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Sample records for a1298c mtr a2756g

  1. Association between dietary intake of folate, vitamin B6, B12 & MTHFR, MTR Genotype and breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Weiwei, Zheng; Liping, Chen; Dequan, Li

    2014-01-01

    Objective: we conducted a case-control study to investigate the association between dietary folate, vitamin B6 and vitamin B12 intake, MTHFR and MTR genotype, and breast cancer risk. Methods: Genotyping for MTHFR C677T and A1298C and MTR A2756G polymorphisms were performed using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (PCR-RFLP) method. The intake of folate, vitamin B6 and vitamin B12 were calculated by each food item from questionnaire. Results: Subjects with breast cancer tended to have more first-degree relatives (?2=30.77, P<0.001) and have high intake of folate (t=2.42, P=0.008) and Vitamin B6 (t=2.94, P=0.002). Compared to the reference group, women with MTHFR 677 TT genotype and T allele had a significantly increased risk of breast cancer, with ORs (95%CI) of 1.8(1.08-2.27) and 1.39(1.02-1.92), respectively. For those who had folate intake?450 ug/day, MTHFR 667TT genotype was associated with a higher risk of breast cancer (OR=2.45, 95% CI=1.09-5.82, P=0.02). Similarly, subjects with Vitamin B6 intake?0.84 mg/day and MTHFR 667T allele genotype was correlated with a marginally increased risk of breast cancer. A significant interaction was observed between MTHFR C667T polymorphism and folate intake on the risk of breast cancer (P for interaction was 0.025). Conclusion: This case-control study found a significant association between MTHFR C667T polymorphism, folate intake and vitamin B6 and breast cancer risk, and a significant interaction was observed between MTHFR C667T polymorphism and folate intake on the risk of breast cancer. PMID:24639841

  2. Prevalence of MTHFR C677T and MS A2756G polymorphisms in major depressive disorder, and their impact on response to fluoxetine treatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To examine the prevalence of the C677T polymorphism of the methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene and the A2756G polymorphism of methionine synthase (MS), and their impact on antidepressant response. We screened 224 subjects (52% female, mean age 39 +/- 11 years) with SCID-diagnosed major...

  3. Association of the MTHFR A1298C Variant with Unexplained Severe Male Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Eloualid, Abdelmajid; Abidi, Omar; Charif, Majida; El houate, Brahim; Benrahma, Houda; Louanjli, Noureddine; Chadli, Elbakkay; Ajjemami, Maria; Barakat, Abdelhamid; Bashamboo, Anu; McElreavey, Ken; Rhaissi, Houria; Rouba, Hassan

    2012-01-01

    The methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene is one of the main regulatory enzymes involved in folate metabolism, DNA synthesis and remethylation reactions. The influence of MTHFR variants on male infertility is not completely understood. The objective of this study was to analyze the distribution of the MTHFR C677T and A1298C variants using PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) in a case group consisting of 344 men with unexplained reduced sperm counts compared to 617 ancestry-matched fertile or normozoospermic controls. The Chi square test was used to analyze the genotype distributions of MTHFR polymorphisms. Our data indicated a lack of association of the C677T variant with infertility. However, the homozygous (C/C) A1298C polymorphism of the MTHFR gene was present at a statistically high significance in severe oligozoospermia group compared with controls (OR?=?3.372, 95% confidence interval CI?=?1.27–8.238; p?=?0.01431). The genotype distribution of the A1298C variants showed significant deviation from the expected Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, suggesting that purifying selection may be acting on the 1298CC genotype. Further studies are necessary to determine the influence of the environment, especially the consumption of diet folate on sperm counts of men with different MTHFR variants. PMID:22457816

  4. Prevalence of MTHFR C677T and MS A2756G polymorphisms in major depressive disorder, and their impact on response to fluoxetine treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mischoulon, David; Lamon-Fava, Stefania; Selhub, Jacob; Katz, Judith; Papakostas, George I.; Iosifescu, Dan V.; Yeung, Albert S.; Dording, Christina M.; Farabaugh, Amy H.; Clain, Alisabet J.; Baer, Lee; Alpert, Jonathan E.; Nierenberg, Andrew A.; Fava, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the prevalence of the C677T polymorphism of the methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene and the A2756G polymorphism of methionine synthase (MS), and their impact on antidepressant response. Methods We screened 224 subjects (52% female, mean age 39 ± 11 years) with SCID-diagnosed major depressive disorder (MDD), and obtained 194 genetic samples. 49 subjects (49% female, mean age 36 ± 11 years) participated in a 12-week open clinical trial of fluoxetine 20–60 mg/day. Association between clinical response and C677T and A2756G polymorphisms, folate, B12, and homocysteine was examined. Results Prevalence of the C677T and A2756G polymorphisms was consistent with previous reports (C/C=41%, C/T=47%, T/T=11%, A/A=66%, A/G=29%, G/G=4%). In the fluoxetine-treated subsample (n=49), intent-to-treat (ITT) response rates were 47% for C/C subjects and 46% for pooled C/T and T/T subjects (nonsignificant). ITT response rates were 38% for A/A subjects and 60% for A/G subjects (nonsignificant), with no subjects exhibiting the G/G homozygote. Mean baseline plasma B12 was significantly lower in A/G subjects compared to A/A, but folate and homocysteine levels were not affected by genetic status. Plasma folate was negatively associated with treatment response. Conclusion The C677T and A2756G polymorphisms did not significantly affect antidepressant response. These preliminary findings require replication in larger samples. PMID:22789065

  5. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene A1298C polymorphism and susceptibility to recurrent pregnancy loss: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Rai, V

    2014-01-01

    Environmental and genetic factors are thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL)/spontaneous abortions (SA), which include endocrine, anatomical abnormalities within the genital organs, autoimmune diseases and some gene variants. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is a key enzyme of the folate/methionine metabolic pathway and it is well established fact that folate deficiency causes pregnancy complications like recurrent pregnancy loss, preeclempsia and birth defects affected pregnancies. MTHFR A1298C polymorphism reduces the enzymatic activity and mimics as folate deficiency. To date, many studies have investigated the association between MTHFR A1298C polymorphism and RPL risk; however, the result is still controversial and inconclusive. The aim of the present study was to address the association of MTHFR A1298C polymorphism with RPL risk by meta—analysis. By searching electronic databases, total seventeen studies were identified for present meta—analysis. Crude odds ratios (OR) with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) was used to assess the strength of association between A1298C polymorphism and RPL. The results indicate that the A1298C polymorphism is not associated with RPL (ORCvs A = 1.13 ,95 % CI= 0.87—1.46, P = 0.36 ; ORACvs AA = 1.22 ,95 % CI= 0.94— 1.6, P = 0.13; ORCCvsAA =1.35, 95 % CI= 76—2.36, P = 0.30; ORCC+AC vs AA = 1.15, 95 % CI= 88 —1.49, P = 0.29; ORCCvs AC+AA = 1.29, 95 % CI= 76 —2.12, P = 0.34). Further prospective studies were needed to confirm the precise relationship between the MTHFR A1298C polymorphism and RPL. PMID:24970119

  6. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T and A1298C polymorphisms and fluorouracil-based treatment in Taiwan colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Nai-Chun; Su, Shih-Ming; Lin, Tai-Jung; Chin, Jen; Hou, Chun-Fang; Yang, Jhong-Ying; Liu, Wen-Sheng; Chang, Li-Ching

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate the association between methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene polymorphisms and the prognosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients undergoing 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy in Taiwan. We investigated 126 CRC cases. The most common polymorphisms C677T (rs1801133) and A1298C (rs1801131) in MTHFR were genotyped using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The frequencies of C677T and A1298C were further compared with those in the HapMap database for Whites and Asians. In this study, we found that TT-homozygosity at MTHFR C677T was significantly associated with survival in CRC patients [P<0.001; 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.068-0.212]. In CRC patients receiving 5-FU-based chemotherapy, the TT genotype at C677T was also significantly associated with survival (P=0.001; 95% CI=0.113-0.400) and recurrence after surgery (P<0.001; 95% CI=0.295-0.609). The A1298C genotypes had a significant impact on survival (?=7.103; P=0.029). The MTHFR A1298C CC genotype may increase the risk of death in Taiwanese CRC patients. The MTHFR C677T TT genotype was present at a lower frequency in our CRC patients than in the HapMap Asian population, but the frequency was similar to that in Whites in the HapMap database. The distribution of MTHFR A1298C genotypes was similar in our CRC and in the HapMap Asian population, but was different from that in the White population. This study suggested that MTHFR C677T and A1298C are associated with prognosis in CRC patients undergoing 5-FU-based chemotherapy. PMID:26111049

  7. Significant association between the MTHFR A1298C polymorphism and hepatocellular carcinoma risk: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chang, W; Meng, Q; Liu, J H; Wu, L X; Chen, Y; Chen, S D

    2015-01-01

    The A1298C polymorphism of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene has been reported to be associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but there are conflicting results from previous studies. The present study aimed to investigate the association between this polymorphism and the risk of HCC using a meta-analysis of the published studies. Published literature from PubMed and Embase databases was systematically searched to identify relevant studies before October 2014. The Begg test was used to measure publication bias. Sensitivity analyses were performed to ensure the authenticity of the outcome. The meta-analysis results showed significant association between the MTHFR A1298C polymorphism and HCC risk (CC vs AA: OR = 0.52, 95%CI = 0.33-0.81; CC vs AC: OR = 0.50, 95%CI = 0.32-0.79; dominant model: OR = 1.94, 95%CI = 1.24-3.02; recessive model: OR = 1.00, 95%CI = 0.84-1.18). In the subgroup analysis, significant associations between the MTHFR A1298C polymorphism and HCC risk were found in Asians (CC vs AA: OR = 0.46, 95%CI = 0.27-0.78; CC vs AC: OR = 0.41, 95%CI = 0.24-0.71; dominant model: OR = 2.27, 95%CI = 1.33-3.86; recessive model: OR = 1.03, 95%CI = 0.86-1.24). Our results suggest that the MTHFR A1298C polymorphism might be related to increased risk of HCC in Asians. Further large and well-designed studies are needed to confirm these conclusions. PMID:26662389

  8. Genetic Variant in MTRR, but Not MTR, Is Associated with Risk of Congenital Heart Disease: An Integrated Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Rong; Zou, Li; Zhu, Beibei; Chen, Wei; Shen, Na; Ke, Juntao; Lou, Jiao; Wang, Zhenling; Sun, Yu; Liu, Lifeng; Song, Ranran

    2014-01-01

    Background Congenital heart disease (CHD) is one of the most common birth defects and the leading cause of deaths among individuals with congenital structural abnormalities worldwide. Both Methionine synthase reductase (MTRR) and Methionine synthase (MTR) are key enzymes involved in the metabolic pathway of homocysteine, which are significant in the earlier period embryogenesis, particularly in the cardiac development. Evidence is mounting for the association between MTRR A66G (rs1801394)/MTR A2756G (rs1805087) and the CHD risk, but results are controversial. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis integrating case-control and transmitted disequilibrium test (TDT) studies to obtain more precise estimate of the associations of these two variants with the CHD risk. Methods To combine case-control and TDT studies, we used the Catmap package of R software to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results A total of 9 reports were included in the final meta-analysis. Eight of them comprised of 914 cases, 964 controls, and 441 families that were germane to MTRR A66G polymorphism; and 4 reports comprised of 250 cases, 205 controls, and 53 families that were relevant to MTR A2756G polymorphism. The pooled OR for the MTRR 66 G allele versus A allele was 1.35 (95% CI?=?1.14–1.59, P<0.001, Pheterogeneity?=?0.073). For MTR A2756G, the G allele conferred a pooled OR of 1.10 (95% CI?=?0.78–1.57, P?=?0.597, Pheterogeneity?=?0.173) compared with the A allele. Sensitivity analyses were carried out to asses the effects of each individual study on the pooled OR, indicating the stability of the outcome. Moreover, positive results were also obtained in all subgroups stratified by study type and ethnicity except the subgroup of TDT studies in MTRR A66G variant. Conclusions This meta-analysis demonstrated a suggestive result that the A66G variant in MTRR, but not the A2756G in MTR, may be associated with the increase of CHD risks. PMID:24595101

  9. Neonatal and Fetal Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Genetic Polymorphisms: An Examination of C677T and A1298C Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Isotalo, Phillip A.; Wells, George A.; Donnelly, James G.

    2000-01-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) mutations are commonly associated with hyperhomocysteinemia, and, through their defects in homocysteine metabolism, they have been implicated as risk factors for neural tube defects and unexplained, recurrent embryo losses in early pregnancy. Folate sufficiency is thought to play an integral role in the phenotypic expression of MTHFR mutations. Samples of neonatal cord blood (n=119) and fetal tissue (n=161) were analyzed for MTHFR C677T and A1298C mutations to determine whether certain MTHFR genotype combinations were associated with decreased in utero viability. Mutation analysis revealed that all possible MTHFR genotype combinations were represented in the fetal group, demonstrating that 677T and 1298C alleles could occur in both cis and trans configurations. Combined 677CT/1298CC and 677TT/1298CC genotypes, which contain three and four mutant alleles, respectively, were not observed in the neonatal group (P=.0402). This suggests decreased viability among fetuses carrying these mutations and a possible selection disadvantage among fetuses with increased numbers of mutant MTHFR alleles. This is the first report that describes the existence of human MTHFR 677CT/1298CC and 677TT/1298CC genotypes and demonstrates their potential role in compromised fetal viability. PMID:10958762

  10. Methyltetrahydrofolate vs Folic Acid Supplementation in Idiopathic Recurrent Miscarriage with Respect to Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase C677T and A1298C Polymorphisms: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hekmatdoost, Azita; Vahid, Farhad; Yari, Zahra; Sadeghi, Mohammadreza; Eini-Zinab, Hassan; Lakpour, Niknam; Arefi, Soheila

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether 5-methylenetetrahydrofolate (MTHF) is more effective than folic acid supplementation in treatment of recurrent abortion in different MTHFR gene C677T and A1298C polymorphisms. Methods A randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial conducted April 2011-September 2014 in recurrent abortion clinics in Tehran, Iran. The participants were women with three or more idiopathic recurrent abortion, aged 20 to 45 years. Two hundred and twenty eligible women who consented to participate were randomly assigned to receive either folic acid or 5-MTHF according to the stratified blocked randomization by age and the number of previous abortions. Participants took daily 1 mg 5-methylentetrahydrofolate or 1 mg folic acid from at least 8 weeks before conception to the 20th week of the pregnancy. The primary outcome was ongoing pregnancy rate at 20th week of pregnancy, and the secondary outcomes were serum folate and homocysteine at the baseline, after 8 weeks, and at the gestational age of 4, 8, 12, and 20 weeks, MTHFR gene C677T and A1298C polymorphisms. Results There was no significant difference in abortion rate between two groups. Serum folate increased significantly in both groups over time; these changes were significantly higher in the group receiving 5-MTHF than the group receiving folic acid (value = 2.39, p<00.1) and the result was the same by considering the time (value = 1.24, p<0.01). Plasma tHcys decreased significantly in both groups over time; however these changes were not significantly different between the groups (value = 0.01, p = 0.47). Conclusion The results do not support any beneficial effect of 5-MTHF vs. folate supplementation in women with recurrent abortion with any MTHFR C677T and/or A1298C polymorphism. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01976676 PMID:26630680

  11. Ethnic variation of the C677T and A1298C polymorphisms in the methylenetetrahydrofolate-reductase (MTHFR) gene in southwestern Mexico.

    PubMed

    Antonio-Véjar, V; Del Moral-Hernández, O; Alarcón-Romero, L C; Flores-Alfaro, E; Leyva-Vázquez, M A; Hernández-Sotelo, D; Illades-Aguiar, B

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we examined the distribution of genotype and allele frequencies of the C677T and A1298C polymorphisms in the methylenetetrahydrofolate-reductase gene (MTHFR) in two ethnic groups in the State of Guerrero, Mexico, which were compared with those of the Mestizo population of the region. A comparative study was conducted on 455 women from two ethnic groups and a group of Mestizo women of the State of Guerrero, Mexico: 135 Nahuas, 124 Mixtecas, and 196 Mestizas. Genotyping of both polymorphisms were performed by using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism methods. We found that the 677TT genotype was more frequent in Nahua and Mixteca women compared to Mestiza women (P = 0.008), and the most prevalent genotype in both ethnic groups was the 1298AA genotype (P < 0.001). We also compared the 677T allele frequency obtained from the groups studied with the frequencies reported in other ethnic groups of Mexico (Huichol, Tarahumara, and Purepecha). There were significant differences between the three ethnic groups compared to Nahuas (Huicholes, P = 0.004; Tarahumaras, P < 0.001; Purepechas, P = 0.042). Our results indicated significant differences in the frequencies of the C677T and A1298C polymorphisms between the two ethnic groups and the Mestizo population of the State of Guerrero. In addition, we found strong differences with other ethnic groups in Mexico. These results could be useful for future studies investigating diseases related to folate metabolism, and could help the government to design specific nutrition programs for different ethnic groups. PMID:25299110

  12. A retrospective comparative exploratory study on two Methylentetrahydrofolate Reductase (MTHFR) polymorphisms in esophagogastric cancer: the A1298C MTHFR polymorphism is an independent prognostic factor only in neoadjuvantly treated gastric cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Methylentetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) plays a major role in folate metabolism and consequently could be an important factor for the efficacy of a treatment with 5-fluorouracil. Our aim was to evaluate the prognostic and predictive value of two well characterized constitutional MTHFR gene polymorphisms for primarily resected and neoadjuvantly treated esophagogastric adenocarcinomas. Methods 569 patients from two centers were analyzed (gastric cancer: 218, carcinoma of the esophagogastric junction (AEG II, III): 208 and esophagus (AEG I): 143). 369 patients received neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery, 200 patients were resected without preoperative treatment. The MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms were determined in DNA from peripheral blood lymphozytes. Associations with prognosis, response and clinicopathological factors were analyzed retrospectively within a prospective database (chi-square, log-rank, cox regression). Results Only the MTHFR A1298C polymorphisms had prognostic relevance in neoadjuvantly treated patients but it was not a predictor for response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The AC genotype of the MTHFR A1298C polymorphisms was significantly associated with worse outcome (p?=?0.02, HR 1.47 (1.06-2.04). If neoadjuvantly treated patients were analyzed based on their tumor localization, the AC genotype of the MTHFR A1298C polymorphisms was a significant negative prognostic factor in patients with gastric cancer according to UICC 6th edition (gastric cancer including AEG type II, III: HR 2.0, 95% CI 1.3-2.0, p?=?0.001) and 7th edition (gastric cancer without AEG II, III: HR 2.8, 95% CI 1.5-5.7, p?=?0.003), not for AEG I. For both definitions of gastric cancer the AC genotype was confirmed as an independent negative prognostic factor in cox regression analysis. In primarily resected patients neither the MTHFR A1298C nor the MTHFR C677T polymorphisms had prognostic impact. Conclusions The MTHFR A1298C polymorphisms was an independent prognostic factor in patients with neoadjuvantly treated gastric adenocarcinomas (according to both UICC 6th or 7th definitions for gastric cancer) but not in AEG I nor in primarily resected patients, which confirms the impact of this enzyme on chemotherapy associated outcome. PMID:24490800

  13. Role of genetic mutations in folate-related enzyme genes on Male Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kang; Zhao, Ruizhe; Shen, Min; Ye, Jiaxin; Li, Xiao; Huang, Yuan; Hua, Lixin; Wang, Zengjun; Li, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Several studies showed that the genetic mutations in the folate-related enzyme genes might be associated with male infertility; however, the results were still inconsistent. We performed a meta-analysis with trial sequential analysis to investigate the associations between the MTHFR C677T, MTHFR A1298C, MTR A2756G, MTRR A66G mutations and the MTHFR haplotype with the risk of male infertility. Overall, a total of 37 studies were selected. Our meta-analysis showed that the MTHFR C677T mutation was a risk factor for male infertility in both azoospermia and oligoasthenoteratozoospermia patients, especially in Asian population. Men carrying the MTHFR TC haplotype were most liable to suffer infertility while those with CC haplotype had lowest risk. On the other hand, the MTHFR A1298C mutation was not related to male infertility. MTR A2756G and MTRR A66G were potential candidates in the pathogenesis of male infertility, but more case-control studies were required to avoid false-positive outcomes. All of these results were confirmed by the trial sequential analysis. Finally, our meta-analysis with trial sequential analysis proved that the genetic mutations in the folate-related enzyme genes played a significant role in male infertility. PMID:26549413

  14. MTR plates modeling with MAIA

    SciTech Connect

    Marelle, V.; Dubois, S.; Ripert, M.; Noirot, J.

    2008-07-15

    MAIA is a thermo-mechanical code dedicated to the modeling of MTR fuel plates. The main physical phenomena modeled in the code are the cladding oxidation, the interaction between fuel and Al-matrix, the swelling due to fission products and the Al/fuel particles interaction. The creeping of the plate can be modeled in the mechanical calculation. MAIA has been validated on U-Mo dispersion fuel experiments such as IRIS 1 and 2 and FUTURE. The results are in rather good agreement with post-irradiation examinations. MAIA can also be used to calculate in-pile behavior of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} plates as in the SHARE experiment irradiated in the SCK/Mol BR2 reactor. The main outputs given by MAIA throughout the irradiation are temperatures, cladding oxidation thickness, interaction thickness, volume fraction of meat constituents, swelling, displacements, strains and stresses. MAIA is originally a two-dimensional code but a three-dimensional version is currently under development. (author)

  15. MTR, SOUTH FACE OF REACTOR. SPECIAL SUPPLEMENTAL SHIELDING WAS REQUIRED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR, SOUTH FACE OF REACTOR. SPECIAL SUPPLEMENTAL SHIELDING WAS REQUIRED OUTSIDE OF MTR FOR EXPERIMENTS. THE AIRCRAFT NUCLEAR PROPULSION PROJECT DOMINATED THE USE OF THIS PART OF THE MTR. INL NEGATIVE NO. 7225. Unknown Photographer, 11/28/1952 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  16. MTR BASEMENT. WORKERS (DON ALVORD AND CYRIL VAN ORDEN OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR BASEMENT. WORKERS (DON ALVORD AND CYRIL VAN ORDEN OF PHILLIPS PETROLEUM CO.) POSE FOR GAMMA IRRADIATION EXPERIMENT IN MTR CANAL. CANS OF FOOD WILL BE LOWERED TO CANAL BOTTOM, WHERE SPENT MTR FUEL ELEMENTS EMIT GAMMA RADIATION. INL NEGATIVE NO. 11746. Unknown Photographer, 8/20/1954 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. Levels of Key Enzymes of Methionine-Homocysteine Metabolism in Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Sepúlveda, Alejandra; España-Perrot, Pedro P.; Fernández B, Ximena; Ahumada, Verónica; Bustos, Vicente; Arraztoa, José Antonio; Dobierzewska, Aneta; Figueroa-Diesel, Horacio; Rice, Gregory E.; Illanes, Sebastián E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the role of key enzymes in the methionine-homocysteine metabolism (MHM) in the physiopathology of preeclampsia (PE). Methods. Plasma and placenta from pregnant women (32 controls and 16 PE patients) were analyzed after informed consent. Protein was quantified by western blot. RNA was obtained with RNA purification kit and was quantified by reverse transcritase followed by real-time PCR (RT-qPCR). Identification of the C677T and A1298C methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and A2756G methionine synthase (MTR) SNP was performed using PCR followed by a high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis. S-adenosyl methionine (SAM) and S-adenosyl homocysteine (SAH) were measured in plasma using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS/MS). The SNP association analysis was carried out using Fisher's exact test. Statistical analysis was performed using a Mann-Whitney test. Results. RNA expression of MTHFR and MTR was significantly higher in patients with PE as compared with controls. Protein, SAM, and SAH levels showed no significant difference between preeclamptic patients and controls. No statistical differences between controls and PE patients were observed with the different SNPs studied. Conclusion. The RNA expression of MTHFR and MTR is elevated in placentas of PE patients, highlighting a potential compensation mechanism of the methionine-homocysteine metabolism in the physiopathology of this disease. PMID:24024209

  18. MTR BUILDING, TRA603. DETAILED VIEW OF NORTHWEST CORNERS OF MTR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR BUILDING, TRA-603. DETAILED VIEW OF NORTHWEST CORNERS OF MTR HIGH-BAY AND SECOND/THIRD STORY SECTIONS. NOTE SHAPE OF PANEL ABOVE WINDOW OVER "TRA-603" BUILDING NUMBERS. THIS IS A "STANDARD PANEL." INL NEGATIVE NUMBER HD46-42-2. Mike Crane, Photographer, 4/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  19. ETR AND MTR COMPLEXES IN CONTEXT. CAMERA FACING NORTHERLY. FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR AND MTR COMPLEXES IN CONTEXT. CAMERA FACING NORTHERLY. FROM BOTTOM TO TOP: ETR COOLING TOWER, ELECTRICAL BUILDING AND LOW-BAY SECTION OF ETR BUILDING, HEAT EXCHANGER BUILDING (WITH U SHAPED YARD), COMPRESSOR BUILDING. MTR REACTOR SERVICES BUILDING IS ATTACHED TO SOUTH WALL OF MTR. WING A IS ATTACHED TO BALCONY FLOOR OF MTR. NEAR UPPER RIGHT CORNER OF VIEW IS MTR PROCESS WATER BUILDING. WING B IS AT FAR WEST END OF COMPLEX. NEAR MAIN GATE IS GAMMA FACILITY, WITH "COLD" BUILDINGS BEYOND: RAW WATER STORAGE TANKS, STEAM PLANT, MTR COOLING TOWER PUMP HOUSE AND COOLING TOWER. INL NEGATIVE NO. 56-4101. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  20. 33 CFR 154.1041 - Specific response information to be maintained on mobile MTR facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Specific response information to be maintained on mobile MTR facilities. 154.1041 Section 154...Specific response information to be maintained on mobile MTR facilities. (a) Each mobile MTR facility must carry the following...

  1. MATERIALS TESTING REACTOR (MTR) BUILDING, TRA603. CONTEXTUAL VIEW OF MTR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MATERIALS TESTING REACTOR (MTR) BUILDING, TRA-603. CONTEXTUAL VIEW OF MTR BUILDING SHOWING NORTH SIDES OF THE HIGH-BAY REACTOR BUILDING, ITS SECOND/THIRD FLOOR BALCONY LEVEL, AND THE ATTACHED ONE-STORY OFFICE/LABORATORY BUILDING, TRA-604. CAMERA FACING SOUTHEAST. VERTICAL CONCRETE-SHROUDED BEAMS SUPPORT PRECAST CONCRETE PANELS. CONCRETE PROJECTION FORMED AS A BUNKER AT LEFT OF VIEW IS TRA-657, PLUG STORAGE BUILDING. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-42-1. Mike Crane, Photographer, 4/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  2. Analysis of Structural MtrC Models Based on Homology with the Crystal Structure of MtrF

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Marcus; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Richardson, David; Clarke, Thomas A.

    2012-12-01

    The outer-membrane decahaem cytochrome MtrC is part of the transmembrane MtrCAB complex required for mineral respiration by Shewanella oneidensis. MtrC has significant sequence similarity to the paralogous decahaem cytochrome MtrF, which has been structurally solved through X-ray crystallography. This now allows for homology-based models of MtrC to be generated. The structure of these MtrC homology models contain ten bis-histidine-co-ordinated c-type haems arranged in a staggered cross through a four-domain structure. This model is consistent with current spectroscopic data and shows that the areas around haem 5 and haem 10, at the termini of an octahaem chain, are likely to have functions similar to those of the corresponding haems in MtrF. The electrostatic surfaces around haem 7, close to the ?-barrels, are different in MtrF and MtrC, indicating that these haems may have different potentials and interact with substrates differently.

  3. MTR AND ETR COMPLEXES. CAMERA FACING EASTERLY TOWARD CHEMICAL PROCESSING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR AND ETR COMPLEXES. CAMERA FACING EASTERLY TOWARD CHEMICAL PROCESSING PLANT. MTR AND ITS ATTACHMENTS IN FOREGROUND. ETR BEYOND TO RIGHT. INL NEGATIVE NO. 56-4100. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  4. MTR BUILDING AND BALCONY FLOORS. CAMERA FACING EASTERLY. PHOTOGRAPHER DID ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR BUILDING AND BALCONY FLOORS. CAMERA FACING EASTERLY. PHOTOGRAPHER DID NOT EXPLAIN DARK CLOUD. MTR WING WILL ATTACH TO GROUND FLOOR. INL NEGATIVE NO. 1567. Unknown Photographer, 2/28/1951 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  5. 33 CFR 154.1041 - Specific response information to be maintained on mobile MTR facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... be maintained on mobile MTR facilities. 154.1041 Section 154.1041 Navigation and Navigable Waters... maintained on mobile MTR facilities. (a) Each mobile MTR facility must carry the following information as... respond to a discharge from the mobile MTR facility. (3) List of the appropriate persons and...

  6. CONTEXTUAL AERIAL VIEW OF "EXCLUSION" MTR AREA WITH IDAHO CHEMICAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONTEXTUAL AERIAL VIEW OF "EXCLUSION" MTR AREA WITH IDAHO CHEMICAL PROCESSING PLANT IN BACKGROUND AT CENTER TOP OF VIEW. CAMERA FACING EAST. EXCLUSION GATE HOUSE AT LEFT OF VIEW. BEYOND MTR BUILDING AND ITS WING, THE PROCESS WATER BUILDING AND WORKING RESERVOIR ARE LEFT-MOST. FAN HOUSE AND STACK ARE TO ITS RIGHT. PLUG STORAGE BUILDING IS RIGHT-MOST STRUCTURE. NOTE FAN LOFT ABOVE MTR BUILDING'S ONE-STORY WING. THIS WAS LATER CONVERTED FOR OFFICES. INL NEGATIVE NO. 3610. Unknown Photographer, 10/30/1951 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  7. Special Issue: From Mtr to Iter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadomtsev, Boris B.

    1996-05-01

    In 1950, A D Sakharov and I E Tamm put forward the fundamental idea of magnetic thermal confinement of high-temperature plasma, and proposed the magnetic thermonuclear reactor (MTR) concept. Studies in this direction initiated the mammoth 'Tokamak' programme. After many years of persistent scientific and engineering efforts in many countries worldwide, the realisation of the thermonuclear reaction has now become available. The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project is currently being developed jointly by the European Community (Euroatom), Russia, USA, and Japan. The aim of the ITER reactor is to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of the peaceful use of nuclear fusion energy. The reactor is based on the Tokamak concept.

  8. MTR BASEMENT. GENERAL ELECTRIC CONTROL CONSOLE FOR AIRCRAFT NUCLEAR PROPULSION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR BASEMENT. GENERAL ELECTRIC CONTROL CONSOLE FOR AIRCRAFT NUCLEAR PROPULSION EXPERIMENT NO. 1. INL NEGATIVE NO. 6510. Unknown Photographer, 9/29/1959 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  9. MTR MAIN FLOOR. MEN DEMONSTRATE INSERTION OF DUMMY PLUG INTO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR MAIN FLOOR. MEN DEMONSTRATE INSERTION OF DUMMY PLUG INTO AN MTR BEAM HOLE. ONE MAN CHECKS RADIATION LEVEL AT THE END OF THE UNIVERSAL COFFIN, WHILE ANOTHER USES TOOL TO INSERT PLUG INTO HOLE THROUGH COFFIN. MEN WEAR "ANTI-C" (ANTI-CONTAMINATION) CLOTHING. INL NEGATIVE NO. 6198. R.G. Larsen, Photographer, 6/27/1952 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  10. CANAL EMERGES FROM EAST SIDE OF MTR BUILDING. "EXTRA" LENGTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CANAL EMERGES FROM EAST SIDE OF MTR BUILDING. "EXTRA" LENGTH WAS TO STORE SPENT FUEL THAT WOULD ACCUMULATE BEFORE THE CHEMICAL PROCESSING PLANT WAS READY TO PROCESS IT. INL NEGATIVE NO. 1659. Unknown Photographer, 3/9/1951 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  11. CUTS FOR MTR EXCAVATION ILLUSTRATE SEDIMENTARY MANTLE OF SOIL AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CUTS FOR MTR EXCAVATION ILLUSTRATE SEDIMENTARY MANTLE OF SOIL AND GRAVEL OVERLAYING LAVA ROCK FIFTY FEET BELOW. SAGEBRUSH HAS BEEN SCOURED FROM REST OF SITE. CAMERA PROBABLY FACES SOUTHWEST. INL NEGATIVE NO. 67. Unknown Photographer, 6/4/1950 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  12. REACTIVITY MEASUREMENT FACILITY. CAMERA LOOKS DOWN INTO MTR CANAL. REACTOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    REACTIVITY MEASUREMENT FACILITY. CAMERA LOOKS DOWN INTO MTR CANAL. REACTOR IS FUELED AS AN ETR MOCK-UP. LIGHTS DANGLE BELOW WATER LEVEL. CONTROL RODS AND OTHER APPARATUS DESCEND FROM ABOVE WATER LEVEL. INL NEGATIVE NO. 56-900. Jack L. Anderson, Photographer, 3/26/1956 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  13. CONTROL ROOM ON MARCH 31, 1952, AS THE MTR GOES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONTROL ROOM ON MARCH 31, 1952, AS THE MTR GOES CRITICAL FOR THE FIRST TIME. COMPARE CEILING FIXTURES IN THIS PHOTO AND PHOTO ID-33-G-212 FOR COMMON PERSPECTIVE. INL NEGATIVE NO. 4517. Unknown Photographer, 3/31/1952 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  14. MTR MAIN FLOOR. NEUTRON TUNNEL (SPANNED BY STILELIKE STEPS) PROJECTS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR MAIN FLOOR. NEUTRON TUNNEL (SPANNED BY STILE-LIKE STEPS) PROJECTS FROM THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE MTR TOWARD SOUTHEAST CORNER OF BUILDING, WHERE SHIELDING BLOCKS BEGIN TO SURROUND THE TUNNEL AS IT NEARS DETECTING INSTRUMENTS NEAR THE BUILDING WALL. GEAR RELATED TO CRYSTAL NEUTRON SPECTROMETER IS IN FOREGROUND SURROUNDED BY SHIELDING. DATA CONSOLES ARE AT MID-LEVEL OF EAST FACE. OTHER WORK PROCEEDS ON TOP OF AND ELSEWHERE AROUND REACTOR. NOTE TOOLS HANGING AGAINST SOUTHEAST CORNER, USED TO CHANGE FUEL ELEMENTS AND OTHER REACTOR ITEMS DURING REFUELING CYCLES. INL NEGATIVE NO. 10439. Unknown Photographer, 4/20/1954 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  15. CONTROL CONSOLE FOR MTR FISSION PRODUCT MONITOR, USED TO DETECT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONTROL CONSOLE FOR MTR FISSION PRODUCT MONITOR, USED TO DETECT BREAKS IN CLADDING OF FUEL ELEMENTS. COUNT-RATE METER IN TOP PANEL INDICATES AMOUNT OF RADIOACTIVITY. LOWER PANELS SUPPLY POWER AND AMPLIFICATION OF SIGNALS GENERATED BY SCINTILLATION COUNTER/PHOTOMULTIPLIER TUBE COMBINATION IN RESPONSE TO RADIOACTIVITY IN A SAMPLE OF THE COOLING WATER. INL NEGATIVE NO. 56-771. Jack L. Anderson, Photographer, 3/15/1956. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  16. MTR CAISSONS WERE DRILLED INTO BEDROCK. IN CENTER OF VIEW, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR CAISSONS WERE DRILLED INTO BEDROCK. IN CENTER OF VIEW, CONCRETE FLOWS FROM TRUCK INTO DRUM, WHICH IS LOWERED INTO CAISSON AND RELEASED AT BOTTOM OF HOLE. BEYOND, TRUCK-MOUNTED DRILLING RIG DRILLS HOLE FOR ANOTHER CAISSON NEAR EDGE OF EXCAVATION. MATERIAL REMOVED FROM HOLE IS CARRIED BY CONVEYOR TO WAITING TRUCK. INL NEGATIVE NO. 307. Unknown Photographer, 6/1950. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. MTR, TRA603. SOURCE STORAGE VAULT IN BASEMENT. MAZE ENTRY. SOLID ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR, TRA-603. SOURCE STORAGE VAULT IN BASEMENT. MAZE ENTRY. SOLID CONCRETE WALLS. CONCRETE PLUGS, ONE LINED WITH LEAD, AND LIFT HANDLES. FLOOR WELLS SIX FEET DEEP BELOW FLOOR. IDO MTR-603-IDO-5, 12/1952. INL INDEX NO. 531-0603-00-396-110469, REV. 0. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  18. MTR, TRA603. BASEMENT DECONTAMINATION ROOM DETAILS. WALLS OF SOLID CONCRETE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR, TRA-603. BASEMENT DECONTAMINATION ROOM DETAILS. WALLS OF SOLID CONCRETE MASONRY. STAINLESS STEEL WORK BENCH, FLOOR COVING AND DRAINS. "WARM" FLOOR DRAIN. OVERHEAD SHOWER WITH CHAIN PULL. IDO MTR-603-IDO-4, 12/1952. INL INDEX NO. 531-0603-00-396-110468, REV. 1. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  19. MTR WING, TRA604. SECTIONS A, B, AND C SHOW CORRIDOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR WING, TRA-604. SECTIONS A, B, AND C SHOW CORRIDOR ARRANGEMENTS AND CONNECTIONS TO MTR BUILDING. BLAW-KNOX 3150-804-6, 11/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0604-00-098-100631, REV. 2. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  20. TEST REACTOR AREA PLOT PLAN CA. 1968. MTR AND ETR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TEST REACTOR AREA PLOT PLAN CA. 1968. MTR AND ETR AREAS SOUTH OF PERCH AVENUE. "COLD" SERVICES NORTH OF PERCH. ADVANCED TEST REACTOR IN NEW SECTION WEST OF COLD SERVICES SECTION. NEW PERIMETER FENCE ENCLOSES BETA RAY SPECTROMETER, TRA-669, AN ATR SUPPORT FACILITY, AND ATR STACK. UTM LOCATORS HAVE BEEN DELETED. IDAHO NUCLEAR CORPORATION, FROM A BLAW-KNOX DRAWING, 3/1968. INL INDEX NO. 530-0100-00-400-011646, REV. 0. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  1. WORKERS FABRICATE ROOF SLABS FOR MTR BUILDING AT THE CONSTRUCTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    WORKERS FABRICATE ROOF SLABS FOR MTR BUILDING AT THE CONSTRUCTION SITE. FORMS WERE MADE OF STEEL. AFTER AN INCH OF CONCRETE HAD BEEN POURED IN THE FORM, A MAT OF REINFORCING STEEL WAS PLACED ON IT. THE REMAINDER OF THE FORM WAS FILLED, AND THE CONCRETE WAS VIBRATED, STRUCK, AND TROWELED. GROOVES AT CORNER WILL HAVE 1/4 INCH RODS WELDED INTO THE EYE OF THE STEEL MAT FOR GROUNDING. INL NEGATIVE NO. 578. Unknown Photographer, 9/1/1950 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  2. Crystal structure of the open state of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae MtrE outer membrane channel.

    PubMed

    Lei, Hsiang-Ting; Chou, Tsung-Han; Su, Chih-Chia; Bolla, Jani Reddy; Kumar, Nitin; Radhakrishnan, Abhijith; Long, Feng; Delmar, Jared A; Do, Sylvia V; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R; Shafer, William M; Yu, Edward W

    2014-01-01

    Active efflux of antimicrobial agents is one of the most important strategies used by bacteria to defend against antimicrobial factors present in their environment. Mediating many cases of antibiotic resistance are transmembrane efflux pumps, composed of one or more proteins. The Neisseria gonorrhoeae MtrCDE tripartite multidrug efflux pump, belonging to the hydrophobic and amphiphilic efflux resistance-nodulation-cell division (HAE-RND) family, spans both the inner and outer membranes of N. gonorrhoeae and confers resistance to a variety of antibiotics and toxic compounds. We here describe the crystal structure of N. gonorrhoeae MtrE, the outer membrane component of the MtrCDE tripartite multidrug efflux system. This trimeric MtrE channel forms a vertical tunnel extending down contiguously from the outer membrane surface to the periplasmic end, indicating that our structure of MtrE depicts an open conformational state of this channel. PMID:24901251

  3. Decontamination and decommissioning MTR-657 plug storage facility. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, L.L.

    1984-01-01

    The MTR-657 Plug Storage Facility consists of 32 horizontal shielded storage holes. Two of these holes contained contaminated hardware with high radiation fields. The D and D mode selected for the facility was removal of the contaminated hardware and decontamination of several of the storage holes to lower contamination levels. Special shielded disposal containers were constructed to allow removal and transport of the radioactive hardware without exposing personnel to high radiation fields. After removal of the hardware, long-handled mops and brushes were used to decontaminate the storage holes. In addition to describing D and D operations and the final facility condition, project cost and schedule information is reported. 14 figures, 2 tables.

  4. CONTEXTUAL AERIAL VIEW OF "COLD" NORTH HALF OF MTR COMPLEX. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONTEXTUAL AERIAL VIEW OF "COLD" NORTH HALF OF MTR COMPLEX. CAMERA FACING EASTERLY. FOREGROUND CORNER CONTAINS OIL STORAGE TANKS. WATER TANKS AND WELL HOUSES ARE BEYOND THEM TO THE LEFT. LARGE LIGHT-COLORED BUILDING IN CENTER OF VIEW IS STEAM PLANT. DEMINERALIZER AND WATER STORAGE TANK ARE BEYOND. SIX-CELL COOLING TOWER AND ITS PUMP HOUSE ARE ABOVE IT IN VIEW. SERVICE BUILDINGS INCLUDING CANTEEN ARE ON NORTH SIDE OF ROAD. "EXCLUSION" AREA IS BEYOND ROAD. COMPARE LOCATION OF EXCLUSION-AREA GATE WITH PHOTO ID-33-G-202. INL NEGATIVE NO. 3608. Unknown Photographer, 10/30/1951 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  5. ENGINEERING TEST REACTOR, TRA642. CONTEXTUAL VIEW ORIENTATING ETR TO MTR. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ENGINEERING TEST REACTOR, TRA-642. CONTEXTUAL VIEW ORIENTATING ETR TO MTR. CAMERA IS ON ROOF OF MTR BUILDING AND FACES DUE SOUTH. MTR SERVICE BUILDING, TRA-635, IN LOWER RIGHT CORNER. STEEL FRAMES SHOW BUILDINGS TO BE ATTACHED TO ETR BUILDING. HIGH-BAY SECTION IN CENTER IS REACTOR BUILDING. TWO-STORY CONTROL ROOM AND OFFICE BUILDING, TRA-647, IS BETWEEN IT AND MTR SERVICE BUILDING. STRUCTURE TO THE LEFT (WITH NO FRAMING YET) IS COMPRESSOR BUILDING, TRA-643, AND BEYOND IT WILL BE HEAT EXCHANGER BUILDING, TRA-644, GREAT SOUTHERN BUTTE ON HORIZON. INL NEGATIVE NO. 56-2382. Jack L. Anderson, Photographer, 6/10/1956 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  6. MTR, TRA603. THIRD FLOOR PLAN AND ROOF PLAN. CONTROL ROOM, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR, TRA-603. THIRD FLOOR PLAN AND ROOF PLAN. CONTROL ROOM, OFFICES, CONFERENCE ROOM, BATHROOMS. HOOD VENT. BALCONY CONNECTS THIRD FLOOR TO AND SIDES OF MTR. STAIRWAYS TO BALCONY PLATFORMS AROUND REACTOR. CRANE ACCESS CATWALK. BLAW-KNOX 3150-803-4, 7/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0603-00-098-100563, REV. 10. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  7. Mtr Extracellular Electron Transfer Pathways in Fe(III)-reducing or Fe(II)-oxidizing Bacteria: A Genomic Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Rosso, Kevin M.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2012-12-01

    Originally discovered in the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (MR-1), the Mtr (i.e., metal-reducing) pathway exists in all characterized strains of metal-reducing Shewanella. The protein components identified to date for the Mtr pathway of MR-1 include four multi-heme c-type cytochromes (c-Cyts), CymA, MtrA, MtrC and OmcA, and a porin-like, outer membrane protein MtrB. They are strategically positioned along the width of the MR-1 cell envelope to mediate electron transfer from the quinone/quinol pool in the inner-membrane to the Fe(III)-containing minerals external to the bacterial cells. A survey of microbial genomes revealed homologues of the Mtr pathway in other dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, including Aeromonas hydrophila, Ferrimonas balearica and Rhodoferax ferrireducens, and in the Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria Dechloromonas aromatica RCB, Gallionella capsiferriformans ES-2 and Sideroxydans lithotrophicus ES-1. The widespread distribution of Mtr pathways in Fe(III)-reducing or Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria emphasizes the importance of this type of extracellular electron transfer pathway in microbial redox transformation of Fe. Their distribution in these two different functional groups of bacteria also emphasizes the bi-directional nature of electron transfer reactions carried out by the Mtr pathways. The characteristics of the Mtr pathways may be shared by other pathways used by microorganisms for exchanging electrons with their extracellular environments.

  8. Preliminary developments of MTR plates with uranium nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Durand, J.P.; Laudamy, P.; Richter, K.

    1997-08-01

    In the opinion of CERCA, the total weight of Uranium per MTR plate (without changing the external dimensions) cannot be further increased using U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}. Limits have been reached on plates with a thicker meat or loaded to 6g Ut/cm{sup 3}. The use of a denser fuel like Uranium mononitride could permit an increase in these limits. A collaboration between the Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, and CERCA has been set ut. The preliminary studies at the ITU to check compatibility between aluminium and UN proved that there are no metallurgical interactions below 500{degrees}C. Feasibility of the manufacturing, on a laboratory scale at CERCA, of depleted Uranium mononitride plates loaded to 7 g Ut/cm{sup 3} has been demonstrated. The manufacturing process, however, is only one aspect of the development of a new fuel. The experience gained in the case of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} has shown that the development of a new fuel requires considerable time and financial investment. Such a development certainly represents an effort of about 10 years.

  9. MTR and In-vivo 1H-MRS studies on mouse brain with parkinson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Moon-Hyun; Kim, Hyeon-Jin; Chung, Jin-Yeung; Doo, Ah-Reum; Park, Hi-Joon; Kim, Seung-Nam; Choe, Bo-Young

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the changes in the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) histogram are related to specific characteristics of Parkinson's disease (PD) and to investigate whether the MTR histogram parameters are associated with neurochemical dysfunction by performing in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS). MTR and in vivo 1H-MRS studies were performed on control mice (n = 10) and 1-methyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine intoxicated mice (n = 10). All the MTR and in vivo 1H-MRS experiments were performed on a 9.4 T MRI/MRS system (Bruker Biospin, Germany) using a standard head coil. The protondensity fast spin echo (FSE) images and the T2-weighted spin echo (SE) images were acquired with no gap. Outer volume suppression (OVS), combined with the ultra-short echo-time stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM), was used for the localized in-vivo 1H-MRS. The quantitative analysis of metabolites was performed from the 1H spectra obtained in vivo on the striatum (ST) by using jMRUI (Lyon, France). The peak height of the MTR histograms in the PD model group was significantly lower than that in the control group (p < 0.05). The midbrain MTR values for volume were lower in the PD group than the control group(p < 0.05). The complex peak (Glx: glutamine+glutamate+ GABA)/creatine (Cr) ratio of the right ST in the PD group was significantly increased as compared to that of the control group. The present study revealed that the peak height of the MTR histogram was significantly decreased in the ST and substantia nigra, and a significant increase in the Gl x /Cr ratio was found in the ST of the PD group, as compared with that of the control group. These findings could reflect the early phase of neuronal dysfunction of neurotransmitters.

  10. The crystal structure of Mtr4 reveals a novel arch domain required for rRNA processing

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, R.N.; Robinson, H.; Klauer, A. A.; Hintze, B. J.; van Hoof, A.; Johnson, S. J.

    2010-07-01

    The essential RNA helicase, Mtr4, performs a critical role in RNA processing and degradation as an activator of the nuclear exosome. The molecular basis for this vital function is not understood and detailed analysis is significantly limited by the lack of structural data. In this study, we present the crystal structure of Mtr4. The structure reveals a new arch-like domain that is specific to Mtr4 and Ski2 (the cytosolic homologue of Mtr4). In vivo and in vitro analyses demonstrate that the Mtr4 arch domain is required for proper 5.8S rRNA processing, and suggest that the arch functions independently of canonical helicase activity. In addition, extensive conservation along the face of the putative RNA exit site highlights a potential interface with the exosome. These studies provide a molecular framework for understanding fundamental aspects of helicase function in exosome activation, and more broadly define the molecular architecture of Ski2-like helicases.

  11. MTR WING, TRA604, INTERIOR. BASEMENT. INTERIOR VIEW FROM SAME LOCATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR WING, TRA-604, INTERIOR. BASEMENT. INTERIOR VIEW FROM SAME LOCATION IN WEST CORRIDOR AS PHOTO ID-33-G-42 BUT CAMERA FACES SOUTH. SIGN ON DOOR FOR "PIPE TUNNEL" WARNS OF RADIOLOGICAL AND ASBESTOS HAZARDS. DOOR HAS METAL HASPS. SIGN ON OVERHEAD WASTE HEAT RECOVERY PIPES SAYS THEY CONTAIN "ASBESTOS FREE INSULATION." FIRE DOOR AT LEFT LEADS TO STAIRWAY TO FIRST FLOOR. DOOR AT RIGHT LEADS TO ROOM WHICH ONCE CONTAINED MTR LIBRARY. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-13-4. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  12. MTR,TRA603. EXPERIMENTERS' SPACE ALLOCATIONS IN BASEMENT AS OF 1963. SHIELDED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR,TRA-603. EXPERIMENTERS' SPACE ALLOCATIONS IN BASEMENT AS OF 1963. SHIELDED CUBICLES WERE IDENTIFIED BY SPONSORING LABORATORY AND ITS TEST HOLE NUMBER IN THE REACTOR, IE, "KAPL HB-1" SIGNIFIED KNOLLS ATOMIC POWER LABORATORY, HORIZONTAL BEAM NO. 1. "WAPD" WAS WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DIVISION. CATCH TANKS AND SAMPLE STATIONS FOR TEST LOOPS WERE ASSOCIATED WITH THESE CUBICLES. NOTE DESKS, STORAGE CABINETS, SWITCH GEAR, INSTRUMENT PANELS. PHILLIPS PETROLEUM COMPANY MTR-E-5205, 4/1963. INL INDEX NO. 531-0603-00-706-009757, REV. 5. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  13. MTR WING, TRA604. BASEMENT FLOOR PLAN. FIREPROOF RECORD ROOM BELOW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR WING, TRA-604. BASEMENT FLOOR PLAN. FIRE-PROOF RECORD ROOM BELOW COUNTING ROOM. HEATING AND COOLING EQUIPMENT. UNSPECIFIED EXPANSION AREA ALONG WEST WALL. BLAW-KNOX 3150-4-1, 7/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0604-00-098-100007, REV. 1. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  14. MTR WING A, TRA604. SOUTH SIDE. CAMERA FACING NORTH. THIS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR WING A, TRA-604. SOUTH SIDE. CAMERA FACING NORTH. THIS VIEW TYPIFIES TENDENCY FOR EXPANSIONS TO TAKE THE FORM OF PROJECTIONS AND INFILL USING AVAILABLE YARD SPACES. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD47-44-3. Mike Crane, Photographer, 4/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  15. MTR, TRA603. FOUNDATION PLAN, SECTION B ALONG EAST/WEST AXIS SHOWS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR, TRA-603. FOUNDATION PLAN, SECTION B ALONG EAST/WEST AXIS SHOWS TUNNELS, SUB-PILE ROOM SHIELDING AND OPENINGS, CANAL AND RELATED SECTIONS. BLAW-KNOX 3150-803-34, 5/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0603-62-098-100590, REV. 7. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  16. MTR WING, TRA604. FIRST FLOOR PLAN. ENTRY LOBBY, MACHINE SHOP, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR WING, TRA-604. FIRST FLOOR PLAN. ENTRY LOBBY, MACHINE SHOP, INSTRUMENT SHOP, COUNTING ROOM, HEALTH PHYSICS LAB, LABS AND OFFICES, STORAGE, SHIPPING AND RECEIVING. BLAW-KNOX 3150-4-2, 7/1950. INL INDEX NO. 053-604-00-099-100008, REV. 7. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. SOUTH WING, MTR661. INTERIOR DETAIL INSIDE LAB ROOM 127. CAMERA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SOUTH WING, MTR-661. INTERIOR DETAIL INSIDE LAB ROOM 127. CAMERA FACES WEST, LOOKING DIRECTLY AT A PAIR OF HOT CELLS, THEIR WINDOWS, AND MASTER/SLAVE MANIPULATORS. CABINET AT LEFT IS ABOVE GLOVE BOX. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-8-2. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  18. Structure and function of Neisseria gonorrhoeae MtrF illuminates a class of antimetabolite efflux pumps

    PubMed Central

    Su, Chih-Chia; Bolla, Jani Reddy; Kumar, Nitin; Radhakrishnan, Abhijith; Long, Feng; Delmar, Jared A.; Chou, Tsung-Han; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Shafer, William M.; Yu, Edward W.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Neisseria gonorrhoeae is an obligate human pathogen and the causative agent of the sexually-transmitted disease gonorrhea. The control of this disease has been compromised by the increasing proportion of infections due to antibiotic-resistant strains, which are growing at an alarming rate. N. gonorrhoeae MtrF is an integral membrane protein, which belongs to the AbgT family of transporters for which no structural information is available. Here we describe the crystal structure of MtrF, revealing a dimeric molecule with architecture distinct from all other families of transporters. MtrF is a bowl-shaped dimer with a solvent-filled basin extending from the cytoplasm to halfway across the membrane bilayer. Each subunit of the transporter contains nine transmembrane helices and two hairpins, posing a plausible pathway for substrate transport. A combination of the crystal structure and biochemical functional assays suggests that MtrF is an antibiotic efflux pump, mediating bacterial resistance to sulfonamide antimetabolite drugs. PMID:25818299

  19. MTR WING, TRA604. PRECAST CONCRETE PANELS AND DIMENSIONS FOR PANELS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR WING, TRA-604. PRECAST CONCRETE PANELS AND DIMENSIONS FOR PANELS K THROUGH Q. BLAW-KNOX 3150-804-21, SHEET #2, 11/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0604-62-098-100645, REV. 2. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  20. MTR, TRA603. BASEMENT FLOOR PLAN. REACTOR SHIELDING, CANAL AND RABBIT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR, TRA-603. BASEMENT FLOOR PLAN. REACTOR SHIELDING, CANAL AND RABBIT CANAL, DEEP WELL STORAGE. DECONTAMINATION ROOM, VAULT, MONITOR ROOM, OFFICE, STAIRWAYS. BLAW-KNOX 3150-803-1, 7/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0603-00-098-100560, REV. 6. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  1. MTR, TRA603. CONTROL ROOM DETAILS. ACOUSTIC PLASTER CEILING, USHAPED CONSOLE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR, TRA-603. CONTROL ROOM DETAILS. ACOUSTIC PLASTER CEILING, U-SHAPED CONSOLE, INSTRUMENT PANELS, GLASS DOOR, ASPHALT TILE FLOOR AND COLORS. BLAW-KNOX 3150-803-11, 10/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0603-00-098-100570, REV. 3. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  2. MTR BUILDING INTERIOR, TRA603. BASEMENT. CAMERA IS IN SOUTHWEST QUADRANT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR BUILDING INTERIOR, TRA-603. BASEMENT. CAMERA IS IN SOUTHWEST QUADRANT OF BASEMENT AND FACING NORTHEAST. PANEL DISPLAYS DATA READOUTS. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-6-2. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  3. Structure and function of Neisseria gonorrhoeae MtrF illuminates a class of antimetabolite efflux pumps

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Su, Chih -Chia; Bolla, Jani  Reddy; Kumar, Nitin; Radhakrishnan, Abhijith; Long, Feng; Delmar, Jared  A.; Chou, Tsung -Han; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta  R.; Shafer, William  M.; Yu, Edward  W.

    2015-04-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is an obligate human pathogen and the causative agent of the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhea. The control of this disease has been compromised by the increasing proportion of infections due to antibiotic-resistant strains, which are growing at an alarming rate. N. gonorrhoeae MtrF is an integral membrane protein that belongs to the AbgT family of transporters for which no structural information is available. Here, we describe the crystal structure of MtrF, revealing a dimeric molecule with architecture distinct from all other families of transporters. MtrF is a bowl-shaped dimer with a solvent-filled basin extending from the cytoplasm tomore »halfway across the membrane bilayer. Each subunit of the transporter contains nine transmembrane helices and two hairpins, posing a plausible pathway for substrate transport. A combination of the crystal structure and biochemical functional assays suggests that MtrF is an antibiotic efflux pump mediating bacterial resistance to sulfonamide antimetabolite drugs.« less

  4. MTR WING A, TRA604, INTERIOR. MAIN FLOOR. VIEW DOWN CORRIDOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR WING A, TRA-604, INTERIOR. MAIN FLOOR. VIEW DOWN CORRIDOR 2 (BETWEEN ROOMS ON WEST WALL AND IN CENTER OF FLOOR). CAMERA FACING SOUTH. PUMICE BLOCK WALLS. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-12-2. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  5. MTR STACK, TRA71, DETAIL OF PUMICE BLOCK SERVICE BUILDING AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR STACK, TRA-71-, DETAIL OF PUMICE BLOCK SERVICE BUILDING AT BASE OF STACK. CAMERA FACING SOUTHEAST. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD52-1-2. Mike Crane, Photographer, 5/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  6. MTR WING, TRA604. A LABORATORY ROOM WITH ITS CABINETS AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR WING, TRA-604. A LABORATORY ROOM WITH ITS CABINETS AND SERVICE STRIP DOWN CENTER OF ROOM. CARD IN LEFT CORNER OF VIEW WAS INSERTED BY INL PHOTOGRAPHER TO COVER AN OBSOLETE SECURITY RESTRICTION PRINTED ON THE ORIGINAL NEGATIVE. INL NEGATIVE NO. 3817. Unknown Photographer, 11/28/1951 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  7. Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulations and Molecular Conductance Measurements of the Bacterial Decaheme Cytochrome MtrF

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, H. S.; Pirbadian, S.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Shi, Liang; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.

    2014-09-05

    Microorganisms overcome the considerable hurdle of respiring extracellular solid substrates by deploying large multiheme cytochrome complexes that form 20 nanometer conduits to traffic electrons through the periplasm and across the cellular outer membrane. Here we report the first kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and single-molecule scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) measurements of the Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 outer membrane decaheme cytochrome MtrF, which can perform the final electron transfer step from cells to minerals and microbial fuel cell anodes. We find that the calculated electron transport rate through MtrF is consistent with previously reported in vitro measurements of the Shewanella Mtr complex, as well as in vivo respiration rates on electrode surfaces assuming a reasonable (experimentally verified) coverage of cytochromes on the cell surface. The simulations also reveal a rich phase diagram in the overall electron occupation density of the hemes as a function of electron injection and ejection rates. Single molecule tunneling spectroscopy confirms MtrF's ability to mediate electron transport between an STM tip and an underlying Au(111) surface, but at rates higher than expected from previously calculated heme-heme electron transfer rates for solvated molecules.

  8. MTR, TRA603. CANAL, PLANS AND TRANSVERSE SECTION. FOUNDATION PLAN. COUNTERFORT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR, TRA-603. CANAL, PLANS AND TRANSVERSE SECTION. FOUNDATION PLAN. COUNTERFORT SUPPORTS. DRAINS. SUMPS. CRANE RAIL. HATCHWAYS. BLAW-KNOX 3150-803-2, 4/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0603-62-098-100582, REV. 7. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  9. MTR, TRA603. DETAIL IN BASEMENT. STEEL FORMS FOR EACH FACE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR, TRA-603. DETAIL IN BASEMENT. STEEL FORMS FOR EACH FACE OF REACTOR COVERED CONCRETE SHIELD. BLAW-KNOX 3150-803-41, 6/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0603-61-098-100597, REV. 2. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  10. MTR, TRA603. NORTH ELEVATION. PLUG STORAGE AREA WITH ROLLING STEEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR, TRA-603. NORTH ELEVATION. PLUG STORAGE AREA WITH ROLLING STEEL DOOR. PIPE TUNNEL IN SUB-BASEMENT. FIXED SASH WINDOWS IN BALCONY SECTION. DOOR DETAILS. BLAW-KNOX 3150-803-7, 7/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0603-00-098-100566, REV. 4. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  11. MTR, TRA603. EAST ELEVATION. CANAL IN BASEMENT. SECTION SHOWS CRANE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR, TRA-603. EAST ELEVATION. CANAL IN BASEMENT. SECTION SHOWS CRANE GIRDER AND CATWALK. DETAILS OF DOOR FRAMES AT FREIGHT ELEVATOR. BLAW-KNOX 3150-803-6, 7/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0603-00-098-100565, REV. 5. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  12. MTR, TRA603. WEST ELEVATION. HOOD VENT. FREIGHT ELEVATOR. SECTION THROUGH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR, TRA-603. WEST ELEVATION. HOOD VENT. FREIGHT ELEVATOR. SECTION THROUGH SECOND AND THIRD FLOORS. BLAW-KNOX 3150-803-8, 7/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0603-00-098-100567, REV. 5. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  13. MTR, TRA603. INTERIOR SECTIONS, ELEVATIONS AND DETAILS. ARRANGEMENT OF CONTROL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR, TRA-603. INTERIOR SECTIONS, ELEVATIONS AND DETAILS. ARRANGEMENT OF CONTROL ROOM, INSTRUMENT ROOM, FREIGHT AND PERSONNEL ELEVATORS. WEST BALCONY PLATFORM. CRANE GIRDER. BLAW-KNOX 3150-803-9, 7/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0603-00-098-100568, REV. 7. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  14. MTR, TRA603. INCANAL CONVEYOR TABLE, SAW TABLE, AND STORAGE AREA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR, TRA-603. IN-CANAL CONVEYOR TABLE, SAW TABLE, AND STORAGE AREA RACKS. DISCHARGE MECHANISM. BLAW-KNOX 3150-579-1, 12/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-603-40-098-100302, REV. 3. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  15. MTR, TRA603. FOUNDATION PLAN FOR AREA JUST BELOW BASEMENT FLOOR. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR, TRA-603. FOUNDATION PLAN FOR AREA JUST BELOW BASEMENT FLOOR. CAISSON COLUMN REINFORCEMENT. AIR DUCTS. BLAW-KNOX 3150-803-31, 5/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0603-62-098-100587, REV. 5. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  16. MTR WING, TRA604. DETAILS OF LABORATORIES ALONG SOUTH WALL: TABLES, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR WING, TRA-604. DETAILS OF LABORATORIES ALONG SOUTH WALL: TABLES, FUME HOODS, DESKS. BLAW-KNOX 3150-404-4, 7/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0604-00-098-100084, REV. 8. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. MTR, TRA603. CANAL BULKHEAD AND GATE. GRABHOOK TOOL. BLAWKNOX 315080329, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR, TRA-603. CANAL BULKHEAD AND GATE. GRAB-HOOK TOOL. BLAW-KNOX 3150-803-29, 6/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0603-60-098-100585, REV. 3. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  18. MTR, TRA603. FOUNDATION PLAN, SECTION C THROUGH COOLANT WATER EXIT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR, TRA-603. FOUNDATION PLAN, SECTION C THROUGH COOLANT WATER EXIT TUNNEL ALONG NORTH SIDE AS IT RETURNS TO MAIN COOLANT TUNNEL LEAVING BUILDING TO THE NORTH. BLAW-KNOX 3150-803-35, 5/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0603-62-098-100591, REV. 2. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  19. MTR BUILDING, TRA603. SOUTH ELEVATION. PRECAST INSULATED PANEL DETAILS. AIR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR BUILDING, TRA-603. SOUTH ELEVATION. PRECAST INSULATED PANEL DETAILS. AIR DUCT PLENUM CHAMBER. BLAW-KNOX 3150-80-5, 9/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0603-00-098-100564, REV. 4. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  20. MTR, TRA603. FOUNDATION PLAN, SECTION A ALONG NORTH/SOUTH AXIS SHOWS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR, TRA-603. FOUNDATION PLAN, SECTION A ALONG NORTH/SOUTH AXIS SHOWS PIPE TUNNEL FOR COOLANT WATER. BLAW-KNOX 3150-803-33, 5/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0603-62-098-100589, REV. 8. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  1. MTR, TRA603. SUBPILE ROOM PLAN AND SECTIONS. CONCRETE FILL AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR, TRA-603. SUB-PILE ROOM PLAN AND SECTIONS. CONCRETE FILL AT TWO ELEVATIONS. EXIT AIR DUCT. EXIT AND INLET WATER. PEBBLE CUBICLE AND BIN. BLAW-KNOX 3150-803-45, 9/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0603-62-098-100601, REV. 1. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  2. MTR, TRA603. SUBBASEMENT FLOOR PLAN. INLET/OUTLET TUNNELS FOR COOLANT WATER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR, TRA-603. SUB-BASEMENT FLOOR PLAN. INLET/OUTLET TUNNELS FOR COOLANT WATER (NORTH SIDE) AND AIR (SOUTH SIDE). RABBIT CANAL AND BULKHEADS. SUMPS AND DRAINS. BLAW-KNOX 3150-3-7, 3/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0603-00-098-100006, REV. 4. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  3. MTR WING, TRA604. SECTIONS SHOW COUNTING ROOM SHIELDING AND MAZE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR WING, TRA-604. SECTIONS SHOW COUNTING ROOM SHIELDING AND MAZE. RECORD ROOM BELOW. STAIRWAYS TO BASEMENT AND FAN LOFT. BLAW-KNOX 3150-804-7, 11/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0604-00-098-100632, REV. 2. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  4. The exosome-binding factors Rrp6 and Rrp47 form a composite surface for recruiting the Mtr4 helicase.

    PubMed

    Schuch, Benjamin; Feigenbutz, Monika; Makino, Debora L; Falk, Sebastian; Basquin, Claire; Mitchell, Phil; Conti, Elena

    2014-12-01

    The exosome is a conserved multi-subunit ribonuclease complex that functions in 3' end processing, turnover and surveillance of nuclear and cytoplasmic RNAs. In the yeast nucleus, the 10-subunit core complex of the exosome (Exo-10) physically and functionally interacts with the Rrp6 exoribonuclease and its associated cofactor Rrp47, the helicase Mtr4 and Mpp6. Here, we show that binding of Mtr4 to Exo-10 in vitro is dependent upon both Rrp6 and Rrp47, whereas Mpp6 binds directly and independently of other cofactors. Crystallographic analyses reveal that the N-terminal domains of Rrp6 and Rrp47 form a highly intertwined structural unit. Rrp6 and Rrp47 synergize to create a composite and conserved surface groove that binds the N-terminus of Mtr4. Mutation of conserved residues within Rrp6 and Mtr4 at the structural interface disrupts their interaction and inhibits growth of strains expressing a C-terminal GFP fusion of Mtr4. These studies provide detailed structural insight into the interaction between the Rrp6-Rrp47 complex and Mtr4, revealing an important link between Mtr4 and the core exosome. PMID:25319414

  5. The exosome-binding factors Rrp6 and Rrp47 form a composite surface for recruiting the Mtr4 helicase

    PubMed Central

    Schuch, Benjamin; Feigenbutz, Monika; Makino, Debora L; Falk, Sebastian; Basquin, Claire; Mitchell, Phil; Conti, Elena

    2014-01-01

    The exosome is a conserved multi-subunit ribonuclease complex that functions in 3? end processing, turnover and surveillance of nuclear and cytoplasmic RNAs. In the yeast nucleus, the 10-subunit core complex of the exosome (Exo-10) physically and functionally interacts with the Rrp6 exoribonuclease and its associated cofactor Rrp47, the helicase Mtr4 and Mpp6. Here, we show that binding of Mtr4 to Exo-10 in vitro is dependent upon both Rrp6 and Rrp47, whereas Mpp6 binds directly and independently of other cofactors. Crystallographic analyses reveal that the N-terminal domains of Rrp6 and Rrp47 form a highly intertwined structural unit. Rrp6 and Rrp47 synergize to create a composite and conserved surface groove that binds the N-terminus of Mtr4. Mutation of conserved residues within Rrp6 and Mtr4 at the structural interface disrupts their interaction and inhibits growth of strains expressing a C-terminal GFP fusion of Mtr4. These studies provide detailed structural insight into the interaction between the Rrp6–Rrp47 complex and Mtr4, revealing an important link between Mtr4 and the core exosome. PMID:25319414

  6. Flavin Binding to the Deca-heme Cytochrome MtrC: Insights from Computational Molecular Simulation.

    PubMed

    Breuer, Marian; Rosso, Kevin M; Blumberger, Jochen

    2015-12-15

    Certain dissimilatory bacteria have the remarkable ability to use extracellular metal oxide minerals instead of oxygen as terminal electron sinks, using a process known as "extracellular respiration". Specialized multiheme cytochromes located on the outer membrane of the microbe were shown to be crucial for electron transfer from the cell surface to the mineral. This process is facilitated by soluble, biogenic flavins secreted by the organism for the purpose of acting as an electron shuttle. However, their interactions with the outer-membrane cytochromes are not established on a molecular scale. Here, we study the interaction between the outer-membrane deca-heme cytochrome MtrC from Shewanella oneidensis and flavin mononucleotide (FMN in fully oxidized quinone form) using computational docking. We find that interaction of FMN with MtrC is significantly weaker than with known FMN-binding proteins, but identify a mildly preferred interaction site close to heme 2 with a dissociation constant (Kd) = 490 ?M, in good agreement with recent experimental estimates, Kd = 255 ?M. The weak interaction with MtrC can be qualitatively explained by the smaller number of hydrogen bonds that the planar headgroup of FMN can form with this protein compared to FMN-binding proteins. Molecular dynamics simulation gives indications for a possible conformational switch upon cleavage of the disulphide bond of MtrC, but without concomitant increase in binding affinities according to this docking study. Overall, our results suggest that binding of FMN to MtrC is reversible and not highly specific, which may be consistent with a role as redox shuttle that facilitates extracellular respiration. PMID:26682818

  7. Human cytomegalovirus mtrII oncoprotein binds to p53 and down-regulates p53-activated transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Muralidhar, S; Doniger, J; Mendelson, E; Araujo, J C; Kashanchi, F; Azumi, N; Brady, J N; Rosenthal, L J

    1996-01-01

    The 79-amino-acid (79-aa) open reading frame (UL111a) gene within morphological transforming region II (mtrII) of human cytomegalovirus strain Towne has been shown to transform rodent cells in vitro (J. Thompson, J. Doniger, and L. J. Rosenthal, Arch. Virol. 136:161-172, 1994). Moreover, a translation termination linker (TTL) mutant of mtrII that coded for the first 49 aa of mtrII oncoprotein (designated TTL49) was sufficient for malignant transformation, whereas a TTL mutant that coded for the first 24 aa (designated TTL24) was not. The current study demonstrates the binding of mtrII oncoprotein to the tumor suppressor protein p53 both in vivo using transiently transfected cells and in vitro using labeled proteins. Furthermore, the C-terminally truncated mtrII protein TTL49, but not truncated protein TTL24, bound to p53. The mtrII binding domain mapped to the N-terminal region of p53, residues 1 to 106, with a critical region from aa 27 to 44, whereas the p53 binding domain of mtrII protein was the first 49 aa. Furthermore, mtrII inhibited p53-activated transcription, indicating its ability to alter p53-directed cellular regulatory mechanisms. mtrII oncoprotein was detected both in stably transfected NIH 3T3 cell lines and human cytomegalovirus-infected HEL 299 cells (as early as 12 h after infection) in the perinuclear region and in the nucleus. mtrII-transformed cell lines, at both early and late passage, exhibited high levels of p53 with a 15-fold-extended half-life. However, p53-activated transcription was suppressed in these cells in spite of the increased p53 levels. Finally, the results with wild-type mtrII and its TTL mutants with respect to p53 binding, p53-activated transcription, and transforming ability suggest that the mechanism of mtrII transformation is linked to both p53 binding and disruption of p53 cell regulation. PMID:8970996

  8. MTR BUILDING, TRA603. EAST SIDE. CAMERA FACING WEST. CORRUGATED IRON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR BUILDING, TRA-603. EAST SIDE. CAMERA FACING WEST. CORRUGATED IRON BUILDING MARKED WITH "X" IS TRA-651. TRA-626, TO ITS RIGHT, HOUSED COMPRESSOR EQUIPMENT FOR THE AIRCRAFT NUCLEAR PROPULSION PROGRAM. LATER, IT WAS USED FOR STORAGE. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-42-4. Mike Crane, Photographer, April 2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  9. MTR WING A, TRA604, INTERIOR. BASEMENT. DETAIL OF A19 LAB ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR WING A, TRA-604, INTERIOR. BASEMENT. DETAIL OF A-19 LAB AREA ALONG SOUTH WALL. SIGN ON FLOOR DIRECTS WORKERS TO OBTAIN WHOLE BODY FRISK UPON LEAVING AREA. SIGN ON EQUIPMENT IN CENTER OF VIEW REQUESTS WORKERS TO "NOTIFY HEALTH PHYSICS BEFORE WORKING ON THIS SYSTEM." CAMERA FACING SOUTHWEST. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-13-2. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  10. MTR WING, TRA604. ELEVATIONS OF NORTH, WEST AND SOUTH SIDES. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR WING, TRA-604. ELEVATIONS OF NORTH, WEST AND SOUTH SIDES. EAST SIDE CONNECTS TO TRA-603'S WEST SIDE. REFERENCE TO PANEL TYPES A, B, C, D, E, H. WINDOWS IN BANKS OF FOUR. DETAILS OF ENTRY ON WEST SIDE: CANOPY, GLASS BLOCK. FAN DECK. BLAW-KNOX 3150-804-5, 11/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0604-00-098-100630, REV. 5. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  11. MTR BUILDING, TRA603. SOUTHEAST CORNER, EAST SIDE FACING TOWARD RIGHT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR BUILDING, TRA-603. SOUTHEAST CORNER, EAST SIDE FACING TOWARD RIGHT OF VIEW. CAMERA FACING NORTHWEST. LIGHT-COLORED PROJECTION AT LEFT IS ENGINEERING SERVICES BUILDING, TRA-635. SMALL CONCRETE BLOCK BUILDING AT CENTER OF VIEW IS FAST CHOPPER DETECTOR HOUSE, TRA-665. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-43-3. Mike Crane, Photographer, 4/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  12. MTR, TRA603. SECOND FLOOR PLAN. OFFICES AND INSTRUMENT ROOM. STEEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR, TRA-603. SECOND FLOOR PLAN. OFFICES AND INSTRUMENT ROOM. STEEL PARTITIONS ON EAST SIDE OF INSTRUMENT ROOM. DETAIL OF COLUMN ENCASEMENTS. STAIRWAYS IN NORTH AND SOUTH CORNERS. PASSENGER ELEVATION. BLAW-KNOX 3150-803-3, 7/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0603-00-098-100562, REV. 6. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  13. MTR, TRA603. TRANSVERSE SECTION LOOKS DOWN EAST/WEST AXIS TO SHOW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR, TRA-603. TRANSVERSE SECTION LOOKS DOWN EAST/WEST AXIS TO SHOW PATH OF PROCESS WATER LINES IN PIPE TUNNEL FROM SUMP PUMP, AIR DUCTS, ELEVATORS, CANAL IN BASEMENT LEVEL, CANAL CRANE DOWN CENTER LINE OF CANAL, AND REACTOR ROOM CRANE ON TRAVELING RAIL. BLAW-KNOX BKC-3150, 3/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0603-00-098-100005, REV. 4. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  14. MTR, TRA603. FOUNDATION PLAN. USE AND LOCATION OF CAISSONS, WHICH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR, TRA-603. FOUNDATION PLAN. USE AND LOCATION OF CAISSONS, WHICH SUPPORTED BASEMENT AND UPPER LEVEL OF BUILDING; CAISSON DIAMETERS. SECTIONS ARE MARKED AS REFERENTS FOR THE NEXT THREE DRAWINGS. BLAW-KNOX 3150-803-30, 5/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0603-62-100586, REV. 5. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  15. MTR WING, TRA604. PRECAST CONCRETE PANELS AND DIMENSIONS. TYPES A, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR WING, TRA-604. PRECAST CONCRETE PANELS AND DIMENSIONS. TYPES A, B, C, D, E, AND F; AND HOW THEY ARE CONNECTED. TYPES C AND D ARE ON WEST SIDE WHERE GLASS BLOCKS SURROUND ENTRY DOOR. BLAW-KNOX 3150-804-20, SHEET #1, 11/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0604-62-098-100644, REV. 0. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  16. Thermodynamics of Electron Flow in the Bacterial Deca-heme Cytochrome MtrF

    SciTech Connect

    Breuer, Marian; Zarzycki, Piotr P.; Blumberger, Jochen; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2012-07-01

    Electron transporting multiheme cytochromes are essential to the metabolism of microbes that inhabit soils and carry out important biogeochemical processes. Recently the first crystal structure of a prototype bacterial deca-heme cytochrome (MtrF) has been resolved and its electrochemistry characterized. However, the molecular details of electron conductance along heme chains in the cytochrome are difficult to access via experiment due to the nearly identical chemical nature of the heme cofactors. Here we employ large-scale molecular dynamics simulations to compute the reduction potentials of the ten hemes of MtrF in aqueous solution. We find that as a whole they fall within a range of about 0.3 V in agreement with experiment. Individual reduction potentials give rise to a free energy profile for electron conduction that is approximately symmetric with respect to the center of the protein. Our calculations indicate that there is no significant potential bias along the orthogonal octa- and tetra-heme chains suggesting that under aqueous conditions MtrF is a nearly reversible two-dimensional conductor.

