluation of a national, Government-sponsored music education initiative for Primary-aged children in England (“Sing Up”), opportunity was taken by the authors, at the request of the funders, to assess any possible relationship between (a) children's developing singing behavior and development and (b) their social inclusion (sense of self and of being socially integrated). Subsequently, it was possible to match data from n = 6087 participants, drawn from the final 3 years of data collection (2008–2011), in terms of each child's individually assessed singing ability (based on their singing behavior of two well-known songs to create a “normalized singing score”) and their written responses to a specially-designed questionnaire that included a set of statements related to children's sense of being socially included to which the children indicated their level of agreement on a seven-point Likert scale. Data analyses suggested that the higher the normalized singing development rating, the more positive the child's self-concept and sense of being socially included, irrespective of singer age, sex and ethnicity. PMID:25120514

  4. Membrane fluctuations around inclusions

    E-print Network

    Christian D. Santangelo; Oded Farago

    2004-01-15

    The free energy of inserting a protein into a membrane is determined by considering the variation in the spectrum of thermal fluctuations in response to the presence of a rigid inclusion. Both numerically and through a simple analytical approximation, we find that the primary effect of fluctuations is to reduce the effective surface tension, hampering the insertion at low surface tension. Our results, which should also be relevant for membrane pores, suggest (in contrast to classical nucleation theory) that a finite surface tension is necessary to facilitate the opening of a pore.

  5. Inclusion body myositis.

    PubMed

    Dimachkie, Mazen M; Barohn, Richard J

    2013-01-01

    Sporadic inclusion body myositis (IBM) is the most common idiopathic inflammatory myopathy (IIM) after age 50 years. It presents with chronic insidious proximal leg and distal arm asymmetric muscle weakness. Despite similarities with polymyositis (PM), it is likely that IBM is primarily a degenerative disorder rather than inflammatory muscle disease. IBM is associated with a modest degree of creatine kinase (CK) elevation and an electromyogram (EMG) demonstrates a chronic irritative myopathy. Muscle histopathology demonstrates endomysial inflammatory exudates surrounding and invading non-necrotic muscle fibers often times accompanied by rimmed vacuoles. We review IBM with emphasis on recent developments in the field and discuss ongoing clinical trials. PMID:23250766

  6. Inclusion body myositis.

    PubMed

    Dimachkie, Mazen M; Barohn, Richard J

    2014-08-01

    The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIMs) are a heterogeneous group of rare disorders that share many similarities. In addition to sporadic inclusion body myositis (IBM), these include dermatomyositis, polymyositis, and autoimmune necrotizing myopathy. IBM is the most common IIM after age 50 years. Muscle histopathology shows endomysial inflammatory exudates surrounding and invading nonnecrotic muscle fibers often accompanied by rimmed vacuoles and protein deposits. It is likely that IBM is has a prominent degenerative component. This article reviews the evolution of knowledge in IBM, with emphasis on recent developments in the field, and discusses ongoing clinical trials. PMID:25037082

  7. Chemical microsensors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, DeQuan; Swanson, Basil I.

    1995-01-01

    An article of manufacture is provided including a substrate having an oxide surface layer and a selective thin film of a cyclodextrin derivative chemically bound upon said substrate, said film is adapted for the inclusion of a selected organic compound therewith. Such an article can be either a chemical sensor capable of detecting a resultant mass change from inclusion of the selected organic compound or a chemical separator capable of reversibly selectively separating a selected organic compound.

  8. Inclusive and Exclusive |Vub|

    SciTech Connect

    Petrella, Antonio; /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara

    2011-11-17

    The current status of the determinations of CKM matrix element |V{sub ub}| via exclusive and inclusive charmless semileptonic B decays is reviewed. The large datasets collected at the B-Factories, and the increased precision of theoretical calculations have allowed an improvement in the determination of |V{sub ub}|. However, there are still significant uncertainties. In the exclusive approach, the most precise measurement of the pion channel branching ratio is obtained by an untagged analysis. This very good precision can be reached by tagged analyses with more data. The problem with exclusive decays is that the strong hadron dynamics can not be calculated from first principles and the determination of the form factor has to rely on light-cone sum rules or lattice QCD calculations. The current data samples allow a comparison of different FF models with data distributions. With further developments on lattice calculations, the theoretical error should shrink to reach the experimental one. The inclusive approach still provides the most precise |V{sub ub}| determinations. With new theoretical calculations, the mild (2.5{sigma}) discrepancy with respect to the |V{sub ub}| value determined from the global UT fit has been reduced. As in the exclusive approach, theoretical uncertainties represent the limiting factor to the precision of the measurement. Reducing the theoretical uncertainties to a level comparable with the statistical error is challenging. New measurements in semileptonic decays of charm mesons could increase the confidence in theoretical calculations and related uncertainties.

  9. Inclusive fitness in agriculture.

    PubMed

    Kiers, E Toby; Denison, R Ford

    2014-05-19

    Trade-offs between individual fitness and the collective performance of crop and below-ground symbiont communities are common in agriculture. Plant competitiveness for light and soil resources is key to individual fitness, but higher investments in stems and roots by a plant community to compete for those resources ultimately reduce crop yields. Similarly, rhizobia and mycorrhizal fungi may increase their individual fitness by diverting resources to their own reproduction, even if they could have benefited collectively by providing their shared crop host with more nitrogen and phosphorus, respectively. Past selection for inclusive fitness (benefits to others, weighted by their relatedness) is unlikely to have favoured community performance over individual fitness. The limited evidence for kin recognition in plants and microbes changes this conclusion only slightly. We therefore argue that there is still ample opportunity for human-imposed selection to improve cooperation among crop plants and their symbionts so that they use limited resources more efficiently. This evolutionarily informed approach will require a better understanding of how interactions among crops, and interactions with their symbionts, affected their inclusive fitness in the past and what that implies for current interactions. PMID:24686938

  10. Asymmetric inclusion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuveni, Shlomi; Eliazar, Iddo; Yechiali, Uri

    2011-10-01

    We introduce and explore the asymmetric inclusion process (ASIP), an exactly solvable bosonic counterpart of the fermionic asymmetric exclusion process (ASEP). In both processes, random events cause particles to propagate unidirectionally along a one-dimensional lattice of n sites. In the ASEP, particles are subject to exclusion interactions, whereas in the ASIP, particles are subject to inclusion interactions that coalesce them into inseparable clusters. We study the dynamics of the ASIP, derive evolution equations for the mean and probability generating function (PGF) of the sites’ occupancy vector, obtain explicit results for the above mean at steady state, and describe an iterative scheme for the computation of the PGF at steady state. We further obtain explicit results for the load distribution in steady state, with the load being the total number of particles present in all lattice sites. Finally, we address the problem of load optimization, and solve it under various criteria. The ASIP model establishes bridges between statistical physics and queueing theory as it represents a tandem array of queueing systems with (unlimited) batch service, and a tandem array of growth-collapse processes.

  11. Inclusive fitness in agriculture

    PubMed Central

    Kiers, E. Toby; Denison, R. Ford

    2014-01-01

    Trade-offs between individual fitness and the collective performance of crop and below-ground symbiont communities are common in agriculture. Plant competitiveness for light and soil resources is key to individual fitness, but higher investments in stems and roots by a plant community to compete for those resources ultimately reduce crop yields. Similarly, rhizobia and mycorrhizal fungi may increase their individual fitness by diverting resources to their own reproduction, even if they could have benefited collectively by providing their shared crop host with more nitrogen and phosphorus, respectively. Past selection for inclusive fitness (benefits to others, weighted by their relatedness) is unlikely to have favoured community performance over individual fitness. The limited evidence for kin recognition in plants and microbes changes this conclusion only slightly. We therefore argue that there is still ample opportunity for human-imposed selection to improve cooperation among crop plants and their symbionts so that they use limited resources more efficiently. This evolutionarily informed approach will require a better understanding of how interactions among crops, and interactions with their symbionts, affected their inclusive fitness in the past and what that implies for current interactions. PMID:24686938

  12. [Inclusion-body myositis].

    PubMed

    Benveniste, O

    2014-07-01

    Sporadic inclusion-body myositis (sIBM) presents in average at the sixth decade of life and affects three men for one woman. It is a non-lethal, slowly progressive but disabling disease. Except the striated muscles, no other organs (such as the interstitial lung) are involved. The phenotype of this myopathy is particular since it involves the axial muscles (camptocormia, swallowing dysfunction) and limb girdle (notably the quadriceps) but also the distal muscles (in particular the fingers' and wrists' flexors) in a bilateral but non-symmetrical manner. The clinical presentation is then very suggestive of the diagnosis, which remains to be proven by a muscle biopsy. Histological features defining the diagnosis associate endomysial inflammatory infiltrates with frequent invaded fibres (the myositis) and amyloid deposits generally accompanying rimmed vacuoles (the inclusions). There is still today a debate to know if this disease is at its beginning a degenerative or an auto-immune condition. Nonetheless, usual immunosuppressive drugs (corticosteroids, azathioprine, methotrexate) or polyvalent immunoglobulines remain ineffective and even may worsen the handicap. Some controlled randomized trials will soon be launched for this condition, but for now, the best therapeutic approach to slow down the rapidity of progression of the disease is to maintain muscle exercise with the help of the physiotherapists. PMID:24128435

  13. Multipurpose Compound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Specially formulated derivatives of an unusual basic compound known as Alcide may be the answer to effective treatment and prevention of the disease bovine mastitis, a bacterial inflammation of a cow's mammary gland that results in loss of milk production and in extreme cases, death. Manufactured by Alcide Corporation the Alcide compound has killed all tested bacteria, virus and fungi, shortly after contact, with minimal toxic effects on humans or animals. Alcide Corporation credits the existence of the mastitis treatment/prevention products to assistance provided the company by NERAC, Inc.

  14. Nickel Compounds

    Cancer.gov

    Nickel is a silvery-white metallic element found in the earth’s crust. It can be combined with other elements to form nickel compounds. Because of its unique properties, nickel has many industrial uses. Most nickel is used in metal alloys because it imparts useful properties, such as corrosion resistance, heat resistance, hardness, and strength.

  15. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2001-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 63% of US magnesium compounds production during 2000. Premier Services in Florida, Dow Chemical in Michigan, Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties, and Rohm & Haas recovered dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias from seawater. And Premier Services' recoveries, in Nevada, were from magnasite.

  16. Inclusive Jets in PHP

    E-print Network

    Philipp Roloff

    2013-10-23

    Differential inclusive-jet cross sections have been measured in photoproduction for boson virtualities Q^2 < 1 GeV^2 with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 300 pb^-1. Jets were identified in the laboratory frame using the k_T, anti-k_T or SIScone jet algorithms. Cross sections are presented as functions of the jet pseudorapidity, eta(jet), and the jet transverse energy, E_T(jet). Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations give a good description of the measurements, except for jets with low E_T(jet) and high eta(jet). The cross sections have the potential to improve the determination of the PDFs in future QCD fits. Values of alpha_s(M_Z) have been extracted from the measurements based on different jet algorithms. In addition, the energy-scale dependence of the strong coupling was determined.

  17. Inclusive Jets in PHP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roloff, P.

    Differential inclusive-jet cross sections have been measured in photoproduction for boson virtualities Q^2 < 1 GeV^2 with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 300 pb^-1. Jets were identified in the laboratory frame using the k_T, anti-k_T or SIScone jet algorithms. Cross sections are presented as functions of the jet pseudorapidity, eta(jet), and the jet transverse energy, E_T(jet). Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations give a good description of the measurements, except for jets with low E_T(jet) and high eta(jet). The cross sections have the potential to improve the determination of the PDFs in future QCD fits. Values of alpha_s(M_Z) have been extracted from the measurements based on different jet algorithms. In addition, the energy-scale dependence of the strong coupling was determined.

  18. Inclusive Jets in PHP

    E-print Network

    Roloff, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    Differential inclusive-jet cross sections have been measured in photoproduction for boson virtualities Q^2 < 1 GeV^2 with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 300 pb^-1. Jets were identified in the laboratory frame using the k_T, anti-k_T or SIScone jet algorithms. Cross sections are presented as functions of the jet pseudorapidity, eta(jet), and the jet transverse energy, E_T(jet). Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations give a good description of the measurements, except for jets with low E_T(jet) and high eta(jet). The cross sections have the potential to improve the determination of the PDFs in future QCD fits. Values of alpha_s(M_Z) have been extracted from the measurements based on different jet algorithms. In addition, the energy-scale dependence of the strong coupling was determined.

  19. Possibilities for an Inclusive Society in Singapore: Becoming Inclusive within

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Levan

    2009-01-01

    The envisioning of Singapore as an inclusive society has witnessed the most progressive systemic and policy developments concerning people with disabilities in recent years. The building of "heartware" in society (as in the will, values, and attitudes of its citizens) in order to realize the vision of an inclusive society, however, requires both…

  20. Inclusion by Design: Engineering Inclusive Practices in Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dukes, Charles; Lamar-Dukes, Pamela

    2009-01-01

    In order to help teachers understand the importance of intentional design for inclusive education, this article describes the design process an engineer might use when designing a new project. If teachers learn to think like engineers, it is possible for them to design inclusive education. This conceptual design can then be combined with…

  1. Inclusive Education: Identifying Teachers' Perceived Stressors in Inclusive Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brackenreed, Darlene

    2008-01-01

    This research replicates the study conducted by Forlin (2001) in Churchlands, Western Australia. Forlin's Inclusive Education Teacher Stress and Coping Questionnaire was adapted from the original questionnaire to more accurately reflect the language and practice of inclusion in Ontario (Frost & Brackenreed, 2004). The purpose of this study was to…

  2. Inclusion in the East: Chinese Students' Attitudes towards Inclusive Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malinen, Olli-Pekka; Savolainen, Hannu

    2008-01-01

    A sample of 523 Chinese university students was given a questionnaire on their attitudes towards the inclusion of children with disabilities into regular classrooms. Factor analysis, analysis of variance, t-test and correlations were used to assess the respondents' general attitude towards inclusion, the factor structure of the attitudes, the…

  3. Characterization of beta-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes containing an essential oil component.

    PubMed

    Abarca, Romina L; Rodríguez, Francisco J; Guarda, Abel; Galotto, María J; Bruna, Julio E

    2016-04-01

    An important issue in food technology is that antimicrobial compounds can be used for various applications, such as the development of antimicrobial active packaging materials. Yet most antimicrobial compounds are volatile and require protection. In the present study, the inclusion complexes of 2-nonanone (2-NN) with ?-cyclodextrin (?-CD), were prepared by a co-precipitation method. Entrapment efficiency (EE), thermal analysis (DSC and TGA), X-ray diffractometry (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), sorption isotherms and antifungal activity were evaluated for the characterization of the inclusion complex (?-CD:2-NN). A higher EE was obtained (34.8%) for the inclusion complex 1:0.5 than for other molar rates. Both DSC and TGA of the inclusion complexes showed the presence of endothermic peaks between 80°C and 150°C, attributed to a complexation phenomenon. Antimicrobial tests for mycelial growth reduction under atmospheric conditions proved the fungistatic behaviour of the inclusion complexes against Botrytis cinerea. PMID:26593579

  4. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, seawater and natural brines accounted for 51% of US magnesium compounds production. World magnesia production was estimated to be 14.5 Mt. Most of the production came from China, North Korea, Russia and Turkey. Although no specific production figures are available, Japan and the United States are estimated to account for almost one-half of the world's capacity from seawater and brines.

  5. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2003-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 60 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production during 2002. Dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias were recovered from seawater by Premier Chemicals in Florida. They were also recovered from well brines in Michigan by Dow Chemical, Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties and Rohm & Haas. And they were recovered from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals.

  6. Stiffening solids with liquid inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Style, Robert W.; Boltyanskiy, Rostislav; Allen, Benjamin; Jensen, Katharine E.; Foote, Henry P.; Wettlaufer, John S.; Dufresne, Eric R.

    2015-01-01

    From bone and wood to concrete and carbon fibre, composites are ubiquitous natural and synthetic materials. Eshelby’s inclusion theory describes how macroscopic stress fields couple to isolated microscopic inclusions, allowing prediction of a composite’s bulk mechanical properties from a knowledge of its microstructure. It has been extended to describe a wide variety of phenomena from solid fracture to cell adhesion. Here, we show experimentally and theoretically that Eshelby’s theory breaks down for small liquid inclusions in a soft solid. In this limit, an isolated droplet’s deformation is strongly size-dependent, with the smallest droplets mimicking the behaviour of solid inclusions. Furthermore, in opposition to the predictions of conventional composite theory, we find that finite concentrations of small liquid inclusions enhance the stiffness of soft solids. A straightforward extension of Eshelby’s theory, accounting for the surface tension of the solid-liquid interface, explains our experimental observations. The counterintuitive stiffening of solids by fluid inclusions is expected whenever inclusion radii are smaller than an elastocapillary length, given by the ratio of the surface tension to Young’s modulus of the solid matrix. These results suggest that surface tension can be a simple and effective mechanism to cloak the far-field elastic signature of inclusions.

  7. Principals Influence Culture of Inclusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Sophia

    2000-01-01

    Three New American High Schools (in Pittsburgh, Baltimore, and Greenbelt, Maryland) have successfully replaced the special-education culture of separation with a culture of inclusion. A large part of moving from self-contained practices to inclusion was helping students become self-advocates, so that the world outside school and home would not…

  8. In Support of Unfinished Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hausstätter, Rune Sarromaa

    2014-01-01

    This article claims that the radical potential inherent in the origins of inclusive education has been altered into a tool for protecting the status quo. Drawing on ideas from the essay "The Unfinished" by Thomas Mathiesen (1971), I discuss inclusion as a potential alternative to mainstream education and argue that the potential power of…

  9. Social Inclusion and Metrolingual Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otsuji, Emi; Pennycook, Alastair

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the implications of metrolingual language practices for how we understand social inclusion. A vision of social inclusion that includes bi- and multilingual capacities may comprise an appreciation of a diversity of languages other than English, and the skills and capabilities of multilingual language users, yet it is all…

  10. Serbian Teachers' Attitudes towards Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalyva, Efrosini; Gojkovic, Dina; Tsakiris, Vlastaris

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the attitudes of 72 Serbian teachers towards the inclusion of children with Special Educational Needs (SEN) in mainstream schools; they were asked to complete "My Thinking About Inclusion Questionnaire" (Stoiber, Goettinger, & Goetz, 1998). It was found that Serbian teachers held overall slightly negative attitudes towards…

  11. Inclusion in Malaysian Integrated Preschools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sukumaran, Sailajah; Loveridge, Judith; Green, Vanessa A.

    2015-01-01

    Inclusive education has been introduced through a number of policy developments in Malaysia over the last 10 years but there is little research investigating the extent and nature of inclusive education for preschoolers with special educational needs (SEN). This study surveyed both regular and special education teachers in Malaysian integrated…

  12. [Inclusion body myositis].

    PubMed

    Bodoki, Levente; Vincze, Melinda; Griger, Zoltán; Csonka, Tamás; Dankó, Katalin; Hortobágyi, Tibor

    2015-01-30

    The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies are systemic, chronic autoimmune diseases characterized by proximal symmetrical muscle weakness. One of the main diseases in this group is inclusion body myositis (IBM), an underdiagnosed, progressive muscle disease characteristically affecting the middle-aged and older population. It has a slow, relentlessly progressive course. The precise pathogenesis of the disease remains unknown. In most of the cases it is diagnosed a few years after the appearance of the first symptoms. The muscle biopsy typically shows endomysial inflammation, with invasion of mononuclear cells into the non-necrotic fibers, and also rimmed vacuoles. It appers, that both inflammation and degeneration are present at the onset of the disease. Our aim is to raise awareness about this disease which leads to severe disability, with clinicopathological case presentations and literature overview, emphasizing the importance of collaboration between the clinician and the neuropathologist. No effective therapy is currently available but the rapid diagnosis is essential to slow disease progression. Although this is a relatively rare disease, patients are presenting not only in immunology outpatient clinics; our reports aims to raise awareness and facilitate accurate early diagnosis of IBM. PMID:25842918

  13. The infidelity of melt inclusions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, A. J.

    2008-12-01

    Melt inclusions provide important information about magmatic systems and represent unique records of magma composition and evolution. However, it is also clear that melt inclusions do not necessarily constitute a petrological 'magic bullet', and potential exists for trapped melt compositions to be modified by a range of inclusion-specific processes. These include trapping of diffusional boundary layers, crystallization of the host mineral after trapping and dissolution of co-trapped minerals during homogenization, diffusional exchange between trapped liquid and the host mineral and external melt, and cryptic alteration of trapped material during weathering or hydrothermal alteration. It clearly important to identify when melt inclusions are unmodified, and which compositional indices represent the most robust sources of petrogenetic information. In this presentation I review and discuss various approaches for evaluating compositions and compositional variations in inclusion suites. An overriding principle is that the variations evident in melt inclusions should be able to be understood in terms of petrological processes that are known, or can be reasonably inferred to also effect bulk magma compositions. One common approach is to base petrological conclusions on species that should be more robust, and many workers use variations in incompatible trace elements for this purpose. However important information may also be obtained from a comparison of variations in melt inclusions and the lavas that host them, and in most cases this comparison is the key to identifying inclusions and suites that are potentially suspect. Comparisons can be made between individual inclusions and lavas, although comparison of average inclusion composition and the host lava, after correction for differences in crystal fractionation, may also be valuable. An important extension of this is the comparison of the variability of different species in inclusions and host lavas. This also provides a means to directly test for effects of inclusion-specific processes through comparison between variance and diffusivity, partition coefficient or other parameters believed to drive compositional changes. Another test that is becoming more accessible is the direct comparison of trace element compositions of inclusions and host minerals, coupled with known element partitioning behavior.

  14. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2002-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 60% of US magnesium compounds production in 2001. Dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias were recovered from seawater in Florida by Premier Chemicals. They were also recovered from Michigan well brines by Dow Chemical, Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties and Rohm & Haas. And Premier Chemicals recovered dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias from magnesite in Nevada. Reilly Industries and Great Salt Lake Minerals recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah.

  15. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 40 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production in 2009. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from seawater by Premier Chemicals in Florida, from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals. Intrepid Potash-Wendover, and Great Salt Lake Minerals Corp. recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from seawater by SPI Pharma in Delaware and Premier Chemicals in Florida, and by Martin Marietta from its operation mentioned above.

  16. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2011-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 54 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production in 2010. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from seawater by Premier Magnesia in Florida, from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Magnesia. Intrepid Potash-Wendover and Great Salt Lake Minerals Corp. recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from seawater by SPI Pharma in Delaware and Premier Magnesia in Florida, and by Martin Marietta from its operation mentioned above.

  17. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 52 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production in 2006. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from sea-water by Premier Chemicals in Florida; from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and Rohm and Haas; and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals. Intrepid Potash-Wendover and Great Salt Lake Minerals recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from brucite by Applied Chemical Magnesias in Texas, from seawater by SPI Pharma in Delaware and Premier Chemicals in Florida, and by Martin Marietta and Rohm and Haas from their operations mentioned above. About 59 percent of the magnesium compounds consumed in the United States was used for refractories that are used mainly to line steelmaking furnaces. The remaining 41 percent was consumed in agricultural, chemical, construction, environmental and industrial applications.

  18. Surface tension method for determining binding constants for cyclodextrin inclusion complexes of ionic surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    Dharmawardana, U.R.; Christian, S.D.; Tucker, E.E.; Taylor, R.W.; Scamehorn, J.F. )

    1993-09-01

    A new method has been developed for determining binding constants of complexes of cyclodextrins with surface-active compounds, including water-soluble ionic surfactants. The technique requires measuring the change in surface tension caused by addition of a cyclodextrin (CD) to aqueous solutions of the surfactant; the experimental results lead directly to inferred values of the thermodynamic activity of the surfactant. Surface tension results are reported for three different surfactants sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) in the presence and in the absence of added [beta]-CD. Data for CPC have been obtained at surfactant concentrations below and above the critical micelle concentration. Correlations between surface tension and surfactant activity are expressed by the Szyszkowski equation, which subsumes the Langmuir adsorption model and the Gibbs equation. It is observed that the surface tension increases monotonically as [beta]-cyclodextrin is added to ionic surfactant solutions. At concentrations of CD well in excess of the surfactant concentration, the surface tension approaches that of pure water, indicating that neither the surfactant-CD complexes nor CD itself are surface active. Binding constants are inferred from a model that incorporates the parameters of the Szyszkowski equation and mass action constants relating to the formation of micelles from monomers of the surfactant and the counterion. Evidence is given that two molecules of CD can complex the C-16 hydrocarbon chain of the cetyl surfactants. 30 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Inclusiveness and Multiculturalism At UC Berkeley

    E-print Network

    Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    Advancing Inclusiveness and Multiculturalism At UC Berkeley Leadership Development Program November ...............................................95 #12;Executive Summary Advancing Inclusiveness and Multiculturalism at UC Berkeley 1 Executive

  20. Inclusion-Body Myositis: Diagnosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Progress Search form Search Inclusion-Body Myositis (IBM) Diagnosis As with other muscle diseases, a doctor diagnoses ... biopsy can enable the physician to pinpoint the diagnosis to a type of myositis. The biopsy sample ...

  1. Expert Secondary Inclusive Classroom Management 

    E-print Network

    Montague, Marcia

    2011-02-22

    The purpose of this study was to gain an understanding of the management practices of expert secondary general education teachers in inclusive classrooms. Specifically, expert teachers of classrooms who included students with severe cognitive...

  2. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 57 percent of magnesium compounds produced in the United States in 2011. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties LLC from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from seawater by Premier Magnesia LLC in Florida, from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Magnesia. Intrepid Potash Wendover LLC and Great Salt Lake Minerals Corp. recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from seawater by SPI Pharma Inc. in Delaware and Premier Magnesia in Florida, and by Martin Marietta from its brine operation in Michigan.

  3. Bismaleimide compounds

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Johnnie E. (Grandview, MO); Jamieson, Donald R. (Merriam, KS)

    1986-01-14

    Bismaleimides of the formula ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 each independently is H, C.sub.1-4 -alkyl, C.sub.1-4 -alkoxy, C1 or Br, or R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 together form a fused 6-membered hydrocarbon aromatic ring, with the proviso that R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are not t-butyl or t-butoxy; X is O, S or Se; n is 1-3; and the alkylene bridging group, optionally, is substituted by 1-3 methyl groups or by fluorine, form polybismaleimide resins which have valuable physical properties. Uniquely, these compounds permit extended cure times, i.e., they remain fluid for a time sufficient to permit the formation of a homogeneous melt prior to curing.

  4. Bismaleimide compounds

    DOEpatents

    Adams, J.E.; Jamieson, D.R.

    1986-01-14

    Bismaleimides of the formula shown in the diagram wherein R[sub 1] and R[sub 2] each independently is H, C[sub 1-4]-alkyl, C[sub 1-4]-alkoxy, Cl or Br, or R[sub 1] and R[sub 2] together form a fused 6-membered hydrocarbon aromatic ring, with the proviso that R[sub 1] and R[sub 2] are not t-butyl or t-butoxy; X is O, S or Se; n is 1--3; and the alkylene bridging group, optionally, is substituted by 1--3 methyl groups or by fluorine, form polybismaleimide resins which have valuable physical properties. Uniquely, these compounds permit extended cure times, i.e., they remain fluid for a time sufficient to permit the formation of a homogeneous melt prior to curing.

  5. Inclusion 101: How To Teach All Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Anne M.; Shea, Thomas M.

    This book is designed to help educators provide effective instruction to students with disabilities in inclusive classrooms. Chapters address: (1) the concepts of inclusive society, schools, classrooms and services; (2) legal foundations for inclusion and government support for education; (3) the qualities of inclusive schools and classrooms; (4)…

  6. Application of DNA Chip Scanning Technology for Automatic Detection of Chlamydia trachomatis and Chlamydia pneumoniae Inclusions

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanov, Anita; Endrész, Valeria; Urbán, Szabolcs; Lantos, Ildikó; Deák, Judit; Burián, Katalin; Önder, Kamil; Ayaydin, Ferhan; Balázs, Péter

    2014-01-01

    Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular bacteria that propagate in the inclusion, a specific niche inside the host cell. The standard method for counting chlamydiae is immunofluorescent staining and manual counting of chlamydial inclusions. High- or medium-throughput estimation of the reduction in chlamydial inclusions should be the basis of testing antichlamydial compounds and other drugs that positively or negatively influence chlamydial growth, yet low-throughput manual counting is the common approach. To overcome the time-consuming and subjective manual counting, we developed an automatic inclusion-counting system based on a commercially available DNA chip scanner. Fluorescently labeled inclusions are detected by the scanner, and the image is processed by ChlamyCount, a custom plug-in of the ImageJ software environment. ChlamyCount was able to measure the inclusion counts over a 1-log-unit dynamic range with a high correlation to the theoretical counts. ChlamyCount was capable of accurately determining the MICs of the novel antimicrobial compound PCC00213 and the already known antichlamydial antibiotics moxifloxacin and tetracycline. ChlamyCount was also able to measure the chlamydial growth-altering effect of drugs that influence host-bacterium interaction, such as gamma interferon, DEAE-dextran, and cycloheximide. ChlamyCount is an easily adaptable system for testing antichlamydial antimicrobials and other compounds that influence Chlamydia-host interactions. PMID:24189259

  7. Application of DNA chip scanning technology for automatic detection of Chlamydia trachomatis and Chlamydia pneumoniae inclusions.

    PubMed

    Bogdanov, Anita; Endrész, Valeria; Urbán, Szabolcs; Lantos, Ildikó; Deák, Judit; Burián, Katalin; Önder, Kamil; Ayaydin, Ferhan; Balázs, Péter; Virok, Dezso P

    2014-01-01

    Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular bacteria that propagate in the inclusion, a specific niche inside the host cell. The standard method for counting chlamydiae is immunofluorescent staining and manual counting of chlamydial inclusions. High- or medium-throughput estimation of the reduction in chlamydial inclusions should be the basis of testing antichlamydial compounds and other drugs that positively or negatively influence chlamydial growth, yet low-throughput manual counting is the common approach. To overcome the time-consuming and subjective manual counting, we developed an automatic inclusion-counting system based on a commercially available DNA chip scanner. Fluorescently labeled inclusions are detected by the scanner, and the image is processed by ChlamyCount, a custom plug-in of the ImageJ software environment. ChlamyCount was able to measure the inclusion counts over a 1-log-unit dynamic range with a high correlation to the theoretical counts. ChlamyCount was capable of accurately determining the MICs of the novel antimicrobial compound PCC00213 and the already known antichlamydial antibiotics moxifloxacin and tetracycline. ChlamyCount was also able to measure the chlamydial growth-altering effect of drugs that influence host-bacterium interaction, such as gamma interferon, DEAE-dextran, and cycloheximide. ChlamyCount is an easily adaptable system for testing antichlamydial antimicrobials and other compounds that influence Chlamydia-host interactions. PMID:24189259

  8. Doing Research Inclusively: Bridges to Multiple Possibilities in Inclusive Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nind, Melanie; Vinha, Hilra

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on a study of how people do research that matters to people with learning disabilities and that involves them and their views and experiences. The study was an attempt to bring together people doing inclusive research so that, collectively, we could take stock of our practices. This would add to the individual reports and…

  9. The Needs of Inclusive Preschool Teachers about Inclusive Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akalin, Selma; Demir, Seyda; Sucuoglu, Bülbin; Bakkaloglu, Hatice; Iscen, Fadime

    2014-01-01

    Problem Statement: Since the law related to the inclusion of children with special needs was passed, the number of children with special needs in preschool classrooms has increased each year. Preschool teachers face serious challenges when they teach children with diverse abilities in the same environment. Although most of them support the idea of…

  10. The Inclusion of Music/the Music of Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubet, Alex

    2009-01-01

    The intention of this paper is to situate music within inclusive education. Intersections of music--widely regarded as a "talent" or hyperability--and disability provide unique perspectives on social organisation in general and human valuation in particular. Music is a ubiquitous and an essential component of learning beginning in infancy.…

  11. Developing Inclusive Practice in Scotland: The National Framework for Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Louise; Beaton, Mhairi; Head, George; McAuliffe, Lisa; Moscardini, Lio; Spratt, Jennifer; Sutherland, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the collaborative development of a "National Framework for Inclusion" under the auspices of the Scottish Teacher Education Committee by a working party representing each of the Scottish Universities providing initial teacher education. Recent research, international legislation and Scottish education policy have…

  12. The Contours of Inclusion: Inclusive Arts Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Don; Henderson, Bill; Barnum, Leah; Kronenberg, Deborah; Blair, Kati; Jenkins, Richard; Hurel, Nicole Agois

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this publication is to share models and case examples of the process of inclusive arts curriculum design and evaluation. The first section explains the conceptual and curriculum frameworks that were used in the analysis and generation of the featured case studies (i.e. Understanding by Design, Differentiated Instruction, and…

  13. Special Teaching for Special Children? Pedagogies for Inclusion. Inclusive Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Ann, Ed.; Norwich, Brahm, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    Some special needs groups (for example dyslexia) have argued strongly for the need for particular specialist approaches. In contrast, many proponents of inclusion have argued that "good teaching is good teaching for all" and that all children benefit from similar approaches. Both positions fail to scrutinise this issue rigorously and coherently,…

  14. Volatile Release From The Siberian Traps Inferred From Melt Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Benjamin A.; Elkins-Tanton, Linda T.; Rowe, Michael C.; Ukstins Peate, Ingrid

    2010-05-01

    The Siberian Traps Large Igneous Province is one of the largest known continental flood volcanic provinces in the Phanerozoic. The quantification of volatile degassing is particularly important because the Siberian Traps have often been invoked as a possible trigger for the end-Permian mass extinction (e.g. Campbell et al., 1992; Wignall, 2001). Volatile degassing provides a crucial mechanism to link mafic volcanic eruption with global environmental change. Mafic flood basalt magmas are expected to have low volatile contents (similar to mid-ocean ridge basalts). However, Siberian Traps magmas were chambered in and erupted through a thick sedimentary basin and may have interacted with, and obtained volatiles from, sedimentary lithologies such as limestone, coal, and evaporite. Melt inclusions from the Siberian Traps provide insight into the potential total volatile budget throughout the evolution of the large igneous province. These droplets of trapped melt may preserve volatile species that would otherwise have degassed at the time of eruption. We present data from the analysis of more than 100 melt inclusions, including both homogenized inclusions and rare glassy inclusions with low crystallinity. Many melt inclusions from tuffs and flows near the base of the Siberian Traps sequence are substantially enriched in chlorine and fluorine compared to Deccan Traps and Laki melt inclusions (Self et al., 2008; Thordarson et al., 1996). These inclusions record chlorine concentrations up to ~1400 ppm, and fluorine concentrations up to ~5000 ppm. Olivines from the Maymechinsky suite, recognized as the last extrusive products of Siberian Traps volcanism, contain melt inclusions with maximum sulfur concentrations in the range of ~5000 ppm and substantial concentrations of chlorine. Intrusive igneous rocks from the province also display significant volatile contents. A sill from the Ust-Ilimsk region yielded plagioclase-hosted melt inclusions which contain chlorine and fluorine concentrations in the range of one weight percent. Visscher et al. (2004) proposed that chlorofluorocarbon compounds (CFCs) may have played a major role in the terrestrial end-Permian extinction. These CFCs are powerful catalysts for the breakdown of ozone, a process which can expose the biosphere to increased ultraviolet radiation. Measurements of elevated chlorine and fluorine from the Siberian Traps may thus provide a concrete source for CFCs that could have triggered this kill mechanism.

  15. Application of a ?-cyclodextrin/graphene oxide-modified fiber for solid-phase microextraction of six fragrance allergens in personal products.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xiudan; Wang, Licheng; Tang, Xiaofen; Xiong, Chunming; Guo, Yong; Liu, Xia

    2015-10-01

    A new ?-cyclodextrin/graphene oxide hybrid material prepared via a chemical covalent interaction and layer-to-layer assembly was developed as a sorbent for the solid-phase microextraction of fragrance allergens. As a result of its ultra-large surface area, large delocalized ?-electron system and abundant hydroxyls, the ?-cyclodextrin/graphene oxide-coated fiber could be used to extract particular compounds via strong ?-? interactions, van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonding interactions. ?-Cyclodextrin with a hydrophobic interior cavity and hydrophilic peripheral face was conducive in extracting the fragrances with hydrophobic and hydrophilic groups. Under the optimized extraction and desorption conditions, the ?-cyclodextrin/graphene oxide-coated fiber showed acceptable extraction efficiency for hydrophilic and hydrogen-bonding-donating alcohols. Compared with other methods based on different coating fibers, the proposed fiber obtained wide linear ranges for fragrances with correlation coefficients ranging from 0.9921 to 0.9970, and low limits of detection in the range of 0.050-0.150 ?g L(-1). The obtained results indicated that the newly developed fiber was a selective, feasible and cost-effective microextraction medium and could be successfully applied for the determination of several fragrances in personal products. PMID:26332186

  16. Spin block inclusions Christine Bessenrodt

    E-print Network

    Olsson, Jørn Børling

    Spin block inclusions Christine Bessenrodt Fakult¨at f¨ur Mathematik und Physik, Universit Classifications: 20C30, 05A17 Abstract In this paper we classify all block equalities and all nontrivial block inclu- sions for spin blocks of the double covers of the symmetric groups at different odd primes. More

  17. Inclusive decay B??X

    E-print Network

    Baringer, Philip S.

    1996-06-01

    Using data samples taken at the ?(4S) resonance and nearby continuum e(+)e(?) annihilation with the CLEO-II detector at CESR, we have measured the inclusive branching fraction B(B??X)=(17.6±1.1±1.2)%, and the momentum distribution of the ? mesons...

