Science.gov

Sample records for a-si photovoltaic manufacturing

  1. Continuous roll-to-roll a-Si photovoltaic manufacturing technology

    SciTech Connect

    Izu, M. )

    1993-04-01

    This report describes work performed by ECD to advance its roll-to-roll, triple-junction photovoltaic manufacturing technologies; to reduce the module production costs; to increase the stabilized module performance; and to expand the commercial capacity utilizing ECD technology. The 3-year goal is to develop advanced large-scale manufacturing technology incorporating ECD's earlier research advances with the capability of producing modules with stable 11% efficiency at a cost of approximately $1/W[sub p]. Major efforts during Phase I are (1) the optimization of the high-performance back-reflector system, (2) the optimization of a-Si-Ge narrow band-gap solar cell, and (3) the optimization of the stable efficiency of the module. The goal is to achieve a stable 8% efficient 0.3-m [times] 1.2-m (1-ft [times] 4-ft) module. Also, the efforts include work on a proprietary, high-deposition-rate, microwave plasma, CVD manufacturing technology; and on the investigation of material cost reduction.

  2. Continuous roll-to-roll a-Si photovoltaic manufacturing technology. Annual subcontractor report, 1 April 1992--31 March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Izu, M.

    1993-12-01

    This report describes work done under a 3-year program to advance ECD`s roll-to-roll, triple-junction photovoltaic manufacturing technologies, to reduce the module production costs, to increase the stabilized module performance, and to expand commercial capacity utilizing ECD technology. The specific 3-year goal is to develop advanced large-scale manufacturing technology incorporating ECD`s earlier research advances with the capability of producing modules with stable 11% efficiency at a cost of approximately $1.00 per peak watt. Accomplishments during Phase 1 included: (1) ECD successfully incorporated a high-performance Ag/metal-oxide back-reflector system into its continuous roll-to-roll commercial production operation. (2) High-quality a-Si-Ge narrow-band-gap solar cells were incorporated into the manufacturing. (3) ECD demonstrated the continuous roll-to-roll production of high-efficiency, triple-junction, two-band-gap solar cells consistently and uniformly throughout a 762-m (2500-ft) run with high yield. (4) ECD achieved 11.1% initial sub-cell efficiency of triple-junction, two-band-gap a-Si alloy solar cells in the production line. (5) The world`s first 0.37-m{sup 2} (4-ft{sup 2}) PV modules were produced utilizing triple-junction spectrum-splitting solar cells manufactured in the production line. (6) As a result of process optimization to reduce the layer thickness and to improve the gas utilization, ECD achieved a 77% material cost reduction for germane and 58% reduction for disilane. Additionally, ECD developed a new low-cost module that saves approximately 30% in assembly material costs.

  3. Photovoltaic manufacturing technology

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, J.H.; Whitehouse, D.; Wiedeman, S.; Catalano, A.W.; Oswald, R. )

    1991-12-01

    This report identifies steps leading to manufacturing large volumes of low-cost, large-area photovoltaic (PV) modules. Both crystalline silicon and amorphous silicon technologies were studied. Cost reductions for each step were estimated and compared to Solarex Corporation's manufacturing costs. A cost model, a simple version of the SAMICS methodology developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), projected PV selling prices. Actual costs of materials, labor, product yield, etc., were used in the cost model. The JPL cost model compared potential ways of lowering costs. Solarex identified the most difficult technical challenges that, if overcome, would reduce costs. Preliminary research plans were developed to solve the technical problems. 13 refs.

  4. Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Easoz, J. R.; Herlocher, R. H.

    1991-12-01

    This report examines the cost-effective manufacture of dendritic-web-based photovoltaic modules. It explains how process changes can increase production and reduce manufacturing costs. Long-range benefits of these improved processes are also discussed. Problems are identified that could impede increasing production and reducing costs; approaches to solve these problems are presented. These approaches involve web growth throughput, cell efficiency, process yield, silicon use, process control, automation, and module efficiency. Also discussed are the benefits of bifacial module design, unique to the dendritic web process.

  5. Photovoltaic manufacturing technology, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    This report describes subcontracted research by the Chronar Corporation, prepared by Advanced Photovoltaic Systems, Inc. (APS) for Phase 1 of the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology Development project. Amorphous silicon is chosen as the PV technology that Chronar Corporation and APS believe offers the greatest potential for manufacturing improvements, which, in turn, will result in significant cost reductions and performance improvements in photovoltaic products. The APS Eureka'' facility was chosen as the manufacturing system that can offer the possibility of achieving these production enhancements. The relationship of the Eureka'' facility to Chronar's batch'' plants is discussed. Five key areas are also identified that could meet the objectives of manufacturing potential that could lead to improved performance, reduced manufacturing costs, and significantly increased production. The projected long-term potential benefits of these areas are discussed, as well as problems that may impede the achievement of the hoped-for developments. A significant number of the problems discussed are of a generic nature and could be of general interest to the industry. The final section of this document addresses the cost and time estimates for achieving the solutions to the problems discussed earlier. Emphasis is placed on the number, type, and cost of the human resources required for the project.

  6. Photovoltaic manufacturing technology, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Izu, M. )

    1992-03-01

    This report examines manufacturing multiple-band-gap, multiple- junction solar cells and photovoltaic modules. Amorphous silicon alloy material is deposited (using microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition) on a stainless-steel substrate using a roll-to-roll process that is continuous and automated. Rapid thermal equilibration of the metal substrate allows rapid throughput of large-area devices in smaller production machines. Potential improvements in the design, deposition, and module fabrication process are described. Problems are also discussed that could impede using these potential improvements. Energy Conversion Devices, Inc. (ECD) proposes cost and time estimates for investigating and solving these problems. Manufacturing modules for less than $1.00 per peak watt and stable module efficiencies of greater than 10% are near-term goals proposed by ECD. 18 refs.

  7. International photovoltaic products and manufacturers directory, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Shepperd, L.W.

    1995-11-01

    This international directory of more than 500 photovoltaic-related manufacturers is intended to guide potential users of photovoltaics to sources for systems and their components. Two indexes help the user to locate firms and materials. A glossary describes equipment and terminology commonly used in the photovoltaic industry.

  8. Research on advanced photovoltaic manufacturing technology

    SciTech Connect

    Jester, T.; Eberspacher, C. )

    1991-11-01

    This report outlines opportunities for significantly advancing the scale and economy of high-volume manufacturing of high-efficiency photovoltaic (PV) modules. We propose to pursue a concurrent effort to advance existing crystalline silicon module manufacturing technology and to implement thin film CuInSe{sub 2} (CIS) module manufacturing. This combination of commercial-scale manufacturing of high-efficiency crystalline silicon modules and of pilot-scale manufacturing of low-cost thin film CIS technology will support continued, rapid growth of the US PV industry.

  9. The Capital Intensity of Photovoltaics Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Basore, Paul

    2015-10-19

    Factory capital expenditure (capex) for photovoltaic (PV) module manufacturing strongly influences the per-unit cost of a c-Si module. This provides a significant opportunity to address the U.S. DOE SunShot module price target through capex innovation. Innovation options to reduce the capex of PV manufacturing include incremental and disruptive process innovation with c-Si, platform innovations, and financial approaches. and financial approaches.

  10. Economics of Future Growth in Photovoltaics Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Basore, Paul A.; Chung, Donald; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2015-06-14

    The past decade's record of growth in the photovoltaics manufacturing industry indicates that global investment in manufacturing capacity for photovoltaic modules tends to increase in proportion to the size of the industry. The slope of this proportionality determines how fast the industry will grow in the future. Two key parameters determine this slope. One is the annual global investment in manufacturing capacity normalized to the manufacturing capacity for the previous year (capacity-normalized capital investment rate, CapIR, units $/W). The other is how much capital investment is required for each watt of annual manufacturing capacity, normalized to the service life of the assets (capacity-normalized capital demand rate, CapDR, units $/W). If these two parameters remain unchanged from the values they have held for the past few years, global manufacturing capacity will peak in the next few years and then decline. However, it only takes a small improvement in CapIR to ensure future growth in photovoltaics. Any accompanying improvement in CapDR will accelerate that growth.

  11. Photovoltaic Cell And Manufacturing Process

    DOEpatents

    Albright, Scot P.; Chamberlin, Rhodes R.

    1996-11-26

    Provided is a method for controlling electrical properties and morphology of a p-type material of a photovoltaic device. The p-type material, such as p-type cadmium telluride, is first subjected to heat treatment in an oxidizing environment, followed by recrystallization in an environment substantially free of oxidants. In one embodiment, the heat treatment step comprises first subjecting the p-type material to an oxidizing atmosphere at a first temperature to getter impurities, followed by second subjecting the p-type material to an oxidizing atmosphere at a second temperature, higher than the first temperature, to develop a desired oxidation gradient through the p-type material.

  12. Multijunction photovoltaic device and method of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Arya, Rejeewa R.; Catalano, Anthony W.; Bennett, Murray

    1995-04-04

    A multijunction photovoltaic device includes first, second, and third amorphous silicon p-i-n photovoltaic cells in a stacked arrangement. The intrinsic layers of the second and third cells are formed of a-SiGe alloys with differing ratios of Ge such that the bandgap of the intrinsic layers respectively decrease from the first uppermost cell to the third lowermost cell. An interface layer, composed of a doped silicon compound, is disposed between the two cells and has a lower bandgap than the respective n- and p-type adjacent layers of the first and second cells. The interface layer forms an ohmic contact with the one of the adjacent cell layers of the same conductivity type, and a tunnel junction with the other of the adjacent cell layers.

  13. Photovoltaic manufacturing technology, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Somberg, H. )

    1991-11-01

    This report describes existing integrated processes for solar cell manufacturing and lists as the primary opportunity for improvement the following areas: low-cost silicon sheets with improved characteristics; improved large-scale and automated solar cell processes that can lead to cell efficiencies in the range of 14% (encapsulated) for direct-cast wafers; improved handling and lamination of large-area modules for the emerging utility market. The proposed solutions can lead to finished module costs on the order of $1.55 per square meter or a selling price of less than $2.00/Watt. The problems that may be considered generic to the industry and that have been addressed in this work are as follows: gettering and passivation of silicon wafers; spray-on passivation layers; dual antireflection coatings; ink-jet printing of metallizations; and automated handling of large-area modules and associated vertical lamination. 14 refs.

  14. Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology, Phase 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Easoz, J.R.; Herlocher, R.H. )

    1991-12-01

    This report examines the cost-effective manufacture of dendritic-web-based photovoltaic modules. It explains how process changes can increase production and reduce manufacturing costs. Long-range benefits of these improved processes are also discussed. Problems are identified that could impede increasing production and reducing costs; approaches to solve these problems are presented. These approaches involve web growth throughput, cell efficiency, process yield, silicon use, process control, automation, and module efficiency. Also discussed are the benefits of bifacial module design, unique to the dendritic web process.

  15. Photovoltaic industry manufacturing technology. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Vanecek, D.; Diver, M.; Fernandez, R.

    1998-08-01

    This report contains the results of the Photovoltaic (PV) Industry Manufacturing Technology Assessment performed by the Automation and Robotics Research Institute (ARRI) of the University of Texas at Arlington for the National Renewable Energy laboratory. ARRI surveyed eleven companies to determine their state-of-manufacturing in the areas of engineering design, operations management, manufacturing technology, equipment maintenance, quality management, and plant conditions. Interviews with company personnel and plant tours at each of the facilities were conducted and the information compiled. The report is divided into two main segments. The first part of the report presents how the industry as a whole conforms to ``World Class`` manufacturing practices. Conclusions are drawn from the results of a survey as to the areas that the PV industry can improve on to become more competitive in the industry and World Class. Appendix A contains the questions asked in the survey, a brief description of the benefits to performing this task and the aggregate response to the questions. Each company participating in the assessment process received the results of their own facility to compare against the industry as a whole. The second part of the report outlines opportunities that exist on the shop floor for improving Process Equipment and Automation Strategies. Appendix B contains the survey that was used to assess each of the manufacturing processes.

  16. Solid state laser applications in photovoltaics manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunsky, Corey; Colville, Finlay

    2008-02-01

    Photovoltaic energy conversion devices are on a rapidly accelerating growth path driven by increasing government and societal pressure to use renewable energy as part of an overall strategy to address global warming attributed to greenhouse gas emissions. Initially supported in several countries by generous tax subsidies, solar cell manufacturers are relentlessly pushing the performance/cost ratio of these devices in a quest to reach true cost parity with grid electricity. Clearly this eventual goal will result in further acceleration in the overall market growth. Silicon wafer based solar cells are currently the mainstay of solar end-user installations with a cost up to three times grid electricity. But next-generation technology in the form of thin-film devices promises streamlined, high-volume manufacturing and greatly reduced silicon consumption, resulting in dramatically lower per unit fabrication costs. Notwithstanding the modest conversion efficiency of thin-film devices compared to wafered silicon products (around 6-10% versus 15-20%), this cost reduction is driving existing and start-up solar manufacturers to switch to thin-film production. A key aspect of these devices is patterning large panels to create a monolithic array of series-interconnected cells to form a low current, high voltage module. This patterning is accomplished in three critical scribing processes called P1, P2, and P3. Lasers are the technology of choice for these processes, delivering the desired combination of high throughput and narrow, clean scribes. This paper examines these processes and discusses the optimization of industrial lasers to meet their specific needs.

  17. Method of manufacturing a large-area segmented photovoltaic module

    DOEpatents

    Lenox, Carl

    2013-11-05

    One embodiment of the invention relates to a segmented photovoltaic (PV) module which is manufactured from laminate segments. The segmented PV module includes rectangular-shaped laminate segments formed from rectangular-shaped PV laminates and further includes non-rectangular-shaped laminate segments formed from rectangular-shaped and approximately-triangular-shaped PV laminates. The laminate segments are mechanically joined and electrically interconnected to form the segmented module. Another embodiment relates to a method of manufacturing a large-area segmented photovoltaic module from laminate segments of various shapes. Other embodiments relate to processes for providing a photovoltaic array for installation at a site. Other embodiments and features are also disclosed.

  18. Printing Processes Used to Manufacture Photovoltaic Solar Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rardin, Tina E.; Xu, Renmei

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing need for renewable energy sources, and solar power is a good option in many instances. Photovoltaic solar panels are now being manufactured via various methods, and different printing processes are being incorporated into the manufacturing process. Screen printing has been used most prevalently in the printing process to make…

  19. Thin film photovoltaic device and process of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Albright, Scot P.; Chamberlin, Rhodes

    1997-10-07

    Provided is a thin film photovoltaic device and a method of manufacturing the device. The thin film photovoltaic device comprises a film layer having particles which are smaller than about 30 microns in size held in an electrically insulating matrix material to reduce the potential for electrical shorting through the film layer. The film layer may be provided by depositing preformed particles onto a surrogate substrate and binding the particles in a film-forming matrix material to form a flexible sheet with the film layer. The flexible sheet may be separated from the surrogate substrate and cut into flexible strips. A plurality of the flexible strips may be located adjacent to and supported by a common supporting substrate to form a photovoltaic module having a plurality of electrically interconnected photovoltaic cells.

  20. Thin film photovoltaic device and process of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Albright, Scot P.; Chamberlin, Rhodes

    1999-02-09

    Provided is a thin film photovoltaic device and a method of manufacturing the device. The thin film photovoltaic device comprises a film layer having particles which are smaller than about 30 microns in size held in an electrically insulating matrix material to reduce the potential for electrical shorting through the film layer. The film layer may be provided by depositing preformed particles onto a surrogate substrate and binding the particles in a film-forming matrix material to form a flexible sheet with the film layer. The flexible sheet may be separated from the surrogate substrate and cut into flexible strips. A plurality of the flexible strips may be located adjacent to and supported by a common supporting substrate to form a photovoltaic module having a plurality of electrically interconnected photovoltaic cells.

  1. Thin film photovoltaic device and process of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Albright, S.P.; Chamberlin, R.

    1997-10-07

    Provided is a thin film photovoltaic device and a method of manufacturing the device. The thin film photovoltaic device comprises a film layer having particles which are smaller than about 30 microns in size held in an electrically insulating matrix material to reduce the potential for electrical shorting through the film layer. The film layer may be provided by depositing preformed particles onto a surrogate substrate and binding the particles in a film-forming matrix material to form a flexible sheet with the film layer. The flexible sheet may be separated from the surrogate substrate and cut into flexible strips. A plurality of the flexible strips may be located adjacent to and supported by a common supporting substrate to form a photovoltaic module having a plurality of electrically interconnected photovoltaic cells. 13 figs.

  2. Thin film photovoltaic device and process of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Albright, S.P.; Chamberlin, R.

    1999-02-09

    Provided is a thin film photovoltaic device and a method of manufacturing the device. The thin film photovoltaic device comprises a film layer having particles which are smaller than about 30 microns in size held in an electrically insulating matrix material to reduce the potential for electrical shorting through the film layer. The film layer may be provided by depositing preformed particles onto a surrogate substrate and binding the particles in a film-forming matrix material to form a flexible sheet with the film layer. The flexible sheet may be separated from the surrogate substrate and cut into flexible strips. A plurality of the flexible strips may be located adjacent to and supported by a common supporting substrate to form a photovoltaic module having a plurality of electrically interconnected photovoltaic cells. 13 figs.

  3. Progress update on the US photovoltaic manufacturing technology project

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, R.L.; Witt, C.E.; Thomas, H.P.

    1997-10-01

    The Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project is helping the U.S. photovoltaic (PV) industry extend its world leadership role in manufacturing and stimulate the commercial development of PV modules and systems. Initiated in 1990, PVMaT is being carried out in several directed and staggered phases to support industry`s continued progress. Thirteen subcontracts awarded in FY 1996 under Phase 4A emphasize improvement and cost reduction in the manufacture of full-system PV products. Areas of work in Phase 4A included, but were not limited to, issues such as improving module-manufacturing processes; system and system-component packaging, integration, manufacturing, and assembly; product manufacturing flexibility; and balance-of-system development with the goal of product manufacturing improvements. These Phase 4A, product-driven manufacturing research and development (R&D) activities are now completing their second phase. Progress under these Phase 4A and remaining Phase 2B subcontracts from the earlier PVMaT solicitation are summarized in this paper. Evaluations of the success of this project have been carried out in FY 1995 and late FY 1996. This paper examines the 1997 cost/capacity data that have been collected from active PVMaT manufacturers.

  4. Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology report, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, A.V.; Lillington, D.R.

    1992-10-01

    This report describes subcontracted research by Spectrolab, Inc., to address tasks outlined in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Letter of solicitation RC-0-10057. These tasks include the potential of making photovoltaics (PV) a more affordable energy source, as set forth in the goal of the PVMaT project. Spectrolab believes that the DOE cost goals can be met using three different types of cells: (1) silicon concentrator cells, (2) high efficiency GaAs concentrator cells, and (3) mechanically stacked multijunction cells.

  5. Overview of the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project

    SciTech Connect

    Witt, C E; Mitchell, R L; Mooney, G D

    1993-08-01

    The Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project is a historic government/industry photovoltaic (PV) manufacturing R&D partnership composed of joint efforts between the federal government (through the US Department of Energy) and members of the US PV industry. The project`s ultimate goal is to ensure that the US industry retains and extends its world leadership role in the manufacture and commercial development of PV components and systems. PVMaT is designed to do this by helping the US PV industry improve manufacturing processes, accelerate manufacturing cost reductions for PV modules, improve commercial product performance, and lay the groundwork for a substantial scale-up of US-based PV manufacturing capacities. Phase 1 of the project, the problem identification phase, was completed in early 1991. Phase 2, the problem solution phase, which addresses process-specific problems of specific manufacturers, is now underway with an expected duration of 5 years. Phase 3 addresses R&D problems that are relatively common to a number of PV companies or the PV industry as a whole. These ``generic`` problem areas are being addressed through a teamed research approach.

  6. Silicon Film[trademark] photovoltaic manufacturing technology

    SciTech Connect

    Bottenberg, W.R.; Hall, R.B.; Jackson, E.L.; Lampo, S.; Mulligan, W.E.; Barnett, A.M. )

    1993-04-01

    This report describes work on a project to develop an advanced low-cost manufacturing process for a new utility-scale flatplate module based on thin active layers of polycrystalline silicon on a low-cost substrate. This is called the Silicon-Film[trademark] process. This new power module is based on a new large solar cell that is 675 cm[sup 2] in area. Eighteen of these solar cells form a 170-W module. Twelve ofthese modules form a 2-kW array. The program has three components: (1) development of a Silicon-Film[trademark] wafer machine that can manufacture wafer 675 cm[sup 2] in size with a total product cost reductionof 70%; (2) development of an advanced solar cell manufacturing process that will turn the Silicon-Film[trademark] wafer into a 14%-efficient solar cell; and (3) development of an advanced module design based on these large-area, efficient silicon solar cells with an average power of 170 watts. The completion of these three tasks will lead to a new power module designed for utility and other power applications with asubstantially lower cost.

  7. The photovoltaic manufacturing technology project: A government/industry partnership

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, R.L.; Witt, C.E.; Mooney, G.D.

    1991-12-01

    The Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project is a government/industry photovoltaic manufacturing research and development (R&D) project composed of partnerships between the federal government (through the US Department of Energy) and members of the US photovoltaic (PV) industry. It is designed to assist the US PV industry in improving manufacturing processes, accelerating manufacturing cost reductions for PV modules, increasing commercial product performance, and generally laying the groundwork for a substantial scale-up of US-based PV manufacturing plant capabilities. The project is being carried out in three separate phases, each focused on a specific approach to solving the problems identified by the industrial participants. These participants are selected through competitive procurements. Furthermore, the PVMaT project has been specifically structured to ensure that these PV manufacturing R&D subcontract awards are selected with no intention of either directing funding toward specific PV technologies (e.g., amorphous silicon, polycrystalline thin films, etc.), or spreading the awards among a number of technologies (e.g., one subcontract in each area). Each associated subcontract under any phase of this project is, and will continue to be, selected for funding on its own technical and cost merits. Phase 1, the problem identification phase, was completed early in 1991. Phase 2 is now under way. This is the solution phase of the project and addresses problems of specific manufacturers. The envisioned subcontracts under Phase 2 may be up to three years in duration and will be highly cost-shared between the US government and US industrial participants. Phase 3, is also under way. General issues related to PV module development will be studied through various teaming arrangements. 25 refs.

  8. The photovoltaic manufacturing technology project: A government/industry partnership

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, R.L.; Witt, C.E.; Mooney, G.D.

    1991-12-01

    The Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project is a government/industry photovoltaic manufacturing research and development (R D) project composed of partnerships between the federal government (through the US Department of Energy) and members of the US photovoltaic (PV) industry. It is designed to assist the US PV industry in improving manufacturing processes, accelerating manufacturing cost reductions for PV modules, increasing commercial product performance, and generally laying the groundwork for a substantial scale-up of US-based PV manufacturing plant capabilities. The project is being carried out in three separate phases, each focused on a specific approach to solving the problems identified by the industrial participants. These participants are selected through competitive procurements. Furthermore, the PVMaT project has been specifically structured to ensure that these PV manufacturing R D subcontract awards are selected with no intention of either directing funding toward specific PV technologies (e.g., amorphous silicon, polycrystalline thin films, etc.), or spreading the awards among a number of technologies (e.g., one subcontract in each area). Each associated subcontract under any phase of this project is, and will continue to be, selected for funding on its own technical and cost merits. Phase 1, the problem identification phase, was completed early in 1991. Phase 2 is now under way. This is the solution phase of the project and addresses problems of specific manufacturers. The envisioned subcontracts under Phase 2 may be up to three years in duration and will be highly cost-shared between the US government and US industrial participants. Phase 3, is also under way. General issues related to PV module development will be studied through various teaming arrangements. 25 refs.

  9. Benefits from the U.S. photovoltaic manufacturing technology project

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, R.L.; Witt, C.E.; Thomas, H.P.

    1996-05-01

    This paper examines the goals of the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project and its achievements in recapturing the investment by the photovoltaic (PV) industry and the public in this research. The PVMaT project was initiated in 1990 with the goal of enhancing the world-wide competitiveness of the U.S. PV industry. Based on the authors analysis, PVMaT has contributed to PV module manufacturing process improvements, increased product value, and reductions in the price of today`s PV products. An evaluation of success in this project was conducted using data collected from 10 of the PVMaT industrial participants in late fiscal year (FY) 1995. These data indicate a reduction of 56% in the weighted average module manufacturing costs from 1992 to 1996. During this same period, U.S. module manufacturing capacity has increased by more than a factor of 6. Finally, the analysis indicates that both the public and the manufacturers will recapture the funds expended in R&D manufacturing improvements well before the year 2000.

  10. Charactrization of a Li-ion battery based stand-alone a-Si photovoltaic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid Vishkasougheh, Mehdi; Tunaboylu, Bahadir

    2014-11-01

    The number of photovoltaic (PV) system installations is increasing rapidly. As more people learn about this versatile and often cost-effective power option, this trend will accelerate. This document presents a recommended design for a battery based stand-alone photovoltaic system (BSPV). BSPV system has the ability to be applied in different areas, including warning signals, lighting, refrigeration, communication, residential water pumping, remote sensing, and cathodic protection. The presented calculation method gives a proper idea for a system sizing technique. Based on application load, different scenarios are possible for designing a BSPV system. In this study, a battery based stand-alone system was designed. The electricity generation part is three a-Si panels, which are connected in parallel, and for the storage part LFP (lithium iron phosphate) battery was used. The high power LFP battery packs are 40 cells each 8S5P (configured 8 series 5 parallel). Each individual pack weighs 0.5 kg and is 25.6 V. In order to evaluate the efficiency of a-Si panels with respect to the temperature and the solar irradiation, cities of Istanbul, Ankara and Adana in Turkey were selected. Temperature and solar irradiation were gathered from reliable sources and by using translation equations, current and voltage output of panels were calculated. As a result of these calculations, current and energy outputs were computed by considering an average efficient solar irradiation time value per day in Turkey. The calculated power values were inserted to a battery cycler system, and the behavior of high power LFP batteries in a time sequence of 7.2 h was evaluated. The charging and discharging cycles were obtained and their behavior was discussed. According to the results, Istanbul has the lowest number of peak month's energy, it followed by Ankara, and ultimately Adana has the highest number of peak months and energy storage. It was observed during the tests that values up to 4 A was

  11. Photovoltaic manufacturing: Present status, future prospects, and research needs

    SciTech Connect

    Wolden, C.A.; Fthenakis, V.; Kurtin, J.; Baxter, J.; Repins, I.; Shasheen, S.; Torvik, J.; Rocket, A.; Aydil, E.

    2011-03-29

    In May 2010 the United States National Science Foundation sponsored a two-day workshop to review the state-of-the-art and research challenges in photovoltaic (PV) manufacturing. This article summarizes the major conclusions and outcomes from this workshop, which was focused on identifying the science that needs to be done to help accelerate PV manufacturing. A significant portion of the article focuses on assessing the current status of and future opportunities in the major PV manufacturing technologies. These are solar cells based on crystalline silicon (c-Si), thin films of cadmium telluride (CdTe), thin films of copper indium gallium diselenide, and thin films of hydrogenated amorphous and nanocrystalline silicon. Current trends indicate that the cost per watt of c-Si and CdTe solar cells are being reduced to levels beyond the constraints commonly associated with these technologies. With a focus on TW/yr production capacity, the issue of material availability is discussed along with the emerging technologies of dye-sensitized solar cells and organic photovoltaics that are potentially less constrained by elemental abundance. Lastly, recommendations are made for research investment, with an emphasis on those areas that are expected to have cross-cutting impact.

  12. Continuous roll-to-roll serpentine deposition for high throughput a-Si PV manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Izu, M.; Ovshinsky, H.C.; Deng, X.; Krisko, A.J.; Narasimhan, K.L.; Crucet, R.; Laarman, T.; Myatt, A.; Ovshinsky, S.R.

