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Sample records for a1-3galactosyltransferase knockout pig

  1. RAG1/2 knockout pigs with severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiao; Guo, Xiaogang; Fan, Nana; Song, Jun; Zhao, Bentian; Ouyang, Zhen; Liu, Zhaoming; Zhao, Yu; Yan, Quanmei; Yi, Xiaoling; Schambach, Axel; Frampton, Jon; Esteban, Miguel A; Yang, Dongshan; Yang, Huaqiang; Lai, Liangxue

    2014-08-01

    Pigs share many physiological, biochemical, and anatomical similarities with humans and have emerged as valuable large animal models for biomedical research. Considering the advantages in immune system resemblance, suitable size, and longevity for clinical practical and monitoring purpose, SCID pigs bearing dysfunctional RAG could serve as important experimental tools for regenerative medicine, allograft and xenograft transplantation, and reconstitution experiments related to the immune system. In this study, we report the generation and phenotypic characterization of RAG1 and RAG2 knockout pigs using transcription activator-like effector nucleases. Porcine fetal fibroblasts were genetically engineered using transcription activator-like effector nucleases and then used to provide donor nuclei for somatic cell nuclear transfer. We obtained 27 live cloned piglets; among these piglets, 9 were targeted with biallelic mutations in RAG1, 3 were targeted with biallelic mutations in RAG2, and 10 were targeted with a monoallelic mutation in RAG2. Piglets with biallelic mutations in either RAG1 or RAG2 exhibited hypoplasia of immune organs, failed to perform V(D)J rearrangement, and lost mature B and T cells. These immunodeficient RAG1/2 knockout pigs are promising tools for biomedical and translational research. PMID:24973446

  2. Generation and characterization of RAG2 knockout pigs as animal model for severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shunichi; Iwamoto, Masaki; Hashimoto, Michiko; Suzuki, Misae; Nakai, Michiko; Fuchimoto, Daiichiro; Sembon, Shoichiro; Eguchi-Ogawa, Tomoko; Uenishi, Hirohide; Onishi, Akira

    2016-10-01

    Pigs with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) are versatile animal models for human medical research because of their biological similarities to humans, suitable body size, and longevity for practical research. SCID pigs with defined mutation(s) can be an invaluable tool for research on porcine immunity. In this study, we produced RAG2-knockout pigs via somatic cell nuclear transfer and analyzed their phenotype. The V(D)J recombination processes were confirmed as being inactivated. They consistently lacked mature T and B cells but had substantial numbers of cells considered to be T- or B-cell progenitors as well as NK cells. They also lacked thymic medulla and lymphoid aggregations in the spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes, and ileal Peyer's patches. We showed more severe immunological defects in the RAG2 and IL2RG double-knockout pig through this study. Thus, SCID pigs could be promising animal models not only for translational medical research but also for immunological studies of pigs themselves. PMID:27496741

  3. Generation of GGTA1 biallelic knockout pigs via zinc-finger nucleases and somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lei; Chen, HaiDe; Jong, UiMyong; Rim, CholHo; Li, WenLing; Lin, XiJuan; Zhang, Dan; Luo, Qiong; Cui, Chun; Huang, HeFeng; Zhang, Yan; Xiao, Lei; Fu, ZhiXin

    2014-02-01

    Genetically modified pigs are valuable models of human disease and donors of xenotransplanted organs. Conventional gene targeting in pig somatic cells is extremely inefficient. Zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) technology has been shown to be a powerful tool for efficiently inducing mutations in the genome. However, ZFN-mediated targeting in pigs has rarely been achieved. Here, we used ZFNs to knock out the porcine α-1, 3-galactosyl-transferase (GGTA1) gene, which generates Gal epitopes that trigger hyperacute immune rejection in pig-to-human transplantation. Primary pig fibroblasts were transfected with ZFNs targeting the coding region of GGTA1. Eighteen mono-allelic and four biallelic knockout cell clones were obtained after drug selection with efficiencies of 23.4% and 5.2%, respectively. The biallelic cells were used to produce cloned pigs via somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Three GGTA1 null piglets were born, and one knockout primary fibroblast cell line was established from a cloned fetus. Gal epitopes on GGTA1 null pig cells were completely eliminated from the cell membrane. Functionally, GGTA1 knockout cells were protected from complement-mediated immune attacks when incubated with human serum. This study demonstrated that ZFN is an efficient tool in creating gene-modified pigs. GGTA1 null pigs and GGTA1 null fetal fibroblasts would benefit research and pig-to-human transplantation. PMID:24430555

  4. Comparison of hematologic, biochemical, and coagulation parameters in α1,3-galactosyltransferase gene-knockout pigs, wild-type pigs, and 4 primate species

    PubMed Central

    Ekser, Burcin; Bianchi, John; Ball, Suyapa; Iwase, Hayato; Walters, Anneke; Ezzelarab, Mohamed; Veroux, Massimiliano; Gridelli, Bruno; Wagner, Robert; Ayares, David; Cooper, David K.C.

    2012-01-01

    Background The increasing availability of genetically-engineered pigs is steadily improving the results of pig organ and cell transplantation in nonhuman primates (NHPs). Current techniques offer knock-out of pig genes and/or knock-in of human genes. Knowledge of normal values of hematologic, biochemical, coagulation, and other parameters in healthy genetically-engineered pigs and NHPs is important, particularly following pig organ transplantation in NHPs. Furthermore, information on parameters in various NHP species may prove important in selecting the optimal NHP model for specific studies. Methods We have collected hematologic, biochemical, and coagulation data on 71 α1,3-galactosyltransferase gene-knockout (GTKO) pigs, 18 GTKO pigs additionally transgenic for human CD46 (GTKO.hCD46), 4 GTKO.hCD46 pigs additionally transgenic for human CD55 (GTKO.hCD46.hCD55), and 2 GTKO.hCD46 pigs additionally transgenic for human thrombomodulin (GTKO.hCD46.hTBM). Results We report these data and compare them with similar data from wild-type pigs, and the 3 major NHP species commonly used in biomedical research (baboons, cynomolgus, and rhesus monkeys) and humans, largely from previously published reports. Conclusions Genetic modification of the pig (e.g., deletion of the Gal antigen and/or the addition of a human transgene) (i) does not result in abnormalities in hematologic, biochemical, or coagulation parameters that might impact animal welfare, (ii) seems not to alter metabolic function of vital organs, though this needs to be confirmed after their xenotransplantation, and (iii) possibly (though by no means certainly) modifies the hematologic, biochemical, and coagulation parameters closer to human values. The present study may provide a good reference for those working with genetically-engineered pigs in xenotransplantation research and eventually in clinical xenotransplantation. PMID:23145497

  5. PKD1 Mono-Allelic Knockout Is Sufficient to Trigger Renal Cystogenesis in a Mini-Pig Model

    PubMed Central

    He, Jin; Li, Qiuyan; Fang, Suyun; Guo, Ying; Liu, Tongxin; Ye, Jianhua; Yu, Zhengquan; Zhang, Ran; Zhao, Yaofeng; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Bai, Xueyuan; Chen, Xiangmei; Li, Ning

    2015-01-01

    PKD1 and PKD2 mutations could lead to autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), which afflicts millions of people worldwide. Due to the marked differences in the lifespan, size, anatomy, and physiology from humans, rodent ADPKD models cannot fully mimic the disease. To obtain a large animal model that recapitulates the disease, we constructed a mini-pig model by mono-allelic knockout (KO) of PKD1 using zinc finger nuclease. The mono-allelic KO pigs had lower PKD1 expression than their wild-type littermates at both the transcriptional and translational levels. After approximately six months, renal cysts appeared and grew progressively in the KO pigs. Histological analysis showed that renal cysts were scatteredly distributed in the mutant pig kidneys and were lined by either cuboidal or flattened epithelial cells. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography confirmed that all of the mutant pigs had renal and hepatic cysts, when they were 11-month-old. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that most of the cysts were derived from the proximal tubules and collecting ducts. Therefore, the PKD1 mono-allelic knockout is sufficient to trigger renal cystogenesis, and this pig model may provide a platform for future study of renal cyst formation. PMID:25798056

  6. [Expression analysis of green fluorescent protein in tissues and organs in α-1,3 galactosyltransferase knockout pigs].

    PubMed

    Zhifang, Li; Chong, Feng; Huili, Ji; Ningning, Shi; Xiaofeng, Song; Qinli, Zhao; Chuan, Long; Dengke, Pan; Xiaogan, Yang

    2015-12-01

    The pig is an ideal source to provide organs because its organ size and physiology are similar to humans. However, an acute rejection will ensue after pig-to-human xenotransplantation. The α-1,3 galactosyltransferase gene knockout (GTKO) pigs were generated in recent years, and could solve the problem of hyperacute rejection. But due to lack of reporting genes, the rejection status of cells and organs post pig-to-human xenotransplantation cannot be visualized. In this study, we introduced the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene driven by the CAG promoter into GTKO porcine ear fibroblasts. Then we produced transgenic pigs expressing the EGFP gene by nuclear transfer technology. Expression levels of EGFP in different tissues and organs of the cloned pig were investigated by Nightsea DFP-1 Fluorescent Protein Flashlight, fluorescence microscope and quantitative PCR assays. The results showed that the protein and transcript of EGFP were expressed in all tissues and organs of the GTKO pig, but the expression was weak in the liver and central nervous system. In conclusion, we have successfully produced the transgenic GTKO pigs expressing EGFP in all tested tissues and organs, which builds up a good basis to track transplanted cells or tissues. PMID:26704946

  7. Generation of α1,3-galactosyltransferase and cytidine monophospho-N-acetylneuraminic acid hydroxylase gene double-knockout pigs.

    PubMed

    Miyagawa, Shuji; Matsunari, Hitomi; Watanabe, Masahito; Nakano, Kazuaki; Umeyama, Kazuhiro; Sakai, Rieko; Takayanagi, Shuko; Takeishi, Toki; Fukuda, Tooru; Yashima, Sayaka; Maeda, Akira; Eguchi, Hiroshi; Okuyama, Hiroomi; Nagaya, Masaki; Nagashima, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are new tools for producing gene knockout (KO) animals. The current study reports produced genetically modified pigs, in which two endogenous genes were knocked out. Porcine fibroblast cell lines were derived from homozygous α1,3-galactosyltransferase (GalT) KO pigs. These cells were subjected to an additional KO for the cytidine monophospho-N-acetylneuraminic acid hydroxylase (CMAH) gene. A pair of ZFN-encoding mRNAs targeting exon 8 of the CMAH gene was used to generate the heterozygous CMAH KO cells, from which cloned pigs were produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). One of the cloned pigs obtained was re-cloned after additional KO of the remaining CMAH allele using the same ZFN-encoding mRNAs to generate GalT/CMAH-double homozygous KO pigs. On the other hand, the use of TALEN-encoding mRNAs targeting exon 7 of the CMAH gene resulted in efficient generation of homozygous CMAH KO cells. These cells were used for SCNT to produce cloned pigs homozygous for a double GalT/CMAH KO. These results demonstrate that the combination of TALEN-encoding mRNA, in vitro selection of the nuclear donor cells and SCNT provides a robust method for generating KO pigs. PMID:26227017

  8. Generation of α1,3-galactosyltransferase and cytidine monophospho-N-acetylneuraminic acid hydroxylase gene double-knockout pigs

    PubMed Central

    MIYAGAWA, Shuji; MATSUNARI, Hitomi; WATANABE, Masahito; NAKANO, Kazuaki; UMEYAMA, Kazuhiro; SAKAI, Rieko; TAKAYANAGI, Shuko; TAKEISHI, Toki; FUKUDA, Tooru; YASHIMA, Sayaka; MAEDA, Akira; EGUCHI, Hiroshi; OKUYAMA, Hiroomi; NAGAYA, Masaki; NAGASHIMA, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are new tools for producing gene knockout (KO) animals. The current study reports produced genetically modified pigs, in which two endogenous genes were knocked out. Porcine fibroblast cell lines were derived from homozygous α1,3-galactosyltransferase (GalT) KO pigs. These cells were subjected to an additional KO for the cytidine monophospho-N-acetylneuraminic acid hydroxylase (CMAH) gene. A pair of ZFN-encoding mRNAs targeting exon 8 of the CMAH gene was used to generate the heterozygous CMAH KO cells, from which cloned pigs were produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). One of the cloned pigs obtained was re-cloned after additional KO of the remaining CMAH allele using the same ZFN-encoding mRNAs to generate GalT/CMAH-double homozygous KO pigs. On the other hand, the use of TALEN-encoding mRNAs targeting exon 7 of the CMAH gene resulted in efficient generation of homozygous CMAH KO cells. These cells were used for SCNT to produce cloned pigs homozygous for a double GalT/CMAH KO. These results demonstrate that the combination of TALEN-encoding mRNA, in vitro selection of the nuclear donor cells and SCNT provides a robust method for generating KO pigs. PMID:26227017

  9. Isozygous and selectable marker-free MSTN knockout cloned pigs generated by the combined use of CRISPR/Cas9 and Cre/LoxP.

    PubMed

    Bi, Yanzhen; Hua, Zaidong; Liu, Ximei; Hua, Wenjun; Ren, Hongyan; Xiao, Hongwei; Zhang, Liping; Li, Li; Wang, Zhirui; Laible, Götz; Wang, Yan; Dong, Faming; Zheng, Xinmin

    2016-01-01

    Predictable, clean genetic modification (GM) in livestock is important for reliable phenotyping and biosafety. Here we reported the generation of isozygous, functional myostatin (MSTN) knockout cloned pigs free of selectable marker gene (SMG) by CRISPR/Cas9 and Cre/LoxP. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated homologous recombination (HR) was exploited to knock out (KO) one allele of MSTN in pig primary cells. Cre recombinase was then used to excise the SMG with an efficiency of 82.7%. The SMG-free non-EGFP cells were isolated by flow cytometery and immediately used as donor nuclei for nuclear transfer. A total of 685 reconstructed embryos were transferred into three surrogates with one delivering two male live piglets. Molecular testing verified the mono-allelic MSTN KO and SMG deletion in these cloned pigs. Western blots showed approximately 50% decrease in MSTN and concurrent increased expression of myogenic genes in muscle. Histological examination revealed the enhanced myofiber quantity but myofiber size remained unaltered. Ultrasonic detection showed the increased longissimus muscle size and decreased backfat thickness. Precision editing of pig MSTN gene has generated isozygous, SMG-free MSTN KO cloned founders, which guaranteed a reliable route for elite livestock production and a strategy to minimize potential biological risks. PMID:27530319

  10. Isozygous and selectable marker-free MSTN knockout cloned pigs generated by the combined use of CRISPR/Cas9 and Cre/LoxP

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Yanzhen; Hua, Zaidong; Liu, Ximei; Hua, Wenjun; Ren, Hongyan; Xiao, Hongwei; Zhang, Liping; Li, Li; Wang, Zhirui; Laible, Götz; Wang, Yan; Dong, Faming; Zheng, Xinmin

    2016-01-01

    Predictable, clean genetic modification (GM) in livestock is important for reliable phenotyping and biosafety. Here we reported the generation of isozygous, functional myostatin (MSTN) knockout cloned pigs free of selectable marker gene (SMG) by CRISPR/Cas9 and Cre/LoxP. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated homologous recombination (HR) was exploited to knock out (KO) one allele of MSTN in pig primary cells. Cre recombinase was then used to excise the SMG with an efficiency of 82.7%. The SMG-free non-EGFP cells were isolated by flow cytometery and immediately used as donor nuclei for nuclear transfer. A total of 685 reconstructed embryos were transferred into three surrogates with one delivering two male live piglets. Molecular testing verified the mono-allelic MSTN KO and SMG deletion in these cloned pigs. Western blots showed approximately 50% decrease in MSTN and concurrent increased expression of myogenic genes in muscle. Histological examination revealed the enhanced myofiber quantity but myofiber size remained unaltered. Ultrasonic detection showed the increased longissimus muscle size and decreased backfat thickness. Precision editing of pig MSTN gene has generated isozygous, SMG-free MSTN KO cloned founders, which guaranteed a reliable route for elite livestock production and a strategy to minimize potential biological risks. PMID:27530319

  11. Production of cloned NIBS (Nippon Institute for Biological Science) and α-1, 3-galactosyltransferase knockout MGH miniature pigs by somatic cell nuclear transfer using the NIBS breed as surrogates

    PubMed Central

    Shimatsu, Yoshiki; Yamada, Kazuhiko; Horii, Wataru; Hirakata, Atsushi; Sakamoto, Yuji; Waki, Shiori; Sano, Junichi; Saitoh, Toshiki; Sahara, Hisashi; Shimizu, Akira; Yazawa, Hajime; Sachs, David H.; Nunoya, Tetsuo

    2013-01-01

    Background Nuclear transfer (NT) technologies offer a means for producing the genetically modified pigs necessary to develop swine models for mechanistic studies of disease processes as well as to serve as organ donors for xenotransplantation. Most previous studies have used commercial pigs as surrogates. Method and Results In this study, we established a cloning technique for miniature pigs by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) using Nippon Institute for Biological Science (NIBS) miniature pigs as surrogates. Moreover, utilizing this technique, we have successfully produced an α-1, 3-galactosyltransferase knockout (GalT-KO) miniature swine. Fibroblasts procured from a NIBS miniature pig fetus were injected into 1312 enucleated oocytes. The cloned embryos were transferred to 11 surrogates of which five successfully delivered 13 cloned offspring; the production efficiency was 1.0% (13/1312). In a second experiment, lung fibroblasts obtained from neonatal GalT-KO MGH miniature swine were used as donor cells and 1953 cloned embryos were transferred to 12 surrogates. Six cloned offspring were born from five surrogates, a production efficiency of 0.3% (6/1953). Conclusions These results demonstrate successful establishment of a miniature pig cloning technique by SCNT using NIBS miniature pigs as surrogates. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of successful production of GalT-KO miniature swine using miniature swine surrogates. This technique could help to ensure a stable supply of the cloned pigs through the use of miniature pig surrogates and could expand production in countries with limited space or in facilities with special regulations such as specific pathogen-free or good laboratory practice. PMID:23581451

  12. Gal knockout and beyond.

    PubMed

    Zhong, R

    2007-01-01

    Recently, Galalpha1-3Galbeta1-4GlcNAc (Gal) knockout (k/o) pigs have been developed using genetic cloning technologies. This remarkable achievement has generated great enthusiasm in xenotransplantation studies. This review summarizes the current status of nonhuman primate experiments using Gal k/o pig organs. Briefly, when Gal k/o pig organs are transplanted into primates, hyperacute rejection does not occur. Although graft survival has been prolonged up to a few months in some cases, the overall results were not better than those using Gal-positive pig organs with human complement regulatory protein transgenes. Gal k/o pig kidneys rapidly developed rejection which was associated with increased anti-non-Gal antibodies. Although the precise mechanisms of Gal k/o pig organ rejection are not clear, it could result from incomplete deletion of Gal, up-regulation of new antigen (non-Gal antigen) and/or production of non-Gal antibodies. Future work in xenotransplantation should place emphasis on further modification of donors, such as combining human complement regulatory genes with Gal k/o, deleting non-Gal antigens and adding protective/surviving genes or a gene that inhibits coagulation. Induction of donor-specific T- and B-cell tolerance and promotion of accommodation are also warranted. PMID:17227553

  13. Kidneys From α1,3-Galactosyltransferase Knockout/Human Heme Oxygenase-1/Human A20 Transgenic Pigs Are Protected From Rejection During Ex Vivo Perfusion With Human Blood

    PubMed Central

    Ahrens, Hellen E.; Petersen, Björn; Ramackers, Wolf; Petkov, Stoyan; Herrmann, Doris; Hauschild-Quintern, Janet; Lucas-Hahn, Andrea; Hassel, Petra; Ziegler, Maren; Baars, Wiebke; Bergmann, Sabine; Schwinzer, Reinhard; Winkler, Michael; Niemann, Heiner

    2015-01-01

    Background Multiple modifications of the porcine genome are required to prevent rejection after pig-to-primate xenotransplantation. Here, we produced pigs with a knockout of the α1,3-galactosyltransferase gene (GGTA1-KO) combined with transgenic expression of the human anti-apoptotic/anti-inflammatory molecules heme oxygenase-1 and A20, and investigated their xenoprotective properties. Methods The GGTA1-KO/human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1)/human A20 (hA20) transgenic pigs were produced in a stepwise approach using zinc finger nuclease vectors targeting the GGTA1 gene and a Sleeping Beauty vector coding for hA20. Two piglets were analyzed by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, flow cytometry, and sequencing. The biological function of the genetic modifications was tested in a 51Chromium release assay and by ex vivo kidney perfusions with human blood. Results Disruption of the GGTA1 gene by deletion of few basepairs was demonstrated in GGTA1-KO/hHO-1/hA20 transgenic pigs. The hHO-1 and hA20 mRNA expression was confirmed by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Ex vivo perfusion of 2 transgenic kidneys was feasible for the maximum experimental time of 240 minutes without symptoms of rejection. Conclusions Results indicate that GGTA1-KO/hHO-1/hA20 transgenic pigs are a promising model to alleviate rejection and ischemia-reperfusion damage in porcine xenografts and could serve as a background for further genetic modifications toward the production of a donor pig that is clinically relevant for xenotransplantation.

  14. Rejection of Cardiac Xenografts Transplanted from α 1,3-Galactosyltransferase Gene-Knockout (GalT-KO) Pigs to Baboons

    PubMed Central

    Hisashi, Y.; Yamada, K.; Kuwaki, K.; Tseng, Y.-L; Dor, F. J. M. F.; Houser, S. L; Robson, S. C.; Schuurman, H.-J.; Cooper, D. K. C.; Sachs, D. H.; Colvin, R. B.; Shimizu, A.

    2010-01-01

    The use of α 1,3-galactosyltransferase gene-knockout (GalT-KO) swine donors in discordant xenotransplantation has extended the survival of cardiac xenografts in baboons following transplantation. Eight baboons received heterotopic cardiac xenografts from GalT-KO swine and were treated with a chronic immunosuppressive regimen. The pathologic features of acute humoral xenograft rejection (AHXR), acute cellular xenograft rejection (ACXR) and chronic rejection were assessed in the grafts. No hyperacute rejection developed and one graft survived up to 6 months after transplantation. However, all GalT-KO heart grafts underwent graft failure with AHXR, ACXR and/or chronic rejection. AHXR was characterized by interstitial hemorrhage and multiple thrombi in vessels of various sizes. ACXR was characterized by TUNEL+ graft cell injury with the infiltration of T cells (including CD3 and TIA-1+ cytotoxic T cells), CD4+ cells, CD8+ cells, macrophages and a small number of B and NK cells. Chronic xenograft vasculopathy, a manifestation of chronic rejection, was characterized by arterial intimal thickening with TUNEL+ dead cells, antibody and complement deposition, and/or cytotoxic T-cell infiltration. In conclusion, despite the absence of the Gal epitope, acute and chronic antibody and cell-mediated rejection developed in grafts, maintained by chronic immunosupression, presumably due to de novo responses to non-Gal antigens. PMID:19032222

  15. Mechanisms in Knockout Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazin, D.; Charity, R. J.; de Souza, R. T.; Famiano, M. A.; Gade, A.; Henzl, V.; Henzlova, D.; Hudan, S.; Lee, J.; Lukyanov, S.; Lynch, W. G.; McDaniel, S.; Mocko, M.; Obertelli, A.; Rogers, A. M.; Sobotka, L. G.; Terry, J. R.; Tostevin, J. A.; Tsang, M. B.; Wallace, M. S.

    2009-06-01

    We report the first detailed study of the relative importance of the stripping and diffraction mechanisms involved in nucleon knockout reactions, by the use of a coincidence measurement of the residue and fast proton following one-proton knockout reactions. The measurements used the S800 spectrograph in combination with the HiRA detector array at the NSCL. Results for the reactions Be9(C9,B8+X)Y and Be9(B8,Be7+X)Y are presented and compared with theoretical predictions for the two reaction mechanisms calculated using the eikonal model. The data show a clear distinction between the stripping and diffraction mechanisms and the measured relative proportions are very well reproduced by the reaction theory. This agreement adds support to the results of knockout reaction analyses and their applications to the spectroscopy of rare isotopes.

  16. Mechanisms in knockout reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazin, D.; Charity, R. J.; de Souza, R. T.; Famiano, M. A.; Gade, A.; Henzl, V.; Henzlova, D.; Hudan, S.; Lee, J.; Lukyanov, S.; Lynch, W. G.; McDaniel, S.; Mocko, M.; Obertelli, A.; Rogers, A. M.; Sobotka, L. G.; Terry, J. R.; Tostevin, J. A.; Tsang, M. B.; Wallace, M. S.

    2009-10-01

    We report on the first detailed study of the mechanisms involved in knockout reactions, via a coincidence measurement of the residue and fast proton in one-proton knockout reactions, using the S800 spectrograph in combination with the HiRA detector array at the NSCL. Results on the reactions ^9Be(^9C,^8B+X)Y and ^9Be(^8B,^7Be+X)Y are presented. They are compared with theoretical predictions for both the diffraction (elastic breakup) and stripping (inelastic breakup) reaction mechanisms, as calculated in the eikonal model. The data shows a clear distinction between the two reaction mechanisms, and the observed respective proportions are very well reproduced by the reaction theory. This agreement supports the results of knockout reaction analyses and their applications to the spectroscopy of rare isotopes. In particular, this add considerable support to the use of the eikonal model as a quantitative tool, able, for example, to determine single-particle spectroscopic strengths in rare isotopes.

  17. Knockout beyond the dripline

    SciTech Connect

    Bonaccorso, A.; Charity, R. J.; Kumar, R.; Salvioni, G.

    2015-02-24

    In this contribution, we will describe neutron and proton removal from {sup 9}C and {sup 7}Be which are two particularly interesting nuclei entering the nucleo-synthesis pp-chain [1, 2]. Neutron and proton removal reactions have been used in the past twenty years to probe the single-particle structure of exotic nuclei. The core parallel-momentum distribution can give information on the angular momentum and spin of the nucleon initial state while the total removal cross section is sensitive to the asymptotic part of the initial wave function and also to the reaction mechanism. Because knockout is a peripheral reaction from which the Asymptotic Normalization Constant (ANC) of the single-particle wave function can be extracted, it has been used as an indirect method to obtain the rate of reactions like {sup 8}B(p,γ){sup 9}C or {sup 7}Be(p,γ){sup 8}B. Nucleon removal has recently been applied by the HiRA collaboration [3] to situations in which the remaining “core” is beyond the drip line, such as {sup 8}C and {sup 6}Be, unbound by one or more protons, and whose excitation-energy spectrum can be obtained by the invariant-mass method. By gating on the ground-state peak, “core” parallel-momentum distributions and total knockout cross sections have been obtained similar to previous studies with well-bound “cores”. In addition for each projectile, knock out to final bound states has also been obtained in several cases. We will report on the theoretical description and comparison to this experimental data for a few cases for which advances in the accuracy of the transfer-to-the continuum model [4, 5] have been made [6]. These include the use, when available, of “ab-initio” overlaps for the initial state [7] and in particular their ANC values [8]. Also, the construction of a nucleus-target folding potential for the treatment of the core-target S-matrix [9] using for the cores “ab-initio” densities [10] and state-of-the-art n−{sup 9}Be optical

  18. Murine mentors: transgenic and knockout models of surgical disease.

    PubMed Central

    Arbeit, J M; Hirose, R

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Transgenic and knockout technologies have emerged from the "molecular biology revolution" as unprecedented techniques for manipulating gene function in intact mice. The goals of this review are to outline the techniques of creating transgenic and knockout mice, and to demonstrate their use in elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying common surgical diseases. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Gain of gene function is created by transgenic technology, whereas gene function is ablated using gene knockouts. Each technique has distinctive applications and drawbacks. A unique feature of genetically manipulated mice is that combinatorial genetic experiments can be executed that precisely define the functional contribution of a gene to disease progression. Transgenic and knockout mouse models of wound healing, cardiovascular disease, transplant immunology, gut motility and inflammatory bowel disease, and oncology are beginning to illuminate the precise molecular regulation of these diseases. Transgenic technology has also been extended to larger mammals such as pigs, with the goal of using genetic manipulation of the xenogenic immune response to increase the availability of transplant organs. Continual refinements in gene manipulation technology in mice offer the opportunity to turn genes on or off at precise time intervals and in particular tissues, according to the needs of the investigator. Ultimately, investigation of disease development and progression in genetically manipulated mammals may delineate new molecular targets for drug discovery and provide novel platforms for drug efficacy screens. CONCLUSIONS: Emulation of human disease and therapy using genetically manipulated mammals fulfills a promise of molecular medicine: fusion of molecular biochemistry with "classical" biology and physiology. Surgeons have unique skills spanning both worlds that can facilitate their success in this expanding arena. PMID:9923797

  19. THERAPEUTIC ISSUES IN THE TREATMENT OF VASCULARIZED XENOTRANSPLANTS USING GAL-KNOCKOUT DONORS IN NONHUMAN PRIMATES

    PubMed Central

    Ekser, Burcin; Kumar, Goutham; Veroux, Massimiliano; Cooper, David K.C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review Solid organ xenotransplantation could be the future of transplantation, but improved outcomes are required in experimental models before clinical trials are justified. This review summarizes recent advances in solid organ xenotransplantation using organs from α1,3-galactosyltransferase gene-knockout (GTKO) pigs (with or without other genetic modifications) and novel therapeutic approaches. Recent findings Work on the development of genetically-engineered pigs has been considerable during the past few years, with many research institutes reporting the outcomes of research. Multiple gene modifications on a GTKO background have been reported, and the results of transplantation using organs from these pigs have been published. Progress, however, has been variable, and several obstacles, e.g., coagulation dysregulation, have been identified. Heterotopic pig heart xenotransplantation has been associated with graft survival exceeding 8 months, but kidney graft survival has not improved significantly. Summary The availability of GTKO pigs with additional genetic modifications aimed towards expression of multiple complement-regulatory proteins and/or human thromboregulatory genes, combined with novel immunosuppressive regimens, e.g., the inclusion of B cell-depleting agents, should improve pig organ survival in the near future. PMID:21415825

  20. Generation of conditional knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kazuhito; Gurumurthy, Channabasavaiah B; Wagner, Kay-Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Conditional knockout mouse models are powerful tools to examine the biological and molecular function(s) of genes in specific tissues. The general procedure to generate such genetically engineered mouse models consists of three main steps. The first step is to find the appropriate genomic clone of the gene of interest and to design the cloning and Southern blot strategies. The second step is the cloning of the gene-targeting vector with all its essential components including positive and negative selection cassettes and the insertion of LoxP sites. Although conventional methods are still being widely used for DNA cloning, we describe in this book chapter the use of λ Red phage-based homologous recombination in Escherichia coli to capture the genomic DNA of the gene of interest and to assemble the gene-targeting vector. This new method provides several advantages as it does not require the presence of restriction sites within the gene of interest to insert LoxP-flanked DNA fragments. In the final step, the gene-targeting vector is transferred into embryonic stem (ES) cells, and successfully targeted ES cell clones are injected into mouse blastocysts to generate conditional knockout mice. PMID:25064096

  1. PIG-TO-MONKEY ISLET XENOTRANSPLANTATION USING MULTI-TRANSGENIC PIGS

    PubMed Central

    Bottino, R.; Wijkstrom, M.; van der Windt, D.J.; Hara, H.; Ezzelarab, M.; Murase, N.; Bertera, S.; He, J.; Phelps, C.; Ayares, D.; Cooper, D.K.C.; Trucco, M.

    2014-01-01

    The generation of pigs with genetic modifications has significantly advanced the field of xenotransplantation. New genetically-engineered pigs were produced on an α1,3-galactosyltransferase gene-knockout background with ubiquitous expression of human CD46 (GTKO/CD46 pigs), with islet beta cell-specific expression of human tissue factor pathway inhibitor (hTFPI) and/or human CD39 and/or porcine CTLA4-lg. Isolated islets from pigs with 3, 4, or 5 genetic modifications were transplanted intraportally into streptozotocin-diabetic, immunosuppressed cynomolgus monkeys (n=5). Immunosuppression was based on anti-CD154mAb costimulation blockade. Monitoring included features of early islet destruction, glycemia, exogenous insulin requirement, and histopathology of the islets at necropsy. Using these modified pig islets, there was evidence of reduced islet destruction in the first hours after transplantation, compared with two series of historical controls that received identical therapy but were transplanted with islets from pigs with either no or only one genetic modification. Despite encouraging effects on early islet loss, these multi-transgenic islet grafts did not demonstrate consistency in regard to long-term success, with only 2 of 5 demonstrating function beyond 5 months. PMID:25220221

  2. Proteomic Analysis of Tissue from α1,3-galactosyltransferase Knockout Mice Reveals That a Wide Variety of Proteins and Protein Fragments Change Expression Level

    PubMed Central

    Thorlacius-Ussing, Louise; Ludvigsen, Maja; Kirkeby, Svend

    2013-01-01

    A barrier in a pig-to-man xenotransplantation is that the Galα1-3Galβ1-4GlcNAc-R carbohydrate (α-Gal epitope) expressed on pig endothelial cells reacts with naturally occurring antibodies in the recipient’s blood leading to rejection. Deletion of the α1,3-galactosyltransferase gene prevents the synthesis of the α-Gal epitope. Therefore, knockout models of the α1,3-galactosyltransferase gene are widely used to study xenotransplantation. We have performed proteomic studies on liver and pancreas tissues from wild type and α1,3-galactosyltransferase gene knockout mice. The tissues were analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry. The analyses revealed that a wide variety of proteins and protein fragments are differentially expressed suggesting that knockout of the α1,3-galactosyltransferase gene affects the expression of several other genes. PMID:24244699

  3. Efficient gene knockout in goats using CRISPR/Cas9 system.

    PubMed

    Ni, Wei; Qiao, Jun; Hu, Shengwei; Zhao, Xinxia; Regouski, Misha; Yang, Min; Polejaeva, Irina A; Chen, Chuangfu

    2014-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system has been adapted as an efficient genome editing tool in laboratory animals such as mice, rats, zebrafish and pigs. Here, we report that CRISPR/Cas9 mediated approach can efficiently induce monoallelic and biallelic gene knockout in goat primary fibroblasts. Four genes were disrupted simultaneously in goat fibroblasts by CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing. The single-gene knockout fibroblasts were successfully used for somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and resulted in live-born goats harboring biallelic mutations. The CRISPR/Cas9 system represents a highly effective and facile platform for targeted editing of large animal genomes, which can be broadly applied to both biomedical and agricultural applications. PMID:25188313

  4. Proton Knock-Out in Hall A

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager

    2002-06-01

    Proton knock-out is studied in a broad program in Hall A at Jefferson Lab. The first experiment performed in Hall A studied the {sup 16}O(e,e'p) reaction. Since then proton knock-out experiments have studied a variety of aspects of that reaction, from single-nucleon properties to its mechanism, such as final-state interactions and two-body currents, in nuclei from {sup 2}H to {sup 16}O. In this review the results of this program will be summarized and an outlook given of future accomplishments.

  5. Production of α1,3-Galactosyltransferase–Deficient Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Phelps, Carol J.; Koike, Chihiro; Vaught, Todd D.; Boone, Jeremy; Wells, Kevin D.; Chen, Shu-Hung; Ball, Suyapa; Specht, Susan M.; Polejaeva, Irina A.; Monahan, Jeff A.; Jobst, Pete M.; Sharma, Sugandha B.; Lamborn, Ashley E.; Garst, Amy S.; Moore, Marilyn; Demetris, Anthony J.; Rudert, William A.; Bottino, Rita; Bertera, Suzanne; Trucco, Massimo; Starzl, Thomas E.; Dai, Yifan; Ayares, David L.

    2011-01-01

    The enzyme α1,3-galactosyltransferase (α1,3GT or GCTA1) synthesizes α1,3-galactose (α1,3Gal) epitopes (Galα1,3Galβ1,4GlcNAc-R), which are the major xenoantigens causing hyperacute rejection in pig-to-human xenotransplantation. Complete removal of α1,3Gal from pig organs is the critical step toward the success of xenotransplantation. We reported earlier the targeted disruption of one allele of the α1,3GT gene in cloned pigs. A selection procedure based on a bacterial toxin was used to select for cells in which the second allele of the gene was knocked out. Sequencing analysis demonstrated that knockout of the second allele of the α1,3GT gene was caused by a T-to-G single point mutation at the second base of exon 9, which resulted in inactivation of the α1,3GT protein. Four healthy α1,3GT double-knockout female piglets were produced by three consecutive rounds of cloning. The piglets carrying a point mutation in the α1,3GT gene hold significant value, as they would allow production of α1,3Gal-deficient pigs free of antibiotic-resistance genes and thus have the potential to make a safer product for human use. PMID:12493821

  6. Germ cell-specific expression of Cre recombinase using the VASA promoter in the pig.

    PubMed

    Song, Yuning; Lai, Liangxue; Li, Li; Huang, Yongye; Wang, Anfeng; Tang, Xiaochun; Pang, Daxin; Li, Zhanjun; Ouyang, Hongsheng

    2016-01-01

    The Cre-loxP system is a powerful tool for genetic analysis of distinct cell lineages and tissue-specific gene knockout in animal models. VASA is specifically expressed in reproductive tissues, and is known to play important roles in spermatogenesis and germ-cell growth. In this study, Cre recombinase transgenic pigs under the control of the VASA promoter were generated by somatic cell nuclear transfer. Germ cell-specific expression of Cre recombinase in VASA-Cre transgenic pigs was shown by western blotting and immunohistochemistry. VASA-Cre transgenic pigs will be a useful tool for germ cell-specific gene knockout and a disease model for disorders of the reproductive system. PMID:27047735

  7. Knockout of exogenous EGFP gene in porcine somatic cells using zinc-finger nucleases

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Masahito; Umeyama, Kazuhiro; Matsunari, Hitomi; Takayanagi, Shuko; Haruyama, Erika; Nakano, Kazuaki; Fujiwara, Tsukasa; Ikezawa, Yuka; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; and others

    2010-11-05

    Research highlights: {yields} EGFP gene integrated in porcine somatic cells could be knocked out using the ZFN-KO system. {yields} ZFNs induced targeted mutations in porcine primary cultured cells. {yields} Complete absence of EGFP fluorescence was confirmed in ZFN-treated cells. -- Abstract: Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) are expected as a powerful tool for generating gene knockouts in laboratory and domestic animals. Currently, it is unclear whether this technology can be utilized for knocking-out genes in pigs. Here, we investigated whether knockout (KO) events in which ZFNs recognize and cleave a target sequence occur in porcine primary cultured somatic cells that harbor the exogenous enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene. ZFN-encoding mRNA designed to target the EGFP gene was introduced by electroporation into the cell. Using the Surveyor nuclease assay and flow cytometric analysis, we confirmed ZFN-induced cleavage of the target sequence and the disappearance of EGFP fluorescence expression in ZFN-treated cells. In addition, sequence analysis revealed that ZFN-induced mutations such as base substitution, deletion, or insertion were generated in the ZFN cleavage site of EGFP-expression negative cells that were cloned from ZFN-treated cells, thereby showing it was possible to disrupt (i.e., knock out) the function of the EGFP gene in porcine somatic cells. To our knowledge, this study provides the first evidence that the ZFN-KO system can be applied to pigs. These findings may open a new avenue to the creation of gene KO pigs using ZFN-treated cells and somatic cell nuclear transfer.

  8. Highly efficient CRISPR/Cas9-mediated transgene knockin at the H11 locus in pigs.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Jinxue; Li, Hegang; Xu, Kui; Wu, Tianwen; Wei, Jingliang; Zhou, Rong; Liu, Zhiguo; Mu, Yulian; Yang, Shulin; Ouyang, Hongsheng; Chen-Tsai, Ruby Yanru; Li, Kui

    2015-01-01

    Transgenic pigs play an important role in producing higher quality food in agriculture and improving human health when used as animal models for various human diseases in biomedicine. Production of transgenic pigs, however, is a lengthy and inefficient process that hinders research using pig models. Recent applications of the CRISPR/Cas9 system for generating site-specific gene knockout/knockin models, including a knockout pig model, have significantly accelerated the animal model field. However, a knockin pig model containing a site-specific transgene insertion that can be passed on to its offspring remains lacking. Here, we describe for the first time the generation of a site-specific knockin pig model using a combination of CRISPR/Cas9 and somatic cell nuclear transfer. We also report a new genomic "safe harbor" locus, named pH11, which enables stable and robust transgene expression. Our results indicate that our CRISPR/Cas9 knockin system allows highly efficient gene insertion at the pH11 locus of up to 54% using drug selection and 6% without drug selection. We successfully inserted a gene fragment larger than 9 kb at the pH11 locus using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Our data also confirm that the gene inserted into the pH11 locus is highly expressed in cells, embryos and animals. PMID:26381350

  9. Cleaning pipelines: a pigging primer

    SciTech Connect

    Kipin, P.

    1985-02-04

    The ''pig'', a cleaning device currently used to clear out pipes, is discussed here. Types of pigs are described and include styrofoam, rubber, and soft foam. The limitations to the use of pigs are discussed. Unless all valves are fully open, a pig can get stuck. Ball-type tees may cause a short pig to drop and bypass. Generally, no pig is able to traverse a one-cut miter.

  10. Pig in the Middle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Sophie

    2000-01-01

    Explores themes relating to human transition as they appear in "Charlotte's Web" and four other stories using pigs as a subject. Discusses the motifs common to all these texts that recur in the film "Babe." Considers how the cycle of life and death is ceaseless, and pigs symbolize the necessary transitions that people must all make. (NH)

  11. Clues to VIP function from knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Hamidi, S A; Szema, A M; Lyubsky, S; Dickman, K G; Degene, A; Mathew, S M; Waschek, J A; Said, S I

    2006-07-01

    We have taken advantage of the availability of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) knockout (KO) mice to examine the possible influence of deletion of the VIP gene on: (a) airway reactivity and airway inflammation, as indicators of bronchial asthma; (b) mortality from endotoxemia, a model of septic shock; and (c) the pulmonary circulation. VIP KO mice showed: (a) airway hyperresponsiveness to the cholinergic agonist methacholine, as well as peribronchial and perivascular inflammation; (b) a greater susceptibility to death from endotoxemia; and (c) evidence suggestive of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:16888146

  12. Universal statistics of the knockout tournament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Seung Ki; Yi, Il Gu; Park, Hye Jin; Kim, Beom Jun

    2013-11-01

    We study statistics of the knockout tournament, where only the winner of a fixture progresses to the next. We assign a real number called competitiveness to each contestant and find that the resulting distribution of prize money follows a power law with an exponent close to unity if the competitiveness is a stable quantity and a decisive factor to win a match. Otherwise, the distribution is found narrow. The existing observation of power law distributions in various kinds of real sports tournaments therefore suggests that the rules of those games are constructed in such a way that it is possible to understand the games in terms of the contestants' inherent characteristics of competitiveness.

  13. Cysticercosis in the pig.

    PubMed

    de Aluja, A S

    2008-01-01

    Taenia solium cysticercosis is still an important parasitosis in rural pigs in many developing countries, México among them. The main causes for the persistence of this condition are lack of hygiene in the rural communities, lack of education of the animal owners, lack of control in the trade of pigs and their meat and lack of conscientious meat inspection. The pig production systems in the marginated areas of Mexico are briefly mentioned and it is stressed that among the important reasons for the persistence of the reproductive cycle of Taenia solium is the fact that appropriate toilet facilities in village dwellings are not mandatory. The diagnostic methods of cysticercosis in the living pigs and in their meat are discussed and the degenerative stages of the larvae as well as methods to test their viability are explained. The treatment of infected pigs and their meat is discussed. Recommendations for control programmes are given. PMID:18393899

  14. Tail biting in pigs.

    PubMed

    Schrøder-Petersen, D L; Simonsen, H B

    2001-11-01

    One of the costly and welfare-reducing problems in modern pig production is tail biting. Tail biting is an abnormal behaviour, characterized by one pig's dental manipulation of another pig's tail. Tail biting can be classified into two groups: the pre-injury stage, before any wound on the tail is present, and the injury stage, where the tail is wounded and bleeding. Tail biting in the injury stage will reduce welfare of the bitten pig and the possible spread of infection is a health as well as welfare problem. The pigs that become tail biters may also suffer, because they are frustrated due to living in a stressful environment. This frustration may result in an excessive motivation for biting the tails of pen mates. This review aims to summarize recent research and theories in relation to tail biting. PMID:11681870

  15. Altered Reward Circuitry in the Norepinephrine Transporter Knockout Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Hall, F. Scott; Uhl, George R.; Bearer, Elaine L.; Jacobs, Russell E.

    2013-01-01

    Synaptic levels of the monoamine neurotransmitters dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine are modulated by their respective plasma membrane transporters, albeit with a few exceptions. Monoamine transporters remove monoamines from the synaptic cleft and thus influence the degree and duration of signaling. Abnormal concentrations of these neuronal transmitters are implicated in a number of neurological and psychiatric disorders, including addiction, depression, and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. This work concentrates on the norepinephrine transporter (NET), using a battery of in vivo magnetic resonance imaging techniques and histological correlates to probe the effects of genetic deletion of the norepinephrine transporter on brain metabolism, anatomy and functional connectivity. MRS recorded in the striatum of NET knockout mice indicated a lower concentration of NAA that correlates with histological observations of subtle dysmorphisms in the striatum and internal capsule. As with DAT and SERT knockout mice, we detected minimal structural alterations in NET knockout mice by tensor-based morphometric analysis. In contrast, longitudinal imaging after stereotaxic prefrontal cortical injection of manganese, an established neuronal circuitry tracer, revealed that the reward circuit in the NET knockout mouse is biased toward anterior portions of the brain. This is similar to previous results observed for the dopamine transporter (DAT) knockout mouse, but dissimilar from work with serotonin transporter (SERT) knockout mice where Mn2+ tracings extended to more posterior structures than in wildtype animals. These observations correlate with behavioral studies indicating that SERT knockout mice display anxiety-like phenotypes, while NET knockouts and to a lesser extent DAT knockout mice display antidepressant-like phenotypic features. Thus, the mainly anterior activity detected with manganese-enhanced MRI in the DAT and NET knockout mice is likely indicative of

  16. Proteomic Analysis of Loricrin Knockout Mouse Epidermis.

    PubMed

    Rice, Robert H; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe P; Ishitsuka, Yosuke; Salemi, Michelle; Phinney, Brett S; Rocke, David M; Roop, Dennis R

    2016-08-01

    The crosslinked envelope of the mammalian epidermal corneocyte serves as a scaffold for assembly of the lipid barrier of the epidermis. Thus, deficient envelope crosslinking by keratinocyte transglutaminase (TGM1) is a major cause of the human autosomal recessive congenital ichthyoses characterized by barrier defects. Expectations that loss of some envelope protein components would also confer an ichthyosis phenotype have been difficult to demonstrate. To help rationalize this observation, the protein profile of epidermis from loricrin knockout mice has been compared to that of wild type. Despite the mild phenotype of the knockout, some 40 proteins were incorporated into envelope material to significantly different extents compared to those of wild type. Nearly half were also incorporated to similarly altered extents into the disulfide bonded keratin network of the corneocyte. The results suggest that loss of loricrin alters their incorporation into envelopes as a consequence of protein-protein interactions during cell maturation. Mass spectrometric protein profiling revealed that keratin 1, keratin 10, and loricrin are prominent envelope components and that dozens of other proteins are also components. This finding helps rationalize the potential formation of functional envelopes, despite loss of a single component, due to the availability of many alternative transglutaminase substrates. PMID:27418529

  17. Efficient Generation of Myostatin Mutations in Pigs Using the CRISPR/Cas9 System

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kankan; Ouyang, Hongsheng; Xie, Zicong; Yao, Chaogang; Guo, Nannan; Li, Mengjing; Jiao, Huping; Pang, Daxin

    2015-01-01

    Genetically modified pigs are increasingly used for biomedical and agricultural applications. The efficient CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing system holds great promise for the generation of gene-targeting pigs without selection marker genes. In this study, we aimed to disrupt the porcine myostatin (MSTN) gene, which functions as a negative regulator of muscle growth. The transfection efficiency of porcine fetal fibroblasts (PFFs) was improved to facilitate the targeting of Cas9/gRNA. We also demonstrated that Cas9/gRNA can induce non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), long fragment deletions/inversions and homology-directed repair (HDR) at the MSTN locus of PFFs. Single-cell MSTN knockout colonies were used to generate cloned pigs via somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), which resulted in 8 marker-gene-free cloned pigs with biallelic mutations. Some of the piglets showed obvious intermuscular grooves and enlarged tongues, which are characteristic of the double muscling (DM) phenotype. The protein level of MSTN was decreased in the mutant cloned pigs compared with the wild-type controls, and the mRNA levels of MSTN and related signaling pathway factors were also analyzed. Finally, we carefully assessed off-target mutations in the cloned pigs. The gene editing platform used in this study can efficiently generate genetically modified pigs with biological safety. PMID:26564781

  18. Initial In Vitro Investigation of the Human Immune Response to Corneal Cells from Genetically Engineered Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Koike, Naoko; Long, Cassandra; Piluek, Jordan; Roh, Danny S.; SundarRaj, Nirmala; Funderburgh, James L.; Mizuguchi, Yoshiaki; Isse, Kumiko; Phelps, Carol J.; Ball, Suyapa F.; Ayares, David L.; Cooper, David K. C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the in vitro human humoral and cellular immune responses to wild-type (WT) pig corneal endothelial cells (pCECs) with those to pig aortic endothelial cells (pAECs). These responses were further compared with CECs from genetically engineered pigs (α1,3-galactosyltransferase gene-knockout [GTKO] pigs and pigs expressing a human complement-regulatory protein [CD46]) and human donors. Methods. The expression of Galα1,3Gal (Gal), swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) class I and class II on pCECs and pAECs, with or without activation by porcine IFN-γ, was tested by flow cytometry. Pooled human serum was used to measure IgM/IgG binding to and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) to cells from WT, GTKO, and GTKO/CD46 pigs. The human CD4+ T-cell response to cells from WT, GTKO, GTKO/CD46 pigs and human was tested by mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). Results. There was a lower level of expression of the Gal antigen and of SLA class I and II on the WT pCECs than on the WT pAECs, resulting in less antibody binding and reduced human CD4+ T-cell proliferation. However, lysis of the WT pCECs was equivalent to that of the pAECs, suggesting more susceptibility to injury. There were significantly weaker humoral and cellular responses to the pCECs from GTKO/CD46 pigs compared with the WT pCECs, although the cellular response to the GTKO/CD46 pCECs was greater than to the human CECs. Conclusions. These data provide the first report of in vitro investigations of CECs from genetically engineered pigs and suggest that pig corneas may provide an acceptable alternative to human corneas for clinical transplantation. PMID:21596821

  19. Universal statistics of the knockout tournament

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Seung Ki; Yi, Il Gu; Park, Hye Jin; Kim, Beom Jun

    2013-01-01

    We study statistics of the knockout tournament, where only the winner of a fixture progresses to the next. We assign a real number called competitiveness to each contestant and find that the resulting distribution of prize money follows a power law with an exponent close to unity if the competitiveness is a stable quantity and a decisive factor to win a match. Otherwise, the distribution is found narrow. The existing observation of power law distributions in various kinds of real sports tournaments therefore suggests that the rules of those games are constructed in such a way that it is possible to understand the games in terms of the contestants' inherent characteristics of competitiveness. PMID:24217406

  20. Ppp2ca knockout in mice spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaoyun; Chen, Xia; Tong, Xin; Tang, Chao; Li, Jianmin

    2015-04-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a ubiquitous serine/threonine phosphatase involved in meiosis, mitosis, sperm capacitation, and apoptosis. Abberant activity of PP2A has been associated with a number of diseases. The homolog PPP2CA and PPP2CB can each function as the phosphatase catalytic subunit generally referred to as PP2AC. We generated a Ppp2ca conditional knockout (CKO) in C57BL/6J mice. Exon 2 of Ppp2ca was knocked out in a spatial or temporal-specific manner in primordial germ cells at E12.5. This Ppp2ca-null mutation caused infertility in male C57BL/6J mice. These CKO mice provide a powerful tool to study the mechanisms of Ppp2ca in development and disease. PMID:25628439

  1. Pig production in the Solomon Islands. I. Village pig production.

    PubMed

    de Fredrick, D F

    1977-05-01

    In 181 villages in the Solomon Islands the pig: human ratio was 1:5-8 and the annual per capita pork consumption was 4-2 kg. Some communities did not keep pigs or eat pig meat. Sows weaned an average of 5-5 piglets per year and mean liveweight at 12 months of age was 28-4 kg. Most pigs were kept on the ground but some were housed in pens over the sea and very few lived in their owner's houses. Pigs were important in the social life of the people but proportionally fewer pigs were raised than in neighbouring Pacific countries. PMID:906090

  2. Human Knockout Carriers: Dead, Diseased, Healthy, or Improved?

    PubMed Central

    Narasimhan, Vagheesh M.; Xue, Yali; Tyler-Smith, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Whole-genome and whole-exome sequence data from large numbers of individuals reveal that we all carry many variants predicted to inactivate genes (knockouts). This discovery raises questions about the phenotypic consequences of these knockouts and potentially allows us to study human gene function through the investigation of homozygous loss-of-function carriers. Here, we discuss strategies, recent results, and future prospects for large-scale human knockout studies. We examine their relevance to studying gene function, population genetics, and importantly, the implications for accurate clinical interpretations. PMID:26988438

  3. Theoretical knock-outs on biological networks.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Pedro J; de S Pinto, Sandro E; Baptista, Murilo S; La Guardia, Giuliano G

    2016-08-21

    In this work we redefine the concept of biological importance and how to compute it, based on a model of complex networks and random walk. We call this new procedure, theoretical knock-out (KO). The proposed method generalizes the procedure presented in a recent study about Oral Tolerance. To devise this method, we make two approaches: algebraically and algorithmically. In both cases we compute a vector on an asymptotic state, called flux vector. The flux is given by a random walk on a directed graph that represents a biological phenomenon. This vector gives us the information about the relative flux of walkers on a vertex which represents a biological agent. With two vector of this kind, we can calculate the relative mean error between them by averaging over its coefficients. This quantity allows us to assess the degree of importance of each vertex of a complex network that evolves in time and has experimental background. We find out that this procedure can be applied in any sort of biological phenomena in which we can know the role and interrelationships of its agents. These results also provide experimental biologists to predict the order of importance of biological agents on a mounted complex network. PMID:27188251

  4. Establishment and phenotypic analysis of an Mstn knockout rat.

    PubMed

    Gu, Hao; Cao, Yong; Qiu, Bin; Zhou, Zhiqiang; Deng, Ran; Chen, Zhuang; Li, Rongfeng; Li, Xueling; Wei, Qiang; Xia, Xianzhu; Yong, Weidong

    2016-08-12

    Myostatin (Mstn) is an inhibitor of myogenesis, regulating the number and size of skeletal myocytes. In addition to its myogenic regulatory function, Mstn plays important roles in the development of adipose tissues and in metabolism. In the present study, an Mstn knockout rat model was generated using the zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) technique in order to further investigate the function and mechanism of Mstn in metabolism. The knockout possesses a frame shift mutation resulting in an early termination codon and a truncated peptide of 109 amino acids rather than the full 376 amino acids. The absence of detectable mRNA confirmed successful knockout of Mstn. Relative to wild-type (WT) littermates, Knockout (KO) rats exhibited significantly greater body weight, body circumference, and muscle mass. However, no significant differences in grip force was observed, indicating that Mstn deletion results in greater muscle mass but not greater muscle fiber strength. Additionally, KO rats were found to possess less body fat relative to WT littermates, which is consistent with previous studies in mice and cattle. The aforementioned results indicate that Mstn knockout increases muscle mass while decreasing fat content, leading to observed increases in body weight and body circumference. The Mstn knockout rat model provides a novel means to study the role of Mstn in metabolism and Mstn-related muscle hypertrophy. PMID:27289021

  5. Purification and crystallization of yeast glycosylphosphatidylinositol transamidase subunit PIG-S (PIG-S71–467)

    PubMed Central

    Kamariah, Neelagandan; Eisenhaber, Frank; Adhikari, Sharmila; Eisenhaber, Birgit; Grüber, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    The transfer of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors onto eukaryotic proteins is catalyzed by the transamidase complex, which is composed of at least five subunits (PIG-K, PIG-S, PIG-T, PIG-U and GPAA1). Here, the recombinant protein PIG-S71–467 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, including residues 71–467 of the entire 534-residue protein, was cloned, expressed and purified to homogeneity. The monodisperse protein was crystallized by the vapour-diffusion method. A diffraction data set was collected to 3.2 Å resolution with 91.6% completeness. The crystals belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 106.72, b = 59.33, c = 124.3 Å, β = 114.19°, and contained two molecules in the asymmetric unit. PMID:21821889

  6. A Simple "Pig" Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Roger W.

    2008-01-01

    Our pig game involves a series of tosses of a die with the possibility of a player's score improving with each additional toss. With each additional toss, however, there is also the chance of losing the entire score accumulated so far. Two different strategies for deciding how many tosses a player should attempt are developed and then compared in…

  7. St. Paul's Pig Pack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Penny Folley

    1982-01-01

    Describes a guinea pig (cavy) breeding and management program developed as part of an elementary school science curriculum. Includes comments on show competitions (sponsored by the American Rabbit Breeders Association) to measure the success of the breeding program and to enable children to experience the business world. (Author/JN)

  8. Pipeline design essential in making pigging plans

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, H.

    1998-08-01

    Pigs have gotten an unfortunate reputation for getting stuck in pipelines. As a result, for many years few pigged their pipelines and consequently, many companies are paying the price to repair or replace their corroded pipelines. It is currently considered a necessary evil to run pigs to improve pipeline efficiency and prevent corrosion. Some pipelines were not designed to run pigs and occasionally the wrong type of pig is selected to run in a particular pipeline, increasing the chances of sticking a pig. A pipeline properly designed for pigging along with proper pig selection greatly reduces chances of sticking a pig.

  9. Increased and prolonged human norovirus infection in RAG2/IL2RG deficient gnotobiotic pigs with severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Lei, Shaohua; Ryu, Junghyun; Wen, Ke; Twitchell, Erica; Bui, Tammy; Ramesh, Ashwin; Weiss, Mariah; Li, Guohua; Samuel, Helen; Clark-Deener, Sherrie; Jiang, Xi; Lee, Kiho; Yuan, Lijuan

    2016-01-01

    Application of genetically engineered (GE) large animals carrying multi-allelic modifications has been hampered by low efficiency in production and extended gestation period compared to rodents. Here, we rapidly generated RAG2/IL2RG double knockout pigs using direct injection of CRISPR/Cas9 system into developing embryos. RAG2/IL2RG deficient pigs were immunodeficient, characterized by depletion of lymphocytes and either absence of or structurally abnormal immune organs. Pigs were maintained in gnotobiotic facility and evaluated for human norovirus (HuNoV) infection. HuNoV shedding lasted for 16 days in wild type pigs, compared to 27 days (until the end of trials) in RAG2/IL2RG deficient pigs. Additionally, higher HuNoV titers were detected in intestinal tissues and contents and in blood, indicating increased and prolonged HuNoV infection in RAG2/IL2RG deficient pigs and the importance of lymphocytes in HuNoV clearance. These results suggest that GE immunodeficient gnotobiotic pigs serve as a novel model for biomedical research and will facilitate HuNoV studies. PMID:27118081

  10. Increased and prolonged human norovirus infection in RAG2/IL2RG deficient gnotobiotic pigs with severe combined immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Shaohua; Ryu, Junghyun; Wen, Ke; Twitchell, Erica; Bui, Tammy; Ramesh, Ashwin; Weiss, Mariah; Li, Guohua; Samuel, Helen; Clark-Deener, Sherrie; Jiang, Xi; Lee, Kiho; Yuan, Lijuan

    2016-01-01

    Application of genetically engineered (GE) large animals carrying multi-allelic modifications has been hampered by low efficiency in production and extended gestation period compared to rodents. Here, we rapidly generated RAG2/IL2RG double knockout pigs using direct injection of CRISPR/Cas9 system into developing embryos. RAG2/IL2RG deficient pigs were immunodeficient, characterized by depletion of lymphocytes and either absence of or structurally abnormal immune organs. Pigs were maintained in gnotobiotic facility and evaluated for human norovirus (HuNoV) infection. HuNoV shedding lasted for 16 days in wild type pigs, compared to 27 days (until the end of trials) in RAG2/IL2RG deficient pigs. Additionally, higher HuNoV titers were detected in intestinal tissues and contents and in blood, indicating increased and prolonged HuNoV infection in RAG2/IL2RG deficient pigs and the importance of lymphocytes in HuNoV clearance. These results suggest that GE immunodeficient gnotobiotic pigs serve as a novel model for biomedical research and will facilitate HuNoV studies. PMID:27118081

  11. Impaired conditioned taste aversion learning in spinophilin knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Stafstrom-Davis, C A; Ouimet, C C; Feng, J; Allen, P B; Greengard, P; Houpt, T A

    2001-01-01

    Plasticity in dendritic spines may underlie learning and memory. Spinophilin, a protein enriched in dendritic spines, has the properties of a scaffolding protein and is believed to regulate actin cytoskeletal dynamics affecting dendritic spine morphology. It also binds protein phosphatase-1 (PP-1), an enzyme that regulates dendritic spine physiology. In this study, we tested the role of spinophilin in conditioned taste aversion learning (CTA) using transgenic spinophilin knockout mice. CTA is a form of associative learning in which an animal rejects a food that has been paired previously with a toxic effect (e.g., a sucrose solution paired with a malaise-inducing injection of lithium chloride). Acquisition and extinction of CTA was tested in spinophilin knockout and wild-type mice using taste solutions (sucrose or sodium chloride) or flavors (Kool-Aid) paired with moderate or high doses of LiCl (0.15 M, 20 or 40 mL/kg). When sucrose or NaCl solutions were paired with a moderate dose of LiCl, spinophilin knockout mice were unable to learn a CTA. At the higher dose, knockout mice acquired a CTA but extinguished more rapidly than wild-type mice. A more salient flavor stimulus (taste plus odor) revealed similar CTA learning at both doses of LiCl in both knockouts and wild types. Sensory processing in the knockouts appeared normal because knockout mice and wild-type mice expressed identical unconditioned taste preferences in two-bottle tests, and identical lying-on-belly responses to acute LiCl. We conclude that spinophilin is a candidate molecule required for normal CTA learning. PMID:11584074

  12. Cathepsin K knockout alleviates aging-induced cardiac dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Yinan; Robinson, Timothy J; Cao, Yongtao; Shi, Guo-Ping; Ren, Jun; Nair, Sreejayan

    2015-01-01

    Aging is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. It has previously been shown that protein levels of cathepsin K, a lysosomal cysteine protease, are elevated in the failing heart and that genetic ablation of cathepsin K protects against pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy and contractile dysfunction. Here we test the hypothesis that cathepsin K knockout alleviates age-dependent decline in cardiac function. Cardiac geometry, contractile function, intracellular Ca2+ properties, and cardiomyocyte apoptosis were evaluated using echocardiography, fura-2 technique, immunohistochemistry, Western blot and TUNEL staining, respectively. Aged (24-month-old) mice exhibited significant cardiac remodeling (enlarged chamber size, wall thickness, myocyte cross-sectional area, and fibrosis), decreased cardiac contractility, prolonged relengthening along with compromised intracellular Ca2+ release compared to young (6-month-old) mice, which were attenuated in the cathepsin K knockout mice. Cellular markers of senescence, including cardiac lipofuscin, p21 and p16, were lower in the aged-cathepsin K knockout mice compared to their wild-type counterpart. Mechanistically, cathepsin K knockout mice attenuated an age-induced increase in cardiomyocyte apoptosis and nuclear translocation of mitochondrial apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF). In cultured H9c2 cells, doxorubicin stimulated premature senescence and apoptosis. Silencing of cathepsin K blocked the doxorubicin-induced translocation of AIF from the mitochondria to the nuclei. Collectively, these results suggest that cathepsin K knockout attenuates age-related decline in cardiac function via suppressing caspase-dependent and caspase-independent apoptosis. PMID:25692548

  13. Efficient production of multi-modified pigs for xenotransplantation by 'combineering', gene stacking and gene editing.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Konrad; Kraner-Scheiber, Simone; Petersen, Björn; Rieblinger, Beate; Buermann, Anna; Flisikowska, Tatiana; Flisikowski, Krzysztof; Christan, Susanne; Edlinger, Marlene; Baars, Wiebke; Kurome, Mayuko; Zakhartchenko, Valeri; Kessler, Barbara; Plotzki, Elena; Szczerbal, Izabela; Switonski, Marek; Denner, Joachim; Wolf, Eckhard; Schwinzer, Reinhard; Niemann, Heiner; Kind, Alexander; Schnieke, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    Xenotransplantation from pigs could alleviate the shortage of human tissues and organs for transplantation. Means have been identified to overcome hyperacute rejection and acute vascular rejection mechanisms mounted by the recipient. The challenge is to combine multiple genetic modifications to enable normal animal breeding and meet the demand for transplants. We used two methods to colocate xenoprotective transgenes at one locus, sequential targeted transgene placement - 'gene stacking', and cointegration of multiple engineered large vectors - 'combineering', to generate pigs carrying modifications considered necessary to inhibit short to mid-term xenograft rejection. Pigs were generated by serial nuclear transfer and analysed at intermediate stages. Human complement inhibitors CD46, CD55 and CD59 were abundantly expressed in all tissues examined, human HO1 and human A20 were widely expressed. ZFN or CRISPR/Cas9 mediated homozygous GGTA1 and CMAH knockout abolished α-Gal and Neu5Gc epitopes. Cells from multi-transgenic piglets showed complete protection against human complement-mediated lysis, even before GGTA1 knockout. Blockade of endothelial activation reduced TNFα-induced E-selectin expression, IFNγ-induced MHC class-II upregulation and TNFα/cycloheximide caspase induction. Microbial analysis found no PERV-C, PCMV or 13 other infectious agents. These animals are a major advance towards clinical porcine xenotransplantation and demonstrate that livestock engineering has come of age. PMID:27353424

  14. Construction of Deletion-knockout Mutant Fowlpox Virus (FWPV)

    PubMed Central

    Laidlaw, Stephen M.; Skinner, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    The construction of deletion-knockout poxviruses is a useful approach to determining the function of specific virus genes. This protocol is an adaptation of the transient dominant knockout selection protocol published by Falkner and Moss (1990) for use with vaccinia virus. The protocol makes use of the dominant selectable marker Escherichia coli guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (gpt) gene (Mulligan and Berg, 1981), under the control of an early/late poxvirus promoter. The deletion viruses that are produced no longer contain a selectable marker, which may be preferable for the production of vaccines.

  15. Mapping Full-Length Porcine Endogenous Retroviruses in a Large White Pig

    PubMed Central

    Herring, C.; Quinn, G.; Bower, R.; Parsons, N.; Logan, N. A.; Brawley, A.; Elsome, K.; Whittam, A.; Fernandez-Suarez, X. M.; Cunningham, D.; Onions, D.; Langford, G.; Scobie, L.

    2001-01-01

    Xenotransplantation may bridge the widening gap between the shortage of donor organs and the increasing number of patients waiting for transplantation. However, a major safety issue is the potential cross-species transmission of porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERV). This problem could be resolved if it is possible to produce pigs that do not contain replication-competent copies of this virus. In order to determine the feasibility of this, we have determined the number of potentially replication-competent full-length PERV proviruses and obtained data on their integration sites within the porcine genome. We have screened genomic DNA libraries from a Large White pig for potentially intact proviruses. We identified six unique PERV B proviruses that were apparently intact in all three genes, while the majority of isolated proviruses were defective in one or more genes. No intact PERV A proviruses were found in this pig, despite the identification of multiple defective A proviruses. Genotyping of 30 unrelated pigs for these unique proviruses showed a heterogeneous distribution. Two proviruses were uncommon, present in 7 of 30 and 3 of 30 pigs, while three were each present in 24 of 30 pigs, and one was present in 30 of 30 animals examined. Our data indicate that few PERV proviruses in Large White pigs are capable of productive infection and suggest that many could be removed by selective breeding. Further studies are required to determine if all potentially functional proviruses could be removed by breeding or whether gene knockout techniques will be required to remove the residuum. PMID:11711616

  16. Absence of Replication of Porcine Endogenous Retrovirus and Porcine Lymphotropic Herpesvirus Type 1 with Prolonged Pig Cell Microchimerism after Pig-to-Baboon Xenotransplantation▿

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Nicolas C.; Wilkinson, Robert A.; Griesemer, Adam; Cooper, David K. C.; Yamada, Kazuhiko; Sachs, David H.; Fishman, Jay A.

    2008-01-01

    Porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV), porcine cytomegalovirus (PCMV), and porcine lymphotropic herpesvirus (PLHV) are common porcine viruses that may be activated with immunosuppression for xenotransplantation. Studies of viral replication or transmission are possible due to prolonged survival of xenografts in baboon recipients from human decay-accelerating factor transgenic or α-1,3-galactosyltransferase gene knockout miniature swine. Ten baboons underwent xenotransplantation with transgenic pig organs. Graft survival was 32 to 179 days. Recipient serial samples of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and plasma were analyzed for PCMV, PERV, and PLHV-1 nucleic acids and viral replication using quantitative PCR assays. The PBMC contained PERV proviral DNA in 10 animals, PLHV-1 DNA in 6, and PCMV in 2. PERV RNA was not detected in any PBMC or serum samples. Plasma PLHV-1 DNA was detected in one animal. Pig cell microchimerism (pig major histocompatibility complex class I and pig mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit II sequences) was present in all recipients with detectable PERV or PLHV-1 (85.5%). Productive infection of PERV or PLHV-1 could not be demonstrated. The PLHV-1 viral load did not increase in serum over time, despite prolonged graft survival and pig cell microchimerism. There was no association of viral loads with the nature of exogenous immune suppression. In conclusion, PERV provirus and PLHV-1 DNA were detected in baboons following porcine xenotransplantation. Viral detection appeared to be due to persistent pig cell microchimerism. There was no evidence of productive infection in recipient baboons for up to 6 months of xenograft function. PMID:18829759

  17. Exercise enclosures for guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Brown, Cyndi

    2009-11-01

    Exercise and exploration are important to the health and happiness of guinea pigs. Laboratory housing does not always provide the space necessary for such opportunities. This article presents an inexpensive, versatile option for an enclosed exercise area for the laboratory guinea pig. PMID:19847177

  18. One-neutron knockout from 51-55 Sc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwertel, S.; Maierbeck, P.; Krücken, R.; Gernhäuser, R.; Kröll, T.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Aksouh, F.; Aumann, T.; Behr, K.; Benjamim, E. A.; Benlliure, J.; Bildstein, V.; Böhmer, M.; Boretzky, K.; Borge, M. J. G.; Brünle, A.; Bürger, A.; Caamaño, M.; Casarejos, E.; Chatillon, A.; Chulkov, L. V.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Enders, J.; Eppinger, K.; Faestermann, T.; Friese, J.; Fabbietti, L.; Gascón, M.; Geissel, H.; Gerl, J.; Gorska, M.; Hansen, P. G.; Jonson, B.; Kanungo, R.; Kiselev, O.; Kojouharov, I.; Klimkiewicz, A.; Kurtukian, T.; Kurz, N.; Larsson, K.; Le Bleis, T.; Mahata, K.; Maier, L.; Nilsson, T.; Nociforo, C.; Nyman, G.; Pascual-Izarra, C.; Perea, A.; Perez, D.; Prochazka, A.; Rodriguez-Tajes, C.; Rossi, D.; Schaffner, H.; Schrieder, G.; Simon, H.; Sitar, B.; Stanoiu, M.; Sümmerer, K.; Tengblad, O.; Weick, H.; Winkler, S.; Brown, B. A.; Otsuka, T.; Tostevin, J. A.; Rae, W. D. M.

    2012-12-01

    Results are presented from a one-neutron knockout experiment at relativistic energies of ≈ 420 A MeV on 51-55Sc using the GSI Fragment Separator as a two-stage magnetic spectrometer and the MINIBALL array for gamma-ray detection. Inclusive longitudinal momentum distributions and cross-sections were measured enabling the determination of the contributions corresponding to knockout from the ν p_{1/2} , ν p_{3/2} , ( L = 1 and ν f_{7/2} , ν f_{5/2} ( L = 3 neutron orbitals. The observed L = 1 and L = 3 contributions are compared with theoretical cross-sections using eikonal knockout theory and spectroscopic factors from shell model calculations using the GXPF1A interaction. The measured inclusive knockout cross-sections generally follow the trends expected theoretically and given by the spectroscopic strength predicted from the shell model calculations. However, the deduced L = 1 cross-sections are generally 30-40% higher while the L = 3 contributions are about a factor of two smaller than predicted. This points to a promotion of neutrons from the ν f_{7/2} to the ν p_{3/2} orbital indicating a weakening of the N = 28 shell gap in these nuclei. While this is not predicted for the phenomenological GXPF1A interaction such a weakening is predicted by recent calculations using realistic low-momentum interactions V_{low k} obtained by evolving a chiral N3LO nucleon-nucleon potential.

  19. Technology And Pregnant Pigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    One of the interesting things about aerospace spinoff is the way it keeps cropping up in uncommon applications unimaginably remote from the original technology. For example, the pig pregnancy detector. The pig pregnancy detector? City folk may be surprised to learn that there is such a thing-and wonder why. The why is because it is a sow's job to produce piglets and farmers can't afford to keep those who don't; it costs about a half-dollar a day in feed, labor and facilities, and even in small herds that's intolerable. So the barren sow must go. Until recently, the best method of determining pig pregnancy was "eyeballing," daily visual examination over a period of time. The problem with eyeballing is that pregnancy is not evident until well advanced; when there is no pregnancy, the farmer learns too late that he has been feeding a sow that won't give him a litter. Advancing technology provided an answer: the quick, easy-to-use, accurate automatic detector for early evaluation of pregnancy status. Among the most popular of these devices are Scanopreg and Scanoprobe, to whose development NASA technology contributed. Scanopreg is an ultrasonic system which detects pregnancy about 30 days after breeding, long before eyeballing can provide an answer. The companion Scanoprobe is a dual-function unit which not only determines pregnancy but also gives farmers an analysis of a hog's meat-fat ratio, an important factor in breeding. Only a short time on the market, Scanopreg and Scanoprobe have already found wide acceptance among meat producers because they rapidly repay their cost.

  20. A review of current large-scale mouse knockout efforts.

    PubMed

    Guan, Chunmei; Ye, Chao; Yang, Xiaomei; Gao, Jiangang

    2010-02-01

    After the successful completion of the human genome project (HGP), biological research in the postgenome era urgently needs an efficient approach for functional analysis of genes. Utilization of knockout mouse models has been powerful for elucidating the function of genes as well as finding new therapeutic interventions for human diseases. Gene trapping and gene targeting are two independent techniques for making knockout mice from embryonic stem (ES) cells. Gene trapping is high-throughput, random, and sequence-tagged while gene targeting enables the knockout of specific genes. It has been about 20 years since the first gene targeting and gene trapping mice were generated. In recent years, new tools have emerged for both gene targeting and gene trapping, and organizations have been formed to knock out genes in the mouse genome using either of the two methods. The knockout mouse project (KOMP) and the international gene trap consortium (IGTC) were initiated to create convenient resources for scientific research worldwide and knock out all the mouse genes. Organizers of KOMP regard it as important as the HGP. Gene targeting methods have changed from conventional gene targeting to high-throughput conditional gene targeting. The combined advantages of trapping and targeting elements are improving the gene trapping spectrum and gene targeting efficiency. As a newly-developed insertional mutation system, transposons have some advantages over retrovirus in trapping genes. Emergence of the international knockout mouse consortium (IKMP) is the beginning of a global collaboration to systematically knock out all the genes in the mouse genome for functional genomic research. PMID:20095055

  1. Hepatic changes in metabolic gene expression in old ghrelin and ghrelin receptor knockout mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ghrelin knockout (GKO) and ghrelin receptor (growth hormone secretagogue receptor) knockout (GHSRKO) mice exhibit enhanced insulin sensitivity, but the mechanism is unclear. Insulin sensitivity declines with age and is inversely associated with accumulation of lipid in liver, a key glucoregulatory ...

  2. The Pig--Pet, Pork or Sacrifice?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Arthur

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the various roles of the pig in children's books, including E. B. White's CHARLOTTE'S WEB and Nina Bawden's PEPPERMINT PIG. Notes that, although pigs are often used as metaphors for greed, gluttony, and squalor, the portrayal of pigs in children's literature is typically positive. (MM)

  3. [The pig sty].

    PubMed

    Pires, J C

    1993-11-01

    A first-page picture of the journal O Estado de S. Paulo on October, 1993, depicts 3 children playing in the ruins of a school building in Bahia. They are dressed in rags, just like the immense majority of children begotten in recent years. They are disgracefully filthy, with dishevelled hair, in the company of a pig content to share its habitat with such animalistic beings. In the inside pages of the same edition are profuse photos of other pigs dressed in suits and ties. This ostentation mocks the people and mainly the 3 children who do not attend school because the money for it has been embezzled from their pockets. Decent journalists, conscious of these piggish humans, endeavor every day to make this country a decent place to live. In the fight for a dignified and decent country, the journal Planejamento Agora, edited by ABEPF, makes an important statement with its slogan that the fight is true when the spirit is unabated. Planejamento Agora stoically battles to make every animal child alive today a human child who is wanted. The work and team of Planejamento Agora are saluted, and they are urged to continue the struggle on behalf of such children. PMID:12346085

  4. Magnetic system tracts steel bodied pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Kershaw, C.F.

    1982-06-01

    A new magnetic detection method can track and locate all types of pipeline-pigging devices - the standard swabbing, batching, and cleaning pig; online corrosion survey pigs; both dummy and live tools; and internal geometry pigs. The battery-operated detection instrument has six levels of sensitivity for varying pipeline depths, diameters, and wall thicknesses. Its operating principle involves sensing and recording the pig's characteristic magnetic signature.

  5. [From alcohol to liquid ecstasy (GHB)--a survey of old and modern knockout agents. Part 1: historic and classic knockout agents].

    PubMed

    Schütz, Harald; Jansen, Malin; Dettmeyer, Reinhard; Verhoff, Marcel A

    2011-01-01

    Alcohol has been the most important knockout drug in history and literature and continues to play an essential role up to now. Blunt force to the head in the form of a knockout punch is another mechanism leading to a transient loss of consciousness. Diethyl ether and chloroform are among the classical knockout substances. Although they have meanwhile been replaced by modern sedatives and hypnotics, their use is still observed in isolated cases. PMID:22039694

  6. Field experiences with intelligent pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.N.; Duvivier, J.P.; Lefevre, D.E.; Robb, G.A.

    1996-08-01

    Oil and gas production operations use intelligent pigs for corrosion inspection of gathering systems and pipelines worldwide. The authors have been involved with intelligent pig inspections which have been conducted on over 155 different pipelines owned by one international corporation. A variety of intelligent pig vendors have been used with tools ranging from standard first generation magnetic flux leakage (MFL) to high-resolution MFL to standard and custom made ultrasonic (UT) tools. Experiences encountered during these inspections are discussed and resolutions to many of the problems are described.

  7. Pre-transplant antibody screening and anti-CD154 costimulation blockade promote long-term xenograft survival in a pig-to-primate kidney transplant model

    PubMed Central

    Higginbotham, Laura; Mathews, Dave; Breeden, Cynthia A.; Song, Mingqing; Farris, Alton Brad; Larsen, Christian P.; Ford, Mandy L.; Lutz, Andrew J.; Tector, Matthew; Newell, Kenneth A.; Tector, A. Joseph; Adams, Andrew B.

