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Sample records for abarema cochliacarpos gomes

  1. Abarema cochliacarpos Extract Decreases the Inflammatory Process and Skeletal Muscle Injury Induced by Bothrops leucurus Venom

    PubMed Central

    Saturnino-Oliveira, Jeison; Santos, Daiana Do Carmo; Guimarães, Adriana Gibara; Santos Dias, Antônio; Tomaz, Marcelo Amorim; Monteiro-Machado, Marcos; Estevam, Charles Santos; Lucca Júnior, Waldecy De; Maria, Durvanei Augusto; Melo, Paulo A.; Araújo, Adriano Antunes de Souza; Santos, Márcio Roberto Viana; Almeida, Jackson Roberto Guedes da Silva; Oliveira, Rita de Cássia Meneses; Pereira de Oliveira, Aldeidia; Quintans Júnior, Lucindo José

    2014-01-01

    Snakebites are a public health problem, especially in tropical countries. However, treatment with antivenom has limited effectiveness against venoms' local effects. Here, we investigated the ability of Abarema cochliacarpos hydroethanolic extract (EAc) to protect mice against injection of Bothrops leucurus venom. Swiss mice received perimuscular venom injection and were subsequently treated orally with EAc in different doses. Treatment with EAc 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg reduced the edema induced by B. leucurus in 1%, 13%, and 39%, respectively. Although lower doses showed no antihypernociceptive effect in the Von Frey test, the higher dose significantly reduced hyperalgesia induced by the venom. Antimyotoxic activity of EAc was also observed by microscopy assessment, with treated muscles presenting preserved structures, decreased edema, and inflammatory infiltrate as compared to untreated ones. Finally, on the rotarod test, the treated mice showed better motor function, once muscle fibers were preserved and there were less edema and pain. Treated mice could stand four times more time on the rotating rod than untreated ones. Our results have shown that EAc presented relevant activities against injection of B. leucurus venom in mice, suggesting that it can be considered as an adjuvant in the treatment of envenomation. PMID:25136627

  2. New generation of GOME instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Albinana, Abelardo; Munro, Rosemary; Corpaccioli, Enrico; Eisinger, Michael; Callies, Joerg; Lefebvre, Alain; Hahne, Achim R.

    2002-02-01

    Following the successful mission of the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) on-board the European Space Agency (ESA) ERS-2 satellite, the European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT) and ESA have decided to embark on-board the Metop satellites an improved version of the GOME spectrometer. The new generation of GOME instruments will provide data for the ozone product chain of the EUMETSAT Polar System, in charge not only of the daily production of ozone data but also of the long term ozone monitoring. This imposes strong accuracy and stability requirements to the instrument, the calibration activities and the ground processing.

  3. Calibration of GOME-2 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez Albinana, Abelardo; Munro, Rosemary; Corpacciolli, E.; Eisinger, Michael; Callies, Joerg; Lefebvre, Alain; Hahne, Achim R.

    2002-12-01

    The GOME-2 spaceborne spectrometers will provide data for the ozone product chain of the EUMETSAT Polar System (EPS), in charge of the monitoring of atmospheric ozone. The accuracy of any geophysical parameter retrieved from the GOME-2 measurements will ultimately be limited by the accuracy of the spectral and radiometric calibration of instrument data. This imposes strong accuracy and stability requirements on the instrument, the calibration activities and the ground processing. In this paper, the processing scheme for the spectral and radiometric calibration of GOME-2 data is presented.

  4. Operational GOME and GOME-2 products for GMES Monitoring atmospheric composition & climate (MACC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyola, Diego; Hao, N.; Valks, P.; Smedt, I. De; Emmadi, S.; Koukoulil, M.; Balis, D.; Rix, M.; van Roozendael, M.; Theys, N.

    2010-05-01

    This contribution focuses on the operational GOME and GOME-2 trace gas column products provided by the German Aerospace Centre (DLR). We present an overview of the retrieval algorithms and exemplary results for ozone, NO2, SO2, BrO and CH2O. These trace gas column products are retrieved from GOME and GOME-2 solar backscattered measurements in the UV and VIS wavelength regions, and are generated operationally using the GDP 4.x algorithm and the UPAS system. Total ozone and NO2 are retrieved with the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) method using the UV wavelength region around 330 nm and 435 nm respectively. An additional algorithm is applied to retrieve the tropospheric NO2 column for polluted conditions. The operational ozone and NO2 products are available for the users in near real time, i.e. within two hours after sensing for GOME-2 and three hours for GOME. SO2 emissions from volcanic and anthropogenic sources can be measured by GOME and GOME-2 around 320 nm. For BrO and CH2O, optimal DOAS fitting windows have been determined for GOME-2 in the UV wavelength region. The GOME-2 ozone, total and tropospheric NO2, SO2, BrO and cloud products from DLR have reached the operational EUMETSAT O3M-SAF status while CH2O is currently pre-operational. All these products are routinely available to the users via EUMETCast, WMO/GTS and FTP in HDF5 and BUFR format. In the same way, the GOME ozone and NO2 products from DLR are the official operational ESA products and are routinely distributed via FTP. We present long-term ozone trend estimates obtained from GOME, SCIAMACHY and GOME-2. Furthermore, we will show initial validation results for GOME-2 products using ground-based measurements, as well as comparisons with other satellite products, such as those from SCIAMACHY and OMI. Finally, the use of tropospheric NO2, SO2 and CH2O columns for air quality applications will be presented.

  5. GOME Calibration and Validation Using Backscatter UV Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilsenrath, E.; Gleason, J.; Janz, S.; Gu, X.-y.; Cebula, R. P.; Chance, K. V.; Hoekstra, R.

    1996-01-01

    GOME radiance, irradiance, and ozone products were validated by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center through three tasks which included, pre-launch calibration comparisons with SBUV and TOMS radiometric standards, validation of GOME Level-1 irradiance and radiance and Level 2 total ozone data products using SBUV/2 and TOMS algorithms and data, and studies of GOME data using the Goddard radiative transfer code. The prelaunch calibration using the NASA large aperture integrating sphere was checked against that provided by TPD. Agreement in the calibration constants, derived in air, between the Goddard and TPD system were better than 3%. Validation of Level-1 irradiance data included comparison of GOME and SSBUV and the UARS solar irradiances measurements. Large wavelength dependent differences, as high as 10%, were noted between GOME and the US instruments. This discrepancy has now been attributed to radiometric sensitivity changes experienced by GOME when operating in a vacuum. GOME Earth radiance data were then compared to the NOAA-14 SBUV/2 radiances. These results show that between 340 and 400 nm the differences in GOME and SBUV/2 data are less than 5% with some wavelength dependence. At wavelengths shorter than 300 nm, differences are of the order of 10% or more where the GOME radiances are larger. To test GOME DOAS retrieved total ozone values, these values were compared with ozone amounts retrieved using GOME radiances in the TOMS version-7 algorithm. The differences showed a solar zenith angle dependence ranging from 0 to 10% where the TOMS algorithm values were higher. GOME radiances below 300 nm were further validated by selecting radiances at wavelengths normally used by SBUV and processing them through the SBUV ozone profile algorithm and then compared to climatological values. The GOME ozone profiles ranged from 10-30% lower over altitude compared to climatological values. This is consistent with the offsets detected in the SBUV/2 radiance comparisons at

  6. Ozone profile retrievals from the ESA GOME instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munro, Rosemary; Kerridge, Brian J.; Burrows, John P.; Chance, Kelly

    1994-01-01

    The potential of the ESA Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) to produce ozone profile information has been examined by carrying out two sample retrievals using simulated GOME data. The first retrieval examines the potential of the GOME instrument to produce stratospheric ozone profiles using the traditional back-scatter ultraviolet technique, while the second examines the possibility of obtaining tropospheric profile information, and improving the quality of the stratospheric profile retrievals, by exploiting the temperature dependence of the ozone Huggins bands.

  7. US Participation in the GOME and SCIAMACHY Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chance, K. V.; Geary, J. C.; Spurr, R. J. D.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes research done under NASA Grant NAGW-2541 through September 30, 1997. The research performed under this grant includes development and maintenance of scientific software for the GOME retrieval algorithms, consultation on operational software development for GOME, sensitivity and instrument studies to define GOME and SCIAMACHY instruments, consultation on optical and detector issues for both GOME and SCIAMACHY, consultation and development for SCIAMACHY near-real-time (NRT) and off-line (OL) data products, and development of infrared line-by-line atmospheric modeling and retrieval capability for SCIAMACHY. The European Space Agency selected the SAO to participate in GOME validation and science studies, part of the overall ERS AO. This provided access to all GOME data; The SAO activities that are carried out as a result of selection by ESA were funded by the present grant. The Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment was successfully launched on the ERS- 2 satellite on April 20, 1995, and remains working in normal fashion. SCIAMACHY is currently scheduled for launch in early 2000. The first two European ozone monitoring instruments (OMI), to fly on the q series of operational meteorological satellites being planned by Eumetsat, have been selected to be GOME-type instruments (the first, in fact, will be the refurbished GOME flight spare). K. Chance is the U.S. member of the OMI Users Advisory Group.

  8. Tropospheric Chemistry Studies using Observations from GOME and TOMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chance, Kelly; Spurr, Robert J. D.; Kurosu, Thomas P.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Gleason, James F.

    2003-01-01

    Studies to quantitatively determine trace gas and aerosol amounts from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) and the Total Ozone Monitoring Experiment (TOMS) and to perform chemical modeling studies which utilize these results are given. This includes: 1. Analysis of measurements from the GOME and TOMS instruments for troposphere distributions of O3 and HCHO; troposphere enhancements of SO2, NO2 and aerosols associated with major sources; and springtime events of elevated BrO in the lower Arctic troposphere. 2. Application of a global 3-dimensional model of troposphere chemistry to interpret the GOME observations in terms of the factors controlling the abundances of troposphere ozone and OH.

  9. Tropospheric Formaldehyde Measurements from the ESA GOME Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chance, K.; Spurr, R. J. D.; Kurosu, T. P.; Palmer, P. I.; Martin, R. V.; Fiore, A.; Li, Q.; Jacob, D. J.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) was launched on the European Space Agency's ERS-2 satellite on April 20, 1995. GOME measures the Earth's atmosphere in the nadir geometry, using a set of spectrometers that cover the UV and visible (240-790 nm) at moderate resolution (0.2 nm in the UV, 0.4 nm in the visible), employing silicon diode array detectors. GOME takes some 30,000 spectra per day, obtaining full global coverage in three days. We directly fit GOME radiance spectra using nonlinear least-squares analysis to obtain column amounts of several trace species with significant tropospheric concentrations, including ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and formaldehyde (HCHO). Measurements of HCHO due to biogenic activity in the troposphere are presented here.

  10. Performance degradation of GOME polarization monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanzi, Cristina P.; Hegels, E.; Aben, I.; Bramstedt, K.; Goede, A. P. H.

    1999-01-01

    The Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) is a nadir-viewing double spectrometer which measures solar radiation backscattered from the Earth's atmosphere over a broad wavelength range, from the ultraviolet (UV) to the near infrared (Burrows, 1998). It has been operating since 1995 on board the ESA ERS-2 satellite, monitoring a large range of atmospheric trace constituents, with particular emphasis on ozone. The performance of the instrument is monitored in-flight by means of routine on-board calibration measurements, observing the sun and, occasionally, the moon. In this way, degradation of optical components in space can be monitored. The performance of the broad-band detectors which monitor the polarization state of the incoming light is analyzed by means of solar measurements. The measurements of the polarization detector which samples UV light show a degradation of 6% per year. The optical components affected can be (partially) identified by monitoring the fractional polarization, which is a characteristic of the light back-scattered by the Earth's atmosphere. The influence of the observed degradation on Earth radiation measurements is estimated to be in the order of 1.5% per year in the UV wavelength range.

  11. NLC occurrence frequency retrieval from SCIAMACHY, GOME and GOME-2 nadir data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langowski, Martin; Von Savigny, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Noctilucent clouds NLCs are clouds occurring in the polar summer mesopause region at about 82-86 km altitude, and they can be observed poleward of about 50 degrees latitude. Due to their high altitude, they can scatter sunlight to the ground, even if it is dark at the ground, which makes them a fascinating bright phenomenon in the summer night sky. First observations of NLCs were reported in the 1880ies after the eruption of the Krakatau volcano. Afterwards they were seen every year and current long time studies show, that their occurrence rate is well anticorrelated with solar activity and it increased over time for the last decades. Ever since the NLCs were observed it was discussed whether their increasing occurrence rate can be interpreted as a sign of climate change in the upper atmosphere. With the SCIAMACHY, GOME and GOME 2 nadir measurements, which are very similar for each instrument a long time dataset of over 20 years of data is available to retrieve NLC occurrence frequencies. All three instruments have a very stable local times with descending nodes ranging between 9:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m.. We present the algorithm to retrieve NLC occurrence frequencies from these instruments and results of this retrieval.

  12. SAO Participation in the GOME and SCIAMACHY Satellite Instrument Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilsenrath, Ernest (Technical Monitor); Chance, Kelly; Kurosu, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    This report summarizes the progress on our three-year program of research to refine the measurement capability for satellite-based instruments that monitor ozone and other trace species in the Earth's stratosphere and troposphere, to retrieve global distributions of these and other constituents h m the GOME and SCIAMACHY satellite instruments, and to conduct scientific studies for the ILAS instruments. This continues our involvements as a U.S. participant in GOME and SCIAMACHY since their inception, and as a member of the ILAS-II Science Team. These programs have led to the launch of the first satellite instrument specifically designed to measure height-resolved ozone, including the tropospheric component (GOME), and the development of the first satellite instrument that will measure tropospheric ozone simultaneously with NO2, CO, HCHO, N2O, H2O, and CH4 (SCIAMACHY). The GOME program now includes the GOME-2 instruments, to be launched on the Eumetsat Metop satellites, providing long-term continuity in European measurements of global ozone that complement the measurements of the TOMS, SBUV, OMI, OMPS instruments. The research primarily focuses on two areas: Data analysis, including algorithm development and validation studies that will improve the quality of retrieved data products, in support for future field campaigns (to complement in situ and airborne campaigns with satellite measurements), and scientific analyses to be interfaced to atmospheric modeling studies.

  13. SAO Participation in the GOME and SCIAMACHY Satellite Instrument Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chance, Kelly; Kurosu, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    This report summarizes the progress on our three-year program of research to refine the measurement capability for satellite-based instruments that monitor ozone and other trace species in the Earth's stratosphere and troposphere, to retrieve global distributions of these and other constituents from the GOME and SCIAMACHY satellite instruments, and to conduct scientific studies for the ILAS instruments. This continues our involvements as a U.S. participant in GOME and SCIAMACHY since their inception, and as a member of the ILAS-II Science Team. These programs have led to the launch of the first satellite instrument specifically designed to measure height-resolved ozone, including the tropospheric component (GOME), and the development of the first satellite instrument that will measure tropospheric ozone simultaneously with NO2, CO, HCHO, N2O, H2O, and CH4 (SCIAMACHY). The GOME program now includes the GOME-2 instruments, to be launched on the Eumetsat Metop satellites, providing long-term continuity in European measurements of global ozone that complement the measurements of the TOMS, SBW, OMI, OMPS instruments. The research primarily focuses on two areas: Data analysis, including algorithm development and validation studies that will improve the quality of retrieved data products, in support for future field campaigns (to complement in situ and airborne campaigns with satellite measurements), and scientific analyses to be interfaced to atmospheric modeling studies.

  14. U.S. Participation in the GOME and SCIAMACHY Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chance, K. V.

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes research done under NASA Grant NAGW-2541 from April 1, 1996 through March 31, 1997. The research performed during this reporting period includes development and maintenance of scientific software for the GOME retrieval algorithms, consultation on operational software development for GOME, consultation and development for SCIAMACHY near-real-time (NRT) and off-line (OL) data products, and development of infrared line-by-line atmospheric modeling and retrieval capability for SCIAMACHY. SAO also continues to participate in GOME validation studies, to the limit that can be accomplished at the present level of funding. The Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment was successfully launched on the ERS-2 satellite on April 20, 1995, and remains working in normal fashion. SCIAMACHY is currently in instrument characterization. The first two European ozone monitoring instruments (OMI), to fly on the Metop series of operational meteorological satellites being planned by Eumetsat, have been selected to be GOME-type instruments (the first, in fact, will be the refurbished GOME flight spare). K. Chance is the U.S. member of the OMI Users Advisory Group.

  15. US Participation in the GOME and SCIAMACHY Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chance, K. V.; Geary, J. C.

    1996-01-01

    The research performed during this reporting period includes development and maintenance of scientific software for the GOME retrieval algorithms, consultation on operational software development for GOME, further sensitivity and instrument studies to help finalize the definition of the SCIAMACHY instrument, and consultation on optical and detector issues for both GOME and SCIAMACHY. The Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment was successfully launched on the ERS-2 satellite on April 20, 1995, during this reporting period, and is working in the expected fashion. The European Space Agency has made their selections from responses to the Announcement of Opportunity for GOME validation and science studies, part of the overall ERS AO. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) proposal has been selected. These proposals are primarily for access to the data; ESA does not provide research funding for the selected investigations. The SAO activities that are carried out as a result of selection by ESA are funded by the present grant, to the limit that can be accomplished at the present level of funding. SCIAMACHY is currently in Phase C/D. Instrument design is almost finalized and selection of infrared detectors from the initial production run has been made.

  16. NO2-production by lightning estimated with GOME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beirle, S.; Hollwedel, J.; Kuehl, S.; Wagner, T.; Wenig, M.; Wilms-Grabe, W.; Platt, U.

    NO2 is an important trace gas in the troposphere with impact on health and atmospheric chemistry, e.g. ozone production. Therefore a better understanding of the various source strengths is desirable. Among the different sources (industry, biomass burning, aircrafts, soil emissions, lightning) the latter has the highest uncertainty (2-20 Tg[N]yr-1) (Lee et al, 1997). While most studies try to estimate the NO2 produced by one flash and get a global value by extrapolation, with satellite measurements another approach is possible. GOME enables a global view of total NO2 columns. With sophisticated methods also tropospheric values can be obtained (Leue et al, 2001). The observation of single lightnings is complicated by the coarse spatial resolution of GOME (40km*320km) as well as the fact that lightning is attended by clouds. However, high lightning activity shall influence the measured NO2 value. In this study, we relate the NO2 received by GOME with the lightning activity measured by LIS. We regard a region in Australia, where other sources like biomass burning and industry are negligible. Between the monthly means of lightning activity and NO2 a clear correlation can be seen.

  17. Spectral surface albedo derived from GOME-2/Metop measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pflug, Bringfried; Loyola, Diego

    2009-09-01

    Spectral surface albedo is an important input for GOME-2 trace gas retrievals. An algorithm was developed for estimation of spectral surface albedo from top-of-atmosphere (TOA)-radiances measured by the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment GOME-2 flying on-board MetOp-A. The climatologically version of this algorithm estimates Minimum Lambert-Equivalent Reflectivity (MLER) for a fixed time window and can use data of many years in contrast to the Near-real time version. Accuracy of surface albedo estimated by MLER-computation increases with the amount of available data. Unfortunately, most of the large GOME pixels are partly covered by clouds, which enhance the LER-data. A plot of LER-values over cloud fraction is used within this presentation to account for this influence of clouds. This "cloud fraction plot" can be applied over all surface types. Surface albedo obtained using the "cloud fraction plot" is compared with reference surface albedo spectra and with the FRESCO climatology. There is a general good agreement; however there are also large differences for some pixels.

  18. An Improved Retrieval of Tropospheric Nitrogen Dioxide from GOME

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Randall V.; Chance, Kelly; Jacob, Daniel J.; Kurosu, Thomas P.; Spurr, Robert J. D.; Bucsela, Eric; Gleason, James F.; Palmer, Paul I.; Bey, Isabelle; Fiore, Arlene M.

    2002-01-01

    We present a retrieval of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) columns from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) satellite instrument that improves in several ways over previous retrievals, especially in the accounting of Rayleigh and cloud scattering. Slant columns, which are directly fitted without low-pass filtering or spectral smoothing, are corrected for an artificial offset likely induced by spectral structure on the diffuser plate of the GOME instrument. The stratospheric column is determined from NO2 columns over the remote Pacific Ocean to minimize contamination from tropospheric NO2. The air mass factor (AMF) used to convert slant columns to vertical columns is calculated from the integral of the relative vertical NO2 distribution from a global 3-D model of tropospheric chemistry driven by assimilated meteorological data (Global Earth Observing System (GEOS)-CHEM), weighted by altitude dependent scattering weights computed with a radiative transfer model (Linearized Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer), using local surface albedos determined from GOME observations at NO2 wavelengths. The AMF calculation accounts for cloud scattering using cloud fraction, cloud top pressure, and cloud optical thickness from a cloud retrieval algorithm (GOME Cloud Retrieval Algorithm). Over continental regions with high surface emissions, clouds decrease the AMT by 20- 30% relative to clear sky. GOME is almost twice as sensitive to tropospheric NO2 columns over ocean than over land. Comparison of the retrieved tropospheric NO2 columns for July 1996 with GEOS-CHEM values tests both the retrieval and the nitrogen oxide radical (NOx) emissions inventories used in GEOS-CHEM. Retrieved tropospheric NO2 columns over the United States, where NOx emissions are particularly well known, are within 18% of GEOS-CHEM columns and are strongly spatially correlated (r = 0.78, n = 288, p less than 0.005). Retrieved columns show more NO2 than GEOS-CHEM columns over the Transvaal

  19. Intercomparison of reflectances observed by GOME and SCIAMACHY in the visible wavelength range.

    PubMed

    Tilstra, Lieuwe G; Stammes, Piet

    2006-06-10

    We compare the Earth reflectances of the spectrometers Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) and Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY) over their overlapping wavelength range (240-800 nm). The goal is to investigate the quality of the radiometric calibration of SCIAMACHY using calibrated GOME data as a reference. However, severe degradation of the GOME instrument in the UV since 2001 prevents it from being a reliable reference below 500 nm. Above 500 nm, GOME is reliable and we find substantial disagreement between GOME and SCIAMACHY, of the order of 15%-20%, which we can attribute completely to the current calibration problems of SCIAMACHY. These numbers are supported by a previous study in which SCIAMACHY was compared with the imager Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) onboard the Envisat satellite. PMID:16761055

  20. GOME/ERS-2: New Homogeneous Level 1B Data from an Old Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slijkhuis, S.; Aberle, B.; Coldewey-Egbers, M.; Loyola, D.; Dehn, A.; Fehr, T.

    2015-06-01

    In the framework of ESA’s “GOME Evolution Project”, a reprocessing will be made of the entire 16 year GOME Level 1 dataset. The GOME Evolution Project further includes the generation of a new GOME water vapour product, and a public outreach programme. In this paper we will describe the reprocessing of the Level 1 data, carried out with the latest version of the GOME Data Processor at DLR. The change most visible to the user will be the new product format in NetCDF, plus supporting documentation (ATBD and PUM). Full-mission reprocessed L1b data are expected to be released in the 4th quarter of 2015.

  1. Development of a prototype algorithm for the operational retrieval of height-resolved products from GOME

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spurr, Robert J. D.

    1997-01-01

    Global ozone monitoring experiment (GOME) level 2 products of total ozone column amounts have been generated on a routine operational basis since July 1996. These products and the level 1 radiance products are the major outputs from the ERS-2 ground segment GOME data processor (GDP) at DLR in Germany. Off-line scientific work has already shown the feasibility of ozone profile retrieval from GOME. It is demonstrated how the retrievals can be performed in an operational context. Height-resolved retrieval is based on the optimal estimation technique, #and cloud-contaminated scenes are treated in an equivalent reflecting surface approximation. The prototype must be able to handle GOME measurements routinely on a global basis. Requirements for the major components of the algorithm are described: this incorporates an overall strategy for operational height-resolved retrieval from GOME.

  2. Retrieval and Analysis of Stratospheric NO2 from GOME

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenig, M.; Kuehl, S.; Beirle, S.; Wagner, T.; Jaehne, B.; Platt, U.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we describe the retrieval of stratospheric NO2 from the GOME (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment) spectrometer. For this retrieval the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) is used and we describe the influence of the instrument s characteristics on this measurement technique. This analysis led to an improved version of the DOAS algorithm resulting in results with lower systematic errors. Subsequently these results were used to separate the tropospheric and stratospheric fraction of the measured NO;! in the atmosphere. This paper is focusing on the annual variations of the stratospheric distribution of nitrogen oxides. For this examination the satellite data from beginning of 1996 to the end of 2001 was used and has been visualized in a plot zonal means versus time of the year, a visualization which proved to be very useful for Ozone. Additionally the so called "Noxon Cliff", a drop of NO2 column densities Noxon measured in 1975-77 while traveling northwards towards the pole in Canada, is shown. Also its southern equivalent could be discovered in the GOME data.

  3. Validation of GOME-2/Metop total column water vapour with ground-based and in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalakoski, Niilo; Kujanpää, Jukka; Sofieva, Viktoria; Tamminen, Johanna; Grossi, Margherita; Valks, Pieter

    2016-04-01

    The total column water vapour product from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 on board Metop-A and Metop-B satellites (GOME-2/Metop-A and GOME-2/Metop-B) produced by the Satellite Application Facility on Ozone and Atmospheric Chemistry Monitoring (O3M SAF) is compared with co-located radiosonde observations and global positioning system (GPS) retrievals. The validation is performed using recently reprocessed data by the GOME Data Processor (GDP) version 4.7. The time periods for the validation are January 2007-July 2013 (GOME-2A) and December 2012-July 2013 (GOME-2B). The radiosonde data are from the Integrated Global Radiosonde Archive (IGRA) maintained by the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC). The ground-based GPS observations from the COSMIC/SuomiNet network are used as the second independent data source. We find a good general agreement between the GOME-2 and the radiosonde/GPS data. The median relative difference of GOME-2 to the radiosonde observations is -2.7 % for GOME-2A and -0.3 % for GOME-2B. Against the GPS, the median relative differences are 4.9 % and 3.2 % for GOME-2A and B, respectively. For water vapour total columns below 10 kg m-2, large wet biases are observed, especially against the GPS retrievals. Conversely, at values above 50 kg m-2, GOME-2 generally underestimates both ground-based observations.

  4. Comparison of GOME-2/Metop total column water vapour with ground-based and in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalakoski, N.; Kujanpää, J.; Sofieva, V.; Tamminen, J.; Grossi, M.; Valks, P.

    2014-12-01

    Total column water vapour product from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 on board Metop-A and Metop-B satellites (GOME-2/Metop-A and GOME-2/Metop-B) produced by the Satellite Application Facility on Ozone and Atmospheric Chemistry Monitoring (O3M SAF) is compared with co-located radiosonde and Global Positioning System (GPS) observations. The comparisons are performed using recently reprocessed data by the GOME Data Processor (GDP) version 4.7. The comparisons are performed for the period of January 2007-July 2013 (GOME-2A) and from December 2012 to July 2013 (GOME-2B). Radiosonde data are from the Integrated Global Radiosonde Archive (IGRA) maintained by National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) and screened for soundings with incomplete tropospheric column. Ground-based GPS observations from COSMIC/SuomiNet network are used as the second independent data source. Good general agreement between GOME-2 and the ground-based observations is found. The median relative difference of GOME-2 to radiosonde observations is -2.7% for GOME-2A and -0.3% for GOME-2B. Against GPS observations, the median relative differences are 4.9 and 3.2% for GOME-2A and B, respectively. For water vapour total columns below 10 kg m-2, large wet biases are observed, especially against GPS observations. Conversely, at values above 50 kg m-2, GOME-2 generally underestimates both ground-based observations.

  5. The GOME-2 total column ozone product: Retrieval algorithm and ground-based validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyola, D. G.; Koukouli, M. E.; Valks, P.; Balis, D. S.; Hao, N.; van Roozendael, M.; Spurr, R. J. D.; Zimmer, W.; Kiemle, S.; Lerot, C.; Lambert, J.-C.

    2011-04-01

    The Global Ozone Monitoring Instrument (GOME-2) was launched on EUMESAT's MetOp-A satellite in October 2006. This paper is concerned with the retrieval algorithm GOME Data Processor (GDP) version 4.4 used by the EUMETSAT Satellite Application Facility on Ozone and Atmospheric Chemistry Monitoring (O3M-SAF) for the operational generation of GOME-2 total ozone products. GDP 4.4 is the latest version of the GDP 4.0 algorithm, which is employed for the generation of official Level 2 total ozone and other trace gas products from GOME and SCIAMACHY. Here we focus on enhancements introduced in GDP 4.4: improved cloud retrieval algorithms including detection of Sun glint effects, a correction for intracloud ozone, better treatment of snow and ice conditions, accurate radiative transfer modeling for large viewing angles, and elimination of scan angle dependencies inherited from Level 1 radiances. Furthermore, the first global validation results for 3 years (2007-2009) of GOME-2/MetOp-A total ozone measurements using Brewer and Dobson measurements as references are presented. The GOME-2/MetOp-A total ozone data obtained with GDP 4.4 slightly underestimates ground-based ozone by about 0.5% to 1% over the middle latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere and slightly overestimates by around 0.5% over the middle latitudes in the Southern Hemisphere. Over high latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere, GOME-2 total ozone has almost no offset relative to Dobson readings, while over high latitudes in the Southern Hemisphere GOME-2 exhibits a small negative bias below 1%. For tropical latitudes, GOME-2 measures on average lower ozone by 0% to 2% compared to Dobson measurements.

  6. Tropospheric ozone based on satellite measurements of sciamachy and gome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladstaetter-Weissenmayer, A.; v. Savigny, C.; Sierks, B.; Burrows, J. P.; Richter, A.; Wittrock, F.

    2003-04-01

    The increase of pollution events caused by an accession of population leads an to extensive air quality degradation with regional and global implications. During such events high levels of trace gases like methane (CH4), carbon monoxid (CO), non methane hydrocarbons (NMHC) and nitrogen oxides (NOx= NO+NO2) can be observed. Additionally tropospheric ozone (O3) is produced by photochemical processes as well. Tropospheric O3 itself is a trace gas, which plays a controlling role in the oxidation capacity of the atmosphere. Until recently our knowledge of the distribution of tropospheric O3 has come from ozone sondes, surface and aircraft observations only, but since the launch of satellite experiments such as GOME (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment, 1995) and SCIAMACHY (Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric ChartographY, 2002) their measurement data allow the globally analysis of tropospheric O3.

  7. Sulfur dioxide retrievals from OMI and GOME-2 in preparation of TROPOMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theys, Nicolas; De Smedt, Isabelle; Danckaert, Thomas; Yu, Huan; van Gent, Jeroen; Van Roozendael, Michel

    2016-04-01

    The TROPOspheric Monitoring Instrument (TROPOMI) will be launched in 2016 onboard the ESA Sentinel-5 Precursor (S5P) platform and will provide global observations of atmospheric trace gases, with unprecedented spatial resolution. Sulfur dioxide (SO2) measurements from S5P will significantly improve the current capabilities for anthropogenic and volcanic emissions monitoring, and will extend the long-term datasets from past and existing UV sensors (TOMS, GOME, SCIAMACHY, OMI, GOME-2, OMPS). This work presents the SO2 retrieval schemes performed at BIRA-IASB as part of level-2 algorithm prototyping activities for S5P and tested on OMI and GOME-2. With a focus on anthropogenic sources, we show comparisons between OMI and GOME-2 as well as ground-based measurements, and discuss the possible reasons for the differences.

  8. An improved NO2 retrieval for the GOME-2 satellite instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, A.; Begoin, M.; Hilboll, A.; Burrows, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    Satellite observations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) provide valuable information on both stratospheric and tropospheric composition. Nadir measurements from GOME, SCIAMACHY, OMI, and GOME-2 have been used in many studies on tropospheric NO2 burdens, the importance of different NOx emissions sources and their change over time. The observations made by the three GOME-2 instruments will extend the existing data set by more than a decade, and a high quality of the data as well as their good consistency with existing time series is of high importance. In this paper, an improved GOME-2 NO2 retrieval is described which reduces the scatter of the individual NO2 columns globally but in particular in the region of the Southern Atlantic Anomaly. This is achieved by using a larger fitting window including more spectral points, and by applying a two step spike removal algorithm in the fit. The new GOME-2 data set is shown to have good consistency with SCIAMACHY NO2 columns. Remaining small differences are shown to be linked to changes in the daily solar irradiance measurements used in both GOME-2 and SCIAMACHY retrievals. In the large retrieval window, a not previously identified spectral signature was found which is linked to deserts and other regions with bare soil. Inclusion of this empirically derived pseudo cross-section significantly improves the retrievals and potentially provides information on surface properties and desert aerosols. Using the new GOME-2 NO2 data set, a long-term average of tropospheric columns was computed and high-pass filtered. The resulting map shows evidence for pollution from several additional shipping lanes, not previously identified in satellite observations. This illustrates the excellent signal to noise ratio achievable with the improved GOME-2 retrievals.

  9. An improved NO2 retrieval for the GOME-2 satellite instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, A.; Begoin, M.; Hilboll, A.; Burrows, J. P.

    2011-06-01

    Satellite observations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) provide valuable information on both stratospheric and tropospheric composition. Nadir measurements from GOME, SCIAMACHY, OMI, and GOME-2 have been used in many studies on tropospheric NO2 burdens, the importance of different NOx emissions sources and their change over time. The observations made by the three GOME-2 instruments will extend the existing data set by more than a decade, and a high quality of the data as well as their good consistency with existing time series is of particular importance. In this paper, an improved GOME-2 NO2 retrieval is described which reduces the scatter of the individual NO2 columns globally but in particular in the region of the Southern Atlantic Anomaly. This is achieved by using a larger fitting window including more spectral points, and by applying a two step spike removal algorithm in the fit. The new GOME-2 data set is shown to have good consistency with SCIAMACHY NO2 columns. Remaining small differences are shown to be linked to changes in the daily solar irradiance measurements used in both GOME-2 and SCIAMACHY retrievals. In the large retrieval window, a not previously identified spectral signature was found which is linked to deserts and other regions with bare soil. Inclusion of this empirically derived pseudo cross-section significantly improves the retrievals and potentially provides information on surface properties and desert aerosols. Using the new GOME-2 NO2 data set, a long-term average of tropospheric columns was computed and high-pass filtered. The resulting map shows evidence for pollution from several additional shipping lanes, not previously identified in satellite observations. This illustrates the excellent signal to noise ratio achievable with the improved GOME-2 retrievals.

  10. Tropical tropospheric ozone columns from nadir retrievals of GOME-1/ERS-2, SCIAMACHY/Envisat, and GOME-2/MetOp-A (1996-2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leventidou, Elpida; Eichmann, Kai-Uwe; Weber, Mark; Burrows, John P.

    2016-07-01

    Tropical tropospheric ozone columns are retrieved with the convective cloud differential (CCD) technique using total ozone columns and cloud parameters from different European satellite instruments. Monthly-mean tropospheric column amounts [DU] are calculated by subtracting the above-cloud ozone column from the total column. A CCD algorithm (CCD_IUP) has been developed as part of the verification algorithm developed for TROPOspheric Monitoring Instrument (TROPOMI) on Sentinel 5-precursor (S5p) mission, which was applied to GOME/ERS-2 (1995-2003), SCIAMACHY/Envisat (2002-2012), and GOME-2/MetOp-A (2007-2012) measurements. Thus a unique long-term record of monthly-mean tropical tropospheric ozone columns (20° S-20° N) from 1996 to 2012 is now available. An uncertainty estimation has been performed, resulting in a tropospheric ozone column uncertainty less than 2 DU ( < 10 %) for all instruments. The dataset has not been yet harmonised into one consistent; however, comparison between the three separate datasets (GOME/SCIAMACHY/GOME-2) shows that GOME-2 overestimates the tropical tropospheric ozone columns by about 8 DU, while SCIAMACHY and GOME are in good agreement. Validation with Southern Hemisphere ADditional OZonesondes (SHADOZ) data shows that tropospheric ozone columns from the CCD_IUP technique and collocated integrated ozonesonde profiles from the surface up to 200 hPa are in good agreement with respect to range, interannual variations, and variances. Biases within ±5 DU and root-mean-square (RMS) deviation of less than 10 DU are found for all instruments. CCD comparisons using SCIAMACHY data with tropospheric ozone columns derived from limb/nadir matching have shown that the bias and RMS deviation are within the range of the CCD_IUP comparison with the ozonesondes. The 17-year dataset can be helpful for evaluating chemistry models and performing climate change studies.

  11. GOME Total Ozone and Calibration Error Derived Usign Version 8 TOMS Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleason, J.; Wellemeyer, C.; Qin, W.; Ahn, C.; Gopalan, A.; Bhartia, P.

    2003-01-01

    The Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) is a hyper-spectral satellite instrument measuring the ultraviolet backscatter at relatively high spectral resolution. GOME radiances have been slit averaged to emulate measurements of the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) made at discrete wavelengths and processed using the new TOMS Version 8 Ozone Algorithm. Compared to Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) techniques based on local structure in the Huggins Bands, the TOMS uses differential absorption between a pair of wavelengths including the local stiucture as well as the background continuum. This makes the TOMS Algorithm more sensitive to ozone, but it also makes the algorithm more sensitive to instrument calibration errors. While calibration adjustments are not needed for the fitting techniques like the DOAS employed in GOME algorithms, some adjustment is necessary when applying the TOMS Algorithm to GOME. Using spectral discrimination at near ultraviolet wavelength channels unabsorbed by ozone, the GOME wavelength dependent calibration drift is estimated and then checked using pair justification. In addition, the day one calibration offset is estimated based on the residuals of the Version 8 TOMS Algorithm. The estimated drift in the 2b detector of GOME is small through the first four years and then increases rapidly to +5% in normalized radiance at 331 nm relative to 385 nm by mid 2000. The lb detector appears to be quite well behaved throughout this time period.

  12. Comparison of tropospheric NO2 observations by GOME and ground stations over Tokyo, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, K.; Itoh, H.; Shibasaki, T.; Hayashida, S.; Uno, I.; Ohara, T.; Richter, A.; Burrows, J. P.

    2009-04-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) are anthropogenically emitted as a form of NO in the high-temperature burning processes of fossil fuels mainly in energy generations and vehicles. Because NOx is a precursor of ozone, which is composed of a so-called photochemical smog, and is a health-hazard matter, the monitoring of NO2 is important to control air quality. The satellite observation is one of the most suitable methods for the monitoring of air pollution because satellite observations can obtain a global distribution of the pollutants. However, the observation of tropospheric gases by satellites still includes technically challenging problems, and the field is developing. To test whether satellite observations could successfully detect the behavior of tropospheric NO2, we compared satellite and ground-based observations of tropospheric NO2 over the Tokyo region. The satellite data were tropospheric NO2 vertical column density (VCD) derived from Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) spectrometer measurements (hereafter GOME-NO2) [Richter et al., 2005], and the ground-based data were surface NO2 volume mixing ratio (VMR) observed by the network of air-quality monitoring stations in Tokyo. The analysis was performed for the data from January 1996 to June 2003. We found a strong correlation between GOME-NO2 and the surface VMR. They showed a similar seasonal variation with a maximum in winter and a minimum in summer. The result suggested that GOME was observing the behavior of NO2 near the surface in the Tokyo region. A more rigorous comparison was conducted by scaling the surface NO2 VMR to the tropospheric VCD with vertical NO2 VMR profiles. The NO2 profiles were calculated by using the chemical transport model CMAQ/REAS [Uno et al., 2007; Ohara et al., 2007]. This second comparison indicated that the GOME observations represent the behavior of NO2 more closely at the relatively unpolluted ground stations than at the highly polluted ground stations of the air

  13. GOME-2 total ozone columns from MetOp-A/MetOp-B and assimilation in the MACC system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, N.; Koukouli, M. E.; Inness, A.; Valks, P.; Loyola, D. G.; Zimmer, W.; Balis, D. S.; Zyrichidou, I.; Van Roozendael, M.; Lerot, C.; Spurr, R. J. D.

    2014-03-01

    The two Global Ozone Monitoring Instrument (GOME-2) sensors operated in tandem are flying onboard EUMETSAT's MetOp-A and MetOp-B satellites, launched in October 2006 and September 2012 respectively. This paper presents the operational GOME-2/MetOp-A (GOME-2A) and GOME-2/MetOp-B (GOME-2B) total ozone products provided by the EUMETSAT Satellite Application Facility on Ozone and Atmospheric Chemistry Monitoring (O3M-SAF). These products are generated using the latest version of the GOME Data Processor (GDP version 4.7). The enhancements in GDP 4.7, including the application of Brion-Daumont-Malicet ozone absorption cross-sections, are presented here. On a global scale, GOME-2B has the same high accuracy as the corresponding GOME-2A products. There is an excellent agreement between the ozone total columns from the two sensors, with GOME-2B values slightly lower with a mean difference of only 0.55 ± 0.29%. First global validation results for 6 months of GOME-2B total ozone using ground-based measurements show that on average the GOME-2B total ozone data obtained with GDP 4.7 slightly overestimate Dobson observations by about 2.0 ± 1.0% and Brewer observations by about 1.0 ± 0.8%. It is concluded that the total ozone columns (TOCs) provided by GOME-2A and GOME-2B are consistent and may be used simultaneously without introducing trends or other systematic effects. GOME-2A total ozone data have been used operationally in the Copernicus atmospheric service project MACC-II (Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate - Interim Implementation) near-real-time (NRT) system since October 2013. The magnitude of the bias correction needed for assimilating GOME-2A ozone is reduced (to about -6 DU in the global mean) when the GOME-2 ozone retrieval algorithm changed to GDP 4.7.

  14. GOME-2 total ozone columns from MetOp-A/MetOp-B and assimilation in the MACC system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, N.; Koukouli, M. E.; Inness, A.; Valks, P.; Loyola, D. G.; Zimmer, W.; Balis, D. S.; Zyrichidou, I.; Van Roozendael, M.; Lerot, C.; Spurr, R. J. D.

    2014-09-01

    The two Global Ozone Monitoring Instrument (GOME-2) sensors operated in tandem are flying onboard EUMETSAT's (European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites) MetOp-A and MetOp-B satellites, launched in October 2006 and September 2012 respectively. This paper presents the operational GOME-2/MetOp-A (GOME-2A) and GOME-2/MetOp-B (GOME-2B) total ozone products provided by the EUMETSAT Satellite Application Facility on Ozone and Atmospheric Chemistry Monitoring (O3M-SAF). These products are generated using the latest version of the GOME Data Processor (GDP version 4.7). The enhancements in GDP 4.7, including the application of Brion-Daumont-Malicet ozone absorption cross sections, are presented here. On a global scale, GOME-2B has the same high accuracy as the corresponding GOME-2A products. There is an excellent agreement between the ozone total columns from the two sensors, with GOME-2B values slightly lower with a mean difference of only 0.55±0.29%. First global validation results for 6 months of GOME-2B total ozone using ground-based measurements show that on average the GOME-2B total ozone data obtained with GDP 4.7 are slightly higher than, both, Dobson observations by about 2.0±1.0% and Brewer observations by about 1.0±0.8%. It is concluded that the total ozone columns (TOCs) provided by GOME-2A and GOME-2B are consistent and may be used simultaneously without introducing systematic effects, which has been illustrated for the Antarctic ozone hole on 18 October 2013. GOME-2A total ozone data have been used operationally in the Copernicus atmospheric service project MACC-II (Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate - Interim Implementation) near-real-time (NRT) system since October 2013. The magnitude of the bias correction needed for assimilating GOME-2A ozone is reduced (to about -6 DU in the global mean) when the GOME-2 ozone retrieval algorithm changed to GDP 4.7.