    1994-12-31

    In order to further improve the economies of scale which are inherent in ECD`s continuous roll-to-roll amorphous silicon alloy solar cell manufacturing process, the authors have developed a concept for a serpentine web plasma CVD deposition process to maximize throughput while keeping the size of the deposition chambers small. When this technique is incorporated into a continuous roll-to-roll PV manufacturing process, it will maximize the throughput for a high volume production plant, reduce the machine cost, improve gas utilization, reduce power consumption, and improve the solar cell stability. To demonstrate the serpentine web deposition concept, the authors have constructed a single loop serpentine deposition chamber to deposit a-Si for n-i-p structure solar cells. During the initial process of optimization, they have produced single-junction a-Si solar cells with 8.6% efficiency, and triple-junction a-Si solar cells with a 9.5% initial efficiency, where the top cell intrinsic layer was deposited in the serpentine deposition chamber.

  13. Photovoltaic devices using a-Si:H from higher order silanes. Final subcontract report, September 1, 1983-August 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Delahoy, A.E.

    1985-03-01

    This report describes the preparation of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films and photovoltaic devices by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from higher silanes, and the properties of such films and devices. The motivation for this research is the prospect of preparing by a new technique a-Si:H having electronic properties similar (or superior) to material prepared by the well-known glow discharge technique. Possible advantages of thermal CVD are the absence of ion bombardment, high deposition rates, efficient utilization of feedstock gases, lower levels of impurity incorporation, absence of pinholes, and greater material stability. Photochemical vapor deposition of a-Si:H from disilane is also described and has yielded higher efficiency solar cells than thermal CVD.

  14. Manufacturing improvements in the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) Project

    SciTech Connect

    Witt, C.E.; Mitchell, R.L.; Thomas, H.P.; Symko, M.I.; King, R.; Ruby, D.S.

    1998-08-01

    The Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology Project (PVMaT) is a government/industry research and development (R and D) partnership between the US federal government (through the US Department of Energy [DOE]) and members of the US PV industry. The goals of PVMaT are to help the US PV industry improve module manufacturing processes and equipment; accelerate manufacturing cost reductions for PV modules, balance-of-systems components, and integrated systems; increase commercial product performance and reliability; and enhance the investment opportunities for substantial scale-ups of US-based PV manufacturing plant capacities. The approach for PVMaT has been to cost-share risk taking by industry as it explores new manufacturing options and ideas for improved PV modules and other components, advances system and product integration, and develops new system designs, all of which will lead to overall reduced system life-cycle costs for reliable PV end products. The PVMaT Phase 4A module manufacturing R and D projects are just being completed and initial results for the work directed primarily to module manufacture are reported in this paper. Fourteen new Phase 5A subcontracts have also just been awarded and planned R and D areas for the ten focused on module manufacture are described. Finally, government funding, subcontractor cost sharing, and a comparison of the relative efforts by PV technology throughout the PVMaT project are presented.

  15. Manufacturing cost analysis for photovoltaic concentrator tracking structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, B.; Pass, N.; Blackwell, R.

    1983-11-01

    Detailed manufacturing, transportation and installation costs are developed for the current design of three different photovoltaic concentrator tracking structures at a production rate of 10 to the 5th power/sq m per year. These costs are combined with array field performance estimates to obtain cost per watt and levelized energy costs for 500 kW fields. Installed structure costs for the three arrays (including G and A and profit but not module FOB costs) range from $166 to $208/sqm, or $1.04 to $1.28/W sub ap in 1982 dollars. The pedestal tracking structure has a lower cost than the post/frame or pylon/torque tube arrays.

  16. High-rate deposition of a-SiNx:H for photovoltaic applications by the expanding thermal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessels, W. M. M.; Hong, J.; van Assche, F. J. H.; Moschner, J. D.; Lauinger, T.; Soppe, W. J.; Weeber, A. W.; Schram, D. C.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.

    2002-09-01

    Driven by the need for improvement of the economical competitiveness of photovoltaic energy, the feasibility of high-rate (>1 nm/s) amorphous silicon nitride (a-SiNx):H deposited by the expanding thermal plasma (ETP) technique has been explored with respect to the application of the a-SiNx:H as functional antireflection coating on crystalline silicon solar cells. First, the deposition rate and the a-SiNx:H film properties, such as refractive index, Si, N, and H atomic density, and hydrogen bonding configurations, have been mapped for various operating conditions. From ellipsometry, elastic recoil detection, and infrared spectroscopy, it has been shown that deposition rates up to 20 nm/s can be reached with a fair film homogeneity and that the refractive index and the N/Si ratio can fully be tuned by the plasma composition while the hydrogen content can be controlled by the substrate temperature. Good antireflection coating performance of the a-SiNx:H has therefore been observed for monocrystalline silicon solar cells. These cells with ETP a-SiNx:H yielded only slightly lower conversion efficiencies than high-quality reference cells due to a much lower degree of surface passivation. This lack of surface passivation has also been shown in a separate study on the surface recombination velocity. Furthermore, it has been tested whether the a-SiNx:H films lead to silicon bulk passivation, which is essential for solar cells based on cheaper, defective silicon stock material such as multicrystalline silicon. It has been proven that bulk passivation of the cells is indeed induced by the high-rate ETP deposited a-SiNx:H after a high-temperature step in which the metal contacts of the cells are processed. These results make the ETP technique an interesting candidate for high-throughput processing of competitive silicon solar cells. copyright 2002 American Vacuum Society.

  17. Behavioral data of thin-film single junction amorphous silicon (a-Si) photovoltaic modules under outdoor long term exposure

    PubMed Central

    Kichou, Sofiane; Silvestre, Santiago; Nofuentes, Gustavo; Torres-Ramírez, Miguel; Chouder, Aissa; Guasch, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Four years׳ behavioral data of thin-film single junction amorphous silicon (a-Si) photovoltaic (PV) modules installed in a relatively dry and sunny inland site with a Continental-Mediterranean climate (in the city of Jaén, Spain) are presented in this article. The shared data contributes to clarify how the Light Induced Degradation (LID) impacts the output power generated by the PV array, especially in the first days of exposure under outdoor conditions. Furthermore, a valuable methodology is provided in this data article permitting the assessment of the degradation rate and the stabilization period of the PV modules. Further discussions and interpretations concerning the data shared in this article can be found in the research paper “Characterization of degradation and evaluation of model parameters of amorphous silicon photovoltaic modules under outdoor long term exposure” (Kichou et al., 2016) [1]. PMID:26977439

  18. Behavioral data of thin-film single junction amorphous silicon (a-Si) photovoltaic modules under outdoor long term exposure.

    PubMed

    Kichou, Sofiane; Silvestre, Santiago; Nofuentes, Gustavo; Torres-Ramírez, Miguel; Chouder, Aissa; Guasch, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Four years׳ behavioral data of thin-film single junction amorphous silicon (a-Si) photovoltaic (PV) modules installed in a relatively dry and sunny inland site with a Continental-Mediterranean climate (in the city of Jaén, Spain) are presented in this article. The shared data contributes to clarify how the Light Induced Degradation (LID) impacts the output power generated by the PV array, especially in the first days of exposure under outdoor conditions. Furthermore, a valuable methodology is provided in this data article permitting the assessment of the degradation rate and the stabilization period of the PV modules. Further discussions and interpretations concerning the data shared in this article can be found in the research paper "Characterization of degradation and evaluation of model parameters of amorphous silicon photovoltaic modules under outdoor long term exposure" (Kichou et al., 2016) [1]. PMID:26977439

  19. Assessment of low-cost manufacturing process sequences. [photovoltaic solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, R. G.

    1979-01-01

    An extensive research and development activity to reduce the cost of manufacturing photovoltaic solar arrays by a factor of approximately one hundred is discussed. Proposed and actual manufacturing process descriptions were compared to manufacturing costs. An overview of this methodology is presented.

  20. Structural and photovoltaic properties of a-Si (SNc)/c-Si heterojunction fabricated by EBPVD technique

    SciTech Connect

    Demiroğlu, D.; Kazmanli, K.; Urgen, M.; Tatar, B.

    2013-12-16

    In last two decades sculptured thin films are very attractive for researches. Some properties of these thin films, like high porosity correspondingly high large surface area, controlled morphology; bring into prominence on them. Sculptured thin films have wide application areas as electronics, optics, mechanics, magnetic and chemistry. Slanted nano-columnar (SnC) thin films are a type of sculptured thin films. In this investigation SnC thin films were growth on n-type crystalline Si(100) and p-type crystalline Si(111) via ultra-high vacuum electron beam evaporation technique. The structural and morphological properties of the amorphous silicon thin films were investigated by XRD, Raman and FE-SEM analysis. According to the XRD and Raman analysis the structure of thin film was amorphous and FE-SEM analysis indicated slanted nano-columns were formed smoothly. Slanted nano-columns a-Si/c-Si heterojunction were prepared as using a photovoltaic device. In this regard we were researched photovoltaic properties of these heterojunction with current-voltage characterization under dark and illumination conditions. Electrical parameters were determined from the current-voltage characteristic in the dark conditions zero-bias barrier height Φ{sub B0} = 0.83−1.00eV; diode ideality factor η = 11.71−10.73; series resistance R{sub s} = 260−31.1 kΩ and shunt resistance R{sub sh} = 25.71−63.5 MΩ SnC a-Si/n-Si and SnC a-Si/p-Si heterojunctions shows a pretty good photovoltaic behavior about 10{sup 3}- 10{sup 4} times. The obtained photovoltaic parameters are such as short circuit current density J{sub sc} 83-40 mA/m{sup 2}, open circuit voltage V{sub oc} 900-831 mV.

  1. Manufacturing injection-moleded Fresnel lens parquets for point-focus concentrating photovoltaic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, E.M.; Masso, J.D.

    1995-10-01

    This project involved the manufacturing of curved-faceted, injection-molded, four-element Fresnel lens parquets for concentrating photovoltaic arrays. Previous efforts showed that high-efficiency (greater than 82%) Fresnel concentrators could be injection molded. This report encompasses the mold design, molding, and physical testing of a four-lens parquet for a solar photovoltaic concentrator system.

  2. Experience Scaling Up Manufacturing of Emerging Photovoltaic Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, G. W.; Skinner, D. E.

    2007-01-01

    This report examines two important generic photovoltaic technologies at particularly revealing stages of development, i.e., the stages between R&D and stable commercial production and profitable sales. Based on two historical cases, it attempts to shed light on the difference between: (1) costs and schedules validated by actual manufacturing and market experience, and (2) estimated costs and schedules that rely on technology forecasts and engineering estimates. The amorphous Silicon case also identifies some of the costs that are incurred in meeting specific market requirements, while the Cadmium Telluride case identifies many of the operational challenges involved in transferring R&D results to production. The transition between R&D and commercial success takes a great deal of time and money for emerging energy conversion technologies in general. The experience reported here can be instructive to those managing comparable efforts, and to their investors. It can also be instructive to R&D managers responsible for positioning such new technologies for commercial success.

  3. Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seippel, R. G.

    This book attempts to provide the reader with a cursory look at solar energy from a quarry of quartz to a sophisticated solar system. The progression of the theories of light is discussed along with the progression of photoelectricity, light rays, the optical spectrum, light reception, photodetection, aspects of photometry and radiometry, preferred terms in radiometric measurement, semiconductor physics, and light energy availability. Other subjects explored are related to manufacturing processes, photovoltaic materials, crystal growing, slicing techniques, wafer finishing, solar cell fabrication, photovoltaic cell types, concentrators, module fabrication, problems of quality assurance, photovoltaic systems, and the photovoltaics hierarchy. Attention is given to the polycrystalline cell, insulator cells, cadmium sulfide cells, amorphous silicon cells, an electrochemical cell, and the low-cost solar array project.

  4. Thermal stability of photovoltaic a-Si:H determined by neutron reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Qviller, A. J. Haug, H.; You, C. C.; Hasle, I. M.; Marstein, E. S.; Frommen, C.; Hauback, B. C.; Dennison, A. J. C.; Vorobiev, A.; Østreng, E.; Fjellvåg, H.; Hjörvarsson, B.

    2014-12-08

    Neutron and X-ray reflectometry were used to determine the layer structure and hydrogen content of thin films of amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) deposited onto crystalline silicon (Si) wafers for surface passivation in solar cells. The combination of these two reflectometry techniques is well suited for non-destructive probing of the structure of a-Si:H due to being able to probe buried interfaces and having sub-nanometer resolution. Neutron reflectometry is also unique in its ability to allow determination of density gradients of light elements such as hydrogen (H). The neutron scattering contrast between Si and H is strong, making it possible to determine the H concentration in the deposited a-Si:H. In order to correlate the surface passivation properties supplied by the a-Si:H thin films, as quantified by obtainable effective minority carrier lifetime, photoconductance measurements were also performed. It is shown that the minority carrier lifetime falls sharply when H has been desorbed from a-Si:H by annealing.

  5. Properties of photovoltaic characteristics of a-SiC:H film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enomoto, K.; Nishiwaki, H.; Watanabe, K.; Nakashima, Y.; Tsuda, S.; Ohnishi, M.; Kuwano, Y.

    1982-01-01

    a-SiC:H films were prepared from a glow discharge in a mixture of SiH4 and CH4 in a capacitive coupled system with parallel plane electrodes. The fundamental properties of the a-SiC:H films were investigated. Using the a-SiC:H film for window material, Glass/SnO2/p(SiC)-i-n/Al cells were fabricated by the consecutive, separated reaction chamber method. The best conversion efficiency of the cell with a size of 4 sq mm was 8.15 percent, which is much larger than that prepared by the single reaction chamber method in the laboratory. It seems that one of the main reasons for the difference in the conversion efficiency is the undesirable mixing of carbon in the non-doped a-Si:H layer. An integrated type Glass/SnO2/p(SiC)-i-n/Al cell with a size of 10 cm x 10 cm was also fabricated. The best conversion efficiency was 6.35 percent.

  6. Photovoltaic effect in a-Si/c-Si heterostructure prepared by RF magnetron sputtering technique

    SciTech Connect

    Budaguan, B.G.; Sherchenkov, A.A.; Aivazov, A.A.

    1996-12-31

    Photosensitivity spectral dependencies of the a-Si(n-type)/c-Si(p-type) heterostructure for the different reverse biases, V{sub b}, amorphous Si film thickness, substrate predeposition temperatures, T{sub s}, and annealing conditions, T{sub a}, were investigated in the wavelengths range of 500--1,200 nm. It was found that the position of the relative photosensitivity maximum depends on T{sub a} and V{sub b} and can be varied in the wavelengths range of 840--1,080 nm. The energy band diagram of the heterostructure was analyzed to explain the observed results. It was shown that the photosensitivity properties of the a-Si/c-Si heterostructure depend on the interfacial condition. The perspective application of the structures investigated is IR detector fabrication.

  7. Recycling of cadmium and selenium from photovoltaic modules and manufacturing wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Zweibel, K.

    1992-01-01

    Since the development of the first silicon based photovoltaic cell in the 1950's, large advances have been made in photovoltaic material and processing options. At present there is growing interest in the commercial potential of cadmium telluride (CdTe) and copper indium diselenide (CIS) photovoltaic modules. As the commercial potential of these technologies becomes more apparent, interest in the environmental, health and safety issues associated with their production, use and disposal has also increased because of the continuing regulatory focus on cadmium and selenium. In future, recycling of spent or broken CdTe and CIS modules and manufacturing wastes may be needed for environmental, economic or political reasons. To assist industry to identify recycling options early in the commercialization process, a Workshop was convened. At this Workshop, representatives from the photovoltaic, electric utility, and nonferrous metals industries met to explore technical and institutional options for the recycling of spent CdTe and CIS modules and manufacturing wastes. This report summarizes the results of the Workshop. This report includes: (1) A discussion of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act regulations and their potential implications to the photovoltaic industry; (2) an assessment of the needs of the photovoltaic industry from the perspective of module manufacturers and consumers; (3) an overview of recycling technologies now employed by other industries for similar types of materials; and, (4) a list of recommendation.

  8. Recycling of cadmium and selenium from photovoltaic modules and manufacturing wastes. A workshop report

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Zweibel, K.

    1992-10-01

    Since the development of the first silicon based photovoltaic cell in the 1950`s, large advances have been made in photovoltaic material and processing options. At present there is growing interest in the commercial potential of cadmium telluride (CdTe) and copper indium diselenide (CIS) photovoltaic modules. As the commercial potential of these technologies becomes more apparent, interest in the environmental, health and safety issues associated with their production, use and disposal has also increased because of the continuing regulatory focus on cadmium and selenium. In future, recycling of spent or broken CdTe and CIS modules and manufacturing wastes may be needed for environmental, economic or political reasons. To assist industry to identify recycling options early in the commercialization process, a Workshop was convened. At this Workshop, representatives from the photovoltaic, electric utility, and nonferrous metals industries met to explore technical and institutional options for the recycling of spent CdTe and CIS modules and manufacturing wastes. This report summarizes the results of the Workshop. This report includes: (1) A discussion of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act regulations and their potential implications to the photovoltaic industry; (2) an assessment of the needs of the photovoltaic industry from the perspective of module manufacturers and consumers; (3) an overview of recycling technologies now employed by other industries for similar types of materials; and, (4) a list of recommendation.

  9. Waste reduction options for manufacturers of copper indium diselenide photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect

    DePhillips, M.P.; Fthenakis, V.M.; Moskowitz, P.D.

    1994-03-01

    This paper identifies general waste reduction concepts and specific waste reduction options to be used in the production of copper indium diselenide (CIS) photovoltaic cells. A general discussion of manufacturing processes used for the production of photovoltaic cells is followed by a description of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guidelines for waste reduction (i.e., waste minimization through pollution prevention). A more specific discussion of manufacturing CIS cells is accompanied by detailed suggestions regarding waste minimization options for both inputs and outputs for ten stages of this process. Waste reduction from inputs focuses on source reduction and process changes, and reduction from outputs focuses on material reuse and recycling.

  10. Large lateral photovoltaic effect in µc-SiOx:H/a-Si:H/c-Si p-i-n structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Shuang; Chen, Jianhui; Liu, Jihong; Zhang, Xinhui; Wang, Shufang; Fu, Guangsheng

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we report on a large lateral photovoltaic effect (LPE) in a hydrogenated microcrystal silicon-oxygen (µc-SiOx:H)-based p-i-n structure. Compared with LPE in a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H)-based p-i-n structure, this structure showed an abnormal current-voltage (I-V) curve with a lower photoelectric conversion efficiency, but exhibited a much higher LPE with the highest position sensitivity of 64.3 mV/mm. We ascribe this to the enhancement of the lateral gradient of excess transmitted carriers induced by increasing both Schottky barrier and p-type layer body conductivity. Our results suggest that this µc-SiOx:H-based p-i-n structure may be a promising candidate for position-sensitive detectors (PSDs). Moreover, our results may also imply that solar cell devices with abnormal I-V curves (or low efficiency) could find their new applications in other aspects.

  11. Lessons Learned from the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology/PV Manufacturing R&D and Thin Film PV Partnership Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Margolis, R.; Mitchell, R.; Zweibel, K.

    2006-09-01

    As the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Solar Energy Technologies Program initiates new cost-shared solar energy R&D under the Solar America Initiative (SAI), it is useful to analyze the experience gained from cost-shared R&D projects that have been funded through the program to date. This report summarizes lessons learned from two DOE-sponsored photovoltaic (PV) projects: the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology/PV Manufacturing R&D (PVMaT/PVMR&D) project and the Thin-Film PV Partnership project. During the past 10-15 years, these two projects have invested roughly $330 million of government resources in cost-shared R&D and leveraged another $190 million in private-sector PV R&D investments. Following a description of key findings and brief descriptions of the PVMaT/PVMR&D and Thin-Film PV Partnership projects, this report presents lessons learned from the projects.

  12. Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) improvements for ENTECH's concentrator module

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neill, M.J.; McDanal, A.J.; Perry, J.L.; Jackson, M.C.; Walters, R.R. )

    1991-11-01

    This final technical report documents ENTECH's Phase 1 contract with Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project. Under this project we prepared a detailed description of our current manufacturing process for making our unique linear Fresnel lens photovoltaic concentrator modules. In addition, we prepared a detailed description of an improved manufacturing process, which will simultaneously increase module production rates, enhance module quality, and substantially reduce module costs. We also identified potential problems in implementing the new manufacturing process, and we proposed solutions to these anticipated problems. Before discussing the key results of our program, however, we present a brief description of our unique photovoltaic technology. The key conclusion of our PVMAT Phase 1 study is that our module technology, without further breakthroughs, can realistically meet the near-term DOE goal of 12 cents/kWh levelized electricity cost, provided that we successfully implement the new manufacturing process at a production volume of at least 10 megawatts per year. The key recommendation from our Phase 1 study is to continue our PVMaT project into Phase 2A, which is directed toward the actual manufacturing technology development required for our new module production process. 15 refs.

  13. Economics of Future Growth in Photovoltaics Manufacturing; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Basore, Paul; Chung, Donald; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2015-06-14

    The past decade’s record of growth in the photovoltaic manufacturing industry indicates that global investment in manufacturing capacity for photovoltaic modules tends to increase in proportion to the size of the industry. The slope of this proportionality determines how fast the industry will grow in the future. Two key parameters determine this slope. One is the annual global investment in manufacturing capacity normalized to the manufacturing capacity for the previous year (capacity-normalized capital investment rate, CapIR, units $/W). The other is how much capital investment is required for each watt of annual manufacturing capacity, normalized to the service life of the assets (capacity-normalized capital demand rate, CapDR, units $/W). If these two parameters remain unchanged from the values they have held for the past few years, global manufacturing capacity will peak in the next few years and then decline. However, it only takes a small improvement in CapIR to ensure future growth in photovoltaics. Any accompanying improvement in CapDR will accelerate that growth.

  14. US manufacturers of commercially available stand-alone photovoltaic lighting systems

    SciTech Connect

    McNutt, P

    1994-05-01

    This report introduces photovoltaic (PV) lighting systems, gives some specifications for ordering these systems, and provides a list of some of the manufacturers of these systems in the United States. These PV lighting systems are all commercially available. They are stand-alone systems because they are not tied to the electric utility power grid.

  15. MANUFACTURE OF PHOTOVOLTAIC SOLAR CELL USING PLANT CHLOROPHYLL

    EPA Science Inventory

    To date, we have successfully manufactured working chlorophyll sensitized solar cells using chlorophyll (and b mixture) from spinach leaves. We have evaluated the electronic characteristics (voltage, current, and power outputs using different loading resistors) of this solar c...

  16. Recent progress in the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology Project (PVMaT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witt, C. Edwin; Mitchell, Richard L.; Thomas, Holly; Herwig, Lloyd O.; Ruby, Douglas S.; Sellers, Rick

    1994-12-01

    The Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) Project was initiated in 1990 to help the US photovoltaic (PV) industry extend its world leadership role in manufacturing and commercially developing PV modules and systems. It is being conducted in several phases, staggered to support industry progress. The four most recently awarded subcontracts (Phase 2B) are now completing their first year of research. They include two subcontracts on CdTe, one on Spheral Solar(trademark) Cells, and one on cast polysilicon. These subcontracts represent new technology additions to the PVMaT Project. Subcontracts initiated in earlier phases are nearing completion, and their progress is summarized. An additional phase of PVMaT, Phase 4A, is being initiated which will emphasize product-driven manufacturing research and development. The intention of Phase 4A is to emphasize improvement and cost reduction in the manufacture of full-system PV products. The work areas may include, but are not limited to, issues such as improvement of module manufacturing processes; system and system component packaging, integration, manufacturing, and assembly; product manufacturing flexibility; and balance-of-system development with the goal of product manufacturing improvements.

  17. Recent progress in the photovoltaic manufacturing technology project (PVMaT)

    SciTech Connect

    Witt, C.E.; Mitchell, R.L.; Thomas, H. ); Herwig, L.O. ); Ruby, D.S. ); Sellers, R.

    1994-12-09

    The Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) Project was initiated in 1990 to help the US photovoltaic (PV) industry extend its world leadership role in manufacturing and commercially developing PV modules and systems. It is being conducted in several phases, staggered to support industry progress. The four most recently awarded subcontracts (Phase 2B) are now completing their first year of research. They include two subcontracts on CdTe, one on Spheral Solar[trademark] Cells, and one on cast polysilicon. These subcontracts represent new technology additions to the PVMaT Project. Subcontracts initiated in earlier phases are nearing completion, and their progress is summarized. An additional phase of PVMaT, Phase 4A, is being initiated which will emphasize product-driven manufacturing research and development. The intention of Phase 4A is to emphasize improvement and cost reduction in the manufacture of full-system PV products. The work areas may include, but are not limited to, issues such as improvement of module manufacturing processes; system and system component packaging, integration, manufacturing, and assembly; product manufacturing flexibility; and balance-of-system development with the goal of product manufacturing improvements.

  18. Photovoltaic manufacturing technology, Phase 1. Final technical report, 1 May 1991--10 May 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    This report describes subcontracted research by the Chronar Corporation, prepared by Advanced Photovoltaic Systems, Inc. (APS) for Phase 1 of the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology Development project. Amorphous silicon is chosen as the PV technology that Chronar Corporation and APS believe offers the greatest potential for manufacturing improvements, which, in turn, will result in significant cost reductions and performance improvements in photovoltaic products. The APS ``Eureka`` facility was chosen as the manufacturing system that can offer the possibility of achieving these production enhancements. The relationship of the ``Eureka`` facility to Chronar`s ``batch`` plants is discussed. Five key areas are also identified that could meet the objectives of manufacturing potential that could lead to improved performance, reduced manufacturing costs, and significantly increased production. The projected long-term potential benefits of these areas are discussed, as well as problems that may impede the achievement of the hoped-for developments. A significant number of the problems discussed are of a generic nature and could be of general interest to the industry. The final section of this document addresses the cost and time estimates for achieving the solutions to the problems discussed earlier. Emphasis is placed on the number, type, and cost of the human resources required for the project.

  19. Recent developments in the economic modeling of photovoltaic module manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, R. G.

    1979-01-01

    Recent developments in the solar array manufacturing industry costing standards (SAMICS) are described. Consideration is given to the added capability to handle arbitrary operating schedules and the revised procedure for calculation of one-time costs. The results of an extensive validation study are summarized.

  20. Transition metal and rare earth quad-doped photovoltaic phosphate glasses toward raising a-SiC:H solar cell performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, P.; Zhang, C. M.; Zhu, P. F.

    2016-01-01

    Efficiency enhancement of a hydrogenated amorphous-silicon carbide (a-SiC:H) solar cell using downshifting and upconversion of photovoltaic (PV) glasses doped with transition metal (TM) ions and rare earth (RE) ions are investigated. P2O5-Li2O-Al2O3-Sb2O3-MnO-Yb2O3-Er2O3 glass doped with Sb3+-Mn2+-Yb3+-Er3+ ions is prepared and the PV glass is placed on an a-SiC:H solar cell. The performance of the cell in combination with the PV glass is simulated and measured, and the results show that the theoretical and experimental efficiencies are both enhanced compared to the bare one. The potential of TM-RE quad-doped glasses for improving the efficiency of a-SiC:H PV modules are explored.

  1. Capital intensity of photovoltaics manufacturing: Barrier to scale and opportunity for innovation

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Douglas M.; Fu, Ran; Horowitz, Kelsey; Basore, Paul A.; Woodhouse, Michael; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2015-09-07

    In this study, using a bottom-up cost model, we assess the impact of initial factory capital expenditure (capex) on photovoltaic (PV) module minimum sustainable price (MSP) and industry-wide trends. We find capex to have two important impacts on PV manufacturing. First, capex strongly influences the per-unit MSP of a c-Si module: we calculate that the capex-related elements sum to 22% of MSP for an integrated wafer, cell, and module manufacturer. This fraction provides a significant opportunity to reduce MSP toward the U.S. DOE SunShot module price target through capex innovation.

  2. Photovoltaic manufacturing technology (PVMaT) improvements for ENTECH{close_quote}s fourth-generation concentrator systems

    SciTech Connect

    ONeill, M.J.; McDanal, A.J.

