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Sample records for a-receptor blockade attenuates

  1. Blockade of 5-HT2A receptors in the medial prefrontal cortex attenuates reinstatement of cue-elicited cocaine-seeking behavior in rats

    PubMed Central

    Pockros, Lara A.; Pentkowski, Nathan S.; Swinford, Sarah E.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale The action of serotonin (5-HT) at the 5-HT2A receptor subtype is thought to be involved in cocaine-seeking behavior that is motivated by exposure to drug-associated cues and drug priming. 5-HT2A receptors are densely clustered in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), an area that plays a role in mediating cocaine-seeking behavior. Objectives This study examined the hypothesis that M100907, a 5-HT2A receptor antagonist, infused directly in the vmPFC attenuates cue- and cocaine-primed reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior. Methods Rats trained to self-administer cocaine (0.75 mg/kg, i.v.) paired with light and tone cues underwent extinction training during which operant responses produced no consequences. Once behavior extinguished, rats were tested for reinstatement of responding elicited by either response-contingent presentations of the cocaine-paired light/tone cues or by cocaine-priming injections (10 mg/kg, i.p.) within 1 min after pretreatment with microinfusions of M100907 (0.1, 0.3, 1.0, or 1.5 μg/0.2 μl/side) into the vmPFC. Results Intra-vmPFC M100907 decreased cue-elicited reinstatement at the two highest doses (1.0 and 1.5 μg) but produced only a slight decrease in cocaine-primed reinstatement that was not dose dependent. The decrease in cue reinstatement was not likely due to impaired ability to respond since intra-vmPFC M100907 infusions had minimal effect on cocaine self-administration and no effect on cue-elicited sucrose-seeking behavior, or spontaneous or cocaine-induced locomotion. M100907 infusions into the adjacent anterior cingulate cortex had no effect on cue reinstatement. Conclusions The results suggest that the blockade of 5-HT2A receptors in the vmPFC selectively attenuates the incentive motivational effects of cocaine-paired cues. PMID:21079923

  2. Endothelin-A receptor blockade improves postischemic hepatic microhemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Uhlmann, Dirk; Glasser, Sebastian; Lauer, Heike; Ludwig, Stefan; Gaebel, Gabor; Serr, Frederick; Hauss, Johann; Witzigmann, Helmut

    2004-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate a possible protective role of a selective endothelin-A receptor antagonist on hepatic microcirculation after ischemia/reperfusion. In a rat model, warm ischemia of the left liver lobe was induced for 90 minutes under intraperitoneal anesthesia with xylazine and ketamine. Shamoperated and untreated ischemic groups and a group treated with BSF 208075 were investigated. The effect of the endothelin-A receptor antagonist on ischemia/reperfusion was assessed by in-vivo microscopy and measurement of aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase levels. In the untreated group, sinusoidal constriction to 70% of basal diameters was observed, leading to a significant decrease in perfusion rate. In addition, we found an increased percentage of stagnant leukocytes and platelets in sinusoids and in postsinusoidal venules (P < 0.05). A significant increase in liver enzymes was detected 6 hours after reperfusion (P < 0.05). In the treatment group, sinusoidal diameters were maintained at 108%, and perfusion rate was significantly increased (P < 0.05). Hepatocellular damage was decreased and leukocyte and platelet-endothelium interactions were reduced (P < 0.05). Our results provide evidence that the new therapeutic approach using an endothelin-A receptor antagonist is effective in reducing hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury. It could be shown for the first time that endothelin receptor blockade also influences platelet-endothelium interactions. PMID:15838253

  3. Blockade of GABA(A) receptors within the extended amygdala attenuates D(2) regulation of alcohol-motivated behaviors in the ventral tegmental area of alcohol-preferring (P) rats.

    PubMed

    Eiler, William J A; June, Harry L

    2007-06-01

    The dopamine (DA) mesolimbic pathway, which originates from DA cell bodies within the ventral tegmental area (VTA), has been shown by various studies to play a role in the mediation of various drugs of abuse including alcohol (EtOH). It has been suggested that the VTA's control of EtOH reward is mediated in part by the D2 receptors within the VTA. These receptors may be under the regulation of reciprocal GABAergic inputs from forebrain components of the mesolimbic path such as the nucleus accumbens (NAcc), a classic EtOH reward substrate, and the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, a substrate recently implicated in EtOH reinforcement, forming a self-regulating feedback loop. To test this hypothesis, D2 regulation of EtOH self-administration (SA) was evaluated by the microinfusion of the D2 antagonist eticlopride into the VTA of P rats, which produced profound reductions in EtOH SA in the highest (20.0 and 40.0microg) doses tested in both BST/VTA and NAcc/VTA implanted P rats. To determine the role of GABA in the mediation of EtOH SA, a 32.0ng dose the non-selective GABA antagonist SR 95531 was microinfused into the BST producing no effect on responding for EtOH and into the NAcc which lead to a reduction in EtOH responding. Finally, the hypothesis that GABA innervation of the VTA from the mesolimbic forebrain may influence EtOH SA was examined by the simultaneous infusion of eticlopride (40.0microg) into the VTA and SR 95531 (32.0ng) into either the BST or NAcc. This combination infusion completely attenuated the reduction in EtOH SA observed with the 40.0microg dose of eticlopride alone in both groups of animals. These results suggest that while the D2 receptors within the VTA regulate EtOH-motivated behaviors, this is modulated by GABAergic input from the mesolimbic forebrain, specifically from the BST and NAcc. PMID:17451754

  4. NEUROTROPHIN RECEPTOR BLOCKADE ATTENUATES DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICULATE MATTER (DEP) ENHANCEMENT OF ALLERGIC RESPONSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT BODY:
    Recent investigations have linked neurotrophins including NGF, NT-3, and BDNF to allergic airways diseases. Antibody blockade of NGF attenuates airway resistance associated with allergic airway responses in mice. Mice administered an antibody against the low aff...

  5. Blockade of B2 receptors attenuates the responses of group III afferents to static contraction.

    PubMed

    Leal, Anna K; Stone, Audrey J; Yamauchi, Katsuya; McCord, Jennifer L; Kaufman, Marc P

    2013-10-25

    Recent evidence has been presented demonstrating that group III mechanoreceptors comprise an important part of the sensory arm of the exercise pressor reflex, which in turn functions to increase arterial blood flow to contracting skeletal muscles. Although group III afferents are stimulated by mechanical distortion of their receptive fields, they are also stimulated by bradykinin, which is produced by skeletal muscle when it contracts. Moreover, blockade of B (bradykinin)2 receptors has been shown to decrease the magnitude of the exercise pressor reflex. Nevertheless, the effect of blockade of B2 receptors on responses of group III afferents to contraction is not known. We therefore determined the effect of B2 receptor blockade with HOE 140 (40μg/kg) on the responses to both static and intermittent contraction of group III afferents with endings in the triceps surae muscle of decerebrated unanesthetized cats. We found that HOE 140 significantly attenuated (P=0.04) the responses of 14 group III afferents to static contraction, but did not significantly attenuate (P=0.16) the responses of 16 group III afferents to intermittent contraction. The attenuation induced by HOE 140 was present throughout the static contraction period, and led us to speculate that blockade of B2 receptors on the endings of group III afferents decreased their sensitivity to mechanical events occurring in the working muscles. PMID:24036460

  6. Selective Blockade of Herpesvirus Entry Mediator–B and T Lymphocyte Attenuator Pathway Ameliorates Acute Graft-versus-Host Reaction

    PubMed Central

    del Rio, Maria-Luisa; Jones, Nick D.; Buhler, Leo; Norris, Paula; Shintani, Yasushi; Ware, Carl F.; Rodriguez-Barbosa, Jose-Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    The cosignaling network mediated by the herpesvirus entry mediator (HVEM; TNFRSF14) functions as a dual directional system that involves proinflammatory ligand, lymphotoxin that exhibits inducible expression and competes with HSV glycoprotein D for HVEM, a receptor expressed by T lymphocytes (LIGHT; TNFSF14), and the inhibitory Ig family member B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA). To dissect the differential contributions of HVEM/BTLA and HVEM/LIGHT interactions, topographically-specific, competitive, and nonblocking anti-HVEM Abs that inhibit BTLA binding, but not LIGHT, were developed. We demonstrate that a BTLA-specific competitor attenuated the course of acute graft-versus-host reaction in a murine F1 transfer semiallogeneic model. Selective HVEM/BTLA blockade did not inhibit donor T cell infiltration into graft-versus-host reaction target organs, but decreased the functional activity of the alloreactive T cells. These results highlight the critical role of HVEM/BTLA pathway in the control of the allogeneic immune response and identify a new therapeutic target for transplantation and autoimmune diseases. PMID:22490863

  7. Peripheral endothelin A receptor antagonism attenuates carcinoma-induced pain.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Brian L; Pickering, Victoria; Liu, Stanley; Quang, Phuong; Dolan, John; Connelly, S Thaddeus; Jordan, Richard C K

    2007-05-01

    In this study we investigated the role of endothelin-1 (ET-1) and its peripheral receptor (ET-A) in carcinoma-induced pain in a mouse cancer pain model. Tumors were induced in the hind paw of female mice by local injection of cells derived from a human oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Significant pain, as indicated by reduction in withdrawal thresholds in response to mechanical stimulation, began at four days after SCC inoculation and lasted to 28 days, the last day of measurement. Intra-tumor expression of both ET-1 mRNA and ET-1 protein were significantly upregulated compared to normal tissue, and local administration of the ET-A receptor selective antagonist, BQ-123 (100 microM) significantly elevated withdrawal thresholds, indicating the induction of an antinociceptive effect. These findings support the suggestion that ET-1 and ET-A receptors contribute to the severity of carcinoma-induced soft tissue cancer pain. PMID:16807013

  8. Adenosine A2A Receptor Blockade Prevents Rotenone-Induced Motor Impairment in a Rat Model of Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Fathalla, Ahmed M.; Soliman, Amira M.; Ali, Mohamed H.; Moustafa, Ahmed A.

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological studies implicate the blockade of adenosine receptorsas an effective strategy for reducing Parkinson’s disease (PD) symptoms. The objective of this study is to elucidate the possible protective effects of ZM241385 and 8-cyclopentyl-1, 3-dipropylxanthine, two selective A2A and A1 receptor antagonists, on a rotenone rat model of PD. Rats were split into four groups: vehicle control (1 ml/kg/48 h), rotenone (1.5 mg/kg/48 h, s.c.), ZM241385 (3.3 mg/kg/day, i.p) and 8-cyclopentyl-1, 3-dipropylxanthine (5 mg/kg/day, i.p). After that, animals were subjected to behavioral (stride length and grid walking) and biochemical (measuring concentration of dopamine levels using high performance liquid chromatography, HPLC). In the rotenone group, rats displayed a reduced motor activity and disturbed movement coordination in the behavioral tests and a decreased dopamine concentration as foundby HPLC. The effect of rotenone was partially prevented in the ZM241385 group, but not with 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine administration. The administration of ZM241385 improved motor function and movement coordination (partial increase of stride length and partial decrease in the number of foot slips) and an increase in dopamine concentration in the rotenone-injected rats. However, the 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine and rotenone groups were not significantly different. These results indicate that selective A2A receptor blockade by ZM241385, but not A1 receptor blockadeby 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, may treat PD motor symptoms. This reinforces the potential use of A2A receptor antagonists as a treatment strategy for PD patients. PMID:26973484

  9. C5a Receptor (CD88) Blockade Protects against MPO-ANCA GN

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Hong; Dairaghi, Daniel J.; Powers, Jay P.; Ertl, Linda S.; Baumgart, Trageen; Wang, Yu; Seitz, Lisa C.; Penfold, Mark E.T.; Gan, Lin; Hu, Peiqi; Lu, Bao; Gerard, Norma P.; Gerard, Craig; Schall, Thomas J.; Jaen, Juan C.; Falk, Ronald J.

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing and crescentic GN (NCGN) with a paucity of glomerular immunoglobulin deposits is associated with ANCA. The most common ANCA target antigens are myeloperoxidase (MPO) and proteinase 3. In a manner that requires activation of the alternative complement pathway, passive transfer of antibodies to mouse MPO (anti-MPO) induces a mouse model of ANCA NCGN that closely mimics human disease. Here, we confirm the importance of C5aR/CD88 in the mediation of anti-MPO–induced NCGN and report that C6 is not required. We further demonstrate that deficiency of C5a-like receptor (C5L2) has the reverse effect of C5aR/CD88 deficiency and results in more severe disease, indicating that C5aR/CD88 engagement enhances inflammation and C5L2 engagement suppresses inflammation. Oral administration of CCX168, a small molecule antagonist of human C5aR/CD88, ameliorated anti-MPO–induced NCGN in mice expressing human C5aR/CD88. These observations suggest that blockade of C5aR/CD88 might have therapeutic benefit in patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis and GN. PMID:24179165

  10. Blockade of Dopamine D4 Receptors Attenuates Reinstatement of Extinguished Nicotine-Seeking Behavior in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yijin; Pushparaj, Abhiram; Le Strat, Yann; Gamaleddin, Islam; Barnes, Chanel; Justinova, Zuzana; Goldberg, Steven R; Le Foll, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Since cloning of the dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4), its role in the brain has remained unclear. It has been reported that polymorphism of the DRD4 gene in humans is associated with reactivity to cues related to tobacco smoking. However, the role of DRD4 in animal models of nicotine addiction has seldom been explored. In our study, male Long-Evans rats learned to intravenously self-administer nicotine under a fixed-ratio (FR) schedule of reinforcement. Effects of the selective DRD4 antagonist L-745,870 were evaluated on nicotine self-administration behavior and on reinstatement of extinguished nicotine-seeking behavior induced by nicotine-associated cues or by priming injections of nicotine. L-745,870 was also tested on reinstatement of extinguished food-seeking behavior as a control. In addition, the selective DRD4 agonist PD 168,077 was tested for its ability to reinstate extinguished nicotine-seeking behavior. Finally, L-745,870 was tested in Sprague Dawley rats trained to discriminate administration of 0.4 mg/kg nicotine from vehicle under an FR schedule of food delivery. L-745,870 significantly attenuated reinstatement of nicotine-seeking induced by both nicotine-associated cues and nicotine priming. In contrast, L-745,870 did not affect established nicotine self-administration behavior or reinstatement of food-seeking behavior induced by food cues or food priming. L-745,870 did not produce nicotine-like discriminative-stimulus effects and did not alter discriminative-stimulus effects of nicotine. PD 168,077 did not reinstate extinguished nicotine-seeking behavior. As DRD4 blockade by L-745,870 selectively attenuated both cue- and nicotine-induced reinstatement of nicotine-seeking behavior, without affecting cue- or food-induced reinstatement of food-seeking behavior, DRD4 antagonists are potential therapeutic agents against tobacco smoking relapse. PMID:22030716

  11. Renin-angiotensin blockade resets podocyte epigenome through Kruppel-like Factor 4 and attenuates proteinuria.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kaori; Sasamura, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Mari; Sakamaki, Yusuke; Azegami, Tatsuhiko; Oguchi, Hideyo; Tokuyama, Hirobumi; Wakino, Shu; Hayashi, Koichi; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2015-10-01

    Proteinuria is a central component of chronic kidney disease and an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Kidney podocytes have an essential role as a filtration barrier against proteinuria. Kruppel-like Factor 4 (KLF4) is expressed in podocytes and decreased in glomerular diseases leading to methylation of the nephrin promoter, decreased nephrin expression and proteinuria. Treatment with an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) reduced methylation of the nephrin promoter in murine glomeruli of an adriamycin nephropathy model with recovery of KLF4 expression and a decrease in albuminuria. In podocyte-specific KLF4 knockout mice, the effect of ARB on albuminuria and the nephrin promoter methylation was attenuated. In cultured human podocytes, angiotensin II reduced KLF4 expression and caused methylation of the nephrin promoter with decreased nephrin expression. In patients, nephrin promoter methylation was increased in proteinuric kidney diseases with decreased KLF4 and nephrin expression. KLF4 expression in ARB-treated patients was higher in patients with than without ARB treatment. Thus, angiotensin II can modulate epigenetic regulation in podocytes and ARB inhibits these actions in part via KLF4 in proteinuric kidney diseases. This study provides a new concept that renin-angiotensin system blockade can exert therapeutic effects through epigenetic modulation of the kidney gene expression. PMID:26108068

  12. Angiotensin II type I receptor blockade attenuates reflex cutaneous vasoconstriction in aged but not young skin.

    PubMed

    Lang, James A; Kolb, Kelsey E

    2015-05-15

    Stimulation of angiotensin II type I receptors (AT1R) elicits vasoconstriction (VC) that may be occurring through the activation of a pathogenic vascular pathway such as Rho kinase (ROCK). We hypothesize that reflex cutaneous VC to whole body cooling (mean skin temperature = 30.5°C) in older humans relies in part on AT1R activation, which may explain greater ROCK activity attendant with aging. Two microdialysis (MD) fibers were placed in the forearm skin of 10 young (Y; 24 ± 1 yr) and 10 older (O; 70 ± 2 yr) individuals for infusion of 1) lactated Ringer's solution (switched to fasudil, a ROCK antagonist, after cooling); and 2) AT1R blockade with losartan. Laser Doppler flux (LDF) was measured over each MD site and cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated (CVC = LDF/mean arterial pressure) and expressed as percent change from baseline (%ΔCVCBASELINE). In older individuals the VC response to whole body cooling was blunted (Y = -34 ± 2, O = -17 ± 3%ΔCVC) and was further attenuated at the losartan site (Y = -34 ± 3, O = -9 ± 3%ΔCVC; P < 0.05). The VC response to an exogenous 10-μM dose of angiotensin II (Y = -27 ± 3, O = -42 ± 5%ΔCVC) was completely blocked in sites pretreated with losartan or with fasudil. These data suggest that AT1R activation contributes to the reflex VC response in aged but not young skin. Furthermore, the angiotensin II component of the VC response appears to occur primarily through a ROCK-mediated mechanism. PMID:25770238

  13. Partial blockade of skeletal muscle somatosensory afferents attenuates baroreflex resetting during exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Smith, Scott A; Querry, Ross G; Fadel, Paul J; Gallagher, Kevin M; Strømstad, Morten; Ide, Kojiro; Raven, Peter B; Secher, Niels H

    2003-09-15

    During exercise, the carotid baroreflex is reset to operate around the higher arterial pressures evoked by physical exertion. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the contribution of somatosensory input from the exercise pressor reflex to this resetting during exercise. Nine subjects performed seven minutes of dynamic cycling at 30% of maximal work load and three minutes of static one-legged contraction at 25% maximal voluntary contraction before (control) and after partial blockade of skeletal muscle afferents with epidural anaesthesia. Carotid baroreflex function was assessed by applying rapid pulses of hyper- and hypotensive stimuli to the neck via a customised collar. Using a logistic model, heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) responses to carotid sinus stimulation were used to develop reflex function stimulus-response curves. Compared with rest, control dynamic and static exercise reset carotid baroreflex-HR and carotid baroreflex-MAP curves vertically upward on the response arm and laterally rightward to higher operating pressures. Inhibition of exercise pressor reflex input by epidural anaesthesia attenuated the bi-directional resetting of the carotid baroreflex-MAP curve during both exercise protocols. In contrast, the effect of epidural anaesthesia on the resetting of the carotid baroreflex-HR curve was negligible during dynamic cycling whereas it relocated the curve in a laterally leftward direction during static contraction. The data suggest that afferent input from skeletal muscle is requisite for the complete resetting of the carotid baroreflex during exercise. However, this neural input appears to modify baroreflex control of blood pressure to a greater extent than heart rate. PMID:12819303

  14. Effects of GABA(A) receptor blockade on regional cerebral blood flow and blood-brain barrier disruption in focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Chi, Oak Z; Hunter, Christine; Liu, Xia; Chi, Youngchan; Weiss, Harvey R

    2011-02-15

    In cerebral ischemia, transmission by the inhibitory neurotransmitter, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is altered. This study was performed to determine whether blockade of GABA(A) receptor would affect regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability in a focal ischemic area of the brain. Rats were anesthetized with isoflurane and mechanically ventilated. Fifteen minutes after a permanent middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion, one half of the rats were infused with bicuculline 1mg/kg/min iv for 2 min followed by 0.1mg/kg/min iv to the end of the experiment. The other half were infused with normal saline. At one hour after MCA occlusion, rCBF was determined using ¹⁴C-iodoantipyrine and BBB permeability was determined by measuring the transfer coefficient (Ki) of ¹⁴C-α-aminoisobutyric acid. With MCA occlusion, rCBF was decreased in the ischemic cortex (IC) (-70%) in the control rats. In the bicuculline treated rats, the rCBF of the IC was lower (-48%) than the contralateral cortex but higher than the rCBF of the IC of the control rats (+55%). MCA occlusion increased Ki in the IC of the control rats (+72%) and bicuculline administration increased Ki further (+53%) in the IC. Blockade of GABA(A) receptors did not significantly affect rCBF or BBB permeability in the non-ischemic brain regions under isoflurane anesthesia. Our data demonstrated that blockade of GABA(A) receptors increased rCBF and enhanced the BBB disruption in focal cerebral ischemia. Our data suggest that GABA(A) receptors are involved, at least in part, in modulating rCBF and BBB disruption in focal cerebral ischemia. PMID:21094956

  15. EXTRINSIC COAGULATION BLOCKADE ATTENUATES LUNG INJURY AND PROINFLAMMATORY CYTOKINE RELEASE AFTER INTRATRACHEAL LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Initiation of coagulation by tissue factor (TF) is a potentially powerful regulator of local inflammatory responses. We hypothesized that blockade of TF-factor VIIa (FVIIa) complex would decrease lung inflammation and proinflammatory cytokine release after tracheal instillation o...

  16. Hypothalamic oxytocin attenuates CRF expression via GABA(A) receptors in rats.

    PubMed

    Bülbül, Mehmet; Babygirija, Reji; Cerjak, Diana; Yoshimoto, Sazu; Ludwig, Kirk; Takahashi, Toku

    2011-04-28

    Centrally released oxytocin (OXT) has anxiolytic and anti-stress effects. Delayed gastric emptying (GE) induced by acute restraint stress (ARS) for 90 min is completely restored following 5 consecutive days of chronic homotypic restraint stress (CHS), via up-regulating hypothalamic OXT expression in rats. However, the mechanism behind the restoration of delayed GE following CHS remains unclear. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-projecting neurons in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) have been shown to inhibit corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) synthesis via GABA(A) receptors. We hypothesized that GABA(A) receptors are involved in mediating the inhibitory effect of OXT on CRF expression in the PVN, which in turn restores delayed GE following CHS. OXT (0.5 μg) and selective GABA(A) receptor antagonist, bicuculline methiodide (BMI) (100 ng), were administered intracerebroventricularly (icv). Solid GE was measured under non-stressed (NS), ARS and CHS conditions. Expression of CRF mRNA in the PVN was evaluated by real time RT-PCR. Neither OXT nor BMI changed GE and CRF mRNA expression under NS conditions. Delayed GE and increased CRF mRNA expression induced by ARS were restored by icv-injection of OXT. The effects of OXT on delayed GE and increased CRF mRNA expression in ARS were abolished by icv-injection of BMI. Following CHS, delayed GE was completely restored in saline (icv)-injected rats, whereas daily injection of BMI (icv) attenuated the restoration of delayed GE. Daily injection of BMI (icv) significantly increased CRF mRNA expression following CHS. It is suggested that central OXT inhibits ARS-induced CRF mRNA expression via GABA(A) receptors in the PVN. GABAergic system is also involved in OXT-mediated adaptation response of delayed GE under CHS conditions. PMID:21382355

  17. Combined, but not individual, blockade of ASIC3, P2X, and EP4 receptors attenuates the exercise pressor reflex in rats with freely perfused hindlimb muscles.

    PubMed

    Stone, Audrey J; Copp, Steven W; Kim, Joyce S; Kaufman, Marc P

    2015-12-01

    In healthy humans, tests of the hypothesis that lactic acid, PGE2, or ATP plays a role in evoking the exercise pressor reflex proved controversial. The findings in humans resembled ours in decerebrate rats that individual blockade of the receptors to lactic acid, PGE2, and ATP had only small effects on the exercise pressor reflex provided that the muscles were freely perfused. This similarity between humans and rats prompted us to test the hypothesis that in rats with freely perfused muscles combined receptor blockade is required to attenuate the exercise pressor reflex. We first compared the reflex before and after injecting either PPADS (10 mg/kg), a P2X receptor antagonist, APETx2 (100 μg/kg), an activating acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC) channel antagonist, or L161982 (2 μg/kg), an EP4 receptor antagonist, into the arterial supply of the hindlimb of decerebrated rats. We then examined the effects of combined blockade of P2X receptors, ASIC3 channels, and EP4 receptors on the exercise pressor reflex using the same doses, intra-arterial route, and time course of antagonist injections as those used for individual blockade. We found that neither PPADS (n = 5), APETx2 (n = 6), nor L161982 (n = 6) attenuated the reflex. In contrast, combined blockade of these receptors (n = 7) attenuated the peak (↓27%, P < 0.019) and integrated (↓48%, P < 0.004) pressor components of the reflex. Combined blockade injected intravenously had no effect on the reflex. We conclude that combined blockade of P2X receptors, ASIC3 channels, and EP4 receptors on the endings of thin fiber muscle afferents is required to attenuate the exercise pressor reflex in rats with freely perfused hindlimbs. PMID:26472871

  18. Blockade of dorsolateral pontine 5HT1A receptors destabilizes the respiratory rhythm in C57BL6/J wild-type mice.

    PubMed

    Dhingra, R R; Dutschmann, M; Dick, T E

    2016-06-01

    The neurotransmitter serotonin (5HT) acting via 5HT1a receptors (5HT1aR) is a potent determinant of respiratory rhythm variability. Here, we address the 5HT1aR-dependent control of respiratory rhythm variability in C57BL6/J mice. Using the in situ perfused preparation, we compared the effects of systemic versus focal blockade of 5HT1aRs. Blocking 5HT1aRs in the Kölliker-Fuse nucleus (KFn) increased the occurrence of spontaneous apneas and accounted for the systemic effects of 5HT1aR antagonists. Further, 5HT1aRs of the KFn stabilized the respiratory rhythm's response to arterial chemoreflex perturbations; reducing the recovering time, e.g., the latency to return to the baseline pattern. Together, these results suggest that the KFn regulates both intrinsic and sensory determinants of respiratory rhythm variability. PMID:26840837

  19. Inflammatory Lung Injury After Cardiopulmonary Bypass is Attenuated by Adenosine A2A Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Lisle, Turner C; Gazoni, Leo M; Fernandez, Lucas G; Sharma, Ashish K; Bellizzi, Andrew M; Schifflett, Grant D; Laubach, Victor E; Kron, Irving L

    2008-01-01

    Objectives Cardiopulmonary bypass has been shown to exert an inflammatory response within the lung, often resulting in postoperative pulmonary dysfunction. Several studies have shown that adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) activation attenuates lung ischemia-reperfusion injury, however the effect of A2AR activation on cardiopulmonary bypass-induced lung injury has not been studied. We hypothesized that specific A2AR activation by ATL313 would attenuate inflammatory lung injury following cardiopulmonary bypass. Methods Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: 1) SHAM group (underwent cannulation+heparinization only); 2) CONTROL group (underwent 90-minutes of normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass with normal whole-blood priming solution; 3) ATL group (underwent 90-minutes of normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass with ATL313 added to the normal priming solution). Results There was significantly less pulmonary edema and lung injury in the ATL group compared to the CONTROL group. The ATL group had significant reductions in bronchoalveolar lavage interleukin-1, interleukin-6, interferon-γ and myeloperoxidase levels compared to the CONTROL group. Similarly, lung tissue interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ were significantly decreased in the ATL group compared to the CONTROL group. There was no significant difference between the SHAM and ATL groups in the amount of pulmonary edema, lung injury, or levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Conclusions The addition of a potent A2AR agonist to the normal priming solution prior to the initiation of CPB significantly protects the lung from the inflammatory effects of CPB and reduces the amount of lung injury. A2AR agonists could represent a new therapeutic strategy for reducing the potentially devastating consequences of the inflammatory response associated with CPB. Ultra-mini Abstract Pharmacologic activation of the adenosine A2A receptor during cardiopulmonary bypass resulted in

  20. Local NMDA receptor blockade attenuates chronic tinnitus and associated brain activity in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Brozoski, Thomas J; Wisner, Kurt W; Odintsov, Boris; Bauer, Carol A

    2013-01-01

    Chronic tinnitus has no broadly effective treatment. Identification of specific markers for tinnitus should facilitate the development of effective therapeutics. Recently it was shown that glutamatergic blockade in the cerebellar paraflocculus, using an antagonist cocktail was successful in reducing chronic tinnitus. The present experiment examined the effect of selective N-methyl d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor blockade on tinnitus and associated spontaneous brain activity in a rat model. The NMDA antagonist, D(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (D-AP5) (0.5 mM), was continuously infused for 2 weeks directly to the ipsilateral paraflocculus of rats with tinnitus induced months prior by unilateral noise exposure. Treated rats were compared to untreated normal controls without tinnitus, and to untreated positive controls with tinnitus. D-AP5 significantly decreased tinnitus within three days of beginning treatment, and continued to significantly reduce tinnitus throughout the course of treatment and for 23 days thereafter, at which time testing was halted. At the conclusion of psychophysical testing, neural activity was assessed using manganese enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI). In agreement with previous research, untreated animals with chronic tinnitus showed significantly elevated bilateral activity in their paraflocculus and brainstem cochlear nuclei, but not in mid or forebrain structures. In contrast, D-AP5-treated-tinnitus animals showed significantly less bilateral parafloccular and dorsal cochlear nucleus activity, as well as significantly less contralateral ventral cochlear nucleus activity. It was concluded that NMDA-mediated glutamatergic transmission in the paraflocculus appears to be a necessary component of chronic noise-induced tinnitus in a rat model. Additionally, it was confirmed that in this model, elevated spontaneous activity in the cerebellar paraflocculus and auditory brainstem is associated with tinnitus. PMID:24282480

  1. Local NMDA Receptor Blockade Attenuates Chronic Tinnitus and Associated Brain Activity in an Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Brozoski, Thomas J.; Wisner, Kurt W.; Odintsov, Boris; Bauer, Carol A.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic tinnitus has no broadly effective treatment. Identification of specific markers for tinnitus should facilitate the development of effective therapeutics. Recently it was shown that glutamatergic blockade in the cerebellar paraflocculus, using an antagonist cocktail was successful in reducing chronic tinnitus. The present experiment examined the effect of selective N-methyl d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor blockade on tinnitus and associated spontaneous brain activity in a rat model. The NMDA antagonist, D(−)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (D-AP5) (0.5 mM), was continuously infused for 2 weeks directly to the ipsilateral paraflocculus of rats with tinnitus induced months prior by unilateral noise exposure. Treated rats were compared to untreated normal controls without tinnitus, and to untreated positive controls with tinnitus. D-AP5 significantly decreased tinnitus within three days of beginning treatment, and continued to significantly reduce tinnitus throughout the course of treatment and for 23 days thereafter, at which time testing was halted. At the conclusion of psychophysical testing, neural activity was assessed using manganese enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI). In agreement with previous research, untreated animals with chronic tinnitus showed significantly elevated bilateral activity in their paraflocculus and brainstem cochlear nuclei, but not in mid or forebrain structures. In contrast, D-AP5-treated-tinnitus animals showed significantly less bilateral parafloccular and dorsal cochlear nucleus activity, as well as significantly less contralateral ventral cochlear nucleus activity. It was concluded that NMDA-mediated glutamatergic transmission in the paraflocculus appears to be a necessary component of chronic noise-induced tinnitus in a rat model. Additionally, it was confirmed that in this model, elevated spontaneous activity in the cerebellar paraflocculus and auditory brainstem is associated with tinnitus. PMID:24282480

  2. Adenosine 2A receptor agonism: A single intrathecal administration attenuates motor paralysis in experimental autoimmune encephalopathy in rats.

    PubMed

    Loram, Lisa C; Strand, Keith A; Taylor, Frederick R; Sloane, Evan; Van Dam, Anne-Marie; Rieger, Jayson; Maier, Steven F; Watkins, Linda R

    2015-05-01

    A single intrathecal dose of adenosine 2A receptor (A2AR) agonist was previously reported to produce a multi-week reversal of allodynia in two different models of neuropathic pain in addition to downregulating glial activation markers in the spinal cord. We aimed to determine whether a single intrathecal administration of an A2AR agonist was able to attenuate motor symptoms induced by experimental autoimmune encephalopathy. Two A2AR agonists (CGS21680 and ATL313) significantly attenuated progression of motor symptoms following a single intrathecal administration at the onset of motor symptoms. OX-42, a marker of microglial activation, was significantly attenuated in the lumbar spinal cord following A2AR administration compared to vehicle. Therefore, A2AR agonists attenuate motor symptoms of EAE by acting on A2AR in the spinal cord. PMID:25653191

  3. Blockade of Endocannabinoid Hydrolytic Enzymes Attenuates Precipitated Opioid Withdrawal Symptoms in MiceS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Divya; Ross, Gracious R.; Schlosburg, Joel E.; Owens, Robert A.; Abdullah, Rehab A.; Kinsey, Steven G.; Long, Jonathan Z.; Nomura, Daniel K.; Sim-Selley, Laura J.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Akbarali, Hamid I.

    2011-01-01

    Δ9-Tetrahydrocannbinol (THC), the primary active constituent of Cannabis sativa, has long been known to reduce opioid withdrawal symptoms. Although THC produces most of its pharmacological actions through the activation of CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors, the role these receptors play in reducing the variety of opioid withdrawal symptoms remains unknown. The endogenous cannabinoids, N-arachidonoylethanolamine (anandamide; AEA) and 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG), activate both cannabinoid receptors but are rapidly metabolized by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), respectively. The objective of this study was to test whether increasing AEA or 2-AG, via inhibition of their respective hydrolytic enzymes, reduces naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal symptoms in in vivo and in vitro models of opioid dependence. Morphine-dependent mice challenged with naloxone reliably displayed a profound withdrawal syndrome, consisting of jumping, paw tremors, diarrhea, and weight loss. THC and the MAGL inhibitor 4-nitrophenyl 4-(dibenzo[d][1,3]dioxol-5-yl(hydroxy)methyl)piperidine-1-carboxylate (JZL184) dose dependently reduced the intensity of most measures through the activation of CB1 receptors. JZL184 also attenuated spontaneous withdrawal signs in morphine-dependent mice. The FAAH inhibitor N-(pyridin-3-yl)-4-(3-(5-(trifluoromethyl)pyridin-2-yloxy)benzyl)-piperdine-1-carboxamide (PF-3845) reduced the intensity of naloxone-precipitated jumps and paw flutters through the activation of CB1 receptors but did not ameliorate incidence of diarrhea or weight loss. In the final series of experiments, we investigated whether JZL184 or PF-3845 would attenuate naloxone-precipitated contractions in morphine-dependent ilea. Both enzyme inhibitors attenuated the intensity of naloxone-induced contractions, although this model does not account mechanistically for the autonomic withdrawal responses (i.e., diarrhea) observed in vivo. These results indicate

  4. Up-Regulation of Endothelin Type A Receptor in Human and Rat Radiation Proctitis: Preclinical Therapeutic Approach With Endothelin Receptor Blockade

    SciTech Connect

    Jullien, Nicolash; Blirando, Karl; Milliat, Fabien; Benderitter, Marc; Francois, Agnes

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: Rectum radiation damage and fibrosis are often associated with radiation therapy of pelvic tumors. The endothelin (ET) system has been implicated in several fibrotic diseases but never studied in the context of gastrointestinal radiation damage. This study assessed modifications in ET type 1 (ET-1), ET type A receptor (ET{sub A}), and ET type B receptor (ET{sub B}) localization and/or expression in irradiated human rectal tissue and in a rat model of delayed colorectal injury. We also evaluated the therapeutic potential of long-term ET receptor blockade. Methods and Materials: Routine histological studies of sections of healthy and radiation-injured human rectum tissue were done; the sections were also immunostained for ET{sub A} and ET{sub B} receptors. The rat model involved the delivery of 27 Gy in a single dose to the colons and rectums of the animals. The ET-1/ET{sub A}/ET{sub B} expression and ET{sub A}/ET{sub B} localization were studied at 10 weeks postexposure. The abilities of bosentan and atrasentan to protect against delayed rectal injury were also investigated. Results: The immunolocalization of ET{sub A} and ET{sub B} in healthy human rectums was similar to that in rat rectums. However, strong ET{sub A} immunostaining was seen in the presence of human radiation proctitis, and increased ET{sub A} mRNA levels were seen in the rat following colorectal irradiation. Immunostaining for ET{sub A} was also strongly positive in rats in areas of radiation-induced mucosal ulceration, atypia, and fibroproliferation. However, neither bosentan nor atrasentan prevented radiation damage to the rectum when given long term. The only effect seen for atrasentan was an increased number of sclerotic vessel sections in injured tissues. Conclusions: As the result of the overexpression of ET{sub A}, radiation exposure deregulates the endothelin system through an 'ET{sub A} profile' in the human and rodent rectum. However, therapeutic interventions involving mixed or

  5. TREK1 channel blockade induces an antidepressant-like response synergizing with 5-HT1A receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Ye, Dongqing; Li, Yang; Zhang, Xiangrong; Guo, Fei; Geng, Leiyu; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Zhijun

    2015-12-01

    Current antidepressants often remain the inadequate efficacy for many depressive patients, which warrant the necessary endeavor to develop the new molecules and targets for treating depression. Recently, the two-pore domain potassium channel TREK1 has been implicated in mood regulation and TREK-1 antagonists could be the promising antidepressant. This study has screened a TREK1 blocker (SID1900) with a satisfactory blood-brain barrier permeation and bioavailability. Electrophysiological research has shown that SID1900 and the previously reported TREK1 blocker (spadin) efficiently blocked TREK-1 current in HEK293 cells and specifically blocked two-pore domain potassium channels in primary-cultured rat hippocampal neurons. SID1900 and spadin induced a significant antidepressant-like response in the rat model of chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS). Both two TREK1 blockers substantially increased the firing rate of 5-HT-ergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nuclei (DRN) and PFC of CUMS rats. SID1900 and spadin significantly up-regulated the expression of PKA-pCREB-BDNF signaling in DRN, hippocampus and PFC of CUMS rats, which were enhanced and reversed by a 5-HTR1A agonist (8-OH-DPAT) and antagonist (WAY100635) respectively. The present findings suggested that TREK1 channel blockers posses the substantial antidepressant-like effect and have the potential synergistic effect with 5-HT1A receptor activation through the common CREB-BDNF signal transduction. PMID:26441141

  6. Effects of a Proprietary Standardized Orthosiphon stamineus Ethanolic Leaf Extract on Enhancing Memory in Sprague Dawley Rats Possibly via Blockade of Adenosine A 2A Receptors.

    PubMed

    George, Annie; Chinnappan, Sasikala; Choudhary, Yogendra; Choudhary, Vandana Kotak; Bommu, Praveen; Wong, Hoi Jin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore a propriety standardized ethanolic extract from leaves of Orthosiphon stamineus Benth in improving impairments in short-term social memory in vivo, possibly via blockade of adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR). The ethanolic extract of O. stamineus leaves showed significant in vitro binding activity of A2AR with 74% inhibition at 150 μg/ml and significant A2AR antagonist activity with 98% inhibition at 300 μg/mL. A significant adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) antagonist activity with 100% inhibition was observed at 300 μg/mL. Its effect on learning and memory was assessed via social recognition task using Sprague Dawley rats whereby the ethanolic extract of O. stamineus showed significant (p < 0.001) change in recognition index (RI) at 300 mg/kg and 600 mg/kg p.o and 120 mg/kg i.p., respectively, compared to the vehicle control. In comparison, the ethanolic extract of Polygonum minus aerial parts showed small change in inflexion; however, it remained insignificant in RI at 200 mg/kg p.o. Our findings suggest that the ethanolic extract of O. stamineus leaves improves memory by reversing age-related deficits in short-term social memory and the possible involvement of adenosine A1 and adenosine A2A as a target bioactivity site in the restoration of memory. PMID:26649059

  7. Effects of a Proprietary Standardized Orthosiphon stamineus Ethanolic Leaf Extract on Enhancing Memory in Sprague Dawley Rats Possibly via Blockade of Adenosine A2A Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Yogendra; Choudhary, Vandana Kotak; Bommu, Praveen; Wong, Hoi Jin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore a propriety standardized ethanolic extract from leaves of Orthosiphon stamineus Benth in improving impairments in short-term social memory in vivo, possibly via blockade of adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR). The ethanolic extract of O. stamineus leaves showed significant in vitro binding activity of A2AR with 74% inhibition at 150 μg/ml and significant A2AR antagonist activity with 98% inhibition at 300 μg/mL. A significant adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) antagonist activity with 100% inhibition was observed at 300 μg/mL. Its effect on learning and memory was assessed via social recognition task using Sprague Dawley rats whereby the ethanolic extract of O. stamineus showed significant (p < 0.001) change in recognition index (RI) at 300 mg/kg and 600 mg/kg p.o and 120 mg/kg i.p., respectively, compared to the vehicle control. In comparison, the ethanolic extract of Polygonum minus aerial parts showed small change in inflexion; however, it remained insignificant in RI at 200 mg/kg p.o. Our findings suggest that the ethanolic extract of O. stamineus leaves improves memory by reversing age-related deficits in short-term social memory and the possible involvement of adenosine A1 and adenosine A2A as a target bioactivity site in the restoration of memory. PMID:26649059

  8. CXCR4 Blockade Attenuates Hyperoxia Induced Lung Injury in Neonatal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Shelley; Ramachandran, Shalini; Torres, Eneida; Huang, Jian; Hehre, Dorothy; Suguihara, Cleide; Young, Karen C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lung inflammation is a key factor in the pathogenesis of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Stromal derived factor-1 (SDF-1) and its receptor chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) modulate the inflammatory response. Whether antagonism of CXCR4 will alleviate lung inflammation in neonatal hyperoxia-induced lung injury is unknown. Objective To determine whether CXCR4 antagonism would attenuate lung injury in rodents with experimental BPD by decreasing pulmonary inflammation. Methods Newborn rats exposed to normoxia (RA) or hyperoxia (FiO2=0.9) from postnatal day 2 (P2)-P16 were randomized to receive the CXCR4 antagonist, AMD3100 or placebo (PL) from P5 to P15. Lung alveolarization, angiogenesis, and inflammation were evaluated at P16. Results As compared to RA, hyperoxic-PL pups had a decrease in alveolarization, reduced lung vascular density and increased lung inflammation. In contrast, AMD3100-treated hyperoxic pups had improved alveolarization and increased angiogenesis. This improvement in lung structure was accompanied by a decrease in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid macrophage and neutrophil count and reduced lung myeloperoxidase activity. Conclusion CXCR4 antagonism decreases lung inflammation and improves alveolar as well as vascular structure in neonatal rats with experimental BPD. These findings suggest a novel therapeutic strategy to alleviate lung injury in preterm infants with BPD. PMID:25825119

  9. Cyclooxygenase blockade (COB) attenuates ethanol-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction in perfused rat lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, W.H.; Lyles, D. )

    1990-02-26

    Ethanol causes pulmonary vasoconstriction and vascular leak by obscure mechanisms. In lambs, COB with indomethacin (Indo) or meclofenamate (Meclo) block ethanol's circulatory effects. To test for these effects in rats, in-situ, ventilated, Krebs-Henselheit perfused (constant flow) lungs were studied in 6 groups: ethanol (ETOH) and perfusate controls; ETOH/Meclo, 0.5 and 1 mg/kg, IV; ETOH/Indo, 0.5 and 1 mg/kg, IV, given 30 minutes before study. They measured mean pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP), peak inspiratory pressure (PIP) and edema, indexed by reservoir weight change (RW), then by tracheal froth ( death'). ETOH doses (0.5, 1.3 and 2.2gm) were infused into the perfusate (60 ml). Data were analyzed by ANOVA and X{sup 2}; n = 9 in each group. PAP differed by treatment, by drug/dose, and by dose/treatment interactions; PIP, RW change, and death' were attenuated. Data show that COB lessens the vascular and edema effects of moderate dose ETOH, which larger ETOH doses override.