  18. Music in the Inclusive Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humpal, Marcia Earl; Wolf, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Excerpts teacher narratives of children's music activities in inclusive early childhood environments to show how music can be used to offer varying levels of engagement ranging from listening or observing to joining in as an active participant. Summarizes the beliefs of the National Association for Music Education for guiding developmentally and…

  19. Vocational & Social Inclusion. Special Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Retish, Paul, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This special issue on vocational and social inclusion of people with disabilities includes papers with the following titles and authors: "Applying Theories of Career Behavior to Special Populations: Implications for Secondary Vocational Transition Programming" (Jay W. Rojewski); "Familiarity with the Service System and Perception of Needs at…

  20. Developing Movement as Inclusive Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peter, Melanie; Walter, Ofra

    2010-01-01

    This article details the emergence of a training framework to support professional development in inclusive Movement teaching. This arose from a collaborative research project in spring 2008 (supported by the Training and Development Agency, UK), between two universities in England and Israel. Movement education is surprisingly underused globally,…

  1. Curriculum Adaptation for Inclusive Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neary, Tom; And Others

    This manual on curriculum adaptation for inclusive classrooms was developed as part of the PEERS (Providing Education for Everyone in Regular Schools) Project, a 5-year collaborative systems change project in California to facilitate the integration of students with severe disabilities previously at special centers into services at regular school…

  2. Towards Inclusion: An Australian Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forbes, Fiona

    2007-01-01

    This article outlines the views of the Australian Special Education Principals' Association (ASEPA) on inclusion and the impact this is having on Australian Government Schools from a school based perspective. ASEPA is a relatively young association and was formed in 1997 out of the need to put forward the case to support students with special…

  3. Inclusive Education and the Arts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allan, Julie

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses the troubled, problematic and contested field of inclusive education, characterised by antagonisms between so-called inclusionists and special educationists; frustration, particularly among disability activists caused by the abstraction of the social model of disability and the expansion of the special educational needs…

  4. Primordial Compositions of Refractory Inclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, L; Simon, S B; Rai, V K; Thiemens, M H; Hutcheon, I D; Williams, R W; Galy, A; Ding, T; Fedkin, A V; Clayton, R N; Mayeda, T K

    2008-02-20

    Bulk chemical and oxygen, magnesium and silicon isotopic compositions were measured for each of 17 Types A and B refractory inclusions from CV3 chondrites. After bulk chemical compositions were corrected for non-representative sampling in the laboratory, the Mg and Si isotopic compositions of each inclusion were used to calculate its original chemical composition assuming that the heavy-isotope enrichments of these elements are due to Rayleigh fractionation that accompanied their evaporation from CMAS liquids. The resulting pre-evaporation chemical compositions are consistent with those predicted by equilibrium thermodynamic calculations for high-temperature nebular condensates but only if different inclusions condensed from nebular regions that ranged in total pressure from 10{sup -6} to 10{sup -1} bar, regardless of whether they formed in a system of solar composition or in one enriched in OC dust relative to gas by a factor of ten relative to solar composition. This is similar to the range of total pressures predicted by dynamic models of the solar nebula for regions whose temperatures are in the range of silicate condensation temperatures. Alternatively, if departure from equilibrium condensation and/or non-representative sampling of condensates in the nebula occurred, the inferred range of total pressure could be smaller. Simple kinetic modeling of evaporation successfully reproduces observed chemical compositions of most inclusions from their inferred pre-evaporation compositions, suggesting that closed-system isotopic exchange processes did not have a significant effect on their isotopic compositions. Comparison of pre-evaporation compositions with observed ones indicates that 80% of the enrichment in refractory CaO + Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} relative to more volatile MgO + SiO{sub 2} is due to initial condensation and 20% due to subsequent evaporation for both Type A and Type B inclusions.

  5. COMPARISON OF PROCEDURES TO DETERMINE ADSORPTION CAPACITY OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS ON ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are under regulatory consideration for inclusion in the National Primary Drinking Water Standards. Adsorption is a cost-effective treatment technology for control of VOCs. Adsorption capacities were determined for fifteen VOCs in distill...

  6. Isolation and characterization of bacterial polyhydroxybutyrate inclusions

    E-print Network

    Kshetry, Nina

    2006-01-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) is a carbon reserve found in some bacteria, and under nutrient limiting conditions accumulates intracellularly in the form of inclusion bodies. These inclusions contain proteins, and the PHB within ...

  7. Nonlinear Neutral Inclusions: Assemblages of Spheres

    E-print Network

    Silvia Jiménez; Bogdan Vernescu; William Sanguinet

    2012-06-14

    If a neutral inclusion is inserted in a matrix containing a uniform applied electric field, it does not disturb the field outside the inclusion. The well known Hashin coated sphere is an example of a neutral coated inclusion. In this paper, we consider the problem of constructing neutral inclusions from nonlinear materials. In particular, we discuss assemblages of coated spheres and the two-dimensional analogous problem of assemblages of coated disks.

  8. Ultrastructural cytochemical analysis of intranuclear arsenic inclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, E.M.B.

    1987-01-01

    To establish the chemical composition of the arsenic inclusion, freshly isolated preparations of inclusions and epon-embedded thin sections of inclusions were subjected to ultrastructural cytochemical analysis. Intranuclear inclusions are composed of amorphous, arsenic-containing subunits aligned linearly to form a coiled complex. Lipase, ribonuclease, deoxyribonuclease, trypsin, pepsin, protease, amylase, or ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) was used to digest or chelate these inclusions. Following enzymatic digestion or chelation, the electron opacity of inclusions was compared with that of control sections exposed for equal times to equivalent solutions lacking the enzymes. Exposure to amylase caused a consistent reduction in the electron opacity of thin sections of inclusions and almost complete digestion of the freshly isolated preparations of inclusions. This was indicative of the presence of a carbohydrate moiety within arsenic inclusions. Incubation of inclusions with EDTA resulted in solubilization of freshly isolated and thin-sectioned embedded material. These data indicated that the intranuclear arsenic inclusion is composed of both metallic and carbohydrate moieties, confirming earlier studies which identified arsenic within inclusions using instrumental neutron activation analysis and x-ray microprobe analysis.

  9. 75 FR 10446 - Minority and Women Inclusion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-08

    ...Part 1207 RIN 2590-AA28 Minority and Women Inclusion AGENCIES: Federal Housing Finance...comment on this proposed rule on minority and women inclusion. Section 1116 of the Housing...promote diversity and the inclusion of women and minorities in all activities....

  10. Measuring Inclusive Education Outcomes in Alberta, Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loreman, Tim

    2014-01-01

    This study details the results of a review of the academic and public sector literature on measuring inclusive education in large systems. It highlights some outcomes drawn from the international literature on inclusion that might be indicative of the presence and quality of inclusive education in an effort to develop a set of outcomes for…

  11. Feature Issue on Inclusion and School Restructuring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandercook, Terri; York-Barr, Jennifer

    1996-01-01

    This feature issue on inclusion and school restructuring for students with and without disabilities contains the following articles: (1) "The 7 Habits for Educators" (Terri Vandercook); (2) "The Evolution of Inclusive Education" (Jennifer York-Barr and Terri Vandercook); (3) "Creating Inclusive Schools: What Does the Research Say?" (Margaret J.…

  12. Forging Inclusive Solutions: Experiential Earth Charter Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Linda D.

    2010-01-01

    Forging Inclusive Solutions describes the aims, methodology and outcomes of Inclusive Leadership Adventures, an experiential education curriculum for exploring the Earth Charter. Experiential education builds meaningful relationships, skills, awareness and an inclusive community based on the Earth Charter principles. When we meet people where they…

  13. Elements of Inclusion: Findings from the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMaster, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The Ministry of Education has set the target of 100% of New Zealand schools to be "mostly" inclusive by 2014. But what are the essential elements of inclusion? This paper explores essential core elements that allow inclusion to flourish. Based on an extensive time in the field as part of a year-long doctoral research project, these…

  14. Inclusive Education: Examining Equity on Five Continents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Artiles, Alfredo J., Ed.; Kozleski, Elizabeth B., Ed.; Waitoller, Federico R., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the impressive growth of inclusive education around the world, questions and considerations about equity have been neglected. This edited volume makes a major contribution to the field of inclusive education by analyzing equity concerns that have emerged from the implementation of inclusive education models in nine nations on five…

  15. Measuring Quality in Inclusive Preschool Classrooms: Development and Validation of the Inclusive Classroom Profile (ICP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soukakou, Elena P.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate an observation measure designed to assess classroom quality in inclusive preschool programs, the Inclusive Classroom Profile (ICP). Developing the rating scale entailed systematic fieldwork in inclusive settings and review of the literature on preschool inclusion. Results from the validation…

  16. Melt inclusions in Luna 24 soil fragments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roedder, W.; Weiblen, P. W.

    1978-01-01

    Optical examinations of 28 slides of Luna 24 soil fragments revealed melt inclusions in grains of olivine, plagioclase, spinel, and ilmenite as well as interstitial inclusions. In contrast with Apollo samples, the Luna 24 samples contain sulfide melt inclusions, which indicates that saturation with respect to an iron sulfide melt took place throughout much of the crystallization history, even while olivine was crystallizing. The Luna 24 silicate-melt inclusions have recorded a more extensive differentiation toward higher iron magmas than have the Apollo inclusions, but they have also recorded some inexplicably low aluminum values.

  17. Gaseous species in fluid inclusions: A tracer of fluids and indicator of fluid processes

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, David I.; Moore, Joseph N.; Yonaka, Brad; Musgrave, John

    1996-01-24

    Quantitative bulk analysis of fluid inclusion volatiles measures the composition of trapped geothermal liquids and vapor. Fluid-inclusion gas-analyses may identify fluid boiling and mixing, and the analyses can be used as a fluid tracer. Fluid boiling is indicated by excess gaseous species. Linear arrays of data points on gas ratio diagrams indicate fluid mixing. Nitrogen-argon ratios are used to discriminate atmospheric fiom magmatic volatiles. Crustal components in geothermal fluids are best indicated by concentrations of methane and helium. Methane strongly correlates with other organic compounds, and N2-Ar-CH4 plots are similar to N2-Ar-He diagrams. Alkene to alkane ratios of C2-7 organic species indicate the oxidation state of geothermal fluids. The Geysers inclusion analyses are an example of how inclusion fluids may be used to understand the paleo hydrology of a geothermal system.

  18. The crack-inclusion interaction problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, X.-H.; Erdogan, F.

    1986-01-01

    The general plane elastostatic problem of interaction between a crack and an inclusion is considered. The Green's functions for a pair of dislocations and a pair of concentrated body forces are used to generate the crack and the inclusion. Integral equations are obtained for a line crack and an elastic line inclusion having an arbitrary relative orientation and size. The nature of stress singularity around the end points of rigid and elastic inclusions is described and three special cases of this intersection problem are studied. The problem is solved for an arbitrary uniform stress state away from the crack-inclusion region. The nonintersecting crack-inclusion problem is considered for various relative size, orientation, and stiffness parameters, and the stress intensity factors at the ends of the inclusion and the crack are calculated. For the crack-inclusion intersection case, special stress intensity factors are defined and are calculated for various values of the parameters defining the relative size and orientation of the crack and the inclusion and the stiffness of the inclusion.

  19. The crack-inclusion interaction problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xue-Hui, L.; Erdogan, F.

    1984-01-01

    The general plane elastostatic problem of interaction between a crack and an inclusion is considered. The Green's functions for a pair of dislocations and a pair of concentrated body forces are used to generate the crack and the inclusion. Integral equations are obtained for a line crack and an elastic line inclusion having an arbitrary relative orientation and size. The nature of stress singularity around the end points of rigid and elastic inclusions is described and three special cases of this intersection problem are studied. The problem is solved for an arbitrary uniform stress state away from the crack-inclusion region. The nonintersecting crack-inclusion problem is considered for various relative size, orientation, and stiffness parameters, and the stress intensity factors at the ends of the inclusion and the crack are calculated. For the crack-inclusion intersection case, special stress intensity factors are defined and are calculated for various values of the parameters defining the relative size and orientation of the crack and the inclusion and the stiffness of the inclusion.

  20. Hereditary inclusion-body myopathies.

    PubMed

    Broccolini, Aldobrando; Mirabella, Massimiliano

    2015-04-01

    The term hereditary inclusion-body myopathies (HIBMs) defines a group of rare muscle disorders with autosomal recessive or dominant inheritance and presence of muscle fibers with rimmed vacuoles and collection of cytoplasmic or nuclear 15-21 nm diameter tubulofilaments as revealed by muscle biopsy. The most common form of HIBM is due to mutations of the GNE gene that codes for a rate-limiting enzyme in the sialic acid biosynthetic pathway. This results in abnormal sialylation of glycoproteins that possibly leads to muscle fiber degeneration. Mutations of the valosin containing protein are instead responsible for hereditary inclusion-body myopathy with Paget's disease of the bone and frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD), with these three phenotypic features having a variable penetrance. IBMPFD probably represents a disorder of abnormal cellular trafficking of proteins and maturation of the autophagosome. HIBM with congenital joint contractures and external ophthalmoplegia is due to mutations of the Myosin Heavy Chain IIa gene that exerts a pathogenic effect through interference with filament assembly or functional defects in ATPase activity. This review illustrates the clinical and pathologic characteristics of HIBMs and the main clues available to date concerning the possible pathogenic mechanisms and therapeutic perspectives of these disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuromuscular Diseases: Pathology and Molecular Pathogenesis. PMID:25149037

  1. Dinitroso and polynitroso compounds

    PubMed Central

    Gowenlock, Brian G.; Richter-Addo, George B.

    2005-01-01

    The growing interest in the chemistry of C-nitroso compounds (RN=O; R = alkyl or aryl group) is due in part to the recognition of their participation in various metabolic processes of nitrogen-containing compounds. C-Nitroso compounds have a rich organic chemistry in their own right, displaying interesting intra- and intermolecular dimerization processes and addition reactions with unsaturated compounds. In addition, they have a fascinating coordination chemistry. While most of the attention has been directed towards C-nitroso compounds containing a single –NO moiety, there is an emerging area of research dealing with dinitroso and polynitroso compounds. In this critical review, we present and discuss the synthetic routes and properties of these relatively unexplored dinitroso and polynitroso compounds, and suggest areas of further development involving these compounds. (126 references.) PMID:16100619

  2. Compounds affecting cholesterol absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, Duy H. (Inventor); Koo, Sung I. (Inventor); Noh, Sang K. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A class of novel compounds is described for use in affecting lymphatic absorption of cholesterol. Compounds of particular interest are defined by Formula I: ##STR1## or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof.

  3. Making the case for inclusive design.

    PubMed

    Waller, Sam; Bradley, Mike; Hosking, Ian; Clarkson, P John

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the University of Cambridge, Engineering Design Centre's (EDC) case for inclusive design, based on 10 years of research, promotion and knowledge transfer. In summary, inclusive design applies an understanding of customer diversity to inform decisions throughout the development process, in order to better satisfy the needs of more people. Products that are more inclusive can reach a wider market, improve customer satisfaction and drive business success. The rapidly ageing population increases the importance of this approach. The case presented here has helped to convince BT, Nestlé and others to adopt an inclusive approach. PMID:23538129

  4. Shock Re-equilibration of Fluid Inclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, M. E. Elwood; Horz, F.; Bodnar, R. J.

    2004-01-01

    Fluid inclusions (microscopic volumes of fluid trapped within minerals as they precipitate) are extremely common in terrestrial minerals formed under a wide range of geological conditions from surface evaporite deposits to kimberlite pipes. While fluid inclusions in terrestrial rocks are nearly ubiquitous, only a few fluid inclusion-bearing meteorites have been documented. The scarcity of fluid inclusions in meteoritic materials may be a result of (a) the absence of fluids when the mineral was formed on the meteorite parent body or (b) the destruction of fluid inclusions originally contained in meteoritic materials by subsequent shock metamorphism. However, the effects of impact events on pre-existing fluid inclusions trapped in target and projectile rocks has received little study. Fluid inclusions trapped prior to the shock event may be altered (re-equilibrated) or destroyed due to the high pressures, temperatures, and strain rates associated with impact events. By examining the effects of shock deformation on fluid inclusion properties and textures we may be able to better constrain the pressure-temperature path experienced by terrestrial and meteoritic shocked materials and also gain a clearer understanding of why fluid inclusions are rarely found in meteorite samples.

  5. Cyclodextrin Inclusion Polymers Forming Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun

    This chapter reviews the advances in the developments of supramolecular hydrogels based on the polypseudorotaxanes and polyrotaxanes formed by inclusion complexes of cyclodextrins threading onto polymer chains. Both physical and chemical supramolecular hydrogels of many different types are discussed with respect to their preparation, structure, property, and gelation mechanism. A large number of physical supramolecular hydrogels were formed induced by self-assembly of densely packed cyclodextrin rings threaded on polymer or copolymer chains acting as physical crosslinking points. The thermo-reversible and thixotropic properties of these physical supramolecular hydrogels have inspired their applications as injectable drug delivery systems. Chemical supramolecular hydrogels synthesized from polypseudorotaxanes and polyrotaxanes were based on the chemical crosslinking of either the cyclodextrin molecules or the included polymer chains. The chemical supramolecular hydrogels were often made biodegradable through incorporation of hydrolyzable threading polymers, end caps, or crosslinkers, for their potential applications as biomaterials.

  6. Measuring the Quality of Inclusive Practices: Findings from the Inclusive Classroom Profile Pilot

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soukakou, Elena P.; Winton, Pam J.; West, Tracey A.; Sideris, John H.; Rucker, Lia M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the reliability and validity of the Inclusive Classroom Profile (ICP), an observation measure designed to assess the quality of classroom practices in inclusive preschool programs. The measure was field tested in 51 inclusive classrooms. Results confirmed and extended previous research findings, providing…

  7. Effective Leadership Makes Schools Truly Inclusive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLeskey, James; Waldron, Nancy L.

    2015-01-01

    There's been much commitment and extensive legislation intended to make schools inclusive for all students but not much real progress in improving student outcomes. The authors review and assess several schools that have succeeded at making schools inclusive and effective for all students, including those with disabilities and draw some inferences…

  8. Inclusive Education: Is This Horse a Trojan?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slee, Roger

    2006-01-01

    In Canada and elsewhere, governments are expending considerable effort in the production of inclusive education policy texts, resources allocation models, and programs. The author notes that despite of the analytic power and the political intent of inclusive education as a counterpoint to special education, its appropriation is imminent if not…

  9. Metaphors of Literacy: Dialogues in Inclusive Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Causarano, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the importance of metaphors in education and in inclusive settings in particular. Metaphors are seen as the fabric of collaboration through dialogue across the curriculum. The article analyzes the dialogues among the Language Arts, Social Studies, and inclusion teacher in a large middle school in the Southwest of the United…

  10. Inclusive Education in Thailand: Practices and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vorapanya, Sermsap; Dunlap, Diane

    2014-01-01

    In 2008, Thailand passed legislation on the educational provisions for students with disabilities to mandate the implementation of inclusive education. This article provides a historical overview of special education in Thailand and the emergence of inclusive education as it moves from policy to practice. To further identify the challenges faced…

  11. Characteristics of Inclusive Classrooms in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melekoglu, Macid Ayhan

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, inclusive classrooms in Turkey are described in terms of the characteristics of both classroom teachers and students with special needs. Participants of this study consisted of 54 teachers working in inclusive classrooms and 54 students with mild intellectual disabilities in those classrooms in Turkey. Data for this study were…

  12. The Sustainability of Inclusive School Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sindelar, Paul T.; Shearer, Deirdre K.; Yendol-Hoppey, Diane; Liebert, Todd W.

    2006-01-01

    For over a decade, University of Florida researchers worked with middle schools in a large urban and suburban south Florida district, as they developed and then worked to sustain inclusive reform. One middle school, Socrates, was notably successful, having built its inclusion model on a foundation of previous reform and a school culture…

  13. Inclusion: Something More Than Sitting Together

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulbul, Mustafa Sahin

    2011-01-01

    Awareness about students with learning difficulty brought us to inclusive learning environments. The acceptance was to build collaborative atmospheres in the class. Unfortunately, when teachers are not enthusiastic and adequate to develop the interaction, the inclusive learning environment never occurs. This conclusion bases on this studies…

  14. Inclusive Education: A Servant-Leadership Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crippen, Carolyn

    2005-01-01

    The concept of inclusive education is common to the Canadian educational system and involves service to the students. According to Young and Levin, "The provision of appropriate education to meet the needs of each student is increasingly accepted as a right in Canadian education." Bloom, Perlmutter and Burnell define inclusion as "a philosophy…

  15. Irish Mathematics Teachers' Attitudes towards Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitty, Elaine; Clarke, Marie

    2012-01-01

    This paper through the theoretical framework of constructive attitude theory explores mathematics teachers' attitudes and pedagogical strategies with reference to inclusive practice. The authors argue that though teachers may have formed positive inclusive attitudes, the translation of these into practice does not always occur and poses…

  16. Inclusion body hepatitis in kestrels (Falco sparverius)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sileo, L.; Franson, J.C.; Graham, D.L.; Domermuth, C.H.; Rattner, B.A.; Pattee, O.H.

    1982-01-01

    Inclusion body disease of suspected adenovirus etiology was the apparent cause of death of 9 captive kestrels (Falco sparverius). Cloacal hemorrhage was the only prominent gross lesion; disseminated hepatocellular necrosis and intranuclear inclusion bodies were evident microscopically. Attempts to reproduce the disease, and to propagate and serologically characterize the agent were unsuccessful.

  17. Early Childhood Inclusion: Focus on Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guralnick, Michael J., Ed.

    Early childhood inclusion is a field characterized by a philosophy and practice that encourages full participation of children with disabilities and their families in everyday activities with their typically developing peers. Noting that success in inclusion endeavors requires substantial changes in the way our society thinks, feels, and acts,…

  18. What's Working: Topics in Inclusive Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What's Working, 1994

    1994-01-01

    This newsletter focuses on what works in inclusive education. A major article is "Inclusive Education: Needs of Minnesota Families--Major Findings from a 'Together We're Better' Study." This article presents findings of a statewide survey of families of children with disabilities. Findings are categorized within four areas: (1) educational…

  19. Older Women's Career Development and Social Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMahon, Mary; Bimrose, Jenny; Watson, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This paper considers women's career development and the potential contribution of career development theory, research, practice and policy in advancing a social inclusion agenda. In particular, the paper focuses on older women in the contexts of an ageing population, labour market shortages and Australia's social inclusion agenda. Supporting young…

  20. Leading under Pressure: Leadership for Social Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muijs, Daniel; Ainscow, Mel; Dyson, Alan; Raffo, Carlo; Goldrick, Sue; Kerr, Kirstin; Lennie, Clare; Miles, Susie

    2010-01-01

    In this study we undertook to look at leadership issues specifically in relation to social inclusion, through a series of six case studies in three districts showing high levels of disadvantage. Findings indicated that schools' views on social inclusion could be typified as leaning towards three main orientations: (1) improving achievement and…

  1. Social Inclusion and Critical Consciousness in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diemer, Matthew A.; Ortega, Lilyana

    2010-01-01

    Australia's Indigenous population is excluded from a range of opportunities, experiences and amenities that facilitate wellbeing, self-determination and social inclusion. This social exclusion constrains the career development and occupational attainment of Indigenous youth, which represent key routes to societal inclusion. Critical…

  2. A Collaborative Group Method of Inclusive Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigby, Christine; Frawley, Patsie; Ramcharan, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background: Funding bodies in Australia and the United Kingdom require research on issues that affect the lives of people with intellectual disability to be inclusive. Debate continues about the nature and benefits of inclusive research, which has become an umbrella term encompassing a broad spectrum of approaches. Method: This study proposes one…

  3. Beyond Political Correctness: Toward the Inclusive University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richer, Stephen, Ed.; Weir, Lorna, Ed.

    This collection of 12 essays examines the history of the discourse over political correctness (PC) in Canadian academia, focusing on the neoconservative backlash to affirmative action, inclusive policies, and feminist and anti-racist teaching in the classroom. It includes: (1) "Introduction: Political Correctness and the Inclusive University"…

  4. Erasmus Mundus SEN: The Inclusive Scholarship Programme?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grinbergs, Christopher J.; Jones, Hilary

    2013-01-01

    The Erasmus Mundus MA/Mgr in Special Education Needs (EM SEN) was created as a Masters Course funded by the European Commission's Erasmus Mundus Programme (EMP) to challenge and educate students in inclusive policy and practice in education. Yet, it is debatable the extent to which this programme embodies the values of an inclusive approach,…

  5. Beyond Prejudice: Inclusive Learning in Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Vikki; Armstrong, Anne

    2005-01-01

    Promoting an inclusive learning environment that caters for all learners and their individual needs and meeting challenging targets set in this area is a huge under taking for providers across the learning and skills sector. This booklet provides an overview that illustrates the breadth and variety that the broad banner of inclusive learning…

  6. Geometric Modeling of Inclusions as Ellipsoids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonacuse, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    Nonmetallic inclusions in gas turbine disk alloys can have a significant detrimental impact on fatigue life. Because large inclusions that lead to anomalously low lives occur infrequently, probabilistic approaches can be utilized to avoid the excessively conservative assumption of lifing to a large inclusion in a high stress location. A prerequisite to modeling the impact of inclusions on the fatigue life distribution is a characterization of the inclusion occurrence rate and size distribution. To help facilitate this process, a geometric simulation of the inclusions was devised. To make the simulation problem tractable, the irregularly sized and shaped inclusions were modeled as arbitrarily oriented, three independent dimensioned, ellipsoids. Random orientation of the ellipsoid is accomplished through a series of three orthogonal rotations of axes. In this report, a set of mathematical models for the following parameters are described: the intercepted area of a randomly sectioned ellipsoid, the dimensions and orientation of the intercepted ellipse, the area of a randomly oriented sectioned ellipse, the depth and width of a randomly oriented sectioned ellipse, and the projected area of a randomly oriented ellipsoid. These parameters are necessary to determine an inclusion s potential to develop a propagating fatigue crack. Without these mathematical models, computationally expensive search algorithms would be required to compute these parameters.

  7. Inclusive Education Reform: Implications for Teacher Aides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourke, Patricia; Carrington, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    In Queensland, inclusive education reform is on the political agenda, following the report of the Ministerial Taskforce on Inclusive Education (students with disabilities) in 2004. The Government's responses to the initiatives outlined in the taskforce report emphasise a commitment to social justice and equity so that all students can be included…

  8. Guided Reading in Inclusive Middle Years Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Wanda; Thompson, Scott Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Teachers in inclusive classrooms are challenged to provide reading instruction for students with a wide range of instructional levels. This article reports on the implementation of guided reading in four middle years inclusive classrooms, the impact on student engagement and reading progress, and teacher perspectives on the guided reading…

  9. Inclusive Focus Particles in English and Korean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Sang-gu

    2011-01-01

    When discussing focus particles, it has been common practice to rely on the dichotomy of inclusive vs. exclusive particles, "a la" Konig (1991). Inclusive focus particles are often further divided into scalar particles, such as "also", "too", and "either", and non-scalar particles, such as "even". In this thesis, I advance a comparative analysis…

  10. Understanding the Development of Inclusive Education System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ainscow, Mel

    2005-01-01

    It is now almost ten years since the Salamanca Conference on Special Needs Education endorsed the idea of inclusive education. Arguably the most significant international document that has ever appeared in the special needs field, the Salamanca Statement argues that regular schools with an inclusive orientation are "the most effective means of…

  11. School Inclusion and the "Community of Practice"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laluvein, Jackie

    2010-01-01

    "Inclusion" is not a mechanism for relocating educationally disadvantaged youngsters in mainstream rather than in special schools. Rather, inclusion implies a whole school approach to social relations and production of meaning reached through processes of negotiation between parents, teachers and children. Such an approach places equal value upon…

  12. Hamiltonian inclusive fitness: a fitter fitness concept

    PubMed Central

    Costa, James T.

    2013-01-01

    In 1963–1964 W. D. Hamilton introduced the concept of inclusive fitness, the only significant elaboration of Darwinian fitness since the nineteenth century. I discuss the origin of the modern fitness concept, providing context for Hamilton's discovery of inclusive fitness in relation to the puzzle of altruism. While fitness conceptually originates with Darwin, the term itself stems from Spencer and crystallized quantitatively in the early twentieth century. Hamiltonian inclusive fitness, with Price's reformulation, provided the solution to Darwin's ‘special difficulty’—the evolution of caste polymorphism and sterility in social insects. Hamilton further explored the roles of inclusive fitness and reciprocation to tackle Darwin's other difficulty, the evolution of human altruism. The heuristically powerful inclusive fitness concept ramified over the past 50 years: the number and diversity of ‘offspring ideas’ that it has engendered render it a fitter fitness concept, one that Darwin would have appreciated. PMID:24132089

  13. XAFS Model Compound Library

    DOE Data Explorer

    Newville, Matthew

    The XAFS Model Compound Library contains XAFS data on model compounds. The term "model" compounds refers to compounds of homogeneous and well-known crystallographic or molecular structure. Each data file in this library has an associated atoms.inp file that can be converted to a feff.inp file using the program ATOMS. (See the related Searchable Atoms.inp Archive at http://cars9.uchicago.edu/~newville/adb/) This Library exists because XAFS data on model compounds is useful for several reasons, including comparing to unknown data for "fingerprinting" and testing calculations and analysis methods. The collection here is currently limited, but is growing. The focus to date has been on inorganic compounds and minerals of interest to the geochemical community. [Copied, with editing, from http://cars9.uchicago.edu/~newville/ModelLib/

  14. Production of epoxy compounds from olefinic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Gelbein, A.P.; Kwon, J.T.

    1985-01-29

    Chlorine and tertiary alkanol dissolved in an inert organic solvent are reacted with aqueous alkali to produce tertiary alkyl hypochlorite which is recovered in the organic solvent and reacted with water and olefinically unsaturated compound to produce chlorohydrin and tertiary alkanol. Chlorohydrin and tertiary alkanol recovered in the organic solvent are contacted with aqueous alkali to produce the epoxy compound, and tertiary alkanol recovered in the organic solvent is recycled to hypochlorite production. The process may be integrated with the electrolytic production of chlorine, with an appropriate treatment of the recycle aqueous stream when required.

  15. Preparation of uranium compounds

    DOEpatents

    Kiplinger, Jaqueline L; Montreal, Marisa J; Thomson, Robert K; Cantat, Thibault; Travia, Nicholas E

    2013-02-19

    UI.sub.3(1,4-dioxane).sub.1.5 and UI.sub.4(1,4-dioxane).sub.2, were synthesized in high yield by reacting turnings of elemental uranium with iodine dissolved in 1,4-dioxane under mild conditions. These molecular compounds of uranium are thermally stable and excellent precursor materials for synthesizing other molecular compounds of uranium including alkoxide, amide, organometallic, and halide compounds.

  16. Volatile Release from the Siberian Traps Inferred from Melt Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, B. A.; Elkins-Tanton, L. T.; Rowe, M. C.; Ukstins Peate, I.

    2009-12-01

    The Siberian Traps Large Igneous Province is one of the largest known continental flood volcanic provinces in the Phanerozoic. The quantification of volatile degassing is particularly important because the Siberian Traps have often been invoked as a possible trigger for the end-Permian mass extinction (e.g. Campbell et al., 1992; Wignall, 2001). Volatile degassing provides a crucial mechanism to link mafic volcanic eruption to global environmental change. Mafic flood basalt magmas are expected to have low volatile contents (similar to mid-ocean ridge basalts). However, Siberian Traps magmas were chambered in and erupted through a thick sedimentary basin and may have interacted with, and obtained volatiles from, sedimentary lithologies such as limestone, coal, and evaporite. Melt inclusions from the Siberian Traps provide insight into the potential total volatile budget throughout the evolution of the large igneous province. These droplets of trapped melt may preserve volatile species that would otherwise have degassed at the time of eruption (Thordarson et al., 1996). Mafic pyroclastic deposits from the lowermost Arydzhangsky suite (basal Siberian Traps) contain clinopyroxene phenocrysts hosting melt inclusions. Electron microprobe analysis of clinopyroxene-hosted re-homogenized melt inclusions indicates maximum measured concentrations of up to 1500 - 2000 ppm sulfur, 500 - 760 ppm chlorine, and 1900 - 2400 ppm fluorine. Olivines from the Maymechinsky suite, recognized as the last extrusive products of Siberian Traps volcanism, contain melt inclusions with maximum sulfur concentrations in the range of 5000 ppm, and less substantial concentrations of chlorine and fluorine. Intrusive igneous rocks from the province also display significant volatile contents. A sill from the Ust-Ilimsk region yielded plagioclase-hosted melt inclusions which contain chlorine and fluorine concentrations nearing one weight percent. Visscher et al. (2004) proposed that chlorofluorocarbon compounds (CFCs) may have played a major role in the terrestrial end-Permian extinction. These CFCs are powerful catalysts for the breakdown of ozone, a process which can expose the biosphere to increased ultraviolet radiation. Measurements of elevated chlorine and fluorine from the Siberian Traps may thus provide a concrete source for CFCs that could have triggered this kill mechanism.

  17. Host-guest inclusion system of artesunate with ?-cyclodextrin and its derivatives: Characterization and antitumor activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Hudie; Yang, Bo; Wang, Fen; Zhao, Yulin

    2015-04-01

    Inclusion complexes between artesunate (ATS) and three cyclodextrins, namely ?-cyclodextrin (?-CD), hydroxypropyl-?-cyclodextrin (HP-?-CD) and sulfobutyl ether-?-cyclodextrin (SBE-?-CD), were prepared by a suspension method. The complexes in both liquid and solid were characterized by phase-solubility diagram, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermoanalysis. The results suggested that artesunate was partly encapsulated within the cyclodextrin cavity to form a 1:1 stoichiometry host-guest compound. Especially in the SBE-?-CD complex, displayed the greatest stability constant. Significant enhancement of water solubility and thermal stability of ATS in present of ?-CDs was shown. The calculated IC50 values indicated that the antitumor activities of inclusion complexes were better than that of ATS. Satisfactory aqueous solubility, along with high thermal stability of inclusion complexes will be potentially useful for their application on the formulation design of natural medicine.

  18. Compound cryopump for fusion reactors

    E-print Network

    Kovari, M; Shephard, T

    2013-01-01

    We reconsider an old idea: a three-stage compound cryopump for use in fusion reactors such as DEMO. The helium "ash" is adsorbed on a 4.5 K charcoal-coated surface, while deuterium and tritium are adsorbed at 15-22 K on a second charcoal-coated surface. The helium is released by raising the first surface to ~30 K. In a separate regeneration step, deuterium and tritium are released at ~110 K. In this way, the helium can be pre-separated from other species. In the simplest design, all three stages are in the same vessel, with a single valve to close the pump off from the tokamak during regeneration. In an alternative design, the three stages are in separate vessels, connected by valves, allowing the stages to regenerate without interfering with each other. The inclusion of the intermediate stage would not affect the overall pumping speed significantly. The downstream exhaust processing system could be scaled down, as much of the deuterium and tritium could be returned directly to the reactor. This could reduce ...

  19. Synthesis and structure of new carbohydrate metal-organic frameworks and inclusion complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Jing-Quan; Wu, Lian-He; Li, Shu-Xian; Yang, Xiao-Ning; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Qian-Nan; Zhu, Pei-Pei

    2015-12-01

    Two new metal-organic framework compounds based on natural ?-cyclodextrin molecules (?-CD) and alkali metals (Na+/K+) were synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, IR, XPRD and 1HNMR. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that compounds 1 and 2 possess the bowl-like pore and the "8" type double channels configuration. Due to the [blow + channel] double configuration, 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) and Quercetin inclusion complexes of compound 1 are studied, and the results show that the two kinds of drug with different structure and size can be included into the compound at the same time, which is expected to become a new type of multi-functional green crystalline solid material.

  20. Nickel and chromium isotopes in Allende inclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birck, J. L.; Lugmair, G. W.

    1988-01-01

    High-precision nickel and chromium isotopic measurements were carried out on nine Allende inclusions. It is found that Ni-62, Ni-64, excesses are present in at least three of the samples. The results suggest that the most likely mechanism for the anomalies is a neutron-rich statistical equilibrium process. An indication of elevated Ni-60 is found in almost every inclusion measured. This effect is thought to be related to the decay of now extinct Fe-60. An upper limit of 1.6 X 10 to the -6th is calculated for the Fe-60/Fe-56 ratio at the time these Allende inclusions crystallized.

  1. Mass spectrometric identification of boric acid in fluid inclusions in pegmatite minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, A.E.; Taylor, M.C.

    1996-09-01

    Direct, on-line mass spectrometric analyses were performed on volatiles released from microscopic fluid inclusions in quartz, feldspar, and tourmaline from the miarolitic Belo Horizonte No. 1 pegmatite in the San Jacinto district, and Himalaya pegmatite dike system in the Mesa Grande district of southern California. These analyses are the first inclusion volatile studies to indicate the presence of significant and variable concentrations of B compounds in pegmatite formation fluids. Boron appears as boric acid B(OH){sub 3}, which is found at levels ranging from less than detection limit (<10{sup {minus}7} mole fraction) to as high as 10{sup {minus}4} mole fraction. High B concentrations are seen in inclusion fluids from miarolite filling quartz, cleavelandite variety albite feldspar, and schorl tourmaline from the Belo Horizonte No. 1, while negligible amounts appear in late-stage green/pink-zoned gem elbaite tourmalines from that mine. Fluid inclusions in quartz, as well as grey and pink tourmaline form the miarolites in the Himalaya mine, have undetectable levels of B compounds. In addition to confirming the presence of very high boric acid concentrations in some pegmatite forming solutions, observations of large variations in abundance may provide new constraints on fluid chemical evolution trends during the genesis of these regionally and paragenetically complex gem deposits. 38 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  2. The interaction between inclusions and cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.

    1973-01-01

    Some current fracture theories are reviewed and a group of mechanics problems of practical interest relating to the elastic interaction between cracks and inclusions are identified and results summarized.

