Science.gov

Sample records for aaviksoo laura kirss

  1. The Laura++ Dalitz plot fitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latham, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    The Laura++ software package is designed for performing fits of amplitude models to data from decays of spin-0 particles into final states containing three spin-0 particles — so-called Dalitz-plot analysis. An overview of the amplitude formalism and its software implementation is given as well as summaries of recently added features and planned future developments.

  2. LAURA Users Manual: 5.3-48528

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazaheri, Alireza; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Johnston, Chirstopher O.; Kleb, Bil

    2010-01-01

    This users manual provides in-depth information concerning installation and execution of LAURA, version 5. LAURA is a structured, multi-block, computational aerothermodynamic simulation code. Version 5 represents a major refactoring of the original Fortran 77 LAURA code toward a modular structure afforded by Fortran 95. The refactoring improved usability and maintainability by eliminating the requirement for problem-dependent re-compilations, providing more intuitive distribution of functionality, and simplifying interfaces required for multi-physics coupling. As a result, LAURA now shares gas-physics modules, MPI modules, and other low-level modules with the FUN3D unstructured-grid code. In addition to internal refactoring, several new features and capabilities have been added, e.g., a GNU-standard installation process, parallel load balancing, automatic trajectory point sequencing, free-energy minimization, and coupled ablation and flowfield radiation.

  3. LAURA Users Manual: 5.2-43231

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazaheri, Alireza; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Johnston, Christopher O.; Kleb, Bil

    2009-01-01

    This users manual provides in-depth information concerning installation and execution of LAURA, version 5. LAURA is a structured, multi-block, computational aerothermodynamic simulation code. Version 5 represents a major refactoring of the original Fortran 77 LAURA code toward a modular structure afforded by Fortran 95. The refactoring improved usability and maintainability by eliminating the requirement for problem-dependent re-compilations, providing more intuitive distribution of functionality, and simplifying interfaces required for multiphysics coupling. As a result, LAURA now shares gas-physics modules, MPI modules, and other low-level modules with the FUN3D unstructured-grid code. In addition to internal refactoring, several new features and capabilities have been added, e.g., a GNU-standard installation process, parallel load balancing, automatic trajectory point sequencing, free-energy minimization, and coupled ablation and flowfield radiation.

  4. LAURA Users Manual: 5.5-64987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazaheri, Alireza; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Johnston, Christopher O.; Kleb, William L.

    2013-01-01

    This users manual provides in-depth information concerning installation and execution of LAURA, version 5. LAURA is a structured, multi-block, computational aerothermodynamic simulation code. Version 5 represents a major refactoring of the original Fortran 77 LAURA code toward a modular structure afforded by Fortran 95. The refactoring improved usability and maintain ability by eliminating the requirement for problem dependent recompilations, providing more intuitive distribution of functionality, and simplifying interfaces required for multi-physics coupling. As a result, LAURA now shares gas-physics modules, MPI modules, and other low-level modules with the Fun3D unstructured-grid code. In addition to internal refactoring, several new features and capabilities have been added, e.g., a GNU standard installation process, parallel load balancing, automatic trajectory point sequencing, free-energy minimization, and coupled ablation and flowfield radiation.

  5. Laura Users Manual: 5.1-41601

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazaheri, Alireza; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Johnston, Christopher O.; Kleb, Bil

    2009-01-01

    This users manual provides in-depth information concerning installation and execution of LAURA, version 5. LAURA is a structured, multi-block, computational aerothermodynamic simulation code. Version 5 represents a major refactoring of the original Fortran 77 LAURA code toward a modular structure afforded by Fortran 95. The refactoring improved usability and maintainability by eliminating the requirement for problem-dependent re-compilations, providing more intuitive distribution of functionality, and simplifying interfaces required for multiphysics coupling. As a result, LAURA now shares gas-physics modules, MPI modules, and other low-level modules with the FUN3D unstructured-grid code. In addition to internal refactoring, several new features and capabilities have been added, e.g., a GNU-standard installation process, parallel load balancing, automatic trajectory point sequencing, free-energy minimization, and coupled ablation and flowfield radiation.

  6. LAURA Users Manual: 5.4-54166

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazaheri, Alireza; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Johnston, Christopher O.; Kleb, Bil

    2011-01-01

    This users manual provides in-depth information concerning installation and execution of Laura, version 5. Laura is a structured, multi-block, computational aerothermodynamic simulation code. Version 5 represents a major refactoring of the original Fortran 77 Laura code toward a modular structure afforded by Fortran 95. The refactoring improved usability and maintainability by eliminating the requirement for problem dependent re-compilations, providing more intuitive distribution of functionality, and simplifying interfaces required for multi-physics coupling. As a result, Laura now shares gas-physics modules, MPI modules, and other low-level modules with the Fun3D unstructured-grid code. In addition to internal refactoring, several new features and capabilities have been added, e.g., a GNU-standard installation process, parallel load balancing, automatic trajectory point sequencing, free-energy minimization, and coupled ablation and flowfield radiation.

  7. Through the Eyes of Laura Ingalls Wilder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowd, Diane

    2006-01-01

    Laura Ingalls Wilder's purpose in writing the "Little House" books for children illustrate the day-to-day experiences of a girl, and her stories provide glimpses into a young mind's conceptualization of aspects of living that are mathematical in nature, such as geometric and quantitative conceptions, logical reasoning and communication, and…

  8. A Tall Tale: Laura Amy Schlitz

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Mary Grace

    2008-01-01

    In this article, American author, children's librarian, and storyteller Laura Amy Schlitz is profiled. Schlitz is the winner of this year's Newbery Medal for her tall tale about the Mongols called "Gulnara the Tartar Warrior." Like her award-winning book, "Good Masters! Sweet Ladies!" (Candlewick, 2007), the tale takes place in the Middle Ages.…

  9. Laura Bassi and the city of learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Findlen, Paula

    2013-09-01

    Laura Bassi might not be a household name, but she was one of the shining stars of 18th-century Italian physics - and could well have been the first woman to have forged a professional scientific career, as Paula Findlen explains.

  10. Combined LAURA-UPS hypersonic solution procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, William A.; Thompson, Richard A.

    1993-01-01

    A combined solution procedure for hypersonic flowfields around blunted slender bodies was implemented using a thin-layer Navier-Stokes code (LAURA) in the nose region and a parabolized Navier-Stokes code (UPS) on the after body region. Perfect gas, equilibrium air, and non-equilibrium air solutions to sharp cones and a sharp wedge were obtained using UPS alone as a preliminary step. Surface heating rates are presented for two slender bodies with blunted noses, having used LAURA to provide a starting solution to UPS downstream of the sonic line. These are an 8 deg sphere-cone in Mach 5, perfect gas, laminar flow at 0 and 4 deg angles of attack and the Reentry F body at Mach 20, 80,000 ft equilibrium gas conditions for 0 and 0.14 deg angles of attack. The results indicate that this procedure is a timely and accurate method for obtaining aerothermodynamic predictions on slender hypersonic vehicles.

  11. Laura Pittman: The Nation's First Credentialed Direct Support Professional

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Tom

    2007-01-01

    This article profiles Laura Pittman, the nation's first credentialed Direct Support Professional (DSP). Laura is a DSP at the Orange Grove Center (OGC) in Chattanooga, Tennessee and has been working there for almost ten years. She has been a DSP for seven of those years, and in that role, supported four women at one of the Orange Grove Center…

  12. 78 FR 17653 - Wright, Laura H.; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Wright, Laura H.; Notice of Filing Take notice that on March 14, 2013, Laura H. Wright filed an application to hold interlocking positions, pursuant to section 305(b) of...

  13. User's Manual for the Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Cheatwood, F. McNeil

    1996-01-01

    This user's manual provides detailed instructions for the installation and the application of version 4.1 of the Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA). Also provides simulation of flow field in thermochemical nonequilibrium around vehicles traveling at hypersonic velocities through the atmosphere. Earlier versions of LAURA were predominantly research codes, and they had minimal (or no) documentation. This manual describes UNIX-based utilities for customizing the code for special applications that also minimize system resource requirements. The algorithm is reviewed, and the various program options are related to specific equations and variables in the theoretical development.

  14. Leadership Succession and Successful Leadership: The Case of Laura Martinez

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garza, Encarnacion, Jr.; Murakami-Ramalho, Elizabeth; Merchant, Betty

    2011-01-01

    This case study follows the work of principal Laura Martinez as moving from leading Stevens Elementary for 9 years, and now opening a new P-8th grade academy in the same south Texas urban, inner-city district. The purpose of this case study was to observe successful leadership and the principal's strategies both in her previous and present school,…

  15. Implementation of a Blowing Boundary Condition in the LAURA Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Richard a.; Gnoffo, Peter A.

    2008-01-01

    Preliminary steps toward modeling a coupled ablation problem using a finite-volume Navier-Stokes code (LAURA) are presented in this paper. Implementation of a surface boundary condition with mass transfer (blowing) is described followed by verification and validation through comparisons with analytic results and experimental data. Application of the code to a carbon-nosetip ablation problem is demonstrated and the results are compared with previously published data. It is concluded that the code and coupled procedure are suitable to support further ablation analyses and studies.

  16. The addition of algebraic turbulence modeling to program LAURA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheatwood, F. Mcneil; Thompson, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    The Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA) is modified to allow the calculation of turbulent flows. This is accomplished using the Cebeci-Smith and Baldwin-Lomax eddy-viscosity models in conjunction with the thin-layer Navier-Stokes options of the program. Turbulent calculations can be performed for both perfect-gas and equilibrium flows. However, a requirement of the models is that the flow be attached. It is seen that for slender bodies, adequate resolution of the boundary-layer gradients may require more cells in the normal direction than a laminar solution, even when grid stretching is employed. Results for axisymmetric and three-dimensional flows are presented. Comparison with experimental data and other numerical results reveal generally good agreement, except in the regions of detached flow.

  17. Application of program LAURA to perfect gas shock tube flows: A parametric study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitterer, K. F.; Mitcheltree, R. A.; Gnoffo, P. A.

    1992-01-01

    The Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA) was originally developed to solve steady-flow problems. The desire to validate the algorithm with shock tube experimental data motivated the development of a time-accurate version of the LAURA code. The current work presents a test of the Algorithm. Computational results are compared with the exact solution for a simple shock tube case. The parameters examined are Courant number, relaxation sweeps, grid spacing, and the inviscid relaxation factor. The results of the study indicate that LAURA is capable of producing accurate solutions when appropriate values are used for each parameter.

  18. Assessment of LAURA for Laminar Supersonic Shallow Cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, William A.; Pulsonetti, Maria V.; Everhart, Joel L.; Bey, Kim S.

    2004-01-01

    The ability of the Laura flow solver to predict local heating augmentation factors for shallow cavities is assessed. This assessment is part of a larger e ort within the Space Shuttle return-to-flight program to develop technologies to support on-orbit tile repair decisions. The comparison is made against global phosphor thermography images taken in the Langley Aerothermodynamic Laboratory 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel. The cavities are rectangular in shape, with lengths L/H of 14 20 and depths H/ of 1.1 5.2. The fully laminar results, for Re = 300, show good agreement between the data sets. For Re = 503, the wind tunnel data indicates boundary layer transition with turbulent flow both within and downstream of the cavity. The turbulent flow structures are significantly di erent from the laminar predictions, with order of magnitude increases in the heating augmentations. Because of the di erent flow structures, no simple bump factor can be used to correct the laminar calculations to account for the turbulent heating levels. A fine gradation in wind tunnel cases will be required to clearly delineate the laminar-to-turbulent transition point, and hence the limits of applicability of the laminar numerical approach.

  19. Creating Value from Innovation: Laura Gordon-Murnane--Bureau of National Affairs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Some corporate executives regard their libraries as black holes that just consume company resources, but thanks to Laura Gordon-Murnane, executives at the Bureau of National Affairs (BNA) know their library actively adds value to the company. As web master for BNA's intranet, Gordon-Murnane creates information tools, databases, and products for…

  20. Teaching Laura Kipnis's "Love's Labors" in "Ways of Reading"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fike, Matthew A.

    2013-01-01

    This essay describes a method of teaching a very challenging anthology piece: Laura Kipnis's "Love's Labors" (chapter 1 of her 2003 "Against Love: A Polemic"). The method, although designed for a critical thinking course, should also provide resources for those who teach Kipnis's work in writing courses. Using…

  1. Gender Transformations and Colonial Displacements in Laura Antillano's "Tuna de mar"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Alana

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the trajectories of two characters in Laura Antillano's short story, "Tuna de mar" (1991), as they navigate interrelated systems of power and attempt to position themselves closer to, or further away from, the margins. Set in the late eighteenth century, the tale features a female protagonist who escapes prostitution…

  2. The Actions of One Inspire the Power of Many: Laura Briley, Day Schools, Tulsa, Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Mena, Janet

    2010-01-01

    Laura Briley is a person who makes things happen! Not only is she instrumental in creating a new World Forum Working Group for the Rights of Children in Children's Homes, but in April she organized the first ever Pikler Intensive Training in the United States by bringing two internationally famous infant development experts to Tulsa, Oklahoma. In…

  3. Preparing Children To Read and Learn: An Education Initiative of Laura Bush.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education, Washington, DC.

    Noting that teaching reading is one of the Bush Administration's top domestic priorities, this pamphlet introduces the Ready to Read, Ready to Learn education initiative of First Lady Laura Bush. The goals of the initiative are to ensure that all young children are ready to read and learn when they enter their first classroom, and to ensure that…

  4. Development of wing and tail configurations for low altitude unmanned research aircraft (LAURA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangalam, S. M.; Harvey, W. D.; Siddiqi, S.

    1987-01-01

    The Low Altitude/Airspeed Unmanned Research Aircraft (LAURA) is being developed by the U.S. Navy for flight test research using low-Reynolds number airfoils. This vehicle consists of a standard modular fuselage designed to accept the installation of several wings/tails having low Reynolds number airfoils, and various planform shapes. Design constraints include shipboard storage, long flight endurance at very low airspeeds and sea-skimming cruise altitude. The stringent design constraints require the development of high-performance low Reynolds number (LRN) airfoils, suitable lifting surface configuration, and advanced airframe-propulsion systems. The present paper describes ongoing efforts to develop wing and tail configurations for LAURA using airfoils designed at NASA Langley Research Center.

  5. 13-Epi-9-deacetoxyxenicin, a Cytotoxic Diterpene from the Soft Coral Asterospicularia laurae (Alcyonacea)

    PubMed Central

    Bowden, Bruce F.; Cusack, Bernard J.; Dangel, Alissa

    2003-01-01

    An investigation of the soft coral Asterospicularia laurae collected on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, afforded the cytotoxic diterpene 13-epi-9-deacetoxyxenicin (1) in addition to the known metabolites 13-epi-9-deacetylxenicin (2) and gorgosterol. 13-Epi-9-deacetoxyxenicin readily underwent an autoxidation reaction in solution to afford a single product, the hydroperoxide 3. Structures, stereochemistry, and NMR assignments were established by high resolution NMR spectroscopy and by comparison with published data for known compounds.

  6. Ground-water resources of the Laura area, Majuro Atoll, Marshall Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamlin, S.N.; Anthony, S.S.

    1987-01-01

    The water system that supplies the heavily populated Dalap-Uliga-Darrit (DUD) area of Majuro atoll, Marshall Island, relies almost entirely upon airstrip catchment of rain water. Droughts cause severe water supply problems and water rationing is required, even during periods of normal rainfall. The Laura area contains a substantial lens of fresh groundwater that could be developed for export to the DUD area 30 mi to the east. Study of the groundwater resource at Laura involved a survey of existing wells, installation of monitoring wells and test holes, compilation of continuous records of rainfall and water level fluctuations, and collection of water quality data. Test hole data permitted the definition of three geohydrologic units which correlate well with similar units in Bikini and Enewetak atolls. The units consist of two layers of unconsolidated reef and lagoon sediments resting on a dense, highly permeable limestone. The potable water zone, or freshwater nucleus, of the lens is contained mostly within the unconsolidated layers, which are much less permeable than the basal limestone. Recharge to the Laura freshwater lens is estimated to be 1.8 mil gal/day, based on an average annual rainfall of 140 in. Sustainable yield is estimated to be about 400,000 gal/day. Shallow skimming wells or infiltration galleries similar to those used on Kwajalein atoll would be appropriate to develop the freshwater lens. The impact of development on the lens can be determined by monitoring the salinity in developed water and in a network of monitor wells. (Author 's abstract)

  7. Geohydrology of the Laura fresh-water lens, Majuro atoll: a hydrogeochemical approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anthony, S.S.; Peterson, F.L.; MacKenzie, F.T.; Hamlin, S.N.

    1989-01-01

    The primary factors controlling the occurrence and flow of ground water in the leeward reef islet of Laura are (1) the depositional history of the upper hydrologic unit, which has resulted in a greater accumulation of low-permeability (fine-grained) sediments beneath the lagoon side of the island and a high- to low-permeability (coarse- to fine-grained sediment) gradation between the ocean and lagoon; and (2) the diagenetic history of the lower hydrologic unit, which has resulted in a highly permeable basement. -from Authors

  8. Distributed-Memory Computing With the Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Christopher J.; Cheatwood, F. McNeil

    1997-01-01

    The Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA), a Navier-Stokes solver, has been modified for use in a parallel, distributed-memory environment using the Message-Passing Interface (MPI) standard. A standard domain decomposition strategy is used in which the computational domain is divided into subdomains with each subdomain assigned to a processor. Performance is examined on dedicated parallel machines and a network of desktop workstations. The effect of domain decomposition and frequency of boundary updates on performance and convergence is also examined for several realistic configurations and conditions typical of large-scale computational fluid dynamic analysis.

  9. Combined LAURA-UPS solution procedure for chemically-reacting flows. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, William A.

    1994-01-01

    A new procedure seeks to combine the thin-layer Navier-Stokes solver LAURA with the parabolized Navier-Stokes solver UPS for the aerothermodynamic solution of chemically-reacting air flowfields. The interface protocol is presented and the method is applied to two slender, blunted shapes. Both axisymmetric and three dimensional solutions are included with surface pressure and heat transfer comparisons between the present method and previously published results. The case of Mach 25 flow over an axisymmetric six degree sphere-cone with a noncatalytic wall is considered to 100 nose radii. A stability bound on the marching step size was observed with this case and is attributed to chemistry effects resulting from the noncatalytic wall boundary condition. A second case with Mach 28 flow over a sphere-cone-cylinder-flare configuration is computed at both two and five degree angles of attack with a fully-catalytic wall. Surface pressures are seen to be within five percent with the present method compared to the baseline LAURA solution and heat transfers are within 10 percent. The effect of grid resolution is investigated and the nonequilibrium results are compared with a perfect gas solution, showing that while the surface pressure is relatively unchanged by the inclusion of reacting chemistry the nonequilibrium heating is 25 percent higher. The procedure demonstrates significant, order of magnitude reductions in solution time and required memory for the three dimensional case over an all thin-layer Navier-Stokes solution.

  10. The complete mitochondrial genome of the leopard spider Pardosa laura (Araneae: Lycosidae).

    PubMed

    Pan, Wen-Jian; Fang, Hong-Yan; Zhang, Peng; Pan, Hong-Chun

    2016-05-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Pardosa laura is a circular molecule of 14,513 bp in length, containing 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNAs, 22 transfer RNAs, and a control region. The A + T content of the overall base composition of H-strand is 77.4% (T: 42.9%; C: 8.1%; A: 34.5%; G: 14.5%). ATP6, COII and COIII genes begin with TTG as start codon; ND4 and ND6 genes begin with ATA as start codon, while other eight protein-coding genes start with ATT. COII, COIII, ND2 and ND6 genes are terminated with TAG as stop codon, COI and ND4L end with T, ND4 ends with TA, ATP6, ATP8, Cyt b, ND1, ND3and ND5 end with TAA. PMID:25208170

  11. Sedimentary facies and Holocene depositional processes of Laura Island, Majuro Atoll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasukochi, Toru; Kayanne, Hajime; Yamaguchi, Toru; Yamano, Hiroya

    2014-10-01

    The depositional processes that formed Laura Island, Majuro Atoll, Marshall Islands, were reconstructed based on a facies analysis of island sediments and spine ratios, and radiocarbon ages of foraminifera. Sedimentary facies were analyzed from trenches and drill cores excavated on the island and its adjacent reef flat. Depositional ages were obtained using benthic foraminifera (Calcarina) whose spines had not been abraded. The facies were classified into two types: gravelly and sandy. The initial sediments of these sites consisted of gravelly facies in the lower horizon and sandy facies in the upper horizon. Their ages were approximately 2000 cal BP and coincident with the onset of a 1.1-m decline in regional relative sea level, which enabled deposition of the gravelly facies. Half of the sand fraction of the sediment was composed of larger benthic foraminifera. The spine ratio showed that their supply source on the reef flat was located oceanside of the island. The supply source appears to have been caused by the relative sea-level fall. This indicates that the studied island was formed by a relative reduction in wave energy and enhanced foraminiferal supply, both of which were triggered by the late Holocene relative sea-level fall.

  12. The Calm AFTER the Storm: An Interview with Laura Bush about the Caring Power of the Gulf Coast School Library Recovery Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Julie

    2012-01-01

    In 2005, a record breaking 26 named tropical storms including 13 hurricanes ravaged the Gulf Coast of the United States. In response to the devastation of hundreds of schools, the Laura Bush Foundation swiftly created The Gulf Coast School Library Recovery Initiative to help school libraries become fully functional and to offer the needed print…

  13. Image, Imagination, and Initiation: Teaching as a Rite of Passage in the Novels of L. M. Montgomery and Laura Ingalls Wilder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gates, Charlene E.

    1989-01-01

    Examines the role of the schoolteacher in Lucy Maud Montgomery's "Anne of Green Gables" and Laura Ingalls Wilder's "Little House in the Big Woods." Describes how becoming a teacher was a rite of passage for both main characters. Asserts that these autobiographically-based, nondidactic stories are useful teaching instruments for young people. (MM)

  14. The hard winter of 1880-1881: Climatological context and communication via a Laura Ingalls Wilder narrative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boustead, Barbara E.

    The Hard Winter of 1880-1881 was featured in the Laura Ingalls Wilder historical fiction account, The Long Winter, as well as in several town histories across the region. Both meteorological records and historical accounts indicate that the winter was particularly long, snowy, and cold. The question of how "hard" a winter is for a given location depends on the climatological context, which relies on an objective characterization of winter severity. The Accumulated Winter Season Severity Index (AWSSI) allows comparison of the winter of 1880-1881 among sites across the region, as well as in the context of the period of record, to quantify its severity. Additionally, investigating the impacts of both the El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) in the central United States provides context for the influence of both a strongly negative NAO and an El Nino event during the winter of 1880-1881. With an understanding of the climatological factors influencing the Hard Winter, along with the context for its severity, a more thorough analysis then was conducted to quantify and describe its severity. The connection of the winter of 1880-1881 to a popular book written by an author who is a cultural icon provides a natural vehicle with which to communicate weather and climate concepts to multiple non-technical audiences. The communication of complex weather and climate concepts is a well-documented challenge. One method to bridge between science concepts and public understanding is to relate those concepts to familiar subjects and stories, including Laura Ingalls Wilder's books. A narrative constructed around the books, particularly The Long Winter, provides a means of audience engagement and interest in weather- and climate-related topics, which was at least partially quantified by surveying audiences of the narrative. Overall, the scientific background, combined with a familiar narrative voice, provides a means to transmit weather and

  15. Performance of the OVERFLOW-MLP and LAURA-MLP CFD Codes on the NASA Ames 512 CPU Origin System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taft, James R.

    2000-01-01

    The shared memory Multi-Level Parallelism (MLP) technique, developed last year at NASA Ames has been very successful in dramatically improving the performance of important NASA CFD codes. This new and very simple parallel programming technique was first inserted into the OVERFLOW production CFD code in FY 1998. The OVERFLOW-MLP code's parallel performance scaled linearly to 256 CPUs on the NASA Ames 256 CPU Origin 2000 system (steger). Overall performance exceeded 20.1 GFLOP/s, or about 4.5x the performance of a dedicated 16 CPU C90 system. All of this was achieved without any major modification to the original vector based code. The OVERFLOW-MLP code is now in production on the inhouse Origin systems as well as being used offsite at commercial aerospace companies. Partially as a result of this work, NASA Ames has purchased a new 512 CPU Origin 2000 system to further test the limits of parallel performance for NASA codes of interest. This paper presents the performance obtained from the latest optimization efforts on this machine for the LAURA-MLP and OVERFLOW-MLP codes. The Langley Aerothermodynamics Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA) code is a key simulation tool in the development of the next generation shuttle, interplanetary reentry vehicles, and nearly all "X" plane development. This code sustains about 4-5 GFLOP/s on a dedicated 16 CPU C90. At this rate, expected workloads would require over 100 C90 CPU years of computing over the next few calendar years. It is not feasible to expect that this would be affordable or available to the user community. Dramatic performance gains on cheaper systems are needed. This code is expected to be perhaps the largest consumer of NASA Ames compute cycles per run in the coming year.The OVERFLOW CFD code is extensively used in the government and commercial aerospace communities to evaluate new aircraft designs. It is one of the largest consumers of NASA supercomputing cycles and large simulations of highly resolved full

  16. Effects of the 1998 Drought on the Freshwater Lens in the Laura Area, Majuro Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Presley, Todd K.

    2005-01-01

    Lower than average rainfall during late 1997 and early 1998 in Majuro Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands, caused a drought and severe drinking-water shortage. Majuro depends on a public rainfall catchment system, which uses an airport runway and storage reservoirs. The storage reservoirs can supply water for about 30 to 50 days without replenishment. In February 1998, after a few months with less than one inch of rainfall per month, a drought-related disaster was declared. Reverse-osmosis water-purification systems were brought to Majuro to help alleviate the water shortage. Concurrent with the water-purification program, ground water from a freshwater lens in the Laura area of the atoll was pumped at increased rates. Of the total consumed water during this period, ground water from Laura supplied between 90 percent (March 1998) and 64 percent (May 1998) of the drinking water. Due to public concern, a study was initiated to determine the effects of the drought on the freshwater lens. The areal extent of the freshwater lens is about 350 acres. A monitoring-well network, consisting of multiple wells driven to varying depths at 11 sites, was installed to determine the thickness of the freshwater lens. Similar locations relative to an earlier study were chosen so that the data from this study could be compared to 1984-85 data. At the end of the drought in June 1998, the freshwater near the middle of the lens was about 45 feet thick; and at the north and south ends, the freshwater was about 25 to 38 feet thick, respectively. Monitoring of the freshwater lens was continued through the wet season following the drought. The lens increased in thickness by 1 to 8 feet after 7 months of rainfall. Greater increases in lens thickness were measured on the lagoon side than on the ocean side of the freshwater lens. Lens thickness during August 1998, and seasonal variation of lens thickness in 1998, were compared to data collected in 1984-85. Comparison of lens thickness from

  17. Experimenting with wires, batteries, bulbs and the induction coil: Narratives of teaching and learning physics in the electrical investigations of Laura, David, Jamie, myself and the nineteenth century experimenters. Our developments and instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavicchi, Elizabeth Mary

    Physics is conventionally taught as a fixed curriculum which students must master. This thesis changes that: curriculum emerges from what learners try and question in experiments they invent. The thesis narrates: three adult students exploring wires, batteries and bulbs with me as teacher; nineteenth century investigations of electromagnetism; my laboratory work replicating historic instruments. In each case, learning arose through activity with materials. Evidences of this are analyzed within narratives and reflections. I used teaching-research, a method developed by Duckworth from Piaget's clinical interviewing, to research and simultaneously extend students' evolving understandings. What I learned through questioning students informed my next interactions; what they learned extended their experimenting. Similarly, I researched historical accounts interactively: improvising experiments to develop my understandings. Studying my own learning deepened my interpretations of students' learning. My students Laura, David and Jamie experimented by: soldering bulbs to wires, making series and parallel circuits, inserting resistive wire that dimmed bulbs, conducting electricity through salt water They noticed bulb brightness and battery heat, compared electricity's paths, questioned how voltage and current relate. They inferred electricity's effects manifest magnitudes of material properties. They found their experiences while learning were inseparable from what they learned. I researched investigations connected with Cavendish's leather fish, Galvani's frogs, Schweigger's wire spiraled around a compass needle, Henry's electromagnets, Faraday's induction ring, induction devices of Page, Callan, Hearder. Experimentally, I made galvanometers, electromagnets, induction rings, induction coil. I observed effects of electromagnetism, internal resistance, induced sparking. Across these investigations, learning developed with instrumental innovations; confusions were productive

  18. From Laura Ingalls to Wing Biddlebaum: A Study of Teacher Identity in Works of Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muchmore, James A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to systemically analyze the types of teachers that appear in works of literature, and to explore the various teacher identities that are depicted. The data consists of 44 works of literature representing a wide variety of genres, settings, cultures, and historical periods. They include 20 adult novels, 6 young adult…

  19. On Ways of Symbolizing: The Case of Laura and the Velocity Sign.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemirovsky, Ricardo

    1994-01-01

    Presents a case study of how one 11th-grader learned the meaning of the velocity sign. Her learning was not just an acknowledgment of a rule but also a broad questioning and revision of her thinking about graphs and motion. (16 references) (Author/MKR)

  20. Renewing Haudenosaunee Ties: Laura Cornelius Kellogg and the Idea of Unity in the Oneida Land Claim

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackley, Kristina

    2008-01-01

    On 10 October 1925 a ceremony was planned for the scenic fields behind the former tribal school in Oneida, Wisconsin. The event was expected to accomplish a number of goals: it would assert political authority by a group of Oneidas, establish traditional leadership of the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) Confederacy locally, and affirm the Wisconsin…

  1. A resolution electing Laura C. Dove, of Virginia, as Secretary for the Minority of the Senate.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. McConnell, Mitch [R-KY

    2013-08-01

    08/01/2013 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S6259; text as passed Senate: CR S6237) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  2. A bill for the relief of Alicia Aranda De Buendia and Ana Laura Buendia Aranda.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Feinstein, Dianne [D-CA

    2013-03-18

    03/18/2013 Read twice and referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. (text of measure as introduced: CR S1901) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  3. Interaction between Parents and Children, by Laura Stafford and Cherie L. Bayer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luster, Tom

    1994-01-01

    Reviews and evaluates 1993 text summarizing research related to three child outcomes: (1) self-control; (2) self-concept; and (3) communication competencies. Suggests that target audience includes researchers and students who are interested in parenting and/or child outcomes or instructors hoping to demonstrate how underlying assumptions influence…

  4. 76 FR 72003 - Proposed Collection, Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian Grant Program Evaluation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-21

    ... information on those who are to respond, including through the use of appropriate automated electronic...., permitting electronic submissions of responses. ADDRESSES: Send comments to: Matthew Birnbaum,...

  5. 77 FR 27253 - Proposed Collection, Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian Grant Program Evaluation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-09

    ...The Institute of Museum and Library Services announces the following information collection has been submitted to the Office of Management and Budget for review and approval in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act (44 U.S.C. Chapter 35). Individuals who use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TTY/TDD) may call 202-653-4614. This review helps to ensure that requested data can be......

  6. From Laura Ingalls to Wing Biddlebaum: A Survey of Teacher Identities in Works of Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muchmore, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Teachers appear as characters in a wide range of literary writing. To date, few scholars have systematically studied the teachers who appear in works of literature. Much of the existing work has focused on relatively small numbers of teachers and has been presented in the form of brief essays rather than formal research (e.g., Booth, 2006; Crume,…

  7. 76 FR 39967 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: U.S. National Commission for UNESCO Laura W...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ... Fellowship ACTION: Notice of request for public comment and submission to OMB of proposed collection of... Fellowship OMB Control Number: 1405-0180 Type of Request: Extension of a Currently Approved Collection... university students applying for a Fellowship Estimated Number of Respondents: 100 Estimated Number...

  8. A bill for the relief of Jose Buendia Balderas, Alicia Aranda De Buendia, and Ana Laura Buendia Aranda.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Feinstein, Dianne [D-CA

    2011-03-02

    03/02/2011 Read twice and referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. (text of measure as introduced: CR S1130) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  9. Living with Crohn's Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Past Issues / Winter 2016 Table of Contents Photo courtesy of Laura King Benjamin King, star of ... King from competing in a triathlon in 2010. Photo courtesy of Laura King Can you share with ...

  10. Caught between a Rock and a Hard Place: A Natural Scientist Writes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Caroline V.

    1999-01-01

    Observes a 9-year-old third-grade student at home and at school. Reveals the disparity between Laura's highly contextualized knowledge of science and the school science curriculum. States that teachers do not value Laura's strong observational and analytical proclivities and that both she and her teachers think of Laura as an academic failure. (SR)

  11. 77 FR 73665 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-11

    ... students, dental students, post-baccalaureate students, graduate students, post-doctoral students, and... this publication. Dated: November 30, 2012. Laura Lee, Project Clearance Liaison, Warren Grant...

  12. Sharing knowledge with Google Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-08-01

    Marine biologist Laura Stocker led experts in economics, policy and urban and regional planning to develop a participatory approach to climate adaptation and sustainability at Rottnest Island, Australia.

  13. Student Engagement in the Teaching and Learning of Grammar: A Case Study of an Early-Career Secondary School English Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smagorinsky, Peter; Wright, Laura; Augustine, Sharon Murphy; O'Donnell-Allen, Cindy; Konopak, Bonnie

    2007-01-01

    This article reports a study of coauthor Laura Wright as she learned to teach secondary school grammar in four settings: university teacher education program, student teaching, her first job, and second job. Data for her university program came from Laura's journals and projects from her course work. Data from student teaching and her first job…

  14. The "Silver Writes" Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perspectives: The Civil Rights Quarterly, 1982

    1982-01-01

    The meaning of "civil rights" is discussed by various American authors and poets, including Alice Walker, Arthur Miller, Nocholasa Mohr, Felipe de Ortega y Gasco, Laura Z. Hobson, Simon J. Ortiz, Raymond Barrio, John Rechy, and Vine Deloria, Jr. (MJL)

  15. Phosphorus blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... II Osteomalacia Parathyroid hormone (PTH) blood test Rickets Sarcoidosis Update Date 11/1/2015 Updated by: Laura ... Balance Kidney Tests Liver Diseases Malnutrition Parathyroid Disorders Sarcoidosis Ulcerative Colitis Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A. ...

  16. Calcium blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... and regrowth, causing deformity of the affected bones. Sarcoidosis . Lymph nodes, lungs, liver, eyes, skin, or other ... disease of the bone Renal cell carcinoma Rickets Sarcoidosis Update Date 11/1/2015 Updated by: Laura ...

  17. Venipuncture

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood is made up of two parts: Fluid (plasma or serum) Cells Plasma is the fluid part that contains substances such ... clots Fibrinogen blood test Platelet count Update Date 4/30/2015 Updated by: Laura J. Martin, MD, ...

  18. Chloride test - blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... electrolytes such as potassium, sodium, and carbon dioxide (CO2). These substances help keep the proper balance of ... acidosis Sodium blood test Update Date 5/3/2015 Updated by: Laura J. Martin, MD, MPH, ABIM ...

  19. Teacher is Space participant Christa McAuliffe during suite/hygiene briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Teacher is Space participant Christa McAuliffe (right) is briefed on her suit and on personal hygiene equipment to be used on the STS 51-L mission. The briefing was conducted by Laura Louviere (center).

  20. Gambling, Sex, and…Parkinson's Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... are spent, browse our financial information. Learn More Gambling, Sex, and…Parkinson's Disease? By Laura Marsh, M. ... elevated, expansive, grandiose or irritable mood states. Pathological gambling Pathological gambling refers to recurrent, maladaptive gambling behaviors, ...

  1. Preventing falls - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ankle replacement Bunion removal Cataract removal Corneal transplant Hip joint replacement Knee joint replacement Spinal fusion Patient Instructions ... discharge Stroke - discharge Taking care of your new hip joint Update Date 2/8/2015 Updated by: Laura ...

  2. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Halloween Hazard: The Hidden Dangers of Buying Decorative Contact Lenses Without a Prescription Sep. 26, 2013 It ... she first put in a pair of colored contact lenses, Laura Butler of Parkersburg, W.Va., had " ...

  3. 75 FR 81331 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Termination-Penn Millers Insurance Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    ..., at 75 FR 38192. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Surety Bond Branch at (202) 874-6850. SUPPLEMENTARY... of the Treasury, Financial Management Service, Financial Accounting and Services Division, Surety.... Laura Carrico, Director, Financial Accounting and Services Division, Financial Management...

  4. 76 FR 416 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds Change in NAIC Number and State of Incorporation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-04

    ... Circular 570, 2010 Revision, published July 1, 2010, at 75 FR 38192. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT... 20782. ] Dated: December 16, 2010. Laura Carrico, Director, Financial Accounting and Services Division... Incorporation; Westchester Fire Insurance Company AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal...

  5. Heartburn - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... bed? What medicines will help my heartburn? Will antacids help my heartburn? Will other medicines help my ... Anti-reflux surgery - discharge Gastroesophageal reflux - discharge Taking antacids Update Date 2/8/2015 Updated by: Laura ...

  6. Careers and people

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-12-01

    The experimental condensed-matter physicist Laura Greene has taken over as chief scientist of the US National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (MagLab) - the world's biggest and most powerful magnet lab.

  7. Catecholamines - urine

    MedlinePlus

    ... neoplasia (MEN) II Neuroblastoma Pheochromocytoma Stress and your health Update Date 5/3/2015 Updated by: Laura J. Martin, MD, MPH, ABIM Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Atlanta, GA. ...

  8. 77 FR 20416 - Used Electronic Products: An Examination of U.S. Exports; Proposed Information Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-04

    ... COMMISSION Used Electronic Products: An Examination of U.S. Exports; Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Used Electronic Products Questionnaire AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission... via email at laura.bloodgood@usitc.gov ). Additional Information: Copies of the questionnaire...

  9. 76 FR 62455 - Announcement of Updated Funding Availability for H-1B Technical Skills Training Grants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ... applications is November 17, 2011. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Jeannette Flowers, Division of Workforce...: (202) 693-3322 (this is not a toll-free number). E-mail: flowers.jennette@dol.gov . Laura Patton...

  10. If 1st Baby's Early, 2nd Will Be Too: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... risk surprised us -- it really is a potent factor," said senior study author Laura Jelliffe-Pawlowski. She is associate director of precision health with the University of California, San Francisco's Preterm Birth Initiative. For ...

  11. Women and Mathematics in the Time of Euler

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayfield, Betty

    2013-01-01

    We explore mathematics written both by and for women in eighteenth-century Europe, and some of the interesting personalities involved: Maria Agnesi, Emilie du Chatelet, Laura Bassi, Princess Charlotte Ludovica Luisa, John Colson, Francesco Algarotti, and Leonhard Euler himself.

  12. 78 FR 51740 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-21

    ... (USGS), Interior. ACTION: Notice of a new information collection, Registry of Climate Change... reference ``Information Collection 1028--NEW, Registry of Climate Change Vulnerability Assessments'' in the subject line. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Laura Thompson, National Climate Change and...

  13. Volatile emissions of scented Alstroemeria genotypes are dominated by terpenes, and a myrcene synthase gene is highly expressed in scented Alstroemeria flowers.

    PubMed

    Aros, Danilo; Gonzalez, Veronica; Allemann, Rudolf K; Müller, Carsten T; Rosati, Carlo; Rogers, Hilary J

    2012-04-01

    Native to South America, Alstroemeria flowers are known for their colourful tepals, and Alstroemeria hybrids are an important cut flower. However, in common with many commercial cut flowers, virtually all the commercial Alstroemeria hybrids are not scented. The cultivar 'Sweet Laura' is one of very few scented commercial Alstroemeria hybrids. Characterization of the volatile emission profile of these cut flowers revealed three major terpene compounds: (E)-caryophyllene, humulene (also known as α-caryophyllene), an ocimene-like compound, and several minor peaks, one of which was identified as myrcene. The profile is completely different from that of the parental scented species A. caryophyllaea. Volatile emission peaked at anthesis in both scented genotypes, coincident in cv. 'Sweet Laura' with the maximal expression of a putative terpene synthase gene AlstroTPS. This gene was preferentially expressed in floral tissues of both cv. 'Sweet Laura' and A. caryophyllaea. Characterization of the AlstroTPS gene structure from cv. 'Sweet Laura' placed it as a member of the class III terpene synthases, and the predicted 567 amino acid sequence placed it into the subfamily TPS-b. The conserved sequences R(28)(R)X(8)W and D(321)DXXD are the putative Mg(2+)-binding sites, and in vitro assay of AlstroTPS expressed in Escherichia coli revealed that the encoded enzyme possesses myrcene synthase activity, consistent with a role for AlstroTPS in scent production in Alstroemeria cv. 'Sweet Laura' flowers. PMID:22268153

  14. Aerodynamic Database Development for Mars Smart Lander Vehicle Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bobskill, Glenn J.; Parikh, Paresh C.; Prabhu, Ramadas K.; Tyler, Erik D.

    2002-01-01

    An aerodynamic database has been generated for the Mars Smart Lander Shelf-All configuration using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. Three different CFD codes, USM3D and FELISA, based on unstructured grid technology and LAURA, an established and validated structured CFD code, were used. As part of this database development, the results for the Mars continuum were validated with experimental data and comparisons made where applicable. The validation of USM3D and LAURA with the Unitary experimental data, the use of intermediate LAURA check analyses, as well as the validation of FELISA with the Mach 6 CF(sub 4) experimental data provided a higher confidence in the ability for CFD to provide aerodynamic data in order to determine the static trim characteristics for longitudinal stability. The analyses of the noncontinuum regime showed the existence of multiple trim angles of attack that can be unstable or stable trim points. This information is needed to design guidance controller throughout the trajectory.

  15. Palearctic elements in the old world tropics: a taxonomic revision of the ant genus Temnothorax Mayr (Hymenoptera, Formicidae) for the Afrotropical biogeographical region

    PubMed Central

    Prebus, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Four new Afrotropical species of the ant genus Temnothorax are described and illustrated, all from Kenya. Based upon high resemblance to taxa known from the North African and Iberian territories of the Mediterranean region, these new tropical elements are placed into known Palaearctic species complexes. Specifically, Temnothorax brevidentis sp. n., Temnothorax mpala sp. n. and Temnothorax rufus sp. n. are placed in the laurae species group, and Temnothorax solidinodus sp. n. is placed in the angustulus species group. Two already known Temnothorax species from the region, Temnothorax cenatus (Bolton, 1982) and Temnothorax megalops (Hamann & Klemm, 1967), are also placed into the laurae species group based on the high number of shared morphological characters. Diagnoses for the African representatives of laurae and angustulus species groups of the Afrotropical biogeographical region are provided. A key to workers of the six Temnothorax species known to occur in the Afrotropical biogeographical region is provided, as well as diagnoses of morphologically similar myrmicine genera. PMID:25755623

  16. Functional Equivalence Acceptance Testing of FUN3D for Entry Descent and Landing Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Wood, William A.; Kleb, William L.; Alter, Stephen J.; Glass, Christopher E.; Padilla, Jose F.; Hammond, Dana P.; White, Jeffery A.

    2013-01-01

    The functional equivalence of the unstructured grid code FUN3D to the the structured grid code LAURA (Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm) is documented for applications of interest to the Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) community. Examples from an existing suite of regression tests are used to demonstrate the functional equivalence, encompassing various thermochemical models and vehicle configurations. Algorithm modifications required for the node-based unstructured grid code (FUN3D) to reproduce functionality of the cell-centered structured code (LAURA) are also documented. Challenges associated with computation on tetrahedral grids versus computation on structured-grid derived hexahedral systems are discussed.

  17. United States Department of Education Update, March 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linton, John

    2006-01-01

    In this column, Linton discusses First Lady Laura Bush's remarks on the special issues faced by boys in contemporary America. Among other things, Linton talks about the Neglected and Delinquent Technical Assistance Center's Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports approach addressing behavioral issues that block school performance and…

  18. THE MUTAGENICITY OF METALLIZED AND UNMETALLIZED AZO AND FORMAZAN DYES IN THE SALMONELLA MUTAGENICITY ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mutagenicity of metallized and unmetallized azo and formazan dyes in the Salmonella mutagenicity
    Laura. C. Edwards', Harold S. Freeman'*, and Larry D. Claxton2

    Abstract
    In previous papers, the synthesis and chemical properties of iron complexed azo and formazan d...

  19. Child Discourse. Language, Thought, and Culture: Advances in the Study of Cognition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ervin-Tripp, Susan, Ed.; Mitchell-Kernan, Claudia, Ed.

    The following essays on children's spoken language are included in this volume: "Play with Language and Speech" by Catherin Garvey, "'You Fruithead': A Sociolinguistic Approach to Children's Dispute Settlement" by Donald Brenneis and Laura Lein, "From Verbal Play to Talk Story: The Role of Routines in Speech Events among Hawaiian Children" by…

  20. Math and Science. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1995

    1995-01-01

    This theme issue contains six articles on improving math and science education for minority group students, particularly language-minority students. "Accelerating Content Area Gains for English Language Learners" (Laura Chris Green) describes the Young Scientists Acquiring English project, which seeks to improve the content-area achievement of…

  1. Postsecondary Education and Transition for Students with Learning Disabilities. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinckerhoff, Loring C.; McGuire, Joan M.; Shaw, Stan F.

    This text is designed to help postsecondary education personnel initiate or refine college programs for the increasing numbers of students with learning disabilities. Following an introductory chapter, chapters have the following titles: (1) "A Comprehensive Approach to Transition Planning"; (2) "Judicial Intent and Legal Precedents" (Laura F.…

  2. Disciplined Development: Teachers and Reform in Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dull, Laura J.

    2006-01-01

    Drawing on Foucault's analysis of disciplinary power and Gramsci's theories on hegemony, Laura Dull argues in this insightful volume that Ghanian teachers' diverse roles--as moral disciplinarians, ambivalent partners with global donors and lenders, romantic racialists of Africans--illustrate the ways in which educators deploy history and…

  3. A New Take on the Field Trip

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukes, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Because Laura Lukes used to be a geologist, when she started teaching science, she wanted to incorporate field experiences in her classroom. But, like many teachers, she faced obstacles: insufficient budgets, testing requirements, a lack of chaperones and transportation, and the safety concerns that come with fieldwork. As a result, a real field…

  4. Advice for Fund Raisers: Know Your Donors and Never Let Them See You Sweat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masterson, Kathryn

    2008-01-01

    The psychology behind getting the big gift and making "the ask" for it was a major topic at Fund Raising Day in New York 2008, which drew representatives from across the nonprofit world, including charities, hospitals, colleges, and museums. Laura Fredricks, who was vice president for philanthropy at Pace University from 2002 until earlier this…

  5. Frontiers for Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willingham, Terri Lynn

    1988-01-01

    A teacher describes how she used the autobiographical stories recounting Laura Ingalls Wilder's frontier life to teach history to a third-grade class. Activities included frontier foods, storytelling, a school play, a concert, bookmarks, student autobiographies, and a spelling bee. (CB)

  6. Giving Muslim Girls "A Voice": The Possibilities and Limits to Challenging Patriarchal Interpretations of Islam in One English Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keddie, Amanda

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the philosophies and practices of "Laura", a young English community liaison worker and former religious studies teacher who has recently converted to Islam. Drawing on data generated from a qualitative and predominantly interview-based research project that investigated issues of pedagogy and social justice in English schools,…

  7. "No DH, No Interview"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pannapacker, William

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses digital humanities (DH) and what future it holds for graduate students who are riding the digital-humanities bandwagon. He spoke with several graduate students about their interest in the field: how they got into it and began their first projects. Laura Mandell, director of the Initiative for Digital…

  8. Balancing ethical decisions and financial constraints in practice.

    PubMed

    2016-05-28

    Some vets find charging properly for their services to be a stressful and challenging aspect of practice. However, as James Yeates argued during a session at the BSAVA congress in Birmingham last month, charging correctly can be justified both economically and ethically. Laura Honey reports. PMID:27235491

  9. Technology in Education. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1995

    1995-01-01

    This theme issue includes four articles on the effective use of computers and electronic technology in education, and on equitable access to educational technologies for Hispanics and other minority groups. "Teachers and Instructional Technology: Wise or Foolish Choices" (Laura Chris Green) describes three unproductive roles for computer…

  10. Consumer Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bibel, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an annotated bibliography of 19 titles that focus on cancer and health-care reform. These include: (1) Anderson, John W. "Stand by Her: A Breast Cancer Guide for Men." AMACOM: American Management Assn.; (2) Carstensen, Laura L. "A Long Bright Future: An Action Plan for a Lifetime of Happiness, Health, and Financial Security."…

  11. Whose Deficit Is This Anyhow? Exploring Counter-Stories of Somali Bantu Refugees' Experiences in "Doing School"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Laura A.; Roxas, Kevin C.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, Laura Roy and Kevin Roxas draw from two studies with Somali Bantu refugee families in South Texas and Michigan. Findings from both study sites revealed a disconnect between how educators perceived the Somali Bantu families' educational goals and Somali Bantu families' actual views of education. In contrast to educators'…

  12. Proceedings of the National Conference on the Impact of Collective Bargaining on the Quality of Education Today (December 2-4, 1979).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jacqueline A., Ed.