  15. Improvement of total and tropospheric NO2 column retrieval for GOME-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Song; Valks, Pieter; Pinardi, Gaia; De Smedt, Isabelle; Huan, Yu; Beirle, Steffen

    2016-04-01

    This contribution focuses on the development and refinement of novel scientific algorithms for the retrieval of total and tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) columns for the GOME-2 satellite instrument. NO2 plays significant roles in atmospheric chemistry. It is strongly related to ozone destruction in the stratosphere, and is regarded as an important air pollutant and ozone precursor in the troposphere. Total NO2 columns from GOME-2 are retrieved with the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) method using the large 425-497 nm wavelength fitting window in order to increase the signal to noise ratio. The tropospheric NO2 column is derived using an improved Stratospheric-Tropospheric separation (STS) algorithm, followed by an air mass factor (AMF) conversion calculated with the LIDORT model. For the calculation of the tropospheric AMF, improved GOME-2 cloud parameters are used and a new surface albedo (LER) climatology based on GOME-2 observations for 2007-2013 is applied. We present the improvements in the NO2 retrieval algorithm, and we show examples of air quality applications with GOME-2 NO2 data.

  16. Monitoring of volcanic SO2 emissions using the GOME-2 instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedelt, Pascal; Valks, Pieter; Loyola, Diego

    2014-05-01

    This contribution focusses on the GOME-2 SO2 column products from the METOP-A and B satellites. The GOME-2 SO2 column product has been developed in the framework of EUMETSAT's Satellite Application Facility on Ozone and Atmospheric Chemistry Monitoring (O3M-SAF). Satellite-based remote sensing measurements of volcanic SO2 provide critical information for reducing volcanic hazards. Volcanic eruptions may bring ash and gases (e.g. SO2) high up into the atmosphere, where a long-range transport can occur. SO2 is an important indicator for volcanic activity and an excellent tracer for volcanic eruption clouds, especially if ash detection techniques fail. SO2 can affect aviation safety: In the cabin it can cause disease and respiratory symptoms, whereas in its hydrogenated form H2SO4 it is highly corrosive and can cause damage to jet engines as well as pitting of windscreens. We will present results for volcanic events retrieved from GOME-2 solar backscattered measurements in the UV wavelength region around 320nm using the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) method. SO2 columns are generated operationally by DLR with the GOME Data Processor (GDP) version 4.7 and are available in near-real-time, i.e. within two hours after sensing. Using data from both MetOp satellites allows for a daily global coverage. We will furthermore present current improvements to the GOME-2 SO2 column product.

  17. Ozone Profile Retrievals from GOME-2 UV/Visible Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Zoogman, P.; Chance, K.; Nowlan, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    It has been shown that adding visible measurements in the Chappuis band to ultraviolet (UV) measurements in the Hartley/Huggins bands can significantly enhance retrieval sensitivity to lower tropospheric ozone from backscattered solar radiances due to deeper photon penetration in the visible to the surface than in the ultraviolet. The first NASA Eearth Venture Instrument TEMPO (Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution) instrument is being developed to measure backscattered solar radiation in two channels (~290-490 and 540-740 nm) and make atmospheric pollution measurements over North America from the Geostationary orbit; the primary purpose of including the second channel is to improve lower tropospheric ozone retrieval for air quality monitoring. However, this retrieval enhancement has yet to be solidly demonstrated from existing measurements due to the weak ozone absorption in the visible and strong interference from surface reflectance. We present retrievals from GOME-2 (Global Ozone Monitoring and Experiment-2) UV and visible measurements using the SAO optimal estimation based ozone profile retrieval algorithm, to directly explore the retrieval improvement in lower tropospheric ozone from additional visible measurements. To reduce the retrieval interference from surface reflectance, we add characterization of surface spectral reflectance in the visible into the ozone profile algorithm based on existing surface reflectance spectra and MODIS (Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) BRDF (Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function) climatology. We evaluate the retrieval performance of UV/visible retrieval over the UV retrieval in terms of retrieved lower tropospheric ozone and increase in degree of free for signal (DFS) over the globe in different seasons, and we validate both retrievals against ozonesonde measurements.

  18. OCRA radiometric cloud fractions for GOME-2 on MetOp-A/B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, R.; Loyola, D.; Gimeno García, S.; Romahn, F.

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes an approach for cloud parameter retrieval (radiometric cloud fraction estimation) using the polarization measurements of the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) on-board the MetOp-A/B satellites. The core component of the Optical Cloud Recognition Algorithm (OCRA) is the calculation of monthly cloud-free reflectances for a global grid (resolution of 0.2° in longitude and 0.2° in latitude) and to derive radiometric cloud fractions. These cloud fractions will serve as a priori information for the retrieval of cloud top height (CTH), cloud top pressure (CTP), cloud top albedo (CTA) and cloud optical thickness (COT) with the Retrieval Of Cloud Information using Neural Networks (ROCINN) algorithm. This approach is already being implemented operationally for the GOME/ERS-2 and SCIAMACHY/ENVISAT sensors and here we present version 3.0 of the OCRA algorithm applied to the GOME-2 sensors. Based on more than six years of GOME-2A data (February 2007-June 2013), reflectances are calculated for ≈ 35 000 orbits. For each measurement a degradation correction as well as a viewing angle dependent and latitude dependent correction is applied. In addition, an empirical correction scheme is introduced in order to remove the effect of oceanic sun glint. A comparison of the GOME-2A/B OCRA cloud fractions with co-located AVHRR geometrical cloud fractions shows a general good agreement with a mean difference of -0.15±0.20. From operational point of view, an advantage of the OCRA algorithm is its extremely fast computational time and its straightforward transferability to similar sensors like OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument), TROPOMI (TROPOspheric Monitoring Instrument) on Sentinel 5 Precursor, as well as Sentinel 4 and Sentinel 5. In conclusion, it is shown that a robust, accurate and fast radiometric cloud fraction estimation for GOME-2 can be achieved with OCRA by using the polarization measurement devices (PMDs).

  19. Pole-to-pole validation of GOME WFDOAS total ozone with groundbased data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, M.; Lamsal, L. N.; Coldewey-Egbers, M.; Bramstedt, K.; Burrows, J. P.

    2005-06-01

    This paper summarises the validation of GOME total ozone retrieved using the Weighting Function Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (WFDOAS) algorithm Version 1.0. This algorithm has been described in detail in a companion paper by Coldewey-Egbers et al. (2005). Compared to the operational GDP (GOME Data Processor) V3, several improvements to the total ozone retrieval have been introduced that account for the varying ozone dependent contribution to rotational Raman scattering, includes a new cloud scheme, and uses the GOME measured effective albedo in the retrieval. In this paper the WFDOAS results have been compared with selected ground-based measurements from the WOUDC (World Ozone and UV Radiation Data Centre) that collects total ozone measurements from a global network of stations covering all seasons. From the global validation excellent agreement between WFDOAS and ground data was observed. The agreement lies within ±1%, and very little seasonal variations in the differences are found. In the polar regions and at high solar zenith angles, however, a positive bias varying between 5 and 8% is found near the polar night period. As a function of solar zenith angle as well as of the retrieved total ozone, the WFDOAS differences to ground polar data, however, show a much weaker dependence as compared to the operational GOME Data Processor Version 3 of GOME that represents a significant improvement. Very few stations carry out simultaneous measurements by Brewer and Dobson spectrometers over an extended period (three years or more). Simultaneous Brewer and Dobson measurements from Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic (50.2N, 15.8E) and Hohenpeissenberg, Germany (47.8N, 11.0E) covering the period 1996-1999 have been compared with our GOME results. Agreement with Brewers are generally better than with the simultaneous Dobson measurements and this may be explained by the neglect of stratospheric (ozone) temperature correction in the standard ozone retrieval from

  20. GOME level 1-to-2 data processor version 3.0: a major upgrade of the GOME/ERS-2 total ozone retrieval algorithm.

    PubMed

    Spurr, Robert; Loyola, Diego; Thomas, Werner; Balzer, Wolfgang; Mikusch, Eberhard; Aberle, Bernd; Slijkhuis, Sander; Ruppert, Thomas; van Roozendael, Michel; Lambert, Jean-Christopher; Soebijanta, Trisnanto

    2005-11-20

    The global ozone monitoring experiment (GOME) was launched in April 1995, and the GOME data processor (GDP) retrieval algorithm has processed operational total ozone amounts since July 1995. GDP level 1-to-2 is based on the two-step differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) approach, involving slant column fitting followed by air mass factor (AMF) conversions to vertical column amounts. We present a major upgrade of this algorithm to version 3.0. GDP 3.0 was implemented in July 2002, and the 9-year GOME data record from July 1995 to December 2004 has been processed using this algorithm. The key component in GDP 3.0 is an iterative approach to AMF calculation, in which AMFs and corresponding vertical column densities are adjusted to reflect the true ozone distribution as represented by the fitted DOAS effective slant column. A neural network ensemble is used to optimize the fast and accurate parametrization of AMFs. We describe results of a recent validation exercise for the operational version of the total ozone algorithm; in particular, seasonal and meridian errors are reduced by a factor of 2. On a global basis, GDP 3.0 ozone total column results lie between -2% and +4% of ground-based values for moderate solar zenith angles lower than 70 degrees. A larger variability of about +5% and -8% is observed for higher solar zenith angles up to 90 degrees. PMID:16318193

  1. Comparison of GOME-2/Metop-A ozone profiles with GOMOS, OSIRIS and MLS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Määttä, A.; Tuinder, O. N. E.; Tukiainen, S.; Sofieva, V.; Tamminen, J.

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a comparison of vertical ozone profiles retrieved by the Ozone ProfilE Retrieval Algorithm (OPERA) from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment 2 (GOME-2) measurements on board Metop-A with high-vertical-resolution ozone profiles by Global Ozone Monitoring by Occultation of Stars (GOMOS), Optical Spectrograph and Infrared Imager System (OSIRIS) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS). The comparison, with global coverage, focuses on the stratosphere and the lower mesosphere and covers the period from March 2008 until the end of 2011. The comparison shows an agreement of the GOME-2 ozone profiles with those of GOMOS, OSIRIS and MLS within ±15 % in the altitude range from 15 km up to ~ 35-40 km depending on latitude. The GOME-2 ozone profiles from non-degradation corrected radiances have a tendency to a systematic negative bias with respect to the reference data above ~ 30 km. The GOME-2 bias with respect to the high-vertical resolution instruments depends on season, with the strongest dependence observed at high latitudes.

  2. OCRA radiometric cloud fractions for GOME-2 on MetOp-A/B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, Ronny; Loyola, Diego; Gimeno García, Sebastián; Romahn, Fabian

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes an approach for cloud parameter retrieval (radiometric cloud-fraction estimation) using the polarization measurements of the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) onboard the MetOp-A/B satellites. The core component of the Optical Cloud Recognition Algorithm (OCRA) is the calculation of monthly cloud-free reflectances for a global grid (resolution of 0.2° in longitude and 0.2° in latitude) to derive radiometric cloud fractions. These cloud fractions will serve as a priori information for the retrieval of cloud-top height (CTH), cloud-top pressure (CTP), cloud-top albedo (CTA) and cloud optical thickness (COT) with the Retrieval Of Cloud Information using Neural Networks (ROCINN) algorithm. This approach is already being implemented operationally for the GOME/ERS-2 and SCIAMACHY/ENVISAT sensors and here we present version 3.0 of the OCRA algorithm applied to the GOME-2 sensors. Based on more than five years of GOME-2A data (April 2008 to June 2013), reflectances are calculated for ≈ 35 000 orbits. For each measurement a degradation correction as well as a viewing-angle-dependent and latitude-dependent correction is applied. In addition, an empirical correction scheme is introduced in order to remove the effect of oceanic sun glint. A comparison of the GOME-2A/B OCRA cloud fractions with colocated AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) geometrical cloud fractions shows a general good agreement with a mean difference of -0.15 ± 0.20. From an operational point of view, an advantage of the OCRA algorithm is its very fast computational time and its straightforward transferability to similar sensors like OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument), TROPOMI (TROPOspheric Monitoring Instrument) on Sentinel 5 Precursor, as well as Sentinel 4 and Sentinel 5. In conclusion, it is shown that a robust, accurate and fast radiometric cloud-fraction estimation for GOME-2 can be achieved with OCRA using polarization measurement devices (PMDs).

  3. Long-term analysis of GOME in-flight calibration parameters and instrument degradation.

    PubMed

    Coldewey-Egbers, Melanie; Slijkhuis, Sander; Aberle, Bernd; Loyola, Diego

    2008-09-10

    Since 1995, the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) has measured solar and backscattered spectra in the ultraviolet and visible wavelength range. Now, the extensive data set of the most important calibration parameters has been investigated thoroughly in order to analyze the long-term stability and performance of the instrument. This study focuses on GOME in-flight calibration and degradation for the solar path. Monitoring the sensor degradation yields an intensity decrease of 70% to 90% in 240-316 nm and 35% to 65% in 311-415 nm. The spectral calibration is very stable over the whole period, although a very complex interaction between predisperser temperature and wavelength was found. The leakage current and the pixel-to-pixel gain increased significantly during the mission, which requires an accurate correction of the measured radiance and irradiance signals using proper calibration parameters. Finally, several outliers in the data sets can be directly assigned to instrument and satellite anomalies. PMID:18784780

  4. SO2 columns over China: Temporal and spatial variations using OMI and GOME-2 observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huanhuan, Yan; Liangfu, Chen; Lin, Su; Jinhua, Tao; Chao, Yu

    2014-03-01

    Enhancements of SO2 column amounts due to anthropogenic emission sources over China were shown in this paper by using OMI and GOME-2 observations. The temporal and spatial variations of SO2 columns over China were analyzed for the time period 2005-2010. Beijing and Chongqing showed a high concentration in the SO2 columns, attributable to the use of coal for power generation in China and the characteristic of terrain and meteorology. The reduction of SO2 columns over Beijing and surrounding provinces in 2008 was observed by OMI, which confirms the effectiveness of strict controls on pollutant emissions and motor vehicle traffic before and during 2008 Olympic and Paralympic Games. The SO2 columns over China from GOME-2 (0.2-0.5 DU) were lower than those from OMI (0.6-1 DU), but both showed a decrease in SO2 columns over northern China since 2008 (except an increase in OMI SO2 in 2010).

  5. Combined Characterisation of GOME and TOMS Total Ozone Using Ground-Based Observations from the NDSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, J.-C.; VanRoozendael, M.; Simon, P. C.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Goutail, F.; Andersen, S. B.; Arlander, D. W.; BuiVan, N. A.; Claude, H.; deLaNoee, J.; DeMaziere, M.; Dorokhov, V.; Eriksen, P.; Gleason, J. F.; Tornkvist, K. Karlsen; Hoiskar, B. A. Kastad; Kyroe, E.; Leveau, J.; Merienne, M.-F.; Milinevsky, G.

    1998-01-01

    Several years of total ozone measured from space by the ERS-2 GOME, the Earth Probe Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), and the ADEOS TOMS, are compared with high-quality ground-based observations associated with the Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Change (NDSC), over an extended latitude range and a variety of geophysical conditions. The comparisons with each spaceborne sensor are combined altogether for investigating their respective solar zenith angle (SZA) dependence, dispersion, and difference of sensitivity. The space- and ground-based data are found to agree within a few percent on average. However, the analysis highlights for both Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) and TOMS several sources of discrepancies, including a dependence on the SZA at high latitudes and internal inconsistencies.

  6. Simulations of Solar Induced Fluorescence compared to observations from GOSAT and GOME-2 Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, I. T.; Berry, J. A.; Frankenberg, C.; Joiner, J.; Van der Tol, C.; Lee, J. E.; Denning, S.

    2014-12-01

    Observations of Solar-Induced Fluorescence (SIF) are currently retrieved from the GOSAT and GOME-2 satellites, and will become available from OCO-2 shortly. The GOSAT (and OCO-2) satellite has a midday overpass time, while GOME-2 has a variable observation of approximately 0800-1100 local time. Previous studies have demonstrated a linear relationship between SIF and Gross Primary Productivity (GPP), but lack the ability to investigate causes of spatiotemporal variability. We demonstrate an ability to simulate SIF using a landsurface model (the Simple Biosphere Model; SIB) for direct comparison to observations. We calculate fluorescence yield based on known relationships between photosynthesis and fluorescence, and calculate total SIF using existing leaf-to-canopy scaling factors. We find that simulated SIF exceeds GOSAT retrieved SIF, especially in tropical and Boreal forests. Simulated SIF exceeds GOME-2 values in Boreal forest and in lower-productivity areas such as marginal desert and tundra. Observed SIF GOME-2 in croplands is significantly higher than simulations. SIF simulated for low- and high-productivity grassland and savanna show much less seasonal and interannual amplitude when compared to values from both satellites, implicating that model phenology and/or response to meteorological forcing is damped. Simulated SIF seasonal cycles are similar to observed from both satellites, and simulations are able to reproduce drought events such as occurred in Russia in 2010 and the Central USA in 2012. As simulated SIF more closely resembles observations, model estimates of GPP become more robust, as does our ability to understand and recreate the mechanisms involved in vegetation response to seasonal cycles and anomalous stress events such as drought.

  7. Tropospheric ozone and ozone profiles retrieved from GOME-2 and their validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, G. M.; Siddans, R.; Kerridge, B. J.; Latter, B. G.; Richards, N. A. D.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes and assesses the performance of the RAL (Rutherford Appleton Laboratory) ozone profile retrieval scheme for the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment 2 (GOME-2) with a focus on tropospheric ozone. Developments to the scheme since its application to GOME-1 measurements are outlined. These include the approaches developed to account sufficiently for UV radiometric degradation in the Hartley band and for inadequacies in knowledge of instrumental parameters in the Huggins bands to achieve the high-precision spectral fit required to extract information on tropospheric ozone. The assessment includes a validation against ozonesondes (sondes) sampled worldwide over 2 years (2007-2008). Standard deviations of the ensemble with respect to the sondes are considerably lower for the retrieved profiles than for the a priori, with the exception of the lowest subcolumn. Once retrieval vertical smoothing (averaging kernels) has been applied to the sonde profiles there is a retrieval bias of 6% (1.5 DU) in the lower troposphere, with smaller biases in the subcolumns above. The bias in the troposphere varies with latitude. The retrieval underestimates lower tropospheric ozone in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) (15-20% or ~ 1-3 DU) and overestimates it in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) (10% or 2 DU). The ability of the retrieval to reflect the geographical distribution of lower tropospheric ozone, globally (rather than just ozonesonde launch sites) is demonstrated by comparison with the chemistry transport model TOMCAT. For a monthly mean of cloud-cleared GOME-2 pixels, a correlation of 0.66 is found between the retrieval and TOMCAT sampled accordingly, with a bias of 0.7 Dobson Units. GOME-2 estimates higher concentrations in NH pollution centres but lower ozone in the Southern Ocean and South Pacific, which is consistent with the comparison to ozonesondes.

  8. Retrieval Of Cloud Pressure And Chlorophyll Content Using Raman Scattering In GOME Ultraviolet Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atlas, Robert (Technical Monitor); Joiner, Joanna; Vasikov, Alexander; Flittner, David; Gleason, James; Bhartia, P. K.

    2002-01-01

    Reliable cloud pressure estimates are needed for accurate retrieval of ozone and other trace gases using satellite-borne backscatter ultraviolet (buv) instruments such as the global ozone monitoring experiment (GOME). Cloud pressure can be derived from buv instruments by utilizing the properties of rotational-Raman scattering (RRS) and absorption by O2-O2. In this paper we estimate cloud pressure from GOME observations in the 355-400 nm spectral range using the concept of a Lambertian-equivalent reflectivity (LER) surface. GOME has full spectral coverage in this range at relatively high spectral resolution with a very high signal-to-noise ratio. This allows for much more accurate estimates of cloud pressure than were possible with its predecessors SBUV and TOMS. We also demonstrate the potential capability to retrieve chlorophyll content with full-spectral buv instruments. We compare our retrieved LER cloud pressure with cloud top pressures derived from the infrared ATSR instrument on the same satellite. The findings confirm results from previous studies that showed retrieved LER cloud pressures from buv observations are systematically higher than IR-derived cloud-top pressure. Simulations using Mie-scattering radiative transfer algorithms that include O2-O2 absorption and RRS show that these differences can be explained by increased photon path length within and below cloud.

  9. Development of an OClO Slant Column Product for the GOME-2 Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Andreas; Wittrock, Folkard; Burrows, John P.

    2016-04-01

    Stratospheric ozone depletion by catalytic reactions involving halogens is one of the most prominent examples of anthropogenic impacts on the atmosphere. In spite of the rapid and successful international action to reduce emissions of CFCs and other ozone depleting substances leading to the Montreal Protocol and its amendments, ozone depletion in polar spring is still observed in both hemispheres on a regular basis. For the coming years, slow ozone recovery is expected but individual years will still see very low ozone columns depending on meteorology and possible interactions with climate change. Monitoring of both ozone and ozone depleting substances in the stratosphere remains a priority to ensure that the predicted reduction in halogen levels and recovery of ozone columns is taking place as predicted. One way to observe stratospheric chlorine activation is by measurements of OClO which can be detected by UV/visible remote sensing from the ground and from satellite. While the link between OClO levels and chlorine activation is complicated by the fact that a) OClO is not directly involved in ozone depletion but is produced by reaction of BrO and ClO and b) is rapidly photolysed at daylight, the long existing data series from both ground-based and satellite observations makes it an interesting tracer of chlorine activation. The GOME-2 instruments on the MetOp series of satellites are nadir viewing UV/vis spectrometers having the spectral coverage and resolution needed for Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy retrievals of OClO. With their combined lifetime of more than 15 years, they can provide a long-term data set. However, previous attempts to create an OClO product for GOME-2 suffered from large scatter in the OClO data and time-dependent offsets. Here we present an improved OClO slant column retrieval for the two instruments GOME2-A and GOME2-B. The data is shown to be of similar quality as for earlier instruments such as SCIAMACHY, and is consistent

  10. Observing lowermost tropospheric ozone pollution with a new multispectral synergic approach of IASI infrared and GOME-2 ultraviolet satellite measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuesta, Juan; Foret, Gilles; Dufour, Gaëlle; Eremenko, Maxim; Coman, Adriana; Gaubert, Benjamin; Beekmann, Matthias; Liu, Xiong; Cai, Zhaonan; Von Clarmann, Thomas; Spurr, Robert; Flaud, Jean-Marie

    2014-05-01

    Tropospheric ozone is currently one of the air pollutants posing greatest threats to human health and ecosystems. Monitoring ozone pollution at the regional, continental and global scale is a crucial societal issue. Only spaceborne remote sensing is capable of observing tropospheric ozone at such scales. The spatio-temporal coverage of new satellite-based instruments, such as IASI or GOME-2, offer a great potential for monitoring air quality by synergism with regional chemistry-transport models, for both inter-validation and full data assimilation. However, current spaceborne observations using single-band either UV or IR measurements show limited sensitivity to ozone in the atmospheric boundary layer, which is the major concern for air quality. Very recently, we have developed an innovative multispectral approach, so-called IASI+GOME-2, which combines IASI and GOME-2 observations, respectively in the IR and UV. This unique multispectral approach has allowed the observation of ozone plumes in the lowermost troposphere (LMT, below 3 km of altitude) over Europe, for the first time from space. Our first analyses are focused on typical ozone pollution events during the summer of 2009 over Europe. During these events, LMT ozone plumes at different regions are produced photo-chemically in the boundary layer, transported upwards to the free troposphere and also downwards from the stratosphere. We have analysed them using IASI+GOME-2 observations, in comparison with single-band methods (IASI, GOME-2 and OMI). Only IASI+GOME-2 depicts ozone plumes located below 3 km of altitude (both over land and ocean). Indeed, the multispectral sensitivity in the LMT is greater by 40% and it peaks at 2 to 2.5 km of altitude over land, thus at least 0.8 to 1 km below that for all single-band methods. Over Europe during the summer of 2009, IASI+GOME-2 shows 1% mean bias and 21% precision for direct comparisons with ozonesondes and also good agreement with CHIMERE model simulations

  11. Evaluating a new homogeneous total ozone climate data record from GOME/ERS-2, SCIAMACHY/Envisat, and GOME-2/MetOp-A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukouli, M. E.; Lerot, C.; Granville, J.; Goutail, F.; Lambert, J.-C.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Balis, D.; Zyrichidou, I.; Van Roozendael, M.; Coldewey-Egbers, M.; Loyola, D.; Labow, G.; Frith, S.; Spurr, R.; Zehner, C.

    2015-12-01

    The European Space Agency's Ozone Climate Change Initiative (O3-CCI) project aims at producing and validating a number of high-quality ozone data products generated from different satellite sensors. For total ozone, the O3-CCI approach consists of minimizing sources of bias and systematic uncertainties by applying a common retrieval algorithm to all level 1 data sets, in order to enhance the consistency between the level 2 data sets from individual sensors. Here we present the evaluation of the total ozone products from the European sensors Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME)/ERS-2, SCIAMACHY/Envisat, and GOME-2/MetOp-A produced with the GOME-type Direct FITting (GODFIT) algorithm v3. Measurements from the three sensors span more than 16 years, from 1996 to 2012. In this work, we present the latest O3-CCI total ozone validation results using as reference ground-based measurements from Brewer and Dobson spectrophotometers archived at the World Ozone and UV Data Centre of the World Meteorological Organization as well as from UV-visible differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS)/Système D'Analyse par Observations Zénithales (SAOZ) instruments from the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change. In particular, we investigate possible dependencies in these new GODFIT v3 total ozone data sets with respect to latitude, season, solar zenith angle, and different cloud parameters, using the most adequate type of ground-based instrument. We show that these three O3-CCI total ozone data products behave very similarly and are less sensitive to instrumental degradation, mainly as a result of the new reflectance soft-calibration scheme. The mean bias to the ground-based observations is found to be within the 1 ± 1% level for all three sensors while the near-zero decadal stability of the total ozone columns (TOCs) provided by the three European instruments falls well within the 1-3% requirement of the European Space Agency's Ozone Climate Change

  12. Evaluating a New Homogeneous Total Ozone Climate Data Record from GOME/ERS-2, SCIAMACHY/Envisat, and GOME-2/MetOp-A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koukouli, M.E.; Lerot, C.; Granville, J.; Goutail, F.; Lambert, J.-C.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Balis, D.; Zyrichidou, I.; Van Roozendael, M.; Coldewey-Egbers, M.; Loyola, D.; Labow, G.; Frith, S.; Spurr, R.; Zehner, C.

    2015-01-01

    The European Space Agency's Ozone Climate Change Initiative (O3-CCI) project aims at producing and validating a number of high-quality ozone data products generated from different satellite sensors. For total ozone, the O3-CCI approach consists of minimizing sources of bias and systematic uncertainties by applying a common retrieval algorithm to all level 1 data sets, in order to enhance the consistency between the level 2 data sets from individual sensors. Here we present the evaluation of the total ozone products from the European sensors Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME)/ERS-2, SCIAMACHY/Envisat, and GOME-2/MetOp-A produced with the GOME-type Direct FITting (GODFIT) algorithm v3. Measurements from the three sensors span more than 16 years, from 1996 to 2012. In this work, we present the latest O3-CCI total ozone validation results using as reference ground-based measurements from Brewer and Dobson spectrophotometers archived at the World Ozone and UV Data Centre of the World Meteorological Organization as well as from UV-visible differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS)/Système D'Analyse par Observations Zénithales (SAOZ) instruments from the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change. In particular, we investigate possible dependencies in these new GODFIT v3 total ozone data sets with respect to latitude, season, solar zenith angle, and different cloud parameters, using the most adequate type of ground-based instrument. We show that these three O3-CCI total ozone data products behave very similarly and are less sensitive to instrumental degradation, mainly as a result of the new reflectance soft-calibration scheme. The mean bias to the ground-based observations is found to be within the 1 plus or minus 1 percent level for all three sensors while the near-zero decadal stability of the total ozone columns (TOCs) provided by the three European instruments falls well within the 1-3 percent requirement of the European Space

  13. Application of a modified DOAS method for total ozone retrieval from GOME data at high polar latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coldewey-Egbers, M.; Weber, M.; Buchwitz, M.; Burrows, J. P.

    2004-01-01

    Since 1995, the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) on board the second European Remote Sensing satellite provides information about spatial distribution and temporal variation of total ozone. Current operational data products are generated using the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) technique. Various validation exercises indicate shortcomings in the current retrieval using the standard DOAS approach. Especially under ozone hole conditions at high polar latitudes GOME tends to overestimate total ozone as compared to ground-based measurements. In this study, we introduce a modified DOAS method for ozone retrieval from GOME which fits directly the vertical columns rather than slant columns. We present preliminary results which demonstrate the advantage of the new approach. It will be shown that not only the differences to ground-based data are reduced but also the fit residuals are improved in comparison with the operational retrieval.

  14. Evaluation of Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) ozone profiles from nine different algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meijer, Y. J.; Swart, D. P. J.; Baier, F.; Bhartia, P. K.; Bodeker, G. E.; Casadio, S.; Chance, K.; Del Frate, F.; Erbertseder, T.; Felder, M. D.; Flynn, L. E.; Godin-Beekmann, S.; Hansen, G.; Hasekamp, O. P.; Kaifel, A.; Kelder, H. M.; Kerridge, B. J.; Lambert, J.-C.; Landgraf, J.; Latter, B.; Liu, X.; McDermid, I. S.; Pachepsky, Y.; Rozanov, V.; Siddans, R.; Tellmann, S.; van der A, R. J.; van Oss, R. F.; Weber, M.; Zehner, C.

    2006-11-01

    An evaluation is made of ozone profiles retrieved from measurements of the nadir-viewing Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) instrument. Currently, four different approaches are used to retrieve ozone profile information from GOME measurements, which differ in the use of external information and a priori constraints. In total nine different algorithms will be evaluated exploiting the optimal estimation (Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, University of Bremen, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory), Phillips-Tikhonov regularization (Space Research Organization Netherlands), neural network (Center for Solar Energy and Hydrogen Research, Tor Vergata University), and data assimilation (German Aerospace Center) approaches. Analysis tools are used to interpret data sets that provide averaging kernels. In the interpretation of these data, the focus is on the vertical resolution, the indicative altitude of the retrieved value, and the fraction of a priori information. The evaluation is completed with a comparison of the results to lidar data from the Network for Detection of Stratospheric Change stations in Andoya (Norway), Observatoire Haute Provence (France), Mauna Loa (Hawaii), Lauder (New Zealand), and Dumont d'Urville (Antarctic) for the years 1997-1999. In total, the comparison involves nearly 1000 ozone profiles and allows the analysis of GOME data measured in different global regions and hence observational circumstances. The main conclusion of this paper is that unambiguous information on the ozone profile can at best be retrieved in the altitude range 15-48 km with a vertical resolution of 10 to 15 km, precision of 5-10%, and a bias up to 5% or 20% depending on the success of recalibration of the input spectra. The sensitivity of retrievals to ozone at lower altitudes varies from scheme to scheme and includes significant influence from a priori assumptions.

  15. Overview of the O3M SAF GOME-2 operational atmospheric composition and UV radiation data products and data availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassinen, S.; Balis, D.; Bauer, H.; Begoin, M.; Delcloo, A.; Eleftheratos, K.; Gimeno Garcia, S.; Granville, J.; Grossi, M.; Hao, N.; Hedelt, P.; Hendrick, F.; Hess, M.; Heue, K.-P.; Hovila, J.; Jønch-Sørensen, H.; Kalakoski, N.; Kiemle, S.; Kins, L.; Koukouli, M. E.; Kujanpää, J.; Lambert, J.-C.; Lerot, C.; Loyola, D.; Määttä, A.; Pedergnana, M.; Pinardi, G.; Romahn, F.; van Roozendael, M.; Lutz, R.; De Smedt, I.; Stammes, P.; Steinbrecht, W.; Tamminen, J.; Theys, N.; Tilstra, L. G.; Tuinder, O. N. E.; Valks, P.; Zerefos, C.; Zimmer, W.; Zyrichidou, I.

    2015-07-01

    The three GOME-2 instruments will provide unique and long data sets for atmospheric research and applications. The complete time period will be 2007-2022, including the period of ozone depletion as well as the beginning of ozone layer recovery. Besides ozone chemistry, the GOME-2 products are important e.g. for air quality studies, climate modeling, policy monitoring and hazard warnings. The heritage for GOME-2 is in the ERS/GOME and Envisat/SCIAMACHY instruments. The current Level 2 (L2) data cover a wide range of products such as trace gas columns (NO2, BrO, H2CO, H2O, SO2), tropospheric columns of NO2, total ozone columns and vertical ozone profiles in high and low spatial resolution, absorbing aerosol indices from the main science channels as well as from the polarization channels (AAI, AAI-PMD), Lambertian-equivalent reflectivity database, clear-sky and cloud-corrected UV indices and surface UV fields with different weightings and photolysis rates. The Ozone Monitoring and Atmospheric Composition Satellite Application Facility (O3M SAF) processing and data dissemination is operational and running 24/7. Data quality is quarantined by the detailed review processes for the algorithms, validation of the products as well as by a continuous quality monitoring of the products and processing. This is an overview paper providing the O3M SAF project background, current status and future plans to utilization of the GOME-2 data. An important focus is the provision of summaries of the GOME-2 products including product principles and validation examples together with the product sample images. Furthermore, this paper collects the references to the detailed product algorithm and validation papers.

  16. GOME data processor: the first operational DOAS-based algorithm applied to data from a spaceborne sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegels, Ernst; Aberle, Bernd; Balzer, Wolfgang; Kretschel, K.; Loyola, Diego; Mikusch, Eberhard; Muehle, H.; Ruppert, Thomas; Schmid, Cornelia; Slijkhuis, Sander; Spurr, Robert J. D.; Thomas, Werner; Wieland, T.; Wolfmueller, Meinhard

    1997-05-01

    The Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) is a new atmospheric chemistry instrument on-board the ERS-2 satellite which was launched in April 1995. The GOME is designed to measure a range of atmospheric trace constituents, with particular emphasis on global ozone distributions. The ground segment for the GOME sensor is with the German Remote Sensing Data Center (DFD). Major components of the GDP are the complete GOME data archive, the Earth-shine spectra calibration step, the total ozone column retrieval process, and the integration into the D-PAF data management system (DMS). Raw GOME data re converted into 'calibrated radiances' during the Level 0 to 1 processing by applying a series of calibration algorithms using in-flight observations and pre-flight instrument calibration parameters. Total column abundances of ozone and other trace gases can be derived from the Level 1 Product, comprising the Earth-shine radiance and the extra- terrestrial solar irradiance, by applying three designated algorithms in the Level 1 to 2 processing step. The Initial Cloud Fitting Algorithm (ICFA) uses the spectral features close to and within the O2 A-band around 760 nm to determine the fractional cloud cover of the pixel scene. The differential optical absorption spectroscopy technique is used for the operational retrieval of ozone and nitrogen dioxide form data in the UV and visible regions of the spectrum. The slant column densities are converted to vertical columns by division with an appropriate Air Mass Factor (AMF), derived from radiative transfer simulations. If clouds are detected by ICFA, an averaged AMF is calculated from the intensity-weighted AMFs to ground and to cloud top. Since the end of July 1996 the GOME data processing is performed operationally at the DFD.

  17. Consistent interpretation of ground based and GOME BrO slant column data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, R. W.; Bovensmann, H.; Kaiser, J. W.; Richter, A.; Rozanov, A.; Wittrock, F.; Burrows, J. P.

    Model computations of slant column densities (SCD) enable the comparison between ground based and satellite based absorption measurements of scattered light and are therefore a good basis to investigate the presence of tropospheric BrO amounts. In this study ground based zenith sky and GOME nadir measurements of BrO SCD are compared with simulations for the 19-21 March 1997 at Ny-Ålesund. The vertical columns of tropospheric BrO amounts are estimated to be in the range 4 ±0.8 ∗ 10 13 [molecules/cm 2] for the investigated period and location.

  18. Intercomparison of tropospheric NO2 concentration by GOME and the air-quality monitoring network in the Tokyo region, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, K.; Itoh, H.; Shibasaki, T.; Hayashida, S.; Uno, I.; Ohara, T.; Morino, Y.; Richter, A.; Burrows, J. P.

    2009-12-01

    The monitoring of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) abundance forms a key part of air-quality control as NO2 plays an important role of producing tropospheric ozone, which is a main component of photochemical smog and an active greenhouse gas. Currently, a huge network of air-quality monitoring stations measuring NO2 throughout Japan is maintained by both the Ministry of the Environment and local governments. Satellite observations are also useful for obtaining the global distribution of compounds. However, the observation of tropospheric species from space remains a challenging problem, and the field is still developing. In order to confirm whether satellite observations could successfully detect the behavior of tropospheric NO2, we compared satellite and ground-based observations of tropospheric NO2. The satellite data were tropospheric NO2 vertical column density (VCD) derived from Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) spectrometer measurements (hereafter GOME-NO2), and the ground-based data were surface NO2 volume mixing ratio (VMR) observed by the network of air-quality monitoring stations in Japan. The analysis was performed over the Tokyo region during 1996-2003. For the comparison, we scaled the surface NO2 VMR to the tropospheric VCD by using vertical NO2 VMR profiles, which were calculated by the chemical transport model CMAQ/REAS. The comparison indicated that the GOME observations represent the behavior of NO2 more closely at the relatively unpolluted stations than at the highly polluted stations in the network of air-quality monitoring. This tendency was thought to result from the horizontal heterogeneity within a GOME footprint. Comparison with a previous study in the northern Italy showed that the GOME-NO2 measurements over Tokyo tended to be smaller than those over northern Italy. Because Tokyo is located in a coastal land region with a gulf, areas of ocean intruding into the GOME pixels could lower the observed GOME-NO2. The pollution in Tokyo is so

  19. Total column water vapour measurements from GOME-2 MetOp-A and MetOp-B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossi, M.; Valks, P.; Loyola, D.; Aberle, B.; Slijkhuis, S.; Wagner, T.; Beirle, S.; Lang, R.

    2015-03-01

    Knowledge of the total column water vapour (TCWV) global distribution is fundamental for climate analysis and weather monitoring. In this work, we present the retrieval algorithm used to derive the operational TCWV from the GOME-2 sensors aboard EUMETSAT's MetOp-A and MetOp-B satellites and perform an extensive inter-comparison in order to evaluate their consistency and temporal stability. For the analysis, the GOME-2 data sets are generated by DLR in the framework of the EUMETSAT O3M-SAF project using the GOME Data Processor (GDP) version 4.7. The retrieval algorithm is based on a classical Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) method and combines a H2O and O2 retrieval for the computation of the trace gas vertical column density. We introduce a further enhancement in the quality of the H2O total column by optimizing the cloud screening and developing an empirical correction in order to eliminate the instrument scan angle dependencies. The overall consistency between measurements from the newer GOME-2 instrument on board of the MetOp-B platform and the GOME-2/MetOp-A data is evaluated in the overlap period (December 2012-June 2014). Furthermore, we compare GOME-2 results with independent TCWV data from the ECMWF ERA-Interim reanalysis, with SSMIS satellite measurements during the full period January 2007-June 2014 and against the combined SSM/I + MERIS satellite data set developed in the framework of the ESA DUE GlobVapour project (January 2007-December 2008). Global mean biases as small as ±0.035 g cm-2 are found between GOME-2A and all other data sets. The combined SSM/I-MERIS sample and the ECMWF ERA-Interim data set are typically drier than the GOME-2 retrievals, while on average GOME-2 data overestimate the SSMIS measurements by only 0.006 g cm-2. However, the size of these biases is seasonally dependent. Monthly average differences can be as large as 0.1 g cm-2, based on the analysis against SSMIS measurements, which include only data over

  20. Satellite observations of tropospheric formaldehyde combining GOME-2 and OMI measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Smedt, Isabelle; Van Roozendael, Michel; Stavrakou, Trissevgeny; Müller, Jean-François; Pinardi, Gaia; Hendrick, François

    2014-05-01

    This work addresses the observation of tropospheric formaldehyde (H2CO) at the global scale using multiple nadir UV sensors, in an attempt to characterize the variability and long-term changes in NMVOC emissions, related to pollution, climate and land use changes. We present an updated version (v13) of the TEMIS formaldehyde data products retrieved from GOME-2 on METOP-A and B at mid-morning, and from OMI on AURA in the early afternoon. Consistent retrieval settings are used for all sensors following an algorithm baseline described in De Smedt et al. (2012), which is also the reference algorithm for the future TROPOMI/Sentinel-5 Precursor instrument to be launched in 2015. The satellite columns are validated using MAX-DOAS measurements in Eastern China (Xiang He), Europe (Uccle and OHP) and Equatorial Africa (Bujumbura). We show that the diurnal variation of the formaldehyde column as measured by the MAX-DOAS instruments is well reproduced by the morning and afternoon satellite measurements. This suggests that a good level of inter-sensor consistency has been achieved for H2CO column measurements from GOME-2 and OMI. Furthermore, regional trends in the formaldehyde columns are estimated from the different satellite datasets. Common features are observed such as a decrease of the formaldehyde columns in the Amazonian forest during the last decade, or lower 2009-2011 levels of pollution-related H2CO columns in industrialized regions.

  1. Calculation of smoke plume mass from passive UV satellite measurements by GOME-2 polarization measurement devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penning de Vries, M. J. M.; Tuinder, O. N. E.; Wagner, T.; Fromm, M.

    2012-04-01

    The Wallow wildfire of 2011 was one of the most devastating fires ever in Arizona, burning over 2,000 km2 in the states of Arizona and New Mexico. The fire originated in the Bear Wallow Wilderness area in June, 2011, and raged for more than a month. The intense heat of the fire caused the formation of a pyro-convective cloud. The resulting smoke plume, partially located above low-lying clouds, was detected by several satellite instruments, including GOME-2 on June 2. The UV Aerosol Index, indicative of aerosol absorption, reached a maximum of 12 on that day, pointing to an elevated plume with moderately absorbing aerosols. We have performed extensive model calculations assuming different aerosol optical properties to determine the total aerosol optical depth of the plume. The plume altitude, needed to constrain the aerosol optical depth, was obtained from independent satellite measurements. The model results were compared with UV Aerosol Index and UV reflectances measured by the GOME-2 polarization measurement devices, which have a spatial resolution of roughly 10x40 km2. Although neither the exact aerosol optical properties nor optical depth can be obtained with this method, the range in aerosol optical depth values that we calculate, combined with the assumed specific extinction mass factor of 5 m2/kg lead us to a rough estimate of the smoke plume mass that cannot, at present, be assessed in another way.

  2. The GOME-type Total Ozone Essential Climate Variable (GTO-ECV) data record from the ESA Climate Change Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coldewey-Egbers, M.; Loyola, D. G.; Koukouli, M.; Balis, D.; Lambert, J.-C.; Verhoelst, T.; Granville, J.; van Roozendael, M.; Lerot, C.; Spurr, R.; Frith, S. M.; Zehner, C.

    2015-09-01

    We present the new GOME-type Total Ozone Essential Climate Variable (GTO-ECV) data record which has been created within the framework of the European Space Agency's Climate Change Initiative (ESA-CCI). Total ozone column observations - based on the GOME-type Direct Fitting version 3 algorithm - from GOME (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment), SCIAMACHY (SCanning Imaging Absorption SpectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY), and GOME-2 have been combined into one homogeneous time series, thereby taking advantage of the high inter-sensor consistency. The data record spans the 15-year period from March 1996 to June 2011 and it contains global monthly mean total ozone columns on a 1°× 1° grid. Geophysical ground-based validation using Brewer, Dobson, and UV-visible instruments has shown that the GTO-ECV level 3 data record is of the same high quality as the equivalent individual level 2 data products that constitute it. Both absolute agreement and long-term stability are excellent with respect to the ground-based data, for almost all latitudes apart from a few outliers which are mostly due to sampling differences between the level 2 and level 3 data. We conclude that the GTO-ECV data record is valuable for a variety of climate applications such as the long-term monitoring of the past evolution of the ozone layer, trend analysis and the evaluation of chemistry-climate model simulations.

  3. The GOME-type Total Ozone Essential Climate Variable (GTO-ECV) data record from the ESA Climate Change Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coldewey-Egbers, M.; Loyola, D. G.; Koukouli, M.; Balis, D.; Lambert, J.-C.; Verhoelst, T.; Granville, J.; van Roozendael, M.; Lerot, C.; Spurr, R.; Frith, S. M.; Zehner, C.