    2016-01-01

    Xenotransplantation has the potential to alleviate the organ shortage that prevents many patients with end-stage renal disease from enjoying the benefits of kidney transplantation. Despite significant advances in other models, pig-to-primate kidney xenotransplantation has met limited success. Preformed anti-pig antibodies are an important component of the xenogeneic immune response. To address this, we screened a cohort of 34 rhesus macaques for anti-pig antibody levels. We then selected animals with both low and high titers of anti-pig antibodies to proceed with kidney transplant from galactose-α1,3-galactose knockout/CD55 transgenic pig donors. All animals received T-cell depletion followed by maintenance therapy with costimulation blockade (either anti-CD154 mAb or belatacept), mycophenolate mofetil, and steroid. The animal with the high titer of anti-pig antibody rejected the kidney xenograft within the first week. Low-titer animals treated with anti-CD154 antibody, but not belatacept exhibited prolonged kidney xenograft survival (>133 and >126 vs. 14 and 21 days, respectively). Long-term surviving animals treated with the anti-CD154-based regimen continue to have normal kidney function and preserved renal architecture without evidence of rejection on biopsies sampled at day 100. This description of the longest reported survival of pig-to-non-human primate kidney xenotransplantation, now >125 days, provides promise for further study and potential clinical translation. PMID:25847130

  8. Fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase deficient pigs are a novel large animal model of metabolic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, Raymond D.; Mao, Shennen A.; Glorioso, Jaime; Lillegard, Joseph B.; Fisher, James E.; Amiot, Bruce; Rinaldo, Piero; Harding, Cary O.; Marler, Ronald; Finegold, Milton J.; Grompe, Markus; Nyberg, Scott L.

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary tyrosinemia type I (HT1) is caused by deficiency in fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH), an enzyme that catalyzes the last step of tyrosine metabolism. The most severe form of the disease presents acutely during infancy, and is characterized by severe liver involvement, most commonly resulting in death if untreated. Generation of FAH+/− pigs was previously accomplished by adeno-associated virus-mediated gene knockout in fibroblasts and somatic cell nuclear transfer. Subsequently, these animals were outbred and crossed to produce the first FAH−/− pigs. FAH-deficiency produced a lethal defect in utero that was corrected by administration of 2-(2-nitro-4-trifluoromethylbenzyol)-1,3 cyclohexanedione (NTBC) throughout pregnancy. Animals on NTBC were phenotypically normal at birth; however, animals were euthanized approximately four weeks after withdrawal of NTBC due to clinical decline and physical examination findings of severe liver injury and encephalopthy consistent with acute liver failure. Biochemical and histological analyses, characterized by diffuse and severe hepatocellular damage, confirmed the diagnosis of severe liver injury. FAH−/− pigs provide the first genetically engineered large animal model of a metabolic liver disorder. Future applications of FAH−/− pigs include discovery research as a large animal model of HT1 and spontaneous acute liver failure, and preclinical testing of efficacy of liver cell therapies, including transplantation of hepatocytes, liver stem cells, and pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocytes. PMID:24879068

  9. Pauli blocking and medium effects in nucleon knockout reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bertulani, C. A.; De Conti, C.

    2010-06-15

    We study medium modifications of the nucleon-nucleon (NN) cross sections and their influence on the nucleon knockout reactions. Using the eikonal approximation, we compare the results obtained with free NN cross sections with those obtained with a purely geometrical treatment of Pauli blocking and with NN obtained with more elaborated Dirac-Bruecker methods. The medium effects are parametrized in terms of the baryon density. We focus on symmetric nuclear matter, although the geometrical Pauli blocking also allows for the treatment of asymmetric nuclear matter. It is shown that medium effects can change the nucleon knockout cross sections and momentum distributions up to 10% in the energy range E{sub lab}=50-300 MeV/nucleon. The effect is more evident in reactions involving halo nuclei.

  10. Knockout driven reactions in complex molecules and their clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatchell, Michael; Zettergren, Henning

    2016-08-01

    Energetic ions lose some of their kinetic energy when interacting with electrons or nuclei in matter. Here, we discuss combined experimental and theoretical studies on such impulse driven reactions in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), fullerenes, and pure or mixed clusters of these molecules. These studies show that the nature of excitation is important for how complex molecular systems respond to ion/atom impact. Rutherford-like nuclear scattering processes may lead to prompt atom knockout and formation of highly reactive fragments, while heating of the molecular electron clouds in general lead to formation of more stable and less reactive fragments. In this topical review, we focus on recent studies of knockout driven reactions, and present new calculations of the angular dependent threshold (displacement) energies for such processes in PAHs. The so-formed fragments may efficiently form covalent bonds with neighboring molecules in clusters. These unique molecular growth processes may be important in astrophysical environments such as low velocity shock waves.

  11. Human Genetic Disorders and Knockout Mice Deficient in Glycosaminoglycan

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are constructed through the stepwise addition of respective monosaccharides by various glycosyltransferases and maturated by epimerases and sulfotransferases. The structural diversity of GAG polysaccharides, including their sulfation patterns and sequential arrangements, is essential for a wide range of biological activities such as cell signaling, cell proliferation, tissue morphogenesis, and interactions with various growth factors. Studies using knockout mice of enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of the GAG side chains of proteoglycans have revealed their physiological functions. Furthermore, mutations in the human genes encoding glycosyltransferases, sulfotransferases, and related enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of GAGs cause a number of genetic disorders including chondrodysplasia, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, and Ehlers-Danlos syndromes. This review focused on the increasing number of glycobiological studies on knockout mice and genetic diseases caused by disturbances in the biosynthetic enzymes for GAGs. PMID:25126564

  12. Creation and Preliminary Characterization of a Leptin Knockout Rat

    PubMed Central

    Vaira, Sergio; Yang, Chang; McCoy, Aaron; Keys, Kelly; Xue, Shurong; Weinstein, Edward J.; Novack, Deborah V.

    2012-01-01

    Leptin, a cytokine-like hormone secreted mainly by adipocytes, regulates various pathways centered on food intake and energy expenditure, including insulin sensitivity, fertility, immune system, and bone metabolism. Here, using zinc finger nuclease technology, we created the first leptin knockout rat. Homozygous leptin null rats are obese with significantly higher serum cholesterol, triglyceride, and insulin levels than wild-type controls. Neither gender produced offspring despite of repeated attempts. The leptin knockout rats also have depressed immune system. In addition, examination by microcomputed tomography of the femurs of the leptin null rats shows a significant increase in both trabecular bone mineral density and bone volume of the femur compared with wild-type littermates. Our model should be useful for many different fields of studies, such as obesity, diabetes, and bone metabolism-related illnesses. PMID:22948215

  13. Targeted gene knockout in chickens mediated by TALENs.

    PubMed

    Park, Tae Sub; Lee, Hong Jo; Kim, Ki Hyun; Kim, Jin-Soo; Han, Jae Yong

    2014-09-01

    Genetically modified animals are used for industrial applications as well as scientific research, and studies on these animals contribute to a better understanding of biological mechanisms. Gene targeting techniques have been developed to edit specific gene loci in the genome, but the conventional strategy of homologous recombination with a gene-targeted vector has low efficiency and many technical complications. Here, we generated specific gene knockout chickens through the use of transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-mediated gene targeting. In this study, we accomplished targeted knockout of the ovalbumin (OV) gene in the chicken primordial germ cells, and OV gene mutant offspring were generated through test-cross analysis. TALENs successfully induced nucleotide deletion mutations of ORF shifts, resulting in loss of chicken OV gene function. Our results demonstrate that the TALEN technique used in the chicken primordial germ cell line is a powerful strategy to create specific genome-edited chickens safely for practical applications. PMID:25139993

  14. Targeted gene knockout in chickens mediated by TALENs

    PubMed Central

    Park, Tae Sub; Lee, Hong Jo; Kim, Ki Hyun; Kim, Jin-Soo; Han, Jae Yong

    2014-01-01

    Genetically modified animals are used for industrial applications as well as scientific research, and studies on these animals contribute to a better understanding of biological mechanisms. Gene targeting techniques have been developed to edit specific gene loci in the genome, but the conventional strategy of homologous recombination with a gene-targeted vector has low efficiency and many technical complications. Here, we generated specific gene knockout chickens through the use of transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-mediated gene targeting. In this study, we accomplished targeted knockout of the ovalbumin (OV) gene in the chicken primordial germ cells, and OV gene mutant offspring were generated through test-cross analysis. TALENs successfully induced nucleotide deletion mutations of ORF shifts, resulting in loss of chicken OV gene function. Our results demonstrate that the TALEN technique used in the chicken primordial germ cell line is a powerful strategy to create specific genome-edited chickens safely for practical applications. PMID:25139993

  15. Designer Nuclease-Mediated Generation of Knockout THP1 Cells.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Tobias; Schmid-Burgk, Jonathan L; Ebert, Thomas S; Gaidt, Moritz M; Hornung, Veit

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments in the field of designer nucleases allow the efficient and specific manipulation of genomic architectures in eukaryotic cell lines. To this end, it has become possible to introduce DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) at user-defined genomic loci. If located in critical coding regions of genes, thus induced DSBs can lead to insertions or deletions (indels) that result in frameshift mutations and thereby the knockout of the target gene. In this chapter, we describe a step-by-step workflow for establishing knockout cell clones of the difficult-to-transfect suspension cell line THP1. The here described protocol encompasses electroporation, cell cloning, and a deep sequencing-based genotyping step that allows the in-parallel analysis of 96 cell clones per gene of interest. Furthermore, we describe the use of the analysis tool OutKnocker that allows rapid identification of cell clones with all-allelic frameshift mutations. PMID:26443227

  16. Generation of Gene Knockout Mice by ES Cell Microinjection

    PubMed Central

    Longenecker, Glenn; Kulkarni, Ashok B

    2009-01-01

    This unit lists and describes protocols used in the production of chimeric mice leading to the generation of gene knockout mice. These protocols include the collection of blastocyst embryos, ES cell injection, and uterine transfer of injected blastocysts. Support protocols in the superovulation of blastocyst donor mice, generation of pseudopregnant recipients, fabrication of glass pipettes, and generation of germline mice are also included. Practical tips and solutions are mentioned to help troubleshoot problems that may occur. PMID:19731226

  17. Pig shipping container test sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, H.E. Jr.

    1995-01-13

    This test plan outlines testing of the integrity of the pig shipping container. It is divided into four sections: (1) drop test requirements; (2) test preparations; (3) perform drop test; and (4) post-test examination.

  18. Solanum malacoxylon toxicity to pigs.

    PubMed

    Rucksan, B E; Wells, G A; Lewis, G

    1978-08-19

    Newly weaned pigs were given Solanum malacoxylon at dose rates of 0.2 and 1.0 g per kg body-weight per week for eight weeks. The Solanum malacoxylon was given either as an aqueous extract (SM) or as an aqueous extract incubated with fresh rumen liquor (SMLR). Tubulonephrosis, dose related in severity, was evident in all treated pigs and focal calcification in kidney and lung occurred in pigs receiving the higher dose rate. There was a marked hypercalcaemia and hypophosphataemia over the trial period; the latter feature was in contrast with the hyperphosphataemia produced in sheep. Incubation of SM with rumen liquor enhanced hypophosphataemia at both dose levels in the pig but its effect on serum calcium was equivocal. PMID:695263

  19. The evolution of thymic lymphomas in p53 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Dudgeon, Crissy; Chan, Chang; Kang, Wenfeng; Sun, Yvonne; Emerson, Ryan; Robins, Harlan; Levine, Arnold J

    2014-12-01

    Germline deletion of the p53 gene in mice gives rise to spontaneous thymic (T-cell) lymphomas. In this study, the p53 knockout mouse was employed as a model to study the mutational evolution of tumorigenesis. The clonality of the T-cell repertoire from p53 knockout and wild-type thymic cells was analyzed at various ages employing TCRβ sequencing. These data demonstrate that p53 knockout thymic lymphomas arose in an oligoclonal fashion, with tumors evolving dominant clones over time. Exon sequencing of tumor DNA revealed that all of the independently derived oligoclonal mouse tumors had a deletion in the Pten gene prior to the formation of the TCRβ rearrangement, produced early in development. This was followed in each independent clone of the thymic lymphoma by the amplification or overexpression of cyclin Ds and Cdk6. Alterations in the expression of Ikaros were common and blocked further development of CD-4/CD-8 T cells. While the frequency of point mutations in the genome of these lymphomas was one per megabase, there were a tremendous number of copy number variations producing the tumors' driver mutations. The initial inherited loss of p53 functions appeared to delineate an order of genetic alterations selected for during the evolution of these thymic lymphomas. PMID:25452272

  20. Knock-out models reveal new aquaporin functions.

    PubMed

    Verkman, Alan S

    2009-01-01

    Knockout mice have been informative in the discovery of unexpected biological functions of aquaporins. Knockout mice have confirmed the predicted roles of aquaporins in transepithelial fluid transport, as in the urinary concentrating mechanism and glandular fluid secretion. A less obvious, though predictable role of aquaporins is in tissue swelling under stress, as in the brain in stroke, tumor and infection. Phenotype analysis of aquaporin knockout mice has revealed several unexpected cellular roles of aquaporins whose mechanisms are being elucidated. Aquaporins facilitate cell migration, as seen in aquaporin-dependent tumor angiogenesis and tumor metastasis, by a mechanism that may involve facilitated water transport in lamellipodia of migrating cells. The ' aquaglyceroporins', aquaporins that transport both glycerol and water, regulate glycerol content in epidermis, fat and other tissues, and lead to a multiplicity of interesting consequences of gene disruption including dry skin, resistance to skin carcinogenesis, impaired cell proliferation and altered fat metabolism. An even more surprising role of a mammalian aquaporin is in neural signal transduction in the central nervous system. The many roles of aquaporins might be exploited for clinical benefit by modulation of aquaporin expression/function - as diuretics, and in the treatment of brain swelling, glaucoma, epilepsy, obesity and cancer. PMID:19096787

  1. Elodontoma in Two Guinea Pigs.

    PubMed

    Capello, Vittorio; Lennox, Angela; Ghisleni, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Elodontoma was diagnosed in two pet guinea pigs, one involving a maxillary premolar tooth and the other affecting a mandibular incisor tooth. Diagnostic imaging, including radiographs, computed tomography, and oral endoscopy was performed in order to quantify dental disease. Diagnostic imaging was also used to guide treatment of acquired dental disease, which included intraoral restoration of normal occlusal plane and tooth extraction using an extraoral approach. These are the first histologically confirmed cases of elodontoma in guinea pigs. PMID:26415388

  2. Solanum malacoxylon poisoning in pigs.

    PubMed

    Done, S H; Tokarina, C H; Dämmrich, K; Döbereiner, J

    1976-03-01

    Solanum malacoxylon was given orally to four pigs. The animals were examined clinically and subjected to post mortem examination. Macroscopic lesions were not seen with the exception of a small calcified plaque in the endocardium of one animal. Microscopic examinations revealed slight calcification of elastic fibres in the soft tissues. The pathological changes in the bones were extensive and are described in detail. The pigs showed minimal lesions at dose levels which cause considerable systemic calcification in cattle and sheep. PMID:1265362

  3. Efficient production of multi-modified pigs for xenotransplantation by ‘combineering’, gene stacking and gene editing

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Konrad; Kraner-Scheiber, Simone; Petersen, Björn; Rieblinger, Beate; Buermann, Anna; Flisikowska, Tatiana; Flisikowski, Krzysztof; Christan, Susanne; Edlinger, Marlene; Baars, Wiebke; Kurome, Mayuko; Zakhartchenko, Valeri; Kessler, Barbara; Plotzki, Elena; Szczerbal, Izabela; Switonski, Marek; Denner, Joachim; Wolf, Eckhard; Schwinzer, Reinhard; Niemann, Heiner; Kind, Alexander; Schnieke, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    Xenotransplantation from pigs could alleviate the shortage of human tissues and organs for transplantation. Means have been identified to overcome hyperacute rejection and acute vascular rejection mechanisms mounted by the recipient. The challenge is to combine multiple genetic modifications to enable normal animal breeding and meet the demand for transplants. We used two methods to colocate xenoprotective transgenes at one locus, sequential targeted transgene placement - ‘gene stacking’, and cointegration of multiple engineered large vectors - ‘combineering’, to generate pigs carrying modifications considered necessary to inhibit short to mid-term xenograft rejection. Pigs were generated by serial nuclear transfer and analysed at intermediate stages. Human complement inhibitors CD46, CD55 and CD59 were abundantly expressed in all tissues examined, human HO1 and human A20 were widely expressed. ZFN or CRISPR/Cas9 mediated homozygous GGTA1 and CMAH knockout abolished α-Gal and Neu5Gc epitopes. Cells from multi-transgenic piglets showed complete protection against human complement-mediated lysis, even before GGTA1 knockout. Blockade of endothelial activation reduced TNFα-induced E-selectin expression, IFNγ-induced MHC class-II upregulation and TNFα/cycloheximide caspase induction. Microbial analysis found no PERV-C, PCMV or 13 other infectious agents. These animals are a major advance towards clinical porcine xenotransplantation and demonstrate that livestock engineering has come of age. PMID:27353424

  4. Pre-Equilibrium Cluster Emission with Pickup and Knockout

    SciTech Connect

    Betak, E.

    2005-05-24

    We present a generalization of the Iwamoto-Harada-Bisplinghoff pre-equilibrium model of light cluster formation and emission, which is enhanced by allowing for possible admixtures of knockout for strongly coupled ejectiles, like {alpha}'s. The model is able to attain the Weisskopf-Ewing formula for compound-nucleus decay at long-time limit; it keeps the philosophy of pre-equilibrium decay during the equilibration stage and it describes the initial phase of a reaction as direct process(es) expressed using the language of the exciton model.

  5. Characterization of pig colonic mucins.

    PubMed Central

    Fogg, F J; Hutton, D A; Jumel, K; Pearson, J P; Harding, S E; Allen, A

    1996-01-01

    Pig colonic mucins isolated from the adherent mucus gel in the presence of proteinase inhibitors were solubilized by homogenization and the component mucins fractionated by CsC1 density-gradient centrifugation. Polymeric and reduced pig colonic mucin were both largely excluded on Sepharose CL-2B, papain-digested colonic mucin was included. The M(r) values of polymeric, reduced and digested mucins were 5.5 x 10(6), 2.1 x 10(6) and 0.6 x 10(6) respectively. This suggests that pig colonic mucin is comprised of 2-3 subunits, each subunit containing 3-4 glycosylated regions. The intrinsic viscosities of polymeric, reduced and digested mucin were 240 ml.g-1, 100 ml.g-1 and 20 ml.g-1 respectively. Polymeric pig colonic mucin comprised 16% protein per mg of glycoprotein and was rich in serine, threonine and proline (43% of total amino acids). There were approx. 150 disulphide bridges and 53 free thiol groups per mucin polymer. A seventh of the protein content was lost on reduction. This protein was particularly rich in proline and the hydrophobic amino acids. Papain-digested pig colonic mucin contained 11% protein per mg of glycoprotein and was rich in serine, threonine, glutamate and aspartate. All types of amino acids with the exception of aspartate were lost on digestion. The amino acid analysis of the proteolytically digested regions of pig colonic mucin are markedly different to the tandem repeat regions of the human mucin genes shown to be expressed in the colon. PMID:8670173

  6. Studying TGF-beta superfamily signaling by knockouts and knockins.

    PubMed

    Chang, H; Lau, A L; Matzuk, M M

    2001-06-30

    The transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) superfamily has profound effects on many aspects of animal development. In the last decade, our laboratory and others have performed in vivo functional studies on multiple components of the TGF-beta superfamily signal transduction pathway, including upstream ligands, transmembrane receptors, receptor-associated proteins and downstream Smad proteins. We have taken gene knockout approaches to generate null alleles of the genes of interest, as well as a gene knockin approach to replace the mature region of one TGF-beta superfamily ligand with another. We found that activin betaB, expressed in the spatiotemporal pattern of activin betaA, can function as a hypomorphic allele of activin betaA and rescue the craniofacial defects and neonatal lethal phenotype of activin betaA-deficient mice. With the knockout approach, we have shown that the expression pattern of a component in the TGF-beta superfamily signal transduction cascade does not necessarily predict its in vivo function. Two liver-specific activins, activin betaC and activin betaE are dispensable for liver development, regeneration and function, whereas ubiquitously expressed Smad5 has specific roles in the development of multiple embryonic and extraembryonic tissues. PMID:11451570

  7. Hair-Cell Mechanotransduction Persists in TRP Channel Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Niksch, Paul D.; Webber, Roxanna M.; Garcia-Gonzalez, Miguel; Watnick, Terry; Zhou, Jing; Vollrath, Melissa A.; Corey, David P.

    2016-01-01

    Members of the TRP superfamily of ion channels mediate mechanosensation in some organisms, and have been suggested as candidates for the mechanotransduction channel in vertebrate hair cells. Some TRP channels can be ruled out based on lack of an inner ear phenotype in knockout animals or pore properties not similar to the hair-cell channel. Such studies have excluded Trpv4, Trpa1, Trpml3, Trpm1, Trpm3, Trpc1, Trpc3, Trpc5, and Trpc6. However, others remain reasonable candidates. We used data from an RNA-seq analysis of gene expression in hair cells as well as data on TRP channel conductance to narrow the candidate group. We then characterized mice lacking functional Trpm2, Pkd2, Pkd2l1, Pkd2l2 and Pkd1l3, using scanning electron microscopy, auditory brainstem response, permeant dye accumulation, and single-cell electrophysiology. In all of these TRP-deficient mice, and in double and triple knockouts, mechanotransduction persisted. Together with published studies, these results argue against the participation of any of the 33 mouse TRP channels in hair cell transduction. PMID:27196058

  8. Hair-Cell Mechanotransduction Persists in TRP Channel Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xudong; Indzhykulian, Artur A; Niksch, Paul D; Webber, Roxanna M; Garcia-Gonzalez, Miguel; Watnick, Terry; Zhou, Jing; Vollrath, Melissa A; Corey, David P

    2016-01-01

    Members of the TRP superfamily of ion channels mediate mechanosensation in some organisms, and have been suggested as candidates for the mechanotransduction channel in vertebrate hair cells. Some TRP channels can be ruled out based on lack of an inner ear phenotype in knockout animals or pore properties not similar to the hair-cell channel. Such studies have excluded Trpv4, Trpa1, Trpml3, Trpm1, Trpm3, Trpc1, Trpc3, Trpc5, and Trpc6. However, others remain reasonable candidates. We used data from an RNA-seq analysis of gene expression in hair cells as well as data on TRP channel conductance to narrow the candidate group. We then characterized mice lacking functional Trpm2, Pkd2, Pkd2l1, Pkd2l2 and Pkd1l3, using scanning electron microscopy, auditory brainstem response, permeant dye accumulation, and single-cell electrophysiology. In all of these TRP-deficient mice, and in double and triple knockouts, mechanotransduction persisted. Together with published studies, these results argue against the participation of any of the 33 mouse TRP channels in hair cell transduction. PMID:27196058

  9. Screening methods to identify TALEN-mediated knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Yoshiko; Yamamoto, Takashi; Suzuki, Ken-Ichi; Araki, Kimi; Takeda, Naoki; Ohmuraya, Masaki; Sakuma, Tetsushi

    2014-01-01

    Genome editing with site-specific nucleases, such as zinc-finger nucleases or transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and RNA-guided nucleases, such as the CRISPR/Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated) system, is becoming the new standard for targeted genome modification in various organisms. Application of these techniques to the manufacture of knockout mice would be greatly aided by simple and easy methods for genotyping of mutant and wild-type pups among litters. However, there are no detailed or comparative reports concerning the identification of mutant mice generated using genome editing technologies. Here, we genotyped TALEN-derived enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) knockout mice using a combination of approaches, including fluorescence observation, heteroduplex mobility assay, restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and DNA sequencing. The detection sensitivities for TALEN-induced mutations differed among these methods, and we therefore concluded that combinatorial testing is necessary for the screening and determination of mutant genotypes. Since the analytical methods tested can be carried out without specialized equipment, costly reagents and/or sophisticated protocols, our report should be of interest to a broad range of researchers who are considering the application of genome editing technologies in various organisms. PMID:24521866

  10. BDNF restricted knockout mice as an animal model for aggression

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Wataru; Chehab, Mahmoud; Thakur, Siddarth; Li, Jiayang; Morozov, Alexei

    2011-01-01

    Mice with global deletion of one BDNF allele, or with forebrain-restricted deletion of both alleles show elevated aggression, but this phenotype is accompanied by other behavioral changes, including increases in anxiety and deficits in cognition. Here, we performed behavioral characterization of conditional BDNF knockout mice generated using a Cre recombinase driver line, KA1-Cre, which expresses Cre in few areas of brain: highly at hippocampal area CA3, moderately in dentate gyrus, cerebellum and facial nerve nucleus. The mutant animals exhibited elevated conspecific aggression and social dominance, but did not show changes in anxiety-like behaviors assessed using the elevated plus maze and open field test. There were no changes in depression like behaviors tested in the forced swim test, but small increase in immobility in the tail suspension test. In cognitive tasks, mutants showed normal social recognition and normal spatial and fear memory, but exhibited a deficit in object recognition. Thus, this knockout can serve as a robust model of BDNF-dependent aggression and object recognition deficiency. PMID:21255268

  11. Creation and preliminary characterization of a Tp53 knockout rat

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Aaron; Besch-Williford, Cynthia L.; Franklin, Craig L.; Weinstein, Edward J.; Cui, Xiaoxia

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The tumor suppressor TP53 plays a crucial role in cancer biology, and the TP53 gene is the most mutated gene in human cancer. Trp53 knockout mouse models have been widely used in cancer etiology studies and in search for a cure of cancer with some limitations that other model organisms might help overcome. Via pronuclear microinjection of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), we created a Tp53 knockout rat that contains an 11-bp deletion in exon 3, resulting in a frameshift and premature terminations in the open reading frame. In cohorts of 25 homozygous (Tp53Δ11/Δ11), 37 heterozygous (Tp53Δ11/+) and 30 wild-type rats, the Tp53Δ11/Δ11 rats lived an average of 126 days before death or removal from study because of clinical signs of abnormality or formation of tumors. Half of Tp53Δ11/+ were removed from study by 1 year of age because of tumor formation. Both Tp53Δ11/+ and Tp53Δ11/Δ11 rats developed a wide spectrum of tumors, most commonly sarcomas. Interestingly, there was a strikingly high incidence of brain lesions, especially in Tp53Δ11/Δ11 animals. We believe that this mutant rat line will be useful in studying cancer types rarely observed in mice and in carcinogenicity assays for drug development. PMID:22917926

  12. Screening Methods to Identify TALEN-Mediated Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Yoshiko; Yamamoto, Takashi; Suzuki, Ken-Ichi; Araki, Kimi; Takeda, Naoki; Ohmuraya, Masaki; Sakuma, Tetsushi

    2014-01-01

    Genome editing with site-specific nucleases, such as zinc-finger nucleases or transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and RNA-guided nucleases, such as the CRISPR/Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated) system, is becoming the new standard for targeted genome modification in various organisms. Application of these techniques to the manufacture of knockout mice would be greatly aided by simple and easy methods for genotyping of mutant and wild-type pups among litters. However, there are no detailed or comparative reports concerning the identification of mutant mice generated using genome editing technologies. Here, we genotyped TALEN-derived enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) knockout mice using a combination of approaches, including fluorescence observation, heteroduplex mobility assay, restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and DNA sequencing. The detection sensitivities for TALEN-induced mutations differed among these methods, and we therefore concluded that combinatorial testing is necessary for the screening and determination of mutant genotypes. Since the analytical methods tested can be carried out without specialized equipment, costly reagents and/or sophisticated protocols, our report should be of interest to a broad range of researchers who are considering the application of genome editing technologies in various organisms. PMID:24521866

  13. Norepinephrine Transporter Heterozygous Knockout Mice Exhibit Altered Transport and Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Fentress, HM; Klar, R; Krueger, JK; Sabb, T; Redmon, SN; Wallace, NM; Shirey-Rice, JK; Hahn, MK

    2013-01-01

    The norepinephrine (NE) transporter (NET) regulates synaptic NE availability for noradrenergic signaling in the brain and sympathetic nervous system. Although genetic variation leading to a loss of NET expression has been implicated in psychiatric and cardiovascular disorders, complete NET deficiency has not been found in people, limiting the utility of NET knockout mice as a model for genetically-driven NET dysfunction. Here, we investigate NET expression in NET heterozygous knockout male mice (NET+/−), demonstrating that they display an ~50% reduction in NET protein levels. Surprisingly, these mice display no significant deficit in NET activity, assessed in hippocampal and cortical synaptosomes. We found that this compensation in NET activity was due to enhanced activity of surface-resident transporters, as opposed to surface recruitment of NET protein or compensation through other transport mechanisms, including serotonin, dopamine or organic cation transporters. We hypothesize that loss of NET protein in the NET+/− mouse establishes an activated state of existing, surface NET proteins. NET+/− mice exhibit increased anxiety in the open field and light-dark box and display deficits in reversal learning in the Morris Water Maze. These data suggest recovery of near basal activity in NET+/− mice appears to be insufficient to limit anxiety responses or support cognitive performance that might involve noradrenergic neurotransmission. The NET+/− mice represent a unique model to study the loss and resultant compensatory changes in NET that may be relevant to behavior and physiology in human NET deficiency disorders. PMID:24102798

  14. Norepinephrine transporter heterozygous knockout mice exhibit altered transport and behavior.

    PubMed

    Fentress, H M; Klar, R; Krueger, J J; Sabb, T; Redmon, S N; Wallace, N M; Shirey-Rice, J K; Hahn, M K

    2013-11-01

    The norepinephrine (NE) transporter (NET) regulates synaptic NE availability for noradrenergic signaling in the brain and sympathetic nervous system. Although genetic variation leading to a loss of NET expression has been implicated in psychiatric and cardiovascular disorders, complete NET deficiency has not been found in people, limiting the utility of NET knockout mice as a model for genetically driven NET dysfunction. Here, we investigate NET expression in NET heterozygous knockout male mice (NET(+/-) ), demonstrating that they display an approximately 50% reduction in NET protein levels. Surprisingly, these mice display no significant deficit in NET activity assessed in hippocampal and cortical synaptosomes. We found that this compensation in NET activity was due to enhanced activity of surface-resident transporters, as opposed to surface recruitment of NET protein or compensation through other transport mechanisms, including serotonin, dopamine or organic cation transporters. We hypothesize that loss of NET protein in the NET(+/-) mouse establishes an activated state of existing surface NET proteins. The NET(+/-) mice exhibit increased anxiety in the open field and light-dark box and display deficits in reversal learning in the Morris water maze. These data suggest that recovery of near basal activity in NET(+/-) mice appears to be insufficient to limit anxiety responses or support cognitive performance that might involve noradrenergic neurotransmission. The NET(+/-) mice represent a unique model to study the loss and resultant compensatory changes in NET that may be relevant to behavior and physiology in human NET deficiency disorders. PMID:24102798

  15. Study of 19C by One-Neutron Knockout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jongwon; Kim, Sunji; Satou, Yoshiteru; Orr, Nigel A.; Nakamura, Takashi; Kondo, Yosuke; Gibelin, Julien; Achouri, N. Lynda; Aumann, Thomas; Baba, Hidetada; Delaunay, Franck; Doornenbal, Pieter; Fukuda, Naoki; Inabe, Naohito; Isobe, Tadaaki; Kameda, Daisuke; Kanno, Daiki; Kobayashi, Nobuyuki; Kobayashi, Toshio; Kubo, Toshiyuki; Leblond, Sylvain; Lee, Jenny; Marqués, F. Miguel; Minakata, Ryogo; Motobayashi, Tohru; Murai, Daichi; Murakami, Tetsuya; Muto, Kotomi; Nakashima, Tomohiro; Nakatsuka, Noritsugu; Navin, Alahari; Nishi, Seijiro; Ogoshi, Shun; Otsu, Hideaki; Sato, Hiromi; Shimizu, Yohei; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Kento; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Tanaka, Ryuki; Togano, Yasuhiro; Tuff, Adam G.; Vandebrouck, Marine; Yoneda, Ken-ichiro

    2016-03-01

    The spectroscopic structure of 19C, a prominent one-neutron halo nucleus, has been studied with a 20C secondary beam at 290 MeV/nucleon and a carbon target. Neutron-unbound states populated by the one-neutron knockout reaction were investigated by means of the invariant mass method. The preliminary relative energy spectrum and parallel momentum distribution of the knockout residue, 19C*, were reconstructed from the measured four momenta of the 18C fragment, neutron, and beam. Three resonances were observed in the spectrum, which correspond to the states at Ex = 0.62(9), 1.42(10), and 2.89(10) MeV. The parallel momentum distributions for the 0.62-MeV and 2.89-MeV states suggest spin-parity assignments of 5/2+ and 1/2-, respectively. The 1.42-MeV state is in line with the reported 5/22+ state.

  16. Agronomic recycling of pig slurry and pig sewage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez Garrido, Melisa; Sánchez García, Pablo; Faz Cano, Ángel; Büyükkılıç Yanardag, Asuman; Yanardag, Ibrahim; Kabas, Sebla; Ángeles Múñoz García, María; María Rosales Aranda, Rosa; Segura Ruíz, Juan Carlos

    2013-04-01

    Recycling pig slurry as organic fertilizer is a convenient and suitable way of waste elimination due to its low cost and high agronomic benefits. The objectives of this two year study are focused on improving and recycling pig slurry appropriately, and monitoring the soil-plant system at the same time. The evaluation of the agronomic effectiveness of different types of pig slurry (raw, solid, treated and depurated) in different doses (170 kg N ha-1 (legislated dose), 340 and 510 kg N ha-1) is innovative because the fertilizer value of each amendment can be balanced. Furthermore environmental issues such us volatilisation, leaching and salinisation have been considered for each treatment in order to set the viability of the study and to justify the treatments applied. Electrical conductivity, Kjeldhal nitrogen, sodium and potassium are the physico-chemical parameters most influenced in soils treated with doses 340 and 510 kg N ha-1. Additionally plant samples, especially halophyte, have shown the highest major and minor nutrients contents. Finally, pig slurry application in legislated doses could be considered a useful environmental practice; however, the development of the crop will be very influenced by the type of dose and amendment selected.

  17. Phenotypic and genetic characterization of a novel phenotype in pigs characterized by juvenile hairlessness and age dependent emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Bruun, Camilla S; Jørgensen, Claus B; Bay, Lene; Cirera, Susanna; Jensen, Henrik E; Leifsson, Páll S; Nielsen, Jens; Christensen, Knud; Fredholm, Merete

    2008-01-01

    Background A pig phenotype characterized by juvenile hairlessness, thin skin and age dependent lung emphysema has been discovered in a Danish pig herd. The trait shows autosomal co-dominant inheritance with all three genotypes distinguishable. Since the phenotype shows resemblance to the integrin β6 -/- knockout phenotype seen in mice, the two genes encoding the two subunits of integrin αvβ6, i.e. ITGB6 and ITGAV, were considered candidate genes for this trait. Results The mutated pig phenotype is characterized by hairlessness until puberty, thin skin with few hair follicles and absence of musculi arrectores pili, and at puberty or later localized areas of emphysema are seen in the lungs. Comparative mapping predicted that the porcine ITGB6 andITGAV orthologs map to SSC15. In an experimental family (n = 113), showing segregation of the trait, the candidate region was confirmed by linkage analysis with four microsatellite markers. Mapping of the porcine ITGB6 and ITGAV in the IMpRH radiation hybrid panel confirmed the comparative mapping information. Sequencing of the ITGB6 and ITGAV coding sequences from affected and normal pigs revealed no evidence of a causative mutation, but alternative splicing of the ITGB6 pre-mRNA was detected. For both ITGB6 and ITGAV quantitative PCR revealed no significant difference in the expression levels in normal and affected animals. In a western blot, ITGB6 was detected in lung protein samples of all three genotypes. This result was supported by flow cytometric analyses which showed comparable reactions of kidney cells from affected and normal pigs with an integrin αvβ6 monoclonal antibody. Also, immunohistochemical staining of lung tissue with an integrin β6 antibody showed immunoreaction in both normal and affected pigs. Conclusion A phenotype resembling the integrin β6 -/- knockout phenotype seen in mice has been characterized in the pig. The candidate region on SSC15 has been confirmed by linkage analysis but molecular

  18. Aromatase knockout mice reveal an impact of estrogen on drug-induced alternation of murine electrocardiography parameters.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Junko; Sasano, Tetsuo; Kodama, Masami; Li, Min; Ebana, Yusuke; Harada, Nobuhiro; Honda, Shin-ichiro; Nakaya, Haruaki; Furukawa, Tetsushi

    2015-06-01

    Our in vitro characterization showed that physiological concentrations of estrogen partially suppressed the I(Kr) channel current in guinea pig ventricular myocytes and the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) channel currents in CHO-K1 cells regardless of estrogen receptor signaling and revealed that the partially suppressed hERG currents enhanced the sensitivity to the hERG blocker E-4031. To obtain in vivo proof-of-concept data to support the effects of estrogen on cardiac electrophysiology, we here employed an aromatase knockout mouse as an in vivo estrogen-null model and compared the acute effects of E-4031 on cardiac electrophysiological parameters with those in wild-type mice (C57/BL6J) by recording surface electrocardiogram (ECG). The ablation of circulating estrogens blunted the effects of E-4031 on heart rate and QT interval in mice under a denervation condition. Our result provides in vivo proof of principle and demonstrates that endogenous estrogens increase the sensitivity of E-4031 to cardiac electrophysiology. PMID:25972195

  19. Oxfendazole flukicidal activity in pigs.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Pedro; Terrones, Susana; Cabrera, María; Hoban, Cristian; Ceballos, Laura; Moreno, Laura; Canton, Candela; Donadeu, Meritxell; Lanusse, Carlos; Alvarez, Luis

    2014-08-01

    Although oxfendazole (OFZ) is a well know broad-spectrum benzimidazole anthelmintic, the assessment of its potential trematodicidal activity remains unexplored. OFZ administration at single high doses has been recommended to control Taenia solium cysticercus in pigs. The current study investigated the flukicidal activity obtained after a single high (30mg/kg) oral dose of OFZ in pigs harbouring a natural Fasciola hepatica infection. Sixteen (16) local ecotype pigs were randomly allocated into two (2) experimental groups of 8 animals each named as follow: Untreated control and OFZ treated, in which animals received OFZ (Synanthic(®), Merial Ltd., 9.06% suspension) orally at 30mg/kg. At seven (7) days post-treatment, all the animals were sacrificed and direct adult liver fluke counts were performed following the WAAVP guidelines. None of the animals involved in this experiment showed any adverse event during the study. OFZ treatment as a single 30mg/kg oral dose showed a 100% efficacy against F. hepatica. In conclusion, the trial described here demonstrated an excellent OFZ activity against F. hepatica in naturally infected pigs, after its administration at a single oral dose of 30mg/kg. PMID:24713198

  20. Toxoplasmosis in pigs-The last 20 years

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pigs are important to the economy of many countries because they are a source of food for humans. Infected pig meat is a source of Toxoplasma gondii infection for humans and animals in many countries. This parasite also causes mortality in pigs, especially neonatal pigs. Most pigs acquire T. gondii ...

  1. Knockout of Foxp2 disrupts vocal development in mice.

    PubMed

    Castellucci, Gregg A; McGinley, Matthew J; McCormick, David A

    2016-01-01

    The FOXP2 gene is important for the development of proper speech motor control in humans. However, the role of the gene in general vocal behavior in other mammals, including mice, is unclear. Here, we track the vocal development of Foxp2 heterozygous knockout (Foxp2+/-) mice and their wildtype (WT) littermates from juvenile to adult ages, and observe severe abnormalities in the courtship song of Foxp2+/- mice. In comparison to their WT littermates, Foxp2+/- mice vocalized less, produced shorter syllable sequences, and possessed an abnormal syllable inventory. In addition, Foxp2+/- song also exhibited irregular rhythmic structure, and its development did not follow the consistent trajectories observed in WT vocalizations. These results demonstrate that the Foxp2 gene is critical for normal vocal behavior in juvenile and adult mice, and that Foxp2 mutant mice may provide a tractable model system for the study of the gene's role in general vocal motor control. PMID:26980647

  2. Drop tests of the Three Mile Island knockout canister

    SciTech Connect

    Box, W D; Aaron, W S; Shappert, L B; Childress, P C; Quinn, G J; Smith, J V

    1987-01-01

    A type of Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) defueling canister, called a ''knockout'' canister, was subjected to a series of drop tests at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Drop Test Facility. These tests confirmed the structural integrity of internal fixed neutron poisons in support of a request for NRC licensing of this type of canister for the shipment of TMI-2 reactor fuel debris to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for the Core Examination R and D Program. This report presents the data generated and the results obtained from a series of four drop tests that included two drops with the test assembly in the vertical position and two drops with the assembly in the horizontal position.

  3. Neuregulin 3 Knockout Mice Exhibit Behaviors Consistent with Psychotic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Lindsay N; Shevelkin, Alexey; Zeledon, Mariela; Steel, Gary; Chen, Pei-Lung; Obie, Cassandra; Pulver, Ann; Avramopoulos, Dimitrios; Valle, David; Sawa, Akira; Pletnikov, Mikhail V

    2016-07-01

    Neuregulin 3 (NRG3) is a paralog of NRG1. Genetic studies in schizophrenia demonstrate that risk variants in NRG3 are associated with cognitive and psychotic symptom severity, and several intronic single nucleotide polymorphisms in NRG3 are associated with delusions in patients with schizophrenia. In order to gain insights into the biological function of the gene, we generated a novel Nrg3 knockout (KO) mouse model and tested for neurobehavioral phenotypes relevant to psychotic disorders. KO mice displayed novelty-induced hyperactivity, impaired prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response, and deficient fear conditioning. No gross cytoarchitectonic or layer abnormalities were noted in the brain of KO mice. Our findings suggest that deletion of the Nrg3 gene leads to alterations consistent with aspects of schizophrenia. We propose that KO mice will provide a valuable animal model to determine the role of the NRG3 in the molecular pathogenesis of schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders. PMID:27606322

  4. Progranulin Knockout Accelerates Intervertebral Disc Degeneration in Aging Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yun-peng; Tian, Qing-yun; Liu, Ben; Cuellar, Jason; Richbourgh, Brendon; Jia, Tang-hong; Liu, Chuan-ju

    2015-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is a common degenerative disease, yet much is unknown about the mechanisms during its pathogenesis. Herein we investigated whether progranulin (PGRN), a chondroprotective growth factor, is associated with IVD degeneration. PGRN was detectable in both human and murine IVD. The levels of PGRN were upregulated in murine IVD tissue during aging process. Loss of PGRN resulted in an early onset of degenerative changes in the IVD tissue and altered expressions of the degeneration-associated molecules in the mouse IVD tissue. Moreover, PGRN knockout mice exhibited accelerated IVD matrix degeneration, abnormal bone formation and exaggerated bone resorption in vertebra with aging. The acceleration of IVD degeneration observed in PGRN null mice was probably due to the enhanced activation of NF-κB signaling and β-catenin signaling. Taken together, PGRN may play a critical role in homeostasis of IVD, and may serve as a potential molecular target for prevention and treatment of disc degenerative diseases. PMID:25777988

  5. Nonsudden limits of heavy-ion induced knockout reactions.

    PubMed

    Flavigny, F; Obertelli, A; Bonaccorso, A; Grinyer, G F; Louchart, C; Nalpas, L; Signoracci, A

    2012-06-22

    We report on the single neutron and proton removal reactions from unstable nuclei with large asymmetry ΔS = S(n)-S(p) at incident energies below 80 MeV/nucleon. Strong nonsudden effects are observed in the case of deeply-bound-nucleon removal. The corresponding parallel momentum distributions exhibit an abrupt cutoff at high momentum that corresponds to an energy threshold occurring when the incident energy per particle is of comparable magnitude to the nucleon separation energy. A large low-momentum tail is related to both dissipative processes and the dynamics of the nucleon removal process. New limits for the applicability of the sudden and eikonal approximations in nucleon knockout are given. PMID:23004591

  6. Spectroscopy of 17C via one-neutron knockout reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sunji; Hwang, Jongwon; Satou, Yoshiteru; Orr, Nigel A.; Nakamura, Takashi; Kondo, Yosuke; Gibelin, Julien; Achouri, N. Lynda; Aumann, Thomas; Baba, Hidetada; Delaunay, Franck; Doornenbal, Pieter; Fukuda, Naoki; Inabe, Naohito; Isobe, Tadaaki; Kameda, Daisuke; Kanno, Daiki; Kobayashi, Nobuyuki; Kobayashi, Toshio; Kubo, Toshiyuki; Leblond, Sylvain; Lee, Jenny; Marqués, F. Miguel; Minakata, Ryogo; Motobayashi, Tohru; Murai, Daichi; Murakami, Tetsuya; Muto, Kotomi; Nakashima, Tomohiro; Nakatsuka, Noritsugu; Navin, Alahari; Nishi, Seijiro; Ogoshi, Shun; Otsu, Hideaki; Sato, Hiromi; Shimizu, Yohei; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Kento; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Tanaka, Ryuki; Togano, Yasuhiro; Tuff, Adam G.; Vandebrouck, Marine; Yoneda, Ken-ichiro

    2016-03-01

    A spectroscopic study of 17C was performed via the one-neutron knockout reaction of 18C on a carbon target at RIKEN-RIBF. Three unbound states at excitation energies of 2.66(2), 3.16(5), and 3.97(3) MeV (preliminary) were observed. The energies are compared with shell-model calculations and existing measurements to deduce their spin-parities. From the comparison, the states at 2.66(2) and 3.97(3) MeV are suggested to be 1/2- and 3/2-, respectively. From its decay property, the state at 3.16(5) MeV is indicated to be 9/2+.

  7. Delayed liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy in adiponectin knockout mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ezaki, Hisao; Yoshida, Yuichi; Saji, Yukiko; Takemura, Takayo; Fukushima, Juichi; Matsumoto, Hitoshi; Kamada, Yoshihiro; Wada, Akira; Igura, Takumi; Kihara, Shinji; Funahashi, Tohru; Shimomura, Iichiro; Tamura, Shinji; Kiso, Shinichi Hayashi, Norio

    2009-01-02

    We previously demonstrated that adiponectin has anti-fibrogenic and anti-inflammatory effects in the liver of mouse models of various liver diseases. However, its role in liver regeneration remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the role of adiponectin in liver regeneration. We assessed liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy in wild-type (WT) and adiponectin knockout (KO) mice. We analyzed DNA replication and various signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation and metabolism. Adiponectin KO mice exhibited delayed DNA replication and increased lipid accumulation in the regenerating liver. The expression levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) {alpha} and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT-1), a key enzyme in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, were decreased in adiponectin KO mice, suggesting possible contribution of altered fat metabolism to these phenomena. Collectively, the present results highlight a new role for adiponectin in the process of liver regeneration.

  8. Fission product release from nuclear fuel by recoil and knockout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, B. J.

    1987-03-01

    An analytical model has been developed to describe the fission product release from nuclear fuel arising from the surface-fission release mechanisms of recoil and knockout. Release expressions are evaluated and compared to the short-lived activity measurements from in-reactor experiments with intact operating fuel. Recoil is shown to be an important process for releasing fission products from free UO 2 surfaces into the fuel-to-sheath gap. The model is also applied to tramp uranium in a power reactor primary heat transport circuit where it is demonstrated that recoil is the dominant release mechanism for small particles of fuel which are deposited on in-core surfaces. A methodology is established whereby release from surface contamination can be distinguished from that of fuel pin failure.

  9. Bioelectric characterization of epithelia from neonatal CFTR knockout ferrets.

    PubMed

    Fisher, John T; Tyler, Scott R; Zhang, Yulong; Lee, Ben J; Liu, Xiaoming; Sun, Xingshen; Sui, Hongshu; Liang, Bo; Luo, Meihui; Xie, Weiliang; Yi, Yaling; Zhou, Weihong; Song, Yi; Keiser, Nicholas; Wang, Kai; de Jonge, Hugo R; Engelhardt, John F

    2013-11-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-shortening, recessive, multiorgan genetic disorder caused by the loss of CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel function found in many types of epithelia. Animal models that recapitulate the human disease phenotype are critical to understanding pathophysiology in CF and developing therapies. CFTR knockout ferrets manifest many of the phenotypes observed in the human disease, including lung infections, pancreatic disease and diabetes, liver disease, malnutrition, and meconium ileus. In the present study, we have characterized abnormalities in the bioelectric properties of the trachea, stomach, intestine, and gallbladder of newborn CF ferrets. Short-circuit current (ISC) analysis of CF and wild-type (WT) tracheas revealed the following similarities and differences: (1) amiloride-sensitive sodium currents were similar between genotypes; (2) responses to 4,4'-diisothiocyano-2,2'-stilbene disulphonic acid were 3.3-fold greater in CF animals, suggesting elevated baseline chloride transport through non-CFTR channels in a subset of CF animals; and (3) a lack of 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX)/forskolin-stimulated and N-(2-Naphthalenyl)-((3,5-dibromo-2,4-dihydroxyphenyl)methylene)glycine hydrazide (GlyH-101)-inhibited currents in CF animals due to the lack of CFTR. CFTR mRNA was present throughout all levels of the WT ferret and IBMX/forskolin-inducible ISC was only observed in WT animals. However, despite the lack of CFTR function in the knockout ferret, the luminal pH of the CF ferret gallbladder, stomach, and intestines was not significantly changed relative to WT. The WT stomach and gallbladder exhibited significantly enhanced IBMX/forskolin ISC responses and inhibition by GlyH-101 relative to CF samples. These findings demonstrate that multiple organs affected by disease in the CF ferret have bioelectric abnormalities consistent with the lack of cAMP-mediated chloride transport. PMID:23782101

  10. Preaxial Polydactyly in Sost/Sostdc1 Double Knockouts

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, C M; Collette, N M; Loots, G G

    2011-07-29

    In the United States, {approx}5% are born with congenital birth defects due to abnormal function of cellular processes and interactions. Sclerosteosis, a rare autosomal recessive disease, causes hyperostosis of the axial and appendicular skeleton, and patients present radial deviation, digit syndactyly, nail dysplasia, and overall high bone mineral density. Sclerosteosis is due to a loss of function of sclerostin (Sost). Sost is a Wnt (abbrev.) antagonist; when mutated, nonfunctional Sost results in hyperactive osteoblast activity which leads to abnormal high bone mass. Previous studies have shown that Sost overexpression in transgenic mice causes reduced bone mineral density and a variety of limb phenotypes ranging from lost, fused, and split phalanges. Consistent with clinical manifestations of Sclerosteosis, Sost knockout mice exhibit increased generalized bone mineral density and syndactyly of the digits. Sostdc1 is a paralog of Sost that has also been described as an antagonist of Wnt signaling, in developing tooth buds. Unlike Sost knockouts, Sostdc1 null mice do not display any limb abnormalities. To determine if Sost and Sostdc1 have redundant functions during limb patterning, we examined Sost; Sostdc1 mice determined that they exhibit a novel preaxial polydactyly phenotype with a low penetrance. LacZ staining, skeletal preparations, and in situ hybridization experiments were used to help characterize this novel phenotype and understand how this phenotype develops. We find Sost and Sostdc1 to have complementary expression patterns during limb development, and the loss of their expression alters the transcription of several key limb regulators, such as Fgf8, Shh and Grem.

  11. Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 Knockout Abrogates Radiation Induced Pulmonary Inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallahan, Dennis E.; Virudachalam, Subbulakshmi

    1997-06-01

    Increased expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1; CD54) is induced by exposure to ionizing radiation. The lung was used as a model to study the role of ICAM-1 in the pathogenesis of the radiation-induced inflammation-like response. ICAM-1 expression increased in the pulmonary microvascular endothelium and not in the endothelium of larger pulmonary vessels following treatment of mice with thoracic irradiation. To quantify radiation-induced ICAM-1 expression, we utilized fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis of anti-ICAM-1 antibody labeling of pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells from human cadaver donors (HMVEC-L cells). Fluorochrome conjugates and UV microscopy were used to quantify the fluorescence intensity of ICAM in the irradiated lung. These studies showed a dose- and time-dependent increase in ICAM-1 expression in the pulmonary microvascular endothelium. Peak expression occurred at 24 h, while threshold dose was as low as 2 Gy. To determine whether ICAM-1 is required for inflammatory cell infiltration into the irradiated lung, the anti-ICAM-1 blocking antibody was administered by tail vein injection to mice following thoracic irradiation. Inflammatory cells were quantified by immunofluorescence for leukocyte common antigen (CD45). Mice treated with the anti-ICAM-1 blocking antibody showed attenuation of inflammatory cell infiltration into the lung in response to ionizing radiation exposure. To verify the requirement of ICAM-1 in the inflammation-like radiation response, we utilized the ICAM-1 knockout mouse. ICAM-1 was not expressed in the lungs of ICAM-1-deficient mice following treatment with thoracic irradiation. ICAM-1 knockout mice had no increase in the inflammatory cell infiltration into the lung in response to thoracic irradiation. These studies demonstrate a radiation dose-dependent increase in ICAM-1 expression in the pulmonary microvascular endothelium, and show that ICAM-1 is required for inflammatory cell infiltration

  12. Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 knockout abrogates radiation induced pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hallahan, D E; Virudachalam, S

    1997-06-10

    Increased expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1; CD54) is induced by exposure to ionizing radiation. The lung was used as a model to study the role of ICAM-1 in the pathogenesis of the radiation-induced inflammation-like response. ICAM-1 expression increased in the pulmonary microvascular endothelium and not in the endothelium of larger pulmonary vessels following treatment of mice with thoracic irradiation. To quantify radiation-induced ICAM-1 expression, we utilized fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis of anti-ICAM-1 antibody labeling of pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells from human cadaver donors (HMVEC-L cells). Fluorochrome conjugates and UV microscopy were used to quantify the fluorescence intensity of ICAM in the irradiated lung. These studies showed a dose- and time-dependent increase in ICAM-1 expression in the pulmonary microvascular endothelium. Peak expression occurred at 24 h, while threshold dose was as low as 2 Gy. To determine whether ICAM-1 is required for inflammatory cell infiltration into the irradiated lung, the anti-ICAM-1 blocking antibody was administered by tail vein injection to mice following thoracic irradiation. Inflammatory cells were quantified by immunofluorescence for leukocyte common antigen (CD45). Mice treated with the anti-ICAM-1 blocking antibody showed attenuation of inflammatory cell infiltration into the lung in response to ionizing radiation exposure. To verify the requirement of ICAM-1 in the inflammation-like radiation response, we utilized the ICAM-1 knockout mouse. ICAM-1 was not expressed in the lungs of ICAM-1-deficient mice following treatment with thoracic irradiation. ICAM-1 knockout mice had no increase in the inflammatory cell infiltration into the lung in response to thoracic irradiation. These studies demonstrate a radiation dose-dependent increase in ICAM-1 expression in the pulmonary microvascular endothelium, and show that ICAM-1 is required for inflammatory cell infiltration

  13. Bioelectric Characterization of Epithelia from Neonatal CFTR Knockout Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, John T.; Tyler, Scott R.; Zhang, Yulong; Lee, Ben J.; Liu, Xiaoming; Sun, Xingshen; Sui, Hongshu; Liang, Bo; Luo, Meihui; Xie, Weiliang; Yi, Yaling; Zhou, Weihong; Song, Yi; Keiser, Nicholas; Wang, Kai; de Jonge, Hugo R.

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-shortening, recessive, multiorgan genetic disorder caused by the loss of CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel function found in many types of epithelia. Animal models that recapitulate the human disease phenotype are critical to understanding pathophysiology in CF and developing therapies. CFTR knockout ferrets manifest many of the phenotypes observed in the human disease, including lung infections, pancreatic disease and diabetes, liver disease, malnutrition, and meconium ileus. In the present study, we have characterized abnormalities in the bioelectric properties of the trachea, stomach, intestine, and gallbladder of newborn CF ferrets. Short-circuit current (ISC) analysis of CF and wild-type (WT) tracheas revealed the following similarities and differences: (1) amiloride-sensitive sodium currents were similar between genotypes; (2) responses to 4,4′-diisothiocyano-2,2′-stilbene disulphonic acid were 3.3-fold greater in CF animals, suggesting elevated baseline chloride transport through non-CFTR channels in a subset of CF animals; and (3) a lack of 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX)/forskolin–stimulated and N-(2-Naphthalenyl)-((3,5-dibromo-2,4-dihydroxyphenyl)methylene)glycine hydrazide (GlyH-101)–inhibited currents in CF animals due to the lack of CFTR. CFTR mRNA was present throughout all levels of the WT ferret and IBMX/forskolin–inducible ISC was only observed in WT animals. However, despite the lack of CFTR function in the knockout ferret, the luminal pH of the CF ferret gallbladder, stomach, and intestines was not significantly changed relative to WT. The WT stomach and gallbladder exhibited significantly enhanced IBMX/forskolin ISC responses and inhibition by GlyH-101 relative to CF samples. These findings demonstrate that multiple organs affected by disease in the CF ferret have bioelectric abnormalities consistent with the lack of cAMP-mediated chloride transport. PMID:23782101

  14. Reduced Extinction of Hippocampal-Dependent Memories in CPEB Knockout Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zearfoss, N. Ruth; Richter, Joel D.; Berger-Sweeney, Joanne

    2006-01-01

    CPEB is a sequence-specific RNA binding protein that regulates translation at synapses. In neurons of CPEB knockout mice, synaptic efficacy is reduced. Here, we have performed a battery of behavioral tests and find that relative to wild-type animals, CPEB knockout mice, although similar on many baseline behaviors, have reduced extinction of…

  15. A Simple Model for Learning Improvement: Weigh Pig, Feed Pig, Weigh Pig. Occasional Paper #23

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulcher, Keston H.; Good, Megan R.; Coleman, Chris M.; Smith, Kristen L.

    2014-01-01

    Assessing learning does not by itself result in increased student accomplishment, much like a pig never fattened up because it was weighed. Indeed, recent research shows that while institutions are more regularly engaging in assessment, they have little to show in the way of stronger student performance. This paper clarifies how assessment results…

  16. Pigs taking wing with transposons and recombinases

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Karl J; Carlson, Daniel F; Fahrenkrug, Scott C

    2007-01-01

    Swine production has been an important part of our lives since the late Mesolithic or early Neolithic periods, and ranks number one in world meat production. Pig production also contributes to high-value-added medical markets in the form of pharmaceuticals, heart valves, and surgical materials. Genetic engineering, including the addition of exogenous genetic material or manipulation of the endogenous genome, holds great promise for changing pig phenotypes for agricultural and medical applications. Although the first transgenic pigs were described in 1985, poor survival of manipulated embryos; inefficiencies in the integration, transmission, and expression of transgenes; and expensive husbandry costs have impeded the widespread application of pig genetic engineering. Sequencing of the pig genome and advances in reproductive technologies have rejuvenated efforts to apply transgenesis to swine. Pigs provide a compelling new resource for the directed production of pharmaceutical proteins and the provision of cells, vascular grafts, and organs for xenotransplantation. Additionally, given remarkable similarities in the physiology and size of people and pigs, swine will increasingly provide large animal models of human disease where rodent models are insufficient. We review the challenges facing pig transgenesis and discuss the utility of transposases and recombinases for enhancing the success and sophistication of pig genetic engineering. 'The paradise of my fancy is one where pigs have wings.' (GK Chesterton). PMID:18047690

  17. Health and population effects of rare gene knockouts in adult humans with related parents.

    PubMed

    Narasimhan, Vagheesh M; Hunt, Karen A; Mason, Dan; Baker, Christopher L; Karczewski, Konrad J; Barnes, Michael R; Barnett, Anthony H; Bates, Chris; Bellary, Srikanth; Bockett, Nicholas A; Giorda, Kristina; Griffiths, Christopher J; Hemingway, Harry; Jia, Zhilong; Kelly, M Ann; Khawaja, Hajrah A; Lek, Monkol; McCarthy, Shane; McEachan, Rosie; O'Donnell-Luria, Anne; Paigen, Kenneth; Parisinos, Constantinos A; Sheridan, Eamonn; Southgate, Laura; Tee, Louise; Thomas, Mark; Xue, Yali; Schnall-Levin, Michael; Petkov, Petko M; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Maher, Eamonn R; Trembath, Richard C; MacArthur, Daniel G; Wright, John; Durbin, Richard; van Heel, David A

    2016-04-22

    Examining complete gene knockouts within a viable organism can inform on gene function. We sequenced the exomes of 3222 British adults of Pakistani heritage with high parental relatedness, discovering 1111 rare-variant homozygous genotypes with predicted loss of function (knockouts) in 781 genes. We observed 13.7% fewer homozygous knockout genotypes than we expected, implying an average load of 1.6 recessive-lethal-equivalent loss-of-function (LOF) variants per adult. When genetic data were linked to the individuals' lifelong health records, we observed no significant relationship between gene knockouts and clinical consultation or prescription rate. In this data set, we identified a healthy PRDM9-knockout mother and performed phased genome sequencing on her, her child, and control individuals. Our results show that meiotic recombination sites are localized away from PRDM9-dependent hotspots. Thus, natural LOF variants inform on essential genetic loci and demonstrate PRDM9 redundancy in humans. PMID:26940866

  18. Health and population effects of rare gene knockouts in adult humans with related parents

    PubMed Central

    Narasimhan, Vagheesh M.; Hunt, Karen A.; Mason, Dan; Baker, Christopher L.; Karczewski, Konrad J.; Barnes, Michael R.; Barnett, Anthony H.; Bates, Chris; Bellary, Srikanth; Bockett, Nicholas A.; Giorda, Kristina; Griffiths, Christopher J.; Hemingway, Harry; Jia, Zhilong; Kelly, M. Ann; Khawaja, Hajrah A.; Lek, Monkol; McCarthy, Shane; McEachan, Rosie; O’Donnell-Luria, Anne; Paigen, Kenneth; Parisinos, Constantinos A.; Sheridan, Eamonn; Southgate, Laura; Tee, Louise; Thomas, Mark; Xue, Yali; Schnall-Levin, Michael; Petkov, Petko M.; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Maher, Eamonn R.; Trembath, Richard C.; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Wright, John; Durbin, Richard; van Heel, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Examining complete gene knockouts within a viable organism can inform on gene function. We sequenced the exomes of 3,222 British Pakistani-heritage adults with high parental relatedness, discovering 1,111 rare-variant homozygous genotypes with predicted loss of gene function (knockouts) in 781 genes. We observed 13.7% fewer than expected homozygous knockout genotypes, implying an average load of 1.6 recessive-lethal-equivalent LOF variants per adult. Linking genetic data to lifelong health records, knockouts were not associated with clinical consultation or prescription rate. In this dataset we identified a healthy PRDM9 knockout mother, and performed phased genome sequencing on her, her child and controls, which showed meiotic recombination sites localised away from PRDM9-dependent hotspots. Thus, natural LOF variants inform upon essential genetic loci, and demonstrate PRDM9 redundancy in humans. PMID:26940866

  19. Up to 9-day survival and control of thrombocytopenia following alpha1,3-galactosyl transferase knockout swine liver xenotransplantation in baboons

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Karen; Schuetz, Christian; Elias, Nahel; Veillette, Gregory R.; Wamala, Isaac; Varma, Manish; Smith, R. Neal; Robson, Simon C.; Cosimi, A. Benedict; Sachs, David H.; Hertl, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Background With standard miniature swine donors, survivals of only 3 days have been achieved in primate liver-transplant recipients. The recent production of alpha1,3-galactosyl transferase knockout (GalT-KO) miniature swine has made it possible to evaluate xenotransplantation of pig organs in clinically relevant pig-to-non-human primate models in the absence of the effects of natural anti-Gal antibodies. We are reporting our results using GalT-KO liver grafts. Methods We performed GalT-KO liver transplants in baboons using an immunosuppressive regimen previously used by our group in xeno heart and kidney transplantation. Post-operative liver function was assessed by laboratory function tests, coagulation parameters and histology. Results In two hepatectomized recipients of GalT-KO grafts, post-transplant liver function returned rapidly to normal. Over the first few days, the synthetic products of the donor swine graft appeared to replace those of the baboon. The first recipient survived for 6 days and showed no histopathological evidence of rejection at the time of death from uncontrolled bleeding, probably caused by transfusion-refractory thrombocytopenia. Amicar treatment of the second and third recipients led to maintenance of platelet counts of over 40 000 per μl throughout their 9- and 8-day survivals, which represents the longest reported survival of pig-to-primate liver transplants to date. Both of the last two animals nevertheless succumbed to bleeding and enterococcal infection, without evidence of rejection. Conclusions These observations suggest that thrombocytopenia after liver xenotransplantation may be overcome by Amicar therapy. The coagulopathy and sepsis that nevertheless occurred suggest that additional causes of coagulation disturbance must be addressed, along with better prevention of infection, to achieve long-term survival. PMID:22909139

  20. Cryptosporidium parvum pig genotype II diagnosed in pigs from the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pigs may represent a source of Cryptosporidium sp. infection to humans. The objective of this study was to identify the species present in pigs from the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and verify what risks pigs represent in transmission of human cryptosporidiosis, since there is no such informati...

  1. Molecular studies on pig cryptosporidiosis in Poland.

    PubMed

    Rzeżutka, A; Kaupke, A; Kozyra, I; Pejsak, Z

    2014-01-01

    Cryptosporidium intestinal parasites have been detected in farmed pigs worldwide. Infections are usually asymptomatic with a low number of oocysts shed in pig feces. This makes the recognition of infection difficult or unsuccessful when microscopic methods are used. The aim of this study was molecular identification of Cryptosporidium species in pig herds raised in Poland with regard to the occurrence of zoonotic species. In total, 166 pig fecal samples were tested. The examined pigs were aged 1 to 20 weeks. Overall, 39 pig farms were monitored for parasite presence. The detection and identification of Cryptosporidium DNA was performed on the basis of PCR-RFLP and nucleotide sequence analysis of the amplified 18 SSU rRNA and COWP gene fragments. Infected animals were housed in 21 (53.8%) of the pig farms monitored. The presence of Cryptosporidum was confirmed in 46 (27.7%) samples of pig feces. Among positive fecal samples, 34 (29.3%) were collected from healthy animals, and 12 (24%) from diarrheic pigs. Most infected animals (42.1%) were 2 to 3 months old. The following parasite species were detected: C. scrofarum, C. suis and C. parvum. Indeed, asymptomatic infections caused by C. scrofarum were observed in the majority of the herds. Mixed infections caused by C. suis and C. scrofarum were not common; however, they were observed in 8.6% of the positive animals. C. parvum DNA was found only in one sample collected from a diarrheic pig. The application of molecular diagnostic tools allowed for detection and identification of Cryptosporidium species in pigs. The sporadic findings of C. parvum are subsequent evidence for the contribution of pigs in the transmission of cryptosporidiosis from animals to humans. PMID:25638969

  2. Supplemental Analysis for N-linked Sugars in Adult Pig Islets.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, H; Kawamura, T; Kashiyama, N; Matsuura, R; Sakai, R; Nakahata, K; Lo, P-C; Asada, M; Maeda, A; Goto, M; Toyoda, M; Okuyama, H; Miyagawa, S

    2016-05-01

    The pig pancreas is considered to be one of the most suitable sources of islets for clinical xenotransplantation. However, after producing α1-3galactosyltransferase knockout pigs, most of the organs of these pigs showed less antigenicity to the human body. Wild-type adult pig islets (APIs) that originally produced negligible levels of α-Gal, different from neonatal porcine islet-like cell clusters, showed a clear antigenicity to human serum. Concerning the so-called non-Gal epitopes, many studies related to glycoproteins and glycolipids are ongoing in efforts to identify them. However, our knowledge of non-Gal glycoantigens remains incomplete. In our previous study, N-glycans were isolated from APIs, and the structures of 28 of the N-glycans were detected. In this study, to identify additional structures, further analyses were performed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). N-glycans were isolated from APIs by the method described by O'Neil et al with minor modifications and LC-MS-based structural analyses were then performed. The detected N-glycan peaks in the LC-MS spectra were selected using the FLexAnalysis software program and the structures of the glycans were predicted using the GlyocoMod Tool. The API preparation contained 11 peaks and 16 structures were then nominated as containing N-linked sugars. Among them, 5 sulfated glycans were estimated, confirming the existence of sulfate structures in N-glycans in API. In addition, these data may supplement several N-glycan structures that contain two deoxyhexose units, such as fucose, to our previous report. The data herein will be helpful for future studies of antigenicity associated with API. PMID:27320609

  3. WILD PIG ATTACKS ON HUMANS

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, J.

    2013-04-12

    Attacks on humans by wild pigs (Sus scrofa) have been documented since ancient times. However, studies characterizing these incidents are lacking. In an effort to better understand this phenomenon, information was collected from 412 wild pig attacks on humans. Similar to studies of large predator attacks on humans, data came from a variety of sources. The various attacks compiled occurred in seven zoogeographic realms. Most attacks occurred within the species native range, and specifically in rural areas. The occurrence was highest during the winter months and daylight hours. Most happened under non-hunting circumstances and appeared to be unprovoked. Wounded animals were the chief cause of these attacks in hunting situations. The animals involved were typically solitary, male and large in size. The fate of the wild pigs involved in these attacks varied depending upon the circumstances, however, most escaped uninjured. Most human victims were adult males traveling on foot and alone. The most frequent outcome for these victims was physical contact/mauling. The severity of resulting injuries ranged from minor to fatal. Most of the mauled victims had injuries to only one part of their bodies, with legs/feet being the most frequent body part injured. Injuries were primarily in the form of lacerations and punctures. Fatalities were typically due to blood loss. In some cases, serious infections or toxemia resulted from the injuries. Other species (i.e., pets and livestock) were also accompanying some of the humans during these attacks. The fates of these animals varied from escaping uninjured to being killed. Frequency data on both non-hunting and hunting incidents of wild pig attacks on humans at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, showed quantitatively that such incidents are rare.

  4. Catheterization of the urethra in female pigs.

    PubMed

    Musk, G C; Zwierzchoniewska, M; He, B

    2015-10-01

    Female pigs are commonly utilized as an animal model for biomedical research and require urethral catheterization. Sixteen pigs were anaesthetized for research purposes and required the placement of a urethral catheter. Post-mortem examination of the vaginas revealed the urethral opening to be consistently halfway from the mucocutaneous junction of the vulva to the cervix. A shallow diverticulum was also observed on the ventral floor of the urethral opening. To optimize conditions for success the pig should be carefully positioned supine, a vaginal speculum and light source should be used, the pig should be adequately anaesthetized, and the anatomy of the vagina should be reviewed. PMID:25977261

  5. Final-state interactions in two-nucleon knockout reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colle, Camille; Cosyn, Wim; Ryckebusch, Jan

    2016-03-01

    Background: Exclusive two-nucleon knockout after electroexcitation of nuclei [A (e ,e'N N ) in brief] is considered to be a primary source of information about short-range correlations (SRCs) in nuclei. For a proper interpretation of the data, final-state interactions (FSIs) need to be theoretically controlled. Purpose: Our goal is to quantify the role of FSI effects in exclusive A (e ,e'p N ) reactions for four target nuclei representative of the whole mass region. Our focus is on processes that are SRC driven. We investigate the role of FSIs for two characteristic detector setups corresponding to "small" and "large" coverage of the available phase space. Method: Use is made of a factorized expression for the A (e ,e'p N ) cross section that is proportional to the two-body center-of-mass (c.m.) momentum distribution of close-proximity pairs. The A (e ,e'p p ) and A (e ,e'p n ) reactions for the target nuclei 12C,27Al,56Fe, and 208Pb are investigated. The elastic attenuation mechanisms in the FSIs are included using the relativistic multiple-scattering Glauber approximation (RMSGA). Single-charge exchange (SCX) reactions are also included. We introduce the nuclear transparency TAp N, defined as the ratio of exclusive (e ,e'p N ) cross sections on nuclei to those on "free" nucleon pairs, as a measure for the aggregated effect of FSIs in p N knockout reactions from nucleus A . A toy model is introduced in order to gain a better understanding of the A dependence of TAp N. Results: The transparency TAp N drops from 0.2 -0.3 for 12C to 0.04 -0.07 for 208Pb. For all considered kinematics, the mass dependence of TAp N can be captured by the power law TAp N∝A-λ with 0.4 ≲λ ≲0.5 . Apart from an overall reduction factor, we find that FSIs only modestly affect the distinct features of SRC-driven A (e ,e'p N ) which are dictated by the c.m. distribution of close-proximity pairs. Conclusion: The SCX mechanisms represent a relatively small (order of a few percent

  6. Complementation Test of Rpe65 Knockout and Tvrm148

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Charles B.; Chrenek, Micah A.; Foster, Stephanie L.; Duncan, Todd; Redmond, T. Michael; Pardue, Machelle T.; Boatright, Jeffrey H.; Nickerson, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. A mouse mutation, tvrm148, was previously reported as resulting in retinal degeneration. Tvrm148 and Rpe65 map between markers D3Mit147 and D3Mit19 on a genetic map, but the physical map places RPE65 outside the markers. We asked if Rpe65 or perhaps another nearby gene is mutated and if the mutant reduced 11-cis-retinal levels. We studied the impact of the tvrm148 mutation on visual function, morphology, and retinoid levels. Methods. Normal phase HPLC was used to measure retinoid levels. Rpe65+/+, tvrm148/+ (T+/−), tvrm148/tvrm148 (T−/−), RPE65KO/KO (Rpe65−/−), and Rpe65T/− mice visual function was measured by optokinetic tracking (OKT) and electroretinography (ERG). Morphology was assessed by light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). qRT-PCR was used to measure Rpe65 mRNA levels. Immunoblotting measured the size and amount of RPE65 protein. Results. The knockout and tvrm148 alleles did not complement. No 11-cis-retinal was detected in T−/− or Rpe65−/− mice. Visual acuity in Rpe65+/+ and T+/− mouse was ∼0.382 c/d, but 0.037 c/d in T−/− mice at postnatal day 210 (P210). ERG response in T−/− mice was undetectable except at bright flash intensities. Outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness in T−/− mice was ∼70% of Rpe65+/+ by P210. Rpe65 mRNA levels in T−/− mice were unchanged, yet 14.5% of Rpe65+/+ protein levels was detected. Protein size was unchanged. Conclusions. A complementation test revealed the RPE65 knockout and tvrm148 alleles do not complement, proving that the tvrm148 mutation is in Rpe65. Behavioral, physiological, molecular, biochemical, and histological approaches indicate that tvrm148 is a null allele of Rpe65. PMID:23778877

  7. Developmental Divergence of Sleep-Wake Patterns in Orexin Knockout and Wild-Type Mice

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Cassandra M.; Johnson, Eric D.; Shaw, Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    Narcolepsy, a disorder characterized by fragmented bouts of sleep and wakefulness during the day and night as well as cataplexy, has been linked in humans and non-human animals to the functional integrity of the orexinergic system. Adult orexin knockout mice and dogs with a mutation of the orexin receptor exhibit symptoms that mirror those seen in narcoleptic humans. As with narcolepsy, infant sleep-wake cycles in humans and rats are highly fragmented, with consolidated bouts of sleep and wakefulness developing gradually. Based on these common features of narcoleptics and infants, we hypothesized that the development of sleep-wake fragmentation in orexin knockout mice would be expressed as a developmental divergence between knockouts and wild-types, with the knockouts lagging behind the wild-types. We tested this hypothesis by recording the sleep-wake patterns of infant orexin knockout and wild-type mice across the first three postnatal weeks. Both knockouts and wild-types exhibited age-dependent, and therefore orexin-independent, quantitative and qualitative changes in sleep-wake patterning. At 3 weeks of age, however, by which time the sleep and wake bouts of the wild-types had consolidated further, the knockouts lagged behind the wild-types and exhibited significantly more bout fragmentation. These findings suggest the possibility that the fragmentation of behavioral states that characterizes narcolepsy in adults reflects reversion back toward the more fragmented sleep-wake patterns that characterize infancy. PMID:17284193

  8. Adaptation of the myoglobin knockout mouse to hypoxic stress.

    PubMed

    Schlieper, Georg; Kim, Jie-Hoon; Molojavyi, Andrei; Jacoby, Christoph; Laussmann, Tim; Flögel, Ulrich; Gödecke, Axel; Schrader, Jürgen

    2004-04-01

    Myoglobin knockout (myo-/-) mice were previously reported to show no obvious phenotype but revealed several compensatory mechanisms that include increases in cardiac capillary density, coronary flow, and hemoglobin. The aim of this study was to investigate whether severe hypoxic stress can exhaust these compensatory mechanisms and whether this can be monitored on the gene and protein level. Myo-/- and wild-type (WT) mice we e exposed to hypoxia (10% O(2)) fo 2 wk. Thereafter hemodynamic parameters were investigated by invasive measurement combined with magnetic resonance imaging. Cardiac gene and protein expression were analyzed using cDNA arrays and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis plus mass spectrometry, respectively. Hematocrit levels increased from 44% (WT) and 48% (myo-/-) to 72% in both groups. Similar to WT controls, hypoxic myo-/- animals maintained stable cardiovascular function (mean arterial blood pressure 82.4 mmHg, ejection fraction 72.5%). Cardiac gene expression of hypoxic myo-/- mice differed significantly from WT controls in 17 genes (e.g., keratinocyte lipid binding protein +202%, cytochrome c oxidase Vb +41%). Interestingly, hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha remained unchanged in both groups. Proteome analysis revealed reduced levels of heart fatty acid-binding protein and heat shock protein 27 both in hypoxic myo-/- and WT mice. Our data thus demonstrate that myo-/- mice do not decompensate du ing hypoxic st ess but a e surprisingly well adapted. Changes in ene gy metabolism of fatty acids may contribute to the robustness of myoglobin-deficient mice. PMID:14656764

  9. Drop tests of the Three Mile Island knockout canister

    SciTech Connect

    Box, W.D.; Aaron, W.S.; Shappert, L.B.; Childress, P.C.; Quinn, G.J.; Smith, J.V.

    1986-09-01

    A type of Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) defueling canister, called a ''knockout'' canister, was subjected to a series of drop tests at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Drop Test Facility. These tests were designed to confirm the structural integrity of internal fixed neutron poisons in support of a request for NRC licensing of this type of canister for the shipment of TMI-2 reactor fuel debris to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for the Core Examination R and D Program. Work conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory included (1) precise physical measurements of the internal poison rod configuration before assembly, (2) canister assembly and welding, (3) nondestructive examination (an initial hydrostatic pressure test and an x-ray profile of the internals before and after each drop test), (4) addition of a simulated fuel load, (5) instrumentation of the canister for each drop test, (6) fabrication of a cask simulation vessel with a developed and tested foam impact limiter, (7) use of refrigeration facilities to cool the canister to well below freezing prior to three of the drops, (8) recording the drop test with still, high-speed, and normal-speed photography, (9) recording the accelerometer measurements during impact, (10) disassembly and post-test examination with precise physical measurements, and (11) preparation of the final report.