    Proceedings of the National Conference on the Impact of Collective Bargaining on the Quality of Education Today are presented. Among the contents are the following papers: "The Importance of Improving the Quality of Education in Our Schools," by Laura Clausen; "Quality Education, Collective Bargaining and Social Equity," by Richard deLone; and…

  13. Thirteen for Thirteen-Year-Olds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructor, 2011

    2011-01-01

    What does it take to reach a middle school reader? Literacy expert Laura Robb recently shared her top strategies in a webcast for Scholastic fans. This article presents Robb's 13 strategies for thirteen-year-olds. These are: (1) Respect students' search for self; (2) Embrace blogging; (3) Send texts in class; (4) Take words apart; (5) Build…

  14. "Butterfly under a Pin": An Emergent Teacher Image amid Mandated Curriculum Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Cheryl J.

    2012-01-01

    The author examines 1 experienced teacher's image of teaching and how it was purposely changed--through external intervention and against the individual's will--from the view of teacher as curriculum maker to the view of teacher as curriculum implementer. Laura's account of the "butterfly under a pin" image, a version of the…

  15. My Desire for Art Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hetrick, Laura J.

    2013-01-01

    In this commentary, Laura Hetrick focuses on what is inherently missing from the art education literature about teaching future teachers of art--of addressing nascent teachers' personal, pedagogical, and professional desires. Specifically, she considers teachers' desires for power and recognition, their desires to love and be loved, and…

  16. LUCY: A New Path to Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marrah, Arleezah; Mills, Roxanne

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the Librarianship Upgrades for Children and Youth Services (LUCY), a multifaceted multicultural continuing education program for librarians developed by the Library and Information Science Program at Old Dominion University. The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) funds LUCY through the Laura Bush 21st century…

  17. Indigenizing Children's Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Debbie

    2008-01-01

    In this article the author situates the analysis of two popular children's books in theoretical frameworks emerging from American Indian Studies. Using a new historicist lens, she discusses Anne Rockwell's (1999) "Thanksgiving Day" and Laura Ingalls Wilder's (1935/1971) "Little House on the Prairie" and suggests that these…

  18. Collaboration: A Reply to Bowern & Warner's Reply

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Laura; Crippen, James

    2015-01-01

    Although Laura Robinson and James Crippen disagree strongly with a number of Bowern and Warner's [see EJ1075309] characterizations of their own paper ["In Defense of the Lone Wolf: Collaboration in Language Documentation" v7 p123-135 2013], Robinson and Crippen do agree with most of Bowern and Warner's assertions. In this reply, Robinson…

  19. Standards and Assessment. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1997

    1997-01-01

    This newsletter includes three articles, two of which focus on standards for student evaluation and for admission to higher education. "A Measuring Stick for Standards and TEKS: Meeting the Needs of Second Language Learners" (Laura Chris Green, Adela Solis) examines beliefs embodied in the notion of standards; defines content, performance, and…

  20. Letting Go of Overresponsibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Counseling and Development, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Contains five personal accounts of counselor overinvolvement: (1) "The First Step" (Mary Dougherty-Hunt); (2) "From Chaos to Organization" (Laura Hill); (3) "Whose Problem Is It?" (Max Hines); (4) "Helping Can Hurt" (Derek Paar); and (5) "The Heroic Syndrome" (Gerald Stone). (NB)

  1. 78 FR 77151 - Notice of Senior Executive Service Performance Review Board Appointments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-20

    ..., Bret Creech Black, Michael S. Blanchard, Mary Josie Boling, Edward A. Bolton, Hannibal Bowker, Bryan L...-Davis, Laura E. Darnell, Joseph D. Davis, Mark H. Dean, Francis J. Deerinwater, Daniel J. Delaplaine, L.... Wainman, Barbara V. Walker, William T. Walkoviak, Larry P. Walsh, Noreen E. Ward, Joseph M. Jr....

  2. Crisis in Community: Conflicting Values, Competing Voices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Mary Anne

    In "Working-Class Women in the Academy," Laura Weaver explains how her working class background affected the attitudes she developed toward members and the elements of the middle-class academy. Weaver says she considers education a privilege, something that must be earned. She holds a particular empathy for working-class students who know that…

  3. Should There Be a National Curriculum for Technological Literacy?: Opinions from Leaders in the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hummell, Laura Johnson; Lipton, Ethan B.; Morrow, Mellissa; Streichler, Jerry; Zuga, Karen

    2007-01-01

    This article shares the opinions of several leaders in technology education regarding the need for a national curriculum for technology literacy. Laura Johnson Hummell, a North Carolina middle school technology education teacher and doctoral candidate at East Carolina University, believes that the United States should have a national curriculum…

  4. Early Years Children Think Too!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mooney, Laura

    2013-01-01

    During a recent theme on "Ourselves," Laura Mooney's class focused on height and looking at similarities and differences between a range of objects. This involved not only looking at each other, but also linked to their self-portrait development, where they had been learning about their facial features and comparing them to other…

  5. PROSPECTIVE PREGNANCY STUDY DESIGNS FOR ASSESSING REPRODUCTIVE AND DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prospective Pregnancy Study Designs for Assessing Reproductive and Developmental Toxicants
    Germaine M. Buck,1 Courtney D. Johnson,1 Joseph Stanford,2 Anne Sweeney,3 Laura Schieve,4 John Rockett,5 Sherry G. Selevan,6 Steve Schrader 7

    Abstract
    The origin of successfu...

  6. A World of Magic: Conference Papers from the Selected Sessions of the AACRAO Annual Meeting (79th, Orlando, FL, April 18-23, 1993).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Michele, Ed.

    Papers on aspects of college admission, records, and institutional research functions are: "How To Improve Office Morale" (Victor Swenson); "Staff Meetings: How To Save Hours per Month and Develop Your Staff" (LuAnn Harris, Shelley Olsen); "Selling SPEED/ExPRESS" (Laura Patterson, Thomas Scott); "Advisement and Registration: A Terminal Solution"…

  7. Formation of Verbal Behavior of Deaf-Blind Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umezu, Hachizo

    The monograph describes the development of verbal behavior over a 20-year period in two deaf Japanese children (5- and 7-years-old when first contacted by the author) with whom previous training attempts had failed. It is noted that prior training methods which had succeeded with Laura Bridgman and Helen Keller failed with these two children. A…

  8. [Recreation for Youth with Deaf Blindness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Theresa, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This newsletter special issue focuses on recreational programming for people with deaf blindness. The following individual articles are presented: "Strategies To Promote Community Integrated Recreation: Guidelines for Leisure Coaches" by Joann Enos (which lists seven such strategies); "Assessing Recreation and Leisure Preferences" by Laura Rocchio…

  9. MEASURED CONCENTRATIONS OF HERBICIDES AND MODEL PREDICTIONS OF ATRAZINE FATE IN THE PATUXENT RIVER ESTUARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    McConnell, Laura L., Jennifer A. Harman-Fetcho and James D. Hagy, III. 2004. Measured Concentrations of Herbicides and Model Predictions of Atrazine Fate in the Patuxent River Estuary. J. Environ. Qual. 33(2):594-604. (ERL,GB X1051).

    The environmental fate of herbicides i...

  10. The White House Conference on School Libraries Proceedings (Washington, DC, June 4, 2002).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute of Museum and Library Services, Washington, DC.

    Laura Bush hosted a White House Conference on School Libraries on June 4, 2002, to discuss the latest research on libraries, student achievement and successful local programs. Mrs. Bush's cohost was Dr. Robert Martin, Director of the Institute of Museum and Library Services and education, library, government and philanthropic leaders from across…

  11. Proceedings: Conference on the Community/Junior College (Knoxville, Tennessee, April 25-26, 1974).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCullough, K. Owen, Ed.

    Presented at the 1974 Community/Junior College Conference, the papers in this monograph examine issues related to institutional, program, staff, and student evaluation. After K. Owen McCullough's and Earl M. Ramer's prefatory remarks, Laura Bornholdt presents a typology of negative staff attitudes toward program and institutional evaluations;…

  12. Establishing an Inclusive Educational System in Samara a Partnership between West Lothian, Barnardo's and Samara

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currie, Laura-Ann; Prudnikova, Victoria; Yarkova, Natalya

    2005-01-01

    In this article, Laura Ann Currie and Victoria Prudnikova describe a three-year Russian/Scottish partnership designed to take forward an inclusive educational policy in the Samara Region of Russia. Education staff from West Lothian Council and Barnardo's visited the Samara Region to train staff there to help take forward their inclusion programme.…

  13. Writing the "Little House": The Architecture of a Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romines, Ann

    1994-01-01

    Laura Ingalls Wilder's Little House series of novels tells the story of her life through narratives developed around housing; male traditions of buying and building; and female traditions of furnishing, housekeeping, and preservation of culture. Wilder made Great Plains houses a central metaphor of U.S. culture. (KS)

  14. Golden Hill, Volume Five. Work and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Lee, Ed.; And Others

    The 12 articles and stories in this issue focus on the integration of work and learning and on adult learning. "An Introduction to 'Work and Learning'" (Lee Herman) outlines the scope of the volume. "Child's Work" (Nancy Wallace) shows children's independent play to be important intellectual work. "Learning to Write" (Laura Robert) is a Kafkaesque…

  15. Treating "the Poor"--Classism or a Rigid Loyalty to Theory?: Comment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Harriet

    2006-01-01

    Comments on "Psychotherapy, classism, and the poor: Conspicuous by their absence" by Laura Smith (see record 2005-11834-002). Smith suggested that social psychology theories might explain how a negative attitude toward the poor has reduced the interest of practitioners in poor patients. The current author was impressed by Smith's comments when …

  16. Looking outside the (voice)box.

    PubMed

    Gartrell, Nanette; Rothblum, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Laura S. Brown, PhD, is a clinical and forensic psychologist in independent practice in Seattle, Washington. The bulk of her scholarly work has been in the fields of feminist therapy theory, trauma treatment, lesbian and gay issues, assessment and diagnosis, ethics and standards of care in psychotherapy, and cultural competence. She has authored or edited ten professional books, including the award-winning Subversive Dialogues: Theory in Feminist Therapy, as well as more than 140 other professional publications. She has also recently published her first book for general audiences, Your turn for care: Surviving the aging and death of the adults who harmed you. Laura has been featured in five psychotherapy training videos produced by the American Psychological Association. She was President of American Psychological Association Divisions 35 (Society for the Psychology of Women), 44 (Society for the Psychological Study of Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual Issues), and 56 (Trauma Psychology). Laura was also President of the Washington State Psychological Association. She is the founder and Director of the Fremont Community Therapy Project, a low-fee psychotherapy training clinic in Seattle. In the fall of 2000, she was the on-site psychologist for the reality show Survivor: The Australian Outback. In 1987, Laura lost her voice and was diagnosed with spasmodic dysphonia. In 1988, she found her voice again. PMID:24400628

  17. 76 FR 10083 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: DS-7652, U.S. National Commission for UNESCO...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-23

    ... Traveling Fellowship ACTION: Notice of request for public comments. SUMMARY: The Department of State is... of Information Collection: U.S. National Commission for UNESCO Laura W. Bush Traveling Fellowship... and university students applying for a Fellowship. Estimated Number of Respondents: 100....

  18. World War II Activity Day: Through the Eyes of Trainee Treachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Emily; Hornsby, Laura; Howard, Abigail; Pople, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    As student teachers, authors Emily Clark, Laura Hornsby, Abigail Howard, and Kathryn Pople were aware of what the class had already covered on World War 2 (WW2). It was unclear to them, however, what knowledge the children actually had acquired from the lessons. In this article these student teachers describe their use of concept mapping as they…

  19. Significance of Marketing Practices for Work Force Preparation. National Marketing Education Research Conference (Key West, Florida, May 19-21, 1995).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of West Florida, Pensacola.

    The following papers are included: "Concepts on Marketing Issues in the Czech Republic" (Anne Mills); "Requiring More of Teacher Preparation: Authentic Assessment as a Vehicle to Reform" (Laura J. Wyant); "A Delphi Study of Professional Competencies for the Secondary Marketing Educator" (Trellys A. Morris); "The Status of Business and Marketing…

  20. Child Nutrition. Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Jacqueline; Eastman, Wayne; Aird, Laura Dutil; McCrea, Nadine L.

    2002-01-01

    Four workshops focus on nutrition for infants and children in child care settings. Articles are: (1) "Nutrition and Child Development: Global Perspectives" (Jacqueline Hayden); (2) "Working with Families around Nutritional Issues" (Wayne Eastman); (3) "Breastfeeding Promotion in Child Care" (Laura Dutil Aird); and (4) "Food as Shared…

  1. Survivors on Campus: A Dialogue about Sexual Assault

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray-Rosendale, Laura; Dierking, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    At a conference last fall, Kirsten Dierking came across "College Girl: A Memoir," a book by Laura Gray-Rosendale that tells the story of a brutal sexual assault she experienced as a college student. While she purchased a copy of the book, it sat unopened on her desk for a while; also a victim of brutal rape in college, she was not sure…

  2. Transitions from High School to College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venezia, Andrea; Jaeger, Laura

    2013-01-01

    The vast majority of high school students aspire to some kind of postsecondary education, yet far too many of them enter college without the basic content knowledge, skills, or habits of mind they need to succeed. Andrea Venezia and Laura Jaeger look at the state of college readiness among high school students, the effectiveness of programs in…

  3. Knowing the Joy: A Family's Story of Down Syndrome Adoptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munro, Carol

    2006-01-01

    Paul Muessig, an Advanced Technology Integrator with the Marine Corps Systems Command in Quantico, Virginia, and his wife Brenda were parents of three grown daughters--Laura, Elizabeth, and Hannah, now 21, 20 and 19 years old--when they decided they hadn't had their fill of raising children. So, nearly empty nesters, they decided to adopt four…

  4. 76 FR 62433 - Delegation of Authority to the Office of Disaster Management and National Security

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Delegation of Authority to the Office of Disaster Management and National Security...: Laura L. McClure, Acting Chief Disaster and National Security Officer, Office of Disaster Management and... disaster management and national security; and to ensure that HUD's security and disaster...

  5. Meteor Beliefs Project: ``Year of Meteors''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBeath, Alastair; Drobnock, George J.; Gheorghe, Andrei Dorian

    2011-10-01

    We present a discussion linking ideas from a modern music album by Laura Veirs back to a turbulent time in American history 150 years ago, which inspired poet Walt Whitman to compose his poem "Year of Meteors", and the meteor beliefs of the period around 1859-1860, when collection of facts was giving way to analyses and theoretical explanations in meteor science.

  6. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 23, Number 4, July-August 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Meeting of the Minds: The Parent-Teacher Conference Is the Cornerstone of School-Home Relations. How Can It Work for All Families? (Laura Pappano); (2) In Search of That "Third…

  7. Implementing No Child Left Behind in Three States. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stecher, Brian M.; Epstein, Scott; Hamilton, Laura S.; Marsh, Julie A.; Robyn, Abby; McCombs, Jennifer Sloan; Russell, Jennifer; Naftel, Scott

    2008-01-01

    This research brief describes work done for RAND Education and documented in "Pain and Gain: Implementing No Child Left Behind in Three States, 2004-2006", Brian M. Stecher, Scott Epstein, Laura S. Hamilton, Julie A. Marsh, Abby Robyn, Jennifer Sloan McCombs, Jennifer Russell, and Scott Naftel." The three states discussed are: California, Georgia,…

  8. Storytime in a Digital World: Making a Case for Thinking Outside the Book

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paganelli, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Storytime is an important fixture in many school libraries that helps foster students' reading abilities. With a history of success, why would librarians want to alter storytime by incorporating technology? This article discusses how Laura Fleming, a long-time school librarian, addressed decreased student engagement in traditional reading…

  9. Histories of Special Education: Stories from Our Past, Insights for Our Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, J. David

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the contributions of historical research to special education and describes the research by Margaret Mead, the views of Helen Keller, and Laura Bridgman, and the work of Samuel Gridley Howe. The importance of understanding aspects of people and events that have previously been overlooked is emphasized. (CR)

  10. Taming Serendipity

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Laura H.

    2011-01-01

    The discovery of high-temperature iron-based superconductors in 2008 thrilled researchers because it indicated that there could be another – more useful – class of superconductors just waiting to be found. Laura H Greene shares that enthusiasm and calls for global collaboration to reveal these new materials.

  11. Support for Science from a Foundation Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finberg, Barbara D.

    1990-01-01

    Presents examples of unique contributions of individuals at private foundations to the emergence and growth of scientific research on child and adolescent development. Discusses specific leaders of the Carnegie Foundation and the Laura Spelman Rockefeller Memorial Fund to demonstrate how influential individuals can be in determining major…

  12. Philanthropy and the Gospel of Child Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlossman, Steven

    1981-01-01

    Highlights the role of the Laura Spelman Rockefeller Memorial Foundation in promoting child development research and parent education in America during the 1920s. The author discusses the ways that the movement's stress on scientific objectivity help to increase its acceptance by both parents and educators. (AM)

  13. Perils of Popularization: The Founding of PARENTS' MAGAZINE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlossman, Steven

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the founding of a post-World War I mass circulation periodical, PARENTS' MAGAZINE, aimed at educating parents in new child-rearing practices through research supported by the Laura Spelman Rockefeller Memorial (LSRM) fund program. Also discusses unsuccessful efforts of two chief program officers to maintain control over magazine…

  14. Educational Boards and Foundations, 1924-1926. Bulletin, 1927, No. 10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Henry R.

    1927-01-01

    The document reports on the income and disbursements of the following organizations; (1) General Education Board; (2) Rockefeller Foundation; (3) Carnegie Corporation of New York; (4) Laura Spelman Rockefeller Memorial; (5) Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching; (6) John F. Slater Fund; (7) Jeanes Fund; (8) Phelps-Stokes Fund; (9)…

  15. A Special Relationship: Rockefeller, Child Study, and Race.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milar, Katherine S.

    In 1928, the Laura Spelman Rockefeller Memorial granted funds to the University of Cincinnati to establish a child study and parent education program for African-Americans. This paper traces the origin of the idea for this program to a special relationship between the family of John D. Rockefeller, Sr. and Spelman College, an African-American…

  16. Teaching Critical Thinking: Using Seminars for 21st Century Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Terry; Billings, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Help students meet today's literacy demands with this new book from Terry Roberts and Laura Billings. The authors show how a seminar approach can lead students deeper into a text and improve their speaking, listening, and writing skills, as recommended by the Common Core State Standards. Roberts and Billings provide easy-to-follow information on…

  17. Censoring History: Citizenship and Memory in Japan, Germany, and the United States. Asia and the Pacific.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hein, Laura, Ed.; Selden, Mark, Ed.

    This collection of essays focuses on textbook treatments of World War II in Japan, Germany, and the United States and gives readers a new perspective on the creation of national identities and international misunderstandings. Essays in the collection are: (1) "The Lessons of War, Global Power, and Social Change" (Laura Hein; Mark Selden); (2) "The…

  18. 78 FR 47433 - GENCAP Strategies LLC, et al.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-05

    ..., 2020 K Street NW., Washington, DC 20006. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Laura L. Solomon, Senior... Management, Exemptive Applications Office). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The following is a summary of the... for which pricing information is not readily available. No affiliated persons of applicants or any...

  19. Must Public Education Restore Its Image as Great Equalizer?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Nora

    2006-01-01

    Widely viewed today by many taxpayers, business leaders, and elected officials as inefficient, ineffective, bureaucratic, public education is losing its once-noble brand position as the cornerstone of American democracy. According to Laura Ries, a marketing guru, the first problem is the name, it is called public education. It is because the…

  20. Working Papers in Educational Linguistics, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, David Cassels, Ed.; Hult, Francis M., Ed.

    2003-01-01

    This collection of articles includes the following: "Second Language Acquisition Research and Applied Linguistics" (Teresa Pica); "'Communicative Lingerings': An Exploratory Study of the Experience of 'Foreign' Communicative Features in the Interactions of American Expatriates after Reentry" (Laura Sicola); "Acquiring Business English in a…

  1. SHORTER MENSTRUAL CYCLES ASSOCIATED WITH CHLORINATION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Shorter Menstrual Cycles Associated with Chlorination by-Products in Drinking Water.
    Gayle Windham, Kirsten Waller, Meredith Anderson, Laura Fenster, Pauline Mendola, Shanna Swan. California Department of Health Services.

    In previous studies of tap water consumption we...

  2. TIME TO PREGNANCY IN RELATION TO TOTAL TRIHALOMETHANE LEVELS IN TAP WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Time to pregnancy in relation to total trihalomethane levels in tap water
    Shanna H. Swan, Cuirong Ren, Gayle C. Windham, Laura Fenster, Kirsten Waller. (University of Missouri and California Department of Health Services).

    We have previously reported increased risks o...

  3. Cultivating Inquiry-Driven Learners: A College Education for the Twenty-First Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrad, Clifton; Dunek, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Inquiry-driven learners anticipate, embrace, and adapt to disruptive change. Clifton Conrad and Laura Dunek advance a transformative purpose of a college education. They invite stakeholders from across higher education to engage in vigorous dialogue about the aims of a college education--and how to realize those aims. Increasingly influenced by…

  4. 76 FR 50286 - Request for Comments and Notice of Public Hearing Concerning China's Compliance With WTO Commitments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-12

    ... interagency Trade Policy Staff Committee (TPSC) will convene a public hearing and seek public comment to... alternatives to on-line submissions, please contact Laura Newport, Trade Policy Staff Committee, at (202) 395... Web site ( http://www.ustr.gov ). Donald W. Eiss, Acting Chair, Trade Policy Staff Committee....

  5. 76 FR 50284 - Request for Public Comments on Interim Review of Eligibility of Cote d'Ivoire, Guinea, and Niger...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-12

    ... Opportunity Act Implementation Subcommittee of the Trade Policy Staff Committee (the ``Subcommittee'') is... submission at http://www.regulations .gov, please contact Laura Newport, Trade Policy Staff Committee, at....regulations .gov, docket number USTR-2011-0009. Donald W. Eiss, Acting Chair, Trade Policy Staff...

  6. Literary Study, Measurement, and the Sublime: Disciplinary Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heiland, Donna, Ed.; Rosenthal, Laura J., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This collection of essays, "Literary Study, Measurement, and the Sublime: Disciplinary Assessment," edited by Donna Heiland and Laura J. Rosenthal, represents an important new venture in the Foundation's communication program. The book is the product of many authors, including the editors, both of whom have written essays for it. But it is the…

  7. The Past, Present, and Future of Second Language Research: Selected Proceedings of the 2000 Second Language Research Forum (Madison, Wisconsin, September 7-10, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonch-Bruevich, Xenia, Ed.; Crawford, William J., Ed.; Hellermann, John, Ed.; Higgins, Christina, Ed.; Nguyen, Hanh, Ed.

    This book presents 16 peer-reviewed papers from a 2000 conference on second language research. Part 1, "Formal Investigations of SLA," includes "L2 Acquisition of English Liquids: Evidence for Production Independent from Perception" (Laura Catharine Smith); "Is L2 Learning the Same as L1 Learning? Learning L2 Phonology in Optimality Theory"…

  8. 77 FR 69511 - Columbia ETF Trust, et al.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-19

    ...(c) and 17(b) of the Investment Company Act of 1940 (the ``Act'') for an exemption from section 17(a.... Plummer, Esq. and Paul B. Goucher, Esq., Ameriprise Financial, Inc., 5228 Ameriprise Financial Center... Center, 100 North Tryon Street, Charlotte, NC 28255. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Laura L....

  9. Instructional Technology. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1997

    1997-01-01

    This theme issue includes five articles that focus on implementing instructional technology in ways that benefit all students, including limited-English-proficient, minority, economically disadvantaged, and at-risk students. "Cruising the Web with English Language Learners" (Laura Chris Green) presents three scenarios using the World Wide Web in…

  10. Establishing Sustainable Higher Education Partnerships in a Globally Competitive Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chigisheva, Oksana

    2013-01-01

    The paper written in the form of literature review is devoted to the analysis of the latest educational manuscripts by Laura M. Portnoi et al and Robin Sakamoto et al and provides a critical overview of possible partnership interactions in the actively globalizing sphere of world higher education. [For complete volume, see ED567118.

  11. Where Daggers Are Only of the Mind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monaghan, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Laura Bates, an associate professor of English at Indiana State University, teaches college courses at Wabash Valley Correctional Facility, but her Shakespeare workshop is a rarer undertaking, with a startling history. About six years ago, an inmate in one of her college-degree courses was sent from the general population to the "SHU"--the…

  12. Working in the Virtual Stacks: The New Library and Information Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Laura Townsend, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Thanks in part to technology, the boundaries of library positions are dissolving. It is no longer practical to discuss the profession in terms of traditional library types, and in today's library, the relationship between librarians and technology is stronger than ever. In this informative volume, veteran author Laura Townsend Kane interviews…

  13. Choreographing Theory: An Analysis of Edouard Lock's "Amelia" (2002) Questioning the Limits of Feminist and Poststructuralist Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ireland, Ruby

    2009-01-01

    Edouard Lock's dance film "Amelia" (2002) is the focus of this essay. Second-wave feminist and poststructuralist perspectives inform the analysis of this piece of contemporary dance. Laura Mulvey's male gaze theory and Julia Kristeva's theory of the semiotic and symbolic realms of representation are explored and critiqued, whilst Jacques Derrida's…

  14. Sequential Art, the White House Conference, and School Library Media Specialists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Daniel D.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses sequential art, also known as comic books or graphic novels, as reading motivators, as content, as literature, and as the subject itself. Includes comic resources for school library media specialists and describes the White House Conference that Laura Bush has promoted that has given library media centers national visibility. (LRW)

  15. "Why Do They Hate Us?": Leading amid Criticism, Crisis, and Disrespect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karpinski, Carol F.

    2012-01-01

    Laura Dannon, an educator with experience as teacher, assistant principal, and principal, enjoys her profession. Faculty camaraderie and student/teacher busyness at her school have led her to think all is well. A sudden outburst by a new teacher causes her to reflect on what is really happening. What has changed? Have media criticism, movements…

  16. Feminist Film Theory and Criticism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayne, Judith

    1985-01-01

    Discusses Laura Mulvey's 1975 essay, "Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema," and the ideas about feminist film theory and psychoanalysis as a critical tool which it raises. Suggests contradiction is the central issue in feminist film theory. Explores definitions of women's cinema. (SA)

  17. Career pathways for new graduates: exploring the options.

    PubMed

    2016-04-30

    Most veterinary professionals will work in primary care practice at some point in their career, but what other options are available? Laura Honey reports on a series of sessions in the student stream at this year's BSAVA congress, which examined some of the other career paths a vet might take. PMID:27127088

  18. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (86th, Kansas City, Missouri, July 30-August 2, 2003). Radio-Television Journalism Division.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2003

    The Radio-Television Journalism Division of the proceedings contains the following 11 papers: "In Whose Best Interest? FCC Deregulation and Local News: How Cross-Ownership, National Caps, and Duopolies Are Addressed in Three Commissioned Studies" (Laura K. Smith); "Remembering the News: The Effect of Chronological Presentation of Information on…

  19. 77 FR 11195 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds-Name Change and Change in State of Incorporation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ... Revision, published July 1, 2011, at 76 FR 38892. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Surety Bond Branch at... 20782. Dated: February 15, 2012. Laura Carrico, Director, Financial Accounting and Services Division... Incorporation: Nations Bonding Company AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service, Department of...

  20. 77 FR 8956 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Grange Insurance Company of Michigan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-15

    ... Supplement No. 8 to the Treasury Department Circular 570, 2011 Revision, published July 1, 2011, at 76 FR... directed to the U.S. Department of the Treasury, Financial Management Service, Financial Accounting and...: January 31, 2012. Laura Carrico, Director, Financial Accounting and Services Division,...

  1. 75 FR 51333 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds; Change in State of Incorporation; National Trust...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-19

    ..., published July 1, 2010, at 75 FR 38192. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Surety Bond Branch at (202) 874... directed to the U.S. Department of the Treasury, Financial Management Service, Financial Accounting and...: August 10, 2010. Laura Carrico, Director, Financial Accounting and Services Division. BILLING CODE...

  2. 77 FR 553 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Amendment-Evergreen National Indemnity Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-05

    ..., 2011, at 76 FR 38892. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Surety Bond Branch at (202) 874-6850... 20782. Dated: December 20, 2011. Laura Carrico, Director, Financial Accounting and Services Division... Company AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service, Department of the Treasury. ACTION:...

  3. 76 FR 66361 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Western National Mutual Insurance Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-26

    ..., at 76 FR 38892. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Surety Bond Branch at (202) 874-6850. SUPPLEMENTARY... directed to the U.S. Department of the Treasury, Financial Management Service, Financial Accounting and...: October 7, 2011. Laura Carrico, Director, Financial Accounting and Services Division. BILLING CODE...

  4. TRIHALOMETHANE LEVELS IN HOME TAP WATER AND SEMEN QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trihalomethane Levels in Home Tap Water and Semen Quality
    Laura Fenster, 1 Kirsten Waller, 2 Gayle Windham, 1 Tanya Henneman, 2 Meredith Anderson, 2 Pauline Mendola, 3 James W. Overstreet, 4 Shanna H. Swan5

    1California Department of Health Services, Division of Environm...

  5. CHLORINATION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER AND MENSTRUAL CYCLE FUNCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorination by-Products in Drinking Water and Menstrual Cycle Function

    Gayle C. Windham1, Kirsten Waller2, Meredith Anderson2, Laura Fenster1, Pauline Mendola3, Shanna Swan4

    1California Department of Health Services, Division of Environmental and Occupational Disea...

  6. Statewide and District Professional Development in Standards: Addressing Teacher Equity. Models of Inservice. National Writing Project at Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, Richard; Roop, Laura; Setter, Gail

    2006-01-01

    The National Writing Project at Work (NWP) monograph series documents how the National Writing Project model is implemented and developed at local sites across the country. These monographs describe NWP work, which is often shared informally or in workshops. Richard Koch and Laura Roop present a model of standards-based professional development…

  7. The Midwest: Life in the Mississippi River Valley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Cathy; Gilles, Carol; Koblitz, Dick; O'Connor, Anne

    1999-01-01

    Describes 33 books that give children insight into living in the great Midwest and into westward expansion, including books by and about Laura Ingalls Wilder, on the nature of the prairie, famous figures of the Midwest, picture books, and novels. (SR)

  8. Changing Faces of Reform. Proceedings of the Annual Rural & Small Schools Conference (18th, Manhattan, Kansas, October 27-28, 1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas State Univ., Manhattan. Center for Rural Education and Small Schools.

    This proceedings contains abstracts of 21 presentations. Titles and presenters are: "Teaching and Learning in Multiage Classrooms" (Laura Blevins and others); "Leadership, School Reform and the Rural School Superintendent" (Mike Boone); "Teaching English as a Second Language from Theory to Practice" (Mingsheng Dai); "A Guide for Central Office…

  9. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 23, Number 2, March-April 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) More Than "Making Nice": Getting Teachers to (Truly) Collaborate (Laura Pappano); (2) "Doing the Critical Things First": An Aligned Approach to PreK and Early Elementary Math;…

  10. Hypersonic, nonequilibrium flow over a cylindrically blunted 6 deg wedge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    1993-01-01

    The numerical simulation of hypersonic flow in chemical nonequilibrium over cylindrically blunted 6 degree wedge is described. The simulation was executed on a Cray C-90 with Program LAURA 92-vl. Code setup procedures and sample results, including grid refinement studies and variations of species number are discussed. This simulation relates to a study of wing leading edge heating on transatmospheric vehicles.

  11. Diversity in the Workplace [in HRD].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1995

    These four papers are from a symposium that was facilitated by Laura Bierema at the 1995 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development (HRD). "The Status of Valuing and Managing Diversity in Fortune 500 Manufacturing and Fortune 500 Service Organizations: Perceptions of Top Human Resource Professionals" (Sandra J. Johnson) reports a…

  12. Issues of Gender. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This symposium is comprised of three papers on issues of gender in human resource development (HRD). "The Impact of Awareness and Action on the Implementation of a Women's Network" (Laura L. Bierema) reports on research to examine how gender consciousness emerges through the formation of in-company networks to promote corporate women's status. It…

  13. Developmental Advising--How? Why? Proceedings of the Region VII Conference on Academic Advising. (4th, Little Rock, Arkansas, May 15-17, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garnett, Donald T., Ed.

    This report of a conference on developmental advising contains the following 18 papers: "An Introduction to the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI)" (Roberta Corder); "Computer-Assisted Advising: The Personal Touch" (Susan Aldrich, Mark Peterson, Bruce Sands); "The Freshman Survey: Phase I" (Laura Lemonine); "Integrating the Myers-Briggs Type…

  14. 76 FR 11843 - U.S. National Commission for UNESCO Notice of Meeting in Closed and Open Session

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-03

    .... National Commission for UNESCO Notice of Meeting in Closed and Open Session The U.S. National Commission for UNESCO will hold a meeting in closed session on Thursday March 10, 2011, from 1 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.... National Commission for UNESCO Laura W. Bush Traveling Fellowship, a fellowship funded through...

  15. 75 FR 39089 - U.S. National Commission for UNESCO; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-07

    .... National Commission for UNESCO; Notice of Closed Meeting The U.S. National Commission for UNESCO will hold... Commission for UNESCO Laura W. Bush Traveling Fellowship, a fellowship funded through privately donated funds.... National Commission for UNESCO, Washington, DC 20037. Telephone: (202) 663-0026; Fax: (202) 663-0035;...

  16. Restorative Practices: Giving Everyone a Voice to Create Safer Saner School Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirsky, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Restorative Practices is a proactive approach to whole-school climate change based on communication and responsibility. It is an approach being developed and refined as an alternative to exclusionary and punitive "zero-tolerance" policies mandated in many schools today. In this article, Laura Mirsky of the International Institute for Restorative…

  17. Losing Libraries, Saving Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    This summer, as public libraries continued to get budget hit after budget hit across the country, several readers asked for a comprehensive picture of the ravages of the recession on library service. In partnership with 2010 Movers & Shakers Laura Solomon and Mandy Knapp, Ohio librarians who bought the Losing Libraries domain name, "LJ" launched…

  18. Increasing Access to College: Extending Possibilities for All Students. SUNY Series, Frontiers in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tierney, William G., Ed.; Hagedorn, Linda Serra, Ed.

    This collection of papers examines pre-college enrichment programs that offer a specific remedy to the problem of low income and underrepresented students' access to higher education. The 10 papers are: (1) "Pre-College Outreach Programs: A National Perspective" (Watson Scott Swail and Laura W. Perna); (2) "The Relationship between Urbanicity and…

  19. The Holocaust and History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Alan, Ed.

    2003-01-01

    This theme based journal issue consists of articles and teaching ideas focusing on the Holocaust and history. This publication contains the following materials: (1) "Multiple Perspectives on the Holocaust?" (Alan Singer); (2) "Responses to 'Multiple Perspectives on the Holocaust'"; (3) "Escape to Cuba: Story of Laura Kahn, a Holocaust Survivor"…

  20. Creation of a California Tribe: Grandfather's Maidu Indian Tales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith-Trafzer, Lee Ann; Trafzer, Clifford E.

    This children's book relates the story of Travis and Laura and how their grandfather, a Maidu Indian, teaches them about their history and culture through stories. The book stresses the importance of storytelling as the traditional way of passing on the history of Indian peoples. As part of a school project, Travis tells his classmates the Maidu…

  1. Fair Use and Copyright.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Scott; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Special section on fair use and copyright contains three articles: "The Management of Intellectual Property" (Scott Bennett); "The Meaning of Fair Use" (Kenneth Frazier), including electronic infringement and examples of court cases; and "Document Delivery" (Laura N. Gassaway), including copies for primary users, warning notices, electronic…

  2. From Mindless to Meaningful

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billings, Laura; Roberts, Terry

    2014-01-01

    Despite teachers' best intentions, traditional whole-class discussions sometimes end up sounding like the monotonous drone of Charlie Brown's teacher. But with careful planning, teachers can structure discussions that encourage meaningful student interaction and collaborative thinking, write Laura Billings and Terry Roberts of the…

  3. Providing a Global Education for Refugee Students: An Activity about Personal Budgeting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quaynor, Laura J.; Hamilton, Carrie

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe how a teacher (Carrie Hamilton) can scaffold and connect social studies concepts to a variety of students' experiences in meaningful ways. They draw on findings from Laura J. Quaynor's study about social studies education for immigrant students who are also refugees. Together, they discuss effective pedagogic…

  4. Development in Mexico and Central America. Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminars Abroad Program. Summer 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute of International Education, New York, NY.

    This document features writings and curriculum projects by teachers who traveled to Mexico and Central America in the summer of 1991 as members of a Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminar. The following items are among the 20 included: Curriculum Project: "'Escritoras Mexicanas Contemporaneas': A Survey of Mexican Women Fiction Writers" (Laura J. Beard);…

  5. INHIBITION OF TOBACCO SMOKE-INDUCED LUNG INFLAMMATION BY A CATALYTIC ANTIOXIDANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    AMathematical Model for the Kinetics of the Male Reproductive Endocrine System

    Laura K. Potter1,2, H.A. Barton2 and R.W. Setzer2
    1Curriculum in Toxicology, UNC-Chapel Hill, NC; 2US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, ETD, RTP, NC

    In this presentation a model for the hormonal regul...

  6. An Unplanned Path

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGarvey, Lynn M.; Sterenberg, Gladys Y.; Long, Julie S.

    2013-01-01

    The authors elucidate what they saw as three important challenges to overcome along the path to becoming elementary school mathematics teacher leaders: marginal interest in math, low self-confidence, and teaching in isolation. To illustrate how these challenges were mitigated, they focus on the stories of two elementary school teachers--Laura and…

  7. Life Cycle Leadership Theory vs. Theory on the Phases of Small Group Discussion: Comparisons, Contrasts, and Examples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preston, Charles Thomas, Jr.

    The work of Paul Hersey and Kenneth Blanchard on life-cycle leadership was compared and contrasted to three studies on group phase theories. The studies on group phases were conducted by Robert Bales and Fred Strodtbeck in 1951, Thomas Scheidel and Laura Crowell in 1964, and B. Aubrey Fisher in 1970. The two theoretical approaches were found to…

  8. "Because We Feel the Pressure and We Also Feel the Support": Examining the Educational Success of Undocumented Immigrant Latina/o Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enriquez, Laura E.

    2011-01-01

    Drawing from the educational experiences of fifty-four undocumented immigrant college students, Laura E. Enriquez seeks to uncover the concrete ways in which social capital is used to successfully navigate K-12 educational institutions and pursue a higher education. Enriquez argues that there is a need for a more grounded understanding of how…

  9. Into the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Library Media Activities Monthly, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Describes fully developed library media activities that are designed to be used in connection with specific curriculum units. Highlights include music (the music of Africa), language arts (American Black poets), science (the work of George Washington Carver), and social studies (Laura Ingalls Wilder and the movement West). (LRW)

  10. Assessing 21st Century Skills: A Guide to Evaluating Mastery and Authentic Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenstein, Laura

    2012-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards clearly define the skills students need for success in college and the 21st century workplace. The question is, how can you measure student mastery of skills like creativity, problem solving, and use of technology? Laura Greenstein demonstrates how teachers can teach and assess 21st century skills using authentic…

  11. Opening Re-Marks: Critical Antecedents of Visual Culture in Art Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tavin, Kevin M.

    2005-01-01

    This article examines positions in favor of the inclusion of popular culture in an education curricula by Vincent Lanier, June King McFee, Laura Chapman, and Brent and Marjory Wilson. It is argued that their work, both individually and collectively, focused on the realm of the everyday and helped posit popular cultural images as legitimate objects…

  12. The First Reactor, 40th Anniversary (rev.)

    SciTech Connect

    Allardice, Corbin; Trapnell, Edward R; Fermi, Enrico; Fermi, Laura; Williams, Robert C

    1982-12-01

    This booklet, an updated version of the original booklet describing the first nuclear reactor, was written in honor of the 40th anniversary of the first reactor or "pile". It is based on firsthand accounts told to Corbin Allardice and Edward R. Trapnell, and includes recollections of Enrico and Laura Fermi.

  13. Doing Social Media So It Matters: A Librarian's Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Laura

    2010-01-01

    Facebook, Twitter, MySpace, LinkedIn: it's difficult enough to keep abreast of social media Web sites, let alone understand how they fit into today's library. This practical resource brings together current information on the topic in a concise format that's easy to digest. Laura Solomon is a librarian with more than a decade of experience in Web…

  14. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 26, Number 5, September-October 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walser, Nancy, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Scenes from the School Turnaround Movement: Passion, Frustration, Mid-Course Corrections Mark Rapid Reforms (Laura Pappano); (2) The Media Savvy Educator: How to Work with the…

  15. Early Childhood Education. National Dropout Prevention Center/Network Newsletter. Volume 22, Number 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duckenfield, Marty, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    The "National Dropout Prevention Newsletter" is published quarterly by the National Dropout Prevention Center/Network. This issue contains the following articles: (1) Laying the Foundation for Success (Mary Caputo); (2) Ready or Not? (Laura Koenig); (3) Every Child A School-Ready Child (Leah Newkirk Meunier); (4) Parents As Teachers (Erin Garner);…

  16. Music Activities for "Mama", "Mama" and "Papa", "Papa"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardany, Audrey Berger

    2011-01-01

    Jean Marzollo creates two beautiful texts using a child's first words, "Mama, Mama" and "Papa, Papa" as a recurring theme. Wildlife artist, Laura Regan, illustrates Marzollo's poetry with loving images of parents and children in the animal kingdom. Poetry and illustrations highlight the tenderness and care of Mama and Papa as they bond with their…

  17. Making Art at a Glance: A Critique of "Discover Art." Elementary Subjects Center Series No. 90.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Wanda T.

    This report presents a detailed analysis of "Discover Art," an elementary textbook series by Laura Chapman. The study was guided by a large set of framing questions requiring a detailed examination of the series' goals, rationale, and structure; content selection, organization, and emphasis; the coherence of content explication in the student…

  18. Unequal Fortunes: Snapshots from the South Bronx

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Arthur; Scheiber, Laura

    2010-01-01

    In this powerful book, Arthur Levine (president of the Woodrow Wilson Foundation) and coauthor Laura Scheiber revisit the South Bronx, where Levine grew up in the 1960s, and compare his experiences with those of a group of teenagers coming of age in the same neighborhood nearly 40 years later. Shaken by the violent death of Leo Disla, one of the…

  19. Aerothermodynamic methods for a Mars environmental survey Mars entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitcheltree, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics models for the thermodynamics and transport properties used in an equilibrium version of the Langley aerothermodynamics upwind relaxation algorithm (LAURA) for Mars atmospheric entries are described. In addition, the physical models used in a nonequilibrium version of LAURA for Mars-entry flows are described. Uncertainties exist in defining constants used in the transport properties for the equilibrium model and in many of the physical models for the nonequilibrium version. Solutions from the two codes using the best available constants are examined at the Mars-entry conditions characteristics of the Mars environmental survey mission. While the flowfields are near thermal equilibrium, chemical nonequilibrium effects are present in the entry cases examined. Convective heating at the stagnation point for these flows (assuming fully catalytic wall boundary conditions) is approximately 100 W/cm(exp 2). Radiative heating is negligible.

  20. Computational Aerothermodynamic Simulation Issues on Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; White, Jeffery A.

    2004-01-01

    The synthesis of physical models for gas chemistry and turbulence from the structured grid codes LAURA and VULCAN into the unstructured grid code FUN3D is described. A directionally Symmetric, Total Variation Diminishing (STVD) algorithm and an entropy fix (eigenvalue limiter) keyed to local cell Reynolds number are introduced to improve solution quality for hypersonic aeroheating applications. A simple grid-adaptation procedure is incorporated within the flow solver. Simulations of flow over an ellipsoid (perfect gas, inviscid), Shuttle Orbiter (viscous, chemical nonequilibrium) and comparisons to the structured grid solvers LAURA (cylinder, Shuttle Orbiter) and VULCAN (flat plate) are presented to show current capabilities. The quality of heating in 3D stagnation regions is very sensitive to algorithm options in general, high aspect ratio tetrahedral elements complicate the simulation of high Reynolds number, viscous flow as compared to locally structured meshes aligned with the flow.

  1. Of Languages and Epistemologies: Reflections of a Graduate International Student on the Road to Becoming a Researcher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colombo, Laura

    2014-01-01

    It is late at night, after working all day on her postdoctoral research Laura Colombo is trying to wind down while drawing and jotting down thoughts in her notebook. She is in the living room/office of her apartment in Buenos Aires, the city where she was born and left when she was 26 years old to pursue her graduate studies in the United States…

  2. Fulfilling Dreams in Adult Education: Managing the Multi-Level Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley, Rebecca J.

    2008-01-01

    Have you ever wondered how Laura Ingalls Wilder taught all of her students in the little one-room school house in The Little House on the Prairie series? How did she teach students on so many different levels and all at the same time? Well, that is exactly what it is like in most adult education classrooms today. The purpose of this paper is to…

  3. The health risks of new-wave vegetarianism.

    PubMed

    Szabo, L

    1997-05-15

    Many young people call themselves vegetarians because they don't eat meat, but the eating style they are adopting is fraught with health risks. In this article, which won CMAJ's 1996 Army Chouinard Memorial Essay Contest for Canadian journalism students, Laura Brydges Szabo looks at the "new vegetarianism" and the recommendations health care professionals are making to young people intent on following this incomplete diet. The contest encourages journalism students to write on health care topics. PMID:9164409

  4. The health risks of new-wave vegetarianism

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, L

    1997-01-01

    Many young people call themselves vegetarians because they don't eat meat, but the eating style they are adopting is fraught with health risks. In this article, which won CMAJ's 1996 Army Chouinard Memorial Essay Contest for Canadian journalism students, Laura Brydges Szabo looks at the "new vegetarianism" and the recommendations health care professionals are making to young people intent on following this incomplete diet. The contest encourages journalism students to write on health care topics. PMID:9164409

  5. Spring Research Festival and NICBR Collaboration Winners Announced | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer, and Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer The winners of the 2014 Spring Research Festival (SRF), held May 7 and 8, were recognized on July 2, and included 20 NCI at Frederick researchers: Matthew Anderson, Victor Ayala, Matt Bess, Cristina Bergamaschi, Charlotte Choi, Rami Doueiri, Laura Guasch Pamies, Diana Haines, Saadia Iftikhar, Maria Kaltcheva, Wojciech Kasprzak, Balamurugan Kuppusamy, James Lautenberger, George Lountos, Megan Mounts, Uma Mudunuri, Martha Sklavos, Gloriana Shelton, Alex Sorum, and Shea Wright.