  17. Analysis of MTR and MTRR Polymorphisms for Neural Tube Defects Risk Association

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongxin; Liu, Yuan; Ji, Wenyu; Qin, Hu; Wu, Hao; Xu, Danshu; Tukebai, Turtuohut; Wang, Zengliang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Neural tube defects (NTDs) are the most common congenital defects of the central nervous system among neonates and the folate status during pregnancy was considered as the most important etiopathogenesis of NTDs. Besides, methionine synthase (MTR) gene and methionine synthase reductase (MTRR) gene were folate metabolism involved genes and had been investigated in several previous studies with inconsistent results. Hence, we aimed to explore the association of 4 selected single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on MTRR/MTR gene and the susceptibility of NTDs in a Chinese population. Seven SNPs were selected from HapMap databases with Haploview 4.2 software. A polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was performed to genotype the polymorphisms from blood samples of 165 NTDs patients and 280 healthy controls. The correlation between these SNPs and NTDs risk was tested by Student t test and Chi-square test by STATA 11.0 software. Furthermore, we performed a meta-analysis of relevant studies to investigate the association between the SNPs MTRR 66A>G and MTR 2756A>G and the susceptibility of NTDs. An increased risk of NTDs was verified to be significantly associated with MTRR 66A>G (G allele vs. A allele: OR?=?1.36 (1.03–1.80), P?=?0.028; GG?+?AG vs. AA: OR?=?1.60 (1.05–2.43), P?=?0.027) and MTR 2756A>G (G allele vs. A allele: OR?=?1.45 (1.06–1.98), P?=?0.021; GG?+?AG vs. AA: OR?=?1.51 (1.02–2.23), P?=?0.038) in our study. However, the other SNPs in our analysis showed no significant association with NTDs risk (all P?>?0.05). Furthermore, the result of the meta-analysis supported the association between MTRR 66A>G and NTDs risk (G allele vs. A allele: OR?=?1.32, 95% CI?=?1.09–1.61, GG?+?GA vs. AA: OR?=?1.49, 95% CI?=?1.06–2.09, GG vs. AA: OR?=?1.61, 95% CI?=?1.04–2.49). Our study confirmed that the MTRR 66A>G and MTR 2756A>G were significantly associated with the increased NTDs risk in a Chinese population. The further meta-analysis enhance that MTRR 66A>G was connected with the susceptibility of NTDs widely. Further investigations based on more detailed stratification were recommended. PMID:26334892

  18. Correlation of Homocysteine Metabolic Enzymes Gene Polymorphism and Mild Cognitive Impairment in the Xinjiang Uygur Population

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Mei; Ji, Huihui; Zhou, Xiaohui; Liang, Jie; Zou, Ting

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic polymorphisms in the homocysteine (HCY) metabolic enzymes in the Xinjiang Uygur population who have mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Material/Methods Based on the epidemiological investigation, 129 cases of diagnosed Uygur MCI patients and a matched control group with 131 cases were enrolled for analyzing the association between the polymorphisms in the HCY metabolism related genes (C677T, A1298C, and G1968A polymorphisms in MTHFR, as well as the A2756G polymorphism in MS) and MCI by using the SNaPshot method. We then determined the homocysteine level in patients. Results In Xinjiang Uygur subjects, the A1298C polymorphisms in MTHFR and the A2756G polymorphisms in the MS gene in the MCI group were different from those in the control group. However, the C677T and G1968A polymorphisms in the MTHFR gene in MCI patients were not different from those in the control group. Multivariate logistic regression showed that, in addition to the well-known risk factors, such as low education level, high cholesterol level, high level of low-density lipoprotein, and high homocysteine levels, the A>G mutation in the MS gene at the rs1805087 locus was another independent risk factor for MCI in the Uyghur MCI population. The risk of MCI in G allele carriers was 2.265 times higher than that in matched control individuals (95% CI: 1.205~4.256, P<0.05). Conclusions The genetic polymorphism of HCY metabolizing enzymes is correlated to the occurrence of MCI in the Xinjiang Uygur population. The A2756G polymorphism in the MS gene could be an independent risk factor for MCI in the Xinjiang Uygur population. PMID:25625218

  19. Targeted Protein Degradation of Outer Membrane Decaheme Cytochrome MtrC Metal Reductase in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Measured Using Biarsenical Probe CrAsH-EDT2

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Yijia; Chen, Baowei; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2011-10-14

    Development of efficient microbial biofuel cells requires an ability to exploit interfacial electron transfer reactions to external electron acceptors, such as metal oxides; such reactions occur in the facultative anaerobic gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 through the catalytic activity of the outer membrane decaheme c-type cytochrome MtrC. Central to the utility of this pathway to synthetic biology is an understanding of cellular mechanisms that maintain optimal MtrC function, cellular localization, and renewal by degradation and resynthesis. In order to monitor trafficking to the outer membrane, and the environmental sensitivity of MtrC, we have engineered a tetracysteine tag (i.e., CCPGCC) at its C-terminus that permits labeling by the cell impermeable biarsenical fluorophore, carboxy-FlAsH (CrAsH) of MtrC at the surface of living Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells. In comparison, the cell permeable reagent FlAsH permits labeling of the entire population of MtrC, including proteolytic fragments resulting from incorrect maturation. We demonstrate specific labeling by CrAsH of engineered MtrC which is dependent on the presence of a functional type-2 secretion system (T2S), as evidenced by T2S system gspD or gspG deletion mutants which are incapable of CrAsH labeling. Under these latter conditions, MtrC undergoes proteolytic degradation to form a large 35-38 kDa fragment; this degradation product is also resolved during normal turnover of the CrAsH-labeled MtrC protein. No MtrC protein is released into the medium during turnover, suggesting the presence of cellular turnover systems involving MtrC reuptake and degradation. The mature MtrC localized on the outer membrane is a long-lived protein, with a turnover rate of 0.043 hr-1 that is insensitive to O2 concentration. Maturation of MtrC is relatively inefficient, with substantial rates of turnover of the immature protein prior to export to the outer membrane (i.e., 0.028 hr-1) that are consistent with the inherent complexity associated with correct heme insertion and acylation of MtrC that occurs in the periplasm prior to its targeting to the outer membrane. These latter results suggest that MtrC protein trafficking to the outer membrane and its subsequent degradation are tightly regulated, which is consistent with cellular processing pathways that target MtrC to extracellular structures and their possible role in promoting electron transfer from Shewanella to extracellular acceptors.

  20. The use of experimental data in an MTR-type nuclear reactor safety analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Simon E.

    Reactivity initiated accidents (RIAs) are a category of events required for research reactor safety analysis. A subset of this is unprotected RIAs in which mechanical systems or human intervention are not credited in the response of the system. Light-water cooled and moderated MTR-type ( i.e., aluminum-clad uranium plate fuel) reactors are self-limiting up to some reactivity insertion limit beyond which fuel damage occurs. This characteristic was studied in the Borax and Spert reactor tests of the 1950s and 1960s in the USA. This thesis considers the use of this experimental data in generic MTR-type reactor safety analysis. The approach presented herein is based on fundamental phenomenological understanding and uses correlations in the reactor test data with suitable account taken for differences in important system parameters. Specifically, a semi-empirical approach is used to quantify the relationship between the power, energy and temperature rise response of the system as well as parametric dependencies on void coefficient and the degree of subcooling. Secondary effects including the dependence on coolant flow are also examined. A rigorous curve fitting approach and error assessment is used to quantify the trends in the experimental data. In addition to the initial power burst stage of an unprotected transient, the longer term stability of the system is considered with a stylized treatment of characteristic power/temperature oscillations (chugging). A bridge from the HEU-based experimental data to the LEU fuel cycle is assessed and outlined based on existing simulation results presented in the literature. A cell-model based parametric study is included. The results are used to construct a practical safety analysis methodology for determining reactivity insertion safety limits for a light-water moderated and cooled MTR-type core.

  1. Gonococcal sensitivity to fecal lipids can be mediated by an Mtr-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    McFarland, L; Mietzner, T A; Knapp, J S; Sandstrom, E; Holmes, K K; Morse, S A

    1983-07-01

    Various factors affect the sensitivity of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to physiological levels of hydrophobic molecules. A total of 98 N. gonorrhoeae strains from rectal, cervical, and urethral cultures of homosexual men and heterosexual men and women were examined for their sensitivities to fecal lipids. Isolates were characterized according to cell envelope phenotype, auxotype, and protein I serogroup. Although cell envelope phenotype was an important factor in the resistance of this organism to fecal lipids (Mtr phenotype greater than wild type greater than Env phenotype), other factors were also of importance. AHU- strains (strains having a requirement for arginine, hypoxanthine, and uracil) uniformly exhibited a wild-type envelope phenotype but were as sensitive to fecal lipids as were Env strains. The protein I serogroup was not a factor in determining the sensitivity of wild-type envelope phenotype non-AHU- strains to fecal lipids. However, sexual preference and site of isolation were important factors. Wild-type envelope phenotype (non-AHU-) strains from homosexual men and heterosexual women were more resistant to fecal lipids than were similar isolates from heterosexual men. When these strains were compared by isolation site, it was observed that rectal isolates from homosexual men and heterosexual women were more resistant than were cervical isolates from heterosexual women or urethral isolates from heterosexual men. Urethral isolates from homosexual men were also more resistant to fecal lipids than were urethral isolates from heterosexual men. These data suggest that the host environment can select for increased resistance to hydrophobic molecules by an Mtr-independent mechanism. The basis for this Mtr-independent resistance is presently unknown, but it is likely that it involves an alteration of the target site(s) for fecal lipid inhibition. PMID:6411761

  2. MTR WING, TRA604. ONE OF THE LABORATORY UNITS ALONG THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR WING, TRA-604. ONE OF THE LABORATORY UNITS ALONG THE SOUTH SIDE WALL. NOTE SINK, CABINET, TABLE, AND HOOD UNITS. DUCT ABOVE RECEIVES CONTAMINATED AIR AND SENDS IT TO FAN HOUSE AND STACK. NOTE PARTITION WALL BEHIND WORK UNITS. THE HEALTH PHYSICS LAB WAS SIMILARLY EQUIPPED. WINDOW AT LEFT EDGE OF VIEW. CARD IN LOWER RIGHT WAS INSERTED BY INL PHOTOGRAPHER TO COVER AN OBSOLETE SECURITY RESTRICTION PRINTED ON ORIGINAL NEGATIVE. INL NEGATIVE NO. 4225. Unknown Photographer, 2/13/1952 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  3. WATER PROCESS SYSTEM FLOW DIAGRAM FOR MTR, TRA603. SUMMARY OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    WATER PROCESS SYSTEM FLOW DIAGRAM FOR MTR, TRA-603. SUMMARY OF COOLANT FLOW FROM WORKING RESERVOIR TO INTERIOR OF REACTOR'S THERMAL SHIELD. NAMES TANK SECTIONS. PIPE AND DRAIN-LINE SIZES. SHOWS DIRECTION OF AIR FLOW THROUGH PEBBLE AND GRAPHITE BLOCK ZONE. NEUTRON CURTAIN AND THERMAL COLUMN DOOR. BLAW-KNOX 3150-92-7, 3/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0603-51-098-100036, REV. 6. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  4. MTR, TRA603. LONGITUDINAL SECTION SHOWS EAST/WEST SECTION AND PROJECTION OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR, TRA-603. LONGITUDINAL SECTION SHOWS EAST/WEST SECTION AND PROJECTION OF CANAL BEYOND EAST WALL OF BUILDING; PIPE TUNNEL, BULKHEAD LOCATIONS IN CANAL, SWING-OUT ISOLATION GATE, TUNNEL HATCH UNDER ROADWAY; SUB-PILE AND RABBIT CANAL SECTIONS; BALCONY CONTROL AND INSTRUMENT ROOMS; CATWALK, MAIN AND AUXILIARY HOISTS. AIR COMPRESSOR BUILDING (TRA-626) TO THE NORTH. BLAW-KNOX BKC-3150-3-5, 3/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0603-00-098-100004, REV. 7. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  5. MTR, TRA603. FIRST FLOOR PLAN. REACTOR AT CENTER. TWENTYMETER CHOPPER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR, TRA-603. FIRST FLOOR PLAN. REACTOR AT CENTER. TWENTY-METER CHOPPER HOUSE. COFFIN TURNING ROLLS. REMOVABLE PANEL OVER CANAL ON EAST SIDE. NEW PLUG STORAGE ACCESS. DOOR SCHEDULE INDICATES STEEL (FOR VAULT), WIRE MESH, AND HOLLOW METAL TYPES. STORAGE AND ISSUE ROOM. SAFETY SHOWERS. DOORWAY TO WING, TRA-604. BLAW-KNOX 3150-803-2, 7/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0603-00-098-100561, REV. 10. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  6. Association of Aberrations in One Carbon Metabolism with Intimal Medial Thickening in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Dhananjayan, R; Malati, T; Rupasree, Y; Kutala, Vijay Kumar

    2015-07-01

    The present work was aimed to study the association of one carbon genetic variants, hyperhomocysteinemia and oxidative stress markers, i.e., serum nitrite, plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) on intimal medial thickening (IMT) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). A total number of 76 subjects from ACS Medical College and Hospital, Chennai, India were included in the study, i.e., Group I (n = 42) of T2D and Group II (n = 34) of age- and sex matched healthy controls. The glycated haemoglobin was measured by ion-exchange resin method; plasma homocysteine by Enzyme Linked Immunosorbant Assay method; serum nitrite (nitric oxide, NO), plasma MDA and GSH by spectrophotometric methods; the IMT by high frequency ultrasound. The polymorphisms of one carbon genetic variants were genotyped using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism and amplified fragment length polymorphism methods. Results indicate that methyltetrahydrofolate homocysteine methyl transferase (MTR) A2756G allele was found to be protective in T2D and the other variants were not significantly associated with T2D. Glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCP II) C1561T (r = 0.34; p = 0.05) and methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T (r = 0.35; 0.04) showed positive correlation with plasma homocysteine in T2D cases. In this study, MTR A2756G allele was found to be protective in T2D; GCP II C1561T and MTHFR C677T showed positive association with plasma homocysteine in T2D cases. Among all the genetic variants, MTR A2756G was found influence IMT. RFC 1 G80A and TYMS 5'-UTR 2R3R showed synergistically interact with MTR A2756G in influencing increase in IMT. PMID:26089610

  7. Structure and function of Neisseria gonorrhoeae MtrF illuminates a class of antimetabolite efflux pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Chih -Chia; Bolla, Jani  Reddy; Kumar, Nitin; Radhakrishnan, Abhijith; Long, Feng; Delmar, Jared  A.; Chou, Tsung -Han; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta  R.; Shafer, William  M.; Yu, Edward  W.

    2015-04-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is an obligate human pathogen and the causative agent of the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhea. The control of this disease has been compromised by the increasing proportion of infections due to antibiotic-resistant strains, which are growing at an alarming rate. N. gonorrhoeae MtrF is an integral membrane protein that belongs to the AbgT family of transporters for which no structural information is available. Here, we describe the crystal structure of MtrF, revealing a dimeric molecule with architecture distinct from all other families of transporters. MtrF is a bowl-shaped dimer with a solvent-filled basin extending from the cytoplasm to halfway across the membrane bilayer. Each subunit of the transporter contains nine transmembrane helices and two hairpins, posing a plausible pathway for substrate transport. A combination of the crystal structure and biochemical functional assays suggests that MtrF is an antibiotic efflux pump mediating bacterial resistance to sulfonamide antimetabolite drugs.

  8. Molecular structure and free energy landscape for electron transport in the decahaem cytochrome MtrF.

    PubMed

    Breuer, Marian; Zarzycki, Piotr; Shi, Liang; Clarke, Thomas A; Edwards, Marcus J; Butt, Julea N; Richardson, David J; Fredrickson, James K; Zachara, John M; Blumberger, Jochen; Rosso, Kevin M

    2012-12-01

    The free energy profile for electron flow through the bacterial decahaem cytochrome MtrF has been computed using thermodynamic integration and classical molecular dynamics. The extensive calculations on two versions of the structure help to validate the method and results, because differences in the profiles can be related to differences in the charged amino acids local to specific haem groups. First estimates of reorganization free energies ? yield a range consistent with expectations for partially solvent-exposed cofactors, and reveal an activation energy range surmountable for electron flow. Future work will aim at increasing the accuracy of ? with polarizable forcefield dynamics and quantum chemical energy gap calculations, as well as quantum chemical computation of electronic coupling matrix elements. PMID:23176454

  9. Isolation of a High-Affinity Functional Protein Complex between OmcA and MtrC: Two Outer Membrane Decaheme c-type Cytochromes of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Chen, Baowei; Wang, Zheming; Elias, Dwayne A.; Mayer, M. Uljana; Gorby, Yuri A.; Ni, Shuisong; Lower, Brian H.; Kennedy, David W.; Wunschel, David S.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Hill, Eric A.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2006-07-01

    SUMMARY Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultatively anaerobic bacterium that is capable of using insoluble oxidized metals, such as manganese [Mn(III, IV)] and iron [Fe(III)] oxides and oxyhydroxides, as terminal electron acceptors during anaerobic respiration. The ability of S. oneidensis MR-1 to reduce oxidized Mn and/or Fe has previously been linked to OmcA and MtrC: two decaheme c-type cytochromes that are localized to the outer membrane. To investigate how the electron transport proteins OmcA and MtrC are organized, we expressed and purified recombinant OmcA and MtrC from wild type S. oneidensis MR-1 as well as a mutant that lacked OmcA and MtrC (?omcA/mtrC). After purification to the nearly electrophoretic homogeneity from the ?omcA/mtrC mutant, the recombinant OmcA and MtrC exhibited the characteristics of c-type cytochromes, and each of their polypeptides was confirmed to contain 10 hemes. When purified from wild type cells, endogenous MtrC or OmcA was always co-purified with recombinant OmcA or MtrC, respectively. Fluorescence polarization experiment showed that recombinant OmcA bound to the FlAsH-labeled MtrC with a dissociation constant of 7 ×10-7 M. The purified recombinant OmcA or MtrC alone displayed intrinsic ferric reductase activity with NADH used as an electron donor. Ferric reductase specific activity increased by 35 to 41% when nearly equimolar concentrations of OmcA and MtrC were assayed relative to the two proteins assayed independently. These results demonstrate that OmcA and MtrC directly interact with each other to form a stable complex with high ferric reductase activity.

  10. Direct Involvement of Type II Secretion System in Extracellular Translocation of Shewanella Oneidensis Outer Membrane Cytochromes MtrC and OmcA

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Deng, Shuang; Marshall, Matthew J.; Wang, Zheming; Kennedy, David W.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mottaz, Heather M.; Hill, Eric A.; Gorby, Yuri A.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Richardson, David J.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2008-08-01

    Outer membrane decaheme c-type cytochromes MtrC and OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 are extracellular lipoproteins important for dissimilatory reduction of solid metal (hydr)oxides during anaerobic respiration. To investigate the roles of type II secretion system (T2S) in translocation of MtrC and OmcA across outer membrane, we measured the effects of deleting two T2S genes, gspD and gspG, on the secretion of MtrC and OmcA when cells were grown under anaerobic conditions. Deletion of gspD or gspG resulted in slightly yellowish supernatants, different from the pink supernatant of wild type (wt). Comparative proteomic analyses revealed that, although MtrC, OmcA and NrfA, a periplasmic nitrite reductase, were present the supernatants of wt and ?gspD mutant, their peptides counts were much lower in ?gspD than in wt. Subsequent analyses with heme-staining and Western blot not only confirmed that deletion of gspD or gspG reduced the abundances of MtrC and OmcA in the supernatants, but also revealed that the deletions consequently increased their abundances inside the cells. Complementation of ?gspG mutant with functional GspG could reverse the effects of deleting gspG on the colors of the supernatants and the abundances of MtrC and OmcA. In contrast, Western results showed that the abundance of NrfA was reduced in the supernatant and the cells of ?gspD mutant, suggesting that reduced NrfA in the periplasm, where MtrC and OmcA were accumulated, contributed to its reduction in the supernatant. Thus, our results demonstrate at the first time that T2S facilitates translocation of MtrC and OmcA across outer membrane.

  11. Characterization of Shewanella oneidensis MtrC: a cell-surface decaheme cytochrome involved in respiratory electron transport to extracellular electron acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Hartshorne, Robert S.; Jepson, Brian N.; Clarke, Thomas A.; Field, Sarah J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Shi, Liang; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David

    2007-09-04

    Abstract MtrC is a decaheme c-type cytochrome associated with the outer cell membrane of Fe(III)-respiring species of the Shewanella genus. It is proposed to play a role in anaerobic respiration by mediating electron transfer to extracellular mineral oxides that can serve as terminal electron acceptors. The present work presents the first spectropotentiometric and voltammetric characterization of MtrC, using protein purified from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Potentiometric titrations, monitored by UV–vis absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, reveal that the hemes within MtrC titrate over a broad potential range spanning between approximately +100 and approximately *500 mV (vs. the standard hydrogen electrode). Across this potential window the UV– vis absorption spectra are characteristic of low-spin c-type hemes and the EPR spectra reveal broad, complex features that suggest the presence of magnetically spin-coupled lowspin c-hemes. Non-catalytic protein film voltammetry of MtrC demonstrates reversible electrochemistry over a potential window similar to that disclosed spectroscopically. The voltammetry also allows definition of kinetic properties of MtrC in direct electron exchange with a solid electrode surface and during reduction of a model Fe(III) substrate. Taken together, the data provide quantitative information on the potential domain in which MtrC can operate.

  12. AAA-ATPase NVL2 acts on MTR4-exosome complex to dissociate the nucleolar protein WDR74.

    PubMed

    Hiraishi, Nobuhiro; Ishida, Yo-Ichi; Nagahama, Masami

    2015-11-20

    Nuclear VCP-like 2 (NVL2) is a chaperone-like nucleolar ATPase of the AAA (ATPase associated with diverse cellular activities) family, which exhibits a high level of amino acid sequence similarity with the cytosolic AAA-ATPase VCP/p97. These proteins generally act on macromolecular complexes to stimulate energy-dependent release of their constituents. We previously showed that NVL2 interacts with RNA processing/degradation machinery containing an RNA helicase MTR4/DOB1 and an exonuclease complex, nuclear exosome, and involved in the biogenesis of 60S ribosomal subunits. These observations implicate NVL2 as a remodeling factor for the MTR4-exosome complex during the maturation of pre-ribosomal particles. Here, we used a proteomic screen and identified a WD repeat-containing protein 74 (WDR74) as a factor that specifically dissociates from this complex depending on the ATPase activity of NVL2. WDR74 shows weak amino acid sequence similarity with the yeast ribosome biogenesis protein Nsa1 and is co-localized with NVL2 in the nucleolus. Knockdown of WDR74 decreases 60S ribosome levels. Taken together, our results suggest that WDR74 is a novel regulatory protein of the MTR4-exsosome complex whose interaction is regulated by NVL2 and is involved in ribosome biogenesis. PMID:26456651

  13. Structural characterization of the principal mRNA-export factor Mex67–Mtr2 from Chaetomium thermophilum

    SciTech Connect

    Aibara, Shintaro; Valkov, Eugene; Lamers, Meindert H.; Dimitrova, Lyudmila; Hurt, Ed; Stewart, Murray

    2015-06-27

    The crystal structures of the individual domains of the Mex67–Mtr2 complex from C. thermophilum have been determined and their arrangement in solution has been studied by SAXS. Members of the Mex67–Mtr2/NXF–NXT1 family are the principal mediators of the nuclear export of mRNA. Mex67/NXF1 has a modular structure based on four domains (RRM, LRR, NTF2-like and UBA) that are thought to be present across species, although the level of sequence conservation between organisms, especially in lower eukaryotes, is low. Here, the crystal structures of these domains from the thermophilic fungus Chaetomium thermophilum are presented together with small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and in vitro RNA-binding data that indicate that, not withstanding the limited sequence conservation between different NXF family members, the molecules retain similar structural and RNA-binding properties. Moreover, the resolution of crystal structures obtained with the C. thermophilum domains was often higher than that obtained previously and, when combined with solution and biochemical studies, provided insight into the structural organization, self-association and RNA-binding properties of Mex67–Mtr2 that facilitate mRNA nuclear export.

  14. Enhancement of the dissolution of albendazole from pellets using MTR technique

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Mohamed A.; Al-Anazi, Fars K.

    2012-01-01

    Albendazole (ABZ), a broad-spectrum anthelmintic agent, is poorly absorbed after oral administration due to its low aqueous solubility. The aim of this study was to improve albendazole dissolution rate by formulating avicel pellets loaded with 10% w/w drug using extrusion/spheronization technique. In addition the wet masses were characterized by mix torque rheometry (MTR) prior to pelletization process. Different additives (i.e., lactose, Tween 80 and low molecular weight chitosan) were formulated with avicel to enhance the dissolution rate of ABZ from the produced pellets. Moreover, mix torque rheometer was used to quantitatively determine the suitable moisture content in the pastes before the extrusion process. The produced pellets were characterized for their ABZ content, particle size, particle shape, dissolution profile and thermal behaviors. The maximum consistencies (the peak torques) of the wet granules were obtained using 0.667–1.333 ml/g of water or water containing surfactant. Also, the produced pellets have size range from 1036 to 1246 ?m. The calculated drug RDR30 for 10%, 30% and 50% lactose concentrations were 1.08, 1.08 and 2.03, respectively, while that calculated for 10%, 30% and 50% w/w chitosan concentrations were 1.71, 3.62 and 3.62, respectively. The results revealed also that increasing the weight ratio of lactose and chitosan was accompanied by a significant reduction of the peak torque magnitude and this was accompanied by an enhanced ABZ dissolution rate. PMID:23960837

  15. Structural analysis reveals the characteristic features of Mtr4, a DExH helicase involved in nuclear RNA processing and surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Weir, John R.; Bonneau, Fabien; Hentschel, Jendrik; Conti, Elena

    2010-01-01

    Mtr4 is a conserved RNA helicase that functions together with the nuclear exosome. It participates in the processing of structured RNAs, including the maturation of 5.8S ribosomal RNA (rRNA). It also interacts with the polyadenylating Trf4-Air2 heterodimer to form the so-called TRAMP (Trf4-Air2-Mtr4 Polyadenylation) complex. TRAMP is involved in exosome-mediated degradation of aberrant RNAs in nuclear surveillance pathways. We report the 2.9-? resolution crystal structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mtr4 in complex with ADP and RNA. The structure shows a central ATPase core similar to that of other DExH helicases. Inserted in the DExH core is a region characteristic of Mtr4 orthologues that folds into an elongated stalk connected to a ?-barrel domain. This domain shows unexpected similarity to the KOW domain of L24, a ribosomal protein that binds 23S rRNA. We find that indeed the KOW domain of Mtr4 is able to bind in vitro transcribed tRNAiMet, suggesting it might assist in presenting RNA substrates to the helicase core. The interaction of Mtr4 with Trf4-Air2 is mediated not by the stalk/KOW insertion but by the DExH core. We find that in the context of the TRAMP complex, the DExH core functions independently in vitro as an RNA helicase and a protein-binding platform. Mtr4 has thus evolved specific structural and surface features to perform its multiple functions. PMID:20566885

  16. Missense mutations that alter the DNA-binding domain of the MtrR protein occur frequently in rectal isolates of Neisseria gonorrhoeae that are resistant to faecal lipids.

    PubMed

    Shafer, W M; Balthazar, J T; Hagman, K E; Morse, S A

    1995-04-01

    Resistance of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to structurally diverse hydrophobic agents (HAs) has been associated with missense or deletion mutations in the mtrR (multiple transferable resistance Regulator) gene of laboratory-derived strains but their prevalence in clinical isolates was heretofore unknown. Since faecal lipids provide strong selective pressure for the emergence of variants resistant to HAs (HAR), the nucleotide sequence of the mtrR gene from rectal isolates of N. gonorrhoeae, which displayed different levels of HAR, was determined. Compared to the mtrR gene possessed by the HA-sensitive strain FA19, each clinical isolate contained mutations in the coding and/or promoter regions of their mtrR gene. A missense mutation in codon 45 (Gly-45 to Asp) was the most common mutation found in the strains studied and impacted the structure of the helix-turn-helix domain of the MtrR protein thought to be important in DNA-binding activity. Two clinical isolates bearing a missense mutation in codon 45 also contained a single basepair deletion in a 13 bp inverted sequence positioned within the mtrR promoter region. Introduction of mtrR sequences amplified from the clinical isolates into strain FA19 revealed that acquisition of the single basepair deletion was correlated with high level HAR while mutations in the mtrR-coding region provided for an intermediate level of HAR. PMID:7773394

  17. Kinetic study of fission product activity released inside containment under loss of coolant transients in a typical MTR system.

    PubMed

    Awan, Saeed E; Mirza, Nasir M; Mirza, Sikander M

    2012-12-01

    Based on continuous release of fission product (FP) activity from fuel to the coolant and then to the containment, a kinetic model is developed for source term after a LOCA in a typical MTR type system. The time dependent source, re-suspension rate, decay of fission products, leakage, deposition on surfaces, and re-circulation of air through filters are employed with a partial prompt source plus a time varying source. Releases of different FP activities are simulated for various release rates. PMID:23041390

  18. Specific Bonds between an Iron Oxide Surface and Outer Membrane Cytochromes MtrC and OmcA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Lower, Brian H.; Shi, Liang; Yongsunthon, Ruchirej; Droubay, Timothy C.; Mccready, David E.; Lower, Steven

    2007-07-31

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is purported to express outer membrane cytochromes (e.g., MtrC and OmcA) that transfer electrons directly to Fe(III) in a mineral during anaerobic respiration.  A prerequisite for this type of reaction would be the formation of a stable bond between a cytochrome and an iron oxide surface.  Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to detect whether a specific bond forms between a hematite (Fe2O3) thin film, created with oxygen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), and recombinant MtrC or OmcA molecules coupled to gold substrates.  Force spectra displayed a unique force signature indicative of a specific bond between each cytochrome and the hematite surface.  The strength of the OmcA-hematite bond was approximately twice as strong as the MtrC-hematite bond, but direct binding to hematite was twice as favorable for MtrC.  Reversible folding/unfolding reactions were observed for mechanically denatured MtrC molecules bound to hematite.  The force measurements for the hematite-cytochrome pairs were compared to spectra collected between an iron oxide and S. oneidensis under anaerobic conditions.  There is a strong correlation between the whole cell and pure protein force spectra suggesting that the unique binding attributes of each cytochrome complement one another and allow both MtrC and OmcA to play a prominent role in the transfer of electrons to Fe(III) in minerals.  Finally, by comparing the magnitude of binding force for the whole cell vs. pure protein data, we were able to estimate that a single bacterium of S. oneidensis (2 x 0.5 ?m) expresses ~104 cytochromes on its outer surface. 

  19. Structural characterization of the principal mRNA-export factor Mex67–Mtr2 from Chaetomium thermophilum

    PubMed Central

    Aibara, Shintaro; Valkov, Eugene; Lamers, Meindert H.; Dimitrova, Lyudmila; Hurt, Ed; Stewart, Murray

    2015-01-01

    Members of the Mex67–Mtr2/NXF–NXT1 family are the principal mediators of the nuclear export of mRNA. Mex67/NXF1 has a modular structure based on four domains (RRM, LRR, NTF2-like and UBA) that are thought to be present across species, although the level of sequence conservation between organisms, especially in lower eukaryotes, is low. Here, the crystal structures of these domains from the thermophilic fungus Chaetomium thermophilum are presented together with small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and in vitro RNA-binding data that indicate that, not withstanding the limited sequence conservation between different NXF family members, the molecules retain similar structural and RNA-binding properties. Moreover, the resolution of crystal structures obtained with the C. thermophilum domains was often higher than that obtained previously and, when combined with solution and biochemical studies, provided insight into the structural organization, self-association and RNA-binding properties of Mex67–Mtr2 that facilitate mRNA nuclear export. PMID:26144233

  20. Structural characterization of the principal mRNA-export factor Mex67-Mtr2 from Chaetomium thermophilum.

    PubMed

    Aibara, Shintaro; Valkov, Eugene; Lamers, Meindert H; Dimitrova, Lyudmila; Hurt, Ed; Stewart, Murray

    2015-07-01

    Members of the Mex67-Mtr2/NXF-NXT1 family are the principal mediators of the nuclear export of mRNA. Mex67/NXF1 has a modular structure based on four domains (RRM, LRR, NTF2-like and UBA) that are thought to be present across species, although the level of sequence conservation between organisms, especially in lower eukaryotes, is low. Here, the crystal structures of these domains from the thermophilic fungus Chaetomium thermophilum are presented together with small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and in vitro RNA-binding data that indicate that, not withstanding the limited sequence conservation between different NXF family members, the molecules retain similar structural and RNA-binding properties. Moreover, the resolution of crystal structures obtained with the C. thermophilum domains was often higher than that obtained previously and, when combined with solution and biochemical studies, provided insight into the structural organization, self-association and RNA-binding properties of Mex67-Mtr2 that facilitate mRNA nuclear export. PMID:26144233

  1. In Vivo Identification of the Outer Membrane Protein OmcA-MtrC Interaction Network in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Cells Using Novel Hydrophobic Chemical Cross-Linkers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haizhen; Tang, Xiaoting; Munske, Gerhard R.; Zakharova, Natalia L.; Yang, Li; Zheng, Chunxiang; Wolff, Meagan A.; Tolic, Nikola; Anderson, Gordon A.; Shi, Liang; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bruce, James E.

    2008-04-01

    Outer membrane (OM) cytochromes OmcA (SO1779) and MtrC (SO1778) are the integral components of electron transfer used by Shewanella oneidensis for anaerobic respiration of metal (hydr)oxides. Here the OmcA-MtrC interaction was identified in vivo using a novel hydrophobic chemical cross-linker (MRN) combined with immunoprecipitation techniques. In addition, identification of other OM proteins from the cross-linked complexes allows first visualization of the OmcA-MtrC interaction network. Further experiments on omcA and mtrC mutant cells showed OmcA plays a central role in the network interaction. For comparison, two commercial cross-linkers were also used in parallel and both resulted in fewer OM protein identifications, indicating the superior properties of MRN for identification of membrane protein interactions. Finally, comparison experiments of in vivo cross-linking and cell lysate cross-linking resulted in significantly different protein interaction data, demonstrating the importance of in vivo cross-linking for study of protein-protein interactions in cells.

  2. Methylation diet and methyl group genetics in risk for adenomatous polyp occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Lucock, Mark; Yates, Zoë; Martin, Charlotte; Choi, Jeong-Hwa; Beckett, Emma; Boyd, Lyndell; LeGras, Kathleen; Ng, Xiaowei; Skinner, Virginia; Wai, Ron; Kho, Jeremy; Roach, Paul; Veysey, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to explore whether a methylation diet influences risk for adenomatous polyps (AP) either independently, or interactively with one-carbon metabolism-dependent gene variants, and whether such a diet modifies blood homocysteine, a biochemical phenotype closely related to the phenomenon of methylation. Methods 249 subjects were examined using selective fluorescence, PCR and food frequency questionnaire to determine homocysteine, nine methylation-related gene polymorphisms, dietary methionine, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate, vitamins B6 and B12. Results 1). Both dietary methionine and 5-methyltetrahydrofolate intake are significantly associated with plasma homocysteine. 2). Dietary methionine is related to AP risk in 2R3R-TS wildtype subjects, while dietary B12 is similarly related to this phenotype in individuals heterozygous for C1420T-SHMT, A2756G-MS and 844ins68-CBS, and in those recessive for 2R3R-TS. 3). Dietary methionine has a marginal influence on plasma homocysteine level in C1420T-SHMT heterozygotes, while B6 exhibits the same effect on homocysteine in C776G-TCN2 homozygote recessive subjects. Natural 5-methyltetrahydrofolate intake is interesting: Wildtype A1298C-MTHFR, heterozygote C677T-MTHFR, wildtype A2756G-MS and recessive A66G-MSR individuals all show a significant reciprocal association with homocysteine. 4). Stepwise regression of all genotypes to predict risk for AP indicated A2756G-MS and A66G-MSR to be most relevant (p = 0.0176 and 0.0408 respectively). Results were corrected for age and gender. Conclusion A methylation diet influences methyl group synthesis in the regulation of blood homocysteine level, and is modulated by genetic interactions. Methylation-related nutrients also interact with key genes to modify risk of AP, a precursor of colorectal cancer. Independent of diet, two methylation-related genes (A2756G-MS and A66G-MSR) were directly associated with AP occurrence. PMID:26673393

  3. Structural Characterization of the Chaetomium thermophilum TREX-2 Complex and its Interaction with the mRNA Nuclear Export Factor Mex67:Mtr2

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrova, Lyudmila; Valkov, Eugene; Aibara, Shintaro; Flemming, Dirk; McLaughlin, Stephen H.; Hurt, Ed; Stewart, Murray

    2015-01-01

    Summary The TREX-2 complex integrates mRNA nuclear export into the gene expression pathway and is based on a Sac3 scaffold to which Thp1, Sem1, Sus1, and Cdc31 bind. TREX-2 also binds the mRNA nuclear export factor, Mex67:Mtr2, through the Sac3 N-terminal region (Sac3N). Here, we characterize Chaetomium thermophilum TREX-2, show that the in vitro reconstituted complex has an annular structure, and define the structural basis for interactions between Sac3, Sus1, Cdc31, and Mex67:Mtr2. Crystal structures show that the binding of C. thermophilum Sac3N to the Mex67 NTF2-like domain (Mex67NTF2L) is mediated primarily through phenylalanine residues present in a series of repeating sequence motifs that resemble those seen in many nucleoporins, and Mlp1 also binds Mex67:Mtr2 using a similar motif. Deletion of Sac3N generated growth and mRNA export defects in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and we propose TREX-2 and Mlp1 function to facilitate export by concentrating mature messenger ribonucleoparticles at the nuclear pore entrance. PMID:26051714

  4. Structural Characterization of the Chaetomium thermophilum TREX-2 Complex and its Interaction with the mRNA Nuclear Export Factor Mex67:Mtr2.

    PubMed

    Dimitrova, Lyudmila; Valkov, Eugene; Aibara, Shintaro; Flemming, Dirk; McLaughlin, Stephen H; Hurt, Ed; Stewart, Murray

    2015-07-01

    The TREX-2 complex integrates mRNA nuclear export into the gene expression pathway and is based on a Sac3 scaffold to which Thp1, Sem1, Sus1, and Cdc31 bind. TREX-2 also binds the mRNA nuclear export factor, Mex67:Mtr2, through the Sac3 N-terminal region (Sac3N). Here, we characterize Chaetomium thermophilum TREX-2, show that the in vitro reconstituted complex has an annular structure, and define the structural basis for interactions between Sac3, Sus1, Cdc31, and Mex67:Mtr2. Crystal structures show that the binding of C. thermophilum Sac3N to the Mex67 NTF2-like domain (Mex67(NTF2L)) is mediated primarily through phenylalanine residues present in a series of repeating sequence motifs that resemble those seen in many nucleoporins, and Mlp1 also binds Mex67:Mtr2 using a similar motif. Deletion of Sac3N generated growth and mRNA export defects in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and we propose TREX-2 and Mlp1 function to facilitate export by concentrating mature messenger ribonucleoparticles at the nuclear pore entrance. PMID:26051714

  5. Kinetics of Reduction of Fe(III) Complexes by Outer Membrane Cytochromes MtrC and OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zheming; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Xuelin; Marshall, Matthew J.; Zachara, John M.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Dupuis, Michel; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Heald, Steve M.; Shi, Liang

    2008-11-01

    Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 possesses up to 42 c-type cytochromes with heme content varying between 1 to as many as 37. Among them, the outer-membrane cytochromes, particularly MtrC and OmcA, are suspected to function as terminal reductases and are responsible for its enzymatic catalysis capability. So far, the mechanisms of metal reduction by these outer-membrane cytochromes are unknown. In this work, we report the study of reduction kinetics of a series of Fe(III) complexes with citrate, NTA and EDTA by abiotically reduced MtrC and OmcA using a stopped-flow technique in combination with theoretical computation methods within the framework of the electron transfer theory of Marcus and speciation calculations based on the current thermodynamic database. Stopped-flow kinetic data showed that the reaction was very fast and appeared to proceed in two stages, a fast stage that completes in much less than a second and a slower stage afterwards. For a given complex, the reaction is faster by reduction with MtrC than OmcA, while for a given protein, the reaction completes in the decreasing order of Fe-EDTA > Fe-NTA > Fe-citrate. All the stopped-flow kinetic curves could be modeled by two parallel second-order bimolecular redox reactions with second-order rate constants ranging from 0.872 µM-1s-1 for the fast reaction between MtrC with Fe-EDTA complex to 0.012 µM-1s-1 for the slow reaction between OmcA and Fe-citrate complex. Speciation calculations indicated that at both metal:ligand ratios, 1:1.5 and 1:10, a single dominant ferric complex was responsible for the observed reaction for each ligand and, therefore, the observed dual-reaction pathways was attributed to the differences in the reduction behavior among various heme groups within each protein. The results of redox potential calculations with known thermodynamic data show only small differences on the scale of a few millivolts among the three complexes, suggested that the observed differences in reaction rate cannot be explained by the overall redox reaction free energy. In contrast, reorganization energies (?) calculated based on DFT-COSMO model are substantially different between the complexes, with a larger reorganization energy and therefore a larger activation energy associated with the citrate complex, and progressively smaller ones for the NTA and EDTA complexes. In combination with approximate electronic coupling terms, the theoretical results show good agreement with the observed trend and implicate the reorganization energy as the key factor in the kinetic reaction.

  6. Role of outer membrane c-type cytochromes MtrC and OmcA in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cell production, accumulation and detachment during respiration on hematite

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 has the capacity to contribute to iron cycling over the long term by respiring on crystalline iron oxides such as hematite when poorly crystalline phases are depleted. The ability of outer membrane cytochromes OmcA and MtrC of MR-1 to bind to an...

  7. Role of Outer Membrane C-Type Cytochromes MtrC and OmcA in Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 Cell Production, Accumulation, and Detachment During Respiration on Hematite

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Andrew C.; Peterson, L.; Reardon, Catherine L.; Reed, Samantha B.; Culley, David E.; Romine, Margaret F.; Geesey, Gill G.

    2012-07-01

    Solid phase iron oxides are considered to be important terminal electron acceptors for microbial respiration in many anoxic environments. Besides the knowledge that cells attach to and reduce these substrates, other aspects of surface-associated cell behavior and the related cell surface components that influence cell-mineral interactions are not well understood. In the present study, wild-type cells of the dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 formed thin biofilms one-to-two cell layers in thickness when respiring on natural specular hematite under flow conditions similar to those which exist in aquatic sediments and subsurface environments. The distribution of cells within the biofilm indicated that direct contact was not required for electron transfer from cells to the mineral surface. Detached biomass in the form of single cells represented >99% of the surface-associated wild-type cell production from respiration on hematite over the biofilm life cycle. A mutant deficient in the outer membrane c35 type cytochrome OmcA, while still able to respire and replicate on hematite, established a lower steady-state cell density on the mineral surface than that of the wild-type strain. A mutant deficient in MtrC, another outer membrane c-type cytochrome, and a mutant deficient in both cytochromes were unable to reduce sufficient amounts of hematite to support detectable growth on the mineral surface. When considered in the context of previous work, the results support a growing body of evidence that the relative importance of OmcA and MtrC to cell respiration and replication depends on the form of iron oxide available as terminal electron acceptor.

  8. Cotranscriptional recruitment of RNA exosome cofactors Rrp47p and Mpp6p and two distinct Trf-Air-Mtr4 polyadenylation (TRAMP) complexes assists the exonuclease Rrp6p in the targeting and degradation of an aberrant messenger ribonucleoprotein particle (mRNP) in yeast.

    PubMed

    Stuparevic, Igor; Mosrin-Huaman, Christine; Hervouet-Coste, Nadège; Remenaric, Mateja; Rahmouni, A Rachid

    2013-11-01

    The cotranscriptional mRNA processing and packaging reactions that lead to the formation of export-competent messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs) are under the surveillance of quality control steps. Aberrant mRNPs resulting from faulty events are retained in the nucleus with ensuing elimination of their mRNA component. The molecular mechanisms by which the surveillance system recognizes defective mRNPs and stimulates their destruction by the RNA degradation machinery are still not completely elucidated. Using an experimental approach in which mRNP formation in yeast is disturbed by the action of the bacterial Rho helicase, we have shown previously that the targeting of Rho-induced aberrant mRNPs is mediated by Rrp6p, which is recruited cotranscriptionally in association with Nrd1p following Rho action. Here we investigated the specific involvement in this quality control process of different cofactors associated with the nuclear RNA degradation machinery. We show that, in addition to the main hydrolytic action of the exonuclease Rrp6p, the cofactors Rrp47p, Mpp6p as well as the Trf-Air-Mtr4 polyadenylation (TRAMP) components Trf4p, Trf5p, and Air2p contribute significantly by stimulating the degradation process upon their cotranscriptional recruitment. Trf4p and Trf5p are apparently recruited in two distinct TRAMP complexes that both contain Air2p as component. Surprisingly, Rrp47p appears to play an important role in mutual protein stabilization with Rrp6p, which highlights a close association between the two partners. Together, our results provide an integrated view of how different cofactors of the RNA degradation machinery cooperate to target and eliminate aberrant mRNPs. PMID:24047896

  9. Cotranscriptional Recruitment of RNA Exosome Cofactors Rrp47p and Mpp6p and Two Distinct Trf-Air-Mtr4 Polyadenylation (TRAMP) Complexes Assists the Exonuclease Rrp6p in the Targeting and Degradation of an Aberrant Messenger Ribonucleoprotein Particle (mRNP) in Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Stuparevic, Igor; Mosrin-Huaman, Christine; Hervouet-Coste, Nadège; Remenaric, Mateja; Rahmouni, A. Rachid

    2013-01-01

    The cotranscriptional mRNA processing and packaging reactions that lead to the formation of export-competent messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs) are under the surveillance of quality control steps. Aberrant mRNPs resulting from faulty events are retained in the nucleus with ensuing elimination of their mRNA component. The molecular mechanisms by which the surveillance system recognizes defective mRNPs and stimulates their destruction by the RNA degradation machinery are still not completely elucidated. Using an experimental approach in which mRNP formation in yeast is disturbed by the action of the bacterial Rho helicase, we have shown previously that the targeting of Rho-induced aberrant mRNPs is mediated by Rrp6p, which is recruited cotranscriptionally in association with Nrd1p following Rho action. Here we investigated the specific involvement in this quality control process of different cofactors associated with the nuclear RNA degradation machinery. We show that, in addition to the main hydrolytic action of the exonuclease Rrp6p, the cofactors Rrp47p, Mpp6p as well as the Trf-Air-Mtr4 polyadenylation (TRAMP) components Trf4p, Trf5p, and Air2p contribute significantly by stimulating the degradation process upon their cotranscriptional recruitment. Trf4p and Trf5p are apparently recruited in two distinct TRAMP complexes that both contain Air2p as component. Surprisingly, Rrp47p appears to play an important role in mutual protein stabilization with Rrp6p, which highlights a close association between the two partners. Together, our results provide an integrated view of how different cofactors of the RNA degradation machinery cooperate to target and eliminate aberrant mRNPs. PMID:24047896

  10. High transition velocities for solid armatures in the 10-mm MTR railgun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colon, N.; Tran, L.; Luu, K.; Paul, L.; Chang, D. I.; Sink, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The study examines the transitioning of a solid armature on the Materials Test Railgun at the Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center and analyzes data on high-velocity transition. Solid aluminum, 7075-series alloy armatures were accelerated to 1.75 km/s and were observed to transition at approximately 1.3 km/s. The data show the development of the measured voltage as a continuous process involving the various phases for the contacts, and the model reflects this behavior. For transitioning times of about 500 microsec there is an initial period with low voltages (not more than 20 V) followed by a sharp rise to about 60 V. After that point there is a smooth rise to about 200 V and a quickly increasing voltage to 800 V after 600 microsec. An analysis based on a model for the contacts elucidates the contact physics during the transitioning process up to 200 V.

  11. Microstructural analysis of MTR fuel plates damaged by a coolant flow blockage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leenaers, A.; Joppen, F.; Van den Berghe, S.

    2009-10-01

    In 1975, as a result of a blockage of the coolant inlet flow, two plates of a fuel element of the BR2 reactor of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK•CEN) were partially melted. The fuel element consisted of Al-clad plates with 90% 235U enriched UAl x fuel dispersed in an Al matrix. The element had accumulated a burn up of 21% 235U before it was removed from the reactor. Recently, the damaged fuel plates were sent to the hot laboratory for detailed PIE. Microstructural changes and associated temperature markers were used to identify several stages in the progression to fuel melting. It was found that the temperature in the center of the fuel plate had increased above 900-950 °C before the reactor was scrammed. In view of the limited availability of such datasets, the results of this microstructural analysis provide valuable input in the analysis of accident scenarios for research reactors.

  12. Mind the gap: diversity and reactivity relationships among multihaem cytochromes of the MtrA/DmsE family

    E-print Network

    Bewley, Kathryn D.

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 has the ability to use many external terminal electron acceptors during anaerobic respiration, such as DMSO. The pathway that facilitates this electron transfer includes the decahaem cytochrome ...

  13. Plasma folate, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), and colorectal cancer risk in three large nested case-control studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Few prospective studies have examined the associations between blood levels of folate, in conjunction with methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) polymorphisms, and colorectal cancer. We evaluated the associations between plasma folate, MTHFR C677T, and A1298C, and colorectal cancer in three la...

  14. Tripartite efflux pumps: energy is required for dissociation, but not assembly or opening of the outer membrane channel of the pump

    PubMed Central

    Janganan, Thamarai K; Bavro, Vassiliy N; Zhang, Li; Borges-Walmsley, Maria Inês; Walmsley, Adrian R

    2013-01-01

    The MtrCDE multidrug pump, from Neisseria gonorrhoeae, is assembled from the inner and outer membrane proteins MtrD and MtrE, which are connected by the periplasmic membrane fusion protein MtrC. Although it is clear that MtrD delivers drugs to the channel of MtrE, it remains unclear how drug delivery and channel opening are connected. We used a vancomycin sensitivity assay to test for opening of the MtrE channel. Cells expressing MtrE or MtrE-E434K were insensitive to vancomycin; but became moderately and highly sensitive to vancomycin respectively, when coexpressed with MtrC, suggesting that the MtrE channel opening requires MtrC binding and is energy-independent. Cells expressing wild-type MtrD, in an MtrCE background, were vancomycin-insensitive, but moderately sensitive in an MtrCE-E434K background. The mutation of residues involved in proton translocation inactivated MtrD and abolished drug efflux, rendered both MtrE and MtrE-E434K vancomycin-insensitive; imply that the pump–component interactions are preserved, and that the complex is stable in the absence of proton flux, thus sealing the open end of MtrE. Following the energy-dependent dissociation of the tripartite complex, the MtrE channel is able to reseal, while MtrE-E434K is unable to do so, resulting in the vancomycin-sensitive phenotype. Thus, our findings suggest that opening of the OMP via interaction with the MFP is energy-independent, while both drug export and complex dissociation require active proton flux. PMID:23565750

  15. A Decaheme Cytochrome as a Molecular Electron Conduit in Dye-Sensitized Photoanodes

    E-print Network

    Hwang, Ee Taek; Sheikh, Khizar; Orchard, Katherine L.; Hojo, Daisuke; Radu, Valentin; Lee, Chong-Yong; Ainsworth, Emma; Lockwood, Colin; Gross, Manuela A.; Adschiri, Tadafumi; Reisner, Erwin; Butt, Julea N.; Jeuken, Lars J. C.

    2015-03-11

    force microscopy (AFM). Photocurrents are dependent on the redox state of the MtrC, confirming that electrons are transferred from the TiO2 nanocrystals to the surface via the MtrC conduit. In other words, in these TiO2/MtrC hybrid photodiodes, Mtr...

  16. HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for the TRA/MTR Warm Waste System Voluntary Consent Order SITE-TANK-005 Tank System TRA-007

    SciTech Connect

    K. Winterholler

    2007-01-30

    This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure Plan was developed for portions of the Test Reactor Area/Materials Test Reactor Warm Waste System located in the Materials Test Reactor Building (TRA-603) at the Reactor Technology Complex, Idaho National Laboratory Site, to meet a further milestone established under Voluntary Consent Order Action Plan SITE-TANK-005 for the Tank System TRA-007. The reactor drain tank and canal sump to be closed are included in the Test Reactor Area/Materials Test Reactor Warm Waste System. The reactor drain tank and the canal sump will be closed in accordance with the interim status requirements of the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act as implemented by the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.05.009 and Code of Federal Regulations 265. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and methods for achieving those standards.

  17. Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Gene Polymorphisms in Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Gokcen, Cem; Kocak, Nadir; Pekgor, Ahmet

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between 5,10- methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) polymorphisms and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in a sample of Turkish children. Study Design: MTHFR gene polymorphisms were assessed in 40 patients with ADHD and 30 healty controls. Two mutations in the MTHFR gene were investigated using polymerase chain reactions and restriction fragment length polymorphisms. Results: Although there were no statistically significant differences in genotype distributions of the C677T alleles between the ADHD and the control groups (p=0,678) but the genotypic pattern of the distributions of the A1298C alleles was different between the ADHD patients and the controls (p=0,033). Conclusions: Preliminary data imply a possible relationship between A1298C MTHFR polymorphisms and the ADHD. PMID:21897766

  18. Potential Inherited Causes of Recurrent Prosthetic Mitral Valve Thrombosis in a Pregnant Patient Suffering from Recurrent Miscarriage

    PubMed Central

    Gursoy, M. Ozan; Karakoyun, Suleyman; Yesin, Mahmut; Astarcioglu, Mehmet Ali; Ozkan, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    An effective anticoagulation is critical in pregnant patients with prosthetic heart valves. Inherited disorders may interfere with the coagulation cascade and may be associated with obstetrical complications as well as with prosthetic valve-derived complications. The patient in the present case had a history of recurrent prosthetic heart valve thrombosis (PHVT) despite an effective anticoagulation. She underwent a thrombolysis with low-dose prolonged infusion of tissue-type plasminogen activator for the management of her recurrrent prosthetic valve thrombosis. The genetic testing showed homozygous mutations of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) A 1298 C and heterozygous mutations of ?-fibrinogen 455 G-A. Inherited disorders such as MTHFR A 1298 C and fibrinogen 455G/A polymorphisms may be involved in the pathogenesis of recurrent PHVT and/or pregnancy loss. PMID:25089140

  19. MTHFR genetic polymorphism increases the risk of preterm delivery

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Yanrong; Li, Hongmei

    2015-01-01

    Aims: This study aimed to investigate the association between the methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene C677T and A1298C polymorphisms and premature delivery susceptibility. Methods: With matched age and gender, 108 premature delivery pregnant women as cases and 108 healthy pregnant women as controls were recruited in this case-control study. The cases and controls had same gestational weeks. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method was adopted to analyze C677T and A1298C polymorphisms of the participants. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) and haplotype analysis were conducted by Haploview software. The differences for frequencies of gene type, allele and haplotypes in cases and controls were tested by chi-square test. The relevant risk of premature delivery was represented by odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). Results: TT gene type frequency of C677T polymorphsim was higher in cases than the controls (P=0.004, OR=3.077, 95% CI=1.469-6.447), so was allele T (P=0.002, OR=1.853, 95% CI=1.265-2.716). Whereas, CC gene type of A1298C polymorphism had a lower distribution in cases than the controls (P=0.008, OR=0.095, 95% CI=0.012-0.775), so was allele C (P=0.047, OR=0.610, 95% CI=0.384-0.970). Haplotype analysis and linkage disequilibrium test conducted on the alleles of two polymorphisms in MTHFR gene, we discovered that haplotype T-A had a higher distribution in cases, which indicated that susceptible haplotype T-A was the candidate factor for premature delivery. Conclusions: Gene type TT of MTHFR C677T polymorphism might make premature delivery risk rise while gene type CC of A1298C polymorphism might have protective influence on premature delivery. PMID:26261642

  20. Analytical Method of Correction of B 1 Errors in Mapping of Magnetization Transfer Ratio in Highfield Magnetic Resonance Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarnykh, V. L.; Khodanovich, M. Yu.

    2015-04-01

    Magnetization Transfer Ratio (MTR) is a widely used parameter for quantitative estimation of tissues in magnetic resonance tomography (MRT). At the same time, MTR is rather sensitive to errors caused by the nonideal characteristics of magnetic resonance tomographs. In particular, MTR depends strongly on the local inhomogeneities of the radio-frequency field B 1 that limits the MTR application for high magnetic field strengths. In the present research, a simple analytical model of the MTR dependence on B 1 is derived. Based on this model, a correction algorithm is developed using a set of parameters independent of tissue. This algorithm is tested for MTR mapping of the human brain in the field with induction of 3 T. The MTR correction demonstrates high accuracy for a wide range of B 1 inhomogeneities. Combination of the analytical algorithm with fast B 1 mapping enables high-precision MTR brain mapping for neuroimaging applications and analysis of histograms on high-field scanners.

  1. Serial Magnetization Transfer Imaging in Acute Optic Neuritis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickman, S. J.; Toosy, A. T.; Jones, S. J.; Altmann, D. R.; Miszkiel, K. A.; MacManus, D. G.; Barker, G. J.; Plant, G. T.; Thompson, A. J.; Miller, D.H.

    2004-01-01

    In serial studies of multiple sclerosis lesions, reductions in magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) are thought to be due to demyelination and axonal loss, with later rises due to remyelination. This study followed serial changes in MTR in acute optic neuritis in combination with clinical and electrophysiological measurements to determine if the MTR

  2. Hypermethylated cap 4 maximizes Trypanosoma brucei translation

    PubMed Central

    Zamudio, Jesse R.; Mittra, Bidyottam; Campbell, David A.; Sturm, Nancy R.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Through trans-splicing of a 39-nt Spliced Leader (SL) onto each protein-coding transcript, mature kinetoplastid mRNA acquire a hypermethylated 5?-cap structure, but its function has been unclear. Gene deletions for three Trypanosoma brucei cap 2?-O-ribose methyltransferases, TbMTr1, TbMTr2, and TbMTr3, reveal distinct roles for four 2?-O-methylated nucleotides. Elimination of individual gene pairs yields viable cells, however attempts at double knockouts resulted in the generation of a TbMTr2?/?/TbMTr3?/? cell line only. Absence of both kinetoplastid-specific enzymes in TbMTr2?/?/TbMTr3?/? lines yielded substrate SL RNA and mRNA with cap 1. TbMTr1?/? translation is comparable to wildtype, while cap 3 and cap 4 loss reduced translation rates, exacerbated by the additional loss of cap 2. TbMTr1?/? and TbMTr2?/?/TbMTr3?/? lines grow to lower densities under normal culture conditions relative to wildtype cells, with growth rate differences apparent under low serum conditions. Cell viability may not tolerate delays at both the nucleolar Sm-independent and nucleoplasmic Sm-dependent stages of SL RNA maturation combined with reduced rates of translation. A minimal level of mRNA cap ribose methylation is essential for trypanosome viability, providing the first functional role for the cap 4. PMID:19504740

  3. TRA Closure Plan REV 0-9-20-06 HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for the TRA/MTR Warm Waste System Voluntary Consent Order SITE-TANK-005 Tank System TRA-007

    SciTech Connect

    Winterholler, K.

    2007-01-31

    This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan was developed for portions of the Test Reactor Area/Materials Test Reactor Warm Waste System located in the Materials Test Reactor Building (TRA-603) at the Reactor Technology Complex, Idaho National Laboratory Site, to meet a further milestone established under Voluntary Consent Order Action Plan SITE-TANK-005 for Tank System TRA-007. The reactor drain tank and canal sump to be closed are included in the Test Reactor Area/Materials Test Reactor Warm Waste System. The reactor drain tank and the canal sump were characterized as having managed hazardous waste. The reactor drain tank and canal sump will be closed in accordance with the interim status requirements of the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act as implemented by the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.05.009 and 40 Code of Federal Regulations 265. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and methods for achieving those standards.

  4. Located at Kowloon Tong, the University is easily accessible from all parts of Hong Kong. It takes only a few minutes' walk from Kowloon Tong MTR Station. Through years of development and substantial improvement in its accommodation and facilities, the

    E-print Network

    Cheung, Yiu-ming

    education in a spacious, fully equipped, high-technology environment. The University has three closely Bo Fun Sports and Cultural Centre with a multi-purpose hall, an indoor sports hall, a roof- top generation of talent for the creative industries and media in Hong Kong. The Academic and Administration

  5. Structure of Arabidopsis thaliana 5-methylthioribose Kinase Reveals a More Occluded Active Site Than its Bacterial Homolog

    SciTech Connect

    Ku,S.; Cornell, K.; Howell, P.

    2007-01-01

    Metabolic variations exist between the methionine salvage pathway of humans and a number of plants and microbial pathogens. 5-Methylthioribose (MTR) kinase is a key enzyme required for methionine salvage in plants and many bacteria. The absence of a mammalian homolog suggests that MTR kinase is a good target for the design of specific herbicides or antibiotics. The structure of Arabidopsis thaliana MTR kinase co-crystallized with ATP?S and MTR has been determined at 1.9 Angstroms resolution. The structure is similar to B. subtilis MTR kinase and has the same protein kinase fold observed in other evolutionarily related protein kinase-like phosphotransferases. The active site is comparable between the two enzymes with the DXE-motif coordinating the nucleotide-Mg, the D238 of the HGD catalytic loop polarizing the MTR O1 oxygen, and the RR-motif interacting with the substrate MTR. Unlike its bacterial homolog, however, the Gly-rich loop (G-loop) of A. thaliana MTR kinase has an extended conformation, which shields most of the active site from solvent, a feature that resembles eukaryotic protein kinases more than the bacterial enzyme. The G- and W-loops of A. thaliana and B. subtilis MTR kinase adopt different conformations despite high sequence similarity. The ATP?S analog was hydrolyzed during the co-crystallization procedure, resulting in ADP in the active site. This suggests that the A. thaliana enzyme, like its bacterial homolog, may have significant ATPase activity in the absence of MTR. The structure of A. thaliana MTR kinase provides a template for structure-based design of agrochemicals, particularly herbicides whose effectiveness could be regulated by nutrient levels. Features of the MTR binding site offer an opportunity for a simple organic salt of an MTR analog to specifically inhibit MTR kinase.

  6. Chromosomal aberration leads to recurrent pregnancy loss and partial trisomy of 5p12-15.3 in the offspring: report of a Syrian couple and review of the literature .

    PubMed

    Al-Achkar, Walid; Moassass, Faten; Al-Ablog, Ayman; Liehr, Thomas; Fan, Xiaobo; Wafa, Abdulsamad

    2015-03-01

    Here we describe a Syrian couple having recurrent pregnancy loss in the first trimester, fetal malformations, and/or neonatal death. The father had a balanced chromosomal translocation t(5;15), an sY125 microdeletion of locus b in the azoospermia factor (AZF) gene, and an MTHFR C677T homozygous polymorphism with normal phenotype. Interestingly, his healthy wife had another MTHFR A1298C homozygous polymorphism. The couple experienced two pregnancy losses and had two stillborn children with severe malformations due to partial trisomy of the short arm of chromosome 5. The couple does not have any living offspring after 10 years of marriage. PMID:25898552

  7. Long-Lasting Gene Conversion Shapes the Convergent Evolution of the Critical Methanogenesis Genes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sishuo; Chen, Youhua; Cao, Qinhong; Lou, Huiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Methanogenesis and its key small-molecule methyltransferase Mtr complex are poorly understood despite their pivotal role in Earth’s global carbon cycle. Mtr complex is encoded by a conserved mtrEDCBAFGH operon in most methanogens. Here we report that two discrete lineages, Methanococcales and Methanomicrobiales, have a noncanonical mtr operon carrying two copies of mtrA resulting from an ancient duplication. Compared to mtrA-1, mtrA-2 acquires a distinct transmembrane domain through domain shuffling and gene fusion. However, the nontransmembrane domains (MtrA domain) of mtrA-1 and mtrA-2 are homogenized by gene conversion events lasting throughout the long history of these extant methanogens (over 2410 million years). Furthermore, we identified a possible recruitment of ancient nonmethanogenic methyltransferase genes to establish the methanogenesis pathway. These results not only provide novel evolutionary insight into the methanogenesis pathway and methyltransferase superfamily but also suggest an unanticipated long-lasting effect of gene conversion on gene evolution in a convergent pattern. PMID:26384370

  8. Characterization of an electron conduit between bacteria and the extracellular environment

    SciTech Connect

    Hartshorne, Robert S.; Reardon, Catherine L.; Ross, Daniel E.; Nuester, Jochen; Clarke, Thomas A.; Gates, Andrew J.; Mills, Paul C.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Shi, Liang; Beliaev, Alex S.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Tien, Ming; Brantley, Susan L.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David

    2009-12-29

    A number of species of Gram-negative bacteria can use insoluble minerals of Fe(III) and Mn(IV) as extracellular respiratory electron acceptors. In some species of Shewanella deca-heme electron transfer proteins lie at the extracellular face of the outer membrane where they can interact with insoluble substrates. To reduce extracellular substrates, these redox proteins must be charged by the inner membrane/periplasmic electron transfer system. Here we present a spectro-potentiometric characterization of a trans-outer membrane icosa-heme protein complex, MtrCAB. Incorporation into proteoliposomes demonstrates its functional capacity to move electrons across a lipid bilayer. We also show that a stable MtrAB sub-complex can assemble in the absence of MtrC, that an MtrBC sub-complex was not assembled in the absence of MtrA and that MtrA is only associated to the membrane in cells when MtrB is present. We propose a model for the modular organization of the MtrCAB complex in which MtrC is an extracellular element that mediates electron transfer to extracellular substrates and MtrB is a trans-outer membrane spanning ?-barrel protein that serves as a sheath to house the deca-heme MtrA allowing it to span the membrane to form a trans-membrane electron delivery module that services MtrC. We have identified the MtrAB module in a range of bacterial phyla suggesting that it is widely used in electron exchange with the extracellular environment

  9. Candidate Assembly Statistical Evaluation

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1998-07-15

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) receives aluminum clad spent Material Test Reactor (MTR) fuel from all over the world for storage and eventual reprocessing. There are hundreds of different kinds of MTR fuels and these fuels will continue to be received at SRS for approximately ten more years. SRS''s current criticality evaluation methodology requires the modeling of all MTR fuels utilizing Monte Carlo codes, which is extremely time consuming and resource intensive. Now that amore »significant number of MTR calculations have been conducted it is feasible to consider building statistical models that will provide reasonable estimations of MTR behavior. These statistical models can be incorporated into a standardized model homogenization spreadsheet package to provide analysts with a means of performing routine MTR fuel analyses with a minimal commitment of time and resources. This became the purpose for development of the Candidate Assembly Statistical Evaluation (CASE) program at SRS.« less

  10. A new-generation 5-nitroimidazole can induce highly metronidazole-resistant Giardia lamblia in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Linda A.; Burgess, Anita G.; Krauer, Kenia G.; Eckmann, Lars; Vanelle, Patrice; Crozet, Maxime D.; Gillin, Frances D.; Upcroft, Peter; Upcroft, Jacqueline A.

    2010-01-01

    The 5-nitroimidazole (NI) compound C17, with a side chain carrying a remote phenyl group in the 2-position of the imidazole ring, is at least 14-fold more active against the gut protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia than the 5-NI drug metronidazole (MTR), with a side chain in the 1-position of the imidazole ring, which is the primary drug for the treatment of giardiasis. Over 10 months, lines resistant to C17 were induced in vitro and were at least 12-fold more resistant to C17 than the parent strains. However, these lines had ID90 values (concentration of drug at which 10% of control parasite ATP levels are detected) for MTR of >200 ?M, whilst lines induced to be highly resistant to MTR in vitro have maximum ID90 values around 100 ?M (MTR-susceptible isolates typically have an ID90 of 5–12.8 ?M). The mechanism of MTR activation in Giardia apparently involves reduction to toxic radicals by the activity of pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) and the electron acceptor ferredoxin. MTR-resistant Giardia have decreased PFOR activity, which is consistent with decreased activation of MTR in these lines, but C17-resistant lines have normal levels of PFOR. Therefore, an alternative mechanism of resistance in Giardia must account for these super-MTR-resistant cells. PMID:20456926

  11. A new-generation 5-nitroimidazole can induce highly metronidazole-resistant Giardia lamblia in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Linda A; Burgess, Anita G; Krauer, Kenia G; Eckmann, Lars; Vanelle, Patrice; Crozet, Maxime D; Gillin, Frances D; Upcroft, Peter; Upcroft, Jacqueline A

    2010-07-01

    The 5-nitroimidazole (NI) compound C17, with a side chain carrying a remote phenyl group in the 2-position of the imidazole ring, is at least 14-fold more active against the gut protozoan parasite Giardialamblia than the 5-NI drug metronidazole (MTR), with a side chain in the 1-position of the imidazole ring, which is the primary drug for the treatment of giardiasis. Over 10 months, lines resistant to C17 were induced in vitro and were at least 12-fold more resistant to C17 than the parent strains. However, these lines had ID(90) values (concentration of drug at which 10% of control parasite ATP levels are detected) for MTR of >200 microM, whilst lines induced to be highly resistant to MTR in vitro have maximum ID(90) values around 100 microM (MTR-susceptible isolates typically have an ID(90) of 5-12.8 microM). The mechanism of MTR activation in Giardia apparently involves reduction to toxic radicals by the activity of pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) and the electron acceptor ferredoxin. MTR-resistant Giardia have decreased PFOR activity, which is consistent with decreased activation of MTR in these lines, but C17-resistant lines have normal levels of PFOR. Therefore, an alternative mechanism of resistance in Giardia must account for these super-MTR-resistant cells. PMID:20456926

  12. SOUTH WING, TRA661. WEST SIDE. CAMERA FACING EAST. COVERED STAIRWAY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SOUTH WING, TRA-661. WEST SIDE. CAMERA FACING EAST. COVERED STAIRWAY AND BUILDING END AT LEFT OF VIEW IS TRA-652, ANOTHER MTR OFFICE WING. WEST SIDE OF MTR HIGH BAY BEYOND. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-45-2. Mike Crane, Photographer, 4/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  13. Export of detritus and invertebrate from headwater streams: linking mountaintop removal and valley fill coal mining to downstream receiving waters

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mountaintop removal and valley fill (MTR/VF) coal mining has resulted in large scale alteration of the topography, reduced forest productivity, and burial of headwater streams in the U.S. Central Appalachians. Although MTR/VF coal mining has occurred for several decades and the ...

  14. A Decaheme Cytochrome as a Molecular Electron Conduit in Dye-Sensitized Photoanodes

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Ee Taek; Sheikh, Khizar; Orchard, Katherine L; Hojo, Daisuke; Radu, Valentin; Lee, Chong-Yong; Ainsworth, Emma; Lockwood, Colin; Gross, Manuela A; Adschiri, Tadafumi; Reisner, Erwin; Butt, Julea N; Jeuken, Lars J C

    2015-01-01

    In nature, charge recombination in light-harvesting reaction centers is minimized by efficient charge separation. Here, it is aimed to mimic this by coupling dye-sensitized TiO2 nanocrystals to a decaheme protein, MtrC from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, where the 10 hemes of MtrC form a ?7-nm-long molecular wire between the TiO2 and the underlying electrode. The system is assembled by forming a densely packed MtrC film on an ultra-flat gold electrode, followed by the adsorption of approximately 7 nm TiO2 nanocrystals that are modified with a phosphonated bipyridine Ru(II) dye (RuP). The step-by-step construction of the MtrC/TiO2 system is monitored with (photo)electrochemistry, quartz-crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Photocurrents are dependent on the redox state of the MtrC, confirming that electrons are transferred from the TiO2 nanocrystals to the surface via the MtrC conduit. In other words, in these TiO2/MtrC hybrid photodiodes, MtrC traps the conduction-band electrons from TiO2 before transferring them to the electrode, creating a photobioelectrochemical system in which a redox protein is used to mimic the efficient charge separation found in biological photosystems. PMID:26180522

  15. FAST CHOPPER BUILDING, TRA665. CONTEXTUAL VIEW: CHOPPER BUILDING IN CENTER. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FAST CHOPPER BUILDING, TRA-665. CONTEXTUAL VIEW: CHOPPER BUILDING IN CENTER. MTR REACTOR SERVICES BUILDING,TRA-635, TO LEFT; MTR BUILDING TO RIGHT. CAMERA FACING WEST. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD42-1. Mike Crane, Photographer, 3/2004 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  16. Structural and functional characteristics of natural and constructed channels draining a reclaimed mountaintop removal and valley fill coal mine

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mountaintop removal and valley fill (MTR/VF) coal mining has altered the landscape of the Central Appalachian region in the United States. The goals of this study were to 1) compare the structure and function of natural and constructed stream channels in forested and MTR/VF catch...

  17. Regional patterns of grey matter atrophy and magnetisation transfer ratio abnormalities in multiple sclerosis clinical subgroups: A voxel-based analysis study

    PubMed Central

    Muhlert, Nils; Samson, Rebecca S; Sethi, Varun; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia AM; Miller, David H; Chard, Declan T

    2015-01-01

    Background: In multiple sclerosis (MS), demyelination and neuro-axonal loss occur in the brain grey matter (GM). We used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures of GM magnetisation transfer ratio (MTR) and volume to assess the regional localisation of reduced MTR (reflecting demyelination) and atrophy (reflecting neuro-axonal loss) in relapsing–remitting MS (RRMS), secondary progressive MS (SPMS) and primary progressive MS (PPMS). Methods: A total of 98 people with MS (51 RRMS, 28 SPMS, 19 PPMS) and 29 controls had T1-weighted volumetric and magnetisation transfer scans. SPM8 was used to undertake voxel-based analysis (VBA) of GM tissue volumes and MTR. MS subgroups were compared with controls, adjusting for age and gender. A voxel-by-voxel basis correlation analysis between MTR and volume within each subject group was performed, using biological parametric mapping. Results: MTR reduction was more extensive than atrophy. RRMS and SPMS patients showed proportionately more atrophy in the deep GM. SPMS and PPMS patients showed proportionately greater cortical MTR reduction. RRMS patients demonstrated the most correlation of MTR reduction and atrophy in deep GM. In SPMS and PPMS patients, there was less extensive correlation. Conclusions: These results suggest that in the deep GM of RRMS patients, demyelination and neuro-axonal loss may be linked, while in SPMS and PPMS patients, neuro-axonal loss and demyelination may occur mostly independently. PMID:25145689

  18. Metabolism of 5-methylthioribose to methionine

    SciTech Connect

    Miyazaki, J.H.; Yang, S.F.

    1987-06-01

    During ethylene biosynthesis, the H/sub 3/CS-group of S-adenosylmethionine is released as 5'-methylthioadenosine, which is recycled to methionine via 5-methylthioribose (MTR). In mungbean hypocotyls and cell-free extracts of avocado, (/sup 14/C)MTR was converted into labeled methionine via 2-keto-4-methylthiobutyric acid (KMB) and 2-hydroxy-4-methylthiobutyric acid (HMB), as intermediates. Incubation of (ribose-U-/sup 14/C)MTR with avocado extract resulted in the production of (/sup 14/C)formate, indicating the conversion of MTR to KMB involves a loss of formate, presumably from C-1 of MTR. Tracer studies showed that KMB was converted readily in vivo and in vitro to methionine, while HMB was converted much more slowly. The conversion of KMB to methionine by dialyzed avocado extract requires an amino donor. Among several potential donors examined, L-glutamine was the most efficient. Anaerobiosis inhibited only partially the oxidation of MTR to formate, KMB/HMB, and methionine by avocado extract. The role of O/sub 2/ in the conversion of MTR to methionine is discussed.

