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Sample records for aa 2024-t3 substrate

  1. Blister Test for Measurements of Adhesion and Adhesion Degradation of Organic Polymers on AA2024-T3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rincon Troconis, Brendy Carolina

    A key parameter for the performance of corrosion protective coatings applied to metals is adhesion. Surface preparation prior to coating application is known to be critical, but there is a lack of understanding of what controls adhesion. Numerous techniques have been developed in the last decades to measure the adhesion strength of coatings to metals. Nonetheless, they are generally non-quantitative, non-reproducible, performed in dry conditions, or overestimate adhesion. In this study, a quantitative and reproducible technique, the Blister Test (BT), is used. The BT offers the ability to study the effects of a range of parameters, including the presence or absence of a wetting liquid, and simulates the stress situation in the coating/substrate interface. The effects of roughness and surface topography were studied by the BT and Optical Profilometry, using AA2024-T3 substrates coated with polyvinyl butyral (PVB). Random abrasion generated a surface with lower average roughness than aligned abrasion due to the continual cross abrasion of the grooves. The BT could discern the effects of different mechanical treatments. An adhesion strength indicator was defined and found to be a useful parameter. The effectiveness of standard adhesion techniques such as ASTM D4541 (Pull-off Test) and ASTM D3359 (Tape Test) was compared to the BT. Also, different attempts to measure adhesion and adhesion degradation of organic polymers to AA2024-T3 were tested. The pull-off test does not produce adhesive failure across the entire interface, while the tape test is a very qualitative technique and does not discern between the effects of different coating systems on the adhesion performance. The BT produces adhesive failure of the primer studied, is very reproducible, and is able to rank different coating systems. Therefore, it was found to be superior to the others. The approaches tested for adhesion degradation were not aggressive enough to have a measurable effect. The effects of

  2. Bending Properties of Locally Laser Heat Treated AA2024-T3 Aluminium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Amirahmad; Vanhove, Hans; Van Bael, Albert; Duflou, Joost R.

    The bending properties of AA2024-T3 aluminium alloy after localized laser assisted softening have been studied and compared to untreated material. Single and multi-path laser scanning strategies are applied for achieving a predictable and minimized springback. Process parameters for softening have been chosen based on FE modeling. In order to investigate the softening, and to characterize the size of this softened region, hardness measurements were carried out. Using a triple scanning path strategy springback was reduced by about 43% without changing the bending radius.

  3. The corrosion protection of AA2024-T3 aluminium alloy by leaching of lithium-containing salts from organic coatings.

    PubMed

    Visser, Peter; Liu, Yanwen; Zhou, Xiaorong; Hashimoto, Teruo; Thompson, George E; Lyon, Stuart B; van der Ven, Leendert G J; Mol, Arjan J M C; Terryn, Herman A

    2015-01-01

    Lithium carbonate and lithium oxalate were incorporated as leachable corrosion inhibitors in model organic coatings for the protection of AA2024-T3. The coated samples were artificially damaged with a scribe. It was found that the lithium-salts are able to leach from the organic coating and form a protective layer in the scribe on AA2024-T3 under neutral salt spray conditions. The present paper shows the first observation and analysis of these corrosion protective layers, generated from lithium-salt loaded organic coatings. The scribed areas were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy before and after neutral salt spray exposure (ASTM-B117). The protective layers typically consist of three different layered regions, including a relatively dense layer near the alloy substrate, a porous middle layer and a flake-shaped outer layer, with lithium uniformly distributed throughout all three layers. Scanning electron microscopy and white light interferometry surface roughness measurements demonstrate that the formation of the layer occurs rapidly and, therefore provides an effective inhibition mechanism. Based on the observation of this work, a mechanism is proposed for the formation of these protective layers. PMID:25927079

  4. Growth of PEO ceramic coatings on AA 2024-T3 aluminium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forero Sotomonte, S.; Blanco Pinzon, C.; García Vergara, S.

    2016-02-01

    The growth of PEO ceramic coatings on AA 2024-T3 aluminium alloy in an aqueous Na2SiO3 (10.5g/l), KOH (2.8g/l) solution at 310 and 400V for 500 and 710s, was investigated. The morphology, roughness and thickness of the coatings were determined by SEM, digital microscopy, XRD diffraction analysis and thickness measuring instrument. The results show that thicker coatings are produced with longer process times and high applied voltages. Due to the nature of the PEO process, the roughness of the surface coatings increases as the coating become thicker, due to the development of sparks. The coatings are porous, with a crater like morphology and they are mainly amorphous.

  5. Evaluation of Various Depainting Processes on Mechanical Properties of 2024-T3 Aluminum Substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, P.

    2001-01-01

    Alternate alkaline and neutral chemical paint strippers have been identified that, with respect to corrosion requirements, perform as well as or better than a methylene chloride baseline. These chemicals also, in general, meet corrosion acceptance criteria as specified in SAE MA 4872. Alternate acid chemical paint strippers have been identified that, with respect to corrosion requirements, perform as well as or better than a methylene chloride baseline. However, these chemicals do not generally meet corrosion acceptance criteria as specified in SAE MA 4872, especially in the areas of non-clad material performance and hydrogen embrittlement. Media blast methods reviewed in the study do not, in general, adversely affect fatigue performance or crack detectability of 2024-T3 substrate. Sodium bicarbonate stripping exhibited a tendency towards inhibiting crack detectability. These generalizations are based on a limited sample size and additional testing should be performed to characterize the response of specific substrates to specific processes.

  6. Analysis of electrochemical noise from metastable pitting in aluminum, aged Al-2%Cu, and AA 2024-T3

    SciTech Connect

    Pride, S.T.; Scully, J.R.; Hudson, J.L.

    1996-12-31

    The authors compare methods of analyzing electrochemical current (ECN) and potential (EPN) noise data associated with metastable pitting and the transition from metastable to stable pitting. Various analysis methods were applied to electrochemical noise data associated with metastable pit events on aluminum, aged Al-2%Cu, and AA 2024-T3 ST. Two experimental approaches were used. High-purity Al, roughly simulating copper-depleted grain boundary zones in aged Al-Cu alloys, was potentiostatically polarized so that current spikes associated with individual pitting events could be analyzed. Second, the coupling current between nominally identical galvanically coupled Al, aged Al-2%Cu, and AA 2024-T3 ST electrodes was recorded in conjunction with couple potential using a saturated calomel reference electrode. Pit stabilization occurred when individual pits exceeded a threshold of I{sub pit}/r{sub pit} > 10{sup {minus}2} A/cm at all times during pit growth as established from potentiostatic measurements. The magnitude of this ratio is linked directly to the concentration of the aggressive solution within pits. Two related statistical pit stabilization factors (I{sub rms}/r{sub pit total} from ECN data and the mean of (I{sub peak}-I{sub ox})/r{sub pit} values from each pit current spike) were obtained from galvanic ECN data containing a large number of pit current spikes. These parameters provided a better indication of the transition to stable pitting than the pitting index or noise resistance but also had shortcomings. Spectral analysis using current and potential spectral power density (SPD) data provided qualitative information on pit susceptibility. However, the transition to stable pitting could not be accurately defined because of a lack of information on pit sizes in spectral data.

  7. Corrosion protection of untreated AA-2024-T3 in chloride solution by a chromate conversion coating monitored with Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J.; Frankel, G.; McCreery, R.L.

    1998-07-01

    The behavior of chromate conversion coatings (CCCs) on the aluminum aircraft alloy AA 2024-T3 was examined by several types of experiments, using Raman spectroscopy as a primary technique. First, Raman spectra of the CCC film made from a commercial process revealed a Raman feature characteristic of Cr(VI) which was distinct from Raman bands to an initially untreated alloy sample. The release of chromate from a CCC was demonstrated, as was redeposition of a chromate film on the fresh alloy surface. Formation of a Raman-observable Cr(VI)-containing deposit was more rapid in or near pits in the untreated alloy sample, and the deposit was spectroscopically very similar to the original CCC film. The initially untreated alloy became much less active toward corrosion after migration of chromate from the nearby CCC film, with the polarization resistance increasing by at least two orders of magnitude and the pitting potential increasing by 60 mV. The results clarify the mechanism of self-healing exhibited by CCC films, in which chromate species released from the CCC migrate to an actively corroding region and stop aluminum dissolution. The migrating chromate is selectively deposited at active corrosion sites, either by forming an insoluble Al/chromate precipitate or by adsorption by previously formed corrosion products.

  8. The structure and composition of chromate conversion coatings formed on aluminum-copper alloy AA2024-T3 and thin film analogs of constituent intermetallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasquez, Marvin Jaime

    2002-01-01

    A comprehensive suite of spectroscopy have been used to study the composition and structure of Chromate Conversion Coatings (CCC) formed on Aluminum Copper (Al-Cu) alloy AA2024-T3 and constituent Intermetallic Compounds (IMCs). Based on previous work the CCC formed over the IMCs is expected to be thinner and therefore different in structure and composition than the CCC formed on the matrix. The formation of the CCC over the different IMCs is expected to be dependent on the chemistry and the interaction of the IMCs with accelerators such as ferricyanide. Surface chemical and structural data determined by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Synchrotron Infrared Microspectroscopy, X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES), Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS), Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), and Secondary Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive Analysis of X-rays (SEM/EDAX) have been developed to refine an existing model for the CCC formed on the AA2024-T3 surface, an Al-Cu aircraft alloy, by considering the composition and structure of the CCC formed on constituent intermetallic compounds (IMCs). The limited corrosion behavior of AA2024-T3 aluminum alloy is generally attributed to the presence of a variety of constituent IMC. These IMC particles are of the order of 1--20 mum which makes their direct analysis exceedingly difficult and has lead to a limited understanding of their surface chemical properties relative to CCC formation. To overcome this limitation, it was necessary to develop for the first time large area samples composed of compositionally homogenous thin films of the various IMCs found on the AA2024-T3 surface, which were galvanically attached to thin films of Al-4.2wt%Cu (representative of the AA2024-T3 matrix). This was performed in a two-step process: Disks of IMC compositions were formed by Reactive Arc Melting (RAM), followed by ultra-fast laser ablation of the RAM IMCs resulting in the formation of homogenous thin films

  9. Evolution of the corrosion process of AA 2024-T3 in an alkaline NaCl solution with sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate and lanthanum chloride inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Biner; Wang, Yishan; Zuo, Yu

    2015-12-01

    The evolution of the corrosion process of AA 2024-T3 in 0.58 g L-1 NaCl solution (pH 10) with sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDBS) and lanthanum chloride inhibitors was studied with electrochemical and surface analysis methods. With the addition of the compounded LaCl3 and SDBS inhibitors, in the early stage the polarization behavior of AA 2024-T3 changed from active corrosion to passivation, and both the general corrosion and pitting corrosion were inhibited. However, with the immersion time extended, the passive behavior gradually disappeared and pitting happened at the Cu-rich phases. After 24 h immersion, the compounded inhibitors still showed good inhibition for general corrosion, but the polarization curve again presented the characteristic similar to active polarization. The compounded inhibitors also inhibited the pitting corrosion to some extent. The acting mechanism of the inhibitors SDBS and La3Cl on the corrosion process of AA 2024-T3 in the test solution was discussed.

  10. Modeling of the Effect of Temperature, Frequency, and Phase Transformations on the Viscoelastic Properties of AA 7075-T6 and AA 2024-T3 Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, Jose I.; Crespo, Daniel

    2012-12-01

    The viscoelastic response of commercial aluminum alloys 7075-T6 and 2024-T3 as a function of temperature is presented. Experimental data are obtained with a dynamic-mechanical analyzer (DMA) at different loading frequencies and compared with the available transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) data. The effect of successive microstructural transformations (particle precipitation and redissolution) is revealed. An analytical model is developed, which fits the mechanical response up to 573 K (300 °C). The model takes into account the concentration of Guinier-Preston Zones (GPZ) and metastable precipitates ( η' in AA 7075-T6 and θ'/S' in AA 2024-T3), allowing us to determine the kinetic parameters of these transformations. The activation energies were previously obtained by several authors from DSC measurements and other techniques, showing considerable dispersion. The presented data, obtained with a completely different technique, allow us to reduce the uncertainty on these data and show the potential of DMA measurements in the study of microstructural transformations.

  11. Experimental Study of the Forces Acting on the Tool in the Friction-Stir Welding of AA 2024 T3 Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astarita, A.; Squillace, A.; Carrino, L.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, AA 2024 T3-rolled sheets were joined in butt joint configuration through the friction stir welding process. Different joints were carried out varying the principal process parameters (i.e., tool welding speed and tool rotational speed). The aim of this work was the study and the experimental characterization of the influence of the process parameters on the forces acting on the tool during the FSW process. Furthermore, it was studied the correlation between the forces and the grain size, in particular with the extension of the heat-affected zone. Forces acting along the axis parallel to the tool are actually greater than those acting along welding direction. All the recorded forces are strictly dependant on the process parameters adopted. No correlation has been found between the grain dimension within the weld bead and the recorded forces, while the greater the forces, the narrower the extension of the heat-affected zone.

  12. Structure and corrosion behavior of sputter deposited cerium oxide based coatings with various thickness on Al 2024-T3 alloy substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Huang, Jiamu; Claypool, James B.; Castano, Carlos E.; O'Keefe, Matthew J.

    2015-11-01

    Cerium oxide based coatings from ∼100 to ∼1400 nm in thickness were deposited onto Al 2024-T3 alloy substrates by magnetron sputtering of a 99.99% pure CeO2 target. The crystallite size of CeO2 coatings increased from 15 nm to 46 nm as the coating thickness increased from ∼100 nm to ∼1400 nm. The inhomogeneous lattice strain increased from 0.36% to 0.91% for the ∼100 nm to ∼900 nm thick coatings and slightly decreased to 0.89% for the ∼1400 nm thick coating. The highest adhesion strength to Al alloy substrates was for the ∼210 nm thick coating, due to a continuous film coverage and low internal stress. Electrochemical measurements indicated that sputter deposited crystalline CeO2 coatings acted as physical barriers that provide good cathodic inhibition for Al alloys in saline solution. The ∼900 nm thick CeO2 coated sample had the best corrosion performance that increased the corrosion resistance by two orders magnitude and lowered the cathodic current density 30 times compared to bare Al 2024-T3 substrates. The reduced defects and exposed surface, along with suppressed charge mobility, likely accounts for the improved corrosion performance as coating thickness increased from ∼100 nm to ∼900 nm. The corrosion performance decreased for ∼1400 nm thick coatings due in part to an increase in coating defects and porosity along with a decrease in adhesion strength.

  13. Effects of aging temperature and time on the corrosion protection provided by trivalent chromium process coatings on AA2024-T3.

    PubMed

    Li, Liangliang; Swain, Greg M

    2013-08-28

    The effects of aging temperature and time on the physical structure of and corrosion protection provided by trivalent chromium process (TCP) coatings on AA2024-T3 are reported. The TCP coating forms a partially blocking barrier layer on the alloy surface that consists of hydrated channels and or defects. It is through these channels and defects that ions and dissolved O2 can be transported to small areas of the underlying alloy. Reactions initiate at these sites, which can ultimately lead to undercutting of the coating and localized corrosion. We tested the hypothesis that collapsing the channels and or reducing the number of defects in the coating might be possible through post-deposition heat treatment, and that this would enhance the corrosion protection provided by the coating. This was tested by aging the TCP-coated AA2024 alloys in air overnight at room temperature (RT), 55, 100, or 150 °C. The TCP coating became dehydrated and thinner at the high temperatures (55 and 100 °C). This improved the corrosion protection as evidenced by a 2× increase in the charge transfer resistance. Aging at 150 °C caused excessive coating dehydration and shrinkage. This led to severe cracking and detachment of the coating from the surface. The TCP-coated AA2024 samples were also aged in air at RT from 1 to 7 days. There was no thinning of the coating, but the corrosion protection was enhanced with a longer aging period as evidenced by a 4× increase in the charge transfer resistance. The coating became more hydrophobic after aging at elevated temperature (up to 100 °C) and with aging time at RT as evidenced by an increased water contact angle from 7 to 100 °C. PMID:23845106

  14. Pigment-derived inhibitors for aluminum alloy 2024-T3

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, R.L. Jr.; Taylor, S.R.

    2000-03-01

    Inhibitor characteristics of 27 compounds considered as possible replacements for chromate pigments in aerospace paint were investigated. These compounds were tested and screened in solution and not as actual paint additives. In initial testing, aluminum alloy (AA) 2024-T3 (UNS A92024) samples were exposed to 0.6 M sodium chloride (NaCl, pH adjusted to 7, T = 23 C) with 3.4 mM of the candidate compound dissolved in solution. Corrosion inhibition characteristics were assessed via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) performed over 10 days, and the statistical analysis of pit depths was analyzed at the conclusion of each exposure. Promising candidates then were exposed to more extreme environments to simulate possible service-life conditions. These environments included unbuffered 0.6 M NaCl initially adjusted to pH 3, T = 23 C and pH 10, T = 23 C. Several candidate inhibitors appeared promising: barium metaborate, cerium chloride, cerium oxalate, lanthanum chloride, and sodium metavanadate. Under the conditions of these tests, sodium metavanadate consistently displayed the best performance. EIS data indicated the corrosion performance of sodium metavanadata was within an order of magnitude of sodium chromate (Na{sub 2}CrO{sub 4}), while pit depth values for metavanadate were comparable to those observed for Na{sub 2}CrO{sub 4}. Rankings of inhibitor performance as determined by EIS was supported by the extreme value analysis of pit depth.

  15. Influence of grain boundaries misorientation angle on intergranular corrosion in 2024-T3 aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bałkowiec, A.; Michalski, J.; Matysiak, H.; Kurzydlowski, K. J.

    2011-12-01

    The special attention has been paid to the influence of misorientation angle of a random grain boundary (GB) on susceptibility to intergranular attack. The detailed observations of the microstructure of the intergranular corrosion (IGC) in 2024-T3 aluminium alloy (AA2024-T3) subjected to galvanic corrosion tests in two different solutions containing chloride ions (0.1 M and 0.5 M NaCl) were carried out using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD) technique was used to determine the grain boundary character distribution (GBCD) in the initial sample and a GBCD of corroded grain boundaries on a sample subjected to the corrosion test. The results are discussed in terms of the influence of the misorientation angle on the susceptibility of the grain boundaries to corrosion.

  16. Corrosion inhibition by inorganic cationic inhibitors on the high strength alumunium alloy, 2024-T3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilukuri, Anusha

    alkaline is retarded in the absence of oxygen. As a result precipitation of Zn oxides and hydroxides was suppressed. Impedance in decarbonated chloride solutions showed that the absence of CO 2 reduces inhibition by Zn2+ at pH 4. The carbonate protective layer formed in aerated solutions is essential for providing better protection of the substrate at pH 4. Inhibitor cations were exchanged into insoluble ion-exchanging sodium bentonites and incorporated as pigments in organic coatings applied to AA 2024-T3 substrates. XRD of the pigments ensured ion exchange and UV-visible spectroscopy was used to characterize inhibitor ion release from the bentonites. Salt spray exposure tests on scribed panels were preformed and results were compared to those from SrCrO4 pigmented coatings. Zn-exchanged bentonite pigmented coatings showed better performance compared to the other exchanged bentonites when incorporated into epoxy coatings with total impedance magnitude in the same order as SrCrO4. PVB (Polyvinyl Butyral) coatings containing Zn bentonite, however, did not show superior behaviour in the impedance response due to less or no water uptake. Salt spray exposures for a period of 336 h, showed that Zn bentonite incorporated into PVB suppressed blistering compared to the neat PVB and other pigmented bentonites.

  17. Corrosion inhibition mechanisms of aluminum alloy 2024-T3 by selected non-chromate inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Garrity, Omar A.

    The pursuit to find a chromate-alternative has led to the development of several chromate-free aerospace primers and coating systems that offer good protection. However, fundamental understanding of the functionality of the chromate-free pigments that are embedded within these coating systems is lacking. The objective of this study was to understand the fundamental mechanism of corrosion inhibition of aluminum alloy 2024-T3 by molybdate (MoO 42-), silicate (SiO32-), and praseodymium (Pr3+) with the goal of developing the kind of understanding that was accomplished for chromate. Furthermore, since most inhibiting conversion coatings and pigments act by releasing soluble species into the local environment, it was of interest to understand the mechanism of inhibition in aqueous 0.1 M NaCl solution. The mechanism of inhibition of AA2024-T3 by the select non-chromate inhibitors was investigated using various electrochemical, microscopic and spectroscopic techniques. Naturally aerated polarization curves showed that molybdate provided mixed inhibition in near-neutral pH and at a threshold concentration of 0.1 M. The largest effect was a 250 mV increase in the breakdown potential associated with pitting and a 350 mV decrease in the open-circuit potential (OCP). In addition, electrochemical impedance indicated that the corrosion inhibition mechanism is oxygen-dependent owing to the protection afforded by Mo(VI) species. It was proposed that the corrosion inhibition of AA2024-T3 by molybdate may occur following a two-step process whereby molybdate is rapidly reduced to MoO.(OH)2 over the intermetallic particles and is subsequently oxidized to intermediate molybdenum oxides (e.g. Mo4O11) in the presence of oxygen which is reduced. This in turn may lead to a local acidification, promoting the condensation and polymerization of molybdate species in solution to form polymolybdate species (Mo7O24 6- and Mo8O264-). Furthermore, S-phase particle dissolution is decreased

  18. Temperature distribution study during the friction stir welding process of Al2024-T3 aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yau, Y. H.; Hussain, A.; Lalwani, R. K.; Chan, H. K.; Hakimi, N.

    2013-08-01

    Heat flux characteristics are critical to good quality welding obtained in the important engineering alloy Al2024-T3 by the friction stir welding (FSW) process. In the present study, thermocouples in three different configurations were affixed on the welding samples to measure the temperatures: in the first configuration, four thermocouples were placed at equivalent positions along one side of the welding direction; the second configuration involved two equivalent thermocouple locations on either side of the welding path; while the third configuration had all the thermocouples on one side of the layout but with unequal gaps from the welding line. A three-dimensional, non-linear ANSYS computational model, based on an approach applied to Al2024-T3 for the first time, was used to simulate the welding temperature profiles obtained experimentally. The experimental thermal profiles on the whole were found to be in agreement with those calculated by the ANSYS model. The broad agreement between the two kinds of profiles validates the basis for derivation of the simulation model and provides an approach for the FSW simulation in Al2024-T3 and is potentially more useful than models derived previously.

  19. An experimental investigation of fatigue damage in aluminum 2024-T3 alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Milton W.

    1993-01-01

    Aluminum alloys are finding increasing use in the aerospace and automobile industries due to their attractive low density-high modulus and low density-high strength characteristics. Unfortunately, cyclic stress-strain deformation alters the microstructure of the material. These structural changes can lead to fatigue damage and ultimately service failure. Therefore, in order to assess the integrity of the alloy, a correlation between fatigue damage and a measurable microstructural property is needed. Aluminum 2024-T3, a commonly used commercial alloy, contains many grains (individual crystals) of various orientations. The sizes and orientations of these grains are known to affect the strength, hardness, and magnetic permeability of polycrystalline alloys and metals; therefore, perhaps a relationship between a grain property and the fatigue state can be established. Tension-compression cycling in aluminum alloys can also induce changes in their dislocation densities. These changes can be studied from measurements of the electrical resistivities of the materials. Consequently, the goals of this investigation were: to study the grain orientation of aluminum 2024-T3 and to seek a correlation between the grain orientation and the fatigue state of the material; and to measure the electrical resistivities of fatigued samples of aluminum 2024-T3 and to interpret the findings.

  20. Determination of anisotropy in impact toughness of aluminium alloy 2024 T3 plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, M. H.; Hashmi, F.; Junaid, A.

    The research was aimed to quantify the existence of anisotropy in fracture toughness of aluminium alloy 2024 T3 plate (used in aircraft structural members). It was further needed to establish the direction in which the fracture toughness of aluminium alloy 2024 T3 plate is maximum and minimum. This could help ascertain the structural integrity of aircraft structural components; also while designing new components, the knowledge of variation in toughness with respect to direction helps in economizing dead weight of the aircraft. In this research, pursued at the College of Aeronautical Engineering, the anisotropy in toughness of aluminium alloy 2024 T3 plate was analysed using the Charpy V-notch impact toughness test. The effect of specimen orientation on the impact toughness values of the alloy was investigated and compared with known results to verify the reliability of the work and to ascertain the extent of anisotropy in fracture toughness of the said alloy. Charpy impact tests were carried out on ASTM E 23 standard specimens machined at a reference laboratory at room temperature (23° C +/- 2° C). Four different specimen orientations analysed for the purpose of this study were L-S, L-T, T-S and T-L directions. Subsequently, the results obtained at the research centre were then analysed and correlated with morphology of microstructure of the material to establish the reliability of the experimental results. Moreover, an analysis was also done to cater for the possible errors that could affect the fracture toughness values obtained from experimental results. It was concluded that the T-S orientation of the plate had maximum toughness, whereas, minimum toughness was observed in L-T direction.

  1. Protection of 2024-T3 aluminium alloy by corrosion resistant phytic acid conversion coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Hongwei; Han, En-Hou; Liu, Fuchun; Kallip, Silvar

    2013-09-01

    The corrosion protection properties of environmentally friendly phytic acid conversion coatings were studied on 2024-T3 aluminium alloy. The films were prepared under acidic conditions with various pH values and characterised by SEM, EDS, ATR-FTIR and electrochemical techniques. The results indicate that the conversion coatings obtained by immersing the alloy in phytic acid solutions at pH from 3 to 5.5 provide excellent corrosion resistance. ATR-FTIR confirms that the film is formed by deposition of reaction products between Al3+ and phosphate groups in phytic acid molecules. The conformation models of the deposition film are proposed.

  2. Proof test and fatigue crack growth modeling on 2024-T3 aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Poe, C. C., Jr.; Dawicke, D. S.

    1990-01-01

    Pressure proof testing of aircraft fuselage structures has been suggested as a means of screening critical crack sizes and of extending their useful life. The objective of this paper is to study the proof-test concept and to model the crack-growth process on a ductile material. Simulated proof and operational fatigue life tests have been conducted on cracked panels made of 2024-T3 aluminum alloy sheet material. A fatigue crack-closure model was modified to simulate the proof test and operational fatigue cycling. Using crack-growth rate and resistance-curve data, the model was able to predict crack growth during and after the proof load. These tests and analyses indicate that the proof test increases fatigue life; but the beneficial life, after a 1.33 or 1.5 proof, was less than a few hundred cycles.

  3. Fatigue crack growth in 2024-T3 aluminum under tensile and transverse shear stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viz, Mark J.; Zehnder, Alan T.

    1994-01-01

    The influence of transverse shear stresses on the fatigue crack growth rate in thin 2024-T3 aluminum alloy sheets is investigated experimentally. The tests are performed on double-edge cracked sheets in cyclic tensile and torsional loading. This loading generates crack tip stress intensity factors in the same ratio as the values computed for a crack lying along a lap joint in a pressurized aircraft fuselage. The relevant fracture mechanics of cracks in thin plates along with the details of the geometrically nonlinear finite element analyses used for the test specimen calibration are developed and discussed. Preliminary fatigue crack growth data correlated using the fully coupled stress intensity factor calibration are presented and compared with fatigue crack growth data from pure delta K(sub I)fatigue tests.

  4. Multi-lab comparison on R-curve methodologies: Alloy 2024-T3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Anthony P.

    1994-01-01

    In an effort to determine an optimum method for ranking the fracture toughness of developmental aluminum alloys for High Speed Civil Transport applications, five labs performed K and/or J based fracture tests on aluminum alloy 2024-T3. Two material thicknesses were examined: 0.063 in. and 0.125 in. Middle crack tension and compact tension specimens were excised from 60 in. wide middle crack tension panels which had been previously tested at Boeing. The crack resistance curves generated were compared to the R-curves from 60 in. wide specimens. The experimental program indicated that effective stress intensity from secant compliance based crack length and stress intensity calculated from J-integral testing were equivalent. In addition, comparison of different specimen sizes and configurations indicated that standard validity requirements for compact tension specimens may be overly restrictive.

  5. Formation and corrosion inhibition mechanisms of chromate conversion coatings on aluminum and AA2024-T3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenping

    Chromate conversion coatings (CCCs) are applied to aluminum alloys to enhance their resistance to localized corrosion and to increase paint adhesion. However, chromate is toxic and suspected carcinogen. To develop environmentally friendly alternative coatings, a detailed and accurate understanding of CCC formation and breakdown is needed. Several studies on CCC formation and breakdown were conducted in this regard. A first set of experiments was aimed at studying CCC formation and breakdown on 25-element Al electrode arrays. Results from coating formation experiments show that the coating process occurs in two stages. The first stage is characterized by intense electrochemical activity on the array and last from 20 to 30 seconds. The second stage occurs under electrochemical quiescence and little measurable current flows among elements in the electrode array. Raman spectroscopy shows that the coating continues to adsorb Cr6+. Anodic polarization of conversion coated arrays in chloride solutions led to several important findings. First, it was found that pitting potential increases as coating time increases through both stage one and stage two coating formation. These results also show that changes in coating structure and chemistry occur during the electrochemically quiescent second stage of coating formation. Further analysis showed that pitting potentials were higher on electrode elements that were net cathodes during first stage CCC formation than on electrode elements that were net anodes. Results also showed that the supplemental ingredients, NaF and K3Fe(CN)6, are essential to CCC formation and contribute greatly to increasing the corrosion protection provided by the coating. A second set of experiments was aimed at characterizing the effect of aging on CCC structure and properties. CCCs are dynamic due to the fact that they continue to polymerize after they are removed from the coating bath. Using cathodic polarization experiments carried out in aerated chloride solutions, it was found that CCCs less than 48 hours old inhibited cathodic reactions. With increased aging time in ambient lab air, cathodic inhibition was lost. This loss of cathodic inhibition was attributed to shrinkage cracking resulting from coating dehydration and continued polymerization. The relative humidity of the environment in which coatings aged was also found to have a significant effect on the CCC aging process. After aging in dry air (RH ˜ 0%), CCCs contained significant shrinkage cracking. Cr6+ release from such coatings was severely inhibited and corrosion resistance was poor in electrochemical testing. CCCs aged in ambient lab air (RH ˜ 50%) exhibited less shrinkage cracking, a 2-order of magnitude increase in Cr6+ release, and considerably greater corrosion resistance. These results support the notion that CCC aging is strongly influenced by coating dehydration.* *This dissertation is multimedia (contains text and other applications not available in printed format). The accompanying CD requires the following system requirements: Windows MediaPlayer or RealPlayer.

  6. Review and study of physics driven pitting corrosion modeling in 2024-T3 aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lingyu; Jata, Kumar V.

    2015-04-01

    Material degradation due to corrosion and corrosion fatigue has been recognized to significantly affect the airworthiness of civilian and military aircraft, especially for the current fleet of airplanes that have served beyond their initial design life. The ability to predict the corrosion damage development in aircraft components and structures, therefore, is of great importance in managing timely maintenance for the aging aircraft vehicles and in assisting the design of new ones. The assessment of aircraft corrosion and its influence on fatigue life relies on appropriate quantitative models that can evaluate the initiation of the corrosion as well as the accumulation during the period of operation. Beyond the aircraft regime, corrosion has also affected the maintenance, safety and reliability of other systems such as nuclear power systems, steam and gas turbines, marine structures and so on. In the work presented in this paper, we reviewed and studied several physics based pitting corrosion models that have been reported in the literature. The classic work of particle induced pitting corrosion by Wei and Harlow is reviewed in detail. Two types of modeling, a power law based simplified model and a microstructure based model, are compared for 2024-T3 alloy. Data from literatures are used as model inputs. The paper ends with conclusions and recommendations for future work.

  7. An assessment of the small-crack effect for 2024-T3 aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Swain, M. H.; Phillips, E. P.

    1986-01-01

    Data on small-crack behavior were obtained for a single-edge-notched tensile specimen made of 2024-T3 Al alloy and used to evaluate the capability of a semiempirical crack-growth and closure model to predict the fatigue life of notched specimens. Fatigue tests were conducted under either constant-amplitude loading (with stress ratios of 0.5, 0, -1, and -2) or spectrum loading, using a replication technique to record growth. It was found that small cracks exhibited the 'small-crack' effect in that they grew faster than large cracks when subjected to the same stress intensity factor range. Experimental small-crack growth rates agreed well with the model predictions. For making predictions of fatigue life, an initial surface defect void size of 3 x 12 x 0.4 microns was used in all calculations; predicted fatigue lives agreed well with experimentally determined values obtained in all tests. The crack-closure model indicated that the 'small-crack' effect on fatigue life was greatest in tests involving significant compressive loads.

  8. The influence of crack closure on fatigue crack growth thresholds in 2024-T3 aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Edward P.