    2015-05-01

    We present the new GOME-type Total Ozone Essential Climate Variable (GTO-ECV) data record which has been created within the framework of the European Space Agency's Climate Change Initiative (ESA-CCI). Total ozone column observations - based on the GOME-type Direct Fitting version 3 algorithm - from GOME (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment), SCIAMACHY (SCanning Imaging Absorption SpectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY), and GOME-2 have been combined into one homogeneous time series, thereby taking advantage of the high inter-sensor consistency. The data record spans the 15-year period from March 1996 to June 2011 and it contains global monthly mean total ozone columns on a 1° × 1° grid. Geophysical ground-based validation using Brewer, Dobson, and UV-visible instruments has shown that the GTO-ECV level 3 data record is of the same high quality as the equivalent individual level 2 data products that constitute it. Both absolute agreement and long-term stability are excellent with respect to the ground-based data, for almost all latitudes apart from a few outliers which are mostly due to sampling differences between the level 2 and level 3 data. We conclude that the GTO-ECV data record is valuable for a variety of climate applications such as the long-term monitoring of the past evolution of the ozone layer, trend analysis and the evaluation of Chemistry-Climate Model simulations.

  4. Comparative study on the technological properties of latex and natural rubber from Hancornia speciosa Gomes and Hevea brasiliensis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This work reports a systematic comparative study of the properties of natural lattices and rubbers extracted from Hancornia speciosa Gomes and Hevea brasiliensis [(Willd. ex Adr. de Juss.) Muell.-Arg.] (clone RRIM 600) trees from 11 collections in Brazil throughout 2004. Natural rubber latex particl...

  5. The GOME-2 Level 1 Instrument Degradation Model Version 1 and its Application for Atmospheric Composition Retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huckle, R.; Lang, R.; Retscher, C.; Poli, G.; Lindstrot, R.; Lacan, A.; Trollope, E.; Munro, R.

    2015-12-01

    GOME-2 on Metop-A and -B is suffering from signal degradation in the shorter wavelength regime below 420 nm, like many instruments of this type. During its 8 years in orbit to date, GOME-2 on Metop-A has acquired enough data to enable correction of most (though not all) aspects of its signal degradation using a combination of empirical and instrument model correction. We present the first version of the GOME-2 Metop-A degradation model which covers the full spectral range between 240 nm and 790 nm and also includes signal correction for two polarisation measurement devices (PMDs). We discuss the individual model components, including a correction of the solar-spectrum and the calibration of the solar diffuser, a stray-light correction in the region below 295 nm, an angular correction of all earthshine data, as well as a correction in the spectral domain for low frequency patterns. The first version of the dataset covers the time period from launch until the start of tandem operations in July 2013, when the swath of GOME-2 Metop-A was reduced from 1920 km to 960 km. We will discuss the individual degradation components accounted for, their physical origin, and will show the first results of the corrected spectra and their impact on level-2 retrieval quality. We also present the roadmap towards the implementation of a near real-time correction scheme of GOME-2 level-1 data and discuss various options concerning its potential operational and offline functionalities.

  6. Contiguous polarisation spectra of the Earth from 300 to 850 nm measured by GOME-2 onboard MetOp-A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilstra, L. G.; Lang, R.; Munro, R.; Aben, I.; Stammes, P.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper we present the first contiguous high-resolution spectra of the Earth's polarisation observed by a satellite instrument. The measurements of the Stokes fraction Q/I are performed by the spectrometer GOME-2 onboard the MetOp-A satellite. Polarisation measurements by GOME-2 are performed by onboard polarisation measurement devices (PMDs) and the high-resolution measurements discussed in this paper are taken in the special "PMD RAW" mode of operation. The spectral resolution of these PMD RAW polarisation measurements varies from 3 nm in the ultraviolet (UV) to 35 nm in the near-infrared wavelength range. We first compare measurements of the polarisation from cloud-free scenes with radiative transfer calculations for a number of cases. We find good agreement but also a spectral discrepancy at 800 nm, which we attribute to remaining imperfections in the calibration key data. Secondly, we study the polarisation of scenes with special scattering geometries that normally lead to near-zero Q/I. The GOME-2 polarisation spectra indeed show this behaviour and confirm the existence of the small discrepancy found earlier. Thirdly, we study the Earth polarisation for a variety of scenes. This provides a blueprint of Q/I over land and sea surfaces for various degrees of cloud cover. Fourthly, we compare the spectral dependence of measurements of Q/I in the UV with the generalised distribution function proposed by Schutgens and Stammes (2002) to describe the shape of the UV polarisation spectrum. The GOME-2 data confirm that these functions match the spectral behaviour captured by the GOME-2 PMD RAW mode.

  7. Contiguous polarisation spectra of the Earth from 300-850 nm measured by GOME-2 onboard MetOp-A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilstra, L. G.; Lang, R.; Munro, R.; Aben, I.; Stammes, P.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper we present the first contiguous high-resolution spectra of the Earth's polarisation observed by a satellite instrument. The measurements of the Stokes fraction Q/I are performed by the spectrometer GOME-2 onboard the MetOp-A satellite. Polarisation measurements by GOME-2 are performed by onboard polarisation measurement devices (PMDs) and the high-resolution measurements discussed in this paper are taken in the special "PMD RAW" mode of operation. The spectral resolution of these PMD RAW polarisation measurements varies from 3 nm in the ultraviolet (UV) to 35 nm in the near-infrared wavelength range. We first compare measurements of the polarisation from cloud-free scenes with radiative transfer calculations for a number of cases. We find good agreement but also a spectral discrepancy at 800 nm, which we attribute to remaining imperfections in the calibration key data. Secondly, we study the polarisation of scenes with special scattering geometries that normally lead to near-zero Q/I. The GOME-2 polarisation spectra indeed show this behaviour and confirm the existence of the small discrepancy found earlier. Thirdly, we study the Earth polarisation for a variety of scenes. This provides a blueprint of Q/I over land and sea surfaces for various degrees of cloud cover. Fourthly, we compare the spectral dependence of measurements of Q/I in the UV with the generalised distribution function that was proposed in the past (Schutgens and Stammes, 2002) to describe the shape of the UV polarisation spectrum. The GOME-2 data confirm that these functions match the spectral behaviour captured by the GOME-2 PMD RAW mode.

  8. Total ozone column derived from GOME and SCIAMACHY using KNMI retrieval algorithms: Validation against Brewer measurements at the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antón, M.; Kroon, M.; López, M.; Vilaplana, J. M.; Bañón, M.; van der A, R.; Veefkind, J. P.; Stammes, P.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2011-11-01

    This article focuses on the validation of the total ozone column (TOC) data set acquired by the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) and the Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY) satellite remote sensing instruments using the Total Ozone Retrieval Scheme for the GOME Instrument Based on the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (TOGOMI) and Total Ozone Retrieval Scheme for the SCIAMACHY Instrument Based on the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (TOSOMI) retrieval algorithms developed by the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute. In this analysis, spatially colocated, daily averaged ground-based observations performed by five well-calibrated Brewer spectrophotometers at the Iberian Peninsula are used. The period of study runs from January 2004 to December 2009. The agreement between satellite and ground-based TOC data is excellent (R2 higher than 0.94). Nevertheless, the TOC data derived from both satellite instruments underestimate the ground-based data. On average, this underestimation is 1.1% for GOME and 1.3% for SCIAMACHY. The SCIAMACHY-Brewer TOC differences show a significant solar zenith angle (SZA) dependence which causes a systematic seasonal dependence. By contrast, GOME-Brewer TOC differences show no significant SZA dependence and hence no seasonality although processed with exactly the same algorithm. The satellite-Brewer TOC differences for the two satellite instruments show a clear and similar dependence on the viewing zenith angle under cloudy conditions. In addition, both the GOME-Brewer and SCIAMACHY-Brewer TOC differences reveal a very similar behavior with respect to the satellite cloud properties, being cloud fraction and cloud top pressure, which originate from the same cloud algorithm (Fast Retrieval Scheme for Clouds from the Oxygen A-Band (FRESCO+)) in both the TOSOMI and TOGOMI retrieval algorithms.

  9. Overview of the O3M SAF GOME-2 operational atmospheric composition and UV radiation data products and data availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassinen, S.; Balis, D.; Bauer, H.; Begoin, M.; Delcloo, A.; Eleftheratos, K.; Gimeno Garcia, S.; Granville, J.; Grossi, M.; Hao, N.; Hedelt, P.; Hendrick, F.; Hess, M.; Heue, K.-P.; Hovila, J.; Jønch-Sørensen, H.; Kalakoski, N.; Kauppi, A.; Kiemle, S.; Kins, L.; Koukouli, M. E.; Kujanpää, J.; Lambert, J.-C.; Lang, R.; Lerot, C.; Loyola, D.; Pedergnana, M.; Pinardi, G.; Romahn, F.; van Roozendael, M.; Lutz, R.; De Smedt, I.; Stammes, P.; Steinbrecht, W.; Tamminen, J.; Theys, N.; Tilstra, L. G.; Tuinder, O. N. E.; Valks, P.; Zerefos, C.; Zimmer, W.; Zyrichidou, I.

    2016-02-01

    The three Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 instruments will provide unique and long data sets for atmospheric research and applications. The complete time period will be 2007-2022, including the period of ozone depletion as well as the beginning of ozone layer recovery. Besides ozone chemistry, the GOME-2 (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2) products are important e.g. for air quality studies, climate modelling, policy monitoring and hazard warnings. The heritage for GOME-2 is in the ERS/GOME and Envisat/SCIAMACHY instruments. The current Level 2 (L2) data cover a wide range of products such as ozone and minor trace gas columns (NO2, BrO, HCHO, H2O, SO2), vertical ozone profiles in high and low spatial resolution, absorbing aerosol indices, surface Lambertian-equivalent reflectivity database, clear-sky and cloud-corrected UV indices and surface UV fields with different weightings and photolysis rates. The Satellite Application Facility on Ozone and Atmospheric Chemistry Monitoring (O3M SAF) processes and disseminates data 24/7. Data quality is guaranteed by the detailed review processes for the algorithms, validation of the products as well as by a continuous quality monitoring of the products and processing. This paper provides an overview of the O3M SAF project background, current status and future plans for the utilisation of the GOME-2 data. An important focus is the provision of summaries of the GOME-2 products including product principles and validation examples together with sample images. Furthermore, this paper collects references to the detailed product algorithm and validation papers.

  10. Monitoring of Volcanic Eruptions and Determination of SO2 Plume Height from GOME-2 Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rix, M.; Valks, P.; Loyola, D.; Maerker, C.; Seidenberger, K.; van Gent, J.; van Roozendael, M.; Spurr, R.; Hao, N.; Emmandi, S.; Zimmer, W.

    2010-12-01

    Satellite-based remote sensing measurements of atmospheric sulphur dioxide (SO2) provide valuable information on anthropogenic pollution and volcanic activity. Sensors like GOME-2 on MetOp-A make it possible to monitor SO2 emissions on a global scale and daily basis. SO2 total column amounts are retrieved in near-real time using the UV range of backscattered sunlight making it possible to detect and track volcanic eruption plumes as a valuable tool for aviation warning. For aviation safety the correct determination of the plume height is a central issue. Therefore a novel method has been developed for the determination of the plume height in near-real time based on the operational DOAS retrieval combined with an iterative look-up table (LUT) approach. The method has been applied to the eruption of Eyjafjöll volcano, April - May 2010, and to the eruption of Kilauea, July 2008.

  11. NO2 evolution at global level using the space instruments SCIAMACHY, OMI and GOME-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosu, Adrian; Constantin, Daniel-Eduard; Bocaneala, Corina; Voiculescu, Mirela; Puiu Georgescu, Lucian

    2016-04-01

    The main objective of this study is to evaluate the amount of NO2 at global level above twenty five worldwide urban agglomerations or station during 2002-2015. Tropospheric NO2 Vertical Column Density (VCD) are derived from various satellite UV-Vis instruments: SCIAMACHY (SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric ChartographY) onboard Envisat, OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) onboard AURA and GOME-2 (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment Measurements-2) onboard Metop-A& B. Possible dependence of the evolution of the density of NO2 molecules above the major cities on demographic, economic, industry characteristics are investigated. Causes for various trends of the NO2 column, depending on geographical characteristics, altitude, are also analysed.

  12. Effective cloud fractions of GOME-2 measurements using an enhanced HICRU implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sihler, Holger; Beirle, Steffen; Grzegorski, Michael; Hörmann, Christoph; Lampel, Johannes; Penning de Vries, Marloes; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The physics of clouds is one of the most important drivers of meteorology and the climate system. Apart from this, the distribution of clouds interferes with the majority of satellite measurement techniques. Tropospheric trace gas retrievals are particularly sensitivity to the distribution of clouds within the field-of-view of the instrument, because already small cloud fractions have the potential to alter the measurement error and significantly increase the uncertainty of the measurement. Hence, the accuracy of tropospheric trace gas retrievals depends on the accuracy of the cloud fraction, particularly for small cloud fractions. The original HICRU Iterative Cloud Retrieval Utilities (HICRU) algorithm has been specifically developed for the retrieval of small cloud fractions at high accuracy. This is achieved by inferring a clear sky top of atmosphere reflectance map from the dataset itself, minimising the influence of instrument degradation and/or insufficient calibration. HICRU thus requires a minimum of a-priori knowledge. So far, this approach was limited to measurements at sufficiently small viewing angles, such as GOME and SCIAMACHY, for which the use of a single, viewing-angle independent background albedo map is justified. Here, we demonstrate how this empirical approach may be enhanced by parametrising the viewing angle dependence of the TOA reflectance. It then becomes applicable to satellite instruments like GOME-2, OMI, and the upcoming TROPOMI/S5P with viewing angles up to 45 or even 70 degrees, by parametrising the viewing angle dependence of the TOA reflectance. Furthermore, the enhanced HICRU algorithm comprises an advanced treatment of the temporal evolution using a spatially averaged Fourier series fit. The enhanced HICRU has the potential to be applied also to instruments with moderate spectral resolution like MERIS, MODIS, or AVHRR as well.

  13. Improvement of GOME-2 Tropospheric Ozone Profile Retrievals from Joint UV/Visible Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Zoogman, P.; Chance, K.; Cai, Z.; Nowlan, C. R.

    2015-12-01

    It has been shown that adding visible measurements in the Chappuis band to UV measurements in the Hartley/Huggins bands can significantly enhance retrieval sensitivity to lower tropospheric ozone from backscattered solar radiances due to deeper photon penetration in the visible to the surface than in the ultraviolet. The first NASA EVI TEMPO (Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution) instrument is being developed to measure backscattered solar radiation in two channels (~290-490 and 540-740 nm) and make atmospheric pollution measurements over North America from the Geostationary orbit. However, this retrieval enhancement has yet to be solidly demonstrated from existing measurements due to the weak ozone absorption in the visible and strong interference from surface reflectance and the requirement of accurate radiometric calibration across different spectral channels. We present GOME-2 retrievals from joint UV/visible measurements using the SAO optimal estimation based ozone profile retrieval algorithm, to directly explore the retrieval improvement in lower tropospheric ozone from additional visible measurements. To reduce the retrieval interference from surface reflectance, we add characterization of surface spectral reflectance in the visible based on ASTER and other surface reflectance spectra and MODIS BRDF climatology into the ozone profile algorithm using two approaches: fitting several EOFs (Empirical Orthogonal Functions) and scaling reflectance spectra. We also perform empirical radiometric calibration of the GOME-2 data based on radiative transfer simulations. We evaluate the retrieval improvement of joint UV/visible retrieval over the UV retrieval. These results clearly show the potential of using the visible to improve lower tropospheric ozone retrieval.

  14. Monitoring the Bardarbunga eruption using GOME-2/Metop-A & -B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedelt, Pascal; Valks, Pieter; Loyola, Diego

    2015-04-01

    We will present here the results of the Bardarbunga eruption monitored by the GOME-2 instrument aboard MetOp-A & -B. After increased seismic activity in August, the Icelandic volcano Bardarbunga (Bárðarbunga) erupted on 31 August 2014. Since 1 September the GOME-2 instruments aboard the MetOp-A and -B satellites detect a continuous emission of sulphur-dioxide (SO2) emitted from the Holuhraun fissure at the flanks of the Bardarbunga volcano. At the beginning the emitted SO2 was mainly transported to the north-eastern direction over Scandinavia and Russia. However, on September 22 an SO2 cloud was even moving over Europe and could be detected at the Hohenpeissenberg and Schneefernerhaus observatories. SO2 emissions are a good indicator for volcanic activity, since besides weak anthropogenic emissions there are no other known sources for atmospheric SO2, which can cause respiratory problems in the local population and the aircraft passengers. Furthermore in form of acid rain it increases the oxidation of aircraft components. It was found that for some volcanic eruptions SO2 can be a good proxy for the much harder to detect volcanic ash. Volcanic ash can be hazardous not only for the local population but also for aviation since it can cause total engine failure if it melts and then congeals in the engine. Furthermore ash is highly abrasive to engine turbine vanes and propellers. Under the leadership of IMF, DLR-EOC provides operational trace gas measurements, including total SO2 columns, in near-real-time (i.e., within 2 hours of recording) in the framework of EUMETSAT's Satellite Application Facility on Ozone and Atmospheric Chemistry Monitoring (O3M-SAF).

  15. Comparison of total water vapor column from GOME-2 on MetOp-A against ground-based GPS measurements at the Iberian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Román, R; Antón, M; Cachorro, V E; Loyola, D; Ortiz de Galisteo, J P; de Frutos, A; Romero-Campos, P M

    2015-11-15

    Water vapor column (WVC) obtained by GOME-2 instrument (GDP-4.6 version) onboard MetOp-A satellite platform is compared against reference WVC values derived from GPS (Global Positioning System) instruments from 2007 to 2012 at 21 places located at Iberian Peninsula. The accuracy and precision of GOME-2 to estimate the WVC is studied for different Iberian Peninsula zones using the mean (MBE) and the standard deviation (SD) of the GOME-2 and GPS differences. A direct comparison of all available data shows an overestimation of GOME-2 compared to GPS with a MBE of 0.7 mm (10%) and a precision quantified by a SD equals to 4.4mm (31%). South-Western zone presents the highest overestimation with a MBE of 1.9 mm (17%), while Continental zone shows the lowest SD absolute value (3.3mm) due mainly to the low WVC values reached at this zone. The influence of solar zenith angle (SZA), cloud fraction (CF), and the type of surface and its albedo on the differences between GOME-2 and GPS is analyzed in detail. MBE and SD increase when SZA increases, but MBE decreases (taking negative values) when CF increases and SD shows no significant dependence on CF. Under cloud-free conditions, the differences between WVC from GOME-2 and GPS are within the WVC error given by GOME-2. The changes of MBE and SD on Surface Albedo are not so evident, but MBE slightly decreases when the Surface Albedo increases. WVC from GOME-2 is, in general, more precise for land than for sea pixels. PMID:26172599

  16. A linear method for the retrieval of sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence from GOME-2 and SCIAMACHY data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, P.; Guanter, L.; Joiner, J.

    2015-06-01

    Global retrievals of near-infrared sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) have been achieved in the last few years by means of a number of space-borne atmospheric spectrometers. Here, we present a new retrieval method for medium spectral resolution instruments such as the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) and the SCanning Imaging Absorption SpectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY). Building upon the previous work by Guanter et al. (2013) and Joiner et al. (2013), our approach provides a solution for the selection of the number of free parameters. In particular, a backward elimination algorithm is applied to optimize the number of coefficients to fit, which reduces also the retrieval noise and selects the number of state vector elements automatically. A sensitivity analysis with simulated spectra has been utilized to evaluate the performance of our retrieval approach. The method has also been applied to estimate SIF at 740 nm from real spectra from GOME-2 and for the first time, from SCIAMACHY. We find a good correspondence of the absolute SIF values and the spatial patterns from the two sensors, which suggests the robustness of the proposed retrieval method. In addition, we compare our results to existing SIF data sets, examine uncertainties and use our GOME-2 retrievals to show empirically the relatively low sensitivity of the SIF retrieval to cloud contamination.

  17. A linear method for the retrieval of sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence from GOME-2 and SCIAMACHY data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, P.; Guanter, L.; Joiner, J.

    2014-12-01

    Global retrievals of near-infrared sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) have been achieved in the last years by means of a number of space-borne atmospheric spectrometers. Here, we present a new retrieval method for medium spectral resolution instruments such as the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME-2) and the SCanning Imaging Absorption SpectroMeter for Atmospheric ChartographY (SCIAMACHY). Building upon the previous work by Joiner et al. (2013), our approach solves existing issues in the retrieval such as the non-linearity of the forward model and the arbitrary selection of the number of free parameters. In particular, we use a backward elimination algorithm to optimize the number of coefficients to fit, which reduces also the retrieval noise and selects the number of state vector elements automatically. A sensitivity analysis with simulated spectra has been utilized to evaluate the performance of our retrieval approach. The method has also been applied to estimate SIF from real spectra from GOME-2 and for the first time, from SCIAMACHY. We find a good correspondence of the absolute SIF values and the spatial patterns from the two sensors, which suggests the robustness of the proposed retrieval method. In addition, we examine uncertainties and use our GOME-2 retrievals to show empirically the low sensitivity of the SIF retrieval to cloud contamination.

  18. A linear method for the retrieval of sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence from GOME-2 and SCIAMACHY data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, Philipp; Guanter, Luis; Joiner, Joanna

    2015-04-01

    Global retrievals of near-infrared sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) have been achieved in the last several years by means of space-borne atmospheric spectrometers. SIF is an electromagnetic signal emitted by the chlorophyll-a of photosynthetically active vegetation in the 650-850 nm spectral range. It represents a part of the excess energy during the process of photosynthesis and provides a measure of photosynthetic activity. The key challenge to retrieve SIF from space is to isolate the signal from the about 100 times more intense reflected solar radiation in the measured top of atmosphere (TOA) radiance spectrum. Nevertheless, it has been demonstrated that a number of satellite sensors provide the necessary spectral and radiometric performance to evaluate the in-filling of solar Fraunhofer lines and/or atmospheric absorption features by SIF. We will present recent developments for the retrieval of SIF from medium spectral resolution space-borne spectrometers such as the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME-2) and the Scanning Imaging Absorption SpectroMeter for Atmospheric ChartographY (SCIAMACHY). Building upon the previous work by Joiner et al. 2013, our approach solves existing issues in the retrieval such as the non-linearity of the forward model and the arbitrary selection of the number of free parameters. In particular, we use a backward elimination algorithm to optimize the number of coefficients to fit, which reduces also the retrieval noise and selects the number of state vector elements automatically. A sensitivity analysis with simulated spectra has been utilized to evaluate the performance of our retrieval approach. The method has also been applied to estimate SIF from real spectra from GOME-2 and for the first time, from SCIAMACHY. We are able to present a time series of GOME-2 SIF results covering the 2007-2011 time period and SCIAMACHY SIF results between 2003-2011. This represents an almost one decade long record of global SIF. We

  19. Validation of GOME-2/MetOp-A total water vapour column using reference radiosonde data from the GRUAN network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antón, M.; Loyola, D.; Román, R.; Vömel, H.

    2015-03-01

    The main goal of this paper is to validate the total water vapour column (TWVC) measured by the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) satellite sensor and generated using the GOME Data Processor (GDP) retrieval algorithm developed by the German Aerospace Centre (DLR). For this purpose, spatially and temporally collocated TWVC data from highly accurate sounding measurements for the period January 2009-May 2014 at six sites are used. These balloon-borne data are provided by the GCOS Reference Upper-Air Network (GRUAN). The correlation between GOME-2 and sounding TWVC data is reasonably good (determination coefficient, R2, of 0.89) when all available radiosondes (1400) are employed in the inter-comparison. When cloud-free cases (544) are selected by means of the satellite cloud fraction (CF < 5%), the correlation exhibits a remarkable improvement (R2 ~ 0.95). Nevertheless, the analysis of the relative differences between GOME-2 and GRUAN data shows a mean absolute bias error (weighted with the combined uncertainty derived from the estimated errors of both data sets) of 15% for all-sky conditions (9% for cloud-free cases). These results evidence a notable bias in the satellite TWVC data against the reference balloon-borne measurements, partially related to the cloudy conditions during the satellite overpass. The detailed analysis of the influence of cloud properties - CF, cloud top albedo (CTA) and cloud top pressure (CTP) - on the satellite-sounding differences reveals, as expected, a large effect of clouds in the GOME-2 TWVC data. For instance, the relative differences exhibit a large negative dependence on CTA, varying from -6 to -23% when CTA rises from 0.3 to 0.8. Furthermore, the satellite-sounding TWVC differences show a strong dependence on the satellite solar zenith angle (SZA) for values above 50°. Hence the smallest relative differences found in this satellite-sounding comparison are achieved for those cloud-free cases with satellite SZA below 50

  20. Validation of GOME (ERS-2) NO2 vertical column data with ground-based measurements at Issyk-Kul (Kyrgyzstan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionov, D.; Sinyakov, V.; Semenov, V.

    Starting from 1995 the global monitoring of atmospheric nitrogen dioxide is carried out by the measurements of nadir-viewing GOME spectrometer aboard ERS-2 satellite. Continuous validation of that data by means of comparisons with well-controlled ground-based measurements is important to ensure the quality of GOME data products and improve related retrieval algorithms. At the station of Issyk-Kul (Kyrgyzstan) the ground-based spectroscopic observations of NO2 vertical column have been started since 1983. The station is located on the northern shore of Issyk-Kul lake, 1650 meters above the sea level (42.6 N, 77.0 E). The site is equipped with grating spectrometer for the twilight measurements of zenith-scattered solar radiation in the visible range, and applies the DOAS technique to retrieve NO2 vertical column. It is included in the list of NDSC stations as a complementary one. The present study is focused on validation of GOME NO2 vertical column data, based on 8-year comparison with correlative ground-based measurements at Issyk-Kul station in 1996-2003. Within the investigation, an agreement of both individual and monthly averaged GOME measurements with corresponding twilight ground-based observations is examined. Such agreement is analyzed with respect to different conditions (season, sun elevation), temporal/spatial criteria choice (actual overpass location, correction for diurnal variation) and data processing (GDP version 2.7, 3.0). In addition, NO2 vertical columns were integrated from simultaneous stratospheric profile measurements by NASA HALOE and SAGE-II/III satellite instruments and introduced to explain the differences with ground-based observations. In particular cases, NO2 vertical profiles retrieved from the twilight ground-based measurements at Issuk-Kul were also included into comparison. Overall, summertime GOME NO2 vertical columns were found to be systematicaly lower than ground-based data. This work was supported by International Association

  1. Validation of GOME-2/MetOp-A total water vapour column using reference radiosonde data from GRUAN network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antón, M.; Loyola, D.; Román, R.; Vömel, H.

    2014-09-01

    The main goal of this article is to validate the total water vapour column (TWVC) measured by the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) satellite sensor and generated using the GOME Data Processor (GDP) retrieval algorithm developed by the German Aerospace Center (DLR). For this purpose, spatially and temporally collocated TWVC data from highly accurate sounding measurements for the period January 2009-May 2014 at six sites are used. These balloon-borne data are provided by GCOS Reference Upper-Air Network (GRUAN). The correlation between GOME-2 and sounding TWVC data is reasonably good (determination coefficient (R2) of 0.89) when all available radiosondes (1400) are employed in the inter-comparison. When cloud-free cases (544) are selected by means of the satellite cloud fraction (CF), the correlation exhibits a remarkable improvement (R2 ~ 0.95). Nevertheless, analyzing the six datasets together, the relative differences between GOME-2 and GRUAN data shows mean values (in absolute term) of 19% for all-sky conditions and 14% for cloud-free cases, which evidences a notable bias in the satellite TWVC data against the reference balloon-borne measurements. The satellite-sounding TWVC differences show a strong solar zenith angle (SZA) dependence for values above 50° with a stable behaviour for values below this zenith angle. The smallest relative differences found in the inter-comparison (between -5 and +3%) are achieved for those cloud-free cases with SZA below 50°. Furthermore, the detailed analysis of the influence of cloud properties (CF, cloud top albedo (CTA) and cloud top pressure (CTP)) on the satellite-sounding differences reveals, as expected, a large effect of clouds in the GOME-2 TWVC data. For instance, the relative differences exhibit a large negative dependence on CTA, varying from +5 to -20% when CTA rises from 0.3 to 0.9. Finally, the satellite-sounding differences also show a negative dependence on the reference TWVC values, changing from

  2. Operational O3M-SAF trace gas column products: GOME-2 NO2, BrO, SO2 and CH2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Nan; Valks, P.; de Smedt, I.; Emmadi, S.; Lambert, J.-C.; Loyola, D.; Pinardi, G.; Rix, M.; van Roozendael, M.; They, N.

    2010-05-01

    This contribution focuses on the operational GOME-2 trace gas column products developed at the German Aerospace Centre, in the framework of EUMETSAT's Satellite Application Facility on Ozone and Atmospheric Chemistry Monitoring (O3M-SAF). We present an overview of the retrieval algorithms and exemplary results for NO2, BrO, SO2 and CH2O. These trace gas column products are retrieved with the GOME Data Processor (GDP) version 4.4 using the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) method in the UV and VIS wavelength regions. Total NO2 is retrieved in the 425-450 nm and an additional algorithm is applied to retrieve the tropospheric NO2 column for polluted conditions. The operational GOME-2 NO2 product is available for the users in near real time, i.e. within two hours after sensing. SO2 emissions from volcanic and anthropogenic sources can be measured by GOME-2 using the UV wavelength region around 320 nm. For BrO and CH2O, optimal DOAS fitting windows have been determined for GOME-2 in the UV wavelength region. The GOME-2 SO2, BrO and CH2O products have reached the operational O3M-SAF status, and are routinely available to the users. More than three years of operational trace gas column measurements are now available from GOME-2. We present initial validation results using ground-based measurements, as well as comparisons with other satellite products, such as those from SCIAMACHY and OMI. The use of tropospheric NO2, SO2 and CH2O columns for air quality applications will be presented, including temporal evolution analyses for China. Furthermore, we will show examples of BrO under polar winter conditions.

  3. Genetic diversity of the Neotropical tree Hancornia speciosa Gomes in natural populations in Northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, H J; Martins, L S S; Montarroyos, A V V; Silva Junior, J F; Alzate-Marin, A L; Moraes Filho, R M

    2015-01-01

    Mangabeira (Hancornia speciosa Gomes) is a fruit tree of the Apocynaceae family, which is native to Brazil and is a very important food resource for human populations in its areas of occurrence. Mangabeira fruit is collected as an extractive activity, and no domesticated varieties or breeding programs exist. Due to a reduction in the area of ecosystems where it occurs, mangabeira is threatened by genetic erosion in Brazil. The objective of this study was to characterize and evaluate the genetic diversity of 38 mangabeira individuals collected from natural populations in Pernambuco State using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) molecular markers. The ISSR methodology generated a total of 93 loci; 10 were monomorphic and 83 were polymorphic. The average number of loci per primer was 15.5, ranging from 9 (#UBC 866) to 21 (#UBC 834). The results showed a high level of genetic diversity (0.30), and found that only around 30% of genetic variability is distributed among populations (GST = 0.29, ФST = 0.30), with the remainder (ФCT = 70%) found within each population, as expected for forest outcrossing species. Estimates for historic gene flow (1.18) indicate that there is some isolation of these populations, and some degree of genetic differentiation. PMID:26782420

  4. Systematic analysis of interannual and seasonal variations of model-simulated tropospheric NO2 in Asia and comparison with GOME-satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, I.; He, Y.; Ohara, T.; Yamaji, K.; Kurokawa, J.-I.; Katayama, M.; Wang, Z.; Noguchi, K.; Hayashida, S.; Richter, A.; Burrows, J. P.

    2006-11-01

    Systematic analyses of interannual and seasonal variations of tropospheric NO2 vertical column densities (VCDs) based on GOME satellite data and the regional scale chemical transport model (CTM), Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ), are presented over eastern Asia between 1996 and June 2003. A newly developed year-by-year emission inventory (REAS) was used in CMAQ. The horizontal distribution of annual averaged GOME NO2 VCDs generally agrees well with the CMAQ results. However, CMAQ/REAS results underestimate the GOME retrievals with factors of 2-4 over polluted industrial regions such as Central East China (CEC), a major part of Korea, Hong Kong, and central and western Japan. For the Japan region, GOME and CMAQ NO2 data show good agreement with respect to interannual variation and show no clear increasing trend. For CEC, GOME and CMAQ NO2 data show good agreement and indicate a very rapid increasing trend from 2000. Analyses of the seasonal cycle of NO2 VCDs show that GOME data have systematically larger dips than CMAQ NO2 during February-April and September-November. Sensitivity experiments with fixed emission intensity reveal that the detection of emission trends from satellite in fall or winter have a larger error caused by the variability of meteorology. Examination during summer time and annual averaged NO2 VCDs are robust with respect to variability of meteorology and are therefore more suitable for analyses of emission trends. Analysis of recent trends of annual emissions in China shows that the increasing trends of 1996-1998 and 2000-2002 for GOME and CMAQ/REAS show good agreement, but the rate of increase by GOME is approximately 10-11% yr-1 after 2000; it is slightly steeper than CMAQ/REAS (8-9% yr-1). The greatest difference was apparent between the years 1998 and 2000: CMAQ/REAS only shows a few percentage points of increase, whereas GOME gives a greater than 8% yr-1 increase. The exact reason remains unclear, but the most likely explanation is

  5. Systematic analysis of interannual and seasonal variations of model-simulated tropospheric NO2 in Asia and comparison with GOME-satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, I.; He, Y.; Ohara, T.; Yamaji, K.; Kurokawa, J.-I.; Katayama, M.; Wang, Z.; Noguchi, K.; Hayashida, S.; Richter, A.; Burrows, J. P.

    2007-03-01

    Systematic analyses of interannual and seasonal variations of tropospheric NO2 vertical column densities (VCDs) based on GOME satellite data and the regional scale chemical transport model (CTM), Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ), are presented for the atmosphere over eastern Asia between 1996 and June 2003. A newly developed year-by-year emission inventory (REAS) was used in CMAQ. The horizontal distribution of annual averaged GOME NO2 VCDs generally agrees well with the CMAQ results. However, CMAQ/REAS results underestimate the GOME retrievals with factors of 2-4 over polluted industrial regions such as Central East China (CEC), a major part of Korea, Hong Kong, and central and western Japan. The most probable reasons for the underestimation typically over the CEC are accuracy of the basic energy statistic data, emission factors, and socio-economic data used for construction of emission inventory. For the Japan region, GOME and CMAQ NO2 data show reasonable agreement with respect to interannual variation and show no clear increasing trend. For CEC, GOME and CMAQ NO2 data indicate a very rapid increasing trend from 2000. Analyses of the seasonal cycle of NO2 VCDs show that GOME data have larger dips than CMAQ NO2 during February-April and September-November. Sensitivity experiments with fixed emission intensity reveal that the detection of emission trends from satellite in fall or winter has a larger error caused by the variability of meteorology. Examination during summer time and annual averaged NO2 VCDs are robust with respect to variability of meteorology and are therefore more suitable for analyses of emission trends. Analysis of recent trends of annual emissions in China shows that the increasing trends of 1996-1998 and 2000-2002 for GOME and CMAQ/REAS show good agreement, but the rate of increase by GOME is approximately 10-11% yr-1 after 2000; it is slightly steeper than CMAQ/REAS (8-9% yr-1). The greatest difference was apparent between the years

  6. Operational O3M-SAF trace-gas column products: GOME-2 tropospheric NO2, SO2 and BrO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valks, P.; Hao, N.; Rix, M.; Lambert, J.-C.; Pinardi, G.; van Roozendael, M.; Theys, N.; Loyola, D.

    2009-04-01

    This contribution focuses on the operational GOME-2 trace-gas column products developed at the German Aerospace Centre, in the framework of EUMETSAT's Satellite Application Facility on Ozone and Atmospheric Chemistry Monitoring (O3M-SAF). We present the algorithms and exemplary results of tropospheric NO2, total BrO and SO2. These trace-gas column products are retrieved from GOME-2 solar backscattered measurements in the UV/VIS wavelength region, using the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) method. Total NO2 is routinely retrieved with the GOME Data Processor (GDP) version 4.2 using the 425-450 nm wavelength region. An additional algorithm is applied to derive the tropospheric NO2 column for polluted conditions: after subtracting the estimated stratospheric component from the total column, the tropospheric NO2 column is determined using an air mass factor based on monthly climatological NO2 profiles from the MOZART-2 model. SO2 emissions from volcanic and anthropogenic sources can be measured by GOME-2 using the UV wavelength region around 320 nm. With GOME-2, it is possible to detect and track volcanic SO2 in near-real time and on a global scale, which is of particular importance for volcanic early warning services. For the GOME-2 retrieval of the total BrO column, current research focuses on the optimisation of the DOAS fitting window in the UV wavelength region. BrO columns retrieved from the baseline GOME fitting window (344.6-359 nm) show relatively large noise levels. Therefore, the use of an alternative fitting window has been analysed. More than two years of tropospheric NO2, total BrO and SO2 measurements are now available from GOME-2. We present initial validation results using ground-based measurements, as well as comparisons with other satellite products, such as those from SCIAMACHY and OMI. The use of tropospheric NO2 columns for air quality applications will be presented. We will show examples of BrO from volcanic eruptions and under

  7. Retrieving aerosol optical depth and type in the boundary layer over land and ocean from simultaneous GOME spectrometer and ATSR-2 radiometer measurements, 1, Method description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer-Popp, T.; Schroedter, M.; Gesell, G.

    2002-11-01

    A new aerosol retrieval method called Synergetic Aerosol Retrieval (SYNAER), using simultaneous measurements of the radiometer Along Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR-2) and the spectrometer Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) in the visible and near-infrared spectra, was developed. Both instruments are flown onboard the European Remote Sensing (ERS-2) satellite. SYNAER delivers boundary layer aerosol optical thickness (BLAOT) and aerosol type both over land and over ocean, the latter as BLAOT percentage of six representative components from the Optical Parameters of Aerosols and Clouds (OPAC) data set. The high spatial resolution of ATSR-2 permits accurate cloud detection. It allows BLAOT calculation over automatically selected dark pixels and surface albedo correction for a set of boundary layer aerosol mixtures. After spatial integration and colocation to GOME pixels, these parameters are used to simulate GOME spectra for the same set of aerosol mixtures. A least squares fit of these spectra to the measured and cloud-corrected GOME spectrum chooses the aerosol mixture. First validation studies are presented in part 2 of this paper [, 2002]. The method will be used for the future sensor pairs Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Cartography (SCIAMACHY)/Advanced ATSR (AATSR) on Envisat and GOME-2/Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on METOP. Thus, SYNAER holds the potential to extract a long-term climatological data set.

  8. Ground-based NO 2 measurements at the Italian Brewer stations: A pilot study with Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francesconi, M.; Casale, G. R.; Siani, A. M.; Casadio, S.

    2004-07-01

    Ground-based NO2 total column measurements have been collected since 1992 using Brewer spectrophotometry at Rome, an urban site, and Ispra (semi-rural). These are the only ground-based stations regularly monitoring NO2 in Italy. The methodology of measurement together with the procedure to control its quality is described. From the analysis of the time series it was found that the mean value of the NO2 column is 1.63 DU at Rome and 1.60 DU at Ispra. A first attempt to compare NO2 vertical column densities (VCD) from GOME with those derived from ground-based Brewer measurements, under different atmospheric conditions and measurement time lags is here presented. The results of this pilot study showed unsatisfactory agreement because different atmospheres are probed by GOME and Brewer instruments. The GOME space resolution resulted insufficient to fully characterize the Rome and Ispra highly localized polluted areas.

  9. Temperature Independent Differential Absorption Spectroscopy (tidas) and Simplified Atmospheric Air Mass Factor (samf) Techniques For The Measurement of Ozone Vertical Content From Gome Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zehner, C.; Casadio, S.; di Sarra, A.; Putz, E.

    A simple technique for the fast retrieval of ozone vertical amount from GOME (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment) spectra is described in detail. The TIDAS (Tempera- ture Independent Differential Absorption Spectroscopy) technique uses GOME's ca- pability of measuring atmospheric spectra over a broad wavelength range with high spectral resolution. The ozone slant columns are retrieved by applying the Beer- Lambert law to two spectral windows where the ozone absorption cross sections show similar temperature dependence. A simple geometric air mass factor is computed for a fixed height spherical atmosphere (SAMF: Simplified Atmospheric air Mass Factor) to retrieve ozone vertical amounts. Vertical ozone values are compared to the GDP (GOME Data Processor), and to ground based ozone measurements.

  10. Development and characterisation of a state-of-the-art GOME-2 formaldehyde air-mass factor algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewson, W.; Barkley, M. P.; Gonzalez Abad, G.; Bösch, H.; Kurosu, T.; Spurr, R.; Tilstra, L. G.

    2015-10-01

    Space-borne observations of formaldehyde (HCHO) are frequently used to derive surface emissions of isoprene, an important biogenic volatile organic compound. The conversion of retrieved HCHO slant column concentrations from satellite line-of-sight measurements to vertical columns is determined through application of an air mass factor (AMF), accounting for instrument viewing geometry, radiative transfer, and vertical profile of the absorber in the atmosphere. This step in the trace gas retrieval is subject to large errors. This work presents the AMF algorithm in use at the University of Leicester (UoL), which introduces scene-specific variables into a per-observation full radiative transfer AMF calculation, including increasing spatial resolution of key environmental parameter databases, input variable area weighting, instrument-specific scattering weight calculation, and inclusion of an ozone vertical profile climatology. Application of these updates to HCHO slant columns from the GOME-2 instrument is shown to typically adjust the AMF by ±20 %, compared to a reference algorithm without these advanced parameterisations. On average the GOME-2 AMFs increase by 4 %, with over 70 % of locations having an AMF of 0-20 % larger than originally, largely resulting from the use of the latest GOME-2 reflectance product. Furthermore, the new UoL algorithm also incorporates a full radiative transfer error calculation for each scene to help characterise AMF uncertainties. Global median AMF errors are typically 50-60 %, and are driven by uncertainties in the HCHO profile shape and its vertical distribution relative to clouds and aerosols. If uncertainty on the a priori HCHO profile is relatively small (< 10 %) then the median AMF total error decreases to about 30-40 %.

  11. Trends in formaldehyde columns over the Amazon rainforest, as observed from space with SCIAMACHY, OMI and GOME-2 spectrometers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Smedt, Isabelle; Stavrakou, Trissevgeni; Lerot, Christophe; Yu, Huan; François, Hendrick; Gielen, Clio; Pinardi, Gaia; Muller, Jean-François; Van Roozendael, Michel

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric formaldehyde (H2CO) is a central carbonyl compound of tropospheric chemistry. It is produced by the oxidation of a large variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), from biogenic, pyrogenic or anthropogenic emission sources. Tropical vegetation, in particular the Amazon forest that represents over half of the planet's remaining rainforests, emit a wide range of highly reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs). Those play a critical role in atmospheric chemistry and climate, by changing the oxidation capacity of the atmosphere and thus the lifetimes of other key trace gases such as CO and CH4, and by producing organic aerosols. Satellite observations of H2CO, bringing information at the global scale and over decades, are essential to trace and understand the nature and the spatio-temporal evolution of VOC emissions. We have been developing algorithms to retrieve formaldehyde columns from satellite nadir UV spectral measurements, and we have processed the full level-1 datasets of GOME/ERS-2, SCIAMACHY/ENVISAT, GOME-2/METOPA&B and OMI/AURA (De Smedt et al., 2008; 2012; 2015). Resulting H2CO products are openly distributed via the TEMIS website (http://h2co.aeronomie.be). In this work, we use the morning and afternoon H2CO columns between 2004 and 2014, respectively composed by the SCIAMACHY and GOME2 A&B datasets, and from the OMI observations, to study the diurnal, seasonal and long-term variations of H2CO over the Amazon rainforest. The highest H2CO columns worldwide are observed, with morning columns markedly higher than early afternoon. Very large variations between the dry and the wet seasons occur each year. Importantly, in some areas of the forest, mainly in the Rondonia Brazilian State, we observe a net decrease of the H2CO columns. We find very high correlation coefficients between the satellite H2CO columns and the reported deforestation fires that have significantly decreased in Rondonia since 2004 [INPE].