  19. Genetic Case-Control Study for Eight Polymorphisms Associated with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mabrouk, Mai S.; Eldeib, Ayman M.

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease which has a significant socio-economic impact. The aim of the current study was to investigate eight candidate RA susceptibility loci to identify the associated variants in Egyptian population. Eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (MTHFR—C677T and A1298C, TGF?1 T869C, TNFB A252G, and VDR—ApaI, BsmI, FokI, and TaqI) were tested by genotyping patients with RA (n = 105) and unrelated controls (n = 80). Associations were tested using multiplicative, dominant, recessive, and co-dominant models. Also, the linkage disequilibrium (LD) between the VDR SNPs was measured to detect any indirect association. By comparing RA patients with controls (TNFB, BsmI, and TaqI), SNPs were associated with RA using all models. MTHFR C677T was associated with RA using all models except the recessive model. TGF?1 and MTHFR A1298C were associated with RA using the dominant and the co-dominant models. The recessive model represented the association for ApaI variant. There were no significant differences for FokI and the presence of RA disease by the used models examination. For LD results, There was a high D? value between BsmI and FokI (D? = 0.91), but the r2 value between them was poor. All the studied SNPs may contribute to the susceptibility of RA disease in Egyptian population except for FokI SNP. PMID:26147289

  20. Genetic modifiers of carcinogen DNA adducts in target lung and peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi-Sun; Su, Li; Mark, Eugene J.; Wain, John C.; Christiani, David C.

    2010-01-01

    Measurement of carcinogen DNA adducts in blood has been used as a surrogate for the target lung tissue. We aimed to examine whether genetic polymorphisms in several metabolic pathway genes modify the relation between DNA adducts in target lung and blood. One hundred and thirty-five early-stage lung cancer patients from the Massachusetts General Hospital were studied. DNA adducts were measured by the 32P-postlabeling assay in lung and blood mononuclear cells (MNCs) in a subset of 53 who had paired blood samples. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were assessed in genes involved in phase II (GSTs, NAT2, EPHX and NQO1), DNA repair (ERCC1, ERCC2 and XRCC1) and DNA methylation (MTHFR C677T and A1298C) pathways. There was a significant correlation between DNA adduct levels in lung and blood within the different genotypes, with one exception. Significant modifications in adducts were found by variants in genes for phase II metabolism [NAT2 (1.51 for rapid versus 0.76 for slow, P = 0.022)], DNA repair [ERCC1 C118T (P = 0.014), ERCC2 (P = 0.003) and XRCC1 (P = 0.025)] and MTHFR [C677T (P = 0.005) and A1298C (P = 0.005)]. The relation between DNA adducts in blood MNCs and target lung tissue was significantly modified by the single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the three main pathways. Despite the relatively small sample size, our results suggest that genetic factors may need to be considered when assessing the association of DNA adducts using surrogate tissue in studies of lung cancer. Further studies are needed to better understand their role and the mechanisms. PMID:20935060

  1. The Association of Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Genotypes with the Risk of Childhood Leukemia in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wen-Shin; Ji, Hong-Xue; Hsiao, Chieh-Lun; Miao, Chia-En; Hsu, Yuan-Nian; Bau, Da-Tian

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most prevalent type of pediatric cancer, the causes of which are likely to involve an interaction between genetic and environmental factors. To evaluate the effects of the genotypic polymorphisms in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) on childhood ALL risk in Taiwan, two well-known polymorphic genotypes of MTHFR, C677T (rs1801133) and A1298C (rs1801131), were analyzed to examine the extent of their associations with childhood ALL susceptibility and to discuss the MTHFR genotypic contribution to childhood ALL risk among different populations. Methodology/Principal Findings In total, 266 patients with childhood ALL and an equal number of non-cancer controls recruited were genotyped utilizing PCR-RFLP methodology. The MTHFR C677T genotype, but not the A1298C, was differently distributed between childhood ALL and control groups. The CT and TT of MTHFR C677T genotypes were significantly more frequently found in controls than in childhood ALL patients (odds ratios=0.60 and 0.48, 95% confidence intervals=0.42–0.87 and 0.24–0.97, respectively). As for gender, the boys carrying the MTHFR C677T CT or TT genotype conferred a lower odds ratio of 0.51 (95% confidence interval=0.32–0.81, P=0.0113) for childhood ALL. As for age, those equal to or greater than 3.5 years of age at onset of disease carrying the MTHFR C677T CT or TT genotype were of lower risk (odds ratio= 0.43 and 95% confidence interval=0.26–0.71, P=0.0016). Conclusions Our results indicated that the MTHFR C677T T allele was a protective biomarker for childhood ALL in Taiwan, and the association was more significant in male patients and in patients 3.5 years of age or older at onset of disease. PMID:25793509

  2. Importance of multidrug efflux pumps in the antimicrobial resistance property of clinical multidrug-resistant isolates of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Golparian, Daniel; Shafer, William M; Ohnishi, Makoto; Unemo, Magnus

    2014-06-01

    The contribution of drug efflux pumps in clinical isolates of Neisseria gonorrhoeae that express extensively drug-resistant or multidrug-resistant phenotypes has heretofore not been examined. Accordingly, we assessed the effect on antimicrobial resistance of loss of the three gonococcal efflux pumps associated with a known capacity to export antimicrobials (MtrC-MtrD-MtrE, MacA-MacB, and NorM) in such clinical isolates. We report that the MIC of several antimicrobials, including seven previously and currently recommended for treatment was significantly impacted. PMID:24733458

  3. Importance of Multidrug Efflux Pumps in the Antimicrobial Resistance Property of Clinical Multidrug-Resistant Isolates of Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Golparian, Daniel; Shafer, William M.; Ohnishi, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    The contribution of drug efflux pumps in clinical isolates of Neisseria gonorrhoeae that express extensively drug-resistant or multidrug-resistant phenotypes has heretofore not been examined. Accordingly, we assessed the effect on antimicrobial resistance of loss of the three gonococcal efflux pumps associated with a known capacity to export antimicrobials (MtrC-MtrD-MtrE, MacA-MacB, and NorM) in such clinical isolates. We report that the MIC of several antimicrobials, including seven previously and currently recommended for treatment was significantly impacted. PMID:24733458

  4. Histogram analysis of quantitative T1 and MT maps from ultrahigh field MRI in clinically isolated syndrome and relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Al-Radaideh, Ali; Mougin, Olivier E; Lim, Su-Yin; Chou, I-Jun; Constantinescu, Cris S; Gowland, Penny

    2015-11-01

    This study used quantitative MRI to study normal appearing white matter (NAWM) in patients with clinically isolated syndromes suggestive of multiple sclerosis and relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). This was done at ultrahigh field (7?T) for greater spatial resolution and sensitivity. 17 CIS patients, 11 RRMS patients, and 20 age-matched healthy controls were recruited. They were scanned using a 3D inversion recovery turbo field echo sequence to measure the longitudinal relaxation time (T1 ). A 3D magnetization transfer prepared turbo field echo (MT-TFE) sequence was also acquired, first without a presaturation pulse and then with the MT presaturation pulse applied at -1.05?kHz and +1.05?kHz off resonance from water to produce two magnetization transfer ratio maps (MTR(-) and MTR(+)). Histogram analysis was performed on the signal from the voxels in the NAWM mask. The upper quartile cut-off of the T1 histogram was significantly higher in RRMS patients than in controls (p?MTR was significantly different between CIS or RRMS patients and controls (p?MTR(+) and MTR(-) signals showed that NOE contributions dominated the changes found. There was a weak negative correlation (r?=?-0.46, p?MTR(+) (r?=?-0.34, p?>?0.05) or MTR(-) (r?=?0.13, p?>?0.05). There was no significant correlation between the median of T1 , MTR(-), or MTR(+) and the age of healthy controls. Furthermore, no significant correlation was observed between EDSS or disease duration and T1 , MTR(-), or MTR(+) for either CIS or RRMS patients. In conclusion, MTR was found to be more sensitive to early changes in MS disease than T1 . Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26346925

  5. Estimating benthic secondary production from aquatic insect emergence in streams affected by mountaintop removal coal mining, West Virginia USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mountaintop removal and valley fill (MTR/VF) coal mining recountours the Appalachian landscape, buries headwater stream channels, and degrades downstream water quality. The goal of this study was to compare benthic community production estimates, based on seasonal insect emergen...

  6. Shiv Grewal, Ph.D. - Publications

    Cancer.gov

    Supplementary Information - Shiv Grewal's Laboratory The revised Supplementary Table S3 from the paper “Mtr4-like protein coordinates nuclear RNA processing for heterochromatin assembly and for telomere maintenance” Cell 155:1061-1074 can be downloaded he

  7. The role of multihaem cytochromes in the respiration of nitrite in Escherichia coli and Fe(III) in Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Thomas A.; Holley, Tracey; Hartshorne, Robert S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Shi, Liang; Richardson, David

    2008-10-01

    The periplasmic nitrite reductase system from Escherichia coli and the extracellular Fe(III) reductase system from Shewanella oneidensis contain multihaem c-type cytochromes as electron carriers and terminal reductases. The position and orientation of the haem cofactors in multihaem cytochromes from different bacteria often show significant conservation despite different arrangements of the polypeptide chain. We propose that the decahaem cytochromes of the iron reductase system MtrA, MtrC and OmcA comprise pentahaem ‘modules’ similar to the electron donor protein, NrfB, from E. coli. To demonstrate this, we have isolated and characterized the N-terminal pentahaem module of MtrA by preparing a truncated form containing five covalently attached haems. UV–visible spectroscopy indicated that all five haems were low-spin, consistent with the presence of bis-His ligand co-ordination as found in full-length MtrA.

  8. 75 FR 74768 - Madison Terminal Railway, LLC-Lease and Operation Exemption-Line of Railroad in Dane County, WI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-01

    ...TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board [Docket No. FD 35433] Madison Terminal Railway, LLC--Lease and Operation Exemption-- Line of Railroad in Dane County, WI Madison Terminal Railway, LLC (MTR), a noncarrier, has filed a verified...

  9. Molecular Underpinnings of Fe(III) Oxide Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Rosso, Kevin M.; Clarke, Thomas A.; Richardson, David J.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2012-02-15

    In the absence of O2 and other electron acceptors, the Gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can use ferric [Fe(III)] (oxy)(hydr)oxide minerals as the terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration. At circumneutral pH and in the absence of strong complexing ligands, Fe(III) oxides are relatively insoluble and thus are external to the bacterial cells. S. oneidensis MR-1 and related strains of metal-reducing Shewanella have evolved the machinery (i.e., metal-reducing or Mtr pathway) for transferring electrons from the inner-membrane, through the periplasm and across the outer-membrane to the surface of extracellular Fe(III) oxides. The protein components identified to date for the Mtr pathway include CymA, MtrA, MtrB, MtrC and OmcA. CymA is an inner-membrane tetraheme c-type cytochrome (c-Cyt) that belongs to the NapC/NrfH family of quinol dehydrogenases. It is proposed that CymA oxidizes the quinol in the inner-membrane and transfers the released electrons to redox proteins in the periplasm. Although the periplasmic proteins receiving electrons from CymA during Fe(III) oxidation have not been identified, they are believed to relay the electrons in the periplasm to MtrA. A decaheme c-Cyt, MtrA is thought to be embedded in the trans outer-membrane and porin-like protein MtrB. Together, MtrAB deliver the electrons through the outer-membrane to the MtrC and OmcA on the outmost bacterial surface. MtrC and OmcA are the outer-membrane decaheme c-Cyts that are translocated across the outer-membrane by the bacterial type II secretion system. Functioning as terminal reductases, MtrC and OmcA can bind the surface of Fe(III) oxides and transfer electrons directly to these minerals via their solvent-exposed hemes. To increase their reaction rates, MtrC and OmcA can use the flavins secreted by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells as diffusible co-factors for reduction of Fe(III) oxides. Because of their extracellular location and broad redox potentials, MtrC and OmcA can also serve as the terminal reductases for soluble forms of Fe(III). Although our understanding of the Mtr pathway is still far from complete, it is the best characterized microbial pathway used for extracellular electron exchange. Characterizations of the Mtr pathway have made significant contributions to the molecular understanding of microbial reduction of Fe(III) oxides.

  10. Genetic Mediators of Neurocognitive Outcomes in Survivors of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Krull, Kevin R.; Bhojwani, Deepa; Conklin, Heather M.; Pei, Deqing; Cheng, Cheng; Reddick, Wilburn E.; Sandlund, John T.; Pui, Ching-Hon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are at increased risk for neurocognitive problems, with significant interindividual variability in outcome. This study examined genetic polymorphisms associated with variability in neurocognitive outcome. Patients and Methods Neurocognitive outcomes were evaluated at the end of therapy in 243 survivors treated on an institutional protocol featuring risk-adapted chemotherapy without prophylactic cranial irradiation. Polymorphisms in genes related to pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics of antileukemic agents, drug metabolism, oxidative stress, and attention problems in noncancer populations were examined as predictors of outcome, using multiple general linear models and controlling for age at diagnosis, sex, race, and treatment intensity. Results Compared with national norms, the cohort demonstrated significantly higher rates of problems on direct assessment of sustained attention (P = .01) and on parent ratings of attention problems (P = .02). Children with the A2756G polymorphism in methionine synthase (MS) were more likely to demonstrate deficits in attentiveness (P = .03) and response speed (P = .02), whereas those with various polymorphisms in glutathione S-transferase demonstrated increased performance variability (P = .01) and reduced attentiveness (P = .003). Polymorphisms in monoamine oxidase (T1460CA) were associated with increased attention variability (P = .03). Parent-reported attention problems were more common in children with the Cys112Arg polymorphism in apoliopoprotein E4 (P = .01). Conclusion These results are consistent with our previous report of association between attention problems and MS in an independent cohort of long-term survivors of childhood ALL treated with chemotherapy only. The results also raise the possibility of an impact from genetic predispositions related to oxidative stress and CNS integrity. PMID:23650422

  11. Grey and White Matter Magnetisation Transfer Ratio Measurements in the Lumbosacral Enlargement: A Pilot In Vivo Study at 3T

    PubMed Central

    Ugorji, Chinyere O.; Samson, Rebecca S.; Liechti, Martina D.; Panicker, Jalesh N.; Miller, David H.; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A. M.; Yiannakas, Marios C.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetisation transfer (MT) imaging of the central nervous system has provided further insight into the pathophysiology of neurological disease. However, the use of this method to study the lower spinal cord has been technically challenging, despite the important role of this region, not only for motor control of the lower limbs, but also for the neural control of lower urinary tract, sexual and bowel functions. In this study, the feasibility of obtaining reliable grey matter (GM) and white matter (WM) magnetisation transfer ratio (MTR) measurements within the lumbosacral enlargement (LSE) was investigated in ten healthy volunteers using a clinical 3T MRI system. The mean cross-sectional area of the LSE (LSE-CSA) and the mean GM area (LSE-GM-CSA) were first obtained by means of image segmentation and tissue-specific (i.e. WM and GM) MTR measurements within the LSE were subsequently obtained. The reproducibility of the segmentation method and MTR measurements was assessed from repeated measurements and their % coefficient of variation (%COV). Mean (± SD) LSE-CSA across 10 healthy subjects was 59.3 (± 8.4) mm2 and LSE-GM-CSA was 17.0 (± 3.1) mm2. The mean intra- and inter-rater % COV for measuring the LSE-CSA were 0.8% and 2.3%, respectively and for the LSE-GM-CSA were 3.8% and 5.4%, respectively. Mean (± SD) WM-MTR was 43.2 (± 4.4) and GM-MTR was 40.9 (± 4.3). The mean scan-rescan % COV for measuring WM-MTR was 4.6% and for GM-MTR was 3.8%. Using a paired t-test, a statistically significant difference was identified between WM-MTR and GM-MTR in the LSE (p<0.0001). This pilot study has shown that it is possible to obtain reliable tissue-specific MTR measurements within the LSE using a clinical MR system at 3T. The MTR acquisition and analysis protocol presented in this study can be used in future investigations of intrinsic spinal cord diseases that affect the LSE. PMID:26230729

  12. Anticancer drug mithramycin interacts with core histones: An additional mode of action of the DNA groove binder

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Amrita; Sanyal, Sulagna; Kulkarni, Kirti K.; Jana, Kuladip; Roy, Siddhartha; Das, Chandrima; Dasgupta, Dipak

    2014-01-01

    Mithramycin (MTR) is a clinically approved DNA-binding antitumor antibiotic currently in Phase 2 clinical trials at National Institutes of Health for treatment of osteosarcoma. In view of the resurgence in the studies of this generic antibiotic as a human medicine, we have examined the binding properties of MTR with the integral component of chromatin – histone proteins – as a part of our broad objective to classify DNA-binding molecules in terms of their ability to bind chromosomal DNA alone (single binding mode) or both histones and chromosomal DNA (dual binding mode). The present report shows that besides DNA, MTR also binds to core histones present in chromatin and thus possesses the property of dual binding in the chromatin context. In contrast to the MTR–DNA interaction, association of MTR with histones does not require obligatory presence of bivalent metal ion like Mg2+. As a consequence of its ability to interact with core histones, MTR inhibits histone H3 acetylation at lysine 18, an important signature of active chromatin, in vitro and ex vivo. Reanalysis of microarray data of Ewing sarcoma cell lines shows that upon MTR treatment there is a significant down regulation of genes, possibly implicating a repression of H3K18Ac-enriched genes apart from DNA-binding transcription factors. Association of MTR with core histones and its ability to alter post-translational modification of histone H3 clearly indicates an additional mode of action of this anticancer drug that could be implicated in novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:25473595

  13. FAST CHOPPER BUILDING, TRA665. CAMERA FACING NORTH. NOTE BRICKEDIN WINDOW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FAST CHOPPER BUILDING, TRA-665. CAMERA FACING NORTH. NOTE BRICKED-IN WINDOW ON RIGHT SIDE (BELOW PAINTED NUMERALS "665"). SLIDING METAL DOOR ON COVERED RAIL AT UPPER LEVEL. SHELTERED ENTRANCE TO STEEL SHIELDING DOOR. DOOR INTO MTR SERVICE BUILDING, TRA-635, STANDS OPEN. MTR BEHIND CHOPPER BUILDING. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD42-1. Mike Crane, Photographer, 3/2004 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  14. Magnetization transfer ratio does not correlate to myelin content in the brain in the MOG-EAE mouse model.

    PubMed

    Fjær, Sveinung; Bø, Lars; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; Torkildsen, Øivind; Wergeland, Stig

    2015-01-01

    Magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) is a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method which may detect demyelination not detected by conventional MRI in the central nervous system of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). A decrease in MTR value has previously been shown to correlate to myelin loss in the mouse cuprizone model for demyelination. In this study, we investigated the sensitivity of MTR for demyelination in the myelin oligodendrocyte (MOG) 1-125 induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mouse model. A total of 24 female c57Bl/6 mice were randomized to a control group (N?=?6) or EAE (N?=?18). MTR images were obtained at a preclinical 7 Tesla Bruker MR-scanner before EAE induction (baseline), 17-19 days (midpoint) and 31-32 days (endpoint) after EAE induction. Mean MTR values were calculated in five regions of the brain and compared to weight, EAE severity score and myelin content assessed by immunostaining for proteolipid protein and luxol fast blue, lymphocyte and monocyte infiltration and iron deposition. Contrary to what was expected, MTR values in the EAE mice were higher than in the control mice at the midpoint and endpoint. No significant difference in myelin content was found according to histo- or immunohistochemistry. Changes in MTR values did not correlate to myelin content, iron content, lymphocyte or monocyte infiltration, weight or EAE severity scores. This suggest that MTR measures of brain tissue can give significant differences between control mice and EAE mice not caused by demyelination, inflammation or iron deposition, and may not be useful surrogate markers for demyelination in the MOG1-125 mouse model. PMID:25744931

  15. Structures of 5-Methylthioribose Kinase Reveal Substrate Specificity and Unusual Mode of Nucleotide Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Ku,S.; Yip, P.; Cornell, K.; Riscoe, M.; Behr, J.; Guillerm, G.; Howell, P.

    2007-01-01

    The methionine salvage pathway is ubiquitous in all organisms, but metabolic variations exist between bacteria and mammals. 5-Methylthioribose (MTR) kinase is a key enzyme in methionine salvage in bacteria and the absence of a mammalian homolog suggests that it is a good target for the design of novel antibiotics. The structures of the apo-form of Bacillus subtilis MTR kinase, as well as its ADP, ADP-PO4, AMPPCP, and AMPPCP-MTR complexes have been determined. MTR kinase has a bilobal eukaryotic protein kinase fold but exhibits a number of unique features. The protein lacks the DFG motif typically found at the beginning of the activation loop and instead coordinates magnesium via a DXE motif (Asp{sup 250}-Glu{sup 252}). In addition, the glycine-rich loop of the protein, analogous to the 'Gly triad' in protein kinases, does not interact extensively with the nucleotide. The MTR substrate-binding site consists of Asp{sup 233} of the catalytic HGD motif, a novel twin arginine motif (Arg{sup 340}/Arg{sup 341}), and a semi-conserved W-loop, which appears to regulate MTR binding specificity. No lobe closure is observed for MTR kinase upon substrate binding. This is probably because the enzyme lacks the lobe closure/inducing interactions between the C-lobe of the protein and the ribosyl moiety of the nucleotide that are typically responsible for lobe closure in protein kinases. The current structures suggest that MTR kinase has a dissociative mechanism.

  16. ETR COMPLEX. CAMERA FACING SOUTH. FROM BOTTOM OF VIEW TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR COMPLEX. CAMERA FACING SOUTH. FROM BOTTOM OF VIEW TO TOP: MTR, MTR SERVICE BUILDING, ETR CRITICAL FACILITY, ETR CONTROL BUILDING (ATTACHED TO ETR), ETR BUILDING (HIGH-BAY), COMPRESSOR BUILDING (ATTACHED AT LEFT OF ETR), HEAT EXCHANGER BUILDING (JUST BEYOND COMPRESSOR BUILDING), COOLING TOWER PUMP HOUSE, COOLING TOWER. OTHER BUILDINGS ARE CONTRACTORS' CONSTRUCTION BUILDINGS. INL NEGATIVE NO. 56-4105. Unknown Photographer, ca. 1956 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. A Cajal body-independent pathway for telomerase trafficking in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Tomlinson, Rebecca L.; Li, Jian; Culp, Bradley R.; Terns, Rebecca M. Terns, Michael P.

    2010-10-15

    The intranuclear trafficking of human telomerase involves a dynamic interplay between multiple nuclear sites, most notably Cajal bodies and telomeres. Cajal bodies are proposed to serve as sites of telomerase maturation, storage, and assembly, as well as to function in the cell cycle-regulated delivery of telomerase to telomeres in human cells. Here, we find that telomerase RNA does not localize to Cajal bodies in mouse cells, and instead resides in separate nuclear foci throughout much of the cell cycle. However, as in humans, mouse telomerase RNA (mTR) localizes to subsets of telomeres specifically during S phase. The localization of mTR to telomeres in mouse cells does not require coilin-containing Cajal bodies, as mTR is found at telomeres at similar frequencies in cells from wild-type and coilin knockout mice. At the same time, we find that human TR localizes to Cajal bodies (as well as telomeres) in mouse cells, indicating that the distinct trafficking of mTR is attributable to an intrinsic property of the RNA (rather than a difference in the mouse cell environment such as the properties of mouse Cajal bodies). We also find that during S phase, mTR foci coalesce into short chains, with at least one of the conjoined mTR foci co-localizing with a telomere. These findings point to a novel, Cajal body-independent pathway for telomerase biogenesis and trafficking in mice.

  18. A chimeric light-regulated amino acid transport system allows the isolation of blue light regulator (blr) mutants of Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed Central

    Carattoli, A; Kato, E; Rodriguez-Franco, M; Stuart, W D; Macino, G

    1995-01-01

    We have developed a system for the isolation of Neurospora crassa mutants that shows altered responses to blue light. To this end we have used the light-regulated promoter of the albino-3 gene fused to the neutral amino acid permease gene mtr. The product of the mtr gene is required for the uptake of neutral aliphatic and aromatic amino acids, as well as toxic analogs such as p-flurophenylalanine or 4-methyltryptophan. mtr trp-2-carrying cells were transformed with the al-3 promoter-mtr wild-type gene (al-3p-mtr+) to obtain a strain with a light-regulated tryptophan uptake. This strain is sensitive to p-fluorophenylalanine when grown under illumination and resistant when grown in the dark. UV mutagenesis of the al-3p-mtr(+)-carrying strain allowed us to isolate two mutant strains, BLR-1 and BLR-2 (blue light regulator), that are light-resistant to p-fluorophenylalanine and have lost the ability to grow on tryptophan. These two strains have a pale-orange phenotype and show down-regulation of all the photoregulated genes tested (al-3, al-1, con-8, and con-10). Mutations in the BLR strains are not allelic with white collar 1 or white collar 2, regulatory genes that are also involved in the response to blue light. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7604041

  19. Assessment of Myofascial Trigger Points Using Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Kumbhare, Dinesh A; Elzibak, Alyaa H; Noseworthy, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome is a common musculoskeletal pain disorder characterized by the presence of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs). The diagnosis of myofascial pain syndrome is currently made on clinical grounds. Numerous diagnostic criteria are used to identify myofascial pain syndrome, including the localization of MTrPs. Identifying the presence of MTrPs currently requires the physician to palpate the symptomatic region. Because the interrater reliability of the palpation technique has been found to be poor, numerous groups have been interested in finding objective imaging measures to localize the MTrP. This comprehensive review focuses on summarizing ultrasound imaging techniques that have shown promise in visually localizing the trigger point. The authors' literature search identified three sonographic approaches that have been used in MTrP localization: conventional gray-scale imaging, Doppler imaging, and elastographic ultrasound imaging. This review article explains the basic physics behind the imaging methods and summarizes the characteristics of the MTrP as identified by the ultrasonic techniques. PMID:26334421

  20. Changes in the normal appearing brain tissue and cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Filippi, M; Tortorella, C; Rovaris, M; Bozzali, M; Possa, F; Sormani, M; Iannucci, G; Comi, G

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To assess (a) whether the changes in the normal appearing brain tissue (NABT), as revealed by magnetisation transfer (MT) histogram analysis, correlates with cognitive dysfunction in patients with multiple sclerosis and (b) the relative contribution of these changes by comparison with that of multiple sclerosis lesions visible on conventional MRI.?METHODS—Dual echo, T1 weighted and MT scans of the brain were obtained in 12 patients with multiple sclerosis with cognitive impairment and in seven without cognitive impairment. Lesion loads were assessed from T2 and T1 weighted scans. To create MT histograms of the NABT, multiple sclerosis lesion outlines from dual echo scans were superimposed automatically and nulled out from the coregistered and scalp stripped MTR maps. Average lesion MT ratio (MTR) and brain size were also measured.?RESULTS—T2 and T1 lesion loads were significantly higher and the average lesion MTR and brain size were significantly lower in the group of cognitively impaired patients. Patients with cognitive deficits also had significantly lower average MTR and peak location of the NABT histogram. Logistic regression analysis showed that 68% of the total variance was explained by average NABT-MTR alone. A multivariable regression model showed that NABT-MTR was the only factor that significantly correlated with cognitive impairment in these patients (p=0.001).?CONCLUSIONS—The extent of abnormalities which go undetected when using conventional MRI is relevant in determining cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis.?? PMID:10644780

  1. The Effect of Monochromatic Infrared Photo Energy on the Irritability of Myofascial Trigger Spot of Rabbit Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Kuan, Ta-Shen; Lin, Yu-Ching; Lien, Wei-Chih; Hsieh, Pei-Chun; Chung, Yu-Ting; Lin, Sheng-Hsiang; Chou, Li-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To determine whether the vasodilatation effect of monochromatic infrared photo energy (MIRE) had the potential for the treatment of myofascial trigger spot (MTrS) in rabbits. Design. A randomized-controlled animal study. Subjects. Twelve adult New Zealand rabbits. Methods. For each rabbit, a MTrS (equivalent to a myofascial trigger point in humans) in one side of the biceps femoris muscle was randomly selected for MIRE treatment (experimental side), while another MTrS in the other side (control side) received a sham treatment. The intervention consisted of a daily 40 minutes treatment, three times per week for 2 weeks. The prevalence of endplate noise (EPN) loci in the MTrS was assessed before, immediately after, and one week after the completion of the 2-week treatment. Results. MIRE could suppress the prevalence of EPN in the MTrS. The degree of reduction in EPN prevalence in the MTrS between the experimental side and the control side was significantly different immediately after MIRE treatment, but not significantly different one week after MIRE treatment. Conclusion. Our study suggests that MIRE may be a useful therapeutic option for the management of the myofascial trigger point in humans. PMID:26442122

  2. Rapid electron exchange between surface-exposed bacterial cytochromes and Fe(III) minerals

    SciTech Connect

    White, Gaye F.; Shi, Zhi; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Dohnalkova, Alice; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David; Clarke, Thomas A.

    2013-04-16

    The mineral respiring bacterium Shewanella oneidensis uses a protein complex, MtrCAB, composed of two decaheme cytochromes brought together inside a transmembrane porin to transport electrons across the outer membrane to a variety of mineral-based electron acceptors. A proteoliposome system that contains methyl viologen as an internalised electron carrier has been used to investigate how the topology of the MtrCAB complex relates to its ability to transport electrons across a lipid bilayer to externally-located Fe(III) oxides. With MtrA facing the interior and MtrC exposed on the outer surface of the phospholipid bilayer, direct electron transfer from the interior through MtrCAB to solid-phase Fe(III) oxides was demonstrated. The observed rates of conduction through the protein complex were 2 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than that observed in whole cells, demonstrating that direct electron exchange between MtrCAB and Fe(III) oxides is efficient enough to support in-vivo, anaerobic, solid phase iron respiration.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging, magnetisation transfer imaging, and diffusion weighted imaging correlates of optic nerve, brain, and cervical cord damage in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Inglese, M; Rovaris, M; Bianchi, S; Mantia, L; Mancardi, G; Ghezzi, A; Montagna, P; Salvi, F; Filippi, M

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrial disease leading to bilateral loss of central vision and severe optic nerve atrophy. A subtype of LHON presents additional clinical and MRI aspects indistinguishable from those of multiple sclerosis (MS) (LHON-MS). In patients with LHON or LHON-MS, an assessment was made of (a) the severity of optic nerve damage, using MRI and magnetisation transfer imaging (MTI), and (b) the presence and extent of macroscopic and microscopic pathology in the brain and cervical cord, using MRI and MT ratio (MTR) and mean diffusivity (&Dmacr;) histogram analysis.?METHODS—Ten patients with LHON, four with LHON-MS, and 20 age and sex matched healthy controls were studied. For the optic nerve and the brain, dual-echo turbo spin echo (TSE), T1 weighted spin echo, and MT images were obtained. For the brain, fast fluid attenuated inversion recovery (fast FLAIR) and diffusion weighted images were also obtained. For the cervical cord, fast short tau inversion recovery (STIR) and MT images were obtained. The volume and the average MTR value of both the optic nerves were measured. MTR and &Dmacr; histograms of the normal appearing brain tissue (NABT) and MTR histograms of the whole cervical cord tissue were created.?RESULTS—The mean values of optic nerve volumes and MTR were significantly lower in patients with LHON than in healthy controls. Mean NABT-MTR histogram peak height was significantly lower in patients with LHON than in controls, whereas no significant difference was found for any of the cervical cord MTR histogram derived measures. Average diffusivity (&Dmacr;) was higher in patients with LHON than in controls. Optic nerve volume and MTR value and mean NABT-MTR were lower in patients with LHON-MS than in those with LHON.?CONCLUSIONS—The severity of optic nerve pathology in LHON is measurable in vivo using MRI and MTI. MTR and &Dmacr; histogram analysis suggests that microscopic brain damage occurs in LHON and that it is more severe in the MS-like form of the disease.?? PMID:11254765

  4. Evaluation of a High Throughput Method for the Detection of Mutations Associated with Thrombosis and Hereditary Hemochromatosis in Brazilian Blood Donors

    PubMed Central

    Dionisio Tavares Niewiadonski, Vivian; dos Santos Bianchi, Juliana Vieira; de Almeida-Neto, Cesar; Gaburo, Nelson; Sabino, Ester Cerdeira

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the OpenArray platform for genetic testing of blood donors and to assess the genotype frequencies of nucleotide-polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with venous thrombosis (G1691A and G20210A), hyperhomocysteinemia (C677T, A1298C), and hereditary hemochromatosis (C282Y, H63D and S65C) in blood donors from Sao Paulo, Brazil. Methods We examined 400 blood donor samples collected from October to November 2011. The SNPs were detected using OpenArray technology. The blood samples were also examined using a real-time PCR–FRET system to compare the results and determine the accuracy of the OpenArray method. Results We observed 100% agreement in all assays tested, except HFE C282Y, which showed 99.75% agreement. The HFE C282Y assay was further confirmed through direct sequencing, and the results showed that OpenArray analysis was accurate. The calculated frequencies of each SNP were FV G1691A 98.8% (G/G), 1.2% (G/A); FII G2021A 99.5% (G/G), 0.5% (G/A); MTHFR C677T 45.5% (C/C), 44.8% (C/T), 9.8% (T/T); MTHFR A1298C 60.3% (A/A), 33.6% (A/C), 6.1% (C/C); HFE C282Y 96%(G/G), 4%(G/A), HFE H63D 78.1%(C/C), 20.3% (C/G), 1.6% (G/G); and HFE S65C 98.1% (A/A), 1.9% (A/T). Conclusion Taken together, these results describe the frequencies of SNPs associated with diseases and are important to enhance our current knowledge of the genetic profiles of Brazilian blood donors, although a larger study is needed for a more accurate determination of the frequency of the alleles. Furthermore, the OpenArray platform showed a high concordance rate with standard FRET RT-PCR. PMID:25955572

  5. Thrombotic genetic risk factors and warfarin pharmacogenetic variants in São Miguel's healthy population (Azores)

    PubMed Central

    Branco, Claudia C; Pereirinha, Tânia; Cabral, Rita; Pacheco, Paula R; Mota-Vieira, Luisa

    2009-01-01

    Background The Azorean population presents the highest standardized mortality rate for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) when compared to mainland Portugal and other populations. Since thrombosis is a common cause of CVD, we assessed four polymorphisms in three thrombotic risk genes – F5 (G1691A), F2 (G20210A) and MTHFR (C677T, A1298C), in 469 healthy blood donors from São Miguel Island (Azores). We also analysed the CYP2C9 (C430T, A1075C) and VKORC1 (G1639A) variants in fifty-eight individuals with predisposition to thrombosis (possessing at least one variation in F5 or F2 genes and one in MTHFR) to evaluate their warfarin drug response genetic profiles. Results Among the 469 individuals, the data showed that thrombotic risk allele frequencies – 1691A (4.9%), 20210A (1.8%), 677T (41.7%) and 1298C (24.8%) – were similar to other Caucasians, but significantly different from mainland Portuguese (?2, p < 0.001). The combined analysis of these variants identified twenty-two different genetic profiles (genotype order: F5, F2, MTHFR C677T and A1298C). Complete homozygosity for all wild-type alleles (GG GG CC AA) was present in 11.7%, being GG GG CT AA (22.4%) the most frequent profile. The results also demonstrated that 12.4% (58 out of 469) of São Miguel islanders have increased genetic predisposition to thrombosis. Subsequently, we evaluated these individuals for their warfarin response genetic profiles. The data showed that seven out of fifty-eight individuals are poor metabolizers (two with CYP2C9*2/*2 and five with CYP2C9*2/*3 genotypes). VKORC1 polymorphism analysis identified twelve individuals (20.7%) with AA genotype, who probably will require lower doses of warfarin. The joint analysis of CYP2C9 and VKORC1 revealed that 79.3% (46 out of 58) of the individuals carry at least one polymorphism in these genes. Within these, twenty-five individuals (43.1%) need intermediate and/or low doses of warfarin, if treatment is started. Conclusion The present study demonstrated, for the first time, that São Miguel, and possibly the Azores population, shows significant differences on allele frequencies of thrombotic risk factors when compared to mainland Portugal. This research constitutes a primary approach for future studies on CVD, as well as for the implementation of warfarin dosing protocols using the patient's genotypic information. PMID:19538716

  6. Meta-Analysis of Studies Comparing Single and Multi-Tablet Fixed Dose Combination HIV Treatment Regimens.

    PubMed

    Clay, P G; Nag, S; Graham, C M; Narayanan, S

    2015-10-01

    Availability of a single source review of once-daily fixed-dose single tablet regimen (STR) and multiple tablet fixed-dose regimen (MTR) would optimally inform healthcare providers and policy makers involved in the management of population with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).We conducted a meta-analysis of published literature to compare patient adherence, clinical, and cost outcomes of STR to MTR.Published literature in English between 2005 and 2014 was searched using Embase, PubMed (Medline in-process), and ClinicalTrials.Gov databases. Two-level screening was undertaken by 2 independent researchers to finalize articles for evidence synthesis. Adherence, efficacy, safety, tolerability, healthcare resource use (HRU), and costs were assessed comparing STR to MTR. A random-effects meta-analysis was performed and heterogeneity examined using meta-regression.Thirty-five articles were identified for qualitative evidence synthesis, of which 9 had quantifiable data for meta-analysis (4 randomized controlled trials and 5 observational studies). Patients on STR were significantly more adherent when compared to patients on MTR of any frequency (odds ratio [OR]: 2.37 [95% CI: 1.68, 3.35], P?MTR (OR: 2.53 [95% CI: 1.13, 5.66], P?=?0.02; 2 studies), and once-daily MTR (OR: 1.81 [95% CI: 1.15, 2.84], P?=?0.01; 2 studies). The relative risk (RR) for viral load suppression at 48 weeks was higher (RR: 1.09 [95% CI: 1.04, 1.15], P?=?.0003; 3 studies) while RR of grade 3 to 4 laboratory abnormalities was lower among patients on STR (RR: 0.68 [95% CI: 0.49, 0.94], P?=?0.02; 2 studies). Changes in CD4 count at 48 weeks, any severe adverse events (SAEs), grade 3 to 4 AEs, mortality, and tolerability were found comparable between STR and MTR. Several studies reported significant reduction in HRU and costs among STR group versus MTR.Study depicted comparable tolerability, safety (All-SAE and Grade 3-4 AE), and mortality and fewer Grade 3 to 4 lab abnormalities and better viral load suppression and adherence among patients on FDC-containing STR versus MTR; literature depicted favorable HRU and costs for STRs.These findings may help decision makers especially in resource-poor settings to plan for optimal HIV disease management when the choice of both STRs and MTRs are available. PMID:26496277

  7. Meta-Analysis of Studies Comparing Single and Multi-Tablet Fixed Dose Combination HIV Treatment Regimens

    PubMed Central

    Clay, P.G.; Nag, S.; Graham, C.M.; Narayanan, S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Availability of a single source review of once-daily fixed-dose single tablet regimen (STR) and multiple tablet fixed-dose regimen (MTR) would optimally inform healthcare providers and policy makers involved in the management of population with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We conducted a meta-analysis of published literature to compare patient adherence, clinical, and cost outcomes of STR to MTR. Published literature in English between 2005 and 2014 was searched using Embase, PubMed (Medline in-process), and ClinicalTrials.Gov databases. Two-level screening was undertaken by 2 independent researchers to finalize articles for evidence synthesis. Adherence, efficacy, safety, tolerability, healthcare resource use (HRU), and costs were assessed comparing STR to MTR. A random-effects meta-analysis was performed and heterogeneity examined using meta-regression. Thirty-five articles were identified for qualitative evidence synthesis, of which 9 had quantifiable data for meta-analysis (4 randomized controlled trials and 5 observational studies). Patients on STR were significantly more adherent when compared to patients on MTR of any frequency (odds ratio [OR]: 2.37 [95% CI: 1.68, 3.35], P?MTR (OR: 2.53 [95% CI: 1.13, 5.66], P?=?0.02; 2 studies), and once-daily MTR (OR: 1.81 [95% CI: 1.15, 2.84], P?=?0.01; 2 studies). The relative risk (RR) for viral load suppression at 48 weeks was higher (RR: 1.09 [95% CI: 1.04, 1.15], P?=?.0003; 3 studies) while RR of grade 3 to 4 laboratory abnormalities was lower among patients on STR (RR: 0.68 [95% CI: 0.49, 0.94], P?=?0.02; 2 studies). Changes in CD4 count at 48 weeks, any severe adverse events (SAEs), grade 3 to 4 AEs, mortality, and tolerability were found comparable between STR and MTR. Several studies reported significant reduction in HRU and costs among STR group versus MTR. Study depicted comparable tolerability, safety (All-SAE and Grade 3–4 AE), and mortality and fewer Grade 3 to 4 lab abnormalities and better viral load suppression and adherence among patients on FDC-containing STR versus MTR; literature depicted favorable HRU and costs for STRs. These findings may help decision makers especially in resource-poor settings to plan for optimal HIV disease management when the choice of both STRs and MTRs are available. PMID:26496277

  8. Disease states associated with telomerase deficiency appear earlier in mice with short telomeres.

    PubMed

    Herrera, E; Samper, E; Martín-Caballero, J; Flores, J M; Lee, H W; Blasco, M A

    1999-06-01

    Mice deficient for the mouse telomerase RNA (mTR-/-) and lacking telomerase activity can only be bred for approximately six generations due to decreased male and female fertility and to an increased embryonic lethality associated with a neural tube closure defect. Although late generation mTR-/- mice show defects in the hematopoietic system, they are viable to adulthood, only showing a decrease in viability in old age. To assess the contribution of genetic background to the effect of telomerase deficiency on viability, we generated mTR-/- mutants on a C57BL6 background, which showed shorter telomeres than the original mixed genetic background C57BL6/129Sv. Interestingly, these mice could be bred for only four generations and the survival of late generation mTR-/- mice decreased dramatically with age as compared with their wild-type counterparts. Fifty percent of the generation 4 mice die at only 5 months of age. This decreased viability with age in the late generation mice is coincident with telomere shortening, sterility, splenic atrophy, reduced proliferative capacity of B and T cells, abnormal hematology and atrophy of the small intestine. These results indicate that telomere shortening in mTR-/- mice leads to progressive loss of organismal viability. PMID:10357808

  9. Multiexponential T2 and Magnetization Transfer MRI of Demyelination and Remyelination in Murine Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    McCreary, Cheryl R; Bjarnason, Thorarin A; Skihar, Viktor; Mitchell, J Ross; Yong, V Wee; Dunn, Jeff F

    2009-01-01

    Identification of remyelination is important in the evaluation of potential treatments of demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Local injection of lysolecithin into the brain or spinal cord provides a murine model of demyelination with spontaneous remyelination. The aim of this study was to determine if quantitative, multicomponent T2 (qT2) analysis and magnetization transfer ratio (MTR), both indicative of myelin content, could detect changes in myelination, particularly remyelination, of the cervical spinal cord in mice treated with lysolecithin. We found that the myelin water fraction and geometric mean T2 value of the intra/extracellular water significantly decreased at 14 days then returned to control levels by 28 days after injury, corresponding to clearance of myelin debris and remyelination which was shown by eriochrome cyanine and oil red O staining of histological sections. The MTR was significantly decreased 14 days after lysolecithin injection, and remained low over the time course studied. Evidence of demyelination shown by both qT2 and MTR lagged behind the histological evidence of demyelination. Myelin water fraction increased with remyelination, however MTR remain lower after 28 days. The difference between qT2 and MTR may identify early remyelination. PMID:19349232

  10. Multi-parameter MRI in the 6-OPRI variant of inherited prion disease

    PubMed Central

    De Vita, Enrico; Ridgway, Gerard R.; Scahill, Rachael I; Caine, Diana; Rudge, Peter; Yousry, Tarek A; Mead, Simon; Collinge, John; Jäger, H R; Thornton, John S; Hyare, Harpreet

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose To define the distribution of cerebral volumetric and microstructural parenchymal tissue changes in a specific mutation within inherited human prion diseases (IPD) combining voxel-based morphometry (VBM) with voxel-based analysis (VBA) of cerebral magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) and mean diffusivity (MD). Materials and Methods VBM and VBA of cerebral MTR and MD were performed in 16 healthy controls and 9 patients with the 6-octapeptide repeat insertion (6-OPRI) mutation. An ANCOVA consisting of diagnostic grouping with age and total intracranial volume as covariates was performed. Results On VBM there was significant grey matter (GM) volume reduction in patients compared with controls in the basal ganglia, perisylvian cortex, lingual gyrus and precuneus. Significant MTR reduction and MD increases were more anatomically extensive than volume differences on VBM in the same cortical areas, but MTR and MD changes were not seen in the basal ganglia. Conclusions GM and WM changes were seen in brain areas associated with motor and cognitive functions known to be impaired in patients with the 6-OPRI mutation. There were some differences in the anatomical distribution of MTR-VBA and MDVBA changes compared to VBM, likely to reflect regional variations in the type and degree of the respective pathophysiological substrates. Combined analysis of complementary multi-parameter MRI data furthers our understanding of prion disease pathophysiology. PMID:23538406

  11. A revised description of graphite irradiation induced creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Mark A.; Bradford, Mark

    2008-10-01

    The UK fleet of advanced gas-cooled reactors (AGR) have been operating for a substantial period of time and rely on data obtained from material test reactor (MTR) programs, dating back to the 1960s and through to the end of the 1980s, to support current and future operation. Historically an empirical approach to the irradiation behaviour of graphite has been used and, due to the nature of the available MTR data and the lack of a consistent set of data containing all the relevant measurements, this is still largely the case at present. Differences in interpretation of the available MTR data can have a significant impact on the assessed integrity of core components. Consequently, a thorough review of the basis of the current models is being carried out, and new models are being developed as necessary. This paper presents some new interpretations of the available low fluence MTR data for irradiation creep and application of a revised model to some high fluence MTR data.

  12. Electron tunneling properties of outer-membrane decaheme cytochromes from Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Wigginton, Nicholas S.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Lower, Brian H.; Shi, Liang; Hochella, Michael F.

    2007-02-01

    In this report, we describe the characterization of two outer-membrane decaheme cytochromes OmcA and MtrC purified from the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and tunneling spectroscopy (TS). OmcA and MtrC were solubilized with a common detergent and irreversibly bound to Au (111) substrates as self-assembled cytochrome films. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) verified that OmcA and MtrC were covalently bound to the Au surface via thiol bonds to cysteine residues. Initial STM images show that a layer of detergent covers and protects the cytochrome films. Temporary application of high bias voltage causes the detergent film to reorganize around the tip, opening a window for direct STM imaging of the cytochrome layer underneath. The STM apparent sizes of both OmcA and MtrC are 5?8 nanometers in diameter consistent with expectations from their molecular masses. Current-voltage TS over individual cytochromes showed that OmcA and MtrC have different abilities to mediate the tunneling current, reflecting differences in their electronic structures. The data suggest that the two cytochromes could have different roles in the electron transport chain during metal reduction.

  13. Links between dwarf and classical novae, and implications for the space densities and evolution of cataclysmic binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Shara, M.M.; Livio, M.; Moffat, A.F.J.; Orio, M.

    1986-12-01

    The effects of mass and angular momentum losses during a nova eruption are investigated by simulation in the context of a new nova evolution model. It is argued that surveys for cataclysmic variables (CVs) are very incomplete and that the local space density of CVs could well be 0.0001/cu pc. It is shown that the competing effets of mass and angular momentum loss usually increase the separation of a red and white dwarf during a nova eruption. The reasons why old novae remain bright for about a century after eruption and why they reduce the mass transfer rate (MTR) and eventually go into a state of hibernation for a thousand to a million years, eventually reviving as dwarf novae or novalike variables, are discussed. The results of these simulations are used to demonstrate the consistency of variable MTR in resolving the MTR discrepancy. 43 references.

  14. Inhibition of Experimental Liver Cirrhosis in Mice by Telomerase Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Karl Lenhard; Chang, Sandy; Millard, Melissa; Schreiber-Agus, Nicole; DePinho, Ronald A.

    2000-02-01

    Accelerated telomere loss has been proposed to be a factor leading to end-stage organ failure in chronic diseases of high cellular turnover such as liver cirrhosis. To test this hypothesis directly, telomerase-deficient mice, null for the essential telomerase RNA (mTR) gene, were subjected to genetic, surgical, and chemical ablation of the liver. Telomere dysfunction was associated with defects in liver regeneration and accelerated the development of liver cirrhosis in response to chronic liver injury. Adenoviral delivery of mTR into the livers of mTR-/- mice with short dysfunctional telomeres restored telomerase activity and telomere function, alleviated cirrhotic pathology, and improved liver function. These studies indicate that telomere dysfunction contributes to chronic diseases of continual cellular loss-replacement and encourage the evaluation of ``telomerase therapy'' for such diseases.

  15. ADP-2Ho as a Phasing Tool for Nucleotide-Containing Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Ku,S.; Smith, G.; Howell, P.

    2007-01-01

    Trivalent holmium ions were shown to isomorphously replace magnesium ions to form an ADP-2Ho complex in the nucleotide-binding domain of Bacillus subtilis 5-methylthioribose (MTR) kinase. This nucleotide-holmium complex provided sufficient phasing power to allow SAD and SIRAS phasing of this previously unknown structure using the L{sub III} absorption edge of holmium. The structure of ADP-2Ho reveals that the two Ho ions are approximately 4 {angstrom} apart and are likely to share their ligands: the phosphoryl O atoms of ADP and a water molecule. The structure determination of MTR kinase using data collected using Cu K X-radiation was also attempted. Although the heavy-atom substructure determination was successful, interpretation of the map was more challenging. The isomorphous substitution of holmium for magnesium in the MTR kinase-nucleotide complex suggests that this could be a useful phasing tool for other metal-dependent nucleotide-containing proteins.

  16. Fluence-dependent effects of low-level laser therapy in myofascial trigger spots on modulation of biochemicals associated with pain in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yueh-Ling; Hong, Chang-Zern; Chou, Li-Wei; Yang, Shun-An; Yang, Chen-Chia

    2015-01-01

    Evidence strongly supports that low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is an effective physical modality for the treatment of pain associated with myofascial trigger points (MTrP). However, the effect of laser fluence (energy intensity in J/cm(2)) on biochemical regulation related to pain is unclear. To better understand the biochemical mechanisms modulated by high- and low-fluence LLLT at myofascial trigger spots (MTrSs; similar to human MTrPs) in skeletal muscles of rabbits, the levels of ?-endorphin (?-ep), substance P (SP), tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) were investigated in this study. New Zealand rabbits (2.5-3.0 kg in weight) were used in this study. High-fluence LLLT (27 J/cm(2)), low-fluence LLLT (4.5 J/cm(2)), or sham operations were applied on MTrSs of biceps femoris of rabbits for five sessions (one session per day). Effects of LLLT at two different fluences on biceps femoris, dorsal root ganglion (DRG), and serum were determined by ?-ep, SP, TNF-?, and COX-2 immunoassays. LLLT irradiation with fluences of 4.5 and 27 J/cm(2) at MTrSs can significantly reduce SP level in DRG. LLLT with lower fluence of 4.5 J/cm(2) exerted lower levels of TNF-? and COX-2 expression in laser-treated muscle, but LLLT with higher fluence of 27 J/cm(2) elevated the levels of ?-ep in serum, DRG, and muscle. This study demonstrated fluence-dependent biochemical effects of LLLT in an animal model on management of myofascial pain. The findings can contribute to the development of dosage guideline for LLLT for treating MTrP-induced pain. PMID:25190639

  17. MTHFR Gene C677T Polymorphism in Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Sener, Elif Funda; Oztop, Didem Behice; Ozkul, Yusuf

    2014-01-01

    Aim. Autism is a subgroup of autism spectrum disorders, classified as a heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorder and symptoms occur in the first three years of life. The etiology of autism is largely unknown, but it has been accepted that genetic and environmental factors may both be responsible for the disease. Recent studies have revealed that the genes involved in the folate/homocysteine pathway may be risk factors for autistic children. In particular, C677T polymorphism in the MTHFR gene as a possible risk factor for autism is still controversial. We aimed to investigate the possible effect of C677T polymorphism in a Turkish cohort. Methods. Autism patients were diagnosed by child psychiatrists according to DSM-IV and DSM-V criteria. A total of 98 children diagnosed as autistic and 70 age and sex-matched children who are nonautistic were tested for C677T polymorphism. This polymorphism was studied by using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) methods. Results. MTHFR 677T-allele frequency was found to be higher in autistic children compared with nonautistic children (29% versus 24%), but it was not found statistically significant. Conclusions. We conclude that other MTHFR polymorphisms such as A1298C or other folate/homocysteine pathway genes may be studied to show their possible role in autism. PMID:25431675

  18. Thrombotic events after starting exogenous testosterone in men with previously undiagnosed familial thrombophilia.

    PubMed

    Glueck, Charles J; Goldenberg, Naila; Budhani, Shaaista; Lotner, Daniel; Abuchaibe, Cesar; Gowda, Madan; Nayar, Tushar; Khan, Naseer; Wang, Ping

    2011-10-01

    Our specific aim was to describe thrombosis (osteonecrosis of the hips, pulmonary embolism, and amaurosis fugax) after exogenous testosterone was given to men with no antecedent thrombosis and previously undiagnosed familial thrombophilia. After starting testosterone patch or gel, 50 mg/day or intramuscular testosterone 400 mg IM/month, 2 men developed bilateral hip osteonecrosis 5 and 6 months later, and 3 developed pulmonary embolism 3, 7, and 17 months later. One man developed amaurosis fugax 18 months after starting testosterone gel 50 mg/day. Of these 6 men, 5 were found to have previously undiagnosed factor V Leiden heterozygosity, 1 of whom had ancillary MTHFR C677T homozygosity, and 2 with ancillary MTHFR C677T-A1298C compound heterozygosity. One man had high factor VIII (195%), factor XI (179%), and homocysteine (29.3 umol/L). Thrombotic events after starting testosterone therapy are associated with familial thrombophilia. We speculate that when exogenous testosterone is aromatized to E2, and E2-induced thrombophilia is superimposed on familial thrombophilia, thrombosis occurs. Men sustaining thrombotic events on testosterone therapy should be screened for the factor V Leiden mutation and other familial and acquired thrombophilias. PMID:21925119

  19. MTRETR MAINTENANCE SHOP, TRA653. FLOOR PLAN FOR FIRST FLOOR: MACHINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR-ETR MAINTENANCE SHOP, TRA-653. FLOOR PLAN FOR FIRST FLOOR: MACHINE SHOP, ELECTRICAL AND INSTRUMENT SHOP, TOOL CRIB, ELECTRONIC SHOP, LOCKER ROOM, SPECIAL TEMPERATURE CONTROLLED ROOM, AND OFFICES. "NEW" ON DRAWING REFERS TO REVISION OF 11/1956 DRAWING ON WHICH AREAS WERE DESIGNATED AS "FUTURE." HUMMEL HUMMEL & JONES 810-MTR-ETR-653-A-7, 5/1957. INL INDEX NO. 532-0653-00-381-101839, REV. 2. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  20. PROCESS WATER BUILDING, TRA605. AERIAL TAKEN WHILE SEVERAL PIPE TRENCHES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PROCESS WATER BUILDING, TRA-605. AERIAL TAKEN WHILE SEVERAL PIPE TRENCHES REMAINED OPEN. CAMERA FACES EASTERLY. NOTE DUAL PIPES BETWEEN REACTOR BUILDING AND NORTH SIDE OF PROCESS WATER BUILDING. PIPING NEAR WORKING RESERVOIR HEADS FOR RETENTION RESERVOIR. PIPE FROM DEMINERALIZER ENTERS MTR FROM NORTH. SEE ALSO TRENCH FOR COOLANT AIR DUCT AT SOUTH SIDE OF MTR AND LEADING TO FAN HOUSE AND STACK. INL NEGATIVE NO. 2966-A. Unknown Photographer, 7/31/1951 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  1. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632. CONTEXTUAL AERIAL VIEW OF HOT CELL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632. CONTEXTUAL AERIAL VIEW OF HOT CELL BUILDING, IN VIEW AT LEFT, AS YET WITHOUT ROOF. PLUG STORAGE BUILDING LIES BETWEEN IT AND THE SOUTH SIDE OF THE MTR BUILDING AND ITS WING. NOTE CONCRETE DRIVE BETWEEN ROLL-UP DOOR IN MTR BUILDING AND CHARGING FACE OF PLUG STORAGE. REACTOR SERVICES BUILDING (TRA-635) WILL COVER THIS DRIVE AND BUTT UP TO CHARGING FACE. DOTTED LINE IS ON ORIGINAL NEGATIVE. TRA PARKING LOT IN LEFT CORNER OF THE VIEW. CAMERA FACING NORTHWESTERLY. INL NEGATIVE NO. 8274. Unknown Photographer, 7/2/1953 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  2. FAST CHOPPER DETECTOR HOUSE, TRA665. FIRST FLOOR, PLAN AND SECTION, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FAST CHOPPER DETECTOR HOUSE, TRA-665. FIRST FLOOR, PLAN AND SECTION, AS PROPOSED FOR MODIFICATION IN 1962. CONCRETE WALLS THREE FEET THICK. EXISTING WINDOWS IN MTR AND DETECTOR HOUSE WALLS WERE TO BE FILLED IN WITH HIGH-DENSITY BRICK. NOTE 20-METER MARK, WHERE THE FAST CHOPPER DETECTOR HAD BEEN LOCATED. F.C. TORKELSON 842-MTR-665-S-2, 4/1962. INL INDEX NO. 531-0665-60-851-150996, REV. 5. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  3. ETR HEAT EXCHANGER BUILDING, TRA644. EAST SIDE. CAMERA FACING WEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR HEAT EXCHANGER BUILDING, TRA-644. EAST SIDE. CAMERA FACING WEST. NOTE COURSE OF PIPE FROM GROUND AND FOLLOWING ROOF OF BUILDING. MTR BUILDING IN BACKGROUND AT RIGHT EDGE OF VIEW. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-36-3. Mike Crane, Photographer, 4/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  4. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY BULLETIN: VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND REMOVAL FROM AIR STREAMS BY MEMBRANES SEPARATION MEMBRANE TECHNOLOGY AND RESEARCH, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This membrane separation technology developed by Membrane Technology and Research (MTR), Incorporated, is designed to remove volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from contaminated air streams. In the process, organic vapor-laden air contacts one side of a membrane that is permeable ...

  5. PROCESS WATER BUILDING, TRA605. EAST SIDE. CAMERA FACING WEST. REMOVABLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PROCESS WATER BUILDING, TRA-605. EAST SIDE. CAMERA FACING WEST. REMOVABLE OPENINGS WERE NOT BENEFICIALLY USED FOR FUTURE EXPANSION. PART OF MTR APPEARS BEHIND BUILDING AT LEFT. ATR BUILDING IN BACKGROUND ON RIGHT. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-34-4. Mike Crane, Photographer, 4/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  6. Projected/Tentative Course Schedule FALL WINTER

    E-print Network

    Littlejohn, Lance

    Practice & Procedure MTWR 235 Administration of Estates MW 341 Insurance MTR 10:30 *528 Practice Court III MWR 321 Patent Law & Drafting (1st of 3hrs) W 351 White Collar Crime MWR 174 Personal Injury Trial Law 125 Patent Litigation W 372 Employment Relations TRF 2:15 *528 P.C. Lab M-F 360 Civil Liberties TRF

  7. ETR COMPRESSOR BUILDING, TRA643. FLOOR PLAN AND SECTIONS. AIR COMPRESSORS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR COMPRESSOR BUILDING, TRA-643. FLOOR PLAN AND SECTIONS. AIR COMPRESSORS, AIR HEATERS, AND PROCESS CONTROL PANELS. CRANE RAILS. KAISER ETR-5528-MTR-643-A-1, 11/1955. INL INDEX NO. 532-0643-00-486-101268, REV. 0. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  8. NORTH WING EXTENSION, TRA668. FLOOR PLAN. ELEVATIONS. SECTION. AN IDENTICAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTH WING EXTENSION, TRA-668. FLOOR PLAN. ELEVATIONS. SECTION. AN IDENTICAL EXTENSION TO THE NORTH ADDED TWO MORE LABS. B.D. BOHNA 1008-MTR-ETR-668-A-1, 5/1963. INL INDEX NO. 531-0669SIC-00-102-118638, REV. 7. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  9. COMPRESSOR BUILDING, TRA626. ELEVATIONS. WINDOWS. WALL SECTIONS. PUMICE BLOCK BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    COMPRESSOR BUILDING, TRA-626. ELEVATIONS. WINDOWS. WALL SECTIONS. PUMICE BLOCK BUILDING HOUSED COMPRESSORS FOR AIRCRAFT NUCLEAR PROPULSION EXPERIMENTS. MTR-626-IDO-2S, 3/1952. INL INDEX NO. 531-0626-00-396-110535, REV. 2. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  10. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632. FIRST FLOOR FOUNDATION PLAN SHOWS SECTIONALIZED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632. FIRST FLOOR FOUNDATION PLAN SHOWS SECTIONALIZED FLOOR LOADINGS AND CONCRETE SLAB THICKNESSES, A TYPICAL FEATURE OF NUCLEAR ARCHITECTURE. IDAHO OPERATIONS OFFICE MTR-632-IDO-2, 11/1952. INL INDEX NO. 531-0632-62-396-110561, REV. 1. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  11. Impacts of Mountaintop Removal and Valley Fill Coal Mining on C and N Processing in Terrestrial Soils and Headwater Streams.

    EPA Science Inventory

    We measured C and N cycling indicators in Appalachian watersheds impacted by mountaintop removal and valley fill (MTR/VF) coal mining, and in nearby forested watersheds. These watersheds include ephemeral, intermittent, and perennial stream reaches, and the length of time since d...

  12. Single-Cell Imaging and Spectroscopic Analyses of Cr(VI) Reduction on the Surface of Bacterial Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuanmin; Sevinc, Papatya C.; Belchik, Sara M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Shi, Liang; Lu, H. Peter

    2013-01-22

    We investigate single-cell reduction of toxic Cr(VI) by the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (MR-1), an important bioremediation process, using Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Our experiments indicate that the toxic and highly soluble Cr(VI) can be efficiently reduced to the less toxic and non-soluble Cr2O3 nanoparticles by MR-1. Cr2O3 is observed to emerge as nanoparticles adsorbed on the cell surface and its chemical nature is identified by EDX imaging and Raman spectroscopy. Co-localization of Cr2O3 and cytochromes by EDX imaging and Raman spectroscopy suggests a terminal reductase role for MR-1 surface-exposed cytochromes MtrC and OmcA. Our experiments revealed that the cooperation of surface proteins OmcA and MtrC makes the reduction reaction most efficient, and the sequence of the reducing reactivity of the MR-1 is: wild type > single mutant @mtrC or mutant @omcA > double mutant (@omcA-@mtrC). Moreover, our results also suggest that the direct microbial Cr(VI) reduction and Fe(II) (hematite)-mediated Cr(VI) reduction mechanisms may co-exist in the reduction processes.

  13. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632. INSTRUMENT FITTINGS, MASTER/SLAVE MANIPULATOR, "POT LID ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632. INSTRUMENT FITTINGS, MASTER/SLAVE MANIPULATOR, "POT LID CRANE." IDAHO OPERATIONS OFFICE MTR-632-IDO-16, 11/1952. INL INDEX NO. 531-0632-40-396-110574, REV. 2. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  14. Hurricanes: Observations and Dynamics Houze Section 10.1.

    E-print Network

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    1 Hurricanes: Observations and Dynamics Houze Section 10.1. Holton Section 9.7. Emanuel, K. A., 1988: Toward a general theory of hurricanes. American Scientist, 76, 371-379 (web link). http://ww2010.atmos.uiuc.edu/(Gh)/guides/mtr/hurr/home.rxml Definition: Hurricanes are intense vortical (rotational

  15. Cognitive impairment as marker of diffuse brain abnormalities in early relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Deloire, M; Salort, E; Bonnet, M; Arimone, Y; Boudineau, M; Amieva, H; Barroso, B; Ouallet, J; Pachai, C; Galliaud, E; Petry, K; Dousset, V; Fabrigoule, C; Brochet, B

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To establish the frequency of cognitive impairment in a population based sample of patients with recently diagnosed relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), and to determine the relation between cognitive abnormalities and the extent of macroscopic and microscopic tissue damage revealed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetisation transfer (MT) imaging. Methods: 58 patients with RRMS consecutively diagnosed in the previous six months in Aquitaine and 70 healthy controls underwent a battery of neuropsychological tests. Lesion load and atrophy indices (brain parenchymal fraction and ventricular fraction) were measured on brain MRI. MT ratio (MTR) histograms were obtained from lesions, normal appearing white matter (NAWM), and normal appearing grey matter (NAGM). Gadolinium enhanced lesions were counted. Results: 44 RRMS patients could be individually matched with healthy controls for age, sex, and education. Patients performed worse in tests of verbal and spatial memory, attention, information processing speed, inhibition, and conceptualisation. Measures of attention and information processing speed were correlated with lesion load, mean NAWM MTR, and the peak location of the NAGM MTR histogram in the patients. Multivariate regression analysis showed that lesion load and mean NAWM MTR were among the MR indices that were most significantly associated with impairment of attention and information processing speed in these early RRMS cases. Conclusions: Cognitive impairment appears to be common in the early stages of RRMS, mainly affecting attention, information processing speed, memory, inhibition, and conceptualisation. The severity of these deficits reflects the extent of the lesions and the severity of tissue disorganisation outside lesions. PMID:15774439

  16. SCIENTIST DEMONSTRATES PLACING A "RABBIT CATCHER" INTO ONE OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SCIENTIST DEMONSTRATES PLACING A "RABBIT CATCHER" INTO ONE OF THE VERTICAL TEST HOLES AT THE TOP OF THE MTR. CONTROL ROD DRIVES ARE BEHIND HIM TOWARDS LEFT OF VIEW. INL NEGATIVE NO. 56-513. Jack L. Anderson, Photographer, 2/13/1956 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. FAST CHOPPER BUILDING, TRA665. DETAIL SHOWS UPPER AND LOWER LEVEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FAST CHOPPER BUILDING, TRA-665. DETAIL SHOWS UPPER AND LOWER LEVEL WALLS OF DIFFERING MATERIALS. NOTE DOORWAY TO MTR TO RIGHT OF CHOPPER BUILDING'S CLIPPED CORNER. CAMERA FACING WEST. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD42-1. Mike Crane, Photographer, 3/2004 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  18. FAST CHOPPER DETECTOR HOUSE, TRA665. SECOND FLOOR ADDITION: PLAN, SECTIONS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FAST CHOPPER DETECTOR HOUSE, TRA-665. SECOND FLOOR ADDITION: PLAN, SECTIONS AND DETAILS AS ADDED TO THE EXISTING CHOPPER HOUSE IN 1962. F.C. TORKELSON 842-MTR-665-S-3, 4/1962. INL INDEX NO. 531-0665-60-851-150997, REV. 3. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  19. 33 CFR 154.1210 - Purpose and applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... fats or vegetable oils including— (1) A fixed MTR facility capable of transferring oil in bulk, to or... (CONTINUED) POLLUTION FACILITIES TRANSFERRING OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL IN BULK Response Plans for Animal Fats and Vegetable Oils Facilities § 154.1210 Purpose and applicability. (a) The requirements of...

  20. 33 CFR 154.1210 - Purpose and applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... fats or vegetable oils including— (1) A fixed MTR facility capable of transferring oil in bulk, to or... (CONTINUED) POLLUTION FACILITIES TRANSFERRING OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL IN BULK Response Plans for Animal Fats and Vegetable Oils Facilities § 154.1210 Purpose and applicability. (a) The requirements of...

  1. 33 CFR 154.1210 - Purpose and applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... fats or vegetable oils including— (1) A fixed MTR facility capable of transferring oil in bulk, to or... (CONTINUED) POLLUTION FACILITIES TRANSFERRING OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL IN BULK Response Plans for Animal Fats and Vegetable Oils Facilities § 154.1210 Purpose and applicability. (a) The requirements of...

  2. 33 CFR 154.1210 - Purpose and applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... fats or vegetable oils including— (1) A fixed MTR facility capable of transferring oil in bulk, to or... (CONTINUED) POLLUTION FACILITIES TRANSFERRING OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL IN BULK Response Plans for Animal Fats and Vegetable Oils Facilities § 154.1210 Purpose and applicability. (a) The requirements of...

  3. Transcriptional Analysis of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 with an Electrode Compared to Fe(III)Citrate or Oxygen

    E-print Network

    Angenent, Lars T.

    because of its versatile metabolic capabilities, especially with regard to respiration with extracellular electron acceptors. The physiological activity of S. oneidensis to respire at electrodes is of great to be involved in electrode respiration, such as the entire mtr operon. We also formulate hypotheses on other

  4. PLUG STORAGE BUILDING, TRA611, AWAITS SHIELDING SOIL TO BE PLACED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PLUG STORAGE BUILDING, TRA-611, AWAITS SHIELDING SOIL TO BE PLACED OVER PLUG STORAGE TUBES. WING WALLS WILL SUPPORT EARTH FILL. MTR, PROCESS WATER BUILDING, AND WORKING RESERVOIR IN VIEW BEYOND PLUG STORAGE. CAMERA FACES NORTHEAST. INL NEGATIVE NO. 2949. Unknown Photographer, 7/30/1951 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  5. Coexisting Flux Rope and Dipped Arcade Sections along One Solar Filament

    E-print Network

    Meyer-Vernet, Nicole

    Magn´etisme et des Instabilit´es Solaires/Multi- Raies (THEMIS/MTR) on 2005 May 27. We propose a new it is "inverse". Quadrupolar configurations can be either normal or inverse with respect to the central inversion

  6. ETR COMPRESSOR BUILDING, TRA643. PLAN AND SECTIONS. GRATECOVERED TRENCHES LAY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR COMPRESSOR BUILDING, TRA-643. PLAN AND SECTIONS. GRATE-COVERED TRENCHES LAY ALONG FLOOR FROM EAST TO WEST AND AROUND MAIN COMPRESSORS. LOCKER ROOM AT NORTHEAST CORNER. KAISER ETR-5528-MTR-643-A-3, 11/1955. INL INDEX NO. 532-0643-00-486-101269, REV. 4. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  7. 75 FR 74768 - Madison Terminal Railway, LLC-Lease and Operation Exemption-Line of Railroad in Dane County, WI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Madison Terminal Railway, LLC--Lease and Operation Exemption-- Line of Railroad in Dane County, WI Madison Terminal Railway, LLC (MTR), a noncarrier, has filed a verified...

  8. 77 FR 13656 - Call for Papers: National Symposium on Moving Target Research

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-07

    ... Call for Papers: National Symposium on Moving Target Research AGENCY: The National Coordination Office... Papers (CFP). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, CONTACT: mtr-symposium@sei.cmu.edu . DATES: To be considered, draft papers must be received by 18:00 EDT, April 2, 2012. SUMMARY: This Call for Papers is being...

  9. Structural and Functional Characteristics of Natural and Constructed Channels Draining a Reclaimed Mountaintop Removal and Valley Fill Coal Mine

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mountaintop removal and valley fill (MTR/VF) coal mining has altered the landscape of the Central Appalachian region in the USA. Among the changes are large-scale topographic recontouring, burial of headwater streams, and degradation of downstream water quality. The goals of our ...

  10. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632. MEZZANINE PLAN. EQUIPMENT ROOM. WORK AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632. MEZZANINE PLAN. EQUIPMENT ROOM. WORK AND STORAGE AREAS. ROOF SLABS. IDAHO OPERATIONS OFFICE MTR-632-IDO-3, 11/1952. INL INDEX NO. 531-0632-60-396-110562, REV. 2. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  11. ETR HEAT EXCHANGER BUILDING, TRA644. FLOOR PLAN AND SECTIONS. PUMP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR HEAT EXCHANGER BUILDING, TRA-644. FLOOR PLAN AND SECTIONS. PUMP CUBICLES WITH PUMP MOTORS OUTSIDE CUBICLES. HEAT EXCHANGER EQUIPMENT. COOLANT PIPE TUNNEL ENTERS FROM REACTOR BUILDING. KAISER ETR-5582-MTR-644-A-3, 2/1956. INL INDEX NO. 532-0644-00-486-101294, REV. 6. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  12. Interaction between the RNA-dependent ATPase and poly(A) polymerase subunits of the TRAMP complex is mediated by short peptides and important for snoRNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Losh, Jillian S.; King, Alejandra Klauer; Bakelar, Jeremy; Taylor, Lacy; Loomis, John; Rosenzweig, Jason A.; Johnson, Sean J.; van Hoof, Ambro

    2015-01-01

    The RNA exosome is one of the main 3? to 5? exoribonucleases in eukaryotic cells. Although it is responsible for degradation or processing of a wide variety of substrate RNAs, it is very specific and distinguishes between substrate and non-substrate RNAs as well as between substrates that need to be 3? processed and those that need to be completely degraded. This specificity does not appear to be determined by the exosome itself but rather by about a dozen other proteins. Four of these exosome cofactors have enzymatic activity, namely, the nuclear RNA-dependent ATPase Mtr4, its cytoplasmic paralog Ski2 and the nuclear non-canonical poly(A) polymerases, Trf4 and Trf5. Mtr4 and either Trf4 or Trf5 assemble into a TRAMP complex. However, how these enzymes assemble into a TRAMP complex and the functional consequences of TRAMP complex assembly remain unknown. Here, we identify an important interaction site between Mtr4 and Trf5, and show that disrupting the Mtr4/Trf interaction disrupts specific TRAMP and exosome functions, including snoRNA processing. PMID:25589546

  13. ARMF, TRA660. NORTH, WEST AND EAST ELEVATIONS. PUMICE BLOCK WALLS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ARMF, TRA-660. NORTH, WEST AND EAST ELEVATIONS. PUMICE BLOCK WALLS. VERTICAL LIFT DOOR IN WEST WALL. WINDOWS AND LOUVERS WERE LATER COVERED. H.K. FERGUSON 8956 MTR-ETR-660-53, 9/1959. INL INDEX NO. 531-0660-00-279-101994, REV. 3. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  14. CONTROL HOUSE, TRA620. MASONS ERECT PUMICE BLOCK WALLS. BUILDING WILL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONTROL HOUSE, TRA-620. MASONS ERECT PUMICE BLOCK WALLS. BUILDING WILL CONTROL ACCESS TO MTR AND OTHER "HOT" AND CLASSIFIED AREAS. INL NEGATIVE NO. 577. Unknown Photographer, 9/11/1950 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  15. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632. ELEVATIONS. PUMICE BLOCK WALLS. BLOWER AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632. ELEVATIONS. PUMICE BLOCK WALLS. BLOWER AND FILTER LOFT PLATFORM AND LADDER ON EAST SIDE. IDAHO OPERATIONS OFFICE MTR-632-IDO-4, 11/1952. INL INDEX NO. 531-0632-00-396-110563, REV. 2. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  16. Neural substrate of quality of life in patients with schizophrenia: a magnetisation transfer imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Catherine, Faget-Agius; Boyer, Laurent; Jonathan, Wirsich; Jean-Philippe, Ranjeva; Raphaelle, Richieri; Elisabeth, Soulier; Sylviane, Confort-Gouny; Pascal, Auquier; Maxime, Guye; Christophe, Lançon

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the neural substrate underlying quality of life (QoL) and to demonstrate the microstructural abnormalities associated with impaired QoL in a large sample of patients with schizophrenia, using magnetisation transfer imaging. A total of 81 right-handed men with a diagnosis of schizophrenia and 25 age- and sex-similar healthy controls were included and underwent a 3T MRI with magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) to detect microstructural abnormalities. Compared with healthy controls, patients with schizophrenia had grey matter (GM) decreased MTR values in the temporal lobe (BA21, BA37 and BA38), the bilateral insula, the occipital lobe (BA17, BA18 and BA19) and the cerebellum. Patients with impaired QoL had lower GM MTR values relative to patients with preserved QoL in the bilateral temporal pole (BA38), the bilateral insula, the secondary visual cortex (BA18), the vermis and the cerebellum. Significant correlations between MTR values and QoL scores (p?