  10. 5-HT(2A) receptor blockade and 5-HT(2C) receptor activation interact to reduce cocaine hyperlocomotion and Fos protein expression in the caudate-putamen.

    PubMed

    Pockros, Lara A; Pentkowski, Nathan S; Conway, Sineadh M; Ullman, Teresa E; Zwick, Kimberly R; Neisewander, Janet L

    2012-12-01

    Both the 5-HT(2A) receptor (R) antagonist M100907 and the 5-HT(2C) R agonist MK212 attenuate cocaine-induced dopamine release and hyperlocomotion. This study examined whether these drugs interact to reduce cocaine hyperlocomotion and Fos expression in the striatum and prefrontal cortex. We first determined from dose-effect functions a low dose of both M100907 and MK212 that failed to alter cocaine (15 mg/kg, i.p.) hyperlocomotion. Subsequently, we examined whether these subthreshold doses given together would attenuate cocaine hyperlocomotion, consistent with a 5-HT(2A)/5-HT(2C) R interaction. Separate groups of rats received two sequential drug injections 5 min apart immediately before a 1-h locomotion test as follows: (1) saline + saline, (2) saline + cocaine, (3) 0.025 mg/kg M100907 + cocaine, (4) 0.125 mg/kg MK212 + cocaine, or (5) cocktail combination of 0.025 mg/kg M100907 and 0.125 mg/kg MK212 + cocaine. Brains were extracted for Fos immunohistochemistry 90 min after the second injection. We next examined the effects of 0.025 mg/kg M100907 and 0.125 mg/kg MK212, alone and in combination, on spontaneous locomotor activity. While neither drug given alone produced any effects, the M100907/MK212 cocktail attenuated cocaine hyperlocomotion as well as cocaine-induced Fos expression in the dorsolateral caudate-putamen (CPu), but had no effect on spontaneous locomotion. The findings suggest that 5-HT(2A) Rs and 5-HT(2C) Rs interact to attenuate cocaine hyperlocomotion and Fos expression in the CPu, and that the CPu is a potential locus of the interactive effects between these 5-HT(2) R subtypes on behavior. Further research investigating combined 5-HT(2A) R antagonism and 5-HT(2C) R agonism as a treatment for cocaine dependence is warranted. PMID:22886755

  11. 5-HT2A receptor blockade and 5-HT2C receptor activation interact to reduce cocaine hyperlocomotion and Fos protein expression in the caudate-putamen

    PubMed Central

    Pockros, Lara A.; Pentkowski, Nathan S.; Conway, Sineadh M.; Ullman, Teresa E.; Zwick, Kimberly R.; Neisewander, Janet L.

    2012-01-01

    Both the 5-HT2A receptor (R) antagonist M100907 and the 5-HT2CR agonist MK212 attenuate cocaine-induced dopamine release and hyperlocomotion. This study examined whether these drugs interact to reduce cocaine hyperlocomotion and Fos expression in the striatum and prefrontal cortex. We first determined from dose-effect functions a low dose of both M100907 and MK212 that failed to alter cocaine (15 mg/kg, i.p.) hyperlocomotion. Subsequently we examined whether these subthreshold doses given together would attenuate cocaine hyperlocomotion, consistent with a 5-HT2A/5-HT2CR interaction. Separate groups of rats received two sequential drug injections 5 min apart immediately before a 1-h locomotion test as follows: 1) saline + saline, 2) saline + cocaine, 3) 0.025 mg/kg M100907 + cocaine, 4) 0.125 mg/kg MK212 + cocaine, or 5) cocktail combination of 0.025 mg/kg M100907 and 0.125 mg/kg MK212 + cocaine. Brains were extracted for Fos immunohistochemistry 90 min after the second injection. We next examined the effects of 0.025 mg/kg M100907 and 0.125 mg/kg MK212, alone and in combination, on spontaneous locomotor activity. While neither drug given alone produced any effects, the M100907/MK212 cocktail attenuated cocaine hyperlocomotion as well as cocaine-induced Fos expression in the dorsolateral caudate-putamen (CPu), but had no effect on spontaneous locomotion. The findings suggest that 5-HT2ARs and 5-HT2CRs interact to attenuate cocaine hyperlocomotion and Fos expression in the CPu, and that the CPu is a potential locus of the interactive effects between these 5-HT2R subtypes on behavior. Further research investigating combined 5-HT2AR antagonism and 5-HT2CR agonism as a treatment for cocaine dependence is warranted. PMID:22886755

  12. ABT-627, an endothelin ET(A) receptor-selective antagonist, attenuates tactile allodynia in a diabetic rat model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, M F; Wessale, J L; Zhu, C Z; Lynch, J J; Dayton, B D; Calzadilla, S V; Padley, R J; Opgenorth, T J; Kowaluk, E A

    2000-01-24

    of ABT-627 and A-192621 produced a significant, acute increase in tactile allodynia thresholds, this effect was significantly less than that produced by ABT-627 alone. These results indicate that the selective blockade of endothelin ET(A) receptors results in an attenuation of tactile allodynia in the streptozotocin-treated rat. PMID:10657544

  13. Role of adenosine A{sub 2A} receptor signaling in the nicotine-evoked attenuation of reflex cardiac sympathetic control

    SciTech Connect

    El-Mas, Mahmoud M. El-gowilly, Sahar M.; Fouda, Mohamed A.; Saad, Evan I.

    2011-08-01

    Baroreflex dysfunction contributes to increased cardiovascular risk in cigarette smokers. Given the importance of adenosinergic pathways in baroreflex control, the hypothesis was tested that defective central adenosinergic modulation of cardiac autonomic activity mediates the nicotine-baroreflex interaction. Baroreflex curves relating changes in heart rate (HR) to increases or decreases in blood pressure (BP) evoked by i.v. doses (1-16 {mu}g/kg) of phenylephrine (PE) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP), respectively, were constructed in conscious rats; slopes of the curves were taken as measures of baroreflex sensitivity (BRS). Nicotine (25 and 100 {mu}g/kg i.v.) dose-dependently reduced BRS{sub SNP} in contrast to no effect on BRS{sub PE}. BRS{sub SNP} was also attenuated after intracisternal (i.c.) administration of nicotine. Similar reductions in BRS{sub SNP} were observed in rats pretreated with atropine or propranolol. The combined treatment with nicotine and atropine produced additive inhibitory effects on BRS, an effect that was not demonstrated upon concurrent exposure to nicotine and propranolol. BRS{sub SNP} was reduced in preparations treated with i.c. 8-phenyltheophylline (8-PT, nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist), 8-(3-Chlorostyryl) caffeine (CSC, A{sub 2A} antagonist), or VUF5574 (A{sub 3} antagonist). In contrast, BRS{sub SNP} was preserved after blockade of A{sub 1} (DPCPX) or A{sub 2B} (alloxazine) receptors or inhibition of adenosine uptake by dipyridamole. CSC or 8-PT abrogated the BRS{sub SNP} depressant effect of nicotine whereas other adenosinergic antagonists were without effect. Together, nicotine preferentially impairs reflex tachycardia via disruption of adenosine A{sub 2A} receptor-mediated facilitation of reflex cardiac sympathoexcitation. Clinically, the attenuation by nicotine of compensatory sympathoexcitation may be detrimental in conditions such as hypothalamic defense response, posture changes, and ventricular rhythms

  14. Blockade of Extracellular High-Mobility Group Box 1 Attenuates Systemic Inflammation and Coagulation Abnormalities in Rats with Acute Traumatic Coagulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lin; Zhao, Kun; Shen, Xiao; Fan, Xin-xin; Ding, Kai; Liu, Ren-min; Wang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Background As an extracellularly released mediator, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) initiates sterile inflammation following severe trauma. Serum HMGB1 levels correlate well with acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC) in trauma patients, which is independently associated with higher mortality. We investigated the involvement of HMGB1 in ATC through blocking extracellular HMGB1. Material/Methods The ATC model was induced by polytrauma and hemorrhage in male Sprague-Dawley rats, which were randomly assigned to sham, ATC, and ATCH (ATC with HMGB1 blockade) groups. Thrombelastography (TEG) was performed to monitor changes in coagulation function. Serum levels of HMGB1, TNF-α, and IL-6 were measured, as well as lung levels of HMGB1 and nuclear factor (NF)-κB and expression of receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE). Results Compared with the sham group, HMGB1 increased the serum levels of TNF-α and IL-6, whereas HMGB1 blockade inhibited the induction of TNF-α and IL-6. HMGB1 also induced elevated serum soluble P-selectin and fibrinolysis markers plasmin-antiplasmin complex, which both were reduced by HMGB1 blockade. Thrombelastography revealed the hypocoagulability status in the ATC group, which was attenuated by anti-HMGB1 antibody. Furthermore, the lung level of NF-κB and expression of RAGE were decreased by anti-HMGB1 antibody, suggesting the role of RAGE/NF-κB pathway in ATC. Conclusions HMGB1 blockade can attenuate inflammation and coagulopathy in ATC rats. Anti-HMGB1 antibody might exert protective effects partly through the RAGE/NF-κB pathway. Thus, HMGB1 has potential as a therapeutic target in ATC. PMID:27436061

  15. Auraptenol attenuates vincristine-induced mechanical hyperalgesia through serotonin 5-HT1A receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunfei; Cao, Shu-e; Tian, Jianmin; Liu, Guozhe; Zhang, Xiaoran; Li, Pingfa

    2013-01-01

    Common chemotherapeutic agents such as vincristine often cause neuropathic pain during cancer treatment in patients. Such neuropathic pain is refractory to common analgesics and represents a challenging clinical issue. Angelicae dahuricae radix is an old traditional Chinese medicine with demonstrated analgesic efficacy in humans. However, the active component(s) that attribute to the analgesic action have not been identified. This work described the anti-hyperalgesic effect of one coumarin component, auraptenol, in a mouse model of chemotherapeutic agent vincristine-induced neuropathic pain. We reported that auraptenol dose-dependently reverted the mechanical hyperalgesia in mice within the dose range of 0.05-0.8 mg/kg. In addition, the anti-hyperalgesic effect of auraptenol was significantly blocked by a selective serotonin 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY100635 (1 mg/kg). Within the dose range studied, auraptenol did not significantly alter the general locomotor activity in mice. Taken together, this study for the first time identified an active component from the herbal medicine angelicae dahuricae radix that possesses robust analgesic efficacy in mice. These data support further studies to assess the potential of auraptenol as a novel analgesic for the management of neuropathic pain. PMID:24287473

  16. Activation of the adenosine A2A receptor attenuates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and is associated with increased intracellular calcium levels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yumei; Zou, Haifeng; Zhao, Ping; Sun, Bo; Wang, Jinghua; Kong, Qingfei; Mu, Lili; Zhao, Sihan; Wang, Guangyou; Wang, Dandan; Zhang, Yao; Zhao, Jiaying; Yin, Pengqi; Liu, Lei; Zhao, Xiuli; Li, Hulun

    2016-08-25

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a common autoimmune disease that inevitably causes inflammatory nerve demyelination. However, an effective approach to prevent its course is still lacking and urgently needed. Recently, the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) has emerged as a novel inflammation regulator. Manipulation of A2AR activity may suppress the MS process and protect against nerve damage. To test this hypothesis, we treated murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model for MS, with the selective A2AR agonist, CGS21680 (CGS). We evaluated the effects of CGS on the pathological features of EAE progression, including CNS cellular infiltration, inflammatory cytokine expression, lymphocyte proliferation, and cell surface markers. Treatment with CGS significantly suppressed specific lymphocyte proliferation, reduced infiltration of CD4(+) T lymphocytes, and attenuated the expression of inflammatory cytokines, which in turn inhibited the EAE progression. For the first time, we demonstrate that CGS can increase the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in murine lymphocytes, which may be the mechanism underlying the suppressive effects of CGS-induced A2AR activation on EAE progression. Our findings strongly suggest that A2AR is a potential therapeutic target for MS and provide insight into the mechanism of action of A2AR agonists, which may offer a therapeutic option for this disease. PMID:27217214

  17. Attenuation of D-1 antagonist-induced D-1 receptor upregulation by conccomitant D-2 receptor blockade

    SciTech Connect

    Parashos, S.A.; Barone, P.; Tucci, I.; Chase, T.N.

    1987-11-16

    The effect of chronic selective D-1 and/or D-2 dopamine receptor blockade on regional D-1 receptor binding was studied in rat brain following chronic treatment with the specific D-1 antagonist SCH 23390 and/or the predominantly D-2 antagonist haloperidol. D-1 receptor density and affinity were evaluated by quantitative autoradiography using /sup 125/I-SCH 23982. Chronic SCH 23390 treatment increased D-1 receptor density by 30 to 40% in the striatum, accumbens and tuberculum olfactorium; receptor affinity remained unchanged. Haloperidol had no effect on D-1 receptor Bmax or Kd values, although, when administered with SCH 23390, reduced the D-1 receptor upregulation induced by the D-1 antagonist in striatum and tuberculum olfactorium, but not in nucleus accumbens, These results may be attributable to D-1/D-2 dopamine receptor interactions occurring in the striatum and tuberculum olfactorium and may have implications for the prevention and treatment of drug-induced extrapyramidal disorders. 34 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  18. Therapeutic blockade of LIGHT interaction with HVEM and LTβR attenuates in vivo cytotoxic allogeneic responses

    PubMed Central

    del Rio, Maria-Luisa; Fernandez-Renedo, Carlos; Scheu, Stefanie; Pfeffer, Klaus; Shintani, Yasushi; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Chaloin, Olivier; Schneider, Pascal; Rodriguez-Barbosa, Jose-Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Background TNF/TNFR superfamily members conform a group of molecular interaction pathways of essential relevance during the process of T cell activation and differentiation towards effector cells and particularly for the maintenance phase of the immune response. Specific blockade of these interacting pathways, such as CD40/CD40L, contributes to modulate the deleterious outcome of allogeneic immune responses. We postulated that antagonizing the interaction of LIGHT expression on activated T cells with its receptors, HVEM and LTβR may decrease T cell-mediated allogeneic responses. Methods A flow cytometry competition assay was designed to identify anti-LIGHT monoclonal antibodies capable to prevent the interaction of mouse LIGHT with its receptors expressed on transfected cells. An antibody with the desired specificity was evaluated in a short-term in vivo allogeneic cytotoxic assay and tested for its ability to detect endogenous mouse LIGHT. Results We provide evidence for the first time that in mice, as previously described in humans, LIGHT protein is rapidly and transiently expressed after T cell activation, and this expression was stronger on CD8 T cells than on CD4 T cells. Two anti-LIGHT antibodies prevented interactions of mouse LIGHT with its two known receptors HVEM and LTβR. In vivo administration of anti-LIGHT antibody (clone 10F12) ameliorated host anti-donor short-term cytotoxic response in WT B6 mice, although to a lesser extent than that observed in LIGHT-deficient mice. Conclusions The therapeutic targeting of LIGHT may contribute to achieve a better control of cytotoxic responses refractory to current immunosuppressive drugs in transplantation. PMID:25226173

  19. Attenuation of Myocardial Injury by HMGB1 Blockade during Ischemia/Reperfusion Is Toll-Like Receptor 2-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Iskandar, Franziska; Habeck, Katharina; Zimmermann, René; Schumann, Ralf R.; Koch, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Genetic or pharmacological ablation of toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) protects against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury (MI/R). However, the endogenous ligand responsible for TLR2 activation has not yet been detected. The objective of this study was to identify HMGB1 as an activator of TLR2 signalling during MI/R. C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) or TLR2−/−-mice were injected with vehicle, HMGB1, or HMGB1 BoxA one hour before myocardial ischemia (30 min) and reperfusion (24 hrs). Infarct size, cardiac troponin T, leukocyte infiltration, HMGB1 release, TLR4-, TLR9-, and RAGE-expression were quantified. HMGB1 plasma levels were measured in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. HMGB1 antagonist BoxA reduced cardiomyocyte necrosis during MI/R in WT mice, accompanied by reduced leukocyte infiltration. Injection of HMGB1 did, however, not increase infarct size in WT animals. In TLR2−/−-hearts, neither BoxA nor HMGB1 affected infarct size. No differences in RAGE and TLR9 expression could be detected, while TLR2−/−-mice display increased TLR4 and HMGB1 expression. Plasma levels of HMGB1 were increased MI/R in TLR2−/−-mice after CABG surgery in patients carrying a TLR2 polymorphism (Arg753Gln). We here provide evidence that absence of TLR2 signalling abrogates infarct-sparing effects of HMGB1 blockade. PMID:24371373

  20. Escitalopram attenuates β-amyloid-induced tau hyperphosphorylation in primary hippocampal neurons through the 5-HT1A receptor mediated Akt/GSK-3β pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Wei-Gang; Wu, Di; Tang, Xiang; Li, Xiao-Li; Wu, Fang-Fang; Bai, Feng; Xu, Lin; Zhang, Zhi-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Tau hyperphosphorylation is an important pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). To investigate whether escitalopram could inhibit amyloid-β (Aβ)-induced tau hyperphosphorylation and the underlying mechanisms, we treated the rat primary hippocampal neurons with Aβ1-42 and examined the effect of escitalopram on tau hyperphosphorylation. Results showed that escitalopram decreased Aβ1–42-induced tau hyperphosphorylation. In addition, escitalopram activated the Akt/GSK-3β pathway, and the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 blocked the attenuation of tau hyperphosphorylation induced by escitalopram. Moreover, the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT also activated the Akt/GSK-3β pathway and decreased Aβ1-42-induced tau hyperphosphorylation. Furthermore, the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635 blocked the activation of Akt/GSK-3β pathway and the attenuation of tau hyperphosphorylation induced by escitalopram. Finally, escitalopram improved Aβ1–42 induced impairment of neurite outgrowth and spine density, and reversed Aβ1–42 induced reduction of synaptic proteins. Our results demonstrated that escitalopram attenuated Aβ1–42-induced tau hyperphosphorylation in primary hippocampal neurons through the 5-HT1A receptor mediated Akt/GSK-3β pathway. PMID:26950279

  1. Escitalopram attenuates β-amyloid-induced tau hyperphosphorylation in primary hippocampal neurons through the 5-HT1A receptor mediated Akt/GSK-3β pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Juan; Ren, Qing-Guo; Gong, Wei-Gang; Wu, Di; Tang, Xiang; Li, Xiao-Li; Wu, Fang-Fang; Bai, Feng; Xu, Lin; Zhang, Zhi-Jun

    2016-03-22

    Tau hyperphosphorylation is an important pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). To investigate whether escitalopram could inhibit amyloid-β (Aβ)-induced tau hyperphosphorylation and the underlying mechanisms, we treated the rat primary hippocampal neurons with Aβ1-42 and examined the effect of escitalopram on tau hyperphosphorylation. Results showed that escitalopram decreased Aβ1-42-induced tau hyperphosphorylation. In addition, escitalopram activated the Akt/GSK-3β pathway, and the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 blocked the attenuation of tau hyperphosphorylation induced by escitalopram. Moreover, the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT also activated the Akt/GSK-3β pathway and decreased Aβ1-42-induced tau hyperphosphorylation. Furthermore, the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635 blocked the activation of Akt/GSK-3β pathway and the attenuation of tau hyperphosphorylation induced by escitalopram. Finally, escitalopram improved Aβ1-42 induced impairment of neurite outgrowth and spine density, and reversed Aβ1-42 induced reduction of synaptic proteins. Our results demonstrated that escitalopram attenuated Aβ1-42-induced tau hyperphosphorylation in primary hippocampal neurons through the 5-HT1A receptor mediated Akt/GSK-3β pathway. PMID:26950279

  2. Myeloid-Specific Blockade of Notch Signaling by RBP-J Knockout Attenuates Spinal Cord Injury Accompanied by Compromised Inflammation Response in Mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bei-Yu; Zheng, Min-Hua; Chen, Yan; Du, Yan-Ling; Sun, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Xing; Duan, Li; Gao, Fang; Liang, Liang; Qin, Hong-Yan; Luo, Zhuo-Jing; Han, Hua

    2015-12-01

    The outcome of spinal cord injury (SCI) is determined by both neural cell-intrinsic survival pathways and tissue microenvironment-derived signals. Macrophages dominating the inflammatory responses in SCI possess both destructive and reparative potentials, according to their activation status. Notch signaling is involved in both cell survival and macrophage-mediated inflammation, but a comprehensive role of Notch signaling in SCI has been elusive. In this study, we compared the effects of general Notch blockade by a pharmaceutical γ-secretase inhibitor (GSI) and myeloid-specific Notch signal disruption by recombination signal binding protein Jκ (RBP-J) knockout on SCI. The administration of Notch signal inhibitor GSI resulted in worsened hind limb locomotion and exacerbated inflammation. However, mice lacking RBP-J, the critical transcription factor mediating signals from all four mammalian Notch receptors, in myeloid lineage displayed promoted functional recovery, attenuated glial scar formation, improved neuronal survival and axon regrowth, and mitigated inflammatory response after SCI. These benefits were accompanied by enhanced AKT activation in the lesion area after SCI. These findings demonstrate that abrogating Notch signal in myeloid cells ameliorates inflammation response post-SCI and promotes functional recovery, but general pharmaceutical Notch interception has opposite effects. Therefore, clinical intervention of Notch signaling in SCI needs to pinpoint myeloid lineage to avoid the counteractive effects of global inhibition. PMID:25344316

  3. Blockade of Toll-Like Receptors (TLR2, TLR4) Attenuates Pain and Potentiates Buprenorphine Analgesia in a Rat Neuropathic Pain Model

    PubMed Central

    Jurga, Agnieszka M.; Rojewska, Ewelina; Makuch, Wioletta; Pilat, Dominika; Przewlocka, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that microglial TLR2 and TLR4 play a significant role in nociception. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the contribution of TLR2 and TLR4 and their adaptor molecules to neuropathy and their ability to amplify opioid effectiveness. Behavioral tests (von Frey's and cold plate) and biochemical (Western blot and qRT-PCR) analysis of spinal cord and DRG tissue were conducted after chronic constriction injury (CCI) to the sciatic nerve. Repeated intrathecal administration of LPS-RS (TLR2 and TLR4 antagonist) and LPS-RS Ultrapure (TLR4 antagonist) attenuated allodynia and hyperalgesia. Biochemical analysis revealed time-dependent upregulation of mRNA and/or protein levels of TLR2 and TLR4 and MyD88 and TRIF adaptor molecules, which was paralleled by an increase in IBA-1/CD40-positive cells under neuropathy. LPS-RS and LPS-RS Ultrapure similarly influenced opioid analgesia by enhancing the effectiveness of buprenorphine but not morphine. Summing up, in light of their upregulation over the course of pain, both TLR2 and TLR4 may indeed play a significant role in neuropathy, which could be linked to the observed activation of IBA-1/CD40-positive cells. Blockade of TLR2 and TLR4 produced analgesia and enhanced buprenorphine's effectiveness, which suggests that they may be a putative target for future pharmacological pain relief tools, especially for opioid rotation, when the effect of morphine is tolerated. PMID:26962463

  4. Myeloid-Specific Blockade of Notch Signaling Attenuates Choroidal Neovascularization through Compromised Macrophage Infiltration and Polarization in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Guo-Rui; Li, Na; Chang, Tian-Fang; Zhang, Ping; Gao, Xiang; Yan, Xian-Chun; Liang, Liang; Han, Hua; Wang, Yu-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages have been recognized as an important inflammatory component in choroidal neovascularization (CNV). However, it is unclear how these cells are activated and polarized, how they affect angiogenesis and what the underlining mechanisms are during CNV. Notch signaling has been implicated in macrophage activation. Previously we have shown that inducible disruption of RBP-J, the critical transcription factor of Notch signaling, in adult mice results in enhanced CNV, but it is unclear what is the role of macrophage-specific Notch signaling in the development of CNV. In the current study, by using the myeloid specific RBP-J knockout mouse model combined with the laser-induced CNV model, we show that disruption of Notch signaling in macrophages displayed attenuated CNV growth, reduced macrophage infiltration and activation, and alleviated angiogenic response after laser induction. The inhibition of CNV occurred with reduced expression of VEGF and TNF-α in infiltrating inflammatory macrophages in myeloid specific RBP-J knockout mice. These changes might result in direct inhibition of EC lumen formation, as shown in an in vitro study. Therefore, clinical intervention of Notch signaling in CNV needs to pinpoint myeloid lineage to avoid the counteractive effects of global inhibition. PMID:27339903

  5. Blockade of Interplay between IL-17A and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Attenuates LPS-Induced Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kim, So Ri; Kim, Hee Jung; Kim, Dong Im; Lee, Kyung Bae; Park, Hae Jin; Jeong, Jae Seok; Cho, Seong Ho; Lee, Yong Chul

    2015-01-01

    IL-17 is a cytokine mainly from IL-17-producing T cells, which are one of subsets of CD4+ T cells and play a role in adaptive immune system. Recent studies have demonstrated that IL-17A can act rapidly as an innate immune responder during infection before the onset of its classic adaptive immune response. This role of IL-17A in innate immune response is implicated in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced lung inflammation. Very recently, we have reported that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is involved in LPS-induced lung inflammation in vivo and in vitro. This study aimed to elucidate the role of IL-17A in LPS-induced lung injury, focusing on the link with ER stress. We treated a murine model of LPS-induced lung injury with IL-17A neutralizing antibody and 4-phenylbutyrate (4-PBA), a representative ER stress inhibitor. In addition, we evaluated the effects of IL-17A on ER stress in LPS-stimulated bronchial epithelial cells. Our results showed that inhibition of IL-17A decreased LPS-induced pulmonary neutrophilia, vascular leakage, nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), infiltration of dendritic cells, increased expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), activation of NLRP3 inflammasome, and increased ER stress in the lung. 4-PBA or TAK-242, a TLR4 inhibitor attenuated expression of IL-17A thereby improving LPS-induced lung inflammation. Intriguingly, we observed that stimulation with LPS increased expression of IL-17A in airway epithelial cells and co-stimulation with IL-17A further increased ER stress and NF-κB activation. This study indicates that the interrelationship between IL-17A and ER stress plays an important role in LPS-induced injury showing a positive feedback in airway epithelial cells and suggests that targeting their interaction can be a potential therapeutic approach to overcome one of severe refractory pulmonary disorders. PMID:26516372

  6. Selective pharmacological blockade of the 5-HT7 receptor attenuates light and 8-OH-DPAT induced phase shifts of mouse circadian wheel running activity

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, Jonathan; Yun, Sujin; Losee Olson, Susan; Turek, Fred; Bonaventure, Pascal; Dvorak, Curt; Lovenberg, Timothy; Dugovic, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Recent reports have illustrated a reciprocal relationship between circadian rhythm disruption and mood disorders. The 5-HT7 receptor may provide a crucial link between the two sides of this equation since the receptor plays a critical role in sleep, depression, and circadian rhythm regulation. To further define the role of the 5-HT7 receptor as a potential pharmacotherapy to correct circadian rhythm disruptions, the current study utilized the selective 5-HT7 antagonist JNJ-18038683 (10 mg/kg) in three different circadian paradigms. While JNJ-18038683 was ineffective at phase shifting the onset of wheel running activity in mice when administered at different circadian time (CT) points across the circadian cycle, pretreatment with JNJ-18038683 blocked non-photic phase advance (CT6) induced by the 5-HT1A/7 receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT (3 mg/kg). Since light induced phase shifts in mammals are partially mediated via the modulation of the serotonergic system, we determined if JNJ-18038683 altered phase shifts induced by a light pulse at times known to phase delay (CT15) or advance (CT22) wheel running activity in free running mice. Light exposure resulted in a robust shift in the onset of activity in vehicle treated animals at both times tested. Administration of JNJ-18038683 significantly attenuated the light induced phase delay and completely blocked the phase advance. The current study demonstrates that pharmacological blockade of the 5-HT7 receptor by JNJ-18038683 blunts both non-photic and photic phase shifts of circadian wheel running activity in mice. These findings highlight the importance of the 5-HT7 receptor in modulating circadian rhythms. Due to the opposite modulating effects of light resetting between diurnal and nocturnal species, pharmacotherapy targeting the 5-HT7 receptor in conjunction with bright light therapy may prove therapeutically beneficial by correcting the desynchronization of internal rhythms observed in depressed individuals. PMID:25642174

  7. Cannabidiol attenuates haloperidol-induced catalepsy and c-Fos protein expression in the dorsolateral striatum via 5-HT1A receptors in mice.

    PubMed

    Sonego, Andreza B; Gomes, Felipe V; Del Bel, Elaine A; Guimaraes, Francisco S

    2016-08-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is a major non-psychoactive compound from Cannabis sativa plant. Given that CBD reduces psychotic symptoms without inducing extrapyramidal motor side-effects in animal models and schizophrenia patients, it has been proposed to act as an atypical antipsychotic. In addition, CBD reduced catalepsy induced by drugs with distinct pharmacological mechanisms, including the typical antipsychotic haloperidol. To further investigate this latter effect, we tested whether CBD (15-60mg/kg) would attenuate the catalepsy and c-Fos protein expression in the dorsal striatum induced by haloperidol (0.6mg/kg). We also evaluated if these effects occur through the facilitation of 5-HT1A receptor-mediated neurotransmission. For this, male Swiss mice were treated with CBD and haloperidol systemically and then subjected to the catalepsy test. Independent groups of animals were also treated with the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY100635 (0.1mg/kg). As expected, haloperidol induced catalepsy throughout the experiments, an effect that was prevented by systemic CBD treatment 30min before haloperidol administration. Also, CBD, administered 2.5h after haloperidol, reversed haloperidol-induced catalepsy. Haloperidol also increased c-Fos protein expression in the dorsolateral striatum, an effect attenuated by previous CBD administration. CBD effects on catalepsy and c-Fos protein expression induced by haloperidol were blocked by the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist. We also evaluated the effects of CBD (60nmol) injection into the dorsal striatum on haloperidol-induced catalepsy. Similar to systemic administration, this treatment reduced catalepsy induced by haloperidol. Altogether, these results suggest that CBD acts in the dorsal striatum to improve haloperidol-induced catalepsy via postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptors. PMID:27131780

  8. Attenuation of phencyclidine-induced object recognition deficits by the combination of atypical antipsychotic drugs and pimavanserin (ACP 103), a 5-hydroxytryptamine(2A) receptor inverse agonist.

    PubMed

    Snigdha, S; Horiguchi, M; Huang, M; Li, Z; Shahid, M; Neill, J C; Meltzer, H Y

    2010-02-01

    Subchronic administration of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist, phencyclidine (PCP), in rodents has been shown to produce impairment in novel object recognition (NOR), a model of visual learning and memory. We tested the hypothesis that the selective 5-HT(2A) inverse agonists, pimavanserin and (R)-(+)-alpha-(2,3-dimethoxyphenyl)-1-[2-(4-fluorophenylethyl]-4-piperidinemethanol (M100907), would potentiate subeffective doses of atypical antipsychotic drugs (APDs) to reverse the NOR deficits. Female rats received vehicle or PCP (2 mg/kg b.i.d.) for 7 days, followed by a 7-day washout. Pimavanserin (3 mg/kg) or M100907 (1 mg/kg) alone, or four atypicial APDs, risperidone (0.05-0.1 mg/kg), melperone (1-3 mg/kg), olanzapine (1-2 mg/kg), or N-desmethylclozapine (1-2 mg/kg), and the typical APD, haloperidol (0.05-0.1 mg/kg), were administered alone, or in combination with pimavanserin or M100907, before NOR testing. The exploration times of objects during 3-min acquisition and retention trials, separated by a 1-min interval, were compared by analysis of variance. Vehicle-, but not PCP-treated, animals, explored the novel object significantly more than the familiar in the retention trial (p < 0.05-0.01). Pretreatment with the higher doses of the atypical APDs, but not pimavanserin, M100907, or haloperidol alone, reversed the effects of PCP. The effect of risperidone was blocked by haloperidol pretreatment. Coadministration of pimavanserin or M100907, with ineffective doses of the atypical APDs, but not haloperidol, also reversed the PCP-induced deficit in NOR. These results support the importance of 5-hydroxytryptamine(2A) receptor blockade relative to D(2) receptor blockade in the ability of atypicals to ameliorate the effect of subchronic PCP, a putative measure of cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia. PMID:19864614

  9. Activation of microglial cells triggers a release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) inducing their proliferation in an adenosine A2A receptor-dependent manner: A2A receptor blockade prevents BDNF release and proliferation of microglia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been shown to control microglial responses in neuropathic pain. Since adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) control neuroinflammation, as well as the production and function of BDNF, we tested to see if A2AR controls the microglia-dependent secretion of BDNF and the proliferation of microglial cells, a crucial event in neuroinflammation. Methods Murine N9 microglial cells were challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 100 ng/mL) in the absence or in the presence of the A2AR antagonist, SCH58261 (50 nM), as well as other modulators of A2AR signaling. The BDNF cellular content and secretion were quantified by Western blotting and ELISA, A2AR density was probed by Western blotting and immunocytochemistry and cell proliferation was assessed by BrdU incorporation. Additionally, the A2AR modulation of LPS-driven cell proliferation was also tested in primary cultures of mouse microglia. Results LPS induced time-dependent changes of the intra- and extracellular levels of BDNF and increased microglial proliferation. The maximal LPS-induced BDNF release was time-coincident with an LPS-induced increase of the A2AR density. Notably, removing endogenous extracellular adenosine or blocking A2AR prevented the LPS-mediated increase of both BDNF secretion and proliferation, as well as exogenous BDNF-induced proliferation. Conclusions We conclude that A2AR activation plays a mandatory role controlling the release of BDNF from activated microglia, as well as the autocrine/paracrine proliferative role of BDNF. PMID:23363775

  10. Dipyridamole attenuates ischemia reperfusion induced acute kidney injury through adenosinergic A1 and A2A receptor agonism in rats.

    PubMed

    Puri, Nikkita; Mohey, Vinita; Singh, Manjinder; Kaur, Tajpreet; Pathak, Devendra; Buttar, Harpal Singh; Singh, Amrit Pal

    2016-04-01

    Dipyridamole (DYP) is an anti-platelet agent with marked vasodilator, anti-oxidant, and anti-inflammatory activity. The present study investigated the role of adenosine receptors in DYP-mediated protection against ischemia reperfusion-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) in rats. The rats were subjected to bilateral renal ischemia for 40 min followed by reperfusion for 24 h. The renal damage induced by ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) was assessed by measuring creatinine clearance, blood urea nitrogen, uric acid, plasma potassium, fractional excretion of sodium, and microproteinuria in rats. The oxidative stress in renal tissues was assessed by quantification of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, superoxide anion generation, and reduced glutathione level. The hematoxylin-eosin staining was carried out to observe histopathological changes in renal tissues. DYP (10 and 30 mg/kg, intraperitoneal, i.p.) was administered 30 min before subjecting the rats to renal IRI. In separate groups, caffeine (50 mg/kg, i.p.), an adenosinergic A1 and A2A receptor antagonist was administered with and without DYP treatment before subjecting the rats to renal IRI. The ischemia reperfusion-induced AKI was demonstrated by significant changes in serum as well as urinary parameters, enhanced oxidative stress, and histopathological changes in renal tissues. The administration of DYP demonstrated protection against AKI. The prior treatment with caffeine abolished DYP-mediated reno-protection suggesting role of A1 and A2A adenosine receptors in DYP-mediated reno-protection in rats. It is concluded that adenosine receptors find their definite involvement in DYP-mediated anti-oxidative and reno-protective effect against ischemia reperfusion-induced AKI. PMID:26728617

  11. Blockade of Cannabinoid CB1 receptor attenuates the acquisition of morphine-induced conditioned place preference along with a downregulation of ERK, CREB phosphorylation, and BDNF expression in the nucleus accumbens and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianbo; Wang, Na; Chen, Bo; Wang, Yi'nan; He, Jing; Cai, Xintong; Zhang, Hongbo; Wei, Shuguang; Li, Shengbin

    2016-09-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) is highly expressed in the mesocorticolimbic system and associated with drug craving and relapse. Clinical trials suggest that CB1R antagonists may represent new therapies for drug addiction. However, the downstream signaling of CB1R is not fully elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between CB1R and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and hippocampus in morphine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP), which is used to assess the morphine-induced reward memory. The protein level of CB1R, ERK, CREB, and BDNF were detected by western blotting. Additionally, a CB1R antagonist, AM251, was used to study whether blockade of CB1R altered the CPP and above-mentioned molecules. We found an increase of CB1R expression in the NAc and hippocampus of the mice following morphine CPP, but not those after repeated morphine in home cage without context exposure (NO-CPP). Both morphine CPP and NO-CPP induced an upregulation of ERK, CREB phosphorylation and BDNF expression. Furthermore, pretreatment with AM251 before morphine attenuated the CPP acquisition and CB1R expression as well as the activation of ERK-CREB-BDNF cascade. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that (1) Repeated morphine with context exposures but not merely the pharmacological effects of morphine increased CB1R expression both in the NAc and hippocampus. (2) CB1R antagonist mediated blockade of ERK-CREB-BDNF signaling activation in the NAc and hippocampus may be an important mechanism underlying the attenuation of morphine CPP. PMID:27461790

  12. NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the cardiopulmonary chemoreflex control of regional sympathetic outputs via a GABAergic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Minic, Zeljka; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2015-07-01

    Adenosine is a powerful central neuromodulator acting via opposing A1 (inhibitor) and A2a (activator) receptors. However, in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), both adenosine receptor subtypes attenuate cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (CCR) sympathoinhibition of renal, adrenal, and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity and attenuate reflex decreases in arterial pressure and heart rate. Adenosine A1 receptors inhibit glutamatergic transmission in the CCR pathway, whereas adenosine A2a receptors most likely facilitate release of an unknown inhibitory neurotransmitter, which, in turn, inhibits the CCR. We hypothesized that adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the CCR via facilitation of GABA release in the NTS. In urethane-chloralose-anesthetized rats (n = 51), we compared regional sympathetic responses evoked by stimulation of the CCR with right atrial injections of the 5-HT3 receptor agonist phenylbiguanide (1-8 μg/kg) before and after selective stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors [microinjections into the NTS of CGS-21680 (20 pmol/50 nl)] preceded by blockade of GABAA or GABAB receptors in the NTS [bicuculline (10 pmol/100 nl) or SCH-50911 (1 nmol/100 nl)]. Blockade of GABAA receptors virtually abolished adenosine A2a receptor-mediated inhibition of the CCR. GABAB receptors had much weaker but significant effects. These effects were similar for the different sympathetic outputs. We conclude that stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibits CCR-evoked hemodynamic and regional sympathetic reflex responses via a GABA-ergic mechanism. PMID:25910812

  13. Adenosine A2A receptor signaling attenuates LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine formation of mouse macrophages by inducing the expression of DUSP1.