    1988-01-01

    Crack opening loads were determined in load-shedding fatigue crack growth threshold tests on 2024-T3 aluminum alloy at stress ratios R of -2, -1, 0, 0.33, 0.5, and 0.7. The effects of load-shedding procedure and rate were investigated. Values of threshold Delta-K were found to vary significantly with R, whereas values of threshold effective Delta-K did not. That is, the variation of threshold Delta-K with R was almost completely explained by accounting for the measured variation in crack opening load behavior with R. The load-shedding guidelines of ASTM Test Method for Measurement of Fatigue Crack Growth (E 647) produced a threshold Delta-K value for R = 0.7 that was in agreement with the value determined using a procedure that should minimize closure effects. At both R = 0 and R = 0.7, high load-shedding rates produced high values of threshold Delta-K caused by large closure effects.

  9. Short fatigue crack behavior in notched 2024-T3 aluminum specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. J.; Sharpe, W. N., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Single-edge, semi-circular notched specimens of Al 2024-T3, 2.3 mm thick, were cyclicly loaded at R-ratios of 0.5, 0.0, -1.0, and -2.0. The notch roots were periodically inspected using a replica technique which duplicates the bore surface. The replicas were examined under an optical microscope to determine the initiation of very short cracks and to monitor the growth of short cracks ranging in length from a few tens of microns to the specimen thickness. In addition to short crack growth measurements, the crack opening displacement (COD) was measured for surface cracks as short as 0.035 mm and for through-thickness cracks using the Interferometric Strain/Displacement Gage (ISDG), a laser-based optical technique. The growth rates of short cracks were faster than the long crack growth rates for R-ratios of -1.0 and -2.0. No significant difference between short and long crack growth rates was observed for R = 0.0. Short cracks had slower growth rates than long cracks for R = 0.5. The crack opening stresses measured for short cracks were smaller than those predicted for large cracks, with little difference appearing for positive R-ratios and large differences noted for negative R-ratios.

  10. Organosilane self-assembled layers (SAMs) and hybrid silicate magnesium-rich primers for the corrosion protection of aluminum alloy 2024 T3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Duhua

    Although current chromate coatings function very well in corrosion protection for aircraft alloys, such as aluminum alloy 2024 T3, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is planning to totally ban the use of chromates as coating materials in the next decade or so because of their extremely toxic effect. For this purpose, both self-assembled layers and silicate magnesium-rich primers were tested to provide the corrosion protection for aluminum alloy. The long-term goal of this research is to develop a coating system to replace the current chromate coating for aircraft corrosion protection. Aluminum alloy 2024 T3 substrates were modified with self-assembled monolayer or multilayer thin films from different alkylsilane compounds. Mono-functional silanes, such as octadecyltrichlorosilane (C18SiCl3), can form a mixed hydrophobic monolayer or multilayer thin film on the aluminum oxide surface to provide a barrier to water and other electrolytes, so the corrosion resistance of the SAMs modified surface was increased significantly. On the other hand, the bi-functional silane self-assembly could attach the aluminum surface through the silicon headgroup while using its functional tailgroup to chemically bond the polymer coating, thus improving the adhesion between the aluminum substrate and coating substantially, and seems to contribute more to corrosion protection of aluminum substrate. Organosilanes were also combined with tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) in propel ratios to form a sol-gel binder to make silicate magnesium-rich primers. Analogue to the inorganic zinc-rich coatings, the silicate magnesium-rich primers also showed excellent adhesion and solvent resistance. The sacrificial magnesium pigments and the chemically inert silicate binder both contribute to the anti-corrosion properties. Future studies will be focused on the formula optimization for better toughness, chemical resistance and anticorrosion performance.

  11. Interpretation of observations made using local electrochemical impedance mapping (LEIM) on organic coated aluminum alloy 2024-T3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierisch, Amber Menemsha

    2001-08-01

    Local Electrochemical Impedance Mapping (LED4) was used to investigate local underfilm corrosion of organic coated (epoxy, polyurethane, vinyl) aluminum alloy 2024- T3 substrates immersed in chloride solutions. Several interesting features in LEIM were observed that would provide insight into the local breakdown processes of coated metals if they reflected actual electrochemical phenomena. Contribution to measurements from' artifact or quantities unrelated to breakdown, and the general effect of the dielectric layer on LEIM, were evaluated by comparison of analytical and numerical modeling to LEIM of fabricated electrodes. An equipotential disk was used to model underfilm corrosion. The fields calculated for these models were correlated with LEIM of both bare and coated fabricated electrodes (Au, Pt, Al, Cu). Numerical modeling predicted that a dielectric layer would dull edge effects and severely dampen the magnitude of the field emanating from the substrate surface. A salt film beneath the coating was predicted to have no significant effect on the field. LEIM of coated disk electrodes showed no evidence of the underfilm electrode with two exceptions: (1)underfilm corrosion occurring on pure aluminum, and (2)a copper electrode, which has a very active surface. The discrepancy between modeling and experimental results of coated systems prompted further experimental investigation to isolate the roles of current density and coating defects. Blisters were created on coated gold samples by placing NaCl and AlCl3 salt islands beneath the coating for various coating and substrate configurations. LEIM recorded a peak in admittance only over an acidic blister in polyurethane where local hydrolysis had occurred. It was determined that one of two criteria is required to measure electrochemical activity through a film: (1)the substrate must be actively corroding to produce a current density sufficient to generate a measurable field, or (2)a low resistivity defect must exist

  12. Failure Modeling of Titanium-6Al-4V and 2024-T3 Aluminum with the Johnson-Cook Material Model

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, G

    2002-09-16

    A validated Johnson-Cook model could be employed to perform simulations that conform to FAA standards for evaluating aircraft and engine designs for airworthiness and containment considerations. A previous LLNL report [1] described the motivation for using the Johnson-Cook material model in simulations involving engine containment and the effect of uncontained engine debris on aircraft structures. In that report, experimental studies of the deformation and failure behavior of Ti-6Al-4V and 2024-T3 aluminum at high strain rates and large strains were conducted. The report also describes the generation of material constants for the Johnson-Cook strength model. This report describes the determination and validation of parameters for Ti-6Al-4V and 2024-T3 aluminum that can be used in the failure portion of the Johnson-Cook material.

  13. Experimental investigations of material models for Ti-6A1-4V and 2024-T3

    SciTech Connect

    Leseur, D

    1999-05-03

    This report describes studies of the deformation and failure behavior of Ti-6Al-4V and 2024-T3 aluminum. Data was obtained at high strain rates and large strains using the split Hopkinson pressure bar technique. This information, plus additional data from the literature, was used to critically evaluate the ability of the Johnson Cook material model to represent the deformation and failure response of Ti-6AMV and 2024-T3 under conditions relevant to simulations of engine containment and the influence of uncontained engine debris on aircraft structures. This model is being used in the DYNA3D finite element code, which is being developed/validated for evaluating aircraft/engine designs relative to the federal airworthiness standards and for improving mitigation/containment technology. The results of the experimental work reported here were used to define a new set of material constants for the strength component of the Johnson Cook model for Ti-6Al-4V and 2024-T3. The capabilities and limitations of the model are reviewed. The model can accurately represent the stress-strain response of the materials. The major concern with the Johnson Cook material model is its ability to accurately represent the stress - strain rate response at strain rates greater than 10{sup 3}-10{sup 4} s{sup {minus}1}. Additional work is also needed to adequately account for failure via shear localization, which was the dominant failure mode at high strain rates in both materials. Failure modeling in both Ti-6Al-N and 2024-T3 will be considered further in future reports.

  14. Effect of additional heat treatment of 2024-T3 on the growth of fatigue crack in air and in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Louwaard, E. P.

    1986-01-01

    In order to determine the influence of ductility on the fatigue crack growth rate of aluminum alloys, fatigue tests were carried out on central notched specimens of 2024-T3 and 2024-T8 sheet material. The 2024-T8 material was obtained by an additional heat treatment applied on 2024-T3 (18 hours at 192 C), which increased the static yield strength from 43.6 to 48.9 kgf/sq mm. A change in the ultimate strength was not observed. Fatigue tests were carried out on both materials in humid air and in high vacuum. According to a new crack propagation model, crack extension is supported to be caused by a slip-related process and debonding triggered by the environment. This model predicts an effect of the ductility on the crack growth rate which should be smaller in vacuum than in humid air; however, this was not confirmed. In humid air the crack-growth rate in 2024-T8 was about 2 times faster than in 2024-T3, while in vacuum the ratio was about 2.5. Crack closure measurements gave no indications that crack closure played a significant role in both materials. Some speculative explanations are briefly discussed.

  15. Multiscale approach to micro/macro fatigue crack growth in 2024-T3 aluminum panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sih, G. C.

    2014-01-01

    When two contacting solid surfaces are tightly closed and invisible to the naked eye, the discontinuity is said to be microscopic regardless of whether its length is short or long. By this definition, it is not sufficient to distinguish the difference between a micro- and macro-crack by using the length parameter. Microcracks in high strength metal alloys have been known to be several centimeters or longer. Considered in this work is a dual scale fatigue crack growth model where the main crack can be micro or macro but there prevails an inherent microscopic tip region that is damaged depending on the irregularities of the microstructure. This region is referred to as the "micro-tip" and can be simulated by a sharp wedge with different angles in addition to mixed boundary conditions. The combination is sufficient to model microscopic entities in the form of voids, inclusions, precipitations, interfaces, in addition to subgrain imperfections, or cluster of dislocations. This is accomplished by using the method of "singularity representation" such that closed form asymptotic solutions can be obtained for the development of fatigue crack growth rate relations with three parameters. They include: (1) the crack surface tightness σ* represented by σ o/ σ ∞ = 0.3-0.5 for short cracks in region I, and 0.1-0.2 for long cracks in region II, (2) the micro/macro material properties reflected by the shear modulus ratio µ* (=µmicro/µmacro varying between 2 and 5) and (3) the most sensitive parameter d* being the micro-tip characteristic length d* (= d/ d o) whose magnitude decreases in the direction of region I→II. The existing fatigue crack growth data for 2024-T3 and 7075-T6 aluminum sheets are used to reinterpret the two-parameter d a/d N= C(Δ K) n relation where Δ K has now been re-derived for a microcrack with surfaces tightly in contact. The contact force will depend on the mean stress σm or mean stress ratio R as the primary parameter and on the stress

  16. Overload and Underload Effects on the Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of the 2024-T3 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawicke, David S.

    1997-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth tests were conducted on 0.09 inch thick, 3.0 inch wide middle-crack tension specimens cut from sheets of 2024-T3 aluminum alloy. The tests were conducted using a load sequence that consisted of a single block of 2,500 cycles of constant amplitude loading followed by an overload/underload combination. The largest fatigue crack growth life occurred for the tests with the overload stress equal to 2 times the constant amplitude stress and the underload stress equal to the constant amplitude minimum stress. For the tests with compressive underloads, the fatigue crack growth life decreased with increasing compressive underload stress.

  17. Periodic Overload and Transport Spectrum Fatigue Crack Growth Tests of Ti62222STA and Al2024T3 Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Edward P.

    1999-01-01

    Variable amplitude loading crack growth tests have been conducted to provide data that can be used to evaluate crack growth prediction codes. Tests with periodic overloads or overloads followed by underloads were conducted on titanium alloy Ti-6Al-2Sn-2Zr-2Mo-2Cr solution treated and aged (Ti62222STA) material at room temperature and at 350 F. Spectrum fatigue crack growth tests were conducted on two materials (Ti62222STA and aluminum alloy 2024-T3) using two transport lower-wing test spectra at two temperatures (room temperature and 350 F (Ti only)). Test lives (growth from an initial crack half-length of 0.15 in. to failure) were recorded in all tests and the crack length against cycles (or flights) data were recorded in many of the tests. The following observations were made regarding the test results: (1) in tests of the Ti62222STA material, the tests at 350 F had longer lives than those at room temperature, (2) in tests to the MiniTwist spectrum, the Al2024T3 material showed much greater crack growth retardations due to the highest stresses in the spectrum than did the Ti62222STA material, and (3) comparisons of material crack growth performances on an "equal weight" basis were spectrum dependent.

  18. Investigation of the Compressive Strength and Creep Lifetime of 2024-T3 Aluminum-Alloy Plates at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathauser, Eldon E; Deveikis, William D

    1957-01-01

    The results of elevated-temperature compressive strength and creep tests of 2024-t3 (formerly 24s-t3) aluminum alloy plates supported in v-grooves are presented. The strength-test results indicate that a relation previously developed for predicting plate compressive strength for plates of all materials at room temperature is also satisfactory for determining elevated-temperature strength. Creep-lifetime results are presented for plates in the form of master creep-lifetime curves by using a time-temperature parameter that is convenient for summarizing tensile creep-rupture data. A comparison is made between tensile and compressive creep lifetime for the plates and a method that made use of isochronous stress-strain curves for predicting plate-creep failure stresses is investigated.

  19. Prediction of Crack Growth under Variable-Amplitude Loading in Thin-Sheet 2024-T3 Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The present paper is concerned with the application of a "plasticity-induced" crack closure model to study fatigue crack growth under various load histories. The model was based on the Dugdale model but modified to leave plastically deformed material in the wake of the advancing crack. The model was used to correlate crack growth rates under constant-amplitude loading and then used to predict crack growth under variable-amplitude and spectrum loading on thin-sheet 2024- T3 aluminum alloys. Predicted crack-opening stresses agreed well with test data from the literature. The crack-growth lives agreed within a factor of two for single and repeated spike overloads/underloads and within 20 percent for spectrum loading. Differences were attributed to fretting-product-debris-induced closure and three-dimensional affects not included in the model.

  20. Fracture Tests on Thin Sheet 2024-T3 Aluminum Alloy for Specimens with and Without Anti-Buckling Guides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, William M.; Newman, James C., Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A series of fracture test were conducted to determine the effects of specimen type specimen width and buckling on the fracture behavior of cracked thin sheet (0.063 inch thick) 2024-T3 aluminum alloy. A summary of the experimental measurements is presented for fracture tests conducted on two specimen types and various widths. Middle-crack tension M(T) and compact tension C(T) specimens were tested in the L-T and T-L orientation with duplicate tests for each condition. Four widths (W= 3, 12, 24, and 40 inch) were tested for the middle-crack tension specimens, and three widths (W=2, 4, and 6 inch) were tested for the compact tension specimens. The M(T) specimens were tested in either a constrained (out-of-plane displacements restrained with antibuckling guides) or unconstrained conditions were the specimen was free to buckle out of plane Measurements were made of load against crack extension for all specimens.

  1. Effect of Multipath Laser Shock Processing on Microhardness, Surface Roughness, and Wear Resistance of 2024-T3 Al Alloy

    PubMed Central

    Kadhim, Abdulhadi; Salim, Evan T.; Fayadh, Saeed M.; Al-Amiery, Ahmed A.; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H.; Mohamad, Abu Bakar

    2014-01-01

    Laser shock processing (LSP) is an innovative surface treatment technique with high peak power, short pulse, and cold hardening for strengthening metal materials. LSP is based on the application of a high intensity pulsed laser beam (I > 1 GW/cm2; t < 50 ns) at the interface between the metallic target and the surrounding medium (a transparent confining material, normally water) forcing a sudden vaporization of the metallic surface into a high temperature and density plasma that immediately develops inducing a shock wave propagating into the material. The shock wave induces plastic deformation and a residual stress distribution in the target material. In this paper we study the increase of microhardness and surface roughness with the increase of laser pulse energy in 2024-T3 Al alloy. The influence of the thickness of the confining layer (water) on microhardness and surface roughness is also studied. In addition, the effect of LSP treatment with best conditions on wear behaviors of the alloy was investigated. PMID:24737973

  2. Prediction of stable tearing of 2024-T3 aluminum alloy using the crack-tip opening angle approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakuckas, J. G., Jr.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    In this study, the crack-tip opening angle (CTOA) approach was incorporated into a damage growth finite element program, MADGIC (Micromechanics Analysis and Damage Growth in Composites), and was used to predict stable tearing in a middle-crack tension 2024-T3 aluminum alloy specimen. The MADGIC code is a displacement based finite element program implemented with an incremental elastic-plastic algorithm used to model elastic-plastic behavior and a nodal splitting and nodal force relaxation algorithm used to generate crack surfaces. Predictions of the applied stress as a function of crack extension and applied stress as a function of load-line displacement were in good agreement with experiments and with similar predictions made using an existing finite element program, ZIP2D. In addition, path integrals, namely, the J-integral and T*-integral, were also evaluated and compared with the CTOA approach. There appears to be a weak relationship between the CTOA and the T*-integral evaluated on a specific integration path during crack extension beyond maximum applied stress. This study further verifies that the CTOA can be used as an effective elastic-plastic fracture mechanics parameter to predict crack growth.

  3. Fatigue-crack initiation and growth in notched 2024-T3 specimens monitored by a video tape system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sova, J. A.; Crews, J. H., Jr.; Exton, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Fatigue-crack initiation and early stages of growth in notched 2024-T3 aluminum alloy sheet specimens were monitored during constant-amplitude fatigue tests conducted for a range of stress ratios. A video tape system was developed to detect fatigue cracks 0.1 mm in length on the sheet surface and to monitor their growth. Fatigue cracks initiated either at the notch corner or on the notch surface. Most of the first fatigue cracks started as notch-corner cracks, and the crack-initiation period was defined as the number of cycles for which the crack was 0.1 mm in length on the sheet surface. For each of the stress ratios used, the results showed that at the low stress levels, the crack-initiation period constituted at least 90 percent of the fatigue lives. However, for the negative stress ratios at the high stress levels, cracks started as early as at about 40 percent of the fatigue lives.

  4. Effects of low fluence neutron bombardment on material properties of aluminum 2024 t-3 and aluminum wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Jesse Lee

    The purpose of this work was to explore the impact of neutron irradiation (1018 n/m2 to 1021 n/m 2) on the aluminum alloy 2024 T-3, and several corrosion resistant treatments commonly used. The irradiation was conducted in the Utah Nuclear Engineering Programs Reactor facility using the Fast Neutron Irradiation Facility (FNIF) with a 1 MeV equivalent beam and the Center Irradiator (CI) with average neutron energy of 0.58 MeV. Historically, materials tests have focused on mechanical failures occurring at very high fluence. These same tests have generally been conducted for pure materials: the limited research existing for alloyed materials focuses on power plant materials such as zircaloy and steel. This body of information is mainly used to avoid catastrophic performance failures. Small research and test reactors operating at low power will subject core materials to fluence from 1014 n/m2 to 1024 n/m2. Aluminum alloys are very common in these systems. Materials used in research reactors, such as aluminum, have been deemed adequate due to high radiation tolerance and low mechanical failure rates. While aluminum and its alloys are a well-defined set of materials in nonradiation environments, there are very little published data for them for low fluence neutron radiation. This work measured Al 2024's (T-3) thermal conductivity, electrical resistivity, oxide layer thickness, oxide/metal interface and corrosion resistance (using passive current density) for Alodine, Anodize type II, Anodize type III and native oxide. These measurements were taken before and after irradiation and results were examined. Over the course of 30 to 50 years, property changes will likely impact thermal diffusion, corrosion properties and electrical properties. Defining these changes may give future engineers the tools needed to safely justify life extensions and build inspection methods to identify pre-failure conditions.

  5. Crack-tip-opening angle measurements and crack tunneling under stable tearing in thin sheet 2024-T3 aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawicke, D. S.; Sutton, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    The stable tearing behavior of thin sheets 2024-T3 aluminum alloy was studied for middle crack tension specimens having initial cracks that were: flat cracks (low fatigue stress) and 45 degrees through-thickness slant cracks (high fatigue stress). The critical crack-tip-opening angle (CTOA) values during stable tearing were measured by two independent methods, optical microscopy and digital image correlation. Results from the two methods agreed well. The CTOA measurements and observations of the fracture surfaces showed that the initial stable tearing behavior of low and high fatigue stress tests is significantly different. The cracks in the low fatigue stress tests underwent a transition from flat-to-slant crack growth, during which the CTOA values were high and significant crack tunneling occurred. After crack growth equal to about the thickness, CTOA reached a constant value of 6 deg and after crack growth equal to about twice the thickness, crack tunneling stabilized. The initial high CTOA values, in the low fatigue crack tests, coincided with large three-dimensional crack front shape changes due to a variation in the through-thickness crack tip constraint. The cracks in the high fatigue stress tests reach the same constant CTOA value after crack growth equal to about the thickness, but produced only a slightly higher CTOA value during initial crack growth. For crack growth on the 45 degree slant, the crack front and local field variables are still highly three-dimensional. However, the constant CTOA values and stable crack front shape may allow the process to be approximated with two-dimensional models.

  6. Numerical analysis of static performance comparison of friction stir welded versus riveted 2024-T3 aluminum alloy stiffened panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Qing; He, Yuting; Zhang, Teng; Wu, Liming

    2014-07-01

    Most researches on the static performance of stiffened panel joined by friction stir welding(FSW) mainly focus on the compression stability rather than shear stability. To evaluate the potential of FSW as a replacement for traditional rivet fastening for stiffened panel assembly in aviation application, finite element method(FEM) is applied to compare compression and shear stability performances of FSW stiffened panels with stability performances of riveted stiffened panels. FEMs of 2024-T3 aluminum alloy FSW and riveted stiffened panels are developed and nonlinear static analysis method is applied to obtain buckling pattern, buckling load and load carrying capability of each panel model. The accuracy of each FEM of FSW stiffened panel is evaluated by stability experiment of FSW stiffened panel specimens with identical geometry and boundary condition and the accuracy of each FEM of riveted stiffened panel is evaluated by semi-empirical calculation formulas. It is found that FEMs without considering weld-induced initial imperfections notably overestimate the static strengths of FSW stiffened panels. FEM results show that, buckling patterns of both FSW and riveted compression stiffened panels represent local buckling of plate between stiffeners. The initial buckling waves of FSW stiffened panel emerge uniformly in each plate between stiffeners while those of riveted panel mainly emerge in the mid-plate. Buckling patterns of both FSW and riveted shear stiffened panels represent local buckling of plate close to the loading corner. FEM results indicate that, shear buckling of FSW stiffened panel is less sensitive to the initial imperfections than compression buckling. Load carrying capability of FSW stiffened panel is less sensitive to the initial imperfections than initial buckling. It can be concluded that buckling loads of FSW panels are a bit lower than those of riveted panels whereas carrying capabilities of FSW panels are almost equivalent to those of riveted

  7. The Influence of Strain Rate Variations on the Appearance of Serrated Yielding in 2024-T3 Al-Clad Aluminium Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Leacock, Alan G.; McMurray, Robert J.; Brown, D.; Poston, Ken

    2007-04-07

    To avoid failure during the stretch forming process using manual control, machine operators tend to achieve the final form using a stop-start approach. It was observed that when approaching full form, stretcher-strain marks appeared on the surface of the part if the operator stopped and restarted the forming operation. In order to investigate this phenomenon, a series of tensile tests was conducted using two batches of 2024-T3 aluminium alloy. The specimens were tested using several different strain rates, representative of those used on the shop floor. Additional tests were conducted involving a series of pauses under displacement control at differing levels of strain and strain rate. In the uninterrupted tests for the two batches of 2024-T3 material tested, serrated yielding was observed just prior to failure. However for the tests in which there was a pause in displacement, the material consistently exhibited serrated yielding when the crosshead began to move again. These results indicate that the pause provides an opportunity for strain ageing and pinning of the dislocations resulting in serrated yielding of this alloy. In order to avoid serrated yielding, stretch forming operations using 2024-T3 aluminium should be conducted at a constant strain rate without interruption. This also has far reaching implications for those involved in the production and testing of these alloys. The test programme described represents an initial attempt to investigate a phenomenon noted during an industrial forming process and should be extended to analyse the affect of strain path changes on the occurrence of serrated yielding.

  8. Tensile Properties of 7075-T6 and 2024-T3 Aluminum-alloy Sheet Heated at Uniform Temperature Rates Under Constant Load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heimerl, George J; Inge, John E

    1955-01-01

    Results are presented of tests to determine the effect of heating at uniform temperature rates from 0.2 degrees to 100 degrees F. per second on the tensile properties of 7075-T6 d(75s-T6) and 2024-T3 (24s-T3) aluminum-alloy sheet under constant-load conditions. Yield and rupture stresses, obtained under rapid-heating conditions, are compared with results of elevated-temperature stress-strain tests for 1/2-hour exposure. Master yield-and-rupture-stress curves based on linear temperature-rate parameter are presented. Yield and rupture stresses and temperatures may be predicted by means of master curves and the parameter.

  9. Preliminary investigation of the compressive strength and creep lifetime of 2024-T3 (formerly 24S-T3) aluminum-alloy plates at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathauser, Eldon E; Deveikis, William D

    1955-01-01

    The results of elevated-temperature compressive strength and creep tests of 2024-T3 (formerly 23S-T3) aluminum-alloy plates supported in V-grooves are presented. For determining elevated-temperature strength, where creep effects are negligible, a relation previously developed for predicting plate compressive strength at room temperature was satisfactory. Creep-lifetime results are presented for the plates in the form of master creep-lifetime curves by using a time-temperature parameter that is convenient for summarizing tensile creep-rupture data. A comparison is made between tensile and compressive creep lifetime for the plates, and the magnitude by which the design stress is decreased because of material creep and loss of strength due to exposure at elevated temperatures is indicated.

  10. Influence of Crack-Tip Configurations on the Fracture Response of 0.04-Inch Thick 2024-T3 Aluminum Alloy Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, William M.; Newman, James C. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A series of fracture tests were conducted on Middle-crack tension M(T) and compact tension C(T) specimens to determine the effects of specimen type, specimen width, notch tip sharpness and buckling on the fracture behavior of cracked thin sheet (0.04 inch thick) 2024-T3 aluminum alloy material. A series of M(T) specimens were tested with three notch tip configurations: (1) a fatigue pre-cracked notch, (2) a 0.010-inch-diameter wire electrical discharge machined (EDM) notch, and (3) a EDM notch sharpened with a razor blade. The test procedures are discussed and the experimental results for failure stress, load vs. crack extension and the material stress-strain response are reported.

  11. A transmission electron microscopy study of constituent-particle-induced corrosion in 7075-T6 and 2024-T3 aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, R.P.; Liao, C.M.; Gao, M.

    1998-04-01

    To better understand particle-induced pitting corrosion in aluminum alloys, thin foil specimens of 7075-T6 and 2024-T3 aluminum alloys, with identified constituent particles, were immersed in aerated 0.5M NaCl solution and then examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results clearly showed matrix dissolution around the iron- and manganese-containing particles (such as Al{sub 23}CuFe{sub 4}), as well as the Al{sub 2}Cu particles. While Al{sub 2}CuMg particles tended to dissolve relative to the matrix, limited local dissolution of the matrix was also observed around these particles. These results are consistent with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations of pitting corrosion and are discussed in terms of the electrochemical characteristics of the particles and the matrix.

  12. An experimental study of CTOD for Mode I/Mode II stable crack growth in thin 2024-T3 aluminum specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Amstutz, B.E.; Sutton, M.A.; Dawicke, D.S.; Newman, J.C.

    1995-12-31

    An experimental study of crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) for Mode I/Mode II stable crack growth in thin sheet 2024-T3 aluminum has been conducted. To perform the experiments, an Arcan specimen and fixture was modified so that (1) slippage in the grips was eliminated, (2) large rotations of the fixture components were achievable and (3) bending stresses were minimized. Defining {Theta} to be the angle between the Mode I loading direction (perpendicular to the crack line) and the direction of applied loading, experimental results indicate that (a) for large amounts of crack extension, a {ge} 10mm, the value of CTOD at 1 mm behind the crack tip appears to approach a constant value of 0.1 mm for all modes of loading, (b) the direction of crack extension varied with applied mixed mode loading, (c) Mode I crack extension is predominant for 0{degree} {le} {Theta} {le} 60{degree}, (d) Mode II crack extension is predominant for 75{degree} {le} {Theta} {le} 90{degree} and (e) a transition zone exists for angles {Theta} near 75{degree}.

  13. Effects of mixed mode I/II loading and grain orientation on crack initiation and stable tearing in 2024-T3 aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Amstutz, B.E.; Sutton, M.A.; Boone, M.L.; Dawicke, D.S.

    1997-12-01

    The effects of material grain orientation and mixed mode I/II loading on crack initiation and stable tearing in 2.3-mm-thick, unclad 2024-T3 aluminum is experimentally investigated. Mode I experiments were performed on center-cracked specimens with the crack being oriented at various angles relative to the rolling direction. Defining {theta} to be the angle between the normal to the initial crack plane and the loading direction, Mode I/II experiments were performed using an Arcan test fixture for 0{degree} {le} {theta} {le} 90{degree} [corresponding to 90{degree} {ge} {beta} {ge} 0{degree}, where {beta} = atan (K{sub II}/K{sub I})] with the crack oriented either along the rolling direction (T-L) or perpendicular to the rolling direction (L-T). Results indicate that: 1. The Mode I crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) is a strong function of the orientation of the crack relative to the rolling direction; CTOD for a T-L specimen is 0.84 mm, increasing linearly with orientation angle to 1.05 mm for an L-T case. 2. The Mode I/II CTOD increases rapidly during initial increments of crack growth and then decreases towards a constant value as crack growth continues. 3. For {theta} < 68{degree} ({beta} > 29{degree}), all cracks kinked and the Mode I/II plastic zones are similar to rotated Mode I plastic zones throughout the crack growth process. 4. J{sub II} = 0 reasonably predicts the direction of tension-dominated crack growth, but does not predict the transition to shear crack growth which occurs for {theta} {ge} 75{degree}. 5. K{sub II} {ge} K{sub I} for {theta} {approx} 58{degree} ({beta} = 45{degree}) does not quantitatively predict the transition to shear crack growth for {theta} {ge} 75{degree} ({beta} {le} 22{degree}), but does provide an indication of changing conditions in the crack tip region.

  14. Investigation of Three Analytical Hypothesis for Determining Material Creep Behavior under Varied Loads, with an Application to 2024-T3 Aluminum-Alloy Sheet in Tension at 400 F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkovits, Avraham

    1961-01-01

    Three existing hypotheses are formulated mathematically to estimate tensile creep strain under varied loads and constant temperature from creep data obtained under constant load and constant temperature. hypotheses investigated include the time-hardening, strain-hardening, and life-fraction rules. Predicted creep behavior is compared with data obtained from tensile creep tests of 2024-T3 aluminum-alloy sheet at 400 F under cyclic-load conditions. creep strain under varied loads is presented on the basis of an equivalent stress, derived from the life-fraction rule, which reduces the varied-load case to a constant-load problem. Creep strain in the region of interest for structural design and rupture times, determined from the hypotheses investigated, are in fair agreement with data in most cases, although calculated values of creep strain are generally greater than the experimental values because creep recovery is neglected in the calculations.

  15. Acoustic emission monitoring of tensile testing of corroded and un-corroded clad aluminum 2024-T3 and characterization of effects of corrosion on AE source events and material tensile properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okafor, A. Chukwujekwu; Natarajan, Shridhar

    2014-02-01

    Corrosion damage affects structural integrity and deteriorates material properties of aluminum alloys in aircraft structures. Acoustic Emission (AE) is an effective nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technique for monitoring such damages and predicting failure in large structures of an aircraft. For successful interpretation of data from AE monitoring, sources of AE and factors affecting it need to be identified. This paper presents results of AE monitoring of tensile testing of corroded and un-corroded clad Aluminum 2024-T3 test specimens, and characterization of the effects of strain-rate and corrosion damage on material tensile properties and AE source events. Effect of corrosion was studied by inducing corrosion in the test specimens by accelerated corrosion testing in a Q-Fog accelerated corrosion chamber for 12 weeks. Eight (8) masked dog-bone shaped specimens were placed in the accelerated corrosion chamber at the beginning of the test. Two (2) dog-bone shaped specimens were removed from the corrosion chamber after exposure time of 3, 6, 9, and 12 weeks respectively, and subjected to tension testing till specimen failure along with AE monitoring, as well as two (2) reference samples not exposed to corrosion. Material tensile properties (yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, toughness, and elongation) obtained from tension test and AE parameters obtained from AE monitoring were analyzed and characterized. AE parameters increase with increase in exposure period of the specimens in the corrosive environment. Aluminum 2024-T3 is an acoustically silent material during tensile deformation without any damage. Acoustic emission events increase with increase of corrosion damage and with increase in strain rate above a certain value. Thus AE is suitable for structural health monitoring of corrosion damage. Ultimate tensile strength, toughness and elongation values decrease with increase of exposure period in corrosion chamber.

  16. Fatigue Strengths of Aircraft Materials: Axial-Load Fatigue Tests on Edge-Notched Sheet Specimens of 2024-T3 and 7075-T6 Aluminum Alloys and of SAE 4130 Steel with Notch Radii of 0.004 and 0.070 inch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grover, H. J.; Hyler, W. S.; Jackson, L. R.