  17. Advice for 1st Year Students

    E-print Network

    Yuen, Shiu Yin, Kelvin

    can use idle time, e.g. sitting in the MTR, efficiently to read through the material. 4. Try to relate and look back. 2. Having said that, not a few students get very bad grade as soon as they join one of these

  18. REACTOR SERVICES BUILDING, TRA635. SECOND FLOOR PLAN. WOMEN'S REST ROOM. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    REACTOR SERVICES BUILDING, TRA-635. SECOND FLOOR PLAN. WOMEN'S REST ROOM. IDO MTR-635-IDO-6-A, 6/1953. INL INDEX NO. 531-0635-00-396-110589, REV. 1. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  19. REACTOR SERVICES BUILDING, TRA635. FIRST FLOOR PLAN. MOCKUP AND PRESSURE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    REACTOR SERVICES BUILDING, TRA-635. FIRST FLOOR PLAN. MOCK-UP AND PRESSURE TEST AREAS. ISSUE ROOM, LAUNDRY, STORAGE. IDO MTR-635-IDO-5-A, 6/1953. INL INDEX NO. 531-0635-00-396-110588, REV. 6. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  20. REACTOR SERVICES BUILDING, TRA635. EAST, WEST, AND SOUTH ELEVATIONS. WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    REACTOR SERVICES BUILDING, TRA-635. EAST, WEST, AND SOUTH ELEVATIONS. WEST ELEVATION HAS TWO STORIES. IDO MTR-635-IDO-7-A, 6/1953. INL INDEX NO. 531-0635-00-396-110590, REV. 1. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  1. 'Fishing' for Alternatives to Mountaintop Mining in Southern West Virginia

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mountaintop removal mining (MTR) is a major industry in southern West Virginia with many detrimental effects for small to mid-sized streams, and interest in alternative, sustainable industries is on the rise. As a first step in a larger effort to assess the value of sport fisheri...

  2. 33 CFR 154.1055 - Exercises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Exercises. 154.1055 Section 154... Exercises. (a) A response plan submitted by an owner or operator of an MTR facility must include an exercise program containing both announced and unannounced exercises. The following are the minimum...

  3. 33 CFR 154.1055 - Exercises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Exercises. 154.1055 Section 154... Exercises. (a) A response plan submitted by an owner or operator of an MTR facility must include an exercise program containing both announced and unannounced exercises. The following are the minimum...

  4. 33 CFR 154.1055 - Exercises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Exercises. 154.1055 Section 154... Exercises. (a) A response plan submitted by an owner or operator of an MTR facility must include an exercise program containing both announced and unannounced exercises. The following are the minimum...

  5. 33 CFR 154.1055 - Exercises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exercises. 154.1055 Section 154... Exercises. (a) A response plan submitted by an owner or operator of an MTR facility must include an exercise program containing both announced and unannounced exercises. The following are the minimum...

  6. 33 CFR 154.1055 - Exercises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Exercises. 154.1055 Section 154... Exercises. (a) A response plan submitted by an owner or operator of an MTR facility must include an exercise program containing both announced and unannounced exercises. The following are the minimum...

  7. Catalog of experimental projects for a fissioning plasma reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanzo, C. D.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical investigations were carried out to determine the feasibility of using a small scale fissioning uranium plasma as the power source in a driver reactor. The driver system is a light water cooled and moderated reactor of the MTR type. The eight experiments and proposed configurations for the reactor are outlined.

  8. Methionine salvage pathway in relation to ethylene biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Miyazaki, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    The recycling of methionine during ethylene biosynthesis (the methionine cycle) was studied. During ethylene biosynthesis, the H/sub 3/CS-group of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) is released at 5'-methylthioadenosine (MTA), which is recycled to methionine via 5'-methylthioribose (MTS). In mungbean hypocotyls and cell-free extracts of avocado fruit, (/sup 14/C)MTR was converted to labeled methionine via 2-keto-4-methylthiobutyric acid (KMB) and 2-hydroxy-4-methylthiobutyric acid (HMB) as intermediates. Radioactive tracer studies showed that KMB was converted readily in vivo and in vitro to methionine, while HMB was converted much more slowly. The conversion of KMB to methionine by dialyzed avocado extract required an amino group donor. Among several potential donors tested, L-glutamine was the most efficient. Incubation of (ribose-U-/sup 14/C)MTR with avocado extract resulted in the production of (/sup 14/C)formate, with little evolution of other /sup 14/C-labeled one-carbon compounds, indicating that the conversion of MTR to KMB involves a loss of formate, presumably from C-1 of MTR.

  9. PROCESS WATER BUILDING, TRA605. CAMERA LOOKING EAST AND TO WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PROCESS WATER BUILDING, TRA-605. CAMERA LOOKING EAST AND TO WEST WALL NOW ENCLOSING FLASH EVAPORATORS. PIPES IN FOREGROUND WILL CARRY DEMINERALIZED COOLING WATER TO AND FROM THE MTR. INL NEGATIVE NO. 2937. Unknown Photographer, 7/30/1951 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  10. Solvability of a stationary nonlinear Black-Scholes equation under conditions on the potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabião, Fátima; do Rosário Grossinho, Maria; Simões, Onofre

    2009-05-01

    In this work, we study a nonlinear problem suggested by the Black-Scholes model for option pricing with stochastic volatility, namely, {mtr>1/2?2S2?2f/?S2+1/2?2V2?2f/??2+??2VS?2f/?S??-1/2??2V?f/??+rS?f/?S = r?(f)in ?,mtr>>f(S,?) = h(S,?),on ??mtr>| where the variables S and ? are respectively the asset value and the market volatility ([1], [2]). In [1], an analogous nonlinear problem has been investigated with a nonlinearity ? of the following type ?(f) = g(f)f. It has been used an iterative procedure under the hypothesis that g(f)f is nondecreasing, applying upper and lower solutions. The function g was assumed to be C2 and this regularity was used in computations in the proofs. We consider a Hölder continuous nonlinearity ?(f) and, assuming certain conditions on the potential ? of ?, we prove the existence of a positive solution. The method of the proof, which is based on the construction of upper and lower solutions, obtained as solutions of an auxiliary initial value problem, also yields information on the localization of f.

  11. Spontaneous electrical activities at myofascial trigger points at different stages of recovery from injury in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qiang-Min; Lv, Jiao-Jiao; Ruanshi, Qiong-Mei; Liu, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background Spontaneous electrical activity (SEA) is a feature of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs), which can either be latent or active. However, SEA at different stages of recovery from MTrPs remains unclear. Objective To investigate the temporal changes in the nature of SEA after generation of MTrPs in a rat model. Methods 32 rats were divided into four groups: 24 rats were assigned to experimental groups (EGs), which underwent the MTrP modelling intervention and 8 were allocated to a control group (CG). All EG rats received a blunt strike to the left vastus medialis combined with eccentric exercise for 8?weeks. After modelling, the EG rats were subdivided into three groups with total recovery times of 4, 8 and 12?weeks (EG-4w, EG-8w and EG-12w, respectively). Taut bands (TBs) with and without the presence of active MTrPs were identified in the left hind limb muscles of all rats, verified by SEA and further examined with electromyography recordings. Myoelectrical signals were also categorised into one of five types. Results CG rats had fewer TBs than EG rats and EGs showed variable frequencies of SEA. SEA frequencies were higher in EG-4w than in EG-8w and EG-12w groups (240.57±72.9 vs 168.14±64.5 and 151.63±65.4, respectively, p<0.05) and were significantly greater in all EGs than in the CG (55.75±21.9). Relative to CG rats, amplitudes and durations of electrical potentials in the EG were only increased in the EG-8w and EG-12w groups. Types IV and V myoelectrical signals were never seen in latent MTrPs and type V signals did not occur in EG-4w rats. Conclusions Increasing recovery periods following a MTrP modelling intervention in rats are characterised by different frequencies and amplitudes of SEA from TBs. Trial registration number 2014012. PMID:25971282

  12. Regulation of RNA processing and transport by a nuclear guanine nucleotide release protein and members of the Ras superfamily.

    PubMed Central

    Kadowaki, T; Goldfarb, D; Spitz, L M; Tartakoff, A M; Ohno, M

    1993-01-01

    The RCC1 gene of mammals encodes a guanine nucleotide release protein (GNRP). RCC1 and a homolog in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (MTR1/PRP20/SRM1) have previously been implicated in control of mRNA metabolism and export from the nucleus. We here demonstrate that a temperature-sensitive fission yeast mutant which has a mutation in a homologous gene, and two of three additional (mtr1/prp20/srm1) mutants accumulate nuclear poly(A)+ RNA at 37 degrees C. In S.cerevisiae, maturation of rRNA and tRNA is also inhibited at 37 degrees C. Nevertheless, studies with the corresponding BHK-21 cell mutant indicate that protein import into the nucleus continues. MTR1 homologs regulate RNA processing at a point which is distinct from their regulation of chromosome condensation since: (i) poly(A)+ RNA accumulation in the fission yeast mutant precedes chromosome condensation, and (ii) unlike chromosome condensation, accumulation of nuclear poly(A)+ RNA does not require p34cdc28 kinase activation or protein synthesis. Moreover, experiments involving inhibition of DNA synthesis indicate that the S.cerevisiae homolog does not govern cell cycle checkpoint control. Since RCC1p acts as GNRP for Ran, a small nuclear GTPase of the ras superfamily, we have identified two homologs of Ran in S.cerevisiae (CNR1 and CNR2). Only CNR1 is essential, but both code for proteins extremely similar to Ran and can suppress mtr1 mutations in allele-specific fashion. Thus, MTR1 and its homologs appear to act as GNRPs for a family of conserved GTPases in controlling RNA metabolism and transport. Their role in governing checkpoint control appears to be restricted to higher eukaryotes. Images PMID:7687541

  13. Characterization of the periplasmic redox network that sustains the versatile anaerobic metabolism of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Mónica N.; Neto, Sónia E.; Alves, Alexandra S.; Fonseca, Bruno M.; Carrêlo, Afonso; Pacheco, Isabel; Paquete, Catarina M.; Soares, Cláudio M.; Louro, Ricardo O.

    2015-01-01

    The versatile anaerobic metabolism of the Gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (SOMR-1) relies on a multitude of redox proteins found in its periplasm. Most are multiheme cytochromes that carry electrons to terminal reductases of insoluble electron acceptors located at the cell surface, or bona fide terminal reductases of soluble electron acceptors. In this study, the interaction network of several multiheme cytochromes was explored by a combination of NMR spectroscopy, activity assays followed by UV-visible spectroscopy and comparison of surface electrostatic potentials. From these data the small tetraheme cytochrome (STC) emerges as the main periplasmic redox shuttle in SOMR-1. It accepts electrons from CymA and distributes them to a number of terminal oxidoreductases involved in the respiration of various compounds. STC is also involved in the electron transfer pathway to reduce nitrite by interaction with the octaheme tetrathionate reductase (OTR), but not with cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR). In the main pathway leading the metal respiration STC pairs with flavocytochrome c (FccA), the other major periplasmic cytochrome, which provides redundancy in this important pathway. The data reveals that the two proteins compete for the binding site at the surface of MtrA, the decaheme cytochrome inserted on the periplasmic side of the MtrCAB–OmcA outer-membrane complex. However, this is not observed for the MtrA homologues. Indeed, neither STC nor FccA interact with MtrD, the best replacement for MtrA, and only STC is able to interact with the decaheme cytochrome DmsE of the outer-membrane complex DmsEFABGH. Overall, these results shown that STC plays a central role in the anaerobic respiratory metabolism of SOMR-1. Nonetheless, the trans-periplasmic electron transfer chain is functionally resilient as a consequence of redundancies that arise from the presence of alternative pathways that bypass/compete with STC. PMID:26175726

  14. The crystal structure of S. cerevisiae Ski2, a DExH helicase associated with the cytoplasmic functions of the exosome

    PubMed Central

    Halbach, Felix; Rode, Michaela; Conti, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Ski2 is a cytoplasmic RNA helicase that functions together with the exosome in the turnover and quality control of mRNAs. Ski2 is conserved in eukaryotes and is related to the helicase Mtr4, a cofactor of the nuclear exosome involved in the processing and quality control of a variety of structured RNAs. We have determined the 2.4 Å resolution crystal structure of the 113 kDa helicase region of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ski2. The structure shows that Ski2 has an overall architecture similar to that of Mtr4, with a core DExH region and an extended insertion domain. The insertion is not required for the formation of the Ski2–Ski3–Ski8 complex, but is instead an RNA-binding domain. While this is reminiscent of the Mtr4 insertion, there are specific structural and biochemical differences between the two helicases. The insertion of yeast Mtr4 consists of a ?-barrel domain that is flexibly attached to a helical stalk, contains a KOW signature motif, and binds in vitro-transcribed tRNAiMet, but not single-stranded RNA. The ?-barrel domain of yeast Ski2 does not contain a KOW motif and is tightly packed against the helical stalk, forming a single structural unit maintained by a zinc-binding site. Biochemically, the Ski2 insertion has broad substrate specificity, binding both single-stranded and double-stranded RNAs. We speculate that the Ski2 and Mtr4 insertion domains have evolved with different properties tailored to the type of transcripts that are the substrates of the cytoplasmic and nuclear exosome. PMID:22114319

  15. Relationship of MTHFR gene polymorphisms with renal and cardiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Trovato, Francesca M; Catalano, Daniela; Ragusa, Angela; Martines, G Fabio; Pirri, Clara; Buccheri, Maria Antonietta; Di Nora, Concetta; Trovato, Guglielmo M

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of different methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) 677C>T gene polymorphism and hyperhomocysteinemia for the development of renal failure and cardiovascular events, which are controversial. METHODS: We challenged the relationship, if any, of MTHFR 677C>T and MTHFR 1298A>C polymorphisms with renal and heart function. The present article is a reappraisal of these concepts, investigating within a larger population, and including a subgroup of dialysis patients, if the two most common MTHFR polymorphisms, C677T and A1298C, as homozygous, heterozygous or with a compound heterozygous state, show different association with chronic renal failure requiring hemodialysis. MTHFR polymorphism could be a favorable evolutionary factor, i.e., a protective factor for many ominous conditions, like cancer and renal failure. A similar finding was reported in fatty liver disease in which it is suggested that MTHFR polymorphisms could have maintained and maintain their persistence by an heterozygosis advantage mechanism. We studied a total of 630 Italian Caucasian subject aged 54.60 ± 16.35 years, addressing to the increased hazard of hemodialysis, if any, according to the studied MTHFR genetic polymorphisms. RESULTS: A favorable association with normal renal function of MTHFR polymorphisms, and notably of MTHFR C677T is present independently of the negative effects of left ventricular hypertrophy, increased Intra-Renal arterial Resistance and hyperparathyroidism. CONCLUSION: MTHFR gene polymorphisms could have a protective role on renal function as suggested by their lower frequency among our dialysis patients in end-stage renal failure; differently, the association with left ventricular hypertrophy and reduced left ventricular relaxation suggest some type of indirect, or concurrent mechanism. PMID:25664255

  16. Genetic variation of folate-mediated one-carbon transfer pathway predicts susceptibility to choline deficiency in humans

    PubMed Central

    Kohlmeier, Martin; da Costa, Kerry-Ann; Fischer, Leslie M.; Zeisel, Steven H.

    2005-01-01

    Choline is a required nutrient, and some humans deplete quickly when fed a low-choline diet, whereas others do not. Endogenous choline synthesis can spare some of the dietary requirement and requires one-carbon groups derived from folate metabolism. We examined whether major genetic variants of folate metabolism modify susceptibility of humans to choline deficiency. Fifty-four adult men and women were fed diets containing adequate choline and folate, followed by a diet containing almost no choline, with or without added folate, until they were clinically judged to be choline-deficient, or for up to 42 days. Criteria for clinical choline deficiency were a more than five times increase in serum creatine kinase activity or a >28% increase of liver fat after consuming the low-choline diet that resolved when choline was returned to the diet. Choline deficiency was observed in more than half of the participants, usually within less than a month. Individuals who were carriers of the very common 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase-1958A gene allele were more likely than noncarriers to develop signs of choline deficiency (odds ratio, 7.0; 95% confidence interval, 2.0-25; P < 0.01) on the low-choline diet unless they were also treated with a folic acid supplement. The effects of the C677T and A1298C polymorphisms of the 5,10-methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase gene and the A80C polymorphism of the reduced folate carrier 1 gene were not statistically significant. The most remarkable finding was the strong association in premenopausal women of the 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase-1958A gene allele polymorphism with 15 times increased susceptibility to developing organ dysfunction on a low-choline diet. PMID:16236726

  17. Meta-analysis of associations between MTHFR and GST polymorphisms and susceptibility to multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Ho; Seo, Young Ho; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Choi, Sung Jae; Ji, Jong Dae; Song, Gwan Gyu

    2015-11-01

    We examined whether methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) polymorphisms are associated with susceptibility to multiple sclerosis (MS). We performed a meta-analysis on the association between MS and the following genotypes: MTHFR C677T, A1298C, and GSTP1 A313G polymorphisms, and GSTM1 and GSTT1 null alleles. Fifteen comparisons involving 2,486 patients and 2,861 controls were considered. Meta-analysis of all study subjects considered together showed no association between MS and the MTHFR 677 T allele (OR = 1.014, 95 % CI 0.803-1.280, p = 0.909). Stratification by ethnicity showed no similar association in Caucasian and Arab populations. Likewise, no link was found between MS and the MTHFR 1298 C allele in the total data (OR = 2.477, 95 % CI 0.507-12.10, p = 0.263), nor when it was stratified by ethnicity. No association with MS was observed in relation to the GSTM1 null genotype in Caucasian populations (OR = 1.229, 95 % CI 0.693-2.181, p = 0.481), nor with the GSTP1 A313G polymorphism (OR for G allele = 1.133, 95 % CI 0.903-1.421, p = 0.281). However, there was an association between MS and the GSTT1 null genotype in data obtained from Caucasian populations (OR = 1.945, 95 % CI 1.452-2.605, p = 8.6 × 10(-7)). GSTT1 null genotype is associated with MS in Caucasian populations; however, no association was found between MS and polymorphisms of MTHFR, GSTM1, and GSTP1. PMID:26150166

  18. Maternal and offspring genetic variants of AKR1C3 and the risk of childhood leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chen-yu; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Pan, Pi-Chen; Wu, Ming-Tsang; Ho, Chi-Kung; Su, Li; Xu, Xin; Li, Yi; Christiani, David C.

    2008-01-01

    The aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3) gene located on chromosome 10p15-p14, a regulator of myeloid cell proliferation and differentiation, represents an important candidate gene for studying human carcinogenesis. In a prospectively enrolled population-based case–control study of Han Chinese conducted in Kaohsiung in southern Taiwan, a total of 114 leukemia cases and 221 controls <20 years old were recruited between November 1997 and December 2005. The present study set out to evaluate the association between childhood leukemia and both maternal and offspring's genotypes. To do so, we conducted a systematic assessment of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at the 5? flanking 10 kb to 3? UTR of AKR1C3 gene. Gln5His and three tagSNPs (rs2245191, rs10508293 and rs3209896) and one multimarker (rs2245191, rs10508293 and rs3209896) were selected with average 90% coverage of untagged SNPs by using the HapMap II data set. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were adjusted for age and gender. After correcting for multiple comparisons, we observed that risk of developing childhood leukemia is significantly associated with rs10508293 polymorphism on intron 4 of the AKR1C3 gene in both offspring alone and in the combined maternal and offspring genotypes (nominal P < 0.0001, permutation P < 0.005). The maternal methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase A1298C polymorphism was found to be an effect modifier of the maternal intron 4 polymorphism of the AKR1C3 gene (rs10508293) and the childhood leukemia risk. In conclusion, this study suggests that AKR1C3 polymorphisms may be important predictive markers for childhood leukemia susceptibility. PMID:18339682

  19. Treatable high homocysteine alone or in concert with five other thrombophilias in 1014 patients with thrombotic events.

    PubMed

    Glueck, Charles J; Smith, Domonique; Gandhi, Niral; Hemachandra, Kailash; Shah, Parth; Wang, Ping

    2015-10-01

    In 1014 patients with thrombotic events, we determined how often treatable high serum homocysteine alone, or in concert with five other thrombophilias, was associated with thrombotic events. We studied 1014 outpatients sequentially referred for evaluation of thrombotic events, all having six measures of thrombophilia--three PCR (methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T-A1298C, factor V Leiden G506A, prothrombin G20210A), and three serologic (factors VIII, XI, homocysteine). Of the 1014 patients, 198 (20%) had atherothrombosis, 199 (20%) ocular vascular thrombosis, 211 (21%) osteonecrosis, 180 (18%) pseudotumor cerebri, and 123 (12%) recurrent miscarriage. In 434 of 1014 (43%) patients, all six thrombophilic measures were normal. High homocysteine, present in 126 of 1014 patients (12.4%), was the sole thrombophilia in 50 (5%), accompanied only by methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase homozygosity-compound heterozygosity in 22 (2.2%), and accompanied by other thrombophilias in 54 (5%). Patients were more likely than 110 healthy controls to have high homocysteine (12 vs. 5%; P = 0.02) and high factor VIII (21 vs. 7%; P = 0.0003). On treatment for a median of 18 months with L-methyl folate (5 mg), vitamin B6 (100 mg), and vitamin B12 (2 mg/day), in 74 homocysteinemic patients, median homocysteine fell from 15.6 to 10.0 ?mol/l (P < 0.0001), and in 56 (76%), homocysteine fell to normal on treatment. When homocysteinemia was the sole thrombophilia, normalization of homocysteine was accompanied by freedom from new thrombotic events in 38 of 41 patients (93%). In evaluation of 1014 patients with thrombotic events, 126 (12%) had treatable high serum homocysteine, and in 50 (5%), high homocysteine was the sole treatable thrombophilia. PMID:25699608

  20. Differences of Intrasession Reproducibility of Circumpapillary Total Retinal Thickness and Circumpapillary Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness Measurements Made with the RS-3000 Optical Coherence Tomograph

    PubMed Central

    Kita, Yoshiyuki; Holl?, Gábor; Kita, Ritsuko; Horie, Daisuke; Inoue, Makoto; Hirakata, Akito

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the intrasession reproducibility of various thickness parameters used to diagnose and follow-up glaucoma, in particular circumpapillary total retinal thickness (cpTR) provided by the RS-3000 optical coherence tomograph (OCT). Methods Fifty-three healthy eyes of 28 subjects underwent three consecutive imaging with the RS-3000 Advance OCT (NIDEK, Aichi,Japan) to evaluate the intrasession reproducibility of circumpapillary total retinal thickness (cpTR), circumpapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (cpRNFL), macular ganglion cell complex thickness (mGCC) and macular total retina thickness (mTR) measurements. Intraclass correlation (ICC), coefficient of variation (CV) and reproducibility coefficient (RC) were calculated for each parameter. Results The ICC and CV values for mean cpTR and cpRNFL were 0.987 and 0.897, and 0.60% and 2.81%, respectively. The RC values for the mean cpTR and cpRNFL were 5.95 ?m and 9.04 ?m, respectively. For all cpTR parameters the ICC values were higher and both the CV and RC values were lower than those for the corresponding cpRNFL parameters. The ICC and CV values for superior mGCC, inferior mGCC, superior mTR and inferior mTR were 0.983, 0.980, 0.983 and 0.988, and 0.84%, 0.98%, 0.48% and 0.43%, respectively. The RC values for superior mGCC, inferior mGCC, superior mTR and inferior mTR were 2.86 ?m, 3.12 ?m, 4.41?m and 4.43 ?m, respectively. Conclusions Intrasession reproducibility of cpTR, mGCC and mTR measurements made on healthy eyes was high. Repeatability of cpTR measurements was better than that of the corresponding cpRNFL measurements. These results suggest that future clinical investigations addressing detection of glaucoma and glaucomatous progression with the RS-3000 OCT may benefit from focusing on the cpTR parameters. PMID:26657805

  1. A Systematic Comparison Between Subjects with No Pain and Pain Associated with Active Myofascial Trigger Points

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Lynn H.; Sikdar, Siddhartha; Armstrong, Katee; Diao, Guoqing; Heimur, Juliana; Kopecky, John; Turo, Diego; Otto, Paul; Gebreab, Tadesse; Shah, Jay

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine whether standard evaluations of pain distinguish subjects with no pain from those with myofascial pain syndromes (MPS) and active trigger points (MTrPs); and to assess whether self-reports of mood, function and health-related quality of life differ between these groups. Design Prospective, descriptive study. Setting University Patients Adults with and without neck pain Methods We evaluated adults with MPS and active (painful) MTrPs and those without pain. Subjects in the “Active” (‘A’) group had at least one active MTrP with spontaneous pain which was persistent, lasted more than 3 months and had characteristic pain on palpation. Subjects in the “No pain” (‘Np’) group had no spontaneous pain. However, some had discomfort on MTrP palpation (latent MTrP) while others in the Np group had no discomfort on palpation of nodules or had no nodules. Outcome Measures Each participant underwent range of motion (ROM) measurement, 10-point manual muscle test, and manual and algometric palpation. The latter determined the pain/pressure threshold using an algometer of 4 pre-determined anatomical sites along the upper trapezius. Participants rated pain using a verbal analogue scale (0–10); completed the Brief Pain Inventory and Oswestry Disability Scale (ODS), which included a sleep sub-scale; Short Form 36(SF36) and the Profile of Mood States (POMS). Results here were 24 in the ‘A’ group (mean 36 yrs, 16 women) and 26 in the ‘Np’ group (mean 26 yrs, 12 women). Subjects in group ‘A’ differed from ‘Np’ in number of latent MTrPs (p=.0062); asymmetrical cervical ROM (p=.01 side bending and p=.002 rotation); in all pain reports (p<.0001); algometry (p<.03); POMS (p<.038); SF36 (p<.01) and ODS (p<.0001). Conclusion A systematic musculoskeletal evaluation of people with MPS reliably distinguishes them from subjects with no pain. The two groups are significantly different in their physical findings and self-reports of pain, sleep disturbance, disability, health status and mood. These findings support the view that a “local” pain syndrome has significant associations with mood, health-related quality of life and function.. PMID:23810811

  2. Associations between genetic variants in folate and drug metabolizing pathways and relapse risk in pediatric acute lymphoid leukemia on CCG-1952

    PubMed Central

    Vujkovic, Marijana; Kershenbaum, Aaron; Wray, Lisa; McWilliams, Thomas; Cannon, Shannon; Devidas, Meenakshi; Stork, Linda; Aplenc, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variation in drug detoxification pathways may influence outcomes in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We evaluated relapse risk and 24 variants in 17 genes in 714 patients in CCG-1961. Three TPMT and 1 MTR variant were associated with increased risks of relapse (rs4712327, OR 3.3, 95%CI 1.2–8.6; rs2842947, OR 2.7, 95%CI 1.1–6.8; rs2842935, OR 2.5, 95%CI 1.1–5.0; rs10925235, OR 4.9, 95%CI 1.1–25.1). One variant in SLC19A1 showed a protective effect (rs4819128, OR 0.5, 95%CI 0.3–0.9). Our study provides data that relapse risk in pediatric ALL is associated with germline variations in TPMT, MTR and SLC19A1.

  3. Genome sequence of a novel endornavirus from the phytopathogenic fungus Alternaria brassicicola.

    PubMed

    Shang, Hong-Hong; Zhong, Jie; Zhang, Ru-Jia; Chen, Chuan-Yuan; Gao, Bi-Da; Zhu, Hong-Jian

    2015-07-01

    In an effort to discover new mycoviruses from phytopathogenic fungi, a dsRNA molecule of 10,290 nt, resembling those associated with the viruses belonging to the family Endornaviridae, was isolated from Alternaria brassicicola, one of the causal agents of rapeseed black spot disease. Genome analysis revealed the presence of a single open reading frame coding for a polyprotein of 3400 aa containing conserved viral methyltransferase (MTR), viral RNA helicase 1 (Hel-1), and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) domains. In addition, a cysteine-rich region (CRR) with conserved CXCC motifs, shared among several endornaviruses, was also identified between the MTR and Hel-1 domains. Phylogenetic analysis based on the RdRp sequence strongly suggested that the virus infecting A. brassicicola should be considered a representative of a novel endornavirus species, and this virus was designated as Alternaria brassicicola endornavirus 1 (AbEV1). PMID:25951967

  4. Exploring the biochemistry at the extracellular redox frontier of bacterial mineral Fe(III) respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, David J.; Edwards, Marcus; White, Gaye F.; Baiden, Nanakow; Hartshorne, Robert S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Shi, Liang; Zachara, John M.; Gates, Andrew J.; Butt, Julea N.; Clarke, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    Many species of the bacterial Shewanella genus are notable for their ability to respire in anoxic environments utilizing insoluble minerals of Fe(III) and Mn(IV) as extracellular electron acceptors. In Shewanella oneidensis, the process is dependent on the decahaem electron-transport proteins that lie at the extracellular face of the outer membrane where they can contact the insoluble mineral substrates. These extracellular proteins are charged with electrons provided by an inter-membrane electron-transfer pathway that links the extracellular face of the outer membrane with the inner cytoplasmic membrane and thereby intracellular electron sources. In the present paper, we consider the common structural features of two of these outermembrane decahaem cytochromes, MtrC and MtrF, and bring this together with biochemical, spectroscopic and voltammetric data to identify common and distinct properties of these prototypical members of different clades of the outer-membrane decahaem cytochrome superfamily.

  5. ADVANCED HEAT TRANSFER TEST FACILITY, TRA666A. ELEVATIONS. ROOF FRAMING PLAN. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ADVANCED HEAT TRANSFER TEST FACILITY, TRA-666A. ELEVATIONS. ROOF FRAMING PLAN. CONCRETE BLOCK SIDING. SLOPED ROOF. ROLL-UP DOOR. AIR INTAKE ENCLOSURE ON NORTH SIDE. F.C. TORKELSON 842-MTR-666-A5, 8/1966. INL INDEX NO. 531-0666-00-851-152258, REV. 2. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  6. HEALTH AND SAFETY BUILDING, TRA667. SOUTH AND WEST ELEVATIONS. FLOOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HEALTH AND SAFETY BUILDING, TRA-667. SOUTH AND WEST ELEVATIONS. FLOOR PLAN AND ROOM DESIGNATIONS. NOTE PAIR OF ENTRY DOORS IN WEST ELEVATION FOR MEN AND WOMEN. CONCRETE T-BEAMS. F.C. TORKELSON CO. 842-MTR-667-A1, 1/1963. INL INDEX NO. 531-0667-00-851-151143, REV. 4. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  7. FAST CHOPPER BUILDING, TRA665, INTERIOR. LOWER (DETECTOR) LEVEL. NOTE BRICKEDIN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FAST CHOPPER BUILDING, TRA-665, INTERIOR. LOWER (DETECTOR) LEVEL. NOTE BRICKED-IN WINDOW ON MTR SIDE. USED FOR STORAGE OF LEAD BRICKS AFTER EXPERIMENTAL NEUTRON INSTRUMENTS WERE REMOVED. SIGN SAYS "IN-PROCESS LEAD SOURCE STORAGE." INL NEGATIVE NO. HD-42-2. Mike Crane, Photographer, 3/2004 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  8. ETR, TRA642 AND TRA647. FLOOR PLANS FOR FIRST AND SECOND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR, TRA-642 AND TRA-647. FLOOR PLANS FOR FIRST AND SECOND FLOORS OF THE OFFICE AND CONTROL BUILDING ALONG THE NORTH WALL OF THE ETR BUILDING. HEALTH PHYSICS, OPERATIONS, AND CONTROL ROOM. AIRLOCK DOOR. OFFICES. STAIRWAY LOCATIONS. KAISER ETR-5528-MTR-642-A-3, 10/1955. INL INDEX NO. 532-0642-00-100911, REV. 0. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  9. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632. FLOOR PLAN OF EXPANSION SHOWS LOCATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632. FLOOR PLAN OF EXPANSION SHOWS LOCATION OF NEW CELLS, "HEAVY" CELL AT WEST END, "LIGHT" CELLS AT EAST. MOCK-UP AND STORAGE AREAS IN SOUTH HALF OF FLOOR. H.K. FERGUSON 895-MTR-ETR-632-A1, 12/1958. INL INDEX NO. 531-0632-00-279-101924, REV. 4. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  10. ETR COOLING TOWER. PUMP HOUSE (TRA645) IN SHADOW OF TOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR COOLING TOWER. PUMP HOUSE (TRA-645) IN SHADOW OF TOWER ON LEFT. AT LEFT OF VIEW, HIGH-BAY BUILDING IS ETR. ONE STORY ATTACHMENT IS ETR ELECTRICAL BUILDING. STACK AT RIGHT IS ETR STACK; MTR STACK IS TOWARD LEFT. CAMERA FACING NORTHEAST. INL NEGATIVE NO. 56-3799. Jack L. Anderson, 11/26/1956 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  11. Experimental analysis of sapphire contact probes for Nd-YAG laser angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Ashley, S; Brooks, S G; Gehani, A A; Kester, R C; Rees, M R

    1990-06-01

    Laser angioplasty may offer percutaneous recanalization of occluded vessels where conventional guidewire and balloon techniques fail. Metal laser thermal angioplasty probes may, however, cause excessive thermal damage due to high tip temperatures (greater than 400.C). Therefore, contact probes made from artificial sapphire crystal designed for general laser surgery are currently being evaluated for use in laser angioplasty with continuous wave Nd-YAG energy. The sapphire modifies the laser energy in various ways, and this paper examines the physical characteristics of five types of rounded sapphire probe (SMTR, MTR, MTRL, OS, LT) and how these properties are affected by clinical usage. The laser beam profile emitted by these probes demonstrates a focal spot 1-2 mm in front of the tip. However, the forward transmission of Nd-YAG energy through the sapphires varied (SMTR, 85%; MTR, 83%; MTRL, 75%; OS, 54%; LT, 69%). Probe heating occurs owing to energy absorption within the sapphire. The surface temperature of the sapphires was measured in air by infrared thermography and the hottest region within the probes localized by an isothermographic technique. At energy settings used clinically (20 J, 10 watts for 2 s) the SMTR, MTR, and MTRL probes exhibited higher temperature rises (94-112.C) than the OS and LT probes (30.C), and heating was localized to the front surface of the former probes. Peak sapphire temperatures remained lower than those of metal probes even at higher energies. After clinical use, the MTR probe demonstrated reduced transmission, beam defocusing, and increased heating, due to surface pitting. Thus, recanalization with sapphire probes occurs by a combination of photothermal and contact thermal effects that are localized to the probe tip and may reduce the degree of thermal injury associated with metal probes. Understanding these basic properties is important to the application and development of contact probes for laser recanalization. PMID:2142867

  12. A Science Survice Feature---I..-D r . Charles ??.Broo;G,

    E-print Network

    ., t e l l s : HO!V TH3 SUW'S W?.T IS-?~ATVR%I - I 4 - To measure accu.ratc>ly thc heat of the sui- r e t i c a l surface prpoiidicular t o thc: sun's rays and mtr4d.a of thc! ntnosphcre ,vith tal, i n an arid, cloudless resion, preferably nea.r thc. equstor - conditions not cdculatcd t o

  13. The EMBO Journal Vol.18 No.19 pp.53995410, 1999 Functions of the exosome in rRNA, snoRNA and

    E-print Network

    Chanfreau, Guillaume

    The EMBO Journal Vol.18 No.19 pp.5399­5410, 1999 Functions of the exosome in rRNA, snoRNA and sn of the 5.8S rRNA, together with the putative RNA helicase Dob1p/Mtr4p. During this processing three components can have distinct functions. Keywords: pre-rRNA/RNA processing/Saccharomyces cerevisiae

  14. Short telomeres initiate telomere recombination in primary and tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Morrish, Tammy A; Greider, Carol W

    2009-01-01

    Human tumors that lack telomerase maintain telomeres by alternative lengthening mechanisms. Tumors can also form in telomerase-deficient mice; however, the genetic mechanism responsible for tumor growth without telomerase is unknown. In yeast, several different recombination pathways maintain telomeres in the absence of telomerase-some result in telomere maintenance with minimal effects on telomere length. To examine non-telomerase mechanisms for telomere maintenance in mammalian cells, we used primary cells and lymphomas from telomerase-deficient mice (mTR-/- and Emumyc+mTR-/-) and CAST/EiJ mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. These cells were analyzed using pq-ratio analysis, telomere length distribution outliers, CO-FISH, Q-FISH, and multicolor FISH to detect subtelomeric recombination. Telomere length was maintained during long-term growth in vivo and in vitro. Long telomeres, characteristic of human ALT cells, were not observed in either late passage or mTR-/- tumor cells; instead, we observed only minimal changes in telomere length. Telomere length variation and subtelomeric recombination were frequent in cells with short telomeres, indicating that length maintenance is due to telomeric recombination. We also detected telomere length changes in primary mTR-/- cells that had short telomeres. Using mouse mTR+/- and human hTERT+/- primary cells with short telomeres, we found frequent length changes indicative of recombination. We conclude that telomere maintenance by non-telomerase mechanisms, including recombination, occurs in primary cells and is initiated by short telomeres, even in the presence of telomerase. Most intriguing, our data indicate that some non-telomerase telomere maintenance mechanisms occur without a significant increase in telomere length. PMID:19180191

  15. Neutronic study on conversion of SAFARI-1 to LEU silicide fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, G.; Pond, R.; Hanan, N.; Matos, J.

    1995-02-01

    This paper marks the initial study into the technical and economic feasibility of converting the SAFARI-1 reactor in South Africa to LEU silicide fuel. Several MTR assembly geometries and LEU uranium densities have been studied and compared with MEU and HEU fuels. Two factors of primary importance for conversion of SAFARI-1 to LEU fuel are the economy of the fuel cycle and the performance of the incore and excore irradiation positions.

  16. ETR, TRA642. NORTHSOUTH SECTION, LOOKING WEST. STEELFRAME ROOF, CRANE RAIL, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR, TRA-642. NORTH-SOUTH SECTION, LOOKING WEST. STEEL-FRAME ROOF, CRANE RAIL, AND CRANES. COOLANT PIPE TUNNEL LEADING TO REACTOR FROM EAST. (THIS WAS A PRELIMINARY CONCEPT DRAWING.) KAISER ETR-5528-MTR-642-A-4, 11/1955. INL INDEX NO. 532-0642-00-486-100912, REV. 1. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. EAST FACE OF REACTOR BASE. COMING TOWARD CAMERA IS EXCAVATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EAST FACE OF REACTOR BASE. COMING TOWARD CAMERA IS EXCAVATION FOR MTR CANAL. CAISSONS FLANK EACH SIDE. COUNTERFORT (SUPPORT PERPENDICULAR TO WHAT WILL BE THE LONG WALL OF THE CANAL) RESTS ATOP LEFT CAISSON. IN LOWER PART OF VIEW, DRILLERS PREPARE TRENCHES FOR SUPPORT BEAMS THAT WILL LIE BENEATH CANAL FLOOR. INL NEGATIVE NO. 739. Unknown Photographer, 10/6/1950 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  18. Quantification of in vivo pH-weighted amide proton transfer (APT) MRI in acute ischemic stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Iris Y.; Igarashi, Takahiro; Guo, Yingkun; Sun, Phillip Z.

    2015-03-01

    Amide proton transfer (APT) imaging is a specific form of chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI that probes the pH-dependent amide proton exchange.The endogenous APT MRI is sensitive to tissue acidosis, which may complement the commonly used perfusion and diffusion scans for characterizing heterogeneous ischemic tissue damage. Whereas the saturation transfer asymmetry analysis (MTRasym) may reasonably compensate for direct RF saturation, in vivo MTRasym is however, susceptible to an intrinsically asymmetric shift (MTR'asym). Specifically, the reference scan for the endogenous APT MRI is 7 ppm upfield from that of the label scan, and subjects to concomitant RF irradiation effects, including nuclear overhauser effect (NOE)-mediated saturation transfer and semisolid macromolecular magnetization transfer. As such, the commonly used asymmetry analysis could not fully compensate for such slightly asymmetric concomitant RF irradiation effects, and MTRasym has to be delineated in order to properly characterize the pH-weighted APT MRI contrast. Given that there is very little change in relaxation time immediately after ischemia and the concomitant RF irradiation effects only minimally depends on pH, the APT contrast can be obtained as the difference of MTRasym between the normal and ischemic regions. Thereby, the endogenous amide proton concentration and exchange rate can be solved using a dual 2-pool model, and the in vivo MTR'asym can be calculated by subtracting the solved APT contrast from asymmetry analysis (i.e., MTR'asym =MTRasym-APTR). In addition, MTR'asym can be quantified using the classical 2-pool exchange model. In sum, our study delineated the conventional in vivo pH-sensitive MTRasym contrast so that pHspecific contrast can be obtained for imaging ischemic tissue acidosis.

  19. Conversion and evaluation of the THOR reactor core to TRIGA fuel elements

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.-H.; Shiau, L.-C.

    1990-07-01

    The THOR reactor is a pool type 1 MW research reactor and has been operated since 1961. The original MTR fuel elements have been gradually replaced by TRIGA fuel elements since 1977 and the conversion completed in 1987. The calculations were performed for various core configurations by using computer codes, WIMS/CITATION. The computing results have been evaluated and compared with the core measurements after the fuel conversion. The analysis results are in good correspondence with the measurements. (author)

  20. The use of WIMS-ANL lumped fission product cross sections for burned core analysis with the MCNP Monte Carlo code.

    SciTech Connect

    Hanan, N. A.

    1998-10-14

    Most Monte Carlo neutronics analyses are performed for fresh cores. To model snapshots of the cores at different stages during burnup using MCNP, a method is presented that uses lumped fission product (LFP) cross sections generated by the WIMS-ANL code and processed for use in MCNP. Results of analyses for four very different reactor cores using MTR-type and Russian-designed fuel assemblies, with LEU and HEU fuels, are provided to demonstrate the use of this method.

  1. Cerebral maturation in the early preterm period-A magnetization transfer and diffusion tensor imaging study using voxel-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Nossin-Manor, Revital; Card, Dallas; Raybaud, Charles; Taylor, Margot J; Sled, John G

    2015-05-15

    The magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) correlates of early brain development were examined in cohort of 18 very preterm neonates (27-31 gestational weeks) presenting with normal radiological findings scanned within 2weeks after birth (28-32 gestational weeks). A combination of non-linear image registration, tissue segmentation, and voxel-wise regression was used to map the age dependent changes in MTR and DTI-derived parameters in 3D across the brain based on the cross-sectional in vivo preterm data. The regression coefficient maps obtained differed between brain regions and between the different quantitative MRI indices. Significant linear increases as well as decreases in MTR and DTI-derived parameters were observed throughout the preterm brain. In particular, the lamination pattern in the cerebral wall was evident on parametric and regression coefficient maps. The frontal white matter area (subplate and intermediate zone) demonstrated a linear decrease in MTR. While the intermediate zone showed an unexpected decrease in fractional anisotropy (FA) with age, with this decrease (and the increase in mean diffusivity (MD)) driven primarily by an increase in radial diffusivity (RD) values, the subplate showed no change in FA (and an increase in MD). The latter was the result of a concomitant similar increase in axial diffusivity (AD) and RD values. Interpreting the in vivo results in terms of available histological data, we present a biophysical model that describes the relation between various microstructural changes measured by complementary quantitative methods available on clinical scanners and a range of maturational processes in brain tissue. PMID:25731990

  2. Prenatal alcohol exposure alters methyl metabolism and programs serotonin transporter and glucocorticoid receptor expression in brain.

    PubMed

    Ngai, Ying Fai; Sulistyoningrum, Dian C; O'Neill, Ryan; Innis, Sheila M; Weinberg, Joanne; Devlin, Angela M

    2015-09-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) programs the fetal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, resulting in HPA dysregulation and hyperresponsiveness to stressors in adulthood. Molecular mechanisms mediating these alterations are not fully understood. Disturbances in one-carbon metabolism, a source of methyl donors for epigenetic processes, contributes to alcoholic liver disease. We assessed whether PAE affects one-carbon metabolism (including Mtr, Mat2a, Mthfr, and Cbs mRNA) and programming of HPA function genes (Nr3c1, Nr3c2, and Slc6a4) in offspring from ethanol-fed (E), pair-fed (PF), and ad libitum-fed control (C) dams. At gestation day 21, plasma total homocysteine and methionine concentrations were higher in E compared with C dams, and E fetuses had higher plasma methionine concentrations and lower whole brain Mtr and Mat2a mRNA compared with C fetuses. In adulthood (55 days), hippocampal Mtr and Cbs mRNA was lower in E compared with C males, whereas Mtr, Mat2a, Mthfr, and Cbs mRNA were higher in E compared with C females. We found lower Nr3c1 mRNA and lower nerve growth factor inducible protein A (NGFI-A) protein in the hippocampus of E compared with PF females, whereas hippocampal Slc6a4 mRNA was higher in E than C males. By contrast, hypothalamic Slc6a4 mRNA was lower in E males and females compared with C offspring. This was accompanied by higher hypothalamic Slc6a4 mean promoter methylation in E compared with PF females. These findings demonstrate that PAE is associated with alterations in one-carbon metabolism and has long-term and region-specific effects on gene expression in the brain. These findings advance our understanding of mechanisms of HPA dysregulation associated with PAE. PMID:26180184

  3. Interaction between methionine synthase isoforms and MMACHC: characterization in cblG-variant, cblG and cblC inherited causes of megaloblastic anaemia.

    PubMed

    Fofou-Caillierez, Ma'atem B; Mrabet, Nadir T; Chéry, Céline; Dreumont, Natacha; Flayac, Justine; Pupavac, Mihaela; Paoli, Justine; Alberto, Jean-Marc; Coelho, David; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Feillet, François; Watkins, David; Fowler, Brian; Rosenblatt, David S; Guéant, Jean-Louis

    2013-11-15

    The cblG and cblC disorders of cobalamin (Cbl) metabolism are two inherited causes of megaloblastic anaemia. In cblG, mutations in methionine synthase (MTR) decrease conversion of hydroxocobalamin  (HOCbl) to methylcobalamin, while in cblC, mutations in MMACHC disrupt formation of cob(II)alamin (detected as HOCbl). Cases with undetectable methionine synthase (MS) activity are extremely rare and classified as 'cblG-variant'. In four 'cblG-variant' cases, we observed a decreased conversion of cyanocobalamin to HOCbl that is also seen in cblC cases. To explore this observation, we studied the gene defects, splicing products and expression of MS, as well as MS/MMACHC protein interactions in cblG-variant, cblG, cblC and control fibroblasts. We observed a full-size MS encoded by MTR-001 and a 124 kDa truncated MS encoded by MTR-201 in cblG, cblC, control fibroblasts and HEK cells, but only the MTR-201 transcript and inactive truncated MS in cblG-variant cells. Co-immunoprecipitation and proximity ligation assay showed interaction between truncated MS and MMACHC in cblG-variant cells. This interaction decreased 2.2, 1.5 and 5.0-fold in the proximity ligation assay of cblC cells with p.R161Q and p.R206W mutations, and HEK cells with knock down expression of MS by siRNA, respectively, when compared with control cells. In 3D modelling and docking analysis, both truncated and full-size MS provide a loop anchored to MMACHC, which makes contacts with R-161 and R-206 residues. Our data suggest that the interaction of MS with MMACHC may play a role in the regulation of the cellular processing of Cbls that is required for Cbl cofactor synthesis. PMID:23825108

  4. Low-dose cisplatin converts the tumor microenvironment into a permissive state for HSVtk-induced antitumor immunity in HPV16-related tonsillar carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Goh, Ah Ra; Shin, Seung-Pil; Jung, Na-Rae; Ryu, Chang-Hwan; Eom, Hyeon Seok; Lee, John H; Choi, Kyungho; Lee, Sang-Jin; Jung, Yuh-S

    2015-01-28

    An adenovirus harboring the HSV thymidine kinase (HSVtk) gene under the regulation of a trans-splicing ribozyme that targets telomerase is cytotoxic to cancer cells because it inhibits DNA replication (Ad5mTR). Furthermore, it induces anti-tumor immunity by activating cytotoxic T cells. Because multiple chemotherapeutic agents also activate cytotoxic T-cell immunity during the direct killing process of tumor cells, we herein explored whether low-dose cisplatin could synergize with cytotoxic Ad5mTR to potentiate its therapeutic effect by boosting anti-tumor immunity in a murine HPV16-associated tonsillar carcinoma model. Tumor regression was enhanced when low-dose (1?mg/kg) cisplatin was added to suicide gene therapy using Ad5mTR. Meanwhile, 1?mg/kg cisplatin alone had no tumor-suppressive effects and did not result in any systemic toxicity. Thus, cisplatin along with Ad5mTR improved tumor clearance by increasing the number of E7-specific CD8+ T cells. Specifically, analysis of the tumors and lymph nodes supported improved immune clearance by increasing the number of E7-specific CD8+ T cells inside tumors (40%, P?

  5. Electron Flow in Multiheme Bacterial Cytochromes is a Balancing Act Between Heme Electronic Interaction and Redox Potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Breuer, Marian; Rosso, Kevin M.; Blumberger, Jochen

    2014-01-14

    The naturally widespread process of electron transfer from metal reducing bacteria to extracellular solid metal oxides entails unique biomolecular machinery optimized for long-range electron transport. To perform this function efficiently microorganisms have adapted multi-heme c-type cytochromes to arrange heme cofactors into wires that cooperatively span the cellular envelope, transmitting electrons along distances greater than 100 Angstroms. Implications and opportunities for bionanotechnological device design are self-evident. However, at the molecular level how these proteins shuttle electrons along their heme wires, navigating intraprotein intersections and interprotein interfaces effciently, remains a mystery so far inaccessible to experiment. To shed light on this critical topic, we carried out extensive computer simulations to calculate Marcus theory quantities for electron transfer along the ten heme cofactors in the recently crystallized outer membrane cytochrome MtrF. The combination of electronic coupling matrix elements with free energy calculations of heme redox potentials and reorganization energies for heme-to-heme electron transfer allows the step-wise and overall electron transfer rate to be estimated and understood in terms of structural and dynamical characteristics of the protein. By solving a master equation for electron hopping, we estimate an intrinsic, maximum possible electron flux through solvated MtrF of 104-105 s-1, consistent with recently measured rates for the related MtrCAB protein complex. Intriguingly, this flux must navigate thermodynamically uphill steps past low potential hemes. Our calculations show that the rapid electron transport through MtrF is the result of a clear correlation between heme redox potential and the strength of electronic coupling along the wire: Thermodynamically uphill steps occur only between electronically well connected stacked heme pairs. This suggests that the protein evolved to harbor low potential hemes, presumably necessary for reduction of certain soluble substrates, without slowing down electron ow. These findings are particularly profound in light of the apparently well conserved staggered cross heme wire structural motif in functionally related outer-membrane proteins.

  6. Identification and Characterization of UndA-HRCR-6, an Outer Membrane Endecaheme c-Type Cytochrome of Shewanella sp. Strain HRCR-6

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Belchik, Sara M.; Wang, Zheming; Kennedy, David W.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Marshall, Matthew J.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2011-08-01

    The outer membrane decaheme c-type cytochromes (c-Cyt) MtrC and OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1(MR-1) play critical roles in extracellular reduction of iron [Fe(III)] oxides and uranium [ U(VI)]. To identify and characterize the outer membrane c-Cyts found in the metal-reducing Shewanella strains isolated from the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River (HRCR), 7 HRCR isolates were tested for the presence of mtrC, omcA and undA1 (a gene encoding a putative 11-heme c-Cyt) homologues in their genomes. All 7 tested strains possessed an mtrC homologue, while 3 strains had an omcA homologue and the remaining 4 strains contained an undA1 homologue. The coding region of an undA1 homologue from HRCR isolate 6 was cloned and sequenced. Because it was 93% identical to the UndA of S. baltica OS223, the protein product encoded by this sequenced gene was named as UndA-HRCR6. In MR-1, UndA-HRCR6 (i) restored an MR-1 mutant’s ability to reduce solid phase ferrihydrite at 40% of that for MR-1 wild type, (ii) increased extracellular formation of UO2 associated with the outer membrane and extracellular polymeric substances in a U(VI) reduction assay and (iii) was secreted to the extracellular environment by bacterial type II secretion system. UndA-HRCR6 was purified from the membrane fraction following its overexpression in MR-1 cells. Purified UndA-HRCR6 possessed 11 heme-Fe and reduced ferric complexes. Collectively, these results show that UndA-HRCR6 is an outer membrane endecaheme c-Cyt and can serve an extracellular metal reductase with functions similar to that of MR-1 MtrC and OmcA.

  7. ETR, TRA642. EASTWEST SECTION, LOOKING NORTH. PATH OF COOLING WATER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR, TRA-642. EAST-WEST SECTION, LOOKING NORTH. PATH OF COOLING WATER PIPE TUNNEL. WORKING AND STORAGE CANAL. SUB-PILE ROOM. CONTROL ROD ACCESS ROOM. FLOOR NAMES. (THIS WAS A CONCEPT DRAWING.) KAISER ETR-5528-MTR-642-A-5, 11/1955. INL INDEX NO. 532-0642-00-486-100913. REV. 0. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  8. LOW-PRESSURE MEMBRANE CONTACTORS FOR CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Richard; Kniep, Jay; Hao, Pingjiao; Chan, Chi Cheng; Nguyen, Vincent; Huang, Ivy; Amo, Karl; Freeman, Brice; Fulton, Don; Ly, Jennifer; Lipscomb, Glenn; Lou, Yuecun; Gogar, Ravikumar

    2014-09-30

    This final technical progress report describes work conducted by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) for the Department of Energy (DOE NETL) on development of low-pressure membrane contactors for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture from power plant flue gas (award number DE-FE0007553). The work was conducted from October 1, 2011 through September 30, 2014. The overall goal of this three-year project was to build and operate a prototype 500 m2 low-pressure sweep membrane module specifically designed to separate CO2 from coal-fired power plant flue gas. MTR was assisted in this project by a research group at the University of Toledo, which contributed to the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of module design and process simulation. This report details the work conducted to develop a new type of membrane contactor specifically designed for the high-gas-flow, low-pressure, countercurrent sweep operation required for affordable membrane-based CO2 capture at coal power plants. Work for this project included module development and testing, design and assembly of a large membrane module test unit at MTR, CFD comparative analysis of cross-flow, countercurrent, and novel partial-countercurrent sweep membrane module designs, CFD analysis of membrane spacers, design and fabrication of a 500 m2 membrane module skid for field tests, a detailed performance and cost analysis of the MTR CO2 capture process with low-pressure sweep modules, and a process design analysis of a membrane-hybrid separation process for CO2 removal from coal-fired flue gas. Key results for each major task are discussed in the report.

  9. GAMMA FACILITY, TRA611, INTERIOR. WITH HELP OF OVERHEAD CHAIN AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GAMMA FACILITY, TRA-611, INTERIOR. WITH HELP OF OVERHEAD CHAIN AND HOOK, SCIENTIST GUIDES METAL CONTAINER (HOLDING POTATOES, IN THIS CASE) INTO RECEIVING "COLUMN" IN THE GAMMA CANAL. NOTE OTHER COLUMNS AT RIGHT AND LEFT WALLS OF CANAL. NEAR BOTTOM OF CANAL, SPENT MTR FUEL WILL IRRADIATE POTATOES. INL NEGATIVE NO. 56-439. R.G. Larsen, Photographer, 2/8/1956 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  10. Short-Term Effects of Kinesio Taping and Cross Taping Application in the Treatment of Latent Upper Trapezius Trigger Points: A Prospective, Single-Blind, Randomized, Sham-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Halski, Tomasz; Ptaszkowski, Kuba; S?upska, Lucyna; Paprocka-Borowicz, Ma?gorzata; Dymarek, Robert; Taradaj, Jakub; Bidzi?ska, Gabriela; Marczy?ski, Daniel; Cynarska, Aleksandra; Rosi?czuk, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Kinesio taping (KT) may be a new treatment in patients with myofascial trigger points (MTrPs). A new method available for taping practitioners is cross taping (CT). The main objective was to determine how CT, KT, and medical adhesive tape (sham group) affect the subjective assessment of resting bioelectrical activity and pain of the upper trapezius muscle (UT) in patients with MTrPs. 105 volunteers were recruited to participate. The primary outcome was resting bioelectrical activity of UT muscle as assessed by surface electromyography (sEMG) in each group and pain intensity on a visual analog scale (VAS). Assessments were collected before and after intervention and after the 24-hours follow-up. No significant differences were observed in bioelectrical activity of UT between pre-, post-, and follow-up results. In three groups patients had significantly lower pain VAS score after the intervention (CT—p < 0.001, KT—p < 0.001, and sham—p < 0.01). The Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA showed no significant differences in almost all measurements between groups. The application of all three types of tapes does not influence the resting bioelectrical activity of UT muscle and may not lead to a reduction in muscle tone in the case of MTrPs. PMID:26491458

  11. Single Tablet Regimen Usage and Efficacy in the Treatment of HIV Infection in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, B.; Chan, D. J.; Stewart, M. J.; Fagan, D.; Smith, D.

    2015-01-01

    Single tablet regimens (STRs) for HIV infection improve patient satisfaction, quality of life, medication adherence, and virological suppression compared to multitablet regimens (MTRs). This is the first study assessing STR uptake and durability in Australia. This retrospective audit of all patients receiving an STR (n = 299) at a large Sydney HIV clinic (January 2012–December 2013) assessed patient demographics, treatment prior to STR, HIV RNA load and CD4 during MTR and STR dosing, and reasons for STR switch. 206 patients switched from previous antiretroviral treatment to an STR, of which 88% switched from an MTR. Reasons for switching included desire to simplify treatment (57%), reduced side effects or toxicity (18%), and cost-saving for the patient. There was no switching for virological failure. Compared to when on an MTR, patients switching to an STR had significantly lower HIV RNA counts (p < 0.001) and significantly higher CD4 counts (p < 0.001). The discontinuation rate from STR was very low and all patients who switched to an STR maintained virological suppression throughout the study duration, although the study is limited by the absence of a control group. PMID:26550490

  12. Preliminary structural studies on the MtxX protein from Methanococcus jannaschii

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Dong Hae

    2008-01-01

    Methanococcus jannaschii has an mtr gene cluster expressing N 5-methyltetra­hydromethanopterin:coenzyme M methyltransferase, which generates methane by reducing CO2 with H2 with concomitant energy production under strictly anaerobic conditions. Some methanogenic archaea also have an mtr gene-cluster homologue, the mtxXAH gene cluster. M. jannaschii has both an entire mtr gene cluster and a single mtxX gene instead of the whole mtxXAH gene cluster. A PSI-BLAST search, secondary-structure prediction and the absence of phosphotransacetylase activity in M. jannaschii strongly support the possibility that the MtxX protein constitutes a unique methyltransferase family. In this study, the MtxX protein from M. jannaschii has been cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized. Synchrotron data were collected to 2.9?Å from a crystal of selenomethionine-substituted MtxX protein. The crystal belonged to the primitive hexagonal space group P6122, with unit-cell parameters a = 54.9, b = 54.9, c = 341.1?Å, ? = 120.0°. A full structure determination is under way in order to provide insight into the structure–function relationship of this protein. PMID:18391432

  13. Action of repeat-induced point mutation on both strands of a duplex and on tandem duplications of various sizes in Neurospora.

    PubMed Central

    Watters, M K; Randall, T A; Margolin, B S; Selker, E U; Stadler, D R

    1999-01-01

    In Neurospora crassa, DNA sequence duplications are detected and altered efficiently during the sexual cycle by a process known as RIP (repeat-induced point mutation). Affected sequences are subjected to multiple GC-to-AT mutations. To explore the pattern in which base changes are laid down by RIP we examined two sets of strains. First, we examined the products of a presumptive spontaneous RIP event at the mtr locus. Results of sequencing suggested that a single RIP event produces two distinct patterns of change, descended from the two strands of an affected DNA duplex. Equivalent results were obtained using an exceptional tetrad from a cross with a known duplication flanking the zeta-eta (zeta-eta) locus. The mtr sequence data were also used to further examine the basis for the differential severity of C-to-T mutations on the coding and noncoding strands in genes. The known bias of RIP toward CpA/TpG sites in conjunction with the sequence bias of Neurospora accounts for the differential effect. Finally, we used a collection of tandem repeats (from 16 to 935 bp in length) within the mtr gene to examine the length requirement for RIP. No evidence of RIP was found with duplications shorter than 400 bp while all longer tandem duplications were frequently affected. A comparison of these results with vegetative reversion data for the same duplications is consistent with the idea that reversion of long tandem duplications and RIP share a common step. PMID:10511550

  14. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEPERATE NITROGEN FROM NATURAL GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Kaaeid Lokhandwala

    2004-01-30

    The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global. MTR will be working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group has found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant. The plant produces about 1 MMscfd of gas containing 24% nitrogen. The membrane unit will bring this gas to 4% nitrogen for delivery to the pipeline. The membrane skid is being built by ABB. NTE has ordered the required compressor and MTR is making the membrane modules. System fabrication was completed in January 2004 and the membrane inserts were loaded. Additional pressure testing and verification will be completed prior to shipment, which is expected in early February 2004.

  15. Brain region white matter associations with visual selective attention.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Christie Burger; Jones, Kelly E; Shera, David; Armstrong, Carol L

    2011-12-01

    To understand how normal variations in white matter relate to cognition, magnetization transfer imaging ratios (MTR) of a hypothesized neural network were associated with a test of visual selective attention (VST). Healthy adults (N?=?16) without abnormal signal on brain scans viewed a version of DeSchepper and Treisman's test of VST (1996) with two levels of processing (novel shape matching with and without distractors, contingency feedback). A hypothesized neural network and component regions was significantly associated with accuracy and response times when distractors were present, with betas predicting 55% of variance in accuracy, and 59% of response times. MTR for anterior and posterior cingulate, prefrontal region, and thalami comprised a model predicting 55% of accuracy when distractors were present, and the anterior cingulate accounted for the majority of this effect. Prefrontal MTR predicted longer response times which was associated with increased accuracy. Distal neural areas involved in complex, processing-driven tasks (error processing, response selection, and variable response competition and processing load) may be dependent on white matter fibers to connect distal brain regions/nuclei of a macronetwork, including prefrontal executive functions. PMID:21720733

  16. Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Separate Nitrogen from Natural Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Kaaeid Lokhandwala

    2007-03-31

    The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR is working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant, which met with limited success. MTR then located an alternative testing opportunity and signed a contract with Towne Exploration in the third quarter of 2006, for a demonstration plant in Rio Vista, CA, to be run through May 2007. The demonstration for Towne has already resulted in the sale of two commercial skids to the company; the units will be delivered in mid-2007. Total sales of nitrogen/natural gas membrane separation units from the partnership with ABB are now approaching $4.0 million.

  17. Altered white matter connectivity in never-medicated patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Mandl, René C W; Rais, Monica; van Baal, Gertrudis Caroline M; van Haren, Neeltje E M; Cahn, Wiepke; Kahn, René S; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E

    2013-09-01

    Numerous diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies have implicated white matter brain tissue abnormalities in schizophrenia. However, the vast majority of these studies included patient populations that use antipsychotic medication. Previous research showed that medication intake can affect brain morphology and the question therefore arises to what extent the reported white matter aberrations can be attributed to the disease rather than to the use of medication. In this study we included 16 medication-naïve patients with schizophrenia and compared them to 23 healthy controls to exclude antipsychotic medication use as a confounding factor. For each subject DTI scans and magnetization transfer imaging (MTI) scans were acquired. A new tract-based analysis was used that combines fractional anisoptropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD) and magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) to examine group differences in 12 major white matter fiber bundles. Significant group differences in combined FA, MD, MTR values were found for the right uncinate fasciculus and the left arcuate fasciculus. Additional analysis revealed that the largest part of both tracts showed an increase in MTR in combination with an increase in MD for patients with schizophrenia. We interpret these group-related differences as disease-related axonal or glial aberrations that cannot be attributed to antipsychotic medication use. PMID:22461372

  18. The Kinesio Taping Method for Myofascial Pain Control

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei-Ting; Hong, Chang-Zern; Chou, Li-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Many people continue suffering from myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) defined as a regional pain syndrome characterized by muscle pain caused by myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) clinically. Muscle spasm and block of blood circulation can be noticed in the taut bands. In the MTrP region, nociceptors can be sensitized by the peripheral inflammatory factors and contracture of fascia can also be induced. Traditional treatments of MPS include stretching therapy, thermal treatment, electrical stimulation, massage, manipulation, trigger points injection, acupuncture, and medicine. However, the pain syndrome may not be relieved even under multiple therapies. Recently, the Kinesio Taping (KT) method is popularly used in sports injuries, postoperative complications, and various pain problems, but little research is focused on MPS with KT method. In this paper, we review the research studies on the application to KT in treating MPS and other related issues. It appears that the KT application can elevate the subcutaneous space and then increase the blood circulation and lymph fluid drainage to reduce the chemical factors around the MTrP region. Therefore, it is suggested that KT method can be used as a regular treatment or added to the previous treatment for myofascial pain. PMID:26185522

  19. Preliminary structural studies on the MtxX protein from Methanococcus jannaschii

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Dong Hae

    2008-04-01

    In this study, the MtxX protein from M. jannaschii has been cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized. Methanococcus jannaschii has an mtr gene cluster expressing N{sup 5}-methyltetrahydromethanopterin:coenzyme M methyltransferase, which generates methane by reducing CO{sub 2} with H{sub 2} with concomitant energy production under strictly anaerobic conditions. Some methanogenic archaea also have an mtr gene-cluster homologue, the mtxXAH gene cluster. M. jannaschii has both an entire mtr gene cluster and a single mtxX gene instead of the whole mtxXAH gene cluster. A PSI-BLAST search, secondary-structure prediction and the absence of phosphotransacetylase activity in M. jannaschii strongly support the possibility that the MtxX protein constitutes a unique methyltransferase family. In this study, the MtxX protein from M. jannaschii has been cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized. Synchrotron data were collected to 2.9 Å from a crystal of selenomethionine-substituted MtxX protein. The crystal belonged to the primitive hexagonal space group P6{sub 1}22, with unit-cell parameters a = 54.9, b = 54.9, c = 341.1 Å, ? = 120.0°. A full structure determination is under way in order to provide insight into the structure–function relationship of this protein.

  20. The Crystal Structure of the Extracellular 11-heme Cytochrome UndA Reveals a Conserved 10-heme Motif and Defined Binding Site for Soluble Iron Chelates.

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Marcus; Hall, Andrea; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David; Clarke, Thomas A.

    2012-07-03

    Members of the genus Shewanella translocate deca- or undeca-heme cytochromes to the external cell surface thus enabling respiration using extracellular minerals and polynuclear Fe(III) chelates. The high resolution structure of the first undeca-heme outer membrane cytochrome, UndA, reveals a crossed heme chain with four potential electron ingress/egress sites arranged within four domains. Sequence and structural alignment of UndA and the deca-heme MtrF reveals the extra heme of UndA is inserted between MtrF hemes 6 and 7. The remaining UndA hemes can be superposed over the heme chain of the decaheme MtrF, suggesting that a ten heme core is conserved between outer membrane cytochromes. The UndA structure is the first outer membrane cytochrome to be crystallographically resolved in complex with substrates, an Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetate dimer or an Fe(III)-citrate trimer. The structural resolution of these UndA-Fe(III)-chelate complexes provides a rationale for previous kinetic measurements on UndA and other outer membrane cytochromes.

  1. HAMLET -Human Model MATROSHKA for Radiation Exposure Determination of Astronauts -Current status and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitz, Guenther; Berger, Thomas; Bilski, Pawel; Burmeister, Soenke; Labrenz, Johannes; Hager, Luke; Palfalvi, Jozsef K.; Hajek, Michael; Puchalska, Monika; Sihver, Lembit

    The exploration of space as seen in specific projects from the European Space Agency (ESA) acts as groundwork for human long duration space missions. One of the main constraints for long duration human missions is radiation. The radiation load on astronauts and cosmonauts in space (as for the ISS) is a factor of 100 higher than the natural radiation on Earth and will further increase should humans travel to Mars. In preparation for long duration space missions it is important to evaluate the impact of space radiation in order to secure the safety of the astronauts and minimize their radiation risks. To determine the radiation risk on humans one has to measure the radiation doses to radiosensitive organs within the human body. One way to approach this is the ESA facility MATROSHKA (MTR), under the scientific and project lead of DLR. It is dedicated to determining the radiation load on astronauts within and outside the International Space Station (ISS), and was launched in January 2004. MTR is currently preparing for its fourth experimental phase inside the Japanese Experimental Module (JEM) in summer 2010. MTR, which mimics a human head and torso, is an anthropomorphic phantom containing over 6000 radiation detectors to determine the depth dose and organ dose distribution in the body. It is the largest international research initiative ever performed in the field of space dosimetry and combines the expertise of leading research institutions around the world, thereby generating a huge pool of data of potentially immense value for research. Aiming at optimal scientific exploitation, the FP7 project HAMLET aims to process and compile the data acquired individually by the participating laboratories of the MATROSHKA experiment. Based on experimental input from the MATROSHKA experiment phases as well as on radiation transport calculations, a three-dimensional model for the distribution of radiation dose in an astronaut's body will be built up. The scientific achievements contribute essentially to radiation risk estimations for future interplanetary space exploration by humans, putting them on a solid experimental and theoretical basis. The talk will give an overview of the current status of the MATROSHKA data evaluation and results and comparisons of the first three MTR experimental phases (MTR-1, 2A and 2B). The HAMLET project is funded by the European Commission under the EUs Seventh Frame-work Programme (FP7) under Project Nr: 218817 and coordinated by the German Aerospace Center (DLR) http://www-fp7-hamlet.eu

  2. Identification and Characterization of MtoA: A Decaheme c-Type Cytochrome of the Neutrophilic Fe(II)-Oxidizing Bacterium Sideroxydans lithotrophicus ES-1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Juan; Wang, Zheming; Belchik, Sara M.; Edwards, Marcus J.; Liu, Chongxuan; Kennedy, David W.; Merkley, Eric D.; Lipton, Mary S.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David J.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, James K.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Shi, Liang

    2012-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Sideroxydans lithotrophicus ES-1 (ES-1) grows on FeCO3 or FeS at oxic–anoxic interfaces at circumneutral pH, and the ES-1-mediated Fe(II) oxidation occurs extracellularly. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying ES-1’s ability to oxidize Fe(II) remain unknown. Survey of the ES-1 genome for candidate genes for microbial extracellular Fe(II) oxidation revealed that it contained a three-gene cluster encoding homologs of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (MR-1) MtrA, MtrB, and CymA that are involved in extracellular Fe(III) reduction. Homologs of MtrA and MtrB were also previously shown to be involved in extracellular Fe(II) oxidation by Rhodopseudomonas palustris TIE-1. To distinguish them from those found in MR-1, the identified homologs were named MtoAB and CymAES-1. Cloned mtoA partially complemented an MR-1 mutant without MtrA with regards to ferrihydrite reduction. Characterization of purified MtoA showed that it was a decaheme c-type cytochrome and oxidized soluble Fe(II). Oxidation of Fe(II) by MtoA was pH- and Fe(II)-complexing ligand-dependent. Under conditions tested, MtoA oxidized Fe(II) from pH 7 to pH 9 with the optimal rate at pH 9. MtoA oxidized Fe(II) complexed with different ligands at different rates. The reaction rates followed the order Fe(II)Cl2?>? Fe(II)–citrate?>?Fe(II)–NTA?>?Fe(II)–EDTA with the second-order rate constants ranging from 6.3?×?10?3??M?1?s?1 for oxidation of Fe(II)Cl2 to 1.0?×?10?3??M?1?s?1 for oxidation of Fe(II)–EDTA. Thermodynamic modeling showed that redox reaction rates for the different Fe(II)-complexes correlated with their respective estimated reaction-free energies. Collectively, these results demonstrate that MtoA is a functional Fe(II)-oxidizing protein that, by working in concert with MtoB and CymAES-1, may oxidize Fe(II) at the bacterial surface and transfer released electrons across the bacterial cell envelope to the quinone pool in the inner membrane during extracellular Fe(II) oxidation by ES-1. PMID:22347878

  3. PROTECTIVE CLOTHING BASED ON PERMSELECTIVE MEMBRANE AND CARBON ADSORPTION

    SciTech Connect

    J.G. Wijmans; J.O. Stull

    2001-11-07

    The goal of this project was to develop chemical protective clothing for use by DOE decontamination and decommissioning workers that is sufficiently water vapor permeable to keep the workers cool, thereby enhancing their productivity. This report describes the results of Phase II of a two-phase project to complete development of the novel permselective material and to test protective clothing made from the fabric. In Phase I a novel material incorporating a nonporous hydrophilic polyvinylacohol (PVA) layer, which is water vapor permeable but relatively impermeable to organic vapors, was developed. The results of the Phase I tests showed that the chemical resistance of the MTR material is comparable to that of Saranex/Tyvek materials, and that the comfort properties are closer to those of Tyvek (as measured in terms of CLO and permeability). Chemical resistance was measured using permeation tests against liquid dichloromethane. Comfort properties were ascertained by measuring the water vapor transmission of the material and by sweating manikin tests on whole protective suits. In addition, a cost/benefit analysis demonstrated that use of MTR's material technology could result in significant improvements in work productivity and cost savings if protective clothing items made from the new material were used more than once. In Phase II, MTR undertook a program to optimize the performance and production engineering for the new material technology. A partnership was formed with Kimberly-Clark Corporation to assist with a detailed evaluation of the MTR technology, and MTR used the services of Mr. Jeff Stull, President of the consulting firm International Personnel Protection, Inc., who conducted a detailed economic and application analysis for the developed fabric. The protective fabric manufacturing steps were simplified significantly, resulting in a 30% reduction in manufacturing costs and eliminating the necessity for capital investment in production equipment. Protective suits were prepared in collaboration with Kimberly-Clark Corporation and heat stress testing with human test subjects was carried out by the International Union of Operating Engineers (IUOE). The tests confirmed that the MTR protective fabric is significantly more comfortable than non-breathable materials. A cost analysis was developed from the properties of the optimized protective fabric and the results of the of the IUOE field study to determine the potential for the MTR material technology within the chemical protective clothing market. A detailed assessment of the specific chemical protective clothing applications for which the material can be used and its competitiveness with existing material technology, based both on expected performance and material/end item costs, was prepared. Three specific market opportunities identified for the novel protective fabric are: (1) liquid splash protective clothing for hazardous waste site operations, (2) liquid splash protective clothing for emergency response, and (3) Class 3 NFPA 1994-compliant protective clothing for civilian use during chemical terrorism incidents.

  4. High Incidence of ACE/PAI-1 in Association to a Spectrum of Other Polymorphic Cardiovascular Genes Involving PBMCs Proinflammatory Cytokines in Hypertensive Hypercholesterolemic Patients: Reversibility with a Combination of ACE Inhibitor and Statin

    PubMed Central

    Mouawad, Charbel; Haddad, Katia; Hamoui, Samar; Azar, Albert; Fajloun, Ziad; Makdissy, Nehman

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are significantly high in the Lebanese population with the two most predominant forms being atherosclerosis and venous thrombosis. The purpose of our study was to assess the association of a spectrum of CVD related genes and combined state of hypertension hypercholesterolemia (HH) in unrelated Lebanese. Twelve polymorphisms were studied by multiplex PCR and reverse hybridization of DNA from 171 healthy individuals and 144 HH subjects. Two genes were significantly associated with HH: ACE (OR: 9.20, P<0.0001) and PAI-1 (OR: 2.29, P = 0.007), respectively with the occurrence of the risky alleles “Del” and “4G”. The frequencies of the Del and 4G alleles were found to be 0.98 and 0.90 in the HH group versus 0.84 and 0.79 in the healthy group, respectively. Serum ACE activity and PAI-I increased significantly with Del/Del and 4G/5G genotypes. The co-expression of Del/4G(+/+) was detected in 113 out of 171 (66.0%) controls and 125 out of 144 (86.8%) HH subjects. Del/4G(-/-) was detected in only 6 (3.5%) controls and undetected in the HH group. Three venous thrombosis related genes [FV(Leiden), MTHFR(A1298C) and FXIII(V34L)] were significantly related to the prominence of the co-expression of Del/4G(+/+). A range of 2 to 8 combined polymorphisms co-expressed per subject where 5 mutations were the most detected. In Del/4G(+/+) subjects, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) produced significant elevated levels of IFN-? and TNF-? contrary to IL-10, and no variations occurred for IL-4. ACE inhibitor (ramipril) in combination with statin (atorvastatin) and not alone reversed significantly the situation. This first report from Lebanon sheds light on an additional genetic predisposition of a complex spectrum of genes involved in CVD and suggests that the most requested gene FVL by physicians may not be sufficient to diagnose eventual future problems that can occur in the cardiovascular system. Subjects expressing the double mutations (Del/4G) are at high risk for the onset of CVDs. PMID:25973747

  5. Age and Geochemical Data From the Madeira-Tore Rise and Surrounding Seamounts: New Insights Into East Atlantic Volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geldmacher, J.; Hoernle, K. A.; Kluegel, A.; van den Bogaard, P.