    PubMed

    Köröskényi, Krisztina; Kiss, Beáta; Szondy, Zsuzsa

    2016-07-01

    Adenosine is known to reduce inflammation by suppressing the activity of most immune cells. Previous studies have shown that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated mouse macrophages produce adenosine, and the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) signaling activated in an autocrine manner attenuates LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine formation. It has been suggested that A2AR signaling inhibits LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production through a unique cAMP-dependent, but PKA- and Epac-independent signaling pathway. However, the mechanism of inhibition was not identified so far. Here we report that LPS stimulation enhances A2AR expression in mouse bone marrow derived macrophages, and loss of A2ARs results in enhanced LPS-induced pro-inflammatory response. Loss of A2ARs in A2AR null macrophages did not alter the LPS-induced NF-κB activation, but an enhanced basal and LPS-induced phosphorylation of MAP kinases (especially that of JNKs) was detected in A2AR null cells. A2AR signaling did not alter the LPS-induced phosphorylation of their upstream kinases, but by regulating adenylate cyclase activity it enhanced the expression of dual specific phosphatase (DUSP)1, a negative regulator of MAP kinases. As a result, lower basal and LPS-induced DUSP1 mRNA and protein levels can be detected in A2AR null macrophages. Silencing of DUSP1 mRNA expression resulted in higher basal and LPS-induced JNK phosphorylation and LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine formation in wild type macrophages, but had no effect on that in A2AR null cells. Our data indicate that A2AR signaling regulates both basal and LPS-induced DUSP1 levels in macrophages via activating the adenylate cyclase pathway. PMID:27066978

  14. PD-1 blockade attenuates immunosuppressive myeloid cells due to inhibition of CD47/SIRPα axis in HPV negative head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Guang-Tao; Bu, Lin-Lin; Huang, Cong-Fa; Zhang, Wen-Feng; Chen, Wan-Jun; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Kulkarni, Ashok B.; Sun, Zhi-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) play key roles in the tumor immune suppressive network and tumor progression. However, precise roles of programmed death-1 (PD-1) in immunological functions of MDSCs and TAMs in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) have not been clearly elucidated. In the present study, we show that PD-1 and PD-L1 levels were significantly higher in human HNSCC specimen than in normal oral mucosa. MDSCs and TAMs were characterized in mice and human HNSCC specimen, correlated well with PD-1 and PD-L1 expression. αPD-1 treatment was well tolerated and significantly reduced tumor growth in the HNSCC mouse model along with significant reduction in MDSCs and TAMs in immune organs and tumors. Molecular analysis suggests a reduction in the CD47/SIRPα pathway by PD-1 blockade, which regulates MDSCs, TAMs, dendritic cell as well as effector T cells. Hence, these data identify that PD-1/PD-L1 axis is significantly increased in human and mouse HNSCC. Adoptive αPD-1 immunotherapy may provide a novel therapeutic approach to modulate the micro- and macro- environment in HNSCC. PMID:26573233

  15. P2X7 Blockade Attenuates Murine Lupus Nephritis by Inhibiting Activation of the NLRP3/ASC/Caspase 1 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jijun; Wang, Hongyue; Dai, Chao; Wang, Hongyang; Zhang, Hui; Huang, Yuefang; Wang, Shuang; Gaskin, Felicia; Yang, Niansheng; Fu, Shu Man

    2014-01-01

    Objective The NLRP3 inflammasome plays key roles in inflammation and autoimmunity, and puriner-gic receptor P2X7 has been proposed to be upstream of NLRP3 activation. The aim of the present study, using murine models, was to investigate whether the P2X7/ NLRP3 inflammasome pathway contributes to the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis (LN). Methods MRL/lpr mice were treated with the selective P2X7 antagonist brilliant blue G (BBG) for 8 weeks. Following treatment, the severity of renal lesions, production of anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) antibodies, rate of survival, activation of the NLRP3/ ASC/caspase 1 inflammasome pathway, and ratio of Thl7 cells to Treg cells were evaluated. P2X7-targeted small interfering RNA (siRNA) was also used for in vivo intervention. Similar evaluations were carried out in NZM2328 mice, a model of LN in which the disease was accelerated by administration of adenovirus-expressing interferon-α (AdIFNα). Results Significant up-regulation of P2X7/NLRP3 inflammasome signaling molecules was detected in the kidneys of MLR/lpr mice as compared with normal control mice. Blockade of P2X7 activation by BBG suppressed NLRP3/ASC/caspase 1 assembly and the subsequent release of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), resulting in a significant reduction in the severity of nephritis and circulating anti-dsDNA antibodies. The lifespan of the treated mice was significantly prolonged. BBG treatment reduced the serum levels of IL-1β and IL-17 and the Thl7:Treg cell ratio. Similar results were obtained by specific siRNA silencing of P2X7 in vivo. The effectiveness of BBG treatment in modulating LN was confirmed in NZM2328 mice with AdIFNα-accelerated disease. Conclusion Activation of the P2X7 signaling pathway accelerates murine LN by activating the NLRP3/ASC/caspase 1 inflammasome, resulting in increased IL-1β production and enhanced Thl7 cell polarization. Thus, targeting of the P2X7/NLRP3 pathway should be considered as a novel therapeutic strategy in

  16. Attenuation of autonomic reflexes by A803467 may not be solely caused by blockade of NaV 1.8 channels

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Audrey J.; Kim, Joyce S.; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Ruiz-Velasco, Victor; Kaufman, Marc P.

    2013-01-01

    In decerebrated rats, we determined the dose of A803467, a NaV 1.8 antagonist, needed to attenuate the reflex pressor responses to femoral arterial injections of lactic acid (24mM; ~0.1mL) and capsaicin (0.1μg), agents which stimulate thin fiber afferents having NaV 1.8 channels. We also determined whether the dose of A803467 needed to attenuate these reflex responses affected the responses of muscle spindle afferents to tendon stretch and succinylcholine (200μg). Spindle afferents are not supplied with NaV 1.8 channels, and consequently their responses to these stimuli should not be influenced by A803467. Pressor responses to lactic acid and capsaicin were not altered by 500μg of A803467 (n=6). A803467 in a dose of 1mg, however, significantly reduced (p< 0.05; n=12) the pressor responses to lactic acid (23±5 to 7±3ΔmmHg) and capsaicin (47±5 to 31±5ΔmmHg). Surprisingly, we also found that 1 mg of A803467 reduced the responses of 10 spindle afferents to succinylcholine (34±11 to 4±3 Δ imp/s p<0.05) and stretch (83±17 to 0.4±1 Δ imp/s; p<0.05). We conclude that A803467 reduces the reflex response to lactic acid and capsaicin; however, it may be working on multiple channels, including NaV 1.8, other NaVs as well as voltage-gated calcium channels. PMID:23523647

  17. Combined stimulation of the glycine and polyamine sites of the NMDA receptor attenuates NMDA blockade-induced learning deficits of rats in a 14-unit T-maze.

    PubMed

    Meyer, R C; Knox, J; Purwin, D A; Spangler, E L; Ingram, D K

    1998-02-01

    The present study examined the effects of multi-site activation of the glycine and polyamine sites of the NMDA receptor on memory formation in rats learning a 14-unit T-maze task. The competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, (+/-)-3-(2-carboxypiperazine-4-yl)-propyl-1-phosphonic acid (CPP, 9 mg/kg), was used to impair learning. The objectives were two-fold: (1) to investigate the effects of independent stimulation of the strychnine-insensitive glycine site or the polyamine site; (2) to investigate the effects of simultaneous activation of these two sites. Male, Fischer-344 rats were pretrained to a criterion of 13 out of 15 shock avoidances in a straight runway, and 24 h later were trained in a 14-unit T-maze that also required shock avoidance. Prior to maze training, rats received intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of saline, saline plus CPP, CPP plus the glycine agonist, D-cycloserine (DCS, 30 or 40 mg/kg), CPP plus the polyamine agonist, spermine (SPM, 2.5 or 5 mg/kg), or CPP plus a combination of DCS (7.5 mg/kg) and SPM (0.625 mg/kg). Individual administration of either DCS or SPM attenuated the CPP-induced maze learning impairment in a dose-dependent manner. However, the combined treatment with both DCS and SPM completely reversed the learning deficit at doses five-fold less than either drug given alone. These findings provide additional evidence that the glycine and polyamine modulatory sites of the NMDA receptor are involved in memory formation. Furthermore, the potent synergistic effect resulting from combined activation of the glycine and polyamine sites would suggest a stronger interaction between these two sites than previously considered, and might provide new therapeutic approaches for enhancing glutamatergic function. PMID:9498733

  18. CTLA-4 blockade enhances the therapeutic effect of an attenuated poxvirus vaccine targeting p53 in an established murine tumor model.

    PubMed

    Espenschied, Jonathan; Lamont, Jeffrey; Longmate, Jeff; Pendas, Solange; Wang, Zhongde; Diamond, Don J; Ellenhorn, Joshua D I

    2003-03-15

    p53 is overexpressed by half of all cancers, and is an attractive target for a vaccine approach to immunotherapy. p53 overexpression is frequently the result of point mutations, which leaves the majority of the protein in its wild-type form. Therefore, the majority of p53 sequence is wild type, making it a self-protein for which tolerance plays a role in limiting immune responses. To overcome tolerance to p53, we have expressed wild-type murine p53 in the nonpathogenic attenuated poxvirus, modified vaccinia virus Ankara (recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara expressing wild-type murine p53 (rMVAp53)). Mice immunized with rMVAp53 vaccine developed vigorous p53-specific CTL responses. rMVAp53 vaccine was evaluated for its ability to inhibit the outgrowth of the syngeneic murine sarcoma Meth A, which overexpresses mutant p53. Mice were inoculated with a lethal dose (5 x 10(5) cells injected s.c.) of Meth A tumor cells and vaccinated by i.p. injection 3 days later with 5 x 10(7) PFU of rMVAp53. The majority of mice remained tumor free and resistant to rechallenge with Meth A tumor cells. We wished to determine whether rMVAp53 immunization could effect the rejection of an established, palpable Meth A tumor. In subsequent experiments, mice were injected with 10(6) Meth A tumor cells, and treated 6 days later with anti-CTLA-4 Ab (9H10) and rMVAp53. The majority of treated mice had complete tumor regression along with lasting tumor immunity. In vivo Ab depletion confirmed that the antitumor effect was primarily CD8 and to a lesser extent CD4 dependent. These experiments demonstrate the potential of a novel cell-free vaccine targeting p53 in malignancy. PMID:12626601

  19. Residual Neuromuscular Blockade.

    PubMed

    Plummer-Roberts, Anna L; Trost, Christina; Collins, Shawn; Hewer, Ian

    2016-02-01

    This article provides an update on residual neuromuscular blockade for nurse anesthetists. The neuromuscular junction, pharmacology for producing and reversing neuromuscular blockade, monitoring sites and methods, and patient implications relating to incomplete reversal of neuromuscular blockade are reviewed. Overall recommendations include using multiple settings when employing a peripheral nerve stimulator for monitoring return of neuromuscular function and administering pharmacologic reversal when the train-of-four ratio is below 0.9. PMID:26939390

  20. Antagonism of the adenosine A2A receptor attenuates akathisia-like behavior induced with MP-10 or aripiprazole in a novel non-human primate model.

    PubMed

    Bleickardt, Carina J; Kazdoba, Tatiana M; Jones, Nicholas T; Hunter, John C; Hodgson, Robert A

    2014-03-01

    Akathisia is a subset of the larger antipsychotic side effect profile known as extrapyramidal syndrome (EPS). It is associated with antipsychotic treatment and is characterized as a feeling of inner restlessness that results in a compulsion to move. There are currently no primate models available to assess drug-induced akathisia; the present research was designed to address this shortcoming. We developed a novel rating scale based on both the Barnes Akathisia Rating Scale (BARS) and the Hillside Akathisia Scale (HAS) to measure the objective, observable incidence of antipsychotic-induced akathisia-like behavior in Cebus apella non-human primates (NHPs). To induce akathisia, we administered the atypical antipsychotic aripiprazole (1 mg/kg) or the selective phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A) inhibitor MP-10 (1-3 mg/kg). Treatment with both compounds produced significantly greater akathisia scores on the rating scale than vehicle treatment. Characteristic behaviors observed included vocalizations, stereotypies, teeth grinding, restless limb movements, and hyperlocomotion. Adenosine A2A receptor antagonists have previously been shown to be effective in blocking antipsychotic-induced EPS in primates. The selective A2A receptor antagonist, SCH 412348 (10-30 mg/kg), effectively reduced or reversed akathisia-like behavior induced by both aripiprazole and MP-10. This work represents the first NHP measurement scale of akathisia and demonstrates that NHPs are responsive to akathisia-inducing agents. As such, it provides a useful tool for the preclinical assessment of putative antipsychotics. In addition, these results provide further evidence of the utility of A2A receptor antagonists for the treatment of antipsychotic-induced movement disorders. PMID:24211858

  1. Endothelin A Receptor Antagonist, Atrasentan, Attenuates Renal and Cardiac Dysfunction in Dahl Salt-Hypertensive Rats in a Blood Pressure Independent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Samad, Mohammed A.; Kim, Ui Kyoung; Kang, Joshua J.; Ke, Qingen; Kang, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Proteinuria is a hallmark of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD), and a good predictor of clinical outcome. Selective endothelin A (ETA) receptor antagonist used with renin-angiotensin system (RAS) inhibitors prevents development of proteinuria in CKD. However, whether the improvement in proteinuria would have beneficial effects on CVD, independent of RAS inhibition, is not well understood. In this study, we investigated whether atrasentan, an ETA receptor antagonist, has renal and cardiovascular effects independent of RAS inhibition. Male Dahl salt sensitive (DSS) rats, at six weeks of age, received water with or without different doses of atrasentan and/or enalapril under high salt (HS) diet or normal diet (ND) for 6 weeks. At the end of 12th week, atrasentan at a moderate dose significantly attenuated proteinuria and serum creatinine without reducing mean arterial pressure (MAP), thereby preventing cardiac hypertrophy and improving cardiac function. ACE inhibitor enalapril at a dose that did not significantly lowered BP, attenuated cardiac hypertrophy while moderately improving cardiac function without reducing proteinuria and serum creatinine level. Nonetheless, combined therapy of atrasentan and enalapril that does not altering BP exerted additional cardioprotective effect. Based on these findings, we conclude that BP independent monotherapy of ETA receptor antagonist attenuates the progression of CKD and significantly mitigates CVD independent of RAS inhibition. PMID:25775254

  2. Endothelin A receptor antagonist, atrasentan, attenuates renal and cardiac dysfunction in Dahl salt-hypertensive rats in a blood pressure independent manner.

    PubMed

    Samad, Mohammed A; Kim, Ui Kyoung; Kang, Joshua J; Ke, Qingen; Kang, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    Proteinuria is a hallmark of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD), and a good predictor of clinical outcome. Selective endothelin A (ETA) receptor antagonist used with renin-angiotensin system (RAS) inhibitors prevents development of proteinuria in CKD. However, whether the improvement in proteinuria would have beneficial effects on CVD, independent of RAS inhibition, is not well understood. In this study, we investigated whether atrasentan, an ETA receptor antagonist, has renal and cardiovascular effects independent of RAS inhibition. Male Dahl salt sensitive (DSS) rats, at six weeks of age, received water with or without different doses of atrasentan and/or enalapril under high salt (HS) diet or normal diet (ND) for 6 weeks. At the end of 12th week, atrasentan at a moderate dose significantly attenuated proteinuria and serum creatinine without reducing mean arterial pressure (MAP), thereby preventing cardiac hypertrophy and improving cardiac function. ACE inhibitor enalapril at a dose that did not significantly lowered BP, attenuated cardiac hypertrophy while moderately improving cardiac function without reducing proteinuria and serum creatinine level. Nonetheless, combined therapy of atrasentan and enalapril that does not altering BP exerted additional cardioprotective effect. Based on these findings, we conclude that BP independent monotherapy of ETA receptor antagonist attenuates the progression of CKD and significantly mitigates CVD independent of RAS inhibition. PMID:25775254

  3. 5-HT2A receptors control body temperature in mice during LPS-induced inflammation via regulation of NO production.

    PubMed

    Voronova, Irina P; Khramova, Galina M; Kulikova, Elizabeth A; Petrovskii, Dmitrii V; Bazovkina, Daria V; Kulikov, Alexander V

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled 5-HT2A receptors are involved in the regulation of numerous normal and pathological physiological functions. At the same time, its involvement in the regulation of body temperature (Tb) in normal conditions is obscure. Here we study the effect of the 5-HT2A receptor activation or blockade on Tb in sick animals. The experiments were carried out on adult C57BL/6 mouse males. Systemic inflammation and sickness were produced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 0.1mg/kg, ip), while the 5-HT2A receptor was stimulated or blocked through the administration of the receptor agonist DOI or antagonist ketanserin (1mg/kg), respectively. LPS, DOI or ketanserin alone produced no effect on Tb. However, administration of LPS together with a peripheral or central ketanserin injection reduced Tb (32.2°C). Ketanserin reversed the LPS-induced expression of inducible NO synthase in the brain. Consequently, an involvement of NO in the mechanism of the hypothermic effect of ketanserin in sick mice was hypothesized. Administration of LPS together with NO synthase inhibitor, l-nitro-arginine methyl ester (60mg/kg, ip) resulted in deep (28.5°C) and prolonged (8h) hypothermia, while administration of l-nitro-arginine methyl ester alone produced no effect on Tb. Thus, 5-HT2A receptors play a key role in Tb control in sick mice. Blockade of this GPCR produces hypothermia in mice with systemic inflammation via attenuation of LPS-induced NO production. These results indicate an unexpected role of 5-HT2A receptors in inflammation and NO production and have a considerable biological impact on understanding the mechanism of animal adaptation to pathogens and parasites. Moreover, adverse side effects of 5-HT2A receptor antagonists in patients with inflammation may be expected. PMID:26621247

  4. Giant Coulomb blockade magnetoresistance

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaoguang; Wen, Z. C.; Wei, H. X.; Han, Prof. X. F.

    2010-01-01

    We show that the Coulomb blockade voltage can be made to depend strongly on the electron spin in a thin magnetic granular layer inserted in the middle of an insulating layer of a tunnel junction. This strong spin dependence is predicted from the spin-dependent inter-granular conductance through any of the following effects within the granular layer, giant magnetoresistance (GMR), tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR), colossal magnetoresistance (CMR), or GMR through a polymer spacer. The resulting Coulomb blockade magnetoresistance (CBMR) ratio can exceed the magnetoresistance ratio of the granular layer itself by orders of magnitude. Unlike other magenetoresistance effects, the CBMR effect does not require magnetic electrodes.

  5. Primate gastric circulation: effects of catecholamines and adrenergic blockade.

    PubMed

    Zinner, M J; Kerr, J C; Reynolds, D G

    1976-02-01

    The effects of intra-arterial injections and infusions of epinephrine, norepinephrine, and isoproterenol on gastric blood flow were studied in anesthetized baboons. Blood flow was measured electromagnetically before and after adrenergic blockade. The results for injected epinephrine and norepinephrine indicate these agents to be pure vasoconstrictors in the primate gastric circulation, and this response is attenuated by alpha-adrenergic blockade with phenoxybenzamine. Isoproterenol is a pure vasodilator, and its response is attenuated following beta-adrenergic blockade with propranolol. Intra-arterial infusions of epinephrine and norepinephrine (.05 mug kg-1 min-1) resulted in sustained vasoconstriction with no evidence of autoregulatory escape and no postinfusion "over-shoot." This study suggests that epinephrine and norepinephrine might provide alternatives to vasopressin as a vasoconstrictor for the control of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:1259012

  6. A2aR antagonists: Next generation checkpoint blockade for cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Leone, Robert D.; Lo, Ying-Chun; Powell, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    The last several years have witnessed exciting progress in the development of immunotherapy for the treatment of cancer. This has been due in great part to the development of so-called checkpoint blockade. That is, antibodies that block inhibitory receptors such as CTLA-4 and PD-1 and thus unleash antigen-specific immune responses against tumors. It is clear that tumors evade the immune response by usurping pathways that play a role in negatively regulating normal immune responses. In this regard, adenosine in the immune microenvironment leading to the activation of the A2a receptor has been shown to represent one such negative feedback loop. Indeed, the tumor microenvironment has relatively high concentrations of adenosine. To this end, blocking A2a receptor activation has the potential to markedly enhance anti-tumor immunity in mouse models. This review will present data demonstrating the ability of A2a receptor blockade to enhance tumor vaccines, checkpoint blockade and adoptive T cell therapy. Also, as several recent studies have demonstrated that under certain conditions A2a receptor blockade can enhance tumor progression, we will also explore the complexities of adenosine signaling in the immune response. Despite important nuances to the A2a receptor pathway that require further elucidation, studies to date strongly support the development of A2a receptor antagonists (some of which have already been tested in phase III clinical trials for Parkinson Disease) as novel modalities in the immunotherapy armamentarium. PMID:25941561

  7. NR4A receptors up-regulate the antiproteinase alpha-2 macroglobulin (A2M) and modulate MMP-2 and MMP-9 in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Calvo, Ricardo; Ferrán, Beatriz; Alonso, Judith; Martí-Pàmies, Ingrid; Aguiló, Silvia; Calvayrac, Olivier; Rodríguez, Cristina; Martínez-González, José

    2015-06-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are associated with tissue remodelling and repair. In non-vascular tissues, NR4A receptors have been involved in the regulation of MMPs by transcriptional repression mechanisms. Here, we analyse alternative mechanisms involving NR4A receptors in the modulation of MMP activity in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Lentiviral overexpression of NR4A receptors (NOR-1, Nurr1 and Nur77) in human VSMC strongly decreased MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities (analysed by zymography and DQ-gelatin assays) and protein levels. NR4A receptors also down-regulated MMP-2 mRNA levels. Real-time PCR analysis evidenced that alpha-2-macroglobulin (A2M), but not other MMP inhibitors (TIMP-1 and TIMP-2) were up-regulated in NR4A-transduced cells. Interestingly, A2M was expressed in human vascular tissues including the smooth muscle media layer. While NR4A receptors increased A2M expression and secretion in VSMC, NR4A knockdown significantly reduced basal A2M expression in these cells. The direct transcriptional regulation of the human A2M promoter by NR4A receptors was characterised in luciferase reporter assays, electrophoretic mobility shift assays and by chromatin immunoprecipitation, identifying a NGFI-B response element (NBRE-71/-64) essential for the NR4A-mediated induction. The blockade of A2M partially prevented the reduction of MMPs activity observed in NR4A-transduced cells. Although mouse A2M promoter was unresponsive to NR4A receptors, vascular MMP expression was attenuated in transgenic mice over-expressing human NOR-1 in VSMC challenged with lipopolysaccharide. Our results show that the pan-proteinase inhibitor A2M is expressed in the vasculature and that NR4A receptors modulate VSMC MMP activity by several mechanisms including the up-regulation of A2M. PMID:25809189

  8. Integrin antagonists prevent costimulatory blockade-resistant transplant rejection by CD8(+) memory T cells.

    PubMed

    Kitchens, W H; Haridas, D; Wagener, M E; Song, M; Kirk, A D; Larsen, C P; Ford, M L

    2012-01-01

    The success of belatacept in late-stage clinical trials inaugurates the arrival of a new class of immunosuppressants based on costimulatory blockade, an immunosuppression strategy that disrupts essential signals required for alloreactive T-cell activation. Despite having improved renal function, kidney transplant recipients treated with belatacept experienced increased rates of acute rejection. This finding has renewed focus on costimulatory blockade-resistant rejection and specifically the role of alloreactive memory T cells in mediating this resistance. To study the mechanisms of costimulatory blockade-resistant rejection and enhance the clinical efficacy of costimulatory blockade, we developed an experimental transplant system that models a donor-specific memory CD8(+) T-cell response. After confirming that graft-specific memory T cells mediate costimulatory blockade-resistant rejection, we characterized the role of integrins in this rejection. The resistance of memory T cells to costimulatory blockade was abrogated when costimulatory blockade was coupled with either anti-VLA-4 or anti-LFA-1. Mechanistic studies revealed that in the presence of costimulatory blockade, anti-VLA-4 impaired T-cell trafficking to the graft but not memory T-cell recall effector function, whereas anti-LFA-1 attenuated both trafficking and memory recall effector function. As antagonists against these integrins are clinically approved, these findings may have significant translational potential for future clinical transplant trials. PMID:21942986

  9. Integrin antagonists prevent costimulatory blockade-resistant transplant rejection by CD8+ memory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Kitchens, W. H.; Haridas, D.; Wagener, M. E.; Song, M.; Kirk, A. D.; Larsen, C. P.; Ford, M. L.

    2012-01-01

    The success of belatacept in late-stage clinical trials inaugurates the arrival of a new class of immunosuppressants based on costimulatory blockade, an immunosuppression strategy that disrupts essential signals required for alloreactive T cell activation. Despite having improved renal function, kidney transplant recipients treated with belatacept experienced increased rates of acute rejection. This finding has renewed focus on costimulatory blockade-resistant rejection and specifically the role of alloreactive memory T cells in mediating this resistance. To study mechanisms of costimulatory blockade-resistant rejection and enhance the clinical efficacy of costimulatory blockade, we developed an experimental transplant system that models a donor-specific memory CD8+ T cell response. After confirming that graft-specific memory T cells mediate costimulatory blockade-resistant rejection, we characterized the role of integrins in this rejection. The resistance of memory T cells to costimulatory blockade was abrogated when costimulatory blockade was coupled with either anti-VLA-4 or anti-LFA-1. Mechanistic studies revealed that in the presence of costimulatory blockade, anti-VLA-4 impaired T cell trafficking to the graft but not memory T cell recall effector function, whereas anti-LFA-1 attenuated both trafficking and memory recall effector function. As antagonists against these integrins are clinically approved, these findings may have significant translational potential for future clinical transplant trials. PMID:21942986

  10. M100907 attenuates elevated grooming behavior in the BTBR mouse.

    PubMed

    Amodeo, Dionisio A; Rivera, Elaine; Dunn, Jeffrey T; Ragozzino, Michael E

    2016-10-15

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) exhibit social-communication deficits along with restricted interests and repetitive behaviors (RRBs). To date, there is a lack of effective treatments to alleviate RRBs. A recent study found that treatment with the 5HT2A receptor antagonist M100907 attenuates a reversal learning deficit in the BTBR mouse model of autism. The BTBR mouse also exhibits elevated grooming behavior which may model stereotyped motor behaviors also observed in ASD. The present study examined whether 5HT2A receptor blockade with M100907 at either 0.01 or 0.1mg/kg can reduce repetitive grooming in BTBR mice compared to that of vehicle-treated BTBR and C57BL6/J (B6) mice. M100907 at 0.1mg/kg, but not 0.01mg/kg, significantly attenuated repetitive grooming in BTBR mice compared to that of vehicle-treated BTBR mice. M100907 at either dose did not affect grooming behavior in B6 mice. To determine whether 0.1mg/kg M100907 had a more general effect on activity in BTBR mice, a second experiment determined whether M100907 at 0.1mg/kg affected locomotor activity in BTBR mice. M100907 treatment in BTBR and B6 mice did not alter locomotor activity compared to that of vehicle-treated BTBR and B6 mice. The present findings taken together with past results suggest that treatment with a 5HT2A receptor antagonist may be effective in ameliorating RRBs in ASD. PMID:27378338

  11. 5-HT2A receptor activation is necessary for CO2-induced arousal.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Gordon F; Smith, Haleigh R; MacAskill, Amanda; Richerson, George B

    2015-07-01

    Hypercapnia-induced arousal from sleep is an important protective mechanism pertinent to a number of diseases. Most notably among these are the sudden infant death syndrome, obstructive sleep apnea and sudden unexpected death in epilepsy. Serotonin (5-HT) plays a significant role in hypercapnia-induced arousal. The mechanism of 5-HT's role in this protective response is unknown. Here we sought to identify the specific 5-HT receptor subtype(s) involved in this response. Wild-type mice were pretreated with antagonists against 5-HT receptor subtypes, as well as antagonists against adrenergic, cholinergic, histaminergic, dopaminergic, and orexinergic receptors before challenge with inspired CO2 or hypoxia. Antagonists of 5-HT(2A) receptors dose-dependently blocked CO2-induced arousal. The 5-HT(2C) receptor antagonist, RS-102221, and the 5-HT1A receptor agonist, 8-OH-DPAT, attenuated but did not completely block CO2-induced arousal. Blockade of non-5-HT receptors did not affect CO2-induced arousal. None of these drugs had any effect on hypoxia-induced arousal. 5-HT2 receptor agonists were given to mice in which 5-HT neurons had been genetically eliminated during embryonic life (Lmx1b(f/f/p)) and which are known to lack CO2-induced arousal. Application of agonists to 5-HT(2A), but not 5-HT(2C), receptors, dose-dependently restored CO2-induced arousal in these mice. These data identify the 5-HT(2A) receptor as an important mediator of CO2-induced arousal and suggest that, while 5-HT neurons can be independently activated to drive CO2-induced arousal, in the absence of 5-HT neurons and endogenous 5-HT, 5-HT receptor activation can act in a permissive fashion to facilitate CO2-induced arousal via another as yet unidentified chemosensor system. PMID:25925320

  12. 5-HT2A receptor activation is necessary for CO2-induced arousal

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Haleigh R.; MacAskill, Amanda; Richerson, George B.

    2015-01-01

    Hypercapnia-induced arousal from sleep is an important protective mechanism pertinent to a number of diseases. Most notably among these are the sudden infant death syndrome, obstructive sleep apnea and sudden unexpected death in epilepsy. Serotonin (5-HT) plays a significant role in hypercapnia-induced arousal. The mechanism of 5-HT's role in this protective response is unknown. Here we sought to identify the specific 5-HT receptor subtype(s) involved in this response. Wild-type mice were pretreated with antagonists against 5-HT receptor subtypes, as well as antagonists against adrenergic, cholinergic, histaminergic, dopaminergic, and orexinergic receptors before challenge with inspired CO2 or hypoxia. Antagonists of 5-HT2A receptors dose-dependently blocked CO2-induced arousal. The 5-HT2C receptor antagonist, RS-102221, and the 5-HT1A receptor agonist, 8-OH-DPAT, attenuated but did not completely block CO2-induced arousal. Blockade of non-5-HT receptors did not affect CO2-induced arousal. None of these drugs had any effect on hypoxia-induced arousal. 5-HT2 receptor agonists were given to mice in which 5-HT neurons had been genetically eliminated during embryonic life (Lmx1bf/f/p) and which are known to lack CO2-induced arousal. Application of agonists to 5-HT2A, but not 5-HT2C, receptors, dose-dependently restored CO2-induced arousal in these mice. These data identify the 5-HT2A receptor as an important mediator of CO2-induced arousal and suggest that, while 5-HT neurons can be independently activated to drive CO2-induced arousal, in the absence of 5-HT neurons and endogenous 5-HT, 5-HT receptor activation can act in a permissive fashion to facilitate CO2-induced arousal via another as yet unidentified chemosensor system. PMID:25925320

  13. Regulator of G-protein signaling 6 (RGS6) promotes anxiety and depression by attenuating serotonin-mediated activation of the 5-HT(1A) receptor-adenylyl cyclase axis.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Adele; Maity, Biswanath; Wunsch, Amanda M; Meng, Fantao; Wu, Qi; Wemmie, John A; Fisher, Rory A

    2014-04-01

    Targeting serotonin (5-HT) bioavailability with selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) remains the most widely used treatment for mood disorders. However, their limited efficacy, delayed onset of action, and side effects restrict their clinical utility. Endogenous regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) proteins have been implicated as key inhibitors of 5-HT(1A)Rs, whose activation is believed to underlie the beneficial effects of SSRIs, but the identity of the specific RGS proteins involved remains unknown. We identify RGS6 as the critical negative regulator of 5-HT(1A)R-dependent antidepressant actions. RGS6 is enriched in hippocampal and cortical neurons, 5-HT(1A)R-expressing cells implicated in mood disorders. RGS6(-/-) mice exhibit spontaneous anxiolytic and antidepressant behavior rapidly and completely reversibly by 5-HT(1A)R blockade. Effects of the SSRI fluvoxamine and 5-HT(1A)R agonist 8-OH-DPAT were also potentiated in RGS6(+/-) mice. The phenotype of RGS6(-/-) mice was associated with decreased CREB phosphorylation in the hippocampus and cortex, implicating enhanced Gα(i)-dependent adenylyl cyclase inhibition as a possible causative factor in the behavior observed in RGS6(-/-) animals. Our results demonstrate that by inhibiting serotonergic innervation of the cortical-limbic neuronal circuit, RGS6 exerts powerful anxiogenic and prodepressant actions. These findings indicate that RGS6 inhibition may represent a viable means to treat mood disorders or enhance the efficacy of serotonergic agents. PMID:24421401

  14. The adenosine A2A antagonist MSX-3 reverses the effort-related effects of dopamine blockade: differential interaction with D1 and D2 family antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Worden, Lila T.; Shahriari, Mona; Farrar, Andrew M.; Sink, Kelly S.; Hockemeyer, Jörg; Müller, Christa E.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Brain dopamine (DA) participates in the modulation of instrumental behavior, including aspects of behavioral activation and effort-related choice behavior. Rats with impaired DA transmission reallocate their behavior away from food-seeking behaviors that have high response requirements, and instead select less effortful alternatives. Although accumbens DA is considered a critical component of the brain circuitry regulating effort-related choice behavior, emerging evidence demonstrates a role for adenosine A2A receptors. Objective Adenosine A2A receptor antagonism has been shown to reverse the effects of DA antagonism. The present experiments were conducted to determine if this effect was dependent upon the subtype of DA receptor that was antagonized to produce the changes in effort-related choice. Materials and methods The adenosine A2A receptor antagonist MSX-3 (0.5–2.0 mg/kg IP) was assessed for its ability to reverse the effects of the D1 family antagonist SCH39166 (ecopipam; 0.2 mg/kg IP) and the D2 family antagonist eticlopride (0.08 mg/kg IP), using a concurrent lever pressing/chow feeding procedure. Results MSX-3 produced a substantial dose-related reversal of the effects of eticlopride on lever pressing and chow intake. At the highest dose of MSX-3, there was a complete reversal of the effects of eticlopride on lever pressing. In contrast, MSX-3 produced only a minimal attenuation of the effects of SCH39166, as measured by regression and effect size analyses. Conclusions The greater ability of MSX-3 to reverse the effects of D2 vs. D1 blockade may be related to the colocalization of D2 and adenosine A2A receptors on the same population of striatal neurons. PMID:19048234

  15. Blockade of KCa3.1 potassium channels protects against cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng-Lung; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Hu, Oliver Yoa-Pu; Pao, Li-Heng

    2016-09-01

    Tubular cell apoptosis significantly contributes to cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) pathogenesis. Although KCa3.1, a calcium-activated potassium channel, participates in apoptosis, its involvement in cisplatin-induced AKI is unknown. Here, we found that cisplatin treatment triggered an early induction of KCa3.1 expression associated with HK-2 cell apoptosis, the development of renal tubular damage, and apoptosis in mice. Treatment with the highly selective KCa3.1 blocker TRAM-34 suppressed cisplatin-induced HK-2 cell apoptosis. We further assessed whether KCa3.1 mediated cisplatin-induced AKI in genetic knockout and pharmacological blockade mouse models. KCa3.1 deficiency reduced renal function loss, renal tubular damage, and the induction of the apoptotic marker caspase-3 in the kidneys of cisplatin-treated KCa3.1 (-/-) mice. Pharmacological blockade of KCa3.1 by TRAM-34 similarly attenuated cisplatin-induced AKI in mice. Furthermore, we dissected the mechanisms underlying cisplatin-induced apoptosis reduction via KCa3.1 blockade. We found that KCa3.1 blockade attenuated cytochrome c release and the increase in the intrinsic apoptotic mediators Bax, Bak, and caspase-9 after cisplatin treatment. KCa3.1 blocking inhibited the cisplatin-induced activation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress mediator caspase-12, which is independent of calcium-dependent protease m-calpain activation. Taken together, KCa3.1 blockade protects against cisplatin-induced AKI through the attenuation of apoptosis by interference with intrinsic apoptotic and ER stress-related mediators, providing a potential target for the prevention of cisplatin-induced AKI. PMID:26438401

  16. Coulomb blockade with neutral modes.

    PubMed

    Kamenev, Alex; Gefen, Yuval

    2015-04-17

    We study transport through a quantum dot in the fractional quantum Hall regime with filling factors ν=2/3 and ν=5/2, weakly coupled to the leads. We account for both injection of electrons to or from the leads, and quasiparticle rearrangement processes between the edge and the bulk of the quantum dot. The presence of neutral modes introduces topological constraints that modify qualitatively the features of the Coulomb blockade (CB). The periodicity of CB peak spacings doubles and the ratio of spacing between adjacent peaks approaches (in the low temperature and large dot limit) a universal value: 2∶1 for ν=2/3 and 3∶1 for ν=5/2. The corresponding CB diamonds alternate their width in the direction of the bias voltage and allow for the determination of the neutral mode velocity, and of the topological numbers associated with it. PMID:25933323

  17. Neurohumoral blockade in CHF management.

    PubMed

    Willenbrock, R; Philipp, S; Mitrovic, V; Dietz, R

    2000-09-01

    Is heart failure an endocrine disease? Historically, congestive heart failure (CHF) has often been regarded as a mechanical and haemodynamic condition. However, there is now strong evidence that the activation of neuroendocrine systems, like the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) and sympathetic nervous system, as well as the activation of natriuretic peptides, endothelin and vasopressin, play key roles in the progression of CHF. In this context, agents targeting neurohormones offer a highly rational approach to CHF management, with ACE inhibitors, aldosterone antagonists and beta-adrenergic blockade improving the prognosis for many patients. Although relevant improvements in clinical status and survival can be achieved with these drug classes, mortality rates for patients with CHF are still very high. Moreover, most patients do not receive these proven life-prolonging drugs, partially due to fear of adverse events, such as hypotension (with ACE inhibitors), gynaecomastia (with spironolactone) and fatigue (with beta-blockers). New agents that combine efficacy with better tolerability are therefore needed. The angiotensin II type 1 (AT(1))-receptor blockers have the potential to fulfil both these requirements, by blocking the deleterious cardiovascular and haemodynamic effects of angiotensin II while offering placebo-like tolerability. As shown with candesartan, AT(1)-receptor blockers also modulate the levels of other neurohormones, including aldosterone and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP). Combined with its tight, long-lasting binding to AT(1)-receptors, this characteristic gives candesartan the potential for complete blockade of the RAAS-neurohormonal axis, along with the great potential to improve clinical outcomes. PMID:11967792

  18. Axillary brachial plexus blockade in moyamoya disease?

    PubMed Central

    Yalcin, Saban; Cece, Hasan; Nacar, Halil; Karahan, Mahmut Alp

    2011-01-01

    Moyamoya disease is characterized by steno-occlusive changes of the intracranial internal carotid arteries. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism are strictly impaired. The goal in perioperative anaesthetic management is to preserve the stability between oxygen supply and demand in the brain. Peripheral nerve blockade allows excellent neurological status monitoring and maintains haemodynamic stability which is very important in this patient group. Herein, we present an axillary brachial plexus blockade in a moyamoya patient operated for radius fracture. PMID:21712873

  19. Axillary brachial plexus blockade in moyamoya disease?

    PubMed

    Yalcin, Saban; Cece, Hasan; Nacar, Halil; Karahan, Mahmut Alp

    2011-03-01

    Moyamoya disease is characterized by steno-occlusive changes of the intracranial internal carotid arteries. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism are strictly impaired. The goal in perioperative anaesthetic management is to preserve the stability between oxygen supply and demand in the brain. Peripheral nerve blockade allows excellent neurological status monitoring and maintains haemodynamic stability which is very important in this patient group. Herein, we present an axillary brachial plexus blockade in a moyamoya patient operated for radius fracture. PMID:21712873

  20. [The practice guideline 'Neuraxis blockade and anticoagulation'].

    PubMed

    De Lange, J J; Van Kleef, J W; Van Everdingen, J J E

    2004-07-31

    In a patient with a coagulation disorder, the administration of a local anaesthetic by means of a needle or via the insertion of a catheter into the epidural space or spinal cavity may lead to bleeding and haematoma formation, with a danger of pressure on the spinal cord or nerve roots. Employing the method of the Dutch Institute for Healthcare (CBO) for the development of practice guidelines, a working group of anaesthesiologists, a haematologist and a hospital chemist have drawn up recommendations for neuraxis blockade in combination with anticoagulant therapy. In patients with a clinically acquired tendency toward increased bleeding, the management is highly dependent on the cause of the bleeding tendency. If the patient uses acetylsalicylic acid or clopidogrel, the medication must be withdrawn at least 10 days before neuraxis blockade is started. Therapy with glycoprotein-IIb/IIIa-receptor antagonists is an absolute contra-indication for neuraxis blockade. In patients who are using coumarin derivatives, neuraxis blockade results in an increased risk of a neuraxial haematoma. The coumarin derivative should then be withdrawn and replaced by a different form of anticoagulation. The use of low-molecular-weight heparin at the usual prophylactic dosage is not a contra-indication for neuraxis blockade and the risk of a neuraxial haematoma following neuraxis blockade is also not increased significantly by the subcutaneous administration of unfractionated heparin. PMID:15366721

  1. Combined LFA-1 and costimulatory blockade prevents transplant rejection mediated by heterologous immune memory alloresponses

    PubMed Central

    Kitchens, William H.; Haridas, Divya; Wagener, Maylene E.; Song, Mingqing; Ford, Mandy L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent evidence suggests that alloreactive memory T cells are generated by the process of heterologous immunity, whereby memory T cells arising in response to pathogen infection cross-react with donor antigens. Due to their diminished requirements for costimulation during recall, these pathogen-elicited allo-crossreactive memory T cells are of particular clinical importance, especially given the emergence of costimulatory blockade as a transplant immunosuppression strategy. Methods We utilized an established model of heterologous immunity involving sequential infection of a naïve C57BL/6 recipient with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus and vaccinia virus, followed by combined skin and bone marrow transplant from a BALB/c donor. Results We demonstrate that coupling the integrin antagonist anti-LFA-1 with costimulatory blockade could surmount the barrier posed by heterologous immunity in a fully allogeneic murine transplant system. The combined costimulatory and integrin blockade regimen suppressed proliferation of alloreactive memory T cells and attenuated their cytokine effector responses. This combined blockade regimen also promoted the retention of FoxP3+ Tregs in draining lymph nodes. Finally, we show that in an in vitro mixed lymphocyte reaction system using human T cells, the combination of belatacept and anti-LFA-1 was able to suppress cytokine production by alloreactive memory T cells that was resistant to belatacept alone. Conclusions As an antagonist against human LFA-1 exists and has been used clinically to treat psoriasis, these findings have significant translational potential for future clinical transplant trials. PMID:22475765

  2. Sugammadex: A Review of Neuromuscular Blockade Reversal.

    PubMed

    Keating, Gillian M

    2016-07-01

    Sugammadex (Bridion(®)) is a modified γ-cyclodextrin that reverses the effect of the steroidal nondepolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents rocuronium and vecuronium. Intravenous sugammadex resulted in rapid, predictable recovery from moderate and deep neuromuscular blockade in patients undergoing surgery who received rocuronium or vecuronium. Recovery from moderate neuromuscular blockade was significantly faster with sugammadex 2 mg/kg than with neostigmine, and recovery from deep neuromuscular blockade was significantly faster with sugammadex 4 mg/kg than with neostigmine or spontaneous recovery. In addition, recovery from neuromuscular blockade was significantly faster when sugammadex 16 mg/kg was administered 3 min after rocuronium than when patients spontaneously recovered from succinylcholine. Sugammadex also demonstrated efficacy in various special patient populations, including patients with pulmonary disease, cardiac disease, hepatic dysfunction or myasthenia gravis and morbidly obese patients. Intravenous sugammadex was generally well tolerated. In conclusion, sugammadex is an important option for the rapid reversal of rocuronium- or vecuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade. PMID:27324403

  3. EFFECTS OF SUSTAINED PRONGF BLOCKADE ON ATTENTIONAL CAPACITIES IN AGED RATS WITH COMPROMISED CHOLINERGIC SYSTEM

    PubMed Central

    YEGLA, BRITTNEY; PARIKH, VINAY

    2014-01-01

    Disruption in nerve growth factor (NGF) signaling via trkA receptors compromises the integrity of the basal forebrain (BF) cholinergic system, yielding cognitive, specifically attentional, impairments in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Although normal aging is considered a risk factor for AD, the mechanisms underlying the selective vulnerability of the aging cholinergic system to trkA disruption is not clear. The levels of proNGF, a proneurotrophin that possesses higher affinity for p75 receptors, increase in aging. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that cholinergic and attentional dysfunction in aged rats with reduced BF trkA receptors occurs due to the overactivation of endogenous proNGF signaling. We employed a viral vector that produced trkA shRNA to suppress trkA receptors in the corticopetal cholinergic neurons of aged rats. BF trkA suppression impaired animals’ performance on signal trials in both the sustained attention task (SAT) and the cognitively-taxing distractor version of SAT (dSAT) and these deficits were normalized by chronic intracerebroventricular administration of proNGF antibody. Moreover, depolarization-evoked ACh release and the density of cortical cholinergic fibers were partially restored in these animals. However, SAT/dSAT scores reflecting overall performance did not improve following proNGF blockade in trkA knockdown rats due to impaired performance in non-signal trials. Sustained proNGF blockade alone did not alter baseline attentional performance but produced moderate impairments during challenging conditions. Collectively, our findings indicate that barring proNGF-p75 signaling may exert some beneficial effects on attentional capacities specifically when BF trkA signaling is abrogated. However, endogenous proNGF may also possess neurotrophic effects and blockade of this proneurotrophin may not completely ameliorate attentional impairments in AD and potentially hinder performance during periods of high cognitive load

  4. Spin blockade qubit in a superconducting junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padurariu, C.; Nazarov, Yu. V.