  6. Engineering Bioluminescent Proteins: Expanding their Analytical Potential

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Laura; Dikici, Emre; Daunert, Sylvia

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Bioluminescence has been observed in nature since the dawn of time, but now, scientists are harnessing it for analytical applications. Laura Rowe, Emre Dikici, and Sylvia Daunert of the University of Kentucky describe the origins of bioluminescent proteins and explore their uses in the modern chemistry laboratory. The cover features spectra of bioluminescent light superimposed on an image of jellyfish, which are a common source of bioluminescent proteins. Images courtesy of Emre Dikici and Shutterstock. PMID:19725502

  7. The First Reactor [40th Anniversary Commemorative Edition].

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    1982-12-01

    This updated and revised story of the first reactor, or 'pile,' commemorates the 40th anniversary of the first controlled, self-sustaining nuclear chain reaction created by mankind. Enrico Fermi and his team of scientists initiated the reaction on December 2, 1941, underneath the West Stands of Stagg Field at the University of Chicago. Firsthand accounts of the participants as well as postwar recollections by Enrico and Laura Fermi are included.

  8. STS-26 crewmembers participate in bench review at offsite Boeing Bldg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, crewmembers participate in bench review at the offsite Boeing Building. Commander Frederick H. Hauck reviews a checklist of necessary supplies with Flight Equipment Processing engineer Laura E. Duvall. Pilot Richard O. Covey makes notations on checklist in background. Hygiene supplies (razors, deodorants, brushes, combs, etc.) are displayed on table behind Hauck. Photograph was taken by Keith Meyers of the NEW YORK TIMES.

  9. STS-26 crewmembers participate in bench review at offsite Boeing Bldg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, crewmembers participate in bench review at the offsite Boeing Building. Left to right Mission Specialist (MS) David C. Hilmers, MS George D. Nelson, Commander Frederick H. Hauck, and Pilot Richard O. Covey, holding clipboards with checklists, look over hygiene supplies (razors, deodorants, tooth paste, etc.). Flight Equipment Processing engineer Laura E. Duvall, standing behind crew members, waits to lend a hand in the 'shopping spree'. Photograph was taken by Keith Meyers of the NEW YORK TIMES.

  10. Vet Futures: taking account of the wider veterinary team.

    PubMed

    2016-08-13

    A summit meeting held at the Royal Veterinary College in July saw the launch of an action plan to take forward the six key ambitions set out in the 2015 Vet Futures report. Developed by an action group following publication of the report, the plan outlines an ambitious programme of work. The summit also saw the launch of a VN Futures report setting out a vision for the veterinary nursing profession over the next five years. Laura Honey reports. PMID:27516558

  11. Are the Animal Welfare Acts achieving their full potential?

    PubMed

    2016-07-30

    A decade has passed since the Animal Welfare Act 2006 and the Animal Health and Welfare (Scotland) Act 2006 became law. A session at this year's Animal Welfare Foundation Discussion Forum examined the successes and limitations of the Acts and whether they are working to their full potential. Further discussions centred on the keeping of non-traditional companion animals as pets and whether greater regulation of the pet trade is needed. Laura Honey reports. PMID:27474055

  12. Taxonomic revision of the genus Prionopelta (Hymenoptera, Formicidae) in the Malagasy region

    PubMed Central

    Overson, Rick; Fisher, Brian L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In this study we revise the taxonomy of the genus Prionopelta for the Malagasy region, treating seven species, six of which are newly described (Prionopelta laurae sp. n., Prionopelta seychelles sp. n., Prionopelta subtilis sp. n., Prionopelta talos sp. n., Prionopelta vampira sp. n., Prionopelta xerosilva sp. n.), and one redescribed (Prionopelta descarpentriesi Santschi). One species, Prionopelta seychelles, is restricted to Seychelles, while the six remaining species treated are endemic to Madagascar. PMID:26155073

  13. Thrifty: An Exascale Architecture for Energy Proportional Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Torrellas, Josep

    2014-12-23

    The objective of this project is to design key aspects of an exascale architecture called Thrifty that addresses the challenges of power/energy efficiency, resiliency, and performance in exascale systems. The project includes work on computer architecture (Josep Torrellas from University of Illinois), compilation (Daniel Quinlan from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory), runtime and applications (Laura Carrington from University of California San Diego), and circuits (Wilfred Pinfold from Intel Corporation).

  14. Giving a Newborn a Bath in her Parents' Presence.

    PubMed

    Didry, Pascale; Didry, Emmanuelle

    2015-11-01

    Today, Sophie is working on the maternity ward. She is going to give Manon, David and Laura's first born, a bath. Manon was born on the day before. She weighs 3.350kg and is 49cm long. She has already got a lot of fuzzy brown hair. Both parents are looking forward to watching and learning how to care for their new baby. PMID:26548395

  15. Hypersonic, nonequilibrium flow over the FIRE 2 forebody at 1634 sec

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, Lin Hartung

    1994-01-01

    The numerical simulation of hypersonic flow in thermochemical nonequilibrium over the forebody of the FIRE 2 vehicle at 1634 sec in its trajectory is described. The simulation was executed on a Cray C90 with the program Langley Aerodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA) 4.0.2. Code setup procedures and sample results, including grid refinement studies, are discussed. This simulation relates to a study of radiative heating predictions on aerobrake type vehicles.

  16. The first reactor [40th anniversary commemorative edition

    SciTech Connect

    1982-12-01

    This updated and revised story of the first reactor, or 'pile,' commemorates the 40th anniversary of the first controlled, self-sustaining nuclear chain reaction created by mankind. Enrico Fermi and his team of scientists initiated the reaction on December 2, 1941, underneath the West Stands of Stagg Field at the University of Chicago. Firsthand accounts of the participants as well as postwar recollections by Enrico and Laura Fermi are included.

  17. Computations of Viking Lander Capsule Hypersonic Aerodynamics with Comparisons to Ground and Flight Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edquist, Karl T.

    2006-01-01

    Comparisons are made between the LAURA Navier-Stokes code and Viking Lander Capsule hypersonic aerodynamics data from ground and flight measurements. Wind tunnel data are available for a 3.48 percent scale model at Mach 6 and a 2.75 percent scale model at Mach 10.35, both under perfect gas air conditions. Viking Lander 1 aerodynamics flight data also exist from on-board instrumentation for velocities between 2900 and 4400 m/sec (Mach 14 to 23.3). LAURA flowfield solutions are obtained for the geometry as tested or flown, including sting effects at tunnel conditions and finite-rate chemistry effects in flight. Using the flight vehicle center-of-gravity location (trim angle approx. equals -11.1 deg), the computed trim angle at tunnel conditions is within 0.31 degrees of the angle derived from Mach 6 data and 0.13 degrees from the Mach 10.35 trim angle. LAURA Mach 6 trim lift and drag force coefficients are within 2 percent of measured data, and computed trim lift-to-drag ratio is within 4 percent of the data. Computed trim lift and drag force coefficients at Mach 10.35 are within 5 percent and 3 percent, respectively, of wind tunnel data. Computed trim lift-to-drag ratio is within 2 percent of the Mach 10.35 data. Using the nominal density profile and center-of-gravity location, LAURA trim angle at flight conditions is within 0.5 degrees of the total angle measured from on-board instrumentation. LAURA trim lift and drag force coefficients at flight conditions are within 7 and 5 percent, respectively, of the flight data. Computed trim lift-to-drag ratio is within 4 percent of the data. Computed aerodynamics sensitivities to center-of-gravity location, atmospheric density, and grid refinement are generally small. The results will enable a better estimate of aerodynamics uncertainties for future Mars entry vehicles where non-zero angle-of-attack is required.

  18. And now, a word from our sponsor.

    PubMed

    Peebles, M Ellen

    2003-10-01

    Bryant Pharmaceutical's flagship product, a popular arthritis medicine called Seflex, is selling well--but not well enough. With generic versions due on the shelves in a couple of years, the drug company is looking for a dramatic sales increase. No wonder marketing VP Laura Goldenberg feels the pressure. She knows she has to reach more consumers, but in an environment where people bombarded with advertising are using devices such as TiVo to skip ads, her job has suddenly taken on a new intensity. In search of a new, gangbuster campaign, Laura and her ad agency come up with the idea of product placement--not your typical integration of a product into a television or movie script, but a less traditional approach. Their idea is to hire a much-loved, elderly actress to extol the virtues of Seflex on a morning news program. The news segment would be about arthritis, and Seflex would be casually mentioned during the interview. The company would have to pay the actress $1 million, and there are risks: What if it gets out that Bryant is paying her? What if the actress errs and says something about Seflex's side effects? If something goes wrong, Bryant Pharmaceutical's reputation could suffer. Should the company green-light Laura's plan? This fictional case study looks at the pros and cons of traditional product placement and newer, more subtle alternatives to advertising. Commenting on the case are Bob Gamgort, president of Masterfoods USA; Michelle R. Nelson, an assistant professor of journalism and mass communications at the University of Wisconsin, Madison; FTC commissioner Mozelle W. Thompson; and Mike Sheehan, president and CEO of Hill, Holliday, Connors, Cosmopulos. PMID:14521096

  19. Rep. Bill Nelson during space food and consumables orientation and suit fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Rita Rapp, a flight coordinator, briefs U.S. Rep. Bill Nelson (D.-Florida) on space food during an orientation session in the life sciences laboratory at JSC (27753); Rep. Nelson tries on a glove during a suit fitting session (27754); Rep. Nelson samples a package of re-hydratable fruit in the life sciences laboratory during early STS 61-C training (27755); Rep. Nelson listens to Laura Louviere brief him on hygiene articles soon after reporting to Houston for STS 61-C training. On the table in front of him is a tube marked Palmalive, a tube marked Gillette and various other articles (27756).

  20. CP violation and flavor-changing-currents at {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup minus} colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Soni, A.

    1996-04-02

    Production and decay (CP) asymmetries at {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} collider, in extensions of the Standard Model (SM) are reported. Production asymmetries appear to be very promising for a large range of parameters, decays are less effective. Importance of flavor- changing scalar currents involving the top are emphasized. At lepton colliders, the top-anticharm final state is uniquely suited for such searches. At a muon collider there is the novel possibility of tree level {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} {r_arrow} t{ovr c}. This talk is based on works done in collaboration with David Atwood and Laura Reina. 10 refs., 8 figs.

  1. Computational Aeroheating Predictions for X-34

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelb, William L.; Wood, William A.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Alter, Stephen J.

    1998-01-01

    Radiative equilibrium surface temperatures, heating rates, streamlines, surface pressures, and flow-field features as predicted by the Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (Laura) are presented for the X-34 Technology Demonstrator. Results for two trajectory points corresponding to entry peak heating and two control surface deflections are discussed. This data is also discussed in context of Thermal Protection System (TPS) design issues. The work presented in this report is part of a larger effort to define the X-34 aerothermal environment, including the application of engineering codes and wind-tunnel studies.

  2. Analysis of Aeroheating Augmentation due to Reaction Control System Jets on Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyakonov, Artem A.; Buck, Gregory M.; Decaro, Anthony D.

    2009-01-01

    The analysis of effects of the reaction control system jet plumes on aftbody heating of Orion entry capsule is presented. The analysis covered hypersonic continuum part of the entry trajectory. Aerothermal environments at flight conditions were evaluated using Langley Aerothermal Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA) code and Data Parallel Line Relaxation (DPLR) algorithm code. Results show a marked augmentation of aftbody heating due to roll, yaw and aft pitch thrusters. No significant augmentation is expected due to forward pitch thrusters. Of the conditions surveyed the maximum heat rate on the aftshell is expected when firing a pair of roll thrusters at a maximum deceleration condition.

  3. [The women's contribution to occupational health at the end of the nineteenth century].

    PubMed

    Salerno, Silvana

    2011-01-01

    In the late nineteenth century Italian working class was mainly represented by women. An extraordinary women movement (Laura Solera Mantegazza, Gualberta Adelaide Beccari, Anna Maria Mozzoni, Ersilia Majno Bronzini, Nina Rignano Sullam, Giuseppina Poggiolini among others) including the first Italian women physicians (Anna Kuliscioff, Maria Montessori, Gina Lombroso, Linita Beretta and the very close to become physician Anna Fraentzel Celli) build up associations, journals, books, schools, researches, and petitions. The first law on women and child labour (1902), the First Congress on Occupational illnesses (1906), the birth of the Clinica del Lavoro (1910) represent only part of this contribution which has been almost forgotten and should be enlightened. PMID:23393899

  4. Computational Fluid Dynamics Technology for Hypersonic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    2003-01-01

    Several current challenges in computational fluid dynamics and aerothermodynamics for hypersonic vehicle applications are discussed. Example simulations are presented from code validation and code benchmarking efforts to illustrate capabilities and limitations. Opportunities to advance the state-of-art in algorithms, grid generation and adaptation, and code validation are identified. Highlights of diverse efforts to address these challenges are then discussed. One such effort to re-engineer and synthesize the existing analysis capability in LAURA, VULCAN, and FUN3D will provide context for these discussions. The critical (and evolving) role of agile software engineering practice in the capability enhancement process is also noted.

  5. Adventures in cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodstein, David

    1. Introduction -- 2. Galaxy formation: from start to finish / Andrew Benson -- 3. The reionization of cosmic hydrogen by the first galaxies / Abraham Loeb -- 4. Clusters of galaxies / Elena Pierpaoli -- 5. Reionizing the universe with the first sources of light / Volker Bromm -- 6. Mapping the cosmic dawn / Steven Furlanetto -- 7. Neutrino masses from cosmology / Ofer Lahav and Shaun Thomas -- 8. Measuring the expansion rate of the universe / Laura Ferrarese -- 9. Particles as dark matter / Dan Hooper -- 10. Detection of WIMP dark matter / Sunil Golwala and Dan McKinsey -- 11. The accelerating universe / Dragan Huterer -- 12. Frontiers of dark energy / Eric V. Linder -- 13. The first supermassive black holes in the universe / Xiaohui Fan.

  6. Engaging Girls in STEM: A Discussion of Foundational and Current Research on What Works

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, M.; Peterson, K. A.; Bleacher, L. V.; Smith, D. A.

    2012-08-01

    This article summarizes a panel discussion with Jolene Jesse (Program Director, NSF Research on Gender in Science and Engineering program) and Laura Migus (Director of Equity & Diversity at the Association of Science Technology Centers) on research related to gender in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). Moderated by Ms. Karen Peterson from the NSF-funded National Girls Collaborative Project, Dr. Jesse and Ms. Migus discussed foundational and current research on pressing questions about the lack of gender diversity in STEM advanced education and careers, and on strategies the EPO community could employ in designing and implementing programs to encourage more girls and women to engage in STEM for the long term.

  7. Lightcurve Photometry of Six Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrero, Andrea

    2012-07-01

    Observations from 2012 January to March lead to the determination of the rotation periods for six main-belt asteroids: 33 Polyhymnia, P = 18.604 ± 0.004 h; 467 Laura, P = 37.4 ± 0.1 h; 825 Tanina, P = 6.940 ± 0.001 h; 1421 Esperanto, P = 21.982 ± 0.005 h; 3481 Xianglupeak, P = 5.137 ± 0.003 h; and 4350 Shibecha, which had two possible solutions, P = 2.890 ± 0.001 h and P = 5.778 ± 0.002 h.

  8. AGU Congressional Science Fellows Chosen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landau, Elizabeth

    2014-04-01

    AGU announces its two newest Congressional Science Fellows—Laura Sherman and Charles Podolak—who will work on science issues in a congressional office from September 2014 until August 2015. The program is run by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and trains scientists in the inner workings of congressional offices before helping them find a position. AGU has sponsored fellows in the program for 37 years, during which AGU fellows have worked on climate change, energy, water, security, and many more critical issues that rely on scientific understanding and affect the lives of the general public every day.

  9. The X-Ray Spectra of Blazars: Analysis of the Complete EXOSAT Archive: Erratum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambruna, Rita M.; Barr, Paul; Giommi, Paolo; Maraschi, Laura; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero; Treves, Aldo

    1995-07-01

    In the paper "The X-Ray Spectra of Blazars: Analysis of the Complete EXOSAT Archive" by Rita M. Sambruna, Paul Barr, Paolo Giommi, Laura Maraschi, Gianpiero Tagliaferri, and Aldo Treves (ApJS, 95,371 [1994]), the section regarding the object PKS 1510-08 (Section 4.4.14) contains an erroneous quotation. K. P. Singh, A.R. Rao, and M.N. Vahia (ApJ, 365,455 [1990]) in fact detected: emission line only in the 1984 data, and not in the 1985 spectrum, as stated.

  10. Computational Aeroheating Predictions for X-34

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb,William H.; Wood, William A.; Gnoffo, Peter A.

    1998-01-01

    Radiative equilibrium surface temperatures, heating rates, streamlines, surface pressures, and flow-field features as predicted by the Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA) are presented for the X-34 Technology Demonstrator. Results for two trajectory points corresponding to entry peak heating and two control surface deflections are discussed. This data is also discussed in the context of Thermal Protection System (TPS) design issues. The work presented in this report is part of a larger effort to define the X-34 aerothermal environment, including the application of engineering codes and wind-tunnel studies.

  11. Where are the female science professors? A personal perspective.

    PubMed

    Kamerlin, Shina Caroline Lynn

    2016-01-01

    The first woman to earn a Professorship at a University in Europe was Laura Maria Caterina Bassi, who earned a professorship in physics at the University of Bologna in 1732. Almost 300 years and three waves of feminism later, in 2016, women typically still only comprise 20% (or less) of the number of full professors in Europe. This opinion article will discuss the experiences of being a female academic today and the factors contributing to the academic gender gap from the perspective of a "young" natural scientist, as well as providing constructive suggestions for strategies to empower women in the academic world. PMID:27347383

  12. Then and Now: Women Respond to the Manhattan Project - an illustrated talk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fermi, M. A., Olivia

    2014-03-01

    I am very much looking forward to visiting you, the family of physicists gathering for your annual APS conference. In different ways, my grandfather Enrico Fermi is a member of both our families. In this sense we are connected and share a common legacy, which I want to explore from the angle of two women inextricably involved with and affected by the Manhattan Project. One from the past and one alive now. These two women, despite a significant temporal and cultural gap share a remarkable number of traits and values. My talk will not offer a particular thesis or finding. Rather it will be about ways of seeing, including questioning unnoticed assumptions and belief systems. My grandmother Laura Fermi, modeled this for me as a youngster. She was at Enrico's side during the Manhattan Project years, yet in the dark about his work. What was it like to live in a climate of intellectually and patriotically charged enthusiasm, with an undercurrent of unspoken dread? Laura, just like most everyone else, discovered the true nature of the effort on the day the atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima. After the war and after Enrico's untimely death in 1954, in response to all she had experienced, Laura re-invented herself as an author and visionary, pioneering in both the environmental and handgun control movements. Marian Naranjo lives on the Santa Clara Pueblo near Los Alamos. Her ancestors dwelled on the Pajarito Plateau which encompasses the space where Los Alamos National Labs (LANL) is today. Her people, the Pueblo People have used the area's natural resources for ceremonial and survival for uncountable generations. They say, ``We are this place.'' What is it like to live on land one's families have safely occupied for thousands of years, with an undercurrent of dread at the prospect of toxic waste stream products from LANL? Like my grandmother did in her place and time, Marian builds community as an integral part of her environmental and social justice activism. She is

  13. The attitudes and beliefs of a female science teacher: Implications in relation to gender and pedagogical practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapata, Mara

    In this case study of a female science teacher named Laura, numerous observations, field notes, researcher interpretations, and assertions were developed. As meanings were negotiated, intent of actions was defined using significant statements, clustered to produce invariant meaning units. Both the participant's intents and how she interpreted her experiences were central to the understandings sought in this study. Whenever Laura planned for teaching science, taught, or otherwise interacted with students, the following four themes seemed to frame her actions: (1) Responsibility to Nurture/Mother/Mentor (2) Connecting to and Relating (3) Meeting Gender-Specific Expectations (4) Promoting the Fighter/Survivor Within. Each theme is examined in relation to attitudes and beliefs about teaching and learning science, and conclusions and assertions are expressed. The findings of this study point to the tensions between Laura's attitudes and beliefs and her pedagogical practices, disconfirming these as they pertain to gender in relation to teaching and learning science. It was not evident as part of her daily practice that student experiences were used in an attempt to create connections between their lives and science, although Laura always emphasized that science is a way of life. The findings support questioning the role of intentionality and a teacher's perceived ability to adhere to intentions while practicing within the norms established by the social institution of schools operating within the larger structures of society. The major findings and implications are relevant to the manner teachers are prepared and encouraged to enact their practice by departments and boards of education, prepared by institutions of higher education and subsequent participation in professional development. Specifically, calling attention to how these educational frameworks emphasize or de-emphasize the role of teachers and promote cognizance in terms of the culture of schools, reflective

  14. Feminism's healing effect.

    PubMed

    Bender, Leslie

    1994-01-01

    Helen Bequaert Holmes and Laura M. Purdy have done medical ethicists and clinical practitioners an enormous favor by publishing in book form their edited collection of 21 essays, Feminist Perspectives in Medical Ethics. This is an anthology of articles applying feminist methods and theories to problems in medical ethics. It is a fitting initiation for healthcare professionals and theorists who have yet to introduce themselves to the methods, analyses, and diverse contributions of feminism. In one simple volume, readers can sample feminist contributions to medical ethics that otherwise would be scattered in books or journals unavailable in most medical libraries. PMID:11644537

  15. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During an administrator's briefing at the IMAX 2 theatre, Lt. Gov. Jefferson Keel of the Chickasaw Nation (far left) presents a blanket with the seal of the Chickasaw Nation to NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (second from right). Next to O'Keefe is Chickasaw Gov. Bill Anoatubby. Next to Gov. Keel is Mrs. Laura O'Keefe. STS-113 Mission Specialist John Herrington is a tribally enrolled Chickasaw and the world's first Native American astronaut. Kennedy Space Center hosted more than 350 Native Americans in STS-113 prelaunch events surrounding the historic mission assignment of Herrington.

  16. Protecting scientists, science, and case protagonists: a discussion of the Taus v. Loftus commentaries.

    PubMed

    Dalenberg, Constance J

    2014-12-01

    This article is a discussion of the articles by Nicole Taus Kluemper, Erna Olafson, Frank Putnam, Laura Brown, Ross Cheit, and Gerald Koocher. The papers center on the issues raised by a decision by two psychologists to break the confidentiality of a case study published by David Corwin and Erna Olafson to gather information to support an alternative theoretical view of the case. The article reviews best understandings of the justifications proposed by the psychologists, who saw themselves as investigative reporters, discusses the papers that have been submitted, and proposes enhanced ethical guidelines and increased professional discussion of these issues. PMID:24913760

  17. A high angle of attack inviscid shuttle orbiter computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, William L.; Weilmuenster, K. James

    1992-01-01

    As a preliminary step toward predicting the leeside thermal environment for winged reentry vehicles at flight conditions, a computational solution for the flow about the Shuttle Orbiter at wind tunnel conditions was made using a point-implicit, finite volume scheme known as the Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA). The surface pressures resulting from the computational solution are compared with wind tunnel data. The results indicate that the dominant inviscid flow features are being accurately predicted on the leeside of the Shuttle Orbiter at a moderately high angle of attack.

  18. A special relationship: Race, child study, and Rockefeller philanthropy.

    PubMed

    Milar, Katharine S

    2010-01-01

    In 1928, the Laura Spelman Rockefeller Memorial granted funds to the University of Cincinnati to establish a child study and parent education program for African Americans. This paper traces the origin of the idea for this program to a special relationship between the family of John D. Rockefeller, Sr., and Spelman College, an African American women's college in Atlanta, Georgia. This relationship embodied Rockefeller's interest in women and children, in Baptist charities, in higher education (especially in the South), and race. The case study of this relationship addresses the larger question: To what purpose was the African American woman to be educated? PMID:20936678

  19. Where are the female science professors? A personal perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kamerlin, Shina Caroline Lynn

    2016-01-01

    The first woman to earn a Professorship at a University in Europe was Laura Maria Caterina Bassi, who earned a professorship in physics at the University of Bologna in 1732. Almost 300 years and three waves of feminism later, in 2016, women typically still only comprise 20% (or less) of the number of full professors in Europe. This opinion article will discuss the experiences of being a female academic today and the factors contributing to the academic gender gap from the perspective of a “young” natural scientist, as well as providing constructive suggestions for strategies to empower women in the academic world. PMID:27347383

  20. High-Performance Java Codes for Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Christopher; Chatterjee, Siddhartha; Biswas, Rupak; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The computational science community is reluctant to write large-scale computationally -intensive applications in Java due to concerns over Java's poor performance, despite the claimed software engineering advantages of its object-oriented features. Naive Java implementations of numerical algorithms can perform poorly compared to corresponding Fortran or C implementations. To achieve high performance, Java applications must be designed with good performance as a primary goal. This paper presents the object-oriented design and implementation of two real-world applications from the field of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD): a finite-volume fluid flow solver (LAURA, from NASA Langley Research Center), and an unstructured mesh adaptation algorithm (2D_TAG, from NASA Ames Research Center). This work builds on our previous experience with the design of high-performance numerical libraries in Java. We examine the performance of the applications using the currently available Java infrastructure and show that the Java version of the flow solver LAURA performs almost within a factor of 2 of the original procedural version. Our Java version of the mesh adaptation algorithm 2D_TAG performs within a factor of 1.5 of its original procedural version on certain platforms. Our results demonstrate that object-oriented software design principles are not necessarily inimical to high performance.

  1. X-33 Rev-F Turbulent Aeroheating Results From Test 6817 in NASA Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel and Comparisons With Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brian R.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Berry, Scott A.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements and predictions of the X-33 turbulent aeroheating environment have been performed at Mach 6, perfect-gas air conditions. The purpose of this investigation was to compare measured turbulent aeroheating levels on smooth models, models with discrete trips, and models with arrays of bowed panels (which simulate bowed thermal protections system tiles) with each other and with predictions from two Navier-Stokes codes, LAURA and GASP. The wind tunnel testing was conducted at free stream Reynolds numbers based on length of 1.8 x 10(exp 6) to 6.1 x 10(exp 6) on 0.0132 scale X-33 models at a = 40-deg. Turbulent flow was produced by the discrete trips and by the bowed panels at ill but the lowest Reynolds number, but turbulent flow on the smooth model was produced only at the highest Reynolds number. Turbulent aeroheating levels on each of the three model types were measured using global phosphor thermography and were found to agree to within .he estimated uncertainty (plus or minus 15%) of the experiment. Computations were performed at the wind tunnel free stream conditions using both codes. Turbulent aeroheating levels predicted using the LAURA code were generally 5%-10% lower than those from GASP, although both sets of predictions fell within the experimental accuracy of the wind tunnel data.

  2. X-33 Turbulent Aeroheating Measurements and Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brian R.; Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J.

    2002-01-01

    Measurements and predictions of the X-33 turbulent aeroheating environment have been performed for Mach 6, perfect-gas air conditions. The purpose of this investigation was to compare turbulent aeroheating predictions from two Navier-Stokes codes, LAURA and GASP, with each other and with experimental data in which turbulent flow was produced through either natural transition or forced transition using roughness elements. The wind tunnel testing was conducted at free stream Reynolds numbers of 0.72 x 10(exp 7)/m to 2.4 x 10(exp 7)/m (2.2 x 10(exp 6)/ft to 7.3 x 10(exp 6)/ft) on 0.254 m (10.0-in.) X-33 models at alpha = 40 deg with smooth surfaces, smooth surfaces with discrete trips, and surfaces with simulated bowed thermal protection system panels. Turbulent flow was produced by the discrete trips and bowed panels for all but the lowest Reynolds number, while turbulent flow on the smooth model was produced only at the highest Reynolds number. Turbulent aeroheating levels on each of the three model types were measured using global phosphor thermography and agreed to within the experimental accuracy (+/= 15%) of the test technique. Computations were performed at the wind tunnel free stream conditions using both codes. Turbulent aeroheating levels predicted using the LAURA code were generally 5%-10% lower than those from GASP, although both sets of predictions fell within the experimental accuracy of the wind tunnel data.

  3. Conservation equations and physical models for hypersonic air flows over the aeroassist flight experiment vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    1989-01-01

    The code development and application program for the Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA), with emphasis directed toward support of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) in the near term and Aeroassisted Space Transfer Vehicle (ASTV) design in the long term is reviewed. LAURA is an upwind-biased, point-implicit relaxation algorithm for obtaining the numerical solution to the governing equations for 3-D, viscous, hypersonic flows in chemical and thermal nonequilibrium. The algorithm is derived using a finite volume formulation in which the inviscid components of flux across cell walls are described with Roe's averaging and Harten's entropy fix with second-order corrections based on Yee's Symmetric Total Variation Diminishing scheme. Because of the point-implicit relaxation strategy, the algorithm remains stable at large Courant numbers without the necessity of solving large, block tri-diagonal systems. A single relaxation step depends only on information from nearest neighbors. Predictions for pressure distributions, surface heating, and aerodynamic coefficients compare well with experimental data for Mach 10 flow over an AFE wind tunnel model. Predictions for the hypersonic flow of air in chemical and thermal nonequilibrium over the full scale AFE configuration obtained on a multi-domain grid are discussed.

  4. Grid generation and flow computation about a Martian entry vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, J. E.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1990-01-01

    A number of vehicles are currently being proposed for a manned mission to Mars. One of these vehicles has a modified blunt-nosed cone configuration. Experimental results were obtained for this vehicle in 1968. They show lift-over-drag ratios comparable to those needed for Mars entry. Computations are performed to verify the earlier results and to further describe the flight characteristics of this vehicle. An analytical method is used to define the surface of this vehicle. A single-block volume grid is generated around the vehicle using the algebraic Two-Boundary Grid Generation algorithm (TBGG) and transfinite interpolation. Euler solutions are then obtained from a Langley Aerodynamic Upward Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA) at Mach 6.0 and angles of attack of 0, 6, and 12 deg. The lift coefficient determined from the LAURA code agree very well with the experimental results. The drag and pitching moment coefficients, however, are underestimated by the code since viscous effects are not considered. Contour plots of the flowfield show no evidence of separation for angles of attack up to 12 deg.

  5. Recent progress in density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truhlar, Donald

    2014-03-01

    Ongoing work involves several areas of density functional theory: new methods for computing electronic excitation energies, including a new way to remove spin contamination in the spin-flip Tamm-Dancoff approximation and a configuration-interaction-corrected Tamm-Dancoff Approximation for treating conical intersections; new ways to treat open-shell states, including a reinterpreted broken-symmetry method and multi-configuration Kohn-Sham theory; a new exchange-correlation functional; new tests of density functional theory against databases for electronic transition energies and molecules and solids containing metal atoms; and applications. A selection of results will be presented. I am grateful to the following collaborators for contributions to the ongoing work: Boris Averkiev, Rebecca Carlson, Laura Fernandez, Laura Gagliardi, Chad Hoyer, Francesc Illas, Miho Isegawa, Shaohong Li, Giovanni Li Manni, Sijie Luo, Dongxia Ma, Remi Maurice, Rubén Means-Pañeda, Roberto Peverati, Nora Planas, Prasenjit Seal, Pragya Verma, Bo Wang, Xuefei Xu, Ke R. Yang, Haoyu Yu, Wenjing Zhang, and Jingjing Zheng. Supported in part by the AFOSR and U.S. DOE.

  6. Couple-based interventions in the treatment of adult anorexia nervosa: A brief case example of UCAN.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Jennifer S; Fischer, Melanie S; Raney, Thomas J; Baucom, Donald H; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2016-06-01

    Adult anorexia nervosa (AN) is a serious and often fatal illness that significantly erodes quality of life for both the patient and loved ones. Treatment of adults with AN has focused largely on individual therapy, with recent findings suggesting that improvement is limited and dropout rates are high. In an effort to improve treatment response, we developed a couple-based intervention, Uniting Couples in the treatment of Anorexia Nervosa (UCAN) as an adjunct treatment to standard multidisciplinary care. UCAN leverages the support of a partner and the relationship in treatment by decreasing avoidance around AN, teaching the couple how to effectively address the eating disorder, and helping to foster a more satisfying relationship. This paper presents a case study of a couple who completed UCAN, "Laura and Steve," including their experiences in treatment and outcome measures at pretest, posttest, and 3-month follow-up. Laura showed clinically significant change on the Restraint subscale of the Eating Disorders Examination at follow-up, and both partners showed clinically significant improvements in relationship satisfaction, as well as on self-reported and observed communication. Both partners reported very high satisfaction with the treatment. A discussion of therapists' experiences in delivering UCAN is provided, including common challenges for therapists with primarily a couple therapy or an individual CBT for eating disorders background, as well as important factors for therapists to consider in order to optimally leverage the benefits of including partners in treatment for AN. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27267510

  7. Reduction and Analysis of Phosphor Thermography Data With the IHEAT Software Package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merski, N. Ronald

    1998-01-01

    Detailed aeroheating information is critical to the successful design of a thermal protection system (TPS) for an aerospace vehicle. This report describes NASA Langley Research Center's (LaRC) two-color relative-intensity phosphor thermography method and the IHEAT software package which is used for the efficient data reduction and analysis of the phosphor image data. Development of theory is provided for a new weighted two-color relative-intensity fluorescence theory for quantitatively determining surface temperatures on hypersonic wind tunnel models; an improved application of the one-dimensional conduction theory for use in determining global heating mappings; and extrapolation of wind tunnel data to flight surface temperatures. The phosphor methodology at LaRC is presented including descriptions of phosphor model fabrication, test facilities and phosphor video acquisition systems. A discussion of the calibration procedures, data reduction and data analysis is given. Estimates of the total uncertainties (with a 95% confidence level) associated with the phosphor technique are shown to be approximately 8 to 10 percent in the Langley's 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel and 7 to 10 percent in the 20-Inch Mach 6 Tunnel. A comparison with thin-film measurements using two-inch radius hemispheres shows the phosphor data to be within 7 percent of thin-film measurements and to agree even better with predictions via a LATCH computational fluid dynamics solution (CFD). Good agreement between phosphor data and LAURA CFD computations on the forebody of a vertical takeoff/vertical lander configuration at four angles of attack is also shown. In addition, a comparison is given between Mach 6 phosphor data and laminar and turbulent solutions generated using the LAURA, GASP and LATCH CFD codes. Finally, the extrapolation method developed in this report is applied to the X-34 configuration with good agreement between the phosphor extrapolation and LAURA flight surface temperature predictions

  8. The Influence of Ablation on Radiative Heating for Earth Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Christopher O.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Sutton, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Using the coupled ablation and radiation capability recently included in the LAURA flowfield solver, this paper investigates the influence of ablation on the shock-layer radiative heating for Earth entry. The extension of the HARA radiation model, which provides the radiation predictions in LAURA, to treat a gas consisting of the elements C, H, O, and N is discussed. It is shown that the absorption coefficient of air is increased with the introduction of the C and H elements. A simplified shock layer model is studied to show the impact of temperature, as well as the abundance of C and H, on the net absorption or emission from an ablation contaminated boundary layer. It is found that the ablation species reduce the radiative flux in the vacuum ultraviolet, through increased absorption, for all temperatures. However, in the infrared region of the spectrum, the ablation species increase the radiative flux, through strong emission, for temperatures above 3,000 K. Thus, depending on the temperature and abundance of ablation species, the contaminated boundary layer may either provide a net increase or decrease in the radiative flux reaching the wall. To assess the validity of the coupled ablation and radiation LAURA analysis, a previously analyzed Mars-return case (15.24 km/s), which contains significant ablation and radiation coupling, is studied. Exceptional agreement with previous viscous shock-layer results is obtained. A 40% decrease in the radiative flux is predicted for ablation rates equal to 20% of the free-stream mass flux. The Apollo 4 peak-heating case (10.24 km/s) is also studied. For ablation rates up to 3.4% of the free-stream mass flux, the radiative heating is reduced by up to 19%, while the convective heating is reduced by up to 87%. Good agreement with the Apollo 4 radiometer data is obtained by considering absorption in the radiometer cavity. For both the Mars return and the Apollo 4 cases, coupled radiation alone is found to reduce the radiative

  9. KSC-04PD-0787

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Center Director Jim Kennedy (center left) and NASA Administrator Sean OKeefe (center right) wait with their wives, Bernadette and Laura, respectively, for the start of a tour of KSC facilities. The new lab is a state-of-the-art facility built for ISS biotechnology research. It was developed as a partnership between NASA-KSC and the State of Florida. The tour followed the launching ceremony at the KSC Visitor Complex for the new Florida quarter issued by the U.S. Mint. The ceremony was emceed by Kennedy and included remarks by NASA Administrator Sean OKeefe, Gov. Jeb Bush, U.S. Mint Director Henrietta Holsman Fore and Deputy Secretary of the Treasury Samuel W. Bodman. Kennedy and OKeefe accompanied by NASA Administrator Sean OKeefe and Center Director Jim Kennedy and their wives.

  10. KSC-04PD-0789

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Neil Yorio, a Dynamac scientist (right), explains the function of the KSC Space Life Sciences (SLS) Lab to a prestigious tour group. From left are NASA Administrator Sean OKeefe and his wife, Laura; Florida Gov. Jeb Bush; Bernadette Kennedy, wife of the Center Director (CD); Columba Bush, wife of the governor; behind Mrs. Bush, former astronaut Winston Scott; and third from right, CD Jim Kennedy. The new lab is a state-of-the-art facility built for ISS biotechnology research. It was developed as a partnership between NASA-KSC and the State of Florida. The tour followed the launching ceremony at the KSC Visitor Complex for the new Florida quarter issued by the U.S. Mint. The ceremony was emceed by Kennedy and included remarks by OKeefe, Bush, U.S. Mint Director Henrietta Holsman Fore and Deputy Secretary of the Treasury Samuel W. Bodman.

  11. KSC-04PD-0791

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Neil Yorio, a Dynamac scientist(left), explains the function of the KSC Space Life Sciences (SLS) Lab to a prestigious tour group: Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, left of center, and NASA Administrator Sean OKeefe, and his wife, Laura, at right. Others in the group included former astronaut Winston Scott, U.S. Mint Director Henrietta Holsman Fore, and Center Director Jim Kennedy. The new lab is a state-of- the-art facility built for ISS biotechnology research. It was developed as a partnership between NASA-KSC and the State of Florida. The tour followed the launching ceremony at the KSC Visitor Complex for the new Florida quarter issued by the U.S. Mint. The ceremony was emceed by Kennedy and included remarks by OKeefe, Bush, Fore and Deputy Secretary of the Treasury Samuel W. Bodman.

  12. KSC-04PD-0792

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Neil Yorio, a Dynamac scientist(left), explains the function of the KSC Space Life Sciences (SLS) Lab to a prestigious tour group: (from left) Florida Gov. Jeb Bush and his wife, Columba; NASA Administrator Sean OKeefe and his wife, Laura; and U.S. Mint Director Henrietta Holsman Fore. The new lab is a state-of-the-art facility built for ISS biotechnology research. It was developed as a partnership between NASA-KSC and the State of Florida. The tour followed the launching ceremony at the KSC Visitor Complex for the new Florida quarter issued by the U.S. Mint. The ceremony was emceed by Center Director Jim Kennedy and included remarks by OKeefe, Bush, Fore and Deputy Secretary of the Treasury Samuel W. Bodman.

  13. KSC-04PD-0790

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Neil Yorio, a Dynamac scientist(left), explains the function of the KSC Space Life Sciences (SLS) Lab to a prestigious tour group. In the background at left is former astronaut Winston Scott; at center is Bernadette Kennedy, wife of the Center Director (CD); next to her are Columba and Florida Gov. Jeb Bush; third from right is NASA Administrator Sean OKeefe, next to his wife, Laura; and on the far right is U.S. Mint Director Henrietta Holsman Fore. The new lab is a state-of-the-art facility built for ISS biotechnology research. It was developed as a partnership between NASA-KSC and the State of Florida. The tour followed the launching ceremony at the KSC Visitor Complex for the new Florida quarter issued by the U.S. Mint. The ceremony was emceed by CD Jim Kennedy and included remarks by OKeefe, Bush, Fore and Deputy Secretary of the Treasury Samuel W. Bodman.

  14. KSC-04PD-0794

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A Dynamac worker (left) explains the function of the KSC Space Life Sciences (SLS) Lab to a prestigious tour group: in the center, Laura OKeefe and NASA Administrator Sean OKeefe; at right, Florida Gov. Jeb Bush flanked by his wife, Columba on the left and Bernadette Kennedy, wife of Center Director Jim Kennedy. The new lab is a state-of- the-art facility built for ISS biotechnology research. It was developed as a partnership between NASA-KSC and the State of Florida. The tour followed the launching ceremony at the KSC Visitor Complex for the new Florida quarter issued by the U.S. Mint. The ceremony was emceed Kennedy and included remarks by OKeefe, Bush, U.S. Mint Director Henrietta Holsman Fore and Deputy Secretary of the Treasury Samuel W. Bodman.

  15. Potential assessed in Argentina's association contract areas

    SciTech Connect

    Pucci, J.C. , Buenos Aires )

    1994-06-20

    The majority of the Austral basin fields discovered are mainly associated with structural and combination traps. Except for El Condor, La Sara, and San Sebastian fields, most of the oil reserves of limited size. This is due to several factors: small areal extent (5--50 sq km), variability of the Springhill thickness which frequently wedges out over the top of structures, facies changes and related complex reservoir distributions, and lack of hydrocarbons. Until 1985, all the commercial discoveries have been made in the area of the platform mostly in the Springhill reservoir and to a lesser extent on top of the volcanic Bahia Laura group (equivalent Lemaire or Tobifera formations). However, the Tertiary discoveries in Campo Boleadoras and Puesto Peter fields opened a zone, named Intermediate'' by YPF's geologists, located to the west of the known producing areas. In this zone, the lower member of the Magallanes group has yielded production. Reservoir characteristics are discussed.

  16. Numerical Simulations of the Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Chun Y.; Trumble, Kerry A.; Campbell, Charles H.; Lessard, Victor R.; Wood, William A.

    2010-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations were used to study the possible effects that the Boundary Layer Transition (BLT) Flight Experiments may have on the heating environment of the Space Shuttle during its entry to Earth. To investigate this issue, hypersonic calculations using the Data-Parallel Line Relaxation (DPLR) and Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation (LAURA) CFD codes were computed for a 0.75 tall protuberance at flight conditions of Mach 15 and 18. These initial results showed high surface heating on the BLT trip and the areas surrounding the protuberance. Since the predicted peak heating rates would exceed the thermal limits of the materials selected to construct the BLT trip, many changes to the geometry were attempted in order to reduce the surface heat flux. The following paper describes the various geometry revisions and the resulting heating environments predicted by the CFD codes.

  17. A convective and radiative heat transfer analysis for the FIRE II forebody

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greendyke, Robert B.; Hartung, Lin C.

    1993-01-01

    A Navier-Stokes flowfield solution method (LAURA code) using finite-rate chemistry and two-temperature thermal nonequilibrium was used in combination with two nonequilibrium radiative heat transfer codes to calculate heating for the FIRE II vehicle. An axisymmetric model of the actual body shape was used. One radiative heating code (NEQAIR) was used in uncoupled fashion with the flowfield solver's energy equations, while the other code (LORAN) was used in both coupled and uncoupled variations. Several trajectory points ranging from highly nonequilibrium flow to near-equilibrium flow were used for a study of both convective and radiative heating over the vehicle. Considerable variation in radiative heating was seen at the extremes, while agreement was good in the intermediate trajectory points. Total heat transfer calculations gave good comparison until the peak heating trajectory points were encountered, and returned to good agreement for the last two equilibrium points.

  18. Heating analysis for a Lunar Transfer Vehicle at near-equilibrium flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Hartung, Lin C.; Greendyke, Robert B.

    1993-01-01

    A heating analysis for a 15.2 m diameter Lunar Transfer Vehicle (LTV) at 0 and 10.6 deg angle of attack for a nominal trajectory through the earth's atmosphere is described. The analysis utilizes the Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA) with thin-layer, Navier-Stokes, thermochemical nonequilibrium options. Radiative heating levels are calculated using the Langley Optimized RAdiative Nonequilibrium (LORAN) and the Non-EQuilibrium AIr Radiation (NEQAIR) codes. At peak heating, the shock layer is substantially in equilibrium. Comprehensive spatial and spectral grid convergence studies have been implemented to quantify grid effects on the convective and radiative heating levels. Axisymmetric tests including the coupled effects of radiative energy transfer show negligible change to the convective heating and a 20 percent reduction in the radiative heating.

  19. 'P-cadherin functional role is dependent on E-cadherin cellular context: a proof of concept using the breast cancer model'.

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    This article corrects: P-cadherin functional role is dependent on E-cadherin cellular context: a proof of concept using the breast cancer model Volume 229, Issue 5, 705–718, Article first published online: 24 January 2013. By Ana Sofia Ribeiro, Bárbara Sousa, Laura Carreto, Nuno Mendes, Ana Rita Nobre, Sara Ricardo, André Albergaria, Jorge F Cameselle-Teijeiro, Rene Gerhard, Ola Söderberg, Raquel Seruca, Manuel A Santos, Fernando Schmitt and Joana Paredes, J Pathol 2013; 229: 708–718. DOI: 10.1002/path.4143. The above article, published online on 24 January 2013 on Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com). The funding information, “This work was also funded by FEDER funds through the Operational Programme for Competitiveness Factors - COMPETE (FCOMP-01-0124-FEDER-021209).” was omitted from the Acknowledgements section. We apologise for any inconvenience caused. PMID:27071484

  20. Disembodiment and Identity in Literary Depictions of Epilepsy Surgery.

    PubMed

    Vaccarella, Maria

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the often perplexing experience of being an epilepsy surgery candidate, as portrayed in four book-length accounts: Laura Doermer's Moritz mein Sohn (Moritz my son, 1990), David B.'s L'ascension du haut mal (The ascent of the high evil, 1996; published in English as Epileptic, 2003), Ray Robinson's Electricity (2006), and Alberto Capitta's Il giardino non esiste (The garden doesn't exist, 2009). Building upon critical disability studies and the work of French poststructuralists Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari, I analyze issues of embodiment, identity and narrative (re)construction in the postsurgical alleviation of chronic illness. I argue that these texts highlight the inevitable disruption of self that brain surgery entails and ultimately resist biomedical normativization. They also call for a narratological reconsideration of current illness narrative typologies, among which Arthur Frank's "chaos narrative" emerges as the best suited to accommodate the chronic fragmentation of consciousness and voice in epilepsy. PMID:26095838

  1. Aeroheating Predictions for X-34 Using an Inviscid-Boundary Layer Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Christropher J.; Kleb, William L.

    1998-01-01

    Radiative equilibrium surface temperatures and surface heating rates from a combined inviscid-boundary layer method are presented for the X-34 Reusable Launch Vehicle for several points along the hypersonic descent portion of its trajectory. Inviscid, perfect-gas solutions are generated with the Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA) and the Data-Parallel Lower-Upper Relaxation (DPLUR) code. Surface temperatures and heating rates are then computed using the Langley Approximate Three-Dimensional Convective Heating (LATCH) engineering code employing both laminar and turbulent flow models. The combined inviscid-boundary layer method provides accurate predictions of surface temperatures over most of the vehicle and requires much less computational effort than a Navier-Stokes code. This enables the generation of a more thorough aerothermal database which is necessary to design the thermal protection system and specify the vehicle's flight limits.

  2. Importance of comparative effectiveness research to the future of healthcare evaluation and delivery.

    PubMed

    Lyman, Gary H; Dormer, Laura

    2014-09-01

    Gary H Lyman speaks to Laura Dormer, Commissioning Editor: Gary H Lyman is a practicing medical oncologist and is nationally and internationally recognized for his leadership in comparative effectiveness, health services and outcomes research. He is a Full Member in the Cancer Prevention Program, Public Health Sciences Division at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (WA, USA), where he co-directs the Hutchinson Institute for Cancer Outcomes Research, a multidisciplinary team devoted to clinical and economic evaluations of new and existing cancer prevention, screening and treatment technologies. In addition, Lyman is also Professor of Medicine and Adjunct Professor in the Department of Health Services in the School of Public Health and the School of Pharmacy at the University of Washington. PMID:25350796

  3. Blurring the Inputs: A Natural Language Approach to Sensitivity Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, William L.; Thompson, Richard A.; Johnston, Christopher O.