  3. Effective field theories for inclusive B decays

    E-print Network

    Lee, Keith S. M. (Keith Seng Mun)

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis, we study inclusive decays of the B meson. These allow one to determine CKM elements precisely and to search for physics beyond the Standard Model. We use the framework of effective field theories, in ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Microvillus inclusion disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of nutrients from food during digestion, resulting in malnutrition and dehydration. Affected infants often have difficulty gaining ... and fluids during digestion leads to recurrent diarrhea, malnutrition, and dehydration in individuals with microvillus inclusion disease. ...

  5. HQET and Inclusive Decays of Heavy Hadrons

    E-print Network

    Martin J. Savage

    1994-07-20

    We discuss the recent developments in inclusive decays of hadrons containing a heavy quark. The subject is approached in a model independent way using an operator product expansion for the time-ordered product of weak currents. We discuss the extraction of the weak mixing angle $|V_{cb}|$ from inclusive semileptonic $B$ decays and the application of these techniques to the endpoint of the $e^-$ spectrum in $B\\rightarrow X_ue\

  6. Abstracts of Bulletins 305 to 327, Inclusive

    E-print Network

    Jackson, A. D.

    1926-01-01

    STATION B. YOUNGBLOOD, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS -- FIN NO. 338 APRIL, 1926 -- DIVISION OF PUBLICATIONS ABSTRACTS OF BULLETINS 305 TO 327, INCLUSIVE AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS T. 0. WALTON, Presideni... cooperation with the School of Agriculture. ies: !an Botanist 9 ABSTRACTS OF BULLETINS 305 TO 327, INCLUSIVE A. D. JACKSON The ~eneral mailing list of the Agricultural 'Experiment Station has become so large that it is not feasible to publish a...

  7. Acidophilic Halophilic Microorganisms in Fluid Inclusions in Halite from Lake Magic, Western Australia

    PubMed Central

    Conner, Amber J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Lake Magic is one of the most extreme of hundreds of ephemeral acid-saline lakes in southern Western Australia. It has pH as low as 1.7, salinity as high as 32% total dissolved solids, temperatures ranging from 0°C to 50°C, and an unusually complex aqueous composition. Optical petrography, UV-vis petrography, and laser Raman spectrometry were used to detect microorganisms and organic compounds within primary fluid inclusions in modern bedded halite from Lake Magic. Rare prokaryotes appear as 1–3??m, bright cocci that fluoresce green with UV-vis illumination. Dimpled, 5–7??m yellow spherules that fluoresce blue with UV-vis illumination are interpreted as Dunaliella algae. Yellow-orange beta-carotene crystals, globules, and coatings are characterized by orange-red fluorescence and three distinct Raman peaks. Because acid saline lakes are good Mars analogues, the documentation of prokaryotes, eukaryotes, and organic compounds preserved in the halite here has implications for the search for life on Mars. Missions to Mars should incorporate such in situ optical and chemical examination of martian evaporites for possible microorganisms and/or organic compounds in fluid inclusions. Key Words: Acid—Extremophiles—Western Australia—Fluid inclusions—Lake Magic—Dunaliella. Astrobiology 13, 850–860. PMID:23971647

  8. Unusual inclusions found in a national diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, I.S.

    1985-01-01

    Three pale yellow minerals, 100-200 microns in their longest dimension, were extracted from a diamond 2.5 mm in size and examined in an SEM equipped with an X-ray energy-dispersive spectrometer. These inclusions were found to be two grains of garnet and a coesite, all of which contain a microscopic grain of Ti-rich biotite, a small amount of sanidine and a number of other minerals. (1) Garnet-biotite-apatite-rutile-sanidine-(Fe,Ca) melt. Attached to one end of this garnet inclusion is a crystal of biotite (50 x 30 ..mu..m) in which an apatite and a rutile are embedded. A thin lamella of sanidine occurs in the biotite near the garnet boundary. (2) Garnet-biotite-apatite-sanidine-rutile-pyrrhotite-(Fe,Ca,K) phase (unidentified). This garnet inclusion partially encased a biotite crystal while all other phases occur as minute prismatic needles or irregular and globular masses on the inclusion surface. (3) Coesite-biotite-sanidine-calcite. They are considered primary phases because the diamond host contains neither internal nor external fractures. Garnet, coesite, biotite and apatite are syngenetic inclusions in this diamond based on their relatively large sizes and their intergrown relationships. All other phases may also be primary or derived from biotite which, in the presence of sulfur, may produce phlogopite + sanidine + pyrrhotite + rutile. The droplets of melt and thin lamella of sanidine in inclusion (1) seem to be products of incongruent melting of biotite during the emplacement of kimberlite.

  9. Heart testing compound

    DOEpatents

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Goodman, M.M.

    1983-06-29

    The compound 15-(p-(/sup 125/I)-iodophenyl)-6-tellurapentadecanoic acid is disclosed as a myocardial imaging agent having rapid and pronounced uptake, prolonged myocardial retention, and low in vivo deiodination.

  10. Heart testing compound

    DOEpatents

    Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Goodman, Mark M. (Knoxville, TN)

    1985-01-01

    The compound 15-(p-[.sup.125 I]-iodophenyl)-6-tellurapentadecanoic acid is disclosed as a myocardial imaging agent having rapid and pronounced uptake, prolonged myocardial retention, and low in vivo deiodination.

  11. Chemistry of peroxide compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volnov, I. I.

    1981-01-01

    The history of Soviet research from 1866 to 1967 on peroxide compounds is reviewed. This research dealt mainly with peroxide kinetics, reactivity and characteristics, peroxide production processes, and more recently with superoxides and ozonides and emphasis on the higher oxides of group 1 and 2 elements. Solid state fluidized bed synthesis and production of high purity products based on the relative solubilities of the initial, intermediate, and final compounds and elements in liquid ammonia are discussed.

  12. Phenolic Molding Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, Koji; Charles, Ted; de Keyser, Hendrik

    Phenolic Molding Compounds continue to exhibit well balanced properties such as heat resistance, chemical resistance, dimensional stability, and creep resistance. They are widely applied in electrical, appliance, small engine, commutator, and automotive applications. As the focus of the automotive industry is weight reduction for greater fuel efficiency, phenolic molding compounds become appealing alternatives to metals. Current market volumes and trends, formulation components and its impact on properties, and a review of common manufacturing methods are presented. Molding processes as well as unique advanced techniques such as high temperature molding, live sprue, and injection/compression technique provide additional benefits in improving the performance characterisitics of phenolic molding compounds. Of special interest are descriptions of some of the latest innovations in automotive components, such as the phenolic intake manifold and valve block for dual clutch transmissions. The chapter also characterizes the most recent developments in new materials, including long glass phenolic molding compounds and carbon fiber reinforced phenolic molding compounds exhibiting a 10-20-fold increase in Charpy impact strength when compared to short fiber filled materials. The role of fatigue testing and fatigue fracture behavior presents some insight into long-term reliability and durability of glass-filled phenolic molding compounds. A section on new technology outlines the important factors to consider in modeling phenolic parts by finite element analysis and flow simulation.

  13. Retention of aroma compounds from Mentha piperita essential oil by cyclodextrins and crosslinked cyclodextrin polymers.

    PubMed

    Ciobanu, A; Mallard, I; Landy, D; Brabie, G; Nistor, D; Fourmentin, S

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, the controlled release of aroma compounds from cyclodextrins (CDs) and CD polymers was studied by multiple headspace extraction (MHE) experiments. Mentha piperita essential oil was obtained by Soxhlet extraction and identification of the major compounds was performed by GC-MS analysis. Menthol, menthone, pulegone and eucalyptol were identified as the major components. Retention of standard compounds in the presence of different CDs and CD polymers has been realised by static headspace gas chromatography (SH-GC) at 25 °C in the aqueous or gaseous phase. Stability constants for standard compounds and for compounds in essential oil have been also determined with monomeric CD derivatives. The obtained results indicated the formation of a 1:1 inclusion complex for all the studied compounds. Molecular modelling was used to investigate the complementarities between host and guest. This study showed that ?-CDs were the most versatile CDs and that ?-CD polymers could perform the controlled release of aroma compounds. PMID:23265490

  14. Endomorphisms on half-sided modular inclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Svegstrup, Rolf Dyre

    2006-12-15

    In algebraic quantum field theory we consider nets of von Neumann algebras indexed over regions of the space time. Wiesbrock [''Conformal quantum field theory and half-sided modular inclusions of von Neumann algebras,'' Commun. Math. Phys. 158, 537-543 (1993)] has shown that strongly additive nets of von Neumann algebras on the circle are in correspondence with standard half-sided modular inclusions. We show that a finite index endomorphism on a half-sided modular inclusion extends to a finite index endomorphism on the corresponding net of von Neumann algebras on the circle. Moreover, we present another approach to encoding endomorphisms on nets of von Neumann algebras on the circle into half-sided modular inclusions. There is a natural way to associate a weight to a Moebius covariant endomorphism. The properties of this weight have been studied by Bertozzini et al. [''Covariant sectors with infinite dimension and positivity of the energy,'' Commun. Math. Phys. 193, 471-492 (1998)]. In this paper we show the converse, namely, how to associate a Moebius covariant endomorphism to a given weight under certain assumptions, thus obtaining a correspondence between a class of weights on a half-sided modular inclusion and a subclass of the Moebius covariant endomorphisms on the associated net of von Neumann algebras. This allows us to treat Moebius covariant endomorphisms in terms of weights on half-sided modular inclusions. As our aim is to provide a framework for treating endomorphisms on nets of von Neumann algebras in terms of the apparently simpler objects of weights on half-sided modular inclusions, we lastly give some basic results for manipulations with such weights.

  15. Fluid-deposited graphitic inclusions in quartz: Comparison between KTB (German Continental Deep-Drilling) core samples and artificially reequilibrated natural inclusions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pasteris, J.D.; Chou, I.-Ming

    1998-01-01

    We used Raman microsampling spectroscopy (RMS) to determine the degree of crystallinity of minute (2-15 ??m) graphite inclusions in quartz in two sets of samples: experimentally reequilibrated fluid inclusions in a natural quartz grain and biotite-bearing paragneisses from the KTB deep drillhole in SE Germany. Our sequential reequilibration experiments at 725??C on initially pure CO2 inclusions in a quartz wafer and the J. Krautheim (1993) experiments at 900-1100??C on organic compounds heated in gold or platinum capsules suggest that, at a given temperature, (1) fluid-deposited graphite will have a lower crystallinity than metamorphosed organic matter and (2) that the crystallinity of fluid-deposited graphite is affected by the composition of the fluid from which it was deposited. We determined that the precipitation of more-crystalline graphite is favored by lower fH2 (higher fO2), and that the crystallinity of graphite is established by the conditions (including gas fugacities) that pertain as the fluid first reaches graphite saturation. Graphite inclusions within quartz grains in the KTB rocks show a wide range in crystallinity index, reflecting three episodes of carbon entrapment under different metamorphic conditions. Isolated graphite inclusions have the spectral properties of totally ordered, completely crystalline graphite. Such crystallinity suggests that the graphite was incorporated from the surrounding metasedimentary rocks, which underwent metamorphism at upper amphibolite-facies conditions. Much of the fluid-deposited graphite in fluid inclusions, however, shows some spectral disorder. The properties of that graphite resemble those of experimental precipitates at temperatures in excess of 700??C and at elevated pressures, suggesting that the inclusions represent precipitates from C-O-H fluids trapped under conditions near those of peak metamorphism at the KTB site. In contrast, graphite that is intimately associated with chlorite and other (presumably low-temperature) silicates in inclusions is highly disordered and spectrally resembles kerogens. This graphite probably was deposited during later greenschist-facies retrograde metamorphism at about 400-500??C. The degree of crystallinity of fluid-deposited graphite is shown to be a much more complex function of temperature than is the crystallinity of metamorphic graphite. To some extent, experiments can provide temperature-calibration of the crystallinity index. However, the difference in time scales between experimental runs and geologic processes makes it difficult to infer specific temperatures for naturally precipitated graphite. Copyright ?? 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  16. Modeling of Reoxidation Inclusion Formation During Filling of Steel Castings

    E-print Network

    Beckermann, Christoph

    1 Modeling of Reoxidation Inclusion Formation During Filling of Steel Castings Kent D. Carlson cycle of inclusions during the filling of steel castings. There are two ways that inclusions can the final location and characteristics of reoxidation inclusions in steel castings. Carlson, K

  17. Language and Social Inclusion: Unexplored Aspects of Intercultural Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musgrave, Simon; Bradshaw, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Social inclusion policy in Australia has largely ignored key issues of communication for linguistic minorities, across communities and with the mainstream community. In the (now disbanded) Social Inclusion Board's reports (e.g., Social Inclusion Unit, 2009), the emphasis is on the economic aspects of inclusion, while little attention has been…

  18. The Inclusion of Inclusive Education in International Development: Lessons from Papua New Guinea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Fanu, Guy

    2013-01-01

    A new "inclusive" curriculum has been introduced in Papua New Guinea, with significant levels of support from a bilateral development agency. The curriculum is inclusive in the sense that it is designed to meet the diverse, complex, and ever-changing needs of students. Research indicates the curriculum has been shaped by various influences, most…

  19. Socially Inclusive Pedagogy in Literacy Classes: Fostering Inclusion in the Inner City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleovoulou, Yiola

    2008-01-01

    Drawing on case studies of five elementary school teachers in one inner city school, the author explored ways teachers foster social inclusion in their classrooms. Rooted in classroom observations and extensive teacher interviews, teachers' teaching methods and practices were examined as a base from which to explore socially inclusive pedagogy in…

  20. Characteristics of Inclusive Faith Communities: A Preliminary Survey of Inclusive Practices in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Megan M.; Kane, Lydia W.; Taylor, Courtney; Francis, Susan H.; Hodapp, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although participation in faith communities is important to many individuals with disabilities, few studies have examined differences between communities that are more (versus less) inclusive. This study investigated characteristics of faith communities in the United States related to greater inclusion. Methods: Participants were 160…

  1. An American on Paris: Extent of aqueous alteration of a CM chondrite and the petrography of its refractory and amoeboid olivine inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Alan E.

    2015-09-01

    Paris is the least aqueously altered CM chondrite identified to date, classified as subtype 2.7; however, literature data indicate that some regions of this apparently brecciated meteorite may be subtype 2.9. The suite of CAIs in Paris includes 19% spinel-pyroxene inclusions, 19% spinel inclusions, 8% spinel-pyroxene-olivine inclusions, 43% pyroxene inclusions, 8% pyroxene-olivine inclusions, and 3% hibonite-bearing inclusions. Both simple and complex inclusions are present; some have nodular, banded, or distended structures. No melilite was identified in any of the inclusions in the present suite, but other recent studies have found a few rare occurrences of melilite in Paris CAIs. Because melilite is highly susceptible to aqueous alteration, it is likely that it was mostly destroyed during early-stage parent-body alteration. Two of the CAIs in this study are part of compound CAI-chondrule objects. Their presence suggests that there were transient heating events (probably associated with chondrule formation) in the nebula after chondrules and CAIs were admixed. Also present in Paris are a few amoeboid olivine inclusions (AOI) consisting of relatively coarse forsterite rims surrounding fine-grained, porous zones containing diopside and anorthite. The interior regions of the AOIs may represent fine-grained rimless CAIs that were incorporated into highly porous forsterite-rich dustballs. These assemblages were heated by an energy pulse that collapsed and coarsened their rims, but failed to melt their interiors.

  2. Electronic Impact of Inclusions in Diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, E.M.; Smedley, J.; Raghothamachar, B.; Gaowei, M.; Keister, J.W.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Dudley, M.; Wu, Q.

    2010-04-07

    X-ray topography data are compared with photodiode responsivity maps to identify potential candidates for electron trapping in high purity, single crystal diamond. X-ray topography data reveal the defects that exist in the diamond material, which are dominated by non-electrically active linear dislocations. However, many diamonds also contain defects configurations (groups of threading dislocations originating from a secondary phase region or inclusion) in the bulk of the wafer which map well to regions of photoconductive gain, indicating that these inclusions are a source of electron trapping which affect the performance of diamond X-ray detectors. It was determined that photoconductive gain is only possible with the combination of an injecting contact and charge trapping in the near surface region. Typical photoconductive gain regions are 0.2 mm across; away from these near-surface inclusions the device yields the expected diode responsivity.

  3. Potassium in clinopyroxene inclusions from diamonds.

    PubMed

    Harlow, G E; Veblen, D R

    1991-02-01

    Analytical transmission electron microscopy, electron microprobe analyses, and singlecrystal x-ray diffraction data support the conclusion that high potassium contents, up to 1.5 weight percent K(2)O, of some diopside and omphacite inclusions from diamonds represent valid clinopyroxene compositions with K in solid solution. This conclusion contradicts the traditional view of pyroxene crystal chemistry, which holds that K is too large to be incorporated in the pyroxene structure. These diopside and omphacite inclusions have a high degree of crystal perfection and anomalously large unit-cell volumes, and a defect-free structure is observed in K-bearing regions when imaged by transmission electron microscopy. These observations imply that clinopyroxene can be a significant host for K in the mantle and that some clinopyroxene inclusions and their diamond hosts may have grown in a highly K-enriched environment. PMID:17741381

  4. History of Inclusive Design in the UK.

    PubMed

    John Clarkson, P; Coleman, Roger

    2015-01-01

    The UK Design Council describes Inclusive Design as neither a new genre of design, nor a separate specialism, but as a general approach to designing in which designers ensure that their products and services address the needs of the widest possible audience, irrespective of age or ability. Inclusive Design (also known [in Europe] as Design for All and as Universal Design in the USA) is in essence the inverse of earlier approaches to designing for disabled and elderly people as a sub-set of the population, and an integral part of a more recent international trend towards the integration of older and disabled people in the mainstream of society. This paper describes the development of Inclusive Design in the UK, from its early beginnings, through its subsequent adoption as a topic of academic research, leading to its recent emergence embodied as a framework and toolkit for design. PMID:23570838

  5. Inclusion probability with dropout: an operational formula.

    PubMed

    Milot, E; Courteau, J; Crispino, F; Mailly, F

    2015-05-01

    In forensic genetics, a mixture of two or more contributors to a DNA profile is often interpreted using the inclusion probabilities theory. In this paper, we present a general formula for estimating the probability of inclusion (PI, also known as the RMNE probability) from a subset of visible alleles when dropouts are possible. This one-locus formula can easily be extended to multiple loci using the cumulative probability of inclusion. We show that an exact formulation requires fixing the number of contributors, hence to slightly modify the classic interpretation of the PI. We discuss the implications of our results for the enduring debate over the use of PI vs likelihood ratio approaches within the context of low template amplifications. PMID:25559642

  6. Studies of Inclusive Hadron Production at BABAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, Ray F.

    2015-02-01

    The clean environment of the e+e- collisions provided by the B-factory PEP-II and the high performances of the BABAR detector allow for precise measurements of the properties of inclusive hadron production. We present recent results obtained using the full data sample of nearly 500 fb-1 on measurements of the inclusive light hadrons momentum spectra, and on anti-deuteron production from decays of bottomonium states, and from continuum e+e- annihilation. We also present a measurement of the azimuthal asymmetries induced by the Collins effect in inclusive production of pion pairs in e+e- ? ??X annihilation, where the two pions are produced in opposite hemispheres.

  7. Metalloid compounds as drugs

    PubMed Central

    Sekhon, B. S.

    2013-01-01

    The six elements commonly known as metalloids are boron, silicon, germanium, arsenic, antimony, and tellurium. Metalloid containing compounds have been used as antiprotozoal drugs. Boron-based drugs, the benzoxaboroles have been exploited as potential treatments for neglected tropical diseases. Arsenic has been used as a medicinal agent and arsphenamine was the main drug used to treat syphilis. Arsenic trioxide has been approved for the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia. Pentavalent antimonials have been the recommended drug for visceral leishmaniasis and cutaneous leishmaniasis. Tellurium (IV) compounds may have important roles in thiol redox biological activity in the human body, and ammonium trichloro (dioxoethylene-O, O’-)tellurate (AS101) may be a promising agent for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. Organosilicon compounds have been shown to be effective in vitro multidrug-resistance reverting agents. PMID:24019824

  8. Compound Droplets on Fibers.

    PubMed

    Weyer, Floriane; Ben Said, Marouen; Hötzer, Johannes; Berghoff, Marco; Dreesen, Laurent; Nestler, Britta; Vandewalle, Nicolas

    2015-07-21

    Droplets on fibers have been extensively studied in the recent years. Although the equilibrium shapes of simple droplets on fibers are well established, the situation becomes more complex for compound fluidic systems. Through experimental and numerical investigations, we show herein that compound droplets can be formed on fibers and that they adopt specific geometries. We focus on the various contact lines formed at the meeting of the different phases and we study their equilibrium state. It appears that, depending on the surface tensions, the triple contact lines can remain separate or merge together and form quadruple lines. The nature of the contact lines influences the behavior of the compound droplets on fibers. Indeed, both experimental and numerical results show that, during the detachment process, depending on whether the contact lines are triple or quadruple, the characteristic length is the inner droplet radius or the fiber radius. PMID:26090699

  9. Compound droplets on fibers

    E-print Network

    Weyer, Floriane; Hötzer, Johannes; Berghoff, Marco; Dreesen, Laurent; Nestler, Britta; Vandewalle, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Droplets on fibers have been extensively studied in the recent years. Although the equilibrium shapes of simple droplets on fibers are well established, the situation becomes more complex for compound fluidic systems. Through experimental and numerical investigations, we show herein that compound droplets can be formed on fibers and that they adopt specific geometries. We focus on the various contact lines formed at the meeting of the different phases and we study their equilibrium state. It appears that, depending on the surface tensions, the triple contact lines can remain separate or merge together and form quadruple lines. The nature of the contact lines influences the behavior of the compound droplets on fibers. Indeed, both experimental and numerical results show that, during the detachment process, depending on whether the contact lines are triple or quadruple, the characteristic length is the inner droplet radius or the fiber radius.

  10. Sulfur compounds in coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Attar, A.; Corcoran, W. H.

    1977-01-01

    The literature on the chemical structure of the organic sulfur compounds (or functional groups) in coal is reviewed. Four methods were applied in the literature to study the sulfur compounds in coal: direct spectrometric and chemical analysis, depolymerization in drastic conditions, depolymerization in mild conditions, and studies on simulated coal. The data suggest that most of the organic sulfur in coal is in the form of thiophenic structures and aromatic and aliphatic sulfides. The relative abundance of the sulfur groups in bituminous coal is estimated as 50:30:20%, respectively. The ratio changes during processing and during the chemical analysis. The main effects are the transformation during processing of sulfides to the more stable thiophenic compounds and the elimination of hydrogen sulfide.

  11. Inclusive Jet ALL Measurements at Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staszak, D.

    2009-09-01

    We report STAR's preliminary measurement of the inclusive jet longitudinal spin asymmetry ALL using data from the RHIC 2006 run. The 2006 data set was taken with 200 GeV polarized proton-proton collisions and represents 4.7 pb-1 of data. Typical beam polarizations were ~ 55 - 60%. The data are compared with theoretical calculations of ALL based on various GRSV models of the polarized parton distribution functions in the nucleon. Previous STAR inclusive jet ALL and cross section measurements are also presented, as is a discussion of constraints these data place on the allowed theoretical models.

  12. From Inclusion for Some to Inclusion for All: A Case Study of the Inclusion Program at One Catholic Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paz, Emily

    2013-01-01

    Catholic schools in the United States have grappled with how to serve students with disabilities without the funding sources available to public schools. This mixed methods case study examines the driving forces, restraining forces, and social justice issues that influenced the development of an inclusion program at one Catholic elementary school.…

  13. Prediction of intermetallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhanov, Gennady S.; Kiselyova, N. N.

    2009-06-01

    The problems of predicting not yet synthesized intermetallic compounds are discussed. It is noted that the use of classical physicochemical analysis in the study of multicomponent metallic systems is faced with the complexity of presenting multidimensional phase diagrams. One way of predicting new intermetallics with specified properties is the use of modern processing technology with application of teaching of image recognition by the computer. The algorithms used most often in these methods are briefly considered and the efficiency of their use for predicting new compounds is demonstrated.

  14. Microoptical compound lens

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM); Gill, David D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-10-23

    An apposition microoptical compound lens comprises a plurality of lenslets arrayed around a segment of a hollow, three-dimensional optical shell. The lenslets collect light from an object and focus the light rays onto the concentric, curved front surface of a coherent fiber bundle. The fiber bundle transports the light rays to a planar detector, forming a plurality of sub-images that can be reconstructed as a full image. The microoptical compound lens can have a small size (millimeters), wide field of view (up to 180.degree.), and adequate resolution for object recognition and tracking.

  15. Diversity in C-Xanes Spectra Obtained from Carbonaceous Solid Inclusions from Monahans Halite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kebukawa, Y.; Zolensky, M. E.; Fries, M.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Rahman, Z.; Cody, G. D.

    2014-01-01

    Monahans meteorite (H5) contains fluid inclusion- bearing halite (NaCl) crystals [1]. Microthermometry and Raman spectroscopy showed that the fluid in the inclusions is an aqueous brine and they were trapped near 25degC [1]. Their continued presence in the halite grains requires that their incorporation into the H chondrite asteroid was post metamorphism [2]. Abundant solid inclusions are also present in the halites. The solid inclusions include abundant and widely variable organics [2]. Analyses by Raman microprobe, SEM/EDX, synchrotron X-ray diffraction and TEM reveal that these grains include macromolecular carbon similar in structure to CV3 chondrite matrix carbon, aliphatic carbon compounds, olivine (Fo99-59), high- and low-Ca pyroxene, feldspars, magnetite, sulfides, lepidocrocite, carbonates, diamond, apatite and possibly the zeolite phillipsite [3]. Here we report organic analyses of these carbonaceous residues in Monahans halite using C-, N-, and O- X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES). Samples and Methods: Approximately 100 nm-thick sections were extracted with a focused ion beam (FIB) at JSC from solid inclusions from Monahans halite. The sections were analyzed using the scanning transmission X-ray microscope (STXM) on beamline 5.3.2.2 at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory for XANES spectroscopy. Results and Discussion: C-XANES spectra of the solid inclusions show micrometer-scale heterogeneity, indicating that the macromolecular carbon in the inclusions have complex chemical variations. C-XANES features include 284.7 eV assigned to aromatic C=C, 288.4-288.8 eV assigned to carboxyl, and 290.6 eV assigned to carbonate. The carbonyl features obtained by CXANES might have been caused by the FIB used in sample preparation. No specific N-XANES features are observed. The CXANES spectra obtained from several areas in the FIB sections include type 1&2 chondritic IOM like, type 3 chondritic IOM like, and none of the above. The natures of the macromolecular carbon in the solid inclusions observed by C-XANES are consistent with the previous studies showing that the carbonaceous solid inclusions have not originated from Monahans parent body [1-3], and have various origins, including various chondritic meteorite parent bodies as well as other unknown source(s).

  16. Effect of liquid crystals with cyclodextrin on the bioavailability of a poorly water-soluble compound, diosgenin, after its oral administration to rats.

    PubMed

    Okawara, Masaki; Hashimoto, Fumie; Todo, Hiroaki; Sugibayashi, Kenji; Tokudome, Yoshihiro

    2014-09-10

    Diosgenin, found in wild yam (Dioscorea villosa), has been shown to ameliorate diabetes and hyperlipidemia, increase cell proliferation in a human 3D skin model, and inhibits melanin production in B16 melanoma cells. It is also an active element in cosmeceutical and dietary supplements. Although the bioavailability of diosgenin is low due to its poor solubility and intestinal permeability, it was subsequently improved using a ?-cyclodextrin (?-CD) inclusion complex. Recently liquid crystals (LCs) were shown to enhance the bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs. The purpose in the present study was to prepare diosgenin LCs and investigate the interaction between LC and ?-CD in order to improve its bioavailability of diosgenin. Crystallinity and particle diameters of LCs in water were determined by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and Zetasizer. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using the plasma content of diosgenin after its oral administration to Wistar rats. Regarding the formation of glyceryl monooleate (GMO) and phytantriol (PHY) LC, SAXS patterns showed the hexagonal and cubic phases, respectively. Bioavailability was significantly enhanced after oral administration of LCs prepared by GMO than after diosgenin alone. The bioavailability was further improved with the combination of LC and ?-CD than LC and water. PMID:24954725

  17. Study of ?-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes with volatile molecules geraniol and ?-terpineol enantiomers in solid state and in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceborska, Magdalena; Szwed, Kamila; Asztemborska, Monika; Wszelaka-Rylik, Ma?gorzata; Kici?ska, Ewa; Suwi?ska, Kinga

    2015-11-01

    Geraniol and ?-terpineol are insoluble in water volatile compounds. ?-Terpineol is a potentially important agent for medical applications. Formation of molecular complexes with ?-cyclodextrin would lead to the increase of water solubility and bioavailability. ?-Cyclodextrin forms 2:2 inclusion complexes with both enantiomers of ?-terpineol and their precursor geraniol. Solid state complexes are thoroughly characterized by single X-ray crystallography and their stability over vast range of temperatures is proven by TG analysis. Intermolecular host-guest, host-host and guest-guest interactions give good insight into the nature of formed inclusion complexes. Stability constants of the complexes in solution are determined by HPLC.

  18. Urinary Compounds in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alcorn, A.; Berney, T.; Bretherton, K.; Mills, M.; Savery, D.; Shattock, P.

    2004-01-01

    Although earlier claims to identify specific compounds in the urine of people with autism had been discredited, it was subsequently suggested that there might be biochemical characteristics that were specific to early childhood, particularly in those who also did not have a severe degree of intellectual disability This study was to establish…

  19. Barium and Compounds

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R - 05 / 001 www.epa.gov / iris TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF BARIUM AND COMPOUNDS ( CAS No . 7440 - 39 - 3 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) March 1998 Minor revisions January 1999 Reference dose revised June 2005 U.S . Environmental Protec

  20. Selenium and Compounds

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Selenium and Compounds ; CASRN 7782 - 49 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcin

  1. PERSISTENT PERFLUORINATED ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) have gained notoriety in the recent past. Global distribution of PFCs in wildlife, environmental samples and humans has sparked a recent increase in new investigations concerning PFCs. Historically PFCs have been used in a wide variety of consume...

  2. Compound floating pivot micromechanisms

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Ernest J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-04-24

    A new class of tilting micromechanical mechanisms have been developed. These new mechanisms use compound floating pivot structures to attain far greater tilt angles than are practical using other micromechanical techniques. The new mechanisms are also capable of bi-directional tilt about multiple axes.

  3. SAMPLING FOR ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The methods of sampling ambient air for organic compounds for subsequent analysis are discussed. The following methods of sample collection are presented and the advantages and disadvantages of each is given: concentration of component of interest on to solid sorbents, into liqui...

  4. Boron and Compounds

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA 635 / 04 / 052 www.epa.gov / iris TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF BORON AND COMPOUNDS ( CAS No . 7440 - 42 - 8 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) June 2004 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC DISCLAIMER This document has been reviewed

  5. Zinc and Compounds

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R - 05 / 002 TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF ZINC AND COMPOUNDS ( CAS No . 7440 - 66 - 6 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) July 2005 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington D.C . DISCLAIMER This document has been reviewed in accordanc

  6. 8-fluoropurine compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Barrio, Jorge R.; Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Namavari, Mohammad; Phelps, Michael E.

    2001-01-01

    An efficient, regiocontrolled approach to the synthesis of 8-fluoropurines by direct fluorination of purines with dilute elemental fluorine, or acetyl hypofluorite, is provided. In a preferred embodiment, a purine compound is dissolved in a polar solvent and reacted with a dilute mixture of F.sub.2 in He or other inert gas.

  7. Fun with Ionic Compounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logerwell, Mollianne G.; Sterling, Donna R.

    2007-01-01

    Ionic bonding is a fundamental topic in high school chemistry, yet it continues to be a concept that students struggle to understand. Even if they understand atomic structure and ion formation, it can be difficult for students to visualize how ions fit together to form compounds. This article describes several engaging activities that help…

  8. Aminopropyl thiophene compounds

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M. (Knoxville, TN); Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1990-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals useful in brain imaging comprising radiohalogenated thienylethylamine derivatives. The compounds are 5-halo-thiophene-2-isopropyl amines able to cross the blood-brain barrier and be retained for a sufficient length of time to allow the evaluation of regional blood flow by radioimaging of the brain.

  9. Lead and compounds (inorganic)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Lead and compounds ( inorganic ) ; CASRN 7439 - 92 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for

  10. Beryllium and compounds

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Beryllium and compounds ; CASRN 7440 - 41 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarci

  11. Water soluble biocompatible vesicles based on polysaccharides and oligosaccharides inclusion complexes for carotenoid delivery.

    PubMed

    Polyakov, Nikolay E; Kispert, Lowell D

    2015-09-01

    Since carotenoids are highly hydrophobic, air- and light-sensitive hydrocarbon compounds, developing methods for increasing their bioavailability and stability towards irradiation and reactive oxygen species is an important goal. Application of inclusion complexes of "host-guest" type with polysaccharides and oligosaccharides such as arabinogalactan, cyclodextrins and glycyrrhizin minimizes the disadvantages of carotenoids when these compounds are used in food processing (colors and antioxidant capacity) as well as for production of therapeutic formulations. Cyclodextrin complexes which have been used demonstrated enhanced storage stability but suffered from poor solubility. Polysaccharide and oligosaccharide based inclusion complexes play an important role in pharmacology by providing increased solubility and stability of lipophilic drugs. In addition they are used as drug delivery systems to increase absorption rate and bioavailability of the drugs. In this review we summarize the existing data on preparation methods, analysis, and chemical reactivity of carotenoids in inclusion complexes with cyclodextrin, arabinogalactan and glycyrrhizin. It was demonstrated that incorporation of carotenoids into the "host" macromolecule results in significant changes in their physical and chemical properties. In particular, polysaccharide complexes show enhanced photostability of carotenoids in water solutions. A significant decrease in the reactivity towards metal ions and reactive oxygen species in solution was also detected. PMID:26005157

  12. Far field imaging of a dielectric inclusion

    E-print Network

    Abdul Wahab; Naveed Ahmed; Tasawar Abbas

    2015-04-11

    A non-iterative topological sensitivity framework for guaranteed far field detection of a dielectric inclusion is presented. The cases of single and multiple measurements of the electric far field scattering amplitude at a fixed frequency are taken into account. The performance of the algorithm is analyzed theoretically in terms of resolution, stability, and signal-to-noise ratio.

  13. Comprehensive School Reform and Inclusive Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLeskey, James; Waldron, Nancy L.

    2006-01-01

    In spite of the emphasis in public policy and the professional literature on developing inclusive programs for students with disabilities over the past 30 years, surprisingly little progress has been made in this regard in school districts across the United States. One approach to change that is currently being used with some success in general…

  14. Inclusion's Confusion in Alberta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilham, Chris; Williamson, W. John

    2014-01-01

    This hermeneutic paper interprets a recent series of reforms to inclusive education policy undertaken by the ministry of education in the province of Alberta, Canada. A 2007 Alberta Education review of the 16,000 student files in the province that school boards had claimed met the criteria for severe disability codification status -- the level of…

  15. Northern Ireland Head Teachers' Perceptions of Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott, Lesley

    2006-01-01

    Inclusion has been a central educational issue for well over a quarter of a century, with continuing emphasis worldwide on initiatives by governments, Higher Education Institutions and schools that respond to the needs of children and young people with learning difficulties, disabilities or other disadvantage. This paper reports how Northern…

  16. Inclusive Education--Empirical Experience from Serbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovacevic, Jasmina; Macesic-Petrovic, Dragana

    2012-01-01

    This descriptive study finds out the problems most frequently facing the children with special needs in regular schooling. The sample included 500 teachers in elementary schools from Serbia. The results point out the problems in inclusive education. Most educational problems occur in relations and communications with their peers in typical…

  17. The Value of Connectedness in Inclusive Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Figueroa, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    The author addresses the importance of relationships in order for learning to take place in an inclusive manner. Anecdotes illustrate the value in beginning where the learner is and the unexpected opportunities the journey can lead to when both teacher and learner venture through unchartered paths together.

  18. Creating Inclusive Schools for All Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Causton-Theoharis, Julie; Theoharis, George

    2008-01-01

    In this article, a former principal at Falk Elementary School in Madison, Wisconsin, describes his school's shift as it sought to create an inclusive school for all students and establish an authentic sense of belonging. Nationwide, schools and districts from Concord, New Hampshire, to Whittier, California, and from Cambridge, Massachusetts, to…

  19. Inclusive Writing in a Psychology Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parameswaram, Gowri

    2007-01-01

    Most college professors are looking for ways to make writing a positive experience for students. This is increasingly a challenge in our contemporary world, which tends to be very image-oriented. This short paper outlines ways in which student writing-projects can be designed encourage critical and innovative thinking in students. Inclusive

  20. 75 FR 81395 - Minority and Women Inclusion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ... Federal National Mortgage Association (Fannie Mae), the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (Freddie Mac), and the Federal Home Loan Banks (Banks) to promote diversity and the inclusion of women and...\\ See 75 FR 10446, March 8, 2010. FHFA received 23 comment letters to the proposed rule from...