    1959-01-01

    The present report gives results of axial-load fatigue tests on notched specimens of three sheet materials: 2024-T3 and 7075-T6 aluminum alloys and normalized SAE 4130 steel. Two edge-notched specimens were designed and tested, each having a theoretical stress-concentration factor K(sub t) = 4.0. The radii of the notches were 0.004 and 0.070 inch. Tests of these specimens were run at two levels of nominal mean stress: 0 and 20,000 psi. Results of these studies extended information previously reported on tests of specimens with varying notch severity. They afford data on the variation of fatigue-strength reduction with notch radius and on the potential usefulness of Neuber's technical stress-concentration factor K(sub n).

  17. Fatigue damage study in aluminum-2024 T3 alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Milton W.

    1992-01-01

    The grain structure of aluminum 2024, a commonly used commercial alloy is investigated, and these findings are correlated with the fatigue property of the material. Samples of aluminum 2024 were polished and etched in different reagents. Optical micrographs (at 500X) of samples etched in Keller's reagent revealed grain boundaries as well as some particles present in the microstructure. Normal x-ray scans of samples etched for different intervals of time in Keller's reagent indicate no significant variations in diffraction peak positions; however, the width of the rocking curve increased with the time of etching. These results are consistent with the direct dependence of the width of the rocking curve on the range of grain orientation. Etching removes the preferred orientation layer of the sample produced by polishing; thereby, causing the width to increase.

  18. Preparation of thin film nanofibrous composite NF membrane based on EDC/NHS modified PAN-AA nanofibrous substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Wang, X.; Hsiao, B. S.

    2016-07-01

    A novel kind of thin-film nanofibrous composite (TFNC) nanofiltration (NF) membranes consisting of a polyamide (PA) barrier layer were successfully fabricated by interfacial polymerization (IFP) based on electrospun double-layer nanofibrous substrates, which have an ultrathin poly (acrylonitrile-co-acrylic acid) (PAN-AA) nanofibrous layer as top layer and a thicker polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofiber layer as bottom porous support layer. Immersing PAN/PAN-AA nanofibrous substrates into 1-ethyl-(3-3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride/N-hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS) aqueous solution and piperazine (PIP) aqueous solution (0.20 wt%) sequentially for a period of time, the carboxyl groups on PAN-AA nanofibers were activated by carbodiimide and then reacted with the amide groups. The as prepared composite membrane has an integrated structure with high rejection rate (98.0%); high permeate flux (40.4 L/m2h) for MgSO4 aqueous solution (2 g/L).

  19. Sol-gel hybrid films based on organosilane and montmorillonite for corrosion inhibition of AA2024.

    PubMed

    Dalmoro, V; dos Santos, J H Z; Armelin, E; Alemán, C; Azambuja, D S

    2014-07-15

    The present work reports the production of films on AA2024-T3 composed of vinyltrimethoxysilane (VTMS)/tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) with incorporation of montmorillonite (sodium montmorillonite and montmorillonite modified with quaternary ammonium salt, abbreviated Na and 30B, respectively), generated by the sol-gel process. According to FT-IR analyses the incorporation of montmorillonite does not affect silica network. Electrochemical characterization was performed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurement in 0.05 mol L(-1) NaCl solution. Results indicate that montmorillonite incorporation improves the corrosion protection compared to the non-modified system. Scanning electron microscopy micrographs reveal that high concentrations of montmorillonite provide agglomerations on the metallic surface, which is in detriment of the anticorrosive performance. The VTMS/TEOS/30B films with the lowest concentration (22 mg L(-1)) of embedded clay provide the highest corrosion protection. PMID:24863798

  20. Microstructure and anisotropic mechanical behavior of friction stir welded AA2024 alloy sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhihan; Li, Wenya; Li, Jinglong; Chao, Y.J.; Vairis, A.

    2015-09-15

    The anisotropic mechanical properties of friction stir welded (FSW) AA2024-T3 alloy joints were investigated based on the uniaxial tensile tests. The joint microstructure was examined by using electron back-scattered diffraction and transmission electron microscope. Results show that the evident anisotropic failure and yielding are present in the FSW joints. With the increase of loading angle from 0° to 90° the ultimate tensile strength and elongation of the specimens consistently decrease, or at first decrease and then increase, depending on the FSW process parameters. The specimen cut from the weld direction, i.e. a loading angle of 0°, exhibits the highest strength and elongation. - Highlights: • Microstructure and anisotropy of friction stir welded joints were studied. • The evident anisotropic failure and yielding are present in joints. • The lowest yield stress and UTS are at 45° and 60° loadings, respectively. • Rotation speed heavily impact on the anisotropy of joints.

  1. A family of AA9 lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases in Aspergillus nidulans is differentially regulated by multiple substrates and at least one is active on cellulose and xyloglucan.

    PubMed

    Jagadeeswaran, Guru; Gainey, Lawrie; Prade, Rolf; Mort, Andrew J

    2016-05-01

    Fungal genomes contain multiple genes encoding AA9 lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs), a recently discovered class of enzymes known to be active on cellulose and expressed when grown on biomass. Because of extensive genetic and biochemical data already available, Aspergillus nidulans offers an excellent model system to study the need for multiple AA9 LPMOs and their activity during oxidative degradation of biomass. We provide the first report on regulation of the entire family of AA9 LPMOs in A. nidulans over a range of polysaccharides including xylan, xyloglucan, pectin, glucan, and cellulose. We have successfully cloned and expressed AN3046, an AA9 LPMO in A. nidulans that is active on cellulose. Additionally, we performed mass spectral analyses that show the enzyme is active on the hemicellulose xyloglucan. The AN3046 LPMO showed synergy with other hydrolases in degrading sorghum stover. Our data showing activity of the overexpressed LPMO on cellulose and xyloglucan provides further evidence for the breadth of substrates acted on by AA9 LPMOs. PMID:27075737

  2. An evaluation of the pressure proof test concept for 2024-T3 aluminium alloy sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawicke, D. S.; Poe, C. C., Jr.; Newman, J. C.; Harris, C. E.

    1991-01-01

    The concept of pressure proof testing of fuselage structures with fatigue cracks to insure structural integrity was evaluated from a fracture mechanics viewpoint. A generic analytical and experimental investigation was conducted on uniaxially loaded flat panels with crack configurations and stress levels typical of longitudinal lap splice joints in commercial transport aircraft fuselages. The results revealed that the remaining fatigue life after a proof cycle was longer than that without the proof cycle because of crack growth retardation due to increased crack closure. However, based on a crack length that is slightly less than the critical value at the maximum proof stress, the minimum assured life or proof test interval must be no more than 550 pressure cycles for a 1.33 proof factor and 1530 pressure cycles for a 1.5 proof factor to prevent in-flight failures.

  3. An evaluation of the pressure proof test concept for thin sheet 2024-T3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawicke, D. S.; Poe, C. C., Jr.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Harris, C. E.

    1990-01-01

    The concept of pressure proof testing of fuselage structures with fatigue cracks to insure structural integrity was evaluated from a fracture mechanics viewpoint. A generic analytical and experimental investigation was conducted on uniaxially loaded flat panels with crack configurations and stress levels typical of longitudinal lap-splice joints in commercial transport aircraft fuselage. The results revealed that the remaining fatigue life after a proof test was longer than that without the proof test because of crack growth retardation due to increased crack closure. However, based on a crack length that is slightly less than the critical value at the maximum proof test stress, the minimum assured life or proof test interval must be no more than 550 pressure cycles for a 1.33 proof factor and 1530 pressure cycles for a 1.5 proof factor to prevent in-flight failures.

  4. An alternate to chromate conversion coatings for the corrosion protection of aluminum 2024-T3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ruiguang

    Corrosion of high-strength aluminum alloys used for airspace application is an expensive and serious problem. The most significant environmental factor contributing to the corrosion of these alloys is water condensed from humid air and contaminated with soluble chloride salts. The Al 2024 series used for aircraft are particularly susceptible to corrosion in aqueous chloride solutions due to alloying constituents such as copper and other impurities. Chromates are efficient inhibitors of corrosion of aluminum in near neutral aqueous environments containing aggressive anions such as chlorides. Usually, aluminum alloys are initially protected by chromate conversion coatings. Additional polymer coatings are sometimes added during exposure to corrosive atmospheres such as marine environments. Although chromate coatings are widely used, they require the use of noxious solutions, so they have always presented effluent disposal problems. There are health and safety concerns over the use of chromates due to their toxicity and carcinogenic nature and, as a consequence, the environmental and health risks associated with the use of such coatings will be restricted in the future. It was these health and safety concerns that led to the development of alternative non-toxic coating processes with comparable adhesion properties and corrosion protection. A variety of process technologies are under development and are vying for acceptance in industrial markets. As an alternate conversion coating, a new titanate conversion coating was systematically researched and developed. Research concentrated on producing passive surfaces from a simple titanate solution using an immersion process. The corrosion resistance of the treated surface has been evaluated using simple, rapid electrochemical techniques as well as a more long-term salt spray test. Passivation by titanate conversion treatment exhibits many similarities to chromate conversion treatment. Based on this study of corrosion protection of the titanate coating formed at different conditions, a possible formation mechanism of a titanate coating is proposed. A conclusion may be drawn that titanate coating seems to be a viable alternative to chromate coatings.

  5. An evaluation of the pressure proof test concept for thin sheet 2024-T3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawicke, D. S.; Poe, C. C., Jr.; Newman, James C., Jr.; Harris, Charles E.

    1990-01-01

    The concept of pressure proof testing of fuselage structures with fatigue cracks to insure structural integrity was evaluated from a fracture mechanics viewpoint. A generic analytical and experimental investigation was conducted on uniaxially loaded flat panels with crack configurations and stress levels typical of longitudinal lap splice joints in commercial transport aircraft fuselages. The results revealed that the remaining fatigue life after a proof test was longer than that without the proof test because of crack growth retardation due to increased crack closure. However, based on a crack length that is slightly less than the critical value at the maximum proof test stress, the minimum assured life or proof test interval must be no more than 550 pressure cycles for a 1.33 proof factor and 1530 pressure cycles for a 1.5 proof factor to prevent in-flight failures.

  6. Fatigue behaviour of laser machined 2024 T3 aeronautic aluminium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpio, F. J.; Araújo, D.; Pacheco, F. J.; Méndez, D.; García, A. J.; Villar, M. P.; García, R.; Jiménez, D.; Rubio, L.

    2003-03-01

    High power laser applications as welding, machining and marking are widely used in several industrial sectors to take advantage of their high processing velocity, clean processing conditions, and a high versatility. However, the heat affected zone (HAZ) is expected to change the mechanical behaviour of laser processed structural elements. For aeronautic applications, this feature is of first importance because those elements suffer cyclic stress under service conditions. Indeed, the most severe requirements for further industrial implantation are the fatigue specifications. In this communication, fatigue behaviour of laser machined 2024 aluminium alloy is studied to evaluate a possible certification of laser-based machining in the aeronautic industry. For this reason, 1.6 mm thick samples laser machined were carried out using a CO 2 laser. The experimental fatigue curves are shown to lie very close to aeronautic requirement despite theoretical fatigue behaviour of the material is significantly more resistant. This is attributed to surface roughness induced by a surface melting zone shown that diminish the fatigue resistance. Fatigue behaviour and surface roughness should be improved using higher power and/or high absorption wavelength as that of YAG laser ( λ=1.06 μm).

  7. The Effect of Hole Quality on the Fatigue Life of 2024-T3 Aluminum Alloy Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everett, Richard A., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study whose main objective was to determine which type of fabrication process would least affect the fatigue life of an open-hole structural detail. Since the open-hole detail is often the fundamental building block for determining the stress concentration of built-up structural parts, it is important to understand any factor that can affect the fatigue life of an open hole. A test program of constant-amplitude fatigue tests was conducted on five different sets of test specimens each made using a different hole fabrication process. Three of the sets used different mechanical drilling procedures while a fourth and fifth set were mechanically drilled and then chemically polished. Two sets of specimens were also tested under spectrum loading to aid in understanding the effects of residual compressive stresses on fatigue life. Three conclusions were made from this study. One, the residual compressive stresses caused by the hole-drilling process increased the fatigue life by two to three times over specimens that were chemically polished after the holes were drilled. Second, the chemical polishing process does not appear to adversely affect the fatigue life. Third, the chemical polishing process will produce a stress-state adjacent to the hole that has insignificant machining residual stresses.

  8. Localised corrosion in aluminium alloy 2024-T3 using in situ TEM.

    PubMed

    Malladi, Sairam; Shen, Chenggang; Xu, Qiang; de Kruijff, Tom; Yücelen, Emrah; Tichelaar, Frans; Zandbergen, Henny

    2013-11-28

    An approach to carry out chemical reactions using aggressive gases in situ in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), at ambient pressures of 1.5 bar using a windowed environmental cell, called a nanoreactor, is presented here. The nanoreactor coupled with a specially developed holder with platinum tubing permits the usage of aggressive chemicals like hydrochloric acid (HCl). PMID:24127075

  9. Effect of Surface Preparation on the Microstructure, Adhesion, and Tensile Properties of Cold-Sprayed Aluminum Coatings on AA2024 Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, M. M.; Eden, T. J.; Golesich, B. T.

    2015-02-01

    Commercially pure aluminum coatings (CP-Al) were applied to AA 2024-T351 substrates utilizing the cold spray process using different surface preparation methods and carrier gases; the resulting microstructures and mechanical properties were investigated. Substrate preparation methods were examined to understand the effect of substrate roughness on coating properties, to minimize embedded grit, and to identify the surface preparation method that yielded the best combination of coating properties. Three substrate roughing preparations, glass bead, SiC grit, and alumina grit blast, were examined while utilizing both helium and nitrogen as carrier gases in the cold spray process. Coatings that were oxide free, possessing densities greater than 99% were achieved, with the mean coating porosity ranging 0.1-0.5%. The highest mean adhesion strength was 42 MPa for the nitrogen gas and 20 MPa for the helium gas, both using glass bead surface preparation. For the nitrogen process gas samples, the surface preparation methods that produced high pull strengths correlated to bend test specimens that showed no signs of cracking on surfaces or edges. The overall best combination of mechanical property results was achieved with coatings prepared by glass bead surface roughening using nitrogen as a carrier gas.

  10. Lamb wave ultrasonic evaluation of welded AA2024 specimens at tensile static and fatigue testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkov, M. V.; Byakov, A. V.; Shah, R. T.; Lyubutin, P. S.; Panin, S. V.

    2015-10-01

    The paper deals with the investigation of Lamb waves ultrasonic testing technique applied for evaluation of different stress-strain and damaged state of aluminum specimens at static and fatigue loading in order to develop a Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) approach. The experimental results of tensile testing of AA2024T3 specimens with welded joints are presented. Piezoelectric transducers used as actuators and sensors were adhesively bonded to the specimen's surface using two component epoxy. The set of static and cyclic tensile tests with two frequencies of acoustic testing (50 kHz and 335 kHz) were performed. The recorded signals were processed to calculate the maximum envelope in order to evaluate the changes of the stress-strain state of the specimen and its microstructure during static tension. The registered data are analyzed and discussed in terms of signal attenuation due to the formation of fatigue defects during cyclic loading. Understanding the relations between acoustic signal features and fatigue damages will provide us the ability to determine the damage state of the structure and its residual lifetime in order to design a robust SHM system.

  11. Site-saturation engineering of lysine 47 in cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase from Paenibacillus macerans to enhance substrate specificity towards maltodextrin for enzymatic synthesis of 2-O-D-glucopyranosyl-L-ascorbic acid (AA-2G).

    PubMed

    Han, Ruizhi; Liu, Long; Shin, Hyun-dong; Chen, Rachel R; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2013-07-01

    In this work, the site-saturation engineering of lysine 47 in cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase (CGTase) from Paenibacillus macerans was conducted to improve the specificity of CGTase towards maltodextrin, which can be used as a cheap and easily soluble glycosyl donor for the enzymatic synthesis of 2-O-D-glucopyranosyl-L-ascorbic acid (AA-2G) by CGTase. When using maltodextrin as glycosyl donor, four mutants K47F (lysine→ phenylalanine), K47L (lysine→ leucine), K47V (lysine→ valine) and K47W (lysine→ tryptophan) showed higher AA-2G yield as compared with that produced by the wild-type CGTase. The transformation conditions (temperature, pH and the mass ratio of L-ascorbic acid to maltodextrin) were optimized and the highest titer of AA-2G produced by the mutant K47L could reach 1.97 g/l, which was 64.2% higher than that (1.20 g/l) produced by the wild-type CGTase. The reaction kinetics analysis confirmed the enhanced maltodextrin specificity, and it was also found that compared with the wild-type CGTase, the four mutants had relatively lower cyclization activities and higher disproportionation activities, which was favorable for AA-2G synthesis. The mechanism responsible for the enhanced substrate specificity was further explored by structure modeling and it was indicated that the enhancement of maltodextrin specificity may be due to the short residue chain and the removal of hydrogen bonding interactions between the side chain of residue 47 and the sugar at -3 subsite. Here the obtained mutant CGTases, especially the K47L, has a great potential in the production of AA-2G with maltodextrin as a cheap and easily soluble substrate. PMID:23129181

  12. Finite element modelling of shot peening and peen forming processes and characterisation of peened AA2024-T351 aluminium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gariepy, Alexandre

    The main purpose of this thesis was to develop and validate finite element (FE) simulation tools for shot peening and peen forming. The specific aim was to achieve quantitatively accurate predictions for both processes and demonstrate the potential of reliable FE modelling for scientific investigation and industrial applications. First, an improved dynamic impact model that takes into account the stochastic nature of shot peening was proposed by carefully studying its dimensions, introducing a dispersion of shot sizes and significantly reducing its computational cost. In addition, cyclic mechanical testing was conducted to define a suitable material constitutive theory for aluminium alloy (AA) 2024-T3/T351 subjected to shot peening. By combining a realistic shot peening model with an appropriate material law, fairly good residual stress predictions were achieved for three different sets of shot peening parameters. Second, an experimental and numerical characterization of AA2024-T351 shot peened with parameters representative of fatigue life improvement applications was conducted. Multiple techniques, such as micro-indentation, residual stress determination and electron backscatter diffraction, were combined to gain a better understanding of the influence of shot peening on the material. The potential uses of finite element simulation to complement experimental data were also studied. The material heterogeneity arising from the random impact sequence was investigated and it was found that the impact modelling methodology could provide useful information on such heterogeneities. Third, a novel peen forming simulation methodology was introduced. The impact model provided the necessary input data as part of a multiscale approach. Numerically calculated unbalanced induced stress profiles were input into shell elements and the deformed shape after peen forming was computed as a springback analysis. In addition, a simple interpolation method was proposed to model the

  13. Microstructure of AA 2024 fixed joints formed by friction stir welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliseev, A. A.; Kalashnikova, T. A.; Tarasov, S. Yu.; Rubtsov, V. E.; Fortuna, S. V.; Kolubaev, E. A.

    2015-10-01

    Friction stir welded butt joints on 2024T3 alloy have been obtained using different process parameters. The microstructures of all the weld joint zones have been examined and such structural parameters as grain size, particle size and volume content of particles have been determined in order to find correlations with the microhardness of the corresponding zones of the weld.

  14. The cytochrome P450 2AA gene cluster in zebrafish (Danio rerio); expression of CYP2AA1 and CYP2AA2 and response to phenobarbital-type inducers

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Akira; Bainy, Afonso C.D.; Woodin, Bruce R.; Goldstone, Jared V.; Stegeman, John J.

    2013-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2 gene family is the largest and most diverse CYP gene family in vertebrates. In zebrafish, we have identified 10 genes in a new subfamily CYP2AA, which does not show orthology to any human or other mammalian CYP genes. Here we report evolutionary and structural relationships of the 10 CYP2AA genes and expression of the first two genes, CYP2AA1 and CYP2AA2. Parsimony reconstruction of the tandem duplication pattern for the CYP2AA cluster suggests that CYP2AA1, CYP2AA2 and CYP2AA3 likely arose in the earlier duplication events and thus are most diverged in function from the other CYP2AAs. On the other hand, CYP2AA8 and CYP2AA9 are genes that arose in the latest duplication event, implying functional similarity between these two CYPs. A molecular model of CYP2AA1 showing the sequence conservation across the CYP2AA cluster reveals that the regions with the highest variability within the cluster map into CYP2AA1 near the substrate access channels, suggesting differing substrate specificity. Zebrafish CYP2AA1 transcript was expressed predominantly in intestine, while CYP2AA2 was most highly expressed in kidney, suggesting differing roles in physiology. In liver CYP2AA2 expression but not that of CYP2AA1, was increased by 1,4-bis [2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)] benzene (TCPOBOP) and, to a lesser extent, by phenobarbital (PB). In contrast, pregnenolone 16α-carbonitrile (PCN) increased CYP2AA1, but not CYP2AA2 in liver. The results identify a CYP2 subfamily in zebrafish that includes genes apparently induced by PB-type chemicals and PXR agonists, the first concrete in vivo evidence for a PB-type response in fish. PMID:23726801

  15. Embedded reference electrodes for corrosion potential monitoring, electrochemical characterization, and controlled-potential cathodic protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merten, Bobbi Jo Elizabeth

    A thin wire Ag/AgCl reference electrode was prepared using 50 mum Ag wire in dilute FeCl3. The wire was embedded beneath the polyurethane topcoat of two sacrificial coating systems to monitor their corrosion potential. This is the first report of a reference electrode embedded between organic coating layers to monitor substrate health. The embedded reference electrode (ERE) successfully monitored the corrosion potential of Mg primer on AA 2024-T3 for 800 days of constant immersion in dilute Harrison's solution. Zn primer on steel had low accuracy in comparison. This is in part due to short circuiting by Zn oxidation products, which are much more conductive than Mg corrosion products. Data interpretation was improved through statistical analysis. On average, ERE corrosion potentials are 0.1 to 0.2 V and 0.2 to 0.3 V more positive than a saturated calomel electrode (SCE) in solution for AA 2024-T3 and steel coating systems, respectively. Further research may confirm that ERE obtains corrosion potential information not possible by an exterior, conventional reference electrode. The ERE is stable under polarization. AA 2024-T3 was polarized to -0.95 V vs ERE to emulate controlled potential cathodic protection (CPCP) applications. Polarizations of -0.75 V vs ERE are recommended for future experiments to minimize cathodic delamination. The ERE was utilized to analyze coating mixtures of lithium carbonate, magnesium nitrate, and Mg metal on AA2024-T3. Corrosion potential, low frequency impedance by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and noise resistance by electrochemical noise method (ENM) were reported. Coating performance ranking is consistent with standard electrochemical characterization and visual analyses. The results suggest anti-corrosion resistance superior to a standard Mg primer following 1600 hours of B117 salt spray. Both lithium carbonate and magnesium nitrate are necessary to achieve corrosion protection. Unique corrosion protective coatings for

  16. The cytochrome P450 2AA gene cluster in zebrafish (Danio rerio): Expression of CYP2AA1 and CYP2AA2 and response to phenobarbital-type inducers

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, Akira; Bainy, Afonso C.D.; Woodin, Bruce R.; Goldstone, Jared V.; Stegeman, John J.

    2013-10-01

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2 gene family is the largest and most diverse CYP gene family in vertebrates. In zebrafish, we have identified 10 genes in a new subfamily, CYP2AA, which does not show orthology to any human or other mammalian CYP genes. Here we report evolutionary and structural relationships of the 10 CYP2AA genes and expression of the first two genes, CYP2AA1 and CYP2AA2. Parsimony reconstruction of the tandem duplication pattern for the CYP2AA cluster suggests that CYP2AA1, CYP2AA2 and CYP2AA3 likely arose in the earlier duplication events and thus are most diverged in function from the other CYP2AAs. On the other hand, CYP2AA8 and CYP2AA9 are genes that arose in the latest duplication event, implying functional similarity between these two CYPs. A molecular model of CYP2AA1 showing the sequence conservation across the CYP2AA cluster reveals that the regions with the highest variability within the cluster map onto CYP2AA1 near the substrate access channels, suggesting differing substrate specificities. Zebrafish CYP2AA1 transcript was expressed predominantly in the intestine, while CYP2AA2 was most highly expressed in the kidney, suggesting differing roles in physiology. In the liver CYP2AA2 expression but not that of CYP2AA1, was increased by 1,4-bis [2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)] benzene (TCPOBOP) and, to a lesser extent, by phenobarbital (PB). In contrast, pregnenolone 16α-carbonitrile (PCN) increased CYP2AA1 expression, but not CYP2AA2 in the liver. The results identify a CYP2 subfamily in zebrafish that includes genes apparently induced by PB-type chemicals and PXR agonists, the first concrete in vivo evidence for a PB-type response in fish. - Highlights: • A tandemly duplicated cluster of ten CYP2AA genes was described in zebrafish. • Parsimony and duplication analyses suggest pathways to CYP2AA diversity. • Homology models reveal amino acid positions possibly related to functional diversity. • The CYP2AA locus does not share synteny with

  17. Statistical investigation of fatigue crack initiation and growth around chamfered rivet holes in Alclad 2024 T3 as affected by corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fadragas, M. I.; Fine, M. E.; Moran, B.

    1994-01-01

    In panel specimens with rivet holes cracks initiate in the blunted knife edge of the chamfered rivet hole and propagate inward as well as along the hole. The fatigue lifetime to dominant crack information was defined as the number of cycles, N500 micrometer, to formation of a 500 micrometer long crack. Statistical data on N500 micrometer and on crack propagation after N500 micrometer were obtained for a large number of uncorroded specimens and specimens corroded in an ASTM B 117 salt spray. Considerable variation in N500 micrometer and crack propagation behavior was observed from specimen to specimen of the same nominal geometry with chamfered rivet holes increased the probability for both early formation and later formation of a propagating 500 micrometer fatigue crack. The growth of fatigue cracks after 500 micrometer size was little affected by prior salt spray.

  18. Section AA Pre2004 Fire, Section AA 2009, Section AA, South ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Section A-A Pre-2004 Fire, Section A-A 2009, Section A-A, South Elevation - Boston & Maine Railroad, Berlin Branch Bridge #148.81, Formerly spanning Moose Brook at former Boston & Maine Railroad, Gorham, Coos County, NH

  19. The AAS Workforce Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postman, Marc; Norman, D. J.; Evans, N. R.; Ivie, R.

    2014-01-01

    The AAS Demographics Committee, on behalf of the AAS, was tasked with initiating a biennial survey to improve the Society's ability to serve its members and to inform the community about changes in the community's demographics. A survey, based in part on similar surveys for other scientific societies, was developed in the summer of 2012 and was publicly launched in January 2013. The survey randomly targeted 2500 astronomers who are members of the AAS. The survey was closed 4 months later (April 2013). The response rate was excellent - 63% (1583 people) completed the survey. I will summarize the results from this survey, highlighting key results and plans for their broad dissemination.

  20. AAS 227: Welcome!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Greetings from the 227th American Astronomical Society meeting in Kissimmee, Florida! This week, along with several fellow authors from astrobites, Iwill bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. You can follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.If youre an author or referee (or plan to be!) and youre here at the meeting, consider joining us at our Author and Referee Workshop on Wednesday in the Tallahassee room, where well be sharingsome of the exciting new features of the AAS journals. You can drop intoeither of the two-hour sessions(10 AM 12 PM or 1 PM 3 PM), and there will be afree buffet lunch at noon.Heres the agenda:Morning SessionTopic Speaker10:00 am 10:05 amIntroductionsJulie Steffen10:05 am 10:35 amChanges at AAS Journals; How to Be a Successful AAS AuthorEthan Vishniac10:35 am 11:00 amThe Peer Review ProcessButler Burton11:00 am 11:15 amAAS Nova: Sharing AAS Authors Research with the Broader CommunitySusanna Kohler11:15 am 11:30 amFixing Software and Instrumentation Publishing: New Paper Styles in AAS JournalsChris Lintott11:30 am 11:45 amMaking Article Writing Easier with the New AASTeX v6.0Greg Schwarz11:45 am 12:00 pmBringing JavaScript and Interactivity to Your AAS Journal FiguresGus MuenchLunch SessionTopic Speaker12:00 pm 12:15 pmUnified Astronomy ThesaurusKatie Frey12:15 pm 12:30 pmAAS/ADS ORCID Integration ToolAlberto Accomazzi12:30 pm 12:45 pmWorldWide Telescope and Video AbstractsJosh Peek12:45 pm 01:00 pmArizona Astronomical Data Hub (AADH)Bryan HeidornAfternoon SessionTopic Speaker01:00 pm 01:05 pmIntroductionsJulie Steffen01:05 pm 01:35 pmChanges at AAS Journals; How to Be a Successful AAS AuthorEthan Vishniac01:35 pm 02:00 pmThe Peer Review ProcessButler Burton02:00 pm 02:15 pmAAS Nova: Sharing AAS Authors Research with the Broader CommunitySusanna Kohler02:15 pm 02:30 pm

  1. AAS 228: Welcome!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Greetings from the 228th American Astronomical Society meeting in San Diego, California! This week, along with a team of fellow authorsfrom astrobites, Iwill bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. You can follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.If youre at the meeting, come stop by the AAS booth (Booth #211-213) to learn about the newly-announced partnership between AAS and astrobites and pick up some swag.And dont forget to visit the IOP booth in the Exhibit Hall (Booth #223) to learn more about the new corridors for AAS Journals and to pick up a badge pin to representyour corridor!

  2. AAS Career Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvel, Kevin B.

    2012-08-01

    The American Astronomical Society provides substantial programs in the area of Career Services.Motivated by the Society's mission to enhance and share humanity's understanding of the Universe, the AAS provides a central resource for advertising positions, interviewing opportunities at its annual winter meeting and information, workshops and networks to enable astronomers to find employment.The programs of the Society in this area are overseen by an active committee on employment and the AAS Council itself.Additional resources that help characterize the field, its growth and facts about employment such as salaries and type of jobs available are regularly summarized and reported on by the American Institute of Physics.

  3. AAS Oral History Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxner, Sanlyn; Holbrook, Jarita; AAS Oral History Team

    2016-06-01

    Now in its fourth year, the AAS Oral History Project has interviewed over 80 astronomers from all over the world. Led by the AAS Historical Astronomy Division (HAD) and partially funded by the American Institute of Physics Niels Bohr Library and ongoing support from the AAS, volunteers have collected oral histories from astronomers at professional meetings starting in 2015, including AAS, DPS, and the IAU general assembly. Each interview lasts one and a half to two hours and focuses on interviewees’ personal and professional lives. Questions include those about one’s family, childhood, strong influences on one’s scientific career, career path, successes and challenges, perspectives on how astronomy is changing as a field, and advice to the next generation. Each interview is audio recorded and transcribed, the content of which is checked with each interviewee. Once complete, interview transcripts are posted online as part of a larger oral history library at https://www.aip.org/history-programs/niels-bohr-library/oral-histories. Future analysis will reveal a rich story of astronomers and will help the community address issues of diversity, controversies, and the changing landscape of science. We are still recruiting individuals to be interviewed from all stages of career from undergraduate students to retired and emeritus astronomers. Contact Jarita Holbrook to schedule an interview or to find out more information about the project (astroholbrook@gmail.com). Also, contact Jarita Holbrook if you would like to become an interviewer for the project.

  4. American Astronomical Society (AAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Founded in 1899, the AAS is a non-profit scientific society created to promote the advancement of astronomy and closely related branches of science. Its membership consists primarily of professional researchers in the astronomical sciences, but also includes educators, students and others interested in the advancement of astronomical research. About 85% of the membership is drawn from North Ame...

  5. AAS 227: Day 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or at astrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the @astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Things kicked off last night at our undergraduate reception booth. Thanks to all of you who stopped by we were delightedto have so many people tell us that they already know about and useastrobites, and we were excited to introduce a new cohort of students at AAS to astrobites for the first time.Tuesday morning was the official start of the meeting. Here are just a few of the talks and workshops astrobiters attended today.Opening Address (by Becky Smethurst)The President of the AAS, aka our fearless leader Meg Urry kicked off the meeting this morning at the purely coffee powered hour of 8am this morning. She spoke about the importance of young astronomers at the meeting (heres looking at you reader!) and also the importance of the new Working Group for Accessibility and Disabilities (aka WGAD pronounced like wicked) at the AAS. The Society has made extra effort this year to make the conference accessible to all,a message which was very well received by everyone in attendance.Kavli Lecture: New Horizons Alan Stern (by Becky Smethurst)We were definitely spoilt with the first Plenary lecture at this years conference Alan Stern gave us a a review of the New Horizons mission of the Pluto Fly By (astrobites covered the mission back in July with this post). We were treated to beautiful images, wonderful results and a foray into geology.Before (Hubble) and after #NewHorizons. #thatisall #science #astro alanstern #aas227 pic.twitter.com/kkMt6RsSIR Science News (@topsciencething) January 5, 2016Some awesome facts from the lecture that blew my mind:New Horizons is now 2AU (!) beyond Pluto

  6. Strategic Change in AAS Publishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, Julie

    2015-08-01

    The American Astronomical Society has embarked on a process of strategic change in its publishing program. The process has incuded authors, AAS leaders, editors, publishing experts, librarians, and data scientists. This session will outline the still ongoing process and present some both upcoming and already available new AAS Publishing features and services to the global astronomy community.