  10. Characteristics of Skeletal Muscle Fibers of SOD1 Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Nagahisa, Hiroshi; Okabe, Kazuma; Iuchi, Yoshihito; Fujii, Junichi; Miyata, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) knockout (KO) mice are known as an aging model in some aspects, but the damage and regeneration process of each fiber type have not been sufficiently studied. In this study, we investigated the damage and satellite cell state of the gastrocnemius muscle in SOD1 KO mice (6 months old) using immunohistochemical staining and real-time RT-PCR. The proportion of central nuclei-containing Type IIx/b fibers in the deep and superficial portions of the gastrocnemius muscle was significantly higher in SOD1 KO than control mice. The number of satellite cells per muscle fiber decreased in all muscle fiber types in the deep portion of the gastrocnemius muscle in SOD1 KO mice. In addition, the mRNA expression levels of Pax7 and myogenin, which are expressed in satellite cells in the activation, proliferation, and differentiation states, significantly increased in the gastrocnemius muscle of SOD1 KO mice. Furthermore, mRNA of myosin heavy chain-embryonic, which is expressed in the early phase of muscle regeneration, significantly increased in SOD1 KO mice. It was suggested that muscle is damaged by reactive oxygen species produced in the mitochondrial intermembrane space in Type IIxb fibers, accelerating the proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells through growth factors in SOD1 KO mice. PMID:26798428

  11. Knockout of Foxp2 disrupts vocal development in mice

    PubMed Central

    Castellucci, Gregg A.; McGinley, Matthew J.; McCormick, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The FOXP2 gene is important for the development of proper speech motor control in humans. However, the role of the gene in general vocal behavior in other mammals, including mice, is unclear. Here, we track the vocal development of Foxp2 heterozygous knockout (Foxp2+/−) mice and their wildtype (WT) littermates from juvenile to adult ages, and observe severe abnormalities in the courtship song of Foxp2+/− mice. In comparison to their WT littermates, Foxp2+/− mice vocalized less, produced shorter syllable sequences, and possessed an abnormal syllable inventory. In addition, Foxp2+/− song also exhibited irregular rhythmic structure, and its development did not follow the consistent trajectories observed in WT vocalizations. These results demonstrate that the Foxp2 gene is critical for normal vocal behavior in juvenile and adult mice, and that Foxp2 mutant mice may provide a tractable model system for the study of the gene’s role in general vocal motor control. PMID:26980647

  12. Improved microarray methods for profiling the yeast knockout strain collection

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Daniel S.; Pan, Xuewen; Ooi, Siew Loon; Peyser, Brian D.; Spencer, Forrest A.; Irizarry, Rafael A.; Boeke, Jef D.

    2005-01-01

    A remarkable feature of the Yeast Knockout strain collection is the presence of two unique 20mer TAG sequences in almost every strain. In principle, the relative abundances of strains in a complex mixture can be profiled swiftly and quantitatively by amplifying these sequences and hybridizing them to microarrays, but TAG microarrays have not been widely used. Here, we introduce a TAG microarray design with sophisticated controls and describe a robust method for hybridizing high concentrations of dye-labeled TAGs in single-stranded form. We also highlight the importance of avoiding PCR contamination and provide procedures for detection and eradication. Validation experiments using these methods yielded false positive (FP) and false negative (FN) rates for individual TAG detection of 3–6% and 15–18%, respectively. Analysis demonstrated that cross-hybridization was the chief source of FPs, while TAG amplification defects were the main cause of FNs. The materials, protocols, data and associated software described here comprise a suite of experimental resources that should facilitate the use of TAG microarrays for a wide variety of genetic screens. PMID:15994458

  13. Social dominance in male vasopressin 1b receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Heather K; Dike, Obianuju E; Stevenson, Erica L; Storck, Kathryn; Young, W Scott

    2010-07-01

    We have previously reported that mice with a targeted disruption of their vasopressin 1b receptor gene, Avpr1b, have mild impairments in social recognition and reduced aggression. The reductions in aggression are limited to social forms of aggression, i.e., maternal and inter-male aggression, while predatory aggression remains unaffected. To further clarify the role of the Avpr1b in the regulation of social behavior we first examined anxiety-like and depression-like behaviors in Avpr1b knockout (Avpr1b -/-) mice. We then went on to test the ability of Avpr1b -/- mice to form dominance hierarchies. No major differences were found between Avpr1b -/- and wildtype mice in anxiety-like behaviors, as measured using an elevated plus maze and an open field test, or depression-like behaviors, as measured using a forced swim test. In the social dominance study we found that Avpr1b -/- mice are able to form dominance hierarchies, though in early hierarchy formation dominant Avpr1b -/- mice display significantly more mounting behavior on Day 1 of testing compared to wildtype controls. Further, non-socially dominant Avpr1b -/- mice spend less time engaged in attack behavior than wildtype controls. These findings suggest that while Avpr1b -/- mice may be able to form dominance hierarchies they appear to employ alternate strategies. PMID:20298692

  14. Bone growth and turnover in progesterone receptor knockout mice.

    SciTech Connect

    Rickard, David J.; Iwaniec, Urszula T.; Evans, Glenda; Hefferan, Theresa E.; Hunter, Jaime C.; Waters, Katrina M.; Lydon, John P.; O'Malley, Bert W.; Khosla, Sundeep; Spelsberg, Thomas C.; Turner, Russell T.

    2008-05-01

    The role of progesterone receptor (PR) signaling in skeletal metabolism is controversial. To address whether signaling through the PR is necessary for normal bone growth and turnover, we performed histomorphometric and mCT analyses of bone from homozygous female PR knockout (PRKO) mice at 6, 12, and 26 weeks of age. These mice possess a null mutation of the PR locus, which blocks the gene expression of A and B isoforms of PR. Body weight gain, uterine weight gain and tibia longitudinal bone growth was normal in PRKO mice. In contrast, total and cortical bone mass were increased in long bones of post-pubertal (12 and 26-week-old) PRKO mice, whereas cancellous bone mass was normal in the tibia but increased in the humerus. The striking 57% decrease in cancellous bone from the proximal tibia metaphysis which occurred between 6 and 26 weeks in WT mice was abolished in PRKO mice. The improved bone balance in aging PRKO mice was associated with elevated bone formation and a tendency toward reduced osteoclast perimeter. Taken together, these findings suggest that PR signaling in mice attenuates the accumulation of cortical bone mass during adolescence and is required for early age-related loss of cancellous bone.

  15. Immunosympathectomy as the first phenotypic knockout with antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Cattaneo, Antonino

    2013-01-01

    In a PNAS Classic Article published in 1960, Rita Levi-Montalcini offered formal and conclusive proof that endogenous NGF was responsible for the survival of sympathetic neurons in vivo. Thus ended an experimental tour de force lasting a decade, starting with the demonstration that a humoral factor, produced from a tumor transplanted in a chicken embryo, was responsible for stimulating outgrowth of nerve fibers from sympathetic and sensory neurons. From a more general methodological point of view, this work provided a breakthrough in the quest to achieve targeted loss of function and experimentally validate the function of biological molecules. Finally, this work provided an example of the ablation of a specific neuronal subpopulation in an otherwise intact nervous system, an immunological knife of unsurpassed effectiveness and precision. The novelty and the importance of the PNAS Classic Article is discussed here, collocating it within the context of the particular moment of the NGF discovery saga, of Rita Levi-Montalcini's scientific and academic career, and of the general scientific context of those years. This seminal work, involving the use of antibodies for phenotypic knockout in vivo, planted seeds that were to bear new fruit many years later with the advent of monoclonal antibodies and recombinant antibody technologies. PMID:23515328

  16. Environmental enrichment induces behavioural disturbances in neuropeptide Y knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Reichmann, Florian; Wegerer, Vanessa; Jain, Piyush; Mayerhofer, Raphaela; Hassan, Ahmed M.; Fröhlich, Esther E.; Bock, Elisabeth; Pritz, Elisabeth; Herzog, Herbert; Holzer, Peter; Leitinger, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) refers to the provision of a complex and stimulating housing condition which improves well-being, behaviour and brain function of laboratory animals. The mechanisms behind these beneficial effects of EE are only partially understood. In the current report, we describe a link between EE and neuropeptide Y (NPY), based on findings from NPY knockout (KO) mice exposed to EE. Relative to EE-housed wildtype (WT) animals, NPY KO mice displayed altered behaviour as well as molecular and morphological changes in amygdala and hippocampus. Exposure of WT mice to EE reduced anxiety and decreased central glucocorticoid receptor expression, effects which were absent in NPY KO mice. In addition, NPY deletion altered the preference of EE items, and EE-housed NPY KO mice responded to stress with exaggerated hyperthermia, displayed impaired spatial memory, had higher hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA levels and altered hippocampal synaptic plasticity, effects which were not seen in WT mice. Accordingly, these findings suggest that NPY contributes to the anxiolytic effect of EE and that NPY deletion reverses the beneficial effects of EE into a negative experience. The NPY system could thus be a target for “enviromimetics”, therapeutics which reproduce the beneficial effects of enhanced environmental stimulation. PMID:27305846

  17. The biology of novel animal genes: Mouse APEX gene knockout

    SciTech Connect

    MacInnes, M.; Altherr, M.R.; Ludwig, D.; Pedersen, R.; Mold, C.

    1997-07-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The controlled breeding of novel genes into mice, including the gene knockout (KO), or conversely by adding back transgenes provide powerful genetic technologies that together suffice to determine in large part the biological role(s) of novel genes. Inbred mouse remains the best understood and most useful mammalian experimental system available for tackling the biology of novel genes. The major mammalian apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease (APE), is involved in a key step in the repair of spontaneous and induced AP sites in DNA. Efficient repair of these lesions is imperative to prevent the stable incorporation of mutations into the cellular genome which may lead to cell death or transformation. Loss or modulation of base excison repair activity in vivo may elevate the spontaneous mutation rate in cells, and may lead to a substantial increase in the incidence of cancer. Despite extensive biochemical analysis, however, the significance of these individual APE functions in vivo has not been elucidated. Mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells heterozygous for a deletion mutation in APE have been generated and whole animals containing the APE mutation have been derived from these ES cells. Animals homozygous for the APE null mutation die early in gestation, underscoring the biological significance of this DNA repair gene.

  18. Bone Growth and Turnover in Progesterone Receptor Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rickard, David J.; Iwaniec, Urszula T.; Evans, Glenda; Hefferan, Theresa E.; Hunter, Jamie C.; Waters, Katrina M.; Lydon, John P.; O’Malley, Bert W.; Khosla, Sundeep; Spelsberg, Thomas C.; Turner, Russell T.

    2008-01-01

    The role of progesterone receptor (PR) signaling in skeletal metabolism is controversial. To address whether signaling through the PR is necessary for normal bone growth and turnover, we performed histomorphometric and microcomputed tomography analyses of bone from homozygous female PR knockout (PRKO) mice at 6, 12, and 26 wk of age. These mice possess a null mutation of the PR locus, which blocks the gene expression of A and B isoforms of PR. Body weight gain, uterine weight gain, and tibia longitudinal bone growth were normal in PRKO mice. In contrast, total, cancellous, and cortical bone mass were increased in the humerus of 12-wk-old PRKO mice, whereas cortical and cancellous bone mass in the tibia was normal. At 26 wk of age, cancellous bone area in the proximal tibia metaphysis of PRKO mice was 153% greater than age matched wild-type mice. The improved cancellous bone balance in 6-month-old PRKO mice was associated with elevated bone formation and a tendency toward reduced osteoclast perimeter. Taken together, these findings suggest that PR signaling in mice is not essential for bone growth and turnover. However, at some skeletal sites, PR signaling attenuates the accumulation of cortical and cancellous bone mass during adolescence. PMID:18276762

  19. Gastrointestinal Pathology in Juvenile and Adult CFTR-Knockout Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xingshen; Olivier, Alicia K.; Yi, Yaling; Pope, Christopher E.; Hayden, Hillary S.; Liang, Bo; Sui, Hongshu; Zhou, Weihong; Hager, Kyle R.; Zhang, Yulong; Liu, Xiaoming; Yan, Ziying; Fisher, John T.; Keiser, Nicholas W.; Song, Yi; Tyler, Scott R.; Goeken, J. Adam; Kinyon, Joann M.; Radey, Matthew C.; Fligg, Danielle; Wang, Xiaoyan; Xie, Weiliang; Lynch, Thomas J.; Kaminsky, Paul M.; Brittnacher, Mitchell J.; Miller, Samuel I.; Parekh, Kalpaj; Meyerholz, David K.; Hoffman, Lucas R.; Frana, Timothy; Stewart, Zoe A.; Engelhardt, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a multiorgan disease caused by loss of a functional cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel in many epithelia of the body. Here we report the pathology observed in the gastrointestinal organs of juvenile to adult CFTR-knockout ferrets. CF gastrointestinal manifestations included gastric ulceration, intestinal bacterial overgrowth with villous atrophy, and rectal prolapse. Metagenomic phylogenetic analysis of fecal microbiota by deep sequencing revealed considerable genotype-independent microbial diversity between animals, with the majority of taxa overlapping between CF and non-CF pairs. CF hepatic manifestations were variable, but included steatosis, necrosis, biliary hyperplasia, and biliary fibrosis. Gallbladder cystic mucosal hyperplasia was commonly found in 67% of CF animals. The majority of CF animals (85%) had pancreatic abnormalities, including extensive fibrosis, loss of exocrine pancreas, and islet disorganization. Interestingly, 2 of 13 CF animals retained predominantly normal pancreatic histology (84% to 94%) at time of death. Fecal elastase-1 levels from these CF animals were similar to non-CF controls, whereas all other CF animals evaluated were pancreatic insufficient (<2 μg elastase-1 per gram of feces). These findings suggest that genetic factors likely influence the extent of exocrine pancreas disease in CF ferrets and have implications for the etiology of pancreatic sufficiency in CF patients. In summary, these studies demonstrate that the CF ferret model develops gastrointestinal pathology similar to CF patients. PMID:24637292

  20. Modeling fragile X syndrome in the Fmr1 knockout mouse

    PubMed Central

    Kazdoba, Tatiana M.; Leach, Prescott T.; Silverman, Jill L.; Crawley, Jacqueline N.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is a commonly inherited form of intellectual disability and one of the leading genetic causes for autism spectrum disorder. Clinical symptoms of FXS can include impaired cognition, anxiety, hyperactivity, social phobia, and repetitive behaviors. FXS is caused by a CGG repeat mutation which expands a region on the X chromosome containing the FMR1 gene. In FXS, a full mutation (> 200 repeats) leads to hypermethylation of FMR1, an epigenetic mechanism that effectively silences FMR1 gene expression and reduces levels of the FMR1 gene product, fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). FMRP is an RNA-binding protein that is important for the regulation of protein expression. In an effort to further understand how loss of FMR1 and FMRP contribute to FXS symptomology, several FXS animal models have been created. The most well characterized rodent model is the Fmr1 knockout (KO) mouse, which lacks FMRP protein due to a disruption in its Fmr1 gene. Here, we review the behavioral phenotyping of the Fmr1 KO mouse to date, and discuss the clinical relevance of this mouse model to the human FXS condition. While much remains to be learned about FXS, the Fmr1 KO mouse is a valuable tool for understanding the repercussions of functional loss of FMRP and assessing the efficacy of pharmacological compounds in ameliorating the molecular and behavioral phenotypes relevant to FXS. PMID:25606362

  1. Environmental enrichment induces behavioural disturbances in neuropeptide Y knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Reichmann, Florian; Wegerer, Vanessa; Jain, Piyush; Mayerhofer, Raphaela; Hassan, Ahmed M; Fröhlich, Esther E; Bock, Elisabeth; Pritz, Elisabeth; Herzog, Herbert; Holzer, Peter; Leitinger, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) refers to the provision of a complex and stimulating housing condition which improves well-being, behaviour and brain function of laboratory animals. The mechanisms behind these beneficial effects of EE are only partially understood. In the current report, we describe a link between EE and neuropeptide Y (NPY), based on findings from NPY knockout (KO) mice exposed to EE. Relative to EE-housed wildtype (WT) animals, NPY KO mice displayed altered behaviour as well as molecular and morphological changes in amygdala and hippocampus. Exposure of WT mice to EE reduced anxiety and decreased central glucocorticoid receptor expression, effects which were absent in NPY KO mice. In addition, NPY deletion altered the preference of EE items, and EE-housed NPY KO mice responded to stress with exaggerated hyperthermia, displayed impaired spatial memory, had higher hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA levels and altered hippocampal synaptic plasticity, effects which were not seen in WT mice. Accordingly, these findings suggest that NPY contributes to the anxiolytic effect of EE and that NPY deletion reverses the beneficial effects of EE into a negative experience. The NPY system could thus be a target for "enviromimetics", therapeutics which reproduce the beneficial effects of enhanced environmental stimulation. PMID:27305846

  2. Technical knockout, a Drosophila model of mitochondrial deafness.

    PubMed Central

    Toivonen, J M; O'Dell, K M; Petit, N; Irvine, S C; Knight, G K; Lehtonen, M; Longmuir, M; Luoto, K; Touraille, S; Wang, Z; Alziari, S; Shah, Z H; Jacobs, H T

    2001-01-01

    Mutations in mtDNA-encoded components of the mitochondrial translational apparatus are associated with diverse pathological states in humans, notably sensorineural deafness. To develop animal models of such disorders, we have manipulated the nuclear gene for mitochondrial ribosomal protein S12 in Drosophila (technical knockout, tko). The prototypic mutant tko(25t) exhibits developmental delay, bang sensitivity, impaired male courtship, and defective response to sound. On the basis of a transgenic reversion test, these phenotypes are attributable to a single substitution (L85H) at a conserved residue of the tko protein. The mutant is hypersensitive to doxycyclin, an antibiotic that selectively inhibits mitochondrial protein synthesis, and mutant larvae have greatly diminished activities of mitochondrial redox enzymes and decreased levels of mitochondrial small-subunit rRNA. A second mutation in the tko gene, Q116K, which is predicted to impair the accuracy of mitochondrial translation, results in the completely different phenotype of recessive female sterility, based on three independent transgenic insertions. We infer that the tko(25t) mutant provides a model of mitochondrial hearing impairment resulting from a quantitative deficiency of mitochondrial translational capacity. PMID:11560901

  3. Method and a horizontal pipeline pig launching mechanism for sequentially launching pipeline pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, G.W.

    1992-08-18

    This patent describes a method for timed automatic sequential launching of serially oriented pipeline pigs from a pig launching system having a tubular pig storage and launching magazine into a gas transmission pipeline. It comprises providing a source of hydraulic fluid medium; locating a free piston within the tubular pig storage and launching magazine for motive contact with the last of the serially oriented pipeline pigs; employing gas pressure from the gas transmission pipeline for pressurizing the hydraulic fluid medium from the source; introducing the pressurized hydraulic fluid medium into the hydraulic chamber; controllably releasing the restraining of the first of the serially oriented pipeline pigs from the tubular pig storage and launching magazine.

  4. Genetically modified pig models for neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Holm, Ida E; Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen; Luo, Yonglun

    2016-01-01

    Increasing incidence of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease has become one of the most challenging health issues in ageing humans. One approach to combat this is to generate genetically modified animal models of neurodegenerative disorders for studying pathogenesis, prognosis, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Owing to the genetic, anatomic, physiologic, pathologic, and neurologic similarities between pigs and humans, genetically modified pig models of neurodegenerative disorders have been attractive large animal models to bridge the gap of preclinical investigations between rodents and humans. In this review, we provide a neuroanatomical overview in pigs and summarize and discuss the generation of genetically modified pig models of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's diseases, Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal muscular atrophy, and ataxia-telangiectasia. We also highlight how non-invasive bioimaging technologies such as positron emission tomography (PET), computer tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and behavioural testing have been applied to characterize neurodegenerative pig models. We further propose a multiplex genome editing and preterm recloning (MAP) approach by using the rapid growth of the ground-breaking precision genome editing technology CRISPR/Cas9 and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). With this approach, we hope to shorten the temporal requirement in generating multiple transgenic pigs, increase the survival rate of founder pigs, and generate genetically modified pigs that will more closely resemble the disease-causing mutations and recapitulate pathological features of human conditions. PMID:26446984

  5. Archaea in the intestinal tract of pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of Archaea in the intestinal tract of pigs is limited. In order to investigate archaeal community structure, samples were taken from the cecum and proximal colon of finishing pigs (24) fed diets with either corn or solvent extracted corn germ meal (CGM). Corn germ meal feeding began in w...

  6. Sweating Like a Pig: Physics or Irony?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohren, Craig F.

    2016-01-01

    In his interesting and informative book "Is That a Fact?," Joe Schwarcz avers that pigs do not sweat and the saying "sweating like a pig" originates in iron smelting. Oblong pieces of hot iron, with a fancied resemblance to a sow with piglets, cool in sand to the dew point of the surrounding air, and hence water condenses on…

  7. Blastocystis tropism in the pig intestine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blastocystis subtype 5, a subtype known to infect humans, was detected by molecular methods in the feces of 36 naturally infected market age pigs. At necropsy, 6 heavily infected pigs were selected to determine the tropism of the infection within the gastrointestinal tract. Because so little is know...

  8. Guinea Pigs: Versatile Animals for the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barman, Charles R.

    1977-01-01

    Guinea pigs are presented as versatile classroom animals. Suggestions for animal behavior and genetics studies are given. Also included is information concerning sex determination and the breeding of guinea pigs, and hints on keeping these animals in the classroom. References and illustrations complete the article. (MA)

  9. A Homolog Pentameric Complex Dictates Viral Epithelial Tropism, Pathogenicity and Congenital Infection Rate in Guinea Pig Cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Stewart; Choi, K Yeon; Root, Matthew; McGregor, Alistair

    2016-07-01

    In human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), tropism to epithelial and endothelial cells is dependent upon a pentameric complex (PC). Given the structure of the placenta, the PC is potentially an important neutralizing antibody target antigen against congenital infection. The guinea pig is the only small animal model for congenital CMV. Guinea pig cytomegalovirus (GPCMV) potentially encodes a UL128-131 HCMV PC homolog locus (GP128-GP133). In transient expression studies, GPCMV gH and gL glycoproteins interacted with UL128, UL130 and UL131 homolog proteins (designated GP129 and GP131 and GP133 respectively) to form PC or subcomplexes which were determined by immunoprecipitation reactions directed to gH or gL. A natural GP129 C-terminal deletion mutant (aa 107-179) and a chimeric HCMV UL128 C-terminal domain swap GP129 mutant failed to form PC with other components. GPCMV infection of a newly established guinea pig epithelial cell line required a complete PC and a GP129 mutant virus lacked epithelial tropism and was attenuated in the guinea pig for pathogenicity and had a low congenital transmission rate. Individual knockout of GP131 or 133 genes resulted in loss of viral epithelial tropism. A GP128 mutant virus retained epithelial tropism and GP128 was determined not to be a PC component. A series of GPCMV mutants demonstrated that gO was not strictly essential for epithelial infection whereas gB and the PC were essential. Ectopic expression of a GP129 cDNA in a GP129 mutant virus restored epithelial tropism, pathogenicity and congenital infection. Overall, GPCMV forms a PC similar to HCMV which enables evaluation of PC based vaccine strategies in the guinea pig model. PMID:27387220

  10. A Homolog Pentameric Complex Dictates Viral Epithelial Tropism, Pathogenicity and Congenital Infection Rate in Guinea Pig Cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Alistair

    2016-01-01

    In human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), tropism to epithelial and endothelial cells is dependent upon a pentameric complex (PC). Given the structure of the placenta, the PC is potentially an important neutralizing antibody target antigen against congenital infection. The guinea pig is the only small animal model for congenital CMV. Guinea pig cytomegalovirus (GPCMV) potentially encodes a UL128-131 HCMV PC homolog locus (GP128-GP133). In transient expression studies, GPCMV gH and gL glycoproteins interacted with UL128, UL130 and UL131 homolog proteins (designated GP129 and GP131 and GP133 respectively) to form PC or subcomplexes which were determined by immunoprecipitation reactions directed to gH or gL. A natural GP129 C-terminal deletion mutant (aa 107–179) and a chimeric HCMV UL128 C-terminal domain swap GP129 mutant failed to form PC with other components. GPCMV infection of a newly established guinea pig epithelial cell line required a complete PC and a GP129 mutant virus lacked epithelial tropism and was attenuated in the guinea pig for pathogenicity and had a low congenital transmission rate. Individual knockout of GP131 or 133 genes resulted in loss of viral epithelial tropism. A GP128 mutant virus retained epithelial tropism and GP128 was determined not to be a PC component. A series of GPCMV mutants demonstrated that gO was not strictly essential for epithelial infection whereas gB and the PC were essential. Ectopic expression of a GP129 cDNA in a GP129 mutant virus restored epithelial tropism, pathogenicity and congenital infection. Overall, GPCMV forms a PC similar to HCMV which enables evaluation of PC based vaccine strategies in the guinea pig model. PMID:27387220

  11. Rare complete knockouts in humans: population distribution and significant role in autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Elaine T.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Sanders, Stephan J.; Stevens, Christine; Sabo, Aniko; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Kirby, Andrew; Ruderfer, Douglas M.; Fromer, Menachem; Lek, Monkol; Liu, Li; Flannick, Jason; Ripke, Stephan; Nagaswamy, Uma; Muzny, Donna; Reid, Jeffrey G.; Hawes, Alicia; Newsham, Irene; Wu, Yuanqing; Lewis, Lora; Dinh, Huyen; Gross, Shannon; Wang, Li-San; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Valladares, Otto; Gabriel, Stacey B.; dePristo, Mark; Altshuler, David M.; Purcell, Shaun M.; State, Matthew W.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Cook, Edwin H.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Sutcliffe, James S.; Devlin, Bernie; Roeder, Kathryn; Daly, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY To characterize the role of rare complete human knockouts in autism spectrum disorders (ASD), we identify genes with homozygous or compound heterozygous loss-of-function (LoF) variants (defined as nonsense and essential splice sites) from exome sequencing of 933 cases and 869 controls. We identify a two-fold increase in complete knockouts of autosomal genes with low rates of LoF variation (≤5% frequency) in cases and estimate a 3% contribution to ASD risk by these events, confirming this observation in an independent set of 563 probands and 4,605 controls. Outside the pseudo-autosomal regions on the X-chromosome, we similarly observe a significant 1.5-fold increase in rare hemizygous knockouts in males, contributing to another 2% of ASDs in males. Taken together these results provide compelling evidence that rare autosomal and X-chromosome complete gene knockouts are important inherited risk factors for ASD. PMID:23352160

  12. INDUCTION OF MAMMARY GLAND DEVELOPMENT IN ESTROGEN RECEPTOR-ALPHA KNOCKOUT MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mammary glands from the estrogen receptor knockout ( ERKO) mouse do not undergo ductal morphogenesis or alveolar development. Disrupted Er signaling may result in reduced estrogen-responsive gene products in the mammary gland or reduced mammotropic hormones that contribute t...

  13. Guinea Pig Ciliary Muscle Development

    PubMed Central

    Pucker, Andrew D.; Carpenter, Ashley R.; McHugh, Kirk M.; Mutti, Donald O.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to develop a method for quantifying guinea pig ciliary muscle volume (CMV) and to determine its relationship to age and ocular biometric measurements. Methods Six albino guinea pigs eyes were collected at each of five ages (n=30 eyes). Retinoscopy and photography were used to document refractive error, eye size, and eye shape. Serial sections through the excised eyes were made and then labeled with an α-smooth muscle actin antibody. The CM was then visualized with an Olympus BX51 microscope, reconstructed with Stereo Investigator (MBF Bioscience) and analyzed using Neurolucida Explorer (MBF Bioscience). Full (using all sections) and partial (using a subset of sections) reconstruction methods were used to determine CMV. Results There was no significant difference between the full and partial volume determination methods (P = 0.86). The mean CMV of the 1, 10, 20, 30, and 90-day old eyes was 0.40 ± 0.16 mm3, 0.48 ± 0.13 mm3, 0.67 ± 0.15 mm3, 0.86 ± 0.35 mm3, and 1.09 ± 0.63 mm3, respectively. CMV was significantly correlated with log age (P = 0.001), ocular length (P = 0.003), limbal circumference (P = 0.01), and equatorial diameter (P = 0.003). It was not correlated with refractive error (P = 0.73) or eye shape (P = 0.60). Multivariate regression determined that biometric variables were not significantly associated with CMV after adjustment for age. Conclusions Three-dimensional reconstruction was an effective means of determining CMV. These data provide evidence that CM growth occurs with age in tandem with eye size in normal albino guinea pigs. Additional work is needed to determine the relationship between CMV and abnormal ocular growth. PMID:24901488

  14. Apolipoprotein E knockout as the basis for mouse models of dyslipidemia-induced neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Hinder, Lucy M; Vincent, Andrea M; Hayes, John M; McLean, Lisa L; Feldman, Eva L

    2013-01-01

    Dyslipidemia has been identified as an important pathogenic risk factor for diabetic neuropathy, but current animal models do not adequately reproduce the lipid profile observed in human diabetics (increased triglycerides with an elevated LDL-cholesterol and reduced HDL-cholesterol). High fat feeding of mice produces hyperlipidemia, but mice are resistant to increases in the LDL to HDL ratio, reducing the potential for peripheral lipid deposits to impact neuropathy, as is postulated to occur in human subjects. Genetic manipulations provide an alternative approach to reproducing a neuropathic plasma lipid profile. Based on findings from the atherosclerosis literature, we began with knockout of ApoE. Since knockout of ApoE alone only partially mimics the human diabetic lipid profile, we examined the impact of its combination with a well-characterized model of type 2 diabetes exhibiting neuropathy, the db/db mouse. We added further gene manipulations to increase hyperlipidemia by using mice with both ApoE and ApoB48 knockout on the ob/+ (leptin mutation) mice. In all of these models, we found that either the db/db or ob/ob genotypes had increased body weight, hyperlipidemia, hyperglycemia, and evidence of neuropathy compared with the control groups (db/+ or ob/+, respectively). We found that ApoE knockout combined with leptin receptor knockout produced a lipid profile most closely modeling human dyslipidemia that promotes neuropathy. ApoE knockout combined with additional ApoB48 and leptin knockout produced similar changes of smaller magnitude, but, notably, an increase in HDL-cholesterol. Our data suggest that the overall effects of ApoE knockout, either directly upon nerve structure and function or indirectly on lipid metabolism, are insufficient to significantly alter the course of diabetic neuropathy. Although these models ultimately do not deliver optimal lipid profiles for translational diabetic neuropathy research, they do present glycemic and lipid profile

  15. Knockout of leucine aminopeptidase in Toxoplasma gondii using CRISPR/Cas9.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jun; Jia, Honglin; Zheng, Yonghui

    2015-02-01

    Leucine aminopeptidases of the M17 peptidase family represent ideal drug targets for therapies directed against the pathogens Plasmodium, Babesia and Trypanosoma. Previously, we characterised Toxoplasma gondii leucine aminopeptidase and demonstrated its role in regulating the levels of free amino acids. In this study, we evaluated the potential of T. gondii leucine aminopeptidase as a drug target in T. gondii by a knockout method. Existing knockout methods for T. gondii have many drawbacks; therefore, we developed a new technique that takes advantage of the CRISPR/Cas9 system. We first chose a Cas9 target site in the gene encoding T. gondii leucine aminopeptidase and then constructed a knockout vector containing Cas9 and the single guide RNA. After transfection, single tachyzoites were cloned in 96-well plates by limiting dilution. Two transfected strains derived from a single clone were cultured in Vero cells, and then subjected to expression analysis by western blotting. The phenotypic analysis revealed that knockout of T. gondii leucine aminopeptidase resulted in inhibition of attachment/invasion and replication; both the growth and attachment/invasion capacity of knockout parasites were restored by complementation with a synonymously substituted allele of T. gondii leucine aminopeptidase. Mouse experiments demonstrated that T. gondii leucine aminopeptidase knockout somewhat reduced the pathogenicity of T. gondii. An enzymatic activity assay showed that T. gondii leucine aminopeptidase knockout reduced the processing of a leucine aminopeptidase-specific substrate in T. gondii. The absence of leucine aminopeptidase activity could be slightly compensated for in T. gondii. Overall, T. gondii leucine aminopeptidase knockout influenced the growth of T. gondii, but did not completely block parasite development, virulence or enzymatic activity. Therefore, we conclude that leucine aminopeptidase would be useful only as an adjunctive drug target in T. gondii. PMID

  16. Enhanced colonic tumorigenesis in alkaline sphingomyelinase (NPP7) knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Zhang, Ping; Xu, Shu-Chang; Yang, Liping; Voss, Ulrikke; Ekblad, Eva; Wu, Yunjin; Min, Yalan; Hertervig, Erik; Nilsson, Åke; Duan, Rui-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal alkaline sphingomyelinase (alk-SMase) generates ceramide and inactivates platelet-activating factor (PAF) and was previously suggested to have anticancer properties. The direct evidence is still lacking. We studied colonic tumorigenesis in alk-SMase knockout (KO) mice. Formation of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) was examined after azoxymethane (AOM) injection. Tumor was induced by AOM alone, a conventional AOM/dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) treatment, and an enhanced AOM/DSS method. β-Catenin was determined by immunohistochemistry, PAF levels by ELISA, and sphingomyelin metabolites by mass spectrometry. Without treatment, spontaneous tumorigenesis was not identified but the intestinal mucosa appeared thicker in KO than in wild-type (WT) littermates. AOM alone induced more ACF in KO mice but no tumors 28 weeks after injection. However, combination of AOM/DSS treatments induced colonic tumors and the incidence was significantly higher in KO than in WT mice. By the enhanced AOM/DSS method, tumor number per mouse increased 4.5 times and tumor size 1.8 times in KO compared with WT mice. Although all tumors were adenomas in WT mice, 32% were adenocarcinomas in KO mice. Compared with WT mice, cytosol expression of β-catenin was significantly increased and nuclear translocation in tumors was more pronounced in KO mice. Lipid analysis showed decreased ceramide in small intestine and increased sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in both small intestine and colon in nontreated KO mice. PAF levels in feces were significantly higher in the KO mice after AOM/DSS treatment. In conclusion, lack of alk-SMase markedly increases AOM/DSS-induced colonic tumorigenesis associated with decreased ceramide and increased S1P and PAF levels. PMID:25381265

  17. Feeding-elicited cataplexy in orexin knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Erika L.; Baumann, Christian R.; Cano, Georgina; Scammell, Thomas E.; Mochizuki, Takatoshi

    2009-01-01

    Mice lacking orexin/hypocretin signaling have sudden episodes of atonia and paralysis during active wakefulness. These events strongly resemble cataplexy, episodes of sudden muscle weakness triggered by strong positive emotions in people with narcolepsy, but it remains unknown whether murine cataplexy is triggered by positive emotions. To determine whether positive emotions elicit murine cataplexy, we placed orexin knockout (KO) mice on a scheduled feeding protocol with regular or highly palatable food. Baseline sleep/wake behavior was recorded with ad lib regular chow. Mice were then placed on a scheduled feeding protocol in which they received 60% of their normal amount of chow 3 hr after dark onset for the next 10 days. Wild-type and KO mice rapidly entrained to scheduled feeding with regular chow, with more wake and locomotor activity prior to the feeding time. On day 10 of scheduled feeding, orexin KO mice had slightly more cataplexy during the food-anticipation period and more cataplexy in the second half of the dark period, when they may have been foraging for residual food. To test whether more palatable food increases cataplexy, mice were then switched to scheduled feeding with an isocaloric amount of Froot Loops, a food often used as a reward in behavioral studies. With this highly palatable food, orexin KO mice had much more cataplexy during the food-anticipation period and throughout the dark period. The increase in cataplexy with scheduled feeding, especially with highly palatable food, suggests that positive emotions may trigger cataplexy in mice, just as in people with narcolepsy. Establishing this connection helps validate orexin KO mice as an excellent model of human narcolepsy and provides an opportunity to better understand the mechanisms that trigger cataplexy. PMID:19362119

  18. Salty taste deficits in CALHM1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Tordoff, Michael G; Ellis, Hillary T; Aleman, Tiffany R; Downing, Arnelle; Marambaud, Philippe; Foskett, J Kevin; Dana, Rachel M; McCaughey, Stuart A

    2014-07-01

    Genetic ablation of calcium homeostasis modulator 1 (CALHM1), which releases adenosine triphosphate from Type 2 taste cells, severely compromises the behavioral and electrophysiological responses to tastes detected by G protein-coupled receptors, such as sweet and bitter. However, the contribution of CALHM1 to salty taste perception is less clear. Here, we evaluated several salty taste-related phenotypes of CALHM1 knockout (KO) mice and their wild-type (WT) controls: 1) In a conditioned aversion test, CALHM1 WT and KO mice had similar NaCl avoidance thresholds. 2) In two-bottle choice tests, CALHM1 WT mice showed the classic inverted U-shaped NaCl concentration-preference function but CALHM1 KO mice had a blunted peak response. 3) In brief-access tests, CALHM1 KO mice showed less avoidance than did WT mice of high concentrations of NaCl, KCl, NH(4)Cl, and sodium lactate (NaLac). Amiloride further ameliorated the NaCl avoidance of CALHM1 KO mice, so that lick rates to a mixture of 1000 mM NaCl + 10 µM amiloride were statistically indistinguishable from those to water. 4) Relative to WT mice, CALHM1 KO mice had reduced chorda tympani nerve activity elicited by oral application of NaCl, NaLac, and sucrose but normal responses to HCl and NH(4)Cl. Chorda tympani responses to NaCl and NaLac were amiloride sensitive in WT but not KO mice. These results reinforce others demonstrating that multiple transduction pathways make complex, concentration-dependent contributions to salty taste perception. One of these pathways depends on CALHM1 to detect hypertonic NaCl in the mouth and signal the aversive taste of concentrated salt. PMID:24846212

  19. Maximal Oxygen Consumption Is Reduced in Aquaporin-1 Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Al-Samir, Samer; Goossens, Dominique; Cartron, Jean-Pierre; Nielsen, Søren; Scherbarth, Frank; Steinlechner, Stephan; Gros, Gerolf; Endeward, Volker

    2016-01-01

    We have measured maximal oxygen consumption ([Formula: see text]O2,max) of mice lacking one or two of the established mouse red-cell CO2 channels AQP1, AQP9, and Rhag. We intended to study whether these proteins, by acting as channels for O2, determine O2 exchange in the lung and in the periphery. We found that [Formula: see text]O2,max as determined by the Helox technique is reduced by ~16%, when AQP1 is knocked out, but not when AQP9 or Rhag are lacking. This figure holds for animals respiring normoxic as well as hypoxic gas mixtures. To see whether the reduction of [Formula: see text]O2,max is due to impaired O2 uptake in the lung, we measured carotid arterial O2 saturation (SO2) by pulse oximetry. Neither under normoxic (inspiratory O2 21%) nor under hypoxic conditions (11% O2) is there a difference in SO2 between AQP1null and WT mice, suggesting that AQP1 is not critical for O2 uptake in the lung. The fact that the % reduction of [Formula: see text]O2,max is identical in normoxia and hypoxia indicates moreover that the limitation of [Formula: see text]O2,max is not due to an O2 diffusion problem, neither in the lung nor in the periphery. Instead, it appears likely that AQP1null animals exhibit a reduced [Formula: see text]O2,max due to the reduced wall thickness and muscle mass of the left ventricles of their hearts, as reported previously. We conclude that very likely the properties of the hearts of AQP1 knockout mice cause a reduced maximal cardiac output and thus cause a reduced [Formula: see text]O2,max, which constitutes a new phenotype of these mice. PMID:27559317

  20. Autism-related behavioral abnormalities in synapsin knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Greco, Barbara; Managò, Francesca; Tucci, Valter; Kao, Hung-Teh; Valtorta, Flavia; Benfenati, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    Several synaptic genes predisposing to autism-spectrum disorder (ASD) have been identified. Nonsense and missense mutations in the SYN1 gene encoding for Synapsin I have been identified in families segregating for idiopathic epilepsy and ASD and genetic mapping analyses have identified variations in the SYN2 gene as significantly contributing to epilepsy predisposition. Synapsins (Syn I/II/III) are a multigene family of synaptic vesicle-associated phosphoproteins playing multiple roles in synaptic development, transmission and plasticity. Lack of SynI and/or SynII triggers a strong epileptic phenotype in mice associated with mild cognitive impairments that are also present in the non-epileptic SynIII−/− mice. SynII−/− and SynIII−/− mice also display schizophrenia-like traits, suggesting that Syns could be involved in the regulation of social behavior. Here, we studied social interaction and novelty, social recognition and social dominance, social transmission of food preference and social memory in groups of male SynI−/−, SynII−/− and SynIII−/− mice before and after the appearance of the epileptic phenotype and compared their performances with control mice. We found that deletion of Syn isoforms widely impairs social behaviors and repetitive behaviors, resulting in ASD-related phenotypes. SynI or SynIII deletion altered social behavior, whereas SynII deletion extensively impaired various aspects of social behavior and memory, altered exploration of a novel environment and increased self-grooming. Social impairments of SynI−/− and SynII−/− mice were evident also before the onset of seizures. The results demonstrate an involvement of Syns in generation of the behavioral traits of ASD and identify Syn knockout mice as a useful experimental model of ASD and epilepsy. PMID:23280234

  1. Spontaneous sleep and homeostatic sleep regulation in ghrelin knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Szentirmai, Eva; Kapás, Levente; Sun, Yuxiang; Smith, Roy G; Krueger, James M

    2007-07-01

    Ghrelin is well known for its feeding and growth hormone-releasing actions. It may also be involved in sleep regulation; intracerebroventricular administration and hypothalamic microinjections of ghrelin stimulate wakefulness in rats. Hypothalamic ghrelin, together with neuropeptide Y and orexin form a food intake-regulatory circuit. We hypothesized that this circuit also promotes arousal. To further investigate the role of ghrelin in the regulation of sleep-wakefulness, we characterized spontaneous and homeostatic sleep regulation in ghrelin knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice. Both groups of mice exhibited similar diurnal rhythms with more sleep and less wakefulness during the light period. In ghrelin KO mice, spontaneous wakefulness and rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS) were slightly elevated, and non-rapid-eye-movement sleep (NREMS) was reduced. KO mice had more fragmented NREMS than WT mice, as indicated by the shorter and greater number of NREMS episodes. Six hours of sleep deprivation induced rebound increases in NREMS and REMS and biphasic changes in electroencephalographic slow-wave activity (EEG SWA) in both genotypes. Ghrelin KO mice recovered from NREMS and REMS loss faster, and the delayed reduction in EEG SWA, occurring after sleep loss-enhanced increases in EEG SWA, was shorter-lasting compared with WT mice. These findings suggest that the basic sleep-wake regulatory mechanisms in ghrelin KO mice are not impaired and they are able to mount adequate rebound sleep in response to a homeostatic challenge. It is possible that redundancy in the arousal systems of the brain or activation of compensatory mechanisms during development allow for normal sleep-wake regulation in ghrelin KO mice. PMID:17409264

  2. A Conditional Knockout Mouse Line of the Oxytocin Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Heon-Jin; Caldwell, Heather K.; Macbeth, Abbe H.; Tolu, Selen G.; Young, W. Scott

    2008-01-01

    Oxytocin plays important roles in reproductive physiology and various behaviors, including maternal behavior and social memory. Its receptor (Oxtr) is present in peripheral tissues and brain, so a conditional knockout (KO, −/−) would be useful to allow elimination of the receptor in specific sites at defined times. We created a line of mice in which loxP sites flank Oxtr coding sequence (floxed) enable Cre recombinase-mediated inactivation of the receptor. We expressed Cre recombinase in these mice either in all tissues (Oxtr−/−) or the forebrain (OxtrFB/FB) using the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIα promoter. The latter KO has reduced Oxtr binding beginning 21–28 d postnatally, leading to prominent reductions in the lateral septum, hippocampus, and ventral pallidum. The medial amygdala is spared, and there is significant retention of binding within the olfactory bulb and nucleus and neocortex. We did not observe any deficits in the general health, sensorimotor functions, anxiety-like behaviors, or sucrose intake in either Oxtr−/− or OxtrFB/FB mice. Females of both KO types deliver pups, but only the OxtrFB/FB mice are able to eject milk. Oxtr−/− males show impaired social memory for familiar females, whereas the OxtrFB/FB males appear to recognize their species but not individuals. Our results confirm the importance of oxytocin in social recognition and demonstrate that spatial and temporal inactivation of the Oxtr will enable finer understanding of the physiological, behavioral, and developmental roles of the receptor. PMID:18356275

  3. Targeting cancer using KAT inhibitors to mimic lethal knockouts

    PubMed Central

    Brown, James A.L.; Bourke, Emer; Eriksson, Leif A.; Kerin, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Two opposing enzyme classes regulate fundamental elements of genome maintenance, gene regulation and metabolism, either through addition of an acetyl moiety by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) or its removal by histone de-acetyltransferases (HDAC), and are exciting targets for drug development. Importantly, dysfunctional acetylation has been implicated in numerous diseases, including cancer. Within the HAT superfamily the MYST family holds particular interest, as its members are directly involved in the DNA damage response and repair pathways and crucially, several members have been shown to be down-regulated in common cancers (such as breast and prostate). In the present study we focus on the development of lysine (K) acetyltransferase inhibitors (KATi) targeting the MYST family member Tip60 (Kat5), an essential protein, designed or discovered through screening libraries. Importantly, Tip60 has been demonstrated to be significantly down-regulated in many cancers which urgently require new treatment options. We highlight current and future efforts employing these KATi as cancer treatments and their ability to synergize and enhance current cancer treatments. We investigate the different methods of KATi production or discovery, their mechanisms and their validation models. Importantly, the utility of KATi is based on a key concept: using KATi to abrogate the activity of an already down-regulated essential protein (effectively creating a lethal knockout) provides another innovative mechanism for targeting cancer cells, while significantly minimizing any off-target effects to normal cells. This approach, combined with the rapidly developing interest in KATi, suggests that KATi have a bright future for providing truly personalized therapies. PMID:27528742

  4. Maximal Oxygen Consumption Is Reduced in Aquaporin-1 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Al-Samir, Samer; Goossens, Dominique; Cartron, Jean-Pierre; Nielsen, Søren; Scherbarth, Frank; Steinlechner, Stephan; Gros, Gerolf; Endeward, Volker

    2016-01-01

    We have measured maximal oxygen consumption (V˙O2,max) of mice lacking one or two of the established mouse red-cell CO2 channels AQP1, AQP9, and Rhag. We intended to study whether these proteins, by acting as channels for O2, determine O2 exchange in the lung and in the periphery. We found that V˙O2,max as determined by the Helox technique is reduced by ~16%, when AQP1 is knocked out, but not when AQP9 or Rhag are lacking. This figure holds for animals respiring normoxic as well as hypoxic gas mixtures. To see whether the reduction of V˙O2,max is due to impaired O2 uptake in the lung, we measured carotid arterial O2 saturation (SO2) by pulse oximetry. Neither under normoxic (inspiratory O2 21%) nor under hypoxic conditions (11% O2) is there a difference in SO2 between AQP1null and WT mice, suggesting that AQP1 is not critical for O2 uptake in the lung. The fact that the % reduction of V˙O2,max is identical in normoxia and hypoxia indicates moreover that the limitation of V˙O2,max is not due to an O2 diffusion problem, neither in the lung nor in the periphery. Instead, it appears likely that AQP1null animals exhibit a reduced V˙O2,max due to the reduced wall thickness and muscle mass of the left ventricles of their hearts, as reported previously. We conclude that very likely the properties of the hearts of AQP1 knockout mice cause a reduced maximal cardiac output and thus cause a reduced V˙O2,max, which constitutes a new phenotype of these mice. PMID:27559317

  5. P2X6 Knockout Mice Exhibit Normal Electrolyte Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Viering, Daan H. H. M.; Bos, Caro; Bindels, René J. M.; Hoenderop, Joost G. J.

    2016-01-01

    ATP-mediated signaling is an important regulator of electrolyte transport in the kidney. The purinergic cation channel P2X6 has been previously localized to the distal convoluted tubule (DCT), a nephron segment important for Mg2+ and Na+ reabsorption, but its role in ion transport remains unknown. In this study, P2x6 knockout (P2x6-/-) mice were generated to investigate the role of P2X6 in renal electrolyte transport. The P2x6-/- animals displayed a normal phenotype and did not differ physiologically from wild type mice. Differences in serum concentration and 24-hrs urine excretion of Na+, K+, Mg2+ and Ca2+ were not detected between P2x6+/+, P2x6+/- and P2x6-/- mice. Quantitative PCR was applied to examine potential compensatory changes in renal expression levels of other P2x subunits and electrolyte transporters, including P2x1-5, P2x7, Trpm6, Ncc, Egf, Cldn16, Scnn1, Slc12a3, Slc41a1, Slc41a3, Cnnm2, Kcnj10 and Fxyd2. Additionally, protein levels of P2X2 and P2X4 were assessed in P2x6+/+ and P2x6-/- mouse kidneys. However, significant changes in expression were not detected. Furthermore, no compensatory changes in gene expression could be demonstrated in heart material isolated from P2x6-/- mice. Except for a significant (P<0.05) upregulation of P2x2 in the heart of P2x6-/- mice compared to the P2x6+/+ mice. Thus, our data suggests that purinergic signaling via P2X6 is not significantly involved in the regulation of renal electrolyte handling under normal physiological conditions. PMID:27254077

  6. Diet-Induced Obesity in the Selenocysteine Lyase Knockout Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Gilman, Christy L.; Hashimoto, Ann C.; Ogawa-Wong, Ashley N.; Berry, Marla J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Selenocysteine lyase (Scly) mediates selenocysteine decomposition. It was previously demonstrated that, upon adequate caloric intake (12% kcal fat) and selenium deficiency, disruption of Scly in mice leads to development of metabolic syndrome. In this study, we investigate the effect of a high-fat (45% kcal) selenium-adequate diet in Scly knockout (KO) mice on development of metabolic syndrome. Involvement of selenoproteins in energy metabolism after Scly disruption was also examined in vitro in the murine hepatoma cell line, Hepa1-6, following palmitate treatment. Results: Scly KO mice were more susceptible to diet-induced obesity than their wild-type counterparts after feeding a high-fat selenium-adequate diet. Scly KO mice had aggravated hyperinsulinemia, hypercholesterolemia, glucose, and insulin intolerance, but unchanged inflammatory cytokines and expression of most selenoproteins, except increased serum selenoprotein P (Sepp1). Scly KO mice also exhibited enhanced hepatic levels of pyruvate and enzymes involved in the regulation of pyruvate cycling, such as pyruvate carboxylase (Pcx) and pyruvate dehydrogenase (Pdh). However, in vitro silencing of Scly in Hepa1-6 cells led to diminished Sepp1 expression, and concomitant palmitate treatment decreased Pdh expression. Innovation: The role of selenium in lipid metabolism is recognized, but specific selenium-dependent mechanisms leading to obesity are unclear. This study uncovers that Scly has a remarkable effect on obesity and metabolic syndrome development triggered by high-fat exposure, independent of the expression of most selenoproteins. Conclusion: Diet-induced obesity in Scly KO mice is aggravated, with effects on pyruvate levels and consequent activation of energy metabolism independent of selenoprotein levels. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 761–774. PMID:26192035

  7. Characterization of Heterogeneous Prostate Tumors in Targeted Pten Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Korsten, Hanneke; Ziel-van der Made, Angelique C. J.; van Weerden, Wytske M.; van der Kwast, Theo; Trapman, Jan; Van Duijn, Petra W.

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we generated a preclinical mouse prostate tumor model based on PSA-Cre driven inactivation of Pten. In this model homogeneous hyperplastic prostates (4-5m) developed at older age (>10m) into tumors. Here, we describe the molecular and histological characterization of the tumors in order to better understand the processes that are associated with prostate tumorigenesis in this targeted mouse Pten knockout model. The morphologies of the tumors that developed were very heterogeneous. Different histopathological growth patterns could be identified, including intraductal carcinoma (IDC), adenocarcinoma and undifferentiated carcinoma, all strongly positive for the epithelial cell marker Cytokeratin (CK), and carcinosarcomas, which were negative for CK. IDC pattern was already detected in prostates of 7–8 month old mice, indicating that it could be a precursor stage. At more than 10 months IDC and carcinosarcoma were most frequently observed. Gene expression profiling discriminated essentially two molecular subtypes, denoted tumor class 1 (TC1) and tumor class 2 (TC2). TC1 tumors were characterized by high expression of epithelial markers like Cytokeratin 8 and E-Cadherin whereas TC2 tumors showed high expression of mesenchyme/stroma markers such as Snail and Fibronectin. These molecular subtypes corresponded with histological growth patterns: where TC1 tumors mainly represented adenocarcinoma / intraductal carcinoma, in TC2 tumors carcinosarcoma was the dominant growth pattern. Further molecular characterization of the prostate tumors revealed an increased expression of genes associated with the inflammatory response. Moreover, functional markers for senescence, proliferation, angiogenesis and apoptosis were higher expressed in tumors compared to hyperplasia. The highest expression of proliferation and angiogenesis markers was detected in TC2 tumors. Our data clearly showed that in the genetically well-defined PSA-Cre;Pten-loxP/loxP prostate tumor model

  8. Comprehensive Behavioral Analysis of Cluster of Differentiation 47 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Koshimizu, Hisatsugu; Takao, Keizo; Matozaki, Takashi; Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Cluster of differentiation 47 (CD47) is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily which functions as a ligand for the extracellular region of signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα), a protein which is abundantly expressed in the brain. Previous studies, including ours, have demonstrated that both CD47 and SIRPα fulfill various functions in the central nervous system (CNS), such as the modulation of synaptic transmission and neuronal cell survival. We previously reported that CD47 is involved in the regulation of depression-like behavior of mice in the forced swim test through its modulation of tyrosine phosphorylation of SIRPα. However, other potential behavioral functions of CD47 remain largely unknown. In this study, in an effort to further investigate functional roles of CD47 in the CNS, CD47 knockout (KO) mice and their wild-type littermates were subjected to a battery of behavioral tests. CD47 KO mice displayed decreased prepulse inhibition, while the startle response did not differ between genotypes. The mutants exhibited slightly but significantly decreased sociability and social novelty preference in Crawley’s three-chamber social approach test, whereas in social interaction tests in which experimental and stimulus mice have direct contact with each other in a freely moving setting in a novel environment or home cage, there were no significant differences between the genotypes. While previous studies suggested that CD47 regulates fear memory in the inhibitory avoidance test in rodents, our CD47 KO mice exhibited normal fear and spatial memory in the fear conditioning and the Barnes maze tests, respectively. These findings suggest that CD47 is potentially involved in the regulation of sensorimotor gating and social behavior in mice. PMID:24586890

  9. Targeting cancer using KAT inhibitors to mimic lethal knockouts.

    PubMed

    Brown, James A L; Bourke, Emer; Eriksson, Leif A; Kerin, Michael J

    2016-08-15

    Two opposing enzyme classes regulate fundamental elements of genome maintenance, gene regulation and metabolism, either through addition of an acetyl moiety by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) or its removal by histone de-acetyltransferases (HDAC), and are exciting targets for drug development. Importantly, dysfunctional acetylation has been implicated in numerous diseases, including cancer. Within the HAT superfamily the MYST family holds particular interest, as its members are directly involved in the DNA damage response and repair pathways and crucially, several members have been shown to be down-regulated in common cancers (such as breast and prostate). In the present study we focus on the development of lysine (K) acetyltransferase inhibitors (KATi) targeting the MYST family member Tip60 (Kat5), an essential protein, designed or discovered through screening libraries. Importantly, Tip60 has been demonstrated to be significantly down-regulated in many cancers which urgently require new treatment options. We highlight current and future efforts employing these KATi as cancer treatments and their ability to synergize and enhance current cancer treatments. We investigate the different methods of KATi production or discovery, their mechanisms and their validation models. Importantly, the utility of KATi is based on a key concept: using KATi to abrogate the activity of an already down-regulated essential protein (effectively creating a lethal knockout) provides another innovative mechanism for targeting cancer cells, while significantly minimizing any off-target effects to normal cells. This approach, combined with the rapidly developing interest in KATi, suggests that KATi have a bright future for providing truly personalized therapies. PMID:27528742

  10. Normal Maternal Behavior, But Increased Pup Mortality, in Conditional Oxytocin Receptor Knockout Females

    PubMed Central

    Macbeth, Abbe H.; Stepp, Jennifer E.; Lee, Heon-Jin; Young, W. Scott; Caldwell, Heather K.

    2011-01-01

    Oxytocin (Oxt) and the Oxt receptor (Oxtr) are implicated in the onset of maternal behavior in a variety of species. Recently, we developed two Oxtr knockout lines: a total body knockout (Oxtr−/−) and a conditional Oxtr knockout (OxtrFB/FB) in which the Oxtr is lacking only in regions of the forebrain, allowing knockout females to potentially nurse and care for their biological offspring. In the current study, we assessed maternal behavior of postpartum OxtrFB/FB females toward their own pups and maternal behavior of virgin Oxtr−/− females toward foster pups and compared knockouts of both lines to wildtype (Oxtr+/+) littermates. We found that both Oxtr−/− and OxtrFB/FB females appear to have largely normal maternal behaviors. However, with first litters, approximately 40% of the OxtrFB/FB knockout dams experienced high pup mortality, compared to fewer than 10% of the Oxtr+/+ dams. We then went on to test whether or not this phenotype occurred in subsequent litters or when the dams were exposed to an environmental disturbance. We found that regardless of the degree of external disturbance, OxtrFB/FB females lost more pups on their first and second litters compared to wildtype females. Possible reasons for higher pup mortality in OxtrFB/FB females are discussed. PMID:20939667

  11. High Incidence of Xenogenic Bone Marrow Engraftment in Pig-to-Baboon Intra-Bone Bone Marrow Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tasaki, M.; Wamala, I.; Tena, A.; Villani, V.; Sekijima, M.; Pathiraja, V.; Wilkinson, R. A.; Pratts, S.; Cormack, T.; Clayman, E.; Arn, J. S.; Shimizu, A.; Fishman, J. A.; Sachs, D. H.; Yamada, K.

    2015-01-01

    Previous attempts of α-1,3-galactocyltransferase knockout (GalTKO) pig bone marrow (BM) transplantation (Tx) into baboons have demonstrated a loss of macro-chimerism within 24 h in most cases. In order to achieve improved engraftment with persistence of peripheral chimerism, we have developed a new strategy of intra-bone BM (IBBM) Tx. Six baboons received GalTKO BM cells, with one-half of the cells transplanted into the bilateral tibiae directly and the remaining cells injected intravenously (IBBM/BM-Tx) with a conditioning immunosuppressive regimen. In order to assess immune responses induced by the combined IBBM/BM-Tx, three recipients received donor SLA-matched GalTKO kidneys in the peri-operative period of IBBM/BM-Tx (Group 1), and the others received kidneys 2 months after IBBM/BM-Tx (Group 2). Peripheral macro-chimerism was continuously detectable for up to 13 days (mean 7.7 days; range 3–13) post-IBBM/BM-Tx and in three animals, macro-chimerism reappeared at days 10, 14 and 21. Pig CFUs, indicating porcine progenitor cell engraftment, were detected in the host BM in four of six recipients on days 14, 15, 19 and 28. In addition, anti-pig unresponsiveness was observed by in vitro assays. GalTKO/pCMV-kidneys survived for extended periods (47 and 60 days). This strategy may provide a potent adjunct for inducing xenogeneic tolerance through BM-Tx. PMID:25676635

  12. PIG KIDNEY GRAFT SURVIVAL IN A BABOON FOR 136 DAYS: LONGEST LIFE-SUPPORTING ORGAN GRAFT SURVIVAL TO DATE

    PubMed Central

    Iwase, Hayato; Liu, Hong; Wijkstrom, Martin; Zhou, Huidong; Singh, Jagjit; Hara, Hidetaka; Ezzelarab, Mohamed; Long, Cassandra; Klein, Edwin; Wagner, Robert; Phelps, Carol; Ayares, David; Shapiro, Ron; Humar, Abhinav; Cooper, David KC

    2015-01-01

    The longest survival of a nonhuman primate with a life-supporting kidney graft to date has been 90 days, though graft survival >30 days has been unusual. A baboon received a kidney graft from an α1,3-galactosyltransferase gene-knockout pig transgenic for two human complement- and three human coagulation- regulatory proteins (though only one was expressed in the kidney). Immunosuppressive therapy was with ATG+anti-CD20mAb (induction) and anti-CD40mAb+rapamycin+corticosteroids (maintenance). Anti-TNF-α and anti-IL-6R were administered. The baboon survived 136 days with a generally stable serum creatinine (0.6–1.6mg/dL) until terminally. No features of a consumptive coagulopathy (e.g., thrombocytopenia, decreased fibrinogen) or of a protein-losing nephropathy were observed. There was no evidence of an elicited anti-pig antibody response. Death was from septic shock (Myroides spp). Histology of a biopsy on day 103 was normal, but by day 136 the kidney showed features of glomerular enlargement, thrombi, and mesangial expansion. The combination of (i) a graft from a specific genetically-engineered pig, (ii) an effective immunosuppressive regimen, and (iii) anti-inflammatory agents prevented immune injury and a protein-losing nephropathy, and delayed coagulation dysfunction. This outcome encourages us that clinical renal xenotransplantation may become a reality. PMID:26130164

  13. Nitrotyrosinylation, Remodeling and Endothelial-Myocyte Uncoupling in iNOS, Cystathionine Beta Synthase (CBS) Knockouts and iNOS/CBS Double Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Soumi; Kumar, Munish; Sen, Utpal; Mishra, Paras K.; Tyagi, Neetu; Metreveli, Naira; Lominadze, David; Rodriguez, Walter; Tyagi, Suresh C.

    2009-01-01

    Increased levels of homocysteine (Hcy), recognized as hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy), were associated with cardiovascular diseases. There was controversy regarding the detrimental versus cardio protective role of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in ischemic heart disease. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the Hcy generated nitrotyrosine by inducing the endothelial nitric oxide synthase, causing endothelial-myocyte (E–M) coupling. To differentiate the role of iNOS versus constitutive nitric oxide synthase (eNOS and nNOS) in Hcy-mediated nitrotyrosine generation and matrix remodeling in cardiac dysfunction, left ventricular (LV) tissue was analyzed from cystathionine beta synthase (CBS) heterozygote knockout, iNOS homozygote knockout, CBS−/+/iNOS−/− double knockout, and wild-type (WT) mice. The levels of nitrotyrosine, MMP-2 and -9 (zymographic analysis), and fibrosis (by trichrome stain) were measured. The endothelial-myocyte function was determined in cardiac rings. In CBS−/+ mice, homocysteine was elevated and in iNOS−/− mice, nitric oxide was significantly reduced. The nitrotyrosine and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) levels were elevated in double knockout and CBS−/+ as compared to WT mice. Although MMP-2 levels were similar in CBS−/+, iNOS−/−, and CBS−/+/iNOS−/−, the levels were three- to fourfold higher than WT. The levels of collagen were similar in CBS−/+ and iNOS−/−, but they were threefold higher than WT. Interesting, the levels of collagen increased sixfold in double knockouts, compared to WT, suggesting synergism between high Hcy and lack of iNOS. Left ventricular hypertrophy was exaggerated in the iNOS−/− and double knockout, and mildly increased in the CBS−/+, compared to WT mice. The endothelial-dependent relaxation was attenuated to the same extent in the CBS−/+ and iNOS−/−, compared to WT, but it was robustly blunted in double knockouts. The results concluded that homocysteine

  14. Salmonellas on pig farms and in abattoirs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J. A.; Ghosh, A. C.; Mann, P. G.; Tee, G. H.

    1972-01-01

    Salmonella infection on two pig farms and its relation to infection in pigs at slaughter was studied. On the first farm feed ingredients were mixed on the farm, and these included fish meal which was found to be contaminated with salmonellas. The feed was pumped to pigs in liquid form. There was a high salmonella isolation rate at slaughter when the contaminated fish meal was fed in liquid feed, but it was significantly lower when no fish meal was fed to the pigs examined at slaughter. In some instances the same serotypes were found in fish meal and pig excreta on the farm and in caecal contents of the pigs at slaughter. No serotype was repeatedly isolated from any source and it appeared that the serotypes were not able to establish themselves in the pigs. It is concluded that infection found at slaughter originated on the farm where fish meal introduced and maintained infection. There was an opportunity for salmonellas to have multiplied in the liquid feed for several hours each day. On a second farm environmental conditions were similar, but feed was given in the form of ready-made pellets and nuts. Salmonellas were not isolated from the feed. At slaughter there was a significantly lower isolation rate than on the first farm. PMID:4501835

  15. Continuous odour measurement from fattening pig units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romain, Anne-Claude; Nicolas, Jacques; Cobut, Pierre; Delva, Julien; Nicks, Baudouin; Philippe, François-Xavier

    2013-10-01

    A study in experimental slatted-system fattening pig units was conducted with the aim of estimating the odour emission factor (in ou s.pig-1), which can subsequently be used in dispersion models to assess the odour annoyance zone. Dynamic olfactometry measurements carried out at different development stages of pigs showed a logical trend of the mean assessed odour emission factor with the pig mass. However, the variation within the same mass class was much larger than variation between classes. Possible causes of such variation were identified as the evolution of ventilation rate during the day and the circadian rhythm of pig. To be able to monitor continuously the daily variation of the odour, an electronic nose was used with suitable regression model calibrated against olfactometric measurements. After appropriate validation check, the electronic nose proved to be convenient, as a complementary tool to dynamic olfactometry, to record the daily variation of the odour emission factor in the pig barn. It was demonstrated that, in the controlled conditions of the experimental pens, the daily variation of the odour emission rate could be mainly attributed to the sole influence of the circadian rhythm of pig. As a consequence, determining a representative odour emission factor in a real case cannot be based on a snapshot odour sampling.

  16. Sarcoptic mange infestation in pigs: an overview.

    PubMed

    Laha, R

    2015-12-01

    Sarcoptic mange infestation in pigs is caused by Sarcoptes scabiei var. suis. It is the most common mange infestation of pigs. The parasite is distributed worldwide. Pig owners are generally concerned about the internal parasitic infections and ignored the external parasitic infestations. But the external parasitic infestation with S. scabiei var. suis has economic significance as it causes morbidity, mortality, decreased fertility and feed conversion ratio in pigs. Keeping in view of importance of S. scabies var. suis infestation in pigs, this communication discussed about the present and past research works done on S. scabies var. suis infestation in pigs, particularly its prevalence, life cycle, pathological lesions, clinical symptoms, haematobiochemical changes, diagnosis, treatment and control, to have an idea about this infestation at a glance. It has been concluded that the research work done on sarcoptic mange infestation in pigs in India is less in comparison to other countries. It may be due to its consideration as a neglected parasite or due to it's under report. Organization of awareness programs for the farmers by extension personalities or other authorities might be able to save the farmers from economic losses due to this infestation. PMID:26688620

  17. Epitope recognition in the human-pig comparison model on fixed and embedded material.

    PubMed

    Scalia, Carla Rossana; Gendusa, Rossella; Basciu, Maria; Riva, Lorella; Tusa, Lorenza; Musarò, Antonella; Veronese, Silvio; Formenti, Angelo; D'Angelo, Donatella; Ronzio, Angela Gabriella; Cattoretti, Giorgio; Bolognesi, Maddalena Maria

    2015-10-01

    The conditions and the specificity by which an antibody binds to its target protein in routinely fixed and embedded tissues are unknown. Direct methods, such as staining in a knock-out animal or in vitro peptide scanning of the epitope, are costly and impractical. We aimed to elucidate antibody specificity and binding conditions using tissue staining and public genomic and immunological databases by comparing human and pig-the farmed mammal evolutionarily closest to humans besides apes. We used a database of 146 anti-human antibodies and found that antibodies tolerate partially conserved amino acid substitutions but not changes in target accessibility, as defined by epitope prediction algorithms. Some epitopes are sensitive to fixation and embedding in a species-specific fashion. We also find that half of the antibodies stain porcine tissue epitopes that have 60% to 100% similarity to human tissue at the amino acid sequence level. The reason why the remaining antibodies fail to stain the tissues remains elusive. Because of its similarity with the human, pig tissue offers a convenient tissue for quality control in immunohistochemistry, within and across laboratories, and an interesting model to investigate antibody specificity. PMID:26209082

  18. GLUCOSE METABOLISM IN PIGS EXPRESSING HUMAN GENES UNDER AN INSULIN PROMOTER

    PubMed Central

    Wijkstrom, M.; Bottino, R.; Iwase, H.; Hara, H.; Ekser, B.; van der Windt, D.J.; Long, C.; Toledo, F.; Phelps, C.; Trucco, M.; Cooper, D.K.C.; Ayares, D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Xenotransplantation of porcine islets can reverse diabetes in nonhuman primates. The remaining hurdles for clinical application include safe and effective T-cell directed immunosuppression, but protection against the innate immune system and coagulation dysfunction may be more difficult to achieve. Islet-targeted genetic manipulation of islet-source pigs represents a powerful tool to protect against graft loss. However, whether these genetic alterations would impair islet function is unknown. Methods On a background of α1,3-galactosyltransferase gene-knockout (GTKO)/human (h) CD46, additional genes (hCD39, human tissue factor pathway inhibitor, porcine CTLA4-Ig) were inserted in different combinations under an insulin promoter to promote expression in islets (confirmed by immunofluorescence). Seven pigs were tested for baseline and glucose/arginine-challenged levels of glucose, insulin, C-peptide, and glucagon. Results This preliminary study did not show definite evidence of β-cell deficiencies, even when 3 transgenes were expressed under the insulin promoter. Of 7 animals, all were normoglycemic at fasting, and 5 of 7 had normal glucose disposal rates after challenge. All animals exhibited insulin, C-peptide, and glucagon responses to both glucose and arginine challenge; however, significant interindividual variation was observed. Conclusions Multiple islet-targeted transgenic expression was not associated with an overtly detrimental effect on islet function, suggesting that complex genetic constructs designed for islet protection warrants further testing in islet xenotransplantation models. PMID:25382150

  19. Altered Neurocircuitry in the Dopamine Transporter Knockout Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaowei; Bearer, Elaine L.; Boulat, Benoit; Hall, F. Scott; Uhl, George R.; Jacobs, Russell E.

    2010-01-01

    The plasma membrane transporters for the monoamine neurotransmitters dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine modulate the dynamics of these monoamine neurotransmitters. Thus, activity of these transporters has significant consequences for monoamine activity throughout the brain and for a number of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Gene knockout (KO) mice that reduce or eliminate expression of each of these monoamine transporters have provided a wealth of new information about the function of these proteins at molecular, physiological and behavioral levels. In the present work we use the unique properties of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to probe the effects of altered dopaminergic dynamics on meso-scale neuronal circuitry and overall brain morphology, since changes at these levels of organization might help to account for some of the extensive pharmacological and behavioral differences observed in dopamine transporter (DAT) KO mice. Despite the smaller size of these animals, voxel-wise statistical comparison of high resolution structural MR images indicated little morphological change as a consequence of DAT KO. Likewise, proton magnetic resonance spectra recorded in the striatum indicated no significant changes in detectable metabolite concentrations between DAT KO and wild-type (WT) mice. In contrast, alterations in the circuitry from the prefrontal cortex to the mesocortical limbic system, an important brain component intimately tied to function of mesolimbic/mesocortical dopamine reward pathways, were revealed by manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI). Analysis of co-registered MEMRI images taken over the 26 hours after introduction of Mn2+ into the prefrontal cortex indicated that DAT KO mice have a truncated Mn2+ distribution within this circuitry with little accumulation beyond the thalamus or contralateral to the injection site. By contrast, WT littermates exhibit Mn2+ transport into more posterior midbrain nuclei and contralateral mesolimbic structures at

  20. Nuclear transfer and transgenesis in the pig.

    PubMed

    Kurome, Mayuko; Kessler, Barbara; Wuensch, Annegret; Nagashima, Hiroshi; Wolf, Eckhard

    2015-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) using genetically modified donor cells facilitates the generation of tailored pig models for biomedical research and for xenotransplantation. Up to now, SCNT is the main way to generate gene-targeted pigs, since germ line-competent pluripotent stem cells are not available for this species. In this chapter, we introduce our routine workflow for the production of genetically engineered pigs, especially focused on the genetic modification of somatic donor cells, SCNT using in vitro matured oocytes, and laparoscopic embryo transfer. PMID:25287337

  1. Impaired Social Behavior in 5-HT3A Receptor Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Smit-Rigter, Laura A.; Wadman, Wytse J.; van Hooft, Johannes A.