    2003-12-01

    Located off the NW African continental margin is a >3000 km long belt of volcanic archipelagoes (e.g. Canary, Madeira Islands) and large seamounts including the 900 km long Madeira-Tore Rise (MTR). The cause of the East Atlantic volcanism, and in particular the origin and age of the MTR, which is composed of a widespread plateau with several seamount groups, is controversial. Proposed models include an origin of the MTR at the Mid Atlantic Ridge, formation over a hotspot, or as a product of diffuse small-scale mantle convection. All recently dredged volcanic samples (RV Meteor cruise M51/1) from the MTR and nearby off-rise seamounts exhibit enriched Ocean Island Basalt-like incompatible trace element signatures similar to HIMU (high time integrated 238U/204Pb) ocean islands. Their isotope compositions are similar to those from Madeira with 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd overlapping Atlantic N-MORB to a large extent, but Pb isotope ratios plotting well below the Northern Hemisphere Reference Line and extending to 206Pb/204Pb values of 19.90. Our preliminary data confirm the existence of at least two distinct isotopic domains in the eastern North Atlantic: 1) a Madeira-like domain (as characterized above) stretching from Madeira Island along the MTR to the NE as far as the Azores Gibraltar fracture zone, and 2) a Canary-like domain with Sr, Nd, Pb isotope ratios intermediate between N-MORB and HIMU (206Pb/204Pb = 19.0-20.2; 207Pb/204Pb = 15.54-15.66) but with lower 143Nd/144Nd ratios (<0.5130) than the Madeira domain. We interpret the distinct compositions of these domains to reflect spatial zonation in the deeper sources of the mantle upwellings. The domains include zones influenced by Enriched Mantle (EM) I and II, which appear to be orientated along the extension of the Oceanographer (at ˜ 34° N) and the Azores-Gibraltar fracture zones (at ˜ 37° N), respectively. The first zone includes a hitherto unknown seamount that exhibits the most extreme EM I composition yet discovered in the North Atlantic (206Pb/204Pb = 17.72, 143Nd/144Nd = 0.5124). If the association with the fracture zones can be confirmed, a shallow source for the EM I and II signatures can be assumed. One explanation would be that splinters of subcontinental lithosphere or continental crust have been incorporated into the oceanic upper mantle during the break up of Pangaea and subsequently trapped along the fracture zones. 40Ar/39Ar age determinations on MTR lavas and off-rise seamounts (currently underway) will help in constructing a geodynamic model for the East Atlantic volcanism.

  6. Simulations of MATROSHKA experiments at ISS using PHITS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchalska, Monika; Sihver, L.; Sato, T.; Berger, T.; Reitz, G.

    Concerns about the biological effects of space radiation are increasing rapidly due to the per-spective of long-duration manned missions, both in relation to the International Space Station (ISS) and to manned interplanetary missions to Moon and Mars in the future. As a prepara-tion for these long duration space missions it is important to ensure an excellent capability to evaluate the impact of space radiation on human health in order to secure the safety of the astronauts/cosmonauts and minimize their risks. It is therefore necessary to measure the radi-ation load on the personnel both inside and outside the space vehicles and certify that organ and tissue equivalent doses can be simulated as accurate as possible. In this paper we will present simulations using the three-dimensional Monte Carlo Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System (PHITS) of long term dose measurements performed with the ESA supported ex-periment MATROSHKA (MTR), which is an anthropomorphic phantom containing over 6000 radiation detectors, mimicking a human head and torso. The MTR experiment, led by the German Aerospace Center (DLR), was launched in January 2004 and has measured the ab-sorbed dose from space radiation both inside and outside the ISS. In this paper preliminary comparisons of measured and calculated dose and organ doses in the MTR located outside the ISS will be presented. The results confirm previous calculations and measurements which indicate that PHITS is a suitable tool for estimations of dose received from cosmic radiation and when performing shielding design studies of spacecraft. Acknowledgement: The research leading to these results has received funding from the Euro-pean Commission in the frame of the FP7 HAMLET project (Project 218817).

  7. Testing of a Transport Cask for Research Reactor Spent Fuel - 13003

    SciTech Connect

    Mourao, Rogerio P.; Leite da Silva, Luiz; Miranda, Carlos A.; Mattar Neto, Miguel; Quintana, Jose F.A.; Saliba, Roberto O.; Novara, Oscar E.

    2013-07-01

    Since the beginning of the last decade three Latin American countries that operate research reactors - Argentina, Brazil and Chile - have been joining efforts to improve the regional capability in the management of spent fuel elements from the TRIGA and MTR reactors operated in the region. A main drive in this initiative, sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency, is the fact that no definite solution regarding the back end of the research reactor fuel cycle has been taken by any of the participating country. However, any long-term solution - either disposition in a repository or storage away from reactor - will involve at some stage the transportation of the spent fuel through public roads. Therefore, a licensed cask that provides adequate shielding, assurance of subcriticality, and conformance to internationally accepted safety, security and safeguards regimes is considered a strategic part of any future solution to be adopted at a regional level. As a step in this direction, a packaging for the transport of irradiated fuel for MTR and TRIGA research reactors was designed by the tri-national team and a half-scale model equipped with the MTR version of the internal basket was constructed in Argentina and Brazil and tested in Brazil. Three test campaigns have been carried out so far, covering both normal conditions of transportation and hypothetical accident conditions. After failing the tests in the first two test series, the specimen successfully underwent the last test sequence. A second specimen, incorporating the structural improvements in view of the previous tests results, will be tested in the near future. Numerical simulations of the free drop and thermal tests are being carried out in parallel, in order to validate the computational modeling that is going to be used as a support for the package certification. (authors)

  8. Multi-Parametric Spinal Cord MRI as Potential Progression Marker in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    El Mendili, Mohamed-Mounir; Cohen-Adad, Julien; Pelegrini-Issac, Mélanie; Rossignol, Serge; Morizot-Koutlidis, Régine; Marchand-Pauvert, Véronique; Iglesias, Caroline; Sangari, Sina; Katz, Rose; Lehericy, Stéphane; Benali, Habib; Pradat, Pierre-François

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate multimodal MRI of the spinal cord in predicting disease progression and one-year clinical status in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. Materials and Methods After a first MRI (MRI1), 29 ALS patients were clinically followed during 12 months; 14/29 patients underwent a second MRI (MRI2) at 11±3 months. Cross-sectional area (CSA) that has been shown to be a marker of lower motor neuron degeneration was measured in cervical and upper thoracic spinal cord from T2-weighted images. Fractional anisotropy (FA), axial/radial/mean diffusivities (??, ?//, MD) and magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) were measured within the lateral corticospinal tract in the cervical region. Imaging metrics were compared with clinical scales: Revised ALS Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS-R) and manual muscle testing (MMT) score. Results At MRI1, CSA correlated significantly (P<0.05) with MMT and arm ALSFRS-R scores. FA correlated significantly with leg ALFSRS-R scores. One year after MRI1, CSA predicted (P<0.01) arm ALSFSR-R subscore and FA predicted (P<0.01) leg ALSFRS-R subscore. From MRI1 to MRI2, significant changes (P<0.01) were detected for CSA and MTR. CSA rate of change (i.e. atrophy) highly correlated (P<0.01) with arm ALSFRS-R and arm MMT subscores rate of change. Conclusion Atrophy and DTI metrics predicted ALS disease progression. Cord atrophy was a better biomarker of disease progression than diffusion and MTR. Our study suggests that multimodal MRI could provide surrogate markers of ALS that may help monitoring the effect of disease-modifying drugs. PMID:24755826

  9. Propagating waves transverse to the magnetic field in a solar prominence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucera, Therese; Schmieder, Brigitte; Knizhnik, Kalman; Lopez-Ariste, Arturo; Luna, Manuel; Toot, David

    2014-01-01

    We have observed a quiescent prominence with the Hinode Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) (Ca II and H? lines), Sacramento Peak Dunn Solar Telescope using the Universal Birefringent Filter (DST/UBF, in H?, H? and Sodium-D lines), THEMIS (Télescope Héliographique pour l Etude du Magnétisme et des Instabilités Solaires/MTR (Multi Raies) spectromagnetograph (He D3), and the Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA) in EUV over a 4 hour period on 2012 October 10. The small fields of view of the SOT, DST, and MTR are centered on a large prominence footpoint extending towards the surface. This feature appears in the larger field of view of the AIA/304 Å filtergram as a large, quasi-vertical pillar with loops on each side. The THEMIS/MTR data indicate that the magnetic field in the pillar is essentially horizontal and the observations in the optical domain show a large number of horizontally aligned features in the pillar. The data are consistent with a model of cool prominence plasma trapped in the dips of horizontal field lines. The SOT and DST data show what appear to be moving wave pulses. These pulses, which include a Doppler signature, move vertically, perpendicular to the field direction, along quasi-vertical columns of horizontal threads in the pillar. The pulses have a velocity of propagation of about 10 km/s, a wavelength about 2000 km in the plane of the sky, and a period about 280 sec. We interpret these waves in terms of fast magnetosonic waves.

  10. Reduced magnetisation transfer ratio in cognitively impaired patients at the very early stage of multiple sclerosis: a prospective, multicenter, cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Faiss, J H; Dähne, D; Baum, K; Deppe, R; Hoffmann, F; Köhler, W; Kunkel, A; Lux, A; Matzke, M; Penner, I K; Sailer, M; Zettl, U K

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Cognitive impairment belongs to the core symptoms in multiple sclerosis (MS) and can already be present at the very early stages of the disease. The present study evaluated cognitive functioning after the first clinical presentation suggestive of MS and brain tissue damage in a non-lesion focused MRI approach by using magnetisation transfer imaging (MTI). Setting and participants 47 patients (15 men and 32 women; mean age: 31.17?years) after the first clinical event suggestive of MS were recruited in six different MS centres in Germany and underwent a neuropsychological test battery including tests for attention, memory and executive function as well as depression and fatigue. MTI and conventional MRI measures (T1/T2 lesion load) were assessed. In addition, Magnetisation Transfer Ratio (MTR) maps were calculated. Primary outcome measure was the investigation of cognitive dysfunction in very early MS in correlation to MRI data. Results 55.3% of patients with MS failed at least one test parameter. Specifically, 6% were reduced in working memory, 14.9% in focused attention, 25.5% in figural learning and up to 14.9% in executive function. When the sample was subdivided into cognitively impaired and preserved, MTR scores within the cognitively impaired subgroup were significantly lower compared with the preserved group (t(43)=2.346, p=0.02*). No significant differences between the two groups were found in T2-weighted and T1-weighted lesion volume. Conclusions After the first MS-related clinical event, 55.3% of patients showed distinct cognitive deficits. Cognitively impaired patients had significantly lower whole brain MTR, but no differences in focal brain lesion volumes supporting the idea that early cognitive deficits may be related to diffuse loss of brain tissue integrity. PMID:24722197

  11. Structural covariance of superficial white matter in mild Alzheimer's disease compared to normal aging

    PubMed Central

    Carmeli, Cristian; Fornari, Eleonora; Jalili, Mahdi; Meuli, Reto; Knyazeva, Maria G

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Interindividual variations in regional structural properties covary across the brain, thus forming networks that change as a result of aging and accompanying neurological conditions. The alterations of superficial white matter (SWM) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are of special interest, since they follow the AD-specific pattern characterized by the strongest neurodegeneration of the medial temporal lobe and association cortices. Methods Here, we present an SWM network analysis in comparison with SWM topography based on the myelin content quantified with magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) for 39 areas in each hemisphere in 15 AD patients and 15 controls. The networks are represented by graphs, in which nodes correspond to the areas, and edges denote statistical associations between them. Results In both groups, the networks were characterized by asymmetrically distributed edges (predominantly in the left hemisphere). The AD-related differences were also leftward. The edges lost due to AD tended to connect nodes in the temporal lobe to other lobes or nodes within or between the latter lobes. The newly gained edges were mostly confined to the temporal and paralimbic regions, which manifest demyelination of SWM already in mild AD. Conclusion This pattern suggests that the AD pathological process coordinates SWM demyelination in the temporal and paralimbic regions, but not elsewhere. A comparison of the MTR maps with MTR-based networks shows that although, in general, the changes in network architecture in AD recapitulate the topography of (de)myelination, some aspects of structural covariance (including the interhemispheric asymmetry of networks) have no immediate reflection in the myelination pattern. PMID:25328848

  12. MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEQUESTER CO2 FROM POWER PLANT FLUE GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Tim Merkel; Karl Amo; Richard Baker; Ramin Daniels; Bilgen Friat; Zhenjie He; Haiqing Lin; Adrian Serbanescu

    2009-03-31

    The objective of this project was to assess the feasibility of using a membrane process to capture CO2 from coal-fired power plant flue gas. During this program, MTR developed a novel membrane (Polaris™) with a CO2 permeance tenfold higher than commercial CO2-selective membranes used in natural gas treatment. The Polaris™ membrane, combined with a process design that uses a portion of combustion air as a sweep stream to generate driving force for CO2 permeation, meets DOE post-combustion CO2 capture targets. Initial studies indicate a CO2 separation and liquefaction cost of $20 - $30/ton CO2 using about 15% of the plant energy at 90% CO2 capture from a coal-fired power plant. Production of the Polaris™ CO2 capture membrane was scaled up with MTR’s commercial casting and coating equipment. Parametric tests of cross-flow and countercurrent/sweep modules prepared from this membrane confirm their near-ideal performance under expected flue gas operating conditions. Commercial-scale, 8-inch diameter modules also show stable performance in field tests treating raw natural gas. These findings suggest that membranes are a viable option for flue gas CO2 capture. The next step will be to conduct a field demonstration treating a realworld power plant flue gas stream. The first such MTR field test will capture 1 ton CO2/day at Arizona Public Service’s Cholla coal-fired power plant, as part of a new DOE NETL funded program.

  13. Molecular Assay for Detection of Genetic Markers Associated with Decreased Susceptibility to Cephalosporins in Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, S. W.; Martin, I.; Demczuk, W.; Bharat, A.; Hoang, L.; Wylie, J.; Allen, V.; Lefebvre, B.; Tyrrell, G.; Horsman, G.; Haldane, D.; Garceau, R.; Wong, T.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of antimicrobial-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae continues to rise in Canada; however, antimicrobial resistance data are lacking for approximately 70% of gonorrhea infections that are diagnosed directly from clinical specimens by nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs). We developed a molecular assay for surveillance use to detect mutations in genes associated with decreased susceptibility to cephalosporins that can be applied to both culture isolates and clinical samples. Real-time PCR assays were developed to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ponA, mtrR, penA, porB, and one N. gonorrhoeae-specific marker (porA). We tested the real-time PCR assay with 252 gonococcal isolates, 50 nongonococcal isolates, 24 N. gonorrhoeae-negative NAAT specimens, and 34 N. gonorrhoeae-positive NAAT specimens. Twenty-four of the N. gonorrhoeae-positive NAAT specimens had matched culture isolates. Assay results were confirmed by comparison with whole-genome sequencing data. For 252 N. gonorrhoeae strains, the agreement between the DNA sequence and real-time PCR was 100% for porA, ponA, and penA, 99.6% for mtrR, and 95.2% for porB. The presence of ?2 SNPs correlated with decreased susceptibility to ceftriaxone (sensitivities of >98%) and cefixime (sensitivities of >96%). Of 24 NAAT specimens with matched cultures, the agreement between the DNA sequence and real-time PCR was 100% for porB, 95.8% for ponA and mtrR, and 91.7% for penA. We demonstrated the utility of a real-time PCR assay for sensitive detection of known markers for the decreased susceptibility to cephalosporins in N. gonorrhoeae. Preliminary results with clinical NAAT specimens were also promising, as they correlated well with bacterial culture results. PMID:25878350

  14. Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Separate Nitrogen from Natural Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Kaaeid Lokhandwala

    2007-03-31

    The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR is working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant, which met with limited success. However, a small test system was installed at a Twin Bottoms Energy well in Kentucky. This unit operated successfully for six months, and demonstrated the technology's reliability on a small scale. MTR then located an alternative test site with much larger gas flow rates and signed a contract with Towne Exploration in the third quarter of 2006, for a demonstration plant in Rio Vista, California, to be run through May 2007. The demonstration for Towne has already resulted in the sale of two commercial skids to the company; both units will be delivered by the end of 2007. Total sales of nitrogen/natural gas membrane separation units from the partnership with ABB are now approaching $4.0 million.

  15. Multi-modal MRI of mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Narayana, Ponnada A; Yu, Xintian; Hasan, Khader M; Wilde, Elisabeth A; Levin, Harvey S; Hunter, Jill V; Miller, Emmy R; Patel, Vipul Kumar S; Robertson, Claudia S; McCarthy, James J

    2015-01-01

    Multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that included high resolution structural imaging, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) imaging, and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) were performed in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) patients with negative computed tomographic scans and in an orthopedic-injured (OI) group without concomitant injury to the brain. The OI group served as a comparison group for mTBI. MRI scans were performed both in the acute phase of injury (~24 h) and at follow-up (~90 days). DTI data was analyzed using tract based spatial statistics (TBSS). Global and regional atrophies were calculated using tensor-based morphometry (TBM). MTR values were calculated using the standard method. MRSI was analyzed using LC Model. At the initial scan, the mean diffusivity (MD) was significantly higher in the mTBI cohort relative to the comparison group in several white matter (WM) regions that included internal capsule, external capsule, superior corona radiata, anterior corona radiata, posterior corona radiata, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, inferior longitudinal fasciculus, forceps major and forceps minor of the corpus callosum, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and corticospinal tract in the right hemisphere. TBSS analysis failed to detect significant differences in any DTI measures between the initial and follow-up scans either in the mTBI or OI group. No significant differences were found in MRSI, MTR or morphometry between the mTBI and OI cohorts either at the initial or follow-up scans with or without family wise error (FWE) correction. Our study suggests that a number of WM tracts are affected in mTBI in the acute phase of injury and that these changes disappear by 90 days. This study also suggests that none of the MRI-modalities used in this study, with the exception of DTI, is sensitive in detecting changes in the acute phase of mTBI. PMID:25610770

  16. c-Type Cytochrome-Dependent Formation of U(IV) Nanoparticles by Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Matthew J.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Kennedy, David W.; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Lai, Barry; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Reed, Samantha B.; Culley, David E.; Bailey, Vanessa L.; Simonson, Cody J.; Saffarini, Daad; Romine, Margaret F.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2006-08-08

    Modern approaches for bioremediation of radionuclide contaminated environments are based on the ability of microorganisms to effectively catalyze changes in the oxidation states of metals that in turn influence their solubility. Although microbial metal reduction has been identified as an effective means for immobilizing highly-soluble uranium(VI) complexes in situ, the biomolecular mechanisms of U(VI) reduction are not well understood. Here, we show that c-type cytochromes of a dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 are essential for the reduction of U(VI) and formation of extracelluar UO2 nanoparticles. In particular, the outer membrane (OM) decaheme cytochrome MtrC, previously implicated in Mn(IV) and Fe(III) reduction, directly transferred electrons to U(VI). Additionally, deletions of mtrC and/or omcA significantly affected the in vivo U(VI) reduction rate relative to wild type MR-1. Similar to the wild type, the mutants accumulated UO2 nanoparticles extracellularly to high densities in association with an exopolymeric substance (EPS). In wild type cells, this UO2-EPS matrix exhibited glycocalyx-like properties, contained multiple elements of the OM, polysaccharide, and heme containing proteins. Using a novel combination of methods including synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy and high resolution immune-electron microscopy, we demonstrate a close association of the extracellular UO2 nanoparticles with MtrC and OmcA. This is the first study to directly localize the OM-associated cytochromes with EPS, which contains biogenic UO2 nanoparticles. In the environment, such association of UO2 nanoparticles with biopolymers may exert a strong influence on subsequent behavior including susceptibility to oxidation by O2 or transport in soils and sediments.

  17. Multiparametric MRI Analysis for the Identification of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound-Treated Tumor Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Strijkers, Gustav J.; Nicolay, Klaas

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In this study endogenous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) biomarkers for accurate segmentation of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU)-treated tumor tissue and residual or recurring non-treated tumor tissue were identified. Methods Multiparametric MRI, consisting of quantitative T1, T2, Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) and Magnetization Transfer Ratio (MTR) mapping, was performed in tumor-bearing mice before (n?=?14), 1 h after (n?=?14) and 72 h (n?=?7) after HIFU treatment. A non-treated control group was included (n?=?7). Cluster analysis using the Iterative Self Organizing Data Analysis (ISODATA) technique was performed on subsets of MRI parameters (feature vectors). The clusters resulting from the ISODATA segmentation were divided into a viable and non-viable class based on the fraction of pixels assigned to the clusters at the different experimental time points. ISODATA-derived non-viable tumor fractions were quantitatively compared to histology-derived non-viable tumor volume fractions. Results The highest agreement between the ISODATA-derived and histology-derived non-viable tumor fractions was observed for feature vector {T1, T2, ADC}. R1 (1/T1), R2 (1/T2), ADC and MTR each were significantly increased in the ISODATA-defined non-viable tumor tissue at 1 h after HIFU treatment compared to viable, non-treated tumor tissue. R1, ADC and MTR were also significantly increased at 72 h after HIFU. Conclusions This study demonstrates that non-viable, HIFU-treated tumor tissue can be distinguished from viable, non-treated tumor tissue using multiparametric MRI analysis. Clinical application of the presented methodology may allow for automated, accurate and objective evaluation of HIFU treatment. PMID:24927280

  18. Immunologic and MRI markers of the therapeutic effect of IFN-?-1a in relapsing-remitting MS

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Yazhong; Zhang, Xin; Dwyer, Michael G.; Kennedy, Cheryl; Bergsland, Niels; Ramasamy, Deepa; Durfee, Jacqueline; Hojnacki, David; Hayward, Brooke; Dangond, Fernando; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess potential roles of effector cells and immunologic markers in demyelinating CNS lesion formation, and their modulation by interferon ?-1a (IFN-?-1a). Methods: Twenty-three patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) received IFN-?-1a for 6 months. Immunologic marker results were correlated with brain MRI lesion volumes, and volumes of normal-appearing brain tissue (NABT) with decreasing or increasing voxel-wise magnetization transfer ratio (VW-MTR), suggestive of demyelination and remyelination, respectively. Results: Baseline expression of Th22 cell transcription factor aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and interleukin (IL)-17F, and percentages of IL-22–expressing CD4+ and CD8+ cells, were significantly higher in patients vs 15 healthy controls; IL-4 in CD4+ cells was lower. Baseline percentage of IL-22–producing CD8+ cells positively correlated with T2 lesion volumes, while percentage of IL-17A–producing CD8+ cells positively correlated with T2 and T1 lesion volumes. IFN-?-1a induced reductions in transcription factor AHR, T-bet, and retinoic acid–related orphan nuclear hormone receptor C (RORc) gene expression, while it increased GATA3's expression in CD4+ cells. Percentages of IL-22-, IL-17A-, and IL-17F-expressing T cells significantly decreased following treatment. Increased percentages of IL-10–expressing CD4+ and CD8+ cells correlated with greater NABT volume with increasing VW-MTR, while decreased percentage of IL-17F–expressing CD4+ cells positively correlated with decreased NABT volume with decreasing VW-MTR. Conclusions: Findings indicate that IFN-?-1a suppresses Th22 and Th17 cell responses, which were associated with decreased MRI-detectable demyelination. Classification of evidence: This pilot study provides Class III evidence that reduced Th22 and Th17 responses are associated with decreased demyelination following IFN-?-1a treatment in patients with RRMS. PMID:26601116

  19. c-Type Cytochrome-Dependent Formation of U(IV) Nanoparticles by Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Matthew J; Dohnalkova, Alice C; Kennedy, David W; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Boyanov, Maxim I; Lai, Barry; Kemner, Kenneth M; McLean, Jeffrey S; Reed, Samantha B; Culley, David E; Bailey, Vanessa L; Simonson, Cody J; Saffarini, Daad A; Romine, Margaret F; Zachara, John M

    2006-01-01

    Modern approaches for bioremediation of radionuclide contaminated environments are based on the ability of microorganisms to effectively catalyze changes in the oxidation states of metals that in turn influence their solubility. Although microbial metal reduction has been identified as an effective means for immobilizing highly-soluble uranium(VI) complexes in situ, the biomolecular mechanisms of U(VI) reduction are not well understood. Here, we show that c-type cytochromes of a dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, are essential for the reduction of U(VI) and formation of extracelluar UO 2 nanoparticles. In particular, the outer membrane (OM) decaheme cytochrome MtrC (metal reduction), previously implicated in Mn(IV) and Fe(III) reduction, directly transferred electrons to U(VI). Additionally, deletions of mtrC and/or omcA significantly affected the in vivo U(VI) reduction rate relative to wild-type MR-1. Similar to the wild-type, the mutants accumulated UO 2 nanoparticles extracellularly to high densities in association with an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS). In wild-type cells, this UO 2-EPS matrix exhibited glycocalyx-like properties and contained multiple elements of the OM, polysaccharide, and heme-containing proteins. Using a novel combination of methods including synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy and high-resolution immune-electron microscopy, we demonstrate a close association of the extracellular UO 2 nanoparticles with MtrC and OmcA (outer membrane cytochrome). This is the first study to our knowledge to directly localize the OM-associated cytochromes with EPS, which contains biogenic UO 2 nanoparticles. In the environment, such association of UO 2 nanoparticles with biopolymers may exert a strong influence on subsequent behavior including susceptibility to oxidation by O 2 or transport in soils and sediments. PMID:16875436

  20. Associations between insulin action and integrity of brain microstructure differ with familial longevity and with age

    PubMed Central

    Akintola, Abimbola A.; van den Berg, Annette; van Buchem, Mark A.; Jansen, Steffy W.; Slagboom, Eline P.; Westendorp, Rudi G.; van der Grond, Jeroen; van Heemst, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Impaired glucose metabolism and type 2 diabetes have been associated with cognitive decline, dementia, and with structural and functional brain features. However, it is unclear whether these associations differ in individuals that differ in familial longevity or age. Here, we investigated the association between parameters of glucose metabolism and microstructural brain integrity in offspring of long-lived families (“offspring”) and controls; and age categories thereof. From the Leiden Longevity Study (LLS), 132 participants underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) to assess glycemia [fasted glucose and glucose area-under-the-curve (AUC)], insulin resistance [fasted insulin, AUCinsulin, and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR)], and pancreatic Beta cell secretory capacity (insulinogenic index). 3 Tesla MRI and Magnetization Transfer (MT) imaging MT-ratio (MTR) peak-height was used to quantify differences in microstructural brain parenchymal tissue homogeneity that remain invisible on conventional MRI. Analyses were performed in offspring and age-matched controls, with and without stratification for age. In the full offspring group only, reduced MTR peak-height in gray and white matter was inversely associated with AUCinsulin, fasted insulin, HOMA-IR and insulinogenic-index (all p < 0.01). When dichotomized for age (?65 years and >65 years): in younger controls, significantly stronger inverse associations were observed between MTR peak-height and fasted glucose, AUCglucose, fasted insulin, AUCinsulin and HOMA-IR in gray matter; and for AUCglucose, fasted insulin and HOMA-IR in white matter (all P-interaction < 0.05). Although the strength of the associations tended to attenuate with age in the offspring group, the difference between age groups was not statistically significant. Thus, associations between impaired insulin action and reduced microstructural brain parenchymal tissue homogeneity were stronger in offspring compared to controls, and seemed to diminish with age. PMID:26074813

  1. White matter hyperintensities and normal-appearing white matter integrity in the aging brain

    PubMed Central

    Maniega, Susana Muñoz; Valdés Hernández, Maria C.; Clayden, Jonathan D.; Royle, Natalie A.; Murray, Catherine; Morris, Zoe; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Gow, Alan J.; Starr, John M.; Bastin, Mark E.; Deary, Ian J.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.

    2015-01-01

    White matter hyperintensities (WMH) of presumed vascular origin are a common finding in brain magnetic resonance imaging of older individuals and contribute to cognitive and functional decline. It is unknown how WMH form, although white matter degeneration is characterized pathologically by demyelination, axonal loss, and rarefaction, often attributed to ischemia. Changes within normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) in subjects with WMH have also been reported but have not yet been fully characterized. Here, we describe the in vivo imaging signatures of both NAWM and WMH in a large group of community-dwelling older people of similar age using biomarkers derived from magnetic resonance imaging that collectively reflect white matter integrity, myelination, and brain water content. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) were significantly lower, whereas mean diffusivity (MD) and longitudinal relaxation time (T1) were significantly higher, in WMH than NAWM (p < 0.0001), with MD providing the largest difference between NAWM and WMH. Receiver operating characteristic analysis on each biomarker showed that MD differentiated best between NAWM and WMH, identifying 94.6% of the lesions using a threshold of 0.747 × 10?9 m2s?1 (area under curve, 0.982; 95% CI, 0.975–0.989). Furthermore, the level of deterioration of NAWM was strongly associated with the severity of WMH, with MD and T1 increasing and FA and MTR decreasing in NAWM with increasing WMH score, a relationship that was sustained regardless of distance from the WMH. These multimodal imaging data indicate that WMH have reduced structural integrity compared with surrounding NAWM, and MD provides the best discriminator between the 2 tissue classes even within the mild range of WMH severity, whereas FA, MTR, and T1 only start reflecting significant changes in tissue microstructure as WMH become more severe. PMID:25457555

  2. Oxygen-dependent autoaggregation in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Geydebrekht, Oleg V.; Bilskis, Christina L.; Zakrajsek, Brian A.; Hill, Eric A.; Saffarini, Daad; Romine, Margaret F.; Gorby, Yuri A.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.

    2008-07-01

    In aerobic chemostat cultures maintained at 50% dissolved O2 tension (123.5 µM dissolved O2), Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 rapidly aggregated upon addition of 0.68 mM CaCl2 and retained this multi-cellular phenotype at high dilution rates. Confocal microscopy analysis of the extracellular matrix material contributing to the stability of the aggregate structures revealed the presence of extracellular DNA, protein, and glycoconjugates. Upon onset of O2-limited growth (dissolved O2 below detection) however, the Ca2+-supplemented chemostat cultures of strain MR-1 rapidly disaggregated and grew as motile dispersed cells. Global transcriptome analysis comparing aerobic aggregated to O2-limited unaggregated cells identified genes encoding cell-to-cell and cell-to-surface adhesion factors whose transcription increased upon exposure to increased O2 concentrations. The aerobic aggregated cells also revealed increased expression of putative anaerobic electron transfer and homologs of metal reduction genes, including mtrD (SO1782), mtrE (SO1781), and mtrF (SO1780). Our data indicate that mechanisms involved in autoaggregation of MR-1 are dependent on the function of pilD gene which encodes a putative prepilin peptidase. Mutants of S. oneidensis strain MR-1 deficient in PilD and associated pathways, including type IV and Msh pili biogenesis, displayed a moderate increase in sensitivity to H2O2. Taken together, our evidence indicates that aggregate formation in S. oneidensis MR-1 may serve as an alternative or an addition to biochemical detoxification to reduce the oxidative stress associated with production of reactive oxygen species during aerobic metabolism while facilitating the development of hypoxic conditions within the aggregate interior.

  3. Family resemblances: A common fold for some dimeric ion-coupled secondary transporters.

    PubMed

    Vergara-Jaque, Ariela; Fenollar-Ferrer, Cristina; Mulligan, Christopher; Mindell, Joseph A; Forrest, Lucy R

    2015-11-01

    Membrane transporter proteins catalyze the passage of a broad range of solutes across cell membranes, allowing the uptake and efflux of crucial compounds. Because of the difficulty of expressing, purifying, and crystallizing integral membrane proteins, relatively few transporter structures have been elucidated to date. Although every membrane transporter has unique characteristics, structural and mechanistic similarities between evolutionarily diverse transporters have been identified. Here, we compare two recently reported structures of membrane proteins that act as antimicrobial efflux pumps, namely MtrF from Neisseria gonorrhoeae and YdaH from Alcanivorax borkumensis, both with each other and with the previously published structure of a sodium-dependent dicarboxylate transporter from Vibrio cholerae, VcINDY. MtrF and YdaH belong to the p-aminobenzoyl-glutamate transporter (AbgT) family and have been reported as having architectures distinct from those of all other families of transporters. However, our comparative analysis reveals a similar structural arrangement in all three proteins, with highly conserved secondary structure elements. Despite their differences in biological function, the overall "design principle" of MtrF and YdaH appears to be almost identical to that of VcINDY, with a dimeric quaternary structure, helical hairpins, and clear boundaries between the transport and scaffold domains. This observation demonstrates once more that the same secondary transporter architecture can be exploited for multiple distinct transport modes, including cotransport and antiport. Based on our comparisons, we detected conserved motifs in the substrate-binding region and predict specific residues likely to be involved in cation or substrate binding. These findings should prove useful for the future characterization of the transport mechanisms of these families of secondary active transporters. PMID:26503722

  4. Manganese sulfide formation via concomitant microbial manganese oxide and thiosulfate reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ji-Hoon; Kennedy, David W.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Moore, Dean A.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Reed, Samantha B.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2011-12-13

    The dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 produced {gamma}-MnS (rambergite) nanoparticles during the concurrent reduction of MnO{sub 2} and thiosulfate coupled to H{sub 2} oxidation. To investigate effect of direct microbial reduction of MnO{sub 2} on MnS formation, two MR-1 mutants defective in outer membrane c-type cytochromes ({Delta}mtrC/{Delta}omcA and {Delta}mtrC/{Delta}omcA/{Delta}mtrF) were also used and it was determined that direct reduction of MnO{sub 2} was dominant relative to chemical reduction by biogenic sulfide generated from thiosulfate reduction. Although bicarbonate was excluded from the medium, incubations of strain MR-1 with lactate as the electron donor produced MnCO{sub 3} (rhodochrosite) as well as MnS in nearly equivalent amounts as estimated by micro X-ray diffraction (micro-XRD) analysis. It was concluded that carbonate released from lactate metabolism promoted MnCO{sub 3} formation and that Mn(II) mineralogy was strongly affected by carbonate ions even in the presence of abundant sulfide and weakly alkaline conditions expected to favor the precipitation of MnS. Formation of MnS, as determined by a combination of micro-XRD, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and selected area electron diffraction analyses was consistent with equilibrium speciation modeling predictions. Biogenic manganese sulfide may be a manganese sink in the Mn biogeochemical cycle in select environments such as deep anoxic marine basins within the Baltic Sea.

  5. Multi-modal MRI of mild traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Narayana, Ponnada A.; Yu, Xintian; Hasan, Khader M.; Wilde, Elisabeth A.; Levin, Harvey S.; Hunter, Jill V.; Miller, Emmy R.; Patel, Vipul Kumar S.; Robertson, Claudia S.; McCarthy, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that included high resolution structural imaging, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) imaging, and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) were performed in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) patients with negative computed tomographic scans and in an orthopedic-injured (OI) group without concomitant injury to the brain. The OI group served as a comparison group for mTBI. MRI scans were performed both in the acute phase of injury (~24 h) and at follow-up (~90 days). DTI data was analyzed using tract based spatial statistics (TBSS). Global and regional atrophies were calculated using tensor-based morphometry (TBM). MTR values were calculated using the standard method. MRSI was analyzed using LC Model. At the initial scan, the mean diffusivity (MD) was significantly higher in the mTBI cohort relative to the comparison group in several white matter (WM) regions that included internal capsule, external capsule, superior corona radiata, anterior corona radiata, posterior corona radiata, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, inferior longitudinal fasciculus, forceps major and forceps minor of the corpus callosum, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and corticospinal tract in the right hemisphere. TBSS analysis failed to detect significant differences in any DTI measures between the initial and follow-up scans either in the mTBI or OI group. No significant differences were found in MRSI, MTR or morphometry between the mTBI and OI cohorts either at the initial or follow-up scans with or without family wise error (FWE) correction. Our study suggests that a number of WM tracts are affected in mTBI in the acute phase of injury and that these changes disappear by 90 days. This study also suggests that none of the MRI-modalities used in this study, with the exception of DTI, is sensitive in detecting changes in the acute phase of mTBI. PMID:25610770

  6. Associations between insulin action and integrity of brain microstructure differ with familial longevity and with age.

    PubMed

    Akintola, Abimbola A; van den Berg, Annette; van Buchem, Mark A; Jansen, Steffy W; Slagboom, Eline P; Westendorp, Rudi G; van der Grond, Jeroen; van Heemst, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Impaired glucose metabolism and type 2 diabetes have been associated with cognitive decline, dementia, and with structural and functional brain features. However, it is unclear whether these associations differ in individuals that differ in familial longevity or age. Here, we investigated the association between parameters of glucose metabolism and microstructural brain integrity in offspring of long-lived families ("offspring") and controls; and age categories thereof. From the Leiden Longevity Study (LLS), 132 participants underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) to assess glycemia [fasted glucose and glucose area-under-the-curve (AUC)], insulin resistance [fasted insulin, AUCinsulin, and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR)], and pancreatic Beta cell secretory capacity (insulinogenic index). 3 Tesla MRI and Magnetization Transfer (MT) imaging MT-ratio (MTR) peak-height was used to quantify differences in microstructural brain parenchymal tissue homogeneity that remain invisible on conventional MRI. Analyses were performed in offspring and age-matched controls, with and without stratification for age. In the full offspring group only, reduced MTR peak-height in gray and white matter was inversely associated with AUCinsulin, fasted insulin, HOMA-IR and insulinogenic-index (all p < 0.01). When dichotomized for age (?65 years and >65 years): in younger controls, significantly stronger inverse associations were observed between MTR peak-height and fasted glucose, AUCglucose, fasted insulin, AUCinsulin and HOMA-IR in gray matter; and for AUCglucose, fasted insulin and HOMA-IR in white matter (all P-interaction < 0.05). Although the strength of the associations tended to attenuate with age in the offspring group, the difference between age groups was not statistically significant. Thus, associations between impaired insulin action and reduced microstructural brain parenchymal tissue homogeneity were stronger in offspring compared to controls, and seemed to diminish with age. PMID:26074813

  7. Effect of cropland management and slope position on soil organic carbon pool at the North Appalachian Experimental Watersheds

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Yueli; Lal, Rattan; Owens, Lloyd; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Post, W M.; Hothem, Daniel

    2002-12-01

    Soil organic matter is strongly related to soil type, landscape morphology, and soil and crop management practices. Therefore, long-term (15-36-years) effects of six cropland management systems on soil organic carbon (SOC) pool in 0-30 cm depth were studied for the period of 1939-1999 at the North Appalachian Experimental Watersheds (<3 ha, Dystric Cambisol, Haplic Luvisol, and Haplic Alisol) near Coshocton, OH, USA. Six management treatments were: (1) no tillage continuous corn with NPK (NC); (2) no tillage continuous corn with NPK and manure (NTC-M); (3) no tillage corn?soybean rotation (NTR); (4) chisel tillage corn?soybean rotation (CTR); (5) moldboard tillage with corn?wheat?meadow?meadow rotation with improved practices (MTR-I); (6) moldboard tillage with corn?wheat?meadow?meadow rotation with prevalent practices (MTR-P). The SOC pool ranged from 24.5Mgha?1 in the 32-years moldboard tillage corn (Zea mays L.)?wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)?meadow?meadow rotation with straight row farming and annual application of fertilizer (N:P:K = 5:9:17) of 56?112 kg ha?1 and cattle (Bos taurus) manure of 9Mg ha?1 as the prevalent system (MTR-P) to 65.5Mgha?1 in the 36-years no tillage continuous corn with contour row farming and annual application of 170?225 kgNha?1 and appropriate amounts of P and K, and 6?11Mgha?1 of cattle manure as the improved system (NTC-M).

  8. ETR, TRA642. ETR COMPLEX NEARLY COMPLETE. CAMERA FACES NORTHWEST, PROBABLY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR, TRA-642. ETR COMPLEX NEARLY COMPLETE. CAMERA FACES NORTHWEST, PROBABLY FROM TOP DECK OF COOLING TOWER. SHADOW IS CAST BY COOLING TOWER UNITS OFF LEFT OF VIEW. HIGH-BAY REACTOR BUILDING IS SURROUNDED BY ITS ATTACHED SERVICES: ELECTRICAL (TRA-648), HEAT EXCHANGER (TRA-644 WITH U-SHAPED YARD), AND COMPRESSOR (TRA-643). THE CONTROL BUILDING (TRA-647) ON THE NORTH SIDE IS HIDDEN FROM VIEW. AT UPPER RIGHT IS MTR BUILDING, TRA-603. INL NEGATIVE NO. 56-3798. Jack L. Anderson, Photographer, 11/26/1956 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  9. ETR COMPLEX. CAMERA FACING EAST. FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: ETRCRITICAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR COMPLEX. CAMERA FACING EAST. FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: ETR-CRITICAL FACILITY BUILDING, ETR CONTROL BUILDING (ATTACHED TO HIGH-BAY ETR), ETR, ONE-STORY SECTION OF ETR BUILDING, ELECTRICAL BUILDING, COOLING TOWER PUMP HOUSE, COOLING TOWER. COMPRESSOR AND HEAT EXCHANGER BUILDING ARE PARTLY IN VIEW ABOVE ETR. DARK-COLORED DUCTS PROCEED FROM GROUND CONNECTION TO ETR WASTE GAS STACK. OTHER STACK IS MTR STACK WITH FAN HOUSE IN FRONT OF IT. RECTANGULAR STRUCTURE NEAR TOP OF VIEW IS SETTLING BASIN. INL NEGATIVE NO. 56-4102. Unknown Photographer, ca. 1956 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  10. Haitian-English Dictionary

    E-print Network

    Freeman, Bryant C.; Laguerre, Jowel C.

    1996-01-01

    consulted existed as a single roughly-typed copy, necessitating first persuasion in order to borrow temporarily, then travel over difficult country roads to a copy facility in Port-au-Pnncc, followed by a return trip. Surprisingly, even the most modest...*r*.» Pafhef K«»*cf F\\*M*IT**N IHRTUT I itfuK tm n J C W • - mtr * . ( J t w n ^ k * I e*Ue G FMRT Hf>aiiit Itcemati PaP K b i...

  11. Atypical Response Regulator ChxR from Chlamydia trachomatis Is Structurally Poised for DNA Binding

    E-print Network

    Barta, Michael L.; Hickey, John Michael; Anbanandam, Asokan; Dyer, Kevin; Hammel, Michal; Hefty, P. Scott

    2014-03-19

    -length protein structures and functional studies of MtrA [6] and PrrA [7] from M. tuberculosis and DrrB [8] from T. maritima support that the receiver domain forms an extensive intramolecular interface with the effector domain effectively occluding the a4-b5-a5... dimeriza- tion interface and resulting in an equilibrium skewed towards an inactive (off) state [5]. In contrast, RegX3 [9] and PhoP [10] from M. tuberculosis and DrrD [11] from T. maritima, have relatively limited interdomain interfaces for which the DNA...

  12. Diversion assumptions for high-powered research reactors. ISPO C-50 Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Binford, F.T.

    1984-01-01

    This study deals with diversion assumptions for high-powered research reactors -- specifically, MTR fuel; pool- or tank-type research reactors with light-water moderator; and water, beryllium, or graphite reflectors, and which have a power level of 25 MW(t) or more. The objective is to provide assistance to the IAEA in documentation of criteria and inspection observables related to undeclared plutonium production in the reactors described above, including: criteria for undeclared plutonium production, necessary design information for implementation of these criteria, verification guidelines including neutron physics and heat transfer, and safeguards measures to facilitate the detection of undeclared plutonium production at large research reactors.

  13. Diversion assumptions for high-powered research reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Binford, F.T.

    1984-01-01

    This study deals with diversion assumptions for high-powered research reactors -- specifically, MTR fuel; pool- or tank-type research reactors with light-water moderator; and water, beryllium, or graphite reflectors, and which have a power level of 25 MW(t) or more. The objective is to provide assistance to the IAEA in documentation of criteria and inspection observables related to undeclared plutonium production in the reactors described above, including: criteria for undeclared plutonium production, necessary design information for implementation of these criteria, verification guidelines including neutron physics and heat transfer, and safeguards measures to facilitate the detection of undeclared plutonium production at large research reactors.

  14. Heterogeneity of passenger exposure to air pollutants in public transport microenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fenhuan; Kaul, Daya; Wong, Ka Chun; Westerdahl, Dane; Sun, Li; Ho, Kin-fai; Tian, Linwei; Brimblecombe, Peter; Ning, Zhi

    2015-05-01

    Epidemiologic studies have linked human exposure to pollutants with adverse health effects. Passenger exposure in public transport systems contributes an important fraction of daily burden of air pollutants. While there is extensive literature reporting the concentrations of pollutants in public transport systems in different cities, there are few studies systematically addressing the heterogeneity of passenger exposure in different transit microenvironments, in cabins of different transit vehicles and in areas with different characteristics. The present study investigated PM2.5 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters smaller than 2.5 ?m), black carbon (BC), ultrafine particles (UFP) and carbon monoxide (CO) pollutant concentrations in various public road transport systems in highly urbanized city of Hong Kong. Using a trolley case housing numerous portable air monitors, we conducted a total of 119 trips during the campaign. Transit microenvironments, classified as 1). busy and secondary roadside bus stops; 2). open and enclosed termini; 3). above- and under-ground Motor Rail Transport (MTR) platforms, were investigated and compared to identify the factors that may affect passenger exposures. The pollutants inside bus and MTR cabins were also investigated together with a comparison of time integrated exposure between the transit modes. Busy roadside and enclosed termini demonstrated the highest average particle concentrations while the lowest was found on the MTR platforms. Traffic-related pollutants BC, UFP and CO showed larger variations than PM2.5 across different microenvironments and areas confirming their heterogeneity in urban environments. In-cabin pollutant concentrations showed distinct patterns with BC and UFP high in diesel bus cabins and CO high in LPG bus cabins, suggesting possible self-pollution issues and/or penetration of on-road pollutants inside cabins during bus transit. The total passenger exposure along selected routes, showed bus trips had the potential for higher integrated passenger exposure compared to MTR trips. The present study may provide useful information to better characterize the distribution of passenger exposure pattern in health assessment studies and the results also highlight the need to formulate exposure reduction based air policies in large cities.

  15. Management of land use land cover through the application of remote sensing, geographic information systems and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Praveen

    Deforestation and degradation of forest areas, including those in the Protected Areas (PAs), are major concerns in India. There were 2 broad objectives of the study: the technological objective pertained to the development of state-of-art programs that could serve as Decision Support Systems while finalizing plans and policy interventions, while the other objective aimed at generating geo-spatial data in 2 PAs. A part of the Eastern Himalaya biodiversity hotspot, Manas Tiger Reserve (MTR), Assam, India having an area of 2837.12 sq km and an important part of Rajaji-Corbett Tiger Conservation Unit, Rajaji National Park (RNP), Uttarakhand, India, having an area of 820.42 sq km, were taken for the assessment of land use and land cover (LULC) change during 1990--2004. Simulation was undertaken in a smaller area of 1.2 km * 1.2 km right on the fringe of RNP. Three advanced geo-spatial programs---Multi-Algorithm Automation Program (MAAP), Data Automatic Modification Program (DAMP) and Multi-Stage Simulation Program (MUSSIP)---developed by the author were used extensively. Based on the satellite data, MAAP was used for the rapid assessments of LULC of 2004 and 1990; DAMP was used for the spectral modification of the satellite data of the adjacent scenes of 2004 and of 1990; and MUSSIP was used to simulate LULC maps for the future periods (till 2018). These programs produced very high accuracy levels: 91.12% in 2004 and 89.67% in 1990 were obtained for MTR; and 94.87% in 2004 and 94.10% in 1990 were obtained for RNP; 93.40% pixel-to-pixel accuracy and 0.7904 for kappa were achieved for simulation. The annual rate of loss of forests (0.41% in MTR and 1.20% in RNP) and loss of water (1.79% in MTR and 1.69% in RNP) during 1990-2004 is a matter of serious concern. The scenario analysis in the study area for simulation revealed that the deforestation rate of 1.27% per year during 2004--2018 would increase to 2.04% if the human population growth rate is enhanced by 10%. Hence these PAs need urgent restoration measures and effective conservation planning to address the problems of deforestation, severe degradation and immense loss of water.

  16. EXHAUST STACK RISES. STEEL FRAMEWORK FOR FAN HOUSE IN PLACE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EXHAUST STACK RISES. STEEL FRAMEWORK FOR FAN HOUSE IN PLACE. TRENCH IN FOREGROUND IS FOR DUCT THAT WILL CARRY COOLANT AIR FROM MTR'S THERMAL SHIELD. DUCT LINES UP WITH NORTH SIDE OF FAN HOUSE. AT RIGHT OF VIEW, NOTE TRENCH LEADING TO SOUTH SIDE OF FAN HOUSE; IT WILL BRING CONTAMINATED AIR FROM LABORATORY HOODS AND VENTS. CAMERA FACING EAST. INL NEGATIVE NO. 2764. Unknown Photographer, 6/29/1951 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. THE USE OF TRIGGER POINT DRY NEEDLING AND INTRAMUSCULAR ELECTRICAL STIMULATION FOR A SUBJECT WITH CHRONIC LOW BACK PAIN: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Study Design: Case Report. Background and Purpose: Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) are widely accepted by clinicians and researchers as a primary source of regional neuromusculoskeletal pain. Trigger point dry needling (TrP?DN) is an invasive procedure that involves stimulation of MTrPs using an monofilament needle. The purpose of this case report is to report the outcomes of TrP?DN and intramuscular electrical stimulation (IES) as a primary treatment intervention in a subject with chronic low back pain. Case Description: The subject was a 30?year?old female, active duty military, who was referred to physical therapy for low back and right posterolateral hip pain. She noticed symptoms after suffering a lumbar flexion injury while picking up a barbell during weight training. Physical examination demonstrated findings that supported the diagnosis of lumbar segmental instability with a right hip stability dysfunction. Objective findings included a multi?segmental flexion movement pattern dysfunction and MTrPs in the right gluteus maximus and gluteus medius muscles with deep palpation. The subject was treated with TrP?DN and IES for a total of two visits. Bilateral L3 and L5 multifidus and right gluteus maximus and medius muscles were treated, along with implementing a home exercise program consisting of core stability exercises. Outcomes: The subject reported no existing pain and disability on the Numerical Pain Rating Scale and Oswestry Disability Questionnaire and a large perceived change in recovery on the Global Rating of Change at final follow?up. Physical examination was normal, demonstrating no observed impairments or functional limitations, including normal multi?segmental flexion and no MTrPs with deep palpation. Discussion: The subject was able to return to full military active duty without any physical limitations and resumed pre?injury activity levels, including the ability to resume all activities without pain. There is much promise regarding the use of TrP?DN with IES intervention for the treatment of lumbar and/or hip stability dysfunction. Future research is recommended to determine if TrP?DN intervention, with and without IES, is effective for other body regions and long?term subject outcomes. Level of Evidence: Level 4. PMID:23593553

  18. Rotary Wing Propulsion Specialists' Meeting, Williamsburg, VA, Nov. 13-15, 1990, Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Topics presented include sound diffraction at a sharp trailing edge in a supersonic flow, the MTR390 turboshaft development program, progress report of the electrostatic engine monitoring system, some corrosion resistant magnesium alloys, handling severe inlet conditions in aircraft fuel pumps, and an over view of inlet protection systems for Army aircraft. Also presented are the advanced control system architecture for the T800 engine, an expert system to perform on-line controller restructuring for abrupt model changes, an enhanced APU for the H-60 series and Sh-2G helicopters, and a linear theory of the North Atlantic blocking during January 1979.

  19. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632. CONTEXTUAL VIEW ALONG WALLEYE AVENUE, CAMERA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632. CONTEXTUAL VIEW ALONG WALLEYE AVENUE, CAMERA FACING EASTERLY. HOT CELL BUILDING IS AT CENTER LEFT OF VIEW; THE LOW-BAY PROJECTION WITH LADDER IS THE TEST TRAIN ASSEMBLY FACILITY, ADDED IN 1968. MTR BUILDING IS IN LEFT OF VIEW. HIGH-BAY BUILDING AT RIGHT IS THE ENGINEERING TEST REACTOR BUILDING, TRA-642. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-32-1. Mike Crane, Photographer, 4/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  20. Bench-Scale Development of a Hybrid Membrane-Absorption CO{sub 2} Capture Process: Preliminary Cost Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, Brice; Kniep, Jay; Pingjiao, Hao; Baker, Richard; Rochelle, Gary; Chen, Eric; Frailie, Peter; Ding, Junyuan; Zhang, Yue

    2014-03-31

    This report describes a study of capture costs for a hybrid membrane-absorption capture system based on Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR)’s low-pressure membrane contactors and the University of Texas at Austin’s 5 m piperazine (PZ) Advanced Flash Stripper (AFS; 5 m PZ AFS) based CO2 capture system. The report is submitted for NETL review, and may be superseded by a final topical report on this topic that will be submitted to satisfy the Task 2 report requirement of the current project (DE-FE0013118).

  1. Genetic variation in genes involved in folate and drug metabolism in a south Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Padmalatha S; Murali, T. S; Vasudevan, T. G; Prasada, Shama K.; Bhagavath, Ashok Kumar; Pai, Pranita; Gopinath, P. M.; Satyamoorthy, K.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genetic variations represented as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) vary across the world population. This genetic polymorphism (such as SNPs) plays an important role in pharmacogenomics. SNPs that affects cellular metabolism, by altering the enzyme activity, have an important role in therapeutic outcome. Allele frequencies in number of clinically relevant SNPs within south Indian populations are not yet known. Hence, we genotyped randomly selected unrelated south Indian subjects from different locations of south India representing the heterogeneous ethnic background of the population. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Common variants of MTHFD1, TYMS, SHMT1, MTR, MTRR, CBS and SULT1A1 gene polymorphisms were screened from healthy unrelated south Indian volunteers. Genotypes were determined using RFLP analysis of polymerase chain reaction-amplified products and confirmed by DNA sequencing. Chi-square test was performed to test for deviation from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for each locus. RESULTS: Gene allele frequency for several polymorphisms in our study differed significantly between the populations of other nations reported for several of the SNPs. These results demonstrate that the populations in different geographic regions may have widely varying genetic allele frequencies for clinically relevant SNPs. CONCLUSION: The present study reports, for the first time, the frequency distribution of MTHFD1, TYMS, SHMT1, MTR, MTRR, CBS and SULTIA1 gene polymorphisms in a south Indian population. Population-specific genetic polymorphism studies will help in practicing pharmacogenomic principles in the clinics. PMID:21747588

  2. Isobutanol production from an engineered Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jong-Min; Park, Hyojung; Seo, Hyung-Min; Kim, Jung-Ho; Bhatia, Shashi Kant; Sathiyanarayanan, Ganesan; Song, Hun-Suk; Park, Sung-Hee; Choi, Kwon-Young; Sang, Byoung-In; Yang, Yung-Hun

    2015-11-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is one of the most well-known metal-reducing bacteria and it has been extensively studied for microbial fuel cell and bioremediation aspects. In this study, we have examined S. oneidensis MR-1 as an isobutanol-producing host by assessing three key factors such as isobutanol synthetic genes, carbon sources, and electron supply systems. Heterologous Ehrlich pathway genes, kivD encoding ketoisovalerate decarboxylase and adh encoding alcohol dehydrogenase, were constructed in S. oneidensis MR-1. Among the composition of carbon sources examined, 2 % of N-acetylglucosamine, 1.5 % of pyruvate and 2 % of lactate were found to be the most optimal nutrients and resulted in 10.3 mg/L of isobutanol production with 48 h of microaerobic incubation. Finally, the effects of metal ions (electron acceptor) and direct electron transfer systems on isobutanol production were investigated, and Fe(2+) ions increased the isobutanol production up to 35 %. Interestingly, deletion of mtrA and mtrB, genes responsible for membrane transport systems, did not have significant impact on isobutanol production. Finally, we applied engineered S. oneidensis to a bioelectrical reactor system to investigate the effect of a direct electron supply system on isobutanol production, and it resulted in an increased growth and isobutanol production (up to 19.3 mg/L). This report showed the feasibility of S. oneidensis MR-1 as a genetic host to produce valuable biochemicals and combine an electron-supplying system with biotechnological applications. PMID:26280214

  3. Neutron beam studies for a medical therapy reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Neuman, W.A. )

    1990-01-01

    A conceptual design of a Medical Therapy Reactor (MTR) for neutron capture therapy (NCT) has been performed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The initial emphasis of the conceptual design was toward the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme and other presently incurable cancers. The design goal of the facility is to provide routine patient treatments both in brief time intervals (approximately 10 minutes) and inexpensively. The conceptual study has shown this goal to be achievable by locating an MTR at a major medical facility. This paper addresses the next step in the conceptual design process: a guide to the optimization of the epithermal-neutron filter and collimator assembly for the treatment of brain tumors. The current scope includes the sensitivity of the treatment beam to variations in filter length, gamma shield length, and collimator lengths as well as exit beam aperture size. The study shows the areas which can provide the greatest latitude in improving beam intensity and quality. Suggestions are given for future areas of optimization of beam filtering and collimation.

  4. Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Recover Heavy Hydrocarbons and to Remove Water from Natural Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Kaaeid Lokhandwala

    2003-09-29

    The objective of this project is to design, construct and field demonstrate a membrane system to recover natural gas liquids (NGLs) and remove water from raw natural gas. To convince industry users of the efficiency and reliability of the process, we plan to conduct an extended field test to demonstrate system performance under real-world conditions. The membrane system has been designed and fabricated by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR). The MTR membrane system and the compressor are now onsite at BP's Pascagoula, MS plant. The plant is undergoing a very significant expansion and the installation of the membrane unit into the test location is being implemented, albeit at a slower rate than we expected. The startup of the system and conducting of tests will occur in the next six months, depending on the availability of the remaining budget. In the interim, significant commercial progress has been made regarding the introduction of the NGL membrane and systems into the natural gas market.

  5. Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Recover Heavy Hydrocarbons and to Remove Water from Natural Gas

    SciTech Connect

    R. Baker; T. Hofmann; K. A. Lokhandwala

    2005-09-29

    The objective of this project is to design, construct and field demonstrate a membrane system to recover natural gas liquids (NGL) and remove water from raw natural gas. An extended field test to demonstrate system performance under real-world high-pressure conditions is being conducted to convince industry users of the efficiency and reliability of the process. The system was designed and fabricated by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) and installed and operated at BP Amoco's Pascagoula, MS plant. The Gas Research Institute is partially supporting the field demonstration and BP-Amoco helped install the unit and provided onsite operators and utilities. The gas processed by the membrane system meets pipeline specifications for dewpoint and BTU value and can be delivered without further treatment to the pipeline. Based on data from prior membrane module tests, the process is likely to be significantly less expensive than glycol dehydration followed by propane refrigeration, the principal competitive technology. During the course of this project, MTR has sold 11 commercial units related to the field test technology, and by the end of this demonstration project the process will be ready for broader commercialization. A route to commercialization has been developed during this project and involves collaboration with other companies already servicing the natural gas processing industry.

  6. NTF2-like domain of Tap plays a critical role in cargo mRNA recognition and export

    PubMed Central

    Katahira, Jun; Dimitrova, Lyudmila; Imai, Yumiko; Hurt, Ed

    2015-01-01

    Metazoan Tap-p15 (also called Nxf1-Nxt1) and yeast Mex67-Mtr2 heterodimers are the general mRNA export receptors. The RNA binding activity of Tap-p15, which is essential for mRNA nuclear export, has been attributed to the amino-terminal RNA binding module of Tap consists of RNA recognition motif (RRM) and leucine-rich repeat. In this study, we identified a novel RNA interaction surface in the NTF2-like (NTF2L) domain of Tap, which is analogous to the rRNA binding platform of Mex67-Mtr2. Tap-p15 uses the three domains to tightly bind the retroviral constitutive transport element. The RNA binding through the NTF2L domain is functionally relevant as introduction of mutations in this region reduced CTE-containing mRNA export activity. In contrast, only when the RRM and NTF2L domains were mutated simultaneously, bulk poly (A)+ RNA export and in vivo poly (A)+ RNA binding activities of Tap-p15 were significantly attenuated. Moreover, an engineered human cell line harboring the NTF2L domain mutation in the NXF1 gene showed a synthetic growth phenotype and severe mRNA export defect under Aly/REF and Thoc5 depleted condition. These data suggest that Tap-p15 recognizes bulk mRNAs through combinatorial use of the distinct RNA binding domains. PMID:25628355

  7. Bioaccumulation and speciation of selenium in fish and insects collected from a mountaintop removal coal mining-impacted stream in West Virginia.

    PubMed

    Arnold, M C; Lindberg, T Ty; Liu, Y T; Porter, K A; Hsu-Kim, H; Hinton, D E; Di Giulio, R T

    2014-07-01

    A major contaminant of concern for mountaintop removal/valley fill (MTR/VF) coal mining is selenium (Se), an essential micronutrient that can be toxic to fish. Creek chubs (Semotilus atromaculatus), green sunfish (Lepomis cyanellus), and composite insect samples were collected in March-July, 2011-2013 at two sites within the Mud River, West Virginia. One site (MR7) receives MTR/VF coal mining effluent, while the reference site (LFMR) does not. MR7 water had significantly higher concentrations of soluble Se (p < 0.01) and conductivity (p < 0.005) compared to LFMR. MR7 whole insects contained significantly higher concentrations of Se compared to LFMR insects (p < 0.001). MR7 creek chubs had significantly higher Se in fillets, liver, and ovary tissues compared to LFMR samples (p < 0.0001, p < 0.0001, and p < 0.02, respectively). MR7 green sunfish fillets contained significantly higher Se (p < 0.0001). Histological examination showed LFMR creek chub gills contained a typical amount of parasitic infestations; however MR7 gills contained minimal to no visible parasites. X-ray absorption spectroscopic analyses revealed that MR7 whole insects and creek chub tissues primarily contained organic Se and selenite. These two species of Mud River fish were shown to specifically accumulate Se differently in tissues compartments. Tissue-specific concentrations of Se may be useful in determining potential reproductive consequences of Se exposure in wild fish populations. PMID:24723096

  8. Audibility-based annoyance prediction modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidell, Sanford; Finegold, Lawrence S.

    1992-04-01

    The effects of rapid onset times and high absolute sound pressures near military training routes (MTR's) including possible startle effects and increased annoyance due to the unpredictable nature of these flights, have been of longstanding concern. A more recent concern is the possibility of increased annoyance due to low ambient noise levels near military flight training operations and differences in expectations about noise exposure in high and low population density areas. This paper describes progress in developing audibility-based methods for predicting the annoyance of noise produced at some distance from aircraft flight tracks. Audibility-based models which take into account near-ground acoustic propagation and ambient noise levels may be useful in assessing environmental impacts of MTR's and Military Operating Areas (MOA's) under some conditions. A prototype Single Event Annoyance Prediction Model (SEAPM) has been developed under USAF sponsorship as an initial effort to address these issues, and work has progressed on a geographic information system (GIS) to produce cartographically referenced representations of aircraft audibility.

  9. Evaluation of Bioreactor-Cultivated Bone by Magnetic Resonance Microscopy and FTIR Microspectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chesnick, Ingrid E.; Avallone, Frank; Leapman, Richard D.; Landis, William J.; Eidelman, Naomi; Potter, Kimberlee

    2007-01-01

    We present a three-dimensional mineralizing model based on a hollow fiber bioreactor (HFBR) inoculated with primary osteoblasts isolated from embryonic chick calvaria. Using non-invasive magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM), the growth and development of the mineralized tissue around the individual fibers were monitored over a period of nine weeks. Spatial maps of the water proton MRM properties of the intact tissue, with 78 ?m resolution, were used to determine changes in tissue composition with development. Unique changes in the mineral and collagen content of the tissue were detected with high specificity by proton density (PD) and magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) maps, respectively. At the end of the growth period, the presence of a bone-like tissue was verified by histology and the formation of poorly crystalline apatite was verified by selected area electron diffraction and electron probe X-ray microanalysis. FTIR microspectroscopy confirmed the heterogeneous nature of the bone-like tissue formed. FTIR-derived phosphate maps confirmed that those locations with the lowest PD values contained the most mineral, and FTIR-derived collagen maps confirmed that bright pixels on MTR maps corresponded to regions of high collagen content. In conclusion, the spatial mapping of tissue constituents by FTIR microspectroscopy corroborated the findings of non-invasive MRM measurements and supported the role of MRM in monitoring the bone formation process in vitro. PMID:17174620

  10. Three dimensional radiation dosimetry in lung-equivalent regions by use of a radiation sensitive gel foam: Proof of principle

    SciTech Connect

    Deene, Yves de; Vergote, Koen; Claeys, Carolien; De Wagter, Carlos

    2006-07-15

    A polymer hydrogel foam is proposed as a potential three dimensional experimental dosimeter for radiation treatment verification in low-density tissue such as the lung. A gel foam is created by beating a radiation sensitive polymer gel mixture in an anoxic atmosphere. The mass density of the gel foam is in the order of 0.25-0.35 kg/dm{sup 3}. Both nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin-spin relaxation rate (R2) and magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) have been used to map the dose distribution from the gel dosimeter. It is found that MTR has significant advantages compared to R2 for mapping the dose distribution in the polymer gel foam dosimeters. The magnetization transfer ratio is found to be less dependent on the density and microstructure of the gel foam dosimeter while spin-spin relaxation dispersion has been observed making the spin-spin relaxation rate dependent on the interecho time interval. Optical microscopy reveals a microstructure that shows great similarity with human lung tissue. It is also shown how NMR hydrogen proton density measurements can be used to map the density distributions in gel dosimeters.

  11. Corrosion of aluminum clad spent nuclear fuel in the 70 ton cask during transfer from L area to H-canyon

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J. I.

    2015-08-31

    Aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel will be transported for processing in the 70-ton nuclear fuel element cask from L Basin to H-canyon. During transport these fuels would be expected to experience high temperature aqueous corrosion from the residual L Basin water that will be present in the cask. Cladding corrosion losses during transport were calculated for material test reactor (MTR) and high flux isotope reactors (HFIR) fuels using literature and site information on aqueous corrosion at a range of time/temperature conditions. Calculations of the cladding corrosion loss were based on Arrhenius relationships developed for aluminum alloys typical of cladding material with the primary assumption that an adherent passive film does not form to retard the initial corrosion rate. For MTR fuels a cladding thickness loss of 33 % was found after 1 year in the cask with a maximum temperature of 263 °C. HFIR fuels showed a thickness loss of only 6% after 1 year at a maximum temperature of 180 °C. These losses are not expected to impact the overall confinement function of the aluminum cladding.

  12. Corrosion of aluminum clad spent nuclear fuel in the 70 ton cask during transfer from L area to H-canyon

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J. I.

    2015-08-01

    Aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel will be transported for processing in the 70-ton nuclear fuel element cask from L Basin to H-canyon. During transport these fuels would be expected to experience high temperature aqueous corrosion from the residual L Basin water that will be present in the cask. Cladding corrosion losses during transport were calculated for material test reactor (MTR) and high flux isotope reactors (HFIR) fuels using literature and site information on aqueous corrosion at a range of time/temperature conditions. Calculations of the cladding corrosion loss were based on Arrhenius relationships developed for aluminum alloys typical of cladding material with the primary assumption that an adherent passive film does not form to retard the initial corrosion rate. For MTR fuels a cladding thickness loss of 33% was found after 1 year in the cask with a maximum temperature of 263 °C. HFIR fuels showed a thickness loss of only 6% after 1 year at a maximum temperature of 180 °C. These losses are not expected to impact the overall confinement function of the aluminum cladding.

  13. CORROSION OF ALUMINUM CLAD SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL IN THE 70 TON CASK DURING TRANSFER FROM L AREA TO H-CANYON

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.

    2014-06-01

    Aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel will be transported for processing in the 70-ton nuclear fuel element cask from L Basin to H-canyon. During transport these fuels would be expected to experience high temperature aqueous corrosion from the residual L Basin water that will be present in the cask. Cladding corrosion losses during transport were calculated for material test reactor (MTR) and high flux isotope reactors (HFIR) fuels using literature and site information on aqueous corrosion at a range of time/temperature conditions. Calculations of the cladding corrosion loss were based on Arrhenius relationships developed for aluminum alloys typical of cladding material with the primary assumption that an adherent passive film does not form to retard the initial corrosion rate. For MTR fuels a cladding thickness loss of 33 % was found after 1 year in the cask with a maximum temperature of 260 {degrees}C. HFIR fuels showed a thickness loss of only 6% after 1 year at a maximum temperature of 180 {degrees}C. These losses are not expected to impact the overall confinement function of the aluminum cladding.

  14. Radioisotopic data of sediment collected in Mobile and Bon Secour Bays, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marot, Marci E.; Smith, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this study was to determine the extent of natural and (or) anthropogenic impacts on the sedimentary records of Mobile and Bon Secour Bays, Alabama during the last 150 years. These bays are unique in that anthropogenic activities are generally widespread and span both the eastern and western shorelines. However, there is a clear distinction in the types of human development and infrastructure between the western and eastern shorelines. These activities and the differences in land-use and -change influence the overall supply and remobilization of sediment to and within the bay. These factors could subsequently threaten the health and integrity of these environments and their ability to mitigate against long-term processes associated with climate change. In an attempt to characterize long-term accretion rates within the Mobile Bay Estuarine System (MBES), seven box cores were collected and analyzed for excess lead-210 (210Pbxs, the difference between total and supported 210Pb) and cesium-137 (137Cs) activities. The MBES receives sediment and water from the Alabama and Tombigbee River watersheds, which converge into the Mobile-Tensaw River (MTR) system just prior to discharging into Mobile Bay. Riverine discharge from the MTR system to the bay is second only to the Mississippi River discharge to the Gulf of Mexico for the conterminous United States.

  15. Experimental validation of photon-heating calculation for the Jules Horowitz Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaire, M.; Vaglio-Gaudard, C.; Lyoussi, A.; Reynard-Carette, C.; Di Salvo, J.; Gruel, A.

    2015-04-01

    The Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) is the next Material-Testing Reactor (MTR) under construction at CEA Cadarache. High values of photon heating (up to 20 W/g) are expected in this MTR. As temperature is a key parameter for material behavior, the accuracy of photon-heating calculation in the different JHR structures is an important stake with regard to JHR safety and performances. In order to experimentally validate the calculation of photon heating in the JHR, an integral experiment called AMMON was carried out in the critical mock-up EOLE at CEA Cadarache to help ascertain the calculation bias and its associated uncertainty. Nuclear heating was measured in different JHR-representative AMMON core configurations using ThermoLuminescent Detectors (TLDs) and Optically Stimulated Luminescent Detectors (OSLDs). This article presents the interpretation methodology and the calculation/experiment (C/E) ratio for all the TLD and OSLD measurements conducted in AMMON. It then deals with representativeness elements of the AMMON experiment regarding the JHR and establishes the calculation biases (and its associated uncertainty) applicable to photon-heating calculation for the JHR.

  16. MALDI-TOF is not useful in the diagnosis of catheter colonization based on superficial cultures: results from an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Guembe, María; Pérez-Granda, María Jesús; Cruces, Raquel; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Belén; Ruíz, Adrián; Alcalá, Luis; Bouza, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    We compared in an vitro model the yields of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) and conventional culture (CC) for the detection of catheter colonization with superficial catheter samples (SS). We used blood culture bottles (BCB) with an inserted cannula and incubated at 37 °C. The BCB were manipulated with different contaminations and when a BCB turned positive, SS were obtained to perform both techniques. To compare both techniques we analyzed the mean time to colonization (MTC) and the mean time to a result (MTR). The MTC (SD, days) by CC and MALDI-TOF was as follows: hub, 0.59 (0.79) versus 1.07 (1.39), P=0.06; surface: 0.62 (0.67) versus 0.82 (0.81), P<0.001. The MTR (SD, days) of CC and MALDI-TOF was as follows: hub: 1.58 (0.79) versus 2.25 (1.48), P=0.04; surface: 1.62 (0.67) versus 1.95 (0.80), P<0.001. In general, the use of MALDI-TOF performed directly with SS was no better than CC and did not anticipate colonization results. PMID:26508104

  17. Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Recover Heavy Hydrocarbons and to Remove Water from Natural Gas

    SciTech Connect

    R. Baker; T. Hofmann; K. A. Lokhandwala

    2006-09-29

    The objective of this project is to design, construct and field demonstrate a membrane system to recover natural gas liquids (NGL) and remove water from raw natural gas. An extended field test to demonstrate system performance under real-world high-pressure conditions is being conducted to convince industry users of the efficiency and reliability of the process. The system was designed and fabricated by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) and installed and operated at BP Amoco's Pascagoula, MS plant. The Gas Research Institute is partially supporting the field demonstration and BP-Amoco helped install the unit and provides onsite operators and utilities. The gas processed by the membrane system meets pipeline specifications for dew point and BTU value and can be delivered without further treatment to the pipeline. Based on data from prior membrane module tests, the process is likely to be significantly less expensive than glycol dehydration followed by propane refrigeration, the principal competitive technology. During the course of this project, MTR has sold 13 commercial units related to the field test technology, and by the end of this demonstration project the process will be ready for broader commercialization. A route to commercialization has been developed during this project and involves collaboration with other companies already servicing the natural gas processing industry.

  18. Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Recover Heavy Hydrocarbons and to Remove Water from Natural Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Kaaeid Lokhandwala

    2007-03-30

    The objective of this project was to design, construct and field demonstrate a membrane system to recover natural gas liquids (NGL) and remove water from raw natural gas. An extended field test to demonstrate system performance under real-world high-pressure conditions was conducted to convince industry users of the efficiency and reliability of the process. The system was designed and fabricated by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) and installed and operated at BP Amoco's Pascagoula, MS plant. The Gas Research Institute partially supported the field demonstration and BP-Amoco helped install the unit and provide onsite operators and utilities. The gas processed by the membrane system meets pipeline specifications for dew point and BTU value and can be delivered without further treatment to the pipeline. During the course of this project, MTR has sold thirteen commercial units related to the field test technology. Revenue generated from new business is already more than four times the research dollars invested in this process by DOE. The process is ready for broader commercialization and the expectation is to pursue the commercialization plans developed during this project, including collaboration with other companies already servicing the natural gas processing industry.

  19. Bell pepper endornavirus: molecular and biological properties, and occurrence in the genus Capsicum.

    PubMed

    Okada, Ryo; Kiyota, Eri; Sabanadzovic, Sead; Moriyama, Hiromitsu; Fukuhara, Toshiyuki; Saha, Prasenjit; Roossinck, Marilyn J; Severin, Ake; Valverde, Rodrigo A

    2011-11-01

    Bell peppers (Capsicum annuum) harbour a large dsRNA virus. The linear genome (14.7 kbp) of two isolates from Japanese and USA bell pepper cultivars were completely sequenced and compared. They shared extensive sequence identity and contained a single, long ORF encoding a 4815 aa protein. This polyprotein contained conserved motifs of putative viral methyltransferase (MTR), helicase 1 (Hel-1), UDP-glycosyltransferase and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. This unique arrangement of conserved domains has not been reported in any of the known endornaviruses. Hence this virus, for which the name Bell pepper endornavirus (BPEV) is proposed, is a distinct species in the genus Endornavirus (family Endornaviridae). The BPEV-encoded polyprotein contains a cysteine-rich region between the MTR and Hel-1 domains, with conserved CXCC motifs shared among several endornaviruses, suggesting an additional functional domain. In agreement with general endornavirus features, BPEV contains a nick in the positive-strand RNA molecule. The virus was detected in all bell pepper cultivars tested and transmitted through seed but not by graft inoculations. Analysis of dsRNA patterns and RT-PCR using degenerate primers revealed putative variants of BPEV, or closely related species, infecting other C. annuum genotypes and three other Capsicum species (C. baccatum, C. chinense and C. frutescens). PMID:21775578

  20. Redox linked flavin sites in extracellular decaheme proteins involved in microbe-mineral electron transfer.

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Edwards, Marcus J.; White, Gaye F.; Norman, Michael; Tome-Fernandez, Alice; Ainsworth, Emma; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David J.; et al

    2015-07-01

    Extracellular microbe-mineral electron transfer is a major driving force for the oxidation of organic carbon in many subsurface environments. Extracellular multi-heme cytochromes of the Shewenella genus play a major role in this process but the mechanism of electron exchange at the interface between cytochrome and acceptor is widely debated. The 1.8 Å x-ray crystal structure of the decaheme MtrC revealed a highly conserved CX?C disulfide that, when substituted for AX?A, severely compromised the ability of S. oneidensis to grow under aerobic conditions. Reductive cleavage of the disulfide in the presence of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) resulted in the reversible formation ofmore »a stable flavocytochrome. Similar results were also observed with other decaheme cytochromes, OmcA, MtrF and UndA. The data suggest that these decaheme cytochromes can transition between highly reactive flavocytochromes or less reactive cytochromes, and that this transition is controlled by a redox active disulfide that responds to the presence of oxygen.« less

  1. Redox linked flavin sites in extracellular decaheme proteins involved in microbe-mineral electron transfer.

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Marcus J.; White, Gaye F.; Norman, Michael; Tome-Fernandez, Alice; Ainsworth, Emma; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David J.; Clarke, Thomas A.