  7. AAS 227: Day 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 2 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Plenary Session: Black Hole Physics with the Event Horizon Telescope (by Susanna Kohler)If anyone needed motivation to wake up early this morning, they got it in the form of Feryal Ozel (University of Arizona) enthralling us all with exciting pictures, videos, and words about black holes and the Event Horizon Telescope. Ozel spoke to a packed room (at 8:30am!) about where the project currently stands, and where its heading in the future.The EHT has pretty much the coolest goal ever: actually image the event horizons of black holes in our universe. The problem is that the largest black hole we can look at (Sgr A*, in the center of our galaxy) has an event horizon size of 50 as. For this kind of resolution roughly equivalent to trying to image a DVD on the Moon! wed need an Earth-sized telescope. EHT has solved this problem by linking telescopes around the world, creating one giant, mm-wavelength effective telescope with a baseline the size of Earth.Besides producing awesome images, the EHT will be able to test properties of black-hole spacetime, the no-hair theorem, and general relativity (GR) in new regimes.Ozel walked us through some of the theory prep work we need to do now in order to get the most science out of the EHT, including devising new

  8. Adhesion and Long-Term Barrier Restoration of Intrinsic Self-Healing Hybrid Sol-Gel Coatings.

    PubMed

    Abdolah Zadeh, Mina; van der Zwaag, Sybrand; Garcia, Santiago J

    2016-02-17

    Self-healing polymeric coatings aiming at smart and on-demand protection of metallic substrates have lately attracted considerable attention. In the present paper, the potential application of a dual network hybrid sol-gel polymer containing reversible tetrasulfide groups as a protective coating for the AA2024-T3 substrate is presented. Depending on the constituent ratio, the developed polymer exhibited a hydrophobic surface, high adhesion strength, and an effective long-term corrosion protection in 0.5 M NaCl solution. Upon thermal treatment, the healable hybrid sol-gel coating demonstrated full restoration of the barrier properties as well as recovery of the coating adhesion and surface properties (e.g., hydrophobicity and surface topology) necessary for lifetime extension of corrosion protective coatings. Excellent long-term barrier restoration of the coating was only obtained if the scratch width was less than the coating thickness. PMID:26780101

  9. AAS 227: Day 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or at astrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the @astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Things kicked off last night at our undergraduate reception booth. Thanks to all of you who stopped by we were delightedto have so many people tell us that they already know about and useastrobites, and we were excited to introduce a new cohort of students at AAS to astrobites for the first time.Tuesday morning was the official start of the meeting. Here are just a few of the talks and workshops astrobiters attended today.Opening Address (by Becky Smethurst)The President of the AAS, aka our fearless leader Meg Urry kicked off the meeting this morning at the purely coffee powered hour of 8am this morning. She spoke about the importance of young astronomers at the meeting (heres looking at you reader!) and also the importance of the new Working Group for Accessibility and Disabilities (aka WGAD pronounced like wicked) at the AAS. The Society has made extra effort this year to make the conference accessible to all,a message which was very well received by everyone in attendance.Kavli Lecture: New Horizons Alan Stern (by Becky Smethurst)We were definitely spoilt with the first Plenary lecture at this years conference Alan Stern gave us a a review of the New Horizons mission of the Pluto Fly By (astrobites covered the mission back in July with this post). We were treated to beautiful images, wonderful results and a foray into geology.Before (Hubble) and after #NewHorizons. #thatisall #science #astro alanstern #aas227 pic.twitter.com/kkMt6RsSIR Science News (@topsciencething) January 5, 2016Some awesome facts from the lecture that blew my mind:New Horizons is now 2AU (!) beyond Pluto

  10. AAS 227: Day 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 2 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Plenary Session: Black Hole Physics with the Event Horizon Telescope (by Susanna Kohler)If anyone needed motivation to wake up early this morning, they got it in the form of Feryal Ozel (University of Arizona) enthralling us all with exciting pictures, videos, and words about black holes and the Event Horizon Telescope. Ozel spoke to a packed room (at 8:30am!) about where the project currently stands, and where its heading in the future.The EHT has pretty much the coolest goal ever: actually image the event horizons of black holes in our universe. The problem is that the largest black hole we can look at (Sgr A*, in the center of our galaxy) has an event horizon size of 50 as. For this kind of resolution roughly equivalent to trying to image a DVD on the Moon! wed need an Earth-sized telescope. EHT has solved this problem by linking telescopes around the world, creating one giant, mm-wavelength effective telescope with a baseline the size of Earth.Besides producing awesome images, the EHT will be able to test properties of black-hole spacetime, the no-hair theorem, and general relativity (GR) in new regimes.Ozel walked us through some of the theory prep work we need to do now in order to get the most science out of the EHT, including devising new

  11. AAS 227: Day 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 3 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Henry Norris Russell Lecture: Viewing the Universe with Infrared Eyes: The Spitzer Space Telescope (by Erika Nesvold)The Henry Norris Russell Award is the highest honor given by the AAS, for a lifetime of eminence in astronomy research. This years award went to Giovanni Fazio of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Fazio became a leader in gamma ray astronomy before switching mid-career to the study of infrared astronomy, and he gave his award lecture on the latter subject, specifically on the Spitzer Space Telescope, one of the most successful infrared telescopes of all time.Artists rendering of the Spitzer space telescope. [NASA/JPL-Caltech]Spitzer has been operating for more than twelve years, and has resulted in over six thousand papers in refereed journals in that time. The telescope sits in an Earth-trailing orbit around the Sun, and is now farther from the Earth (1.4 AU) than the Earth is from the Sun. Fazio gave the audience a fascinating overview of the science done by Spitzer over more than a decade. One of the most productive areas of research for Spitzer is the study of exoplanets, which hadnt even been discovered when the Spitzer Telescope was first conceived. Spitzers high sensitivity and ability to observe exoplanets over

  12. AAS 227: Day 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 3 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Henry Norris Russell Lecture: Viewing the Universe with Infrared Eyes: The Spitzer Space Telescope (by Erika Nesvold)The Henry Norris Russell Award is the highest honor given by the AAS, for a lifetime of eminence in astronomy research. This years award went to Giovanni Fazio of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Fazio became a leader in gamma ray astronomy before switching mid-career to the study of infrared astronomy, and he gave his award lecture on the latter subject, specifically on the Spitzer Space Telescope, one of the most successful infrared telescopes of all time.Artists rendering of the Spitzer space telescope. [NASA/JPL-Caltech]Spitzer has been operating for more than twelve years, and has resulted in over six thousand papers in refereed journals in that time. The telescope sits in an Earth-trailing orbit around the Sun, and is now farther from the Earth (1.4 AU) than the Earth is from the Sun. Fazio gave the audience a fascinating overview of the science done by Spitzer over more than a decade. One of the most productive areas of research for Spitzer is the study of exoplanets, which hadnt even been discovered when the Spitzer Telescope was first conceived. Spitzers high sensitivity and ability to observe exoplanets over

  13. AAS 228: Day 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note: Lastweek we were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Here is a final post aboutselectedevents on the last day of the meeting, written by authors fromastrobites.com, a grad-student collaborative project with which we recently announced a new partnership! Starting in July,keep an eye out for astrobites postsat AAS Nova in between Highlights(i.e., on Tuesdays and Thursdays).Were excited to be working together to bring you more recent astronomy research from AAS journals!Extrasolar Planets: Detection (by Leonardo dos Santos)Thursdays first session on exoplanets was about detecting these distant worlds, and the opening talk was given by Robert Siverd (Las Cumbres Observatory). He describes the NRES, a network of spectrographs that will look for exoplanets using the radial velocity method. One of the coolest aspects of this instrument is that it will feature an on the fly scheduling system that will perform observations as efficiently as possible. The spectrograph is still being tested, but a unit will be deployed at CTIO later this year.@lcogt contracted by @NASA_TESS for follow up of their candidates. #aas228 Jessie Christiansen (@aussiastronomer) June 16, 2016Measuring the depths of transits and eclipses in Spitzer has been problematic in the past, since the Spitzer instrument IRAC (InfraRed Array Camera) has a non-uniform response in its detectors pixels. But, as reported by James Ingalls (Spitzer Science Center, Caltech), observers are circumventing this issue by using what they call the staring mode (avoiding large pointing jumps) and an algorithm to pick sweet spot pixels. Moreover, the results from the IRAC Data Challenge are helping to better understand its behavior. Giuseppe Morello (University College London), on the other hand, explained how his research group gets rid of instrumental effects from IRAC using machine learning. This method removes systematics from exoplanet transit data no matter if the noise source is from an instrument or

  14. AA9 and AA10: from enigmatic to essential enzymes.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Thamy Lívia Ribeiro; dos Santos, Leandro Vieira; Pereira, Gonçalo Amarante Guimarães

    2016-01-01

    The lignocellulosic biomass, comprised mainly of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, is a strong competitor for petroleum to obtain fuels and other products because of its renewable nature, low cost, and non-competitiveness with food production when obtained from agricultural waste. Due to its recalcitrance, lignocellulosic material requires an arsenal of enzymes for its deconstruction and the consequent release of fermentable sugars. In this context, enzymes currently classified as auxiliary activity 9 (AA9/formerly GH61) and 10 (AA10/formerly CBM 33) or lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMO) have emerged as cellulase boosting enzymes. AA9 and AA10 are the new paradigm for deconstruction of lignocellulosic biomass by enhancing the activity and decreasing the loading of classical enzymes to the reaction and, consequently, reducing costs of the hydrolysis step in the second-generation ethanol production chain. In view of that disclosed above, the goal of this work is to review experimental data that supports the relevance of AA9 and AA10 for the biomass deconstruction field. PMID:26476647

  15. AAS 227: Day 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 4 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Helen B. Warner Prize: Origins of Structure in Planetary Systems (by Erika Nesvold)Another excellent prize lecture started off todays sessions. The Helen B. Warner Prize is awarded for achievement in observational or theoretical astrophysics by a young researcher (no more than eight years after their Ph.D.). This years Warner Prize was presented to Ruth Murray-Clay of UC Santa Barbara. For her award lecture, Murray-Clay told us all about planetary system architecture: the number, masses, and orbits of planets in a given system.Ruth Murray-Clay [photo from http://web.physics.ucsb.edu/ ~murray/biocv.html]The underlying question motivating this type of research is: How rare is the Solar System? In other words, how likely is it that a given planetary system will have rocky planets close to their star, gas giants farther out, and ice giants at the outer reaches of the system? Answering this question will help us solve the physics problem of how and where planets form, and will also help us on our search for other planets like Earth.The data on exoplanet population from transit and radial velocity observations and from direct imaging tell us that our Solar System is not common (many systems we observe have much more eccentric gas giants), but that doesnt

  16. AAS 228: Day 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note: Lastweek we were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Here is a final post aboutselectedevents on the last day of the meeting, written by authors fromastrobites.com, a grad-student collaborative project with which we recently announced a new partnership! Starting in July,keep an eye out for astrobites postsat AAS Nova in between Highlights(i.e., on Tuesdays and Thursdays).Were excited to be working together to bring you more recent astronomy research from AAS journals!Extrasolar Planets: Detection (by Leonardo dos Santos)Thursdays first session on exoplanets was about detecting these distant worlds, and the opening talk was given by Robert Siverd (Las Cumbres Observatory). He describes the NRES, a network of spectrographs that will look for exoplanets using the radial velocity method. One of the coolest aspects of this instrument is that it will feature an on the fly scheduling system that will perform observations as efficiently as possible. The spectrograph is still being tested, but a unit will be deployed at CTIO later this year.@lcogt contracted by @NASA_TESS for follow up of their candidates. #aas228 Jessie Christiansen (@aussiastronomer) June 16, 2016Measuring the depths of transits and eclipses in Spitzer has been problematic in the past, since the Spitzer instrument IRAC (InfraRed Array Camera) has a non-uniform response in its detectors pixels. But, as reported by James Ingalls (Spitzer Science Center, Caltech), observers are circumventing this issue by using what they call the staring mode (avoiding large pointing jumps) and an algorithm to pick sweet spot pixels. Moreover, the results from the IRAC Data Challenge are helping to better understand its behavior. Giuseppe Morello (University College London), on the other hand, explained how his research group gets rid of instrumental effects from IRAC using machine learning. This method removes systematics from exoplanet transit data no matter if the noise source is from an instrument or

  17. Competition and allostery govern substrate selectivity of cyclooxygenase-2

    PubMed Central

    Mitchener, Michelle M.; Hermanson, Daniel J.; Shockley, Erin M.; Brown, H. Alex; Lindsley, Craig W.; Reese, Jeff; Rouzer, Carol A.; Lopez, Carlos F.; Marnett, Lawrence J.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) oxygenates arachidonic acid (AA) and its ester analog, 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), to prostaglandins (PGs) and prostaglandin glyceryl esters (PG-Gs), respectively. Although the efficiency of oxygenation of these substrates by COX-2 in vitro is similar, cellular biosynthesis of PGs far exceeds that of PG-Gs. Evidence that the COX enzymes are functional heterodimers suggests that competitive interaction of AA and 2-AG at the allosteric site of COX-2 might result in differential regulation of the oxygenation of the two substrates when both are present. Modulation of AA levels in RAW264.7 macrophages uncovered an inverse correlation between cellular AA levels and PG-G biosynthesis. In vitro kinetic analysis using purified protein demonstrated that the inhibition of 2-AG oxygenation by high concentrations of AA far exceeded the inhibition of AA oxygenation by high concentrations of 2-AG. An unbiased systems-based mechanistic model of the kinetic data revealed that binding of AA or 2-AG at the allosteric site of COX-2 results in a decreased catalytic efficiency of the enzyme toward 2-AG, whereas 2-AG binding at the allosteric site increases COX-2’s efficiency toward AA. The results suggest that substrates interact with COX-2 via multiple potential complexes involving binding to both the catalytic and allosteric sites. Competition between AA and 2-AG for these sites, combined with differential allosteric modulation, gives rise to a complex interplay between the substrates, leading to preferential oxygenation of AA. PMID:26392530

  18. AAS 227: Day 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 4 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Helen B. Warner Prize: Origins of Structure in Planetary Systems (by Erika Nesvold)Another excellent prize lecture started off todays sessions. The Helen B. Warner Prize is awarded for achievement in observational or theoretical astrophysics by a young researcher (no more than eight years after their Ph.D.). This years Warner Prize was presented to Ruth Murray-Clay of UC Santa Barbara. For her award lecture, Murray-Clay told us all about planetary system architecture: the number, masses, and orbits of planets in a given system.Ruth Murray-Clay [photo from http://web.physics.ucsb.edu/ ~murray/biocv.html]The underlying question motivating this type of research is: How rare is the Solar System? In other words, how likely is it that a given planetary system will have rocky planets close to their star, gas giants farther out, and ice giants at the outer reaches of the system? Answering this question will help us solve the physics problem of how and where planets form, and will also help us on our search for other planets like Earth.The data on exoplanet population from transit and radial velocity observations and from direct imaging tell us that our Solar System is not common (many systems we observe have much more eccentric gas giants), but that doesnt

  19. Structural Basis of Fatty Acid Substrate Binding to Cyclooxygenase-2*

    PubMed Central

    Vecchio, Alex J.; Simmons, Danielle M.; Malkowski, Michael G.

    2010-01-01

    The cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2) are membrane-associated heme-containing homodimers that generate prostaglandin H2 from arachidonic acid (AA). Although AA is the preferred substrate, other fatty acids are oxygenated by these enzymes with varying efficiencies. We determined the crystal structures of AA, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) bound to Co3+-protoporphyrin IX-reconstituted murine COX-2 to 2.1, 2.4, and 2.65 Å, respectively. AA, EPA, and docosahexaenoic acid bind in different conformations in each monomer constituting the homodimer in their respective structures such that one monomer exhibits nonproductive binding and the other productive binding of the substrate in the cyclooxygenase channel. The interactions identified between protein and substrate when bound to COX-1 are conserved in our COX-2 structures, with the only notable difference being the lack of interaction of the carboxylate of AA and EPA with the side chain of Arg-120. Leu-531 exhibits a different side chain conformation when the nonproductive and productive binding modes of AA are compared. Unlike COX-1, mutating this residue to Ala, Phe, Pro, or Thr did not result in a significant loss of activity or substrate binding affinity. Determination of the L531F:AA crystal structure resulted in AA binding in the same global conformation in each monomer. We speculate that the mobility of the Leu-531 side chain increases the volume available at the opening of the cyclooxygenase channel and contributes to the observed ability of COX-2 to oxygenate a broad spectrum of fatty acid and fatty ester substrates. PMID:20463020

  20. Role(s) of pretreatment, inhibitors, and other process steps that effect surface composition on the under-paint corrosion of an aluminum-copper-magnesium alloy 2024-T3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Daryl A.

    2006-12-01

    Under-paint corrosion is a surface corrosion that grows under a coating. The composition of an aluminum alloy, particularly Cu and Fe content, has a direct and dominant effect on the growth rate of filiform corrosion (FFC) and scribe-creep. The Cu and Fe content leads to formation of galvanic cells between intermetallic compounds (IMCs) or replated Cu and the aluminum-rich matrix. However, there is no model which describes scribe-creep behavior and can be used to predict the effect of material and surface pretreatment parameters such as inhibitors, chemical surface pretreatment, and alloy microstructure. Surface pretreatments and aging which control the amount of surface copper and alter IMC distributions decrease the growth rate of scribe-creep. Scribe-creep was observed to be enhanced by temperature, regardless of surface pretreatment, as well as by artificial aging and surface pretreatments. Scribe-creep was accelerated by pretreatments that increased surface copper or left a high capacity for Cu-replating such as Cu-containing IMCs. Pretreatment was rationalized to decrease the cathodic oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) rate, which supports anodic undercutting at the head of the corrosion front. In this galvanic corrosion mechanism, the scribe-creep rate will be proportional to the rate of the anodic dissolution at the head. This, in turn, is proportional to the galvanic corrosion rate. Both charge transfer controlled and mass transport controlled cathodic reaction rates occurred at the fastest rates at the scratch and tail. The charge transfer controlled cathodic reaction rate was directly proportional to the surface coverage of Cu (thetaCu) while the mass transport limited rate was a complex nonlinear function of thetaCu . Based on enhanced understanding a galvanic couple model that describes scribe-creep rates in terms of the relevant processes at the tail and head as well as ohmic voltage between the head and tail was developed in order to explain scribe-creep propagation. Utilizing a galvanic corrosion model it is possible to predict the effect of material, pretreatment, inhibitors, and physical parameters on the under-paint galvanic corrosion rate and scribe-creep rate. This can be used to predict the under-paint corrosion rate as well as help to identify and clarify methods which can be utilized to slow down the rate of under-paint corrosion.

  1. Laboratory Astrophysics Division of The AAS (LAD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salama, Farid; Drake, R. P.; Federman, S. R.; Haxton, W. C.; Savin, D. W.

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of the Laboratory Astrophysics Division (LAD) is to advance our understanding of the Universe through the promotion of fundamental theoretical and experimental research into the underlying processes that drive the Cosmos. LAD represents all areas of astrophysics and planetary sciences. The first new AAS Division in more than 30 years, the LAD traces its history back to the recommendation from the scientific community via the White Paper from the 2006 NASA-sponsored Laboratory Astrophysics Workshop. This recommendation was endorsed by the Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee (AAAC), which advises the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on selected issues within the fields of astronomy and astrophysics that are of mutual interest and concern to the agencies. In January 2007, at the 209th AAS meeting, the AAS Council set up a Steering Committee to formulate Bylaws for a Working Group on Laboratory Astrophysics (WGLA). The AAS Council formally established the WGLA with a five-year mandate in May 2007, at the 210th AAS meeting. From 2008 through 2012, the WGLA annually sponsored Meetings in-a-Meeting at the AAS Summer Meetings. In May 2011, at the 218th AAS meeting, the AAS Council voted to convert the WGLA, at the end of its mandate, into a Division of the AAS and requested draft Bylaws from the Steering Committee. In January 2012, at the 219th AAS Meeting, the AAS Council formally approved the Bylaws and the creation of the LAD. The inaugural gathering and the first business meeting of the LAD were held at the 220th AAS meeting in Anchorage in June 2012. You can learn more about LAD by visiting its website at http://lad.aas.org/ and by subscribing to its mailing list.

  2. Laboratory Astrophysics Division of the AAS (LAD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid; Drake, R. P.; Federman, S. R.; Haxton, W. C.; Savin, D. W.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the Laboratory Astrophysics Division (LAD) is to advance our understanding of the Universe through the promotion of fundamental theoretical and experimental research into the underlying processes that drive the Cosmos. LAD represents all areas of astrophysics and planetary sciences. The first new AAS Division in more than 30 years, the LAD traces its history back to the recommendation from the scientific community via the White Paper from the 2006 NASA-sponsored Laboratory Astrophysics Workshop. This recommendation was endorsed by the Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee (AAAC), which advises the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on selected issues within the fields of astronomy and astrophysics that are of mutual interest and concern to the agencies. In January 2007, at the 209th AAS meeting, the AAS Council set up a Steering Committee to formulate Bylaws for a Working Group on Laboratory Astrophysics (WGLA). The AAS Council formally established the WGLA with a five-year mandate in May 2007, at the 210th AAS meeting. From 2008 through 2012, the WGLA annually sponsored Meetings in-a-Meeting at the AAS Summer Meetings. In May 2011, at the 218th AAS meeting, the AAS Council voted to convert the WGLA, at the end of its mandate, into a Division of the AAS and requested draft Bylaws from the Steering Committee. In January 2012, at the 219th AAS Meeting, the AAS Council formally approved the Bylaws and the creation of the LAD. The inaugural gathering and the first business meeting of the LAD were held at the 220th AAS meeting in Anchorage in June 2012. You can learn more about LAD by visiting its website at http://lad.aas.org/ and by subscribing to its mailing list.

  3. Comparative study of two chitin-active and two cellulose-active AA10-type lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, Zarah; Røhr, Asmund Kjendseth; Mekasha, Sophanit; Andersson, K Kristoffer; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Vaaje-Kolstad, Gustav; Sørlie, Morten

    2014-03-18

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs), found in family 9 (previously GH61), family 10 (previously CBM33), and the newly discovered family 11 of auxiliary activities (AA) in the carbohydrate-active enzyme classification system, are copper-dependent enzymes that oxidize sp(3)-carbons in recalcitrant polysaccharides such as chitin and cellulose in the presence of an external electron donor. In this study, we describe the activity of two AA10-type LPMOs whose activities have not been described before and we compare in total four different AA10-type LPMOs with the aim of finding possible correlations between their substrate specificities, sequences, and EPR signals. EPR spectra indicate that the electronic environment of the copper varies within the AA10 family even though amino acids directly interacting with the copper atom are identical in all four enzymes. This variation seems to be correlated to substrate specificity and is likely caused by sequence variation in areas that affect substrate binding geometry and/or by variation in a cluster of conserved aromatic residues likely involved in electron transfer. Interestingly, EPR signals for cellulose-active AA10 enzymes were similar to those previously observed for cellulose-active AA9 enzymes. Mutation of the conserved phenylalanine positioned in close proximity to the copper center in AA10-type LPMOs to Tyr (the corresponding residue in most AA9-type LPMOs) or Ala, led to complete or partial inactivation, respectively, while in both cases the ability to bind copper was maintained. Moreover, substrate binding affinity and degradation ability seemed hardly correlated, further emphasizing the crucial role of the active site configuration in determining LPMO functionality. PMID:24559135

  4. Constitutive behavior of as-cast AA1050, AA3104, and AA5182

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Haaften, W. M.; Magnin, B.; Kool, W. H.; Katgerman, L.

    2002-07-01

    Recent thermomechanical modeling to calculate the stress field in industrially direct-chill (DC) cast-aluminum slabs has been successful, but lack of material data limits the accuracy of these calculations. Therefore, the constitutive behavior of three aluminum alloys (AA1050, AA3104, and AA5182) was determined in the as-cast condition using tensile tests at low strain rates and from room temperature to solidus temperature. The parameters of two constitutive equations, the extended Ludwik equation and a combination of the Sellars-Tegart equation with a hardening law, were determined. In order to study the effect of recovery, the constitutive behavior after prestraining at higher temperatures was also investigated. To evaluate the quantified constitutive equations, tensile tests were performed simulating the deformation and cooling history experienced by the material during casting. It is concluded that both constitutive equations perform well, but the combined hardening-Sellars-Tegart (HST) equation has temperature-independent parameters, which makes it easier to implement in a DC casting model. Further, the deformation history of the ingot should be taken into account for accurate stress calculations.

  5. AAS 228: Day 1 morning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Along with a team ofauthors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Come visit astrobites at the AAS booth we have swag!Things kicked off last night at our undergraduate reception booth. Thanks to all of you who stopped by we were delightedto hear from undergrads who already know and love the site, educators who want to use it in their classrooms, and students who had not yet been introduced to astrobites and were excited about a new resource!For the rest of the meeting we will be stationed at theAAS booth in the exhibit hall (booth #211-213), so drop by if you want to learn more (or pick up swag: weve got lots of stickers and sunglasses)!Mondaymorning was the official start of the meeting. Here are just a few of the talks and workshops astrobiters attended this morning.Opening Address(by Susanna Kohler)AAS President Meg Urry kicked off the meeting this morning at 8am with an overview of some of the great endeavors AAS is supporting. We astrobiters had personal motivation to drag ourselves out of bed that early: during this session, Urryannounced the new partnership between AAS and astrobites!Urry touched on some difficult topics in her welcome, including yesterdays tragedy in Orlando. Shereiteratedthe AASs support fortheCommittee for Sexual-Orientation and Gender Minorities in Astronomy (SGMA). She also reminded meeting attendees about the importance ofkeeping conference interactions professional, and pointed to the meetings anti-harassment policy.Partnership Announcement (by Michael Zevin)This morning, the American Astronomical Society announced the new partnership that it will have with Astrobites! We are beyond excited to embark on this new partnership with the

  6. Transmission of systemic AA amyloidosis in animals.

    PubMed

    Murakami, T; Ishiguro, N; Higuchi, K

    2014-03-01

    Amyloidoses are a group of protein-misfolding disorders that are characterized by the deposition of amyloid fibrils in organs and/or tissues. In reactive amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis, serum AA (SAA) protein forms deposits in mice, domestic and wild animals, and humans that experience chronic inflammation. AA amyloid fibrils are abnormal β-sheet-rich forms of the serum precursor SAA, with conformational changes that promote fibril formation. Extracellular deposition of amyloid fibrils causes disease in affected animals. Recent findings suggest that AA amyloidosis could be transmissible. Similar to the pathogenesis of transmissible prion diseases, amyloid fibrils induce a seeding-nucleation process that may lead to development of AA amyloidosis. We review studies of possible transmission in bovine, avian, mouse, and cheetah AA amyloidosis. PMID:24280941

  7. AAS 228: Day 3 afternoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Along with a team ofauthors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Wikipedia Year of Science Editathon (by Meredith Rawls)Whats your first go-to source for an unfamiliar topic on the internet? If you said Wikipedia, youre not alone. For many people, Wikipedia is the primary source of information about astronomy and science. However, many Wikipedia articles about science topics are incomplete or missing, and women are underrepresented among scientists with biographies.To address this, the AAS Astronomy Education Board teamed up with the Wiki Education Foundation to host an edit-a-thon as part of the Wikipedia Year of Science. More than forty attendees spent the better part of three hours working through tutorials, creating new articles, and editing existing ones. The session was generously sponsored by the Simons Foundation.The Year of Science initiative seeks to bring Wikipedia editing skills to the classroom and help new editors find sustainable ways to contribute to Wikipedia in the long term. Anybody can create a free account and start editing!As a first-time Wikipedia contributor, I took the time to go through nearly all the tutorial exercises and familiarize myself with the process of editing a page. I decided to flesh out one section in an existing page about asteroseismology. Others created biography pages from scratch or selected various astronomical topics to write about. To me, the editing process felt like a cross between writing a blog post and a journal article, in a hack day type environment. Working through the tutorial and some examples renewed my empathy for learners who are tackling a new skill set for the first time. A full summary of our

  8. Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis Cyt1Aa synergizes Cry11Aa toxin by functioning as a membrane-bound receptor.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Claudia; Fernandez, Luisa E; Sun, Jianguang; Folch, Jorge Luis; Gill, Sarjeet S; Soberón, Mario; Bravo, Alejandra

    2005-12-20

    Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis produces crystal proteins, Cry (4Aa, 4Ba, 10Aa, and 11Aa) and Cyt (1Aa and 2Ba) proteins, toxic to mosquito vectors of human diseases. Cyt1Aa overcomes insect resistance to Cry11Aa and Cry4 toxins and synergizes the toxicity of these toxins. However, the molecular mechanism of synergism remains unsolved. Here, we provide evidence that Cyt1Aa functions as a receptor of Cry11Aa. Sequential-binding analysis of Cyt1Aa and Cry11Aa revealed that Cyt1Aa binding to Aedes aegypti brush border membrane vesicles enhanced the binding of biotinylated-Cry11Aa. The Cyt1Aa- and Cry11Aa-binding epitopes were mapped by means of the yeast two-hybrid system, peptide arrays, and heterologous competition assays with synthetic peptides. Two exposed regions in Cyt1Aa, loop beta6-alphaE and part of beta7, bind Cry11Aa. On the other side, Cry11Aa binds Cyt1Aa proteins by means of domain II-loop alpha8 and beta-4, which are also involved in midgut receptor interaction. Characterization of single-point mutations in Cry11Aa and Cyt1Aa revealed key Cry11Aa (S259 and E266) and Cyt1Aa (K198, E204 and K225) residues involved in the interaction of both proteins and in synergism. Additionally, a Cyt1Aa loop beta6-alphaE mutant (K198A) with enhanced synergism to Cry11Aa was isolated. Data provided here strongly indicates that Cyt1Aa synergizes or suppresses resistance to Cry11Aa toxin by functioning as a membrane-bound receptor. Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis is a highly effective pathogenic bacterium because it produces a toxin and also its functional receptor, promoting toxin binding to the target membrane and causing toxicity. PMID:16339907

  9. AAS 228: Day 3 afternoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Along with a team ofauthors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Wikipedia Year of Science Editathon (by Meredith Rawls)Whats your first go-to source for an unfamiliar topic on the internet? If you said Wikipedia, youre not alone. For many people, Wikipedia is the primary source of information about astronomy and science. However, many Wikipedia articles about science topics are incomplete or missing, and women are underrepresented among scientists with biographies.To address this, the AAS Astronomy Education Board teamed up with the Wiki Education Foundation to host an edit-a-thon as part of the Wikipedia Year of Science. More than forty attendees spent the better part of three hours working through tutorials, creating new articles, and editing existing ones. The session was generously sponsored by the Simons Foundation.The Year of Science initiative seeks to bring Wikipedia editing skills to the classroom and help new editors find sustainable ways to contribute to Wikipedia in the long term. Anybody can create a free account and start editing!As a first-time Wikipedia contributor, I took the time to go through nearly all the tutorial exercises and familiarize myself with the process of editing a page. I decided to flesh out one section in an existing page about asteroseismology. Others created biography pages from scratch or selected various astronomical topics to write about. To me, the editing process felt like a cross between writing a blog post and a journal article, in a hack day type environment. Working through the tutorial and some examples renewed my empathy for learners who are tackling a new skill set for the first time. A full summary of our

  10. Interface Formation During Fusion™ Casting of AA3003/AA4045 Aluminum Alloy Ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Ciano, Massimo; Caron, E. J. F. R.; Weckman, D. C.; Wells, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Fusion™ casting is a unique Direct Chill continuous casting process whereby two different alloys can be cast simultaneously, producing a laminated ingot for rolling into clad sheet metal such as AA3003/AA4045 brazing sheet. Better understanding of the wetting and interface formation process during Fusion™ casting is required to further improve process yields and also explore use of other alloy systems for new applications. In this research, AA3003-core/AA4045-clad ingots were cast using a well-instrumented lab-scale Fusion™ casting system. As-cast Fusion™ interfaces were examined metallurgically and by mechanical testing. Computational fluid dynamic analyses of the FusionTM casts were also performed. It was shown that the liquid AA4045-clad alloy was able to successfully wet and create an oxide-free, metallurgical, and mechanically sound interface with the lightly oxidized AA3003-core shell material. Based on the results of this study, it is proposed that the bond formation process at the alloys interface during casting is a result of discrete penetration of AA4045 liquid at defects in the preexisting AA3003 oxide, dissolution of underlying AA3003 by liquid AA4045, and subsequent bridging between penetration sites. Spot exudation on the AA3003 chill cast surface due to remelting and inverse segregation may also improve the wetting and bonding process.