    2010-01-01

    The 5-HT3 receptor is a ligand-gated ion channel expressed on interneurons throughout the brain. So far, analysis of the 5-HT3A knockout mouse revealed changes in nociceptive processing and a reduction in anxiety related behavior. Recently, it was shown that the 5-HT3 receptor is also expressed on Cajal-Retzius cells which play a key role in cortical development and that knockout mice lacking this receptor showed aberrant growth of the dendritic tree of cortical layer II/III pyramidal neurons. Other mouse models in which serotonergic signaling was disrupted during development showed similar morphological changes in the cortex, and in addition, also deficits in social behavior. Here, we subjected male and female 5-HT3A knockout mice and their non-transgenic littermates to several tests of social behavior. We found that 5-HT3A knockout mice display impaired social communication in the social transmission of food preference task. Interestingly, we showed that in the social interaction test only female 5-HT3A knockout mice spent less time in reciprocal social interaction starting after 5 min of testing. Moreover, we observed differences in preference for social novelty for male and female 5-HT3A knockout mice during the social approach test. However, no changes in olfaction, exploratory activity and anxiety were detected. These results indicate that the 5-HT3A knockout mouse displays impaired social behavior with specific changes in males and females, reminiscent to other mouse models in which serotonergic signaling is disturbed in the developing brain. PMID:21103015

  2. Viral Glycoprotein Complex Formation, Essential Function and Immunogenicity in the Guinea Pig Model for Cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Stewart; Hornig, Julia; Maddux, Sarah; Choi, K Yeon; McGregor, Alistair

    2015-01-01

    Development of a cytomegalovirus (CMV) vaccine is a major public health priority due to the risk of congenital infection. A key component of a vaccine is thought to be an effective neutralizing antibody response against the viral glycoproteins necessary for cell entry. Species specificity of human CMV (HCMV) precludes direct studies in an animal model. The guinea pig is the only small animal model for congenital cytomegalovirus infection. Analysis of the guinea pig CMV (GPCMV) genome indicates that it potentially encodes homologs to the HCMV glycoproteins (including gB, gH, gL, gM, gN and gO) that form various cell entry complexes on the outside of the virus: gCI (gB); gCII (gH/gL/gO); gCIII (gM/gN). The gB homolog (GP55) has been investigated as a candidate subunit vaccine but little is known about the other homolog proteins. GPCMV glycoproteins were investigated by transient expression studies which indicated that homolog glycoproteins to gN and gM, or gH, gL and gO were able to co-localize in cells and generate respective homolog complexes which could be verified by immunoprecipitation assays. ELISA studies demonstrated that the individual complexes were highly immunogenic in guinea pigs. The gO (GP74) homolog protein has 13 conserved N-glycosylation sites found in HCMV gO. In transient expression studies, only the glycosylated protein is detected but in virus infected cells both N-glycosylated and non-glycosylated gO protein were detected. In protein interaction studies, a mutant gO that lacked N-glycosylation sites had no impact on the ability of the protein to interact with gH/gL which indicated a potential alternative function associated with these sites. Knockout GPCMV BAC mutagenesis of the respective glycoprotein genes (GP55 for gB, GP75 for gH, GP115 for gL, GP100 for gM, GP73 for gN and GP74 for gO) in separate reactions was lethal for virus regeneration on fibroblast cells which demonstrated the essential nature of the GPCMV glycoproteins. The gene

  3. Viral Glycoprotein Complex Formation, Essential Function and Immunogenicity in the Guinea Pig Model for Cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    Maddux, Sarah; Choi, K. Yeon; McGregor, Alistair

    2015-01-01

    Development of a cytomegalovirus (CMV) vaccine is a major public health priority due to the risk of congenital infection. A key component of a vaccine is thought to be an effective neutralizing antibody response against the viral glycoproteins necessary for cell entry. Species specificity of human CMV (HCMV) precludes direct studies in an animal model. The guinea pig is the only small animal model for congenital cytomegalovirus infection. Analysis of the guinea pig CMV (GPCMV) genome indicates that it potentially encodes homologs to the HCMV glycoproteins (including gB, gH, gL, gM, gN and gO) that form various cell entry complexes on the outside of the virus: gCI (gB); gCII (gH/gL/gO); gCIII (gM/gN). The gB homolog (GP55) has been investigated as a candidate subunit vaccine but little is known about the other homolog proteins. GPCMV glycoproteins were investigated by transient expression studies which indicated that homolog glycoproteins to gN and gM, or gH, gL and gO were able to co-localize in cells and generate respective homolog complexes which could be verified by immunoprecipitation assays. ELISA studies demonstrated that the individual complexes were highly immunogenic in guinea pigs. The gO (GP74) homolog protein has 13 conserved N-glycosylation sites found in HCMV gO. In transient expression studies, only the glycosylated protein is detected but in virus infected cells both N-glycosylated and non-glycosylated gO protein were detected. In protein interaction studies, a mutant gO that lacked N-glycosylation sites had no impact on the ability of the protein to interact with gH/gL which indicated a potential alternative function associated with these sites. Knockout GPCMV BAC mutagenesis of the respective glycoprotein genes (GP55 for gB, GP75 for gH, GP115 for gL, GP100 for gM, GP73 for gN and GP74 for gO) in separate reactions was lethal for virus regeneration on fibroblast cells which demonstrated the essential nature of the GPCMV glycoproteins. The gene

  4. Production of α1,3-galactosyltransferase targeted pigs using transcription activator-like effector nuclease-mediated genome editing technology.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jung-Taek; Kwon, Dae-Kee; Park, A-Rum; Lee, Eun-Jin; Yun, Yun-Jin; Ji, Dal-Young; Lee, Kiho; Park, Kwang-Wook

    2016-03-01

    Recent developments in genome editing technology using meganucleases demonstrate an efficient method of producing gene edited pigs. In this study, we examined the effectiveness of the transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) system in generating specific mutations on the pig genome. Specific TALEN was designed to induce a double-strand break on exon 9 of the porcine α1,3-galactosyltransferase (GGTA1) gene as it is the main cause of hyperacute rejection after xenotransplantation. Human decay-accelerating factor (hDAF) gene, which can produce a complement inhibitor to protect cells from complement attack after xenotransplantation, was also integrated into the genome simultaneously. Plasmids coding for the TALEN pair and hDAF gene were transfected into porcine cells by electroporation to disrupt the porcine GGTA1 gene and express hDAF. The transfected cells were then sorted using a biotin-labeled IB4 lectin attached to magnetic beads to obtain GGTA1 deficient cells. As a result, we established GGTA1 knockout (KO) cell lines with biallelic modification (35.0%) and GGTA1 KO cell lines expressing hDAF (13.0%). When these cells were used for somatic cell nuclear transfer, we successfully obtained live GGTA1 KO pigs expressing hDAF. Our results demonstrate that TALEN-mediated genome editing is efficient and can be successfully used to generate gene edited pigs. PMID:27051344

  5. Production of α1,3-galactosyltransferase targeted pigs using transcription activator-like effector nuclease-mediated genome editing technology

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jung-Taek; Kwon, Dae-Kee; Park, A-Rum; Lee, Eun-Jin; Yun, Yun-Jin; Ji, Dal-Young; Lee, Kiho

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments in genome editing technology using meganucleases demonstrate an efficient method of producing gene edited pigs. In this study, we examined the effectiveness of the transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) system in generating specific mutations on the pig genome. Specific TALEN was designed to induce a double-strand break on exon 9 of the porcine α1,3-galactosyltransferase (GGTA1) gene as it is the main cause of hyperacute rejection after xenotransplantation. Human decay-accelerating factor (hDAF) gene, which can produce a complement inhibitor to protect cells from complement attack after xenotransplantation, was also integrated into the genome simultaneously. Plasmids coding for the TALEN pair and hDAF gene were transfected into porcine cells by electroporation to disrupt the porcine GGTA1 gene and express hDAF. The transfected cells were then sorted using a biotin-labeled IB4 lectin attached to magnetic beads to obtain GGTA1 deficient cells. As a result, we established GGTA1 knockout (KO) cell lines with biallelic modification (35.0%) and GGTA1 KO cell lines expressing hDAF (13.0%). When these cells were used for somatic cell nuclear transfer, we successfully obtained live GGTA1 KO pigs expressing hDAF. Our results demonstrate that TALEN-mediated genome editing is efficient and can be successfully used to generate gene edited pigs. PMID:27051344

  6. Decellularized GGTA1-KO pig heart valves do not bind preformed human xenoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Ramm, Robert; Niemann, Heiner; Petersen, Björn; Haverich, Axel; Hilfiker, Andres

    2016-07-01

    Pre-clinical and clinical data have unequivocally demonstrated the usefulness of decellularized heart valve (HV) matrices implanted for HV replacement therapy. However, human donor valves applicable for decellularization are in short supply, which prompts the search for suitable alternatives, such as porcine grafts. Since decellularization might be insufficient to remove all xenoantigens, we analysed the interaction of human preformed antibodies with decellularized porcine HV in vitro to assess potential immune reactions upon implantation. Detergent-decellularized pulmonary HV from German Landrace wild-type (wt) or α1,3-galactosyltransferase knockout (GGTA1-KO) pigs were investigated by inhibition ELISA and GSL I-B4 staining to localize and quantify matrix-bound αGal epitopes, which represent the most prominent xenoantigen. Additionally, preformed human xenoantibodies were affinity purified by perfusing porcine kidneys. Binding of purified human antibodies to decellularized HV was investigated by inhibition ELISA. Furthermore, binding of human plasma proteins to decellularized matrices was determined by western blot. Decellularized human pulmonary artery served as controls. Decellularization of wt HV led to a reduction of αGal epitopes by 70 %. Residual epitopes were associated with the subendothelial extracellular matrix. As expected, no αGal epitopes were found on decellularized GGTA1-KO matrix. The strongest binding of preformed human anti-pig antibodies was found on wt matrices, whereas GGTA1-KO matrices bound similar or even fewer xenoantibodies than human controls. These results demonstrate the suitability of GGTA1-KO pigs as donors for decellularized heart valves for human patients. Besides the presence of αGal antibodies on decellularized heart valves, no further preformed xenoantibodies against porcine matrix were detected in tested human sera. PMID:27154491

  7. Proteomic Identification of Non-Gal Antibody Targets After Pig-to-Primate Cardiac Xenotransplantation

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Guerard W.; Stalboerger, Paul G.; Davila, Eduardo; Heppelmann, Carrie J.; Gazi, Mozammel H.; McGregor, Hugh C. J.; LaBreche, Peter T.; Davies, William R.; Rao, Vinay P.; Oi, Keiji; Tazelaar, Henry D.; Logan, John S.; McGregor, Christopher G. A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Experience with non-antigenic galactose α1,3 galactose (αGal) polymers and development of αGal deficient pigs has reduced or eliminated the significance of this antigen in xenograft rejection. Despite these advances, delayed xenograft rejection (DXR) continues to occur most likely due to antibody responses to non-Gal endothelial cell (EC) antigens. Methods To gauge the diversity of the non-Gal antibody response we used antibody derived from CD46 transgenic heterotopic cardiac xenografts performed without T-cell immunosuppression, Group A (n = 4) and Gal knockout (GT-KO) heart transplants under tacrolimus and sirolimus immunosuppression, Group B (n = 8). Non-Gal antibody was measured by flow cytometry and by Western blots using GT-KO EC membrane antigens. A nanoLC/MS/MS analysis of proteins recovered from 2D gels was used to identify target antigens. Results Group A recipients exhibited a mixed cellular and humoral rejection. Group B recipients mainly exhibited classical DXR. Western blot analysis showed a non-Gal antibody response induced by GT+ and GT-KO hearts to an overlapping set of pig aortic EC membrane antigens. Proteomic analysis identified 14 potential target antigens but failed to define several immunodominant targets. Conclusions These experiments indicate that the non-Gal antibody response is directed to a number of stress response and inflammation related pig EC antigens and a few undefined targets. Further analysis of these antibody specificities using alternative methods is required to more fully define the repertoire of non-Gal antibody responses. PMID:18957049

  8. Diacylglycerol Lipase α Knockout Mice Demonstrate Metabolic and Behavioral Phenotypes Similar to Those of Cannabinoid Receptor 1 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Powell, David R.; Gay, Jason P.; Wilganowski, Nathaniel; Doree, Deon; Savelieva, Katerina V.; Lanthorn, Thomas H.; Read, Robert; Vogel, Peter; Hansen, Gwenn M.; Brommage, Robert; Ding, Zhi-Ming; Desai, Urvi; Zambrowicz, Brian

    2015-01-01

    After creating >4,650 knockouts (KOs) of independent mouse genes, we screened them by high-throughput phenotyping and found that cannabinoid receptor 1 (Cnr1) KO mice had the same lean phenotype published by others. We asked if our KOs of DAG lipase α or β (Dagla or Daglb), which catalyze biosynthesis of the endocannabinoid (EC) 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), or Napepld, which catalyzes biosynthesis of the EC anandamide, shared the lean phenotype of Cnr1 KO mice. We found that Dagla KO mice, but not Daglb or Napepld KO mice, were among the leanest of 3651 chow-fed KO lines screened. In confirmatory studies, chow- or high fat diet-fed Dagla and Cnr1 KO mice were leaner than wild-type (WT) littermates; when data from multiple cohorts of adult mice were combined, body fat was 47 and 45% lower in Dagla and Cnr1 KO mice, respectively, relative to WT values. By contrast, neither Daglb nor Napepld KO mice were lean. Weanling Dagla KO mice ate less than WT mice and had body weight (BW) similar to pair-fed WT mice, and adult Dagla KO mice had normal activity and VO2 levels, similar to Cnr1 KO mice. Our Dagla and Cnr1 KO mice also had low fasting insulin, triglyceride, and total cholesterol levels, and after glucose challenge had normal glucose but very low insulin levels. Dagla and Cnr1 KO mice also showed similar responses to a battery of behavioral tests. These data suggest: (1) the lean phenotype of young Dagla and Cnr1 KO mice is mainly due to hypophagia; (2) in pathways where ECs signal through Cnr1 to regulate food intake and other metabolic and behavioral phenotypes observed in Cnr1 KO mice, Dagla alone provides the 2-AG that serves as the EC signal; and (3) small molecule Dagla inhibitors with a pharmacokinetic profile similar to that of Cnr1 inverse agonists are likely to mirror the ability of these Cnr1 inverse agonists to lower BW and improve glycemic control in obese patients with type 2 diabetes, but may also induce undesirable neuropsychiatric side

  9. Diacylglycerol Lipase α Knockout Mice Demonstrate Metabolic and Behavioral Phenotypes Similar to Those of Cannabinoid Receptor 1 Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Powell, David R; Gay, Jason P; Wilganowski, Nathaniel; Doree, Deon; Savelieva, Katerina V; Lanthorn, Thomas H; Read, Robert; Vogel, Peter; Hansen, Gwenn M; Brommage, Robert; Ding, Zhi-Ming; Desai, Urvi; Zambrowicz, Brian

    2015-01-01

    After creating >4,650 knockouts (KOs) of independent mouse genes, we screened them by high-throughput phenotyping and found that cannabinoid receptor 1 (Cnr1) KO mice had the same lean phenotype published by others. We asked if our KOs of DAG lipase α or β (Dagla or Daglb), which catalyze biosynthesis of the endocannabinoid (EC) 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), or Napepld, which catalyzes biosynthesis of the EC anandamide, shared the lean phenotype of Cnr1 KO mice. We found that Dagla KO mice, but not Daglb or Napepld KO mice, were among the leanest of 3651 chow-fed KO lines screened. In confirmatory studies, chow- or high fat diet-fed Dagla and Cnr1 KO mice were leaner than wild-type (WT) littermates; when data from multiple cohorts of adult mice were combined, body fat was 47 and 45% lower in Dagla and Cnr1 KO mice, respectively, relative to WT values. By contrast, neither Daglb nor Napepld KO mice were lean. Weanling Dagla KO mice ate less than WT mice and had body weight (BW) similar to pair-fed WT mice, and adult Dagla KO mice had normal activity and VO2 levels, similar to Cnr1 KO mice. Our Dagla and Cnr1 KO mice also had low fasting insulin, triglyceride, and total cholesterol levels, and after glucose challenge had normal glucose but very low insulin levels. Dagla and Cnr1 KO mice also showed similar responses to a battery of behavioral tests. These data suggest: (1) the lean phenotype of young Dagla and Cnr1 KO mice is mainly due to hypophagia; (2) in pathways where ECs signal through Cnr1 to regulate food intake and other metabolic and behavioral phenotypes observed in Cnr1 KO mice, Dagla alone provides the 2-AG that serves as the EC signal; and (3) small molecule Dagla inhibitors with a pharmacokinetic profile similar to that of Cnr1 inverse agonists are likely to mirror the ability of these Cnr1 inverse agonists to lower BW and improve glycemic control in obese patients with type 2 diabetes, but may also induce undesirable neuropsychiatric side

  10. Infection status of pigs with Cryptosporidium parvum

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jae-Ran

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the infection status of pigs with Cryptosporidium parvum, 589 fecal samples were collected from pigs raised at farm in Chungcheongbuk-do and Chungcheongnam-do. Of the 589 pig fecal samples, 62 (10.5%) were positive for C. parvum. The area showing the highest positive rate was Dangjin-gun, Chungcheongnam-do (14.0%), and the lowest (0%) Salmi-myon, Chungcheongbuk-do. The positive rate of C. parvum in Judok-eup increased from 12.7% in the winter to 22.1% in the summer. The results of this study suggest that the pigs may be a source of human C. parvum infection. PMID:15060340

  11. The Pig Olfactory Brain: A Primer.

    PubMed

    Brunjes, Peter C; Feldman, Sanford; Osterberg, Stephen K

    2016-06-01

    Despite the fact that pigs are reputed to have excellent olfactory abilities, few studies have examined regions of the pig brain involved in the sense of smell. The present study provides an overview of the olfactory bulb, anterior olfactory nucleus, and piriform cortex of adult pigs using several approaches. Nissl, myelin, and Golgi stains were used to produce a general overview of the organization of the regions and confocal microscopy was employed to examine 1) projection neurons, 2) GABAergic local circuit neurons that express somatostatin, parvalbumin, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, or calretinin, 3) neuromodulatory fibers (cholinergic and serotonergic), and 4) glia (astrocytes and microglia). The findings revealed that pig olfactory structures are quite large, highly organized and follow the general patterns observed in mammals. PMID:26936231

  12. Swine Influenza (Swine Flu) in Pigs

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the United States since 2005 Prevention Treatment Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Pandemic Other Get ... Submit Button Past Newsletters Key Facts about Swine Influenza (Swine Flu) in Pigs Language: English Español ...

  13. Animal models of tuberculosis: Guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Clark, Simon; Hall, Yper; Williams, Ann

    2015-05-01

    The progression of the disease that follows infection of guinea pigs with Mycobacterium tuberculosis displays many features of human tuberculosis (TB), and the guinea pig model of TB has been used for more than 100 years as a research tool to understand and describe disease mechanisms. Changes in the bacterial burden and pathology following infection can be readily monitored and used to evaluate the impact of TB interventions. Demonstration of the protective efficacy of vaccines in the low-dose aerosol guinea pig model is an important component of the preclinical data package for novel vaccines in development, and there is a continual need to improve the model to facilitate progression of vaccines to the clinic. Development of better tools with which to dissect the immune responses of guinea pigs is a focus of current research. PMID:25524720

  14. The Pig Olfactory Brain: A Primer

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Sanford; Osterberg, Stephen K.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that pigs are reputed to have excellent olfactory abilities, few studies have examined regions of the pig brain involved in the sense of smell. The present study provides an overview of the olfactory bulb, anterior olfactory nucleus, and piriform cortex of adult pigs using several approaches. Nissl, myelin, and Golgi stains were used to produce a general overview of the organization of the regions and confocal microscopy was employed to examine 1) projection neurons, 2) GABAergic local circuit neurons that express somatostatin, parvalbumin, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, or calretinin, 3) neuromodulatory fibers (cholinergic and serotonergic), and 4) glia (astrocytes and microglia). The findings revealed that pig olfactory structures are quite large, highly organized and follow the general patterns observed in mammals. PMID:26936231

  15. Effects of D1 receptor knockout on fear and reward learning.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Antony D; Neve, Kim A; Lattal, K Matthew

    2016-09-01

    Dopamine signaling is involved in a variety of neurobiological processes that contribute to learning and memory. D1-like dopamine receptors (including D1 and D5 receptors) are thought to be involved in memory and reward processes, but pharmacological approaches have been limited in their ability to distinguish between D1 and D5 receptors. Here, we examine the effects of a specific knockout of D1 receptors in associative learning tasks involving aversive (shock) or appetitive (cocaine) unconditioned stimuli. We find that D1 knockout mice show similar levels of cued and contextual fear conditioning to WT controls following conditioning protocols involving one, two, or four shocks. D1 knockout mice show increased generalization of fear conditioning and extinction across contexts, revealed as increased freezing to a novel context following conditioning and decreased freezing to an extinguished cue during a contextual renewal test. Further, D1 knockout mice show mild enhancements in extinction following an injection of SKF81297, a D1/D5 receptor agonist, suggesting a role for D5 receptors in extinction enhancements induced by nonspecific pharmacological agonists. Finally, although D1 knockout mice show decreased locomotion induced by cocaine, they are able to form a cocaine-induced conditioned place preference. We discuss these findings in terms of the role of dopamine D1 receptors in general learning and memory processes. PMID:27423521

  16. Gene Knockout Identification Using an Extension of Bees Hill Flux Balance Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Choon, Yee Wen; Mohamad, Mohd Saberi; Deris, Safaai; Chong, Chuii Khim; Omatu, Sigeru; Corchado, Juan Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Microbial strain optimisation for the overproduction of a desired phenotype has been a popular topic in recent years. Gene knockout is a genetic engineering technique that can modify the metabolism of microbial cells to obtain desirable phenotypes. Optimisation algorithms have been developed to identify the effects of gene knockout. However, the complexities of metabolic networks have made the process of identifying the effects of genetic modification on desirable phenotypes challenging. Furthermore, a vast number of reactions in cellular metabolism often lead to a combinatorial problem in obtaining optimal gene knockout. The computational time increases exponentially as the size of the problem increases. This work reports an extension of Bees Hill Flux Balance Analysis (BHFBA) to identify optimal gene knockouts to maximise the production yield of desired phenotypes while sustaining the growth rate. This proposed method functions by integrating OptKnock into BHFBA for validating the results automatically. The results show that the extension of BHFBA is suitable, reliable, and applicable in predicting gene knockout. Through several experiments conducted on Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Clostridium thermocellum as model organisms, extension of BHFBA has shown better performance in terms of computational time, stability, growth rate, and production yield of desired phenotypes. PMID:25874200

  17. Featured Article: Accelerated decline of physical strength in peroxiredoxin-3 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Gang; Wang, Li; Kaifu, Tomonori; Li, Jingmin; Li, Xiaoyan; Li, Lianqin

    2016-07-01

    As a member of peroxiredoxin family, peroxiredoxin-3 plays a major role in the control of mitochondrial level of reactive oxygen species. During the breeding of experimental mice, we noticed that the peroxiredoxin-3 knockout mice were listless with aging. In the present study, we compared the swimming exercise performance and oxidative status between peroxiredoxin-3 knockout mice (n = 15) and wild-type littermates (n = 15). At the age of 10 months, the physical strength of peroxiredoxin-3 knockout mice was much lower than the wild-type littermates. Increased oxidative damage and decreased mitochondrial DNA copy number of the animal skeletal muscles were observed in peroxiredoxin-3 knockout mice as compared to that in the wild-type littermates. In addition, we found increased apoptotic cells in the brains of peroxiredoxin-3 knockout mice. Our results suggest that the deficiency of peroxiredoxin-3 induces accelerated oxidative stress and mitochondrial impairment, resulting in the decrease of energy supply and cellular activities. Peroxiredoxin-3 might be involved in the inhibition of aging process. PMID:27037278

  18. Glutamate transporter type 3 knockout leads to decreased heart rate possibly via parasympathetic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jiao; Li, Jiejie; Li, Liaoliao; Feng, Chenzhuo; Xiong, Lize; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2013-08-01

    Parasympathetic tone is a dominant neural regulator for basal heart rate. Glutamate transporters (EAAT) via their glutamate uptake functions regulate glutamate neurotransmission in the central nervous system. We showed that EAAT type 3 (EAAT3) knockout mice had a slower heart rate than wild-type mice when they were anesthetized. We design this study to determine whether non-anesthetized EAAT3 knockout mice have a slower heart rate and, if so, what may be the mechanism for this effect. Young adult EAAT3 knockout mice had slower heart rates than those of their littermate wild-type mice no matter whether they were awake or anesthetized. This difference was abolished by atropine, a parasympatholytic drug. Carbamylcholine chloride, a parasympathomimetic drug, equally effectively reduced the heart rates of wild-type and EAAT3 knockout mice. Positive immunostaining for EAAT3 was found in the area of nuclei deriving fibers for vagus nerve. There was no positive staining for the EAATs in the sinoatrial node. These results suggest that EAAT3 knockout mice have a slower heart rate at rest. This effect may be caused by an increased parasympathetic tone possibly due to increased glutamate neurotransmission in the central nervous system. These findings indicate that regulation of heart rate, a vital sign, is one of the EAAT biological functions. PMID:23361868

  19. Glycogen storage disease type III: A novel Agl knockout mouse model.

    PubMed

    Pagliarani, Serena; Lucchiari, Sabrina; Ulzi, Gianna; Violano, Raffaella; Ripolone, Michela; Bordoni, Andreina; Nizzardo, Monica; Gatti, Stefano; Corti, Stefania; Moggio, Maurizio; Bresolin, Nereo; Comi, Giacomo P

    2014-11-01

    Glycogen storage disease type III is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by a deficiency in the glycogen debranching enzyme, encoded by AGL. Essential features of this disease are hepatomegaly, hypoglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and growth retardation. Progressive skeletal myopathy, neuropathy, and/or cardiomyopathy become prominent in adults. Currently, there is no available cure. We generated an Agl knockout mouse model by deletion of the carboxy terminus of the protein, including the carboxy end of the glucosidase domain and the glycogen-binding domain. Agl knockout mice presented serious hepatomegaly, but we did not observe signs of cirrhosis or adenomas. In affected tissues, glycogen storage was higher than in wild-type mice, even in the central nervous system which has never been tested in GSDIII patients. The biochemical findings were in accordance with histological data, which clearly documented tissue impairment due to glycogen accumulation. Indeed, electron microscopy revealed the disruption of contractile units due to glycogen infiltrations. Furthermore, adult Agl knockout animals appeared less prompt to move, and they exhibited kyphosis. Three-mo-old Agl knockout mice could not run, and adult mice showed exercise intolerance. In addition, older affected animals exhibited an accelerated respiratory rate even at basal conditions. This observation was correlated with severe glycogen accumulation in the diaphragm. Diffuse glycogen deposition was observed in the tongues of affected mice. Our results demonstrate that this Agl knockout mouse is a reliable model for human glycogenosis type III, as it recapitulates the essential phenotypic features of the disease. PMID:25092169

  20. The physiological roles of vesicular GABA transporter during embryonic development: a study using knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) loads GABA and glycine from the neuronal cytoplasm into synaptic vesicles. To address functional importance of VGAT during embryonic development, we generated global VGAT knockout mice and analyzed them. Results VGAT knockouts at embryonic day (E) 18.5 exhibited substantial increases in overall GABA and glycine, but not glutamate, contents in the forebrain. Electrophysiological recordings from E17.5-18.5 spinal cord motoneurons demonstrated that VGAT knockouts presented no spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents mediated by GABA and glycine. Histological examination of E18.5 knockout fetuses revealed reductions in the trapezius muscle, hepatic congestion and little alveolar spaces in the lung, indicating that the development of skeletal muscle, liver and lung in these mice was severely affected. Conclusion VGAT is fundamental for the GABA- and/or glycine-mediated transmission that supports embryonic development. VGAT knockout mice will be useful for further investigating the roles of VGAT in normal physiology and pathophysiologic processes. PMID:21190592

  1. Sweating Like a Pig: Physics or Irony?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohren, Craig F.

    2016-03-01

    In his interesting and informative book Is That a Fact?, Joe Schwarcz avers that pigs do not sweat and the saying "sweating like a pig" originates in iron smelting. Oblong pieces of hot iron, with a fancied resemblance to a sow with piglets, cool in sand to the dew point of the surrounding air, and hence water condenses on the "pig." But this explanation, which I have seen on the Internet, lacks a few caveats. It implies that molten iron, solidifying and cooling, anywhere, anytime, accretes liquid water, as if this were a special property of cooling iron. Set aside that real pigs sweat perceptibly from their snouts; kiss a pig and verify for yourself. Pigs also sweat imperceptibly. Imperceptible (insensible) perspiration is water vapor from the skin and lungs exuded without sensible condensation. That from humans is about 1 liter/day. Sweat is 99% liquid water, NaCl the dominant solute, secreted quickly, sometimes profusely, by subcutaneous sweat glands in response to thermal stress, in contrast to the slow, continuous diffusion of water vapor through skin.

  2. Solid gel pigs for cleaning production pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, D.E.; Bohon, W.M.; Chesnut, G.R.

    1996-08-01

    Many oil fields, such as that at Kuparuk, on the North Slope of Alaska, have been built as a trunk and lateral gathering system, with many different pipeline diameters in a branched network. No launchers nor receivers were built for the Kuparuk oil production pipelines. The high cost of retrofitting launchers and receivers prompted investigation of alternative methods for cleaning the pipelines. This paper describes a novel approach to mold solid gelatin pigs in bypass lines, and to run those pigs through the production pipelines to the primary separators. The gelatin pigs would slowly melt, eliminating the need for receivers. Field and laboratory testing showed that gelatin pigs could not effectively clean the pipelines. The addition of cross linking agents could increase the mechanical integrity of the gelatin pigs, but also elevated the melting temperatures above the operating temperatures of the primary separators. As such, they were not meltable (in time), and no benefits could be obtained by the use of solid gelatin pigs for cleaning applications.

  3. Using guinea pigs in studies relevant to asthma and COPD

    PubMed Central

    Canning, Brendan J.; Chou, Yangling

    2010-01-01

    The guinea pig has been the most commonly used small animal species in preclinical studies related to asthma and COPD. The primary advantages of the guinea pig are the similar potencies and efficacies of agonists and antagonists in human and guinea pig airways and the many similarities in physiological processes, especially airway autonomic control and the response to allergen. The primary disadvantages to using guinea pigs are the lack of transgenic methods, limited numbers of guinea pig strains for comparative studies and a prominent axon reflex that is unlikely to be present in human airways. These attributes and various models developed in guinea pigs are discussed. PMID:18462968

  4. Characterization of physiological responses to 22 gene knockouts in Escherichia coli central carbon metabolism.

    PubMed

    Long, Christopher P; Gonzalez, Jacqueline E; Sandoval, Nicholas R; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the impact of gene knockouts on cellular physiology, and metabolism in particular, is centrally important to quantitative systems biology and metabolic engineering. Here, we present a comprehensive physiological characterization of wild-type Escherichia coli and 22 knockouts of enzymes in the upper part of central carbon metabolism, including the PTS system, glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway and Entner-Doudoroff pathway. Our results reveal significant metabolic changes that are affected by specific gene knockouts. Analysis of collective trends and correlations in the data using principal component analysis (PCA) provide new, and sometimes surprising, insights into E. coli physiology. Additionally, by comparing the data-to-model predictions from constraint-based approaches such as FBA, MOMA and RELATCH we demonstrate the important role of less well-understood kinetic and regulatory effects in central carbon metabolism. PMID:27212692

  5. Functional consequences of hippocampal neuronal ectopia in the apolipoprotein E receptor-2 knockout mouse

    PubMed Central

    Fish, Kenneth. N.; Krucker, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about the impact ectopically located neurons have on the functional connectivity of local circuits. The ApoER2 knockout mouse has subtle cytoarchitectural disruptions, altered prepulse inhibition, and memory abnormalities. We evaluated this mouse mutant as a model to study the role ectopic neurons play in the manifestation of symptoms associated with brain diseases. We found that ectopic CA1 pyramidal and inhibitory neurons in the ApoER2 knockout hippocampus are organized into two distinct stratum pyramidale layers. In vitro analyses found that ApoER2 is not required for neurons to reach maturity in regards to dendritic arborization and synaptic structure density, and electrophysiological testing determined that neurons in both strata pyramidale are integrated into the hippocampal network. However, the presence of these two layers alters the spatiotemporal pattern of hippocampal activity, which may explain why ApoER2 knockout mice have selective cognitive dysfunctions that are revealed only under challenging conditions. PMID:18778775

  6. MR histology of advanced atherosclerotic lesions of ApoE- knockout mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumova, A.; Yarnykh, V.; Ferguson, M.; Rosenfeld, M.; Yuan, C.

    2016-02-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine the feasibility of determining the composition of advanced atherosclerotic plaques in fixed ApoE-knockout mice and to develop a time-efficient microimaging protocol for MR histological imaging on mice. Five formalin-fixed transgenic ApoE-knockout mice were imaged at the 9.4T Bruker BioSpec MR scanner using 3D spoiled gradient-echo sequence with an isotropic field of view of 24 mm3; TR 20.8 ms; TE 2.6 ms; flip angle 20°, resulted voxel size 47 × 63 × 94 pm3. MRI examination has shown that advanced atherosclerotic lesions of aorta, innominate and carotid arteries in ApoE-knockout mice are characterized by high calcification and presence of the large fibrofatty nodules. MRI quantification of atherosclerotic lesion components corresponded to histological assessment of plaque composition with a correlation coefficient of 0.98.

  7. A Genetic Analysis of Taoyuan Pig and Its Phylogenetic Relationship to Eurasian Pig Breeds

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kuan-Yi; Li, Kuang-Ti; Cheng, Chun-Chun; Chen, Chia-Hsuan; Hung, Chien-Yi; Ju, Yu-Ten

    2015-01-01

    Taoyuan pig is a native Taiwan breed. According to the historical record, the breed was first introduced to Taiwan from Guangdong province, Southern China, around 1877. The breed played an important role in Taiwan’s early swine industry. It was classified as an indigenous breed in 1986. After 1987, a conserved population of Taoyuan pig was collected and reared in isolation. In this study, mitochondrial DNA sequences and 18 microsatellite markers were used to investigate maternal lineage and genetic diversity within the Taoyuan pig population. Population differentiation among Taoyuan, Asian type, and European type pig breeds was also evaluated using differentiation indices. Only one D-loop haplotype of the Taoyuan pig was found. It clustered with Lower Changjiang River Basin and Central China Type pig breeds. Based on the polymorphism of microsatellite markers, a positive fixation index value (FIS) indicates that the conserved Taoyuan population suffers from inbreeding. In addition, high FST values (>0.2105) were obtained, revealing high differentiation among these breeds. Non-metric multi-dimensional scaling showed a clear geometric structure among 7 breeds. Together these results indicate that maternally Taoyuan pig originated in the Lower Changjiang River Basin and Central China; however, since being introduced to Taiwan differentiation has occurred. In addition, Taoyuan pig has lost genetic diversity in both its mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. PMID:25656199

  8. Prevalence of the Cryptosporidium Pig Genotype II in Pigs from the Yangtze River Delta, China

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhongying; Lu, Weiyuan; Xu, Yuxin; Cao, Jianping

    2011-01-01

    Background Cryptosporidium spp. is prevalent globally, pigs are an important Cryptosporidium reservoir. In China, little data regarding rates of Cryptosporidium infections in pigs are available. The present study was therefore aimed at characterizing the distribution of Cryptosporidium species in pigs from two different cities, Shaoxing and Shanghai, from the Yangtze River delta. Methodology/Principal Findings Nested PCR to amplify the 18S rRNA locus on DNA extracted from fecal samples (n = 94) revealed the positive rate of Cryptosporidium in pigs from two cities was approximately 17.0%. The positive rates in Shanghai and Shaoxing were 14.3% and 25.0% respectively. Amplified sequences were verified by sequencing. The identified strain belonged to the C. pig genotype II using BLAST analysis in the NCBI database. Conclusion/Significance Our finding of Cryptosporidium pig genotype II in pigs in the Yangtze River delta area suggests that pig farms in this region must be considered a public health threat and proper control measures be introduced. PMID:21677776

  9. Effect of knockout of α2δ-1 on action potentials in mouse sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Margas, Wojciech; Ferron, Laurent; Nieto-Rostro, Manuela; Schwartz, Arnold; Dolphin, Annette C

    2016-08-01

    Gene deletion of the voltage-gated calcium channel auxiliary subunit α2δ-1 has been shown previously to have a cardiovascular phenotype, and a reduction in mechano- and cold sensitivity, coupled with delayed development of neuropathic allodynia. We have also previously shown that dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron calcium channel currents were significantly reduced in α2δ-1 knockout mice. To extend our findings in these sensory neurons, we have examined here the properties of action potentials (APs) in DRG neurons from α2δ-1 knockout mice in comparison to their wild-type (WT) littermates, in order to dissect how the calcium channels that are affected by α2δ-1 knockout are involved in setting the duration of individual APs and their firing frequency. Our main findings are that there is reduced Ca(2+) entry on single AP stimulation, particularly in the axon proximal segment, reduced AP duration and reduced firing frequency to a 400 ms stimulation in α2δ-1 knockout neurons, consistent with the expected role of voltage-gated calcium channels in these events. Furthermore, lower intracellular Ca(2+) buffering also resulted in reduced AP duration, and a lower frequency of AP firing in WT neurons, mimicking the effect of α2δ-1 knockout. By contrast, we did not obtain any consistent evidence for the involvement of Ca(2+)-activation of large conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) and small conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channels in these events. In conclusion, the reduced Ca(2+) elevation as a result of single AP stimulation is likely to result from the reduced duration of the AP in α2δ-1 knockout sensory neurons.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolution brings Ca(2+) and ATP together to control life and death'. PMID:27377724

  10. Effect of knockout of α2δ-1 on action potentials in mouse sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Margas, Wojciech; Ferron, Laurent; Nieto-Rostro, Manuela; Schwartz, Arnold; Dolphin, Annette C.

    2016-01-01

    Gene deletion of the voltage-gated calcium channel auxiliary subunit α2δ-1 has been shown previously to have a cardiovascular phenotype, and a reduction in mechano- and cold sensitivity, coupled with delayed development of neuropathic allodynia. We have also previously shown that dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron calcium channel currents were significantly reduced in α2δ-1 knockout mice. To extend our findings in these sensory neurons, we have examined here the properties of action potentials (APs) in DRG neurons from α2δ-1 knockout mice in comparison to their wild-type (WT) littermates, in order to dissect how the calcium channels that are affected by α2δ-1 knockout are involved in setting the duration of individual APs and their firing frequency. Our main findings are that there is reduced Ca2+ entry on single AP stimulation, particularly in the axon proximal segment, reduced AP duration and reduced firing frequency to a 400 ms stimulation in α2δ-1 knockout neurons, consistent with the expected role of voltage-gated calcium channels in these events. Furthermore, lower intracellular Ca2+ buffering also resulted in reduced AP duration, and a lower frequency of AP firing in WT neurons, mimicking the effect of α2δ-1 knockout. By contrast, we did not obtain any consistent evidence for the involvement of Ca2+-activation of large conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) and small conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channels in these events. In conclusion, the reduced Ca2+ elevation as a result of single AP stimulation is likely to result from the reduced duration of the AP in α2δ-1 knockout sensory neurons. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Evolution brings Ca2+ and ATP together to control life and death’. PMID:27377724

  11. CD47 gene knockout protects against transient focal cerebral ischemia in mice.

    PubMed

    Jin, Guang; Tsuji, Kiyoshi; Xing, Changhong; Yang, Yong-Guang; Wang, Xiaoying; Lo, Eng H

    2009-05-01

    CD47 is a cell surface glycoprotein that helps mediate neutrophil transmigration across blood vessels. The present study was performed to determine whether absence of the CD47 gene decreases focal ischemic brain damage. Mice were subjected to 90 min middle cerebral artery occlusion. CD47 knockout mice were compared against matching wildtype mice. CD47 expression was checked by Western blotting. Infarct volume and ischemic brain swelling were quantified with cresyl violet-stained brain sections at 24 and 72 h after ischemia. The tight junction protein claudin-5 was detected by imunohistochemistry. Two surrogate markers of neuroinflammation, brain levels of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and infiltration of neutrophils, were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Western blots confirmed that CD47 was absent in knockout brains. Ischemia did not appear to upregulate total brain levels of CD47 in WT mice. In CD47 knockout mice, infarct volumes were reduced at 24 and 72 h after ischemia, and hemispheric swelling was decreased at 72 h. Loss of claudin-5 was observed in ischemic WT brain. This effect was ameliorated in CD47 knockout brains. Extravasation of neutrophils into the brain parenchyma was significantly reduced in CD47 knockout mice compared to wildtype mice. MMP-9 appeared to be upregulated in microvessels within ischemic brain. MMP-9 levels were markedly lower in CD47 knockout brains compared to wildtype brains. We conclude that CD47 is broadly involved in neuroinflammation, and this integrin-associated-protein plays a role in promoting MMP-9 upregulaton, neutrophil extravasation, brain swelling and progression of acute ischemic brain injury. PMID:19233173

  12. Comparison of nociceptive behavior in prostaglandin E, F, D, prostacyclin and thromboxane receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Popp, Laura; Häussler, Annett; Olliges, Anke; Nüsing, Rolf; Narumiya, Shuh; Geisslinger, Gerd; Tegeder, Irmgard

    2009-08-01

    Antagonist at specific prostaglandin receptors might provide analgesia with a more favourable toxicity profile compared with cyclooxygenase inhibitors. We analyzed nociceptive responses in prostaglandin D, E, F, prostacyclin and thromboxane receptor knockout mice and mice deficient of cyclooxygenase 1 or 2 to evaluate the contribution of individual prostaglandin receptors for heat, mechanical and formalin-evoked pain. None of the knockouts was uniformly protected from all of these pain stimuli but COX-1 and EP4 receptor knockouts presented with reduced heat pain and EP3 receptor and COX-2 knockout mice had reduced licking responses in the 2nd phase of the formalin assay. This was accompanied with reduced c-Fos immunoreactivity in the spinal cord dorsal horn in EP3 knockouts. Oppositely, heat pain sensitivity was increased in FP, EP1 and EP1+3 double mutant mice possibly due to a loss of FP or EP1 receptor mediated central control of thermal pain sensitivity. Deficiency of either EP2 or DP1 was associated with increased formalin-evoked flinching responses and c-Fos IR in dorsal horn neurons suggesting facilitated spinal cord pain reflex circuity. Thromboxane and prostacyclin receptor knockout mice showed normal pain behavior in all tests. The results suggest a differential, pain-stimulus and site-specific contribution of specific PG-receptors for the processing of the nociceptive stimuli, a differential modulation of nociceptive responses by COX-1 and COX-2 derived prostaglandins and compensatory and/or developmental adaptations in mice lacking specific PG receptors. PMID:18938093

  13. Hyperactivity of newborn Pten knock-out neurons results from increased excitatory synaptic drive.

    PubMed

    Williams, Michael R; DeSpenza, Tyrone; Li, Meijie; Gulledge, Allan T; Luikart, Bryan W

    2015-01-21

    Developing neurons must regulate morphology, intrinsic excitability, and synaptogenesis to form neural circuits. When these processes go awry, disorders, including autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or epilepsy, may result. The phosphatase Pten is mutated in some patients having ASD and seizures, suggesting that its mutation disrupts neurological function in part through increasing neuronal activity. Supporting this idea, neuronal knock-out of Pten in mice can cause macrocephaly, behavioral changes similar to ASD, and seizures. However, the mechanisms through which excitability is enhanced following Pten depletion are unclear. Previous studies have separately shown that Pten-depleted neurons can drive seizures, receive elevated excitatory synaptic input, and have abnormal dendrites. We therefore tested the hypothesis that developing Pten-depleted neurons are hyperactive due to increased excitatory synaptogenesis using electrophysiology, calcium imaging, morphological analyses, and modeling. This was accomplished by coinjecting retroviruses to either "birthdate" or birthdate and knock-out Pten in granule neurons of the murine neonatal dentate gyrus. We found that Pten knock-out neurons, despite a rapid onset of hypertrophy, were more active in vivo. Pten knock-out neurons fired at more hyperpolarized membrane potentials, displayed greater peak spike rates, and were more sensitive to depolarizing synaptic input. The increased sensitivity of Pten knock-out neurons was due, in part, to a higher density of synapses located more proximal to the soma. We determined that increased synaptic drive was sufficient to drive hypertrophic Pten knock-out neurons beyond their altered action potential threshold. Thus, our work contributes a developmental mechanism for the increased activity of Pten-depleted neurons. PMID:25609613

  14. Germ line knockout of IGFBP-3 reveals influences of the gene on mammary gland neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Blouin, Marie-José; Bazile, Miguel; Birman, Elena; Zakikhani, Mahvash; Florianova, Livia; Aleynikova, Olga; Powell, David R; Pollak, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) is an important carrier protein for insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) in the circulation. IGFBP-3 antagonizes the growth-promoting and anti-apoptotic activities of IGFs in experimental systems, but in certain contexts can increase IGF bioactivity, probably by increasing its half-life. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of IGFBP-3 in breast carcinogenesis and breast cancer metastasis. In the first part of the study, we exposed IGFBP-3 knockout and wild-type female mice to dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) and followed them for appearance of primary tumors for up to 13 months. In the second part, mice of each genotype received an IV injection of 4T1 mammary carcinoma cells and then lung nodules were counted. Our results show that IGFBP-3 knockout mice developed breast tumors significantly earlier than the wild-type (13.9 ± 1.1 versus 22.5 ± 3.3 weeks, respectively, P = 0.0144), suggesting tumor suppression activity of IGFBP-3. In tumors of IGFBP-3 knockout mice, levels of phospho-AKT(Ser473) were increased compared to wild-type mice. The lung metastasis assay showed significantly more and larger lung nodules in IGFBP-3 knockout mice than in wild-type mice. While we observed increased levels of IGFBP-5 protein in the IGFBP-3 knockout mice, our findings suggest that this was not sufficient to completely compensate for the absence of IGFBP-3. Even though knockout of IGFBP-3 is associated with only a subtle phenotype under control conditions, our results reveal that loss of this gene has measurable effects on breast carcinogenesis and breast cancer metastasis. PMID:25614235

  15. Distortion effects on the neutron knockout from exotic nuclei in the collision with a proton target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cravo, E.; Crespo, R.; Deltuva, A.

    2016-05-01

    Background: Reaction theory plays a major role in the interpretation of experimental data and one needs to identify and include accurately all the relevant dynamical effects in order to extract reliable structure information. The knockout of a nucleon (neutron/proton) from a high energy exotic nucleus projectile colliding with a proton target allows to get insight on the structure of its valence and inner shells. Purpose: We aim to clarify the role of the distortion on the calculated observables for nucleon knockout, in particular, the dependence of the calculated observables on the binding energy ɛb and angular momentum L of the knockout particle, and on the mass of the projectile core, Ac. We consider mainly the knockout of a neutron that may be either in the valence or in the inner shell of the projectile nucleus. Method: Exact three-body Faddeev/Alt-Grassberger-Sandhas (Faddeev/AGS) calculations are performed for the nucleon knockout from stable and exotic nuclei in the collision of 420 MeV/u projectile beams with a proton target. Results are compared with plane-wave impulse approximation (PWIA) calculations. Results: The Faddeev/AGS formalism accurately predicts: (i) a systematic nearly logarithmic dependence of the distortion parameter on the separation energy; (ii) roughly linear dependence of the ratio of the full to the PWIA cross section on the asymmetry parameter; (iii) a distinct behavior between the calculated transverse core momentum distribution from the PWIA and full Faddeev/AGS exact approach which indicates that distortion effects do not modify fully exclusive observables through a common renormalization factor. Conclusions: To extract structure information on deeper shells one needs to include distortion effects accurately. A systematic analysis enables to estimate the total cross section for knockout of a nucleon from a given shell of nuclei at/away the stability line of the nuclear landscape. The comparison with experimental results may

  16. Monitoring for Presence of Potentially Xenotic Viruses in Recipients of Pig Islet Xenotransplantation

    PubMed Central

    Garkavenko, O.; Croxson, M. C.; Irgang, M.; Karlas, A.; Denner, J.; Elliott, R. B.

    2004-01-01

    This study represents a long-term follow-up of human patients receiving pig islet xenotransplantation. Eighteen patients had been monitored for up to 9 years for potentially xenotic pig viruses: pig endogenous retrovirus, pig cytomegalovirus, pig lymphotropic herpesvirus, and pig circovirus type 2. No evidence of viral infection was found. PMID:15528741

  17. PROXIMAL GUT MUCOSAL EPITHELIAL HOMEOSTASIS IN AGED IL-1 TYPE I RECEPTOR KNOCKOUT MICE AFTER STARVATION

    PubMed Central

    Song, Juquan; Wolf, Steven E.; Wu, Xiao-Wu; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Herndon, David N.; Jeschke, Marc G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that starvation induces small bowel atrophy, and that atrophy diminishes with aging. In this experiment, we assessed whether starvation-induced atrophy of proximal gut mucosa is associated with the Interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R) signaling pathway in aged mice. Materials and Methods Thirty 26-month-old IL-1R knockout mice and age-matched wild-type C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into two groups: ad libitum fed and fasted. Mice were euthanized 12 or 48 hours after starvation. The proximal small bowel was harvested for morphologic analysis. Gut epithelial cell proliferation was detected using immunohistochemical staining for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and apoptosis was identified using terminal deoxyuridine nick-end labeling (TUNEL) staining. Results Aged IL-1R knockout mice were larger than aged-matched wild-type mice (p<0.05). Proximal gut mucosal height and mucosal cell number were not different between aged IL-1R knockout and wild-type groups. The apoptosis index in gut epithelial cells was higher in fed IL-1R knockout versus wild-type mice (p<0.05), while no significant difference in cell proliferation between both groups. Mucosal atrophy was induced in both aged IL-1R knockout and wild-type groups by starvation (p<0.05), however, aged IL-1R knockout mice experienced greater losses in proximal gut weight, mucosal length, and corresponding cell number than did wild-type mice at the 12-hour time point (p<0.05). The apoptosis index in gut epithelial cells significantly increased in both groups after starvation (p<0.05). Starvation decreased cell proliferation in IL-1R knockout mice (p<0.05), but not in wild-type mice. Conclusions The response in aged IL-1R knockout mice differs from wild-type mice in that starvation increases atrophy and is associated with decreased cell proliferation rather than increased apoptosis. PMID:20605606

  18. 8He cluster structure studied by recoil proton tagged knockout reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Y.; Cao, Z.; Xiao, J.; Jiang, D.; Zheng, T.; Hua, H.; Ge, Y.; Li, X.; Lou, J.; Li, Q.; Lv, L.; Qiao, R.; You, H.; Chen, R.; Sakurai, H.; Otsu, H.; Li, Z.; Nishimura, M.; Sakaguchi, S.; Baba, H.; Togano, Y.; Yoneda, K.; Li, C.; Wang, S.; Wang, H.; Li, K.; Nakayama, Y.; Kondo, Y.; Deguchi, S.; Sato, Y.; Tshoo, K.

    2013-04-01

    Knockout reaction experiment for 8He at 82.3 MeV/u on Hydrogen target was carried out at the RIPS beam line in RIKEN. Recoil protons were detected in coincidence with the forward moving core fragments and neutrons. The quasi-free knockout mechanism is identified through the polar angle correlation and checked by various kinematics conditions. The absolute differential cross sections for 6He core cluster are obtained and compared with the simple Glauber model calculations. The extracted spectroscopic factor is close to unity and a shrinking of the cluster size is evidenced.

  19. Population of positive-parity states in {sup 53}Sc through one-proton knockout

    SciTech Connect

    McDaniel, S.; Gade, A.; Brown, B. A.; Campbell, C. M.; Cook, J. M.; Dinca, D.-C.; Glasmacher, T.; Hansen, P. G.; Terry, J. R.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Carpenter, M. P.; Zhu, S.; Bazin, D.; Mueller, W. F.; Deacon, A. N.; Freeman, S. J.; Kay, B. P.; Mantica, P. F.; Tostevin, J. A.

    2010-02-15

    The one-proton knockout reaction {sup 9}Be({sup 54}Ti,{sup 53}Sc+{gamma})X at 72 MeV/nucleon has been measured. The location of the first 3/2{sup -} state at 2110(3) keV was confirmed, and new {gamma}-ray transitions were observed at 1111(2), 1273(2), 1539(4), and 2495(5) keV. Large spectroscopic strength to excited states in {sup 53}Sc was found and attributed to the knockout of sd-shell protons.

  20. Population of positive-parity states in {sup 53}Sc through one-proton knockout.

    SciTech Connect

    McDaniel, S.; Gade, A.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Bazin, D.; Brown, B. A.; Campbell, C. M.; Carpenter, M. P.; Cook, J. M.; Deacon, A. N.; Dinca, D.-C.; Freeman, S. J.; Glasmacher, T.; Hansen, P. G.; Kay, B. P.; Mantica, P. F.; Mueller, W. F.; Terry, J. R.; Tostevin, J. A.; Zhu, S.; Physics; Michigan State Univ.; Univ. of Manchester; Univ. of Surrey

    2010-02-01

    The one-proton knockout reaction {sup 9}Be({sup 54}Ti,{sup 53}Sc+{gamma})X at 72 MeV/nucleon has been measured. The location of the first 3/2{sup -} state at 2110(3) keV was confirmed, and new {gamma}-ray transitions were observed at 1111(2), 1273(2), 1539(4), and 2495(5) keV. Large spectroscopic strength to excited states in {sup 53}Sc was found and attributed to the knockout of sd-shell protons.

  1. Cross sections for one-neutron knock-out from 37Ca at intermediate energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bürger, A.; Azaiez, F.; Algora, A.; Al-Khatib, A.; Bastin, B.; Benzoni, G.; Borcea, R.; Bourgeois, C.; Bringel, P.; Clément, E.; Dalouzy, J.-C.; Dlouhý, Z.; Dombrádi, Z.; Drouart, A.; Engelhardt, C.; Franchoo, S.; Fülöp, Z.; Görgen, A.; Grévy, S.; Hübel, H.; Ibrahim, F.; Korten, W.; Mrázek, J.; Navin, A.; Rotaru, F.; Roussel Chomaz, P.; Saint-Laurent, M.-G.; Sletten, G.; Sohler, D.; Sorlin, O.; Stanoiu, M.; Stefan, I.; Theisen, C.; Timis, C.; Verney, D.; Williams, S.

    2012-12-01

    The cross section for the knock-out of a deeply bound valence neutron from 37Ca at an incident beam energy of 60AMeV has been measured along with momentum distributions of the residual nuclei and γ rays from the de-excitation of the first excited state in 36Ca. As for other cases of deeply bound nucleons studied using knock-out reactions, the reduction of the measured cross section compared to theoretical predictions is stronger than those observed for near-magic stable nuclei. Both the momentum distributions and the excitation energy of the first excited state in 36Ca indicate a sizable N=16 gap.

  2. A description of smallholder pig production systems in eastern Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Edwina E C; Geong, Maria; Abdurrahman, Muktasam; Ward, Michael P; Toribio, Jenny-Ann L M L

    2015-03-01

    Pig farming is a common practice among smallholder farmers in Nusa Tenggara Timur province (NTT), eastern Indonesia. To understand their production systems a survey of smallholder pig farmers was conducted. Eighteen villages were randomly selected across West Timor, Flores and Sumba islands, and 289 pig farmers were interviewed. Information on pig management, biosecurity practices, pig movements and knowledge of pig health and disease, specifically classical swine fever was collected. The mean number of pigs per herd was 5.0 (not including piglets), and total marketable herd size (pigs≥two months of age) did not differ significantly between islands (P=0.215). Chickens (71%) and dogs (62%) were the most commonly kept animal species in addition to pigs. Pigs were mainly kept as a secondary income source (69%) and 83% of farmers owned at least one sow. Seventy-four percent (74%) of pigs were housed in a kandang (small bamboo pen) and 25% were tethered. Pig feeds were primarily locally sourced agricultural products (93%). The majority of farmers had no knowledge of classical swine fever (91%) and biosecurity practices were minimal. Forty-five percent (45%) reported to consuming a pig when it died and 74% failed to report cases of sick or dead pigs to appropriate authorities. Sixty-five percent (65%) of farmers reported that a veterinarian or animal health worker had never visited their village. Backyard slaughter was common practice (55%), with meat mainly used for home consumption (89%). Most (73%) farmers purchased pigs in order to raise the animal on their farm with 36% purchasing at least one pig within the last year. Predominantly fattener pigs (34%) were given as gifts for celebratory events, most commonly for funerals (32%), traditional ceremonies (27%) and marriages (10%). For improved productivity of this traditional low-input system, research incorporating farming training and improved knowledge on pig disease and biosecurity needs to be integrated with

  3. Pig surgery: cryptorchidectomy using an inguinal approach.

    PubMed

    Scollo, A; Martelli, P; Borri, E; Mazzoni, C

    2016-06-11

    The objective of the study was to determine whether a less-invasive surgical technique used in cryptorchid horses, dogs and cats can be used successfully to remove retained testicles in pigs on farm. In total, 284 monolateral cryptorchid pigs underwent surgery on-farm condition, during which an incision was made over the inguinal ring and the undescended testicle was located for removal via identification of the vaginal process and the embryonic gubernaculum. A traction of these structures allowed the testis to pass through the deep and the superficial rings up to its exteriorisation outside the abdominal wall through the inguinal canal. The undescended testicle was located in the abdomen in 258 cases (90.8 per cent) and in the inguinal region in the remaining 26 cases (9.1 per cent). In none of the pigs was the abdominal cavity breached or the inguinal rings enlarged. However, in 23 pigs (8.1 per cent) the gubernaculum testis was thin and it frayed and ruptured when traction was applied, requiring a recovering by inserting a finger and Kelly curved forceps into the abdomen through the inguinal ring. In two pigs (0.7 per cent), the undescended testicle was not found. All surgical procedures were completed within 6-12 minutes. Four pigs died within two days after surgery (1.4 per cent). Major intraoperative or long-term complications did not occur. Results suggested that this surgical method is highly effective and could be used as a primary surgical approach in cryptorchid pigs as it is in cryptorchid dogs, cats and horses. PMID:27053253

  4. Estimation of body composition of pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrell, C.L.; Cornelius, S.G.

    1984-04-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the use of deuterium oxide (D2O) for in vivo estimation of body composition of diverse types of pigs. Obese (Ob, 30) and contemporary Hampshire X Yorkshire (C, 30) types of pigs used in the study were managed and fed under typical management regimens. Indwelling catheters were placed in a jugular vein of 6 Ob and 6 C pigs at 4, 8, 12, 18 and 24 wk of age. The D2O was infused (.5 g/kg body weight) as a .9% NaCl solution into the jugular catheter. Blood samples were taken immediately before and at .25, 1, 4, 8, 12, 24 and 48 h after the D2O infusion and D2O concentration in blood water was determined. Pigs were subsequently killed by euthanasia injection. Contents of the gastrointestinal tract were removed and the empty body was then frozen and later ground and sampled for subsequent analyses. Ground body tissue samples were analyzed for water, fat, N, fat-free organic matter and ash. Pig type, age and the type X age interaction were significant sources of variation in live weight, D2O pool size and all empty body components, as well as all fat-free empty body components. Relationships between age and live weight or weight of empty body components, and between live weight, empty body weight, empty body water or D2O space and weight of empty components were highly significant but influenced, in most cases, by pig type. The results of this study suggested that, although relationships between D2O space and body component weights were highly significant, they were influenced by pig type and were little better than live weight for the estimation of body composition.

  5. Pig but not Human Interferon-γ Initiates Human Cell-Mediated Rejection of Pig Tissue in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultan, Parvez; Murray, Allan G.; McNiff, Jennifer M.; Lorber, Marc I.; Askenase, Philip W.; Bothwell, Alfred L. M.; Pober, Jordan S.

    1997-08-01

    Split-thickness pig skin was transplanted on severe combined immunodeficient mice so that pig dermal microvessels spontaneously inosculated with mouse microvessels and functioned to perfuse the grafts. Pig endothelial cells in the healed grafts constitutively expressed class I and class II major histocompatibility complex molecules. Major histocompatibility complex molecule expression could be further increased by intradermal injection of pig interferon-γ (IFN-γ ) but not human IFN-γ or tumor necrosis factor. Grafts injected with pig IFN-γ also developed a sparse infiltrate of mouse neutrophils and eosinophils without evidence of injury. Introduction of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells into the animals by intraperitoneal inoculation resulted in sparse perivascular mononuclear cell infiltrates in the grafts confined to the pig dermis. Injection of pig skin grafts on mice that received human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with pig IFN-γ (but not human IFN-γ or heat-inactivated pig IFN-γ ) induced human CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and macrophages to more extensively infiltrate the pig skin grafts and injure pig dermal microvessels. These findings suggest that human T cell-mediated rejection of xenotransplanted pig organs may be prevented if cellular sources of pig interferon (e.g., passenger lymphocytes) are eliminated from the graft.

  6. Artificial insemination in pigs today.

    PubMed

    Knox, R V

    2016-01-01

    Use of artificial insemination (AI) for breeding pigs has been instrumental for facilitating global improvements in fertility, genetics, labor, and herd health. The establishment of AI centers for management of boars and production of semen has allowed for selection of boars for fertility and sperm production using in vitro and in vivo measures. Today, boars can be managed for production of 20 to 40 traditional AI doses containing 2.5 to 3.0 billion motile sperm in 75 to 100 mL of extender or 40 to 60 doses with 1.5 to 2.0 billion sperm in similar or reduced volumes for use in cervical or intrauterine AI. Regardless of the sperm dose, in liquid form, extenders are designed to sustain sperm fertility for 3 to 7 days. On farm, AI is the predominant form for commercial sow breeding and relies on manual detection of estrus with sows receiving two cervical or two intrauterine inseminations of the traditional or low sperm doses on each day detected in standing estrus. New approaches for increasing rates of genetic improvement through use of AI are aimed at methods to continue to lower the number of sperm in an AI dose and reducing the number of inseminations through use of a single, fixed-time AI after ovulation induction. Both approaches allow greater selection pressure for economically important swine traits in the sires and help extend the genetic advantages through AI on to more production farms. PMID:26253434

  7. Computer tracks pigs to speed gas drying

    SciTech Connect

    Ashburner, M.

    1984-04-01

    Advanced pipeline drying techniques have been used to commission a 27-mile, 30-in. undersea natural gas pipeline in Malaysia's Luconia field. After first sending a series of torpedo-shape foam and rubber cup pigs through the line to force out some 4 million gal of seawater, a new technique combines a vacuum drying process with a sophisticated computer program to keep track of the pigs, thereby enabling the job to be completed in just 4 weeks. The program simulates pipeline conditions at the pig air/water interface under constant propelling flow conditions. The computer produces a pressure profile, calculates the overall time along the pipe, and then uses the resultant time-pressure model to interpret the actual results from the flow measurement-pressure plot for the pig's progress. The program was developed primarily to forecast the effects of changes in propelling capacity in deepwater conditions to ensure that adequate pressure capacity was available to maintain pig speeds above minimum self-cleaning velocities.

  8. A review of pig pathology in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Richard Trevor; Swai, Emmanuel

    2013-08-01

    The approximately 1.58 million pigs in Tanzania represent 3.7% of the national population of quadruped meat-producing animals. Pigs are kept mainly by small producers who own 99.5% of the national stock in units that average 3.04 animals (range 2-48). Government policy has had little practical application. African swine fever, foot-and-mouth disease and Cysticercosis are important diseases. The first two are notifiable diseases under Tanzania legislation; the last has widespread distribution and relevance as a major zoonosis. Ascariasis (Ascaris suum), hydatidosis (Echinococcus granulosus), leptospirosis (Leptospira interrogans) and thermophilic Campylobacter are other zoonoses associated with pigs. Gastrointestinal helminths and external parasites, especially Sarcoptes scabiei, are common. Risk factors associated with cysticercosis for humans working with pigs or eating their meat include the free-range or semi-confined management systems, the use of rivers or ponds as a source of water, lack of household sanitation, informal home slaughter, pork not being inspected at slaughter slabs and undercooked and barbecued meat. Pigs are a minor component of Tanzania's livestock sector but there is potential for increasing their contribution to human welfare. Prospects are enhanced by the shorter life cycle, greater number of young produced per year and the possibility of producing high-quality animal protein at a lower cost than meat produced by cattle and small ruminants. PMID:23733144

  9. Behavior training reverses asymmetry in hippocampal transcriptome of the cav3.2 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ni-Chun; Huang, Ying-Hsueh; Chang, Chuan-Hsiung; Liao, James C; Yang, Chih-Hsien; Chen, Chien-Chang; Liu, Ingrid Y

    2015-01-01

    Homozygous Cav3.2 knockout mice, which are defective in the pore-forming subunit of a low voltage activated T-type calcium channel, have been documented to show impaired maintenance of late-phase long-term potentiation (L-LTP) and defective retrieval of context-associated fear memory. To investigate the role of Cav3.2 in global gene expression, we performed a microarray transcriptome study on the hippocampi of the Cav3.2-/- mice and their wild-type littermates, either naïve (untrained) or trace fear conditioned. We found a significant left-right asymmetric effect on the hippocampal transcriptome caused by the Cav3.2 knockout. Between the naive Cav3.2-/- and the naive wild-type mice, 3522 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were found in the left hippocampus, but only 4 DEGs were found in the right hippocampus. Remarkably, the effect of Cav3.2 knockout was partially reversed by trace fear conditioning. The number of DEGs in the left hippocampus was reduced to 6 in the Cav3.2 knockout mice after trace fear conditioning, compared with the wild-type naïve mice. To our knowledge, these results demonstrate for the first time the asymmetric effects of the Cav3.2 and its partial reversal by behavior training on the hippocampal transcriptome. PMID:25768289

  10. Targeted gene knockout in mammalian cells by using engineered zinc-finger nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Yolanda; Chan, Edmond; Liu, Pei-Qi; Orlando, Salvatore; Zhang, Lin; Urnov, Fyodor D.; Holmes, Michael C.; Guschin, Dmitry; Waite, Adam; Miller, Jeffrey C.; Rebar, Edward J.; Gregory, Philip D.; Klug, Aaron; Collingwood, Trevor N.

    2008-01-01

    Gene knockout is the most powerful tool for determining gene function or permanently modifying the phenotypic characteristics of a cell. Existing methods for gene disruption are limited by their efficiency, time to completion, and/or the potential for confounding off-target effects. Here, we demonstrate a rapid single-step approach to targeted gene knockout in mammalian cells, using engineered zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs). ZFNs can be designed to target a chosen locus with high specificity. Upon transient expression of these nucleases the target gene is first cleaved by the ZFNs and then repaired by a natural—but imperfect—DNA repair process, nonhomologous end joining. This often results in the generation of mutant (null) alleles. As proof of concept for this approach we designed ZFNs to target the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene in a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line. We observed biallelic gene disruption at frequencies >1%, thus obviating the need for selection markers. Three new genetically distinct DHFR−/− cell lines were generated. Each new line exhibited growth and functional properties consistent with the specific knockout of the DHFR gene. Importantly, target gene disruption is complete within 2–3 days of transient ZFN delivery, thus enabling the isolation of the resultant DHFR−/− cell lines within 1 month. These data demonstrate further the utility of ZFNs for rapid mammalian cell line engineering and establish a new method for gene knockout with application to reverse genetics, functional genomics, drug discovery, and therapeutic recombinant protein production. PMID:18359850

  11. SPERM MOTILITY IN HSF1 KNOCKOUT MICE AFTER HEAT SHOCK IS ASSOCIATED WITH FERTILITY DEFICITS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPERM MOTILITY IN HSF1 KNOCKOUT MICE AFTER HEAT SHOCK IS ASSOCIATED WITH FERTILITY DEFICITS. L.F. Strader*, S.D. Perreault, J.C. Luft*, and D.J. Dix*. US EPA/ORD, Reproductive Toxicology Div., Research Triangle Park, NC
    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) protect cells from environm...

  12. A baculovirus alkaline nuclease knockout construct produces fragmented DNA and aberrant capsids

    SciTech Connect

    Okano, Kazuhiro; Vanarsdall, Adam L.; Rohrmann, George F. . E-mail: rohrmanng@orst.edu

    2007-03-01

    DNA replication of bacmid-derived constructs of the Autographa californica multiple nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) was analyzed by field inversion gel electrophoresis (FIGE) in combination with digestion at a unique Eco81I restriction enzyme site. Three constructs were characterized: a parental bacmid, a bacmid deleted for the alkaline nuclease gene, and a bacmid from which the gp64 gene had been deleted. The latter was employed as a control for comparison with the alkaline nuclease knockout because neither yields infectious virus and their replication is limited to the initially transfected cells. The major difference between DNA replicated by the different constructs was the presence in the alkaline nuclease knockout of high concentrations of relatively small, subgenome length DNA in preparations not treated with Eco81I. Furthermore, upon Eco81I digestion, the alkaline nuclease knockout bacmid also yielded substantially more subgenome size DNA than the other constructs. Electron microscopic examination of cells transfected with the alkaline nuclease knockout indicated that, in addition to a limited number of normal-appearing electron-dense nucleocapsids, numerous aberrant capsid-like structures were observed indicating a defect in nucleocapsid maturation or in a DNA processing step that is necessary for encapsidation. Because of the documented role of the baculovirus alkaline nuclease and its homologs from other viruses in homologous recombination, these data suggest that DNA recombination may play a major role in the production of baculovirus genomes.

  13. Properties of the 7He ground state from 8He neutron knockout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksyutina, Yu.; Johansson, H. T.; Aumann, T.; Boretzky, K.; Borge, M. J. G.; Chatillon, A.; Chulkov, L. V.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Pramanik, U. Datta; Emling, H.; Forssén, C.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Geissel, H.; Ickert, G.; Jonson, B.; Kulessa, R.; Langer, C.; Lantz, M.; LeBleis, T.; Lindahl, A. O.; Mahata, K.; Meister, M.; Münzenberg, G.; Nilsson, T.; Nyman, G.; Palit, R.; Paschalis, S.; Prokopowicz, W.; Reifarth, R.; Richter, A.; Riisager, K.; Schrieder, G.; Simon, H.; Sümmerer, K.; Tengblad, O.; Weick, H.; Zhukov, M. V.

    2009-08-01

    The unbound nucleus 7He, produced in neutron-knockout reactions with a 240 MeV/u 8He beam in a liquid-hydrogen target, has been studied in an experiment at the ALADIN-LAND setup at GSI. From an R-matrix analysis the resonance parameters for 7He as well as the spectroscopic factor for the 6He(0+) + n configuration in its ground-state have been obtained. The spectroscopic factor is 0.61 confirming that 7He is not a pure single-particle state. An analysis of 5He data from neutron-knockout reactions of 6He in a carbon target reveals the presence of an s-wave component at low energies in the α + n relative energy spectrum. A possible low-lying exited state in 7He observed in neutron knockout data from 8He in a carbon target and tentatively interpreted as a Iπ = 1 /2- state, could not be observed in the present experiment. Possible explanations of the shape difference between the 7He resonance obtained in the two knockout reactions are discussed in terms of target-dependence or different reaction mechanisms at relativistic energies.

  14. Fasting induces ketoacidosis and hypothermia in PDHK2/PDHK4-double-knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Jeoung, Nam Ho; Rahimi, Yasmeen; Wu, Pengfei; Lee, W. N. Paul; Harris, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    The importance of PDHK (pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase) 2 and 4 in regulation of the PDH complex (pyruvate dehydrogenase complex) was assessed in single- and double-knockout mice. PDHK2 deficiency caused higher PDH complex activity and lower blood glucose levels in the fed, but not the fasted, state. PDHK4 deficiency caused similar effects, but only after fasting. Double deficiency intensified these effects in both the fed and fasted states. PDHK2 deficiency had no effect on glucose tolerance, PDHK4 deficiency produced only a modest effect, but double deficiency caused a marked improvement and also induced lower insulin levels and increased insulin sensitivity. In spite of these beneficial effects, the double-knockout mice were more sensitive than wild-type and single-knockout mice to long-term fasting, succumbing to hypoglycaemia, ketoacidosis and hypothermia. Stable isotope flux analysis indicated that hypoglycaemia was due to a reduced rate of gluconeogenesis and that slightly more glucose was converted into ketone bodies in the double-knockout mice. The findings establish that PDHK2 is more important in the fed state, PDHK4 is more important in the fasted state, and survival during long-term fasting depends upon regulation of the PDH complex by both PDHK2 and PDHK4. PMID:22360721

  15. Blueberries reduce lipid peroxidation and boost antioxidant enzymes in apoe knockout mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ApoE knockout (ApoE-/-) mice fed AIN-93G diet (CD) formulated to contain 1 % freeze-dried whole wild blueberries (CD1 percent BB) were found to have significantly less atherosclerotic lesions in aorta. Biomarkers of lipid peroxidation, including F2-isoprostanes, hydroxyoctadecadienoic acids (HODEs) ...

  16. Effects of blueberries in prevention of atherosclerosis in apoe knockout mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ApoE knockout (ApoE-/-) mice were fed AIN-93G diet (CD) or CD formulated to contain 1% freeze-dried whole wild blueberries (CD1% BB). Mice were sacrificed after 20 weeks on the specified diet. Atherosclerotic lesions in aortic sinus were determined by staining cryosections (10 µm) with Oil Red O. Th...

  17. IdealKnock: A framework for efficiently identifying knockout strategies leading to targeted overproduction.

    PubMed

    Gu, Deqing; Zhang, Cheng; Zhou, Shengguo; Wei, Liujing; Hua, Qiang

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, computer aided redesigning methods based on genome-scale metabolic network models (GEMs) have played important roles in metabolic engineering studies; however, most of these methods are hindered by intractable computing times. In particular, methods that predict knockout strategies leading to overproduction of desired biochemical are generally unable to do high level prediction because the computational time will increase exponentially. In this study, we propose a new framework named IdealKnock, which is able to efficiently evaluate potentials of the production for different biochemical in a system by merely knocking out pathways. In addition, it is also capable of searching knockout strategies when combined with the OptKnock or OptGene framework. Furthermore, unlike other methods, IdealKnock suggests a series of mutants with targeted overproduction, which enables researchers to select the one of greatest interest for experimental validation. By testing the overproduction of a large number of native metabolites, IdealKnock showed its advantage in successfully breaking through the limitation of maximum knockout number in reasonable time and suggesting knockout strategies with better performance than other methods. In addition, gene-reaction relationship is well considered in the proposed framework. PMID:26948338

  18. Serotonin Transporter Knockout Rats Show Improved Strategy Set-Shifting and Reduced Latent Inhibition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nonkes, Lourens J. P.; van de Vondervoort, Ilse I. G. M.; de Leeuw, Mark J. C.; Wijlaars, Linda P.; Maes, Joseph H. R.; Homberg, Judith R.

    2012-01-01

    Behavioral flexibility is a cognitive process depending on prefrontal areas allowing adaptive responses to environmental changes. Serotonin transporter knockout (5-HTT[superscript -/-]) rodents show improved reversal learning in addition to orbitofrontal cortex changes. Another form of behavioral flexibility, extradimensional strategy set-shifting…

  19. CRISPR-Cas9-based knockout of the prion protein and its effect on the proteome.

    PubMed

    Mehrabian, Mohadeseh; Brethour, Dylan; MacIsaac, Sarah; Kim, Jin Kyu; Gunawardana, C Geeth; Wang, Hansen; Schmitt-Ulms, Gerold

    2014-01-01

    The molecular function of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) and the mechanism by which it may contribute to neurotoxicity in prion diseases and Alzheimer's disease are only partially understood. Mouse neuroblastoma Neuro2a cells and, more recently, C2C12 myocytes and myotubes have emerged as popular models for investigating the cellular biology of PrP. Mouse epithelial NMuMG cells might become attractive models for studying the possible involvement of PrP in a morphogenetic program underlying epithelial-to-mesenchymal transitions. Here we describe the generation of PrP knockout clones from these cell lines using CRISPR-Cas9 knockout technology. More specifically, knockout clones were generated with two separate guide RNAs targeting recognition sites on opposite strands within the first hundred nucleotides of the Prnp coding sequence. Several PrP knockout clones were isolated and genomic insertions and deletions near the CRISPR-target sites were characterized. Subsequently, deep quantitative global proteome analyses that recorded the relative abundance of>3000 proteins (data deposited to ProteomeXchange Consortium) were undertaken to begin to characterize the molecular consequences of PrP deficiency. The levels of ∼ 120 proteins were shown to reproducibly correlate with the presence or absence of PrP, with most of these proteins belonging to extracellular components, cell junctions or the cytoskeleton. PMID:25490046

  20. Brief Report: Altered Social Behavior in Isolation-Reared "Fmr1" Knockout Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heitzer, Andrew M.; Roth, Alexandra K.; Nawrocki, Lauren; Wrenn, Craige C.; Valdovinos, Maria G.

    2013-01-01

    Social behavior abnormalities in Fragile X syndrome (FXS) are characterized by social withdrawal, anxiety, and deficits in social cognition. To assess these deficits, a model of FXS, the "Fmr1" knockout mouse ("Fmr1" KO), has been utilized. This mouse model has a null mutation in the fragile X mental retardation 1 gene ("Fmr1") and displays…

  1. Split marketing: A risk factor for Salmonella in market pigs?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine if split marketing affects Salmonella prevalence in market pigs, by comparing the Salmonella prevalence in the first group of pigs selected for slaughter (i.e., “First pull”) versus the last group of pigs selected for slaughter (i.e., “Close out”) from typical co...

  2. Absence of Chlamydia-like organisms in pigs.

    PubMed

    Van Gils, M; Aeby, S; Vanrompay, D; Greub, G

    2015-09-01

    Porcine reproductive failure, especially abortion, causes significant economic loss in the pig industry. Waddlia chondrophila and Parachlamydia acanthamoebae are potential abortigenic agents for pigs. Therefore, we investigated the presence of these two Chlamydia-like organisms in abortion-related samples originating from Belgian pig farms. All investigated samples remained negative. PMID:26137311

  3. Absence of Chlamydia-like organisms in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Van Gils, M.; Aeby, S.; Vanrompay, D.; Greub, G.

    2015-01-01

    Porcine reproductive failure, especially abortion, causes significant economic loss in the pig industry. Waddlia chondrophila and Parachlamydia acanthamoebae are potential abortigenic agents for pigs. Therefore, we investigated the presence of these two Chlamydia-like organisms in abortion-related samples originating from Belgian pig farms. All investigated samples remained negative. PMID:26137311

  4. Salmonella infection and immune response in finishing pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Finishing pigs infected with Salmonella pose significant food safety risks by carrying the pathogen into abattoirs. A study was conducted to determine the dynamic of Salmonella infection in finishing pigs, and the immunological alterations that occur in Salmonella-carrier pigs, by longitudinally com...

  5. Experimental Salmonella Enterica Infection in Market-weight Pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Market pigs infected with Salmonella pose a significant food safety risk by carrying the pathogen into abattoirs. A study was conducted to determine the dynamic of Salmonella infection in market-weight pigs (220-240 lbs.). Pigs (n=24) were individually inoculated (intranasally; 108 cfu/mL) with Salm...

  6. First report of Enterocytozoon bieneusi in pigs in Brazil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although Brazil is the world’s fourth largest producer and exporter of pork, there is no information on E. bieneusi in pigs. This study was undertaken to determine the presence of E. bieneusi in pigs in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Fecal samples were collected from 91 pigs (1- to 12-mo-old) ...

  7. Endotoxin induced uncoupling of the somatotrophic axis in nursery pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an endotoxin known to stimulate the innate immune response and stress axis in pigs. However, little is known about the effects of LPS on pig somatotrophic responses. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of an endotoxin challenge on weaned pig serum con...

  8. 9 CFR 113.38 - Guinea pig safety test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... be injected either intramuscularly or subcutaneously into each of two guinea pigs and the animals... pigs during the observation period, the serial or subserial is unsatisfactory. If unfavorable reactions... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Guinea pig safety test. 113.38...

  9. 9 CFR 113.38 - Guinea pig safety test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... be injected either intramuscularly or subcutaneously into each of two guinea pigs and the animals... pigs during the observation period, the serial or subserial is unsatisfactory. If unfavorable reactions... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Guinea pig safety test. 113.38...

  10. malT knockout mutation invokes a stringent type gene-expression profile in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae in bronchoalveolar fluid

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae causes contagious pleuropneumonia, an economically important disease of commercially reared pigs throughout the world. To cause this disease, A. pleuropneumoniae must rapidly overcome porcine pulmonary innate immune defenses. Since bronchoalveolar fluid (BALF) contains many of the innate immune and other components found in the lungs, we examined the gene expression of a virulent serovar 1 strain of A. pleuropneumoniae after exposure to concentrated BALF for 30 min. Results In reverse transcription PCR differential display (RT-PCR DD) experiments, A. pleuropneumoniae CM5 exposed to BALF up-regulated, among other genes, a gene predicted to encode LamB, an outer-membrane transport protein of the maltose regulon. To determine the role of the lamB and other genes of the maltose regulon in the pathogenesis of A. pleuropneumoniae, knockout mutations were created in the lamB and malT genes, the latter being the positive transcriptional regulator of the maltose regulon. Relative to the lamB mutant and the wild type, the malT mutant had a significant (P < 0.05) decrease in growth rate and an increased sensitivity to fresh porcine serum and high concentrations (more than 0.5 M) of sodium chloride. In DNA microarray experiments, the BALF-exposed malT mutant exhibited a gene-expression profile resembling that of a stringent type gene-expression profile seen in bacteria facing amino acid or carbon starvation. Genes encoding proteins for protein synthesis, energy metabolism, and DNA replication were down-regulated, while genes involved in stringent response (e.g., relA), amino acid and nucleotide biosynthesis, biofilm formation, DNA transformation, and stress response were up-regulated. Conclusion These results suggest that MalT may be involved in protection against some stressors and in the transport of one or more essential nutrients in BALF. Moreover, if MalT is directly or indirectly linked to the stringent response, an important

  11. Soluble pig for radioactive waste transfer lines

    SciTech Connect

    Ohl, P.C., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-12-02

    Flushing transfer pipe after radioactive waste transfers generates thousands of gallons of additional radioactive waste each year at the Hanford site. The use of pneumatic pigging with waste soluble pigs as a means to clear transfer piping may be an effective alternative to raw water flushes. A feasibility study was performed by a group of senior mechanical engineering students for their senior design project as part of their curriculum at Washington State University. The students divided the feasibility study into three sub-projects involving: (1) materials research, (2) delivery system design, and (3) mockup fabrication and testing. The students screened through twenty-three candidate materials and selected a thermoplastic polymer combined 50:50 wt% with sucrose to meet the established material performance criteria. The students also prepared a conceptual design of a remote pneumatic delivery system and constructed a mockup section of transfer pipe for testing the prototype pigs.

  12. Growth and skeletal development of the pig.

    PubMed

    Reiland, S

    1978-01-01

    Growth and skeletal development of the domestic pig (Swedish landrace and Yorkshire) are reported and the weight curve of males from birth to maturity included. Other parameters were tooth development and growth of certain bones. It was concluded that daily weight gain increases rapidly to an age of about 5 months. Sexual maturity is reached by both the male and female pig at about 5--6 months of age. At this time there is an inflection point on the weight curve. The period from 5--6 months to about 18 months of age is called adolescence. After 18 months of age the weight curve is flattened. The data from the domestic pigs were compared with the corresponding data of the wild European hog. It was found that the wild hog has a much slower weight gain. PMID:233594

  13. Discerning Pig Screams in Production Environments

    PubMed Central

    Vandermeulen, J.; Bahr, C.; Tullo, E.; Fontana, I.; Ott, S.; Kashiha, M.; Guarino, M.; Moons, C. P. H.; Tuyttens, F. A. M.; Niewold, T. A.; Berckmans, D.

    2015-01-01

    Pig vocalisations convey information about their current state of health and welfare. Continuously monitoring these vocalisations can provide useful information for the farmer. For instance, pig screams can indicate stressful situations. When monitoring screams, other sounds can interfere with scream detection. Therefore, identifying screams from other sounds is essential. The objective of this study was to understand which sound features define a scream. Therefore, a method to detect screams based on sound features with physical meaning and explicit rules was developed. To achieve this, 7 hours of labelled data from 24 pigs was used. The developed detection method attained 72% sensitivity, 91% specificity and 83% precision. As a result, the detection method showed that screams contain the following features discerning them from other sounds: a formant structure, adequate power, high frequency content, sufficient variability and duration. PMID:25923725

  14. Trichinella pseudospiralis in pig from Croatia.

    PubMed

    Beck, Relja; Beck, Ana; Lucinger, Snjezana; Florijancić, Tihomir; Bosković, Ivica; Marinculić, Albert

    2009-02-23

    Trichinella spiralis and Trichinella britovi are species that are frequently found in domestic pigs and various sylvatic animals in Croatia. During routine trichinoscopy, non-encapsulated larvae were detected in the muscle tissue of a domestic pig. Artificial digestion revealed a larvae burden of 602 muscle larvae per gram of tissue. Tissue section analysis confirmed the presence of non-encapsulated larvae. Multiplex PCR identified the larvae as T. pseudospiralis. This observation is consistent with the reports of a local veterinary inspector who described the presence of non-encapsulated Trichinella in four individual cases over the last 2 years. This is the first report of T. pseudospiralis in Croatia and one of very few cases of T. pseudospiralis infection described in domestic pigs. The detection of non-encapsulated larvae stresses the need for implementation of artificial digestion instead of trichinoscopy for the detection and identification of Trichinella infections. PMID:19054619

  15. Smart pigs assess reliability of corroded pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D.G.; Dawson, S.J.; Brown, M.

    1995-03-01

    Pipeline operating companies are relying more and more on high-resolution, magnetic pigs to inspect onshore and offshore pipelines for corrosion. Data derived from these corrosion surveys can be used to develop a safe future operating strategy. British Gas has successfully developed and applied a realistic deterministic analysis for corroded pipelines. It involves identification and calculation of failure pressure and time to failure of corroded pipe spools with the highest risk of failure. High-resolution, intelligent pigs (smart pigs) can accurately detect, size, and locate corrosion in pipelines. Once corrosion is detected, the operator needs to known if the corrosion will affect the integrity of the pipeline and when it could fail from further corrosion growth. This information can be used to develop a pipeline de-rating schedule, implement a repair or replacement program, determine if re-inspection is necessary, and evaluate effectiveness of a corrosion inhibitor program. Such methods are described.