    2012-12-01

    We interpret a recent pioneering experiment (Zgirski M. et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 106 (2011) 257003) on quasiparticle manipulation in a superconducting break junction in terms of spin blockade drawing analogy with spin qubits. We propose a novel qubit design that exploits the spin state of two trapped quasiparticles. We detail the coherent control of all four spin states by resonant quantum manipulation and compute the corresponding Rabi frequencies. The read-out technique is based on the spin blockade that inhibits quasiparticle recombination in triplet states. We provide extensive microscopic estimations of the parameters of our model.

  5. Observation of ionic Coulomb blockade in nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jiandong; Liu, Ke; Graf, Michael; Dumcenco, Dumitru; Kis, Andras; di Ventra, Massimiliano; Radenovic, Aleksandra

    2016-08-01

    Emergent behaviour from electron-transport properties is routinely observed in systems with dimensions approaching the nanoscale. However, analogous mesoscopic behaviour resulting from ionic transport has so far not been observed, most probably because of bottlenecks in the controlled fabrication of subnanometre nanopores for use in nanofluidics. Here, we report measurements of ionic transport through a single subnanometre pore junction, and the observation of ionic Coulomb blockade: the ionic counterpart of the electronic Coulomb blockade observed for quantum dots. Our findings demonstrate that nanoscopic, atomically thin pores allow for the exploration of phenomena in ionic transport, and suggest that nanopores may also further our understanding of transport through biological ion channels.

  6. Blockade of interferon Beta, but not interferon alpha, signaling controls persistent viral infection.

    PubMed

    Ng, Cherie T; Sullivan, Brian M; Teijaro, John R; Lee, Andrew M; Welch, Megan; Rice, Stephanie; Sheehan, Kathleen C F; Schreiber, Robert D; Oldstone, Michael B A

    2015-05-13

    Although type I interferon (IFN-I) is thought to be beneficial against microbial infections, persistent viral infections are characterized by high interferon signatures suggesting that IFN-I signaling may promote disease pathogenesis. During persistent lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection, IFNα and IFNβ are highly induced early after infection, and blocking IFN-I receptor (IFNAR) signaling promotes virus clearance. We assessed the specific roles of IFNβ versus IFNα in controlling LCMV infection. While blockade of IFNβ alone does not alter early viral dissemination, it is important in determining lymphoid structure, lymphocyte migration, and anti-viral T cell responses that lead to accelerated virus clearance, approximating what occurs during attenuation of IFNAR signaling. Comparatively, blockade of IFNα was not associated with improved viral control, but with early dissemination of virus. Thus, despite their use of the same receptor, IFNβ and IFNα have unique and distinguishable biologic functions, with IFNβ being mainly responsible for promoting viral persistence. PMID:25974304

  7. Local blockade of glucocorticoid activation reverses stress- and glucocorticoid-induced delays in cutaneous wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Youm, Jong-Kyung; Park, Kyungho; Uchida, Yoshikazu; Chan, Aegean; Mauro, Theodora M.; Holleran, Walter M.; Elias, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Stress slows cutaneous wound healing (WH) in an endogenous glucocorticoid (GC)-dependent fashion. We investigated whether stress/GC-induced delays in WH require further intracutaneous activation of endogenous GC; and whether blockade or down-regulation of peripheral activation normalizes WH in the face of stress. Delayed WH in our motion-restricted murine model of stress could be attributed to elevated systemic GC, because blockade of GC production (using corticotropin-releasing factor inhibitor, antalarmin), or of peripheral binding to the GC receptor [GCr], with an antagonist, Ru-486, normalized WH. We next investigated whether local blockade or down-regulation of the peripheral GC-activating enzyme, 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1), accelerates cutaneous WH. Topical applications of nonspecific (carbenoxolone) as well as an isoform-specific 11β-HSD1 inhibitor overcame stress and exogenous GC-induced delays in WH. Moreover, two liver X receptor ligands, TO901317 and GW3695, down-regulated expression of 11β-HSD1, attenuating stress-induced delays in WH. Combined inhibitor and liver X receptor ligand applications accelerated WH in the face of stress/systemic GC. Thus: (1) intracutaneous conversion of inactive-to-active GC accounts for stress (GC)-induced delays in WH; and (2) blockade or down-regulation of 11β-HSD1 and/or GCr normalize cutaneous WH in the face of stress/GC. Local blockade or down-regulation of cutaneous GC activation could help enhance WH in various clinical settings. PMID:23927023

  8. Neuromuscular blockade in the elderly patient

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Luis A; Athanassoglou, Vassilis; Pandit, Jaideep J

    2016-01-01

    Neuromuscular blockade is a desirable or even essential component of general anesthesia for major surgical operations. As the population continues to age, and more operations are conducted in the elderly, due consideration must be given to neuromuscular blockade in these patients to avoid possible complications. This review considers the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of neuromuscular blockade that may be altered in the elderly. Compartment distribution, metabolism, and excretion of drugs may vary due to age-related changes in physiology, altering the duration of action with a need for reduced dosage (eg, aminosteroids). Other drugs (atracurium, cisatracurium) have more reliable duration of action and should perhaps be considered for use in the elderly. The range of interpatient variability that neuromuscular blocking drugs may exhibit is then considered and drugs with a narrower range, such as cisatracurium, may produce more predictable, and inherently safer, outcomes. Ultimately, appropriate neuromuscular monitoring should be used to guide the administration of muscle relaxants so that the risk of residual neuromuscular blockade postoperatively can be minimized. The reliability of various monitoring is considered. This paper concludes with a review of the various reversal agents, namely, anticholinesterase drugs and sugammadex, and the alterations in dosing of these that should be considered for the elderly patient. PMID:27382330

  9. INHIBITION OF PAN NEUROTROPHIN RECEPTOR P75 ATTENUATES DIESEL PARTICULATE-INDUCED ENHANCEMENT OF ALLERGIC AIRWAY RESPONSES IN C57/BL6J MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent investigations have linked neurotrophins including nerve growth factor (NGF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) to allergic airways diseases. Antibody blockade of NGF attenuates airway resistance in allergic mice. Diesel exhaust particle...

  10. Serotonin 2A receptors contribute to the regulation of risk-averse decisions

    PubMed Central

    Macoveanu, Julian; Rowe, James B; Hornboll, Bettina; Elliott, Rebecca; Paulson, Olaf B; Knudsen, Gitte M; Siebner, Hartwig R

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacological studies point to a role of the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) in regulating the preference for risky decisions, yet the functional contribution of specific 5-HT receptors remains to be clarified. We used pharmacological fMRI to investigate the role of the 5-HT2A receptors in processing negative outcomes and regulating risk-averse behavior. During fMRI, twenty healthy volunteers performed a gambling task under two conditions: with or without blocking the 5-HT2A receptors. The volunteers repeatedly chose between small, likely rewards and large, unlikely rewards. Choices were balanced in terms of expected utility and potential loss. Acute blockade of the 5-HT2A receptors with ketanserin made participants more risk-averse. Ketanserin selectively reduced the neural response of the frontopolar cortex to negative outcomes that were caused by low-risk choices and were associated with large missed rewards. In the context of normal 5-HT2A receptor function, ventral striatum displayed a stronger response to low-risk negative outcomes in risk-taking as opposed to risk-averse individuals. This (negative) correlation between the striatal response to low-risk negative outcomes and risk-averse choice behavior was abolished by 5-HT2A receptor blockade. The results provide the first evidence for a critical role of 5-HT2A receptor function in regulating risk-averse behavior. We suggest that the 5-HT2A receptor system facilitates risk-taking behavior by modulating the outcome evaluation of “missed” reward. These results have implications for understanding the neural basis of abnormal risk-taking behavior, for instance in pathological gamblers. PMID:23810974

  11. Hippocampal 5-HT1A Receptor and Spatial Learning and Memory

    PubMed Central

    Glikmann-Johnston, Yifat; Saling, Michael M.; Reutens, David C.; Stout, Julie C.

    2015-01-01

    Spatial cognition is fundamental for survival in the topographically complex environments inhabited by humans and other animals. The hippocampus, which has a central role in spatial cognition, is characterized by high concentration of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) receptor binding sites, particularly of the 1A receptor (5-HT1A) subtype. This review highlights converging evidence for the role of hippocampal 5-HT1A receptors in spatial learning and memory. We consider studies showing that activation or blockade of the 5-HT1A receptors using agonists or antagonists, respectively, lead to changes in spatial learning and memory. For example, pharmacological manipulation to induce 5-HT release, or to block 5-HT uptake, have indicated that increased extracellular 5-HT concentrations maintain or improve memory performance. In contrast, reduced levels of 5-HT have been shown to impair spatial memory. Furthermore, the lack of 5-HT1A receptor subtype in single gene knockout mice is specifically associated with spatial memory impairments. These findings, along with evidence from recent cognitive imaging studies using positron emission tomography (PET) with 5-HT1A receptor ligands, and studies of individual genetic variance in 5-HT1A receptor availability, strongly suggests that 5-HT, mediated by the 5-HT1A receptor subtype, plays a key role in spatial learning and memory. PMID:26696889

  12. Effects of blockade of ionotropic glutamate receptors on blood-brain barrier disruption in focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xia; Hunter, Christine; Weiss, Harvey R; Chi, Oak Z

    2010-12-01

    To determine whether blockade of ionotropic glutamate receptors such as NMDA or AMPA receptors would attenuate blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption in focal cerebral ischemia, 15 min before middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion, CGS-19755 or NBQX was injected intraperitoneally in rats. At 1 h after MCA occlusion, BBB permeability was determined by measuring the transfer coefficient (K(i)) of (14)C-α-aminoisobutyric acid and the volume of dextran distribution. With MCA occlusion, K(i) was increased in the ischemic cortex (IC) (316%). CGS-19755 attenuated the increase in K(i) in the IC (-46%), but NBQX did not significantly decrease it. The difference in the volume of dextran distribution between the IC and the contralateral cortex became insignificant with the blockade of NMDA or AMPA receptors. Our data demonstrated that blockade of NMDA or AMPA receptors could attenuate the BBB disruption in focal cerebral ischemia and suggest that ionotropic glutamate receptors are involved in part in BBB disruption. PMID:20217443

  13. Specific inhibition of the endothelin A receptor with ZD4054: clinical and pre-clinical evidence

    PubMed Central

    Morris, C D; Rose, A; Curwen, J; Hughes, A M; Wilson, D J; Webb, D J

    2005-01-01

    Activation of the endothelin A receptor (ETA) by endothelin-1 (ET-1) mediates events that regulate mitogenesis, apoptosis, angiogenesis and metastasis in tumours. Specific blockade of ETA may have anticancer effects, while retaining beneficial endothelin B receptor (ETB)-mediated effects such as apoptosis and clearance of ET-1. ZD4054 is an orally active, specific ETA antagonist in clinical development. In receptor-binding studies, ZD4054 specifically bound to ETA with high affinity; no binding was detected at ETB. In a randomised placebo-controlled trial in eight healthy volunteers, a single oral dose of ZD4054 reduced forearm vasoconstriction in response to brachial artery infusion of ET-1, thus providing clinical evidence of ETA blockade. ETB blockade was assessed in an ascending, single-dose, placebo-controlled trial in 28 volunteers. For all doses of ZD4054, mean plasma ET-1 concentrations measured at 4 and 24 h were within the placebo reference range (a rise in ET-1 would indicate ETB blockade) and there was no evidence of dose-related changes. These data confirm the specificity of ZD4054 for ETA, with no activity at ETB in a clinical or preclinical setting. As a result of this specificity, ZD4054 has the potential to block multiple ETA-induced pathological processes, while allowing beneficial ETB-mediated processes to continue, which may, in turn, lead to an effective cancer therapy. PMID:15956965

  14. [Cancer immunotherapy by immuno-checkpoint blockade].

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Yutaka

    2015-10-01

    As cancer immunotherapies utilizing anti-tumor T-cell responses, immuno-checkpoint blockade and adoptive T-cell immunotherapy have recently achieved durable responses even in advanced cancer patients with metastases. Administration of antibodies on the T-cell surface, CTLA-4 and PD-1 (or PD-1 ligand PD-L1), resulted in tumor regression of not only melanoma and renal cell cancer which were known to be relatively sensitive to immunotherapy, but also various malignancies including lung, bladder, ovarian, gastric, and head and neck cancers, as well as hematological malignancies such as Hodgkin and B-cell malignant lymphomas. These findings have changed the status of immunotherapy in the development of cancer treatments. Currently, development of combinations employing cancer immunotherapy with immuno-checkpoint blockade, as well as personalized cancer immunotherapy based on the evaluation of pretreatment immune status, are in progress. PMID:26458459

  15. hERG Blockade by Iboga Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Alper, Kenneth; Bai, Rong; Liu, Nian; Fowler, Steven J; Huang, Xi-Ping; Priori, Silvia G; Ruan, Yanfei

    2016-01-01

    The iboga alkaloids are a class of naturally occurring and synthetic compounds, some of which modify drug self-administration and withdrawal in humans and preclinical models. Ibogaine, the prototypic iboga alkaloid that is utilized clinically to treat addictions, has been associated with QT prolongation, torsades de pointes and fatalities. hERG blockade as IKr was measured using the whole-cell patch clamp technique in HEK 293 cells. This yielded the following IC50 values: ibogaine manufactured by semisynthesis via voacangine (4.09 ± 0.69 µM) or by extraction from T. iboga (3.53 ± 0.16 µM); ibogaine's principal metabolite noribogaine (2.86 ± 0.68 µM); and voacangine (2.25 ± 0.34 µM). In contrast, the IC50 of 18-methoxycoronaridine, a product of rational synthesis and current focus of drug development was >50 µM. hERG blockade was voltage dependent for all of the compounds, consistent with low-affinity blockade. hERG channel binding affinities (K i) for the entire set of compounds, including 18-MC, ranged from 0.71 to 3.89 µM, suggesting that 18-MC binds to the hERG channel with affinity similar to the other compounds, but the interaction produces substantially less hERG blockade. In view of the extended half-life of noribogaine, these results may relate to observations of persistent QT prolongation and cardiac arrhythmia at delayed intervals of days following ibogaine ingestion. The apparent structure-activity relationships regarding positions of substitutions on the ibogamine skeleton suggest that the iboga alkaloids might provide an informative paradigm for investigation of the structural biology of the hERG channel. PMID:25636206

  16. Efficient Multiparticle Entanglement via Asymmetric Rydberg Blockade

    SciTech Connect

    Saffman, M.; Moelmer, K.

    2009-06-19

    We present an efficient method for producing N particle entangled states using Rydberg blockade interactions. Optical excitation of Rydberg states that interact weakly, yet have a strong coupling to a second control state is used to achieve state dependent qubit rotations in small ensembles. On the basis of quantitative calculations, we predict that an entangled quantum superposition state of eight atoms can be produced with a fidelity of 84% in cold Rb atoms.

  17. Reversal by pronethalol of dibenamine blockade

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, S.

    1969-01-01

    1. The guinea-pig seminal vesicle has been shown to be a very suitable test object for the study of mechanisms involving α-adrenoceptive receptors, because no β-receptors were found in this preparation. 2. Adrenaline, noradrenaline and phenylephrine were directly acting agonists, their ED50 values being 7·1 × 10-6M, 1·5 × 10-5M and 2·7 × 10-5M, respectively. 3. Pretreatment with reserpine had no influence on the contractions caused by adrenaline, noradrenaline and phenylephrine but abolished or greatly reduced the contractions caused by dopamine. Cocaine enhanced the effects of adrenaline, noradrenaline and phenylephrine and reduced those of dopamine. 4. Pronethalol (6·8 × 10-5M) reversed the α-receptor blockade by dibenamine, ergotamine and phentolamine of responses to adrenaline, noradrenaline and phenylephrine; it did not affect the blockade by dibenamine of responses to histamine. 5. Reversal of the blockade by dibenamine was observed only when its concentration was such that it caused a parallel shift of the dose-effect curves of the agonists to the right; higher concentrations, which caused an unsurmountable depression of the maximal contraction, were not antagonized by pronethalol. 6. It is assumed that the reversal is dependent on a direct action on α-receptors, “spare receptors” being probably involved. PMID:4389284

  18. Immune Checkpoint Blockade in Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Postow, Michael A.; Callahan, Margaret K.; Wolchok, Jedd D.

    2015-01-01

    Immunologic checkpoint blockade with antibodies that target cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and the programmed cell death protein 1 pathway (PD-1/PD-L1) have demonstrated promise in a variety of malignancies. Ipilimumab (CTLA-4) and pembrolizumab (PD-1) are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of advanced melanoma, and additional regulatory approvals are expected across the oncologic spectrum for a variety of other agents that target these pathways. Treatment with both CTLA-4 and PD-1/PD-L1 blockade is associated with a unique pattern of adverse events called immune-related adverse events, and occasionally, unusual kinetics of tumor response are seen. Combination approaches involving CTLA-4 and PD-1/PD-L1 blockade are being investigated to determine whether they enhance the efficacy of either approach alone. Principles learned during the development of CTLA-4 and PD-1/PD-L1 approaches will likely be used as new immunologic checkpoint blocking antibodies begin clinical investigation. PMID:25605845

  19. Pharmacological blockade of the vanilloid receptor TRPV1 elicits marked hyperthermia in humans.

    PubMed

    Gavva, Narender R; Treanor, James J S; Garami, Andras; Fang, Liang; Surapaneni, Sekhar; Akrami, Anna; Alvarez, Francisco; Bak, Annette; Darling, Mary; Gore, Anu; Jang, Graham R; Kesslak, James P; Ni, Liyun; Norman, Mark H; Palluconi, Gabrielle; Rose, Mark J; Salfi, Margaret; Tan, Edward; Romanovsky, Andrej A; Banfield, Christopher; Davar, Gudarz

    2008-05-01

    The vanilloid receptor TRPV1 has been identified as a molecular target for the treatment of pain associated with inflammatory diseases and cancer. Hence, TRPV1 antagonists have been considered for therapeutic evaluation in such diseases. During Phase I clinical trials with AMG 517, a highly selective TRPV1 antagonist, we found that TRPV1 blockade elicited marked, but reversible, and generally plasma concentration-dependent hyperthermia. Similar to what was observed in rats, dogs, and monkeys, hyperthermia was attenuated after repeated dosing of AMG 517 (at the highest dose tested) in humans during a second Phase I trial. However, AMG 517 administered after molar extraction (a surgical cause of acute pain) elicited long-lasting hyperthermia with maximal body temperature surpassing 40 degrees C, suggesting that TRPV1 blockade elicits undesirable hyperthermia in susceptible individuals. Mechanisms of AMG 517-induced hyperthermia were then studied in rats. AMG 517 caused hyperthermia by inducing tail skin vasoconstriction and increasing thermogenesis, which suggests that TRPV1 regulates vasomotor tone and metabolic heat production. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that: (a) TRPV1-selective antagonists like AMG 517 cannot be developed for systemic use as stand alone agents for treatment of pain and other diseases, (b) individual susceptibility influences magnitude of hyperthermia observed after TRPV1 blockade, and (c) TRPV1 plays a pivotal role as a molecular regulator for body temperature in humans. PMID:18337008

  20. Interleukin-1 Antagonists and Other Cytokine Blockade Strategies for Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines stimulate adaptive immunity and attenuate T cell regulation and tolerance induction. They also profoundly impair β-cell function, proliferation, and viability, activities of similar importance in the context of type 1 diabetes (T1D). Detailed knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of β-cell toxicity has been gathered within the last 2-3 decades. However, the efficacy of individual proinflammatory cytokine blockade in animal models of T1D has been inconsistent and generally modest, except in the context of islet transplantation. This suggests that the timing of the cytokine blockade relative to anti-β-cell immune activation is critical, and that combination therapy may be required. In randomized, placebo-controlled, clinical trials of limited power, TNF-α (but not IL-1) blockade has yielded moderate but significant improvements in glycemia, insulin requirement, and β-cell function. The safety experience with anti-cytokine biologics is still very limited in T1D. However, combinations with other biologics, at doses of adaptive and innate immune inhibitors/modulators that are suboptimal or ineffective in themselves, may generate synergies of true therapeutic benefit and safety in T1D. Critical and balanced appraisal of the preclinical and clinical evidence of efficacy and safety of anti-immune, anti-inflammatory, and anti-dysmetabolic therapeutics should thus guide future studies to move closer to novel treatments, targeting the underlying causes of β-cell failure and destruction in T1D. PMID:23804271

  1. Histamine H2 receptor blockade augments blood pressure responses to acute submaximal exercise in males.

    PubMed

    Doh, Hyung-Woo; Stebbins, Charles L; Choi, Hyun-Min; Park, Joonsung; Nho, Hosung; Kim, Jong-Kyung

    2016-06-01

    Histamine is a potent vasodilator that has been found to increase during exercise. We tested the hypothesis that histamine would attenuate blood pressure (BP), cardiac output (CO), and vascular resistance responses to short-term, submaximal dynamic exercise during H2 receptor blockade. Fourteen healthy men (20-29 years of age) were studied. Systolic (SBP), diastolic (DBP), and mean arterial (MAP) BP and heart rate (HR) were assessed at rest and during the last minute of 10 min of submaximal cycling exercise (60% of peak oxygen consumption) in the absence and presence of histamine H2 receptor blockade (ranitidine, 300 mg). Stroke volume (SV) (impedance cardiography) and plasma norepinephrine (NE) were measured, and CO, rate × pressure product (RPP), and total peripheral resistance (TPR) were calculated. Plasma levels of histamine were also measured. H2 blockade had no effects on any variables at rest. During exercise, SBP (184 ± 3 mm Hg vs. 166 ± 2 mm Hg), MAP (121 ± 2 mm Hg vs. 112 ± 5 mm Hg), and RPP (25.9 ± 0.8 × 10(3) mm Hg·beats/min vs. 23.5 ± 0.8 × 10(3) mm Hg/beats·min) were greater during blocked conditions (P < 0.05), and an interaction was observed for TPR. SV, DBP, HR, and NE levels were unaffected by blockade. Plasma histamine increased from 1.83 ± 0.14 ng/mL at rest to 2.33 ± 0.23 ng/mL during exercise (P < 0.05) and was not affected by H2 blockade (1.56 ± 0.23 ng/mL vs. 1.70 ± 0.24 ng/mL). These findings suggest that, during submaximal exercise, histamine attenuates BP, vascular resistance, and the work of the heart via activation of H2 receptors and that these effects occurred primarily in the vasculature and not in the myocardium. PMID:27191340

  2. Vasopressin V(1A) receptors mediate the increase in gastric mucosal oxygenation during hypercapnia.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, Christian; Schwartges, Ingo; Naber, Silke; Beck, Christopher; Bauer, Inge; Picker, Olaf

    2013-04-01

    Hypercapnia (HC) improves systemic oxygen delivery (DO₂) and microvascular hemoglobin oxygenation of the mucosa (μHbO₂). Simultaneously, HC increases plasma levels of vasopressin. Although vasopressin is generally regarded a potent vasoconstrictor particularly in the splanchnic region, its effects on splanchnic microcirculation during HC is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of endogenous vasopressin on gastric mucosal oxygenation and hemodynamic variables during physiological (normocapnia) and hypercapnic conditions. Five dogs were repeatedly anesthetized to study the effect of vasopressin V(1A) receptor blockade ([Pmp¹,Tyr(Me)²]-Arg⁸-Vasopressin, 35  μg/kg) on hemodynamic variables and μHbO₂ during normocapnia or HC (end-tidal CO₂ 70  mmHg). In a control group, animals were subjected to HC alone. μHbO₂ was measured by reflectance spectrophotometry, systemic DO₂ was calculated from intermittent blood gas analysis, and cardiac output was measured by transpulmonary thermodilution. Data are presented as mean±s.e.m. for n=5 animals. During HC alone, DO₂ increased from 12±1 to 16±1 ml/kg per min and μHbO₂ from 70±4 to 80±2%. By contrast, additional vasopressin V(1A) receptor blockade abolished the increase in μHbO₂ (80±2 vs. 69±2%) without altering the increase in DO₂ (16±1 vs. 19±2  ml/kg per min). Vasopressin V1A receptor blockade (VB) during normocapnia neither affected DO₂ (13±1 vs. 14±1  ml/kg per min) nor μHbO₂ (75±3 vs. 71±5%). Vasopressin V(1A) receptor blockade abolished the increase in μHbO₂ during HC independent of DO₂. Thus, in contrast to its generally vasoconstrictive properties, the vasopressin V1A receptors seem to mediate the increase in gastric microcirculatory mucosal oxygenation induced by acute HC. PMID:23359662

  3. Blockade of store-operated calcium entry alleviates ethanol-induced hepatotoxicity via inhibiting apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Ruibing; Yan, Lihui; Luo, Zheng; Guo, Xiaolan; Yan, Ming

    2015-08-15

    Extracellular Ca{sup 2+} influx has been suggested to play a role in ethanol-induced hepatocyte apoptosis and necrosis. Previous studies indicated that store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry (SOCE) was involved in liver injury induced by ethanol in HepG2 cells. However, the mechanisms underlying liver injury caused by SOCE remain unclear. We aimed to investigate the effects and mechanism of SOCE inhibition on liver injury induced by ethanol in BRL cells and Sprague–Dawley rats. Our data demonstrated that ethanol (0–400 mM) dose-dependently increased hepatocyte injury and 100 mM ethanol significantly upregulated the mRNA and protein expression of SOC for at least 72 h in BRL cells. Blockade of SOCE by pharmacological inhibitors and sh-RNA knockdown of STIM1 and Orai1 attenuated intracellular Ca{sup 2+} overload, restored the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), decreased cytochrome C release and inhibited ethanol-induced apoptosis. STIM1 and Orai1 expression was greater in ethanol-treated than control rats, and the SOCE inhibitor corosolic acid ameliorated the histopathological findings and alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase activity as well as decreased cytochrome C release and inhibited alcohol-induced cell apoptosis. These findings suggest that SOCE blockade could alleviate alcohol-induced hepatotoxicity via inhibiting apoptosis. SOCE might be a useful therapeutic target in alcoholic liver diseases. - Highlights: • Blockade of SOCE alleviated overload of Ca{sup 2+} and hepatotoxicity after ethanol application. • Blockade of SOCE inhibited mitochondrial apoptosis after ethanol application. • SOCE might be a useful therapeutic target in alcoholic liver diseases.

  4. Pyramidal Neurons in Rat Prefrontal Cortex Projecting to Ventral Tegmental Area and Dorsal Raphe Nucleus Express 5-HT2A Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Borsetti, Pablo; Cortés, Roser

    2009-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is involved in higher brain functions altered in schizophrenia. Classical antipsychotics modulate cortico-limbic circuits mainly through subcortical D2 receptor blockade, whereas second generation (atypical) antipsychotics preferentially target cortical 5-HT receptors. Anatomical and functional evidence supports a PFC-based control of the brainstem monoaminergic nuclei. Using a combination of retrograde tracing experiments and in situ hybridization we report that a substantial proportion of PFC pyramidal neurons projecting to the dorsal raphe (DR) and/or ventral tegmental area (VTA) express 5-HT2A receptors. Cholera-toxin B application into the DR and the VTA retrogradely labeled projection neurons in the medial PFC (mPFC) and in orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). In situ hybridization of 5-HT2A receptor mRNA in the same tissue sections labeled a large neuronal population in mPFC and OFC. The percentage of DR-projecting neurons expressing 5-HT2A receptor mRNA was ∼60% in mPFC and ∼75% in OFC (n = 3). Equivalent values for VTA-projecting neurons were ∼55% in both mPFC and ventral OFC. Thus, 5-HT2A receptor activation/blockade in PFC may have downstream effects on dopaminergic and serotonergic systems via direct descending pathways. Atypical antipsychotics may distally modulate monoaminergic cells through PFC 5-HT2A receptor blockade, presumably decreasing the activity of neurons receiving direct cortical inputs. PMID:19029064

  5. Immune checkpoint blockade in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Somasundaram, Aswin; Socinski, Mark A; Villaruz, Liza C

    2016-08-01

    Immunotherapy has revolutionized the therapeutic landscape of advanced lung cancer. The adaptive immune system has developed a sophisticated method of tumor growth control, but T-cell activation is regulated by various checkpoints. Blockade of the immune checkpoints with therapies targeting the PD-1 pathway, such as nivolumab and pembrolizumab, has been validated as a therapeutic approach in non-small cell lung cancer. Newer therapies and novel combinations are also being evaluated, and the use of biomarkers in conjunction with these drugs is an area of active investigation. This review summarizes the current evidence for the efficacy and safety of the above approaches in the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:27585231

  6. Photonic Nonlinearities via Quantum Zeno Blockade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yu-Zhu; Huang, Yu-Ping; Kumar, Prem

    2013-05-01

    Realizing optical-nonlinear effects at a single-photon level is a highly desirable but also extremely challenging task, because of both fundamental and practical difficulties. We present an avenue to surmounting these difficulties by exploiting quantum Zeno blockade in nonlinear optical systems. Considering specifically a lithium-niobate microresonator, we find that a deterministic phase gate can be realized between single photons with near-unity fidelity. Supported by established techniques for fabricating and operating such devices, our approach can provide an enabling tool for all-optical applications in both classical and quantum domains.

  7. IMPACT OF PHARMACOLOGICAL AUTONOMIC BLOCKADE ON COMPLEX FRACTIONATED ATRIAL ELECTROGRAMS

    PubMed Central

    Knecht, Sébastien; Wright, Matthew; Matsuo, Seiichiro; Nault, Isabelle; Lellouche, Nicolas; Sacher, Frédéric; Kim, Steven J.; Morgan, Dennis; Afonso, Valtino; Shinzuke, Miyazaki; Hocini, Mélèze; Clémenty, Jacques; Narayan, Sanjiv M.; Ritter, Phillipe; Jaïs, Pierre; Haïssaguerre, Michel

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The influence of the autonomic nervous system on the pathogenesis of complex fractionated atrial electrograms (CFAE) during atrial fibrillation (AF) is incompletely understood. This study evaluated the impact of pharmacological autonomic blockade on CFAE characteristics. Methods Autonomic blockade was achieved with propanolol and atropine in 29 patients during AF. Three-dimensional maps of the fractionation degree were made before and after autonomic blockade using the Ensite Navx® system. In 2 patients, AF terminated following autonomic blockade. In the remaining 27 patients, 20113 electrogram samples of 5 seconds duration were collected randomly throughout the left atrium (10054 at baseline and 10059 after autonomic blockade). The impact of autonomic blockade on fractionation was assessed by blinded investigators and related to the type of AF and AF cycle length. Results Globally, CFAE as a proportion of all atrial electrogram samples were reduced after autonomic blockade: 61.6±20.3% vs. 57.9±23.7%, p=0.027. This was true/significant for paroxysmal AF (47±23% vs. 40±22%, p=0.003), but not for persistent AF (65±22% vs. 62±25% respectively, p=0.166). Left atrial AF cycle length prolonged with autonomic blockade from 170±33 ms to. 180±40 ms (p=0.001). Fractionation decreases only in the 14/27 patients with a significant (>6ms) prolongation of the AF cycle length (64±20% vs. 59±24%, p=0.027), while fractionation did not reduce when autonomic blockade did not affect the AF cycle length (58±21% vs. 56±25%, p=0.419). Conclusions Pharmacological autonomic blockade reduces CFAE in paroxysmal AF, but not persistent AF. This effect appears to be mediated by prolongation of the AF cycle length. PMID:20132382

  8. Rotary antenna attenuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, R. M.; Hardy, J. C.

    1969-01-01

    Radio frequency attenuator, having negligible insertion loss at minimum attenuation, can be used for making precise antenna gain measurements. It is small in size compared to a rotary-vane attenuator.

  9. The Effect of Therapeutic Blockades of Dust Particles-Induced Ca²⁺ Signaling and Proinflammatory Cytokine IL-8 in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ju Hee; Jeong, Sung Hwan; Hong, Jeong Hee

    2015-01-01

    Bronchial epithelial cells are the first barrier of defense against respiratory pathogens. Dust particles as extracellular stimuli are associated with inflammatory reactions after inhalation. It has been reported that dust particles induce intracellular Ca(2+) signal, which subsequently increases cytokines production such as interleukin- (IL-) 8. However, the study of therapeutic blockades of Ca(2+) signaling induced by dust particles in human bronchial epithelial cells is poorly understood. We investigated how to modulate dust particles-induced Ca(2+) signaling and proinflammatory cytokine IL-8 expression. Bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells were exposed to PM10 dust particles and subsequent mediated intracellular Ca(2+) signaling and reactive oxygen species signal. Our results show that exposure to several inhibitors of Ca(2+) pathway attenuated the PM10-induced Ca(2+) response and subsequent IL-8 mRNA expression. PM10-mediated Ca(2+) signal and IL-8 expression were attenuated by several pharmacological blockades such as antioxidants, IP3-PLC blockers, and TRPM2 inhibitors. Our results show that blockades of PLC or TRPM2 reduced both of PM10-mediated Ca(2+) signal and IL-8 expression, suggesting that treatment with these blockades should be considered for potential therapeutic trials in pulmonary epithelium for inflammation caused by environmental events such as seasonal dust storm. PMID:26640326

  10. Lithium differs from anticonvulsant mood stabilizers in prefrontal cortical and accumbal dopamine release: role of 5-HT(1A) receptor agonism.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Junji; Dai, Jin; Meltzer, Herbert Y

    2005-07-12

    Anticonvulsant mood stabilizers, e.g., valproic acid and carbamazepine, and atypical antipsychotic drugs (APDs), e.g., clozapine, quetiapine, olanzapine, risperidone, and ziprasidone, have been reported to preferentially increase dopamine (DA) release in rat medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), an effect partially or fully inhibited by WAY100635, a selective 5-HT(1A) antagonist. These atypical APDs have themselves been reported to be effective mood stabilizers, although the importance of increased cortical DA release to mood stabilization has not been established. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether zonisamide, another anticonvulsant mood stabilizer, as well as lithium, a mood stabilizer without anticonvulsant properties, also increases prefrontal cortical DA release and, if so, whether this release is also inhibited by 5-HT(1A) antagonism. As with valproic acid and carbamazepine, zonisamide (12.5 and 25 mg/kg) increased DA release in the mPFC, but not the NAC, an increase abolished by WAY100635 (0.2 mg/kg). However, lithium (100 and 250 mg/kg) decreased DA release in the NAC, an effect also attenuated by WAY100635 (0.2 mg/kg). Lithium itself had no effect in the mPFC but the combination of WAY100635 (0.2 mg/kg) and lithium (100 and 250 mg/kg) markedly increased DA release in the mPFC. Furthermore, M100907 (0.1 mg/kg), a selective 5-HT(2A) antagonist, abolished this increase in DA release in the mPFC. These results indicate that not all mood-stabilizing agents but only those, which have anticonvulsant mood-stabilizing properties, increase DA release in the cortex, and that the effect is dependent upon 5-HT(1A) receptor stimulation. However, the combination of lithium and 5-HT(1A) blockade may result in excessive 5-HT(2A) receptor stimulation, relative to 5-HT(1A) receptor stimulation, both of which can increase prefrontal cortical DA release. PMID:15936730

  11. Coulomb blockade of spin-dependent shuttling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hee Chul; Kadigrobov, Anatoli M.; Shekhter, Robert I.; Jonson, M.

    2013-12-01

    We show that nanomechanical shuttling of single electrons may enable qualitatively new functionality if spin-polarized electrons are injected into a nanoelectromechanical single-electron tunneling (NEM-SET) device. This is due to the combined effects of spin-dependent electron tunneling and Coulomb blockade of tunneling, which are phenomena that occur in certain magnetic NEM-SET devices. Two effects are predicted to occur in such structures. The first is a reentrant shuttle instability, by which we mean the sequential appearance, disappearance and again the appearance of a shuttle instability as the driving voltage is increased (or the mechanical dissipation is diminished). The second effect is an enhanced spin polarization of the nanomechanically assisted current flow.

  12. Photon blockade in the ultrastrong coupling regime.

    PubMed

    Ridolfo, A; Leib, M; Savasta, S; Hartmann, M J

    2012-11-01

    We explore photon coincidence counting statistics in the ultrastrong coupling regime, where the atom-cavity coupling rate becomes comparable to the cavity resonance frequency. In this regime, usual normal order correlation functions fail to describe the output photon statistics. By expressing the electric-field operator in the cavity-emitter dressed basis, we are able to propose correlation functions that are valid for arbitrary degrees of light-matter interaction. Our results show that the standard photon blockade scenario is significantly modified for ultrastrong coupling. We observe parametric processes even for two-level emitters and temporal oscillations of intensity correlation functions at a frequency given by the ultrastrong photon emitter coupling. These effects can be traced back to the presence of two-photon cascade decays induced by counterrotating interaction terms. PMID:23215383

  13. Pauli spin blockade in double molecular magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Płomińska, Anna; Weymann, Ireneusz

    2016-07-01

    The Pauli spin blockade effect in transport through two, coupled in series, single molecular magnets weakly attached to external leads is considered theoretically. By using the real-time diagrammatic technique in the lowest-order perturbation theory with respect to the coupling strength, the behavior of the current and the shot noise is studied in the nonlinear response regime. It is shown that the current suppression occurs due to the occupation of highest-weight spin states of the system. Moreover, transport properties are found to strongly depend on parameters of the double molecular magnet, such as the magnitude of spin, internal exchange interaction and the hopping between the molecules. It is also demonstrated that the current suppression may be accompanied by negative differential conductance and a large super-Poissonian shot noise. The mechanisms leading to those effects are discussed.

  14. Novel drug development for neuromuscular blockade.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Amit; Kaye, Alan D; Wyche, Melville Q; Salinas, Orlando J; Mancuso, Kenneth; Urman, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological advances in anesthesia in recent decades have resulted in safer practice and better outcomes. These advances include improvement in anesthesia drugs with regard to efficacy and safety profiles. Although neuromuscular blockers were first introduced over a half century ago, few new neuromuscular blockers and reversal agents have come to market and even fewer have remained as common clinically employed medications. In recent years, newer agents have been studied and are presented in this review. With regard to nondepolarizer neuromuscular blocker agents, the enantiomers Gantacurium and CW002, which are olefinic isoquinolinium diester fumarates, have shown potential for clinical application. Advantages include ultra rapid reversal of neuromuscular blockade via cysteine adduction and minimal systemic hemodynamic effects with administration. PMID:27625489

  15. Novel drug development for neuromuscular blockade

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakar, Amit; Kaye, Alan D; Wyche, Melville Q; Salinas, Orlando J; Mancuso, Kenneth; Urman, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological advances in anesthesia in recent decades have resulted in safer practice and better outcomes. These advances include improvement in anesthesia drugs with regard to efficacy and safety profiles. Although neuromuscular blockers were first introduced over a half century ago, few new neuromuscular blockers and reversal agents have come to market and even fewer have remained as common clinically employed medications. In recent years, newer agents have been studied and are presented in this review. With regard to nondepolarizer neuromuscular blocker agents, the enantiomers Gantacurium and CW002, which are olefinic isoquinolinium diester fumarates, have shown potential for clinical application. Advantages include ultra rapid reversal of neuromuscular blockade via cysteine adduction and minimal systemic hemodynamic effects with administration. PMID:27625489

  16. Kinetics of cycle length dependence of ventricular repolarization: effect of autonomic blockade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raeder, E. A.; Albrecht, P.; Perrott, M.; Cohen, R. J.

    1995-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Beat-to-beat adaptation of ventricular repolarization duration to cardiac cycle length and autonomic activity has not been previously characterized in the spontaneously beating human heart. METHODS AND RESULTS: The ECG of 14 healthy subjects was recorded from the supine and upright positions. Autonomic blockade was accomplished by atropine and propranolol. RR and RT intervals were measured by a computer algorithm, and the impulse response (h) from RR to RT computed. In the supine position the maximal adjustment of the RT interval occurred in the first beat following a change in cycle length (hpeak = 17.8 +/- 1.6 msec/sec), but continued to be detectable for 3.8 seconds (2.9-4.7 sec). Propranolol attenuated the peak impulse response to 15.8 +/- 4.0 msec/sec (P = NS). In the standing position the peak impulse response was increased to 25.2 +/- 5.0 msec/sec (P = 0.004 vs supine), and the impulse response duration (hdur) shortened to 1.4 seconds (1.3-1.6). This was reversed by beta blockade (hpeak = 10.7 +/- 3.6 [P = 0.005 vs standing]; hdur = 5.5 sec [4.8-6.1]). Parasympathetic and combined autonomic blockade resulted in too little residual heart rate variability to estimate the impulse response accurately. The slope of the regression of delta RT and delta RR in the supine position was 0.0177 +/- 0.0016, which was closely correlated with the peak impulse response (r = 0.91). CONCLUSIONS: System identification techniques can assist in characterizing the cycle dependence of ventricular repolarization and may provide new insights into conditions associated with abnormal repolarization.