    2015-07-01

    Extracellular microbe-mineral electron transfer is a major driving force for the oxidation of organic carbon in many subsurface environments. Extracellular multi-heme cytochromes of the Shewenella genus play a major role in this process but the mechanism of electron exchange at the interface between cytochrome and acceptor is widely debated. The 1.8 Å x-ray crystal structure of the decaheme MtrC revealed a highly conserved CX?C disulfide that, when substituted for AX?A, severely compromised the ability of S. oneidensis to grow under aerobic conditions. Reductive cleavage of the disulfide in the presence of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) resulted in the reversible formation of a stable flavocytochrome. Similar results were also observed with other decaheme cytochromes, OmcA, MtrF and UndA. The data suggest that these decaheme cytochromes can transition between highly reactive flavocytochromes or less reactive cytochromes, and that this transition is controlled by a redox active disulfide that responds to the presence of oxygen.

  2. Antioxidant and phenolic acid profiles of tissue cultured and acclimatized Merwilla plumbea plantlets in relation to the applied cytokinins.

    PubMed

    Aremu, Adeyemi O; Gruz, Ji?í; Subrtová, Michaela; Szü?ová, Lucie; Doležal, Karel; Bairu, Michael W; Finnie, Jeffrey F; Van Staden, Johannes

    2013-10-15

    Merwilla plumbea (Lindl.) Speta is an important medicinal plant widely used in traditional medicine. We evaluated the effect of five cytokinins [benzyladenine (BA), 2-isopentenyladenine (2iP), meta-topolin (mT), meta-topolin riboside (mTR), and meta-methoxy-9-tetrahydropyran-2-yl-topolin (MemTTHP)] on the level of phenolic acids and antioxidant activity of M. plumbea during the tissue culture and acclimatization stages. Two cytokinins (mT and mTR) significantly improved the antioxidant activity of tissue culture plantlets while the control plantlets were better after acclimatization. Using UPLC-MS/MS, the levels of hydroxybenzoic and hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives (phenolic acids) varied significantly during tissue culture and acclimatization, depending on the cytokinin and plant part analyzed. Vanillic acid (24.9 ?g g?¹) detected in underground parts of tissue culture plants supplemented with BA was the most abundant phenolic acid detected. The current findings indicate that the phytochemicals together with the bioactivity during in vitro propagation of M. plumbea is influenced by the cytokinin type used and the stage of plant material collection. PMID:23747061

  3. Redox Linked Flavin Sites in Extracellular Decaheme Proteins Involved in Microbe-Mineral Electron Transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Marcus J.; White, Gaye F.; Norman, Michael; Tome-Fernandez, Alice; Ainsworth, Emma; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David J.; Clarke, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular microbe-mineral electron transfer is a major driving force for the oxidation of organic carbon in many subsurface environments. Extracellular multi-heme cytochromes of the Shewenella genus play a major role in this process but the mechanism of electron exchange at the interface between cytochrome and acceptor is widely debated. The 1.8?Å x-ray crystal structure of the decaheme MtrC revealed a highly conserved CX8C disulfide that, when substituted for AX8A, severely compromised the ability of S. oneidensis to grow under aerobic conditions. Reductive cleavage of the disulfide in the presence of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) resulted in the reversible formation of a stable flavocytochrome. Similar results were also observed with other decaheme cytochromes, OmcA, MtrF and UndA. The data suggest that these decaheme cytochromes can transition between highly reactive flavocytochromes or less reactive cytochromes, and that this transition is controlled by a redox active disulfide that responds to the presence of oxygen. PMID:26126857

  4. Identification and Characterization of MtoA: a Decaheme c-Type Cytochrome of the Neutrophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing Bacterium Sideroxydans lithotrophicus ES-1

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Juan; Wang, Zheming; Belchik, Sara M.; Edwards, Marcus; Liu, Chongxuan; Kennedy, David W.; Merkley, Eric D.; Lipton, Mary S.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Shi, Liang

    2012-02-08

    The Gram-negative bacterium Sideroxydans lithotrophicus ES-1 (ES-1) grows on FeCO{sub 3} or FeS at oxic-anoxic interfaces at circumneutral pH, and the ES-1-mediated Fe(II) oxidation occurs extracellularly. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying ES-1's ability to oxidize Fe(II) remain unknown. Survey of the ES-1 genome for the genes known for microbial extracellular Fe(II) oxidation revealed that it contained a three-gene cluster encoding an MtrA homologue, an MtrB homologue and a CymA homologue. The homologues of MtrA, MtrB and/or CymA were previously shown to be involved in extracellular Fe(II) oxidation by Rhodopseudomonas palustris TIE-1 and in extracellular Fe(III) reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (MR-1). To distinguish them from those found in MR-1, the identified homologues were named MtoAB and CymA{sub ES-1}, respectively. The gene for MtoA was cloned, and cloned mtoA partially complemented an MR-1 mutant without MtrA in ferrihydrite reduction. Following overexpression in MR-1 cells, recombinant MtoA was purified. Characterization of purified MtoA showed that it was a decaheme c-type cytochrome and oxidized soluble Fe(II). Oxidation of Fe(II) by MtoA was pH- and Fe(II)-complexing ligand-dependent. Under conditions tested, MtoA oxidized Fe(II) at pH ranging from 7-9, and optimal oxidation occurred at pH 9, possibly because of the attendant net increase of [Fe(OH){sup +}] at higher pH. MtoA oxidized Fe(II) complexed with different ligands at different rates. The reaction rates followed the order Fe(II)Cl2 > Fe(II)-citrate > Fe(III)-NTA > Fe(II)-EDTA with the second-order rate constants ranging from 5.5 x 10{sup -3} {micro}M{sup -1}s{sup -1} for oxidation of Fe(II)Cl{sub 2} to 1.0 x 10{sup -3} {micro}M{sup -1}s{sup -1} for oxidation of Fe(II)-EDTA. Thermodynamic modeling shows that redox reaction rate differences for the different Fe(II)-complexes correlated with estimated reaction-free energies. Collectively, these results suggest that MtoA is a functional Fe(II)-oxidizing protein that, by working in concert with MtoB and CymAES 1, may oxidize the Fe(II) on the bacterial surface and transfer released electrons across the bacterial cell envelope to the quinone pool in the inner membrane during extracellular Fe(II) oxidation by ES-1.

  5. A Modular Re-configurable Rover System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouloubasis, A.; McKee, G.; Active Robotics Lab

    In this paper we present the novel concepts incorporated in a planetary surface exploration rover design that is currently under development. The Multitasking Rover (MTR) aims to demonstrate functionality that will cover many of the current and future needs such as rough-terrain mobility, modularity and upgradeability [1]. The rover system has enhanced mobility characteristics. It operates in conjunction with Science Packs (SPs) and Tool Packs (TPs) - modules attached to the main frame of the rover, which are either special tools or science instruments and alter the operation capabilities of the system. To date, each rover system design is very much task driven for example, the scenario of cooperative transportation of extended payloads [2], comprises two rovers each equipped with a manipulator dedicated to the task [3]. The MTR approach focuses mostly on modularity and upgradeability presenting at the same time a fair amount of internal re-configurability for the sake of rough terrain stability. The rover itself does not carry any scientific instruments or tools. To carry out the scenario mentioned above, the MTR would have to locate and pick-up a TP with the associated manipulator. After the completion of the task the TP could be put away to a storage location enabling the rover to utilize a different Pack. The rover will not only offer mobility to these modules, but also use them as tools, transforming its role and functionality. The advantage of this approach is that instead of sending a large number of rovers to perform a variety of tasks, a smaller number of MTRs could be deployed with a large number of SPs/TPs, offering multiples of the functionality at a reduced payload. Two SPs or TPs (or a combination of) can be carried and deployed. One of the key elements in the design of the four wheeled rover, lies within its suspension system. It comprises a linear actuator located within each leg and also an active differential linking the two shoulders. This novel design allows the MTR to lift, lower, roll or tilt its body. It also provides the ability to lift any of the legs by nearly 300mm, enhancing internal re-configurability and therefore rough terrain stability off the robotic vehicle. A modular software and control architecture will be used so that integration to, and operation through the MTR, of different Packs can be demonstrated. An on-board high-level controller [4] will communicate with a small network of micro-controllers through an RS485 bus. Additional processing power could be obtained through a Pack with equivalent or higher computational capabilities. 1 The nature of the system offers many opportunities for behavior based control. The control system must accommodate not only rover based behaviors like obstacle avoidance and vehicle stabilization, but also any additional behaviors that different Packs may introduce. The Ego-Behavior Architecture (EBA) [5] comprises a number of behaviors which operate autonomously and independent of each other. This facilitates the design and suits the operation of the MTR since it fulfills the need for uncomplicated assimilation of new behaviors in the existing architecture. Our work at the moment focuses on the design and construction of the mechanical and electronic systems for the MTR and an associated Pack. References [1] NASA, Human Exploration of Mars: The Reference Mission (Version 3.0 with June, 1998 Addendum) of the NASA Mars Exploration Study Team, Exploration Office, Advanced Development Office, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX 77058, June, 1998. [2] A. Trebi-Ollennu, H Das Nayer, H Aghazarian, A ganino, P Pirjanian, B Kennedy, T Huntsberger and P Schenker, Mars Rover Pair Cooperatively Transporting a Long Payload, in Proceedings of the 2002 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, May 2002, pp. 3136-3141. [3] A. K. Bouloubasis, G. T McKee, P. S. Schenker, A Behavior-Based Manipulator for Multi-Robot Transport Tasks, in proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA) 2003, Taipei, Taiwan, Septembe

  6. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian

    1999-09-30

    The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) demonstration of the diamond wire cutting technology on the surrogate of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), Figure 1, was performed from August 23-September 3, 1999. The plated diamond wire, Figure 2, was successful in cutting through all components of the TFTR surrogate including stainless steel, inconel and graphite. The demonstration tested three different void fill materials (mortar with sand, Rheocell-15, and foam) and three cooling systems (water, air, and liquid nitrogen). The optimum combination was determined to be the use of the low-density concrete void fill, Rheocell-15 with an average density of 52 lbs/ft{sup 3}, using a water coolant. However, the liquid nitrogen performed better than expected with only minor problems and was considered to be a successful demonstration of the Bluegrass Concrete Cutting, Inc. proprietary liquid-nitrogen coolant system. Data from the demonstration is being calculated and a summary of the technology demonstration will be included in the October monthly report. An ITSR will be written comparing the diamond wire saw to the plasma arc (baseline) technology. The MTR Chemical Protective Suit, a proprietary new suit from Kimberly Clark, was evaluated from 8/9/99 to 8/12/99 at Beaver, WV. This particular suit was tested on subjects performing three different tasks: climbing through a horizontal confined space, vertical confined space (pit), and loading and unloading material using a wheel barrow. Multiple test subjects performed each task for 20 minutes each. Performance of the innovative suit was compared to two commonly used types of protective clothing. Vital statistics, including body temperature and heart rate, were continuously monitored and recorded by an authorized physician. A summary of the demonstration will be included in the October monthly report. Along with the MTR Chemical Protective Suit, the VitalSense{trademark} Telemetric Monitoring System from Mini Mitter Co., Inc. was evaluated. A summary of the demonstration will be included in the October monthly report. A Kool-Vest from MicroClimate Systems, Inc. was evaluated during assessment at Beaver, WV from 8/16/99 to 8/17/99. The evaluation was performed in the same manner as the MTR Chemical Protective Suit described above. A summary of the demonstration will be included in the October monthly report. A brochure announcing the new Gateway to Environmental Technology (GET) website was produced by FIU-HCET and is being distributed to the D&D community by FETC-DDFA. The website provides links to the TIS and other decision support systems developed at FIU-HCET.

  7. Commuter exposure to aromatic VOCs in public transportation modes in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Lau, Wai-Lun; Chan, Lo-Yin

    2003-06-01

    This study investigated commuter exposure to aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in different commuting microenvironments. In Hong Kong, more than 90% of the local citizens rely on public transport facilities in their daily commutes. During five winter months in late 2001 and early 2002, in-vehicle monitoring was performed in nine popular public transportation modes: tram, public light bus, air-conditioned bus, non-air-conditioned bus, taxi, ferry and three railway systems (Mass Transit Railway-MTR, Kowloon-Canton Railway-KCR and Light Rail Transit-LRT). These transports were grouped into three categories: railway transport, roadway transport and marine transport. Air samples of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and m/p/o-xylene were collected by canisters and analysed by gas chromatography and mass selective detector technique. Results indicated that the in-vehicle VOC exposure levels were greatly influenced by the mode of transport. For benzene, mean concentration ranged from 4.8 to 6.1 microg x m(-3) in roadway transports, 3.0-3.8 microg x m(-3) in railway transports and it was 2.1 microg x m(-3) in ferry. Regardless of the results in MTR and air-conditioned buses, the VOC levels in roadway transport were the highest and was followed by railway transport. The exposure levels in marine transport were the lowest. The TEX concentrations were found to be substantially higher in air-conditioned buses and MTR trains than in other transports, suggesting the existence of additional solvent-related sources in their vehicle interiors. Measurements in non-air-conditioned double deck vehicles indicate that there was slightly higher VOC levels in the lower deck than in the upper deck microenvironment. The average upper to lower deck exposure ratio ranged from 0.79 to 0.87 in trams and 0.78-0.83 in non-air-conditioned buses, depending on the compound of concern. The VOC exposure levels of public transport commuters in Hong Kong are far lower than those in most oversea cities. The experimental concentrations obtained in this study are within the relevant health-protecting limits as stated in the Hong Kong Indoor Air Quality Objective. Influences of recent VOC pollution control measures and local traffic characteristics on in-vehicle level are discussed. PMID:12738208

  8. Scale 4.4 Validation for the DFS System at SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, A.

    1999-10-07

    The document is a compilation of the work to date dealing with the validation of the CSAS25 sequence in SCALE 4.4. using the 27-group ENDF/B-IV and the 238-group ENDF/B-V cross section libraries, executed on the Digital Equipment Alpha Processors workstation cluster at WSMS. Revisions to this document will be made as new validation information is generated; therefore, this document should be used as the reference point for bias and bias uncertainties for SCALE 4.4-related work. This initial issue of the report (Revision 0) contains bias and bias uncertainty for plutonium and highly enriched uranium solutions and metal systems, including MTR type fuel.

  9. Short telomeres, even in the presence of telomerase, limit tissue renewal capacity.

    PubMed

    Hao, Ling-Yang; Armanios, Mary; Strong, Margaret A; Karim, Baktiar; Feldser, David M; Huso, David; Greider, Carol W

    2005-12-16

    Autosomal-dominant dyskeratosis congenita is associated with heterozygous mutations in telomerase. To examine the dosage effect of telomerase, we generated a line of mTR+/- mice on the CAST/EiJ background, which has short telomeres. Interbreeding of heterozygotes resulted in progressive telomere shortening, indicating that limiting telomerase compromises telomere maintenance. In later-generation heterozygotes, we observed a decrease in tissue renewal capacity in the bone marrow, intestines, and testes that resembled defects seen in dyskeratosis congenita patients. The progressive worsening of disease with decreasing telomere length suggests that short telomeres, not telomerase level, cause stem cell failure. Further, wild-type mice derived from the late-generation heterozygous parents, termed wt*, also had short telomeres and displayed a germ cell defect, indicating that telomere length determines these phenotypes. We propose that short telomeres in mice that have normal telomerase levels can cause an occult form of genetic disease. PMID:16360040

  10. Application of derivative spectrophotometry under orthogonal polynomial at unequal intervals: Determination of metronidazole and nystatin in their pharmaceutical mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korany, Mohamed A.; Abdine, Heba H.; Ragab, Marwa A. A.; Aboras, Sara I.

    2015-05-01

    This paper discusses a general method for the use of orthogonal polynomials for unequal intervals (OPUI) to eliminate interferences in two-component spectrophotometric analysis. In this paper, a new approach was developed by using first derivative D1 curve instead of absorbance curve to be convoluted using OPUI method for the determination of metronidazole (MTR) and nystatin (NYS) in their mixture. After applying derivative treatment of the absorption data many maxima and minima points appeared giving characteristic shape for each drug allowing the selection of different number of points for the OPUI method for each drug. This allows the specific and selective determination of each drug in presence of the other and in presence of any matrix interference. The method is particularly useful when the two absorption spectra have considerable overlap. The results obtained are encouraging and suggest that the method can be widely applied to similar problems.

  11. Application of derivative spectrophotometry under orthogonal polynomial at unequal intervals: determination of metronidazole and nystatin in their pharmaceutical mixture.

    PubMed

    Korany, Mohamed A; Abdine, Heba H; Ragab, Marwa A A; Aboras, Sara I

    2015-05-15

    This paper discusses a general method for the use of orthogonal polynomials for unequal intervals (OPUI) to eliminate interferences in two-component spectrophotometric analysis. In this paper, a new approach was developed by using first derivative D1 curve instead of absorbance curve to be convoluted using OPUI method for the determination of metronidazole (MTR) and nystatin (NYS) in their mixture. After applying derivative treatment of the absorption data many maxima and minima points appeared giving characteristic shape for each drug allowing the selection of different number of points for the OPUI method for each drug. This allows the specific and selective determination of each drug in presence of the other and in presence of any matrix interference. The method is particularly useful when the two absorption spectra have considerable overlap. The results obtained are encouraging and suggest that the method can be widely applied to similar problems. PMID:25748283

  12. Thermal property measurement of solder joints fabricated by self-propagating exothermic reaction in Al/Ni multilayer film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, Shugo; Kanetsuki, Shunsuke; Morino, Katsuya; Kuroishi, Junki; Namazu, Takahiro

    2015-06-01

    To realize the application of reactive joint process to electronic packaging, we analyze thermal resistance for solder joints fabricated by using Al/Ni self-propagating exothermic reaction. Laser flash method with response function analysis is used for thermal resistance measurement. The specimens with 4-8-µm-thick Sn-3.5Ag solder joint have thermal resistances ranging from 5.0 × 10-6 to 8.1 × 10-6 m2 K/W. In the specimen with 12-µm-thick SnAg solder joint, periodical heating analysis suggests that high and low thermal resistance areas happen to coexist due to incomplete bonding. Micro thermo-reflectance (m-TR) analysis suggests that thermal effusivity of reacted NiAl layer is lower than expected. Thermal resistance of the joints will be influenced by voids, cracks, and grain boundaries in reacted NiAl layer.

  13. Unbalanced fermentation of glycerol in Escherichia coli via heterologous production of an electron transport chain and electrode interaction in microbial electrochemical cells.

    PubMed

    Sturm-Richter, Katrin; Golitsch, Frederik; Sturm, Gunnar; Kipf, Elena; Dittrich, André; Beblawy, Sebastian; Kerzenmacher, Sven; Gescher, Johannes

    2015-06-01

    Microbial electrochemical cells are an emerging technology for achieving unbalanced fermentations. However, organisms that can serve as potential biocatalysts for this application are limited by their narrow substrate spectrum. This study describes the reprogramming of Escherichia coli for the efficient use of anodes as electron acceptors. Electron transfer into the periplasm was accelerated by 183% via heterologous expression of the c-type cytochromes CymA, MtrA and STC from Shewanella oneidensis. STC was identified as a target for heterologous expression via a two-stage screening approach. First, mass spectroscopic analysis revealed natively expressed cytochromes in S. oneidensis. Thereafter, the corresponding genes were cloned and expressed in E. coli to quantify periplasmic electron transfer activity using methylene blue. This redox dye was further used to expand electron transfer to carbon electrode surfaces. The results demonstrate that E. coli can be reprogrammed from glycerol fermentation to respiration upon production of the new electron transport chain. PMID:25812811

  14. Evidence of a bigenomic regulation of mitochondrial gene expression by thyroid hormone during rat brain development

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Rohit Anthony; Pathak, Amrita; Mohan, Vishwa; Babu, Satish; Pal, Amit; Khare, Drirh; Godbole, Madan M.

    2010-07-02

    Hypothyroidism during early mammalian brain development is associated with decreased expression of various mitochondrial encoded genes along with evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction. However, in-spite of the similarities between neurological disorders caused by perinatal hypothyroidism and those caused by various genetic mitochondrial defects we still do not know as to how thyroid hormone (TH) regulates mitochondrial transcription during development and whether this regulation by TH is nuclear mediated or through mitochondrial TH receptors? We here in rat cerebellum show that hypothyroidism causes reduction in expression of nuclear encoded genes controlling mitochondrial biogenesis like PGC-1{alpha}, NRF-1{alpha} and Tfam. Also, we for the first time demonstrate a mitochondrial localization of thyroid hormone receptor (mTR) isoform in developing brain capable of binding a TH response element (DR2) present in D-loop region of mitochondrial DNA. These results thus indicate an integrated nuclear-mitochondrial cross talk in regulation of mitochondrial transcription by TH during brain development.

  15. Genetic variation in homocysteine metabolism, cognition, and white matter lesions.

    PubMed

    de Lau, Lonneke M L; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Uitterlinden, André G; Smith, A David; Refsum, Helga; Johnston, Carole; Breteler, Monique M B

    2010-11-01

    Several studies have shown an association between homocysteine concentration and cognitive performance or cerebral white matter lesions. However, variations in genes encoding for enzymes and other proteins that play a role in homocysteine metabolism have hardly been evaluated in relation to these outcome measures. In the population-based Rotterdam Scan Study, we examined the association of seven polymorphisms of genes involved in homocysteine metabolism (MTHFR 677C>T, MTHFR 1298A>C, RFC 80G>A, TC 776C>G, MTR 2756A>G, MTRR 66A>G, and CBS 844ins68) with plasma total homocysteine, cognitive performance, and cerebral white matter lesions among 1011 non-demented elderly participants. Of all the studied polymorphisms, only MTHFR 677C>T was associated with homocysteine concentration. No significant relationship was observed for any of the polymorphisms with cognitive performance or severity of cerebral white matter lesions. PMID:19019492

  16. Far field tsunami simulations of the 1755 Lisbon earthquake: Implications for tsunami hazard to the U.S. East Coast and the Caribbean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barkan, R.; ten Brink, U.S.; Lin, J.

    2009-01-01

    The great Lisbon earthquake of November 1st, 1755 with an estimated moment magnitude of 8.5-9.0 was the most destructive earthquake in European history. The associated tsunami run-up was reported to have reached 5-15??m along the Portuguese and Moroccan coasts and the run-up was significant at the Azores and Madeira Island. Run-up reports from a trans-oceanic tsunami were documented in the Caribbean, Brazil and Newfoundland (Canada). No reports were documented along the U.S. East Coast. Many attempts have been made to characterize the 1755 Lisbon earthquake source using geophysical surveys and modeling the near-field earthquake intensity and tsunami effects. Studying far field effects, as presented in this paper, is advantageous in establishing constraints on source location and strike orientation because trans-oceanic tsunamis are less influenced by near source bathymetry and are unaffected by triggered submarine landslides at the source. Source location, fault orientation and bathymetry are the main elements governing transatlantic tsunami propagation to sites along the U.S. East Coast, much more than distance from the source and continental shelf width. Results of our far and near-field tsunami simulations based on relative amplitude comparison limit the earthquake source area to a region located south of the Gorringe Bank in the center of the Horseshoe Plain. This is in contrast with previously suggested sources such as Marqu??s de Pombal Fault, and Gulf of C??diz Fault, which are farther east of the Horseshoe Plain. The earthquake was likely to be a thrust event on a fault striking ~ 345?? and dipping to the ENE as opposed to the suggested earthquake source of the Gorringe Bank Fault, which trends NE-SW. Gorringe Bank, the Madeira-Tore Rise (MTR), and the Azores appear to have acted as topographic scatterers for tsunami energy, shielding most of the U.S. East Coast from the 1755 Lisbon tsunami. Additional simulations to assess tsunami hazard to the U.S. East Coast from possible future earthquakes along the Azores-Iberia plate boundary indicate that sources west of the MTR and in the Gulf of Cadiz may affect the southeastern coast of the U.S. The Azores-Iberia plate boundary west of the MTR is characterized by strike-slip faults, not thrusts, but the Gulf of Cadiz may have thrust faults. Southern Florida seems to be at risk from sources located east of MTR and South of the Gorringe Bank, but it is mostly shielded by the Bahamas. Higher resolution near-shore bathymetry along the U.S. East Coast and the Caribbean as well as a detailed study of potential tsunami sources in the central west part of the Horseshoe Plain are necessary to verify our simulation results. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  17. Conversion and Evaluation of the University of Massachusetts Lowell Research Reactor From High-Enriched To Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Leo M. Bobek

    2003-11-19

    The process for converting the University of Massachusetts Lowell Research Reactor (UMLRR) from high-enrichment uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enrichment uranium (LEU) fuel began in 1988. Several years of design reviews, computational modeling, and thermal hydraulic analyses resulted in a preliminary reference core design and configuration based on 20 standard, MTR-type, flat-plate, 19.75% enriched, uranium silicide (u3Si2) fuel elements. A final safety analysis for the fuel conversion was submitted to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 1993. The NRC made two additional requests for additional information and supplements were submitted in 1994 and 1997. The new UMLRR Reactor Supervisor initiated an effort to change the LEU reference core configuration to eliminate a complicated control rod modification needed for the smaller core.

  18. Effective delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron lifetime of Tehran research reactor mixed-core

    PubMed Central

    Lashkari, A.; Khalafi, H.; Kazeminejad, H.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, kinetic parameters of Tehran research reactor (TRR) mixed cores have been calculated. The mixed core configurations are made by replacement of the low enriched uranium control fuel elements with highly enriched uranium control fuel elements in the reference core. The MTR_PC package, a nuclear reactor analysis tool, is used to perform the analysis. Simulations were carried out to compute effective delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron lifetime. Calculation of kinetic parameters is necessary for reactivity and power excursion transient analysis. The results of this research show that effective delayed neutron fraction decreases and prompt neutron lifetime increases with the fuels burn-up. Also, by increasing the number of highly enriched uranium control fuel elements in the reference core, the prompt neutron lifetime increases, but effective delayed neutron fraction does not show any considerable change. PMID:24976672

  19. Dependence of positive and negative sprite morphology on lightning characteristics and upper atmospheric ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jianqi; Celestin, Sebastien; Pasko, Victor P.

    2013-05-01

    Carrot sprites, exhibiting both upward and downward propagating streamers, and columniform sprites, characterized by predominantly vertical downward streamers, represent two distinct morphological classes of lightning-driven transient luminous events in the upper atmosphere. It is found that positive cloud-to-ground lightning discharges (+CGs) associated with large charge moment changes (QhQ) tend to produce carrot sprites with the presence of a mesospheric region where the electric field exceeds the value 0.8Ek and persists for <mtr columnalign="center">>mtr> columnalign="center">˜mtr>2 ms, whereas those associated with small QhQ are only able to produce columniform sprites. Columniform sprites may also appear in the periphery of a sprite halo produced by +CGs associated with large QhQ. For a sufficiently large QhQ, the time dynamics of the QhQ determines the specific shape of the carrot sprites. In the case when the sufficiently large QhQ is produced mainly by an impulsive return stroke, strong electric field is produced at high altitudes and manifests as a bright halo, and the corresponding conductivity enhancement lowers/enhances the probability of streamer initiation inside/below the sprite halo. A more impulsive return stroke leads to a more significant conductivity enhancement (i.e., a brighter halo). This conductivity enhancement also leads to fast decay and termination of the upper diffuse region of carrot sprites because it effectively screens out the electric field at high altitudes. On the contrary, if the sufficiently large QhQ is produced by a weak return stroke (i.e., a dim halo) accompanied by intense continuing current, the lightning-induced electric field at high altitudes persists at a level that is comparable to Ek, and therefore an extensive upper diffuse region can develop. Furthermore, we demonstrate that `negative sprites' (produced by -CGs) should be necessarily carrot sprites and most likely accompanied by a detectable halo, since the initiation of upward positive streamers is always easier than that of downward negative streamers, and -CGs are usually associated with impulsive return stroke with no continuing current. We also conjecture that in some cases, fast decaying single-headed upward positive streamers produced by -CGs may appear as bright spots/patches. We show that the threshold charge moment changes of positive and negative sprites are, respectively, ~320 and ~500 C km under typical nighttime conditions assumed in this study. These different initiation thresholds, along with the different applied electric field required for stable propagation of positive and negative streamers and the fact that +CGs much more frequently produce large charge moment changes, represent three major factors in the polarity asymmetry of +CGs and -CGs in producing sprite streamers. We further demonstrate that lower mesospheric ambient conductivity leads to smaller threshold charge moment change required for the production of carrot sprites. We suggest that geographical and temporal conductivity variations in the lower ionosphere documented in earlier studies, along with the seasonal and inter-annual variations of thunderstorm activity that lead to different lightning characteristics in the troposphere, account for the different morphological features of sprites observed in different observation campaigns.

  20. Selenite reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is mediated by fumarate reductase in periplasm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dao-Bo; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Wu, Chao; Li, Wen-Wei; Li, Na; Yang, Zong-Chuang; Tong, Zhong-Hua; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-01-01

    In situ reduction of selenite to elemental selenium (Se(0)), by microorganisms in sediments and soils is an important process and greatly affects the environmental distribution and the biological effects of selenium. However, the mechanism behind such a biological process remains unrevealed yet. Here we use Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a widely-distributed dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium with a powerful and diverse respiration capability, to evaluate the involvement of anaerobic respiration system in the microbial selenite reduction. With mutants analysis, we identify fumarate reductase FccA as the terminal reductase of selenite in periplasm. Moreover, we find that such a reduction is dependent on central respiration c-type cytochrome CymA. In contrast, nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, and the Mtr electron transfer pathway do not work as selenite reductases. These findings reveal a previously unrecognized role of anaerobic respiration reductases of S. oneidensis MR-1 in selenite reduction and geochemical cycles of selenium in sediments and soils.

  1. Characteristics of the GOCE Orbit in the Re-Entry Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamm, Johann; Lengsfeld, Alexander; Kekce, Ugur; Pape, Werner; Shabanloui, Akbar; Naeimi, Majid; Flury, Jakob

    2015-03-01

    The GOCE de-orbiting phase was started as the Ion thruster was switched off on 21st October 2013. Beginning with this, the transition from the Drag-Free and Attitude Control System (DFACS) to Fine Pointing Mode (FPM) started, so the Gradiometer was no longer in the attitude control loop. On 11th of November 2013, the de-orbiting phase ended with the re-entry of GOCE in the Earth’s atmosphere, near to the Falkland Islands. As a part of a research project, we analyzed the 20 days of the GOCE data during de-orbiting phase. We investigate: Electrostatic Gravity Gradiometer (EGG), DFACS Accelerometer data, Magneto-Torques Currents (MTR) data, Precise Science Orbits (PSO) data, Satellite to Satellite Tracking (SST) data and Atmospheric Models (MSISE-90, NRMSISE-00).

  2. Effect of yoga on the Myofascial Pain Syndrome of neck

    PubMed Central

    Sharan, D; Manjula, M; Urmi, D; Ajeesh, PS

    2014-01-01

    Myofascial Pain Syndrome (MPS) refers to pain attributed to muscle and its surrounding fascia, which is associated with “myofascial trigger points” (MTrPs). MTrPs in the trapezius has been proposed as the main cause of temporal and cervicogenic headache and neck pain. Literature shows that the prevalence of various musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) among physiotherapists is high. Yoga has traditionally been used to treat MSDs in various populations. But there is scarcity of literature which explains the effects of yoga on reducing MPS of the neck in terms of various physical parameters and subjective responses. Therefore, a pilot study was done among eight physiotherapists with minimum six months of experience. A structured yoga protocol was designed and implemented for five days in a week for four weeks. The outcome variables were Disability of Arm, Shoulder and Hands (DASH) score, Neck Disability Index (NDI), Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), Pressure Pain Threshold (PPT) for Trigger Points, Cervical Range of Motion (CROM) - active & passive, grip and pinch strengths. The variables were compared before and after the intervention. Finally, the result revealed that all the variables (DASH: P<0.00, NDI: P<0.00, VAS: P<0.00, PPT: Left: P<0.00, PPT: Right: P<0.00, Grip strength: left: P<0.00, Grip strength: right: P<0.01, Key pinch: left: P<0.01, Key pinch: right: P<0.01, Palmar pinch: left: P<0.01, Palmar pinch: right: P<0.00, Tip pinch: left: P<0.01, Tip pinch: Right: P<0.01) improved significantly after intervention. PMID:25035608

  3. Simulations of the MATROSHKA experiment at the international space station using PHITS.

    PubMed

    Sihver, L; Sato, T; Puchalska, M; Reitz, G

    2010-08-01

    Concerns about the biological effects of space radiation are increasing rapidly due to the perspective of long-duration manned missions, both in relation to the International Space Station (ISS) and to manned interplanetary missions to Moon and Mars in the future. As a preparation for these long-duration space missions, it is important to ensure an excellent capability to evaluate the impact of space radiation on human health, in order to secure the safety of the astronauts/cosmonauts and minimize their risks. It is therefore necessary to measure the radiation load on the personnel both inside and outside the space vehicles and certify that organ- and tissue-equivalent doses can be simulated as accurate as possible. In this paper, simulations are presented using the three-dimensional Monte Carlo Particle and Heavy-Ion Transport code System (PHITS) (Iwase et al. in J Nucl Sci Tech 39(11):1142-1151, 2002) of long-term dose measurements performed with the European Space Agency-supported MATROSHKA (MTR) experiment (Reitz and Berger in Radiat Prot Dosim 120:442-445, 2006). MATROSHKA is an anthropomorphic phantom containing over 6,000 radiation detectors, mimicking a human head and torso. The MTR experiment, led by the German Aerospace Center (DLR), was launched in January 2004 and has measured the absorbed doses from space radiation both inside and outside the ISS. Comparisons of simulations with measurements outside the ISS are presented. The results indicate that PHITS is a suitable tool for estimation of doses received from cosmic radiation and for study of the shielding of spacecraft against cosmic radiation. PMID:20496176

  4. Relapse profile of early breast cancer according to immunohistochemical subtypes: guidance for patient’s follow up?

    PubMed Central

    Boussen, H.; Labidi, S.; Benna, F.; Afrit, M.; Rahal, K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the profile of annual recurrence rate (ARR) of patients with early breast cancer (BC) in Tunisia. Patients and methods: We classified 293 patients with histologically confirmed early BC relapsing after 1 year of follow up into three subgroups: hormone receptor (HR)+ ‘HR’ [estrogen receptor (ER)+ or progesterone receptor (PR)+ and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)–], triple negative ‘TN’ (ER–, PR– and HER2 score 0/1 or fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)/chromogenic in situ hybridization negative) and HER2 overexpression ‘HER2’ (HER2+). ARR was restricted to follow-up contribution of each specified time interval. The HR group was the reference group for comparison. Results: A higher proportion of patients who were up to 35 years old (18% versus 10%, p = 0.04), and patients with obesity (46% versus 26%, p = 0.045) was seen in the TN group. Median time to relapse (MTR) was shorter in TN and HER2 groups than in HR patients (20 and 29 months compared with 56 months, respectively, p < 0.001). In the HR group, the ARR was 22%, 16% and 10% at 3, 4 and 5 years respectively, becoming less than 3% at 7 years. In the TN group, 71% of patients relapsed during the first 2 years and the ARR declined rapidly to less than 1.5% after 4 years. In the HER2 group, the ARR peaked at 2 years (29%) and decreased significantly to 7% and 3% at 5 and 7 years respectively. Adjuvant trastuzumab delayed the MTR from 24 to 34 months (p = 0.022). Conclusion: The relapse risk in Tunisian patients is higher in young women and patients with HER2+ and TN tumors. A long and close follow up is recommended for patients with HR and HER2. Conversely, we suggest that follow up in patients with TN could be spaced after 4 years (ARR being <1.5% after this period). PMID:26674096

  5. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of 5'-methylthioribose kinase from Bacillus subtilis and Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Ku, Shao Yang; Yip, Patrick; Cornell, Kenneth A; Riscoe, Michael K; Howell, P Lynne

    2004-01-01

    Recombinant Bacillus subtilis 5'-methylthioribose (MTR) kinase has been expressed, purified and subsequently crystallized using the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion technique. With PEG 2000MME as the precipitant, two different crystal forms have been grown in the absence and presence of the detergent CHAPS. These crystals belong to space groups P2(1)2(1)2(1) (unit-cell parameters a = 193.7, b = 83.2, c = 51.6 A) and P2(1)2(1)2 (unit-cell parameters a = 213.8, b = 83.2, c = 51.5 A), respectively. The crystals grown in the presence of CHAPS diffract to 2.2 A resolution at Station X8C, National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). For both crystal forms, the presence of two monomers per asymmetric unit is predicted (Matthews coefficient V(M) = 2.29 and 2.52 A(3) Da(-1), respectively). Recombinant C-terminally histidine-tagged Arabidopsis thaliana MTR kinase has also been expressed, purified and refolded into its active form. Rod-shaped crystals of this protein were grown from PEG 8000 using the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion technique. These crystals exhibit the symmetry of space group C2 (unit-cell parameters a = 162.3, b = 83.3, c = 91.0 A, beta = 117.8 degrees ) and diffract to 1.9 A resolution at Station X8C, NSLS. Two monomers are estimated to be present in the asymmetric unit (V(M) = 2.82 A(3) Da(-1)). PMID:14684902

  6. Transcriptional and proteomic analyses of two-component response regulators in multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lei; Yang, Liu; Zeng, Xianfei; Danzheng, Jiacuo; Zheng, Qing; Liu, Jiayun; Liu, Feng; Xin, Yijuan; Cheng, Xiaodong; Su, Mingquan; Ma, Yueyun; Hao, Xiaoke

    2015-07-01

    Two-component systems (TCSs) have been reported to exhibit a sensing and responding role under drug stress that induces drug resistance in several bacterial species. However, the relationship between TCSs and multidrug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis has not been comprehensively analysed to date. In this study, 90 M. tuberculosis clinical isolates were analysed using 15-loci mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit (MIRU)-variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) typing and repetitive extragenic palindromic (rep)-PCR-based DNA fingerprinting. The results showed that all of the isolates were of the Beijing lineage, and strains with a drug-susceptible phenotype had not diverged into similar genotype clusters. Expression analysis of 13 response regulators of TCSs using real-time PCR and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) proteomic analysis demonstrated that four response regulator genes (devR, mtrA, regX3 and Rv3143) were significantly upregulated in multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains compared with the laboratory strain H37Rv as well as drug-susceptible and isoniazid-monoresistant strains (P<0.05). DNA sequencing revealed that the promoter regions of devR, mtrA, regX3 and Rv3143 did not contain any mutations. Moreover, expression of the four genes could be induced by most of the four first-line antitubercular agents. In addition, either deletion or overexpression of devR in Mycobacterium bovis BCG did not alter its sensitivity to the four antitubercular drugs. This suggests that upregulation of devR, which is common in MDR-TB strains, might be induced by drug stress and hypoxic adaptation following the acquisition of multidrug resistance. PMID:25937537

  7. PROPAGATING WAVES TRANSVERSE TO THE MAGNETIC FIELD IN A SOLAR PROMINENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Schmieder, B.; Kucera, T. A.; Knizhnik, K.; Luna, M.; Lopez-Ariste, A.; Toot, D.

    2013-11-10

    We report an unusual set of observations of waves in a large prominence pillar that consist of pulses propagating perpendicular to the prominence magnetic field. We observe a huge quiescent prominence with the Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in EUV on 2012 October 10 and only a part of it, the pillar, which is a foot or barb of the prominence, with the Hinode Solar Optical Telescope (SOT; in Ca II and H? lines), Sac Peak (in H?, H?, and Na-D lines), and THEMIS ({sup T}élescope Héliographique pour l' Etude du Magnétisme et des Instabilités Solaires{sup )} with the MTR (MulTi-Raies) spectropolarimeter (in He D{sub 3} line). The THEMIS/MTR data indicates that the magnetic field in the pillar is essentially horizontal and the observations in the optical domain show a large number of horizontally aligned features on a much smaller scale than the pillar as a whole. The data are consistent with a model of cool prominence plasma trapped in the dips of horizontal field lines. The SOT and Sac Peak data over the four hour observing period show vertical oscillations appearing as wave pulses. These pulses, which include a Doppler signature, move vertically, perpendicular to the field direction, along thin quasi-vertical columns in the much broader pillar. The pulses have a velocity of propagation of about 10 km s{sup –1}, a period of about 300 s, and a wavelength around 2000 km. We interpret these waves in terms of fast magnetosonic waves and discuss possible wave drivers.

  8. NASA Reactor Facility Hazards Summary. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    The Lewis Research Center of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration proposes to build a nuclear research reactor which will be located in the Plum Brook Ordnance Works near Sandusky, Ohio. The purpose of this report is to inform the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards of the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission in regard to the design Lq of the reactor facility, the characteristics of the site, and the hazards of operation at this location. The purpose of this research reactor is to make pumped loop studies of aircraft reactor fuel elements and other reactor components, radiation effects studies on aircraft reactor materials and equipment, shielding studies, and nuclear and solid state physics experiments. The reactor is light water cooled and moderated of the MTR-type with a primary beryllium reflector and a secondary water reflector. The core initially will be a 3 by 9 array of MTR-type fuel elements and is designed for operation up to a power of 60 megawatts. The reactor facility is described in general terms. This is followed by a discussion of the nuclear characteristics and performance of the reactor. Then details of the reactor control system are discussed. A summary of the site characteristics is then presented followed by a discussion of the larger type of experiments which may eventually be operated in this facility. The considerations for normal operation are concluded with a proposed method of handling fuel elements and radioactive wastes. The potential hazards involved with failures or malfunctions of this facility are considered in some detail. These are examined first from the standpoint of preventing them or minimizing their effects and second from the standpoint of what effect they might have on the reactor facility staff and the surrounding population. The most essential feature of the design for location at the proposed site is containment of the maximum credible accident.

  9. Noise modeling for MOAs and ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Michael J.; Lee, Robert A.

    Whenever there is a reallocation of DOD fixed- or rotary-wing aircraft or a change in the use of the airspace requirements, either an Environmental Assessment or an Environmental Impact Statement must be prepared. These environmental studies require an analysis of the noise impacts resulting from aircraft operations surrounding the airports and under Military Training Routes (MTR's), Military Operating Areas (MOA's), and Ranges. NOISEMAP and ROUTEMAP were developed for the purpose of estimating the noise levels around military airports and under MTR's. Neither of these programs is suitable for estimating noise levels under MOA's or Ranges. MR NMAP is a PC-based computer model that has been developed to calculate the noise levels under MOA's and ranges. The program calculates L(sub dn), CNEL, L(sub eq), SEL, L(sub max), and where appropriate L(sub dnmr). The program output is a tabular form or in graphics suitable for inclusion in reports. The computer program is designed for use by environmental planning personnel who are familiar with MOA and range operations and with noise, but are not necessarily expert. The program will be widely distributed to DOD planners and contractors that have a requirement to make noise estimates. A companion graphical user interface (GUI) computer program called MR OPS has been developed that allows the user to draw the airspace, specify areas of high/medium/low activity, and draw the specific flight tracks for bombing runs and military training routes. MR OPS writes an ASCII file that is read by MR NMAP. Contained in this ASCII file is the operation data and keywords that control the computational features in MR NMAP. MR NMAP is written in FORTRAN; executable versions are available under DOS, Windows, and Windows NT. MR OPS is written in the C programming language and will run under Windows and Windows NT.

  10. Efficacy and side effects of diclofenac patch in treatment of patients with myofascial pain syndrome of the upper trapezius.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Lin-Fen; Hong, Chang-Zern; Chern, Shiuan-Horng; Chen, Chen-Chiao

    2010-01-01

    Locally administered nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have been widely used in acute soft-tissue damage and articular musculoskeletal pain. This double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a topical diclofenac sodium patch in the relief of pain and inflammation as a result of myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) in the upper trapezius. After sample size calculations indicated that 147 patients would be needed to detect a 25% difference between drug and control, 153 patients with MPS were recruited and randomized to receive either a diclofenac sodium patch or control (menthol) patch. Visual analog scale (VAS), cervical active range of motion, pressure pain threshold of the myofascial trigger point (MTrP), patient global assessment, Neck Disability Index, and the occurrence of adverse events were assessed on Day 0 (baseline), Day 4, and Day 8. Use of the diclofenac sodium patch elicited favorable responses for the VAS, cervical active range of motion, and Neck Disability Index by the end of the treatment course (P<0.05), and was consistently superior to the control patch at all time intervals. No significant differences were observed for the pressure pain threshold of the MTrP for either patch. Tolerability assessment similarly showed the diclofenac patch to be comparatively superior. When assessed at the end of the study, 20 diclofenac patch patients, but only four control patients, considered the tolerability of treatment to be "very good." Significant differences in adverse reactions were observed between the diclofenac and control patches, with the control patch more likely to produce overall skin irritation. This study demonstrate that the diclofenac sodium patch was superior to the control patch in terms of reducing pain and improving functional outcomes, and did not result in significant adverse effects. PMID:19822404

  11. The role of branched chain amino acid and tryptophan metabolism in rat's behavioral diversity: Intertwined peripheral and brain effects.

    PubMed

    Asor, Eyal; Stempler, Shiri; Avital, Avi; Klein, Ehud; Ruppin, Eytan; Ben-Shachar, Dorit

    2015-10-01

    Previously, we showed that a transient early-in-life interference with the expression of multiple genes by mithramycin (MTR) followed by later-in-life exposure to chronic stress, leads to a "daring" and novelty seeking behavior in rats. In this study we searched for molecular changes that contribute to this behavioral alteration. We applied a non-hypothesis driven strategy using whole genome cDNA array analysis (WGA) followed by Genome Scale Metabolic modeling analysis (GSMM). Gene expression validation was performed by qRT-PCR and immunoblotting. Brain and serum amino acids levels were measured by HPLC. WGA data directed us towards metabolic pathways and GSMM pointed at branched chain amino acids (BCAA) pathway. Out of 21 amino acids analyzed in the prefrontal cortex of MTR+Stress rats only tryptophan, whose brain levels depend on serum BCAA levels, showed a significant decrease. No change was observed in serotonin or kynurenine levels. However, a significant reduction in mRNA and protein levels of the large neutral amino acid transporter (LAT1), which transports BCAA and tryptophan into the brain, as well as in serum levels of tryptophan/BCAA ratio were observed. The latter may be attributed to the failure to increase serum insulin, following stress, in rats pre-exposed to mithramycin. Finally, significant correlations were observed between the anxiety index and tryptophan and between T-maze errors and LAT1. This study shows a specific behavioral pattern, which is linked to modulations in fluxes of amino acids both peripheral and central, which converge and reciprocally interact, and may thus be equally important targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26271721

  12. Exploring the molecular mechanisms of electron shuttling across the microbe/metal space

    PubMed Central

    Paquete, Catarina M.; Fonseca, Bruno M.; Cruz, Davide R.; Pereira, Tiago M.; Pacheco, Isabel; Soares, Cláudio M.; Louro, Ricardo O.

    2014-01-01

    Dissimilatory metal reducing organisms play key roles in the biogeochemical cycle of metals as well as in the durability of submerged and buried metallic structures. The molecular mechanisms that support electron transfer across the microbe-metal interface in these organisms remain poorly explored. It is known that outer membrane proteins, in particular multiheme cytochromes, are essential for this type of metabolism, being responsible for direct and indirect, via electron shuttles, interaction with the insoluble electron acceptors. Soluble electron shuttles such as flavins, phenazines, and humic acids are known to enhance extracellular electron transfer. In this work, this phenomenon was explored. All known outer membrane decaheme cytochromes from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 with known metal terminal reductase activity and a undecaheme cytochrome from Shewanella sp. HRCR-6 were expressed and purified. Their interactions with soluble electron shuttles were studied using stopped-flow kinetics, NMR spectroscopy, and molecular simulations. The results show that despite the structural similarities, expected from the available structural data and sequence homology, the detailed characteristics of their interactions with soluble electron shuttles are different. MtrC and OmcA appear to interact with a variety of different electron shuttles in the close vicinity of some of their hemes, and with affinities that are biologically relevant for the concentrations typical found in the medium for this type of compounds. All data support a view of a distant interaction between the hemes of MtrF and the electron shuttles. For UndA a clear structural characterization was achieved for the interaction with AQDS a humic acid analog. These results provide guidance for future work of the manipulation of these proteins toward modulation of their role in metal attachment and reduction. PMID:25018753

  13. Quantitative multi-modal MRI of the Hippocampus and cognitive ability in community-dwelling older subjects.

    PubMed

    Aribisala, Benjamin S; Royle, Natalie A; Maniega, Susana Muñoz; Valdés Hernández, Maria C; Murray, Catherine; Penke, Lars; Gow, Alan; Starr, John M; Bastin, Mark E; Deary, Ian J; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2014-04-01

    Hippocampal structural integrity is commonly quantified using volumetric measurements derived from brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Previously reported associations with cognitive decline have not been consistent. We investigate hippocampal integrity using quantitative MRI techniques and its association with cognitive abilities in older age. Participants from the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936 underwent brain MRI at mean age 73 years. Longitudinal relaxation time (T1), magnetization transfer ratio (MTR), fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) were measured in the hippocampus. General factors of fluid-type intelligence (g), cognitive processing speed (speed) and memory were obtained at age 73 years, as well as childhood IQ test results at age 11 years. Amongst 565 older adults, multivariate linear regression showed that, after correcting for ICV, gender and age 11 IQ, larger left hippocampal volume was significantly associated with better memory ability (? = .11, p = .003), but not with speed or g. Using quantitative MRI and after correcting for multiple testing, higher T1 and MD were significantly associated with lower scores of g (? range = -.11 to -.14, p < .001), speed (? range = -.15 to -.20, p < .001) and memory (? range = -.10 to -.12, p < .001). Higher MTR and FA in the hippocampus were also significantly associated with higher scores of g (? range = .17 to .18, p < .0001) and speed (? range = .10 to .15, p < .0001), but not memory. Quantitative multi-modal MRI assessments were more sensitive at detecting cognition-hippocampal integrity associations than volumetric measurements, resulting in stronger associations between MRI biomarkers and age-related cognition changes. PMID:24561387

  14. Metagenomic Insights into Anaerobic Metabolism along an Arctic Peat Soil Profile

    PubMed Central

    Lipson, David A.; Haggerty, John Matthew; Srinivas, Archana; Raab, Theodore K.; Sathe, Shashank; Dinsdale, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    A metagenomic analysis was performed on a soil profile from a wet tundra site in northern Alaska. The goal was to link existing biogeochemical knowledge of the system with the organisms and genes responsible for the relevant metabolic pathways. We specifically investigated how the importance of iron (Fe) oxides and humic substances (HS) as terminal electron acceptors in this ecosystem is expressed genetically, and how respiratory and fermentative processes varied with soil depth into the active layer and into the upper permafrost. Overall, the metagenomes reflected a microbial community enriched in a diverse range of anaerobic pathways, with a preponderance of known Fe reducing species at all depths in the profile. The abundance of sequences associated with anaerobic metabolic processes generally increased with depth, while aerobic cytochrome c oxidases decreased. Methanogenesis genes and methanogen genomes followed the pattern of CH4 fluxes : they increased steeply with depth into the active layer, but declined somewhat over the transition zone between the lower active layer and the upper permafrost. The latter was relatively enriched in fermentative and anaerobic respiratory pathways. A survey of decaheme cytochromes (MtrA, MtrC and their homologs) revealed that this is a promising approach to identifying potential reducers of Fe(III) or HS, and indicated a possible role for Acidobacteria as Fe reducers in these soils. Methanogens appear to coexist in the same layers, though in lower abundance, with Fe reducing bacteria and other potential competitors, including acetogens. These observations provide a rich set of hypotheses for further targeted study. PMID:23741360

  15. Membrane Process to Capture CO{sub 2} from Coal-Fired Power Plant Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Merkel, Tim; Wei, Xiaotong; Firat, Bilgen; He, Jenny; Amo, Karl; Pande, Saurabh; Baker, Richard; Wijmans, Hans; Bhown, Abhoyjit

    2012-03-31

    This final report describes work conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) on development of an efficient membrane process to capture carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from power plant flue gas (award number DE-NT0005312). The primary goal of this research program was to demonstrate, in a field test, the ability of a membrane process to capture up to 90% of CO{sub 2} in coal-fired flue gas, and to evaluate the potential of a full-scale version of the process to perform this separation with less than a 35% increase in the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE). Membrane Technology and Research (MTR) conducted this project in collaboration with Arizona Public Services (APS), who hosted a membrane field test at their Cholla coal-fired power plant, and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and WorleyParsons (WP), who performed a comparative cost analysis of the proposed membrane CO{sub 2} capture process. The work conducted for this project included membrane and module development, slipstream testing of commercial-sized modules with natural gas and coal-fired flue gas, process design optimization, and a detailed systems and cost analysis of a membrane retrofit to a commercial power plant. The Polaris? membrane developed over a number of years by MTR represents a step-change improvement in CO{sub 2} permeance compared to previous commercial CO{sub 2}-selective membranes. During this project, membrane optimization work resulted in a further doubling of the CO{sub 2} permeance of Polaris membrane while maintaining the CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} selectivity. This is an important accomplishment because increased CO{sub 2} permeance directly impacts the membrane skid cost and footprint: a doubling of CO{sub 2} permeance halves the skid cost and footprint. In addition to providing high CO{sub 2} permeance, flue gas CO{sub 2} capture membranes must be stable in the presence of contaminants including SO{sub 2}. Laboratory tests showed no degradation in Polaris membrane performance during two months of continuous operation in a simulated flue gas environment containing up to 1,000 ppm SO{sub 2}. A successful slipstream field test at the APS Cholla power plant was conducted with commercialsize Polaris modules during this project. This field test is the first demonstration of stable performance by commercial-sized membrane modules treating actual coal-fired power plant flue gas. Process design studies show that selective recycle of CO{sub 2} using a countercurrent membrane module with air as a sweep stream can double the concentration of CO{sub 2} in coal flue gas with little energy input. This pre-concentration of CO{sub 2} by the sweep membrane reduces the minimum energy of CO{sub 2} separation in the capture unit by up to 40% for coal flue gas. Variations of this design may be even more promising for CO{sub 2} capture from NGCC flue gas, in which the CO{sub 2} concentration can be increased from 4% to 20% by selective sweep recycle. EPRI and WP conducted a systems and cost analysis of a base case MTR membrane CO{sub 2} capture system retrofitted to the AEP Conesville Unit 5 boiler. Some of the key findings from this study and a sensitivity analysis performed by MTR include: The MTR membrane process can capture 90% of the CO{sub 2} in coal flue gas and produce high-purity CO{sub 2} (>99%) ready for sequestration. CO{sub 2} recycle to the boiler appears feasible with minimal impact on boiler performance; however, further study by a boiler OEM is recommended. For a membrane process built today using a combination of slight feed compression, permeate vacuum, and current compression equipment costs, the membrane capture process can be competitive with the base case MEA process at 90% CO{sub 2} capture from a coal-fired power plant. The incremental LCOE for the base case membrane process is about equal to that of a base case MEA process, within the uncertainty in the analysis. With advanced membranes (5,000 gpu for CO{sub 2} and 50 for CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2}), operating with no feed compression and l

  16. Dry needling: a literature review with implications for clinical practice guidelines1

    PubMed Central

    Dunning, James; Butts, Raymond; Mourad, Firas; Young, Ian; Flannagan, Sean; Perreault, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background: Wet needling uses hollow-bore needles to deliver corticosteroids, anesthetics, sclerosants, botulinum toxins, or other agents. In contrast, dry needling requires the insertion of thin monofilament needles, as used in the practice of acupuncture, without the use of injectate into muscles, ligaments, tendons, subcutaneous fascia, and scar tissue. Dry needles may also be inserted in the vicinity of peripheral nerves and/or neurovascular bundles in order to manage a variety of neuromusculoskeletal pain syndromes. Nevertheless, some position statements by several US State Boards of Physical Therapy have narrowly defined dry needling as an ‘intramuscular’ procedure involving the isolated treatment of ‘myofascial trigger points’ (MTrPs). Objectives: To operationalize an appropriate definition for dry needling based on the existing literature and to further investigate the optimal frequency, duration, and intensity of dry needling for both spinal and extremity neuromusculoskeletal conditions. Major findings: According to recent findings in the literature, the needle tip touches, taps, or pricks tiny nerve endings or neural tissue (i.e. ‘sensitive loci’ or ‘nociceptors’) when it is inserted into a MTrP. To date, there is a paucity of high-quality evidence to underpin the use of direct dry needling into MTrPs for the purpose of short and long-term pain and disability reduction in patients with musculoskeletal pain syndromes. Furthermore, there is a lack of robust evidence validating the clinical diagnostic criteria for trigger point identification or diagnosis. High-quality studies have also demonstrated that manual examination for the identification and localization of a trigger point is neither valid nor reliable between-examiners. Conclusions: Several studies have demonstrated immediate or short-term improvements in pain and/or disability by targeting trigger points (TrPs) using in-and-out techniques such as ‘pistoning’ or ‘sparrow pecking’; however, to date, no high-quality, long-term trials supporting in-and-out needling techniques at exclusively muscular TrPs exist, and the practice should therefore be questioned. The insertion of dry needles into asymptomatic body areas proximal and/or distal to the primary source of pain is supported by the myofascial pain syndrome literature. Physical therapists should not ignore the findings of the Western or biomedical ‘acupuncture’ literature that have used the very same ‘dry needles’ to treat patients with a variety of neuromusculoskeletal conditions in numerous, large scale randomized controlled trials. Although the optimal frequency, duration, and intensity of dry needling has yet to be determined for many neuromusculoskeletal conditions, the vast majority of dry needling randomized controlled trials have manually stimulated the needles and left them in situ for between 10 and 30 minute durations. Position statements and clinical practice guidelines for dry needling should be based on the best available literature, not a single paradigm or school of thought; therefore, physical therapy associations and state boards of physical therapy should consider broadening the definition of dry needling to encompass the stimulation of neural, muscular, and connective tissues, not just ‘TrPs’. PMID:25143704

  17. Modelling tools to support the harmonization of Water Framework Directive and Common Agricultural Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tediosi, A.; Bulgheroni, C.; Sali, G.; Facchi, A.; Gandolfi, C.

    2009-04-01

    After a few years from the delivery of the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD) the need to link agriculture and WFD has emerged as one of the highest priorities; therefore, it is important to discuss on how the EU Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) can contribute to the achievements of the WFD objectives. The recent CAP reform - known as Mid Term Review (MTR) or Fischler Reform - has increased the opportunities, offering to farmers increased support to address some environmental issues. The central novelty coming from the MTR is the introduction of a farm single payment which aims to the Decoupling of EU Agricultural Support from production. Other MTR important topics deal with the Modulation of the payments, the Cross-Compliance and the strengthening of the Rural Development policy. All these new elements will affect the farmers' behaviour, steering their productive choices for the future, which, in turn, will have consequences on the water demand for irrigation. Indeed, from the water quantity viewpoint, agriculture is a large consumer and improving water use efficiency is one of the main issues at stake, following the increasing impacts of water scarcity and droughts across Europe in a context of climate change. According to a recent survey of the European Commission the saving potential in the agricultural sector is 43% of present abstraction and 95% of it is concentrated in southern europe. Many models have been developed to forecast the farmers' behaviour as a consequence of agricultural policies, both at sector and regional level; all of them are founded on Mathematical Programming techniques and many of them use the Positive approach, which better fits the territorial dimension. A large body of literature also exists focusing on the assessment of irrigation water requirements. The examples of conjunctive modelling of the two aspects are however much more limited. The work presented has got some innovative aspects: not only does it couple an economical model and a spatially distributed hydrologic model, but also embodies the two models in a wider procedure aiming at supporting the process of water resources planning at basin scale, based on the IWRM (Integrated Water Resources Management) paradigm. In practice, the economical model defines different land use scenarios deriving from the effects of the CAP on the farmers' productive choices; the hydrological model assesses the crop water requirements and determines the consequent variations of irrigation water demand at the basin scale; finally, the modified pattern of irrigation demand of each land use scenario is incorporated into a multi-objective optimisation procedure, which generates a set of efficient water management policies. Stakeholders involvement is a central component in all the phases of the procedure, including setting the optimization objectives and selecting the performance indicators for the different uses of the water resources within the basin. The presentation will focus on the first two phases of the process, describing the characteristics of the economical and hydrological models; moreover it will illustrate the results of their application to a pilot study basin in Northern Italy, the 6,500 sqaure kilometers wide Adda river basin, which includes the regulated Como lake and is characterized by a broad range of conflicting water related issues: irrigation of a 3,500 square kilometers wide district, navigation and tourism, environment protection, flood protection, hydropower production.

  18. Electrokinesis is a microbial behavior that requires extracellular electron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Howard W.; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.; Bretschger, Orianna; Ward, Melissa J.; Romine, Margaret F.; Obraztsova, Anna; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    2010-01-05

    Shewanella species are widespread in nature, enjoying a cosmopolitan distribution in marine,freshwater, sedimentary and soil environments (1), and have attracted considerable attention in recent years because of their ability to reduce an extensive number of different electron 3 acceptors, including the solid (oxy)hydroxides of iron and manganese, such as Fe(OH)3 and MnO2, using one or more proposed mechanisms of extracellular electron transport (EET) (2, 3). The EET ability of Shewanella species is consistent with their ability to generate electric current in microbial fuel cells in the absence of exogenous electron shuttles (4). Various strategies of extracellular electron transfer have been proposed in metal-reducing microbes, including naturally-occurring (2) or biogenic (5-7) soluble mediators that ‘shuttle’ electrons from cells to acceptors, as well as direct transfer using multiheme cytochromes located on the cell exterior (8) and transfer via conductive nanowires (9-11). S. oneidensis MR-1 features several proteins that are involved with the transport of electrons to the exterior of the cell where they play an important role with regard to the reduction of solid electron acceptors such as metal oxides. These include two outer-membrane decaheme c-type cytochromes (MtrC and OmcA), a membrane spanning protein (MtrB), and two periplasmic multi-heme c-type cytochromes (MtrA and CymA). Deletion of the genes encoding any of these proteins leads to phenotypes that are greatly inhibited with regard to metal-oxide reduction and current production in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) (12, 13). The mutation of genes that code for proteins involved in the movement of cytochromes to the outer membrane also results in loss of metal-reducing phenotypes (13). The shewanellae are highly motile, by virtue of a single polar flagellum, and individual S. oneidensis MR-1 cells have been tracked swimming at speeds of up to, and sometimes over, 100 ?m/sec, although the average swimming speed of cells in a population is considerably lower (14). Research has also shown that S. oneidensis MR-1 also displays chemotactic responses to several soluble electron acceptors, including Fe(III) citrate (15, 16) and that the CheA-3 histidine protein kinase is required for this chemotactic behavior to be observed (14). Strain MR-1 has 4 also been shown to be very sensitive to the presence of electron acceptors. For example, strain MR-1 ceases motility after a short time in the absence of an electron acceptor; however motility can be restored upon the re-addition of an electron acceptor. Here we present data that suggest that the shewanellae exhibit a motility response not previously reported: we call it electrokinesis. This response occurs intermittently with the cells in proximity to a solid electron acceptor, such as a manganese oxide particle or the working electrode of an electrochemical cell, and motility is observed to increase after contact. In addition to increased swimming velocities, cells occasionally pause on the solid acceptor surface, then after brief contact (up to 1 second) the cells typically swim away in the opposite direction from which they approached. Electrokinesis is not a uniform response that can be observed in all cells, although if an electron shuttle is added, all cells rapidly become motile.

  19. Corynebacterium glutamicum Methionine Sulfoxide Reductase A Uses both Mycoredoxin and Thioredoxin for Regeneration and Oxidative Stress Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Si, Meiru; Zhang, Lei; Chaudhry, Muhammad Tausif; Ding, Wei; Xu, Yixiang; Chen, Can; Akbar, Ali; Liu, Shuang-Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Oxidation of methionine leads to the formation of the S and R diastereomers of methionine sulfoxide (MetO), which can be reversed by the actions of two structurally unrelated classes of methionine sulfoxide reductase (Msr), MsrA and MsrB, respectively. Although MsrAs have long been demonstrated in numerous bacteria, their physiological and biochemical functions remain largely unknown in Actinomycetes. Here, we report that a Corynebacterium glutamicum methionine sulfoxide reductase A (CgMsrA) that belongs to the 3-Cys family of MsrAs plays important roles in oxidative stress resistance. Deletion of the msrA gene in C. glutamicum resulted in decrease of cell viability, increase of ROS production, and increase of protein carbonylation levels under various stress conditions. The physiological roles of CgMsrA in resistance to oxidative stresses were corroborated by its induced expression under various stresses, regulated directly by the stress-responsive extracytoplasmic-function (ECF) sigma factor SigH. Activity assays performed with various regeneration pathways showed that CgMsrA can reduce MetO via both the thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase (Trx/TrxR) and mycoredoxin 1/mycothione reductase/mycothiol (Mrx1/Mtr/MSH) pathways. Site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that Cys56 is the peroxidatic cysteine that is oxidized to sulfenic acid, while Cys204 and Cys213 are the resolving Cys residues that form an intramolecular disulfide bond. Mrx1 reduces the sulfenic acid intermediate via the formation of an S-mycothiolated MsrA intermediate (MsrA-SSM) which is then recycled by mycoredoxin and the second molecule of mycothiol, similarly to the glutathione/glutaredoxin/glutathione reductase (GSH/Grx/GR) system. However, Trx reduces the Cys204-Cys213 disulfide bond in CgMsrA produced during MetO reduction via the formation of a transient intermolecular disulfide bond between Trx and CgMsrA. While both the Trx/TrxR and Mrx1/Mtr/MSH pathways are operative in reducing CgMsrA under stress conditions in vivo, the Trx/TrxR pathway alone is sufficient to reduce CgMsrA under normal conditions. Based on these results, a catalytic model for the reduction of CgMsrA by Mrx1 and Trx is proposed. PMID:25681179

  20. A human post-mortem brain model for the standardization of multi-centre MRI studies.

    PubMed

    Droby, Amgad; Lukas, Carsten; Schänzer, Anne; Spiwoks-Becker, Isabella; Giorgio, Antonio; Gold, Ralf; De Stefano, Nicola; Kugel, Harald; Deppe, Michael; Wiendl, Heinz; Meuth, Sven G; Acker, Till; Zipp, Frauke; Deichmann, Ralf

    2015-04-15

    Multi-centre MRI studies of the brain are essential for enrolling large and diverse patient cohorts, as required for the investigation of heterogeneous neurological and psychiatric diseases. However, the multi-site comparison of standard MRI data sets that are weighted with respect to tissue parameters such as the relaxation times (T1, T2) and proton density (PD) may be problematic, as signal intensities and image contrasts depend on site-specific details such as the sequences used, imaging parameters, and sensitivity profiles of the radiofrequency (RF) coils. Water or gel phantoms are frequently used for long-term and/or inter-site quality assessment. However, these phantoms hardly mimic the structure, shape, size or tissue distribution of the human brain. The goals of this study were: (1) to validate the long-term stability of a human post-mortem brain phantom, performing quantitative mapping of T1, T2, and PD, and the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) over a period of 18months; (2) to acquire and analyse data for this phantom and the brain of a healthy control (HC) in a multi-centre study for MRI protocol standardization in four centres, while conducting a voxel-wise as well as whole brain grey (GM) and white matter (WM) tissue volume comparison. MTR, T2, and the quotient of PD in WM and GM were stable in the post-mortem brain with no significant changes. T1 was found to decrease from 267/236ms (GM/WM) to 234/216ms between 5 and 17weeks post embedment, stabilizing during an 18-month period following the first scan at about 215/190ms. The volumetric measures, based on T1-weighted MP-RAGE images obtained at all participating centres, revealed inter- and intra-centre variations in the evaluated GM and WM volumes that displayed similar trends in both the post-mortem brain as well as the HC. At a confidence level of 95%, brain regions such as the brainstem, deep GM structures as well as boundaries between GM and WM tissues were found to be less reproducible than other brain regions in all participating centres. The results demonstrate that a post-mortem brain phantom may be used as a reliable tool for multi-centre MR studies. PMID:25595502

  1. Corynebacterium glutamicum methionine sulfoxide reductase A uses both mycoredoxin and thioredoxin for regeneration and oxidative stress resistance.

    PubMed

    Si, Meiru; Zhang, Lei; Chaudhry, Muhammad Tausif; Ding, Wei; Xu, Yixiang; Chen, Can; Akbar, Ali; Shen, Xihui; Liu, Shuang-Jiang

    2015-04-01

    Oxidation of methionine leads to the formation of the S and R diastereomers of methionine sulfoxide (MetO), which can be reversed by the actions of two structurally unrelated classes of methionine sulfoxide reductase (Msr), MsrA and MsrB, respectively. Although MsrAs have long been demonstrated in numerous bacteria, their physiological and biochemical functions remain largely unknown in Actinomycetes. Here, we report that a Corynebacterium glutamicum methionine sulfoxide reductase A (CgMsrA) that belongs to the 3-Cys family of MsrAs plays important roles in oxidative stress resistance. Deletion of the msrA gene in C. glutamicum resulted in decrease of cell viability, increase of ROS production, and increase of protein carbonylation levels under various stress conditions. The physiological roles of CgMsrA in resistance to oxidative stresses were corroborated by its induced expression under various stresses, regulated directly by the stress-responsive extracytoplasmic-function (ECF) sigma factor SigH. Activity assays performed with various regeneration pathways showed that CgMsrA can reduce MetO via both the thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase (Trx/TrxR) and mycoredoxin 1/mycothione reductase/mycothiol (Mrx1/Mtr/MSH) pathways. Site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that Cys56 is the peroxidatic cysteine that is oxidized to sulfenic acid, while Cys204 and Cys213 are the resolving Cys residues that form an intramolecular disulfide bond. Mrx1 reduces the sulfenic acid intermediate via the formation of an S-mycothiolated MsrA intermediate (MsrA-SSM) which is then recycled by mycoredoxin and the second molecule of mycothiol, similarly to the glutathione/glutaredoxin/glutathione reductase (GSH/Grx/GR) system. However, Trx reduces the Cys204-Cys213 disulfide bond in CgMsrA produced during MetO reduction via the formation of a transient intermolecular disulfide bond between Trx and CgMsrA. While both the Trx/TrxR and Mrx1/Mtr/MSH pathways are operative in reducing CgMsrA under stress conditions in vivo, the Trx/TrxR pathway alone is sufficient to reduce CgMsrA under normal conditions. Based on these results, a catalytic model for the reduction of CgMsrA by Mrx1 and Trx is proposed. PMID:25681179

  2. Effects of soluble flavin on heterogeneous electron transfer between surface-exposed bacterial cytochromes and iron oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zheming; Shi, Zhi; Shi, Liang; White, Gaye F.; Richardson, David J.; Clarke, Thomas A.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.

    2015-08-25

    Dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria can utilize insoluble Fe(Mn)-oxides as a terminal electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions. For Shewanella species specifically, some evidence suggests that iron reduction is associated with the secretion of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and riboflavin that are proposed to mediate electron transfer (Marsili et al., 2008). In this work, we used methyl viologen (MV•+)-encapsulated, porin-cytochrome complex (MtrCAB) embedded liposomes (MELs) as a synthetic model of the Shewanella outer membrane to investigate the proposed mediating behavior of secreted flavins. The reduction kinetics of goethite, hematite and lepidocrocite (200 µM) by MELs ([MV•+] ~ 42 µM and MtrABC ? 1 nM) were determined in the presence FMN at pH 7.0 in N2 atmosphere by monitoring the concentrations of MV•+ and FMN through their characteristic UV-visible absorption spectra. Experiments were performed where i) FMN and Fe(III)-oxide were mixed and then reacted with the reduced MELs and ii) FMN was reacted with the reduced MELs followed by addition of Fe(III)-oxide. The redox reactions proceeded in two steps: a fast step that was completed in a few seconds, and a slower one lasting over 400 seconds. For all three Fe(III)-oxides, the initial reaction rate in the presence of a low concentration of FMN (? 1 µM) was at least a factor of five faster than those with MELs alone, and orders of magnitude faster than those by FMNH2, suggesting that FMN may serve as a co-factor that enhances electron transfer from outer-membrane c-cytochromes to Fe(III)-oxides. The rate and extent of the initial reaction followed the order of lepidocrocite > hematite > goethite, the same as their reduction potentials, implying thermodynamic control on reaction rate. However, at higher FMN concentrations (> 1 µM), the reaction rates for both steps decreased and varied inversely with FMN concentration, indicating that FMN inhibited the MEL to Fe(III)-oxide electron transfer reaction. The implications of the observed kinetic behaviors to flavin-mediated Fe(III) oxide reduction in natural environments are discussed.

  3. Biotic and Abiotic Reduction and Solubilization of Pu(IV)O2•xH2O(am) as Affected by Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) and Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA)

    SciTech Connect

    Plymale, Andrew E.; Bailey, Vanessa L.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Heald, Steve M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Resch, Charles T.; Moore, Dean A.; Bolton, Harvey

    2012-01-24

    In the presence of hydrogen (H{sub 2}), the synthetic chelating agent ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA), and the electron shuttle anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria (DMRB) Shewanella oneidensis and Geobacter sulfurreducens both reductively solubilized 100% of added 0.5 mM plutonium (IV) hydrous oxide (Pu(IV)O{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)}) in {approx}24 h at pH 7 in a non-complexing buffer. In the absence of AQDS, bioreduction was much slower ({approx}22 days) and less extensive ({approx}83-94%). In the absence of DMRB but under comparable conditions, 89% (without AQDS) to 98% (with AQDS) of added 0.5 mM PuO{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)} was reductively solubilized over 418 days. Under comparable conditions but in the absence of EDTA, <0.001% of the 0.5 mM PuO{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)} was solubilized, with or without bacteria. However, Pu(aq) increased by as much as an order of magnitude in some EDTA-free treatments, both biotic and abiotic, and increases in solubility were associated with the production of both Pu(OH)3(am) and Pu(III)(aq). Incubation with DMRB in the absence of EDTA increased the polymeric and crystalline content of the PuO{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)} and also decreased Pu solubility in 6-N HCl. Results from an in vitro assay demonstrated electron transfer to PuO{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)} from the S. oneidensis outer-membrane c-type cytochrome MtrC, and EDTA increased the oxidation of MtrC by PuO{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)}. Our results suggest that PuO{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)} biotic and abiotic reduction and solubilization may be important in anoxic, reducing environments, especially where complexing ligands and electron shuttling compounds are present.

  4. Effects of soluble flavin on heterogeneous electron transfer between surface-exposed bacterial cytochromes and iron oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zheming; Shi, Zhi; Shi, Liang; White, Gaye F.; Richardson, David J.; Clarke, Thomas A.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.

    2015-08-01

    Dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria can utilize insoluble Fe(Mn)-oxides as a terminal electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions. For Shewanella species specifically, evidence suggests that iron reduction is associated with the secretion of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and riboflavin. However, the exact mechanism of flavin involvement is unclear; while some indicate that flavins mediate electron transfer (Marsili et al., 2008), others point to flavin serving as co-factors to outer membrane proteins (Okamoto et al., 2013). In this work, we used methyl viologen (MVrad +)-encapsulated, porin-cytochrome complex (MtrCAB) embedded liposomes (MELs) as a synthetic model of the Shewanella outer membrane to investigate the proposed mediating behavior of microbially produced flavins. The reduction kinetics of goethite, hematite and lepidocrocite (200 ?M) by MELs ([MVrad +] ? 40 ?M and MtrABC ? 1 nM) were determined in the presence FMN at pH 7.0 in N2 atmosphere by monitoring the concentrations of MVrad + and FMN through their characteristic UV-visible absorption spectra. Experiments were performed where (i) FMN and Fe(III)-oxide were mixed and then reacted with the reduced MELs and (ii) FMN was reacted with the reduced MELs followed by addition of Fe(III)-oxide. The redox reactions proceeded in two steps: a fast step that was completed in a few seconds, and a slower one lasting over 400 s. For all three Fe(III)-oxides, the initial reaction rate in the presence of a low concentration of FMN (?1 ?M) was at least a factor of five faster than those with MELs alone, and orders of magnitude faster than those by FMNH2, suggesting that FMN may serve as a co-factor that enhances electron transfer from outer-membrane c-cytochromes to Fe(III)-oxides. The rate and extent of the initial reaction followed the order of lepidocrocite > hematite > goethite, the same as their reduction potentials, implying thermodynamic control on reaction rate. For LEP, with the highest reduction potential among the three Fe(III)-oxides, its reduction by FMNH2 was completed in less than 10 min, suggesting that FMN was capable of mediating electron transfer to LEP. At higher FMN concentrations (>1 ?M), the reaction rates for both steps decreased and varied inversely with FMN concentration, indicating that FMN inhibited the MEL to Fe(III)-oxide electron transfer reaction under these conditions. The implications of the observed kinetic behaviors to flavin-mediated Fe(III)-oxide reduction in natural environments are discussed.