  16. Global Nav1.7 Knockout Mice Recapitulate the Phenotype of Human Congenital Indifference to Pain

    PubMed Central

    Gingras, Jacinthe; Smith, Sarah; Matson, David J.; Johnson, Danielle; Nye, Kim; Couture, Lauren; Feric, Elma; Yin, Ruoyuan; Moyer, Bryan D.; Peterson, Matthew L.; Rottman, James B.; Beiler, Rudolph J.; Malmberg, Annika B.; McDonough, Stefan I.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical genetic studies have shown that loss of Nav1.7 function leads to the complete loss of acute pain perception. The global deletion is reported lethal in mice, however, and studies of mice with promoter-specific deletions of Nav1.7 have suggested that the role of Nav1.7 in pain transduction depends on the precise form of pain. We developed genetic and animal husbandry strategies that overcame the neonatal-lethal phenotype and enabled construction of a global Nav1.7 knockout mouse. Knockouts were anatomically normal, reached adulthood, and had phenotype wholly analogous to human congenital indifference to pain (CIP): compared to littermates, knockouts showed no defects in mechanical sensitivity or overall movement yet were completely insensitive to painful tactile, thermal, and chemical stimuli and were anosmic. Knockouts also showed no painful behaviors resulting from peripheral injection of nonselective sodium channel activators, did not develop complete Freund’s adjuvant-induced thermal hyperalgesia, and were insensitive to intra-dermal histamine injection. Tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium current recorded from cell bodies of isolated sensory neurons and the mechanically-evoked spiking of C-fibers in a skin-nerve preparation each were reduced but not eliminated in tissue from knockouts compared to littermates. Results support a role for Nav1.7 that is conserved between rodents and humans and suggest several possibly translatable biomarkers for the study of Nav1.7-targeted therapeutics. Results further suggest that Nav1.7 may retain its key role in persistent as well as acute forms of pain. PMID:25188265

  17. Methylphenidate improves the behavioral and cognitive deficits of neurogranin knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Freesia L.; Huang, Kuo-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Neurogranin (Ng), a brain-specific calmodulin-binding protein, is expressed highly in hippocampus, and is important for cognitive function. Deletion of the Ng gene from mice caused attenuation of signal reaction cascade in hippocampus, impairments in learning and memory and high frequency stimulation-induced long-term potentiation. Environmental enrichment alone failed to improve cognitive function. In the present study, behavioral testing revealed that Ng knockout mice were both hyperactive and socially withdrawn. Methylphenidate (MPH) was given to mice while they were also kept under an enrichment condition. MPH treatment reduced the hyperactivity of Ng knockout mice tested in both the open field and forced swim chamber. MPH improved their social abilities such that mice recognized and interacted better with novel subjects. The cognitive memories of MPH-treated mutants were improved in both water maze and contextual fear conditioning tests. High frequency stimulation-induced long-term potentiation of Ng knockout mice was also improved by MPH. The present treatment regimen, however, did not fully reverse the deficits of the mutant mice. In contrast, MPH exerted only a minimal effect on the wild type mice. At the cellular level, MPH increased the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive cells in hippocampus, particularly within the dentate gyrus of Ng knockout mice. Therefore it will be of interest to determine the nature of MPH-mediated astrocyte activation and how it may modulate behavior in future studies. Taken together these Ng knockout mice may be useful for the development of better drug treatment to improve cognitive and behavioral impairments. PMID:22809330

  18. Atherosclerosis, inflammation and lipoprotein glomerulopathy in kidneys of apoE-/-/LDL-/- double knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The apoE-/-/LDL-/- double knockout mice are bearing considerable structural homology to human atherosclerosis. We hypothesized, that advanced lesion formation in the renal artery is associated with kidney alterations in these mice. Methods Kidneys from apoE-/-/LDL-/- double knockout mice at the age of 80 weeks (n = 6) and C57/BL control mice (n = 5) were infused with Microfil, harvested and scanned with micro-CT (12 μm cubic voxels) and Nano-CT (900 nm cubic voxels). We quantitated the total vascular volume using micro-CT. Number and cross-sectional area (μm2) of glomeruli were measured using histology. Results At the age of 80 weeks, the renal total vascular volume fraction decreased significantly (p < 0.001) compared to controls. Moreover, the renal artery showed advanced atherosclerotic lesions with adventitial Vasa vasorum neovascularization. Perivascular inflammation was present in kidneys of apoE-/-/LDL-/- double knockout mice, predominantly involved are plasma cells and leucocytes. Glomeruli cross-sectional area (9959 ± 1083 μm2) and number (24.8 ± 4.5) increased in apoE-/-/LDL-/- double knockout mice compared to controls (3533 ± 398 μm2; 17.6 ± 3, respectively), whereas 41% of the total number of glomeruli showed evidence for lipoprotein associated glomerulopathy (LPG). Moreover, immunohistochemistry demonstrated capillary aneurysms of the glomeruli filled with factor 8 containing emboli. Conclusion The reduced intra-renal total vascular volume is associated with systemic atherosclerosis and glomeruli alterations in the apoE-/-/LDL-/- double knockout mouse model. PMID:20727187

  19. Thyrotropin receptor knockout mice: studies on immunological tolerance to a major thyroid autoantigen.

    PubMed

    Pichurin, Pavel N; Pichurina, Oxana; Marians, Russell C; Chen, Chun-Rong; Davies, Terry F; Rapoport, Basil; McLachlan, Sandra M

    2004-03-01

    Graves' disease involves a breakdown in self-tolerance to the TSH receptor (TSHR). Central T cell tolerance is established by intrathymic deletion of immature T lymphocytes that bind with high affinity to peptides from autoantigens (like the TSHR) expressed ectopically in the thymus. In TSHR-knockout mice, tolerance cannot be induced to the TSHR, which should, therefore, be a foreign antigen for these animals. To test this hypothesis, TSHR-knockout mice and wild-type controls were vaccinated (three injections) with TSHR DNA or control DNA. TSHR antibodies, measured by ELISA, binding to TSHR-expressing eukaryotic cells, and TSH binding inhibition, developed in approximately 60% of TSHR-knockout mice, not significantly different from 80% in the wild-type mice. Antibody levels were also comparable in the two groups, and both strains recognized the same immunodominant linear antibody epitope at the amino terminus of the TSHR. Splenocyte responses to TSHR protein in culture, measured as interferon-gamma production, were similar in TSHR-knockout and wild-type mice. Moreover, T cells from both strains recognized the same two epitopes from a panel of 29 synthetic peptides encompassing the TSHR ectodomain and extracellular loops. This lack of difference in immune responses in TSHR-knockout and wild-type mice is unexpected and is contrary to observations in other induced animal models of autoimmunity. The importance of our finding is that the TSHR may not be similar to other model proteins used to define the concept of central immune tolerance. PMID:14630711

  20. FMR1 Knockout mice: A model to study fragile X mental retardation

    SciTech Connect

    Oostra, B.A.; Bakker, C.E.; Reyniers, E.

    1994-09-01

    The fragile X syndrome is the most frequent form of inherited mental retardation in humans with an incidence of 1 in 1250 males and 1 in 2500 females. The clinical syndrome includes moderate to severe mental retardation, autistic behavior, macroorchidism, and facial features, such as long face with mandibular prognathism and large, everted ears. The molecular basis for this disease is a large expansion of a triplet repeat (CGG){sub n} in the 5{prime} untranslated region of the FMR1 gene. Due to this large expansion of the CGG repeat, the promoter region becomes methylated and the FMR1 gene is subsequently silenced. Hardly anything is known about the physiologic function of FMR1 and the pathologic mechanisms leading to these symptoms. Since the FMR1 gene is highly conserved in the mouse, we used the mouse to design a knockout model for the fragile X syndrome. These knockout mice lacking Fmrp have normal litter size suggesting that FMR1 is not essential in human gametogenesis and embryonic development. The knockout mice show the abnormalities also seen in the affected organs of human patients. Mutant mice show a gradual development through time of macroorchidism. In the knockout mice we observed cognitive defects in the form of deficits in learning (as shown by the hidden platform Morris water maze task) and behavioral abnormalities such as increased exploratory behavior and hyperactivity. Therefore this knockout mouse may serve as a valuable tool in studying the role of FMR1 in the fragile X syndrome and may serve as a model to elucidate the mechanisms involved in macroorchidism, abnormal behavior, and mental retardation.

  1. Lipopolysaccharides of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae bind pig hemoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    Bélanger, M; Bégin, C; Jacques, M

    1995-01-01

    A previous study indicated that lipopolysaccharides (LPS) extracted from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae bind two low-molecular-mass proteins, of approximately 10 and 11 kDa, present in porcine respiratory tract secretions (M. Bélanger, D. Dubreuil, and M. Jacques, Infect. Immun. 62:868-873, 1994). In the present study, we determined the N-terminal amino acid sequences of these two proteins, which revealed high homology with the alpha and beta chains of pig hemoglobin. Some isolates of A. pleuropneumoniae were able to use hemoglobin from various animal species as well as other heme compounds as sole sources of iron for growth, while other isolates were unable to use them. Immunoelectron microscopy showed binding of pig hemoglobin at the surface of all A. pleuropneumoniae isolates as well as labeling of outer membrane blebs. We observed, using Western blotting (immunoblotting), that the lipid A-core region of LPS of all isolates was binding pig hemoglobin. Furthermore, lipid A obtained after acid hydrolysis of LPS extracted from A. pleuropneumoniae was able to bind pig hemoglobin and this binding was completely abolished by preincubation of lipid A with polymyxin B but was not inhibited by preincubation with glucosamines. Fatty acids constituting the lipid A of A. pleuropneumoniae, namely, dodecanoic acid, tetradecanoic acid, 3-hydroxytetradecanoic acid, hexadecanoic acid, and octadecanoic acid, were also binding pig hemoglobin. Our results indicate that LPS of all A. pleuropneumoniae isolates tested bind pig hemoglobin and that lipid A is involved in this binding. Our results also indicate that some A. pleuropneumoniae isolates are, in addition, able to use hemoglobin for growth. Binding of hemoglobin to LPS might represent an important means by which A. pleuropneumoniae acquires iron in vivo from hemoglobin released from erythrocytes lysed by the action of its hemolysins. PMID:7822035

  2. Farming practices and genetic characterization of Nicobari pig, an indigenous pig germplasm of Nicobar group of islands, India.

    PubMed

    De, Arun Kumar; Jeyakumar, S; Kundu, Madhu Sudan; Kundu, Anandamoy; Sunder, Jai; Ramachandran, M

    2014-04-01

    The Nicobari pig, locally known as Ha-un, is an indigenous pig germplasm located only in the Nicobar group of islands, India. The present study documents the Nicobari pig-rearing practices of the tribal farmers and genetically characterizes them using 23 FAO-recommended microsatellite markers. The study was conducted over a period of 3 years (2010-2012) in Car Nicobar, India. A total of 225 farmers were surveyed (15 farmers per village of 15 villages). Information on herd statistics, husbandry practices, and constraints faced by the farmers in pig production were collected. The pigs were reared in a free-range system. Mean pig herd size per house hold was 8.9, and main feed for pigs was coconut and some indigenous feed materials such as pandanus, bread fruit, and Nicobari alu. The main constraints faced by the farmers were lack of feed after the tsunami, different disease conditions, piglet mortality, and predator attack. The Nicobari pigs were genotyped by 23 FAO-recommended microsatellite markers. The mean observed number of alleles for all 23 loci in Nicobari pigs was 6.96 ± 0.31. The mean observed and expected heterozygosities were 0.66 ± 0.02 and 0.75 ± 0.01, respectively. It was found that the genetic diversity of this pig breed was very high compared to Large White Yorkshire and other European pig breeds. This genetic characterization of the pig breed will be helpful in their conservation effort. PMID:24595559

  3. Tests of cryogenic pigs for use in liquefied gas pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Hipple, D.L.; O'Neal, W.C.

    1982-09-09

    Pipeline pigs are a key element in the design of a proposed spill test facility whose purpose is to evaluate the hazards of large spills of liquefied gaseous fuels (LGFs). A long pipe will run from the LGF storage tanks to the spill point; to produce a rapid spill, the pipe will be filled with LGF and a pig will be pneumatically driven through the pipe to force out the LGF quickly and cleanly. Several pig designs were tested in a 6-inch-diameter, 420-foot-long pipe to evaluate their performance at liquid-nitrogen temperature and compare it with their performance at ambient temperature. For each test, the pig was placed in one end of the pipe and either water or liquid nitrogen was put into the pipe in front of the pig. Then pressurized drive gas, either nitrogen or helium, was admitted to the pipe behind the pig to push the pig and the fluid ahead of it out the exit nozzle. For some tests, the drive gas supply was shut off when the pig was part way through the pipe as a method of velocity control; in these cases, the pressurized gas trapped behind the pig continued to expand until it pushed the pig the remaining distance out of the pipe. The tests provided information on how the effectiveness and velocity of the pig and the flow rate of the expelled fluid changed with pressure and shutoff time of the drive gas and with temperature. The pig designs that left the least liquid during the water tests were a polyurethane foam pig and a cylindrical metal pig with flexible metal wipers. In the liquid nitrogen tests, the metal pig with wipers performed best. It removed all the liquid nitrogen and survived most of the tests well.

  4. Cardiac ganglioneuroma in a juvenile pig.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Ryoko; Joma, Ikumi; Otsubo, Koji; Matsutake, Hiroshi; Yanai, Tokuma; Sakai, Hiroki

    2016-02-01

    A cardiac mass (3 × 5 × 3 cm) was detected at the base between the right auricular wall and right vena cava of a slaughtered 6-month-old female mixed-breed pig during a meat inspection. The tumor comprised infiltrative prominent interweaving fascicles of Schwann cells with Verocay bodies. Moreover, the ganglion cells were scattered or aggregated throughout the neoplastic tissue. The ganglion and Schwann cells had neither cellular atypism nor mitosis. On the basis of the bearing site as well as the morphological and immunohistochemical features, this is the first case of a cardiac ganglioneuroma in a pig. PMID:26256406

  5. Cardiac ganglioneuroma in a juvenile pig

    PubMed Central

    INOUE, Ryoko; JOMA, Ikumi; OTSUBO, Koji; MATSUTAKE, Hiroshi; YANAI, Tokuma; SAKAI, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    A cardiac mass (3 × 5 × 3 cm) was detected at the base between the right auricular wall and right vena cava of a slaughtered 6-month-old female mixed-breed pig during a meat inspection. The tumor comprised infiltrative prominent interweaving fascicles of Schwann cells with Verocay bodies. Moreover, the ganglion cells were scattered or aggregated throughout the neoplastic tissue. The ganglion and Schwann cells had neither cellular atypism nor mitosis. On the basis of the bearing site as well as the morphological and immunohistochemical features, this is the first case of a cardiac ganglioneuroma in a pig. PMID:26256406

  6. Pigs from iron containing dusts and sludges

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, C.M.

    1995-12-31

    DK Recycling und Roheisen GmbH converts 380,000 annual tonnes of iron containing waste materials into pig iron. Zinc is the main reason that these materials are classified as waste. The materials are processed in the conventional way by making sinter which is then smelted in a blast furnace to foundry grade pig iron. The trick lies not in the unit operations which are quite standard but rather in the modifications made to the plant and operating procedures to cope with the much higher levels of tramp elements.

  7. Dynamics of Japanese Encephalitis Virus Transmission among Pigs in Northwest Bangladesh and the Potential Impact of Pig Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Salah Uddin; Salje, Henrik; Hannan, A.; Islam, Md. Atiqul; Bhuyan, A. A. Mamun; Islam, Md. Ariful; Rahman, M. Ziaur; Nahar, Nazmun; Hossain, M. Jahangir; Luby, Stephen P.; Gurley, Emily S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus infection can cause severe disease in humans, resulting in death or permanent neurologic deficits among survivors. Studies indicate that the incidence of JE is high in northwestern Bangladesh. Pigs are amplifying hosts for JE virus (JEV) and a potentially important source of virus in the environment. The objectives of this study were to describe the transmission dynamics of JEV among pigs in northwestern Bangladesh and estimate the potential impact of vaccination to reduce incidence among pigs. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a comprehensive census of pigs in three JE endemic districts and tested a sample of them for evidence of previous JEV infection. We built a compartmental model to describe JEV transmission dynamics in this region and to estimate the potential impact of pig vaccination. We identified 11,364 pigs in the study area. Previous JEV infection was identified in 30% of pigs with no spatial differences in the proportion of pigs that were seropositive across the study area. We estimated that JEV infects 20% of susceptible pigs each year and the basic reproductive number among pigs was 1.2. The model suggest that vaccinating 50% of pigs each year resulted in an estimated 82% reduction in annual incidence in pigs. Conclusions/Significance The widespread distribution of historic JEV infection in pigs suggests they may play an important role in virus transmission in this area. Future studies are required to understand the contribution of pig infections to JE risk in humans and the potential impact of pig vaccination on human disease. PMID:25255286

  8. Feasibility tests of pipeline pigs for cryogenic pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Hipple, D.L.

    1983-07-01

    The cryogenic pig experiment reported here was designed to test the concept of using a pneumatically driven pipeline pig to force cryogenic fluid through a long, large-diameter pipe, which is one of the key features of the proposed large-scale Spill Safety Test Facility. The Spill Safety Test Facility will spill materials such as liquefied natural gas (LNG), liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), ammonia, and other liquefied gases under controlled conditions so that atmospheric dispersion of these materials can be better understood. Three pig design concepts were tested: (1) commercially available, bullet-shaped polyurethane foam pigs, (2) close-fitting spherical metal pigs with sufficient clearance to pass through the pipe at cryogenic temperatures. Three different sizes were tested to determine the effect of a loose fit, and (3) cylindrical metal pigs with flexible wipers at each end which would maintain a seal during transit through the pipe. The most effective pigs in removing liquid from the pipe were the polyurethane foam pig and the cylindrical wiper pig. For the LN/sub 2/ tests these two pigs left no liquid in the pipe, and for the water tests they left 1% of pipe volume. The large sphere was the next best pig, leaving 2 to 3% of pipe volume during the LN/sub 2/ tests and about 3% of pipe volume during the water tests.

  9. Screening pigs for xenotransplantation: expression of porcine endogenous retroviruses in transgenic pig skin.

    PubMed

    Kimsa-Dudek, Magdalena; Strzalka-Mrozik, Barbara; Kimsa, Malgorzata W; Blecharz, Irena; Gola, Joanna; Skowronek, Bartlomiej; Janiszewski, Adrian; Lipinski, Daniel; Zeyland, Joanna; Szalata, Marlena; Slomski, Ryszard; Mazurek, Urszula

    2015-06-01

    Pigs seem to be the answer to worldwide organ donor shortage. Porcine skin may also be applied as a dressing for severe burns. Genetic modifications of donor animals enable reduction of immune response, which prolongs xenograft survival as temporary biological dressing and allows achieving resistance against xenograft rejection. The risk posed by porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) cannot be eliminated by breeding animals under specific-pathogen-free conditions and so all recipients of porcine graft will be exposed to PERVs. Therefore our study has been focused on the assessment of PERV DNA and mRNA level in skin samples of transgenic pigs generated for xenotransplantation. Porcine skin fragments were obtained from 3- to 6-month-old non-transgenic and transgenic Polish Landrace pigs. Transgenic pigs were produced by pronuclear DNA microinjection and were developed to express the human α-galactosidase and the human α-1,2-fucosyltransferase gene. The copy numbers of PERV DNA and RNA were evaluated using real-time Q-PCR and QRT-PCR. Comparative analysis of all PERV subtypes revealed that PERV-A is the main subtype of PERVs in analyzed skin samples. There was no significantly different copy number of PERV-A, PERV-B and PERV-C between non-transgenic pigs, pigs with the human α-galactosidase and pigs expressing the human α-1,2-fucosyltransferase gene, except of PERV-C DNA. It brings the conclusion, that transgenesis process exerts no influence on PERVs transinfection. That is another step forward in the development of pig skin xenografts as burn wounds dressing. PMID:25812516

  10. A QTL resource and comparison tool for pigs: PigQTLDB.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhi-Liang; Dracheva, Svetlana; Jang, Wonhee; Maglott, Donna; Bastiaansen, John; Rothschild, Max F; Reecy, James M

    2005-10-01

    During the past decade, efforts to map quantitative trait loci (QTL) in pigs have resulted in hundreds of QTL being reported for growth, meat quality, reproduction, disease resistance, and other traits. It is a challenge to locate, interpret, and compare QTL results from different studies. We have developed a pig QTL database (PigQTLdb) that integrates available pig QTL data in the public domain, thus, facilitating the use of this QTL data in future studies. We also developed a pig trait classification system to standardize names of traits and to simplify organization and searching of the trait data. These steps made it possible to compare primary data from diverse sources and methods. We used existing pig map databases and other publicly available data resources (such as PubMed) to avoid redundant developmental work. The PigQTLdb was also designed to include data representing major genes and markers associated with a large effect on economically important traits. To date, over 790 QTL from 73 publications have been curated into the database. Those QTL cover more than 300 different traits. The data have been submitted to the Entrez Gene and the Map Viewer resources at NCBI, where the information about markers was matched to marker records in NCBI's UniSTS database. Having these data in a public resource like NCBI allows regularly updated automatic matching of markers to public sequence data by e-PCR. The submitted data, and the results of these calculations, are retrievable from NCBI via Entrez Gene, Map Viewer, and UniSTS. Efforts were undertaken to improve the integrated functional genomics resources for pigs. PMID:16261421

  11. Charge-to-Mass Dispersion Methods in Knockout-Ablation Fragmentation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Lawrence; Burton, Krista; de Wet, Wouter

    2014-09-01

    Breakup of high-energy heavy ions in nuclear collisions is an important process in space radiation transport, shielding and risk assessment since the secondary particles produced by these collisions have ranges greater than their parent nucleus, and are damaging to humans and spacecraft components. This work uses a quantum-mechanical optical potential knockout-ablation model to estimate these collision cross sections in order to investigate differences in isotope and element production cross sections as a result of utilizing two different models of charge-to mass ratios for the projectile prefragments produced by the abrasion/knockout process. One model commonly used, a hypergeometric model, assumes that the distribution of abraded nucleons is completely uncorrelated. However, it permits some unrealistic distributions, such as removing all neutrons in the knockout stage, while leaving all protons intact. Another model, developed for use with a classical geometric, clean-cut abrasion model, is based upon the zero point vibrations of the giant dipole resonance of the fragmenting nucleus. In this work we compare fragment production cross section predictions using the two charge dispersion models with published experimental data. Breakup of high-energy heavy ions in nuclear collisions is an important process in space radiation transport, shielding and risk assessment since the secondary particles produced by these collisions have ranges greater than their parent nucleus, and are damaging to humans and spacecraft components. This work uses a quantum-mechanical optical potential knockout-ablation model to estimate these collision cross sections in order to investigate differences in isotope and element production cross sections as a result of utilizing two different models of charge-to mass ratios for the projectile prefragments produced by the abrasion/knockout process. One model commonly used, a hypergeometric model, assumes that the distribution of abraded nucleons is

  12. Efficient CRISPR/Cas9-mediated biallelic gene disruption and site-specific knockin after rapid selection of highly active sgRNAs in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xianlong; Zhou, Jinwei; Cao, Chunwei; Huang, Jiaojiao; Hai, Tang; Wang, Yanfang; Zheng, Qiantao; Zhang, Hongyong; Qin, Guosong; Miao, Xiangnan; Wang, Hongmei; Cao, Suizhong; Zhou, Qi; Zhao, Jianguo

    2015-01-01

    Genetic engineering in livestock was greatly enhanced by the emergence of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated 9 (Cas9), which can be programmed with a single-guide RNA (sgRNA) to generate site-specific DNA breaks. However, the uncertainties caused by wide variations in sgRNA activity impede the utility of this system in generating genetically modified pigs. Here, we described a single blastocyst genotyping system to provide a simple and rapid solution to evaluate and compare the sgRNA efficiency at inducing indel mutations for a given gene locus. Assessment of sgRNA mutagenesis efficiencies can be achieved within 10 days from the design of the sgRNA. The most effective sgRNA selected by this system was successfully used to induce site-specific insertion through homology-directed repair at a frequency exceeding 13%. Additionally, the highly efficient gene deletion via the selected sgRNA was confirmed in pig fibroblast cells, which could serve as donor cells for somatic cell nuclear transfer. We further showed that direct cytoplasmic injection of Cas9 mRNA and the favorable sgRNA into zygotes could generate biallelic knockout piglets with an efficiency of up to 100%. Thus, our method considerably reduces the uncertainties and expands the practical possibilities of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome engineering in pigs. PMID:26293209

  13. A single nucleotide polymorphism in suppressor of cytokine signalling-2 is associated with growth and feed conversion efficiency in pigs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Piper, E; Zhang, Y; Tier, B; Graser, H U; Luxford, B G; Moran, C

    2011-04-01

    Feed efficiency and growth are the most important traits in pig production, and very few genetic markers have been reported to be associated with feed efficiency. The suppressor of cytokine signalling-2 (encoded by SOCS2) is the main negative regulator of somatic growth, and the knockout of SOCS2 and naturally mutant mice have high-growth phenotypes. Porcine SOCS2 was selected as a primary positional candidate for feed efficiency, because it is located on chromosome 5q, in the vicinity of a Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) region for food conversion ratio in pigs. Here, we report five single nucleotide polymorphisms identified by sequencing of the promoter region and exon 1. One PCR-RFLP assay was designed for genotyping the polymorphism c.1667A > G (GenBank Accession No AY312266). Association analyses were performed in an Australian mapping resource pedigree population (PRDC-US43) for food conversion ratio, backfat, IGF1 level and growth traits and showed significant effects on average daily gain on test (ADG2) (P < 0.01) and marginal association with food conversion ratio (FCR) (P < 0.08). PMID:24725230

  14. Phenotypes Associated with Knockouts of Eight Dense Granule Gene Loci (GRA2-9) in Virulent Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Rommereim, Leah M; Bellini, Valeria; Fox, Barbara A; Pètre, Graciane; Rak, Camille; Touquet, Bastien; Aldebert, Delphine; Dubremetz, Jean-François; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie-France; Mercier, Corinne; Bzik, David J

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii actively invades host cells and establishes a parasitophorous vacuole (PV) that accumulates many proteins secreted by the dense granules (GRA proteins). To date, at least 23 GRA proteins have been reported, though the function(s) of most of these proteins still remains unknown. We targeted gene knockouts at ten GRA gene loci (GRA1-10) to investigate the cellular roles and essentiality of these classical GRA proteins during acute infection in the virulent type I RH strain. While eight of these genes (GRA2-9) were successfully knocked out, targeted knockouts at the GRA1 and GRA10 loci were not obtained, suggesting these GRA proteins may be essential. As expected, the Δgra2 and Δgra6 knockouts failed to form an intravacuolar network (IVN). Surprisingly, Δgra7 exhibited hyper-formation of the IVN in both normal and lipid-free growth conditions. No morphological alterations were identified in parasite or PV structures in the Δgra3, Δgra4, Δgra5, Δgra8, or Δgra9 knockouts. With the exception of the Δgra3 and Δgra8 knockouts, all of the GRA knockouts exhibited defects in their infection rate in vitro. While the single GRA knockouts did not exhibit reduced replication rates in vitro, replication rate defects were observed in three double GRA knockout strains (Δgra4Δgra6, Δgra3Δgra5 and Δgra3Δgra7). However, the virulence of single or double GRA knockout strains in CD1 mice was not affected. Collectively, our results suggest that while the eight individual GRA proteins investigated in this study (GRA2-9) are not essential, several GRA proteins may provide redundant and potentially important functions during acute infection. PMID:27458822

  15. Phenotypes Associated with Knockouts of Eight Dense Granule Gene Loci (GRA2-9) in Virulent Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Barbara A.; Pètre, Graciane; Rak, Camille; Touquet, Bastien; Aldebert, Delphine; Dubremetz, Jean-François; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie-France; Mercier, Corinne; Bzik, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii actively invades host cells and establishes a parasitophorous vacuole (PV) that accumulates many proteins secreted by the dense granules (GRA proteins). To date, at least 23 GRA proteins have been reported, though the function(s) of most of these proteins still remains unknown. We targeted gene knockouts at ten GRA gene loci (GRA1-10) to investigate the cellular roles and essentiality of these classical GRA proteins during acute infection in the virulent type I RH strain. While eight of these genes (GRA2-9) were successfully knocked out, targeted knockouts at the GRA1 and GRA10 loci were not obtained, suggesting these GRA proteins may be essential. As expected, the Δgra2 and Δgra6 knockouts failed to form an intravacuolar network (IVN). Surprisingly, Δgra7 exhibited hyper-formation of the IVN in both normal and lipid-free growth conditions. No morphological alterations were identified in parasite or PV structures in the Δgra3, Δgra4, Δgra5, Δgra8, or Δgra9 knockouts. With the exception of the Δgra3 and Δgra8 knockouts, all of the GRA knockouts exhibited defects in their infection rate in vitro. While the single GRA knockouts did not exhibit reduced replication rates in vitro, replication rate defects were observed in three double GRA knockout strains (Δgra4Δgra6, Δgra3Δgra5 and Δgra3Δgra7). However, the virulence of single or double GRA knockout strains in CD1 mice was not affected. Collectively, our results suggest that while the eight individual GRA proteins investigated in this study (GRA2-9) are not essential, several GRA proteins may provide redundant and potentially important functions during acute infection. PMID:27458822

  16. Global Gene Expression Profiling in PAI-1 Knockout Murine Heart and Kidney: Molecular Basis of Cardiac-Selective Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Asish K.; Murphy, Sheila B.; Kishore, Raj; Vaughan, Douglas E.

    2013-01-01

    Fibrosis is defined as an abnormal matrix remodeling due to excessive synthesis and accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins in tissues during wound healing or in response to chemical, mechanical and immunological stresses. At present, there is no effective therapy for organ fibrosis. Previous studies demonstrated that aged plasminogen activator inhibitor-1(PAI-1) knockout mice develop spontaneously cardiac-selective fibrosis without affecting any other organs. We hypothesized that differential expressions of profibrotic and antifibrotic genes in PAI-1 knockout hearts and unaffected organs lead to cardiac selective fibrosis. In order to address this prediction, we have used a genome-wide gene expression profiling of transcripts derived from aged PAI-1 knockout hearts and kidneys. The variations of global gene expression profiling were compared within four groups: wildtype heart vs. knockout heart; wildtype kidney vs. knockout kidney; knockout heart vs. knockout kidney and wildtype heart vs. wildtype kidney. Analysis of illumina-based microarray data revealed that several genes involved in different biological processes such as immune system processing, response to stress, cytokine signaling, cell proliferation, adhesion, migration, matrix organization and transcriptional regulation were affected in hearts and kidneys by the absence of PAI-1, a potent inhibitor of urokinase and tissue-type plasminogen activator. Importantly, the expressions of a number of genes, involved in profibrotic pathways including Ankrd1, Pi16, Egr1, Scx, Timp1, Timp2, Klf6, Loxl1 and Klotho, were deregulated in PAI-1 knockout hearts compared to wildtype hearts and PAI-1 knockout kidneys. While the levels of Ankrd1, Pi16 and Timp1 proteins were elevated during EndMT, the level of Timp4 protein was decreased. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive report on the influence of PAI-1 on global gene expression profiling in the heart and kidney and its implication in fibrogenesis and

  17. Experimental evidence of hepatitis A virus infection in pigs.

    PubMed

    Song, Young-Jo; Park, Woo-Jung; Park, Byung-Joo; Kwak, Sang-Woo; Kim, Yong-Hyeon; Lee, Joong-Bok; Park, Seung-Yong; Song, Chang-Seon; Lee, Sang-Won; Seo, Kun-Ho; Kang, Young-Sun; Park, Choi-Kyu; Song, Jae-Young; Choi, In-Soo

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is the leading cause of acute viral hepatitis worldwide, with HAV infection being restricted to humans and nonhuman primates. In this study, HAV infection status was serologically determined in domestic pigs and experimental infections of HAV were attempted to verify HAV infectivity in pigs. Antibodies specific to HAV or HAV-like agents were detected in 3.5% of serum samples collected from pigs in swine farms. When the pigs were infected intravenously with 2 × 10(5) 50% tissue culture infectious dose (TCID50 ) of HAV, shedding of the virus in feces, viremia, and seroconversion were detected. In pigs orally infected with the same quantity of HAV, viral shedding was detected only in feces. HAV genomic RNA was detected in the liver and bile of intravenously infected pigs, but only in the bile of orally infected pigs. In further experiments, pigs were intravenously infected with 6 × 10(5) TCID50 of HAV. Shedding of HAV in feces, along with viremia and seroconversion, were confirmed in infected pigs but not in sentinel pigs. HAV genomic RNA was detected in the liver, bile, spleen, lymph node, and kidney of the infected pigs. HAV antigenomic RNA was detected in the spleen of one HAV-infected pig, suggesting HAV replication in splenic cells. Infiltration of inflammatory cells was observed in the livers of infected pigs but not in controls. This is the first experimental evidence to demonstrate that human HAV strains can infect pigs. PMID:26381440

  18. Lessons learned from the cystic fibrosis pig.

    PubMed

    Meyerholz, David K

    2016-07-01

    Deficient function in the anion channel cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator is the fundamental cause for CF. This is a monogenic condition that causes lesions in several organs including the respiratory tract, pancreas, liver, intestines, and reproductive tract. Lung disease is most notable, given it is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in people with CF. Shortly after the identification of CF transmembrane conductance regulator, CF mouse models were developed that did not show spontaneous lung disease as seen in humans, and this spurred development of additional CF animal models. Pig models were considered a leading choice for several reasons including their similarity to humans in respiratory anatomy, physiology, and in size for translational imaging. The first CF pig models were reported in 2008 and have been extremely valuable to help clarify persistent questions in the field and advance understanding of disease pathogenesis. Because CF pigs are susceptible to lung disease like humans, they have direct utility in translational research. In addition, CF pig models are useful to compare and contrast with current CF mouse models, human clinical studies, and even newer CF animal models being characterized. This "triangulation" strategy could help identify genetic differences that underlie phenotypic variations, so as to focus and accelerate translational research. PMID:27142487

  19. W5 - If Pigs Could Fly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, Trina

    2012-10-01

    Centripetal force seems to be a challenge for students and we are typically using stoppers, string, tubes and slotted masses (that always crash to the floor). But if we use a toy that reminds them of an amusement park ride, we can get the message across and have some fun. Come and see if pigs can fly!

  20. Chlamydia prevalence in Polish pig herds.

    PubMed

    Rypuła, K; Kumala, A; Płoneczka-Janeczko, K; Karuga-Kuźniewska, E; Dudek, K; Chorbiński, P

    2016-09-01

    Chlamydiae are frequently encountered intracellular Gram-negative bacteria. In pigs, these bacteria in combination with other pathogens contribute to the induction of a multi-aetiological syndrome. One of the major characteristics of Chlamydia spp. is their ability to cause prolonged, often subclinical infections. While the economic consequences of Chlamydia spp. infections in pig farms are not fully established, we know that reproductive disorders and other syndromes correlated with Chlamydia infection can lead to financial loss as a result of a reduction in pork production. Additionally, Chlamydia spp. presents a potential zoonotic hazard, therefore determining the prevalence of Chlamydia in pig populations is critical. In the present study 97 pig herds from Poland were involved. To determine the prevalence of Chlamydia PCR and CFT tests were used. In total 797 vaginal samples, 797 conjunctival samples, and 235 serum samples were collected and tested. The study took place from 2011 to 2014. We found Chlamydia spp. present in 71·2% of all tested farms. The percentage of animals testing positive on any given farm varied from 20% to 100%. PMID:27174765

  1. Feeding biofuels co-products to pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) and other co-products from the fuel ethanol industry may be included in diets fed to pigs in all phases of production. The concentration of digestible energy (DE) and metabolizable energy (ME) in DDGS and corn germ is similar to corn, but high protein dis...

  2. K Basins floor sludge retrieval system knockout pot basket fuel burn accident

    SciTech Connect

    HUNT, J.W.

    1998-11-11

    The K Basins Sludge Retrieval System Preliminary Hazard Analysis Report (HNF-2676) identified and categorized a series of potential accidents associated with K Basins Sludge Retrieval System design and operation. The fuel burn accident was of concern with respect to the potential release of contamination resulting from a runaway chemical reaction of the uranium fuel in a knockout pot basket suspended in the air. The unmitigated radiological dose to an offsite receptor from this fuel burn accident is calculated to be much less than the offsite risk evaluation guidelines for anticipated events. However, because of potential radiation exposure to the facility worker, this accident is precluded with a safety significant lifting device that will prevent the monorail hoist from lifting the knockout pot basket out of the K Basin water pool.

  3. Podocyte-specific knockout of myosin 1e disrupts glomerular filtration.

    PubMed

    Chase, Sharon E; Encina, Christina V; Stolzenburg, Lindsay R; Tatum, Arthur H; Holzman, Lawrence B; Krendel, Mira

    2012-10-01

    Myosin 1e (myo1e) is an actin-dependent molecular motor that plays an important role in kidney functions. Complete knockout of myo1e in mice and Myo1E mutations in humans are associated with nephrotic syndrome and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. In this paper, we tested the hypothesis that myo1e is necessary for normal functions of glomerular visceral epithelial cells (podocytes) using podocyte-targeted knockout of myo1e. Myo1e was selectively knocked out in podocytes using Cre-mediated recombination controlled by the podocin promoter. Myo1e loss from podocytes resulted in proteinuria, podocyte foot process effacement, and glomerular basement membrane disorganization. Our findings indicate that myo1e expression in podocytes is necessary for normal glomerular filtration and that podocyte defects are likely to represent the primary pathway leading to glomerular disease associated with Myo1E mutations. PMID:22811491

  4. Germ cell differentiation and synaptonemal complex formation are disrupted in CPEB knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Tay, J; Richter, J D

    2001-08-01

    CPEB is a sequence-specific RNA binding protein that regulates translation during vertebrate oocyte maturation. Adult female CPEB knockout mice contained vestigial ovaries that were devoid of oocytes; ovaries from mid-gestation embryos contained oocytes that were arrested at the pachytene stage. Male CPEB null mice also contained germ cells arrested at pachytene. The germ cells from the knockout mice harbored fragmented chromatin, suggesting a possible defect in homologous chromosome adhesion or synapsis. Two CPE-containing synaptonemal complex protein mRNAs, which interact with CPEB in vitro and in vivo, contained shortened poly(A) tails and mostly failed to sediment with polysomes in the null mice. Synaptonemal complexes were not detected in these animals. CPEB therefore controls germ cell differentiation by regulating the formation of the synaptonemal complex. PMID:11702780

  5. Knockout reactions from p-shell nuclei : tests of ab initio structure models.

    SciTech Connect

    Grinyer, G. F.; Bazin, D.; Gade, A.; Tostevin, J. A.; Adrich, P.; Bowen, M. D.; Brown, B. A.; Campbell, C. M.; Cook, J. M.; Glasmacher, T.; McDaniel, S.; Navratil, P.; Obertelli, A.; Quaglioni, S.; Siwek, K.; Terry, J. R.; Weisshaar, D.; Wiringa, R. B.

    2011-04-22

    Absolute cross sections have been determined following single neutron knockout reactions from {sup 10}Be and {sup 10}C at intermediate energy. Nucleon density distributions and bound-state wave function overlaps obtained from both variational Monte Carlo (VMC) and no core shell model (NCSM) ab initio calculations have been incorporated into the theoretical description of knockout reactions. Comparison to experimental cross sections demonstrates that the VMC approach, with the inclusion of 3-body forces, provides the best overall agreement while the NCSM and conventional shell-model calculations both overpredict the cross sections by 20% to 30% for {sup 10}Be and by 40% to 50% for {sup 10}C, respectively. This study gains new insight into the importance of 3-body forces and continuum effects in light nuclei and provides a sensitive technique to assess the accuracy of ab initio calculations for describing these effects.

  6. Knockout Reactions from p-Shell Nuclei: Tests of Ab Initio Structure Models

    SciTech Connect

    Grinyer, G. F.; Bazin, D.; Adrich, P.; Obertelli, A.; Weisshaar, D.; Gade, A.; Bowen, M. D.; Brown, B. A.; Campbell, C. M.; Cook, J. M.; Glasmacher, T.; McDaniel, S.; Siwek, K.; Terry, J. R.; Tostevin, J. A.; Navratil, P.; Quaglioni, S.; Wiringa, R. B.

    2011-04-22

    Absolute cross sections have been determined following single neutron knockout reactions from {sup 10}Be and {sup 10}C at intermediate energy. Nucleon density distributions and bound-state wave function overlaps obtained from both variational Monte Carlo (VMC) and no core shell model (NCSM) ab initio calculations have been incorporated into the theoretical description of knockout reactions. Comparison to experimental cross sections demonstrates that the VMC approach, with the inclusion of 3-body forces, provides the best overall agreement while the NCSM and conventional shell-model calculations both overpredict the cross sections by 20% to 30% for {sup 10}Be and by 40% to 50% for {sup 10}C, respectively. This study gains new insight into the importance of 3-body forces and continuum effects in light nuclei and provides a sensitive technique to assess the accuracy of ab initio calculations for describing these effects.

  7. Altered behavioral development in Nrf2 knockout mice following early postnatal exposure to valproic acid

    PubMed Central

    Furnari, Melody A.; Saw, Constance Lay-Lay; Kong, Ah-Ng; Wagner, George C

    2015-01-01

    Early exposure to valproic acid results in autism-like neural and behavioral deficits in humans and other animals through oxidative stress-induced neural damage. In the present study, valproic acid was administered to genetically altered mice lacking the Nrf2 (nuclear factor-erythroid 2 related factor 2) gene on postnatal day 14 (P14). Nrf2 is a transcription factor that induces genes that protect against oxidative stress. It was found that valproic acid-treated Nrf2 knockout mice were less active in open field activity chambers, less successful on the rotorod, and had deficits in learning and memory in the Morris water maze compared to the valproic acid-treated wild type mice. Given these results, it appears that Nrf2 knockout mice were more sensitive to the neural damage caused by valproic acid administered during early development. PMID:25454122

  8. Cnga2 Knockout Mice Display Alzheimer's-Like Behavior Abnormities and Pathological Changes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ao-Ji; Liu, En-Jie; Huang, He-Zhou; Hu, Yu; Li, Ke; Lu, Youming; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Zhu, Ling-Qiang

    2016-09-01

    Olfactory dysfunction is recognized as a potential risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have reported previously that olfactory deprivation by olfactory bulbectomy (OBX) induced Alzheimer's-like pathological changes and behavioral abnormalities. However, the acute OBX model undergoes surgical-induced brain parenchyma loss and unexpected massive hemorrhage so that it cannot fully mimic the progressive olfactory loss and neurodegeneration in AD. Here, we employed the mice loss of cyclic nucleotide-gated channel alpha 2 (Cnga2) which is critical for olfactory sensory transduction, to investigate the role of olfactory dysfunction in AD pathological process. We found that impaired learning and memory abilities, loss of dendrite spines, as well as decrement of synaptic proteins were displayed in Cnga2 knockout mice. Moreover, Aβ overproduction, tau hyperphosphorylation, and somatodendritic translocation were also found in Cnga2 knockout mice. Our findings suggest that progressive olfactory loss leads to Alzheimer's-like behavior abnormities and pathological changes. PMID:26377105

  9. Determination of antibiotic hypersensitivity among 4,000 single-gene-knockout mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tamae, Cindy; Liu, Anne; Kim, Katherine; Sitz, Daniel; Hong, Jeeyoon; Becket, Elinne; Bui, Ann; Solaimani, Parrisa; Tran, Katherine P; Yang, Hanjing; Miller, Jeffrey H

    2008-09-01

    We have tested the entire Keio collection of close to 4,000 single-gene knockouts in Escherichia coli for increased susceptibility to one of seven different antibiotics (ciprofloxacin, rifampin, vancomycin, ampicillin, sulfamethoxazole, gentamicin, or metronidazole). We used high-throughput screening of several subinhibitory concentrations of each antibiotic and reduced more than 65,000 data points to a set of 140 strains that display significantly increased sensitivities to at least one of the antibiotics, determining the MIC in each case. These data provide targets for the design of "codrugs" that can potentiate existing antibiotics. We have made a number of double mutants with greatly increased sensitivity to ciprofloxacin, and these overcome the resistance generated by certain gyrA mutations. Many of the gene knockouts in E. coli are hypersensitive to more than one antibiotic. Together, all of these data allow us to outline the cell's "intrinsic resistome," which provides innate resistance to antibiotics. PMID:18621901

  10. Have gene knockouts caused evolutionary reversals in the mammalian first arch?

    PubMed

    Smith, K K; Schneider, R A

    1998-03-01

    Many recent gene knockout experiments cause anatomical changes to the jaw region of mice that several investigators claim are evolutionary reversals. Here we evaluate these mutant phenotypes and the assertions of atavism. We argue that following the knockout of Hoxa-2, Dlx-2, MHox, Otx2, and RAR genes, ectopic cartilages arise as secondary consequences of disruptions in normal processes of cell specification, migration, or differentiation. These disruptions cause an excess of mesenchyme to accumulate in a region through which skeletal progenitor cells usually migrate, and at a site of condensation that is normally present in mammals but that is too small to chondrify. We find little evidence that these genes, when disrupted, cause a reversion to any primitive condition and although changes in their expression may have played a role in the evolution of the mammalian jaw, their function during morphogenesis is not sufficiently understood to confirm such hypotheses. PMID:9631652

  11. Protein Production with a Pichia pastoris OCH1 Knockout Strain in Fed-Batch Mode.

    PubMed

    Gmeiner, Christoph; Spadiut, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris is a widely used host organism for recombinant protein production in biotechnology and pharmaceutical industry. However, if the target product describes a glycoprotein, an α-1,6-mannosyltransferase located in the Golgi apparatus of P. pastoris, called OCH1, triggers hypermannosylation of the recombinant protein which significantly impedes following unit operations and hampers biopharmaceutical product applications. A knockout of the och1 gene allows the production of less-glycosylated proteins-however, morphology and physiology of P. pastoris also change, complicating the upstream process. Here, we describe a controlled and efficient bioprocess based on the specific substrate uptake rate (q s) for a recombinant P. pastoris OCH1 knockout strain expressing a peroxidase as model protein. PMID:26082217

  12. CARD9 knockout ameliorates myocardial dysfunction associated with high fat diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Cao, Li; Qin, Xing; Peterson, Matthew R; Haller, Samantha E; Wilson, Kayla A; Hu, Nan; Lin, Xin; Nair, Sreejayan; Ren, Jun; He, Guanglong

    2016-03-01

    Obesity is associated with chronic inflammation which plays a critical role in the development of cardiovascular dysfunction. Because the adaptor protein caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9 (CARD9) in macrophages regulates innate immune responses via activation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, we hypothesize that CARD9 mediates the pro-inflammatory signaling associated with obesity en route to myocardial dysfunction. C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) and CARD9(-/-) mice were fed normal diet (ND, 12% fat) or a high fat diet (HFD, 45% fat) for 5months. At the end of 5-month HFD feeding, cardiac function was evaluated using echocardiography. Cardiomyocytes were isolated and contractile properties were measured. Immunofluorescence was performed to detect macrophage infiltration in the heart. Heart tissue homogenates, plasma, and supernatants from isolated macrophages were collected to measure the concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines using ELISA kits. Western immunoblotting analyses were performed on heart tissue homogenates and isolated macrophages to explore the underlying signaling mechanism(s). CARD9 knockout alleviated HFD-induced insulin resistance and glucose intolerance, prevented myocardial dysfunction with preserved cardiac fractional shortening and cardiomyocyte contractile properties. CARD9 knockout also significantly decreased the number of infiltrated macrophages in the heart with reduced myocardium-, plasma-, and macrophage-derived cytokines including IL-6, IL-1β and TNFα. Finally, CARD9 knockout abrogated the increase of p38 MAPK phosphorylation, the decrease of LC3BII/LC3BI ratio and the up-regulation of p62 expression in the heart induced by HFD feeding and restored cardiac autophagy signaling. In conclusion, CARD9 knockout ameliorates myocardial dysfunction associated with HFD-induced obesity, potentially through reduction of macrophage infiltration, suppression of p38 MAPK phosphorylation, and preservation of autophagy in the heart. PMID

  13. Transgenic knockout mice with exclusively human sickle hemoglobinand sickle cell disease

    SciTech Connect

    Paszty, C.; Brion, C.; Manci, E.; Witkowska, E.; Stevens, M.; Narla, M.; Rubin, E.

    1997-06-13

    To create mice expressing exclusively human sicklehemoglobin (HbS), transgenic mice expressing human alpha-, gamma-, andbeta[S]-globin were generated and bred with knockout mice that haddeletions of the murine alpha- and beta-globin genes. These sickle cellmice have the major features (irreversibly sickled red cells, anemia,multiorgan pathology) found in humans with sickle cell disease and, assuch, represent a useful in vivo system to accelerate the development ofimproved therapies for this common genetic disease.

  14. Development of a high-efficiency gene knockout system for Pochonia chlamydosporia.

    PubMed

    Shen, Baoming; Xiao, Jiling; Dai, Liangying; Huang, Yonghong; Mao, Zhenchuan; Lin, Runmao; Yao, Yurong; Xie, Bingyan

    2015-01-01

    The nematophagous fungus Pochonia chlamydosporia, which belongs to the family Clavicipitaceae (Ascomycota: Pezizomycotina: Sordariomycetes: Hypocreales), is a promising biological control agent for root-knot and cyst nematodes. Its biocontrol effect has been confirmed by pot and field trials. The genome sequence of the fungus was completed recently; therefore, genome-wide functional analyses will identify its infection-associated genes. Gene knockout techniques are useful molecular tools to study gene functions. However, cultures of P. chlamydosporia are resistant to high levels of a range of fungal inhibitors, which makes the gene knockout technique difficult in this fungus. Fortunately, we found that the wild P. chlamydosporia strain PC-170 could not grow on medium containing 150μgml(-1) G418 sulfate, representing a new selectable marker for P. chlamydosporia. The neomycin-resistance gene (neo), which was amplified from the plasmid pKOV21, conferred G418-resistance on the fungus; therefore, it was chosen as the marker gene. We subsequently developed a gene knockout system for P. chlamydosporia using split-marker homologous recombination cassettes with resistance selection and protoplast transformation. The split-marker cassettes were developed using fusion PCR, and involved only two rounds of PCR. The final products comprised two linear constructs. Each construct contained a flanking region of the target gene and two thirds of the neo gene. Alkaline serine protease and chitinase were confirmed to be produced by P. chlamydosporia during infection of nematode eggs and could participate in lysis of the eggshell of nematode eggs. Here, we knocked out one chitinase gene, VFPPC_01099, and two protease genes (VFPPC_10088, VFPPC_06535). We obtained approximately 100 suspected mutants after each transformation. After screening by PCR, the average rate of gene knockout was 13%: 11% (VFPPC_01099), 13% (VFPPC_10088) and 15% (VFPPC_06535). This efficient and convenient

  15. Kv4.2 Knockout Mice Have Hippocampal-Dependent Learning and Memory Deficits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lugo, Joaquin N.; Brewster, Amy L.; Spencer, Corinne M.; Anderson, Anne E.

    2012-01-01

    Kv4.2 channels contribute to the transient, outward K[superscript +] current (A-type current) in hippocampal dendrites, and modulation of this current substantially alters dendritic excitability. Using Kv4.2 knockout (KO) mice, we examined the role of Kv4.2 in hippocampal-dependent learning and memory. We found that Kv4.2 KO mice showed a deficit…

  16. Protein Degradation and Quality Control in Cells from Laforin and Malin Knockout Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Garyali, Punitee; Segvich, Dyann M.; DePaoli-Roach, Anna A.; Roach, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Lafora disease is a progressive myoclonus epilepsy caused by mutations in the EPM2A or EPM2B genes that encode a glycogen phosphatase, laforin, and an E3 ubiquitin ligase, malin, respectively. Lafora disease is characterized by accumulation of insoluble, poorly branched, hyperphosphorylated glycogen in brain, muscle, heart, and liver. The laforin-malin complex has been proposed to play a role in the regulation of glycogen metabolism and protein quality control. We evaluated three arms of the protein degradation/quality control process (the autophago-lysosomal pathway, the ubiquitin-proteasomal pathway, and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response) in mouse embryonic fibroblasts from Epm2a−/−, Epm2b−/−, and Epm2a−/− Epm2b−/− mice. The levels of LC3-II, a marker of autophagy, were decreased in all knock-out cells as compared with wild type even though they still showed a slight response to starvation and rapamycin. Furthermore, ribosomal protein S6 kinase and S6 phosphorylation were increased. Under basal conditions there was no effect on the levels of ubiquitinated proteins in the knock-out cells, but ubiquitinated protein degradation was decreased during starvation or stress. Lack of malin (Epm2b−/− and Epm2a−/− Epm2b−/− cells) but not laforin (Epm2a−/− cells) decreased LAMP1, a lysosomal marker. CHOP expression was similar in wild type and knock-out cells under basal conditions or with ER stress-inducing agents. In conclusion, both laforin and malin knock-out cells display mTOR-dependent autophagy defects and reduced proteasomal activity but no defects in the ER stress response. We speculate that these defects may be secondary to glycogen overaccumulation. This study also suggests a malin function independent of laforin, possibly in lysosomal biogenesis and/or lysosomal glycogen disposal. PMID:24914213

  17. Tests of cryogenic pigs for use in liquefied gas pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hipple, D. L.; Oneal, W. C.

    1982-09-01

    Pipeline pigs are a key element in the design of a proposed spill test facility whose purpose is to evaluate the hazards of large spills of liquefied gaseous fuels (LGFs). A long pipe runs from the LGF storage tanks to the spill point; to produce a rapid spill, the pipe is filled with LGF and a pig will be pneumatically driven through the pipe to force out the LGF quickly and cleanly. Several pig designs were tested in a 6 inch diameter, 420 foot long pipe to evaluate their performance at liquid-nitrogen temperature and compare it with their performance at ambient temperature. For each test, the pig was placed in one end of the pipe and either water or liquid nitrogen was put into the pipe in front of the pig. Then pressurized drive gas, either nitrogen or helium, was admitted to the pipe behind the pig to push the pig and the fluid ahead of it out the exit nozzle. For some tests, the drive gas supply was shut off when the pig was part way through the pipe as a method of velocity control; in these cases, the pressurized gas trapped behind the pig continued to expand until it pushed the pig the remaining distance out of the pipe.

  18. Neutron Knockout to Probe 3N Forces in the Ca Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Heather; NSCL Experiment e12029 Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    Recent calculations by Holt et al. have suggested that the inclusion of 3N forces to describe the structure of neutron-rich Ca isotopes provides a more realistic description of the nuclear structure. Mass measurements have confirmed the importance of including 3N forces compared to NN-only interactions, but cannot discriminate between the predictions of phenomenological interactions and the NN+3N microscopic calculations. Neutron knockout along the Z = 20 isotopes provides an opportunity to test the results of NN+3N calculations against phenomenological interactions. The calculations of Holt et al. predict a fragmentation of the 1f7 / 2 neutron strength from the first 7/2- state in 49Ca into higher lying states, in contrast to the predictions of both GXPF1 and KB3G which concentrate the strength in the lowest lying 7/2- state. Differences are also observed in the summed f7 / 2 strength to bound nuclear states in both 50Ca and 49Ca neutron knockout. We will report on a systematic study of one-neutron knockout along the Ca isotopes using GRETINA+S800. Comparison of experimental spectroscopic factors to calculations will provide insight into the role of 3N forces in describing the Z = 20 isotopes. With collaborators from LBNL, NSCL/MSU, ANL, Central Michigan University, TRIUMF/UBC and TU-Darmstadt.

  19. Knockout Mice Challenge our Concepts of Glucose Homeostasis and the Pathogenesis of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    A central component of type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome is insulin resistance. Insulin exerts a multifaceted and highly integrated series of actions via its intracellular signaling systems. Generation of mice carrying null mutations of the genes encoding proteins in the insulin signaling pathway provides a unique approach to determining the role of individual proteins in the molecular mechanism of insulin action and the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and diabetes. The role of the four major insulin receptor substrates (IRS1-4) in insulin and IGF-1 signaling have been examined by creating mice with targeted gene knockouts. Each produces a unique phenotype, indicating the complementary role of these signaling components. Combined heterozygous defects often produce synergistic or epistatic effects, although the final severity of the phenotype depends on the genetic background of the mice. Conditional knockouts of the insulin receptor have also been created using the Cre-lox system. These tissue specific knockouts have provide unique insights into the control of glucose homeostasis and the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes, and have led to development of new hypotheses about the nature of the insulin action and development of diabetes. PMID:15061645

  20. Positron emission tomography and functional characterization of a complete PBR/TSPO knockout.

    PubMed

    Banati, Richard B; Middleton, Ryan J; Chan, Ronald; Hatty, Claire R; Kam, Winnie Wai-Ying; Quin, Candice; Graeber, Manuel B; Parmar, Arvind; Zahra, David; Callaghan, Paul; Fok, Sandra; Howell, Nicholas R; Gregoire, Marie; Szabo, Alexander; Pham, Tien; Davis, Emma; Liu, Guo-Jun

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR), or 18-kDa translocator protein (TSPO), is thought to be essential for cholesterol transport and steroidogenesis, and thus life. TSPO has been proposed as a biomarker of neuroinflammation and a new drug target in neurological diseases ranging from Alzheimer's disease to anxiety. Here we show that global C57BL/6-Tspo(tm1GuWu(GuwiyangWurra))-knockout mice are viable with normal growth, lifespan, cholesterol transport, blood pregnenolone concentration, protoporphyrin IX metabolism, fertility and behaviour. However, while the activation of microglia after neuronal injury appears to be unimpaired, microglia from (GuwiyangWurra)TSPO knockouts produce significantly less ATP, suggesting reduced metabolic activity. Using the isoquinoline PK11195, the ligand originally used for the pharmacological and structural characterization of the PBR/TSPO, and the imidazopyridines CLINDE and PBR111, we demonstrate the utility of (GuwiyangWurra)TSPO knockouts to provide robust data on drug specificity and selectivity, both in vitro and in vivo, as well as the mechanism of action of putative TSPO-targeting drugs. PMID:25406832

  1. Myo5b knockout mice as a model of microvillus inclusion disease

    PubMed Central

    Cartón-García, Fernando; Overeem, Arend W.; Nieto, Rocio; Bazzocco, Sarah; Dopeso, Higinio; Macaya, Irati; Bilic, Josipa; Landolfi, Stefania; Hernandez-Losa, Javier; Schwartz, Simo; Ramon y Cajal, Santiago; van Ijzendoorn, Sven C. D.; Arango, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Inherited MYO5B mutations have recently been associated with microvillus inclusion disease (MVID), an autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by intractable, life-threatening, watery diarrhea appearing shortly after birth. Characterization of the molecular mechanisms underlying this disease and development of novel therapeutic approaches is hampered by the lack of animal models. In this study we describe the phenotype of a novel mouse model with targeted inactivation of Myo5b. Myo5b knockout mice show perinatal mortality, diarrhea and the characteristic mislocalization of apical and basolateral plasma membrane markers in enterocytes. Moreover, in transmission electron preparations, we observed microvillus atrophy and the presence of microvillus inclusion bodies. Importantly, Myo5b knockout embryos at day 20 of gestation already display all these structural defects, indicating that they are tissue autonomous rather than secondary to environmental cues, such as the long-term absence of nutrients in the intestine. Myo5b knockout mice closely resemble the phenotype of MVID patients and constitute a useful model to further investigate the underlying molecular mechanism of this disease and to preclinically assess the efficacy of novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:26201991

  2. Generation of Recombinant Capripoxvirus Vectors for Vaccines and Gene Knockout Function Studies.

    PubMed

    Boshra, Hani; Cao, Jingxin; Babiuk, Shawn

    2016-01-01

    The ability to manipulate capripoxvirus through gene knockouts and gene insertions has become an increasingly valuable research tool in elucidating the function of individual genes of capripoxvirus, as well as in the development of capripoxvirus-based recombinant vaccines. The homologous recombination technique is used to generate capripoxvirus knockout viruses (KO), and is based on the targeting a particular viral gene of interest. This technique can also be used to insert a gene of interest. A protocol for the generation of a viral gene knockout is described. This technique involves the use of a plasmid which encodes the flanking sequences of the regions where the homologous recombination will occur, and will result in the insertion of an EGFP reporter gene for visualization of recombinant virus, as well as the E. coli gpt gene as a positive selection marker. If an additional gene is to be incorporated, this can be achieved by inserting a gene of interest for expression under a poxvirus promoter into the plasmid between the flanking regions for insertion. This chapter describes a protocol for generating such recombinant capripoxviruses. PMID:26458835

  3. Positron emission tomography and functional characterization of a complete PBR/TSPO knockout

    PubMed Central

    Banati, Richard B.; Middleton, Ryan J.; Chan, Ronald; Hatty, Claire R.; Wai-Ying Kam, Winnie; Quin, Candice; Graeber, Manuel B.; Parmar, Arvind; Zahra, David; Callaghan, Paul; Fok, Sandra; Howell, Nicholas R.; Gregoire, Marie; Szabo, Alexander; Pham, Tien; Davis, Emma; Liu, Guo-Jun

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR), or 18-kDa translocator protein (TSPO), is thought to be essential for cholesterol transport and steroidogenesis, and thus life. TSPO has been proposed as a biomarker of neuroinflammation and a new drug target in neurological diseases ranging from Alzheimer’s disease to anxiety. Here we show that global C57BL/6-Tspotm1GuWu(GuwiyangWurra)-knockout mice are viable with normal growth, lifespan, cholesterol transport, blood pregnenolone concentration, protoporphyrin IX metabolism, fertility and behaviour. However, while the activation of microglia after neuronal injury appears to be unimpaired, microglia from GuwiyangWurraTSPO knockouts produce significantly less ATP, suggesting reduced metabolic activity. Using the isoquinoline PK11195, the ligand originally used for the pharmacological and structural characterization of the PBR/TSPO, and the imidazopyridines CLINDE and PBR111, we demonstrate the utility of GuwiyangWurraTSPO knockouts to provide robust data on drug specificity and selectivity, both in vitro and in vivo, as well as the mechanism of action of putative TSPO-targeting drugs. PMID:25406832

  4. The alcohol-induced locomotor stimulation and accumbal dopamine release is suppressed in ghrelin knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Jerlhag, Elisabet; Landgren, Sara; Egecioglu, Emil; Dickson, Suzanne L; Engel, Jörgen A

    2011-06-01

    Ghrelin, the first endogenous ligand for the type 1A growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R1A), plays a role in energy balance, feeding behavior, and reward. Previously, we showed that pharmacologic and genetic suppression of the GHS-R1A attenuates the alcohol-induced stimulation, accumbal dopamine release, and conditioned place preference as well as alcohol consumption in mice, implying that the GHS-R1A is required for alcohol reward. The present study further elucidates the role of ghrelin for alcohol-induced dopamine release in nucleus accumbens and locomotor stimulation by means of ghrelin knockout mice. We found that the ability of alcohol to increase accumbal dopamine release in wild-type mice is not observed in ghrelin knockout mice. Furthermore, alcohol induced a locomotor stimulation in the wild-type mice and ghrelin knockout mice; however, the locomotor stimulation in homozygote mice was significantly lower than in the wild-type mice. The present series of experiments suggest that endogenous ghrelin may be required for the ability of alcohol to activate the mesolimbic dopamine system. PMID:21145690

  5. The effect of PDIA3 gene knockout on the mucosal immune function in IBS rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Zhao-Meng; Wang, Xiao-Teng; Zhang, Lu; Tao, Li-Yuan; Lv, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To observe the changes of intestinal inflammation on PDIA3 gene knockout IBS rats and its effect on immune function. Methods: 36 SD rats were randomly divided into four groups: the control group (n = 8); IBS- empty virus group (IBS-GFP, which); IBS-PDIA3 knockout group (n = 12); IBS- the control group (n = 12). After modeling, colon and ileocecal tissue pathology in each group were observed separately. Changes of immune and inflammatory markers were measured. At the same time, ultrastructural changes in each group were observed by electron microscopy. Results: Compared with the IBS control group, inflammation was reduced significantly in IBS-PDIA3 knockout group. IgE, IL-4 and IL-9 and the level of intestinal trypsin type were decreased significantly. Furthermore, mast cell degranulation and PAR 2 receptor reduced significantly. Conclusion: PDIA3 may play an important role in the development of IBS by mediating through immune responses of mucosal abnormalities. However, the mechanism needs to be confirmed in further study. PMID:26221224

  6. Identification of Novel Knockout Targets for Improving Terpenoids Biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Wang, Jianfeng; Li, Qian; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Yansheng

    2014-01-01

    Many terpenoids have important pharmacological activity and commercial value; however, application of these terpenoids is often limited by problems associated with the production of sufficient amounts of these molecules. The use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) for the production of heterologous terpenoids has achieved some success. The objective of this study was to identify S. cerevisiae knockout targets for improving the synthesis of heterologous terpeniods. On the basis of computational analysis of the S. cerevisiae metabolic network, we identified the knockout sites with the potential to promote terpenoid production and the corresponding single mutant was constructed by molecular manipulations. The growth rates of these strains were measured and the results indicated that the gene deletion had no adverse effects. Using the expression of amorphadiene biosynthesis as a testing model, the gene deletion was assessed for its effect on the production of exogenous terpenoids. The results showed that the dysfunction of most genes led to increased production of amorphadiene. The yield of amorphadiene produced by most single mutants was 8–10-fold greater compared to the wild type, indicating that the knockout sites can be engineered to promote the synthesis of exogenous terpenoids. PMID:25386654

  7. Audiograms, gap detection thresholds, and frequency difference limens in cannabinoid receptor 1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Toal, Katrina L; Radziwon, Kelly E; Holfoth, David P; Xu-Friedman, Matthew A; Dent, Micheal L

    2016-02-01

    The cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) is found at several stages in the auditory pathway, but its role in hearing is unknown. Hearing abilities were measured in CB1R knockout mice and compared to those of wild-type mice. Operant conditioning and the psychophysical Method of Constant Stimuli were used to measure audiograms, gap detection thresholds, and frequency difference limens in trained mice using the same methods and stimuli as in previous experiments. CB1R knockout mice showed deficits at frequencies above 8 kHz in their audiograms relative to wild-type mice. CB1R knockouts showed enhancements for detecting gaps in low-pass noisebursts relative to wild-type mice, but were similar for other noise conditions. Finally, the two groups of mice did not differ in their frequency discrimination abilities as measured by the frequency difference limens task. These experiments suggest that the CB1R is involved in auditory processing and lay the groundwork for future physiological experiments. PMID:26427583

  8. [Hygienic aspects of pig's head meat. 1. Obtaining and processing pigs' heads].

    PubMed

    Bijker, P G; Koolmees, P A

    1988-05-01

    Pigs's head meat is mainly obtained in specialised deboning plants and provides raw materials for the manufacture of meat products and snacks. Few data on hygiene in processing and production of pig's heads or on the bacteriological quality and tissue composition of pig's head meat have so far been published. The object of the present investigation was to supplement these data and to examine the extent to which this quality could be improved by Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP's). A total number of 11 slaughter-houses and 14 deboning plants were studied. Hygiene was assessed by two investigators on the basis of a check list. Temperatures of rooms, heads and head meat were measured. Twenty-one samples (7 x 3) were taken in each of nine deboning plants for bacteriological and histological examination. The investigations carried out in slaughter-houses showed that pig's heads were only washed in five out of eleven slaughter-houses. Cleansing and disinfection of the apparatus used in splitting the carcasses were omitted or merely carried out incidentally during slaughter. Assessment of hygiene in the deboning plants ranged from adequate to satisfactory in 13 out of 14 plants. The average aerobic colony count in Log N g-1 of pig's head meat was 6.7 +/- 0.7; this was 4.4 +/- 0.9 for counts of colony-forming units (CFU) of Enterobacteriaceae. Tonsils, mucous membranes, bone, hair and dirt were found to be present in 8, 13, 21, 39 and 9 per cent of the samples respectively. As a result of the manual cleavage of heads, relatively large bone particles (greater than 8 mm) were detected in the head meat. It is concluded that an improvement of the hygienic quality of pig's head meat can mainly be achieved by taking more care in obtaining pig's heads. PMID:3287680

  9. Conditional knockouts generated by engineered CRISPR-Cas9 endonuclease reveal the roles of coronin in C. elegans neural development.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhongfu; Zhang, Xianliang; Chai, Yongping; Zhu, Zhiwen; Yi, Peishan; Feng, Guoxin; Li, Wei; Ou, Guangshuo

    2014-09-01

    Conditional gene knockout animals are valuable tools for studying the mechanisms underlying cell and developmental biology. We developed a conditional knockout strategy by spatiotemporally manipulating the expression of an RNA-guided DNA endonuclease, CRISPR-Cas9, in Caenorhabditis elegans somatic cell lineages. We showed that this somatic CRISPR-Cas9 technology provides a quick and efficient approach to generate conditional knockouts in various cell types at different developmental stages. Furthermore, we demonstrated that this method outperforms our recently developed somatic TALEN technique and enables the one-step generation of multiple conditional knockouts. By combining these techniques with live-cell imaging, we showed that an essential embryonic gene, Coronin, which is associated with human neurobehavioral dysfunction, regulates actin organization and cell morphology during C. elegans postembryonic neuroblast migration and neuritogenesis. We propose that the somatic CRISPR-Cas9 platform is uniquely suited for conditional gene editing-based biomedical research. PMID:25155554

  10. Phosphorylation of 4EBP by oral leucine administration was suppressed in the skeletal muscle of PGC-1α knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Ryoji; Minami, Kimiko; Matsuda, Junichiro; Sawada, Naoki; Miura, Shinji; Kamei, Yasutomi

    2016-01-01

    Leucine is known to increase mTOR-mediated phosphorylation of 4EBP. In this study, leucine was administered to skeletal muscle-PGC-1α knockout mice. We observed attenuated 4EBP phosphorylation in the skeletal muscle, but not in the liver, of the PGC-1α knockout mice. These data suggest that skeletal muscle-PGC-1α is important for leucine-mediated mTOR activation and protein biosynthesis. PMID:26745679

  11. Renal and Cardiac Endothelial Heterogeneity Impact Acute Vascular Rejection in Pig-to-Baboon Xenotransplantation

    PubMed Central

    Knosalla, C.; Yazawa, K.; Behdad, A.; Bodyak, N.; Shang, H.; Bühler, L.; Houser, S.; Gollackner, B.; Griesemer, A.; Schmitt-Knosalla, I.; Schuurman, H.-J.; Awwad, M.; Sachs, D. H.; Cooper, D. K. C.; Yamada, K.; Usheva, A.; Robson, S. C.

    2010-01-01

    Xenograft outcomes are dictated by xenoantigen expression, for example, Gal α 1, 3Gal (Gal), but might also depend on differing vascular responses. We investigated whether differential vascular gene expression in kidney and cardiac xenografts correlate with development of thrombotic microangiopathy (TM) and consumptive coagulation (CC). Immunosuppressed baboons underwent miniswine or hDAF pig kidney (n = 6) or heart (n = 7), or Gal-transferase gene-knockout (GalT-KO) (thymo)kidney transplantation (n = 14). Porcine cDNA miniarrays determined donor proinflammatory, apoptosis-related and vascular coagulant/fibrinolytic gene expression at defined time points; validated by mRNA, protein levels and immunopathology. hDAF-transgenic and GalT-KO xenografts, (particularly thymokidneys) exhibited prolonged survival. CC was seen with Gal-expressing porcine kidneys (3 of 6), only 1 of 7 baboons post-cardiac xenotransplantation and was infrequent following GalT-KO grafts (1 of 14). Protective-type genes (heme oxygenase-I, superoxide dismutases and CD39) together with von Willebrand factor and P-selectin were upregulated in all renal grafts. Transcriptional responses in Gal-expressing xenografts were comparable to those seen in the infrequent GalT-KO rejection. In cardiac xenografts, fibrin deposition was associated with increased plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 expression establishing that gene expression profiles in renal and cardiac xenografts differ in a quantitative manner. These findings suggest that therapeutic targets may differ for renal and cardiac xenotransplants. PMID:19422330

  12. Mup-knockout mice generated through CRISPR/Cas9-mediated deletion for use in urinary protein analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haixia; Zhang, Wei; Lu, Shan; Lu, Guangqing; Zhang, Hongjuan; Zhuang, Yinghua; Wang, Yue; Dong, Mengqiu; Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Xingang; Wang, Peng; Yu, Lei; Wang, Fengchao; Chen, Liang

    2016-05-01

    Major urinary proteins (MUPs) are the most abundant protein species in mouse urine, accounting for more than 90% of total protein content. Twenty-one Mup genes and 21 pseudogenes are clustered in a region of around 2 megabase pairs (Mbp) on chromosome 4. A Mup-knockout mouse model would greatly facilitate researches in the field of proteomic analysis of mouse urine. Here, we report the successful knockout of the Mup gene cluster of 2.2 Mbp using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Homozygous Mup-knockout mice survived to adulthood and exhibited no obvious defects. The patterns of the proteomes of non-MUP urinary proteins in homozygous Mup-knockout mice were similar to those of wild-type mice judged by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The sensitivity of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to detect non-MUP urinary protein was significantly enhanced in Mup-knockout mice. In short, we have developed a Mup-knockout mouse model. This mouse model will be useful for the research of urinary biomarker testing that may have relevance for humans. PMID:26851484

  13. Reproductive performance in pigs reared under organic conditions compared with conventionally reared pigs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To achieve a competitive reproductive performance in organic pig farming is a major challenge for this farming practise. Practices and research data regarding conventional pig production are not always applicable to organic production, why field studies are needed to identify differences in performance between organic and conventional pig farms in order to identify areas for improvement. Results Performance data for one year was collected from 5 organic herds that had more than 30 sows in production and used a computerized recording system, and data from five nearby conventional farms with more than 30 sows and the same recording system were used as a comparison. In total data from 4697 farrowings were analyzed. In the organic pig herds, there were a higher total number of piglets born per litter (p=0.001), a higher number of piglets stillborn per litter (p<0.001), but a tendency (p<0.06) to lower number of weaned pigs per litter and longer nursing period (p<0.001) and farrowing interval (p<0.001). Conclusions The reproductive performance was lower in the organic herds and the variation in reproductive performance among the organic herds was larger than among the conventional ones, suggesting options for improvement in the organic herds. PMID:23594682

  14. Artificial insemination in pigs: predicting male fertility.

    PubMed

    Broekhuijse, M L W J; Feitsma, H; Gadella, B M

    2012-01-01

    Efficient artificial insemination (AI) is essential for future challenges in the pig industry. Knowledge on the exact relation between semen quality characteristics and fertility can have a major impact on both the genetic merit of future animals and the efficiency of AI. Variation in fertility is caused not only by farm- or sow-related parameters but also by boar- and semen-related parameters. In pig AI there is no gold standard concerning semen quality assessment. Assessing semen quality characteristics objectively and relating them to large field fertility datasets leads to an efficient production of insemination doses, which results in an efficient dissemination/descent of the breeding program required genes. Overall, this contributes to the development of semen quality assessments, which improves the prediction of porcine male fertility. Knowing which semen characteristics, and to what extent, contribute to male fertility and makes the field fertility more predictable. PMID:23092203

  15. Survival of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae outside the pig.

    PubMed

    Assavacheep, P; Rycroft, A N

    2013-02-01

    Transmission of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is primarily thought to be via direct transfer of mucus from pig to pig. For transfer between farms, the organism may need to persist in the wet or dried state to be carried on an inanimate surface. The survival of A. pleuropneumoniae was investigated under controlled laboratory conditions. In aqueous suspension, survival was improved by the presence of NaCl and mucin; it was prolonged at lower temperature. In dry state, it survived best on a hydrophobic surface either under desiccated conditions or saturated humidity. Detectable viability was maintained for 3-4 days. When frozen, A. pleuropneumoniae survived for more than 17 weeks at -20 °C, but the viability declined to 0.01% during that time. Survival at -70 °C was effective for long term storage. Results obtained from this investigation would be applicable for sampling method, transport techniques, epidemiological study, and biosecurity implementation. PMID:22892250

  16. PIG2LIG-4FUTURE: a database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Ouahabi, A.; Martrat, B.; Lopez, J. F.; Grimalt, J. O.

    2012-04-01

    The ability to simulate the rhythm of abrupt climate changes (ACCs) will depend on the availability of high quality palæoclimate databases with sufficient temporal resolution to make relevant inferences from a human perspective. This study presents the PIG2LIG-4FUTURE database (P2L-4F db). The philosophy behind is to facilitate access to data not only for the scientific community, but also for those outside this community and, in doing so, ensure that the data are as useful as possible to help in answering a challenging key question: What is the risk of ACCs in periods similar to the present one? The P2L-4F db identifies an intra- and inter-event stratigraphy. A breakdown of the events in the PIG (present interglacial, time period from which more information is available and it is reasonably well dated) is defined in order to (2) identify ACCs in the LIG (last interglacial, much less known and dated period) for (4) better evaluation of the likelihood of sudden shifts within warm climate behaviour (i.e. next centuries, FUTURE). For this db, both the PIG and the LIG include deglaciation and interglacial states and they are referred to by means of chronostratigraphy: (i) the PIG refers to the last 19 ka years, i.e. a precessional cycle should be complete within the next 5 ka years; (ii) the LIG is the time span between 133 ka and 109 ka years, i.e. a time slot of 24 ka years, roughly a precessional cycle. The db compiles comprehensive selected palæo-data retrieved from a variety of sources (http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov, http://www.pangaea.de and others) but also instrumental data, to validate reconstructions against observations (e.g. http://data.giss.nasa.gov, http://iridl.ldeo.columbia.edu, etc). The records included accomplish two simple criteria: they cover the time span of interest, specifically the PIG and the LIG periods, and have sufficient time resolution to distinguish between an ACC and a gradual event. The research has focussed on three main pal

  17. Genetically Engineered Pig Models for Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Prather, Randall S.; Lorson, Monique; Ross, Jason W.; Whyte, Jeffrey J.; Walters, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Although pigs are used widely as models of human disease, their utility as models has been enhanced by genetic engineering. Initially, transgenes were added randomly to the genome, but with the application of homologous recombination, zinc finger nucleases, and transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) technologies, now most any genetic change that can be envisioned can be completed. To date these genetic modifications have resulted in animals that have the potential to provide new insights into human diseases for which a good animal model did not exist previously. These new animal models should provide the preclinical data for treatments that are developed for diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, cystic fibrosis, retinitis pigmentosa, spinal muscular atrophy, diabetes, and organ failure. These new models will help to uncover aspects and treatments of these diseases that were otherwise unattainable. The focus of this review is to describe genetically engineered pigs that have resulted in models of human diseases. PMID:25387017

  18. The cochleogram of the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Linss, Volker; Linss, Werner; Emmerich, Edeltraut; Richter, Frank

    2007-04-01

    The cochleogram is an important tool to relate properties of the cochlea (e.g. hair cell loss, damaged hair cells) to their position in the cochlear turns, to calculate the average hair cell density, and to measure the length of the whole cochlea. In this work different methods of plotting cochleograms are compared. We suggest that a sector-wise division of the cochlea for counting a cochleogram has advantages over line diagrams that provide a higher spatial resolution but might lead to misinterpretations of the degree of missing hair cells. The scanning electron microscopic analysis of 171 guinea pig cochleas revealed a mean basilar membrane length of 16.4 +/- 1.4 mm (mean +/- standard deviation) with sector lengths of 6.9, 4.2, 3.2, and 1.9 mm, thus adding relevant information to the morphology of the guinea pig cochlea. PMID:17082943

  19. Tylosin depletion from edible pig tissues.

    PubMed

    Prats, C; El Korchi, G; Francesch, R; Arboix, M; Pérez, B

    2002-12-01

    The depletion of tylosin from edible pig tissues was studied following 5 days of intramuscular (i.m.) administration of 10 mg/kg of tylosin to 16 crossbreed pigs. Animals were slaughtered at intervals after treatment and samples of muscle, kidney, liver, skin+fat, and injection site were collected and analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Seven days after the completion of treatment, the concentration of tylosin in kidney, skin+fat, and at the injection site was higher than the European Union maximal residue limit (MRL) of 100 microg/kg. Tylosin residues in all tissues were below the quantification limit (50 microg/kg) at 10 and 14 days post-treatment. PMID:12443694

  20. Heat stress increases insulin sensitivity in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Sanz Fernandez, M Victoria; Stoakes, Sara K; Abuajamieh, Mohannad; Seibert, Jacob T; Johnson, Jay S; Horst, Erin A; Rhoads, Robert P; Baumgard, Lance H

    2015-01-01

    Proper insulin homeostasis appears critical for adapting to and surviving a heat load. Further, heat stress (HS) induces phenotypic changes in livestock that suggest an increase in insulin action. The current study objective was to evaluate the effects of HS on whole-body insulin sensitivity. Female pigs (57 ± 4 kg body weight) were subjected to two experimental periods. During period 1, all pigs remained in thermoneutral conditions (TN; 21°C) and were fed ad libitum. During period 2, pigs were exposed to: (i) constant HS conditions (32°C) and fed ad libitum (n = 6), or (ii) TN conditions and pair-fed (PFTN; n = 6) to eliminate the confounding effects of dissimilar feed intake. A hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp (HEC) was conducted on d3 of both periods; and skeletal muscle and adipose tissue biopsies were collected prior to and after an insulin tolerance test (ITT) on d5 of period 2. During the HEC, insulin infusion increased circulating insulin and decreased plasma C-peptide and nonesterified fatty acids, similarly between treatments. From period 1 to 2, the rate of glucose infusion in response to the HEC remained similar in HS pigs while it decreased (36%) in PFTN controls. Prior to the ITT, HS increased (41%) skeletal muscle insulin receptor substrate-1 protein abundance, but did not affect protein kinase B or their phosphorylated forms. In adipose tissue, HS did not alter any of the basal or stimulated measured insulin signaling markers. In summary, HS increases whole-body insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. PMID:26243213

  1. The role of genetically engineered pigs in xenotransplantation research.

    PubMed

    Cooper, David K C; Ekser, Burcin; Ramsoondar, Jagdeece; Phelps, Carol; Ayares, David

    2016-01-01

    There is a critical shortage in the number of deceased human organs that become available for the purposes of clinical transplantation. This problem might be resolved by the transplantation of organs from pigs genetically engineered to protect them from the human immune response. The pathobiological barriers to successful pig organ transplantation in primates include activation of the innate and adaptive immune systems, coagulation dysregulation and inflammation. Genetic engineering of the pig as an organ source has increased the survival of the transplanted pig heart, kidney, islet and corneal graft in non-human primates (NHPs) from minutes to months or occasionally years. Genetic engineering may also contribute to any physiological barriers that might be identified, as well as to reducing the risks of transfer of a potentially infectious micro-organism with the organ. There are now an estimated 40 or more genetic alterations that have been carried out in pigs, with some pigs expressing five or six manipulations. With the new technology now available, it will become increasingly common for a pig to express even more genetic manipulations, and these could be tested in the pig-to-NHP models to assess their efficacy and benefit. It is therefore likely that clinical trials of pig kidney, heart and islet transplantation will become feasible in the near future. PMID:26365762

  2. Feasibility tests of pipeline pigs for cryogenic pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hipple, D. L.

    The cryogenic pig experiment was designed to test the concept of using a pneumatically driven pipeline pig to force cryogenic fluid through a long, large diameter pipe, which is one of the key features of the proposed large-scale Spill Safety Test Facility. The Spill Safety Test Facility will spill materials such as liquefied natural gas (LNG), liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), ammonia, and other liquefied gases under controlled conditions so that atmospheric dispersion of these materials can be better understood. Three pig design concepts were tested: (1) commercially available, bullet-shaped polyurethane foam pigs, (2) close-fitting spherical metal pigs with sufficient clearance to pass through the pipe at cryogenic temperatures. Three different sizes were tested to determine the effect of a loose fit, and (3) cylindrical metal pigs with flexible wipers at each end which would maintain a seal during transit through the pipe. The most effective pigs in removing liquid from the pipe were the polyurethane foam pig and the cylindrical wiper pig.

