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Sample records for aa geomagnetic index

  1. An update on the correlation between the cosmic radiation intensity and the geomagnetic AA index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shea, M. A.; Smart, D. F.

    1985-01-01

    A statistical study between the cosmic ray intensity, as observed by a neutron monitor, and of the geomagnetic aa index, as representative of perturbations in the plasma and interplanetary magnetic field in the heliosphere, has been updated to specifically exclude time periods around the reversal of the solar magnetic field. The results of this study show a strong negative correlation for the period 1960 through 1968 with a correlation coefficient of approximately -0.86. However, there is essentially no correlation between the cosmic ray intensity and the aa index for the period 1972-1979 (i.e. correlation coefficient less than 0.16). These results would appear to support the theory of preferential particle propagation into the heliosphere vis the ecliptic during the period 1960-1968 and via the solar polar regions during 1972-1979.

  2. Simulation Of Fluctuating Geomagnetic Index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vedder, John; Tabor, Jill

    1993-01-01

    Mathematical model produces synthetic geomagnetic-index (ap) data including short-term fluctuations like those of real ap data. Measures geomagnetic activity computed from measurements of fluctuations in geomagnetic field taken at 12 high-latitude stations every 3 hours. Used in studies of interactions between solar wind and Earth, especially in studies of effect of geomagnetic field upon heating of thermosphere by impacts of energetic charged solar-wind particles.

  3. Long-term biases in geomagnetic K and aa indices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Analysis is made of the geomagnetic-activity aa index and its source K-index data from groups of ground-based observatories in Britain, and Australia, 1868.0-2009.0, solar cycles 11-23. The K data show persistent biases, especially for high (low) K-activity levels at British (Australian) observatories. From examination of multiple subsets of the K data we infer that the biases are not predominantly the result of changes in observatory location, localized induced magnetotelluric currents, changes in magnetometer technology, or the modernization of K-value estimation methods. Instead, the biases appear to be artifacts of the latitude-dependent scaling used to assign K values to particular local levels of geomagnetic activity. The biases are not effectively removed by weighting factors used to estimate aa. We show that long-term averages of the aa index, such as annual averages, are dominated by medium-level geomagnetic activity levels having K values of 3 and 4. ?? 2011 Author(s).

  4. Aurora Boundaries Quantified by Geomagnetic Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbary, J. F.

    2004-12-01

    Various operational systems require information on the location and intensity of the aurora. A statistical model of the aurora is given using global images from the Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) on the Polar satellite. The equatorward (EQ), poleward (PO) and peak (PK) boundaries of the auroral oval are determined. using UVI images averaged into 1° x1° spatial bins according to common geomagnetic indices such as Kp, AE, AL, and PCI. From these bin-averaged images, latitude intensity profiles at 1 hour MLT intervals are constructed by interpolation. A background is subtracted for each profile, and the EQ, PO, and PK boundary latitudes are found from the corrected profile. (The PK boundary is the maximum, and the EQ and PO boundaries are threshold locations of fixed irradiances such as 1, 2, or 4 photons/cm2s.) Several months of images during the winter and summer of 1997 were used to statistically quantify the boundaries at various levels of geomagnetic activity given by the several indices. As expected, the higher the level of activity, the wider and more expanded the oval. More importantly, the boundaries are functionally related to the indices at any local time. These functional relations can then be used to determine the auroral location at any level of geomagnetic activity given by the indices. Thus, given a level of geomagnetic activity, one can find the boundaries of the oval as defined on the basis of intensity. By monitoring the relevant geomagnetic index, an operational system can then easily compute the expected oval location and judge its impact on performance. The optimum indices that best define the oval will be discussed.

  5. The semiannual variation of geomagnetic activity: Phases and profiles for 130 years of aa data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cliver, E. W.; Kamide, Y.; Ling, A. G.

    2001-05-01

    We determined the phases of the maxima (spring, fall) and minima (summer, winter) in the curve of smoothed daily averages of the aa geomagnetic index, available from 1868-1998. The dates we obtained are consistent with the equinoctial hypothesis which has aberration-adjusted theoretical maxima on 25 March (experimentally determined to be 27 March) and 27 September (27 September) and minima on 26 June (26 June) and 26 December (27 December). We also show that the overall shape of the modulation curve throughout the year (broad minima, narrow peaks) bears greater fidelity (r = -0.96) to the solar declination D (the controlling angle for the seasonal variation under the equinoctial hypothesis) than to the solar B angle (r = 0.83; axial hypothesis) or the solar P angle (r = 0.80; Russell-McPherron effect). Lastly, a three-parameter fit of the smoothed annual variation of the aa data with a function consisting of the sum of the smoothed yearly curves for the D, B, and P angles yielded an amplitude of 0.58 for the D component vs. 0.20 for B and 0.16 for P. Generally similar results for each of these analyses (timing, shape, relative contributions) were obtained for shorter intervals of data for the ap and am indices. We conclude that the semiannual modulation of average values of mid-latitude range indices such as aa and ap is primarily controlled by the equinoctial hypothesis.

  6. On the local operational geomagnetic index K calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankov, Stan; Stegen, Koen; Wautelet, Gilles; Warnant, Rene

    2010-05-01

    There is an ongoing demand for services that can provide real-time assessment of the (global and local) geomagnetic activity and identified as being of importance to the exploration geophysics, radio communications and precise position/navigation practices, space weather research and modelling, etc. Such services depend largely on the reduction of solar, geomagnetic and ionospheric observations to generate activity indices, one of the most widely used being the K index. The K index is a quasi-logarithmic index characterising the 3-hourly range in transient magnetic activity relative to the regular "quiet-day" activity for a single site location. A derivative "planetary" index (Kp), the mean standardized K index from several globally distributed stations, provides a convenient measure of the global geomagnetic activity. Computer-based derivation of K/Kp indices was a major step towards higher efficiency and lower costs. Nowadays, automated data acquisition, processing and generating the index in real time is mandatory for any reliable service. However, Kp may not be accurate enough when monitoring disturbances of smaller scale, so the local K index (derived from the nearest magnetic station/s) might be considered as the better choice. Moreover, the 3-hour time scale is much larger than the shorter characteristic time of localised ionospheric phenomena that are of particular interest to us. Our experience in developing a novel nowcast system for local operational geomagnetic index K calculation (K-LOGIC) will be presented. The system is based on a fully automated computer procedure for real-time digital magnetogram data acquisition, screening the dataset and removing the outliers, establishing the solar regular (Sr) variation of the geomagnetic field, calculating the K index, and issuing an alert if storm-level activity is indicated. This is a time-controlled (rather than event-driven) system delivering as regular output (time resolution set to 1 hour) the K value

  7. Power grid disturbances and polar cap index during geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauning, Peter

    2013-06-01

    The strong geomagnetic storm in the evening of 30 October 2003 caused high-voltage power grid disturbances in Sweden that expanded to produce hour-long power line outage in Malmö located in the southern part of the country. This was not a unique situation. The geomagnetic storm on 13 March 1989 caused extensive disruptions of high-voltage power circuits especially in the Province of Quebec, Canada, but also to a lesser degree in Scandinavia. Similar events have occurred earlier, among others, during the great storms of 13-14 July 1982 and 8-9 February 1986. These high-voltage power grid disturbances were related to impulsive magnetic variations accompanying extraordinarily intense substorm events. The events were preceded by lengthy intervals of unusually high values of the Polar Cap (PC) index caused by enhanced transpolar ionospheric convection. The transpolar convection transports magnetic flux from the dayside to nightside which causes equatorward displacements of the region of auroral activity enabling the substorms to hit vital power grids. During the 30 October 2003 event the intense solar proton radiation disabled the ACE satellite observations widely used to provide forecast of magnetic storm events. Hence in this case the alarmingly high PC index could provide useful warning of the storm as a back-up of the missing ACE-based forecast. In further cases, monitoring the PC index level could provide supplementary storm warnings to the benefit of power grid operators.

  8. A combined solar and geomagnetic index for thermospheric climate

    PubMed Central

    Mlynczak, Martin G; Hunt, Linda A; Marshall, B Thomas; Russell, James M; Mertens, Christopher J; Thompson, R Earl; Gordley, Larry L

    2015-01-01

    Infrared radiation from nitric oxide (NO) at 5.3 µm is a primary mechanism by which the thermosphere cools to space. The Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on the NASA Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics satellite has been measuring thermospheric cooling by NO for over 13 years. In this letter we show that the SABER time series of globally integrated infrared power (watts) radiated by NO can be replicated accurately by a multiple linear regression fit using the F10.7, Ap, and Dst indices. This allows reconstruction of the NO power time series back nearly 70 years with extant databases of these indices. The relative roles of solar ultraviolet and geomagnetic processes in determining the NO cooling are derived and shown to vary significantly over the solar cycle. The NO power is a fundamental integral constraint on the thermospheric climate, and the time series presented here can be used to test upper atmosphere models over seven different solar cycles. Key Points F10.7, Ap, and Dst replicate time series of radiative cooling by nitric oxide Quantified relative roles of solar irradiance, geomagnetism in radiative cooling Establish a new index and extend record of thermospheric cooling back 70 years PMID:26709319

  9. A New Polar Magnetic Index of Geomagnetic Activity and its Application to Monitoring Ionospheric Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyatsky, Wladislaw; Khazanov, George V.

    2008-01-01

    For improving the reliability of Space Weather prediction, we developed a new, Polar Magnetic (PM) index of geomagnetic activity, which shows high correlation with both upstream solar wind data and related events in the magnetosphere and ionosphere. Similarly to the existing polar cap PC index, the new, PM index was computed from data from two near-pole geomagnetic observatories; however, the method for computing the PM index is different. The high correlation of the PM index with both solar wind data and events in Geospace environment makes possible to improve significantly forecasting geomagnetic disturbances and such important parameters as the cross-polar-cap voltage and global Joule heating in high latitude ionosphere, which play an important role in the development of geomagnetic, ionospheric and thermospheric disturbances. We tested the PM index for 10-year period (1995-2004). The correlation between PM index and upstream solar wind data for these years is very high (the average correlation coefficient R approximately equal to 0.86). The PM index also shows the high correlation with the cross-polar-cap voltage and hemispheric Joule heating (the correlation coefficient between the actual and predicted values of these parameters is approximately 0.9), which results in significant increasing the prediction reliability of these parameters. Using the PM index of geomagnetic activity provides a significant increase in the forecasting reliability of geomagnetic disturbances and related events in Geospace environment. The PM index may be also used as an important input parameter in modeling ionospheric, magnetospheric, and thermospheric processes.

  10. A Combined Solar and Geomagnetic Index for Thermospheric Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Linda; Mlynczak, Marty

    2015-01-01

    Infrared radiation from nitric oxide (NO) at 5.3 Â is a primary mechanism by which the thermosphere cools to space. The SABER instrument on the NASA TIMED satellite has been measuring thermospheric cooling by NO for over 13 years. Physically, changes in NO emission are due to changes in temperature, atomic oxygen, and the NO density. These physical changes however are driven by changes in solar irradiance and changes in geomagnetic conditions. We show that the SABER time series of globally integrated infrared power (Watts) radiated by NO can be replicated accurately by a multiple linear regression fit using the F10.7, Ap, and Dst indices. This fit enables several fundamental properties of NO cooling to be determined as well as their variability with time, permitting reconstruction of the NO power time series back nearly 70 years with extant databases of these indices. The relative roles of solar ultraviolet and geomagnetic processes in determining the NO cooling are derived and shown to be solar cycle dependent. This reconstruction provides a long-term time series of an integral radiative constraint on thermospheric climate that can be used to test climate models.

  11. Solar wind and geomagnetism: toward a standard classification of geomagnetic activity from 1868 to 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerbo, J. L.; Amory Mazaudier, C.; Ouattara, F.; Richardson, J. D.

    2012-02-01

    We examined solar activity with a large series of geomagnetic data from 1868 to 2009. We have revisited the geomagnetic activity classification scheme of Legrand and Simon (1989) and improve their scheme by lowering the minimum Aa index value for shock and recurrent activity from 40 to 20 nT. This improved scheme allows us to clearly classify about 80% of the geomagnetic activity in this time period instead of only 60% for the previous Legrand and Simon classification.

  12. Comparison of K-index Calculations between Several Geomagnetic Stations during IQDs and IDDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Junga; Kim, Hang-Pyo; Park, Young-Deuk

    2013-09-01

    BOH magnetometer was installed at Mt. Bohyun in 2007 and has provided continuous dataset for 3-axis geomagnetic field over the South Korea. We have calculated real-time K-index based on BOH magnetic field data using well-known FMI method. Local K-index is calculated eight times a day, per every three hours. To calculate K-index, it is critical to get the Quiet Day Curve (QDC). For QDC calculation, we take the previous one month's average of H-component. In this paper, we compared four geomagnetic stations' magnetic field data over South Korea and Japan and K-indices of each stations; Bohyun, Gangneung, Jeju, and Kakioka for two years data, 2011-2012. To investigate the difference depending on the latitude, longitude and local time in more detail, we compare K-index on International Quiet Days (IQDs) and International Disturbed Days (IDDs). As a result, we report the correlation between local K-indices are higher than those between Kp and local K-indices, and the correlation is much better after sunset than after sunrise. As the geomagnetic activity becomes stronger, the correlation between the local K-indices and global Kp-index become higher.

  13. Wp index: A new substorm index derived from high-resolution geomagnetic field data at low latitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosé, M.; Iyemori, T.; Wang, L.; Hitchman, A.; Matzka, J.; Feller, M.; Egdorf, S.; Gilder, S.; Kumasaka, N.; Koga, K.; Matsumoto, H.; Koshiishi, H.; Cifuentes-Nava, G.; Curto, J. J.; Segarra, A.; ćElik, C.

    2012-08-01

    Geomagnetic field data with high time resolution (typically 1 s) have recently become more commonly acquired by ground stations. Such high time resolution data enable identifying Pi2 pulsations which have periods of 40-150 s and irregular (damped) waveforms. It is well-known that pulsations of this type are clearly observed at mid- and low-latitude ground stations on the nightside at substorm onset. Therefore, with 1-s data from multiple stations distributed in longitude around the Earth's circumference, substorm onset can be regularly monitored. In the present study we propose a new substorm index, the Wp index (Wave and planetary), which reflects Pi2 wave power at low-latitude, using geomagnetic field data from 11 ground stations. We compare the Wp index with the AE and ASY indices as well as the electron flux and magnetic field data at geosynchronous altitudes for 11 March 2010. We find that significant enhancements of the Wp index mostly coincide with those of the other data. Thus the Wp index can be considered a good indicator of substorm onset. The Wp index, other geomagnetic indices, and geosynchronous satellite data are plotted in a stack for quick and easy search of substorm onset. The stack plots and digital data of the Wp index are available at the Web site (http://s-cubed.info) for public use. These products would be useful to investigate and understand space weather events, because substorms cause injection of intense fluxes of energetic electrons into the inner magnetosphere and potentially have deleterious impacts on satellites by inducing surface charging.

  14. Coincident 1.3-year Periodicities in the ap Geomagnetic Index and the Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paularena, K. I.; Szabo, A.; Richardson, J. D.

    1995-01-01

    Recent observations show an approximately 1.3-year period in the speed of the solar wind detected by the IMP 8 and Voyager 2 spacecraft. A similar period is also seen in the north-south (GSE) component of the magnetic field observed by IMP 8. Since both parameters are commonly used as input to models of geomagnetic activity, the 'ap' index (a measure of geomagnetic disturbance) is examined to look for this periodicity. The Lomb-Scargle periodogram method is used on the ap, plasma, and magnetic field data during the 1973-1994 time range. A dynamic FFT periodogram method is also used to analyze the ap data during this time, as well as to look for periods present between 1932 and 1972. A clear 1.3-year periodicity is present in the post-1986 data when the same period is observed in the plasma and field data. The V(2)B(zsm) and V(2)B(s) proxies for geomagnetic activity also show this periodicity. However, the southward (GSM) component of the magnetic field does not have a 1.3-year period, and neither do solar wind or ap data from 1973-1985. This demonstrates that the ap geomagnetic index can act as a proxy for solar wind periodicities at this time scale. Historic ap data are examined, and show that a similar periodicity in ap exists around 1942. Since auroral data show a 1.4-year periodicity, all these similar periods may result from a common underlying solar mechanism.

  15. A prediction of geomagnetic activity for solar cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cliver, E. W.; Ling, A. G.; Wise, J. E.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    1999-04-01

    Using a database of 13 solar cycles of geomagnetic aa data, we obtained correlations between cycle averages of geomagnetic activity (and sunspot number) and the numbers of days with disturbance levels above certain aa thresholds. We then used a precursor-type relation to predict an average aa index of 23.1 nT for cycle 23 and inserted this average aa value into the above correlations to forecast the integral size distribution of geomagnetic activity for the new cycle. The predicted size distribution is similar to that observed for cycles 21 and 22 but most closely resembles that of solar cycle 18 (1944-1954), which was slightly smaller than cycles 21 and 22. Our prediction agrees reasonably well with the ``climatology-based'' forecast made by the intergovernmental panel tasked to predict geomagnetic activity for the coming solar cycle and is significantly different from their ``precursor-based'' prediction.

  16. AE Geomagnetic Index Predictability for High Speed Solar Wind Streams: A Wavelet Decomposition Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guarnieri, Fernando L.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Hajra, Rajkumar; Echer, Ezequiel; Gonzalez, Walter D.; Mannucci, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    High speed solar wind streams cause geomagnetic activity at Earth. In this study we have applied a wavelet interactive filtering and reconstruction technique on the solar wind magnetic field components and AE index series to allowed us to investigate the relationship between the two. The IMF Bz component was found as the most significant solar wind parameter responsible by the control of the AE activity. Assuming magnetic reconnection associated to southward directed Bz is the main mechanism transferring energy into the magnetosphere, we adjust parameters to forecast the AE index. The adjusted routine is able to forecast AE, based only on the Bz measured at the L1 Lagrangian point. This gives a prediction approximately 30-70 minutes in advance of the actual geomagnetic activity. The correlation coefficient between the observed AE data and the forecasted series reached values higher than 0.90. In some cases the forecast reproduced particularities observed in the signal very well.The high correlation values observed and the high efficacy of the forecasting can be taken as a confirmation that reconnection is the main physical mechanism responsible for the energy transfer during HILDCAAs. The study also shows that the IMF Bz component low frequencies are most important for AE prediction.

  17. Geomagnetic inverse of the ring current during magnetic storm and its applications in the Dst index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, C.

    2012-12-01

    Intensity and lasting time of the main phase were two significantly important parts for the space weather prediction. Furthermore, any improvements of forecasting technique and result depend on the studies of the ring current energization during magnetic storm. It's also helpful to advance our knowledge of the energy transport and transformation when energization was fully understood. In a word, the research progress by the methods of theoretic analysis combined with geomagnetic inverse should be useful to investigate the physical energization with both academic meanings and operational application. This program start with the lognormal fitting of Dst indices and further analyse the energization of the charged particle in traveling magnetosphere by using single particle dynamics and adiabatic theory. The probability distribution function will be proposed in order to extend the single particle problem to many particles which consistent with real physics. After that, a quantitative parameter which called energizing index as describe the efficiency of the ring current energization will be designed. Finally, the two fitting parameters of lognormal will be physically interpreted after compared with the geomagnetic observations and then the theoretic basis for Dst physical predicting can be constructed.

  18. Some Fractal Dimension Algorithms and Their Application to Time Series Associated with the Dst a Geomagnetic Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervantes, F.; Gonzalez, J.; Real, C.; Hoyos, L.

    2012-12-01

    ABSTRACT: Chaotic invariants like fractal dimensions are used to characterize non-linear time series. The fractal dimension is an important characteristic of fractals that contains information about their geometrical structure at multiple scales. In this work four fractal dimension estimation algorithms are applied to non-linear time series. The algorithms employed are the Higuchi's algorithm, the Petrosian's algorithm, the Katz's Algorithm and the Box counting method. The analyzed time series are associated with natural phenomena, the Dst a geomagnetic index which monitors the world wide magnetic storm; the Dst index is a global indicator of the state of the Earth's geomagnetic activity. The time series used in this work show a behavior self-similar, which depend on the time scale of measurements. It is also observed that fractal dimensions may not be constant over all time scales.

  19. Semiannual variation of the geomagnetic activity and solar wind parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlando, M.; Moreno, G.; Parisi, M.; Storini, M.

    1993-10-01

    The semiannual variation of the geomagnetic activity is investigated in connection with a large set of solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field data (4494 daily averages from 1965 to 1987). Our analysis confirms that the geomagnetic activity (described by the aa index), is mainly modulated by the southward component of the magnetic field (BS), as suggested by Russell and McPherron. On the other hand, it is also found that the solar wind velocity (V) has a relevant role in this phenomenon. In fact, the amplitude of the aa modulation is best correlated with the function BSV2. We also explore the linkage between the annual trend of aa and the sunspot activity (1868-1989), showing that the modulation of the geomagnetic activity follows a more regular pattern during the descending phase of the solar cycle than during the rising and maximum parts.

  20. Comment on the existence of a long range correlation in the geomagnetic disturbance storm time (Dst) index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacasa, Lucas

    2012-01-01

    Very recently (Banerjee et al. in Astrophys. Space, doi:10.1007/s10509-011-0836-1, 2011) the statistics of geomagnetic Disturbance storm (Dst) index have been addressed, and the conclusion from this analysis suggests that the underlying dynamical process can be modeled as a fractional Brownian motion with persistent long-range correlations. In this comment we expose several misconceptions and flaws in the statistical analysis of that work. On the basis of these arguments, the former conclusion should be revisited.

  1. Statistical Technique for Intermediate and Long-Range Estimation of 13-Month Smoothed Solar Flux and Geomagnetic Index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niehuss, K. O.; Euler, H. C., Jr.; Vaughan, W. W.

    1996-01-01

    This report documents the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) 13-month smoothed solar flux (F(sub 10.7)) and geomagnetic index (A(sub p)) intermediate (months) and long-range (years) statistical estimation technique, referred to as the MSFC Lagrangian Linear Regression Technique (MLLRT). Estimates of future solar activity are needed as updated input to upper atmosphere density models used for satellite and spacecraft orbital lifetime predictions. An assessment of the MLLRT computer program's products is provided for 5-year periods from the date estimates were made. This was accomplished for a number of past solar cycles.

  2. Geomagnetic activity related NOx enhancements and polar surface air temperature variability in a chemistry climate model: modulation of the NAM index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgaertner, A. J. G.; Seppälä, A.; Jöckel, P.; Clilverd, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    The atmospheric chemistry general circulation model ECHAM5/MESSy is used to simulate polar surface air temperature effects of geomagnetic activity variations. A transient model simulation was performed for the years 1960-2004 and is shown to develop polar surface air temperature patterns that depend on geomagnetic activity strength, similar to previous studies. In order to eliminate influencing factors such as sea surface temperatures (SST) or UV variations, two nine-year long simulations were carried out, with strong and weak geomagnetic activity, respectively, while all other boundary conditions were held to year 2000 levels. Statistically significant temperature effects that were observed in previous reanalysis and model results are also obtained from this set of simulations, suggesting that such patterns are indeed related to geomagnetic activity. In the model, strong geomagnetic activity and the associated NOx enhancements lead to polar stratospheric ozone loss. Compared with the simulation with weak geomagnetic activity, the ozone loss causes a decrease in ozone radiative cooling and thus a temperature increase in the polar winter mesosphere. Similar to previous studies, a cooling is found below the stratopause, which other authors have attributed to a decrease in the mean meridional circulation. In the polar stratosphere this leads to a more stable vortex. A strong (weak) Northern Hemisphere vortex is known to be associated with a positive (negative) Northern Annular Mode (NAM) index; our simulations exhibit a positive NAM index for strong geomagnetic activity, and a negative NAM for weak geomagnetic activity. Such NAM anomalies have been shown to propagate to the surface, and this is also seen in the model simulations. NAM anomalies are known to lead to specific surface temperature anomalies: a positive NAM is associated with warmer than average northern Eurasia and colder than average eastern North Atlantic. This is also the case in our simulation. Our

  3. Temporal Offsets Between Maximum CME Speed Index and Solar, Geomagnetic, and Interplanetary Indicators During Solar Cycle 23 and the Ascending Phase of Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özgüç, A.; Kilcik, A.; Georgieva, K.; Kirov, B.

    2016-05-01

    On the basis of a morphological analysis of yearly values of the maximum coronal mass ejection (CME) speed index, the sunspot number and total sunspot area, sunspot magnetic field, and solar flare index, the solar wind speed and interplanetary magnetic field strength, and the geomagnetic Ap and D_{st} indices, we point out the particularities of solar and geomagnetic activity during the last Cycle 23, the long minimum that followed it, and the ascending branch of Cycle 24. We also analyze the temporal offset between the maximum CME speed index and the above-mentioned solar, geomagnetic, and interplanetary indices. It is found that this solar activity index, analyzed jointly with other solar activity, interplanetary parameters, and geomagnetic activity indices, shows a hysteresis phenomenon. It is observed that these parameters follow different paths for the ascending and descending phases of Cycle 23. The hysteresis phenomenon represents a clue in the search for physical processes responsible for linking the solar activity to near-Earth and geomagnetic responses.

  4. Temporal Offsets Between Maximum CME Speed Index and Solar, Geomagnetic, and Interplanetary Indicators During Solar Cycle 23 and the Ascending Phase of Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özgüç, A.; Kilcik, A.; Georgieva, K.; Kirov, B.

    2016-06-01

    On the basis of a morphological analysis of yearly values of the maximum coronal mass ejection (CME) speed index, the sunspot number and total sunspot area, sunspot magnetic field, and solar flare index, the solar wind speed and interplanetary magnetic field strength, and the geomagnetic Ap and D_{st} indices, we point out the particularities of solar and geomagnetic activity during the last Cycle 23, the long minimum that followed it, and the ascending branch of Cycle 24. We also analyze the temporal offset between the maximum CME speed index and the above-mentioned solar, geomagnetic, and interplanetary indices. It is found that this solar activity index, analyzed jointly with other solar activity, interplanetary parameters, and geomagnetic activity indices, shows a hysteresis phenomenon. It is observed that these parameters follow different paths for the ascending and descending phases of Cycle 23. The hysteresis phenomenon represents a clue in the search for physical processes responsible for linking the solar activity to near-Earth and geomagnetic responses.

  5. Superposed epoch analysis and storm statistics from 25 years of the global geomagnetic disturbance index, USGS-Dst

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gannon, J.L.

    2012-01-01

    Statistics on geomagnetic storms with minima below -50 nanoTesla are compiled using a 25-year span of the 1-minute resolution disturbance index, U.S. Geological Survey Dst. A sudden commencement, main phase minimum, and time between the two has a magnitude of 35 nanoTesla, -100 nanoTesla, and 12 hours, respectively, at the 50th percentile level. The cumulative distribution functions for each of these features are presented. Correlation between sudden commencement magnitude and main phase magnitude is shown to be low. Small, medium, and large storm templates at the 33rd, 50th, and 90th percentile are presented and compared to real examples. In addition, the relative occurrence of rates of change in Dst are presented.

  6. Assessing the validity of station location assumptions made in the calculation of the geomagnetic disturbance index, Dst

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gannon, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of the assumptions made in the calculation of the Dst index with regard to longitude sampling, hemisphere bias, and latitude correction are explored. The insights gained from this study will allow operational users to better understand the local implications of the Dst index and will lead to future index formulations that are more physically motivated. We recompute the index using 12 longitudinally spaced low-latitude stations, including the traditional 4 (in Honolulu, Kakioka, San Juan, and Hermanus), and compare it to the standard United States Geological Survey definitive Dst. We look at the hemisphere balance by comparing stations at equal geomagnetic latitudes in the Northern and Southern hemispheres. We further separate the 12-station time series into two hemispheric indices and find that there are measurable differences in the traditional Dst formulation due to the undersampling of the Southern Hemisphere in comparison with the Northern Hemisphere. To analyze the effect of latitude correction, we plot latitudinal variation in a disturbance observed during the year 2005 using two separate longitudinal observatory chains. We separate these by activity level and find that while the traditional cosine form fits the latitudinal distributions well for low levels of activity, at higher levels of disturbance the cosine form does not fit the observed variation. This suggests that the traditional latitude scaling is insufficient during active times. The effect of the Northern Hemisphere bias and the inadequate latitude scaling is such that the standard correction underestimates the true disturbance by 10–30 nT for storms of main phase magnitude deviation greater than 150 nT in the traditional Dst index.

  7. Detailed Analysis of Solar Data Related to Historical Extreme Geomagnetic Storms: 1868 - 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefèvre, Laure; Vennerstrøm, Susanne; Dumbović, Mateja; Vršnak, Bojan; Sudar, Davor; Arlt, Rainer; Clette, Frédéric; Crosby, Norma

    2016-05-01

    An analysis of historical Sun-Earth connection events in the context of the most extreme space weather events of the last ˜150 years is presented. To identify the key factors leading to these extreme events, a sample of the most important geomagnetic storms was selected based mainly on the well-known aa index and on geomagnetic parameters described in the accompanying paper (Vennerstrøm et al., Solar Phys. in this issue, 2016, hereafter Paper I). This part of the analysis focuses on associating and characterizing the active regions (sunspot groups) that are most likely linked to these major geomagnetic storms.

  8. Geomagnetic activity related NOx enhancements and polar surface air temperature variability in a chemistry climate model: modulation of the NAM index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgaertner, A. J. G.; Seppälä, A.; Jöckel, P.; Clilverd, M. A.

    2011-05-01

    The atmospheric chemistry general circulation model ECHAM5/MESSy is used to simulate polar surface air temperature effects of geomagnetic activity variations. A transient model simulation was performed for the years 1960-2004 and is shown to develop polar surface air temperature patterns that depend on geomagnetic activity strength, similar to previous studies. In order to eliminate influencing factors such as sea surface temperatures (SST) or UV variations, two nine-year long simulations were carried out, with strong and weak geomagnetic activity, respectively, while all other boundary conditions were held to year 2000 levels. Statistically significant temperature effects that were observed in previous reanalysis and model results are also obtained from this set of simulations, suggesting that such patterns are indeed related to geomagnetic activity. In the model, strong geomagnetic activity and the associated NOx (= NO + NO2) enhancements lead to polar stratospheric ozone loss. Compared with the simulation with weak geomagnetic activity, the ozone loss causes a decrease in ozone radiative cooling and thus a temperature increase in the polar winter mesosphere. Similar to previous studies, a cooling is found below the stratopause, which other authors have attributed to a decrease in the mean meridional circulation. In the polar stratosphere this leads to a more stable vortex. A strong (weak) Northern Hemisphere vortex is known to be associated with a positive (negative) Northern Annular Mode (NAM) index; our simulations exhibit a positive NAM index for strong geomagnetic activity, and a negative NAM for weak geomagnetic activity. Such NAM anomalies have been shown to propagate to the surface, and this is also seen in the model simulations. NAM anomalies are known to lead to specific surface temperature anomalies: a positive NAM is associated with warmer than average northern Eurasia and colder than average eastern North Atlantic. This is also the case in our

  9. Extreme Geomagnetic Storms - 1868 - 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vennerstrom, S.; Lefevre, L.; Dumbović, M.; Crosby, N.; Malandraki, O.; Patsou, I.; Clette, F.; Veronig, A.; Vršnak, B.; Leer, K.; Moretto, T.

    2016-05-01

    We present the first large statistical study of extreme geomagnetic storms based on historical data from the time period 1868 - 2010. This article is the first of two companion papers. Here we describe how the storms were selected and focus on their near-Earth characteristics. The second article presents our investigation of the corresponding solar events and their characteristics. The storms were selected based on their intensity in the aa index, which constitutes the longest existing continuous series of geomagnetic activity. They are analyzed statistically in the context of more well-known geomagnetic indices, such as the Kp and Dcx/Dst index. This reveals that neither Kp nor Dcx/Dst provide a comprehensive geomagnetic measure of the extreme storms. We rank the storms by including long series of single magnetic observatory data. The top storms on the rank list are the New York Railroad storm occurring in May 1921 and the Quebec storm from March 1989. We identify key characteristics of the storms by combining several different available data sources, lists of storm sudden commencements (SSCs) signifying occurrence of interplanetary shocks, solar wind in-situ measurements, neutron monitor data, and associated identifications of Forbush decreases as well as satellite measurements of energetic proton fluxes in the near-Earth space environment. From this we find, among other results, that the extreme storms are very strongly correlated with the occurrence of interplanetary shocks (91 - 100 %), Forbush decreases (100 %), and energetic solar proton events (70 %). A quantitative comparison of these associations relative to less intense storms is also presented. Most notably, we find that most often the extreme storms are characterized by a complexity that is associated with multiple, often interacting, solar wind disturbances and that they frequently occur when the geomagnetic activity is already elevated. We also investigate the semiannual variation in storm occurrence

  10. Solar-Terrestrial Coupling Evidenced by Periodic Behavior in Geomagnetic Indexes and the Infrared Energy Budget of the Thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.; Martin-Torres, F. Javier; Mertens, Christopher J.; Marshall, B. Thomas; Thompson, R. Earl; Kozyra, Janet U.; Remsberg, Ellis E.; Gordley, Larry L.; Russell, James M.; Woods, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    We examine time series of the daily global power (W) radiated by carbon dioxide (at 15 microns) and by nitric oxide (at 5.3 microns) from the Earth s thermosphere between 100 km and 200 km altitude. Also examined is a time series of the daily absorbed solar ultraviolet power in the same altitude region in the wavelength span 0 to 175 nm. The infrared data are derived from the SABER instrument and the solar data are derived from the SEE instrument, both on the NASA TIMED satellite. The time series cover nearly 5 years from 2002 through 2006. The infrared and solar time series exhibit a decrease in radiated and absorbed power consistent with the declining phase of the current 11-year solar cycle. The infrared time series also exhibits high frequency variations that are not evident in the solar power time series. Spectral analysis shows a statistically significant 9-day periodicity in the infrared data but not in the solar data. A very strong 9-day periodicity is also found to exist in the time series of daily A(sub p) and K(sub p) geomagnetic indexes. These 9-day periodicities are linked to the recurrence of coronal holes on the Sun. These results demonstrate a direct coupling between the upper atmosphere of the Sun and the infrared energy budget of the thermosphere.

  11. Geomagnetic response to IMF and solar wind over different latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam, A. M.; Tripathi, Sharad Chandra; Mansoori, Azad Ahmad; Waheed, Malik Abdul

    2016-07-01

    In this paper a study on the response of geomagnetic field characteristics to the solar wind variation during three solar cycles (SC 21, SC 22, SC 23) have been conducted in a long term scale. The difference in the response of two different latitudinal characteristic indices has been investigated. For the purpose we have considered the high latitude index AE and the mid-latitude aa index and both gives the knowledge about the perturbations in the geomagnetic field conditions. Eventually we can infer the idea about the ionospheric current system changes in response to the solar wind conditions. The variation found in the AE and aa indices have been found to follow a 11 year cycle as similar to the sunspot variation. Also the correlation between the annual means of the solar wind parameters velocity V, magnetic filed B and the composite parameters BV and BV ^{2 } have been calculated . A difference was found between the correlations obtained for the AE and aa indices. We could also see that the difference in correlation follows a cyclic pattern i.e. the large difference is found during the solar maxima while a small difference is observed during the minima.