  12. Anthropogenic emissions of NOx over China: Reconciling the difference of inverse modeling results using GOME-2 and OMI measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Dasa; Wang, Yuhang; Smeltzer, Charles; Boersma, K. Folkert

    2014-06-27

    Inverse modeling using satellite observations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) columns has been extensively used to estimate nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions in China. Recently, the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) provide independent global NO2 column measurements on a nearly daily basis at around 9:30 and 13:30 local time across the equator, respectively. Anthropogenic NOx emission estimates by applying previously developed monthly inversion (MI) or daily inversion (DI) methods to these two sets of measurements show substantial differences. We improve the DI method by conducting model simulation, satellite retrieval, and inverse modeling sequentially on a daily basis. After each inversion, we update anthropogenic NOx emissions in the model simulation with the newly obtained a posteriori results. Consequently, the inversion-optimized emissions are used to compute the a priori NO2 profiles for satellite retrievals. As such, the a priori profiles used in satellite retrievals are now coupled to inverse modeling results. The improved procedure was applied to GOME-2 and OMI NO2 measurements in 2011. The new daily retrieval-inversion (DRI) method estimates an average NOx emission of 6.9 Tg N/yr over China, and the difference between using GOME-2 and OMI measurements is 0.4 Tg N/yr, which is significantly smaller than the difference of 1.3 Tg N/yr using the previous DI method. Using the more consistent DRI inversion results, we find that anthropogenic NOx emissions tend to be higher in winter and summer than spring (and possibly fall) and the weekday-to-weekend emission ratio tends to increase with NOx emission in China.

  13. Operational Monitoring of GOME-2 and IASI Level 1 Product Processing at EUMETSAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livschitz, Y.; Munro, R.; Lang, R.; Fiedler, L.; Dyer, R.; Eisinger, M.

    2009-12-01

    The growing complexity of operational level 1 radiance products from Low Earth Orbiting (LEO) platforms like EUMETSATs Metop series makes near-real-time monitoring of product quality a challenging task. The main challenge is to provide a monitoring system which is flexible and robust enough to identify and to react to anomalies which may be previously unknown to the system, as well as to provide all means and parameters necessary in order to support efficient ad-hoc analysis of the incident. The operational monitoring system developed at EUMETSAT for monitoring of GOME-2 and IASI level 1 data allows to perform near-real-time monitoring of operational products and instrument’s health in a robust and flexible fashion. For effective information management, the system is based on a relational database (Oracle). An Extract, Transform, Load (ETL) process transforms products in EUMETSAT Polar System (EPS) format into relational data structures. The identification of commonalities between products and instruments allows for a database structure design in such a way that different data can be analyzed using the same business intelligence functionality. An interactive analysis software implementing modern data mining techniques is also provided for a detailed look into the data. The system is effectively used for day-to-day monitoring, long-term reporting, instrument’s degradation analysis as well as for ad-hoc queries in case of an unexpected instrument or processing behaviour. Having data from different sources on a single instrument and even from different instruments, platforms or numerical weather prediction within the same database allows effective cross-comparison and looking for correlated parameters. Automatic alarms raised by checking for deviation of certain parameters, for data losses and other events significantly reduce time, necessary to monitor the processing on a day-to-day basis.

  14. Operational Monitoring of GOME-2 and IASI Level 1 Product Processing at EUMETSAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livschitz, Yakov; Munro, Rosemary; Lang, Rüdiger; Fiedler, Lars; Dyer, Richard; Eisinger, Michael

    2010-05-01

    The growing complexity of operational level 1 radiance products from Low Earth Orbiting (LEO) platforms like EUMETSATs Metop series makes near-real-time monitoring of product quality a challenging task. The main challenge is to provide a monitoring system which is flexible and robust enough to identify and to react to anomalies which may be previously unknown to the system, as well as to provide all means and parameters necessary in order to support efficient ad-hoc analysis of the incident. The operational monitoring system developed at EUMETSAT for monitoring of GOME-2 and IASI level 1 data allows to perform near-real-time monitoring of operational products and instrument's health in a robust and flexible fashion. For effective information management, the system is based on a relational database (Oracle). An Extract, Transform, Load (ETL) process transforms products in EUMETSAT Polar System (EPS) format into relational data structures. The identification of commonalities between products and instruments allows for a database structure design in such a way that different data can be analyzed using the same business intelligence functionality. An interactive analysis software implementing modern data mining techniques is also provided for a detailed look into the data. The system is effectively used for day-to-day monitoring, long-term reporting, instrument's degradation analysis as well as for ad-hoc queries in case of an unexpected instrument or processing behaviour. Having data from different sources on a single instrument and even from different instruments, platforms or numerical weather prediction within the same database allows effective cross-comparison and looking for correlated parameters. Automatic alarms raised by checking for deviation of certain parameters, for data losses and other events significantly reduce time, necessary to monitor the processing on a day-to-day basis.

  15. Macrophytobenthic flora of the Abrolhos Archipelago and the Sebastião Gomes Reef, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrano-Silva, Beatriz N.; Oliveira, Eurico C.

    2013-11-01

    The Abrolhos Bank, located on the coast of Bahia, Brazil, harbors the largest coral reef system in the South Atlantic. This area has attracted the attention of biologists because of its peculiar mushroom-shaped structures, locally known as "chapeirões", and endemic species of corals and other organisms. The macrophytobenthos compartment plays an important ecological role in the functioning of the bank, and some reports on the presence of seaweeds and seagrasses have been published; however, the data are fragmentary, and a more detailed survey of the macrophytobenthos compartment is lacking. Here we consolidate the information available and add new data obtained from two expeditions focused on seaweed and seagrass diversity from two sectors of the bank: the islands of the Abrolhos archipelago (AA) and the Sebastião Gomes Reef (SG). These sites were selected for their contrasting characteristics. Specifically, SG (15 km off the mouth of the Caravelas River) is subjected to a broader range of anthropogenic impacts and to input of terrigenous sediments, while the AA (54 km offshore) is surrounded by calcareous biogenic sediments, has clearer water and is less affected by human activities. Macrophytobenthic species richness on both reference areas is larger than previously thought. Considering previous records, there are 164 species of macrophytes in AA and 111 species in SG, of which 59 and 74 species are first records for each respective location. The higher species richness at the AA may result from a higher habitat complexity and lower turbidity, but a potential negative effect of enhanced human impacts at SG cannot be ruled out. Considering that macroalgae are relevant components of the benthic community, as producers and structurer organisms, the data presented herein provide a reliable baseline for future environmental studies, and thus may contribute to improve management policies within the unique ecosystem of Abrolhos.

  16. Operational surface UV radiation product from GOME-2 and AVHRR/3 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kujanpää, J.; Kalakoski, N.

    2015-10-01

    The surface ultraviolet (UV) radiation product, version 1.20, generated operationally in the framework of the Satellite Application Facility on Ozone and Atmospheric Chemistry Monitoring (O3M SAF) of the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT) is described. The product is based on the total ozone column derived from the measurements of the second Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME-2) instrument aboard EUMETSAT's polar orbiting meteorological operational (Metop) satellites. Cloud cover is taken into account by retrieving cloud optical depth from the channel 1 reflectance of the third Advanced Very High-Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR/3) instrument aboard both Metop in the morning orbit and Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in the afternoon orbit. In addition, more overpasses are used at high latitudes where the swaths of consecutive orbits overlap. The input satellite data are received from EUMETSAT's Multicast Distribution System (EUMETCast). The surface UV product includes daily maximum dose rates and integrated daily doses with different biological weighting functions, integrated ultraviolet B (UVB) and ultraviolet A (UVA) radiation, solar noon UV index and daily maximum photolysis frequencies of ozone and nitrogen dioxide at the surface level. The quantities are computed in a 0.5°×0.5° regular latitude-longitude grid and stored as daily files in the hierarchical data format (HDF5) within 2 weeks from sensing. The product files are archived in the O3M SAF distributed archive and can be ordered via the EUMETSAT Data Centre.

  17. Relationship between MODIS fire counts and GOME-2 tropospheric NO2 measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, S. F.; Richter, A.; Schönhardt, A.; Burrows, J. P.

    2012-04-01

    Biomass burning has an ongoing role in determining the composition of Earth's surface and atmosphere. The term biomass burning comprises prescribed and wild fires (vegetation fires), as well as biofuel use, such as wood or peat for heating and cooking. Biomass burning represents an important source of aerosol particles and greenhouse gases such as CO2, CH4 and N2O, but also chemically active gases such as CO and NO2 are observed in the plumes. Even though vegetation fire emission inventories have improved considerably in recent years, large uncertainties remain in the temporally and spatially highly variable biomass burning emissions, especially due to uncertainties in input parameters. While satellite observed CO emissions from biomass burning have been investigated in great detail in the last years, NO2 has received much less attention. This can be explained by difficulties posed by the short atmospheric lifetime of NO2 and its photochemical equilibrium with NO but also the complicated retrieval of NO2 due to the presence of smoke and aerosols in the biomass burning plumes. Here, we present the relationship between observed fire counts and NO2 tropospheric vertical column densities from MODIS and GOME-2 measurements, respectively. The MOZART model for 1997 was used to determine monthly averaged air-mass factors and cloud fraction was derived by the FRESCO algorithm from SCIAMACHY measurements. The results show good correlation values (> 0.7) in many parts of the world, especially in the Subtropics. Future work will be further improvement of the retrieval for specific biomass burning situations in order to estimate total emissions from biomass burning for representative biomass burning regions by the use of appropriate models.

  18. Operational O3M-SAF trace gas column products: GOME-2 ozone, NO2, BrO, SO2 and CH2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Nan; Valks, Pieter; Loyola, Diego; de Smedt, Isabelle; van Roozendael, Michel; Theys, Nicolas; Rix, Meike; Koukouli, Mariliza; Balis, Dimitris; Lambert, Jean-Christopher; Pinardi, Gaia; Zimmer, Walter; Emmadi, Sunil

    This contribution focuses on the operational GOME-2 trace gas column products developed at the German Aerospace Centre, in the framework of EUMETSAT's Satellite Application Facility on Ozone and Atmospheric Chemistry Monitoring (O3M-SAF). We present an overview of the retrieval algorithms and exemplary results for ozone, NO2, BrO, SO2 and CH2O. These trace gas column products are retrieved with the GOME Data Processor (GDP) version 4.x algorithm and the UPAS system. Total ozone and NO2 are retrieved with the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) method using the UV wavelength region around 330 nm and 435 nm respectively. An additional algorithm is applied to retrieve the tropospheric NO2 column for polluted con-ditions. The operational ozone and NO2 products are available for the users in near real time, i.e. within two hours after sensing. SO2 emissions from volcanic and anthropogenic sources can be measured by GOME-2 around 320 nm. For BrO and CH2O, optimal DOAS fitting windows have been determined for GOME-2 in the UV wavelength region. The GOME-2 ozone, total and tropospheric NO2, SO2, BrO, CH2O and cloud products from DLR have reached the operational EUMETSAT O3M-SAF status. All these products are routinely available to the users via EUMETCast, WMO/GTS and FTP in HDF5 and BUFR format. We present initial validation results for GOME-2 products using ground-based measurements, as well as comparisons with other satellite products, such as those from SCIAMACHY and OMI. The use of tropospheric NO2, SO2 and CH2O columns for air quality applications will be presented, including temporal evolution analyses for China. Furthermore, we will show examples of BrO under polar winter conditions.

  19. Overview of the O3M-SAF validation facility for operational GOME-2 NO2 column data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinardi, Gaia; Lambert, Jean-Christopher; Granville, Jos; van Roozendael, Michel; Delcloo, Andy; Debacker, Hugo; Valks, Pieter; Hao, Nan

    In the framework of EUMETSAT's Satellite Application Facility on Ozone and Atmospheric Chemistry Monitoring (O3M-SAF,) nitrogen dioxide (NO2) total column and tropospheric column data are generated operationally from GOME-2 measurements in near-real-time (within 2:30 hours after sensing). NO2 column data are retrieved from the Earth radiance and solar irradiance spectra by a chain of several modules (currently, the level-0-to-1 processor v4.0 and the level-1-to-2 DOAS retrieval processor GDP v4.3). These intermediate modules calculates the parameters needed to derive the final column data: the slant column density along the optical path, the fractional cover and top pressure of clouds affecting the measurement scene, the geometrical enhancement factor (AMF, needed to convert slant into vertical columns), and the NO2 stratospheric reference to be subtracted from the total column to obtain the tropospheric column. In order to validate the final product (the total and tropospheric NO2 columns) in the best way, and due to the complexity of the GOME-2 retrieval chain and the existing issues related to the set-up of a validation strategy in an operational environment, an end-to-end validation ap-proach has been developed, as recommended by Reference Protocols and Guidelines. To ensure meaningful and continuous quality assessment of GOME-2 NO2 data products, the end-to-end validation approach performs the verification and validation of critical individual components of the level-1-to-2 retrieval chain. Particular interest is given to recurring validation issues, such as the particular way remote sensing samples and smoothes the significant variability of atmospheric NO2, the diurnal cycle of NO2, the poor availability of correlative measure-ments (especially for tropospheric column), as well as the current lack of homogenisation of the validation methods. The end-to-end validation process of GOME-2 NO2 data is based on a set of correlative obser-vations performed by

  20. Satellite observation of lowermost tropospheric ozone by multispectral synergism of IASI thermal infrared and GOME-2 ultraviolet measurements over Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuesta, J.; Eremenko, M.; Liu, X.; Dufour, G.; Cai, Z.; Hoepfner, M.; von Clarmann, T.; Sellitto, P.; Foret, G.; Gaubert, B.; Beekmann, M.; Orphal, J. J.; Chance, K.; Spurr, R. J.; Flaud, J.

    2013-12-01

    Lowermost tropospheric ozone is a major factor determining air quality, which directly affects human health in megacities and causes damages to ecosystems. Monitoring tropospheric ozone is a key societal issue which can be addressed at the regional scale by spaceborne observation. However, current satellite retrievals of tropospheric ozone using uncoupled either ultraviolet (UV) or thermal infrared (TIR) observations show limited sensitivity to ozone at the lowermost troposphere (LMT, up to 3 km asl of altitude above sea level), which is the major concern for air quality. In this framework, we have developed a new multispectral approach for observing lowermost tropospheric ozone from space by synergism of atmospheric TIR radiances observed by IASI and earth UV reflectances measured by GOME-2. Both instruments are onboard the series of MetOp satellites (in orbit since 2006 and expected until 2022) and their scanning capabilities offer global coverage every day, with a relatively fine ground pixel resolution (12-km-diameter pixels spaced by 25 km for IASI at nadir). Our technique uses altitude-dependent Tikhonov-Phillips-type constraints, which optimize sensitivity to lower tropospheric ozone. It integrates the VLIDORT and KOPRA radiative transfer codes for simulating UV reflectance and TIR radiance, respectively. We have used our method to analyze real observations over Europe during an ozone pollution episode in the summer of 2009. The results show that the multispectral synergism of IASI (TIR) and GOME-2 (UV) enables the observation of the spatial distribution of ozone plumes in the LMT, in good agreement with the CHIMERE regional chemistry-transport model. In this case study, when high ozone concentrations extend vertically above 3 km asl, they are similarly observed over land by both the multispectral and IASI retrievals. On the other hand, ozone plumes located below 3 km asl are only clearly depicted by the multispectral retrieval (both over land and over ocean

  1. Application of OMI, SCIAMACHY and GOME-2 Satellite SO2 Retrievals for Detection of Large Emission Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fioletov, V.E.; McLinden, C. A.; Krotkov, N.; Yang, K.; Loyola, D. G.; Valks, P.; Theys, N.; Van Roozendael, M.; Nowlan, C. R.; Chance, K.; Liu, X.; Lee, C.; Martin, R. V.

    2013-01-01

    Retrievals of sulfur dioxide (SO2) from space-based spectrometers are in a relatively early stage of development. Factors such as interference between ozone and SO2 in the retrieval algorithms often lead to errors in the retrieved values. Measurements from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY), and Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) satellite sensors, averaged over a period of several years, were used to identify locations with elevated SO2 values and estimate their emission levels. About 30 such locations, detectable by all three sensors and linked to volcanic and anthropogenic sources, were found after applying low and high spatial frequency filtration designed to reduce noise and bias and to enhance weak signals to SO2 data from each instrument. Quantitatively, the mean amount of SO2 in the vicinity of the sources, estimated from the three instruments, is in general agreement. However, its better spatial resolution makes it possible for OMI to detect smaller sources and with additional detail as compared to the other two instruments. Over some regions of China, SCIAMACHY and GOME-2 data show mean SO2 values that are almost 1.5 times higher than those from OMI, but the suggested spatial filtration technique largely reconciles these differences.

  2. Round-robin evaluation of nadir ozone profile retrievals: methodology and application to MetOp-A GOME-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppens, A.; Lambert, J.-C.; Granville, J.; Miles, G.; Siddans, R.; van Peet, J. C. A.; van der A, R. J.; Hubert, D.; Verhoelst, T.; Delcloo, A.; Godin-Beekmann, S.; Kivi, R.; Stubi, R.; Zehner, C.

    2015-05-01

    A methodology for the round-robin evaluation and the geophysical validation of ozone profile data retrieved from nadir UV backscatter satellite measurements is detailed and discussed, consisting of data set content studies, information content studies, co-location studies, and comparisons with reference measurements. Within the European Space Agency's Climate Change Initiative on ozone (Ozone_cci project), the proposed round-robin procedure is applied to two nadir ozone profile data sets retrieved at the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI) and the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL, United Kingdom), using their respective OPERA v1.26 and RAL v2.1 optimal estimation algorithms, from MetOp-A GOME-2 (i.e. the second generation Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment on the first Meteorological Operational Satellite) measurements taken in 2008. The ground-based comparisons use ozonesonde and lidar profiles as reference data, acquired by the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC), Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesonde programme (SHADOZ), and other stations of the World Meteorological Organisation's Global Atmosphere Watch (WMO GAW). This direct illustration highlights practical issues that inevitably emerge from discrepancies in e.g. profile representation and vertical smoothing, for which different recipes are investigated and discussed. Several approaches for information content quantification, vertical resolution estimation, and reference profile resampling are compared and applied as well. The paper concludes with compliance estimates of the two GOME-2 ozone profile data sets with user requirements from the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) and from climate modellers.

  3. Tropospheric ozone and nitrogen dioxide measurements in urban and rural regions as seen by IASI and GOME-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safieddine, S.; Clerbaux, C.; George, M.; Hadji-Lazaro, J.; Hurtmans, D.; Coheur, P.-F.; Wespes, C.; Loyola, D.; Valks, P.; Hao, N.

    2013-09-01

    ozone (O3) columns in urban and rural regions as seen by the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) are analyzed along with the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME-2) tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) columns. Results over nine cities of the Northern Hemisphere for the period 2008-2011 show a typical seasonal behavior of tropospheric O3, with a first maximum reached in late spring because of stratospheric intrusion mainly and a continuous rise till the summer because of the anthropogenic-based ozone production. Over the East Asian cities, a decrease in the O3 tropospheric column is detected during the monsoon period. Seasonal cycling of tropospheric NO2 shows consistent higher values during winter because of the higher anthropogenic sources and longer lifetime. In rural regions, a complex relation between the O3 and NO2 columns is found, with good correlation in summer and winter. O3 concentrations in rural sites are found to be comparable to those closest to the anthropogenic emission sources, with peak values in spring and summer. Furthermore, the effect of the reduction of pollutant emissions in the Beijing region during the Olympic Games of 2008 compared to the same summer period in the following 3 years is studied. GOME-2 NO2 measurements show a reduction up to 54% above Beijing during this period compared to the following 3 years. IASI O3 measurements show an increase of 12% during July 2008 followed by a decrease of 5-6% during the months of August and September.

  4. How consistent are top-down hydrocarbon emissions based on formaldehyde observations from GOME-2 and OMI?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavrakou, T.; Müller, J.-F.; Bauwens, M.; De Smedt, I.; Van Roozendael, M.; De Mazière, M.; Vigouroux, C.; Hendrick, F.; George, M.; Clerbaux, C.; Coheur, P.-F.; Guenther, A.

    2015-10-01

    The vertical columns of formaldehyde (HCHO) retrieved from two satellite instruments, the Global Ozone Monitoring Instrument-2 (GOME-2) on Metop-A and the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on Aura, are used to constrain global emissions of HCHO precursors from open fires, vegetation and human activities in the year 2010. To this end, the emissions are varied and optimized using the adjoint model technique in the IMAGESv2 global CTM (chemical transport model) on a monthly basis and at the model resolution. Given the different local overpass times of GOME-2 (09:30 LT) and OMI (13:30 LT), the simulated diurnal cycle of HCHO columns is investigated and evaluated against ground-based optical measurements at seven sites in Europe, China and Africa. The modeled diurnal cycle exhibits large variability, reflecting competition between photochemistry and emission variations, with noon or early afternoon maxima at remote locations (oceans) and in regions dominated by anthropogenic emissions, late afternoon or evening maxima over fire scenes, and midday minima in isoprene-rich regions. The agreement between simulated and ground-based columns is generally better in summer (with a clear afternoon maximum at mid-latitude sites) than in winter, and the annually averaged ratio of afternoon to morning columns is slightly higher in the model (1.126) than in the ground-based measurements (1.043). The anthropogenic VOC (volatile organic compound) sources are found to be weakly constrained by the inversions on the global scale, mainly owing to their generally minor contribution to the HCHO columns, except over strongly polluted regions, like China. The OMI-based inversion yields total flux estimates over China close to the bottom-up inventory (24.6 vs. 25.5 TgVOC yr-1 in the a priori) with, however, pronounced increases in the northeast of China and reductions in the south. Lower fluxes are estimated based on GOME-2 HCHO columns (20.6 TgVOC yr-1), in particular over the northeast

  5. How consistent are top-down hydrocarbon emissions based on formaldehyde observations from GOME-2 and OMI?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavrakou, T.; Müller, J.-F.; Bauwens, M.; De Smedt, I.; Van Roozendael, M.; De Mazière, M.; Vigouroux, C.; Hendrick, F.; George, M.; Clerbaux, C.; Coheur, P.-F.; Guenther, A.

    2015-04-01

    The vertical columns of formaldehyde (HCHO) retrieved from two satellite instruments, the Global Ozone Monitoring Instrument-2 (GOME-2) on Metop-A and the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on Aura, are used to constrain global emissions of HCHO precursors from open fires, vegetation and human activities in the year 2010. To this end, the emissions are varied and optimized using the adjoint model technique in the IMAGESv2 global CTM (chemistry-transport model) on a monthly basis and at the model resolution. Given the different local overpass times of GOME-2 (09:30 LT) and OMI (13:30 LT), the simulated diurnal cycle of HCHO columns is investigated and evaluated against ground-based optical measurements at 7 sites in Europe, China and Africa. The modelled diurnal cycle exhibits large variability, reflecting competition between photochemistry and emission variations, with noon or early afternoon maxima at remote locations (oceans) and in regions dominated by anthropogenic emissions, late afternoon or evening maxima over fire scenes, and midday minima in isoprene-rich regions. The agreement between simulated and ground-based columns is found to be generally better in summer (with a clear afternoon maximum at mid-latitude sites) than in winter, and the annually averaged ratio of afternoon to morning columns is slightly higher in the model (1.126) than in the ground-based measurements (1.043). The anthropogenic VOC (volatile organic compound) sources are found to be weakly constrained by the inversions on the global scale, mainly owing to their generally minor contribution to the HCHO columns, except over strongly polluted regions, like China. The OMI-based inversion yields total flux estimates over China close to the bottom-up inventory (24.6 vs. 25.5 in the a priori) with, however, pronounced increases in the Northeast China and reductions in the south. Lower fluxes are estimated based on GOME-2 HCHO columns (20.6 TgVOC), in particular over the Northeast, likely

  6. Operational surface UV radiation product from GOME-2 and AVHRR/3 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kujanpää, J.; Kalakoski, N.

    2015-05-01

    The surface ultraviolet (UV) radiation product, version 1.20, generated operationally in the framework of the Satellite Application Facility on Ozone and Atmospheric Chemistry Monitoring (O3M SAF) of the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT) is described. The product is based on the total ozone column derived from the measurements of the second Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME-2) instrument aboard EUMETSAT's polar orbiting meteorological operational (Metop) satellites. The input total ozone product is generated by the German Aerospace Center (DLR) also within the O3M SAF framework. Polar orbiting satellites provide global coverage but infrequent sampling of the diurnal cloud cover. The diurnal variation of the surface UV radiation is extremely strong due to modulation by solar elevation and rapidly changing cloud cover. At the minimum, one sample of the cloud cover in the morning and another in the afternoon are needed to derive daily maximum and daily integrated surface UV radiation quantities. This is achieved by retrieving cloud optical depth from the channel 1 reflectance of the third Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR/3) instrument aboard both Metop in the morning orbit (daytime descending node around 09:30 LT) and Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in the afternoon orbit (daytime ascending node around 14:30 LT). In addition, more overpasses are used at high latitudes where the swaths of consecutive orbits overlap. The input satellite data are received from EUMETSAT's Multicast Distribution System (EUMETCast) using commercial telecommunication satellites for broadcasting the data to the user community. The surface UV product includes daily maximum dose rates and integrated daily doses with different biological weighting functions, integrated UVB and UVA radiation, solar noon UV Index and daily maximum photolysis

  7. Evaluation of GOME satellite measurements of tropospheric NO2 and HCHO using regional data from aircraft campaigns in the southeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, R. V.; Parrish, D. D.; Ryerson, T. B.; Nicks, D. K.; Chance, K.; Kurosu, T. P.; Jacob, D. J.; Sturges, E. D.; Fried, A.; Wert, B. P.

    2004-12-01

    We compare tropospheric measurements of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and formaldehyde (HCHO) from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) satellite instrument with in situ measurements over eastern Texas and the southeast United States. On average, the GOME and in situ measurements of tropospheric NO2 and HCHO columns are consistent despite pronounced sampling differences. The geometric mean in situ to GOME ratios over the campaign are 1.08 for NO2 and 0.84 for HCHO, with corresponding geometric standard deviations of 1.27 and 1.38. The correlation of the observed column spatial variability between the two NO2 measurement sets is encouraging before (r2 = 0.54, n = 18) and after (r2 = 0.67, n = 18) correcting for a sampling bias. Mean relative vertical profiles of HCHO and NO2 calculated with a global three-dimensional model (GEOS-CHEM) and used in the GOME retrieval are highly consistent with in situ measurements; differences would affect the retrieved NO2 and HCHO columns by a few percent. GOME HCHO columns over eastern Texas include contributions from anthropogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions but are dominated by biogenic VOC emissions at the regional scale in August-September when HCHO columns are within 20% of those over the southeastern United States. In situ measurements show that during summer the lowest 1500 m (the lower mixed layer) contains 75% of the tropospheric NO2 column over Houston and Nashville, and 60% of the HCHO column over Houston. Future validation of space-based measurements of tropospheric NO2 and HCHO columns over polluted regions should include coincident in situ measurements that span the entire satellite footprint, especially in the heterogeneous mixed layer.

  8. Evaluation of GOME Satellite Measurements of Tropospheric NO2 and HCHO using Regional Data from Aircraft Campaigns in the Southeastern United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. V.; Parrish, D. D.; Ryerson, T.B.; Nicks, D.K.; Chance, K.; Kurosu, T.P.; Jacob, D.J.; Sturges, E.D.; Fried, A.; Wert, B.P.

    2004-01-01

    We compare tropospheric measurements of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and formaldehyde (HCHO) from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) satellite instrument with in situ measurements over eastern Texas and the southeast United States. On aveiage, the GOME and in situ measurements of tropospheric NO2 and HCHO columns are consistent despite pronounced sampling differences. The geometric mean in situ to GOME ratios over the campaign are 1.08 for NO2 and 0.84 for HCHO, with corresponding geometric standard deviations of 1.27 and 1.38. The correlation of the observed column spatial variability between the two NO2 measurement sets is encouraging before (r2 = 0.54, n = 18) and after (r2 = 0.67, n = 18) correcting for a sampling bias. Mean relative vertical profiles of HCHO and NO2 calculated with a global three-dimensional model (GEOS-CHEM) and used in the GOME retrieval are highly consistent with in situ measurements; differences would affect the retrieved NO2 and HCHO columns by a few percent. GOME HCHO columns over eastern Texas include contributions from anthropogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions but are dominated by biogenic VOC emissions at the regional scale in August-September when HCHO columns are within 20% of those over the southeastern United States. In situ measurements show that during summer the lowest 1500 m (the lower mixed layer) contains 75% of the tropospheric NO2 column over Houston and Nashville, and 60% of the HCHO column over Houston. Future validation of space-based measurements of tropospheric NO2 and HCHO columns over polluted regions should include coincident in situ measurements that span the entire satellite footprint, especially in the heterogeneous mixed layer.

  9. Diurnal, seasonal and long-term variations of global formaldehyde columns inferred from combined OMI and GOME-2 observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Smedt, I.; Stavrakou, T.; Hendrick, F.; Danckaert, T.; Vlemmix, T.; Pinardi, G.; Theys, N.; Lerot, C.; Gielen, C.; Vigouroux, C.; Hermans, C.; Fayt, C.; Veefkind, P.; Müller, J.-F.; Van Roozendael, M.

    2015-04-01

    We present the new version (v14) of the BIRA-IASB algorithm for the retrieval of formaldehyde (H2CO) columns from spaceborne UV-Visible sensors. Applied to OMI measurements from Aura and to GOME-2 measurements from MetOp-A and B, this algorithm is used to produce global distributions of H2CO representative of mid-morning and early afternoon conditions. Its main features include (1) a new iterative DOAS scheme involving three fitting intervals to better account for the O2-O2 absorption, (2) the use of earthshine radiances averaged in the equatorial Pacific as reference spectra, (3) a destriping correction and background normalisation resolved in the along-swath position. For the air mass factor calculation, a priori vertical profiles calculated by the IMAGES chemistry transport model at 9.30 a.m. and 13.30 p.m. are used. Although the resulting GOME-2 and OMI H2CO vertical columns are found to be highly correlated, some systematic differences are observed. Afternoon columns are generally larger than morning ones, especially in mid-latitude regions. In contrast, over tropical rainforests, morning H2CO columns significantly exceed those observed in the afternoon. These differences are discussed in terms of the H2CO column variation between mid-morning and early afternoon, using ground-based MAX-DOAS measurements available from seven stations in Europe, China and Africa. Validation results confirm the capacity of the combined satellite measurements to resolve diurnal variations in H2CO columns. Furthermore, vertical profiles derived from MAX-DOAS measurements in the Beijing area and in Bujumbura are used for a more detailed validation exercise. In both regions, we find an agreement better than 15% when MAX-DOAS profiles are used as a priori for the satellite retrievals. Finally regional trends in H2CO columns are estimated for the 2004-2014 period using SCIAMACHY and GOME-2 data for morning conditions, and OMI for early afternoon conditions. Consistent features are

  10. Diurnal, seasonal and long-term variations of global formaldehyde columns inferred from combined OMI and GOME-2 observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Smedt, I.; Stavrakou, T.; Hendrick, F.; Danckaert, T.; Vlemmix, T.; Pinardi, G.; Theys, N.; Lerot, C.; Gielen, C.; Vigouroux, C.; Hermans, C.; Fayt, C.; Veefkind, P.; Müller, J.-F.; Van Roozendael, M.

    2015-11-01

    We present the new version (v14) of the BIRA-IASB algorithm for the retrieval of formaldehyde (H2CO) columns from spaceborne UV-visible sensors. Applied to OMI measurements from Aura and to GOME-2 measurements from MetOp-A and MetOp-B, this algorithm is used to produce global distributions of H2CO representative of mid-morning and early afternoon conditions. Its main features include (1) a new iterative DOAS scheme involving three fitting intervals to better account for the O2-O2 absorption, (2) the use of earthshine radiances averaged in the equatorial Pacific as reference spectra, and (3) a destriping correction and background normalisation resolved in the across-swath position. For the air mass factor calculation, a priori vertical profiles calculated by the IMAGES chemistry transport model at 09:30 and 13:30 LT are used. Although the resulting GOME-2 and OMI H2CO vertical columns are found to be highly correlated, some systematic differences are observed. Afternoon columns are generally larger than morning ones, especially in mid-latitude regions. In contrast, over tropical rainforests, morning H2CO columns significantly exceed those observed in the afternoon. These differences are discussed in terms of the H2CO column variation between mid-morning and early afternoon, using ground-based MAX-DOAS measurements available from seven stations in Europe, China and Africa. Validation results confirm the capacity of the combined satellite measurements to resolve diurnal variations in H2CO columns. Furthermore, vertical profiles derived from MAX-DOAS measurements in the Beijing area and in Bujumbura are used for a more detailed validation exercise. In both regions, we find an agreement better than 15 % when MAX-DOAS profiles are used as a priori for the satellite retrievals. Finally, regional trends in H2CO columns are estimated for the 2004-2014 period using SCIAMACHY and GOME-2 data for morning conditions, and OMI for early afternoon conditions. Consistent features

  11. How consistent are top-down hydrocarbon emissions based on formaldehyde observations from GOME-2 and OMI?

    SciTech Connect

    Stavrakou, T.; Muller, J. F.; Bauwens, M.; De Smedt, I.; Van Roozendael, M.; De Maziere, M.; Vigouroux, C.; Hendrick, F.; George, M.; Clerbaux, C.; Coheur, P-F; Guenther, Alex B.

    2015-10-26

    The vertical columns of formaldehyde (HCHO) retrieved from two satellite instruments, the Global Ozone Monitoring Instrument-2 (GOME-2) on Metop-A and the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on Aura, are used to constrain global emissions of HCHO precursors from open fires, vegetation and human activities in the year 2010. To this end, the emissions are varied and optimized using the ad-joint model technique in the IMAGESv2 global CTM (chem-ical transport model) on a monthly basis and at the model res-olution. Given the different local overpass times of GOME- 2 (09:30 LT) and OMI (13:30 LT), the simulated diurnal cy-cle of HCHO columns is investigated and evaluated against ground-based optical measurements at seven sites in Europe, China and Africa. The modeled diurnal cycle exhibits large variability, reflecting competition between photochemistry and emission variations, with noon or early afternoon max-ima at remote locations (oceans) and in regions dominated by anthropogenic emissions, late afternoon or evening max-ima over fire scenes, and midday minima in isoprene-rich re-gions. The agreement between simulated and ground-based columns is generally better in summer (with a clear after-noon maximum at mid-latitude sites) than in winter, and the annually averaged ratio of afternoon to morning columns is slightly higher in the model (1.126) than in the ground-based measurements (1.043).The anthropogenic VOC (volatile organic compound) sources are found to be weakly constrained by the inversions on the global scale, mainly owing to their generally minor contribution to the HCHO columns, except over strongly pol-luted regions, like China. The OMI-based inversion yields total flux estimates over China close to the bottom-up inven-tory (24.6 vs. 25.5 TgVOC yr-1 in the a priori) with, how-ever, pronounced increases in the northeast of China and re-ductions in the south. Lower fluxes are estimated based on GOME-2 HCHO columns (20.6 TgVOC yr-1), in

  12. The direct fitting approach for total ozone column retrievals: a sensitivity study on GOME-2/MetOp-A measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassmann, A.; Borsdorff, T.; aan de Brugh, J. M. J.; Hasekamp, O. P.; Aben, I.; Landgraf, J.

    2015-10-01

    We present a sensitivity study of the direct fitting approach to retrieve total ozone columns from the clear sky Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment 2/MetOp-A (GOME-2/MetOp-A) measurements between 325 and 335 nm in the period 2007-2010. The direct fitting of the measurement is based on adjusting the scaling of a reference ozone profile and requires accurate simulation of GOME-2 radiances. In this context, we study the effect of three aspects that introduce forward model errors if not addressed appropriately: (1) the use of a clear sky model atmosphere in the radiative transfer demanding cloud filtering, (2) different approximations of Earth's sphericity to address the influence of the solar zenith angle, and (3) the need of polarization in radiative transfer modeling. We conclude that cloud filtering using the operational GOME-2 FRESCO (Fast Retrieval Scheme for Clouds from the Oxygen A band) cloud product, which is part of level 1B data, and the use of pseudo-spherical scalar radiative transfer is fully sufficient for the purpose of this retrieval. A validation with ground-based measurements at 36 stations confirms this showing a global mean bias of -0.1 % with a standard deviation (SD) of 2.7 %. The regularization effect inherent to the profile scaling approach is thoroughly characterized by the total column averaging kernel for each individual retrieval. It characterizes the effect of the particular choice of the ozone profile to be scaled by the inversion and is part of the retrieval product. Two different interpretations of the data product are possible: first, regarding the retrieval product as an estimate of the true column, a direct comparison of the retrieved column with total ozone columns from ground-based measurements can be done. This requires accurate a priori knowledge of the reference ozone profile and the column averaging kernel is not needed. Alternatively, the retrieval product can be interpreted as an effective column defined by the total column

  13. The GOME-2 instrument on the Metop series of satellites: instrument design, calibration, and level 1 data processing - an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munro, Rosemary; Lang, Rüdiger; Klaes, Dieter; Poli, Gabriele; Retscher, Christian; Lindstrot, Rasmus; Huckle, Roger; Lacan, Antoine; Grzegorski, Michael; Holdak, Andriy; Kokhanovsky, Alexander; Livschitz, Jakob; Eisinger, Michael

    2016-03-01

    The Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) flies on the Metop series of satellites, the space component of the EUMETSAT Polar System. In this paper we will provide an overview of the instrument design, the on-ground calibration and characterization activities, in-flight calibration, and level 0 to 1 data processing. The current status of the level 1 data is presented and points of specific relevance to users are highlighted. Long-term level 1 data consistency is also discussed and plans for future work are outlined. The information contained in this paper summarizes a large number of technical reports and related documents containing information that is not currently available in the published literature. These reports and documents are however made available on the EUMETSAT web pages and readers requiring more details than can be provided in this overview paper will find appropriate references at relevant points in the text.

  14. The GOME-2 instrument on the Metop series of satellites: instrument design, calibration, and level 1 data processing - an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munro, R.; Lang, R.; Klaes, D.; Poli, G.; Retscher, C.; Lindstrot, R.; Huckle, R.; Lacan, A.; Grzegorski, M.; Holdak, A.; Kokhanovsky, A.; Livschitz, J.; Eisinger, M.

    2015-08-01

    The Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) flies on the Metop series of satellites, the space component of the EUMETSAT Polar System. In this paper we will provide an overview of the instrument design, the on-ground calibration and characterisation activities, in-flight calibration, and level 0 to 1 data processing. The quality of the level 1 data is presented and points of specific relevance to users are highlighted. Long-term level 1 data consistency is also discussed and plans for future work are outlined. The information contained in this paper summarises a large number of technical reports and related documents containing information that is not currently available in the published literature. These reports and documents are however made available on the EUMETSAT web pages (http://www.eumetsat.int) and readers requiring more details than can be provided in this overview paper will find appropriate references at relevant points in the text.

  15. Satellite observation of lowermost tropospheric ozone by multispectral synergism of IASI thermal infrared and GOME-2 ultraviolet measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuesta, Juan; Eremenko, Maxim; Liu, Xiong; Dufour, Gaëlle; Cai, Zhaonan; Höpfner, Michael; von Clarmann, Thomas; Sellitto, Pasquale; Forêt, Gilles; Gaubert, Benjamin; Beekmann, Matthias; Orphal, Johannes; Chance, Kelly; Spurr, Robert; Flaud, Jean-Marie

    2013-04-01

    Lowermost tropospheric ozone is a major factor determining air quality in densely populated megacities. During pollution events, knowledge on the 3D regional distribution of ozone in and around these urban areas is key for assessing its impact on health of population and ecosystems damages. Temporal and spatial coverage of spaceborne observations are particularly fitted for monitoring tropospheric ozone spatial distribution at the regional scale and offers a great potential for improving air quality forecasting with numerical regional models. However, current tropospheric ozone retrievals using uncoupled either ultraviolet (UV) or thermal infrared (TIR) spaceborne observations show limited sensitivity to lowermost troposphere ozone (up to 3 km of altitude), which is the major concern for air quality, and they are mainly sensitive to ozone at the free Troposphere (at lowest 3-4 km of altitude). In this framework, we have developed a new multispectral approach for observing lowermost tropospheric ozone from space by synergism of atmospheric TIR radiances observed by IASI and earth UV reflectances measured by GOME-2. Both instruments are onboard the series of MetOp satellites (in orbit since 2006 and expected until 2022) and their scanning capabilities offer global coverage every day, with a relatively fine ground pixel resolution (12-km-diameter pixels spaced by 25 km for IASI at nadir). Our technique uses altitude-dependent Tikhonov-Phillips-type constraints, which optimize sensitivity to lower tropospheric ozone. It integrates the VLIDORT and KOPRA radiative transfer codes for simulating UV reflectance and TIR radiance, respectively. We have used our method to analyse real observations over Europe during an ozone pollution episode in the summer of 2009. The results show that the multispectral synergism of IASI (TIR) and GOME-2 (UV) enables the observation of the spatial distribution of ozone plumes in the lowermost troposphere (LMT, from the surface up to 3 km msl

  16. First Directly Retrieved Global Distribution of Tropospheric Column Ozone from GOME: Comparison with the GEOS-CHEM Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Xiong; Chance, Kelly; Sioris, Christopher E.; Kurosu, Thomas P.; Spurr, Robert J. D.; Martin, Randall V.; Fu, Tzung-May; Logan, Jennifer A.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Palmer, Paul I.; Newchurch, Michael J.; Megretskaia, Inna A.; Chatfield, Robert B.

    2006-01-01

    We present the first directly retrieved global distribution of tropospheric column ozone from Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) ultraviolet measurements during December 1996 to November 1997. The retrievals clearly show signals due to convection, biomass burning, stratospheric influence, pollution, and transport. They are capable of capturing the spatiotemporal evolution of tropospheric column ozone in response to regional or short time-scale events such as the 1997-1998 El Nino event and a 10-20 DU change within a few days. The global distribution of tropospheric column ozone displays the well-known wave-1 pattern in the tropics, nearly zonal bands of enhanced tropospheric column ozone of 36-48 DU at 20degS-30degS during the austral spring and at 25degN-45degN during the boreal spring and summer, low tropospheric column ozone of <30 DU uniformly distributed south of 35 S during all seasons, and relatively high tropospheric column ozone of >33 DU at some northern high-latitudes during the spring. Simulation from a chemical transport model corroborates most of the above structures, with small biases of <+/-5 DU and consistent seasonal cycles in most regions, especially in the southern hemisphere. However, significant positive biases of 5-20 DU occur in some northern tropical and subtropical regions such as the Middle East during summer. Comparison of GOME with monthly-averaged Measurement of Ozone and Water Vapor by Airbus in-service Aircraft (MOZAIC) tropospheric column ozone for these regions usually shows good consistency within 1 a standard deviations and retrieval uncertainties. Some biases can be accounted for by inadequate sensitivity to lower tropospheric ozone, the different spatiotemporal sampling and the spatiotemporal variations in tropospheric column ozone.

  17. Tropospheric ozone and nitrogen dioxide measurements in urban and rural regions as seen by IASI and GOME-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safieddine, S.; Clerbaux, C.; George, M.; Hadji-Lazaro, J.; Hurtmans, D.; Coheur, P.; Wespes, C.; Layola, D.; Valks, P.; Hao, N.