  17. The effects of calcium channel blockade on agouti-induced obesity

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jung Han; Moustaid, N.; Zemel, M.B.

    1996-12-01

    We have previously observed that obese viable yellow (A{sup vy}/a) mice exhibit increased intracellular Ca{sup 2+} ([Ca{sup 2+}]i) and fatty acid synthase (FAS) gene expression; further, recombinant agouti protein increases in cultured adipocytes and these effects are inhibited by Ca{sup 2+} channel blockade. Accordingly, we determined the effect of Ca{sup 2+} channel blockade (nifedipine for 4 wk) on FAS and obesity in transgenic mice expressing the agouti gene in a ubiquitous manner. The transgenic mice initially were significantly heavier (30.5 {+-} 0.6 vs. 27.3 {+-} 0.3 g; P<0.001) and exhibited a 0.81{degrees}C lower initial core temperature (P<0.0005), an approximately twofold increase in fat pad weights (P=0.002), a sevenfold increase in adipose FAS activity (P=0.009), and a twofold increase in plasma insulin level (P<0.05) compared to control mice. Nifedipine treatment resulted in an 18% decrease in fat pad weights (P<0.007) and a 74% decrease in adipose FAS activity (P=0.03), normalized circulating insulin levels and insulin sensitivity (P,0.05), and transiently elevated core temperature in the transgenic mice, but was without effect in the control mice. These data suggest that agouti regulates FAS, fat storage, and possibly thermogenesis, at least partially, via a [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}-dependent mechanism, and that Ca{sup 2+} channel blockade may partially attenuate agouti-induced obesity. 42 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. DC attenuation meter

    DOEpatents

    Hargrove, Douglas L.

    2004-09-14

    A portable, hand-held meter used to measure direct current (DC) attenuation in low impedance electrical signal cables and signal attenuators. A DC voltage is applied to the signal input of the cable and feedback to the control circuit through the signal cable and attenuators. The control circuit adjusts the applied voltage to the cable until the feedback voltage equals the reference voltage. The "units" of applied voltage required at the cable input is the system attenuation value of the cable and attenuators, which makes this meter unique. The meter may be used to calibrate data signal cables, attenuators, and cable-attenuator assemblies.

  19. Potential effect of angiotensin II receptor blockade in adipose tissue and bone.

    PubMed

    Nakagami, Hironori; Osako, Mariana Kiomy; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence demonstrated that dysregulation of adipocytokine functions seen in abdominal obesity may be involved in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome. Angiotensinogen, the precursor of angiotensin (Ang) II, is produced primarily in the liver, and also in adipose tissue, where it is up-regulated during the development of obesity and involved in blood pressure regulation and adipose tissue growth. Blockade of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) attenuates weight gain and adiposity by enhanced energy expenditure, and the favorable metabolic effects of telmisartan have been related to its Ang II receptor blockade and action as a partial agonist of peroxisome proliferators activated receptor (PPAR)-γ. PPARγ plays an important role in regulating carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, and ligands for PPARγ can improve insulin sensitivity and reduce triglyceride levels. Similarly, bone metabolism is closely regulated by hormones and cytokines, which have effects on both bone resorption and deposition. It is known that the receptors of Ang II are expressed in culture osteoclasts and osteoblasts, and Ang II is postulated to be able to act upon the cells involved in bone metabolism. In in vitro system, Ang II induced the differentiation and activation of osteoclasts responsible for bone resorption. Importantly, it was demonstrated by the sub-analysis of a recent clinical study that the fracture risk was significantly reduced by the usage of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. To treat the subgroups of hypertensive patients with osteoporosis RAS can be considered a novel target. PMID:23176218

  20. Effect of intestinal chylomicron secretory blockade on apolipoprotein synthesis in the newborn piglet.

    PubMed Central

    Black, D D

    1992-01-01

    Pluronic L-81 is a hydrophobic surfactant which blocks intestinal chylomicron secretion at the pre-Golgi level without affecting triacylglycerol uptake and re-esterification. To study the effects of such blockade on apolipoprotein synthesis, newborn female piglets received 24 h intraduodenal infusions of low-triacylglycerol, or high-triacylglycerol with or without Pluronic L-81, diets, followed by determination of apolipoprotein (apo) B-48, A-I and A-IV synthesis and content and apo B and A-IV mRNA levels in the small intestine. Jejunal apo B-48 content, synthesis and mRNA levels were down-regulated below basal levels by the addition of Pluronic to the high-triacylglycerol infusion. The normal increase in apo A-I synthesis induced by triacylglycerol absorption was ablated in both jejunum and ileum, even though the expected increase in apo A-I content in jejunum still occurred. Although attenuated, the expected increase in jejunal apo A-IV synthesis and mRNA levels with triacylglycerol absorption was still present with Pluronic treatment. These results suggest very different mechanisms of cellular regulation and trafficking for the various apolipoproteins incorporated into nascent intestinal chylomicrons. Apo B may be specifically down-regulated by the chylomicron secretory blockade induced by Pluronic L-81. PMID:1567381

  1. Effects of blockade of NMDA receptors on cerebral oxygen consumption during hyperosmolar BBB disruption in rats.

    PubMed

    Chi, Oak Z; Barsoum, Sylviana; Grayson, Jeremy; Hunter, Christine; Liu, Xia; Weiss, Harvey R

    2013-03-15

    Hyperosmolar blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption has been reported to increase cerebral O2 consumption. This study was performed to test whether blockade of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor would affect cerebral O2 consumption during hyperosmolar BBB disruption. A competitive NMDA receptor antagonist CGS-19755 10mg/kg was injected iv 15min before intracarotid infusion of 25% mannitol. Twelve min after BBB disruption, the BBB transfer coefficient (Ki) of (14)C-α-aminoisobutyric acid ((14)C-AIB) was measured. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), regional arteriolar and venular O2 saturation (SaO2 and SvO2 respectively), and O2 consumption were determined using (14)C-iodoantipyrine autoradiography and cryomicrospectrophotometry in alternate slices of the brain tissue. The Ki of (14)C-AIB was markedly increased with hyperosmolar mannitol in both the control (5.8×) and the CGS treated rats (5.2×). With BBB disruption, the O2 consumption was significantly increased (+39%) only in the control but not in the CGS treated rats and was significantly lower (-29%) in the CGS treated than the control rats. The distribution of SvO2 was significantly shifted to the higher concentrations with CGS treatment. Our data demonstrated an increase of O2 consumption by hyperosmolar BBB disruption and attenuation of the increase with NMDA blockade without affecting the degree of BBB disruption. PMID:23357315

  2. Rydberg blockade effects at n ˜300 in strontium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Dunning, F. B.; Yoshida, S.; Burgdörfer, J.

    2015-11-01

    Rydberg blockade at n ˜300 , is examined using strontium n F13 Rydberg atoms excited in an atomic beam in a small volume defined by two tightly focused crossed laser beams. The observation of blockade for such states is challenging due to their extreme sensitivity to stray fields and the many magnetic sublevels associated with F states which results in a high local density of states. Nonetheless, with a careful choice of laser polarization to selectively excite only a limited number of these sublevels, sizable blockade effects are observed on an ˜0.1 mm length scale extending blockade measurements into the near-macroscopic regime and enabling study of the dynamics of strongly coupled many-body high-n Rydberg systems under carefully controlled conditions.

  3. The anti-dyskinetic effect of dopamine receptor blockade is enhanced in parkinsonian rats following dopamine neuron transplantation.

    PubMed

    Shin, Eunju; Lisci, Carlo; Tronci, Elisabetta; Fidalgo, Camino; Stancampiano, Roberto; Björklund, Anders; Carta, Manolo

    2014-02-01

    Graft-induced dyskinesia (GID) is a serious complication induced by dopamine (DA) cell transplantation in parkinsonian patients. We have recently shown that DA D2 receptor blockade produces striking blockade of dyskinesia induced by amphetamine in grafted 6-OHDA-lesioned rats, a model of GID. This study was designed to investigate whether blockade of DA D1 receptors could produce similar outcome, and to see whether the effect of these treatments in grafted rats was specific for dyskinesia induced by amphetamine, or could also influence L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID). L-DOPA-primed rats received transplants of fetal DA neurons into the DA-denervated striatum. Beginning at 20weeks after transplantation rats were subjected to pharmacological treatments with either L-DOPA (6mg/kg) or amphetamine (1.5mg/kg) alone, or in combination with the D1 receptor antagonist SCH23390, the D2 receptor antagonist eticlopride, and the 5-HT1A agonist/D2 receptor antagonist buspirone. Grafted rats developed severe GID, while LID was reduced. Both eticlopride and SCH23390 produced near-complete suppression of GID already at very low doses (0.015 and 0.1mg/kg, respectively). Buspirone induced similar suppression at a dose as low as 0.3mg/kg, which is far lower than the dose known to affect LID in non-grafted dyskinetic rats. In agreement with our previous results, the effect of buspirone was independent from 5-HT1A receptor activation, as it was not counteracted by the selective 5-HT1A antagonist WAY100635, but likely due to D2 receptor blockade. Most interestingly, the same doses of eticlopride, SCH23390 and buspirone were found to suppress LID in grafted but not in control dyskinetic rats. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the DA cell grafts strikingly exacerbate the effect of DA D1 and D2 receptor blockade against both GID and LID, and suggest that the anti-GID effect of buspirone seen in patients may also be due to blockade of DA D2 receptors. PMID:24135006

  4. Duration of opioid receptor blockade determines biotherapeutic response.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Patricia J; Zagon, Ian S

    2015-10-01

    Historically, studies on endogenous and exogenous opioids and their receptors focused on the mediation of pain, with excess opiate consumption leading to addiction. Opioid antagonists such as naloxone and naltrexone blocked these interactions, and still are widely used to reverse drug and alcohol overdose. Although specific opioid antagonists have been designed for mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors, the general antagonists remain the most effective. With the discovery of the opioid growth factor (OGF)-OGF receptor (OGFr) axis as a novel biological pathway involved in homeostasis of replicating cells and tissues, the role of opioid receptor antagonists was expanded. An intermittent OGFr blockade by low dosages of naltrexone resulted in depressed cell replication, whereas high (or sustained) dosages of naltrexone that conferred a continuous OGFr blockade resulted in enhanced growth. More than 3 decades of research have confirmed that the duration of opioid receptor blockade, not specifically the dosage, by general opioid antagonists determines the biotherapeutic outcome. Dysregulation of the OGF-OGFr pathway is apparent in a number of human disorders including diabetes, multiple sclerosis, and cancer, and thus opioid antagonist disruption of interaction prevails as a therapeutic intervention. We review evidence that the duration of opioid receptor blockade is correlated with the magnitude and direction of response, and discuss the potential therapeutic effectiveness of continuous receptor blockade for treatment of diabetic complications such as corneal defects and skin wounds, and of intermittent receptor blockade by low dosages of naltrexone for treatment of autoimmune diseases and cancer. PMID:26119823

  5. Comparison of bupivacaine and etidocaine in extradural blockade.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, C J; Scott, D B

    1984-02-01

    In a randomized, double-blind study, 40 female patients underwent major gynaecological surgery with extradural anaesthesia provided by 0.75% bupivacaine, 0.75% bupivacaine with adrenaline 5 micrograms ml-1, 1.5% etidocaine or 1.5% etidocaine with adrenaline 5 micrograms ml-1, 20 ml in each case. In all patients the resultant blockade was suitable for intra-abdominal pelvic surgery. Mean maximum spread of analgesia was around T3/4 with all four drugs. Onset of sensory and motor block was more rapid following etidocaine than following bupivacaine. The addition of adrenaline increased the speed of onset of sensory block. Patients receiving etidocaine had a denser motor blockade than those receiving bupivacaine, and the addition of adrenaline led to an increase in the density of the motor blockade. There were no differences in the durations of motor blockade. Objective measurements of the duration of sensory blockade showed that there were no differences between the drugs and that the addition of adrenaline increased the duration of blockade. However, pain returned sooner following etidocaine than bupivacaine, and the additive effect of adrenaline was to increase this period of subjective analgesia. PMID:6362694

  6. Orbital excitation blockade and algorithmic cooling in quantum gases.

    PubMed

    Bakr, Waseem S; Preiss, Philipp M; Tai, M Eric; Ma, Ruichao; Simon, Jonathan; Greiner, Markus

    2011-12-22

    Interaction blockade occurs when strong interactions in a confined, few-body system prevent a particle from occupying an otherwise accessible quantum state. Blockade phenomena reveal the underlying granular nature of quantum systems and allow for the detection and manipulation of the constituent particles, be they electrons, spins, atoms or photons. Applications include single-electron transistors based on electronic Coulomb blockade and quantum logic gates in Rydberg atoms. Here we report a form of interaction blockade that occurs when transferring ultracold atoms between orbitals in an optical lattice. We call this orbital excitation blockade (OEB). In this system, atoms at the same lattice site undergo coherent collisions described by a contact interaction whose strength depends strongly on the orbital wavefunctions of the atoms. We induce coherent orbital excitations by modulating the lattice depth, and observe staircase-like excitation behaviour as we cross the interaction-split resonances by tuning the modulation frequency. As an application of OEB, we demonstrate algorithmic cooling of quantum gases: a sequence of reversible OEB-based quantum operations isolates the entropy in one part of the system and then an irreversible step removes the entropy from the gas. This technique may make it possible to cool quantum gases to have the ultralow entropies required for quantum simulation of strongly correlated electron systems. In addition, the close analogy between OEB and dipole blockade in Rydberg atoms provides a plan for the implementation of two-quantum-bit gates in a quantum computing architecture with natural scalability. PMID:22193104

  7. Checkpoint blockade in combination with cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Morse, Michael A; Lyerly, H Kim

    2015-12-16

    Checkpoint blockade, prevention of inhibitory signaling that limits activation or function of tumor antigen-specific T cells responses, is revolutionizing the treatment of many poor prognosis malignancies. Indeed monoclonal antibodies that modulate signaling through the inhibitory molecules CTLA-4 and PD-1 are now clinically available; however, many tumors, demonstrate minimal response suggesting the need for combinations with other therapeutic strategies. Because an inadequate frequency of activated tumor antigen-specific T cells in the tumor environment, the so-called non-inflamed phenotype, is observed in some malignancies, other rationale partners are modalities that lead to enhanced T cell activation (vaccines, cytokines, toll-like receptor agonists, and other anticancer therapies such as chemo-, radio- or targeted therapies that lead to release of antigen from tumors). This review will focus on preclinical and clinical data supporting the use of cancer vaccines with anti-CTLA-4 and anti-PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies. Preliminary preclinical data demonstrate enhanced antitumor activity although the results in human studies are less clear. Broader combinations of multiple immune modulators are now under study. PMID:26482147

  8. 5-Hydroxytryptamine 1A receptors in the dorsomedial hypothalamus connected to dorsal raphe nucleus inputs modulate defensive behaviours and mediate innate fear-induced antinociception.

    PubMed

    Biagioni, Audrey Franceschi; de Oliveira, Rithiele Cristina; de Oliveira, Ricardo; da Silva, Juliana Almeida; dos Anjos-Garcia, Tayllon; Roncon, Camila Marroni; Corrado, Alexandre Pinto; Zangrossi, Hélio; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2016-03-01

    The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is an important brainstem source of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), and 5-HT plays a key role in the regulation of panic attacks. The aim of the present study was to determine whether 5-HT1A receptor-containing neurons in the medial hypothalamus (MH) receive neural projections from DRN and to then determine the role of this neural substrate in defensive responses. The neurotracer biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) was iontophoretically microinjected into the DRN, and immunohistochemical approaches were then used to identify 5HT1A receptor-labelled neurons in the MH. Moreover, the effects of pre-treatment of the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) with 8-OH-DPAT and WAY-100635, a 5-HT1A receptor agonist and antagonist, respectively, followed by local microinjections of bicuculline, a GABAA receptor antagonist, were investigated. We found that there are many projections from the DRN to the perifornical lateral hypothalamus (PeFLH) but also to DMH and ventromedial (VMH) nuclei, reaching 5HT1A receptor-labelled perikarya. DMH GABAA receptor blockade elicited defensive responses that were followed by antinociception. DMH treatment with 8-OH-DPAT decreased escape responses, which strongly suggests that the 5-HT1A receptor modulates the defensive responses. However, DMH treatment with WAY-100635 failed to alter bicuculline-induced defensive responses, suggesting that 5-HT exerts a phasic influence on 5-HT1A DMH neurons. The activation of the inhibitory 5-HT1A receptor had no effect on antinociception. However, blockade of the 5-HT1A receptor decreased fear-induced antinociception. The present data suggest that the ascending pathways from the DRN to the DMH modulate panic-like defensive behaviours and mediate antinociceptive phenomenon by recruiting 5-HT1A receptor in the MH. PMID:26749090

  9. Calcium channel blockade attenuates abnormal synaptic transmission in the dentate gyrus elicited by entorhinal amyloidopathy.

    PubMed

    Gholami Pourbadie, Hamid; Naderi, Nima; Janahmadi, Mahyar; Mehranfard, Nasrin; Motamedi, Fereshteh

    2016-10-01

    Entorhinal-hippocampal network is one of the earliest circuits which is affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD). There are numerous data providing the evidence of synaptic deficit in the dentate gyrus (DG) of AD animal model. However, there is little known about how entorhinal cortex (EC) amyloidophaty affects each excitatory and/or inhibitory transmission in the early stage of AD. On the other hand, it is believed that calcium dyshomeostasis has a critical role in the etiology of AD. Here, the effect of the EC amyloid pathogenesis on excitatory or inhibitory post synaptic currents (EPSC and IPSC, respectively) in the DG granule cells and then the possible neuroprotective action of L-type calcium channel blockers (CCBs), nimodipine and isradipine, were examined. The amyloid beta (Aβ) 1-42 was injected bilaterally into the EC of male rats and one week later, synaptic currents in the DG granule cells were assessed by whole cell patch clamp. EPSCs were evoked by stimulating the perforant pathway. Voltage clamp recording showed profound decrease of evoked EPSC amplitude and paired pulse facilitation in the DG granule cells of Aβ treated rats. Furthermore, AMPA/NMDA ratio was significantly decreased in the Aβ treated animals. On the other hand, amplitude of IPSC currents was significantly increased in the DG granule cells of these animals. These modifications of synaptic currents were partially reversed by daily intracerebroventricular administration of isradipine or nimodipine. In conclusion, our results suggest that Aβ in the EC triggers decreased excitatory transmission in the DG with substantial decrement in AMPA currents, leading to a prominent activity of inhibitory circuits and increased inhibition of granule cells which may contribute to the development of AD-related neurological deficits in AD and treatment by CCBs could preserve normal synaptic transmission against Aβ toxicity. PMID:27240164

  10. Blockade of Nerve Sprouting and Neuroma Formation Markedly Attenuates the Development of Late Stage Cancer Pain

    PubMed Central

    Mantyh, William G.; Jimenez-Andrade, Juan M.; Stake, James I.; Bloom, Aaron P.; Kaczmarska, Magdalena J.; Taylor, Reid N.; Freeman, Katie T.; Ghilardi, Joseph R.; Kuskowski, Michael A.; Mantyh, Patrick W.

    2010-01-01

    For many patients, pain is the first sign of cancer and, while pain can be present at any time, the frequency and intensity of pain tend to increase with advancing stages of the disease. Thus, between 75 and 90% of patients with metastatic or advanced-stage cancer will experience significant cancer-induced pain. One major unanswered question is why cancer pain increases and frequently becomes more difficult to fully control with disease progression. To gain insight into this question we used a mouse model of bone cancer pain to demonstrate that as tumor growth progresses within bone, Tropomyosin receptor kinase A (TrkA)-expressing sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers undergo profuse sprouting and form neuroma-like structures. To address what is driving the pathological nerve reorganization we administered an antibody to nerve growth factor (anti-NGF). Early sustained administration of anti-NGF, whose cognate receptor is TrkA, blocks the pathological sprouting of sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers, the formation of neuroma-like structures, and inhibits the development of cancer pain. These results suggest that cancer cells and their associated stromal cells release NGF, which induces a pathological remodeling of sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers. This pathological remodeling of the peripheral nervous system then participates in driving cancer pain. Similar to therapies that target the cancer itself, the data presented here suggest that the earlier that therapies blocking this pathological nerve remodeling are initiated, the more effective the control of cancer pain. PMID:20851743

  11. Genetic blockade of adenosine A2A receptors induces cognitive impairments and anatomical changes related to psychotic symptoms in mice.

    PubMed

    Moscoso-Castro, Maria; Gracia-Rubio, Irene; Ciruela, Francisco; Valverde, Olga

    2016-07-01

    Schizophrenia is a chronic severe mental disorder with a presumed neurodevelopmental origin, and no effective treatment. Schizophrenia is a multifactorial disease with genetic, environmental and neurochemical etiology. The main theories on the pathophysiology of this disorder include alterations in dopaminergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission in limbic and cortical areas of the brain. Early hypotheses also suggested that nucleoside adenosine is a putative affected neurotransmitter system, and clinical evidence suggests that adenosine adjuvants improve treatment outcomes, especially in poorly responsive patients. Hence, it is important to elucidate the role of the neuromodulator adenosine in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. A2A adenosine receptor (A2AR) subtypes are expressed in brain areas controlling motivational responses and cognition, including striatum, and in lower levels in hippocampus and cerebral cortex. The aim of this study was to characterize A2AR knockout (KO) mice with complete and specific inactivation of A2AR, as an animal model for schizophrenia. We performed behavioral, anatomical and neurochemical studies to assess psychotic-like symptoms in adult male and female KO and wild-type (WT) littermates. Our results show impairments in inhibitory responses and sensory gating in A2AR KO animals. Hyperlocomotion induced by d-amphetamine and MK-801 was reduced in KO animals when compared to WT littermates. Moreover, A2AR KO animals show motor disturbances, social and cognitive alterations. Finally, behavioral impairments were associated with enlargement of brain lateral ventricles and decreased BDNF levels in the hippocampus. These data highlight the role of adenosine in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and provide new possibilities for the therapeutic management of schizophrenia. PMID:27133030

  12. Pressure surge attenuator

    DOEpatents

    Christie, Alan M.; Snyder, Kurt I.

    1985-01-01

    A pressure surge attenuation system for pipes having a fluted region opposite crushable metal foam. As adapted for nuclear reactor vessels and heads, crushable metal foam is disposed to attenuate pressure surges.

  13. Brain Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockade Improves Dairy Blood Pressure Variability via Sympathoinhibition in Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal blood pressure (BP) elevation in early morning is known to cause cardiovascular events. Previous studies have suggested that one of the reasons in abnormal dairy BP variability is sympathoexcitation. We have demonstrated that brain angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) causes sympathoexcitation. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether central AT1R blockade attenuates the excess BP elevation in rest-to-active phase in hypertensive rats or not. Stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) were treated with intracerebroventricular infusion (ICV) of AT1R receptor blocker (ARB), oral administration of hydralazine (HYD), or ICV of vehicle (VEH). Telemetric averaged mean BP (MBP) was measured at early morning (EM), after morning (AM), and night (NT). At EM, MBP was significantly lower in ARB to a greater extent than in HYD compared to VEH, though MBP at AM was the same in ARB and HYD. At NT, MBP was also significantly lower in ARB than in HYD. These results in MBP were compatible to those in sympathoexcitation and suggest that central AT1R blockade attenuates excess BP elevation in early active phase and continuous BP elevation during rest phase independent of depressor response in hypertensive rats. PMID:25918643

  14. Heterologous Vaccination and Checkpoint Blockade Synergize To Induce Antileukemia Immunity.

    PubMed

    Manlove, Luke S; Schenkel, Jason M; Manlove, Kezia R; Pauken, Kristen E; Williams, Richard T; Vezys, Vaiva; Farrar, Michael A

    2016-06-01

    Checkpoint blockade-based immunotherapies are effective in cancers with high numbers of nonsynonymous mutations. In contrast, current paradigms suggest that such approaches will be ineffective in cancers with few nonsynonymous mutations. To examine this issue, we made use of a murine model of BCR-ABL(+) B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Using a principal component analysis, we found that robust MHC class II expression, coupled with appropriate costimulation, correlated with lower leukemic burden. We next assessed whether checkpoint blockade or therapeutic vaccination could improve survival in mice with pre-established leukemia. Consistent with the low mutation load in our leukemia model, we found that checkpoint blockade alone had only modest effects on survival. In contrast, robust heterologous vaccination with a peptide derived from the BCR-ABL fusion (BAp), a key driver mutation, generated a small population of mice that survived long-term. Checkpoint blockade strongly synergized with heterologous vaccination to enhance overall survival in mice with leukemia. Enhanced survival did not correlate with numbers of BAp:I-A(b)-specific T cells, but rather with increased expression of IL-10, IL-17, and granzyme B and decreased expression of programmed death 1 on these cells. Our findings demonstrate that vaccination to key driver mutations cooperates with checkpoint blockade and allows for immune control of cancers with low nonsynonymous mutation loads. PMID:27183622

  15. Gene expression and function of adenosine A(2A) receptor in the rat carotid body.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Conforti, L; Millhorn, D E

    2000-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine whether rat carotid bodies express adenosine (Ado) A(2A) receptors and whether this receptor is involved in the cellular response to hypoxia. Our results demonstrate that rat carotid bodies express the A(2A) and A(2B) Ado receptor mRNAs but not the A(1) or A(3) receptor mRNAs as determined by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. In situ hybridization confirmed the expression of the A(2A) receptor mRNA. Immunohistochemical studies further showed that the A(2A) receptor is expressed in the carotid body and that it is colocalized with tyrosine hydroxylase in type I cells. Whole cell voltage-clamp studies using isolated type I cells showed that Ado inhibited the voltage-dependent Ca(2+) currents and that this inhibition was abolished by the selective A(2A) receptor antagonist ZM-241385. Ca(2+) imaging studies using fura 2 revealed that exposure to severe hypoxia induced elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in type I cells and that extracellularly applied Ado significantly attenuated the hypoxia-induced elevation of [Ca(2+)](i). Taken together, our findings indicate that A(2A) receptors are present in type I cells and that activation of A(2A) receptors modulates Ca(2+) accumulation during hypoxia. This mechanism may play a role in regulating intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis and cellular excitability during hypoxia. PMID:10926550

  16. Tracer attenuation in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetkovic, Vladimir

    2011-12-01

    The self-purifying capacity of aquifers strongly depends on the attenuation of waterborne contaminants, i.e., irreversible loss of contaminant mass on a given scale as a result of coupled transport and transformation processes. A general formulation of tracer attenuation in groundwater is presented. Basic sensitivities of attenuation to macrodispersion and retention are illustrated for a few typical retention mechanisms. Tracer recovery is suggested as an experimental proxy for attenuation. Unique experimental data of tracer recovery in crystalline rock compare favorably with the theoretical model that is based on diffusion-controlled retention. Non-Fickian hydrodynamic transport has potentially a large impact on field-scale attenuation of dissolved contaminants.

  17. Effect of ICAM-1 blockade on lung inflammation and physiology during acute viral bronchiolitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Sorkness, R L; Mehta, H; Kaplan, M R; Miyasaka, M; Hefle, S L; Lemanske, R F

    2000-06-01

    Viral respiratory infections cause acute bronchiolitis and physiologic dysfunction in human infants and in animals. It is possible that the pulmonary dysfunction is a consequence of the inflammatory cells that are recruited during viral illness. We hypothesized that blockade of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), a major cell adhesion molecule, would impede the ingress of leukocytes during viral infection and attenuate virus-induced pulmonary dysfunction. Adult male rats were inoculated with parainfluenza type 1 (Sendai) virus or sterile vehicle, and treated with blocking or nonblocking MAb specific for rat ICAM-1. Respiratory system resistance, oxygenation (PaO2), methacholine responsiveness, and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) leukocyte counts were measured in anesthetized, paralyzed, ventilated rats. Treatment with the blocking ICAM-1 antibody reduced virus-induced increases in BAL neutrophils and lymphocytes by 70% (p < 0.001), but did not affect BAL monocytes/macrophages. Peripheral blood leukocyte counts were elevated in anti-ICAM-1 blocking antibody-treated rats (p = 0.0003). Although virus-induced increases in resistance and decreases in PaO2 were not affected by anti-ICAM-1 treatment, there was a small but significant attenuation of virus-induced methacholine hyperresponsiveness (p = 0.02). We conclude that ICAM-1 has an important role in neutrophil and lymphocyte infiltration during respiratory viral illness, and that virus-induced changes in pulmonary physiology are not related directly to the numbers of neutrophils and lymphocytes that migrate to the air spaces during infection. PMID:10832744

  18. INSIGHTS INTO THE REGULATION OF 5-HT2A RECEPTORS BY SCAFFOLDING PROTEINS AND KINASES

    PubMed Central

    Allen, John A.; Yadav, Prem N.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY 5-HT2A serotonin receptors are essential molecular targets for the actions of LSD-like hallucinogens and atypical antipsychotic drugs. 5-HT2A serotonin receptors also mediate a variety of physiological processes in peripheral and central nervous systems including platelet aggregation, smooth muscle contraction, and the modulation of mood and perception. Scaffolding proteins have emerged as important regulators of 5-HT2A receptors and our recent studies suggest multiple scaffolds exist for 5-HT2A receptors including PSD95, arrestin, and caveolin. In addition, a novel interaction has emerged between p90 ribosomal S6 kinase and 5-HT2A receptors which attenuates receptor signaling. This article reviews our recent studies and emphasizes the role of scaffolding proteins and kinases in the regulation of 5-HT2A trafficking, targeting and signaling. PMID:18640136

  19. Indirect androgen doping by oestrogen blockade in sports

    PubMed Central

    Handelsman, D J

    2008-01-01

    Androgens can increase muscular mass and strength and remain the most frequently abused and widely available drugs used in sports doping. Banning the administration of natural or synthetic androgens has led to a variety of strategies to circumvent the ban of the most effective ergogenic agents for power sports. Among these, a variety of indirect androgen doping strategies aiming to produce a sustained rise in endogenous testosterone have been utilized. These include oestrogen blockade by drugs that act as oestrogen receptor antagonists (antioestrogen) or aromatase inhibitors. The physiological and pharmacological basis for the effects of oestrogen blockade in men, but not women, are reviewed. PMID:18500381

  20. Observation of ionic Coulomb blockade in nanopores.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jiandong; Liu, Ke; Graf, Michael; Dumcenco, Dumitru; Kis, Andras; Di Ventra, Massimiliano; Radenovic, Aleksandra

    2016-08-01

    Emergent behaviour from electron-transport properties is routinely observed in systems with dimensions approaching the nanoscale. However, analogous mesoscopic behaviour resulting from ionic transport has so far not been observed, most probably because of bottlenecks in the controlled fabrication of subnanometre nanopores for use in nanofluidics. Here, we report measurements of ionic transport through a single subnanometre pore junction, and the observation of ionic Coulomb blockade: the ionic counterpart of the electronic Coulomb blockade observed for quantum dots. Our findings demonstrate that nanoscopic, atomically thin pores allow for the exploration of phenomena in ionic transport, and suggest that nanopores may also further our understanding of transport through biological ion channels. PMID:27019385

  1. The Union Blockade and Demoralization of the South: Relative Prices in the Confederacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekelund, Robert B., Jr.; Thornton, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Applies the economic concept of relative prices to the blockaded Confederacy during the U.S. Civil War. Describes how the Union blockade encouraged blockade runners to supply luxury items while soldiers lacked food, clothing, and ammunition. Contends that the resultant demoralization was a factor in the demise of the Confederacy. (CFR)

  2. The Use of Beta-Adrenergic Blockade in Preventing Trauma-Induced Hepatomegaly

    PubMed Central

    Barrow, Robert E.; Wolfe, Robert R.; Dasu, Mohan R.; Barrow, Laura N.; Herndon, David N.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that hepatomegaly in burned children can be attenuated or reversed by blocking lipolysis and reducing free fatty acids delivered to the liver. Summary Background Data: Accelerated lipolysis in severely burned children has been shown to play an important role in the accumulation of hepatic TGs. Severely burned children who survive 10 days or more after injury commonly have enlarged livers often twice or more normal size for their sex, age, and weight. Methods: Ninety-eight children, 2 to 18 years of age, with burns covering more than 40% of their body surface and who received either propranolol (β-adrenergic blockade) or placebo were studied. Liver weights were measured by ultrasonic scanning. Body composition changes were identified by dual-image x-ray absorptiometry and validated by whole-body potassium-40 scintillation counting. Discarded abdominal cutaneous adipose tissue was collected before and after propranolol or placebo for microarray analysis. Results: In 80% of severely burned children studied not receiving propranolol, liver sizes increased by 100% or more while 86% of burned children receiving propranolol showed a decrease or no change in liver size over the same period of time after injury. Gene expression patterns of adipose tissue after propranolol treatment showed that all of the identified genes related to lipid metabolism were down-regulated. Conclusions: Data reported here support the hypothesis that β-adrenergic blockade can reduce delivery of fatty acids to the liver and hepatic congestion commonly found in severely burned children by inhibiting lipolysis and reducing hepatic blood flow. PMID:16371745

  3. Neutrophil CD18 expression and blockade after traumatic shock and endotoxin challenge.

    PubMed Central

    Fabian, T C; Croce, M A; Stewart, R M; Dockter, M E; Proctor, K G

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The expression of the leukocyte CD18 adhesion complex on polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) was measured, and the physiologic effects of blockade of the complex were studied after trauma and sepsis. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Margination of PMNs occurs early during inflammation and depends, in part, on expression of the CD18 adhesion complex. Blockade of this adherence complex can reduce PMN-mediated damage. This study tests the hypothesis that PMN activation after resuscitated trauma produces an occult endothelial injury that increases the vulnerability to a delayed inflammatory stimulus. METHODS: Anesthetized (fentanyl) mongrel pigs were sham injured or fluid resuscitated from soft tissue injury +35% hemorrhage. Systemic blood was collected at 24-hour intervals from awake animals. The CD18 density on circulating PMNs was determined with flow cytometry using mean channel fluorescence (MCF). The CD18 receptors were blocked with monoclonal antibodies either immediately before trauma or immediately before an endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS]) challenge that was administered to all groups 3 days after the shock episode. Bronchoscopy was performed before trauma, pre-LPS, and post-LPS, and protein content was measured in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). RESULTS: Mean channel fluorescence was reduced on PMNs for 48 hours in animals with trauma versus animals with sham injuries. Anti-CD18 therapy produced higher circulating PMN counts compared with nontreated sham or shock groups. The incremental rise of BAL protein after shock was prevented with anti-CD18; the increment after LPS was attenuated. Anti-CD18 was administered before trauma and reduced the fluids necessary to maintain cardiac filling pressures after LPS. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that PMNs are activated after resuscitation from traumatic shock and that these cells produce an endothelial injury that may increase the vulnerability to a septic challenge. The broad implication is that temporarily

  4. Participation of 5-HT1-like and 5-HT2A receptors in the contraction of human temporal artery by 5-hydroxytryptamine and related drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Verheggen, R.; Freudenthaler, S.; Meyer-Dulheuer, F.; Kaumann, A. J.

    1996-01-01

    1. We investigated the hypothesis that, as in some other large human arteries, 5-HT-induced contraction of the temporal artery is mediated through two co-existing receptor populations, 5-HT1-like- and 5-HT2A. Temporal arterial segments were obtained from patients undergoing brain surgery and rings prepared set up to contract with 5-HT and related agents. Fractions of maximal 5-HT responses mediated through 5-HT1-like and 5-HT2A receptors, f1 and f2 = 1-f1, were estimated by use of the 5-HT2A-selective antagonist ketanserin. 2. In rings with intact endothelium 5-HT evoked contractions with a -log EC50, M of 7.0. Ketanserin (10-1000 nM) antagonized part of the 5-HT-induced contractions. Ketanserin-resistant components of 5-HT-induced contractions were found with -log EC50, M of 6.9 and f1 of 0.17 (100 nM ketanserin) and -log EC50, M of 6.4 and f1 of 0.20 (1000 nM ketanserin). 3. In rings with endothelial function attenuated by enzymatic treatment, 5-HT caused contractions with a -log EC50, M of 7.2 that were partially blocked by ketanserin. Ketanserin-resistant components of 5-HT-induced contractions were found with -log EC50, M 7.4 and f1 of 0.16 (100 nM ketanserin) and -log EC50, M of 7.5 and f1 of 0.14 (1000 nM ketanserin). 4. The ketanserin-resistant component of 5-HT-evoked contraction was blocked by methiothepin (100-1000 nM) consistent with mediation through 5-HT1-like receptors. 5. In rings with intact endothelium the 5-HT1-like-selective agonist, sumatriptan, caused small contractions with a -log EC50, M of 6.5 and intrinsic activity of 0.21 with respect to 5-HT that were resistant to blockade by 1000 nM ketanserin but antagonized by 100 nM methiothepin. 6. In rings with intact endothelium the 5-HT2A receptor partial agonist SK&F 103829 (2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-8[methyl sulphonyl]-1H3-benzazepin-7-ol methensulphonate) contracted rings with a -log EC50, M of 5.0 and an intrinsic activity of 0.49 with respect to 5-HT; the effects were antagonized by ketanserin 1000

  5. A new regime of Pauli-spin blockade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perron, Justin K.; Stewart, M. D.; Zimmerman, Neil M.

    2016-04-01

    Pauli-spin blockade (PSB) is a transport phenomenon in double quantum dots that allows for a type of spin to charge conversion often used to probe fundamental physics such as spin relaxation and singlet-triplet coupling. In this paper, we theoretically explore Pauli-spin blockade as a function of magnetic field B applied parallel to the substrate. In the well-studied low magnetic field regime, where PSB occurs in the forward (1, 1) → (0, 2) tunneling direction, we highlight some aspects of PSB that are not discussed in detail in existing literature, including the change in size of both bias triangles measured in the forward and reverse biasing directions as a function of B. At higher fields, we predict a crossover to "reverse PSB" in which current is blockaded in the reverse direction due to the occupation of a spin singlet as opposed to the traditional triplet blockade that occurs at low fields. The onset of reverse PSB coincides with the development of a tail like feature in the measured bias triangles and occurs when the Zeeman energy of the polarized triplet equals the exchange energy in the (0, 2) charge configuration. In Si quantum dots, these fields are experimentally accessible; thus, this work suggests a way to observe a crossover in magnetic field to qualitatively different behavior.

  6. Axillary Brachial Plexus Blockade for the Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribbers, G. M.; Geurts, A. C. H.; Rijken, R. A. J.; Kerkkamp, H. E. M.

    1997-01-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSD) is a neurogenic pain syndrome characterized by pain, vasomotor and dystrophic changes, and often motor impairments. This study evaluated the effectiveness of brachial plexus blockade with local anaesthetic drugs as a treatment for this condition. Three patients responded well; three did not. (DB)

  7. Accurate Coulomb blockade thermometry up to 60 kelvin.

    PubMed

    Meschke, M; Kemppinen, A; Pekola, J P

    2016-03-28

    We demonstrate experimentally a precise realization of Coulomb blockade thermometry working at temperatures up to 60 K. Advances in nano-fabrication methods using electron beam lithography allow us to fabricate uniform arrays of sufficiently small tunnel junctions to guarantee an overall temperature reading precision of about 1%. PMID:26903107

  8. Sodium intake, RAAS-blockade and progressive renal disease.

    PubMed

    de Borst, Martin H; Navis, Gerjan

    2016-05-01

    Pharmacological blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) by angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers is the current standard treatment to prevent progressive renal function loss in patients with chronic kidney disease. Yet in many patients the renal protective effect of RAAS-blockade is incomplete. Short-term clinical studies have demonstrated that dietary sodium restriction potentiates the antiproteinuric effect of RAAS-blockade. More recently, it was shown that this effect is accompanied by a lower risk of end-stage renal disease and adverse cardiovascular outcomes. The modulation of RAAS-blockade efficacy by sodium intake is likely multifactorial, and is mediated by effects of sodium on local tissue RAAS in kidney, vasculature and brain, and by effects on the immune system. Despite the evidence showing the beneficial effects of even a moderate sodium restriction (∼2.5g/d), it remains difficult to realize in clinical practice. In an analysis based on 24-h urinary sodium excretion data from more than 10,000 CKD patients and renal transplant recipients, we found that sodium intake in these patients is on average 3.8g/d, closely resembling the global general population (3.95g/d). Behavioral approaches including the use of online dietary coaching (ehealth) and feedback using data from 24-h urine collections may be useful to successfully lower dietary sodium intake, aiming to improve cardio-renal outcomes in patients with CKD. PMID:27041482

  9. Unraveling mechanisms underlying partial agonism in 5-HT3A receptors.

    PubMed

    Corradi, Jeremías; Bouzat, Cecilia

    2014-12-10

    Partial agonists have emerged as attractive therapeutic molecules. 2-Me-5HT and tryptamine have been defined as partial agonists of 5-HT3 receptors on the basis of macroscopic measurements. Because several mechanisms may limit maximal responses, we took advantage of the high-conductance form of the mouse serotonin type 3A (5-HT3A) receptor to understand their molecular actions. Individual 5-HT-bound receptors activate in long episodes of high open probability, consisting of groups of openings in quick succession. The activation pattern is similar for 2-Me-5HT only at very low concentrations since profound channel blockade takes place within the activating concentration range. In contrast, activation episodes are significantly briefer in the presence of tryptamine. Generation of a full activation scheme reveals that the fully occupied receptor overcomes transitions to closed preopen states (primed states) before opening. Reduced priming explains the partial agonism of tryptamine. In contrast, 2-Me-5HT is not a genuine partial agonist since priming is not dramatically affected and its low apparent efficacy is mainly due to channel blockade. The analysis also shows that the first priming step is the rate-limiting step and partial agonists require an increased number of priming steps for activation. Molecular docking suggests that interactions are similar for 5-HT and 2-Me-5HT but slightly different for tryptamine. Our study contributes to understanding 5-HT3A receptor activation, extends the novel concept of partial agonism within the Cys-loop family, reveals novel aspects of partial agonism, and unmasks molecular actions of classically defined partial agonists. Unraveling mechanisms underlying partial responses has implications in the design of therapeutic compounds. PMID:25505338

  10. P2X7 receptor blockade protects against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in mice by decreasing the activities of inflammasome components, oxidative stress and caspase-3

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Yuan, Fahuan; Cao, Xuejiao; Zhai, Zhifang; Gang Huang; Du, Xiang; Wang, Yiqin; Zhang, Jingbo; Huang, Yunjian; Zhao, Jinghong; Hou, Weiping

    2014-11-15

    Nephrotoxicity is a common complication of cisplatin chemotherapy and thus limits the use of cisplatin in clinic. The purinergic 2X7 receptor (P2X7R) plays important roles in inflammation and apoptosis in some inflammatory diseases; however, its roles in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity remain unclear. In this study, we first assessed the expression of P2X7R in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in C57BL/6 mice, and then we investigated the changes of renal function, histological injury, inflammatory response, and apoptosis in renal tissues after P2X7R blockade in vivo using an antagonist A-438079. Moreover, we measured the changes of nod-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing proteins (NLRP3) inflammasome components, oxidative stress, and proapoptotic genes in renal tissues in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity after treatment with A-438079. We found that the expression of P2X7R was significantly upregulated in the renal tubular epithelial cells in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity compared with that of the normal control group. Furthermore, pretreatment with A-438079 markedly attenuated the cisplatin-induced renal injury while lightening the histological damage, inflammatory response and apoptosis in renal tissue, and improved the renal function. These effects were associated with the significantly reduced levels of NLRP3 inflammasome components, oxidative stress, p53 and caspase-3 in renal tissues in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. In conclusions, our studies suggest that the upregulated activity of P2X7R might play important roles in the development of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity, and P2X7R blockade might become an effective therapeutic strategy for this disease. - Highlights: • The P2X7R expression was markedly upregulated in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. • P2X7R blockade significantly attenuated the cisplatin-induced renal injury. • P2X7R blockade reduced activities of NLRP3 inflammasome components in renal tissue. • P2X7R blockade

  11. Variable laser attenuator

    DOEpatents

    Foltyn, Stephen R.