  12. Geomagnetic Activity Indicates Large Amplitude for Sunspot Cycle 24

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, D. H.; Wilson, R. M.

    2006-01-01

    The level of geomagnetic activity near the time of solar activity minimum has been shown to be a reliable indicator for the amplitude of the following solar activity maximum. The geomagnetic activity index aa can be split into two components: one associated with solar flares, prominence eruptions, and coronal mass ejections which follows the solar activity cycle and a second component associated with recurrent high speed solar wind streams which is out of phase with the solar activity cycle. This second component often peaks before solar activity minimum and has been one of the most reliable indicators for the amplitude of the following maximum. The size of the recent maximum in this second component indicates that solar activity cycle 24 will be much higher than average - similar in size to cycles 21 and 22.

  13. Geomagnetism applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, Wallace H.

    1995-01-01

    The social uses of geomagnetism include the physics of the space environment, satellite damage, pipeline corrosion, electric power-grid failure, communication interference, global positioning disruption, mineral-resource detection, interpretation of the Earth's formation and structure, navigation, weather, and magnetoreception in organisms. The need for continuing observations of the geomagnetic field, together with careful archiving of these records and mechanisms for dissemination of these data, is emphasized.

  14. Geomagnetism during solar cycle 23: Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Zerbo, Jean-Louis; Amory-Mazaudier, Christine; Ouattara, Frédéric

    2013-05-01

    On the basis of more than 48 years of morphological analysis of yearly and monthly values of the sunspot number, the aa index, the solar wind speed and interplanetary magnetic field, we point out the particularities of geomagnetic activity during the period 1996-2009. We especially investigate the last cycle 23 and the long minimum which followed it. During this period, the lowest values of the yearly averaged IMF (3 nT) and yearly averaged solar wind speed (364 km/s) are recorded in 1996, and 2009 respectively. The year 2003 shows itself particular by recording the highest value of the averaged solar wind (568 km/s), associated to the highest value of the yearly averaged aa index (37 nT). We also find that observations during the year 2003 seem to be related to several coronal holes which are known to generate high-speed wind stream. From the long time (more than one century) study of solar variability, the present period is similar to the beginning of twentieth century. We especially present the morphological features of solar cycle 23 which is followed by a deep solar minimum. PMID:25685427

  15. Geomagnetism during solar cycle 23: Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Zerbo, Jean-Louis; Amory-Mazaudier, Christine; Ouattara, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of more than 48 years of morphological analysis of yearly and monthly values of the sunspot number, the aa index, the solar wind speed and interplanetary magnetic field, we point out the particularities of geomagnetic activity during the period 1996–2009. We especially investigate the last cycle 23 and the long minimum which followed it. During this period, the lowest values of the yearly averaged IMF (3 nT) and yearly averaged solar wind speed (364 km/s) are recorded in 1996, and 2009 respectively. The year 2003 shows itself particular by recording the highest value of the averaged solar wind (568 km/s), associated to the highest value of the yearly averaged aa index (37 nT). We also find that observations during the year 2003 seem to be related to several coronal holes which are known to generate high-speed wind stream. From the long time (more than one century) study of solar variability, the present period is similar to the beginning of twentieth century. We especially present the morphological features of solar cycle 23 which is followed by a deep solar minimum. PMID:25685427

  16. Analytical Study of Geomagnetic and Solar Activities During Solar Cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hady, A. A.

    The data of amplitude and phase of most common indicators of geomagnetic activities (especially aa index, A? index) have been analyzed and compared with the solar ac- tivities in the time of solar cycle 23(started from 1996 to 2007). The data taken from NOAA space environment center (SES), USA. during the period starting April 1996 Until Dec. 2001, have been analyzed by power spectrum method. The prediction until year 2007 of geomagnetic activities were studied according to the whole of behavior of solar cycle 23. The results show a good indication of the effects of solar activities on changes of earth climate and weather forecasting. The results are important to various techniques including the operation of low earth orbiting satellites. The climatologi- cal approach makes use of the secular trend since year 1900 until now, by about 15 nanotesla. This indication was recorded too, in solar activity changes during the last century.

  17. On the statistics of El Nino occurrences and the relationship of El Nino to volcanic and solar/geomagnetic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    1989-01-01

    El Nino is conventionally defined as an anomalous and persistent warming of the waters off the coasts of Ecuador and Peru in the eastern equatorial Pacific, having onset usually in Southern Hemispheric summer/fall. Some of the statistical aspects of El Nino occurrences are examined, especially as they relate to the normal distribution and to possible associations with volcanic, solar, and geomagnetic activity. With regard to the very strong El Nino of 1982 to 1983, it is noted that, although it may very well be related to the 1982 eruptions of El Chichon, the event occurred essentially on time (with respect to the past behavior of elapsed times between successive El Nino events; a moderate-to-stronger El Nino was expected during the interval 1978 to 1982, assuming that El Nino occurrences are normally distributed, having a mean elapsed time between successive onsets of 4 years and a standard deviation of 2 years and a last known occurrence in 1976). Also, although not widely recognized, the whole of 1982 was a record year for geomagnetic activity (based on the aa geomagnetic index, with the aa index registering an all time high in February 1982), perhaps, important for determining a possible trigger for this and other El Nino events. A major feature is an extensive bibliography (325 entries) on El Nino and volcanic-solar-geomagnetic effects on climate. Also, included is a tabular listing of the 94 major volcanic eruptions of 1835 to 1986.

  18. On the Relationship between Solar Wind Speed, Earthward-Directed Coronal Mass Ejections, Geomagnetic Activity, and the Sunspot Cycle Using 12-Month Moving Averages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.; Hathaway, David H.

    2008-01-01

    For 1996 .2006 (cycle 23), 12-month moving averages of the aa geomagnetic index strongly correlate (r = 0.92) with 12-month moving averages of solar wind speed, and 12-month moving averages of the number of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) (halo and partial halo events) strongly correlate (r = 0.87) with 12-month moving averages of sunspot number. In particular, the minimum (15.8, September/October 1997) and maximum (38.0, August 2003) values of the aa geomagnetic index occur simultaneously with the minimum (376 km/s) and maximum (547 km/s) solar wind speeds, both being strongly correlated with the following recurrent component (due to high-speed streams). The large peak of aa geomagnetic activity in cycle 23, the largest on record, spans the interval late 2002 to mid 2004 and is associated with a decreased number of halo and partial halo CMEs, whereas the smaller secondary peak of early 2005 seems to be associated with a slight rebound in the number of halo and partial halo CMEs. Based on the observed aaM during the declining portion of cycle 23, RM for cycle 24 is predicted to be larger than average, being about 168+/-60 (the 90% prediction interval), whereas based on the expected aam for cycle 24 (greater than or equal to 14.6), RM for cycle 24 should measure greater than or equal to 118+/-30, yielding an overlap of about 128+/-20.

  19. Dominant modes of relationship between U.S. temperature and geomagnetic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prohaska, J. T.; Willett, H. C.

    1983-01-01

    Eigen-analysis is applied to a matrix of cross-correlation coefficients between the geomagnetic aa-index for 0 to 23-yr lag and the monthly mean temperature at 32 United States stations. About 75 percent of the relationship between the two fields is contained in three dominant modes. A secular trend (about 90 yr) and two 11-yr cycles dominate the mode time series. The month-to-month changes in the temperature anomaly patterns indicate a slow eddy-like motion to the east of the Continental Divide for all three dominant modes.

  20. The geomagnetic storms of 2015: Statistical analysis and forecasting results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paouris, Evangelos; Gerontidou, Maria; Mavromichalaki, Helen

    2016-04-01

    The year 2015 was characterized by long geomagnetic quiet periods with a lot of geomagnetically active breaks although it is on the declining phase of the current solar cycle. As a result a number of geomagnetic storms in the G1 up to G4 scale were noticed. In this work the characteristics of these geomagnetic storms like the scale level, the origin of the storm (CME or CIR) and the duration have been studied. Furthermore, a statistical analysis of these events and a comparative study of the forecasting and the actual geomagnetic conditions are performed using data from the NOAA space weather forecasting center and from the Athens Space Weather Forecasting Center as well. These forecasting centers estimate and provide every day the geomagnetic conditions for the upcoming days giving the values of the geomagnetic index Ap. The forecasting values of Ap index for the year 2015 from these two centers and their comparison in terms of the actual values are discussed.

  1. Project to develop an index of pc 3,4,5 geomagnetic pulsations and to study their control by solar wind parameters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Greenstadt, E.W.

    1983-04-01

    This report summarizes the recent activities and results of a study seeking to discover and quantify the relationship between solar wind parameters, magnetosheath turbulence, and daytime geomagnetic pulsations. The most significant achievement has been a major advance in data processing and computational analysis leading to the first observations and measurements of magnetospheric resonance thickness, wave transfer across the magnetopause, and wave structure in the outer magnetosheath.

  2. Geomagnetic Disturbances Caused by Internal Atmospheric Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneman, G.

    1984-01-01

    It is commonly believed that geomagnetic disturbances are caused by external influences connected with the solar wind. The 27-day recurrence of perturbations seems to be a strong hint for this interaction. But frequently geomagnetic disturbances occur without any relation to sunspot numbers or radiowave fluxes. This was one of the reasons for introducing hypothetical M-regions on the Sun and their relation to solar wind activities. Only one half of the variance of the geomagnetic AL-index could be related to the solar wind. Therefore it is concluded that internal processes of the magnetosphere were responsible for additional geomagnetic activity. Arguments, which might lead to the suggestion of geomagnetic disturbances as being caused by internal atmospheric dynamics are discussed and a rather preliminary scenario of those processes is proposed.

  3. An Examination of Selected Geomagnetic Indices in Relation to the Sunspot Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.; Hathaway, David H.

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies have shown geomagnetic indices to be useful for providing early estimates for the size of the following sunspot cycle several years in advance. Examined this study are various precursor methods for predicting the minimum and maximum amplitude of the following sunspot cycle, these precursors based on the aa and Ap geomagnetic indices and the number of disturbed days (NDD), days when the daily Ap index equaled or exceeded 25. Also examined is the yearly peak of the daily Ap index (Apmax), the number of days when Ap greater than or equal to 100, cyclic averages of sunspot number R, aa, Ap, NDD, and the number of sudden storm commencements (NSSC), as well the cyclic sums of NDD and NSSC. The analysis yields 90-percent prediction intervals for both the minimum and maximum amplitudes for cycle 24, the next sunspot cycle. In terms of yearly averages, the best regressions give Rmin = 9.8+/-2.9 and Rmax = 153.8+/-24.7, equivalent to Rm = 8.8+/-2.8 and RM = 159+/-5.5, based on the 12-mo moving average (or smoothed monthly mean sunspot number). Hence, cycle 24 is expected to be above average in size, similar to cycles 21 and 22, producing more than 300 sudden storm commencements and more than 560 disturbed days, of which about 25 will be Ap greater than or equal to 100. On the basis of annual averages, the sunspot minimum year for cycle 24 will be either 2006 or 2007.

  4. A Study on local geomagnetic activity trend and singularity with geomagnetic data at Cheongyang Magnetic Observatory, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.; Jeon, Y.; Ryoo, S.

    2011-12-01

    The KMA(Korea Meteorological Administration) has installed and operated the geomagnetic observatory at Cheongyang-gun, Chungcheongnam-do, Korea which started in April, 2009. As Cheongyang geomagnetic observatory, it has been automatically observing total-, X-, Y- and Z-component data at 1-sec interval and storing in real-time. The National Institute of Meteorological Research, which belongs to KMA, proceeded with their work on the production of K-index that is used for geomagnetic activity observation. In addition, we detect the starting and ending of geomagnetic storm as typical thing of global geomagnetic field change and utilize it for showing current status of geomagnetic storm occurrence. It has been reported that geomagnetic storm occurred seven times during from April, 2010 to July, 2011. It was 5 of the maximum K-index value during geomagnetic storm occurrence period and thought mostly to have been caused by coronal hole and CME(Coronal Mass Ejection). Yet the geomagnetic storm has not been had much of an impact locally. At Cheongyang Observatory, a significantly disturbed geomagnetic data was seen as related to the Tohoku, Japan Earthquake, Mw 9.0, on March 11, 2011. Compared to seismic wave data at Seosan seismic observatory 60km away from Cheongyang geomagnetic observatory, we identified the signal involved to the Tohoku, Japan Earthquake. The power spectral density of the disturbed signal has the dominant frequency band of about 0.05 to 0.1 Hz. We should proceed additional study about this in detail.

  5. On the Relationship Between Global Land-Ocean Temperature and Various Descriptors of Solar-Geomagnetic Activity and Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Examined are sunspot cycle- (SC-) length averages of the annual January-December values of the Global Land-Ocean Temperature Index () in relation to SC-length averages of annual values of various descriptors of solar-geomagnetic activity and climate, incorporating lags of 0-5 yr. For the overall interval SC12-SC23, the is inferred to correlate best against the parameter <aa(I:SSN)> incorporating lag = 5 yr, where the parameter <aa(I:SSN)> refers to the resultant aa value having removed that portion of the annual aa average value due to the yearly variation of sunspot number (SSN). The inferred correlation between the and <aa(I:SSN)> is statistically important at confidence level cl > 99.9%, having a coefficient of linear correlation r = 0.865 and standard error of estimate se = 0.149 degC. Excluding the most recent cycles SC22 and SC23, the inferred correlation is stronger, having r = 0.969 and se = 0.048 degC. With respect to the overall trend in the , which has been upwards towards warmer temperatures since SC12 (1878-1888), solar-geomagnetic activity parameters are now trending downwards (since SC19). For SC20-SC23, in contrast, comparison of the against SC-length averages of the annual value of the Mauna Loa carbon dioxide () index is found to be highly statistically important (cl >> 99.9%), having r = 0.9994 and se = 0.012 degC for lag = 2 yr. On the basis of the inferred preferential linear correlation between the and , the current ongoing SC24 is inferred to have warmer than was seen in SC23 (i.e., >0.526 degC), probably in excess of 0.68 degC (relative to the 1951-1980 base period).

  6. Detection of the significant geomagnetic field signals in the interannual variations of Length-of-Day using wavelet method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Genyou; Duan, Pengshuo; Hao, Xiaoguang; Hu, Xiaogang

    2015-04-01

    The previous studies indicated that the most of the interannual variations in Length-Of-Day (LOD) could be explained by the joint effects of ENSO (EI Nino-Southern Oscillations) and QBO (Quasi-Biennial Oscillation) phenomenon in the atmosphere. Due to the limit of the used methods, those results cannot give the 'time-frequency' coherence spectrum between ENSO and LOD, and cannot indicate in which specific periods the weak coherence occurred and difficult to give the reliable reason. This paper uses Daubechies wavelet with 10 order vanishing moment to analyze the LOD monthly time series from 1962 to 2011. Based on cross-wavelet and wavelet coherence methods, the analysis of the time-frequency correlations between ENSO and LOD series (1962-2011) on the 1.3~10.7 year scales is given. We have extracted and reconstructed the LOD signals on 1.3~10.7year scales. The result shows that there is obvious weak coherence on both biennial and 5~8 year scales after 1982 relative to before 1982. According to the previous works, the biennial weak coherence is due to QBO, but the weak coherence on 5~8 year scales cannot be interpreted by the effects of ENSO and QBO. In this study, the Geomagnetic field signals (can be characterized as Aa index) are introduced, we have further extracted and reconstructed the LOD, ENSO and Aa signals in 5-8.0 year band using wavelet packet analysis. Through analyzing the standardized series of the three signals, we found a linear time-frequency formula among the original observation series: LOD(t,f) =αENSO(t,f) +βAa(t,f). This study indicates that the LOD signals on 5.3~8.0 year scales can be expressed in term of linear combination of ENSO and Aa signals. Especially after 1982, the contributions of ENSO and Aa to LOD respectively reach about 0.95ms and 1.0ms.The results also imply that there is an obvious Geomagnetic field signal in interannual variations of LOD. Furthermore, after considering the geomagnetic field signal correction, the Pearson

  7. Geomagnetically Induced Currents, a space weather hazard. Case study - Europe under intense geomagnetic storms of the solar cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrica, V.; Demetrescu, Cr.; Stefan, C.; Greculeasa, R.

    2016-05-01

    The interaction of the solar wind and heliospheric magnetic field with the magnetosphere and ionosphere results in variations of the geomagnetic field that induce hazardous electric currents in grounded technological systems (electric power and hydrocarbon transportation networks), the so-called geomagnetically induced currents (GICs). In order to evaluate the hazard induced on the European continent, we present a study of the surface electric field induced by 16 intense (Dst < -150 nT) geomagnetic storms, based on the analysis of the geomagnetic records from the European network of observatories, study that tend to solve the geophysical part of the problem. The evolution during storm development and the sources of the disturbance field are explored in case of the largest geomagnetic storm in the cycle 23 (Dst = -422 nT, November 20-21, 2003), and the geographical distribution of the maximum induced surface geoelectric field over Europe by the 16 storms considered in the study is presented. As source proxies, the Dst geomagnetic index, showing the disturbed field produced by the magnetospheric ring current at the geomagnetic equator, the AL geomagnetic index, showing the disturbed field produced by the ionospheric electrojet at auroral latitude, and the PC geomagnetic index, showing the disturbed field produced by the polar cap current, were examined.

  8. Finnish geomagnetically induced currents project

    SciTech Connect

    Vilianen, A.; Pirjola, R. . Dept. of Geophysics)

    1995-01-01

    This article is a summary of Results of the Finnish Project on Geomagnetically Induced Currents,'' published in Surveys in Geophysics 15:383-408, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Netherlands, 1994. IVO and FMI carried out a 1-year GIC project from June 1991 to May 1992. The time of the project was a little after the sunspot maximum, and the geomagnetic activity was high; there were 34 major or severe magnetic storm days (A[sub k] index at least 50). The main aim was to derive reliable statistics of the occurrences of GICs at different sites of the Finnish 400 and 220 kV power systems. Besides the practical engineering purpose, the project is also geophysically relevant by providing a GIC data set usable for large-scale investigations of auroral ionospheric-magnetospheric processes and of the earth's structure.

  9. Prediction of Solar Cycle 24 Using Geomagnetic Precursors: Validation and Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh Dabas, Raj; Sharma, Kavita; Sarkar, S. K.

    Maximum amplitude of forthcoming solar cycle number 24 is predicted using geomagnetic precursor technique which is based on the correlation of geomagnetic indices (disturbances) prior to the minimum of the sunspot cycle with the magnitude of the ensuing solar cycle maximum. In the previous study Ap index was used as disturbance index which is available from the last 6-7 solar cycle only whereas long series of aa index is available for more than last 10-12 cycles. In the present study, instead of Ap, aa index is used to predict maximum amplitude of solar cycle 24. First, to validate earlier prediction (Dabas et al., 2008, Solar Phys. DOI 10.1007/s11207-008-9200-1), based on cycles 17-23, linear correlations are obtained between 12-month moving averages of the number of disturbed days when aa is greater than or equal to 50, called the disturbance index, DI, at thirteen selected times (called variate blocks 1, 2, . . . each of them in six-month duration) during the declining portion of the ongoing sunspot cycle and the maximum amplitude of the following sunspot cycle. As in the case of Ap, here again, variate block 9, which occurs exactly 48 months after the current cycle maximum or just prior to subsequent cycle minimum, gives the best correlation (0.97) with a minimum standard error of estimation of ±9, and hind casting shows agreement between predicted and observed maximum amplitudes to about 10 percent. As applied to cycle 24, with aa as precursors yields maximum amplitude of about 120±16 (the 90% prediction interval), which is very close to the earlier prediction of 124±23 (the 90% prediction interval) using Ap and hence validating the same. Further, the same method is applied to cycles 11-23 and once again the variate block 9, gives the best correlation (0.95) with a minimum standard error of estimation of ±13. The relation yields modified maximum amplitude for cycle 24 of about 130±20 (the 90% prediction interval) occurring about 44±4 months after its

  10. Detailed Analysis of Solar Data Related to Historical Extreme Geomagnetic Storms: 1868 - 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefèvre, Laure; Vennerstrøm, Susanne; Dumbović, Mateja; Vršnak, Bojan; Sudar, Davor; Arlt, Rainer; Clette, Frédéric; Crosby, Norma

    2016-04-01

    An analysis of historical Sun-Earth connection events in the context of the most extreme space weather events of the last ˜150 years is presented. To identify the key factors leading to these extreme events, a sample of the most important geomagnetic storms was selected based mainly on the well-known aa index and on geomagnetic parameters described in the accompanying paper (Vennerstrøm et al., Solar Phys. in this issue, 2016, hereafter Paper I). This part of the analysis focuses on associating and characterizing the active regions (sunspot groups) that are most likely linked to these major geomagnetic storms. For this purpose, we used detailed sunspot catalogs as well as solar images and drawings from 1868 to 2010. We have systematically collected the most pertinent sunspot parameters back to 1868, gathering and digitizing solar drawings from different sources such as the Greenwich archives, and extracting the missing sunspot parameters. We present a detailed statistical analysis of the active region parameters (sunspots, flares) relative to the geomagnetic parameters developed in Paper I. In accordance with previous studies, but focusing on a much larger statistical sample, we find that the level of the geomagnetic storm is highly correlated to the size of the active regions at the time of the flare and correlated with the size of the flare itself. We also show that the origin at the Sun is most often a complex active region that is also most of the time close to the central meridian when the event is identified at the Sun. Because we are dealing with extremely severe storms, and not the usual severe storm sample, there is also a strong correlation between the size of the linked active region, the estimated transit speed, and the level of the geomagnetic event. In addition, we confirm that the geomagnetic events studied here and the associated events at the Sun present a low probability of occurring at low sunspot number value

  11. Predicting Solar Cycle 24 Using a Geomagnetic Precursor Pair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesnell, W. Dean

    2014-01-01

    We describe using Ap and F(10.7) as a geomagnetic-precursor pair to predict the amplitude of Solar Cycle 24. The precursor is created by using F(10.7) to remove the direct solar-activity component of Ap. Four peaks are seen in the precursor function during the decline of Solar Cycle 23. A recurrence index that is generated by a local correlation of Ap is then used to determine which peak is the correct precursor. The earliest peak is the most prominent but coincides with high levels of non-recurrent solar activity associated with the intense solar activity of October and November 2003. The second and third peaks coincide with some recurrent activity on the Sun and show that a weak cycle precursor closely following a period of strong solar activity may be difficult to resolve. A fourth peak, which appears in early 2008 and has recurrent activity similar to precursors of earlier solar cycles, appears to be the "true" precursor peak for Solar Cycle 24 and predicts the smallest amplitude for Solar Cycle 24. To determine the timing of peak activity it is noted that the average time between the precursor peak and the following maximum is approximately equal to 6.4 years. Hence, Solar Cycle 24 would peak during 2014. Several effects contribute to the smaller prediction when compared with other geomagnetic-precursor predictions. During Solar Cycle 23 the correlation between sunspot number and F(10.7) shows that F(10.7) is higher than the equivalent sunspot number over most of the cycle, implying that the sunspot number underestimates the solar-activity component described by F(10.7). During 2003 the correlation between aa and Ap shows that aa is 10 % higher than the value predicted from Ap, leading to an overestimate of the aa precursor for that year. However, the most important difference is the lack of recurrent activity in the first three peaks and the presence of significant recurrent activity in the fourth. While the prediction is for an amplitude of Solar Cycle 24 of

  12. Long-term prediction of solar and geomagnetic activity daily time series using singular spectrum analysis and fuzzy descriptor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirmomeni, M.; Kamaliha, E.; Shafiee, M.; Lucas, C.

    2009-09-01

    Of the various conditions that affect space weather, Sun-driven phenomena are the most dominant. Cyclic solar activity has a significant effect on the Earth, its climate, satellites, and space missions. In recent years, space weather hazards have become a major area of investigation, especially due to the advent of satellite technology. As such, the design of reliable alerting and warning systems is of utmost importance, and international collaboration is needed to develop accurate short-term and long-term prediction methodologies. Several methods have been proposed and implemented for the prediction of solar and geomagnetic activity indices, but problems in predicting the exact time and magnitude of such catastrophic events still remain. There are, however, descriptor systems that describe a wider class of systems, including physical models and non-dynamic constraints. It is well known that the descriptor system is much tighter than the state-space expression for representing real independent parametric perturbations. In addition, the fuzzy descriptor models as a generalization of the locally linear neurofuzzy models are general forms that can be trained by constructive intuitive learning algorithms. Here, we propose a combined model based on fuzzy descriptor models and singular spectrum analysis (SSA) (FD/SSA) to forecast a number of geomagnetic activity indices in a manner that optimizes a fuzzy descriptor model for each of the principal components obtained from singular spectrum analysis and recombines the predicted values so as to transform the geomagnetic activity time series into natural chaotic phenomena. The method has been applied to predict two solar and geomagnetic activity indices: geomagnetic aa and solar wind speed (SWS) of the solar wind index. The results demonstrate the higher power of the proposed method-- compared to other methods -- for predicting solar activity.

  13. Reconstruction of Geomagnetic activity and near-Earth interplanetary conditions over the past 167 years.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockwood, Mike; Nevanlinna, Heikki; Barnard, Luke; Owens, Mat; Harrison, Giles; Rouillard, Alexis; Scott, Chris; Vokhmyanin, Mikhail; Ponyavin, Dmitri; Sokolov, Sergey

    2014-05-01

    Records of geomagnetic activity have previously been used to reconstruct the conditions in near-Earth space, such as the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), solar wind speed (Vsw) and open solar flux (OSF). Reliable geomagnetic activity records exist back until the mid-1800's, and these data provide one of the few means of inferring variations in the conditions in near-Earth space before the advent of the space age. However, there are challenges in using geomagnetic activity records to reconstruct interplanetary conditions. In particular it is necessary to ensure, as best as is possible, the homogeneity and reliability of any geomagnetic indices used. This becomes increasingly difficult further back in history, as both the quality of the data and the number of observing stations decreases. A new geomagnetic activity index, the IDV(1D) index, is presented, which is designed to be as homogeneous in its construction as possible (Lockwood et al. 2013a). This is achieved by only combining data that, by virtue of the locations of the source observatories used, have similar responses to solar wind and IMF variations. IDV(1d) employs many of the principles of the IDV index (Svalgaard and Cliver (2010)), inspired by the u index of Bartels (1932). The index uses interdiurnal variation data from Helsinki for 1845- 1890 and 1893-1896 and from Eskdalemuir from 1911 to the present. The gaps are filled using data from the Potsdam (1891-1892 and 1897-1907) and the nearby Seddin observatories (1908-1910) and intercalibration achieved using the Potsdam-Seddin sequence. The index is compared with independent, early data from European-sector stations, as well as the composite u index and the IDV index. Agreement is found to be extremely good in most cases. IDV(1D) does not suffer from the poor homogeneity of the IDV index, and is more highly correlated with the IMF, consequently it yields a more reliable reconstruction (Lockwood et al 2013b). For completeness, we use 4 different

  14. Range indices of geomagnetic activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuart, W.F.; Green, A.W., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The simplest index of geomagnetic activity is the range in nT from maximum to minimum value of the field in a given time interval. The hourly range R was recommended by IAGA for use at observatories at latitudes greater than 65??, but was superceded by AE. The most used geomagnetic index K is based on the range of activity in a 3 h interval corrected for the regular daily variation. In order to take advantage of real time data processing, now available at many observatories, it is proposed to introduce a 1 h range index and also a 3 h range index. Both will be computed hourly, i.e. each will have a series of 24 per day, the 3 h values overlapping. The new data will be available as the range (R) of activity in nT and also as a logarithmic index (I) of the range. The exponent relating index to range in nT is based closely on the scale used for computing K values. The new ranges and range indices are available, from June 1987, to users in real time and can be accessed by telephone connection or computer network. Their first year of production is regarded as a trial period during which their value to the scientific and commercial communities will be assessed, together with their potential as indicators of regional and global disturbances' and in which trials will be conducted into ways of eliminating excessive bias at quiet times due to the rate of change of the daily variation field. ?? 1988.

  15. Reconstruction of geomagnetic activity and near-Earth interplanetary conditions over the past 167 yr - Part 4: Near-Earth solar wind speed, IMF, and open solar flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockwood, M.; Nevanlinna, H.; Barnard, L.; Owens, M. J.; Harrison, R. G.; Rouillard, A. P.; Scott, C. J.

    2014-04-01

    In the concluding paper of this tetralogy, we here use the different geomagnetic activity indices to reconstruct the near-Earth interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and solar wind flow speed, as well as the open solar flux (OSF) from 1845 to the present day. The differences in how the various indices vary with near-Earth interplanetary parameters, which are here exploited to separate the effects of the IMF and solar wind speed, are shown to be statistically significant at the 93% level or above. Reconstructions are made using four combinations of different indices, compiled using different data and different algorithms, and the results are almost identical for all parameters. The correction to the aa index required is discussed by comparison with the Ap index from a more extensive network of mid-latitude stations. Data from the Helsinki magnetometer station is used to extend the aa index back to 1845 and the results confirmed by comparison with the nearby St Petersburg observatory. The optimum variations, using all available long-term geomagnetic indices, of the near-Earth IMF and solar wind speed, and of the open solar flux, are presented; all with ±2σ uncertainties computed using the Monte Carlo technique outlined in the earlier papers. The open solar flux variation derived is shown to be very similar indeed to that obtained using the method of Lockwood et al. (1999).

  16. Geomagnetic disturbances imprints in ground and satellite altitude observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahiat, Yasmina; Lamara, Souad; Zaourar, Naima; Hamoudi, Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    The temporal evolution of the geomagnetic field and its variations have been repeatedly studied from both ground observatories and near-earth orbiting platforms. With the advent of the space ageand the launches of geomagnetic low altitude orbits satellites, a global coverage has been achieved. Since Magsat mission, more satellites were put into orbit and some of them are still collecting data enhancing the spatial and temporal descriptions of the field. Our study uses new data gathered by the latest SWARM satellite mission launched on November, 22nd 2013. It consists of a constellation of three identical satellites carrying on board high resolution and accuracy scientific equipment. Data from this constellation will allow better understanding the multiscale behavior of the geomagnetic field. Our goal is to analyze and interpret the geomagnetic data collected by this Swarm mission, for a given period and try to separate the external disturbances from internal contributions. We consider in the study the variation of the horizontal component H, for different virtual geomagnetic observatories at the satellite altitude. The analysis of data by Swarm orbital segments shows clearly the external disturbances of the magnetic field like that occurring on 27th of August 2014. This perturbation is shown on geomagnetic indexes and is related to a coronal mass ejection (CME). These results from virtual observatories are confirmed, by the equivalent analysis using ground observatories data for the same geographic positions and same epochs. Key words: Geomagnetic field, external field, geomagnetic index, SWARM mission, virtual observatories.

  17. Major geomagnetic storm due to solar activity (2006-2013).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Bhupendra Kumar

    Major geomagnetic storm due to solar activity (2006-2013). Bhupendra Kumar Tiwari Department of Physics, A.P.S.University, Rewa(M.P.) Email: - btiwtari70@yahoo.com mobile 09424981974 Abstract- The geospace environment is dominated by disturbances created by the sun, it is observed that coronal mass ejection (CME) and solar flare events are the causal link to solar activity that produces geomagnetic storm (GMS).CMEs are large scale magneto-plasma structures that erupt from the sun and propagate through the interplanetary medium with speeds ranging from only a few km/s to as large as 4000 km/s. When the interplanetary magnetic field associated with CMEs impinges upon the earth’s magnetosphere and reconnect occur geomagnetic storm. Based on the observation from SOHO/LASCO spacecraft for solar activity and WDC for geomagnetism Kyoto for geomagnetic storm events are characterized by the disturbance storm time (Dst) index during the period 2006-2013. We consider here only intense geomagnetic storm Dst <-100nT, are 12 during 2006-2013.Geomagnetic storm with maximum Dst< -155nT occurred on Dec15, 2006 associated with halo CME with Kp-index 8+ and also verify that halo CME is the main cause to produce large geomagnetic storms.

  18. Ionospheric Response to Geomagnetic Activity during 2007-2009 Solar Minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yiding; Liu, Libo; Huijun Le, lake709.; Wan, Weixing

    The significant effect of weaker geomagnetic activity on ionospheric day-to-day variability during 2007-2009 solar minimum was highlighted by investigating the response of global electron content (GEC) to geomagnetic activity index Ap. A case distinctly manifests the modulation of recurrent weaker geomagnetic disturbance on GEC during the solar minimum. Statistical analyses indicate that the effect of weaker geomagnetic activity on GEC day-to-day variability is significant during 2007-2009, even under relatively quiet geomagnetic activity condition, while geomagnetic activity effect on GEC is not prominent during 2003-2005 solar cycle descending phase except under strong geomagnetic disturbance condition. Nevertheless, statistically the most important effect on GEC day-to-day variability during 2007-2009 comes from the factors other than geomagnetic activity and solar EUV irradiance.

  19. Ionospheric Response to Geomagnetic Activity during 2007-2009 Solar Minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yiding; Liu, Libo; Le, Huijun; Wan, Weixing

    2014-05-01

    The significant effect of weaker geomagnetic activity on ionospheric day-to-day variability during 2007-2009 solar minimum was highlighted by investigating the response of global electron content (GEC) to geomagnetic activity index Ap. A case distinctly manifests the modulation of recurrent weaker geomagnetic disturbance on GEC during the solar minimum. Statistical analyses indicate that the effect of weaker geomagnetic activity on GEC day-to-day variability is significant during 2007-2009, even under relatively quiet geomagnetic activity condition, while geomagnetic activity effect on GEC is not prominent during 2003-2005 solar cycle descending phase except under strong geomagnetic disturbance condition. Nevertheless, statistically the most important effect on GEC day-to-day variability during 2007-2009 comes from the factors other than geomagnetic activity and solar EUV irradiance.

  20. Solar and geomagnetic precursors of the climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukianova, Renata; Alekseev, Genrikh

    2010-05-01

    Observed climate change and warming are temporary and spatially non-uniform over the globe whereas the global models tend to predict the gradual increase of temperature due to the antropogenic impact. In particular, rapid climate changes in the Arctic in 1990-2000s can not be accounted solely for the anthropogenic effect since the actually observed changes exceed the predictions of the global climate models. Such discrepancy is usually attributed to the intrinsic variability of the climate system. However, the Sun influences the Earth climate through mechanisms that are not fully understood but which can be linked to solar variations of luminosity, magnetic field, UV radiation, solar flares and modulation of the cosmic ray intensity. In this contribution we (re)examined the long-term behavior of some solar proxies and surface air and see temperatures (SAT and SST). The satellite composite of total solar irradiance (TSI) covered approximately three last solar cycles has been used for determination of the inter-annual solar variability. In the spectrum of anomalies relative to 11-yr cycle a strong 12-month harmonic is clearly seen along with some lower (3-4 yr) periodicities. Examination of the long-term behavior of the solar proxy in the individual months of the year reveals the persisted increase of solar irradiance anomalies in December-February. Although the TSI time series has no overall trend, in Nov-Feb the 0.32 W/m2 upward trend is detected. The largest differential anomaly (between 1983 and 2002) is 1.21 W/m2. The natural seasonal weather cycle may play a role of amplifier of solar annual signal. In order to check further the external (solar) forcing-climate hypothesis, comparisons between the geomagnetic aa index and the update SAT and SST have been made over the time interval of 1868-2009. The long-term variability of the 11-yr running average aa index shows the overall upward trend that rises from 1900 to 1950s, decreases until 1960s, rises again to 1990s

  1. Dependence of geosynchronous relativistic electron enhancements on geomagnetic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, A. V.; Chao, J. K.