    2013-05-01

    Tropospheric ozone (O3) columns in urban and rural regions as seen by the infrared sounder IASI are analyzed along with GOME-2 tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) columns. Results over nine cities of the Northern Hemisphere for the period 2008-2011 show a typical seasonal behavior of tropospheric O3, with a first maximum reached in late spring because of stratospheric intrusion mainly, and a continuous rise till the summer because of the anthropogenic based ozone production. Over the East Asian cities, a decrease in the O3 tropospheric column is detected during monsoon period. Seasonal cycling of tropospheric NO2 shows consistent higher values during winter because of the higher anthropogenic sources and longer lifetime. In rural regions, a complex relation between the O3 and NO2 column is found, with higher linearity in summer. O3 concentrations in rural sites are found to be comparable to those found closest to the anthropogenic emission sources, with peak values in spring and summer. Furthermore, the effect of the reduction of pollutant emissions in China during the Olympic games of 2008 is studied. GOME-2 NO2 measurements show a reduction up to 54% above Beijing during this period compared to the following three years. IASI O3 measurements show an increase of 12% during July 2008 followed by a decrease of 5-6% during the months of August and September. A significant reduction in O3 tropospheric column values is also detected in the area downwind, few hundreds of kilometers to the south of Beijing.

  18. [Luís Gomes Ferreira reports on the health of slaves in his work entitled Erário mineral (1735)].

    PubMed

    Eugênio, Alisson

    2015-01-01

    The article analyzes the reports of Luís Gomes Ferreira published in his manual on practical medicine entitled Erário mineral, of 1735, on the most common illnesses in captivity. It is shown that such reports can be interpreted as a criticism of the social relations of the slave era by issuing some warnings to the landowners who failed to look after the health of their slaves. PMID:26331650

  19. A method to generate surface UV radiation maps over Europe using GOME, Meteosat, and ancillary geophysical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdebout, Jean

    2000-02-01

    This paper presents a method for generating surface ultraviolet (UV) radiation maps over Europe, with a spatial resolution of 0.05°, and potentially on a half-hour basis. The UV irradiance is obtained by interpolation in a look-up table (LUT), the entries of which are solar zenith angle, total column ozone amount, cloud liquid water thickness, near-surface horizontal visibility, surface elevation, and UV albedo. Both satellite (Meteosat, GOME) and nonsatellite (synoptic observations, meteorological model results, digital elevation model) data are exploited to assign values to the influencing factors. With the help of another LUT simulating the visible signal, Meteosat data are processed to retrieve the cloud liquid water thickness. The radiative transfer calculations are performed with the UVspec code. A preliminary step consists in generating an effective surface Meteosat albedo map from a series of 10 consecutive days. In this process the well-known difficulty of distinguishing clouds from snow-covered surfaces is encountered. An attempt is made to partially resolve the ambiguity by using the Meteosat infrared channel and modeled snow cover data. After additional empirical cloud filtering, the effective albedo map is used as a baseline to estimate the cloud liquid water thickness. The UV surface albedo is assigned uniform values for land and sea/ocean, except in the presence of snow. In this case it is given a value proportional to the Meteosat effective albedo. The total column ozone is extracted from the level 3 GOME products. The aerosol optical thickness is mapped by gridding the daily measurements performed by ˜1000 ground stations. The digital elevation model is the GTOPO30 data set from the U.S. Geological Survey. European wide UV dose rate maps are presented for one day in April 1997, and the influence of the various factors is illustrated. A daily integrated dose map was also generated using 27 Meteosat acquisitions at half-hour intervals on the same

  20. OMI/Aura, SCIAMACHY/Envisat and GOME2/MetopA Sulphur Dioxide Estimate; The Case of Eastern Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukouli, M. E.; Balis, D. S.; Theys, N.; Brenot, H.; van Gent, J.; Hendrick, F.; Wang, T.; Valks, P.; Hedelt, P.; Lichtenberg, G.; Richter, A.; Krotkov, N.; Li, C.; van der A, R.

    2015-06-01

    The EU FP7 Monitoring and Assessment of Regional air quality in China using space Observations, Project Of Long-term sino-european co-Operation, MarcoPolo, project focuses on deriving emission estimates from space, http://www.marcopolo-panda.eu. Long term satellite observations of Sulphur Dioxide, SO2, over the greater China area from the SCIAMACHY/Envisat, GOME2/MetopA and OMI/Aura missions are compared and their relative strong points and limitations are discussed. For each satellite instrument, two different datasets are being analyzed in the same manner. Rigorous spatiotemporal statistical analysis based on novel analysis techniques is performed for each data set in order to reduce noise and biases and enhance pollution signals in satellite datasets. Furthermore, identification of point sources such as power plants, smelters and urban agglomerations, as well as definition of their relative contribution to the regional SO2 levels, form the main findings of this investigation. Trend analyses and their statistical representation help locate regions of interesting SO2 loading in China.

  1. Evaluation of satellite sulphur dioxide estimates from OMI/Aura, SCIAMACHY/Envisat and GOME2/MetopA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukouli, MariLiza; Balis, Dimitris; Theys, Nicolas; Brenot, Hugues; van Gent, Jeroen; Valks, Pieter; Hedelt, Pascal; Lichtenberg, Günter; Richter, Andreas; Krotkov, Nickolay; van der A, Ronald

    2015-04-01

    The EU FP7 Monitoring and Assessment of Regional air quality in China using space Observations, Project Of Long-term sino-european co-Operation, MarcoPolo, project focuses on deriving emission estimates from space and their refinement by spatial downscaling and by source sector apportionment. Satellite observations of suphur dioxide, SO2, over the greater China area are analyzed using novel techniques [Fioletov et al., 2011; 2013] in order to enhance the observational signal and provide a robust SO2 dataset for the region. Observations from the SCIAMACHY/Envisat, GOME2/MetopA and OMI/Aura missions are assessed in this work and their relative strengths and shortcomings discussed at length. Rigorous screening is applied to and presented for each data source, including a full length spatiotemporal statistical analysis. Furthermore, identification of point sources such as power plants and urban agglomerations, as well as the definition of their relative contribution to the general SO2 levels, form the basis of this investigation.

  2. Solar Induced Vegetation Fluorescence Retrieval Using SCIAMACHY and GOME-2 Measurements And Its Correlation To GPP And FAPAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vountas, M.; Khosravi, N.; Rozanov, V. V.; Burrows, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Global carbon cycle is connected to terrestrial vegetation as an important sink of CO2. Plants contribute to the global carbon cycle both through photosynthesis and respiration processes. Fluorescence is a fraction of surplus energy, emitted to the environment by Chlorophyll molecules as a side-product of photosynthesis. As a result, Sun-Induced plant Fluorescence (SIF) is a reliable indicator of photosynthesis efficiency and therefore, important for vegetation observation, forest monitoring, global carbon uptake formulation and even agriculture.In our study, a newly developed retrieval scheme is used to quantify SIF from non-invasive satellite measurements of Top of Atmosphere (TOA) Earthshine radiances. Our method has been developed and tested on simulated data, created by the comprehensive radiative transfer model, SCIATRAN. Sensitivity studies showed that the method is capable of assessing SIF. The method is then applied on long-term data of 10 years from SCIAMACHY (Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography) and GOME-2 (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2) instruments and produced promising results.Furthermore, the relationship between the retrieved SIF values and vegetation's contribution to the global CO2 uptake is investigated by comparing monthly variation of SIF against GPP (Gross Primary Production) and FAPAR (Fraction of Absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation) for selected regions.

  3. Volcanic SO2 fluxes derived from satellite data: a survey using OMI, GOME-2, IASI and MODIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theys, N.; Campion, R.; Clarisse, L.; Brenot, H.; van Gent, J.; Dils, B.; Corradini, S.; Merucci, L.; Coheur, P.-F.; Van Roozendael, M.; Hurtmans, D.; Clerbaux, C.; Tait, S.; Ferrucci, F.

    2013-06-01

    Sulphur dioxide (SO2) fluxes of active degassing volcanoes are routinely measured with ground-based equipment to characterize and monitor volcanic activity. SO2 of unmonitored volcanoes or from explosive volcanic eruptions, can be measured with satellites. However, remote-sensing methods based on absorption spectroscopy generally provide integrated amounts of already dispersed plumes of SO2 and satellite derived flux estimates are rarely reported. Here we review a number of different techniques to derive volcanic SO2 fluxes using satellite measurements of plumes of SO2 and investigate the temporal evolution of the total emissions of SO2 for three very different volcanic events in 2011: Puyehue-Cordón Caulle (Chile), Nyamulagira (DR Congo) and Nabro (Eritrea). High spectral resolution satellite instruments operating both in the ultraviolet-visible (OMI/Aura and GOME-2/MetOp-A) and thermal infrared (IASI/MetOp-A) spectral ranges, and multispectral satellite instruments operating in the thermal infrared (MODIS/Terra-Aqua) are used. We show that satellite data can provide fluxes with a sampling of a day or less (few hours in the best case). Generally the flux results from the different methods are consistent, and we discuss the advantages and weaknesses of each technique. Although the primary objective of this study is the calculation of SO2 fluxes, it also enables us to assess the consistency of the SO2 products from the different sensors used.

  4. Volcanic SO2 fluxes derived from satellite data: a survey using OMI, GOME-2, IASI and MODIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theys, N.; Campion, R.; Clarisse, L.; Brenot, H.; van Gent, J.; Dils, B.; Corradini, S.; Merucci, L.; Coheur, P.-F.; Van Roozendael, M.; Hurtmans, D.; Clerbaux, C.; Tait, S.; Ferrucci, F.

    2012-12-01

    Sulphur dioxide (SO2) fluxes of active degassing volcanoes are routinely measured with ground-based equipment to characterize and monitor volcanic activity. SO2 of unmonitored volcanoes or from explosive volcanic eruptions, can be measured with satellites. However, remote-sensing methods based on absorption spectroscopy generally provide integrated amounts of already dispersed plumes of SO2 and satellite derived flux estimates are rarely reported. Here we review a number of different techniques to derive volcanic SO2 fluxes using satellite measurements of dispersed and large-scale plumes of SO2 and investigate the temporal evolution of the total emissions of SO2 for three very different volcanic events in 2011: Puyehue-Cordón Caulle (Chile), Nyamulagira (DR Congo) and Nabro (Eritrea). High spectral resolution satellite instruments operating both in the UV-visible (OMI/Aura and GOME-2/MetOp-A) and thermal infrared (IASI/MetOp-A) spectral ranges, and multispectral satellite instruments operating in the thermal infrared (MODIS/Terra-Aqua) are used. We show that satellite data can provide fluxes with a sampling of a day or less (few hours in the best case). Generally the flux results from the different methods are consistent, and we discuss the advantages and weaknesses of each technique. Although the primary objective of this study is the calculation of SO2 fluxes, it also enables to assess the consistency of the SO2 products from the different sensors used.

  5. Surface NO2 fields derived from joint use of OMI and GOME-2A observations with EMEP model output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Philipp; Svendby, Tove; Stebel, Kerstin

    2016-04-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is one of the most prominent air pollutants. Emitted primarily by transport and industry, NO2 has a major impact on health and economy. In contrast to the very sparse network of air quality monitoring stations, satellite data of NO2 is ubiquitous and allows for quantifying the NO2 levels worldwide. However, one drawback of satellite-derived NO2 products is that they provide solely an estimate of the entire tropospheric column, whereas what is generally needed for air quality applications are the concentrations of NO2 near the surface. Here we derive surface NO2 concentration fields from OMI and GOME-2A tropospheric column products using the EMEP chemical transport model as auxiliary information. The model is used for providing information of the boundary layer contribution to the total tropospheric column. For preparation of deriving the surface product, a comprehensive model-based analysis of the spatial and temporal patterns of the NO2 surface-to-column ratio in Europe was carried out for the year 2011. The results from this analysis indicate that the spatial patterns of the surface-to-column ratio vary only slightly. While the highest ratio values can be found in some shipping lanes, the spatial variability of the ratio in some of the most polluted areas of Europe is not very high. Some but not all urban agglomeration shows high ratio values. Focusing on the temporal behavior, the analysis showed that the European-wide average ratio varies throughout the year. The surface-to-column ratio increases from January all the way through April when it reaches its maximum, then decreases relatively rapidly to average levels and then stays mostly constant throughout the summer. The minimum ratio is observed in December. The knowledge gained from analyzing the spatial and temporal patterns of the surface-to-column ratio was then used to produce surface NO2 products from the daily NO2 data for OMI and GOME-2A. This was carried out using two methods

  6. The NOAA-NASA OMI/GOME-2 Near-Real-Time Monitoring System of Volcanic SO2 and Aerosol Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicente, G.; Schroeder, W.; Krueger, A. J.; Yang, K.; Carn, S. A.; Krotkov, N. A.; Guffanti, M.; Levelt, P.

    2009-12-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on the NASA EOS/Aura research satellite and the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) instrument on the Metop-A satellite allow measurement of SO2 concentrations at UV wavelengths with daily global coverage. SO2 is detected from space using its strong absorption band structure in the near UV (300-320 nm) as well as in IR bands near 7.3 and 8.6 μm. UV SO2 measurements are very robust and are insensitive to the factors that confound IR data. SO2 and ash can be detected in a very fresh volcanic eruption cloud due to sunlight backscattering and ash presence can be confirmed by UV derived aerosol index measurements. When detected in Near Real-Time (NRT) it can be used as aviation alerts to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) with reduced false alarm ratios and permit more robust detection and tracking of volcanic clouds. NRT observations of SO2 and volcanic ash using UV measurements (OMI and GOME-2) and well as IR measurements can be incorporated into data products compatible with Decision Support Tools (DSTs) in use at Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAACs) in Washington and Anchorage, and the USGS Volcano Observatories. In this presentation we show the latest NASA and NOAA Office of Satellite Data Processing and Distribution (OSDPD) developments of an online NRT image and data product distribution system. The system generates eruption alerts, NRT global composite images and SO2, Aerosol Index and Cloud Reflectivity images for 28 volcano regions, as well as up to 15 days of digital data files in McIDAS, NetCDF, GeoTIFF and gif formats for the OMI and GOME-2 instruments. Products are infused into DSTs including the Volcanic Ash Coordination Tool (VACT), under development by the NOAA Forecast Systems Laboratory and the FAA’s Oceanic Weather Product Development Team (OWPDT), to monitor and track, drifting volcanic clouds and aerosol index.

  7. Global Monitoring of Terrestrial Chlorophyll Fluorescence from Moderate-Spectral-Resolution Near-Infrared Satellite Measurements: Methodology, Simulations, and Application to GOME-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joiner, J.; Guanter, L.; Lindstrot, R.; Voigt, M.; Vasilkov, A. P.; Middleton, E. M.; Huemmrich, K. F.; Yoshida, Y.; Frankenberg, C.

    2013-01-01

    Globally mapped terrestrial chlorophyll fluorescence retrievals are of high interest because they can provide information on the functional status of vegetation including light-use efficiency and global primary productivity that can be used for global carbon cycle modeling and agricultural applications. Previous satellite retrievals of fluorescence have relied solely upon the filling-in of solar Fraunhofer lines that are not significantly affected by atmospheric absorption. Although these measurements provide near-global coverage on a monthly basis, they suffer from relatively low precision and sparse spatial sampling. Here, we describe a new methodology to retrieve global far-red fluorescence information; we use hyperspectral data with a simplified radiative transfer model to disentangle the spectral signatures of three basic components: atmospheric absorption, surface reflectance, and fluorescence radiance. An empirically based principal component analysis approach is employed, primarily using cloudy data over ocean, to model and solve for the atmospheric absorption. Through detailed simulations, we demonstrate the feasibility of the approach and show that moderate-spectral-resolution measurements with a relatively high signal-to-noise ratio can be used to retrieve far-red fluorescence information with good precision and accuracy. The method is then applied to data from the Global Ozone Monitoring Instrument 2 (GOME-2). The GOME-2 fluorescence retrievals display similar spatial structure as compared with those from a simpler technique applied to the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT). GOME-2 enables global mapping of far-red fluorescence with higher precision over smaller spatial and temporal scales than is possible with GOSAT. Near-global coverage is provided within a few days. We are able to show clearly for the first time physically plausible variations in fluorescence over the course of a single month at a spatial resolution of 0.5 0.5. We also show

  8. Global Monitoring of Terrestrial Chlorophyll Fluorescence from Moderate-spectral-resolution Near-infrared Satellite Measurements: Methodology, Simulations, and Application to GOME-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joiner, J.; Gaunter, L.; Lindstrot, R.; Voigt, M.; Vasilkov, A. P.; Middleton, E. M.; Huemmrich, K. F.; Yoshida, Y.; Frankenberg, C.

    2013-01-01

    Globally mapped terrestrial chlorophyll fluorescence retrievals are of high interest because they can provide information on the functional status of vegetation including light-use efficiency and global primary productivity that can be used for global carbon cycle modeling and agricultural applications. Previous satellite retrievals of fluorescence have relied solely upon the filling-in of solar Fraunhofer lines that are not significantly affected by atmospheric absorption. Although these measurements provide near-global coverage on a monthly basis, they suffer from relatively low precision and sparse spatial sampling. Here, we describe a new methodology to retrieve global far-red fluorescence information; we use hyperspectral data with a simplified radiative transfer model to disentangle the spectral signatures of three basic components: atmospheric absorption, surface reflectance, and fluorescence radiance. An empirically based principal component analysis approach is employed, primarily using cloudy data over ocean, to model and solve for the atmospheric absorption. Through detailed simulations, we demonstrate the feasibility of the approach and show that moderate-spectral-resolution measurements with a relatively high signal-to-noise ratio can be used to retrieve far-red fluorescence information with good precision and accuracy. The method is then applied to data from the Global Ozone Monitoring Instrument 2 (GOME-2). The GOME-2 fluorescence retrievals display similar spatial structure as compared with those from a simpler technique applied to the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT). GOME-2 enables global mapping of far-red fluorescence with higher precision over smaller spatial and temporal scales than is possible with GOSAT. Near-global coverage is provided within a few days. We are able to show clearly for the first time physically plausible variations in fluorescence over the course of a single month at a spatial resolution of 0.5 deg × 0.5 deg

  9. Global monitoring of terrestrial chlorophyll fluorescence from moderate-spectral-resolution near-infrared satellite measurements: methodology, simulations, and application to GOME-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joiner, J.; Guanter, L.; Lindstrot, R.; Voigt, M.; Vasilkov, A. P.; Middleton, E. M.; Huemmrich, K. F.; Yoshida, Y.; Frankenberg, C.

    2013-10-01

    Globally mapped terrestrial chlorophyll fluorescence retrievals are of high interest because they can provide information on the functional status of vegetation including light-use efficiency and global primary productivity that can be used for global carbon cycle modeling and agricultural applications. Previous satellite retrievals of fluorescence have relied solely upon the filling-in of solar Fraunhofer lines that are not significantly affected by atmospheric absorption. Although these measurements provide near-global coverage on a monthly basis, they suffer from relatively low precision and sparse spatial sampling. Here, we describe a new methodology to retrieve global far-red fluorescence information; we use hyperspectral data with a simplified radiative transfer model to disentangle the spectral signatures of three basic components: atmospheric absorption, surface reflectance, and fluorescence radiance. An empirically based principal component analysis approach is employed, primarily using cloudy data over ocean, to model and solve for the atmospheric absorption. Through detailed simulations, we demonstrate the feasibility of the approach and show that moderate-spectral-resolution measurements with a relatively high signal-to-noise ratio can be used to retrieve far-red fluorescence information with good precision and accuracy. The method is then applied to data from the Global Ozone Monitoring Instrument 2 (GOME-2). The GOME-2 fluorescence retrievals display similar spatial structure as compared with those from a simpler technique applied to the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT). GOME-2 enables global mapping of far-red fluorescence with higher precision over smaller spatial and temporal scales than is possible with GOSAT. Near-global coverage is provided within a few days. We are able to show clearly for the first time physically plausible variations in fluorescence over the course of a single month at a spatial resolution of 0.5° × 0.5°. We

  10. Global observations of glyoxal columns from OMI/Aura and GOME-2/Metop-A sensors and comparison with multi-year simulations by the IMAGES model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerot, Christophe; Stavrakou, Trissevgeni; Hendrick, François; De Smedt, Isabelle; Müller, Jean-François; Volkamer, Rainer; Van Roozendael, Michel

    2015-04-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) originating from both natural and human activities play a key role in air quality. Information on their atmospheric concentrations can be derived using remote sensing techniques for a limited number of species, including formaldehyde (HCHO) and glyoxal (CHOCHO). The latter is mostly produced in the atmosphere as an intermediate product in the oxidation of other non-methane VOCs. It is also directly emitted from fire events and combustion processes. Owing to its short lifetime, elevated glyoxal concentrations are observed near emission sources. Measurements of atmospheric glyoxal concentrations therefore provide quantitative information on the different types of VOC emission and can help to better assess the quality of current inventories. In addition, glyoxal is also known to significantly contribute to the total budget of secondary organic aerosols. Global observations of glyoxal columns have been realized from different space-borne spectrometers using the well-known DOAS retrieval technique. In the past, we developed an algorithm to retrieve glyoxal columns from spectra measured by the GOME-2 instrument aboard METOP-A (Lerot et al., 2010). Specificities of this algorithm were an original two-step approach in the DOAS fit to minimize the impact of spectral interferences with the liquid water absorption as well as the use of a priori information from the Chemical Transport Model IMAGES in the air mass factor calculation. In this work, we present the adaptation of this algorithm to the OMI sensor on the AURA platform. The time series of glyoxal columns derived from OMI and GOME-2 are compared in different parts of the world and a high level of consistency is found. The OMI glyoxal data product is found to be very stable over the entire duration of the mission, in contrast to the GOME-2 product which is affected by instrumental degradation. We present validation results using several years of MAX-DOAS glyoxal measurements

  11. Global monitoring of terrestrial chlorophyll fluorescence from moderate spectral resolution near-infrared satellite measurements: methodology, simulations, and application to GOME-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joiner, J.; Guanter, L.; Lindstrot, R.; Voigt, M.; Vasilkov, A. P.; Middleton, E. M.; Huemmrich, K. F.; Yoshida, Y.; Frankenberg, C.

    2013-04-01

    Globally mapped terrestrial chlorophyll fluorescence retrievals are of high interest because they can provide information on the functional status of vegetation including light-use efficiency and global primary productivity that can be used for global carbon cycle modeling and agricultural applications. In addition, fluorescence can contaminate photon path estimates from the O2 A-band that has become an integral part of missions to accurately measure greenhouse gas concentrations. Global mapping of far-red (~ 755-770 nm) terrestrial vegetation solar-induced fluorescence from space has been accomplished using the high spectral resolution (ν/Δ ν > 35 000) interferometer on the Japanese Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT). These satellite retrievals of fluorescence rely solely upon the filling-in of solar Fraunhofer lines that are not significantly affected by atmospheric absorption. Although these measurements provide near global coverage on a monthly basis, they suffer from relatively low precision and sparse spatial sampling. Here, we describe a new methodology to retrieve global far-red fluorescence information; we use hyperspectral data to disentangle the spectral signatures of three basic components in and surrounding the O2 A-band: atmospheric absorption, surface reflectance, and fluorescence radiance. Through detailed simulations, we demonstrate the feasibility of the approach and show that moderate spectral resolution measurements with a relatively high signal-to-noise ratio within and outside the O2 A-band can be used to retrieve far-red fluorescence information with good precision and accuracy. The method is then applied to data from the Global Ozone Monitoring Instrument 2 (GOME-2). The GOME-2 fluorescence retrievals display similar spatial structure as compared with GOSAT. GOME-2 enables global mapping of far-red fluorescence with higher precision over smaller spatial and temporal scales than is possible with GOSAT. It should be noted that

  12. Retrieval of Ozone Column Content from Airborne Sun Photometer Measurements During SOLVE II: Comparison with SAGE III, POAM III,THOMAS and GOME Measurements. Comparison with SAGE 111, POAM 111, TOMS and GOME Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livingston, J.; Schmid, B.; Russell, P.; Eilers, J.; Kolyer, R.; Redemann, J.; Yee, J.-H.; Trepte, C.; Thomason, L.; Pitts, M.

    2003-01-01

    retrievals during selected DC-8 latitudinal and longitudinal transects with total column ozone data acquired by the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) and the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) satellite sensors. To enable this comparison, the amount of ozone in the column below the aircraft is estimated by combining SAGE and/or POAM data with high resolution, fast response in-situ ozone measurements acquired during the DC-8 ascent at the start of each science flight.

  13. A Model-Data Fusion Approach for Constraining Modeled GPP at Global Scales Using GOME2 SIF Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacBean, N.; Maignan, F.; Lewis, P.; Guanter, L.; Koehler, P.; Bacour, C.; Peylin, P.; Gomez-Dans, J.; Disney, M.; Chevallier, F.

    2015-12-01

    Predicting the fate of the ecosystem carbon, C, stocks and their sensitivity to climate change relies heavily on our ability to accurately model the gross carbon fluxes, i.e. photosynthesis and respiration. However, there are large differences in the Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) simulated by different land surface models (LSMs), not only in terms of mean value, but also in terms of phase and amplitude when compared to independent data-based estimates. This strongly limits our ability to provide accurate predictions of carbon-climate feedbacks. One possible source of this uncertainty is from inaccurate parameter values resulting from incomplete model calibration. Solar Induced Fluorescence (SIF) has been shown to have a linear relationship with GPP at the typical spatio-temporal scales used in LSMs (Guanter et al., 2011). New satellite-derived SIF datasets have the potential to constrain LSM parameters related to C uptake at global scales due to their coverage. Here we use SIF data derived from the GOME2 instrument (Köhler et al., 2014) to optimize parameters related to photosynthesis and leaf phenology of the ORCHIDEE LSM, as well as the linear relationship between SIF and GPP. We use a multi-site approach that combines many model grid cells covering a wide spatial distribution within the same optimization (e.g. Kuppel et al., 2014). The parameters are constrained per Plant Functional type as the linear relationship described above varies depending on vegetation structural properties. The relative skill of the optimization is compared to a case where only satellite-derived vegetation index data are used to constrain the model, and to a case where both data streams are used. We evaluate the results using an independent data-driven estimate derived from FLUXNET data (Jung et al., 2011) and with a new atmospheric tracer, Carbonyl sulphide (OCS) following the approach of Launois et al. (ACPD, in review). We show that the optimization reduces the strong positive

  14. Evaluation of the operational Aerosol Layer Height retrieval algorithm for Sentinel-5 Precursor: application to O2 A band observations from GOME-2A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, A. F. J.; de Haan, J. F.; Sneep, M.; Apituley, A.; Stammes, P.; Vieitez, M. O.; Tilstra, L. G.; Tuinder, O. N. E.; Koning, C. E.; Veefkind, J. P.

    2015-06-01

    An algorithm setup for the operational Aerosol Layer Height product for TROPOMI on the Sentinel-5 Precursor mission is described and discussed, applied to GOME-2A data, and evaluated with lidar measurements. The algorithm makes a spectral fit of reflectance at the O2 A band in the near-infrared and the fit window runs from 758 to 770 nm. The aerosol profile is parameterized by a scattering layer with constant aerosol volume extinction coefficient and aerosol single scattering albedo and with a fixed pressure thickness. The algorithm's target parameter is the height of this layer. In this paper, we apply the algorithm to observations from GOME-2A in a number of systematic and extensive case studies and we compare retrieved aerosol layer heights with lidar measurements. Aerosol scenes cover various aerosol types, both elevated and boundary layer aerosols, and land and sea surfaces. The aerosol optical thicknesses for these scenes are relatively moderate. Retrieval experiments with GOME-2A spectra are used to investigate various sensitivities, in which particular attention is given to the role of the surface albedo. From retrieval simulations with the single-layer model, we learn that the surface albedo should be a fit parameter when retrieving aerosol layer height from the O2 A band. Current uncertainties in surface albedo climatologies cause biases and non-convergences when the surface albedo is fixed in the retrieval. Biases disappear and convergence improves when the surface albedo is fitted, while precision of retrieved aerosol layer pressure is still largely within requirement levels. Moreover, we show that fitting the surface albedo helps to ameliorate biases in retrieved aerosol layer height when the assumed aerosol model is inaccurate. Subsequent retrievals with GOME-2A spectra confirm that convergence is better when the surface albedo is retrieved simultaneously with aerosol parameters. However, retrieved aerosol layer pressures are systematically low (i

  15. Evaluation of the operational Aerosol Layer Height retrieval algorithm for Sentinel-5 Precursor: application to O2 A band observations from GOME-2A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, A. F. J.; de Haan, J. F.; Sneep, M.; Apituley, A.; Stammes, P.; Vieitez, M. O.; Tilstra, L. G.; Tuinder, O. N. E.; Koning, C. E.; Veefkind, J. P.

    2015-11-01

    An algorithm setup for the operational Aerosol Layer Height product for TROPOMI on the Sentinel-5 Precursor mission is described and discussed, applied to GOME-2A data, and evaluated with lidar measurements. The algorithm makes a spectral fit of reflectance at the O2 A band in the near-infrared and the fit window runs from 758 to 770 nm. The aerosol profile is parameterised by a scattering layer with constant aerosol volume extinction coefficient and aerosol single scattering albedo and with a fixed pressure thickness. The algorithm's target parameter is the height of this layer. In this paper, we apply the algorithm to observations from GOME-2A in a number of systematic and extensive case studies, and we compare retrieved aerosol layer heights with lidar measurements. Aerosol scenes cover various aerosol types, both elevated and boundary layer aerosols, and land and sea surfaces. The aerosol optical thicknesses for these scenes are relatively moderate. Retrieval experiments with GOME-2A spectra are used to investigate various sensitivities, in which particular attention is given to the role of the surface albedo. From retrieval simulations with the single-layer model, we learn that the surface albedo should be a fit parameter when retrieving aerosol layer height from the O2 A band. Current uncertainties in surface albedo climatologies cause biases and non-convergences when the surface albedo is fixed in the retrieval. Biases disappear and convergence improves when the surface albedo is fitted, while precision of retrieved aerosol layer pressure is still largely within requirement levels. Moreover, we show that fitting the surface albedo helps to ameliorate biases in retrieved aerosol layer height when the assumed aerosol model is inaccurate. Subsequent retrievals with GOME-2A spectra confirm that convergence is better when the surface albedo is retrieved simultaneously with aerosol parameters. However, retrieved aerosol layer pressures are systematically low (i

  16. Dynamical contibution of Mean Potential Vorticity pseudo-observations derived from MetOp/GOME2 Ozone data into weather forecast, a Mediterranean High Precipitation Event study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sbii, Siham; Zazoui, Mimoun; Semane, Noureddine

    2015-04-01

    In the absence of observations covering the upper troposphere - lower stratophere, headquarters of several disturbances, and knowing that satellites are uniquely capable of providing uniform data coverage globally, a methodology is followed [1] to convert Total Column Ozone, observed by MetOp/GOME2, into pseudo-observations of Mean Potential Vorticity (MPV). The aim is to study the dynamical impact of Ozone data in the prediction of a Mediterranean Heavy Precipitation Event observed during 28-29 September 2012 in the context of HYMEX1. This study builds on a previously described methodology [2] that generates numerical weather prediction model initial conditions from ozone data. Indeed, the assimilation of MPV in a 3D-var framework is based on a linear regression between observed Ozone and vertical integrated Ertel PV. The latter is calculated using dynamical fields from the moroccan operational limited area model ALADIN-MAROC according to [3]: δθ fp p0 -R δU δV P V = - gξaδp- g-R-(p )Cp [(δp-)2 + (δp-)2] (1) Where ξa is the vertical component of the absolute vorticity, U and V the horizontal wind components, θ the potential temperature, R gas constant, Cp specific heat at constant pressure, p the pressure, p0 a reference pressure, g the gravity and f is the Coriolis parameter. The MPV is estimated using the following expression: --1--∫ P2 M PV = P1 - P2 P P V.δp 1 (2) With P1 = 500hPa and P2 = 100hPa In the present study, the linear regression is performed over September 2012 with a correlation coefficient of 0.8265 and is described as follows: M P V = 5.314610- 2 *O3 - 13.445 (3) where O3 and MPV are given in Dobson Unit (DU) and PVU (1 PV U = 10-6 m2 K kg-1 s-1), respectively. It is found that the ozone-influenced upper-level initializing fields affect the precipitation forecast, as diagnosed by a comparison with the ECMWF model. References [1] S. Sbii, N. Semane, Y. Michel, P. Arbogast and M. Zazoui (2012). Using METOP/GOME-2 data and MSG ozone

  17. Can One Satellite Data Set Validation Another? Validation of Envisat SCIAMACHY Data by Comparisons with NOAA-16 SBUV/2 and ERS-2 GOME

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilsenrath, E.; Bojkov, B. R.; Labow, G.; Weber, M.; Burrows, J.

    2004-01-01

    Validation of satellite data remains a high priority for the construction of climate data sets. Traditionally ground based measurements have provided the primary comparison data for validation. For some atmospheric parameters such as ozone, a thoroughly validated satellite data record can be used to validate a new instrument s data product in addition to using ground based data. Comparing validated data with new satellite data has several advantages; availability of much more data, which will improve precision, larger geographical coverage, and the footprints are closer in size, which removes uncertainty due to different observed atmospheric volumes. To demonstrate the applicability and some limitations of this technique, observations from the newly launched SCIAMACHY instrument were compared with the NOM-16 SBW/2 and ERS-2 GOME instruments. The SBW/2 data had all ready undergone validation by comparing to the total ozone ground network. Overall the SCIAMACHY data were found to low by 3% with respect to satellite data and 1% low with respect to ground station data. There appears to be seasonal and or solar zenith angle dependences in the comparisons with SBW/2 where differences increase with higher solar zenith angles. It is known that accuracies in both satellite and ground based total ozone algorithms decrease at high solar zenith angles. There is a strong need for more accurate measurement from and the ground under these conditions. At the present time SCIAMACHY data are limited and longer data set with more coverage in both hemispheres is needed to unravel the cause of these differences.

  18. Macrofauna associated with the brown algae Dictyota spp. (Phaeophyceae, Dictyotaceae) in the Sebastião Gomes Reef and Abrolhos Archipelago, Bahia, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha, Tauana Junqueira; Güth, Arthur Ziggiatti; Bromberg, Sandra; Sumida, Paulo Yukio Gomes

    2013-11-01

    The taxonomic richness and distributional patterns of the macrofauna associated with the algae genus Dictyota from the Abrolhos Bank (Eastern Brazilian coast) are analyzed. Macrofauna comprised a total of 9586 specimens; a complete faunal list of the most abundant taxa (Crustacea, Polychaeta and Mollusca, accounting for 95.6%) resulted in 64 families and 120 species. Forty six species are registered for the first time for the Abrolhos Bank, of which 3 are also new for the Brazilian coast. The most abundant families were Ampithoidae amphipods (with Ampithoe ramondi as the main faunal component), Janiridae isopods, Rissoellidae gastropods and Syllidae polychaetes. Comparisons were made between summer and winter periods and among sites from Sebastião Gomes Reef, near the coast, and from Siriba Island, in the Abrolhos Archipelago, away from the mainland. Algae size was lower in the summer, when faunal density was higher, suggesting a possible effect of grazing. Macrofaunal communities were significantly different among sites and periods. Coastal and external communities were markedly different and winter had the greatest effects on the fauna. Environmental conditions related to sediment type and origin and turbidity appear to be a good scenario for our macrofauna distribution results.

  19. A Kalman filter reconstruction of the vertical ozone distribution in an equivalent latitude-potential temperature framework from TOMS/GOME/SBUV total ozone observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, D.; Staehelin, J.; Künsch, H.-R.; Bodeker, G. E.

    2006-06-01

    We present a quasi three-dimensional ozone data set (Candidoz Assimilated Three-dimensional Ozone, CATO) with daily resolution and covering the period 1979-2004. It was reconstructed from two-dimensional total ozone observations of the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME), and Solar Backscatter UV (SBUV) satellite instruments by assimilating the measurements into an equivalent latitude (ϕE)-potential temperature (θ) framework. The statistical reconstruction method uses the fact that total ozone columns are influenced by transient north-south excursions of air parcels associated, for instance, with Rossby waves. These adiabatic motions change the thickness of individual isentropic layers and transport high or low ozone into the column depending on meridional concentration gradients. A Kalman filter was employed to calculate sequentially the ozone distributions on a (ϕE, θ) grid that best match the total ozone observations given the errors in both the measurements and the ozone field predicted by the filter. CATO is shown to agree in midlatitudes within 20% with ozonesondes and the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) capturing both seasonal and interannual variations. Significantly larger differences of about 30% are found at the high-latitude sonde station Sodankylä (67°N), while differences from HALOE are mostly within 20% at these latitudes. Differences of about 30% from both the sondes and HALOE are found in the tropical lower stratosphere. This new data set is unique in its temporal and spatial coverage and will be particularly useful for studies of the factors influencing the long-term evolution of ozone in the lower stratosphere.

  20. Chemical ozone loss and ozone mini-hole event during the Arctic winter 2010/2011 as observed by SCIAMACHY and GOME-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hommel, R.; Eichmann, K.-U.; Aschmann, J.; Bramstedt, K.; Weber, M.; von Savigny, C.; Richter, A.; Rozanov, A.; Wittrock, F.; Khosrawi, F.; Bauer, R.; Burrows, J. P.

    2014-04-01

    Record breaking loss of ozone (O3) in the Arctic stratosphere has been reported in winter-spring 2010/2011. We examine in detail the composition and transformations occurring in the Arctic polar vortex using total column and vertical profile data products for O3, bromine oxide (BrO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), chlorine dioxide (OClO), and polar stratospheric clouds (PSC) retrieved from measurements made by SCIAMACHY (Scanning Imaging Absorption SpectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartography) on-board Envisat (Environmental Satellite), as well as total column ozone amount, retrieved from the measurements of GOME-2 (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment) on MetOp-A (Meteorological Experimental Satellite). Similarly we use the retrieved data from DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) measurements made in Ny-Ålesund (78.55° N, 11.55° E). A chemical transport model (CTM) has been used to relate and compare Arctic winter-spring conditions in 2011 with those in the previous year. In late winter-spring 2010/2011 the chemical ozone loss in the polar vortex derived from SCIAMACHY observations confirms findings reported elsewhere. More than 70% of O3 was depleted by halogen catalytic cycles between the 425 and 525 K isentropic surfaces, i.e. in the altitude range ~16-20 km. In contrast, during the same period in the previous winter 2009/2010, a typical warm Arctic winter, only slightly more than 20% depletion occurred below 20 km, while 40% of O3 was removed above the 575 K isentrope (~23 km). This loss above 575 K is explained by the catalytic destruction by NOx descending from the mesosphere. In both Arctic winters 2009/2010 and 2010/2011, calculated O3 losses from the CTM are in good agreement to our observations and other model studies. The mid-winter 2011 conditions, prior to the catalytic cycles being fully effective, are also investigated. Surprisingly, a significant loss of O3 around 60%, previously not discussed in detail, is observed in mid-January 2011 below

  1. Eutetrarhynchid trypanorhynchs (Cestoda) from elasmobranchs off Argentina, including the description of Dollfusiella taminii sp. n. and Parachristianella damiani sp. n., and amended description of Dollfusiella vooremi (São Clemente et Gomes, 1989).

    PubMed

    Menoret, Adriana; Ivanov, Verónica A

    2014-10-01

    During a parasitological survey of teleosts and elasmobranchs in the Argentine Sea, 3 species of eutetrarhynchids were collected from the batoids Myliobatis goodei Garman and Psammobatis bergi Marini, and the shark Mustelus schmitti Springer. The specimens collected from Mu. schmitti were identified as Dollfusiela vooremi (Sπo Clemente et Gomes, 1989), whereas the specimens from My. goodei and Ps. bergi resulted in new species of Dollfusiella Campbell et Beveridge, 1994 and Parachristianella Dollfus, 1946, respectively. Dollfusiella taminii sp. n. from Ps. bergi is characterised by a distinct basal armature with basal swelling and a heteroacanthous homeomorphous metabasal armature with 7-9 falcate hooks per principal row. Parachristianella damiani sp. n. from My. goodei lacks a distinct basal armature, having 2-3 initial rows of uncinate hooks, a heteroacanthous heteromorphous metabasal armature with the first principal row of small hooks, followed by rows with 10-14 large hooks. This is the first record of Parachristianella in the southwestern Atlantic. The amended description of D. vooremi includes the detailed description of the tentacular armature, including SEM micrographs of all tentacular surfaces. This species is characterised by a basal armature consisting of rows of uncinate and falcate hooks, a basal swelling and a metabasal armature with billhooks on the antibothrial surface and uncinate hooks on the bothrial surface. The scolex peduncle of D. vooremi is covered with enlarged spinitriches. This species is restricted to carcharhiniform sharks, since the report of D. vooremi in Sympterygia bonapartii Müller et Henle off Bahia Blanca (Argentina) is dubious. PMID:25549498

  2. Comparison of Profile Total Ozone from SBUV (v8.6) with GOME-Type and Ground-Based Total Ozone for a 16-Year Period (1996 to 2011)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiou, E. W.; Bhartia, P. K.; McPeters, R. D.; Loyola, D. G.; Coldewey-Egbers, M.; Fioletov, V. E.; Van Roozendael, M.; Spurr, R.; Lerot, C.; Frith, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the comparison of the variability of total column ozone inferred from the three independent multi-year data records, namely, (i) Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet Instrument (SBUV) v8.6 profile total ozone, (ii) GTO (GOME-type total ozone), and (iii) ground-based total ozone data records covering the 16-year overlap period (March 1996 through June 2011). Analyses are conducted based on area-weighted zonal means for 0-30degS, 0-30degN, 50-30degS, and 30-60degN. It has been found that, on average, the differences in monthly zonal mean total ozone vary between -0.3 and 0.8% and are well within 1 %. For GTO minus SBUV, the standard deviations and ranges (maximum minus minimum) of the differences regarding monthly zonal mean total ozone vary between 0.6-0.7% and 2.8-3.8% respectively, depending on the latitude band. The corresponding standard deviations and ranges regarding the differences in monthly zonal mean anomalies show values between 0.4-0.6% and 2.2-3.5 %. The standard deviations and ranges of the differences ground-based minus SBUV regarding both monthly zonal means and anomalies are larger by a factor of 1.4-2.9 in comparison to GTO minus SBUV. The ground-based zonal means demonstrate larger scattering of monthly data compared to satellite-based records. The differences in the scattering are significantly reduced if seasonal zonal averages are analyzed. The trends of the differences GTO minus SBUV and ground-based minus SBUV are found to vary between -0.04 and 0.1%/yr (-0.1 and 0.3DU/yr). These negligibly small trends have provided strong evidence that there are no significant time-dependent differences among these multiyear total ozone data records. Analyses of the annual deviations from pre-1980 level indicate that, for the 15-year period of 1996 to 2010, all three data records show a gradual increase at 30-60degN from -5% in 1996 to -2% in 2010. In contrast, at 50-30degS and 30degS- 30degN there has been a leveling off in the 15 years after

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: M dwarfs activity and radial velocity (Gomes da Silva+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes da, Silva; J.; Santos; N., C.; Bonfils; X.; Delfosse; X.; Forveille; T.; Udry; S.; Dumusque; X.; Lovis; C.

    2012-03-01

    Due to their low mass and luminosity, M dwarfs are ideal targets if one hopes to find low-mass planets similar to Earth by using the radial velocity (RV) method. However, stellar magnetic cycles could add noise or even mimic the RV signal of a long-period companion. Following our previous work that studied the correlation between activity cycles and long-term RV variations for K dwarfs we now expand that research to the lower-end of the main sequence. Our objective is to detect any correlations between long-term activity variations and the observed RV of a sample of M dwarfs. We used a sample of 27 M-dwarfs with a median observational timespan of 5.9 years. The cross-correlation function (CCF) with its parameters RV, bisector inverse slope (BIS), full-width-at-half- maximum (FWHM) and contrast have been computed from the HARPS spectrum. The activity index have been derived using the Na I D doublet. These parameters were compared with the activity level of the stars to search for correlations. We detected RV variations up to ~5m/s that we can attribute to activity cycle effects. However, only 36% of the stars with long-term activity variability appear to have their RV affected by magnetic cycles, on the typical timescale of ~6 years. Therefore, we suggest a careful analysis of activity data when searching for extrasolar planets using long-timespan RV data. (2 data files).