    1988-01-01

    The disclosure relates to low loss, high power variable attenuators comprng one or more transmissive and/or reflective multilayer dielectric filters. The attenuator is particularly suitable to use with unpolarized lasers such as excimer lasers. Beam attenuation is a function of beam polarization and the angle of incidence between the beam and the filter and is controlled by adjusting the angle of incidence the beam makes to the filter or filters. Filters are selected in accordance with beam wavelength.

  12. Variable laser attenuator

    DOEpatents

    Foltyn, S.R.

    1987-05-29

    The disclosure relates to low loss, high power variable attenuators comprising one or more transmissive and/or reflective multilayer dielectric filters. The attenuator is particularly suitable to use with unpolarized lasers such as excimer lasers. Beam attenuation is a function of beam polarization and the angle of incidence between the beam and the filter and is controlled by adjusting the angle of incidence the beam makes to the filter or filters. Filters are selected in accordance with beam wavelength. 9 figs.

  13. The effect of subfornical organ lesions and ventricular blockade on drinking induced by angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, W E; Phillips, M I

    1976-05-21

    The role of the subfornical organ (SFO) as the unique receptor site for the drinking behavior induced by intracranial injections of angiotensin II (AII) was investigated. It was found that: (1) drinking in response to intraventricular (IVT) injections of AII was reduced in 6 rats but was unchanged after 80-100% damage of the SFO in 4 cases; (2) reduction of drinking to lateral ventricular application of AII was seen with no apparent SFO damage in 4 rats; (3) recovery of the AII induced drinking deficit was consistently observed within a short time interval (14 days), even in those animals with complete SFO lesions: (4) the presence of ventricular debris was correlated with deficits in water intake to IVT angiotensin injections. In a second experiment artificial blockade of the ventricular space was produced by a plugging technique. Plugging the anterior third ventricle simulated the effects of SFO lesioning. It was concluded that the SFO is not a unique receptor area since the ventral anterior third ventricle is also sensitive for AII (IVT) induced drinking. If the SFO is a receptor site for AII circulating in the CSF it is probably not the only periventricular receptor site. Access of AII to the anterior ventral third ventricle appears to be essential for inducement of drinking. PMID:1276893

  14. Presynaptic adenosine A2A receptors dampen cannabinoid CB1 receptor-mediated inhibition of corticostriatal glutamatergic transmission

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, S G; Gonçalves, F Q; Marques, J M; Tomé, Â R; Rodrigues, R J; Nunes-Correia, I; Ledent, C; Harkany, T; Venance, L; Cunha, R A; Köfalvi, A

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Both cannabinoid CB1 and adenosine A2A receptors (CB1 receptors and A2A receptors) control synaptic transmission at corticostriatal synapses, with great therapeutic importance for neurological and psychiatric disorders. A postsynaptic CB1−A2A receptor interaction has already been elucidated, but the presynaptic A2A receptor-mediated control of presynaptic neuromodulation by CB1 receptors remains to be defined. Because the corticostriatal terminals provide the major input to the basal ganglia, understanding the interactive nature of converging neuromodulation on them will provide us with novel powerful tools to understand the physiology of corticostriatal synaptic transmission and interpret changes associated with pathological conditions. Experimental Approach Pharmacological manipulation of CB1 and A2A receptors was carried out in brain nerve terminals isolated from rats and mice, using flow synaptometry, immunoprecipitation, radioligand binding, ATP and glutamate release measurement. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were made in horizontal corticostriatal slices. Key Results Flow synaptometry showed that A2A receptors were extensively co-localized with CB1 receptor-immunopositive corticostriatal terminals and A2A receptors co-immunoprecipitated CB1 receptors in these purified terminals. A2A receptor activation decreased CB1 receptor radioligand binding and decreased the CB1 receptor-mediated inhibition of high-K+-evoked glutamate release in corticostriatal terminals. Accordingly, A2A receptor activation prevented CB1 receptor-mediated paired-pulse facilitation and attenuated the CB1 receptor-mediated inhibition of synaptic transmission in glutamatergic synapses of corticostriatal slices. Conclusions and Implications Activation of presynaptic A2A receptors dampened CB1 receptor-mediated inhibition of corticostriatal terminals. This constitutes a thus far unrecognized mechanism to modulate the potent CB1 receptor-mediated presynaptic

  15. Blockade of Wnt/β-Catenin Pathway Aggravated Silica-Induced Lung Inflammation through Tregs Regulation on Th Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Wujing; Liu, Fangwei; Li, Chao; Lu, Yiping; Lu, Xiaowei; Du, Sitong; Chen, Ying; Weng, Dong; Chen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ T cells play an important role in regulating silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis. Recent studies showed that Wnt/β-catenin pathway could modulate the function and the differentiation of CD4+ T cells. Therefore, Wnt/β-catenin pathway may participate in the development and progress of silicosis. To investigate the role of Wnt/β-catenin pathway, we used lentivirus expressing β-catenin shRNA to block the Wnt/β-catenin pathway by intratracheal instillation to the mice model of silicosis. Treatment of lentivirus could significantly aggravate the silica-induced lung inflammation and attenuated the fibrosis at the late stage. By analyzing CD4+ T cells, we found that blockade of Wnt/β-catenin pathway suppressed regulatory T cells (Tregs). Reciprocally, enhanced Th17 response was responsible for the further accumulation of neutrophils and production of proinflammatory cytokines. In addition, blockade of Wnt/β-catenin pathway delayed the Th1/Th2 polarization by inhibiting Tregs and Th2 response. These results indicated that Wnt/β-catenin pathway could regulate Tregs to modulate Th immune response, which finally altered the pathological character of silicosis. Our study suggested that Wnt/β-catenin pathway might be a potential target to treat the silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis. PMID:27069316

  16. Blockade of Wnt/β-Catenin Pathway Aggravated Silica-Induced Lung Inflammation through Tregs Regulation on Th Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Dai, Wujing; Liu, Fangwei; Li, Chao; Lu, Yiping; Lu, Xiaowei; Du, Sitong; Chen, Ying; Weng, Dong; Chen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    CD4(+) T cells play an important role in regulating silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis. Recent studies showed that Wnt/β-catenin pathway could modulate the function and the differentiation of CD4(+) T cells. Therefore, Wnt/β-catenin pathway may participate in the development and progress of silicosis. To investigate the role of Wnt/β-catenin pathway, we used lentivirus expressing β-catenin shRNA to block the Wnt/β-catenin pathway by intratracheal instillation to the mice model of silicosis. Treatment of lentivirus could significantly aggravate the silica-induced lung inflammation and attenuated the fibrosis at the late stage. By analyzing CD4(+) T cells, we found that blockade of Wnt/β-catenin pathway suppressed regulatory T cells (Tregs). Reciprocally, enhanced Th17 response was responsible for the further accumulation of neutrophils and production of proinflammatory cytokines. In addition, blockade of Wnt/β-catenin pathway delayed the Th1/Th2 polarization by inhibiting Tregs and Th2 response. These results indicated that Wnt/β-catenin pathway could regulate Tregs to modulate Th immune response, which finally altered the pathological character of silicosis. Our study suggested that Wnt/β-catenin pathway might be a potential target to treat the silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis. PMID:27069316

  17. Adenosine 2A receptors modulate reward behaviours for methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Chesworth, Rose; Brown, Robyn M; Kim, Jee Hyun; Ledent, Catherine; Lawrence, Andrew J

    2016-03-01

    Addiction to methamphetamine (METH) is a global health problem for which there are no approved pharmacotherapies. The adenosine 2A (A2 A ) receptor presents a potential therapeutic target for METH abuse due to its modulatory effects on striatal dopamine and glutamate transmission. Notably, A2 A receptor signalling has been implicated in the rewarding effects of alcohol, cocaine and opiates; yet, the role of this receptor in METH consumption and seeking is essentially unknown. Therefore, the current study used A2 A knockout (KO) mice to assess the role of A2 A in behaviours relevant to METH addiction. METH conditioned place preference was absent in A2 A KO mice compared with wild-type (WT) littermates. Repeated METH treatment produced locomotor sensitization in both genotypes; however, sensitization was attenuated in A2 A KO mice in a dose-related manner. METH intravenous self-administration was intact in A2 A KO mice over a range of doses and schedules of reinforcement. However, the motivation to self-administer was reduced in A2 A KO mice. Regression analysis further supported the observation that the motivation to self-administer METH was reduced in A2 A KO mice even when self-administration was similar to WT mice. Sucrose self-administration was also reduced in A2 A KO mice but only at higher schedules of reinforcement. Collectively, these data suggest that A2 A signalling is critically required to integrate rewarding and motivational properties of both METH and natural rewards. PMID:25612195

  18. Conductance through a proximitized nanowire in the Coulomb blockade regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Heck, Bernard; Lutchyn, Roman; Glazman, Leonid

    Motivated by recent experiments of the Copenhagen group on InAs nanowires with epitaxial Al, we investigate the two-terminal conductance of a strongly proximitized nanowire in the Coulomb blockade regime. We identify the leading electron transport processes at zero applied magnetic field B as well as at finite fields, suppressing the induced gap Δind (B) . In the conventional superconducting phase, the conductance is controlled by the sequential Cooper pair tunneling if Δind (B) exceeds the charging energy Ec, and by the elastic single-electron processes if Δind (B) blockade peaks, which explains the experimental finding in Ref.. We also develop a quantitative theory for the differential conductance and examine its evolution across the topological transition point.

  19. Effect of beta blockade and beta stimulation on stage fright.

    PubMed

    Brantigan, C O; Brantigan, T A; Joseph, N

    1982-01-01

    Stage fright, physiologically the "fight or flight" reaction, is a disabling condition to the professional musician. Because it is mediated by the sympathetic nervous system, we have investigated the effects of beta blockade on musical performance with propranolol in a double blind fashion and the effects of beta stimulation using terbutaline. Stage fright symptoms were evaluated in two trials, which included a total of 29 subjects, by questionnaire and by the State Trai Anxiety Inventory. Quality of musical performance was evaluated by experienced music critics. Beta blockade eliminates the physical impediments to performance caused by stage fright and even eliminates the dry mouth so frequently encountered. The quality of musical performance as judged by experienced music critics is significantly improved. This effect is achieved without tranquilization. Beta stimulating drugs increase stage fright problems, and should be used in performing musicians only after consideration of the detrimental effects which they may have on musical performance. PMID:6120650

  20. Conductance of a proximitized nanowire in the Coulomb blockade regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Heck, B.; Lutchyn, R. M.; Glazman, L. I.

    2016-06-01

    We identify the leading processes of electron transport across finite-length segments of proximitized nanowires and build a quantitative theory of their two-terminal conductance. In the presence of spin-orbit interaction, a nanowire can be tuned across the topological transition point by an applied magnetic field. Due to a finite segment length, electron transport is controlled by the Coulomb blockade. Upon increasing of the field, the shape and magnitude of the Coulomb blockade peaks in the linear conductance are defined, respectively, by Andreev reflection, single-electron tunneling, and resonant tunneling through the Majorana modes emerging after the topological transition. Our theory provides the framework for the analysis of experiments with proximitized nanowires [such as reported in S. M. Albrecht et al., Nature (London) 531, 206 (2016), 10.1038/nature17162] and identifies the signatures of the topological transition in the two-terminal conductance.

  1. Immunotherapeutic implications of IL-6 blockade for cytokine storm.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Toshio; Narazaki, Masashi; Kishimoto, Tadamitsu

    2016-07-01

    IL-6 contributes to host defense against infections and tissue injuries. However, exaggerated, excessive synthesis of IL-6 while fighting environmental stress leads to an acute severe systemic inflammatory response known as 'cytokine storm', since high levels of IL-6 can activate the coagulation pathway and vascular endothelial cells but inhibit myocardial function. Remarkable beneficial effects of IL-6 blockade therapy using a humanized anti-IL-6 receptor antibody, tocilizumab were recently observed in patients with cytokine release syndrome complicated by T-cell engaged therapy. In this review we propose the possibility that IL-6 blockade may constitute a novel therapeutic strategy for other types of cytokine storm, such as the systemic inflammatory response syndrome including sepsis, macrophage activation syndrome and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. PMID:27381687

  2. Touch Perception Altered by Chronic Pain and by Opioid Blockade.

    PubMed

    Case, Laura K; Čeko, Marta; Gracely, John L; Richards, Emily A; Olausson, Håkan; Bushnell, M Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Touch plays a significant role in human social behavior and social communication, and its rewarding nature has been suggested to involve opioids. Opioid blockade in monkeys leads to increased solicitation and receipt of grooming, suggesting heightened enjoyment of touch. We sought to study the role of endogenous opioids in perception of affective touch in healthy adults and in patients with fibromyalgia, a chronic pain condition shown to involve reduced opioid receptor availability. The pleasantness of touch has been linked to the activation of C-tactile fibers, which respond maximally to slow gentle touch and correlate with ratings of pleasantness. We administered naloxone to patients and healthy controls to directly observe the consequences of µ-opioid blockade on the perceived pleasantness and intensity of touch. We found that at baseline chronic pain patients showed a blunted distinction between slow and fast brushing for both intensity and pleasantness, suggesting reduced C-tactile touch processing. In addition, we found a differential effect of opioid blockade on touch perception in healthy subjects and pain patients. In healthy individuals, opioid blockade showed a trend toward increased ratings of touch pleasantness, while in chronic pain patients it significantly decreased ratings of touch intensity. Further, in healthy individuals, naloxone-induced increase in touch pleasantness was associated with naloxone-induced decreased preference for slow touch, suggesting a possible effect of opioid levels on processing of C-tactile fiber input. These findings suggest a role for endogenous opioids in touch processing, and provide further evidence for altered opioid functioning in chronic pain patients. PMID:27022625

  3. Deterministic entanglement of two neutral atoms via Rydberg blockade

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X. L.; Isenhower, L.; Gill, A. T.; Walker, T. G.; Saffman, M.

    2010-09-15

    We demonstrate the deterministic entanglement of two individually addressed neutral atoms using a Rydberg blockade mediated controlled-not gate. Parity oscillation measurements reveal a Bell state fidelity of F=0.58{+-}0.04, which is above the entanglement threshold of F=0.5, without any correction for atom loss, and F=0.71{+-}0.05 after correcting for background collisional losses. The fidelity results are shown to be in good agreement with a detailed error model.

  4. Landing gear noise attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moe, Jeffrey W. (Inventor); Whitmire, Julia (Inventor); Kwan, Hwa-Wan (Inventor); Abeysinghe, Amal (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A landing gear noise attenuator mitigates noise generated by airframe deployable landing gear. The noise attenuator can have a first position when the landing gear is in its deployed or down position, and a second position when the landing gear is in its up or stowed position. The noise attenuator may be an inflatable fairing that does not compromise limited space constraints associated with landing gear retraction and stowage. A truck fairing mounted under a truck beam can have a compliant edge to allow for non-destructive impingement of a deflected fire during certain conditions.

  5. RADIO FREQUENCY ATTENUATOR

    DOEpatents

    Giordano, S.

    1963-11-12

    A high peak power level r-f attenuator that is readily and easily insertable along a coaxial cable having an inner conductor and an outer annular conductor without breaking the ends thereof is presented. Spaced first and second flares in the outer conductor face each other with a slidable cylindrical outer conductor portion therebetween. Dielectric means, such as water, contact the cable between the flares to attenuate the radio-frequency energy received thereby. The cylindrical outer conductor portion is slidable to adjust the voltage standing wave ratio to a low level, and one of the flares is slidable to adjust the attenuation level. An integral dielectric container is also provided. (AFC)

  6. Sequential RAAS blockade: is it worth the risk?

    PubMed

    Persson, Frederik; Rossing, Peter

    2014-03-01

    Soon after the emergence of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blocking treatment as the cornerstone of renoprotective treatment in the prevention and treatment of diabetic and nondiabetic CKD, it was investigated if a higher degree of achievable RAAS blockade by combining more than one compound is feasible and advantageous. Regardless of the benefits from using monotherapy for diabetic kidney disease, there is still much improvement to wish for in terms of kidney prognosis in these populations. A great deal of research has gone into evaluating combinations of the RAAS blocking treatments in different populations and with different drugs and doses. Studies have mostly been short-term and use surrogate endpoints such as albuminuria. Side effects have been well known and expected in terms of increasing potassium levels and hypotension, but to an acceptable extent. With recent disappointing results from major hard endpoint trials using dual RAAS blockade the concept is now under scrutiny. In this review we will discuss the pros and cons of dual RAAS blockade, with facts and findings from smaller studies, endpoint trials, and meta-analyses. PMID:24602465

  7. Dynamical Coulomb blockade of tunnel junctions driven by alternating voltages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabert, Hermann

    2015-12-01

    The theory of the dynamical Coulomb blockade is extended to tunneling elements driven by a time-dependent voltage. It is shown that, for standard setups where an external voltage is applied to a tunnel junction via an impedance, time-dependent driving entails an excitation of the modes of the electromagnetic environment by the applied voltage. Previous approaches for ac driven circuits need to be extended to account for the driven bath modes. A unitary transformation involving also the variables of the electromagnetic environment is introduced which allows us to split off the time dependence from the Hamiltonian in the absence of tunneling. This greatly simplifies perturbation-theoretical calculations based on treating the tunneling Hamiltonian as a perturbation. In particular, the average current flowing in the leads of the tunnel junction is studied. Explicit results are given for the case of an applied voltage with a constant dc part and a sinusoidal ac part. The connection with standard dynamical Coulomb blockade theory for constant applied voltage is established. It is shown that an alternating voltage source reveals significant additional effects caused by the electromagnetic environment. The hallmark of the dynamical Coulomb blockade in ac driven devices is a suppression of higher harmonics of the current by the electromagnetic environment. The theory presented basically applies to all tunneling devices driven by alternating voltages.

  8. Beta-adrenergic blockade and atrio--ventricular conduction impairment.

    PubMed

    Giudicelli, J F; Lhoste, F; Boissier, J R

    1975-04-01

    Atrio--ventricular conduction and its modifications induced by six Beta-adrenergic blocking agents have been investigated in the dog. Premature atrial stimuli (St2) were applied at variable intervals following regular stimuli (St1) ensuring atrial pacing; atrial (AERP), nodoventricular (NERP) and global (GERP) effective refractory periods as well as global functional refractory period (GFRP) were determined before and after administration of each of the six drugs. When Beta-blockade was produced with d,1-propranolol which hwas membrane stabilizing effects (MSE) but no intrinsic sympathomimetic activity (ISA) or with sotalol, which has neither MSE nor ISA, all parameters were significantly increased. When Beta-blockade was achieved with pindolol or practolol, which have only a poor Beta-adrenolytic potency and no ISA. Alprenolol showed intermediate effects. Thus, it appears that Beta-blockade and not MSE, is responsible for the onset of A-V conduction impairment but that ISA, probably through a metabolic mechanism, affords protection against this impairment. On the other hand, measurement of ventricular effective refractory period (VERP) has shown that at the Purkinje-free junction, it is MSE which is mainly involved in conduction impairment. PMID:238853

  9. [Effect of cimetidine on neuromuscular blockade by succinylcholine and pancuronium].

    PubMed

    Sato, Y; Tsuchida, H; Harada, Y; Namiki, A

    1990-02-01

    The effect of cimetidine on neuromuscular blockade by succinylcholine and pancuronium was investigated in 54 adult patients scheduled for elective surgery. The neuromuscular blocking properties were estimated with single twitch height (T1) which was obtained by measuring the acceleration of adduction of the thumb in response to the ulnar nerve stimulation under N2O-fentanyl anesthesia. In cimetidine group, cimetidine 200 mg was administered orally on the night before surgery and 90 mins before anesthesia. Succinylcholine 1 mg.kg-1 (n = 14) or 1.5 mg.kg-1 (n = 20) was injected intravenously, and the onset time (from injection to 0% T1), the duration of maximal block (0% T1), and the recovery time from injection to 50% and 75% of control twitch height were evaluated. ED25 and ED50 of pancuronium were calculated from the dose response curve obtained by incremental administration of the drug (n = 20) whose total cumulative dose was 0.1 mg.kg-1. The recovery index of pancuronium was determined by measuring the 25%-75% recovery time. There was no significant difference between cimetidine pretreated patients and non-pretreated patients regarding these parameters of neuromuscular blockade with both succinylcholine and pancuronium. In conclusion, cimetidine has no influence on neuromuscular blockade of succinylcholine and pancuronium under N2O-fentanyl anesthesia. PMID:2325250

  10. Shape-sensitive Pauli blockade in a bent carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Széchenyi, Gábor; Pályi, András

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by a recent experiment [F. Pei et al., Nat. Nanotechnol. 7, 630 (2012), 10.1038/nnano.2012.160], we theoretically study the Pauli blockade transport effect in a double quantum dot embedded in a bent carbon nanotube. We establish a model for the Pauli blockade, taking into account the strong g -factor anisotropy that is linked to the local orientation of the nanotube axis in each quantum dot. We provide a set of conditions under which our model is approximately mapped to the spin-blockade model of Jouravlev and Nazarov [O. N. Jouravlev and Y. V. Nazarov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 176804 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.176804]. The results we obtain for the magnetic anisotropy of the leakage current, together with their qualitative geometrical explanation, provide a possible interpretation of previously unexplained experimental results. Furthermore, we find that in a certain parameter range, the leakage current becomes highly sensitive to the shape of the tube, and this sensitivity increases with increasing g -factor anisotropy. This mutual dependence of the electron transport and the tube shape allows for mechanical control of the leakage current, and for characterization of the tube shape via measuring the leakage current.

  11. Serum Immunoglobulin A Cross-Strain Blockade of Human Noroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Lindesmith, Lisa C.; Beltramello, Martina; Swanstrom, Jesica; Jones, Taylor A.; Corti, Davide; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Baric, Ralph S.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Human noroviruses are the leading cause of acute viral gastroenteritis, justifying vaccine development despite a limited understanding of strain immunity. After genogroup I (GI).1 norovirus infection and immunization, blockade antibody titers to multiple virus-like particles (VLPs) increase, suggesting that GI cross-protection may occur. Methods. Immunoglobulin (Ig)A was purified from sera collected from GI.1-infected participants, and potential neutralization activity was measured using a surrogate neutralization assay based on antibody blockade of ligand binding. Human and mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were produced to multiple GI VLPs to characterize GI epitopes. Results. Immunoglobulin A purified from day 14 post-GI.1 challenge sera blocked binding of GI.1, GI.3, and GI.4 to carbohydrate ligands. In some subjects, purified IgA preferentially blocked binding of other GI VLPs compared with GI.1, supporting observations that the immune response to GI.1 infection may be influenced by pre-exposure history. For other subjects, IgA equivalently blocked multiple GI VLPs. Only strain-specific mAbs recognized blockade epitopes, whereas strain cross-reactive mAbs recognized nonblockade epitopes. Conclusions. These studies are the first to describe a functional role for serum IgA in norovirus immunity and the first to characterize human monoclonal antibodies to GI strains, expanding our understanding of norovirus immunobiology. PMID:26180833

  12. Intrathecal rimantadine induces motor, proprioceptive, and nociceptive blockades in rats.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Jann-Inn; Wang, Jieh-Neng; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Chen, Yu-Wen; Hung, Ching-Hsia

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of the experiment was to evaluate the local anesthetic effect of rimantadine in spinal anesthesia. Rimantadine in a dose-dependent fashion was constructed after intrathecally injecting the rats with four different doses. The potency and duration of rimantadine were compared with that of the local anesthetic lidocaine at producing spinal motor, nociceptive, and proprioceptive blockades. We demonstrated that intrathecal rimantadine dose-dependently produced spinal motor, nociceptive, and proprioceptive blockades. On the 50% effective dose (ED50) basis, the ranks of potencies at inducing spinal motor, nociceptive, and proprioceptive blockades was lidocaine>rimantadine (P<0.01). Rimantadine exhibited more nociceptive block (ED50) than motor block (P<0.05). At equi-anesthetic doses (ED25, ED50, and ED75), the spinal block duration produced by rimantadine was longer than that produced by lidocaine (P<0.01). Furthermore, rimantadine (26.52μmol/kg) prolonged the nociceptive nerve block more than the motor block (P<0.001). Our preclinical data showed that rimantadine, with a more sensory-selective action over motor block, was less potent than lidocaine. Rimantadine produced longer duration in spinal anesthesia when compared with lidocaine. PMID:26949181

  13. Attenuator And Conditioner

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Gene R.; Armendariz, Marcelino G.; Carson, Richard F.; Bryan, Robert P.; Duckett, III, Edwin B.; Kemme, Shanalyn Adair; McCormick, Frederick B.; Peterson, David W.

    2006-04-04

    An apparatus and method of attenuating and/or conditioning optical energy for an optical transmitter, receiver or transceiver module is disclosed. An apparatus for attenuating the optical output of an optoelectronic connector including: a mounting surface; an array of optoelectronic devices having at least a first end; an array of optical elements having at least a first end; the first end of the array of optical elements optically aligned with the first end of the array of optoelectronic devices; an optical path extending from the first end of the array of optoelectronic devices and ending at a second end of the array of optical elements; and an attenuator in the optical path for attenuating the optical energy emitted from the array of optoelectronic devices. Alternatively, a conditioner may be adapted in the optical path for conditioning the optical energy emitted from the array of optoelectronic devices.

  14. Blockade of N-acetylaspartylglutamate peptidases: a novel protective strategy for brain injuries and neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Chunlong; Luo, Qizhong; Jiang, Jiyao

    2014-12-01

    The peptide neurotransmitter N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) is reported to suppress glutamate release mainly through selective activation of presynaptic Group II metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 3 (mGluR3). Therefore, strategies of inhibition of NAAG peptidases and subsequent NAAG hydrolysis to elevate levels of NAAG could reduce glutamate release under pathological conditions and be neuroprotective by attenuating excitotoxic cell injury. A series of potent inhibitors of NAAG peptidases has been synthesized and demonstrated efficacy in experimental models of ischemic-hypoxic brain injury, traumatic brain injury, inflammatory pain, diabetic neuropathy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and phencyclidine-induced schizophrenia-like behaviors. The excessive glutamatergic transmission has been implicated in all of these neurological disorders. Thus, blockade of NAAG peptidases may augment an endogenous protective mechanism and afford neuroprotection in the brain. This review aims to summarize and provide insight into the current understanding of the novel neuroprotective strategy based on limiting glutamate excitotoxicity for a wide variety of brain injuries and neurological disorders. PMID:24494725

  15. Blockade of IL-18 signaling diminished neuropathic pain and enhanced the efficacy of morphine and buprenorphine.

    PubMed

    Pilat, Dominika; Piotrowska, Anna; Rojewska, Ewelina; Jurga, Agnieszka; Ślusarczyk, Joanna; Makuch, Wioletta; Basta-Kaim, Agnieszka; Przewlocka, Barbara; Mika, Joanna

    2016-03-01

    Currently, the low efficacy of antinociceptive drugs for the treatment of neuropathic pain is a major therapeutic problem. Here, we show the potential role of interleukin (IL)-18 signaling in this phenomenon. IL-18 is an important molecule that performs various crucial functions, including the alteration of nociceptive transmission in response to neuropathic pain. We have studied the changes in the mRNA and protein levels (qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively) of IL-18, IL-18-binding protein (IL-18BP) and the IL-18 receptor (IL-18R) over time in rats following chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve. Our study demonstrated that the spinal levels of IL-18BP were slightly downregulated at days 7 and 14 in the rats subjected to CCI. In contrast, the IL-18 and IL-18R mRNA expression and protein levels were elevated in the ipsilateral spinal cord on days 2, 7 and 14. Moreover, in rats exposed to a single intrathecal administration of IL-18BP (50 and 100 ng) 7 or 14 days following CCI, symptoms of neuropathic pain were attenuated, and the analgesia pursuant to morphine and buprenorphine (0.5 and 2.5 μg) was enhanced. In summary, the restoration of the analgesic activity of morphine and buprenorphine via the blockade of IL-18 signaling suggests that increased IL-18 pathway may account for the decreased analgesic efficacy of opioids for neuropathic pain. PMID:26763728

  16. Tetrandrine induces lipid accumulation through blockade of autophagy in a hepatic stellate cell line.

    PubMed

    Miyamae, Yusaku; Nishito, Yukina; Nakai, Naomi; Nagumo, Yoko; Usui, Takeo; Masuda, Seiji; Kambe, Taiho; Nagao, Masaya

    2016-08-12

    Macroautophagy, or autophagy, is a cellular response in which unnecessary cytoplasmic components, including lipids and organelles, are self-degraded. Recent studies closely related autophagy to activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), a process critical in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis. During HSC activation, cytoplasmic lipid droplets (LDs) are degraded as autophagic cargo, and then cells express fibrogenic genes. Thus, inhibition of autophagy in HSCs is a potential therapeutic approach for attenuating liver fibrosis. We found that tetrandrine, a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid isolated from Stephania tetrandra, induced lipid accumulation, a phenotype associated with quiescent HSCs, through blockade of autophagy in the rat-derived HSC line HSC-T6. Tetrandrine inhibited autophagic flux without affecting lysosomal function. A phenotypic comparison using siRNA knockdown suggested that tetrandrine may target regulators, involved in fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes (e.g., syntaxin 17). Moreover, perilipin 1, an LD-coated protein, co-localized specifically with LC3, a marker protein for autophagosomes, in tetrandrine-treated HSC-T6 cells. This suggests a potential role for perilipin 1 in autophagy-mediated LD degradation in HSCs. Our results identified tetrandrine as a potential tool for prevention and treatment of HSC activation. PMID:27270032

  17. Role of 5-HT(1A) receptors in fluoxetine-induced lordosis inhibition.

    PubMed

    Guptarak, Jutatip; Sarkar, Jhimly; Hiegel, Cindy; Uphouse, Lynda

    2010-07-01

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), fluoxetine (Prozac(R)), is an effective antidepressant that is also prescribed for other disorders (e.g. anorexia, bulimia, and premenstrual dysphoria) that are prevalent in females. However, fluoxetine also produces sexual side effects that may lead patients to discontinue treatment. The current studies were designed to evaluate several predictions arising from the hypothesis that serotonin 1A (5-HT(1A)) receptors contribute to fluoxetine-induced sexual dysfunction. In rodent models, 5-HT(1A) receptors are potent negative modulators of female rat sexual behavior. Three distinct experiments were designed to evaluate the contribution of 5-HT(1A) receptors to the effects of fluoxetine. In the first experiment, the ability of the 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist, N-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl]-N-2-pyridinylcyclohexanecarboxamide (WAY100635), to prevent fluoxetine-induced lordosis inhibition was examined. In the second experiment, the effects of prior treatment with fluoxetine on the lordosis inhibitory effect of the 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist, (+/-)-8-hydroxy-2-(dipropylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT), were studied. In the third experiment, the ability of progesterone to reduce the acute response to fluoxetine was evaluated. WAY100635 attenuated the effect of fluoxetine; prior treatment with fluoxetine decreased 8-OH-DPAT's potency in reducing lordosis behavior; and progesterone shifted fluoxetine's dose-response curve to the right. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that 5-HT(1A) receptors contribute to fluoxetine-induced sexual side effects. PMID:20223238

  18. Fiber Optic Attenuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Mike Buzzetti designed a fiber optic attenuator while working at Jet Propulsion Laboratory, intended for use in NASA's Deep Space Network. Buzzetti subsequently patented and received an exclusive license to commercialize the device, and founded Nanometer Technologies to produce it. The attenuator functions without introducing measurable back-reflection or insertion loss, and is relatively insensitive to vibration and changes in temperature. Applications include cable television, telephone networks, other signal distribution networks, and laboratory instrumentation.

  19. 5-HT2A receptors are involved in cognitive but not antidepressant effects of fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Castañé, Anna; Kargieman, Lucila; Celada, Pau; Bortolozzi, Analía; Artigas, Francesc

    2015-08-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) plays a crucial role in cognitive and affective functions. It contains a rich serotonergic (serotonin, 5-HT) innervation and a high density of 5-HT receptors. Endogenous 5-HT exerts robust actions on the activity of pyramidal neurons in medial PFC (mPFC) via excitatory 5-HT2A and inhibitory 5-HT1A receptors, suggesting the involvement of 5-HT neurotransmission in cortical functions. However, the underlying mechanisms must be elucidated. Here we examine the role of 5-HT2A receptors in the processing of emotional and cognitive signals evoked by increasing the 5-HT tone after acute blockade of the 5-HT transporter. Fluoxetine (5-20mg/kg i.p.) dose-dependently reduced the immobility time in the tail-suspension test in wild-type (WT) and 5-HT2Aknockout (KO2A) mice, with non-significant differences between genotypes. Fluoxetine (10mg/kg i.p.) significantly impaired mice performance in the novel object recognition test 24h post-administration in WT, but not in KO2A mice. The comparable effect of fluoxetine on extracellular 5-HT in the mPFC of both genotypes suggests that presynaptic differences are not accountable. In contrast, single unit recordings of mPFC putative pyramidal neurons showed that fluoxetine (1.8-7.2mg/kg i.v.) significantly increased neuronal discharge in KO2A but not in WT mice. This effect is possibly mediated by an altered excitatory/inhibitory balance in the PFC in KO2A mice. Overall, the present results suggest that 5-HT2A receptors play a detrimental role in long-term memory deficits mediated by an excess 5-HT in PFC. PMID:25914158

  20. Clinical/pharmacological aspect of adenosine A2A receptor antagonist for dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Tomoyuki; Uchida, Shin-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine replacement therapy using the dopamine precursor, l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA), with a peripheral dopa decarboxylase inhibitor is the most effective treatment currently available for the symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the long-term use of dopaminergic therapies for PD is often limited by the development of motor response complications, such as dyskinesia. Adenosine A2A receptors are a promising nondopaminergic target for the treatment of PD. The treatment of motor response complications involves combinations of regular and controlled release L-DOPA, perhaps with the addition of a COMT inhibitor or the use of a longer-acting dopamine agonist. However, when dyskinesia is already established, the increase in dopaminergic load produced by the addition of a dopamine agonist can result in an increase in the severity and duration of dyskinesia. Currently, there are no well-tolerated antidyskinesia agents available. Amantadine, which may exert its effects through the inhibition of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, shows some effects on established dyskinesia. Dyskinesia has a negative impact on the quality of life of patients, sometimes being more disabling than PD itself. Although some patients prefer experiencing dyskinesia than being in the OFF state and unable to move, alternative, more effective therapies are still required for severe disabling dyskinesia to afford patients an improved quality of life while in the ON state. The mechanisms causing and maintaining the dyskinesia have not been clarified. The application of a nondopaminergic approach to modify the basal ganglial activity would be helpful to better understand and treat dyskinesia. The use of an adenosine A2A receptor may provide one such approach. In this literature review, we will summarize the current knowledge from both clinical and nonclinical studies on the effects of adenosine A2A receptor blockade on dyskinesia. PMID:25175964

  1. Qubit-induced phonon blockade as a signature of quantum behavior in nanomechanical resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yuxi; Miranowicz, Adam; Gao, Y. B.; Bajer, Jiri; Sun, C. P.; Nori, Franco

    2010-09-15

    The observation of quantized nanomechanical oscillations by detecting femtometer-scale displacements is a significant challenge for experimentalists. We propose that a phonon blockade can serve as a signature of quantum behavior in nanomechanical resonators. In analogy to the photon blockade and Coulomb blockade for electrons, the main idea for phonon blockade is that the second phonon cannot be excited when there is one phonon in the nonlinear oscillator. To realize phonon blockade, a superconducting quantum two-level system is coupled to the nanomechanical resonator and is used to induce the phonon self-interaction. Using Monte Carlo simulations, the dynamics of the induced nonlinear oscillator is studied via the Cahill-Glauber s-parametrized quasiprobability distributions. We show how the oscillation of the resonator can occur in the quantum regime and demonstrate how the phonon blockade can be observed with the currently accessible experimental parameters.

  2. 5-HT-1A receptor-mediated modulation of medullary expiratory neurones in the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Lalley, P M; Bischoff, A M; Richter, D W

    1994-01-01

    The involvement of the 5-HT-1A receptor in serotoninergic responses of stage 2 expiratory (E-2) neurones was investigated in pentobarbitone-anaesthetized, mechanically ventilated cats. The specific agonist of the 5-HT-1A receptor, 8-hydroxy-diproplaminotetralin (8-OH-DPAT), administered systemically or by ionophoresis directly on to the neurones, had a clear depressant effect. Administration of 8-OH-DPAT at doses of 10-50 micrograms kg-1 (I.V.) increased the membrane hyperpolarizations of E-2 neurones during the inspiratory and postinspiratory phases, and shortened their duration of activity in association with shortening of phrenic nerve activity. Discharges of E-2 neurones were also less intense. At doses of 50-90 micrograms kg-1, 8-OH-DPAT reduced or abolished inspiratory hyperpolarizations, and reduced expiratory depolarizations of membrane potential and discharge in parallel with inhibition of phrenic nerve discharges. The effects of the larger doses were reversed by I.V. injection of NAN-190, an antagonist at the 5-HT-1A receptor. Dose-dependent effects on the membrane potential and discharge of E-2 neurones, but not on phrenic nerve activity, were also seen by ionophoretic administration of 8-OH-DPAT on to E-2 neurones. At low currents, ejection of 8-OH-DPAT hyperpolarized the neurones without affecting the duration of inspiratory hyperpolarization and expiratory depolarization. This hyperpolarization depressed the intensity and the duration of expiratory discharges. Ejection with larger currents hyperpolarized the E-2 neurones further, and depressed expiratory depolarization leading to blockade of expiratory discharges. The effects on membrane potential were accompanied by decreased neuronal input resistance. This depressed the excitability of E-2 neurones as tested by discharge evoked by intracellular current injection. The amplitudes of action potentials decreased in parallel with the changes in input resistance. The effects were attributed to a

  3. Usefulness of galvanic skin reflex monitor in CT-guided thoracic sympathetic blockade for palmar hyperhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Uchino, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Seiichi; Miura, Hitoshi; Hirabayashi, Go; Nishiyama, Takahisa; Ohta, Takashi; Ishii, Nagao; Ito, Tatsushi

    2007-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT)-guided thoracic sympathetic blockade with ethanol was performed while monitoring sympathetic nerve activity, with an alternating current (AC) galvanic skin reflex (GSR) monitor, in a patient with palmar hyperhidrosis in whom endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy was impossible because of pleural adhesion. Sweating was suppressed after the thoracic sympathetic blockade, and the monitor showed a significant increase in skin resistance. The effect of sympathetic blockade could be evaluated directly and in real time using a GSR monitor. PMID:17680195

  4. Seismic attenuation in Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Bellini, J.J.; Bartolini, T.J.; Lord, K.M.; Smith, D.L. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Seismic signals recorded by the expanded distribution of earthquake seismograph stations throughout Florida and data from a comprehensive review of record archives from stations GAI contribute to an initial seismic attenuation model for the Florida Plateau. Based on calculations of surface particle velocity, a pattern of attenuation exists that appears to deviate from that established for the remainder of the southeastern US. Most values suggest greater seismic attenuation within the Florida Plateau. However, a separate pattern may exist for those signals arising from the Gulf of Mexico. These results have important implications for seismic hazard assessments in Florida and may be indicative of the unique lithospheric identity of the Florida basement as an exotic terrane.

  5. Radiofrequency attenuator and method

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Benjamin P.; McCleskey, T. Mark; Burrell, Anthony K.; Agrawal, Anoop; Hall, Simon B.

    2009-01-20

    Radiofrequency attenuator and method. The attenuator includes a pair of transparent windows. A chamber between the windows is filled with molten salt. Preferred molten salts include quarternary ammonium cations and fluorine-containing anions such as tetrafluoroborate (BF.sub.4.sup.-), hexafluorophosphate (PF.sub.6.sup.-), hexafluoroarsenate (AsF.sub.6.sup.-), trifluoromethylsulfonate (CF.sub.3SO.sub.3.sup.-), bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-), bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3CF.sub.2SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-) and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.3C.sup.-). Radicals or radical cations may be added to or electrochemically generated in the molten salt to enhance the RF attenuation.

  6. Radiofrequency attenuator and method

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Benjamin P.; McCleskey, T. Mark; Burrell, Anthony K.; Agrawal, Anoop; Hall, Simon B.

    2009-11-10

    Radiofrequency attenuator and method. The attenuator includes a pair of transparent windows. A chamber between the windows is filled with molten salt. Preferred molten salts include quarternary ammonium cations and fluorine-containing anions such as tetrafluoroborate (BF.sub.4.sup.-), hexafluorophosphate (PF.sub.6.sup.-), hexafluoroarsenate (AsF.sub.6.sup.-), trifluoromethylsulfonate (CF.sub.3SO.sub.3.sup.-), bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-), bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3CF.sub.2SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-) and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.3 C.sup.-). Radicals or radical cations may be added to or electrochemically generated in the molten salt to enhance the RF attenuation.