  1. Inclusion: Professional Development Needs of Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocks, Amanda G.

    2010-01-01

    An attitudinal resistance among teachers regarding the inclusion of children with disabilities is well documented in the literature. Studies collectively highlight two specific areas that contribute to this resistance. First, a lack of teacher knowledge or preparedness for meeting the diverse needs of children with disabilities stimulates…

  2. Citizenship Education in Turkey: Inclusive or Exclusive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ince, Basak

    2012-01-01

    This paper scrutinises citizenship education in Turkey from the foundation of the Turkish Republic (1923) to the present and explores the extent to which it encourages inclusive or exclusive concepts of national identity and citizenship. In Turkey, where there are citizens belonging to ethnic and religious minorities, civic education plays a…

  3. Transformative Pathways: Inclusive Pedagogies in Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guojonsdottir, Hafdis; Cacciattolo, Marcelle; Dakich, Eva; Davies, Anne; Kelly, Claire; Dalmau, Mary C.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports a three-year study of Praxis Inquiry based developments in teacher education undertaken by an international consortium of university colleagues who have worked in Australia, Iceland, Latvia, and the United Kingdom. Our study suggests that the attainment of inclusive community responsive pedagogies--in schools and in teacher…

  4. Creating Inclusive Schools for All Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Causton-Theoharis, Julie; Theoharis, George

    2009-01-01

    Inclusion in general education and attention to belonging are the first steps toward greater achievement for all students. This must be followed by improving the core teaching and curriculum to enhance learning of all students through differentiation, and teaching to multiple modalities and learning preferences. For these changes to occur,…

  5. Ambivalent inclusion: anti-racism and racist

    E-print Network

    -standing debates about the legacy of Andalusia's medieval Muslim past, produces both inclusion and exclusion result in the exclusion of those deemed undeserving, particularly Muslim, Moroccan men. The Andalusian us that he needed help renewing his temporary visa, which was about to expire. Before leaving Morocco

  6. "Coming out Crip" in Inclusive Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erevelles, Nirmala

    2011-01-01

    Background/Context: The author argues that within inclusive education's almost obsessive focus on space, there is a tendency to ignore the ideological assumptions that undergird the curricular and extracurricular practices in schools that serve to construct certain student subjectivities as deviant, disturbing, and dangerous, thereby justifying…

  7. Student Behaviour Self-Monitoring Enabling Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jull, Stephen K.

    2009-01-01

    Disruptive, antisocial behaviour remains an ongoing issue for all schools, and particularly those identified as inclusive. Children who exhibit elevated levels of antisocial behaviour have an increased risk of numerous negative life consequences, including impaired social relationships, escalating aggressive behaviours, substance abuse, and school…

  8. Nonlinear elastic inclusions in isotropic solids

    PubMed Central

    Yavari, Arash; Goriely, Alain

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a geometric framework to calculate the residual stress fields and deformations of nonlinear solids with inclusions and eigenstrains. Inclusions are regions in a body with different reference configurations from the body itself and can be described by distributed eigenstrains. Geometrically, the eigenstrains define a Riemannian 3-manifold in which the body is stress-free by construction. The problem of residual stress calculation is then reduced to finding a mapping from the Riemannian material manifold to the ambient Euclidean space. Using this construction, we find the residual stress fields of three model systems with spherical and cylindrical symmetries in both incompressible and compressible isotropic elastic solids. In particular, we consider a finite spherical ball with a spherical inclusion with uniform pure dilatational eigenstrain and we show that the stress in the inclusion is uniform and hydrostatic. We also show how singularities in the stress distribution emerge as a consequence of a mismatch between radial and circumferential eigenstrains at the centre of a sphere or the axis of a cylinder. PMID:24353470

  9. "Shakespeare with Heart": An Inclusive Drama Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkins, Ilene E.

    2008-01-01

    This article features Shakespeare with Heart, a two week inclusive summer program for middle and high school students with and without disabilities. The program runs each morning until noon, culminating with a workshop performance of a Shakespeare play with full costume and set with a live audience of parents, friends, and community members. The…

  10. Inclusive High Schools: Learning from Contemporary Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Douglas, Ed.; Sax, Caren, Ed.; Pumpian, Ian, Ed.

    Addressing both processes and outcomes, this book provides a framework for developing inclusive high schools, illustrated by detailed accounts of high schools that have struggled, strategized, and ultimately achieved success. Themes discussed include building crucial school-based relationships, developing support strategies, communicating…

  11. 75 FR 10446 - Minority and Women Inclusion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-08

    ... activities. The proposed rule will implement this statutory provision. See 75 FR 1289 (January 11, 2010). The... BOARD 12 CFR Part 906 FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY 12 CFR Part 1207 RIN 2590-AA28 Minority and Women Inclusion AGENCIES: Federal Housing Finance Board; Federal Housing Finance Agency. ACTION: Notice...

  12. Building Inclusive Communities: A Social Capital Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaklee, Harriet; Laumatia, Laura; Luckey, Brian; Traver, Sue; Nauman, Arlinda; Tifft, Kathee; Liddil, Audrey; Hampton, Carol

    2010-01-01

    Population shifts have changed the face of many Idaho communities, but inclusive relationships among groups can build the social capital required for communities to thrive. University of Idaho Extension developed "Idaho's Journey for Diversity and Human Rights" as a hands-on traveling workshop about past and present issues of human rights and…

  13. [International aspects of inclusion in schools].

    PubMed

    Häßler, Frank; Burgert, Michael; Fegert, Jörg Michael; Chodan, Wencke

    2015-07-01

    The term inclusion (=admittance, involvement) is used almost synonymously for the concept of the joint schooling of children with and without intellectual disabilities, language disabilities, physical handicaps, or mental disorders. This article addresses the current state of inclusion in Germany as well as the international situation, such as the Salamanca Declaration of the UNESCO, the «Individuals with Disabilities Act» (IDEA) in the United States as well as European developments, particularly in Great Britain, Austria, and Russia. Even though, from a political perspective, the decision in favor of inclusion seems irreversible, there appears to be a lack an agreement on the modality and timeframe. Thus, the average percentage of students with special education needs in Germany amounts to only 28.2%. The reasons behind this situation are presently being analyzed and discussed. A question of key importance concerns the benefit for the persons concerned, since that should be the measure of the success of inclusion. This question will most likely be validly answered only for individual subgroups of disabilities. This field still requires extensive research. PMID:26118812

  14. Making Campuses More Inclusive of Transgender Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beemyn, Brett Genny

    2005-01-01

    This article examines a number of areas of campus life where transgender students experience discrimination because of gender-exclusive policies and practices: health care, residence halls, bathrooms, locker rooms, records and documents, public inclusion, and programming, training, and support. The specific obstacles faced by transgender students…

  15. Public Policies that Help Foster Social Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, Chau-kiu

    2013-01-01

    Public policies can be effective in raising people's social inclusion as intended only reasonably through their implementation. With respect to the implementation perspective, this study examines the effectiveness of eight policies as perceived to implement in Hong Kong, China. The study employs data collected from 1,109 Chinese adults randomly…

  16. Economic and Demographic Predictors of Inclusive Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cosier, Meghan E.; Causton-Theoharis, Julie

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated economic and demographic predictors of levels of inclusion of students with disabilities in 129 school districts. Multiple regression analysis was utilized to address the following research questions: (a) Is there a relationship between economic factors and percentage of highly included students with disabilities in general…

  17. SIGN: Science, Inclusion and Growth in Norfolk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lefever, David; Symonds, Lynne

    2000-01-01

    Science, Inclusion, and Growth in Norfolk (SIGN) is a Public Understanding of Science project that seeks to use the understanding of plant and soil science to demonstrate that people with severe learning difficulties can find the scientific method of inquiry a relevant and rewarding route to self-confidence and an understanding of the events that…

  18. Equity and Inclusion in Physical Education PLC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, John

    2014-01-01

    Physical Educationalists in many western and westernised societies across the globe are facing new challenges as system wide changes take place increasing the role of private bodies (e.g. Academy trusts) in the delivery of school based education. This reflective and rather personal paper considers the place and meaning of "inclusion" and…

  19. [Inclusion - pediatric and adolescent psychiatry aspects].

    PubMed

    Warnke, Andreas

    2015-07-01

    The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities became legally binding in Germany in March 2009. “Inclusion” is the major concept–all people with any kind of handicap must have the same rights to full and effective participation and inclusion in society. Preceding inclusion come adjustments in society with regard to ethical, legislative, administrative, conceptual, structural, economical, and thus also to healthcare-political frameworks, in order to make disabilities are as far as possible no longer a handicap in an individual’s everyday life. This review first outlines the present social status influencing the development of children, a child’s welfare, and especially the healthcare of children and adolescents with psychiatric disorders and conditions indicating barriers to inclusion. It focuses on those articles of the UN convention which are relevant with regard to ethical attitude, epidemiology, healthcare framework, diagnostics, therapy, teaching, and research with respect to child and adolescent psychiatry. The analysis points to a significant backlog demand in child psychiatric healthcare, teaching, and research. PMID:26118811

  20. Effects of rigid inclusions on wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suddhiprakarn, C.; Roesset, J. N.; Stokoe, K. H., II

    1983-03-01

    The effect of rigid inclusions on the characteristics (amplitude and time of arrival) of shear and P-waves is investigated using a finite element model to discretize the region of interest and an explicit integration scheme. The effect of boundary conditions, type of excitation (point load versus distributed load) and wave length (or frequency of the excitation) are investigated and discussed.

  1. Measuring Teacher Efficacy to Implement Inclusive Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Umesh; Loreman, Tim; Forlin, Chris

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an instrument to measure perceived teacher efficacy to teach in inclusive classrooms. An 18-item scale was developed on a sample of 607 pre-service teachers selected from four countries (Canada, Australia, Hong Kong and India). Factor analysis of responses from the sample revealed three factors: efficacy in…

  2. Inclusive Standard Model Higgs searches with ATLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Polci, Francesco

    2008-11-23

    The update of the discovery potential for a Standard Model Higgs boson through the inclusive searches H{yields}{gamma}{gamma}, H{yields}ZZ* and H{yields}WW with the ATLAS detector is reported. The analysis are based on the most recent available simulations of signal, backgrounds as well as the detector response.

  3. Tomographic Imaging Of Low-Density Inclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, Jagatjit; Nguyen, Trung; Willenberg, James D.

    1993-01-01

    Computed neutron tomography reveals structure of volume containing material of lesser density surrounded by material of greater density. Technique used, for example, to examine and measure flaws or other inclusions containing equally dense or less-dense material hidden in complicated structure made of denser material.

  4. Inclusive Education in Bosnia and Herzegovina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dizdarevic, Alma; Vantic-Tanjic, Medina; Nikolic, Milena

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the different challenges faced by all members of the local community who are directly or indirectly responsible for the educational reform regarding the process of inclusion in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Yugoslavia education system is regulated in canton legislature. Each canton has its own law on preschool, elementary school,…

  5. Final state interactions and inclusive nuclear collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Dubey, Rajendra R.

    1993-01-01

    A scattering formalism is developed in a multiple scattering model to describe inclusive momentum distributions for high-energy projectiles. The effects of final state interactions on response functions and momentum distributions are investigated. Calculations for high-energy protons that include shell model response functions are compared with experiments.

  6. Communities of Practice in Inclusive Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mortier, Kathleen; Hunt, Pam; Leroy, Mieke; Van de Putte, Inge; Van Hove, Geert

    2010-01-01

    The data in this paper represent the experiences and perspectives of parents and teachers who worked as communities of practice, designing support plans for the inclusion of three students with intellectual disabilities in general education classrooms. Their reflections, obtained through interviews and questionnaires, show how they constructed…

  7. Inclusive Schooling: Are We There yet?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Causton, Julie; Theoharis, George

    2013-01-01

    Today, when trying to find a way to an unfamiliar destination, many rely on global positioning systems, or GPS technology. "Recalibrating" and "Whenever possible make a legal U-turn" are now ubiquitous phrases in the audio backdrop to many car trips. One can think about modern-day inclusive education in similar terms. The programming decisions…

  8. Tactile sensation imaging system for inclusion characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-Ha; Garcia-Acosta, Nathalia; Te, Kenny; Won, Chang-Hee

    2011-03-01

    Characterizing and locating sub-surface tumors will greatly enhance the detection and treatment of breast cancer. In this paper, a novel tactile sensation imaging system, that is capable of detecting and characterizing the subsurface object, was designed, implemented, and tested. A multi-layer Polydimethylsiloxane optical waveguide has been fabricated as the sensing probe. The light was illuminated below the acceptance angle to totally reflect within the flexible and transparent waveguide. When a waveguide is compressed by an external force, the contact area of the waveguide deforms and causes the light to scatter. The scattered light is captured by a high resolution camera and saved as an image. Using the salient features of the captured image, we estimated inclusion characteristics such as size, depth, and Young's modulus. To test the performance of the proposed system, we use a realistic tissue phantom with embedded stiff inclusions. The experimental results showed that the proposed system can detect inclusions and provide the relative values of inclusion's mechanical properties. Using these relative values, we can discern malignant and benign tumors.

  9. Diversity and Inclusion Annual Progress Report

    E-print Network

    Feeny, Brian

    and programs for persons with disabilities. The Office for Inclusion and Intercultural Initiatives of faculty, students and support staff. This report represents examples of some of the many ways with Disabilities Act (ADA) also led to changes that enhance accessibility to campus facilities

  10. Academic Freedom and the Inclusive University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Sharon E., Ed.; Pavlich, Dennis, Ed.

    The chapters in this collection explore issues related to academic freedom and the inclusive university. The first section, Clarifying Concepts in Ideology, Language, and Law, contains these chapters: (1) Whats Sauce for One Goose: The Logic of Academic Freedom (Stanley Fish); (2) Academic Freedom: Rights as Immunities and Privileges (Frederick…

  11. Dynamic phase separation of fluid membranes with rigid inclusions.

    PubMed

    Weikl, Thomas R

    2002-12-01

    Membrane shape fluctuations induce attractive interactions between rigid inclusions. Previous analytical studies showed that the fluctuation-induced pair interactions are rather small compared to thermal energies, but also that multibody interactions cannot be neglected. In this paper, it is shown numerically that shape fluctuations indeed lead to the dynamic separation of the membrane into phases with different inclusion concentrations. The tendency of lateral phase separation strongly increases with the inclusion size. Large inclusions aggregate at very small inclusion concentrations and for relatively small values of the inclusions' elastic modulus. PMID:12513325

  12. Diagenetic palaeotemperatures from aqueous fluid inclusions: re- equilibration of inclusions in carbonate cements by burial heating.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burruss, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    Calculations based on the observed behaviour of inclusions in fluorite under external confining P allows prediction of the T and depths of burial necessary to initiate re-equilibration of aqueous inclusions in the common size range 40-4 mu m. Heating of 20-60oC over the initial trapping T may cause errors of 10-20oC in the homogenization T. This suggests that re-equilibration may cause aqueous inclusions in carbonates to yield a poor record of their low-T history, but a useful record of the maximum T experienced by the host rock. Previous work suggests that inclusions containing petroleum fluids will be less susceptible to re-equilibration.This and the following six abstracts represent papers presented at a joint meeting of the Applied Mineralogy Group of the Mineralogical Society and the Petroleum Group of the Geological Society held in Newcastle upon Tyne in April 1986.-R.A.H.

  13. Compound Chondrules fused Cold

    E-print Network

    Hubbard, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    About 4-5% of chondrules are compound: two separate chondrules stuck together. This is commonly believed to be the result of the two component chondrules having collided shortly after forming, while still molten. This allows high velocity impacts to result in sticking. However, at T ~ 1100K, the temperature below which chondrules collide as solids (and hence usually bounce), coalescence times for droplets of appropriate composition are measured in tens of seconds. Even at 1025K, at which temperature theory predicts that the chondrules must have collided extremely slowly to have stuck together, the coalescence time scale is still less than an hour. These coalescence time scales are too short for the collision of molten chondrules to explain the observed frequency of compound chondrules. We suggest instead a scenario where chondrules stuck together in slow collisions while fully solid; and the resulting chondrule pair was subsequently briefly heated to a temperature in the range of 900-1025K. In that temperatur...

  14. A Study of the Optical Properties of Ice Crystals with Black Carbon Inclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Arienti, Marco; Yang, Xiaoyuan; Kopacz, Adrian M; Geier, Manfred

    2015-09-01

    The report focu ses on the modification of the optical properties of ice crystals due to atmospheric black car bon (BC) contamination : the objective is to advance the predictive capabilities of climate models through an improved understanding of the radiative properties of compound particles . The shape of the ice crystal (as commonly found in cirrus clouds and cont rails) , the volume fraction of the BC inclusion , and its location inside the crystal are the three factors examined in this study. In the multiscale description of this problem, where a small absorbing inclusion modifies the optical properties of a much la rger non - absorbing particle, state - of - the - art discretization techniques are combined to provide the best compromise of flexibility and accuracy over a broad range of sizes .

  15. Acidophilic halophilic microorganisms in fluid inclusions in halite from Lake Magic, Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Conner, Amber J; Benison, Kathleen C

    2013-09-01

    Lake Magic is one of the most extreme of hundreds of ephemeral acid-saline lakes in southern Western Australia. It has pH as low as 1.7, salinity as high as 32% total dissolved solids, temperatures ranging from 0°C to 50°C, and an unusually complex aqueous composition. Optical petrography, UV-vis petrography, and laser Raman spectrometry were used to detect microorganisms and organic compounds within primary fluid inclusions in modern bedded halite from Lake Magic. Rare prokaryotes appear as 1-3??m, bright cocci that fluoresce green with UV-vis illumination. Dimpled, 5-7??m yellow spherules that fluoresce blue with UV-vis illumination are interpreted as Dunaliella algae. Yellow-orange beta-carotene crystals, globules, and coatings are characterized by orange-red fluorescence and three distinct Raman peaks. Because acid saline lakes are good Mars analogues, the documentation of prokaryotes, eukaryotes, and organic compounds preserved in the halite here has implications for the search for life on Mars. Missions to Mars should incorporate such in situ optical and chemical examination of martian evaporites for possible microorganisms and/or organic compounds in fluid inclusions. PMID:23971647

  16. Compound chondrules fused cold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, Alexander

    2015-07-01

    About 4-5% of chondrules are compound: two separate chondrules stuck together. This is commonly believed to be the result of the two component chondrules having collided shortly after forming, while still molten. This allows high velocity impacts to result in sticking. However, at T ? 1100 K, the temperature below which chondrules collide as solids (and hence usually bounce), coalescence times for droplets of appropriate composition are measured in tens of seconds. Even at 1025 K, at which temperature theory predicts that the chondrules must have collided extremely slowly to have stuck together, the coalescence time scale is still less than an hour. These coalescence time scales are too short for the collision of molten chondrules to explain the observed frequency of compound chondrules. We suggest instead a scenario where chondrules stuck together in slow collisions while fully solid; and the resulting chondrule pair was subsequently briefly heated to a temperature in the range of 900-1025 K. In that temperature window the coalescence time is finite but long, covering a span of hours to a decade. This is particularly interesting because those temperatures are precisely the critical window for thermally ionized MRI activity, so compound chondrules provide a possible probe into that vital regime.

  17. Toxic compounds in honey.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Nazmul; Khalil, Md Ibrahim; Islam, Md Asiful; Gan, Siew Hua

    2014-07-01

    There is a wealth of information about the nutritional and medicinal properties of honey. However, honey may contain compounds that may lead to toxicity. A compound not naturally present in honey, named 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), may be formed during the heating or preservation processes of honey. HMF has gained much interest, as it is commonly detected in honey samples, especially samples that have been stored for a long time. HMF is a compound that may be mutagenic, carcinogenic and cytotoxic. It has also been reported that honey can be contaminated with heavy metals such as lead, arsenic, mercury and cadmium. Honey produced from the nectar of Rhododendron ponticum contains alkaloids that can be poisonous to humans, while honey collected from Andromeda flowers contains grayanotoxins, which can cause paralysis of limbs in humans and eventually leads to death. In addition, Melicope ternata and Coriaria arborea from New Zealand produce toxic honey that can be fatal. There are reports that honey is not safe to be consumed when it is collected from Datura plants (from Mexico and Hungary), belladonna flowers and Hyoscamus niger plants (from Hungary), Serjania lethalis (from Brazil), Gelsemium sempervirens (from the American Southwest), Kalmia latifolia, Tripetalia paniculata and Ledum palustre. Although the symptoms of poisoning due to honey consumption may differ depending on the source of toxins, most common symptoms generally include dizziness, nausea, vomiting, convulsions, headache, palpitations or even death. It has been suggested that honey should not be considered a completely safe food. PMID:24214851

  18. Compound semiconductor SPAD arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Eric S.; Naydenkov, Mikhail; Hyland, James T.

    2013-06-01

    Single photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) are revolutionizing ultra-sensitive photodetection applications, providing single photon sensitivity, high quantum efficiency and low dark noise at or near room temperature. When aggregated into arrays, these devices have demonstrated the ability to operate as photon number resolving detectors with wide dynamic range, or as single-photon imaging detectors. SPAD array performance has reached a point where replacing vacuum tube based MCP and PMT photodetectors for most applications is inevitable. Compound semiconductor SPAD arrays offer the unique proposition to tailor performance to match application specific wavelength, speed and radiation hardness requirements. We present a theoretical framework describing performance limits to compound semiconductor SPAD arrays and our latest experimental results detailing the performance of GaAs SPAD arrays. These devices achieve nanosecond rise and fall times, excellent photon number resolving capability, and low dark count rates. Single photon number resolving is demonstrated with 4% single photon detection efficiency at room temperature with dark count rates below 7 Mcps/mm2. Compound semiconductor SPAD arrays have the opportunity to provide orders of magnitude improvement in dark count rate and radiation hardness over silicon SPAD arrays, as well as the ability to detect wavelengths where silicon is blind.

  19. Antifungal Compounds from Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Shishido, Tânia K.; Humisto, Anu; Jokela, Jouni; Liu, Liwei; Wahlsten, Matti; Tamrakar, Anisha; Fewer, David P.; Permi, Perttu; Andreote, Ana P. D.; Fiore, Marli F.; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes found in a range of environments. They are infamous for the production of toxins, as well as bioactive compounds, which exhibit anticancer, antimicrobial and protease inhibition activities. Cyanobacteria produce a broad range of antifungals belonging to structural classes, such as peptides, polyketides and alkaloids. Here, we tested cyanobacteria from a wide variety of environments for antifungal activity. The potent antifungal macrolide scytophycin was detected in Anabaena sp. HAN21/1, Anabaena cf. cylindrica PH133, Nostoc sp. HAN11/1 and Scytonema sp. HAN3/2. To our knowledge, this is the first description of Anabaena strains that produce scytophycins. We detected antifungal glycolipopeptide hassallidin production in Anabaena spp. BIR JV1 and HAN7/1 and in Nostoc spp. 6sf Calc and CENA 219. These strains were isolated from brackish and freshwater samples collected in Brazil, the Czech Republic and Finland. In addition, three cyanobacterial strains, Fischerella sp. CENA 298, Scytonema hofmanni PCC 7110 and Nostoc sp. N107.3, produced unidentified antifungal compounds that warrant further characterization. Interestingly, all of the strains shown to produce antifungal compounds in this study belong to Nostocales or Stigonematales cyanobacterial orders. PMID:25871291

  20. Fluid inclusions in stony meteorites - A cautionary note

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudnick, R. L.; Ashwal, L. D.; Henry, D. J.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Roedder, E.; Belkin, H. E.; Colucci, M. T.

    1985-01-01

    Newly discovered fluid inclusions in thin sections of Bjurbole chondrules, shergottite EETA79001, lunar meteorite ALHA81005, and Apollo 16 glasses possess physical properties similar to those of fluid inclusions found in thin sections of five stony meteorites recently described by Warner et al. (1983). The distribution and physical properties of these new fluid inclusions indicate they may be artifacts of thin section preparation; it is suggested that saw coolant was sucked into vacuum vesicles in glasses and minerals through submicroscopic fractures produced during sawing. The similarities between these fluid inclusions and fluid inclusions previously described by Warner et al. (1983) indicate that many of the fluid inclusions reported earlier may be artifacts. Consequently, the origin of any fluid inclusions observed in thin sections of extraterrestrial materials must be interpreted with caution. The most probable true extraterrestrial fluid inclusions are those that have been observed in grains prepared without exposure to liquids of any kind.

  1. Inclusive decays of B mesons to charmonium

    E-print Network

    Baringer, Philip S.

    1995-09-01

    ~0 0.20 0.15— 0.10— 0.05— I I I I I j & I 0.6 1.2 Momentum (GeV / c)c1 1.8 O4 LO I ~ tD 200— I I I I I 3.10 0. . . I 2.80 2.90 3.00 @P Mass (GeV / c ) 3.20 FIG. 16. Momentum spectrum for inclusive y q production from B decays. FIG. 17. Mass... X measurement is optimized by imposing stringent 52 INCLUSIVE DECAYS OF 8 MESONS TO CHARMONIUM 2667 1500 Ol 1000 X CV 500 ~ tD I I I I ~ Data I I I 1 I a4k 0 O~ a a ' ~ I I I I I I I I cv 60 Ii ii~y ii 4Q ~ s fC) ii L '~J hl il 20— ~ I I Data Monte...

  2. Bowel "dissection" in microvillus inclusion disease.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Ming-Chou; Hsu, Jen-Fu; Hsueh, Chuen; Chao, Hsun-Chin; Wang, Tzu-Hao; Chen, Chih-Ping; Lai, Ming-Wei

    2015-04-01

    A preterm male neonate was diagnosed as having microvillus inclusion disease based on the characteristics of histological and ultrastructural findings. The peripheral blood sample also revealed MYO5B mutation. He had been on long-term parenteral nutrition. However, a bowel segment was seen in the baby's diaper during hospitalization when he was 5 months old. Serial abdominal ultrasound demonstrated progressive dissection of the bowel wall with detached mucosa in real-time. Small intestinal epithelia were seen on the histology of the detached bowel segment. He died 2 weeks after the episode; postmortem autopsy showed diffuse detachment of mucosa of small bowels without perforation. This is the first report of an infant with microvillus inclusion disease that presented with bowel "dissection". Weakened adhesion and integrity of intestinal epithelial cells caused by MYO5B mutation was speculated to result in the dissection and detachment of the epithelia of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23608388

  3. Inclusive Deep-Inelastic Scattering at HERA

    E-print Network

    Zhiqing Zhang; for the H1; ZEUS Collaborations

    2014-12-19

    This contribution covers three recent results on deep-inelastic scattering at HERA: (i) new measurements of the proton longitudinal structure function $F_L$ from H1 and ZEUS experiments, (ii) a dedicated NC cross section measurement from ZEUS in the region of high Bjorken $x$, and (iii) preliminary combination results of all HERA inclusive data published up to now by H1 and ZEUS, taking into account the experimental correlations between measurements.

  4. Inclusive jet production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Norniella, Olga; /Barcelona, IFAE

    2006-08-01

    Preliminary results on inclusive jet production in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV based on 1 fb{sup -1} of CDF Run II data are presented. Measurements are preformed using different jet algorithms in a wide range of jet transverse momentum and jet rapidity. The measured cross sections are compared to next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations

  5. Optimal Control of Evolution Mixed Variational Inclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Alduncin, Gonzalo

    2013-12-15

    Optimal control problems of primal and dual evolution mixed variational inclusions, in reflexive Banach spaces, are studied. The solvability analysis of the mixed state systems is established via duality principles. The optimality analysis is performed in terms of perturbation conjugate duality methods, and proximation penalty-duality algorithms to mixed optimality conditions are further presented. Applications to nonlinear diffusion constrained problems as well as quasistatic elastoviscoplastic bilateral contact problems exemplify the theory.

  6. Inclusive jet cross section measurement at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Pagliarone, C.

    1996-08-01

    The CDF Collaboration has measured the inclusive jet cross section using 1992-93 collider data at 1.8 TeV. The CDF measurement is in very good agreement with NLO QCD predictions for transverse energies (E{sub T}) below 200 GeV. However, it is systematically higher than NLO QCD predictions for E{sub T} above 200 GeV.

  7. Bilingual reading of compound words.

    PubMed

    Ko, In Yeong; Wang, Min; Kim, Say Young

    2011-02-01

    The present study investigated whether bilingual readers activate constituents of compound words in one language while processing compound words in the other language via decomposition. Two experiments using a lexical decision task were conducted with adult Korean-English bilingual readers. In Experiment 1, the lexical decision of real English compound words was more accurate when the translated compounds (the combination of the translation equivalents of the constituents) in Korean (the nontarget language) were real words than when they were nonwords. In Experiment 2, when the frequency of the second constituents of compound words in English (the target language) was manipulated, the effect of lexical status of the translated compounds was greater on the compounds with high-frequency second constituents than on those with low-frequency second constituents in the target language. Together, these results provided evidence for morphological decomposition and cross-language activation in bilingual reading of compound words. PMID:20623255

  8. Leadership Strategies for Successful Schoolwide Inclusion: The STAR Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munk, Dennis D.; Dempsey, Thomas L.

    2010-01-01

    Effective, "schoolwide" inclusion ensures the best outcomes for all students--but how can school teams knock down the barriers to inclusion and make sure it's happening across all classrooms? This concise book gives principals and other school leaders the solution they've been waiting for: a clear framework for leading inclusion efforts,…

  9. Development of the Inclusion Attitude Scale for High School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ernst, Catherine; Rogers, Margaret R.

    2009-01-01

    This study involved the development of a new scale to measure high school teacher attitudes toward the inclusion of students with disabilities in regular education classrooms. A second aim was to examine the relationship of teachers' professional development regarding inclusion, their years of experience with inclusion, access to instructional…

  10. Statistical Trends and Developments within Inclusive Education in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cakiroglu, Orhan; Melekoglu, Macid Ayhan

    2014-01-01

    The education of students with special needs in an inclusive environment is becoming more widespread throughout the world. Similarly, in Turkey, the inclusion of students with disabilities has also improved. However, current statistical trends and developments within inclusive education are not well known. The purpose of this study is to provide a…

  11. Leadership for All Students: Planning for More Inclusive School Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, William R.; Simon, Marsha D.

    2014-01-01

    Educational policies and leadership practice has evolved to support efforts for inclusive education for students with disabilities. This article focuses on how leaders support and develop inclusive practices for students with disability through engaging institutional norms and inertia; developing inclusive practice as a planned organization-wide…

  12. Teacher Perspectives on Inclusive Education in Rural Alberta, Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGhie-Richmond, Donna; Irvine, Angela; Loreman, Tim; Cizman, Juna Lea; Lupart, Judy

    2013-01-01

    The results of 123 elementary-to-secondary teacher surveys and 14 in-depth qualitative interviews examining teachers' perspectives regarding inclusion in a rural school district are reported. Four features of inclusive education from the perspective of teachers are elaborated: (1) attitudes toward inclusion; (2) supportive communication and…

  13. What Are Schools Looking for in New, Inclusive Teachers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sokal, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Focus groups were conducted in four school divisions in central Canada in order to determine whether inclusive educators in schools could identify the knowledge base, skills set, and attitudes desirable in new inclusive teachers. Participants failed to identify an essential knowledge base for inclusive educators. Findings indicated that a focus on…

  14. Inclusive Education: Practical Implementation of the Least Restrictive Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power-deFur, Lissa A.; Orelove, Fred P.

    The 19 chapters of this book address theoretical and practical aspects of the development and implementation of inclusive education programs. Chapter titles and authors are: (1) "Inclusive Education: The Past, Preset, and Future" (Lissa A. Power-deFur and Fred P. Orelove); (2) "Inclusion and School Restructuring: Meeting the Needs of All Children"…

  15. Pre-Service Educators' Attitudes towards Inclusive Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mdikana, Andile; Ntshangase, Sibusiso; Mayekiso, Tokozile

    2007-01-01

    The inclusion of learners with special educational needs in general education is becoming more prevalent. As a result various special education researchers have begun to examine the success of inclusion, as well as the attitudes and beliefs of general educators towards the inclusion of learners with disabilities in the general education classroom.…

  16. Educational Inclusion in England: Origins, Perspectives and Current Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauchlan, Fraser; Greig, Susan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we examine different aspects of the inclusion debate, including how it has been shaped by the political context in England over the past 30 years. We then give consideration to the key argument that has dominated the inclusion agenda over the last decade: should effective inclusion be considered only as placement in mainstream school…

  17. Successful Strategies for Inclusion at the Middle Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldron, Karen A.; Allen, Laura Van Zandt

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the inclusion of students with special needs into the team-taught middle school environment. Notes existing middle school factors supporting successful inclusion and additional support needs, teaching models for the inclusive classroom, grouping practices, cooperative learning, peer tutoring, multiple intelligences, instructional…

  18. Preparing Teachers for Inclusive Education in Latin America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaillant, Denise

    2011-01-01

    This article analyzes the current challenges facing inclusive education in Latin America and explores some possible solutions. The author suggests that teachers play a key role in providing education that is inclusive for all. In Latin America, today, however, inclusive education often does not respond to the needs of children and young people,…

  19. Preliminary Study of Prosody in Foreign Language Inclusions

    E-print Network

    Preliminary Study of Prosody in Foreign Language Inclusions Report for ETH project TH-22 07 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 3 Prosody in foreign language inclusions 3 3.1 Influence factors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1 #12;1 Introduction This report provides a preliminary study about foreign language inclusion

  20. Inclusion in Rural School Districts: Where Is the Superintendent?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooper, H. H., Jr.; Pankake, Anita; Schroth, Gwen

    1999-01-01

    A survey of 482 rural Texas superintendents examined their attitudes toward inclusion as a method of serving students with special needs. Superintendents were uncertain whether inclusion is the best method for serving special needs children and were more involved in planning for inclusion than in implementing it. Recommends actions rural…

  1. Inclusion and Guilt: The Emotional Fallout for Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macmillan, Robert; Meyer, Matthew J.

    2006-01-01

    The principle of inclusion of children with exceptionalities is accepted by teachers, but the practice of inclusion is problematic, particularly at the secondary level. In a study of inclusion and the impact of budgetary constraints in Nova Scotia, teachers reported that they had difficulty meeting the needs of all students within their classroom…

  2. Inclusion in Viet Nam: More than a Decade of Implementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villa, Richard A.; Tac, Le Van; Muc, Pham Minh; Ryan, Susan; Thuy, Nguyen Thi Minh; Weill, Cindy; Thousand, Jacqueline S.

    2003-01-01

    This article traces the evolution of special education policies and services and the introduction of inclusive education as a service delivery model in Viet Nam. The impact of a series of inclusion projects and resultant goals of the Ministry of Education and Training to expand inclusive education are described. (Contains 8 references.) (Author/CR)

  3. Class Inclusion and Role-Taking: Structural Mediation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gash, Hugh

    The mediational linkage between class inclusion and role-taking skills was investigated by studying the effects of a successive perspective-taking training technique on the consolidation of class inclusion structures. Sixty preoperational Irish boys were given two pretest measures of class inclusion and two of role-taking. They were then grouped…

  4. Detecting kin selection at work using inclusive fitness

    E-print Network

    Grafen, Alan

    Detecting kin selection at work using inclusive fitness Alan Grafen* Zoology Department, Oxford arguments, that the model falls squarely within the scope of inclusive fitness theory, which furthermore shows how to calculate inclusive fitness and the relevant relatedness. A distinction is drawn between

  5. When social inclusion is not enough: Implicit expectations of extreme inclusion in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    De Panfilis, Chiara; Riva, Paolo; Preti, Emanuele; Cabrino, Chiara; Marchesi, Carlo

    2015-10-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD) might feel rejected even when socially included by others. A psychological mechanism accounting for this response bias could be that objective social inclusion violates BPD patients' underlying implicit needs of "extreme" inclusion. Thus, this study investigated whether, during interpersonal exchanges, BPD patients report more rejection-related negative emotions and less feelings of social connection than controls unless they are faced with conditions of extreme social inclusion. Sixty-one BPD patients and 61 healthy controls completed a modified Cyberball paradigm. They were randomly assigned to a condition of ostracism, social inclusion, or overinclusion (a proxy for extreme social inclusion). They then rated their emotional states and feelings of social connection immediately and 20 min after the game. BPD patients reported greater levels of negative emotions than controls in the ostracism and the inclusion conditions, but not when overincluded. Furthermore, only for BPD participants was overinclusion associated with experiencing less negative emotions than the ostracism condition. However, BPD patients reported lower feelings of social connection than controls in any experimental situation. Thus, in BPD, a laboratory condition of "overinclusion" is associated with a reduction of negative emotions to levels comparable to those of control participants, but not with similar degrees of social connection. These results suggest that for BPD patients, even "including contexts" activate feelings of rejection. Their implicit expectations of idealized interpersonal inclusion may nullify the opportunity of experiencing "real" social connection and explain their distorted subjective experiences of rejection. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26147068

  6. Organometallic chemistry of bimetallic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, C.P.

    1991-07-01

    This report consists of six sections: heterobimetallic dihydrides, early-late transition metal heterobimetallic compounds, amphiphilic carbene complexes and hydroxycarbene complexes, diiron compounds with bridging hydrocarbon ligands, diphosphine chelates with natural bite angles near 120 degrees, and synthesis and reactions of M=M compounds. (WET)

  7. CHARACTERISTICS Nitrated compounds constitute a

    E-print Network

    Sniadecki, Nathan J.

    CHARACTERISTICS Nitrated compounds constitute a class of chemical substances that can be explosive. The appearance of nitrated compounds may vary from a fine moist crystalline solid to clear viscous liquids. A few nitrated compounds can become shock sensitive or can react with certain metals to form extremely unstable

  8. The strange-sea quark spin distribution in the nucleon from inclusive and semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering

    E-print Network

    L. Grigoryan

    2008-02-21

    We propose new method which allows determination of the strange-sea quark spin distribution in the nucleon through measurement of various inclusive and semi-inclusive polarized deep inelastic electron- or muon-proton reactions. It is shown, that using combinations of inclusive data and semi-inclusive data containing neutral pions in the final state, it is possible to extract the strange-sea quark spin distribution. Similar result can be obtained for charged pions and some other hadrons also.

  9. Offset Compound Gear Drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Mark A.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Lewicki, David G.