  4. Harmonised Validation System for Tropospheric Ozone and Ozone Profile Retrievals from GOME to the Copernicus Sentinels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppens, A.; Lambert, J.-C.; Hubert, D.; Verhoelst, T.; Granville, J.; Ancellet, G.; Balis, D.; Delcloo, A.; Duflot, V.; Godin-Beekmann, S.; Leblanc, T.; Stavrakou, T.; Steinbrecht, W.; Stubi, R.; Thompson, A. M.

    2015-06-01

    This work outlines the principles and implementation procedures of a harmonised QA/validation system for assessing the quality of atmospheric composition data. The system now runs in pre-operational mode at BIRA-IASB, following a generic and fully traceable flow of operations. The system’s broad applicability to virtually all (partial) column and profile datasets is demonstrated here by evaluation activities within ESA’s Ozone_cci project. However, ozone data validation as envisaged in the upcoming S5PVT AO project “CHEOPS-5p” and for the future Copernicus Sentinel missions raises a number of additional challenges, foremost regarding the expected amount of data to be handled. We therefore provide a perspective on current developments of the validation system to address those challenges and make it evolve into a fast operational phase.

  5. Hepatic profile of Gallus gallus Linnaeus, 1758 experimentally infected by Plasmodium juxtanucleare Versiani & Gomes, 1941.

    PubMed

    Vashist, Usha; Falqueto, Aline Duarte; Lustrino, Danilo; Tunholi, Victor Menezes; Tunholi-Alves, Vinícius Menezes; dos Santos, Marcos Antônio José; D'Agosto, Marta; Massard, Carlos Luiz; Pinheiro, Jairo

    2011-02-10

    One of the species that causes avian malaria is Plasmodium juxtanucleare. It is commonly found in poultry, especially when the birds receive food free of coccidiostats. Since industrial and organic poultry breeding is increasing in the world and few studies have been conducted examining the clinical parameters of both healthy and infected birds, this work evaluated whether the infection caused by P. juxtanucleare in Gallus gallus provokes alterations in the birds' hepatic profile. We analyzed the activity of ALT and AST and carried out histological analyses of liver sections of infected fowls by intracelomic inoculation with infected blood from a donor fowl with a parasite load of around 7%. The infected birds' parasite load was evaluated during 45 days by means of blood smears. There was a positive correlation between the increase in parasite load and higher ALT activity in the infected fowls, but there was no significant variation of the AST activity between the control and infected groups, possibly because of the non-specificity of this enzyme as an indicator of hepatic lesion. The results show that infection caused by P. juxtanucleare in G. gallus provokes hepatic alterations, indicated by the increase in the ALT enzyme activity and by the inflammatory infiltrates found in the liver sections of the infected fowls. PMID:21074323

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Positions of satellites of giant planets (Gomes-Junior+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes-Junior, A. R.; Assafin, M.; Vieira Martins, R.; Arlot, J.-E.; Camargo, J. I. B.; Braga-Ribas, F.; da Silva Neto, D. N.; Andrei, A. H.; Dias-Oliveira, A.; Morgado, B. E.; Benedetti-Rossi, G.; Duchemin, Y.; Desmars, J.; Lainey, V.; Thuillot, W.

    2015-05-01

    Tables contain the topocentric ICRS coordinates of the irregular satellites, the position error estimated from the dispersion of the ephemeris offsets of the night of observation, the UTC time of the frame's mid-exposure in julian date, the estimated magnitude, the filter used, the telescope origin and correspondent IAU code. The filters may be U, B, V, R or I following the Johnson system; C stands for clear (no filter used), resulting in a broader R band magnitude, RE for the broad-band R filter ESO#844 with λ=651.725nm and Δλ=162.184nm (full width at half maximum) and "un" for unknown filter. E, OH, PE, BC and Z stand respectively for the ESO, OHP (Observatoire de Haute-Provence), Perkin-Elmer, Bollen & Chivens and Zeiss telescopes from the Observatorio do Pico dos Dias. (2 data files).

  7. The Impact of Global Climate Change on the Geographic Distribution and Sustainable Harvest of Hancornia speciosa Gomes (Apocynaceae) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nabout, João Carlos; Magalhães, Mara Rúbia; de Amorim Gomes, Marcos Aurélio; da Cunha, Hélida Ferreira

    2016-04-01

    The global Climate change may affect biodiversity and the functioning of ecosystems by changing the appropriate locations for the development and establishment of the species. The Hancornia speciosa, popularly called Mangaba, is a plant species that has potential commercial value and contributes to rural economic activities in Brazil. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of global climate change on the potential geographic distribution, productivity, and value of production of H. speciosa in Brazil. We used MaxEnt to estimate the potential geographic distribution of the species in current and future (2050) climate scenarios. We obtained the productivity and value of production for 74 municipalities in Brazil. Moreover, to explain the variation the productivity and value of production, we constructed 15 models based on four variables: two ecological (ecological niche model and the presence of Unity of conservation) and two socio-economic (gross domestic product and human developed index). The models were selected using Akaike Information Criteria. Our results suggest that municipalities currently harvesting H. speciosa will have lower harvest rates in the future (mainly in northeastern Brazil). The best model to explain the productivity was ecological niche model; thus, municipalities with higher productivity are inserted in regions with higher environmental suitability (indicated by niche model). Thus, in the future, the municipalities harvesting H. speciosa will produce less because there will be less suitable habitat for H. speciosa, which in turn will affect the H. speciosa harvest and the local economy. PMID:26796699

  8. The Impact of Global Climate Change on the Geographic Distribution and Sustainable Harvest of Hancornia speciosa Gomes (Apocynaceae) in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabout, João Carlos; Magalhães, Mara Rúbia; de Amorim Gomes, Marcos Aurélio; da Cunha, Hélida Ferreira

    2016-04-01

    The global Climate change may affect biodiversity and the functioning of ecosystems by changing the appropriate locations for the development and establishment of the species. The Hancornia speciosa, popularly called Mangaba, is a plant species that has potential commercial value and contributes to rural economic activities in Brazil. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of global climate change on the potential geographic distribution, productivity, and value of production of H. speciosa in Brazil. We used MaxEnt to estimate the potential geographic distribution of the species in current and future (2050) climate scenarios. We obtained the productivity and value of production for 74 municipalities in Brazil. Moreover, to explain the variation the productivity and value of production, we constructed 15 models based on four variables: two ecological (ecological niche model and the presence of Unity of conservation) and two socio-economic (gross domestic product and human developed index). The models were selected using Akaike Information Criteria. Our results suggest that municipalities currently harvesting H. speciosa will have lower harvest rates in the future (mainly in northeastern Brazil). The best model to explain the productivity was ecological niche model; thus, municipalities with higher productivity are inserted in regions with higher environmental suitability (indicated by niche model). Thus, in the future, the municipalities harvesting H. speciosa will produce less because there will be less suitable habitat for H. speciosa, which in turn will affect the H. speciosa harvest and the local economy.

  9. Survey of Basic Skills: Grade 3 [and] Grade 6 - 1982. School Report for John M. Gomes Elementary. California Assessment Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento.

    The California Assessment Program (CAP) presents the Survey of Basic Skills report for grades 3 and 6 of an Alameda County elementary school for 1982. This report begins with an overview of school and district achievement and progresses to more detailed information related to performance in specific skill areas and scores for different groups of…

  10. Satellite-Based Stratospheric and Tropospheric Measurements: Determination of Global Ozone and other Trace Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chance, K. V.

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes research done under NASA Grant NAG5-3461 from November 1, 1996 through December 31, 2000. The research performed during this reporting period includes development and maintenance of scientific software for the GOME retrieval algorithms, consultation on operational software development for GOME, sensitivity and instrument studies to help finalize the definition of the SCIAMACHY instrument, leading the development of the SCIAMACHY Scientific Requirements Document for Data and Algorithm Development, consultation and development for SCIAMACHY near-real-time (NRT) and off-line (OL) data products, radiative transfer model development for utilization in GOME, SCIAMACHY and other programs, development of infrared line-by-line atmospheric modeling and retrieval capability for SCIAMACHY, and participation in GOME and SCIAMACHY validation studies. The Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment was successfully launched on the ERS-2 satellite on April 20, 1995, and remains working in normal fashion. SCIAMACHY is currently planned for launch in late 2001 on the ESA Envisat satellite. Three GOME-2 instruments are now scheduled to fly on the Metop series of operational meteorological satellites (Eumetsat). K. Chance is a member of the reconstituted GOME Scientific Advisory Group, which will guide the GOME-2 program as well as the continuing ERS-2 GOME program.

  11. Gold Nanosphere Gated Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticle Responsive to Near-Infrared Light and Redox Potential as a Theranostic Platform for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Bei; He, Huacheng; Huang, Tao; Berr, Stuart S; He, Jiang; Fan, Daping; Zhang, Jiajia; Xu, Peisheng

    2016-03-01

    A gold/mesoporous silica hybrid nanoparticle (GoMe), which possesses the best of both conventional gold nanoparticles and mesoporous silica nanoparticles, such as excellent photothermal converting ability as well as high drug loading capacity and triggerable drug release, has been developed. In contrast to gold nanorod and other heat generating gold nanoparticles, GoMe is photothermal stable and can be repetitively activated through NIR irradiation. Doxorubicin loaded GoMe (DOX@GoMe) is sensitive to both NIR irradiation and intracellularly elevated redox potential. DOX@GoMe coupled with NIR irradiation exhibits a synergistic effect of photothermal therapy and chemotherapy in killing cancer cells. Furthermore, 64Cu-labeled GoMe can successfully detect the existence of clinically relevant spontaneous lung tumors in a urethane-induced lung cancer mouse model through PET imaging. Altogether, GoMe can be utilized as an effective theranostic platform for cancer therapy. PMID:26949379

  12. Satellite-Based Stratospheric and Tropospheric Measurements: Determination of Global Ozone and Other Trace Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chance, Kelly

    2003-01-01

    This grant is an extension to our previous NASA Grant NAG5-3461, providing incremental funding to continue GOME (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment) and SCIAMACHY (SCanning Imaging Absorption SpectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY) studies. This report summarizes research done under these grants through December 31, 2002. The research performed during this reporting period includes development and maintenance of scientific software for the GOME retrieval algorithms, consultation on operational software development for GOME, consultation and development for SCIAMACHY near-real-time (NRT) and off-line (OL) data products, and participation in initial SCIAMACHY validation studies. The Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment was successfully launched on the ERS-2 satellite on April 20, 1995, and remains working in normal fashion. SCIAMACHY was launched March 1, 2002 on the ESA Envisat satellite. Three GOME-2 instruments are now scheduled to fly on the Metop series of operational meteorological satellites (Eumetsat). K. Chance is a member of the reconstituted GOME Scientific Advisory Group, which will guide the GOME-2 program as well as the continuing ERS-2 GOME program.

  13. Satellite-Based Stratospheric and Tropospheric Measurements: Determination of Global Ozone and Other Trace Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, Kelly

    2003-02-01

    This grant is an extension to our previous NASA Grant NAG5-3461, providing incremental funding to continue GOME (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment) and SCIAMACHY (SCanning Imaging Absorption SpectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY) studies. This report summarizes research done under these grants through December 31, 2002. The research performed during this reporting period includes development and maintenance of scientific software for the GOME retrieval algorithms, consultation on operational software development for GOME, consultation and development for SCIAMACHY near-real-time (NRT) and off-line (OL) data products, and participation in initial SCIAMACHY validation studies. The Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment was successfully launched on the ERS-2 satellite on April 20, 1995, and remains working in normal fashion. SCIAMACHY was launched March 1, 2002 on the ESA Envisat satellite. Three GOME-2 instruments are now scheduled to fly on the Metop series of operational meteorological satellites (Eumetsat). K. Chance is a member of the reconstituted GOME Scientific Advisory Group, which will guide the GOME-2 program as well as the continuing ERS-2 GOME program.

  14. Quantifying the Seasonal and Interannual Variability of North American Isoprene Emissions Using Satellite Observations of the Formaldehyde Column

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Paul I.; Abbot, Dorian S.; Fu, Tzung-May; Jacob, Daniel J.; Chance, Kelly; Kurosu, Thomas P.; Guenther, Alex; Wiedinmyer, Christine; Stanton, Jenny C.; Pilling, Michael J.; Pressley, Shelley N.; Lamb, Brian; Sumner, Anne Louise

    2006-01-01

    Quantifying isoprene emissions using satellite observations of the formaldehyde (HCHO) columns is subject to errors involving the column retrieval and the assumed relationship between HCHO columns and isoprene emissions, taken here from the GEOS-CHEM chemical transport model. Here we use a 6-year (1996-2001) HCHO column data set from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) satellite instrument to (1) quantify these errors, (2) evaluate GOME-derived isoprene emissions with in situ flux measurements and a process-based emission inventory (Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature, MEGAN), and (3) investigate the factors driving the seasonal and interannual variability of North American isoprene emissions. The error in the GOME HCHO column retrieval is estimated to be 40%. We use the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM) to quantify the time-dependent HCHO production from isoprene, alpha- and beta-pinenes, and methylbutenol and show that only emissions of isoprene are detectable by GOME. The time-dependent HCHO yield from isoprene oxidation calculated by MCM is 20-30% larger than in GEOS-CHEM. GOME-derived isoprene fluxes track the observed seasonal variation of in situ measurements at a Michigan forest site with a -30% bias. The seasonal variation of North American isoprene emissions during 2001 inferred from GOME is similar to MEGAN, with GOME emissions typically 25% higher (lower) at the beginning (end) of the growing season. GOME and MEGAN both show a maximum over the southeastern United States, but they differ in the precise location. The observed interannual variability of this maximum is 20-30%, depending on month. The MEGAN isoprene emission dependence on surface air temperature explains 75% of the month-to-month variability in GOME-derived isoprene emissions over the southeastern United States during May-September 1996-2001.

  15. Neural network scheme for the retrieval of total ozone from Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment data.

    PubMed

    Müller, Martin D; Kaifel, Anton; Weber, Mark; Burrows, John P

    2002-08-20

    A novel approach to retrieving total ozone columns from the ERS2 GOME (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment) spectral data has been developed. With selected GOME wavelength regions, from clear and cloudy pixels alike plus orbital and instrument data as input, a feed-forward neural network was trained to determine total ozone in a one-step inverse retrieval procedure. To achieve this training, ground-based total ozone measurements from the World Ozone and Ultraviolet Data Center (WOUDC) for the years 1996-2000, supplemented with Dobson-corrected Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) data to provide global coverage, were collocated with GOME ground pixels into a training data set. Validation of the neural-network-retrieved ozone values relative to independent ground stations yielded a rms error of better than 11 Dobson units. Comparisons performed on the basis of operationally available TOMS and GOME level-3 maps exhibit good agreement in general, with a latitude-dependent offset. PMID:12206215

  16. Retrieval and molecule sensitivity studies for the global ozone monitoring experiment and the scanning imaging absorption spectrometer for atmospheric chartography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chance, Kelly V.; Burrows, John P.; Schneider, Wolfgang

    1991-01-01

    The Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) and the SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY) are diode based spectrometers that will make atmospheric constituent and aerosol measurements from European satellite platforms beginning in the mid 1990's. GOME measures the atmosphere in the UV and visible in nadir scanning, while SCIAMACHY performs a combination of nadir, limb, and occultation measurements in the UV, visible, and infrared. A summary is presented of the sensitivity studies that were performed for SCIAMACHY measurements. As the GOME measurement capability is a subset of the SCIAMACHY measurement capability, the nadir, UV, and visible portion of the studies is shown to apply to GOME as well.

  17. Mapping Isoprene Emissions over North America using Formaldehyde Column Observations from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Paul I.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Fiore, Arlene M.; Martin, Randall V.; Chance, Kelly; Kurosu, Thomas P.

    2004-01-01

    I] We present a methodology for deriving emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) using space-based column observations of formaldehyde (HCHO) and apply it to data from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) satellite instrument over North America during July 1996. The HCHO column is related to local VOC emissions, with a spatial smearing that increases with the VOC lifetime. lsoprene is the dominant HCHO precursor over North America in summer, and its lifetime (approx. = 1 hour) is sufficiently short that the smearing can be neglected. We use the Goddard Earth Observing System global 3-D model of tropospheric chemistry (GEOS-CHEM) to derive the relationship between isoprene emissions and HCHO columns over North America and use these relationships to convert the GOME HCHO columns to isoprene emissions. We also use the GEOS-CHEM model as an intermediary to validate the GOME HCHO column measurements by comparison with in situ observations. The GEOS-CHEM model including the Global Emissions Inventory Activity (GEIA) isoprene emission inventory provides a good simulation of both the GOME data (r(sup 2) = 0.69, n = 756, bias = +l1 %) and the in situ summertime HCHO measurements over North America (r(sup 2) = 0.47, n = 10, bias = -3%). The GOME observations show high values over regions of known high isoprene emissions and a day-to-day variability that is consistent with the temperature dependence of isoprene emission. Isoprene emissions inferred from the GOME data are 20% less than GEIA on average over North America and twice those from the U S . EPA Biogenic Emissions Inventory System (BEIS2) inventory. The GOME isoprene inventory when implemented in the GEOS-CHEM model provides a better simulation of the HCHO in situ measurements thaneitherGEIAorBEIS2 (r(sup 2) = 0.71,n= 10, bias = -10 %).

  18. Accurate modeling of spectral fine-structure in Earth radiance spectra measured with the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment.

    PubMed

    van Deelen, Rutger; Hasekamp, Otto P; Landgraf, Jochen

    2007-01-10

    We present what we believe to be a novel approach to simulating the spectral fine structure (<1 nm) in measurements of spectrometers such as the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME). GOME measures the Earth's radiance spectra and daily solar irradiance spectra from which a reflectivity spectrum is commonly extracted. The high-frequency structures contained in such a spectrum are, apart from atmospheric absorption, caused by Raman scattering and by a shift between the solar irradiance and the Earth's radiance spectrum. Normally, an a priori high-resolution solar spectrum is used to simulate these structures. We present an alternative method in which all the required information on the solar spectrum is retrieved from the GOME measurements. We investigate two approaches for the spectral range of 390-400 nm. First, a solar spectrum is reconstructed on a fine spectral grid from the GOME solar measurement. This approach leads to undersampling errors of up to 0.5% in the modeling of the Earth's radiance spectra. Second, a combination of the solar measurement and one of the Earth's radiance measurement is used to retrieve a solar spectrum. This approach effectively removes the undersampling error and results in residuals close to the GOME measurement noise of 0.1%. PMID:17268571

  19. Guido Beck, Alexandre Proca, and the Oporto Theoretical Physics Seminar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dos Santos Fitas, Augusto José; Passos Videira, António Augusto

    2007-01-01

    We describe the pioneering attempts made by Ruy Luís Gomes (1905 1984) and other Portuguese physicists to develop a research and teaching seminar in theoretical physics at the University of Oporto in 1942 1944 under the leadership first of the refugee Austrian theoretical physicist Guido Beck (1903 1988) and then of the Romanian-French theoretical physicist Alexandre Proca (1896 1955). These efforts failed, however, owing to lack of sustained financial support from the Portuguese government and to the political repression of the Salazar regime, which dismissed Gomes and other prominent Portuguese physicists and other scientists from their university positions.

  20. Improvement of OMI Ozone Profile Retrievals in the Troposphere and Lower Troposphere by the Use of the Tropopause-Based Ozone Profile Climatology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bak, Juseon; Liu, X.; Wei, J.; Kim, J. H.; Chance, K.; Barnet, C.

    2011-01-01

    An advance algorithm based on the optimal estimation technique has beeen developed to derive ozone profile from GOME UV radiances and have adapted it to OMI UV radiances. OMI vertical resolution : 7-11 km in the troposphere and 10-14 km in the stratosphere. Satellite ultraviolet measurements (GOME, OMI) contain little vertical information for the small scale of ozone, especially in the upper troposphere (UT) and lower stratosphere (LS) where the sharp O3 gradient across the tropopause and large ozone variability are observed. Therefore, retrievals depend greatly on the a-priori knowledge in the UTLS

  1. Interpreting satellite column observations of formaldehyde over tropical South America.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Paul I; Barkley, Michael P; Kurosu, Thomas P; Lewis, Alastair C; Saxton, Julie E; Chance, Kelly; Gatti, Luciana V

    2007-07-15

    Space-borne column measurements of formaldehyde (HCHO), a high-yield oxidation product of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), represent important constraints for quantifying net regional fluxes of VOCs. Here, we interpret observed distributions of HCHO columns from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) over tropical South America during 1997-2001. We present the first comparison of year-long in situ isoprene concentrations and fire-free GOME HCHO columns over a tropical ecosystem. GOME HCHO columns and in situ isoprene concentrations are elevated in the wet and dry seasons, with the highest values in the dry season. Previous analysis of the in situ data highlighted the possible role of drought in determining the elevated concentrations during the dry season, inferring the potential of HCHO columns to provide regional-scale constraints for estimating the role of drought on isoprene emissions. The agreement between the observed annual cycles of GOME HCHO columns and Along-Track Scanning Radiometer firecount data over the Amazon basin (correlations typically greater than 0.75 for a particular year) illustrates the potential of HCHO column to provide quantitative information about biomass burning emissions. PMID:17513262

  2. Wavelength calibration of spectra measured by the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment by use of a high-resolution reference spectrum.

    PubMed

    van Geffen, Jos H G M; van Oss, Roeland F

    2003-05-20

    Earthshine spectra measured by the nadir-viewing Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) spectrometer aboard the second European Remote Sensing (ERS-2) Satellite in the range of 240-790 nm are widely used for the retrieval of concentrations and vertical profiles of atmospheric trace gases. For the near-real-time delivery of ozone columns and profiles at the Royal Netherlands Meterological Institute, a tailor-made wavelength calibration method was developed. The method use a high-resolution (0.01-nm) solar spectrum as the reference spectrum and applies both a shift and a squeeze to the wavelengths in selected windows to find the optimal wavelength grid per window. This method provides a calibration accuracy of 0.002 nm below and 0.001 nm above 290 nm. The new wavelength calibration method can be used on any wavelength window, for example, to improve the calibration of spectra from the GOME Data Processor. A software package, GomeCal, which performs this recalibration, along with an improved polarization and radiometric correction, has been made and has been released via the World Wide Web. The method can be used for any high-resolution (ir)radiance spectrometer, such as the satellite instruments SCIAMACHY (Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Cartography), Ozone Monitoring Instrument, and GOME-2. PMID:12777012

  3. Long term total ozone trend analysis for the years 1979 - 2011 from merged data sets of various satellites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chehade, Wissam; Weber, Mark; Burrows, John P.

    2013-04-01

    The study presents a long term trend analysis of total ozone data sets obtained from various satellites. A multi-variate linear regression is applied to annual mean zonal mean data using various explanatory variables that represent the dynamical and chemical processes which modify global ozone distributions in a changing climate. The total ozone data sets comprise SBUV/TOMS/TOMI merged data (1979 - 2011) MOD V8 and GOME/SCIAMACHY/GOME-2 ("GSG") WFDOAS (Weighting Function DOAS) merged data (1995 - 2011). A sensitivity study is carried out by comparing SBUV/TOMS/OMI merged time series (1979 - 2011) and a merged data set containing SBUV/TOMS OMI (1979 - 1995) and GOME/SCIAMACHY/GOME-2 (1995 - 2011) in the regression analysis in order to investigate the uncertainty in the long-term trends due to the use of different ozone datasets. The aim of this study is to identify the fingerprint and its statistical significance of the onset of ozone recovery as expected from the turnaround and slow decrease in stratospheric halogen after measures introduced by the Montreal Protocol and amendments to phase out ozone depleting substances (ODS). Total ozone changes reflect changes in lower stratospheric ozone that is governed by chemical and dynamical short-term as well as long-term variability. Using different approaches to separate chemical and dynamical changes in total ozone, the onset of ozone recovery can be quantified.

  4. More than Just Hot Air: How Hairdryers and Role Models Inspire Girls in Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kekelis, Linda; Larkin, Molly; Gomes, Lyn

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a reverse-engineering project where female students take a part a hair dryer--giving them an opportunity to see the many different kinds of engineering disciplines involved in making a hairdryer and that they work together. Mechanical Engineer, Lyn Gome, describes her experience leading a group of middle school girls through…

  5. ESA DUE GlobVapour water vapor products: Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Nadine; Schröder, Marc; Lindstrot, Ramus; Preusker, Rene; Stengel, Martin; ESA DUE GlobVapour Consortium

    2013-05-01

    The main objective of the European Space Agency (ESA) Data User Element (DUE) GlobVapour project was the development of multi-annual global water vapor data sets. Since water vapour is a key climate variable it is important to have a good understanding of its behavior in the climate system. The ESA DUE GlobVapour project provides water vapor data, including error estimates, based on carefully calibrated and inter-calibrated satellite radiances in response to user requirements for long time series satellite observations. ESA DUE GlobVapour total columnar water vapor (TCWV) products derived from GOME/SCIA/GOME-2 (1996-2008) and SSM/I+MERIS (2003-2008) have been validated for the mentioned period, using satellite-based (AIRS, ATOVS) and ground-based measurements (radiosondes and microwave radiometer). The validation results are discussed in the following. The technical specifications on bias (1 kg/m2 for SSMI+MERIS and 2 kg/m2 for GOME/SCIA/GOME-2) are generally met. For more information, documents and data download follow the link: www.globvapour.info.

  6. P(URI)fying Novel Drivers of NASH and HCC: A Feedforward Loop of IL17A via White Adipose Tissue.

    PubMed

    Weber, Achim; Heikenwalder, Mathias

    2016-07-11

    How obesity and metabolic syndrome trigger non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains elusive. In this issue, Gomes and colleagues describe that nutrient surplus induces hepatic URI expression, triggering genotoxicity and IL17A expression, thus leading to insulin resistance, NASH, and HCC. IL17A signaling blockers might become a readily translatable therapy. PMID:27411585

  7. Analysis of Solar Spectral Irradiance Measurements from the SBUV/2-Series and the SSBUV Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebula, Richard P.; DeLand, Matthew T.; Hilsenrath, Ernest

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a NOAA-11 SBUV/2 solar spectral irradiance data set which is free from long-term instrument drift, then perform scientific analysis using the data set. During the current period of performance, 29 February 1996 through 31 August 1996, we finalized the NOAA-11 SBUV/2 characterization using internal data. This included updating the instrument's electronic, photomultiplier tube gain, wavelength, diffuser degradation, and goniometric calibrations. We have also completed the SSBUV characterization, 1989-1994, and produced SSBUV irradiances for the first seven SSBUV flights. Both of these steps were needed before the long-term calibration of the NOAA-11 SBUV/2 solar spectral irradiance data set via SSBUV can be undertaken. A second major aspect of this work is to compare solar spectral irradiances from the SBUV/2 instruments and SSBUV with corresponding data from other instruments. In the preceding six months, SSBUV data from the ATLAS-3 (November 1994) mission were compared to coincident SUSIM ATLAS-3 data. The GOME instrument was launched by the European Space Agency in early 1995 and began making solar irradiance measurements in May 1995. Working with GOME scientists, we are using SSBUV data to validate the GOME solar irradiance data. Based in part on those findings, the GOME absolute calibration data were reanalyzed.

  8. ESA DUE GlobVapour water vapor products: Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Nadine; Schroeder, Marc; Stengel, Martin; Lindstrot, Ramus; Preusker, Rene; Collaboration: ESA DUE GlobVapour Consortium

    2013-05-10

    The main objective of the European Space Agency (ESA) Data User Element (DUE) GlobVapour project was the development of multi-annual global water vapor data sets. Since water vapour is a key climate variable it is important to have a good understanding of its behavior in the climate system. The ESA DUE GlobVapour project provides water vapor data, including error estimates, based on carefully calibrated and inter-calibrated satellite radiances in response to user requirements for long time series satellite observations. ESA DUE GlobVapour total columnar water vapor (TCWV) products derived from GOME/SCIA/GOME-2 (1996-2008) and SSM/I+MERIS (2003-2008) have been validated for the mentioned period, using satellite-based (AIRS, ATOVS) and ground-based measurements (radiosondes and microwave radiometer). The validation results are discussed in the following. The technical specifications on bias (1 kg/m{sup 2} for SSMI+MERIS and 2 kg/m{sup 2} for GOME/SCIA/GOME-2) are generally met. For more information, documents and data download follow the link: www.globvapour.info.

  9. 78 FR 58320 - National Institute on Drug Abuse; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute on Drug Abuse; Notice of Closed Meetings... Committee: National Institute on Drug Abuse Special Emphasis Panel GOMED: Grand Opportunity in Medications... of Extramural Affairs, National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH, Room 4228, MSC 9550, 6001...

  10. First comparison between ground-based and satellite-borne measurements of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide in the Po basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petritoli, Andrea; Bonasoni, Paolo; Giovanelli, Giorgio; Ravegnani, Fabrizio; Kostadinov, Ivan; Bortoli, Daniele; Weiss, Andrea; Schaub, Daniel; Richter, Andreas; Fortezza, Francesco

    2004-08-01

    In this paper we present in situ and tropospheric column measurements of NO2 in the Po river basin (northern Italy). The aim of the work is to provide a quantitative comparison between ground-based and satellite measurements in order to assess the validity of spaceborne measurements for estimating NO2 emissions and evaluate possible climatic effects. The study is carried out using in situ chemiluminescent instrumentation installed in the Po valley, a UV/Vis spectrometer installed at Mount Cimone (44.2°N, 10.7°E, 2165 m asl), and tropospheric column measurements obtained from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) spectrometer. Results show that the annual cycle in surface concentrations and also some specific pollution periods observed by the air quality network are well reproduced by the GOME measurements. However, tropospheric columns derived from the surface measurements assuming a well-mixed planetary boundary layer (PBL) are much larger than the GOME columns and also have a different seasonal cycle. This is interpreted as indication of a smaller and less variable mixing height for NO2 in the boundary layer. Under particular meteorological conditions the agreement between UV/Vis tropospheric column observations and GOME measurements in the Mount Cimone area is good (R2 = 0.9) with the mixing properties of the atmosphere being the most important parameter for a valid comparison of the measurements. However, even when the atmospheric mixing properties are optimal for comparison, the ratio between GOME and ground-based tropospheric column data may not be unity. It is demonstrated that the values obtained (less than 1) are related to the fraction of the satellite ground pixel occupied by the NO2 hot spot.

  11. Homogenization of UV-Visible NDACC spectrometers reprocessing for ozone and NO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazmino, Andrea

    2010-05-01

    SAOZ is a ground-based UV-Visible zenith-sky spectrometer deployed since 1988 at a number of NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change) stations at all latitudes on the globe. The instrument is providing ozone and NO2 total columns at sunrise and sunset using the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) technique in the visible spectral range. SAOZ observations have been used extensively to validate various atmospheric chemistry satellite instruments such as nadir viewing TOMS, GOME, SCIAMACHY, OMI and GOME-2. The NDACC UV-Visible working group initiated a tentative homogenization of ozone and NO2 processing of all UV-Vis zenith sky spectrometers as one of its objectives. The first recommendation is concerning the total ozone retrieval. A significant change for the SAOZ network is the use of different cross-sections (O3, NO2, H2O, O4, and Ring calculations) and different spectral window fitting range, which leads to a recalculation of the slant columns. In addition, it is recommended to use a climatological air mass factor (AMF) instead of an annual AMF usually used in standard SAOZ processing. Here we present the results of comparisons between TOMS (since 1988), GOME (since 1995), SCIAMACHY (since 2002), OMI (since 2004), GOME-2 (since 2006) and SAOZ at all latitudes - tropics, mid-latitudes and Polar Regions - in both hemispheres. In the case of ozone, the NDACC recommendations resulted in a significant improvement of the differences between ground-based SAOZ and measurements from space. Preliminary results of NO2 SAOZ columns, using climatological AMF, are also presented and compared to different satellites, such as GOME, SCIAMACHY and OMI.

  12. Validity of satellite measurements used for the monitoring of UV radiation risk on health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jégou, F.; Godin-Beekman, S.; Corrêa, M. P.; Brogniez, C.; Auriol, F.; Peuch, V. H.; Haeffelin, M.; Pazmino, A.; Saiag, P.; Goutail, F.; Mahé, E.

    2011-06-01

    In order to test the validity of ultraviolet index (UVI) satellite products and UVI model simulations for general public information, intercomparison involving three satellite instruments (SCIAMACHY, OMI and GOME-2), the Chemistry and Transport Model, Modélisation de la Chimie Atmosphérique Grande Echelle (MOCAGE), and ground-based instruments was performed in 2008 and 2009. The intercomparison highlighted a systematic high bias of ~1 UVI in the OMI clear-sky products compared to the SCIAMACHY and TUV model clear-sky products. The OMI and GOME-2 all-sky products are close to the ground-based observations with a low 6 % positive bias, comparable to the results found during the satellite validation campaigns. This result shows that OMI and GOME-2 all-sky products are well appropriate to evaluate the UV-risk on health. The study has pointed out the difficulty to take into account either in the retrieval algorithms or in the models, the large spatial and temporal cloud modification effect on UV radiation. This factor is crucial to provide good quality UV information. OMI and GOME-2 show a realistic UV variability as a function of the cloud cover. Nevertheless these satellite products do not sufficiently take into account the radiation reflected by clouds. MOCAGE numerical forecasts show good results during periods with low cloud covers, but are actually not adequate for overcast conditions; this is why Météo-France currently uses human-expertised cloudiness (rather than direct outputs from Numerical Prediction Models) together with MOCAGE clear-sky UV indices for its operational forecasts. From now on, the UV monitoring could be done using free satellite products (OMI, GOME-2) and operational forecast for general public by using modelling, as long as cloud forecasts and the parametrisation of the impact of cloudiness on UV radiation are adequate.

  13. Validity of satellite measurements used for the monitoring of UV radiation risk on health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jégou, F.; Godin-Beekman, S.; Corrêa, M. P.; Brogniez, C.; Auriol, F.; Peuch, V. H.; Haeffelin, M.; Pazmino, A.; Saiag, P.; Goutail, F.; Mahé, E.

    2011-12-01

    In order to test the validity of ultraviolet index (UVI) satellite products and UVI model simulations for general public information, intercomparison involving three satellite instruments (SCIAMACHY, OMI and GOME-2), the Chemistry and Transport Model, Modélisation de la Chimie Atmosphérique Grande Echelle (MOCAGE), and ground-based instruments was performed in 2008 and 2009. The intercomparison highlighted a systematic high bias of ~1 UVI in the OMI clear-sky products compared to the SCIAMACHY and TUV model clear-sky products. The OMI and GOME-2 all-sky products are close to the ground-based observations with a low 6 % positive bias, comparable to the results found during the satellite validation campaigns. This result shows that OMI and GOME-2 all-sky products are well appropriate to evaluate the UV-risk on health. The study has pointed out the difficulty to take into account either in the retrieval algorithms or in the models, the large spatial and temporal cloud modification effect on UV radiation. This factor is crucial to provide good quality UV information. OMI and GOME-2 show a realistic UV variability as a function of the cloud cover. Nevertheless these satellite products do not sufficiently take into account the radiation reflected by clouds. MOCAGE numerical forecasts show good results during periods with low cloud covers, but are actually not adequate for overcast conditions; this is why Météo-France currently uses human-expertised cloudiness (rather than direct outputs from Numerical Prediction Models) together with MOCAGE clear-sky UV indices for its operational forecasts. From now on, the UV monitoring could be done using free satellite products (OMI, GOME-2) and operational forecast for general public by using modelling, as long as cloud forecasts and the parametrisation of the impact of cloudiness on UV radiation are adequate.

  14. Satellite Observations of NO2 Trend over Romania

    PubMed Central

    Voiculescu, Mirela; Georgescu, Lucian

    2013-01-01

    Satellite-based measurements of atmospheric trace gases loading give a realistic image of atmospheric pollution at global, regional, and urban level. The aim of this paper is to investigate the trend of atmospheric NO2 content over Romania for the period 1996–2010 for several regions which are generally characterized by different pollutant loadings, resulting from GOME-1, SCIAMACHY, OMI, and GOME-2 instruments. Satellite results are then compared with ground-based in situ measurements made in industrial and relatively clean areas of one major city in Romania. This twofold approach will help in estimating whether the trend of NO2 obtained by means of data satellite retrievals can be connected with the evolution of national industry and transportation. PMID:24453819

  15. Satellite observations of NO2 trend over Romania.

    PubMed

    Constantin, Daniel-Eduard; Voiculescu, Mirela; Georgescu, Lucian

    2013-01-01

    Satellite-based measurements of atmospheric trace gases loading give a realistic image of atmospheric pollution at global, regional, and urban level. The aim of this paper is to investigate the trend of atmospheric NO2 content over Romania for the period 1996-2010 for several regions which are generally characterized by different pollutant loadings, resulting from GOME-1, SCIAMACHY, OMI, and GOME-2 instruments. Satellite results are then compared with ground-based in situ measurements made in industrial and relatively clean areas of one major city in Romania. This twofold approach will help in estimating whether the trend of NO2 obtained by means of data satellite retrievals can be connected with the evolution of national industry and transportation. PMID:24453819

  16. Validation of space-based polarization measurements by use of a single-scattering approximation, with application to the global ozone monitoring experiment.

    PubMed

    Aben, Ilse; Tanzi, Cristina P; Hartmann, Wouter; Stam, Daphne M; Stammes, Piet

    2003-06-20

    A method is presented for in-flight validation of space-based polarization measurements based on approximation of the direction of polarization of scattered sunlight by the Rayleigh single-scattering value. This approximation is verified by simulations of radiative transfer calculations for various atmospheric conditions. The simulations show locations along an orbit where the scattering geometries are such that the intensities of the parallel and orthogonal polarization components of the light are equal, regardless of the observed atmosphere and surface. The method can be applied to any space-based instrument that measures the polarization of reflected solar light. We successfully applied the method to validate the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) polarization measurements. The error in the GOME's three broadband polarization measurements appears to be approximately 1%. PMID:12833967

  17. Observations of the moon by the global ozone monitoring experiment: radiometric calibration and lunar albedo.

    PubMed

    Dobber, M R; Goede, A P; Burrows, J P

    1998-11-20

    The Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) is a new instrument, which was launched aboard the second European Remoting Sensing satellite ESA-ERS2 in 1995. For its long-term radiometric and spectral calibration the GOME observes the sun and less frequently the moon on a regular basis. These measurements of the lunar radiance and solar irradiance have been used in a study to determine, for the first time to the authors' knowledge, the geometric lunar albedo from 240 to 800 nm at high spectral resolution from space. For a waning moon there is good agreement with ground-based measurements in the visible region and with recent space-based measurements in the ultraviolet region. In addition, the use of these measurements for the characterization of in-orbit degradation of instruments operating in this spectral region has been adequately demonstrated. PMID:18301626

  18. Ozone Monitoring Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Johan

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument is a trace gas monitoring instrument in the line of GOME (ERS-2) and Sciamachy (ENVISAT). Following these instruments, OMI provides UV-visible spectroscopy with a resolution sufficient to separate out the various absorbing trace gases (using DOAS or `Full' retrieval), but shaped as an imaging spectrometer. This means that a two dimensional detector is used where one dimension records the spectrum and the other images the swath. The scanning mechanism from the GOME and Sciamachy is not required anymore and there are considerable advantages with respect to simultaneous measurement of swath pixels, polarisation and obtainable swath width. The OMI consortium for a phase B is formed by Fokker Space & Systems and TPD in the Netherlands and VTT in Finland. In the presentation UV-visible atmospheric remote sensing will be placed in perspective and the OMI will be explaned.

  19. The Multi-TASTE Validation System: Tasting the Evolution of Reactive and Greenhouse Gas Data Products from Envisat and Third Party Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, D.; Keppens, A.; Lambert, J.-C.; Granville, J.; Hendrick, F.; Verhoelst, T.

    2015-06-01

    Over the past two decades the Multi-TASTE validation system has proven its value in the characterisation and support to the development of atmospheric composition measurements by ESA’s GOME, Envisat and Third Party Missions (TPMs). We give an overview of the capabilities and the latest results of this comprehensive, versatile and semi-operational system and address its relevance regarding the recommendations voiced at ATMOS 2012.

  20. Idiopathic calcified myocardial mass

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, David; Gibson, Derek; Gomes, Ricardo; McDonald, Lawson; Olsen, Eckhardt; Parker, John; Ross, Donald

    1974-01-01

    Patterson, D., Gibson, D., Gomes, R., McDonald, L., Olsen, E., Parker, J., and Ross, D. (1974).Thorax,29, 589-594. Idiopathic calcified myocardial mass. Myocardial calcification can be subdivided into three groups—metastatic, dystrophic or an extension inwards from the pericardium. This case in which the calcified myocardial mass was initially delineated by radiography and by echocardiography and subsequently removed does not fit into any subdivision and has been termed idiopathic. Images PMID:4279467

  1. Variability of HCHO over the Southeastern United States observed from space: Implications for VOC emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, L.; Mickley, L. J.; Jacob, D. J.; Cohan, D. S.; Li, Y.; Chen, Y.; Chance, K.

    2012-12-01

    Satellite observations of formaldehyde (HCHO) have been used as proxies for biogenic isoprene emissions, but the observed multiscale variability of HCHO is still not well understood. We use OMI and GOME2 HCHO column densities at 0.5x0.5 degree resolution to investigate both fine-scale and interannual patterns of HCHO variability in the Southeastern United States. By several statistical methods (step-wise variable selection, principle component analysis, least absolute shrinkage and selection operator), we find that temperature is the most important meteorological variable controlling HCHO, with implications for better understanding the variability of isoprene emissions. Both OMI and GOME2 observe a turnover of HCHO at high temperatures (307~310 K), as expected from process models of isoprene emission. Daily GOME2 and OMI HCHO column densities match well (R=0.91, bias = 9%) in 2007-2008, implying that GOME2 data can provide continuity following the degradation of OMI data after 2008. We used the fine-pixel information from OMI to search for HCHO enhancements in urban areas such as Houston that could serve as proxy for anthropogenic VOC emissions. We could find no such enhancements, including in winter. This illustrates the complete dominance of biogenic over anthropogenic VOC emissions in the Southeastern United States. Using the long-term archive of HCHO satellite measurements compiled by de Smedt et al. [GRL, 37, L18808, 2010], we find a significant decline in HCHO column density over the Southeastern United States from 1996 to 2011. Such a trend might be related to changes in ecosystem type or function.

  2. Satellite observations of OClO from 1995 to 2011 in comparison to ECMWF data and EMAC simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühl, S.; Pukite, J.; Dörner, S.; Jöckel, P.; Kirner, O.; Wagner, T.

    2012-04-01

    Satellite instruments like GOME, GOME-2 and SCIAMACHY measure the spectral intensity of the sunlight, scattered back from Earths atmosphere, on an almost global and daily scale. By applying the DOAS method to the spectral measurements, the integrated concentration along the light path, the so called Slant Column Density (SCD), can be derived for a wide range of absorbers. Chlorine dioxide (OClO) is an important indicator for stratospheric chlorine activation, the basis for massive ozone depletion in polar spring. Due to the daily coverage of the Polar regions, the OClO measurements give a good overview of the intensity and the extension of the chlorine activation. While the observations in nadir geometry (i.e. perpendicular to Earths surface) provide a (indirect) measurement of the total column, the limb observations (i.e. tangential view) can be inverted to vertical profiles. We investigated GOME, GOME-2 and SCIAMACHY data from 1995 to 2011, covering Arctic and Antarctic winters with very different meteorological situations (very cold and very warm winters; early and major warmings). In particular, the long lasting cold stratospheric temperatures inside the vortex for the Arctic winter 2010/11 led to large levels of chlorine activation until mid of March, also observed in the OClO data. The derived OClO columns and vertical profiles are compared to ECMWF analysis data, looking at inter-hemispheric and inter-annual differences and studying the dependence of the OClO enhancements on meteorological parameters like stratospheric temperatures, potential vorticity, PSC area and volume. Also, the OClO observations are compared to correlated ECHAM5/MESSy2 (EMAC) simulations, which were calculated for the exact time and place of the satellite observations. We investigate the agreement of the observed and simulated OClO profiles for the dataset from 2003 to 2009 (regarding the magnitude, the altitude of the profile peak and their evolution throughout the winter).