  5. The effect of commuting microenvironment on commuter exposures to vehicular emission in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, L. Y.; Chan, C. Y.; Qin, Y.

    Vehicular exhaust emission has gradually become the major air pollution source in modern cities and traffic related exposure is found to contribute significantly to total human exposure level. A comprehensive survey was conducted from November 1995 to July 1996 in Hong Kong to assess the effect of traffic-induced air pollution inside different commuting microenvironments on commuter exposure. Microenvironmental monitoring is performed for six major public commuting modes (bus, light bus, MTR, railway, tram, ferry), plus private car and roadside pavement. Traffic-related pollutants, CO, NO x, THC and O 3 were selected as the target pollutants. The results indicate that commuter exposure is highly influenced by the choice of commuting microenvironment. In general, the exposure level in decreasing order of measured pollutant level for respective commuting microenvironments are: private car, the group consisting light bus, bus, tram and pavement, MTR and train, and finally ferry. In private car, the CO level is several times higher than that in the other microenvironments with a trip averaged of 10.1 ppm and a maximum of 24.9 ppm. Factors such as the body position of the vehicle, intake point of the ventilation system, fuel used, ventilation, transport mode, road and driving conditions were used in the analysis. Inter-microenvironment, intra-microenvironment and temporal variation of CO concentrations were used as the major indicator. The low body position and low intake point of the ventilation system of the private car are believed to be the cause of higher intake of exhaust of other vehicles and thus result in high pollution level in this microenvironment. Compared with other metropolis around the world and the Hong Kong Air Quality Objectives (HKAQO), exposure levels of commuter to traffic-related air pollution in Hong Kong are relatively low for most pollutants measured. Only several cases of exceedence of HKAQO by NO 2 were recorded. The strong prevailing wind plus the channeling effect created by the harbor, the fuel used, the relative abundance of new cars and the successful implementation of the vehicle emission control program are factors that compensate the effect of the emission source strength and thus lead to low exposure levels.

  6. NEET Micro-Pocket Fission Detector -- FY 2012 Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Unruh; Joy Rempe; Douglas McGregor; Philip Ugorowski; Michael Reichenberger

    2012-09-01

    A research program has been initiated by the NEET program for developing and testing compact miniature fission chambers capable of simultaneously measuring thermal neutron flux, fast neutron flux and temperature within a single package. When implemented, these sensors will significantly advance flux detection capabilities for irradiation tests in US Materials Test Reactors (MTRs).Ultimately, evaluations may lead to a more compact, more accurate, and longer lifetime flux sensor for critical mock-ups, high performance reactors and commercial nuclear power plants. Deployment of Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors (MPFDs) in US DOE-NE program irradiation tests will address several challenges: Current fission chamber technologies do not offer the ability to measure fast flux, thermal flux and temperature within a single compact probe, MPFDs offer this option. MPFD construction is very different then current fission chamber construction; the use of high temperature materials allow MPFDs to be specifically tailored to survive harsh conditions in typical high performance MTR irradiation tests. New high-fidelity reactor physics codes will need a small, accurate, multipurpose in-core sensor to validate the codes without perturbing the validation experiment; MPFDs fill this requirement. MPFDs can be built with variable sensitivities to survive the lifetime of an experiment or fuel assembly in some MTRs; allowing for more efficient and cost effective power monitoring. The small size of the MPFDs allows multiple sensors to be simultaneously deployed; obtaining data required to visualize the reactor flux and temperature profiles. This report summarizes the research progress for year 1 of this 3 year project. An updated design of the MPFD has been developed, materials and tools to support the new design have been procured, construction methods to support the new design have been initiated at INL’s HTTL and KSU’s SMART Laboratory, plating methods are being updated at KSU, new detector electronics have been designed, built and tested at KSU. In addition, a project meeting was held at KSU and a detector evaluation plan has been initiated between INL and KSU. Once NEET program evaluations are completed, the final MPFD will be deployed in MTR irradiations, enabling DOE-NE programs evaluating the performance of candidate new fuels and materials to better characterize irradiation test conditions.

  7. A SnoRNA-derived piRNA interacts with human interleukin-4 pre-mRNA and induces its decay in nuclear exosomes

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Fudi; Zhou, Nan; Wu, Kang; Guo, Yubiao; Tan, Weiping; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Xue; Geng, Guannan; Pan, Ting; Luo, Haihua; Zhang, Yijun; Xu, Zhibin; Liu, Jun; Liu, Bingfeng; Gao, Wenchao; Liu, Chao; Ren, Liangliang; Li, Jun; Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    PIWI interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are highly expressed in germline cells and are involved in maintaining genome integrity by silencing transposons. These are also involved in DNA/histone methylation and gene expression regulation in somatic cells of invertebrates. The functions of piRNAs in somatic cells of vertebrates, however, remain elusive. We found that snoRNA-derived and C (C?)/D? (D)-box conserved piRNAs are abundant in human CD4 primary T-lymphocytes. piRNA (piR30840) significantly downregulated interleukin-4 (IL-4) via sequence complementarity binding to pre-mRNA intron, which subsequently inhibited the development of Th2 T-lymphocytes. Piwil4 and Ago4 are associated with this piRNA, and this complex further interacts with Trf4-Air2-Mtr4 Polyadenylation (TRAMP) complex, which leads to the decay of targeted pre-mRNA through nuclear exosomes. Taken together, we demonstrate a novel piRNA mechanism in regulating gene expression in highly differentiated somatic cells and a possible novel target for allergy therapeutics. PMID:26405199

  8. [Study of screening nephroprotective bioactive substances based on triple-color fluorescence probes in Carthami flos].

    PubMed

    Lan, Xiao-Hong; Xiao, Shun; Gong, Wan; Wang, Yi; Zhao, Xiao-Ping

    2014-05-01

    In this study, an approach based on triple-color fluorescence probes was developed for screening potential nephro-protective bioactive substances. Three fluorescent probes (i. e. FDA, MTR and Hoechst 33342) were used to label HK-2 cells injured by doxorubicin hydrochloride, and cellular fluorescence images were subsequently acquired and analyzed by a cellular-fluorescence image microscopy platform. The established method was applied to screening 53 components of Carthami Flos, and three components C17, C18 and C19 were found to exhibit nephroprotective effects against doxorubicin hydrochloride induced injury on HK-2 cells. Eight compounds (i. e. hydroxysafflor yellow A, 6-hydroxykaempferol-3-O-rutinoside-6-O-glucoside, 6-hydroxykaempferol-3,6-di-O-gluco-side or 6-hydroxykaempferol-6, 7-di-O-glucoside, 6-hydroxykaempferol-3-O-rutinoside, 6-hydroxykaempferol-3-O-glucoside or 6-hydroxykaempferol-7-O-glucoside, rutin, isoquercetin, and kaempferol-3-O-rutinoside) in components C17, C18 and C19 were preliminarily identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Isoquercetin, rutin, kaempferol-3-O-rutinoside, and hydroxysafflor yellow A were confirmed by comparing with reference substances, Further study indicated that these four compounds had moderate nephroprotective effects, while isoquercetin showed a significant nephroprotective effect in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that isoquercetin, rutin, kaempferol-3-O-rutinoside and hydroxysafflor yellow A might be the nephroprotective bioactive substances in Carthami Flos. PMID:25282899

  9. Space Radiation Dose Calculations for the Space Experiment Matroshka-R Modelling Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shurshakov, Vyacheslav; Kartashov, Dmitrij; Tolochek, Raisa

    Space radiation dose calculations for the space experiment Matroshka-R modelling conditions are presented in the report. The experiment has been carried out onboard the ISS from 2004 to 2014. Dose measurements were realized both outside the ISS on the outer surface of the Service Module with the MTR-facility and in the ISS compartments with anthropomorphic and spherical phantoms, and the protective curtain facility. Newly applied approach to calculate the shielding probability functions for complex shape objects is used when the object surface is composed from a set of the disjoint adjacent triangles that fully cover the surface. Using the simplified Matroshka-R shielding geometry models of the space station compartments the space ionizing radiation dose distributions in tissue-equivalent spherical and anthropomorphic phantoms, and for an additional shielding installed in the compartment are calculated. There is good agreement between the data obtained in the experiment and calculated ones within an experiment accuracy of about 10%. Thus the calculation method used has been successfully verified with the Matroshka-R experiment data. The suggested method can be recommended for modelling of radiation loads on the crewmembers, and estimation of the additional shielding efficiency in space station compartments, and also for pre-flight estimations of radiation shielding in future space missions.

  10. Development and application of procedures to evaluate air quality and visibility impacts of low-altitude flying operations

    SciTech Connect

    Liebsch, E.J.

    1990-08-01

    This report describes the development and application of procedures to evaluate the effects of low-altitude aircraft flights on air quality and visibility. The work summarized in this report was undertaken as part of the larger task of assessing the various potential environmental impacts associated with low-altitude military airspaces. Accomplishing the air quality/visibility analysis for the GEIS included (1) development and application of an integrated air quality model and aircraft emissions database specifically for Military Training Route (MTR) or similar flight operations, (2) selection and application of an existing air quality model to analyze the more widespread and less concentrated aircraft emissions from military Operations Areas (MOAs) and Restricted Areas (RAs), and (3) development and application of procedures to assess impacts of aircraft emissions on visibility. Existing air quality models were considered to be inadequate for predicting ground-level concentrations of pollutants emitted by aircraft along MTRs; therefore, the Single-Aircraft Instantaneous Line Source (SAILS) and Multiple-Aircraft Instantaneous Line Source (MAILS) models were developed to estimate potential impacts along MTRs. Furthermore, a protocol was developed and then applied in the field to determine the degree of visibility impairment caused by aircraft engine exhaust plumes. 19 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. MRI biomarker assessment of neuromuscular disease progression: a prospective observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, Jasper M; Sinclair, Christopher D J; Fischmann, Arne; Machado, Pedro M; Reilly, Mary M; Yousry, Tarek A; Thornton, John S; Hanna, Michael G

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background A substantial impediment to progress in trials of new therapies in neuromuscular disorders is the absence of responsive outcome measures that correlate with patient functional deficits and are sensitive to early disease processes. Irrespective of the primary molecular defect, neuromuscular disorder pathological processes include disturbance of intramuscular water distribution followed by intramuscular fat accumulation, both quantifiable by MRI. In pathologically distinct neuromuscular disorders, we aimed to determine the comparative responsiveness of MRI outcome measures over 1 year, the validity of MRI outcome measures by cross-sectional correlation against functionally relevant clinical measures, and the sensitivity of specific MRI indices to early muscle water changes before intramuscular fat accumulation beyond the healthy control range. Methods We did a prospective observational cohort study of patients with either Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease 1A or inclusion body myositis who were attending the inherited neuropathy or muscle clinics at the Medical Research Council (MRC) Centre for Neuromuscular Diseases, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London, UK. Genetic confirmation of the chromosome 17p11·2 duplication was required for Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease 1A, and classification as pathologically or clinically definite by MRC criteria was required for inclusion body myositis. Exclusion criteria were concomitant diseases and safety-related MRI contraindications. Healthy age-matched and sex-matched controls were also recruited. Assessments were done at baseline and 1 year. The MRI outcomes—fat fraction, transverse relaxation time (T2), and magnetisation transfer ratio (MTR)—were analysed during the 12-month follow-up, by measuring correlation with functionally relevant clinical measures, and for T2 and MTR, sensitivity in muscles with fat fraction less than the 95th percentile of the control group. Findings Between Jan 19, 2010, and July 7, 2011, we recruited 20 patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease 1A, 20 patients with inclusion body myositis, and 29 healthy controls (allocated to one or both of the 20-participant matched-control subgroups). Whole muscle fat fraction increased significantly during the 12-month follow-up at calf level (mean absolute change 1·2%, 95% CI 0·5–1·9, p=0·002) but not thigh level (0·2%, ?0·2 to 0·6, p=0·38) in patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease 1A, and at calf level (2·6%, 1·3–4·0, p=0·002) and thigh level (3·3%, 1·8–4·9, p=0·0007) in patients with inclusion body myositis. Fat fraction correlated with the lower limb components of the inclusion body myositis functional rating score (?=–0·64, p=0·002) and the Charcot-Marie-Tooth examination score (?=0·63, p=0·003). Longitudinal T2 and MTR changed consistently with fat fraction but more variably. In muscles with a fat fraction lower than the control group 95th percentile, T2 was increased in patients compared with controls (regression coefficients: inclusion body myositis thigh 4·0 ms [SE 0·5], calf 3·5 ms [0·6]; Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A thigh 1·0 ms [0·3], calf 2·0 ms [0·3]) and MTR reduced compared with controls (inclusion body myositis thigh ?1·5 percentage units [pu; 0·2], calf ?1·1 pu [0·2]; Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A thigh ?0·3 pu [0·1], calf ?0·7 pu [0·1]). Interpretation MRI outcome measures can monitor intramuscular fat accumulation with high responsiveness, show validity by correlation with conventional functional measures, and detect muscle water changes preceding marked intramuscular fat accumulation. Confirmation of our results in further cohorts with these and other muscle-wasting disorders would suggest that MRI biomarkers might prove valuable in experimental trials. Funding Medical Research Council UK. PMID:26549782

  12. Accumulation pattern of endogenous cytokinins and phenolics in different organs of 1-year-old cytokinin pre-incubated plants: implications for conservation.

    PubMed

    Aremu, A O; Pla?ková, L; Gruz, J; Bíba, O; Šubrtová, M; Novák, O; Doležal, K; Van Staden, J

    2015-11-01

    A better understanding of phytohormone physiology can provide an essential basis to coherently achieve a conservation drive/strategy for valuable plant species. We evaluated the distribution pattern of cytokinins (CKs) and phenolic compounds in different organs of 1-year-old greenhouse-grown Tulbaghia simmleri pre-treated (during micropropagation) with three aromatic CKs (benzyladenine = BA, meta-topolin = mT, meta-topolin riboside = mTR). The test species is highly valuable due to its medicinal and ornamental uses. Based on UHPLC-MS/MS quantification, mT and mTR pre-treated plants had the highest total CK, mostly resulting from the isoprenoid CK-type, which occurred at highest concentrations in the roots. Although occurring in much lower concentrations when compared to isoprenoid CKs, aromatic CKs were several-fold more abundant in the root of mT pre-treated plants than with other treatments. Possibly related to the enhanced aromatic CKs, free bases and ribonucleotides, plants pre-treated with mT generally displayed better morphology than the other treatments. A total of 12 bioactive phenolic compounds, including four hydroxybenzoic acids, five hydroxycinnamic acids and three flavonoids at varying concentrations, were quantified in T. simmleri. The occurrence, distribution and levels of these phenolic compounds were strongly influenced by the CK pre-treatments, thereby confirming the importance of CKs in phenolic biosynthesis pathways. PMID:26177040

  13. CNEA/ANL collaboration program to develop an optimized version of DART validation and assessment by means of U{sub 3}Si{sub x} and U{sub 3}O{sub 8-}Al dispersed CNEA miniplate irradiation behavior.

    SciTech Connect

    Solis, D.

    1998-10-16

    The DART code is based upon a thermomechanical model that can predict swelling, recrystallization, fuel-meat interdiffusion and other issues related with MTR dispersed FE behavior under irradiation. As a part of a common effort to develop an optimized version of DART, a comparison between DART predictions and CNEA miniplates irradiation experimental data was made. The irradiation took place during 1981-82 for U3O8 miniplates and 1985-86 for U{sub 3}Si{sub x} at Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR). The microphotographs were studied by means of IMAWIN 3.0 Image Analysis Code and different fission gas bubbles distributions were obtained. Also it was possible to find and identify different morphologic zones. In both kinds of fuels, different phases were recognized, like particle peripheral zones with evidence of Al-U reaction, internal recrystallized zones and bubbles. A very good agreement between code prediction and irradiation results was found. The few discrepancies are due to local, fabrication and irradiation uncertainties, as the presence of U{sub 3}Si phase in U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} particles and effective burnup.

  14. Ayurvedic approach in the management of spinal cord injury: A case study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sarvesh Kumar; Rajoria, Kshipra

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is associated with consequences such as full loss of spinal movements, incontinence of bladder functions, bed sores, etc. There is no satisfactory treatment available in biomedicine with only limited treatments only for enhancement of spinal cord function. These treatments have many limitations. Ayurvedic drugs and Pancakarma procedures have been in use to treat such conditions since a long time. We present a case of SCI with lesion at C4 level which was treated for 2 months with an Ayurvedic combined intervention. The combined treatment plan involved Ayurvedic oral medications (Brhadv?tacint?ma?i rasa - 125 mg, Ardhan?gav?t?ri rasa - 125 mg, Da?am?la kv?tha - 40 ml, A?vagandh?c?r?a [powder of Withania somnifera DUNAL] - 3 g, Am?t? [Tinospora cordifolia WILLD] - 500 mg, Mukt??ukti pi??i - 500 mg and Trayoda???ga guggulu - 500 mg) twice daily. Combined procedures involved such as ??li?a??ika pi??asvedana (sudation with medicated cooked bolus of rice) every day for 2 months and M?tr? basti (enema) for first 15 days with A?vagandh? oil. From 16th day, Must?di y?pana basti (MYB, enema with medicated milk) was given for 16 days. After an interval of 7 days, MYB was further repeated for next 16 days. Substantial clinical improvement was reported after 2 months of the Ayurvedic treatment in existing neurological deficits and in quality of life. PMID:26283809

  15. Matrin 3 as a key regulator of endothelial cell survival

    SciTech Connect

    Przygodzka, Patrycja; Boncela, Joanna; Cierniewski, Czeslaw S.

    2011-04-01

    Matrin 3 is an integral component of nuclear matrix architecture that has been implicated in interacting with other nuclear proteins and thus modulating the activity of proximal promoters. In this study, we evaluated the contribution of this protein to proliferation of endothelial cells. To selectively modulate matrin 3 expression, we used siRNA oligonucleotides and transfection of cells with a pEGFP-N1-Mtr3. Our data indicate that downregulation of matrin 3 is responsible for reduced proliferation and leads to necrosis of endothelial cells. This conclusion is supported by observations that reducing matrin 3 expression results in (a) producing signs of necrosis detected by PI staining, LDH release, and scatter parameters in flow cytometry, (b) affecting cell cycle progression. It does not cause (c) membrane asymmetry of cells as indicated by lack of Annexin V binding as well as (d) activation of caspase 3 and cleavage of PARP. We conclude that matrin 3 plays a significant role in controlling cell growth and proliferation, probably via formation of complexes with nuclear proteins that modulate pro- and antiapoptotic signaling pathways. Thus, degradation of matrin 3 may be a switching event that induces a shift from apoptotic to necrotic death of cells.

  16. Leaching of radionuclides from MRT-fuel elements in concentrated salt brines

    SciTech Connect

    Fachinger, J.; Brodda, B.G.

    1996-12-31

    Direct final disposal in a salt mine is being discussed in the Federal Republic of Germany as an alternative to the reprocessing of spent material test reactor fuel elements (MTR-FE). The KFA Institute for Safety Research and Reactor Technology conducts safety studies for the interim storage and final disposal of such special fuel elements. One accident scenario in long-term safety analyses is a water ingress into the salt repository. This involves the formation of brines which come into contact with the fuel elements. Radionuclides are mobilized from the irradiated fuel element when the {open_quotes}meat{close_quotes} of the fuel element becomes accessible to the brine solution. However, it seems that most of the radionuclides are effectively trapped by the corrosion products of the cladding material aluminium. After a short leaching period, the activity concentrations in the Q-brine solution reach a constant level far below the limit of solubility with a progressing corrosion of the fuel element.

  17. Redox reactions of reduced flavin mononucleotide (FMN), riboflavin (RBF), and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) with ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Zhi; Zachara, John M.; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Moore, Dean A.; Kennedy, David W.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2012-11-01

    Flavins are secreted by the dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella and can function as endogenous electron transfer mediators (ETM). In order to assess the potential importance of flavins in Fe(III) bioreduction, we investigated the redox reaction kinetics of reduced flavins (FMNH2 and RBFH2) with ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite. The organic reductants rapidly reduced and dissolved ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite in the pH range 4-8. The rate constant k for 2-line ferrihydrite reductive dissolution by FMNH2 was 87.5 ? 3.5 M-1?s-1 at pH 7.0 in batch reactors, and the k was similar for RBFH2. For lepidocrocite, the k was 500 ? 61 M-1?s-1 for FMNH2, and 236 ? 22 M-1?s-1 for RBFH2. The surface area normalized initial reaction rates (ra) were between 0.08 and 77 ?moles?m-2?s-1 for various conditions in stopped-flow experiments. Initial rates (ro) were first-order with respect to Fe(III) oxide concentration, and ra increased with decreasing pH. Poorly crystalline 2-line ferrihydrite yielded the highest ra, followed by more crystalline 6-line ferrihydrite, and crystalline lepidocrocite. Compared to a previous whole-cell study with Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1, our findings suggest that ETM reduction by the Mtr pathway coupled to lactate oxidation are rate limiting, rather than heterogeneous electron transfer to the Fe(III) oxide.

  18. Calculated public doses from 39 years of emission from Studsvik.

    PubMed

    Hedvall, R

    1999-09-01

    Emission monitoring of radionuclides has been performed since 1959 at the Studsvik site at the Baltic coast in the county of Södermanland, 80 km south of Stockholm. Several small nuclear reactors have been used at the site. Today only one 50 MW high-flux pool-type materials testing reactor (MTR) and one 1 MW low-power pool reactor are used. In the R2 reactor, testing of nuclear reactor fuel, production of radioisotopes for medical purposes and neutron transmutation doping of silicon are performed. A facility for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for medical treatments at the R2-0 reactor will be in operation by the year 2000. The University of Uppsala has a department of neutron research at the reactor. Other types of nuclear work done at Studsvik are decontamination, incineration, melting and recycling of low-level waste. Yearly emissions are much smaller than the limit, 0.1 mSv per year to the critical group, set by the Swedish authority. PMID:10503705

  19. Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Recover Heavy Hydrocarbons and to Remove Water from Natural Gas

    SciTech Connect

    R. Baker; T. Hofmann; K. A. Lokhandwala

    2004-09-29

    The objective of this project is to design, construct and field demonstrate a membrane system to recover natural gas liquids (NGL) and remove water from raw natural gas. An extended field test to demonstrate system performance under real-world conditions would convince industry users of the efficiency and reliability of the process. The system has been designed and fabricated by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) and will be installed and operated at British Petroleum (BP)-Amoco's Pascagoula, MS plant. The Gas Research Institute will partially support the field demonstration and BP-Amoco will help install the unit and provide onsite operators and utilities. The gas processed by the membrane system will meet pipeline specifications for dewpoint and BTU value and can be delivered without further treatment to the pipeline. Based on data from prior membrane module tests, the process is likely to be significantly less expensive than glycol dehydration followed by propane refrigeration, the principal competitive technology. At the end of this demonstration project the process will be ready for commercialization. The route to commercialization will be developed during this project and may involve collaboration with other companies already servicing the natural gas processing industry.

  20. Reflector modelling of small high leakage cores making use of multi-group nodal equivalence theory

    SciTech Connect

    Theron, S. A.; Reitsma, F.

    2012-07-01

    This research focuses on modelling reflectors in typical material testing reactors (MTRs). Equivalence theory is used to homogenise and collapse detailed transport solutions to generate equivalent nodal parameters and albedo boundary conditions for reflectors, for subsequent use in full core nodal diffusion codes. This approach to reflector modelling has been shown to be accurate for two-group large commercial light water reactor (LWR) analysis, but has not been investigated for MTRs. MTRs are smaller, with much larger leakage, environment sensitivity and multi-group spectrum dependencies than LWRs. This study aims to determine if this approach to reflector modelling is an accurate and plausible homogenisation technique for the modelling of small MTR cores. The successful implementation will result in simplified core models, better accuracy and improved efficiency of computer simulations. Codes used in this study include SCALE 6.1, OSCAR-4 and EQUIVA (the last two codes are developed and used at Necsa). The results show a five times reduction in calculational time for the proposed reduced reactor model compared to the traditional explicit model. The calculated equivalent parameters however show some sensitivity to the environment used to generate them. Differences in the results compared to the current explicit model, require more careful investigation including comparisons with a reference result, before its implementation can be recommended. (authors)

  1. Underwater Coatings Testing for INEEL Fuel Basin Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Julia L. Tripp

    2004-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is deactivating several fuel storage basins. Airborne contamination is a concern when the sides of the basins are exposed and allowed to dry during water removal. One way of controlling this airborne contamination is to fix the contamination in place while the pool walls are still submerged. There are many underwater coatings available on the market that are used in marine, naval and other applications. A series of tests were run to determine whether the candidate underwater fixatives are easily applied and adhere well to the substrates (pool wall materials) found in INEEL fuel pools. The four pools considered included (1) Test Area North (TAN-607) with epoxy painted concrete walls; (2) Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) (CPP-603) with bare concrete walls; (3) Materials Test Reactor (MTR) Canal with stainless steel lined concrete walls; and (4) Power Burst Facility (PBF-620) with stainless steel lined concrete walls on the bottom and epoxy painted carbon steel lined walls on the upper portions. Therefore, the four materials chosen for testing included bare concrete, epoxy painted concrete, epoxy painted carbon steel, and stainless steel. The typical water temperature of the pools varies from 55 F to 80 F dependent on the pool and the season. These tests were done at room temperature.

  2. Power transient analyses of experimental in-reflector devices during safety shutdown in Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR)

    SciTech Connect

    Camprini, P. C.; Sumini, M.; Artioli, C.; Gonnier, C.; Pouchin, B.; Bourdon, S.

    2012-07-01

    The Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) is designed to be a 100 MW material testing reactor (MTR) and it is expected to become the reference facility in the framework of European nuclear research activity. As the core neutron spectrum is quite fast, several experimental devices concerning fuel studies have been conceived to be placed in the reflector in order to exploit a proper thermal neutron flux irradiation. Since the core power is relatively high, the neutronic coupling between the reactor core and the reflector devices has to be taken into account for different rod insertions. In fact the thermal power produced within the fuel samples is considerable. Heat removal during shutdown is a main topic in nuclear safety and it is worth to analyse thermal power transients in fuel samples as well. Here a thermal hydraulic model for JHR core is proposed aiming at a simple and representative description as far as reactivity feedbacks are concerned. Then it is coupled with a neutronic pointwise kinetics analysis by means of the DULCINEE code to compute core power transient calculations. Moreover, some reflector-core coupling evaluations are performed through Monte Carlo method using the TRIPOLI 4.7 code. The JHR equilibrium cycle is considered with respect to four fuel compositions namely Beginning of Cycle (BOC), Xenon Saturation Point (XSP), Middle of Cycle (MOC) and End of Cycle (EOC). Then thermal power transients in the experimental reflector devices are evaluated during safety shutdowns and they are verified for all these cycle steps. (authors)

  3. Genome-wide screen uncovers novel pathways for tRNA processing and nuclear-cytoplasmic dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jingyan; Bao, Alicia; Chatterjee, Kunal; Wan, Yao; Hopper, Anita K

    2015-12-15

    Transfer ribonucleic acids (tRNAs) are essential for protein synthesis. However, key gene products involved in tRNA biogenesis and subcellular movement remain to be discovered. We conducted the first comprehensive unbiased analysis of the role of nearly an entire proteome in tRNA biology and describe 162 novel and 12 previously known Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene products that function in tRNA processing, turnover, and subcellular movement. tRNA nuclear export is of particular interest because it is essential, but the known tRNA exporters (Los1 [exportin-t] and Msn5 [exportin-5]) are unessential. We report that mutations of CRM1 (Exportin-1), MEX67/MTR2 (TAP/p15), and five nucleoporins cause accumulation of unspliced tRNA, a hallmark of defective tRNA nuclear export. CRM1 mutation genetically interacts with los1? and causes altered tRNA nuclear-cytoplasmic distribution. The data implicate roles for the protein and mRNA nuclear export machineries in tRNA nuclear export. Mutations of genes encoding actin cytoskeleton components and mitochondrial outer membrane proteins also cause accumulation of unspliced tRNA, likely due to defective splicing on mitochondria. Additional gene products, such as chromatin modification enzymes, have unanticipated effects on pre-tRNA end processing. Thus, this genome-wide screen uncovered putative novel pathways for tRNA nuclear export and extensive links between tRNA biology and other aspects of cell physiology. PMID:26680305

  4. Design and Laboratory Evaluation of Future Elongation and Diameter Measurements at the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    K. L. Davis; D. L. Knudson; J. L. Rempe; J. C. Crepeau; S. Solstad

    2015-07-01

    New materials are being considered for fuel, cladding, and structures in next generation and existing nuclear reactors. Such materials can undergo significant dimensional and physical changes during high temperature irradiations. In order to accurately predict these changes, real-time data must be obtained under prototypic irradiation conditions for model development and validation. To provide such data, researchers at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL) are developing several instrumented test rigs to obtain data real-time from specimens irradiated in well-controlled pressurized water reactor (PWR) coolant conditions in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This paper reports the status of INL efforts to develop and evaluate prototype test rigs that rely on Linear Variable Differential Transformers (LVDTs) in laboratory settings. Although similar LVDT-based test rigs have been deployed in lower flux Materials Testing Reactors (MTRs), this effort is unique because it relies on robust LVDTs that can withstand higher temperatures and higher fluxes than often found in other MTR irradiations. Specifically, the test rigs are designed for detecting changes in length and diameter of specimens irradiated in ATR PWR loops. Once implemented, these test rigs will provide ATR users with unique capabilities that are sorely needed to obtain measurements such as elongation caused by thermal expansion and/or creep loading and diameter changes associated with fuel and cladding swelling, pellet-clad interaction, and crud buildup.

  5. Genetic Resistance Determinants, In Vitro Time-Kill Curve Analysis and Pharmacodynamic Functions for the Novel Topoisomerase II Inhibitor ETX0914 (AZD0914) in Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Foerster, Sunniva; Golparian, Daniel; Jacobsson, Susanne; Hathaway, Lucy J.; Low, Nicola; Shafer, William M.; Althaus, Christian L.; Unemo, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae to all available therapeutic antimicrobials has emerged and new efficacious drugs for treatment of gonorrhea are essential. The topoisomerase II inhibitor ETX0914 (also known as AZD0914) is a new spiropyrimidinetrione antimicrobial that has different mechanisms of action from all previous and current gonorrhea treatment options. In this study, the N. gonorrhoeae resistance determinants for ETX0914 were further described and the effects of ETX0914 on the growth of N. gonorrhoeae (ETX0914 wild type, single step selected resistant mutants, and e?ux pump mutants) were examined in a novel in vitro time-kill curve analysis to estimate pharmacodynamic parameters of the new antimicrobial. For comparison, ciprofloxacin, azithromycin, ceftriaxone, and tetracycline were also examined (separately and in combination with ETX0914). ETX0914 was rapidly bactericidal for all wild type strains and had similar pharmacodynamic properties to ciprofloxacin. All selected resistant mutants contained mutations in amino acid codons D429 or K450 of GyrB and inactivation of the MtrCDE e?ux pump fully restored the susceptibility to ETX0914. ETX0914 alone and in combination with azithromycin and ceftriaxone was highly effective against N. gonorrhoeae and synergistic interaction with ciprofloxacin, particularly for ETX0914-resistant mutants, was found. ETX0914, monotherapy or in combination with azithromycin (to cover additional sexually transmitted infections), should be considered for phase III clinical trials and future gonorrhea treatment. PMID:26696986

  6. Quantification of telomere length by FISH and laser scanning cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahoney, John E.; Sahin, Ergun; Jaskelioff, Mariela; Chin, Lynda; DePinho, Ronald A.; Protopopov, Alexei I.

    2008-02-01

    Telomeres play a critical role in the maintenance of chromosomal stability. Telomere erosion, coupled with loss of DNA damage checkpoint function, results in genomic instability that promotes the development of cancer. The critical role of telomere dynamics in cancer has motivated the development of technologies designed to monitor telomere reserves in a highly quantitative and high-throughput manner in humans and model organisms. To this end, we have adapted and modified two established technologies, telomere-FISH and laser scanning cytometry. Specifically, we have produced a number of enhancements to the iCys LSC (CompuCyte) package including software updates, use of 60X dry objectives, and increased spatial resolution by 0.2 um size of stage steps. In addition, the 633 nm HeNe laser was replaced with a 532 nm green diode laser to better match the viewing options. Utilization of telomere-deficient mouse cells with short dysfunctional telomeres and matched telomerase reconstituted cultures demonstrated significantly higher mean integral specific fluorescence values for mTR transfectants relative to empty vector controls: 4.485M vs. 1.362M (p<0.0001). Histograms of average telomere intensities for individual cells were obtained and demonstrated intercellular heterogeneity in telomere lengths. The validation of the approach derives from a strong correlation between iCys LSC values and Southern blotting. This validated method greatly increases our experimental throughput and objectivity.

  7. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO RECOVER HEAVY HYDROCARBONS AND TO REMOVE WATER FROM NATURAL GAS

    SciTech Connect

    R. Baker; T. Hofmann; J. Kaschemekat; K.A. Lokhandwala; Membrane Group; Module Group; Systems Group

    2001-01-11

    The objective of this project is to design, construct and field demonstrate a 3-MMscfd membrane system to recover natural gas liquids (NGL) and remove water from raw natural gas. An extended field test to demonstrate system performance under real-world conditions is required to convince industry users of the efficiency and reliability of the process. The system will be designed and fabricated by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) and then installed and operated at British Petroleum (BP)-Amoco's Pascagoula, MS plant. The Gas Research Institute will partially support the field demonstration and BP-Amoco will help install the unit and provide onsite operators and utilities. The gas processed by the membrane system will meet pipeline specifications for dewpoint and Btu value and can be delivered without further treatment to the pipeline. Based on data from prior membrane module tests, the process is likely to be significantly less expensive than glycol dehydration followed by propane refrigeration, the principal competitive technology. At the end of this demonstration project the process will be ready for commercialization. The route to commercialization will be developed during this project and may involve collaboration with other companies already servicing the natural gas processing industry.

  8. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO RECOVER HEAVY HYDROCARBONS AND TO REMOVE WATER FROM NATURAL GAS

    SciTech Connect

    R. Baker; R. Hofmann; K.A. Lokhandwala

    2003-02-14

    The objective of this project is to design, construct and field demonstrate a membrane system to recover natural gas liquids (NGL) and remove water from raw natural gas. An extended field test to demonstrate system performance under real-world conditions would convince industry users of the efficiency and reliability of the process. The system has been designed and fabricated by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) and will be installed and operated at British Petroleum (BP)-Amoco's Pascagoula, MS plant. The Gas Research Institute will partially support the field demonstration and BP-Amoco will help install the unit and provide onsite operators and utilities. The gas processed by the membrane system will meet pipeline specifications for dewpoint and Btu value and can be delivered without further treatment to the pipeline. Based on data from prior membrane module tests, the process is likely to be significantly less expensive than glycol dehydration followed by propane refrigeration, the principal competitive technology. At the end of this demonstration project the process will be ready for commercialization. The route to commercialization will be developed during this project and may involve collaboration with other companies already servicing the natural gas processing industry.

  9. "Azul Platino": another Spanish natural stone to be considered as Global Heritage Stone Resource.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José Tejado, Juan; Mota, M. Isabel; Pereira, Dolores

    2014-05-01

    Several granites are quarried in Extremadura, Spain, with very good aesthetic and physic and mechanical characteristics. "Azul Platino" has a striking bluish colour and its properties make this granite a perfect option for most applications as ornamental rocks. This granite has been used for centuries, first in the architectonic heritage of the extraction surrounding area, but afterwards in many important projects in Spain, Europe and all around the world: La Guardia Airport (NYC, USA), Yokohama Bridge (Tokyo, Japan), European Parliament (Brussels, Belgium), Planetarium (Valencia, Spain), Tenerife Auditorium (Tenerife, Spain), Suntec City (Singapore), MTR Kowlonn Station (Hong Kong), O'Connel Street (Dublin, Ireland), .... One important characteristic of this natural stone is the low radon exhalation that all the varieties, including the more weathered ones, show. For being a granite, this is an important characteristic for its use, both in interior and exterior use. But "Azul Platino" accomplishes all requirements to be considered as a nominee for Global Heritage Stone Resource consideration. Together with other local natural stones, it could be part as well of a Global Heritage Stone Province nomination.

  10. Extracellular Polymeric Substances from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 Biofilms: Characterization by Infrared Spectroscopy and Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Bin; Shi, Liang; Brown, Roslyn N.; Xiong, Yijia; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Romine, Margaret F.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Lipton, Mary S.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2011-04-01

    This study characterizes the composition of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms to provide insight into potential interactions of EPS with redox-active metals and radionuclides. Both bound and loosely associated EPS were extracted from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms prepared using a hollow-fiber membrane biofilm reactor (HfMBR). FTIR spectra revealed the presence of proteins, polysaccharides, nucleic acids, membrane lipids, and fatty acids in both bound and loosely associated EPS. Using a global proteomic approach, a total of 58 extracellular and outer membrane proteins were identified in the EPS. These included homologues of multiple S. oneidensis MR-1 proteins that potentially contribute to key physiological biofilm processes, such as biofilm-promoting protein BpfA, surface-associated serine protease, nucleotidases (CpdB and UshA), an extracellular lipase, and oligopeptidases (PtrB and a M13 family oligopeptidase lipoprotein). In addition, 20 redox proteins were found in extracted EPS. Among the detected redox proteins were the homologues of two S. oneidensis MR-1 c-type cytochromes, MtrC and OmcA, which have been implicated in extracellular electron transfer. Given their detection in the EPS of Shewanella sp. HRCR 1 biofilms, c-type cytochromes may contribute to the possible redox activity of the biofilm matrix and play important roles in extracellular electron transfer reactions.

  11. Environmental Adaptation: Genomic Analysis of the Piezotolerant and Psychrotolerant Deep-Sea Iron Reducing Bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans WP3

    PubMed Central

    Jian, Huahua; Zhang, Bing; Li, Shengkang; Wang, Feng; Zeng, Xiaowei; Gao, Lei; Bartlett, Douglas Hoyt; Yu, Jun; Hu, Songnian; Xiao, Xiang

    2008-01-01

    Shewanella species are widespread in various environments. Here, the genome sequence of Shewanella piezotolerans WP3, a piezotolerant and psychrotolerant iron reducing bacterium from deep-sea sediment was determined with related functional analysis to study its environmental adaptation mechanisms. The genome of WP3 consists of 5,396,476 base pairs (bp) with 4,944 open reading frames (ORFs). It possesses numerous genes or gene clusters which help it to cope with extreme living conditions such as genes for two sets of flagellum systems, structural RNA modification, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) biosynthesis and osmolyte transport and synthesis. And WP3 contains 55 open reading frames encoding putative c-type cytochromes which are substantial to its wide environmental adaptation ability. The mtr-omc gene cluster involved in the insoluble metal reduction in the Shewanella genus was identified and compared. The two sets of flagellum systems were found to be differentially regulated under low temperature and high pressure; the lateral flagellum system was found essential for its motility and living at low temperature. PMID:18398463

  12. Irradiation Facilities at the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover

    2005-12-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is the third generation and largest test reactor built in the Reactor Technology Complex (RTC – formerly known as the Test Reactor Area), located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), to study the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The RTC was established in the early 1950s with the development of the Materials Testing Reactor (MTR), which operated until 1970. The second major reactor was the Engineering Test Reactor (ETR), which operated from 1957 to 1981, and finally the ATR, which began operation in 1967 and will continue operation well into the future. These reactors have produced a significant portion of the world’s data on materials response to reactor environments. The wide range of experiment facilities in the ATR and the unique ability to vary the neutron flux in different areas of the core allow numerous experiment conditions to co-exist during the same reactor operating cycle. Simple experiments may involve a non-instrumented capsule containing test specimens with no real-time monitoring or control capabilities1. More sophisticated testing facilities include inert gas temperature control systems and pressurized water loops that have continuous chemistry, pressure, temperature, and flow control as well as numerous test specimen monitoring capabilities. There are also apparatus that allow for the simulation of reactor transients on test specimens.

  13. Electrical transport along bacterial nanowires from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    PubMed Central

    El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.; Wanger, Greg; Leung, Kar Man; Yuzvinsky, Thomas D.; Southam, Gordon; Yang, Jun; Lau, Woon Ming; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Gorby, Yuri A.

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial nanowires are extracellular appendages that have been suggested as pathways for electron transport in phylogenetically diverse microorganisms, including dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria and photosynthetic cyanobacteria. However, there has been no evidence presented to demonstrate electron transport along the length of bacterial nanowires. Here we report electron transport measurements along individually addressed bacterial nanowires derived from electron-acceptor–limited cultures of the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Transport along the bacterial nanowires was independently evaluated by two techniques: (i) nanofabricated electrodes patterned on top of individual nanowires, and (ii) conducting probe atomic force microscopy at various points along a single nanowire bridging a metallic electrode and the conductive atomic force microscopy tip. The S. oneidensis MR-1 nanowires were found to be electrically conductive along micrometer-length scales with electron transport rates up to 109/s at 100 mV of applied bias and a measured resistivity on the order of 1 ?·cm. Mutants deficient in genes for c-type decaheme cytochromes MtrC and OmcA produce appendages that are morphologically consistent with bacterial nanowires, but were found to be nonconductive. The measurements reported here allow for bacterial nanowires to serve as a viable microbial strategy for extracellular electron transport. PMID:20937892

  14. Verification of 235U mass content in nuclear fuel plates by an absolute method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Gammal, W.

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear Safeguards is referred to a verification System by which a State can control all nuclear materials (NM) and nuclear activities under its authority. An effective and efficient Safeguards System must include a system of measurements with capabilities sufficient to verify such NM. Measurements of NM using absolute methods could eliminate the dependency on NM Standards, which are necessary for other relative or semi-absolute methods. In this work, an absolute method has been investigated to verify the 235U mass content in nuclear fuel plates of Material Testing Reactor (MTR) type. The most intense gamma-ray signature at 185.7 keV emitted after ?-decay of the 235U nuclei was employed in the method. The measuring system (an HPGe-spectrometer) was mathematically calibrated for efficiency using the general Monte Carlo transport code MCNP-4B. The calibration results and the measured net count rate were used to estimate the 235U mass content in fuel plates at different detector-to-fuel plate distances. Two sets of fuel plates, containing natural and low enriched uranium, were measured at the Fuel Fabrication Facility. Average accuracies for the estimated 235U masses of about 2.62% and 0.3% are obtained for the fuel plates containing natural and low enriched uranium; respectively, with a precision of about 3%.

  15. Influences of aerobic respiration on current generation by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in single-chamber microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Kouzuma, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2012-01-01

    In single-chamber microbial fuel cells (SC-MFCs), oxygen molecules diffuse through air cathodes into electrolytes and compete against anodes in accepting electrons. In this study, we constructed multiple gene-knockout mutants for terminal oxidases (SO4607, SO2364, and SO3286) in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and examined their abilities to generate electric currents in SC-MFCs. Although single-knockout mutants generated levels of current similar to that of the wild type (WT), an SO4607/SO2364 double-knockout mutant (DO) generated 50% higher current than WT. A triple-knockout mutant did not grow in SC-MFC. The Coulombic efficiencies in SC-MFC were, however, not substantially different between WT and DO. In aerobically grown DO cells, the transcription levels of the genes involved in extracellular electron transfer (mtrC and crp) were increased compared to those in WT cells. These results suggest that suppression of aerobic respiration activates the expression of genes related to the extracellular electron transfer and increases the electric output from SC-MFCs. PMID:22313754

  16. Calibration of dimensional change in finite element models using AGR moderator brick measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally, K.; Hall, G.; Tan, E.; Marsden, B. J.; Warren, N.

    2014-08-01

    Physically based models, resolved using the finite element (FE) method, are often used to model changes in geometry and the associated stress fields of graphite moderator bricks within a reactor. These models require inputs that describe the loading conditions (field variables), and coded relationships describing the behaviour of material properties. Historically, behaviour on material properties have been obtained from Materials Test Reactor (MTR) experiments, however data relating to samples trepanned from operating reactors are increasingly being used to improve models. Geometry measurements from operating reactors offer the potential for improving the coded relationship for dimensional change in FE models. A non-linear mixed-effect model is presented for calibrating the parameters of FE models that are sensitive to mid-brick diameter, using channel geometry measurements obtained from inspection campaigns. The work makes use of a novel technique: the development of a Bayesian emulator, which is a surrogate for the FE model. The use of an emulator allows the influence of the inputs to the finite element model to be evaluated, and delivers a substantial reduction in the computational burden of calibration.

  17. Enhanced In-pile Instrumentation for Material Testing Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Joy Rempe; Darrell Knudson; Joshua Daw; Troy Unruh; Benjamin Chase; Kurt Davis; Robert Schley

    2012-07-01

    An increasing number of U.S. nuclear research programs are requesting enhanced in-pile instrumentation capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiations. For example, fuel research and development funded by the U.S. Department of Energy now emphasize approaches that rely on first principle models to develop optimized fuel designs that offer significant improvements over current fuels. To facilitate this approach, high fidelity, real-time data are essential for characterizing the performance of new fuels during irradiation testing. Furthermore, sensors that obtain such data must be miniature, reliable and able to withstand high flux/high temperature conditions. Depending on user requirements, sensors may need to obtain data in inert gas, pressurized water, or liquid metal environments. To address these user needs, in-pile instrumentation development efforts have been initiated as part of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) National Scientific User Facility (NSUF), the Fuel Cycle Research & Development (FCR&D), and the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technology (NEET) programs. This paper reports on recent INL achievements to support these programs. Specifically, an overview of the types of sensors currently available to support in-pile irradiations and those sensors currently available to MTR users are identified. In addition, recent results and products available from sensor research and development are detailed. Specifically, progress in deploying enhanced in-pile sensors for detecting elongation and thermal conductivity are reported. Results from research to evaluate the viability of ultrasonic and fiber optic technologies for irradiation testing are also summarized.

  18. Transcriptomic Analysis for Genetic Mechanisms of the Factors Related to Biofilm Formation in Escherichia coli O157:H7

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Yong-Guy; Cho, Moo Hwan; Wood, Thomas K.; Lee, Jintae

    2011-01-01

    Two lineages of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EDL933, Stx1+ and Stx2+) and 86-24 (Stx2+) were investigated to determine the genetic basis of biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces. Strain EDL933 formed a robust biofilm while strain 86-24 formed almost no biofilm on either polystyrene plates or polyethylene tubes. Whole-transcriptome profiles of EDL933 vs. 86-24 revealed that in the strong biofilm-forming strain, genes involved in curli biosynthesis (csgBAC and csgDEFG) and cellulose production (adrA) were significantly induced, whereas genes involved in indole signaling (trpLED and mtr) were most repressed. Additionally, 49 phage genes were highly induced and repressed between the two strains. Curli assays using Congo red plates and scanning electron microscopy corroborated the microarray data as the EDL933 strain produced a large amount of curli, while strain 86-24 formed much less curli. Moreover, EDL933 produced 19-fold more cellulose than 86-24, and indole production in EDL933 was two times lower than that of the strain 86-24. Therefore, it appears E. coli O157:H7 EDL933 produces more biofilm because of its increased curli and cellulose production and reduced indole production. PMID:21221972

  19. Genetic variants in one-carbon metabolism genes and breast cancer risk in European American and African American women.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zhihong; Yao, Song; Zirpoli, Gary; David Cheng, Ting-Yuan; Roberts, Michelle; Khoury, Thaer; Ciupak, Gregory; Davis, Warren; Pawlish, Karen; Jandorf, Lina; Bovbjerg, Dana H; Bandera, Elisa V; Ambrosone, Christine B

    2015-08-01

    Folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism plays critical roles in DNA synthesis, repair and DNA methylation. The impact of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in folate-metabolizing enzymes has been investigated in risk of breast cancer among European or Asian populations, but not among women of African ancestry. We conducted a comprehensive analysis of SNPs in eleven genes involved in one-carbon metabolism and risk of breast cancer in 1,275 European-American (EA) and 1,299 African-American (AA) women who participated in the Women's Circle of Health Study. Allele frequencies varied significantly between EA and AA populations. A number of these SNPs, specifically in genes including MTR, MTRR, SHMT1, TYMS and SLC19A1, were associated with overall breast cancer risk, as well as risk by estrogen receptor (ER) status, in either EA or AA women. Associations appeared to be modified by dietary folate intake. Although single-SNP associations were not statistically significant after correcting for multiple comparisons, polygenetic score analyses revealed significant associations with breast cancer risk. Per unit increase of the risk score was associated with a modest 19 to 50% increase in risk of breast cancer overall, ER positive or ER negative cancer (all p?

  20. A SnoRNA-derived piRNA interacts with human interleukin-4 pre-mRNA and induces its decay in nuclear exosomes.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Fudi; Zhou, Nan; Wu, Kang; Guo, Yubiao; Tan, Weiping; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Xue; Geng, Guannan; Pan, Ting; Luo, Haihua; Zhang, Yijun; Xu, Zhibin; Liu, Jun; Liu, Bingfeng; Gao, Wenchao; Liu, Chao; Ren, Liangliang; Li, Jun; Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Hui

    2015-12-01

    PIWI interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are highly expressed in germline cells and are involved in maintaining genome integrity by silencing transposons. These are also involved in DNA/histone methylation and gene expression regulation in somatic cells of invertebrates. The functions of piRNAs in somatic cells of vertebrates, however, remain elusive. We found that snoRNA-derived and C (C')/D' (D)-box conserved piRNAs are abundant in human CD4 primary T-lymphocytes. piRNA (piR30840) significantly downregulated interleukin-4 (IL-4) via sequence complementarity binding to pre-mRNA intron, which subsequently inhibited the development of Th2 T-lymphocytes. Piwil4 and Ago4 are associated with this piRNA, and this complex further interacts with Trf4-Air2-Mtr4 Polyadenylation (TRAMP) complex, which leads to the decay of targeted pre-mRNA through nuclear exosomes. Taken together, we demonstrate a novel piRNA mechanism in regulating gene expression in highly differentiated somatic cells and a possible novel target for allergy therapeutics. PMID:26405199

  1. 60S pre-ribosome formation viewed from assembly in the nucleolus until export to the cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Nissan, Tracy A.; Baßler, Jochen; Petfalski, Elisabeth; Tollervey, David; Hurt, Ed

    2002-01-01

    60S ribosomes undergo initial assembly in the nucleolus before export to the cytoplasm and recent analyses have identified several nucleolar pre-60S particles. To unravel the steps in the pathway of ribosome formation, we have purified the pre-60S ribosomes associated with proteins predicted to act at different stages as the pre-ribosomes transit from the nucleolus through the nucleoplasm and are then exported to the cytoplasm for final maturation. About 50 non-ribosomal proteins are associated with the early nucleolar pre-60S ribosomes. During subsequent maturation and transport to the nucleoplasm, many of these factors are removed, while others remain attached and additional factors transiently associate. When the 60S precursor particles are close to exit from the nucleus they associate with at least two export factors, Nmd3 and Mtr2. As the 60S pre-ribosome reaches the cytoplasm, almost all of the factors are dissociated. These data provide an initial biochemical map of 60S ribosomal subunit formation on its path from the nucleolus to the cytoplasm. PMID:12374754

  2. Towards a Computational Model of a Methane Producing Archaeum

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Joseph R.; Ellermeier, Jeremy R.; Kohler, Petra R. A.; Ha, Taekjip; Metcalf, William W.; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2014-01-01

    Progress towards a complete model of the methanogenic archaeum Methanosarcina acetivorans is reported. We characterized size distribution of the cells using differential interference contrast microscopy, finding them to be ellipsoidal with mean length and width of 2.9??m and 2.3??m, respectively, when grown on methanol and 30% smaller when grown on acetate. We used the single molecule pull down (SiMPull) technique to measure average copy number of the Mcr complex and ribosomes. A kinetic model for the methanogenesis pathways based on biochemical studies and recent metabolic reconstructions for several related methanogens is presented. In this model, 26 reactions in the methanogenesis pathways are coupled to a cell mass production reaction that updates enzyme concentrations. RNA expression data (RNA-seq) measured for cell cultures grown on acetate and methanol is used to estimate relative protein production per mole of ATP consumed. The model captures the experimentally observed methane production rates for cells growing on methanol and is most sensitive to the number of methyl-coenzyme-M reductase (Mcr) and methyl-tetrahydromethanopterin:coenzyme-M methyltransferase (Mtr) proteins. A draft transcriptional regulation network based on known interactions is proposed which we intend to integrate with the kinetic model to allow dynamic regulation. PMID:24729742

  3. Pre-design of MYRRHA, A Multipurpose Accelerator Driven System for Research and Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'hondt, P.; Abderrahim, H. Aït; Kupschus, P.; Malambu, E.; Aoust, Th.; Benoit, Ph.; Sobolev, V.; Van Tichelen, K.; Arien, B.; Vermeersch, F.; Jongen, Y.; Ternier, S.; Vandeplassche, D.

    2003-08-01

    One of the main SCK•CEN research facility, namely BR2, is nowadays arriving at an age of 40 years just like the major materials testing reactors (MTR) in the world and in Europe (i.e. BR2 (B-Mol), HFR (EU-Petten), OSIRIS (F-Saclay), R2 (S-Studsvik)). The MYRRHA facility in planning has been conceived as potentially replacing BR2 and to be a fast spectrum facility complementary to the thermal spectrum RJH (Réacteur Jules Horowitz) facility, in planning in France. This situation would give Europe a full research capability in terms of nuclear R&D. Furthermore, the disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from industrial nuclear energy production has still to find a fully satisfactory solution, especially in terms of environmental and social acceptability. Scientists are looking for ways to drastically reduce (by a factor of 100 or more) the radio-toxicity of the High Level Waste (HLW) to be stored in a deep geological repository. This can be achieved via burning of minor actinides (MA) and to a less extent of long-lived fission products (LLFP) in Accelerator Driven Systems. The MYRRHA project contribution will be in helping to demonstrate the ADS concept at reasonable power level and the demonstration of the technological feasibility of MA and LLFP transmutation under real conditions.

  4. Development, calibration, and experimental results obtained with an innovative calorimeter (CALMOS) for nuclear heating measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Carcreff, Hubert; Cloute-Cazalaa, Veronique; Salmon, Laurent

    2012-08-15

    Nuclear heating inside an MTR reactor has to be known in order to be able to control samples temperature during irradiation experiments. An R and D program has been carried out at CEA to design a new type of in-core calorimetric system. This new development, started in 2002, has for main objective to manufacture a calorimeter suitable to monitoring nuclear heating inside the 70 MWth OSIRIS material testing reactor operated by CEA's Nuclear Energy Division at the Saclay research center. An innovative calorimetric probe, associated to a specific handling system, has been designed to provide access to measurements both along the fissile height and on the upper part of the core, where nuclear heating still remains high. Two mock-ups of the probe were manufactured and tested in 2005 and 2009 in ex-core area of OSIRIS reactor for process validation, while a displacement system has been especially studied to move the probe along a given axial measurement range. This paper deals with the development, tests on preliminary mock-ups and the finalization of the probe. Main modeling and experimental results are presented. Moreover, alternative methods to calibration for nuclear heating rate measurements which are now possible with this new calorimeter are presented and discussed. (authors)

  5. The MYRRHA ADS Project in Belgium Enters the Front End Engineering Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bruyn, Didier; Abderrahim, Hamid Aït; Baeten, Peter; Leysen, Paul

    The MYRRHA project started in 1998 by SCK•CEN. MYRRHA is a MTR, based on the ADS concept, for material and fuel research, for studying the feasibility of transmutation of Minor Actinides and Long-Lived Fission Products arising from radioactive waste reprocessing and finally for demonstrating at a reasonable power scale the principle of the ADS. The MYRRHA design has progressed through various framework programmes of the European Commission in the context of Partitioning and Transmutation. The design has now entered into the Front End Engineering Phase (FEED) covering the period 2012-2015. The engineering company, which will handle this phase, has been selected and the works have begun in the late 2013. In the mean time we have made some refinements in both primary systems and plant layout, including reactor building design. In this paper, we present the most recent developments of the MYRRHA design in terms of reactor building and plant layout as existing today as well as a preliminary study concerning the spent fuel building of the facility. During the oral presentation we add some preliminary results of the interaction with the FEED contractor and the most recent version of the primary systems.

  6. Ayurvedic approach in the management of spinal cord injury: A case study.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sarvesh Kumar; Rajoria, Kshipra

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is associated with consequences such as full loss of spinal movements, incontinence of bladder functions, bed sores, etc. There is no satisfactory treatment available in biomedicine with only limited treatments only for enhancement of spinal cord function. These treatments have many limitations. Ayurvedic drugs and Pancakarma procedures have been in use to treat such conditions since a long time. We present a case of SCI with lesion at C4 level which was treated for 2 months with an Ayurvedic combined intervention. The combined treatment plan involved Ayurvedic oral medications (Brhadv?tacint?ma?i rasa - 125 mg, Ardhan?gav?t?ri rasa - 125 mg, Da?am?la kv?tha - 40 ml, A?vagandh?c?r?a [powder of Withania somnifera DUNAL] - 3 g, Am?t? [Tinospora cordifolia WILLD] - 500 mg, Mukt??ukti pi??i - 500 mg and Trayoda???ga guggulu - 500 mg) twice daily. Combined procedures involved such as ??li?a??ika pi??asvedana (sudation with medicated cooked bolus of rice) every day for 2 months and M?tr? basti (enema) for first 15 days with A?vagandh? oil. From 16(th) day, Must?di y?pana basti (MYB, enema with medicated milk) was given for 16 days. After an interval of 7 days, MYB was further repeated for next 16 days. Substantial clinical improvement was reported after 2 months of the Ayurvedic treatment in existing neurological deficits and in quality of life. PMID:26283809

  7. Impacts of Shewanella oneidensis c-type cytochromes on aerobic and anaerobic respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Haichun; Barua, Soumitra; Liang, Yili; Wu, Lianming; Dong, Yangyang; Reed, Samantha B.; Chen, Jingrong; Culley, David E.; Kennedy, David W.; Yang, Yunfeng; He, Zhili; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Tiedje, James M.; Romine, Margaret F.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-06-24

    Shewanella are renowned for their ability to utilize a wide range of electron acceptors (EA) for respiration, which has been partially accredited to the presence of a large number of the c-type cytochromes. To investigate the involvement of c-type cytochrome proteins in aerobic and anaerobic respiration of Shewanella oneidensis Mr -1, 36 in-frame deletion mutants, among possible 41 predicted, c-type cytochrome genes were obtained. The potential involvement of each individual c-type cytochrome in the reduction of a variety of EAs was assessed individually as well as in competition experiments. While results on the wellstudied c-type cytochromes CymA(SO4591) and MtrC(SO1778) were consistent with previous findings, collective observations were very interesting: the responses of S. oneidensis Mr -1 to low and highly toxic metals appeared to be significantly different; CcoO, CcoP and PetC, proteins involved in aerobic respiration in various organisms, played critical roles in both aerobic and anaerobic respiration with highly toxic metals as EA. In addition, these studies also suggested that an uncharacterized c-type cytochrome (SO4047) may be important to both aerobiosis and anaerobiosis.

  8. Testing of HTR UO2 TRISO fuels in AVR and in material test reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kania, Michael J.; Nabielek, Heinz; Verfondern, Karl; Allelein, Hans-Josef

    2013-10-01

    The German High Temperature Reactor Fuel Development Program successfully developed, licensed and manufactured many thousands of spherical fuel elements that were used to power the experimental AVR reactor and the commercial THTR reactor. In the 1970s, this program extended the performance envelope of HTR fuels by developing and qualifying the TRISO-coated particle system. Irradiation testing in real-time AVR tests and accelerated MTR tests demonstrated the superior manufacturing process of this fuel and its irradiation performance. In the 1980s, another program direction change was made to a low enriched UO2 TRISO-coated particle system coupled with high-quality manufacturing specifications designed to meet new HTR plant design needs. These needs included requirements for inherent safety under normal operation and accident conditions. Again, the German fuel development program met and exceeded these challenges by manufacturing and qualifying the low-enriched UO2 TRISO-fuel system for HTR systems with steam generation, gas-turbine systems and very high temperature process heat applications. Fuel elements were manufactured in production scale facilities that contained near defect free UO2 TRISO coated particles, homogeneously distributed within a graphite matrix with very low levels of uranium contamination. Good irradiation performance for these elements was demonstrated under normal operating conditions to 12% FIMA and under accident conditions not exceeding 1600 °C.

  9. Impaired macromolecular protein pools in fronto-striato-thalamic circuits in type 2 diabetes revealed by magnetization transfer imaging.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shaolin; Ajilore, Olusola; Wu, Minjie; Lamar, Melissa; Kumar, Anand

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has shown that type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with white matter microstructural changes, cognitive impairment, and decreased resting-state functional connectivity and spontaneous brain activity. This study used magnetization transfer imaging to examine, for the first time, the integrity of macromolecular protein pools in fronto-striato-thalamic circuits and its clinical and cognitive correlates in patients with T2DM. T2DM patients without mood disorders (n = 20, aged 65.05 ± 11.95 years) and healthy control subjects (HCs; n = 26, aged 62.92 ± 12.71 years) were recruited. Nodes of fronto-striato-thalamic circuits-head of the caudate nucleus (hCaud), putamen, globus pallidus, thalamus-and four cortical regions-rostral and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and lateral orbitofrontal cortex-were examined. Compared with HCs, patients with T2DM had significantly lower magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) in bilateral anterior cingulate and hCaud. Reduced MTRs in the above regions showed correlations with T2DM-related clinical measures, including hemoglobin A1c level and vascular risk factors, and neuropsychological task performance in the domains of learning and memory, executive function, and attention and information processing. The impaired biophysical integrity of brain macromolecular protein pools and their local microenvironments in T2DM patients may provide insights into the neurological pathophysiology underlying diabetes-associated clinical and cognitive deficits. PMID:25092675

  10. Regulation of methane genes and genome expression

    SciTech Connect

    John N. Reeve

    2009-09-09

    At the start of this project, it was known that methanogens were Archaeabacteria (now Archaea) and were therefore predicted to have gene expression and regulatory systems different from Bacteria, but few of the molecular biology details were established. The goals were then to establish the structures and organizations of genes in methanogens, and to develop the genetic technologies needed to investigate and dissect methanogen gene expression and regulation in vivo. By cloning and sequencing, we established the gene and operon structures of all of the “methane” genes that encode the enzymes that catalyze methane biosynthesis from carbon dioxide and hydrogen. This work identified unique sequences in the methane gene that we designated mcrA, that encodes the largest subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase, that could be used to identify methanogen DNA and establish methanogen phylogenetic relationships. McrA sequences are now the accepted standard and used extensively as hybridization probes to identify and quantify methanogens in environmental research. With the methane genes in hand, we used northern blot and then later whole-genome microarray hybridization analyses to establish how growth phase and substrate availability regulated methane gene expression in Methanobacterium thermautotrophicus ?H (now Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus). Isoenzymes or pairs of functionally equivalent enzymes catalyze several steps in the hydrogen-dependent reduction of carbon dioxide to methane. We established that hydrogen availability determine which of these pairs of methane genes is expressed and therefore which of the alternative enzymes is employed to catalyze methane biosynthesis under different environmental conditions. As were unable to establish a reliable genetic system for M. thermautotrophicus, we developed in vitro transcription as an alternative system to investigate methanogen gene expression and regulation. This led to the discovery that an archaeal protein, designated TFE, that had sequences in common with the eukaryotic general transcription factor TFIIE, stimulated archaeal transcription initiation and that the archaeal TATA-box binding protein (TBP) remained attached to the promoter region whereas the transcription factor TFB dissociated from the template DNA following initiation. DNA sequences that directed the localized assembly of archaeal histones into archaeal nucleosomes were identified, and we established that transcription by an archaeal RNA polymerase was slowed but not blocked by archaeal nucleosomes. We developed a new protocol to purify archaeal RNA polymerases and with this enzyme and additional improvements to the in vitro transcription system, we established the template requirements for archaeal transcription termination, investigated the activities of proteins predicted to be methane gene regulators, and established how TrpY, a novel archaeal regulator of expression of the tryptophan biosynthetic operon functions in M. thermautotrophicus. This also resulted in the discovery that almost all M. thermautotrophicus mutants isolated as spontaneously resistant to 5-methyl tryptophan (5MTR) had mutations in trpY and were therefore 5MTR through de-repressed trp operon expression. This established a very simple, practical procedure to determine and quantify the DNA sequence changes that result from exposure of this Archaeon to any experimental mutagenesis protocol. Following the discovery that the Thermococcus kodakaraensis was amenable to genetic manipulation, we established this technology at OSU and subsequently added plasmid expression, a reporter system and additional genetic selections to the T. kodakaraensis genetic toolbox. We established that transcription and translation are coupled in this Archaeon, and by combining in vitro transcription and in vivo genetics, we documented that both TFB1 and TFB2 support transcription initiation in T. kodakaraensis. We quantified the roles of ribosome binding sequences and alternative initiation codons in translation initiation, established that polarity e

  11. Mechanistic Diversity in the RuBisCO Superfamily: The Enolase in the Methionine

    SciTech Connect

    Imker,H.; Fedorov, A.; Fedorov, E.; Almo, S.; Gerlt, J.

    2007-01-01

    D-Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO), the most abundant enzyme, is the paradigm member of the recently recognized mechanistically diverse RuBisCO superfamily. The RuBisCO reaction is initiated by abstraction of the proton from C3 of the D-ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate substrate by a carbamate oxygen of carboxylated Lys 201 (spinach enzyme). Heterofunctional homologues of RuBisCO found in species of Bacilli catalyze the tautomerization ('enolization') of 2,3-diketo-5-methylthiopentane 1-phosphate (DK-MTP 1-P) in the methionine salvage pathway in which 5-methylthio-D-ribose (MTR) derived from 5'-methylthioadenosine is converted to methionine [Ashida, H., Saito, Y., Kojima, C., Kobayashi, K., Ogasawara, N., and Yokota, A. (2003) A functional link between RuBisCO-like protein of Bacillus and photosynthetic RuBisCO, Science 302, 286-290]. The reaction catalyzed by this 'enolase' is accomplished by abstraction of a proton from C1 of the DK-MTP 1-P substrate to form the tautomerized product, a conjugated enol. Because the RuBisCO- and 'enolase'-catalyzed reactions differ in the regiochemistry of proton abstraction but are expected to share stabilization of an enolate anion intermediate by coordination to an active site Mg{sup 2+}, we sought to establish structure-function relationships for the 'enolase' reaction so that the structural basis for the functional diversity could be established. We determined the stereochemical course of the reaction catalyzed by the 'enolases' from Bacillus subtilis and Geobacillus kaustophilus. Using stereospecifically deuterated samples of an alternate substrate derived from D-ribose (5-OH group instead of the 5-methylthio group in MTR) as well as of the natural DK-MTP 1-P substrate, we determined that the 'enolase'-catalyzed reaction involves abstraction of the 1-proS proton. We also determined the structure of the activated 'enolase' from G. kaustophilus (carboxylated on Lys 173) liganded with Mg{sup 2+} and 2,3-diketohexane 1-phosphate, a stable alternate substrate. The stereospecificity of proton abstraction restricts the location of the general base to the N-terminal {alpha}+ {beta} domain instead of the C-terminal ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8}-barrel domain that contains the carboxylated Lys 173. Lys 98 in the N-terminal domain, conserved in all 'enolases', is positioned to abstract the 1-proS proton. Consistent with this proposed function, the K98A mutant of the G. kaustophilus 'enolase' is unable to catalyze the 'enolase' reaction. Thus, we conclude that this functionally divergent member of the RuBisCO superfamily uses the same structural strategy as RuBisCO for stabilizing the enolate anion intermediate, i.e., coordination to an essential Mg{sup 2+}, but the proton abstraction is catalyzed by a different general base.

  12. Whole brain myelin mapping using T1- and T2-weighted MR imaging data

    PubMed Central

    Ganzetti, Marco; Wenderoth, Nicole; Mantini, Dante

    2014-01-01

    Despite recent advancements in MR imaging, non-invasive mapping of myelin in the brain still remains an open issue. Here we attempted to provide a potential solution. Specifically, we developed a processing workflow based on T1-w and T2-w MR data to generate an optimized myelin enhanced contrast image. The workflow allows whole brain mapping using the T1-w/T2-w technique, which was originally introduced as a non-invasive method for assessing cortical myelin content. The hallmark of our approach is a retrospective calibration algorithm, applied to bias-corrected T1-w and T2-w images, that relies on image intensities outside the brain. This permits standardizing the intensity histogram of the ratio image, thereby allowing for across-subject statistical analyses. Quantitative comparisons of image histograms within and across different datasets confirmed the effectiveness of our normalization procedure. Not only did the calibrated T1-w/T2-w images exhibit a comparable intensity range, but also the shape of the intensity histograms was largely corresponding. We also assessed the reliability and specificity of the ratio image compared to other MR-based techniques, such as magnetization transfer ratio (MTR), fractional anisotropy (FA), and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR). With respect to these other techniques, T1-w/T2-w had consistently high values, as well as low inter-subject variability, in brain structures where myelin is most abundant. Overall, our results suggested that the T1-w/T2-w technique may be a valid tool supporting the non-invasive mapping of myelin in the brain. Therefore, it might find important applications in the study of brain development, aging and disease. PMID:25228871

  13. Assessment of compressive modulus, hydraulic permeability and matrix content of trypsin-treated nucleus pulposus using quantitative MRI.

    PubMed

    Périé, D; Iatridis, J C; Demers, C N; Goswami, T; Beaudoin, G; Mwale, F; Antoniou, J

    2006-01-01

    A clinical strength MRI and intact bovine caudal intervertebral discs were used to test the hypotheses that (1) mechanical loading and trypsin treatment induce changes in NMR parameters, mechanical properties and biochemical contents; and (2) mechanical properties are quantitatively related to NMR parameters. MRI acquisitions, confined compression stress-relaxation experiments, and biochemical assays were applied to determine the NMR parameters (relaxation times T1 and T2, magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) and diffusion trace (TrD)), mechanical properties (compressive modulus H(A0) and hydraulic permeability k(0)), and biochemical contents (H(2)O, proteoglycan and total collagen) of nucleus pulposus tissue from bovine caudal discs subjected to one of two injections and one of two mechanical loading conditions. Significant correlations were found between k(0) and T1 (r=0.75,p=0.03), T2 (r=0.78, p=0.02), and TrD (r=0.85, p=0.007). A trend was found between H(A0) and TrD (r=0.56, p=0.12). However, loading decreased these correlations (r=0.4, p=0.2). The significant effect of trypsin treatment on mechanical properties, but not on NMR parameters, may suggest that mechanical properties are more sensitive to the structural changes induced by trypsin treatment. The significant effect of loading on T1 and T2, but not on H(A0) or k(0), may suggest that NMR parameters are more sensitive to the changes in water content enhanced by loading. We conclude that MRI offers promise as a sensitive and non-invasive technique for describing alterations in material properties of intervertebral disc nucleus, and our results demonstrate that the hydraulic permeability correlated more strongly to the quantitative NMR parameters than did the compressive modulus; however, more studies are necessary to more precisely characterize these relationships. PMID:15970200

  14. Cell-Penetrating Peptides Selectively Cross the Blood-Brain Barrier In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Stalmans, Sofie; Bracke, Nathalie; Wynendaele, Evelien; Gevaert, Bert; Peremans, Kathelijne; Burvenich, Christian; Polis, Ingeborgh; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are a group of peptides, which have the ability to cross cell membrane bilayers. CPPs themselves can exert biological activity and can be formed endogenously. Fragmentary studies demonstrate their ability to enhance transport of different cargoes across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). However, comparative, quantitative data on the BBB permeability of different CPPs are currently lacking. Therefore, the in vivo BBB transport characteristics of five chemically diverse CPPs, i.e. pVEC, SynB3, Tat 47–57, transportan 10 (TP10) and TP10-2, were determined. The results of the multiple time regression (MTR) analysis revealed that CPPs show divergent BBB influx properties: Tat 47–57, SynB3, and especially pVEC showed very high unidirectional influx rates of 4.73 ?l/(g × min), 5.63 ?l/(g × min) and 6.02 ?l/(g × min), respectively, while the transportan analogs showed a negligible to low brain influx. Using capillary depletion, it was found that 80% of the influxed peptides effectively reached the brain parenchyma. Except for pVEC, all peptides showed a significant efflux out of the brain. Co-injection of pVEC with radioiodinated bovine serum albumin (BSA) did not enhance the brain influx of radiodionated BSA, indicating that pVEC does not itself significantly alter the BBB properties. A saturable mechanism could not be demonstrated by co-injecting an excess dose of non-radiolabeled CPP. No significant regional differences in brain influx were observed, with the exception for pVEC, for which the regional variations were only marginal. The observed BBB influx transport properties cannot be correlated with their cell-penetrating ability, and therefore, good CPP properties do not imply efficient brain influx. PMID:26465925

  15. Effect of Therapeutic Sequence of Hot Pack and Ultrasound on Physiological Response Over Trigger Point of Upper Trapezius

    PubMed Central

    Benjaboonyanupap, Dararat; Paungmali, Aatit; Pirunsan, Ubon

    2015-01-01

    Background: Musculoskeletal pain is a common problem among athletes. Apart from sport injuries, the myofascial pain syndrome is another important problem that affects performance of the athlete. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of therapeutic sequences of the hot pack in combination with ultrasound on the physiological responses over the latent myofascial trigger point (LMTrP) of upper trapezius muscle. Materials and Methods: Thirty subjects with a latent myofascial trigger point (LMTrP) in both sides of the upper trapezius muscle participated in the study (age 27.33 ± 4.34 years, weight 58.11 ± 7.47 kg, height 161.50 ± 5.82 cm, pressure pain threshold 2.28 ± 0.24 kg/cm2, pain intensity 7.17 ± 2.25 VAS). All subjects received both treatments (hot pack followed by ultrasound: HP + US; and ultrasound followed by hot pack: US + HP) by randomization with a 24 to 48-hour interval between sessions. Outcome measures, including the tissue blood flow (TBF), pressure pain threshold (PPT), supra-thermal threshold (STT) and visual analog scale (VAS) were evaluated at baseline, immediately, after 30 minutes and after 60 minutes. Results: The TBF and PPT significantly increased from baseline in both treatment conditions (i.e. HP + US and US + HP), while the HP + US condition showed a trend toward significant difference in VAS and STT in 45°C. Conclusions: The application of HP and US treatment induces physiological responses (especially, TBF and PPT) on the LMTrP. This finding provides the direction toward the management of MTrPs condition. PMID:26448847

  16. Identification and biophysical characterization of a very-long-chain-fatty-acid-substituted phosphatidylinositol in yeast subcellular membranes

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Morphological analysis of a conditional yeast mutant in acetyl-CoA carboxylase acc1ts/mtr7, the rate-limiting enzyme of fatty acid synthesis, suggested that the synthesis of C26 VLCFAs (very-long-chain fatty acids) is important for maintaining the structure and function of the nuclear membrane. To characterize this C26-dependent pathway in more detail, we have now examined cells that are blocked in pathways that require C26. In yeast, ceramide synthesis and remodelling of GPI (glycosylphosphatidylinositol)-anchors are two pathways that incorporate C26 into lipids. Conditional mutants blocked in either ceramide synthesis or the synthesis of GPI anchors do not display the characteristic alterations of the nuclear envelope observed in acc1ts, indicating that the synthesis of another C26-containing lipid may be affected in acc1ts mutant cells. Lipid analysis of isolated nuclear membranes revealed the presence of a novel C26-substituted PI (phosphatidylinositol). This C26-PI accounts for approx. 1% of all the PI species, and is present in both the nuclear and the plasma membrane. Remarkably, this C26-PI is the only C26-containing glycerophospholipid that is detectable in wild-type yeast, and the C26-substitution is highly specific for the sn-1 position of the glycerol backbone. To characterize the biophysical properties of this lipid, it was chemically synthesized. In contrast to PIs with normal long-chain fatty acids (C16 or C18), the C26-PI greatly reduced the bilayer to hexagonal phase transition of liposomes composed of 1,2-dielaidoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DEPE). The biophysical properties of this lipid are thus consistent with a possible role in stabilizing highly curved membrane domains. PMID:15270698

  17. Progress towards developing neutron tolerant magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhardt, Brian; Tittmann, Bernhard; Rempe, Joy; Daw, Joshua; Kohse, Gordon; Carpenter, David; Ames, Micheal; Ostrovsky, Yakov; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Montgomery, Robert; Chien, Hualte; Wernsman, Bernard

    2014-07-01

    Current generation light water reactors (LWRs), sodium cooled fast reactors (SFRs), small modular reactors (SMRs), and next generation nuclear plants (NGNPs) provide harsh environments in and near the core that can severely test material performance and limit their operational life. To address this issue, several Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) research programs are evaluating the long duration radiation performance of fuels and materials. In To reduce the amount of Material and Test Reactor (MTR) irradiations required, DOE is also funding development of enhanced instrumentation that will be able to obtain data, with unprecedented accuracy and resolution, that are required to validate new multi-scale multiphysics modeling tools . It is not feasible to obtain such data with the current state of instrumentation technology. To address this need, PSU and collaborators have started an experiment to test the potential for utilizing ultrasonic instruments in-pile. Ultrasonic sensors must be resistant to high neutron flux, high gamma radiation, and high temperature. PSU and collaborators have designed, fabricated, and started to irradiate piezoelectric and magnetostrictive transducers designed to perform in such harsh environments. Three piezoelectric transducers were fabricated with aluminum nitride, zinc oxide, and bismuth titanate as the active element. The transducers are coupled kovar and aluminum waveguides of which pulse-echo ultrasonic measurements are made in-situ. Two magnetostrictive transducers were fabricated with Remendur and Arnokrome as the active elements. These devices will be pulsed and monitored in-situ. (1) Selection of candidate sensor materials as well as optimization of test assembly parameters (2) High temperature benchmark testing and (3) initial data from the irradiation will be reported.