  11. AAS 228: Day 1 morning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Along with a team ofauthors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Come visit astrobites at the AAS booth we have swag!Things kicked off last night at our undergraduate reception booth. Thanks to all of you who stopped by we were delightedto hear from undergrads who already know and love the site, educators who want to use it in their classrooms, and students who had not yet been introduced to astrobites and were excited about a new resource!For the rest of the meeting we will be stationed at theAAS booth in the exhibit hall (booth #211-213), so drop by if you want to learn more (or pick up swag: weve got lots of stickers and sunglasses)!Mondaymorning was the official start of the meeting. Here are just a few of the talks and workshops astrobiters attended this morning.Opening Address(by Susanna Kohler)AAS President Meg Urry kicked off the meeting this morning at 8am with an overview of some of the great endeavors AAS is supporting. We astrobiters had personal motivation to drag ourselves out of bed that early: during this session, Urryannounced the new partnership between AAS and astrobites!Urry touched on some difficult topics in her welcome, including yesterdays tragedy in Orlando. Shereiteratedthe AASs support fortheCommittee for Sexual-Orientation and Gender Minorities in Astronomy (SGMA). She also reminded meeting attendees about the importance ofkeeping conference interactions professional, and pointed to the meetings anti-harassment policy.Partnership Announcement (by Michael Zevin)This morning, the American Astronomical Society announced the new partnership that it will have with Astrobites! We are beyond excited to embark on this new partnership with the

  12. AA amyloidosis in vaccinated growing chickens.

    PubMed

    Murakami, T; Inoshima, Y; Sakamoto, E; Fukushi, H; Sakai, H; Yanai, T; Ishiguro, N

    2013-01-01

    Systemic amyloid-A (AA) amyloidosis in birds occurs most frequently in waterfowl such as Pekin ducks. In chickens, AA amyloidosis is observed as amyloid arthropathy. Outbreaks of systemic amyloidosis in flocks of layers are known to be induced by repeated inflammatory stimulation, such as those resulting from multiple vaccinations with oil-emulsified bacterins. Outbreaks of fatal AA amyloidosis were observed in growing chickens in a large scale poultry farm within 3 weeks of vaccination with multiple co-administered vaccines. This study documents the histopathological changes in tissues from these birds. Amyloid deposits were also observed at a high rate in the tissues of apparently healthy chickens. Vaccination should therefore be considered as a potential risk factor for the development of AA amyloidosis in poultry. PMID:23570943

  13. AAS 228: Day 3 morning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Along with a team ofauthors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Plenary Session 2015 Newton Lacy Pierce Prize Lecture: The Elephant in the Room: Effects of Distant, Massive Companions on Planetary System Architectures (by Leonardo dos Santos)The first session on Wednesday at 228th AAS Meeting was the Newton Lacy Pierce Prize Lecture by Heather Knutson (California Institute of Technology). This talk featured a broad range of research efforts on exoplanets, with the main focus on how we study the composition of their atmospheres, and how multi-body interactions carve the structure of the planetary systems we observe.One of her first points is the well-known idea that the Solar System is an oddball, compared to the exoplanet systems we have found so far: most of these systems contain hot Jupiters and mini-Neptunes at very close-in orbits around their host stars. Moreover, even when studying their transmission spectra, it is difficult to know the exact composition of their atmospheres.Knutson: it is difficult to constrain atmospheric composition of exoplanets (H-poor or H-rich+clouds?) #aas228pic.twitter.com/LdyN4o9RC7 astrobites (@astrobites) June 15, 2016The main proposal on how these systems formed is the migration scenario. In order to validate this idea, Dr. Knutson and her group The Friends of Hot Jupiters study systems with close-in gas giants and their frequency of binary companions, which are supposed to be the main culprits causing gas-giant migration. They found that approximately half of the observed systems have long-distance companions, providing strong validation of the migration scenario. Moreover, Dr. Knutson speculates that wide binaries have more

  14. AAS 228: Day 3 morning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Along with a team ofauthors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Plenary Session 2015 Newton Lacy Pierce Prize Lecture: The Elephant in the Room: Effects of Distant, Massive Companions on Planetary System Architectures (by Leonardo dos Santos)The first session on Wednesday at 228th AAS Meeting was the Newton Lacy Pierce Prize Lecture by Heather Knutson (California Institute of Technology). This talk featured a broad range of research efforts on exoplanets, with the main focus on how we study the composition of their atmospheres, and how multi-body interactions carve the structure of the planetary systems we observe.One of her first points is the well-known idea that the Solar System is an oddball, compared to the exoplanet systems we have found so far: most of these systems contain hot Jupiters and mini-Neptunes at very close-in orbits around their host stars. Moreover, even when studying their transmission spectra, it is difficult to know the exact composition of their atmospheres.Knutson: it is difficult to constrain atmospheric composition of exoplanets (H-poor or H-rich+clouds?) #aas228pic.twitter.com/LdyN4o9RC7 astrobites (@astrobites) June 15, 2016The main proposal on how these systems formed is the migration scenario. In order to validate this idea, Dr. Knutson and her group The Friends of Hot Jupiters study systems with close-in gas giants and their frequency of binary companions, which are supposed to be the main culprits causing gas-giant migration. They found that approximately half of the observed systems have long-distance companions, providing strong validation of the migration scenario. Moreover, Dr. Knutson speculates that wide binaries have more

  15. The Changing Shape of the AAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyce, P. B.

    1995-12-01

    What is the astronomical workforce like? Where do astronomers work? How old are they? How permanent are their jobs? As we move into a period of increased uncertainty in federal funding for science it is important to know the answers to these questions. There are four sources of information for answers: 1. Information from the AAS membership database. 2. A survey of the AAS membership. 3. Surveys of samples of the AAS membership by AIP. 4. Information from the NRC and NSF. We have gender and age data from 1. A survey of the AAS membershWe will have age and gender data from 1. We will complete and analyze a new membersip survey shortly. The latest AIP data is from 1994. They will do a new sample in 1996. Much of the NRC data is aggregated with physics, and that does not give information about astronomers. Nevertheless, we do have some interesting information. The ages and genders of AAS members are available for 1972, 1990 and 1995. The time sequence provides an interesting look at the AAS. For instance, from 1990 to 1995 the number of women in each 5-year age group below the the age of 65 increased. Contrary to popular perception, women are not leaving the Society as they get older. However, the number of men actually decreased in each age group above the age of 35. This and other interesting trends will be discussed.

  16. AAS 228: Day 1 afternoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Along with a team ofauthors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Plenary Session: From Space Archeology to Serving the World Today: A 20-year Journey from the Jungles of Guatemala to a Network of Satellite Remote Sensing Facilities Around the World(by Michael Zevin)In the conferences second plenary session, NASAs Daniel Irwin turned the eyes of the conference back to Earth by highlighting the huge impact that NASA missions play in protecting and developing our own planet.Daniel Irwin: using satellite imagery to detect differences in vegetation and find ancient Mayan cities. #aas228 pic.twitter.com/9LFPQdCHTM astrobites (@astrobites) June 13, 2016Irwin came to be involved in NASA through his work mapping Guatemalan jungles, where he would spend 22 days at a time exploring the treacherous jungles on foot armed with a 1st generation GPS, a compass, and a machete. A colleague introduced Irwin to the satellite imagery thathe was exploring, demonstratinghow these images are a strong complement to field work. The sharing of this satellite data with nearby villages helped to show the encroachment of agriculture and the necessity of connecting space to the village. Satellite imagery also played a role in archeological endeavors, uncovering dozens of Mayan cities that have been buried for over a millennia by vegetation, and it provided evidence that the fall of the Mayan civilization may have been due to massive deforestation that ledto drought.Glacial retreat in Chile imaged by ISERV.Irwin displayed the constellation of NASAs Earth-monitoring satellites that have played an integral role in conserving our planet and alerting the world of natural disasters. He also showed

  17. AAS 228: Day 1 afternoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Along with a team ofauthors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Plenary Session: From Space Archeology to Serving the World Today: A 20-year Journey from the Jungles of Guatemala to a Network of Satellite Remote Sensing Facilities Around the World(by Michael Zevin)In the conferences second plenary session, NASAs Daniel Irwin turned the eyes of the conference back to Earth by highlighting the huge impact that NASA missions play in protecting and developing our own planet.Daniel Irwin: using satellite imagery to detect differences in vegetation and find ancient Mayan cities. #aas228 pic.twitter.com/9LFPQdCHTM astrobites (@astrobites) June 13, 2016Irwin came to be involved in NASA through his work mapping Guatemalan jungles, where he would spend 22 days at a time exploring the treacherous jungles on foot armed with a 1st generation GPS, a compass, and a machete. A colleague introduced Irwin to the satellite imagery thathe was exploring, demonstratinghow these images are a strong complement to field work. The sharing of this satellite data with nearby villages helped to show the encroachment of agriculture and the necessity of connecting space to the village. Satellite imagery also played a role in archeological endeavors, uncovering dozens of Mayan cities that have been buried for over a millennia by vegetation, and it provided evidence that the fall of the Mayan civilization may have been due to massive deforestation that ledto drought.Glacial retreat in Chile imaged by ISERV.Irwin displayed the constellation of NASAs Earth-monitoring satellites that have played an integral role in conserving our planet and alerting the world of natural disasters. He also showed

  18. Intermolecular interaction between Cry2Aa and Cyt1Aa and its effect on larvicidal activity against Culex quinquefasciatus.

    PubMed

    Bideshi, Dennis K; Waldrop, Greer; Fernandez-Luna, Maria Teresa; Diaz-Mendoza, Mercedes; Wirth, Margaret C; Johnson, Jeffrey J; Park, Hyun-Woo; Federici, Brian A

    2013-08-01

    The Cyt1Aa protein of Bacillus thuringiensis susbp. israelensis elaborates demonstrable toxicity to mosquito larvae, but more importantly, it enhances the larvicidal activity of this species Cry proteins (Cry11Aa, Cry4Aa, and Cry4Ba) and delays the phenotypic expression of resistance to these that has evolved in Culex quinquefasciatus. It is also known that Cyt1Aa, which is highly lipophilic, synergizes Cry11Aa by functioning as a surrogate membrane-bound receptor for the latter protein. Little is known, however, about whether Cyt1Aa can interact similarly with other Cry proteins not primarily mosquitocidal; for example, Cry2Aa, which is active against lepidopteran larvae, but essentially inactive or has very low toxicity to mosquito larvae. Here we demonstrate by ligand binding and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays that Cyt1Aa and Cry2Aa form intermolecular complexes in vitro, and in addition show that Cyt1Aa facilitates binding of Cry2Aa throughout the midgut of C. quinquefasciatus larvae. As Cry2Aa and Cry11Aa share structural similarity in domain II, the interaction between Cyt1Aa and Cry2Aa could be a result of a similar mechanism previously proposed for Cry11Aa and Cyt1Aa. Finally, despite the observed interaction between Cry2Aa and Cyt1Aa, only a 2-fold enhancement in toxicity resulted against C. quinquefasciatus. Regardless, our results suggest that Cry2Aa could be a useful component of mosquitocidal endotoxin complements being developed for recombinant strains of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis and B. sphaericus aimed at improving the efficacy of commercial products and avoiding resistance. PMID:23727800

  19. Mechanism of corrosion inhibition of AA2024 by rare-earth compounds.

    PubMed

    Yasakau, Kiryl A; Zheludkevich, Mikhail L; Lamaka, Sviatlana V; Ferreira, Mario G S

    2006-03-23

    The mechanism of corrosion protection of the widely used 2024-T3 aluminum alloy by cerium and lanthanum inhibitors in chloride media is described in detail in the present work. The corrosion process was investigated by means of scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy (SKPFM), in situ atomic force microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy. Employment of the high-resolution and in situ techniques results in a deep understanding of the details of the physical chemistry and mechanisms of the corrosion processes. The applicability of the SKPFM for mechanistic analysis of the effect of different corrosion inhibitors is demonstrated for the first time. The inhibitors under study show sufficient hindering of the localized corrosion processes especially in the case of pitting formation located around the intermetallic S-phase particles. The main role of Ce(3+) and La(3+) in the corrosion protection is formation of hydroxide deposits on S-phase inclusions buffering the local increase of pH, which is responsible for the acceleration of the intermetallics dealloying. The formed hydroxide precipitates can also act as a diffusion barrier hindering the corrosion processes in active zones. Cerium nitrate exhibits higher inhibition efficiency in comparison with lanthanum nitrate. The higher effect in the case of cerium is obtained due to lower solubility of the respective hydroxide. A detailed mechanism of the corrosion process and its inhibition is proposed based on thermodynamic analysis. PMID:16539491

  20. Direct-Chill Co-Casting of AA3003/AA4045 Aluminum Ingots via Fusion™ Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron, Etienne J. F. R.; Pelayo, Rosa E. Ortega; Baserinia, Amir R.; Wells, Mary A.; Weckman, David C.; Barker, Simon; Gallerneault, Mark

    2014-06-01

    Laboratory-scale experiments were conducted to cast AA3003/AA4045 clad ingots via Fusion™ Technology, a novel process developed by Novelis Inc. for the production of aluminum clad materials such as brazing sheet. Experimental results were used to validate a steady-state thermofluids model of the Fusion™ Technology co-casting process. The numerical model was able to accurately predict the temperature field within the AA3003/AA4045 clad ingot as well as the shape of the AA3003 liquid sump. The model was also used to quantify the temperature, fraction solid, and velocity fields in a clad ingot cast with an asymmetrical molten metal-feeding system. Feeding of core and clad molten metals at opposite corners of the mold was found to reduce the risks of hot spots and liquid metal breakthrough from the core sump to the clad side of the Fusion™ Technology mold. The use of a diffuser for the AA3003 core molten metal and of a vertical feeding tube for the AA4045 clad produced different flow patterns and liquid sump shapes on either side of the mold. The quality of the metallurgical bond at the core/clad interface appeared good near the clad inlet and at the ingot centerline, but poor near the edges of the ingot. SEM-EDS analysis of the chemical composition across the interface showed that a 1 to 20- μm-deep penetration of silicon from the AA4045 clad into the AA3003 core had occurred at visually acceptable interfaces, whereas silicon diffusion across poor interfaces was very limited. A study of the model-predicted fraction solid history at different points along the interface indicated that reheating of the AA3003 core is not required to form a visually acceptable metallurgical bond. However, a sufficient amount of interaction time between the solid AA3003 core shell and the silicon-rich AA4045 clad liquid is required to chemically dissolve the surface of the core and form a good metallurgical bond. An approximate dissolution depth of 750 to 1000 μm was observed along

  1. The Strica Homolog AaCASPS16 Is Involved in Apoptosis in the Yellow Fever Vector, Aedes albopictus

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Kun; Li, Xiaomei; Wang, Shengya; Zhong, Chunyan; Yang, Zhouning; Feng, Lingyan; Liu, Qingzhen

    2016-01-01

    Caspases are a family of cysteine proteases playing essential roles during apoptosis. Seven caspases identified in Drosophila were Dronc, Dredd, Strica, Dcp-1, Decay, Drice and Damm. Among them, Strica is an insect-specific caspase containing a long serine- and threonine- rich prodomain, of which function is not yet well studied. Here we identified a homolog of strica from Aedes albopictus, named as Aacasps16. Aacasps16 encoded a protein containing a putative serine- and threonine-rich prodomain and a well conserved caspase catalytic domain. AaCASPS16 shared high identity with dipteran insects Strica homologs. Alignment showed that the closest relative of AaCASPS16 was Aedes aegypti AeCASPS16. The expression profiles of Aacasps16 during developmental and adult stages were analyzed. Purified recombinant AaCASPS16 exhibited the highest caspase activity to WEHD, which is the substrate preferred by human caspase-9. AaCASPS16 induced apoptosis when over-expressed in C6/36 cells. AaCASPS16 was processed during apoptosis induced by actinomycin D and ultraviolet irradiation treatment, whereas partial silencing of Aacasps16 reduced actinomycin D- and ultraviolet irradiation-triggered apoptosis in C6/36 cells. Taken together, our study identified AaCASPS16 as a novel apoptotic caspase in Aedes albopictus. PMID:27351972

  2. Detection of AA76, a Common Form of Amyloid A Protein, as a Way of Diagnosing AA Amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Junji; Okuda, Yasuaki; Kuroda, Takeshi; Yamada, Toshiyuki

    2016-03-01

    Reactive amyloid deposits consist of amyloid A (AA) proteins, the degradation products of serum amyloid A (SAA). Since the most common species of AA is the amino terminal portion produced by cleavage between residues 76 and 77 of SAA (AA76), the presence of AA76 in tissues could be a consequence of AA amyloid deposition. This study assessed the diagnostic significance of the detection of AA76 for AA amyloidosis using two different approaches. Biopsy specimens (n=130 from 54 subjects) from gastroduodenal mucosa or abdominal fat (n=9 from 9 subjects) of patients who had already been diagnosed with or were suspected of having AA amyloidosis were used. Fixed mucosal sections were subjected to immunohistochemistry using a newly developed antibody recognizing the carboxyl terminal end of AA76 (anti-AA76). The non-fixed materials from gastroduodenal mucosa or abdominal fat were subjected to immunoblotting for detection of the size of AA76. Among the gastroduodenal specimens (n=115) from already diagnosed patients, the positive rates of Congo red staining, immunohistochemistry using anti-AA76, and immunoblotting were 68.4%, 73.0%, and 92.2%, respectively. The anti-AA76 did not stain the supposed SAA in the blood or leakage, which was stained by anti-SAA antibody. AA76 was not detected either by immunohistochemistry or by immunoblot in the materials from patients in whom AA amyloidosis had been ruled out. In the abdominal fat, the immunoblot detected AA76 in 8 materials from 8 already diagnosed patients and did not in 1 patient whose gastroduodenal mucosa was negative. In conclusion, the detection of AA76 may alter the ability to diagnose AA amyloidosis. In immunohistochemistry for fixed specimens, the new anti-AA76 antibody can improve the specificity. Immunoblot for non-fixed materials, which can considerably improve the sensitivity, should be beneficial for small materials like abdominal fat. PMID:27098620

  3. MDCT evaluation of acute aortic syndrome (AAS).

    PubMed

    Valente, Tullio; Rossi, Giovanni; Lassandro, Francesco; Rea, Gaetano; Marino, Maurizio; Muto, Maurizio; Molino, Antonio; Scaglione, Mariano

    2016-05-01

    Non-traumatic acute thoracic aortic syndromes (AAS) describe a spectrum of life-threatening aortic pathologies with significant implications on diagnosis, therapy and management. There is a common pathway for the various manifestations of AAS that eventually leads to a breakdown of the aortic intima and media. Improvements in biology and health policy and diffusion of technology into the community resulted in an associated decrease in mortality and morbidity related to aortic therapeutic interventions. Hybrid procedures, branched and fenestrated endografts, and percutaneous aortic valves have emerged as potent and viable alternatives to traditional surgeries. In this context, current state-of-the art multidetector CT (MDCT) is actually the gold standard in the emergency setting because of its intrinsic diagnostic value. Management of acute aortic disease has changed with the increasing realization that endovascular therapies may offer distinct advantages in these situations. This article provides a summary of AAS, focusing especially on the MDCT technique, typical and atypical findings and common pitfalls of AAS, as well as recent concepts regarding the subtypes of AAS, consisting of aortic dissection, intramural haematoma, penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer and unstable aortic aneurysm or contained aortic rupture. MDCT findings will be related to pathophysiology, timing and management options to achieve a definite and timely diagnostic and therapeutic definition. In the present article, we review the aetiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, outcomes and therapeutic approaches to acute aortic syndromes. PMID:27033344

  4. AAS 228: Day 2 afternoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Along with a team ofauthors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.The Limits of Scientific Cosmology: Setting the Stage: Accepted Facts, and Testing Limitations in Theory and Data (by Gourav Khullar)With a stellar lineup of speakers to talk about current and future prospects of cosmology and its limits (or lack thereof), the first session kicked off with talks by Risa Wechsler, Joseph Silk, and Sean Carroll (his talk on Multiverses is described below, by Nathan Sanders). Risa set the stage with an elaborate description of the current accepted facts in the era of precision cosmology including the standard model of concordance cosmology, described by seven parameters and an accepted Lambda-CDM paradigm (with a cosmological constant and cold dark matter). The talk stressed on the fact that all these parameters are understood to a percent order precision, which is a remarkable deviation from the time in 1990s when according to Risa, Alan Guth never thought that any of these numbers could be measured precisely!Risa Wechsler describing our current constraints on what Dark Matter could constitute.Joseph Silk discussing limits on cosmological parameters.The CMB measurements, Big Bang Nucleosynthesis estimates and galaxy clustering statistics all contribute to locking down the description of our universe. She emphasized on the tensions between different probes to measure expansion rate H0 of the universe, and small scale predictions of cold dark matter simulations, but she is hopeful that these shall be resolved eventually. Joe Silk followed this up with his interpretation of trying to understand our place in the universe and placing limits on different parameters and

  5. AAS 228: Day 2 afternoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Along with a team ofauthors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.The Limits of Scientific Cosmology: Setting the Stage: Accepted Facts, and Testing Limitations in Theory and Data (by Gourav Khullar)With a stellar lineup of speakers to talk about current and future prospects of cosmology and its limits (or lack thereof), the first session kicked off with talks by Risa Wechsler, Joseph Silk, and Sean Carroll (his talk on Multiverses is described below, by Nathan Sanders). Risa set the stage with an elaborate description of the current accepted facts in the era of precision cosmology including the standard model of concordance cosmology, described by seven parameters and an accepted Lambda-CDM paradigm (with a cosmological constant and cold dark matter). The talk stressed on the fact that all these parameters are understood to a percent order precision, which is a remarkable deviation from the time in 1990s when according to Risa, Alan Guth never thought that any of these numbers could be measured precisely!Risa Wechsler describing our current constraints on what Dark Matter could constitute.Joseph Silk discussing limits on cosmological parameters.The CMB measurements, Big Bang Nucleosynthesis estimates and galaxy clustering statistics all contribute to locking down the description of our universe. She emphasized on the tensions between different probes to measure expansion rate H0 of the universe, and small scale predictions of cold dark matter simulations, but she is hopeful that these shall be resolved eventually. Joe Silk followed this up with his interpretation of trying to understand our place in the universe and placing limits on different parameters and

  6. AAS 228: Day 2 morning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Along with a team ofauthors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Plenary Session (Day 1) The Galaxy Zoo(by Benny Tsang)Galaxy Zoo was so hot that the servers hosting the galaxy images got melted down soon after being launched.Kevin Schawinski from ETH Zurich took us on a tour ofhis wonderful Galaxy Zoo. It is a huge zoo with about a quarter million zookeepers, they are citizen astronomers who collaboratively classify galaxies by their looks as an attempt to understand galaxy evolution. The big question that is being answered is: how do blue, actively star-forming galaxies evolve into red, quiescent (non-star-forming) galaxies? The Zoo helped reveal that blue galaxies turn into red galaxies via two possible paths galaxies might run out of supply of gas and shut off star formation slowly; or they could merge with one another and turn off star formation by destroying the gas reservoir rapidly!The Galaxy Zoo project also led to the discoveries of:Green Peas: they are the living fossils of galaxy evolution; compact, bright, green galaxies that are actively forming starsOverlapping galaxies: they are pairs of galaxies that are separated physically but happen to lie on the same line of sight; they provide excellent laboratories for studying dust extinctionHannys Voorwerp: an unusual object named after Hanny the discoverer, which is believed to be the first detection of quasar light echoThe idea of Galaxy Zoo in getting help from citizen scientists was further extended into an award-winningproject known as the Zooniverse, which is an online platform for streamlined crowd-sourcing for scientific research that requires human input. The future of astronomy is going to be

  7. Degradation Modeling of 2024 Aluminum Alloy During Corrosion Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pidaparti, Ramana M.; Aghazadeh, Babak Seyed

    2011-04-01

    Corrosion is one of the most damaging mechanisms in aluminum alloys used in aerospace engineering structures. In this article, the degradation behavior of AA 2024-T3 as a function of time under corrosive conditions is studied through experiments and modeling. Corrosion experiments were conducted on AA 2024-T3 specimens under controlled electrochemical conditions. The chemical element alloy map was investigated through EDS technique for evaluation purposes. Based on the experimental data, an analytical model is developed relating the material loss to the degradation during the corrosion process. The analytical model uses genetic algorithms (GAs) to map the relationship through optimization. The results obtained from GAs were compared with a standard non-linear regression model. The results obtained indicate that a quadratic relationship exists in time between the material loss due to corrosion and the degradation behavior of the alloy. Based on the good results obtained, the present approach of degradation modeling can be extended to other metals.

  8. The AAS: Its Next 100 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, S.

    1999-05-01

    The AAS: Its Next Hundred Years "We are probably nearing the limit of all we can know about astronomy."-- Simon Newcomb, 1888. The best way to celebrate the centennial of the AAS is to look forward, not backward, and to begin planning for the next 100 years. However, predicting the future is even more difficult than it was in Newcomb's time. We live in an era characterized by an unprecedented rate of change in the kinds of scientific questions we ask, the tools we use to answer them, and the way we communicate our results. This talk will highlight some of the issues that we will face as a community during the next 10--but not the next 100!--years and suggests that the AAS has a fundamental role to play in shaping the community response to these issues.

  9. AAS 228: Day 2 morning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Along with a team ofauthors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Plenary Session (Day 1) The Galaxy Zoo(by Benny Tsang)Galaxy Zoo was so hot that the servers hosting the galaxy images got melted down soon after being launched.Kevin Schawinski from ETH Zurich took us on a tour ofhis wonderful Galaxy Zoo. It is a huge zoo with about a quarter million zookeepers, they are citizen astronomers who collaboratively classify galaxies by their looks as an attempt to understand galaxy evolution. The big question that is being answered is: how do blue, actively star-forming galaxies evolve into red, quiescent (non-star-forming) galaxies? The Zoo helped reveal that blue galaxies turn into red galaxies via two possible paths galaxies might run out of supply of gas and shut off star formation slowly; or they could merge with one another and turn off star formation by destroying the gas reservoir rapidly!The Galaxy Zoo project also led to the discoveries of:Green Peas: they are the living fossils of galaxy evolution; compact, bright, green galaxies that are actively forming starsOverlapping galaxies: they are pairs of galaxies that are separated physically but happen to lie on the same line of sight; they provide excellent laboratories for studying dust extinctionHannys Voorwerp: an unusual object named after Hanny the discoverer, which is believed to be the first detection of quasar light echoThe idea of Galaxy Zoo in getting help from citizen scientists was further extended into an award-winningproject known as the Zooniverse, which is an online platform for streamlined crowd-sourcing for scientific research that requires human input. The future of astronomy is going to be

  10. Power electronics substrate for direct substrate cooling

    DOEpatents

    Le, Khiet; Ward, Terence G.; Mann, Brooks S.; Yankoski, Edward P.; Smith, Gregory S.

    2012-05-01

    Systems and apparatus are provided for power electronics substrates adapted for direct substrate cooling. A power electronics substrate comprises a first surface configured to have electrical circuitry disposed thereon, a second surface, and a plurality of physical features on the second surface. The physical features are configured to promote a turbulent boundary layer in a coolant impinged upon the second surface.

  11. 7 CFR 51.596 - U.S. Grade AA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Celery Stalks Grades § 51.596 U.S. Grade AA. U.S. Grade AA shall consist of stalks of celery of similar varietal characteristics, which are...

  12. 7 CFR 51.596 - U.S. Grade AA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Celery Stalks Grades § 51.596 U.S. Grade AA. U.S. Grade AA shall consist of stalks of celery of similar varietal characteristics, which are...

  13. 7 CFR 51.596 - U.S. Grade AA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Consumer Standards for Celery Stalks Grades § 51.596 U.S. Grade AA. U.S. Grade AA shall consist of stalks of celery of similar varietal characteristics, which are well developed, and have good...

  14. 7 CFR 51.596 - U.S. Grade AA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Consumer Standards for Celery Stalks Grades § 51.596 U.S. Grade AA. U.S. Grade AA shall consist of stalks of celery of similar varietal characteristics, which are well developed, and have good...

  15. 7 CFR 51.596 - U.S. Grade AA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false U.S. Grade AA. 51.596 Section 51.596 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Consumer Standards for Celery Stalks Grades § 51.596 U.S. Grade AA. U.S. Grade AA shall consist of...

  16. Systemic AA amyloidosis: epidemiology, diagnosis, and management

    PubMed Central

    Real de Asúa, Diego; Costa, Ramón; Galván, Jose María; Filigheddu, María Teresa; Trujillo, Davinia; Cadiñanos, Julen

    2014-01-01

    The term “amyloidosis” encompasses the heterogeneous group of diseases caused by the extracellular deposition of autologous fibrillar proteins. The global incidence of amyloidosis is estimated at five to nine cases per million patient-years. While amyloid light-chain (AL) amyloidosis is more frequent in developed countries, amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis is more common in some European regions and in developing countries. The spectrum of AA amyloidosis has changed in recent decades owing to: an increase in the median age at diagnosis; a percent increase in the frequency of primary AL amyloidosis with respect to the AA type; and a substantial change in the epidemiology of the underlying diseases. Diagnosis of amyloidosis is based on clinical organ involvement and histological evidence of amyloid deposits. Among the many tinctorial characteristics of amyloid deposits, avidity for Congo red and metachromatic birefringence under unidirectional polarized light remain the gold standard. Once the initial diagnosis has been made, the amyloid subtype must be identified and systemic organ involvement evaluated. In this sense, the 123I-labeled serum amyloid P component scintigraphy is a safe and noninvasive technique that has revolutionized the diagnosis and monitoring of treatment in systemic amyloidosis. It can successfully identify anatomical patterns of amyloid deposition throughout the body and enables not only an initial estimation of prognosis, but also the monitoring of the course of the disease and the response to treatment. Given the etiologic diversity of AA amyloidosis, common therapeutic strategies are scarce. All treatment options should be based upon a greater control of the underlying disease, adequate organ support, and treatment of symptoms. Nevertheless, novel therapeutic strategies targeting the formation of amyloid fibrils and amyloid deposition may generate new expectations for patients with AA amyloidosis. PMID:25378951

  17. Processing and Optimization of Dissimilar Friction Stir Welding of AA 2219 and AA 7039 Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkateswarlu, D.; Nageswara rao, P.; Mahapatra, M. M.; Harsha, S. P.; Mandal, N. R.

    2015-12-01

    The present paper discusses the optimization of dissimilar friction stir welding of AA 2219 and AA 7039 alloys with respect to tool design issues including microstructural study of weld. The optimized ultimate tensile strength was ~280 MPa, and % elongation was ~11.5. It was observed that the extent of tool shoulder flat surface and tool rotational speed influenced the weld quality significantly. A mathematical model was also developed using response surface regression analysis to predict the effects of tool geometry and process variables on dissimilar AA 2219 and AA 7039 alloys welds. The microstructure evolution and mechanical properties were investigated by employing electron backscatter diffraction technique, Vickers microhardness, and tensile testing, respectively. The microstructural observations indicated that the grain size obtained at advancing side (AA 2219 alloy side) was much finer compared to the retreating side (AA 7039 alloy side). Hardness distribution in the stir zone was inhomogeneous, which might be due to inadequate mixing of weld zone material. The hardness values observed at the weld zone were lower than that in the base materials.

  18. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Aa of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA A Appendix A to Subpart AA of Part 63 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants From Phosphoric Acid Manufacturing Plants Pt. 63, Subpt. AA, App. A Appendix A to Subpart AA of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA 40...

  19. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Aa of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA A Appendix A to Subpart AA of Part 63 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants From Phosphoric Acid Manufacturing Plants Pt. 63, Subpt. AA, App. A Appendix A to Subpart AA of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA 40...

  20. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Aa of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA A Appendix A to Subpart AA of Part 63 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants From Phosphoric Acid Manufacturing Plants Pt. 63, Subpt. AA, App. A Appendix A to Subpart AA of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA 40...

  1. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Aa of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA A Appendix A to Subpart AA of Part 63 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants From Phosphoric Acid Manufacturing Plants Pt. 63, Subpt. AA, App. A Appendix A to Subpart AA of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA 40...

  2. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Aa of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA A Appendix A to Subpart AA of Part 63 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants From Phosphoric Acid Manufacturing Plants Pt. 63, Subpt. AA, App. A Appendix A to Subpart AA of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA 40...

  3. Colchicine use in isolated renal AA amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Meneses, Carlos F; Egües, César A; Uriarte, Miren; Belzunegui, Joaquín; Rezola, Marta

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 45-year-old woman, with two-year history of chronic renal insufficiency and proteinuria. A kidney biopsy showed the presence of AA amyloidosis (positive Congo red staining and immunohistochemistry). There was no evidence of amyloid deposits in other organs and there was no underlying disease. AA amyloidosis normally is secondary to chronic inflammatory or infectious diseases. High levels of IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-α play a role in the pathogenesis of amyloidosis and induce the synthesis of serum amyloid A protein (SAA), a precursor of tissue amyloid deposits. We empirically treated the patient with a low dose colchicine. The patient responded well. Colchicine has been used for the treatment of Familiar Mediterranean Fever and related auto-inflammatory diseases. To monitor treatment responses, we measured SAA finding low titers. Soon after treatment onset there were signs of improvement pertaining to proteinuria and stabilization of renal function. PMID:25453598

  4. The Effectiveness of the AAS REU Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, M. K.; Boyce, P. B.; Milkey, R. W.