    2003-11-01

    Relativistic electron fluxes observed in geosynchronous orbit by GOES-8 in 1997 to 2000 were considered as a complex function of geomagnetic indices PC, Kp, and Dst, as well as parameters of the magnetosphere size, subsolar Rs, and terminator Rf magnetopause distances. A geosynchronous relativistic electron enhancement (GREE) is determined as daily maximal electron flux exceeding the upper root mean square deviation (RMSD) threshold of about 1500 (cm2s sr)-1. Comparison analysis of the GREE dynamics and geomagnetic conditions on the rising phase of current solar cycle revealed suppression of the relativistic electron enhancements by substantially increased strong geomagnetic activity in the solar maximum. Statistical consideration of a relationship between the GREEs and the geomagnetic parameters showed that the most important parameters controlling the geosynchronous relativistic electron enhancements were 4-day averaged Kp index, PC index, and magnetopause termination distance Rf, delayed on 3 and 14 hours, respectively. Relatively high averaging time for Kp was explained by the cumulative effect of substorm energy release in a gradual mechanism accelerating the relativistic electrons in the magnetosphere. Very short time delay for PC index was interpreted as intensification of a fast acceleration mechanism producing the GREEs during severe geomagnetic storms. Substantial increase of the PC index (PC > 5) was found to be a sufficient condition for GREE occurrence. The fast response of the geosynchronous relativistic electron fluxes on the magnetosphere compression was explained by drift losses of the energetic electrons at the magnetopause, which approaches the Earth during geomagnetic storms.

  2. Statistical Study of Strong and Extreme Geomagnetic Disturbances and Solar Cycle Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilpua, E. K. J.; Olspert, N.; Grigorievskiy, A.; Käpylä, M. J.; Tanskanen, E. I.; Miyahara, H.; Kataoka, R.; Pelt, J.; Liu, Y. D.

    2015-06-01

    We study the relation between strong and extreme geomagnetic storms and solar cycle characteristics. The analysis uses an extensive geomagnetic index AA data set spanning over 150 yr complemented by the Kakioka magnetometer recordings. We apply Pearson correlation statistics and estimate the significance of the correlation with a bootstrapping technique. We show that the correlation between the storm occurrence and the strength of the solar cycle decreases from a clear positive correlation with increasing storm magnitude toward a negligible relationship. Hence, the quieter Sun can also launch superstorms that may lead to significant societal and economic impact. Our results show that while weaker storms occur most frequently in the declining phase, the stronger storms have the tendency to occur near solar maximum. Our analysis suggests that the most extreme solar eruptions do not have a direct connection between the solar large-scale dynamo-generated magnetic field, but are rather associated with smaller-scale dynamo and resulting turbulent magnetic fields. The phase distributions of sunspots and storms becoming increasingly in phase with increasing storm strength, on the other hand, may indicate that the extreme storms are related to the toroidal component of the solar large-scale field.

  3. Geomagnetic disturbance and the orientation of nocturnally migrating birds.

    PubMed

    Moore, F R

    1977-05-01

    Free-flying passerine migrants respond to natural fluctuations in the earth's magnetic field. The variability in flight directions of nocturnal migrants is significantly correlated with increasing geomagnetic disturbance as measured by both the K index and various components of the earth's magnetic field. The results indicate that such disturbances influence the orientation of free-flying migrants, but the evidence is not sufficient to show that geomagnetism is a cue in their orientation system. PMID:854743

  4. The equatorial electrojet during geomagnetic storms and substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Yosuke; Kosch, Michael J.

    2015-03-01

    The climatology of the equatorial electrojet during periods of enhanced geomagnetic activity is examined using long-term records of ground-based magnetometers in the Indian and Peruvian regions. Equatorial electrojet perturbations due to geomagnetic storms and substorms are evaluated using the disturbance storm time (Dst) index and auroral electrojet (AE) index, respectively. The response of the equatorial electrojet to rapid changes in the AE index indicates effects of both prompt penetration electric field and disturbance dynamo electric field, consistent with previous studies based on F region equatorial vertical plasma drift measurements at Jicamarca. The average response of the equatorial electrojet to geomagnetic storms (Dst<-50 nT) reveals persistent disturbances during the recovery phase, which can last for approximately 24 h after the Dst index reaches its minimum value. This "after-storm" effect is found to depend on the magnitude of the storm, solar EUV activity, season, and longitude.

  5. Geomagnetic Indices Variations And Human Physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrova, S.

    2007-12-01

    A group of 86 volunteers was examined on each working day in autumn 2001 and in spring 2002. Systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and heart rate (HR) were registered. Pulse pressure (PP) was calculated. Data about subjective psycho-physiological complaints (SPPC) were also gathered. Altogether 2799 recordings were obtained. ANOVA was employed to check the significance of influence of daily amplitude of H-component of local geomagnetic field, daily planetary Ap-index and hourly planetary Dst-index on the physiological parameters examined. Post hoc analysis was performed to elicit the significance of differences in the factors levels. Average values of SBP, DBP, PP and SPPC of the group were found to increase statistically significantly and biologically considerably with the increase of geomagnetic indices.

  6. Geomagnetic activity and Hale sector boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundstedt, H.; Scherrer, P. H.; Wilcox, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The variation of the geomagnetic activity index Ap at the IMF sector boundaries (+ to - and - to +) has been studied for three solar cycles, separating data into vernal and autumnal equinoxes. It was found that a reported increase in Ap as an effect of a Hale boundary can be better attributed to the occurrence of a negative IMF Bz component in the geocentric solar magnetospheric coordinate system and to the occurrence of high speed solar wind streams.

  7. Conjugate Event Study of Geomagnetic ULF Pulsations with Wavelet-based Indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Z.; Clauer, C. R.; Kim, H.; Weimer, D. R.; Cai, X.

    2013-12-01

    The interactions between the solar wind and geomagnetic field produce a variety of space weather phenomena, which can impact the advanced technology systems of modern society including, for example, power systems, communication systems, and navigation systems. One type of phenomena is the geomagnetic ULF pulsation observed by ground-based or in-situ satellite measurements. Here, we describe a wavelet-based index and apply it to study the geomagnetic ULF pulsations observed in Antarctica and Greenland magnetometer arrays. The wavelet indices computed from these data show spectrum, correlation, and magnitudes information regarding the geomagnetic pulsations. The results show that the geomagnetic field at conjugate locations responds differently according to the frequency of pulsations. The index is effective for identification of the pulsation events and measures important characteristics of the pulsations. It could be a useful tool for the purpose of monitoring geomagnetic pulsations.

  8. Vertical total electron content and geomagnetic perturbations at mid- and sub-auroral southern latitudes during geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meza, Amalia; Andrea van Zele, María; Claudio, Brunini; Rosalía Cabassi, Iris

    2005-03-01

    Several new space geodesy techniques allow us to analyze the behavior of the vertical total electron content (VTEC) with high spatial and temporal resolution. This study is based on the VTEC computed from global positioning system (GPS) satellite signals that are recorded from observatories located at mid- and sub-auroral southern latitudes. The geomagnetic disturbances are analyzed using the Dst and AL geomagnetic indices and geomagnetic field variations which are recorded from an observatory close to one of the GPS stations and from observatories located at equivalent geomagnetic latitudes but in the Northern Hemisphere. The study is focused on two consecutive geomagnetic storms, which happened on October 4 and 5, 2000, characterized by two flips of the interplanetary magnetic field. During this perturbed period, the substorms are evidenced by the AL index and by the field variations recorded by the geomagnetic observatories. We also analyze a substorm effect that occurred during a geomagnetic storm. Variations in f0F2 are currently considered to study the geomagnetic storm effects on the ionosphere. Our results show that at mid- and subauroral southern latitudes the behavior of the VTEC evidences the “dusk” effect (positive ionospheric storm after noon) in a similar way to f0F2 variations. Similar geomagnetic conditions can be inferred from the Dst index for both geomagnetic storms but a quick rise of the VTEC and the dusk effect is only observed on the first stormy day. The positive ionospheric storm is followed by a negative phase that lasts until October 6. The second geomagnetic storm starts when the negative phase of the first ionospheric storm is still deployed and the ionosphere/plasmasphere system conditions do not allow a new positive ionospheric storm. The AL index and the geomagnetic field variations allow us to recognize the expansion phase of the substorm due to the presence of the electromagnetic wedge that couples the magnetosphere and

  9. Introduction to Geomagnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinze, William J.

    Coincidentally, as I sat down in late October 2003 to read and review the second edition of Wallace H. Campbell's text, Introduction to Geomagnetic Fields, we received warnings from the news media of a massive solar flare and its possible effect on power supply systems and satellite communications. News programs briefly explained the source of Sun-Earth interactions. If you are interested in learning more about the physics of the connection between sun spots and power supply systems and their impact on orbiting satellites, I urge you to become acquainted with Campbell's book. It presents an interesting and informative explanation of the geomagnetic field and its applications to a wide variety of topics, including oil exploration, climate change, and fraudulent claims of the utility of magnetic fields for alleviating human pain. Geomagnetism, the study of the nature and processes of the Earth's magnetic fields and its application to the investigation of the Earth, its processes, and history, is a mature science with a well-developed theoretical foundation and a vast array of observations. It is discussed in varied detail in Earth physics books and most entry-level geoscience texts. The latter treatments largely are driven by the need to discuss paleomagnetism as an essential tool in studying plate tectonics. A more thorough explanation of geomagnetism is needed by many interested scientists in related fields and by laypersons. This is the objective of Campbell's book. It is particularly germane in view of a broad range of geomagnetic topics that are at the forefront of today's science, including environmental magnetism, so-called ``jerks'' observed in the Earth's magnetic field, the perplexing magnetic field of Mars, improved satellite magnetic field observations, and the increasing availability of high-quality continental magnetic anomaly maps, to name only a few.

  10. Local geomagnetic indices and their role in space weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Antonio; Cid, Consuelo; Saiz, Elena; Palacios, Judith; Cerrato, Yolanda

    2016-04-01

    The analysis of local geomagnetic disturbances (specific longitude and latitude) have recently proved to play an important role in space weather research. Localized strong (high intensity) and impulsive (fast developed and fast recovered) geomagnetic disturbances are typically recorded at high latitudes and commonly related to field-aligned currents. These type of disturbances are also recorded, less frequently, at mid and low latitudes, representing an important hazard for technology. In order to obtain geomagnetic disturbances (geomagnetic index) from the records at a certain observatory, a baseline has to be removed. The baseline is usually determined taking into account geomagnetic secular variation and solar quiet time. At mid-latitudes the shape of the daily solar quiet component presents a strong day-to-day variability difficult to predict. In this work we present a new technique capable to determine the baseline at mid-latitudes which allows us to obtain a high resolution local geomagnetic index with the highest accuracy ever obtained at mid-latitudes.

  11. Estimation of interplanetary electric field conditions for historical geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Veenadhari, B.; Tulasi Ram, S.; Selvakumaran, R.; Mukherjee, Shyamoli; Singh, Rajesh; Kadam, B. D.

    2015-09-01

    Ground magnetic measurements provide a unique database in understanding space weather. The continuous geomagnetic records from Colaba-Alibag observatories in India contain historically longest and continuous observations from 1847 to present date. Some of the super intense geomagnetic storms that occurred prior to 1900 have been revisited and investigated in order to understand the probable interplanetary conditions associated with intense storms. Following Burton et al. (1975), an empirical relationship is derived for estimation of interplanetary electric field (IEFy) from the variations of Dst index and ΔH at Colaba-Alibag observatories. The estimated IEFy values using Dst and ΔHABG variations agree well with the observed IEFy, calculated using Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite observations for intense geomagnetic storms in solar cycle 23. This study will provide the uniqueness of each event and provide important insights into possible interplanetary conditions for intense geomagnetic storms and probable frequency of their occurrence.

  12. Studies on the Geomagnetic Induction Vectors of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiao; Zhang, Huiqian; Huang, Qinghua

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the geomagnetic data of 16 stations, near 6 years for most, provided by the National Geomagnetic Center of China, were used to study on the geomagnetic induction vectors. The stations cover the whole North China and part of southwestern China, both of which has a complicate geological and tectonic background. This study will not only advance the understanding of regional tectonic variations, but also provide some suggestions on the construction for geomagnetic observation network of earthquake monitoring. The time series of geomagnetic induction vectors were obtained by the robust estimation method, which has been verified and compared with the ordinary least square and the weighted square method. A principle of selecting a specified period's results from the robust estimation method was defined. Then, the results with the period of 640s for all stations were selected by this principle. The long-term trends (more than six months at least) within the time series were extracted by the Fourier harmonic analysis. Consistent phase variations exist for most stations within a similar tectonic background. About one-month period variations in the most stations' results after removing the long-term trends were found. Spectrum analysis for the results and geomagnetic activity index showed that those phenomena may relate to the period of the global geomagnetic activity. A preference azimuth of the geomagnetic induction vectors was found in each station by statistical analysis on the time series. It pointed out the possible relatively high conductivity structures. Exactly, geomagnetic vectors of BJI, JIH, LYH and TAY station, which surround the basin of North China, suggested a relatively higher conductivity layer; that of stations around the Erdos block suggested a complicated structure. Three-dimension inversion by ModEM verifies our results.

  13. Foundations of Geomagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Andy

    The study of the magnetic field of the Earth, or geomagnetism, is one of the oldest lines of scientific enquiry. Indeed, it has often been said that William Gilbert's De Magnete, published in 1600 and predating Isaac Newton's Principia by 87 years, can claim to be the first true scientific textbook; his study was essentially the first of academic rather than practical interest.What then, we may ask, has been accomplished in the nearly 400 intervening years up to the publication of Foundations of Geomagnetism? In short, a wealth of observational evidence, considerable physical understanding, and a great deal of mathematical apparatus have accrued, placing the subject on a much surer footing.The latter two categories are described in considerable detail, and with attendant rigor, in this book. The sphericity of the Earth means that a frequent theme in the book is the solution of the partial differential equations of electrodynamics in a spherical geometry.

  14. Geomagnetic activity and polar surface air temperature variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seppälä, A.; Randall, C. E.; Clilverd, M. A.; Rozanov, E.; Rodger, C. J.

    2009-10-01

    Here we use the ERA-40 and ECMWF operational surface level air temperature data sets from 1957 to 2006 to examine polar temperature variations during years with different levels of geomagnetic activity, as defined by the A p index. Previous modeling work has suggested that NO x produced at high latitudes by energetic particle precipitation can eventually lead to detectable changes in surface air temperatures (SATs). We find that during winter months, polar SATs in years with high A p index are different than in years with low A p index; the differences are statistically significant at the 2-sigma level and range up to about ±4.5 K, depending on location. The temperature differences are larger when years with wintertime Sudden Stratospheric Warmings (SSWs) are excluded. We take into account solar irradiance variations, unlike previous analyses of geomagnetic effects in ERA-40 and operational data. Although we cannot conclusively show that the polar SAT patterns are physically linked by geomagnetic activity, we conclude that geomagnetic activity likely plays a role in modulating wintertime surface air temperatures. We tested our SAT results against variation in the Quasi Biennial Oscillation, the El Niño Southern Oscillation and the Southern Annular Mode. The results suggested that these were not driving the observed polar SAT variability. However, significant uncertainty is introduced by the Northern Annular Mode, and we cannot robustly exclude a chance linkage between sea surface temperature variability and geomagnetic activity.

  15. On regional geomagnetic charts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alldredge, L.R.

    1987-01-01

    When regional geomagnetic charts for areas roughly the size of the US were compiled by hand, some large local anomalies were displayed in the isomagnetic lines. Since the late 1960s, when the compilation of charts using computers and mathematical models was started, most of the details available in the hand drawn regional charts have been lost. One exception to this is the Canadian magnetic declination chart for 1980. This chart was constructed using a 180 degrees spherical harmonic model. -from Author

  16. Geomagnetism. Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    The latest attempt to summarise the wealth of knowledge now available on geomagnetic phenomena has resulted in this multi-volume treatise, with contributions and reviews from many scientists. The first volume in the series contains a thorough review of all existing information on measuring the Earth's magnetic field, both on land and at sea, and includes a comparative analysis of the techniques available for this purpose.

  17. Spiking the Geomagnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constable, C.; Davies, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Geomagnetic field intensities corresponding to virtual axial dipole moments of up to 200 ZAm2, more than twice the modern value, have been inferred from archeomagnetic measurements on artifacts dated at or shortly after 1000 BC. Anomalously high values occur in the Levant and Georgia, but not in Bulgaria. The origin of this spike is believed to lie in Earth's core: however, its spatio-temporal characteristics and the geomagnetic processes responsible for such a feature remain a mystery. We show that a localized spike in the radial magnetic field at the core-mantle boundary (CMB) must necessarily contribute to the largest scale changes in Earth's surface field, namely the dipole. Even the limiting spike of a delta function at the CMB produces a minimum surface cap size of 60 degrees for a factor of two increase in paleointensity. Combined evidence from modern satellite and millennial scale field modeling suggests that the Levantine Spike is intimately associated with a strong increase in dipole moment prior to 1000 BC and likely the product of north-westward motion of concentrated near equatorial Asian flux patches like those seen in the modern field. New archeomagnetic studies are needed to confirm this interpretation. Minimum estimates of the power dissipated by the spike are comparable to independent estimates of the dissipation associated with the entire steady state geodynamo. This suggests that geomagnetic spikes are either associated with rapid changes in magnetic energy or strong Lorentz forces.

  18. On extreme geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cid, Consuelo; Palacios, Judith; Saiz, Elena; Guerrero, Antonio; Cerrato, Yolanda

    2014-10-01

    Extreme geomagnetic storms are considered as one of the major natural hazards for technology-dependent society. Geomagnetic field disturbances can disrupt the operation of critical infrastructures relying on space-based assets, and can also result in terrestrial effects, such as the Quebec electrical disruption in 1989. Forecasting potential hazards is a matter of high priority, but considering large flares as the only criterion for early-warning systems has demonstrated to release a large amount of false alarms and misses. Moreover, the quantification of the severity of the geomagnetic disturbance at the terrestrial surface using indices as Dst cannot be considered as the best approach to give account of the damage in utilities. High temporal resolution local indices come out as a possible solution to this issue, as disturbances recorded at the terrestrial surface differ largely both in latitude and longitude. The recovery phase of extreme storms presents also some peculiar features which make it different from other less intense storms. This paper goes through all these issues related to extreme storms by analysing a few events, highlighting the March 1989 storm, related to the Quebec blackout, and the October 2003 event, when several transformers burnt out in South Africa.

  19. Trends of solar-geomagnetic activity, cosmic rays, atmosphere, and climate changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronin, N.; Avakyan, S.

    2009-04-01

    The results are presented of the analysis of trends in the solar-geomagnetic activity and intensity of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) for the several eleven-year solar cycles. The indication has been revealed of the change of signs in the long-term changes in geomagnetic activity (aa-index) and the GCR in recent years. These changes correspond to the changes of sings in long-term trends in some of atmospheric parameters (transparency, albedo, cloudness, the content of water vapour, methane, ozone, the erythemal radiation flux). These global changes in atmosphere is most important problem of the up-to-date science. The global warming observed during the several past decades presents a real danger for the mankind. Till present the predominant point of view has been that the main cause of the increase of mean surface air temperature is the increase of concentrations of the anthropogenic gases first of all carbon dioxide CO2 and methane CH_4. Indeed, from the beginning of nineteen century the concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere has been growing and now it exceeds the initial level by the factor of 1.4 and the speed of this increase being growing too. This was the reason of international efforts to accept the Kyoto Protocol which limited the ejections of greenhouse gases. However there are premises which show that the influence of solar variability on the climate should be taken into account in the first place. The obtained results are analyzed from the point of view of well known effects of GCR influence on weather and climate with taken into account also a novel trigger mechanism in solar-terrestrial relations what allows revaluation of the role of solar flares and geomagnetic storms. The mechanism explains how agents of solar and geomagnetic activities affect atmospheric processes. This first agent under consideration is variation of fluxes of solar EUV and X-ray radiation. The second agent is fluxes of electrons and protons which precipitate from radiation belts as a

  20. The national geomagnetic initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Earth's magnetic field, through its variability over a spectrum of spatial and temporal scales, contains fundamental information on the solid Earth and geospace environment (the latter comprising the atmosphere, ionosphere, and magnetosphere). Integrated studies of the geomagnetic field have the potential to address a wide range of important processes in the deep mantle and core, asthenosphere, lithosphere, oceans, and the solar-terrestrial environment. These studies have direct applications to important societal problems, including resource assessment and exploration, natural hazard mitigation, safe navigation, and the maintenance and survivability of communications and power systems on the ground and in space. Studies of the Earth's magnetic field are supported by a variety of federal and state agencies as well as by private industry. Both basic and applied research is presently supported by several federal agencies, including the National Science Foundation (NSF), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) (through the Navy, Air Force, and Defense Mapping Agency). Although each agency has a unique, well-defined mission in geomagnetic studies, many areas of interest overlap. For example, NASA, the Navy, and USGS collaborate closely in the development of main field reference models. NASA, NSF, and the Air Force collaborate in space physics. These interagency linkages need to be strengthened. Over the past decade, new opportunities for fundamental advances in geomagnetic research have emerged as a result of three factors: well-posed, first-order scientific questions; increased interrelation of research activities dealing with geomagnetic phenomena; and recent developments in technology. These new opportunities can be exploited through a national geomagnetic initiative to define objectives and

  1. Geomagnetic polarity transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, Ronald T.; McFadden, Phillip L.

    1999-05-01

    The top of Earth's liquid outer core is nearly 2900 km beneath Earth's surface, so we will never be able to observe it directly. This hot, dense, molten iron-rich body is continuously in motion and is the source of Earth's magnetic field. One of the most dynamic manifestations at Earth's surface of this fluid body is, perhaps, a reversal of the geomagnetic field. Unfortunately, the most recent polarity transition occurred at about 780 ka, so we have never observed a transition directly. It seems that a polarity transition spans many human lifetimes, so no human will ever witness the phenomenon in its entirety. Thus we are left with the tantalizing prospect that paleomagnetic records of polarity transitions may betray some of the secrets of the deep Earth. Certainly, if there are systematics in the reversal process and they can be documented, then this will reveal substantial information about the nature of the lowermost mantle and of the outer core. Despite their slowness on a human timescale, polarity transitions occur almost instantaneously on a geological timescale. This rapidity, together with limitations in the paleomagnetic recording process, prohibits a comprehensive description of any reversal transition both now and into the foreseeable future, which limits the questions that may at this stage be sensibly asked. The natural model for the geomagnetic field is a set of spherical harmonic components, and we are not able to obtain a reliable model for even the first few harmonic terms during a transition. Nevertheless, it is possible, in principle, to make statements about the harmonic character of a geomagnetic polarity transition without having a rigorous spherical harmonic description of one. For example, harmonic descriptions of recent geomagnetic polarity transitions that are purely zonal can be ruled out (a zonal harmonic does not change along a line of latitude). Gleaning information about transitions has proven to be difficult, but it does seem

  2. Geomagnetic survey and geomagnetic model research in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Zuowen; Zhan, Zhijia; Gao, Jintian; Han, Wei; An, Zhenchang; Yao, Tongqi; Chen, Bin

    2006-06-01

    The geomagnetic survey at 135 stations in China were carried out in 2003. These stations are with better environmental condition and small magnetic field gradient (<5 nT/m). In the field survey, the geomagnetic declination D, the inclination I and the total intensity F were measured. Ashtech ProMark2 differential GPS (Global Positioning System) was used in measuring the azimuth, the longitude, the latitude and the elevation at these stations. The accuracy of the azimuth is 0.1'. The geomagnetic survey data were reduced using the data at geomagnetic observatories in China. The mean standard deviations of the geomagnetic reduced values are: <1.5 nT for F, <0.5' for D and I. Using the geomagnetic data which include the data at 135 stations and 35 observatories in China, and the data at 38 IGRF (International Geomagnetic Reference Field) calculation points in China's adjacent regions, the Taylor polynomial model and the spherical cap harmonic model were calculated for the geomagnetic field in China. The truncation order of the Taylor polynomial model is 5, and its original point is at 36.0°N and 104.5°E. Based on the geomagnetic anomalous values and using the method of spherical cap harmonic (SCH) analysis, the SCH model of the geomagnetic anomalous field was derived. In the SCH model, the pole of the spherical cap is at 36.0°N and 104.5°E, and the half-angle is 30°, the truncation order K= 8 is determined according to the mean square deviation between the model calculation value and the observation value, the AIC (Akaike Information Criterion) and the distribution of geomagnetic field.

  3. [Relation between microcirculation parameters and Pc3 geomagnetic pulsations].

    PubMed

    Zenchehko, T A; Poskotinova, L V; Rekhtina, A G; Zaslavskaia, R M

    2010-01-01

    An individual analysis of long-term monitoring of microcirculation parameters of nine healthy volunteers showed that an increase in the geomagnetic activity led to an increase in tissue perfusion, variability of blood flow and growth of the amplitude of neurogenic and myogenic oscillations in four volunteers. It was found that the degree of microcirculation sensitivity to the level of geomagnetic activity values with time and is proportional to its average level in the period of measurement. A comparison of frequency ranges of oscillations of blood flow and variations of the geomagnetic activity shows that neurogenic and myogenic oscillations showing the highest sensitivity to the geomagnetic activity have the same frequency as geomagnetic Pc3 pulsations. The pulsations of this frequency range are excited mainly during geomagnetic disturbances, which may explain the correlation between the microcirculation parameters and the Kp index. The relation of the amplitude-frequency characteristics of Pc3-pulsations can explain the results obtained using the alternating magnetic fields. PMID:20968090

  4. Prediction of Geomagnetic Activity and Key Parameters in High-Latitude Ionosphere-Basic Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyatsky, W.; Khazanov, G. V.

    2007-01-01

    Prediction of geomagnetic activity and related events in the Earth's magnetosphere and ionosphere is an important task of the Space Weather program. Prediction reliability is dependent on the prediction method and elements included in the prediction scheme. Two main elements are a suitable geomagnetic activity index and coupling function -- the combination of solar wind parameters providing the best correlation between upstream solar wind data and geomagnetic activity. The appropriate choice of these two elements is imperative for any reliable prediction model. The purpose of this work was to elaborate on these two elements -- the appropriate geomagnetic activity index and the coupling function -- and investigate the opportunity to improve the reliability of the prediction of geomagnetic activity and other events in the Earth's magnetosphere. The new polar magnetic index of geomagnetic activity and the new version of the coupling function lead to a significant increase in the reliability of predicting the geomagnetic activity and some key parameters, such as cross-polar cap voltage and total Joule heating in high-latitude ionosphere, which play a very important role in the development of geomagnetic and other activity in the Earth s magnetosphere, and are widely used as key input parameters in modeling magnetospheric, ionospheric, and thermospheric processes.

  5. Geomagnetism and climate I: the last 400 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevanlinna, H.; Shumilov, O.; Mörner, N.-A.; Dergachev, V.

    2003-04-01

    During the last 400 years there seems to exist a close linkage between sunspot activity and paleoclimate. The combined Schwabe Gleisberg cycles provide a good approximation of past climate. Changes in the phase of the sunspot cycles exhibit a very close correlation with observed changes in climate for the last 150 years. The heliomagnetic aa-index provides a close correlation with climate over the last 150 years. The close correlation between sunspot activity and atmospheric changes in radiocarbon indicates that changes in heliomagnetic interaction with the Earth’s magnetosphere play a central role in this solar-terrestrial interaction; via its modulation of the cosmic ray flux or its modulation of Earth’s rate of rotation. Variations in cosmic ray flux have the capacity of affecting Earth’s climate via its modulation of airglow and cloudiness (especially at the level around 15 km). There is a good correlation between Solar Wind intensity and Earth’s rate of rotation (LOD), implying that variations in Solar Wind intensity (sunspot activity) act in retarding and speeding up in the spin rate of Planet Earth. During the Spörer, Maunder and Dalton Sunspot Minima, the Earth’s rate of rotation was significantly speeded-up, affecting the ocean surface circulation and the atmospheric circulation as to create significant changes in local climate; “Little Ice Ages” in western and northern Europe and “Little Interglacial” in southwest Europe and northwest Africa. In conclusion, Earth’s climate seems closely driven by changes in sunspot activity. This correlation may operate via the cosmic ray effects on airglow and/or cloudiness, or via the heliomagnetic (Solar Wind) effects on Earth’s rate of rotation, or a combination of these processes. Changes in the Earth’s own internal geomagnetic field seem to have played little or no role during this time period. Nor are there any reasons to advocate major changes in Solar irradiance.

  6. Solar generated quasi-biennial geomagnetic variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugiura, M.; Poros, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    The existence of highly correlated quasi-biennial variations in the geomagnetic field and in solar activity is demonstrated. The analysis uses a numerical filter technique applied to monthly averages of the geomagnetic horizontal component and of the Zurich relative sunspot number. Striking correlations are found between the quasi-biennial geomagnetic variations determined from several magnetic observatories located at widely different longitudes, indicating a worldwide nature of the obtained variation. The correlation coefficient between the filtered Dst index and the filtered relative sunspot number is found to be -0.79 at confidence level greater than 99% with a time-lag of 4 months, with solar activity preceding the Dst variation. The correlation between the unfiltered data of Dst and of the sunspot number is also high with a similar time-lag. Such a timelag has not been discussed in the literature, and a further study is required to establish the mode of sun-earth relationship that gives this time delay.

  7. Sources of Geomagnetic Activity during Nearly Three Solar Cycles (1972-2000)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Cane, H. V.; Cliver, E. W.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We examine the contributions of the principal solar wind components (corotating highspeed streams, slow solar wind, and transient structures, i.e., interplanetary coronal mass ejections (CMEs), shocks, and postshock flows) to averages of the aa geomagnetic index and the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) strength in 1972-2000 during nearly three solar cycles. A prime motivation is to understand the influence of solar cycle variations in solar wind structure on long-term (e.g., approximately annual) averages of these parameters. We show that high-speed streams account for approximately two-thirds of long-term aa averages at solar minimum, while at solar maximum, structures associated with transients make the largest contribution (approx. 50%), though contributions from streams and slow solar wind continue to be present. Similarly, high-speed streams are the principal contributor (approx. 55%) to solar minimum averages of the IMF, while transient-related structures are the leading contributor (approx. 40%) at solar maximum. These differences between solar maximum and minimum reflect the changing structure of the near-ecliptic solar wind during the solar cycle. For minimum periods, the Earth is embedded in high-speed streams approx. 55% of the time versus approx. 35% for slow solar wind and approx. 10% for CME-associated structures, while at solar maximum, typical percentages are as follows: high-speed streams approx. 35%, slow solar wind approx. 30%, and CME-associated approx. 35%. These compositions show little cycle-to-cycle variation, at least for the interval considered in this paper. Despite the change in the occurrences of different types of solar wind over the solar cycle (and less significant changes from cycle to cycle), overall, variations in the averages of the aa index and IMF closely follow those in corotating streams. Considering solar cycle averages, we show that high-speed streams account for approx. 44%, approx. 48%, and approx. 40% of the solar

  8. Geomagnetic activity effect on the global ionosphere during the 2007-2009 deep solar minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yiding; Liu, Libo; Le, Huijun; Wan, Weixing

    2014-05-01

    In this paper the significant effect of weaker geomagnetic activity during the 2007-2009 deep solar minimum on ionospheric variability on the shorter-term time scales of several days was highlighted via investigating the response of daily mean global electron content (GEC, the global area integral of total electron content derived from ground-based GPS measurements) to geomagnetic activity index Ap. Based on a case during the deep solar minimum, the effect of the recurrent weaker geomagnetic disturbances on the ionosphere was evident. Statistical analyses indicate that the effect of weaker geomagnetic activity on GEC variations on shorter-term time scales was significant during 2007-2009 even under relatively quiet geomagnetic activity condition; daily mean GEC was positively correlated with geomagnetic activity. However, GEC variations on shorter-term time scales were poorly correlated with geomagnetic activity during the solar cycle descending phase of 2003-2005 except under strong geomagnetic disturbance condition. Statistically, the effects of solar EUV irradiance, geomagnetic activity, and other factors (e.g., meteorological sources) on GEC variations on shorter-term time scales were basically equivalent during the 2007-2009 solar minimum.

  9. Evolution of Solar and Geomagnetic Activity Indices, and Their Relationship: 1960 - 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbanac, G.; Mandea, M.; Vršnak, B.; Sentic, S.

    2011-07-01

    We employ annually averaged solar and geomagnetic activity indices for the period 1960 - 2001 to analyze the relationship between different measures of solar activity as well as the relationship between solar activity and various aspects of geomagnetic activity. In particular, to quantify the solar activity we use the sunspot number R s, group sunspot number R g, cumulative sunspot area Cum, solar radio flux F10.7, and interplanetary magnetic field strength IMF. For the geomagnetic activity we employ global indices Ap, Dst and Dcx, as well as the regional geomagnetic index RES, specifically estimated for the European region. In the paper we present the relative evolution of these indices and quantify the correlations between them. Variations have been found in: i) time lag between the solar and geomagnetic indices; ii) relative amplitude of the geomagnetic and solar activity peaks; iii) dual-peak distribution in some of solar and geomagnetic indices. The behavior of geomagnetic indices is correlated the best with IMF variations. Interestingly, among geomagnetic indices, RES shows the highest degree of correlation with solar indices.

  10. Statistical analysis of extreme values for geomagnetic and geoelectric field variations for Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitina, Lidia; Trichtchenko, Larisa; Boteler, David

    2016-04-01

    Disturbances of the geomagnetic field produced by space weather events cause variable geoelectric fields at Earth's surface which drive electric currents in power systems, resulting in hazardous impacts on electric power transmission. In extreme cases, as during the magnetic storm in March 13, 1989, this can result in burnt-out transformers and power blackouts. To make assessment of geomagnetic and geoelectric activity in Canada during extreme space weather events, extreme value statistical analysis has been applied to more than 40 years of magnetic data from the Canadian geomagnetic observatories network. This network has archived digital data recordings for observatories located in sub-auroral, auroral, and polar zones. Extreme value analysis was applied to hourly ranges of geomagnetic variations as an index of geomagnetic activity and to hourly maximum of rate-of-change of geomagnetic field. To estimate extreme geoelectric fields, the minute geomagnetic data were used together with Earth conductivity models for different Canadian locations to calculate geoelectric fields. The extreme value statistical analysis was applied to hourly maximum values of the horizontal geoelectric field. This assessment provided extreme values of geomagnetic and geoelectric activity which are expected to happen once per 50 years and once per 100 years. The results of this analysis are designed to be used to assess the geomagnetic hazard to power systems and help the power industry mitigate risks from extreme space weather events.