  18. Genomic analyses of bacterial porin-cytochrome gene clusters

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, James K.; Zachara, John M.

    2014-01-01

    The porin-cytochrome (Pcc) protein complex is responsible for trans-outer membrane electron transfer during extracellular reduction of Fe(III) by the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. The identified and characterized Pcc complex of G. sulfurreducens PCA consists of a porin-like outer-membrane protein, a periplasmic 8-heme c-type cytochrome (c-Cyt) and an outer-membrane 12-heme c-Cyt, and the genes encoding the Pcc proteins are clustered in the same regions of genome (i.e., the pcc gene clusters) of G. sulfurreducens PCA. A survey of additionally microbial genomes has identified the pcc gene clusters in all sequenced Geobacter spp. and other bacteria from six different phyla, including Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans 2CP-1, A. dehalogenans 2CP-C, Anaeromyxobacter sp. K, Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis, Denitrovibrio acetiphilus DSM 12809, Desulfurispirillum indicum S5, Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus AHT2, Desulfurobacterium thermolithotrophum DSM 11699, Desulfuromonas acetoxidans DSM 684, Ignavibacterium album JCM 16511, and Thermovibrio ammonificans HB-1. The numbers of genes in the pcc gene clusters vary, ranging from two to nine. Similar to the metal-reducing (Mtr) gene clusters of other Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, such as Shewanella spp., additional genes that encode putative c-Cyts with predicted cellular localizations at the cytoplasmic membrane, periplasm and outer membrane often associate with the pcc gene clusters. This suggests that the Pcc-associated c-Cyts may be part of the pathways for extracellular electron transfer reactions. The presence of pcc gene clusters in the microorganisms that do not reduce solid-phase Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides, such as D. alkaliphilus AHT2 and I. album JCM 16511, also suggests that some of the pcc gene clusters may be involved in extracellular electron transfer reactions with the substrates other than Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides. PMID:25505896

  19. Parametric study of the energy deposition inside the calorimeter measuring the nuclear heating in Material Testing Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amharrak, H.; Reynard-Carette, C.; Lyoussi, A.; Carette, M.; Brun, J.; De Vita, C.; Fourmentel, D.; Villard, J.-F.

    2015-11-01

    The nuclear heating measurements in Material Testing Reactors (MTRs) are crucial for the study of nuclear materials and fuels under irradiation. The reference measurements of this nuclear heating are especially performed by a differential calorimeter including a graphite sample material and two calorimetric cells. Then these measurements are used for other experimental conditions in order to predict the nuclear heating and thermal conditions induced in the irradiation devices. This paper will present simulations with MCNP5 Monte-Carlo transport code (using ENDF/B-VI nuclear data library) to evaluate the nuclear heating inside the calorimeter during irradiation campaigns of the CARMEN-1P mock-up inside OSIRIS reactor periphery (MTR based on Saclay, France). The whole complete geometry of the sensor has been considered. The calculation method corresponds to a calculation in two steps. Consequently, we used as an input source in the model, the neutron and photon spectra calculated in various experimental locations tested during the irradiation campaign (H9, H10, H11, D9). After a description of the differential calorimeter sensor, the MCNP5 model used for the calculations of nuclear heating inside the calorimeter elements is introduced by two quantities: KERMA and energy deposition rate per mass unit. The Charged Particle Equilibrium (CPE) inside the calorimeter elements is studied. The contribution of prompt gamma and neutron is determined. A comparison between this total nuclear heating calculation and the experimental results in a graphite sample will be made. Then parametric studies performed on the influence of the various calorimeter components on the nuclear heating are presented and discussed. The studies of the influence of the nature of materials, the sensor jacket, the source type and the comparison of the results obtained for the two calorimetric cells leads to some proposals for the sensor improvement.

  20. Nab3 facilitates the function of the TRAMP complex in RNA processing via recruitment of Rrp6 independent of Nrd1.

    PubMed

    Fasken, Milo B; Laribee, R Nicholas; Corbett, Anita H

    2015-03-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) play critical roles in gene regulation. In eukaryotic cells, ncRNAs are processed and/or degraded by the nuclear exosome, a ribonuclease complex containing catalytic subunits Dis3 and Rrp6. The TRAMP (Trf4/5-Air1/2-Mtr4 polyadenylation) complex is a critical exosome cofactor in budding yeast that stimulates the exosome to process/degrade ncRNAs and human TRAMP components have recently been identified. Importantly, mutations in exosome and exosome cofactor genes cause neurodegenerative disease. How the TRAMP complex interacts with other exosome cofactors to orchestrate regulation of the exosome is an open question. To identify novel interactions of the TRAMP exosome cofactor, we performed a high copy suppressor screen of a thermosensitive air1/2 TRAMP mutant. Here, we report that the Nab3 RNA-binding protein of the Nrd1-Nab3-Sen1 (NNS) complex is a potent suppressor of TRAMP mutants. Unlike Nab3, Nrd1 and Sen1 do not suppress TRAMP mutants and Nrd1 binding is not required for Nab3-mediated suppression of TRAMP suggesting an independent role for Nab3. Critically, Nab3 decreases ncRNA levels in TRAMP mutants, Nab3-mediated suppression of air1/2 cells requires the nuclear exosome component, Rrp6, and Nab3 directly binds Rrp6. We extend this analysis to identify a human RNA binding protein, RALY, which shares identity with Nab3 and can suppress TRAMP mutants. These results suggest that Nab3 facilitates TRAMP function by recruiting Rrp6 to ncRNAs for processing/degradation independent of Nrd1. The data raise the intriguing possibility that Nab3 and Nrd1 can function independently to recruit Rrp6 to ncRNA targets, providing combinatorial flexibility in RNA processing. PMID:25775092

  1. Adoption of ASME Code Section XI for ISI to Research Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Tawfik, Y.E.; El-sesy, I.A.; Shaban, H.I.; Ibrahim, M.M

    2002-07-01

    ETRR-2 (Second Egyptian thermal research reactor) is a multi-purpose, pool- type reactor with an open water surface and variable core arrangement. The core power is 22 MWth, cooled and moderated by light water and with beryllium reflectors. It contains plate- type fuel elements (MTR type, 19.7% enriched uranium) with aluminum clad. The ETRR-2 reactor consist of 57 systems and around 200 subsystems. These systems contain many mechanical components such as tanks, pipes, valves, pumps, heat exchangers, cooling tower, air compressors, and supports. In this present work, a trial was made to adopt the general requirements of ASME code, section XI to ETRR-2 research reactor. ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) boiler and pressure vessel Code, section XI, provides requirements for in-service inspection (ISI) and in-service testing (IST) of components and systems, and repair/replacement activities in a nuclear power plant. Also, IAEA (International Atomic Energy Authority) has published some recommendations for ISI for research reactors similar to that rules and requirements specified in ASME. The complete ISI program requires several steps that have to be performed in sequence. These steps are described in many logic flow charts (LFC's). These logic flow charts include; the general LFC's for all steps required to complete ISI program, the LFC's for examination requirements, the LFC's for flaw evaluation modules, and the LFC's for acceptability of welds for class 1 components. This program includes, also, the inspection program for welded parts of the reactor components during its lifetime. This inspection program is applied for each system and subsystem of ETRR-2 reactor. It includes the examination area type, the component type, the part to be examined, the weld type, the examination method, the inspection program schedule, and the detailed figures of the welded components. (authors)

  2. Myrrha, Technology Development for the Realisation of ADS in Eu:. Current Status & Prospects for Realisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, R.; Abderrahim, H. Aït; Baeten, P.; de Bruyn, D.; Maes, D.; Mazouzi, A. Al; Ariën, B.; Malambu, E.; Schuurmans, P.; Schyns, M.; Sobolev, V.; van den Eynde, G.; Vandeplassche, D.

    2010-06-01

    The coupling between an accelerator, a spallation target and a subcritical core has been studied for the first time at SCK•CEN in collaboration with Ion Beam Applications (IBA, Louvain-la-Neuve) in the frame of the ADONIS project (1995-1997). ADONIS was a small irradiation facility, based on the ADS concept, having a dedicated objective to produce radioisotopes for medical purposes and more particularly 99Mo as a fission product from highly enriched 235U (HEU) fissile targets. The ad-hoc scientific advisory committee recommended extending the purpose of the ADONIS machine to become a Material Testing Reactor (MTR) for material and fuel research, to study the feasibility of transmutation of the minor actinides and to demonstrate at a reasonable power scale the principle of the ADS. The project, since 1998 named MYRRHA, has then evolved to a larger installation. MYRRHA is now conceived as a flexible irradiation facility, able to work as an Accelerator Driven (subcritical mode) and in critical mode. In this way, MYRRHA will allow fuel developments for innovative reactor systems, material developments for GEN IV systems, material developments for fusion reactors, radioisotope production for medical and industrial applications and industrial applications, such as Si-doping. MYRRHA will also demonstrate the ADS full concept by coupling the three components (accelerator, spallation target and subcritical reactor) at reasonable power level to allow operation feedback, scalable to an industrial demonstrator and allow the study of efficient transmutation of high-level nuclear waste. Since MYRRHA is based on the heavy liquid metal technology, the eutectic lead-bismuth, it will be able to significantly contribute to the development of Lead Fast Reactor Technology. Since MYRRHA will also be operated in critical mode, MYRRHA can even better play the role of European Technology Pilot Plant in the roadmap for LFR.

  3. Genomic analyses of bacterial porin-cytochrome gene clusters

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, James K.; Zachara, John M.

    2014-11-26

    In this study, the porin-cytochrome (Pcc) protein complex is responsible for trans-outer membrane electron transfer during extracellular reduction of Fe(III) by the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. The identified and characterized Pcc complex of G. sulfurreducens PCA consists of a porin-like outer-membrane protein, a periplasmic 8-heme c type cytochrome (c-Cyt) and an outer-membrane 12-heme c-Cyt, and the genes encoding the Pcc proteins are clustered in the same regions of genome (i.e., the pcc gene clusters) of G. sulfurreducens PCA. A survey of additionally microbial genomes has identified the pcc gene clusters in all sequenced Geobacter spp. and other bacteriamore »from six different phyla, including Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans 2CP-1, A. dehalogenans 2CP-C, Anaeromyxobacter sp. K, Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis, Denitrovibrio acetiphilus DSM 12809, Desulfurispirillum indicum S5, Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus AHT2, Desulfurobacterium thermolithotrophum DSM 11699, Desulfuromonas acetoxidans DSM 684, Ignavibacterium album JCM 16511, and Thermovibrio ammonificans HB-1. The numbers of genes in the pcc gene clusters vary, ranging from two to nine. Similar to the metal-reducing (Mtr) gene clusters of other Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, such as Shewanella spp., additional genes that encode putative c-Cyts with predicted cellular localizations at the cytoplasmic membrane, periplasm and outer membrane often associate with the pcc gene clusters. This suggests that the Pcc-associated c-Cyts may be part of the pathways for extracellular electron transfer reactions. The presence of pcc gene clusters in the microorganisms that do not reduce solid-phase Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides, such as D. alkaliphilus AHT2 and I. album JCM 16511, also suggests that some of the pcc gene clusters may be involved in extracellular electron transfer reactions with the substrates other than Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides.« less

  4. Association between Genetic Variants in DNA and Histone Methylation and Telomere Length

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangmi; Parks, Christine G.; Xu, Zongli; Carswell, Gleta; DeRoo, Lisa A.; Sandler, Dale P.; Taylor, Jack A.

    2012-01-01

    Telomere length, a biomarker of aging and age-related diseases, exhibits wide variation between individuals. Common genetic variation may explain some of the individual differences in telomere length. To date, however, only a few genetic variants have been identified in the previous genome-wide association studies. As emerging data suggest epigenetic regulation of telomere length, we investigated 72 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 46 genes that involve DNA and histone methylation as well as telomerase and telomere-binding proteins and DNA damage response. Genotyping and quantification of telomere length were performed in blood samples from 989 non-Hispanic white participants of the Sister Study, a prospective cohort of women aged 35–74 years. The association of each SNP with logarithmically-transformed relative telomere length was estimated using multivariate linear regression. Six SNPs were associated with relative telomere length in blood cells with p-values<0.05 (uncorrected for multiple comparisons). The minor alleles of BHMT rs3733890 G>A (p?=?0.041), MTRR rs2966952 C>T (p?=?0.002) and EHMT2 rs558702 G>A (p?=?0.008) were associated with shorter telomeres, while minor alleles of ATM rs1801516 G>A (p?=?0.031), MTR rs1805087 A>G (p?=?0.038) and PRMT8 rs12299470 G>A (p?=?0.019) were associated with longer telomeres. Five of these SNPs are located in genes coding for proteins involved in DNA and histone methylation. Our results are consistent with recent findings that chromatin structure is epigenetically regulated and may influence the genomic integrity of telomeric region and telomere length maintenance. Larger studies with greater coverage of the genes implicated in DNA methylation and histone modifications are warranted to replicate these findings. PMID:22792358

  5. Macro-Invertebrate Decline in Surface Water Polluted with Imidacloprid

    PubMed Central

    Van Dijk, Tessa C.; Van Staalduinen, Marja A.; Van der Sluijs, Jeroen P.

    2013-01-01

    Imidacloprid is one of the most widely used insecticides in the world. Its concentration in surface water exceeds the water quality norms in many parts of the Netherlands. Several studies have demonstrated harmful effects of this neonicotinoid to a wide range of non-target species. Therefore we expected that surface water pollution with imidacloprid would negatively impact aquatic ecosystems. Availability of extensive monitoring data on the abundance of aquatic macro-invertebrate species, and on imidacloprid concentrations in surface water in the Netherlands enabled us to test this hypothesis. Our regression analysis showed a significant negative relationship (P<0.001) between macro-invertebrate abundance and imidacloprid concentration for all species pooled. A significant negative relationship was also found for the orders Amphipoda, Basommatophora, Diptera, Ephemeroptera and Isopoda, and for several species separately. The order Odonata had a negative relationship very close to the significance threshold of 0.05 (P?=?0.051). However, in accordance with previous research, a positive relationship was found for the order Actinedida. We used the monitoring field data to test whether the existing three water quality norms for imidacloprid in the Netherlands are protective in real conditions. Our data show that macrofauna abundance drops sharply between 13 and 67 ng l?1. For aquatic ecosystem protection, two of the norms are not protective at all while the strictest norm of 13 ng l?1 (MTR) seems somewhat protective. In addition to the existing experimental evidence on the negative effects of imidacloprid on invertebrate life, our study, based on data from large-scale field monitoring during multiple years, shows that serious concern about the far-reaching consequences of the abundant use of imidacloprid for aquatic ecosystems is justified. PMID:23650513

  6. Second generation Research Reactor Fuel Container (RRFC-II).

    SciTech Connect

    Abhold, M. E.; Baker, M. C.; Bourret, S. C.; Harker, W. C.; Pelowitz, D. G.; Polk, P. J.

    2001-01-01

    The second generation Research Reactor Fuel Counter (RRFC-II) has been developed to measure the remaining {sup 235}U content in foreign spent Material Test Reactor (MTR)-type fuel being returned to the Westinghouse Savannah River Site (WSRS) for interim storage and subsequent disposal. The fuel to be measured started as fresh fuel nominally with 93% enriched Uraniuin alloyed with A1 clad in Al. The fuel was irradiated to levels of up to 65% burnup. The RRFC-II, which will be located in the L-Basin spent fuel pool, is intended to assay the {sup 235}U content using a combination of passive neutron coincidence counting, active neutron coincidence counting, and active-multiplicity analysis. Measurements will be done underwater, eliminating the need for costly and hazardous handling operations of spent fuel out of water. The underwater portion of the RRFC-II consists of a watertight stainless steel housing containing neutron and gamma detectors and a scanning active neutron source. The portion of the system that resides above water consists of data-processing electronics; electromechanical drive electronics; a computer to control the operation of the counter, to collect, and to analyze data; and a touch screen interface located at the equipment rack. The RRFC-II is an improved version of the Los Alamos-designed RRFC already installed in the SRS Receipts Basin for Offsite Fuel. The RRFC-II has been fabricated and is scheduled for installation in late FY 2001 pending acceptance testing by Savannah River Site personnel.

  7. Proteome scale comparative modeling for conserved drug and vaccine targets identification in Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis (Cp) is a pathogenic bacterium that causes caseous lymphadenitis (CLA), ulcerative lymphangitis, mastitis, and edematous to a broad spectrum of hosts, including ruminants, thereby threatening economic and dairy industries worldwide. Currently there is no effective drug or vaccine available against Cp. To identify new targets, we adopted a novel integrative strategy, which began with the prediction of the modelome (tridimensional protein structures for the proteome of an organism, generated through comparative modeling) for 15 previously sequenced C. pseudotuberculosis strains. This pan-modelomics approach identified a set of 331 conserved proteins having 95-100% intra-species sequence similarity. Next, we combined subtractive proteomics and modelomics to reveal a set of 10 Cp proteins, which may be essential for the bacteria. Of these, 4 proteins (tcsR, mtrA, nrdI, and ispH) were essential and non-host homologs (considering man, horse, cow and sheep as hosts) and satisfied all criteria of being putative targets. Additionally, we subjected these 4 proteins to virtual screening of a drug-like compound library. In all cases, molecules predicted to form favorable interactions and which showed high complementarity to the target were found among the top ranking compounds. The remaining 6 essential proteins (adk, gapA, glyA, fumC, gnd, and aspA) have homologs in the host proteomes. Their active site cavities were compared to the respective cavities in host proteins. We propose that some of these proteins can be selectively targeted using structure-based drug design approaches (SBDD). Our results facilitate the selection of C. pseudotuberculosis putative proteins for developing broad-spectrum novel drugs and vaccines. A few of the targets identified here have been validated in other microorganisms, suggesting that our modelome strategy is effective and can also be applicable to other pathogens. PMID:25573232

  8. Combined analysis of neutron and photon flux measurements for the Jules Horowitz reactor core mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Fourmentel, D.; Villard, J. F.; Lyoussi, A.; Reynard-Carette, C.; Bignan, G.; Chauvin, J. P.; Gonnier, C.; Guimbal, P.; Malo, J. Y.; Carette, M.; Janulyte, A.; Merroun, O.; Brun, J.; Zerega, Y.; Andre, J.

    2011-07-01

    We study the combined analysis of nuclear measurements to improve the knowledge of the irradiation conditions in the experimental locations of the future Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR). The goal of the present work is to measure more accurately neutron flux, photon flux and nuclear heating in the reactor. In a Material Testing Reactor (MTR), nuclear heating is a crucial parameter to design the experimental devices to be irradiated in harsh nuclear conditions. This parameter drives the temperature of the devices and of the samples. The numerical codes can predict this parameter but in-situ measurements are necessary to reach the expected accuracy. For this reason, one objective of the IN-CORE program [1] is to study the combined measurements of neutron and photon flux and their cross advanced interpretation. It should be reminded that both neutron and photon sensors are not totally selective as their signals are due to neutron and photon interactions. We intend to measure the neutron flux by three different kinds of sensors (Uranium Fission chamber, Plutonium Fission chamber and Self Powered Neutron Detector), the photon flux by two different sensors (Ionization chamber and Self Powered Gamma Detector) and the nuclear heating by two different ones (Differential calorimeter and Gamma Thermometer). For the same parameter, we expect that the use of different kinds of sensors will allow a better estimation of the aimed parameter by mixing different spectrum responses and different neutron and gamma contributions. An experimental test called CARMEN-1 is scheduled in OSIRIS reactor (CEA Saclay - France) at the end of 2011, with the goal to map irradiation locations in the reactor reflector to get a first validation of the analysis model. This article focuses on the sensor selection for CARMEN-1 experiment and to the way to link neutron and photon flux measurements in view to reduce their uncertainties but also to better assess the neutron and photon contributions to nuclear heating. (authors)

  9. Topological Departures from Translational Invariance along a Filament Observed by THEMIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudík, J.; Aulanier, G.; Schmieder, B.; Bommier, V.; Roudier, T.

    2008-03-01

    We study the topology of the 3D magnetic field in a filament channel to address the following questions: Is a filament always formed in a single flux tube? How does the photospheric magnetic field lead to filament interruptions and to feet formation? What is the relation between feet-related field lines and the parasitic polarities? What can topological analyses teach us about EUV filament channels? To do so, we consider a filament observed on 6 October 2004 with THEMIS/MTR, in H? with the full line profile simultaneously and cospatially with its photospheric vector magnetic field. The coronal magnetic field was calculated from a “linear magnetohydrostatic” extrapolation of a composite THEMIS-MDI magnetogram. Its free parameters were adjusted to get the best match possible between the distribution of modeled plasma-supporting dips and the H? filament morphology. The model results in moderate plasma ??1 at low altitudes in the filament, in conjunction with non-negligible departures from force-freeness measured by various metrics. The filament here is formed by a split flux tube. One part of the flux tube is rooted in the photosphere aside an observed interruption in the filament. This splitted topology is due to strong network polarities on the edge of the filament channel, not to flux concentrations closer to the filament. We focus our study to the northwest portion of the filament. The related flux tube is highly fragmented at low altitudes. This fragmentation is due to small flux concentrations of two types. First, some locally distort the tube, leading to noticeable thickness variations along the filament body. Second, parasitic polarities, associated with filament feet, result in secondary dips above the related local inversion line. These dips belong to long field lines that pass below the flux tube. Many of these field lines are not rooted near the related foot. Finally, the present model shows that the coronal void interpretation cannot be ruled out to interpret the wideness of EUV filament channels.

  10. Nuclear characteristics of a fissioning uranium plasma test reactor with light-water cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmarsh, C. L., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    An analytical study was performed to determine a design configuration for a cavity test reactor. Test section criteria were that an average flux of 10 to the 15th power neutrons/sq cm/sec (E less than or equal to 0.12 eV) be supplied to a 61-cm-diameter spherical cavity at 200-atm pressure. Design objectives were to minimize required driver power, to use existing fuel-element technology, and to obtain fuel-element life of 10 to 100 full-power hours. Parameter calculations were made on moderator region size and material, driver fuel arrangement, control system, and structure in order to determine a feasible configuration. Although not optimized, a configuration was selected which would meet design criteria. The driver fuel region was a cylindrical annular region, one element thick, of 33 MTR-type H2O-cooled elements (Al-U fuel plate configuration), each 101 cm long. The region between the spherical test cavity and the cylindrical driver fuel region was Be (10 vol. % H2O coolant) with a midplane dimension of 8 cm. Exterior to the driver fuel, the 25-cm-thick cylindrical and axial reflectors were also Be with 10 vol. % H2O coolant. The entire reactor was contained in a 10-cm-thick steel pressure vessel, and the 200-atm cavity pressure was equalized throughout the driver reactor. Fuel-element life was 50 hr at the required driver power of 200 MW. Reactor control would be achieved with rotating poison drums located in the cylindrical reflector region. A control range of about 18 percent delta k/k was required for reactor operation.

  11. Options for a Health System Researcher to Choose in Meta Review (MR) Approaches-Meta Narrative (MN) and Meta Triangulation (MT).

    PubMed

    Davey, Sanjeev; Davey, Anuradha; Singh, Jai Vir

    2015-01-01

    Two new approaches in systematic reviewing i.e. Meta-narrative review(MNR) (which a health researcher can use for topics which are differently conceptualized and studied by different types of researchers for policy decisions) and Meta-triangulation review(MTR) (done to build theory for studying multifaceted phenomena characterized by expansive and contested research domains) are ready for penetration in an arena of health system research. So critical look at which approach in Meta-review is better i.e. Meta-narrative review or Meta-triangulation review, can give new insights to a health system researcher. A systematic review on 2 key words-"meta-narrative review" and "meta-triangulation review" in health system research, were searched from key search engines, such as Pubmed, Cochrane library, Bio-med Central and Google Scholar etc till 21st March 2014 since last 20 years. Studies from both developed and developing world were included in any form and scope to draw final conclusions. However unpublished data from thesis was not included in systematic review. Meta-narrative review is a type of systematic review which can be used for a wide range of topics and questions involving making judgments and inferences in public health. On the other hand Meta-triangulation review is a three-phased, qualitative meta-analysis process which can be used to explore variations in the assumptions of alternative paradigms, gain insights into these multiple paradigms at one point of time and addresses emerging themes and the resulting theories. PMID:26170537

  12. Fluctuation of Arabidopsis seed dormancy with relative humidity and temperature during dry storage.

    PubMed

    Basbouss-Serhal, Isabelle; Leymarie, Juliette; Bailly, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The changes in germination potential of freshly harvested seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana stored in various combinations of temperature and relative humidity were investigated over 63 weeks of storage. Seeds of the wild type Col-0 and of two mutants displaying low and high levels of dormancy, cat2-1 and mtr4-1, respectively, were stored at harvest in 24 different environments including a combination of eight relative humidities, from 1 to 85%, and four temperatures (10, 15, 20, and 25 °C). These mutations did not influence behaviour of seeds during storage. Primary dormant seeds did not germinate in darkness at 25 °C but acquired the potential to germinate at this temperature within 7 weeks when stored in relative humidities close to 50% across all temperatures. Sorption isotherms and Arrhenius plots demonstrated that the seed moisture content of 0.06g H2O/g dry weight was a critical value below which dormancy release was associated with reactions of negative activation energy and above which dormancy release increased with temperature. Longer storage times when relative humidity did not exceed 75-85% led to decreased germination at 25 °C, corresponding to the induction of secondary dormancy. Dormancy release and induction of secondary dormancy in the dry state were associated with induction or repression of key genes related to abscisic acid and gibberellins biosynthesis and signalling pathways. In high relative humidity, prolonged storage of seeds induced ageing and progressive loss of viability, but this was not related to the initial level of dormancy. PMID:26428064

  13. Fluctuation of Arabidopsis seed dormancy with relative humidity and temperature during dry storage

    PubMed Central

    Basbouss-Serhal, Isabelle; Leymarie, Juliette; Bailly, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The changes in germination potential of freshly harvested seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana stored in various combinations of temperature and relative humidity were investigated over 63 weeks of storage. Seeds of the wild type Col-0 and of two mutants displaying low and high levels of dormancy, cat2-1 and mtr4-1, respectively, were stored at harvest in 24 different environments including a combination of eight relative humidities, from 1 to 85%, and four temperatures (10, 15, 20, and 25 °C). These mutations did not influence behaviour of seeds during storage. Primary dormant seeds did not germinate in darkness at 25 °C but acquired the potential to germinate at this temperature within 7 weeks when stored in relative humidities close to 50% across all temperatures. Sorption isotherms and Arrhenius plots demonstrated that the seed moisture content of 0.06g H2O/g dry weight was a critical value below which dormancy release was associated with reactions of negative activation energy and above which dormancy release increased with temperature. Longer storage times when relative humidity did not exceed 75–85% led to decreased germination at 25 °C, corresponding to the induction of secondary dormancy. Dormancy release and induction of secondary dormancy in the dry state were associated with induction or repression of key genes related to abscisic acid and gibberellins biosynthesis and signalling pathways. In high relative humidity, prolonged storage of seeds induced ageing and progressive loss of viability, but this was not related to the initial level of dormancy. PMID:26428064

  14. Structure and function of the polymerase core of TRAMP, a RNA surveillance complex

    SciTech Connect

    Hamill, Stephanie; Wolin, Sandra L.; Reinisch, Karin M.

    2010-09-03

    The Trf4p/Air2p/Mtr4p polyadenylation (TRAMP) complex recognizes aberrant RNAs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and targets them for degradation. A TRAMP subcomplex consisting of a noncanonical poly(A) RNA polymerase in the Pol {beta} superfamily of nucleotidyl transferases, Trf4p, and a zinc knuckle protein, Air2p, mediates initial substrate recognition. Trf4p and related eukaryotic poly(A) and poly(U) polymerases differ from other characterized enzymes in the Pol {beta} superfamily both in sequence and in the lack of recognizable nucleic acid binding motifs. Here we report, at 2.7-{angstrom} resolution, the structure of Trf4p in complex with a fragment of Air2p comprising two zinc knuckle motifs. Trf4p consists of a catalytic and central domain similar in fold to those of other noncanonical Pol {beta} RNA polymerases, and the two zinc knuckle motifs of Air2p interact with the Trf4p central domain. The interaction surface on Trf4p is highly conserved across eukaryotes, providing evidence that the Trf4p/Air2p complex is conserved in higher eukaryotes as well as in yeast and that the TRAMP complex may also function in RNA surveillance in higher eukaryotes. We show that Air2p, and in particular sequences encompassing a zinc knuckle motif near its N terminus, modulate Trf4p activity, and we present data supporting a role for this zinc knuckle in RNA binding. Finally, we show that the RNA 3{prime} end plays a role in substrate recognition.

  15. Predictive value of different conventional and non-conventional MRI-parameters for specific domains of cognitive function in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Pinter, Daniela; Khalil, Michael; Pichler, Alexander; Langkammer, Christian; Ropele, Stefan; Marschik, Peter B.; Fuchs, Siegrid; Fazekas, Franz; Enzinger, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Objective While many studies correlated cognitive function with changes in brain morphology in multiple sclerosis (MS), few of them used a multi-parametric approach in a single dataset so far. We thus here assessed the predictive value of different conventional and quantitative MRI-parameters both for overall and domain-specific cognitive performance in MS patients from a single center. Methods 69 patients (17 clinically isolated syndrome, 47 relapsing–remitting MS, 5 secondary-progressive MS) underwent the “Brief Repeatable Battery of Neuropsychological Tests” assessing overall cognition, cognitive efficiency and memory function as well as MRI at 3 Tesla to obtain T2-lesion load (T2-LL), normalized brain volume (global brain volume loss), normalized cortical volume (NCV), normalized thalamic volume (NTV), normalized hippocampal volume (NHV), normalized caudate nuclei volume (NCNV), basal ganglia R2* values (iron deposition) and magnetization transfer ratios (MTRs) for cortex and normal appearing brain tissue (NABT). Results Regression models including clinical, demographic variables and MRI-parameters explained 22–27% of variance of overall cognition, 17–26% of cognitive efficiency and 22–23% of memory. NCV, T2-LL and MTR of NABT were the strongest predictors of overall cognitive function. Cognitive efficiency was best predicted by NCV, T2-LL and iron deposition in the basal ganglia. NTV was the strongest predictor for memory function and NHV was particularly related to memory function. Conclusions The predictive value of distinct MRI-parameters differs for specific domains of cognitive function, with a greater impact of cortical volume, focal and diffuse white matter abnormalities on overall cognitive function, an additional role of basal ganglia iron deposition on cognitive efficiency, and thalamic and hippocampal volume on memory function. This suggests the usefulness of using multiparametric MRI to assess (micro)structural correlates of different cognitive constructs. PMID:25844323

  16. MEMBRANE SYSTEM FOR RECOVERY OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM REMEDIATION OFF-GASES

    SciTech Connect

    J.G. Wijmans

    2003-11-17

    In situ vacuum extraction, air or steam sparging, and vitrification are widely used to remediate soil contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). All of these processes produce a VOC-laden air stream from which the VOC must be removed before the air can be discharged or recycled to the generating process. Treatment of these off-gases is often a major portion of the cost of the remediation project. Currently, carbon adsorption and catalytic incineration are the most common methods of treating these gas streams. Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) proposed an alternative treatment technology based on selective membranes that separate the organic components from the gas stream, producing a VOC-free air stream. This technology can be applied to off-gases produced by various remediation activities and the systems can be skid-mounted and automated for easy transportation and unattended operation. The target performance for the membrane systems is to produce clean air (less than 10 ppmv VOC) for discharge or recycle, dischargeable water (less than 1 ppmw VOC), and a concentrated liquid VOC phase. This report contains the results obtained during Phase II of a two-phase project. In Phase I, laboratory experiments were carried out to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach. In the subsequent Phase II project, a demonstration system was built and operated at the McClellan Air Force Base near Sacramento, California. The membrane system was fed with off-gas from a Soil Vacuum Extraction (SVE) system. The work performed in Phase II demonstrated that the membrane system can reduce the VOC concentration in remediation off-gas to 10 ppmv, while producing a concentrated VOC phase and dischargeable water containing less than 1 ppmw VOC. However, the tests showed that the presence of 1 to 3% carbon dioxide in the SVE off-gas reduced the treatment capacity of the system by a factor of three to four. In an economic analysis, treatment costs of the membrane system were compared with those of catalytic oxidation and carbon adsorption. This analysis showed that the treatment costs of the membrane system are higher than those of the competing technologies in the VOC concentration range up to 1%. Catalytic oxidation is the most economical treatment technology for off-gases containing VOCs in the range 50 ppmv to 1%, whereas carbon adsorption (off-site regeneration) is the most economical for VOC concentrations less than 50 ppmv. Because the VOC concentration in the vast majority of remediation off-gases is below 1%, we conclude that the usefulness of membrane VOC-separation systems for remediation applications will be very limited.

  17. Progress towards developing neutron tolerant magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhardt, Brian; Tittmann, Bernhard; Rempe, Joy; Daw, Joshua; Kohse, Gordon; Carpenter, David; Ames, Michael; Ostrovsky, Yakov; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Montgomery, Robert; Chien, Hualte; Wernsman, Bernard

    2015-03-31

    Current generation light water reactors (LWRs), sodium cooled fast reactors (SFRs), small modular reactors (SMRs), and next generation nuclear plants (NGNPs) produce harsh environments in and near the reactor core that can severely tax material performance and limit component operational life. To address this issue, several Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) research programs are evaluating the long duration irradiation performance of fuel and structural materials used in existing and new reactors. In order to maximize the amount of information obtained from Material Testing Reactor (MTR) irradiations, DOE is also funding development of enhanced instrumentation that will be able to obtain in-situ, real-time data on key material characteristics and properties, with unprecedented accuracy and resolution. Such data are required to validate new multi-scale, multi-physics modeling tools under development as part of a science-based, engineering driven approach to reactor development. It is not feasible to obtain high resolution/microscale data with the current state of instrumentation technology. However, ultrasound-based sensors offer the ability to obtain such data if it is demonstrated that these sensors and their associated transducers are resistant to high neutron flux, high gamma radiation, and high temperature. To address this need, the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR-NSUF) is funding an irradiation, led by PSU, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor to test the survivability of ultrasound transducers. As part of this effort, PSU and collaborators have designed, fabricated, and provided piezoelectric and magnetostrictive transducers that are optimized to perform in harsh, high flux, environments. Four piezoelectric transducers were fabricated with either aluminum nitride, zinc oxide, or bismuth titanate as the active element that were coupled to either Kovar or aluminum waveguides and two magnetostrictive transducers were fabricated with Remendur or Galfenol as the active elements. Pulse-echo ultrasonic measurements of these transducers are made in-situ. This paper will present an overview of the test design including selection criteria for candidate materials and optimization of test assembly parameters, data obtained from both out-of-pile and in-pile testing at elevated temperatures, and an assessment based on initial data of the expected performance of ultrasonic devices in irradiation conditions.

  18. Calibrating and training of neutron based NSA techniques with less SNM standards

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, William H; Swinhoe, Martyn T; Bracken, David S; Freeman, Corey R; Newell, Matthew R

    2010-01-01

    Accessing special nuclear material (SNM) standards for the calibration of and training on nondestructive assay (NDA) instruments has become increasingly difficult in light of enhanced safeguards and security regulations. Limited or nonexistent access to SNM has affected neutron based NDA techniques more than gamma ray techniques because the effects of multiplication require a range of masses to accurately measure the detector response. Neutron based NDA techniques can also be greatly affected by the matrix and impurity characteristics of the item. The safeguards community has been developing techniques for calibrating instrumentation and training personnel with dwindling numbers of SNM standards. Monte Carlo methods have become increasingly important for design and calibration of instrumentation. Monte Carlo techniques have the ability to accurately predict the detector response for passive techniques. The Monte Carlo results are usually benchmarked to neutron source measurements such as californium. For active techniques, the modeling becomes more difficult because of the interaction of the interrogation source with the detector and nuclear material; and the results cannot be simply benchmarked with neutron sources. A Monte Carlo calculated calibration curve for a training course in Indonesia of material test reactor (MTR) fuel elements assayed with an active well coincidence counter (AWCC) will be presented as an example. Performing training activities with reduced amounts of nuclear material makes it difficult to demonstrate how the multiplication and matrix properties of the item affects the detector response and limits the knowledge that can be obtained with hands-on training. A neutron pulse simulator (NPS) has been developed that can produce a pulse stream representative of a real pulse stream output from a detector measuring SNM. The NPS has been used by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for detector testing and training applications at the Agency due to the lack of appropriate SNM standards. This paper will address the effect of reduced access to SNM for calibration and training of neutron NDA applications along with the advantages and disadvantages of some solutions that do not use standards, such as the Monte Carlo techniques and the NPS.

  19. Past research and fabrication conducted at SCK•CEN on ferritic ODS alloys used as cladding for FBR's fuel pins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bremaecker, Anne

    2012-09-01

    In the 1960s in the frame of the sodium-cooled fast breeders, SCK•CEN decided to develop claddings made with ferritic stainless materials because of their specific properties, namely a higher thermal conductivity, a lower thermal expansion, a lower tendency to He-embrittlement, and a lower swelling than the austenitic stainless steels. To enhance their lower creep resistance at 650-700 °C arose the idea to strengthen the microstructure by oxide dispersions. This was the starting point of an ambitious programme where both the matrix and the dispersions were optimized. A purely ferritic 13 wt% Cr matrix was selected and its mechanical strength was improved through addition of ferritizing elements. Results of tensile and stress-rupture tests showed that Ti and Mo were the most beneficial elements, partly because of the chi-phase precipitation. In 1973 the optimized matrix composition was Fe-13Cr-3.5Ti-2Mo. To reach creep properties similar to those of AISI 316, different dispersions and methods were tested: internal oxidation (that was not conclusive), and the direct mixing of metallic and oxide powders (Al2O3, MgO, ZrO2, TiO2, ZrSiO4) followed by pressing, sintering, and extrusion. The compression and extrusion parameters were determined: extrusion as hollow at 1050 °C, solution annealing at 1050 °C/15 min, cleaning, cold drawing to the final dimensions with intermediate annealings at 1050 °C, final annealing at 1050 °C, straightening and final aging at 800 °C. The choice of titania and yttria powders and their concentrations were finalized on the basis of their out-of-pile and in-pile creep and tensile strength. As soon as a resistance butt welding machine was developed and installed in a glove-box, fuel segments with PuO2 were loaded in the Belgian MTR BR2. The fabrication parameters were continuously optimized: milling and beating, lubrication, cold drawing (partial and final reduction rates, temperature, duration, atmosphere and furnace). Specific non-destructive tests (ultrasonic and eddy currents) were also developed. In-pile creep in argon and in liquid sodium was deeply studied on pressurized segments irradiated up to 75 dpaNRT. Finally two fuel assemblies cladded with such ODS alloys were irradiated in Phenix to the max dose of 90 dpa. Creep deformation and swelling were limited but the irradiation-induced embrittlement became acute. The programme was stopped shortly after the Chernobyl disaster, before the embrittlement problem was solved.

  20. YliH (BssR) and YceP (BssS) Regulate Escherichia coli K-12 Biofilm Formation by Influencing Cell Signaling†

    PubMed Central

    Domka, Joanna; Lee, Jintae; Wood, Thomas K.

    2006-01-01

    We previously discovered that yliH and yceP are induced in Escherichia coli biofilms (D. Ren, L. A. Bedzyk, S. M. Thomas, R. W. Ye, and T. K. Wood, Appl. Microbiol. Biotechnol. 64:515-524, 2004). Here, it is shown that deletion of yceP (b1060) and yliH (b0836) increases biofilm formation in continuous-flow chambers with minimal glucose medium by increasing biofilm mass (240- to 290-fold), surface coverage (16- to 31-fold), and mean thickness (2,800-fold). To determine the genetic basis of the increase in biofilm formation, we examined the differential gene expression profile in biofilms for both the mutants relative to the wild-type strain in rich medium with glucose and found that 372 to 882 genes were induced and that 76 to 337 were repressed consistently >2-fold (P ? 0.05). The increase in biofilm formation was related to differential expression of genes related to stress response (8 to 64 genes) for both mutants, including rpoS and sdiA. More importantly, 42 to 130 genes related to autoinducer 2 cell signaling were also differentially expressed, including gadAB and flgBCEGHIJLMN, as well as signaling through indole, since 17 to 26 indole-related genes were differentially expressed, including phoAER, gltBD, mtr (encodes protein for indole import), and acrEF (encodes proteins for indole export). Increased biofilm formation in the yliH and yceP mutants in LB supplemented with 0.2% glucose (LB glu) occurred through a reduction in extracellular and intracellular indole concentrations in both mutants (50- to 140-fold), and the addition of indole to the culture restored the wild-type biofilm phenotype; hence, indole represses biofilms. Additionally, both mutants regulate biofilms through quorum sensing, since deletion of either yliH or yceP increased extracellular autoinducer 2 concentrations 50-fold when grown in complex medium (most notably in the stationary phase). Both proteins are involved in motility regulation, since YliH (127 amino acids) and YceP (84 amino acids) repressed motility two to sevenfold (P ? 0.05) in LB, and YceP repressed motility sevenfold (P ? 0.05) in LB glu. Heightened motility in the yceP mutant occurred, due to increased transcription of the flagella and motility loci, including fliC, motA, and qseB (3- to 86-fold). We propose new names for these two loci: bssR for yliH and bssS for yceP, based on the phrase “regulator of biofilm through signal secretion.” PMID:16597943

  1. New insights on late stage volcanism in the Pigafetta basin, western Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadler, T.; Tominaga, M.

    2014-12-01

    We document observations of late stage volcanism in the western Pacific Pigafetta Basin by integrating previously published and new multichannel seismic (MCS) reflection profiles, Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) drill core, and well log data. We examine data from three seismic experiments (FM35-12, MESOPAC II, and MTr5) conducted in the Pigafetta Basin, one of the oldest, deepest abyssal basins in the world, where crustal age is suggested to range from M29 (~157 Ma) to M44 (~169.8 Ma) based on Japanese Mesozoic magnetic lineations. We use a total of ~2150 km of MCS lines along with core and wire-line logging data from ODP Hole 801C. As a basis for our interpretation, we use previously defined seismic stratigraphy for the Pigafetta Basin, including Horizon B (basement) and lower transparent unit (volcaniclastic turbidites) terminology. We build synthetic seismograms from density and p-wave velocity logs using OpendTect v 4.6.0 tie well to seismic feature. We then incorporate energy and similarity attributes of the MCS profiles with the modeled seismogram to correlate reflectors to ODP Hole 801C lithostratigraphy. From this correlation, to be consistent with previous studies, we assign lithology and age to prominent sedimentary and basement reflectors throughout all survey lines. We characterize widely distributed deformation of Horizon B and lower sedimentary unit reflectors based on coherency of wiggle traces, lateral and vertical energy attenuation, and dip of reflectors over a range of scales (>10 km to <1 km). Our findings provide new evidence of late stage volcanism occurring in the Pigafetta Basin during the mid-Cretaceous (110 - 90 Ma). We classify late stage volcanism into 3 types of volcanic related features: (1) seamounts, (2) sills, and (3) vertical seismic disturbance zones (<<1 km wide) characterized by bilateral upward drag of reflectors (indicating a thin, vertical volcanic intrusion). The distribution of these features provide new insights into Cretaceous volcanism in the Pigafetta Basin: (i) late stage volcanism is more widely distributed and younger than previously reported, (ii) findings indicate a local source of magma, and (iii) the modes of volcanism differ from previously documented flood basalts and massive flows.

  2. Genomic Characterization of a Novel Virus of the Family Tymoviridae Isolated from Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Shihong; Wang, David; Rayner, Simon; Tang, Qing; Liang, Guodong

    2012-01-01

    Background The family Tymoviridae comprises three plant virus genera, including Tymovirus, Marafivirus, and Maculavirus, which are found in most parts of the world and cause severe agricultural losses. We describe a putatively novel member of the family Tymoviridae, which is isolated from mosquitoes (Culex spp.), referred to as CuTLV. Methods and Results The CuTLV was isolated by cell culture, which replicates and causes cytopathic effects in Aedes albopictus C6/36 cells, but not in mammalian BHK-21 or Vero cells. The complete 6471 nucleotide sequence of CuTLV was determined. The genome of CuTLV is predicted to contain three open reading frames (ORFs). The largest ORF1 is 5307 nucleotides (nt) in length and encodes a putative polypeptide of 1769 amino acids (aa), which contains the conserved motifs for the methyltransferase (MTR), Tymovirus endopeptidase (PRO), helicase (HEL), and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of the replication-associated proteins (RPs) of positive-stranded RNA viruses. In contrast, the ORF1 sequence does not contain the so-called “tymobox” or “marafibox”, the conserved subgenomic RNA promoter present in all tymoviruses or marafiviruses, respectively. ORF2 and ORF3 putatively encode a 248-aa coat protein (CP) and a proline-rich 149-aa polypeptide. The whole genomic nucleotide identity of CuTLV with other members of family Tymoviridae ranged from 46.2% (ChiYMV) to 52.4% (GFkV). Phylogenetic analysis based on the putative RP and CP genes of CuTLV demonstrated that the virus is most closely related to viruses in the genus Maculavirus. Conclusions The CuTLV is a novel virus related to members of the family Tymoviridae, with molecular characters that are distinct from those of tymoviruses, marafiviruses, and other maculaviruses or macula-like viruses. This is the first report of the isolation of a Tymoviridae-like virus from mosquitoes. Further investigations are required to clarify the origin, replication strategy, and the public health or agricultural importance of the CuTLV. PMID:22848363

  3. Biosynthesis and Functions of Mycothiol, the Unique Protective Thiol of Actinobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Gerald L.; Buchmeier, Nancy; Fahey, Robert C.

    2008-01-01

    Summary: Mycothiol (MSH; AcCys-GlcN-Ins) is the major thiol found in Actinobacteria and has many of the functions of glutathione, which is the dominant thiol in other bacteria and eukaryotes but is absent in Actinobacteria. MSH functions as a protected reserve of cysteine and in the detoxification of alkylating agents, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, and antibiotics. MSH also acts as a thiol buffer which is important in maintaining the highly reducing environment within the cell and protecting against disulfide stress. The pathway of MSH biosynthesis involves production of GlcNAc-Ins-P by MSH glycosyltransferase (MshA), dephosphorylation by the MSH phosphatase MshA2 (not yet identified), deacetylation by MshB to produce GlcN-Ins, linkage to Cys by the MSH ligase MshC, and acetylation by MSH synthase (MshD), yielding MSH. Studies of MSH mutants have shown that the MSH glycosyltransferase MshA and the MSH ligase MshC are required for MSH production, whereas mutants in the MSH deacetylase MshB and the acetyltransferase (MSH synthase) MshD produce some MSH and/or a closely related thiol. Current evidence indicates that MSH biosynthesis is controlled by transcriptional regulation mediated by ?B and ?R in Streptomyces coelicolor. Identified enzymes of MSH metabolism include mycothione reductase (disulfide reductase; Mtr), the S-nitrosomycothiol reductase MscR, the MSH S-conjugate amidase Mca, and an MSH-dependent maleylpyruvate isomerase. Mca cleaves MSH S-conjugates to generate mercapturic acids (AcCySR), excreted from the cell, and GlcN-Ins, used for resynthesis of MSH. The phenotypes of MSH-deficient mutants indicate the occurrence of one or more MSH-dependent S-transferases, peroxidases, and mycoredoxins, which are important targets for future studies. Current evidence suggests that several MSH biosynthetic and metabolic enzymes are potential targets for drugs against tuberculosis. The functions of MSH in antibiotic-producing streptomycetes and in bioremediation are areas for future study. PMID:18772286

  4. Underwater Coatings for Contamination Control

    SciTech Connect

    Julia L. Tripp; Kip Archibald; Ann-Marie Phillips; Joseph Campbell

    2004-02-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is deactivating several fuel storage basins. Airborne contamination is a concern when the sides of the basins are exposed and allowed to dry during water removal. One way of controlling this airborne contamination is to fix the contamination in place while the pool walls are still submerged. There are many underwater coatings available on the market that are used in marine, naval and other applications. A series of tests were run to determine whether the candidate underwater fixatives are easily applied and adhere well to the substrates (pool wall materials) found in INEEL fuel pools. The four pools considered included 1) Test Area North (TAN-607) with epoxy painted concrete walls; 2) Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) (CPP-603) with bare concrete walls; 3) Materials Test Reactor (MTR) Canal with stainless steel lined concrete walls; and 4) Power Burst Facility (PBF-620) with stainless steel lined concrete walls on the bottom and epoxy painted carbon steel lined walls on the upper portions. Therefore, the four materials chosen for testing included bare concrete, epoxy painted concrete, epoxy painted carbon steel, and stainless steel. The typical water temperature of the pools varies from 55oF to 80oF dependent on the pool and the season. These tests were done at room temperature. The following criteria were used during this evaluation. The underwater coating must: · Be easy to apply · Adhere well to the four surfaces of interest · Not change or have a negative impact on water chemistry or clarity · Not be hazardous in final applied form · Be proven in other underwater applications. In addition, it is desirable for the coating to have a high pigment or high cross-link density to prevent radiation from penetrating. This paper will detail the testing completed and the test results. A proprietary two-part, underwater epoxy owned by S. G. Pinney and Associates was selected to be applied by divers after scrubbing loose contamination off the basin walls and floors using a ship hull scrubber and vacuuming up the sludge. A special powered roller with two separate heated hoses that allowed the epoxy to mix at the roller surface was used to eliminate pot time concerns. The walls were successfully coated and water was removed from the pool with no airborne contamination problems.

  5. Progress towards developing neutron tolerant magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhardt, Brian; Tittmann, Bernhard; Rempe, Joy; Daw, Joshua; Kohse, Gordon; Carpenter, David; Ames, Michael; Ostrovsky, Yakov; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Montgomery, Robert; Chien, Hualte; Wernsman, Bernard

    2015-03-01

    Current generation light water reactors (LWRs), sodium cooled fast reactors (SFRs), small modular reactors (SMRs), and next generation nuclear plants (NGNPs) produce harsh environments in and near the reactor core that can severely tax material performance and limit component operational life. To address this issue, several Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) research programs are evaluating the long duration irradiation performance of fuel and structural materials used in existing and new reactors. In order to maximize the amount of information obtained from Material Testing Reactor (MTR) irradiations, DOE is also funding development of enhanced instrumentation that will be able to obtain in-situ, real-time data on key material characteristics and properties, with unprecedented accuracy and resolution. Such data are required to validate new multi-scale, multi-physics modeling tools under development as part of a science-based, engineering driven approach to reactor development. It is not feasible to obtain high resolution/microscale data with the current state of instrumentation technology. However, ultrasound-based sensors offer the ability to obtain such data if it is demonstrated that these sensors and their associated transducers are resistant to high neutron flux, high gamma radiation, and high temperature. To address this need, the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR-NSUF) is funding an irradiation, led by PSU, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor to test the survivability of ultrasound transducers. As part of this effort, PSU and collaborators have designed, fabricated, and provided piezoelectric and magnetostrictive transducers that are optimized to perform in harsh, high flux, environments. Four piezoelectric transducers were fabricated with either aluminum nitride, zinc oxide, or bismuth titanate as the active element that were coupled to either Kovar or aluminum waveguides and two magnetostrictive transducers were fabricated with Remendur or Galfenol as the active elements. Pulse-echo ultrasonic measurements of these transducers are made in-situ. This paper will present an overview of the test design including selection criteria for candidate materials and optimization of test assembly parameters, data obtained from both out-of-pile and in-pile testing at elevated temperatures, and an assessment based on initial data of the expected performance of ultrasonic devices in irradiation conditions.

  6. Gene polymorphisms as risk factors for predicting the cardiovascular manifestations in Marfan syndrome. Role of folic acid metabolism enzyme gene polymorphisms in Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Benke, Kálmán; Ágg, Bence; Mátyás, Gábor; Szokolai, Viola; Harsányi, Gergely; Szilveszter, Bálint; Odler, Balázs; Pólos, Miklós; Maurovich-Horvat, Pál; Radovits, Tamás; Merkely, Béla; Nagy, Zsolt B; Szabolcs, Zoltán

    2015-10-01

    Folic acid metabolism enzyme polymorphisms are believed to be responsible for the elevation of homocysteine (HCY) concentration in the blood plasma, correlating with the pathogenesis of aortic aneurysms and aortic dissection. We studied 71 Marfan patients divided into groups based on the severity of cardiovascular involvement: no intervention required (n=27, Group A); mild involvement requiring intervention (n=17, Group B); severe involvement (n=27, Group C) subdivided into aortic dilatation (n=14, Group C1) and aortic dissection (n=13, Group C2), as well as 117 control subjects. We evaluated HCY, folate, vitamin B12 and the polymorphisms of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR;c.665C>T and c.1286A>C), methionine synthase (MTR;c.2756A>G) and methionine synthase reductase (MTRR;c.66A>G). Multiple comparisons showed significantly higher levels of HCY in Group C2 compared to Groups A, B, C1 and control group (p<0.0001, p<0.0001, p=0.001 and p=0.003, respectively). Folate was lower in Group C2 than in Groups A, B, C1 and control subjects (p<0.0001, p=0.02, p<0.0001 and p<0.0001, respectively). Group C2 had the highest prevalence of homozygotes for all four gene polymorphisms. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that HCY plasma level was an independent risk factor for severe cardiovascular involvement (Group C; odds ratio [OR] 1.85, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.28-2.67, p=0.001) as well as for aortic dissection (Group C2; OR 2.49, 95%CI 1.30-4.78, p=0.006). In conclusion, severe cardiovascular involvement in Marfan patients, and especially aortic dissection, is associated with higher HCY plasma levels and prevalence of homozygous genotypes of folic acid metabolism enzymes than mild or no cardiovascular involvement. These results suggest that impaired folic acid metabolism has an important role in the development and remodelling of the extracellular matrix of the aorta. PMID:26063524

  7. Genomic analyses of bacterial porin-cytochrome gene clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, James K.; Zachara, John M.

    2014-11-26

    In this study, the porin-cytochrome (Pcc) protein complex is responsible for trans-outer membrane electron transfer during extracellular reduction of Fe(III) by the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. The identified and characterized Pcc complex of G. sulfurreducens PCA consists of a porin-like outer-membrane protein, a periplasmic 8-heme c type cytochrome (c-Cyt) and an outer-membrane 12-heme c-Cyt, and the genes encoding the Pcc proteins are clustered in the same regions of genome (i.e., the pcc gene clusters) of G. sulfurreducens PCA. A survey of additionally microbial genomes has identified the pcc gene clusters in all sequenced Geobacter spp. and other bacteria from six different phyla, including Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans 2CP-1, A. dehalogenans 2CP-C, Anaeromyxobacter sp. K, Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis, Denitrovibrio acetiphilus DSM 12809, Desulfurispirillum indicum S5, Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus AHT2, Desulfurobacterium thermolithotrophum DSM 11699, Desulfuromonas acetoxidans DSM 684, Ignavibacterium album JCM 16511, and Thermovibrio ammonificans HB-1. The numbers of genes in the pcc gene clusters vary, ranging from two to nine. Similar to the metal-reducing (Mtr) gene clusters of other Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, such as Shewanella spp., additional genes that encode putative c-Cyts with predicted cellular localizations at the cytoplasmic membrane, periplasm and outer membrane often associate with the pcc gene clusters. This suggests that the Pcc-associated c-Cyts may be part of the pathways for extracellular electron transfer reactions. The presence of pcc gene clusters in the microorganisms that do not reduce solid-phase Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides, such as D. alkaliphilus AHT2 and I. album JCM 16511, also suggests that some of the pcc gene clusters may be involved in extracellular electron transfer reactions with the substrates other than Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides.

  8. Transcriptome and Proteome Dynamics of the Cellular Response of Shewanella oneidensis to Chromium Stress

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.K.

    2005-04-18

    The overall goal of this DOE NABIR project is to characterize the molecular basis and regulation of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] stress response and reduction by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. Temporal genomic profiling and mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis were employed to characterize the dynamic molecular response of S. oneidensis MR-1 to both acute and chronic Cr(VI) exposure. The acute stress response of aerobic, mid-exponential phase cells shocked to a final concentration of 1 mM potassium chromate (K2CrO4) was examined at post-exposure time intervals of 5, 30, 60, and 90 min relative to untreated cells. The transcriptome of mid-exponential cultures was also analyzed 30 min after shock doses of 0.3, 0.5, or 1 mM K{sub 2}CrO{sub 4}. The tonB1-exbB1-exbD1 genes comprising the TonB1 iron transport system were some of the most highly induced coding sequences (CDSs) after 90 min (up to {approx}240 fold), followed by other genes involved in heme transport, sulfate transport, and sulfur assimilation pathways. In addition, transcript levels for CDSs with annotated functions in DNA repair (dinP, recX, recA, recN) and detoxification processes (so3585, so3586) were substantially increased in Cr(VI)-exposed cells compared to untreated cells. By contrast, genes predicted to encode hydrogenases (HydA, HydB), oxidoreductases (SO0902-03-04, SO1911), iron-sulfur cluster binding proteins (SO4404), decaheme cytochrome c proteins (MtrA, OmcA, OmcB), and a number of LysR or TetR family transcriptional regulators were some of the most highly repressed CDSs following the 90-min shock period. Transcriptome profiles generated from MR-1 cells adapted to 0.3 mM Cr(VI) differed significantly from those characterizing cells exposed to acute Cr(VI) stress without adaptation. Parallel proteomic characterization of soluble protein and membrane protein fractions extracted from Cr(VI)-shocked and Cr(VI)-adapted MR-1 cells was performed using multidimensional HPLC-ESI-MS/MS (both LCQ and LTQ instruments used). With LTQ, we were able to substantially increase proteome coverage by at least two-fold compared to LCQ analysis. These studies provide important insights into cellular chromium tolerance. Future research will focus on the structural and regulatory genes implicated in Cr(VI) reduction and detoxification.

  9. Novel polymer membrane process for pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture from coal-fired syngas

    SciTech Connect

    Merkel, Tim

    2011-09-14

    This final report describes work conducted for the Department of Energy (DOE NETL) on development of a novel polymer membrane process for pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture from coalfired syngas (award number DE-FE0001124). The work was conducted by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) from September 15, 2009, through December 14, 2011. Tetramer Technologies, LLC (Tetramer) was our subcontract partner on this project. The National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) at Wilsonville, AL, provided access to syngas gasifier test facilities. The main objective of this project was to develop a cost-effective membrane process that could be used in the relatively near-term to capture CO{sub 2} from shifted syngas generated by a coal-fired Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant. In this project, novel polymeric membranes (designated as Proteus™ membranes) with separation properties superior to conventional polymeric membranes were developed. Hydrogen permeance of up to 800 gpu and H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity of >12 was achieved using a simulated syngas mixture at 150°C and 50 psig, which exceeds the original project targets of 200 gpu for hydrogen permeance and 10 for H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity. Lab-scale Proteus membrane modules (with a membrane area of 0.13 m{sup 2}) were also developed using scaled-up Proteus membranes and high temperature stable module components identified during this project. A mixed-gas hydrogen permeance of about 160 gpu and H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity of >12 was achieved using a simulated syngas mixture at 150°C and 100 psig. We believe that a significant improvement in the membrane and module performance is likely with additional development work. Both Proteus membranes and lab-scale Proteus membrane modules were further evaluated using coal-derived syngas streams at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC). The results indicate that all module components, including the Proteus membrane, were stable under the field conditions (feed pressures: 150-175 psig and feed temperatures: 120-135°C) for over 600 hours. The field performance of both Proteus membrane stamps and Proteus membrane modules is consistent with the results obtained in the lab, suggesting that the presence of sulfur-containing compounds (up to 780 ppm hydrogen sulfide), saturated water vapor, carbon monoxide and heavy hydrocarbons in the syngas feed stream has no adverse effect on the Proteus membrane or module performance. We also performed an economic analysis for a number of membrane process designs developed in this project (using hydrogen-selective membranes, alone or in the combination with CO{sub 2}- selective membranes). The current field performance for Proteus membranes was used in the design analysis. The study showed the current best design has the potential to reduce the increase in Levelized Cost of Electricity (LCOE) caused by 90% CO{sub 2} capture to about 15% if co-sequestration of H{sub 2}S is viable. This value is still higher than the DOE target for increase in LCOE (10%); however, compared to the base-case Selexol process that gives a 30% increase in LCOE at 90% CO2 capture, the membrane-based process appears promising. We believe future improvements in membrane performance have the potential to reach the DOE target.

  10. NITROGEN REMOVAL FROM NATURAL GAS

    SciTech Connect

    K.A. Lokhandwala; M.B. Ringer; T.T. Su; Z. He; I. Pinnau; J.G. Wijmans; A. Morisato; K. Amo; A. DaCosta; R.W. Baker; R. Olsen; H. Hassani; T. Rathkamp

    1999-12-31

    The objective of this project was to develop a membrane process for the denitrogenation of natural gas. Large proven reserves in the Lower-48 states cannot be produced because of the presence of nitrogen. To exploit these reserves, cost-effective, simple technology able to reduce the nitrogen content of the gas to 4-5% is required. Technology applicable to treatment of small gas streams (below 10 MMscfd) is particularly needed. In this project membranes that selectively permeate methane and reject nitrogen in the gas were developed. Preliminary calculations show that a membrane with a methane/nitrogen selectivity of 3 to 5 is required to make the process economically viable. A number of polymer materials likely to have the required selectivities were evaluated as composite membranes. Polyacetylenes such as poly(1-trimethylsilyl-1-propyne) [PTMSP] and poly(4-methyl-2-pentyne) [PMP] had high selectivities and fluxes, but membranes prepared from these polymers were not stable, showing decreasing flux and selectivity during tests lasting only a few hours. Parel, a poly(propylene oxide allyl glycidyl ether) had a selectivity of 3 at ambient temperatures and 4 or more at temperatures of {minus}20 C. However, Parel is no longer commercially available, and we were unable to find an equivalent material in the time available. Therefore, most of our experimental work focused on silicone rubber membranes, which have a selectivity of 2.5 at ambient temperatures, increasing to 3-4 at low temperatures. Silicone rubber composite membranes were evaluated in bench-scale module tests and with commercial-scale, 4-inch-diameter modules in a small pilot plant. Over six days of continuous operation at a feed gas temperature of {minus}5 to {minus}10 C, the membrane maintained a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 3.3. Based on the pilot plant performance data, an analysis of the economic potential of the process was prepared. We conclude that a stand-alone membrane process is the lowest-cost technology for small gas streams containing less than 10% nitrogen. The membrane process can recover more than 60-70% of the hydrocarbon content of the gas at a cost of $0.60-0.70/Mscfd. The capital cost of the process is about $100-200/Mscf. A number of small operators appear to be ready to use the technology if these costs can be demonstrated in the field. A second, and perhaps better, application of the technology is to combine the membrane process with a cryogenic process to treat large gas streams containing 10-20% nitrogen. The combination process achieves significant synergies. The membrane process performs a bulk separation of the gas, after which the cryogenic process treats the membrane residue (nitrogen-enriched) gas to recover more methane. Overall, hydrocarbon recoveries are greater than 95%. The capital cost of the combination process is lower than that of either process used alone and the processing costs are in the range $0.30-0.40/Mscf. This operating cost would be attractive to many gas producers. MTR is collaborating with a producer of cryogenic systems to further develop the combination process. A number of innovations in membrane process designs were made during the project; four U.S. patents covering various aspects of the technology were filed and issued.

  11. Separation of Olefin/Paraffin Mixtures with Carrier Facilitated Membrane Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Merkel, T.C.; Blanc, R.; Zeid, J.; Suwarlim, A.; Firat, B.; Wijmans, H.; Asaro, M.; Greene, M.

    2007-03-12

    This document describes the results of a DOE funded joint effort of Membrane Technology and Research Inc. (MTR), SRI International (SRI), and ABB Lummus (ABB) to develop facilitated transport membranes for olefin/paraffin separations. Currently, olefin/paraffin separation is done by distillation—an extremely energy-intensive process because of the low relative volatilities of olefins and paraffins. If facilitated transport membranes could be successfully commercialized, the potential energy savings achievable with this membrane technology are estimated to be 48 trillion Btu per year by the year 2020. We discovered in this work that silver salt-based facilitated transport membranes are not stable even in the presence of ideal olefin/paraffin mixtures. This decline in membrane performance appears to be caused by a previously unrecognized phenomenon that we have named olefin conditioning. As the name implies, this mechanism of performance degradation becomes operative once a membrane starts permeating olefins. This project is the first study to identify olefin conditioning as a significant factor impacting the performance of facilitated olefin transport membranes. To date, we have not identified an effective strategy to mitigate the impact of olefin conditioning. other than running at low temperatures or with low olefin feed pressures. In our opinion, this issue must be addressed before further development of facilitated olefin transport membranes can proceed. In addition to olefin conditioning, traditional carrier poisoning challenges must also be overcome. Light, hydrogen, hydrogen sulfide, and acetylene exposure adversely affect membrane performance through unwanted reaction with silver ions. Harsh poisoning tests with these species showed useful membrane lifetimes of only one week. These tests demonstrate a need to improve the stability of the olefin complexing agent to develop membranes with lifetimes satisfactory for commercial application. A successful effort to improve membrane coating solution stability resulted in the finding that membrane performance loss could be reversed for all poisoning cases except hydrogen sulfide exposure. This discovery offers the potential to extend membrane lifetime through cyclic regeneration. We also found that certain mixed carriers exhibited greater stability in reducing environments than exhibited by silver salt alone. These results offer promise that solutions to deal with carrier poisoning are possible. The main achievement of this program was the progress made in gaining a more complete understanding of the membrane stability challenges faced in the use of facilitated olefin transport membranes. Our systematic study of facilitated olefin transport uncovered the full extent of the stability challenge, including the first known identification of olefin conditioning and its impact on membrane development. We believe that significant additional fundamental research is required before facilitated olefin transport membranes are ready for industrial implementation. The best-case scenario for further development of this technology would be identification of a novel carrier that is intrinsically more stable than silver ions. If the stability problems could be largely circumvented by development of a new carrier, it would provide a clear breakthrough toward finally recognizing the potential of facilitated olefin transport. However, even if such a carrier is identified, additional development will be required to insure that the membrane matrix is a benign host for the olefin-carrier complexation reaction and shows good long-term stability.

  12. RERTR Fuel Developmemt and Qualification Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Wachs

    2007-01-01

    In late 2003 it became evident that U-Mo aluminum fuels under development exhibited significant fuel performance problems under the irradiation conditions required for conversion of most high-powered research reactors. Solutions to the fuel performance issue have been proposed and show promise in early testing. Based on these results, a Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) program strategy has been mapped to allow generic fuel qualification to occur prior to the end of FY10 and reactor conversion to occur prior to the end of FY14. This strategy utilizes a diversity of technologies, test conditions, and test types. Scoping studies using miniature fuel plates will be completed in the time frame of 2006-2008. Irradiation of larger specimens will occur in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) in the United States, the Belgian Reactor-2 (BR2) reactor in Belgium, and in the OSIRIS reactor in France in 2006-2009. These scoping irradiation tests provide a large amount of data on the performance of advanced fuel types under irradiation and allow the down selection of technology for larger scale testing during the final stages of fuel qualification. In conjunction with irradiation testing, fabrication processes must be developed and made available to commercial fabricators. The commercial fabrication infrastructure must also be upgraded to ensure a reliable low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel supply. Final qualification of fuels will occur in two phases. Phase I will obtain generic approval for use of dispersion fuels with density less than 8.5 g-U/cm3. In order to obtain this approval, a larger scale demonstration of fuel performance and fabrication technology will be necessary. Several Materials Test Reactor (MTR) plate-type fuel assemblies will be irradiated in both the High Flux Reactor (HFR) and the ATR (other options include the BR2 and Russian Research Reactor, Dmitrovgrad, Russia [MIR] reactors) in 2008-2009. Following postirradiation examination, a report detailing very-high density fuel behavior will be submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Assuming acceptable fuel behavior, it is anticipated that NRC will issue a Safety Evaluation Report granting generic approval of the developed fuels based on the qualification report. It is anticipated that Phase I of fuel qualification will be completed prior to the end of FY10. Phase II of the fuel qualification requires development of fuels with density greater than 8.5 g-U/cm3. This fuel is required to convert the remaining few reactors that have been identified for conversion. The second phase of the fuel qualification effort includes both dispersion fuels with fuel particle volume loading on the order of 65 percent, and monolithic fuels. Phase II presents a larger set of technical unknowns and schedule uncertainties than phase I. The final step in the fuel qualification process involves insertion of lead test elements into the converting reactors. Each reactor that plans to convert using the developed high-density fuels will develop a reactor specific conversion plan based upon the reactor safety basis and operating requirements. For some reactors (FRM-II, High-Flux Isotope Reactor [HFIR], and RHF) conversion will be a one-step process. In addition to the U.S. fuel development effort, a Russian fuel development strategy has been developed. Contracts with Russian Federation institutes in support of fuel development for Russian are in place.

  13. NOx Control Options and Integration for US Coal Fired Boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Mike Bockelie; Kevin Davis; Temi Linjewile; Connie Senior; Eric Eddings; Kevin Whitty; Larry Baxter; Calvin Bartholomew; William Hecker; Stan Harding

    2004-03-31

    This is the fifteenth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-00NT40753. The goal of the project is to develop cost effective analysis tools and techniques for demonstrating and evaluating low NOx control strategies and their possible impact on boiler performance for boilers firing US coals. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is providing co-funding for this program. At AEP's Gavin Plant, data from the corrosion probes showed that corrosion rate increased as boiler load was increased. During an outage at the plant, the drop in boiler load, sensor temperature and corrosion rate could all be seen clearly. Restarting the boiler saw a resumption of corrosion activity. This behavior is consistent with previous observations made at a 600MWe utility boiler. More data are currently being examined for magnitudes of corrosion rates and changes in boiler operating conditions. Considerable progress was made this quarter in BYU's laboratory study of catalyst deactivation. Surface sulfation appears to partially suppress NO adsorption when the catalyst is not exposed to NH3; NH3 displaces surface-adsorbed NO on SCR catalysts and surface sulfation increases the amount of adsorbed NH3, as confirmed by both spectroscopy and TPD experiments. However, there is no indication of changes in catalyst activity despite changes in the amount of adsorbed NH3. A monolith test reactor (MTR), completed this quarter, provided the first comparative data for one of the fresh and field-exposed monolith SCR catalysts yet developed in this project. Measurements of activity on one of the field-exposed commercial monolith catalysts do not show significant changes in catalyst activity (within experimental error) as compared to the fresh catalyst. The exposed surface of the sample contains large amounts of Ca and Na, neither of which is present in the fresh sample, even after removal of visibly obvious fouling deposits. However, these fouling compounds do not deactivate the catalyst to the extent that these same poisons do in the deliberately wet-impregnated laboratory-prepared samples (1%V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-9%WO{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2}). At least in this case, the fouling deposits generated by field exposure present little if any chemical deactivation or barrier to mass transfer. During this quarter, the slipstream reactor at Rockport operated for 1000 hours on flue gas. Periodic NO{sub x} reduction measurements were made, showing some decrease in activity relative to fresh catalyst samples. Plans are being made to take the reactor out of service at the Rockport plant and move it to Plant Gadsden. At Gadsden, inlet and outlet ports were installed on Unit 1 for the slipstream reactor during an outage.

  14. Novel Membranes and Processes for Oxygen Enrichment

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Haiqing

    2011-11-15

    The overall goal of this project is to develop a membrane process that produces air containing 25-35% oxygen, at a cost of $25-40/ton of equivalent pure oxygen (EPO2). Oxygen-enriched air at such a low cost will allow existing air-fueled furnaces to be converted economically to oxygen-enriched furnaces, which in turn will improve the economic and energy efficiency of combustion processes significantly, and reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration from flue gases throughout the U.S. manufacturing industries. During the 12-month Concept Definition project: We identified a series of perfluoropolymers (PFPs) with promising oxygen/nitrogen separation properties, which were successfully made into thin film composite membranes. The membranes showed oxygen permeance as high as 1,200 gpu and oxygen/nitrogen selectivity of 3.0, and the permeance and selectivity were stable over the time period tested (60 days). We successfully scaled up the production of high-flux PFP-based membranes, using MTR's commercial coaters. Two bench-scale spiral-wound modules with countercurrent designs were made and parametric tests were performed to understand the effect of feed flow rate and pressure, permeate pressure and sweep flow rate on the membrane module separation properties. At various operating conditions that modeled potential industrial operating conditions, the module separation properties were similar to the pure-gas separation properties in the membrane stamps. We also identified and synthesized new polymers [including polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIMs) and polyimides] with higher oxygen/nitrogen selectivity (3.5-5.0) than the PFPs, and made these polymers into thin film composite membranes. However, these membranes were susceptible to severe aging; pure-gas permeance decreased nearly six-fold within two weeks, making them impractical for industrial applications of oxygen enrichment. We tested the effect of oxygen-enriched air on NO{sub x} emissions using a Bloom baffle burner at GTI. The results are positive and confirm that oxygen-enriched combustion can be carried out without producing higher levels of NOx than normal air firing, if lancing of combustion air is used and the excess air levels are controlled. A simple economic study shows that the membrane processes can produce O{sub 2} at less than $40/ton EPO{sub 2} and an energy cost of 1.1-1.5 MMBtu/ton EPO{sub 2}, which are very favorable compared with conventional technologies such as cryogenics and vacuum pressure swing adsorption processes. The benefits of integrated membrane processes/combustion process trains have been evaluated, and show good savings in process costs and energy consumption, as well as reduced CO{sub 2} emissions. For example, if air containing 30% oxygen is used in natural gas furnaces, the net natural gas savings are an estimated 18% at a burner temperature of 2,500 F, and 32% at a burner temperature of 3,000 F. With a 20% market penetration of membrane-based oxygen-enriched combustion in all combustion processes by 2020, the energy savings would be 414-736 TBtu/y in the U.S. The comparable net cost savings are estimated at $1.2-2.1 billion per year by 2020, calculated as the value of fuel savings subtracted from the cost of oxygen production. The fuel savings of 18%-32% by the membrane/oxygen-enriched combustion corresponds to an 18%-32% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions, or 23-40 MM ton/y less CO{sub 2} from natural gas-fired furnaces by 2020. In summary, results from this project (Concept Definition phase) are highly promising and clearly demonstrate that membrane processes can produce oxygen-enriched air in a low cost manner that will lower operating costs and energy consumption in industrial combustion processes. Future work will focus on proof-of-concept bench-scale demonstration in the laboratory.