    1997-02-01

    This paper describes recent improvements in manufacturing technology for fourth-generation photovoltaic concentrator systems. The fourth-generation systems are firmly based on prior generations of a field-proven, high-efficiency, stable photovoltaic technology. The fourth-generation manufacturing process has been streamlined and validated through pilot runs and field deployments. Future plans include a 1.5 MW installation in 1998, as part of the Solar Enterprise Zone (SEZ) program in Nevada. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Next Generation Print-based Manufacturing for Photovoltaics and Solid State Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Sue A. Carter

    2012-09-07

    For the grand challenge of reducing our energy and carbon footprint, the development of renewable energy and energy efficient technologies offer a potential solution. Energy technologies can reduce our dependence on foreign oil as well as the energy consumed by the petroleum industry, the leading consumer of energy by a U.S. industry sector. Nonetheless, the manufacturing processes utilized to manufacture equipment for alternative energy technologies often involve energy-intensive processes. This undermines some of the advantages to moving to 'green' technologies in the first place. Our answer to the Industrial Technology Program's (ITP) Grand Challenge FOA was to develop a transformational low cost manufacturing process for plastic-based photovoltaics that will lower by over 50% both energy consumption and greenhouse emissions and offer a return-of-investment of over 20%. We demonstrated a Luminescent Solar Concentrator fabricated on a plastic acrylic substrate (i.e. no glass) that increases the power output of the PV cell by 2.2x with a 2% power efficiency as well as an LSC with a 7% power efficiency that increased the power output from the PV cells by 35%. S large area 20-inch x 60-inch building-integrated photovoltaic window was fabricated using contract manufacturing with a 4% power efficiency which improved the power output of the PV cell by over 50%. In addition, accelerated lifetimes of the luminescent material demonstrate lifetimes of 20-years.

  4. Flat plate vs. concentrator solar photovoltaic cells - A manufacturing cost analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granon, L. A.; Coleman, M. G.

    1980-01-01

    The choice of which photovoltaic system (flat plate or concentrator) to use for utilizing solar cells to generate electricity depends mainly on the cost. A detailed, comparative manufacturing cost analysis of the two types of systems is presented. Several common assumptions, i.e., cell thickness, interest rate, power rate, factory production life, polysilicon cost, and direct labor rate are utilized in this analysis. Process sequences, cost variables, and sensitivity analyses have been studied, and results of the latter show that the most important parameters which determine manufacturing costs are concentration ratio, manufacturing volume, and cell efficiency. The total cost per watt of the flat plate solar cell is $1.45, and that of the concentrator solar cell is $1.85, the higher cost being due to the increased process complexity and material costs.

  5. Dark current-voltage measurements on photovoltaic modules as a diagnostic or manufacturing tool

    SciTech Connect

    King, D.L.; Hansen, B.R.; Quintana, M.A.; Kratochvil, J.A.

    1997-10-01

    Dark current-voltage (dark I-V) measurements are commonly used to analyze the electrical characteristics of solar cells, providing an effective way to determine fundamental performance parameters without the need for a solar simulator. The dark I-V measurement procedure does not provide information regarding short-circuit current, but is more sensitive than light I-V measurements in determining the other parameters (series resistance, shunt resistance, diode factor, and diode saturation currents) that dictate the electrical performance of a photovoltaic device. The work documented here extends the use of dark I-V measurements to photovoltaic modules, illustrates their use in diagnosing module performance losses, and proposes their use for process monitoring during manufacturing.

  6. A preliminary 'test case' manufacturing sequence for 50 cents/watt solar photovoltaic modules in 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickler, D. B.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes a 'test case' manufacturing process sequence for solar photovoltaic modules which will cost 50 cents/watt in 1986. The process, which starts with the purification of silicon grown into 75-mm-wide thin ribbons, is discussed, and the plant layout is depicted; each department is sized to produce 250 MW of modules/per year. The cost of this process sequence is compared to present technology at various companies showing considerable spread for each process; data are tabulated in a composite state-of-the-art cell processing cost summary for these processes.

  7. Toxicology of tetramethyltin and other organometals used in photovoltaic cell manufacture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, L. D.; Medeiros, W. H.; Moskowitz, P. D.; Rybicka, K.

    1988-07-01

    In photovoltaic cell fabrication, organometals (alkyl metals) may be used in such processes as metalorganic chemical vapor deposition, transparent contact oxide deposition, doping, and ion implantation. Although these compounds offer potential performance advantages over earth metals and possibly greater safety in handling than metal hydrides, they are not without risk to health and property. Most organometals can ignite spontaneously in air. Some also react violently with water. Oxidation by-products from these reactions are hazardous to health. Of the organometals used in photovoltaic cell fabrication, only the toxicology of organotins (triethyl-, trimethyl- and tetramethyltin) was studied extensively. In mammalian systems, tetramethyltin is rapidly dealkylated to trimethyltin. Although tin was classified by some investigators as an essential trace element, the effects of organotin compounds on humans are poorly known. Animal studies show that the most prominent effects of trimethyltin are on the central nervous system. Several observations of poisoning were reported; effects ranged from reversible neurologic disorders to death. Limited available data suggest that humans respond to single acute doses and more alarmingly to repeated sub-toxic doses, suggesting a cumulative effect. Toxicologic properties of diethyltelluride also were evaluated in animal experiments. The compound had toxic effects on the blood, liver, kidney, heart, and skin. Based on these studies and others of related compounds (e.g., methylmercury, tributyltin) extreme caution should be exercised in using organometal compounds in photovoltaic cell manufacturing.

  8. Toxicology of tetramethyltin and other organometals used in photovoltaic cell manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, L.D.; Medeiros, W.H.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Rybicka, K.

    1988-01-01

    In photovoltaic cell fabrication, organometals (alkyl metals) may be used in such processes as metalorganic chemical vapor deposition, transparent contact oxide deposition, doping, and ion implantation. Although these compounds offer potential performance advantages over earth metals and possibly greater safety in handling than metal hydrides, they are not without risk to health and property. Most organometals can ignite spontaneously in air. Some also react violently with water. Oxidation by-products from these reactions are hazardous to health. Of the organometals used in photovoltaic cell fabrication, only the toxicology of organotins (triethyl-, trimethyl- and tetramethyltin) was studied extensively. In mammalian systems, tetramethyltin is rapidly dealkylated to trimethyltin. Although tin was classified by some investigators as an essential trace element, the effects of organotin compounds on humans are poorly known. Animal studies show that the most prominent effects of trimethyltin are on the central nervous system. Several observations of poisoning were reported; effects ranged from reversible neurologic disorders to death. Limited available data suggest that humans respond to single acute doses, and more alarmingly, to repeated sub-toxic doses, suggesting a cumulative effect. Toxicologic properties of diethyltelluride also were evaluated in animal experiments. The compound had toxic effects on the blood, liver, kidney, heart, and skin. Based on these studies and others of related compounds (e.g., methylmercury, tributyltin) extreme caution should be exercised in using organometal compounds in photovoltaic cell manufacturing. 54 refs., 3 tabs.

  9. Toxicology of tetramethyltin and other organometals used in photovoltaic cell manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, L.D.; Medeiros, W.H.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Rybicka, K.

    1988-07-15

    In photovoltaic cell fabrication, organometals (alkyl metals) may be used in such processes as metalorganic chemical vapor deposition, transparent contact oxide deposition, doping, and ion implantation. Although these compounds offer potential performance advantages over earth metals and possibly greater safety in handling than metal hydrides, they are not without risk to health and property. Most organometals can ignite spontaneously in air. Some also react violently with water. Oxidation by-products from these reactions are hazardous to health. Of the organometals used in photovoltaic cell fabrication, only the toxicology of organotins (triethyl-, trimethyl- and tetramethyltin) was studied extensively. In mammalian systems, tetramethyltin is rapidly dealkylated to trimethyltin. Although tin was classified by some investigators as an essential trace element, the effects of organotin compounds on humans are poorly known. Animal studies show that the most prominent effects of trimethyltin are on the central nervous system. Several observations of poisoning were reported; effects ranged from reversible neurologic disorders to death. Limited available data suggest that humans respond to single acute doses and more alarmingly to repeated sub-toxic doses, suggesting a cumulative effect. Toxicologic properties of diethyltelluride also were evaluated in animal experiments. The compound had toxic effects on the blood, liver, kidney, heart, and skin. Based on these studies and others of related compounds (e.g., methylmercury, tributyltin) extreme caution should be exercised in using organometal compounds in photovoltaic cell manufacturing.

  10. Study of locally manufactured motor vehicle batteries in stand alone home photovoltaic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, S.

    1999-07-01

    Analysis of voltage, current, specific gravity, and temperature was performed on locally manufactured lead acid batteries operating in stand alone home photovoltaic (SAHPV) systems in the Dominican Republic. While voltage, charge/discharge current, and specific gravity of most batteries were within reasonable limits, there were indications of batteries spending an excessive time discharged and some incidents of overcharge. During charging above 1 amp, ambient temperatures were 6 to 13 C above the optimal operating temperature (25 C) and battery temperatures were 9 to 20 C above 25 C. Examination of worn out batteries from these SAHPV systems revealed that the majority had deteriorated positive plates and/or sulfation, while a smaller number showed signs of spalling. High temperature was determined to be a significant factor contributing to the premature failure of locally manufactured lead acid batteries operating in these systems.

  11. Costs of controlling emissions from the manufacture of silicon photovoltaic cells using dendritic web technology

    SciTech Connect

    Wilenitz, I.

    1983-11-01

    Detailed analyses were conducted to determine environmental control costs associated with the production of silicon dendritic web photovoltaic (PV) cells. In these analyses (i) likely manufacturing processing steps were identified, (ii) material inputs and uncontrolled material outputs were estimated, (iii) need for and capability of environmental control equipment were examined, and (iv) capital and operation and maintenance costs for environmental controls for integrated and disaggregated plant designs were estimated. These estimates were developed for a hypothetical facility with a yearly output of PV cells capable of producing 10 MWp. Analysis suggested that the annualized incremental environmental control costs, based on capital recovery over a 10 year plant life, would be 1.4 cents and 2.8 cents per watt for integrated and disaggregated plant designs, respectively. Capital costs ranged from 50% to 55% (integrated) and 36% to 40% (disaggregated) of the estimated costs; the ranges reflected differences in assumed real discount rates. Because of the small emission flows projected, treatment equipment to be used, for the most part, represents the smallest size readily available from equipment manufacturers. Consequently, larger emission flows could be accommodated without additional capital costs. Total control costs are small in comparison with current production costs for silicon photovoltaic devices ($5/watt), but may be of greater importance at projected production cost of $0.5 to 1.0/watt. These conclusions may not apply to other material or process options.

  12. Integral bypass diodes in an amorphous silicon alloy photovoltaic module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanak, J. J.; Flaisher, H.

    1991-01-01

    Thin-film, tandem-junction, amorphous silicon (a-Si) photovoltaic modules were constructed in which a part of the a-Si alloy cell material is used to form bypass protection diodes. This integral design circumvents the need for incorporating external, conventional diodes, thus simplifying the manufacturing process and reducing module weight.

  13. Photovoltaic Czochralski silicon manufacturing technology improvements. Annual subcontract report, 1 April 1993--31 March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Jester, T.

    1995-03-01

    This report describes work performed under a 3-year, 3-phase, cost-share contract to demonstrate significant cost reductions and improvements in manufacturing technology. The objective of the program is to reduce costs in photovoltaic manufacturing by approximately 10% per year. The work was focused in three main areas: (1) silicon crystal growth and thin wafer technology; (2) silicon cell processing; and (3) silicon module fabrication and environmental, safety, and health issues. During this reporting period, several significant improvements were achieved. The crystal growing operation improved significantly with an increase in growth capacity due to larger crucibles, higher polysilicon packing density, and high pull speeds. Wafer processing with wire saws progressed rapidly, and the operation is completely converted to wire saw wafer processing. The wire saws yield almost 50% more wafers per inch in production, thus improving manufacturing volume by 50% without any additional expense in crystal growth. Cell processing improvements focused on better understanding the contact paste and firing processes. Module designs for lower material and labor costs began with the focus on a new junction box, larger modules with larger cells, and a less costly framing technique. In addition, chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) usage was completely eliminated in the Siemens manufacturing facility during this period, resulting in significant reductions in the cost of caustic waste treatment.

  14. Development of Inorganic Precursors for Manufacturing of Photovoltaic Devices: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-308

    SciTech Connect

    van Hest, M.; Ginley, D.

    2013-06-01

    Both NREL and Rohm and Haas Electronic Materials are interested in the development of solution phase metal and semiconductive precursors for the manufacturing of photovoltaic devices. In particular, we intend to develop material sets for atmospheric deposition processes. The cooperation between these two parties will enable high value materials and processing solutions for the manufacturing of low cost, roll-to-roll photovoltaics.

  15. Photovoltaic manufacturing technology (PVMaT). Annual subcontract report, March 31, 1994--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Holley, W A

    1996-01-01

    This report describes work performed under a subcontract to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory under the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology Project. The objectives of this subcontract are to (1) define the problem of yellowing/browning of EVA-based encapsulants; (2) determine probable mechanisms and the role of various parameters such as heat, UV exposure, module construction, EVA interfaces, and EVA thickness, in the browning of EVA-based encapsulants; (3) develop stabilization strategies for various module constructions to protect the encapsulant from degradative failure; (4) conduct laboratory, accelerated outdoor, and field testing of encapsulant, laminated test coupons, and full modules to demonstrate the functional adequacy of the stabilization strategies; and (5) implement these strategies. This report summarizes the accomplishments related to the above goals for the reporting period.

  16. Method of Manufacturing a Light Emitting, Photovoltaic or Other Electronic Apparatus and System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, William Johnstone (Inventor); Lowenthal, Mark David (Inventor); Shotton, Neil O. (Inventor); Blanchard, Richard A. (Inventor); Lewandowski, Mark Allan (Inventor); Fuller, Kirk A. (Inventor); Frazier, Donald Odell (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of manufacturing an electronic apparatus, such as a lighting device having light emitting diodes (LEDs) or a power generating device having photovoltaic diodes. The exemplary method includes depositing a first conductive medium within a plurality of channels of a base to form a plurality of first conductors; depositing within the plurality of channels a plurality of semiconductor substrate particles suspended in a carrier medium; forming an ohmic contact between each semiconductor substrate particle and a first conductor; converting the semiconductor substrate particles into a plurality of semiconductor diodes; depositing a second conductive medium to form a plurality of second conductors coupled to the plurality of semiconductor diodes; and depositing or attaching a plurality of lenses suspended in a first polymer over the plurality of diodes. In various embodiments, the depositing, forming, coupling and converting steps are performed by or through a printing process.

  17. Method of Manufacturing a Light Emitting, Photovoltaic or Other Electronic Apparatus and System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, William Johnstone (Inventor); Lowenthal, Mark D. (Inventor); Shotton, Neil O. (Inventor); Blanchard, Richard A. (Inventor); Lewandowski, Mark Allan (Inventor); Fuller, Kirk A. (Inventor); Frazier, Donald Odell (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of manufacturing an electronic apparatus, such as a lighting device having light emitting diodes (LEDs) or a power generating device having photovoltaic diodes. The exemplary method includes forming at least one first conductor coupled to a base; coupling a plurality of substantially spherical substrate particles to the at least one first conductor; converting the substrate particles into a plurality of substantially spherical diodes; forming at least one second conductor coupled to the substantially spherical diodes; and depositing or attaching a plurality of substantially spherical lenses suspended in a first polymer. The lenses and the suspending polymer have different indices of refraction. In some embodiments, the lenses and diodes have a ratio of mean diameters or lengths between about 10:1 and 2:1. In various embodiments, the forming, coupling and converting steps are performed by or through a printing process.

  18. Method of Manufacturing a Light Emitting, Photovoltaic or Other Electronic Apparatus and System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, William Johnstone (Inventor); Lowenthal, Mark D. (Inventor); Shotton, Neil O. (Inventor); Blanchard, Richard A. (Inventor); Lewandowski, Mark Allan (Inventor); Fuller, Kirk A. (Inventor); Frazier, Donald Odell (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of manufacturing an electronic apparatus, such as a lighting device having light emitting diodes (LEDs) or a power generating device having photovoltaic diodes. The exemplary method includes forming at least one first conductor coupled to a base; coupling a plurality of substrate particles to the at least one first conductor; converting the plurality of substrate particles into a plurality of diodes; forming at least one second conductor coupled to the plurality of spherical diodes; and depositing or attaching a plurality of substantially spherical lenses suspended in a first polymer, with the lenses and the suspending polymer having different indices of refraction. In some embodiments, the lenses and diodes have a ratio of mean diameters or lengths between about 10:1 and 2:1. In various embodiments, the forming, coupling and converting steps are performed by or through a printing process.

  19. Method of manufacturing a light emitting, photovoltaic or other electronic apparatus and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, William Johnstone (Inventor); Lowenthal, Mark D. (Inventor); Shotton, Neil O. (Inventor); Blanchard, Richard A. (Inventor); Lewandowski, Mark Allan (Inventor); Fuller, Kirk A. (Inventor); Frazier, Donald Odell (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of manufacturing an electronic apparatus, such as a lighting device having light emitting diodes (LEDs) or a power generating device having photovoltaic diodes. The exemplary method includes depositing a first conductive medium within a plurality of channels of a base to form a plurality of first conductors; depositing within the plurality of channels a plurality of semiconductor substrate particles suspended in a carrier medium; forming an ohmic contact between each semiconductor substrate particle and a first conductor; converting the semiconductor substrate particles into a plurality of semiconductor diodes; depositing a second conductive medium to form a plurality of second conductors coupled to the plurality of semiconductor diodes; and depositing or attaching a plurality of lenses suspended in a first polymer over the plurality of diodes. In various embodiments, the depositing, forming, coupling and converting steps are performed by or through a printing process.

  20. Cadmium telluride photovoltaic manufacturing technology. Annual subcontract report, 7 January 1994--6 January 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Weisiger, D.; Albright, S.P.; Brines, J.; Thompson, R.

    1995-11-01

    This report describes work performed by Golden Photon, Inc. (GPI), to conduct research under the PVMaT program, Phase 2B. The objective of the research is to advance GPI`s manufacturing technology, reduce module production costs, increase average module performance, and identify ways to expand production capacity. More specifically, the tasks established for Phase I were to design and install leasehold improvements for the 2-MW production line; to improve and develop product design, efficiency, and marketability; to ensure uninterrupted qualified supplies and raw materials for production; to address environmental, health, and safety issues encountered during production of photovoltaic modules; and to reduce the cost of manufacturing modules. During the first half of this reporting period, the development, design, and debugging of cell interconnection equipment critical to start-up was completed. During the second and third quarters, the primary focus was on the substrate deposition steps (tin oxide, cadmium sulfide, and cadmium telluride) and cell interconnection steps (division). In general, process development, engineering, and quality teams continued to focus on identifying, baselining, and improving (through redesign) actual process equipment operation parameters to meet the required PV panel specifications and improve process throughput rates and yields.

  1. Progress of the Photovoltaic Technology Incubator Project Towards an Enhanced U.S. Manufacturing Base: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Ullal, H.; Mitchell, R.; Keyes, B.; VanSant, K.; von Roedern, B.; Symko-Davies, M.; Kane, V.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we report on the major accomplishments of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Solar Energy Technologies Program (SETP) Photovoltaic (PV) Technology Incubator project. The Incubator project facilitates a company's transition from developing a solar cell or PV module prototype to pilot- and large-scale U.S. manufacturing. The project targets small businesses that have demonstrated proof-of-concept devices or processes in the laboratory. Their success supports U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu's SunShot Initiative, which seeks to achieve PV technologies that are cost-competitive without subsidies at large scale with fossil-based energy sources by the end of this decade. The Incubator Project has enhanced U.S. PV manufacturing capacity and created more than 1200 clean energy jobs, resulting in an increase in American economic competitiveness. The investment raised to date by these PV Incubator companies as a result of DOE's $ 59 million investment totals nearly $ 1.3 billion.

  2. Photovoltaic device with increased light absorption and method for its manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Glatfelter, Troy; Vogeli, Craig; Call, Jon; Hammond, Ginger

    1993-07-20

    A photovoltaic cell having a light-directing optical element integrally formed in an encapsulant layer thereof. The optical element redirects light to increase the internal absorption of light incident on the photovoltaic device.

  3. Photovoltaic devices using a-Si:H from higher order silanes. Semiannual report, 1 September 1983-29 February 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Delahoy, A.E.

    1984-10-01

    This report summarizes research performed during a six-month period on hydrogenated amorphous silicon, prepared by chemical vapor deposition using flow methods rather than a static method in order to deposit from a time-invariant gas phase chemistry. Both low-pressure and atmospheric-pressure systems were employed. The feedstock gases were electronic-grade higher order silanes (principally disilane) manufactured by silent electric discharge. Because of the historically poor performance of CVD p layers in p-i-n devices, an effort was made to develop a higher quality p layer. Both silane/diborane and disilane/diborane mixtures were investigated. Using disilane/diborane mixtures at low pressures and very low temperatures (200/sup 0/C) significantly improved LPCVD p layers. P-i-n devices employing these p layers exhibited open-circuit voltages up to 723 mV.

  4. Consortia Focused on Photovoltaic R&D, Manufacturing, and Testing: A Review of Existing Models and Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Coggeshall, C.; Margolis, R. M.

    2010-03-01

    As the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Solar Energy Technologies Program prepares to initiate a new cost-shared research and development (R&D) effort on photovoltaic (PV) manufacturing, it is useful to review the experience to date with consortia focused on PV R&D, manufacturing, and testing. Information was gathered for this report by conducting interviews and accessing Web sites of 14 U.S. consortia and four European consortia, each with either a primary focus on or an emerging interest in PV technology R&D, manufacturing, or testing. Additional input was collected from several workshops held by the DOE and National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in 2009, which examined the practical steps -- including public-private partnerships and policy support -- necessary to enhance the United States' capacity to competitively manufacture photovoltaics. This report categorizes the 18 consortia into three groups: university-led consortia, industry-led consortia, and manufacturing and testing facilities consortia. The first section summarizes the organizations within the different categories, with a particular focus on the key benefits and challenges for each grouping. The second section provides a more detailed overview of each consortium, including the origins, goals, organization, membership, funding sources, and key contacts. This survey is a useful resource for stakeholders interested in PV manufacturing R&D, but should not imply endorsement of any of these groups.

  5. Numerical modeling of uncertainty and variability in the technology, manufacturing, and economics of crystalline silicon photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ristow, Alan H.

    2008-10-01

    Electricity generated from photovoltaics (PV) promises to satisfy the world's ever-growing thirst for energy without significant pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. At present, however, PV is several times too expensive to compete economically with conventional sources of electricity delivered via the power grid. To ensure long-term success, must achieve cost parity with electricity generated by conventional sources of electricity. This requires detailed understanding of the relationship between technology and economics as it pertains to PV devices and systems. The research tasks of this thesis focus on developing and using four types of models in concert to develop a complete picture of how solar cell technology and design choices affect the quantity and cost of energy produced by PV systems. It is shown in this thesis that high-efficiency solar cells can leverage balance-of-systems (BOS) costs to gain an economic advantage over solar cells with low efficiencies. This advantage is quantified and dubbed the "efficiency premium." Solar cell device models are linked to models of manufacturing cost and PV system performance to estimate both PV system cost and performance. These, in turn, are linked to a model of levelized electricity cost to estimate the per-kilowatt-hour cost of electricity produced by the PV system. A numerical PV module manufacturing cost model is developed to facilitate this analysis. The models and methods developed in this thesis are used to propose a roadmap to high-efficiency multicrystalline-silicon PV modules that achieve cost parity with electricity from the grid. The impact of PV system failures on the cost of electricity is also investigated; from this, a methodology is proposed for improving the reliability of PV inverters.

  6. Amorphous silicon photovoltaic manufacturing technology, Phase 2A. Semiannual subcontract report, 1 May 1993--31 October 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Duran, G.; Mackamul, K.; Metcalf, D.; Volltrauer, H.

    1994-04-01

    Utility Power Group (UPG) and its lower-tier subcontractor, Advanced Photovoltaic Systems, Inc. (APS), continued work to develop their manufacturing lines. UPG focused on the automation of encapsulation and termination processes developed in Phase 1. APS focused on completion of the encapsulation and module design tasks while continuing process quality control, and automation projects. The goal is to produce 55-W (stabilized) EP50 modules in a new facility.

  7. Prototyping and Development of Commercial Nano Crystalline and Thin Film Silicon for Photovoltaic Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Haldar, Pradeep, Ph.D.; Pethuraja, Gopal, Ph.D.; Efstathiadis, Haralabos, Ph.D.

    2011-12-02

    The College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) at the University at Albany received funding from the Department of Energy for its proposal Prototyping and Development of Commercial Nanocrystalline and Thin Film Si for Photovoltaic Manufacturing. This project was created to identify growth rate, texture uniformity, process window, economics, composition and thickness uniformity solutions related to fabricating large area, high efficiency thin film silicon based solar cells. This document serves as a final report for the closure of this program and details the deliverables from CNSE against its original scope of work. Thin-film silicon solar cells are a promising candidate for electricity generation applications because of a combination of advantages. Nanocrystalline and poly-Si based thin films, reduces the use of expensive semiconductor material content, can be deposited onto a foreign substrate (e.g. glass or flexible stainless steel) and enables use of the cells in wide variety of applications. In addition, nano and poly-Si films have higher carrier mobility as well as reduce recombination effects, relative to traditional amorphous-silicon films. They can be mass-produced at low cost, and expected to have a strong position in the international photovoltaic industry, which is experiencing a compounded annual growth of 25%. The objectives included: • Demonstration of high rate VHF (Very High Frequency) growth of nc-Si over large areas with uniform thickness. • Demonstration of single chamber device growth that allows mass production processing. • Demonstration of uniform segmented electrodes. • Development of computer models to accelerate efforts. • Demonstration of large grain thin film polycrystalline silicon films fabrication. • Utilizing the AIC (Aluminum Induced Crystallization) process for large grain silicon film

  8. High-throughput manufacturing of thin-film CdS/CdTe photovoltaic modules. Annual subcontract report, 16 September 1996--15 January 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Sandwisch, D.W.

    1998-08-01

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) is recognized as one of the leading materials for low-cost photovoltaic modules. Solar Cells, Inc., has developed this technology and is scaling its pilot production capabilities to a multi-megawatt level. The Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) subcontract supports these efforts. Activities during the third phase of the program concentrated on process development, equipment design and testing, quality assurance, ES and H programs, and large-scale next-generation coating-system prototype development. These efforts broadly addressed the issues of the manufacturing process for producing thin-film, monolithic CdS/CdTe photovoltaic modules.

  9. Laser processing of organic photovoltaic cells with a roll-to-roll manufacturing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petsch, Tino; Haenel, Jens; Clair, Maurice; Keiper, Bernd; Scholz, Christian

    2011-03-01

    Flexible large area organic photovoltaic (OPV) is currently one of the fastest developing areas of organic electronics. New light absorbing polymer blends combined with new transparent conductive materials provide higher power conversion efficiencies while new and improved production methods are developed to achieve higher throughput at reduced cost. A typical OPV is formed by TCO layers as the transparent front contact and polymers as active layer as well as interface layer between active layer and front contact. The several materials have to be patterned in order to allow for a row connection of the solar cell. 3D-Micromac used ultra-short pulsed lasers to evaluate the applicability of various wavelengths for the selective ablation of the indium tin oxide (ITO) layer and the selective ablation of the bulk hetero junction (BHJ) consisting of poly(3-hexylthiophene):phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PCBM) on top of a Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) without damaging the ITO. These lasers in combination with high performance galvanometer scanning systems achieve superior scribing quality without damaging the substrate. With scribing speeds of 10 m/s and up it is possible to integrate this technology into a roll-to-roll manufacturing tool. The functionality of an OPV usually also requires an annealing step, especially when using a BHJ for the active layer consisting of P3HT:PCBM, to optimize the layers structure and therewith the efficiency of the solar cell (typically by thermal treatment, e.g. oven). The process of laser annealing was investigated using a short-pulsed laser with a wavelength close to the absorption maximum of the BHJ.

  10. Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Deb, S.K.