  3. Pipe line pigs have varied applications in operations. Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Vernooy, B.

    1980-10-01

    In the early days of pipelining, it was discovered that running a swab equipped with leather disks through the line removed paraffin deposited on the pipe wall increasing the flow without increasing the power input. Blades were added to the device later to improve the efficiency of wax removal, which also decreased the number of runs and the cost of pigging. Pig developers learned from their successes as well as their failures. Part 1 of this work focused on the construction and kaliper pigs, and the second part describes the general form and function of the different operational pigs, i.e., calipers, cleaners, and spheres.

  4. A decade of pig genome sequencing: a window on pig domestication and evolution.

    PubMed

    Groenen, Martien A M

    2016-01-01

    Insight into how genomes change and adapt due to selection addresses key questions in evolutionary biology and in domestication of animals and plants by humans. In that regard, the pig and its close relatives found in Africa and Eurasia represent an excellent group of species that enables studies of the effect of both natural and human-mediated selection on the genome. The recent completion of the draft genome sequence of a domestic pig and the development of next-generation sequencing technology during the past decade have created unprecedented possibilities to address these questions in great detail. In this paper, I review recent whole-genome sequencing studies in the pig and closely-related species that provide insight into the demography, admixture and selection of these species and, in particular, how domestication and subsequent selection of Sus scrofa have shaped the genomes of these animals. PMID:27025270

  5. Such as pigs eat: the rise and fall of the pannage pig in the UK.

    PubMed

    Wealleans, Alexandra L

    2013-07-01

    Mast-feeding systems once formed the mainstay of pork production across Europe, but have now largely been forgotten. One of the earliest farming practices, it allowed people to fatten pigs on an otherwise wasted resource. Mast feeding was vital in the ancient world: Rome, Saxon England and the Normans all relied heavily on woodland pigs. As time and technology advanced, mast systems became outmoded and fell into disuse. However, recent public interest in improved animal welfare and sustainable agriculture, combined with anecdotal reports of improved flavour, has once again brought mast feeding into the spotlight. This article chronicles the changes in popularity and perception of mast-feeding systems throughout history, and uses the historical perspective to outline a possible future for woodland pigs. PMID:23553313

  6. Endogenous prostaglandin in guinea pig taenia coli.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, T; Hitzig, B; Coburn, R F

    1976-01-01

    Prostaglandin (PGE) is synthesized in the guinea pig taenia coli. A low threshold concentration for an effect of exogenous PGE1 or PGE2 on spontaneous mechanical activity was demonstrated. The PG synthetase inhibitors aspirin, indomethacin, and 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid, at concentrations that inhibited PGE efflux, had effects on spontaneous mechanical activity, membrane potential, membrane resistance, and evoked and spontaneous action potentials (single and double sucrose-gap methods) that were consistent with an action due to inhibition of membrane PGE concentration. The threshold concentration of indomethacin, which inhibited PGE efflux, was the same as the concentration that inhibited spontaneous mechanical activity. Pretreatment with ouabain (10(-6)-10(-5) g/ml) or elevated extracellular K+ (29 and 126 mM) made the guinea pig taenia coli entirely refractory to exogenous PGE1 or PGE2; the mechanical effects of the three prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors also were absent in the presence of elevated K+ or ouabain. The data are consistent with a hypothesis that, under conditions of our experiments, endogenous PGE has an effect on resting tension and spontaneous mechanical activity and on properties of the surface membrane of the guinea pig taenia coli. PMID:1251900

  7. Tail-biting in outdoor pig production.

    PubMed

    Walker, P K; Bilkei, G

    2006-03-01

    A study was performed in five identical outdoor production units in the same geographic area using growing-finishing pigs of similar genetic makeup, age, diet and feed management. The severity of tail-biting (TS) was scored 1-4. The average group prevalence of bitten tails at slaughter on different farms was between 14.1+/-2.1% and 20.1+/-3.0% (P<0.05). The odds of a barrow being bitten were 2.9 times higher than those for a gilt. The most frequently recorded score of bitten tails was TS3, indicating moderate wounds with low grade infection. The prevalence of bitten barrows was positively correlated with the percentage of gilts in a group (r = 0.54, P<0.001). Pigs with zero TS score had no significantly higher weights at slaughter compared to pigs with a score of TS1. As the TS increased from 1 to 4, weights decreased (TS 1 to TS 2 to 4, P<0.05). TS 3 and 4 were positively (P<0.001) associated with subsequent carcass condemnation. We concluded that outdoor rearing does not prevent tail-biting. PMID:15951210

  8. Gnotobiotic pigs-derivation and rearing.

    PubMed Central

    Miniats, O P; Jol, D

    1978-01-01

    The procurement, rearing, nutrition and microbiological monitoring of gnotobiotic pigs and a method for conditioning of primary, colostrum-deprived, specific pathogen free pigs is described. As compared to the established hysterectomy and closed hysterotomy methods for the derivation of gnotobiotic piglets an alternative approach, open caesarian section with the sow maintained under general halothane-nitrous oxide anaesthesia and the introduction of each fetus into the sterile isolator via a liquid germicidal trap, was found to be more efficient and equally successful in providing viable and microbiologically sterile piglets. Two sterile commercially available milk diets, a special formula for orphan animals and condensed cow's milk, when the latter was supplemented with injectable vitamin E, selenium and iron, proved adequate for satisfactory health of the animals. Two types of pelleted starter rations, sterilized by 4.5 megarads of gamma irradiation, provided adequately for the nutritional needs of older gnotobiotic pigs. Results of microbiological monitoring indicated that the surgical and rearing methods employed were capable of preventing contamination of the animals with bacteria, mycoplasma, yeasts, molds, protozoa and helminths but probably could not exclude occasional vertically transmitted viral infections. Exposure of the animals for four weeks to selected strains of lactobacilli, fecal streptococci and Escherichia coli did not result in visible disease while they were maintained in isolators and conditioned them for transfer into a conventional microbial environment. PMID:154359

  9. CHARACTERIZATION OF WILD PIG VEHICLE COLLISIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, J; Paul E. Johns, P

    2007-05-23

    Wild pig (Sus scrofa) collisions with vehicles are known to occur in the United States, but only minimal information describing these accidents has been reported. In an effort to better characterize these accidents, data were collected from 179 wild pig-vehicle collisions from a location in west central South Carolina. Data included accident parameters pertaining to the animals involved, time, location, and human impacts. The age structure of the animals involved was significantly older than that found in the population. Most collisions involved single animals; however, up to seven animals were involved in individual accidents. As the number of animals per collision increased, the age and body mass of the individuals involved decreased. The percentage of males was significantly higher in the single-animal accidents. Annual attrition due to vehicle collisions averaged 0.8 percent of the population. Wild pig-vehicle collisions occurred year-round and throughout the 24-hour daily time period. Most accidents were at night. The presence of lateral barriers was significantly more frequent at the collision locations. Human injuries were infrequent but potentially serious. The mean vehicle damage estimate was $1,173.

  10. Generation of a New Model Rat: Nrf2 Knockout Rats Are Sensitive to Aflatoxin B1 Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Keiko; Takaku, Misaki; Egner, Patricia A; Morita, Masanobu; Kaneko, Takehito; Mashimo, Tomoji; Kensler, Thomas W; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2016-07-01

    THE TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR NRF2: (NF-E2-related-factor 2) REGULATES A BATTERY OF ANTIOXIDATIVE STRESS-RESPONSE GENES AND DETOXICATION GENES, AND NRF2 KNOCKOUT LINES OF MICE HAVE BEEN CONTRIBUTING CRITICALLY TO THE CLARIFICATION OF ROLES THAT NRF2 PLAYS FOR CELL PROTECTION HOWEVER, THERE ARE APPARENT LIMITATIONS IN USE OF THE MOUSE MODELS FOR INSTANCE, RATS EXHIBIT MORE SUITABLE FEATURES FOR TOXICOLOGICAL OR PHYSIOLOGICAL EXAMINATIONS THAN MICE IN THIS STUDY, WE GENERATED 2 LINES OF NRF2 KNOCKOUT RATS BY USING A GENOME EDITING TECHNOLOGY; 1 LINE HARBORS A 7-BP DELETION Δ7 AND THE OTHER LINE HARBORS A 1-BP INSERTION +1 IN THE NRF2 GENE IN THE LIVERS OF RATS HOMOZYGOUSLY DELETING THE NRF2 GENE, AN ACTIVATOR OF NRF2 SIGNALING, CDDO-IM, COULD NOT INDUCE EXPRESSION OF REPRESENTATIVE NRF2 TARGET GENES TO EXAMINE ALTERED TOXICOLOGICAL RESPONSE, WE TREATED THE NRF2 KNOCKOUT RATS WITH AFLATOXIN B1 AFB1, A CARCINOGENIC MYCOTOXIN THAT ELICITS GENE MUTATIONS THROUGH BINDING OF ITS METABOLITES TO DNA AND FOR WHICH THE RAT HAS BEEN PROPOSED AS A REASONABLE SURROGATE FOR HUMAN TOXICITY INDEED, IN THE NRF2 KNOCKOUT RAT LIVERS THE ENZYMES OF THE AFB1 DETOXICATION PATHWAY WERE SIGNIFICANTLY DOWNREGULATED SINGLE DOSE ADMINISTRATION OF AFB1 INCREASED HEPATOTOXICITY AND BINDING OF AFB1-N7-GUANINE TO HEPATIC DNA IN NRF2 KNOCKOUT RATS COMPARED WITH WILD-TYPE NRF2 KNOCKOUT RATS REPEATEDLY TREATED WITH AFB1 WERE PRONE TO LETHALITY AND CDDO-IM WAS NO LONGER PROTECTIVE THESE RESULTS DEMONSTRATE THAT NRF2 KNOCKOUT RATS ARE QUITE SENSITIVE TO AFB1 TOXICITIES AND THIS RAT GENOTYPE EMERGES AS A NEW MODEL ANIMAL IN TOXICOLOGY. PMID:27071940

  11. CAF1-knockout mice are more susceptive to lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jia-Xin; Li, Jia-Shu; Hu, Rong; Li, Xiao-Min; Wang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The carbon catabolite repressor protein 4 (CCR4)–negative on TATA (NOT) complex includes multiple subunits and is conserved in the eukaryotic cells. The CCR4–NOT complex can regulate gene expression at different levels. Two subunits of the CCR4–NOT complex, CCR4 and CCR4-associated factor 1 (CAF1), possess deadenylase activity. In yeast, the deadenylase activity is mainly provided by the CCR4 subunit; however, the deadenylase activity is provided by both CCR4 and CAF1 in other eukaryotes. A previous study reported that CAF1 but not CCR4 is required for the decay of a reporter mRNA with AU-rich elements. Our previous study showed that CAF1 is involved in the regulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) expression. Both ICAM-1 and IL-8 play crucial roles in acute lung injury. In the present study, we examined the effects of CAF1 deficiency on IL-8 and ICAM-1 expression and acute lung injury in mice. Here we showed that there were no differences between the wild-type and CAF1-knockout mice on phenotypes. The lung histology and protein and mRNA levels of IL-8 and ICAM-1 in unstimulated wild-type mice were comparable to those in unstimulated CAF1-knockout mice. However, lipopolysaccharide stimulation led to more severe lung histological injury and greatly higher IL-8 and ICAM-1 expression in CAF1-knockout mice compared to the wild-type mice. These results, together with our previous study, suggest that CAF1 is involved in the regulation of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated IL-8 and ICAM-1 expression in vivo and affects the progression of acute lung injury. PMID:27358572

  12. Normal gonadotropin production and fertility in gonadotrope-specific Bmpr1a knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiang; Wang, Ying; Ongaro, Luisina; Boehm, Ulrich; Kaartinen, Vesa; Mishina, Yuji; Bernard, Daniel J

    2016-06-01

    Pituitary follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) synthesis is regulated by transforming growth factorβsuperfamily ligands, most notably the activins and inhibins. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) also regulate FSHβ subunit (Fshb) expression in immortalized murine gonadotrope-like LβT2 cells and in primary murine or ovine primary pituitary cultures. BMP2 signals preferentially via the BMP type I receptor, BMPR1A, to stimulate murine Fshb transcription in vitro Here, we used a Cre-lox approach to assess BMPR1A's role in FSH synthesis in mice in vivo Gonadotrope-specific Bmpr1a knockout animals developed normally and had reproductive organ weights comparable with those of controls. Knockouts were fertile, with normal serum gonadotropins and pituitary gonadotropin subunit mRNA expression. Cre-mediated recombination of the floxed Bmpr1a allele was efficient and specific, as indicated by PCR analysis of diverse tissues and isolated gonadotrope cells. Furthermore, BMP2 stimulation of inhibitor of DNA binding 3 expression was impaired in gonadotropes isolated from Bmpr1a knockout mice, confirming the loss of functional receptor protein in these cells. Treatment of purified gonadotropes with small-molecule inhibitors of BMPR1A (and the related receptors BMPR1B and ACVR1) suppressed Fshb mRNA expression, suggesting that an autocrine BMP-like molecule might regulate FSH synthesis. However, deletion of Bmpr1a and Acvr1 in cultured pituitary cells did not alter Fshb expression, indicating that the inhibitors had off-target effects. In sum, BMPs or related ligands acting via BMPR1A or ACVR1 are unlikely to play direct physiological roles in FSH synthesis by murine gonadotrope cells. PMID:27029473

  13. Up-regulation of the interferon-related genes in BRCA2 knockout epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hong; Xian, Jian; Vire, Emmanuelle; McKinney, Steven; Wong, Jason; Wei, Vivien; Tong, Rebecca; Kouzarides, Tony; Caldas, Carlos; Aparicio, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    BRCA2 mutations are significantly associated with early onset breast cancer, and the tumour suppressing function of BRCA2 has been attributed to its involvement in homologous recombination [1]-mediated DNA repair. In order to identify additional functions of BRCA2, we generated BRCA2-knockout HCT116 human colorectal carcinoma cells. Using genome-wide microarray analyses, we have discovered a link between the loss of BRCA2 and the up-regulation of a subset of interferon (IFN)-related genes, including APOBEC3F and APOBEC3G. The over-expression of IFN-related genes was confirmed in different human BRCA2−/− and mouse Brca2−/− tumour cell lines, and was independent of either senescence or apoptosis. In isogenic wild type BRCA2 cells, we observed over-expression of IFN-related genes after treatment with DNA-damaging agents, and following ionizing radiation. Cells with endogenous DNA damage because of defective BRCA1 or RAD51 also exhibited over-expression of IFN-related genes. Transcriptional activity of the IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) was increased in BRCA2 knockout cells, and the expression of BRCA2 greatly decreased IFN-α stimulated ISRE reporter activity, suggesting that BRCA2 directly represses the expression of IFN-related genes through the ISRE. Finally, the colony forming capacity of BRCA2 knockout cells was significantly reduced in the presence of either IFN-β or IFN-γ, suggesting that IFNs may have potential as therapeutic agents in cancer cells with BRCA2 mutations. PMID:25043256

  14. Spatiotemporal Alterations in Primary Odorant Representations in Olfactory Marker Protein Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kass, Marley D.; Moberly, Andrew H.; McGann, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Olfactory marker protein (OMP) is highly and selectively expressed in primary olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) across species, but its physiological function remains unclear. Previous studies in the olfactory epithelium suggest that it accelerates the neural response to odorants and may modulate the odorant-selectivity of OSNs. Here we used a line of gene-targeted mice that express the fluorescent exocytosis indicator synaptopHluorin in place of OMP to compare spatiotemporal patterns of odorant-evoked neurotransmitter release from OSNs in adult mice that were heterozygous for OMP or OMP-null. We found that these patterns, which constitute the primary neural representation of each odorant, developed more slowly during the odorant presentation in OMP knockout mice but eventually reached the same magnitude as in heterozygous mice. In the olfactory bulb, each glomerulus receives synaptic input from a subpopulation of OSNs that all express the same odor receptor and thus typically respond to a specific subset of odorants. We observed that in OMP knockout mice, OSNs innervating a given glomerulus typically responded to a broader range of odorants than in OMP heterozygous mice and thus each odorant evoked synaptic input to a larger number of glomeruli. In an olfactory habituation task, OMP knockout mice behaved differently than wild-type mice, exhibiting a delay in their onset to investigate an odor stimulus during its first presentation and less habituation to that stimulus over repeated presentations. These results suggest that the actions of OMP in olfactory transduction carry through to the primary sensory representations of olfactory stimuli in adult mice in vivo. PMID:23630588

  15. Perseverative instrumental and Pavlovian responding to conditioned stimuli in serotonin transporter knockout rats.

    PubMed

    Nonkes, Lourens J P; Homberg, Judith R

    2013-02-01

    Environmental stimuli can influence behavior via the process of Pavlovian conditioning. Recent genetic research suggests that some individuals are more sensitive to environmental stimuli for behavioral guidance than others. One important mediator of this effect is serotonin transporter (5-HTT) genetic variance, which increases sensitivity to Pavlovian conditioned stimuli through changes in the build-up of corticolimbic circuits. As these stimuli can have reinforcing effects on instrumental responding, we here investigated their effects on instrumental behavior in 5-HTT knockout rats and their wild-type counterparts by means of the signal attenuation paradigm. In this paradigm animals acquired a Pavlovian association between a stimulus and food reward, and subsequently they had to lever press in order to gain access to this food reward-associated stimulus. Thereafter, half of the animals underwent extinction training during which extinction of the primary Pavlovian association was induced via non-reinforced stimulus presentations, whereas the other half did not receive this training. During a final test session all animals were tested for instrumental responding for the non-reinforced Pavlovian conditioned stimulus, as well as instrumental and Pavlovian responding to the stimulus after an initial lever-press. No genotype differences were observed during the training and extinction sessions. However, during the test session 5-HTT knockout rats that had not received prior extinction training displayed excessive instrumental responding. This was specifically observed during presentation of the stimulus (induced by the first lever press) and was accompanied by an increased number of feeder visits after termination of the stimulus presentation. An additionally performed c-Fos immunohistochemistry study revealed that the behaviors in these animals were associated with abnormal c-Fos immunoreactivity in the orbitofrontal cortex and basolateral amygdala, regions important

  16. Generation of ER{alpha}-floxed and knockout mice using the Cre/LoxP system

    SciTech Connect

    Antonson, P.; Omoto, Y.; Humire, P.; Gustafsson, J.-A.

    2012-08-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ER{alpha} floxed and knockout mice were generated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Disruption of the ER{alpha} gene results in sterility in both male and female mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ER{alpha}{sup -/-} mice have ovaries with hemorrhagic follicles and hypoplastic uterus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Female ER{alpha}{sup -/-} mice develop obesity. -- Abstract: Estrogen receptor alpha (ER{alpha}) is a nuclear receptor that regulates a range of physiological processes in response to estrogens. In order to study its biological role, we generated a floxed ER{alpha} mouse line that can be used to knock out ER{alpha} in selected tissues by using the Cre/LoxP system. In this study, we established a new ER{alpha} knockout mouse line by crossing the floxed ER{alpha} mice with Cre deleter mice. Here we show that genetic disruption of the ER{alpha} gene in all tissues results in sterility in both male and female mice. Histological examination of uterus and ovaries revealed a dramatically atrophic uterus and hemorrhagic cysts in the ovary. These results suggest that infertility in female mice is the result of functional defects of the reproductive tract. Moreover, female knockout mice are hyperglycemic, develop obesity and at the age of 4 months the body weight of these mice was more than 20% higher compared to wild type littermates and this difference increased over time. Our results demonstrate that ER{alpha} is necessary for reproductive tract development and has important functions as a regulator of metabolism in females.

  17. Spectroscopy of 35P using the one-proton knockout reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutschler, A.; Sorlin, O.; Lemasson, A.; Bazin, D.; Borcea, C.; Borcea, R.; Gade, A.; Iwasaki, H.; Khan, E.; Lepailleur, A.; Recchia, F.; Roger, T.; Rotaru, F.; Stanoiu, M.; Stroberg, S. R.; Tostevin, J. A.; Vandebrouck, M.; Weisshaar, D.; Wimmer, K.

    2016-03-01

    The structure of 35P was studied with a one-proton knockout reaction at 88 MeV/u from a 36S projectile beam at NSCL. The γ rays from the depopulation of excited states in 35P were detected with GRETINA, while the 35P nuclei were identified event-by-event in the focal plane of the S800 spectrograph. The level scheme of 35P was deduced up to 7.5 MeV using γ -γ coincidences. The observed levels were attributed to proton removals from the s d shell and also from the deeply bound p1 /2 orbital. The orbital angular momentum of each state was derived from the comparison between experimental and calculated shapes of individual (γ -gated) parallel momentum distributions. Despite the use of different reactions and their associate models, spectroscopic factors, C2S , derived from the 36S(-1 p ) knockout reaction agree with those obtained earlier from 36S(d ,3He ) transfer, if a reduction factor Rs, as deduced from inclusive one-nucleon removal cross sections, is applied to the knockout transitions. In addition to the expected proton-hole configurations, other states were observed with individual cross sections of the order of 0.5 mb. Based on their shifted parallel momentum distributions, their decay modes to negative parity states, their high excitation energy (around 4.7 MeV), and the fact that they were not observed in the (d ,3He ) reaction, we propose that they may result from a two-step mechanism or a nucleon-exchange reaction with subsequent neutron evaporation. Regardless of the mechanism, that could not yet be clarified, these states likely correspond to neutron core excitations in 35P. This newly identified pathway, although weak, offers the possibility to selectively populate certain intruder configurations that are otherwise hard to produce and identify.

  18. Cardiac-Specific Knockout of ETA Receptor Mitigates Paraquat-Induced Cardiac Contractile Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiaxing; Lu, Songhe; Zheng, Qijun; Hu, Nan; Yu, Wenjun; Li, Na; Liu, Min; Gao, Beilei; Zhang, Guoyong; Zhang, Yingmei; Wang, Haichang

    2016-07-01

    Paraquat (1,1'-dim ethyl-4-4'-bipyridinium dichloride), a highly toxic quaternary ammonium herbicide widely used in agriculture, exerts potent toxic prooxidant effects resulting in multi-organ failure including the lung and heart although the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Recent evidence suggests possible involvement of endothelin system in paraquat-induced acute lung injury. This study was designed to examine the role of endothelin receptor A (ETA) in paraquat-induced cardiac contractile and mitochondrial injury. Wild-type (WT) and cardiac-specific ETA receptor knockout mice were challenged to paraquat (45 mg/kg, i.p.) for 48 h prior to the assessment of echocardiographic, cardiomyocyte contractile and intracellular Ca(2+) properties, as well as apoptosis and mitochondrial damage. Levels of the mitochondrial proteins for biogenesis and oxidative phosphorylation including UCP2, HSP90 and PGC1α were evaluated. Our results revealed that paraquat elicited cardiac enlargement, mechanical anomalies including compromised echocardiographic parameters (elevated left ventricular end-systolic and end-diastolic diameters as well as reduced factional shortening), suppressed cardiomyocyte contractile function, intracellular Ca(2+) handling, overt apoptosis and mitochondrial damage. ETA receptor knockout itself failed to affect myocardial function, apoptosis, mitochondrial integrity and mitochondrial protein expression. However, ETA receptor knockout ablated or significantly attenuated paraquat-induced cardiac contractile and intracellular Ca(2+) defect, apoptosis and mitochondrial damage. Taken together, these findings revealed that endothelin system in particular the ETA receptor may be involved in paraquat-induced toxic myocardial contractile anomalies possibly related to apoptosis and mitochondrial damage. PMID:26089164

  19. Generating double knockout mice to model genetic intervention for diabetic cardiomyopathy in humans.

    PubMed

    Chavali, Vishalakshi; Nandi, Shyam Sundar; Singh, Shree Ram; Mishra, Paras Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a rapidly increasing disease that enhances the chances of heart failure twofold to fourfold (as compared to age and sex matched nondiabetics) and becomes a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. There are two broad classifications of diabetes: type1 diabetes (T1D) and type2 diabetes (T2D). Several mice models mimic both T1D and T2D in humans. However, the genetic intervention to ameliorate diabetic cardiomyopathy in these mice often requires creating double knockout (DKO). In order to assess the therapeutic potential of a gene, that specific gene is either overexpressed (transgenic expression) or abrogated (knockout) in the diabetic mice. If the genetic mice model for diabetes is used, it is necessary to create DKO with transgenic/knockout of the target gene to investigate the specific role of that gene in pathological cardiac remodeling in diabetics. One of the important genes involved in extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling in diabetes is matrix metalloproteinase-9 (Mmp9). Mmp9 is a collagenase that remains latent in healthy hearts but induced in diabetic hearts. Activated Mmp9 degrades extracellular matrix (ECM) and increases matrix turnover causing cardiac fibrosis that leads to heart failure. Insulin2 mutant (Ins2+/-) Akita is a genetic model for T1D that becomes diabetic spontaneously at the age of 3-4 weeks and show robust hyperglycemia at the age of 10-12 weeks. It is a chronic model of T1D. In Ins2+/- Akita, Mmp9 is induced. To investigate the specific role of Mmp9 in diabetic hearts, it is necessary to create diabetic mice where Mmp9 gene is deleted. Here, we describe the method to generate Ins2+/-/Mmp9-/- (DKO) mice to determine whether the abrogation of Mmp9 ameliorates diabetic cardiomyopathy. PMID:25064116

  20. Long-term potentiation in the hippocampus of fragile X knockout mice

    SciTech Connect

    Godfraind, J.M.; Reyniers, E.; De Boulle, K.

    1996-08-09

    To gain more insight in the physiological function of the fragile X gene (FMR1) and the mechanisms leading to fragile X syndrome, the Fmr1 gene has been inactivated in mice by gene targeting techniques. In the Morris water maze test, the Fmr1 knockout mice learn to find the hidden platform nearly as well as the control animals, but show impaired performance after the position of the platform has been modified. As malperformance in the Morris water maze test has been associated with impaired long-term potentiation (LTP), electrophysiological studies were performed in hippocampal slices of Fmr1 knockout mice to check for the presence of LTP. Judged by field extracellular excitatory postsynaptic potential recordings in the CA1 hippocampal area, Fmr1 knockout mice express LTP to a similar extent as their wild type littermates during the first 1-2 hr after high frequency stimulation. Also, short-term potentiation (STP) was similar in both types of mice. To investigate whether Fmr1 is involved in the latter stages of LTP as an immediate early gene, we compared Fmr1 mRNA quantities on northern blots after chemical induction of seizures. A transient increase in the transcription of immediate early genes is thought to be essential for the maintenance of LTP. As no increase in Fmr1 mRNA could be detected, neither in cortex nor in total brain, during the first 2{1/2} hr after pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures, it is unlikely that Fmr1 is an immediate early gene in mice. In conclusion, we found no evidence for a function of FMR1 in STP or LTP. 37 refs., 4 figs.

  1. AP endonuclease knockdown enhances methyl methanesulfonate hypersensitivity of DNA polymerase β knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Ryohei; Umetsu, Makio; Yamamoto, Mizuki; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Takenaka, Shigeo; Ide, Hiroshi; Kubo, Kihei

    2015-01-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease (Apex) is required for base excision repair (BER), which is the major mechanism of repair for small DNA lesions such as alkylated bases. Apex incises the DNA strand at an AP site to leave 3′-OH and 5′-deoxyribose phosphate (5′-dRp) termini. DNA polymerase β (PolB) plays a dominant role in single nucleotide (Sn-) BER by incorporating a nucleotide and removing 5′-dRp. Methyl methanesulfonate (MMS)-induced damage is repaired by Sn-BER, and thus mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) deficient in PolB show significantly increased sensitivity to MMS. However, the survival curve for PolB-knockout MEFs (PolBKOs) has a shoulder, and increased sensitivity is only apparent at relatively high MMS concentrations. In this study, we prepared Apex-knockdown/PolB-knockout MEFs (AKDBKOs) to examine whether BER is related to the apparent resistance of PolBKOs at low MMS concentrations. The viability of PolBKOs immediately after MMS treatment was significantly lower than that of wild-type MEFs, but there was essentially no effect of Apex-knockdown on cell viability in the presence or absence of PolB. In contrast, relative counts of MEFs after repair were decreased by Apex knockdown. Parental PolBKOs showed especially high sensitivity at >1.5 mM MMS, suggesting that PolBKOs have another repair mechanism in addition to PolB-dependent Sn-BER, and that the back-up mechanism is unable to repair damage induced by high MMS concentrations. Interestingly, AKDBKOs were hypersensitive to MMS in a relative cell growth assay, suggesting that MMS-induced damage in PolB-knockout MEFs is repaired by Apex-dependent repair mechanisms, presumably including long-patch BER. PMID:25724755

  2. Selenium elimination in pigs after an outbreak of selenium toxicosis.

    PubMed

    Davidson-York, D; Galey, F D; Blanchard, P; Gardner, I A

    1999-07-01

    In May 1996, 150 grower pigs in 5 California counties were exposed to selenium-contaminated feed distributed by a single feed company. Feed samples from 20 herds had a mean selenium concentration of 121.7 ppm dry weight (range, 22.1-531 ppm). In San Luis Obispo County, 52 pigs in 24 herds were exposed to the feed, and 8 pigs died with signs of paralysis. Bilateral symmetrical poliomyelomalacia involving the ventral horns of the cervical and lumbar intumescence was evident on histologic examination of spinal cord from affected pigs. Of 44 surviving exposed pigs, 33 (75%) exhibited signs of selenosis, including anorexia, alopecia, and hoof lesions. Thirty-nine of 44 pigs (88.6%) had elevated (>1 ppm) blood selenium concentrations. Surviving exposed pigs were changed to a standard commercial ration containing approximately 0.5 ppm (dry weight) selenium. Blood selenium concentrations were determined weekly for 46 days following removal of the contaminated feed and were compared with values of 20 control pigs fed a standard commercial ration. Mean (+/-SD) blood selenium concentrations of exposed pigs were 3.2 +/- 2.6 ppm at the initial sampling and 0.4 +/- 0.1 ppm after 46 days. Mean blood selenium concentrations of < or = 0.3 ppm for control pigs at all samplings were significantly lower (P < 0.001) than concentrations for exposed pigs. Muscle and liver samples of 22 of the 44 exposed pigs were collected at slaughter approximately 72 days after withdrawal of the selenium-contaminated feed. Muscle samples had a mean selenium concentration of 0.36 ppm (wet weight). Liver samples had a mean selenium concentration of 1.26 ppm (wet weight). One liver sample had a selenium value in the toxic range for pigs (3.3 ppm wet weight; reference range, 0.4-1.2 ppm). A 1-compartment pharmacokinetic model of selenium elimination in exposed pigs was generated, and the geometric mean blood selenium elimination half-life was estimated to be 12 days. The 60-day withdrawal time recommended

  3. Ground state energy and width of {sup 7}He from {sup 8}Li proton knockout

    SciTech Connect

    Denby, D. H.; DeYoung, P. A.; Hall, C. C.; Baumann, T.; Bazin, D.; Spyrou, A.; Breitbach, E.; Howes, R.; Brown, J.; Frank, N.; Gade, A.; Mosby, S. M.; Peters, W. A.; Thoennessen, M.; Hinnefeld, J.; Hoffman, C. R.; Jenson, R. A.; Luther, B.; Olson, C. W.; Schiller, A.

    2008-10-15

    The ground state energy and width of {sup 7}He has been measured with the Modular Neutron Array (MoNA) and superconducting dipole Sweeper magnet experimental setup at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory. {sup 7}He was produced by proton knockout from a secondary {sup 8}Li beam. The measured decay energy spectrum is compared to simulations based on Breit-Wigner line shape with an energy-dependent width for the resonant state. The energy of the ground state is found to be 400(10) keV with a full-width at half-maximum of 125({sub -15}{sup +40}) keV.

  4. Narp knockout mice show normal reactivity to novelty but attenuated recovery from neophobia.

    PubMed

    Blouin, Ashley M; Lee, Jongah J; Tao, Bo; Smith, Dani R; Johnson, Alexander W; Baraban, Jay M; Reti, Irving M

    2013-11-15

    Narp knockout (KO) mice demonstrate cognitive inflexibility and addictive behavior, which are associated with abnormal reactivity to a novel stimulus. To assess reactivity to novelty, we tested Narp KO and wild-type (WT) mice on a neophobia procedure. Both Narp KO and WT mice showed a similar decrease in consumption upon initial exposure to a novel flavor, but Narp KO mice did not increase consumption with subsequent exposures to the novel flavor like the WT mice. Therefore, Narp KO mice do not have abnormal reactivity to novelty but show deficits in adapting behavior to reflect the updated value of a stimulus. PMID:24120400

  5. Wip1 knockout inhibits the proliferation and enhances the migration of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yiting; Liu, Lan; Sheng, Ming; Xiong, Kai; Huang, Lei; Gao, Qian; Wei, Jingliang; Wu, Tianwen; Yang, Shulin; Liu, Honglin; Mu, Yulian; Li, Kui

    2015-06-10

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), a unique population of multipotent adult progenitor cells originally found in bone marrow (BM), are extremely useful for multifunctional therapeutic approaches. However, the growth arrest and premature senescence of MSCs in vitro prevent the in-depth characterization of these cells. In addition, the regulatory factors involved in MSCs migration remain largely unknown. Given that protein phosphorylation is associated with the processes of MSCs proliferation and migration, we focused on wild-type p53-inducible phosphatase-1 (Wip1), a well-studied modulator of phosphorylation, in this study. Our results showed that Wip1 knockout significantly inhibited MSCs proliferation and induced G2-phase cell-cycle arrest by reducing cyclinB1 expression. Compared with WT-MSCs, Wip1{sup −/−} MSCs displayed premature growth arrest after six passages in culture. Transwell and scratch assays revealed that Wip1{sup −/−} MSCs migrate more effectively than WT-MSCs. Moreover, the enhanced migratory response of Wip1{sup −/−} MSCs may be attributed to increases in the induction of Rac1-GTP activity, the pAKT/AKT ratio, the rearrangement of filamentous-actin (f-actin), and filopodia formation. Based on these results, we then examined the effect of treatment with a PI3K/AKT and Rac1 inhibitor, both of which impaired the migratory activity of MSCs. Therefore, we propose that the PI3K/AKT/Rac1 signaling axis mediates the Wip1 knockout-induced migration of MSCs. Our findings indicate that the principal function of Wip1 in MSCs transformation is the maintenance of proliferative capacity. Nevertheless, knocking out Wip1 increases the migratory capacity of MSCs. This dual effect of Wip1 provides the potential for purposeful routing of MSCs. - Highlights: • Wip1 knockout inhibited MSCs proliferation through reducing cyclinB1 expression. • Wip1{sup −/−} MSCs displayed premature growth arrest in vitro after six passages. • Knocking out Wip1

  6. Transcriptomic profiling comparison of YAP over-expression and conditional knockout mouse tooth germs

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ming; Wang, Xiu-Ping

    2015-01-01

    To identify the downstream target genes of YAP, we used RNA-Seq technology to compare the transcriptomic profilings of Yap conditional knockout (Yap CKO) and YAP over-expression mouse tooth germs. Our results showed that some Hox, Wnt and Laminin family genes had concurrent changes with YAP transcripts, indicating that the expression of these genes may be regulated by YAP. Here, we provide the detailed experimental procedure for the transcriptomic profiling results (NCBI GEO accession number GSE65524). The associated study on the regulation of Hoxa1 and Hoxc13 genes by YAP was published in Molecular Cellular Biology in 2015 [Liu et al., 2015]. PMID:26484260

  7. Spectroscopy of 23F by quasi-free proton knockout reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Tsz Leung

    2014-09-01

    The separation energy of quasi-free proton knockout reactioncan be a good probe for the single particle energy of each orbit inside a nucleus. The spectroscopic factor can also bededuced from the measured cross section. The effective single particle energy (ESPE)can then be calculated as a spectroscopic factor weighted mean of single particle energy. The ESPE can reveal the strength of spin-orbit splitting. This splitting is further related to the effects of tensor force, 3N force and spin-orbit coupling of nuclear force. Florine has 1 proton on the s-d shell. The single particle picture should be suitable to explain its behavior. However, in the neutron rich isotopes, this picture may be broken due to the effect of excessive neutrons on the s-d shell. The possible effects are s-d shell mixing and reduction of shell gap energy. We are going to present the experimental setup and condition, data analysis process and the latest data analysis result for exclusive measurement of F(p,2p)O* knockout reaction. The excitation energy spectrum of residual nucleus will be discussed. The yield will be compared with the theoretical calculation of the cross section by code THREEDEE. The separation energy of quasi-free proton knockout reactioncan be a good probe for the single particle energy of each orbit inside a nucleus. The spectroscopic factor can also bededuced from the measured cross section. The effective single particle energy (ESPE)can then be calculated as a spectroscopic factor weighted mean of single particle energy. The ESPE can reveal the strength of spin-orbit splitting. This splitting is further related to the effects of tensor force, 3N force and spin-orbit coupling of nuclear force. Florine has 1 proton on the s-d shell. The single particle picture should be suitable to explain its behavior. However, in the neutron rich isotopes, this picture may be broken due to the effect of excessive neutrons on the s-d shell. The possible effects are s-d shell mixing and

  8. Multiple nucleon knockout by Coulomb dissociation in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Norbury, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1988-01-01

    The Coulomb dissociation contributions to fragmentation cross sections in relativistic heavy ion collisions, where more than one nucleon is removed, are estimated using the Weizsacker-Williams method of virtual quanta. Photonuclear cross sections taken from experimental results were used to fold into target photon number spectra calculated with the Weizsacker-Williams method. Calculations for several projectile target combinations over a wide range of charge numbers, and a wide range of incident projectile energies, are reported. These results suggest that multiple nucleon knockout by the Coulomb field may be of negligible importance in galactic heavy ion studies for projectiles lighter than Fe-56.

  9. Isolation and Identification of Fiber-utilizing Bacteria From Pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pigs can obtain up to 30% of their maintenance energy from short chain fatty acids. The major source of short chain fatty acids is bacterial fiber fermentation in the large intestine; however, fiber-utilizing bacterial communities in pigs are not well defined. In order to gain better insight into ...

  10. PIG7 promotes leukemia cell chemosensitivity via lysosomal membrane permeabilization

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Ting; Wu, Yu; Li, Jianjun; Wang, Fangfang; Zheng, Yuhuan; Liu, Ting

    2016-01-01

    PIG7 localizes to lysosomal membrane in leukemia cells. Our previous work has shown that transduction of pig7 into a series of leukemia cell lines did not result in either apoptosis or differentiation of most tested cell lines. Interestingly, it did significantly sensitize these cell lines to chemotherapeutic drugs. Here, we further investigated the mechanism underlying pig7-induced improved sensitivity of acute leukemia cells to chemotherapy. Our results demonstrated that the sensitization effect driven by exogenous pig7 was more effective in drug-resistant leukemia cell lines which had lower endogenous pig7 expression. Overexpression of pig7 did not directly activate the caspase apoptotic pathway, but decreased the lysosomal stability. The expression of pig7 resulted in lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and lysosomal protease (e.g. cathepsin B, D, L) release. Moreover, we also observed increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) induced by pig7. Some autophagy markers such as LC3I/II, ATG5 and Beclin-1, and necroptosis maker MLKL were also stimulated. However, intrinsic antagonism such as serine/cysteine protease inhibitors Spi2A and Cystatin C prevented downstream effectors from triggering leukemia cells, which were only on the “verge of apoptosis”. When combined with chemotherapy, LMP increased and more proteases were released. Once this process was beyond the limit of intrinsic antagonism, it induced programmed cell death cooperatively via caspase-independent and caspase-dependent pathways. PMID:26716897

  11. The pig X and Y Chromosomes: structure, sequence, and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Benjamin M.; Sargent, Carole A.; Churcher, Carol; Hunt, Toby; Herrero, Javier; Loveland, Jane E.; Dunn, Matt; Louzada, Sandra; Fu, Beiyuan; Chow, William; Gilbert, James; Austin-Guest, Siobhan; Beal, Kathryn; Carvalho-Silva, Denise; Cheng, William; Gordon, Daria; Grafham, Darren; Hardy, Matt; Harley, Jo; Hauser, Heidi; Howden, Philip; Howe, Kerstin; Lachani, Kim; Ellis, Peter J.I.; Kelly, Daniel; Kerry, Giselle; Kerwin, James; Ng, Bee Ling; Threadgold, Glen; Wileman, Thomas; Wood, Jonathan M.D.; Yang, Fengtang; Harrow, Jen; Affara, Nabeel A.; Tyler-Smith, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We have generated an improved assembly and gene annotation of the pig X Chromosome, and a first draft assembly of the pig Y Chromosome, by sequencing BAC and fosmid clones from Duroc animals and incorporating information from optical mapping and fiber-FISH. The X Chromosome carries 1033 annotated genes, 690 of which are protein coding. Gene order closely matches that found in primates (including humans) and carnivores (including cats and dogs), which is inferred to be ancestral. Nevertheless, several protein-coding genes present on the human X Chromosome were absent from the pig, and 38 pig-specific X-chromosomal genes were annotated, 22 of which were olfactory receptors. The pig Y-specific Chromosome sequence generated here comprises 30 megabases (Mb). A 15-Mb subset of this sequence was assembled, revealing two clusters of male-specific low copy number genes, separated by an ampliconic region including the HSFY gene family, which together make up most of the short arm. Both clusters contain palindromes with high sequence identity, presumably maintained by gene conversion. Many of the ancestral X-related genes previously reported in at least one mammalian Y Chromosome are represented either as active genes or partial sequences. This sequencing project has allowed us to identify genes—both single copy and amplified—on the pig Y Chromosome, to compare the pig X and Y Chromosomes for homologous sequences, and thereby to reveal mechanisms underlying pig X and Y Chromosome evolution. PMID:26560630

  12. A 2-D guinea pig lung proteome map

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Guinea pigs represent an important model for a number of infectious and non-infectious pulmonary diseases. The guinea pig genome has recently been sequenced to full coverage, opening up new research avenues using genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics techniques in this species. In order to furth...

  13. Validation of QTL in commercial-type pigs at USMARC

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The US Meat Animal Research Center’s commercial swine resource population was a closed population maintained for 10 generations and produced over 40,000 pigs with basic phenotypic measurements. Approximately 3,000 of the most heavily phenotyped pigs as well as all boars used were genotyped with the ...

  14. Biology of Cryptosporidium parvum in pigs: from weaning to market.

    PubMed

    Guselle, N J; Appelbee, A J; Olson, M E

    2003-04-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is commonly identified as infecting domestic livestock and humans. Prevalence of C. parvum in pigs has been reported, however, the duration and infection pattern of naturally acquired Cryptosporidium infections in pigs has not been reported. This study was undertaken to investigate the age of oocyst shedding and duration of natural Cryptosporidium parvum infections in pigs from weaning to market weight. Fecal samples were collected from weaned Yorkshire-Landrace piglets (n=33) twice per week until Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected. Upon oocyst detection, fecal samples were collected three times per week and pigs were monitored throughout the study for diarrhea and examined after concentration and immunofluroescent staining. Cryptosporidium isolates were genotyped by polymerase chain reaction to amplify the HSP70 gene which was subsequently sequence analyzed. All 33 pigs shed oocysts some time during the study. The mean age of initial oocyst detection was 45.2 days post-weaning with the mean duration of infection 28.7 days. Mean number of Cryptosporidium oocysts was low and declined to zero prior to study completion. Episodes of diarrhea were not associated with oocyst excretion. Genetic sequences were obtained for 10 of the pigs. All of the 10 isolates aligned as the Cryptosporidium parvum 'pig' genotype. This study demonstrates that the age and duration of oocyst shedding in pigs infected with C. parvum porcine genotype is different from other livestock species. PMID:12651214

  15. The effects of pigs' feet consumption on lactation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myo-Kyoung; Shin, Jung-Sook; Patel, Rajul A; Min, Young Sil; Song, Hyun Ju; Sohn, Uy Dong; Kim, Dong Kyue; Nam, Jean-Yong; Kim, Dong-Seok

    2013-01-01

    Pigs' feet are traditionally consumed by Korean women to increase milk production during lactation. In this study, we evaluated the perceived effectiveness and safety of consuming pigs' feet. Parous women were recruited to complete survey questionnaires in South Korea. Of the 516 respondents, 188 (36%) claimed they consumed pigs' feet. One-hundred twenty women (64%) who consumed pigs' feet reported experiencing an increase in breast milk production. Seventy-three (61%) women from this same group exclusively breastfed. In contrast, 16 (25%) of 65 respondents who did not embrace the same purported effect of pigs' feet indicated that they solely breastfed. Ninety-eight (82%) respondents who consumed pigs' feet and reported galactagoguic effects would recommend its use. Study findings reveal that the majority of women who consume pigs' feet believe in its milk-promoting effects. The results of this study suggest that further investigation of the galactagoguic effects of pigs' feet via conduction of an experimental study is warranted. PMID:23621487

  16. Performance and carcass characteristics of growing pigs fed crude glycerol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Performance and carcass characteristics of growing pigs fed crude glycerol, a co-product of biodiesel production, were determined in a 138-d feeding trial conducted at the Iowa State University Swine Nutrition Research Farm, Ames, IA. Pigs were weaned at 21d of age and were fed a commercial starter-...

  17. 9 CFR 113.38 - Guinea pig safety test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Guinea pig safety test. 113.38 Section 113.38 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Standard Procedures § 113.38 Guinea pig safety...

  18. The pig X and Y Chromosomes: structure, sequence, and evolution.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Benjamin M; Sargent, Carole A; Churcher, Carol; Hunt, Toby; Herrero, Javier; Loveland, Jane E; Dunn, Matt; Louzada, Sandra; Fu, Beiyuan; Chow, William; Gilbert, James; Austin-Guest, Siobhan; Beal, Kathryn; Carvalho-Silva, Denise; Cheng, William; Gordon, Daria; Grafham, Darren; Hardy, Matt; Harley, Jo; Hauser, Heidi; Howden, Philip; Howe, Kerstin; Lachani, Kim; Ellis, Peter J I; Kelly, Daniel; Kerry, Giselle; Kerwin, James; Ng, Bee Ling; Threadgold, Glen; Wileman, Thomas; Wood, Jonathan M D; Yang, Fengtang; Harrow, Jen; Affara, Nabeel A; Tyler-Smith, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We have generated an improved assembly and gene annotation of the pig X Chromosome, and a first draft assembly of the pig Y Chromosome, by sequencing BAC and fosmid clones from Duroc animals and incorporating information from optical mapping and fiber-FISH. The X Chromosome carries 1033 annotated genes, 690 of which are protein coding. Gene order closely matches that found in primates (including humans) and carnivores (including cats and dogs), which is inferred to be ancestral. Nevertheless, several protein-coding genes present on the human X Chromosome were absent from the pig, and 38 pig-specific X-chromosomal genes were annotated, 22 of which were olfactory receptors. The pig Y-specific Chromosome sequence generated here comprises 30 megabases (Mb). A 15-Mb subset of this sequence was assembled, revealing two clusters of male-specific low copy number genes, separated by an ampliconic region including the HSFY gene family, which together make up most of the short arm. Both clusters contain palindromes with high sequence identity, presumably maintained by gene conversion. Many of the ancestral X-related genes previously reported in at least one mammalian Y Chromosome are represented either as active genes or partial sequences. This sequencing project has allowed us to identify genes--both single copy and amplified--on the pig Y Chromosome, to compare the pig X and Y Chromosomes for homologous sequences, and thereby to reveal mechanisms underlying pig X and Y Chromosome evolution. PMID:26560630

  19. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in pigs from Vietnam

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pigs are considered an important source of Toxoplasma gondii infection for humans. Antibodies to T. gondii were determined in serum samples from 587 pigs from different sources and different ages using the modified agglutination test (MAT). Sera were diluted two fold 1:25 1:3200. Antibodies were fou...

  20. Mycobacterium bovis infection in domestic pigs in Great Britain.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Suzanne S; Crawshaw, Timothy R; Smith, Noel H; Palgrave, Christopher J

    2013-11-01

    Mycobacterium bovis, the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis (TB), infects a wide range of wild and domestic mammals. Despite a control programme spanning decades, M. bovis infection levels in cattle in Great Britain (GB) have continued to rise over recent years. As the incidence of infection in cattle and wildlife may be linked to that in swine, data relating to infection of pigs identified at slaughter were examined in this study. Between 2007 and 2011, almost all M. bovis-infected pigs originated from farms in the South-West and West-Midland regions of England. The data suggest that pigs raised outdoors or on holdings with poor biosecurity may be more vulnerable to infection with M. bovis. In the majority of cases, the same strains of M. bovis were found in pigs and cattle, despite that fact that direct contact between these species was rarely observed. Genotyping and geographical mapping data indicated that some strains found in pigs may correlate better with those present in badgers, rather than cattle. In consequence, it is proposed that pigs may represent a useful sentinel for M. bovis infection in wildlife in GB. Given the potential implications of this infection for the pig industry, and for the on-going effort to control bovine TB, the importance of understanding the epidemiology and pathogenesis of M. bovis infection, as well as monitoring its prevalence, in pigs should not be underestimated. PMID:24095608

  1. The Guinea Pigs of a Problem-Based Learning Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reddy, Sarasvathie; McKenna, Sioux

    2016-01-01

    Participants in a study on learning the clinical aspects of medicine in a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum repeatedly referred to themselves as "Guinea pigs" at the mercy of a curriculum experiment. This article interrogates and problematises the "Guinea pig" identity ascribed to and assumed by the first cohort of…

  2. Integrating the USMARC genetic map for the pig with the pig physical map

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A comprehensive genetic linkage map containing 3418 markers and spanning 2,326 cM of the autosomal genome was generated and integrated with the available physical maps for the pig. Marker types consisted of 1531 microsatellites and 1887 markers based on single feature polymorphisms, insertion/delet...

  3. An updated USMARC genetic map for the pig integrated with the pig physical map

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ten years ago, we published our last comprehensive genetic map for the pig. This map contained 1,042 markers (mostly microsatellites) and spanned 2,286 cM of the autosomal genome, ~98% estimated coverage based on information available at the time. Since that time, USMARC has continued to add genetic...

  4. DENDRITIC SPINE ALTERATIONS IN THE HIPPOCAMPUS AND PARIETAL CORTEX OF ALPHA7 NICOTINIC ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTOR KNOCKOUT MICE

    PubMed Central

    Morley, B. J.; Mervis, R. F.

    2013-01-01

    The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is involved in higher cognitive and memory functions, and is associated with the etiology of neurological diseases involving cognitive decline, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We hypothesized that spine changes in the α7 knockout might help to explain the behavioral deficits observed in α7 knockout mice and prodromal hippocampal changes in AD. We quantified several measures of dendritic morphology in the CA1 region of the mouse hippocampus in Golgi-stained material from wildtype and α7 knockout mice at P24. The most significant difference was a 64% increase in thin (L-type) dendritic spines on the CA1 basilar tree in knockout mice (p < .05). There were small decreases in the number of in N-type (−15%), M-type (−14%) and D-type (−4%) spine densities. The CA1 basilar dendritic tree of knockout mice had significantly less branching in the regions nearthesoma in comparison with wildtype animals (p < .01), but not in the more distal branching. Changes in the configuration of CA1 basilar dendritic spines have been observed in a number of experimental paradigms, suggesting that basilar dendritic spines are highly plastic. One component of cognitive dysfunction may be through α7-modulated GABAergic interneurons synapsing on CA1 basal dendrites. PMID:23270857

  5. BK Knockout by TALEN-Mediated Gene Targeting in Osteoblasts: KCNMA1 Determines the Proliferation and Differentiation of Osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Hei, Hongya; Gao, Jianjun; Dong, Jibin; Tao, Jie; Tian, Lulu; Pan, Wanma; Wang, Hongyu; Zhang, Xuemei

    2016-01-01

    Large conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels participate in many important physiological functions in excitable tissues such as neurons, cardiac and smooth muscles, whereas the knowledge of BK channels in bone tissues and osteoblasts remains elusive. To investigate the role of BK channels in osteoblasts, we used transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) to establish a BK knockout cell line on rat ROS17/2.8 osteoblast, and detected the proliferation and mineralization of the BK-knockout cells. Our study found that the BK-knockout cells significantly decreased the ability of proliferation and mineralization as osteoblasts, compared to the wild type cells. The overall expression of osteoblast differentiation marker genes in the BK-knockout cells was significantly lower than that in wild type osteoblast cells. The BK-knockout osteoblast cell line in our study displays a phenotype decrease in osteoblast function which can mimic the pathological state of osteoblast and thus provide a working cell line as a tool for study of osteoblast function and bone related diseases. PMID:27329042

  6. Modeling leucine's metabolic pathway and knockout prediction improving the production of surfactin, a biosurfactant from Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Coutte, François; Niehren, Joachim; Dhali, Debarun; John, Mathias; Versari, Cristian; Jacques, Philippe

    2015-08-01

    A Bacillus subtilis mutant strain overexpressing surfactin biosynthetic genes was previously constructed. In order to further increase the production of this biosurfactant, our hypothesis is that the surfactin precursors, especially leucine, must be overproduced. We present a three step approach for leucine overproduction directed by methods from computational biology. Firstly, we develop a new algorithm for gene knockout prediction based on abstract interpretation, which applies to a recent modeling language for reaction networks with partial kinetic information. Secondly, we model the leucine metabolic pathway as a reaction network in this language, and apply the knockout prediction algorithm with the target of leucine overproduction. Out of the 21 reactions corresponding to potential gene knockouts, the prediction algorithm selects 12 reactions. Six knockouts were introduced in B. subtilis 168 derivatives strains to verify their effects on surfactin production. For all generated mutants, the specific surfactin production is increased from 1.6- to 20.9-fold during the exponential growth phase, depending on the medium composition. These results show the effectiveness of the knockout prediction approach based on formal models for metabolic reaction networks with partial kinetic information, and confirms our hypothesis that precursors supply is one of the main parameters to optimize surfactin overproduction. PMID:26220295

  7. Analysis of pig movements across eastern Indonesia, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Edwina E C; Christley, Robert M; Geong, Maria; Ward, Michael P; Toribio, Jenny-Ann L M L

    2015-03-01

    Knowledge of live animal movement through markets and from farm-to-farm is needed to inform strategies for control of trans-boundary animal diseases (TADs) in south-east Asia, particularly due to consumer preference for fresh meat. In eastern Indonesia a TAD of principal interest for control is classical swine fever (CSF) due to its impacts on smallholder farmers. Pig movement is considered a contributor to failure of current CSF control efforts but pig movement patterns are not well understood. This study investigated movement of live pigs in West Timor, Flores and Sumba islands during 2009-2010, with the aim of informing CSF control policies for Nusa Tenggara Timor province. A market survey of 292 pig sellers and 281 pig buyers across nine live pig markets and a farmer survey across 18 villages with 289 smallholder farmers were conducted and information collected on pig movements. The data obtained was used for social network analysis (SNA) on formal (via a market) and informal (village-to-village) movements using information on trading practices, source and destination locations, and the number of pigs being moved. Both inter- and intra-island movements were identified, however inter-island movement was only observed between Flores and Sumba islands. West Timor and Sumba had highly connected networks where large numbers of villages were directly and indirectly linked through pig movement. Further for West Timor, both formal and informal pig movements linked the capital Kupang, on the eastern end of the island to the western districts bordering East Timor connecting all five districts and demonstrating that informal movement transports pigs over distances similar to formal movement on this island. Sumba had a higher potential for pigs to move to a greater number of sequential locations across the entire island. Flores was found to have a more fragmented network, with pig movements concentrated in its eastern or western regions, influenced by terrain. Markets were

  8. Spontaneous reproductive tract leiomyomas in aged guinea-pigs.

    PubMed

    Field, K J; Griffith, J W; Lang, C M

    1989-10-01

    Seven of 83 female guinea-pigs were found to have reproductive tract leiomyomas at necropsy. Sixty-three of these guinea-pigs also had cystic rete ovarii. Eleven separate leiomyomas were identified, the most common site of formation being the uterine body or horn. The tumours contained histological evidence of smooth muscle, abundant fibrous connective tissue and occasional foci of fibrocartilage and bone. Mitotic figures were identified in only one tumour. The mean age of guinea-pigs with leiomyomas was 47.6 months, and the mean age of the study population was 33.1 months. Two other reproductive tract tumours identified in the 83 guinea-pigs were an ovarian teratoma and a cavernous haemangioma. These data indicate that leiomyomas are the most common reproductive tract tumour in this colony of aged female guinea-pigs and that they are frequently seen in conjunction with cystic rete ovarii. PMID:2584448

  9. Pigs expressing salivary phytase produce low-phosphorus manure.

    PubMed

    Golovan, S P; Meidinger, R G; Ajakaiye, A; Cottrill, M; Wiederkehr, M Z; Barney, D J; Plante, C; Pollard, J W; Fan, M Z; Hayes, M A; Laursen, J; Hjorth, J P; Hacker, R R; Phillips, J P; Forsberg, C W

    2001-08-01

    To address the problem of manure-based environmental pollution in the pork industry, we have developed the phytase transgenic pig. The saliva of these pigs contains the enzyme phytase, which allows the pigs to digest the phosphorus in phytate, the most abundant source of phosphorus in the pig diet. Without this enzyme, phytate phosphorus passes undigested into manure to become the single most important manure pollutant of pork production. We show here that salivary phytase provides essentially complete digestion of dietary phytate phosphorus, relieves the requirement for inorganic phosphate supplements, and reduces fecal phosphorus output by up to 75%. These pigs offer a unique biological approach to the management of phosphorus nutrition and environmental pollution in the pork industry. PMID:11479566

  10. Pig organs for transplantation into humans: a Jewish view.

    PubMed

    Rosner, F

    1999-01-01

    In view of the shortage of human organs for transplantation, intense interest has focused on the use of pig organs. Although the early rejection of pig organs by a human recipient has not yet been overcome, scientists are actively seeking to solve this problem. If and when xenotransplantation from pigs or other animals becomes scientifically feasible, Judaism will look with favor upon this procedure to prolong or save the life of a human being who is ill or dying from organ failure. Although Jewish law forbids Jews to raise or eat pigs, no such prohibition exists for the use of pigs to cure human illness or to save human lives by xenotransplantation. PMID:10618731

  11. Knockout silkworms reveal a dispensable role for juvenile hormones in holometabolous life cycle.

    PubMed

    Daimon, Takaaki; Uchibori, Miwa; Nakao, Hajime; Sezutsu, Hideki; Shinoda, Tetsuro

    2015-08-01

    Insect juvenile hormones (JHs) prevent precocious metamorphosis and allow larvae to undergo multiple rounds of status quo molts. However, the roles of JHs during the embryonic and very early larval stages have not been fully understood. We generated and characterized knockout silkworms (Bombyx mori) with null mutations in JH biosynthesis or JH receptor genes using genome-editing tools. We found that embryonic growth and morphogenesis are largely independent of JHs in Bombyx and that, even in the absence of JHs or JH signaling, pupal characters are not formed in first- or second-instar larvae, and precocious metamorphosis is induced after the second instar at the earliest. We also show by mosaic analysis that a pupal specifier gene broad, which is dramatically up-regulated in the late stage of the last larval instar, is essential for pupal commitment in the epidermis. Importantly, the mRNA expression level of broad, which is thought to be repressed by JHs, remained at very low basal levels during the early larval instars of JH-deficient or JH signaling-deficient knockouts. Therefore, our study suggests that the long-accepted paradigm that JHs maintain the juvenile status throughout larval life should be revised because the larval status can be maintained by a JH-independent mechanism in very early larval instars. We propose that the lack of competence for metamorphosis during the early larval stages may result from the absence of an unidentified broad-inducing factor, i.e., a competence factor. PMID:26195792

  12. Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) knockout reduces fetal dysmorphogenesis in murine diabetic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ejdesjö, Andreas; Brings, Sebastian; Fleming, Thomas; Fred, Rikard G; Nawroth, Peter P; Eriksson, Ulf J

    2016-07-01

    The receptor for Advanced Glycation End products (RAGE) is implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications, but its importance in diabetic embryopathy is unclear. We therefore investigated the role of RAGE in diabetic embryopathy using streptozotocin induced diabetes in female wild type (WT) C57Bl/6N and RAGE knockout C57Bl/6N (RAGE(-/-)) mice, mated with control males of the same genotype. Maternal diabetes induced more fetal resorption and malformation (facial skeleton, neural tube) in the WT than in the RAGE(-/-) fetuses. Maternal plasma glucose and methylgyoxal concentrations, as well as embryonic N(ε)-carboxymethyl-lysine (CML) levels were increased to the same extent in diabetic WT and RAGE(-/-) pregnancy. However, maternal diabetes induced increased fetal hepatic isoprostane 8-iso-PGF2α levels (oxidative stress marker) and embryonic activation of NFκB in WT only (not in RAGE(-/-) embryos). The association between RAGE knockout and diminished embryonic dysmorphogenesis in diabetic pregnancy suggests that embryonic RAGE activation is involved in diabetic embryopathy. PMID:27109771

  13. Conditional knockout of retinal determination genes in differentiating cells in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Jin, Meng; Eblimit, Aiden; Pulikkathara, Merlyn; Corr, Stuart; Chen, Rui; Mardon, Graeme

    2016-08-01

    Conditional gene knockout in postmitotic cells is a valuable technique which allows the study of gene function with spatiotemporal control. Surprisingly, in contrast to its long-term and extensive use in mouse studies, this technology is lacking in Drosophila. Here, we use a novel method for generating complete loss of eyes absent (eya) or sine oculis (so) function in postmitotic cells posterior to the morphogenetic furrow (MF). Specifically, genomic rescue constructs with flippase recognition target (FRT) sequences flanking essential exons are used to generate conditional null alleles. By removing gene function in differentiating cells, we show that eya and so are dispensable for larval photoreceptor differentiation, but are required for differentiation during pupal development. Both eya and so are necessary for photoreceptor survival and the apoptosis caused by loss of eya or so function is likely a secondary consequence of inappropriate differentiation. We also confirm their requirement for cone cell development and reveal a novel role in interommatidial bristle (IOB) formation. In addition, so is required for normal eye disc morphology. This is the first report of a knockout method to study eya and so function in postmitotic cells. This technology will open the door to a large array of new functional studies in virtually any tissue and at any stage of development or in adults. PMID:27257739

  14. Chronic liver disease is triggered by taurine transporter knockout in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Warskulat, Ulrich; Borsch, Elena; Reinehr, Roland; Heller-Stilb, Birgit; Mönnighoff, Irmhild; Buchczyk, Darius; Donner, Markus; Flögel, Ulrich; Kappert, Günther; Soboll, Sibylle; Beer, Sandra; Pfeffer, Klaus; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Gabrielsen, Marcus; Amiry-Moghaddam, Mahmood; Ottersen, Ole Petter; Dienes, Hans Peter; Häussinger, Dieter

    2006-03-01

    Taurine is an abundant organic osmolyte with antioxidant and immunomodulatory properties. Its role in the pathogenesis of chronic liver disease is unknown. The liver phenotype was studied in taurine transporter knockout (taut-/-) mice. Hepatic taurine levels were ~21, 15 and 6 mumol/g liver wet weight in adult wild-type, heterozygous (taut+/-) and homozygous (taut-/-) mice, respectively. Immunoelectronmicroscopy revealed an almost complete depletion of taurine in Kupffer and sinusoidal endothelial cells, but not in parenchymal cells of (taut-/-) mice. Compared with wild-type mice, (taut-/-) and (taut+/-) mice developed moderate unspecific hepatitis and liver fibrosis with increased frequency of neoplastic lesions beyond 1 year of age. Liver disease in (taut-/-) mice was characterized by hepatocyte apoptosis, activation of the CD95 system, elevated plasma TNF-alpha levels, hepatic stellate cell and oval cell proliferation, and severe mitochondrial abnormalities in liver parenchymal cells. Mitochondrial dysfunction was suggested by a significantly lower respiratory control ratio in isolated mitochondria from (taut-/-) mice. Taut knockout had no effect on taurine-conjugated bile acids in bile; however, the relative amount of cholate-conjugates acid was decreased at the expense of 7-keto-cholate-conjugates. In conclusion, taurine deficiency due to defective taurine transport triggers chronic liver disease, which may involve mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:16421246

  15. Depdc5 knockout rat: A novel model of mTORopathy.

    PubMed

    Marsan, Elise; Ishida, Saeko; Schramm, Adrien; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Muraca, Giuseppe; Lecas, Sarah; Liang, Ning; Treins, Caroline; Pende, Mario; Roussel, Delphine; Le Van Quyen, Michel; Mashimo, Tomoji; Kaneko, Takehito; Yamamoto, Takashi; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Mahon, Séverine; Miles, Richard; Leguern, Eric; Charpier, Stéphane; Baulac, Stéphanie

    2016-05-01

    DEP-domain containing 5 (DEPDC5), encoding a repressor of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling pathway, has recently emerged as a major gene mutated in familial focal epilepsies and focal cortical dysplasia. Here we established a global knockout rat using TALEN technology to investigate in vivo the impact of Depdc5-deficiency. Homozygous Depdc5(-/-) embryos died from embryonic day 14.5 due to a global growth delay. Constitutive mTORC1 hyperactivation was evidenced in the brains and in cultured fibroblasts of Depdc5(-/-) embryos, as reflected by enhanced phosphorylation of its downstream effectors S6K1 and rpS6. Consistently, prenatal treatment with mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin rescued the phenotype of Depdc5(-/-) embryos. Heterozygous Depdc5(+/-) rats developed normally and exhibited no spontaneous electroclinical seizures, but had altered cortical neuron excitability and firing patterns. Depdc5(+/-) rats displayed cortical cytomegalic dysmorphic neurons and balloon-like cells strongly expressing phosphorylated rpS6, indicative of mTORC1 upregulation, and not observed after prenatal rapamycin treatment. These neuropathological abnormalities are reminiscent of the hallmark brain pathology of human focal cortical dysplasia. Altogether, Depdc5 knockout rats exhibit multiple features of rodent models of mTORopathies, and thus, stand as a relevant model to study their underlying pathogenic mechanisms. PMID:26873552

  16. Effects of major histocompatibility complex class II knockout on mouse bone mechanical properties during development.

    PubMed

    Simske, Steven J; Bateman, Ted A; Smith, Erin E; Ferguson, Virginia L; Chapes, Stephen K

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the effect of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) knockout on the development of the mouse peripheral skeleton. These C2D mice had less skeletal development at 8, 12 and 16 weeks of age compared to wild-type C57BL/6J (B6) male mice. The C2D mice had decreased femur mechanical, geometric and compositional measurements compared to wild type mice at each of these ages. C2D femur stiffness (S), peak force in 3-pt bending (Pm), and mineral mass (Min-M) were 74%, 64% and 66%, respectively, of corresponding B6 values at 8 weeks of age. Similar differences were measured at 12 weeks (for which C2D femoral S, Pm and Min-M were 71%, 72% and 73%, respectively, of corresponding B6 values) and at 16 weeks (for which C2D femoral S, Pm and Min-M were 80%, 66% and 61%, respectively, of corresponding B6 values). MHC II knockout delays the development of adult bone properties and is accompanied by lower body mass compared to wild-type controls. PMID:12085652

  17. Hesr1 knockout mice exhibit behavioral alterations through the dopaminergic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Fuke, Satoshi; Minami, Natsumi; Kokubo, Hiroki; Yoshikawa, Ayumu; Yasumatsu, Hiroshi; Sasagawa, Noboru; Saga, Yumiko; Tsukahara, Toshifumi; Ishiura, Shoichi

    2006-11-15

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcriptional factor Hesr1 gene (hairy and enhancer of split-related 1, also called Hey1/HRT1/CHF2/HERP2) has been identified and characterized as a member of the subfamily of hairy/Enhancer of split, and shown to be involved in cardiovascular and neural development. We report that HESR1 binds directly to a part of the 3' non-coding region of the human dopamine transporter (DAT1) gene and represses the endogenous DAT1 gene in HEK293 cells. To investigate functions of the HESR1 gene in the dopaminergic nervous system in vivo, we analyzed the expressions of dopamine-related genes in the postnatal day 0 whole brains of Hesr1 knockout mice by real-time RT-PCR analysis. Several dopamine-related genes, such as DAT, dopamine receptors D1, D2, D4, and D5, were significantly upregulated. Moreover, young adults of Hesr1 knockout mice showed a decrease in spontaneous locomotor activity and a reduction in exploratory behavior or behavioral responses to novelty in the open-field, and elevated plus-maze tests. These results indicate that the HESR1 gene is related to neuropsychiatric disorders and behavioral traits through the dopaminergic nervous system. PMID:16998899

  18. Hitting two birds with one stone: The unforeseen consequences of nested gene knockouts in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Jovelin, Richard; Cutter, Asher D

    2016-01-01

    Nested genes represent an intriguing form of non-random genomic organization in which the boundaries of one gene are fully contained within another, longer host gene. The C. elegans genome contains over 10,000 nested genes, 92% of which are ncRNAs, which occur inside 16% of the protein coding gene complement. Host genes are longer than non-host coding genes, owing to their longer and more numerous introns. Indel alleles are available for nearly all of these host genes that simultaneously alter the nested gene, raising the possibility of nested gene disruption contributing to phenotypes that might be attributed to the host gene. Such dual-knockouts could represent a source of misinterpretation about host gene function. Dual-knockouts might also provide a novel source of synthetic phenotypes that reveal the functional effects of ncRNA genes, whereby the host gene disruption acts as a perturbed genetic background to help unmask ncRNA phenotypes. PMID:27386165

  19. Downregulation of Glutamate Transporter EAAT4 by Conditional Knockout of Rheb1 in Cerebellar Purkinje Cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Nan-Wei; Wang, De-Juan; Xie, Ya-Jun; Zhou, Liang; Su, Li-Da; Li, Huashun; Wang, Qin-Wen; Shen, Ying

    2016-06-01

    Excitatory amino acid transporter 4 (EAAT4) is believed to be critical to the synaptic activity of cerebellar Purkinje cells by limiting extracellular glutamate concentrations and facilitating the induction of long-term depression. However, the modulation of EAAT4 expression has not been elucidated. It has been shown that Ras homolog enriched in brain (Rheb)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling plays essential roles in the regulation of protein translation, cell size, and cell growth. In addition, we previously found that a cascade including mTOR suppression and Akt activation induces increased expression of EAAT2 in astrocytes. In the present work, we explored whether Rheb/mTOR signaling is involved in the regulation of EAAT4 expression using conditional Rheb1 knockout mice. Our results demonstrated that Rheb1 deficiency resulted in the downregulation of EAAT4 expression, as well as decreased activity of mTOR and increased activity of Akt. The downregulation of EAAT4 was also confirmed by reduced EAAT4 currents and slowed kinetics of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptor-mediated currents. On the other hand, conditional knockout of Rheb1 did not alter the morphology of Purkinje cell layer and the number of Purkinje cells. Overall, our findings suggest that small GTPase Rheb1 is a modulator in the expression of EAAT4 in Purkinje cells. PMID:26194056

  20. Generation of knockout alleles by RFLP based BAC targeting of polymorphic embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Barakat, Tahsin Stefan; Gribnau, Joost

    2015-01-01

    The isolation of germ line competent mouse Embryonic Stem (ES) cells and the ability to modify the genome by homologous recombination has revolutionized life science research. Since its initial discovery, several approaches have been introduced to increase the efficiency of homologous recombination, including the use of isogenic DNA for the generation of targeting constructs, and the use of Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes (BACs). BACs have the advantage of combining long stretches of homologous DNA, thereby increasing targeting efficiencies, with the possibilities delivered by BAC recombineering approaches, which provide the researcher with almost unlimited possibilities to efficiently edit the genome in a controlled fashion. Despite these advantages of BAC targeting approaches, a widespread use has been hampered, mainly because of the difficulties in identifying BAC-targeted knockout alleles by conventional methods like Southern Blotting. Recently, we introduced a novel BAC targeting strategy, in which Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms (RFLPs) are targeted in polymorphic mouse ES cells, enabling an efficient and easy PCR-based readout to identify properly targeted alleles. Here we provide a detailed protocol for the generation of targeting constructs, targeting of ES cells, and convenient PCR-based analysis of targeted clones, which enable the user to generate knockout ES cells of almost every gene in the mouse genome within a 2-month period. PMID:25239745

  1. Romk1 Knockout Mice Do Not Produce Bartter Phenotype but Exhibit Impaired K Excretion.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ke; Yan, Qingshang; Lu, Ming; Wan, Laxiang; Hu, Haiyan; Guo, Junhua; Boulpaep, Emile; Wang, WenHui; Giebisch, Gerhard; Hebert, Steven C; Wang, Tong

    2016-03-01

    Romk knock-out mice show a similar phenotype to Bartter syndrome of salt wasting and dehydration due to reduced Na-K-2Cl-cotransporter activity. At least three ROMK isoforms have been identified in the kidney; however, unique functions of any of the isoforms in nephron segments are still poorly understood. We have generated a mouse deficient only in Romk1 by selective deletion of the Romk1-specific first exon using an ES cell Cre-LoxP strategy and examined the renal phenotypes, ion transporter expression, ROMK channel activity, and localization under normal and high K intake. Unlike Romk(-/-) mice, there was no Bartter phenotype with reduced NKCC2 activity and increased NCC expression in Romk1(-/-) mice. The small conductance K channel (SK) activity showed no difference of channel properties or gating in the collecting tubule between Romk1(+/+) and Romk1(-/-) mice. High K intake increased SK channel number per patch and increased the ROMK channel intensity in the apical membrane of the collecting tubule in Romk1(+/+), but such regulation by high K intake was diminished with significant hyperkalemia in Romk1(-/-) mice. We conclude that 1) animal knockouts of ROMK1 do not produce Bartter phenotype. 2) There is no functional linking of ROMK1 and NKCC2 in the TAL. 3) ROMK1 is critical in response to high K intake-stimulated K(+) secretion in the collecting tubule. PMID:26728465

  2. Improving cold storage and processing traits in potato through targeted gene knockout.

    PubMed

    Clasen, Benjamin M; Stoddard, Thomas J; Luo, Song; Demorest, Zachary L; Li, Jin; Cedrone, Frederic; Tibebu, Redeat; Davison, Shawn; Ray, Erin E; Daulhac, Aurelie; Coffman, Andrew; Yabandith, Ann; Retterath, Adam; Haun, William; Baltes, Nicholas J; Mathis, Luc; Voytas, Daniel F; Zhang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Cold storage of potato tubers is commonly used to reduce sprouting and extend postharvest shelf life. However, cold temperature stimulates the accumulation of reducing sugars in potato tubers. Upon high-temperature processing, these reducing sugars react with free amino acids, resulting in brown, bitter-tasting products and elevated levels of acrylamide--a potential carcinogen. To minimize the accumulation of reducing sugars, RNA interference (RNAi) technology was used to silence the vacuolar invertase gene (VInv), which encodes a protein that breaks down sucrose to glucose and fructose. Because RNAi often results in incomplete gene silencing and requires the plant to be transgenic, here we used transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) to knockout VInv within the commercial potato variety, Ranger Russet. We isolated 18 plants containing mutations in at least one VInv allele, and five of these plants had mutations in all VInv alleles. Tubers from full VInv-knockout plants had undetectable levels of reducing sugars, and processed chips contained reduced levels of acrylamide and were lightly coloured. Furthermore, seven of the 18 modified plant lines appeared to contain no TALEN DNA insertions in the potato genome. These results provide a framework for using TALENs to quickly improve traits in commercially relevant autotetraploid potato lines. PMID:25846201

  3. Knockout of BRD7 results in impaired spermatogenesis and male infertility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Heran; Zhao, Ran; Guo, Chi; Jiang, Shihe; Yang, Jing; Xu, Yang; Liu, Yukun; Fan, Liqing; Xiong, Wei; Ma, Jian; Peng, Shuping; Zeng, Zhaoyang; Zhou, Yanhong; Li, Xiayu; Li, Zheng; Li, Xiaoling; Schmitt, David C; Tan, Ming; Li, Guiyuan; Zhou, Ming

    2016-01-01

    BRD7 was originally identified as a novel bromodomain gene and a potential transcriptional factor. BRD7 was found to be extensively expressed in multiple mouse tissues but was highly expressed in the testis. Furthermore, BRD7 was located in germ cells during multiple stages of spermatogenesis, ranging from the pachytene to the round spermatid stage. Homozygous knockout of BRD7 (BRD7(-/-)) resulted in complete male infertility and spermatogenesis defects, including deformed acrosomal formation, degenerative elongating spermatids and irregular head morphology in postmeiotic germ cells in the seminiferous epithelium, which led to the complete arrest of spermatogenesis at step 13. Moreover, a high ratio of apoptosis was determined by TUNEL analysis, which was supported by high levels of the apoptosis markers annexin V and p53 in knockout testes. Increased expression of the DNA damage maker λH2AX was also found in BRD7(-/-) mice, whereas DNA damage repair genes were down-regulated. Furthermore, no or lower expression of BRD7 was detected in the testes of azoospermia patients exhibiting spermatogenesis arrest than that in control group. These data demonstrate that BRD7 is involved in male infertility and spermatogenesis in mice, and BRD7 defect might be associated with the occurrence and development of human azoospermia. PMID:26878912

  4. Upregulation of GSK3β Contributes to Brain Disorders in Elderly REGγ-knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yiqing; Meng, Bo; Dong, Hao; Jing, Tiantian; Wu, Nan; Yang, Yingying; Huang, Lan; Moses, Robb E; O'Malley, Bert W; Mei, Bing; Li, Xiaotao

    2016-04-01

    GSK3β regulates some functions of the brain, but the mechanisms involved in the maintenance of GSK3β protein stability remain ambiguous. REGγ, an important proteasome activator for ubiquitin-independent protein degradation, has been shown to degrade certain intact proteins and is involved in the regulation of important biological processes. Here we demonstrate that REGγ promotes the degradation of GSK3β protein in vitro and in vivo. With increased GSK3β activity, REGγ knockout (REGγ-/-) mice exhibit late-onset sensorimotor gating and cognitive deficiencies including decreased working memory, hyperlocomotion, increased stereotype, defective prepulse inhibition (PPI), and disability in nest building, at the age of 8 months or older. Inhibition of GSK3β rescued the compromised PPI phenotypes and working memory deficiency in the knockout mice. Also, we found an age-dependent decrease in the trypsin-like proteasomal activity in REGγ-/- mice brains, which may be reflective of a lack of degradation of GSK3β. Collectively, our findings reveal a novel regulatory pathway in which the REGγ-proteasome controls the steady-state level of GSK3β protein. Dysfunction in this non-canonical proteasome degradation pathway may contribute to the sensorimotor gating deficiency and cognitive disorders in aging mice. PMID:26370326

  5. Serotonin receptor 1A knockout: An animal model of anxiety-related disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ramboz, Sylvie; Oosting, Ronald; Amara, Djamel Aït; Kung, Hank F.; Blier, Pierre; Mendelsohn, Monica; Mann, J. John; Brunner, Dani; Hen, René

    1998-01-01

    To investigate the contribution of individual serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) receptors to mood control, we have used homologous recombination to generate mice lacking specific serotonergic receptor subtypes. In the present report, we demonstrate that mice without 5-HT1A receptors display decreased exploratory activity and increased fear of aversive environments (open or elevated spaces). 5-HT1A knockout mice also exhibited a decreased immobility in the forced swim test, an effect commonly associated with antidepressant treatment. Although 5-HT1A receptors are involved in controlling the activity of serotonergic neurons, 5-HT1A knockout mice had normal levels of 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, possibly because of an up-regulation of 5-HT1B autoreceptors. Heterozygote 5-HT1A mutants expressed approximately one-half of wild-type receptor density and displayed intermediate phenotypes in most behavioral tests. These results demonstrate that 5-HT1A receptors are involved in the modulation of exploratory and fear-related behaviors and suggest that reductions in 5-HT1A receptor density due to genetic defects or environmental stressors might result in heightened anxiety. PMID:9826725

  6. One-neutron knockout from light neutron-rich nuclei at relativistic energies

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Tajes, C.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Benjamim, E.; Benlliure, J.; Caamano, M.; Casarejos, E.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Gascon, M.; Kurtukian, T.; Perez-Loureiro, D.; Aumann, T.; Chatillon, A.; Geissel, H.; Nociforo, C.; Prochazka, A.; Simon, H.; Suemmerer, K.; Weick, H.; Winkler, M.; Borge, M. J. G.