  7. Filtering single atoms from Rydberg-blockaded mesoscopic ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosyan, David; Rao, D. D. Bhaktavatsala; Mølmer, Klaus

    2015-04-01

    We propose an efficient method to filter out single atoms from trapped ensembles with unknown numbers of atoms. The method employs stimulated adiabatic passage to reversibly transfer a single atom to the Rydberg state which blocks subsequent Rydberg excitation of all the other atoms within the ensemble. This triggers the excitation of Rydberg-blockaded atoms to short-lived intermediate states and their subsequent decay to untrapped states. Using an auxiliary microwave field to carefully engineer the dissipation, we obtain a nearly deterministic single-atom source. Our method is applicable to small atomic ensembles in individual microtraps and in lattice arrays.

  8. GP IIb/IIIa Blockade During Peripheral Artery Interventions

    SciTech Connect

    Tepe, Gunnar Wiskirchen, Jakub; Pereira, Philippe; Claussen, Claus D.; Miller, Stephen; Duda, Stephan H.

    2008-01-15

    The activation of the platelet GP IIb/IIIa receptor is the final and common pathway in platelet aggregation. By blocking this receptor, platelet aggregation can be inhibited independently of the stimulus prompted the targeting of this receptor. Several years ago, three drugs have been approved for coronary artery indications. Since that time, there is increasing evidence that GP IIb/IIIa receptor blockade might have also an important role in peripheral arterial intervention. This article summarizes the action and differences of GP Ilb/IIIa receptor inhibitors and its possible indication in peripheral arteries.

  9. Antidepressant, Antipsychotic, and Hallucinogen Drugs for the Treatment of Psychiatric Disorders: A Convergence at the Serotonin-2A Receptor.

    PubMed

    Howland, Robert H

    2016-07-01

    Antidepressant, atypical antipsychotic, and hallucinogen drugs mediate their actions in part by interactions with the serotonin-2A (5HT2A) receptor. Serotonergic hallucinogen drugs, such as psilocybin, bind most potently as agonists at the 5HT2A receptor, producing profound changes in perception, mood, and cognition. Some of these drugs have been or are currently being investigated in small Phase 2 studies for depression, alcoholism, smoking cessation, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder. However, unlike the synergistic effects of combining antidepressant and atypical antipsychotic drugs, the potential therapeutic effects of hallucinogen drugs may be attenuated by the concurrent use of these medications because antidepressant and atypical antipsychotic drugs desensitize and/or down-regulate 5HT2A receptors. This finding has important implications for optimizing the potential therapeutic use of hallucinogen drugs in psychiatry. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 54(7), 21-24.]. PMID:27362381

  10. Assessment of Methods for the Intracellular Blockade of GABAA Receptors.

    PubMed

    Atherton, Laura A; Burnell, Erica S; Mellor, Jack R

    2016-01-01

    Selective blockade of inhibitory synaptic transmission onto specific neurons is a useful tool for dissecting the excitatory and inhibitory synaptic components of ongoing network activity. To achieve this, intracellular recording with a patch solution capable of blocking GABAA receptors has advantages over other manipulations, such as pharmacological application of GABAergic antagonists or optogenetic inhibition of populations of interneurones, in that the majority of inhibitory transmission is unaffected and hence the remaining network activity preserved. Here, we assess three previously described methods to block inhibition: intracellular application of the molecules picrotoxin, 4,4'-dinitro-stilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (DNDS) and 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (DIDS). DNDS and picrotoxin were both found to be ineffective at blocking evoked, monosynaptic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) onto mouse CA1 pyramidal cells. An intracellular solution containing DIDS and caesium fluoride, but lacking nucleotides ATP and GTP, was effective at decreasing the amplitude of IPSCs. However, this effect was found to be independent of DIDS, and the absence of intracellular nucleotides, and was instead due to the presence of fluoride ions in this intracellular solution, which also blocked spontaneously occurring IPSCs during hippocampal sharp waves. Critically, intracellular fluoride ions also caused a decrease in both spontaneous and evoked excitatory synaptic currents and precluded the inclusion of nucleotides in the intracellular solution. Therefore, of the methods tested, only fluoride ions were effective for intracellular blockade of IPSCs but this approach has additional cellular effects reducing its selectivity and utility. PMID:27501143

  11. OX40L blockade protects against inflammation-driven fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Elhai, Muriel; Avouac, Jérôme; Hoffmann-Vold, Anna Maria; Ruzehaji, Nadira; Amiar, Olivia; Ruiz, Barbara; Brahiti, Hassina; Ponsoye, Matthieu; Fréchet, Maxime; Burgevin, Anne; Pezet, Sonia; Sadoine, Jérémy; Guilbert, Thomas; Nicco, Carole; Akiba, Hisaya; Heissmeyer, Vigo; Subramaniam, Arun; Resnick, Robert; Molberg, Øyvind; Kahan, André; Chiocchia, Gilles; Allanore, Yannick

    2016-07-01

    Treatment for fibrosis represents a critical unmet need, because fibrosis is the leading cause of death in industrialized countries, and there is no effective therapy to counteract the fibrotic process. The development of fibrosis relates to the interplay between vessel injury, immune cell activation, and fibroblast stimulation, which can occur in various tissues. Immunotherapies have provided a breakthrough in the treatment of immune diseases. The glycoprotein OX40-OX40 ligand (OX40L) axis offers the advantage of a targeted approach to costimulatory signals with limited impact on the whole immune response. Using systemic sclerosis (SSc) as a prototypic disease, we report compelling evidence that blockade of OX40L is a promising strategy for the treatment of inflammation-driven fibrosis. OX40L is overexpressed in the fibrotic skin and serum of patients with SSc, particularly in patients with diffuse cutaneous forms. Soluble OX40L was identified as a promising serum biomarker to predict the worsening of lung and skin fibrosis, highlighting the role of this pathway in fibrosis. In vivo, OX40L blockade prevents inflammation-driven skin, lung, and vessel fibrosis and induces the regression of established dermal fibrosis in different complementary mouse models. OX40L exerts potent profibrotic effects by promoting the infiltration of inflammatory cells into lesional tissues and therefore the release of proinflammatory mediators, thereafter leading to fibroblast activation. PMID:27298374

  12. Effects of VLA-1 Blockade on Experimental Inflammation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Totsuka, Ryuichi; Kondo, Takaaki; Matsubara, Shigeki; Hirai, Midori; Kurebayashi, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    VLA-1 (very late antigen-1) is implicated in recruitment, retention and activation of leukocytes and its blockade has been referred as a potential target of new drug discovery to address unmet medical needs in inflammatory disease area. In the present study, we investigate the effects of an anti-murine CD49a (integrin α subunit of VLA-1) monoclonal antibody (Ha31/8) on various experimental models of inflammatory diseases in mice. Pretreatment with Ha31/8 at an intraperitoneal dose of 250 µg significantly (P<0.01) reduced arthritic symptoms and joint tissue damage in mice with type II collagen-induced arthritis. In addition, Ha31/8 at an intraperitoneal dose of 100 µg significantly (P<0.01) inhibited airway inflammatory cell infiltration induced by repeated exposure to cigarette smoke. In contrast, Ha31/8 failed to inhibit oxazolone-induced chronic dermatitis and OVA-induced airway hyperresponsiveness at an intraperitoneal dose of 100 µg. These results show that VLA-1 is involved, at least partly, in the pathogenesis of type II collagen-induced arthritis and cigarette smoke-induced airway inflammatory cell infiltration in mice, indicating the therapeutic potential of VLA-1 blockade against rheumatoid arthritis and chronic occlusive pulmonary disease. PMID:27578034

  13. [Recent Development of Therapies for Melanoma Using Immune Checkpoint Blockades].

    PubMed

    Okuyama, Ryuhei

    2016-06-01

    Melanoma is a highly immune tumor, and tumor-specific T lymphocytes are occasionally induced. Recent progress in tumor immunology has made it possible to clinically develop new medicines targeting immune checkpoint molecules, such as cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4(CTLA-4), programmed cell death 1(PD-1), and programmed cell death 1 ligand 1(PD-L1). CTLA-4 is expressed on naïve T cells and regulatory T cells. Ipilimumab, an anti-CTLA-4 antibody, shows a distinct durable clinical benefit by inhibiting the immunosuppressive function of CTLA-4. PD-1, which is expressed on activated T cells, inhibits T cell responses against tumor cells. The antibodies against PD-1, nivolumab and pembrolizumab, produce anti-tumor responses in melanoma and other cancers due to T cell reactivation. Furthermore, clinical trials of combination therapies using immune checkpoint blockades with molecularly targeted therapies and other chemotherapeutic agents are being conducted. However, immune checkpoint blockades frequently cause immune-related adverse events. Targeted therapies to immune checkpoint molecules are expected to be promising strategies for treatment of melanoma and other cancers. PMID:27306802

  14. PD-1 Checkpoint Blockade in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Alison; Whiteside, Theresa L.; Boyiadzis, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Immune checkpoints are regulatory pathways induced in activated T lymphocytes that regulate antigen responsiveness. These immune checkpoints are hijacked by tumors to promote dysfunction of anti-tumor effector cells and consequently of tumor escape from the host immune system. Areas covered PD1/PDL-1, a checkpoint pathway, has been extensively investigated in leukemia mouse models. Expression of PD-1 on the surface of activated immune cells and of its ligands, PD-L1 and PD-L2, on leukemic blasts has been documented. Clinical trials with PD-1 inhibitors in patients with hematological malignancies are ongoing with promising clinical responses. Expert Opinion Therapy of hematological cancers with antibodies blocking inhibitory receptors is expected to be highly clinically effective. Checkpoint inhibitory receptors and their ligands are co-expressed on hematopoietic cells found in the leukemic milieu. Several distinct immunological mechanisms are likely to be engaged by antibody-based checkpoint blockade. Co-expression of multiple inhibitory receptors on hematopoietic cells offers an opportunity for combining blocking antibodies to achieve more effective therapy. Up-regulation of receptor/ligand expression in the leukemic milieu may provide a blood marker predictive of response. Finally, chemotherapy-induced up-regulation of PD-1 on T cells after conventional leukemia therapy creates a solid rationale for application of checkpoint blockade as a follow-up therapy. PMID:26036819

  15. Evaluation of the safety of epinephrine in digital nerve blockade

    PubMed Central

    Chapeskie, Henry; Juliao, Alexis; Payne, Sonja; Koichopolos, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate the safety profile of lidocaine containing 1:200 000 to 1:100 000 epinephrine with concurrent tourniquet use in patients undergoing toe surgery. Design A retrospective case series analysis of toe procedures performed under digital blockade with adjuvant vasopressor from January 25, 2009, to May 31, 2014, was conducted. Exclusion criteria were limited to procedures performed without adjuvant vasopressor use. Setting A single clinic in Ontario. Participants A total of 1334 toe procedures performed in 937 patients. Main outcome measures The primary study outcome was the incidence of postoperative digital necrosis. Secondary outcomes included other postoperative complications including infection, reperfusion injury, persistent granulation, and damage to the nail matrix. Results In total, 1334 toe procedures were included in this study, of which 45 involved patients with a pre-existing diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. The overall incidence of postoperative complications was low (4.6%). No cases of digital ischemia or gangrenous necrosis were observed. Subgroup analysis of patients with and without diabetes showed no statistically significant difference in the rate of complications. Conclusion This study demonstrates the safety of adjuvant vasopressor use in digital nerve blockade of the toes within a large, diverse population. This study adds to a growing base of evidence on the safety of lidocaine with 1:200 000 to 1:100 000 epinephrine for digital anesthesia.

  16. Philosophical Intelligence: Letters, Print, and Experiment during Napoleon's Continental Blockade.

    PubMed

    Watts, Iain P

    2015-12-01

    This essay investigates scientific exchanges between Britain and France from 1806 to 1814, at the height of the Napoleonic Wars. It argues for a picture of scientific communication that sees letters and printed texts not as separate media worlds, but as interconnected bearers of time-critical information within a single system of intelligence gathering and experimental practice. During this period, Napoleon Bonaparte's Continental System blockade severed most links between Britain and continental Europe, yet scientific communications continued--particularly on electrochemistry, a subject of fierce rivalry between Britain and France. The essay traces these exchanges using the archive of a key go-between, the English man of science Sir Charles Blagden. The first two sections look at Blagden's letter-writing operation, reconstructing how he harnessed connections with neutral American diplomats, merchants, and the State to get scientific intelligence between London and Paris. The third section, following Blagden's words from Britain to France to America, looks at how information in letters cross-fertilized with information in print. The final section considers how letters and print were used together to solve the difficult practical problem of replicating experiments across the blockade. PMID:27024935

  17. Tritium Attenuation by Distillation

    SciTech Connect

    Wittman, N.E.

    2001-07-31

    The objective of this study was to determine how a 100 Area distillation system could be used to reduce to a satisfactory low value the tritium content of the dilute moderator produced in the 100 Area stills, and whether such a tritium attenuator would have sufficient capacity to process all this material before it is sent to the 400 Area for reprocessing.

  18. The Sphingolipid Receptor S1PR2 Is a Receptor for Nogo-A Repressing Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Arzt, Michael E.; Weinmann, Oliver; Obermair, Franz J.; Pernet, Vincent; Zagrebelsky, Marta; Delekate, Andrea; Iobbi, Cristina; Zemmar, Ajmal; Ristic, Zorica; Gullo, Miriam; Spies, Peter; Dodd, Dana; Gygax, Daniel; Korte, Martin; Schwab, Martin E.

    2014-01-01

    Nogo-A is a membrane protein of the central nervous system (CNS) restricting neurite growth and synaptic plasticity via two extracellular domains: Nogo-66 and Nogo-A-Δ20. Receptors transducing Nogo-A-Δ20 signaling remained elusive so far. Here we identify the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1PR2) as a Nogo-A-Δ20-specific receptor. Nogo-A-Δ20 binds S1PR2 on sites distinct from the pocket of the sphingolipid sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and signals via the G protein G13, the Rho GEF LARG, and RhoA. Deleting or blocking S1PR2 counteracts Nogo-A-Δ20- and myelin-mediated inhibition of neurite outgrowth and cell spreading. Blockade of S1PR2 strongly enhances long-term potentiation (LTP) in the hippocampus of wild-type but not Nogo-A−/− mice, indicating a repressor function of the Nogo-A/S1PR2 axis in synaptic plasticity. A similar increase in LTP was also observed in the motor cortex after S1PR2 blockade. We propose a novel signaling model in which a GPCR functions as a receptor for two structurally unrelated ligands, a membrane protein and a sphingolipid. Elucidating Nogo-A/S1PR2 signaling platforms will provide new insights into regulation of synaptic plasticity. PMID:24453941

  19. The 37kDa/67kDa Laminin Receptor acts as a receptor for Aβ42 internalization

    PubMed Central

    Da Costa Dias, Bianca; Jovanovic, Katarina; Gonsalves, Danielle; Moodley, Kiashanee; Reusch, Uwe; Knackmuss, Stefan; Weinberg, Marc S.; Little, Melvyn; Weiss, Stefan F. T.

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal loss is a major neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The associations between soluble Aβ oligomers and cellular components cause this neurotoxicity. The 37 kDa/67 kDa laminin receptor (LRP/LR) has recently been implicated in Aβ pathogenesis. In this study the mechanism underlying the pathological role of LRP/LR was elucidated. Försters Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) revealed that LRP/LR and Aβ form a biologically relevant interaction. The ability of LRP/LR to form stable associations with endogenously shed Aβ was confirmed by pull down assays and Aβ-ELISAs. Antibody blockade of this association significantly lowered Aβ42 induced apoptosis. Furthermore, antibody blockade and shRNA mediated downregulation of LRP/LR significantly hampered Aβ42 internalization. These results suggest that LRP/LR is a receptor for Aβ42 internalization, mediating its endocytosis and contributing to the cytotoxicity of the neuropeptide by facilitating intra-cellular Aβ42 accumulation. These findings recommend anti-LRP/LR specific antibodies and shRNAs as potential therapeutic tools for AD treatment. PMID:24990253

  20. eQTL and receptor pharmacology implicate Arg1 and the GABA-A receptor as therapeutic targets in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, Christopher S.; Quigley, David A.; Wong, Robyn A.; Chen, Justin; Cheng, Christine; Song, Young K.; Wei, Jun S.; Pawlikowska, Ludmila; Bao, Yun; Goldenberg, David D.; Nguyen, Kim; Gustafson, W. Clay; Rallapalli, Sundari K.; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Cook, James M.; Kozlov, Serguei; Mao, Jian-Hua; Van Dyke, Terry; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Khan, Javed; Balmain, Allan; Fan, QiWen; Weiss, William A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The development of targeted therapeutics for neuroblastoma, the third most common tumor in children, has been limited by a poor understanding of growth signaling mechanisms unique to the peripheral nerve precursors from which tumors arise. In this study, we combined genetics with gene expression analysis in the peripheral sympathetic nervous system to implicate arginase 1 and GABA signaling in tumor formation in vivo. In human neuroblastoma cells, either blockade of ARG1 or benzodiazepine-mediated activation of GABA-A receptors induced apoptosis and inhibited mitogenic signaling through AKT and MAPK. These results suggest that ARG1 and GABA influence both neural development and neuroblastoma, and that benzodiazepines in clinical use may have potential for neuroblastoma therapy. PMID:25437558

  1. Beta-adrenoceptor blockade and atrio-ventricular conduction in dogs. Role of intrinsic sympathomimetic activity.

    PubMed

    Giudicelli, J F; Lhoste, F

    1982-01-01

    1 Atrio-ventricular conduction and its modifications induced by six beta-adrenoceptor blocking agents and isoprenaline have been investigated in the anaesthetized dog using the extrastimulus technique and measuring atrial (AERP), nodal (NERP), global (GERP) effective refractory periods as well as global functional refractory period (GFRP). 2 When beta-adrenoceptor blockade was produced by (+/-)-propranolol (beta 1 + beta 2-adrenoceptor blockade) which is devoid of intrinsic sympathomimetic activity (ISA) but has membrane stabilizing effects (MSE), sotalol (beta 1 + beta 2-adrenoceptor blockade, no ISA, no MSE) and atenolol (beta 1-adrenoceptor blockade, no ISA, no MSE), all parameters were significantly increased. When beta-adrenoceptor blockade was achieved with pindolol (beta 1 + beta 2-adrenoceptor blockade) and practolol (beta 1-adrenoceptor blockade) which have ISA but no MSE, all parameters remained unchanged, as was also the case with (+)-propranolol, which has MSE but neither ISA nor beta-adrenolytic properties. 3 Isoprenaline at high doses significantly reduced the refractory periods but when infusion was stopped, marked but reversible conduction depression was observed. 4 It thus appears that beta-adrenoceptor blockade but not MSE is responsible for the onset of atrial and AV-conduction impairment and that ISA affords protection against this impairment. PMID:6125166

  2. Attenuating Staphylococcus aureus Virulence Gene Regulation: A Medicinal Chemistry Perspective

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Virulence gene expression in Staphylococcus aureus is tightly regulated by intricate networks of transcriptional regulators and two-component signal transduction systems. There is now an emerging body of evidence to suggest that the blockade of S. aureus virulence gene expression significantly attenuates infection in experimental models. In this Perspective, we will provide insights into medicinal chemistry strategies for the development of chemical reagents that have the capacity to inhibit staphylococcal virulence expression. These reagents can be broadly grouped into four categories: (1) competitive inhibitors of the accessory gene regulator (agr) quorum sensing system, (2) inhibitors of AgrA–DNA interactions, (3) RNAIII transcription inhibitors, and (4) inhibitors of the SarA family of transcriptional regulators. We discuss the potential of specific examples of antivirulence agents for the management and treatment of staphylococcal infections. PMID:23294220

  3. Direct or indirect stimulation of adenosine A2A receptors enhances bone regeneration as well as bone morphogenetic protein-2

    PubMed Central

    Mediero, Aránzazu; Wilder, Tuere; Perez-Aso, Miguel; Cronstein, Bruce N.

    2015-01-01

    Promoting bone regeneration and repair of bone defects is a need that has not been well met to date. We have previously found that adenosine, acting via A2A receptors (A2AR) promotes wound healing and inhibits inflammatory osteolysis and hypothesized that A2AR might be a novel target to promote bone regeneration. Therefore, we determined whether direct A2AR stimulation or increasing endogenous adenosine concentrations via purine transport blockade with dipyridamole regulates bone formation. We determined whether coverage of a 3 mm trephine defect in a mouse skull with a collagen scaffold soaked in saline, bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2; 200 ng), 1 μM CGS21680 (A2AR agonist, EC50 = 160 nM), or 1 μM dipyridamole (EC50 = 32 nM) promoted bone regeneration. Microcomputed tomography examination demonstrated that CGS21680 and dipyridamole markedly enhanced bone regeneration as well as BMP-2 8 wk after surgery (60 ± 2%, 79 ± 2%, and 75 ± 1% bone regeneration, respectively, vs. 32 ± 2% in control, P < 0.001). Blockade by a selective A2AR antagonist (ZM241385, 1 μM) or deletion of A2AR abrogated the effect of CGS21680 and dipyridamole on bone regeneration. Both CGS21680 and dipyridamole treatment increased alkaline phosphatase-positive osteoblasts and diminished tartrate resistance acid phosphatase-positive osteoclasts in the defects. In vivo imaging with a fluorescent dye for new bone formation revealed a strong fluorescent signal in treated animals that was equivalent to BMP-2. In conclusion, stimulation of A2AR by specific agonists or by increasing endogenous adenosine levels stimulates new bone formation as well as BMP-2 and represents a novel approach to stimulating bone regeneration.—Mediero, A., Wilder, T., Perez-Aso, M., Cronstein, B. N. Direct or indirect stimulation of adenosine A2A receptors enhances bone regeneration as well as bone morphogenetic protein-2. PMID:25573752

  4. A compact rotary vane attenuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, D. L.; Otosh, T. Y.; Stelzried, C. T.

    1969-01-01

    Rotary vane attenuator, when used as a front end attenuator, introduces an insertion loss that is proportional to the angle of rotation. New technique allows the construction of a shortened compact unit suitable for most installations.

  5. Impact of β-Adrenoceptor Blockade on Systemic Inflammation and Coagulation Disturbances in Rats with Acute Traumatic Coagulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lin; Yu, Wen-kui; Lin, Zhi-liang; Tan, Shan-jun; Bai, Xiao-wu; Ding, Kai; Li, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Background Sympathetic hyperactivity occurs early in acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC) and is closely related to its development. β-adrenoceptor antagonists are known to alleviate adverse sympathetic effects and improve outcome in various diseases. We investigated whether β-blockers have protective effects against inflammation and endothelial and hemostatic disorders in ATC. Material/Methods ATC was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by trauma and hemorrhagic shock. Rats were randomly assigned to the sham, ATCC (ATC control), and ATCB (ATC with beta-adrenoceptor blockade) groups. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with propranolol or vehicle at baseline. Heart rate variability (HRV) and markers of inflammation, coagulation, and endothelial activation were measured, and Western blotting analysis of nuclear factor (NF)-κB was done after shock. Separate ATCC and ATCB groups were observed to compare overall mortality. Results HRV showed enhanced sympathetic tone in the ATCC group, which was reversed by propranolol. Propranolol attenuated the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6, as well as fibrinolysis markers plasmin antiplasmin complex and tissue-type plasminogen activator. The increased serum syndecan-1 and soluble thrombomodulin were inhibited by propranolol, and the NF-κB expression was also decreased by propranolol pretreatment. But propranolol did not alter overall mortality in rats with ATC after shock. Conclusions Beta-adrenoceptor blockade can alleviate sympathetic hyperactivity and exert anti-inflammatory, anti-fibrinolysis, and endothelial protective effects, confirming its pivotal role in the pathogenesis of ATC. Its mechanism in ATC should be explored further. PMID:25676919

  6. Blockade of spinal glutamate recycling produces paradoxical antinociception in rats with orofacial inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kui Y; Mun, Jun H; Park, Ki D; Kim, Min J; Ju, Jin S; Kim, Seong T; Bae, Yong C; Ahn, Dong K

    2015-03-01

    In our current study, we investigated the role of spinal glutamate recycling in the development of orofacial inflammatory pain. DL-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartate (TBOA) or methionine sulfoximine (MSO) was administered intracisternally to block spinal glutamate transporter and glutamine synthetase activity in astroglia. Intracisternal administration of high dose TBOA (10 μg) produced thermal hyperalgesia in naïve rats but significantly attenuated the thermal hyperalgesia in rats that had been pretreated with interleukin (IL)-1β or Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA). In contrast, intracisternal injection of MSO produced anti-hyperalgesic effects against thermal stimuli in CFA-treated rats only. To confirm the paradoxical antinociceptive effects of TBOA and MSO, we examined changes in c-Fos expression in the medullary dorsal horn produced by thermal stimulation in naïve, IL-1β-, or CFA-treated rats, after intracisternal injections of TBOA and MSO. Intracisternal administration of TBOA significantly increased c-Fos immunoreactivity in naïve rats. In contrast, intracisternal administration of TBOA significantly decreased the up-regulation of c-Fos immunoreactivity in the medullary dorsal horn of IL-1β- and CFA-treated rats. However, intracisternal injection of MSO blocked the up-regulation of c-Fos immunoreactivity in CFA-treated rats only. We also investigated the effects of botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) on TBOA-induced paradoxical antinociception in CFA-treated rats, as BoNT-A inhibits the release of neurotransmitters, including glutamate. BoNT-A treatment reversed behavioral responses produced by intracisternal administration of TBOA in CFA-treated rats. These results suggest that the paradoxical responses produced by blocking glutamate transporters under inflammatory pain conditions are mediated by the modulation of glutamate release from presynaptic terminals. Moreover, blockade of glutamate reuptake could represent a new therapeutic target for the treatment of

  7. Blockade of chronic high glucose-induced endothelial apoptosis by Sasa borealis bamboo extract.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yean-Jung; Lim, Hyeon-Sook; Choi, Jung-Suk; Shin, Seung-Yong; Bae, Ji-Young; Kang, Sang-Wook; Kang, Il-Jun; Kang, Young-Hee

    2008-05-01

    Hyperglycemia is a causal factor in the development of diabetic vascular complications including impaired vascular smooth muscle contractility and increased cell proliferation. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of Sasa borealis water-extract (SBwE) on chronic hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVEC). HUVEC were cultured in 5.5 mM low glucose, 5.5 mM glucose plus 27.5 mM mannitol as an osmotic control, or 33 mM high glucose for 5 days in the absence and presence of 1-30 microg/ ml SBwE. Caspase-3 activation and Annexin V staining revealed chronic high glucose-induced endothelial apoptotic toxicity with a generation of oxidants detected by DCF-fluorescence, and these effects were reversed by SBwE at > or =1 microg/ml in a dose-dependent manner. Cytoprotective SBwE substantially reduced the sustained high glucose-induced expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and attenuated the formation of peroxynitrite radicals. The suppressive effects of SBwE were most likely mediated through blunting activation of PKC beta 2 and NADPH oxidase promoted by high glucose. In addition, this bamboo extract modulated the high glucose-triggered mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent upregulation of heat-shock proteins. Our results suggest that SBwE suppressed these detrimental effects caused by PKC-dependent peroxynitrite formation via activation of NADPH oxidase and induction of nitric oxide synthase and heat-shock protein family that may be essential mechanisms responsible for increased apoptotic oxidative stress in diabetic vascular complications. Moreover, the blockade of high glucose-elicited heat-shock protein induction appeared to be responsible for SBwE-alleviated endothelial apoptosis. Therefore, SBwE may be a therapeutic agent for the prevention and treatment of diabetic endothelial dysfunction and related complications. PMID:18375828

  8. AT1R blockade in adverse milieus: role of SMRT and corepressor complexes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Tejinder; Ayasolla, Kamesh; Rai, Partab; Chandel, Nirupama; Haque, Shabirul; Lederman, Rivka; Husain, Mohammad; Vethantham, Vasupradha; Chawla, Amrita; Vashistha, Himanshu; Saleem, Moin A; Ding, Guohua; Chander, Praveen N; Malhotra, Ashwani; Meggs, Leonard G; Singhal, Pravin C

    2015-08-01

    ANG II type 1 receptor blockade (AT1R-BLK) is used extensively to slow down the progression of proteinuric kidney diseases. We hypothesized that AT1R-BLK provides podocyte protection through regulation of silencing mediator of retinoic acid and thyroid hormone receptor (SMRT) and vitamin D receptor (VDR) expression under adverse milieus such as high glucose and human immunodeficiency virus infection. Both AT1R-BLK and VDR agonists (VDAs) stimulated VDR complex formation that differed not only in their composition but also in their functionality. AT1R-BLK-induced VDR complexes contained predominantly unliganded VDR, SMRT, and phosphorylated histone deacetylase 3, whereas VDA-VDR complexes were constituted by liganded VDR and CREB-binding protein/p300. AT1R-BLK-induced complexes attenuated podocyte acetyl-histone 3 levels as well as cytochrome P-450 family 24A1 expression, thus indicating their deacetylating and repressive properties. On the other hand, VDA-VDR complexes not only increased podocyte acetyl-histone 3 levels but also enhanced cytochrome P-450 family 24A1 expression, thus suggesting their acetylating and gene activation properties. AT1R-BLK- induced podocyte SMRT inhibited expression of the proapoptotic gene BAX through downregulation of Wip1 and phosphorylation of checkpoint kinase 2 in high-glucose milieu. Since SMRT-depleted podocytes lacked AT1R-BLK-mediated protection against DNA damage, it appears that SMRT is necessary for DNA repairs during AT1R-BLK. We conclude that AT1R-BLK provides podocyte protection in adverse milieus predominantly through SMRT expression and partly through unliganded VDR expression in 1,25(OH)2D-deficient states; on the other hand, AT1R-BLK contributes to liganded VDR expression in 1,25(OH)2D-sufficient states. PMID:26084932

  9. Blockade of the N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Glutamate Receptor Ameliorates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Renal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ho-Shiang; Ma, Ming-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activation in rat kidney reduces renal perfusion and ultrafiltration. Hypoperfusion-induced ischemia is the most frequent cause of functional insufficiency in the endotoxemic kidney. Here, we used non-hypotensive rat model of lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxemia to examine whether NMDA receptor hyperfunction contributes to acute kidney injury. Lipopolysaccharide-induced renal damage via increased enzymuria and hemodynamic impairments were ameliorated by co-treatment with the NMDA receptor blocker, MK-801. The NMDA receptor NR1 subunit in the rat kidney mainly co-localized with serine racemase, an enzyme responsible for synthesizing the NMDA receptor co-agonist, D-serine. The NMDA receptor hyperfunction in lipopolysaccharide-treated kidneys was demonstrated by NR1 and serine racemase upregulation, particularly in renal tubules, and by increased D-serine levels. Lipopolysaccharide also induced cell damage in cultured tubular cell lines and primary rat proximal tubular cells. This damage was mitigated by MK-801 and by small interfering RNA targeting NR1. Lipopolysaccharide increased cytokine release in tubular cell lines via toll-like receptor 4. The release of interleukin-1β from these cells are the most abundant. An interleukin-1 receptor antagonist not only attenuated cell death but also abolished lipopolysaccharide-induced NR1 and serine racemase upregulation and increases in D-serine secretion, suggesting that interleukin-1β-mediated NMDA receptor hyperfunction participates in lipopolysaccharide-induced tubular damage. The results of this study indicate NMDA receptor hyperfunction via cytokine effect participates in lipopolysaccharide-induced renal insufficiency. Blockade of NMDA receptors may represent a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of sepsis-associated renal failure. PMID:26133372

  10. Blockade of endogenous opioid neurotransmission enhances acquisition of conditioned fear in humans.

    PubMed

    Eippert, Falk; Bingel, Ulrike; Schoell, Eszter; Yacubian, Juliana; Büchel, Christian

    2008-05-21

    The endogenous opioid system is involved in fear learning in rodents, as opioid agonists attenuate and opioid antagonists facilitate the acquisition of conditioned fear. It has been suggested that an opioidergic signal, which is engaged through conditioning and acts inhibitory on unconditioned stimulus input, is the source of these effects. To clarify whether blockade of endogenous opioid neurotransmission enhances acquisition of conditioned fear in humans, and to elucidate the neural underpinnings of such an effect, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging in combination with behavioral recordings and a double-blind pharmacological intervention. All subjects underwent the same classical fear-conditioning paradigm, but subjects in the experimental group received the opioid antagonist naloxone before and during the experiment, in contrast to subjects in the control group, who received saline. Blocking endogenous opioid neurotransmission with naloxone led to more sustained responses to the unconditioned stimulus across trials, evident in both behavioral and blood oxygen level-dependent responses in pain responsive cortical regions. This effect was likely caused by naloxone blocking conditioned responses in a pain-inhibitory circuit involving opioid-rich areas such as the rostral anterior cingulate cortex, amygdala, and periaqueductal gray. Most importantly, naloxone enhanced the acquisition of fear on the behavioral level and changed the activation profile of the amygdala: whereas the control group showed rapidly decaying conditioned responses across trials, the naloxone group showed sustained conditioned responses in the amygdala. Together, these results demonstrate that in humans the endogenous opioid system has an inhibitory role in the acquisition of fear. PMID:18495880

  11. Targeted leptin receptor blockade: Role of VTA and NTS leptin receptors in body weight homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Matheny, M.; Strehler, K.Y.E.; King, M.; Tümer, N.; Scarpace, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation examined whether leptin stimulation of ventral tegmental area (VTA) or nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) has a role in body weight homeostasis independent of the medial basal hypothalamus (MBH). To this end, recombinant adeno-associated viral techniques were employed to target leptin overexpression or overexpression of a dominant negative leptin mutant (Leptin Antagonist). Leptin Antagonist overexpression in MBH or VTA increased food intake and body weight to similar extents over 14 days in rats. Simultaneous overexpression of leptin in VTA with antagonist in MBH resulted in food intake and body weight gain that were less than with control treatment but greater than with leptin alone in VTA. Notably, leptin overexpression in VTA increased P-STAT3 in MBH along with VTA, and Leptin Antagonist overexpression in the VTA partially attenuated P-STAT3 levels in MBH. Interestingly, leptin antagonist overexpression elevated body weight gain, but leptin overexpression in the NTS failed to modulate either food intake or body weight despite increased P-STAT3. These data suggest that leptin function in the VTA participates in the chronic regulation of food consumption and body weight in response to stimulation or blockade of VTA leptin receptors. Moreover, one component of VTA-leptin action appears to be independent of the MBH, and another component appears to be related to leptin receptor-mediated P-STAT3 activation in the MBH. Finally, leptin receptors in the NTS are necessary for normal energy homeostasis, but appear to have mostly a permissive role. Direct leptin activation of NTS slightly increases UCP1, but has little effect on food consumption or body weight. PMID:24920667

  12. Selective α1-adrenergic blockade disturbs the regional distribution of cerebral blood flow during static handgrip exercise.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Igor A; Mattos, João D; Campos, Monique O; Machado, Alessandro C; Rocha, Marcos P; Rocha, Natalia G; Vianna, Lauro C; Nobrega, Antonio C L

    2016-06-01

    Handgrip-induced increases in blood flow through the contralateral artery that supplies the cortical representation of the arm have been hypothesized as a consequence of neurovascular coupling and a resultant metabolic attenuation of sympathetic cerebral vasoconstriction. In contrast, sympathetic restraint, in theory, inhibits changes in perfusion of the cerebral ipsilateral blood vessels. To confirm whether sympathetic nerve activity modulates cerebral blood flow distribution during static handgrip (SHG) exercise, beat-to-beat contra- and ipsilateral internal carotid artery blood flow (ICA; Doppler) and mean arterial pressure (MAP; Finometer) were simultaneously assessed in nine healthy men (27 ± 5 yr), both at rest and during a 2-min SHG bout (30% maximal voluntary contraction), under two experimental conditions: 1) control and 2) α1-adrenergic receptor blockade. End-tidal carbon dioxide (rebreathing system) was clamped throughout the study. SHG induced increases in MAP (+31.4 ± 10.7 mmHg, P < 0.05) and contralateral ICA blood flow (+80.9 ± 62.5 ml/min, P < 0.05), while no changes were observed in the ipsilateral vessel (-9.8 ± 39.3 ml/min, P > 0.05). The reduction in ipsilateral ICA vascular conductance (VC) was greater compared with contralateral ICA (contralateral: -0.8 ± 0.8 vs. ipsilateral: -2.6 ± 1.3 ml·min(-1)·mmHg(-1), P < 0.05). Prazosin was effective to induce α1-blockade since phenylephrine-induced increases in MAP were greatly reduced (P < 0.05). Under α1-adrenergic receptor blockade, SHG evoked smaller MAP responses (+19.4 ± 9.2, P < 0.05) but similar increases in ICAs blood flow (contralateral: +58.4 ± 21.5 vs. ipsilateral: +54.3 ± 46.2 ml/min, P > 0.05) and decreases in VC (contralateral: -0.4 ± 0.7 vs. ipsilateral: -0.4 ± 1.0 ml·min(-1)·mmHg(-1), P > 0.05). These findings indicate a role of sympathetic nerve activity in the regulation of cerebral blood flow distribution during SHG. PMID:27016578

  13. Fluid dynamic bowtie attenuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczykutowicz, Timothy P.; Hermus, James

    2015-03-01

    Fluence field modulated CT allows for improvements in image quality and dose reduction. To date, only 1-D modulators have been proposed, the extension to 2-D modulation is difficult with solid-metal attenuation-based modulators. This work proposes to use liquids and gas to attenuate the x-ray beam which can be arrayed allowing for 2-D fluence modulation. The thickness of liquid and the pressure for a given path length of gas were determined that provided the same attenuation as 30 cm of soft tissue at 80, 100, 120, and 140 kV. Gaseous Xenon and liquid Iodine, Zinc Chloride, and Cerium Chloride were studied. Additionally, we performed some proof-of-concept experiments in which (1) a single cell of liquid was connected to a reservoir which allowed the liquid thickness to be modulated and (2) a 96 cell array was constructed in which the liquid thickness in each cell was adjusted manually. Liquid thickness varied as a function of kV and chemical composition, with Zinc Chloride allowing for the smallest thickness; 1.8, 2.25, 3, and 3.6 cm compensated for 30 cm of soft tissue at 80, 100, 120, and 140 kV respectively. The 96 cell Iodine attenuator allowed for a reduction in both dynamic range to the detector and scatter to primary ratio. Successful modulation of a single cell was performed at 0, 90, and 130 degrees using a simple piston/actuator. The thickness of liquids and the Xenon gas pressure seem logistically implementable within the constraints of CBCT and diagnostic CT systems.

  14. Diminished trkA receptor signaling reveals cholinergic-attentional vulnerability of aging

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Vinay; Howe, William M.; Welchko, Ryan M.; Naughton, Sean X.; D'Amore, Drew E.; Han, Daniel H.; Deo, Monika; Turner, David L.; Sarter, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The cellular mechanisms underlying the exceptional vulnerability of the basal forebrain (BF) cholinergic neurons during pathological aging have remained elusive. Here we employed an adeno-associated viral vector-based RNA interference (AAV-RNAi) strategy to suppress the expression of trkA receptors by cholinergic neurons in the nucleus basalis of Meynert/ substantia innominata (nMB/SI) of adult and aged rats. Suppression of trkA receptor expression impaired attentional performance selectively in aged rats. Performance correlated with trkA levels in the nMB/SI. TrkA knockdown neither affected nMB/SI cholinergic cell counts nor the decrease in cholinergic cell size observed in aged rats. However, trkA suppression augmented an age-related decrease in the density of cortical cholinergic processes and attenuated the capacity of cholinergic neurons to release ACh. The capacity of cortical synapses to release acetylcholine (ACh) in vivo was also lower in aged/trkA-AAV-infused rats than in aged or young controls, and it correlated with their attentional performance. Furthermore, age-related increases in cortical proNGF and p75 receptor levels interacted with the vector-induced loss of trkA receptors to shift NGF signaling toward p75-mediated suppression of the cholinergic phenotype, thereby attenuating cholinergic function and impairing attentional performance. These effects model the abnormal trophic regulation of cholinergic neurons and cognitive impairments in patients with early Alzheimer's disease. This rat model is useful for identifying the mechanisms rendering aging cholinergic neurons vulnerable as well as for studying the neuropathological mechanisms that are triggered by disrupted trophic signaling. PMID:23228124

  15. Downhole pressure attenuation apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Ricles, T.D.; Barton, J.A.

    1992-02-18

    This patent describes a process for preventing damage to tool strings and other downhole equipment in a well caused by pressures produced during detonation of one or more downhole explosive devices. It comprises adding to a tool string at least one pressure attenuating apparatus for attenuating the peak pressure wave and quasi-static pressure pulse produced by the explosive devices, the pressure attenuating apparatus including an initially closed relief vent including tubing means supporting a plurality of charge port assemblies each including an explosive filled shaped charge and a prestressed disc, the shaped charges interconnected by a detonating cord, the amount of explosive in each shaped charge being sufficient to rupture its associated disc without damaging surrounding tubular bodies in the well, and a vent chamber defined by the tubing means and providing a liquid free volume, and opening the relief vent substantially contemporaneously with downhole explosive device detonation by detonating the shaped charges to rupture the discs of the charge port assemblies.