    1985-01-01

    Photovoltaics, the direct conversion of sunlight into electrical energy, may be the best hope for a relatively clean, secure, and inexhaustible source of energy for the future. To stimulate the growth of this technology as a viable energy supply option, considerable research and development has been directed, in both the private and public sectors, to a variety of materials and devices. The technology has sufficiently matured in recent years to be seriously considered as an alternative to conventional energy sources. Despite phenomenal advances in energy conversion efficiencies, many problems still remain to be solved. It is timely, therefore, to review various technological options available. This review critically assesses the status and promise of this emerging technology by a group of experts, each of whom has presented an extended invited paper on his specific field of expertise. This collection of presentations is intended to be an authoritative review of the technology including its developments, current status, and projections for future direction. The content of this review was carefully chosen to represent most of the leading state-of-the-art technologies; these are divided into four areas: (i) a general overview and discussion of silicon technology; (ii) high efficiency multijunction solar cells; (iii) amorphous silicon solar cells; and (iv) thin film compound semiconductors.

  11. Eco green flexible hybrid photovoltaic-thermoelectric solar cells with nanoimprint technology and roll-to-roll manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadan, Vijay K.; Choi, Sang H.

    2010-04-01

    This paper explores the technical and commercial feasibility of nanotechnology based, high-efficiency, photovoltaic-thermoelectric hybrid solar cells as an environmentally-friendly, renewable energy source for residential and commercial buildings. To convert as much as possible of the usable photovoltaic (58% of the Energy Density) and thermoelectric (42% of the Energy Density) solar spectrum into electricity, a hybrid multilayer system is presented which comprises of 1) carbon nanotube (CNT) embedded in conducting polymers such as P3HT (poly(3-hexylthiophene) or P3OT (poly3-octylthiophene), 2) 3D gold nanostructures exhibiting plasmonic resonances for energy conversion, 3) nanoantenna architecture to capture IR energy, 4) a composite of Bi2Te3, SiGe nanocrystals and Au nanoshells as thermoelectric energy conversion layer, 5) configuration of the above items engineered in the form of meta-material designs that by virtue of their 3D structures ensure that incident light is neither reflected nor transmitted, but is rather all absorbed, 6) a multilayer arrangement of the above layers in a fractal architecture to capture all the wavelengths from 200 to 3000 nm8 and the matching electronic interface for each layer. The roll-to-roll manufacturing method presented will enable economical large-scale production of solar panels. This potentially transformational technology has the ability to replace the Si solar cell technology by reducing costs from 0.18/KWh to 0.003/KWh while introducing a more environmentally-friendly manufacturing process.

  12. Cast polycrystalline silicon photovoltaic module manufacturing technology improvements. Annual subcontract report, 1 January 1996--31 December 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, J.

    1997-10-01

    This report describes Solarex`s accomplishments during this phase of the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) program. During this reporting period, Solarex researchers converted 79% of production casting stations to increase ingot size and operated them at equivalent yields and cell efficiencies; doubled the casting capacity at 20% the cost of buying new equipment to achieve the same capacity increase; operated the wire saws in a production mode with higher yields and lower costs than achieved on the ID saws; purchased additional wire saws; developed and qualified a new wire-guide coating material that doubles the wire-guide lifetime and produces significantly less scatter in wafer thickness; ran an Al paste back-surface-field process on 25% of all cells in manufacturing; completed environmental qualification of modules using cells produced by an all-print metallization process; qualified a vendor-supplied Tedlar/ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) laminate to replace the combination of separate sheets of EVA and Tedlar backsheet; substituted RTV adhesive for the 3M Very High Bond tape after several field problems with the tape; demonstrated the operation of a prototype unit to trim/lead attach/test modules; demonstrated the use of light soldering for solar cells; demonstrated the operation of a wafer pull-down system for cassetting wet wafers; and presented three PVMaT-related papers at the 25th IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference.

  13. Amorphous silicon photovoltaic manufacturing technology - Phase 2A. Annual subcontract report, May 1, 1993--April 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Duran, G.; Mackamul, K.; Metcalf, D.

    1995-01-01

    Utility Power Group (UPG), and its lower-tier subcontractor, Advanced Photovoltaic Systems, Inc. (APS) have conducted efforts in developing their manufacturing lines. UPG has focused on the automation of encapsulation and termination processes developed in Phase I. APS has focused on completion of the encapsulation and module design tasks, while continuing the process and quality control and automation projects. The goal is to produce 55 watt (stabilized) EP50 modules in a new facility. In the APS Trenton EUREKA manufacturing facility, APS has: (1) Developed high throughput lamination procedures; (2) Optimized existing module designs; (3) Developed new module designs for architectural applications; (4) Developed enhanced deposition parameter control; (5) Designed equipment required to manufacture new EUREKA modules developed during Phase II; (6) Improved uniformity of thin-film materials deposition; and (7) Improved the stabilized power output of the APS EP50 EUREKA module to 55 watts. In the APS Fairfield EUREKA manufacturing facility, APS has: (1) Introduced the new products developed under Phase I into the APS Fairfield EUREKA module production line; (2) Increased the extent of automation in the production line; (3) Introduced Statistical Process Control to the module production line; and (4) Transferred-progress made in the APS Trenton facility into the APS Fairfield facility.

  14. Methods and apparatus for manufacturing monocrystalline cast silicon and monocrystalline cast silicon bodies for photovoltaics

    DOEpatents

    Stoddard, Nathan G

    2014-01-14

    Methods and apparatuses are provided for casting silicon for photovoltaic cells and other applications. With such methods and apparatuses, a cast body of monocrystalline silicon may be formed that is free of, or substantially free of, radially-distributed impurities and defects and having at least two dimensions that are each at least about 35 cm is provided.

  15. Methods and apparatuses for manufacturing monocrystalline cast silicon and monocrystalline cast silicon bodies for photovoltaics

    DOEpatents

    Stoddard, Nathan G.

    2011-11-01

    Methods and apparatuses are provided for casting silicon for photovoltaic cells and other applications. With such methods and apparatuses, a cast body of monocrystalline silicon may be formed that is free of, or substantially free of, radially-distributed impurities and defects and having at least two dimensions that are each at least about 35 cm is provided.

  16. High-throughput manufacturing of thin-film CdS/CdTe photovoltaic modules. Annual subcontract report, 16 November 1994--15 November 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Sandwisch, D.W.

    1997-02-01

    The objectives of this subcontract are to advance Solar Cells, Inc.`s (SCI`s) photovoltaic manufacturing technologies, reduce module production costs, increase module performance, and provide the groundwork for SCI to expand its commercial production capacities. Activities during the second year of the program concentrated on process development, equipment design and testing, quality assurance, and ES and H programs. These efforts broadly addressed the issues of the manufacturing process for producing thin-film monolithic CdS/CdTe photovoltaic modules.

  17. Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) improvements for ENTECH`s concentrator module. Final technical report, 9 January 1991--14 April 1991

    SciTech Connect

    O`Neill, M.J.; McDanal, A.J.; Perry, J.L.; Jackson, M.C.; Walters, R.R.

    1991-11-01

    This final technical report documents ENTECH`s Phase 1 contract with Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project. Under this project we prepared a detailed description of our current manufacturing process for making our unique linear Fresnel lens photovoltaic concentrator modules. In addition, we prepared a detailed description of an improved manufacturing process, which will simultaneously increase module production rates, enhance module quality, and substantially reduce module costs. We also identified potential problems in implementing the new manufacturing process, and we proposed solutions to these anticipated problems. Before discussing the key results of our program, however, we present a brief description of our unique photovoltaic technology. The key conclusion of our PVMAT Phase 1 study is that our module technology, without further breakthroughs, can realistically meet the near-term DOE goal of 12 cents/kWh levelized electricity cost, provided that we successfully implement the new manufacturing process at a production volume of at least 10 megawatts per year. The key recommendation from our Phase 1 study is to continue our PVMaT project into Phase 2A, which is directed toward the actual manufacturing technology development required for our new module production process. 15 refs.

  18. Modeling of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon (a-Si:H) Thin Films Prepared by the Saddle Field Glow Discharge Method for Photovoltaic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachenko, A. V.; Shkrebtii, A. I.; Gaspari, F.; Kherani, N.; Kazakevitch, A.

    2008-01-01

    We present results of combined theoretical and experimental study of the thin hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films based solar cells. The films for efficient and inexpensive solar cells were grown by the Saddle Field Glow Discharge Method. An analytical model to optimize photo-conversion efficiency a-Si:H based solar cells with contact grid has been developed. This two-dimensional model allows an optimization of the p+-i-n sandwich in terms of carrier mobilities, layers thickness, doping levels and others. The geometry of the grid fingers that conduct the photo-current to the bus bars and ITO/SiO2 layers has been optimizes as well as the effect of non-zero sun incidence angles. We demonstrate the optimization method to the typical a-Si:H solar cells.

  19. Continuous roll-to-roll amorphous silicon photovoltaic manufacturing technology. Semiannual subcontract report, 1 April 1993--30 September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Izu, M.

    1994-06-01

    This report describes work for this reporting period under a 3-year program to advance Energy Conversion Device`s (ECD) roll-to-roll, triple-junction photovoltaic (PV) manufacturing technologies, to reduce the module production costs, to increase the stabilized module performance, and to expand commercial production capacity utilizing ECD technology. The specific 3-year goal is to develop advanced large-scale manufacturing technology incorporating ECD`s earlier research advances with the capability of producing modules with stable 11% efficiency at a cost of approximately $1.00 per peak watt. Major accomplishments during this reporting period include (1) the design, construction. amd testomg of a continuous roll-to-roll multipurpose amorphous silicon alloy solar cell deposition machine that incorporates improvements necessary to obtain higher efficiency solar cells; (2) development of a photothermal deflection spectroscopy (PDS) technique for evaluating back-reflector systems; (3) the development of an improved textured Ag/ZnO back-reflector system demonstrating 25% gain in J{sub sc} over previous textured Al back-reflector systems; and (4) the design of a serpentine web continuous roll-to-roll deposition chamber.

  20. In situ optical diagnostic for monitoring or control of sodium diffusion in photovoltaics manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jian; Levi, Dean; Contreras, Miguel; Glynn, Stephen

    2015-09-15

    A method of fabricating a photovoltaic device 100, includes the steps of providing a glass substrate 102, depositing a molybdenum layer 104 on a surface of the glass substrate, directing light through the glass substrate to the near-substrate region of the molybdenum layer 206, detecting an optical property of the near-substrate region of the molybdenum layer after interaction with the incident light 208 and determining a density of the near-substrate region of the molybdenum layer from the detected optical property 210. A molybdenum deposition parameter may be controlled based upon the determined density of the near-substrate region of the molybdenum layer 218. A non-contact method measures a density of the near-substrate region of a molybdenum layer and a deposition chamber 300.

  1. Spectroscopic ellipsometry as a process control tool for manufacturing cadmium telluride thin film photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Westcott P.

    In recent decades, there has been concern regarding the sustainability of fossil fuels. One of the more promising alternatives is Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) thin-film photovoltaic (PV) devices. Improved quality measurement techniques may aid in improving this existing technology. Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) is a common, non-destructive technique for measuring thin films in the silicon wafer industry. SE results have also been tied to properties believed to play a role in CdTe PV device efficiency. A study assessing the potential of SE for use as a quality measurement tool had not been previously reported. Samples of CdTe devices produced by both laboratory and industrial scale processes were measured by SE and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Mathematical models of the optical characteristics of the devices were developed and fit to SE data from multiple angles and locations on each sample. Basic statistical analysis was performed on results from the automated fits to provide an initial evaluation of SE as a quantitative quality measurement process. In all cases studied, automated SE models produced average stack thickness values within 10% of the values produced by SEM, and standard deviations for the top bulk layer thickness were less than 1% of the average values.

  2. Cast polycrystalline silicon photovoltaic module manufacturing technology improvements. Semiannual subcontract report, January 1--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, J.

    1996-02-01

    The objective of this three-year program is to advance Solarex`s cast polycrystalline silicon manufacturing technology, reduce module production cost, increase module performance and expand Solarex`s commercial production capacities. Two specific objectives of this program are to reduce the manufacturing cost for polycrystalline silicon PV modules to less than $1.20/watt and to increase the manufacturing capacity by a factor of three. To achieve these objectives, Solarex is working in the following technical areas: casting, wire saws, cell process, module assembly, frameless module development, and automated cell handling. Accomplishments reported include: Cast first successful larger ingot producing 73% larger volume of usable Si; Increased the size of the ingot even further and cast an ingot yielding nine 11.4 {times} 11.4 cm bricks, representing a 125% increase in usable Si from a single casting; Operated the wire-saw in a semi-operational mode, producing 459,000 wafers at 94.1% overall yield; Reduced the cost of wire-saw consumables, spare parts, and waste disposal; Developed a cost-effective back surface field process that increases cell efficiency by 5% and began production trials; Developed a plan for increasing the capacity in the module assembly area; Completed qualification testing of modules built using Spire`s automated tabbing and stringing machine; Selected, tested, and qualified a low-cost electrical termination system; Completed long-term UV testing of experimental back sheets; Qualified the structure and adhesive-tape system for mounting frameless modules; and ARRI completed a study of the fracture properties of cast polycrystalline Si wafers and provided the information necessary to calculate the maximum stresses allowable during wafer handling.

  3. Progress in phases 2 and 3 of the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology Project (PVMaT)

    SciTech Connect

    Witt, C E; Mitchell, R L; Mooney, G D; Herwig, L O; Hasti, D; Sellers, R

    1993-10-01

    This first year of the process-specific activities of the Photo- voltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project has been completed, and the first subcontracts for teamed efforts on R&D of a general nature have been awarded. A second solicitation for process-specific research and development (R&D) is in the evaluation stage for award of subcontracts. This paper describes the technical accomplishments of the first process-specific subcontracts (Phase 2A), the status of the teamed research (Phase 3A), and the status of the solicitation for the second process-specific solicitation (Phases 2B).

  4. Cast polycrystalline silicon photovoltaic module manufacturing technology improvements. Semiannual technical report, 1 January 1996--30 June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, J

    1997-01-01

    Two specific objectives of Solarex`s program are to reduce the manufacturing cost for polycrystalline silicon photovoltaic modules to less than $1.20/watt and to increase the manufacturing capacity by a factor of three. This report highlights accomplishments during the period of January 1 through June 30, 1996. Accomplishments include: began the conversion of production casting stations to increase ingot size; operated the wire saw in a production mode with higher yields and lower costs than achieved on the ID saws; developed and qualified a new wire guide coating material that doubles the wire guide lifetime and produces significantly less scatter in wafer thickness; completed a third pilot run of the cost-effective Al paste back-surface-field (BSF) process, verifying a 5% increase in cell efficiency and demonstrating the ability to process and handle the BSF paste cells; completed environmental qualification of modules using cells produced by an all-print metallization process; optimized the design of the 15.2-cm by 15.2-cm polycrystalline silicon solar cells; demonstrated the application of a high-efficiency process in making 15.2-cm by 15.2-cm solar cells; demonstrated that cell efficiency increases with decreasing wafer thickness for the Al paste BSF cells; qualified a vendor-supplied Tedlar/ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) laminate to replace the combination of separate sheets of EVA and Tedlar backsheet; demonstrated the operation of a prototype unit to trim/lead attach/test modules; and demonstrated the operation of a wafer pull-down system for cassetting wet wafers.

  5. Photovoltaic manufacturing technology monolithic amorphous silicon modules on continuous polymer substrates: Final technical report, July 5, 1995--December 31, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey, F.

    2000-03-28

    Iowa Thin Film Technologies is completing a three-phase program that has increased throughput and decreased costs in nearly all aspects of its thin-film photovoltaic manufacturing process. The overall manufacturing costs have been reduced by 61 percent through implementation of the improvements developed under this program. Development of the ability to use a 1-mil substrate, rather than the standard 2-mil substrate, results in a 50 percent cost-saving for this material. Process development on a single-pass amorphous silicon deposition system has resulted in a 37 percent throughput improvement. A wide range of process and machine improvements have been implemented on the transparent conducting oxide deposition system. These include detailed parameter optimization of deposition temperatures, process gas flows, carrier gas flows, and web speeds. An overall process throughput improvement of 275 percent was achieved based on this work. The new alignment technique was developed for the laser scriber and printer systems, which improved registration accuracy from 100 microns to 10 microns. The new technique also reduced alignment time for these registration systems significantly. This resulted in a throughput increase of 75 percent on the scriber and 600 percent on the printer. Automated techniques were designed and implemented for the module assembly processes. These include automated busbar attachment, roll-based lamination, and automated die cutting of finished modules. These processes were previously done by hand labor. Throughput improvements ranged from 200 percent to 1200 percent, relative to hand labor rates. A wide range of potential encapsulation materials were evaluated for suitability in a roll lamination process and for cost-effectiveness. A combination material was found that has a cost that is only 10 percent of the standard EVA/Tefzel cost and is suitable for medium-lifetime applications. The 20-year lifetime applications still require the more expensive

  6. Development of a High Volume Capable Process to Manufacture High Performance Photovoltaic Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-322

    SciTech Connect

    Geisz, J. F.

    2012-11-01

    The intent of the work is for RFMD and NREL to cooperate in the development of a commercially viable and high volume capable process to manufacture high performance photovoltaic cells, based on inverted metamorphic (IMM) GaAs technology. The successful execution of the agreement will result in the production of a PV cell using technology that is capable of conversion efficiency at par with the market at the time of release (reference 2009: 37-38%), using RFMD's production facilities. The CRADA work has been divided into three phases: (1) a foundation phase where the teams will demonstrate the manufacturing of a basic PV cell at RFMD's production facilities; (2) a technology demonstration phase where the teams will demonstrate the manufacturing of prototype PV cells using IMM technology at RFMD's production facilities, and; (3) a production readiness phase where the teams will demonstrate the capability to manufacture PV cells using IMM technology with high yields, high reliability, high reproducibility and low cost.

  7. Cast Polycrystalline Photovoltaic Module Manufacturing Technology Improvements; Final Subcontract Report, 8 December 199330 April 1998

    SciTech Connect

    J. Wohlgemuth.

    1999-06-16

    This report summarizes work performed by Solarex, A Business Unit of Amoco/Enron Solar, under this subcontract. Among the accomplishments during the program are the following: Converting all of the production casting stations to increase ingot size, operating them at equivalent yields and cell efficiencies, and thus doubling the casting capacity at a 20% lower cost than the cost of new equipment. Developing a wire-saw process and transferring the process to production; as a result, more than 80% of wafering is now done using wire saws, at higher yields and lower costs than achieved on the internal diameter saws. Developing an aluminum paste back-surface field (BSF) process to increase cell efficiency by 5%; researchers also designed, procured, and transferred to manufacturing a fully automated printing system to produce the BSF cells. Fabricating 15.2-cm by 15.2-cm polycrystalline silicon solar cells and building modules using these cells. Modifying the module assembly area to increase capacity by a factor of three. Implementing a single-layer Tedlar backsheet that reduced backsheet cost by $0.50/ft2. Selecting, testing, and qualifying a low-cost (< $1.00 per module) electrical termination system. Qualifying the structure and adhesive system for mounting frameless modules and using the system to build several large arrays.

  8. Black a-Si:H sputtered films for photovoltaic solar cells. Final technical progress report, May 15, 1979-May 15, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Messier, R; Tsong, I S.T.

    1980-01-01

    Aa a first step in attempting to understand the many interrelated deposition processes and film characteristics which govern sputter deposited a-Si:H film quality, a number of important basic film characteristics as a function of the preparation parameters total plasma pressure P/sub T/ and H/sub 2/ partial pressure, %H (in Ar), for the range P/sub T/ = 5 to 70mTorr and %H = 0.10, were examined in detail. A series of films were systematically prepared in this region of deposition parameter space, and these films were characterized with respect to surface and internal microstructure, chemical reactivity and etchability, total elemental composition, H-bonding configuration, intrinsic mechanical stress, optical bandgap, and mean density. In general terms, the films are described by a transition of properties dependent upon both P/sub T/ and %H. Films prepared at high P/sub T/ display a distinct columnar morphology with varying extent of intercolumn void or low-density regions. Some of these films have densities as low as approx. 60% that of c-Si, contain H predominantly in the dihydride bonding configuration, and undergo post-deposition oxidation to an extent as great as approx. 10 wt %. Films prepared in the low P/sub T/ regime are without detectable microstructure and chemically stable with no detectable bulk oxidation after many months. In these films, up to 20 at. %H was found almost entirely as monohydride, Ar content was as high as 7 at. %H, and compressive intrinsic stresses were found as large as 5 x 10/sup 9/ dynes/cm/sup 2/. These results are entirely consistent with the general Structure Zone Model (SZM) of physical vapor deposition upon which there are superimposed the chemical effects of H/sub 2/ reactive sputtering. 64 references.

  9. Ultrashort-pulsed laser processing and solution based coating in roll-to-roll manufacturing of organic photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hördemann, C.; Hirschfelder, K.; Schaefer, M.; Gillner, A.

    2015-09-01

    The breakthrough of flexible organic electronics and especially organic photovoltaics is highly dependent on cost-efficient production technologies. Roll-2-Roll processes show potential for a promising solution in terms of high throughput and low-cost production of thin film organic components. Solution based material deposition and integrated laser patterning processes offer new possibilities for versatile production lines. The use of flexible polymeric substrates brings along challenges in laser patterning which have to be overcome. One main challenge when patterning transparent conductive layers on polymeric substrates are material bulges at the edges of the ablated area. Bulges can lead to short circuits in the layer system leading to device failure. Therefore following layers have to have a sufficient thickness to cover and smooth the ridge. In order to minimize the bulging height, a study has been carried out on transparent conductive ITO layers on flexible PET substrates. Ablation results using different beam shapes, such as Gaussian beam, Top-Hat beam and Donut-shaped beam, as well as multi-pass scribing and double-pulsed ablation are compared. Furthermore, lab scale methods for cleaning the patterned layer and eliminating bulges are contrasted to the use of additional water based sacrificial layers in order to obtain an alternative procedure suitable for large scale Roll-2-Roll manufacturing. Besides progress in research, ongoing transfer of laser processes into a Roll-2-Roll demonstrator is illustrated. By using fixed optical elements in combination with a galvanometric scanner, scribing, variable patterning and edge deletion can be performed individually.

  10. Core-shell GaN-ZnO moth-eye nanostructure arrays grown on a-SiO2/Si (1 1 1) as a basis for improved InGaN-based photovoltaics and LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, D. J.; Sandana, V. E.; Gautier, S.; Moudakir, T.; Abid, M.; Ougazzaden, A.; Teherani, F. Hosseini; Bove, P.; Molinari, M.; Troyon, M.; Peres, M.; Soares, Manuel J.; Neves, A. J.; Monteiro, T.; McGrouther, D.; Chapman, J. N.; Drouhin, H.-J.; McClintock, R.; Razeghi, M.

    2015-06-01

    Self-forming, vertically-aligned, ZnO moth-eye-like nanoarrays were grown by catalyst-free pulsed laser deposition on a-SiO2/Si (1 1 1) substrates. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Cathodoluminescence (CL) studies indicated that nanostructures were highly c-axis oriented wurtzite ZnO with strong near band edge emission. The nanostructures were used as templates for the growth of non-polar GaN by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy. XRD, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis and CL revealed ZnO encapsulated with GaN, without evidence of ZnO back-etching. XRD showed compressive epitaxial strain in the GaN, which is conducive to stabilization of the higher indium contents required for more efficient green light emitting diode (LED) and photovoltaic (PV) operation. Angular-dependent specular reflection measurements showed a relative reflectance of less than 1% over the wavelength range of 400-720 nm at all angles up to 60°. The superior black-body performance of this moth-eye-like structure would boost LED light extraction and PV anti-reflection performance compared with existing planar or nanowire LED and PV morphologies. The enhancement in core conductivity, provided by the ZnO, would also improve current distribution and increase the effective junction area compared with nanowire devices based solely on GaN.

  11. Methods and apparatuses for manufacturing geometric multicrystalline cast silicon and geometric multicrystalline cast silicon bodies for photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Stoddard, Nathan G

    2015-02-10

    Methods and apparatuses are provided for casting silicon for photovoltaic cells and other applications. With such methods and apparatuses, a cast body of geometrically ordered multi-crystalline silicon may be formed that is free or substantially free of radially-distributed impurities and defects and having at least two dimensions that are each at least about 10 cm is provided.

  12. Cast polycrystalline silicon photovoltaic cell and module manufacturing technology improvements. Annual subcontract report, 1 December 1993--30 November 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, J.

    1995-09-01

    This report describes work performed under a 3-y contract to advance Solarex`s cast polycrystalline silicon manufacturing technology, reduce module production cost, increase module performance, and expand Solarex`s commercial production capacities. Specific objectives are to reduce manufacturing cost for polycrstalline silicon PV modules to less than $1.20/W and to increase manufacturing capacity by a factor of 3. Solarex is working on casting, wire saws, cell process, module assembly, frameless module development, and automated cell handling.

  13. Cast polycrystalline silicon photovoltaic module manufacturing technology improvements. Annual subcontract report, January 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, J

    1996-06-01

    The objective of this three-year program is to advance Solarex`s cast polycrystalline silicon manufacturing technology, reduce module production cost, increase module performance and expand Solarex`s commercial production capacities. Two specific objectives of this program are to reduce the manufacturing cost for polycrystalline silicon PV modules to less than $1.20/watt and to increase the manufacturing capacity by a factor of three.

  14. Efficiency and throughput advances in continuous roll-to-roll a-Si alloy PV manufacturing technology: Annual technical progress report: 22 June 1998--21 June 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Izu, M.

    1999-11-09

    This document reports on work performed by Energy Conversion Devices, Inc. (ECD) during Phase 1 of this subcontract. During this period, ECD researchers: (1) Completed design and construction of new, improved substrate heater; (2) Tested and verified improved performance of the new substrate heater in the pilot machine; (3) Verified improved performance of the new substrate heater in the production machine; (4) Designed and bench-tested a new infrared temperature sensor; (5) Installed a prototype new infrared temperature sensor in the production machine for evaluation; (6) Designed a new rolling thermocouple temperature sensor; (7) Designed and bench-tested a reflectometer for the backreflector deposition machine; (8) Designed and bench-tested in-line non-contacting cell diagnostic sensor and PV capacitive diagnostic system; (9) Installed the in-line cell diagnostic sensor in the 5-MW a-Si deposition machine for evaluation; (10) Demonstrated a new low-cost zinc metal process in the pilot back reflector machine; and (11) Fully tested a new cathode design for improved uniformity.

  15. Manufacturing technologies for photovoltaics and possible means of their development in Russia (Review). Part 1: General approach to the development of photoelectric converters and basic silicon technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, A. B.; Popel', O. S.

    2015-11-01

    The state and key tendencies of the development of basic technologies for manufacture of photoelectric converters (PECs) in the world are considered, and their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. The first part of the review gives short information on the development of photovoltaics in the world and planes of the development of solar power plants in Russia. Total power of photoelectric plants operating in various countries in 2015 exceeded 150 GW and increased in the last ten years with a rate of approximately 50% per year. Russia made important state decisions on the support of the development of renewable power engineering and developed mechanisms, which were attractive for business, on the stimulation of building of the network of solar power plants with a total power to 1.5 GW in the country to 2020. At the same time, the rigid demands are made with respect to the localization of the production of components of these plants that opens new abilities for the development of the domestic production of photovoltaics manufacture. Data on the efficiency of PECs of various types that are attained in the leading laboratories of the world are given. Particular emphasis has been placed on the consideration of basic silicon technologies of PEC manufacture, which had the widest commercial application. The basic methods for production of polycrystalline silicon and making single-crystal and multicrystal silicon are described. Fundamentals of making techniques for plates, PECs, and photoelectric modules based on single-crystal and polycrystalline silicon are considered. The second part will be devoted to modifications of manufacturing techniques for photoelectric converters, enhancement methods for contact structures, and recommendations of authors with respect to the choice of prospective technologies for the expansion of PEC production in Russia. It will involve formulations and substantiations of the most promising lines of the development of photoelectric

  16. Photovoltaic manufacturing technology monolithic amorphous silicon modules on continuous polymer substrates. Annual technical progress report, 5 July 1995--4 June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey, F

    1997-02-01

    Iowa Thin Film Technologies` goal is to develop the most cost-effective photovoltaic manufacturing process possible. During the first year, they developed the capability of sputtering a high-quality (Zn(Al)O) successfully implemented increased deposition rates for the ZnO top contact deposition; improved registration and ink-line width to reduce area loss due to interconnects; developed a new alignment process and sensor to improve the speed and accuracy of registration for the patterning processes; developed a new Silver ink composition that allows finer print lines and lower series resistance; demonstrated an 8% overall improvement in area utilization; evaluated water-based insulator inks for compatibility with their processes; investigated and tested the use of roll-based lamination as a means to reduce the cost of assembly; developed straight roll lamination capability using pressure-sensitive adhesives and thermally activated bonding; and evaluated the use of the standard EVA/Tefzel encapsulant with a roll laminator.