    2010-08-15

    One-neutron knockout reactions from neutron-rich nuclei, with Z=6-13 and N=8-22, were studied at the Fragment Separator (GSI) at high beam energies, around 700 MeV/nucleon. Structural phenomena such as the formation of one-neutron halos in odd-mass carbon isotopes ({sup 15,17,19}C) will be discussed. In addition, one-neutron knockout measurements from {sup 22}N were carried out for the first time and demonstrate clearly the change from a 0d{sub 5/2} to a 1s{sub 1/2} orbital for the valence neutron, an effect that is expected above N=14 and that was also observed in {sup 23}O and {sup 24}F. The possibility of an anomalous structure of {sup 26}F, due to a significant 1s{sub 1/2} neutron admixture, will also be discussed in the light of the experimental data obtained in this work. Finally, the ground-state configuration of neutron-rich neon isotopes ({sup 24-28}Ne) was studied, providing new information in a region that is relatively close to the island of inversion.

  7. Knockout of BRD7 results in impaired spermatogenesis and male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Heran; Zhao, Ran; Guo, Chi; Jiang, Shihe; Yang, Jing; Xu, Yang; Liu, Yukun; Fan, Liqing; Xiong, Wei; Ma, Jian; Peng, Shuping; Zeng, Zhaoyang; Zhou, Yanhong; Li, Xiayu; Li, Zheng; Li, Xiaoling; Schmitt, David C.; Tan, Ming; Li, Guiyuan; Zhou, Ming

    2016-01-01

    BRD7 was originally identified as a novel bromodomain gene and a potential transcriptional factor. BRD7 was found to be extensively expressed in multiple mouse tissues but was highly expressed in the testis. Furthermore, BRD7 was located in germ cells during multiple stages of spermatogenesis, ranging from the pachytene to the round spermatid stage. Homozygous knockout of BRD7 (BRD7−/−) resulted in complete male infertility and spermatogenesis defects, including deformed acrosomal formation, degenerative elongating spermatids and irregular head morphology in postmeiotic germ cells in the seminiferous epithelium, which led to the complete arrest of spermatogenesis at step 13. Moreover, a high ratio of apoptosis was determined by TUNEL analysis, which was supported by high levels of the apoptosis markers annexin V and p53 in knockout testes. Increased expression of the DNA damage maker λH2AX was also found in BRD7−/− mice, whereas DNA damage repair genes were down−regulated. Furthermore, no or lower expression of BRD7 was detected in the testes of azoospermia patients exhibiting spermatogenesis arrest than that in control group. These data demonstrate that BRD7 is involved in male infertility and spermatogenesis in mice, and BRD7 defect might be associated with the occurrence and development of human azoospermia. PMID:26878912

  8. Sex-dependence of anxiety-like behavior in cannabinoid receptor 1 (Cnr1) knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Mallory E; Ressler, Kerry J

    2016-03-01

    Epidemiological data suggest women are at increased risk for developing anxiety and depression, although the mechanisms for this sex/gender difference remain incompletely understood. Pre-clinical studies have begun to investigate sex-dependent emotional learning and behavior in rodents, particularly as it relates to psychopathology; however, information about how gonadal hormones interact with the central nervous system is limited. We observe greater anxiety-like behavior in male mice with global knockout of the cannabinoid 1 receptor (Cnr1) compared to male, wild-type controls as measured by percent open arm entries on an elevated plus maze test. A similar increase in anxiety-like behavior, however, is not observed when comparing female Cnr1 knockouts to female wild-type subjects. Although, ovariectomy in female mice did not reverse this effect, both male and female adult mice with normative development were sensitive to Cnr1 antagonist-mediated increases in anxiety-like behavior. Together, these data support an interaction between sex, potentially mediated by gonadal hormones, and the endocannabinoid system at an early stage of development that is critical for establishing adult anxiety-like behavior. PMID:26684509

  9. Hydrogenated pyrene: Statistical single-carbon loss below the knockout threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Michael; Giacomozzi, Linda; Gatchell, Michael; de Ruette, Nathalie; Stockett, Mark H.; Schmidt, Henning T.; Cederquist, Henrik; Zettergren, Henning

    2016-04-01

    An ongoing discussion revolves around the question of what effect hydrogenation has on carbon backbone fragmentation in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In order to shed more light on this issue, we have measured absolute single carbon loss cross sections in collisions between native or hydrogenated pyrene cations (C16H+10+m, m = 0, 6, 16) and He as functions of center-of-mass energies down to 20 eV. Classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations give further insight into energy transfer processes and also yield m-dependent threshold energies for prompt (femtoseconds) carbon knockout. Such fast, non-statistical fragmentation processes dominate CHx-loss for native pyrene (m = 0), while much slower statistical fragmentation processes contribute significantly to single-carbon loss for the hydrogenated molecules (m = 6 and m = 16). The latter is shown by measurements of large CHx-loss cross sections far below the MD knockout thresholds for C16H+16 and C16H+26. Contribution to the "Atomic Cluster Collisions (7th International Symposium)", edited by Gerardo Delgado Barrio, Andrey Solov'Yov, Pablo Villarreal, Rita Prosmiti.

  10. Retinal Ganglion Cell Loss is Delayed Following Optic Nerve Crush in NLRP3 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Puyang, Zhen; Feng, Liang; Chen, Hui; Liang, Peiji; Troy, John B.; Liu, Xiaorong

    2016-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome, a sensor for a variety of pathogen- and host-derived threats, consists of the adaptor ASC (Apoptosis-associated Speck-like protein containing a Caspase Activation and Recruitment Domain (CARD)), pro-caspase-1, and NLRP3 (NOD-Like Receptor family Pyrin domain containing 3). NLRP3-induced neuroinflammation is implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of eye diseases, but it remains unclear whether activation of NLRP3 inflammasome contributes to retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death. Here we examined NLRP3-induced neuroinflammation and RGC survival following partial optic nerve crush (pONC) injury. We showed that NLRP3 was up-regulated in retinal microglial cells following pONC, propagating from the injury site to the optic nerve head and finally the entire retina within one day. Activation of NLRP3-ASC inflammasome led to the up-regulation of caspase-1 and a proinflammatory cytokine, interleukin-1β (IL-1β). In NLRP3 knockout mice, up-regulation of ASC, caspase-1, and IL-1β were all reduced, and, importantly, RGC and axon loss was substantially delayed following pONC injury. The average survival time of RGCs in NLRP3 knockout mice was about one week longer than for control animals. Taken together, our study demonstrated that ablating the NLRP3 gene significantly reduced neuroinflammation and delayed RGC loss after optic nerve crush injury. PMID:26893104

  11. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene knockout in the mouse brain using in utero electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Shinmyo, Yohei; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tsunoda, Shinichi; Hosomichi, Kazuyoshi; Tajima, Atsushi; Kawasaki, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system has recently been adapted for generating knockout mice to investigate physiological functions and pathological mechanisms. Here, we report a highly efficient procedure for brain-specific disruption of genes of interest in vivo. We constructed pX330 plasmids expressing humanized Cas9 and single-guide RNAs (sgRNAs) against the Satb2 gene, which encodes an AT-rich DNA-binding transcription factor and is responsible for callosal axon projections in the developing mouse brain. We first confirmed that these constructs efficiently induced double-strand breaks (DSBs) in target sites of exogenous plasmids both in vitro and in vivo. We then found that the introduction of pX330-Satb2 into the developing mouse brain using in utero electroporation led to a dramatic reduction of Satb2 expression in the transfected cerebral cortex, suggesting DSBs had occurred in the Satb2 gene with high efficiency. Furthermore, we found that Cas9-mediated targeting of the Satb2 gene induced abnormalities in axonal projection patterns, which is consistent with the phenotypes previously observed in Satb2 mutant mice. Introduction of pX330-NeuN using our procedure also resulted in the efficient disruption of the NeuN gene. Thus, our procedure combining the CRISPR/Cas9 system and in utero electroporation is an effective and rapid approach to achieve brain-specific gene knockout in vivo. PMID:26857612

  12. CRISPR-Mediated VHL Knockout Generates an Improved Model for Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Schokrpur, Shiruyeh; Hu, Junhui; Moughon, Diana L; Liu, Peijun; Lin, Lucia C; Hermann, Kip; Mangul, Serghei; Guan, Wei; Pellegrini, Matteo; Xu, Hua; Wu, Lily

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) is nearly incurable and accounts for most of the mortality associated with RCC. Von Hippel Lindau (VHL) is a tumour suppressor that is lost in the majority of clear cell RCC (ccRCC) cases. Its role in regulating hypoxia-inducible factors-1α (HIF-1α) and -2α (HIF-2α) is well-studied. Recent work has demonstrated that VHL knock down induces an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype. In this study we showed that a CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knock out of VHL in the RENCA model leads to morphologic and molecular changes indicative of EMT, which in turn drives increased metastasis to the lungs. RENCA cells deficient in HIF-1α failed to undergo EMT changes upon VHL knockout. RNA-seq revealed several HIF-1α-regulated genes that are upregulated in our VHL knockout cells and whose overexpression signifies an aggressive form of ccRCC in the cancer genome atlas (TCGA) database. Independent validation in a new clinical dataset confirms the upregulation of these genes in ccRCC samples compared to adjacent normal tissue. Our findings indicate that loss of VHL could be driving tumour cell dissemination through stabilization of HIF-1α in RCC. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved in this phenomenon can guide the search for more effective treatments to combat mRCC. PMID:27358011

  13. Dual sgRNA-directed gene knockout using CRISPR/Cas9 technology in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiangyang; Xu, Fei; Zhu, Chengming; Ji, Jiaojiao; Zhou, Xufei; Feng, Xuezhu; Guang, Shouhong

    2014-01-01

    The CRISPR RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease gene-targeting system has been successfully used for genome editing in a variety of organisms. Here, we report the use of dual sgRNA-guided Cas9 nuclease to generate knockout mutants of protein coding genes, noncoding genes, and repetitive sequences in C. elegans. Co-injection of C. elegans with dual sgRNAs results in the removal of the interval between two sgRNAs and the loss-of-function phenotype of targeted genes. We sought to determine how large an interval can be eliminated and found that at least a 24 kb chromosome segment can be deleted using this dual sgRNA/Cas9 strategy. The deletion of large chromosome segments facilitates mutant screening by PCR and agarose electrophoresis. Thus, the use of the CRISPR/Cas9 system in combination with dual sgRNAs provides a powerful platform with which to easily generate gene knockout mutants in C. elegans. Our data also suggest that encoding multiple sgRNA sequences into a single CRISPR array to simultaneously edit several sites within the genome may cause the off-target deletion of chromosome sequences. PMID:25531445

  14. Phenotypic screening of hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF) 4-{gamma} receptor knockout mice

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdin, Anna Karin; Surve, Vikas V.; Joensson, Marie; Bjursell, Mikael; Edenro, Anne; Schuelke, Meint; Saad, Alaa; Bjurstroem, Sivert; Lundgren, Elisabeth Jensen; Snaith, Michael; Fransson-Steen, Ronny; Toernell, Jan; Bohlooly-Y, Mohammad . E-mail: mohammad.bohlooly@astrazeneca.com

    2006-10-20

    Using the mouse as a model organism in pharmaceutical research presents unique advantages as its physiology in many ways resembles the human physiology, it also has a relatively short generation time, low breeding and maintenance costs, and is available in a wide variety of inbred strains. The ability to genetically modify mouse embryonic stem cells to generate mouse models that better mimic human disease is another advantage. In the present study, a comprehensive phenotypic screening protocol is applied to elucidate the phenotype of a novel mouse knockout model of hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF) 4-{gamma}. HNF4-{gamma} is expressed in the kidneys, gut, pancreas, and testis. First level of the screen is aimed at general health, morphologic appearance, normal cage behaviour, and gross neurological functions. The second level of the screen looks at metabolic characteristics and lung function. The third level of the screen investigates behaviour more in-depth and the fourth level consists of a thorough pathological characterisation, blood chemistry, haematology, and bone marrow analysis. When compared with littermate wild-type mice (HNF4-{gamma}{sup +/+}), the HNF4-{gamma} knockout (HNF4-{gamma}{sup -/-}) mice had lowered energy expenditure and locomotor activity during night time that resulted in a higher body weight despite having reduced intake of food and water. HNF4-{gamma}{sup -/-} mice were less inclined to build nest and were found to spend more time in a passive state during the forced swim test.

  15. A Knockout Experiment: Disciplinary Divides and Experimental Skill in Animal Behaviour Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Nicole C.

    2015-01-01

    In the early 1990s, a set of new techniques for manipulating mouse DNA allowed researchers to ‘knock out’ specific genes and observe the effects of removing them on a live mouse. In animal behaviour genetics, questions about how to deploy these techniques to study the molecular basis of behaviour became quite controversial, with a number of key methodological issues dissecting the interdisciplinary research field along disciplinary lines. This paper examines debates that took place during the 1990s between a predominately North American group of molecular biologists and animal behaviourists around how to design, conduct, and interpret behavioural knockout experiments. Drawing from and extending Harry Collins’s work on how research communities negotiate what counts as a ‘well-done experiment,’ I argue that the positions practitioners took on questions of experimental skill reflected not only the experimental traditions they were trained in but also their differing ontological and epistemological commitments. Different assumptions about the nature of gene action, eg., were tied to different positions in the knockout mouse debates on how to implement experimental controls. I conclude by showing that examining representations of skill in the context of a community’s knowledge commitments sheds light on some of the contradictory ways in which contemporary animal behaviour geneticists talk about their own laboratory work as a highly skilled endeavour that also could be mechanised, as easy to perform and yet difficult to perform well. PMID:26090739

  16. Effects of major histocompatibility complex class II knockout on mouse bone mechanical properties during development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simske, Steven J.; Bateman, Ted A.; Smith, Erin E.; Ferguson, Virginia L.; Chapes, Stephen K.

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the effect of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) knockout on the development of the mouse peripheral skeleton. These C2D mice had less skeletal development at 8, 12 and 16 weeks of age compared to wild-type C57BL/6J (B6) male mice. The C2D mice had decreased femur mechanical, geometric and compositional measurements compared to wild type mice at each of these ages. C2D femur stiffness (S), peak force in 3-pt bending (Pm), and mineral mass (Min-M) were 74%, 64% and 66%, respectively, of corresponding B6 values at 8 weeks of age. Similar differences were measured at 12 weeks (for which C2D femoral S, Pm and Min-M were 71%, 72% and 73%, respectively, of corresponding B6 values) and at 16 weeks (for which C2D femoral S, Pm and Min-M were 80%, 66% and 61%, respectively, of corresponding B6 values). MHC II knockout delays the development of adult bone properties and is accompanied by lower body mass compared to wild-type controls.

  17. Immune malfunction in the GPR39 zinc receptor of knockout mice: Its relationship to depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Młyniec, Katarzyna; Trojan, Ewa; Ślusarczyk, Joanna; Głombik, Katarzyna; Basta-Kaim, Agnieszka; Budziszewska, Bogusława; Skrzeszewski, Jakub; Siwek, Agata; Holst, Birgitte; Nowak, Gabriel

    2016-02-15

    Depression is a serious psychiatric disorder affecting not only the monaminergic, glutamatergic, and GABAergic neurosystems, but also the immune system. Patients suffering from depression show disturbance in the immune parameters as well as increased susceptibility to infections. Zinc is well known as an anti-inflammatory agent, and its link with depression has been proved, zinc deficiency causing depression- and anxiety-like behavior with immune malfunction. It has been discovered that trace-element zinc acts as a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system via zinc receptor GPR39. In this study we investigated whether GPR39 knockout would cause depressive-like behavior as measured by the forced swim test, and whether these changes would coexist with immune malfunction. In GPR39 knockout mice versus a wild-type control we found: i) depressive-like behavior; ii) significantly reduced thymus weight; (iii) reduced cell viability of splenocytes; iv) reduced proliferative response of splenocytes; and v) increased IL-6 production of splenocytes after ConA stimulation and decreased IL-1b and IL-6 release after LPS stimulation. The results indicate depressive-like behavior in GPR39 KO animals with an immune response similar to that observed in depressive disorder. Here for the first time we show immunological changes under GPR39-deficient conditions. PMID:26857489

  18. Granzyme B degrades extracellular matrix and contributes to delayed wound closure in apolipoprotein E knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Hiebert, P R; Wu, D; Granville, D J

    2013-01-01

    Chronic inflammation and excessive protease activity have a major role in the persistence of non-healing wounds. Granzyme B (GzmB) is a serine protease expressed during chronic inflammation that, in conjunction with perforin, has a well-established role in initiating apoptotic cell death. GzmB is also capable of acting extracellularly, independent of perforin and can degrade several extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins that are critical during wound healing. We used apolipoprotein E (ApoE) knockout (AKO) mice as a novel model of chronic inflammation and impaired wound healing to investigate the role of GzmB in chronic wounds. Wild-type and AKO mice were grown to 7 weeks (young) or 37 weeks (old) of age on a regular chow or high-fat diet (HFD), given a 1-cm diameter full thickness wound on their mid dorsum and allowed to heal for 16 days. Old AKO mice fed a HFD exhibited reduced wound closure, delayed contraction, chronic inflammation and altered ECM remodeling. Conversely, GzmB/ApoE double knockout mice displayed improved wound closure and contraction rates. In addition, murine GzmB was found to degrade both fibronectin and vitronectin derived from healthy mouse granulation tissue. In addition, GzmB-mediated degradation of fibronectin generated a fragment similar in size to that observed in non-healing mouse wounds. These results provide the first direct evidence that GzmB contributes to chronic wound healing in part through degradation of ECM. PMID:23912712

  19. Knockout reactions on p-shell nuclei for tests of structure and reaction models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchera, A. N.; Bazin, D.; Babo, M.; Baumann, T.; Bowry, M.; Bradt, J.; Brown, J.; Deyoung, P. A.; Elman, B.; Finck, J. E.; Gade, A.; Grinyer, G. F.; Jones, M. D.; Lunderberg, E.; Redpath, T.; Rogers, W. F.; Stiefel, K.; Thoennessen, M.; Weisshaar, D.; Whitmore, K.

    2015-10-01

    A series of knockout reactions on p-shell nuclei were studied to extract exclusive cross sections and to investigate the neutron knockout mechanism. The measured cross sections provide stringent tests of shell model and ab initio calculations while measurements of neutron+residual coincidences test the accuracy and validity of reaction models used to predict cross sections. Six different beams ranging from A = 7 to 12 were produced at the NSCL totaling measurements of nine different reaction settings. The reaction settings were determined by the magnetic field of the Sweeper magnet which bends the residues into charged particle detectors. The reaction target was surrounded by the high efficiency CsI array, CAESAR, to tag gamma rays for cross section measurements of low-lying excited states. Additionally, knocked out neutrons were detected with MoNA-LISA in coincidence with the charged residuals. Preliminary results will be discussed. This work is partially supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY11-02511 and the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award No. DE-NA0000979.

  20. Optimization of transcription factor binding map accuracy utilizing knockout-mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Krebs, Wolfgang; Schmidt, Susanne V.; Goren, Alon; De Nardo, Dominic; Labzin, Larisa; Bovier, Anton; Ulas, Thomas; Theis, Heidi; Kraut, Michael; Latz, Eicke; Beyer, Marc; Schultze, Joachim L.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide assessment of protein–DNA interaction by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by massive parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq) is a key technology for studying transcription factor (TF) localization and regulation of gene expression. Signal-to-noise-ratio and signal specificity in ChIP-seq studies depend on many variables, including antibody affinity and specificity. Thus far, efforts to improve antibody reagents for ChIP-seq experiments have focused mainly on generating higher quality antibodies. Here we introduce KOIN (knockout implemented normalization) as a novel strategy to increase signal specificity and reduce noise by using TF knockout mice as a critical control for ChIP-seq data experiments. Additionally, KOIN can identify ‘hyper ChIPable regions’ as another source of false-positive signals. As the use of the KOIN algorithm reduces false-positive results and thereby prevents misinterpretation of ChIP-seq data, it should be considered as the gold standard for future ChIP-seq analyses, particularly when developing ChIP-assays with novel antibody reagents. PMID:25378309

  1. Immunoglobulin knockout chickens via efficient homologous recombination in primordial germ cells.

    PubMed

    Schusser, Benjamin; Collarini, Ellen J; Yi, Henry; Izquierdo, Shelley Mettler; Fesler, Jeffrey; Pedersen, Darlene; Klasing, Kirk C; Kaspers, Bernd; Harriman, William D; van de Lavoir, Marie-Cecile; Etches, Robert J; Leighton, Philip A

    2013-12-10

    Gene targeting by homologous recombination or by sequence-specific nucleases allows the precise modification of genomes and genes to elucidate their functions. Although gene targeting has been used extensively to modify the genomes of mammals, fish, and amphibians, a targeting technology has not been available for the avian genome. Many of the principles of humoral immunity were discovered in chickens, yet the lack of gene targeting technologies in birds has limited biomedical research using this species. Here we describe targeting the joining (J) gene segment of the chicken Ig heavy chain gene by homologous recombination in primordial germ cells to establish fully transgenic chickens carrying the knockout. In homozygous knockouts, Ig heavy chain production is eliminated, and no antibody response is elicited on immunization. Migration of B-lineage precursors into the bursa of Fabricius is unaffected, whereas development into mature B cells and migration from the bursa are blocked in the mutants. Other cell types in the immune system appear normal. Chickens lacking the peripheral B-cell population will provide a unique experimental model to study avian immune responses to infectious disease. More generally, gene targeting in avian primordial germ cells will foster advances in diverse fields of biomedical research such as virology, stem cells, and developmental biology, and provide unique approaches in biotechnology, particularly in the field of antibody discovery. PMID:24282302

  2. Beta2-adrenergic activity modulates vascular tone regulation in lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Manzini, S.; Pinna, C.; Busnelli, M.; Cinquanta, P.; Rigamonti, E.; Ganzetti, G.S.; Dellera, F.; Sala, A.; Calabresi, L.; Franceschini, G.; Parolini, C.; Chiesa, G.

    2015-01-01

    Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) deficiency is associated with hypoalphalipoproteinemia, generally a predisposing factor for premature coronary heart disease. The evidence of accelerated atherosclerosis in LCAT-deficient subjects is however controversial. In this study, the effect of LCAT deficiency on vascular tone and endothelial function was investigated in LCAT knockout mice, which reproduce the human lipoprotein phenotype. Aortas from wild-type (Lcatwt) and LCAT knockout (LcatKO) mice exposed to noradrenaline showed reduced contractility in LcatKO mice (P < 0.005), whereas acetylcholine exposure showed a lower NO-dependent relaxation in LcatKO mice (P < 0.05). Quantitative PCR and Western blotting analyses suggested an adequate eNOS expression in LcatKO mouse aortas. Real-time PCR analysis indicated increased expression of β2-adrenergic receptors vs wild-type mice. Aorta stimulation with noradrenaline in the presence of propranolol, to abolish the β-mediated relaxation, showed the same contractile response in the two mouse lines. Furthermore, propranolol pretreatment of mouse aortas exposed to L-NAME prevented the difference in responses between Lcatwt and LcatKO mice. The results indicate that LCAT deficiency leads to increased β2-adrenergic relaxation and to a consequently decreased NO-mediated vasodilation that can be reversed to guarantee a correct vascular tone. The present study suggests that LCAT deficiency is not associated with an impaired vascular reactivity. PMID:26254103

  3. Beta2-adrenergic activity modulates vascular tone regulation in lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Manzini, S; Pinna, C; Busnelli, M; Cinquanta, P; Rigamonti, E; Ganzetti, G S; Dellera, F; Sala, A; Calabresi, L; Franceschini, G; Parolini, C; Chiesa, G

    2015-11-01

    Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) deficiency is associated with hypoalphalipoproteinemia, generally a predisposing factor for premature coronary heart disease. The evidence of accelerated atherosclerosis in LCAT-deficient subjects is however controversial. In this study, the effect of LCAT deficiency on vascular tone and endothelial function was investigated in LCAT knockout mice, which reproduce the human lipoprotein phenotype. Aortas from wild-type (Lcat(wt)) and LCAT knockout (Lcat(KO)) mice exposed to noradrenaline showed reduced contractility in Lcat(KO) mice (P<0.005), whereas acetylcholine exposure showed a lower NO-dependent relaxation in Lcat(KO) mice (P<0.05). Quantitative PCR and Western blotting analyses suggested an adequate eNOS expression in Lcat(KO) mouse aortas. Real-time PCR analysis indicated increased expression of β2-adrenergic receptors vs wild-type mice. Aorta stimulation with noradrenaline in the presence of propranolol, to abolish the β-mediated relaxation, showed the same contractile response in the two mouse lines. Furthermore, propranolol pretreatment of mouse aortas exposed to L-NAME prevented the difference in responses between Lcat(wt) and Lcat(KO) mice. The results indicate that LCAT deficiency leads to increased β2-adrenergic relaxation and to a consequently decreased NO-mediated vasodilation that can be reversed to guarantee a correct vascular tone. The present study suggests that LCAT deficiency is not associated with an impaired vascular reactivity. PMID:26254103

  4. Knockout silkworms reveal a dispensable role for juvenile hormones in holometabolous life cycle

    PubMed Central

    Daimon, Takaaki; Uchibori, Miwa; Nakao, Hajime; Sezutsu, Hideki; Shinoda, Tetsuro

    2015-01-01

    Insect juvenile hormones (JHs) prevent precocious metamorphosis and allow larvae to undergo multiple rounds of status quo molts. However, the roles of JHs during the embryonic and very early larval stages have not been fully understood. We generated and characterized knockout silkworms (Bombyx mori) with null mutations in JH biosynthesis or JH receptor genes using genome-editing tools. We found that embryonic growth and morphogenesis are largely independent of JHs in Bombyx and that, even in the absence of JHs or JH signaling, pupal characters are not formed in first- or second-instar larvae, and precocious metamorphosis is induced after the second instar at the earliest. We also show by mosaic analysis that a pupal specifier gene broad, which is dramatically up-regulated in the late stage of the last larval instar, is essential for pupal commitment in the epidermis. Importantly, the mRNA expression level of broad, which is thought to be repressed by JHs, remained at very low basal levels during the early larval instars of JH-deficient or JH signaling-deficient knockouts. Therefore, our study suggests that the long-accepted paradigm that JHs maintain the juvenile status throughout larval life should be revised because the larval status can be maintained by a JH-independent mechanism in very early larval instars. We propose that the lack of competence for metamorphosis during the early larval stages may result from the absence of an unidentified broad-inducing factor, i.e., a competence factor. PMID:26195792

  5. CRISPR-Mediated VHL Knockout Generates an Improved Model for Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Schokrpur, Shiruyeh; Hu, Junhui; Moughon, Diana L.; Liu, Peijun; Lin, Lucia C.; Hermann, Kip; Mangul, Serghei; Guan, Wei; Pellegrini, Matteo; Xu, Hua; Wu, Lily

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) is nearly incurable and accounts for most of the mortality associated with RCC. Von Hippel Lindau (VHL) is a tumour suppressor that is lost in the majority of clear cell RCC (ccRCC) cases. Its role in regulating hypoxia-inducible factors-1α (HIF-1α) and -2α (HIF-2α) is well-studied. Recent work has demonstrated that VHL knock down induces an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype. In this study we showed that a CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knock out of VHL in the RENCA model leads to morphologic and molecular changes indicative of EMT, which in turn drives increased metastasis to the lungs. RENCA cells deficient in HIF-1α failed to undergo EMT changes upon VHL knockout. RNA-seq revealed several HIF-1α-regulated genes that are upregulated in our VHL knockout cells and whose overexpression signifies an aggressive form of ccRCC in the cancer genome atlas (TCGA) database. Independent validation in a new clinical dataset confirms the upregulation of these genes in ccRCC samples compared to adjacent normal tissue. Our findings indicate that loss of VHL could be driving tumour cell dissemination through stabilization of HIF-1α in RCC. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved in this phenomenon can guide the search for more effective treatments to combat mRCC. PMID:27358011

  6. Myeloid Deletion of α1AMPK Exacerbates Atherosclerosis in LDL Receptor Knockout (LDLRKO) Mice.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qiang; Cui, Xin; Wu, Rui; Zha, Lin; Wang, Xianfeng; Parks, John S; Yu, Liqing; Shi, Hang; Xue, Bingzhong

    2016-06-01

    Macrophage inflammation marks all stages of atherogenesis, and AMPK is a regulator of macrophage inflammation. We therefore generated myeloid α1AMPK knockout (MAKO) mice on the LDL receptor knockout (LDLRKO) background to investigate whether myeloid deletion of α1AMPK exacerbates atherosclerosis. When fed an atherogenic diet, MAKO/LDLRKO mice displayed exacerbated atherosclerosis compared with LDLRKO mice. To determine the underlying pathophysiological pathways, we characterized macrophage inflammation/chemotaxis and lipid/cholesterol metabolism in MAKO/LDLRKO mice. Myeloid deletion of α1AMPK increased macrophage inflammatory gene expression and enhanced macrophage migration and adhesion to endothelial cells. Remarkably, MAKO/LDLRKO mice also displayed higher composition of circulating chemotaxically active Ly-6C(high) monocytes, enhanced atherosclerotic plaque chemokine expression, and monocyte recruitment into plaques, leading to increased atherosclerotic plaque macrophage content and inflammation. MAKO/LDLRKO mice also exhibited higher plasma LDL and VLDL cholesterol content, increased circulating apolipoprotein B (apoB) levels, and higher liver apoB expression. We conclude that macrophage α1AMPK deficiency promotes atherogenesis in LDLRKO mice and is associated with enhanced macrophage inflammation and hypercholesterolemia and that macrophage α1AMPK may serve as a therapeutic target for prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:26822081

  7. Sirh7/Ldoc1 knockout mice exhibit placental P4 overproduction and delayed parturition.

    PubMed

    Naruse, Mie; Ono, Ryuichi; Irie, Masahito; Nakamura, Kenji; Furuse, Tamio; Hino, Toshiaki; Oda, Kanako; Kashimura, Misho; Yamada, Ikuko; Wakana, Shigeharu; Yokoyama, Minesuke; Ishino, Fumitoshi; Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko

    2014-12-01

    Sirh7/Ldoc1 [sushi-ichi retrotransposon homolog 7/leucine zipper, downregulated in cancer 1, also called mammalian retrotransposon-derived 7 (Mart7)] is one of the newly acquired genes from LTR retrotransposons in eutherian mammals. Interestingly, Sirh7/Ldoc1 knockout (KO) mice exhibited abnormal placental cell differentiation/maturation, leading to an overproduction of placental progesterone (P4) and placental lactogen 1 (PL1) from trophoblast giant cells (TGCs). The placenta is an organ that is essential for mammalian viviparity and plays a major endocrinological role during pregnancy in addition to providing nutrients and oxygen to the fetus. P4 is an essential hormone in the preparation and maintenance of pregnancy and the determination of the timing of parturition in mammals; however, the biological significance of placental P4 in rodents is not properly recognized. Here, we demonstrate that mouse placentas do produce P4 in mid-gestation, coincident with a temporal reduction in ovarian P4, suggesting that it plays a role in the protection of the conceptuses specifically in this period. Pregnant Sirh7/Ldoc1 knockout females also displayed delayed parturition associated with a low pup weaning rate. All these results suggest that Sirh7/Ldoc1 has undergone positive selection during eutherian evolution as a eutherian-specific acquired gene because it impacts reproductive fitness via the regulation of placental endocrine function. PMID:25468940

  8. Impaired neurogenesis in embryonic spinal cord of Phgdh knockout mice, a serine deficiency disorder model.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Yuriko; Yoshida, Kazuyuki; Yang, Jung Hoon; Suzuki, Takeshi; Azuma, Norihiro; Sakai, Kazuhisa; Hashikawa, Tsutomu; Watanabe, Masahiko; Yasuda, Kaori; Kuhara, Satoru; Hirabayashi, Yoshio; Furuya, Shigeki

    2009-03-01

    Mutations in the d-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH; EC 1.1.1.95) gene, which encodes an enzyme involved in de novol-serine biosynthesis, are shown to cause human serine deficiency disorder. This disorder has been characterized by severe neurological symptoms including congenital microcephaly and psychomotor retardation. Our previous work demonstrated that targeted disruption of mouse Phgdh leads to a marked decrease in serine and glycine, severe growth retardation of the central nervous system, and lethality after embryonic day 13.5. To clarify how a serine deficiency causes neurodevelopmental defects, we characterized changes in metabolites, gene expression and morphological alterations in the spinal cord of Phgdh knockout mice. BeadChip microarray analysis revealed significant dysregulation of genes involved in the cell cycle. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis also revealed a significant perturbation of regulatory networks that operate in the cell cycle progression. Moreover, morphological examinations of the knockout spinal cord demonstrated a marked deficit in dorsal horn neurons. Radial glia cells, native neural stem/progenitor cells, accumulated in the dorsal ventricular zone, but they did not proceed to a G(0)-like quiescent state. The present integrative study provides in vivo evidence that normal cell cycle progression and subsequent neurogenesis of radial glia cells are severely impaired by serine deficiency. PMID:19114063

  9. Idebenone and Resveratrol Extend Lifespan and Improve Motor Function of HtrA2 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Szegő, Éva M.; Moisoi, Nicoleta; Martins, L. Miguel; Outeiro, Tiago F.; Kermer, Pawel

    2011-01-01

    Heterozygous loss-of-function mutation of the human gene for the mitochondrial protease HtrA2 has been associated with increased risk to develop mitochondrial dysfunction, a process known to contribute to neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease (HD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Knockout of HtrA2 in mice also leads to mitochondrial dysfunction and to phenotypes that resemble those found in neurodegenerative disorders and, ultimately, lead to death of animals around postnatal day 30. Here, we show that Idebenone, a synthetic antioxidant of the coenzyme Q family, and Resveratrol, a bioactive compound extracted from grapes, are both able to ameliorate this phenotype. Feeding HtrA2 knockout mice with either compound extends lifespan and delays worsening of the motor phenotype. Experiments conducted in cell culture and on brain tissue of mice revealed that each compound has a different mechanism of action. While Idebenone acts by downregulating the integrated stress response, Resveratrol acts by attenuating apoptosis at the level of Bax. These activities can account for the delay in neuronal degeneration in the striata of these mice and illustrate the potential of these compounds as effective therapeutic approaches against neurodegenerative disorders such as HD or PD. PMID:22205977

  10. Foxn1 gene knockout suppresses sexual attractiveness and pheromonal components of male urine in inbred mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Xu; Sun, Lixing; Zhang, Yao-Hua

    2010-01-01

    The immunocompetence handicap hypothesis (ICHH) posits that females prefer signals emitted by immunocompetent males over immunocompromised males and that these signals are honest. However, mechanisms of mate choice under an ICHH model may be impacted by levels of genetic variation (inbred animals vs. outbred animals). Here, we conducted 2-choice female preference experiments and chemical analyses of male urine in inbred BALB/c and outbred CD-1 mice, both of which have immunocompromised nude (nu) strains resulting from a Foxn1 gene knockout. We found that inbred BALB/c females but not outbred CD-1 females preferred the urine of healthy males over that of immunocompromised males despite measured differences in the qualities of their urine. There was a clear increase in female-attracting pheromones (such as farnesenes) in the preputial glands and urine metabolites in healthy BALB/c males but no such difference between CD-1 and CD-1 nu males. Therefore, CD-1 male urine failed to provide an honest mate-choice cue for females. Our results suggest that deleterious traits associated with male odor in mice might be jointly affected by the level of inbreeding and immunodeficiency caused by a single-gene knockout. PMID:20019156

  11. Necroptotic Cell Death Signaling and Execution Pathway: Lessons from Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Belizário, José; Vieira-Cordeiro, Luiz; Enns, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    Under stress conditions, cells in living tissue die by apoptosis or necrosis depending on the activation of the key molecules within a dying cell that either transduce cell survival or death signals that actively destroy the sentenced cell. Multiple extracellular (pH, heat, oxidants, and detergents) or intracellular (DNA damage and Ca2+ overload) stress conditions trigger various types of the nuclear, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), cytoplasmatic, and mitochondrion-centered signaling events that allow cells to preserve the DNA integrity, protein folding, energetic, ionic and redox homeostasis, thus escaping from injury. Along the transition from reversible to irreversible injury, death signaling is highly heterogeneous and damaged cells may engage autophagy, apoptotic, or necrotic cell death programs. Studies on multiple double- and triple- knockout mice identified caspase-8, flip, and fadd genes as key regulators of embryonic lethality and inflammation. Caspase-8 has a critical role in pro- and antinecrotic signaling pathways leading to the activation of receptor interacting protein kinase 1 (RIPK1), RIPK3, and the mixed kinase domain-like (MLKL) for a convergent execution pathway of necroptosis or regulated necrosis. Here we outline the recent discoveries into how the necrotic cell death execution pathway is engaged in many physiological and pathological outcome based on genetic analysis of knockout mice. PMID:26491219

  12. Fast screening of rice knockout mutants by multi-channel microchip electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Nan, He; Lee, Sang-Won; Kang, Seong Ho

    2012-08-15

    A multi-channel microchip electrophoresis (MC-ME) system with a laser-induced fluorescence detector was developed for the fast simultaneous detection of rice knockout mutants in genetically modified (GM) rice. In addition, three parallel separation channels were fabricated on a glass microchip to investigate the possibility of high-throughput screening of amplified-polymerase chain reaction products representing wild-type rice and mutants. The MC-ME system was developed to simultaneously record data on all channels using specifically designed electrodes for an even distribution of electric fields, an expanded laser beam for excitation, a 10× objective lens to capture emissions, and a charge coupled device camera for detection. Under a programmed electric field strength and a sieving gel matrix of 0.7% poly(ethylene oxide) (M(r)=8,000,000), T-DNA-inserted rice mutants, two standard wild-type rice lines, and six rice knockout mutants were analyzed within 4 min using three parallel channels on the microchip. Compared to conventional microchip electrophoresis, the MC-ME method is a valid and practical way to effectively analyze multiple samples in parallel for the identification of GM rice without any loss of resolving power or reproducibility. The MC-ME method was more than 15 times faster than traditional slab gel electrophoresis and proved to be a powerful tool for high-throughput screening of GM rice with high sensitivity, efficiency, and reproducibility. PMID:22841075

  13. Genes critical to vasculogenesis as defined by systematic analysis of vascular defects in knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Argraves, W Scott; Drake, Christopher J

    2005-10-01

    To identify genes important to the process of vasculogenesis, we evaluated embryonic vascular anomalies from 100 mouse knockout studies using a novel meta-analysis approach. By applying this method, termed approach for ranking of embryonic vascular anomalies (AREVA), rank scores were calculated for each knockout based on the occurrence of vascular defects during periods of vasculogenesis in specific embryonic regions. As a result, 12 genes (fibronectin, VEGFR-1/Flt-1, VEGFR-2/Flk-1, alpha 5 integrin, Tek/Tie2, VE-cadherin, VEGFA, connexin 45, ShcA, cytochrome P450 reductase, CD148/DEP-1, and EphrinB2) were determined to play critical roles in vasculogenesis. Functional categorization of these genes revealed the fundamental importance of VEGF signaling since 10 of the 12 genes (fibronectin, VEGFR-1/Flt-1, VEGFR-2/Flk-1, alpha 5 integrin, VE-cadherin, VEGFA, ShcA, cytochrome P450 reductase, CD148/DEP-1, and EphrinB2) relate to this pathway. Furthermore, the findings highlight a potential network for regulating VEGF signaling involving integration of fibronectin, EphrinB2, Tie2, and connexin 45 signaling pathways via the ShcA/Ras/Raf/Mek/Erk cascade. In addition to retrospective application of AREVA as done herein, AREVA can be used prospectively to determine the relevancy to vasculogenesis of newly inactivated genes. PMID:16114069

  14. NRMT1 knockout mice exhibit phenotypes associated with impaired DNA repair and premature aging

    PubMed Central

    Bonsignore, Lindsay A.; Tooley, John G.; Van Hoose, Patrick M.; Wang, Eugenia; Cheng, Alan; Cole, Marsha P.; Tooley, Christine E. Schaner

    2015-01-01

    Though defective genome maintenance and DNA repair have long been know to promote phenotypes of premature aging, the role protein methylation plays in these processes is only now emerging. We have recently identified the first N-terminal methyltransferase, NRMT1, which regulates protein-DNA interactions and is necessary for both accurate mitotic division and nucleotide excision repair. To demonstrate if complete loss of NRMT1 subsequently resulted in developmental or aging phenotypes, we constructed the first NRMT1 knockout (Nrmt1−/−) mouse. The majority of these mice die shortly after birth. However, the ones that survive exhibit decreased body size, female-specific infertility, kyphosis, decreased mitochondrial function, and early-onset liver degeneration; phenotypes characteristic of other mouse models deficient in DNA repair. The livers from Nrmt1−/− mice produce less reactive oxygen species (ROS) than wild type controls, and Nrmt1−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts show a decreased capacity for handling oxidative damage. This indicates that decreased mitochondrial function may benefit Nrmt1−/− mice and protect them from excess internal ROS and subsequent DNA damage. These studies position the NRMT1 knockout mouse as a useful new system for studying the effects of genomic instability and defective DNA damage repair on organismal and tissue-specific aging. PMID:25843235

  15. Appetitively motivated instrumental learning in SynGAP heterozygous knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Muhia, Mary; Feldon, Joram; Knuesel, Irene; Yee, Benjamin K

    2009-10-01

    The synaptic Ras/Rap-GTPase-activating protein (SynGAP) regulates specific intracellular events following N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) activation. Here, the impact of SynGAP heterozygous knockout (SG+/-) on NMDAR-dependent functions was assessed using different positive reinforcement schedules in instrumental conditioning. The knockout did not affect the temporal control of operant responding under a fixed interval (FI) schedule, but led to a putative enhancement in response vigor and/or disinhibition. When examined on differential reinforcement of low rates of response (DRL) schedules, SG+/- mice showed increased responding under DRL-4s and DRL-8s, without impairing the response efficiency (total rewards/total lever presses) because both rewarded and nonrewarded presses were elevated. Motivation was unaffected as evaluated using a progressive ratio (PR) schedule. Yet, SG+/- mice persisted in responding during extinction at the end of PR training, although an equivalent phenotype was not evident in extinction learning following FI-20s training. This extinction phenotype is therefore schedule-specific and cannot be generalized to Pavlovian conditioning. In conclusion, constitutive SynGAP reduction increases vigor in the execution of learned operant behavior without compromising its temporal control, yielding effects readily distinguishable from NMDAR blockade. PMID:19824778

  16. Sirh7/Ldoc1 knockout mice exhibit placental P4 overproduction and delayed parturition

    PubMed Central

    Naruse, Mie; Ono, Ryuichi; Irie, Masahito; Nakamura, Kenji; Furuse, Tamio; Hino, Toshiaki; Oda, Kanako; Kashimura, Misho; Yamada, Ikuko; Wakana, Shigeharu; Yokoyama, Minesuke; Ishino, Fumitoshi; Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko

    2014-01-01

    Sirh7/Ldoc1 [sushi-ichi retrotransposon homolog 7/leucine zipper, downregulated in cancer 1, also called mammalian retrotransposon-derived 7 (Mart7)] is one of the newly acquired genes from LTR retrotransposons in eutherian mammals. Interestingly, Sirh7/Ldoc1 knockout (KO) mice exhibited abnormal placental cell differentiation/maturation, leading to an overproduction of placental progesterone (P4) and placental lactogen 1 (PL1) from trophoblast giant cells (TGCs). The placenta is an organ that is essential for mammalian viviparity and plays a major endocrinological role during pregnancy in addition to providing nutrients and oxygen to the fetus. P4 is an essential hormone in the preparation and maintenance of pregnancy and the determination of the timing of parturition in mammals; however, the biological significance of placental P4 in rodents is not properly recognized. Here, we demonstrate that mouse placentas do produce P4 in mid-gestation, coincident with a temporal reduction in ovarian P4, suggesting that it plays a role in the protection of the conceptuses specifically in this period. Pregnant Sirh7/Ldoc1 knockout females also displayed delayed parturition associated with a low pup weaning rate. All these results suggest that Sirh7/Ldoc1 has undergone positive selection during eutherian evolution as a eutherian-specific acquired gene because it impacts reproductive fitness via the regulation of placental endocrine function. PMID:25468940

  17. Differential proteomic analysis of STAT6 knockout mice reveals new regulatory function in liver lipid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Iff, Joël; Wang, Wei; Sajic, Tatjana; Oudry, Nathalie; Gueneau, Estelle; Hopfgartner, Gérard; Varesio, Emmanuel; Szanto, Ildiko

    2009-10-01

    Increased inflammatory signaling is a key feature of metabolic disorders. In this context, the role of increased pro-inflammatory signals has been extensively studied. By contrast, no efforts have been dedicated to study the contrasting scenario: the attenuation of anti-inflammatory signals and their role in metabolic homeostasis. IL-4 and IL-13 are anti-inflammatory cytokines signaling through the Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 6 (STAT6). Our study was aimed at evaluating the lack of STAT6 signaling on liver homeostasis. To this end we analyzed the liver proteome of wild type and STAT6 knock-out mice using 2D nanoscale LC-MS/MS with iTRAQ labeling technique. The coordinated changes in proteins identified by this quantitative proteome analysis indicated disturbed lipid homeostasis and a state of hepatocellular stress. Most significantly, the expression of the liver fatty acid binding protein (FABP1) was increased in the knock-out mice. In line with the elevated FABP1 expression we found latent liver lipid accumulation in the STAT6-deficient mice which was further aggravated when mice were challenged by a high fat diet. In conclusion, our study revealed a so far uncharacterized role for STAT6 in regulating liver lipid homeostasis and demonstrates the importance of anti-inflammatory signaling in the defense against the development of liver steatosis. PMID:19663508

  18. Epithelial-specific knockout of the Rac1 gene leads to enamel defects

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhan; Kim, Jieun; Lacruz, Rodrigo; Bringas, Pablo; Kaartinen, Vesa M.; Snead, Malcolm L.

    2015-01-01

    Rac1 encodes a 21kDa GTP-binding protein belonging to the RAS superfamily. RAS members play important roles in controlling focal adhesion complex formation and cytoskeleton contraction; activities with consequences to cell growth, adhesion, migration, and differentiation. To examine the role(s) played by Rac1 protein in cell-to-matrix interaction and in enamel matrix biomineralization we used the Cre/loxP binary recombination system to characterize enamel matrix proteins expression and enamel formation in Rac1 knockout mice. Mating between mice bearing the floxed Rac1 allele with mice bearing a keratin14-Cre transgene generate animals in which Rac1 is absent from epithelial organs. The enamel of Rac1 conditional knockout mouse was characterized by computerized tomography (microCT), light microscopy, histochemistry, and back-scatter electron microscopy. Enamel matrix protein expression was analyzed by Western blotting. Major findings showed that the Tomes’ processes of Rac1−/− ameloblasts loose contact with the forming enamel matrix in un-erupted teeth. The abundance of amelogenin and ameloblastin was reduced in the Rac1−/− ameloblasts. After eruption, the enamel from the Rac1−/− mice displayed severe structural defects with the complete loss of enamel. These results support an essential role for Rac1 function in the dental epithelium involving cell-matrix interaction and matrix biomineralization. PMID:22243243

  19. Neurotransmitter and their metabolite concentrations in different areas of the HPRT knockout mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Tschirner, Sarah K; Gutzki, Frank; Schneider, Erich H; Seifert, Roland; Kaever, Volkhard

    2016-06-15

    Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (LNS) is characterized by uric acid overproduction and severe neurobehavioral symptoms, such as recurrent self-mutilative behavior. To learn more about the pathophysiology of the disease, we quantified neurotransmitters and their metabolites in the cerebral hemisphere, cerebellum and the medulla oblongata of HPRT knockout mice, an animal model for LNS, in comparison to the corresponding wild-type. Our analyses included l-glutamate, 4-aminobutanoic acid (GABA), acetylcholine, serotonin, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), norepinephrine, l-normetanephrine, epinephrine and l-metanephrine and were conducted via high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Among these neurotransmitter systems, we did not find any abnormalities in the HPRT knockout mouse brains. On one side, this might indicate that HPRT deficiency most severely affects dopamine signaling, while brain functioning based on other neurotransmitters is more or less spared. On the other hand, our findings may reflect a compensating mechanism for impaired purine salvage that protects the brain in HPRT-deficient mice but not in LNS patients. PMID:27206901

  20. The Local Origin of the Tibetan Pig and Additional Insights into the Origin of Asian Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Linsheng; Zhao, Guiying; Yan, Yulin; Deng, Weidong; Shi, Xianwei; Han, Shuxin; Li, Shuai; Wang, Xiujuan; Gou, Xiao

    2011-01-01

    Background The domestic pig currently indigenous to the Tibetan highlands is supposed to have been introduced during a continuous period of colonization by the ancestors of modern Tibetans. However, there is no direct genetic evidence of either the local origin or exotic migration of the Tibetan pig. Methods and Findings We analyzed mtDNA hypervariable segment I (HVI) variation of 218 individuals from seven Tibetan pig populations and 1,737 reported mtDNA sequences from domestic pigs and wild boars across Asia. The Bayesian consensus tree revealed a main haplogroup M and twelve minor haplogroups, which suggested a large number of small scale in situ domestication episodes. In particular, haplogroups D1 and D6 represented two highly divergent lineages in the Tibetan highlands and Island Southeastern Asia, respectively. Network analysis of haplogroup M further revealed one main subhaplogroup M1 and two minor subhaplogroups M2 and M3. Intriguingly, M2 was mainly distributed in Southeastern Asia, suggesting for a local origin. Similar with haplogroup D6, M3 was mainly restricted in Island Southeastern Asia. This pattern suggested that Island Southeastern Asia, but not Southeastern Asia, might be the center of domestication of the so-called Pacific clade (M3 and D6 here) described in previous studies. Diversity gradient analysis of major subhaplogroup M1 suggested three local origins in Southeastern Asia, the middle and downstream regions of the Yangtze River, and the Tibetan highlands, respectively. Conclusions We identified two new origin centers for domestic pigs in the Tibetan highlands and in the Island Southeastern Asian region. PMID:22163285

  1. By-pass pigs for two-phase flow pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, H.L.; Spronsen, G. van; Klaus, E.H.; Stewart, D.M.

    1996-12-31

    Pigging two-phase pipelines normally leads to the generation of large liquid slug volumes in front of the pig requiring excessively large separators or slug catchers. The concept of using a high by-pass pig to disperse the liquid and reduce the maximum liquid production rate prior to pig arrival is under investigation by Shell Exploration and Production companies. A simulation model of the dynamics of the pig and related two-phase flow behavior in the pipeline was used to predict the performance of by-pass pigs. Field trials in a dry gas pipeline were carried out to provide friction data and to validate the model. It was then used to explore operating possibilities in a two-phase lie which led to the follow-up trial in a 15.6 km, 20 inch OD two-phase offshore interfield pipeline with risers. Whereas the volume of liquid swept in front of the pig would be 179 m{sup 3} if the by-pass fraction were zero, a reduction of 70% to 53m{sup 3} was achieved in the field with a by-pass fraction of 10%. The predicted mobility of the high by-pass pig in the pipeline and risers was verified and the beneficial effects due to the by-pass concept exceeded the prediction of the simplified model. The significant gains of using a by-pass pig in modifying gas and liquid production rates during pigging operation have been demonstrated. The method can widen the possibility of applying two-phase flow pipeline transportation to cases where separator or slug catcher capacity are limited for reasons of practicality or cost.

  2. Assessment of Domestic Pigs, Wild Boars and Feral Hybrid Pigs as Reservoirs of Hepatitis E Virus in Corsica, France.

    PubMed

    Jori, Ferran; Laval, Morgane; Maestrini, Oscar; Casabianca, François; Charrier, François; Pavio, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    In Corsica, extensive pig breeding systems allow frequent interactions between wild boars and domestic pigs, which are suspected to act as reservoirs of several zoonotic diseases including hepatitis E virus (HEV). In this context, 370 sera and 166 liver samples were collected from phenotypically characterized as pure or hybrid wild boars, between 2009 and 2012. In addition, serum and liver from 208 domestic pigs belonging to 30 farms were collected at the abattoir during the end of 2013. Anti-HEV antibodies were detected in 26% (21%-31.6%) of the pure wild boar, 43.5% (31%-56.7%) of hybrid wild boar and 88% (82.6%-91.9%) of the domestic pig sera. In addition, HEV RNA was detected in five wild boars, three hybrid wild boars and two domestic pig livers tested. Our findings provide evidence that both domestic pig and wild boar (pure and hybrid) act as reservoirs of HEV in Corsica, representing an important zoonotic risk for Corsican hunters and farmers but also for the large population of consumers of raw pig liver specialties produced in Corsica. In addition, hybrid wild boars seem to play an important ecological role in the dissemination of HEV between domestic pig and wild boar populations, unnoticed to date, that deserves further investigation. PMID:27556478

  3. Assessment of Domestic Pigs, Wild Boars and Feral Hybrid Pigs as Reservoirs of Hepatitis E Virus in Corsica, France

    PubMed Central

    Jori, Ferran; Laval, Morgane; Maestrini, Oscar; Casabianca, François; Charrier, François; Pavio, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    In Corsica, extensive pig breeding systems allow frequent interactions between wild boars and domestic pigs, which are suspected to act as reservoirs of several zoonotic diseases including hepatitis E virus (HEV). In this context, 370 sera and 166 liver samples were collected from phenotypically characterized as pure or hybrid wild boars, between 2009 and 2012. In addition, serum and liver from 208 domestic pigs belonging to 30 farms were collected at the abattoir during the end of 2013. Anti-HEV antibodies were detected in 26% (21%–31.6%) of the pure wild boar, 43.5% (31%–56.7%) of hybrid wild boar and 88% (82.6%–91.9%) of the domestic pig sera. In addition, HEV RNA was detected in five wild boars, three hybrid wild boars and two domestic pig livers tested. Our findings provide evidence that both domestic pig and wild boar (pure and hybrid) act as reservoirs of HEV in Corsica, representing an important zoonotic risk for Corsican hunters and farmers but also for the large population of consumers of raw pig liver specialties produced in Corsica. In addition, hybrid wild boars seem to play an important ecological role in the dissemination of HEV between domestic pig and wild boar populations, unnoticed to date, that deserves further investigation. PMID:27556478

  4. Will AI in pigs become more efficient?

    PubMed

    Roca, J; Parrilla, I; Bolarin, A; Martinez, E A; Rodriguez-Martinez, H

    2016-07-01

    AI is commercially applied worldwide to breed pigs, yielding fertility outcomes similar to those of natural mating. However, it is not fully efficient, as only liquid-stored semen is used, with a single boar inseminating about 2000 sows yearly. The use of liquid semen, moreover, constrains international trade and slows genetic improvement. Research efforts, reviewed hereby, are underway to reverse this inefficient scenario. Special attention is paid to studies intended to decrease the number of sperm used per pregnant sow, facilitating the practical use of sexed frozen-thawed semen in swine commercial insemination programs. PMID:26723133

  5. Metabolomic Characterization of Knockout Mutants in Arabidopsis: Development of a Metabolite Profiling Database for Knockout Mutants in Arabidopsis1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Atsushi; Kusano, Miyako; Mejia, Ramon Francisco; Iwasa, Mami; Kobayashi, Makoto; Hayashi, Naomi; Watanabe-Takahashi, Akiko; Narisawa, Tomoko; Tohge, Takayuki; Hur, Manhoi; Wurtele, Eve Syrkin; Nikolau, Basil J.; Saito, Kazuki

    2014-01-01

    Despite recent intensive research efforts in functional genomics, the functions of only a limited number of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genes have been determined experimentally, and improving gene annotation remains a major challenge in plant science. As metabolite profiling can characterize the metabolomic phenotype of a genetic perturbation in the plant metabolism, it provides clues to the function(s) of genes of interest. We chose 50 Arabidopsis mutants, including a set of characterized and uncharacterized mutants, that resemble wild-type plants. We performed metabolite profiling of the plants using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. To make the data set available as an efficient public functional genomics tool for hypothesis generation, we developed the Metabolite Profiling Database for Knock-Out Mutants in Arabidopsis (MeKO). It allows the evaluation of whether a mutation affects metabolism during normal plant growth and contains images of mutants, data on differences in metabolite accumulation, and interactive analysis tools. Nonprocessed data, including chromatograms, mass spectra, and experimental metadata, follow the guidelines set by the Metabolomics Standards Initiative and are freely downloadable. Proof-of-concept analysis suggests that MeKO is highly useful for the generation of hypotheses for genes of interest and for improving gene annotation. MeKO is publicly available at http://prime.psc.riken.jp/meko/. PMID:24828308

  6. CD24 knockout prevents colorectal cancer in chemically induced colon carcinogenesis and in APC(Min)/CD24 double knockout transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Naumov, Inna; Zilberberg, Alona; Shapira, Shiran; Avivi, Doran; Kazanov, Dina; Rosin-Arbesfeld, Rina; Arber, Nadir; Kraus, Sarah

    2014-09-01

    Increased expression of CD24 is seen in a large variety of solid tumors, including up to 90% of gastrointestinal (GI) tumors. Stable derivatives of SW480 colorectal cancer (CRC) cells that overexpress CD24 proliferate faster, and increase cell motility, saturation density, plating efficiency, and growth in soft agar. They also produce larger tumors in nude mice as compared to the parental SW480 cells. Most significantly, even depletion of one copy of the CD24 allele in the APC(Min/+) mice of a transgenic mouse model led to a dramatic reduction in tumor burden in all sections of the small intestine. Homozygous deletion of both CD24 alleles resulted in complete abolishment of tumor formation. Moreover, CD24 knockout mice exhibited resistance to chemically induced inflammation-associated CRC. Finally, a new signal transduction pathway is suggested: namely, CD24 expression downstream to COX2 and PGE2 synthesis, which is directly regulated by β-catenin. CD24 is shown in vitro and in vivo as being an important oncogene in the gut, and one that plays a critical role in the initiation and progression of carcinogenesis. PMID:24500912

  7. Characterization of an Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae seeder pig challenge-exposure model.

    PubMed

    Lechtenberg, K F; Shryock, T R; Moore, G

    1994-12-01

    Five strains of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 1 were used to intranasally infect 5 groups of pigs. Using each bacterial strain, infected pigs (termed seeder pigs) were commingled for 48 hours with 5 groups of noninfected test pigs, then were removed. Seeder and test pigs were maintained in isolation and were observed for 14 days. Seeder pigs had mortality that was threefold greater than that of test pigs (24% vs 8%). Rectal temperature in excess of 40.3 C was achieved for 84% of test pigs and 88% of seeder pigs. Neither of these 2 variables was statistically different between the 2 groups of pigs. Clinical impression scores > or = 2 (on a 0 to 3 scale) were three-fold (64% vs 20%) greater for seeder than for test pigs (P < 0.05). The total number of bacterial isolations or nonrecoverable isolates was tabulated for test and seeder pigs' lungs at necropsy, irrespective of the amount of lesions. The number of A pleuropneumoniae isolations was not statistically different between test and seeder pig populations. Recovery of Pasteurella multocida or other bacteria was greater from the seeder pigs (P < 0.05), whereas the number of non-recoverable isolates was greater from test pigs than from seeder pigs (P < 0.05). Assessment of lung lesions at necropsy by either visual estimation or on a weight basis were in agreement.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7887514

  8. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in domestic pigs in Durango State, Mexico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known concerning the prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in pigs in Mexico. Antibodies to T. gondii were determined in 1,077 domestic pigs in Durango, Mexico using the modified agglutination test (MAT). Two groups (A, B) of pigs were sampled: Group A pigs (n=555) were raised in 3 geo...

  9. 21 CFR 520.1044b - Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution. 520....1044b Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of pig pump oral.... (d) Conditions of use—(1) Amount. Administer 1.15 milliliters of pig pump oral solution (5...

  10. 21 CFR 520.1044b - Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution. 520....1044b Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of pig pump oral.... (d) Conditions of use—(1) Amount. Administer 1.15 milliliters of pig pump oral solution (5...

  11. Skeletal muscle-specific HMG-CoA reductase knockout mice exhibit rhabdomyolysis: A model for statin-induced myopathy.

    PubMed

    Osaki, Yoshinori; Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Miyahara, Shoko; Iwasaki, Hitoshi; Ishii, Akiko; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yatoh, Shigeru; Takahashi, Akimitsu; Yahagi, Naoya; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Sone, Hirohito; Ohashi, Ken; Ishibashi, Shun; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2015-10-23

    HMG-CoA reductase (HMGCR) catalyzes the conversion of HMG-CoA to mevalonic acid (MVA); this is the rate-limiting enzyme of the mevalonate pathway that synthesizes cholesterol. Statins, HMGCR inhibitors, are widely used as cholesterol-reducing drugs. However, statin-induced myopathy is the most adverse side effect of statins. To eludicate the mechanisms underlying statin the myotoxicity and HMGCR function in the skeletal muscle, we developed the skeletal muscle-specific HMGCR knockout mice. Knockout mice exhibited postnatal myopathy with elevated serum creatine kinase levels and necrosis. Myopathy in knockout mice was completely rescued by the oral administration of MVA. These results suggest that skeletal muscle toxicity caused by statins is dependent on the deficiencies of HMGCR enzyme activity and downstream metabolites of the mevalonate pathway in skeletal muscles rather than the liver or other organs. PMID:26381177

  12. Quasielastic knockout of light fragments from {sup 12}C and {sup 16}O nuclei by intermediate-energy pions

    SciTech Connect

    Abramov, B. M.; Borodin, Yu. A.; Bulychjov, S. A.; Dukhovskoy, I. A.; Krutenkova, A. P.; Kulikov, V. V. Martemianov, M. A.; Matsuk, M. A.; Tarasov, V. E.; Turdakina, E. N.; Khanov, A. I.

    2007-07-15

    Quasielastic deuteron and triton knockout from {sup 12}C and {sup 16}O nuclei has been studied infull kinematics using a 0.72-GeV/c pion beam. The momentum distributions of the intranuclear quasideuteron motion, excitation-energy spectra of the residual nuclei, and the effective numbers N{sub d}{sup eff} of quasideuterons are determined. The parameters of the quasideuteron intranuclear motion are in reasonable agreement with the results obtained in other beams. The N{sub d}{sup eff} in the nuclei from {sup 6}Li to {sup 16}O measured in full kinematics are virtually independent of the atomic number in contrast to the analogous values in the inclusive deuteron-knockout reaction induced by protons. The phenomenon of triton knockout from these nuclei is observed, which makes possible estimation of the cross section of backward pion-triton elastic scattering in yet unexplored regions of energy and momentum transfer.

  13. Aspartoacylase deficiency does not affect N-acetylaspartylglutamate level or glutamate carboxypeptidase II activity in the knockout mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Surendran, Sankar; Ezell, Edward L; Quast, Michael J; Wei, Jingna; Tyring, Stephen K; Michals-Matalon, Kimberlee; Matalon, Reuben

    2004-08-01

    Aspartoacylase (ASPA)-deficient patients [Canavan disease (CD)] reportedly have increased urinary excretion of N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG), a neuropeptide abundant in the brain. Whether elevated excretion of urinary NAAG is due to ASPA deficiency, resulting in an abnormal level of brain NAAG, is examined using ASPA-deficient mouse brain. The level of NAAG in the knockout mouse brain was similar to that in the wild type. The NAAG hydrolyzing enzyme, glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCP II), activity was normal in the knockout mouse brain. These data suggest that ASPA deficiency does not affect the NAAG or GCP II level in the knockout mouse brain, if documented also in patients with CD. PMID:15246864

  14. Arginase enzymes in isolated airways from normal and nitric oxide synthase 2-knockout mice exposed to ovalbumin

    SciTech Connect

    Bratt, Jennifer M.; Franzi, Lisa M.; Linderholm, Angela L.; Last, Michael S.; Kenyon, Nicholas J. Last, Jerold A.

    2009-02-01

    Arginase has been suggested to compete with nitric oxide synthase (NOS) for their common substrate, L-arginine. To study the mechanisms underlying this interaction, we compared arginase expression in isolated airways and the consequences of inhibiting arginase activity in vivo with NO production, lung inflammation, and lung function in both C57BL/6 and NOS2 knockout mice undergoing ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation, a mouse model of asthma. Arginases I and II were measured by western blot in isolated airways from sensitized C57BL/6 mice exposed to ovalbumin aerosol. Physiological and biochemical responses - inflammation, lung compliance, airway hyperreactivity, exhaled NO concentration, arginine concentration - were compared with the responses of NOS2 knockout mice. NOS2 knockout mice had increased total cells in lung lavage, decreased lung compliance, and increased airway hyperreactivity. Both arginase I and arginase II were constitutively expressed in the airways of normal C57BL/6 mice. Arginase I was up-regulated approximately 8-fold in the airways of C57BL/6 mice exposed to ovalbumin. Expression of both arginase isoforms were significantly upregulated in NOS2 knockout mice exposed to ovalbumin, with about 40- and 4-fold increases in arginases I and II, respectively. Arginine concentration in isolated airways was not significantly different in any of the groups studied. Inhibition of arginase by systemic treatment of C57BL/6 mice with a competitive inhibitor, N{omega}-hydroxy-nor-L-arginine (nor-NOHA), significantly decreased the lung inflammatory response to ovalbumin in these animals. We conclude that NOS2 knockout mice are more sensitive to ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation and its sequelae than are C57BL/6 mice, as determined by increased total cells in lung lavage, decreased lung compliance, and increased airway hyperreactivity, and that these findings are strongly correlated with increased expression of both arginase isoforms in the airways of the

  15. Changes in the expression of neurotransmitter receptors in Parkin and DJ-1 knockout mice--A quantitative multireceptor study.

    PubMed

    Cremer, J N; Amunts, K; Schleicher, A; Palomero-Gallagher, N; Piel, M; Rösch, F; Zilles, K

    2015-12-17

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a well-characterized neurological disorder with regard to its neuropathological and symptomatic appearance. At the genetic level, mutations of particular genes, e.g. Parkin and DJ-1, were found in human hereditary PD with early onset. Neurotransmitter receptors constitute decisive elements in neural signal transduction. Furthermore, since they are often altered in neurological and psychiatric diseases, receptors have been successful targets for pharmacological agents. However, the consequences of PD-associated gene mutations on the expression of transmitter receptors are largely unknown. Therefore, we studied the expression of 16 different receptor binding sites of the neurotransmitters glutamate, GABA, acetylcholine, adrenaline, serotonin, dopamine and adenosine by means of quantitative receptor autoradiography in Parkin and DJ-1 knockout mice. These knockout mice exhibit electrophysiological and behavioral deficits, but do not show the typical dopaminergic cell loss. We demonstrated differential changes of binding site densities in eleven brain regions. Most prominently, we found an up-regulation of GABA(B) and kainate receptor densities in numerous cortical areas of Parkin and DJ-1 knockout mice, as well as increased NMDA but decreased AMPA receptor densities in different brain regions of the Parkin knockout mice. The alterations of three different glutamate receptor types may indicate the potential relevance of the glutamatergic system in the pathogenesis of PD. Furthermore, the cholinergic M1, M2 and nicotinic receptors as well as the adrenergic α2 and the adenosine A(2A) receptors showed differentially increased densities in Parkin and DJ-1 knockout mice. Taken together, knockout of the PD-associated genes Parkin or DJ-1 results in differential changes of neurotransmitter receptor densities, highlighting a possible role of altered non-dopaminergic, and in particular of glutamatergic neurotransmission in PD pathogenesis. PMID

  16. The Expression of TALEN before Fertilization Provides a Rapid Knock-Out Phenotype in Xenopus laevis Founder Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Miyuki; Sakane, Yuto; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Herberg, Sarah; Simeone, Angela; Simpson, David; Jullien, Jerome; Yamamoto, Takashi; Gurdon, J. B.

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in genome editing using programmable nucleases have revolutionized gene targeting in various organisms. Successful gene knock-out has been shown in Xenopus, a widely used model organism, although a system enabling less mosaic knock-out in founder embryos (F0) needs to be explored in order to judge phenotypes in the F0 generation. Here, we injected modified highly active transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) mRNA to oocytes at the germinal vesicle (GV) stage, followed by in vitro maturation and intracytoplasmic sperm injection, to achieve a full knock-out in F0 embryos. Unlike conventional injection methods to fertilized embryos, the injection of TALEN mRNA into GV oocytes allows expression of nucleases before fertilization, enabling them to work from an earlier stage. Using this procedure, most of developed embryos showed full knock-out phenotypes of the pigmentation gene tyrosinase and/or embryonic lethal gene pax6 in the founder generation. In addition, our method permitted a large 1 kb deletion. Thus, we describe nearly complete gene knock-out phenotypes in Xenopus laevis F0 embryos. The presented method will help to accelerate the production of knock-out frogs since we can bypass an extra generation of about 1 year in Xenopus laevis. Meantime, our method provides a unique opportunity to rapidly test the developmental effects of disrupting those genes that do not permit growth to an adult able to reproduce. In addition, the protocol shown here is considerably less invasive than the previously used host transfer since our protocol does not require surgery. The experimental scheme presented is potentially applicable to other organisms such as mammals and fish to resolve common issues of mosaicism in founders. PMID:26580070

  17. Tissue- and cell-specific functions of the androgen receptor revealed through conditional knockout models in mice.

    PubMed

    De Gendt, Karel; Verhoeven, Guido

    2012-04-16

    This review aims to evaluate the contribution of individual cell-selective knockout models to our current understanding of androgen action. Cre/loxP technology has allowed the generation of cell-selective knockout models targeting the androgen receptor (AR) in distinct putative target cells in a wide variety of organs and tissues including: testis, ovary, accessory sex tissues, muscle, bone, fat, liver, skin and myeloid tissue. In some androgen-regulated processes such as spermatogenesis and folliculogenesis this approach has lead to the identification of a key cellular mediator of androgen action (Sertoli and granulosa cells, respectively). In many target tissues, however, the final response to androgens appears to be more complex. Here, cell-selective knockout technology offers a platform upon which we can begin to unravel the more complex interplay and signaling pathways of androgens. A prototypic example is the analysis of mesenchymal-epithelial interactions in many accessory sex glands. Furthermore, for some actions of testosterone, in which part of the effect is mediated by the active metabolite 17β-estradiol, conditional knockout technology offers a novel strategy to study the relative contribution of AR and estrogen receptor-mediated signaling. The latter approach has already resulted in a better understanding of androgen action in brain and bone. Finally, cell-selective knockout technology has generated valuable models to search for AR-controlled molecular mediators of androgen action, a strategy that has successfully been applied to the study of androgen action in the testis and in the epididymis. Although some conditional knockout models have provided clear answers to physiologic questions, it should be noted that others have pointed to unexpected complexities or technical limitations confounding interpretation of the results. PMID:21871526

  18. ARGINASE ENZYMES IN ISOLATED AIRWAYS FROM NORMAL AND NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE 2-KNOCKOUT MICE EXPOSED TO OVALBUMIN

    PubMed Central

    Bratt, Jennifer M.; Franzi, Lisa M.; Linderholm, Angela L.; Last, Michael S.; Kenyon, Nicholas J.; Last, Jerold A.

    2009-01-01

    Arginase has been suggested to compete with nitric oxide synthase (NOS) for their common substrate, L-arginine. To study the mechanisms underlying this interaction, we compared arginase expression in isolated airways and the consequences of inhibiting arginase activity in vivo with NO production, lung inflammation, and lung function in both C57BL/6 and NOS2 knockout mice undergoing ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation, a mouse model of asthma. Arginases I and II were measured by western blot in isolated airways from sensitized C57BL/6 mice exposed to ovalbumin aerosol. Physiological and biochemical responses---inflammation, lung compliance, airway hyperreactivity, exhaled NO concentration, arginine concentration--were compared with the responses of NOS2 knockout mice. NOS2 knockout mice had increased total cells in lung lavage, decreased lung compliance, and increased airway hyperreactivity. Both arginase I and arginase II were constitutively expressed in the airways of normal C57BL/6 mice. Arginase I was up-regulated approximately 8-fold in the airways of C57BL/6 mice exposed to ovalbumin. Expression of both arginase isoforms were significantly upregulated in NOS2 knockout mice exposed to ovalbumin, with about 40- and 4-fold increases in arginases I and II, respectively. Arginine concentration in isolated airways was not significantly different in any of the groups studied. Inhibition of arginase by systemic treatment of C57BL/6 mice with a competitive inhibitor, Nω-hydroxy-nor-L-arginine (nor-NOHA), significantly decreased the lung inflammatory response to ovalbumin in these animals. We conclude that NOS2 knockout mice are more sensitive to ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation and its sequelae than are C57BL/6 mice, as determined by increased total cells in lung lavage, decreased lung compliance, and increased airway hyperreactivity, and that these findings are strongly correlated with increased expression of both arginase isoforms in the airways of the NOS2

  19. Arginase enzymes in isolated airways from normal and nitric oxide synthase 2-knockout mice exposed to ovalbumin.

    PubMed

    Bratt, Jennifer M; Franzi, Lisa M; Linderholm, Angela L; Last, Michael S; Kenyon, Nicholas J; Last, Jerold A

    2009-02-01

    Arginase has been suggested to compete with nitric oxide synthase (NOS) for their common substrate, l-arginine. To study the mechanisms underlying this interaction, we compared arginase expression in isolated airways and the consequences of inhibiting arginase activity in vivo with NO production, lung inflammation, and lung function in both C57BL/6 and NOS2 knockout mice undergoing ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation, a mouse model of asthma. Arginases I and II were measured by western blot in isolated airways from sensitized C57BL/6 mice exposed to ovalbumin aerosol. Physiological and biochemical responses - inflammation, lung compliance, airway hyperreactivity, exhaled NO concentration, arginine concentration - were compared with the responses of NOS2 knockout mice. NOS2 knockout mice had increased total cells in lung lavage, decreased lung compliance, and increased airway hyperreactivity. Both arginase I and arginase II were constitutively expressed in the airways of normal C57BL/6 mice. Arginase I was up-regulated approximately 8-fold in the airways of C57BL/6 mice exposed to ovalbumin. Expression of both arginase isoforms were significantly upregulated in NOS2 knockout mice exposed to ovalbumin, with about 40- and 4-fold increases in arginases I and II, respectively. Arginine concentration in isolated airways was not significantly different in any of the groups studied. Inhibition of arginase by systemic treatment of C57BL/6 mice with a competitive inhibitor, Nomega-hydroxy-nor-l-arginine (nor-NOHA), significantly decreased the lung inflammatory response to ovalbumin in these animals. We conclude that NOS2 knockout mice are more sensitive to ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation and its sequelae than are C57BL/6 mice, as determined by increased total cells in lung lavage, decreased lung compliance, and increased airway hyperreactivity, and that these findings are strongly correlated with increased expression of both arginase isoforms in the airways of the

  20. Domestic Pigs Are Susceptible to Infection with Influenza B Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Zhiguang; Shen, Huigang; Lang, Yuekun; Kolb, Elizabeth A.; Turan, Nuri; Zhu, Laihua; Ma, Jingjiao; Bawa, Bhupinder; Liu, Qinfang; Liu, Haixia; Quast, Megan; Sexton, Gabriel; Krammer, Florian; Hause, Ben M.; Christopher-Hennings, Jane; Nelson, Eric A.; Richt, Juergen

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza B virus (IBV) causes seasonal epidemics in humans. Although IBV has been isolated from seals, humans are considered the primary host and reservoir of this important pathogen. It is unclear whether other animal species can support the replication of IBV and serve as a reservoir. Swine are naturally infected with both influenza A and C viruses. To determine the susceptibility of pigs to IBV infection, we conducted a serological survey for U.S. Midwest domestic swine herds from 2010 to 2012. Results of this study showed that antibodies to IBVs were detected in 38.5% (20/52) of sampled farms, and 7.3% (41/560) of tested swine serum samples were positive for IBV antibodies. Furthermore, swine herds infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) showed a higher prevalence of IBV antibodies in our 2014 survey. In addition, IBV was detected in 3 nasal swabs collected from PRRSV-seropositive pigs by real-time RT-PCR and sequencing. Finally, an experimental infection in pigs, via intranasal and intratracheal routes, was performed using one representative virus from each of the two genetically and antigenically distinct lineages of IBVs: B/Brisbane/60/2008 (Victoria lineage) and B/Yamagata/16/1988 (Yamagata lineage). Pigs developed influenza-like symptoms and lung lesions, and they seroconverted after virus inoculation. Pigs infected with B/Brisbane/60/2008 virus successfully transmitted the virus to sentinel animals. Taken together, our data demonstrate that pigs are susceptible to IBV infection; therefore, they warrant further surveillance and investigation of swine as a potential host for human IBV. IMPORTANCE IBV is an important human pathogen, but its ability to infect other species, for example, pigs, is not well understood. We showed serological evidence that antibodies to two genetically and antigenically distinct lineages of IBVs were present among domestic pigs, especially in swine herds previously infected with PRRSV

  1. Biosynthesis of plasmenylcholine in guinea pig heart

    SciTech Connect

    Wientzek, M.; Choy, P.C.