  16. Effects of Long-term Blockade of Vasopressin Receptor Types 1a and 2 on Cardiac and Renal Damage in a Rat Model of Hypertensive Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Tomoyuki; Iwanaga, Yoshitaka; Watanabe, Heitaro; Morooka, Hanako; Akahoshi, Yasumitsu; Fujiki, Hiroyuki; Miyazaki, Shunichi

    2015-11-01

    The effects of chronic blockade of vasopressin type 1a receptors (V1aR) and the additive effects of a type 2 receptor (V2R) antagonist on the treatment of hypertension-induced heart failure and renal injury remain to be unknown. In this study, Dahl salt-sensitive hypertensive rats were chronically treated with a vehicle (CONT), a V1aR antagonist (OPC21268; OPC), a V2R antagonist (tolvaptan; TOLV), or a combination of OPC21268 and tolvaptan (OPC/TOLV) from the pre-hypertrophic stage (6 weeks). No treatment altered blood pressure during the study. Significant improvements were seen in median survival for the OPC and TOLV, and the OPC/TOLV showed a further improvement in Kaplan-Meier analysis. Echocardiography showed suppressed left ventricular hypertrophy in the OPC and OPC/TOLV at 11 weeks with improved function in all treatment groups by 17 weeks. In all treatment groups, improvements were seen in the following: myocardial histological changes, creatinine clearance, urinary albumin excretion, and renal histopathologic damage. Also, key mRNA levels were suppressed (eg, endothelin-1 and collagen). In conclusion, chronic V1aR blockade ameliorated disease progression in this rat model, with additive benefits from the combination of V1aR and V2R antagonists. It was associated with protection of both myocardial and renal damage, independent of blood pressure. PMID:26248278

  17. Ultra-high-ohmic microstripline resistors for Coulomb blockade devices.

    PubMed

    Lotkhov, Sergey V

    2013-06-14

    In this paper, we report on the fabrication and low-temperature characterization of ultra-high-ohmic microstripline resistors made of a thin film of weakly oxidized titanium. Nearly linear voltage-current characteristics were measured at temperatures down to T ~ 20 mK for films with sheet resistivities as high as ~7 kΩ, i.e. about an order of magnitude higher than our previous findings for weakly oxidized Cr. Our analysis indicates that such an improvement can help to create an advantageous high-impedance environment for different Coulomb blockade devices. Further properties of the Ti film addressed in this work show the promise of low-noise behavior of the resistors when applied in different realizations of the quantum standard of current. PMID:23670293

  18. Entanglement of Two Individual Neutral Atoms Using Rydberg Blockade

    SciTech Connect

    Wilk, T.; Gaeetan, A.; Evellin, C.; Wolters, J.; Miroshnychenko, Y.; Grangier, P.; Browaeys, A.

    2010-01-08

    We report the generation of entanglement between two individual {sup 87}Rb atoms in hyperfine ground states |F=1,M=1> and |F=2,M=2> which are held in two optical tweezers separated by 4 {mu}m. Our scheme relies on the Rydberg blockade effect which prevents the simultaneous excitation of the two atoms to a Rydberg state. The entangled state is generated in about 200 ns using pulsed two-photon excitation. We quantify the entanglement by applying global Raman rotations on both atoms. We measure that 61% of the initial pairs of atoms are still present at the end of the entangling sequence. These pairs are in the target entangled state with a fidelity of 0.75.

  19. Photoalteration of calcium channel blockade in the cardiac Purkinje fiber.

    PubMed

    Sanguinetti, M C; Kass, R S

    1984-05-01

    Organic compounds that block calcium channel current (calcium antagonists) are important tools for the characterization of this channel. However, the practically irreversible nature of this block restricts the usefulness of this group of drugs. In this paper, we investigate the influence of light on calcium channel blockade by several organic compounds. Our results show that inhibition of calcium channel current by two dihydropyridine derivatives that contain an o-nitro moiety (nisoldipine and nifedipine) can be rapidly reversed by illumination. The energy range important to this reaction is for light wavelengths between 320 and 450 nm. Calcium channel inhibition by two other dihydropyridine derivatives (nicardipine and nitrendipine) as well as by D600, is not modulated by illumination. These results indicate that the photosensitivity of certain dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers make these compounds useful as reversible blockers of this channel. PMID:6329345

  20. Single-Photon Switch Based on Rydberg Blockade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baur, Simon; Tiarks, Daniel; Rempe, Gerhard; Duerr, Stephan

    2015-05-01

    All-optical switching is a technique in which a gate light pulse changes the transmission of a target light pulse without the detour via electronic signal processing. We take this to the quantum regime, where the incoming gate light pulse contains only one photon on average. The gate pulse is stored as a Rydberg excitation in an ultracold atomic gas using electromagnetically induced transparency. Rydberg blockade suppresses the transmission of the subsequent target pulse. Finally, the stored gate photon can be retrieved. A retrieved photon heralds successful storage. The corresponding postselected subensemble shows a relative transmission of 0.05. The single-photon switch offers many interesting perspectives ranging from quantum communication to quantum information processing.

  1. Sustained Neuromuscular Blockade after Vecuronium Use in a Premature Infant

    PubMed Central

    Sahni, Mitali; Richardson, C. Joan; Jain, Sunil K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Prolonged use of neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBAs) is very common in critically ill children both in pediatric and neonatal intensive care units. There are no guidelines available for use of NMBAs in children or neonates in the US, and the data for their safety in this age group is limited. Case Description Our case describes prolonged neuromuscular blockade following concurrent use of a NMBA along with aminoglycosides and steroids in the setting of renal failure in a premature infant. Conclusion Prolonged use of NMBAs in preterm infants should be avoided if possible or should be restricted to the shortest possible duration and the smallest possible physiologically effective dose. Concurrent use of NMBAs with aminoglycoside and steroids should be avoided, especially in the setting of renal failure. PMID:26495168

  2. Costimulation Blockade in Autoimmunity and Transplantation: The CD28 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Adams, Andrew B; Ford, Mandy L; Larsen, Christian P

    2016-09-15

    T cell activation is a complex process that requires multiple cell signaling pathways, including a primary recognition signal and additional costimulatory signals. TCR signaling in the absence of costimulatory signals can lead to an abortive attempt at activation and subsequent anergy. One of the best-characterized costimulatory pathways includes the Ig superfamily members CD28 and CTLA-4 and their ligands CD80 and CD86. The development of the fusion protein CTLA-4-Ig as an experimental and subsequent therapeutic tool is one of the major success stories in modern immunology. Abatacept and belatacept are clinically approved agents for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and renal transplantation, respectively. Future interventions may include selective CD28 blockade to block the costimulatory potential of CD28 while exploiting the coinhibitory effects of CTLA-4. PMID:27591335

  3. Cavity polaritons with Rydberg blockade and long-range interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litinskaya, Marina; Tignone, Edoardo; Pupillo, Guido

    2016-08-01

    We study interactions between polaritons, arising when photons strongly couple to collective excitations in an array of two-level atoms trapped in an optical lattice inside a cavity. We consider two types of interactions between atoms: dipolar forces and atomic saturability, which range from hard-core repulsion to Rydberg blockade. We show that, in spite of the underlying repulsion in the subsystem of atomic excitations, saturability induces a broadband bunching of photons for two-polariton scattering states. We interpret this bunching as a result of interference, and trace it back to the mismatch of the quantization volumes for atomic excitations and photons. We also examine bound bipolaritonic states: these include states created by dipolar forces, as well as a gap bipolariton, which forms solely due to saturability effects in the atomic transition. Both types of bound states exhibit strong bunching in the photonic component. We discuss the dependence of bunching on experimentally relevant parameters.

  4. Investigation of uncertainty components in Coulomb blockade thermometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hahtela, O. M.; Heinonen, M.; Manninen, A.; Meschke, M.; Savin, A.; Pekola, J. P.; Gunnarsson, D.; Prunnila, M.; Penttilä, J. S.; Roschier, L.

    2013-09-11

    Coulomb blockade thermometry (CBT) has proven to be a feasible method for primary thermometry in every day laboratory use at cryogenic temperatures from ca. 10 mK to a few tens of kelvins. The operation of CBT is based on single electron charging effects in normal metal tunnel junctions. In this paper, we discuss the typical error sources and uncertainty components that limit the present absolute accuracy of the CBT measurements to the level of about 1 % in the optimum temperature range. Identifying the influence of different uncertainty sources is a good starting point for improving the measurement accuracy to the level that would allow the CBT to be more widely used in high-precision low temperature metrological applications and for realizing thermodynamic temperature in accordance to the upcoming new definition of kelvin.

  5. Anisotropic Pauli spin blockade in hole quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauns, Matthias; Ridderbos, Joost; Li, Ang; Bakkers, Erik P. A. M.; van der Wiel, Wilfred G.; Zwanenburg, Floris A.

    2016-07-01

    We present measurements on gate-defined double quantum dots in Ge-Si core-shell nanowires, which we tune to a regime with visible shell filling in both dots. We observe a Pauli spin blockade and can assign the measured leakage current at low magnetic fields to spin-flip cotunneling, for which we measure a strong anisotropy related to an anisotropic g factor. At higher magnetic fields we see signatures for leakage current caused by spin-orbit coupling between (1,1) singlet and (2,0) triplet states. Taking into account these anisotropic spin-flip mechanisms, we can choose the magnetic field direction with the longest spin lifetime for improved spin-orbit qubits.

  6. Coulomb blockade in low-mobility nanometer size Si MOSFET's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanquer, M.; Specht, M.; Ghenim, L.; Deleonibus, S.; Guegan, G.

    2000-03-01

    We investigate coherent transport in Si metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors with nominal gate lengths 50-100 nm and various widths at very low temperature. Independent of the geometry, localized states appear when G~=e2/h and transport is dominated by resonant tunnelling through a single quantum dot formed by an impurity potential. We find that the typical size of the relevant impurity quantum dot is comparable to the channel length and that the periodicity of the observed Coulomb blockade oscillations is roughly inversely proportional to the channel length. The spectrum of resonances and the nonlinear I-V curves allow us to measure the charging energy and the mean level energy spacing for electrons in the localized state. Furthermore, we find that in the dielectric regime the variance var(lng) of the logarithmic conductance lng is proportional to its average value consistent with one-electron scaling models.

  7. Edge-state blockade of transport in quantum dot arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benito, Mónica; Niklas, Michael; Platero, Gloria; Kohler, Sigmund

    2016-03-01

    We propose a transport blockade mechanism in quantum dot arrays and conducting molecules based on an interplay of Coulomb repulsion and the formation of edge states. As a model we employ a dimer chain that exhibits a topological phase transition. The connection to a strongly biased electron source and drain enables transport. We show that the related emergence of edge states is manifest in the shot noise properties as it is accompanied by a crossover from bunched electron transport to a Poissonian process. For both regions we develop a scenario that can be captured by a rate equation. The resulting analytical expressions for the Fano factor agree well with the numerical solution of a full quantum master equation.

  8. Autonomic blockade improves insulin sensitivity in obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Gamboa, Alfredo; Okamoto, Luis E; Arnold, Amy C; Figueroa, Rocio A; Diedrich, André; Raj, Satish R; Paranjape, Sachin Y; Farley, Ginnie; Abumrad, Naji; Biaggioni, Italo

    2014-10-01

    Obesity is an important risk factor for the development of insulin resistance. Initial compensatory mechanisms include an increase in insulin levels, which are thought to induce sympathetic activation in an attempt to restore energy balance. We have previously shown, however, that sympathetic activity has no beneficial effect on resting energy expenditure in obesity. On the contrary, we hypothesize that sympathetic activation contributes to insulin resistance. To test this hypothesis, we determined insulin sensitivity using a standard hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp protocol in obese subjects randomly assigned in a crossover design 1 month apart to receive saline (intact day) or trimetaphan (4 mg/min IV, autonomic blocked day). Whole-body glucose uptake (MBW in mg/kg per minute) was used as index of maximal muscle glucose use. During autonomic blockade, we clamped blood pressure with a concomitant titrated intravenous infusion of the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N-monomethyl-L-arginine. Of the 21 obese subjects (43±2 years; 35±2 kg/m(2) body mass index) studied, 14 were insulin resistant; they were more obese, had higher plasma glucose and insulin, and had higher muscle sympathetic nerve activity (23.3±1.5 versus 17.2±2.1 burst/min; P=0.03) when compared with insulin-sensitive subjects. Glucose use improved during autonomic blockade in insulin-resistant subjects (MBW 3.8±0.3 blocked versus 3.1±0.3 mg/kg per minute intact; P=0.025), with no effect in the insulin-sensitive group. These findings support the concept that sympathetic activation contributes to insulin resistance in obesity and may result in a feedback loop whereby the compensatory increase in insulin levels contributes to greater sympathetic activation. PMID:25001269

  9. Assessment of Methods for the Intracellular Blockade of GABAA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Atherton, Laura A.; Burnell, Erica S.; Mellor, Jack R.

    2016-01-01

    Selective blockade of inhibitory synaptic transmission onto specific neurons is a useful tool for dissecting the excitatory and inhibitory synaptic components of ongoing network activity. To achieve this, intracellular recording with a patch solution capable of blocking GABAA receptors has advantages over other manipulations, such as pharmacological application of GABAergic antagonists or optogenetic inhibition of populations of interneurones, in that the majority of inhibitory transmission is unaffected and hence the remaining network activity preserved. Here, we assess three previously described methods to block inhibition: intracellular application of the molecules picrotoxin, 4,4’-dinitro-stilbene-2,2’-disulphonic acid (DNDS) and 4,4’-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2’-disulphonic acid (DIDS). DNDS and picrotoxin were both found to be ineffective at blocking evoked, monosynaptic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) onto mouse CA1 pyramidal cells. An intracellular solution containing DIDS and caesium fluoride, but lacking nucleotides ATP and GTP, was effective at decreasing the amplitude of IPSCs. However, this effect was found to be independent of DIDS, and the absence of intracellular nucleotides, and was instead due to the presence of fluoride ions in this intracellular solution, which also blocked spontaneously occurring IPSCs during hippocampal sharp waves. Critically, intracellular fluoride ions also caused a decrease in both spontaneous and evoked excitatory synaptic currents and precluded the inclusion of nucleotides in the intracellular solution. Therefore, of the methods tested, only fluoride ions were effective for intracellular blockade of IPSCs but this approach has additional cellular effects reducing its selectivity and utility. PMID:27501143

  10. Blockade of tolerance to morphine analgesia by cocaine.

    PubMed

    Misra, A L; Pontani, R B; Vadlamani, N L

    1989-07-01

    Tolerance to morphine analgesia was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by s.c. implantation of a morphine base pellet (75 mg) on the first and second day and determining the magnitude of tolerance 72 h after the first implant by s.c. injection of a test dose of morphine (5 mg/kg). Implantation of a cocaine hydrochloride pellet (25 mg), concurrently with morphine pellets or of a cocaine hydrochloride (50 mg) pellet after the development of tolerance, blocked both the development and expression of morphine analgesic tolerance. In morphine-pelleted animals pretreatment for 3 days with desipramine or zimelidine or phenoxybenzamine but not haloperidol produced no significant morphine tolerance. Pretreatment with a combination of desipramine and zimelidine, however, was as effective as cocaine in blocking morphine tolerance. Alpha-Methyl-p-tyrosine methyl ester counteracted the effect of cocaine in blocking morphine tolerance and potentiated the tolerance development. Blockade of morphine tolerance by cocaine was reinforced and facilitated by pretreatment with fenfluramine or p-chlorophenylalanine ethyl ester and to a lesser extent by clonidine and haloperidol. Acute administration of fenfluramine or zimelidine or a combination of desipramine and zimelidine or alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine methyl ester or p-chlorophenylalanine ethyl ester did not significantly affect morphine analgesia. The study suggests an important role of the concomitant depletion of both central noradrenaline and serotonin in the blockade of morphine tolerance by cocaine and stresses the importance of the counter-balancing functional relationship between these two neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. PMID:2780065

  11. Flexible graphene based microwave attenuators.

    PubMed

    Byun, Kisik; Ju Park, Yong; Ahn, Jong-Hyun; Min, Byung-Wook

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate flexible 3 dB and 6 dB microwave attenuators using multilayer graphene grown by the chemical vapor deposition method. On the basis of the characterized results of multilayer graphene and graphene-Au ohmic contacts, the graphene attenuators are designed and measured. The flexible graphene-based attenuators have 3 dB and 6 dB attenuation with a return loss of less than -15 dB at higher than 5 GHz. The devices have shown durability in a bending cycling test of 100 times. The circuit model of the attenuator based on the characterized results matches the experimental results well. PMID:25590144

  12. Control algorithms for dynamic attenuators

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Scott S.; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The authors describe algorithms to control dynamic attenuators in CT and compare their performance using simulated scans. Dynamic attenuators are prepatient beam shaping filters that modulate the distribution of x-ray fluence incident on the patient on a view-by-view basis. These attenuators can reduce dose while improving key image quality metrics such as peak or mean variance. In each view, the attenuator presents several degrees of freedom which may be individually adjusted. The total number of degrees of freedom across all views is very large, making many optimization techniques impractical. The authors develop a theory for optimally controlling these attenuators. Special attention is paid to a theoretically perfect attenuator which controls the fluence for each ray individually, but the authors also investigate and compare three other, practical attenuator designs which have been previously proposed: the piecewise-linear attenuator, the translating attenuator, and the double wedge attenuator. Methods: The authors pose and solve the optimization problems of minimizing the mean and peak variance subject to a fixed dose limit. For a perfect attenuator and mean variance minimization, this problem can be solved in simple, closed form. For other attenuator designs, the problem can be decomposed into separate problems for each view to greatly reduce the computational complexity. Peak variance minimization can be approximately solved using iterated, weighted mean variance (WMV) minimization. Also, the authors develop heuristics for the perfect and piecewise-linear attenuators which do not requirea priori knowledge of the patient anatomy. The authors compare these control algorithms on different types of dynamic attenuators using simulated raw data from forward projected DICOM files of a thorax and an abdomen. Results: The translating and double wedge attenuators reduce dose by an average of 30% relative to current techniques (bowtie filter with tube current

  13. Ultrasonic attenuation in pearlitic steel.

    PubMed

    Du, Hualong; Turner, Joseph A

    2014-03-01

    Expressions for the attenuation coefficients of longitudinal and transverse ultrasonic waves are developed for steel with pearlitic microstructure. This type of lamellar duplex microstructure influences attenuation because of the lamellar spacing. In addition, longitudinal attenuation measurements were conducted using an unfocused transducer with 10 MHz central frequency on the cross section of a quenched railroad wheel sample. The dependence of longitudinal attenuation on the pearlite microstructure is observed from the changes of longitudinal attenuation from the quenched tread surface to deeper locations. The results show that the attenuation value is lowest and relatively constant within the quench depth, then increases linearly. The experimental results demonstrate a reasonable agreement with results from the theoretical model. Ultrasonic attenuation provides an important non-destructive method to evaluate duplex microstructure within grains which can be implemented for quality control in conjunction with other manufacturing processes. PMID:24268679

  14. The Role of The A2A Receptor in Cell Apoptosis Caused by MDMA

    PubMed Central

    Soleimani, Mansooreh; Katebi, Majid; Alizadeh, Akram; Mohammadzadeh, Farzaneh; Mehdizadeh, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Ecstasy, also known as 3, 4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), is a psychoactive recreational hallucinogenic substance and a major worldwide recreational drug. There are neurotoxic effects observed in laboratory animals and humans following MDMA use. MDMA causes apoptosis in neurons of the central nervous system (CNS). Withdrawal signs are attenuated by treatment with the adenosine receptor (A2A receptor). This study reports the effects of glutamyl cysteine synthetase (GCS), as an A2A receptor agonist, and succinylcholine (SCH), as an A2A receptor antagonist, on Sprague Dawley rats, both in the presence and absence of MDMA. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, we used seven groups of Sprague Dawley rats (200-250 g each). Each group was treated with daily intraperitoneal (IP) injections for a period of one week, as follows: i. MDMA (10 mg/kg); ii. GCS (0.3 mg/kg); iii. SCH (0.3 mg/kg); iv. GCS + SCH (0.3 mg/kg each); v. MDMA (10 mg/kg) + GCS (0.3 mg/kg); vi. MDMA (10 mg/kg) + SCH (0.3 mg/kg); and vi. normal saline (1 cc/kg) as the sham group. Bax (apoptotic protein) and Bcl-2 (anti-apoptotic protein) expressions were evaluated by striatum using RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Results: There was a significant increase in Bax protein expression in the MDMA+SCH group and a significant decrease in Bcl-2 protein expression in the MDMA+SCH group (p<0.05). Conclusion: A2A receptors have a role in the apoptotic effects of MDMA via the Bax and Bcl-2 pathways. An agonist of this receptor (GCS) decreases the cytotoxcity of MDMA, while the antagonist of this receptor (SCH) increases its cytotoxcity. PMID:23508639

  15. Chloride dysregulation and inhibitory receptor blockade yield equivalent disinhibition of spinal neurons yet are differentially reversed by carbonic anhydrase blockade.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwan Yeop; Prescott, Steven A

    2015-12-01

    Synaptic inhibition plays a key role in processing somatosensory information. Blocking inhibition at the spinal level is sufficient to produce mechanical allodynia, and many neuropathic pain conditions are associated with reduced inhibition. Disinhibition of spinal neurons can arise through decreased GABAA/glycine receptor activation or through dysregulation of intracellular chloride. We hypothesized that these distinct disinhibitory mechanisms, despite all causing allodynia, are differentially susceptible to therapeutic intervention. Specifically, we predicted that reducing bicarbonate efflux by blocking carbonic anhydrase with acetazolamide (ACTZ) would counteract disinhibition caused by chloride dysregulation without affecting normal inhibition or disinhibition caused by GABAA/glycine receptor blockade. To test this, responses to innocuous tactile stimulation were recorded in vivo from rat superficial dorsal horn neurons before and after different forms of pharmacological disinhibition and again after application of ACTZ. Blocking GABAA or glycine receptors caused hyperresponsiveness equivalent to that caused by blocking the potassium chloride cotransporter KCC2, but, consistent with our predictions, only disinhibition caused by KCC2 blockade was counteracted by ACTZ. ACTZ did not alter responses of neurons with intact inhibition. As pathological downregulation of KCC2 is triggered by brain-derived neurotrophic factor, we also confirmed that ACTZ was effective against brain-derived neurotrophic factor-induced hyperresponsiveness. Our results argue that intrathecal ACTZ has antiallodynic effects only if allodynia arises through chloride dysregulation; therefore, behavioral evidence that ACTZ is antiallodynic in nerve-injured animals affirms the contribution of chloride dysregulation as a key pathological mechanism. Although different disinhibitory mechanisms are not mutually exclusive, these results demonstrate that their relative contribution dictates which

  16. Identification of ginsenoside interaction sites in 5-HT3A receptors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Hwan; Lee, Jun-Ho; Lee, Sang-Mok; Jeong, Sang Min; Yoon, In-Soo; Lee, Joon-Hee; Choi, Sun-Hye; Pyo, Mi Kyung; Rhim, Hyewhon; Kim, Hyoung-Chun; Jang, Choon-Gon; Lee, Byoung-Cheol; Park, Chul-Seung; Nah, Seung-Yeol

    2007-03-01

    We previously demonstrated that 20(S)-ginsenoside Rg(3) (Rg(3)), one of the active components of Panax ginseng, non-competitively inhibits 5-HT(3A) receptor channel activity on extracellular side of the cell. Here, we sought to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying Rg(3)-induced 5-HT(3A) receptor regulation. We used the two-microelectrode voltage-clamp technique to investigate the effect of Rg(3) on 5-HT-mediated ion currents (I(5-HT)) in Xenopus oocytes expressing wild-type or 5-HT(3A) receptors harboring mutations in the gating pore region of transmembrane domain 2 (TM2). In oocytes expressing wild-type 5-HT(3A) receptors, Rg(3) dose-dependently inhibited peak I(5-HT) with an IC(50) of 27.6+/-4.3microM. Mutations V291A, F292A, and I295A in TM2 greatly attenuated or abolished the Rg(3)-induced inhibition of peak I(5-HT). Mutation V291A but not F292A and I295A induced constitutively active ion currents with decrease of current decay rate. Rg(3) accelerated the rate of current decay with dose-dependent manner in the presence of 5-HT. Rg(3) and TMB-8, an open channel blocker, dose-dependently inhibited constitutively active ion currents. The IC(50) values of constitutively active ion currents in V291A mutant receptor were 72.4+/-23.1 and 6.5+/-0.7microM for Rg(3) and TMB-8, respectively. Diltiazem did not prevent Rg(3)-induced inhibition of constitutively active ion currents in occlusion experiments. These results indicate that Rg(3) inhibits 5-HT(3A) receptor channel activity through interactions with residues V291, F292, and I295 in the channel gating region of TM2 and further demonstrate that Rg(3) regulates 5-HT(3A) receptor channel activity in the open state at different site(s) from those of TMB-8 and diltiazem. PMID:17257631

  17. Digitally Controlled Beam Attenuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peppler, W. W.; Kudva, B.; Dobbins, J. T.; Lee, C. S.; Van Lysel, M. S.; Hasegawa, B. H.; Mistretta, C. A.

    1982-12-01

    In digital fluorographic techniques the video camera must accommodate a wide dynamic range due to the large variation in the subject thickness within the field of view. Typically exposure factors and the optical aperture are selected such that the maximum video signal is obtained in the most transmissive region of the subject. Consequently, it has been shown that the signal-to-noise ratio is severely reduced in the dark regions. We have developed a prototype digital beam attenuator (DBA) which will alleviate this and some related problems in digital fluorography. The prototype DBA consists of a 6x6 array of pistons which are individually controlled. A membrane containing an attenuating solu-tion of (CeC13) in water and the piston matrix are placed between the x-ray tube and the subject. Under digital control the pistons are moved into the attenuating material in order to adjust the beam intensity over each of the 36 cells. The DBA control unit which digitizes the image during patient positioning will direct the pistons under hydraulic control to produce a uniform x-ray field exiting the subject. The pistons were designed to produce very little structural background in the image. In subtraction studies any structure would be cancelled. For non-subtraction studies such as cine-cardiology we are considering higher cell densities (eg. 64x64). Due to the narrow range of transmission provided by the DBA, in such studies ultra-high contrast films could be used to produce a high resolution quasi-subtraction display. Additional benefits of the DBA are: 1) reduced dose to the bright image areas when the dark areas are properly exposed. 2) improved scatter and glare to primary ratios, leading to improved contrast in the dark areas.

  18. Propranolol, a β-adrenergic antagonist, attenuates the decrease in trabecular bone mass in high calorie diet fed growing mice.

    PubMed

    Baek, Kyunghwa; Hwang, Hyo Rin; Park, Hyun-Jung; Kwon, Arang; Qadir, Abdul S; Baek, Jeong-Hwa

    2014-09-01

    We investigated the effects of high calorie and low calorie diets on skeletal integrity, and whether β-adrenergic blockade (BB) attenuates bone loss induced by dietary calorie alteration. Male 6-week-old C57BL/6 mice were assigned to either an ad-lib fed control diet (CON), a high calorie diet (HIGH), or a low calorie diet (LOW) group. In each diet group, mice were treated with either vehicle (VEH) or propranolol, a β-adrenergic antagonist. Over 12-weeks, β-blockade mitigated body weight and fat mass increases induced by the high calorie diet. Femoral trabecular bone mineral density and the expression levels of osteogenic marker genes in bone marrow cells were reduced in HIGHVEH and LOWVEH mice, and BB significantly attenuated this decline only in HIGH mice. In summary, the magnitude of bone loss induced by low calorie diet was greater than that caused by high calorie diet in growing mice, and β-blockade mitigated high calorie diet-induced bone loss. PMID:24393528

  19. Propranolol, a β-adrenergic antagonist, attenuates the decrease in trabecular bone mass in high calorie diet fed growing mice

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Kyunghwa; Hwang, Hyo Rin; Park, Hyun-Jung; Kwon, Arang; Qadir, Abdul S.; Baek, Jeong-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effects of high calorie and low calorie diets on skeletal integrity, and whether β-adrenergic blockade (BB) attenuates bone loss induced by dietary calorie alteration. Male 6-week-old C57BL/6 mice were assigned to either an ad-lib fed control diet (CON), a high calorie diet (HIGH), or a low calorie diet (LOW) group. In each diet group, mice were treated with either vehicle (VEH) or propranolol, a β-adrenergic antagonist. Over 12-weeks, β-blockade mitigated body weight and fat mass increases induced by the high calorie diet. Femoral trabecular bone mineral density and the expression levels of osteogenic marker genes in bone marrow cells were reduced in HIGHVEH and LOWVEH mice, and BB significantly attenuated this decline only in HIGH mice. In summary, the magnitude of bone loss induced by low calorie diet was greater than that caused by high calorie diet in growing mice, and β-blockade mitigated high calorie diet-induced bone loss. [BMB Reports 2014; 47(9): 506-511] PMID:24393528

  20. Radiation Imaging and Attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davison, Candace; Yocum, Douglas

    2008-03-01

    X-ray and neutron images are used to demonstrate materials' different radiation attenuation properties. This leads to discussion of applications in medicine, industry and research. The Penn State Radiation Science and Engineering Center (RSEC) uses neutron radioscopy to image the inside of a working hydrogen fuel cell. This is one of the many educational activities that are conducted when students visit the RSEC. To encourage pre-college students to apply these principles and learn more about nuclear technology, we are sponsoring a design competition. For more information visit www.rsec.psu.edu

  1. Chronic treatment with LY341495 decreases 5-HT(2A) receptor binding and hallucinogenic effects of LSD in mice.

    PubMed

    Moreno, José L; Holloway, Terrell; Rayannavar, Vinayak; Sealfon, Stuart C; González-Maeso, Javier

    2013-03-01

    Hallucinogenic drugs, such as lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), mescaline and psilocybin, alter perception and cognitive processes. All hallucinogenic drugs have in common a high affinity for the serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptor. Metabotropic glutamate 2/3 (mGlu2/3) receptor ligands show efficacy in modulating the cellular and behavioral responses induced by hallucinogenic drugs. Here, we explored the effect of chronic treatment with the mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist 2S-2-amino-2-(1S,2S-2-carboxycyclopropan-1-yl)-3-(xanth-9-yl)-propionic acid (LY341495) on the hallucinogenic-like effects induced by LSD (0.24mg/kg). Mice were chronically (21 days) treated with LY341495 (1.5mg/kg), or vehicle, and experiments were carried out one day after the last injection. Chronic treatment with LY341495 down-regulated [(3)H]ketanserin binding in somatosensory cortex of wild-type, but not mGlu2 knockout (KO), mice. Head-twitch behavior, and expression of c-fos, egr-1 and egr-2, which are responses induced by hallucinogenic 5-HT(2A) agonists, were found to be significantly decreased by chronic treatment with LY341495. These findings suggest that repeated blockade of the mGlu2 receptor by LY341495 results in reduced 5-HT(2A) receptor-dependent hallucinogenic effects of LSD. PMID:23333599

  2. Activation of type 5 metabotropic glutamate receptors attenuates deficits in cognitive flexibility induced by NMDA receptor blockade

    PubMed Central

    Stefani, Mark R.; Moghaddam, Bita

    2010-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors provide a mechanism by which the function of NMDA glutamate receptors can be modulated. As NMDA receptor hypofunction is implicated in the etiology of psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, the pharmacological regulation of mGlu receptor activity represents a promising therapeutic approach. We examined the effects of the positive allosteric mGlu5 receptor modulator 3- cyano-N-(1,3-diphenyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl)benzamide (CDPPB), alone and in combination with the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801, on a task measuring cognitive set-shifting ability. This task measures NMDA receptor-dependent cognitive abilities analogous to those impaired in schizophrenia. Systemic administration of CDPPB (10 & 30 mg/kg i.p) blocked MK-801 (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.)-induced impairments in set-shifting ability. The effect on learning was dose-dependent, with the 30 mg/kg dose having a greater effect than the 10 mg/kg dose across all trials. This ameliorative effect of CDPPB reflected a reduction in MK-801-induced perseverative responding. These results add to the evidence that mGlu5 receptors interact functionally with NMDA receptors to regulate behavior, and suggest that positive modulators of mGlu5 receptors may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of disorders, like schizophrenia, characterized by impairments in cognitive flexibility and memory. PMID:20371234

  3. Therapeutic exercise attenuates neutrophilic lung injury and skeletal muscle wasting.

    PubMed

    Files, D Clark; Liu, Chun; Pereyra, Andrea; Wang, Zhong-Min; Aggarwal, Neil R; D'Alessio, Franco R; Garibaldi, Brian T; Mock, Jason R; Singer, Benjamin D; Feng, Xin; Yammani, Raghunatha R; Zhang, Tan; Lee, Amy L; Philpott, Sydney; Lussier, Stephanie; Purcell, Lina; Chou, Jeff; Seeds, Michael; King, Landon S; Morris, Peter E; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2015-03-11

    Early mobilization of critically ill patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has emerged as a therapeutic strategy that improves patient outcomes, such as the duration of mechanical ventilation and muscle strength. Despite the apparent efficacy of early mobility programs, their use in clinical practice is limited outside of specialized centers and clinical trials. To evaluate the mechanisms underlying mobility therapy, we exercised acute lung injury (ALI) mice for 2 days after the instillation of lipopolysaccharides into their lungs. We found that a short duration of moderate intensity exercise in ALI mice attenuated muscle ring finger 1 (MuRF1)-mediated atrophy of the limb and respiratory muscles and improved limb muscle force generation. Exercise also limited the influx of neutrophils into the alveolar space through modulation of a coordinated systemic neutrophil chemokine response. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) concentrations were systemically reduced by exercise in ALI mice, and in vivo blockade of the G-CSF receptor recapitulated the lung exercise phenotype in ALI mice. Additionally, plasma G-CSF concentrations in humans with acute respiratory failure (ARF) undergoing early mobility therapy showed greater decrements over time compared to control ARF patients. Together, these data provide a mechanism whereby early mobility therapy attenuates muscle wasting and limits ongoing alveolar neutrophilia through modulation of systemic neutrophil chemokines in lung-injured mice and humans. PMID:25761888

  4. Fano effect dominance over Coulomb blockade in transport properties of parallel coupled quantum dot system

    SciTech Connect

    Brogi, Bharat Bhushan Ahluwalia, P. K.; Chand, Shyam

    2015-06-24

    Theoretical study of the Coulomb blockade effect on transport properties (Transmission Probability and I-V characteristics) for varied configuration of coupled quantum dot system has been studied by using Non Equilibrium Green Function(NEGF) formalism and Equation of Motion(EOM) method in the presence of magnetic flux. The self consistent approach and intra-dot Coulomb interaction is being taken into account. As the key parameters of the coupled quantum dot system such as dot-lead coupling, inter-dot tunneling and magnetic flux threading through the system can be tuned, the effect of asymmetry parameter and magnetic flux on this tuning is being explored in Coulomb blockade regime. The presence of the Coulomb blockade due to on-dot Coulomb interaction decreases the width of transmission peak at energy level ε + U and by adjusting the magnetic flux the swapping effect in the Fano peaks in asymmetric and symmetric parallel configuration sustains despite strong Coulomb blockade effect.

  5. [Genetic Mutation Accumulation and Clinical Outcome of Immune Checkpoint Blockade Therapy].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Masanobu

    2016-06-01

    Immune checkpoint blockade therapy has recently attracted great attention in the area of oncology. In Japan, since 2014, an anti-PD-1antibody nivolumab and anti-CTLA-4 antibody ipilimumab have been available for the treatment of patients with malignant melanoma, and nivolumab has been available for patients with non-small cell lung cancer. Clinical trials using these drugs and other immune checkpoint inhibitors are currently in progress worldwide. The immune checkpoint blockade therapy is a promising new cancer therapy; however, not all patients with cancer can benefit from this therapy. Recent evidence shows that markers reflecting the extent of genetic mutation accumulation, including mutation burden, non-synonymous mutation that produces neoantigen, and microsatellite instability, possibly serve as promising marker to predict who can benefit from the immune checkpoint blockade therapy. Here, I introduce the recent evidence and discuss the correlation between genetic mutation accumulation and clinical outcome of immune checkpoint blockade therapy. PMID:27306805

  6. Anticancer immunotherapy by CTLA-4 blockade relies on the gut microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Vétizou, Marie; Pitt, Jonathan M.; Daillère, Romain; Lepage, Patricia; Waldschmitt, Nadine; Flament, Caroline; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Routy, Bertrand; Roberti, Maria P.; Duong, Connie P. M.; Poirier-Colame, Vichnou; Roux, Antoine; Becharef, Sonia; Formenti, Silvia; Golden, Encouse; Cording, Sascha; Eberl, Gerard; Schlitzer, Andreas; Ginhoux, Florent; Mani, Sridhar; Yamazaki, Takahiro; Jacquelot, Nicolas; Enot, David P.; Bérard, Marion; Nigou, Jérôme; Opolon, Paule; Eggermont, Alexander; Woerther, Paul-Louis; Chachaty, Elisabeth; Chaput, Nathalie; Robert, Caroline; Mateus, Christina; Kroemer, Guido; Raoult, Didier; Boneca, Ivo Gomperts; Carbonnel, Franck; Chamaillard, Mathias; Zitvogel, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies targeting CTLA-4 have been successfully used as cancer immunotherapy. We find that the antitumor effects of CTLA-4 blockade depend on distinct Bacteroides species. In mice and patients, T cell responses specific for B. thetaiotaomicron or B. fragilis were associated with the efficacy of CTLA-4 blockade. Tumors in antibiotic-treated or germ-free mice did not respond to CTLA blockade. This defect was overcome by gavage with B. fragilis, by immunization with B. fragilis polysaccharides, or by adoptive transfer of B. fragilis–specific T cells. Fecal microbial transplantation from humans to mice confirmed that treatment of melanoma patients with antibodies against CTLA-4 favored the outgrowth of B. fragilis with anticancer properties. This study reveals a key role for Bacteroidales in the immunostimulatory effects of CTLA-4 blockade. PMID:26541610

  7. Anticancer immunotherapy by CTLA-4 blockade relies on the gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Vétizou, Marie; Pitt, Jonathan M; Daillère, Romain; Lepage, Patricia; Waldschmitt, Nadine; Flament, Caroline; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Routy, Bertrand; Roberti, Maria P; Duong, Connie P M; Poirier-Colame, Vichnou; Roux, Antoine; Becharef, Sonia; Formenti, Silvia; Golden, Encouse; Cording, Sascha; Eberl, Gerard; Schlitzer, Andreas; Ginhoux, Florent; Mani, Sridhar; Yamazaki, Takahiro; Jacquelot, Nicolas; Enot, David P; Bérard, Marion; Nigou, Jérôme; Opolon, Paule; Eggermont, Alexander; Woerther, Paul-Louis; Chachaty, Elisabeth; Chaput, Nathalie; Robert, Caroline; Mateus, Christina; Kroemer, Guido; Raoult, Didier; Boneca, Ivo Gomperts; Carbonnel, Franck; Chamaillard, Mathias; Zitvogel, Laurence

    2015-11-27

    Antibodies targeting CTLA-4 have been successfully used as cancer immunotherapy. We find that the antitumor effects of CTLA-4 blockade depend on distinct Bacteroides species. In mice and patients, T cell responses specific for B. thetaiotaomicron or B. fragilis were associated with the efficacy of CTLA-4 blockade. Tumors in antibiotic-treated or germ-free mice did not respond to CTLA blockade. This defect was overcome by gavage with B. fragilis, by immunization with B. fragilis polysaccharides, or by adoptive transfer of B. fragilis-specific T cells. Fecal microbial transplantation from humans to mice confirmed that treatment of melanoma patients with antibodies against CTLA-4 favored the outgrowth of B. fragilis with anticancer properties. This study reveals a key role for Bacteroidales in the immunostimulatory effects of CTLA-4 blockade. PMID:26541610

  8. Facilitating T Cell Infiltration in Tumor Microenvironment Overcomes Resistance to PD-L1 Blockade.

    PubMed

    Tang, Haidong; Wang, Yang; Chlewicki, Lukasz K; Zhang, Yuan; Guo, Jingya; Liang, Wei; Wang, Jieyi; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Fu, Yang-Xin

    2016-03-14

    Immune checkpoint blockade therapies fail to induce responses in the majority of cancer patients, so how to increase the objective response rate becomes an urgent challenge. Here, we demonstrate that sufficient T cell infiltration in tumor tissues is a prerequisite for response to PD-L1 blockade. Targeting tumors with tumor necrosis factor superfamily member LIGHT activates lymphotoxin β-receptor signaling, leading to the production of chemokines that recruit massive numbers of T cells. Furthermore, targeting non-T cell-inflamed tumor tissues by antibody-guided LIGHT creates a T cell-inflamed microenvironment and overcomes tumor resistance to checkpoint blockade. Our data indicate that targeting LIGHT might be a potent strategy to increase the responses to checkpoint blockades and other immunotherapies in non-T cell-inflamed tumors. PMID:26977880

  9. Blockaded six- and eight-wave mixing processes tailored by electromagnetically induced transparency scissors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, H. B.; Yao, X.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Che, J. L.; Zhang, Y. Q.; Zhang, Y. P.; Xiao, M.

    2014-04-01

    We report the first experimental observations of the blockaded six- and eight-wave mixing processes in a collective multi-level Rydberg atomic ensemble tailored by multi-channel scissors and created by three coexisting electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) windows. The interplay between the dressed-state effect and the Rydberg blockade caused by strong van der Waals interactions is investigated when several parameters in the excitation lasers are changed. Blockaded multi-wave mixing (MWM) signals are obtained when the coupling frequency detuning is changed, which is improved to give multiple channels when the probe detuning is scanned. Such MWM signals tailored by EIT scissors produce a much narrower linewidth and therefore are suitable for application in long-distance quantum communication. The advantages of having multi-channel blockaded MWM signals also makes potential applications in demonstrating multi-channel entanglement possible and improves the performance of quantum computation with Rydberg atoms.

  10. Electronic ground state properties of Coulomb blockaded quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Satyadev Rajesh

    Conductance through quantum dots at low temperature exhibits random but repeatable fluctuations arising from quantum interference of electrons. The observed fluctuations follow universal statistics arising from the underlying universality of quantum chaos. Random matrix theory (RMT) has provided an accurate description of the observed universal conductance fluctuations (UCF) in "open" quantum dots (device conductance ≥e 2/h). The focus of this thesis is to search for and decipher the underlying origin of similar universal properties in "closed" quantum dots (device conductance ≤e2/ h). A series of experiments is presented on electronic ground state properties measured via conductance measurements in Coulomb blockaded quantum dots. The statistics of Coulomb blockade (CB) peak heights with zero and non-zero magnetic field measured in various devices agree qualitatively with predictions from Random Matrix Theory (RMT). The standard deviation of the peak height fluctuations for non-zero magnetic field is lower than predicted by RMT; the temperature dependence of the standard deviation of the peak height for non-zero magnetic field is also measured. The second experiment summarizes the statistics of CB peak spacings. The peak spacing distribution width is observed to be on the order of the single particle level spacing, Delta, for both zero and non-zero magnetic field. The ratio of the zero field peak spacing distribution width to the non-zero field peak spacing distribution width is ˜1.2; this is good agreement with predictions from spin-resolved RMT predictions. The standard deviation of the non-zero magnetic field peak spacing distribution width shows a T-1/2 dependence in agreement with a thermal averaging model. The final experiment summarizes the measurement of the peak height correlation length versus temperature for various quantum dots. The peak height correlation length versus temperature saturates in small quantum dots, suggesting spectral scrambling