  11. Bayesian inference in geomagnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backus, George E.

    1988-01-01

    The inverse problem in empirical geomagnetic modeling is investigated, with critical examination of recently published studies. Particular attention is given to the use of Bayesian inference (BI) to select the damping parameter lambda in the uniqueness portion of the inverse problem. The mathematical bases of BI and stochastic inversion are explored, with consideration of bound-softening problems and resolution in linear Gaussian BI. The problem of estimating the radial magnetic field B(r) at the earth core-mantle boundary from surface and satellite measurements is then analyzed in detail, with specific attention to the selection of lambda in the studies of Gubbins (1983) and Gubbins and Bloxham (1985). It is argued that the selection method is inappropriate and leads to lambda values much larger than those that would result if a reasonable bound on the heat flow at the CMB were assumed.

  12. [Can solar/geomagnetic activity restrict the occurrence of some shellfish poisoning outbreaks? The example of PSP caused by Gymnodinium catenatum at the Atlantic Portuguese coast].

    PubMed

    Vale, P

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic outbreaks of accumulation of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins in mussels attributed to Gymnodinium catenatum blooms displayed several of the highest inter-annual maxima coincidental with minima of the 11-year solar sunspot number (SSN) cycle. The monthly distribution of PSP was associated with low levels of the solar radio flux, a more quantitative approach than SSN for fluctuations in solar activity. A comparison between monthly distribution of PSP and other common biotoxins (okadaic acid (OA), dinophysistoxin-2 (DTX2) and amnesic shellfish poisoning (ASP) toxins) demonstrated that only PSP was significantly associated with low levels of radio flux (p < 0.01). PSP occurrence suggests a prior decline in solar activity could be required to act as a trigger, in a similar manner to a photoperiodic signal. The seasonal frequency increased towards autumn during the study period, which might be related to the progressive atmospheric cut-off of deleterious radiation associated with the seasonal change in solar declination, and might play an additional role in seasonal signal-triggering. PSP distribution was also associated with low levels of the geomagnetic index Aa. A comparison between monthly distribution of PSP and other common biotoxins, also demonstrated that only PSP was significantly associated with low levels of the Aa index (p < 0.01). In some years of SSN minima no significant PSP-outbreaks in mussels were detected. This was attributed to a steady rise in geomagnetic activity that could disrupt the triggering signal. Global distribution patterns show that hotspots for G. catenatum blooms are regions with deficient crustal magnetic anomalies. In addition to the variable magnetic field mostly of solar origin, static fields related to magnetized rocks in the crust and upper mantle might play a role in restricting worldwide geographic distribution. PMID:24455892

  13. High latitude TEC fluctuations and irregularity oval during geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shagimuratov, I. I.; Krankowski, A.; Ephishov, I.; Cherniak, Yu.; Wielgosz, P.; Zakharenkova, I.

    2012-06-01

    GPS measurements obtained by the global IGS network were used to study the occurrence of TEC fluctuations in the northern and southern high-latitude ionosphere during severe geomagnetic storms. In the northern hemisphere, GPS stations located higher than 55N Corrected Geomagnetic Latitude (CGL) at different longitudes were selected. In the southern hemisphere, Antarctic permanent GPS stations were used. Dual-frequency GPS measurements for individual satellite passes served as raw data. As a measure of fluctuation activity the rate of TEC (ROT) was used, and the fluctuation intensity was evaluated using the ROTI index. Using daily GPS measurements from all selected stations, images of the spatial and temporal behavior of TEC fluctuations were formed (in Corrected Geomagnetic Coordinates—CGC and geomagnetic local time—GLT). Similarly to the auroral oval, these images demonstrate an irregularity oval. The occurrence of the irregularity oval relates to the auroral oval, cusp and polar cap. During a storm, the intensity of TEC fluctuations essentially increased. The irregularity oval expands equatorward with an increase of magnetic activity. The study showed that the existing high-latitude GPS stations can provide a permanent monitoring tool for the irregularity oval in near real-time. In this paper, the features of the development of phase fluctuations at the geomagnetic conjugate points, and inter-hemispheric differences and similarities during winter and summer conditions, are discussed.

  14. Lagged association between geomagnetic activity and diminished nocturnal pain thresholds in mice.

    PubMed

    Galic, M A; Persinger, M A

    2007-10-01

    A wide variety of behaviors in several species has been statistically associated with the natural variations in geomagnetism. To examine whether changes in geomagnetic activity are associated with pain thresholds, adult mice were exposed to a hotplate paradigm once weekly for 52 weeks during the dark cycle. Planetary A index values from the previous 6 days of a given hotplate session were correlated with the mean response latency for subjects to the thermal stimulus. We found that hotplate latency was significantly (P < 0.05) and inversely correlated (rho = -0.25) with the daily geomagnetic intensity 3 days prior to testing. Therefore, if the geomagnetic activity was greater 3 days before a given hotplate trial, subjects tended to exhibit shorter response latencies, suggesting lower pain thresholds or less analgesia. These results are supported by related experimental findings and suggest that natural variations in geomagnetic intensity may influence nociceptive behaviors in mice. PMID:17657732

  15. Relationship between isolated sleep paralysis and geomagnetic influences: a case study.

    PubMed

    Conesa, J

    1995-06-01

    This preliminary report, of a longitudinal study, looks at the relationship between geomagnetic activity and the incidence of isolated sleep paralysis over a 23.5-mo. period. The author, who has frequently and for the last 24 years experienced isolated sleep paralysis was the subject. In addition, incidence of lucid dreaming, vivid dreams, and total dream frequency were looked at with respect to geomagnetic activity. The data were in the form of dream-recall frequency recorded in a diary. These frequency data were correlated with geomagnetic activity k-index values obtained from two observatories. A significant correlation was obtained between periods of local geomagnetic activity and the incidence of isolated sleep paralysis. Specifically, periods of relatively quiet geomagnetic activity were significantly associated with an increased incidence of episodes. PMID:7478886

  16. Geomagnetic Reversals during the Phanerozoic.

    PubMed

    McElhinny, M W

    1971-04-01

    An antalysis of worldwide paleomagnetic measurements suggests a periodicity of 350 x 10(6) years in the polarity of the geomagnetic field. During the Mesozoic it is predominantly normal, whereas during the Upper Paleozoic it is predominantly reversed. Although geomagnetic reversals occur at different rates throughout the Phanerozoic, there appeaars to be no clear correlation between biological evolutionary rates and reversal frequency. PMID:17735224

  17. Large geomagnetic storms of extreme solar event periods in solar cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruiguang

    During extreme solar events such as big flares or/and energetic coronal mass ejections (CMEs) high energy particles are accelerated by the shocks formed in front of fast interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). The ICMEs (and their sheaths) also give rise to large geomagnetic storms which have significant effects on the Earth's environment and human life. Around 14 solar cosmic ray ground level enhancement (GLE) events in solar cycle 23 we examined the cosmic ray variation, solar wind speed, ions density, interplanetary magnetic field, and geomagnetic disturbance storm time index ( Dst). We found that all but one of GLEs are always followed by a geomagnetic storm with Dst ⩽ -50 nT within 1-5 days later. Most(10/14) geomagnetic storms have Dst index ⩽ -100 nT therefore generally belong to strong geomagnetic storms. This suggests that GLE event prediction of geomagnetic storms is 93% for moderate storms and 71% for large storms when geomagnetic storms preceded by GLEs. All Dst depressions are associated with cosmic ray decreases which occur nearly simultaneously with geomagnetic storms. We also investigated the interplanetary plasma features. Most geomagnetic storm correspond significant periods of southward Bz and in close to 80% of the cases that the Bz was first northward then turning southward after storm sudden commencement (SSC). Plasma flow speed, ion number density and interplanetary plasma temperature near 1 AU also have a peak at interplanetary shock arrival. Solar cause and energetic particle signatures of large geomagnetic storms and a possible prediction scheme are discussed.

  18. Forecasting geomagnetic activity at monthly and annual horizons: Time series models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reikard, Gordon

    2015-10-01

    Most of the existing work on forecasting geomagnetic activity has been over short intervals, on the order of hours or days. However, it is also of interest to predict over longer horizons, ranging from months to years. Forecasting tests are run for the Aa index, which begins in 1868 and provides the longest continuous records of geomagnetic activity. This series is challenging to forecast. While it exhibits cycles at 11-22 years, the amplitude and period of the cycles varies over time. There is also evidence of discontinuous trending: the slope and direction of the trend change repeatedly. Further, at the monthly resolution, the data exhibits nonlinear variability, with intermittent large outliers. Several types of models are tested: regressions, neural networks, a frequency domain algorithm, and combined models. Forecasting tests are run at horizons of 1-11 years using the annual data, and 1-12 months using the monthly data. At the 1-year horizon, the mean errors are in the range of 13-17 percent while the median errors are in the range of 10-14 percent. The accuracy of the models deteriorates at longer horizons. At 5 years, the mean errors lie in the range of 21-23 percent, and at 11 years, 23-25 percent. At the 1 year horizon, the most accurate forecast is achieved by a combined model, but over longer horizons (2-11 years), the neural net dominates. At the monthly resolution, the mean errors are in the range of 17-19 percent at 1 month, while the median errors lie in a range of 14-17 percent. The mean error increases to 23-24 percent at 5 months, and 25 percent at 12 months. A model combining frequency and time domain methods is marginally better than regressions and neural networks alone, up to 11 months. The main conclusion is that geomagnetic activity can only be predicted to within a limited threshold of accuracy, over a given range of horizons. This is consistent with the finding of irregular trends and cycles in the annual data and nonlinear variability in

  19. Ionospheric redistribution during geomagnetic storms

    PubMed Central

    Immel, T J; Mannucci, A J

    2013-01-01

    [1]The abundance of plasma in the daytime ionosphere is often seen to grow greatly during geomagnetic storms. Recent reports suggest that the magnitude of the plasma density enhancement depends on the UT of storm onset. This possibility is investigated over a 7year period using global maps of ionospheric total electron content (TEC) produced at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The analysis confirms that the American sector exhibits, on average, larger storm time enhancement in ionospheric plasma content, up to 50% in the afternoon middle-latitude region and 30% in the vicinity of the high-latitude auroral cusp, with largest effect in the Southern Hemisphere. We investigate whether this effect is related to the magnitude of the causative magnetic storms. Using the same advanced Dst index employed to sort the TEC maps into quiet and active (Dst<−100 nT) sets, we find variation in storm strength that corresponds closely to the TEC variation but follows it by 3–6h. For this and other reasons detailed in this report, we conclude that the UT-dependent peak in storm time TEC is likely not related to the magnitude of external storm time forcing but more likely attributable to phenomena such as the low magnetic field in the South American region. The large Dst variation suggests a possible system-level effect of the observed variation in ionospheric storm response on the measured strength of the terrestrial ring current, possibly connected through UT-dependent modulation of ion outflow. PMID:26167429

  20. Probing Geomagnetic Jerks combining Geomagnetic and Earth Rotation Observations (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holme, R. T.; de Viron, O.

    2013-12-01

    Geomagnetic jerks, first observed in the late 1970s, are the most rapid variations in the observed geomagnetic field that are believed to be of internal origin. Their occurence has been correlated with a number of different geophysical phenomena. Here we consider simultaneous features in variations in Earth's length of day. Recently, we have provided a simple description of non-atmospheric variations in length of day (LOD), consisting of 3 components: a slowly varying decadal trend, a 5.9-year oscillation, and occasional sudden jumps. Both of the shorter period parts of this correlate with geomagnetic jerks, with peaks in the LOD oscillation being contemporaneous with well-known jerk occurances (for example in 1969, 1972, 1978 and 1982), and jumps in the LOD fitting a jerk observed in satellite data in 2003.5. The simultaneous observation of these two features constrains Earth structure, in particular limiting the electric conductivity of the deep mantle. However, the nature of the LOD changes also may change the paradigm for the study of jerk timings. it is customarily assumed that the jerks represent features in the geomagnetic field that are continuous in the secular variation, but discontinuous in its derivative, the secular acceleration. However, a jump in LOD suggested by the modelling of the data would correspond also to a jump in SV, thus invalidating standard methods for temporal location of a jerk (which will consider the intersection of best-fit straight lines to the secular variation before and after). Olsen and Mandea have localised a jerk in satellite virtual observatory data using flow modelling; this seems the most promising method to investigate whether jerks could have discontinuous secular variation. We apply similar methods to time series of virtual geomagnetic obseratories from satellite data to further explore geomagnetic jerks and their rotational links in the geomagnetic satellite era.

  1. Dependence of Quiet Time Geomagnetic Activity Seasonal Variation on the Solar Magnetic Polarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Suyeon

    2013-03-01

    The geomagnetic activity shows the semiannual variation stronger in vernal and autumnal equinoxes than in summer and winter solstices. The semiannual variation has been explained by three main hypotheses such as Axial hypothesis, Equinoctial hypothesis, and Russell-McPherron Effect. Many studies using the various geomagnetic indices have done to support three main hypotheses. In recent, Oh & Yi (2011) examined the solar magnetic polarity dependency of the geomagnetic storm occurrence defined by Dst index. They reported that there is no dependency of the semiannual variation on the sign of the solar polar fields. This study examines the solar magnetic polarity dependency of quiet time geomagnetic activity. Using Dxt index (Karinen & Mursula 2005) and Dcx index (Mursula & Karinen 2005) which are recently suggested, in addition to Dst index, we analyze the data of three-year at each solar minimum for eight solar cycles since 1932. As a result, the geomagnetic activity is stronger in the period that the solar magnetic polarity is anti-parallel with the Earth's magnetic polarity. There exists the difference between vernal and autumnal equinoxes regarding the solar magnetic polarity dependency. However, the difference is not statistically significant. Thus, we conclude that there is no solar magnetic polarity dependency of the semiannual variation for quiet time geomagnetic activity.

  2. Sub- and Quasi-Centurial Cycles in Solar and Geomagnetic Activity Data Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komitov, B.; Sello, S.; Duchlev, P.; Dechev, M.; Penev, K.; Koleva, K.

    2016-07-01

    The subject of this paper is the existence and stability of solar cycles with durations in the range of 20-250 years. Five types of data series are used: 1) the Zurich series (1749-2009 AD), the mean annual International sunspot number Ri, 2) the Group sunspot number series Rh (1610-1995 AD), 3) the simulated extended sunspot number from Extended time series of Solar Activity Indices (ESAI) (1090-2002 AD), 4) the simulated extended geomagnetic aa-index from ESAI (1099-2002 AD), 5) the Meudon filament series (1919-1991 AD). Two principally independent methods of time series analysis are used: the T-R periodogram analysis (both in standard and ``scanning window'' regimes) and the wavelet-analysis. The obtained results are very similar. A strong cycle with a mean duration of 55-60 years is found to exist in all series. On the other hand, a strong and stable quasi 110-120 years and ˜200-year cycles are obtained in all of these series except in the Ri one. The high importance of the long term solar activity dynamics for the aims of solar dynamo modeling and predictions is especially noted.

  3. Linking geomagnetic activity and polar surface air temperature variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seppala, Annika

    ERA-40 and ECMWF operational surface level air temperature (SAT) data sets from 1957 to 2006 were used to examine polar temperature variations during years with different levels of geomagnetic activity, as defined by the Ap index. Previous modelling work has suggested that NOx produced at high latitudes by energetic particle precipitation can eventually lead to detectable changes in polar SATs. We find that during winter months, ERA-40 and ECMWF polar SATs in years with high Ap index are different than in years with low Ap index; the differences are statistically significant at the 2-sigma level and range up to about ±4.5 K, de-pending on location. The temperature differences are larger when years with wintertime Sudden Stratospheric Warmings are excluded. Solar irradiance variations were taken into account in the analysis. Although using the re-analysis and operational data sets it was not possible to conclusively show that the polar SAT patterns are physically linked by geomagnetic activity, we conclude that geomagnetic activity likely plays a role in modulating polar wintertime surface air temperature patterns. The SAT results were tested against variation in the Quasi Biennial Oscillation (QBO), the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Southern Annular Mode n (SAM). The results suggested that these were not driving the observed polar SAT variability. However, significant uncertainty is introduced by the Northern Annular Mode (NAM) and we could not robustly exclude a chance linkage between sea surface temperature (SST) variability and geomagnetic activity. Examining the physical link between geomagnetic activity and polar surface temperature variability patterns using atmospheric models is an ongoing task.

  4. Solar activity and human health at middle and low geomagnetic latitudes in Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Blanca; Sánchez de La Peña, Salvador

    2010-08-01

    The study of the possible effect of solar variability on living organisms is one of the most controversial issues of present day science. It has been firstly and mainly carried on high latitudes, while at middle and low latitudes this study is rare. In the present review we focused on the work developed at middle and low geomagnetic latitudes of America. At these geomagnetic latitudes the groups consistently dedicated to this issue are mainly two, one in Cuba and the other in Mexico. The Cuban and Mexican studies show that at such latitudes there are biological consequences to the solar/geomagnetic activity, coinciding in four points: (1) the male population behave differently from the female population, (2) the most vulnerable age group to geomagnetic perturbations is that of ⩾65 years old, (3) there is a tendency for myocardial infarctions (death or occurrence) to increase one day after a geomagnetic Ap index large value or during the day of the associated Forbush decrease, and (4) the myocardial infarctions (death or occurrence) increase as the geomagnetic perturbation increases. Additionally, the Cuban group found seasonal periodicities from their data, and also that increases of female myocardial infarctions occurred before and after the day of the geomagnetic disturbance. The Mexican group found that the male sex is more vulnerable to geomagnetic perturbations and that the myocardial infarction deaths present the conspicuous cycle of ˜7 days.

  5. a Millennium of Geomagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, David P.

    2002-11-01

    The history of geomagnetism began around the year 1000 with the discovery in China of the magnetic compass. Methodical studies of the Earth's field started in 1600 with William Gilbert's De Magnete [Gilbert, 1600] and continued with the work of (among others) Edmond Halley, Charles Augustin de Coulomb, Carl Friedrich Gauss, and Edward Sabine. The discovery of electromagnetism by Hans Christian Oersted and André-Marie Ampére led Michael Faraday to the notion of fluid dynamos, and the observation of sunspot magnetism by George Ellery Hale led Sir Joseph Larmor in 1919 to the idea that such dynamos could sustain themselves naturally in convecting conducting fluids. From that came modern dynamo theory, of both the solar and terrestrial magnetic fields. Paleomagnetic studies revealed that the Earth's dipole had undergone reversals in the distant past, and these became the critical evidence in establishing plate tectonics. Finally, the recent availability of scientific spacecraft has demonstrated the intricacy of the Earth's distant magnetic field, as well as the existence of magnetic fields associated with other planets and with satellites in our solar system.

  6. The disturbances of ionospheric Total Electron Content during great geomagnetic storm above Iraq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ubaidi, Najat

    2016-07-01

    Several efforts have been made to study the behavior of Total Electron Content (TEC) with many types of geomagnetic storms; the purpose of this research is to study the disturbances of the ionosphere through the TEC parameter during great geomagnetic storm. TEC data selected for year 2003 (descending solar cycle 23), as available from (www.ngdc.noaa.gov/stp/IONO/USTEC/) for Iraq region (longitude 27-54 degree East, latitude 27-42 degree North) during great geomagnetic storm for 28-30 October 2003. To find out the type of geomagnetic storms the Disturbance storm time (Dst) index was selected for the days selected from Kyoto/Japan website. From data analysis, it is found that in general, there is a good proportionality between disturbance storm time index (Dst) and the total electron contents, the values of TEC in daytime greater than night time, but there is anomaly when the storm continued for several hours from the day.

  7. Different geomagnetic indices as an indicator for geo-effective solar storms and human physiological state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrova, Svetla

    2008-02-01

    A group of 86 healthy volunteers were examined on each working day during periods of high solar activity. Data about systolic and diastolic blood pressure, pulse pressure, heart rate and subjective psycho-physiological complaints were gathered. MANOVA was employed to check the significance of the influence of three factors on the physiological parameters. The factors were as follows: (1) geomagnetic activity estimated by daily amplitude of H-component of the local geomagnetic field, Ap- and Dst-index; (2) gender; and (3) the presence of medication. Average values of systolic, diastolic blood pressure, pulse pressure and subjective complaints of the group were found to increase significantly with geomagnetic activity increment.

  8. Satellite Vulnerability To Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, R. B.; Freemen, M. P.; Riley, D.; Daws, M.; Rutten, K.

    There are several examples where satellites on orbit have failed or partially failed during geomagnetic storms resulting in large insurance claims. Whether the storm is directly responsible for the failures is very controversial, commercially sensitive, and difficult to prove conclusively since there are so few examples. However, there are many non-fatal errors, or anomalies, that occur during the lifetime of spacecraft that enable a statistical analysis. Here we present an analysis of over 5000 satellite anomalies that shows for the first time a statistically significant link between satellite anomalies and geomagnetic storms. We find that the period of highest risk lasts for six days after the start of a magnetic storm. Approximately 40% of anomalies could be due to a random occurrence, but in addition there are between 0 and 35% of satellite anomalies that we attribute as being directly related to geomagnetic storms. We show that the risk depends on satellite prime contractor, orbit type, and age of satellite.

  9. Geomagnetic activity and Hale sector boundaries. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Lundstedt, H.; Scherrer, P.H.; Wilcox, J.M.

    1980-02-01

    The variation of the geomagnetic activity index Ap at the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) sector boundaries (+ to - and - to +) has been studied for three solar cycles, separating data into vernal and autumnal equinoxes. It was found that a reported increase in Ap as an effect of a Hale boundary can be better attributed to the occurrence of a negative IMF Bz component in the geocentric solar magnetospheric coordinate system and to the occurrence of high speed solar wind streams.

  10. On the Relationship Between Solar Wind Speed, Geomagnetic Activity, and the Solar Cycle Using Annual Values

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.; Hathaway, David H.

    2008-01-01

    The aa index can be decomposed into two separate components: the leading sporadic component due to solar activity as measured by sunspot number and the residual or recurrent component due to interplanetary disturbances, such as coronal holes. For the interval 1964-2006, a highly statistically important correlation (r = 0.749) is found between annual averages of the aa index and the solar wind speed (especially between the residual component of aa and the solar wind speed, r = 0.865). Because cyclic averages of aa (and the residual component) have trended upward during cycles 11-23, cyclic averages of solar wind speed are inferred to have also trended upward.

  11. Keith's early work in geomagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowes, F. J.

    This paper describes how Runcorn was started on his geophysical career by a chance combination of circumstances, when in 1947 he was given the job of measuring the variation of the geomagnetic field with depth inside the Earth, down British coal mines. It then shows how his interest in the semi-conduction of the lower mantle led to attempts to detect DC earth currents, at first again in mines, but later using discarded trans-Pacific telegraph cables. It ends by briefly discussing the “fifth force” measurements he instigated, which, though not a geomagnetic problem, had many similarities with the original mine experiments.

  12. On Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    1998-01-01

    A statistical description of Earth's broad scale, core-source magnetic field has been developed and tested. The description features an expected, or mean, spatial magnetic power spectrum that is neither "flat" nor "while" at any depth, but is akin to spectra advanced by Stevenson and McLeod. This multipole spectrum describes the magnetic energy range; it is not steep enough for Gubbins' magnetic dissipation range. Natural variations of core multipole powers about their mean values are to be expected over geologic time and are described via trial probability distribution functions that neither require nor prohibit magnetic isotropy. The description is thus applicable to core-source dipole and low degree non-dipole fields despite axial dipole anisotropy. The description is combined with main field models of modem satellite and surface geomagnetic measurements to make testable predictions of: (1) the radius of Earth's core, (2) mean paleomagnetic field intensity, and (3) the mean rates and durations of both dipole power excursions and durable axial dipole reversals. The predicted core radius is 0.7% above the 3480 km seismologic value. The predicted root mean square paleointensity (35.6 mu T) and mean Virtual Axial Dipole Moment (about 6.2 lx 1022 Am(exp 2)) are within the range of various mean paleointensity estimates. The predicted mean rate of dipole power excursions, as defined by an absolute dipole moment <20% of the 1980 value, is 9.04/Myr and 14% less than obtained by analysis of a 4 Myr paleointensity record. The predicted mean rate of durable axial dipole reversals (2.26/Myr) is 2.3% more than established by the polarity time-scale for the past 84 Myr. The predicted mean duration of axial dipole reversals (5533 yr) is indistinguishable from an observational value. The accuracy of these predictions demonstrates the power and utility of the description, which is thought to merit further development and testing. It is suggested that strong stable stratification

  13. The risk characteristics of solar and geomagnetic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podolska, Katerina

    2016-04-01

    The main aim of this contribution is a deeper analysis of the influence of solar activity which is expected to have an impact on human health, and therefore on mortality, in particular civilization and degenerative diseases. We have constructed the characteristics that represent the risk of solar and geomagnetic activity on human health on the basis of our previous analysis of association between the daily numbers of death on diseases of the nervous system and diseases of the circulatory system and solar and geomagnetic activity in the Czech Republic during the years 1994 - 2013. We used long period daily time series of numbers of deaths by cause, long period time series of solar activity indices (namely R and F10.7), geomagnetic indicies (Kp planetary index, Dst) and ionospheric parameters (foF2 and TEC). The ionospheric parameters were related to the geographic location of the Czech Republic and adjusted for middle geographic latitudes. The risk characteristics were composed by cluster analysis in time series according to the phases of the solar cycle resp. the seasonal insolation at mid-latitudes or the daily period according to the impact of solar and geomagnetic activity on mortality by cause of death from medical cause groups of death VI. Diseases of the nervous system and IX. Diseases of the circulatory system mortality by 10th Revision of International Classification of Diseases WHO (ICD-10).

  14. Reconstruction of geomagnetic activity and near-Earth interplanetary conditions over the past 167 yr - Part 3: Improved representation of solar cycle 11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockwood, M.; Nevanlinna, H.; Vokhmyanin, M.; Ponyavin, D.; Sokolov, S.; Barnard, L.; Owens, M. J.; Harrison, R. G.; Rouillard, A. P.; Scott, C. J.

    2014-04-01

    Svalgaard (2014) has recently pointed out that the calibration of the Helsinki magnetic observatory's H component variometer was probably in error in published data for the years 1866-1874.5 and that this makes the interdiurnal variation index based on daily means, IDV(1d), (Lockwood et al., 2013a), and the interplanetary magnetic field strength derived from it (Lockwood et al., 2013b), too low around the peak of solar cycle 11. We use data from the modern Nurmijarvi station, relatively close to the site of the original Helsinki Observatory, to confirm a 30% underestimation in this interval and hence our results are fully consistent with the correction derived by Svalgaard. We show that the best method for recalibration uses the Helsinki Ak (H) and aa indices and is accurate to ±10%. This makes it preferable to recalibration using either the sunspot number or the diurnal range of geomagnetic activity which we find to be accurate to ±20%. In the case of Helsinki data during cycle 11, the two recalibration methods produce very similar corrections which are here confirmed using newly digitised data from the nearby St Petersburg observatory and also using declination data from Helsinki. However, we show that the IDV index is, compared to later years, too similar to sunspot number before 1872, revealing independence of the two data series has been lost; either because the geomagnetic data used to compile IDV has been corrected using sunspot numbers, or vice versa, or both. We present corrected data sequences for both the IDV(1d) index and the reconstructed IMF (interplanetary magnetic field). We also analyse the relationship between the derived near-Earth IMF and the sunspot number and point out the relevance of the prior history of solar activity, in addition to the contemporaneous value, to estimating any "floor" value of the near-Earth interplanetary field.

  15. Geomagnetic activity influences the melatonin secretion at latitude 70 degrees N.

    PubMed

    Weydahl, A; Sothern, R B; Cornélissen, G; Wetterberg, L

    2001-01-01

    Factors other than light may affect variations in melatonin, including disturbances in the geomagnetic field. Such a possibility was tested in Alta, Norway, located at latitude 70 degrees N, where the aurora borealis is a result of large changes in the horizontal component (H) of the geomagnetic field. Geomagnetic disturbances are felt more strongly closer to the pole than at lower latitudes. Also noteworthy in Alta is the fact that the sun does not rise above the horizon for several weeks during the winter. To examine whether changes in geomagnetic activity influence the secretion of melatonin, saliva was collected from 25 healthy subjects in Alta several times during the day-night and at different times of the year. Single cosinor analyses yielded individual estimates of.the circadian amplitude and MESOR of melatonin. A 3-hour mean value for the local geomagnetic activity index, K, was used for approximately the same 24-hour span. A circadian rhythm was found to characterize both melatonin and K, the peak in K (23:24) preceding that of melatonin (06:08). During the span of investigation, a circannual variation also characterized both variables. Correlation analyses suggest that changes in geomagnetic activity had to be of a certain magnitude to affect the circadian amplitude of melatonin. If large enough (> 80 nT/3 h), changes in geomagnetic activity also significantly decreased salivary melatonin concentration. PMID:11774869

  16. Analysis of the Solar Diameter Variations at July, 1986 and the Geomagnetic Storm of March, 1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humberto Andrei, Alexandre; Garcia, Marcos A.; Papa, Andres R. R.; Calderari Boscardin, Sergio; Lousada Penna, Jucira; Sigismondi, Costantino

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we have a well-known event in scientific literature used to illustrate our investigation on the viability of the solar diameter variation be a precursor for the occurrence of sets of coronal mass ejections, and thus, for geomagnetic storms, as noted in previous works of our group, but now, in a time scale of a few days. The selected event was that of March 13, 1989, a strong geomagnetic storm that made the Hydro-Quebec power grid fall down by 9 hours, damaging the local economy in millions of dollars. At the same time we have investigated a time interval belonging to a solar minimum period, on July 1986, prior to the rising phase and solar maximum of Solar Cycle 22, to compare with the geomagnetic pattern, as well as with the solar diameter behavior along these periods of low solar and geomagnetic activity. We used the time series of the CERGA’s astrolabe (because its dataset is long enough as to comprise both time periods of the analysis), the geomagnetic index AP and the H geomagnetic component from the Tatuoca Magnetic Observatory (because it is near to the geomagnetic equator and with the extra aim of checking the sensitivity of its magnetometers to global events).

  17. Large geomagnetic storms of extreme solar event periods in solar cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, R. G.; Wang, J. X.

    At the duration of extreme solar events solar eruption associated with big flares or and energetic coronal mass ejections CMEs can not only make high energy particles acceleration but also give rise to large geomagnetic storms which have significant effects on the Earth s environment and human life Around 14 solar cosmic ray ground level enhancement GLE events in solar cycle 23 we examine the cosmic ray variations solar wind speeds ion densities interplanetary magnetic fields and geomagnetic disturbance storm time indices Dst We find that all but one of GLEs are always followed by a geomagnetic storm with Dst leq -50 nT within 1-5 days later Most 10 14 geomagnetic storms have Dst index leq -100 nT suggesting that GLE event prediction of geomagnetic storms is 93 for moderate storms and 71 for large storms More than half 57 Dst depressions are simultaneously accompanied by cosmic ray decreases and other Dst variabilities are without clear cosmic ray deceases We also investigated the interplanetary plasma features during GLE events Most geomagnetic storm correspond significant periods of southward B z and in close to 80 of the cases that the B z was first northward then turning southward after storm sudden commencement SSC Plasma flow speed ion number density and interplanetary plasma temperature near 1 AU also have a peak at interplanetary shock arrival Solar cause and energetic particle signatures of large geomagnetic storms are discussed

  18. Mantle superplumes induce geomagnetic superchrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Peter; Amit, Hagay

    2015-07-01

    We use polarity reversal systematics from numerical dynamos to quantify the hypothesis that the modulation of geomagnetic reversal frequency, including geomagnetic superchrons, results from changes in core heat flux related to growth and collapse of lower mantle superplumes. We parameterize the reversal frequency sensitivity from numerical dynamos in terms of average core heat flux normalized by the difference between the present-day core heat flux and the core heat flux at geomagnetic superchron onset. A low-order polynomial fit to the 0-300 Ma Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale (GPTS) reveals that a decrease in core heat flux relative to present-day of approximately 30% can account for the Cretaceous Normal Polarity and Kiaman Reverse Polarity Superchrons, whereas the hyper-reversing periods in the Jurassic require a core heat flux equal to or higher than present-day. Possible links between GPTS transitions, large igneous provinces (LIPs), and the two lower mantle superplumes are explored. Lower mantle superplume growth and collapse induce GPTS transitions by increasing and decreasing core heat flux, respectively. Age clusters of major LIPs postdate transitions from hyper-reversing to superchron geodynamo states by 30-60 Myr, suggesting that superchron onset may be contemporaneous with LIP-forming instabilities produced during collapses of lower mantle superplumes.

  19. Climate determinism or Geomagnetic determinism?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallet, Y.; Genevey, A.; Le Goff, M.; Fluteau, F.; Courtillot, V.

    2006-12-01

    A number of episodes of sharp geomagnetic field variations (in both intensity and direction), lasting on the order of a century, have been identified in archeomagnetic records from Western Eurasia and have been called "archeomagnetic jerks". These seem to correlate well with multi-decadal cooling episodes detected in the North Atlantic Ocean and Western Europe, suggesting a causal link between both phenomena. A possible mechanism could be a geomagnetic modulation of the cosmic ray flux that would control the nucleation rate of clouds. We wish to underline the remarkable coincidence between archeomagnetic jerks, cooling events in Western Europe and drought periods in tropical and sub-tropical regions of the northern hemisphere. The latter two can be interpreted in terms of global teleconnections among regional climates. It has been suggested that these climatic variations had caused major changes in the history of ancient civilizations, such as in Mesopotamia, which were critically dependent on water supply and particularly vulnerable to lower rainfall amounts. This is one of the foundations of "climate determinism". Our studies, which suggest a geomagnetic origin for at least some of the inferred climatic events, lead us to propose the idea of a "geomagnetic determinism" in the history of humanity.

  20. Klimovskaya: A new geomagnetic observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, A. A.; Sidorov, R. V.; Krasnoperov, R. I.; Grudnev, A. A.; Khokhlov, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    In 2011 Geophysical Center RAS (GC RAS) began to deploy the Klimovskaya geomagnetic observatory in the south of Arkhangelsk region on the territory of the Institute of Physiology of Natural Adaptations, Ural Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences (IPNA UB RAS). The construction works followed the complex of preparatory measures taken in order to confirm that the observatory can be constructed on this territory and to select the optimal configuration of observatory structures. The observatory equipping stages are described in detail, the technological and design solutions are described, and the first results of the registered data quality control are presented. It has been concluded that Klimovskaya observatory can be included in INTERMAGNET network. The observatory can be used to monitor and estimate geomagnetic activity, because it is located at high latitudes and provides data in a timely manner to the scientific community via the web-site of the Russian-Ukrainian Geomagnetic Data Center. The role of ground observatories such as Klimovskaya remains critical for long-term observations of secular variation and for complex monitoring of the geomagnetic field in combination with low-orbiting satellite data.