    2010-01-01

    The Offset Compound Gear Drive is an in-line, discrete, two-speed device utilizing a special offset compound gear that has both an internal tooth configuration on the input end and external tooth configuration on the output end, thus allowing it to mesh in series, simultaneously, with both a smaller external tooth input gear and a larger internal tooth output gear. This unique geometry and offset axis permits the compound gear to mesh with the smaller diameter input gear and the larger diameter output gear, both of which are on the same central, or primary, centerline. This configuration results in a compact in-line reduction gear set consisting of fewer gears and bearings than a conventional planetary gear train. Switching between the two output ratios is accomplished through a main control clutch and sprag. Power flow to the above is transmitted through concentric power paths. Low-speed operation is accomplished in two meshes. For the purpose of illustrating the low-speed output operation, the following example pitch diameters are given. A 5.0 pitch diameter (PD) input gear to 7.50 PD (internal tooth) intermediate gear (0.667 reduction mesh), and a 7.50 PD (external tooth) intermediate gear to a 10.00 PD output gear (0.750 reduction mesh). Note that it is not required that the intermediate gears on the offset axis be of the same diameter. For this example, the resultant low-speed ratio is 2:1 (output speed = 0.500; product of stage one 0.667 reduction and stage two 0.750 stage reduction). The design is not restricted to the example pitch diameters, or output ratio. From the output gear, power is transmitted through a hollow drive shaft, which, in turn, drives a sprag during which time the main clutch is disengaged.

  10. Boronated porphyrin compounds

    DOEpatents

    Kahl, Stephen B. (Portola Valley, CA); Koo, Myoung-Seo (San Francisco, CA)

    1992-01-01

    A compound is described having the structure ##STR1## where R preferably is ##STR2## and most preferably R.sup.3 is a closo-carborane and R.sup.2 is --H, an alkyl or aryl having 1 to about 7 carbon atoms, This invention was made with Government support under NIH Grant No. CA-37961 awarded by the Department of Health and Human Services and under the Associated Universities Inc. Contract No. De-AC02-76CH00016 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The Government has rights in this invention.

  11. Titanium alkoxide compound

    DOEpatents

    Boyle, Timothy J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-08-14

    A titanium alkoxide composition is provided, as represented by the chemical formula (OC.sub.6H.sub.5N).sub.2Ti(OC.sub.6H.sub.5NH.sub.2).sub.2. As prepared, the compound is a crystalline substance with a hexavalent titanium atom bonded to two OC.sub.6H.sub.5NH.sub.2 groups and two OC.sub.6H.sub.5N groups with a theoretical molecular weight of 480.38, comprising 60.01% C, 5.04% H and 11.66% N.

  12. Boronated porphyrin compounds

    DOEpatents

    Kahl, S.B.; Koo, M.S.

    1992-09-22

    A compound is described having the structure ##STR1## where R preferably is ##STR2## and most preferably R.sup.3 is a closo-carborane and R.sup.2 is --H, an alkyl or aryl having 1 to about 7 carbon atoms, This invention was made with Government support under NIH Grant No. CA-37961 awarded by the Department of Health and Human Services and under the Associated Universities Inc. Contract No. De-AC02-76CH00016 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The Government has rights in this invention.

  13. Improving rubber concrete by waste organic sulfur compounds.

    PubMed

    Chou, Liang-Hisng; Lin, Chun-Nan; Lu, Chun-Ku; Lee, Cheng-Haw; Lee, Maw-Tien

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the use of crumb tyres as additives to concrete was investigated. For some time, researchers have been studying the physical properties of concrete to determine why the inclusion of rubber particles causes the concrete to degrade. Several methods have been developed to improve the bonding between rubber particles and cement hydration products (C-S-H) with the hope of creating a product with an improvement in mechanical strength. In this study, the crumb tyres were treated with waste organic sulfur compounds from a petroleum refining factory in order to modify their surface properties. Organic sulfur compounds with amphiphilic properties can enhance the hydrophilic properties of the rubber and increase the intermolecular interaction forces between rubber and C-S-H. In the present study, a colloid probe of C-S-H was prepared to measure these intermolecular interaction forces by utilizing an atomic force microscope. Experimental results showed that rubber particles treated with waste organic sulfur compounds became more hydrophilic. In addition, the intermolecular interaction forces increased with the adsorption of waste organic sulfur compounds on the surface of the rubber particles. The compressive, tensile and flexural strengths of concrete samples that included rubber particles treated with organic sulfur compound also increased significantly. PMID:19710121

  14. Iron- and 4-hydroxy-2-alkylquinoline-containing periplasmic inclusion bodies of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: A chemical analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Royt, P.W.; Honeychuck, R.V.; Pant, R.R.; Rogers, M.L.; Asher, L.V.; Lloyd, J.R.; Carlos, W.E.; Belkin, H.E.; Patwardhan, S.

    2007-01-01

    Dark aggregated particles were seen on pellets of iron-rich, mid-logarithmic phase Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Transmission electron microscopy of these cells showed inclusion bodies in periplasmic vacuoles. Aggregated particles isolated from the spent medium of these cells contained iron as indicated by atomic absorption spectroscopy and by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy that revealed Fe3+. Scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray analysis of whole cells revealed the presence of iron-containing particles beneath the surface of the cell, indicating that the isolated aggregates were the intracellular inclusion bodies. Collectively, mass spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the isolated inclusion bodies revealed the presence of 3,4-dihydroxy-2-heptylquinoline which is the Pseudomonas quinolone signaling compound (PQS) and an iron chelator; 4-hydroxy-2-heptylquinoline (pseudan VII), which is an iron chelator, antibacterial compound and precursor of PQS; 4-hydroxy-2-nonylquinoline (pseudan IX) which is an iron chelator and antibacterial compound; 4-hydroxy-2-methylquinoline (pseudan I), and 4-hydroxy-2-nonylquinoline N-oxide. ?? 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Chemical and Physical Indicators of Compromised Melt Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Roger L.; Michael, Peter J.; Sours-Page, Rachel

    1998-03-01

    The utility of the geochemistry of basaltic suites as probes of mantle processes is encumbered by the processing those magmas undergo during transport from the field of melting to the ocean floor. Melt inclusions provide us with an opportunity to obtain information on intermediate stages in the evolution of a magma system. Such data can be an extra constraint for our modeling of petrologic processes. However, melt inclusions have generally undergone some degree of post-entrapment crystallization. Therefore, to quantify the details of geochemical trends represented by melt inclusion suites, we must construct a set of criteria to evaluate the degree to which any inclusion or set of inclusions represents the original trapped liquid composition. The problems encountered in evaluating the degree to which inclusion compositions depart from that standard fall into three categories: (1) Errors caused by the selection of the temperature or time of heating; (2) Loss or gain of volatiles caused by inclusion rupture; (3) Contamination from alteration products such as manganese oxides or salts in the host crystal. The criteria that may be used to evaluate the veracity of rehomogenized inclusion compositions include examination of the relationship of the inclusion composition to the host lava suite, the morphology of the inclusion, the Fe and S content relative to the host suite, and the MnO content relative to the inclusion suite and the host lavas.

  16. Quantitative analysis of inclusion distributions in hot pressed silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Paul Bakas

    2012-12-01

    ABSTRACT Depth of penetration measurements in hot pressed SiC have exhibited significant variability that may be influenced by microstructural defects. To obtain a better understanding regarding the role of microstructural defects under highly dynamic conditions; fragments of hot pressed SiC plates subjected to impact tests were examined. Two types of inclusion defects were identified, carbonaceous and an aluminum-iron-oxide phase. A disproportionate number of large inclusions were found on the rubble, indicating that the inclusion defects were a part of the fragmentation process. Distribution functions were plotted to compare the inclusion populations. Fragments from the superior performing sample had an inclusion population consisting of more numerous but smaller inclusions. One possible explanation for this result is that the superior sample withstood a greater stress before failure, causing a greater number of smaller inclusions to participate in fragmentation than in the weaker sample.

  17. An overview on current fluid-inclusion research and applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chi, G.; Chou, I.-Ming; Lu, H.-Z.

    2003-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of some of the more important developments in fluid-inclusion research and applications in recent years, including fluid-inclusion petrography, PVTX studies, and analytical techniques. In fluid-inclusion petrography, the introduction of the concept of 'fluid-inclusion assemblage' has been a major advance. In PVTX studies, the use of synthetic fluid inclusions and hydrothermal diamond-anvil cells has greatly contributed to the characterization of the phase behaviour of geologically relevant fluid systems. Various analytical methods are being developed and refined rapidly, with the Laser-Raman and LA-ICP-MS techniques being particularly useful for volatile and solute analyses, respectively. Ore deposit research has been and will continue to be the main field of application of fluid inclusions. However, fluid inclusions have been increasingly applied to other fields of earth science, especially in petroleum geology and the study of magmatic and earth interior processes.

  18. Microscopic analysis of a native Bacillus thuringiensis strain from Malaysia that produces exosporium-enclosed parasporal inclusion.

    PubMed

    Chai, Pui Fun; Rathinam, Xavier; Solayappan, Maheswaran; Ahmad Ghazali, Amir Hamzah; Subramaniam, Sreeramanan

    2014-10-01

    The current study focused on the microscopic studies of a native Bacillus thuringiensis strain isolated from Malaysia, Bt-S84-13a, that produced an unusual crystal type. Primary detection of parasporal inclusions using a phase contrast microscope presented one to two small crystal proteins in the sporulating cells of Bt-S84-13a. Compound light microscopic examination of autolysed Bt-S84-13a cells stained with 0.133% Coomassie Brilliant Blue showed two types of crystal morphology: small crystals independent of spores and spore-associated crystals. Surface structure analysis with a scanning electron microscope revealed spherical-like, coarse and wrinkled-looking crystal in Bt-S84-13a. A close-up observation of the crystal morphology using a transmission electron microscope also demonstrated two parasporal inclusions in Bt-S84-13a. One inclusion was deposited against the forespore and was in a shape of incomplete rectangular. Another smaller inclusion was developed within the exosporium and was rectangular in shape. However, the latter inclusion was found lack in another bacterial cell which was still in the early stages of sporulation. This unique crystal morphology may imply some biological potential in Bt-S84-13a. PMID:24943903

  19. Distinguishing primary and secondary inclusion assemblages in Jack Hills zircons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Elizabeth A.; Boehnke, Patrick; Hopkins-Wielicki, Michelle D.; Harrison, T. Mark

    2015-10-01

    Detrital igneous zircons from Jack Hills, Western Australia, range in age from ~ 3.0 to nearly 4.4 Ga and contain an inclusion assemblage dominated by quartz and muscovite, cited as evidence of their derivation from peraluminous granitoids. However, some phosphate inclusions in these zircons are known to be secondary from their post-depositional U-Pb ages and manifest mineralization along cracks. We undertook a survey of mineral inclusions in 4.3-3.0 Ga Jack Hills zircons with particular emphasis on their relationship to possible alteration features (e.g., cracks, disturbed internal zonation, and visual turbidity). Mineral inclusions revealed at polished surfaces show variations in modal mineralogy, mostly corresponding to their relationship with cracks. Muscovite is common both on and away from cracks, although the chemistry of muscovite inclusions shows little relationship with other potential alteration features. Inclusions filling cracks (secondary) and inclusions isolated from cracks differ in their modal mineralogy, although both suites are rich in muscovite and quartz. The higher incidence of crack-intersecting inclusions among younger zircons may reflect effects of the (generally larger) inclusion size among younger zircons. Mismatches between the isolated and crack-intersecting populations indicate selective loss of certain phases (e.g., feldspar, apatite) and over-representation of quartz and muscovite along cracks likely due to the effects of larger inclusion size and varying degrees of overpressure following zircon cooling and decompression. Inclusions not associated with cracks in magmatically zoned versus regions with disturbed zoning have similar phase proportions. This indicates only minor inclusion replacement away from cracks (i.e., the isolated assemblage is likely primary). This holds true also for inclusions within visually turbid versus clear volumes of zircon. Phase proportions within the inclusion assemblages differ with age indicating a provenance shift toward fewer mafic phases and apatite in < 3.6 Ga relative to Hadean granitoid sources.

  20. Encapsulating fatty acid esters of bioactive compounds in starch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lay Ma, Ursula Vanesa

    Interest in the use of many bioactive compounds in foods is growing in large part because of the apparent health benefits of these molecules. However, many of these compounds can be easily degraded during processing, storage, or their passage through the gastrointestinal tract before reaching the target site. In addition, they can be bitter, acrid, or astringent, which may negatively affect the sensory properties of the product. Encapsulation of these molecules may increase their stability during processing, storage, and in the gastrointestinal tract, while providing controlled release properties. The ability of amylose to form inclusion complexes and spherulites while entrapping certain compounds has been suggested as a potential method for encapsulation of certain molecules. However, complex formation and spherulitic crystallization are greatly affected by the type of inclusion molecules, type of starch, and processing conditions. The objectives of the present investigation were to: (a) study the effect of amylose, amylopectin, and intermediate material on spherulite formation and its microstructure; (b) investigate the formation of amylose and high amylose starch inclusion complexes with ascorbyl palmitate, retinyl palmitate, and phytosterol esters; (c) evaluate the ability of spherulites to form in the presence of fatty acid esters and to entrap ascorbyl palmitate, retinyl palmitate, and phytosterol esters; and (d) evaluate the effect of processing conditions on spherulite formation and fatty acid ester entrapment. Higher ratios of linear to branched molecules resulted in the formation of more and rounder spherulites with higher heat stability. In addition to the presence of branches, it appears that spherulitic crystallization is also affected by other factors, such as degree of branching, chain length, and chain length distribution. Amylose and Hylon VII starch formed inclusion complexes with fatty acid esters of ascorbic acid, retinol, or phytosterols. However, only retinyl palmitate formed a complex with amylopectin. In general, ascorbyl palmitate resulted in the highest complexation, followed by retinyl palmitate and phytosterol ester. The presence of native lipids in Hylon VII starch did not inhibit complex formation. On the contrary, native lipids appear to increase the complexation yield and thermal stability of the starch-fatty acid ester inclusion complexes, possibly due to the formation of ternary complexes. From the three fatty acid esters studied, only ascorbyl palmitate was entrapped in starch spherulites. Various structures including round spherulites, various sizes of torus-shape spherulites, non-spherulitic birefringent and non-birefringent particles, "balloon" morphologies, and gel-like material were formed depending on processing conditions. However, only the torus-shape spherulites, and some non-spherulitic birefringent and non-birefringent particles showed ascorbyl palmitate entrapment. The % yield of the precipitate increased with higher % of added Hylon VII, and decreased with higher heating temperature and faster cooling rates. The amount of entrapped ascorbyl palmitate in the starch precipitate seems to be governed by the amount of this compound added during processing. This study showed that starch can form inclusion complexes with fatty acid esters which may be used for the delivery of certain bioactive molecules. In addition, encapsulation of fatty acid esters in starch spherulites may be a good potential delivery system for water soluble bioactive molecules. However, further research is necessary to gain a better understanding of the type of molecules that can be entrapped in starch spherulites, and the factors affecting spherulitic crystallization and bioactive compound entrapment.

  1. MINER?A charged current inclusive analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Caicedo, D. A. M.

    2015-05-15

    MINER?A is a few-GeV neutrino scattering experiment that has been taking data in the NuMI beam line at Fermilab since November 2009. The experiment will provide important inputs, both in support of neutrino oscillation searches and as a pure weak probe of the nuclear medium. For this, MINERvA employs a fine-grained detector, with an eight ton active target region composed of plastic scintillator and a suite of nuclear targets composed of helium, carbon, iron, lead and water placed upstream of the active region. We will describe the current status of the charged current inclusive analysis in plastic scintillator.

  2. Inclusion Optimization for Next Generation Steel Products

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sridar Seetharaman: Dr. Alan Cramb

    2006-04-06

    The project objective is to determine the conditions under which the inclusions in liquid steel can act as heterogeneous nucleants for solidification. The experimental approach consisted of measuring the undercooling of a pure iron droplet in contact with different oxides to determine which oxides promote iron solidification by providing a suitable surface for nucleation and which oxides and under which conditions the metal can be deeply undercooled. The conclusions suggest that deep undercoolings are possible at low oxygen content provided the oxygen potential is such that substrate decomposition does not occur. If the oxygen content increases the undercooling decreases.

  3. What can we learn from inclusive spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Nagamiya, S.

    1981-05-01

    The present experimental status on single particle inclusive measurements is described. Then, the geometrical aspect of the collision is discussed from the data of total integrated cross sections of nuclear charge or mass. The dynamical aspect of the collision, especially that for the participating region is discussed in connection with proton spectra, composite fragment spectra, pion production, ratios of ..pi../sup -//..pi../sup +/, n/p and t//sup 3/He, and production of strange particles. The spectator physics is described from the data on projectile fragments. (GHT)

  4. Semiconducting glasses with flux pinning inclusions

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, William L. (Pasadena, CA); Poon, Siu-Joe (Palo Alto, CA); Duwez, Pol E. (Pasadena, CA)

    1981-01-01

    A series of amorphous superconducting glassy alloys containing 1% to 10% by volume of flux pinning crystalline inclusions have been found to have potentially useful properties as high field superconducting magnet materials. The alloys are prepared by splat cooling by the piston and anvil technique. The alloys have the composition (TM).sub.90-70 (M).sub.10-30 where TM is a transition metal selected from at least one metal of Groups IVB, VB, VIB, VIIB or VIIIB of the Periodic Table such as Nb, Mo, Ru, Zr, Ta, W or Re and M is at least one metalloid such as B, P, C, N, Si, Ge or Al.

  5. Transport in Nonstoichiometric Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Simkovich, G.; Stubican, V.S.

    1984-01-01

    This conference entitled ''Transport in Nonstoichiometric Compounds'' was held in August 1980 in Mogilany, Poland. The conference includes papers on: concentration distribution for diffusion in a temperature gradient; transport in anion deficient fluorite oxides; oxygen self-diffusion in Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/-ZrO/sub 2/ solid solution; experimental study of MoO/sub 3/ electrical conductivity changes under low oxygen pressures; thermogravimetric and electrical conductivity studies of Mg-doped LaCrO/sub 3/ and La-doped SrTiO/sub 3/; the role of dopant ionic radius in O/sup 2/- conducting solid electrolytes; the use and misuse of chemical diffusion theory; electrical properties of a Fe/sub 2/(MoO/sub 4/)/sub 3/ catalyst; the structure and stoichiometry in lithium inserted metal oxides; the behaviour of protons in oxides, and radiation enhanced diffusion in nuclear carbides.

  6. Microoptical telescope compound eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duparré, Jacques W.; Schreiber, Peter; Matthes, André; Pshenay–Severin, Ekaterina; Bräuer, Andreas; Tünnermann, Andreas; Völkel, Reinhard; Eisner, Martin; Scharf, Toralf

    2005-02-01

    A new optical concept for compact digital image acquisition devices with large field of view is developed and proofed experimentally. Archetypes for the imaging system are compound eyes of small insects and the Gabor Superlens. A paraxial 3x3 matrix formalism is used to describe the telescope arrangement of three microlens arrays with different pitch to find first order parameters of the imaging system. A 2mm thin imaging system with 21x3 channels, 70ºx10º field of view and 4.5mm x 0.5mm image size is optimized and analyzed using sequential and non sequential raytracing and fabricated by microoptics technology. Anamorphic lenses, where the parameters are a function of the considered optical channel, are used to achieve a homogeneous optical performance over the whole field of view. Captured images are presented and compared to simulation results.

  7. Reduction of thermal conductivity of bulk nanostructured bismuth telluride composites embedded with silicon nano-inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satyala, Nikhil; Tahmasbi Rad, Armin; Zamanipour, Zahra; Norouzzadeh, Payam; Krasinski, Jerzy S.; Tayebi, Lobat; Vashaee, Daryoosh

    2014-01-01

    Bulk nanostructured bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) composite with silicon nano-crystallite inclusions was synthesized via sintering approach. The effect of the composite structure formed by the addition of miniscule quantity (5 at. %) of silicon on the thermoelectric properties of bulk nanostructured Bi2Te3 is shown via a 50% drop in thermal conductivity accompanied with a simultaneous enhancement in the Seebeck coefficient. We demonstrate that the addition of silicon nano-inclusions to the nanostructured compound combined with a systematic thermal treatment beneficially reduces the thermal conductivity to less than 1.0 W/mK over the entire temperature range of 300 K to 525 K. It is shown that the combinatorial techniques of nanostructuring, nano-inclusions, and annealing are effective in reducing thermal conductivity by a significant magnitude. This low thermal conductivity is comparable to that of Bi2Te3 based superlattices and significantly lower than that of bulk Bi2Te3. The technique is extendable to (Bi,Se)2(Sb,Te)3 based thermoelectric alloys for enhancing the figure-of-merit.

  8. Diffusive over-hydration of olivine-hosted melt inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartley, Margaret E.; Neave, David A.; Maclennan, John; Edmonds, Marie; Thordarson, Thor

    2015-09-01

    The pre-eruptive water content of magma is often estimated using crystal-hosted melt inclusions. However, olivine-hosted melt inclusions are prone to post-entrapment modification by H+ diffusion as they re-equilibrate with their external environment. This effect is well established for the case of H+ loss from olivine-hosted inclusions that have cooled slowly in degassed magma. Here we present evidence for the opposite effect: the addition of H+ into inclusions that are held in melts that are enriched in H2O with respect to the trapped melts. The compositional variability in a suite of 211 olivine-hosted inclusions from the Laki and Skuggafjöll eruptions in Iceland's Eastern Volcanic Zone indicates that diffusive H+ gain governs the H2O content of incompatible trace element depleted inclusions. Individual eruptive units contain olivine-hosted inclusions with widely varying incompatible element concentrations but near-constant H2O. Furthermore, over 40% of the inclusions have H2 O /Ce > 380, significantly higher than the H2O/Ce expected in primary Icelandic melts or mid-ocean ridge basalts (150-280). The fact that the highest H2O/Ce ratios are found in the most incompatible element depleted inclusions indicates that hydration is a consequence of the concurrent mixing and crystallisation of compositionally diverse primary melts. Hydration occurs when olivines containing depleted inclusions with low H2O contents are juxtaposed against more hydrous melts during mixing. Melt inclusions from a single eruption may preserve evidence of both diffusive H+ loss and H+ gain. Trace element data are therefore vital for determining H2O contents of melt inclusions at the time of inclusion trapping and, ultimately, the H2O content of the mantle source regions.

  9. Selection, Inclusion, Evaluation and Defense of Transgender-Inclusive Fiction for Young Adults: A Resource Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rockefeller, Elsworth I.

    2009-01-01

    An increasingly visible youth transgender population is emerging and the number of transgender-inclusive fiction texts for young adults is growing. Adults serving teens in schools, libraries, and community agencies must begin actively pursuing, utilizing, and incorporating these texts into resource collections. This article provides an overview of…

  10. Preparing Teachers for Inclusive Education: Using Inclusive Pedagogy to Enhance Teaching and Learning for All

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florian, Lani; Linklater, Holly

    2010-01-01

    As the concept of "inclusive education" has gained currency, students who would previously have been referred to specialist forms of provision, having been judged "less able", are now believed to belong in mainstream classrooms. However, it is often argued that teachers lack the necessary knowledge and skills to work with such students in…

  11. Marking Time: Using Music to Create Inclusive Religious Education and Inclusive Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, Julian

    2004-01-01

    Religious education (RE) is a vital subject in the inclusion of pupils and staff alike, as it brings together ways of life and communities, the personal and the social. Based on the philosophy of community of John Macmurray, and the philosophy of dialogue of Martin Buber, Julian Stern investigates ways of marking time, understanding and…

  12. Preventing Inclusion? Inclusive Early Childhood Education and the Option to Exclude

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cologon, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    While there is increasing international commitment to inclusive education, as outlined in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), many children remain excluded at school. One marginalised and frequently excluded group of people are people who experience disability. In the recently released first report on…

  13. Behavioral and Academic Differences between an Inclusive and Non-Inclusive Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatch, Sherry Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Although educators continue to provide all students access to their grade-level curriculum, students with disabilities are not performing academically in accordance with state standards. The purpose of this sequential transformative mixed methods study was to investigate academic and/or behavioral differences between an inclusion classroom and a…

  14. Inclusive/Exclusive? Contradictory Perspectives on Autism and Inclusion: The Case for an Integrative Position

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravet, Jackie

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores some of the tensions that frequently arise in debates about inclusion and the education of children and young people on the autism spectrum. This debate is often characterised by bipolar thinking and moral posturing, and is obscured by misunderstandings and omissions. This can create confusion for practitioners trying their…

  15. Method of preparing metallocene compounds

    DOEpatents

    Rosenblum, Myron (Lexington, MA); Matchett, Stephen A. (Lisle, IL)

    1992-01-01

    This invention describes a novel method of preparing metallocene compounds. The invention is based on synthesis of novel bis cyclopentadienides that, under appropriate conditions, will either encapsulate a transition metal to produce a metallocene such as ferrocene, or ferrocene derivative, or will yield a polymeric metallocene. Compounds produced by this process are useful as catalysts in propulsion systems, or as anti-knock compounds in gasolines.

  16. Method of preparing metallocene compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenblum, M.; Matchett, S.A.

    1992-06-23

    This invention describes a novel method of preparing metallocene compounds. The invention is based on synthesis of novel bis cyclopentadienides that, under appropriate conditions, will either encapsulate a transition metal to produce a metallocene such as ferrocene, or ferrocene derivative, or will yield a polymeric metallocene. Compounds produced by this process are useful as catalysts in propulsion systems, or as anti-knock compounds in gasolines. 2 figs.

  17. Method of producing cyclohexasilane compounds

    DOEpatents

    Elangovan, Arumugasamy; Anderson, Kenneth; Boudjouk, Philip R; Schulz, Douglas L

    2015-03-10

    A method of preparing a cyclohexasilane compound from trichlorosilane is provided. The method includes contacting trichlorosilane with a reagent composition to produce a compound containing a tetradecahalocyclohexasilane dianion, such as a tetradecachlorocyclohexasilane dianion. The reagent composition typically includes (a) tertiary polyamine ligand; and (b) a deprotonating reagent, such as a tertiary amine having a pKa of at least about 10.5. Methods of converting the tetradecahalocyclohexasilane dianion-containing compound to cyclohexasilane or a dodecaorganocyclohexasilane are also provided.

  18. Functional characterization of mutations in the myosin Vb gene associated with microvillus inclusion disease

    PubMed Central

    Szperl, Agata M.; Golachowska, Magdalena R.; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Prekeris, Rytis; Thunnissen, Andy-Mark W. H.; Karrenbeld, Arend; Dijkstra, Gerard; Hoekstra, Dick; Mercer, David; Ksiazyk, Janusz; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wapenaar, Martin C.; Rings, Edmond H. H. M.; van IJzendoorn, Sven C. D.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Microvillus inclusion disease (MVID) is a rare autosomal recessive enteropathy characterized by intractable diarrhea and malabsorption. Recently, various MYO5B gene mutations have been identified in MVID patients. Interestingly, several MVID patients showed only a MYO5B mutation in one allele (heterozygous) or no mutations in the MYO5B gene, illustrating the need to further functionally characterize the cell biological effects of the MYO5B mutations. Methods The genomic DNA of nine patients diagnosed with microvillus inclusion disease was screened for MYO5B mutations, and qPCR and immunohistochemistry on the material of two patients was performed to investigate resultant cellular consequences. Results We demonstrate for the first time that MYO5B mutations can be correlated with altered myosin Vb mRNA expression and with an aberrant subcellular distribution of the myosin Vb protein. Moreover, we demonstrate that the typical and myosin Vb–controlled accumulation of rab11a-and FIP5-positive recycling endosomes in the apical cytoplasm of the cells is abolished in MVID enterocytes, which is indicative for altered myosin Vb function. Also, we report 8 novel MYO5B mutations in 9 MVID patients of various etnic backgrounds, including compound heterozygous mutations. Conclusions Our functional analysis indicate that MYO5B mutations can be correlated with an aberrant subcellular distribution of the myosin Vb protein and apical recycling endosomes which, together with the additional compound heterozygous mutations, significantly strengthen the link between MYO5B and MVID. PMID:21206382

  19. Influence of germanium nano-inclusions on the thermoelectric power factor of bulk bismuth telluride alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satyala, Nikhil; Tahmasbi Rad, Armin; Zamanipour, Zahra; Norouzzadeh, Payam; Krasinski, Jerzy S.; Tayebi, Lobat; Vashaee, Daryoosh

    2014-05-01

    Nanocomposite thermoelectric compound of bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) with 5 at. % germanium nano-inclusions was prepared via mechanically alloying and sintering techniques. The influence of Ge nano-inclusions and long duration annealing on the thermoelectric properties of nanostructured Bi2Te3 were investigated. It was found that annealing has significant effect on the carrier concentration, Seebeck coefficient, and the power factor of the thermoelectric compound. The systematic heat treatment also reduced the density of donor type defects thereby decreasing the electron concentration. While the as-pressed nanocomposite materials showed n-type properties, it was observed that with the increase of annealing time, the nanocomposite gradually transformed to an abundantly hole-dominated (p-type) sample. The long duration annealing (˜500 h) resulted in a significantly enhanced electrical conductivity pertaining to the augmentation in the density and the structural properties of the sample. Therefore, a simultaneous enhancement in both electrical and Seebeck coefficient characteristics resulted in a remarkable increase in the thermoelectric power factor.

  20. Influence of germanium nano-inclusions on the thermoelectric power factor of bulk bismuth telluride alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Satyala, Nikhil; Zamanipour, Zahra; Norouzzadeh, Payam; Krasinski, Jerzy S.; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Tahmasbi Rad, Armin; Tayebi, Lobat

    2014-05-28

    Nanocomposite thermoelectric compound of bismuth telluride (Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}) with 5 at. % germanium nano-inclusions was prepared via mechanically alloying and sintering techniques. The influence of Ge nano-inclusions and long duration annealing on the thermoelectric properties of nanostructured Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} were investigated. It was found that annealing has significant effect on the carrier concentration, Seebeck coefficient, and the power factor of the thermoelectric compound. The systematic heat treatment also reduced the density of donor type defects thereby decreasing the electron concentration. While the as-pressed nanocomposite materials showed n-type properties, it was observed that with the increase of annealing time, the nanocomposite gradually transformed to an abundantly hole-dominated (p-type) sample. The long duration annealing (?500 h) resulted in a significantly enhanced electrical conductivity pertaining to the augmentation in the density and the structural properties of the sample. Therefore, a simultaneous enhancement in both electrical and Seebeck coefficient characteristics resulted in a remarkable increase in the thermoelectric power factor.

  1. Biomedical Compounds from Marine organisms

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Rajeev Kumar; Zi-rong, Xu

    2004-01-01

    The Ocean, which is called the ‘mother of origin of life’, is also the source of structurally unique natural products that are mainly accumulated in living organisms. Several of these compounds show pharmacological activities and are helpful for the invention and discovery of bioactive compounds, primarily for deadly diseases like cancer, acquired immuno-deficiency syndrome (AIDS), arthritis, etc., while other compounds have been developed as analgesics or to treat inflammation, etc. The life-saving drugs are mainly found abundantly in microorganisms, algae and invertebrates, while they are scarce in vertebrates. Modern technologies have opened vast areas of research for the extraction of biomedical compounds from oceans and seas.

  2. Organic Compounds in Carbonaceous Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Grorge

    2001-01-01

    Carbonaceous meteorites are relatively enriched in soluble organic compounds. To date, these compounds provide the only record available to study a range of organic chemical processes in the early Solar System chemistry. The Murchison meteorite is the best-characterized carbonaceous meteorite with respect to organic chemistry. The study of its organic compounds has related principally to aqueous meteorite parent body chemistry and compounds of potential importance for the origin of life. Among the classes of organic compounds found in Murchison are amino acids, amides, carboxylic acids, hydroxy acids, sulfonic acids, phosphonic acids, purines and pyrimidines (Table 1). Compounds such as these were quite likely delivered to the early Earth in asteroids and comets. Until now, polyhydroxylated compounds (polyols), including sugars (polyhydroxy aldehydes or ketones), sugar alcohols, sugar acids, etc., had not been identified in Murchison. Ribose and deoxyribose, five-carbon sugars, are central to the role of contemporary nucleic acids, DNA and RNA. Glycerol, a three-carbon sugar alcohol, is a constituent of all known biological membranes. Due to the relative lability of sugars, some researchers have questioned the lifetime of sugars under the presumed conditions on the early Earth and postulated other (more stable) compounds as constituents of the first replicating molecules. The identification of potential sources and/or formation mechanisms of pre-biotic polyols would add to the understanding of what organic compounds were available, and for what length of time, on the ancient Earth.

  3. Experimental and Theoretical Investigations on the Supermolecular Structure of Isoliquiritigenin and 6-O-?-d-Maltosyl-?-cyclodextrin Inclusion Complex

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Liu, Benguo; Li, Jiaqi; Xiao, Huizhi; Wang, Junyi; Liang, Guizhao

    2015-01-01

    Isoliquiritigenin (ILTG) possesses many pharmacological properties. However, its poor solubility and stability in water hinders its wide applications. The solubility of bioactive compounds can often be enhanced through preparation and delivery of various cyclodextrin (CD) inclusion complexes. The 6-O-?-d-maltosyl-?-CD (G2-?-CD), as one of the newest developments of CDs, has high aqueous solubility and low toxicity, especially stable inclusion characteristics with bioactive compounds. In this work, we for the first time construct and characterize the supermolecular structure of ILTG/G2-?-CD by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). The solubility of ILTG in water at 25 °C rises from 0.003 to 0.717 mg/mL by the encapsulation with G2-?-CD. Our experimental observations on the presence of the ILTG/G2-?-CD inclusion complex are further supported by the ONIOM(our Own N-layer Integrated Orbital molecular Mechanics)-based QM/MM (Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics) calculations, typically substantiating these supermolecular characteristics, such as detailed structural assignments, preferred binding orientations, selectivity, solvent effects, interaction energies and forces of the ILTG/G2-?-CD inclusion complex. Our results have elucidated how ILTG interacts with G2-?-CD, demonstrating the primary host-guest interactions between ILTG and G2-?-CD, characterized by hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic interactions, electrostatic forces, and conformational effects, are favored for the formation of the ILTG/G2-?-CD inclusion. PMID:26247946

  4. Efficient mechanochemical complexation of various steroid compounds with ?-, ?- and ?-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Laura; Binello, Arianna; Stolle, Achim; Curini, Massimo; Cravotto, Giancarlo

    2015-06-01

    Mechanochemical technology enables solvent-free micronized solid dispersions and efficient molecular host-guest inclusion complexes to be formed in matrices which contain cyclodextrins (CDs). This type of complexation has been studied using ?-, ?- and ?-cyclodextrin with the dual aims of improving overall solubility and enhancing the bioavailability of common steroid compounds, such as cholic acids and ?-sitosterols or lowering cholesterol content in products of animal origin. Several parameters have been studied and optimized: CD/compound molar ratio (1:1, 1:2, 2:1 and 3:1) in function of the cavity sizes of the three different CDs, milling time (from 5 to 40 min) and rotation speed (from 100 to 300 rpm). DSC (differential scanning calorimetry) analyses have revealed that inclusion complexes were efficiently formed after 40 min milling (200 rpm) for ?-CD/cholesterol and ?-CD/ugrsodeoxycholic acid (encapsulation efficiency 96% and 77% respectively). Besides steroid encapsulation/vehiculation, the mechanochemical technique may pave the way for new ideas in solventless steroid extraction from vegetal matrices with CDs. PMID:25725254

  5. Compound power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.R.

    1991-02-05

    This patent describes a compound motor for a vehicle. It comprises: an engine defining therein a chamber for the combustion of fuel, an intake passage leading to the combustion chamber and an exhaust passage leading from the combustion chamber; a drive shaft extending from the engine; means in the engine for rotating the drive shaft in response to the combustion of fuel in the chamber; a rotary compressor at the entry end of the intake passage; a turbine at the exit end of the exhaust passage, the turbine being drivable by exhaust gases from the combustion chamber; means for selectively transferring rotational motion of the turbine to the compressor, the transferring means including a clutch for mechanically connecting or disconnecting the compressor from the turbine; a planetary gear set having a sun gear member, a ring gear member surrounding the sun gear member, a planet gear member rotatable about its own axis and meshed between the sun gear member and the ring gear member, and a planet carrier member upon which the planet gear member is mounted for revolution about the sun gear member; a gear train between one of the members of the planetary gear set and the turbine; another one of the members of the planetary gear set being driven by the shaft extending from the engine; and a final output shaft driven by a third member of the planetary gear set.

  6. Enhanced Inclusion Removal from Steel in the Tundish

    SciTech Connect

    R. C. Bradt; M.A.R. Sharif

    2009-09-25

    The objective of this project was to develop an effective chemical filtering system for significantly reducing the content of inclusion particles in the steel melts exiting the tundish for continuous casting. This project combined a multi-process approach that aimed to make significant progress towards an "inclusion free" steel by incorporating several interdependent concepts to reduce the content of inclusions in the molten steel exiting the tundish for the caster. The goal is to produce "cleaner" steel.

  7. System for Detection of Small Inclusions in Large Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, J E; Runkel, M J

    2008-10-24

    The presence of defects in optical materials can lead to bulk damage or downstream modulation and subsequent surface damage in high fluence laser systems. An inclusion detection system has been developed by the National Ignition Facility Optics Metrology Group. The system detects small inclusions in optical materials with increased sensitivity and speed over previous methods. The system has detected all known inclusions and defects and has detected previously undetected defects smaller than 5 microns.