  17. Photovoltaics industry profile

    SciTech Connect

    1980-10-01

    A description of the status of the US photovoltaics industry is given. Principal end-user industries are identified, domestic and foreign market trends are discussed, and industry-organized and US government-organized trade promotion events are listed. Trade associations and trade journals are listed, and a photovoltaic product manufacturers list is included. (WHK)

  18. Life-cycle nitrogen trifluoride emissions from photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Fthenakis, Vasilis; Clark, Daniel O; Moalem, Mehran; Chandler, Phil; Ridgeway, Robert G; Hulbert, Forrest E; Cooper, David B; Maroulis, Peter J

    2010-11-15

    Amorphous- and nanocrystalline-silicon thin-film photovoltaic modules are made in high-throughput manufacturing lines that necessitate quickly cleaning the reactor. Using NF₃, a potent greenhouse gas, as the cleaning agent triggered concerns as recent reports reveal that the atmospheric concentrations of this gas have increased significantly. We quantified the life-cycle emissions of NF₃ in photovoltaic (PV) manufacturing, on the basis of actual measurements at the facilities of a major producer of NF₃ and of a manufacturer of PV end-use equipment. From these, we defined the best practices and technologies that are the most likely to keep worldwide atmospheric concentrations of NF₃ at very low radiative forcing levels. For the average U.S. insolation and electricity-grid conditions, the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from manufacturing and using NF₃ in current PV a-Si and tandem a-Si/nc-Si facilities add 2 and 7 g CO₂(eq)/kWh, which can be displaced within the first 1-4 months of the PV system life. PMID:21067246

  19. Photovoltaic Manufacturing Cost and Throughput Improvements for Thin-Film CIGS-Based Modules; Phase II Annual Subcontract Technical Report, July 1999 - August 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, T.G.; Wiedeman, S.

    2001-03-12

    Thin-film photovoltaics (PV) has expanded dramatically in the last five years, but commercial use remains limited by performance, cost, and reliability. Of all the thin-film systems, copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) has demonstrated the greatest potential for achieving high performance at a low cost. The highest-quality CIGS has been formed by multi-source co-evaporation, a technique pioneered in this country by researchers at NREL. Multi-source co-evaporation is also potentially the fastest and most cost-effective method of CIGS absorber deposition. Global Solar Energy (GSE) has adapted multi-source co-evaporation of CIGS to large-area, roll-to-roll processing on flexible substrates, enabling several manufacturing and product capability advantages. Roll-to-roll processing enables a low-cost, automated continuous manufacturing process. Flexible substrates enable product application in unique, as well as traditional, areas. The primary objectives of the GSE Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) subcontract are to reduce cost and expand the production rate of thin-film CIGS-based PV modules on flexible substrates. Improvements will be implemented in monolithic integration, CIGS deposition, contact deposition, and in-situ CIGS control and monitoring. Specific goals of the three-year contract are: - Monolithic Integration - Increase integration speed by developing high-speed, all-laser scribing processes that are more than 100% faster than the baseline process and offer clean, selective scribing; increase capacity and substantially reduce module area losses by insulating materials with high accuracy into laser scribes. - Absorber Deposition - Increase absorber-layer deposition rate by 75% in the large-area, continuous GSE process, increasing throughput and reducing labor and capital costs. Integrate a parallel detector spectroscopic ellipsometer (PDSE) with mathematical algorithms for in-situ control of the CIGS absorber, enabling runs of over 300 meters

  20. Analysis methods for photovoltaic applications

    SciTech Connect

    1980-01-01

    Because photovoltaic power systems are being considered for an ever-widening range of applications, it is appropriate for system designers to have knowledge of and access to photovoltaic power systems simulation models and design tools. This brochure gives brief descriptions of a variety of such aids and was compiled after surveying both manufacturers and researchers. Services available through photovoltaic module manufacturers are outlined, and computer codes for systems analysis are briefly described. (WHK)

  1. Silicon-Film{trademark} photovoltaic manufacturing technology. Annual subcontract report, 15 November 1992--15 October 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, S.R.; Hall, R.B.

    1994-06-01

    The goal of this project is to develop an advanced, low-cost manufacturing process for a new utility-scale, flat-plate module. The program has three main components: development of a Silicon-Film{trademark} (S-F) wafer machine that is capable of manufacturing wafers that are 225 cm{sup 2} in size with a total product cost reduction of 70%; development of an advanced solar cell manufacturing process that is capable of turning the wafer into a 14% efficient solar cell; and development of an advanced module design based on these large area, efficient silicon solar cells with an average power of 170 watts for 56 solar cells and 113 watts for 36 solar cells. During Phase 2, AstroPower made significant advances in improving S-F material quality and device performance. Advances were made in developing the prototype machines and processes toward reliable manufacturing counterparts. The following key achievements in Phase 2 are detailed: demonstration of a truly continuous production mode S-F machine; demonstration of a 2.5 watt, 15 cm by 15 cm solar cell; and demonstration of a 78 watt module fabricated from 36, 15 cm by 15 cm S-F solar cells.

  2. PVMaT cost reductions in the EFG high volume PV manufacturing line: Annual report, 5 August 1998--4 August 1999[PhotoVoltaic Manufacturing Technology, Edge-defined Film-fed Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Bathey, B.; Brown, B.; Cao, J.; Ebers, S.; Gonsiorawski, R.; Heath, B.; Kalejs, J.; Kardauskas, M.; Mackintosh, B.; Ouellette, M.; Piwczyk, B.; Rosenblum, M.; Southimath, B.

    1999-11-16

    This report describes work performed by ASE Americas researchers during the first year of this Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology 5A2 program. Significant accomplishments in each of three task are as follows. Task 1--Manufacturing Systems: Researchers completed key node analysis, started statistical process control (SPC) charting, carried out design-of-experiment (DoE) matrices on the cell line to optimize efficiencies, performed a capacity and bottleneck study, prepared a baseline chemical waste analysis report, and completed writing of more than 50% of documentation and statistical sections of ISO 9000 procedures. A highlight of this task is that cell efficiencies in manufacturing were increased by 0.4%--0.5% absolute, to an average in excess of 14.2%, with the help of DoE and SPC methods. Task 2--Low-Cost Processes: Researchers designed, constructed, and tested a 50-cm-diameter, edge-defined, film-fed growth (EFG) cylinder crystal growth system to successfully produce thin cylinders up to 1.2 meters in length; completed a model for heat transfer; successfully deployed new nozzle designs and used them with a laser wafer-cutting system with the potential to decrease cutting labor costs by 75% and capital costs by 2X; achieved laser-cutting speeds of up to 8X and evaluation of this system is proceeding in production; identified laser-cutting conditions that reduce damage for both Q-switched Nd:YAG and copper-vapor lasers with the help of a breakthrough in fundamental understanding of cutting with these short-pulse-length lasers; and found that bulk EFG material lifetimes are optimized when co-firing of silicon nitride and aluminum is carried out with rapid thermal processing (RTP). Task 3--Flexible Manufacturing: Researchers improved large-volume manufacturing of 10-cm {times} 15-cm EFG wafers by developing laser-cutting fixtures, adapting carriers and fabricating adjustable racks for etching and rinsing facilities, and installing a high-speed data collection

  3. Development of high stable-efficiency, triple-junction a-Si alloy solar cells. Annual subcontract report, July 18, 1994--July 17, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, X.

    1996-02-01

    This report describes work performed by Energy Conversion Devices, Inc. (ECD) under a 3-year, cost-shared amorphous silicon (a-Si) research program to develop advanced technologies and to demonstrate stable 14%-efficient, triple-junction a-Si alloy solar cells. The technologies developed under the program will then be incorporated into ECD`s continuous roll-to-roll deposition process to further enhance ECD`s photovoltaic manufacturing technology. In ECD`s solar cell design, triple-junction a-Si alloy solar cells are deposited onto stainless-steel substrates coated with Ag/ZnO back-reflector layers. This type of cell design enabled ECD to use a continuous roll- to-roll deposition process to manufacture a-Si PV materials in high volume at low cost. Using this cell design, ECD previously achieved 13.7% initial solar cell efficiency using the following features: (1) a triple-junction, two-band-gap, spectrum-splitting solar cell design; (2) a microcrystalline silicon p-layer; (3) a band-gap-profiled a- SiGe alloy as the bottom cell i-layer; (4) a high-performance AgZnO back-reflector; and (5) a high-performance tunnel junction between component cells. ECD also applied the technology into its 2-MW/yr a- Si production line and achieved the manufacturing of 4-ft{sup 2} PV modules with 8% stable efficiency. During this program, ECD is also further advancing its existing PV technology toward the goal of 14% stable solar cells by performing the following four tasks: (1) improving the stability of the intrinsic a-Si alloy materials; (2) improving the quality of low-band-gap a-SiGe alloy; (3) improving p{sup +} window layers, and (4) developing high stable-efficiency triple-junction a-Si alloy solar cells.

  4. PVMaT improvements in the Solarex photovoltaic module manufacturing technology: Annual subcontract report: May 5, 1998 -- April 30, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, J.

    2000-01-10

    This report describes work done by Solarex during the first year of this subcontract. The objective of this three-year PVMaT program is to continue the advancement of Solarex PV manufacturing technologies to design and implement a process that produces polycrystalline silicon PV modules that can be sold profitably for $2.00 per peak watt or less and that will increase the production capacity of the Frederick plant to at least 25 megawatts per year. Accomplishments during the first year of the program include: (1) Verification of the process to produce SiF{sub 4}, the precursor to silicon feedstock. (2) Design of a silicon feedstock pilot facility using the SiNaF process. (3) Development of and transfer to manufacturing of a process to use thinner wire in the wire saw. (4) Completion of a production trial with recycled SiC. (5) Laboratory development of a selective emitter process using rapid thermal processing. (6) Fabrication of high-efficiency polycrystalline cells using silicon nitride from three different sources. (7) Development of a new encapsulation formulation and laboratory demonstration of a 6-minute lamination cycle. (8) Implementation of an automated laminator. (9) Laboratory demonstration of automated handling of ceramics.

  5. Silicon-film {trademark} photovoltaic manufacturing technology. Annual subcontract report, 1 January 1994--31 December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, S.R.; Hall, R.B.; Rand, J.A.

    1995-11-01

    The goal of AstroPower`s PVMaT-2A project is to develop an advanced, low-cost manufacturing process for a new utility-scale, flat-plate module. This process starts with the production of continuous sheets of thin-film polycrystalline silicon using the Silicon-Film {trademark} process. Our main product focus in PVMaT-2A has been a 240 cm{sup 2} solar cell. Continuous sheets of silicon are produced and cut into wafers that are 15.5 cm on a side. Both standard modules (36 solar cells) and a new 56 solar cell module were produced. The targeted high power module design is a 170 watt module, used in a twelve module array to generate 2 kW. The solar cells, modules, and array developed here are described.

  6. Transport phenomena in the close-spaced sublimation deposition process for manufacture of large-area cadmium telluride photovoltaic panels: Modeling and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malhotra, C. P.

    With increasing national and global demand for energy and concerns about the effect of fossil fuels on global climate change, there is an increasing emphasis on the development and use of renewable sources of energy. Solar cells or photovoltaics constitute an important renewable energy technology but the major impediment to their widespread adoption has been their high initial cost. Although thin-film photovoltaic semiconductors such as cadmium sulfide-cadmium telluride (CdS/CdTe) can potentially be inexpensively manufactured using large area deposition techniques such as close-spaced sublimation (CSS), their low stability has prevented them from becoming an alternative to traditional polycrystalline silicon solar cells. A key factor affecting the stability of CdS/CdTe cells is the uniformity of deposition of the thin films. Currently no models exist that can relate the processing parameters in a CSS setup with the film deposition uniformity. Central to the development of these models is a fundamental understanding of the complex transport phenomena which constitute the deposition process which include coupled conduction and radiation as well as transition regime rarefied gas flow. This thesis is aimed at filling these knowledge gaps and thereby leading to the development of the relevant models. The specific process under consideration is the CSS setup developed by the Materials Engineering Group at the Colorado State University (CSU). Initially, a 3-D radiation-conduction model of a single processing station was developed using the commercial finite-element software ABAQUS and validated against data from steady-state experiments carried out at CSU. A simplified model was then optimized for maximizing the steady-state thermal uniformity within the substrate. It was inferred that contrary to traditional top and bottom infrared lamp heating, a lamp configuration that directs heat from the periphery of the sources towards the center results in the minimum temperature

  7. Cast polycrystalline silicon photovoltaic module manufacturing technology improvements. Semiannual subcontract report, 8 December 1993--30 June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, J.

    1995-03-01

    This report describes work done under a 3-year program to advance Solarex`s cast polycrystalline silicon manufacturing technology, reduce module production cost, increase module performance, and expand Solarex`s commercial production capacities. The accomplishments described in this report are as follows: (1) the authors designed modifications to casting stations, ceramic molds, and sizing saws to allow for casting and sizing of larger ingots; (2) they demonstrated the casting of ingots with 17% larger volume; (3) the selected and purchased a new wire saw from HCT Shaping Systems; (4) they demonstrated wafering of eight bricks (2,400 wafers or {approximately}4.4 kilowatts at the cell level) in a 6.5-h run; (5) they demonstrated 14% average cell efficiency in the laboratory using an aluminum paste back surface field; (6) the Automation and Robotics Research Institute (ARRI) completed a modeling study of the Solarex module assembly process; (7) they identified and qualified three new lower-cost back sheet materials through accelerated environmental tests; and (8) they designed and built a test structure for mounting frameless modules, and selected two adhesives and began testing their ability to hold modules to the structure.

  8. Silicon-film{trademark} photovoltaic manufacturing technology. Annual subcontract report, 15 January 1992--15 November 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Bottenberg, W.R.; Hall, R.B.; Jackson, E.L.; Lampo, S.; Mulligan, W.P.; Barnett, A.M.

    1994-02-01

    This report describes work under a subcontract to upgrade AstroPower, Inc.`s facility to produce 1.22-m{sup 2} Silicon-Film{trademark} PV modules with an output of 170 W{sub p}. The focus for the first year of the PVMaT Phase 2A project is to establish the baseline process capability and optimize the performance of the present machine. This first year`s activities accelerated the advance of Silicon-Film{trademark} manufacturing technology in several ways. First, the project led directly to plans to make an early introduction of a large solar cell product. The successful fabrication of 646-cm{sup 2} wafers and solar cells paved the way for dramatically increasing the power output per solar cell. Second was the establishment of a basis for the design and construction of a 2.4-MW/yr wafer machine. Another important contribution was the determination of the importance of H{sup +} implantation processes for polycrystalline silicon technologies.

  9. Characterization of photovoltaic generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boitier, V.; Cressault, Y.

    2011-05-01

    This paper discusses photovoltaic panel systems and reviews their electrical properties and use in several industrial fields. We explain how different photovoltaic panels may be characterized by undergraduate students at university using simple methods to retrieve their electrical properties (power, current and voltage) and compare these values with those stated by the manufacturer. We also discuss how the efficiency of solar panels depends upon their construction, temperature, net irradiation and geographic location.

  10. Photovoltaic manufacturing cost and throughput improvements for thin-film CIGS-based modules: Phase 1 technical report, July 1998--July 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedeman, S.; Wendt, R.G.

    2000-03-01

    The primary objectives of the Global Solar Energy (GSE) Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) subcontract are directed toward reducing cost and expanding the production rate of thin-film CuInGaSe{sub 2} (CIGS)-based PV modules on flexible substrates. Improvements will be implemented in monolithic integration, CIGS deposition, contact deposition, and in-situ CIGS control and monitoring. In Phase 1, GSE has successfully attacked many of the highest risk aspects of each task. All-laser, selective scribing processes for CIGS have been developed, and many end-of-contract goals for scribing speed have been exceeded in the first year. High-speed ink-jet deposition of insulating material in the scribes now appears to be a viable technique, again exceeding some end-of-contract goals in the first year. Absorber deposition of CIGS was reduced corresponding to throughput speeds of up to 24-in/min, also exceeding an end-of-contract goal. Alternate back-contact materials have been identified that show potential as candidates for replacement of higher-cost molybdenum, and a novel, real-time monitoring technique (parallel-detector spectroscopic ellipsometry) has shown remarkable sensitivity to relevant properties of the CIGS absorber layer for use as a diagnostic tool. Currently, one of the bilayers has been baselined by GSE for flexible CIGS on polymeric substrates. Resultant back-contacts meet sheet-resistance goals and exhibit much less intrinsic stress than Mo. CIGS has been deposited, and resultant devices are comparable in performance to pure Mo back-contacts. Debris in the chamber has been substantially reduced, allowing longer roll-length between system cleaning.

  11. Laser-assisted manufacturing of micro-optical volume elements for enhancing the amount of light absorbed by solar cells in photovoltaic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peharz, Gerhard; Kuna, Ladislav; Leiner, Claude

    2015-03-01

    The laser-generation of micro-optical volume elements is a promising approach to decrease the optical shadowing of front side metal contacts of solar cells. Focusing a femtosecond laser beam into the volume of the encapsulation material causes a local modification its optical constants. Suchlike fabricated micro-optical elements can be used to decrease the optical shadowing of the front side metallization of c-Si solar cells. Test samples comprising of a sandwich structure of a glass sheet with metallic grid-lines, an Ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) encapsulant and another glass sheet were manufactured in order to investigate the optical performance of the volume optics. Transmission measurements show that the shadowing of the metalling grid-lines is substantially decreased by the micro-optical volume elements created in the EVA bulk right above the grid-fingers. A detailed investigation of the optical properties of these volume elements was performed: (i) experimentally on the basis of goniometric measurements, as well as (ii) theoretically by applying optical modelling and optimization procedures. This resulted in a better understanding of the effectiveness of the optical volume elements in decreasing the optical shadowing of metal grid lines on the active cell surfaces. Moreover, results of photovoltaic mini-modules with incorporated micro-optical volume elements are presented. Results of optical simulation and Laser Beam Induced Current (LBIC) experiments show that the losses due to the grid fingers can be reduced by about 50%, when using this fs-laser structuring approach for the fabrication of micro-optical volume elements in the EVA material.

  12. Effect of interposing thin oxide layers on the photovoltaic properties of a-Si:H solar cells II between the middle n and p layers of a tandem-type cell

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Y.; Fukuyama, K.; Matsumura, M.; Nakato, Y.; Tsubomura, H.

    1988-07-01

    The properties of the pn junction of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si) were studied by use of some kinds of a-Si cells. It was concluded that the photoelectromotive force generated at the pn junction reduces the photovoltage of the tandum-type solar cells, and the rate of the electron-hole recombination lowers their fill factor. However, by interposing a 2-nm-thick TiO/sub 2/ layer between p and n layers of the tandem-type solar cells, the open-circuit photovoltage was raised from 1.50 to 1.64 V, the fill factor from 0.705 to 0.775, and the energy conversion efficiency was improved approx.10%. Among the metal oxides examined i.e., V/sub 2/O/sub 5/, TiO, TiO/sub x/, TiO/sub 2/, NiO, WO/sub 3/, ITO, Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and SiO/sub 2/, the TiO/sub x/ (x = 1.7)= layer showed the best result. In addition, it was observed that the thickness of the p and n layers, which was necessary to form the pn junction, could be reduced by interposing a metal-oxide layer.

  13. Photovoltaics (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) works with industry, academia, national laboratories, and other government agencies to advance solar photovoltaics (PV) domestically. The SunShot Initiative aims to achieve widespread, unsubsidized cost-competitiveness through an applied research and development (R&D) portfolio spanning PV materials, devices, and manufacturing technologies.

  14. Photovoltaics (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    DOE works with national labs, academia, and industry to support the domestic photovoltaics (PV) industry and research enterprise. SunShot aims to achieve widespread, unsubsidized cost-competitiveness through an applied research and development (R&D) portfolio spanning PV materials, devices, and manufacturing technologies.

  15. Photovoltaics (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program

    2011-10-13

    DOE works with national labs, academia, and industry to support the domestic photovoltaics (PV) industry and research enterprise. SunShot aims to achieve widespread, unsubsidized cost-competitiveness through an applied research and development (R&D) portfolio spanning PV materials, devices, and manufacturing technologies.

  16. Organic photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leo, Karl

    2016-08-01

    Organic photovoltaics are on the verge of revolutionizing building-integrated photovoltaics. For other applications, however, several basic open scientific questions need answering to, in particular, further improve energy-conversion efficiency and lifetime.

  17. Manufacturing technologies for photovoltaics and possible means of their development in Russia (Review): Part 2. Modification of production technologies for photoelectric converters, development of contact structures, and choice of promising technologies for expansion of FEC production in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, A. B.; Popel', O. S.

    2015-12-01

    As the development of the first part of the review of modern industrial technologies for manufacture of photoelectric converters (PECs) of solar power, the present paper considers modifications of technologies for manufacture of PECs, including various thin-film techniques. Main tendencies in the advancement of contact structures of PECs are described. Formulation and substantiation are made for promising, in the authors' opinion, lines of the development of industry of PECs in Russia based on the upcoming implementation of 1.5 GW network photovoltaic power plants to 2020, which are developed with the national support under conditions of the fulfillment of rigid requirements to manufacture localization. As the most prospective technology for development of the competitive manufacture of photoelectric converters subject to the Russian scientific and engineering groundwork, the authors recommend the technology based on single-crystal silicon of the n type with the passivation of the frontal and rear sides and symmetrical contacts ( n-PASHa), which provides the possibility to produce double-faced solar modules also.

  18. Photovoltaic device

    DOEpatents

    Reese, Jason A.; Keenihan, James R.; Gaston, Ryan S.; Kauffmann, Keith L.; Langmaid, Joseph A.; Lopez, Leonardo C.; Maak, Kevin D.; Mills, Michael E.; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R.

    2015-06-02

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly and a body portion joined at an interface region and including an intermediate layer, at least one interconnecting structural member, relieving feature, unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.

  19. Photovoltaic device

    SciTech Connect

    Reese, Jason A.; Keenihan, James R.; Gaston, Ryan S.; Kauffmann, Keith L.; Langmaid, Joseph A.; Lopez, Leonardo C.; Maak, Kevin D.; Mills, Michael E.; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R.

    2015-09-01

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device (10) with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly (100) and a body portion (200) joined at an interface region (410) and including an intermediate layer (500), at least one interconnecting structural member (1500), relieving feature (2500), unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.

  20. Thin film photovoltaic panel and method

    DOEpatents

    Ackerman, Bruce; Albright, Scot P.; Jordan, John F.

    1991-06-11

    A thin film photovoltaic panel includes a backcap for protecting the active components of the photovoltaic cells from adverse environmental elements. A spacing between the backcap and a top electrode layer is preferably filled with a desiccant to further reduce water vapor contamination of the environment surrounding the photovoltaic cells. The contamination of the spacing between the backcap and the cells may be further reduced by passing a selected gas through the spacing subsequent to sealing the backcap to the base of the photovoltaic panels, and once purged this spacing may be filled with an inert gas. The techniques of the present invention are preferably applied to thin film photovoltaic panels each formed from a plurality of photovoltaic cells arranged on a vitreous substrate. The stability of photovoltaic conversion efficiency remains relatively high during the life of the photovoltaic panel, and the cost of manufacturing highly efficient panels with such improved stability is significantly reduced.

  1. Process Development for Nanostructured Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Elam, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    Photovoltaic manufacturing is an emerging industry that promises a carbon-free, nearly limitless source of energy for our nation. However, the high-temperature manufacturing processes used for conventional silicon-based photovoltaics are extremely energy-intensive and expensive. This high cost imposes a critical barrier to the widespread implementation of photovoltaic technology. Argonne National Laboratory and its partners recently invented new methods for manufacturing nanostructured photovoltaic devices that allow dramatic savings in materials, process energy, and cost. These methods are based on atomic layer deposition, a thin film synthesis technique that has been commercialized for the mass production of semiconductor microelectronics. The goal of this project was to develop these low-cost fabrication methods for the high efficiency production of nanostructured photovoltaics, and to demonstrate these methods in solar cell manufacturing. We achieved this goal in two ways: 1) we demonstrated the benefits of these coatings in the laboratory by scaling-up the fabrication of low-cost dye sensitized solar cells; 2) we used our coating technology to reduce the manufacturing cost of solar cells under development by our industrial partners.

  2. Photovoltaic Subcontract Program

    SciTech Connect

    Surek, Thomas; Catalano, Anthony

    1993-03-01

    This report summarizes the fiscal year (FY) 1992 progress of the subcontracted photovoltaic (PV) research and development (R D) performed under the Photovoltaic Advanced Research and Development Project at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)-formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI). The mission of the national PV program is to develop PV technology for large-scale generation of economically competitive electric power in the United States. The technical sections of the report cover the main areas of the subcontract program: the Crystalline Materials and Advanced Concepts project, the Polycrystalline Thin Films project, Amorphous Silicon Research project, the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project, PV Module and System Performance and Engineering project, and the PV Analysis and Applications Development project. Technical summaries of each of the subcontracted programs provide a discussion of approaches, major accomplishments in FY 1992, and future research directions.

  3. High throughput manufacturing of thin-film CdTe photovoltaic modules. Annual subcontract report, 16 November 1993--15 November 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Sandwisch, D W

    1995-11-01

    This report describes work performed by Solar Cells, Inc. (SCI), under a 3-year subcontract to advance SCI`s PV manufacturing technologies, reduce module production costs, increase module performance, and provide the groundwork for SCI to expand its commercial production capacities. SCI will meet these objectives in three phases by designing, debugging, and operating a 20-MW/year, automated, continuous PV manufacturing line that produces 60-cm {times} 120-cm thin-film CdTe PV modules. This report describes tasks completed under Phase 1 of the US Department of Energy`s PV Manufacturing Technology program.

  4. Photovoltaic Energy Program Overview Fiscal Year 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    Significant activities in the National Photovoltaic Program are reported for each of the three main program elements. In Research and Development, advances in thin-film materials and crystalline silicon materials are described. The Technology Development report describes activities in photovoltaic manufacturing technology, industrial expansion, module and array development, and testing photovoltaic system components. Systems Engineering and Applications projects described include projects with government agencies, projects with utilities, documentation of performance for international applications, and product certification.

  5. Semiconductors: In Situ Processing of Photovoltaic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, Peter A.

    1998-01-01

    The possible processing of semiconductor photovoltaic devices is discussed. The requirements for lunar PV cells is reviewed, and the key challenges involved in their manufacturing are investigated. A schematic diagram of a passivated emitter and rear cell (PERC) is presented. The possible fabrication of large photovoltaic arrays in space from lunar materials is also discussed.

  6. National Center for Photovoltaics at NREL

    ScienceCinema

    VanSant, Kaitlyn; Wilson, Greg; Berry, Joseph; Al-Jassim, Mowafak; Kurtz, Sarah

    2014-06-10

    The National Center for Photovoltaics at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) focuses on technology innovations that drive industry growth in U.S. photovoltaic (PV) manufacturing. The NCPV is a central resource for our nation's capabilities in PV research, development, deployment, and outreach.

  7. National Center for Photovoltaics at NREL

    SciTech Connect

    VanSant, Kaitlyn; Wilson, Greg; Berry, Joseph; Al-Jassim, Mowafak; Kurtz, Sarah

    2013-11-07

    The National Center for Photovoltaics at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) focuses on technology innovations that drive industry growth in U.S. photovoltaic (PV) manufacturing. The NCPV is a central resource for our nation's capabilities in PV research, development, deployment, and outreach.