    2007-01-01

    To document model parameter uncertainties and to automate sensitivity analyses for numerical simulation codes, a natural-language-based method to specify tolerances has been developed. With this new method, uncertainties are expressed in a natural manner, i.e., as one would on an engineering drawing, namely, 5.25 +/- 0.01. This approach is robust and readily adapted to various application domains because it does not rely on parsing the particular structure of input file formats. Instead, tolerances of a standard format are added to existing fields within an input file. As a demonstration of the power of this simple, natural language approach, a Monte Carlo sensitivity analysis is performed for three disparate simulation codes: fluid dynamics (LAURA), radiation (HARA), and ablation (FIAT). Effort required to harness each code for sensitivity analysis was recorded to demonstrate the generality and flexibility of this new approach.

  4. Chol understandings of suicide and human agency.

    PubMed

    Imberton, Gracia

    2012-06-01

    According to ethnographic material collected since 2003, the Chol Mayan indigenous people in southern Mexico have different causal explanations for suicide. It can be attributed to witchcraft that forces victims to take their lives against their own will, to excessive drinking, or to fate determined by God. However, it can also be conceived of as a conscious decision made by a person overwhelmed by daily problems. Drawing from the theoretical framework developed by Laura M. Ahearn, inspired by practice theory, the paper contends that these different explanations operate within two different logics or understandings of human agency. The first logic attributes responsibility to supernatural causes such as witchcraft or divine destiny, and reflects Chol notions of personhood. The second logic accepts personal responsibility for suicide, and is related to processes of social change such as the introduction of wage labor, education and a market economy. The contemporary Chol resort to both logics to make sense of the human drama of suicide. PMID:22382678

  5. Women and the practice and teaching of medicine in Bologna in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.

    PubMed

    Logan, Gabriella Berti

    2003-01-01

    When Bologna's political and intellectual elites had control over the university and associated institutions during the eighteenth century, a few women were allowed to participate in medical fields not typically associated with their gender. Laura Bassi could occasionally teach and debate on anatomy at the university, and the practical anatomist Anna Morandi Manzolini could make contributions to the research and teaching of anatomy. With the arrival of the French in Bologna in 1796, the control of the university and associated institutions passed from the local elite to the Ministry of Public Instruction in Milan. This article shows that a few women were awarded degrees in medicine, surgery, and pharmacy from the University of Bologna when the French were in control-however, these women, unlike Bassi and Morandi, were directed to fields deemed appropriate to their gender, such as the training of midwives, or apothecary practice within female institutions. PMID:14523259

  6. Plasma Line in the Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenmary, M.; Sulzer, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    New Plasma Line Observations from the Arecibo Radar show the exact timings of the Arecibo's conjugate sunrise as well as the local sunrise. Using the shadow height of the Earth's radius extend 175 km, we have predicted the time at which local sunrise effects propagate downward with time. These predictions agree within a minute of the observed effects. We can observe the apparent conjugate sunrise with equivalent sensitivity. We are currently comparing the data with predictions from various locations of Arecibo's conjugate point. We have compared our results with the standard tilted dipole configuration and seen a 25 minute discrepancy. Now we are investigating if the delay can be accounted for using research from Laura Waldrop's paper "Photoelectron impact excitation of OI 8446 A emission observed from Arecibo Observatory.

  7. The Hawthorne experiments and the introduction of Jean Piaget in American industrial psychology, 1929-1932.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Yeh

    2002-05-01

    The Hawthorne interview program between 1929 and 1932 was one of the most significant industrial studies in the United States. The Hawthorne researchers applied Jean Piaget's clinical method in their extensive interviews with tens of thousands of workers. Chiefly responsible for the program's methodology was Elton Mayo, an Australian who saw interviewing as a means to promote social cooperation. Previous discussions of the Hawthorne experiments have ignored the influence of Piaget in the social sciences. This article provides an account of Mayo's and the Hawthorne researchers' efforts to fuse Piaget's innovation with burgeoning American industrial psychology. The endeavor was not an isolated event but rather drew on the theories and practice of Janet-Piaget psychology, on the support of the Laura Spelman Rockefeller Memorial Foundation, and on the discourse among social scientists about Piaget's work. PMID:12096759

  8. Correlation of lycopene measured by HPLC with the L, a, b color readings of a hydroponic tomato and the relationship of maturity with color and lycopene content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arias, R.; Lee, T. C.; Logendra, L.; Janes, H.

    2000-01-01

    Tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum cv. Laura) were separated, according to the ripening stage, by a sensory panel into seven groups, and color was measured on the tomato surface with a Minolta Chroma meter. The L, a, b, hue, chroma, and lycopene content were plotted against the maturity stages of the tomatoes, and several good correlations were found. The a/b ratio and the lycopene content were the parameters that allowed six of seven maturity groups in the tomato to be statistically distinguished. The lycopene content, measured by HPLC, was also correlated with the color measurements, and the a, a/b, and (a/b)(2) color factors produced the best regressions. An estimation of the lycopene content in tomatoes can be achieved by using a portable chroma meter, with a possible field usage application. Equations to calculate the lycopene content of tomatoes based on the color readings are reported.

  9. Statistical Modeling of Robotic Random Walks on Different Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naylor, Austin; Kinnaman, Laura

    Issues of public safety, especially with crowd dynamics and pedestrian movement, have been modeled by physicists using methods from statistical mechanics over the last few years. Complex decision making of humans moving on different terrains can be modeled using random walks (RW) and correlated random walks (CRW). The effect of different terrains, such as a constant increasing slope, on RW and CRW was explored. LEGO robots were programmed to make RW and CRW with uniform step sizes. Level ground tests demonstrated that the robots had the expected step size distribution and correlation angles (for CRW). The mean square displacement was calculated for each RW and CRW on different terrains and matched expected trends. The step size distribution was determined to change based on the terrain; theoretical predictions for the step size distribution were made for various simple terrains. It's Dr. Laura Kinnaman, not sure where to put the Prefix.

  10. A Collection of Articles Reprinted from Science & Technology Review on University Relations Program

    SciTech Connect

    Radousky, H; Rennie, G; Henke, A

    2006-08-23

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) The Power of Partnership--Livermore researchers forge strategic collaborations with colleagues from other University of California campuses to further science and better protect the nation; (2) Collaborative Research Prepares Our Next-Generation Scientists and Engineers--Commentary by Laura R. Gilliom; (3) Next-Generation Scientists and Engineers Tap Lab's Resources--University of California Ph.D. candidates work with Livermore scientists and engineers to conduct fundamental research as part of their theses; (4) The Best and the Brightest Come to Livermore--The Lawrence Fellowship Program attracts the most sought-after postdoctoral researchers to the Laboratory; and (5) Faculty on Sabbatical Find a Good Home at Livermore--Faculty members from around the world come to the Laboratory as sabbatical scholars.

  11. Comparison of PLIF and CFD Results for the Orion CEV RCS Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivey, Christopher B.; Danehy, Paul M.; Bathel, Brett F.; Dyakonov, Artem A.; Inman, Jennifer A.; Jones, Stephen B.

    2011-01-01

    Nitric-oxide planar laser-induced fluorescence (NO PLIF) was used to visualize and measure centerline streamwise velocity of the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) Reaction Control System (RCS) Jets at NASA Langley Research Center's 31-Inch Mach 10 Air wind tunnel. Fluorescence flow visualizations of pitch, roll, and yaw RCS jets were obtained using different plenum pressures and wind tunnel operating stagnation pressures. For two yaw RCS jet test cases, the PLIF visualizations were compared to computational flow imaging (CFI) images based on Langley Aerothermal Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of the flowfield. For the same test cases, the streamwise velocity measurements were compared to CFD. The CFD solution, while showing some unphysical artifacts, generally agree with the experimental measurements.

  12. Assessment of Turbulent CFD Against STS-128 Hypersonic Flight Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, William A.; Kleb, William L.; Hyatt, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    Turbulent CFD simulations are compared against surface temperature measurements of the space shuttle orbiter windward tiles at reentry flight conditions. Algebraic turbulence models are used within both the LAURA and DPLR CFD codes. The flight data are from temperature measurements obtained by seven thermocouples during the STS-128 mission (September 2009). The flight data indicate boundary layer transition onset over the Mach number range 13.5{15.5, depending upon the location on the vehicle. But the boundary layer flow appeared to be transitional down through Mach 12, based upon the flight data and CFD trends. At Mach 9 the simulations match the flight data on average within 20 F/11 C, where typical surface temperatures were approximately 1600 F/870 C.

  13. Genomic Sequence or Signature Tags (GSTs) from the Genome Group at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Dunn, John J.; McCorkle, Sean R.; Praissman, Laura A.; Hind, Geoffrey; Van der Lelie, Daniel; Bahou, Wadie F.; Gnatenko, Dmitri V.; Krause, Maureen K.

    Genomic Signature Tags (GSTs) are the products of a method we have developed for identifying and quantitatively analyzing genomic DNAs. The DNA is initially fragmented with a type II restriction enzyme. An oligonucleotide adaptor containing a recognition site for MmeI, a type IIS restriction enzyme, is then used to release 21-bp tags from fixed positions in the DNA relative to the sites recognized by the fragmenting enzyme. These tags are PCR-amplified, purified, concatenated and then cloned and sequenced. The tag sequences and abundances are used to create a high resolution GST sequence profile of the genomic DNA. [Quoted from Genomic Signature Tags (GSTs): A System for Profiling Genomic DNA, Dunn, John J.; McCorkle, Sean R.; Praissman, Laura A.; Hind, Geoffrey; Van der Lelie, Daniel; Bahou, Wadie F.; Gnatenko, Dmitri V.; Krause, Maureen K., Revised 9/13/2002

  14. Sustainable use of groundwater in Atoll Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, M.; Nakada, S.; Umezawa, Y.; Yamano, H.

    2010-12-01

    Water resources in small islands, such as atoll islands, are limited and threatened by climate change such as changes in precipitation and sea level rise. Groundwater is the main water resources in many atoll islands, and the freshwater in aquifers in coral atolls, where the average elevations are a few meters above the sea level, exists as lenses f1oating on salt water. Decrease in precipitation and groundwater recharge is caused by the climate change, increases of storm surge, and excessive groundwater extractions due to over population. There is high possibility that the aquifer salinization can damage the important natural ambience for the people living habitat such as crops field and vegetation. In this study, the aquifer salinization is evaluated by using electrical resistivity, hydrological and long-term meteorological data in two low-lying coral atolls, Laura islet, Majuro Atoll, Marshall islands and Fongafale islet, Funafuti atoll, Tuvalu. Hydrological surveys conducted in Laura islet showed that the interface between seawater and freshwater is shallowed in Aug 2009. This may be attributed to the result of recent decrease of the decadal rainfall and/or the sea level rise. The detailed structure of the freshwater lens based on the electrical resistivity surveys showed patches of brackish water due to the intrusion of seawater and over-pumping. The clear intrusion of the saltwater was observed near the lagoon coast which might be inf1uenced by the recirculation of the seawater in the margin of the freshwater lens. The recirculation was confirmed based on the analysis of the submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) observed by seepage meters. On the other hand, in Fongatale islet, the geoelectric and hydrological surveys conducted in March 2009 showed that the soil and groundwater salinization was mainly caused by the tidal forcing during spring tides. The decrease of the resistivity during the f1ood tide indicates the coastal aquifer beneath the islet is

  15. A Comparison of EAST Shock-Tube Radiation Measurements with a New Air Radiation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Christopher O.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison between the recent EAST shock tube radiation measurements (Grinstead et al., AIAA 2008-1244) and the HARA radiation model. The equilibrium and nonequilibrium radiation measurements are studied for conditions relevant to lunar-return shock-layers; specifically shock velocities ranging from 9 to 11 kilometers per second at initial pressures of 0.1 and 0.3 Torr. The simulated shock-tube flow is assumed one-dimensional and is calculated using the LAURA code, while a detailed nonequilibrium radiation prediction is obtained in an uncoupled manner from the HARA code. The measured and predicted intensities are separated into several spectral ranges to isolate significant spectral features, mainly strong atomic line multiplets. The equations and physical data required for the prediction of these strong atomic lines are reviewed and their uncertainties identified. The 700-1020 nm wavelength range, which accounts for roughly 30% of the radiative flux to a peak-heating lunar return shock-layer, is studied in detail and the measurements and predictions are shown to agree within 15% in equilibrium. The plus or minus 1.5% uncertainty on the measured shock velocity is shown to cause up to a plus or minus 30% difference in the predicted radiation. This band of predictions contains the measured values in almost all cases. For the highly nonequilibrium 0.1 Torr cases, the nonequilibrium radiation peaks are under-predicted by about half. This under-prediction is considered acceptable when compared to the order-of-magnitude over-prediction obtained using a Boltzmann population of electronic states. The reasonable comparison in the nonequilibrium regions provides validation for both the non-Boltzmann modeling in HARA and the thermochemical nonequilibrium modeling in LAURA. The N2 (+)(1-) and N2(2+) molecular band systems are studied in the 290 480 nm wavelength range for both equilibrium and nonequilibrium regimes. The non-Boltzmann rate models for these

  16. Review on solving the inverse problem in EEG source analysis

    PubMed Central

    Grech, Roberta; Cassar, Tracey; Muscat, Joseph; Camilleri, Kenneth P; Fabri, Simon G; Zervakis, Michalis; Xanthopoulos, Petros; Sakkalis, Vangelis; Vanrumste, Bart

    2008-01-01

    In this primer, we give a review of the inverse problem for EEG source localization. This is intended for the researchers new in the field to get insight in the state-of-the-art techniques used to find approximate solutions of the brain sources giving rise to a scalp potential recording. Furthermore, a review of the performance results of the different techniques is provided to compare these different inverse solutions. The authors also include the results of a Monte-Carlo analysis which they performed to compare four non parametric algorithms and hence contribute to what is presently recorded in the literature. An extensive list of references to the work of other researchers is also provided. This paper starts off with a mathematical description of the inverse problem and proceeds to discuss the two main categories of methods which were developed to solve the EEG inverse problem, mainly the non parametric and parametric methods. The main difference between the two is to whether a fixed number of dipoles is assumed a priori or not. Various techniques falling within these categories are described including minimum norm estimates and their generalizations, LORETA, sLORETA, VARETA, S-MAP, ST-MAP, Backus-Gilbert, LAURA, Shrinking LORETA FOCUSS (SLF), SSLOFO and ALF for non parametric methods and beamforming techniques, BESA, subspace techniques such as MUSIC and methods derived from it, FINES, simulated annealing and computational intelligence algorithms for parametric methods. From a review of the performance of these techniques as documented in the literature, one could conclude that in most cases the LORETA solution gives satisfactory results. In situations involving clusters of dipoles, higher resolution algorithms such as MUSIC or FINES are however preferred. Imposing reliable biophysical and psychological constraints, as done by LAURA has given superior results. The Monte-Carlo analysis performed, comparing WMN, LORETA, sLORETA and SLF, for different noise levels

  17. Steps towards a phylogeny of the pill millipedes: non-monophyly of the family Protoglomeridae, with an integrative redescription of Eupeyerimhoffia archimedis (Diplopoda, Glomerida)

    PubMed Central

    Oeyen, Jan Philip; Wesener, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Eupeyerimhoffia archimedis (Strasser, 1965) is redescribed based on several specimens collected at a number of sites close to the type locality on Sicily, Italy. Scanning electron microscopy is used to illustrate several unusual morphological characters for a member of the Glomerida for the first time. A fragment of the mitochondrial COI gene (668bp) is sequenced for the first time in Eupeyerimhoffia to provide a species-specific barcode and to gain first insights into the genetic distances between the genera in the widespread family Protoglomeridae. The novel sequences are compared to representatives of all other genera of the family: Protoglomeris vasconica (Brölemann, 1897) from northern Spain, the dwarfed Glomerellina laurae Silvestri, 1908 from Italy and Glomeroides primus (Silvestri, 1929) from western North America. The addition of COI sequences from the two other families of the Glomerida renders the family Protoglomeridae paraphyletic with Glomeroides primus being more closely related to Glomeridella minima (Latzel, 1884) than to the other genera in the family. The large genetic distances (13.2–16.8%) between Eupeyerimhoffia and the other genera in the order, as well as its unusual morphological characters, including unique morphological adaptations to roll into a ball, are probably an indication of the old age of the group. PMID:26257534

  18. IAGG workshop: health promotion program on prevention of late onset dementia.

    PubMed

    Andrieu, S; Aboderin, I; Baeyens, J P; Beard, J; Benetos, A; Berrut, G; Brainin, M; Cha, H B; Chen, L K; Du, P; Forette, B; Forette, F; Franco, A; Fratiglioni, L; Gillette-Guyonnet, S; Gold, G; Gomez, F; Guimaraes, R; Gustafson, D; Khachaturian, A; Luchsinger, J; Mangialasche, F; Mathiex-Fortunet, H; Michel, J P; Richard, E; Schneider, L S; Solomon, A; Vellas, B

    2011-08-01

    IAGG, WHO, and SFGG organized a international workshop on Health promotion programs on prevention of late on-set dementia. Thirty world specialists coming from Europe, North America, Asia, South America, Africa and Australia, shared their experience on methods and results of large epidemiological interventions to reduce incidents of dementia or delay its on-set. Chaired by Laura FRATIGLIONI, an expert in Epidemiological studies on dementia issues, the workshop gave opportunity for discussions and controversies about the state-of-the-art. Based on different national and international trials (ADAPT, MAPT, FINGER, GUDIAGE, GEM etc) the questions remained opened for different aspects of methodology, the choice of domain or multi domain intervention, the choice and the definition of the target populations, the best age of candidates, the issues related to the discrepancy between late effects, and interventions' duration. We are please to publish in the Journal, the presentations presented to this workshop. These publications will complete previously task force published in the journal in the last two years on methodological issues for Alzheimer's trials including end point, biomarkers, and the experience of past therapeutic trials. PMID:21808935

  19. KSC-05PD-1769

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. In the Launch Control Center at NASA Kennedy Space Center, NASA Administrator Mike Griffin, First Lady Laura Bush, Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach and Center Director Jim Kennedy pose for a photograph. Mrs. Bush witnessed the historic launch of Space Shuttle Discovery on Return to Flight mission STS-114. She is only the third First Lady to witness a Space Shuttle launch at KSC. On this mission to the International Space Station the crew will perform inspections on- orbit for the first time of all of the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels on the leading edge of the wings and the Thermal Protection System tiles using the new Canadian-built Orbiter Boom Sensor System and the data from 176 impact and temperature sensors. Mission Specialists will also practice repair techniques on RCC and tile samples during a spacewalk in the payload bay. During two additional spacewalks, the crew will install the External Stowage Platform-2, equipped with spare part assemblies, and a replacement Control Moment Gyroscope contained in the Lightweight Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure. The 12- day mission is expected to end with touchdown at the Shuttle Landing Facility on Aug. 7. (Photo Credit: Bill Ingalls)

  20. A concept for a research tool for experiments with cochlear implant users.

    PubMed

    Geurts, L; Wouters, J

    2000-12-01

    APEX, an acronym for computer Application for Psycho-Electrical eXperiments, is a user friendly tool used to conduct psychophysical experiments and to investigate new speech coding algorithms with cochlear implant users. Most common psychophysical experiments can be easily programmed and all stimuli can be easily created without any knowledge of computer programing. The pulsatile stimuli are composed off-line using custom-made MATLAB (Registered trademark of The Mathworks, Inc., http://www.mathworks.com) functions and are stored on hard disk or CD ROM. These functions convert either a speech signal into a pulse sequence or generate any sequence of pulses based on the parameters specified by the experimenter. The APEX personal computer (PC) software reads a text file which specifies the experiment and the stimuli, controls the experiment, delivers the stimuli to the subject through a digital signal processor (DSP) board, collects the responses via a computer mouse or a graphics tablet, and writes the results to the same file. At present, the APEX system is implemented for the LAURA (Registered trademark of Philips Hearing Implants) cochlear implant. However, the concept-and many parts of the system-is portable to any other device. Also, psycho-acoustical experiments can be conducted by presenting the stimuli acoustically through a sound card. PMID:11144586

  1. A new skink (Scincidae: Liburnascincus) from rocky habitat on Cape York, northeast Australia.

    PubMed

    Hoskin, Conrad J; Couper, Patrick J

    2015-01-01

    The genus Liburnascincus is composed of saxicoline skinks restricted to northeast Australia. This small radiation consists of one widespread species, L. mundivensis, found in a variety of rocky habitats in eastern Queensland, and two localized species, L. coensis and L. scirtetis, restricted to granite boulder habitats on Cape York Peninsula, in north Queensland. Here we describe a fourth species, L. artemis sp. nov., from the Bamboo Range, a low rocky range on Cape York. As for other Liburnascincus, the new species is a saxicoline skink that is active on boulder surfaces primarily early and late in the day. Liburnascincus artemis sp. nov. is most similar to L. mundivensis but can be diagnosed based on longer limbs, higher toe and finger lamellae counts, lower midbody scale count, and other aspects of morphology, scalation and colour pattern. Liburnascincus artemis sp. nov. is currently known from a very small area but further surveys will likely extend the range. It is geographically separated from L. mundivensis to the south by unsuitable habitat in the Laura region, but it may abut the range of L. coensis to the north. Despite a small distribution, L. artemis sp. nov. occurs at high density at the known sites and appears to be currently secure. In this paper we also discuss the distributions and biogeography of Liburnascincus more broadly. PMID:26250269

  2. Assessment of CFD Hypersonic Turbulent Heating Rates for Space Shuttle Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, William A.; Oliver, A. Brandon

    2011-01-01

    Turbulent CFD codes are assessed for the prediction of convective heat transfer rates at turbulent, hypersonic conditions. Algebraic turbulence models are used within the DPLR and LAURA CFD codes. The benchmark heat transfer rates are derived from thermocouple measurements of the Space Shuttle orbiter Discovery windward tiles during the STS-119 and STS-128 entries. The thermocouples were located underneath the reaction-cured glass coating on the thermal protection tiles. Boundary layer transition flight experiments conducted during both of those entries promoted turbulent flow at unusually high Mach numbers, with the present analysis considering Mach 10{15. Similar prior comparisons of CFD predictions directly to the flight temperature measurements were unsatisfactory, showing diverging trends between prediction and measurement for Mach numbers greater than 11. In the prior work, surface temperatures and convective heat transfer rates had been assumed to be in radiative equilibrium. The present work employs a one-dimensional time-accurate conduction analysis to relate measured temperatures to surface heat transfer rates, removing heat soak lag from the flight data, in order to better assess the predictive accuracy of the numerical models. The turbulent CFD shows good agreement for turbulent fuselage flow up to Mach 13. But on the wing in the wake of the boundary layer trip, the inclusion of tile conduction effects does not explain the prior observed discrepancy in trends between simulation and experiment; the flight heat transfer measurements are roughly constant over Mach 11-15, versus an increasing trend with Mach number from the CFD.

  3. PREFACE: HITES 2012: 'Horizons of Innovative Theories, Experiments, and Supercomputing in Nuclear Physics'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht, K. T.

    2012-12-01

    This volume contains the contributions of the speakers of an international conference in honor of Jerry Draayer's 70th birthday, entitled 'Horizons of Innovative Theories, Experiments and Supercomputing in Nuclear Physics'. The list of contributors includes not only international experts in these fields, but also many former collaborators, former graduate students, and former postdoctoral fellows of Jerry Draayer, stressing innovative theories such as special symmetries and supercomputing, both of particular interest to Jerry. The organizers of the conference intended to honor Jerry Draayer not only for his seminal contributions in these fields, but also for his administrative skills at departmental, university, national and international level. Signed: Ted Hecht University of Michigan Conference photograph Scientific Advisory Committee Ani AprahamianUniversity of Notre Dame Baha BalantekinUniversity of Wisconsin Bruce BarrettUniversity of Arizona Umit CatalyurekOhio State Unversity David DeanOak Ridge National Laboratory Jutta Escher (Chair)Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Jorge HirschUNAM, Mexico David RoweUniversity of Toronto Brad Sherill & Michigan State University Joel TohlineLouisiana State University Edward ZganjarLousiana State University Organizing Committee Jeff BlackmonLouisiana State University Mark CaprioUniversity of Notre Dame Tomas DytrychLouisiana State University Ana GeorgievaINRNE, Bulgaria Kristina Launey (Co-chair)Louisiana State University Gabriella PopaOhio University Zanesville James Vary (Co-chair)Iowa State University Local Organizing Committee Laura LinhardtLouisiana State University Charlie RascoLouisiana State University Karen Richard (Coordinator)Louisiana State University

  4. Gendered Obstacles Faced by Historical Women in Physics and Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Kristen M.

    2007-12-01

    A gender gap still exists in modern science; this is especially evident in the fields of physics and astronomy. The cause of such a gap is the center of debate. Is this discrepancy the result of inherent ability or socialization? Most studies have focused on modern issues and how women are socialized today. The role of historical gender perspectives and social opinions in creating the field of modern science and any discrepancies within it has not yet been explored in depth. This project investigates the obstacles faced by historical women in physics and astronomy that stem from the officialized gender biases that accompanied the establishment of modern science. Such obstacles are both formal and informal. Four women were chosen to span the three hundred year period between the standardization of the field and the modern day: Laura Bassi, Mary Somerville, Lise Meitner, and Jocelyn Bell Burnell. The investigation reveals that formal obstacles significantly decreased over the time period, while informal obstacles eroded more gradually. Obstacles also reflected historical events such as the World Wars and the Enlightenment. Trends in obstacles faced by four prominent women physicists indicate that education, finances, support networks, and social opinion played a large role in determining success in the field. The applicability to modern day physics issues and the gender gap is discussed. Many thanks to the Pathways Scholars Program and the Ronald E. McNair Post-Baccalaureate Achievement Program for funding for this project.

  5. KSC-05PD-1745

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. KSC Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow Jr. (left) escorts distinguished guests to the VIP viewing site at NASA Kennedy Space Center. First Lady Laura Bush is in front (right) with Noelle Bush, the daughter of Florida Gov. Jeb Bush and Columba Bush behind her. They are attending the historic launch of Space Shuttle Discovery on Return to Flight mission STS-114, scheduled to lift off at 10:39 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39B with a crew of seven. Mrs. Bush is only the third First Lady to witness a Space Shuttle launch at KSC. On this mission to the International Space Station the crew will perform inspections on- orbit for the first time of all of the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels on the leading edge of the wings and the Thermal Protection System tiles using the new Canadian-built Orbiter Boom Sensor System and the data from 176 impact and temperature sensors. Mission Specialists will also practice repair techniques on RCC and tile samples during a spacewalk in the payload bay. During two additional spacewalks, the crew will install the External Stowage Platform-2, equipped with spare part assemblies, and a replacement Control Moment Gyroscope contained in the Lightweight Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure. The 12- day mission is expected to end with touchdown at the Shuttle Landing Facility on Aug. 7.

  6. The Faulkes Telescope Project at school

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neta, Miguel

    2014-05-01

    The Faulkes Telescope Project [1] was started in 2000 and is currently managed by the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) [2]. Allows student access to two remote telescopes (in Hawaii and in Australia), allowing you to capture images of the sky. Since January 2012 I conduct monthly observations with students: first with students from Escola Secundária de Loulé (ESL) [3] and starting from September 2013 with students from Agrupamento de Escolas Dra Laura Ayres [4], in Quarteira. Each session is previously prepared in order to make the best of the time available. For that we use a virtual planetarium that allows us to see the sky in place and time of the scheduled session. After the start of each session a student takes control in real time of one of the telescopes from a computer connected to the internet. This project is a tool that gives the students the feeling of doing science and meet the sky step by step. The observations made by my students can be found at www.miguelneta.pt/faulkestelescope. [1] http://www.faulkes-telescope.com [2] http://lcogt.net [3] https://www.es-loule.edu.pt [4] http://www.esla.edu.pt

  7. Foreword

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    XMM-Newton has been an outstanding scientific success. In the three years since launch the observatory has made over 3000 observations resulting in around 300 publications and rising. The EPIC instrument has been the prime instrument for the majority of these observations. Members of the EPIC consortium institutes have been active in the scientific exploitation of the data through successful bids for observing time in the AO programmes and the consortium was, of course, allocated a substantial observing budget of 3 Msec in the Guaranteed Time (GT) programme. In 2003 when the GT programme was nearing completion the EPIC consortium decided to organize a scientific meeting, hosted by the INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo in Sicily, inviting members of the consortium institutes and other scientists associated to the successful development of XMM-Newton to present the XMM-Newton results on the astrophysics of the X-ray Universe. The meeting has been kindly hosted in the magnificent "Sala delle Capriate" of Palazzo Steri, a superb historical building, recently restored, and now hosting the Rettorato of the Università degli Studi di Palermo. The meeting has seen the participation of more than 90 scientists coming from several european countries who have shown a series of new exciting results. We wish to thank the local organizing committee and, especially, Laura Daricello whose dedication and effort have made i the meeting very successful and pleasant.

  8. Prefazione al terzo volume di GERBERTVS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, Costantino

    The symposium dedicated to Gerbert on 12.52012 was held at the Vallicelliana Library, in the Borromini hall. The title was Gerberto and Borromini, in order to evidence the link between Gerbert (938 ca. - 1003) and the Ticinese architect who saved his tumb, during the restauration of the Cathedral of Rome St. John in Laterano in 1648. It is possibile that from his residence in the Lateran Gerbert could observe the stars with his tubes, which are presented by C. Sigismondi in this volume. During his trips to Italy, alone and following the archbishop Adalbero of Reims Gerbert could have passed in the Chiusa Valley and influence with his astronomical knowledges the builders of the Sacra of S. Michele, this is the subject of Laura C. Paladino study. Abbo of Fleury is contemporary to Gerbert and he had the same vast interests. He studied in England and they are presented together in the paper of Paolo Rossi. Veronica Regoli shows the link between Gerbert, Dante and Jerusalem.

  9. KSC-05PD-1757

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. In the stands at NASA Kennedy Space Centers Banana Creek viewing site, First Lady Laura Bush and other guests follow path of Space Shuttle Discovery as it successfully launches on Return to Flight mission STS-114 at 10:39 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39B. At right of Mrs. Bush is Florida Gov. Jeb Bush. KSC Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow Jr. is in front of the governor. On this mission to the International Space Station the crew will perform inspections on-orbit for the first time of all of the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels on the leading edge of the wings and the Thermal Protection System tiles using the new Canadian-built Orbiter Boom Sensor System and the data from 176 impact and temperature sensors. Mission Specialists will also practice repair techniques on RCC and tile samples during a spacewalk in the payload bay. During two additional spacewalks, the crew will install the External Stowage Platform-2, equipped with spare part assemblies, and a replacement Control Moment Gyroscope contained in the Lightweight Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure. The 12-day mission is expected to end with touchdown at the Shuttle Landing Facility on Aug. 7.

  10. KSC-05PD-1754

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. In the stands at NASA Kennedy Space Centers Banana Creek viewing site, First Lady Laura Bush (center) applauds the successful liftoff of Space Shuttle Discovery on Return to Flight mission STS-114 at 10:39 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39B. She is flanked by astronaut Scott Altmann at left and Florida Gov. Jeb Bush at right. KSC Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow Jr. is in front of the governor. On this mission to the International Space Station the crew will perform inspections on- orbit for the first time of all of the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels on the leading edge of the wings and the Thermal Protection System tiles using the new Canadian-built Orbiter Boom Sensor System and the data from 176 impact and temperature sensors. Mission Specialists will also practice repair techniques on RCC and tile samples during a spacewalk in the payload bay. During two additional spacewalks, the crew will install the External Stowage Platform-2, equipped with spare part assemblies, and a replacement Control Moment Gyroscope contained in the Lightweight Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure. The 12- day mission is expected to end with touchdown at the Shuttle Landing Facility on Aug. 7.

  11. KSC-05PD-1756

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. In the stands at NASA Kennedy Space Centers Banana Creek viewing site, First Lady Laura Bush follows the path of Space Shuttle Discovery as it successfully launches on Return to Flight mission STS-114 at 10:39 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39B. At right is Florida Gov. Jeb Bush. KSC Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow Jr. is in front of the governor. On this mission to the International Space Station the crew will perform inspections on-orbit for the first time of all of the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels on the leading edge of the wings and the Thermal Protection System tiles using the new Canadian-built Orbiter Boom Sensor System and the data from 176 impact and temperature sensors. Mission Specialists will also practice repair techniques on RCC and tile samples during a spacewalk in the payload bay. During two additional spacewalks, the crew will install the External Stowage Platform-2, equipped with spare part assemblies, and a replacement Control Moment Gyroscope contained in the Lightweight Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure. The 12-day mission is expected to end with touchdown at the Shuttle Landing Facility on Aug. 7.

  12. KSC-05PD-1755

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. In the stands at NASA Kennedy Space Centers Banana Creek viewing site, First Lady Laura Bush follows the path of Space Shuttle Discovery as it successfully launches on Return to Flight mission STS-114 at 10:39 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39B. At right is Florida Gov. Jeb Bush. KSC Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow Jr. is in front of the governor. On this mission to the International Space Station the crew will perform inspections on-orbit for the first time of all of the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels on the leading edge of the wings and the Thermal Protection System tiles using the new Canadian-built Orbiter Boom Sensor System and the data from 176 impact and temperature sensors. Mission Specialists will also practice repair techniques on RCC and tile samples during a spacewalk in the payload bay. During two additional spacewalks, the crew will install the External Stowage Platform-2, equipped with spare part assemblies, and a replacement Control Moment Gyroscope contained in the Lightweight Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure. The 12-day mission is expected to end with touchdown at the Shuttle Landing Facility on Aug. 7.

  13. KSC-05PD-1751

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. In the stands at NASA Kennedy Space Centers Banana Creek viewing site, First Lady Laura Bush (center) watches Launch Pad 39B for the liftoff of Space Shuttle Discovery on Return to Flight mission STS-114, scheduled to lift off at 10:39 a.m. EDT. She is flanked by astronaut Scott Altmann at left and Florida Gov. Jeb Bush at right. In front of her are Michael OBrien (left), assistant administrator for External Relations, and Woodrow Whitlow Jr. (right), KSC deputy director. Mrs. Bush is only the third First Lady to witness a Space Shuttle launch at KSC. On this mission to the International Space Station the crew will perform inspections on-orbit for the first time of all of the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels on the leading edge of the wings and the Thermal Protection System tiles using the new Canadian-built Orbiter Boom Sensor System and the data from 176 impact and temperature sensors. Mission Specialists will also practice repair techniques on RCC and tile samples during a spacewalk in the payload bay. During two additional spacewalks, the crew will install the External Stowage Platform-2, equipped with spare part assemblies, and a replacement Control Moment Gyroscope contained in the Lightweight Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure. The 12-day mission is expected to end with touchdown at the Shuttle Landing Facility on Aug. 7.

  14. KSC-05PD-1750

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. In the stands at NASA Kennedy Space Centers Banana Creek viewing site, First Lady Laura Bush pauses for a photo with astronaut Scott Altmann and Michael OBrien, assistant administrator for External Relations. Mrs. Bush and other guests are attending the launch of Space Shuttle Discovery on Return to Flight mission STS-114, scheduled to lift off at 10:39 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39B with a crew of seven. Mrs. Bush is only the third First Lady to witness a Space Shuttle launch at KSC. On this mission to the International Space Station the crew will perform inspections on-orbit for the first time of all of the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels on the leading edge of the wings and the Thermal Protection System tiles using the new Canadian-built Orbiter Boom Sensor System and the data from 176 impact and temperature sensors. Mission Specialists will also practice repair techniques on RCC and tile samples during a spacewalk in the payload bay. During two additional spacewalks, the crew will install the External Stowage Platform-2, equipped with spare part assemblies, and a replacement Control Moment Gyroscope contained in the Lightweight Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure. The 12-day mission is expected to end with touchdown at the Shuttle Landing Facility on Aug. 7.

  15. KSC-05PD-1752

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. In the stands at NASA Kennedy Space Centers Banana Creek viewing site, First Lady Laura Bush (center) applauds the successful liftoff of Space Shuttle Discovery on Return to Flight mission STS-114 at 10:39 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39B. She is flanked by astronaut Scott Altmann at left and Florida Gov. Jeb Bush at right. KSC Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow Jr. is in front of the governor. On this mission to the International Space Station the crew will perform inspections on- orbit for the first time of all of the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels on the leading edge of the wings and the Thermal Protection System tiles using the new Canadian-built Orbiter Boom Sensor System and the data from 176 impact and temperature sensors. Mission Specialists will also practice repair techniques on RCC and tile samples during a spacewalk in the payload bay. During two additional spacewalks, the crew will install the External Stowage Platform-2, equipped with spare part assemblies, and a replacement Control Moment Gyroscope contained in the Lightweight Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure. The 12- day mission is expected to end with touchdown at the Shuttle Landing Facility on Aug. 7.

  16. Potatoes - A crop resistant against input of heavy metals from the metallicaly contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Musilova, Janette; Bystricka, Judita; Lachman, Jaromir; Harangozo, Lubos; Trebichalsky, Pavol; Volnova, Beata

    2016-01-01

    The objective of our study was to assess the extent of accumulation of cadmium, lead and zinc in potato tubers depending on the concentration of these heavy metals in soil and to evaluate the resistance of 11 cultivars of potato cultivated in 5 localities of the Slovakia against input of these heavy metals into the consumption part of potato. Contents of Cd (Pb, Zn) in soil were 0.94-2.54 (18.03-24.90, 35.71-72.40) mg/kg in soil extract by aqua regia and 0.030-0.188 (0.149-0.356, 0.052-0.238) mg/kg in soil extract by NH4NO3. The contents of Cd, Pb, and Zn were determined in potatoes in extracts of freeze-dried samples and expressed in mg/kg of fresh matter (FM). Determined contents of heavy metals were in the range of ND-0.058 mg Cd/kg FM, 0.020-0.630 mg Pb/kg FM, 1.836-3.457 mg Zn/kg FM, resp. The statistically significant correlation between heavy metal content in soil and its content in potato tubers were confirmed only: cv. Laura - Spissky Stvrtok (Cd), cv. Red Anna - Odorin (Pb) and Marabel, Red Anna - Odorin, cv. Marabel - Belusa, cv. Volumia - Imel (Zn). PMID:26421760

  17. A Study of Ablation-Flowfield Coupling Relevant to the Orion Heatshield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Christopher O.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Mazaheri, Alireza

    2009-01-01

    The coupled interaction between an ablating surface and the surrounding aerothermal environment is studied. An equilibrium ablation model is coupled to the LAURA flowfield solver, which allows the char ablation rate (m-dot(sub c)) to be computed as part of the flowfield solution. The wall temperature (T(sub w)) and pyrolysis ablation rate (m-dot(sub g)) may be specified by the user, obtained from the steady-state ablation approximation, or computed from a a material response code. A 32 species thermochemical nonequilibrium flowfield model is applied, which permits the treatment of C, H, O, N, and Si containing species. Coupled ablation cases relevant to the Orion heatshield are studied. These consist of diffusion-limited oxidation cases with Avcoat as the ablation material. The m-dot(sub c) values predicted from the developed coupled ablation analysis were compared with those obtained from a typical uncoupled ablation analysis. The coupled results were found to be as much as 50% greater than the uncoupled values. This is shown to be a result of the cumulative effect of the two fundamental approximations inherent in the uncoupled analysis.

  18. Modeling of Laser Vaporization and Plume Chemistry in a Boron Nitride Nanotube Production Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Fay, Catharine C.

    2012-01-01

    Flow in a pressurized, vapor condensation (PVC) boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) production rig is modeled. A laser provides a thermal energy source to the tip of a boron ber bundle in a high pressure nitrogen chamber causing a plume of boron-rich gas to rise. The buoyancy driven flow is modeled as a mixture of thermally perfect gases (B, B2, N, N2, BN) in either thermochemical equilibrium or chemical nonequilibrium assuming steady-state melt and vaporization from a 1 mm radius spot at the axis of an axisymmetric chamber. The simulation is intended to define the macroscopic thermochemical environment from which boron-rich species, including nanotubes, condense out of the plume. Simulations indicate a high temperature environment (T > 4400K) for elevated pressures within 1 mm of the surface sufficient to dissociate molecular nitrogen and form BN at the base of the plume. Modifications to Program LAURA, a finite-volume based solver for hypersonic flows including coupled radiation and ablation, are described to enable this simulation. Simulations indicate that high pressure synthesis conditions enable formation of BN vapor in the plume that may serve to enhance formation of exceptionally long nanotubes in the PVC process.

  19. KSC-05PD-1764

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. In the Launch Control Center at NASA Kennedy Space Center, First Lady Laura Bush thanks NASA Administrator for his hospitality. At far left is Center Director Jim Kennedy. Mrs. Bush witnessed the historic launch of Space Shuttle Discovery on Return to Flight mission STS-114. She is only the third First Lady to witness a Space Shuttle launch at KSC.On this mission to the International Space Station the crew will perform inspections on-orbit for the first time of all of the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels on the leading edge of the wings and the Thermal Protection System tiles using the new Canadian-built Orbiter Boom Sensor System and the data from 176 impact and temperature sensors. Mission Specialists will also practice repair techniques on RCC and tile samples during a spacewalk in the payload bay. During two additional spacewalks, the crew will install the External Stowage Platform-2, equipped with spare part assemblies, and a replacement Control Moment Gyroscope contained in the Lightweight Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure. The 12-day mission is expected to end with touchdown at the Shuttle Landing Facility on Aug. 7.

  20. Sea surface emissivity at L-band: results of the WInd and Salinity Experiments WISE 2000 and 2001 and preliminary results from FROG 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarino, Ramon; Camps, Adriano; Corbella, Ignasi; Vall-llossera, Merce; Duffo, Nuria; Torres, Francesc; Enrique, Luis; Miranda, Joge; Arenas, Juanjo; Font, Jordi; Julia, Agusti; Gabarro, Carolina; Etcheto, Jacqueline; Boutin, Jacqueline; Contardo, Stephanie; Weill, Alain; Rubio, Eva; Niclos, Raquel R.; Rivas, Raul; Caselles, Vicente; Wursteisen, Patrick; Berger, Michael; Neira, Manuel Martin

    2004-02-01

    Two field experiments named WISE (WInd and Salinity Experiment) were sponsored by the European Space Agency (ESA) to better understand the wind and sea state effects on the L-band brightness temperatures. They took place at the Casablanca oil rig located in the North Mediterranean Sea, 40 km off shore the Ebro river delta: WISE 2000 from November 25 to December 18, 2000, and continued during the January 9 to 16, 2001, and WISE 2001 from October 23 to November 22, 2001. During the spring of 2003, under Spanish National funds, a third field experiment named FROG (Foam, Rain, Oil slicks and GPS reflectometry) took place at the Ebro river delta, to measure the phenomena that were not completely understood during the WISE field experiments, mainly the effect of foam and rain. In order to achieve the objectives of the WISE field experiments the LAURA L-band fully polarimetric radiometer from the Technical University of Catalonia (UPC) was mounted on the Casablanca oil-rig at the 32 meters deck above the sea surface, pointing to the North and North-West, in the direction of the dominant winds. In this paper we present the results of the first study to determine the relationship between the brightness temperature and the sea state.

  1. Erratum: The Hubble Space Telescope Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale. XXVIII. Combining the Constraints on the Hubble Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mould, Jeremy R.; Huchra, John P.; Freedman, Wendy L.; Kennicutt, Robert C., Jr.; Ferrarese, Laura; Ford, Holland C.; Gibson, Brad K.; Graham, John A.; Hughes, Shaun M. G.; Illingworth, Garth D.; Kelson, Daniel D.; Macri, Lucas M.; Madore, Barry F.; Sakai, Shoko; Sebo, Kim M.; Silbermann, Nancy A.; Stetson, Peter B.

    2000-12-01

    In the article ``The Hubble Space Telescope Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale. XXVIII. Combining the Constraints on the Hubble Constant'' (ApJ, 529, 786 [2000]), by Jeremy R. Mould, John P. Huchra, Wendy L. Freedman, Robert C. Kennicutt, Jr., Laura Ferrarese, Holland C. Ford, Brad K. Gibson, John A. Graham, Shaun M. G. Hughes, Garth D. Illingworth, Daniel D. Kelson, Lucas M. Macri, Barry F. Madore, Shoko Sakai, Kim M. Sebo, Nancy A. Silbermann, and Peter B. Stetson, some sign errors need to be corrected. 1. In equation (A2) the minus signs should be plus signs. The correct version is Vcosmic=VH+Vc,LG+Vin,Virgo+Vin,GA+Vin,Shap+... 2. In Table A1 the declination of the Great Attractor (GA) is -44°, and that of the Shapley supercluster is -31°, i.e., south declination, not north, as implied in the table. The first error is the authors' and the second occurred in the publication process. In both cases the computer code was correct, and the errors are in the published representation. None of the results presented in the paper are therefore affected in any way. The authors thank Dr. Jim Condon for pointing out the error in equation (A2)

  2. James R. Wait (1924-1998)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, David A.

    James (Jim) R.Wait, a pioneer in electromagnetic theory and applications to geophysical exploration, died of cancer in Tucson, Arizona, on October 1, 1998. At 74, he was still very active and innovative in electromagnetics as Regents Professor Emeritus, University of Arizona, and as a consultant in electrical geophysics. He is survived by his wife, Gertrude; his son, George; his daughter, Laura; and three grandchildren, James, Carolyn, and Connor.Jim was born in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, on January 23, 1924. He obtained B.A.Sc.and M.A.Sc. degrees in 1948 and 1949, respectively and his Ph.D. degree in 1951, in electrical engineering, all from the University of Toronto. He obtained his “T” in skiing and remained an avid skier all his life. Jim stayed in great shape and always found time to work out despite his busy schedule. I still remember the business trip where Jim and I ran laps around the parking lot of a Holiday Inn for his daily workout.

  3. Stumbling toward equity: the role of government in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Dooley, L G; Gaston, R S

    1998-01-01

    In Mortal Peril, Professor Epstein is critical of the current, regulated system for organ donation and suggests that a market for organ tissue would better meet the needs of patients. In this response to Professor Epstein, Professor Laura Dooley and Dr. Robert Gaston pair their skills to attack Professor Epstein's analysis. As they have done on several other occasions, Professors Dooley and Gaston argue that the kidney donation and transplantation arena is fraught with racial inequity, and that Professor Epstein's proposal for a market in kidneys will exacerbate this inequity. The authors maintain that to prevent the poor from being excluded from transplants, the government plays a critical (if imperfect) role in the allocation of these scarce resources. Furthermore, government intervention is acceptable to correct past discrimination because there is scientific evidence that the disproportionate incidence of kidney failure in African Americans is related to the evolutionary pressures of slave trading and slavery. Professors Dooley and Gaston also defend their previous efforts to change the government system of allocation and characterize the government's willingness to adopt their recommendations as an appropriate response to scientific research rather than a governmental susceptibility to lobbying from special interest groups. Finally, the authors criticize Professor Epstein's argument that dialysis is a viable alternative to transplantation because there are significant differences in "quality of life, morbidity and survival." Professors Dooley and Gaston conclude that government intervention is necessary for maintaining the equity in kidney transplantation that a market system would not. PMID:12071208

  4. Erratum: The Extragalactic Distance Scale Key Project. III. The Discovery of Cepheids and a New Distance to M101 Using the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelson, Daniel D; Illingworth, Garth D.; Freedman, Wendy F.; Graham, John A.; Hill, Robert; Madore, Barry F.; Saha, Abhijit; Stetson, Peter B.; Kennicutt, Robert C., Jr.; Mould, Jeremy R.; Hughes, Shaun M.; Ferrarese, Laura; Phelps, Randy; Turner, Anne; Cook, Kem H.; Ford, Holland; Hoessel, John G.; Huchra, John

    1997-03-01

    In the paper ``The Extragalactic Distance Scale Key Project. III. The Discovery of Cepheids and a New Distance to M101 Using the Hubble Space Telescope'' by Daniel D. Kelson, Garth D. Illingworth, Wendy F. Freedman, John A. Graham, Robert Hill, Barry F. Madore, Abhijit Saha, Peter B. Stetson, Robert C. Kennicutt, Jr., Jeremy R. Mould, Shaun M. Hughes, Laura Ferrarese, Randy Phelps, Anne Turner, Kem H. Cook, Holland Ford, John G. Hoessel, and John Huchra (ApJ, 463, 26 [1996]), two of the tables are in error. The magnitudes in Tables B1 and B2, in Appendix B, are ordered incorrectly. As a result, the Julian dates are not associated with their correct Cepheid magnitudes. We have now corrected these data, and updated versions of the tables are available on the World Wide Web. The tables are available in ASCII format at our Key Project site (http://www.ipac.caltech.edu/H0kp/) and will appear in volume 7 of the AAS CDROM. PostScript and paper copies are also available from the first author (http://www.ucolick.org/~kelson/H0/home.html or kelson@ucolick.org).