    1996-05-01

    In an attempt to address the particular needs of astronomy faculty and undergraduate students, in 1991 the Education Office of the American Astronomical Society approached the National Science Foundation with a unique proposal for funding through the Research Experiences for Undergraduates program. The goals of the AAS program were to "slow the hemorrhage of students out of science...", extend the REU program to non-NSF-funded scientists, to reach under-represented women and minority students particularly in small educational institutions, and to encourage research scientists there to mentor students. As this grant has now expired, the AAS has surveyed the 44 mentors and their students to assess the program's effect on the mentor and the mentor's career; the educational institution; and the student's education and career choices. More than half the mentors responded by the abstract deadline. The program clearly had an effect upon the individuals involved. The greatest effect (in 85% of the cases) was to develop more interest in the mentor's research project both among the students and among the mentor's faculty colleagues. The mentors rated the grant to be a medium or strong factor in their student's decision to pursue graduate study, which 90% of them did. All but one of the AAS-REU students attended an AAS meeting and 3/4 of those gave a paper on their project research. Over 90% of the mentors felt that the research experience strongly promoted a greater interest in science, a greater understanding of science and a desire to continue in science. According to the mentors, this was a very positive and beneficial program for the students as well as for themselves.

  5. AAS Publishing News: Astronomical Software Citation Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-07-01

    Do you write code for your research? Use astronomical software? Do you wish there were a better way of citing, sharing, archiving, or discovering software for astronomy research? You're not alone! In April 2015, AAS's publishing team joined other leaders in the astronomical software community in a meeting funded by the Sloan Foundation, with the purpose of discussing these issues and potential solutions. In attendance were representatives from academic astronomy, publishing, libraries, for-profit software sharing platforms, telescope facilities, and grantmaking institutions. The goal of the group was to establish “protocols, policies, and platforms for astronomical software citation, sharing, and archiving,” in the hopes of encouraging a set of normalized standards across the field. The AAS is now collaborating with leaders at GitHub to write grant proposals for a project to develop strategies for software discoverability and citation, in astronomy and beyond. If this topic interests you, you can find more details in this document released by the group after the meeting: http://astronomy-software-index.github.io/2015-workshop/ The group hopes to move this project forward with input and support from the broader community. Please share the above document, discuss it on social media using the hashtag #astroware (so that your conversations can be found!), or send private comments to julie.steffen@aas.org.

  6. Introducing the AAS Astronomy Ambassadors Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurton, S.; Fienberg, R. T.; Fraknoi, A.; Prather, E. E.

    2013-04-01

    Newly established by the American Astronomical Society (AAS), the Astronomy Ambassadors program is designed to support early-career AAS members with training in resources and techniques for effective outreach to students and/or the public. A pilot Astronomy Ambassadors workshop will be held at the January 2013 AAS meeting. Workshop participants will learn to communicate effectively with public and school audiences; find outreach opportunities and establish ongoing partnerships with local schools, science centers, museums, parks, and/or community centers; reach audiences with personal stories, hands-on activities, and jargon-free language; identify strategies and techniques to improve their presentation skills; gain access to a menu of outreach resources that work in a variety of settings; and become part of an active community of astronomers who do outreach. Applications are welcome from advanced undergraduates (those doing research and committed to continuing in astronomy), graduate students, and postdocs and new faculty in their first two years after receipt of the PhD. We especially encourage applications from members of groups that are presently underrepresented in science.

  7. High cycle fatigue of AA6082 and AA6063 aluminum extrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanninga, Nicholas E.

    The high cycle fatigue behavior of hollow extruded AA6082 and AA6063 aluminum extrusions has been studied. Hollow extruded aluminum profiles can be processed into intricate shapes, and may be suitable replacements for fatigue critical automotive applications requiring reduced weight. There are several features inherent in hollow aluminum extrusions, such as seam welds, charge welds, microstructural variations and die lines. The effects of such extrusion variables on high cycle fatigue properties were studied by taking specimens from an actual car bumper extrusion. It appears that extrusion die lines create large anisotropy differences in fatigue properties, while welds themselves have little effect on fatigue lives. Removal of die lines greatly increased fatigue properties of AA6082 specimens taken transverse to the extrusion direction. Without die lines, anisotropy in fatigue properties between AA6082 specimens taken longitudinal and transverse to the extrusion direction, was significantly reduced, and properties associated with the orientation of the microstructure appears to be isotropic. A fibrous microstructure for AA6082 specimens showed great improvements in fatigue behavior. The effects of elevated temperatures and exposure of specimens to NaCl solutions was also studied. Exposure to the salt solution greatly reduced the fatigue lives of specimens, while elevated temperatures showed more moderate reductions in fatigue lives.

  8. The AAS Visiting Professor Programs: Three Anniversaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, A. G. Davis

    2003-05-01

    The AAS Program of Visiting Professors was started in 1958 with three astronomers as lecturers. They were Paul Merrill (Mt. Wilson and Palomar Observatories), Seth Nicholson (Mt. Wilson and Palomar Observatories) and Harlow Shapley (Harvard College Observatory). The program was run by a Committee on Visiting Professors from 1958 through 1963. The program was funded by grants from the National Science Foundation. The Executive Officer of the AAS, Paul Routley headed the program from the 1963 - 64 academic year through the 1968 - 69 academic year. Larry Fredrick headed the program for 1969 - 70 and then Hank Gurin headed it through 1973 -74, the last year of the program. At the end of this summer meeting, the combined Visiting Professors Program and the Shapley Program will be starting their 47th year. The Shapley Visiting Lectureships in Astronomy Program was started in the 1974 - 75 academic year under the leadership of Hank Gurin. The original funding came from the Perkin Fund and a three year grant from the Research Corporation. In 1975 the Shapley Endowment fund was set up to help pay the expenses of the program. In 1976 there was support from the Slipher fund which lasted through the 1978 - 79 academic year. From 1979 to the present the program is financed by the Shapley Endowment Fund and by the contributions made by institutions which host the visits. In the fall of 1998 the fee that Institutions pay to the AAS in support of their Shapley visits was reduced from 300 to 250 to make it easier for them to apply for visits. Members of the AAS have made contributions to the program over the years and we are very appreciative of this support. In 1974 there were 42 lecturers in the program, of whom four are still active giving lectures (George Carruthers, Larry Fredrick, Arlo Landolt and Davis Philip). After the summer meeting, the Shapley Program will be embarking on its 30th year. Now there are 82 astronomers in the program and we get from 40 to 60 requests a year

  9. Ascorbic acid (AA) metabolism in protection against radiation damage

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, R.C.; Koch, M.J.

    1986-03-05

    The possibility is considered that AA protects tissues against radiation damage by scavenging free radicals that result from radiolysis of water. A physiologic buffer (pH 6.7) was incubated with /sup 14/C-AA and 1 mM thiourea (to slow spontaneous oxidation of AA). Aliquots were assayed by HPLC and scintillation spectrometry to identify the /sup 14/C-label. Samples exposed to Cobalt-60 radiation had a half time of AA decay of < 3 minutes compared with nonirradiated samples (t/sub 1/2/ > 30 minutes) indicating that AA scavenges radiation-induced free radicals and forms the ascorbate free radical (AFR). Pairs of /sup 14/C-AFR disproportionate, with the net effect of /sup 14/C-dehydroascorbic acid formation from /sup 14/C-AA. Having established that AFR result from ionizing radiation in an aqueous solution, the possibility was evaluated that a tissue factor reduces AFR. Cortical tissue from the kidneys of male rats was minced, homogenized in buffer and centrifuged at 8000 xg. The supernatant was found to slow the rate of radiation-induced AA degradation by > 90% when incubated at 23/sup 0/C in the presence of 15 ..mu..M /sup 14/C-AA. Samples of supernatant maintained at 100/sup 0/C for 10 minutes or precipitated with 5% PCA did not prevent radiation-induced AA degradation. AA may have a specific role in scavenging free radicals generated by ionizing radiation and thereby protect body tissues.

  10. Comparison between ARB and CARB processes on an AA5754/AA6061 composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstraete, K.; Helbert, A.-L.; Brisset, F.; Baudin, T.

    2014-08-01

    The present work aims to compare two processes: Accumulative Roll Bonding and Cross Accumulative Roll Bonding (CARB). Both processes consist in the repetition of rolling but the second technique adds a 90° rotation of the sheet around its normal direction between each rolling. Microstructure, mechanical properties and texture were compared for both processes on an AA5754/AA6061 composite. As a result a thinner and less elongated microstructure was obtained in the CARB process leading to an isotropy and an improvement of the mechanical properties. Besides, the texture was characterized by the rotated Cube component for both processes but for CARB it is of less strength.

  11. Cu(II)-catalyzed reactions in ternary [Cu(AA)(AA - H)]+ complexes (AA = Gly, Ala, Val, Leu, Ile, t-Leu, Phe).

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Ohanessian, Gilles; Wesdemiotis, Chrys

    2009-01-01

    The unimolecular chemistry of [Cu(II)AA(AA - H)](+) complexes, composed of an intact and a deprotonated amino acid (AA) ligand, have been probed in the gas phase by tandem and multistage mass spectrometry in an electrospray ionization quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. The amino acids examined include Gly, Ala, Val, Leu, Ile, t-Leu and Phe. Upon collisionally-activated dissociation (CAD), the [Cu(II)AA(AA - H)](+) complexes undergo decarboxylation with simultaneous reduction of Cu(II) to Cu(I); during this process, a radical site is created at the alpha-carbon of the decarboxylated ligand (H(2)N(1) - (*)C(alpha)H - C(beta)H(2) - R; R = side chain substituent). The radical site is able to move along the backbone of the decarboxylated amino acid to form two new radicals (HN(1)(*) - C(alpha)H(2) - C(beta)H(2) - R and H(2)N(1) - C(alpha)H(2) - (*)C(beta)H - R). From the complexes of Gly and t-Leu, only C(alpha) and N(1) radicals can be formed. The whole radical ligand can be lost to form [Cu(I)AA](+) from these three isomeric radicals. Alternatively, further radical induced dissociations can take place along the backbone of the decarboxylated amino acid ligand to yield [Cu(II)AA(AA - 2H - CO(2))](+), [Cu(I)AA((*)NH(2))](+), [Cu(I)AA(HN = C(alpha)H(2))](+), or [Cu(I)AA(H(2)N - C(alpha)H = C(beta)H - R'](+) (R' = partial side chain substituent). The sodiated copper complexes, [Cu(II)(AA - H + Na)(AA - H)](+), show the same fragmentation patterns as their non-sodiated counterparts; sodium ion is retained on the intact amino acid ligand and is not involved in the CAD pathways. The amino groups of both AA units, the carbonyl group of the intact amino acid, and the deprotonated hydroxyl oxygen coordinate Cu(II) in square-planar fashion. Ab initio calculations indicate that the metal ion facilitates hydrogen atom shuttling between the N(1), C(alpha) and C(beta) atoms of the decarboxylated amino acid ligand. The dissociations of the decarboxylated radical ions unveil

  12. How Can Linoleic Acid Be the Preferential Substrate of the Enzyme 15-Lipoxygenase-1? A QM/MM Approach.

    PubMed

    Soler, Jordi; Saura, Patricia; García-López, Diego; Masgrau, Laura; Lluch, José M; González-Lafont, Àngels

    2016-03-01

    The most common substrate of mammalian lipoxygenases (LOXs) is arachidonic acid (AA). However, 15-LOXs can present dual substrate specificity. These LOXs catalyze the peroxidation of AA, initiated by a H-abstraction step (mainly H13-abstraction) by the Fe(III)-OH(-) cofactor, and the peroxidation of linoleic acid (LA) after H11-abstraction. In this paper, QM(B3LYP)/MM(CHARMM) calculations of the rate-limiting H11-abstraction process of LA catalyzed by rabbit 15-LOX-1 (15-rLOX-1) have been carried out using a complete model of the solvated 15-rLOX-1:LA complex. A total of 26 QM/MM potential energy profiles as a function of the H-transfer reaction coordinate have been computed along with one QM/MM free energy profile obtained using the Free Energy Perturbation method. The molecular origin of substrate specificity of 15-rLOX-1 for LA in comparison with AA has been analyzed. In many of the QM/MM reactive 15-rLOX-1:LA energy minima, LA adopts more elongated conformations than AA, although having a shorter carbon chain, because LA has one double bond between C1 and C11 whereas AA has three double bonds between C1 and C13. Consequently, C11 of LA can be located in the same region of the active site as C13 of AA, a zone where H11-abstraction from LA as well as H13-abstraction from AA is not hindered by bulky residue side chains. This explains at a molecular level how 15-LOXs might accommodate and recognize for catalysis two substrates that are different in length by two carbons. Our results also explain why (9Z,11E)-13-hydro(pero)xyoctadeca-9,11-dienoic acid is the major product of the peroxidation and why LA is the preferential substrate of 15-rLOX-1. PMID:26646740

  13. Ribbed electrode substrates

    DOEpatents

    Breault, Richard D.; Goller, Glen J.

    1983-01-01

    A ribbed substrate for an electrochemical cell electrode is made from a mixture of carbon fibers and carbonizable resin and has a mean pore size in the ribs which is 60-75% of the mean pore size of the web portions of the substrate which interconnect the ribs. Preferably the mean pore size of the web portion is 25-45 microns; and, if the substrate includes edge seals parallel to the ribs, the edge seals preferably have a mean pore size no greater than about ten microns. Most preferably the substrate has the same ratio of carbon fibers to polymeric carbon in all areas, including the ribs, webs, and edge seals. A substrate according to the present invention will have better overall performance than prior art substrates and minimizes the substrate thickness required for the substrate to perform all its functions well.

  14. Coated substrates and process

    DOEpatents

    Chu, Wei-kan; Childs, Charles B.

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a coated substrate and a process for forming films on substrates and for providing a particularly smooth film on a substrate. The method of this invention involves subjecting a surface of a substrate to contact with a stream of ions of an inert gas having sufficient force and energy to substantially change the surface characteristics of said substrate, and then exposing a film-forming material to a stream of ions of an inert gas having sufficient energy to vaporize the atoms of said film-forming material and to transmit the vaporized atoms to the substrate surface with sufficient force to form a film bonded to the substrate. This process is particularly useful commercially because it forms strong bonds at room temperature. This invention is particularly useful for adhering a gold film to diamond and forming ohmic electrodes on diamond, but also can be used to bond other films to substrates.

  15. Polished polymide substrate

    DOEpatents

    Farah, John; Sudarshanam, Venkatapuram S.

    2003-05-13

    Polymer substrates, in particular polyimide substrates, and polymer laminates for optical applications are described. Polyimide substrates are polished on one or both sides depending on their thickness, and single-layer or multi-layer waveguide structures are deposited on the polished polyimide substrates. Optical waveguide devices are machined by laser ablation using a combination of IR and UV lasers. A waveguide-fiber coupler with a laser-machined groove for retaining the fiber is also disclosed.

  16. Recovery of EUVL substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Vernon, S.P.; Baker, S.L.

    1995-01-19

    Mo/Si multilayers, were removed from superpolished zerodur and fused silica substrates with a dry etching process that, under suitable processing conditions, produces negligible change in either the substrate surface figure or surface roughness. Full recovery of the initial normal incidence extreme ultra-violet (EUV) reflectance response has been demonstrated on reprocessed substrates.

  17. AAS Special Session: Policy Making in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardelli, J. A.; Massa, D.

    1995-12-01

    The professional astronomical community today is more diverse than at any time in its history. Individuals participating in creative research programs can be found in a wide range of positions. This type of diversity, which mixes research, education, and service (e.g. contract) work, represents the strength of contemporary astronomy. While recognizing the unavoidable reductions in funding and restructuring of organizations like NASA, it is imperative that the significance of the current diversity be considered during these processes. Creative ideas are one of the cornerstones of quality research, and they can originate anywhere. Consequently, it is essential that adequate research resources remain available for free and open competition by all astronomers. Our goal in this session is to bring together officials from the AAS, NASA, and the NSF to discuss how the policy and decision making process operates and whether it should be changed to better serve the general needs of the professional astronomical community. Examples of the issues we believe are important include: In establishing new policy, how can the needs of the average research astronomer be better addressed? How could input from such astronomers be provided to those who craft NASA/NSF policy? How can/should the AAS serve as an interface between policy/decision making bodies and its membership? Should the AAS membership become more actively/effectively involved in the decision making process and, if so, how? More information on this session and related issues can be found at the Association of Research Astronomers Home Page: http://www.phy.vill.edu/astro/faculty/ara/ara_home.htm

  18. Impact resistance of AA6005 panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausen, A. H.; Borvik, T.; Hopperstad, O. S.; Langseth, M.

    2003-09-01

    The interest regarding use of extruded aluminium panels as lightweight protective structures is cmrently increasing. Even so, there are few experimental and computational investigations considering such structures. This paper presents some perforation tests on AA6005-T6 aluminium panels impacted by ogival-nose steel projectiles, where special emphasis was paid to the determination of the ballistic limit. Moreover, a material test programme including high strain rate tests using a split-Hopkinson tension bar was carried out in order to calibrate the Johnson-Cook constitutive model. Results from numerical analyses with LS-DYNA are finally included.

  19. Study on Fabrication of AA4032/AA6069 Cladding Billet Using Direct Chill Casting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xing; Zhang, Haitao; Shao, Bo; Li, Lei; Liu, Xuan; Cui, Jianzhong

    2016-04-01

    AA4032/AA6069 cladding billet in size of φ130 mm/φ110 mm was prepared by the modified direct chill casting process, and the parametric effect on casting performance was investigated using numerical simulation. Microstructures, elements distribution, and mechanical properties of the bonding interface were examined. The results show that metallurgical bonding interface can be obtained with the optimal parameters: the casting speed of 130 to 140 mm/min, the internal liquid level height of 50 to 60 mm, and the contact height of 40 to 50 mm. The metallurgical bonding interface is free of any discontinuities due to the fact that the alloying elements diffused across the interface and formed Ni-containing phase. Tensile strength of the cladding billet reaches 225.3 MPa, and the fracture position was located in AA6069 side, suggesting that the interface bonding strength is higher than the strength of AA6069. The interfacial shearing strength is 159.3 MPa, indicating excellent metallurgical bonding.

  20. Activity of vegetative insecticidal proteins Vip3Aa58 and Vip3Aa59 of Bacillus thuringiensis against lepidopteran pests.

    PubMed

    Baranek, Jakub; Kaznowski, Adam; Konecka, Edyta; Naimov, Samir

    2015-09-01

    Vegetative insecticidal proteins (Vips) secreted by some isolates of Bacillus thuringiensis show activity against insects and are regarded as insecticides against pests. A number of B. thuringiensis strains harbouring vip3A genes were isolated from different sources and identified by using a PCR based approach. The isolates with the highest insecticidal activity were indicated in screening tests, and their vip genes were cloned and sequenced. The analysis revealed two polymorphic Vip protein forms, which were classified as Vip3Aa58 and Vip3Aa59. After expression of the vip genes, the proteins were isolated and characterized. The activity of both toxins was estimated against economically important lepidopteran pests of woodlands (Dendrolimus pini), orchards (Cydia pomonella) and field crops (Spodoptera exigua). Vip3Aa58 and Vip3Aa59 were highly toxic and their potency surpassed those of many Cry proteins used in commercial bioinsecticides. Vip3Aa59 revealed similar larvicidal activity as Vip3Aa58 against S. exigua and C. pomonella. Despite 98% similarity of amino acid sequences of both proteins, Vip3Aa59 was significantly more active against D. pini. Additionally the effect of proteolytic activation of Vip58Aa and Vip3Aa59 on toxicity of D. pini and S. exigua was studied. Both Vip3Aa proteins did not show any activity against Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera) larvae. The results suggest that the Vip3Aa58 and Vip3Aa59 toxins might be useful for controlling populations of insect pests of crops and forests. PMID:26146224

  1. Systemic AA amyloidosis in the common marmoset.

    PubMed

    Ludlage, E; Murphy, C L; Davern, S M; Solomon, A; Weiss, D T; Glenn-Smith, D; Dworkin, S; Mansfield, K G

    2005-03-01

    The common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) is a small New World primate native to Brazil that has been used extensively in biomedical research. A retrospective analysis of archived hematoxylin and eosin-stained tissue sections and clinical records was conducted at the New England Primate Research Center on 86 marmosets more than 1 year of age that were euthanized during the past decade because of morbidity and failure to thrive. Approximately 17% (15 of 86) were found to have amyloid deposits in one or more organs, including the liver, adrenal glands, kidneys, and intestine. This material was shown by amino acid sequence analysis to be composed of serum amyloid A (SAA)-related protein. This type of amyloidosis, designated AA or "secondary," is associated typically with an inflammatory process that induces elevated levels of the SAA amyloidogenic precursor molecule. Notably, there were no significant pathologic differences or other distinguishing features in animals with amyloid versus those without; furthermore, on the basis of the limited number of serum specimens available for analysis, the SAA concentrations in the two groups were comparable, thus suggesting the possible inheritable nature of the disorder. In this respect, the common marmoset provides a unique experimental model for study of the pathogenesis and treatment of AA and other forms of systemic amyloidosis. PMID:15753464

  2. A corpora allata farnesyl diphosphate synthase in mosquitoes displaying a metal ion dependent substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Perez, Crisalejandra; Nyati, Pratik; Noriega, Fernando G

    2015-09-01

    Farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPPS) is a key enzyme in isoprenoid biosynthesis, it catalyzes the head-to-tail condensation of dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) with two molecules of isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) to generate farnesyl diphosphate (FPP), a precursor of juvenile hormone (JH). In this study, we functionally characterized an Aedes aegypti FPPS (AaFPPS) expressed in the corpora allata. AaFPPS is the only FPPS gene present in the genome of the yellow fever mosquito, it encodes a 49.6 kDa protein exhibiting all the characteristic conserved sequence domains on prenyltransferases. AaFPPS displays its activity in the presence of metal cofactors; and the product condensation is dependent of the divalent cation. Mg(2+) ions lead to the production of FPP, while the presence of Co(2+) ions lead to geranyl diphosphate (GPP) production. In the presence of Mg(2+) the AaFPPS affinity for allylic substrates is GPP > DMAPP > IPP. These results suggest that AaFPPS displays "catalytic promiscuity", changing the type and ratio of products released (GPP or FPP) depending on allylic substrate concentrations and the presence of different metal cofactors. This metal ion-dependent regulatory mechanism allows a single enzyme to selectively control the metabolites it produces, thus potentially altering the flow of carbon into separate metabolic pathways. PMID:26188328

  3. Floor Plans: Section "AA", Section "BB"; Floor Framing Plans: Section ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Floor Plans: Section "A-A", Section "B-B"; Floor Framing Plans: Section "A-A", Section "B-B" - Fort Washington, Fort Washington Light, Northeast side of Potomac River at Fort Washington Park, Fort Washington, Prince George's County, MD

  4. Idiopathic systemic AA-amyloidosis in a skunk (Mephitis mephitis).

    PubMed

    Elhensheri, Mohamed; Linke, Reinhold P; Blankenburg, Anja; Beineke, Andreas

    2012-03-01

    This report describes a case of systemic amyloidosis in a captive striped skunk. At necropsy, bilateral alopecia, as well as reno-, hepato-, and splenomegaly were present. Congo red staining and immunohistochemistry revealed depositions of AA-amyloid in different organs. The lack of a predisposing disease is suggestive of idiopathic systemic AA-amyloidosis. PMID:22448530

  5. States' Flexibility Waiver Plans for Alternate Assessments Based on Alternate Achievement Standards (AA-AAS). Synthesis Report 96

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarus, Sheryl S.; Edwards, Lynn M.; Thurlow, Martha L.; Hodgson, Jennifer R.

    2014-01-01

    All states have alternate assessments based on alternate achievement standards (AA-AAS) for students with the most significant cognitive disabilities. For accountability purposes, the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) allows up to 1% of students to be counted as proficient with this assessment option. In 2011 the U.S. Department of…

  6. Mutant Rep protein of the porcine circovirus type 2 N-glycosylation:23-25aa, 256-258aa mutation reduced virus replication but 286-288aa mutation enhanced virus replication in PK-15 cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jianli; Peng, Zhe; Fu, Fang; Xu, Shaojian; Xu, Shengnan; Cong, Xiaoyan; Yuan, Xiaoyuan; Yu, Jiang; Wu, Jiaqiang; Sun, Wenbo; Du, Yijun; Li, Jun; Wang, Jinbao

    2015-06-12

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) Rep protein and the splice variant Rep' protein impact genome replication. The Rep protein contains three potential N-glycosylation at positions 23-25aa (NPS), 256-258aa (NQT) and 286-288aa (NAT). Three double copy infectious clones with Rep protein N-glycosylation at positions mutations 23-25aa (DPS), 256-258aa (DQT) and 286-288aa (DAT) were constructed and their function in virus replication in PK-15 cells was investigated. The results showed that the double copy infectious clone with N-glycosylation site mutation could be rescued in vitro and 23-25aa, 256-258aa mutation reduced virus replication but 286-288aa mutation enhanced virus replication. PMID:25829242

  7. Chromium-free conversion coatings based on inorganic salts (Zr/Ti/Mn/Mo) for aluminum alloys used in aircraft applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santa Coloma, P.; Izagirre, U.; Belaustegi, Y.; Jorcin, J. B.; Cano, F. J.; Lapeña, N.

    2015-08-01

    Novel chromium-free conversion coatings based on Zr/Ti/Mn/Mo compounds were developed at a pilot scale to improve the corrosion resistance of the AA2024-T3 and AA7075-T6 aluminum alloys for aircraft applications. The influence of the presence of Zr and Ti in the Zr/Ti/Mn/Mo conversion bath's formulation on the corrosion resistance of the coated alloys was investigated. The corrosion resistance provided by the conversion coatings was evaluated by salt spray exposure and potentiodynamic sweeps. Optical and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) operating in the Kelvin Probe mode (SKPFM) were used to provide microstructural information of the coated samples that achieved the best results in the corrosion tests. The salt spray test evidenced the higher corrosion resistance of the coated samples compared to the bare surfaces for both alloys. The potentiodynamic tests showed that the corrosion current density decreased for coated AA7075-T6 and AA2024-T3 alloys, which indicated an obvious improvement of the corrosion resistance with all the processes for both alloys. Although the corrosion resistance of the coated samples appeared to be higher for the alloy AA7075-T6 than for the alloy AA2024-T3, both alloys achieved the best corrosion protection with the coatings deposited from conversion bath formulations containing no titanium salts. The microscopy analysis on the coated AA7075-T6 samples revealed that a local deposition of Zr compounds and, possibly, an oxidation process occurred in the vicinity of the alloy's intermetallic particles. The amount of the Zr deposits at these locations increased with coating's formulations without Ti, which provided the best corrosion resistance. The Cr-free conversion coatings developed in this study for the AA7075-T6 and AA2024-T3 alloys do not meet yet the strict requirements of the aircraft industry. However, they significantly improved the corrosion

  8. Nephrotic Syndrome Associated with Lung Cancer: A Rare Case of Malignancy Associated with AA Amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Gueutin, Victor; Langlois, Anne-Lyse; Shehwaro, Nathalie; Elharraqui, Ryme; Rouvier, Philippe; Izzedine, Hassane

    2013-01-01

    Nonhematologic malignancies are rarely reported to be associated with AA amyloidosis. Although the association between renal cell carcinoma and systemic AA amyloidosis has been established, the evidence linking pulmonary cancer to AA amyloidosis is scarce. Here, a case of biopsy-proven renal AA amyloidosis complicated with nephrotic syndrome associated with lung carcinoma is reported. PMID:24558629

  9. Section BB, Section DD, Plan AA, Plan CC, Typical Framing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Section B-B, Section D-D, Plan A-A, Plan C-C, Typical Framing Detail of Upper Stringers, Typical Framing Detail of Lower Stringers - Covered Bridge, Spanning Connecticut River, Orford, Grafton County, NH

  10. Lightweight Substrates For Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, D. Kyle

    1991-01-01

    New substrate uses conventional quasi-isotropic fabric laminate with surfacing layer of carbon-fiber paper consisting of randomly oriented chopped carbon fibers. Layered structure of fabric and paper relatively easy to manufacture. When impregnated with carbon, structure rigid and stable. Substrates of this type made quite thin, thus keeping areal weights to minimum. Mirrors of this type made faster, and cost less, than predecessors.

  11. Microstructure and properties of AA 2090 weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Sunwoo, A.J.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1988-06-01

    The effects of welding on AA 2090 are examined along with the metallurgical changes associated with welding and aging. The results of the study show that the GTA and EB weldment properties are controlled by the precipitate size and distribution. There is a trade-off between strength and elongation. In the as-welded condition, solid solution strengthening is the primary strengthening mechanism present. As a result, the weldment strengths are less than 200 MPa, but the elongations are greater than 4%. In the post-weld aged condition, an inhomogeneous distribution of solutes results in an inhomogeneous distribution of precipitates, causing strain localization. Although the weldment strengths increase, the weldment elongations decrease precipitously. The peak strengths of EB and GTA weldments are obtained aging at 160{degree}C for 32 hours with 75% joint efficiency and at 190{degree}C for 16 hours with 65% joint efficiency, respectively. Aging at 230{degree}C leads to coarsening of precipitates as well as the intermetallic constituents; the weldment strengths deteriorate rapidly, but the elongations improve. The best overall weldment properties are obtained in the solution heat treated and aged conditions, and are associated with a homogeneous distribution of strengthening precipitates. 13 refs.

  12. AAS Committee on Employment Panel Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borne, Kirk; Fanelli, M. N.; Storrie-Lombardi, L. J.; Krishnamurthi, A.

    2006-12-01

    Many younger astronomers are unaware of the dangers and pitfalls that await them in the job market. Issues related to fringe benefits (if any), moving expenses, medical coverage for family members, teaching versus research expectations, etc. can lead to misunderstandings and to serious difficulties if these are not addressed early in the job interview process. The AAS Committee on Employment has often received letters from concerned junior members of the society, who feel that they needed more guidance and assistance in entering the job market for the first time. The major areas of concern have included those just listed, but there may be others. The session is structured as a panel presentation, whose members are asked to prepare in advance their top 10 questions that job applicants should ask, and we will instruct our panel members not to discuss their list at all with the other panel members prior to their presentations. This will ensure independent viewpoints and novel responses. The panel will consist of astronomers who have different perspectives on this issue, including old and young, postdoc and beyond, academic and non-academic. To kick off the session, we will invite a brief humorous presentation of the Top Ten List, in the style of The Night Show host David Letterman.

  13. Recrystallization behaviour of AA6063 extrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, K.; Pettersen, T.; Paulsen, C. O.; Marthinsen, K.; Holmedal, B.; Segatori, A.

    2015-08-01

    Cylindrical profiles of an AA6063 aluminium alloy were produced in a lab-scale direct extrusion set-up. The extrusion was performed at 300 °C, 450 °C and 550 °C, respectively, with the same ram speed. Immediate water quenching was applied to the profiles and the end of billet (butt-end) after extrusion. Microstructure and texture of the material in different states were measured by electron back-scattered diffraction. Only the profile extruded at 300 °C, was found in the deformed state after extrusion, featuring a fibrous grain structure and a strong <111> and weak <100> double fibre texture. Post-extrusion annealing of this profile at 450 °C resulted in an almost fully recrystallized structure (recrystallized fraction of 87%) and with a texture similar to that of the as-deformed state. The profile extruded at 450 °C was almost fully recrystallized (recrystallization fraction 91%) already after quenching, and with a texture characterized by a weak <111> and strong <100> double fibre. The profile extruded at 550 °C showed a partially recrystallized grain structure with recrystallization fraction of 71%, and with a texture dominated by a <100> fibre. The influence of the deformation conditions on the recrystallization behaviour, in terms of recrystallization kinetics and mechanisms, are discussed in view of these results.