  3. Satellite observations of OClO from 1995 to 2012 in comparison to ECMWF data and EMAC simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühl, Sven; Pukite, Janis; Dörner, Steffen; Jöckel, Patrick; Ziegler, Marc; Wagner, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Satellite instruments like GOME, GOME-2 and SCIAMACHY measure the spectral intensity of the sunlight, scattered back from Earths atmosphere, on an almost global and daily scale. By applying the DOAS method to the spectral measurements, the integrated concentration along the light path, the so called Slant Column Density (SCD), can be derived for a wide range of absorbers. Chlorine dioxide (OClO) is an important indicator for stratospheric chlorine activation, the basis for massive ozone depletion in polar spring. Due to the daily coverage of the Polar regions, the OClO measurements give a good overview of the intensity and the extension of the chlorine activation. While the observations in nadir geometry (i.e. perpendicular to Earths surface) provide a (indirect) measurement of the total column, the limb observations (i.e. tangential view) can be inverted to vertical profiles. We investigated GOME, GOME-2 and SCIAMACHY data from 1995 to 2012, covering Arctic and Antarctic winters with very different meteorological situations (very cold and very warm winters; early and major warmings). In particular, the long lasting cold stratospheric temperatures inside the vortex for the Arctic winter 2010/11 led to large levels of chlorine activation until mid of March, also observed in the OClO data. The derived OClO columns and vertical profiles are compared to ECMWF analysis data, looking at inter-hemispheric and inter-annual differences and studying the dependence of the OClO enhancements on meteorological parameters like stratospheric temperatures, potential vorticity, PSC area and volume. Also, the OClO observations are compared to correlated ECHAM5/MESSy2 (EMAC) simulations, which were calculated for the exact time and place of the satellite observations. We investigate the agreement of the observed and simulated OClO profiles for the dataset from 2003 to 2012 (regarding the magnitude, the altitude of the profile peak and their evolution throughout the winter).

  4. Tunable far infrared studies of molecular parameters in support of stratospheric measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chance, Kelly V.; Evenson, K. M.; Park, K.; Radostitz, J. V.; Jennings, D. A.; Nolt, I. G.; Vanek, M. D.

    1991-01-01

    Lab studies were made in support of far infrared spectroscopy of the stratosphere using the Tunable Far InfraRed (TuFIR) method of ultrahigh resolution spectroscopy and, more recently, spectroscopic and retrieval calculations performed in support of satellite-based atmospheric measurement programs: the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME), and the SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY).

  5. Global Retrieval of BrO, HCHO, and OClO for the EOS--Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurosu, T. P.; Chance, K.

    2003-12-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) is scheduled for launch on the EOS--Aura platform in March 2004. OMI is a nadir viewing UV/Vis instrument observing continuously from 270 to 500 nm, and thus similar to the European Space Agency's Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME), from which it derives much of its heritage. Compared to GOME, OMI has about 3--5 times coarser spectral resolution but a more than 40 times smaller ground footprint of 13x24 km2, and it achieves global coverage within one day. Stratospheric bromine oxide (BrO) and chlorine dioxide (OClO) are key elements in the destruction of stratospheric ozone and the formation of the Antarctic ozone hole; in the troposphere, BrO is released from the snow and ice-pack during high-latitude Spring. Tropospheric formaldehyde (HCHO), a volatile organic compound (VOC), is an indicator of isoprene emissions and a byproduct of forest fires; it is a key measure for air quality determination from space. We present results from the operational algorithms for BrO, HCHO, and OClO, as well as auxiliary retrievals of ozone, which we are currently developing for OMI. Global retrievals of BrO and HCHO, and OClO within the polar vortex, have been performed by applying the OMI algorithms to existing GOME data. The trace gas algorithms developed for OMI are scientifically mature since they are able to fully exploit their heritage from GOME. Key elements in the retrieval are the non-linear least squares minimization procedure to derive trace gas slant columns and the conversion from slant to vertical columns using cloud information and a shape factor analysis. This poster demonstrates the capabilities of atmospheric chemistry monitoring with the OMI instrument.

  6. Satellite observations of atmospheric SO 2 from volcanic eruptions during the time-period of 1996-2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhar, M. F.; Frankenberg, C.; Van Roozendael, M.; Beirle, S.; Kühl, S.; Richter, A.; Platt, U.; Wagner, T.

    In this article, we present satellite observations of atmospheric sulfur dioxide (SO 2) from volcanic eruptions. Global ozone monitoring experiment (GOME) data for the years 1996-2002 is analyzed using a DOAS based algorithm with the aim of retrieving SO 2 slant column densities (SCD). The retrieval of SO 2 SCD in the UV spectral region is difficult due to strong and interfering ozone absorptions. It is also likely affected by instrumental effects. We investigated these effects in detail to obviate systematic biases in the SO 2 retrieval. A quantitative study of about 20 volcanoes from Italy, Iceland, Congo/Zaire, Ecuador, Japan, Vanuatu Island and Mexico is presented. The focus is on both eruption and out gassing scenarios. We prepared a 7-year mean map (1996-2002) of SO 2 SCD observed by GOME and tabulated the ratios of the maximum SO 2 SCD observed to the average SO 2 SCD as seen in the 7-year mean map. The further aim of this study is to provide information about unknown volcanic eruptions, e.g., Bandai Honshu Japan, Central Islands Vanuatu, Piton de la Fournaise Réunion Island France, Kamchatka region of Russia and from Indonesia especially. The results demonstrate a high sensitivity of the GOME instrument towards SO 2 emissions during both eruption and degassing episodes.

  7. Characterization and correction of Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment 2 ultraviolet measurements and application to ozone profile retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Zhaonan; Liu, Yi; Liu, Xiong; Chance, Kelly; Nowlan, Caroline R.; Lang, Ruediger; Munro, Rosemary; Suleiman, Raid

    2012-04-01

    We present an assessment study of the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment 2 (GOME-2) reflectance for the wavelength range 270-350 nm by comparing measurements with simulations calculated using the vector linearized discrete ordinate radiative transfer model (VLIDORT) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) ozone profiles. The results indicate wavelength- and cross-track-position-dependent biases. GOME-2 reflectance is overestimated by 10% near 300 nm and by 15%-20% around 270 nm. Stokes fraction measurements made by onboard polarization measurement devices are also validated directly using the VLIDORT model. GOME-2 measurements agree well with the simulated Stokes fractions, with mean biases ranging from -1.0% to ˜2.9%; the absolute differences are less than 0.05. Cloudiness-dependent biases suggest the existence of uncorrected stray-light errors that vary seasonally and latitudinally. Temporal analysis indicates that reflectance degradation began at the beginning of the mission; the reflectance degrades by 15% around 290 nm and by 2.2% around 325 nm from 2007 through 2009. Degradation shows wavelength- and viewing-angle-dependent features. Preliminary validation of ozone profile retrievals with MLS, Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding, and ozonesonde reveals that the application of radiometric recalibration improves the ozone profile retrievals as well as reduces fitting residuals by 30% in band 2b.

  8. Satellite Mapping of Rain-Induced Nitric Oxide Emissions from Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaegle, L.; Martin, R. V.; Chance, K.; Steinberger, L.; Kurosu, T. P.; Jacob, D. J.; Modi, A. I.; Yoboue, V.; Sigha-Nkamdjou, L.; Galy-Lacaux, C.

    2004-01-01

    We use space-based observations of NO2 columns from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) to map the spatial and seasonal variations of NOx emissions over Africa during 2000. The GOME observations show not only enhanced tropospheric NO2 columns from biomass burning during the dry season but also comparable enhancements from soil emissions during the rainy season over the Sahel. These soil emissions occur in strong pulses lasting 1-3 weeks following the onset of rain, and affect 3 million sq km of semiarid sub-Saharan savanna. Surface observations of NO2 from the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC)/Deposition of Biochemically Important Trace Species (DEBITS)/Africa (IDAF) network over West Africa provide further evidence for a strong role for microbial soil sources. By combining inverse modeling of GOME NO2 columns with space-based observations of fires, we estimate that soils contribute 3.3+/-1.8 TgN/year, similar to the biomass burning source (3.8+/-2.1 TgN/year), and thus account for 40% of surface NO(x) emissions over Africa. Extrapolating to all the tropics, we estimate a 7.3 TgN/year biogenic soil source, which is a factor of 2 larger compared to model-based inventories but agrees with observation-based inventories. These large soil NO(x) emissions are likely to significantly contribute to the ozone enhancement originating from tropical Africa.

  9. Six years of total ozone column measurements from SCIAMACHY nadir observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerot, C.; van Roozendael, M.; van Geffen, J.; van Gent, J.; Fayt, C.; Spurr, R.; Lichtenberg, G.; von Bargen, A.

    2008-11-01

    Total O3 columns have been retrieved from six years of SCIAMACHY nadir UV radiance measurements using SDOAS, an adaptation of the GDOAS algorithm previously developed at BIRA-IASB for the GOME instrument. GDOAS and SDOAS have been implemented by the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in the version 4 of the GOME Data Processor (GDP) and in version 3 of the SCIAMACHY Ground Processor (SGP), respectively. The processors are being run at the DLR processing centre on behalf of the European Space Agency (ESA). We first focus on the description of the SDOAS algorithm with particular attention to the impact of uncertainties on the reference O3 absorption cross-sections. Second, the resulting SCIAMACHY total ozone data set is globally evaluated through large-scale comparisons with results from GOME and OMI as well as with ground-based correlative measurements. The various total ozone data sets are found to agree within 2% on average. However, a negative trend of 0.2-0.4%/year has been identified in the SCIAMACHY O3 columns; this probably originates from instrumental degradation effects that have not yet been fully characterized.

  10. Six years of total ozone column measurements from SCIAMACHY nadir observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerot, C.; van Roozendael, M.; van Geffen, J.; van Gent, J.; Fayt, C.; Spurr, R.; Lichtenberg, G.; von Bargen, A.

    2009-04-01

    Total O3 columns have been retrieved from six years of SCIAMACHY nadir UV radiance measurements using SDOAS, an adaptation of the GDOAS algorithm previously developed at BIRA-IASB for the GOME instrument. GDOAS and SDOAS have been implemented by the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in the version 4 of the GOME Data Processor (GDP) and in version 3 of the SCIAMACHY Ground Processor (SGP), respectively. The processors are being run at the DLR processing centre on behalf of the European Space Agency (ESA). We first focus on the description of the SDOAS algorithm with particular attention to the impact of uncertainties on the reference O3 absorption cross-sections. Second, the resulting SCIAMACHY total ozone data set is globally evaluated through large-scale comparisons with results from GOME and OMI as well as with ground-based correlative measurements. The various total ozone data sets are found to agree within 2% on average. However, a negative trend of 0.2-0.4%/year has been identified in the SCIAMACHY O3 columns; this probably originates from instrumental degradation effects that have not yet been fully characterized.

  11. MERIS albedo climatology and its effect on the FRESCO+ O2 A-band cloud retrieval from SCIAMACHY data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popp, Christoph; Wang, Ping; Brunner, Dominik; Stammes, Piet; Zhou, Yipin

    2010-05-01

    Accurate cloud information is an important prerequisite for the retrieval of atmospheric trace gases from spaceborne UV/VIS sensors. Errors in the estimated cloud fraction and cloud height (pressure) result in an erroneous air mass factor and thus can lead to inaccuracies in the vertical column densities of the retrieved trace gas. In ESA's TEMIS (Tropospheric Emission Monitoring Internet Service) project, the FRESCO+ (Fast Retrieval Scheme for Clouds from the Oxygen A-band) cloud retrieval is applied to, amongst others, SCIAMACHY (SCanning Imaging Absorption SpectroMeter for Atmospheric CartograpHY) data to determine these quantities. Effective cloud fraction and pressure are inverted by (i) radiative transfer simulations of top-of-atmosphere reflectance based on O2 absorption, single Rayleigh scattering, surface and cloud albedo in three spectral windows covering the O2 A-band and (ii) a subsequent fitting of the simulated to the measured spectrum. However, FRESCO+ relies on a relatively coarse resolution surface albedo climatology (1° x 1°) compiled from GOME (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment) measurements in the 1990's which introduces several artifacts, e.g. an overestimation of cloud fraction at coastlines or over some mountainous regions. Therefore, we test the substitution of the GOME climatology with a new land surface albedo climatology compiled for every month from MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) Albedomap data (0.05° x 0.05°) covering the period January 2003 to October 2006. The MERIS channels at 754nm and 775nm are located spectrally close to the corresponding GOME channels (758nm and 772nm) on both sides of the O2 A-band. Further, the increased spatial resolution of the MERIS product allows to better account for SCIAMACHY's pixel size of approximately 30x60km. The aim of this study is to describe and assess (i) the compilation and quality of the MERIS climatology (ii) the differences to the GOME climatology, and (iii) possible

  12. Long-term changes of tropospheric NO2 over megacities derived from multiple satellite instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilboll, A.; Richter, A.; Burrows, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    Tropospheric NO2, a key pollutant in particular in cities, has been measured from space since the mid-1990s by the GOME, SCIAMACHY, OMI, and GOME-2 instruments. These data provide a unique global long-term data set of tropospheric pollution. However, the measurements differ in spatial resolution, local time of measurement, and measurement geometry. All these factors can severely impact the retrieved NO2 columns, which is why they need to be taken into account when analysing time series spanning more than one instrument. In this study, we present several ways to explicitly account for the instrumental differences in trend analyses of the NO2 columns derived from satellite measurements, while preserving their high spatial resolution. Both a physical method, based on spatial averaging of the measured earthshine spectra and extraction of a resolution pattern, and statistical methods, including instrument-dependent offsets in the fitted trend function, are developed. These methods are applied to data from GOME and SCIAMACHY separately, to the combined time series and to an extended data set comprising also GOME-2 and OMI measurements. All approaches show consistent trends of tropospheric NO2 for a selection of areas on both regional and city scales, for the first time allowing consistent trend analysis of the full time series at high spatial resolution and significantly reducing the uncertainties of the retrieved trend estimates compared to previous studies. We show that measured tropospheric NO2 columns have been strongly increasing over China, the Middle East, and India, with values over East Central China triplicating from 1996 to 2011. All parts of the developed world, including Western Europe, the United States, and Japan, show significantly decreasing NO2 amounts in the same time period. On a megacity level, individual trends can be as large as +27 ± 3.7% yr-1 and +20 ± 1.9% yr-1 in Dhaka and Baghdad, respectively, while Los Angeles shows a very strong decrease

  13. Satellite monitoring of volcanic SO2 emissions within the Volcano Fast Response System (Exupéry)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rix, Meike; Maerker, Cordelia; Valks, Pieter; Erbertseder, Thilo

    2010-05-01

    Volcanic eruptions are a major hazard to the local population near large volcanoes and to aviation. They also play an important role in global climate change. Atmospheric SO2 is an important indicator for volcanic eruptions and volcanic activity like passive degassing. Space based atmospheric sensors such as GOME-2 on MetOp and OMI on EOS-Aura make it possible to detect the emissions of volcanic SO2 in near-real time (NRT) and monitor volcanic activity and eruptions on a global scale. The GOME-2 instrument provides operational measurements of the SO2 columns with a spatial resolution of 80x40 km² and a global coverage within about one day. Volcanic sulfur dioxide emissions are determined from solar backscatter measurements in the ultra-violet spectral range between 315 - 326 nm, applying the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) method. This retrieval technique uses the high spectral resolution of the instrument to determine the total column density of SO2. The ability to monitor changes in volcanic degassing behavior is of great importance for early warning of volcanic activity, as large increases in SO2 fluxes are often an indicator for new episodes of volcanic unrest. Ensembles of backward trajectories using the FLEXTRA model are applied to relate exceptional SO2 values to particular sources or regions and hence attribute them to a volcanic or anthropogenic origin. Trajectory density maps give an overview of the most probable location of the emission source. Additionally, the moment of the eruption as well as the emission and the plume height can be estimated. Hypothetical forward trajectories starting at potentially active volcanoes allow forecasting the dispersion of volcanic SO2 and ash depending on the emission height in case of an eruption. For validation purposes the dispersion model FLEXPART provides a three dimensional forecast of the plume motion and the transport of SO2 for several days. The GOME-2 observations of volcanic SO2 are used

  14. Total Ozone from the Ozone Monitoring System (OMI) using TOMS and DOAS Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veefkind, J. P.; Bhartia, P. K.; Gleason, J.; deHaan, J. F.; Wellemeyer, C.; Levelt, P. F.

    2003-01-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) is the Dutch-Finnish contribution to NASA's EOS-Aura satellite scheduled for launch in January 2004. OMI is an imaging spectrometer that will measure the back-scattered Solar radiance in the wavelength range of 270 to 500 nm. The instrument provides near global coverage in one day with a spatial resolution of 13x24 square kilometers. OMI is a new instrument, with a heritage from TOMS, SBW, GOME, GOMOS and SCIAMACHY. OMI'S unique capabilities for measuring important trace gases and aerosols with a small footprint and daily global coverage, in conjunction with the other Aura instruments, will make a major contribution to our understanding of stratospheric and tropospheric chemistry and climate change. OMI will provide data continuity with the 23-year ozone record of TOMS. There are three ozone products planned for OMI: total column ozone, ozone profile and tropospheric column ozone. We are developing two different algorithms for total column ozone: one similar to the algorithm currently being used to process the TOMS data, and the other an improved version of the differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) method, which has been applied to GOME and SCIAMACHY data. The main reasons for starting with two algorithms for total ozone have to do with heritage and past experience; our long-term goal is to combine the two to develop a more accurate and reliable total ozone product for OMI. We will compare the performance of these two algorithms by applying both of them to the GOME data. We will examine where and how the results differ, and use the extensive TOMS-Dobson comparison studies to assess the performance of the DOAS algorithm.

  15. Development of a harmonised multi sensor retrieval scheme for HCHO within the Quality Assurance For Essential Climate Variables (QA4ECV) project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Smedt, Isabelle; Richter, Andreas; Beirle, Steffen; Danckaert, Thomas; Van Roozendael, Michel; Yu, Huan; Bösch, Tim; Hilboll, Andreas; Peters, Enno; Doerner, Steffen; Wagner, Thomas; Wang, Yang; Lorente, Alba; Eskes, Henk; Van Geffen, Jos; Boersma, Folkert

    2016-04-01

    One of the main goals of the QA4ECV project is to define community best-practices for the generation of multi-decadal ECV data records from satellite instruments. QA4ECV will develop retrieval algorithms for the Land ECVs surface albedo, leaf area index (LAI), and fraction of active photosynthetic radiation (fAPAR), as well as for the Atmosphere ECV ozone and aerosol precursors nitrogen dioxide (NO2), formaldehyde (HCHO), and carbon monoxide (CO). Here we assess best practices and provide recommendations for the retrieval of HCHO. Best practices are established based on (1) a detailed intercomparison exercise between the QA4ECV partner's for each specific algorithm processing steps, (2) the feasibility of implementation, and (3) the requirement to generate consistent multi-sensor multi-decadal data records. We propose a fitting window covering the 328.5-346 nm spectral interval for the morning sensors (GOME, SCIAMACHY and GOME-2) and an extension to 328.5-359 nm for OMI and GOME-2, allowed by improved quality of the recorded spectra. A high level of consistency between group algorithms is found when the retrieval settings are carefully aligned. However, the retrieval of slant columns is highly sensitive to any change in the selected settings. The use of a mean background radiance as DOAS reference spectrum allows for a stabilization of the retrievals. A background correction based on the reference sector method is recommended for implementation in the QA4ECV HCHO algorithm as it further reduces retrieval uncertainties. HCHO AMFs using different radiative transfer codes show a good overall consistency when harmonized settings are used. As for NO2, it is proposed to use a priori HCHO profiles from the TM5 model. These are provided on a 1°x1° latitude-longitude grid.

  16. Satellite-observed NO2, SO2, and HCHO Vertical Column Densities in East Asia: Recent Changes and Comparisons with Regional Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. C.; Lee, P.; Kim, S.; Mok, J.; Yoo, H. L.; Bae, C.; Kim, B. U.; Lim, Y. K.; Woo, J. H.; Park, R.

    2015-12-01

    This study reports the recent changes in tropospheric NO2, SO2, and HCHO vertical column densities (VCD) in East Asia observed from multiple satellites, highlighting especially the annual trend changes of NO2 and SO2 over Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (BTH) region of China since 2010. Tropospheric VCD data from Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME), SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY), Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and GOME-2, retrieved from the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI) and OMI National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) standard products, are utilized to investigate the annual trends of NO2, SO2, and HCHO VCDs from 2001 to 2015. They are also compared with simulations from Community Multi-scale Air Quality Model (CMAQ) based forecast system by the Integrated Multi-scale Air Quality System for Korea (IMAQS-K) of Ajou University. Until 2011, the changes in NO2 VCD over East Asian countries agree well with the findings of previous research, including the impact of the economic downturn during 2008-2009 and the subsequent quick recovery in China. After peaking in 2011, the NO2 VCD observations from active instruments (OMI and GOME-2) over China started to show a slower decreasing trend, mostly led by the rapid changes in the BTH region in northern China. On the other hand, SO2 started to decline earlier, from 2007, but inclined back from 2010 to 2012, and then back to declining trend since 2012. While satellite observations show dramatic recent changes, the model could not reproduce those changes mostly due to its use of fixed emission inventory. We conclude that rapid update of latest emission inventory is necessary for an accurate forecast of regional air quality in east Asia, especially for upcoming international sports events in PyeongChang (Korea), Tokyo (Japan) and Beijing (China) in 2018, 2020 and 2022, respectively.

  17. Multi-sensor satellite monitoring of ash and SO2 volcanic plume in support to aviation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenot, Hugues; Theys, Nicolas; Clarisse, Lieven; van Geffen, Jos; van Gent, Jeroen; Van Roozendael, Michel; van der A, Ronald; Hurtmans, Daniel; Coheur, Pierre-Francois; Clerbaux, Cathy; Valks, Pieter; Hedelt, Pascal; Prata, Fred; Rasson, Olivier; Sievers, Klaus; Zehner, Claus

    2014-05-01

    The 'Support to Aviation Control Service' (SACS; http://sacs.aeronomie.be) is an ESA-funded project hosted by the Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy since 2007. The service provides near real-time (NRT) global volcanic ash and SO2 observations, as well as notifications in case of volcanic eruptions (success rate >95% for ash and SO2). SACS is based on the combined use of UV-visible (OMI, GOME-2 MetOp-A, GOME-2 MetOp-B) and infrared (AIRS, IASI MetOp-A, IASI MetOp-B) satellite instruments. The SACS service is primarily designed to support the Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAACs) in their mandate to gather information on volcanic clouds and give advice to airline and air traffic control organisations. SACS also serves other users that subscribe to the service, in particular local volcano observatories, research scientists and airliner pilots. When a volcanic eruption is detected, SACS issues a warning that takes the form of a notification sent by e-mail to users. The SACS notification points to a dedicated web page where all relevant information is available and can be visualised with user-friendly tools. Information about the volcanic plume height from GOME-2 (MetOp-A and MetOp-B) are also available. The strength of a multi-sensor approach relies in the use of satellite data with different overpasses times, minimising the time-lag for detection and enhancing the reliability of such alerts. This presentation will give an overview of the SACS service, and of the different techniques used to detect volcanic plumes (ash, SO2 and plume height). It will also highlight the strengths and limitations of the service and measurements, and some perspectives.

  18. Comparison of 7 years of satellite-borne and ground-based tropospheric NO2 measurements around Milan, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    OrdóñEz, C.; Richter, A.; Steinbacher, M.; Zellweger, C.; Nüß, H.; Burrows, J. P.; PréVôT, A. S. H.

    2006-03-01

    Tropospheric NO2 vertical column densities (VCDs) over the Lombardy region were retrieved from measurements of the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) spectrometer for the period 1996-2002 using a differential optical absorption method. This data set was compared with in situ measurements of NO2 at around 100 ground stations in the Lombardy region, northern Italy. The tropospheric NO2 VCDs are reasonably well correlated with the near-surface measurements under cloud-free conditions. However, the slope of the tropospheric VCDs versus ground measurements is higher in autumn-winter than in spring-summer. This effect is clearly reduced when the peroxyacetyl nitrate and nitric acid (HNO3) interferences of conventional NOx analyzers are taken into account. For a more quantitative comparison, the NO2 ground measurements were scaled to tropospheric VCDs using a seasonal NO2 vertical profile over northern Italy calculated by the Model of Ozone and Related Tracers 2 (MOZART-2). The tropospheric VCDs retrieved from satellite and those determined from ground measurements agree well, with a correlation coefficient R = 0.78 and a slope close to 1 for slightly polluted stations. GOME cannot reproduce the high NO2 amounts over the most polluted stations, mainly because of the large spatial variability in the distribution of pollution within the GOME footprint. The yearly and weekly cycles of the tropospheric NO2 VCDs are similar for both data sets, with significantly lower values in the summer months and on Sundays, respectively. Considering the pollution level and high aerosol concentrations of this region, the agreement is very good. Furthermore, uncertainties in the ground-based measurements, including the extrapolation to NO2 VCDs, might be as important as those of the NO2 satellite retrieval itself.

  19. The Seasonal Cycle of Satellite Chlorophyll Fluorescence Observations and its Relationship to Vegetation Phenology and Ecosystem Atmosphere Carbon Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joiner, J.; Yoshida, Y.; Vasilkov, A. P.; Schaefer, K.; Jung, M.; Guanter, L.; Zhang, Y; Garrity, S.; Middleton, E. M.; Huemmrich, K. F.; Gu, L.; Marchesini, L. Belelli

    2014-01-01

    Mapping of terrestrial chlorophyll uorescence from space has shown potentialfor providing global measurements related to gross primary productivity(GPP). In particular, space-based fluorescence may provide information onthe length of the carbon uptake period that can be of use for global carboncycle modeling. Here, we examine the seasonal cycle of photosynthesis asestimated from satellite fluorescence retrievals at wavelengths surroundingthe 740nm emission feature. These retrievals are from the Global OzoneMonitoring Experiment 2 (GOME-2) flying on the MetOp A satellite. Wecompare the fluorescence seasonal cycle with that of GPP as estimated froma diverse set of North American tower gas exchange measurements. Because the GOME-2 has a large ground footprint (40 x 80km2) as compared with that of the flux towers and requires averaging to reduce random errors, we additionally compare with seasonal cycles of upscaled GPP in the satellite averaging area surrounding the tower locations estimated from the Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry (MPI-BGC) machine learning algorithm. We also examine the seasonality of absorbed photosynthetically-active radiation(APAR) derived with reflectances from the MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Finally, we examine seasonal cycles of GPP as produced from an ensemble of vegetation models. Several of the data-driven models rely on satellite reflectance-based vegetation parameters to derive estimates of APAR that are used to compute GPP. For forested sites(particularly deciduous broadleaf and mixed forests), the GOME-2 fluorescence captures the spring onset and autumn shutoff of photosynthesis as delineated by the tower-based GPP estimates. In contrast, the reflectance-based indicators and many of the models tend to overestimate the length of the photosynthetically-active period for these and other biomes as has been noted previously in the literature. Satellite fluorescence measurements therefore show potential for

  20. Revisiting satellite derived tropospheric NO2 trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Andreas; Hilboll, Andreas; Burrows, John P.

    2015-04-01

    Nitrogen dioxide levels can be used as tracer of anthropogenic pollution as NOx, the sum of NO and NO2, is released during fossil fuel combustion. With its short atmospheric lifetime, atmospheric NO2 can be easily linked to its sources. Using its structured absorption cross section in the blue spectral region, NO2 amounts can be derived from measurements of backscattered solar radiation with the help of Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy measurements. Satellite retrievals of tropospheric NO2 became possible with the launch of the GOME instrument in 1995, and since then a series of instruments including SCIAMACHY, GOME-2 and OMI provide spectral data which can be used to quantify NO2 columns in the troposphere. Using these observations, spatial distributions of NO2, its sources and transport pathways as well as temporal changes have been investigated over the last years. In particular the latter have shown remarkable atmospheric developments with large reductions of NO2 levels in many industrialised countries and dramatic increases in regions with growing economies, most notably in China but also in many other countries. In this study, recent trends of satellite derived NO2 columns are evaluated using data from all available instruments with a focus on the last years. Combination of data taken from the two GOME-2 instruments and OMI improves coverage and sensitivity, and also provides important constraints on the reliability of the satellite data set. As in previous studies, large changes in NO2 columns are found in many regions, in particular over China where after two years of stagnating NO2 levels an unexpected substantial reduction is observed for 2014.

  1. Consistency Between Sun-Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence and Gross Primary Production of Vegetation in North America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Yao; Xiao, Xiangming; Jin, Cui; Dong, Jinwei; Zhou, Sha; Wagle, Pradeep; Joiner, Joanna; Guanter, Luis; Zhang, Yongguang; Zhang , Geli; Qin, Yuanwei; Wang, Jie; Moore, Berrien, III

    2016-01-01

    Accurate estimation of the gross primary production (GPP) of terrestrial ecosystems is vital for a better understanding of the spatial-temporal patterns of the global carbon cycle. In this study,we estimate GPP in North America (NA) using the satellite-based Vegetation Photosynthesis Model (VPM), MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer) images at 8-day temporal and 500 meter spatial resolutions, and NCEP-NARR (National Center for Environmental Prediction-North America Regional Reanalysis) climate data. The simulated GPP (GPP (sub VPM)) agrees well with the flux tower derived GPP (GPPEC) at 39 AmeriFlux sites (155 site-years). The GPP (sub VPM) in 2010 is spatially aggregated to 0.5 by 0.5-degree grid cells and then compared with sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) data from Global Ozone Monitoring Instrument 2 (GOME-2), which is directly related to vegetation photosynthesis. Spatial distribution and seasonal dynamics of GPP (sub VPM) and GOME-2 SIF show good consistency. At the biome scale, GPP (sub VPM) and SIF shows strong linear relationships (R (sup 2) is greater than 0.95) and small variations in regression slopes ((4.60-5.55 grams Carbon per square meter per day) divided by (milliwatts per square meter per nanometer per square radian)). The total annual GPP (sub VPM) in NA in 2010 is approximately 13.53 petagrams Carbon per year, which accounts for approximately 11.0 percent of the global terrestrial GPP and is within the range of annual GPP estimates from six other process-based and data-driven models (11.35-22.23 petagrams Carbon per year). Among the seven models, some models did not capture the spatial pattern of GOME-2 SIF data at annual scale, especially in Midwest cropland region. The results from this study demonstrate the reliable performance of VPM at the continental scale, and the potential of SIF data being used as a benchmark to compare with GPP models.

  2. FRESCO+: an improved O2 A-band cloud retrieval algorithm for tropospheric trace gas retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Stammes, P.; van der A, R.; Pinardi, G.; van Roozendael, M.

    2008-05-01

    The FRESCO (Fast Retrieval Scheme for Clouds from the Oxygen A-band) algorithm has been used to retrieve cloud information from measurements of the O2 A-band around 760 nm by GOME, SCIAMACHY and GOME-2. The cloud parameters retrieved by FRESCO are the effective cloud fraction and cloud pressure, which are used for cloud correction in the retrieval of trace gases like O3 and NO2. To improve the cloud pressure retrieval for partly cloudy scenes, single Rayleigh scattering has been included in an improved version of the algorithm, called FRESCO+. We compared FRESCO+ and FRESCO effective cloud fractions and cloud pressures using simulated spectra and one month of GOME measured spectra. As expected, FRESCO+ gives more reliable cloud pressures over partly cloudy pixels. Simulations and comparisons with ground-based radar/lidar measurements of clouds shows that the FRESCO+ cloud pressure is about the optical midlevel of the cloud. Globally averaged, the FRESCO+ cloud pressure is about 50 hPa higher than the FRESCO cloud pressure, while the FRESCO+ effective cloud fraction is about 0.01 larger. The effect of FRESCO+ cloud parameters on O3 and NO2 vertical column densities (VCD) is studied using SCIAMACHY data and ground-based DOAS measurements. We find that the FRESCO+ algorithm has a significant effect on tropospheric NO2 retrievals but a minor effect on total O3 retrievals. The retrieved SCIAMACHY tropospheric NO2 VCDs using FRESCO+ cloud parameters (v1.1) are lower than the tropospheric NO2 VCDs which used FRESCO cloud parameters (v1.04), in particular over heavily polluted areas with low clouds. The difference between SCIAMACHY tropospheric NO2 VCDs v1.1 and ground-based MAXDOAS measurements performed in Cabauw, The Netherlands, during the DANDELIONS campaign is about -2.12×1014 molec cm-2.

  3. FRESCO+: an improved O2 A-band cloud retrieval algorithm for tropospheric trace gas retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Stammes, P.; van der A, R.; Pinardi, G.; van Roozendael, M.

    2008-11-01

    The FRESCO (Fast Retrieval Scheme for Clouds from the Oxygen A-band) algorithm has been used to retrieve cloud information from measurements of the O2 A-band around 760 nm by GOME, SCIAMACHY and GOME-2. The cloud parameters retrieved by FRESCO are the effective cloud fraction and cloud pressure, which are used for cloud correction in the retrieval of trace gases like O3 and NO2. To improve the cloud pressure retrieval for partly cloudy scenes, single Rayleigh scattering has been included in an improved version of the algorithm, called FRESCO+. We compared FRESCO+ and FRESCO effective cloud fractions and cloud pressures using simulated spectra and one month of GOME measured spectra. As expected, FRESCO+ gives more reliable cloud pressures over partly cloudy pixels. Simulations and comparisons with ground-based radar/lidar measurements of clouds show that the FRESCO+ cloud pressure is about the optical midlevel of the cloud. Globally averaged, the FRESCO+ cloud pressure is about 50 hPa higher than the FRESCO cloud pressure, while the FRESCO+ effective cloud fraction is about 0.01 larger. The effect of FRESCO+ cloud parameters on O3 and NO2 vertical column density (VCD) retrievals is studied using SCIAMACHY data and ground-based DOAS measurements. We find that the FRESCO+ algorithm has a significant effect on tropospheric NO2 retrievals but a minor effect on total O3 retrievals. The retrieved SCIAMACHY tropospheric NO2 VCDs using FRESCO+ cloud parameters (v1.1) are lower than the tropospheric NO2VCDs which used FRESCO cloud parameters (v1.04), in particular over heavily polluted areas with low clouds. The difference between SCIAMACHY tropospheric NO2 VCDs v1.1 and ground-based MAXDOAS measurements performed in Cabauw, The Netherlands, during the DANDELIONS campaign is about -2.12×1014molec cm-2.

  4. Satellite retrieval of cloud properties from the O2 A-band for air quality and climate applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Stammes, P.; van der A, R.

    2009-04-01

    The FRESCO (Fast Retrieval Scheme for Clouds from the Oxygen A-band) algorithm has been used to retrieve cloud information from measurements of the O2 A-band around 760 nm by GOME, SCIAMACHY and GOME-2. The cloud parameters retrieved by FRESCO are the effective cloud fraction and cloud pressure, which are used for cloud correction in the retrieval of trace gases like O3 and NO2. To improve the cloud pressure retrieval for partly cloudy scenes, single Rayleigh scattering has been included in an improved version of the algorithm, called FRESCO+. FRESCO+ gives more reliable cloud pressures over partly cloudy pixels. Simulations and comparisons with ground-based radar measurements of clouds shows that the FRESCO+ cloud pressure is about the optical midlevel of the cloud. Globally averaged, the FRESCO+ cloud pressure is about 50 hPa higher than the FRESCO cloud pressure, while the FRESCO+ effective cloud fraction is about 0.01 larger. From ground-based validation (P. Wang et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys., 8, 6565-6576, 2008) it appears that the FRESCO+ cloud retrievals improve the retrieval of tropospheric NO2 as compared to FRESCO. So FRESCO+ contributes to better monitoring of air quality from space. The FRESCO+ cloud algorithm has been applied to GOME and SCIAMACHY measurements since the beginning of the missions. Monthly averaged SCIAMACHY FRESCO+ effective cloud fraction and cloud pressure maps show similar patterns as the ISCCP cloud maps, although there are some differences, due to the different meaning of the cloud products and due to the fact that photons in the O2 A-band penetrate into clouds. The 6-year averaged seasonal cloud maps from SCIAMACHY data have good agreement with the global circulation patterns. Therefore, the FRESCO+ products are not only efficient for cloud correction of trace gas retrievals but also contribute additional information for climate research.

  5. Combining in situ and Remote Measurements with Models: Picking the Right Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerson, R. R.; Hains, J. C.; Burrows, J. P.

    2004-05-01

    Visibility reduction, photochemical smog, and the global climate changes these pollutants engender involve complex interactions of emissions, atmospheric transformations, and transport. In situ measurements, numerical simulations, and remotely sensed data all have strengths and weaknesses, but picking the right combination of tools can avoid the limitations of any one method to advance the science and provide policy-relevant research on the causes and nature of air pollution. The Regional Atmospheric Measurement, Modeling, and Prediction Program (RAMMPP) seeks a balanced approach to air pollution studies in the Mid Atlantic. We employ surface and airborne measurements as input and tests for air quality models of the Baltimore/Washington area. Both ozone and summertime haze tend to form in blobs covering areas hundreds of km on a side and lasting several days. Point and aircraft measurements offer high accuracy, but cannot always characterize the spatial and temporal extent of these masses. To provide the big picture, we are exploring the use of satellite data including GOME and SCIAMACHY for SO2, TOMS for tropospheric O3, and MODIS for aerosol optical depth. Comparison with direct measurements can greatly improve retrievals of atmospheric composition. For example, GOME identified a persistent hot spot in SO2 over eastern North America where many large, coal-fired power plants are located. Aircraft measurements confirmed the presence of this hotspot, but indicated an average column content of 0.65 DU (m atm cm), while the satellite instrument, indicated only 0.14 DU. GOME uses, however, an initial guess for the altitudinal distribution of the SO2, and when the retrieval algorithm is corrected with the observed profile, the result is 0.42 DU. Further improving the retrieval with more representative background values yields a mean SO2 column content of 0.52 DU, within experimental uncertainty of the aircraft value. Ozone and aerosol retrievals can be similarly

  6. Data series of total columns of H2O measured from the ground and from space at Observatoire de Haute-Provence in France (44° N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkasm, Sulaf; Sarkissian, Alain; Keckhut, Philippe; Pazmino, Andrea; Goutail, Florence; Noel, Stephan

    2013-04-01

    Water vapour is an atmospheric constituent having a determinant effect on the climate and on the weather. It presents the two third of the greenhouse gases, and is mostly located in the troposphere. It is the key element of the hydrological cycle, conditioned by exchanges between its three phases in the atmosphere, the ocean and the continents, and also directed by the transport of energy between the surface and the atmosphere, by evaporation and condensation. However, because of its large temporal and spatial variability, the measure of this component is a demanding task. For this reason, many different techniques have been developed to estimate water vapour in the atmosphere. Also, the accuracy of the measurements changes from one instrument to another as the mode of observation, the period of observation, the condition of measurement, and the retrieval method are different between them. Note that these instruments were not specialised initially to water vapour measurements and the extraction of H2O was not the principle objective. This paper compares measurements of total vertical column density (VCD) of water vapour, i.e. the amount of water vapour in a vertical atmospheric column, obtained above Observatoire de Haute-Provence (OHP), south of France (5°42'E, +43°55'N) from five different instruments. This work compares results from two ground based and three satellite instruments: the SAOZ (système d'analyse par observation zénithale) an automated UV-VIS spectrometer; Elodie, a cross-dispersed echelle spectrograph and its 1.92 m telescope; SCIAMACHY, a scanning imaging absorption spectrometer for atmospheric cartography; GOME, a nadir scanning ultraviolet and visible spectrometer for global monitoring of atmospheric ozone; and GOME2, a second generation of GOME.

  7. Potential of the multispectral synergism for observing ozone pollution combining measurements of IASI-NG and UVNS onboard EPS-SG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costantino, Lorenzo; Cuesta, Juan; Emili, Emanuele; Foret, Gilles; Dufour, Gaëlle; Eremenko, Maxim; Chailleux, Yohann; Beekmann, Matthias; Flaud, Jean-Marie

    2016-04-01

    Current and future satellite observations offer a great potential for monitoring air quality on daily and global basis. However, measurements from currently in orbit sensors offer a limited capacity to probe surface concentrations of gaseous pollutants such as tropospheric ozone. Using single-band approaches based on IASI spaceborne thermal infrared measurements, only ozone down to the lower troposphere (3-4 km of altitude at lowest) may be observed (Eremenko et al., 2008). A recent multispectral method combining IASI and GOME-2 (both onboard MetOp satellites) spectra, respectively from the IR and UV, has shown enhanced sensitivity for probing ozone at the lowermost troposphere, but with maximum sensitivity around 2 km at lowest (Cuesta et al., 2013). Future spatial missions will be launched in the upcoming years, such as EPS-SG, carrying new generation sensors like IASI-NG and UVNS that will enhance the capacity to observe ozone pollution, and particularly when combining them through a multispectral synergism. This work presents an analysis of the potential of the multispectral synergism of IASI-NG and UVNS future spaceborne measurements for observing ozone pollution, performed in the framework of SURVEYOZON project (funded by the French Space Agency, CNES). For this, we develop a simulator of synthetic multispectral retrievals or pseudo-observations (referred as OSSE, Observing System Simulation Experiment) derived from IASI-NG+UVNS that will be compared to those from IASI+GOME2. In the first step of the OSSE, we create a pseudo-reality with simulations from the chemical-transport model MOCAGE (provided by CERFACS laboratory), where real O3 data from IASI and surface network stations have been assimilated for a realistic representation of ozone variability at the surface and the free troposphere. We focus on the high pollution event occurred in Europe on 10 July 2010. We use the coupled algorithms KOPRA+VLIDORT to simulate the spectra emitted, scattered and

  8. Metrology of ground-based satellite validation: co-location mismatch and smoothing issues of total ozone comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhoelst, T.; Granville, J.; Hendrick, F.; Köhler, U.; Lerot, C.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Redondas, A.; Van Roozendael, M.; Lambert, J.-C.

    2015-12-01

    Comparisons with ground-based correlative measurements constitute a key component in the validation of satellite data on atmospheric composition. The error budget of these comparisons contains not only the measurement errors but also several terms related to differences in sampling and smoothing of the inhomogeneous and variable atmospheric field. A versatile system for Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs), named OSSSMOSE, is used here to quantify these terms. Based on the application of pragmatic observation operators onto high-resolution atmospheric fields, it allows a simulation of each individual measurement, and consequently, also of the differences to be expected from spatial and temporal field variations between both measurements making up a comparison pair. As a topical case study, the system is used to evaluate the error budget of total ozone column (TOC) comparisons between GOME-type direct fitting (GODFITv3) satellite retrievals from GOME/ERS2, SCIAMACHY/Envisat, and GOME-2/MetOp-A, and ground-based direct-sun and zenith-sky reference measurements such as those from Dobsons, Brewers, and zenith-scattered light (ZSL-)DOAS instruments, respectively. In particular, the focus is placed on the GODFITv3 reprocessed GOME-2A data record vs. the ground-based instruments contributing to the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). The simulations are found to reproduce the actual measurements almost to within the measurement uncertainties, confirming that the OSSE approach and its technical implementation are appropriate. This work reveals that many features of the comparison spread and median difference can be understood as due to metrological differences, even when using strict co-location criteria. In particular, sampling difference errors exceed measurement uncertainties regularly at most mid- and high-latitude stations, with values up to 10 % and more in extreme cases. Smoothing difference errors only play a role in the

  9. Reply to 'Comment on 'Quantum time-of-flight distribution for cold trapped atoms''

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Md. Manirul; Home, Dipankar; Pan, Alok K.; Majumdar, A. S.