  8. The enhancement of the oral bioavailability of ?-tocotrienol in mice by ?-cyclodextrin inclusion.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Noriyuki; Wakao, Yohei; Tomono, Susumu; Tatemichi, Masayuki; Yano, Tomohiro; Ohshima, Hiroshi

    2011-12-01

    Cyclodextrin (CD) is widely used in the pharmaceutical and nutritional fields to form an inclusion complex with lipophilic compounds for the improvement of their aqueous solubility, stability and diffusibility under physiological conditions. In this study, we investigated the effect of the ?-tocotrienol (?T3) inclusion complex with CD on its oral bioavailability. Five-week-old C57BL6 mice were fed a vitamin E-free diet for 28 days, followed by the oral administration of 2.79 mg of ?T3-rich fraction (TRF) extracted from rice bran or the equivalent dose (14.5 mg) of a CD inclusion complex with TRF (TRF/CD). The levels of ?T3 in sequentially collected plasma were determined by LC-MS/MS. The pharmacokinetic study revealed that the plasma concentrations of ?T3 were increased and peaked at 6 or 3 h after the oral administration of TRF or TRF/CD, respectively (C(max) values of 7.9±3.3 or 11.4±4.5 ?M, respectively). The area under the curve of plasma ?T3 concentration also showed a 1.4-fold increase in the group administered with TRF/CD compared with the TRF-only group. Furthermore, the mice that had received the TRF/CD tended to reduce the endotoxin shock induced by injection with lethal amounts of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide, compared with the mice that had received TRF alone. Taken together, our results suggest that the CD inclusion improved ?T3 bioavailability, resulting in the enhancement of ?T3 physiological activity, which would be a useful approach for the nutrition delivery system. PMID:21292469

  9. Volatile Organic Compound Emissions by Agricultural Crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormeno, E.; Farres, S.; Gentner, D.; Park, J.; McKay, M.; Karlik, J.; Goldstein, A.

    2008-12-01

    Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (BVOCs) participate in ozone and aerosol formation, and comprise a substantial fraction of reactive VOC emission inventories. In the agriculturally intensive Central Valley of California, emissions from crops may substantially influence regional air quality, but emission potentials have not been extensively studied with advanced instrumentation for many important crops. Because crop emissions may vary according to the species, and California emission inventories are constructed via a bottom-up approach, a better knowledge of the emission rate at the species-specific level is critical for reducing uncertainties in emission inventories and evaluating emission model performance. In the present study we identified and quantified the BVOCs released by dominant agricultural crops in California. A screening study to investigate both volatile and semivolatile BVOC fractions (oxygenated VOCs, isoprene, monoterepenes, sesquiterpenes, etc.) was performed for 25 crop species (at least 3 replicates plants each), including branch enclosures of woody species (e.g. peach, mandarin, grape, pistachio) and whole plant enclosures for herbaceous species (e.g. onion, alfalfa, carrot), through a dynamic cuvette system with detection by PTRMS, in-situ GCMS/FID, and collection on carbon-based adsorbents followed by extraction and GCMS analysis. Emission data obtained in this study will allow inclusion of these crops in BVOC emission inventories and air quality simulations.

  10. Petrographic studies of refractory inclusions from the Murchison meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macpherson, G. J.; Grossman, L.; Hashimoto, A.; Bar-Matthews, M.; Tanaka, T.

    1984-01-01

    Textural and mineral-chemical data on freeze-thaw disaggregated refractory inclusions from the Murchison meteorite are reported. The data were obtained with neutron activation analysis, SEM, and spectroscopy, the study revealed corundum-bearing inclusions, spinel-hibonite aggregates and spherules, and spinel-pyroxene and elivine-pyroxene inclusions. One of the three spinel-, pyroxene-, forsterite-rich inclusions had an amoeba-shaped spinel-pyroxene core, implying vapor-to-solid condensation and therefore crystallization from a melt. It is concluded that the meteorite formation encompassed diverse nebular materials, and that further studies of the meteorite will enhance the data base on the planetary nebular processes.

  11. Petrographic studies of refractory inclusions from the Murchison meteorite

    SciTech Connect

    Macpherson, G.J.; Grossman, L.; Hashimoto, A.; Bar-Matthews, M.

    1984-11-15

    Textural and mineral-chemical data on freeze-thaw disaggregated refractory inclusions from the Murchison meteorite are reported. The data were obtained with neutron activation analysis, SEM, and spectroscopy, the study revealed corundum-bearing inclusions, spinel-hibonite aggregates and spherules, and spinel-pyroxene and elivine-pyroxene inclusions. One of the three spinel-, pyroxene-, forsterite-rich inclusions had an amoeba-shaped spinel-pyroxene core, implying vapor-to-solid condensation and therefore crystallization from a melt. It is concluded that the meteorite formation encompassed diverse nebular materials, and that further studies of the meteorite will enhance the data base on the planetary nebular processes.

  12. Inclusive Hadron Production in p+p Collisions at STAR

    E-print Network

    Frank Simon; for the STAR Collaboration

    2006-09-08

    The STAR experiment at RHIC has measured a variety of inclusive hadron cross sections in $p+p$ collisions at Sqrt(s) = 200 GeV. Measurements of the differential cross section for inclusive charged pion production at mid rapidity and for inclusive neutral pion production at forward rapidity (3.0 STAR for the differential cross section for inclusive neutral pion production near mid rapidity are presented. These cross sections are compared to next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations and can provide constraints on the pion fragmentation functions. Good agreement between data and pQCD has been found for all three cross sections.

  13. Inclusion body myositis with granuloma formation in muscle tissue.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Kenji; Ikeda, Yoshihisa; Ishida, Chiho; Matsumoto, Yasuko; Ono, Kenjiro; Iwasa, Kazuo; Yamada, Masahito

    2015-09-01

    Inclusion body myositis is a form of inflammatory myopathy. We identified 4 cases of inclusion body myositis showing granuloma formation in muscle tissue and aimed to assess the features of this atypical form of inclusion body myositis. We retrospectively reviewed consecutive patients who satisfied European Neuromuscular Centre IBM Research Diagnostic Criteria 2011. Then, we assessed clinical profiles and pathological findings in patients with inclusion body myositis with granuloma and compared these findings with those of typical inclusion body myositis without granuloma. We identified 15 patients with inclusion body myositis. Four patients showed granuloma formation in muscle tissue in addition to typical pathological features of inclusion body myositis. Granulomas comprised a mixture of inflammatory cells, such as macrophages, epithelioid histiocytic cells, and lymphocytes. One patient was found to have mediastinal granulomatous lymphadenopathy; however, the evidence in other patients was insufficient for a diagnosis of systemic sarcoidosis. There were no significant differences between groups with and without granuloma regarding clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, response to immunomodulating therapies, or myopathological profiles. We established a new form of inclusion body myositis showing granuloma formation in muscle tissue. Inclusion body myositis and granuloma formation could have identical pathomechanisms concerning dysregulation of autophagy. PMID:26143153

  14. Inclusive radiative {psi}(2S) decays

    SciTech Connect

    Libby, J.; Martin, L.; Powell, A.; Thomas, C.; Wilkinson, G.; Mendez, H.; Ge, J. Y.; Miller, D. H.; Shipsey, I. P. J.; Xin, B.; Adams, G. S.; Hu, D.; Moziak, B.; Napolitano, J.; Ecklund, K. M.; He, Q.; Insler, J.; Muramatsu, H.; Park, C. S.; Thorndike, E. H.

    2009-10-01

    Using e{sup +}e{sup -} collision data taken with the CLEO-c detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, we have investigated the direct photon spectrum in the decay {psi}(2S){yields}{gamma}gg. We determine the ratio of the inclusive direct photon decay rate to that of the dominant three-gluon decay rate {psi}(2S){yields}ggg (R{sub {gamma}}{identical_to}{gamma}({gamma}gg)/{gamma}(ggg)) to be R{sub {gamma}}(z{sub {gamma}}>0.4)=0.070{+-}0.002{+-}0.019{+-}0.011, with z{sub {gamma}} defined as the scaled photon energy relative to the beam energy. The errors shown are statistical, systematic, and that due to the uncertainty in the input branching fractions used to extract the ratio, respectively.

  15. Monotone viable trajectories for functional differential inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddad, Georges

    This paper is a study on functional differential inclusions with memory which represent the multivalued version of retarded functional differential equations. The main result gives a necessary and sufficient equations. The main result gives a necessary and sufficient condition ensuring the existence of viable trajectories; that means trajectories remaining in a given nonempty closed convex set defined by given constraints the system must satisfy to be viable. Some motivations for this paper can be found in control theory where F( t, ?) = { f( t, ?, u)} u?U is the set of possible velocities of the system at time t, depending on the past history represented by the function ? and on a control u ranging over a set U of controls. Other motivations can be found in planning procedures in microeconomics and in biological evolutions where problems with memory do effectively appear in a multivalued version. All these models require viability constraints represented by a closed convex set.

  16. Inclusive $A_{LL}$ Measurements at STAR

    E-print Network

    Adam Kocoloski; for the STAR Collaboration

    2009-06-01

    One of the primary goals of the RHIC Spin program is to determine the gluon polarization distribution within the proton. At leading order, $pp$ collisions involve a mixture of quark-quark, quark-gluon, and gluon-gluon scattering. In RHIC, the gluon-gluon and quark-gluon contributions dominate, making the accelerator an ideal tool to explore gluon polarization. The STAR experiment has measured the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry $A_{LL}$ for inclusive production of jets and pions, and for charged pion production opposite a jet, at $\\sqrt{s} = 200 GeV$. The results provide valuable new constraints on the gluon polarization in the proton when included in a next-to-leading-order global analysis. The current status of the STAR measurements and the plans for future measurements will be discussed.

  17. Inclusive Higgs Production at Large Transverse Momentum

    E-print Network

    Braaten, Eric

    2015-01-01

    We present a factorization formula for the inclusive production of the Higgs boson at large transverse momentum $P_T$ that includes all terms with the leading power of $1/P_T^2$. The cross section is factorized into convolutions of parton distributions, infrared-safe hard-scattering cross sections for producing a parton, and fragmentation functions that give the distribution of the longitudinal momentum fraction of the Higgs relative to the fragmenting parton. The infrared-safe cross sections and the fragmentation functions are perturbatively calculable. The most important fragmentation functions are those for which the fragmenting parton is the top quark, gluon, $W$, $Z$, and the Higgs itself. We calculate the fragmentation functions at leading order in the Standard Model coupling constants. The factorization formula enables the resummation of large logarithms of $P_T/M_H$ due to final-state radiation by integrating evolution equations for the fragmentation functions. By comparing the cross section for the p...

  18. ATMOSPHERIC FREONS AND HALOGENATED COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ambient levels of atmospheric Freons, halogenated hydrocarbons, and SF6 were measured at various locations in the U.S.A. Compounds such as CCl3F, CCl2F2, CH3-CCl3, and CCl4 were ubiquitious and generally measured at sub ppb levels. Tropospherically reactive compounds such as C2Cl...

  19. Bilingual Reading of Compound Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ko, In Yeong; Wang, Min; Kim, Say Young

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated whether bilingual readers activate constituents of compound words in one language while processing compound words in the other language via decomposition. Two experiments using a lexical decision task were conducted with adult Korean-English bilingual readers. In Experiment 1, the lexical decision of real English…

  20. Bilayer Effects of Antimalarial Compounds.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Nicole B; Andersen, Olaf S

    2015-01-01

    Because of the perpetual development of resistance to current therapies for malaria, the Medicines for Malaria Venture developed the Malaria Box to facilitate the drug development process. We tested the 80 most potent compounds from the box for bilayer-mediated effects on membrane protein conformational changes (a measure of likely toxicity) in a gramicidin-based stopped flow fluorescence assay. Among the Malaria Box compounds tested, four compounds altered membrane properties (p< 0.05); MMV007384 stood out as a potent bilayer-perturbing compound that is toxic in many cell-based assays, suggesting that testing for membrane perturbation could help identify toxic compounds. In any case, MMV007384 should be approached with caution, if at all. PMID:26551613

  1. Devices for collecting chemical compounds

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jill R; Groenewold, Gary S

    2013-12-24

    A device for sampling chemical compounds from fixed surfaces and related methods are disclosed. The device may include a vacuum source, a chamber and a sorbent material. The device may utilize vacuum extraction to volatilize the chemical compounds from a fixed surface so that they may be sorbed by the sorbent material. The sorbent material may then be analyzed using conventional thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS) instrumentation to determine presence of the chemical compounds. The methods may include detecting release and presence of one or more chemical compounds and determining the efficacy of decontamination. The device may be useful in collection and analysis of a variety of chemical compounds, such as residual chemical warfare agents, chemical attribution signatures and toxic industrial chemicals.

  2. Bilayer Effects of Antimalarial Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Nicole B.; Andersen, Olaf S.

    2015-01-01

    Because of the perpetual development of resistance to current therapies for malaria, the Medicines for Malaria Venture developed the Malaria Box to facilitate the drug development process. We tested the 80 most potent compounds from the box for bilayer-mediated effects on membrane protein conformational changes (a measure of likely toxicity) in a gramicidin-based stopped flow fluorescence assay. Among the Malaria Box compounds tested, four compounds altered membrane properties (p< 0.05); MMV007384 stood out as a potent bilayer-perturbing compound that is toxic in many cell-based assays, suggesting that testing for membrane perturbation could help identify toxic compounds. In any case, MMV007384 should be approached with caution, if at all. PMID:26551613

  3. Assimilation of Unusual Carbon Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middelhoven, Wouter J.

    Yeast taxa traditionally are distinguished by growth tests on several sugars and organic acids. During the last decades it became apparent that many yeast species assimilate a much greater variety of naturally occurring carbon compounds as sole source of carbon and energy. These abilities are indicative of a greater role of yeasts in the carbon cycle than previously assumed. Especially in acidic soils and other habitats, yeasts may play a role in the degradation of carbon compounds. Such compounds include purines like uric acid and adenine, aliphatic amines, diamines and hydroxyamines, phenolics and other benzene compounds and polysaccharides. Assimilation of purines and amines is a feature of many ascomycetes and basidiomycetes. However, benzene compounds are degraded by only a few ascomycetous yeasts (e.g. the Stephanoascus/ Blastobotrys clade and black yeastlike fungi) but by many basidiomycetes, e.g. Filobasidiales, Trichosporonales, red yeasts producing ballistoconidia and related species, but not by Tremellales. Assimilation of polysaccharides is wide-spread among basidiomycetes

  4. Chemical zonation in olivine-hosted melt inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newcombe, M. E.; Fabbrizio, A.; Zhang, Youxue; Ma, C.; Le Voyer, M.; Guan, Y.; Eiler, J. M.; Saal, A. E.; Stolper, E. M.

    2014-07-01

    Significant zonation in major, minor, trace, and volatile elements has been documented in naturally glassy olivine-hosted melt inclusions from the Siqueiros Fracture Zone and the Galapagos Islands. Components with a higher concentration in the host olivine than in the melt (e.g., MgO, FeO, Cr2O3, and MnO) are depleted at the edges of the zoned melt inclusions relative to their centers, whereas except for CaO, H2O, and F, components with a lower concentration in the host olivine than in the melt (e.g., Al2O3, SiO2, Na2O, K2O, TiO2, S, and Cl) are enriched near the melt inclusion edges. This zonation is due to formation of an olivine-depleted boundary layer in the adjacent melt in response to cooling and crystallization of olivine on the walls of the melt inclusions, concurrent with diffusive propagation of the boundary layer toward the inclusion center. Concentration profiles of some components in the melt inclusions exhibit multicomponent diffusion effects such as uphill diffusion (CaO, FeO) or slowing of the diffusion of typically rapidly diffusing components (Na2O, K2O) by coupling to slow diffusing components such as SiO2 and Al2O3. Concentrations of H2O and F decrease toward the edges of some of the Siqueiros melt inclusions, suggesting either that these components have been lost from the inclusions into the host olivine late in their cooling histories and/or that these components are exhibiting multicomponent diffusion effects. A model has been developed of the time-dependent evolution of MgO concentration profiles in melt inclusions due to simultaneous depletion of MgO at the inclusion walls due to olivine growth and diffusion of MgO in the melt inclusions in response to this depletion. Observed concentration profiles were fit to this model to constrain their thermal histories. Cooling rates determined by a single-stage linear cooling model are 150-13,000 °C h-1 from the liquidus down to ~1,000 °C, consistent with previously determined cooling rates for basaltic glasses; compositional trends with melt inclusion size observed in the Siqueiros melt inclusions are described well by this simple single-stage linear cooling model. Despite the overall success of the modeling of MgO concentration profiles using a single-stage cooling history, MgO concentration profiles in some melt inclusions are better fit by a two-stage cooling history with a slower-cooling first stage followed by a faster-cooling second stage; the inferred total duration of cooling from the liquidus down to ~1,000 °C ranges from 40 s to just over 1 h. Based on our observations and models, compositions of zoned melt inclusions (even if measured at the centers of the inclusions) will typically have been diffusively fractionated relative to the initially trapped melt; for such inclusions, the initial composition cannot be simply reconstructed based on olivine-addition calculations, so caution should be exercised in application of such reconstructions to correct for post-entrapment crystallization of olivine on inclusion walls. Off-center analyses of a melt inclusion can also give results significantly fractionated relative to simple olivine crystallization. All melt inclusions from the Siqueiros and Galapagos sample suites exhibit zoning profiles, and this feature may be nearly universal in glassy, olivine-hosted inclusions. If so, zoning profiles in melt inclusions could be widely useful to constrain late-stage syneruptive processes and as natural diffusion experiments.

  5. Fluid Inclusions in Extraterrestrial Samples Fact or Fiction?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodnar, R. J.; Zolensky, M. E.; Gibson, E. K.

    2000-01-01

    Over the years there have been numerous reports of liquid inclusions in meteorites. Roedder reviews the reported occurrences of liquid inclusions in meteorites and states that "silicate-melt inclusions are expectable and apparently ubiquitous, but the presence of actual liquid inclusions (i.e., with moving bubbles at room temperature) would seem almost impossible." The reason for this conclusion is that meteorites (presumably) form in space at high temperatures and very low pressures where liquid water (or carbon dioxide) is not stable. Perhaps the most infamous report of fluid inclusions in meteorites was that of Warner et al. In that study, the authors reported the presence of two-phase, liquid-vapor inclusions in a diogenite from Antarctica. This report of fluid inclusions generated considerable interest in the meteorite community, and caused many to question existing models for the origin of the diogenites. This interest was short-lived however, as later investigations of the same samples showed that the inclusions were most likely artifacts. Rudnick et al. showed that many of the inclusions in meteorites prepared at the Johnson Space Center contained a fluid that fluoresced strongly under the laser beam on the Raman microprobe. They interpreted this to indicate that the inclusions contained Almag oil used in the preparation of thin sections. Presumably, the Almag oil entered empty vesicles along fractures that were opened intermittently during cutting. Here, the occurrence of unambiguous fluid inclusions that could not have been introduced during sample preparation are described in samples from two different extraterrestrial environments. One environment is represented by the SNC (martian) meteorites ALH 84001 and Nakhla. The second environment is represented by the Monahans 1998 meteorite that fell recently in the USA.

  6. Fluid inclusion analyses of detrital quartz grains - new Provenance Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Bloch, J.D.

    1985-02-01

    Preliminary analyses by microthermometry of fluid inclusions in detrital quartz of the Upper Cambrian Lamotte Sandstone revealed the occurrence of 2 distinct groups of aqueous fluid inclusions. Specific salinity signatures and homogenization temperatures may be used to distinguish specific granite types of the source rock terrain. The inclusions chosen for analysis occur in isolated clusters or are randomly distributed within a grain, commonly in association with mineral inclusions of zircon, sphene, rutile, and/or tourmaline. Secondary inclusions are present in the Lamotte but are not included in this study. The first group of inclusions is characterized by low salinities (< 1.0-8.0 wt.% eq. NaCl), the second by high salinities (12.1-29.6 wt. % eq. NaCl). Final melting temperatures as low as -30.6/sup 0/C indicate the presence of divalent ions in these inclusions. Both groups yield homogenization temperatures of between 150/sup 0/C and 220/sup 0/C. The low-salinity inclusions occur predominantly in subrounded to well-rounded sand less than 1.0 mm in size that is derived from a distal source. The brine inclusions occur exclusively in subangular to angular gravel 2.0-3.0 mm in size, implying a more proximal source area. A comparison of these inclusions with inclusions found in the granites of the apparent source terrain indicates that a medium-silica amphiboleorthoclase granite (Slabtown type) or a low-silica amphibole-plagioclase granite (Sivermines type) or both are the primary source rocks for this quartz. These granite types have limited areal distribution in the present day St. Francois mountains and the identification of these granite types as the source rock for the locally derived quartz has broad implications for reconstructing Cambrian depositional environments and paleostructure of the ancient St. Francois mountains.

  7. Ceramic Inclusions In Powder Metallurgy Disk Alloys: Characterization and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonacuse, Pete; Kantzos, Pete; Telesman, Jack

    2002-01-01

    Powder metallurgy alloys are increasingly used in gas turbine engines, especially as the material chosen for turbine disks. Although powder metallurgy materials have many advantages over conventionally cast and wrought alloys (higher strength, higher temperature capability, etc.), they suffer from the rare occurrence of ceramic defects (inclusions) that arise from the powder atomization process. These inclusions can have potentially large detrimental effect on the durability of individual components. An inclusion in a high stress location can act as a site for premature crack initiation and thereby considerably reduce the fatigue life. Because these inclusions are exceedingly rare, they usually don't reveal themselves in the process of characterizing the material for a particular application (the cumulative volume of the test bars in a fatigue life characterization is typically on the order of a single actual component). Ceramic inclusions have, however, been found to be the root cause of a number of catastrophic engine failures. To investigate the effect of these inclusions in detail, we have undertaken a study where a known population of ceramic particles, whose composition and morphology are designed to mimic the 'natural' inclusions, are added to the precursor powder. Surface connected inclusions have been found to have a particularly large detrimental effect on fatigue life, therefore the volume of ceramic 'seeds' added is calculated to ensure that a minimum number will occur on the surface of the fatigue test bars. Because the ceramic inclusions are irregularly shaped and have a tendency to break up in the process of extrusion and forging, a method of calculating the probability of occurrence and expected intercepted surface and embedded cross-sectional areas were needed. We have developed a Monte Carlo simulation to determine the distributions of these parameters and have verified the simulated results with observations of ceramic inclusions found in macro slices from extrusions and forgings. The ultimate goal of this study will be to use probabilistic methods to determine the reliability detriment that can be attributed to these ceramic inclusions.

  8. Novel 7-substituted coumarin compounds and an improved method for their synthesis. [Patent application

    SciTech Connect

    Bissell, E.R.

    1982-01-20

    Novel substituted coumarin compounds and an improved method for their synthesis are disclosed. The preferred class of compounds are substituted at the 7-position. The method of synthesis comprises reacting a polyhydroxy benzene or a substituted phenol, with a ..beta..-alkoxy acrylic acid or nitrile, in the presence of a Lewis acid catalyst. By the inclusion of the catalyst in the reaction mixture, the reaction can be carried out under much milder experimental conditions and in increased yields. The method is also applicable to the preparation of substituted amino phenols.

  9. Abundant 26Mg* in Adelaide Refractory Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huss, G. R.; Hutcheon, I. D.

    1992-07-01

    Adelaide is an anomalous carbonaceous chondrite with a CV-like oxygen isotopic composition (Hutcheon and Steele, 1982), abundant small chondrules, and an anhydrous, low-Fe matrix. The bulk composition, which is highly depleted in volatiles and carbon (Kallemeyn and Wasson ,1982), and the H, N, and C isotopic compositions and abundances (Kerridge, 1985) do not match those of any known meteorite; nearest relatives appear to be Bench Crater and Kakangari (Fitzgerald and Jones, 1977). Adelaide contains a variety of refractory inclusions, including several rich in CaAl4O7 (Hutcheon and Steele, 1982). We report here initial results from a study of Mg and Si isotopes in Adelaide CAI. SMH-1 is a 150 x 200-micrometer compact ovoid inclusion of densely intergrown spinel (52% of the mode), melilite (33%), and hibonite (14%). Hibonite occurs as 10 x 25 micrometer blades projecting radially from the periphery into a melilite-rich core. A 5-micrometer-thick diopside rim surrounds SMH-1. Textural relationships suggest that SMH-1 crystallized from a melt. Mg is enriched in the heavier isotopes by ~2o/oo/amu and all phases have excess ^26Mg* from the in situ decay of ^26Al. Data from spinel, hibonite, and melilite define a linear array with slope ^26Mg*/^27Al = (4.5+-0.8) x 10^-5. HM-1 is a 200 x 500-micrometer compact inclusion of tightly intergrown hibonite (75%) and gehlenitic melilite (25%), with accessory perovskite. No spinel is present. HM-1 may be a fragment of a larger CAI; a ~30-micrometer-thick rim of secondary Ca-poor, hydrous alumino-silicate surrounds ~40% of HM1. Similar secondary material is also present in the interior. Melilite (Ak(sub)0.6 to Ak(sub)1.6) and hibonite show clearly resolved ^26Mg* with delta^26Mg up to 90o/oo in melilite, and define an array with slope ^26Mg*/^27Al = (4.3 +- 0.3) x 10^-5. The secondary alumino-silicate also exhibits ^26Mg*, but the inferred initial ratio falls considerably below 5 x 10^-5, suggesting partial exchange of Mg. Inclusion M12 is an irregularly shaped 100 x 200-micrometer CAI consisting almost entirely of melilite. M12 exhibits unusual isotopic heterogeneity. Mg is enriched in the heavier isotopes, but F(sub)Mg is not constant among melilite: 4.5 < F(sub)Mg < 19o/oo/amu. The heavier Si isotopes are also enriched but F(sub)si is nearly constant at 11 +- 2o/oo/amu. Excess ^26Mg* is present in some, but not all, melilite characterized by F(sub)Mg = 19o/oo/amu; melilite with F(sub)Mg = 4.5o/oo/amu has delta^26Mg = 0. The data suggest that, initially, F(sub)Mg was >= 20o/oo/amu and F(sub)Si was ~12o/oo/amu in M12. Subsequent reaction with an isotopically normal reservoir produced partial isotopic re-equilibration of Mg but not Si, creating a heterogeneous F(sub)Mg distribution and causing loss of ^26Mg*. Two 25- to 50-micrometer CAI consist almost entirely of CaAl4O7 with accessory perovskite and Fe-rich spinel. Large excesses of ^26Mg* (200-550o/oo) were observed for ^27Al/^24Mg of 600 to 1900. Data from both CAI fall along a single array on a Mg evolution diagram, with slope ^26Mg*/^27Al = (4.2 +- 0.5) x 10^-5. Excess ^26Mg* is widespread in Adelaide CAI. The presence of ^26Mg* in all eight CAI studied to date and the small number of CAI with disturbed Al-Mg isotope systems distinguish Adelaide from other carbonaceous chondrites. The high abundances of hibonite, CaAl4O7 and gehlenitic melilite suggest that Adelaide CAI were isolated from nebular gas at a higher temperature than most CAI in CV-chondrites. The near absence of isotopic disturbance suggests that isotopic and petrographic studies of Adelaide CAI may provide a clearer look at refractory inclusion formation. (Supported by NASA, NAG 9-43. Division contribution #5164 (781).) References Hutcheon I. D. and Steele I. M. (1982) LPSC XXIII, 352-353. Kallemeyn and Wasson (1982) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 46, 2217- 2228. Kerridge (1985) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 49, 1707-1714. Fitzgerald M. J. and Jones J. B. (1977) Meteoritics 12, 443-458.

  10. Membrane rejection of nitrogen compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S.; Lueptow, R. M.

    2001-01-01

    Rejection characteristics of nitrogen compounds were examined for reverse osmosis, nanofiltration, and low-pressure reverse osmosis membranes. The rejection of nitrogen compounds is explained by integrating experimental results with calculations using the extended Nernst-Planck model coupled with a steric hindrance model. The molecular weight and chemical structure of nitrogen compounds appear to be less important in determining rejection than electrostatic properties. The rejection is greatest when the Donnan potential exceeds 0.05 V or when the ratio of the solute radius to the pore radius is greater than 0.8. The transport of solute in the pore is dominated by diffusion, although convective transport is significant for organic nitrogen compounds. Electromigration contributes negligibly to the overall solute transport in the membrane. Urea, a small organic compound, has lower rejection than ionic compounds such as ammonium, nitrate, and nitrite, indicating the critical role of electrostatic interaction in rejection. This suggests that better treatment efficiency for organic nitrogen compounds can be obtained after ammonification of urea.

  11. From Special to Inclusive Education in Macau (SAR)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forlin, Chris

    2011-01-01

    The education for learners with special education needs (SEN) in Macau (SAR), China, has gradually transitioned over the past 30 years from a completely segregated approach to a more inclusive one. Following a review of the development of special education and the transition towards inclusion in Macau, consideration is given to the enactment of…

  12. Preparing Teachers for Inclusion: Jordanian Preservice Early Childhood Teachers' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fayez, Merfat; Dababneh, Kholoud; Jumiaan, Ibrahim

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted during a period of national educational reforms in Jordan to investigate Jordanian preservice early childhood teachers' attitudes toward inclusion and the adequacy of their current preparation for implementing inclusion. The study also sought to identify the perceived concerns of preservice early childhood teachers about…

  13. Altering the Model: The Challenge of Achieving Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguerrondo, Ines

    2008-01-01

    Besides "inclusion" meaning incorporation within the education system, there is also "inclusion" signifying the incorporation of knowledge, two distinct processes which went hand-in-hand to start with but which, as education systems expanded, have begun to drift apart. While the population as a whole, including the more deprived sectors, has…

  14. Exploring Digital Literacy Practices in an Inclusive Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price-Dennis, Detra; Holmes, Kathlene A.; Smith, Emily

    2015-01-01

    In this article instructional practices from a diverse inclusive 5th grade classroom are examined to better understand how students engaged in 21st century literacies. The authors focus on one classroom to provide insight into how a 21st century literacies perspective can support inclusive literacy practices that 1) create a community of learners,…

  15. Teaching for Inclusion: A Resource Book for NU Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prenger, Suzanne M., Ed.

    This teaching manual helps college faculty understand how to work with diverse students in the classroom. An introductory section defines diversity, discusses teacher attitudes, and suggests where to begin. The 14 chapters are: (1) "Creating Inclusive Classrooms"; (2) "Selected Strategies for Teaching for Inclusion"; (3) "Gender"; (4) "Class in…

  16. Inclusive Education Setting in Southwestern Nigeria: Myth or Reality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oluremi, Fareo Dorcas

    2015-01-01

    Researches from developed and developing countries found that there were problems affecting the inclusive education in Nigeria. Hence, there is need to determine the challenges facing the schools where inclusive education is being implemented, and what could be done to improve the programme. The study showed that essential facilities and materials…

  17. Teachers' In-Flight Thinking in Inclusive Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paterson, David

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the thinking of five junior high school teachers as they teach students with learning difficulties in inclusive classrooms. Insights into the ways these teachers think about students in these inclusive secondary school contexts were obtained through triangulating data from semistructured interviews, stimulated recall of…

  18. Oh, Canada: Bridges and Barriers to Inclusion in Canadian Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sokal, Laura; Katz, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Inclusion in Canadian schools, both academic and social, is explored through the historic legislative structures that have resulted in a diversity of approaches to meeting the educational needs of Canadians. Innovative programmes that have been developed which showcase Canadian commitment to inclusive academic and social practices are described.…

  19. Elementary Teachers' Perspectives of Inclusion in the Regular Education Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olinger, Becky Lorraine

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine regular education and special education teacher perceptions of inclusion services in an elementary school setting. In this phenomenological study, purposeful sampling techniques and data were used to conduct a study of inclusion in the elementary schools. In-depth one-to-one interviews with 8…

  20. "That's Definite Discrimination": Practice under the Umbrella of Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyder, Eileen; Tissot, Cathy

    2013-01-01

    Inclusive practice is well embedded across society and has developed over time. However, although policy and public view have moved forward, the way organisations address the agenda for inclusion often represents a superficial interpretation of this concept. Qualitative data were gathered using new ethnography to explore the experiences of a…

  1. 46 CFR 201.117 - Inclusion in record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Inclusion in record. 201.117 Section 201.117 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION POLICY, PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Discovery and Depositions (Rule 11) § 201.117 Inclusion in record. No deposition or part thereof shall constitute a part of the...

  2. Proposed Framework for Digitally Inclusive Communities. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute of Museum and Library Services, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Digital inclusion is the ability of individuals and groups to access and use information and communication technologies. Not all members of a community benefit equally, and some communities have been left out altogether. This paper is a guide for fostering digital inclusion throughout the United States so that everyone can take advantage of…

  3. Inclusion of Technology Resources in Early Childhood Music Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kersten, Fred

    2006-01-01

    The article discusses the inclusion of technology resources in early childhood music education. Successful technology inclusion in music for young children depends on the physical, mental, and social readiness of each individual child. Learning providers involved with young children should constantly review the child's capabilities and …

  4. Inclusive Education: An Examination of School Relationships and Student Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez-Marti, Angelina; Ramirez-Iniguez, Alma A.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine inclusive education in multicultural contexts from an interaction networks perspective. The paper is based on the idea that inclusive education can be better understood by studying how native and non-native students interact, and what kinds of networks they establish in school. To do so, we assume two premises:…

  5. Pedagogic Voicing: The Struggle for Participation in an Inclusive Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naraian, Srikala

    2011-01-01

    Within inclusive education research, the call to foster participation stems from a generalized vision for promoting democratic practices within classrooms, prompting the concern for eliciting student "voices." In this ethnographic study, I explore the utility of "voice" as a workable construct in securing participation within inclusive classrooms.…

  6. Advancements in Research Synthesis Methods: From a Methodologically Inclusive Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suri, Harsh; Clarke, David

    2009-01-01

    The dominant literature on research synthesis methods has positivist and neo-positivist origins. In recent years, the landscape of research synthesis methods has changed rapidly to become inclusive. This article highlights methodologically inclusive advancements in research synthesis methods. Attention is drawn to insights from interpretive,…

  7. NASFAA Diversity and Inclusion: Recommendations of the Professional Diversity Caucus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, 2015

    2015-01-01

    NASFAA's Diversity and Inclusion Report emphasizes the importance of diversity and inclusivity to NASFAA. Included in this report is a diversity statement developed by NASFAA's Professional Diversity Caucus, and approved by NASFAA's Board in March of 2015. The Caucus convened in the summer of 2014 to better understand issues related to diversity…

  8. March 8, 1999 Many-body forces between membrane inclusions

    E-print Network

    Oster, George

    by the inclusion's elasticity, its shape, and by the membrane's elastic properties. In an earlier paper [6] , we. 87.10.+e - Interdisciplinary Physics, Biological, Mathematical Abstract The elastic interaction by the elasticity of the membrane [2-5] . An embedded inclusion creates a deformation field in the surrounding

  9. Adapted Education: The Norwegian Pathway to Inclusive and Efficient Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fasting, Rolf B.

    2013-01-01

    Since the UNESCO conference in 1994, inclusion has been a major denominator in the educational debates of most OECD countries, focusing on how to facilitate education and social interaction for the diversity of pupils. By international standards, the Norwegian education system is regarded as inclusive, but the ongoing debate and political pressure…

  10. Assessing Inclusion: Strategies for Success. Hot Topics Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philipsen, Maike, Ed.

    This collection of 16 readings focuses on the implementation and evaluation of efforts to include students with special needs in general education classrooms. The readings are: (1) "From Segregation to Integration: A Brief History of Special Education and Inclusion" (Katie Blenk and Doris Landau Fine); (2) "National Study on Inclusion: Overview…

  11. Is This Inclusion? Lessons from a Very "Special" Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenstein, Anat

    2014-01-01

    Debates about the meanings of inclusive education are long-lasting, and the imperative to include disabled students in mainstream schools is currently under threat by the UK government's educational policies. This paper draws on critiques from inclusive education and critical pedagogy literature, as well as on findings from field research in…

  12. Interdisciplinary engagement with inclusive design - the Challenge Workshops model.

    PubMed

    Cassim, Julia; Dong, Hua

    2015-01-01

    The DBA Inclusive Design Challenge and the Challenge Workshops organised by the lead author has exposed numerous design teams to the benefit of working with extreme users - this paper will analyse the challenges and benefits of this approach to inclusive design and suggest how the lessons learned from competition can be transferred into design practice. PMID:23706574

  13. Prediction of Reoxidation Inclusion Composition in Casting of Steel

    E-print Network

    Beckermann, Christoph

    Prediction of Reoxidation Inclusion Composition in Casting of Steel Liang Wang and Christoph ABSTRACT A model is developed to calculate the composition of reoxidation inclusions in steel casting. It is assumed that oxygen is continually absorbed by the steel during pouring. The software package Thermo

  14. Prediction of Reoxidation Inclusion Composition in Casting of Steel

    E-print Network

    Beckermann, Christoph

    Prediction of Reoxidation Inclusion Composition in Casting of Steel LIANG WANG and CHRISTOPH pouring of steel castings. The software package Thermo-Calc is used to obtain the inclusion phase fractions and compositions as a function of the temperature and oxygen content of the steel. Oxygen

  15. Simulation of Reoxidation Inclusion Formation in Steel Casting

    E-print Network

    Beckermann, Christoph

    Simulation of Reoxidation Inclusion Formation in Steel Casting Antonio J. Melendez, Kent D. Carlson the formation of reoxidation inclusions in carbon and low-alloy steel castings. A model is developed are conducted using radiographs of cast steel weld plates. The limit of resolution in the radiographs is about 1

  16. Inclusion in Mexico: Ensuring Supportive Attitudes by Newly Graduated Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forlin, Chris; Cedillo, Ismael Garcia; Romero-Contreras, Silvia; Fletcher, Todd; Hernandez, Humberto Javier Rodriguez

    2010-01-01

    The inclusion of students with special education needs in regular schools in Mexico is slowly gaining momentum. Likewise, teacher training for inclusion is increasingly becoming an important aspect of preservice training. This research investigates the perceptions of 286 preservice teachers who are about to complete their general teacher training…

  17. 26 CFR 26.2642-1 - Inclusion ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inclusion ratio. 26.2642-1 Section 26.2642-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES GENERATION-SKIPPING TRANSFER TAX REGULATIONS UNDER THE TAX REFORM ACT OF 1986 § 26.2642-1 Inclusion ratio....