  14. Outcomes From AAS Hack Day at the 227th AAS Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This is a final post from the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. This special summary of AAS Hack Day, a meeting of AAS members to collaboratively work on various small projects, was written by Meredith Rawls (@Merrdiff) and was originally posted on astrobites.com.As the 227thAmerican Astronomical Society meeting drew to a close (see highlights from Day 1, Day 2, Day 3, and Day 4), a group of at least 50 attendees spent Day 4working on small projects fondly called hacks. Thanks to sponsorship from LSST and Northrup Grumman, the industrious hackers werewell-caffeinated and fed so we could devote time and energy toworking in groups on one-day projects.TheHack Day beganat 10am with pitches. Anybody with a project idea was welcome to briefly speak and try to convince others to work with them. Only someideas panned out, but the enthusiasm was palpable. Its not every day you get a full room of astronomers and affiliates eager to spend hours working on fun and useful projects to benefit the community.#hackAAS is getting underway! #aas227 pic.twitter.com/yX7jlOnSCK James R A Davenport (@jradavenport) January 8, 2016Here is a rundown of what we accomplished. Pretty impressive for a single day! Many thanks to fellow astrobiter Erika Nesvold (now at Carnegie DTM; @erikanesvold) whose hack was live-documenting all the other hacks. Her tweets as @astrobites appeared with the #hackaas hashtag, and her notes made this recap post infinitely easier to write.Interested in joining the fun? Sign up for Hack Day at the 2017 JanuaryAAS meeting (its free with meeting registration), and consider applying for the .Astronomy conference this summer.Towards Optimal Session Scheduling:Adrian Price-Whelan (Columbia), David Hogg (NYU), and Scott Idem (AAS) began writing a program to take all submitted abstracts to a conference like AAS and sort them using keywords to avoid scheduling similar talks in parallel sessions. Its impossible to make everyone happy, but minimizing conflicts

  15. Asiago spectroscopic classification of SN2016aa in PGC 22658

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciabattari, F.; Tomasella, L.; Pastorello, A.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Ochner, P.; Tartaglia, L.; Terreran, G.; Turatto, M.; Briganti, F.; Caimmi, M.; Campaner, P.; Donati, S.; Mazzoni, E.

    2016-02-01

    We report the spectroscopic classification of SN2016aa in PGC 22658 through observations obtained with the 1.82-m Copernico Telescope in Asiago (+ AFOSC; range 340-820 nm, resolution 1.3 nm). A low signal-to-noise spectrogram obtained on Jan 04.97 UT indicates that SN2016aa is a Type II SNe, a few weeks after the explosion.

  16. Section AA through main entrance gates & west stairs. San ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Section AA through main entrance gates & west stairs. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Science Building. Also includes plans and sections of boys' and girls' toilets. Howard E. Jones, Architect, San Bernardino, California. Sheet 5, job no. 311. Scales 1/4 inch to the foot (section AA) and 1/2 inch to the foot (toilet rooms). February 15, 1927. - San Bernardino Valley College, Life Science Building, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  17. AA amyloidosis as a complication of primary lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Beloncle, François; Sayegh, Johnny; Eymerit-Morin, Caroline; Duveau, Agnès; Augusto, Jean-François

    2014-03-01

    Primary lymphedema is a rare disease caused by a disorder of lymphangiogenesis. Clinical presentation and age at onset are variable. AA amyloidosis is usually due to chronic inflammatory diseases, malignant tumors or less frequently chronic infectious diseases. We report here the first two cases of AA amyloidosis present with renal failure and nephrotic syndrome in patients with primary lymphedema-induced chronic leg ulcers. The first patient was a 62-year-old female who presented with chronic untreated leg ulcers for 8 years secondary to primary lymphedema. A kidney biopsy done for nephrotic syndrome allowed the diagnosis of AA amyloidosis. The second patient was a 54-year-old male who presented with hereditary lymphedema and elephantiasis since the age of 12. A salivary gland biopsy allowed the diagnosis of AA amyloidosis. Renal function deteriorated progressively needing chronic haemodialysis. Chronic leg ulcers have been rarely reported to induce AA amyloidosis. Only five other cases have been reported in the literature, but none of them with chronic lymphedema. We believe that the relation between lymphedema, chronic leg ulcers and AA amyloidosis is underestimated. PMID:23964754

  18. Preparation of Substrate for Flavorant from Chicken Bone Residue with Hot-Pressure Process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin-Zhi; Dong, Xian-Bing; Yue, Jian-Ying; Zhang, Chun-Hui; Jia, Wei; Li, Xia

    2016-03-01

    Hot-pressure extraction (HPE), which is regarded as a "green" technology, was applied to extract nutrients (protein, collagen, and minerals) from chicken bone residue (CBR). Amino acids (AA), color, and volatile flavor compounds of chicken bone extract (CBE) were also investigated. Results showed that contents of protein, total soluble solids, minerals, and collagen of CBE were positively correlated with extraction time and temperature. High ratios of protein (83.51%) and collagen (96.81%) were obtained with 135 °C and 120 min. Essential AA accounted for 31.03% to 47.73% of total AA in CBE. The percentage of bitter AA in TAA decreased from 28.94% to 25.02% at 0 min to 20.19% and 21.41% at 120 min, although fresh AA increased from 46.35% to 50.84% (0 min) to 53.14% (120 min) at 130 and 135 °C, respectively, indicating CBE was nutritionally beneficial with good flavor. Color and volatile flavor of CBE improved significantly after extraction, although calcium in CBE (4.2 to 4.8 mg/100 g) was relatively low compared with that of CBR (1078 mg/100 g). It can be concluded that HPE is a promising way to transform CBR into a nutritious flavorant substrate, but it is not an efficient way to extract calcium. PMID:26809140

  19. 40 CFR Table Aa-2 to Subpart Aa of... - Kraft Lime Kiln and Calciner Emissions Factors for CH4 and N2O

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Kraft Lime Kiln and Calciner Emissions... Manufacturing Pt. 98, Subpt. AA, Table AA -2 Table AA-2 to Subpart AA of Part 98—Kraft Lime Kiln and Calciner Emissions Factors for CH4 and N2O Fuel Fossil fuel-based emissions factors (kg/mmBtu HHV) Kraft lime...

  20. Cloning and epitope mapping of Cry11Aa-binding sites in the Cry11Aa-receptor alkaline phosphatase from Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Luisa E; Martinez-Anaya, Claudia; Lira, Erandi; Chen, Jianwu; Evans, Amy; Hernández-Martínez, Salvador; Lanz-Mendoza, Humberto; Bravo, Alejandra; Gill, Sarjeet S; Soberón, Mario

    2009-09-22

    Cry11Aa is the most active Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis toxin against Aedes aegypti larvae. Ae. aegypti alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was previously identified as a Cry11Aa receptor mediating toxicity. Here we report the cloning and functional characterization of this Ae. aegypti Cry11Aa-ALP receptor. Of three ALP's cDNA clones, the recombinant produced ALP1 isoform was shown to bind Cry11Aa and P1.BBMV peptide phage that specifically binds the midgut ALP-Cry11Aa receptor. An anti-ALP1 antibody inhibited binding to brush border membrane vesicles and toxicity of Cry11Aa in isolated cultured guts. Two ALP1 Cry11Aa binding regions (R59-G102 and N257-I296) were mapped by characterizing binding of Cry11Aa to nine recombinant overlapping peptides covering the ALP1 sequence. Finally, by using a peptide spot array of Cry11Aa domain III and site-directed mutagenesis, we show that the ALP1 R59-G102 region binds Cry11Aa through domain II loop alpha-8 while ALP1 N257-I296 interacts with Cry11Aa through domain III 561RVQSQNSGNN570 located in beta18-beta19. Our results show that Cry11Aa domain II and domain III are involved in the binding with two distinct binding sites in the ALP1 receptor. PMID:19697959

  1. Cloning and Epitope Mapping of Cry11Aa-Binding Sites in the Cry11Aa-Receptor Alkaline Phosphatase from Aedes aegypti†

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Luisa E.; Martinez-Anaya, Claudia; Lira, Erandi; Chen, Jianwu; Evans, Amy; Hernández-Martínez, Salvador; Lanz-Mendoza, Humberto; Bravo, Alejandra; Gill, Sarjeet S.; Soberón, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Cry11Aa is the most active Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis toxin against Aedes aegypti larvae. Ae. aegypti alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was previously identified as a Cry11Aa receptor mediating toxicity. Here we report the cloning and functional characterization of this Ae. aegypti Cry11Aa-ALP receptor. Of three ALP’s cDNA clones, the recombinant produced ALP1 isoform was shown to bind Cry11Aa and P1.BBMV peptide phage that specifically binds the midgut ALP-Cry11Aa receptor. An anti-ALP1 antibody inhibited binding to brush border membrane vesicles and toxicity of Cry11Aa in isolated cultured guts. Two ALP1 Cry11Aa binding regions (R59–G102 and N257–I296) were mapped by characterizing binding of Cry11Aa to nine recombinant overlapping peptides covering the ALP1 sequence. Finally, by using a peptide spot array of Cry11Aa domain III and site-directed mutagenesis, we show that the ALP1 R59–G102 region binds Cry11Aa through domain II loop α-8 while ALP1 N257–I296 interacts with Cry11Aa through domain III 561RVQSQNSGNN570 located in β18-β19. Our results show that Cry11Aa domain II and domain III are involved in the binding with two distinct binding sites in the ALP1 receptor. PMID:19697959

  2. Bonded semiconductor substrate

    DOEpatents

    Atwater, Jr.; Harry A. , Zahler; James M.

    2010-07-13

    Ge/Si and other nonsilicon film heterostructures are formed by hydrogen-induced exfoliation of the Ge film which is wafer bonded to a cheaper substrate, such as Si. A thin, single-crystal layer of Ge is transferred to Si substrate. The bond at the interface of the Ge/Si heterostructures is covalent to ensure good thermal contact, mechanical strength, and to enable the formation of an ohmic contact between the Si substrate and Ge layers. To accomplish this type of bond, hydrophobic wafer bonding is used, because as the invention demonstrates the hydrogen-surface-terminating species that facilitate van der Waals bonding evolves at temperatures above 600.degree. C. into covalent bonding in hydrophobically bound Ge/Si layer transferred systems.

  3. Decontamination of metal substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent, L.D.

    1998-12-31

    A brief look at the history of surface corrosion and contamination of steel is important for understanding the best approach to proper cleaning of substrates prior to surface preparation and application of coatings and linings, particularly in immersion conditions such as encountered in railroad hopper and tank cars. All contaminants contribute to reduction of the coating or lining`s capacity to either protect the substrate or prevent contamination of the liquid cargo. This paper will explore the types of tests available to determine the levels of contamination, particularly sulfides, sulfates and chlorides, along with suggested methods to reduce theses contaminants to acceptable levels.

  4. Biaxially textured composite substrates

    DOEpatents

    Groves, James R.; Foltyn, Stephen R.; Arendt, Paul N.

    2005-04-26

    An article including a substrate, a layer of a metal phosphate material such as an aluminum phosphate material upon the surface of the substrate, and a layer of an oriented cubic oxide material having a rock-salt-like structure upon the metal phosphate material layer is provided together with additional layers such as a HTS top-layer of YBCO directly upon a layer of a buffer material such as a SrTi.sub.x Ru.sub.1-x O.sub.3 layer.

  5. Observations of AA Tau requested to schedule XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2013-08-01

    Dr. Hans Moritz Guenther (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics) has requested nightly observations of the classical T Tauri star AA Tau in order to schedule x-ray observations with XMM-Newton that have been planned for between 2013 August 15 and September 15. The purpose of the AAVSO observations is to determine whether AA Tau is at a suitable magnitude for the satellite observations. Taurus is difficult to observe during this time period but that is exactly why AAVSO assistance is needed! AA Tau is a morning object, and also, many of the professional ground-based telescopes are offline because of the US southwest monsoon season. Since it is critical to know the brightness of AA Tau, AAVSO observations will be truly essential. Nightly visual and snapshot (not more than once per night) observations beginning now and continuing through September 20 are needed. Coverage beginning ahead of the XMM window is requested because there is a one- to two-week lead time for the target to be inserted into the telescope schedule. Continuing the nightly observations a few days beyond the end of the XMM window will give better optical context for the x-ray data. AA Tau ranges between ~12.8V and ~16.1V; since December 2011 or earlier it has been at ~14.5V. The most recent observation in the AAVSO International Database shows it at 14.779V on 2013 Feb 5 (J. Roe, Bourbon, MO). Dr. Guenther writes, "AA Tau is surrounded by a thick accretion disk which is seen nearly edge-on. For decades the light curve of AA Tau showed regular eclipsing events when the accretion funnel rotated through the line of sight. However, earlier this year J. Bouvier and his group found that this behavior changed dramatically: AA Tau now seems to be deeply absorbed all the time (V band 14.5 mag). In collaboration with this group we will perform X-ray observations of AA Tau with the XMM-Newton satellite." Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plo! tter (http

  6. The Pasadena Recommendations: Five Years After AAS Endorsement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knezek, Patricia; Frattare, L.; Ulvestad, J.

    2010-01-01

    It has been five years since the AAS Council unanimously endorsed the document, known as "Equity Now: The Pasadena Recommendations for Gender Equality in Astronomy," in January 2005. This document was the main product of the conference entitled "Women in Astronomy II: Ten Years After” (WIA II), held in June 2003 in Pasadena, CA. Participants of that 2003 meeting assessed the progress for women in science, offering insights into causes of the slower advancement of women, and discussed strategies to accelerate the achievement of equality. These insights and strategies were then incorporated into the "Pasadena Recommendations" by the CSWA. It was subsequently released to the entire AAS community for review and comments prior to its endorsement by the AAS. We will discuss the Recommendations and their impact since the endorsement by the AAS, including the process that is in place for organizations and departments to formally endorse the Pasadena Recommendations, thus making an organizational commitment to their implementation (see http://www.aas.org/cswa/pasadena_endorse.html).

  7. Multiple alternative substrate kinetics.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Vernon E

    2015-11-01

    The specificity of enzymes for their respective substrates has been a focal point of enzyme kinetics since the initial characterization of metabolic chemistry. Various processes to quantify an enzyme's specificity using kinetics have been utilized over the decades. Fersht's definition of the ratio kcat/Km for two different substrates as the "specificity constant" (ref [7]), based on the premise that the important specificity existed when the substrates were competing in the same reaction, has become a consensus standard for enzymes obeying Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The expansion of the theory for the determination of the relative specificity constants for a very large number of competing substrates, e.g. those present in a combinatorial library, in a single reaction mixture has been developed in this contribution. The ratio of kcat/Km for isotopologs has also become a standard in mechanistic enzymology where kinetic isotope effects have been measured by the development of internal competition experiments with extreme precision. This contribution extends the theory of kinetic isotope effects to internal competition between three isotopologs present at non-tracer concentrations in the same reaction mix. This article is part of a special issue titled: Enzyme Transition States from Theory and Experiment. PMID:26051088

  8. Outcomes From AAS Hack Day at the 227th AAS Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This is a final post from the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. This special summary of AAS Hack Day, a meeting of AAS members to collaboratively work on various small projects, was written by Meredith Rawls (@Merrdiff) and was originally posted on astrobites.com.As the 227thAmerican Astronomical Society meeting drew to a close (see highlights from Day 1, Day 2, Day 3, and Day 4), a group of at least 50 attendees spent Day 4working on small projects fondly called hacks. Thanks to sponsorship from LSST and Northrup Grumman, the industrious hackers werewell-caffeinated and fed so we could devote time and energy toworking in groups on one-day projects.TheHack Day beganat 10am with pitches. Anybody with a project idea was welcome to briefly speak and try to convince others to work with them. Only someideas panned out, but the enthusiasm was palpable. Its not every day you get a full room of astronomers and affiliates eager to spend hours working on fun and useful projects to benefit the community.#hackAAS is getting underway! #aas227 pic.twitter.com/yX7jlOnSCK James R A Davenport (@jradavenport) January 8, 2016Here is a rundown of what we accomplished. Pretty impressive for a single day! Many thanks to fellow astrobiter Erika Nesvold (now at Carnegie DTM; @erikanesvold) whose hack was live-documenting all the other hacks. Her tweets as @astrobites appeared with the #hackaas hashtag, and her notes made this recap post infinitely easier to write.Interested in joining the fun? Sign up for Hack Day at the 2017 JanuaryAAS meeting (its free with meeting registration), and consider applying for the .Astronomy conference this summer.Towards Optimal Session Scheduling:Adrian Price-Whelan (Columbia), David Hogg (NYU), and Scott Idem (AAS) began writing a program to take all submitted abstracts to a conference like AAS and sort them using keywords to avoid scheduling similar talks in parallel sessions. Its impossible to make everyone happy, but minimizing conflicts

  9. Substrate system for spray forming

    DOEpatents

    Chu, Men G.; Chernicoff, William P.

    2002-01-01

    A substrate system for receiving a deposit of sprayed metal droplets including a movable outer substrate on which the sprayed metal droplets are deposited. The substrate system also includes an inner substrate disposed adjacent the outer substrate where the sprayed metal droplets are deposited on the outer substrate. The inner substrate includes zones of differing thermal conductivity to resist substrate layer porosity and to resist formation of large grains and coarse constituent particles in a bulk layer of the metal droplets which have accumulated on the outer substrate. A spray forming apparatus and associated method of spray forming a molten metal to form a metal product using the substrate system of the invention is also provided.

  10. Substrate system for spray forming

    DOEpatents

    Chu, Men G.; Chernicoff, William P.

    2000-01-01

    A substrate system for receiving a deposit of sprayed metal droplets including a movable outer substrate on which the sprayed metal droplets are deposited. The substrate system also includes an inner substrate disposed adjacent the outer substrate where the sprayed metal droplets are deposited on the outer substrate. The inner substrate includes zones of differing thermal conductivity to resist substrate layer porosity and to resist formation of large grains and coarse constituent particles in a bulk layer of the metal droplets which have accumulated on the outer substrate. A spray forming apparatus and associated method of spray forming a molten metal to form a metal product using the substrate system of the invention is also provided.

  11. Quantitative analysis of texture evolution of cold-rolled direct-chill-cast and continuous-cast AA5052 and AA5182 aluminum alloys during isothermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y. M.; Liu, W. C.; Morris, J. G.

    2004-11-01

    The as-received direct-chill-cast (DC) and continuous-cast (CC) AA5052 and AA5182 hot bands were preheated at 454 °C for 4 hours, followed by cold rolling to an 80 pct reduction in thickness. The texture evolution of these cold-rolled samples during isothermal annealing was investigated by X-ray diffraction. The variation in texture volume fractions with annealing time was quantitatively analyzed by using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) equation. The differences in recrystallization textures between the AA5052 and AA5182 alloys and between the DC and CC alloys were compared. It was found that the AA5052 alloy possessed a stronger cube recrystallization texture than the AA5182 alloy for the DC and CC materials. The recrystallization textures of the AA5182 alloy were affected strongly by the annealing temperature. As the annealing temperature increased, the cube recrystallization texture strengthened, whereas the R texture weakened. The annealing temperature had little influence on the recrystallization textures of the AA5052 alloy. The DC AA5052 and 5182 alloys also exhibited stronger cube recrystallization textures than the corresponding CC alloys. For the DC and CC AA5052 alloys, the n value in the JMAK-type equation increased with an increase in the annealing temperature, while the n values varied only slightly with the annealing temperature for the DC and CC AA5182 alloys.

  12. Severe hidradenitis suppurativa complicated by renal AA amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Utrera-Busquets, M; Romero-Maté, A; Castaño, Á; Alegre, L; García-Donoso, C; Borbujo, J

    2016-04-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic, recurrent inflammatory disease affecting the skin folds. Multiple therapeutic options have been proposed for severe cases, but persistent responses are rarely seen. Important complications of HS are uncommon, and usually seen only in severe and unresponsive disease. Amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis is secondary to inflammatory chronic diseases, and is an uncommon complication of dermatological diseases. Only a few cases related with HS have been reported. We report the case of a 37-year-old patient who developed AA amyloidosis secondary to severe HS. PMID:26206410

  13. Species Differences in Alternative Substrate Utilization by the Antibacterial Target Undecaprenyl Pyrophosphate Synthase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase (UPPS) is a critical enzyme required for the biosynthesis of polysaccharides essential for bacterial survival. In this report, we have tested the substrate selectivity of UPPS derived from the mammalian symbiont Bacteroides fragilis, the human pathogen Vibrio vulnificus, and the typically benign but opportunistic pathogen Escherichia coli. An anthranilamide-containing substrate, 2-amideanilinogeranyl diphosphate (2AA-GPP), was an effective substrate for only the B. fragilis UPPS protein, yet replacing the amide with a nitrile [2-nitrileanilinogeranyl diphosphate (2CNA-GPP)] led to a compound that was fully functional for UPPS from all three target organisms. These fluorescent substrate analogues were also found to undergo increases in fluorescence upon isoprenoid chain elongation, and this increase in fluorescence can be utilized to monitor the activity and inhibition of UPPS in 96-well plate assays. The fluorescence of 2CNA-GPP increased by a factor of 2.5-fold upon chain elongation, while that of 2AA-GPP increased only 1.2-fold. The 2CNA-GPP compound was therefore more versatile for screening the activity of UPPS from multiple species of bacteria and underwent a larger increase in fluorescence that improved its ability to detect increases in chain length. Overall, this work describes the development of new assay methods for UPPS and demonstrates the difference in substrate utilization between forms of UPPS from different species, which has major implications for UPPS inhibitor development, assay construction, and the development of polysaccharide biosynthesis probes. PMID:25020247

  14. Lattice matched crystalline substrates for cubic nitride semiconductor growth

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, Andrew G; Ptak, Aaron J; McMahon, William E

    2015-02-24

    Disclosed embodiments include methods of fabricating a semiconductor layer or device and devices fabricated thereby. The methods include, but are not limited to, providing a substrate having a cubic crystalline surface with a known lattice parameter and growing a cubic crystalline group III-nitride alloy layer on the cubic crystalline substrate by coincident site lattice matched epitaxy. The cubic crystalline group III-nitride alloy may be prepared to have a lattice parameter (a') that is related to the lattice parameter of the substrate (a). The group III-nitride alloy may be a cubic crystalline In.sub.xGa.sub.yAl.sub.1-x-yN alloy. The lattice parameter of the In.sub.xGa.sub.yAl.sub.1-x-yN or other group III-nitride alloy may be related to the substrate lattice parameter by (a')= 2(a) or (a')=(a)/ 2. The semiconductor alloy may be prepared to have a selected band gap.

  15. Experimental induction and oral transmission of avian AA amyloidosis in vaccinated white hens.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tomoaki; Muhammad, Naeem; Inoshima, Yasuo; Yanai, Tokuma; Goryo, Masanobu; Ishiguro, Naotaka

    2013-06-01

    Avian AA amyloidosis is commonly observed in adult birds afflicted with bacterial infections or chronic inflammatory disorders. Experimental AA amyloidosis in birds can be induced by repeated inflammatory stimulation, such as injection with casein or vaccination with oil-emulsified bacterins. However, the transmission of amyloidosis among avian species has not been studied well to date. In the present study, we confirm the potential induction of avian AA amyloidosis by inoculation of Salmonella enteritidis (SE) vaccine or Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine. To determine the transmission of chicken AA amyloidosis among white hens, we induced experimental AA amyloidosis in vaccinated chickens by intravenous or oral administration of chicken AA fibrils. Amyloid deposits were observed in chickens injected with SE and inoculated with chicken AA fibrils intravenously (21/26: 81%) and orally (8/12: 67%). These results suggest that chicken AA amyloidosis can be induced by vaccinations, and may be transmitted among like species by oral administration. PMID:23548152

  16. The 9aaTAD Transactivation Domains: From Gal4 to p53.

    PubMed

    Piskacek, Martin; Havelka, Marek; Rezacova, Martina; Knight, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The family of the Nine amino acid Transactivation Domain, 9aaTAD family, comprises currently over 40 members. The 9aaTAD domains are universally recognized by the transcriptional machinery from yeast to man. We had identified the 9aaTAD domains in the p53, Msn2, Pdr1 and B42 activators by our prediction algorithm. In this study, their competence to activate transcription as small peptides was proven. Not surprisingly, we elicited immense 9aaTAD divergence in hundreds of identified orthologs and numerous examples of the 9aaTAD species' convergence. We found unforeseen similarity of the mammalian p53 with yeast Gal4 9aaTAD domains. Furthermore, we identified artificial 9aaTAD domains generated accidentally by others. From an evolutionary perspective, the observed easiness to generate 9aaTAD transactivation domains indicates the natural advantage for spontaneous generation of transcription factors from DNA binding precursors. PMID:27618436

  17. Bridge Types: Suspension Bridge Spans, Section AA; Cantilever Truss Spans, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Bridge Types: Suspension Bridge Spans, Section A-A; Cantilever Truss Spans, Section B-B; Through Truss Spans, Section C-C; Deck Truss Spans, Section D-D - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  18. Controlling Works, Section AA at Bear Trap Dam, Section BB ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Controlling Works, Section A-A at Bear Trap Dam, Section B-B at Bear-Trap Dam, Section C-C at Sluice Gate - Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal, Lockport Controlling Works, Illinois Waterway River Mile 293.2, Lockport, Will County, IL

  19. 32. SECTIONS AA, BB, CC, DD, AND EE WASTE CALCINATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. SECTIONS A-A, B-B, C-C, D-D, AND E-E WASTE CALCINATION FACILITY SHOWING RELATIONSHIPS OF DIFFERENT FLOOR LEVELS TO ONE ANOTHER. INEEL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0633-00-287-106353. FLUOR NUMBER 5775-CPP-633-A-3. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  20. Selective Laser Treatment on Cold-Sprayed Titanium Coatings: Numerical Modeling and Experimental Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlone, Pierpaolo; Astarita, Antonello; Rubino, Felice; Pasquino, Nicola; Aprea, Paolo

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a selective laser post-deposition on pure grade II titanium coatings, cold-sprayed on AA2024-T3 sheets, was experimentally and numerically investigated. Morphological features, microstructure, and chemical composition of the treated zone were assessed by means of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry. Microhardness measurements were also carried out to evaluate the mechanical properties of the coating. A numerical model of the laser treatment was implemented and solved to simulate the process and discuss the experimental outcomes. Obtained results highlighted the key role played by heat input and dimensional features on the effectiveness of the treatment.

  1. 49 CFR 178.56 - Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders. 178... FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.56 Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4AA480 cylinder is a welded steel cylinder having a...

  2. 49 CFR 178.37 - Specification 3AA and 3AAX seamless steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Specification 3AA and 3AAX seamless steel...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.37 Specification 3AA and 3AAX seamless steel... conform to the following: (1) A DOT-3AA cylinder is a seamless steel cylinder with a water...

  3. 49 CFR 178.37 - Specification 3AA and 3AAX seamless steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specification 3AA and 3AAX seamless steel...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.37 Specification 3AA and 3AAX seamless steel... conform to the following: (1) A DOT-3AA cylinder is a seamless steel cylinder with a water...

  4. 49 CFR 178.56 - Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders. 178... FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.56 Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4AA480 cylinder is a welded steel cylinder having a...

  5. 49 CFR 178.56 - Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders. 178... FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.56 Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4AA480 cylinder is a welded steel cylinder having a...

  6. 49 CFR 178.37 - Specification 3AA and 3AAX seamless steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Specification 3AA and 3AAX seamless steel...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.37 Specification 3AA and 3AAX seamless steel... conform to the following: (1) A DOT-3AA cylinder is a seamless steel cylinder with a water...

  7. 49 CFR 178.37 - Specification 3AA and 3AAX seamless steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specification 3AA and 3AAX seamless steel...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.37 Specification 3AA and 3AAX seamless steel... conform to the following: (1) A DOT-3AA cylinder is a seamless steel cylinder with a water...

  8. 49 CFR 178.56 - Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders. 178... FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.56 Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4AA480 cylinder is a welded steel cylinder having a...

  9. Displaying Now-Understanding: The Finnish Change-of-State Token "aa"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koivisto, Aino

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the use of the Finnish change-of-state token "aa" that has previously not been identified. The central claim is that even though "aa" indicates a cognitive shift experienced by the speaker, it does not function as a receipt of new information. Instead, the token "aa" indicates that the speaker…

  10. An Analysis of the Rise and Fall of the AA-MAS Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarus, Sheryl S.; Thurlow, Martha L.; Ysseldyke, James E.; Edwards, Lynn M.

    2015-01-01

    In 2005, to address concerns about students who might fall in the "gap" between the regular assessment and the alternate assessment based on alternate achievement standards (AA-AAS), the U.S. Department of Education announced that states could develop alternate assessments based on modified achievement standards (AA-MAS). This article…

  11. An Existential Approach: An Alternative to the AA Model of Recovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Maria A.; Cobia, Debra

    2008-01-01

    Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) is the most widely used organization for the treatment of alcoholism. AA's philosophy has changed how many people view themselves and their substance use. The majority of substance abuse programs in the United States use the 12 steps, either by making them the basis of their treatment program, or by introducing AA to…

  12. Nitrification in a zeoponic substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGilloway, R. L.; Weaver, R. W.; Ming, D. W.; Gruener, J. E.

    2003-01-01

    Clinoptilolite is a zeolite mineral with high cation exchange capacity used in zeoponic substrates that have been proposed as a solid medium for growing plants or as a fertilizer material. The kinetics of nitrification has not been measured for NH4+ saturated zeoponic substrate. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the production of NO2- and NO3-, and nitrifier populations in zeoponic substrates. Small columns were filled with zeoponic substrate inoculated with a commercial inoculum or soil enrichment culture of nitrifying bacteria. In addition to column studies, a growth chamber study was conducted to evaluate the kinetics of nitrification in zeoponic substrates used to grow radishes (Raphanus sativus L.). The zeoponic substrate provided a readily available source of NH4+, and nitrifying bacteria were active in the substrate. Ammonium oxidation rates in column studies ranged from 5 to 10 micrograms N g-1 substrate h-1, and NO2- oxidation rates were 2 to 9.5 micrograms N g-1 substrate h-1. Rates determined from the growth chamber study were approximately 1.2 micrograms N g-1 substrate h-1. Quantities of NH4+ oxidized to NO2- and NO3- in inoculated zeoponic substrate were in excess of plant up-take. Acidification as a result of NH4+ oxidation resulted in a pH decline, and the zeoponic substrate showed limited buffering capacity.

  13. A Status Report on the AAS Astronomy Ambassadors Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fienberg, Richard Tresch; Fraknoi, Andrew; Gurton, Suzanne; Hurst, Anna; Schatz, Dennis L.

    2014-06-01

    The American Astronomical Society, in partnership with the Astronomical Society of the Pacific (ASP), has launched a series of professional-development workshops and a community of practice designed to improve early-career astronomers’ ability to communicate effectively with students and the public. Called AAS Astronomy Ambassadors, the program provides training and mentoring for young astronomers, from advanced undergraduates to beginning faculty; it also provides them access to resources and a network of contacts within the astronomy education and public outreach (EPO) community. Ambassadors are provided with a library of outreach activities and resource materials suitable for a range of venues and audiences. For much of this library we are using resources developed by organizations such as the ASP, the Pacific Science Center, and the Center for Astronomy Education for other outreach programs, though some resources have been created by one of us (AF) specifically for this program. After a period of evaluation and revision, the program’s “Menu of Outreach Opportunities for Science Education” (MOOSE) is now posted on the AAS website at http://aas.org/outreach/moose-menu-outreach-opportunities-science-education.The first two Astronomy Ambassadors workshops were held at AAS meetings in January 2013 and January 2014; each served 30 young astronomers chosen from about twice that many applicants. Web-based follow-up activities are being provided through a website at the ASP designed to keep cohorts of educators trained in their programs in touch with one another. The AAS is exploring ways to fund additional workshops at future winter meetings; suggestions are most welcome. Meanwhile, the Astronomy Ambassadors trained to date have logged more than 150 outreach events, reaching many thousands of children and adults across the U.S. and Canada.

  14. 2002 AA 29: Earth's recurrent quasi-satellite?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wajer, Paweł

    2009-03-01

    We study the dynamical evolution of Asteroid 2002 AA 29. This object moves in the co-orbital region of the Earth and is the first known asteroid which experiences recurrent horseshoe-quasi-satellite transitions. The transitions between the HS and QS states are unique among other known Earth co-orbital asteroids and in the QS state 2002 AA 29 remains very close to Earth (within 0.2 AU for several decades [Connors, M., Chodas, P., Mikkola, S., Wiegert, P., Veillet, C., Innanen, K., 2002. Meteorit. Planet. Sci. 37, 1435-1441]). Based on results obtained analytically by Brasser et al. [Brasser, R., Heggie, D.C., Mikkola, S., 2004b. Celest. Mech. Dynam. Astron. 88, 123-152] we developed a simple analytical method to describe and analyze the motion of 2002 AA 29. We distinguish a few moments in time crucial for understanding its dynamics. Near 2400 and 2500 this object will be close to going through the maxima of the averaged disturbing function and it will either change its co-orbital regime by transition from the HS into QS state, or leave the librating mode. These approaches generate instability in the motion of 2002 AA 29. By means of 66 observations, covering a two-year interval, we extend the analysis of the long term evolution of this object presented by Connors et al. [Connors, M., Chodas, P., Mikkola, S., Wiegert, P., Veillet, C., Innanen, K., 2002. Meteorit. Planet. Sci. 37, 1435-1441] and Brasser et al. [Brasser, R., Innanen, K.A., Connors, M., Veillet, C., Wiegert, P., Mikkola, S., Chodas, P.W., 2004a. Icarus 171, 102-109]. Our analysis is based on a sample of 100 cloned orbits. We show that the motion of 2002 AA 29 is predictable in the time interval [-2600,7100] and outside of this interval the past and future orbital history can be studied using statistical methods.