  1. Prediction of Geomagnetic Activity and Key Parameters in High-latitude Ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, George V.; Lyatsky, Wladislaw; Tan, Arjun; Ridley, Aaron

    2007-01-01

    Prediction of geomagnetic activity and related events in the Earth's magnetosphere and ionosphere are important tasks of US Space Weather Program. Prediction reliability is dependent on the prediction method, and elements included in the prediction scheme. Two of the main elements of such prediction scheme are: an appropriate geomagnetic activity index, and an appropriate coupling function (the combination of solar wind parameters providing the best correlation between upstream solar wind data and geomagnetic activity). We have developed a new index of geomagnetic activity, the Polar Magnetic (PM) index and an improved version of solar wind coupling function. PM index is similar to the existing polar cap PC index but it shows much better correlation with upstream solar wind/IMF data and other events in the magnetosphere and ionosphere. We investigate the correlation of PM index with upstream solar wind/IMF data for 10 years (1995-2004) that include both low and high solar activity. We also have introduced a new prediction function for the predicting of cross-polar-cap voltage and Joule heating based on using both PM index and upstream solar wind/IMF data. As we show such prediction function significantly increase the reliability of prediction of these important parameters. The correlation coefficients between the actual and predicted values of these parameters are approx. 0.9 and higher.

  2. Sudden impulse and interplanetary shock parameters correlation near the south atlantic geomagnetic anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, J.; Echer, E.; Gonzalez, W.; Alves, M.; Trivedi, N.; Gonzalez, A.; Vieira, L.; dal Lago, A.; Guarnieri, F.; Schuch, N.

    In this work we intend to perform a comparative study of the sudden impulse (SI) response to interplanetary shocks near the South Atlantic Geomagnetic Anomaly (SAGA) region. A total of 34 events were selected for analysis during September 2000 -- December 2001. The magnetospheric SI response was studied using ground-based geomagnetic station SMS (29.4°S, 53.82°W) located near SAGA center. To compare we use also stations out of the SAGA's influence. The geomagnetic symmetrical (SYM) index was also employed in order to characterize the average SI response. Solar wind data were obtained from plasma and magnetic field detectors on board the ACE spacecraft, orbiting L1 point. Since the total geomagnetic field strength is low in SAGA, the SI response might be different inside and outside the SAGA region. This subject is assessed by correlative analyses among solar shock parameters and SI amplitudes.

  3. Longitude dependent response of the GPS derived ionospheric ROTI to geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanna, H. J.; Pathak, K. N.

    2014-08-01

    The local time dependent effects of geomagnetic storm on the ionospheric TEC and Rate of change of TEC Index (ROTI) are studied here using the GPS data for four different low latitude stations: Ogaswara, Japan (24.29 °N, 153.91 °E; Geomagnetic: 17.21 °N, 136.16 °W); Surat, India (21.16 °N, 72.78 °E; Geomagnetic: 12.88 °N, 146.91 °E); Bogota, Colombia (4.64 °N, -74.09 °E; Geomagnetic: 14.42 °N, 1.67 °W); and Kokee park Waimea, Hawaii, US (22.12 °N, -159.67 °E; Geomagnetic: 22.13 °N, 91.19 °W). The solar wind velocity and geomagnetic indices: Dst, Kp and IMF Bz are utilized to validate the geomagnetic storms registered during the years 2011 and 2012. Using the GPS based TEC data and computed values of ROTI, the storm induced ionospheric irregularities generation and inhibition has been studied for all stations. The present study suggests that, the F-region irregularities of a scale length of few kilometers over the magnetic equator are locally affected by geomagnetic storms. This study also shows a good agreement (70-84 %) with the Aaron's criteria (Aarons, Radio Sci., 26:1131-1149, 1991; Biktash, Ann. Geophys., 19:731-739, 2004) as significant absence and enhancement of ROTI was found to be influenced by the local time of the negative peak of Dst index association.

  4. No covariation between the geomagnetic activity and the incidence of acute myocardial infarction in the polar area of northern Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messner, T.; Häggström, I.; Sandahl, I.; Lundberg, V.

    2002-05-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate whether there was any relation between the aurora borealis (measured as the geomagnetic activity) and the number of acute myocardial infarctions (AMI) in the northern, partly polar, area of Sweden. The AMI cases were collected from The Northern Sweden MONICA (multinational MONItoring of trends and determinants of CArdiovascular disease) AMI registry between 1985 and 1998, inclusive, and the information on the geomagnetic activity from continuous measurements at the Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Kiruna. In the analyses, both the relation between the individual AMI case and ambient geomagnetic activity, and the relation between the mean daily K index and the daily number of AMI cases were tested. We found no statistically significant relation between the number of fatal or non-fatal AMI cases, the number of sudden deaths or the number of patients with chest pain without myocardial damage, and geomagnetic activity. Our data do not support a relation between the geomagnetic activity and AMI.

  5. Worldwide Geomagnetic Data Collection and Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandea, Mioara; Papitashvili, Vladimir

    2009-11-01

    Geomagnetic data provided by different platforms piece together a global picture of Earth's magnetic field and its interaction with geospace. Furthermore, a great diversity of the geomagnetic field changes, from secular (over decades to centuries) to short time variations (down to minutes and seconds), can be detected only through continued observations. An international effort to watch and record geomagnetic changes first began in the 1830s with a network of scientific observers organized by Karl Friedrich Gauss in Germany, and this effort has continued since then. One of the most remarkable achievements in understanding the geomagnetic field morphology and time behavior was made possible by the International Geophysical Year (IGY), an exploration and research effort that lasted for 18 months, starting on 1 July 1957. The IGY encompassed 11 geoscience disciplines, including geomagnetism. The IGY has represented a giant step forward in the quality and quantity of worldwide geomagnetic measurements, as well as in the widespread interest in magnetic measurements. A half century of probing the geomagnetic field spatial and temporal variations has produced a number of outstanding results, and the interested reader can find recent reviews on various geomagnetic field topics (from measurements to modeling) in Encyclopedia of Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism [Gubbins and Herrero-Bervera, 2007] or Treatise on Geophysics: Geomagnetism [Kono, 2007].

  6. Teaching Geomagnetism in High School

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, D. P.

    2001-05-01

    Many high school curricula include a one-year course in Earth Sciences, often in the 9th grade (essentially pre-algebra). That is a good time to teach about geomagnetism. Not only are dipole reversals and sea-floor magnetization central to this subject, but this is a good opportunity to introduce students to magnetism and its connection to electric currents. The story of Oersted and Faraday give a fascinating insight into the uneven path of scientific discovery, the magnetic compass and William Gilbert provide a view of the beginnings of the scientific revolution, and even basic concepts of dynamo theory and its connection to solar physics can be included. A resource including all the suitable material now exists on the world-wide web at http://www-spof.gsfc.nasa.gov/earthmag/demagint.htm (home page). A 1-month unit on geomagnetism will be outlined.

  7. Ice ages and geomagnetic reversals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Patrick

    1992-01-01

    There have been speculations on the relationship between climatic cooling and polarity reversals of the earth's magnetic field during the Pleistocene. Two of the common criticisms on this relationship have been the reality of these short duration geomagnetic events and the accuracy of their dates. Champion et al. (1988) have reviewed recent progress in this area. They identified a total of 10 short-duration polarity events in the last 1 Ma and 6 of these events have been found in volcanic rocks, which also have K-Ar dates. Supposing that the speculated relationship between climatic cooling and geomagnetic reversals actually exist, two mechanisms that assume climatic cooling causes short period magnetic reversals will be investigated. These two methods are core-mantle boundary topography and transfer of the rotational energy to the core.

  8. Geomagnetic excursions and climate change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rampino, M. R.

    1983-01-01

    Rampino argues that although Kent (1982) demonstrated that the intensity of natural remanent magnetism (NRM) in deep-sea sediments is sensitive to changes in sediment type, and hence is not an accurate indicator of the true strength of the geomagnetic field, it does not offer an alternative explanation for the proposed connections between excursions, climate, and orbital parameters. Kent replies by illustrating some of the problems associated with geomagnetic excursions by considering the record of proposed excursions in a single critical core. The large departure from an axial dipole field direction seen in a part of the sample is probably due to a distorted record; the drawing and storage of the sample, which is described, could easily have led to disturbance and distortion of the record.

  9. Global geomagnetic field mapping - from secular variation to geomagnetic excursions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panovska, Sanja; Constable, Catherine

    2015-04-01

    The main source of the geomagnetic field is a self-sustaining dynamo produced by fluid motions in Earth's liquid outer core. We study the spatial and temporal changes in the internal magnetic field by mapping the time-varying geomagnetic field over the past 100 thousand years. This is accomplished using a new global data set of paleomagnetic records drawn from high accumulation rate sediments and from volcanic rocks spanning the past 100 thousand years (Late Pleistocene). Sediment data comprises 105 declination, 117 inclination and 150 relative paleointensity (RPI) records, mainly concentrated in northern mid-latitudes, although some are available in the southern hemisphere. Northern Atlantic and Western Pacific are regions with high concentrations of data. The number of available volcanic/archeomagnetic data is comparitively small on the global scale, especially in the Southern hemisphere. Temporal distributions show that the number of data increases toward more recent times with a good coverage for the past 50 ka. Laschamp excursion (41 ka BP) is well represented for both directional and intensity data. The significant increase in data compared to previous compilations results in an improvement over current geomagnetic field models covering these timescales. Robust aspects of individual sediment records are successfully captured by smoothing spline modeling allowing an estimate of random uncertainties present in the records. This reveals a wide range of fidelities across the sediment magnetic records. Median uncertainties are: 17° for declination (range, 1° to 113°), 6° for inclination (1° to 50°) and 0.4 for standardized relative paleointensity (0.02 to 1.4). The median temporal resolution of the records defined by the smoothing time is 400 years (range, 50 years to about 14 kyr). Using these data, a global, time-varying, geomagnetic field model is constructed covering the past 100 thousand years. The modeling directly uses relative forms of sediment

  10. Effective area for northern Polar Cap index data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauning, Peter

    2016-07-01

    The northern (PCN) and southern (PCS) Polar Cap indices are used, among other, in applications to forecast geomagnetic storms and substorms. The index values are based on geomagnetic observations that for the forecast are transmitted in real-time from selected stations, PCN on data from Qaanaaq (Thule) in Greenland and PCS on geomagnetic data from Vostok in Antarctica. Observational conditions in the harsh polar environments are difficult and data transmission links are vulnerable. Hence, it could be advantageous to base real-time PC index values on data from multiple sites in order to safeguard the forecasts. The presentation shall compare PCN index values derived from a range of further observatories in Greenland and Canada in order to delimit an effective Polar Cap area for providing geomagnetic data for a useful index and to settle whether reliable (preliminary) index values could be derived from other than the standard observatories particularly during strongly disturbed conditions.

  11. Future of geomagnetism and paleomagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, S. K.; Cain, J. C.; Van der Voo, R.

    After the heady days of the 1960s, when geomagnetism and paleomagnetism provided crucial quantitative evidence for plate tectonics by establishing the geomagnetic polarity timescale, the 1980s may appear to be somewhat tame in the eyes of an average geophysicist. To such a person, the intervening 1970s may well look like a period of “mopping up” after the big event has happened, and it may not be unfair for him or her to ask what significant discoveries in geomagnetism and paleomagnetism (GP) have been made since 1970. The practitioners in this field of research are individuals who carry out their work without a large degree of formal overlap, so it is not surprising that the same question about recent accomplishments has arisen also in the minds of AGU GP Section members. This question came to the forefront especially during the 1984 AGU Fall Meeting, when members spoke strongly (in private conversations) about a perceived decrease in National Science Foundation funding of GP-related research projects.

  12. Forecasts of geomagnetic secular variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wardinski, Ingo

    2014-05-01

    We attempt to forecast the geomagnetic secular variation based on stochastic models, non-parametric regression and singular spectrum analysis of the observed past field changes. Although this modelling approach is meant to be phenomenological, it may provide some insight into the mechanisms underlying typical time scales of geomagnetic field changes. We follow two strategies to forecast secular variation: Firstly, by applying time series models, and secondly, by using time-dependent kinematic models of the advected secular variation. These forecasts can span decades, to longer periods. This depends on the length of the past observations used as input, with different input models leading to different details in the forecasts. These forecasts become more uncertain over longer forecasting periods. One appealing reason is the disregard of magnetic diffusion in the kinematic modelling. But also the interactions of unobservable small scale core field with core flow at all scale unsettle the kinematic forecasting scheme. A further (obvious) reason is that geomagnetic secular variation can not be mimicked by linear time series models as the dynamo action itself is highly non-linear. Whether the dynamo action can be represented by a simple low-dimensional system requires further analysis.

  13. Correlative comparison of geomagnetic storms and auroral substorms using geomagnetic indeces. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cade, W.B.

    1993-06-01

    Partial contents include the following: (1) Geomagnetic storm and substorm processes; (2) Magnetospheric structure; (3) Substorm processes; (4) Data description; (5) Geomagnetic indices; and (6) Data period and data sets.

  14. Section AA Pre2004 Fire, Section AA 2009, Section AA, South ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Section A-A Pre-2004 Fire, Section A-A 2009, Section A-A, South Elevation - Boston & Maine Railroad, Berlin Branch Bridge #148.81, Formerly spanning Moose Brook at former Boston & Maine Railroad, Gorham, Coos County, NH

  15. Magnetospheric effects of cosmic rays. 1. Long-term changes in the geomagnetic cutoff rigidities for the stations of the global network of neutron monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvozdevskii, B. B.; Abunin, A. A.; Kobelev, P. G.; Gushchina, R. T.; Belov, A. V.; Eroshenko, E. A.; Yanke, V. G.

    2016-07-01

    Vertical geomagnetic cutoff rigidities are obtained for the stations of the global network of neutron monitors via trajectory calculations for each year of the period from 1950 to 2020. Geomagnetic cutoff rigidities are found from the model of the Earth's main field International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) for 1950-2015, and the forecast until 2020 is provided. In addition, the geomagnetic cutoff rigidities for the same period are obtained by Tsyganenko model T89 (Tsyganenko, 1989) with the average annual values of the Kp-index. In each case, the penumbra is taken into account in the approximation of the flat and power spectra of variations of cosmic rays. The calculation results show an overall decrease in geomagnetic cutoff rigidities, which is associated with the overall decrease and restructuring of the geomagnetic field during the reporting period, at almost all points.

  16. Restoration project of geomagnetic survey in Latvia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlakovs, J.; Lembere, I.

    2003-04-01

    THE RESTORATION PROJECT OF GEOMAGNETIC SURVEY IN LATVIA J. Burlakovs, I. Lembere State Land Service of Latvia, Geodesy Board juris.burlakovs@gp.vzd.gov.lv / Fax: +371-7612736 The aim of geomagnetic survey measurements is to study the geomagnetic field at global, regional as well as local scales. To determine secular changes of the geomagnetic field it is very important to do a lot of regular field work. Recalculation and comparison of measured data for corrections must be made using the observatory or magnetic station data collected nearby the investigated area in the real-time. Field geomagnetic survey measurements in Latvia have not been made since 1991. The State Land Service of Latvia, the Geodesy Board plans to restart such kind of measurements in Latvia. The repeat station network must be renewed, regular magnetic declination, inclination and total field intensity data must be gathered, compared with the observatory data and secular changes of the geomagnetic field discovered. It is also possible to do regional correlations for data to determine future trends of the geomagnetic field changes. The detection of geomagnetic anomalies and the reason of the existence of those at particular territories could be made. Such kind of measurements demands the highest accuracy and therefore is necessary to cooperate with geomagnetic research network groups in neighbouring areas - Estonia, Finland and Poland, where permanent magnetic stations are situated. One permanent magnetic station also could be established in Latvia to do permanent recordings of geomagnetic field components, which give the possibility to do regional corrections for separate measurement recordings in the field. Geomagnetic field studies are important for cartography, navigational and military needs, also it is possible to use this information together with geological and geophysical data to create and specify the geological model for the territory. In future Latvia must participate within the

  17. The Geomagnetic Field During a Reversal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heirtzler, James R.

    2003-01-01

    By modifying the IGRF it is possible to learn what may happen to the geomagnetic field during a geomagnetic reversal. If the entire IGRF reverses then the declination and inclination only reverse when the field strength is zero. If only the dipole component of the IGRF reverses a large geomagnetic field remains when the dipole component is zero and he direction of the field at the end of the reversal is not exactly reversed from the directions at the beginning of the reversal.

  18. Possible Geomagnetic and Environmental Symptoms in the Area of Athens During the Solar Cycle No 22

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastos, P. T.; Paliatsos, A. G.; Korbakis, G. K.; Tritakis, V. P.; Bergiannaki, A.; Psarros, K.; Paparrigopoulos, P.; Stafanis, K.

    The goal of this research is to confirm possible influences of environmental and geomagnetic variability in psychiatric hygiene of sensitive and heavily psychological patients. Three yearly samples of psychological patients consisted by four thousand cases (4000) each have been studied. The patients have been filed by the psychiatric clinic of the Eginition hospital in Athens where the three samples have been compiled during three very characteristic years of the No 22 11-year cycle, the maximum (1989), the minimum (1996) and one intermediate year of the descending branch (1994). A file with five to eight psychological symptoms like depression, sleep disturbance anxiety, aggressiveness etc. is attached to every patient. Each of these symptoms is correlated to the local geomagnetic index (k-index), the international geomagnetic index (Dst) and the environmental index (DI, Discomfort Index) in both daily and monthly basis. A clear seasonal variation in almost all symptoms and samples is present with maximum at the end of summer (August/September) and minimum at the end of winter (February-March). In addition very significant correlations among DI, Dst and some psychological symptoms appear. The main conclusion is that meteorological and geomagnetic factors play a significant role in the formation of sensitive psychological patients, behavior

  19. The Causes of Geomagnetic Storms During Solar Maximum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Gonzalez, W. D.

    1998-01-01

    One of the oldest mysteries in geomagnetism is the linkage between solar and geomagnetic activity. The 11-year cycles of both the numbers of sunspots and Earth geomagnetic storms were first noted by Sabine (1852).

  20. Extremely low geomagnetic activity during the recent deep solar cycle minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echer, E.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Gonzalez, W. D.

    2012-07-01

    The recent solar minimum (2008-2009) was extreme in several aspects: the sunspot number, R z , interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) magnitude B o and solar wind speed V sw were the lowest during the space era. Furthermore, the variance of the IMF southward B z component was low. As a consequence of these exceedingly low solar wind parameters, there was a minimum in the energy transfer from solar wind to the magnetosphere, and the geomagnetic activity ap index reached extremely low levels. The minimum in geomagnetic activity was delayed in relation to sunspot cycle minimum. We compare the solar wind and geomagnetic activity observed in this recent minimum with previous solar cycle values during the space era (1964-2010). Moreover, the geomagnetic activity conditions during the current minimum are compared with long term variability during the period of available geomagnetic observations. The extremely low geomagnetic activity observed in this solar minimum was previously recorded only at the end of XIX century and at the beginning of the XX century, and this might be related to the Gleissberg (80-100 years) solar cycle.

  1. The response of mesospheric NO to geomagnetic forcing in 2002-2012 as seen by SCIAMACHY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinnhuber, M.; Friederich, F.; Bender, S.; Burrows, J. P.

    2016-04-01

    Daily NO number density, retrieved from measurements of the Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY) from 2002 to 2012 for polar summer in the mesosphere, is used to investigate the response of NO to geomagnetic activity, as expressed by the auroral electrojet (AE) index. Applying the superposed epoch analysis, we observe a clear response of NO to strong geomagnetic forcing at geomagnetic latitudes 55-75°N/S and altitudes above 66 km. The 27 day solar rotation cycle is observed, indicating that some of the observed geomagnetic events are related to solar coronal holes. We find a linear relationship between anomalies of AE and NO at geomagnetic latitudes 55-70°N/S and 70-74 km altitude. A clear auroral oval-like structure is observed on days of strong geomagnetic forcing in both hemispheres, with small longitudinal inhomogeneities, which might be related to the South Atlantic Anomaly or the magnetic local time. The NO lifetime and production rate per AE anomaly has been derived from a least squares fit to the observations. Comparisons of results from a simple model using this empirical NO production and a lifetime varying from 1.2 days in summer to 10 days in winter to SCIAMACHY observations show good agreement. In particular, the strength and interannual variability of the wintertime maximum is well captured. This suggests that direct production of NO in the upper mesosphere above 72 km contributes substantially to the so-called energetic particle precipitation indirect effect.

  2. Sparkling Geomagnetic Field: Involving Schools in Geomagnetic Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Rachel; Leonhardt, Roman; Leichter, Barbara

    2014-05-01

    Solar activity will be reaching a maximum in 2013/2014 as the sun reaches the end of its cycle, bringing with it an opportunity to study in greater detail the effect of solar wind or "space weather" on our planet's magnetic field. Heightened solar activity leads to a larger amount of clouds of energetic particles bombarding the Earth. Although the Earth's magnetic field shields us from most of these particles, the field becomes distorted and compacted by the solar wind, which leads to magnetic storms that we detect from the surface. These storms cause aurorae at higher latitudes and can lead to widespread disruption of communication and navigation equipment all over the Earth when sufficiently strong. This project, "Sparkling Geomagnetic Field," is a part of Austria's Sparkling Science programme, which aims to involve schools in active scientific research to encourage interest in science from a young age. Researchers from the Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics (ZAMG) in Vienna have worked hand-in-hand with three schools across Austria to set up regional geomagnetic stations consisting of state-of-the-art scalar and vector magnetometers to monitor the effects of the solar wind on the geomagnetic field. The students have been an active part of the research team from the beginning, first searching for a suitable location to set up the stations as well as later overseeing the continued running of the equipment and analysing the data output. Through this project the students will gain experience in contemporary scientific methods: data processing and analysis, field work, as well as equipment setup and upkeep. A total of three stations have been established with schools in Innsbruck, Tamsweg and Graz at roughly equal distances across Austria to run alongside the already active station in the Conrad Observatory near Vienna. Data acquisition runs through a data logger and software developed to deliver data in near realtime. This network allows for

  3. The AAS Workforce Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postman, Marc; Norman, D. J.; Evans, N. R.; Ivie, R.

    2014-01-01

    The AAS Demographics Committee, on behalf of the AAS, was tasked with initiating a biennial survey to improve the Society's ability to serve its members and to inform the community about changes in the community's demographics. A survey, based in part on similar surveys for other scientific societies, was developed in the summer of 2012 and was publicly launched in January 2013. The survey randomly targeted 2500 astronomers who are members of the AAS. The survey was closed 4 months later (April 2013). The response rate was excellent - 63% (1583 people) completed the survey. I will summarize the results from this survey, highlighting key results and plans for their broad dissemination.

  4. AAS 227: Day 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 4 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Helen B. Warner Prize: Origins of Structure in Planetary Systems (by Erika Nesvold)Another excellent prize lecture started off todays sessions. The Helen B. Warner Prize is awarded for achievement in observational or theoretical astrophysics by a young researcher (no more than eight years after their Ph.D.). This years Warner Prize was presented to Ruth Murray-Clay of UC Santa Barbara. For her award lecture, Murray-Clay told us all about planetary system architecture: the number, masses, and orbits of planets in a given system.Ruth Murray-Clay [photo from http://web.physics.ucsb.edu/ ~murray/biocv.html]The underlying question motivating this type of research is: How rare is the Solar System? In other words, how likely is it that a given planetary system will have rocky planets close to their star, gas giants farther out, and ice giants at the outer reaches of the system? Answering this question will help us solve the physics problem of how and where planets form, and will also help us on our search for other planets like Earth.The data on exoplanet population from transit and radial velocity observations and from direct imaging tell us that our Solar System is not common (many systems we observe have much more eccentric gas giants), but that doesnt

  5. AAS 227: Welcome!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Greetings from the 227th American Astronomical Society meeting in Kissimmee, Florida! This week, along with several fellow authors from astrobites, Iwill bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. You can follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.If youre an author or referee (or plan to be!) and youre here at the meeting, consider joining us at our Author and Referee Workshop on Wednesday in the Tallahassee room, where well be sharingsome of the exciting new features of the AAS journals. You can drop intoeither of the two-hour sessions(10 AM 12 PM or 1 PM 3 PM), and there will be afree buffet lunch at noon.Heres the agenda:Morning SessionTopic Speaker10:00 am 10:05 amIntroductionsJulie Steffen10:05 am 10:35 amChanges at AAS Journals; How to Be a Successful AAS AuthorEthan Vishniac10:35 am 11:00 amThe Peer Review ProcessButler Burton11:00 am 11:15 amAAS Nova: Sharing AAS Authors Research with the Broader CommunitySusanna Kohler11:15 am 11:30 amFixing Software and Instrumentation Publishing: New Paper Styles in AAS JournalsChris Lintott11:30 am 11:45 amMaking Article Writing Easier with the New AASTeX v6.0Greg Schwarz11:45 am 12:00 pmBringing JavaScript and Interactivity to Your AAS Journal FiguresGus MuenchLunch SessionTopic Speaker12:00 pm 12:15 pmUnified Astronomy ThesaurusKatie Frey12:15 pm 12:30 pmAAS/ADS ORCID Integration ToolAlberto Accomazzi12:30 pm 12:45 pmWorldWide Telescope and Video AbstractsJosh Peek12:45 pm 01:00 pmArizona Astronomical Data Hub (AADH)Bryan HeidornAfternoon SessionTopic Speaker01:00 pm 01:05 pmIntroductionsJulie Steffen01:05 pm 01:35 pmChanges at AAS Journals; How to Be a Successful AAS AuthorEthan Vishniac01:35 pm 02:00 pmThe Peer Review ProcessButler Burton02:00 pm 02:15 pmAAS Nova: Sharing AAS Authors Research with the Broader CommunitySusanna Kohler02:15 pm 02:30 pm

  6. AAS 228: Welcome!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Greetings from the 228th American Astronomical Society meeting in San Diego, California! This week, along with a team of fellow authorsfrom astrobites, Iwill bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. You can follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.If youre at the meeting, come stop by the AAS booth (Booth #211-213) to learn about the newly-announced partnership between AAS and astrobites and pick up some swag.And dont forget to visit the IOP booth in the Exhibit Hall (Booth #223) to learn more about the new corridors for AAS Journals and to pick up a badge pin to representyour corridor!

  7. Comparison of CME and CIR driven geomagnetic storms using the artificial neural network model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revallo, Milos; Valach, Fridrich; Hejda, Pavel; Bochnicek, Josef

    2016-04-01

    A model of geomagnetic storms based on the method of artificial neural networks (ANN) combined with an analytical approach is presented in the paper. Unlike our previous studies, here we focus on medium and weak geomagnetic storms caused by coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and those caused by corotating interaction regions (CIRs). As the model input, the hourly solar wind parameters measured by the ACE satellite at the libration point L1 are used. The time series of the Dst index is obtained as the model output. The simulated Dst index series is compared with the corresponding observatory data. The resulting Dst index series are inspected and typical features of CME and CIR driven storms are isolated. The model reliabilty is assessed using the skill scores, namely the correlation coefficient CC and the prediction efficiency PE. The general observation is that in the case of medium and weak geomagnetic storms the model performance is worse than in the case of intense geomagnetic storms studied in our previous paper. Due to more complex Dst index record, the model response for CIR driven storms is worse than in the case of CME driven storms.

  8. Electric utility industry experience with geomagnetic disturbances

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, P.R.; Rizy, D.T.; McConnell, B.W.; Taylor, E.R. Jr.; Tesche, F.M.

    1991-09-01

    A geomagnetic disturbance (GMD) by its nature occurs globally and almost simultaneously. Severe geomagnetic storms cause problems for electric power systems. The vulnerability of electric power systems to such events has apparently increased during the last 10 to 20 years because power system transmission lines have become more interconnected and have increased in length and because power systems are now operated closer to their limits than in the past. In this report, the experience of electric utilities during geomagnetic storms is examined and analyzed. Measured data, effects on power system components, and power system impacts are considered. It has been found that electric power systems are susceptible to geomagnetically induced earth-surface potential gradients as small as few (2 to 3) volts per kilometer, corresponding to a storm of K-6 intensity over an area of high earth resistivity. The causes and effects are reasonably well understood, but additional research is needed to develop a better understanding of solar-induced geomagnetic storms and the responses of power systems to these types of storms. A better understanding of geomagnetic storms and the power systems` responses to GMDs is needed so that mitigation measures can be implemented that will make power systems less susceptible to severe geomagnetic disturbances. A GMD caused by a large high-altitude nuclear detonation is similar in many ways to that of solar-induced geomagnetic storms except that a nuclear-caused disturbance would be much more intense with a far shorter duration. 49 refs.

  9. Electric Utility Industry Experience with Geomagnetic Disturbances

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, P.R.

    1991-01-01

    A geomagnetic disturbance (GMD) by its nature occurs globally and almost simultaneously. Severe geomagnetic storms cause problems for electric power systems. The vulnerability of electric power systems to such events has apparently increased during the last 10 to 20 years because power system transmission lines have become more interconnected and have increased in length and because power systems are now operated closer to their limits than in the past. In this report, the experience of electric utilities during geomagnetic storms is examined and analyzed. Measured data, effects on power system components, and power system impacts are considered. It has been found that electric power systems are susceptible to geomagnetically induced earth-surface potential gradients as small as a few (2 to 3) volts per kilometer, corresponding to a storm of K-6 intensity over an area of high earth resistivity. The causes and effects are reasonably well understood, but additional research is needed to develop a better understanding of solar-induced geomagnetic storms and the responses of power systems to these types of storms. A better understanding of geomagnetic storms and the power systems' responses to GMDs is needed so that mitigation measures can be implemented that will make power systems less susceptible to severe geomagnetic disturbances. A GMD caused by a large high-altitude nuclear detonation is similar in many ways to that of solar-induced geomagnetic storms except that a nuclear-caused disturbance would be much more intense with a far shorter duration.

  10. Electric utility industry experience with geomagnetic disturbances

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, P.R.; Rizy, D.T.; McConnell, B.W. ); Taylor, E.R. Jr. ); Tesche, F.M.

    1991-09-01

    A geomagnetic disturbance (GMD) by its nature occurs globally and almost simultaneously. Severe geomagnetic storms cause problems for electric power systems. The vulnerability of electric power systems to such events has apparently increased during the last 10 to 20 years because power system transmission lines have become more interconnected and have increased in length and because power systems are now operated closer to their limits than in the past. In this report, the experience of electric utilities during geomagnetic storms is examined and analyzed. Measured data, effects on power system components, and power system impacts are considered. It has been found that electric power systems are susceptible to geomagnetically induced earth-surface potential gradients as small as few (2 to 3) volts per kilometer, corresponding to a storm of K-6 intensity over an area of high earth resistivity. The causes and effects are reasonably well understood, but additional research is needed to develop a better understanding of solar-induced geomagnetic storms and the responses of power systems to these types of storms. A better understanding of geomagnetic storms and the power systems' responses to GMDs is needed so that mitigation measures can be implemented that will make power systems less susceptible to severe geomagnetic disturbances. A GMD caused by a large high-altitude nuclear detonation is similar in many ways to that of solar-induced geomagnetic storms except that a nuclear-caused disturbance would be much more intense with a far shorter duration. 49 refs.

  11. On the limitations of geomagnetic measures of interplanetary magnetic polarity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Rosenberg, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    The maximum attainable accuracy in inferring the interplanetary magnetic polarity from polar cap magnetograms is about 88%. This is achieved in practice, when high-latitude polar cap stations are used during local summer months, and the signature in the ground records is strong. An attempt by Svalgaard (1972) to use this effect to infer an index of interplanetary magnetic polarity back to 1926 has not been so successful. Furthermore, some of the properties of the index have changed with time. Prior to 1963, the inferred polarities are strongly dependent on geomagnetic activity, while after this time they are not. Thus, this index should not be used to separate solar-magnetic from solar-activity effects prior to 1963.

  12. Effect of geomagnetic activity, solar wind and parameters of interplanetary magnetic field on regularities in intermittency of Pi2 geomagnetic pulsations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurazhkovskaya, Nadezhda; Klain, Boris

    2015-09-01

    We present the results of investigation of the influence of geomagnetic activity, solar wind and parameters of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) on properties of the intermittency of midlatitude burst series of Pi2 geomagnetic pulsations observed during magnetospheric substorms on the nightside (substorm Pi2) and in the absence of these phenomena (nonsubstorm Pi2). We considered the index α as a main characteristic of intermittency of substorm and nonsubstorm Pi2 pulsations. The index α characterizes the slope of the cumulative distribution function of Pi2 burst amplitudes. The study indicated that the value and dynamics of the index α varies depending on the planetary geomagnetic activity, auroral activity and the intensity of magnetospheric ring currents. In addition, the forms of dependences of the index α; on the density n, velocity V, dynamic pressure Pd of the solar wind and IMF Bx-component are different. The behavior of the index α depending on the module of B, By- and Bz-components is similar. We found some critical values of V, Pd, B, By- and Bz-components, after reaching of which the turbulence of the magnetotail plasma during substorm development is decreased. The revealed patterns of the intermittency of Pi2 pulsations can be used for qualitative assessment of turbulence level in the magnetotail plasma depending on changing interplanetary conditions.

  13. Mountains versus valleys: Semiannual variation of geomagnetic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cliver, E. W.; Kamide, Y.; Ling, A. G.

    2000-02-01

    The semiannual variation in geomagnetic activity is generally attributed to the Russell-McPherron effect. In that picture, enhancements of southward field Bs near the equinoxes account for the observed higher geomagnetic activity in March and September. In a contrary point of view, we argue that the bulk of the semiannual variation results from an equinoctial effect (based on the ψ angle between the solar wind flow direction and Earth's dipole axis) that makes Bs coupling less effective (by ~25% on average) at the solstices. Thus the semiannual variation is not simply due to ``mountain building'' (creation of Bs) at the equinoxes but results primarily from ``valley digging'' (loss of coupling efficiency) at the solstices. We estimate that this latter effect, which clearly reveals itself in the diurnal variation of the am index, is responsible for ~65% of the semiannual modulation. The characteristic imprint of the equinoctial hypothesis is also apparent in hourly/monthly averages of the time-differential Dst index and the AE index.

  14. Geophysical excitation of nutation and geomagnetic jerks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vondrák, Jan; Ron, Cyril

    2014-05-01

    Recently Zinovy Malkin (2013) proposed that the observed changes of Free Core Nutation parameters (phase, amplitude) might be related to geomagnetic jerks (rapid changes of the secular variations of geomagnetic field). We tested this hypothesis and found that if the numerical integration of Brzezinski broad-band Liouville equations of atmospheric/oceanic excitations is re-initialized at the epochs of geomagnetic jerks, the agreement between the integrated and observed celestial pole offsets is improved significantly. This approach however tacitly assumes that the influence of geomagnetic jerks has a stepwise character, which is physically not acceptable. The present study continues in this effort by introducing a simple continuous excitation function (hypothetically due to geomagnetic jerks). The results of numerical integration of atmospheric/oceanic excitations plus this newly introduced excitation are then compared with the observed celestial pole offsets.

  15. Causal relationships between solar and geomagnetic cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponyavin, D. I.