  18. COMMUNITY CURRENCIES AND SOCIAL INCLUSION: A CRITICAL EVALUATION

    E-print Network

    Bateman, Ian J.

    COMMUNITY CURRENCIES AND SOCIAL INCLUSION: A CRITICAL EVALUATION by Gill Seyfang CSERGE Working Paper EDM 05-09 #12;COMMUNITY CURRENCIES AND SOCIAL INCLUSION: A CRITICAL EVALUATION By Gill Seyfang and initiatives to achieve these aims. Community currencies are a grassroots innovation which claim to meet those

  19. Preparing Early Childhood Special Educators for Inclusive Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooper, Belinda Bourne

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe experienced practitioners' beliefs about inclusion and their perceptions of what early childhood special education (ECSE) preservice teachers need to know and be able to do to effectively support early childhood inclusion. This study used a sequential explanatory mixed methods approach to describe the…

  20. Social Inclusion: What It Is and Why It's Important?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osher, David; Pickeral, Terry

    2013-01-01

    Social inclusion for students with disabilities builds on steps taken for physically and academically inclusive learning environments and highlights the need for all students having frequent opportunities to interact with a broad range of peers in a variety of settings within and outside the classroom setting. This article presents some…

  1. Schools as Agents of Social Exclusion and Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Razer, Michal; Friedman, Victor J.; Warshofsky, Boaz

    2013-01-01

    Although schools are usually regarded as important agents for social inclusion, research has shown that they may also function as agents of exclusion itself. The goal of this paper is to deepen our understanding of how schools function as agents of exclusion and how they can become more effective agents of inclusion. It is based on action research…

  2. Inclusive Education in Sweden: Responses, Challenges and Prospects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berhanu, Girma

    2011-01-01

    This paper maps out the challenges and responses to inclusive education in Sweden from a cultural/historical point of view. Core concepts that have bearing on inclusive education practices are discussed. The analysis incorporates varied materials. As the current Swedish political and educational discourses reflect contradictions and dilemmas among…

  3. Novel Method for Growing Te-Inclusion-Free CZT

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotnikov,A.

    2008-06-17

    The authors propose a new method for growth of detector-grade CdZnTe (CZT) with reduced concentration and sizes of Te inclusions. The method is designed to impede the formation of Te-rich inclusions in crystals due to the use of new CZT growth method and a unique ampoule design.

  4. Community College Adjunct Faculty Inclusion: Variations by Institution Type

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spaniel, Suzann H.; Scott, Joyce A.

    2013-01-01

    The present article derives from a larger study about the academic and social inclusion of adjunct faculty at representative public, 2-year colleges in Texas. The research identified a significant difference in adjunct faculty inclusion by institution type. Subject institutions represented Basic Carnegie Classification categories: rural, suburban,…

  5. Tiny Melt Inclusions from 2009 Redoubt Tephra Samples

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Graduate student Allison Payne (USGS ARRA student appointment) uses a binocular microscope to pick out minerals that contain tiny melt inclusions from 2009 Redoubt tephra samples. Melt inclusions are then analyzed with a SHRIMP - Sensitive High Resolution Ion Microprobe - for their volatile (H2O and...

  6. Enhancing Inclusive Educational Practices within Secondary Schools in Brunei Darussalam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Kenneth Walden

    2010-01-01

    Inclusive education policies have been espoused by the Ministry of Education in Brunei Darussalam since the late 1990's. In this paper, the author examines the current state of inclusion in secondary schools throughout the country. Procedures, practices and processes which directly or indirectly impede the realization of national and international…

  7. Head Start Instructional Professionals' Inclusion Perceptions and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muccio, Leah S.; Kidd, Julie K.; White, C. Stephen; Burns, M. Susan

    2014-01-01

    This study considered the facilitators and barriers of successful inclusion in Head Start classrooms by examining the perspectives and practices of instructional professionals. A cross-sectional survey design was combined with direct observation in inclusive Head Start classrooms. Survey data were collected from 71 Head Start instructional…

  8. Questions to Assess Learning as a Communicative Routine for Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ní Bhroin, Órla

    2013-01-01

    In the context of rapid policy transformation from segregation to inclusion in the education of children with special educational needs in Ireland, a study was conducted to investigate the interplay between policy and principles of inclusion, resource teachers' and class teachers' interpretations of this and the manner in which policy…

  9. Inclusive Education in Canada: Issues in Teacher Preparation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrimmon, Adam W.

    2015-01-01

    Inclusive education (IE) is widely adopted in Canadian educational systems. However, few Canadian universities require students in undergraduate teacher preparation programs to complete coursework on the topic of IE, and the few courses on this topic do not adequately prepare future teachers to work in inclusive classrooms with students with…

  10. When Teachers Reflect: Journeys toward Effective, Inclusive Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tertell, Elizabeth A., Ed.; Klein, Susan M., Ed.; Jewett, Janet L., Ed.

    On the premise that hearing other preschool teachers talk about their challenges in creating inclusive settings is a powerful impetus to reflect about one's own teaching practice, this book contains personal narratives by 18 teachers about their journeys toward inclusive, developmentally appropriate practice in early childhood education. The…

  11. Solomon Islands School Leaders Readiness for Inclusive Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porakari, James; Sevala, Brenda; Miniti, Patrick; Saemane, George; Sharma, Umesh; Forlin, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The inclusion of students with disabilities was initiated by the Ministry of Education and Human Resource Development in the Solomon Islands in 2013. This paper investigates the knowledge, skills, and values of school leaders in public and private schools in Honiara, the capital of the Solomon Islands, in regard to providing support for inclusive

  12. Developing Disability-Inclusive Indicators in the Pacific Islands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forlin, Chris; Sharma, Umesh; Loreman, Tim; Sprunt, Beth

    2015-01-01

    The Pacific Island nations are in the process of transforming education to support all learners through the application of more inclusive approaches. In order to measure progress, they are working collaboratively to develop a set of local and contextually applicable indicators for inclusive education. This article reports the initial step in this…

  13. Effects of Training on Teacher's Stages of Concern Regarding Inclusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroth, Gwen; And Others

    This paper describes a process that empowered special education teachers in Greenville Independent School District (Texas) to begin moving toward an inclusive model of special education. Specifically, the paper examines special education teachers' levels of concern regarding inclusion during this process. During the summer, 26 special education…

  14. Transatlantic Conversations about Inclusive Education: France and Nova Scotia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Cornelia; Harkins, Mary Jane

    2009-01-01

    Inclusive education has become an international educational priority with the ratification of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. This article compares and analyses in depth two different educational systems on two continents with regard to their development of inclusive education and their current issues with this…

  15. Teacher Preparation for Inclusive and Critical (Special) Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oyler, Celia

    2011-01-01

    The author's preservice program prepares both single and dual certification master's students to teach in inclusive classrooms. This article provides an overview of the context in which, and for which, the program was designed, a description of the program, including what the author means by inclusive education and critical special education,…

  16. Reframing Inclusive Education: Educational Equality as Capability Equality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terzi, Lorella

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I argue that rethinking questions of inclusive education in the light of the value of educational equality--specifically conceived as capability equality, or genuine opportunities to achieve educational functionings--adds some important insights to the current debate on inclusive education. First, it provides a cohesive value…

  17. The Preparation of Today's Educational Leaders: Inclusivity of Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Genevieve; Irby, Beverly J.

    If the challenges of the 21st century are to be met successfully, education must transform its orientation from one of exclusion to inclusion. To assist in the transformation of systems, to address specific barriers to inclusion, and to offer exemplary models in educational leadership, the Texas Council of Women School Executives sponsored a pilot…

  18. Inclusive Education at Work: Students with Disabilities in Mainstream Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labon, Don

    This report details a study of how inclusive practices for students with disabilities are being developed and implemented in eight countries: Australia, Canada, Denmark, Germany, Iceland, Italy, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The study aimed to describe national, regional, and local policies on inclusion and school-based practices and…

  19. Promoting Inclusive Schooling Practices through Practitioner Directed Inquiry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salisbury, Christine L.; Wilson, Linda L.; Palombaro, Mary M.

    1998-01-01

    A study investigated use of practitioner directed inquiry (PDI) by 45 different practitioners who designed, implemented, and evaluated solutions to educational issues affecting the inclusion of students with disabilities. Results indicate positive changes in attitudes and knowledge about inclusive practices and students with disabilities,…

  20. A Participatory Action Research Approach To Evaluating Inclusive School Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dymond, Stacy K.

    2001-01-01

    This article proposes a model for evaluating inclusive schools. Key elements of the model are inclusion of stakeholders in the evaluation process through a participatory action research approach, analysis of program processes and outcomes, use of multiple methods and measures, and obtaining perceptions from diverse stakeholder groups. (Contains…

  1. Study of CP asymmetry in mixing using inclusive dilepton samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzia, Isabella

    2015-07-01

    The asymmetry between same sign inclusive dilepton samples ?+?+ and ?-?- from semileptonic B decays in events allows to compare B mixing probabilities , and therefore to test the T and CP invariance. We present the measurement of CP asymmetry in inclusive dilepton samples with the full BABAR data set near the ?(4S) resonance, corresponding to 471 million of pairs.

  2. Setting Sail for that Country: The Utopian Urge behind Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMaster, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    The vision for the future embedded in inclusive values has fuelled educational reform. This paper will explore the utopian drive behind inclusion. The contributions of thinkers as diverse as John Dewey, Antonio Gramsci, and Paulo Freire give impetus to efforts to create a better tomorrow. They, and those who have previously struggled for…

  3. Zambian Pre-Service Teachers' Voices about Successful Inclusive Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muwana, Florence C.; Ostrosky, Michaelene M.

    2014-01-01

    While inclusion has been studied in many parts of the world, there is a dearth of research on this topic in Zambia. This study investigated the perceptions of pre-service teachers about the benefits of inclusion and the resources needed to successfully include students with disabilities in general education settings in Zambia. Participants…

  4. Powerful Partnerships: Parents & Professionals Building Inclusive Recreation Programs Together.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schleien, Stuart J., Ed.; And Others

    This collection of readings is intended to help parents of children with disabilities join together or with professionals to advocate for inclusive recreational programs for their children. The following 15 readings are included: "To Play or Not To Play? A History of Recreation in America" (Carla E. S. Tabourne et al.); "Why Is Inclusive

  5. Principals' Attitudes toward the Inclusion of Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stith, Angelnet L.

    2013-01-01

    The quantitative correlation study investigated 50 Virginia's elementary principals' attitudes toward the inclusion of students with disabilities and principals' training, experience, placement decision, and state assessment decision in special education. The data was collected using the modified version of Principal and Inclusion Survey tool.…

  6. The Evolution from Integration to Inclusion: The Hong Kong Tale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poon-McBrayer, Kim Fong

    2014-01-01

    As a worldwide movement, some forms or stages of inclusive education have been experimented and/or mandated in various countries since the mid-1970s. Integration was piloted in Hong Kong in 1997 and remains the official rhetoric and policy. Three developmental phases of inclusive education, namely, integration, integration in transition to…

  7. Inclusive Research: Making a Difference to Policy and Legislation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Kelley; Minogue, Gerard; Hopklins, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Background: While inclusive research has become an important stream in research with people with intellectual disabilities, there is a tension between the possibly empowering research process and the strength of the research itself to make social change happen. In this paper, we explore the contribution of two inclusive qualitative research…

  8. Perceptions by Teachers about the Benefits and Liabilities of Inclusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Alonzo, Bruno J.; Giordano, Gerard; VanLeeuwen, Dawn M.

    1997-01-01

    This survey of 336 New Mexico regular and special educators investigated their perceptions of the benefits and problems of inclusion. Results indicated skepticism and a mixed opinion about potential benefits of inclusion and an overwhelming expectation that problems would be inherent in a unified system of education. (CR)

  9. Inclusion of Scatter in HADES: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Aufderheide, M B

    2010-12-20

    Covert nuclear attack is one of the foremost threats facing the United States and is a primary focus of the War on Terror. The Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO), within the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), is chartered to develop, and improve domestic systems to detect and interdict smuggling for the illicit use of a nuclear explosive device, fissile material or radiologica1 material. The CAARS (Cargo Advanced Automated Radiography System) program is a major part of the DHS effort to enhance US security by harnessing cutting-edge technologies to detect radiological and nuclear threats at points of entry to the United States. DNDO has selected vendors to develop complete radiographic systems. It is crucial that the initial design and testing concepts for the systems be validated and compared prior to the substantial efforts to build and deploy prototypes and subsequent large-scale production. An important aspect of these systems is the scatter which interferes with imaging. Monte Carlo codes, such as MCNP (X-5 Monte Carlo Team, 2005 Revision) allow scatter to be calculatied, but these calculations are very time consuming. It would be useful to have a fast scatter estimation algorithm in a fast ray tracing code. We have been extending the HADES ray-tracing radiographic simulation code to model vendor systems in a flexible and quick fashion and to use this tool to study a variety of questions involving system performance and the comparative value of surrogates. To enable this work, HADES has been linked to the BRL-CAD library (BRL-CAD Open Source Project, 2010), in order to enable the inclusion of complex CAD geometries in simulations, scanner geometries have been implemented in HADES, and the novel detector responses have been included in HADES. A major extension of HADES which has been required by this effort is the inclusion of scatter in these radiographic simulations. Ray tracing codes generally do not easily allow the inclusion of scatter, because these codes define a source and a grid of detector pixels and only compute the attenuation along rays between these points. Scatter is an extremely complex set of processes which can involve rays which change directions many times between the source and detector. Scatter from outside the field of view of the imaging system, as well as within the field of view, can have an important role in image formation. In this report, we will describe how we implemented a treatment of scatter in HADES. We begin with a discussion of how we define scatter in Section 2, followed by a description of how single Compton scatter is now included in HADES in Section 3. In Section 4 we report a set of verification tests against MCNP and tests of how the technique scales with image size, number of scatters allowed and number of processors used in the calculations. In Section 5, we describe how we plan to extend this approach to other forms of scatter and conclude in Section 6. It should be emphasized that the purpose of this report is to show that a form of scatter has been implemented in HADES and has been verified against MCNP. Validation, the process of comparing simulation and experiment, is a future task.

  10. Polishing compound for plastic surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Stowell, M.S.

    1993-01-01

    A polishing compound for plastic surfaces is disclosed. The compound contains by weight approximately 4 to 17 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 6 parts mineral spirits, 2.5 to 15 parts abrasive particles, and 2.5 to 10 parts water. The abrasive is tripoli or a similar material that contains colloidal silica. Preferably, most of the abrasive particles are less than approximately 10 microns, more preferably less than approximately 5 microns in size. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS{sup TM}, LEXAN{sup TM}, LUCITE{sup TM}, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired.

  11. Polishing compound for plastic surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Stowell, Michael S. (New Ellenton, SC)

    1995-01-01

    A polishing compound for plastic surfaces. The compound contains by weight approximately 4 to 17 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 6 parts mineral spirits, 2.5 to 15 parts abrasive particles, and 2.5 to 10 parts water. The abrasive is tripoli or a similar material that contains fine particles silica. Preferably, most of the abrasive particles are less than approximately 10 microns, more preferably less than approximately 5 microns in size. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS.TM., LEXAN.TM., LUCITE.TM., polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired.

  12. Compound curvature laser window development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhoff, Vincent G.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has developed and implemented a unique process for forming flawless compound curvature laser windows. These windows represent a major part of specialized, nonintrusive laser data acquisition systems used in a variety of compressor and turbine research test facilities. This report summarizes the main aspects of compound curvature laser window development. It is an overview of the methodology and the peculiarities associated with the formulation of these windows. Included in this discussion is new information regarding procedures for compound curvature laser window development.

  13. Polishing compound for plastic surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Stowell, M.S.

    1995-08-22

    A polishing compound for plastic surfaces is disclosed. The compound contains by weight approximately 4 to 17 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 6 parts mineral spirits, 2.5 to 15 parts abrasive particles, and 2.5 to 10 parts water. The abrasive is tripoli or a similar material that contains fine particles silica. Preferably, most of the abrasive particles are less than approximately 10 microns, more preferably less than approximately 5 microns in size. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS{trademark}, LEXAN{trademark}, LUCITE{trademark}, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired. 5 figs.

  14. Bond alternation in phosphonitrilic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferris, Kim F.; Risser, S. M.

    1990-11-01

    The molecular structures of linear phosphonitrilic compounds demonstrate a dependence on the number of repeat units and on ligand electronegativity. Recent structural measurements of short length phosphonitrilic molecules have indicated the presence of bond alternation, in contrast to previous X-ray studies of the polymer itself. Ab initio electronic structure calculations have been performed on a series of short phosphonitrilic compounds H3P(NPH2)nNH, n=1-4, which show that bond alternation does exist for the small chain compounds. The behavior of the alternation as the number of repeat units is increased suggests that alternation continues into the infinite limit.

  15. Compound WordsCompound WordsCompound WordsCompound Words Crabapple TreeCrabapple TreeCrabapple TreeCrabapple Tree

    E-print Network

    Ashline, George

    J.C. 2004 Compound WordsCompound WordsCompound WordsCompound Words Crabapple TreeCrabapple Tree the mixture of two or more different things. Therefore, a compound word is the combination of two different words to form a new word. An example of such a word is "crabapple." Go to the crabapple tree. Observe

  16. Goethite-bearing brine inclusions, petroleum inclusions, and the geochemical conditions of ore deposition at the Jumbo mine, Kansas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasch, Sheila R.; Coveney, Raymond M., Jr.

    1988-05-01

    Petroleum-bearing fluid inclusions occur in sphalerite, calcite, dolomite, and barite at the Jumbo mine, a Mississippi Valley-type deposit in eastern Kansas. In addition to petroleum, Na-Ca-Mg-Fe chloride brines were present during deposition of calcite and sphalerite in which primary inclusions contain ?23 equivalent wt.% NaCl. Dolomite- and barite-hosted inclusions are more dilute, possibly because of mixing between hydrothermal fluids and groundwater during mineralization. Primary oil inclusions in sphalerite have homogenization temperatures ( Th) between 85 and 95°C. Aqueous inclusions have Th values ranging from ~90 to 130°C for sphalerite to below ~50°C for barite. Primary brine inclusions in calcite at the Jumbo mine contain goethite, apparently as a daughter mineral (although it is possible that the goethite formed as a result of diffusion of H 2 from the inclusions like the hematite daughter described by ROEDDER and SKINNER, 1968, from Bingham, Utah). Goethite has also been tentatively identified in inclusions from the Fletcher mine of Missouri. If goethite is a true daughter phase, it implies the presence of oxidized fluids during mineralization. This suggests that ore deposition resulted from interactions between hydrothermal fluids and dilute groundwater ( e.g., by dilution or cooling of ore fluids, or oxidation of organometallic complexes that may have transported metal constituents).

  17. Social Competence, Sense of Loneliness, and Speech Intelligibility of Young Children with Hearing Loss in Individual Inclusion and Group Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Most, Tova; Ingber, Sara; Heled-Ariam, Einat

    2012-01-01

    The study focused on social competence (SC) and perceived sense of loneliness of preschool children with hearing loss (HL) in group inclusion (GI, a small group of children with HL is integrated in a standard classroom) and individual inclusion (II, each child with HL is individually integrated into a standard classroom). The relations between…

  18. Conceptions of Inclusion and Inclusive Education: A Critical Examination of the Perspectives and Practices of Teachers in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodkinson, Alan; Devarakonda, Chandrika

    2009-01-01

    This paper details the development and operation of a system of inclusive education in India during the latter part of the twentieth and the beginning of the twenty-first century. Through a literature review and the employment of in-depth semi-structured interviews the study sought to determine how inclusion is defined and how the professional…

  19. Making Excellence Inclusive Making Excellence Inclusive is AAC&U's guiding principle for access, student success, and high-quality

    E-print Network

    Barrash, Warren

    , inclusion, and equity as critical to the wellbeing of democratic culture. Making excellence inclusive-quality, practical liberal education should be the standard of excellence for all students. The action of making, sexual orientation, country of origin, and ability as well as cultural, political, religious, or other

  20. Inclusion "All Present and Correct?" A Critical Analysis of New Labour's Inclusive Education Policy in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodkinson, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on Derrida this paper considers how inclusive education in England was defined and operationalised within New Labour's educational policy and by those teachers who reconstructed this policy within the confines of schools and individual classrooms. The paper has two critical ambitions. First it argues that the epistemology of inclusion

  1. Routes to Novel Azo compounds 

    E-print Network

    Iannarelli, Paul M.

    Routes to novel heterocyclic azo compounds and components of use as potential inkjet dyes were investigated. A new route to fluorenones from biphenyl acid chlorides using FVP (Flash Vacuum Pyrolysis) has been discovered. ...

  2. Detection of chlorinated aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    1996-02-06

    A method for making a composition for measuring the concentration of chlorinated aromatic compounds in aqueous fluids, and an optical probe for use with the method are disclosed. The composition comprises a hydrophobic polymer matrix, preferably polyamide, with a fluorescent indicator uniformly dispersed therein. The indicator fluoresces in the presence of the chlorinated aromatic compounds with an intensity dependent on the concentration of these compounds in the fluid of interest, such as 8-amino-2-naphthalene sulfonate. The probe includes a hollow cylindrical housing that contains the composition in its distal end. The probe admits an aqueous fluid to the probe interior for exposure to the composition. An optical fiber transmits excitation light from a remote source to the composition while the indicator reacts with chlorinated aromatic compounds present in the fluid. The resulting fluorescence light signal is reflected to a second optical fiber that transmits the light to a spectrophotometer for analysis. 5 figs.

  3. Detection of chlorinated aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Ekechukwu, Amy A. (Augusta, GA)

    1996-01-01

    A method for making a composition for measuring the concentration of chloated aromatic compounds in aqueous fluids, and an optical probe for use with the method. The composition comprises a hydrophobic polymer matrix, preferably polyamide, with a fluorescent indicator uniformly dispersed therein. The indicator fluoresces in the presence of the chlorinated aromatic compounds with an intensity dependent on the concentration of these compounds in the fluid of interest, such as 8-amino-2-naphthalene sulfonate. The probe includes a hollow cylindrical housing that contains the composition in its distal end. The probe admits an aqueous fluid to the probe interior for exposure to the composition. An optical fiber transmits excitation light from a remote source to the composition while the indicator reacts with chlorinated aromatic compounds present in the fluid. The resulting fluorescence light signal is reflected to a second optical fiber that transmits the light to a spectrophotometer for analysis.

  4. Special Risks of Pharmacy Compounding

    MedlinePLUS

    ... your doctor or pharmacist about proper use and storage of the compounded product. If you receive a ... FEAR Act Site Map Transparency Website Policies U.S. Food and Drug Administration 10903 New Hampshire Avenue Silver ...

  5. Polishing compound for plastic surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Stowell, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    This invention is comprised of a polishing compound for plastic materials. The compound includes approximately by approximately by weight 25 to 80 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 12 parts mineral spirits, 50 to 155 parts abrasive paste, and 15 to 60 parts water. Preferably, the compound includes approximately 37 to 42 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, up to 8 parts mineral spirits, 95 to 110 parts abrasive paste, and 50 to 55 parts water. The proportions of the ingredients are varied in accordance with the particular application. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS{trademark}, LEXAN{trademark}, LUCITE{trademark}, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired.

  6. Crystallographic properties of fertilizer compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Frazier, A.W.; Dillard, E.F.; Thrasher, R.D.; Waerstad, K.R.; Hunter, S.R.; Kohler, J.J.; Scheib, R.M.

    1991-02-01

    This bulletin is a compilation of crystallographic data collected at NFERC on 450 fertilizer-related compounds. In TVA's fertilizer R and D program, petrographic examination, XRD, and infrared spectroscopy are combined with conventional chemical analysis methods in identifying the individual compounds that occur in fertilizer materials. This handbook brings together the results of these characterization studies and supplemental crystallographic data from the literature. It is in one-compound-per-page, loose-leaf format, ordered alphabetically by IUPAC name. Indexes provided include IUPAC name, formula, group, alternate formula, synonyms, x-ray data, optical data. Tables are given for solids, compounds in commercial MAP and DAP, and matrix materials in phosphate rock.

  7. Limit laws for the asymmetric inclusion process.

    PubMed

    Reuveni, Shlomi; Eliazar, Iddo; Yechiali, Uri

    2012-12-01

    The Asymmetric Inclusion Process (ASIP) is a unidirectional lattice-gas flow model which was recently introduced as an exactly solvable 'Bosonic' counterpart of the 'Fermionic' asymmetric exclusion process. An iterative algorithm that allows the computation of the probability generating function (PGF) of the ASIP's steady state exists but practical considerations limit its applicability to small ASIP lattices. Large lattices, on the other hand, have been studied primarily via Monte Carlo simulations and were shown to display a wide spectrum of intriguing statistical phenomena. In this paper we bypass the need for direct computation of the PGF and explore the ASIP's asymptotic statistical behavior. We consider three different limiting regimes: heavy-traffic regime, large-system regime, and balanced-system regime. In each of these regimes we obtain-analytically and in closed form-stochastic limit laws for five key ASIP observables: traversal time, overall load, busy period, first occupied site, and draining time. The results obtained yield a detailed limit-laws perspective of the ASIP, numerical simulations demonstrate the applicability of these laws as useful approximations. PMID:23367919

  8. Inclusive Higgs Production at Large Transverse Momentum

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    We present a factorization formula for the inclusive production of the Higgs boson at large transverse momentum $P_T$ that includes all terms with the leading power of $1/P_T^2$. The cross section is factorized into convolutions of parton distributions, infrared-safe hard-scattering cross sections for producing a parton, and fragmentation functions that give the distribution of the longitudinal momentum fraction of the Higgs relative to the fragmenting parton. The infrared-safe cross sections and the fragmentation functions are perturbatively calculable. The factorization formula enables the resummation of large logarithms of $P_T/M_H$ due to final-state radiation by integrating evolution equations for the fragmentation functions. By comparing the cross section for the process $q\\bar{q}\\to H t\\bar t$ from the leading-power factorization formula at leading order in the coupling constants with the complete leading-order cross section, we infer that the error in the factorization formula decreases to less than 5...

  9. Inclusive Higgs Production at Large Transverse Momentum

    E-print Network

    Eric Braaten; Hong Zhang

    2015-10-06

    We present a factorization formula for the inclusive production of the Higgs boson at large transverse momentum $P_T$ that includes all terms with the leading power of $1/P_T^2$. The cross section is factorized into convolutions of parton distributions, infrared-safe hard-scattering cross sections for producing a parton, and fragmentation functions that give the distribution of the longitudinal momentum fraction of the Higgs relative to the fragmenting parton. The infrared-safe cross sections and the fragmentation functions are perturbatively calculable. The most important fragmentation functions are those for which the fragmenting parton is the top quark, gluon, $W$, $Z$, and the Higgs itself. We calculate the fragmentation functions at leading order in the Standard Model coupling constants. The factorization formula enables the resummation of large logarithms of $P_T/M_H$ due to final-state radiation by integrating evolution equations for the fragmentation functions. By comparing the cross section for the process $q\\bar{q}\\to H t\\bar t$ from the leading-power factorization formula at leading order in the coupling constants with the complete leading-order cross section, we infer that the error in the factorization formula decreases to less than 5\\% for $P_T>600$ GeV at a future $100$ TeV collider.

  10. Inclusive Higgs Production at Large Transverse Momentum

    E-print Network

    Hong Zhang; Eric Braaten

    2015-10-23

    We present a factorization formula for the inclusive production of the Higgs boson at large transverse momentum $P_T$ that includes all terms with the leading power of $1/P_T^2$. The cross section is factorized into convolutions of parton distributions, infrared-safe hard-scattering cross sections for producing a parton, and fragmentation functions that give the distribution of the longitudinal momentum fraction of the Higgs relative to the fragmenting parton. The infrared-safe cross sections and the fragmentation functions are perturbatively calculable. The factorization formula enables the resummation of large logarithms of $P_T/M_H$ due to final-state radiation by integrating evolution equations for the fragmentation functions. By comparing the cross section for the process $q\\bar{q}\\to H t\\bar t$ from the leading-power factorization formula at leading order in the coupling constants with the complete leading-order cross section, we infer that the error in the factorization formula decreases to less than 5% for $P_T>600$ GeV at a future $100$ TeV collider.

  11. [Sporadic inclusion body myositis and amyloid].

    PubMed

    Aoki, Masashi; Suzuki, Naoki

    2014-07-01

    Sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM) is an intractable and progressive skeletal muscle disease of unknown etiology and without effective treatment. While the etiology is still unknown, however, genetic factors, aging, life style, and environmental factors may be involved. Muscle biopsy typically reveals endomysial inflammation, invasion of mononuclear cells into non-necrotic fibers and rimmed vacuoles, suggesting inflammation and degeneration co-exist as part of the pathomechanism. Recent studies implicate amyloid beta accumulation, defects of proteolysis, and immune system abnormalities. The clinical course is slow with chronic worsening. Diagnosis of sIBM is usually made 5 years after onset. Muscle weakness and atrophy in the quadriceps, wrist flexor and finger flexors are the typical neurological findings of sIBM. Dysphagia and asymmetric weakness are often found. Serum creatine kinase is usually below 2,000 IU/L. sIBM is generally refractory to current therapy, such as steroids or immunosuppressants. Elucidation of the pathomechanism of sIBM is the most important to therapy. PMID:24998819

  12. Limit laws for the asymmetric inclusion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuveni, Shlomi; Eliazar, Iddo; Yechiali, Uri

    2012-12-01

    The Asymmetric Inclusion Process (ASIP) is a unidirectional lattice-gas flow model which was recently introduced as an exactly solvable ‘Bosonic’ counterpart of the ‘Fermionic’ asymmetric exclusion process. An iterative algorithm that allows the computation of the probability generating function (PGF) of the ASIP's steady state exists but practical considerations limit its applicability to small ASIP lattices. Large lattices, on the other hand, have been studied primarily via Monte Carlo simulations and were shown to display a wide spectrum of intriguing statistical phenomena. In this paper we bypass the need for direct computation of the PGF and explore the ASIP's asymptotic statistical behavior. We consider three different limiting regimes: heavy-traffic regime, large-system regime, and balanced-system regime. In each of these regimes we obtain—analytically and in closed form—stochastic limit laws for five key ASIP observables: traversal time, overall load, busy period, first occupied site, and draining time. The results obtained yield a detailed limit-laws perspective of the ASIP, numerical simulations demonstrate the applicability of these laws as useful approximations.

  13. Aza compounds as anion receptors

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Hung Sui (East Setauket, NY); Yang, Xiao-Qing (Port Jefferson Station, NY); McBreen, James (Bellport, NY)

    1998-01-06

    A family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of Li.sup.+ ion in alkali metal batteries.

  14. Aza compounds as anion receptors

    DOEpatents

    Lee, H.S.; Yang, X.Q.; McBreen, J.

    1998-01-06

    A family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of Li{sup +} ion in alkali metal batteries. 3 figs.

  15. Volatile Organic Compounds in Uremia

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Luzia; Slodzinski, Rafael; Jankowski, Joachim; Zidek, Walter; Westhoff, Timm H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Although “uremic fetor” has long been felt to be diagnostic of renal failure, the compounds exhaled in uremia remain largely unknown so far. The present work investigates whether breath analysis by ion mobility spectrometry can be used for the identification of volatile organic compounds retained in uremia. Methods Breath analysis was performed in 28 adults with an eGFR ?60 ml/min per 1.73 m2, 26 adults with chronic renal failure corresponding to an eGFR of 10–59 ml/min per 1.73 m2, and 28 adults with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) before and after a hemodialysis session. Breath analysis was performed by ion mobility spectrometryafter gas-chromatographic preseparation. Identification of the compounds of interest was performed by thermal desorption gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Results Breath analyses revealed significant differences in the spectra of patients with and without renal failure. Thirteen compounds were chosen for further evaluation. Some compounds including hydroxyacetone, 3-hydroxy-2-butanone and ammonia accumulated with decreasing renal function and were eliminated by dialysis. The concentrations of these compounds allowed a significant differentiation between healthy, chronic renal failure with an eGFR of 10–59 ml/min, and ESRD (p<0.05 each). Other compounds including 4-heptanal, 4-heptanone, and 2-heptanone preferentially or exclusively occurred in patients undergoing hemodialysis. Conclusion Impairment of renal function induces a characteristic fingerprint of volatile compounds in the breath. The technique of ion mobility spectrometry can be used for the identification of lipophilic uremic retention molecules. PMID:23049998

  16. Melt inclusion re-equilibration with complex shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruprecht, P.; Plank, T.; Lloyd, A. S.

    2010-12-01

    Volatile diffusion in melts and most crystals is fast, for example minutes to hours for H2O diffusion through typical volcanic olivines of a few hundreds of microns to a few millimeters. This character of fast diffusion and re-equilibration has been used recently to derive magma ascent rates via volatile concentrations in melt inclusions, channels and crystal phases (i.e., pyroxene and olivine). When assessing the amount of diffusive re-equilibration, previous models have used a spherical framework and melt inclusions located in the center of crystals (e.g., Qin et al., Am. Mineral. 77, 565, 1992; Cottrell et al., Geochem. Geophys. Geosys. 3, 2001). However, melt inclusions occur randomly within crystals of different shapes and a spherical model with a melt inclusion in the center can significantly underestimate the degree of re-equilibration. Off-center melt inclusions close to the edge of a crystal may equilibrate up to an order of magnitude faster than centrally located melt inclusions. Furthermore, multiple melt inclusions or melt channels may lead to different re-equilibration rates than isolated melt inclusions. For example, non-equilibrated melt embayments may significantly inhibit re-equilibration of the melt inclusion, due to slower diffusive loss in the direction of the embayment. Thus, to constrain the ascent dynamics of an individual eruption from specific volatile diffusion profiles in crystals and melt inclusions requires taking into account the complex shapes associated with natural melt inclusions and their encompassing crystals. We present a numerical diffusion model that can address complex melt inclusion geometries and crystal shapes with different time-dependent diffusive properties and boundary conditions (e.g., degassing and continuous volatile loss in the surrounding melt as magma ascends). Moreover, we explore the effect of multiple melt inclusions, which can significantly delay re-equilibration, and melt channels that have a more variable affect. In addition to the application to volatile diffusion in magmatic crystals the model also applies to elemental diffusion profiles generated during other magmatic processes and time scales, such as magma mixing or xenocryst entrainment.

  17. Miniature curved artificial compound eyes.

    PubMed

    Floreano, Dario; Pericet-Camara, Ramon; Viollet, Stéphane; Ruffier, Franck; Brückner, Andreas; Leitel, Robert; Buss, Wolfgang; Menouni, Mohsine; Expert, Fabien; Juston, Raphaël; Dobrzynski, Michal Karol; L'Eplattenier, Geraud; Recktenwald, Fabian; Mallot, Hanspeter A; Franceschini, Nicolas

    2013-06-01

    In most animal species, vision is mediated by compound eyes, which offer lower resolution than vertebrate single-lens eyes, but significantly larger fields of view with negligible distortion and spherical aberration, as well as high temporal resolution in a tiny package. Compound eyes are ideally suited for fast panoramic motion perception. Engineering a miniature artificial compound eye is challenging because it requires accurate alignment of photoreceptive and optical components on a curved surface. Here, we describe a unique design method for biomimetic compound eyes featuring a panoramic, undistorted field of view in a very thin package. The design consists of three planar layers of separately produced arrays, namely, a microlens array, a neuromorphic photodetector array, and a flexible printed circuit board that are stacked, cut, and curved to produce a mechanically flexible imager. Following this method, we have prototyped and characterized an artificial compound eye bearing a hemispherical field of view with embedded and programmable low-power signal processing, high temporal resolution, and local adaptation to illumination. The prototyped artificial compound eye possesses several characteristics similar to the eye of the fruit fly Drosophila and other arthropod species. This design method opens up additional vistas for a broad range of applications in which wide field motion detection is at a premium, such as collision-free navigation of terrestrial and aerospace vehicles, and for the experimental testing of insect vision theories. PMID:23690574

  18. Miniature curved artificial compound eyes

    PubMed Central

    Floreano, Dario; Pericet-Camara, Ramon; Viollet, Stéphane; Ruffier, Franck; Brückner, Andreas; Leitel, Robert; Buss, Wolfgang; Menouni, Mohsine; Expert, Fabien; Juston, Raphaël; Dobrzynski, Michal Karol; L’Eplattenier, Geraud; Recktenwald, Fabian; Mallot, Hanspeter A.; Franceschini, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    In most animal species, vision is mediated by compound eyes, which offer lower resolution than vertebrate single-lens eyes, but significantly larger fields of view with negligible distortion and spherical aberration, as well as high temporal resolution in a tiny package. Compound eyes are ideally suited for fast panoramic motion perception. Engineering a miniature artificial compound eye is challenging because it requires accurate alignment of photoreceptive and optical components on a curved surface. Here, we describe a unique design method for biomimetic compound eyes featuring a panoramic, undistorted field of view in a very thin package. The design consists of three planar layers of separately produced arrays, namely, a microlens array, a neuromorphic photodetector array, and a flexible printed circuit board that are stacked, cut, and curved to produce a mechanically flexible imager. Following this method, we have prototyped and characterized an artificial compound eye bearing a hemispherical field of view with embedded and programmable low-power signal processing, high temporal resolution, and local adaptation to illumination. The prototyped artificial compound eye possesses several characteristics similar to the eye of the fruit fly Drosophila and other arthropod species. This design method opens up additional vistas for a broad range of applications in which wide field motion detection is at a premium, such as collision-free navigation of terrestrial and aerospace vehicles, and for the experimental testing of insect vision theories. PMID:23690574

  19. Host compounds for red phosphorescent OLEDs

    DOEpatents

    Xia, Chuanjun; Cheon, Kwang -Ohk

    2015-08-25

    Novel compounds containing a triphenylene moiety linked to an .alpha..beta. connected binaphthyl ring system are provided. These compounds have surprisingly good solubility in organic solvents and are useful as host compounds in red phosphorescent OLEDs.