  15. Computational Investigation of Hardness Evolution During Friction-Stir Welding of AA5083 and AA2139 Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Arakere, G.; Yen, C.-F.; Cheeseman, B. A.

    2011-10-01

    A fully coupled thermo-mechanical finite-element analysis of the friction-stir welding (FSW) process developed in our previous work is combined with the basic physical metallurgy of two wrought aluminum alloys to predict/assess their FSW behaviors. The two alloys selected are AA5083 (a solid-solution strengthened and strain-hardened/stabilized Al-Mg-Mn alloy) and AA2139 (a precipitation hardened quaternary Al-Cu-Mg-Ag alloy). Both of these alloys are currently being used in military-vehicle hull structural and armor systems. In the case of non-age-hardenable AA5083, the dominant microstructure-evolution processes taking place during FSW are extensive plastic deformation and dynamic re-crystallization of highly deformed material subjected to elevated temperatures approaching the melting temperature. In the case of AA2139, in addition to plastic deformation and dynamic recrystallization, precipitates coarsening, over-aging, dissolution, and re-precipitation had to be also considered. Limited data available in the open literature pertaining to the kinetics of the aforementioned microstructure-evolution processes are used to predict variation in the material hardness throughout the various FSW zones of the two alloys. The computed results are found to be in reasonably good agreement with their experimental counterparts.

  16. 40 CFR Table Aa-1 to Subpart Aa of... - Kraft Pulping Liquor Emissions Factors for Biomass-Based CO2, CH4, and N2O

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Kraft Pulping Liquor Emissions Factors for Biomass-Based CO2, CH4, and N2O AA Table AA-1 to Subpart AA of Part 98 Protection of Environment... Liquor Emissions Factors for Biomass-Based CO2, CH4, and N2O Wood furnish Biomass-based emissions...

  17. 40 CFR Table Aa-1 to Subpart Aa of... - Kraft Pulping Liquor Emissions Factors for Biomass-Based CO2, CH4, and N2O

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Kraft Pulping Liquor Emissions Factors for Biomass-Based CO2, CH4, and N2O AA Table AA-1 to Subpart AA of Part 98 Protection of Environment... Liquor Emissions Factors for Biomass-Based CO2, CH4, and N2O Wood furnish Biomass-based emissions...

  18. 40 CFR Table Aa-1 to Subpart Aa of... - Kraft Pulping Liquor Emissions Factors for Biomass-Based CO2, CH4, and N2O

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Kraft Pulping Liquor Emissions Factors for Biomass-Based CO2, CH4, and N2O AA Table AA-1 to Subpart AA of Part 98 Protection of Environment... Liquor Emissions Factors for Biomass-Based CO2, CH4, and N2O Wood furnish Biomass-based emissions...

  19. 40 CFR Table Aa-1 to Subpart Aa of... - Kraft Pulping Liquor Emissions Factors for Biomass-Based CO2, CH4, and N2O

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... for Biomass-Based CO2, CH4, and N2O AA Table AA-1 to Subpart AA of Part 98 Protection of Environment... Liquor Emissions Factors for Biomass-Based CO2, CH4, and N2O Wood furnish Biomass-based emissions factors(kg/mmBtu HHV) CO2 a CH4 N2O North American Softwood 94.4 0.030 0.005 North American Hardwood...

  20. 40 CFR Table Aa-2 to Subpart Aa of... - Kraft Lime Kiln and Calciner Emissions Factors for Fossil Fuel-Based CH4 and N2O

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Kraft Lime Kiln and Calciner Emissions Factors for Fossil Fuel-Based CH4 and N2O AA Table AA-2 to Subpart AA of Part 98 Protection of Environment... and Calciner Emissions Factors for Fossil Fuel-Based CH4 and N2O Fuel Fossil fuel-based...

  1. 40 CFR Table Aa-2 to Subpart Aa of... - Kraft Lime Kiln and Calciner Emissions Factors for Fossil Fuel-Based CH4 and N2O

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Kraft Lime Kiln and Calciner Emissions Factors for Fossil Fuel-Based CH4 and N2O AA Table AA-2 to Subpart AA of Part 98 Protection of Environment... and Calciner Emissions Factors for Fossil Fuel-Based CH4 and N2O Fuel Fossil fuel-based...

  2. 40 CFR Table Aa-2 to Subpart Aa of... - Kraft Lime Kiln and Calciner Emissions Factors for Fossil Fuel-Based CH4 and N2O

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Kraft Lime Kiln and Calciner Emissions Factors for Fossil Fuel-Based CH4 and N2O AA Table AA-2 to Subpart AA of Part 98 Protection of Environment... and Calciner Emissions Factors for Fossil Fuel-Based CH4 and N2O Fuel Fossil fuel-based...

  3. Maintainable substrate carrier for electroplating

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chen-An; Abas, Emmanuel Chua; Divino, Edmundo Anida; Ermita, Jake Randal G.; Capulong, Jose Francisco S.; Castillo, Arnold Villamor; Ma; Diana Xiaobing

    2012-07-17

    One embodiment relates to a substrate carrier for use in electroplating a plurality of substrates. The carrier includes a non-conductive carrier body on which the substrates are placed and conductive lines embedded within the carrier body. A plurality of conductive clip attachment parts are attached in a permanent manner to the conductive lines embedded within the carrier body. A plurality of contact clips are attached in a removable manner to the clip attachment parts. The contact clips hold the substrates in place and conductively connecting the substrates with the conductive lines. Other embodiments, aspects and features are also disclosed.

  4. Maintainable substrate carrier for electroplating

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Chen-An; Abas, Emmanuel Chua; Divino, Edmundo Anida; Ermita, Jake Randal G.; Capulong, Jose Francisco S.; Castillo, Arnold Villamor; Ma, Diana Xiaobing

    2016-08-02

    One embodiment relates to a substrate carrier for use in electroplating a plurality of substrates. The carrier includes a non-conductive carrier body on which the substrates are placed and conductive lines embedded within the carrier body. A plurality of conductive clip attachment parts are attached in a permanent manner to the conductive lines embedded within the carrier body. A plurality of contact clips are attached in a removable manner to the clip attachment parts. The contact clips hold the substrates in place and conductively connecting the substrates with the conductive lines. Other embodiments, aspects and features are also disclosed.

  5. Fatigue properties of as-welded AA6005 and AA6082 aluminium alloys in T1 and T5 temper condition

    SciTech Connect

    Ranes, M.; Kluken, A.O.; Midling, O.T.

    1996-12-31

    The present investigation was undertaken to determine the as-welded fatigue properties of AA6005 and AA6082 aluminium alloys in the T1 and T5 temper conditions. Extruded flat bars of the base materials were welded by means of the Metal Inert Gas (MIG), Friction Stir and Plasma-keyhole techniques. The latter technique was only employed for alloy AA6005. The weldments were subsequently fatigue tested at a load ratio of 0.5. The results revealed that the friction stir welds had fatigue properties superior to both the MIG and Plasma-keyhole welds. For alloy AA6005 the fatigue properties of the friction stir weld was close to the base material properties. The shortest fatigue life was exhibited by the MIG welds. The fatigue strength of these weldments appear to be affected by the base metal temper condition. For this reason, MIG welds on alloy AA6082 should be performed in the T5 temper condition, while alloy AA6005 should be welded in the T1 temper condition. Plasma-keyhole welds should be performed on T1 tempered material rather than on T5 tempered material. Repair welding of MIG welds on the T1 tempered base material resulted in improved fatigue properties of AA6082 weldments, while the fatigue strength of AA6005 weldments remained unaffected. The fatigue properties of MIG welds in alloy AA6082 correspond well with the static strength properties.

  6. Substrate inhibition of transketolase.

    PubMed

    Solovjeva, Olga N; Kovina, Marina V; Kochetov, German A

    2016-03-01

    We studied the influence of the acceptor substrate of transketolase on the activity of the enzyme in the presence of reductants. Ribose-5-phosphate in the presence of cyanoborohydride decreased the transketolase catalytic activity. The inhibition is caused by the loss of catalytic function of the coenzyme-thiamine diphosphate. Similar inhibitory effect was observed in the presence of NADPH. This could indicate its possible regulatory role not only towards transketolase, but also towards the pentose phosphate pathway of carbohydrate metabolism overall, taking into account the fact that it inhibits not only transketolase but also another enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway--glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase [Eggleston L.V., Krebs H.A. Regulation of the pentose phosphate cycle, Biochem. J. 138 (1974) 425-435]. PMID:26708478

  7. Young People in Alcoholics Anonymous: the role of spiritual orientation and AA member affiliation.

    PubMed

    Galanter, Marc; Dermatis, Helen; Santucci, Courtney

    2012-01-01

    Empirical findings characterizing long-term, committed Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) members are limited, particularly among younger members. The authors studied a sample of 266 highly committed attendees (mean age, 27 years) at an annual conference of Young People in Alcoholics Anonymous (YPAA), whose first encounter with AA was 6 years previously. Most (72%) had abused drugs and alcohol, and 36% had never received substance abuse treatment. They now reported a mean duration of abstinence of 44 months and had attended an average of 233 AA meetings in the previous year; 66% had served as AA sponsors, and 92% reported experiencing an AA "spiritual awakening," itself associated with a decreased likelihood of alcohol craving. Scores on AA beliefs, affiliation to other members, and the experience of spiritual awakening were associated with lower depression scores. These findings are discussed to clarify the nature of long-term AA membership. PMID:22540438

  8. Frictional conditions between alloy AA6060 aluminium and tool steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widerøe, Fredrik; Welo, Torgeir

    2011-05-01

    The frictional conditions in the new process of screw extrusion of aluminium have been investigated. The contact behaviour between the aluminum alloy and the tool steel in the extruder is vital for understanding the extrusion process. Using a compressive-rotational method for frictional measurements the conditions for unlubricated sticking friction between aluminum alloy AA6060 and tool steel at different combinations of temperatures and pressures have been investigated. In this method the samples in the form of disks are put under hydrostatic pressure while simultaneously being rotated at one end. Pins made from contrast material have been inserted into the samples to measure the deformation introduced. This approach along with 3D simulations form a method for determining the frictional conditions. The paper describes the test method and the results. It was found that the necessary pressure for sticking to occur between the aluminum AA6060 and the different parts of the extruder is heavily influenced by the temperature.

  9. AA-stacked bilayer square ice between graphene layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobrino Fernandez Mario, M.; Neek-Amal, M.; Peeters, F. M.

    2015-12-01

    Water confined between two graphene layers with a separation of a few Å forms a layered two-dimensional ice structure. Using large scale molecular dynamics simulations with the adoptable ReaxFF interatomic potential we found that flat monolayer ice with a rhombic-square structure nucleates between the graphene layers which is nonpolar and nonferroelectric. We provide different energetic considerations and H-bonding results that explain the interlayer and intralayer properties of two-dimensional ice. The controversial AA stacking found experimentally [Algara-Siller et al., Nature (London) 519, 443 (2015), 10.1038/nature14295] is consistent with our minimum-energy crystal structure of bilayer ice. Furthermore, we predict that an odd number of layers of ice has the same lattice structure as monolayer ice, while an even number of ice layers exhibits the square ice AA stacking of bilayer ice.

  10. AA protein-related renal amyloidosis in drug addicts.

    PubMed Central

    Menchel, S.; Cohen, D.; Gross, E.; Frangione, B.; Gallo, G.

    1983-01-01

    Reports of renal amyloidosis occurring among narcotic addicts have been limited, for the most part, to case reports. In a prospective survey of 150 addicts examined at autopsy in the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner of the City of New York, 7 cases of renal amyloidosis were found. Immunohistologic examination demonstrated that in all of the 7 cases, the amyloid was AA protein-related. The amyloid extracted from the kidneys of two addicts and analyzed biochemically did not differ from the AA amyloid secondary to chronic infectious and inflammatory diseases. The combined data of previous reports and the present survey demonstrate that addicts who are subcutaneous users with skin infections most frequently develop amyloidosis. Our data demonstrating renal amyloidosis in 26% of addicts with chronic suppurative skin infections suggest that such addicts are at high risk for the development of amyloidosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:6881286

  11. 184AA3: a xenograft model of ER+ breast adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hines, William C; Kuhn, Irene; Thi, Kate; Chu, Berbie; Stanford-Moore, Gaelen; Sampayo, Rocío; Garbe, James C; Stampfer, Martha; Borowsky, Alexander D; Bissell, Mina J

    2016-01-01

    Despite the prevalence and significant morbidity resulting from estrogen receptor positive (ER(+)) breast adenocarcinomas, there are only a few models of this cancer subtype available for drug development and arguably none for studying etiology. Those models that do exist have questionable clinical relevance. Given our goal of developing luminal models, we focused on six cell lines derived by minimal mutagenesis from normal human breast cells, and asked if any could generate clinically relevant xenografts, which we then extensively characterized. Xenografts of one cell line, 184AA3, consistently formed ER(+) adenocarcinomas that had a high proliferative rate and other features consistent with "luminal B" intrinsic subtype. Squamous and spindle cell/mesenchymal differentiation was absent, in stark contrast to other cell lines that we examined or others have reported. We explored intratumoral heterogeneity produced by 184AA3 by immunophenotyping xenograft tumors and cultured cells, and characterized marker expression by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. A CD44(High) subpopulation was discovered, yet their tumor forming ability was far less than CD44(Low) cells. Single cell cloning revealed the phenotypic plasticity of 184AA3, consistent with the intratumoral heterogeneity observed in xenografts. Characterization of ER expression in cultures revealed ER protein and signaling is intact, yet when estrogen was depleted in culture, and in vivo, it did not impact cell or tumor growth, analogous to therapeutically resistant ER(+) cancers. This model is appropriate for studies of the etiology of ovarian hormone independent adenocarcinomas, for identification of therapeutic targets, predictive testing, and drug development. PMID:26661596

  12. The trajectory and atmospheric impact of asteroid 2014 AA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnocchia, Davide; Chesley, Steven R.; Brown, Peter G.; Chodas, Paul W.

    2016-08-01

    Near-Earth asteroid 2014 AA entered the Earth's atmosphere on 2014 January 2, only 21 h after being discovered by the Catalina Sky Survey. In this paper we compute the trajectory of 2014 AA by combining the available optical astrometry, seven ground-based observations over 69 min, and the International Monitoring System detection of the atmospheric impact infrasonic airwaves in a least-squares orbit estimation filter. The combination of these two sources of observations results in a tremendous improvement in the orbit uncertainties. The impact time is 3:05 UT with a 1σ uncertainty of 6 min, while the impact location corresponds to a west longitude of 44.2° and a latitude of 13.1° with a 1σ uncertainty of 140 km. The minimum impact energy estimated from the infrasound data and the impact velocity result in an estimated minimum mass of 22.6 t. By propagating the trajectory of 2014 AA backwards we find that the only window for finding precovery observations is for the three days before its discovery.

  13. Long-term biases in geomagnetic K and aa indices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Analysis is made of the geomagnetic-activity aa index and its source K-index data from groups of ground-based observatories in Britain, and Australia, 1868.0-2009.0, solar cycles 11-23. The K data show persistent biases, especially for high (low) K-activity levels at British (Australian) observatories. From examination of multiple subsets of the K data we infer that the biases are not predominantly the result of changes in observatory location, localized induced magnetotelluric currents, changes in magnetometer technology, or the modernization of K-value estimation methods. Instead, the biases appear to be artifacts of the latitude-dependent scaling used to assign K values to particular local levels of geomagnetic activity. The biases are not effectively removed by weighting factors used to estimate aa. We show that long-term averages of the aa index, such as annual averages, are dominated by medium-level geomagnetic activity levels having K values of 3 and 4. ?? 2011 Author(s).

  14. PLZT capacitor on glass substrate

    DOEpatents

    Fairchild, M. Ray; Taylor, Ralph S.; Berlin, Carl W.; Wong, Celine W. K.; Ma, Beihai; Balachandran, Uthamalingam

    2016-01-05

    A lead-lanthanum-zirconium-titanate (PLZT) capacitor on a substrate formed of glass. The first metallization layer is deposited on a top side of the substrate to form a first electrode. The dielectric layer of PLZT is deposited over the first metallization layer. The second metallization layer deposited over the dielectric layer to form a second electrode. The glass substrate is advantageous as glass is compatible with an annealing process used to form the capacitor.

  15. PLZT capacitor on glass substrate

    DOEpatents

    Fairchild, Manuel Ray; Taylor, Ralph S.; Berlin, Carl W.; Wong, Celine Wk; Ma, Beihai; Balachandran, Uthamalingam

    2016-03-29

    A lead-lanthanum-zirconium-titanate (PLZT) capacitor on a substrate formed of glass. The first metallization layer is deposited on a top side of the substrate to form a first electrode. The dielectric layer of PLZT is deposited over the first metallization layer. The second metallization layer deposited over the dielectric layer to form a second electrode. The glass substrate is advantageous as glass is compatible with an annealing process used to form the capacitor.

  16. Sealed substrate carrier for electroplating

    DOEpatents

    Ganti, Kalyana Bhargava

    2012-07-17

    One embodiment relates to a substrate carrier for use in electroplating a plurality of substrates. The substrate carrier includes a non-conductive carrier body on which the substrates are held, and conductive lines are embedded within the carrier body. A conductive bus bar is embedded into a top side of the carrier body and is conductively coupled to the conductive lines. A thermoplastic overmold covers a portion of the bus bar, and there is a plastic-to-plastic bond between the thermoplastic overmold and the non-conductive carrier body. Other embodiments, aspects and features are also disclosed.

  17. Pedestal substrate for coated optics

    DOEpatents

    Hale, Layton C.; Malsbury, Terry N.; Patterson, Steven R.

    2001-01-01

    A pedestal optical substrate that simultaneously provides high substrate dynamic stiffness, provides low surface figure sensitivity to mechanical mounting hardware inputs, and constrains surface figure changes caused by optical coatings to be primarily spherical in nature. The pedestal optical substrate includes a disk-like optic or substrate section having a top surface that is coated, a disk-like base section that provides location at which the substrate can be mounted, and a connecting cylindrical section between the base and optics or substrate sections. The connecting cylindrical section may be attached via three spaced legs or members. However, the pedestal optical substrate can be manufactured from a solid piece of material to form a monolith, thus avoiding joints between the sections, or the disk-like base can be formed separately and connected to the connecting section. By way of example, the pedestal optical substrate may be utilized in the fabrication of optics for an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography imaging system, or in any optical system requiring coated optics and substrates with reduced sensitivity to mechanical mounts.

  18. Local Plastic Deformation and Failure Behavior of Nd:YAG Laser Welds in AA5182-O and AA6111-T4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Wei; Hector, Louis G.; Dasch, Cameron; Tao, Hong; Jiang, Xiquan

    2007-12-01

    An experimental methodology that quantifies tensile properties and damage accumulation in Nd:YAG laser welds in aluminum sheet metals is presented. Coupons identified as AA5182-O and AA6111-T4, with bead-on-plate and lap welds in various configurations, were quasi-statically strained to fracture in a miniature tensile stage. Two-dimensional strain fields, measured with a state-of-the-art digital image correlation (DIC) algorithm, served as the basis for the calculation of true stress-true strain behavior and the salient tensile properties of the weld materials. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis provided estimates of fracture strength, while ultrasonic microscopy was used to quantify weld porosity and establish a qualitative linkage with observed deformation behavior. Although containing substantial porosity, the AA5182-O all-weld material was found to have greater ductility than the AA6111-T4 material. The nominal strength of the AA5182-O/AA6111-T4 lap welds exceeded that of welds in AA6111-T4/AA5182-O, up to 50 pct strain. This suggests that bimaterial lap-weld strength at large plastic strains is dependent upon the placement of each Al alloy relative to the laser beam. Atomic force microscopy confirmed that fracture consistently occurred along weld/base metal interfaces, irrespective of the alloy type.

  19. Promoters of AaGL2 and AaMIXTA-Like1 genes of Artemisia annua direct reporter gene expression in glandular and non-glandular trichomes

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Sunita; Longchar, Bendangchuchang; Singh, Alka; Gupta, Vikrant

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we report cloning and analysis of promoters of GLABRA2 (AaGL2) homolog and a MIXTA-Like (AaMIXTA-Like1) gene from Artemisia annua. The upstream regulatory regions of AaGL2 and AaMIXTA-Like1 showed the presence of several crucial cis-acting elements. Arabidopsis and A. annua seedlings were transiently transfected with the promoter-GUS constructs using a robust agro-infiltration method. Both AaGL2 and AaMIXTA-Like1 promoters showed GUS expression preferentially in Arabidopsis single-celled trichomes and glandular as well as T-shaped trichomes of A. annua. Transgenic Arabidopsis harboring constructs in which AaGL2 or AaMIXTA-Like1 promoters would control GFP expression, showed fluorescence emanating specifically from trichome cells. Our study provides a fast and efficient method to study trichome-specific expression, and 2 promoters that have potential for targeted metabolic engineering in plants. PMID:26340695

  20. Through-thickness recrystallization characteristics of a laminated AA3xxx–AA6xxx aluminum alloy system

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, L.H.; Jin, H.; Gallerneault, M.; Esmaeili, S.

    2015-03-15

    The through-thickness annealing behavior of a laminated AA3xxx–AA6xxx alloy system at 300 °C has been studied by scanning electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction analysis, electron probe micro-analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and hardness measurement. Results show that the recrystallization process starts at the interface region between the AA3xxx (clad) and AA6xxx (core) layers. Subsequently, the recrystallization process front progresses into the core layer, while the clad layer is the last region to recrystallize. It is also found that precipitation precedes recrystallization in the entire laminate at the investigated temperature. The preferential onset of recrystallization at the interface region is attributed to the net driving pressure being the highest in this region. The factors that lead to such enhanced net driving pressure are (a) deformation incompatibility between the two alloy layers, (b) lower solute content of the interface, which also leads to lower volume fraction of precipitates, and (c) an accelerated rate of precipitate coarsening due to the presence of a higher density of dislocations. The gradual progress of recrystallization from the interface towards the core layer is dictated by precipitate coarsening and the dependence of its rate on the density of deformation-induced dislocations. The lower driving pressure due to lower work hardening capacity, high solute drag pressure due to Mn, and additional Zener drag from precipitates that form due to solute redistribution during annealing explain the late initiation of recrystallization in the clad layer. - Highlights: • The through-thickness recrystallization of a laminated system is investigated. • The early onset of recrystallization at the interface is discussed. • The effects of precipitation and coarsening on recrystallization are analyzed.

  1. Carbon nanotubes on a substrate

    DOEpatents

    Gao, Yufei [Kennewick, WA; Liu, Jun [West Richland, WA

    2002-03-26

    The present invention includes carbon nanotubes whose hollow cores are 100% filled with conductive filler. The carbon nanotubes are in uniform arrays on a conductive substrate and are well-aligned and can be densely packed. The uniformity of the carbon nanotube arrays is indicated by the uniform length and diameter of the carbon nanotubes, both which vary from nanotube to nanotube on a given array by no more than about 5%. The alignment of the carbon nanotubes is indicated by the perpendicular growth of the nanotubes from the substrates which is achieved in part by the simultaneous growth of the conductive filler within the hollow core of the nanotube and the densely packed growth of the nanotubes. The present invention provides a densely packed carbon nanotube growth where each nanotube is in contact with at least one nearest-neighbor nanotube. The substrate is a conductive substrate coated with a growth catalyst, and the conductive filler can be single crystals of carbide formed by a solid state reaction between the substrate material and the growth catalyst. The present invention further provides a method for making the filled carbon nanotubes on the conductive substrates. The method includes the steps of depositing a growth catalyst onto the conductive substrate as a prepared substrate, creating a vacuum within a vessel which contains the prepared substrate, flowing H2/inert (e.g. Ar) gas within the vessel to increase and maintain the pressure within the vessel, increasing the temperature of the prepared substrate, and changing the H2/Ar gas to ethylene gas such that the ethylene gas flows within the vessel. Additionally, varying the density and separation of the catalyst particles on the conductive substrate can be used to control the diameter of the nanotubes.

  2. Photoresist substrate having robust adhesion

    DOEpatents

    Dentinger, Paul M.

    2005-07-26

    A substrate material for LIGA applications w hose general composition is Ti/Cu/Ti/SiO.sub.2. The SiO.sub.2 is preferably applied to the Ti/Cu/Ti wafer as a sputtered coating, typically about 100 nm thick. This substrate composition provides improved adhesion for epoxy-based photoresist materials, and particularly the photoresist material SU-8.

  3. Substrate With Low Secondary Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Kenneth A. (Inventor); Curren, Arthur N. (Inventor); Roman, Robert F. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method and apparatus for producing a highly -textured surface on a copper substrate -with only extremely small amounts of texture-inducing seeding or masking material. The texture-inducing seeding material is delivered to the copper substrate electrically switching the seeding material in and out of a circuit loop.

  4. Control of respiration in proteoliposomes containing cytochrome aa3. I. Stimulation by valinomycin and uncoupler.

    PubMed

    Hansen, F B; Miller, M; Nicholls, P

    1978-06-01

    1. Both valinomycin and p-trifluoromethoxy carbonyl cyanide phenylhydrazone (FCCP) are required for full release of respiration by cytochrome c oxidase-containing proteoliposomes (prepared by sonicating beef heart cytochrome aa3 in salt solution with 4 parts phosphatidylcholine, 4 parts phosphatidylethanolamine and 2 parts cardiolipin) in the presence of external ascorbate and cytochrome c. In the absence of valinomycin the response to FCCP is rather sluggish, as reported by Wrigglesworth et al. (1976) (Abstracts, 10th Int. Congr. Biochem., No. 06-6-230). 2. The Km for cytochrome c in 67 mM, pH 7.4, phosphate buffer with ascorbate as substrate, was 9 micrometer in both absence and presence of valinomycin and FCCP. Energization thus acts non-competitively towards cytochrome c oxidation. 3. The apparent Km for oxygen is greater in the energized than in the deenergized state; double reciprocal plots of respiration rate versus oxygen concentration are concave downward in the absence of uncouplers, as found with intact mitochondria. Energization thus acts "competitively" towards oxygen. 4. Despite the lack of a functional ATPase system, all the kinetic features of energization found in intact mitochondria can be mimicked in the reconstituted liposomes. This supports the chemiosmotic idea that electrical and perhaps H+ gradients modify the oxidase activity in reconstituted vesicles. PMID:207320

  5. Electrospray Ionization on Solid Substrates

    PubMed Central

    So, Pui-Kin; Hu, Bin; Yao, Zhong-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Development of electrospray ionization on solid substrates (solid-substrate ESI) avoids the clogging problem encountered in conventional capillary-based ESI, allows more convenient sampling and permits new applications. So far, solid-substrate ESI with various materials, e.g., metals, paper, wood, fibers and biological tissue, has been developed, and applications ranging from analysis of pure compounds to complex mixtures as well as in vivo study were demonstrated. Particularly, the capability of solid-substrate ESI in direct analysis of complex samples, e.g., biological fluids and foods, has significantly facilitated mass spectrometric analysis in real-life applications and led to increasingly important roles of these techniques nowadays. In this review, various solid-substrate ESI techniques and their applications are summarized and the prospects in this field are discussed. PMID:26819900

  6. Composite substrate for bipolar electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Tekkanat, B.; Bolstad, J.J.

    1992-12-22

    Substrates for electrode systems, particularly those to be used for bipolar electrodes in zinc-bromine batteries, are disclosed. The substrates preferably include carbon-black as a conductive filler in a polymeric matrix, with reinforcing materials such as glass fibers. Warpage of the zinc-bromine electrodes which was experienced in the prior art and which was believed to be caused by physical expansion of the electrodes due to bromine absorption by the carbon-black, is substantially eliminated when new substrate fabrication techniques are employed. In the present invention, substrates are prepared using a lamination process known as glass mat reinforced thermoplastics technology or, in an alternate embodiment, the substrate is made using a slurry process. 4 figs.

  7. Composite substrate for bipolar electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Tekkanat, Bora; Bolstad, James J.

    1992-12-22

    Substrates for electrode systems, particularly those to be used for bipolar electrodes in zinc-bromine batteries, are disclosed. The substrates preferably include carbon-black as a conductive filler in a polymeric matrix, with reinforcing materials such as glass fibers. Warpage of the zinc-bromine electrodes which was experienced in the prior art and which was believed to be caused by physical expansion of the electrodes due to bromine absorption by the carbon-black, is substantially eliminated when new substrate fabrication techniques are employed. In the pesent invention, substrates are prepared using a lamination process known as glass mat reinforced thermoplastics technology or, in an alternate embodiment, the substrate is made using a slurry process.

  8. Substrate recognition by ADAR1 and ADAR2.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, S K; Sato, S; Lazinski, D W

    2001-01-01

    RNA editing catalyzed by ADAR1 and ADAR2 involves the site-specific conversion of adenosine to inosine within imperfectly duplexed RNA. ADAR1- and ADAR2-mediated editing occurs within transcripts of glutamate receptors (GluR) in the brain and in hepatitis delta virus (HDV) RNA in the liver. Although the Q/R site within the GluR-B premessage is edited more efficiently by ADAR2 than it is by ADAR1, the converse is true for the +60 site within this same transcript. ADAR1 and ADAR2 are homologs having two common functional regions, an N-terminal double-stranded RNA-binding domain and a C-terminal deaminase domain. It is neither understood why only certain adenosines within a substrate molecule serve as targets for ADARs, nor is it known which domain of an ADAR confers its specificity for particular editing sites. To assess the importance of several aspects of RNA sequence and structure on editing, we evaluated 20 different mutated substrates, derived from four editing sites, for their ability to be edited by either ADAR1 or ADAR2. We found that when these derivatives contained an A:C mismatch at the editing site, editing by both ADARs was enhanced compared to when A:A or A:G mismatches or A:U base pairs occurred at the same site. Hence substrate recognition and/or catalysis by ADARs could involve the base that opposes the edited adenosine. In addition, by using protein chimeras in which the deaminase domains were exchanged between ADAR1 and ADAR2, we found that this domain played a dominant role in defining the substrate specificity of the resulting enzyme. PMID:11421361

  9. Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Aa toxin-binding region of Bombyx mori aminopeptidase N.

    PubMed

    Yaoi, K; Nakanishi, K; Kadotani, T; Imamura, M; Koizumi, N; Iwahana, H; Sato, R

    1999-12-17

    The Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Aa toxin-binding region of Bombyx mori aminopeptidase N (APN) was analyzed, to better understand the molecular mechanism of susceptibility to the toxin and the development of resistance in insects. APN was digested with lysylendopeptidase and the ability of the resulting fragments to bind to Cry1Aa and 1Ac toxins was examined. The binding abilities of the two toxins to these fragments were different. The Cry1Aa toxin bound to the fragment containing 40-Asp to 313-Lys, suggesting that the Cry1Aa toxin-binding site is located in the region between 40-Asp and 313-Lys, while Cry1Ac toxin bound exclusively to mature APN. Next, recombinant APN of various lengths was expressed in Escherichia coli cells and its ability to bind to Cry1Aa toxin was examined. The results localized the Cry1Aa toxin binding to the region between 135-Ile and 198-Pro. PMID:10606725

  10. Novel substrate specificity of glutathione synthesis enzymes from Streptococcus agalactiae and Clostridium acetobutylicum

    SciTech Connect

    Kino, Kuniki . E-mail: kkino@waseda.jp; Kuratsu, Shoko; Noguchi, Atsushi; Kokubo, Masahiro; Nakazawa, Yuji; Arai, Toshinobu; Yagasaki, Makoto; Kirimura, Kohtaro

    2007-01-12

    Glutathione (GSH) is synthesized by {gamma}-glutamylcysteine synthetase ({gamma}-GCS) and glutathione synthetase (GS) in living organisms. Recently, bifunctional fusion protein, termed {gamma}-GCS-GS catalyzing both {gamma}-GCS and GS reactions from gram-positive firmicutes Streptococcus agalactiae, has been reported. We revealed that in the {gamma}-GCS activity, S. agalactiae {gamma}-GCS-GS had different substrate specificities from those of Escherichia coli {gamma}-GCS. Furthermore, S. agalactiae {gamma}-GCS-GS synthesized several kinds of {gamma}-glutamyltripeptide, {gamma}-Glu-X{sub aa}-Gly, from free three amino acids. In Clostridium acetobutylicum, the genes encoding {gamma}-GCS and putative GS were found to be immediately adjacent by BLAST search, and had amino acid sequence homology with S. agalactiae {gamma}-GCS-GS, respectively. We confirmed that the proteins expressed from each gene showed {gamma}-GCS and GS activity, respectively. C. acetobutylicum GS had broad substrate specificities and synthesized several kinds of {gamma}-glutamyltripeptide, {gamma}-Glu-Cys-X{sub aa}. Whereas the substrate specificities of {gamma}-GCS domain protein and GS domain protein of S. agalactiae {gamma}-GCS-GS were the same as those of S. agalactiae {gamma}-GCS-GS.