    2006-12-01

    Sunspots are sui generis "hot spots" that display the most responsive regions to solar cycle changes. Rudolf Wolf in 1848 derived a simple measure of solar cyclicity by counting a number of sunspots and sunspot groups at the solar disk. Edward Sabine in 1852 announced that geomagnetic cycle was "absolutely identical" to solar cycle. However geomagnetic and sunspot indices due to their different nature do not exhibit similar variations and often manifest out of phase behavior. Long-term sunspot and geomagnetic time-series were studied using wavelet transforms and recurrence plot techniques. We have analyzed similarities and relationships between sunspot and geomagnetic cycles in order to find recurrence, synchronization and phase differences on interannual scale. Predictive schemes of the current and future solar cycles using geomagnetic proxies were analyzed and discussed.

  16. History of the geomagnetic field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doell, Richard R.

    1969-01-01

    Direct measurements of the direction and strength of the earth's magnetic field have provided a knowledge of the field's form and behavior during the last few hundreds of years. For older times, however, it has been necessary to measure the magnetism of certain rocks to learn what the geomagnetic field was like. For example, when a lava flow solidifies (at temperatures near 1000??C) and cools through the Curie point of the magnetic minerals contained in it (around 500??C) it acquires a remanent magnetism that is (1) very weak, (2) very stablel, (3) paralle to the direction of the ambient geomagnetic field, and (4) proportional in intensity to the ambient field. Separating, by various analytical means, this magnetization from other 'unwanted' magnetizations has allowed paleomagnetists to study the historical and prehistorical behavior of the earth's field. It has been learned, for example, that the strength of the field was almost twice its present value 2000 years ago and that it has often completely reversed its polarity. Paleo-magnetists have also confirmed that most oceans are, geologically speaking, relatively new features, and that the continents have markedly changed their positions over the surface of the earth. ?? 1969 The American Institute of Physics.

  17. Improved geomagnetic referencing in the Arctic environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poedjono, B.; Beck, N.; Buchanan, A. C.; Borri, L.; Maus, S.; Finn, Carol; Worthington, Bill; White, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Geomagnetic referencing uses the Earth’s magnetic field to determine accurate wellbore positioning essential for success in today's complex drilling programs, either as an alternative or a complement to north-seeking gyroscopic referencing. However, fluctuations in the geomagnetic field, especially at high latitudes, make the application of geomagnetic referencing in those areas more challenging. Precise crustal mapping and the monitoring of real-time variations by nearby magnetic observatories is crucial to achieving the required geomagnetic referencing accuracy. The Deadhorse Magnetic Observatory (DED), located at Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, has already played a vital role in the success of several commercial ventures in the area, providing essential, accurate, real-time data to the oilfield drilling industry. Geomagnetic referencing is enhanced with real-time data from DED and other observatories, and has been successfully used for accurate wellbore positioning. The availability of real-time geomagnetic measurements leads to significant cost and time savings in wellbore surveying, improving accuracy and alleviating the need for more expensive surveying techniques. The correct implementation of geomagnetic referencing is particularly critical as we approach the increased activity associated with the upcoming maximum of the 11-year solar cycle. The DED observatory further provides an important service to scientific communities engaged in studies of ionospheric, magnetospheric and space weather phenomena.

  18. foF2 correlation studies with solar and geomagnetic indices for two equatorial stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshua, E. O.; Nzekwe, N. M.

    2012-05-01

    The analysis of the contributions of solar and geomagnetic indices on the critical frequency of the ionospheric F2 layer (foF2)-, for different seasons and two Nigerian equatorial stations- Ibadan (Lat. 7.4°N, Long. 3.9°N) and Ilorin (Lat. 8.5°N, Long. 4.55°E)- are presented. The data set was randomly sampled across three solar cycles of periods of low, moderate and high solar activities. Solar indices used in this work are Coviten solar flux (F10.7 cm), daily solar radio flux (dF10.7), International Sunspot Number (ISSN), Smoothen Sunspot Number (SmSSN), and Sun Spot Number (SSN). The geomagnetic indices used are planetary indices Am, Aa, Ap, C9, Cp, and Kp. foF2 showed a non-linear trend with an average coefficient (R) of 0.70 across the various seasons. Regression lines for polynomials of degree n=1 to n=6 was fitted, for each data set. Am, Ap, Aa, SSN, ISSN, F10.7 cm, and dF10.7 with R values of 0.71,0.74,0.61,0.59,0.72,0.80, and 0.86, for the various geomagnetic and solar indices, had the highest contributions. We therefore advocate for SSN, ISSN, F10.7 cm, dF10.7 and Am, Ap or Aa in modeling foF2 for the African equatorial ionosphere. The results of this work are in line with the results of other works carried out at different equatorial stations.

  19. Statistical analysis and verification of 3-hourly geomagnetic activity probability predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingjing; Zhong, Qiuzhen; Liu, Siqing; Miao, Juan; Liu, Fanghua; Li, Zhitao; Tang, Weiwei

    2015-12-01

    The Space Environment Prediction Center (SEPC) has classified geomagnetic activity into four levels: quiet to unsettled (Kp < 4), active (Kp = 4), minor to moderate storm (Kp = 5 or 6), and major to severe storm (Kp > 6). The 3-hourly Kp index prediction product provided by the SEPC is updated half hourly. In this study, the statistical conditional forecast models for the 3-hourly geomagnetic activity level were developed based on 10 years of data and applied to more than 3 years of data, using the previous Kp index, interplanetary magnetic field, and solar wind parameters measured by the Advanced Composition Explorer as conditional parameters. The quality of the forecast models was measured and compared against verifications of accuracy, reliability, discrimination capability, and skill of predicting all geomagnetic activity levels, especially the probability of reaching the storm level given a previous "calm" (nonstorm level) or "storm" (storm level) condition. It was found that the conditional models that used the previous Kp index, the peak value of BtV (the product of the total interplanetary magnetic field and speed), the average value of Bz (the southerly component of the interplanetary magnetic field), and BzV (the product of the southerly component of the interplanetary magnetic field and speed) over the last 6 h as conditional parameters provide a relative operating characteristic area of 0.64 and can be an appropriate predictor for the probability forecast of geomagnetic activity level.

  20. Mid-latitude Geomagnetic Field Analysis Using BOH Magnetometer: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jun-Ga; Choi, Kyu-Cheol; Lee, Jae-Jin; Park, Young-Deuk; Ha, Dong-Hun

    2011-09-01

    Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute researchers have installed and operated magnetometers at Mt. Bohyun Observatory to measure the Earth's magnetic field variations in South Korea. We, in 2007, installed a fluxgate magnetometer (RFP-523C) to measure H, D, and Z components of the geomagnetic field. In addition, in 2009, we installed a Overhauser proton sensor to measure the absolute total magnetic field F and a three-axis magneto-impedance sensor for spectrum analysis. Currently three types of magnetometer data have been accumulated. In this paper, we provide the preliminary and the first statistical analysis using the BOH magnetometer installed at Mt. Bohyun Observatory. By superposed analysis, we find that daily variations of H, D, and Z shows similar tendency, that is, about 30 minutes before the meridian (11:28) a minimum appears and the time after about 3 hours and 30 minutes (15:28) a maximum appears. Also, a quiet interval start time (19:06) is near the sunset time, and a quiet interval end time (06:40) is near the sunrise time. From the sunset to the sunrise, the value of H has a nearly constant interval, that is, the sun affects the changes in H values. Seasonal variations show similar dependences to the sun. Local time variations show that noon region has the biggest variations and midnight region has the smallest variations. We compare the correlations between geomagnetic variations and activity indices as we expect the geomagnetic variation would contain the effects of geomagnetic activity variations. As a result, the correlation coefficient between H and Dst is the highest (r = 0.947), and other AL, AE, AU index and showed a high correlation. Therefore, the effects of geomagnetic storms and geomagnetic substorms might contribute to the geomagnetic changes significantly.

  1. Intense geomagnetic storms: A study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silbergleit, Virginia

    In the pipes and the lines of the transmission of the electrical energy, the route of the currents through them, causes a diminution of the life utility of the same one. The intense storms are studied, because these are induced quickly to the ionospheric systems that they change, obtaining great induced telluric currents (or GICs). Also the Akasofús parameter based on the time for periods of strong and moderate magnetic storms during the last 10 years is calculated. The method also standardizes the parameters of the storm: electron flow between 30-300 KeV, z component of the magnetic field (Bz), the solar Wind velocity (v), indices AE and AL. Also, the decay time of the ring current (which is different during the main and the recovery phase from of the geomagnetic disturbances) are calculated.

  2. Frequency of Proterozoic geomagnetic superchrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, Peter E.; Evans, David A. D.

    2016-03-01

    Long-term geodynamo evolution is expected to respond to inner core growth and changing patterns of mantle convection. Three geomagnetic superchrons, during which Earth's magnetic field maintained a near-constant polarity state through tens of Myr, are known from the bio/magnetostratigraphic record of Phanerozoic time, perhaps timed according to supercontinental episodicity. Some geodynamo simulations incorporating a much smaller inner core, as would have characterized Proterozoic time, produce field reversals at a much lower rate. Here we compile polarity ratios of site means within a quality-filtered global Proterozoic paleomagnetic database, according to recent plate kinematic models. Various smoothing parameters, optimized to successfully identify the known Phanerozoic superchrons, indicate 3-10 possible Proterozoic superchrons during the 1300 Myr interval studied. Proterozoic geodynamo evolution thus appears to indicate a relatively narrow range of reversal behavior through the last two billion years, implying either remarkable stability of core dynamics over this time or insensitivity of reversal rate to core evolution.

  3. Modeling of severe geomagnetic storms of solar cycle 23 by means of artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revallo, Milos; Valach, Fridrich; Hejda, Pavel; Bochnicek, Josef

    2015-04-01

    We set up a model for strong geomagnetic storms of solar cycle 23 using the method of artificial neural networks combined with an empirical model of the solar wind magnetosphere interaction. The set of solar wind data obtained from the ACE satellite is considered and the corresponding geomagnetic response is modeled and compared with real data. The discontinuity in magnetic field at the magnetopause is shown to play a key role in this study. The geomagnetic response is evaluated in terms of the Dst index. To assess the model performance, we compute the skill scores, namely the correlation coefficient and the prediction efficiency. We compare the model with previously known similar models based on artificial neural networks.

  4. Deciphering records of geomagnetic reversals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valet, Jean-Pierre; Fournier, Alexandre

    2016-06-01

    Polarity reversals of the geomagnetic field are a major feature of the Earth's dynamo. Questions remain regarding the dynamical processes that give rise to reversals and the properties of the geomagnetic field during a polarity transition. A large number of paleomagnetic reversal records have been acquired during the past 50 years in order to better constrain the structure and geometry of the transitional field. In addition, over the past two decades, numerical dynamo simulations have also provided insights into the reversal mechanism. Yet despite the large paleomagnetic database, controversial interpretations of records of the transitional field persist; they result from two characteristics inherent to all reversals, both of which are detrimental to an ambiguous analysis. On the one hand, the reversal process is rapid and requires adequate temporal resolution. On the other hand, weak field intensities during a reversal can affect the fidelity of magnetic recording in sedimentary records. This paper is aimed at reviewing critically the main reversal features derived from paleomagnetic records and at analyzing some of these features in light of numerical simulations. We discuss in detail the fidelity of the signal extracted from paleomagnetic records and pay special attention to their resolution with respect to the timing and mechanisms involved in the magnetization process. Records from marine sediments dominate the database. They give rise to transitional field models that often lead to overinterpret the data. Consequently, we attempt to separate robust results (and their subsequent interpretations) from those that do not stand on a strong observational footing. Finally, we discuss new avenues that should favor progress to better characterize and understand transitional field behavior.

  5. AAS Career Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvel, Kevin B.

    2012-08-01

    The American Astronomical Society provides substantial programs in the area of Career Services.Motivated by the Society's mission to enhance and share humanity's understanding of the Universe, the AAS provides a central resource for advertising positions, interviewing opportunities at its annual winter meeting and information, workshops and networks to enable astronomers to find employment.The programs of the Society in this area are overseen by an active committee on employment and the AAS Council itself.Additional resources that help characterize the field, its growth and facts about employment such as salaries and type of jobs available are regularly summarized and reported on by the American Institute of Physics.

  6. AAS 227: Day 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 4 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Helen B. Warner Prize: Origins of Structure in Planetary Systems (by Erika Nesvold)Another excellent prize lecture started off todays sessions. The Helen B. Warner Prize is awarded for achievement in observational or theoretical astrophysics by a young researcher (no more than eight years after their Ph.D.). This years Warner Prize was presented to Ruth Murray-Clay of UC Santa Barbara. For her award lecture, Murray-Clay told us all about planetary system architecture: the number, masses, and orbits of planets in a given system.Ruth Murray-Clay [photo from http://web.physics.ucsb.edu/ ~murray/biocv.html]The underlying question motivating this type of research is: How rare is the Solar System? In other words, how likely is it that a given planetary system will have rocky planets close to their star, gas giants farther out, and ice giants at the outer reaches of the system? Answering this question will help us solve the physics problem of how and where planets form, and will also help us on our search for other planets like Earth.The data on exoplanet population from transit and radial velocity observations and from direct imaging tell us that our Solar System is not common (many systems we observe have much more eccentric gas giants), but that doesnt

  7. Geomagnetic storms, super-storms, and their impacts on GPS-based navigation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astafyeva, E.; Yasyukevich, Yu.; Maksikov, A.; Zhivetiev, I.

    2014-07-01

    Using data of GPS receivers located worldwide, we analyze the quality of GPS performance during four geomagnetic storms of different intensity: two super-storms and two intense storms. We show that during super-storms the density of GPS Losses-of-Lock (LoL) increases up to 0.25% at L1 frequency and up to 3% at L2 frequency, and up to 0.15% (at L1) and 1% (at L2) during less intense storms. Also, depending on the intensity of the storm time ionospheric disturbances, the total number of total electron content (TEC) slips can exceed from 4 to 40 times the quiet time level. Both GPS LoL and TEC slips occur during abrupt changes of SYM-H index of geomagnetic activity, i.e., during the main phase of geomagnetic storms and during development of ionospheric storms. The main contribution in the total number of GPS LoL was found to be done by GPS sites located at low and high latitudes, whereas the area of numerous TEC slips seemed to mostly correspond to the boundary of the auroral oval, i.e., region with intensive ionospheric irregularities. Our global maps of TEC slips show where the regions with intense irregularities of electron density occur during geomagnetic storms and will let us in future predict appearance of GPS errors for geomagnetically disturbed conditions.

  8. AAS Oral History Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxner, Sanlyn; Holbrook, Jarita; AAS Oral History Team

    2016-06-01

    Now in its fourth year, the AAS Oral History Project has interviewed over 80 astronomers from all over the world. Led by the AAS Historical Astronomy Division (HAD) and partially funded by the American Institute of Physics Niels Bohr Library and ongoing support from the AAS, volunteers have collected oral histories from astronomers at professional meetings starting in 2015, including AAS, DPS, and the IAU general assembly. Each interview lasts one and a half to two hours and focuses on interviewees’ personal and professional lives. Questions include those about one’s family, childhood, strong influences on one’s scientific career, career path, successes and challenges, perspectives on how astronomy is changing as a field, and advice to the next generation. Each interview is audio recorded and transcribed, the content of which is checked with each interviewee. Once complete, interview transcripts are posted online as part of a larger oral history library at https://www.aip.org/history-programs/niels-bohr-library/oral-histories. Future analysis will reveal a rich story of astronomers and will help the community address issues of diversity, controversies, and the changing landscape of science. We are still recruiting individuals to be interviewed from all stages of career from undergraduate students to retired and emeritus astronomers. Contact Jarita Holbrook to schedule an interview or to find out more information about the project (astroholbrook@gmail.com). Also, contact Jarita Holbrook if you would like to become an interviewer for the project.

  9. American Astronomical Society (AAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Founded in 1899, the AAS is a non-profit scientific society created to promote the advancement of astronomy and closely related branches of science. Its membership consists primarily of professional researchers in the astronomical sciences, but also includes educators, students and others interested in the advancement of astronomical research. About 85% of the membership is drawn from North Ame...

  10. The International Geomagnetic Reference Field, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rukstales, Kenneth S.; Love, Jeffrey J.

    2007-01-01

    This is a set of five world charts showing the declination, inclination, horizontal intensity, vertical component, and total intensity of the Earth's magnetic field at mean sea level at the beginning of 2005. The charts are based on the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) main model for 2005 and secular change model for 2005-2010. The IGRF is referenced to the World Geodetic System 1984 ellipsoid. Additional information about the USGS geomagnetism program is available at: http://geomag.usgs.gov/

  11. How the geomagnetic field vector reverses polarity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prevot, M.; Mankinen, E.A.; Gromme, C.S.; Coe, R.S.

    1985-01-01

    A highly detailed record of both the direction and intensity of the Earth's magnetic field as it reverses has been obtained from a Miocene volcanic sequence. The transitional field is low in intensity and is typically non-axisymmetric. Geomagnetic impulses corresponding to astonishingly high rates of change of the field sometimes occur, suggesting that liquid velocity within the Earth's core increases during geomagnetic reversals. ?? 1985 Nature Publishing Group.

  12. Geomagnetic main field modeling using magnetohydrodynamic constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of physical constraints are investigated which may be approximately satisfied by the Earth's liquid core on models of the geomagnetic main field and its secular variation. A previous report describes the methodology used to incorporate nonlinear equations of constraint into the main field model. The application of that methodology to the GSFC 12/83 field model to test the frozen-flux hypothesis and the usefulness of incorporating magnetohydrodynamic constraints for obtaining improved geomagnetic field models is described.

  13. Geomagnetic disturbance effects on power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Albertson, V.D.; Bozoki, B.; Feero, W.E.; Kappenman, J.G.; Larsen, E.V.; Nordell, D.E.; Ponder, J.; Prabhakara, F.S.; Thompson, K.; Walling, R.

    1993-07-01

    In the northern hemisphere, the aurora borealis is visual evidence of simultaneous fluctuations in the earth's magnetic field (geomagnetic field). These geomagnetic disturbances (GMD's), or geomagnetic storms, can affect a number of man-made systems, including electric power systems. The GMD's are caused by the electromagnetic interaction of the solar wind plasma of protons and electrons with the geomagnetic field. These dynamic impulses in the solar wind are due to solar flares, coronal holes, and disappearing filaments, and reach the earth from one to six days after being emitted by a solar event. Instances of geomagnetic storms affecting telegraph systems were noted in England in 1846, and power system disturbances linked to GMD's were first reported in the United States in 1940. This Working Group report is a summary of the state of knowledge and research activity to the present time, and covers the GMD/Geomagnetically-induced currents (GIC) phenomena, transformer effects, the impact on generators, protective relay effects, and communication system effects. It also summarizes modeling and predicting GIC, measuring and monitoring GIC, mitigation methods, system operating guidelines during GMD's, and alerting and forecasting procedures and needs for the power industry.

  14. Ergodicity of the recent geomagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Santis, A.; Qamili, E.; Cianchini, G.

    2011-06-01

    The geomagnetic field is a fundamental property of our planet: its study would allow us to understand those processes of Earth's interior, which act in its outer core and produce the main field. Knowledge of whether the field is ergodic, i.e. whether time averages correspond to phase space averages, is an important question since, if this were true, it would point out a strong spatio-temporal coupling amongst the components of the dynamical system behind the present geomagnetic field generation. Another consequence would be that many computations, usually undertaken with many difficulties in the phase space, can be made in the conventional time domain. We analyse the temporal behaviour of the deviation between predictive and definitive geomagnetic global models for successive intervals from 1965 to 2010, finding a similar exponential growth with time. Also going back in time (at around 1600 and 1900 by using the GUFM1 model) confirms the same findings. This result corroborates previous chaotic analyses made in a reconstructed phase space from geomagnetic observatory time series, confirming the chaotic character of the recent geomagnetic field with no reliable prediction after around 6 years from definitive values, and disclosing the potentiality of estimating important entropic quantities of the field by time averages. Although more tests will be necessary, some of our analyses confirm the efforts to improve the representation of the geomagnetic field with more detailed secular variation and acceleration.

  15. Geomagnetic field effects of the Chelyabinsk meteoroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernogor, L. F.

    2014-09-01

    An analysis was conducted of time variations in geomagnetic field components on the day of the Chelyabinsk meteorite event (February 15, 2013) and on control days (February 12 and 16, 2013). The analysis uses the data collected by magnetic observatories in Novosibirsk, Almaty, Kyiv, and Lviv. The distance R from the explosion site to the observatories varies in the range 1200-2700 km. The flyby and explosion of the Chelyabinsk cosmic body is found to have been accompanied by variations mainly in the horizontal component of the geomagnetic field. The variations are quasi-periodic with a period of 30-40 min, an amplitude of 0.5-2 nT for R ≈ 2700-1200 km, respectively, and a duration of 2-3 h. The horizontal velocity of the geomagnetic field disturbances is close to 260-370 m/s. A theoretical model of wave disturbances is proposed. According to the model, wave disturbances in the geomagnetic field are caused (a) by the motion of the gravity wave generated in the atmosphere by the falling space body and (b) by traveling ionospheric disturbances, which modulate the ionospheric current at dynamo altitudes. The calculated amplitudes of the wave disturbances are 0.6-1.8 nT for R ≈ 2700-1200 km, respectively. The estimates are in good agreement with the observational data. Disturbances in the geomagnetic field level (geomagnetic pulsations) in the period range 1-1000 s are negligible (less than 1 nT).

  16. Aurora Activities Observed by SNPP VIIRS Day-Night Band during St. Patrick's Day, 2015 G4 Level Geomagnetic Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, T. C.; Shao, X.; Cao, C.; Zhang, B.; Fung, S. F.; Sharma, S.

    2015-12-01

    A G4 level (severe) geomagnetic storm occurred on March 17 (St. Patrick's Day), 2015 and it is among the strongest geomagnetic storms of the current solar cycle (Solar Cycle 24). The storm is identified as due to the Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) which erupted on March 15 from Region 2297 of solar surface. During this event, the geomagnetic storm index Dst reached -223 nT and the geomagnetic aurora electrojet (AE) index increased and reached as high as >2200 nT with large amplitude fluctuations. Aurora occurred in both hemispheres. Ground auroral sightings were reported from Michigan to Alaska and as far south as southern Colorado. The Day Night Band (DNB) of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) onboard Suomi-NPP represents a major advancement in night time imaging capabilities. The DNB senses radiance that can span 7 orders of magnitude in one panchromatic (0.5-0.9 μm) reflective solar band and provides imagery of clouds and other Earth features over illumination levels ranging from full sunlight to quarter moon. In this paper, DNB observations of aurora activities during the St. Patrick's Day geomagnetic storm are analyzed. Aurora are observed to evolve with salient features by DNB for orbital pass on the night side (~local time 1:30am) in both hemispheres. The radiance data from DNB observation are collected at the night sides of southern and northern hemispheres and geo-located onto geomagnetic local time (MLT) coordinates. Regions of aurora during each orbital pass are identified through image processing by contouring radiance values and excluding regions with stray light near day-night terminator. The evolution of aurora are characterized with time series of the poleward and low latitude boundary of aurora, their latitude-span and area, peak radiance and total light emission of the aurora region in DNB observation. These characteristic parameters are correlated with solar wind and geomagnetic index parameters.

  17. Synchronization of heart rate indices of human and Pc5 pulsations in the geomagnetic quiet conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenchenko, Tatiana

    Geomagnetic pulsations with duration of the period over 150 seconds (Pc5-6) are present in the magnetosphere almost constantly. Unlike other types of geomagnetic pulsations, they are characterized by high amplitudes reaching in auroral latitudes 30-100 nT, and even 300 - 600 nT in time of significant geomagnetic disturbances [1]. To date, it is generally accepted that the classic morning and afternoon Pc5 pulsations in the magnetosphere are toroidal Alfven resonance vibrations of the geomagnetic field lines [2, 3]. It was revealed that the basic oscillation periods, presented in heart rate variability of healthy subjects, in conditions of rest, at each time point substantially coincide with the periods of oscillation of the X-vector components of the geomagnetic field in the frequency range of Pc5-6 pulsations. Synchronization effect was observed in approximately 60% of cases [4]. The above statement is based on the results of more than 100 experiments (recording time from 60 to 200 min), conducted in the period 2011-2013 in various research groups [4]. In total, 37 volunteers in the age range 18-65 yrs took part in the experiments. Experiments were performed in Pushchino and Khimki (Moscow region), Arkhangelsk, Tomsk, Sofia (Bulgaria), as well as at the station Starorusskaya (Leningrad region). The geomagnetic data were obtained from INTERMAGNET network (http://ottawa.intermagnet.org/Welcom_e.php). From a biophysical point of view, the observed effects of timing fluctuations of heart rate of healthy subjects with the oscillations of the magnetic induction vector of the GMF could be an effective tool for solving one of the most actual problems in heliobiophysics, namely the identification of specific physiological mechanisms of biosystems response to low-intensity variations external factors. 1. Pilipenko V.A., Kleimenova N.G., Kozyreva O.V., Yumoto K., Bitterly G. Geomagnetism and aeronomy, 1997, V. 37, №.3, P. 64-76 2. Chen L. and Hasegawa A. J.Geophys. Res

  18. Spectral characteristics of geomagnetic field variations at low and equatorial latitudes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, W.H.

    1977-01-01

    Geomagnetic field spectra from eight standard observations at geomagnetic latitudes below 30?? were studied to determine the field characteristics unique to the equatorial region. Emphasis was placed upon those variations having periods between 5 min and 4 hr for a selection of magnetically quiet, average, and active days in 1965. The power spectral density at the equator was about ten times that the near 30?? latitude. The initial manifestation of the equatorial electrojet as evidenced by the east-west alignment of the horizontal field or the change in vertical amplitudes occurred below about 20?? latitude. Induced current effects upon the vertical component from which the Earth conductivity might be inferred could best be obtained at times and latitudes unaffected by the electrojet current. Values of about 1.6 ?? 103 mhos/m for an effective skin depth of 500-600 km were determined. The spectral amplitudes increased linearly with geomagnetic activity index, Ap. The spectral slope had a similar behavior at all latitudes. The slope changed systematically with Ap-index and showed a diurnal variation, centered on local noon, that changed form with geomagnetic activity.

  19. Relationship Between Human Physiological Parameters And Geomagnetic Variations Of Solar Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrova, S.

    This study attempts to assess the influence of increased geomagnetic activity on some human physiological parameters. The blood pressure, heart rate and general well-being of 86 volunteers were measured (the latter by means of a standardized questionnaire) on work days in autumn 2001 (01/10 to 09/11) and in spring 2002 (08/04 to 28/05). These periods were chosen because of maximal expected geomagnetic activity. Altogether, 2799 recordings were obtained and analysed. MANOVA was employed to check the significance of the influence of three factors on the physiological parameters under consideration. The three factors were the following: 1) planetary geomagnetic activity level estimated by Ap-index and divided into five levels; 2) gender - males and females; 3) blood pressure degree - persons in the group examined were divided into hypotensive, normotensive and hypertensive. Post hoc analysis was performed to elicit the significance of differences in the factors' levels. The average arterial blood pressure of the group was found to increase significantly with the increase of geomagnetic activity level. The average increment of systolic and diastolic blood pressure reached 9%, which deserves attention from a medical point of view. This effect was present irrespectively of gender. Results obtained suppose that hypertensive persons have the highest sensitivity and the hypotensive persons have the lowest sensitivity of the arterial blood pressure to increase of geomagnetic activity. The results did not show significant changes in the heart rate. The percentage of the persons who reported subjective psycho-physiological complaints was also found to increase significantly with the geomagnetic activity increase. During severe geomagnetic storms 30% of the persons examined reported subjective complaints and the highest sensitivity was revealed for the hypertensive females. The results obtained add further evidence that blood pressure seems to be affected by geomagnetic

  20. Geomagnetic Field Modeling with DMSP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alken, P.; Redmon, R. J.; Rich, F. J.; Maus, S.; Luhr, H.

    2013-12-01

    The Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) launches and maintains a network of satellites to monitor the meteorological, oceanographic, and solar-terrestrial physics environments. In the past decade, geomagnetic field modelers have focused much attention on magnetic measurements from missions such as CHAMP, Oersted and SAC-C. With the completion of the CHAMP mission in 2010, there have been limited satellite-based vector and scalar magnetic field measurements available for main field modeling. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of using the Special Sensor Magnetometer (SSM) instrument onboard DMSP for main field modeling. These vector field measurements are calibrated to compute instrument timing shifts, scale factors, offsets, and non-orthogonalities in the fluxgate magnetometer cores. Euler angles are then computed to determine the orientation of the vector magnetometer with respect to a local coordinate system. We fit a degree 12 main field model to the dataset and compare with similar models such as the World Magnetic Model (WMM) and IGRF. Initial results indicate that the DMSP dataset will be a valuable source for main field modeling for the years between CHAMP and the upcoming Swarm mission.

  1. On Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    2000-01-01

    A partial description of Earth's broad scale, core-source magnetic field has been developed and tested three ways. The description features an expected, or mean, spatial magnetic power spectrum that is approximately inversely proportional to horizontal wavenumber atop Earth's core. This multipole spectrum describes a magnetic energy range; it is not steep enough for Gubbins' magnetic dissipation range. Temporal variations of core multipole powers about mean values are to be expected and are described statistically, via trial probability distribution functions, instead of deterministically, via trial solution of closed transport equations. The distributions considered here are closed and neither require nor prohibit magnetic isotropy. The description is therefore applicable to, and tested against, both dipole and low degree non-dipole fields. In Part 1, a physical basis for an expectation spectrum is developed and checked. The description is then combined with main field models of twentieth century satellite and surface geomagnetic field measurements to make testable predictions of the radius of Earth's core. The predicted core radius is 0.7% above the 3480 km seismological value. Partial descriptions of other planetary dipole fields are noted.

  2. Determining the strength of the ring and the magnetopause currents during the initial phase of a geomagnetic storm using cosmic-ray data

    SciTech Connect

    Flueckiger, E.O.; Smart, D.F.; Shea, M.A.

    1990-02-01

    During a geomagnetic storm the strength of the magnetospheric current systems is strongly increased. In the initial phase of most events, however, the magnetic field at the Earth's equator (as characterized by the Dst index) shows only a relatively small perturbation due to the opposite magnetic effects caused by the magnetopause currents compared to the ring current. Analysis of Dst and of the cosmic ray cutoff rigidity changes at about 55 deg geomagnetic latitude offers the unique possibility to estimate the intensity of these two current systems separately. The procedure is illustrated for the geomagnetic storm on December 17, 1971.

  3. Determining the strength of the ring and the magnetopause currents during the initial phase of a geomagnetic storm using cosmic ray data

    SciTech Connect

    Flueckiger, E.O. ); Smart, D.F.; Shea, M.A. )

    1990-02-01

    During a geomagnetic storm the strength of the magnetospheric current systems is strongly increased. In the initial phase of most events, however, the magnetic field at the Earth's equator (as characterized by the Dst index) shows only a relatively small perturbation due to the opposite magnetic effects caused by the magnetopause currents compared to the ring current. Analysis of Dst and of the cosmic ray cutoff rigidity changes at about 55{degree} geomagnetic latitude offers the unique possibility to estimate the intensity of these two current systems separately. The procedure is illustrated for the geomagnetic storm on December 17, 1971.

  4. Local Geomagnetic Indices and the Prediction of Auroral Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newell, P. T.; Gjerloev, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    As the number of magnetometer stations and data processing power increases, just how auroral power relates to geomagnetic observations becomes a quantitatively more tractable question. This paper compares Polar UVI auroral power observations during 1997 with a variety of geomagnetic indices. Local time (LT) versions of the SuperMAG auroral electojet (SME) are introduced and examined, along with the corresponding upper and lower envelopes (SMU and SML). Also, the East-West component, BE, is investigated. We also consider whether using any of the local indices is actually better at predicting local auroral power than a single global index. Each index is separated into 24 LT indices based on a sliding 3-h MLT window. The ability to predict - or better reconstruct - auroral power varies greatly with LT, peaking at 1900 MLT, where about 75% of the variance (r2) can be predicted at 1-min cadence. The aurora is fairly predictable from 1700 MLT - 0400 MLT, roughly the region in which substorms occur. Auroral power is poorly predicted from auroral electrojet indices from 0500 MLT - 1500 MLT, with the minima at 1000-1300 MLT. In the region of high predictability, the local variable which works best is BE, in contrast to long-standing expectations. However using global SME is better than any local variable. Auroral power is best predicted by combining global SME with a local index: BE from 1500-0200 MLT, and either SMU or SML from 0300-1400 MLT. In the region of the diffuse aurora, it is better to use a 30 min average than the cotemporaneous 1-min SME value, while from 1500-0200 MLT the cotemporaneous 1-min SME works best, suggesting a more direct physical relationship with the auroral circuit. These results suggest a significant role for discrete auroral currents closing locally with Pedersen currents.

  5. Fractal and wavelet analysis evaluation of the mid latitude ionospheric disturbances associated with major geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Montes, Rebeca; Pérez-Enríquez, Román; Araujo-Pradere, Eduardo A.; López Cruz-Abeyro, Jose Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Variations of the total electron content (TEC) of the ionosphere are mainly associated with major geomagnetic storms occurring with the arrival of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) to the Earth environment. The purpose of this paper is to show results of the analysis we made of the impact of all major geomagnetic storms (Dst < - 200 nT) on the ionosphere at mid latitudes, which have occurred since 2000. The analysis consists in the calculation of TEC of the ionosphere using data from several Mexican GPS stations, with the purpose of quantifying the impact into the ionosphere to these latitudes, through the variations in amplitude, Hurst index, that is roughness, and wavelet transform of the time series of TEC. Indeed, during the geomagnetic storms of April 7, 2000, July 16, 2000, October 30, 2003, November 20, 2003 and November 8, 2004, major ionospheric disturbances at mid latitudes took place with changes in amplitude of TEC going from 3.29 to 8.82 sigmas. These ionospheric disturbances were probably associated with prompt penetration electric fields (PPEFs) and equatorward neutral winds. On the other hand, during four geomagnetic storms (August 12, 2000, March 31, 2001, April 11, 2001 and May 15, 2005), there were negative ionospheric storms that pushed the TEC to significantly lower values. This has been interpreted as the presence of regions in which the neutral composition is changed. Also, in some cases during the disturbed days, the Hurst values were smaller than during the undisturbed days, i.e. during these geomagnetic storms, the roughness of the time series of TEC increased. The wavelet analysis showed a strong influence of the diurnal variation on TEC values (periodicities of 12 h), and periodicities characteristics of ionospheric disturbances of 1-8 h. It is found that large geomagnetic storms produce significant ionospheric disturbances at mid latitudes, as shown by the wavelet analysis and, in some cases, changes in the roughness of the time series of

  6. Relationship between human physiological parameters and geomagnetic variations of solar origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrova, S.

    Results presented concern influence of increased geomagnetic activity on some human physiological parameters. The blood pressure and heart rate of 86 volunteers were measured on working days in autumn 2001 (01/10 09/11) and in spring 2002 (08/04 28/05). These periods were chosen because of maximal expected geomagnetic activity. Altogether 2799 recordings were obtained and analysed. Questionnaire information about subjective psycho-physiological complaints was also gathered. MANOVA was employed to check the significance of the influence of three factors on the physiological parameters under consideration. The factors were the following: (1) planetary geomagnetic activity level estimated by Ap-index and divided into five levels; (2) gender males and females; (3) blood pressure degree persons in the group examined were divided into hypotensive, normotensive and hypertensive. Post hoc analysis was performed to elicit the significance of differences in the factors’ levels. The average arterial blood pressure of the group was found to increase significantly with the increase of geomagnetic activity level. The average increment of systolic and diastolic blood pressure of the group examined reached 9%. This effect was present irrespectively of gender. Results obtained suppose that hypertensive persons have the highest sensitivity and the hypotensive persons have the lowest sensitivity of the arterial blood pressure to increase of geomagnetic activity. The results did not show significant changes in the heart rate. The percentage of the persons who reported subjective psycho-physiological complaints was also found to increase significantly with the geomagnetic activity increase and the highest sensitivity was revealed for the hypertensive females.