  5. Multi-Component Diffusion with Application To Computational Aerothermodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, Kenneth; Gnoffo, Peter A.

    1998-01-01

    The accuracy and complexity of solving multicomponent gaseous diffusion using the detailed multicomponent equations, the Stefan-Maxwell equations, and two commonly used approximate equations have been examined in a two part study. Part I examined the equations in a basic study with specified inputs in which the results are applicable for many applications. Part II addressed the application of the equations in the Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA) computational code for high-speed entries in Earth's atmosphere. The results showed that the presented iterative scheme for solving the Stefan-Maxwell equations is an accurate and effective method as compared with solutions of the detailed equations. In general, good accuracy with the approximate equations cannot be guaranteed for a species or all species in a multi-component mixture. 'Corrected' forms of the approximate equations that ensured the diffusion mass fluxes sum to zero, as required, were more accurate than the uncorrected forms. Good accuracy, as compared with the Stefan- Maxwell results, were obtained with the 'corrected' approximate equations in defining the heating rates for the three Earth entries considered in Part II.

  6. Re-Entry Aeroheating Analysis of Tile-Repair Augers for the Shuttle Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazaheri, Ali R.; Wood, William A.

    2007-01-01

    Computational re-entry aerothermodynamic analysis of the Space Shuttle Orbiter s tile overlay repair (TOR) sub-assembly is presented. Entry aeroheating analyses are conducted to characterize the aerothermodynamic environment of the TOR and to provide necessary inputs for future TOR thermal and structural analyses. The TOR sub-assembly consists of a thin plate and several augers and spacers that serve as the TOR fasteners. For the computational analysis, the Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA) is used. A 5-species non-equilibrium chemistry model with a finite rate catalytic recombination model and a radiation equilibrium wall condition are used. It is assumed that wall properties are the same as reaction cured glass (RCG) properties with a surface emissivity of epsilon = 0.89. Surface heat transfer rates for the TOR and tile repair augers (TRA) are computed at a STS-107 trajectory point corresponding to Mach 18 free stream conditions. Computational results show that the average heating bump factor (BF), which is a ratio of local heat transfer rate to a design reference point located at the damage site, for the auger head alone is about 1.9. It is also shown that the average BF for the combined auger and washer heads is about 2.0.

  7. CFD Analysis of Tile-Repair Augers for the Shuttle Orbiter Re-Entry Aeroheating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazaheri, Ali R.

    2007-01-01

    A three-dimensional aerothermodynamic model of the shuttle orbiter's tile overlay repair (TOR) sub-assembly is presented. This sub-assembly, which is an overlay that covers the damaged tiles, is modeled as a protuberance with a constant thickness. The washers and augers that serve as the overlay fasteners are modeled as cylindrical protuberances with constant thicknesses. Entry aerothermodynamic cases are studied to provide necessary inputs for future thermal analyses and to support the space-shuttle return-to-flight effort. The NASA Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA) is used to calculate heat transfer rate on the surfaces of the tile overlay repair and augers. Gas flow is modeled as non-equilibrium, five species air in thermal equilibrium. Heat transfer rate and surface temperatures are analyzed and studied for a shuttle orbiter trajectory point at Mach 17.85. Computational results show that the average heat transfer rate normalized with respect to its value at body point 1800 is about BF=1.9 for the auger head. It is also shown that the average BF for the auger and washer heads is about BF=2.0.

  8. Radiation Coupling with the FUN3D Unstructured-Grid CFD Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, William A.

    2012-01-01

    The HARA radiation code is fully-coupled to the FUN3D unstructured-grid CFD code for the purpose of simulating high-energy hypersonic flows. The radiation energy source terms and surface heat transfer, under the tangent slab approximation, are included within the fluid dynamic ow solver. The Fire II flight test, at the Mach-31 1643-second trajectory point, is used as a demonstration case. Comparisons are made with an existing structured-grid capability, the LAURA/HARA coupling. The radiative surface heat transfer rates from the present approach match the benchmark values within 6%. Although radiation coupling is the focus of the present work, convective surface heat transfer rates are also reported, and are seen to vary depending upon the choice of mesh connectivity and FUN3D ux reconstruction algorithm. On a tetrahedral-element mesh the convective heating matches the benchmark at the stagnation point, but under-predicts by 15% on the Fire II shoulder. Conversely, on a mixed-element mesh the convective heating over-predicts at the stagnation point by 20%, but matches the benchmark away from the stagnation region.

  9. Review of a code development and calibration program in support of the aeroassist flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    1989-01-01

    The code development and calibration program for the Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA) is reviewed, with emphasis directed toward support of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE). The flight project is designed to obtain data which will be used in the validation of computational fluid dynamic approximation methods. Comparisons between experimental data and numerical simulation focus on perfect-gas tests over a scale model of the AFE and on flight and ground tests which challenge some aspect of the thermochemical nonequilibrium model. In the first case, the gas model is simple, but the grid-related problems of defining the real vehicle are present. In the second case, the vehicle geometries are simple, but thermochemical processes must be modeled correctly in order to compare with the experimental data. These comparisons are described as calibration runs because they test elements of the numerical simulation, but no single data set adequately simulates the full-scale AFE flight conditions. Comparisons between computation and experiment over a broad range of data sets show generally good agreement, though some aspects of the numerical model require further development.

  10. Rice Glycosyltransferase (GT) Phylogenomic Database

    DOE Data Explorer

    Ronald, Pamela

    The Ronald Laboratory staff at the University of California-Davis has a primary research focus on the genes of the rice plant. They study the role that genetics plays in the way rice plants respond to their environment. They created the Rice GT Database in order to integrate functional genomic information for putative rice Glycosyltransferases (GTs). This database contains information on nearly 800 putative rice GTs (gene models) identified by sequence similarity searches based on the Carbohydrate Active enZymes (CAZy) database. The Rice GT Database provides a platform to display user-selected functional genomic data on a phylogenetic tree. This includes sequence information, mutant line information, expression data, etc. An interactive chromosomal map shows the position of all rice GTs, and links to rice annotation databases are included. The format is intended to "facilitate the comparison of closely related GTs within different families, as well as perform global comparisons between sets of related families." [From http://ricephylogenomics.ucdavis.edu/cellwalls/gt/genInfo.shtml] See also the primary paper discussing this work: Peijian Cao, Laura E. Bartley, Ki-Hong Jung and Pamela C. Ronalda. Construction of a Rice Glycosyltransferase Phylogenomic Database and Identification of Rice-Diverged Glycosyltransferases. Molecular Plant, 2008, 1(5): 858-877.

  11. Nonequilibrium radiative heating prediction method for aeroassist flowfields with coupling to flowfield solvers. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartung, Lin C.

    1991-01-01

    A method for predicting radiation adsorption and emission coefficients in thermochemical nonequilibrium flows is developed. The method is called the Langley optimized radiative nonequilibrium code (LORAN). It applies the smeared band approximation for molecular radiation to produce moderately detailed results and is intended to fill the gap between detailed but costly prediction methods and very fast but highly approximate methods. The optimization of the method to provide efficient solutions allowing coupling to flowfield solvers is discussed. Representative results are obtained and compared to previous nonequilibrium radiation methods, as well as to ground- and flight-measured data. Reasonable agreement is found in all cases. A multidimensional radiative transport method is also developed for axisymmetric flows. Its predictions for wall radiative flux are 20 to 25 percent lower than those of the tangent slab transport method, as expected, though additional investigation of the symmetry and outflow boundary conditions is indicated. The method was applied to the peak heating condition of the aeroassist flight experiment (AFE) trajectory, with results comparable to predictions from other methods. The LORAN method was also applied in conjunction with the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code LAURA to study the sensitivity of the radiative heating prediction to various models used in nonequilibrium CFD. This study suggests that radiation measurements can provide diagnostic information about the detailed processes occurring in a nonequilibrium flowfield because radiation phenomena are very sensitive to these processes.

  12. Analysis of Effectiveness of Phoenix Entry Reaction Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyakonov, Artem A.; Glass, Christopher E.; Desai, Prasun, N.; VanNorman, John W.

    2008-01-01

    Interaction between the external flowfield and the reaction control system (RCS) thruster plumes of the Phoenix capsule during entry has been investigated. The analysis covered rarefied, transitional, hypersonic and supersonic flight regimes. Performance of pitch, yaw and roll control authority channels was evaluated, with specific emphasis on the yaw channel due to its low nominal yaw control authority. Because Phoenix had already been constructed and its RCS could not be modified before flight, an assessment of RCS efficacy along the trajectory was needed to determine possible issues and to make necessary software changes. Effectiveness of the system at various regimes was evaluated using a hybrid DSMC-CFD technique, based on DSMC Analysis Code (DAC) code and General Aerodynamic Simulation Program (GASP), the LAURA (Langley Aerothermal Upwind Relaxation Algorithm) code, and the FUN3D (Fully Unstructured 3D) code. Results of the analysis at hypersonic and supersonic conditions suggest a significant aero-RCS interference which reduced the efficacy of the thrusters and could likely produce control reversal. Very little aero-RCS interference was predicted in rarefied and transitional regimes. A recommendation was made to the project to widen controller system deadbands to minimize (if not eliminate) the use of RCS thrusters through hypersonic and supersonic flight regimes, where their performance would be uncertain.

  13. Aerodynamic Interference Due to MSL Reaction Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyakonov, Artem A.; Schoenenberger, Mark; Scallion, William I.; VanNorman, John W.; Novak, Luke A.; Tang, Chun Y.

    2009-01-01

    An investigation of effectiveness of the reaction control system (RCS) of Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) entry capsule during atmospheric flight has been conducted. The reason for the investigation is that MSL is designed to fly a lifting actively guided entry with hypersonic bank maneuvers, therefore an understanding of RCS effectiveness is required. In the course of the study several jet configurations were evaluated using Langley Aerothermal Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA) code, Data Parallel Line Relaxation (DPLR) code, Fully Unstructured 3D (FUN3D) code and an Overset Grid Flowsolver (OVERFLOW) code. Computations indicated that some of the proposed configurations might induce aero-RCS interactions, sufficient to impede and even overwhelm the intended control torques. It was found that the maximum potential for aero-RCS interference exists around peak dynamic pressure along the trajectory. Present analysis largely relies on computational methods. Ground testing, flight data and computational analyses are required to fully understand the problem. At the time of this writing some experimental work spanning range of Mach number 2.5 through 4.5 has been completed and used to establish preliminary levels of confidence for computations. As a result of the present work a final RCS configuration has been designed such as to minimize aero-interference effects and it is a design baseline for MSL entry capsule.

  14. Female science teacher beliefs and attitudes: implications in relation to gender and pedagogical practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapata, Mara; Gallard, Alejandro J.

    2007-10-01

    Beliefs and attitudes resulting from the unique life experiences of teachers frame interactions with learners promoting gender equity or inequity and the reproduction of social views about knowledge and power as related to gender. This study examines the enactment of a female science teacher's pedagogy (Laura), seeking to understand the implications of her beliefs and attitudes, as framed by her interpretations and daily manifestations, as she interacts with students. Distinct influences inform the conceptual framework of this study: (a) the social organization of society at large, governed by understood and unspoken patriarchy, present both academically and socially; (b) the devaluing of women as "knowers" of scientific knowledge as defined by a western and male view of science; (c) the marginalization or "feminization" of education and pedagogical knowledge. The findings reflect tensions between attitudes and beliefs and actual teacher practice suggesting the need for awareness within existing or new teachers about their positions as social agents and the sociological implications related to issues of gender within which we live and work, inclusive of science teaching and learning.

  15. KSC-05PD-1766

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. At the Skid Strip on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, First Lady Laura Bush says farewell to KSC Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow Jr. At left is Associate Director Jim Hattaway. Mrs. Bush witnessed the historic launch of Space Shuttle Discovery on Return to Flight mission STS-114. She is only the third First Lady to witness a Space Shuttle launch at KSC. On this mission to the International Space Station the crew will perform inspections on-orbit for the first time of all of the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels on the leading edge of the wings and the Thermal Protection System tiles using the new Canadian-built Orbiter Boom Sensor System and the data from 176 impact and temperature sensors. Mission Specialists will also practice repair techniques on RCC and tile samples during a spacewalk in the payload bay. During two additional spacewalks, the crew will install the External Stowage Platform-2, equipped with spare part assemblies, and a replacement Control Moment Gyroscope contained in the Lightweight Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure. The 12-day mission is expected to end with touchdown at the Shuttle Landing Facility on Aug. 7.

  16. KSC-05PD-1744

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. After arriving at the Skid Strip on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, First Lady Laura Bush is welcomed by Jim Hattaway (left), associate director at NASA Kennedy Space Center, and Woodrow Whitlow Jr., deputy director at KSC. Mrs. Bush is attending the historic launch of Space Shuttle Discovery on Return to Flight mission STS-114, scheduled to lift off at 10:39 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39B with a crew of seven. Mrs. Bush is only the third First Lady to witness a Space Shuttle launch at KSC. On this mission to the International Space Station the crew will perform inspections on-orbit for the first time of all of the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels on the leading edge of the wings and the Thermal Protection System tiles using the new Canadian-built Orbiter Boom Sensor System and the data from 176 impact and temperature sensors. Mission Specialists will also practice repair techniques on RCC and tile samples during a spacewalk in the payload bay. During two additional spacewalks, the crew will install the External Stowage Platform-2, equipped with spare part assemblies, and a replacement Control Moment Gyroscope contained in the Lightweight Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure. The 12-day mission is expected to end with touchdown at the Shuttle Landing Facility on Aug. 7.

  17. KSC-05PD-1743

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. Arriving at the Skid Strip on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station is First Lady Laura Bush, who is attending the historic launch of Space Shuttle Discovery on Return to Flight mission STS-114, scheduled to lift off at 10:39 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39B with a crew of seven. Mrs. Bush is only the third First Lady to witness a Space Shuttle launch at KSC. On this mission to the International Space Station the crew will perform inspections on-orbit for the first time of all of the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels on the leading edge of the wings and the Thermal Protection System tiles using the new Canadian-built Orbiter Boom Sensor System and the data from 176 impact and temperature sensors. Mission Specialists will also practice repair techniques on RCC and tile samples during a spacewalk in the payload bay. During two additional spacewalks, the crew will install the External Stowage Platform-2, equipped with spare part assemblies, and a replacement Control Moment Gyroscope contained in the Lightweight Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure. The 12-day mission is expected to end with touchdown at the Shuttle Landing Facility on Aug. 7.

  18. A multiblock analysis for shuttle orbiter re-entry heating from Mach 24 to Mach 12

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Weilmuenster, K. J.; Alter, Stephen J.

    1993-01-01

    A multiblock, laminar heating analysis for the shuttle orbiter at three trajectory points ranging from Mach 24.3 to Mach 12.86 on re-entry is described. The analysis is performed using the Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA) with both a seven species chemical nonequilibrium model and an equilibrium model. A finite-catalytic-wall model appropriate for shuttle tiles at a radiative equilibrium wall temperature is applied. Computed heating levels are generally in good agreement with the flight data though a few rather large discrepancies remain unexplained. The multiblock relaxation strategy partitions the flowfield into manageable blocks requiring a fraction of the computational resources (time and memory) required by a full domain approach. In hot, the computational cost for a solution at even a single trajectory point would be prohibitively expensive at the given resolution without the multiblock approach. Converged blocks are reassembled to enable a fully coupled converged solution over the entire vehicle, starting from a nearly converged initial condition.

  19. Recommended direct simulation Monte Carlo collision model parameters for modeling ionized air transport processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan-Gopalan, Krishnan; Stephani, Kelly A.

    2016-02-01

    A systematic approach for calibrating the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) collision model parameters to achieve consistency in the transport processes is presented. The DSMC collision cross section model parameters are calibrated for high temperature atmospheric conditions by matching the collision integrals from DSMC against ab initio based collision integrals that are currently employed in the Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA) and Data Parallel Line Relaxation (DPLR) high temperature computational fluid dynamics solvers. The DSMC parameter values are computed for the widely used Variable Hard Sphere (VHS) and the Variable Soft Sphere (VSS) models using the collision-specific pairing approach. The recommended best-fit VHS/VSS parameter values are provided over a temperature range of 1000-20 000 K for a thirteen-species ionized air mixture. Use of the VSS model is necessary to achieve consistency in transport processes of ionized gases. The agreement of the VSS model transport properties with the transport properties as determined by the ab initio collision integral fits was found to be within 6% in the entire temperature range, regardless of the composition of the mixture. The recommended model parameter values can be readily applied to any gas mixture involving binary collisional interactions between the chemical species presented for the specified temperature range.

  20. Cultural, social and personal ways of experiencing love – an analysis of the perception of subjectivity

    PubMed Central

    Gori, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Summary This article is based on analysis of 4 couple’s personal and public documents, in order to integrate personal choices, values and ideas with cultural representations and social attitudes. Moreover, being based on Italian sources from the nineteenth century, the study offers an historical insight on the Italian nation-building process and its political and social foundations. This study is based on archival and printed primary sources from: Gianna Maffei and Ercole Trotti Mosti (Museo Centrale del Risorgimento – Roma – MCRR); Augusto Pierantoni and Grazia Mancini (Museo Centrale del Risorgimento – Roma); Luigi Majno and Ersilia Bronzini (Archivio Unione Femminile Nazionale – Milano); Angiolo Orvieto and Laura Cantoni (Archivio Contemporaneo Bonsanti del Gabinetto Vieuesseux – Firenze – ACGV). This study reflects on love as a political and moral issue, by linking the personal sphere of subjectivity to the public dimension of the political community. An extensive understanding of the role played by the perception and the expression of sentiments can be considered as the central issue of this analysis. PMID:22037756

  1. GMAG Dissertation Award Talk: Zero-moment Half-Metallic Ferrimagnetic Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamer, Michelle E.

    2015-03-01

    Low- and zero-moment half-metallic ferrimagnetic semiconductors have been proposed for advanced applications, such as nonvolatile RAM memory and quantum computing. These inverse-Heusler materials could be used to generate spin-polarized electron or hole currents without the associated harmful fringing magnetic fields. Such materials are expected to exhibit low to zero magnetic moment at room temperature, which makes them well-positioned for future spin-based devices. However, these compounds have been shown to suffer from disorder. This work focuses on the synthesis of these compounds and the investigation of their structural, magnetic, and transport properties. Cr2CoGa and Mn3Al thin films were synthesized by molecular beam epitaxy, and V3Al and Cr2CoAl were synthesized via arc-melting. Rietveld analysis was used to determine the degree of ordering in the sublattices as a function of annealing. The atomic moments were measured by X-ray magnetic circular and linear dichroism confirmed antiferromagnetic alignment of sublattices and the desired near-zero moment in several compounds. In collaboration with George E. Sterbinsky, Photon Sciences Directorate, Brookhaven National Laboratory; Dario Arena Photon Sciences Directorate, Brookhaven National Laboratory; Laura H. Lewis, Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University; and Don Heiman, Physics, Northeastern University. NSF-ECCS-1402738, NSF-DMR-0907007.

  2. Recent work of decay spectroscopy at RIBF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Söderström, Pär-Anders

    2014-09-01

    β- and isomer-decay spectroscopy are sensitive probes of nuclear structure, and are often the only techniques capable of providing data for exotic nuclei that are producted with very low rates. Decay properties of exotic nuclei are also essential to model astrophysical events responible for the evolution of the universe such as the rp- and r-process. The EURICA project (EUROBALL RIKEN Cluster Array) has been launched in 2012 with the goal of performing spectroscopy of very exotic nuclei. Since 2012, four experimental campaigns have been successfully completed using fragmentation of 124Xe beam and in-flight-fission of 238U beam, approaching for example the key nuclei 78Ni, 110Zr, 100Sn, 128Pd, and 138Sn. This contribution highlights the experiments performed, results obtained, and discusses the future perspective of the EURICA project. In collaboration with Shunji Nishimura, Hidetada Baba, RIKEN Nishina Center; Frank Browne, Brighton University; Pieter Doornenbal, RIKEN Nishina Center; Guillaume Gey, Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble; Tadaaki Isobe and Giuseppe Lorusso, RIKEN Nishina Center; Daniel Lubos, Technische Universitat Munchen; Kevin Mochner, University of Cologne; Zena Patel and Simon Rice, University of Surrey; Hiroyoshi Sakurai, RIKEN Nishina Center; Laura Sinclair, University of York; Toshiyuki Sumikama, Tohoku University; Jan Taprogge, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid; Zsolt Vajta, MTA Atomki; Hiroshi Watanabe, Beihang University; Jin Wu, Peking University; and Zhengyu Xu, University of Tokyo.

  3. 2011 Einstein Fellows Chosen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-03-01

    ASA has announced the selection of the 2011 Einstein Fellows who will conduct research related to NASA's Physics of the Cosmos program, which aims to expand our knowledge of the origin, evolution, and fate of the Universe. The Einstein Fellowship provides support to the awardees for three years, and the Fellows may pursue their research at a host university or research center of their choosing in the United States. The new Fellows will begin their programs in the fall of 2011. The new Einstein Fellows and their host institutions are listed below: * Akos Bogdan (Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Cambridge, Mass.) * Samuel Gralla (University of Maryland, College Park, Md.) * Philip Hopkins (University of California at Berkeley) * Matthew Kunz (Princeton University, Princeton, N.J.) * Laura Lopez (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass.) * Amy Reines (National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, Virg.) * Rubens Reis (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor) * Ken Shen (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, Calif.) * Jennifer Siegal-Gaskins (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena) * Lorenzo Sironi (Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.) NASA has two other astrophysics theme-based fellowship programs: the Sagan Fellowship Program, which supports research into exoplanet exploration, and the Hubble Fellowship Program, which supports research into cosmic origins. More information on the Einstein Fellowships can be found at: http://cxc.harvard.edu/fellows/

  4. Committees and Sponsors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-05-01

    Local Organizing Committee J Fernando Barbero González (IEM, CSIC) Laura Castelló Gomar (Univ. Complutense, Madrid) Mikel Fernández Méndez (IEM, CSIC) Iñaki Garay Elizondo (Univ. País Vasco) Luis J Garay Elizondo (Univ. Complutense, Madrid) Mercedes Martín-Benito (Perimeter Institute, Canada) Daniel Martín de Blas (IEM, CSIC) Guillermo A Mena Marugán (IEM, CSIC) Javier Olmedo Nieto (IEM, CSIC) Gonzalo Olmo Alba (IFIC, CSIC) Tomasz Pawlowski (Warsaw University, Poland) Eduardo J Sánchez Villaseñor (Univ. Carlos III, Madrid) Scientific International Committee Abhay Ashtekar (Penn State University, USA) J Fernando Barbero González (IEM, CSIC, Spain) John Barrett (University of Nottingham, UK) José Manuel Cidade Mourão (Instituto Superior Técnico de Lisboa, Portugal) Laurent Freidel (Perimeter Institute, Canada) Jerzy Lewandowski (Warsaw University, Poland) Guillermo A Mena Marugán (IEM, CSIC, Spain) Jorge Pullin (Louisiana State University, USA) Carlo Rovelli (Univ. Méditerranée, Marseille, France) Thomas Thiemann (Univ. Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany) Sponsors MinisterioBBVA CSICESF UniCarlosCPAN

  5. Canary in the Coal Mine: Monitoring Indicators and Thresholds of Ecological Integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applegate, L. M.

    2010-12-01

    Ecological integrity is the ability of an ecosystem to maintain resilience when disturbed; retain native or natural components and processes; and remain sustainable without external inputs. Ecosystems may be subject to a variety of anthropogenic disturbances from intentional natural resource harvesting such as cattle grazing or timber harvest to unintentional large scale processes including climate change. Monitoring ecological integrity can aid in the prevention of irreversible degradation of a system by identifying indicators to serve as early warning signs of degradation. Our central hypothesis is that changes in ecological integrity and movement towards thresholds may be anticipated through monitoring. Our research objective is to develop efficient and effective methods and indicators for natural resource management. We have collected data for four years (2006-2010) on grazed Wildlife Management Areas in southeastern Washington State using a replicated study design in two ecosystem types stratified by six ecological sites distributed within nine pastures. Methods and metrics were developed from quantitative data (cover, frequency, and species richness), qualitative data (photo monitoring and rangeland health surveys), and desired ecological conditions based on state and transition models and classification systems previously published for the study area. The data are a first step to identify efficient and effective methods and metrics to enable natural resource managers to monitor ecological integrity and identify and avoid crossing irreversible thresholds. Study area, southeast Washington State. Photo by Laura Applegate

  6. Spectroscopic Observations of Nearby Low Mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vican, Laura; Zuckerman, B. M.; Rodriguez, D.

    2014-01-01

    Young low-mass stars are known to be bright in X-ray and UV due to a high level of magnetic activity. By cross-correlating the GALEX Catalog with the WISE and 2MASS Point Source Catalogs, we have identified more than 2,000 stars whose UV excesses suggest ages in the 10-100 Myr range. We used the Shane 3-m telescope at Lick Observatory on Mount Hamilton, California to observe some of these 2,000 stars spectroscopically. We measured the equivalent width of lithium at 6708 A absorption and H-alpha emission lines. Out of a total of 122 stars observed with the Kast grating spectrometer, we find that roughly 10% have strong lithium absorption features. The high percentage of stars with lithium present is further evidence of the importance of UV emission as a youth indicator for low-mass stars. In addition, we used high-resolution spectra obtained with the Hamilton echelle spectrograph to determine radial velocities for several UV-bright stars. These radial velocities will be useful for the calculation of Galactic UVW space velocities for determination of possible moving group membership. This work is supported by NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program award NNX12AH37G to RIT and UCLA and Chilean FONDECYT grant 3130520 to Universidad de Chile. This submission presents work for the GALNYSS project and should be linked to abstracts submitted by David Rodriguez, Laura Vican, and Joel Kastner.

  7. Comparison of CFD Predictions with Shuttle Global Flight Thermal Imagery and Discrete Surface Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, William A.; Kleb, William L.; Tang, chun Y.; Palmer, Grant E.; Hyatt, Andrew J.; Wise, Adam J.; McCloud, Peter L.

    2010-01-01

    Surface temperature measurements from the STS-119 boundary-layer transition experiment on the space shuttle orbiter Discovery provide a rare opportunity to assess turbulent CFD models at hypersonic flight conditions. This flight data was acquired by on-board thermocouples and by infrared images taken off-board by the Hypersonic Thermodynamic Infrared Measurements (HYTHIRM) team, and is suitable for hypersonic CFD turbulence assessment between Mach 6 and 14. The primary assessment is for the Baldwin-Lomax and Cebeci-Smith algebraic turbulence models in the DPLR and LAURA CFD codes, respectively. A secondary assessment is made of the Shear-Stress Transport (SST) two-equation turbulence model in the DPLR code. Based upon surface temperature comparisons at eleven thermocouple locations, the algebraic-model turbulent CFD results average 4% lower than the measurements for Mach numbers less than 11. For Mach numbers greater than 11, the algebraic-model turbulent CFD results average 5% higher than the three available thermocouple measurements. Surface temperature predictions from the two SST cases were consistently 3 4% higher than the algebraic-model results. The thermocouple temperatures exhibit a change in trend with Mach number at about Mach 11; this trend is not reflected in the CFD results. Because the temperature trends from the turbulent CFD simulations and the flight data diverge above Mach 11, extrapolation of the turbulent CFD accuracy to higher Mach numbers is not recommended.

  8. Developing a Graphical User Interface for the ALSS Crop Planning Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koehlert, Erik

    1997-01-01

    The goal of my project was to create a graphical user interface for a prototype crop scheduler. The crop scheduler was developed by Dr. Jorge Leon and Laura Whitaker for the ALSS (Advanced Life Support System) program. The addition of a system-independent graphical user interface to the crop planning tool will make the application more accessible to a wider range of users and enhance its value as an analysis, design, and planning tool. My presentation will demonstrate the form and functionality of this interface. This graphical user interface allows users to edit system parameters stored in the file system. Data on the interaction of the crew, crops, and waste processing system with the available system resources is organized and labeled. Program output, which is stored in the file system, is also presented to the user in performance-time plots and organized charts. The menu system is designed to guide the user through analysis and decision making tasks, providing some help if necessary. The Java programming language was used to develop this interface in hopes of providing portability and remote operation.

  9. Cebrennus Simon, 1880 (Araneae: Sparassidae): a revisionary up-date with the description of four new species and an updated identification key for all species.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The spider genus Cebrennus Simon, 1880 is revised again after thirteen years. Four new species are described: Cebrennus atlas spec. nov. from Morocco (female), C. flagellatus spec. nov. from Afghanistan (male), C. laurae spec. nov. from Canary Islands (male), and C. rechenbergi spec. nov. from Morocco (male and female). Cebrennus clercki (Audouin, 1826) comb. nov. is transferred from Philodromidae to Sparassidae and considered a nomen dubium. The holotype of C. aethiopicus Simon, 1880 is illustrated for the first time. Cebrennus tunetanus Simon, 1885 is re-described by illustrating its copulatory organs and some somatic characters, the internal duct system is shown for the first time supporting its placement in Cebrennus. An updated identification key for all species is provided. New records of Cebrennus species are listed: C. wagae (Simon, 1874) is recorded from Libya and Malta for the first time, the latter representing the first record for the entire genus from Europe. C. kochi (O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1872) is recorded from Syria, C. aethiopicus from Sudan for the first time. Records from the Canary Islands and from Afghanistan extend the known generic distribution range further to the West and East. Behavioural aspects (burrowing, escaping, mating) of C. rechenbergi and partly of C. villosus (Jézéquel & Junqua, 1966) are described. Photographs of this behaviour as well as of the habitus of several species are provided. PMID:24869871

  10. Approach for a Global Height Reference System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihde, Johannes

    2015-04-01

    Hermann Drewes, Christoph Foerste, Thomas Gruber, Gunter Liebsch, Roland Pail, Laura Sanchez For Earth system monitoring the heights are main parameters for global changes. Physical heights are potential differences of the outer Earth gravity field at different positions. Long term monitoring of the vertical component of the Earth surface needs a standardized defined and realized global reference relating the geometry and the gravity field of the Earth. In the last two decades, in several working groups of the International Association of Geodesy were different concepts for definition and realization of global height reference system discussed. Furthermore, the satellite gravity missions have the Earth gravity field data basis general extended. So far, it is possible to develop the present local and regional height reference systems concepts to a global approach. The presented proposal has to be understood as a model that consider the present possibilities and actual needs for the realization of a global height reference system. It includes aspects for the combination of observations and products representing the geometry and the gravity field of the Earth.

  11. Brain signatures of perceiving a smile: Time course and source localization.

    PubMed

    Beltrán, David; Calvo, Manuel G

    2015-11-01

    Facial happiness is consistently recognized faster than other expressions of emotion. In this study, to determine when and where in the brain such a recognition advantage develops, EEG activity during an expression categorization task was subjected to temporospatial PCA analysis and LAURA source localizations. Happy, angry, and neutral faces were presented either in whole or bottom-half format (with the mouth region visible). The comparison of part- versus whole-face conditions served to examine the role of the smile. Two neural signatures underlying the happy face advantage emerged. One peaked around 140 ms (left N140) and was source-located at the left IT cortex (MTG), with greater activity for happy versus non-happy faces in both whole and bottom-half face format. This suggests an enhanced perceptual encoding mechanism for salient smiles. The other peaked around 370 ms (P3b and N3) and was located at the right IT (FG) and dorsal cingulate (CC) cortices, with greater activity specifically for bottom-half happy versus non-happy faces. This suggests an enhanced recruitment of face-specific information to categorize (or reconstruct) facial happiness from diagnostic smiling mouths. Additional differential brain responses revealed a specific "anger effect," with greater activity for angry versus non-angry expressions (right N170 and P230; right pSTS and IPL); and a coarse "emotion effect," with greater activity for happy and angry versus neutral expressions (anterior P2 and posterior N170; vmPFC and right IFG). PMID:26252428

  12. PREFACE: XIV Conference on Theoretical Nuclear Physics in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombaci, I.; Covello, A.; Marcucci, L. E.; Rosati, S.

    2014-07-01

    This volume contains the invited and contributed papers presented at the 14th Conference on Theoretical Nuclear Physics in Italy held in Cortona, Italy, from 29-31 October, 2013. The meeting was held at the Palazzone, an elegant Renaissance Villa, commissioned by the Cardinal Silvio Passerini (1469-1529), Bishop of Cortona, and presently owned by the Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa. The aim of this biennial Conference is to bring together Italian theorists working in various fields of nuclear physics to discuss their latest results and confront their points of view in a lively and informal way. This offers the opportunity to stimulate new ideas and promote collaborations between different research groups. The Conference was attended by 46 participants, coming from 13 Italian Universities and 11 Laboratories and Sezioni of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - INFN. The program of the conference, prepared by the Organizing Committee (Ignazio Bombaci, Aldo Covello, Laura Elisa Marcucci and Sergio Rosati) focused on the following main topics: Few-Nucleon Systems Nuclear Structure Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Dynamics Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions and Quark-Gluon Plasma Nuclear Astrophysics Nuclear Physics with Electroweak Probes Structure of Hadrons and Hadronic Matter. In the last session of the Conference there were two invited review talks related to experimental activities of great current interest. Giacomo De Angelis from the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro spoke about the INFN SPES radioactive ion beam project. Sara Pirrone, INFN Sezione di Catania, gave a talk on the symmetry energy and isospin physics with the CHIMERA detector. Finally, Mauro Taiuti (Università di Genova), National Coordinator of the INFN-CSN3 (Nuclear Physics Experiments), reported on the present status and future challenges of experimental nuclear physics in Italy. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of INFN who helped make the conference possible. I Bombaci, A Covello

  13. G x E: a NIAAA workshop on gene-environment interactions.

    PubMed

    Gunzerath, Lorraine; Goldman, David

    2003-03-01

    The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) sponsored a May 2002 workshop on gene-environment interaction (G x E) research to identify potential roadblocks to further research and to propose solutions to those roadblocks, to optimize investigative opportunities and multidisciplinary or multi-institution collaborations, and to explore ways that NIAAA can facilitate G x E studies. Sessions included panels on animal models; phenotypes; genetic findings in humans; study designs and analytical methods; and assessment of environmental risk. Key among the identified challenges to progress in G x E research were issues of study design and sampling strategies; logistic and methodological costs and constraints; availability and understanding of data analysis techniques; potential stigmatization of study populations; and organizational/bureaucratic structures that are inadequate to address the unique needs of large-scale, multicenter, longitudinal projects. Participants proposed a series of recommendations to address these issues. Session coordinators included: Gayle Boyd, Kendall Bryant, Page Chiapella, Vivian Faden, David Goldman, and Antonio Noronha. Session participants included: Laura Almasy, Henri Begleiter, Raul Caetano, Bruce Dudek, Mary Dufour, Cindy Ehlers, Mary-Anne Enoch, Joel Gelernter, David Goldman, Bridget Grant, Lorraine Gunzerath, Deborah Hasin, Andrew Heath, Victor Hesselbrock, J. Dee Higley, Shirley Hill, Kerry Jang, Raynard S. Kington, Rick Kittles, George Koob, Kenneth Leonard, Ting-Kai Li, Jeffrey Long, William McBride, Matthew McGue, Kathleen Merikangas, Tamara Phillips, Bernice Porjesz, Carol Prescott, Theodore Reich, John Rice, Richard Rose, Charmaine Royal, Arnold Sameroff, Marc Schuckit, Kenneth Sher, Renee Sieving, Robert Taylor, Michael Windle, and Robert Zucker. PMID:12658122

  14. Prefazione al quarto volume di GERBERTVS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, Costantino

    The fourth volume of GERBERTVS contains the acts of the symposia held in Rome, at the Odeion hall of Lettere faculty in Sapienza University on December 7, 2012 Gerbert Homo Novus and on March 13, 2013 on the pre and post humanistic figures. Laura C. Paladino presents the didactical activity of Gerbert as from Richer of Reims who completed his Historia Francorum in 998, before the election of Gerbert to the pontifical soil. Among these activities there is the teaching of astronomy and mathematics and the abacus, to which a special article of Jorge Nuno Silva is dedicated. The abacus increased dramatically the rapidity of the computations and some algoritms thaught by Gerbert and reported by his former student Bernelinus is very reliably invented by Gerbert himself, as Silva demostrates in his paper. Giancarlo Pani presents the relation between Galileo and Kepler, at the end of the humanistic period, showing interesting insights on the rather asymmetrical exchange of information between the two greater astronomer of 1600. Veronica Regoli presents the Cosmos of Dante, the ideal structure of the Divine Comedy. Patrick Demouy presents the new biography of Flavio G. Nuvolone where the great novelty is the noble origin of Gerbert from Carlat family, but before the marriage of his (presumed) father. His birth is shifted back to 938 with technical demostrations. Paolo Zanna compares the magisterium of Gerbert-Sylvester II and that one of John Paul II and pope Francesco. Finally C. Sigismondi presents the work and the activities of Pawel Max Maksym (1983-2013) who founded the Observatory &"Pope Sylvester II" in the town of Bukowiec, near Lodz, Poland.

  15. Intrinsic Uncertainties in Modeling Complex Systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Curtis S; Bramson, Aaron L.; Ames, Arlo L.

    2014-09-01

    Models are built to understand and predict the behaviors of both natural and artificial systems. Because it is always necessary to abstract away aspects of any non-trivial system being modeled, we know models can potentially leave out important, even critical elements. This reality of the modeling enterprise forces us to consider the prospective impacts of those effects completely left out of a model - either intentionally or unconsidered. Insensitivity to new structure is an indication of diminishing returns. In this work, we represent a hypothetical unknown effect on a validated model as a finite perturba- tion whose amplitude is constrained within a control region. We find robustly that without further constraints, no meaningful bounds can be placed on the amplitude of a perturbation outside of the control region. Thus, forecasting into unsampled regions is a very risky proposition. We also present inherent difficulties with proper time discretization of models and representing in- herently discrete quantities. We point out potentially worrisome uncertainties, arising from math- ematical formulation alone, which modelers can inadvertently introduce into models of complex systems. Acknowledgements This work has been funded under early-career LDRD project #170979, entitled "Quantify- ing Confidence in Complex Systems Models Having Structural Uncertainties", which ran from 04/2013 to 09/2014. We wish to express our gratitude to the many researchers at Sandia who con- tributed ideas to this work, as well as feedback on the manuscript. In particular, we would like to mention George Barr, Alexander Outkin, Walt Beyeler, Eric Vugrin, and Laura Swiler for provid- ing invaluable advice and guidance through the course of the project. We would also like to thank Steven Kleban, Amanda Gonzales, Trevor Manzanares, and Sarah Burwell for their assistance in managing project tasks and resources.

  16. The 7th International Workshop on Chiral Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The 7th International Workshop Chiral Dynamics: Theory and Experiment (CD12) took place at Jefferson Lab, Newport News, Virginia, USA, from August 6 to 10, 2012. Following in the tradition of this triennial series of Conferences, it attracted theorists and experimentalists, who were brought together to highlight the recent progress in the field of low energy QCD, and to discuss and explore the direction for future development. The conference consisted of plenary talks and three working groups. We would like to thank the working group organizers for their dedicated effort, namely: Goldstone Bosons: Mario Antonelli, Liping Gan, Jorge Portoles and Urs Wenger; Hadron Structure: Alessandro Bacchetta, Bastian Kubis, Kostas Orginos and Karl Slifer and Few Body Physics: Andreas Nogga, Assumpta Parreno, Michele Viviani and Henry Weller. We would like to express our special thanks to our co-organizers, Patricia Solvignon, Harald Griesshammer, Rocco Schiavilla, Dinko Pocanic, Robert Edwards, and Alexandre Deur for their hard work and advice. Last but not least, we thank the International Advisory Committee for their very useful inputs to the CD12 program. The organizers thank the excellent logistic and administrative support provided by the Jefferson Lab Conference Staff, Ruth Bizot, Cynthia Lockwood, Stephanie Vermeire, Marti Hightower and MeLaina Evans, and the Conference Secretary Mary Fox, which was instrumental for the success of the organization of CD12. We thank Joanna Griffin for the poster design. CD12 was primarily sponsored by Jefferson Lab, along with generous supports from Old Dominion University and the European Physics Journal. The CD12 homepage is located at http://www.jlab.org/conference/CD12 The upcoming Chiral Dynamics Workshop will take place in Pisa, Italy, in 2015. We thank Laura Marcucci and Michele Viviani for graciously taking the baton from us. Jose Goity and Jianping Chen

  17. Nonequilibrium Stagnation-Line Radiative Heating for Fire II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Christopher O.; Hollis, Brian R.; Sutton, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a detailed analysis of the shock-layer radiative heating to the Fire II vehicle using a new air radiation model and a viscous shock-layer flowfield model. This new air radiation model contains the most up-to-date properties for modeling the atomic-line, atomic photoionization, molecular band, and non-Boltzmann processes. The applied viscous shock-layer flowfield analysis contains the same thermophysical properties and nonequilibrium models as the LAURA Navier-Stokes code. Radiation-flowfield coupling, or radiation cooling, is accounted for in detail in this study. It is shown to reduce the radiative heating by about 30% for the peak radiative heating points, while reducing the convective heating only slightly. A detailed review of past Fire II radiative heating studies is presented. It is observed that the scatter in the radiation predicted by these past studies is mostly a result of the different flowfield chemistry models and the treatment of the electronic state populations. The present predictions provide, on average throughout the trajectory, a better comparison with Fire II flight data than any previous study. The magnitude of the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) contribution to the radiative flux is estimated from the calorimeter measurements. This is achieved using the radiometer measurements and the predicted convective heating. The VUV radiation predicted by the present model agrees well with the VUV contribution inferred from the Fire II calorimeter measurement, although only when radiation-flowfield coupling is accounted for. This agreement provides evidence that the present model accurately models the VUV radiation, which is shown to contribute significantly to the Fire II radiative heating.

  18. Stagnation-point heat-transfer rate predictions at aeroassist flight conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Roop N.; Jones, Jim J.; Rochelle, William C.

    1992-01-01

    The results are presented for the stagnation-point heat-transfer rates used in the design process of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) vehicle over its entire aeropass trajectory. The prediction methods used in this investigation demonstrate the application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques to a wide range of flight conditions and their usefulness in a design process. The heating rates were computed by a viscous-shock-layer (VSL) code at the lower altitudes and by a Navier-Stokes (N-S) code for the higher altitude cases. For both methods, finite-rate chemically reacting gas was considered, and a temperature-dependent wall-catalysis model was used. The wall temperature for each case was assumed to be radiative equilibrium temperature, based on total heating. The radiative heating was estimated by using a correlation equation. Wall slip was included in the N-S calculation method, and this method implicitly accounts for shock slip. The N-S/VSL combination of projection methods was established by comparison with the published benchmark flow-field code LAURA results at lower altitudes, and the direct simulation Monte Carlo results at higher altitude cases. To obtain the design heating rate over the entire forward face of the vehicle, a boundary-layer method (BLIMP code) that employs reacting chemistry and surface catalysis was used. The ratio of the VSL or N-S method prediction to that obtained from the boundary-layer method code at the stagnation point is used to define an adjustment factor, which accounts for the errors involved in using the boundary-layer method.

  19. The College of Charleston's 400-Student Observational Lab Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    True, C. M.

    2006-06-01

    For over thirty years the College of Charleston has been teaching a year-long introductory astronomy course incorporating a mandatory 3 hour lab. Despite our location in a very light polluted, coastal, high humidity, and often cloudy metropolitan area we have emphasized observational activities as much as possible. To accommodate our population of between 300-400 students per semester, we have 28 8-inch Celestron Telescopes and 25 GPS capable 8-inch Meade LX-200 telescopes. Finally, we have a 16 DFM adjacent to our rooftop observing decks. For indoor activities we have access to 42 computers running a variety of astronomy education software. Some of the computer activities are based on the Starry Night software (Backyard and Pro), the CLEA software from Gettysburg College, and Spectrum Explorer from Boston University. Additionally, we have labs involving cratering, eclipses and phases, coordinate systems with celestial globes, the inverse square law, spectroscopy and spectral classification, as well as others. In this presentation we will discuss the difficulties in managing a program of this size. We have approximately 14 lab sections a week. The lab manager's task involves coordinating 8-10 lab instructors and the same number of undergraduate teaching assistants as well as trying to maintain a coherent experience between the labs and lecture sections. Our lab manuals are produced locally with yearly updates. Samples from the manuals will be available. This program has been developed by a large number of College of Charleston astronomy faculty, including Don Drost, Bob Dukes, Chris Fragile, Tim Giblin, Jon Hakkila, Bill Kubinec, Lee Lindner, Jim Neff, Laura Penny, Al Rainis, Terry Richardson, and D. J. Williams, as well as adjunct and visiting faculty Bill Baird, Kevin Bourque, Ethan Denault, Kwayera Davis, Francie Halter, and Alan Johnson. Part of this work has been funded by NSF DUE grants to the College of Charleston.

  20. Development of the Orion Crew Module Static Aerodynamic Database. Part 1; Hypersonic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bibb, Karen L.; Walker, Eric L.; Robinson, Philip E.

    2011-01-01

    The Orion aerodynamic database provides force and moment coefficients given the velocity, attitude, configuration, etc. of the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). The database is developed and maintained by the NASA CEV Aerosciences Project team from computational and experimental aerodynamic simulations. The database is used primarily by the Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GNC) team to design vehicle trajectories and assess flight performance. The initial hypersonic re-entry portion of the Crew Module (CM) database was developed in 2006. Updates incorporating additional data and improvements to the database formulation and uncertainty methodologies have been made since then. This paper details the process used to develop the CM database, including nominal values and uncertainties, for Mach numbers greater than 8 and angles of attack between 140deg and 180deg. The primary available data are more than 1000 viscous, reacting gas chemistry computational simulations using both the Laura and Dplr codes, over a range of Mach numbers from 2 to 37 and a range of angles of attack from 147deg to 172deg. Uncertainties were based on grid convergence, laminar-turbulent solution variations, combined altitude and code-to-code variations, and expected heatshield asymmetry. A radial basis function response surface tool, NEAR-RS, was used to fit the coefficient data smoothly in a velocity-angle-of-attack space. The resulting database is presented and includes some data comparisons and a discussion of the predicted variation of trim angle of attack and lift-to-drag ratio. The database provides a variation in trim angle of attack on the order of +/-2deg, and a range in lift-to-drag ratio of +/-0.035 for typical vehicle flight conditions.

  1. Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) Program — IDCA Quarterly Program Review, September 14 and 15, 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Sandstrom, Mary M.; Brown, Geoffrey W.; Warner, Kirstin F.; Remmers, Daniel L.; Shelley, Timothy J.; Reyes, Jose A.; Hsu, Peter C.; Reynolds, John G.

    2012-02-07

    The IDCA conducted a program review at Los Alamos National Laboratory, September 14 and 15, 2010. The review was divided into three parts: 1) an update on the current status of the program, 2) an information exchange and discussion on technical details for current issues and future planning, and 3) a tour of the SSST testing facilities at LANL. The meeting started with an update from DHS by Laura Parker and a restating of some of the objectives of the Proficiency Test of which the IDCA is currently engaged. This update was followed by a discussion of some high level programmatic issues particularly about ways of communicating the overall goals of the IDCA to non-technical representatives. The final topic focused on the difficulty of releasing information, including the DHS approval process, ITAR, and open publication. Next JGR presented a technical summary of accomplishments, schedule, milestones, and future directions. These key points made were: 1) about 1/3 of the materials have been tested, 2) some participants are behind others causing a lag in report writing, 3) method reports have been assigned to various participants to speed up the process of reporting, 4) the SSST Compendium needs reformatting and restructuring, and 5) the Compendium needs a web site to house with access control. After the technical update, some of the Proficiency Test results were shown comparing data from the various laboratories. These results included comparisons of the RDX standard, KC/sugar mixtures (-100 mesh and as received), KC/dodecane, KP/Al, and KP/C. Impact, friction, ESD, and DSC results were the focus. All the participants were involved in these discussions. This report includes summary notes, presentations, and explanatory information.