  8. Photovoltaics for commercial solar power applications; Proceedings of the Meeting, Cambridge, MA, Sept. 18, 19, 1986

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, David

    1986-01-01

    Papers are presented on efficient multijunction monolithic cascade solar cells, high efficiency silicon solar cells, point contact silicon cells, and space solar cell research. Also considered are photovoltaic power plants, the reliability of photovoltaic modules, the continuous fabrication of amorphous silicon solar cells on polymer substrates, and the density of states of amorphous silicon. Other topics include breaking the efficiency-stability-production barrier in amorphous photovoltaics, the development of flexible a-SiC/a-Si heterojunction solar cells and stable a-SiC/a-Si tandem cells with blocking barriers, and performance aspects for thin-film-silicon-hydrogen solar cells.

  9. Photovoltaic cell

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, Roy G.; Kurtz, Sarah

    1984-11-27

    In a photovoltaic cell structure containing a visibly transparent, electrically conductive first layer of metal oxide, and a light-absorbing semiconductive photovoltaic second layer, the improvement comprising a thin layer of transition metal nitride, carbide or boride interposed between said first and second layers.

  10. Photovoltaic manufacturing technology monolithic amorphous silicon modules on continuous polymer substrates. Annual technical progress report, July 5, 1996--December 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey, F.

    1998-08-01

    Iowa Thin Film Technologies, Inc.`s (ITF) goal is to develop the most cost effective PV manufacturing process possible. To this end the authors have chosen a roll based manufacturing process with continuous deposition and monolithic integration. Work under this program is designed to meet this goal by improving manufacturing throughput and performance of the manufactured devices. Significant progress was made during Phase 2 of this program on a number of fronts. A new single pass tandem deposition machine was brought on line which allows greatly increased and improved throughput for rolls of tandem material. The TCO deposition process was improved resulting in an increase in throughput by 20%. A new alignment method was implemented on the printing process which improves throughput six fold while improving alignment from 100 {micro}m to 10 {micro}m. A roll based lamination procedure was developed and implemented on selected products which improves throughput from 20 sq. ft./hr. to 240 sq. ft./hr. A wide range of lower cost encapsulants were evaluated. A promising material was selected initially to be introduced in 5 year lifetime type products. The sum of these improvements bring the overall cost reduction resulting from this program to 49%.

  11. Photovoltaic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Duty, C.; Angelini, J.; Armstrong, B.; Bennett, C.; Evans, B.; Jellison, G. E.; Joshi, P.; List, F.; Paranthaman, P.; Parish, C.; Wereszczak, A.

    2012-10-15

    The goal of the current project was to help make the US solar industry a world leader in the manufacture of thin film photovoltaics. The overall approach was to leverage ORNL’s unique characterization and processing technologies to gain a better understanding of the fundamental challenges for solar cell processing and apply that knowledge to targeted projects with industry members. ORNL has the capabilities in place and the expertise required to understand how basic material properties including defects, impurities, and grain boundaries affect the solar cell performance. ORNL also has unique processing capabilities to optimize the manufacturing process for fabrication of high efficiency and low cost solar cells. ORNL recently established the Center for Advanced Thin-film Systems (CATS), which contains a suite of optical and electrical characterization equipment specifically focused on solar cell research. Under this project, ORNL made these facilities available to industrial partners who were interested in pursuing collaborative research toward the improvement of their product or manufacturing process. Four specific projects were pursued with industrial partners: Global Solar Energy is a solar industry leader in full scale production manufacturing highly-efficient Copper Indium Gallium diSelenide (CIGS) thin film solar material, cells and products. ORNL worked with GSE to develop a scalable, non-vacuum, solution technique to deposit amorphous or nanocrystalline conducting barrier layers on untextured stainless steel substrates for fabricating high efficiency flexible CIGS PV. Ferro Corporation’s Electronic, Color and Glass Materials (“ECGM”) business unit is currently the world’s largest supplier of metallic contact materials in the crystalline solar cell marketplace. Ferro’s ECGM business unit has been the world's leading supplier of thick film metal pastes to the crystalline silicon PV industry for more than 30 years, and has had operational cells and

  12. Photovoltaic module reliability workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrig, L.

    The paper and presentations compiled in this volume form the Proceedings of the fourth in a series of Workshops sponsored by Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI/DOE) under the general theme of photovoltaic module reliability during the period 1986 to 1990. The reliability photovoltaic (PV) modules/systems is exceedingly important along with the initial cost and efficiency of modules if the PV technology has to make a major impact in the power generation market, and for it to compete with the conventional electricity producing technologies. The reliability of photovoltaic modules has progressed significantly in the last few years as evidenced by warrantees available on commercial modules of as long as 12 years. However, there is still need for substantial research and testing required to improve module field reliability to levels of 30 years or more. Several small groups of researchers are involved in this research, development, and monitoring activity around the world. In the U.S., PV manufacturers, DOE laboratories, electric utilities and others are engaged in the photovoltaic reliability research and testing. This group of researchers and others interested in this field were brought together under SERI/DOE sponsorship to exchange the technical knowledge and field experience as related to current information in this important field. The papers presented here reflect this effort.

  13. Progress on photovoltaic technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Maycock, P.

    1985-01-01

    This chapter presents the state of the art of photovoltaics, both economic and technological, using 15 tables of data to augment the text. The tables are entitled: (1) World PV Module Shipments; (2) 1984 World Market End-Use Sectors (MW); (3) World PV Module Shipments by Module Type; (4) US PV Module Shipments by Company; (5) US PV Module Shipments by Application; (6) Summary of Technology/Cost for Key Silicon-Based Options (1984 $); (7) Single-Crystal Cells: Manufacturing Process and Costs; (8) Manufactured cost per Watt (10% Module): US 5MWp; (9) Manufactured Cost per Watt (13% Modules): Hoxan 9MW; (10) Single-Crystal Technology Forecast; (11) Concentrators: 1985, 1990, 1995; (12) Si Ribbon: 1985, 1990, 1995; (13) Polysilicon: 1985, 1990, 1995; (14) Amorphous Si: 1985, 1990, 1995; (15) Option: No. of Professionals. Technology and cost forecasts, as well as R and D are included for all pertinent areas. 15 tables.

  14. Photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groth, H.

    1982-11-01

    The utilization of photovoltaic generators in measuring and signalling installations, communication systems, water pumping, and electric power plants is discussed. The advantages of solar generators over conventional power supply equipment are outlined.

  15. Solar Photovoltaics Technology: The Revolution Begins . . .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazmerski, Lawrence

    2009-11-01

    The prospects of current and coming solar-photovoltaic (PV) technologies are envisioned, arguing this solar-electricity source is at a tipping point in the complex worldwide energy outlook. The emphasis of this presentation is on R&D advances (cell, materials, and module options), with indications of the limitations and strengths of crystalline (Si and GaAs) and thin-film (a-Si:H, Si, Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S)2, CdTe). The contributions and technological pathways for now and near-term technologies (silicon, III-Vs, and thin films) and status and forecasts for next- generation PV (organics, nanotechnologies, non-conventional junction approaches) are evaluated. Recent advances in concentrators with efficiencies headed toward 50%, new directions for thin films (20% and beyond), and materials/device technology issues are discussed in terms of technology progress. Insights into technical and other investments needed to tip photovoltaics to its next level of contribution as a significant clean-energy partner in the world energy portfolio. The need for R&D accelerating the now and imminent (evolutionary) technologies balanced with work in mid-term (disruptive) approaches is highlighted. Moreover, technology progress and ownership for next generation solar PV mandates a balanced investment in research on longer-term (the revolution needs revolutionary approaches to sustain itself) technologies (quantum dots, multi-multijunctions, intermediate-band concepts, nanotubes, bio-inspired, thermophotonics, solar hydrogen. . . ) having high-risk, but extremely high performance and cost returns for our next generations of energy consumers. Issues relating to manufacturing are explored-especially with the requirements for the next-generation technologies. This presentation provides insights into how this technology has developed-and where the R&D investments should be made and we can expect to be by this mid-21st century.

  16. Amorphous silicon photovoltaic modules and test devices design, fabrication and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanleeuwen, M.

    1985-01-01

    In July of 1984, Hughes and JPL initiated a contract for Hughes to design, fabricate and test 10 thin film Amorphous Silicon (a-Si) photovoltaic power modules. These modules were to be 1 ft x 4 ft in size. They were to be preceded by the delivery of 10 a-Si 4 in. square test devices. This effort is very timely since thin film PV development has progressed to the point where intermediate load power applications are on the horizon. It is important to know if current a-Si submodule design and manufacturing processes yield a product that is compatible with the packaging needed to meet a 20 to 30 year life span expectancy. The term submodule is assigned to an interconnected assembly of 28 a-Si cells deposited on a 1 foot square glass superstrate. These assemblies are equipped with electrical terminations, i.e., copper tabs at the four corners of the inverted submodules. It is these submodules that are to be interconnected and packaged into power modules, as opposed to the interconnected individual crystalline cells packaged into todays PV modules. A discussion of the fabrication methods and results follows.

  17. US photovoltaic patents: 1991-1993

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohle, L.

    1995-03-01

    This document contains US patents on terrestrial photovoltaic (PV) power applications, including systems, components, and materials as well as manufacturing and support functions. The patent entries in this document were issued from 1991 to 1993. The entries were located by searching USPA, the database of the US Patent Office. The final search retrieved all patents under the class 'Batteries, Thermoelectric and Photoelectric' and the subclasses 'Photoelectric,' 'Testing,' and 'Applications.' The search also located patents that contained the words 'photovoltaic(s)' or 'solar cell(s)' and their derivatives. After the initial list was compiled, most of the patents on the following subjects were excluded: space photovoltaic technology, use of the photovoltaic effect for detectors, and subjects only peripherally concerned with photovoltaic. Some patents on these three subjects were included when ft appeared that those inventions might be of use in terrestrial PV power technologies.

  18. US photovoltaic patents: 1991--1993

    SciTech Connect

    Pohle, L

    1995-03-01

    This document contains US patents on terrestrial photovoltaic (PV) power applications, including systems, components, and materials as well as manufacturing and support functions. The patent entries in this document were issued from 1991 to 1993. The entries were located by searching USPA, the database of the US Patent Office. The final search retrieved all patents under the class ``Batteries, Thermoelectric and Photoelectric`` and the subclasses ``Photoelectric,`` ``Testing,`` and ``Applications.`` The search also located patents that contained the words ``photovoltaic(s)`` or ``solar cell(s)`` and their derivatives. After the initial list was compiled, most of the patents on the following subjects were excluded: space photovoltaic technology, use of the photovoltaic effect for detectors, and subjects only peripherally concerned with photovoltaic. Some patents on these three subjects were included when ft appeared that those inventions might be of use in terrestrial PV power technologies.

  19. PHOTOVOLTAICS AND THE ENVIRONMENT 1998. REPORT ON THE WORKSHOP PHOTOVOLTAICS AND THE ENVIRONMENT 1999

    SciTech Connect

    FTHENAKIS,V.; ZWEIBEL,K.; MOSKOWITZ,P.

    1999-02-01

    The objective of the workshop ``Photovoltaics and the Environment'' was to bring together PV manufacturers and industry analysts to define EH and S issues related to the large-scale commercialization of PV technologies.

  20. Photovoltaic concentrator module technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Elizabeth H.; Chamberlin, Jay L.; Boes, Eldon C.

    Significant developments in the development of photovoltaic (PV) concentrator technology are described. Concentrator cell research, advances in PV concentrator cell technology, and PV concentrator module development are described. Reliability issues currently of concern, including the applicability of wet insulation resistance tests to concentrator modules, correlation of accelerated thermal cycling tests with life expectancy in the field, and the importance of quality assurance during manufacture, are discussed. Two PV concentrator power systems installed in 1989 are discussed. A PV concentrator initiative program established by the DOE is given, and the results of the latest cost study are presented.

  1. A photovoltaic industry overview - The results of a survey on photovoltaic technology industrialization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferber, R. R.; Costogue, E. N.; Thornhill, J. W.; Shimada, K.

    1981-01-01

    The National Photovoltaics Program of the United States Department of Energy has the objective of bringing photovoltaic power systems to a point where they can supply a significant portion of the United States energy requirements by the year 2000. This is planned to be accomplished through substantial research and technology development activities aimed at achieving major cost reductions and market penetration. This paper presents information derived from a limited survey performed to obtain photovoltaic industry attitudes concerning industrialization, and to determine current industry plans to meet the DOE program goals. Silicon material production, a key photovoltaic manufacturing industry, is highlighted with regards to implementation of technology improvement and silicon material supply outlook.

  2. Photovoltaic cell and production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Narayanan, Srinivasamohan; Kumar, Bikash

    2008-07-22

    An efficient photovoltaic cell, and its process of manufacture, is disclosed wherein the back surface p-n junction is removed from a doped substrate having an oppositely doped emitter layer. A front surface and edges and optionally the back surface periphery are masked and a back surface etch is performed. The mask is not removed and acts as an anti-reflective coating, a passivating agent, or both. The photovoltaic cell retains an untextured back surface whether or not the front is textured and the dopant layer on the back surface is removed to enhance the cell efficiency. Optionally, a back surface field is formed.

  3. Recycling Of Cis Photovoltaic Waste

    DOEpatents

    Drinkard, Jr., William F.; Long, Mark O.; Goozner; Robert E.

    1998-07-14

    A method for extracting and reclaiming metals from scrap CIS photovoltaic cells and associated photovoltaic manufacturing waste by leaching the waste with dilute nitric acid, skimming any plastic material from the top of the leaching solution, separating glass substrate from the leachate, electrolyzing the leachate to plate a copper and selenium metal mixture onto a first cathode, replacing the cathode with a second cathode, re-electrolyzing the leachate to plate cadmium onto the second cathode, separating the copper from selenium, and evaporating the depleted leachate to yield a zinc and indium containing solid.

  4. Photovoltaic Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The Ohio Aerospace Institute through David Scheiman and Phillip Jenkins provided the Photovoltaics Branch at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) with expertise in photovoltaic (PV) research, flight experiments and solar cell calibration. NASA GRC maintains the only world-class solar cell calibration and measurement facility within NASA. GRC also has a leadership role within the solar cell calibration community, and is leading the effort to develop ISO standards for solar cell calibration. OAI scientists working under this grant provided much of the expertise and leadership in this area.

  5. Large-area triple-junction a-Si alloy production scaleup. Annual subcontract report, 17 March 1993--18 March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Oswald, R.; Morris, J.

    1994-11-01

    The objective of this subcontract over its three-year duration is to advance Solarex`s photovoltaic manufacturing technologies, reduce its a-Si:H module production costs, increase module performance and expand the Solarex commercial production capacity. Solarex shall meet these objectives by improving the deposition and quality of the transparent front contact, by optimizing the laser patterning process, scaling-up the semiconductor deposition process, improving the back contact deposition, scaling-up and improving the encapsulation and testing of its a-Si:H modules. In the Phase 2 portion of this subcontract, Solarex focused on improving deposition of the front contact, investigating alternate feed stocks for the front contact, maximizing throughput and area utilization for all laser scribes, optimizing a-Si:H deposition equipment to achieve uniform deposition over large-areas, optimizing the triple-junction module fabrication process, evaluating the materials to deposit the rear contact, and optimizing the combination of isolation scribe and encapsulant to pass the wet high potential test. Progress is reported on the following: Front contact development; Laser scribe process development; Amorphous silicon based semiconductor deposition; Rear contact deposition process; Frit/bus/wire/frame; Materials handling; and Environmental test, yield and performance analysis.

  6. Photovoltaic module reliability workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Mrig, L.

    1990-01-01

    The paper and presentations compiled in this volume form the Proceedings of the fourth in a series of Workshops sponsored by Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI/DOE) under the general theme of photovoltaic module reliability during the period 1986--1990. The reliability Photo Voltaic (PV) modules/systems is exceedingly important along with the initial cost and efficiency of modules if the PV technology has to make a major impact in the power generation market, and for it to compete with the conventional electricity producing technologies. The reliability of photovoltaic modules has progressed significantly in the last few years as evidenced by warranties available on commercial modules of as long as 12 years. However, there is still need for substantial research and testing required to improve module field reliability to levels of 30 years or more. Several small groups of researchers are involved in this research, development, and monitoring activity around the world. In the US, PV manufacturers, DOE laboratories, electric utilities and others are engaged in the photovoltaic reliability research and testing. This group of researchers and others interested in this field were brought together under SERI/DOE sponsorship to exchange the technical knowledge and field experience as related to current information in this important field. The papers presented here reflect this effort.

  7. Photovoltaics and the Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Fthenakis, Vasilis

    2005-09-21

    Over the past five years, solar energy usage has grown by about 43 percent a year, giving rise to a billion-dollar industry in photovoltaics (PV) or getting electricity from light. The word photovoltaics combines the Greek phos, or light, with the “volt” of electricity. PV technologies have distinct environmental advantages over conventional power technologies, such as: no noise, no emissions, no need for fuel and power lines. Compared to burning coal, a gigawatt-hour of PV-generated electricity would prevent the release of about 1,000 tons of carbon dioxide, eight of sulfur dioxide, four of nitrogen oxides, and 0.4 tons of particulates. However, manufacturing the solar cells that transform light to electricity requires the use of some toxic and flammable substances. Addressing the environmental, health, and safety concerns of the PV industry to minimize risk while ensuring economic viability and public support is the work of the National Photovoltaic Environmental Health, & Safety Assistance Center at BNL.

  8. Quo Vadis photovoltaics 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäger-Waldau, A.

    2011-10-01

    Since more than 10 years photovoltaics is one of the most dynamic industries with growth rates well beyond 40% per annum. This growth is driven not only by the progress in materials knowledge and processing technology, but also by market introduction programmes in many countries around the world. Despite the negative impacts on the economy by the financial crisis since 2009, photovoltaics is still growing at an extraordinary pace and had in 2010 an extraordinary success, as both production and markets doubled. The open question is what will happen in 2011 and the years after as the situation is dominated by huge manufacturing overcapacities and an increasing unpredictability of policy support. How can the PV industry continue their cost reduction to ensure another 10 to 20 years of sustained and strong growth necessary to make PV to one of the main pillars of a sustainable energy supply in 2030. Despite the fact, that globally the share of electricity from photovoltaic systems is still small, at local level it can be already now above 30% of the demand at certain times of the year. Future research in PV has to provide intelligent solutions not only on the solar cell alone, but also on the module and the system integration level in order to permit a 5 to 10% share of electricity in 2020.

  9. Basic research challenges in crystalline silicon photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, J.H.

    1995-08-01

    Silicon is abundant, non-toxic and has an ideal band gap for photovoltaic energy conversion. Experimental world record cells of 24 % conversion efficiency with around 300 {mu}m thickness are only 4 % (absolute) efficiency points below the theoretical Auger recombination-limit of around 28 %. Compared with other photovoltaic materials, crystalline silicon has only very few disadvantages. The handicap of weak light absorbance may be mastered by clever optical designs. Single crystalline cells of only 48 {mu}m thickness showed 17.3 % efficiency even without backside reflectors. A technology of solar cells from polycrystalline Si films on foreign substrates arises at the horizon. However, the disadvantageous, strong activity of grain boundaries in Si could be an insurmountable hurdle for a cost-effective, terrestrial photovoltaics based on polycrystalline Si on foreign substrates. This talk discusses some basic research challenges related to a Si based photovoltaics.

  10. Photovoltaic cell

    SciTech Connect

    Bronstein-Bonte, I.Y.; Fischer, A.B.

    1986-12-16

    This patent describes a product comprising a photovoltaic cell including a luminescent dye which will absorb radiation at a wavelength to which the cell is not significantly responsive and emit radiation at a higher wavelength at which it is responsive. The improvement described here is wherein the dye comprises a lepidopterene.

  11. Photovoltaic energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-01-01

    In 1989, the U.S. photovoltaic industry enjoyed a growth rate of 30 percent in sales for the second year in a row. This sends a message that the way we think about electricity is changing. Instead of big energy projects that perpetuate environmental and economic damage, there is a growing trend toward small renewable technologies that are well matched to end-user needs and operating conditions. As demand grows and markets expand, investment capital will be drawn to the industry and new growth trends will emerge. The photovoltaic industry around the world achieved record shipments also. Worldwide shipments of photovoltaic (PV) modules for 1989 totaled more than 40 megawatts (MW), nearly a 20 percent increase over last year's shipments. The previous two years showed increases in worldwide shipments of 23 and 25 percent, respectively. If this growth rate continues through the 1990s, as industry back orders would indicate, 300 to 1000 MW of PV-supplied power could be on line by 2000. Photovoltaic systems have low environmental impact and they are inexpensive to operate and maintain. Using solid-state technology, PV systems directly convert sunlight to electricity without high-temperature fluids or moving parts that could cause mechanical failure. This makes the technology very reliable.

  12. Photovoltaics information user study

    SciTech Connect

    Belew, W.W.; Wood, B.L.; Marie, T.L.; Reinhardt, C.L.

    1980-10-01

    The results of a series of telephone interviews with groups of users of information on photovoltaics (PV) are described. These results, part of a larger study on many different solar technologies, identify types of information each group needed and the best ways to get information to each group. The report is 1 of 10 discussing study results. The overall study provides baseline data about information needs in the solar community. It covers these technological areas: photovoltaics, passive solar heating and cooling, active solar heating and cooling, biomass energy, solar thermal electric power, solar industrial and agricultural process heat, wind energy, ocean energy, and advanced energy storage. An earlier study identified the information user groups in the solar community and the priority (to accelerate solar energy commercialization) of getting information to each group. In the current study only high-priority groups were examined. Results from seven PV groups respondents are analyzed in this report: DOE-Funded Researchers, Non-DOE-Funded Researchers, Researchers Working for Manufacturers, Representatives of Other Manufacturers, Representatives of Utilities, Electric Power Engineers, and Educators.

  13. Photovoltaic Subcontract Program, FY 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This report summarizes the fiscal year (FY) 1991 (October 1, 1990, through September 30, 1991) progress of the subcontracted photovoltaic (PV) research and development (R D) performed under the Photovoltaic Advanced Research and Development Project at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) -- formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI). The mission of the national PV program is to develop PV technology for large-scale generation of economically competitive electric power in the United States. The technical sections of the report cover the main areas of the subcontract program: the Amorphous Silicon Research Project, Polycrystalline Thin Films, Crystalline Silicon Materials Research, High-Efficiency Concepts, the New Ideas Program, the University Participation Program, and the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project. Technical summaries of each of the subcontracted programs provide a discussion of approaches, major accomplishments in FY 1991, and future research directions.

  14. 12th NREL photovoltaic program review

    SciTech Connect

    Noufi, R.; Ullal, H.S. )

    1994-01-01

    The 12th NREL Photovoltaic Program Review was held in Denver in October 1993. This represents the U.S. Department of Energy's National Photovoltaic Program. Invited speakers from private industry, university etc., discussed topics such as: materials growth and testing, photovoltaic cell manufacturing, system engineering and applications, single and multijunction device etc.. These proceedings represent collection of papers presented at the review, most of the research reported is sponsored by the Department of Energy. Sixty six papers were presented at the review, out of these fifty nine have been abstracted for the Energy Science and Technology database. (AIP)

  15. Photovoltaic Roofs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, R. W., Jr.; Shepard, N. F., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Solar cells perform two functions: waterproofing roof and generating electricity. Sections through horizontal and slanting joints show overlapping modules sealed by L-section rubber strips and side-by-side modules sealed by P-section strips. Water seeping through seals of slanting joints drains along channels. Rooftop photovoltaic array used watertight south facing roof, replacing shingles, tar, and gravel. Concept reduces cost of residential solar-cell array.

  16. Reliability Research for Photovoltaic Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Ronald J., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Report describes research approach used to improve reliability of photovoltaic modules. Aimed at raising useful module lifetime to 20 to 30 years. Development of cost-effective solutions to module-lifetime problem requires compromises between degradation rates, failure rates, and lifetimes, on one hand, and costs of initial manufacture, maintenance, and lost energy, on other hand. Life-cycle costing integrates disparate economic terms, allowing cost effectiveness to be quantified, allowing comparison of different design alternatives.

  17. Photovoltaics Performance and Reliability Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrig, L.

    This document consists of papers and viewgraphs compiled from the proceedings of a workshop held in September 1992. This workshop was the fifth in a series sponsored by NREL/DOE under the general subject areas of photovoltaic module testing and reliability. PV manufacturers, DOE laboratories, electric utilities, and others exchanged technical knowledge and field experience. The topics of cell and module characterization, module and system performance, materials and module durability/reliability research, solar radiation, and applications are discussed.

  18. 48 CFR 252.225-7017 - Photovoltaic Devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., Guatemala, Honduras, Korea (Republic of), Mexico, Morocco, Nicaragua, Panama, Peru, or Singapore); (iii) A..., Morocco, Nicaragua, Panama, Peru, or Singapore. Free Trade Agreement country photovoltaic device means an.... Moroccan photovoltaic device means an article that— (i) Is wholly manufactured in Morocco; or (ii) In...

  19. Investigation of structural and electrical properties of flat a-Si/c-Si heterostructure fabricated by EBPVD technique

    SciTech Connect

    Demiroğlu, D.; Tatar, B.; Kazmanli, K.; Urgen, M.

    2013-12-16

    Flat amorphous silicon - crystal silicon (a-Si/c-Si) heterostructure were prepared by ultra-high vacuum electron beam evaporation technique on p-Si (111) and n-Si (100) single crystal substrates. Structural analyses were investigated by XRD, Raman and FEG-SEM analysis. With these analyses we determined that at the least amorphous structure shows modification but amorphous structure just protected. The electrical and photovoltaic properties of flat a-Si/c-Si heterojunction devices were investigated with current-voltage characteristics under dark and illumination conditions. Electrical properties of flat a-Si/c-Si heterorojunction; such as barrier height Φ{sub B}, diode ideality factor η were determined from current-voltage characteristics in dark conditions. These a-Si/c-Si heterostructure have good rectification behavior as a diode and exhibit high photovoltaic sensitivity.

  20. Organic photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna; Krebs, Frederik C.; Chen, Hongzheng

    2013-12-01

    Energy inflation, the constant encouragement to economize on energy consumption and the huge investments in developing alternative energy resources might seem to suggest that there is a global shortage of energy. Far from it, the energy the Sun beams on the Earth each hour is equivalent to a year's supply, even at our increasingly ravenous rate of global energy consumption [1]. But it's not what you have got it's what you do with it. Hence the intense focus on photovoltaic research to find more efficient ways to harness energy from the Sun. Recently much of this research has centred on organic solar cells since they offer simple, low-cost, light-weight and large-area flexible photovoltaic structures. This issue with guest editors Frederik C Krebs and Hongzheng Chen focuses on some of the developments at the frontier of organic photovoltaic technology. Improving the power conversion efficiency of organic photovoltaic systems, while maintaining the inherent material, economic and fabrication benefits, has absorbed a great deal of research attention in recent years. Here significant progress has been made with reports now of organic photovoltaic devices with efficiencies of around 10%. Yet operating effectively across the electromagnetic spectrum remains a challenge. 'The trend is towards engineering low bandgap polymers with a wide optical absorption range and efficient hole/electron transport materials, so that light harvesting in the red and infrared region is enhanced and as much light of the solar spectrum as possible can be converted into an electrical current', explains Mukundan Thelakkat and colleagues in Germany, the US and UK. In this special issue they report on how charge carrier mobility and morphology of the active blend layer in thin film organic solar cells correlate with device parameters [2]. The work contributes to a better understanding of the solar-cell characteristics of polymer:fullerene blends, which form the material basis for some of the most

  1. Photovoltaic Power Systems: A Tour Through the Alternatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Henry

    1978-01-01

    Photovoltaic systems are examined as potentially major energy sources, along with the economic factors that will affect their future use. Cell design, power efficiency, and manufacturing problems are also considered. (MA)

  2. Nanostructured photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Lan; Tan, H. Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2013-01-01

    Energy and the environment are two of the most important global issues that we currently face. The development of clean and sustainable energy resources is essential to reduce greenhouse gas emission and meet our ever-increasing demand for energy. Over the last decade photovoltaics, as one of the leading technologies to meet these challenges, has seen a continuous increase in research, development and investment. Meanwhile, nanotechnology, which is considered to be the technology of the future, is gradually revolutionizing our everyday life through adaptation and incorporation into many traditional technologies, particularly energy-related technologies, such as photovoltaics. While the record for the highest efficiency is firmly held by multijunction III-V solar cells, there has never been a shortage of new research effort put into improving the efficiencies of all types of solar cells and making them more cost effective. In particular, there have been extensive and exciting developments in employing nanostructures; features with different low dimensionalities, such as quantum wells, nanowires, nanotubes, nanoparticles and quantum dots, have been incorporated into existing photovoltaic technologies to enhance their performance and/or reduce their cost. Investigations into light trapping using plasmonic nanostructures to effectively increase light absorption in various solar cells are also being rigorously pursued. In addition, nanotechnology provides researchers with great opportunities to explore the new ideas and physics offered by nanostructures to implement advanced solar cell concepts such as hot carrier, multi-exciton and intermediate band solar cells. This special issue of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics contains selected papers on nanostructured photovoltaics written by researchers in their respective fields of expertise. These papers capture the current excitement, as well as addressing some open questions in the field, covering topics including the

  3. Photovoltaic evaluation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, G.; Heikkilae, M.; Melasuo, T.; Spanner, S.