  7. Bats Use Geomagnetic Field: Behavior and Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Y.; Tian, L.; Zhang, B.; Zhu, R.

    2015-12-01

    It has been known that numerous animals can use the Earth's magnetic field for spatial orientation and long-distance navigation, nevertheless, how animals can respond to the magnetic field remain mostly ambiguous. The intensities of the global geomagnetic field varies between 23 and 66 μT, and the geomagnetic field intensity could drop to 10% during geomagnetic polarity reversals or geomagnetic excursions. Such dramatic changes of the geomagnetic field may pose a significant challenge for the evolution of magnetic compass in animals. For examples, it is vital whether the magnetic compass can still work in such very weak magnetic fields. Our previous experiment has demonstrated that a migratory bat (Nyctalus plancyi) uses a polarity compass for orientation during roosting when exposed to an artificial magnetic field (100 μT). Recently, we experimentally tested whether the N. plancyi can sense very weak magnetic fields that were even lower than those of the present-day geomagnetic field. Results showed: 1) the bats can sense the magnetic north in a field strength of present-day local geomagnetic field (51μT); 2) As the field intensity decreased to only 1/5th of the natural intensity (10 μT), the bats still responded by positioning themselves at the magnetic north. Notably, as the field polarity was artificially reversed, the bats still preferred the new magnetic north, even at the lowest field strength tested (10 μT). Hence, N. plancyi is able to detect the direction of a magnetic field with intensity range from twice to 1/5th of the present-day field strength. This allows them to orient themselves across the entire range of present-day global geomagnetic field strengths and sense very weak magnetic fields. We propose that this high sensitivity might have evolved in bats as the geomagnetic field strength varied and the polarity reversed tens of times over the past fifty million years since the origin of bats. The physiological mechanisms underlying

  8. Determination of Geomagnetically Quiet Time Disturbances of the Ionosphere over Uganda during the Beginning of Solar Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habyarimana, Valence

    2016-07-01

    The ionosphere is prone to significant disturbances during geomagnetically active and quiet conditions. This study focused on the occurrence of ionospheric disturbances during geomagnetically quiet conditions. Ionospheric data comprised of Global Positioning System (GPS)-derived Total Electron Content (TEC), obtained over Mt. Baker, Entebbe, and Mbarara International Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Service (IGS) stations. The Disturbance storm time (Dst) index was obtained from Kyoto University website. The number of geomagnetically quiet days in the period under study were first identified. Their monthly percentages were compared for the two years. The monthly percentage of geomagnetically quiet days for all the months in 2009 numerically exceeded those in 2008. December had the highest percentage of geomagnetically quiet days for both years (94 % in 2008 and 100 % in 2009). Geomagnetically quiet days did not show seasonal dependence. The variation in percentage of geomagnetically quiet days during solstice months (May, June, July, November, December, and January) and equinoctial months (February, March, April, August, September, and October) was not uniform. Geomagnetically quiet time disturbances were found to be more significant from 09:00 UT to 13:00 UT. However, there were some other disturbances of small scale amplitude that occurred between 14:00 UT and 22:00 UT. Further analysis was done to identify the satellites that observed the irregularities that were responsible for TEC perturbations. Satellites are identified by Pseudo Random Numbers (PRNs). The ray path between individual PRNs and the corresponding receivers were analysed. Satellites with PRNs: 3, 7, 8, 19 and 21 registered most of the perturbations. It was found that Q disturbances led to fluctuations in density gradients. Significant TEC perturbations were observed on satellite with PRN 21 with receivers at Entebbe and Mbarara on June 28, 2009 between 18:00 UT and 21:00 UT.

  9. Ionospheric response to great geomagnetic storms during solar cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merline Matamba, Tshimangadzo; Bosco Habarulema, John

    2016-07-01

    The analyses of ionospheric responses due to great geomagnetic storms i.e. Dst index < 350 nT that occurred during solar cycle 23 are presented. The GPS Total Electron Content (TEC) and ionosonde data over Southern and Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes were used to study the ionospheric responses. A geomagnetic latitude region of ±30° to ±46° within a longitude sector of 15° to 40° was considered. Using a criteria of Dst < -350 nT, there were only four great storm periods (29 March - 02 April 2001, 27 - 31 October 2003, 18 - 23 November 2003 and 06 - 11 November 2004) in solar cycle 23. Analysis has shown that ionospheric dynamics during these disturbed conditions could be due to a number of dynamic and electrodynamics processes in both Hemispheres. In some instances the ionosphere responds differently to the same storm condition in both Hemispheres. Physical mechanisms related to (but not limited to) composition changes and electric fields will be discussed.

  10. Geomagnetic storm forecasts several hours ahead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podladchikova, Tatiana; Petrukovich, Anatoli

    In this study we present a service implemented at Space Research Institute, Russia, providing an advance warning about the future geomagnetic storm magnitude (the negative peak Dst) using first geomagnetic storm indications. We demonstrate a clear relation between the solar wind parameters in the beginning of the storm development with the ultimate storm strength. For suddenly developing major storms that have essential influence on susceptible technological systems such as satellites, pipelines, power systems, and radio communications we predict lower and upper limits of the negative peak Dst. The high predictive potential of the proposed technique was confirmed by testing it on geomagnetic storms during the period 1995-2013. The advance warning time about the future geomagnetic storm strength on average achieves 5-6 hours and varies from 1 to 22 hours. The error of the peak Dst prediction does not exceed 25% with probability of 0.96. The false prediction probability does not exceed 0.03. Real-time predictions of the geomagnetic storm magnitude are updated every hour and published at http://spaceweather.ru

  11. On the geomagnetic jerk of 1969

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, M. G.

    1985-05-01

    Courtillot et al. (1978) have first reported a sudden change in the slope of the first time derivatives of the geomagnetic field components which occurred around 1970. It was found that the change took place in a large part of the northern hemisphere. Malin and Hodder (1982) reported on studies which were conducted to determine whether this 1970 step change in the second time derivative of the geomagnetic field components, which they termed a geomagnetic 'jerk', was of internal or external origin. It was concluded that internal sources can give rise to changes in secular variation on time scales as short as one or two years and that these were the major factor in the geomagnetic jerk which occurred around 1970. The present paper provides new supporting evidence for the existence of a worldwide geomagnetic jerk, its (average) time of occurrence, and its internal nature. New estimates are given of the spherical harmonic coefficients of the jerk and of the pre-1969 and post-1969 secular acceleration.

  12. On the geomagnetic jerk of 1969

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcleod, M. G.

    1985-01-01

    Courtillot et al. (1978) have first reported a sudden change in the slope of the first time derivatives of the geomagnetic field components which occurred around 1970. It was found that the change took place in a large part of the northern hemisphere. Malin and Hodder (1982) reported on studies which were conducted to determine whether this 1970 step change in the second time derivative of the geomagnetic field components, which they termed a geomagnetic 'jerk', was of internal or external origin. It was concluded that internal sources can give rise to changes in secular variation on time scales as short as one or two years and that these were the major factor in the geomagnetic jerk which occurred around 1970. The present paper provides new supporting evidence for the existence of a worldwide geomagnetic jerk, its (average) time of occurrence, and its internal nature. New estimates are given of the spherical harmonic coefficients of the jerk and of the pre-1969 and post-1969 secular acceleration.

  13. The causes of recurrent geomagnetic storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Lepping, R. P.

    1976-01-01

    The causes of recurrent geomagnetic activity were studied by analyzing interplanetary magnetic field and plasma data from earth-orbiting spacecraft in the interval from November 1973 to February 1974. This interval included the start of two long sequences of geomagnetic activity and two corresponding corotating interplanetary streams. In general, the geomagnetic activity was related to an electric field which was due to two factors: (1) the ordered, mesoscale pattern of the stream itself, and (2) random, smaller-scale fluctuations in the southward component of the interplanetary magnetic field Bz. The geomagnetic activity in each recurrent sequence consisted of two successive stages. The first stage was usually the most intense, and it occurred during the passage of the interaction region at the front of a stream. These large amplitudes of Bz were primarily produced in the interplanetary medium by compression of ambient fluctuations as the stream steepened in transit to 1 A.U. The second stage of geomagnetic activity immediately following the first was associated with the highest speeds in the stream.

  14. Geomagnetic anomaly detected at hydromagnetic wave frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meloni, A.; Medford, L. V.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    1985-04-01

    We report the discovery, in northwestern Illinois, of a geomagnetic anomaly, using hydromagnetic wave frequencies as the source spectrum. Three portable magnetometer stations with computer-compatible digital data acquisition systems were operated in a longitude array at Piano and Ashton, Illinois, and Cascade, Iowa (total separation ˜200 km), in 1981-1982. Analysis of the natural geomagnetic field fluctuations in the hydromagnetic wave regime reveals that the vertical components of the detected fluctuations are essentially 180° out of phase between Plano/Ashton and Cascade for variations with periods ˜30-120 s. The observations can be modeled in terms of a shallow (˜10-20 km) north-south oriented geomagnetic anomaly of enhanced conductivity located between Ashton and Cascade, approximately parallel to the Mississippi River valley.

  15. Scaling laws from geomagnetic time series

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Voros, Z.; Kovacs, P.; Juhasz, A.; Kormendi, A.; Green, A.W.

    1998-01-01

    The notion of extended self-similarity (ESS) is applied here for the X - component time series of geomagnetic field fluctuations. Plotting nth order structure functions against the fourth order structure function we show that low-frequency geomagnetic fluctuations up to the order n = 10 follow the same scaling laws as MHD fluctuations in solar wind, however, for higher frequencies (f > l/5[h]) a clear departure from the expected universality is observed for n > 6. ESS does not allow to make an unambiguous statement about the non triviality of scaling laws in "geomagnetic" turbulence. However, we suggest to use higher order moments as promising diagnostic tools for mapping the contributions of various remote magnetospheric sources to local observatory data. Copyright 1998 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. An introduction to quiet daily geomagnetic fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, W.H.

    1989-01-01

    On days that are quiet with respect to solar-terrestrial activity phenomena, the geomagnetic field has variations, tens of gamma in size, with major spectral components at about 24, 12, 8, and 6 hr in period. These quiet daily field variations are primarily due to the dynamo currents flowing in the E region of the earth's ionosphere, are driven by the global thermotidal wind systems, and are dependent upon the local tensor conductivity and main geomagnetic field vector. The highlights of the behavior and interpretation of these quiet field changes, from their discovery in 1634 until the present, are discussed as an introduction to the special journal issue on Quiet Daily Geomagnetic Fields. ?? 1989 Birkha??user Verlag.

  17. Solar flares, flare particles and geomagnetic disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, T.

    1986-03-01

    Geomagnetic disturbances related to solar-terrestrial events during the period June-September 1982 are described. The cause of these activities is investigated using solar phenomena and solar flare particles observed by the geostationary satellite GMS-2/SEM (Space Environment Monitor). It is noted that the geomagnetic disturbances in June were weak, two big geomagnetic storms occurred in September, and the largest storm, caused by a large flare, occurred on July 13-14. The July 13-14, 1972 storm is compared to the February 11-12, 1958 storm observed by Hakura and Nagai (1964, 1965) and the August 4-5, 1972 storm data of Hakura (1976). The July storm was characterized by a deep depression of the H-component caused by an abnormal expansion of the substorm-associated current system in the auroral zone toward the Far East and was short-lived.

  18. International Geomagnetic Reference Field: the third generation.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peddie, N.W.

    1982-01-01

    In August 1981 the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy revised the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF). It is the second revision since the inception of the IGRF in 1968. The revision extends the earlier series of IGRF models from 1980 to 1985, introduces a new series of definitive models for 1965-1976, and defines a provisional reference field for 1975- 1980. The revision consists of: 1) a model of the main geomagnetic field at 1980.0, not continuous with the earlier series of IGRF models together with a forecast model of the secular variation of the main field during 1980-1985; 2) definitive models of the main field at 1965.0, 1970.0, and 1975.0, with linear interpolation of the model coefficients specified for intervening dates; and 3) a provisional reference field for 1975-1980, defined as the linear interpolation of the 1975 and 1980 main-field models.-from Author

  19. Geomagnetic storm forecasts and the power industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappenman, John G.; Zanetti, Lawrence J.; Radasky, William A.

    There is a well-recognized link between solar activity, geomagnetic disturbances, and disruptions to man-made systems such as power grids, satellites, communications, and defense systems. As technology evolves, these systems become more susceptible to magnetic disturbances than their counterparts of previous solar cycles. Analysis suggests that these vulnerabilities will continue and perhaps even increase as these systems continue to evolve.Geomagnetic disturbances can cause geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) to flow through the power system, entering and exiting the many grounding points on a transmission network. This is generally of most concern at the latitudes of the northern United States, Canada, and Scandinavia, for example, but regions much farther south are also affected during intense magnetic storms.

  20. Global matrix of thermospheric density values for selected solar/geomagnetic conditions and spacecraft orbital attitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    Presented are selected thermospheric/exospheric global mean and extreme density values computed between 130 and 1100 km altitude. These values were generated from the MSFC/J70 reference orbital atmospheric model using different input conditions of solar flux and geomagnetic index, ranging from low to peak. Typical magnitudes of day-night density changes are presented, as an example, for use in space vehicle orbital analyses.

  1. Large Geomagnetic Storms: Introduction to Special Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.

    2010-01-01

    Solar cycle 23 witnessed the accumulation of rich data sets that reveal various aspects of geomagnetic storms in unprecedented detail both at the Sun where the storm causing disturbances originate and in geospace where the effects of the storms are directly felt. During two recent coordinated data analysis workshops (CDAWs) the large geomagnetic storms (Dst < or = -100 nT) of solar cycle 23 were studied in order to understand their solar, interplanetary, and geospace connections. This special section grew out of these CDAWs with additional contributions relevant to these storms. Here I provide a brief summary of the results presented in the special section.

  2. Satellite Data for Geomagnetic Field Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langel, R. A.; Baldwin, R. T.

    1992-01-01

    Satellite measurements of the geomagnetic fields began with the launch of Sputnik 3 in May of 1958 and have continued sporadically. Spacecraft making significant contributions to main field geomagnetism will be reviewed and the characteristics of their data discussed, including coverage, accuracy, resolution and data availability. Of particular interest are Vanguard 3; Cosmos 49, Ogo's -2, -4, and -6; Magsat; DE-2; and POGS. Spacecraft make measurements on a moving platfrom above the ionosphere as opposed to measurements from fixed observatories and surveys, both below the ionosphere. Possible future missions, such as Aristoteles and GOS are reviewed.

  3. Anencephalus, drinking water, geomagnetism and cosmic radiation.

    PubMed

    Archer, V E

    1979-01-01

    The mortality rates from anencephalus from 1950-1969 in Canadian cities are shown to be strongly correlated with city growth rate and with horizontal geomagnetic flux, which is directly related to the intensity of cosmic radiation. They are also shown to have some association with the magnesium content of drinking water. Prior work with these data which showed associations with magnesium in drinking water, mean income, latitude and longitude was found to be inadequate because it dismissed the observed geographic associations as having little biological meaning, and because the important variables of geomagnetism and city growth rate were overlooked. PMID:433919

  4. First geomagnetic measurements in the Antarctic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raspopov, O. M.; Demina, I. M.; Meshcheryakov, V. V.

    2014-05-01

    Based on data from literature and archival sources, we have further processed and analyzed the results of geomagnetic measurements made during the 1772-1775 Second World Expedition by James Cook and the 1819-1821 overseas Antarctic Expedition by Russian mariners Bellingshausen and Lazarev. Comparison with the GUFM historical model showed that there are systematic differences in the spatial structure of both the declination and its secular variation. The results obtained can serve as a basis for the construction of regional models of the geomagnetic field for the Antarctic region.

  5. A simple statistical model for geomagnetic reversals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constable, Catherine

    1990-01-01

    The diversity of paleomagnetic records of geomagnetic reversals now available indicate that the field configuration during transitions cannot be adequately described by simple zonal or standing field models. A new model described here is based on statistical properties inferred from the present field and is capable of simulating field transitions like those observed. Some insight is obtained into what one can hope to learn from paleomagnetic records. In particular, it is crucial that the effects of smoothing in the remanence acquisition process be separated from true geomagnetic field behavior. This might enable us to determine the time constants associated with the dominant field configuration during a reversal.

  6. Geomagnetism and climate V: general conclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mörner, N.-A.; Nevanlinna, H.; Dergachev, V.; Shumilov, O.; Raspopov, O.; Abrahamsen, N.; Pilipenko, O.; Trubikhin, V.; Gooskova, E.

    2003-04-01

    The shielding capacity of the Earth’s geomagnetic field is a prime factor regulating the flux into the atmosphere of galactic cosmic ray (in its turn controlling the 14C and 10Be production). This shielding capacity is controlled both by the Earth’s own geomagnetic field variability and by the Solar Wind variations. The Solar Wind interaction with the magnetosphere also affects the Earth’s rate of rotation (as recorded in the correlation between LOD and Sunspot activity). This opens for three possible lines of Solar Terrestrial interaction. (1) Changes in the total irradiance (known to be very small, however, over a full sun spot cycle). (2) Changes in cosmic ray flux reaching into the Earth’s atmosphere where it has the potential of affecting airglow and cloudiness (especially the cloudiness at a height in the order of 15 km). (3) Changes in the Earth’s rate of rotation affecting the oceanic circulation redistributing ocean-stored heat and water masses. The Spörer, Maunder and Dalton sun spot minima seem all to have led to periods of rotational acceleration pulling Arctic water down the European coasts and displacing the warm Gulf Stream towards Gibraltar. The geomagnetic field as regulator of cosmic ray flux and rotational potential is likely to have played a significant role even over longer time periods. It should be noted, however, the geometry of the Earth’s geomagnetic field cannot have differed very much due to frozen plasma conditions even at excursions and reversals. If the recorded sunspot and geomagnetic cycles are extrapolated into the future they predict a new low (“Little Ice Age”) in the years 2050 2100 (i.e. a scenario very different from that presented by IPCC). Our study of the relation between geomagnetism and climate has shown that geomagnetic field changes have played an important role in modulation Earth’s climate. These changes may originate from internal planetary sources (i.e. the Earth’s own geomagnetic field) as well

  7. Tsunami related to solar and geomagnetic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cataldi, Gabriele; Cataldi, Daniele; Straser, Valentino

    2016-04-01

    The authors of this study wanted to verify the existence of a correlation between earthquakes of high intensity capable of generating tsunami and variations of solar and Earth's geomagnetic activity. To confirming or not the presence of this kind of correlation, the authors analyzed the conditions of Spaceweather "near Earth" and the characteristics of the Earth's geomagnetic field in the hours that preceded the four earthquakes of high intensity that have generated tsunamis: 1) Japan M9 earthquake occurred on March 11, 2011 at 05:46 UTC; 2) Japan M7.1 earthquake occurred on October 25, 2013 at 17:10 UTC; 3) Chile M8.2 earthquake occurred on April 1, 2014 at 23:46 UTC; 4) Chile M8.3 earthquake occurred on September 16, 2015 at 22:54 UTC. The data relating to the four earthquakes were provided by the United States Geological Survey (USGS). The data on ion density used to realize the correlation study are represented by: solar wind ion density variation detected by ACE (Advanced Composition Explorer) Satellite, in orbit near the L1 Lagrange point, at 1.5 million of km from Earth, in direction of the Sun. The instrument used to perform the measurement of the solar wind ion density is the Electron, Proton, and Alpha Monitor (EPAM) instrument, equipped on the ACE Satellite. To conduct the study, the authors have taken in consideration the variation of the solar wind protons density of three different energy fractions: differential proton flux 1060-1900 keV (p/cm^2-sec-ster-MeV); differential proton flux 761-1220 keV (p/cm^2-sec-ster-MeV); differential proton flux 310-580 keV (p/cm^2-sec-ster-MeV). Geomagnetic activity data were provided by Tromsø Geomagnetic Observatory (TGO), Norway; by Scoresbysund Geomagnetic Observatory (SCO), Greenland, Denmark and by Space Weather Prediction Center of Pushkov Institute of terrestrial magnetism, ionosphere and radio wave propagation (IZMIRAN), Troitsk, Moscow Region. The results of the study, in agreement with what already

  8. Geomagnetic storm fields near a synchronous satellite.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawasaki, K.; Akasofu, S. I.

    1971-01-01

    An apparent early recovery of the main phase of geomagnetic storms at the distance of the synchronous satellite is examined in terms of changing electric current distributions in the magnetosphere during magnetic storms. It is suggested that a rapid recession of the edge of the plasma sheet (after the advance toward the earth during an early epoch of the main phase) is partly responsible for the early recovery. Relevant plasma sheet variations during geomagnetic storms are found to be in agreement with the inferred variations.

  9. AAS 227: Day 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or at astrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the @astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Things kicked off last night at our undergraduate reception booth. Thanks to all of you who stopped by we were delightedto have so many people tell us that they already know about and useastrobites, and we were excited to introduce a new cohort of students at AAS to astrobites for the first time.Tuesday morning was the official start of the meeting. Here are just a few of the talks and workshops astrobiters attended today.Opening Address (by Becky Smethurst)The President of the AAS, aka our fearless leader Meg Urry kicked off the meeting this morning at the purely coffee powered hour of 8am this morning. She spoke about the importance of young astronomers at the meeting (heres looking at you reader!) and also the importance of the new Working Group for Accessibility and Disabilities (aka WGAD pronounced like wicked) at the AAS. The Society has made extra effort this year to make the conference accessible to all,a message which was very well received by everyone in attendance.Kavli Lecture: New Horizons Alan Stern (by Becky Smethurst)We were definitely spoilt with the first Plenary lecture at this years conference Alan Stern gave us a a review of the New Horizons mission of the Pluto Fly By (astrobites covered the mission back in July with this post). We were treated to beautiful images, wonderful results and a foray into geology.Before (Hubble) and after #NewHorizons. #thatisall #science #astro alanstern #aas227 pic.twitter.com/kkMt6RsSIR Science News (@topsciencething) January 5, 2016Some awesome facts from the lecture that blew my mind:New Horizons is now 2AU (!) beyond Pluto

  10. AAS Publishing News: Astronomical Software Citation Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-07-01

    Do you write code for your research? Use astronomical software? Do you wish there were a better way of citing, sharing, archiving, or discovering software for astronomy research? You're not alone! In April 2015, AAS's publishing team joined other leaders in the astronomical software community in a meeting funded by the Sloan Foundation, with the purpose of discussing these issues and potential solutions. In attendance were representatives from academic astronomy, publishing, libraries, for-profit software sharing platforms, telescope facilities, and grantmaking institutions. The goal of the group was to establish “protocols, policies, and platforms for astronomical software citation, sharing, and archiving,” in the hopes of encouraging a set of normalized standards across the field. The AAS is now collaborating with leaders at GitHub to write grant proposals for a project to develop strategies for software discoverability and citation, in astronomy and beyond. If this topic interests you, you can find more details in this document released by the group after the meeting: http://astronomy-software-index.github.io/2015-workshop/ The group hopes to move this project forward with input and support from the broader community. Please share the above document, discuss it on social media using the hashtag #astroware (so that your conversations can be found!), or send private comments to julie.steffen@aas.org.

  11. Long-term variation in the upper atmosphere as seen in the geomagnetic solar quiet daily variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinbori, Atsuki; Koyama, Yukinobu; Nose, Masahito; Hori, Tomoaki; Otsuka, Yuichi; Yatagai, Akiyo

    2014-12-01

    Characteristics of long-term variation in the amplitude of solar quiet (Sq) geomagnetic field daily variation have been investigated using 1-h geomagnetic field data obtained from 69 geomagnetic observation stations within the period of 1947 to 2013. The Sq amplitude observed at these geomagnetic stations showed a clear dependence on the 10- to 12-year solar activity cycle and tended to be enhanced during each solar maximum phase. The Sq amplitude was the smallest around the minimum of solar cycle 23/24 in 2008 to 2009. The relationship between the solar F10.7 index and Sq amplitude was approximately linear but about 53% of geomagnetic stations showed a weak nonlinear relation to the solar F10.7 index. In order to remove the effect of solar activity seen in the long-term variation of the Sq amplitude, we calculated a linear or second-order fitting curve between the solar F10.7 index and Sq amplitude during 1947 to 2013 and examined the residual Sq amplitude, which is defined as the deviation from the fitting curve. As a result, the majority of trends in the residual Sq amplitude that passed through a trend test showed negative values over a wide region. This tendency was relatively strong in Europe, India, the eastern part of Canada, and New Zealand. The relationship between the magnetic field intensity at 100-km altitude and residual Sq amplitude showed an anti-correlation for about 71% of the geomagnetic stations. Furthermore, the residual Sq amplitude at the equatorial station (Addis Ababa) was anti-correlated with the absolute value of the magnetic field inclination. This implies movement of the equatorial electrojet due to the secular variation of the ambient magnetic field.

  12. Lunisolar tidal waves, geomagnetic activity and epilepsy in the light of multivariate coherence.

    PubMed

    Mikulecky, M; Moravcikova, C; Czanner, S

    1996-08-01

    The computed daily values of lunisolar tidal waves, the observed daily values of Ap index, a measure of the planetary geomagnetic activity, and the daily numbers of patients with epileptic attacks for a group of 28 neurology patients between 1987 and 1992 were analyzed by common, multiple and partial cross-spectral analysis to search for relationships between periodicities in these time series. Significant common and multiple coherence between them was found for rhythms with a period length over 3-4 months, in agreement with seasonal variations of all three variables. If, however, the coherence between tides and epilepsy was studied excluding the influence of geomagnetism, two joint infradian periodicities with period lengths of 8.5 and 10.7 days became significant. On the other hand, there were no joint rhythms for geomagnetism and epilepsy when the influence of tidal waves was excluded. The result suggests a more primary role of gravitation, compared with geomagnetism, in the multivariate process studied. PMID:9181091

  13. Observations in the South Atlantic Geomagnetic Anomaly with Intercosmos-Bulgaria-1300 during a geomagnetic storm

    SciTech Connect

    Gogoshev, M.M.; Gogosheva, TS.N.; Kostadinov, I.N.; Markova, T.I.; Kisovski, S.

    1985-01-01

    The region of South Atlantic Geomagnetic Anomaly was investigated by the Intercosmos-Bulgaria-1300 satellite, launched on August 7, 1981. On the basis of data obtained from 15 orbits during increased geomagnetic activity in August 1981, a map of the Anomaly was elaborated. Two centers of activity were identified. By means of the EMO-5 electrophotometer on board the Intercosmos-Bulgaria-1300 satellite, the atmosphere glow in lines 5577 A, 6300 A and 4278 A was studied. 11 references.

  14. Nonlinear Behavior of the Geomagnetic Fluctuations Recorded in Different Geomagnetic Latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacs, P.; Heilig, B.; Koppan, A.; Vadasz, G.; Echim, M.

    2014-12-01

    The paper concerns with the nonlinear properties of geomagnetic variations recorded in different geomagnetic latitudes, in the years of solar maximum and minimum. For the study, we use the geomagnetic time-series recorded by some of the stations of the EMMA quasi-meridional magnetometer network, established for pulsation study, in September 2001. The stations are located approx. along the magnetic meridian of 100 degree, and the sampling frequency of the series is 1 Hz. It is argued that the geomagnetic field exhibits nonlinear intermittent fluctuations in certain temporal scale range. For quantitatively investigating the scaling ranges and the variation of intermittent properties with latitude and time, we analyse the higher order moments of the time records (probability density function or structure function analyses). The multifractal or self-similar scaling of the fluctuations is investigated via the fitting of the P model to structure function scaling exponents. We also study the power-law behaviour of the power-spectral density functions of the series in order to evaluate the possible inertial frequency (and temporal) range of the geomagnetic field and compare them with the scaling ranges of structure functions. The range where intermittent geomagnetic variation is found falls typically between 100 and 20.000 s, i.e. covers the temporal range of the main phases of geomagnetic storms. It is shown that the intensity of intermittent fluctuations increases from solar minimum to solar maximum. The expected increase in the level of intermittency with the geomagnetic latitude can be evidenced only in the years of solar minimum. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme ([FP7/2007-2013]) under grant agreement n° 313038/STORM.

  15. Review of methods to derive a Polar Cap (PC) index.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauning, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Since a Polar Cap (PC) index was introduced in 1985, several different methods have been used to derive index values. Basically, the northern (PCN) and southern (PCS) are based on geomagnetic recordings at Qaanaaq (Thule) and Vostok, respectively. However, different derivation methods can give index values differing by more than a factor 2. The PC indices are used, among other, in scientific analyses to link solar wind conditions to relevant geophysical effects and in forecast efforts to establish numerical criteria for imminent risk of geomagnetic storms and substorms. Thus, it is unfortunate that several different versions of the PC index have been in use, often without specifically mentioning the index version being used or without ensuring that proper documention and specification of the derivation method is available. The presentation shall briefly describe the basic calculation of a Polar Cap index and point specifically to the differences between the different derivation methods and to the consequences for the index values

  16. Earthquake waves and the geomagnetic dynamo.

    PubMed

    Mullan, D J

    1973-08-10

    It is proposed that earthquake waves energize the geomagnetic dynamo. Fluid motions generated by earthquakes may have enough energy to be in equipartition with fields as large as 100 gauss. Seismic waves from meteoritic impacts with energies sufficient to reverse the field occur every 170,000 years. PMID:17777805

  17. Geomagnetic referencing in the arctic environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Podjono, Benny; Beck, Nathan; Buchanan, Andrew; Brink, Jason; Longo, Joseph; Finn, Carol A.; Worthington, E. William

    2011-01-01

    Geomagnetic referencing is becoming an increasingly attractive alternative to north-seeking gyroscopic surveys to achieve the precise wellbore positioning essential for success in today's complex drilling programs. However, the greater magnitude of variations in the geomagnetic environment at higher latitudes makes the application of geomagnetic referencing in those areas more challenging. Precise, real-time data on those variations from relatively nearby magnetic observatories can be crucial to achieving the required accuracy, but constructing and operating an observatory in these often harsh environments poses a number of significant challenges. Operational since March 2010, the Deadhorse Magnetic Observatory (DED), located in Deadhorse, Alaska, was created through collaboration between the United States Geological Survey (USGS) and a leading oilfield services supply company. DED was designed to produce real-time geomagnetic data at the required level of accuracy, and to do so reliably under the extreme temperatures and harsh weather conditions often experienced in the area. The observatory will serve a number of key scientific communities as well as the oilfield drilling industry, and has already played a vital role in the success of several commercial ventures in the area, providing essential, accurate data while offering significant cost and time savings, compared with traditional surveying techniques.

  18. Geomagnetic referencing in the arctic environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poedjono, B.; Beck, N.; Buchanan, A. C.; Brink, J.; Longo, J.; Finn, C.A.; Worthington, E.W.

    2011-01-01

    Geomagnetic referencing is becoming an increasingly attractive alternative to north-seeking gyroscopic surveys to achieve the precise wellbore positioning essential for success in today's complex drilling programs. However, the greater magnitude of variations in the geomagnetic environment at higher latitudes makes the application of geomagnetic referencing in those areas more challenging. Precise, real-time data on those variations from relatively nearby magnetic observatories can be crucial to achieving the required accuracy, but constructing and operating an observatory in these often harsh environments poses a number of significant challenges. Operational since March 2010, the Deadhorse Magnetic Observatory (DED), located in Deadhorse, Alaska, was created through collaboration between the United States Geological Survey (USGS) and a leading oilfield services supply company. DED was designed to produce real-time geomagnetic data at the required level of accuracy, and to do so reliably under the extreme temperatures and harsh weather conditions often experienced in the area. The observatory will serve a number of key scientific communities as well as the oilfield drilling industry, and has already played a vital role in the success of several commercial ventures in the area, providing essential, accurate data while offering significant cost and time savings, compared with traditional surveying techniques. Copyright 2011, Society of Petroleum Engineers.

  19. Geomagnetic storms: historical perspective to modern view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhina, Gurbax S.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.

    2016-12-01

    The history of geomagnetism is more than 400 years old. Geomagnetic storms as we know them were discovered about 210 years ago. There has been keen interest in understanding Sun-Earth connection events, such as solar flares, CMEs, and concomitant magnetic storms in recent times. Magnetic storms are the most important component of space weather effects on Earth. We give an overview of the historical aspects of geomagnetic storms and the progress made during the past two centuries. Super magnetic storms can cause life-threatening power outages and satellite damage, communication failures and navigational problems. The data for such super magnetic storms that occurred in the last 50 years during the space era is sparce. Research on historical geomagnetic storms can help to create a database for intense and super magnetic storms. New knowledge of interplanetary and solar causes of magnetic storms gained from spaceage observations will be used to review the super magnetic storm of September 1-2, 1859. We discuss the occurrence probability of such super magnetic storms, and the maximum possible intensity for the effects of a perfect ICME: extreme super magnetic storm, extreme magnetospheric compression, and extreme magnetospheric electric fields.

  20. Indian Institute of Geomagnetism: Progress in research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Progress and aspects is the study of the geomagnetic variations in the Indian region on quiet and disturbed days, equatorial electrojet field, electromagnetic induction in the earth, magnetic pulsations, aeronomy, radio scintillations, magnetosphere and solar wind, and solar-terrestrial relationships were reported.

  1. Enhancing model based forecasting of geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Alla G.

    Modern society is increasingly dependent on the smooth operation of large scale technology supporting Earth based activities such as communication, electricity distribution, and navigation. This technology is potentially threatened by global geomagnetic storms, which are caused by the impact of plasma ejected from the Sun upon the protective magnetic field that surrounds the Earth. Forecasting the timing and magnitude of these geomagnetic storms is part of the emerging discipline of space weather. The most severe geomagnetic storms are caused by magnetic clouds, whose properties and characteristics are important variables in space weather forecasting systems. The methodology presented here is the development of a new statistical approach to characterize the physical properties (variables) of the magnetic clouds and to examine the extent to which theoretical models can be used in describing both of these physical properties, as well as their evolution in space and time. Since space weather forecasting is a complex system, a systems engineering approach is used to perform analysis, validation, and verification of the magnetic cloud models (subsystem of the forecasting system) using a model-based methodology. This research demonstrates that in order to validate magnetic cloud models, it is important to categorize the data by physical parameters such as velocity and distance travelled. This understanding will improve the modeling accuracy of magnetic clouds in space weather forecasting systems and hence increase forecasting accuracy of geomagnetic storms and their impact on earth systems.