  20. Inclusion Behavior During the Electron Beam Button Melting Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellot, J. P.; Defay, B.; Jourdan, J.; Chapelle, P.; Jardy, A.

    2012-10-01

    The high mechanical performance of alloys developed for the manufacture of turbine disks depend upon the size and the number density of the inclusions. The electron beam button method has been practiced since the 1980s as a technique to quantify the cleanliness of the superalloys as well as to identify the nature and the size of the inclusions. The technique involves melting the sample into a hemispherical water-cooled crucible and the low density inclusions (mainly oxides) are concentrated by a combination of Marangoni and buoyancy forces into an area at the top surface of the button referred to as the raft. We have experimentally studied the behavior of oxide inclusions in special steels using both high definition video and infrared cameras. We have observed the inversion of the Marangoni effect due to the presence of sulfur, which leads to a positive temperature coefficient of the surface tension. A mathematical modeling has been carried out to simulate the turbulent fluid flow associated with the temperature field in the metallic pool of the button. The surface temperature profile has been successfully compared with the measured data. A post-processor numerical tool calculates the inclusion trajectories taking into account the turbulent fluctuation velocity by a stochastic approach. Hence, the behavior of a population of inclusions has been statistically studied, and the dependence of the capture efficiency on the inclusion size has been analyzed.

  1. The eukaryotic signal sequence, YGRL, targets the chlamydial inclusion

    PubMed Central

    Kabeiseman, Emily J.; Cichos, Kyle H.; Moore, Elizabeth R.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how host proteins are targeted to pathogen-specified organelles, like the chlamydial inclusion, is fundamentally important to understanding the biogenesis of these unique subcellular compartments and how they maintain autonomy within the cell. Syntaxin 6, which localizes to the chlamydial inclusion, contains an YGRL signal sequence. The YGRL functions to return syntaxin 6 to the trans-Golgi from the plasma membrane, and deletion of the YGRL signal sequence from syntaxin 6 also prevents the protein from localizing to the chlamydial inclusion. YGRL is one of three YXXL (YGRL, YQRL, and YKGL) signal sequences which target proteins to the trans-Golgi. We designed various constructs of eukaryotic proteins to test the specificity and propensity of YXXL sequences to target the inclusion. The YGRL signal sequence redirects proteins (e.g., Tgn38, furin, syntaxin 4) that normally do not localize to the chlamydial inclusion. Further, the requirement of the YGRL signal sequence for syntaxin 6 localization to inclusions formed by different species of Chlamydia is conserved. These data indicate that there is an inherent property of the chlamydial inclusion, which allows it to recognize the YGRL signal sequence. To examine whether this “inherent property” was protein or lipid in nature, we asked if deletion of the YGRL signal sequence from syntaxin 6 altered the ability of the protein to interact with proteins or lipids. Deletion or alteration of the YGRL from syntaxin 6 does not appreciably impact syntaxin 6-protein interactions, but does decrease syntaxin 6-lipid interactions. Intriguingly, data also demonstrate that YKGL or YQRL can successfully substitute for YGRL in localization of syntaxin 6 to the chlamydial inclusion. Importantly and for the first time, we are establishing that a eukaryotic signal sequence targets the chlamydial inclusion. PMID:25309881

  2. Inclusion of Binaries in Evolutionary Population Synthesis

    E-print Network

    Fenghui Zhang; Zhanwen Han; Lifang Li; Jarrod R. Hurley

    2004-12-01

    Using evolutionary population synthesis we present integrated colours, integrated spectral energy distributions and absorption-line indices defined by the Lick Observatory image dissector scanner (referred to as Lick/IDS) system, for an extensive set of instantaneous burst binary stellar populations with and without binary interactions. The ages of the populations are in the range $1-15 $Gyr and the metallicities are in the range $0.0001-0.03$. By comparing the results for populations with and without binary interactions we show that the inclusion of binary interactions makes the integrated $\\rm U-B$, $\\rm B-V$, $\\rm V-R$ and $\\rm R-I$ colours and all Lick/IDS spectral absorption indices (except for $\\rm H_\\beta$) substantially smaller. In other words binary evolution makes a population appear bluer. This effect raises the derived age and metallicity of the population. We calculate several sets of additional solar-metallicity binary stellar populations to explore the influence of input parameters to the binary evolution algorithm (the common-envelope ejection efficiency and the stellar wind mass-loss rate) on the resulting integrated colours. We also look at the dependence on the choice of distribution functions used to generate the initial binary population. The results show that variations in the choice of input model parameters and distributions can significantly affect the results. However, comparing the discrepancies that exist between the colours of various models, we find that the differences are less than those produced between the models with and those without binary interactions. Therefore it is very necessary to consider binary interactions in order to draw accurate conclusions from evolutionary population synthesis work.

  3. [Begnin naevus cell inclusions in two patients treated for cancer].

    PubMed

    Amrani, Mariam; Jahid, Ahmed; Benkirane, Leila; Tijami, Ahmed; Gamra, Lamia; Labrousse, Francois; Catanzano, Gilbert; Belabbas, Mohamed Alaoui; Elhachimi, Azzouz

    2002-09-01

    In 1897, Reis was the first to describe benign nevus inclusions in the lymph node of patients undergoing surgery for genital neoplasia. These inclusions are very rarely encountered and can be misleading in the absence of careful analysis. We report on two cases of nevus cell inclusions in axillary and inguinal lymph nodes dissected in the context of breast cancer and thigh sarcoma respectively. Cautious morphological analysis should be compared with histochemistry and immunohistochemistry data to avoid erroneous diagnosis of metastasis. We also should bare in mind the possible occurrance of primitive lymph node melanoma. PMID:12410156

  4. Carbonate Mineral Assemblages as Inclusions in Yakutian Diamonds: TEM Verifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logvinova, A. M.; Wirth, R.; Sobolev, N. V.; Taylor, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonate mineral inclusions are quite rare in diamonds from the upper mantle, but are evidence for a carbonate abundance in the mantle. It is believed that such carbonatitic inclusions originated from high-density fluids (HDFs) that were enclosed in diamond during its growth. Using TEM and EPMA, several kinds of carbonate inclusions have been identified in Yakutian diamonds : aragonite, dolomite, magnesite, Ba-, Sr-, and Fe-rich carbonates. Most of them are represented by multi-phase inclusions of various chemically distinct carbonates, rich in Ca, Mg, and K and associated with minor amounts of silicate, oxide, saline, and volatile phases. Volatiles, leaving some porosity, played a significant role in the diamond growth. A single crystal of aragonite (60?m) is herein reported for the first time. This inclusion is located in the center of a diamond from the Komsomolskaya pipe. Careful CL imaging reveals the total absence of cracks around the aragonite inclusion - i.e., closed system. This inclusion has been identified by X-ray diffraction and microprobe analysis. At temperatures above 1000 0C, aragonite is only stable at high pressures of 5-6 GPa. Inside this aragonite, we observed nanocrystalline inclusions of titanite, Ni-rich sulfide, magnetite, water-bearing Mg-silicate, and fluid bubbles. Dolomite is common in carbonate multi-phase inclusions in diamonds from the Internatsionalnaya, Yubileinaya, and Udachnaya kimberlite pipes. Alluvial diamonds of the northeastern Siberian Platform are divided into two groups based on the composition of HDFs: 1) Mg-rich multi-phase inclusions (60% magnesite + dolomite + Fe-spinel + Ti-silicate + fluid bubbles); and 2) Ca-rich multi-phase inclusions (Ca,Ba-, Ca,Sr-, Ca,Fe-carbonates + Ti-silicate + Ba-apatite + fluid bubbles). High-density fluids also contain K. Volatiles in the fluid bubbles are represented by water, Cl, F, S, CO2, CH4, and heavy hydrocarbons. Origin of the second group of HDFs may be related to the non-silicate carbonatitic melt. We consider the primary hydrous, ?a-rich and Mg-poor carbonate melts as having formed in subducted oceanic crust. Variations of carbonate-inclusion compositions among diamonds indicate the variability in the source media during the formation of diamond and may be the result of metasomatic interaction with host rocks.

  5. The challenge of inclusive design in the US context.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Valerie; Bonome-Sims, Gabriela; Knecht, Barbara; Ostroff, Elaine; Otitigbe, Jennifer; Parente, Maura; Safdie, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    The paper considers the evolution of thinking and practice of inclusive design in the United States since 1993, the year of the first special edition of Applied Ergonomics on inclusive design. It frames the examination initially in terms of the US social mores that substantially influence behavior and attitudes from a defining individualism to legal mandates for accessibility to the nation's ingrained obsession with youth and delusional attitudes about aging. The authors explore the disparate patterns across the design disciplines and identify promising linkages and patterns that may be harbingers of a more expansive embrace of inclusive design in the years ahead. PMID:24529531

  6. Method for locating metallic nitride inclusions in metallic alloy ingots

    DOEpatents

    White, Jack C. (Albany, OR); Traut, Davis E. (Corvallis, OR); Oden, Laurance L. (Albany, OR); Schmitt, Roman A. (Corvallis, OR)

    1992-01-01

    A method of determining the location and history of metallic nitride and/or oxynitride inclusions in metallic melts. The method includes the steps of labeling metallic nitride and/or oxynitride inclusions by making a coreduced metallic-hafnium sponge from a mixture of hafnium chloride and the chloride of a metal, reducing the mixed chlorides with magnesium, nitriding the hafnium-labeled metallic-hafnium sponge, and seeding the sponge to be melted with hafnium-labeled nitride inclusions. The ingots are neutron activated and the hafnium is located by radiometric means. Hafnium possesses exactly the proper metallurgical and radiochemical properties for this use.

  7. Inclusion process of tetracycline in ? and ?-cyclodextrins: A theoretical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Mércia A. S.; Anconi, Cleber P. A.; Dos Santos, Hélio F.; De Almeida, Wagner B.; Nascimento, Clebio S.

    2015-04-01

    The present Letter reports results from a comprehensive theoretical analysis of the inclusion process involving the tetracycline (TC) by ? and ?-cyclodextrin (CD). Structure and stabilization energies were calculated, both in gas phase and aqueous solution, using a sequential methodology based on semiempirical and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. By the results, a qualitative structure-property relationship could be established with two main structural features being relevant for inclusion complex stabilization: (i) the depth of inclusion, which favors the hydrophobic contact inside the cavity of CDs and (ii) the hydrogen bonds established between guest and host molecules.

  8. Broadband sound blocking in phononic crystals with rotationally symmetric inclusions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joong Seok; Yoo, Sungmin; Ahn, Young Kwan; Kim, Yoon Young

    2015-09-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of broadband sound blocking with rotationally symmetric extensible inclusions introduced in phononic crystals. By varying the size of four equally shaped inclusions gradually, the phononic crystal experiences remarkable changes in its band-stop properties, such as shifting/widening of multiple Bragg bandgaps and evolution to resonance gaps. Necessary extensions of the inclusions to block sound effectively can be determined for given incident frequencies by evaluating power transmission characteristics. By arraying finite dissimilar unit cells, the resulting phononic crystal exhibits broadband sound blocking from combinational effects of multiple Bragg scattering and local resonances even with small-numbered cells. PMID:26428816

  9. Ceramic Inclusions in Powder Metallurgy Disk Alloys: Characterization and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonacuse, Peter J.

    2001-01-01

    Powder metallurgy alloys are increasingly used in gas turbine engines, especially in turbine disk applications. Although powder metallurgy materials have many advantages over conventionally cast and wrought alloys (higher strength, higher temperature capability, etc.), they suffer from the rare occurrence of ceramic defects (inclusions) that are inherent to the powder atomization process. These inclusions can have a potentially large detrimental effect on the durability of individual components. An inclusion in a high stress location can act as a site for premature crack initiation and thereby considerably reduce the fatigue life. Because these inclusions are exceedingly rare, they typically do not reveal themselves in the process of characterizing the material for a particular application (the cumulative volume of the test bars in a fatigue life characterization is typically on the order of a single actual component). Ceramic inclusions have, however, been found to be the root cause of a number of catastrophic engine failures. To investigate the effect of these inclusions in detail, we have undertaken a study where known populations of ceramic particles, whose composition and morphology are designed to mimic the "natural" inclusions, are added to the precursor powder. Surface-connected inclusions have been found to have a particularly large detrimental effect on fatigue life; therefore, the quantity of ceramic "seeds" added is calculated to ensure that a minimum number will intersect the surface of the fatigue test bars. Because the ceramic inclusions are irregularly shaped and have a tendency to break up in the process of extrusion and forging, a method of calculating the probability of occurrence and expected intercepted surface area was needed. We have developed a Monte Carlo simulation to determine the distributions of these parameters and have verified the simulated results with observations of ceramic inclusions found in macroscopic slices from extrusions and forgings. Fatigue specimens have been machined from Udimet 720 (a powder metallurgy superalloy) forgings, to determine the effects of the inclusions on fatigue life. The ultimate goal of this study will be to use probabilistic methods to determine the reliability detriment that can be attributed to these ceramic inclusions. This work has been supported by the Ultra Safe and Ultra- Efficient Engine Technologies programs.

  10. Brine Inclusions Migration in Intact Salt Crystals under Thermal Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caporuscio, F.; Boukhalfa, H.

    2013-12-01

    The behavior of water contained in rock salt under the influence of thermal gradients is critical to the performance of salt as a medium for the disposal of nuclear waste. Water contained in salt can be present as discrete inclusions within intact salt crystals, at the interface between salt crystals and aggregates, and also as hydration water and structural water present in accessory minerals present in salt. Water content in pure halite salt usually rages from 0.1 to 0.5 wt. % but is significantly higher in clay rich salt, for which water content can be up to several wt. %. Under the influence of thermal gradients brine inclusions and water associated to the accessory mineral is mobilized. Previous investigations have shown brine inclusions tend to move towards the heat source through a mechanism that involves the dissolution of salt at the hot face of the brine inclusion and its precipitation at the colder side of the inclusion. Uncertainties remain on the exact parameters that define the rate of brine migration and whether it truly migrates to towards the heat source. We performed studies under controlled thermal gradients to examine the behavior of brine inclusions in single salt crystals obtained from the underground salt mine at the Waste Isolation Power Plant (WIPP). We found that the behavior of the brine inclusions under thermal gradients is dependent on the thermal gradient magnitude and the nature of the inclusion. Full inclusions (liquid only) migrate predominantly towards the heat source, but when the inclusions are large and close to the surface they fracture the salt and release water near the surface. Inclusions that migrate towards the heat source migrate through a mechanism that involves the dissolution of salt at the hot side of the inclusion and its deposition along the migration path. SEM analysis of the migration pathways shows that brine migrates through the creation of a network of square shaped hollow channels of about 10 micron diameter. The behavior of two phase inclusions (liquid and gas) in a temperature gradient is distinctly different from that of full inclusions. The brine in the two phase inclusions still migrates towards the heat source; however, the vapor phase moves away from the heat source through narrow square shaped channels. The resulting salt crystals are much more fractured and have a distinct appearance compared to salt crystals with full inclusion. The composition of the salt deposited along the migration channels changes along migration pathway. At the start of the inclusion migration pathway the deposited salt is composed of a mixture of NaCl, MgCl2, and CaCl2, with minor other elements. However, as the brine migrates towards the heat source its composition changes and it gets enriched in NaCl. SEM images and migration channels

  11. Blue Photoluminescence From Silacyclobutene Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernisz, Udo

    1999-04-01

    Organosilicon compounds in which the Si atom is bound to an aromatic moiety such as a phenyl group, exhibit strong blue photoluminescence when excited with UV light (for example at a wavelength of 337 nm). This phenomenon was investigated quantitatively at room temperature and at the temperature of liquid nitrogen (78 K) by measuring the emission and excitation spectra of the total luminescence, and of the phosphorescence, for a silacyclobutene compound in which two phenyl groups are joined across the C=C double bond of the ring. The effect of a series of organic substituents on the Si atom was investigated as well as the time dependence of the phosphorescence intensity decay for this class of materials. A tentative model of the energy levels in this compound is proposed. The observation of visible blue emission -- in contrast to photoluminescence in the UV from the aromatic groups -- is explained by the Si-C bond lowering the energy of the molecular orbitals, an effect that is currently under study for a range of Si-containing compounds. Synthesis of the silacyclobutene compounds was performed at the laboratory of Prof. N. Auner, now at J.W. Goethe Universität, Frankfurt, Germany. His contributions, and those of his collaborators, to the work reported here are gratefully acknowledged.

  12. Extraterrestrial Organic Compounds in Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botta, Oliver; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Meyer, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Many organic compounds or their precursors found in meteorites originated in the interstellar or circumstellar medium and were later incorporated into planetesimals during the formation of the solar system. There they either survived intact or underwent further processing to synthesize secondary products on the meteorite parent body. The most distinct feature of CI and CM carbonaceous chondrites, two types of stony meteorites, is their high carbon content (up to 3% of weight), either in the form of carbonates or of organic compounds. The bulk of the organic carbon consists of an insoluble macromolecular material with a complex structure. Also present is a soluble organic fraction, which has been analyzed by several separation and analytical procedures. Low detection limits can be achieved by derivatization of the organic molecules with reagents that allow for analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography. The CM meteorite Murchison has been found to contain more than 70 extraterrestrial amino acids and several other classes of compounds including carboxylic acids, hydroxy carboxylic acids, sulphonic and phosphonic acids, aliphatic, aromatic and polar hydrocarbons, fullerenes, heterocycles as well as carbonyl compounds, alcohols, amines and amides. The organic matter was found to be enriched in deuterium, and distinct organic compounds show isotopic enrichments of carbon and nitrogen relative to terrestrial matter.

  13. A cyclodextrin-based polymer for sensing diclofenac in water.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Pu; Weibel, Nicolas; Dudal, Yves; Corvini, Philippe F-X; Shahgaldian, Patrick

    2015-12-15

    An assay for the determination of diclofenac concentration, in the micromolar range in water, was developed. It is based on the use of a recently developed cyclodextrin-based polymer that possesses an inherent affinity for the target pharmaceutical. This competitive assay is exploiting the possibility to displace a fluorescent dye, adsorbed in the cyclodextrin-based polymer, by the target drug. This displacement is followed by measuring the increase in fluorescence polarization of the dye released in solution. The assay was successfully tested on a real wastewater sample with a limit of detection of 1?M. PMID:26164704

  14. Encapsulation of ethylene gas into ?-cyclodextrin and characterisation of the inclusion complexes.

    PubMed

    Ho, Binh T; Joyce, Daryl C; Bhandari, Bhesh R

    2011-07-15

    Molecular encapsulation of various apolar compounds with ?-cyclodextrin (?-CD) is becoming a widely applied technique to produce food, pharmaceutical and agricultural materials. Encapsulated ethylene in the form of inclusion complexes (ICs) with cyclodextrin, which is in powder form, could be used in fruit ripening and other aspect of plant growth regulation. In this research, ethylene was complexed with an ?-CD under 0.2-1.5MPa for 12-120h. Ethylene concentration in the inclusion complexes (ICs) varied from 0.98 to 1.03mol ethylene/mole CD. Pressure and time did not increase ethylene concentrations in the complexes, but did yield significantly higher amounts of the crystal complex. The physico-chemical properties of the ethylene-?-CD complexes at various concentration of ethylene were characterised using X-ray diffractometry (XRD), nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (CP-MAS (13)C NMR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetry analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Complex formation was confirmed by sharp peaks in the XRD diffractograms, crystal images by SEM, double bond of ethylene gas and chemical shifts at C(4), C(3) and C(5) in NMR spectra, intensity changes of C-H bending and CC stretching in the FTIR spectra, and water loss and physico-chemical property modifications in the DSC and TGA scans. PMID:23140702

  15. 34 CFR 200.6 - Inclusion of all students.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...OF EDUCATION TITLE I-IMPROVING THE ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT OF THE DISADVANTAGED ...Inclusion of all students. A State's academic assessment system required under...accommodations. (i) A State's academic assessment system must...

  16. 34 CFR 200.6 - Inclusion of all students.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...OF EDUCATION TITLE I-IMPROVING THE ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT OF THE DISADVANTAGED ...Inclusion of all students. A State's academic assessment system required under...accommodations. (i) A State's academic assessment system must...

  17. 34 CFR 200.6 - Inclusion of all students.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...OF EDUCATION TITLE I-IMPROVING THE ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT OF THE DISADVANTAGED ...Inclusion of all students. A State's academic assessment system required under...accommodations. (i) A State's academic assessment system must...

  18. Volatile compositions of melt inclusions in Coso Range Rhyolite

    SciTech Connect

    Blouke, K.J. )

    1993-04-01

    Dissolved water and carbon dioxide concentrations were measured in melt inclusions in quartz phenocrysts from rhyolite domes and lava flows in the Coso volcanic field to determine pre-eruptive volatile content of the magma. Inclusions roughly 50--100 microns in diameter were analyzed for dissolved water and carbon dioxide using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The glasses have a total water concentration ranging from four to six weight percent and no detectable carbon dioxide. Vapor bubbles in the inclusions about 10--40 microns in diameter were also analyzed for their volatile composition. The spectra show no evidence for carbon dioxide, although significant water is observed. If the melt inclusions were saturated at the time of entrapment, then crystallization occurred between 1,200 and 2,100 bars pressure or greater than 4 kilometers depth.

  19. Using Performance Feedback to Support Paraprofessionals in Inclusive Preschool Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Teresa L.; Gatmaitan, Michelle; Harjusola-Webb, Sanna M.

    2014-01-01

    Paraprofessionals (also referred to as paraeducators or instructional assistants) who work in inclusive early childhood classrooms are facing increasing responsibilities in supporting teachers and children with diverse learning needs (Deardorff, Glasenapp, Schalock, & Udell, 2007; Downing, Ryndak, & Clark, 2000; Giangreco, Broer, &…

  20. Anomalous Behaviour Detection Using Spatiotemporal Oriented Energies, Subset Inclusion Histogram

    E-print Network

    Wildes, Richard P.

    Anomalous Behaviour Detection Using Spatiotemporal Oriented Energies, Subset Inclusion Histogram of spatiotemporal oriented energy are used to model behaviour. This representation can capture a wide range.g., backgrounds of fluttering vegetation or water waves), including multimodal behaviour. Modeling must

  1. 26 CFR 26.2642-1 - Inclusion ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2642-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES GENERATION-SKIPPING TRANSFER TAX REGULATIONS UNDER THE TAX REFORM ACT OF 1986 § 26.2642-1 Inclusion ratio. (a) In...

  2. 26 CFR 26.2642-5 - Finality of inclusion ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2642-5 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES GENERATION-SKIPPING TRANSFER TAX REGULATIONS UNDER THE TAX REFORM ACT OF 1986 § 26.2642-5 Finality of inclusion ratio....

  3. Refractory-element-rich inclusions in CM meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdougall, J. D.

    1979-01-01

    Refractory-element-rich inclusions of a variety of types occur in CM meteorites. Based on detailed study of Murchison and more limited investigations of Murray, Nogoya, Cold Bokkeveld and Mighei, the most common of these inclusions are small spinel-hibonite bodies rimmed with diopside. Bulk chemical compositions are estimated to be approximately 67% Al2O3, 21% MgO, 5.5% CaO, 5.5% TiO2, and 1% SiO2. Although this chemical composition does not agree closely with current theoretically predicted compositions of early condensate assemblages, the inclusions have many features which suggest that they are indeed early condensates. These include texture, mineralogical composition, sequence of minerals and magnesium isotopic composition of hibonite. The CM refractory inclusions exhibit several differences from those observed in Allende and other CV meteorites. These probably record variations in time, place or physical conditions of origin for the two cases.

  4. Beyond Blindfolds: Creating an Inclusive Classroom through Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krebs, Cathryn S.

    2000-01-01

    This article discusses the inclusion of a student with blindness in a general education classroom. Disability awareness activities that encouraged students without blindness to understand blindness are described, including reading materials, a blindfold lunch, and a Braille Day. (CR)

  5. Circovirus inclusion bodies in intestinal muscle cells of a canary.

    PubMed

    Rampin, T; Manarolla, G; Pisoni, G; Recordati, C; Sironi, G

    2006-08-01

    Multiple cytoplasmic inclusion bodies were observed in the intestinal smooth muscle cells of an adult canary from an aviary with a history of high mortality (50%) both in adult and young birds. Grossly, a mild enteritis was the only lesion appreciable. Smears of the proventricular contents contained a few megabacteria (Macrorhabdus ornithogaster). The intestinal inclusions were found in very high numbers in all parts of the tract examined. They appeared round to oval, amphophilic and hyaline in sections stained with haematoxylin and eosin, and magenta with Feulgen stain. Inclusions of the same type were occasionally detectable in the wall of a few splenic and pancreatic arteries. No inclusions or lesions were seen in the other organs examined. Transmission electron microscopy of the intestinal wall revealed circovirus-like particles either in paracrystalline arrays or loose arrangements, mostly within the cytoplasm of the intestinal muscule cells. Polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequence analysis confirmed infection with canary circovirus. PMID:16854639

  6. On fractional differential inclusions with the Jumarie derivative

    SciTech Connect

    Kamocki, Rafa?; Obczy?ski, Cezary

    2014-02-15

    In the paper, fractional differential inclusions with the Jumarie derivative are studied. We discuss the existence and uniqueness of a solution to such problems. Our study relies on standard variational methods.

  7. EVEN MORE INCLUSIVE GENERAL VIEW OF THE GARDEN, AND THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EVEN MORE INCLUSIVE GENERAL VIEW OF THE GARDEN, AND THE DISTANT HOUSE AND OUTBUILDINGS, FROM THE BOTANIC GARDEN'S SOUTHEAST SIDE - John Bartram House & Garden, 54th Street & Lindbergh Boulevard, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  8. MORE INCLUSIVE GENERAL VIEW OF THE GARDEN, HOUSE, AND OUTBUILDINGS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MORE INCLUSIVE GENERAL VIEW OF THE GARDEN, HOUSE, AND OUTBUILDINGS FROM THE BOTANIC GARDEN'S SOUTHEAST SIDE - John Bartram House & Garden, 54th Street & Lindbergh Boulevard, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  9. Dynamic inclusion complexes of metal nanoparticles inside nanocups.

    PubMed

    Alarcón-Correa, Mariana; Lee, Tung-Chun; Fischer, Peer

    2015-06-01

    Host-guest inclusion complexes are abundant in molecular systems and of fundamental importance in living organisms. Realizing a colloidal analogue of a molecular dynamic inclusion complex is challenging because inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) with a well-defined cavity and portal are difficult to synthesize in high yield and with good structural fidelity. Herein, a generic strategy towards the fabrication of dynamic 1:1 inclusion complexes of metal nanoparticles inside oxide nanocups with high yield (>70%) and regiospecificity (>90%) by means of a reactive double Janus nanoparticle intermediate is reported. Experimental evidence confirms that the inclusion complexes are formed by a kinetically controlled mechanism involving a delicate interplay between bipolar galvanic corrosion and alloying-dealloying oxidation. Release of the NP guest from the nanocups can be efficiently triggered by an external stimulus. PMID:25959070

  10. Fluid inclusion geobarometry from ejected Mt. Somma-Vesuvius nodules.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belkin, H.E.; de Vivo, B.; Roedder, E.; Cortini, M.

    1985-01-01

    The results of a microthermometric study of fluid inclusions from seven cumulate and three 'skarn' nodules collected from the pyroclastics of three non-Plinian eruptive episodes are presented. -J.A.Z.

  11. Organometallic chemistry of bimetallic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, C.P.

    1992-07-01

    Hydrogenation of alkynes by the heterobimetallic compound C{sub 5}H{sub 5}(CO){sub 2}Re({mu}-H)Pt(H)(PPh{sub 3}){sub 2} is being studied. The compound C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}(CO){sub 2}Re{double bond}Re(CO){sub 2}C{sub 5}Me{sub 5} was synthesized; its chemistry is being studied. Compounds discovered in a reinvestigation of a spurious report of (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5})Co{double bond}Co(C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}), are being studied. The deuterioformylation of alkenes using wide bite angle phosphines will be studied.

  12. Gallium-containing anticancer compounds

    PubMed Central

    Chitambar, Christopher R

    2013-01-01

    There is an ever pressing need to develop new drugs for the treatment of cancer. Gallium nitrate, a group IIIa metal salt, inhibits the proliferation of tumor cells in vitro and in vivo and has shown activity against non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and bladder cancer in clinical trials. Gallium can function as an iron mimetic and perturb iron-dependent proliferation and other iron-related processes in tumor cells. Gallium nitrate lacks cross resistance with conventional chemotherapeutic drugs and is not myelosuppressive; it can be used when other drugs have failed or when the blood count is low. Given the therapeutic potential of gallium, newer generations of gallium compounds are now in various phases of preclinical and clinical development. These compounds hold the promise of greater anti-tumor activity against a broader spectrum of cancers. The development of gallium compounds for cancer treatment and their mechanisms of action will be discussed. PMID:22800370

  13. Mantle-derived fluids in diamond micro-inclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navon, O.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Rossman, G. R.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1988-01-01

    Microinclusions in diamonds from Zaire and Botswana differ in composition from the more common large inclusions of the peridotitic or eclogitic assemblages. These sub-micrometer inclusions resemble potassic magmas in their composition, but are enriched in H2O, CO2(3-), and K2O and depleted in MgO. This composition represents a volatile-rich fluid or melt from the upper mantle, which was trapped in the diamonds as they grew.

  14. Breakdown of QCD factorization theorems for inclusive reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.; Bodwin, G.T.; Lepage, G.P.

    1982-08-01

    Initial state interactions are shown to violate standard factorization for massive lepton pair production and hadron-induced hard-scattering inclusive reactions order-by-order in QCD perturbation theory. Initial and final state interactions lead to a number of new physical phenomena including K/sub 1/ fluctuations, color correlations, anomalous nuclear number dependence of inclusive cross sections, and induced hadron production in the central rapidity region.

  15. N-rich fluid inclusions in octahedrally-grown diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Evan M.; Kopylova, Maya G.; Frezzotti, Maria Luce; Afanasiev, Valentin P.

    2014-05-01

    Nitrogen is generally considered a trace component in the Earth's mantle. Mantle volatiles sampled from mid-ocean ridge basalts or preserved as fluid inclusions in xenoliths are dominated by CO2, with only traces of nitrogen. Here we describe CO2-N2 fluid inclusions with 40 mol% N2 and silicate melt inclusions with ?0.1 wt% dissolved N2 in mantle-derived diamonds from 3 different cratons. The diamonds are octahedrally-grown, which is the most common growth habit and rarely reported to contain fluid inclusions. The inclusions have C/N ratios <1, more than two orders of magnitude below typical mantle values. We propose that nitrogen can become concentrated to high degrees by processes related to diamond growth. A growing diamond does not readily consume the nitrogen available, suggesting incompatible behaviour. Residual N2 from this process represents a concentrated nitrogen flux escaping the convecting mantle. Hidden nitrogen fluxes like this might be significant in counteracting the large apparent net influx by subduction. Based on nitrogen and carbon speciation in the inclusions, we propose that redox processes control the liberation of nitrogen from the convecting mantle, by the oxidation of NH+4 in silicates to mobile N2, concurrent with a parallel oxidation process releasing carbonate melt from the asthenosphere. Isotopic fractionation accompanying changes in nitrogen speciation could help account for the apparent isotopic mismatch between surficial and mantle nitrogen.

  16. Genesis of melilitolite from Colle Fabbri: inferences from melt inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panina, L. I.; Nikolaeva, A. T.; Stoppa, F.

    2013-12-01

    Melilite and wollastonite from the Colle Fabbri stock contain silicate melt and silicate-carbonate inclusions. The homogenization temperatures of silicate inclusions are within the magmatic temperature range of mantle ultrabasic melts: about 1,320 ± 15 °?. Their composition is melilititic and evolves to the composition of leucite tephrite and phonolite. The composition of silicate-carbonate inclusions are high SiO2, Ca-rich, enriched in alkalies and are similar to that of inclusions of carbonatite melts in the minerals of melilitolites of other intrusive ultramafic complexes. They are also similar to the compositions of metasomatized travertine covering the melilitolite stock. The presence of primary silicate and silicate-carbonate inclusions evidences that the melilitite magma from which melilitolites of Colle Fabbri crystallized was associated with carbonatite liquid. This liquid was highly fluidized, mobile and aggressive. Actively interacting with overlying travertine, the liquid enriched them with alkalies, aluminosilicates and incompatible elements, which resulted in the equalization of their compositions. Heterogeneous compositional dominions were formed at the contact between melilitolite and wall pelites. In the minerals of these contact facies high-Si melt inclusions of varying composition have been observed. Their occurrence is related to the local assimilation by the high-temperature melilitite magma of pelitic country rocks. The content of incompatible elements in melilitite melts and melilitolites is higher than the mantle norm and they have peculiar indicator ratios, spectra, Eu/Eu* ratio, which suggest a peculiar mantle source.

  17. Compounding errors in 2 dogs receiving anticonvulsants

    PubMed Central

    McConkey, Sandra E.; Walker, Susan; Adams, Cathy

    2012-01-01

    Two cases that involve drug compounding errors are described. One dog exhibited increased seizure activity due to a compounded, flavored phenobarbital solution that deteriorated before the expiration date provided by the compounder. The other dog developed clinical signs of hyperkalemia and bromine toxicity following a 5-fold compounding error in the concentration of potassium bromide (KBr). PMID:23024385

  18. Persulfate Oxidation of Gasoline Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sra, K.; Thomson, N.; Barker, J.

    2009-05-01

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) using persulfate is a promising remediation technology that can be potentially applied to a wide range of organic contaminants. Gasoline compounds are of particular interest because they extensively impact the soil and groundwater, and are highly persistent and toxic. In this investigation, destruction of specific gasoline compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzenes, xylenes, trimethylbenzenes (TMBs) and naphthalene), and fractions (F1 and F2) by activated and inactivated persulfate was studied at the bench-scale. Aqueous phase batch reactors (25 mL) for inactivated systems employed persulfate at two concentrations (1 or 20 g/L), and activated systems were conducted with a persulfate concentration of 20 g/L. In the activated systems, the ability of hydrogen peroxide or chelated-ferrous as an activator was examined at two experimental conditions (peroxide molar ratio 0.1 and 1.0 with respect to persulfate; and citric acid chelated ferrous at 150 and 600 mg/L). All treatments and controls contained an initial gasoline concentration of approximately 25 mg/L and were run in triplicate. Sampling for gasoline compounds was conducted over <28 day reaction period. The controls showed insignificant degradation for all the gasoline compounds and fractions examined while inactivated persulfate at 1 g/L showed little (<10%) decrease in the concentration of gasoline compounds over the 28 day reaction period. Inactivated persulfate at 20 g/L demonstrated a significant decrease in the aqueous concentration of BTEX (>99%), TMB (>94%) and naphthalene (>71%). Oxidation of the F1 fraction (>94%) was more pronounced than the F2 fraction (>80%), and >93% TPH was oxidized. Use of peroxide as an activator at a molar ratio of 0.1 improved the destruction of TMBs (>99%) and naphthalene (>85%) while maintaining the high removal of BTEX (>99%) compounds. Increase in activator strength (molar ratio 1.0) decreased the destruction of xylenes (>86%) and TMBs (>81%). The decrease in concentration of all the compounds was higher for a molar ratio of 1.0 (<27%) as compared with a molar ratio of 0.1 (<11%). The activation by ferrous concentration resulted in higher oxidation of compounds (except naphthalene) as compared with unactivated or peroxide activated persulfate. 1,3,5-TMB was completed oxidized after 4 days using higher chelated ferrous concentration and after 12 days using lower chelated ferrous concentration for persulfate activation. In general, increase in chelated ferrous concentration resulted in higher oxidation of the gasoline compounds. While oxidation of F1 fraction was similar for two ferrous activation conditions, the oxidation of F2 fraction was lower when ferrous activation at 600 mg/L was employed. Use of persulfate at high dosages by itself or in combination with higher doses of chelated ferrous or optimum doses of peroxide as an activator seems to be a viable option for remediation of gasoline compounds examined in this study. Persulfate appears to be particularly effective in the oxidation of BTEX compounds, but may require ferrous activation for a complete oxidation of TMBs and peroxide activation for oxidation of naphthalene.

  19. Halogenated Compounds from Marine Algae

    PubMed Central

    Cabrita, Maria Teresa; Vale, Carlos; Rauter, Amélia Pilar

    2010-01-01

    Marine algae produce a cocktail of halogenated metabolites with potential commercial value. Structures exhibited by these compounds go from acyclic entities with a linear chain to complex polycyclic molecules. Their medical and pharmaceutical application has been investigated for a few decades, however other properties, such as antifouling, are not to be discarded. Many compounds were discovered in the last years, although the need for new drugs keeps this field open as many algal species are poorly screened. The ecological role of marine algal halogenated metabolites has somehow been overlooked. This new research field will provide valuable and novel insight into the marine ecosystem dynamics as well as a new approach to comprehending biodiversity. Furthermore, understanding interactions between halogenated compound production by algae and the environment, including anthropogenic or global climate changes, is a challenging target for the coming years. Research of halogenated metabolites has been more focused on macroalgae than on phytoplankton. However, phytoplankton could be a very promising material since it is the base of the marine food chain with quick adaptation to environmental changes, which undoubtedly has consequences on secondary metabolism. This paper reviews recent progress on this field and presents trends on the role of marine algae as producers of halogenated compounds. PMID:20948909

  20. Cerium Oxide and Cerium Compounds

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R - 08 / 002F www.epa.gov / iris TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF Cerium Oxide and Cerium Compounds ( CAS No . 1306 - 38 - 3 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) September 2009 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC ii DISCLAIMER Th