    Realizing the value and potential of PV-power as well as the growing need for increased cooperation and sharing of knowledge in the field of photovoltaics, FINNIDA and UNICEF decided to undertake a study of selected PV-projects. There were two main objectives for the study: To gather, compile, evaluate and share information on the photovoltaic technology appropriate to developing countries, and to promote the interest and competence of Finnish research institutes, consultants and manufacturers in photovoltaic development. For this purpose a joint evaluation of significant, primarily UN-supported projects providing for the basic needs of rural communities was undertaken. The Gambia and Kenya offered a variety of such projects, and were chosen as target countries for the study. The projects were chosen to be both comparable and complimentary. In the Gambia, the main subject was a partially integrated health and telecommunications project, but a long-operating drinking water pumping system was also studied. In Kenya, a health project in the Turkana area was examined, and also a large scale water pumping installation for fish farming. Field visits were made in order to verify and supplement the data gathered through document research and earlier investigations. Individual data gathering sheets for the project form the core of this study and are intended to give the necessary information in an organized and accessible format. The findings could practically be condensed into one sentence: PV-systems work very well, if properly designed and installed, but the resources and requirements of the recipients must be considered to a higher degree.

  4. Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holley, W.

    1995-04-01

    The following highlights key findings from this reporting period: While 'standard cure' A9918P ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) encapsulant, laminated between low iron glass, shows significant yellowing after 17 weeks in a xenon-arc Weather-Ometer, 'neat' EVA with no additives shows little or no yellowing after the same exposure. When similar laminates were prepared and exposed in the Weather-Ometer, using A9918P with the Lupersol 101 crosslinker removed from the encapsulant, color development after 10 weeks was reduced by approximately 2/3. This result strongly implicates Lupersol 101 in the discoloration of EVA encapsulant. Similar Weather-Ometer aging studies of other laminates, prepared using EVA with various combinations of the A9918P additives, suggests that EVA discoloration arises primarily from Naugard P and an interaction of Lupersol 101 with Cyasorb UV-531. Transformation products of these additives appear to be giving rise to yellowing, rather than the Elvax 3185 resin itself. When Lupersol TBEC was substituted for Lupersol 101 in the encapsulant (i.e. 'fast cure' 15295P formulation rather than the 'standard cure' A9918P), the rate of yellowing was reduced by a factor of approximately 2.5. Use of a cerium-oxide containing low-iron glass superstrate reduced the rate of yellowing of A9918P EVA by approximately 75%. When laminates were prepared and exposed using 15295P EVA and cerium-oxide containing glass superstrate, there was no visible yellowing. Analytical results show no measurable loss of acetic acid from very browned, field-aged EVA and no evidence of conjugated unsaturation; analysis also reveals the loss of Cyasorb UV-531 in both field-aged and laboratory U.V. aged samples, but only in the presence of Lupersol 101. This result supports the finding of an interaction of Lupersol 101 with UV-531 as contributing to color formation in the presence of U.V.

  5. Organic photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna; Krebs, Frederik C.; Chen, Hongzheng

    2013-12-01

    Energy inflation, the constant encouragement to economize on energy consumption and the huge investments in developing alternative energy resources might seem to suggest that there is a global shortage of energy. Far from it, the energy the Sun beams on the Earth each hour is equivalent to a year's supply, even at our increasingly ravenous rate of global energy consumption [1]. But it's not what you have got it's what you do with it. Hence the intense focus on photovoltaic research to find more efficient ways to harness energy from the Sun. Recently much of this research has centred on organic solar cells since they offer simple, low-cost, light-weight and large-area flexible photovoltaic structures. This issue with guest editors Frederik C Krebs and Hongzheng Chen focuses on some of the developments at the frontier of organic photovoltaic technology. Improving the power conversion efficiency of organic photovoltaic systems, while maintaining the inherent material, economic and fabrication benefits, has absorbed a great deal of research attention in recent years. Here significant progress has been made with reports now of organic photovoltaic devices with efficiencies of around 10%. Yet operating effectively across the electromagnetic spectrum remains a challenge. 'The trend is towards engineering low bandgap polymers with a wide optical absorption range and efficient hole/electron transport materials, so that light harvesting in the red and infrared region is enhanced and as much light of the solar spectrum as possible can be converted into an electrical current', explains Mukundan Thelakkat and colleagues in Germany, the US and UK. In this special issue they report on how charge carrier mobility and morphology of the active blend layer in thin film organic solar cells correlate with device parameters [2]. The work contributes to a better understanding of the solar-cell characteristics of polymer:fullerene blends, which form the material basis for some of the most

  6. Photovoltaic solar concentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Nielson, Gregory N.; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Okandan, Murat; Resnick, Paul J.; Sanchez, Carlos Anthony; Clews, Peggy J.; Gupta, Vipin P.

    2015-09-08

    A process including forming a photovoltaic solar cell on a substrate, the photovoltaic solar cell comprising an anchor positioned between the photovoltaic solar cell and the substrate to suspend the photovoltaic solar cell from the substrate. A surface of the photovoltaic solar cell opposite the substrate is attached to a receiving substrate. The receiving substrate may be bonded to the photovoltaic solar cell using an adhesive force or a metal connecting member. The photovoltaic solar cell is then detached from the substrate by lifting the receiving substrate having the photovoltaic solar cell attached thereto and severing the anchor connecting the photovoltaic solar cell to the substrate. Depending upon the type of receiving substrate used, the photovoltaic solar cell may be removed from the receiving substrate or remain on the receiving substrate for use in the final product.

  7. Photovoltaics: New opportunities for utilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    This publication presents information on photovoltaics. The following topics are discussed: Residential Photovoltaics: The New England Experience Builds Confidence in PV; Austin's 300-kW Photovoltaic Power Station: Evaluating the Breakeven Costs; Residential Photovoltaics: The Lessons Learned; Photovoltaics for Electric Utility Use; Least-Cost Planning: The Environmental Link; Photovoltaics in the Distribution System; Photovoltaic Systems for the Rural Consumer; The Issues of Utility-Intertied Photovoltaics; and Photovoltaics for Large-Scale Use: Costs Ready to Drop Again.

  8. Photovoltaic Subcontract Program, FY 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, K.A.

    1991-03-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the subcontracted photovoltaic (PV) research and development (R D) performed under the Photovoltaics Program at the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI). The SERI subcontracted PV research and development represents most of the subcontracted R D that is funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) National Photovoltaics Program. This report covers fiscal year (FY) 1990: October 1, 1989 through September 30, 1990. During FY 1990, the SERI PV program started to implement a new DOE subcontract initiative, entitled the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) Project.'' Excluding (PVMaT) because it was in a start-up phase, in FY 1990 there were 54 subcontracts with a total annualized funding of approximately $11.9 million. Approximately two-thirds of those subcontracts were with universities, at a total funding of over $3.3 million. Cost sharing by industry added another $4.3 million to that $11.9 million of SERI PV subcontracted R D. The six technical sections of this report cover the previously ongoing areas of the subcontracted program: the Amorphous Silicon Research Project, Polycrystalline Thin Films, Crystalline Silicon Materials Research, High-Efficiency Concepts, the New Ideas Program, and the University Participation Program. Technical summaries of each of the subcontracted programs discuss approaches, major accomplishments in FY 1990, and future research directions. Another section introduces the PVMaT project and reports the progress since its inception in FY 1990. Highlights of technology transfer activities are also reported.

  9. Photovoltaic cell

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, J.F.; Lampkin, C.M.

    1981-12-08

    A photovoltaic cell has: an electrically conductive substrate, which may be glass having a film of conductive tin oxide; a first layer containing a suitable semiconductor, which layer has a first component film with an amorphous structure and a second component film with a polycrystalline structure; a second layer forming a heterojunction with the first layer; and suitable electrodes where the heterojunction is formed from a solution containing copper, the amorphous film component is superposed above an electrically conductive substrate to resist permeation of the copper-containing material to shorting electrical contact with the substrate. The penetration resistant amporphous layer permits a variety of processes to be used in forming the heterojunction with even very thin layers (1-6 mu thick) of underlying polycrystalline semi-conductor materials. In some embodiments, the amorphous-like structure may be formed by the addition of aluminum or zirconium compounds to a solution of cadmium salts sprayed over a heated substrate.

  10. Solar Photovoltaic Cell/Module Shipments Report

    EIA Publications

    2016-01-01

    Summary data for the photovoltaic industry in the United States. Data includes manufacturing, imports, and exports of modules in the United States and its territories. Summary data include volumes in peak kilowatts and average prices. Where possible, imports and exports are listed by country, and shipments to the United States are listed by state.

  11. The status of lightweight photovoltaic space array technology based on amorphous silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanak, Joseph J.; Kaschmitter, Jim

    1991-01-01

    Ultralight, flexible photovoltaic (PV) array of amorphous silicon (a-Si) was identified as a potential low cost power source for small satellites. A survey was conducted of the status of the a-Si PV array technology with respect to present and future performance, availability, cost, and risks. For existing, experimental array blankets made of commercial cell material, utilizing metal foil substrates, the Beginning of Life (BOL) performance at Air Mass Zero (AM0) and 35 C includes total power up to 200 W, power per area of 64 W/sq m and power per weight of 258 W/kg. Doubling of power per weight occurs when polyimide substrates are used. Estimated End of Life (EOL) power output after 10 years in a nominal low earth orbit would be 80 pct. of BOL, the degradation being due to largely light induced effects (-10 to -15 pct.) and in part (-5 pct.) to space radiation. Predictions for the year 1995 for flexible PV arrays, made on the basis of published results for rigid a-Si modules, indicate EOL power output per area and per weight of 105 W/sq m and 400 W/kg, respectively, while predictions for the late 1990s based on existing U.S. national PV program goals indicate EOL values of 157 W/sq m and 600 W/kg. Cost estimates by vendors for 200 W ultralight arrays in volume of over 1000 units range from $100/watt to $125/watt. Identified risks include the lack of flexible, space compatible encapsulant, the lack of space qualification effort, recent partial or full acquisitions of US manufacturers of a-Si cells by foreign firms, and the absence of a national commitment for a long range development program toward developing of this important power source for space.

  12. Photovoltaic performance and reliability workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrig, L.

    1993-12-01

    This workshop was the sixth in a series of workshops sponsored by NREL/DOE under the general subject of photovoltaic testing and reliability during the period 1986-1993. PV performance and PV reliability are at least as important as PV cost, if not more. In the U.S., PV manufacturers, DOE laboratories, electric utilities, and others are engaged in the photovoltaic reliability research and testing. This group of researchers and others interested in the field were brought together to exchange the technical knowledge and field experience as related to current information in this evolving field of PV reliability. The papers presented here reflect this effort since the last workshop held in September, 1992. The topics covered include: cell and module characterization, module and system testing, durability and reliability, system field experience, and standards and codes.

  13. Photovoltaic performance and reliability workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Mrig, L.

    1993-12-01

    This workshop was the sixth in a series of workshops sponsored by NREL/DOE under the general subject of photovoltaic testing and reliability during the period 1986--1993. PV performance and PV reliability are at least as important as PV cost, if not more. In the US, PV manufacturers, DOE laboratories, electric utilities, and others are engaged in the photovoltaic reliability research and testing. This group of researchers and others interested in the field were brought together to exchange the technical knowledge and field experience as related to current information in this evolving field of PV reliability. The papers presented here reflect this effort since the last workshop held in September, 1992. The topics covered include: cell and module characterization, module and system testing, durability and reliability, system field experience, and standards and codes.

  14. Encapsulation Processing and Manufacturing Yield Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.

    1984-01-01

    The development of encapsulation processing and a manufacturing productivity analysis for photovoltaic cells are discussed. The goals were: (1) to understand the relationships between both formulation variables and process variables; (2) to define conditions required for optimum performance; (3) to predict manufacturing yield; and (4) to provide documentation to industry.

  15. Scattering properties of nanostructures: Applications to photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derkacs, Daniel

    Solar cells are specially engineered semiconductor diodes that have the ability to convert solar energy, in the form of light, into electricity. Manufacturing high-efficiency low-cost photovoltaic devices has been the goal of researchers since it was discovered in 1954 that a voltage developed across a semiconductor pn junction when the lights in the room on. The costs associated with manufacturing solar modules can be greatly reduced if thinner semiconductor wafers are used. In order to maintain cell efficiency, novel light trapping methods that increase photon path lengths must be employed to ensure the usable portion of the solar spectrum is fully absorbed by thinner cells. Due to the planar symmetry of semiconductor wafers, any light transmitted into the cell from the top surface will be confined to the continuum of radiation modes only. Transmitted photons that reflect from the back of the cell will be incident onto the front of the cell at angles that reside within the exit cone of the semiconductor as mandated by reciprocity. Thus, a large portion of unabsorbed photons are transmitted out of the cell after a single round-trip through the material. To trap light in the cell, it is required to break the non-ergodic geometry of the planar material so that transmitted photons propagate at angles greater than what is required to totally internally reflect at the cell boundaries. This dissertation reports on absorption enhancing methods that employ the unique light scattering properties of metal and dielectric nanoparticles deposited onto the planar surfaces of a-Si and InP/InGaAsP quantum-well solar cells. The nanoparticles scatter incident light not only into radiation modes, but also into laterally propagating trapped modes. Due to increased path traveled by laterally propagating photons, enhanced absorption and increased energy conversion efficiency is observed. The non-ergodic geometry of planar cells treated in this manner is broken without modifying or

  16. MBE growth of GaP on a Si substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolev, M. S. Lazarenko, A. A.; Nikitina, E. V.; Pirogov, E. V.; Gudovskikh, A. S.; Egorov, A. Yu.

    2015-04-15

    It is shown that single-crystal GaP buffer layers can be formed on a Si substrate by molecular-beam epitaxy, with the “migration-enhanced epitaxy” procedure applied in the stage in which the nucleating layer is formed. When a GaP layer is produced on a p-type silicon substrate, a p-n junction is created in a natural way between the p-Si substrate and the surface n-Si layer produced by the diffusion of phosphorus into the substrate during the course of the epitaxial growth of GaP. This p-n junction can be used as the first junction of a silicon-based multijunction photovoltaic converter.

  17. Photovoltaic cell

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, J. F.; Lampkin, C. M.

    1981-02-03

    A photovoltaic cell is disclosed having an electrically conductive substrate, which may be glass having a film of conductive tin oxide. A first layer contains a suitable semiconductor, which layer has a first component film with an amorphous structure and a second component film with a polycrystalline structure a second layer forms a heterojunction with the first layer suitable electrodes are provided where the heterojunction is formed from a solution containing copper, and the amorphous film component is superposed above an electrically conductive substrate to resist permeation of the copper-containing material to shorting electrical contact with the substrate. The penetration resistant amorphous layer permits a variety of processes to be used in forming the heterojunction with even very thin layers (1-6 mu thick) of underlying polycrystalline semi-conductor materials. In some embodiments, the amorphous-like structure may be formed by the addition of aluminum or zirconium compounds to a solution of cadmium salts sprayed over a heated substrate.

  18. Manufacturing technology development for CuInGaSe sub 2 solar cell modules

    SciTech Connect

    Stanbery, B.J. )

    1991-11-01

    The report describes research performed by Boeing Aerospace and Electronics under the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology project. We anticipate that implementing advanced semiconductor device fabrication techniques to the production of large-area CuIn{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} (CIGS)/Cd{sub 1-y}Zn{sub y}S/ZnO monolithically integrated thin-film solar cell modules will enable 15% median efficiencies to be achieved in high-volume manufacturing. We do not believe that CuInSe{sub 2} (CIS) can achieve this efficiency in production without sufficient gallium to significantly increase the band gap, thereby matching it better to the solar spectrum (i.e., x{ge}0.2). Competing techniques for CIS film formation have not been successfully extended to CIGS devices with such high band gaps. The SERI-confirmed intrinsic stability of CIS-based photovoltaics renders them far superior to a-Si:H-based devices, making a 30-year module lifetime feasible. The minimal amounts of cadmium used in the structure we propose, compared to CdTe-based devices, makes them environmentally safer and more acceptable to both consumers and relevant regulatory agencies. Large-area integrated thin-film CIGS modules are the product most likely to supplant silicon modules by the end of this decade and enable the cost improvements which will lead to rapid market expansion.

  19. Manufacturing technology development for CuInGaSe2 solar cell modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanbery, B. J.

    1991-11-01

    The report describes research performed by Boeing Aerospace and Electronics under the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology project. We anticipate that implementing advanced semiconductor device fabrication techniques to the production of large area CuIn(1-x)Ga(x)Se2 (CIGS)/Cd(1-y)Zn(y)S/ZnO monolithically integrated thin film solar cell modules will enable 15 pct. median efficiencies to be achieved in high volume manufacturing. We do not believe that CuInSe2 (CIS) can achieve this efficiency in production without sufficient gallium to significantly increase the band gap, thereby matching it better to the solar spectrum (i.e., x greater than or = 0.2). Competing techniques for CIS film formation have not been successfully extended to CIGS devices with such high band gaps. The SERI-confirmed intrinsic stability of CIS-based photovoltaics renders them far superior to a-Si:H-based devices, making a 30 year module lifetime feasible. The minimal amounts of cadmium used in the structure we propose, compared to CdTe-based devices, makes them environmentally safer and more acceptable to both consumers and relevant regulatory agencies. Large area integrated thin film CIGS modules are the product most likely to supplant silicon modules by the end of this decade and enable the cost improvements which will lead to rapid market expansion.

  20. Photovoltaic roof construction

    SciTech Connect

    Hawley, W.W.

    1980-02-26

    In a batten-seam roof construction employing at least one photovoltaic cell module, the electrical conduits employed with the at least one photovoltaic cell module are disposed primarily under the battens of the roof.

  1. Methodology for a reliability study on photovoltaic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desombre, A.

    It is found that an assessment of the reliability of photovoltaic solar modules involves an analysis of the stresses encountered in use and of the failure mechanisms that depend on the design and manufacture of the module. It is stressed that research must be carried out on acceleration tests and on calculating acceleration factors for each method of manufacture and each environmental parameter.

  2. US Photovoltaic Patents, 1988--1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    This document contains US patents on terrestrial photovoltaic (PV) power applications, including systems, components, and materials, as well as manufacturing and support functions. The patent entries in this document were issued from 1988 through 1990. The entries were located by searching USPA, the data base of the US Patent Office. The final search retrieved all patents under the class ``Batteries, Thermoelectric and Photoelectric`` and the subclasses ``Photoelectric,`` ``Testing,`` and ``Applications.`` The search also located patents that contained the words ``photovoltaic(s)`` or ``solar cell(s)`` and their derivatives. A manual search of the patents in the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) patent file augmented the data base search. After the initial list was compiled, most of the patents on the following subjects were excluded: space photovoltaic technology, use of the photovoltaic effect for detectors and subjects only peripherally concerned with photovoltaics. Some patents on these three subjects were included when it appeared that those inventions might be of use in terrestrial PV power technologies.

  3. US photovoltaic patents, 1951--1987

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1988-09-01

    This document contains 2195 U.S. patents on terrestrial photovoltaic (PV) power applications, including systems, components, and materials as well as manufacturing and support functions. The patent entries in this document were issued from 1951 through 1987; no patents were found in 1950. The entries were located by searching USPA, the data base of the U.S. Patent Office. The final search retrieved all patents under the class Batteries, Thermoelectric and Photoelectric, and the subclasses Photoelectric, Testing, and Applications. The search also located patents that contained the words photovoltaic(s) or solar cell(s) and their derivatives. A manual search of the patents in the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) patent file augmented the data base search. After the initial list was compiled, most of the patents on the following subjects were excluded: space photovoltaic technology, use of the photovoltaic effect for detectors, and subjects only peripherally concerned with photovoltaics. Some patents on these three subjects were included when it appeared that those inventions might be of use in terrwstrial PV power technologies.

  4. US photovoltaic patents, 1951--1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    This document contains 2195 US patents on terrestrial photovoltaic (PV) power applications, including systems, components, and materials as well as manufacturing and support functions. The patent entries in this document were issued from 1951 through 1987; no patents were found in 1950. The entries were located by searching USPA, the data base of the US Patent Office. The final search retrieved all patents under the class ''Batteries, Thermoelectric and Photoelectric,'' and the subclasses ''Photoelectric,'' ''Testing,'' and ''Applications.'' The search also located patents that contained the words ''photovoltaic(s)'' or ''solar cell(s)'' and their derivatives. A manual search of the patents in the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) patent file augmented the data base search. After the initial list was compiled, most of the patents on the following subjects were excluded: space photovoltaic technology, use of the photovoltaic effect for detectors, and subjects only peripherally concerned with photovoltaics. Some patents on these three subjects were included when it appeared that those inventions might be of use in terrestrial PV power technologies.

  5. Photovoltaics program plan, FY 1991--FY 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    This program plan describes the goals and philosophy of DOE National Photovoltaics Program and its major research and development activities for fiscal years (FY) 1991 through 1995. The plan represents a consensus among researchers and manufacturers, as well as current and potential users of photovoltaics (PV). It defines the activites that we believe are necessary to continue the rapid progress toward acceptance of photovoltaics as a serious candidate for cost-competitive electric power generation by the utility, transportation, buildings, and industrial sectors. A succesful National Photovoltaics Program will help achieve many of our national priorities. The mission of the National Photovoltaics Program is to help US industry to develop photovoltaic technology for large-scale generation of economically competitive electric power in the United States, making PV a significant part of our national energy mix. To fully achieve this, we must continue to work toward the long-term goals established in our previous program plan: reducing the price of delivered electricity to 5 to 6 cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh), increasing lifetimes to 30 years, and increasing module efficiencies to 15% for flat-plate and 25% for concentrator technologies. If progress continues at its current pace, we expect that the PV industry will have installed at least 1000 megawatts (MW) of capacity in the United States and 500 MW internationally by the year 2000.

  6. US Photovoltaic Patents, 1988--1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    This document contains US patents on terrestrial photovoltaic (PV) power applications, including systems, components, and materials, as well as manufacturing and support functions. The patent entries in this document were issued from 1988 through 1990. The entries were located by searching USPA, the data base of the US Patent Office. The final search retrieved all patents under the class Batteries, Thermoelectric and Photoelectric'' and the subclasses Photoelectric,'' Testing,'' and Applications.'' The search also located patents that contained the words photovoltaic(s)'' or solar cell(s)'' and their derivatives. A manual search of the patents in the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) patent file augmented the data base search. After the initial list was compiled, most of the patents on the following subjects were excluded: space photovoltaic technology, use of the photovoltaic effect for detectors and subjects only peripherally concerned with photovoltaics. Some patents on these three subjects were included when it appeared that those inventions might be of use in terrestrial PV power technologies.

  7. Thermionic photovoltaic energy converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, D. L. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A thermionic photovoltaic energy conversion device comprises a thermionic diode mounted within a hollow tubular photovoltaic converter. The thermionic diode maintains a cesium discharge for producing excited atoms that emit line radiation in the wavelength region of 850 nm to 890 nm. The photovoltaic converter is a silicon or gallium arsenide photovoltaic cell having bandgap energies in this same wavelength region for optimum cell efficiency.

  8. Report of an exploratory study: safety and liability considerations for photovoltaic modules/panels, Low Cost Solar Array Project

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, A.S.; Meeker, D.G.

    1981-01-01

    Product safety and product liability considerations are explored for photovoltaic module/array devices. A general review of photovoltaic literature was made using computerized literature searches. A literature search was also made of relevant legal material as it applies to design. Recommendations are made to minimize or eliminate perceived hazards in manufacture and use of a photovoltaic module/array. (MHR)

  9. Photovoltaic device and method

    DOEpatents

    Cleereman, Robert J; Lesniak, Michael J; Keenihan, James R; Langmaid, Joe A; Gaston, Ryan; Eurich, Gerald K; Boven, Michelle L

    2015-01-27

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PVD") and method of use, more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device with an integral locator and electrical terminal mechanism for transferring current to or from the improved photovoltaic device and the use as a system.

  10. Amorphous silicon photovoltaic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, David E.; Lin, Guang H.; Ganguly, Gautam

    2004-08-31

    This invention is a photovoltaic device comprising an intrinsic or i-layer of amorphous silicon and where the photovoltaic device is more efficient at converting light energy to electric energy at high operating temperatures than at low operating temperatures. The photovoltaic devices of this invention are suitable for use in high temperature operating environments.

  11. Photovoltaic device and method

    SciTech Connect

    Cleereman, Robert; Lesniak, Michael J.; Keenihan, James R.; Langmaid, Joe A.; Gaston, Ryan; Eurich, Gerald K.; Boven, Michelle L.

    2015-11-24

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PVD") and method of use, more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device with an integral locator and electrical terminal mechanism for transferring current to or from the improved photovoltaic device and the use as a system.

  12. Photovoltaic systems for export application. Informal report

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, J.; Campbell, H.; Sajo, A.; Sanz, E.

    1988-01-31

    One approach to improving the competitiveness of photovoltaic systems is the development of designs specifically for export applications. In other words, where is it appropriate in a system design to incorporate components manufactured and/or assembled in the receiving country in order to improve the photovoltaic exports from the US? What appears to be needed is a systematic method of evaluating the potential for export from the US of PV systems for various application in different countries. Development of such a method was the goal of this project.

  13. Nanorod solar cell with an ultrathin a-Si:H absorber layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Yinghuan; van der Werf, Karine H. M.; Houweling, Z. Silvester; Schropp, Ruud E. I.

    2011-03-01

    We propose a nanostructured three-dimensional (nano-3D) solar cell design employing an ultrathin hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) n-i-p junction deposited on zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorod arrays. The ZnO nanorods were prepared by aqueous chemical growth at 80 °C. The photovoltaic performance of the nanorod/a-Si:H solar cell with an ultrathin absorber layer of only 25 nm is experimentally demonstrated. An efficiency of 3.6% and a short-circuit current density of 8.3 mA/cm2 were obtained, significantly higher than values achieved for planar or even textured counterparts with three times thicker (˜75 nm) a-Si:H absorber layers.

  14. Manufacturing Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Susan

    2007-01-01

    According to the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM), "manufacturing is the engine that drives American prosperity". When NAM and its research and education arm, The Manufacturing Institute, released the handbook, "The Facts About Modern Manufacturing," in October 2006, NAM President John Engler noted, that manufacturing output in America…

  15. Progress in Photovoltaic Components and Systems

    SciTech Connect

    THOMAS,H.; KROPOSKI,B.; WITT,C.; BOWER,WARD I.

    2000-07-15

    The Photovoltaic Manufacturing Research and Development project is a government/industry partnership between the US Department of Energy and members of the US photovoltaic (TV) industry. The purpose of the project is to work with industry to improve manufacturing processes, reduce manufacturing costs, and improve the performance of PV products. This project is conducted through phased solicitations with industry participants selected through a competitive evaluation process. Starting in 1995, the two most recent solicitations include manufacturing improvements for balance-of-system (BOS) components, energy storage, and PV system design improvements. This paper surveys the work accomplished since that time, as well as BOS work currently in progress in the PV Manufacturing R and D project to identify areas of continued interest and product trends. Industry participants continue to work to improve inverters and to expand the features and capabilities of this key component. The industry also continues to advance fully integrated systems that meet standards for performance and safety. All participants included manufacturing improvements to reduce costs and improve reliability. Accomplishments of the project's participants are summarized to illustrate the product and manufacturing trends.