  2. Helio-geomagnetic influence in cardiological cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsavrias, Ch.; Preka-Papadema, P.; Moussas, X.; Apostolou, Th.; Theodoropoulou, A.; Papadima, Th.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of the energetic phenomena of the Sun, flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) on the Earth's ionosphere-magnetosphere, through the solar wind, are the sources of the geomagnetic disturbances and storms collectively known as Space Weather. The research on the influence of Space Weather on biological and physiological systems is open. In this work we study the Space Weather impact on Acute Coronary Syndromes (ACS) distinguishing between ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (STE-ACS) and non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE-ACS) cases. We compare detailed patient records from the 2nd Cardiologic Department of the General Hospital of Nicaea (Piraeus, Greece) with characteristics of geomagnetic storms (DST), solar wind speed and statistics of flares and CMEs which cover the entire solar cycle 23 (1997-2007). Our results indicate a relationship of ACS to helio-geomagnetic activity as the maximum of the ACS cases follows closely the maximum of the solar cycle. Furthermore, within very active periods, the ratio NSTE-ACS to STE-ACS, which is almost constant during periods of low to medium activity, changes favouring the NSTE-ACS. Most of the ACS cases exhibit a high degree of association with the recovery phase of the geomagnetic storms; a smaller, yet significant, part was found associated with periods of fast solar wind without a storm.

  3. Simulation of the Geomagnetic Cut-off with GEANT using the International Geomagnetic Reference Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentz, J.; Bercuci, A.; Vulpescu, B.

    2001-08-01

    The International Geomagnetic Reference Field is used in a GEANT3 simulation to calculate the geomagnetic cut-off for cosmic rays entering in the Earth's magnetic field. The calculations are done in the back tracking method, where antiprotons start from the top of atmosphere and are tracked to outer space. The geomagnetic cut-off functions are estimated in momentum steps of 0.2 GeV for 131 directions in 1655 locations covering in a nearly equidistant grid the surface of the Earth. For special locations, where neutrino or low energy muon data have been measured, the cut-off functions are calculated in a fine grid of 21601 directions. The estimated geomagnetic cut-offs can be verified by the experimental results for primary protons and helium nuclei measured in different geomagnetic latitudes during the shuttle mission of the AMS prototype. These precise tables of the geomagnetic cut-off can be used in the frame of the CORSIKA code to calculate atmospheric muon and neutrino fluxes.

  4. Magnetospheric impulse response for many levels of geomagnetic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bargatze, L. F.; Baker, D. N.; Hones, E. W., Jr.; Mcpherron, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    The temporal relationship between the solar wind and magnetospheric activity has been studied using 34 intervals of high time resolution IMP 8 solar wind data and the corresponding AL auroral activity index. The median values of the AL index for each interval were utilized to rank the intervals according to geomagnetic activity level. The linear prediction filtering technique was then applied to model magnetospheric response as measured by the AL index to the solar wind input function VB(s). The linear prediction filtering routine produces a filter of time-lagged response coefficients which estimates the most general linear relationship between the chosen input and output parameters of the magnetospheric system. It is found that the filters are composed of two response pulses speaking at time lags of 20 and 60 min. The amplitude of the 60-min pulse is the larger for moderate activity levels, while the 20-min pulse is the larger for strong activity levels. A possible interpretation is that the 20-min pulse represents magnetospheric activity driven directly by solar wind coupling and that the 60-min pulse represents magnetospheric activity driven by the release of energy previously stored in the magnetotail. If this interpretation is correct, the linear filtering results suggest that both the driven and the unloading models of magnetospheric response are important facets of a more comprehensive response model.

  5. Solar Radiation Influence on Ground-Level Geomagnetic Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weimer, D. R.; Clauer, C. R.

    2011-12-01

    An empirical model has been developed for predicting ground-level geomagnetic perturbations. Measurements from over 112 magnetometers were used, along with simultaneous observations of the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) from the ACE satellite. These data were from an eight-year period, from 1998 through 2005, covering both the rise and fall of the solar cycle. Variations in the solar radiation during this cycle are incorporated into the model, as determined by the F10.7 index of solar radio flux. Variations in ionospheric conductivity, under the influence of both season (dipole tilt angle) and solar radiation are implicitly included. Comparisons of model calculations with measurements at different locations show very good results. Maps of the magnetic perturbations for different conditions generally look as expected. Surprisingly, increasing the F10.7 index does not always increase the magnetic perturbations on the ground at all locations, as one might expect. The largest increases in the perturbations occur near the cusp when the IMF is Northward or has a strong Y component. However, in the nightside, as well as under the Region-2 currents, the ground-level perturbations are more likely to have a smaller magnitude with a higher F10.7 index.

  6. Strategic Change in AAS Publishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, Julie

    2015-08-01

    The American Astronomical Society has embarked on a process of strategic change in its publishing program. The process has incuded authors, AAS leaders, editors, publishing experts, librarians, and data scientists. This session will outline the still ongoing process and present some both upcoming and already available new AAS Publishing features and services to the global astronomy community.

  7. Incorporation of geomagnetic data and services into EPOS infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejda, Pavel; Chambodut, Aude; Curto, Juan-Jose; Flower, Simon; Kozlovskaya, Elena; Kubašta, Petr; Matzka, Jürgen; Tanskanen, Eija; Thomson, Alan

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring of the geomagnetic field has a long history across Europe that dates back to 1830', and is currently experiencing an increased interest within Earth observation and space weather monitoring. Our goals within EPOS-IP are to consolidate the community, modernise data archival and distribution formats for existing services and create new services for magnetotelluric data and geomagnetic models. Specific objectives are: • Enhance existing services providing geomagnetic data (INTERMAGNET- INTErnational Real-time MAGnetic observatory NETwork; World Data Centre for Geomagnetism; IMAGE- International Monitor for Auroral Geomagnetic Effects) and existing services providing geomagnetic indices (ISGI - International Service of Geomagnetic Indices). • Develop and enhance the geomagnetic community's metadata systems by creating a metadata database, filling it and putting in place processes to ensure that it is kept up to date in the future. • Develop and build access to magnetotelluric (MT) data including transfer functions and time series data from temporary, portable MT-arrays in Europe, as well as to lithospheric conductivity models derived from TM-data. • Develop common web and database access points to global and regional geomagnetic field and conductivity models. • Establish links from the geomagnetic data services, products and models to the Integrated Core Services. The immediate task in the current period is to identify data models of existing services, modify them and integrate into a common model of Geomagnetic Thematic Core Services.

  8. AAS 227: Day 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 2 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Plenary Session: Black Hole Physics with the Event Horizon Telescope (by Susanna Kohler)If anyone needed motivation to wake up early this morning, they got it in the form of Feryal Ozel (University of Arizona) enthralling us all with exciting pictures, videos, and words about black holes and the Event Horizon Telescope. Ozel spoke to a packed room (at 8:30am!) about where the project currently stands, and where its heading in the future.The EHT has pretty much the coolest goal ever: actually image the event horizons of black holes in our universe. The problem is that the largest black hole we can look at (Sgr A*, in the center of our galaxy) has an event horizon size of 50 as. For this kind of resolution roughly equivalent to trying to image a DVD on the Moon! wed need an Earth-sized telescope. EHT has solved this problem by linking telescopes around the world, creating one giant, mm-wavelength effective telescope with a baseline the size of Earth.Besides producing awesome images, the EHT will be able to test properties of black-hole spacetime, the no-hair theorem, and general relativity (GR) in new regimes.Ozel walked us through some of the theory prep work we need to do now in order to get the most science out of the EHT, including devising new

  9. What causes geomagnetic activity during sunspot minimum?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirov, B.; Asenovski, S.; Georgieva, K.; Obridko, V. N.

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that the main drivers of geomagnetic disturbances are coronal mass ejections whose number and intensity are maximum in sunspot maximum, and high speed solar wind streams from low latitude solar coronal holes which maximize during sunspot declining phase. But even during sunspot minimum periods when there are no coronal mass ejections and no low latitude solar coronal holes, there is some "floor" below which geomagnetic activity never falls. Moreover, this floor changes from cycle to cycle. Here we analyze the factors determining geomagnetic activity during sunspot minimum. It is generally accepted that the main factor is the thickness of the heliospheric current sheet on which the portion of time depends which the Earth spends in the slow and dense heliospheric current sheet compared to the portion of time it spends in the fast solar wind from superradially expanding polar coronal holes. We find, however, that though the time with fast solar wind has been increasing in the last four sunspot minima, the geomagnetic activity in minima has been decreasing. The reason is that the parameters of the fast solar wind from solar coronal holes change from minimum to minimum, and the most important parameter for the fast solar wind's geoeffectivity—its dynamic pressure—has been decreasing since cycle 21. Additionally, we find that the parameters of the slow solar wind from the heliospheric current sheet which is an important driver of geomagnetic activity in sunspot minimum also change from cycle to cycle, and its magnetic field, velocity and dynamic pressure have been decreasing during the last four minima.

  10. Geomagnetic storms link to the mortality rate in the Smolyan region for the period 1988--2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simeonova, Siyka G. 1; Georgieva, Radostina C. 2; Dimitrova, Boryana H. 2; Slavcheva, Radka G. 2; Kerimova, Bojena P. 2; Georgiev, Tsvetan B. 34

    We present correlations and trends of 10 parameters of annual mortality rate (1 to common mortality rate, 5 to cardiovascular reasons and 4 to "accidental" reasons (car accidents, suicides, infections)) with respect to 6 parameters of annual solar and geomagnetic activity (Wolf index, number of geomagnetic storms, duration of the storms, amplitude of the storms). During the period of observation, characterized by a 3-4-fold decrease of the mean geomagnetic activity (in terms of the number and the duration of the storms) and with a strong variations of the amplitude of the storms (about an almost constant mean values for the period), there is a 1.3-fold decrease in the urban population, a 1.5-fold increase of the common mortality rate, a 1.8-fold increase of the cardiovascular mortality rate and a 1.1-fold decrease of the "accidental" mortality rates. During the years 2003-2005 we observe about 2-fold temporary increase in the storm amplitudes. During the years 2007-2008, characterized by extremely low geomagnetic activity, we observe a surprising temporary increase of the common and the cardiovascular mortality rates 1.1 and 1.3-fold, respectively (Figures 1-4). We point out 3 main results. (1) The available data shows notable increase in the mortality rates while there is generally a decrease of the solar or geomagnetic activity during the studied period (Figures 5-9). We explain this anti-correlation with the domination of the increasing mortality rates as an effect of the advance in the mean age of the population (due to immigration of young people and decrease of new-borns), hiding an eventual display of the solar and geomagnetic influence on the mortality rates. Using this data we can not reveal influence of the long-time (10-20 years) change of the average solar and geomagnetic activity on the mortality rate. (2) Excluding the unusual years 2007 and 2008, we establish that with respect to the years with low geomagnetic activity (1993, 1995, 1996, 1999), in

  11. AAS 227: Day 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or at astrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the @astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Things kicked off last night at our undergraduate reception booth. Thanks to all of you who stopped by we were delightedto have so many people tell us that they already know about and useastrobites, and we were excited to introduce a new cohort of students at AAS to astrobites for the first time.Tuesday morning was the official start of the meeting. Here are just a few of the talks and workshops astrobiters attended today.Opening Address (by Becky Smethurst)The President of the AAS, aka our fearless leader Meg Urry kicked off the meeting this morning at the purely coffee powered hour of 8am this morning. She spoke about the importance of young astronomers at the meeting (heres looking at you reader!) and also the importance of the new Working Group for Accessibility and Disabilities (aka WGAD pronounced like wicked) at the AAS. The Society has made extra effort this year to make the conference accessible to all,a message which was very well received by everyone in attendance.Kavli Lecture: New Horizons Alan Stern (by Becky Smethurst)We were definitely spoilt with the first Plenary lecture at this years conference Alan Stern gave us a a review of the New Horizons mission of the Pluto Fly By (astrobites covered the mission back in July with this post). We were treated to beautiful images, wonderful results and a foray into geology.Before (Hubble) and after #NewHorizons. #thatisall #science #astro alanstern #aas227 pic.twitter.com/kkMt6RsSIR Science News (@topsciencething) January 5, 2016Some awesome facts from the lecture that blew my mind:New Horizons is now 2AU (!) beyond Pluto

  12. AAS 227: Day 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 2 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Plenary Session: Black Hole Physics with the Event Horizon Telescope (by Susanna Kohler)If anyone needed motivation to wake up early this morning, they got it in the form of Feryal Ozel (University of Arizona) enthralling us all with exciting pictures, videos, and words about black holes and the Event Horizon Telescope. Ozel spoke to a packed room (at 8:30am!) about where the project currently stands, and where its heading in the future.The EHT has pretty much the coolest goal ever: actually image the event horizons of black holes in our universe. The problem is that the largest black hole we can look at (Sgr A*, in the center of our galaxy) has an event horizon size of 50 as. For this kind of resolution roughly equivalent to trying to image a DVD on the Moon! wed need an Earth-sized telescope. EHT has solved this problem by linking telescopes around the world, creating one giant, mm-wavelength effective telescope with a baseline the size of Earth.Besides producing awesome images, the EHT will be able to test properties of black-hole spacetime, the no-hair theorem, and general relativity (GR) in new regimes.Ozel walked us through some of the theory prep work we need to do now in order to get the most science out of the EHT, including devising new

  13. Comparison between the effect of two geomagnetic storms with the same seasonal and daily characteristics and different intensity on the European ionosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Bouza, Marta; Herraiz, Miguel; Rodríguez-Caderot, Gracía; Paparini, Claudia; Otero, Xurxo; Radicella, Sandro M.

    2016-04-01

    This work presents an analysis of the ionospheric disturbance caused by two geomagnetic storms occurred on the same day, 17th March, but one in 2013 and other in 2015. The greatest intensity of both storms occurs after sunset when geomagnetic indexes (Dst index, Kp and Ap) reached the peak values. Both geomagnetic storms can be classified as intense according to the Dst index criteria. The storm of March 17, 2015, ("St Patricḱs storm"), can be considered even "severe" because the Dst index dropped off -200nT. The solar origins of both geomagnetic storms were magnetic filament eruptions followed by Coronal Mass Ejections, CME. The ionospheric behavior has been studied through the total electron content, TEC. This parameter is obtained from RINEX files processed using the calibration technique developed by Prof. Luigi Ciraolo. RINEX files from selected GNSS stations on Europe belonging to International GPS Service, IGS, and EUREF Permanent Network, have been used. The calibration technique assumes the ionospheric thin shell model to obtain vertical total electron content (vTEC) from slant total electron content (sTEC) at the Ionospheric Pierce Point. The data were obtained in periods of the geomagnetic storms and during quite days surrounding the storms days, at 1 minute sampling. The behavior of the ionosphere during the two geomagnetic storms was similar. In both cases, a positive ionospheric storm, defined as an increase on the TEC, occurred during the main phase of the geomagnetic storms on 17th of March. These increases were followed by a negative ionospheric storm, a decreasing of TEC, in the recuperation phase. However, in the event of 2015, the positive ionospheric storm of the main phase had more intensity but the same duration than that of 2013 and for the negative ionospheric storm both, intensity and duration, were largest in 2015 than in 2013.

  14. The Effect of Helio-Geomagnetic Activity on the Proceedings in the Emergency Department of Two Greek Hospitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preka-Papadema, P.; Moussas, X.; Noula, M.; Katranitsa, H.; Theodoropoulou, A.; Katsavrias, Ch.; Vasiliou, Ch.; Kontogeorgou, E.; Tsaliki, S.-M.; Kailas, K.; Papadima, Th.

    2010-01-01

    Study of the solar and geomagnetic activity influence on the emergency proceedings in Greece, for selected months of solar cycle 23 and especially for the year 2005 is presented. We examined the time association between the magnetic storms (Dst geomagnetic index), daily numbers of solar flares and Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) with the emergency proceedings. The sample of about 30000 cases from two Greek hospitals (The General Hospital of the town of Lamia and The General Hospital of the town of Veria) analyzed according to diagnoses. The cardiological, neurological, accidents (multitrauma and burns) and oncological patients as well as in partially pathological/surgical patients showed an increase during periods of high helio-geomagnetic activity. In order to strengthen this result, more data need to be collected and analyzed.

  15. AAS 227: Day 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 3 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Henry Norris Russell Lecture: Viewing the Universe with Infrared Eyes: The Spitzer Space Telescope (by Erika Nesvold)The Henry Norris Russell Award is the highest honor given by the AAS, for a lifetime of eminence in astronomy research. This years award went to Giovanni Fazio of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Fazio became a leader in gamma ray astronomy before switching mid-career to the study of infrared astronomy, and he gave his award lecture on the latter subject, specifically on the Spitzer Space Telescope, one of the most successful infrared telescopes of all time.Artists rendering of the Spitzer space telescope. [NASA/JPL-Caltech]Spitzer has been operating for more than twelve years, and has resulted in over six thousand papers in refereed journals in that time. The telescope sits in an Earth-trailing orbit around the Sun, and is now farther from the Earth (1.4 AU) than the Earth is from the Sun. Fazio gave the audience a fascinating overview of the science done by Spitzer over more than a decade. One of the most productive areas of research for Spitzer is the study of exoplanets, which hadnt even been discovered when the Spitzer Telescope was first conceived. Spitzers high sensitivity and ability to observe exoplanets over

  16. A study of OI 844.6 nm dayglow emission under geomagnetic storm conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharwan, Maneesha; Singh, Vir

    2015-06-01

    A comprehensive model is developed to study 844.6 nm dayglow emission. The Solar2000 EUV (extreme ultraviolet) flux model, neutral atmosphere model (NRLMSISE-00) and latest available cross-sections are incorporated in this model. The present model is used to study the effects of geomagnetic storm on the 844.6 nm dayglow emission at a low latitude station Tirunelveli (8.7°N, 77.8°E). Three geomagnetic storms which occurred during 23rd-27th August 2005, 13th-17th April 2006 and 1st-5th February 2008 are chosen in the present study. It is found that the volume emission rate (VER) shows a negative correlation with the Dst index for all the three geomagnetic storms. The present study also shows that the altitude of the peak emission rate does not vary with the activity of geomagnetic storm. The model predicts a positive correlation between the zenith intensity of 844.6 nm dayglow emission and atomic oxygen number density. The consistency of atomic oxygen number density obtained from the NRLMSISE-00 model during a geomagnetic storm is checked using the satellite measurements of Earle et al. (2013). It is found that the atomic oxygen number density given by NRLMSISE-00 model is significantly lower than the measured values. Consequently, the effect of atomic oxygen number density abundance on 844.6 nm dayglow emission is further studied by treating the atomic oxygen number density as a variable parameter in the present model. An increase of more than 50% in the zenith intensity above the normal level (before the onset of the storm) is found when the atomic oxygen number density which is obtained from NRLMSISE-00 model is doubled (under the limits of measurements).

  17. Surface electromagnetic impedance and geomagnetic activity: results of long term observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemperger, István; Menvielle, Menvielle; Wesztergom, Viktor; Bencze, Pál; Szendrői, Judit; Novák, Attila; Kis, Árpád; Szalai, Sándor

    2014-05-01

    The magnetotelluric (MT) method is one of the most useful geophysical tool to discover even the deep subsurface structures. The target function of the MT data processing is the surface electromagnetic (EM) impedance. In case of practical MT exploration the surface EM impedance is computed based on a simplification related to the nature of the ionospheric source of the surface EM signals. Assuming that the ionospheric current systems result in homogeneous surface electromagnetic variations, the uncertainty of the computed surface electromagnetic impedance tensor depends only the duration of the EM observation. However the surface EM field can only be approached by plane waves in certain time periods and besides given uncertainty. The EM impedance may be sensitive to magnetospheric and -indirectly- interplanetary circumstances and solar activity. Four years continuous observation of telluric and surface geomagnetic components allowed to perform a representative survey to discover if geomagnetic activity has any effect on observed EM impedance tensor. Geomagnetic indices (Dst, ULF-index, ASY-H, SYM-H) have been used to classify dates according to geomagnetic activity. Processing to estimate the mean surface EM impedance tensor has been performed in each dataset, each class separately. The sensitivity and the characteristics of the answer of the EM impedance tensor to the geomagnetic disturbances seems to be definite. This presentation aims to briefly summarize the preliminary results of our study based on the unique dataset of the Széchenyi István Geophysical Obsevatory (Intermagnet code:NCK). In addition, pointing out the limitations of the routine way of practical MT data processing and interpretation is an important duty of this study. This study was supported by the TAMOP-4.2.2.C-11/1/KONV-2012-0015 (Earth-system) project sponsored by the EU and European Social Foundation.

  18. Near real-time geomagnetic data for space weather applications in the European sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnsen, M. G.; Hansen, T. L.

    2012-12-01

    Tromsø Geophysical Observatory (TGO) is responsible for making and maintaining long time-series of geomagnetic measurements in Norway. TGO is currently operating 3 geomagnetic observatories and 11 variometer stations from southern Norway to Svalbard . Data from these 14 locations are acquired, processed and made available for the user community in near real-time. TGO is participating in several European Union (EU) and European Space Agency (ESA) space weather related projects where both near real-time data and derived products are provided. In addition the petroleum industry is benefiting from our real-time data services for directional drilling. Near real-time data from TGO is freely available for non-commercial purposes. TGO is exchanging data in near real-time with several institutions, enabling the presentation of near real-time geomagnetic data from more than 40 different locations in Fennoscandia and Greenland. The open exchange of non real-time geomagnetic data has been successfully going on for many years through services such as the world data center in Kyoto, SuperMAG, IMAGE and SPIDR. TGO's vision is to take this one step further and make the exchange of near real-time geomagnetic data equally available for the whole community. This presentation contains an overview of TGO, our activities and future aims. We will show how our near real-time data are presented. Our contribution to the space weather forecasting and nowcasting effort in the EU and ESA will be presented with emphasis on our real-time auroral activity index and brand new auroral activity monitor and electrojet tracker.

  19. Prediction of foF2 during geomagnetic storms - a global perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Vickal; Parkinson, Murray

    2016-04-01

    Geomagnetic storms cause complex and difficult to predict changes in ionospheric electron density. The severity of density perturbations depends on various parameters including solar cycle phase, season, local time of storm onset, the intensity and duration of the storm, and the geomagnetic coordinates of the station. Superposed Epoch Analysis (SEA) was used to examine a 50-year period (years 1964-2014, solar cycles 20-24) of foF2 observations recorded using a world-wide database of over 160 ionosondes. The analysis was used to identify reoccurring patterns in the evolution of foF2 for various geomagnetic storm parameters. A total of 1356 storms were identified in the 50-year period using a Dst-index based temporal filter, namely Dst ≤‑30 nT for at least 5 consecutive hours. Before the SEA, diurnal and seasonal effects were accounted for by subtracting monthly median quiet-time values of foF2. The SEA identified and ranked the effects of various parameters on foF2. The analysis showed that storm-time foF2 perturbations are regulated mostly strongly by storm intensity and duration, geomagnetic latitude, season, phase of the solar cycle, and local time of storm onset. Solar cycle number and geomagnetic longitude had the least influence on foF2 perturbations. The most regularly observed storm feature was an increase in electron density (positive storm effect) at low magnetic latitudes during the post storm onset hours. Decreases in electron densities (negative storm effects) occurred at mid and high magnetic latitude regions, but with the depth of density decrease exhibiting a strong dependency on storm intensity, season and phase of solar cycle. This analysis forms the basis of empirical model which can be used to help predict storm-time variations of foF2.

  20. No covariation between the geomagnetic activity and the incidence of acute myocardial infarction in the polar area of northern Sweden.

    PubMed

    Messner, T; Häggström, I; Sandahl, I; Lundberg, V

    2002-05-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate whether there was any relation between the aurora borealis (measured as the geomagnetic activity) and the number of acute myocardial infarctions (AMI) in the northern, partly polar, area of Sweden. The AMI cases were collected from The Northern Sweden MONICA (multinational MONItoring of trends and determinants of CArdiovascular disease) AMI registry between 1985 and 1998, inclusive, and the information on the geomagnetic activity from continuous measurements at the Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Kiruna. In the analyses, both the relation between the individual AMI case and ambient geomagnetic activity, and the relation between the mean daily K index and the daily number of AMI cases were tested. We found no statistically significant relation between the number of fatal or non-fatal AMI cases, the number of sudden deaths or the number of patients with chest pain without myocardial damage, and geomagnetic activity. Our data do not support a relation between the geomagnetic activity and AMI. PMID:12135204

  1. Monitoring the ionospheric total electron content variations over the Korean Peninsula using a GPS network during geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Byung-Kyu; Lee, Sang-Jeong; Park, Jong-Uk

    2011-06-01

    We have established a regional ionospheric model (RIM) for investigating changes in the total electron content (TEC) over South Korea using 38 Korean GPS reference stations. The inverse distance weighted (IDW) interpolation method was applied to create a two-dimensional ionospheric map of vertical TEC units (TECU) based on a grid. To examine the diurnal patterns of ionospheric TEC over South Korea, we first processed the GPS data from a geomagnetically quiet period of 10 days. In a second step, we compared the estimated GPS-TEC variations with the changes in geomagnetic activity indices (the K p and D st indices) and the auroral electrojet index (AE) as a function of universal time (UT) on 4 and 20 November, 2003. The GPS-TEC responses for those storm events were proportional to the geomagnetic activity at this mid-latitude location. The sudden increases in ionospheric TEC (SITEC) caused by the geomagnetic storms were detected. The variations in GPS-TEC may help reveal the processes of ionospheric disturbances caused by geomagnetic storms.

  2. The study of the midlatitude ionospheric response to geomagnetic activity at Nagycenk Geophysical Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berényi, Kitti; Kis, Árpád; Barta, Veronika; Novák, Attila

    2016-04-01

    European ionosondes. Also we studied the prominent phenomena (e.g. TIDs- Travelling Ionospheric Disturbances), and plasma irregularities (e.g. spread-F) of the ionosphere in the function of geomagnetic activity. As we compared the occurrences of TIDs and spread-F phenomena on the quiet days with their occurrences on moderate and strong stormy days, we can see significant correlation between the magnitude of the Ae-index and the daily number of the occurrence of TIDs, but at the same time there is no definite connection between the daily number of the occurrence of spread-F phenomenas and the intensity of geomagnetic activity.

  3. AAS 227: Day 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 3 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Henry Norris Russell Lecture: Viewing the Universe with Infrared Eyes: The Spitzer Space Telescope (by Erika Nesvold)The Henry Norris Russell Award is the highest honor given by the AAS, for a lifetime of eminence in astronomy research. This years award went to Giovanni Fazio of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Fazio became a leader in gamma ray astronomy before switching mid-career to the study of infrared astronomy, and he gave his award lecture on the latter subject, specifically on the Spitzer Space Telescope, one of the most successful infrared telescopes of all time.Artists rendering of the Spitzer space telescope. [NASA/JPL-Caltech]Spitzer has been operating for more than twelve years, and has resulted in over six thousand papers in refereed journals in that time. The telescope sits in an Earth-trailing orbit around the Sun, and is now farther from the Earth (1.4 AU) than the Earth is from the Sun. Fazio gave the audience a fascinating overview of the science done by Spitzer over more than a decade. One of the most productive areas of research for Spitzer is the study of exoplanets, which hadnt even been discovered when the Spitzer Telescope was first conceived. Spitzers high sensitivity and ability to observe exoplanets over

  4. AAS 228: Day 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note: Lastweek we were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Here is a final post aboutselectedevents on the last day of the meeting, written by authors fromastrobites.com, a grad-student collaborative project with which we recently announced a new partnership! Starting in July,keep an eye out for astrobites postsat AAS Nova in between Highlights(i.e., on Tuesdays and Thursdays).Were excited to be working together to bring you more recent astronomy research from AAS journals!Extrasolar Planets: Detection (by Leonardo dos Santos)Thursdays first session on exoplanets was about detecting these distant worlds, and the opening talk was given by Robert Siverd (Las Cumbres Observatory). He describes the NRES, a network of spectrographs that will look for exoplanets using the radial velocity method. One of the coolest aspects of this instrument is that it will feature an on the fly scheduling system that will perform observations as efficiently as possible. The spectrograph is still being tested, but a unit will be deployed at CTIO later this year.@lcogt contracted by @NASA_TESS for follow up of their candidates. #aas228 Jessie Christiansen (@aussiastronomer) June 16, 2016Measuring the depths of transits and eclipses in Spitzer has been problematic in the past, since the Spitzer instrument IRAC (InfraRed Array Camera) has a non-uniform response in its detectors pixels. But, as reported by James Ingalls (Spitzer Science Center, Caltech), observers are circumventing this issue by using what they call the staring mode (avoiding large pointing jumps) and an algorithm to pick sweet spot pixels. Moreover, the results from the IRAC Data Challenge are helping to better understand its behavior. Giuseppe Morello (University College London), on the other hand, explained how his research group gets rid of instrumental effects from IRAC using machine learning. This method removes systematics from exoplanet transit data no matter if the noise source is from an instrument or

  5. Environmental and geomagnetic factors in relation to self-destructive ideation and behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergiannaki, J. D.; Psarros, C.; Nastos, P. Th.; Paparigopoulos, T.; Paliatsos, A. G.; Tritakis, V. P.; Stefanis, C. N.

    2001-09-01

    Besides the individual factors such as the reaction to conflicts, several exogenous factors environmental and social may exert a pathogenic influence on suicidal behavior, suicide attempts and complete suicide on predisposed individuals. In the turn of the century many reports accord for the seasonality of suicides, which seems to have a bimodal distribution with a major peak around the spring-summer (April-May) and a second minor in autumn. On the other hand, the seasonal variation of environmental factors (daylight, sunlight duration, weather, temperature, air pressure, humidity, geomagnetism, solar activity, etc), of biological factors (melatonin, serotonin, serotonin precursors, etc) as also of sociological factors (ethnic events, major holidays, weekends etc) possibly influences the seasonal pattern of self-destructive behavior. Bimodal seasonal variation is also reported for biochemical parameters (L-tryptophan, serotonin, endorphin I fraction) that matches seasonal pattern in the prevalence of violent suicide in the total population and also in the incidence of the affective disorders. The aim of this study is to investigate the relation of environmental factors expressed by the Discomfort Index (DI) and geomagnetic factors expressed by the geomagnetic field Index DST in relation to suicidal behavior. The total number (4803) of patients recorded in the Ambulance of a Phychiatric Hospital (Eginition) throughout 1994 was used along with the records of 2750 patients of the year 1989. The Index DI is a function of dry and wet-bulb temperature. DST is probably one of the geomagnetic indices that expresses and monitors with the greatest accuracy the equatorial ring current variations. Our results show that there is a seasonal variation of suicidal behavior (Fourier analysis) with a major peak during summer (July) and a minor one during spring. A difference in the occurrence of the peaks was observed among genders. A relation of self-destructive behavior and the

  6. Model of the evolution of the plasmasphere during a geomagnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Xu, R. L.

    The morphology of the plasmasphere during a geomagnetic storm is simulated by considering the two dimensional E × B drift motion of plasmaspheric charged particles in the equatorial plane. Assuming a time-independent dipolar magnetic field and a corotation electric field plus, a spatially uniform dawn-dusk convection electric field varying with Kp index, the spatial distributions of charged particles at different time during a geomagnetic storm are obtained. Our results show that if Kp increases with time, some particles inside the original plasmapause will convect into the magnetopause, forming a long tail that stretches from the plasmasphere to the magnetopause in the afternoon region. The particle convection weakens as Kp decreases, and as Kp returns to its normal value, the plasmasphere develops a thin tail that wraps around the Earth.

  7. On the high correlation between long-term averages of solar wind speed and geomagnetic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crooker, N. U.; Feynman, J.; Gosling, J. T.

    1977-01-01

    Six-month and yearly averages of solar-wind speed from 1962 to 1975 are shown to be highly correlated with geomagnetic activity as measured by averages of the Ap index. On the same time scale the correlation between the southward component of the interplanetary magnetic field and geomagnetic activity is poor. Previous studies with hourly averages gave opposite results. The better correlation with the southward component on an hourly time scale is explained by its large variation compared with the relatively constant solar-wind speed. However, on a yearly time scale the magnitude of the variations in both parameters are about the same. This problem can be solved by invoking an energy transfer mechanism which is proportional to the first power of the southward component and a higher power of the solar-wind speed.

  8. Cross-spectral coherence between geomagnetic disturbance and human cardiovascular variables at non-societal frequencies.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Y; Hillman, D C; Otsuka, K; Bingham, C; Breus, T K; Cornélissen, G; Halberg, F

    1994-01-01

    A 35-year-old cardiologist monitored himself with an automatic ABPM-630 (Colin Electronics) monitor, mostly at 15-minute intervals around-the-clock for three years with a few interruptions. In this subject with a family history of high blood pressure and stroke, a cross-spectral analysis revealed a statistically significant coherence at 27.7 days between systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate vs. the geomagnetic disturbance index, Kp. A lesser peak in coherence was found for systolic blood pressure with Kp at a trial period of 4.16 days (P = 0.046). These results suggest that changes in geomagnetism may influence the human circulation, at least in the presence of familial cardiovascular disease risk, and they may do so at frequencies that have no precise human-made cyclic worldwide match. PMID:7729242

  9. Geomagnetic storm's precursors observed from 2001 to 2007 with the Global Muon Detector Network (GMDN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockenbach, M.; Dal Lago, A.; Gonzalez, W. D.; Munakata, K.; Kato, C.; Kuwabara, T.; Bieber, J.; Schuch, N. J.; Duldig, M. L.; Humble, J. E.; Al Jassar, H. K.; Sharma, M. M.; Sabbah, I.

    2011-08-01

    We use complementary observations from the prototype and expanded Global Muon Detector Network (GMDN) and the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite to identify precursors of geomagnetic storm events. The GMDN was completed and started operation in March 2006 with the addition of the Kuwait detector, complementing the detectors at Nagoya, Hobart, and São Martinho da Serra. Analyzed geomagnetic storms sorted by their intensity as measured by the Disturbance storm-time (Dst) index. Between March 2001 and December 2007, 122 Moderate Storms (MS), 51 Intense Storms (IS), and 8 Super Storms (SS) were monitored by the GMDN. The major conclusions are (i) the percentage of the events accompanied by the precursors prior to the Sudden Storm Commencement (SSC) increases with increasing peak Dst, (ii) 15% of MSs, 30% of ISs, and 86% of SSs are accompanied by cosmic ray precursors observed on average 7.2 hours in advance of the SSC.

  10. [A comprehensive analysis of incidence of myocardial infarction in Vladikavkaz depending on solar and geomagnetic activity].

    PubMed

    Botoeva, N K; Khetarugova, l G; Rapoport, S I

    2013-01-01

    The data on myocardial infarction morbidity in Vladikavkaz for 2007-2010 were analysed with reference to solar and geomagnetic activity. Time series of morbidity in men and women were constructed and their seasonal constituent was distinguished. It was found that the number of myocardial infarctions increases on day with enhanced geomagnetic activity especially among subjects aged 50-69 years. Regression analysis of the relationship between the number of sunspots and myocardial infarctions yielded the equation of piecewise linear regression showing that 42% of the cases were due to the changes in the number of sunspots. Medium strength negative correlation was found between the number of myocardial infarctions and the recurrence index of Bz-component of the interplanetary magnetic field. It suggests an important role of chaotic dynamics of external factors in the development of myocardial infarction. PMID:25696947