  2. PREFACE: 2nd International Conference on Innovative Materials, Structures and Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ručevskis, Sandris

    2015-11-01

    Bajare, Laura Sele, Liga Radina and Jana Galilejeva for their major contribution to organizing the conference and to the literary editor Tatjana Smirnova and technical editor Daira Erdmane for their hard work on the conference proceedings.

  3. Multiverse: Increasing Diversity in Earth and Space Science Through Multicultural Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peticolas, L. M.; Raftery, C. L.; Mendez, B.; Paglierani, R.; Ali, N. A.; Zevin, D.; Frappier, R.; Hauck, K.; Shackelford, R. L., III; Yan, D.; Thrall, L.

    2015-12-01

    Multiverse at the University of California, Berkeley Space Sciences Laboratory provides earth and space science educational opportunities and resources for a variety of audiences, especially for those who are underrepresented in the sciences. By way of carefully crafted space and earth science educational opportunities and resources, we seek to connect with people's sense of wonder and facilitate making personal ties to science and the learning process in order to, ultimately, bring the richness of diversity to science and make science discovery accessible for all. Our audiences include teachers, students, education and outreach professionals, and the public. We partner with NASA, the National Science Foundation, scientists, teachers, science center and museum educators, park interpreters, and others with expertise in reaching particular audiences. With these partners, we develop resources and communities of practice, offer educator workshops, and run events for the public. We will will present on our pedagogical techniques, our metrics for success, and our evaluation findings of our education and outreach projects that help us towards reaching our vision: We envision a world filled with science literate societies capable of thriving with today's technology, while maintaining a sustainable balance with the natural world; a world where people develop and sustain the ability to think critically using observation and evidence and participate authentically in scientific endeavors; a world where people see themselves and their culture within the scientific enterprise, and understand science within the context that we are all under one sky and on one Earth. Photo Caption: Multiverse Team Members at our Space Sciences Laboratory from left to right: Leitha Thrall, Daniel Zevin, Bryan Mendez, Nancy Ali, Igor Ruderman, Laura Peticolas, Ruth Paglierani, Renee Frappier, Rikki Shackelford, Claire Raftery, Karin Hauck, and Darlene Yan.

  4. Kootenai River Focus Watershed Coordination, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, Bob; Munson, Vicki; Rogers, Rox

    2003-10-01

    The Kootenai River Network Inc. (KRN) was incorporated in Montana in early 1995 with a mission ''to involve stakeholders in the protection and restoration of the chemical, physical and biological integrity of the Kootenai River Basin waters''. The KRN operates with funding from donations, membership dues, private, state and federal grants, and with funding through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for a Focus Watershed Coordinator Program. The Focus Watershed Program is administered to KRN as of October 2001, through a Memorandum of Understanding. Katie Randall resigned her position as Watershed Coordinator in late January 2003 and Munson Consulting was contracted to fill that position through the BPA contract period ending May 30, 2003. To improve communications with in the Kootenai River watershed, the board and staff engaged watershed stakeholders in a full day KRN watershed conference on May 15 and 16 in Bonners Ferry, Idaho. This Annual General Meeting was a tremendous success with over 75 participants representing over 40 citizen groups, tribes and state/provincial/federal agencies from throughout northern Montana and Idaho as well as British Columbia and Alberta. Membership in the KRN increased during the course of the BPA 02/03 grant period. The board of directors grew in numbers during this same time frame and an Advisory Council was formed to assist in transboundary efforts while developing two reorganized KRN committees (Habitat/Restoration/Monitoring (HRM) and Communication/Education/Outreach (CEO)). These committees will serve pivotal roles in communications, outreach, and education about watershed issues, as well as habitat restoration work being accomplished throughout the entire watershed. During this BPA grant period, the KRN has capitalized on the transboundary interest in the Kootenai River watershed. Jim and Laura Duncan of Kimberley, British Columbia, have been instrumental volunteers who have acted as Canadian liaisons to the KRN. As a

  5. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-07-01

    Alba Paolo (Università di Torino) Becattini Francesco (Università di Firenze) Bombaci Ignazio (Università di Pisa) Bonaccorso Angela (INFN Pisa) Colonna Maria (INFN-LNS Catania) Coraggio Luigi (INFN Napoli) Covello Aldo (Università di Napoli) Di Toro Massimo (Università di Catania) De Angelis Giacomo (INFN-LNL Legnaro) Gargano Angela (INFN Napoli) Gattobigio Mario (INLN, Université de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, France) Gensini Paolo (INFN Lecce) Giannini Mauro (Università di Genova) Girlanda Luca (Università del Salento) Giusti Carlotta (Università di Pavia) Greco Vincenzo (Università di Catania) Grossi Eduardo (Università di Firenze) Itaco Nunzio (Università di Napoli) Kievsky Alejandro (INFN Pisa) Lanza Edoardo (INFN Catania) Lavagno Andrea (Politecnico di Torino) Logoteta Domenico (Universidade de Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal) Lo Iudice Nicola (Università di Napoli) Lombardo Maria Paola (INFN-LNF Frascati) Lo Meo Sergio (ENEA Bologna) Mannarelli Massimo (INFN-LNGS Assergi) Marcucci Laura Elisa (Università di Pisa) Matera Francesco (Università di Firenze) Orlandini Giuseppina (Università di Trento) Pacati Franco (Università di Pavia) Pederiva Francesco (Università di Trento) Pirrone Sara (INFN Catania) Puglisi Armando (Università di Catania) Radici Marco (INFN Pavia) Rinaldi Matteo (Università di Perugia) Roggero Alessandro (Università di Trento) Rolando Valentina (Università di Ferrara) Rosati Sergio (Università di Pisa) Ruggieri Marco (Università di Catania) Salmè Gianni (INFN Roma) Santopinto Elena (INFN Genova) Scopetta Sergio (Università di Perugia) Taiuti Mauro (Università di Genova) Vigezzi Enrico (INFN Milano) Viviani Michele (INFN Pisa) Vorabbi Matteo (Università di Pavia)

  6. Use of geophysical methods to map subsurface features at levee seepage locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brackett, Thomas C.

    The Great Flood of 2011 caused moderate to severe seepage and piping along the Mississippi River levees in Northwest Mississippi. The aim of this thesis was to implement geophysical techniques at two seepage locations in order to give a better understanding of the causes of underseepage and information on how to mitigate the problem. Sites near Rena Lara in Coahoma County and near Francis in Bolivar County were chosen to conduct this survey. Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) and Electromagnetic Induction (EM) surveys were conducted on and adjacent to levees to identify seepage pathways and any dominant geological features at the sites. Results from geophysical surveys revealed that Francis and Rena Laura each had a prominent geomorphologic feature that was attributing to underseepage. Seepage at Francis was the result of a sand filled channel capped by a clay overburden. Permeable materials at the base of the channel served as a conduit for transporting river water beneath the levee. The seepage surfaced as sand boils where the overlying clay overburden was thin or non-existent. Investigations at the Rena Lara site revealed a large, clay-filled swale extending beneath the levee. The clay within the swale has relatively low horizontal permeability, and concentrated the seepage flow towards more permeable zones on the flanks of the swale. This resulted in the formation of sand boils at the base of the levee. Both geomorphic features at Francis and Rena Lara were identified as surface drainages using remote sensing data. With the assistance of borehole and elevation data, geophysics was successfully used to characterize the features at each site. Properties such as permeability and clay content were derived from responses in electrical conductivity and used to build seepage models at each site. These models will hopefully be considered when determining seepage conditions and mitigation techniques at other sites along the levee.

  7. Aerothermodynamic Analyses of Towed Ballutes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Buck, Greg; Moss, James N.; Nielsen, Eric; Berger, Karen; Jones, William T.; Rudavsky, Rena

    2006-01-01

    A ballute (balloon-parachute) is an inflatable, aerodynamic drag device for application to planetary entry vehicles. Two challenging aspects of aerothermal simulation of towed ballutes are considered. The first challenge, simulation of a complete system including inflatable tethers and a trailing toroidal ballute, is addressed using the unstructured-grid, Navier-Stokes solver FUN3D. Auxiliary simulations of a semi-infinite cylinder using the rarefied flow, Direct Simulation Monte Carlo solver, DSV2, provide additional insight into limiting behavior of the aerothermal environment around tethers directly exposed to the free stream. Simulations reveal pressures higher than stagnation and corresponding large heating rates on the tether as it emerges from the spacecraft base flow and passes through the spacecraft bow shock. The footprint of the tether shock on the toroidal ballute is also subject to heating amplification. Design options to accommodate or reduce these environments are discussed. The second challenge addresses time-accurate simulation to detect the onset of unsteady flow interactions as a function of geometry and Reynolds number. Video of unsteady interactions measured in the Langley Aerothermodynamic Laboratory 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel and CFD simulations using the structured grid, Navier-Stokes solver LAURA are compared for flow over a rigid spacecraft-sting-toroid system. The experimental data provides qualitative information on the amplitude and onset of unsteady motion which is captured in the numerical simulations. The presence of severe unsteady fluid - structure interactions is undesirable and numerical simulation must be able to predict the onset of such motion.

  8. Low-Energy Impacts onto Lunar Regolith Simulant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seward, Laura M.; Colwell, J.; Mellon, M.; Stemm, B.

    2012-10-01

    Low-Energy Impacts onto Lunar Regolith Simulant Laura M. Seward1, Joshua E. Colwell1, Michael T. Mellon2, and Bradley A. Stemm1, 1Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida, 2Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, Colorado. Impacts and cratering in space play important roles in the formation and evolution of planetary bodies. Low-velocity impacts and disturbances to planetary regolith are also a consequence of manned and robotic exploration of planetary bodies such as the Moon, Mars, and asteroids. We are conducting a program of laboratory experiments to study low-velocity impacts of 1 to 5 m/s into JSC-1 lunar regolith simulant, JSC-Mars-1 Martian regolith simulant, and silica targets under 1 g. We use direct measurement of ejecta mass and high-resolution video tracking of ejecta particle trajectories to derive ejecta mass velocity distributions. Additionally, we conduct similar experiments under microgravity conditions in a laboratory drop tower and on parabolic aircraft with velocities as low as 10 cm/s. We wish to characterize and understand the collision parameters that control the outcome of low-velocity impacts into regolith, including impact velocity, impactor mass, target shape and size distribution, regolith depth, target relative density, and crater depth, and to experimentally determine the functional dependencies of the outcomes of low-velocity collisions (ejecta mass and ejecta velocities) on the controlling parameters of the collision. We present results from our ongoing study showing the positive correlation between impact energy and ejecta mass. The total ejecta mass is also dependent on the packing density (porosity) of the regolith. We find that ejecta mass velocity fits a power-law or broken power-law distribution. Our goal is to understand the physics of ejecta production and regolith compaction in low-energy impacts and experimentally validate predictive models for dust flow and deposition. We will present our

  9. Occurrence of cancer at multiple sites: Towards distinguishing multigenesis from metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei-Kang; Zhang, Chun; Zhang, Jing J; Liu, Shi V

    2008-01-01

    Background Occurrence of tumors at multiple sites is a hallmark of malignant cancers and contributes to the high mortality of cancers. The formation of multi-site cancers (MSCs) has conventionally been regarded as a result of hematogenous metastasis. However, some MSCs may appear as unusual in the sense of vascular dissemination pattern and therefore be explained by alternative metastasis models or even by non-metastatic independent formation mechanisms. Results Through literature review and incorporation of recent advance in understanding aging and development, we identified two alternative mechanisms for the independent formation of MSCs: 1) formation of separate tumors from cancer-initiating cells (CICs) mutated at an early stage of development and then diverging as to their physical locations upon further development, 2) formation of separate tumors from different CICs that contain mutations in some convergent ways. Either of these processes does not require long-distance migration and/or vascular dissemination of cancer cells from a primary site to a secondary site. Thus, we classify the formation of these MSCs from indigenous CICs (iCICs) into a new mechanistic category of tumor formation – multigenesis. Conclusion A multigenesis view on multi-site cancer (MSCs) may offer explanations for some "unusual metastasis" and has important implications for designing expanded strategies for the diagnosis and treatment of cancers. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Carlo C. Maley nominated by Laura F. Landweber and Razvan T. Radulescu nominated by David R. Kaplan. For the full reviews, please go to the Reviewers' comments section. PMID:18405362

  10. Extracting and Applying SV-SV Shear Modes from Vertical Vibrator Data Across Geothermal Prospects Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hardage, Bob

    2013-07-01

    This 3-year project was terminated at the end of Year 1 because the DOE Geothermal project-evaluation committee decided one Milestone was not met and also concluded that our technology would not be successful. The Review Panel recommended a ?no-go? decision be implemented by DOE. The Principal Investigator and his research team disagreed with the conclusions reached by the DOE evaluation committee and wrote a scientifically based rebuttal to the erroneous claims made by the evaluators. We were not told if our arguments were presented to the people who evaluated our work and made the ?no-go? decision. Whatever the case regarding the information we supplied in rebuttal, we received an official letter from Laura Merrick, Contracting Officer at the Golden Field Office, dated June 11, 2013 in which we were informed that project funding would cease and instructed us to prepare a final report before September 5, 2013. In spite of the rebuttal arguments we presented to DOE, this official letter repeated the conclusions of the Review Panel that we had already proven to be incorrect. This is the final report that we are expected to deliver. The theme of this report will be another rebuttal of the technical deficiencies claimed by the DOE Geothermal Review Panel about the value and accomplishments of the work we did in Phase 1 of the project. The material in this report will present images made from direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources using the software and research findings we developed in Phase 1 that the DOE Review Panel said would not be successful. We made these images in great haste when we were informed that DOE Geothermal rejected our rebuttal arguments and still regarded our technical work to be substandard. We thought it was more important to respond quickly rather than to take additional time to create better quality images than what we present in this Final Report.

  11. Final Progress Report: Developing Ethical Practices for Genetics Testing in the Workplace

    SciTech Connect

    Laura Roberts, MD; Teddy Warner, PhD

    2008-05-14

    Our multidisciplinary research team for this project involved collaboration between the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine at the Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW) and the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center (UNM HSC). Our research team in Wisconsin was led by Laura Roberts, M.D., Principal Investigator, and included Scott Helberg, MLS (Project Coordinator), Kate Green Hammond, Ph.D. (Consultant), Krisy Edenharder (Research Coordinator), and Mark Talatzko (Research Assistant). Our New Mexico-based team was led by Teddy Warner, Ph.D., Co-Principal Investigator and UNM Site Principal Investigator, and included Suzanne Roybal (Project Assistant), Darlyn Mabon (Project Assistant), Kate Green Hammond, PhD (Senior Research Scientist on the UNM team from 2004 until January, 2007), and Paulette Christopher (Research Assistant). In addition, computer technical and web support for the web-based survey conducted on a secure server at the University of New Mexico was provided by Kevin Wiley and Kim Hagen of the Systems and Programming Team of the Health Sciences Center Library and Information Center. We stated 3 aims in the grant proposal: (1) To collect web survey reports of the ethical perspectives, concerns, preferences and decision-making related to genetic testing using surveys from employees at: (a) Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); (b) Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); and (c) the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center (UNMHSC); (2) To perform an extensive literature search and the extant survey data to develop evidence-based policy recommendations for ethically sound genetic testing associated with research and occupational health activities in the workplace; and, (3) To host a conference at the Medical College of Wisconsin to provide employers, workers, health professionals, researchers, the public, and the media an opportunity to consider ethical issues involved in genetic

  12. Post-AGB Stars in Nearby Galaxies as Calibrators for HST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, Howard E.

    2003-01-01

    This report summarizes activities carried out with support from the NASA Ultraviolet, Visible, and Gravitational Astrophysics Research and Analysis Program under Grant NAG 5-6821. The Principal Investigator is Howard E. Bond (Space Telescope Science Institute). STScI Postdoctoral Associates Laura K. Fullton (1998), David Alves (1998-2001), and Michael Siegel (2001) were partially supported by this grant. The aim of the program is to calibrate the absolute magnitudes of post-asymptotic- giant-branch (post-AGB or PAGB) stars, which we believe will be an excellent new "standard candle" for measuring extragalactic distances. The argument is that, in old populations, the stars that are evolving through the PAGB region of the HR diagram arise from only a single main-sequence turnoff mass. In addition, theoretical PAGB evolutionary tracks show that they evolve through this region at constant luminosity; hence the PAGB stars should have an extremely narrow luminosity function. Moreover, as the PAGB stars evolve through spectral types F and A (en route from the AGB to hot stellar remnants and white dwarfs), they have the highest luminosities attained by old stars (both bolometrically and in the visual band). Finally, PAGB stars of these spectral types are very easily identified. because of their large Balmer jumps, which are due to their very low surface gravities. Our approach is first to identify PAGB stars in Milky Way globular clusters and in other Local Group galaxies, which are at known distances, and thus to measure accurate absolute magnitudes for the PAGB stars. With this Milky Way and Local Group luminosity calibration, we will then be in a position to find PAGB stars in more distant galaxies from the ground, and ultimately from the Hubble Space Telescope. and thus derive distances. These PAGB stars are, as noted above, the visually brightest members of Population II, and hence will allow distance measurements to galaxies that do not contain Cepheids, such as

  13. PREFACE: FAIRNESS 2012: FAIR NExt Generation of ScientistS 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcones, Almudena; Bleicher, Marcus; Fritsch, Miriam; Galatyuk, Tetyana; Nicmorus, Diana; Petersen, Hannah; Ratti, Claudia; Tolos, Laura

    2013-03-01

    forefront of research that is dedicated to the physics of FAIR. February 2013, Organizers of FAIRNESS 2012: Almudena Arcones, Marcus Bleicher, Miriam Fritsch, Tetyana Galatyuk, Diana Nicmorus, Hannah Petersen, Claudia Ratti and Laura Tolos Support for holding the conference was provided by: logos

  14. PREFACE: FAIRNESS 2013: FAIR NExt generation of ScientistS 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Hannah; Destefanis, Marco; Galatyuk, Tetyana; Montes, Fernando; Nicmorus, Diana; Ratti, Claudia; Tolos, Laura; Vogel, Sascha

    2014-04-01

    research that is dedicated to the physics of FAIR. February 2014. Organizers of FAIRNESS 2013: Marco Destefanis, Tetyana Galatyuk, Fernando Montes, Diana Nicmorus, Hannah Petersen, Claudia Ratti, Laura Tolos, and Sascha Vogel. Support for holding the conference was provided by: Logos

  15. "Positive and negative item wording and its influence on the Assessment of Callous-Unemotional Traits": Correction to Ray et al. (2015).

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    Reports an error in "Positive and Negative Item Wording and Its Influence on the Assessment of Callous-Unemotional Traits" by James V. Ray, Paul J. Frick, Laura C. Thornton, Laurence Steinberg and Elizabeth Cauffman (Psychological Assessment, Advanced Online Publication, Jun 29, 2015, np). In the article, the sixth sentence of the second full paragraph in the Data Analyses subsection of the Method section should read "For k response categories, there are k-1 threshold parameters." (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2015-28939-001.) This study examined the item functioning of the Inventory of Callous-Unemotional Traits (ICU) in an ethnically diverse sample 1,190 of first-time justice-involved adolescents (mean age = 15.28 years, SD = 1.29). On elimination of 2 items, the total ICU score provided a reliable (internally consistent and stable) and valid (correlated with and predictive of measures of empathy, school conduct problems, delinquency, and aggression) continuous measure of callous and unemotional (CU) traits. A shortened, 10-item version of the total scale, developed from item response theory (IRT) analyses, appeared to show psychometric properties similar to those of the full ICU and, thus, could be used as an abbreviated measure of CU traits. Finally, item analyses and tests of validity suggested that the factor structure of the ICU reported in a large number of past studies could reflect method variance related to the ICU, including equal numbers of positively and negatively worded items. Specifically, positively worded items (i.e., items for which higher ratings are indicative of higher levels of CU traits) were more likely to be rated in the lower response categories, showed higher difficulty levels in IRT analyses (i.e., discriminated best at higher levels of CU traits), and were more highly correlated with measures of antisocial and aggressive behavior. On the basis of these findings, we recommend using the total ICU as

  16. Kootenai River Focus Watershed Coordination, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Kootenai River Network,

    2005-07-01

    The Kootenai River Network (KRN) was contracted by the Bonneville Power Administration; PPA Project Number 96087200 for the period June 1, 2004 to May 31, 2005 to provide Kootenai River basin watershed coordination services. The prime focus of the KRN Watershed Coordination Program is coordinating projects and disseminating information related to watershed improvement and education and outreach with other interest groups in the Kootenai River basin. The KRN willingly shares its resources with these groups. The 2004-2005 BPA contract extended the original Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks contract, which was transferred to the Kootenai River Network through a Memorandum of Understanding in November 2001. The KRN objectives of this contract were carried out by one half-time Watershed Coordinator position in Montana-Idaho (Nancy Zapotocki) and one half-time Watershed Coordination team in British Columbia (Laura and Jim Duncan). Nancy Zapotocki was hired as the KRN US Watershed Coordinator in July 2004. Her extensive work experience in outreach and education and watershed planning complements the Duncans in British Columbia. To continue rejuvenating and revitalizing the KRN, the Board conducted a second retreat in November 2004. The first retreat took place in November 2003. Board and staff members combined efforts to define KRN goals and ways of achieving them. An Education and Outreach Plan formulated by the Watershed Coordinators was used to guide much of the discussions. The conclusions reached during the retreat specified four ''flagship'' projects for 2005-2006, to: (1) Provide leadership and facilitation, and build on current work related to the TMDL plans and planning efforts on the United States side of the border. (2) Continue facilitating trans-boundary British Columbia projects building on established work and applying the KRN model of project facilitation to other areas of the Kootenai basin. (3) Finalize and implement the KRN Education and Outreach plan

  17. PREFACE: FAIRNESS 2014: FAIR Next Generation ScientistS 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-04-01

    is dedicated to the physics at FAIR. February 2015, Organizers of FAIRNESS 2014: Marco Destefanis, Tetyana Galatyuk, Fernando Montes, Diana Nicmorus, Hannah Petersen, Claudia Ratti, Laura Tolos, and Sascha Vogel. Support for holding the conference was provided by: Conference photograph

  18. The RNA world hypothesis: the worst theory of the early evolution of life (except for all the others)a

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    far from perfect or complete, is the best we currently have to help understand the backstory to contemporary biology. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Eugene Koonin, Anthony Poole and Michael Yarus (nominated by Laura Landweber). PMID:22793875

  19. PREFACE: XIX Latin American Symposium on Solid State Physics (SLAFES XIX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serquis, Adriana; Balseiro, Carlos; Bolcatto, Pablo

    2009-07-01

    This volume contains selected papers which have been presented at the XIX Latin American Symposium on Solid State Physics (SLAFES XIX) held at Puerto Iguazú, Argentina, from 5--10 October 2008. The conference, covering all areas of Solid State Physics, is one of the most important and traditional meetings in Physics in our region. The Latin American Symposium on Solid State Physics is a forum where researchers and students from Latin America as well as leading scientists from other parts of the world get together to exchange information, strengthen collaborations and identify new challenges in Solid State Physics. This successful series of meetings has been organised in eight different countries, the last three held in Mérida, Venezuela (2002), La Habana, Cuba (2004) and Puebla, México (2006). Following the trends of previous events, SLAFES XIX included seven plenary talks, eighteen invited talks and contributions, and 28 oral and 255 poster presentations, covering mostly the latest experimental and theoretical advances in Nanophysics, Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology, Spintronics, Magnetism, New Materials, Superconductivity, Surfaces and Interfaces, Low-Dimensional Systems, Materials Preparation and Characterization, Theory and Computing Simulations of Materials among other topics. The group of scientists participating had come from Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Brazil, France, Spain, Switzerland and the USA We are indebted to all participants for their enthusiasm and contributions and to the members of the International Advisory Commitees. We also wish to thank to the rest of the Organizing Committee: Gustavo Lozano, Ana María Llois, Laura Steren and Edith Goldberg and very specially to Javier Schmidt, Gustavo Ruano, Marcelo Romero, Lucila Cristina and Juan Carlos Moreno for their invaluable assistance during the event. Finally we gratefully aknowledge the financial support the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET

  20. "Presumed fair: Ironic effects of organizational diversity structures": Correction to Kaiser et al. (2013).

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    Reports an error in "Presumed fair: Ironic effects of organizational diversity structures" by Cheryl R. Kaiser, Brenda Major, Ines Jurcevic, Tessa L. Dover, Laura M. Brady and Jenessa R. Shapiro (Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 2013[Mar], Vol 104[3], 504-519). In the article, a raw data merging error in one racial discrimination claim condition from Experiment 6 inadvertently resulted in data analyses on an inaccurate data set. When the error was discovered by the authors and corrected, all analyses reported in Experiment 6 for claim validity, seriousness of the claim, and support for the claimant were inaccurate and none were statistically significant. The conclusions should be altered to indicate that participants with management experience who reflected on their own workplace diversity policies did not show the predicted effects. The literature review, remaining five studies, and remaining conclusions in the article are unaffected by this error. Experiment 6 should also report that 26.4% (not 26.4.7%) of participants had a graduate degree and eight participants (not 8%) did not provide educational data. Experiment 5 should have referred to the claim validity measure as a six-item measure ( .92) rather than a five-item measure; analyses on claim validity are accurate in text. Table 2's note should have said standard errors, not standard deviations. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2012-31077-001.) This research tests the hypothesis that the presence (vs. absence) of organizational diversity structures causes high-status group members (Whites, men) to perceive organizations with diversity structures as procedurally fairer environments for underrepresented groups (racial minorities, women), even when it is clear that underrepresented groups have been unfairly disadvantaged within these organizations. Furthermore, this illusory sense of fairness derived from the mere presence of diversity structures causes high

  1. The health care response to pandemic influenza.

    PubMed

    Barnitz, Laura; Berkwits, Michael

    2006-07-18

    The threat of an H5N1 influenza virus (avian flu) pandemic is substantial. The success of the current U.S. influenza pandemic response plan depends on effective coordination among state and local public health authorities and individual health care providers. This article is a summary of a public policy paper developed by the American College of Physicians to address issues in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Pandemic Influenza Plan that involve physicians. The College's positions call for the following: 1) development of local public health task forces that include physicians representing all specialties and practice settings; 2) physician access to 2-way communication with public health authorities and to information technology tools for diagnosis and syndrome surveillance; 3) clear identification and authorization of agencies to process licensing and registration of volunteer physicians; 4) clear guidelines for overriding standard procedures for confidentiality and consent in the interest of the public's health; 5) clear and fair infection control measures that do not create barriers to care; 6) analysis of and solutions to current problems with seasonal influenza vaccination programs as a way of developing a maximally efficient pandemic flu vaccine program; 7) federal funding to provide pandemic flu vaccine for the entire U.S. population and antiviral drugs for 25% of the population; and 8) planning for health care in alternative, nonhospital settings to prevent a surge in demand for hospital care that exceeds supply. *This paper is an abridged version of a full-text position paper (available at http://www.acponline.org/college/pressroom/as06/pandemic_policy.pdf) written by Laura Barnitz, BJ, MA, and updated and adapted for publication in Annals of Internal Medicine by Michael Berkwits, MD, MSCE. The original position paper was developed for the Health and Public Policy Committee of the American College of Physicians: Jeffrey P. Harris, MD

  2. Final Report for Phase I Northern California CO2 Reduction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Wagoner, J

    2010-10-26

    On June 8, 2009, the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory released a Funding Opportunity Announcement (DE-FOA 0000015) with the title, Recovery Act: Carbon Capture and Sequestration from Industrial Sources and Innovative Concepts for Beneficial CO{sub 2} Use. C6 Resources (C6), an affiliate of Shell Oil Company, responded with a proposal for Technology Area 1: Large-scale industrial carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) projects from industrial sources. As DOE Federally Funded Research and Development Center (FFRDC) Contractors, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LBNL) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LLNL) proposed to collaborate with C6 and perform technical tasks, which C6 included in the C6 proposal, titled the Northern California CO{sub 2} Reduction Project. The proposal was accepted for Phase I funding and C6 received DOE Award DEFE0002042. LLNL and LBNL each received Phase I funding of $200,000, directly from DOE. The essential task of Phase I was to prepare a proposal for Phase II, which would be a five-year, detailed technical proposal, budget, and schedule for a complete carbon capture, transportation, and geologic storage project, with the objective of starting the injection of 1 million tons per year of industrial CO2 by the end of FY2015. LLNL and LBNL developed technical proposals (and DOE Field Work Proposals [FWPs]) for many aspects of the geologic testing and CO{sub 2} monitoring that were included in the C6 Phase II proposal, which C6 submitted by the deadline of April 16, 2010. This document is the Final Report for LLNL's Phase I efforts and is presented in two parts. Part 1 is the complete text of the technical proposal provided to C6 by LLNL and LBNL for inclusion in the C6 Phase II proposal. Because of space limitations, however, C6 may not have included all of this information in their proposal. In addition to developing the proposal presented below, LLNL's Bill Foxall and Laura Chiarmonte, in

  3. Effects of Glycemic Level on Outcome of Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Navas-Marrugo, Sandy Zuleica; Velasquez-Loperena, Robert Andrés; Adie-Villafañe, Richard José; Velasquez-Loperena, Duffay; Castellar-Leones, Sandra Milena; Alcala- Cerra, Gabriel; Pulido-Gutiérrez, Juan Camilo; Rodríguez-Conde, Javier Ricardo; Moreno-Moreno, María Fernanda; M. Rubiano, Andrés; Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effects of glycemic level on outcome patients with traumatic brain injury. Methods:  From September 2010 to December 2012, all medical records of adult patients with TBI admitted to the Emergency Room of Laura Daniela Clinic in Valledupar City, Colombia, South America were enrolled. Both genders between 18 and 85 years who referred during the first 48 hours after trauma, and their glucose level was determined in the first 24 hours of admission were included. Adults older than 85 years, with absence of Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score and a brain Computerized Tomography (CT) scans were excluded. The cut-off value was considered 200 mg/dL to define hyperglycemia. Final GCS, hospital admission duration and complications were compared between normoglycemic and hyperglycemic patients. Results: Totally 217 patients were identified with TBI. Considering exclusion criteria, 89 patients remained for analysis. The mean age was 43.0±19.6 years, the mean time of remission was 5.9±9.4 hours, the mean GCS on admission was 10.5±3.6 and the mean blood glucose level in the first 24 hours was 138.1±59.4 mg/dL. Hyperglycemia was present in 13.5% of patients. The most common lesions presented by patients with TBI were fractures (22.5%), hematoma (18.3%), cerebral edema (18.3%) and cerebral contusion (16.2%). Most of patients without a high glucose level at admission were managed only medically, whereas surgical treatment was more frequent in patients with hyperglycemia (p=0.042). Hyperglycemia was associated with higher complication (p=0.019) and mortality rate (p=0.039). GCS was negatively associated with on admission glucose level (r=0.11; p=0.46). Conclusion: Hyperglycemia in the first 24-hours of TBI is associated with higher rate of surgical intervention, higher complication and mortality rates. So hyperglycemia handling is critical to the outcome of patients with traumatic brain injury. PMID:27162868

  4. A simple measuring technique of surface flow velocity to analyze the behavior of velocity fields in hydraulic engineering applications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellez, Jackson; Gomez, Manuel; Russo, Beniamino; Redondo, Jose M.

    2015-04-01

    An important achievement in hydraulic engineering is the proposal and development of new techniques for the measurement of field velocities in hydraulic problems. The technological advances in digital cameras with high resolution and high speed found in the market, and the advances in digital image processing techniques now provides a tremendous potential to measure and study the behavior of the water surface flows. This technique was applied at the Laboratory of Hydraulics at the Technical University of Catalonia - Barcelona Tech to study the 2D velocity fields in the vicinity of a grate inlet. We used a platform to test grate inlets capacity with dimensions of 5.5 m long and 4 m wide allowing a zone of useful study of 5.5m x 3m, where the width is similar of the urban road lane. The platform allows you to modify the longitudinal slopes from 0% to 10% and transversal slope from 0% to 4%. Flow rates can arrive to 200 l/s. In addition a high resolution camera with 1280 x 1024 pixels resolution with maximum speed of 488 frames per second was used. A novel technique using particle image velocimetry to measure surface flow velocities has been developed and validated with the experimental data from the grate inlets capacity. In this case, the proposed methodology can become a useful tools to understand the velocity fields of the flow approaching the inlet where the traditional measuring equipment have serious problems and limitations. References DigiFlow User Guide. (2012), (June). Russo, B., Gómez, M., & Tellez, J. (2013). Methodology to Estimate the Hydraulic Efficiency of Nontested Continuous Transverse Grates. Journal of Irrigation and Drainage Engineering, 139(10), 864-871. doi:10.1061/(ASCE)IR.1943-4774.0000625 Teresa Vila (1), Jackson Tellez (1), Jesus Maria Sanchez (2), Laura Sotillos (1), Margarita Diez (3, 1), and J., & (1), M. R. (2014). Diffusion in fractal wakes and convective thermoelectric flows. Geophysical Research Abstracts - EGU General Assembly 2014

  5. Transitions from high school to college.

    PubMed

    Venezia, Andrea; Jaeger, Laura

    2013-01-01

    The vast majority of high school students aspire to some kind of postsecondary education, yet far too many of them enter college without the basic content knowledge, skills, or habits of mind they need to succeed. Andrea Venezia and Laura Jaeger look at the state of college readiness among high school students, the effectiveness of programs in place to help them transition to college, and efforts to improve those transitions. Students are unprepared for postsecondary coursework for many reasons, the authors write, including differences between what high schools teach and what colleges expect, as well as large disparities between the instruction offered by high schools with high concentrations of students in poverty and that offered by high schools with more advantaged students. The authors also note the importance of noncurricular variables, such as peer influences, parental expectations, and conditions that encourage academic study. Interventions to improve college readiness offer a variety of services, from academic preparation and information about college and financial aid, to psychosocial and behavioral supports, to the development of habits of mind including organizational skills, anticipation, persistence, and resiliency. The authors also discuss more systemic programs, such as Middle College High Schools, and review efforts to allow high school students to take college classes (known as dual enrollment). Evaluations of the effectiveness of these efforts are limited, but the authors report that studies of precollege support programs generally show small impacts, while the more systemic programs show mixed results. Dual-enrollment programs show promise, but the evaluation designs may overstate the results. The Common Core State Standards, a voluntary set of goals and expectations in English and math adopted by most states, offer the potential to improve college and career readiness, the authors write. But that potential will be realized, they add, only if the

  6. Memory encoding vibrations in a disconnecting air bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wendy

    2009-03-01

    is pronounced requires a smaller initial amplitude than a contact produced when the vibration is out of phase. (Joint work with Nathan C. Keim, Lipeng Lai, Laura E. Schmidt, Konstantin Turitsyn and Sidney R. Nagel.)

  7. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombaci, I.; Covello, A.; Marcucci, L. E.; Rosati, S.

    2009-07-01

    Armani Paolo (Università di Trento) Benhar Omar (INFN Roma) Bombaci Ignazio (Università di Pisa) Bonanno Luca (Università di Ferrara) Catara Francesco (Università di Catania) Cò Giampaolo (Università di Lecce) Colonna Maria (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN Catania) Colonna Nicola (INFN Bari) Conti Francesco (Università di Pavia) Coraggio Luigi (INFN Napoli) Covello Aldo (Università di Napoli) Cristoforetti Marco (Technische Universität München, Germania) Cuofano Carmine (Università di Ferrara) Di Toro Massimo (Università di Catania) Drago Alessandro (Università di Ferrara) Faccioli Pietro (Università di Trento) Farina Nicola (INFN Roma) Finelli Paolo (Università di Bologna) Fiorentini Giovanni (Università di Ferrara) Fortunato Lorenzo (Università di Padova) Gambacurta Danilo (Università di Catania) Gandolfi Stefano (Università di Trento) Gargano Angela (INFN Napoli) Giannini Mauro (Università di Genova) Girlanda Luca (INFN Pisa) Giusti Carlotta (INFN Pavia) Illarionov Alexei (SISSA Trieste) Itaco Nunzio (Università di Napoli) Kievsky Alejandro (INFN Pisa) Lanza Edoardo (INFN Catania) Leidemann Winfried (Università di Trento) Lenzi Silvia (Università di Padova) Lipparini Enrico (Università di Trento) Lissia Marcello (Università di Cagliari) Lo Iudice Nicola (Università di Napoli) Maieron Chiara (Università di Lecce) Marcucci Laura Elisa (Università di Pisa) Matera Francesco (Università di Firenze) Millo Raffaele (Università di Trento) Orlandini Giuseppina (Università di Trento) Pacati Franco (Università di Pavia) Pastore Alessandro (Univeristy of Jyväskylä, Finlandia) Pederiva Francesco (Università di Trento) Pisent Gualtiero (Università di Padova) Prete Gianfranco (INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro) Quarati Piero (Politecnico di Torino) Rosati Sergio (Università di Pisa) Salmè Giovanni (INFN Roma) Santopinto Elena (INFN Genova) Traini Marco (Università di Trento) Vigezzi Enrico (INFN Milano) Vitturi Andrea (Universit

  8. Proceedings from the 6th Annual University of Calgary Leaders in Medicine Research Symposium.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jodie I; Beatty, Jennifer K; Peplowski, Michael A; Keough, Michael B; Yipp, Bryan G; Hollenberg, Morley D; Beck, Paul L

    2015-01-01

    On November 14, 2014, the Leaders in Medicine (LIM) program at the Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary hosted its 6th Annual Research Symposium. Dr. Danuta Skowronski, Epidemiology Lead for Influenza and Emerging Respiratory Pathogens at the British Columbia Centre for Disease Control (BCCDC), was the keynote speaker and presented a lecture entitled "Rapid response research during emerging public health crises: influenza and reflections from the five year anniversary of the 2009 pandemic". The LIM symposium provides a forum for both LIM and non-LIM medical students to present their research work, either as an oral or poster presentation. There were a total of six oral presentations and 77 posters presented. 
The oral presentations included: Swathi Damaraju, "The role of cell communication and 3D Cell-Matrix environment in a stem cell-based tissue engineering strategy for bone repair"; Menglin Yang, "The proteolytic activity of Nepenthes pitcher fluid as a therapeutic for the treatment of celiac disease"; Amelia Kellar, "Monitoring pediatric inflammatory bowel disease - a retrospective analysis of transabdominal ultrasound"; Monica M. Faria-Crowder, "The design and application of a molecular profiling strategy to identify polymicrobial acute sepsis infections"; Waleed Rahmani, "Hair follicle dermal stem cells regenerate the dermal sheath, repopulate the dermal papilla and modulate hair type"; and, Laura Palmer, "A novel role for amyloid beta protein during hypoxia/ischemia". 
The article on the University of Calgary Leaders in Medicine Program, "A Prescription that Addresses the Decline of Basic Science Education in Medical School," in a previous issue of CIM (2014 37(5):E292) provides more details on the program. Briefly, the LIM Research Symposium has the following objectives: (1) to showcase the impressive variety of projects undertaken by students in the LIM Program as well as University of Calgary medical students; (2) to encourage medical

  9. Genetic characterization of Hawaiian isolates of Plasmodium relictum reveals mixed-genotype infections

    PubMed Central

    Jarvi, Susan I; Farias, Margaret EM; Atkinson, Carter T

    2008-01-01

    shows that clonal diversity of Hawaiian isolates of P. relictum is much higher than previously recognized. Mixed infections can significantly contribute to the uncertainty in host-pathogen dynamics with direct implications for host demographics, disease management strategies, and evolution of virulence. The results of this study indicate a widespread presence of multiple-genotype malaria infections with high clonal diversity in native birds of Hawaii, which when coupled with concurrent infection with Avipoxvirus, may significantly influence evolution of virulence. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Joseph Schall (nominated by Laura Landweber), Daniel Jeffares (nominated by Anthony Poole) and Susan Perkins (nominated by Eugene Koonin). PMID:18578879

  10. NEQAIRv14.0 Release Notes: Nonequilibrium and Equilibrium Radiative Transport Spectra Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandis, Aaron Michael; Cruden, Brett A.

    2014-01-01

    NEQAIR v14.0 is the first parallelized version of NEQAIR. Starting from the last version of the code that went through the internal software release process at NASA Ames (NEQAIR 2008), there have been significant updates to the physics in the code and the computational efficiency. NEQAIR v14.0 supersedes NEQAIR v13.2, v13.1 and the suite of NEQAIR2009 versions. These updates have predominantly been performed by Brett Cruden and Aaron Brandis from ERC Inc at NASA Ames Research Center in 2013 and 2014. A new naming convention is being adopted with this current release. The current and future versions of the code will be named NEQAIR vY.X. The Y will refer to a major release increment. Minor revisions and update releases will involve incrementing X. This is to keep NEQAIR more in line with common software release practices. NEQAIR v14.0 is a standalone software tool for line-by-line spectral computation of radiative intensities and/or radiative heat flux, with one-dimensional transport of radiation. In order to accomplish this, NEQAIR v14.0, as in previous versions, requires the specification of distances (in cm), temperatures (in K) and number densities (in parts/cc) of constituent species along lines of sight. Therefore, it is assumed that flow quantities have been extracted from flow fields computed using other tools, such as CFD codes like DPLR or LAURA, and that lines of sight have been constructed and written out in the format required by NEQAIR v14.0. There are two principal modes for running NEQAIR v14.0. In the first mode NEQAIR v14.0 is used as a tool for creating synthetic spectra of any desired resolution (including convolution with a specified instrument/slit function). The first mode is typically exercised in simulating/interpreting spectroscopic measurements of different sources (e.g. shock tube data, plasma torches, etc.). In the second mode, NEQAIR v14.0 is used as a radiative heat flux prediction tool for flight projects. Correspondingly, NEQAIR has

  11. PREFACE: 10th International Conference on Materials and Mechanisms of Superconductivity (M2S-X)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, L. H.; Zhu, J.-X.; Wang, H.; Meen, J.; Lorenz, B.; Dong, X. L.; dela Cruz, C. R.; Carlson, E.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Bauer, E.; Paglione, J.

    2013-07-01

    Conference Secretary, deserves special mention for her Olympian efforts. And of course, many thanks to all of our ~600 participants, who made this entire conference such a success. George Crabtree Laura Greene Peter Johnson The PDF also contains the organizing, program and publication committees, prize winners, conference photographs, sponsors and supporters.

  12. Research in X-ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This research grant supported an active sounding rocket program at Penn State University over a period of over 10 years. During this period, the grant supported at least 8 graduate students in Astronomy & Astrophysics for at least a portion of their research. During the same period, our group was involved in seven sounding rocket flights, launched from White Sands, New Mexico, and from Woomera, Australia. Most of these rocket flights, and most of the work supported by this grant, involved the use of X-ray CCD cameras. The first X-ray CCD camera ever flown in space was our sounding rocket observation of SN1987A (flight 36.030 in 1987). Subsequent flights utilized improved CCD detectors, culminating in the'state-of-the-art EEV detector developed for our CUBIC mission, which was flown on 36.093 last May. Data from the last three flights, which observed the diffuse X-ray background with CCDS, include detection of the OVII He(alpha) line in the high latitude diffuse background and detection of the Mg XI He(alpha) line in the North Polar Spur. These results have been reported at meetings of the American Astronomical Society and the SPIE. The analysis of flights 36.092 and 36.106 is part of Jeff Mendenhall's PhD thesis and will be published in the Astrophysical Journal next year. The 36.093 data are currently being analyzed by PhD student Laura Cawley. From 1990 to 1996 this grant supported our development and launch of the CUBIC instrument on the SAC-B satellite, which was designed to measure the spectrum of the soft X-ray diffuse background with moderate energy resolution and high S/N ratio. Unfortunately, this mission terminated shortly after launch due to a failure of the Pegasus XL launch vehicle. This work resulted in publication of 4 papers in the SPIE Proceedings and four others in refereed journals, in addition to several other conference proceedings and contributed papers. In addition to the CCD flights described above, this grant has supported preliminary

  13. Physics of protein motility and motor proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2013-09-01

    Xianchao Meng, Min Yu and Yunxin Zhang Microtubule organization by kinesin motors and microtubule crosslinking protein MAP65 Joshua Pringle, Amutha Muthukumar, Amanda Tan, Laura Crankshaw, Leslie Conway and Jennifer L Ross Backtracking dynamics of RNA polymerase: pausing and error correction Mamata Sahoo and Stefan Klumpp First-passage problems in DNA replication: effects of template tension on stepping and exonuclease activities of a DNA polymerase motor Ajeet K Sharma and Debashish Chowdhury

  14. Learning unit: Thin lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nita, L.-S.

    2012-04-01

    Learning unit: Thin lenses "Why objects seen through lenses are sometimes upright and sometimes reversed" Nita Laura Simona National College of Arts and Crafts "Constantin Brancusi", Craiova, Romania 1. GEOMETRIC OPTICS. 13 hours Introduction (models, axioms, principles, conventions) 1. Thin lenses (Types of lenses. Defining elements. Path of light rays through lenses. Image formation. Required physical quantities. Lens formulas). 2. Lens systems (Non-collated lenses. Focalless systems). 3. Human eye (Functioning as an optical system. Sight defects and their corrections). 4. Optical instruments (Characteristics exemplified by a magnifying glass. Paths of light rays through a simplified photo camera. Path of light rays through a classical microscope) (Physics curriculum for the IXth grade/ 2011). This scenario exposes a learning unit based on experimental sequences (defining specific competencies), as a succession of lessons started by noticing a problem whose solution assumes the setup of an experiment under laboratory conditions. Progressive learning of theme objectives are realised with sequential experimental steps. The central cognitive process is the induction or the generalization (development of new knowledge based on observation of examples or counterexamples of the concept to be learnt). Pupil interest in theme objectives is triggered by problem-situations, for example: "In order to better see small objects I need a magnifying glass. But when using a magnifier, small object images are sometimes seen upright and sometimes seen reversed!" Along the way, pupils' reasoning will converge to the idea: "The image of an object through a lens depends on the relative distances among object, lens, and observer". Associated learning model: EXPERIMENT Specific competencies: derived from the experiment model, in agreement with the following learning unit steps I. Evoking - Anticipation: Size of the problem, formulation of hypotheses and planning of experiment. II

  15. We Need You! The Importance of Scientist Involvement in Education and Public Outreach (E/PO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxner, S.; Hsu, B. C.; Meinke, B. K.; Shipp, S. S.; Schwerin, T. G.; Peticolas, L. M.; Smith, D.; Dalton, H.

    2013-12-01

    )'s Scientist Speaker's Bureau in an abstract by Heather Dalton, et al. Discover the many resources and opportunities provided by NASA SMD's Science E/PO Forums in abstracts by Stephanie Shipp, et al. and Laura Peticolas, et al. Join the fun - get involved in E/PO!

  16. Volcanoes: effusions and explosions. Interactive exhibits to understand how volcanoes work.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nostro, C.; Freda, L.; Castellano, C.; Arcoraci, L.; Baroux, E.

    2009-04-01

    , Colli Albani); some of them are reproduced with 3D models or described by short movies. The museum finishes with the visit of the volcanic survey hall of Stromboli, seeing - in real time - seismic data, three different webcams, geochemical and strain data. The INGV Museum had remarkably successful, reaching more than 7,500 children and adults yet in 13 days, also thanks to 30 volcanologists as very special guides. The Educational & Outreach Group: M. Pignone, A. Tertulliani, M. De Lucia, M. Di Vito, P. Landi, P. Madonia, M. Martini, R. Nave, M. Neri, P. Scarlato, J. Taddeucci, R. Moschillo, S. Tarquini, G. Vilardo, A. Bonforte, L. Calderone, F. Cannavò, W. De Cesare, P. Ficeli, S. Inguaggiato, M. Mattia, G. Puglisi, S. Morici, D. Reitano, D. Richichi, G. Scarpato, B. Angioni, F. Di Laura, S. Palone, D. Riposati.