  16. Progress in photovoltaic system and component improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, H.P.; Kroposki, B.; McNutt, P.; Witt, C.E.; Bower, W.; Bonn, R.; Hund, T.D.

    1998-07-01

    The Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project is a partnership between the US government (through the US Department of Energy [DOE]) and the PV industry. Part of its purpose is to conduct manufacturing technology research and development to address the issues and opportunities identified by industry to advance photovoltaic (PV) systems and components. The project was initiated in 1990 and has been conducted in several phases to support the evolution of PV industrial manufacturing technology. Early phases of the project stressed PV module manufacturing. Starting with Phase 4A and continuing in Phase 5A, the goals were broadened to include improvement of component efficiency, energy storage and manufacturing and system or component integration to bring together all elements for a PV product. This paper summarizes PV manufacturers` accomplishments in components, system integration, and alternative manufacturing methods. Their approaches have resulted in improved hardware and PV system performance, better system compatibility, and new system capabilities. Results include new products such as Underwriters Laboratories (UL)-listed AC PV modules, modular inverters, and advanced inverter designs that use readily available and standard components. Work planned in Phase 5A1 includes integrated residential and commercial roof-top systems, PV systems with energy storage, and 300-Wac to 4-kWac inverters.

  17. Comparative life-cycle energy payback analysis of multi-junction a-SiGe and nanocrystalline/a-Si modules

    SciTech Connect

    Fthenakis, V.; Kim, H.

    2010-07-15

    Despite the publicity of nanotechnologies in high tech industries including the photovoltaic sector, their life-cycle energy use and related environmental impacts are understood only to a limited degree as their production is mostly immature. We investigated the life-cycle energy implications of amorphous silicon (a-Si) PV designs using a nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) bottom layer in the context of a comparative, prospective life-cycle analysis framework. Three R and D options using nc-Si bottom layer were evaluated and compared to the current triple-junction a-Si design, i.e., a-Si/a-SiGe/a-SiGe. The life-cycle energy demand to deposit nc-Si was estimated from parametric analyses of film thickness, deposition rate, precursor gas usage, and power for generating gas plasma. We found that extended deposition time and increased gas usages associated to the relatively high thickness of nc-Si lead to a larger primary energy demand for the nc-Si bottom layer designs, than the current triple-junction a-Si. Assuming an 8% conversion efficiency, the energy payback time of those R and D designs will be 0.7-0.9 years, close to that of currently commercial triple-junction a-Si design, 0.8 years. Future scenario analyses show that if nc-Si film is deposited at a higher rate (i.e., 2-3 nm/s), and at the same time the conversion efficiency reaches 10%, the energy-payback time could drop by 30%.

  18. Photovoltaic fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudiana, Russell; Eckert, Robert; Cardone, John; Ryan, James; Montello, Alan

    2006-08-01

    It was realized early in the history of Konarka that the ability to produce fibers that generate power from solar energy could be applied to a wide variety of applications where fabrics are utilized currently. These applications include personal items such as jackets, shirts and hats, to architectural uses such as awnings, tents, large covers for cars, trucks and even doomed stadiums, to indoor furnishings such as window blinds, shades and drapes. They may also be used as small fabric patches or fiber bundles for powering or recharging batteries in small sensors. Power generating fabrics for clothing is of particular interest to the military where they would be used in uniforms and body armor where portable power is vital to field operations. In strong sunlight these power generating fabrics could be used as a primary source of energy, or they can be used in either direct sunlight or low light conditions to recharge batteries. Early in 2002, Konarka performed a series of proof-of-concept experiments to demonstrate the feasibility of building a photovoltaic cell using dye-sensitized titania and electrolyte on a metal wire core. The approach taken was based on the sequential coating processes used in making fiber optics, namely, a fiber core, e.g., a metal wire serving as the primary electrode, is passed through a series of vertically aligned coating cups. Each of the cups contains a coating fluid that has a specific function in the photocell. A second wire, used as the counter electrode, is brought into the process prior to entering the final coating cup. The latter contains a photopolymerizable, transparent cladding which hardens when passed through a UV chamber. Upon exiting the UV chamber, the finished PV fiber is spooled. Two hundred of foot lengths of PV fiber have been made using this process. When the fiber is exposed to visible radiation, it generates electrical power. The best efficiency exhibited by these fibers is 6% with an average value in the 4

  19. Transparent ultraviolet photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xun; Shan, Chong-Xin; Lu, Ying-Jie; Xie, Xiu-Hua; Li, Bing-Hui; Wang, Shuang-Peng; Jiang, Ming-Ming; Shen, De-Zhen

    2016-02-15

    Photovoltaic cells have been fabricated from p-GaN/MgO/n-ZnO structures. The photovoltaic cells are transparent to visible light and can transform ultraviolet irradiation into electrical signals. The efficiency of the photovoltaic cells is 0.025% under simulated AM 1.5 illumination conditions, while it can reach 0.46% under UV illumination. By connecting several such photovoltaic cells in a series, light-emitting devices can be lighting. The photovoltaic cells reported in this Letter may promise the applications in glass of buildings to prevent UV irradiation and produce power for household appliances in the future. PMID:26872163

  20. Amorphous carbon for photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risplendi, Francesca; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2015-03-01

    All-carbon solar cells have attracted attention as candidates for innovative photovoltaic devices. Carbon-based materials such as graphene, carbon nanotubes (CNT) and amorphous carbon (aC) have the potential to present physical properties comparable to those of silicon-based materials with advantages such as low cost and higher thermal stability.In particular a-C structures are promising systems in which both sp2 and sp3 hybridization coordination are present in different proportions depending on the specific density, providing the possibility of tuning their optoelectronic properties and achieving comparable sunlight absorption to aSi. In this work we employ density functional theory to design suitable device architectures, such as bulk heterojunctions (BHJ) or pn junctions, consisting of a-C as the active layer material.Regarding BHJ, we study interfaces between aC and C nanostructures (such as CNT and fullerene) to relate their optoelectronic properties to the stoichiometry of aC. We demonstrate that the energy alignment between the a-C mobility edges and the occupied and unoccupied states of the CNT or C60 can be widely tuned by varying the aC density to obtain a type II interface.To employ aC in pn junctions we analyze the p- and n-type doping of a-C focusingon an evaluation of the Fermi level and work function dependence on doping.Our results highlight promising features of aC as the active layer material of thin-film solar cells.

  1. Perspective on photovoltaic amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Luft, W.; Stafford, B.; von Roedern, B.

    1992-05-01

    Amorphous silicon is a thin film option that has the potential for a cost-effective product for large-scale utility photovoltaics application. The initial efficiencies for single-junction and multijunction amorphous silicon cells and modules have increased significantly over the past 10 years. The emphasis of research and development has changed to stabilized efficiency, especially that of multijunction modules. NREL has measured 6.3%--7.2% stabilized amorphous silicon module efficiencies for US products, and 8.1% stable efficiencies have been reported by Fuji Electric. This represents a significant increase over the stabilized efficiencies of modules manufactured only a few years ago. An increasing portion of the amorphous silicon US government funding is now for manufacturing technology development to reduce cost. The funding for amorphous silicon for photovoltaics by Japan over the last 5 years has been about 50% greater than that in the United State, and by Germany in the last 2--3 years more than twice that of the US Amorphous silicon is the only thin-film technology that is selling large-area commercial modules. The cost for amorphous silicon modules is now in the $4.50 range; it is a strong function of plant production capacity and is expected to be reduced to $1.00--1.50/W{sub p} for plants with 10 MW/year capacities. 10 refs.

  2. Perspective on photovoltaic amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Luft, W.; Stafford, B.; von Roedern, B. )

    1992-12-01

    Amorphous silicon is a thin film option that has the potential for a cost-effective product for large-scale utility photovoltaics application. The initial efficiencies for single-junction and multijunction amorphous silicon cells and modules have increased significantly over the past 10 years. The emphasis of research and development has changed to stabilized efficiency, especially that of multijunction modules. NREL has measured 6.3%--7.2% stabilized amorphous silicon module efficiencies for U.S. products, and 8.1% stable efficiencies have been reported by Fuji Electric. This represents a significant increase over the stabilized efficiencies of modules manufactured only a few years ago. An increasing portion of the amorphous silicon U.S. government funding is now for manufacturing technology development to reduce cost. The funding for amorphous silicon for photovoltaics by Japan over the last 5 years has been about 50% greater than that in the United States, and by Germany in the last 2--3 years more than twice that of the U.S. Amorphous silicon is the only thin-film technology that is selling large-area commercial modules. The cost for amorphous silicon modules is now in the $4.50 range; it is a strong function of plant production capacity and is expected to be reduced to $1.00--1.50/W[sub [ital p

  3. Photovoltaic Subcontract Program. Annual report, FY 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    This report summarizes the fiscal year (FY) 1992 progress of the subcontracted photovoltaic (PV) research and development (R&D) performed under the Photovoltaic Advanced Research and Development Project at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)-formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI). The mission of the national PV program is to develop PV technology for large-scale generation of economically competitive electric power in the United States. The technical sections of the report cover the main areas of the subcontract program: the Crystalline Materials and Advanced Concepts project, the Polycrystalline Thin Films project, Amorphous Silicon Research project, the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project, PV Module and System Performance and Engineering project, and the PV Analysis and Applications Development project. Technical summaries of each of the subcontracted programs provide a discussion of approaches, major accomplishments in FY 1992, and future research directions.

  4. Annual Report: Photovoltaic Subcontract Program FY 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, K. A.

    1992-03-01

    This report summarizes the fiscal year (FY) 1991 (October 1, 1990, through September 30, 1991) progress of the subcontracted photovoltaic (PV) research and development (R&D) performed under the Photovoltaic Advanced Research and Development Project at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)-formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI). The mission of the national PV program is to develop PV technology for large-scale generation of economically competitive electric power in the United States. The technical sections of the report cover the main areas of the subcontract program: the Amorphous Silicon Research Project, Polycrystalline Thin Films, Crystalline Silicon Materials Research, High Efficiency Concepts, the New Ideas Program, the University Participation Program, and the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project. Technical summaries of each of the subcontracted programs provide a discussion of approaches, major accomplishments in FY 1991, and future research directions.

  5. Photovoltaic environmental, health and safety electronic bulletin board service

    SciTech Connect

    Meinhold, A.F.; Moskowitz, P.D.

    1990-01-01

    An electronic bulletin board system (BBS) has been established by the Biomedical and Environmental Assessment Group, Brookhaven National Laboratory, for the Photovoltaics Technology Division, US Department of Energy. The purpose of the BBS is to provide a forum for the ongoing exchange of information relating to the environmental, health and safety aspects of photovoltaic cell manufacture. This BBS is available, at no charge, to organizations engaged in photovoltaic cell research, development and production. Individuals with access to a microcomputer, modem and communications software can call into the BBS and join ongoing discussions. Users of the BBS may also electronically access reports, models and databases which relate to the environmental, health and safety aspects of photovoltaic cell manufacture. 6 figs.

  6. High voltage with Si series photovoltaics.

    SciTech Connect

    Hsia, Alex; Bennett, Reid Stuart; Patel, Rupal K.; Nasby, Robert D.; Stein, David J.

    2006-02-01

    A monolithic crystalline Si photovoltaic device, developing a potential of 2,120 Volts, has been demonstrated. The monolithic device consists of 3600 small photovoltaic cells connected in series and fabricated using standard CMOS processing on SOI wafers. The SOI wafers with trenches etched to the buried oxide (BOX) depth are used for cell isolation. The photovoltaic cell is a Si pn junction device with the n surface region forming the front surface diffused region upon which light impinges. Contact is formed to the deeper diffused region at the cell edge. The p+ deep-diffused region forms the contact to the p-type base region. Base regions were 5 or 10 {micro}m thick. Series connection of individual cells is accomplished using standard CMOS interconnects. This allows for the voltage to range from approximately 0.5 Volts for a single cell to above a thousand volts for strings of thousands of cells. The current is determined by cell area. The voltage is limited by dielectric breakdown. Each cell is isolated from the adjacent cells through dielectric-filled trench isolation, the substrate through the SOI buried oxide, and the metal wiring by the deposited pre-metal dielectric. If any of these dielectrics fail (whether due to high electric fields or inherent defects), the photovoltaic device will not produce the desired potential. We have used ultra-thick buried oxide SOI and several novel processes, including an oxynitride trench fill process, to avoid dielectric breakdown.

  7. Influence of Deposition Pressure on the Properties of Round Pyramid Textured a-Si:H Solar Cells for Maglev.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaehyeong; Choi, Wonseok; Lee, Kyuil; Lee, Daedong; Kang, Hyunil

    2016-05-01

    HIT (Heterojunction with Intrinsic Thin-layer) photovoltaic cells is one of the highest efficiencies in the commercial solar cells. The pyramid texturization for reducing surface reflectance of HIT solar cells silicon wafers is widely used. For the low leakage current and high shunt of solar cells, the intrinsic amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) on substrate must be uniformly thick of pyramid structure. However, it is difficult to control the thickness in the traditional pyramid texturing process. Thus, we textured the intrinsic a-Si:H thin films with the round pyramidal structure by using HNO3, HF, and CH3COOH solution. The characteristics of round pyramid a-Si:H solar cells deposited at pressure of 500, 1000, 1500, and 2000 mTorr by PECVD (Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition) was investigated. The lifetime, open circuit voltage, fill factor and efficiency of a-Si:H solar cells were investigated with respect to various deposition pressure. PMID:27483880

  8. Photovoltaics in the U.S.A. - A progress report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forney, R. G.

    1979-01-01

    The Federal Photovoltaics Program is reviewed with reference to price goals, program organization, technical developments, and various applications. The immediate goals of the program are: (1) to develop the Federal market by encouraging Government agencies to incorporate photovoltaic systems, and (2) to provide marketing support to commercial solar cell and system manufacturers whose growth is crucial to the ultimate success of the photovoltaic program. The program will initially provide for procurement of the smaller remote types of systems and will be broadened to include residential and intermediate load systems.

  9. Parameter variation of the one-diode model of a-Si and a- Si/μc-Si solar cells for modeling light-induced degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weicht, J. A.; Hamelmann, F. U.; Behrens, G.

    2014-11-01

    For analyzing the long-term behavior of thin film a-Si/μc-Si photovoltaic modules, it is important to observe the light-induced degradation (LID) in dependence of the temperature for the parameters of the one-diode model for solar cells. According to the IEC 61646 standard, the impact of LID on module parameters of these thin film cells is determined at a constant temperature of 50°C with an irradiation of 1000 W/m2 at open circuit conditions. Previous papers examined the LID of thin film a-Si cells with different temperatures and some others are about a-Si/μc-Si. In these previous papers not all parameters of the one-diode model are examined. We observed the serial resistance (Rs), parallel resistance (Rp), short circuit current (Isc), open circuit voltage (Uoc), the maximum power point (MPP: Umpp, Impp and Pmpp) and the diode factor (n). Since the main reason for the LID of silicon-based thin films is the Staebler Wronski effect in the a-Si part of the cell, the temperature dependence of the healing of defects for all parameters of the one-diode model is also taken into account. We are also measuring modules with different kind of transparent conductive oxides: In a-Si thin film solar cells fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) is used and for thin film solar cells of a-Si/μc-Si boron- doped zinc oxide is used. In our work we describe an approach for transferring the parameters of a one-diode model for tandem thin film solar cells into the one-diode model for each part of the solar cell. The measurement of degradation and regeneration at higher temperatures is the necessary base for optimization of the different silicon-based thin films in warm hot climate.

  10. Editorial: Photovoltaic Materials and Devices 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, Bhushan; Rupnowski, Peter; Shet, Sudhakar; Basnyat, Prakash

    2014-12-22

    An ever increasing demand on energy has fostered many new generation technologies, which include photovoltaics. In recent years, photovoltaic industry has grown very rapidly. The installed capacity of PV for 2013 was about 37 GW and 2014 sales are expected to be around 45 GW. However, there has been excess production for last several years, which is responsible in part for the low prices (about 60 c/W). To lower the PV energy costs further, a major strategy appears to be going to high efficiency solar cells. This approach is favored (over lower cost/lower efficiency) because cell efficiency has a very large influence on the acceptable manufacturing cost of a PV module. Hence, the PV industry is moving toward developing processes and equipment to manufacture solar cells that can yield efficiencies >20%. Therefore, further research is needed within existing technologies to accomplish these objectives. Likewise, research will continue to seek new materials and devices.

  11. Design and optimization of photovoltaics recycling infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun-Ki; Fthenakis, Vasilis

    2010-11-15

    With the growing production and installation of photovoltaics (PV) around the world constrained by the limited availability of resources, end-of-life management of PV is becoming very important. A few major PV manufacturers currently are operating several PV recycling technologies at the process level. The management of the total recycling infrastructure, including reverse-logistics planning, is being started in Europe. In this paper, we overview the current status of photovoltaics recycling planning and discuss our mathematic modeling of the economic feasibility and the environmental viability of several PV recycling infrastructure scenarios in Germany; our findings suggest the optimum locations of the anticipated PV take-back centers. Short-term 5-10 year planning for PV manufacturing scraps is the focus of this article. Although we discuss the German situation, we expect the generic model will be applicable to any region, such as the whole of Europe and the United States. PMID:20886824

  12. Photovoltaics - The endless spring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, H. W., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of the developments in the photovoltaic field over the past decade or two is presened. Accomplishments in the terrestrial field are reviewed along with projections and challenges toward meeting cost goals. The contrasts and commonality of space and terrestrial photovoltaics are presented. Finally, a strategic philosophy of photovoltaics research highlighting critical factors, appropriate directions, emerging opportunities, and challenges of the future is given.

  13. Residential photovoltaic system designs

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, M. C.

    1981-01-01

    A project to develop Residential Photovoltaic Systems has begun at Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratory with the construction and testing of five Prototype Systems. All of these systems utilize a roof-mounted photovoltaic array and allow excess solar-generated electric energy to be fed back to the local utility grid, eliminating the need for on-site storage. Residential photovoltaic system design issues are discussed and specific features of the five Prototype Systems now under test are presented.

  14. Photovoltaics: The endless spring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, H. W., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of the developments in the photovoltaic field over the past decade or two is presented. Accomplishments in the terrestrial field are reviewed along with projections and challenges toward meeting cost goals. The contrasts and commonality of space and terrestrial photovoltaics are presented. Finally, a strategic philosophy of photovoltaics research highlighting critical factors, appropriate directions, emerging opportunities, and challenges of the future is given.

  15. Photovoltaic technology assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Backus, C.E.

    1981-01-01

    After a brief review of the history of photovoltaic devices and a discussion of the cost goals set for photovoltaic modules, the status of photovoltaic technology is assessed. Included are discussions of: current applications, present industrial production, low-cost silicon production techniques, energy payback periods for solar cells, advanced materials research and development, concentrator systems, balance-of-system components. Also discussed are some nontechnical aspects, including foreign markets, US government program approach, and industry attitudes and approaches. (LEW)

  16. Tests Of Amorphous-Silicon Photovoltaic Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Ronald G., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Progress in identification of strengths and weaknesses of amorphous-silicon technology detailed. Report describes achievements in testing reliability of solar-power modules made of amorphous-silicon photovoltaic cells. Based on investigation of modules made by U.S. manufacturers. Modules subjected to field tests, to accelerated-aging tests in laboratory, and to standard sequence of qualification tests developed for modules of crystalline-silicon cells.

  17. Recycling of CdTe photovoltaic waste

    DOEpatents

    Goozner, Robert E.; Long, Mark O.; Drinkard, Jr., William F.

    1999-01-01

    A method for extracting and reclaiming metals from scrap CdTe photovoltaic cells and manufacturing waste by leaching the waste with a leaching solution comprising nitric acid and water, skimming any plastic material from the top of the leaching solution, separating the glass substrate from the liquid leachate and electrolyzing the leachate to separate Cd from Te, wherein the Te is deposits onto a cathode while the Cd remains in solution.

  18. Photovoltaic system criteria documents. Volume 2: Quality assurance criteria for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, John C.; Billitti, Joseph W.; Tallon, John M.

    1979-01-01

    Quality assurance criteria are described for manufacturers and installers of solar photovoltaic tests and applications. Quality oriented activities are outlined to be pursued by the contractor/subcontractor to assure the physical and operational quality of equipment produced is included. In the broad sense, guidelines are provided for establishing a QA organization if none exists. Mainly, criteria is provided to be considered in any PV quality assurance plan selected as appropriate by the responsible Field Center. A framework is established for a systematic approach to ensure that photovoltaic tests and applications are constructed in a timely and cost effective manner.

  19. Department of Energy: Photovoltaics program - FY 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    The National Photovoltaic Program supports efforts to make PV an important part of the US economy through three main program elements: Research and Development, Technology Development, and Systems Engineering and Applications. (1) Research and Development activities generate new ideas, test the latest scientific theories, and push the limits of PV efficiencies in laboratory and prototype materials and devices. (2) Technology Development activities apply laboratory innovations to products to improve PV technology and the manufacturing techniques used to produce PV systems for the market. (3) Systems Engineering and Applications activities help improve PV systems and validate these improvements through tests, measurements, and deployment of prototypes. In addition, applications research validates, sales, maintenance, and financing mechanisms worldwide. (4) Environmental, Health, Safety and Resource Characterization activities help to define environmental, health and safety issues for those facilities engaged in the manufacture of PV products and organizations engaged in PV research and development. All PV Program activities are planned and executed in close collaboration and partnership with the U.S. PV industry. The overall PV Program is planned to be a balanced effort of research, manufacturing development, and market development. Critical to the success of this strategy is the National Photovoltaic Program`s effort to reduce the cost of electricity generated by photovoltaic. The program is doing this in three primary ways: by making devices more efficient, by making PV systems less expensive, and by validating the technology through measurements, tests, and prototypes.

  20. Method and apparatus for increasing the durability and yield of thin film photovoltaic devices

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, James E.; Lasswell, Patrick G.

    1987-01-01

    Thin film photovoltaic cells having a pair of semiconductor layers between an opaque and a transparent electrical contact are manufactured in a method which includes the step of scanning one of the semiconductor layers to determine the location of any possible shorting defect. Upon the detection of such defect, the defect is eliminated to increase the durability and yield of the photovoltaic device.

  1. Photovoltaic commercialization: an analysis of legal issues affecting a government-accelerated solar industry

    SciTech Connect

    Lamm, D.

    1980-06-01

    The Photovoltaics Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1978 is discussed. Legal issues, including solar access, the need for performance standards, the effects of building codes on photovoltaic system use and commercialization, and manufacturer and installer performance guarantees, are examined. Electric utility policies are examined, including interconnection, and rates and legal issues affecting them. (LEW)

  2. Manufacturing Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Manufacturing Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The Manufacturing Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) focuses on developing methods and technologies that will assist manufacturers of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, as well as other renewable energy technologies, to scale up their manufacturing capabilities to volumes that meet DOE and industry targets. Specifically, the manufacturing activity is currently focused on developing and validating quality control techniques to assist manufacturers of low temperature and high temperature fuel cells in the transition from low to high volume production methods for cells and stacks. Capabilities include initial proof-of-concept studies through prototype system development and in-line validation. Existing diagnostic capabilities address a wide range of materials, including polymer films, carbon and catalyst coatings, carbon fiber papers and wovens, and multi-layer assemblies of these materials, as well as ceramic-based materials in pre- or post-fired forms. Work leading to the development of non-contact, non-destructive techniques to measure critical dimensional and functional properties of fuel cell and other materials, and validation of those techniques on the continuous processing line. This work will be supported by materials provided by our partners. Looking forward, the equipment in the laboratory is set up to be modified and extended to provide processing capabilities such as coating, casting, and deposition of functional layers, as well as associated processes such as drying or curing. In addition, continuous processes are used for components of organic and thin film photovoltaics (PV) as well as battery technologies, so synergies with these important areas will be explored.

  3. Microsystems Enabled Photovoltaics

    ScienceCinema

    Gupta, Vipin; Nielson, Greg; Okandan, Murat, Granata, Jennifer; Nelson, Jeff; Haney, Mike; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luiz

    2014-06-23

    Sandia's microsystems enabled photovoltaic advances combine mature technology and tools currently used in microsystem production with groundbreaking advances in photovoltaics cell design, decreasing production and system costs while improving energy conversion efficiency. The technology has potential applications in buildings, houses, clothing, portable electronics, vehicles, and other contoured structures.

  4. Handbook for photovoltaic cabling

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, D. N.

    1980-08-01

    This volume, originally written as part of the Interim Performance Criteria Document Development Implementation Plan and Procedures for Photovoltaic Energy Systems, is an analysis of the several factors to be considered in selecting cabling for photovoltaic purposes. These factors, correspoonding to chapter titles, are electrical, structural, safety, durability/reliability, and installation. A glossary of terms used within the volume is included for reference.

  5. Solar Photovoltaic Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrenreich, Henry; Martin, John H.

    1979-01-01

    The goals of solar photovoltaic technology in contributing to America's future energy needs are presented in this study conducted by the American Physical Society. Although the time needed for photovoltaics to become popular is several decades away, according to the author, short-range applications are given. (Author/SA)

  6. Characterization of Photovoltaic Generators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boitier, V.; Cressault, Y.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses photovoltaic panel systems and reviews their electrical properties and use in several industrial fields. We explain how different photovoltaic panels may be characterized by undergraduate students at university using simple methods to retrieve their electrical properties (power, current and voltage) and compare these values…

  7. Solar Photovoltaic Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mickey, Charles D.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews information on solar radiation as an energy source. Discusses these topics: the key photovoltaic material; the bank theory of solids; conductors, semiconductors, and insulators; impurity semiconductors; solid-state photovoltaic cell operation; limitations on solar cell efficiency; silicon solar cells; cadmium sulfide/copper (I) sulfide…

  8. Microsystems Enabled Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Vipin; Nielson, Greg; Okandan, Murat, Granata, Jennifer; Nelson, Jeff; Haney, Mike; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luiz

    2012-07-02

    Sandia's microsystems enabled photovoltaic advances combine mature technology and tools currently used in microsystem production with groundbreaking advances in photovoltaics cell design, decreasing production and system costs while improving energy conversion efficiency. The technology has potential applications in buildings, houses, clothing, portable electronics, vehicles, and other contoured structures.

  9. Challenges to Scaling CIGS Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanbery, B. J.

    2011-03-01

    The challenges of scaling any photovoltaic technology to terawatts of global capacity are arguably more economic than technological or resource constraints. All commercial thin-film PV technologies are based on direct bandgap semiconductors whose absorption coefficient and bandgap alignment with the solar spectrum enable micron-thick coatings in lieu to hundreds of microns required using indirect-bandgap c-Si. Although thin-film PV reduces semiconductor materials cost, its manufacture is more capital intensive than c-Si production, and proportional to deposition rate. Only when combined with sufficient efficiency and cost of capital does this tradeoff yield lower manufacturing cost. CIGS has the potential to become the first thin film technology to achieve the terawatt benchmark because of its superior conversion efficiency, making it the only commercial thin film technology which demonstrably delivers performance comparable to the dominant incumbent, c-Si. Since module performance leverages total systems cost, this competitive advantage bears directly on CIGS' potential to displace c-Si and attract the requisite capital to finance the tens of gigawatts of annual production capacity needed to manufacture terawatts of PV modules apace with global demand growth.

  10. Photovoltaic conversion of laser power to electrical power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Gilbert H.; Heinbockel, John H.

    1987-01-01

    Photovoltaic laser to electric converters are attractive for use with a space-based laser power station. The results of modeling studies for a silicon vertical junction converter used with a Nd laser are given. A computer code was developed for the model and this code was used to conduct a parametric study for a Si vertical junction converter consisting of one p-n junction irradiated with a Nd laser. These calculations predict an efficiency over 50 percent for an optimized converter.