    1986-05-01

    In some mammalian hearts, up to 40% of the choline phosphoglyceride (CPG) exists as plasmenylcholine (1-alkenyl-2-acyl-glycero-3-phosphocholine). Although the majority of diacylphosphatidylcholine (PC) in mammalian hearts is synthesized from choline via the CDP-choline pathway, the formation of plasmenylcholine from choline was not known. In this study, they investigated the biosynthesis of plasmenyl-choline in the isolated guinea pig heart by perfusion with (/sup 3/H)choline. Labelled choline containing metabolites and labelled plasmenylcholine were isolated and determined at different perfusion time points. Significant amounts of labelling were found only in choline, phosphocholine, CDP-choline, plasmenyl-choline and PC. In addition, a precursor-product relationship was observed between the labelling of CDP-choline and plasmenylcholine. Such a relationship was not observed between choline and plasmenylcholine. Hence, they postulate that the incorporation of choline into plasmenylcholine is via the CDP-choline pathway and not via base exchange. The ability to condense 1-alkenyl-2-acyl-glycerol with CDP-choline was also demonstrated in vitro with guinea pig heart microsomes.

  2. Comparative effects of chlorpyrifos in wild type and cannabinoid Cb1 receptor knockout mice

    SciTech Connect

    Baireddy, Praveena; Liu, Jing; Hinsdale, Myron; Pope, Carey

    2011-11-15

    Endocannabinoids (eCBs) modulate neurotransmission by inhibiting the release of a variety of neurotransmitters. The cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55.212-2 (WIN) can modulate organophosphorus (OP) anticholinesterase toxicity in rats, presumably by inhibiting acetylcholine (ACh) release. Some OP anticholinesterases also inhibit eCB-degrading enzymes. We studied the effects of the OP insecticide chlorpyrifos (CPF) on cholinergic signs of toxicity, cholinesterase activity and ACh release in tissues from wild type (+/+) and cannabinoid CB1 receptor knockout (-/-) mice. Mice of both genotypes (n = 5-6/treatment group) were challenged with CPF (300 mg/kg, 2 ml/kg in peanut oil, sc) and evaluated for functional and neurochemical changes. Both genotypes exhibited similar cholinergic signs and cholinesterase inhibition (82-95% at 48 h after dosing) in cortex, cerebellum and heart. WIN reduced depolarization-induced ACh release in vitro in hippocampal slices from wild type mice, but had no effect in hippocampal slices from knockouts or in striatal slices from either genotype. Chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO, 100 {mu}M) reduced release in hippocampal slices from both genotypes in vitro, but with a greater reduction in tissues from wild types (21% vs 12%). CPO had no significant in vitro effect on ACh release in striatum. CPF reduced ACh release in hippocampus from both genotypes ex vivo, but reduction was again significantly greater in tissues from wild types (52% vs 36%). In striatum, CPF led to a similar reduction (20-23%) in tissues from both genotypes. Thus, while CB1 deletion in mice had little influence on the expression of acute toxicity following CPF, CPF- or CPO-induced changes in ACh release appeared sensitive to modulation by CB1-mediated eCB signaling in a brain-regional manner. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C57Bl/6 mice showed dose-related cholinergic toxicity following subcutaneous chlorpyrifos exposure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wild type and

  3. Specific pathogen-free pig herds also free from Campylobacter?

    PubMed

    Kolstoe, E M; Iversen, T; Østensvik, Ø; Abdelghani, A; Secic, I; Nesbakken, T

    2015-03-01

    As Specific Pathogen-Free (SPF) pig herds are designed and managed to prevent specific pig diseases, it might be feasible to expand the list of micro-organisms also including zoonotic pathogens such as Campylobacter coli as this agent has its origin in pigs. In a previous survey, 15 of 16 of SPF herds were found free from human pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica. Accordingly, three nucleus and seven multiplying herds were surveyed for Campylobacter to investigate whether the Norwegian SPF pig pyramid also might be free from this agent. In conclusion, the intervention of Campylobacter at the herd level might be possible as four of 10 SPF herds tested negative in two sets of samples from both autumn 2008 and summer/early autumn 2010. The four negative herds were all located in remote areas several kilometres away from conventional pig farming while the positive SPF farms were all situated in neighbourhoods with conventional pig production. It seems more difficult to control Campylobacter than some specific animal disease agents and another significant zoonotic agent, Y. enterocolitica, in pig herds. PMID:24798507

  4. Estimate of herpetofauna depredation by a population of wild pigs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jolley, D.B.; Ditchkoff, S.S.; Sparklin, B.D.; Hanson, L.B.; Mitchell, M.S.; Grand, J.B.

    2010-01-01

    Herpetofauna populations are decreasing worldwide, and the range of wild pigs (Sus scrofa) is expanding. Depredation of threatened reptile and amphibian populations by wild pigs could be substantial. By understanding depredation characteristics and rates, more resources can be directed toward controlling populations of wild pigs coincident with threatened or endangered herpetofauna populations. From April 2005 to March 2006 we used firearms to collect wild pigs (n = 68) and examined stomach content for reptiles and amphibians. We found 64 individual reptiles and amphibians, composed of 5 different species, that were consumed by wild pigs during an estimated 254 hours of foraging. Primarily arboreal species (e.g., Anolis carolinensis) became more vulnerable to depredation when temperatures were low and they sought thermal shelter. Other species (e.g., Scaphiopus holbrookii) that exhibit mass terrestrial migrations during the breeding season also faced increased vulnerability to depredation by wild pigs. Results suggest that wild pigs are opportunistic consumers that can exploit and potentially have a negative impact on species with particular life-history characteristics. ?? 2009 American Society of Mammalogists.

  5. Enterobacter cloacae inhibits human norovirus infectivity in gnotobiotic pigs

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Shaohua; Samuel, Helen; Twitchell, Erica; Bui, Tammy; Ramesh, Ashwin; Wen, Ke; Weiss, Mariah; Li, Guohua; Yang, Xingdong; Jiang, Xi; Yuan, Lijuan

    2016-01-01

    Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are the leading cause of epidemic gastroenteritis worldwide. Study of HuNoV biology has been hampered by the lack of an efficient cell culture system. Recently, enteric commensal bacteria Enterobacter cloacae has been recognized as a helper in HuNoV infection of B cells in vitro. To test the influences of E. cloacae on HuNoV infectivity and to determine whether HuNoV infects B cells in vivo, we colonized gnotobiotic pigs with E. cloacae and inoculated pigs with 2.74 × 104 genome copies of HuNoV. Compared to control pigs, reduced HuNoV shedding was observed in E. cloacae colonized pigs, characterized by significantly shorter duration of shedding in post-inoculation day 10 subgroup and lower cumulative shedding and peak shedding in individual pigs. Colonization of E. cloacae also reduced HuNoV titers in intestinal tissues and in blood. In both control and E. cloacae colonized pigs, HuNoV infection of enterocytes was confirmed, however infection of B cells was not observed in ileum, and the entire lamina propria in sections of duodenum, jejunum, and ileum were HuNoV-negative. In summary, E. cloacae inhibited HuNoV infectivity, and B cells were not a target cell type for HuNoV in gnotobiotic pigs, with or without E. cloacae colonization. PMID:27113278

  6. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of pig CD138.

    PubMed

    Bae, Joonbeom; Jeong, Seonah; Lee, Ju Yeon; Lee, Hyun-Jeong; Choi, Bong-Hwan; Kim, Ji-Eun; Choi, Inho; Chun, Taehoon

    2013-12-01

    CD138 (syndecan-1) interacts with various components of the extracellular matrix and associates with the actin cytoskeleton. In this study, we cloned pig CD138 cDNA and determined its complete cDNA sequence. Pig CD138 cDNA contained an open reading frame (930 bp) encoding 309 amino acids with five well conserved putative glycosaminoglycan attachment sites, a putative cleavage site for matrix metalloproteinases, and conserved motifs involved in signal transduction among mammalian species. Pig CD138 mRNA was detected in various tissues, including lymphoid and non-lymphoid organs, indicating the multicellular functions of CD138 in pigs. Western blot and flow cytometry analyses detected an approximate 35 kDa pig CD138 protein expressed on the cell surface. Further immunohistochemistry analysis revealed that CD138 expression was mainly observed in submucosa and lamina propria of the pig small intestine. Further study will be necessary to define the functional importance of CD138 during specific infectious diseases in pigs. PMID:24128845

  7. Blood lactate kinetics in normal and stress-susceptible pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Darrah, P.S.; Beitz, D.C.; Topel, D.G.; Christian, L.L.

    1981-10-01

    In vitro rates of lactate metabolism were determined in stress-susceptible (SS) and stress-resistant (SR) pigs. Three SR and three SS pigs were given 20 muCi of (U-/sup 14/C) L-lactate by a single injection method and resting blood lactate kinetics were measured. Seventeen blood samples were taken during the 60 min after injection. Lactate was separated from the deproteinized plasma by silicic acid column chromatography, and specific radioactivity was determined. Kinetic characteristics were calculated from plots of specific activity versus time. Pigs met steady-state requirements during the sampling period. There were no differences in kinetic characteristics of resting SS and SR pigs. Later, a second isotope injection was given after 5 min of electrical stress. Lactate pool sizes increased similarly in both types of pigs after stress; however, SS pigs had greater plasma lactate concentrations after stress. It is concluded that SS and SR pigs respond differently to stress but have similar capacities to metabolize lactate while resting.

  8. Bortezomib, C1-inhibitor and Plasma Exchange Do Not Prolong the Survival of Multi-transgenic GalT-KO Pig Kidney Xenografts in Baboons

    PubMed Central

    Le, Bas-Bernardet S.; Tillou, X.; Branchereau, J.; Dilek, N.; Poirier, N.; Châtelais, M.; Charreau, B.; Minault, D.; Hervouet, J.; Renaudin, K.; Crossan, C.; Scobie, L.; Takeuchi, Y.; Diswall, M.; Breimer, M.E.; Klar, N.; Daha, M.R.; Simioni, P.; Robson, S.C.; Nottle, M.B.; Salvaris, E.J.; Cowan, P.J.; d’Apice, A.J.F.; Sachs, D.H.; Yamada, K.; Lagutina, I.; Duchi, R.; Perota, A.; Lazzari, G.; Galli, C.; Cozzi, E.; Soulillou, J.-P.; B., Vanhove; Blancho, G.

    2014-01-01

    Galactosyl-transferase knock-out (GalT-KO) pigs represent a potential solution to xenograft rejection, particularly in the context of additional genetic modifications. We have performed life supporting kidney xenotransplantation into baboons utilizing GalT-KO pigs transgenic for human CD55/CD59/CD39/HT. Baboons received tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, corticosteroids and recombinant human C1 Inhibitor combined with cyclophosphamide or bortezomib with or without 2–3 plasma exchanges. One baboon received a control GalT-KO xenograft with the latter immunosuppression. All immunosuppressed baboons rejected the xenografts between days 9 to 15 with signs of acute humoral rejection, in contrast to untreated controls (n=2) which lost their grafts on day 3 and 4. Immunofluorescence analyses showed deposition of IgM, C3, C5b-9 in rejected grafts, without C4d staining, indicating classical complement pathway blockade but alternate pathway activation. Moreover, rejected organs exhibited predominantly monocyte/macrophage infiltration with minimal lymphocyte representation. None of the recipients showed any signs of PERV transmission but some showed evidence of PCMV replication within the xenografts. Our work indicates that the addition of bortezomib and plasma exchange to the immunosuppressive regimen did not significantly prolong the survival of multi-transgenic GalT-KO renal xenografts. Non-Gal antibodies, the alternative complement pathway, innate mechanisms with monocyte activation and PCMV replication may have contributed to rejection. PMID:25612490

  9. Identification of Copy Number Variations in Xiang and Kele Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jian; Li, Rongrong; Li, Sheng; Ran, Xueqin; Wang, Jiafu; Jiang, Jicai; Zhao, Pengju

    2016-01-01

    Xiang and Kele pigs are two well-known local Chinese pig breeds that possess rich genetic resources and have enormous economic and scientific value. We performed a comprehensive genomic analysis of the copy number variations (CNVs) in these breeds. CNVs are one of the most important forms of genomic variation and have profound effects on phenotypic variation. In this study, PorcineSNP60 genotyping data from 98 Xiang pigs and 22 Kele pigs were used to identify CNVs. In total, 172 candidate CNV regions (CNVRs) were identified, ranging from 3.19 kb to 8175.26 kb and covering 80.41 Mb of the pig genome. Approximately 56.40% (97/172) of the CNVRs overlapped with those identified in seven previous studies, and 43.60% (75/172) of the identified CNVRs were novel. Of the identified CNVRs, 82 (47 gain, 33 loss, and two gain-loss events that covered 4.58 Mb of the pig genome) were found only in a Xiang population with a large litter size. In contrast, 13 CNVRs (8 gain and 5 loss events) were unique to a Xiang population with small litter sizes, and 30 CNVRs (14 loss and 16 gain events) were unique to Kele pigs. The CNVRs span approximately 660 annotated Sus scrofa genes that are significantly enriched for specific biological functions, such as sensory perception, cognition, reproduction, ATP biosynthetic processes, and neurological processes. Many CNVR-associated genes, particularly the genes involved in reproductive traits, differed between the Xiang populations with large and small litter sizes, and these genes warrant further investigation due to their importance in determining the reproductive performance of Xiang pigs. Our results provide meaningful information about genomic variation, which may be useful in future assessments of the associations between CNVs and important phenotypes in Xiang and Kele pigs to ultimately help protect these rare breeds. PMID:26840413

  10. Glutamine and glucose metabolism in enterocytes of the neonatal pig.

    PubMed

    Wu, G; Knabe, D A; Yan, W; Flynn, N E

    1995-02-01

    Glutamine and glucose metabolism was studied in 0- to 21-day-old pig enterocytes. Cells were incubated at 37 degrees C for 30 min in Krebs-Henseleit bicarbonate buffer (pH 7.4) in the presence of 2 mM [U-14C]glutamine with or without 5 mM glucose, or 5 mM [U-14C]glucose with or without 2 mM glutamine. Glutamine was metabolized to ammonia, glutamate, alanine, aspartate, CO2, citrulline, ornithine, and proline, whereas glucose was converted to lactate, pyruvate, and CO2 in pig enterocytes. CO2 production from glutamine accounted for 32-36% and 3-4% of utilized glutamine carbons in 0- to 7-day-old and 14- to 21-day-old pigs, respectively. The rates of O2 consumption and metabolism of glutamine and glucose decreased in enterocytes from 2- to 14-day-old pigs compared with 0-day-old pigs. By day 14 after birth, the oxidation of glutamine and glucose as well as citrulline production had decreased by 90-95%. Arginine synthesis from glutamine occurred in cells from 0- to 7-day-old pigs but not 14- to 21-day-old ones. Glucose (5 mM) had no effect on glutamine utilization and oxidation or the production of glutamate and arginine but stimulated the formation of alanine, citrulline, and proline at the expense of aspartate. In contrast, glutamine (2 mM) inhibited glycolysis and glucose oxidation in cells from 0- to 7-day-old pigs and had no effects in 14- to 21-day-old pigs. As a result, glutamine contributed approximately 2-fold greater amounts of ATP to 0- to 7-day-old pig enterocytes than glucose.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7864226

  11. A spatial ammonia emission inventory for pig farming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebolledo, Boris; Gil, Antonia; Pallarés, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric emissions of ammonia (NH3) from the agricultural sector have become a significant environmental and public concern as they have impacts on human health and ecosystems. This work proposes an improved methodology in order to identify administrative regions with high NH3 emissions from pig farming and calculates an ammonia density map (kg NH3-N ha-1), based on the number of pigs and available agricultural land, terrain slopes, groundwater bodies, soil permeability, zones sensitive to nitrate pollution and surface water buffer zones. The methodology has been used to construct a general tool for locating ammonia emissions from pig farming when detailed information of livestock farms is not available.

  12. Aggression and Affiliation during Social Conflict in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Camerlink, Irene; Turner, Simon P.; Ursinus, Winanda W.; Reimert, Inonge; Bolhuis, J. Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Social conflict is mostly studied in relation to aggression. A more integral approach, including aggressive and affiliative behaviour as well as physiology, may however give a better understanding of the animals' experience during social conflict. The experience of social conflict may also be reflected in the spatial distribution between conspecifics. The objective was to assess the relationship between behaviour, physiology, and spatial integration in pigs (Sus scrofa) during social conflict. Hereto, 64 groups of pigs (9 wk of age) were studied in a 24 h regrouping test whereby pairs of familiar pigs were grouped with 2 unfamiliar pairs, in either barren or straw-enriched housing. Data on aggressive and affiliative behaviour, skin lesions, body weight, and haptoglobin could be summarized into three principal component analysis factors. These three factors were analysed in relation to spatial integration, i.e. inter-individual distances and lying in body contact. Pigs stayed up to 24 h after encounter in closer proximity to the familiar pig than to unfamiliar pigs. Pigs with a high factor 1 score were more inactive, gave little social nosing, had many skin lesions and a high body weight. They tended to space further away from the familiar pig (b = 1.9 cm; P = 0.08) and unfamiliar ones (b = 0.7 cm; P = 0.05). Pigs that were involved in much aggression (factor 2), and that had a strong increase in haptoglobin (factor 3), tended to be relatively most far away from unfamiliar pigs (b = 0.03 times further; P = 0.08). Results on lying in body contact were coherent with results on distances. Pigs in enriched housing spaced further apart than pigs in barren housing (P<0.001). The combined analysis of measures revealed animals that may either promote or slow down group cohesion, which may not have become clear from single parameters. This emphasizes the importance of an integral approach to social conflict. PMID:25427249

  13. Experimental poisoning of guinea pig (Cavia porcellus) with Indigofera suffruticosa.

    PubMed

    Salvador, I S; Medeiros, R M T; Pessoa, C R M; Oliveira, D M; Duarte, A L A; Fighera, R A; Riet-Correa, F

    2011-05-01

    Indigofera suffruticosa causes hemolytic anemia and hemoglobinuria in cattle. The plant was administered to six groups of two guinea pigs each, at the daily dose of 10 g/kg body weight, for periods of 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 15 days. The guinea pigs progressively developed reduced hematocrits and hemoglobin concentrations, and finally presented anemia, without hemoglobinuria. Urine passed by guinea pigs that had ingested the plant for more than 24 h acquired a turquoise blue pigmentation 8-10 h after urination. It is suggested that the anemia is caused by the aniline contained in I. suffruticosa. PMID:21396390

  14. Pulsed Azidohomoalanine Labeling in Mammals (PALM) Detects Changes in Liver-Specific LKB1 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Quantification of proteomes by mass spectrometry has proven to be useful to study human pathology recapitulated in cellular or animal models of disease. Enriching and quantifying newly synthesized proteins (NSPs) at set time points by mass spectrometry has the potential to identify important early regulatory or expression changes associated with disease states or perturbations. NSP can be enriched from proteomes by employing pulsed introduction of the noncanonical amino acid, azidohomoalanine (AHA). We demonstrate that pulsed introduction of AHA in the feed of mice can label and identify NSP from multiple tissues. Furthermore, we quantitate differences in new protein expression resulting from CRE-LOX initiated knockout of LKB1 in mouse livers. Overall, the PALM strategy allows for the first time in vivo labeling of mouse tissues to differentiate protein synthesis rates at discrete time points. PMID:26445171

  15. Dynamical Relativistic Effects in Quasielastic 1p -Shell Proton Knockout from O{sup 16}

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Aniol, K. A.; Auerbach, L.; Baker, F. T.; Berthot, J.; Bertin, P.-Y.; Boeglin, W. U.

    2000-04-10

    We have measured the cross section for quasielastic 1p -shell proton knockout in the {sup 16}O( e, e{sup '}p) reaction at {omega}=0.439 GeV and Q{sup 2}=0.8 (GeV/c){sup 2} for missing momentum P{sub miss}{<=}355 MeV /c . We have extracted the response functions R{sub L+TT} , R{sub T} , R{sub LT} , and the left-right asymmetry, A{sub LT} , for the 1p{sub 1/2} and the 1p{sub 3/2} states. The data are well described by relativistic distorted wave impulse approximation calculations. At large P{sub miss} , the structure observed in A{sub LT} indicates the existence of dynamical relativistic effects. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  16. Gomafu lncRNA knockout mice exhibit mild hyperactivity with enhanced responsiveness to the psychostimulant methamphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Ip, Joanna Y.; Sone, Masamitsu; Nashiki, Chieko; Pan, Qun; Kitaichi, Kiyoyuki; Yanaka, Kaori; Abe, Takaya; Takao, Keizo; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Blencowe, Benjamin J.; Nakagawa, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    The long noncoding RNA Gomafu/MIAT/Rncr2 is thought to function in retinal cell specification, stem cell differentiation and the control of alternative splicing. To further investigate physiological functions of Gomafu, we created mouse knockout (KO) model that completely lacks the Gomafu gene. The KO mice did not exhibit any developmental deficits. However, behavioral tests revealed that the KO mice are hyperactive. This hyperactive behavior was enhanced when the KO mice were treated with the psychostimulant methamphetamine, which was associated with an increase in dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. RNA sequencing analyses identified a small number of genes affected by the deficiency of Gomafu, a subset of which are known to have important neurobiological functions. These observations suggest that Gomafu modifies mouse behavior thorough a mild modulation of gene expression and/or alternative splicing of target genes. PMID:27251103

  17. Activity of Pontine Neurons during Sleep and Cataplexy in Hypocretin Knock-Out Mice

    PubMed Central

    Thankachan, Stephen; Kaur, Satvinder; Shiromani, Priyattam J.

    2009-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a human sleep disorder resulting from the loss of neurons containing the neuropeptide orexin, also known as hypocretin. Cataplexy, which is a sudden loss of muscle tone during waking, is an important diagnostic symptom of narcolepsy. In humans and canines with narcolepsy, cataplexy is considered to be a separate and distinct behavioral state. However, in the mouse model of the disease this issue is not resolved. The present study monitored the activity of forty four neurons in the rostral pons in hypocretin knock-out mice. Majority of the neurons were active during wake and REM sleep, while four neurons were selectively active during REM sleep. All of these neurons were less active during cataplexy compared with REM sleep. Thus, although cataplexy and REM sleep share many common features, including the muscle atonia, cataplexy is a distinct state in mice. PMID:19193905

  18. Impairment of social and emotional behaviors in Cadm1-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Takayanagi, Yuki; Fujita, Eriko; Yu, Zhiling; Yamagata, Takanori; Momoi, Mariko Y; Momoi, Takashi; Onaka, Tatsushi

    2010-06-01

    Cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1), a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, mediates synaptic cell adhesion. Missense mutations in the CADM1 gene have been identified in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) patients. In the present study, we examined emotional behaviors, social behaviors and motor performances in Cadm1-knockout (KO) mice. Cadm1-KO mice showed increased anxiety-related behavior in open-field and light-dark transition tests. Social behaviors of Cadm1-KO mice were impaired in social interaction, resident-intruder and social memory/recognition tests. Furthermore, motor coordination and gait of Cadm1-KO mice were impaired in rotarod and footprint tests. Our study demonstrates that CADM1 plays roles in regulating emotional behaviors, social behaviors and motor performances, and that CADM1 has important implications for psychiatric disorders with disruptions in social behavior, such as autism. PMID:20450890

  19. Gomafu lncRNA knockout mice exhibit mild hyperactivity with enhanced responsiveness to the psychostimulant methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Ip, Joanna Y; Sone, Masamitsu; Nashiki, Chieko; Pan, Qun; Kitaichi, Kiyoyuki; Yanaka, Kaori; Abe, Takaya; Takao, Keizo; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Nakagawa, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    The long noncoding RNA Gomafu/MIAT/Rncr2 is thought to function in retinal cell specification, stem cell differentiation and the control of alternative splicing. To further investigate physiological functions of Gomafu, we created mouse knockout (KO) model that completely lacks the Gomafu gene. The KO mice did not exhibit any developmental deficits. However, behavioral tests revealed that the KO mice are hyperactive. This hyperactive behavior was enhanced when the KO mice were treated with the psychostimulant methamphetamine, which was associated with an increase in dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. RNA sequencing analyses identified a small number of genes affected by the deficiency of Gomafu, a subset of which are known to have important neurobiological functions. These observations suggest that Gomafu modifies mouse behavior thorough a mild modulation of gene expression and/or alternative splicing of target genes. PMID:27251103

  20. Generation of myometrium-specific Bmal1 knockout mice for parturition analysis.

    PubMed

    Ratajczak, Christine K; Asada, Minoru; Allen, Gregg C; McMahon, Douglas G; Muglia, Lisa M; Smith, Donté; Bhattacharyya, Sandip; Muglia, Louis J

    2012-01-01

    Human and rodent studies indicate a role for circadian rhythmicity and associated clock gene expression in supporting normal parturition. The importance of clock gene expression in tissues besides the suprachiasmatic nucleus is emerging. Here, a Bmal1 conditional knockout mouse line and a novel Cre transgenic mouse line were used to examine the role of myometrial Bmal1 in parturition. Ninety-two percent (22/24) of control females but only 64% (14/22) of females with disrupted myometrial Bmal1 completed parturition during the expected time window of 5p.m. on Day 19 through to 9a.m. on Day 19.5 of gestation. However, neither serum progesterone levels nor uterine transcript expression of the contractile-associated proteins Connexin43 and Oxytocin receptor differed between females with disrupted myometrial Bmal1 and controls during late gestation. The data indicate a role for myometrial Bmal1 in maintaining normal time of day of parturition. PMID:22697126

  1. The effect of insulin deficiency on tau and neurofilament in the insulin knockout mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Schechter, Ruben; E-mail: ruben.schechter@okstate.edu; Beju, Delia; Miller, Kenneth E.

    2005-09-09

    Complications of diabetes mellitus within the nervous system are peripheral and central neuropathy. In peripheral neuropathy, defects in neurofilament and microtubules have been demonstrated. In this study, we examined the effects of insulin deficiency within the brain in insulin knockout mice (I(-/-)). The I(-/-) exhibited hyperphosphorylation of tau, at threonine 231, and neurofilament. In addition, we showed hyperphosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and glycogen synthase kinase 3 {beta} (GSK-3 {beta}) at serine 9. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (ERK 1) showed decrease in phosphorylation, whereas ERK 2 showed no changes. Ultrastructural examination demonstrated swollen mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, and Golgi apparatus, and dispersion of the nuclear chromatin. Microtubules showed decrease in the number of intermicrotubule bridges and neurofilament presented as bunches. Thus, lack of insulin brain stimulation induces JNK hyperphosphorylation followed by hyperphosphorylation of tau and neurofilament, and ultrastructural cellular damage, that over time may induce decrease in cognition and learning disabilities.

  2. Structure of excited states in {sup 21}Mg studied in one-neutron knockout

    SciTech Connect

    Diget, C. A.; Adrich, P.; Bazin, D.; Campbell, C. M.; Obertelli, A.; Weisshaar, D.; Bowen, M. D.; Brown, B. A.; Cook, J. M.; Gade, A.; Glasmacher, T.; McDaniel, S.; Siwek, K.; Terry, J. R.; Hosier, K.; McGlinchery, D.; Riley, L. A.; Tostevin, J. A.

    2008-06-15

    Bound excited states in the neutron-deficient nucleus {sup 21}Mg were probed in the one-neutron knockout reaction {sup 9}Be({sup 22}Mg,{sup 21}Mg+{gamma})X at 74 MeV/nucleon projectile energy. The low-lying level scheme of {sup 21}Mg was investigated for the first time with {gamma}-ray spectroscopy. Contrary to the interpretation of previous particle spectroscopy data, our proposed excitation scheme is in agreement with the mirror nucleus and shell-model calculations in the p-sd shell. Spectroscopic factors for the one-neutron removal from {sup 22}Mg to {sup 21}Mg are extracted and compared to shell-model calculations using the WBP effective interaction.

  3. Knockout of insulin and IGF-1 receptors on vascular endothelial cells protects against retinal neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Tatsuya; Vicent, David; Suzuma, Kiyoshi; Yanagisawa, Masashi; King, George L.; Holzenberger, Martin; Kahn, C. Ronald

    2003-01-01

    Both insulin and IGF-1 have been implicated in control of retinal endothelial cell growth, neovascularization, and diabetic retinopathy. To precisely define the role of insulin and IGF-1 signaling in endothelium in these processes, we have used the oxygen-induced retinopathy model to study mice with a vascular endothelial cell–specific knockout of the insulin receptor (VENIRKO) or IGF-1 receptor (VENIFARKO). Following relative hypoxia, VENIRKO mice show a 57% decrease in retinal neovascularization as compared with controls. This is associated with a blunted rise in VEGF, eNOS, and endothelin-1. By contrast, VENIFARKO mice show only a 34% reduction in neovascularization and a very modest reduction in mediator generation. These data indicate that both insulin and IGF-1 signaling in endothelium play a role in retinal neovascularization through the expression of vascular mediators, with the effect of insulin being most important in this process. PMID:12813019

  4. Management Of Hanford KW Basin Knockout Pot Sludge As Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, R. E.; Evans, K. M.

    2012-10-22

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) and AREVA Federal Services, LLC (AFS) have been working collaboratively to develop and deploy technologies to remove, transport, and interim store remote-handled sludge from the 10S-K West Reactor Fuel Storage Basin on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, WA, USA. Two disposal paths exist for the different types of sludge found in the K West (KW) Basin. One path is to be managed as Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) with eventual disposal at an SNF at a yet to be licensed repository. The second path will be disposed as remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, NM. This paper describes the systems developed and executed by the Knockout Pot (KOP) Disposition Subproject for processing and interim storage of the sludge managed as SNF, (i.e., KOP material).

  5. DNA-free two-gene knockout in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii via CRISPR-Cas9 ribonucleoproteins.

    PubMed

    Baek, Kwangryul; Kim, Duk Hyoung; Jeong, Jooyeon; Sim, Sang Jun; Melis, Anastasios; Kim, Jin-Soo; Jin, EonSeon; Bae, Sangsu

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae are versatile organisms capable of converting CO2, H2O, and sunlight into fuel and chemicals for domestic and industrial consumption. Thus, genetic modifications of microalgae for enhancing photosynthetic productivity, and biomass and bio-products generation are crucial for both academic and industrial applications. However, targeted mutagenesis in microalgae with CRISPR-Cas9 is limited. Here we report, a one-step transformation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by the DNA-free CRISPR-Cas9 method rather than plasmids that encode Cas9 and guide RNAs. Outcome was the sequential CpFTSY and ZEP two-gene knockout and the generation of a strain constitutively producing zeaxanthin and showing improved photosynthetic productivity. PMID:27466170

  6. Rapidly generating knockout mice from H19-Igf2 engineered androgenetic haploid embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meili; Liu, Yufang; Liu, Guang; Li, Xin; Jia, Yuyan; Sun, Lihong; Wang, Liu; Zhou, Qi; Huang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Haploid mammalian embryonic stem cells (ESCs) hold great promise for functional genetic studies and assisted reproduction. Recently, rodent androgenetic haploid ESCs (AG-haESCs) were generated from androgenetic blastocysts and functioned like sperm to produce viable offspring via the intracytoplasmic AG-haESCs injection into oocytes. However, the efficiency of this reproduction was very low. Most pups were growth-retarded and died shortly after birth, which is not practical for producing knockout animals. Further investigation suggested a possible link between the low birthrate and aberrant expression of imprinted genes. Here, we report the high-frequency generation of healthy, fertile mice from H19-Igf2 imprinting-locus modified AG-haESCs, which maintained normal paternal imprinting and pluripotency. Moreover, it is feasible to perform further genetic manipulations in these AG-haESCs. Our study provides a reliable and efficient tool to rapidly produce gene-modified mouse models and will benefit reproductive medicine in the future.

  7. Estrogens and Spermiogenesis: New Insights from Type 1 Cannabinoid Receptor Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cacciola, Giovanna; Chioccarelli, Teresa; Fasano, Silvia; Pierantoni, Riccardo; Cobellis, Gilda

    2013-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is a complex mechanism which allows the production of male gametes; it consists of mitotic, meiotic, and differentiation phases. Spermiogenesis is the terminal differentiation process during which haploid round spermatids undergo several biochemical and morphological changes, including extensive remodelling of chromatin and nuclear shape. Spermiogenesis is under control of endocrine, paracrine, and autocrine factors, like gonadotropins and testosterone. More recently, emerging pieces of evidence are suggesting that, among these factors, estrogens may have a role. To date, this is a matter of debate and concern because of the agonistic and antagonistic estrogenic effects that environmental chemicals may have on animal and human with damaging outcome on fertility. In this review, we summarize data which fuel this debate, with a particular attention to our recent results, obtained using type 1 cannabinoid receptor knockout male mice as animal model. PMID:24324492

  8. Animal models for the study of liver fibrosis: new insights from knockout mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Hiromitsu

    2011-01-01

    Fibrosis arises as part of a would-healing response that maintains organ structure and integrity following tissue damage but also contributes to a variety of human pathologies such as liver fibrosis. Liver fibrosis is an abnormal response of the liver to persistent injury with the excessive accumulation of collagenous extracellular matrices. Currently there is no effective treatment, and many patients end up with a progressive form of the disease, eventually requiring a liver transplant. The clarification of mechanisms underlying pathogenesis of liver fibrosis and the development of effective therapy are of clinical importance. Experimental animal models, in particular targeted gene knockouts (loss of function) in mice, have become a powerful resource to address the molecular mechanisms or significance of the targeted gene in hepatic functions and diseases. This review will focus on the recent advances in knowledge obtained from genetically engineered mice that provide novel insights into the pathophysiology of liver fibrosis. PMID:21350186

  9. Knockout of an endogenous mannosyltransferase increases the homogeneity of glycoproteins produced in Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Krainer, Florian W.; Gmeiner, Christoph; Neutsch, Lukas; Windwarder, Markus; Pletzenauer, Robert; Herwig, Christoph; Altmann, Friedrich; Glieder, Anton; Spadiut, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    The yeast Pichia pastoris is a common host for the recombinant production of biopharmaceuticals, capable of performing posttranslational modifications like glycosylation of secreted proteins. However, the activity of the OCH1 encoded α-1,6-mannosyltransferase triggers hypermannosylation of secreted proteins at great heterogeneity, considerably hampering downstream processing and reproducibility. Horseradish peroxidases are versatile enzymes with applications in diagnostics, bioremediation and cancer treatment. Despite the importance of these enzymes, they are still isolated from plant at low yields with different biochemical properties. Here we show the production of homogeneous glycoprotein species of recombinant horseradish peroxidase by using a P. pastoris platform strain in which OCH1 was deleted. This och1 knockout strain showed a growth impaired phenotype and considerable rearrangements of cell wall components, but nevertheless secreted more homogeneously glycosylated protein carrying mainly Man8 instead of Man10 N-glycans as a dominant core glycan structure at a volumetric productivity of 70% of the wildtype strain. PMID:24252857

  10. Combination of cell culture assays and knockout mouse analyses for the study of opioid partial agonism.

    PubMed

    Ide, Soichiro; Minami, Masabumi; Sora, Ichiro; Ikeda, Kazutaka

    2010-01-01

    Nonselective opioid partial agonists, such as buprenorphine, butorphanol, and pentazocine, have been widely used as analgesics and for anti-addiction therapy. However, the precise molecular mechanisms underlying the therapeutic and rewarding effects of these drugs have not been clearly delineated. Recent success in developing mu-opioid receptor knockout (MOP-KO) mice has elucidated the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of morphine and other opioids. We have revealed the in vivo roles of MOPs in the effects of opioid partial agonists by using MOP-KO mice for behavioral tests (e.g., several kinds of antinociceptive tests for analgesic effects, conditioned place preference test for dependence). The combination of the cell culture assays using cDNA for mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors and the behavioral tests using MOP-KO mice has provided novel theories on the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of opioid ligands, especially opioid partial agonists. PMID:20336435

  11. DNA-free two-gene knockout in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii via CRISPR-Cas9 ribonucleoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Kwangryul; Kim, Duk Hyoung; Jeong, Jooyeon; Sim, Sang Jun; Melis, Anastasios; Kim, Jin-Soo; Jin, EonSeon; Bae, Sangsu

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae are versatile organisms capable of converting CO2, H2O, and sunlight into fuel and chemicals for domestic and industrial consumption. Thus, genetic modifications of microalgae for enhancing photosynthetic productivity, and biomass and bio-products generation are crucial for both academic and industrial applications. However, targeted mutagenesis in microalgae with CRISPR-Cas9 is limited. Here we report, a one-step transformation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by the DNA-free CRISPR-Cas9 method rather than plasmids that encode Cas9 and guide RNAs. Outcome was the sequential CpFTSY and ZEP two-gene knockout and the generation of a strain constitutively producing zeaxanthin and showing improved photosynthetic productivity. PMID:27466170

  12. Generation of a conditional knockout allele for the NFAT5 gene in mice.

    PubMed

    Küper, Christoph; Beck, Franz-Xaver; Neuhofer, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    The osmosensitive transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T-cells 5 (NFAT5), also known as tonicity enhancer element binding protein (TonEBP) plays a crucial role in protection of renal medullary cells against hyperosmotic stress, urinary concentration, the adaptive immune response, and other physiological systems. Since it is also important for development, conventional homozygous-null mutations result in perinatal death, which hinders the analysis of NFAT5 function in specific tissues in vivo. Here we describe the generation of mice with a conditional-null allele, in which loxP sites are inserted around exon 4. Mice harboring the floxed allele (NFAT5(flx) ) were mated to a strain expressing a tamoxifen-inducible derivative of the Cre-recombinase (Cre (+)) under the control of the ubiqitinC promoter. The resultant homozygous conditional knockout mice (Cre (+) NFAT5 (flx/flx) ) are viable, fertile, and show normal expression of NFAT5 and NFAT5 target genes, indicating that the conditional alleles retain their wild-type function. Induction of Cre-mediated recombination by administration of tamoxifen in 8-week-old mice resulted in a decrease in NFAT5 expression of about 70-90% in all tested tissues (renal cortex, renal outer medulla, renal inner medulla, heart, lung, spleen, skeletal muscle). Accordingly, the expression of the NFAT5 target genes aldose reductase and heat shock protein 70 in the renal medulla was also significantly decreased. Mice harboring this conditional knockout allele should be useful in future studies for gaining a better understanding of tissue and cell-type specific functions of NFAT5 in adult animals under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. PMID:25601839

  13. Exacerbated neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis phenotype in Cln1/5 double-knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Blom, Tea; Schmiedt, Mia-Lisa; Wong, Andrew M.; Kyttälä, Aija; Soronen, Jarkko; Jauhiainen, Matti; Tyynelä, Jaana; Cooper, Jonathan D.; Jalanko, Anu

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Both CLN1 and CLN5 deficiencies lead to severe neurodegenerative diseases of childhood, known as neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs). The broadly similar phenotypes of NCL mouse models, and the potential for interactions between NCL proteins, raise the possibility of shared or convergent disease mechanisms. To begin addressing these issues, we have developed a new mouse model lacking both Cln1 and Cln5 genes. These double-knockout (Cln1/5 dko) mice were fertile, showing a slight decrease in expected Mendelian breeding ratios, as well as impaired embryoid body formation by induced pluripotent stem cells derived from Cln1/5 dko fibroblasts. Typical disease manifestations of the NCLs, i.e. seizures and motor dysfunction, were detected at the age of 3 months, earlier than in either single knockout mouse. Pathological analyses revealed a similar exacerbation and earlier onset of disease in Cln1/5 dko mice, which exhibited a pronounced accumulation of autofluorescent storage material. Cortical demyelination and more pronounced glial activation in cortical and thalamic regions was followed by cortical neuron loss. Alterations in lipid metabolism in Cln1/5 dko showed a specific increase in plasma phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) activity. Finally, gene expression profiling of Cln1/5 dko cortex revealed defects in myelination and immune response pathways, with a prominent downregulation of α-synuclein in Cln1/5 dko mouse brains. The simultaneous loss of both Cln1 and Cln5 genes might enhance the typical pathological phenotypes of these mice by disrupting or downregulating shared or convergent pathogenic pathways, which could potentially include interactions of CLN1 and CLN5. PMID:23065637

  14. Thyrotoropin receptor knockout changes monoaminergic neuronal system and produces methylphenidate-sensitive emotional and cognitive dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Mouri, Akihiro; Hoshino, Yuta; Narusawa, Shiho; Ikegami, Keisuke; Mizoguchi, Hiroyuki; Murata, Yoshiharu; Yoshimura, Takashi; Nabeshima, Toshitaka

    2014-10-01

    Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has been reported in association with resistance to thyroid hormone, a disease caused by a mutation in the thyroid hormone receptor β (TRβ) gene. TRβ is a key protein mediating down-regulation of thyrotropin (TSH) expression by 3,3',5-tri-iodothyronine (T3), an active form of thyroid hormone. Dysregulation of TSH and its receptor (TSHR) is implicated in the pathophysiology of ADHD but the role of TSHR remains elusive. Here, we clarified a novel role for TSHR in emotional and cognitive functions related to monoaminergic nervous systems. TSHR knockout mice showed phenotypes of ADHD such as hyperactivity, impulsiveness, a decrease in sociality and increase in aggression, and an impairment of short-term memory and object recognition memory. Administration of methylphenidate (1, 5 and 10mg/kg) reversed impulsiveness, aggression and object recognition memory impairment. In the knockout mice, monoaminergic changes including decrease in the ratio of 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol/noradrenaline and increase in the ratio of homovanillic acid/dopamine were observed in some brain regions, accompanied by increase in the expression of noradrenaline transporter in the frontal cortex. When TSH was completely suppressed by the supraphysiological administration of T3 to the adult mice, some behavioral and neurological changes in TSHR KO mice were also observed, suggesting that these changes were not due to developmental hypothyroidism induced by the inactivation of TSHR but to the loss of the TSH-TSHR pathway itself. Taken together, the present findings suggest a novel role for TSHR in behavioral and neurological phenotypes of ADHD. PMID:25016105

  15. Caveolin-1 gene knockout impairs nitrergic function in mouse small intestine

    PubMed Central

    El-Yazbi, Ahmed F; Cho, Woo-Jung; Boddy, Geoffrey; Daniel, Edwin E

    2005-01-01

    Caveolin-1 is a plasma membrane-associated protein that is responsible for caveolae formation. It plays an important role in the regulation of the function of different signaling molecules, among which are the different isoforms of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Nitric oxide (NO) is known to be an important inhibitory mediator in the mouse gut. Caveolin-1 knockout mice (Cav1−/−) were used to examine the effect of caveolin-1 absence on the NO function in the mouse small intestine (ileum and jejunum) compared to their genetic controls and BALB/c controls. Immunohistochemical staining showed loss of caveolin-1 and NOS in the jejunal smooth muscles and myenteric plexus interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) of Cav1−/− mice; however, nNOS immunoreactive nerves were still present in myenteric ganglia. Under nonadrenergic noncholinergic (NANC) conditions, small intestinal tissues from Cav1−/− mice relaxed to electrical field stimulation (EFS), as did tissues from control mice. Relaxation of tissues from control mice was markedly reduced by N-omega-nitro-L-arginine (10−4 M), but relaxation of Cav1−/− animals was affected much less. Also, Cav1−/− mice tissues showed reduced relaxation responses to sodium nitroprusside (100 μM) compared to controls; yet there were no significant differences in the relaxation responses to 8-bromoguanosine-3′ : 5′-cyclic monophosphate (100 μM). Apamin (10−6 M) significantly reduced relaxations to EFS in NANC conditions in Cav1−/− mice, but not in controls. The data from this study suggest that caveolin-1 gene knockout causes alterations in the smooth muscles and the ICC, leading to an impaired NO function in the mouse small intestine that could possibly be compensated by apamin-sensitive inhibitory mediators. PMID:15937515

  16. Effect of chronic glutathione deficiency on the behavioral phenotype of Gclm-/- knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Curran, Christine P; Nebert, Daniel W; Patel, Krishna V; Williams, Michael T; Vorhees, Charles V

    2012-07-01

    Enhanced oxidative stress or deficient oxidative stress response in the brain is associated with neurodegenerative disorders and behavioral abnormalities. Previously we generated a knockout mouse line lacking the gene encoding glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier subunit (GCLM). Gclm(-/-) knockout (KO) mice are viable and fertile, yet exhibit only 9-35% of wild-type levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) in tissues, making them a useful model for chronic GSH depletion. Having the global absence of this gene, KO mice--from the time of conception and throughout postnatal life--experience chronic oxidative stress in all tissues, including brain. Between postnatal day (P) 60 and P100, we carried out behavioral phenotyping tests in adults, comparing male and female Gclm(-/-) with Gclm(-/-) wild-type (WT) littermates. Compared with WT, KO mice exhibited: subnormal anxiety in the elevated zero maze; normal overall exploratory open-field activity, but slightly more activity in the peripheral zones; normal acoustic startle and prepulse inhibition reactions; normal novel object recognition with increased time attending to the stimulus objects; slightly reduced latencies to reach a random marked platform in the Morris water maze; normal spatial learning and memory in multiple phases of the Morris water maze; and significantly greater hyperactivity in response to methamphetamine in the open field. These findings are generally in agreement with two prior studies on these mice and suggest that the brain is remarkably resilient to lowered GSH levels, implying significant reserve capacity to regulate reactive oxygen species-but with regional differences such that anxiety and stimulated locomotor control brain regions might be more vulnerable. PMID:22580179

  17. Does murine spermatogenesis require WNT signalling? A lesson from Gpr177 conditional knockout mouse models.

    PubMed

    Chen, Su-Ren; Tang, J-X; Cheng, J-M; Hao, X-X; Wang, Y-Q; Wang, X-X; Liu, Y-X

    2016-01-01

    Wingless-related MMTV integration site (WNT) proteins and several other components of the WNT signalling pathway are expressed in the murine testes. However, mice mutant for WNT signalling effector β-catenin using different Cre drivers have phenotypes that are inconsistent with each other. The complexity and overlapping expression of WNT signalling cascades have prevented researchers from dissecting their function in spermatogenesis. Depletion of the Gpr177 gene (the mouse orthologue of Drosophila Wntless), which is required for the secretion of various WNTs, makes it possible to genetically dissect the overall effect of WNTs in testis development. In this study, the Gpr177 gene was conditionally depleted in germ cells (Gpr177(flox/flox), Mvh-Cre; Gpr177(flox/flox), Stra8-Cre) and Sertoli cells (Gpr177(flox/flox), Amh-Cre). No obvious defects in fertility and spermatogenesis were observed in these three Gpr177 conditional knockout (cKO) mice at 8 weeks. However, late-onset testicular atrophy and fertility decline in two germ cell-specific Gpr177 deletion mice were noted at 8 months. In contrast, we did not observe any abnormalities of spermatogenesis and fertility, even in 8-month-old Gpr177(flox/flox), Amh-Cre mice. Elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was detected in Gpr177 cKO germ cells and Sertoli cells and exhibited an age-dependent manner. However, significant increase in the activity of Caspase 3 was only observed in germ cells from 8-month-old germ cell-specific Gpr177 knockout mice. In conclusion, GPR177 in Sertoli cells had no apparent influence on spermatogenesis, whereas loss of GPR177 in germ cells disrupted spermatogenesis in an age-dependent manner via elevating ROS levels and triggering germ cell apoptosis. PMID:27362799

  18. Conditional N-WASP knockout in mouse brain implicates actin cytoskeleton regulation in hydrocephalus pathology.

    PubMed

    Jain, Neeraj; Lim, Lee Wei; Tan, Wei Ting; George, Bhawana; Makeyev, Eugene; Thanabalu, Thirumaran

    2014-04-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is produced by the choroid plexus and moved by multi-ciliated ependymal cells through the ventricular system of the vertebrate brain. Defects in the ependymal layer functionality are a common cause of hydrocephalus. N-WASP (Neural-Wiskott Aldrich Syndrome Protein) is a brain-enriched regulator of actin cytoskeleton and N-WASP knockout caused embryonic lethality in mice with neural tube and cardiac abnormalities. To shed light on the role of N-WASP in mouse brain development, we generated N-WASP conditional knockout mouse model N-WASP(fl/fl); Nestin-Cre (NKO-Nes). NKO-Nes mice were born with Mendelian ratios but exhibited reduced growth characteristics compared to their littermates containing functional N-WASP alleles. Importantly, all NKO-Nes mice developed cranial deformities due to excessive CSF accumulation and did not survive past weaning. Coronal brain sections of these animals revealed dilated lateral ventricles, defects in ciliogenesis, loss of ependymal layer integrity, reduced thickness of cerebral cortex and aqueductal stenosis. Immunostaining for N-cadherin suggests that ependymal integrity in NKO-Nes mice is lost as compared to normal morphology in the wild-type controls. Moreover, scanning electron microscopy and immunofluorescence analyses of coronal brain sections with anti-acetylated tubulin antibodies revealed the absence of cilia in ventricular walls of NKO-Nes mice indicative of ciliogenesis defects. N-WASP deficiency does not lead to altered expression of N-WASP regulatory proteins, Fyn and Cdc42, which have been previously implicated in hydrocephalus pathology. Taken together, our results suggest that N-WASP plays a critical role in normal brain development and implicate actin cytoskeleton regulation as a vulnerable axis frequently deregulated in hydrocephalus. PMID:24462670

  19. Masticatory HyperMuscularity is not related to Reduced Cranial Volume in Myostatin-Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cray, James; Kneib, Jared; Vecchione, Lisa; Byron, Craig; Cooper, Gregory M.; Losee, Joseph E.; Siegel, Michael I.; Hamrick, Mark W.; Sciote, James J.; Mooney, Mark P.

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested recently that masticatory muscle size reduction in humans resulted in greater encephalization through decreased compressive forces on the cranial vault. Following this logic, if masticatory muscle size were increased, then a reduction in brain growth should also occur. The present study was designed to test this hypothesis using a myostatin (GDF-8) knockout mouse model. Myostatin is a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth, and individuals lacking this gene show significant hypermuscularity. Sixty-two (32 wild-type and 30 GDF-8 −/− knockout), 1, 28, 56 and 180 day old CD-1 mice were used. Body and masseter muscle weights were collected following dissection and standardized lateral and dorsoventral cephalographs were obtained. Cephalometric landmarks were identified on the radiographs and cranial volume was calculated. Mean differences were assessed using a two-way ANOVA. KO mice had significantly greater body and masseter weights beginning at 28 days compared to WT controls. No significant differences in cranial volumes were noted between KO and WT. Muscle weight was not significantly correlated with cranial volume in 1, 28, or 180 day old mice. Muscle weights exhibited a positive correlation with cranial volume at 56 days. Results demonstrate that masticatory hypermuscularity is not associated with reduced cranial volume. In contrast, there is abundant data demonstrating the opposite, brain growth determines cranial vault growth and masticatory apparatus only affects ectocranial morphology. The results presented here do not support the hypothesis that a reduction in masticatory musculature relaxed compressive forces on the cranial vault allowing for greater encephalization. PMID:21618442

  20. Effect of chronic glutathione deficiency on the behavioral phenotype of Gclm(−/−) knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Curran, Christine P.; Nebert, Daniel W.; Patel, Krishna V.; Williams, Michael T.; Vorhees, Charles V.

    2012-01-01

    Enhanced oxidative stress or deficient oxidative stress response in the brain is associated with neurodegenerative disorders and behavioral abnormalities. Previously we generated a knockout mouse line lacking the gene encoding γ-glutamylcysteine ligase modifier subunit (GCLM). Gclm(−/−) knockout (KO) mice are viable and fertile, yet exhibit only 9–35% of wild-type levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) in tissues, making them a useful model for chronic GSH depletion. Having the global absence of this gene, KO mice—from the time of conception and throughout postnatal life—experience chronic oxidative stress in all tissues, including brain. Between postnatal day (P) 60 and P100, we carried out behavioral phenotyping tests in adults, comparing male and female Gclm(−/−) with Gclm(+/+) wild-type (WT) littermates. Compared with WT, KO mice exhibited: subnormal anxiety in the elevated zero maze; normal overall exploratory open-field activity, but slightly more activity in the peripheral zones; normal acoustic startle and prepulse inhibition reactions; normal novel object recognition with increased time attending to the stimulus objects; slightly reduced latencies to reach a random marked platform in the Morris water maze; normal spatial learning and memory in multiple phases of the Morris water maze; and significantly greater hyperactivity in response to methamphetamine in the open field. These findings are in general agreement with two prior studies on these mice and suggest that the brain is remarkably resilient to lowered GSH levels, implying significant reserve capacity to regulate reactivity oxygen species—but with regional differences such that anxiety and stimulated locomotor control brain regions might be more vulnerable. PMID:22580179

  1. Effect of arylamine acetyltransferase Nat3 gene knockout on N-acetylation in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Sugamori, K S; Brenneman, D; Wong, S; Gaedigk, A; Yu, V; Abramovici, H; Rozmahel, R; Grant, D M

    2007-07-01

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NAT) catalyze the biotransformation of many important arylamine drugs and procarcinogens. NAT can either detoxify or activate procarcinogens, complicating the manner in which these enzymes may participate in enhancing or preventing toxic responses to particular agents. Mice possess three NAT isoenzymes: Nat1, Nat2, and Nat3. Whereas Nat1 and Nat2 can efficiently acetylate many arylamines, few substrates appear to be appreciably metabolized by Nat3. We generated a Nat3 knockout mouse strain and used it along with our double Nat1/2(-/-) knockout strain to further investigate the functional role of Nat3. Nat3(-/-) mice showed normal viability and reproductive capacity. Nat3 expression was very low in wild-type animals and completely undetectable in Nat3(-/-) mice. In contrast, greatly elevated expression of Nat3 transcript was observed in Nat1/2(-/-) mice. We used a transcribed marker polymorphism approach to establish that the increased expression of Nat3 in Nat1/2(-/-) mice is a positional artifact of insertion of the phosphoglycerate kinase-neomycin resistance cassette in place of the Nat1/Nat2 gene region and upstream of the intact Nat3 gene, rather than a biological compensatory mechanism. Despite the increase in Nat3 transcript, the N-acetylation of p-aminosalicylate, sulfamethazine, 2-aminofluorene, and 4-aminobiphenyl was undetectable either in vivo or in vitro in Nat1/2(-/-) animals. In parallel, no difference was observed in the in vivo clearance or in vitro metabolism of any of these substrates between wild-type and Nat3(-/-) mice. Thus, Nat3 is unlikely to play a significant role in the N-acetylation of arylamines either in wild-type mice or in mice lacking Nat1 and Nat2 activities. PMID:17403913

  2. Suppression of diet-induced atherosclerosis in low density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice overexpressing lipoprotein lipase.

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, M; Ishibashi, S; Inaba, T; Yagyu, H; Harada, K; Osuga, J I; Ohashi, K; Yazaki, Y; Yamada, N

    1996-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is a key enzyme in the hydrolysis of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. Conflicting results have been reported concerning its role in atherogenesis. To determine the effects of the overexpressed LPL on diet-induced atherosclerosis, we have generated low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) knockout mice that overexpressed human LPL transgene (LPL/LDLRKO) and compared their plasma lipoproteins and atherosclerosis with those in nonexpressing LDLR-knockout mice (LDLRKO). On a normal chow diet, LPL/LDLRKO mice showed marked suppression of mean plasma triglyceride levels (32 versus 236 mg/dl) and modest decrease in mean cholesterol levels (300 versus 386 mg/dl) as compared with LDLRKO mice. Larger lipoprotein particles of intermediate density lipoprotein (IDL)/LDL were selectively reduced in LPL/LDLRKO mice. On an atherogenic diet, both mice exhibited severe hypercholesterolemia. But, mean plasma cholesterol levels in LPL/ LDLRKO mice were still suppressed as compared with that in LDLRKO mice (1357 versus 2187 mg/dl). Marked reduction in a larger subfraction of IDL/LDL, which conceivably corresponds to remnant lipoproteins, was observed in the LPL/LDLRKO mice. LDLRKO mice developed severe fatty streak lesions in the aortic sinus after feeding with the atherogenic diet for 8 weeks. In contrast, mean lesion area in the LPL/LDLRKO mice was 18-fold smaller than that in LDLRKO mice. We suggest that the altered lipoprotein profile, in particular the reduced level of remnant lipoproteins, is mainly responsible for the protection by LPL against atherosclerosis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8692976

  3. MKP-1 knockout does not prevent glucocorticoid-induced bone disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Conradie, Maria M; Cato, Andrew C B; Ferris, William F; de Wet, Heidi; Horsch, Kay; Hough, Stephen

    2011-09-01

    Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GCOP) is predominantly caused by inhibition of bone formation, resulting from a decrease in osteoblast numbers. Employing mouse (MBA-15.4) and human (MG-63) osteoblast cell lines, we previously found that the glucocorticoid (GC) dexamethasone (Dex) inhibits cellular proliferation as well as activation of the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway, essential for mitogenesis in these cells, and that both these effects could be reversed by the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) inhibitor vanadate. In a rat model of GCOP, the GC-induced changes in bone formation, mass, and strength could be prevented by vanadate cotreatment, suggesting that the GC effects on bone were mediated by one or more PTPs. Employing phosphatase inhibitors, qRT-PCR, Western blotting, and overexpression/knockdown experiments, we concluded that MKP-1 was upregulated by Dex, that this correlated with the dephosphorylation of ERK, and that it largely mediated the in vitro effects of GCs on bone. To confirm the pivotal role of MKP-1 in vivo, we investigated the effects of the GC methylprednisolone on the quantitative bone histology of wild-type (WT) and MKP-1 homozygous knockout (MKP-1(-/-)) mice. In WT mice, static bone histology revealed that GC administration for 28 days decreased osteoid surfaces, volumes, and osteoblast numbers. Dynamic histology, following time-spaced tetracycline labeling, confirmed a significant GC-induced reduction in osteoblast appositional rate and bone formation rate. However, identical results were obtained in MKP-1 knockout mice, suggesting that in these animals upregulation of MKP-1 by GCs cannot be regarded as the sole mediator of the GC effects on bone. PMID:21698455

  4. Hyperaldosteronism after decreased renal K+ excretion in KCNMB2 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Casper K; Jensen, Iben S; Sorensen, Mads V; de Bruijn, Pauline I; Bleich, Markus; Praetorius, Helle A; Leipziger, Jens

    2016-05-15

    The kidney is the primary organ ensuring K(+) homeostasis. K(+) is secreted into the urine in the distal tubule by two mechanisms: by the renal outer medullary K(+) channel (Kir1.1) and by the Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel (KCa1.1). Here, we report a novel knockout mouse of the β2-subunit of the KCa1.1 channel (KCNMB2), which displays hyperaldosteronism after decreased renal K(+) excretion. KCNMB2(-/-) mice displayed hyperaldosteronism, normal plasma K(+) concentration, and produced dilute urine with decreased K(+) concentration. The normokalemia indicated that hyperaldosteronism did not result from primary aldosteronism. Activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system was also ruled out as renal renin mRNA expression was reduced in KCNMB2(-/-) mice. Renal K(+) excretion rates were similar in the two genotypes; however, KCNMB2(-/-) mice required elevated plasma aldosterone to achieve K(+) balance. Blockade of the mineralocorticoid receptor with eplerenone triggered mild hyperkalemia and unmasked reduced renal K(+) excretion in KCNMB2(-/-) mice. Knockout mice for the α-subunit of the KCa1.1 channel (KCNMA1(-/-) mice) have hyperaldosteronism, are hypertensive, and lack flow-induced K(+) secretion. KCNMB2(-/-) mice share the phenotypic traits of normokalemia and hyperaldosteronism with KCNMA1(-/-) mice but were normotensive and displayed intact flow-induced K(+) secretion. Despite elevated plasma aldosterone, KNCMB2(-/-) mice did not display salt-sensitive hypertension and were able to decrease plasma aldosterone on a high-Na(+) diet, although plasma aldosterone remained elevated in KCNMB2(-/-) mice. In summary, KCNMB2(-/-) mice have a reduced ability to excrete K(+) into the urine but achieve K(+) balance through an aldosterone-mediated, β2-independent mechanism. The phenotype of KCNMB2 mice was similar but milder than the phenotype of KCNMA1(-/-) mice. PMID:26962098

  5. ATP-sensitive K+ channel knockout induces cardiac proteome remodeling predictive of heart disease susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Arrell, D Kent; Zlatkovic, Jelena; Kane, Garvan C; Yamada, Satsuki; Terzic, Andre

    2009-10-01

    Forecasting disease susceptibility requires detection of maladaptive signatures prior to onset of overt symptoms. A case-in-point are cardiac ATP-sensitive K+ (K(ATP)) channelopathies, for which the substrate underlying disease vulnerability remains to be identified. Resolving molecular pathobiology, even for single genetic defects, mandates a systems platform to reliably diagnose disease predisposition. High-throughput proteomic analysis was here integrated with network biology to decode consequences of Kir6.2 K(ATP) channel pore deletion. Differential two-dimensional gel electrophoresis reproducibly resolved >800 protein species from hearts of asymptomatic wild-type and Kir6.2-knockout counterparts. K(ATP) channel ablation remodeled the cardiac proteome, significantly altering 71 protein spots, from which 102 unique identities were assigned following hybrid linear ion trap quadrupole-Orbitrap tandem mass spectrometry. Ontological annotation stratified the K(ATP) channel-dependent protein cohort into a predominant bioenergetic module (63 resolved identities), with additional focused sets representing signaling molecules (6), oxidoreductases (8), chaperones (6), and proteins involved in catabolism (6), cytostructure (8), and transcription and translation (5). Protein interaction mapping, in conjunction with expression level changes, localized a K(ATP) channel-associated subproteome within a nonstochastic scale-free network. Global assessment of the K(ATP) channel deficient environment verified the primary impact on metabolic pathways and revealed overrepresentation of markers associated with cardiovascular disease. Experimental imposition of graded stress precipitated exaggerated structural and functional myocardial defects in the Kir6.2-knockout, decreasing survivorship and validating the forecast of disease susceptibility. Proteomic cartography thus provides an integral view of molecular remodeling in the heart induced by K(ATP) channel deletion, establishing a

  6. Not All SCID Pigs Are Created Equally: Two Independent Mutations in the Artemis Gene Cause SCID in Pigs.

    PubMed

    Waide, Emily H; Dekkers, Jack C M; Ross, Jason W; Rowland, Raymond R R; Wyatt, Carol R; Ewen, Catherine L; Evans, Alyssa B; Thekkoot, Dinesh M; Boddicker, Nicholas J; Serão, Nick V L; Ellinwood, N Matthew; Tuggle, Christopher K

    2015-10-01

    Mutations in >30 genes are known to result in impairment of the adaptive immune system, causing a group of disorders collectively known as SCID. SCID disorders are split into groups based on their presence and/or functionality of B, T, and NK cells. Piglets from a line of Yorkshire pigs at Iowa State University were shown to be affected by T(-)B(-)NK(+) SCID, representing, to our knowledge, the first example of naturally occurring SCID in pigs. In this study, we present evidence for two spontaneous mutations as the molecular basis for this SCID phenotype. Flow cytometry analysis of thymocytes showed an increased frequency of immature T cells in SCID pigs. Fibroblasts from these pigs were more sensitive to ionizing radiation than non-SCID piglets, eliminating the RAG1 and RAG2 genes. Genetic and molecular analyses showed that two mutations were present in the Artemis gene, which in the homozygous or compound heterozygous state cause the immunodeficient phenotype. Rescue of SCID fibroblast radiosensitivity by human Artemis protein demonstrated that the identified Artemis mutations are the direct cause of this cellular phenotype. The work presented in the present study reveals two mutations in the Artemis gene that cause T(-)B(-)NK(+) SCID in pigs. The SCID pig can be an important biomedical model, but these mutations would be undesirable in commercial pig populations. The identified mutations and associated genetic tests can be used to address both of these issues. PMID:26320255

  7. Ammonia and odour emissions from UK pig farms and nitrogen leaching from outdoor pig production. A review.

    PubMed

    Webb, J; Broomfield, Mark; Jones, Stephanie; Donovan, Brian

    2014-02-01

    We reviewed specific literature for emissions of ammonia (NH3) and odours from all stages of pig production together with nitrogen (N) leaching from raising pigs outdoors. Emissions of NH3 decrease with decreases in the crude protein (CP) content of pig diets, at all stages of manure management. The CPs of pig diets have been greatly reduced by matching the CP content to the protein required at each stage of the animals' growth and by using synthetic essential amino acids to minimise total CP intake. The CP contents of the dietary ingredients needed to provide energy for the animals impose further limits to reductions in dietary CP. Housing systems have been designed and evaluated which offer potential for reducing NH3 emissions. However such designs may not be applicable at all stages of the pigs' development and the careful management needed to ensure their effective working may be costly and difficult to implement on commercial farms. The factors behind odour emissions are less well characterised. Reducing diet CP to 160 g CP kg(-1) has been shown to reduce odour emissions but further CP reductions may increase them. Some reductions in odour emissions from buildings can be achieved by careful management of the ventilation rate but the most effective measures to reduce emissions of NH3 and odours are to cover slurry stores and to inject slurry into soil. Changes in the feeding and management of outdoor pigs mean that N leaching losses may be up to 50% less than previously reported. No studies have been undertaken that compare the N leached from pigs raised outdoors, versus that arising from the application of pig manure from an equal number of housed pigs. As a precursor to any field study, current models could be used to provide a first estimate of any systematic differences. PMID:24211346

  8. Rhamnolipid and poly (hydrozyalkanoate) biosynthesis in 3-hydrozyacyl-ACP:COA transacylase (phaG) - knockouts of pseudomonas chloroaphis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 3-hydroxyacyl-ACP:CoA transacylase gene (phaG(Pc30761)) of P. chlororaphis NRRL B-30761 was cloned and analyzed. The nucleotide and translated amino-acid sequences of phaG(Pc30761) had 99% identities (at 100% query coverage) with the phaG gene of P. fluorescens O6. Two phaG-knockout strains of...

  9. Evaluation of cimi-shield knock-out bed bug eliminator against house fly (Musca domestica) adults.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cimi-Shield Knock-Out (CSKO) Bed Bug Eliminator is a green treatment labeled for use against bed bugs, carpet beetles, ants, roaches, fleas, ticks, silverfish, millipedes and centipedes. The active ingredient is soybean oil. If CSKO is formulated according to label instructions and sprayed directly ...

  10. Evaluation of cimi-shield knock-out bed bug eliminator against house fly (Musca domestica) adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cimi-Shield Knock-Out (CSKO) Bed Bug Eliminator is a green treatment labeled for use against bed bugs, carpet beetles, ants, roaches, fleas, ticks, silverfish, millipedes and centipedes. The active ingredient is soybean oil. If CSKO is formulated according to label instructions and sprayed directly ...

  11. Male contraception via simultaneous knockout of α1A-adrenoceptors and P2X1-purinoceptors in mice

    PubMed Central

    White, Carl W.; Choong, Yan-Ting; Short, Jennifer L.; Exintaris, Betty; Malone, Daniel T.; Allen, Andrew M.; Evans, Richard J.; Ventura, Sabatino

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutic targets for male contraception are associated with numerous problems due to their focus on disrupting spermatogenesis or hormonal mechanisms to produce dysfunctional sperm. Here we describe the dual genetic deletion of α1A-adrenergic G protein-coupled receptors (adrenoceptors) and P2X1-purinoceptor ligand gated ion channels in male mice, thereby blocking sympathetically mediated sperm transport through the vas deferens during the emission phase of ejaculation. This modification produced 100% infertility without effects on sexual behavior or function. Sperm taken from the cauda epididymides of double knockout mice were microscopically normal and motile. Furthermore, double knockout sperm were capable of producing normal offspring following intracytoplasmic sperm injection into wild-type ova and implantation of the fertilized eggs into foster mothers. Blood pressure and baroreflex function was reduced in double knockout mice, but no more than single knockout of α1A-adrenoceptors alone. These results suggest that this autonomic method of male contraception appears free of major physiological and behavioral side effects. In addition, they provide conclusive proof of concept that pharmacological antagonism of the P2X1-purinoceptor and α1A-adrenoceptor provides a safe and effective therapeutic target for a nonhormonal, readily reversible male contraceptive. PMID:24297884

  12. EFFECTS OF HEAT AND BROMOCHLOROACETIC ACID ON MALE REPRODUCTION IN HEAT SHOCK FACTOR-1 GENE KNOCKOUT MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of heat and bromochloroacetic acid on male reproduction in heat shock factor-1 gene knockout mice.
    Luft JC1, IJ Benjamin2, JB Garges1 and DJ Dix1. 1Reproductive Toxicology Division, USEPA, RTP, NC, 27711 and 2Dept of Internal Medicine, Univ.of Texas Southwestern Med C...

  13. Gene knockout of the KCNJ8-encoded Kir6.1 K(ATP) channel imparts fatal susceptibility to endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Kane, Garvan C; Lam, Chen-Fuh; O'Cochlain, Fearghas; Hodgson, Denice M; Reyes, Santiago; Liu, Xiao-Ke; Miki, Takashi; Seino, Susumu; Katusic, Zvonimir S; Terzic, Andre

    2006-11-01

    Sepsis, the systemic inflammatory response to infection, imposes a high demand for bodily adaptation, with the cardiovascular response a key determinant of outcome. The homeostatic elements that secure cardiac tolerance in the setting of the sepsis syndrome are poorly understood. Here, in a model of acute septic shock induced by endotoxin challenge with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS), knockout of the KCNJ8 gene encoding the vascular Kir6.1 K(ATP) channel pore predisposed to an early and profound survival disadvantage. The exaggerated susceptibility provoked by disruption of this stress-responsive sensor of cellular metabolism was linked to progressive deterioration in cardiac activity, ischemic myocardial damage, and contractile dysfunction. Deletion of KCNJ8 blunted the responsiveness of coronary vessels to cytokine- or metabolic-mediated vasodilation necessary to support myocardial perfusion in the wild-type (WT), creating a deficit in adaptive response in the Kir6.1 knockout. Application of a K(ATP) channel opener drug improved survival in the endotoxic WT but had no effect in the Kir6.1 knockout. Restoration of the dilatory capacity of coronary vessels was required to rescue the Kir6.1 knockout phenotype and reverse survival disadvantage in lethal endotoxemia. Thus, the Kir6.1-containing K(ATP) channel, by coupling vasoreactivity with metabolic demand, provides a vital feedback element for cardiovascular tolerance in endotoxic shock. PMID:17077304

  14. Linking cellular zinc status to body weight and fat mass: mapping quantitative trait loci in Znt7 knockout mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zinc transporter 7 (Znt7, Slc30a7) knockout (KO) mice display abnormalities in body weight gain and body adiposity. Regulation of body weight and fatness is complex, involving multiple genetic and environmental factors. To understand how zinc homeostasis influences body weight gain and fat deposit a...

  15. CB2 Cannabinoid Receptor Knockout in Mice Impairs Contextual Long-Term Memory and Enhances Spatial Working Memory

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong; Kim, Jimok

    2016-01-01

    Neurocognitive effects of cannabinoids have been extensively studied with a focus on CB1 cannabinoid receptors because CB1 receptors have been considered the major cannabinoid receptor in the nervous system. However, recent discoveries of CB2 cannabinoid receptors in the brain demand accurate determination of whether and how CB2 receptors are involved in the cognitive effects of cannabinoids. CB2 cannabinoid receptors are primarily involved in immune functions, but also implicated in psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and depression. Here, we examined the effects of CB2 receptor knockout in mice on memory to determine the roles of CB2 receptors in modulating cognitive function. Behavioral assays revealed that hippocampus-dependent, long-term contextual fear memory was impaired whereas hippocampus-independent, cued fear memory was normal in CB2 receptor knockout mice. These mice also displayed enhanced spatial working memory when tested in a Y-maze. Motor activity and anxiety of CB2 receptor knockout mice were intact when assessed in an open field arena and an elevated zero maze. In contrast to the knockout of CB2 receptors, acute blockade of CB2 receptors by AM603 in C57BL/6J mice had no effect on memory, motor activity, or anxiety. Our results suggest that CB2 cannabinoid receptors play diverse roles in regulating memory depending on memory types and/or brain areas. PMID:26819779

  16. Male contraception via simultaneous knockout of α1A-adrenoceptors and P2X1-purinoceptors in mice.

    PubMed

    White, Carl W; Choong, Yan-Ting; Short, Jennifer L; Exintaris, Betty; Malone, Daniel T; Allen, Andrew M; Evans, Richard J; Ventura, Sabatino

    2013-12-17

    Therapeutic targets for male contraception are associated with numerous problems due to their focus on disrupting spermatogenesis or hormonal mechanisms to produce dysfunctional sperm. Here we describe the dual genetic deletion of α1A-adrenergic G protein-coupled receptors (adrenoceptors) and P2X1-purinoceptor ligand gated ion channels in male mice, thereby blocking sympathetically mediated sperm transport through the vas deferens during the emission phase of ejaculation. This modification produced 100% infertility without effects on sexual behavior or function. Sperm taken from the cauda epididymides of double knockout mice were microscopically normal and motile. Furthermore, double knockout sperm were capable of producing normal offspring following intracytoplasmic sperm injection into wild-type ova and implantation of the fertilized eggs into foster mothers. Blood pressure and baroreflex function was reduced in double knockout mice, but no more than single knockout of α1A-adrenoceptors alone. These results suggest that this autonomic method of male contraception appears free of major physiological and behavioral side effects. In addition, they provide conclusive proof of concept that pharmacological antagonism of the P2X1-purinoceptor and α1A-adrenoceptor provides a safe and effective therapeutic target for a nonhormonal, readily reversible male contraceptive. PMID:24297884

  17. MiR-155 Knockout in Fibroblasts Improves Cardiac Remodeling by Targeting Tumor Protein p53-Inducible Nuclear Protein 1.

    PubMed

    He, Wangwei; Huang, He; Xie, Qiang; Wang, Zhiqiang; Fan, Yang; Kong, Bin; Huang, Dan; Xiao, Yali

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac remodeling caused by acute myocardial infarction (AMI) represents a major challenge for heart failure research. MiR-155 has been identified as a key mediator of cardiac inflammation and hypertrophy. In this study, we investigate the role of miR-155 in cardiac remodeling induced by AMI. We demonstrate that miR-155 expressed in cardiac fibroblasts is a potent contributor to cardiac remodeling. We reveal that in vivo, miR-155 knockout improves left ventricular function, reduces infarct size, and attenuates collagen deposition, whereas overexpression of miR-155 produces the opposite effects. MiR-155 knockout also inhibits cardiac fibroblast proliferation and differentiation into myofibroblasts. In addition, downregulation of tumor protein p53-inducible nuclear protein 1 (TP53INP1) by small interfering RNA reverses the effects of miR-155 knockout on cardiac fibroblasts. Our data reveal that knockout of miR-155 in cardiac fibroblasts improves cardiac remodeling by targeting TP53INP1, which may be a novel treatment strategy for cardiac remodeling. PMID:26589288

  18. CRISPR-Cas9-mediated gene knockout in primary human airway epithelial cells reveals a proinflammatory role for MUC18.

    PubMed

    Chu, H W; Rios, C; Huang, C; Wesolowska-Andersen, A; Burchard, E G; O'Connor, B P; Fingerlin, T E; Nichols, D; Reynolds, S D; Seibold, M A

    2015-10-01

    Targeted knockout of genes in primary human cells using CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genome-editing represents a powerful approach to study gene function and to discern molecular mechanisms underlying complex human diseases. We used lentiviral delivery of CRISPR-Cas9 machinery and conditional reprogramming culture methods to knockout the MUC18 gene in human primary nasal airway epithelial cells (AECs). Massively parallel sequencing technology was used to confirm that the genome of essentially all cells in the edited AEC populations contained coding region insertions and deletions (indels). Correspondingly, we found mRNA expression of MUC18 was greatly reduced and protein expression was absent. Characterization of MUC18 knockout cell populations stimulated with TLR2, 3 and 4 agonists revealed that IL-8 (a proinflammatory chemokine) responses of AECs were greatly reduced in the absence of functional MUC18 protein. Our results show the feasibility of CRISPR-Cas9-mediated gene knockouts in AEC culture (both submerged and polarized), and suggest a proinflammatory role for MUC18 in airway epithelial response to bacterial and viral stimuli. PMID:26043872

  19. The butyrylcholinesterase knockout mouse a research tool in the study of drug sensitivity, bio-distribution, obesity and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Duysen, Ellen G; Li, Bin; Lockridge, Oksana

    2009-05-01

    Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) mutations common in the human population may result in complete or partial BChE deficiency, making the BChE knockout (KO) mouse a model for human deficiencies. The BChE KO mouse cannot tolerate standard doses of the muscle relaxant succinylcholine or the Alzheimer's disease drugs huperzine A and donepezil. It is resistant to the asthma drug bambuterol. The importance of BChE in detoxication of cocaine has been demonstrated by hepatotoxicity and cardiotoxicity in cocaine-challenged BChE KO mice. The BChE KO mouse becomes obese on a high-fat diet, suggesting a role for BChE in fat metabolism. BChE serves as a backup for acetylcholinesterase by hydrolyzing the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in acetylcholinesterase knockout mice. Imaging studies show that BChE injected intrathecally crosses the blood-brain barrier. Mice, but not humans, have carboxylesterase in their blood. Carboxylesterase obscures the role of BChE in detoxication of organophosphorus pesticides. Future studies will make a double knockout that has neither BChE nor carboxylesterase. The double knockout is expected to be unusually sensitive to the toxicity of organophosphorus pesticides. Knowledge of drug sensitivities in the mouse model of human BChE deficiency will aid in understanding adverse drug effects in humans. PMID:19416087

  20. Food intake, tumor growth, and weight loss in EP2 receptor subtype knockout mice bearing PGE2-producing tumors

    PubMed Central

    Iresjö, Britt-Marie; Wang, Wenhua; Nilsberth, Camilla; Andersson, Marianne; Lönnroth, Christina; Smedh, Ulrika

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that prostaglandin (PG) E2 is involved in anorexia/cachexia development in MCG 101 tumor-bearing mice. In the present study, we investigate the role of PGE receptor subtype EP2 in the development of anorexia after MCG 101 implantation in wild-type (EP2+/+) or EP2-receptor knockout (EP2−/−) mice. Our results showed that host absence of EP2 receptors attenuated tumor growth and development of anorexia in tumor-bearing EP2 knockout mice compared to tumor-bearing wild-type animals. Microarray profiling of the hypothalamus revealed a relative twofold change in expression of around 35 genes including mRNA transcripts coding for Phospholipase A2 and Prostaglandin D2 synthase (Ptgds) in EP2 receptor knockout mice compared to wild-type mice. Prostaglandin D2 synthase levels were increased significantly in EP2 receptor knockouts, suggesting that improved food intake may depend on altered balance of prostaglandin production in hypothalamus since PGE2 and PGD2 display opposing effects in feeding control. PMID:26197930