  17. Kootenai River Focus Watershed Coordination, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Kootenai River Network,

    2006-02-01

    States and Canada. In September 2004 Kim Laub was hired as US-Watershed Coordinator and Jim and Laura Duncan were hired as Canadian Watershed Coordinators. To rejuvenate and revitalize the KRN, the Board conducted a strategic thinking and planning meeting in November 2004. All Board, staff and Advisory members participated in a combined effort to clearly define the goals of the KRN and to design ways of achieving those goals. Affirming and integrating board policy was a primary focus and it included writing accurate job descriptions for all KRN positions. KRN committee goals, the BPA contract and the Statement of Work plan were reviewed to establish future directions for a complex organization.

  18. Coseismic ground deformations related to the 2009 L’Aquila seismic sequence (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montone, P.; Working Group, E.

    2009-12-01

    and to many individual throws observed along the long-term Paganica fault, raise questions on the maximum expected Magnitude and the seismic hazard estimate of this area. Thus, although the 2009 L’Aquila earthquake and associated faulting caused major damage and loss of life, it does not fully characterize the seismic hazard associated to this area. Emergeo working group: Giuliana Alessio, Laura Alfonsi, Carlo Alberto Brunori, Francesca R. Cinti, Riccardo Civico, Luigi Cucci, Paolo Marco De Martini, Sofia Mariano, Maria Teresa Mariucci, Paola Montone, Rosa Nappi, Daniela Pantosti, Antonio Patera, Simona Pierdominici and Stefano Pucci.

  19. Landscapes of Central Italy through Science, Poetry and Music. A perspective for educating to the planet sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesci, Olivia; Valentini, Laura

    2016-04-01

    Born from a desire to promote the Italian landscape by integrating its physical aesthetic with its cultural and artistic heritage, we develop a story about the landscape told in popular science, and supported by visual stimulations, poetry and ancient music. Our work proceeds through two different routes. The first route analyzes the landscape from the scientific point of view trying to understand how it evolves and responds in response to changes in independent variables. The second path examines the landscape from a perspective more closely related to the visual and emotional impact that a place evokes, its history, its cultural significance, and perception of its fragility. The latter is perhaps a more complex path, more intimate, which develop fully only through the intersection of different forms of language, linked to specific arts. Three different disciplines focused on the same site, the combination of which results in an emotional experience where the encounter between different languages becomes an expression of the place. Among the many amazing landscapes of Italy, we focus on three known sites from the hystorical region of Montefeltro, in central Italy: "The flatiron of Petrano Mount", "The Stones of Montefeltro", "The sea-cliff of San Bartolo". Since a few years we have created a team of five researchers-artists, called "TerreRare" (Rare Earth Elements), whose mission is the desire to promote the gorgeous Italian landscape. Olivia Nesci, geomorphologist, begins this story analyzing the processes and the "forces" that have created and modified the landscape over time. Laura Valentini, a geologist and a musician, through the musical language, try to reproduce the emotional impact of the site, by searching for a piece of ancient music, composed for harpsichord. The choice of the musical instrument and the historical period is not accidental: the harpsichord has a punchy and gritty tone that clearly expresses the "strength" of the landscape; early music

  20. Subsoil erosion dominates the supply of fine sediment to rivers draining into Princess Charlotte Bay, Australia.

    PubMed

    Olley, Jon; Brooks, Andrew; Spencer, John; Pietsch, Timothy; Borombovits, Daniel

    2013-10-01

    The Laura-Normanby River (catchment area: 24,350 km(2)), which drains into Princess Charlotte Bay, has been identified in previous studies as the third largest contributor of sediment to the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area. These catchment scale modelling studies also identified surface soil erosion as supplying >80% of the sediment. Here we use activity concentrations of the fallout radionuclides (137)Cs and (210)Pbex to test the hypothesis that surface soil erosion dominates the supply of fine (<10 μm) sediment in the river systems draining into Princess Charlotte Bay. Our results contradict these previous studies, and are consistent with channel and gully erosion being the dominant source of fine sediment in this catchment. The hypothesis that surface soil erosion dominates the supply of fine sediment to Princess Charlotte Bay is rejected. River sediment samples were collected using both time-integrated samplers and sediment drape deposits. We show that there is no detectable difference in (137)Cs and (210)Pbex activity concentrations between samples collected using these two methods. Two methods were also used to collect samples to characterise (137)Cs and (210)Pbex concentrations in sediment derived from surface soil erosion; sampling of surface-wash deposits and deployment of surface runoff traps that collected samples during rain events. While there was no difference in the (137)Cs activity concentrations for samples collected using these two methods, (210)Pbex activity concentrations were significantly higher in the samples collected using the runoff traps. The higher (210)Pbex concentrations are shown to be correlated with loss-on-ignition (r(2) = 0.79) and therefore are likely to be related to higher organic concentrations in the runoff trap samples. As a result of these differences we use a three end member mixing model (channel/gully, hillslope surface-wash and hillslope runoff traps) to determine the relative contribution from surface soil

  1. Metallomics - An Interdisciplinary and Evolving Field

    SciTech Connect

    Koppenaal, David W.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2007-09-14

    In an editorial earlier this year (JAAS, 22, 111, 2007), we opined that metallomics, the study of metals in biological systems, would be an increasingly important topic in elemental analysis in general and for this journal in particular . This issue of the journal, co-edited by the two of us, is a second special issue covering the subject of Metallomics (the first issue was JAAS, 19/1, 2004). The present issue is comprised of technique, application, and perspective papers that address this emerging field of study and show how atomic spectrometry is contributing to the understanding of biological systems. The subjects covered range from metal binding in plants through investigations of metal and metalloids in samples of biological fluids to the study of food supplements and drug interactions in cells. The issue includes two Critical Reviews. Yuxi Gao and colleagues discuss advanced nuclear analytical techniques for the emerging field of metalloproteomics. While Laura Liermann and her colleagues consider how micro-organisms extract metals from minerals in the environment for utilization in metabolic processes. The content of some of these papers stretches the traditional boundaries and scope of this journal, as echoed by the reviewers of some of the papers. This discussion about scope requires perhaps further debate. However, it is our view that while the Journal must remain true to its core aims, it must also strive to accommodate and motivate a wider authorship and readership. Metallomics is a field that transcends biology and microbiology, biochemistry, clinical chemistry, environmental chemistry, geochemistry, and yes, atomic spectroscopy. If JAAS aspires to be a leading force in metallomics, the Journal must expand its horizons beyond traditional analytical spectroscopy per se. Accordingly, in this special issue you will find papers that have a heavy clinical emphasis, which speak to complementary (non-atomic) spectroscopic techniques, and that provide

  2. A comparative study of Navier-Stokes codes for high-speed flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudy, David H.; Thomas, James L.; Kumar, Ajay; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Chakravarthy, Sukumar R.

    1989-01-01

    A comparative study was made with four different codes for solving the compressible Navier-Stokes equations using three different test problems. The first of these cases was hypersonic flow through the P8 inlet, which represents inlet configurations typical of a hypersonic airbreathing vehicle. The free-stream Mach number in this case was 7.4. This 2-D inlet was designed to provide an internal compression ratio of 8. Initial calculations were made using two state-of-the-art finite-volume upwind codes, CFL3D and USA-PG2, as well as NASCRIN, a code which uses the unsplit finite-difference technique of MacCormack. All of these codes used the same algebraic eddy-viscosity turbulence model. In the experiment, the cowl lip was slightly blunted; however, for the computations, a sharp cowl leading edge was used to simplify the construction of the grid. The second test problem was the supersonic (Mach 3.0) flow in a three-dimensional corner formed by the intersection of two wedges with equal wedge angles of 9.48 degrees. The flow in such a corner is representative of the flow in the corners of a scramjet inlet. Calculations were made for both laminar and turbulent flow and compared with experimental data. The three-dimensional versions of the three codes used for the inlet study (CFL3D, USA-PG3, and SCRAMIN, respectively) were used for this case. For the laminar corner flow, a fourth code, LAURA, which also uses recently-developed upwind technology, was also utilized. The final test case is the two-dimensional hypersonic flow over a compression ramp. The flow is laminar with a free-stream Mach number of 14.1. In the experiment, the ramp angle was varied to change the strength of the ramp shock and the extent of the viscous-inviscid interaction. Calculations were made for the 24-degree ramp configuration which produces a large separated-flow region that extends upstream of the corner.

  3. Relation of NDVI obtained from different remote sensing at different space and resolutions sensors in Spanish Dehesas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escribano Rodríguez, Juan; Tarquis, Ana M.; Saa-Requejo, Antonio; Díaz-Ambrona, Carlos G. H.

    2015-04-01

    . Geophysical Research Abstracts, 15, EGU2013-14153, 2013. EGU General Assembly 2013 Juan Escribano, Carlos G.H. Díaz-Ambrona, Laura Recuero, Margarita Huesca, Victor Cicuendez, Alicia Palacios, and Ana M. Tarquis. Application of Vegetation Indices to Estimate Acorn Production at Iberian Peninsula. Geophysical Research Abstracts, 16, EGU2014-16428, 2014. EGU General Assembly 2014. Acknowledgements This work was partially supported by ENESA under project P10 0220C-823

  4. Real-time Remote Data Online For Norris Geyser Basin in Yellowstone National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, J. E.; Lowenstern, J. B.; Clor, L.; Cervelli, P. F.; Allen, S. T.; Heasler, H.; Moloney, T.

    2010-12-01

    Perry, John, Lowenstern, Jacob, Cervelli, Peter, Clor, Laura, Heasler, Henry, Allen, Scott, Moloney, Tim During June 2010, ten 900MHz wireless temperature data loggers (nodes) were installed around the Norris Geyser Basin to monitor geothermal features, streams and soil temperatures. The loggers can provide near real-time updates on temperature variations within 0.2 deg C due to hydrothermal discharges or subsurface fluid migration. Each sensor node is programmed to measure the temperature every two minutes and automatically upload data to the base station computer daily. The hardware consists of a waterproof case containing an M5 logger (made by Marathon Products, Inc.®) with internal memory, lithium D-cell batteries and a 900 MHz, 1-W-transceiver and 5 meter long Teflon-coated probe with a thermistor sensor. Tethered stub or panel antennas are oriented to optimize signal strength to the base station near the Norris Museum. A 0.61 meter-long base-station antenna located 10m high provides signal to the furthest node over 850 meters away with most being “line-of-sight”. A 20-meter coaxial cable and lightning grounding wire connects the base-station antenna to an Ethernet-radio connected to the YNP local-area network. A server located 26-km north at Mammoth Hot Springs requests data at regular intervals (normally daily), archives the information, and then sends it to the USGS for further archiving and internet distribution. During periods of unusual hydrothermal behavior, data can be requested as needed, and it is possible to set user-programmable alarm limits for notification. The RF network is designed to monitor changes from three different sub-basins at Norris (Gray Lakes, Steamboat-Echinus and Porcelain Basin), the main Tantalus Creek drainage, and five individual thermal features (Constant, Porkchop, Steamboat and Echinus Geysers, and Opalescent Spring). The logger installed in Nuphar Lake provides ambient temperatures controlled solely by local

  5. The Rodin-Ohno hypothesis that two enzyme superfamilies descended from one ancestral gene: an unlikely scenario for the origins of translation that will not be dismissed

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    rate-limiting step in uncatalyzed protein synthesis, together with the synergy of synthetase Urzymes and their cognate tRNAs, introduce a new paradigm for the origin of protein catalysts, emphasize the potential relevance of an operational RNA code embedded in the tRNA acceptor stems, and challenge the RNA-World hypothesis. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Dr. Paul Schimmel (nominated by Laura Landweber), Dr. Eugene Koonin and Professor David Ardell. PMID:24927791

  6. Genomics, molecular imaging, bioinformatics, and bio-nano-info integration are synergistic components of translational medicine and personalized healthcare research

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Supported by National Science Foundation (NSF), International Society of Intelligent Biological Medicine (ISIBM), International Journal of Computational Biology and Drug Design and International Journal of Functional Informatics and Personalized Medicine, IEEE 7th Bioinformatics and Bioengineering attracted more than 600 papers and 500 researchers and medical doctors. It was the only synergistic inter/multidisciplinary IEEE conference with 24 Keynote Lectures, 7 Tutorials, 5 Cutting-Edge Research Workshops and 32 Scientific Sessions including 11 Special Research Interest Sessions that were designed dynamically at Harvard in response to the current research trends and advances. The committee was very grateful for the IEEE Plenary Keynote Lectures given by: Dr. A. Keith Dunker (Indiana), Dr. Jun Liu (Harvard), Dr. Brian Athey (Michigan), Dr. Mark Borodovsky (Georgia Tech and President of ISIBM), Dr. Hamid Arabnia (Georgia and Vice-President of ISIBM), Dr. Ruzena Bajcsy (Berkeley and Member of United States National Academy of Engineering and Member of United States Institute of Medicine of the National Academies), Dr. Mary Yang (United States National Institutes of Health and Oak Ridge, DOE), Dr. Chih-Ming Ho (UCLA and Member of United States National Academy of Engineering and Academician of Academia Sinica), Dr. Andy Baxevanis (United States National Institutes of Health), Dr. Arif Ghafoor (Purdue), Dr. John Quackenbush (Harvard), Dr. Eric Jakobsson (UIUC), Dr. Vladimir Uversky (Indiana), Dr. Laura Elnitski (United States National Institutes of Health) and other world-class scientific leaders. The Harvard meeting was a large academic event 100% full-sponsored by IEEE financially and academically. After a rigorous peer-review process, the committee selected 27 high-quality research papers from 600 submissions. The committee is grateful for contributions from keynote speakers Dr. Russ Altman (IEEE BIBM conference keynote lecturer on combining simulation and machine

  7. Review of COSPAR Mars Special Regions Parameter Definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockell, Charles; Kminek, Gerhard; Perfumo, Amedea; Kelly, Laura

    Review of COSPAR Mars Special Regions Parameter Definition Charles S. Cockell (??), Ger-hard Kminek (??), Amedea Perfumo (??), Laura Kelly (??) 1. Planetary and Space Sciences Research Institute, Open University, CityplaceMilton Keynes, country-regionU.K. 2. ESA-ESTEC, Keplerlaan 1, 2200 Noordwijk, Netherlands. A Mars special region is a `region within which terrestrial organisms are likely to propagate, or a region which is interpreted to have a high potential for the existence of extant martian life forms'. We are undertaking a review of the parameter space that defines a special region. We agree, consistent with the COSPAR Mars Special Regions Colloquium held in Rome in 2007, that any region experiencing temperatures > -25°C for a few hours a year and a water activity > 0.5 can potentially allow the replication of terrestrial microorganisms. However, with respect to the role of salts in defining a special region, recent research shows that water activity per se may not be the limiting factor for life in extremely arid environments (??). Chaotropic salts (those which have a tendency to destabilize macromolecules), such as MgCl2 and CaCl2, may exert a more important influence on the survival of microorganisms in very arid environments. Given the unlikelihood of high concentrations of kosmotropic (stabilizing) substances, such as sugars, many Martian environments, particularly ancient sedimentary deposits, may turn out to be places where chaotropic characteristics of salts will be a more important factor for biological macromolecules than water activity, although water activity still remains an important metric in defining biological activity. Even with the presence of transient liquid water, chaotropic salts may still act to limit the growth and reproduction of life. Chaotropism needs to be assessed for a range of new salts in relation to different microorganisms and in relation to the predicted salt composition of Martian surface (including evaporitic

  8. Microbial community diversity associated with moonmilk deposits in a karstic cave system in Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rooney, D.; Hutchens, E.; Clipson, Nick; McDermott, Frank

    2009-04-01

    has been unaltered by human disturbance or practices. The aim of this study was to examine microbial community diversity associated with moonmilk deposits at Ballynamintra Cave, Ireland using automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA). The results revealed considerable bacterial and fungal diversity associated with moonmilk in a karstic cave system, suggesting that the microbial community implicated in moonmilk formation may be more diverse than previously thought. These results suggest that microbes may have important functional roles in subterranean environments. Although the moonmilk in this study was largely comprised of calcite, microbial involvement in calcite precipitation could result in the bioavailability of a range of organic compounds for subsequent microbial metabolism. References: Baskar, S., Baskar, R., Mauclaire, L., and McKenzie, J.A. 2006. Microbially induced calcite precipitation in culture experiments: Possible origin for stalactites in Sahastradhara caves, Dehradun, India. Current Science 90: 58-64. Burford, E.P., Fomina, M., Gadd, G. 2003. Fungal involvement in bioweathering and biotrasformations of rocks and minerals. Min Mag 67(6):1172-1155. Engel, A.S., Stern, L.A., Bennett, P.C. 2004. Microbial contributions to cave formation: new insights into sulfuric acid speleogenesis. Geology 32(5): 369-372. Gadd, G.M. (2004). Mycotransformation of organic and inorganic substrates. Mycologist 18: 60-70. Northup, D., Barns, S.M., Yu, Laura, E., Spilde, M.N., Schelble, R.T., Dano, K.E., Crossey, L.J., Connolly, C.A., Boston, P.J., and Dahm, C.N. 2003. Diverse microbial communities inhabiting ferromanganese deposits in Lechuguilla and Spider Caves. Environmental Microbiology 5(11): 1071-1086.

  9. Women in Chemistry: Their Changing Roles from Alchemical Times to the Mid-Twentieth Century (by Marelene Rayner-Canham and Geoffrey Rayner-Canham)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caserio, Marjorie C.

    1999-07-01

    such women pursued higher education. The role of women as "chemical assistants" to leading chemists of the day is well illustrated in the lives of du Chatelet, Paulze-Lavoisier, Picardet, and Necker de Saussure. Sadly, all this ended with the French Revolution when the woman intellectual became unacceptable. Chapter 3 focuses on a few exceptional women of the 1800-1900s who succeeded independently in their scientific work in an era when, without access to universities and financial resources, it was almost impossible to function other than as a "chemical assistant". This chapter gives a fascinating account of the life and work of five women, including Elizabeth Fulhame, who is credited with the discovery of photoreduction and the concept of catalysis, and Agnes Pockels, who, without formal education or laboratory facilities, pioneered research in surface films. By the 1850s, access to advanced education for women began in earnest. Chapter 4 tells of this radical change and its ramifications. This most readable account of the cultural conflicts that existed in Europe and the United States over educating women, admitting them to professional societies, and gaining faculty appointments is exemplified in the biographies of four U.S. women (Ellen Swallow Richards, Rachel Lloyd, Laura Linton, Ida Freund) and two Russian women (Yulya Lermontova and Vera Bogdanovskaia). Much of the content of the book resides in the remaining chapters (5-10) and covers 20th century science through 1950. The titles, Women in: Crystallography (Chapter 5), Radioactivity (Chapter 6), Biochemistry (Chapter 7), Industrial Chemistry (Chapter 8), Analytical, Education and History (Chapter 9), suggest that women favored some areas of chemistry over others. Why did they tend to congregate in certain fields? The authors give cogent reasons why this was so. They observe that, in developing fields, there was initially a collegiality among colleagues and the support of senior mentors that established a

  10. PREFACE: Proceedings of the TeV Particle Astrophysics II Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halzen, F.; Karle, A.; Montaruli, T.

    2007-03-01

    people from the various fields of Astroparticle Physics. Acknowledgements Due to the high quality of help that we received from them, we wish to acknowledge the conveners of the Working Groups mentioned in the text with the same numbering used above: 1) Felix Aharonian, Gus Sinnis, Frank Krennrich and Masahiro Teshima; 2) Piera Ghia and Tom Gaisser; 3) Laura Baudis and Gianfranco Bertone; 4) Lutz Koepke and Dan Hooper; 5) David Saltzberg and David Waters; 6) Ivone Albuquerque, Alexander Kusenko and Tom Weiler; and Bruce Allen and Guido Mueller. Special thanks also go to Tom Gaisser, who gave a comprehensive final summary of the conference. Throughout the Conference and the collection of these proceedings, Kim Kreiger constantly supported us. She was also responsible for the wonderful food available at coffee breaks and at the social dinner! (The PDF file lists the IceCube Collaboration) T Montaruli

  11. NRAO 12-Meter Radio Telescope Detects Molecular Emission from Comet Hyakutake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-05-01

    "parent molecules" within Comet Hyakutake. Measurements of H2CO, Hydrogen Cynaide (HCN), and Carbon Monoxide (CO) emission toward the comet were made on March 16 and 17. The derived production rates for these molecules indicate that the HCN production rate is similar to that measured for CN. Current theory holds that the similar production rates for these two molecules suggest a direct link between them. The observing team found dissimilar production rates when they observed CO and H2CO in Comet Hyakutake. According to prevalent theory, this dissimilarity suggests that these could be parent molecules, produced by different chemical processes. Comparison to other CO measurements done prior to these March measurements indicates very rapid changes in the CO production rate over time scales of weeks. A second research team has made the first detection of Carbonyl Sulfide in a comet by measuring its characteristic emission at 146 GHz. Laura Woodney, Michael A'Hearn (University of Maryland), and J. McMullin (University of Arizona) made their discovery on March 19, when the comet was 20 million miles from the Earth. By comparing the molecular production rates of OCS and OH and comparing them to theoretical predictions, they find that the OCS molecule is likely a parent molecule in Comet Hyakutake. On March 21st, Jeff Mangum of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory made an image of the CO emission toward Hyakutake. This image indicates that the "cloud" of CO surrounding the comet's nucleus is quite extended, with a size of about 2,500 miles. Stronger emissions indicate increased sublimation and studies of the changes in CO distribution will continue as the comet approaches perihelion. Comet Hyakutake will not be visible to northern hemisphere optical observers during the second leg of its journey because it will be in our daylight skies. But, since radio telescopes can operate 24 hours a day, the 12-Meter radio telescope will continue its observations until the comet exits the

  12. PREFACE: 5th International Workshop DICE2010: Space-Time-Matter - Current Issues in Quantum Mechanics and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diósi, Lajos; Elze, Hans-Thomas; Fronzoni, Leone; Halliwell, Jonathan; Prati, Enrico; Vitiello, Giuseppe; Yearsley, James

    2011-07-01

    frontiere della scienza moderna with the participation of E Del Giudice (INFN & Università di Milano), L Fronzoni (Università di Pisa) and G Vitiello (Università di Salerno). By now forming a tradition, this evening event drew a large audience, who participated in lively discussions until late. The workshop was organized by L Diósi (Budapest), H-T Elze (Pisa, chair), L Fronzoni (Pisa), J Halliwell (London), E Prati (Milano) and G Vitiello (Salerno), with essential help from our conference seceretaries M Pesce-Rollins and L Baldini and from our students G Gambarotta and F Vallone, all from Pisa. Several institutions and sponsors supported the workshop; their representatives and, in particular, the citizens of Rosignano / Castiglioncello are deeply thanked for their generous help and kind hospitality: Comune di Rosignano - A Franchi (Sindaco di Rosignano), S Scarpellini (Segreteria sindaco), L Benini (Assessore ai lavori pubblici), M Pia (Assessore all' urbanistica). REA Rosignano Energia Ambiente s.p.a. - F Ghelardini (Presidente della REA), E Salvadori (Segreteria). Associazione Armunia - M Paganelli (Direttore), G Mannari (Programmazione). Special thanks go to G Mannari and her collaborators for their advice and great help in all the practical matters that had to be dealt with in order to run the meeting at Castello Pasquini smoothly. Funds made available by Università di Pisa, by Domus Galilaeana (Pisa), Centro Interdisciplinare per lo Studio dei Sistemi Complessi - CISSC (Pisa), Dipartmento di Matematica e Informatica (Università di Salerno), Instituto Italiano per gli Studi Filosofici - IISF (Napoli), and by the Hungarian Scientific Research Fund OTKA, are gratefully ackowledged. Last, but not least, special thanks are due to Laura Pesce (Vitrium Galleria, San Vincenzo) for the exposition for her artwork Dal io al cosmo at Castello Pasquini during the conference. The papers presented at the workshop and collected here have been edited by L Diósi, H-T Elze, L

  13. PREFACE: 21st Latin American Symposium on Solid State Physics (SLAFES XXI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, J. Albino

    2014-04-01

    Colombia e-mail: dalandinezt@unal.edu.co Professor Laura T Corredor Bohórquez Departamento de Física Universidade Federal de Pernambuco 50670-901 Recife PE Brazil e-mail: ltcorredorb@df.ufpe.br Professor Arkady Shanenko Departamento de Física Universidade Federal de Pernambuco 50670-901 Recife PE Brazil e-mail: arkadyshanenko@df.ufpe.br Professor Renato F Jardim Instituto de Física Universidade de S\\~ao Paulo CP 66318 S\\~ao Paulo SP Brazil e-mail: rjardim@if.usp.br Professor Francois Peeters Department Fysica Universiteit Antwerpen Groneneborgerlann 171 B-2020, Antwerpen Belgium e-mail: francois.peeters@uantwerpen.be Organizing committee ChairmanCarlos Arturo Parra Vargas Proceedings EditorJosé Albino Aguiar Program ChairJairo Roa-Rojas SecretaryAura Janeth Barón González TreasurerArmando Sarmiento Santos Speaker ChairRafael González Hernández Fernando Naranjo Mayorga David A Landínez Téllez Jesús Oswaldo Morán José Sierra Ortega

  14. EDITORIAL: Focus on Dark Matter and Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aprile, Elena; Profumo, Stefano

    2009-10-01

    Doetinchem, H Gast, T Kirn and S Schael Axion searches with helioscopes and astrophysical signatures for axion(-like) particles K Zioutas, M Tsagri, Y Semertzidis, T Papaevangelou, T Dafni and V Anastassopoulos The indirect search for dark matter with IceCube Francis Halzen and Dan Hooper DIRECT DARK MATTER SEARCHES:EXPERIMENTS Gaseous dark matter detectors G Sciolla and C J Martoff Search for dark matter with CRESST Rafael F Lang and Wolfgang Seidel DIRECT AND INDIRECT PARTICLE DARK MATTER SEARCHES:THEORY Dark matter annihilation around intermediate mass black holes: an update Gianfranco Bertone, Mattia Fornasa, Marco Taoso and Andrew R Zentner Update on the direct detection of dark matter in MSSM models with non-universal Higgs masses John Ellis, Keith A Olive and Pearl Sandick Dark stars: a new study of the first stars in the Universe Katherine Freese, Peter Bodenheimer, Paolo Gondolo and Douglas Spolyar Determining the mass of dark matter particles with direct detection experiments Chung-Lin Shan The detection of subsolar mass dark matter halos Savvas M Koushiappas Neutrino coherent scattering rates at direct dark matter detectors Louis E Strigari Gamma rays from dark matter annihilation in the central region of the Galaxy Pasquale Dario Serpico and Dan Hooper DARK MATTER MODELS The dark matter interpretation of the 511 keV line Céline Boehm Axions as dark matter particles Leanne D Duffy and Karl van Bibber Sterile neutrinos Alexander Kusenko Dark matter candidates Lars Bergström Minimal dark matter: model and results Marco Cirelli and Alessandro Strumia Shedding light on the dark sector with direct WIMP production Partha Konar, Kyoungchul Kong, Konstantin T Matchev and Maxim Perelstein Axinos as dark matter particles Laura Covi and Jihn E Kim

  15. Astronomical tuning of black cherts in the Cenomanian Scaglia Bianca as precursors of the Bonarelli level (OAE2) at Furlo, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batenburg, S. J.; Montanari, A.; Sprovieri, M.; Hilgen, F. J.; Coccioni, R.; Gale, A. S.

    2012-04-01

    chert deposition, as well as the onset of the oceanic anoxic event itself, is related to eccentricity maxima. The stable 405-kyr periodicity of eccentricity is readily discernible in the data records and can be used for tuning to the astronomical solution (Laskar et al. 2011). A total of five and a half 405-kyr cycles can be identified below the Bonarelli level, which itself comprises a 405-kyr cycle. This cyclostratigraphy can potentially be anchored to the absolute time scale by using the newly determined Cenomanian-Turonian boundary age of 93.9 ± 0.15 Ma, which is based on intercalibration of astrochronological and radioisotopic data for the Cenomanian-Turonian boundary interval near the GSSP in Colorado, USA (Meyers et al., 2012). Correlation to the orbitally tuned Turonian interval of the nearby Gubbio and Contessa sections in Italy (De Vleeschouwer et al., this session) allows the construction of an anchored astronomical time scale for the Cenomanian-Turonian interval of > 5 Ma. Herbert, T. D., and A. G. Fischer. 1986. "Milankovitch climatic origin of mid-Cretaceous black shale rhythms in central Italy." Nature 321 (19): 739-743. Lanci, L., G. Muttoni, and E. Erba. 2010. "Astronomical tuning of the Cenomanian Scaglia Bianca Formation at Furlo, Italy." Earth and Planetary Science Letters. Laskar, J., A. Fienga, M. Gastineau, and H. Manche. 2011. "La2010: A new orbital solution for the long term motion of the Earth." Astronomy and Astrophysics arXiv:1103.1084v1. Mitchell, Ross N., David M. Bice, Alessandro Montanari, Laura C. Cleaveland, Keith T. Christianson, Rodolfo Coccioni, and Linda A. Hinnov. 2008. "Oceanic anoxic cycles? Orbital prelude to the Bonarelli Level (OAE 2)." Earth and Planetary Science Letters 267: 1-16. Trabucho Alexandre, J., E. Tuenter, G. A Henstra, K. J van der Zwan, R. S.W van de Wal, H. A Dijkstra, and P. L de Boer. 2010. "The mid-Cretaceous North Atlantic nutrient trap: Black shales and OAEs." Paleoceanography 25 (4).

  16. Root distribution in a California semi-arid oak savanna ecosystem as determined by conventional sampling and ground penetrating radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koteen, L. E.; Raz-Yaseef, N.; Baldocchi, D. D.

    2011-12-01

    Koteen, Laura E., Raz-Yaseef, Naama, and Dennis D. Baldocchi University of California, Berkeley California's blue oak, Quercus douglasii, is a unique tree in several ways. Despite the intense heat of California's central valley and Sierra foothills, and absence of precipitation during dry summer months, blue oaks are winter deciduous, and rely on a suite of drought adaptation measures for highly-efficient water use. To date, much more is known about aboveground dynamics in semi-arid oak savanna ecosystems than belowground. Yet, the root system is instrumental in ensuring oak survival and in determining the magnitude and timing of land-atmospheric fluxes via its control of water and nutrient supply to aboveground processes and soil moisture content. Tree root distribution is notoriously heterogeneous. Therefore a comprehensive sampling effort is needed in order to optimally represent it. To further understand the patterns of water use in oak savanna ecosystems in the Sierra foothills of California, we have sought to characterize the root system by depth. To accomplish this goal, we have sampled the root system using conventional sampling methods (i.e. pit and core sampling), in conjunction with ground penetrating radar (GPR). Using both methods together made it possible to compensate for the limitations of each: Fine roots can only be detected by conventional sampling, and involve time intensive work in the lab, limiting sample size. GPR, on the other hand, allows for much greater spatial coverage and therefore more comprehensive characterization of the coarse root component. An extensive field campaign was executed during May 2011. 7 tree areas where chosen, representing the range of tree sizes and composition at the research site: 2 small trees, 2 large trees and 2 tree clusters. One additional very large tree that has undergone extensive additional physiological measurements was also chosen in order to posit and test hypotheses about linkages among root, soil

  17. Controlled Vocabularies and Ontologies for Oceanographic Data: The R2R Eventlogger Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coburn, E.; Maffei, A. R.; Chandler, C. L.; Raymond, L. M.

    2012-12-01

    Vocabulary. These vocabularies and their mappings are an important part of the Eventlogger system. Before a research cruise investigators configure the instruments they intend to use for science activities. The instruments available for selection are pulled directly from the instrument vocabulary. The promotion and use of controlled vocabularies and ontologies will pave the way for linked data. By mapping local terms to agreed upon authoritative terms links are created, whereby related datasets can be discovered, and utilized. The Library is a natural home for the management of standards. Librarians have an established history of working with controlled vocabularies and metadata and libraries serve as centers for information discovery. Eventlogger is currently being tested across the UNOLS fleet. A large submission of suggested instrument terms to the SeaDataNet community listserv is in progress. References: Maffei, Andrew R., Cynthia L. Chandler, Janet Fredericks, Nan Galbraith, Laura Stolp. Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R): A Controlled Vocabulary and Ontology Development Effort for Oceanographic Research Cruise Event Logging. EGU2011-12341. Poster presented at the 2011 EGU Meeting.

  18. Assessment of Radiative Heating Uncertainty for Hyperbolic Earth Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Christopher O.; Mazaheri, Alireza; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Kleb, W. L.; Sutton, Kenneth; Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Brandis, Aaron M.; Bose, Deepak

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the shock-layer radiative heating uncertainty for hyperbolic Earth entry, with the main focus being a Mars return. In Part I of this work, a baseline simulation approach involving the LAURA Navier-Stokes code with coupled ablation and radiation is presented, with the HARA radiation code being used for the radiation predictions. Flight cases representative of peak-heating Mars or asteroid return are de ned and the strong influence of coupled ablation and radiation on their aerothermodynamic environments are shown. Structural uncertainties inherent in the baseline simulations are identified, with turbulence modeling, precursor absorption, grid convergence, and radiation transport uncertainties combining for a +34% and ..24% structural uncertainty on the radiative heating. A parametric uncertainty analysis, which assumes interval uncertainties, is presented. This analysis accounts for uncertainties in the radiation models as well as heat of formation uncertainties in the flow field model. Discussions and references are provided to support the uncertainty range chosen for each parameter. A parametric uncertainty of +47.3% and -28.3% is computed for the stagnation-point radiative heating for the 15 km/s Mars-return case. A breakdown of the largest individual uncertainty contributors is presented, which includes C3 Swings cross-section, photoionization edge shift, and Opacity Project atomic lines. Combining the structural and parametric uncertainty components results in a total uncertainty of +81.3% and ..52.3% for the Mars-return case. In Part II, the computational technique and uncertainty analysis presented in Part I are applied to 1960s era shock-tube and constricted-arc experimental cases. It is shown that experiments contain shock layer temperatures and radiative ux values relevant to the Mars-return cases of present interest. Comparisons between the predictions and measurements, accounting for the uncertainty in both, are made for a range

  19. Investigation of Non-Equilibrium Radiation for Earth Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandis, A. M.; Johnston, C. O.; Cruden, B. A.

    2016-01-01

    For Earth re-entry at velocities between 8 and 11.5 km/s, the accuracy of NASA's computational uid dynamic and radiative simulations of non-equilibrium shock layer radiation is assessed through comparisons with measurements. These measurements were obtained in the NASA Ames Research Center's Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility. The experiments were aimed at measuring the spatially and spectrally resolved radiance at relevant entry conditions for both an approximate Earth atmosphere (79% N2 : 21% O2 by mole) as well as a more accurate composition featuring the trace species Ar and CO2 (78.08% N2 : 20.95% O2 : 0.04% CO2 : 0.93% Ar by mole). The experiments were configured to target a wide range of conditions, of which shots from 8 to 11.5 km/s at 0.2 Torr (26.7 Pa) are examined in this paper. The non-equilibrium component was chosen to be the focus of this study as it can account for a significant percentage of the emitted radiation for Earth re-entry, and more importantly, non-equilibrium has traditionally been assigned a large uncertainty for vehicle design. The main goals of this study are to present the shock tube data in the form of a non-equilibrium metric, evaluate the level of agreement between the experiment and simulations, identify key discrepancies and to examine critical aspects of modeling non-equilibrium radiating flows. Radiance pro les integrated over discreet wavelength regions, ranging from the Vacuum Ultra Violet (VUV) through to the Near Infra-Red (NIR), were compared in order to maximize both the spectral coverage and the number of experiments that could be used in the analysis. A previously defined non-equilibrium metric has been used to allow comparisons with several shots and reveal trends in the data. Overall, LAURA/HARA is shown to under-predict EAST by as much as 40% and over-predict by as much as 12% depending on the shock speed. DPLR/NEQAIR is shown to under-predict EAST by as much as 50% and over-predict by as much as 20% depending

  20. PREFACE: DICE 2012 : Spacetime Matter Quantum Mechanics - from the Planck scale to emergent phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diósi, Lajos; Elze, Hans-Thomas; Fronzoni, Leone; Halliwell, Jonathan; Prati, Enrico; Vitiello, Giuseppe; Yearsley, James

    2013-06-01

    Milano), F Guerra (Università 'La Sapienza', Roma) and G Vitiello (Università di Salerno), this event traditionally dedicated to the public drew a large audience involved in lively discussions until late. The workshop was organized by L Diósi (Budapest), H-T Elze (Pisa, chair), L Fronzoni (Pisa), J J Halliwell (London), E Prati (Milano) and G Vitiello (Salerno), with most essential help from our conference secretaries L Fratino, N Lampo, I Pozzana, and A Sonnellini, all students from Pisa, and from our former secretaries M Pesce-Rollins and L Baldini. Several institutions and sponsors supported the workshop and their representatives and, in particular, the citizens of Rosignano/Castiglioncello are deeply thanked for the generous help and kind hospitality: Comune di Rosignano - A Franchi (Sindaco di Rosignano), S Scarpellini (Segreteria sindaco), L Benini (Assessore ai lavori pubblici), M Pia (Assessore all' urbanistica) REA Rosignano Energia Ambiente s.p.a. - F Ghelardini (Presidente della REA), E Salvadori and C Peccianti (Segreteria) Associazione Armunia - A Nanni (Direttore), G Mannari (Programmazione), C Perna, F Bellini, M Nannerini, P Bruni and L Meucci (Tecnici). Special thanks go to G Mannari and her collaborators for advice and great help in all the practical matters that had to be dealt with, in order to run the meeting at Castello Pasquini smoothly Funds made available by Università di Pisa, Domus Galilaeana (Pisa), Centro Interdisciplinare per lo Studio dei Sistemi Complessi - CISSC (Pisa), Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale (Università di Salerno), Istituto Italiano per gli Studi Filosofici - IISF (Napoli), Solvay Italia SA (Rosignano), Institute of Physics Publishing - IOP (Bristol), Springer Verlag (Heidelberg), and Hungarian Scientific Research Fund OTKA are gratefully acknowledged. Last, but not least, special thanks are due to Laura Pesce (Vitrium Galleria, San Vincenzo) for the exposition of her artwork 'arte e scienza' at Castello Pasquini

  1. Physics-Based Spectra of Accretion Disks around Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krolik, Julian H.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this grant was to begin the process of deriving the light output of accretion disks around black holes directly from the actual processes that inject heat into the accreting matter, rather than from guessed dependences of heating rate on physical parameters. At JHU, the effort has focussed so far on models of accretion onto "intermediate mass black holes", a possible class of black holes, examples of which may have recently been discovered in nearby galaxies. There, Krolik and his student (Yawei Hui) have computed stellar atmospheres for uniformly-heated disks around this class of black holes. Their models serve two purposes: they are the very first serious attempts to compute the spectrum from accreting black holes in this mass range; and a library of such models can be used later in this program as contrasts for those computed on the basis of real disk dynamics. The output from these local disk calculations has also been successfully coupled to a program that applies the appropriate relativistic transformations and computes photon trajectories in order to predict the spectrum received by observers located at different polar angles. The principal new result of these calculations is the discovery of potentially observable ionization edges of H-like C and O at frequencies near the peak in flux from these objects. Most of the grant money at UCSB was spent on supporting graduate student Shane Davis. In addition. some money was spent on supporting two other students: Ari Socrates (now a Hubble Fellow at Princeton), and Laura Melling. Davis spent the year constructing stellar atmosphere models of accretion disks appropriate for the high/soft (thermal) state of black hole X-ray binaries. As with AGN models published previously by our collaboration with NASA support. our models include a complete general relativistic treatment of both the disk structure and the propagation of photons from the disk to a distant observer. They also include all important

  2. Timing of Pleistocene glacial oscillations recorded in the Cantabrian Mountains (North Iberia): correlation of glacial and periglacial sequences from both sides of the range using a multiple-dating method approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Laura; Jiménez-Sánchez, Montserrat; José Domínguez-Cuesta, María; Rinterknecht, Vincent; Pallàs, Raimón; Bourlès, Didier

    2015-04-01

    by a deglaciation sequence that changed gradually to periglacial conditions during the Lateglacial (16 - 12 ka). Radiocarbon and OSL sampling campaigns have been recently developed to complement and cross-check these preliminary results, which are compared with other paleoclimate proxies in this contribution. Rodríguez-Rodríguez, L., Jiménez-Sánchez, M., Domínguez-Cuesta, M.J., 2014. Geophysical Research Abstracts 16, EGU2014-292. Rodríguez-Rodríguez, L., Jiménez-Sánchez, M., Domínguez-Cuesta, M.J., Aranburu, A., in press. Quaternary International, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.quaint.2014.06.007 Research funded by MINECO-PGE-FEDER through the project CANDELA (MINECO-CGL2012-31938). Laura Rodríguez-Rodríguez developed her research granted by the Spanish FPU Program (Ministerio de Educación Cultura y Deporte).

  3. Classroom Assessment Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, M.

    2003-12-01

    Provost David L. Potter of George Mason University chaired a joint task force and presented a report entitled ``Powerful Partnerships : A Shared Responsibility for Learnin'' in June 1998. The main goal is to make a difference in the quality of student learning. Further, it is important to assess this difference and document it. Clifford O. Young, Sr., & Laura Howzell Young of California State University, San Bernardino argue that a new paradigm for assessment, a learning paradigm, must be constructed to measure the success of new kinds of educational practices. Using two survey instruments, the Instruction Model Learning Model Questionnaire (IMLMQ) and the Student Evaluation of Teaching Effectiveness (SETE), they compared students' responses to the course when taught with traditional methods and with interactive methods. The results suggest that neither instrument effectively measures the kinds of learning promoted under the new paradigm. Linn, Baker, & Dunbar recommend that these newer assessment practices should be more authentic, that is, to involve students in the actual or simulated performance of a task or the documentation of the desired competency in a portfolio. Cerbin says that one of the most unfortunate consequences of a summative emphasis is that it inhibits open and productive discussions about teaching; in essence, it marginalizes the types of activity that could lead to better teaching (Cerbin, 1992). William Cerbin, who is the Director of the Center for Effective Teaching and learning, University Assessment Coordinator, and Professor of Psychology at the University of Wisconsin-LaCrosse is a recognized expert in the areas of cognition, language, and development. Edgerton, Hutchings, & Quinlan indicate that Teaching Portfolios may contain evidence of students' learning, but such information is optional, and when included, it may be only one of many pieces of material. Seldin, also supports this and stresses that the interplay between the instructor

  4. The GalileoMobile starts its South American voyage - Astronomy education goes on tour through the Andes Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-10-01

    and November 2009, and will cover 5000 kilometres. The voyage will largely take place across the Altiplano, or high plateau, shared by Peru, Bolivia and Chile, which is among the poorest regions in these countries. South America and the Andes Mountains were particularly chosen for the GalileoMobile Project for several reasons. IYA2009 already has a strong presence in the region through national contacts, including three Cornerstone IYA2009 projects: Developing Astronomy Globally, Universe Awareness and the Galileo Teacher Training Programme, which are all official partners of the project. Most people in Peru, Bolivia and Chile speak the same language, Spanish [1], and have a rich astronomical heritage dating back to the pre-Columbian Inca and Tiwanaku civilisations that lived on the Altiplano. The region's high elevation and the quality of its skies for astronomical observations also made it an attractive candidate for the maiden voyage of the GalileoMobile. The journey starts today 5 October 2009 in Antofagasta, Chile, with a free, public inauguration event at 19:00 in the Berta González Square at the Universidad Católica del Norte. The event, which will include observations of the night sky, is organised by ESO in collaboration with Explora II Region and the Astronomy Institute of the University. From Antofagasta the GalileoMobile heads north through La Paz in Bolivia and on into Peru. The return trip to Antofagasta goes via the Panamericana coastal road, and passes near the home of ESO's world-class observatory, the Very Large Telescope at Cerro Paranal. ESO Education and Outreach coordinator in Chile, Laura Ventura, will assist the GalileoMobile team as they greet communities throughout Chile's northern deserts. "The GalileoMobile is a wonderful initiative, and a unique opportunity to reinforce educational activities in the north of Chile and the neighbouring countries. It will promote greater awareness of astronomy and science", says Ventura. "We are looking

  5. Obituary: Donald Edward Osterbrock, 1924-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veilleux, Sylvain

    2007-12-01

    living in Santa Cruz; two daughters, Laura of Seattle, Washington, and Carol of Santa Cruz; and three grandchildren. Don did a theoretical Ph.D. thesis with Chandrasekhar calculating the effects of gravitational interactions between interstellar clouds and stars, but arguably his best known graduate work was observational in nature, helping Morgan map the nearest spiral arms of our Galaxy. Morgan put Don's name on the landmark 1952 paper (Morgan, Sharpless, & Osterbrock, AJ, 57, p. 3, 1952), even though, according to Don's own account in his 2000 autobiography A Fortunate Life in Astronomy, the work was mostly Morgan's. This generous gesture by Morgan likely fashioned what was to become Don's own trademark generosity towards his Ph.D. students and colleagues for years to come. After obtaining his Ph.D. degree, Don spent a single but very productive year as a postdoctoral fellow at Princeton University, becoming interested in the stellar structures of red dwarfs. Using numerical integration methods generously provided by Martin Schwarzschild, Don produced the first models of red dwarfs that took into account their outer convective layers (Osterbrock, ApJ, 118, pp. 529-546, 1953). These calculations also inspired Fred Hoyle and Schwarzschild to successfully model red giant stars with similar convective envelopes. In 1953, Osterbrock accepted an instructorship at Caltech, joining a young astronomy department led by Jesse Greenstein. Direct access to Caltech's outstanding astronomical facilities on Mounts Wilson and Palomar marked a turning point in Don's career, since it allowed him to pursue his observational interests in gaseous nebulae. Drawing on his expertise in atomic physics, and a very productive collaboration via air mail with young atomic theorist Michael Seaton, he pioneered the use of spectroscopic methods for the study of gaseous nebulae. In a daring move in 1958, Don left Caltech for the University of Wisconsin, to appease his wife's and his own homesickness

  6. Obituary: Fred Lawrence Whipple, 1906-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeomans, Donald Keith

    2004-12-01

    Fred Whipple, one of the founding fathers of planetary science, died on August 30, 2004 just two months shy of his 98th birthday. The breadth of Fred's published research from 1927 through 2000 is quite extraordinary. Although his collected works were published in two massive volumes in 1972, shortly before his retirement, Fred's research contributions continued for another three decades - and another volume is planned. Fred Lawrence Whipple was born on November 5, 1906 on a farm in Red Oak Iowa. His parents were Harry Lawrence and Celestia (MacFarl) Whipple. At the age of fifteen, the Whipple family moved to California where Fred studied mathematics at Occidental College and the University of California at Los Angeles. As a graduate student at the University of California at Berkeley in 1930, he was one of the first to compute an orbit for the newly discovered planet Pluto. Upon receiving his PhD in 1931, he joined the staff of the Harvard College Observatory. He was Chairman of the Harvard Department of Astronomy (1949 - 1956), Director or the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (1955 - 1973), Phillips Professor of Astronomy (1968 - 1977) and Emeritus Phillips Professor of astronomy (1977 - 2004). In 1928 he married Dorothy Woods and their son, Earle Raymond, survives him. The marriage ended in divorce in 1935. Eleven years later, he married Babette F. Samelson and she too survives him, as do their two daughters Laura and (Dorothy) Sandra. Shortly after arriving at Harvard in the early 1930's, Fred developed a photographic tracking network to determine meteor trajectories from simultaneous observations from two or more stations. The photographic trails, chopped by a rotating shutter, allowed their orbits in space to be determined accurately. With the strong involvement of Richard McCrosky and others, he concluded in the early 1960's that most of these meteors were on comet-like orbits and less than 1% of the naked eye, sporadic meteors could be traced to an

  7. Asteroids IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Patrick; DeMeo, Francesca E.; Bottke, William F.

    easy and pleasant as possible for the editors, authors, and referees. They also thank Richard Binzel, the General Editor of the Space Science Series, for his strong support and advice during this process, as well as the staff at the University of Arizona Press. Finally, editor Patrick Michel would like to thank his wife Delphine, who married him on June 14, 2013, almost at the birth of the book process. He is grateful that she was willing to put up with him as he spent many of his nights and weekends working on the book. Thanks to her support, their trajectories are as bounded as a perfectly stable asteroid binary system, and this was probably the best way to experience from the start what her life would be like with a researcher! Co-editor Bottke would also like to thank his wife Veronica and his children Kristina-Marie, Laura, and Julie, who make up his own favorite asteroid family. Since Asteroids III, the size distribution of the family members has been steadily changing, and who knows how many tiny new members it will contain by Asteroids V! Co-editor DeMeo would like to thank her husband Alfredo for his support and encouragement throughout the process of creating this book. They met at the beginning of her career in research, becoming an asteroid pair and now continuing on the same orbit in life.

  8. PUBLISHER'S ANNOUNCEMENT: Refereeing standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, C.; Scriven, N.

    2004-08-01

    On 1 January 2004 I will be assuming the position of Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and General (J. Phys. A). I am flattered at the confidence expressed in my ability to carry out this challenging job and I will try hard to justify this confidence. The previous Editor-in-Chief, Ed Corrigan, has worked tirelessly for the last five years and has done an excellent job for the journal. Everyone at the journal is profoundly grateful for his leadership and for his achievements. Before accepting the position of Editor-in-Chief, I visited the office of J. Phys. A to examine the organization and to assess its strengths and weaknesses. This office is located at the Institute of Physics Publishing (IOPP) headquarters in Bristol. J. Phys. A has been expanding rapidly and now publishes at the rate of nearly 1000 articles (or about 14,000 pages) per year. The entire operation of the journal is conducted in a very small space---about 15 square metres! Working in this space are six highly intelligent, talented, hard working, and dedicated people: Neil Scriven, Publisher; Mike Williams, Publishing Editor; Rose Gray and Sarah Nadin, Publishing Administrators; Laura Smith and Steve Richards, Production Editors. In this small space every day about eight submitted manuscripts are downloaded from the computer or received in the post. These papers are then processed and catalogued, referees are selected, and the papers are sent out for evaluation. In this small space the referees' reports are received, publication decisions are made, and accepted articles are then published quickly by IOPP. The whole operation is amazingly efficient. Indeed, one of the great strengths of J. Phys. A is the speed at which papers are processed. The average time between the receipt of a manuscript and an editorial decision is under sixty days. (Many distinguished journals take three to five times this amount of time.) This speed of publication is an extremely strong enticement for

  9. PREFACE: DICE 2012 : Spacetime Matter Quantum Mechanics - from the Planck scale to emergent phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diósi, Lajos; Elze, Hans-Thomas; Fronzoni, Leone; Halliwell, Jonathan; Prati, Enrico; Vitiello, Giuseppe; Yearsley, James

    2013-06-01

    Milano), F Guerra (Università 'La Sapienza', Roma) and G Vitiello (Università di Salerno), this event traditionally dedicated to the public drew a large audience involved in lively discussions until late. The workshop was organized by L Diósi (Budapest), H-T Elze (Pisa, chair), L Fronzoni (Pisa), J J Halliwell (London), E Prati (Milano) and G Vitiello (Salerno), with most essential help from our conference secretaries L Fratino, N Lampo, I Pozzana, and A Sonnellini, all students from Pisa, and from our former secretaries M Pesce-Rollins and L Baldini. Several institutions and sponsors supported the workshop and their representatives and, in particular, the citizens of Rosignano/Castiglioncello are deeply thanked for the generous help and kind hospitality: Comune di Rosignano - A Franchi (Sindaco di Rosignano), S Scarpellini (Segreteria sindaco), L Benini (Assessore ai lavori pubblici), M Pia (Assessore all' urbanistica) REA Rosignano Energia Ambiente s.p.a. - F Ghelardini (Presidente della REA), E Salvadori and C Peccianti (Segreteria) Associazione Armunia - A Nanni (Direttore), G Mannari (Programmazione), C Perna, F Bellini, M Nannerini, P Bruni and L Meucci (Tecnici). Special thanks go to G Mannari and her collaborators for advice and great help in all the practical matters that had to be dealt with, in order to run the meeting at Castello Pasquini smoothly Funds made available by Università di Pisa, Domus Galilaeana (Pisa), Centro Interdisciplinare per lo Studio dei Sistemi Complessi - CISSC (Pisa), Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale (Università di Salerno), Istituto Italiano per gli Studi Filosofici - IISF (Napoli), Solvay Italia SA (Rosignano), Institute of Physics Publishing - IOP (Bristol), Springer Verlag (Heidelberg), and Hungarian Scientific Research Fund OTKA are gratefully acknowledged. Last, but not least, special thanks are due to Laura Pesce (Vitrium Galleria, San Vincenzo) for the exposition of her artwork 'arte e scienza' at Castello Pasquini

  10. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-11-01

    Mohab Abou ZeidVrije Universiteit, Brussel Joke AdamKatholieke Universiteit Leuven Nikolas AkerblomMax-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Luis Fernando Alday Utrecht University Stelios Alexandris University of Patras Antonio Amariti Università di Milano-Bicocca Nicola Ambrosetti Université de Neuchâtel Pascal Anastasopoulos Università di Roma Tor Vergata Laura Andrianopoli Enrico Fermi Center Carlo Angelantonj Università di Torino Lilia Anguelova Queen Mary, University of London Daniel AreanUniversidade de Santiago de Compostela Gleb ArutyunovUtrecht University Spyros Avramis NTU Athens—University of Patras Ioannis Bakas University of Patras Subrata Bal Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies Igor Bandos Valencia University Jessica Barrett University of Iceland Marco Baumgartl Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule, Zürich Jacopo Bechi Università di Firenze James Bedford Queen Mary, University of London Jorge Bellorin Universidad Autonoma de Madrid Francesco Benini SISSA, Trieste Eric Bergshoeff Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen Gaetano BertoldiUniversity of Wales, Swansea Adel Bilal Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, École Normale Superieure, Paris Matthias Blau Université de Neuchâtel Johannes BroedelUniversität Hannover Felix Brümmer Universität Heidelberg Julio Cesar Bueno de Andrade São Paulo State University—UNESP Cliff Burgess McMaster University Agostino Butti Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, École Normale Superieure, Paris Marco Caldarelli Universitat de Barcelona Pablo G Camara Centre de Physique Théorique, École Polytechnique, Palaiseau Joan Camps Universitat de Barcelona Felipe Canoura FernandezUniversidade de Santiago de Compostela Luigi Cappiello Università di Napoli Federico II Luca Carlevaro École Polytechnique, Palaiseau Roberto Casero Centre de Physique Théorique, École Polytechnique, Palaiseau Claudio Caviezel Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Alessio Celi Universitat de Barcelona Anna

  11. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-11-01

    Mohab Abou ZeidInstitut des Hautes Études Scientifiques, Bures-sur-Yvette Ido AdamMax-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik (AEI), Potsdam Henrik AdorfLeibniz Universität Hannover Mohammad Ali-AkbariIPM, Tehran Antonio Amariti Università di Milano-Bicocca Nicola Ambrosetti Université de Neuchâtel Martin Ammon Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Christopher AndreyÉcole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) Laura AndrianopoliPolitecnico di Torino David AndriotLPTHE, Université UPMC Paris VI Carlo Angelantonj Università di Torino Pantelis ApostolopoulosUniversitat de les Illes Balears, Palma Gleb ArutyunovInstitute for Theoretical Physics, Utrecht University Davide AstolfiUniversità di Perugia Spyros AvramisUniversité de Neuchâtel Mirela BabalicChalmers University, Göteborg Foday BahDigicom Ioannis Bakas University of Patras Igor BandosUniversidad de Valencia Jose L F BarbonIFTE UAM/CSIC Madrid Till BargheerMax-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik (AEI), Potsdam Marco Baumgartl Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich James BedfordImperial College London Raphael BenichouLaboratoire de Physique Théorique, École Normale Supérieure, Paris Francesco Benini SISSA, Trieste Eric Bergshoeff Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen Alice BernamontiVrije Universiteit, Brussel Julia BernardLaboratoire de Physique Théorique, École Normale Supérieure, Paris Adel Bilal Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, École Normale Supérieure, Paris Marco Billo' Università di Torino Matthias Blau Université de Neuchâtel Guillaume BossardAlbert-Einstein-Institut, Golm Leonardo BriziÉcole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) Johannes BroedelLeibniz Universität Hannover (AEI) Tom BrownQueen Mary, University of London Ilka BrunnerEidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich Erling BrynjolfssonUniversity of Iceland Dmitri BykovSteklov Institute, Moscow and Trinity College, Dublin Joan CampsUniversitat de Barcelona

  12. Jets Spout Far Closer to Black Hole Than Thought, Scientists Say

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-01-01

    Scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, taking advantage of multiple unique views of black hole particle jets over the course of a year with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, have assembled a "picture" of the region that has revealed several key discoveries. They have found that the jets may be originating five times closer to the black hole than previously thought; they see in better detail how these jets change with time and distance from the black hole; and they could use this information as a new technique to measure black hole mass. Presented today in a press conference at the meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Atlanta, the observation will ultimately help solve the mystery of the great cosmic contradiction, in which black holes, notorious for pulling matter in, somehow manage to also shoot matter away in particle jets moving close to the speed of light. The observation is of a familiar source named SS 433 -- a binary star system within our Galaxy in the constellation Aquila, the Eagle, about 16,000 light years away. The black hole and its companion are about two-thirds closer to each other than the planet Mercury is to the Sun. The jets shoot off at 175 million miles per hour, 26 percent of light speed. "The high-speed jets in nearby SS 433 may be caused by the same mechanisms as the powerful outflows in the most distant and much more massive black holes, such as quasars," said Laura Lopez, an undergraduate student at MIT and lead author on a paper about the result. "SS 433 provides a nice local laboratory to study the formation of and conditions in relativistic jets." Dr. Herman Marshall, Ms. Lopez's research supervisor, led the investigation. Matter from the companion star pours into the black hole via a swirling accretion disk, much like water down a drain. Black hole particles jets are thought to be produced as some of the matter encounters strong magnetic fields close to the black hole. SS 433 is angled in such a way that

  13. PREFACE: XII Latin American workshop on plasma physics (17-21 September 2007, Caracas, Venezuela)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puerta, Julio

    2008-10-01

    ller, Laura Beiras, Juan Contreras, Gabriel Torrente, Aimée Guerrero, Francisco Jose Blanco Tovar, and last but not least, my son Johann Puerta. Without their generous help and great effort, it would have been impossible for me to organize, reach all the goals and finally, successfully realize the workshop. We are also grateful for the financial support of CLAF (Centro Latino American de Fisica), Fonacit (Fondo Nacional de Ciencia Investigacion y Tecnología), IVIC (Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificos), Fundacion Banco Mercantil, whose sponsorship and finnacial support were vital to the realization of the event. We would like to thank La Universidad del Zulia, Universidad Central de Venezuela, Instituto Universitario de Tecnología, IDEA (Instituto de Estudios Avanzados), and Asociación de Amigos de la Universidad Simón Bolivar for their help and support in different ways for the good results we achieved in most of the meetings and the participation of their students who attend the Workshops. Finally we appreciate very much the Ministry for Science and Technology (Ministerio del Poder Popular para la Ciencia y la Tecnología) for their contribution to the workshops and to the publication process. We are under the impression that our meeting was successful, as we expected, and we are thankful for the collaboration of our Institution, and the close relation we had with all the physics researchers of Latin America and abroad (Europe, USA, Australia and Russia). Lastly, many thanks to the invited speakers for their lectures presented which have given a whole overview of the state of the art in different areas of the Physics of Plasma.

  14. Evidence for Ultra-Energetic Particles in Jet from Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-06-01

    shoot out from the black hole at close to the speed of light and then release their energy as radiation as far out as they are seen, the particles have to be accelerated locally, where they produce their emission. Both teams also used data from the third of NASA's Great Observatories, the Hubble Space Telescope, and the radio telescopes of the Very Large Array (VLA). The three space telescopes and the VLA "see" emission of different wavelengths from celestial objects, and the combined data was essential to reveal the new comprehensive perspective on the jets. "The new observations show that the flow structure of this jet is more complicated than had been assumed previously," Jester explains. "That the present evidence favors the synchrotron model deepens the mystery of how jets produce the ultra-energetic particles that radiate at X-ray wavelengths." "Our results call for a radical rethink of the physics of relativistic jets that black holes drive," said Uchiyama. "But, we now have a crucial new clue to solving one of the major mysteries in high-energy astrophysics." Other authors on the papers include Jeffrey Van Duyne and Paolo Coppi at Yale; C.C. Cheung at Stanford University; Rita Sambruna at NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, MD; Tadayuki Takahashi at ISAS/JAXA, Japan; Laura Maraschi and Fabrizio Tavecchio at the Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Milan; Dan Harris from the SAO; Herman Marshall at MIT; and Klaus Meisenheimer at Max Planck Institute for Astronomy in Heidelberg. Grant and contract funding from NASA supported the research. Additional images and background material are available at: http://www.astro.soton.ac.uk/~jester/3C273.html and http://www.astro.isas.jaxa.jp/~uchiyama/Site2/Spitzer_3C273.html

  15. Novel Quantum Monte Carlo Approaches for Quantum Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubenstein, Brenda M.

    the eventual hope is to apply this algorithm to the exploration of yet unidentified high-pressure, low-temperature phases of hydrogen, I employ this algorithm to determine whether or not quantum hard spheres can form a low-temperature bcc solid if exchange is not taken into account. In the final chapter of this thesis, I use Path Integral Monte Carlo once again to explore whether glassy para-hydrogen exhibits superfluidity. Physicists have long searched for ways to coax hydrogen into becoming a superfluid. I present evidence that, while glassy hydrogen does not crystallize at the temperatures at which hydrogen might become a superfluid, it nevertheless does not exhibit superfluidity. This is because the average binding energy per p-H2 molecule poses a severe barrier to exchange regardless of whether the system is crystalline. All in all, this work extends the reach of Quantum Monte Carlo methods to new systems and brings the power of existing methods to bear on new problems. Portions of this work have been published in Rubenstein, PRE (2010) and Rubenstein, PRA (2012) [167;169]. Other papers not discussed here published during my Ph.D. include Rubenstein, BPJ (2008) and Rubenstein, PRL (2012) [166;168]. The work in Chapters 6 and 7 is currently unpublished. [166] Brenda M. Rubenstein, Ivan Coluzza, and Mark A. Miller. Controlling the folding and substrate-binding of proteins using polymer brushes. Physical Review Letters, 108(20):208104, May 2012. [167] Brenda M. Rubenstein, J.E. Gubernatis, and J.D. Doll. Comparative monte carlo efficiency by monte carlo analysis. Physical Review E, 82(3):036701, September 2010. [168] Brenda M. Rubenstein and Laura J. Kaufman. The role of extracellular matrix in glioma invasion: A cellular potts model approach. Biophysical Journal, 95(12):5661-- 5680, December 2008. [169] Brenda M. Rubenstein, Shiwei Zhang, and David R. Reichman. Finite-temperature auxiliary-field quantum monte carlo for bose-fermi mixtures. Physical Review A, 86

  16. Supernova Explosions Stay In Shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-12-01

    At a very early age, children learn how to classify objects according to their shape. Now, new research suggests studying the shape of the aftermath of supernovas may allow astronomers to do the same. A new study of images from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory on supernova remnants - the debris from exploded stars - shows that the symmetry of the remnants, or lack thereof, reveals how the star exploded. This is an important discovery because it shows that the remnants retain information about how the star exploded even though hundreds or thousands of years have passed. "It's almost like the supernova remnants have a 'memory' of the original explosion," said Laura Lopez of the University of California at Santa Cruz, who led the study. "This is the first time anyone has systematically compared the shape of these remnants in X-rays in this way." Astronomers sort supernovas into several categories, or "types", based on properties observed days after the explosion and which reflect very different physical mechanisms that cause stars to explode. But, since observed remnants of supernovas are leftover from explosions that occurred long ago, other methods are needed to accurately classify the original supernovas. Lopez and colleagues focused on the relatively young supernova remnants that exhibited strong X-ray emission from silicon ejected by the explosion so as to rule out the effects of interstellar matter surrounding the explosion. Their analysis showed that the X-ray images of the ejecta can be used to identify the way the star exploded. The team studied 17 supernova remnants both in the Milky Way galaxy and a neighboring galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud. For each of these remnants there is independent information about the type of supernova involved, based not on the shape of the remnant but, for example, on the elements observed in it. The researchers found that one type of supernova explosion - the so-called Type Ia - left behind relatively symmetric, circular

  17. PREFACE: 5th International Workshop DICE2010: Space-Time-Matter - Current Issues in Quantum Mechanics and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diósi, Lajos; Elze, Hans-Thomas; Fronzoni, Leone; Halliwell, Jonathan; Prati, Enrico; Vitiello, Giuseppe; Yearsley, James

    2011-07-01

    frontiere della scienza moderna with the participation of E Del Giudice (INFN & Università di Milano), L Fronzoni (Università di Pisa) and G Vitiello (Università di Salerno). By now forming a tradition, this evening event drew a large audience, who participated in lively discussions until late. The workshop was organized by L Diósi (Budapest), H-T Elze (Pisa, chair), L Fronzoni (Pisa), J Halliwell (London), E Prati (Milano) and G Vitiello (Salerno), with essential help from our conference seceretaries M Pesce-Rollins and L Baldini and from our students G Gambarotta and F Vallone, all from Pisa. Several institutions and sponsors supported the workshop; their representatives and, in particular, the citizens of Rosignano / Castiglioncello are deeply thanked for their generous help and kind hospitality: Comune di Rosignano - A Franchi (Sindaco di Rosignano), S Scarpellini (Segreteria sindaco), L Benini (Assessore ai lavori pubblici), M Pia (Assessore all' urbanistica). REA Rosignano Energia Ambiente s.p.a. - F Ghelardini (Presidente della REA), E Salvadori (Segreteria). Associazione Armunia - M Paganelli (Direttore), G Mannari (Programmazione). Special thanks go to G Mannari and her collaborators for their advice and great help in all the practical matters that had to be dealt with in order to run the meeting at Castello Pasquini smoothly. Funds made available by Università di Pisa, by Domus Galilaeana (Pisa), Centro Interdisciplinare per lo Studio dei Sistemi Complessi - CISSC (Pisa), Dipartmento di Matematica e Informatica (Università di Salerno), Instituto Italiano per gli Studi Filosofici - IISF (Napoli), and by the Hungarian Scientific Research Fund OTKA, are gratefully ackowledged. Last, but not least, special thanks are due to Laura Pesce (Vitrium Galleria, San Vincenzo) for the exposition for her artwork Dal io al cosmo at Castello Pasquini during the conference. The papers presented at the workshop and collected here have been edited by L Diósi, H-T Elze, L

  18. Obituary: Donald Alexander Macrae, 1916-2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaquist, E. R.

    2007-12-01

    With the passing of Donald Alexander MacRae on 6 December 2006 at age 90, the astronomy community lost a visionary scientist and a great educator in the field. Don MacRae was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia, on 19 February 1916, to Donald Alexander and Laura Geddes (Barnstead) MacRae. His father was originally a classics scholar and preceptor of Greek and Latin at Princeton, but at the time of Don's birth in 1916 he was Dean of the Dalhousie Law School in Halifax. The family moved to Toronto, Ontario, in 1924 when his father joined the faculty of Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto as a Professor of Law. After the family moved to Toronto, where he received most of his early education, he obtained his undergraduate degree in Mathematics and Physics in 1937 from the University of Toronto (U of T). He obtained the degree of A.M. in 1940 and of Ph.D. in 1943 from Harvard University under the mentorship of Bart Bok in the field of galactic structure. During his early career he worked briefly at the University of Pennsylvania, Cornell University, and Carbide and Chemical Corporation at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. For Don the latter work was a brief and somewhat uneasy association with the Manhattan Project. In 1946, he obtained a position at Case Institute of Technology (now Case Western Reserve University), where he worked until 1953. In 1953, he accepted a position at the U of T, replacing Ralph Williamson, who had earlier introduced Don to the emerging field of radio astronomy while they both were at Cornell. Don's primary research field was stellar spectroscopy, but his interests were much broader than this, and he possessed an abiding ability to interest students and faculty in new and emerging ideas. In the early 1960s he developed a strong interest in the nature and origin of the lunar surface, and discussed these extensively with colleagues. Many of his ideas on this subject were later confirmed by the lunar exploration program. Don's continuing interest in radio astronomy

  19. On predicting future economic losses from tropical cyclones: Comparing damage functions for the Eastern USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, Tobias; Levermann, Anders; Frieler, Katja

    2015-04-01

    for the Eastern USA until the year 2100. The projection is based on downscaling five different GCM model runs for the RCP8.5 scenario, as conducted by Emanuel et al. [7], and accounts for population and GDP changes relying on the newly developed Shared Socioenonomic Pathways (SSPs) [8]. We hereby contribute valuable input to the scientific community as well as the societies at risk. The possibility of extending this work to different regions in order to access the future impact of tropical cyclones on a global scale will also be discussed. References [1] Thomas R. Knutson, John L. McBride, Johnny Chan, Kerry Emanuel, Greg Holland, Chris Landsea, Isaac Held, James P. Kossin, A. K. Srivastava, and Masato Sugi. Tropical cyclones and climate change. Nature Geoscience, 3(3):157-163, 2010. [2] Robert Mendelsohn, Kerry Emanuel, Shun Chonabayashi, and Laura Bakkensen. The impact of climate change on global tropical cyclone damage. Nature Climate Change, 2(3):205-209, 2012. [3] Silvio Schmidt, Claudia Kemfert, and Peter Höppe. The impact of socio-economics and climate change on tropical cyclone losses in the USA. Regional Environmental Change, 10(1):13-26, 2009. [4] William D. Nordhaus. The Economics of Hurricanes and Implications of Global Warming. Climate Change Economics, 01(01):1-20, 2010. [5] Kerry Emanuel. Global Warming Effects on U.S. Hurricane Damage. Weather, Climate, and Society, 3(4):261-268, 2011. [6] Richard J. Murnane and James B. Elsner. Maximum wind speeds and US hurricane losses. Geophysical Research Letters, 39(16):707, 2012. [7] Kerry Emanuel. Downscaling CMIP5 climate models shows increased tropical cyclone activity over the 21st century. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 110(30):12219-24, 2013. [8] Detlef P. van Vuuren, Keywan Riahi, and Richard Moss. A proposal for a new scenario framework to support research and assessment in different climate research communities. Global Environmental Change, 22

  20. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-11-01

    Mohab Abou ZeidInstitut des Hautes Études Scientifiques, Bures-sur-Yvette Ido AdamMax-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik (AEI), Potsdam Henrik AdorfLeibniz Universität Hannover Mohammad Ali-AkbariIPM, Tehran Antonio Amariti Università di Milano-Bicocca Nicola Ambrosetti Université de Neuchâtel Martin Ammon Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Christopher AndreyÉcole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) Laura AndrianopoliPolitecnico di Torino David AndriotLPTHE, Université UPMC Paris VI Carlo Angelantonj Università di Torino Pantelis ApostolopoulosUniversitat de les Illes Balears, Palma Gleb ArutyunovInstitute for Theoretical Physics, Utrecht University Davide AstolfiUniversità di Perugia Spyros AvramisUniversité de Neuchâtel Mirela BabalicChalmers University, Göteborg Foday BahDigicom Ioannis Bakas University of Patras Igor BandosUniversidad de Valencia Jose L F BarbonIFTE UAM/CSIC Madrid Till BargheerMax-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik (AEI), Potsdam Marco Baumgartl Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich James BedfordImperial College London Raphael BenichouLaboratoire de Physique Théorique, École Normale Supérieure, Paris Francesco Benini SISSA, Trieste Eric Bergshoeff Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen Alice BernamontiVrije Universiteit, Brussel Julia BernardLaboratoire de Physique Théorique, École Normale Supérieure, Paris Adel Bilal Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, École Normale Supérieure, Paris Marco Billo' Università di Torino Matthias Blau Université de Neuchâtel Guillaume BossardAlbert-Einstein-Institut, Golm Leonardo BriziÉcole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) Johannes BroedelLeibniz Universität Hannover (AEI) Tom BrownQueen Mary, University of London Ilka BrunnerEidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich Erling BrynjolfssonUniversity of Iceland Dmitri BykovSteklov Institute, Moscow and Trinity College, Dublin Joan CampsUniversitat de Barcelona

  1. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-11-01

    Mohab Abou ZeidVrije Universiteit, Brussel Joke AdamKatholieke Universiteit Leuven Nikolas AkerblomMax-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Luis Fernando Alday Utrecht University Stelios Alexandris University of Patras Antonio Amariti Università di Milano-Bicocca Nicola Ambrosetti Université de Neuchâtel Pascal Anastasopoulos Università di Roma Tor Vergata Laura Andrianopoli Enrico Fermi Center Carlo Angelantonj Università di Torino Lilia Anguelova Queen Mary, University of London Daniel AreanUniversidade de Santiago de Compostela Gleb ArutyunovUtrecht University Spyros Avramis NTU Athens—University of Patras Ioannis Bakas University of Patras Subrata Bal Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies Igor Bandos Valencia University Jessica Barrett University of Iceland Marco Baumgartl Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule, Zürich Jacopo Bechi Università di Firenze James Bedford Queen Mary, University of London Jorge Bellorin Universidad Autonoma de Madrid Francesco Benini SISSA, Trieste Eric Bergshoeff Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen Gaetano BertoldiUniversity of Wales, Swansea Adel Bilal Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, École Normale Superieure, Paris Matthias Blau Université de Neuchâtel Johannes BroedelUniversität Hannover Felix Brümmer Universität Heidelberg Julio Cesar Bueno de Andrade São Paulo State University—UNESP Cliff Burgess McMaster University Agostino Butti Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, École Normale Superieure, Paris Marco Caldarelli Universitat de Barcelona Pablo G Camara Centre de Physique Théorique, École Polytechnique, Palaiseau Joan Camps Universitat de Barcelona Felipe Canoura FernandezUniversidade de Santiago de Compostela Luigi Cappiello Università di Napoli Federico II Luca Carlevaro École Polytechnique, Palaiseau Roberto Casero Centre de Physique Théorique, École Polytechnique, Palaiseau Claudio Caviezel Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Alessio Celi Universitat de Barcelona Anna

  2. Women in Chemistry: Their Changing Roles from Alchemical Times to the Mid-Twentieth Century (by Marelene Rayner-Canham and Geoffrey Rayner-Canham)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caserio, Marjorie C.

    1999-07-01

    such women pursued higher education. The role of women as "chemical assistants" to leading chemists of the day is well illustrated in the lives of du Chatelet, Paulze-Lavoisier, Picardet, and Necker de Saussure. Sadly, all this ended with the French Revolution when the woman intellectual became unacceptable. Chapter 3 focuses on a few exceptional women of the 1800-1900s who succeeded independently in their scientific work in an era when, without access to universities and financial resources, it was almost impossible to function other than as a "chemical assistant". This chapter gives a fascinating account of the life and work of five women, including Elizabeth Fulhame, who is credited with the discovery of photoreduction and the concept of catalysis, and Agnes Pockels, who, without formal education or laboratory facilities, pioneered research in surface films. By the 1850s, access to advanced education for women began in earnest. Chapter 4 tells of this radical change and its ramifications. This most readable account of the cultural conflicts that existed in Europe and the United States over educating women, admitting them to professional societies, and gaining faculty appointments is exemplified in the biographies of four U.S. women (Ellen Swallow Richards, Rachel Lloyd, Laura Linton, Ida Freund) and two Russian women (Yulya Lermontova and Vera Bogdanovskaia). Much of the content of the book resides in the remaining chapters (5-10) and covers 20th century science through 1950. The titles, Women in: Crystallography (Chapter 5), Radioactivity (Chapter 6), Biochemistry (Chapter 7), Industrial Chemistry (Chapter 8), Analytical, Education and History (Chapter 9), suggest that women favored some areas of chemistry over others. Why did they tend to congregate in certain fields? The authors give cogent reasons why this was so. They observe that, in developing fields, there was initially a collegiality among colleagues and the support of senior mentors that established a

  3. PREFACE: First Mediterranean Conference on Classical and Quantum Gravity (MCCQG 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basilakos, Spyros; Cadoni, Mariano; Cavaglia, Marco; Christodoulakis, Theodosios; Vagenas, Elias C.

    2010-04-01

    Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Brasil) Antoniadis, Ignatios (CERN, Geneva, Switzerland) Arminjon, Mayeul (CNRS, Section of Theoretical Physics, France) Banados, Max (University of Oxford, UK) Basilakos, Spyros (RCAAM, Academy of Athens, Greece) Bastos, Catarina (IST, Departamento de Física, Portugal) Bertolami, Orfeu (IST, Departamento de Física, Portugal) Bevilaqua, Leandro Ibiapina (Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Brazil) Bezerra De Mello, Eugenio (Dept. de Física, CCEN Universidade Federal da Paraíba, Brazil) Blake, Russ (Readify Pty Ltd, Australia) Bogdanos, Charalampos (LPT-Orsay, France) Burinskii, Alexander (Gravity Research Group NSI, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia) Cadonati, Laura (University of Massachusetts, Amherst, USA) Cadoni, Mariano (Università di Cagliari, Italy) Capone, Monica (University of Turin, Italy) Cavaglià, Marco (University of Mississippi, USA) Chirco, Goffredo (SISSA-International School for Advanced Studies, Italy) Christodoulakis, Theodosios (University of Athens, Greece) Domingues Zarro, Carlos Augusto ((IST, Departamento de Física, Portugal) Durrer, Ruth (Université de Genève, Département de Physique Théorique, Switzerland) Fagnocchi, Serena (SISSA-International School for Advanced Studies, Italy) Finazzi, Stefano (SISSA-International School for Advanced Studies, Italy) Francia, Dario (University Paris 7 - APC, France) Ghosh, Subir (Indian Statistical Institute, India) Gomberoff, Andres (Universidad Catolica de Chile, Chile) Grumiller, Daniel (Institute for Theoretical Physics Vienna University of Technology, Austria) Herrera-Aguilar, Alfredo (IFM, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, Mexico) Hsu, Steve (University of Oregon, USA) Ichinose, Shoichi (University of Shizuoka, SFNS, Japan) Kiefer, Claus (Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Cologne, Germany) Kokkotas, Kostas (Theoretical Astrophysics, Eberhard Karls University of Tuebingen, Germany) Kothawala, Dawood (IUCAA, Pune

  4. Obituary: James Adolph Westphal, 1930-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielson, G. Edward

    2004-12-01

    .4 meter mirror, which caused the Hubble's initial focusing problems, while being photographed in real time by all the press cameras. A straight forward fix was devised for the WFPCII camera to bring the images into sharp focus. Once the repaired camera and the Hubble Space Telescope were safely in orbit, Westphal and his collaborators began receiving data on a regular basis. One of the early images of distant galaxies provided especially compelling evidence for the phenomenon known as gravitational lensing. "When this picture came in," Westphal said in a 1995 interview for Caltech's Engineering and Science magazine, "I put it under [Caltech physicist] Kip Thorne's door with a note saying, if you ever have any doubt about gravitational lenses, here's your proof." He was a member of the American Astronomical Society and served as the chairman of the Division for Planetary Sciences in 1979-1980. In 1991 Westphal received a MacArthur Fellowship. Already a tenured faculty member and the author of scores of refereed journal articles, and the creator of 15 patented inventions, Westphal was named director of Palomar Observatory in 1995 and served for three years. This assignment included being Caltech's representative to the Cara Board (which managed the KECK telescope). After lowering one of his custom-designed instruments into Old Faithful at Yellowstone National Park to study the geyser's cycling mechanism, he published a paper with Caltech graduate, Sue Kieffer, in 1997. The work, which received a good deal of media attention, confirmed previous assumptions about the geyser and also uncovered new details about the eruption cycle. Westphal took Caltech emeritus status in 1998, but remained active in research endeavors until his bout with this illness. Surviving Jim are his wife, Jean Westphal of Altadena; a son, Andrew Westphal, a daughter-in-law, Kim Taylor, and two granddaughters, Theresa and Laura Westphal, all of Richmond, California; two stepdaughters, Robin Stroll of

  5. Are Japanese groups more competitive than Japanese individuals? A cross-cultural validation of the interindividual-intergroup discontinuity effect.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Kosuke; Yuki, Masaki

    2007-02-01

    Study of Cultural and Ecological Foundations of the Mind, a 21(st) Century Center of Excellence Program at Hokkaido University. The authors would like to thank Dr. Laura Hernández-Guzmán, three anonymous reviewers, and Robin Cooper, Mark H. B. Radford, and Paul A. Wehr for their helpful comments on earlier versions of this article. They would also like to thank Dr. Chester A. Insko for his kind and valuable advice during the planning of this experiment as well as the interpretation of its results, Kaori Akaishi for her help with data collection, and, finally, colleagues at Hokkaido University who helped to recruit potential participants from their classes. L'effet de discontinuité entre les individus et entre les groupes est la tendance des relations entre les groupes à être plus compétitives que les relations entre les individus. Cet effet fut fermement démontré dans des études menées aux États-Unis, une société caractérisée d' «individualiste». Dans la présente étude, nous avons exploré dans quelle mesure l'effet était applicable à une société «collectiviste» comme le Japon. À partir du point de vue traditionnel de la psychologie interculturelle, laquelle met l'emphase sur la nature collectiviste des peuples de l'Asie de l'Est, il était attendu que l'effet de discontinuité allait être plus grand au Japon qu'aux États-Unis. D'un autre côté, se basant sur les données empiriques récentes qui suggèrent que les Nord-américains ne sont pas moins orientés vers le groupe que les Asiatiques de l'Est, il était attendu que l'effet de discontinuité ne serait pas plus important au Japon qu'aux États-Unis. Cent soixante étudiants universitaires japonais ont pris part à un jeu de dilemme de prisonnier de 10 essais répétés: 26 sessions entre individus et 18 sessions entre groupes. Suivant exactement la procédure des expériences menées précédemment aux États-Unis, les individus et les groupes avaient la permission de communiquer face

  6. Obituary: Donald Alexander Macrae, 1916-2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaquist, E. R.

    2007-12-01

    With the passing of Donald Alexander MacRae on 6 December 2006 at age 90, the astronomy community lost a visionary scientist and a great educator in the field. Don MacRae was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia, on 19 February 1916, to Donald Alexander and Laura Geddes (Barnstead) MacRae. His father was originally a classics scholar and preceptor of Greek and Latin at Princeton, but at the time of Don's birth in 1916 he was Dean of the Dalhousie Law School in Halifax. The family moved to Toronto, Ontario, in 1924 when his father joined the faculty of Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto as a Professor of Law. After the family moved to Toronto, where he received most of his early education, he obtained his undergraduate degree in Mathematics and Physics in 1937 from the University of Toronto (U of T). He obtained the degree of A.M. in 1940 and of Ph.D. in 1943 from Harvard University under the mentorship of Bart Bok in the field of galactic structure. During his early career he worked briefly at the University of Pennsylvania, Cornell University, and Carbide and Chemical Corporation at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. For Don the latter work was a brief and somewhat uneasy association with the Manhattan Project. In 1946, he obtained a position at Case Institute of Technology (now Case Western Reserve University), where he worked until 1953. In 1953, he accepted a position at the U of T, replacing Ralph Williamson, who had earlier introduced Don to the emerging field of radio astronomy while they both were at Cornell. Don's primary research field was stellar spectroscopy, but his interests were much broader than this, and he possessed an abiding ability to interest students and faculty in new and emerging ideas. In the early 1960s he developed a strong interest in the nature and origin of the lunar surface, and discussed these extensively with colleagues. Many of his ideas on this subject were later confirmed by the lunar exploration program. Don's continuing interest in radio astronomy

  7. Obituary: Hakki Ogelman (1940-2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orio, Marina

    2011-12-01

    , Nedim and Laura Ögelman of Alexandria, Virginia, and Roberto Ögelman of Madison, Wisconsin, and two grandsons, Anders and Soren Ögelman, of Alexandria, Virginia. His family, friends and colleagues will miss Hakki's inquisitive spirit.

  8. a Passage to the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-11-01

    a concluding Press Conference , during which the outcome of this unique event will be summarized by the participants and the organisers: Monday, November 20, 1995, 15:30 pm, at the ESO Headquarters, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching, Germany List of National First-Prize Winners Belgium: Mr. Freddy Allemeersch (Teacher), Mr. Pieter De Ceuninck, Mr. Jeroen Staelens (Onze-Lieve-Vrouwecollege, Brugge) Denmark: Mr. Joern C. Olsen, Mr. Henrik Struckmann, Mr. Uffe A. Hansen, Mr. Mogens Winther (Teacher) (Soenderborg Amtsgymnasium) Finland: Mr. Reima Eresmaa, Ms. Laura Elina Nykyri, Ms. Reetamaija Janhonen (Cygnaeues-Lukeo, Jyvaeskylae and Jyvaeskylaen Lyseon Lukeo) France: Mr. Rene Cavaroz (Teacher), Mr. Vincent Hardy, Mr. Antoine Lesuffleur (Lycee Chartier, Bayeux) Germany: Ms. Dorothee Barth, Mr. Walter Czech (Teacher), Mr. Uwe Kranz, Ms. Karin Wieland (Immanuel-Kant-Gymnasium, Leinfelden-Echterdingen, Baden-Wuerttemberg) Greece: Ms. Agni Ioannidi, Ms. Elena Katifori, Mr. Vassilis Samiotis, Mr. Vassillos Tzotzes (Teacher) (Second Varvakelo Experimental Lyceum, Athens) Ireland: Mr. Declan Maccuarta (Teacher), Mr. Colm Mcloughlin (St. Peter's College, Wexford, Co. Wexford) Italy: Mr. Pasquale Ciarletta, Ms. Francesca D'elia, Ms. Ada Fortugna (Teacher), Mr. Alfredo Pudano (Liceo Scientifico `Leonardo da Vinci', Reggio Calabria) The Netherlands: Mr. Alex De Beer, Mr. Klaas Huijbregts, Mr. Ruud Nellen (Norbertuscollege, Rosendaal) Spain: Mr. Aritz Atela Aio, Mr. Julen Sarasola Manich (Teacher), Mr. Jon Huertas Rodriquez (Txorierri Batxilergoko Institua, Derio Bizkaia) Sweden: Mr. Rahman Amanullah, Mr. Kjell L. Bonander (Teacher), Mr. Tomas Oppelstrup, Ms. Christin Wiedemann (Saltsjoebadens Samskola, Saltsjoebaden) United Kingdom: Mr. Michael Ching, Dr. Richard Field (Teacher) (Oundle School, Peterborough) National Committees Further information about the national contests may be obtained from the National Committees: Belgium: Dr. C. Sterken, Vrije Universiteit

  9. Obituary: Kevin H. Prendergast, 1929-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiegel, Edward A.

    2005-12-01

    worthy of his steel. He was, in short, a person worth knowing. Kevin is survived by his wife Jane, two daughters, Laura and Cathy, and a younger brother, Robert, an emeritus professor of medicine from Johns Hopkins who rowed too much.

  10. The GalileoMobile starts its South American voyage - Astronomy education goes on tour through the Andes Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-10-01

    and November 2009, and will cover 5000 kilometres. The voyage will largely take place across the Altiplano, or high plateau, shared by Peru, Bolivia and Chile, which is among the poorest regions in these countries. South America and the Andes Mountains were particularly chosen for the GalileoMobile Project for several reasons. IYA2009 already has a strong presence in the region through national contacts, including three Cornerstone IYA2009 projects: Developing Astronomy Globally, Universe Awareness and the Galileo Teacher Training Programme, which are all official partners of the project. Most people in Peru, Bolivia and Chile speak the same language, Spanish [1], and have a rich astronomical heritage dating back to the pre-Columbian Inca and Tiwanaku civilisations that lived on the Altiplano. The region's high elevation and the quality of its skies for astronomical observations also made it an attractive candidate for the maiden voyage of the GalileoMobile. The journey starts today 5 October 2009 in Antofagasta, Chile, with a free, public inauguration event at 19:00 in the Berta González Square at the Universidad Católica del Norte. The event, which will include observations of the night sky, is organised by ESO in collaboration with Explora II Region and the Astronomy Institute of the University. From Antofagasta the GalileoMobile heads north through La Paz in Bolivia and on into Peru. The return trip to Antofagasta goes via the Panamericana coastal road, and passes near the home of ESO's world-class observatory, the Very Large Telescope at Cerro Paranal. ESO Education and Outreach coordinator in Chile, Laura Ventura, will assist the GalileoMobile team as they greet communities throughout Chile's northern deserts. "The GalileoMobile is a wonderful initiative, and a unique opportunity to reinforce educational activities in the north of Chile and the neighbouring countries. It will promote greater awareness of astronomy and science", says Ventura. "We are looking

  11. Obituary: Donald Edward Osterbrock, 1924-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veilleux, Sylvain

    2007-12-01

    living in Santa Cruz; two daughters, Laura of Seattle, Washington, and Carol of Santa Cruz; and three grandchildren. Don did a theoretical Ph.D. thesis with Chandrasekhar calculating the effects of gravitational interactions between interstellar clouds and stars, but arguably his best known graduate work was observational in nature, helping Morgan map the nearest spiral arms of our Galaxy. Morgan put Don's name on the landmark 1952 paper (Morgan, Sharpless, & Osterbrock, AJ, 57, p. 3, 1952), even though, according to Don's own account in his 2000 autobiography A Fortunate Life in Astronomy, the work was mostly Morgan's. This generous gesture by Morgan likely fashioned what was to become Don's own trademark generosity towards his Ph.D. students and colleagues for years to come. After obtaining his Ph.D. degree, Don spent a single but very productive year as a postdoctoral fellow at Princeton University, becoming interested in the stellar structures of red dwarfs. Using numerical integration methods generously provided by Martin Schwarzschild, Don produced the first models of red dwarfs that took into account their outer convective layers (Osterbrock, ApJ, 118, pp. 529-546, 1953). These calculations also inspired Fred Hoyle and Schwarzschild to successfully model red giant stars with similar convective envelopes. In 1953, Osterbrock accepted an instructorship at Caltech, joining a young astronomy department led by Jesse Greenstein. Direct access to Caltech's outstanding astronomical facilities on Mounts Wilson and Palomar marked a turning point in Don's career, since it allowed him to pursue his observational interests in gaseous nebulae. Drawing on his expertise in atomic physics, and a very productive collaboration via air mail with young atomic theorist Michael Seaton, he pioneered the use of spectroscopic methods for the study of gaseous nebulae. In a daring move in 1958, Don left Caltech for the University of Wisconsin, to appease his wife's and his own homesickness

  12. Obituary: Fred Lawrence Whipple, 1906-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeomans, Donald Keith

    2004-12-01

    Fred Whipple, one of the founding fathers of planetary science, died on August 30, 2004 just two months shy of his 98th birthday. The breadth of Fred's published research from 1927 through 2000 is quite extraordinary. Although his collected works were published in two massive volumes in 1972, shortly before his retirement, Fred's research contributions continued for another three decades - and another volume is planned. Fred Lawrence Whipple was born on November 5, 1906 on a farm in Red Oak Iowa. His parents were Harry Lawrence and Celestia (MacFarl) Whipple. At the age of fifteen, the Whipple family moved to California where Fred studied mathematics at Occidental College and the University of California at Los Angeles. As a graduate student at the University of California at Berkeley in 1930, he was one of the first to compute an orbit for the newly discovered planet Pluto. Upon receiving his PhD in 1931, he joined the staff of the Harvard College Observatory. He was Chairman of the Harvard Department of Astronomy (1949 - 1956), Director or the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (1955 - 1973), Phillips Professor of Astronomy (1968 - 1977) and Emeritus Phillips Professor of astronomy (1977 - 2004). In 1928 he married Dorothy Woods and their son, Earle Raymond, survives him. The marriage ended in divorce in 1935. Eleven years later, he married Babette F. Samelson and she too survives him, as do their two daughters Laura and (Dorothy) Sandra. Shortly after arriving at Harvard in the early 1930's, Fred developed a photographic tracking network to determine meteor trajectories from simultaneous observations from two or more stations. The photographic trails, chopped by a rotating shutter, allowed their orbits in space to be determined accurately. With the strong involvement of Richard McCrosky and others, he concluded in the early 1960's that most of these meteors were on comet-like orbits and less than 1% of the naked eye, sporadic meteors could be traced to an

  13. Most Distant Group of Galaxies Known in the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-04-01

    the research journal Astrophysical Journal ("The Most Distant Structure of Galaxies Known: a Protocluster at z = 4.1" by B.P. Venemans and co-authors), cf. astro-ph/0203249. Notes [1]: The team is led by George Miley (Leiden University, The Netherlands) and the first author of the resulting research paper is Bram Venemans , a graduate student of Miley's. Other members are Jaron Kurk and Huub Röttgering (also Leiden University), Laura Pentericci (MPIA, Heidelberg, Germany), Wil van Breugel (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA), Chris Carilli (US National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA), Carlos De Breuck (Institut d'Astrophysique, Paris, France) Holland Ford and Tim Heckman (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, USA) and Pat McCarthy (Carnegie Institute, Pasadena, USA). [2]: The measured redshift of TN J1338-1942 is z = 4.1. In astronomy, the redshift denotes the fraction by which the lines in the spectrum of an object are shifted towards longer wavelengths. The observed redshift of a remote galaxy provides an estimate of its distance. The distances indicated in the present text are based on an age of the Universe of 15 billion years. At the indicated redshift, the Lyman-alpha line of atomic hydrogen (rest wavelength 121.6 nm) is observed at 620 nm, i.e. in the red spectral region. Contact George Miley Leiden University Observatory The Netherlands Tel.: +31-715275849 email: miley@strw.leidenuniv.nl Technical information about the photos PR Photo 11a/02 is reproduced from FORS2-exposures, obtained on March 25 and 26, 2001, using a narrow-band optical filter (peak at 619.5 nm with transmission 80%, FWHM 6.0 nm). The total exposure time was 33300 sec (9 hrs 15 min). The field-of-view of the final image is 6.4 x 6.2 arcmin 2 , corresponding to about 3 Mpc on each side. The frames were obtained in photometric conditions, and the image quality in the combined frame is 0.65 arcsec. The galaxy spectra shown in PR Photo 11b/02 were obtained by FORS2 in

  14. Poster Session A

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    efficacy in mouse models, specifically focused on multiple myeloma. This study intends to discover and validate murine apoptotic related peptides, to classify them, and to create an accurate biomarker panel to predict treatment response. A.16 Extracellular Matrix Quantification of Tissue Engineered Scaffolds: Analysis of Rat Lung using the QconCAT Method Ryan Hill1, Elizabeth A. Calle2, Laura E. Niklason2, Kirk C. Hansen1 1University of Colorado-Denver, Aurora, CO, USA; 2Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA The Extracellular Matrix (ECM) is a complex milieu of macromolecules whose structure and function plays an integral role in tissue and organ morphogenesis. Changes in ECM composition and architecture have been shown to mediate cell proliferation, differentiation, and growth, serving as a critical component of organ scaffolds for tissue engineering efforts. Efficient Re-seeding of decellularized scaffolds has been shown to be dependent on retaining native ECM structural integrity and elasticity. A critical goal of the decellularization procedure is to preserve the microarchitecture of the organ and retain tissue-specific molecular cues that guide successful recellularization. Local variations in expression of abundant proteins in the ECM scaffolding (Collagens, Laminins, Fibronectin) have been correlated to variance in cell repopulation and subsequent proliferation. It is thought that retaining ECM morphology allows cells to be directed back to a tissue specific niche during reseeding, and that small changes in abundance of these molecular cues can drastically effect the recellularization process. However, current methods used to characterize the protein composition of native and acellular tissues fail to accurately quantify ECM proteins. Thus, we developed a more complete and accurate method for protein characterization by (1) increasing proteome coverage by analyzing both the chaotrope soluble and insoluble fractions and (2) accurately quantifying protein levels using