    2008-02-15

    In their comment Gomes et al. [Phys. Rev. A 77, 026101 (2008)] have questioned the possibility of empirically testable differences existing between the semiclassical time of flight distribution for cold trapped atoms and a quantum distribution discussed by us recently [Ali et al., Phys. Rev. A 75, 042110 (2007).]. We argue that their criticism is based on a semiclassical treatment having restricted applicability for a particular trapping potential. Their claim does not preclude, in general, the possibility of differences between the semiclassical calculations and fully quantum results for the arrival time distribution of freely falling atoms.

  10. Trend analysis of satellite-observed tropospheric NO2 vertical column densities over East Asia for 2005-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muto, T.; Irie, H.; Itahashi, S.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) plays a central role in the troposphere as a toxic substance for the respiratory system and a precursor for ozone and aerosols. Furthermore, the OH concentration is dependent on the NO2 concentration. While trend analysis for tropospheric NO2 concentrations in several specific regions all over the world was made in literature for period until 2011, the latest trends after 2011 have not been reported yet. The time period after 2011 is of interest, because it corresponds to the 12th 5-year-plan regulating NOx emissions in China and the period with the power substitution of thermal power generation for the nuclear power generation in Japan. In this study, we first compared satellite-observed tropospheric NO2 VCDs (Vertical Column Densities) with those observed by ground-based Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) instruments installed at Chiba University in order to clarify whether or not there is degradation in OMI and GOME-2 NO2 VCDs data after 2011. We concluded that there is no significant degradation in OMI and GOME-2 data, since the comparison results are similar to those reported by previous validation studies. Based on the results, tropospheric NO2 VCD trends over Central Eastern China (CEC; 30-40°N, 110.0-123.0°E) and Japan (JPN; 33.5-37.0°N, 133.0-141.0°E) regions were estimated using the regression analysis for annual mean values. Although an increase in NO2 VCDs occurred at a rate of 6%(8%) per year in OMI (GOME-2) data from 2005(2007) to 2011 over CEC, we found a decrease at a rate of 10%(11%) per year from 2011 to 2014. This reduction may be a result from the regulation of NOx emissions from coal fired power generation, iron foundry, cement plant, etc., and installation of the denitrification units during the period of 12th 5-year-plan. For JPN, both OMI and GOME-2 data sets showed that the NO2 VCDs decreased at a rate of 4% per year before 2011. The decreasing trends continued until 2014, with a

  11. Satellite observations of OClO from 1995 to 2010 in comparison to ECMWF data and EMAC simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühl, Sven; Pukite, Janis; Dörner, Steffen; Jöckel, Patrick; Sörensen, Rüdiger; Wagner, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    Satellite instruments like GOME, GOME-2 and SCIAMACHY measure the spectral intensity of the sunlight, scattered back from Earths atmosphere, on an almost global and daily scale. By applying the DOAS method to the spectral measurements, the integrated concentration of several trace gases along the light path, the so called Slant Column Densitiy (SCD), can be derived. Chlorine dioxide (OClO) is an important indicator for stratospheric chlorine activation, the basis for massive ozone depletion in polar spring. Due to the daily coverage of the polar regions, the OClO measurements give a good overview of the intensity and the extension of the chlorine activation. While the observations in nadir geometry (i.e. perpendicular to Earths surface) provide a (indirect) measurement of the total column, the limb observations (i.e. tangential view) can be inverted to vertical profiles. We investigated GOME, GOME-2 and SCIAMACHY data from 1995 to 2010, covering Arctic and Antarctic winters with very different meteorological situations (very cold and very warm winters; early and major warmings). The derived OClO columns are compared to ECMWF analysis data, studying the dependence of the OClO enhancements on meteorological parameters like stratospheric temperatures and potential vorticity. Also, the interaction of stratospheric OClO with NO2 and BrO is investigated for selected meteorological situations as well as for long term correlations for different seasons and latitudes, considering in particular the impact on the ozone chemistry. In addition the OClO SCDs are compared to model results calculated (in a nudged setup) with the ECHAM5/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) general circulation model for the time of the satellite observations. We investigate the inter-hemispheric differences in the observed and simulated OClO profile (e.g. regarding the magnitude, the altitude of the profile peak and their evolution throughout the winter). For the Arctic, we study the inter

  12. Satellite observations of OClO from 1995 to 2010 in comparison to ECMWF data and EMAC simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühl, Sven; Pukite, Janis; Steffen, D.; Jöckel, Patrick; Wagner, Thomas

    Satellite instruments like GOME, GOME-2 and SCIAMACHY measure the spectral intensity of the sunlight, scattered back from Earths atmosphere, on an almost global and daily scale. By applying the DOAS method to the spectral measurements, the integrated concentration of several trace gases along the light path, the so called Slant Column Densitiy (SCD), can be derived. Chlorine dioxide (OClO) is an important indicator for stratospheric chlorine activa-tion, the basis for massive ozone depletion in polar spring. Due to the daily coverage of the polar regions, the OClO measurements give a good overview of the intensity and the extension of the chlorine activation. While the observations in nadir geometry (i.e. perpendicular to Earths surface) provide a (indirect) measurement of the total column, the limb observations (i.e. tangential view) can be inverted to vertical profiles. We investigated GOME, GOME-2 and SCIAMACHY data from 1995 to 2010, covering Arctic and Antarctic winters with very dif-ferent meteorological situations (very cold and very warm winters; early and major warmings). The derived OClO columns are compared to ECMWF analysis data, studying the dependence of the OClO enhancements on meteorological parameters like stratospheric temperatures and potential vorticity. Also, the interaction of stratospheric OClO with NO2 and BrO is investi-gated for selected meteorological situations as well as for long term correlations for different seasons and latitudes, considering in particular the impact on the ozone chemistry. In addition the OClO SCDs are compared to correlated ECHAM5/MESSy1 (EMAC) simulations, which were calculated for the time of the satellite observations. We investigate the inter-hemispheric differences in the observed and simulated OClO profile (e.g. regarding the magnitude, the altitude of the profile peak and their evolution throughout the winter). For the Arctic, we study the inter-annual differences and investigate the dependence of the

  13. Elevated Glyoxal Concentrations over the Eastern Equatorial Pacific: A Direct Biogenic Source?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R.; Wang, Y.; Lerot, C.

    2014-12-01

    Elevated atmospheric glyoxal (CHOCHO) was observed over the eastern equatorial Pacific by satellite and ship measurements. We investigated the source contributions through inverse modeling using GOME-2 observations (2007-2012) and the GEOS-Chem model. The observed high glyoxal to HCHO column ratio over the region indicates the potential presence of a direct source of glyoxal rather than secondary production. A bimodal seasonal cycle of glyoxal concentrations was found, providing further evidence for a biogenic origin of glyoxal emission. The estimate of the primary glyoxal emission over the eastern equatorial Pacific is 20-40Tg/yr, which is comparable to the previous estimate of the global continential glyoxal emission.

  14. The impact of the ozone effective temperature on satellite validation using the Dobson spectrophotometer network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elissavet Koukouli, Maria; Zara, Marina; Lerot, Christophe; Fragkos, Konstantinos; Balis, Dimitris; van Roozendael, Michel; Antonius Franciscus Allart, Marcus; van der A, Ronald Johannes

    2016-05-01

    The main aim of the paper is to demonstrate an approach for post-processing of the Dobson spectrophotometers' total ozone columns (TOCs) in order to compensate for their known stratospheric effective temperature (Teff) dependency and its resulting effect on the usage of the Dobson TOCs for satellite TOCs' validation. The Dobson observations employed are those routinely submitted to the World Ozone and Ultraviolet Data Centre (WOUDC) of the World Meteorological Organization, whereas the effective temperatures have been extracted from two sources: the European Space Agency, ESA, Ozone Climate Change Initiative, Ozone-CCI, GODFIT version 3 (GOME-type Direct FITting) algorithm applied to the GOME2/MetopA, GOME2A, observations as well as the one derived from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) outputs. Both temperature sources are evaluated utilizing co-located ozonesonde measurements also retrieved from the WOUDC database. Both GODFIT_v3 and ECMWF Teffs are found to be unbiased against the ozonesonde observations and to agree with high correlation coefficients, especially for latitudes characterized by high seasonal variability in Teff. The validation analysis shows that, when applying the GODFIT_v3 effective temperatures in order to post-process the Dobson TOC, the mean difference between Dobson and GOME2A GODFIT_v3 TOCs moves from 0.63 ± 0.66 to 0.26 ± 0.46 % in the Northern Hemisphere and from 1.25 ± 1.20 to 0.80 ± 0.71 % in the Southern Hemisphere. The existing solar zenith angle dependency of the differences has been smoothed out, with near-zero dependency up to the 60-65° bin and the highest deviation decreasing from 2.38 ± 6.6 to 1.37 ± 6.4 % for the 80-85° bin. We conclude that the global-scale validation of satellite TOCs against collocated Dobson measurements benefits from a post-correction using suitably estimated Teffs.

  15. Retrieval of aerosol optical properties over land using PMAp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzegorski, Michael; Munro, Rosemary; Lang, Ruediger; Poli, Gabriele; Holdak, Andriy

    2015-04-01

    The retrieval of aerosol optical properties is an important task for industry and climate forecasting. An ideal instrument should include observations with moderate spectral and high spatial resolutions for a wide range of wavelengths (from the UV to the TIR), measurements of the polarization state at different wavelengths and measurements of the same scene for different observation geometries. As such an ideal instrument is currently unavailable the usage of different instruments on one satellite platform is an alternative choice. Since February 2014, the Polar Multi sensor Aerosol product (PMAp) is delivered as operational GOME product to our customers. The algorithms retrieve aerosol optical properties over ocean (AOD, volcanic ash, aerosol type) using a multi-sensor approach (GOME, AVHRR, IASI). The next releases of PMAp will provide an extended set of aerosol and cloud properties which include AOD over land and an improved volcanic ash retrieval combining AVHRR and IASI. This presentation gives an overview on the existing product and the prototypes in development. The major focus is the discussion of the AOD retrieval over land implemented in the upcoming PMAp2 release. In addition, the results of our current validation studies (e.g. comparisons to AERONET, other satellite platforms and model data) are shown.

  16. A new operational EUMETSAT product for the retrieval of aerosol optical properties over land (PMAp v2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzegorski, Michael; Munro, Rosemary; Poli, Gabriele; Holdak, Andriy; Lang, Ruediger

    2016-04-01

    The retrieval of aerosol optical properties is an important task to provide data for industry and climate forecasting. An ideal instrument should include observations with moderate spectral and high spatial resolution for a wide range of wavelengths (from the UV to the TIR), measurements of the polarization state at different wavelengths and measurements of the same scene for different observation geometries. As such an ideal instrument is currently unavailable the usage of different instruments on one satellite platform is an alternative choice. Since February 2014, the Polar Multi sensor Aerosol product (PMAp) has been delivered as an operational GOME product to our customers. The algorithm retrieves aerosol optical properties over ocean (AOD, volcanic ash, aerosol type) using a multi-sensor approach (GOME, AVHRR, IASI). The product is now extended to pixels over land using a new release of the operational PMAp processor (PMAp v2). The pre-operational data dissemination of the new PMAp v2 data to our users is scheduled for March 2016. This presentation gives an overview on the new operational product PMAp v2 with a focus on the validation of the PMAp aerosol optical depth over land. The impact of different error sources on the results (e.g. surface contribution to the TOA reflectance) is discussed. We also show first results of upcoming extensions of our PMAp processor, in particular the improvement of the cloud/aerosol discrimination of thick aerosol events (e.g. volcanic ash plumes, desert dust outbreaks).

  17. Analysis of stratospheric NO2 trends above Kiruna using ground-based zenith sky DOAS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Myojeong; Enell, Carl-Fredrik; Hendrick, François; Platt, Ulrich; Pukite, Janis; Raffalski, Uwe; Van Roozendael, Michel; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Stratospheric NO2 not only destroys ozone but acts as a buffer against halogen catalyzed ozone loss by converting halogen species into stable nitrates. To a better understanding of the impacts of stratospheric NO2 and O3 chemistry, we need long-term measurement data. In this study, ground-based zenith sky DOAS has successfully monitored trace gases related to stratospheric ozone chemistry since 1997. In this study, we shows the trend in stratospheric NO2 vertical column densities (VCDs) at Kiruna, Sweden (68.84°N, 20.41°E) as derived from ground-based zenith sky DOAS over the period 1997 to 2015. The results will be compared with satellite data measured from GOME on ERS-2, SCIAMACHY on EnviSAT, and GOME-2 on METOP-A. To calculate the trends, we apply a multiple linear regression model including variables to describe effects caused by the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO), solar activity, and stratospheric aerosol amount.

  18. Long-term observations of tropospheric NO2 from satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Andreas; Hilboll, Andreas; Noguchi, Katsuyuki; Leitao, Joana; Burrows, John P.

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2 ) are key species in atmospheric chemistry. Together with volatile organic compounds they determine the amount of ozone present in the troposphere. Through the formation of nitric acid they are involved in acid rain formation and in addition they contribute to radiative forcing both directly and indirectly. As nitrogen dioxide adversely affects human health it is also regulated by environmental laws. While ground-based networks provide long-term data of surface concentrations of nitrogen oxides at high temporal resolution in many countries, truly global observations can only be performed from space. By using the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) method on spectrally resolved UV/vis measurements of scattered sunlight, column amounts of NO2 can be determined from nadir satellite observations. With additional assumptions on stratospheric NO2 and the radiative transfer, the tropospheric NO2 amounts can be retrieved. In this work, satellite observations of NO2 from several sensors (GOME, SCIAMACHY, OMI, and GOME-2) are used to study the long-term evolution of tropospheric NO2 amounts on a global scale. A particular focus is on the comparison of results retrieved from the different sensors in times of overlapping measurements and the degree of consistency achieved in regions of both large and small pollution signals. The effects of sampling statistics, time of overpass and spatial resolution are discussed as well as the influence of clouds.

  19. Towards a NNORSY Ozone Profile ECV from European Nadir UV/VIS Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felder, Martin; Kaifel, Anton; Huckle, Roger

    2010-12-01

    The Neural Network Ozone Retrieval System (NNORSY) has been adapted and applied to several different satellite instruments, including the backscatter UV/VIS instruments ERS2-GOME, SCIAMACHY and METOP-GOME-2. The retrieved long term ozone field hence spans the years 1995 till now. To provide target data for training the neural networks, the lower parts of the atmosphere are sampled by ozone sondes from the WOUDC and SHADOZ data archives. Higher altitudes are covered by a variety of limb-sounding instruments, including the SAGE and POAM series, HALOE, ACE-FTS and AURA-MLS. In this paper, we show ozone profile time series over the entire time range to demonstrate the "out-of-the-box" consistency and homogeneity of our data across the three different nadir sounders, i.e. without any kind of tuning applied. These features of Essential Climate Variable (ECV) datasets [1] also lie at the heart of the recently announced ESA Climate Change Initiative, to which we hope to contribute in the near future.

  20. Validation and attribution of solar induced fluorescence (SIF) from OCO-2: first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, M.; Schimel, D.; Frankenberg, C.; Drewry, D.; Eldering, A.; Gunson, M. R.; Evans, B. J.; Beringer, J.; Hutley, L. B.; Moore, C.; Marang, I.

    2015-12-01

    Plant physiology exerts a key control on the exchange of carbon and water between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere at different spatial and temporal scales. Therefore, accurate and reliable detection of variations in plant physiological functioning is critical for modeling and monitoring terrestrial carbon and water cycle. Using data from Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) and the Global Ozone Monitoring Mission (GOME), recent studies have shown that remotely sensed solar induced fluorescence (SIF) can provide reliable information of plant physiological functioning at a large spatial scale. SIF from GOSAT and GOME, however, have coarse spatial resolution, which restricts their application in understanding spatially heterogeneous variation in gross primary productivity. Launched in 2014, the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) has enabled fine scale retrievals of SIF, a standard product from OCO-2. Because of the fine spatial resolution of OCO-2 SIF, it can be directly compared with eddy covariance measurement. Using field measurements, eddy covariance data, and several different complementary remotely sensed data such as land surface temperature, soil moisture, and vegetation indices we will validate and investigate spatiotemporal variations in SIF from OCO-2. Combined use of eddy covariance and meteorological measurements will help understand the relationship between SIF and photosynthesis. The focus will be on understanding the relationship between SIF and gross primary productivity at diurnal and seasonal time scale, and across different sites and ecosystems.

  1. Increase in NOx emissions from Indian thermal power plants during 1996-2010: unit-based inventories and multisatellite observations.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zifeng; Streets, David G

    2012-07-17

    Driven by rapid economic development and growing electricity demand, NO(x) emissions (E) from the power sector in India have increased dramatically since the mid-1990s. In this study, we present the NO(x) emissions from Indian public thermal power plants for the period 1996-2010 using a unit-based methodology and compare the emission estimates with the satellite observations of NO(2) tropospheric vertical column densities (TVCDs) from four spaceborne instruments: GOME, SCIAMACHY, OMI, and GOME-2. Results show that NO(x) emissions from Indian power plants increased by at least 70% during 1996-2010. Coal-fired power plants, NO(x) emissions from which are not regulated in India, contribute ∼96% to the total power sector emissions, followed by gas-fired (∼4%) and oil-fired (<1%) ones. A number of isolated NO(2) hot spots are observed over the power plant areas, and good agreement between NO(2) TVCDs and NO(x) emissions is found for areas dominated by power plant emissions. Average NO(2) TVCDs over power plant areas were continuously increasing during the study period. We find that the ratio of ΔE/E to ΔTVCD/TVCD changed from greater than one to less than one around 2005-2008, implying that a transition of the overall NO(x) chemistry occurred over the power plant areas, which may cause significant impact on the atmospheric environment. PMID:22732062

  2. Assessment of the Impact of The East Asian Summer Monsoon on the Air Quality Over China from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, N.; Ding, A.; Valks, P.; Safieddine, S.; Clerbaux, C.; Trautmann, T.

    2013-12-01

    Air pollution is one of the most important environmental problems in developing Asian countries like China. Due to huge consumption of fossil fuels and rapid increase of traffic emissions in the past decades, many regions in China have been experiencing heavy air pollution. In China, studies showed that the East Asian monsoon plays a significant role in characterizing the temporal variation and spatial patterns of air pollution, since monsoon is a major atmospheric system affecting air mass transport, convection, and precipitation. Publicly available in situ observations cannot provide sufficient spatial coverage and high consistence in data quality for a long-term period. Therefore, knowledge gaps still exist in the understanding of Asian monsoon impact on the air quality in China under the background of global climate change. Satellite retrievals with high spatial coverage and high consistence for a long period can well document the change of air pollution with monsoon. We apply multi-platform satellite observations by the GOME, SCIAMACHY, GOME-2, IASI, GOMOS, MIPAS and MOPITT instruments to analyze tropospheric ozone and CO, precursors of ozone (NOx, HCHO and CH4) and other related trace gases over China. The potential of using the current generation of satellite instruments to monitor air quality changes caused by the East Asian monsoon circulation will be presented. Preliminary comparison results between satellite measurement and limited but valuable ground-based and aircraft measurements will also be showed.

  3. Height resolved ozone hole structure as observed by the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Peet, J. C. A.; van der A, R. J.; de Laat, A. T. J.; Tuinder, O. N. E.; König-Langlo, G.; Wittig, J.

    2009-06-01

    We present Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) ozone profiles that were operationally retrieved with the KNMI Ozone ProfilE Retrieval Algorithm (OPERA) algorithm for the period September-December 2008. It is shown that it is possible to accurately measure the vertical distribution of stratospheric ozone for Antarctic ozone hole conditions from spectra measured at ultraviolet wavelengths from a nadir viewing instrument. Comparisons with ozone sonde observations from the Neumayer station at the Antarctic coast show a good agreement for various ozone profile shapes representing different phases of the annual recurring ozone hole cycle. A preliminary analysis of the three-dimensional structure of the ozone hole shows for example that at the vortex edges ozone rich mid-latitude middle and upper stratospheric layers can be found over ozone depleted lower stratospheric ‘ozone hole’ layers. These Antarctic ozone profile observations combined with the daily global coverage of GOME-2 enables the monitoring of the three-dimensional structure of the ozone hole on a daily basis.

  4. Validation of SCIAMACHY Radiances and Ozone Products Using Ground and Space Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilsenrath, E.; Bhartia, P. K.; Bojkov, B. R.; Kowalewski, M.; Labow, G.; Ahmad, Z.

    2004-01-01

    Validation of SCIAMACHY data products are is key element for the detecting a stratospheric ozone recovery, which is a high priority for environmental research and environmental policy. Models predict an ozone recovery at a much lower rate than the measured depletion rate observed to date. Therefore improved precision of the satellite and ground ozone observing systems are required over the long term to verify its recovery. We show that validation of satellite radiances from space and from the ground can be an effective means for correcting long term drifts of backscatter type satellite measurements such as SCIAMACHY and can be used to cross calibrate all BUV instruments in orbit (TOMS, SBUV/2, GOME, OMI, GOME-2, OMPS). This method bypasses the retrieval algorithms used for both satellite and ground based measurements that are normally used to validate and correct the satellite data. This approach however requires well calibrated instruments and an accurate radiative transfer model that accounts for aerosols. In addition to comparing radiances, validation of SCIAMACHY ozone products will conducted by comparing total and profile ozone with TOMS and SBUV/2.

  5. Potential of the TROPOspheric Monitoring Instrument (TROPOMI) onboard the Sentinel-5 Precursor for the monitoring of terrestrial chlorophyll fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guanter, L.; Aben, I.; Tol, P.; Krijger, J. M.; Hollstein, A.; Köhler, P.; Damm, A.; Joiner, J.; Frankenberg, C.; Landgraf, J.

    2015-03-01

    Global monitoring of sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) is improving our knowledge about the photosynthetic functioning of terrestrial ecosystems. The feasibility of SIF retrievals from spaceborne atmospheric spectrometers has been demonstrated by a number of studies in the last years. In this work, we investigate the potential of the upcoming TROPOspheric Monitoring Instrument (TROPOMI) onboard the Sentinel-5 Precursor satellite mission for SIF retrieval. TROPOMI will sample the 675-775 nm spectral window with a spectral resolution of 0.5 nm and a pixel size of 7 km × 7 km. We use an extensive set of simulated TROPOMI data in order to assess the uncertainty of single SIF retrievals and subsequent spatio-temporal composites. Our results illustrate the enormous improvement in SIF monitoring achievable with TROPOMI with respect to comparable spectrometers currently in-flight, such as the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) instrument. We find that TROPOMI can reduce global uncertainties in SIF mapping by more than a factor of 2 with respect to GOME-2, which comes together with an approximately 5-fold improvement in spatial sampling. Finally, we discuss the potential of TROPOMI to map other important vegetation parameters at a global scale with moderate spatial resolution and short revisit time. Those include leaf photosynthetic pigments and proxies for canopy structure, which will complement SIF retrievals for a self-contained description of vegetation condition and functioning.

  6. Linear trends in cloud top height from passive observations in the oxygen A-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelli, L.; Kokhanovsky, A. A.; Rozanov, V. V.; Vountas, M.; Burrows, J. P.

    2014-06-01

    Measurements by the hyperspectral spectrometers GOME, SCIAMACHY and GOME-2 are used to determine the rate of linear change (and trends) in cloud top height (CTH) in the period between June 1996 and May 2012. The retrievals are obtained from Top-Of-Atmosphere (TOA) backscattered solar light in the oxygen A-band using the Semi-Analytical CloUd Retrieval Algorithm SACURA. The physical framework relies on the asymptotic equations of radiative transfer, valid for optically thick clouds. Using linear least-squares techniques, a global trend of -1.78 ± 2.14 m yr-1 in deseasonalized CTH has been found, in the latitude belt within ±60°, with diverging tendencies over land (+0.27 ± 3.2 m yr-1) and ocean (-2.51 ± 2.8 m yr-1). The El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), strongly coupled to CTH, forces clouds to lower altitudes. The global ENSO-corrected trend in CTH amounts to -0.49 ± 2.22 m yr-1. At a global scale, no explicit regional pattern of statistically significant trends (at 95% confidence level, estimated with bootstrap technique) have been found, which would be representative of typical natural synoptical features. One exception is North Africa, which exhibits the strongest upward trend in CTH sustained by an increasing trend in water vapour.

  7. Trends in cloud top height from passive observations in the oxygen A-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelli, L.; Kokhanovsky, A. A.; Rozanov, V. V.; Vountas, M.; Burrows, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    Measurements by the hyperspectral spectrometers GOME, SCIAMACHY, and GOME-2 are used to determine the rate of linear change (and trends) in cloud top height (CTH) in the period between June 1996 and May 2012. The retrievals are obtained from Top-Of-Atmosphere (TOA) backscattered solar light in the oxygen A-band using the Semi-Analytical CloUd Retrieval Algorithm SACURA. The physical framework relies on the asymptotic equations of radiative transfer, valid for optically thick clouds. Using linear least-squares techniques, a global trend of -1.78 ± 2.14 m yr-1 in deseasonalised CTH has been found, in the latitude belt within ±60°, with diverging tendencies over land (+0.27 ± 3.2 m yr-1) and ocean (-2.51 ± 2.8 m yr-1). The El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), strongly coupled to CTH, forces clouds to lower altitudes. The global ENSO-corrected trend in CTH amounts to -0.49 ± 2.22 m yr-1. At a~global scale, no explicit regional pattern of statistically significant trends (at 95 % confidence level, estimated with bootstrap technique) have been found, which would be representative of typical natural synoptical features. One exception is North Africa, which exhibits the strongest upward trend in CTH sustained by an increasing trend in water vapor.

  8. Satellites and SAOZ total ozone comparison in the tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frihi, Aymen; Pommereau, Jean-Pierre; Pazmino, Andrea; Goutail, Florence; Bekki, Slimane

    2016-04-01

    All satellites total ozone measurements available from SBUV, OMI-T, OMI-D, OMI-CCI, GOME-CCI, GOME2-CCI, SCIAMACHY-CCI, NPP and IASI, since 2004 until 2015 now are compared to those provided by the UV-Vis SAOZ/NDACC spectrometer at two tropical stations of Reunion Island in the Indian Ocean and Bauru in Southern Brazil. The differences between satellites and SAOZ show systematic seasonal variations of 2-3% (6-9 DU) amplitude and sharp negative peaks in Jan-Mar in the austral summer. The largest low peaks seen on IASI, OMI-T, NPP and OMI-CCI at Reunion are shown to be due to hurricanes. In turn, those seen in Brazil correlate with high altitude overshooting convective clouds. The origin of the seasonality of the Sat-SAOZ difference is still unknown. Surprisingly and though there has been no change in either SAOZ instruments or data analysis processes, the amplitude of the seasonal cycle of the Sat-SAOZ difference reduces in 2012 and drops to less than ± 0.5% (1.5 DU) after 2013 in Reunion Island and less than ±1% in Bauru, reduction for which there is no clear explanation. Shown in the presentation will be the demonstration of the impact of hurricanes and high altitude clouds on satellites ozone retrievals, followed by a discussion of possible causes of seasonality of Sat-SAOZ difference and the its amplitude drop after 2012.

  9. Satellite Observations of Atmospheric SO2 from Volcanic Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhar, M. F.; Platt, U.; Wagner, T.

    Volcanoes are an important source of various atmospheric trace gases. Volcanic eruptions and their emissions are sporadic and intermittent and often occur in uninhabited regions. Therefore assessing the amount and size of the gaseous and particulate emission from volcanoes is difficult. Satellite remote sensing measurements provide one well suited opportunity to overcome this difficulty. Onboard ERS-2, GOME's moderate spectral resolution enables us to apply the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) algorithm to retrieve SO2 column densities from radiance/irradiance measurements in UV spectral region. Volcanic emissions can cause significant variations of climate on a variety of time scales; just one very large eruption can cause a measurable change in the Earth's climate with a time scale of a few years. Stratospheric aerosols produced by volcanic eruptions can influence stratospheric chemistry both through chemical reactions that take place on the surface of the aerosols and through temperature changes induced by their presence in the stratosphere. In this work we give a comprehensive overview on several volcanoes and the retrieval of SO2 column densities from GOME data for the years 1996 - 2002. The focus is on both eruption and out gassing scenarios from different volcanic eruptions in Italy, Iceland, Congo/ Zaire, Ecuador and Mexico.

  10. A comprehensive study over the recent important reduction in SO2 and NO2 emissions from the power plants located in S-E Europe using space observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocǎnealǎ, Corina; Constantin, Daniel-Eduard; Theys, Nicolas; Merlaud, Alexis; Van Roozendael, Michel

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the recent important reduction of atmospheric SO2 and NO2 emissions from several power plants located in S-E Europe during 2005-2014 using space observations. The study is focused over three large power plants which are located in Romania and Bulgaria: Turceni (44.66°N, 23.38°E), Rovinari (44.9°N, 23.15°E) and Stara Zagora (42.43°N, 25.65°E). The space observations used in this work are based on OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) and GOME-2 (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment Measurements) measurements. The results obtained using data from satellites are compared with in-situ observations and calculated emissions. The OMI and GOME-2 observed SO2 and NO2 content is well correlated with the in-situ data and calculated SO2 and NOx emissions. This study investigates the potential of using satellite observations as an instrument to check quality air as a standard procedure by governmental and non-governmental institutions. To this aim, we compared the emissions calculated from ground and space with the European Directive 2001/80/EC which refers to the limitation of emissions of certain pollutants by large combustion plants.

  11. An improved glyoxal retrieval from OMI measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado, L. M. A.; Richter, A.; Vrekoussis, M.; Wittrock, F.; Hilboll, A.; Schreier, S. F.; Burrows, J. P.

    2014-06-01

    Satellite observations from the SCIAMACHY, GOME-2, and OMI spectrometers have been used to retrieve atmospheric columns of glyoxal (CHOCHO) with the DOAS method. High CHOCHO levels are found over regions with large biogenic and pyrogenic emissions, and hot-spots have been identified over areas of anthropogenic activities. This study focuses on the development of an improved retrieval for CHOCHO from measurements by the OMI instrument. From sensitivity tests, an optimal fitting window and polynomial degree are determined. Two different approaches to reduce the interference of liquid water absorption over oceanic regions are evaluated, achieving significant reduction of negative columns over clear water regions. Moreover, a high temperature absorption cross-section of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is introduced in the DOAS retrieval to account for potential interferences of NO2 over regions with large anthropogenic emissions, leading to improved fit quality over these areas. A comparison with vertical CHOCHO columns retrieved from measurements of the GOME-2 and SCIAMACHY instruments over continental regions is performed, showing overall good consistency. Using the new OMI CHOCHO data set, the link between fires and glyoxal columns is investigated for two selected regions in Africa. In addition, mapped averages are computed for a fire event in the east of Moscow between mid-July and mid-August 2010. In both cases, enhanced CHOCHO levels are found in close spatial and temporal proximity to MODIS fire radiative power, demonstrating that pyrogenic emissions can be clearly identified in the OMI CHOCHO product.

  12. Improving satellite retrievals of large tropospheric NO2 columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Andreas; Hilboll, Andreas; Burrows, John P.

    2014-05-01

    Satellite observations of tropospheric NO2 amounts are based on application of the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) method to space-borne nadir measurements of the backscattered solar radiation. In the DOAS method, the effects of absorption and radiative transfer are usually treated separately to facilitate rapid data analysis. In most cases, this approximation is valid and only small uncertainties are introduced. During the dramatic pollution episode in China in January 2013, tropospheric NO2 retrievals on GOME-2 data suffered from significantly increased residuals leading to rejection of the retrievals as having poor quality. Closer inspection of the fits revealed systematic residuals which could be explained by the wavelength dependence of the air mass factor (AMF) for absorbers located close to the surface. At the large NO2 columns present during the event, this effect becomes significant. In addition, the spectral signature of the temperature dependence of the NO2 absorption cross-section could be detected. In this study, GOME-2 data for high NO2 situations are evaluated systematically for usually neglected effects such as the AMF and temperature dependence. Using semi-empirical approaches, solutions are proposed to improve the quality of retrievals under these conditions. In addition, the potential for retrieving useful information from the magnitude of these effects is evaluated and it is shown, that some qualitative deductions on the vertical position of the NO2 absorption can be made under favourable conditions.

  13. LIDORT V2PLUS: a comprehensive radiative transfer package for UV/VIS/NIR nadir remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spurr, Robert J. D.

    2004-02-01

    The LIDPORT V2PLUS radiative transfer package is designed for simulation and retrieval applications for nadir viewing remote sensing instruments such as GOME, GOME-2, SCIAMACHY, OMI and MODIS. The package is based on the LIDORT family of linearized discrete ordinate models, and it will deliver earthshine radiances, analytic profile, total column and surface property Jacobians. LIDORT V2PLUS includes a quasi-exact single scatter computation for all solar beams and the line of sight direction in a curved spherical-shell refracting atmosphere, and a full treatment of the diffuse radiation field in the pseudo-spherical approximation at all points along the line-of-sight. We give examples of radiances and O3 air mass factors at 325 nm, and Jacobians for O3 total column and profiles and for surface albedos, with particular emphasis on the wide-angle spherically-corrected viewing mode. We also look at the effect of horizontal inhomogeneity caused by varying surface properties along the line of sight.

  14. Tropospheric Composition Change observed from Space (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, A.; Hilboll, A.; Leitao, J.; Vrekoussis, M.; Wittrock, F.; Burrows, J. P.

    2010-12-01

    The composition of the troposphere is largely influenced by surface emissions of both natural and anthropogenic origins. These emissions change over time as result of human activities and natural variability, leading to varying atmospheric levels of primary and secondary pollutants. Satellite observations of sun light scattered back by the surface and the atmosphere can be used to retrieve information on atmospheric trace gases by application of optical absorption spectroscopy. In the UV and visible part of the spectrum, these measurements have good sensitivity to the lower troposphere providing information on relevant species such as O3, NO2, SO2, HCHO or glyoxal. Here, we report on recent results on tropospheric composition changes obtained from the GOME, SCIAMACHY and GOME-2 instruments which have a combined data record of nearly 15 years. The focus is on NO2 which shows an increasing trend over Asia and many large cities in countries with growing economies. At the same time, significant reductions are observed over the US and Europe, probably as result of changes in environmental legislation. SO2 signals have been decreasing over the US since 1996 while a strong upward trend was evident over China until recently when desulphurisation of power plant emissions came into effect. There also is evidence for increases in VOC levels over China which could be either of anthropogenic origin or from biogenic emissions.

  15. Satellite remote sensing of vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahr, Tobias; Peper, Eva; Schubert, Alexander; Warnach, Simon; Pöhler, Denis; Horbanski, Martin; Beirle, Steffen; Mies, Kornelia; Platt, Ulrich; Wagner, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) allows to determine the concentration of trace gases based on their specific absorptions cross-sections along a light path. Since 1995, this principle is employed successfully on satellite-based instruments like GOME, GOME-2 and SCIAMACHY for the global measurement of stratospheric and tropospheric trace gases like ozone and nitrogen oxides. Usually, spectral signatures from the ground, where a big part of the sunlight is reflected, are neglected in the evaluation. This can lead to errors in the trace gas determination. However, these structures offer the opportunity to identify surface properties of the earth and different types of vegetation. To analyse spectral reflectance properties, high resolved reflection spectra (FWHM 0.29 nm) from 95 plants were measured between 350 and 1050 nm. They can serve as a basis for the analysis of satellite data. Including different vegetation reference spectra, it is possible to determine groups of plants with similar optical properties. This allows to derive global maps of the spatio-temporal variation of plant distribution by satellite remote sensing. We present first results of this technique based on SCIAMACHY observations.

  16. A climatology of visible surface reflectance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoogman, Peter; Liu, Xiong; Chance, Kelly; Sun, Qingsong; Schaaf, Crystal; Mahr, Tobias; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    We present a high spectral resolution climatology of visible surface reflectance as a function of wavelength for use in satellite measurements of ozone and other atmospheric species. The Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO) instrument is planned to measure backscattered solar radiation in the 290-740 nm range, including the ultraviolet and visible Chappuis ozone bands. Observation in the weak Chappuis band takes advantage of the relative transparency of the atmosphere in the visible to achieve sensitivity to near-surface ozone. However, due to the weakness of the ozone absorption features this measurement is more sensitive to errors in visible surface reflectance, which is highly variable. We utilize reflectance measurements of individual plant, man-made, and other surface types to calculate the primary modes of variability of visible surface reflectance at a high spectral resolution, comparable to that of TEMPO (0.6 nm). Using the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Bidirection Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF)/albedo product and our derived primary modes we construct a high spatial resolution climatology of wavelength-dependent surface reflectance over all viewing scenes and geometries. The Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) Lambertian Equivalent Reflectance (LER) product provides complementary information over water and snow scenes. Preliminary results using this approach in multispectral ultraviolet+visible ozone retrievals from the GOME-2 instrument show significant improvement to the fitting residuals over vegetated scenes.

  17. Rapid economic growth leads to boost in NO2 pollution over India, as seen from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilboll, Andreas; Richter, Andreas; Burrows, John P.

    2016-04-01

    Over the past decades, the Indian economy has been growing at an exceptional pace. This growth was induced and accompanied by a strong increase of the Indian population. Consequently, traffic, electricity consumption, and industrial production have soared over the past decades, leading to a strong increase in fuel consumption and thus pollutant emissions. Nitrogen oxides (NO+NO2) are a major component of anthropogenic air pollution, playing key part in reaction cycles leading to the formation of tropospheric ozone. They are mainly emitted by the combustion of fossil fuels; other sources include production by lightning, biomass burning, and microbial activity in soils. Since the mid-1990s, space-borne measurements of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) have been conducted by the GOME, SCIAMACHY, GOME-2, and OMI instruments. These instruments perform hyperspectral measurements of scattered and reflected sunlight. Their measurements are then analyzed using differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) to yield vertically integrated columnar trace gas abundances. Here, we will present the results of 20 years of NO2 measurements over the Indian subcontinent. After showing the spatial distribution of NO2 pollution over India, we will present time series for individual states and urban agglomerations. These time series will then be related to various indicators of economic development. Finally, we will highlight several instances where single industrial pollution sources and their development can clearly be identified from the NO2 maps and estimate their NO2 emissions.

  18. Correlations between dentoskeletal variables and deep bite in Class II Division 1 individuals.

    PubMed

    Marques, Leandro Silva; Armond, Mônica Costa; Ramos-Jorge, Maria Letícia; Andrade, Raquel Gonçalves Vieira de; Bolognese, Ana Maria

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the cephalometric pattern of Class II Division 1 individuals with deep bite, and to determine possible correlations between dentoskeletal variables and deep bite. Comparisons were also made between genders and cases that were to be treated both with and without premolar extraction. A total of 70 lateral cephalograms were used, from both male (n = 35) and female (n = 35) individuals with an average age of 11.6 years, who simultaneously presented with ANB ≥ 5º and overbite ≥ 4 mm. Statistical analysis involved parametric (t-test) and non-parametric (Mann-Whitney) tests for independent samples, as well as the Spearman correlation test (p ≤ 0.05). The values of Go-Me, Ar-Pog, PM-1 and PM-CMI were higher in males (p < 0.05). However, no significant differences were found among the averages of the cephalometric measurements when the sample was divided by treatment with and without extraction. Deep bite was positively correlated to the PM-1 and SNA measurements, and negatively correlated to the Go-Me, Ar-Pog, SNB and SNGoMe measurements. The main factors associated with the determination of deep bite in Angle's Class II Division 1 cases were: greater lower anterior dentoalveolar growth and/or lower incisor extrusion, horizontal growth pattern, maxillary protrusion and mandibular retrusion. PMID:21359452

  19. Assessing potential changes of chestnut productivity in Europe under future climate conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calheiros, T.; Pereira, M. G.; Pinto, J. G.; Caramelo, L.; Gomes-Laranjo, J.; Dacamara, C. C.

    2012-04-01

    The European chestnut is cultivated for its nuts and wood. Several studies point to the dependency of chestnut productivity on specific soil and climate characteristics. For instance, this species dislikes chalky and poorly drained soils, appreciates sedimentary, siliceous and acidic to neutral soils. Chestnut trees also seems to appreciate annual mean values of sunlight spanning between 2400 and 2600 h, rainfall ranging between 600 and 1500 mm, mean annual temperature between 9 and 13°C, 27°C being the mean of the maximum temperature (Heiniger and Conedera, 1992; Gomes-Laranjo et al.,2008). The amount of heat between May and October must range between 1800°D and 2400°D (Dinis et al., 2011) . In Poland, the growing season is defined as the period of time when the mean 24-h temperature is greater than 5°C (Wilczynski and Podalski, 2007). In Portugal, maximum photosynthetic activity occurs at 24-28°C for adult trees, but exhibits more than 50% of termoinhibition when the air temperature is above 32°C, which is frequent during summer (Gomes- Laranjo et al., 2006, 2008). Recently Pereira et al (2011) identified a set of meteorological variables/parameters with high impact on chestnut productivity. The main purpose of this work is to assess the potential impacts of future climate change on chestnut productivity in Portugal as well as on European chestnut orchards. First, observed data from the European Climate assessment (ECA) and simulations with the Regional Circulation Model (RCM) COSMO-CLM for recent climate conditions are used to assess the ability of the RCM to model the actual meteorological conditions. Then, ensemble projections from the ECHAM5/COSMO-CLM model chain for two climate scenarios (A1B and B1) are used to estimate the values of relevant meteorological variables and parameters und future climate conditions. Simulated values are then compared with those obtained for present climate. Results point to changes in the spatial and temporal

  20. Observing the Impact of the Anthropocene from Space: the Evolution of Atmospheric Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrows, John P.

    2016-04-01

    From the Neolithic revolution to the industrial revolution over ~ 10 000 years, the earth's population rose from several millions to 1 Billion powered by energy from a mixture of biofuels, water and solar power and a limited amount of the combustion of coal. The industrial revolution began in the UK in the late 18th century, and has been fuelled by the combustion of fossil fuels, initially coal but then oil and gas. This has led to a dramatic rise in both the human population, now comprising over 7 Billion with more than 50% living in urban areas, and its standard of living. The expectation is that by 2050 population will be of the order of 10 Billion with 75% dwelling in urban areas. Anthropogenic activity has resulted in pollution from the local to the global scale, changes in land use, the destruction of stratospheric ozone, the modification of biogeochemical cycling, the destruction of species, ecosystems and ecosystem services and climate change. The earth has entered a new geological epoch the anthropocene. The observation of atmospheric composition provides a unique early warning of the natural and anthropogenic origins of change. Consistent and consolidated measurements from the local to the global scale are required to test our knowledge of the biogeochemical cycles, which determine atmospheric composition, and to assess and attribute accurately their modification by anthropogenic activity. To achieve global measurements of atmospheric constituents (trace gases, aerosol and cloud parameters) the SCIAMACHY (SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY), Project was initiated in the early 1980s. This was the first passive remote sensing space based instrumentation, designed to make simultaneous contiguous measurements of the solar upwelling radiation at the top of the atmosphere from the ultraviolet to the shortwave infrared. The SCIAMACHY project resulted in measurements of the instruments GOME, originally called SCIA-mini, on ESA

  1. Measurements of tropospheric NO2 in Romania using a zenith-sky mobile DOAS system and comparisons with satellite observations.

    PubMed

    Constantin, Daniel-Eduard; Merlaud, Alexis; Van Roozendael, Michel; Voiculescu, Mirela; Fayt, Caroline; Hendrick, François; Pinardi, Gaia; Georgescu, Lucian

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a new method for retrieving tropospheric NO2 Vertical Column Density (VCD) from zenith-sky Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) measurements using mobile observations. This method was used during three days in the summer of 2011 in Romania, being to our knowledge the first mobile DOAS measurements peformed in this country. The measurements were carried out over large and different areas using a mobile DOAS system installed in a car. We present here a step-by-step retrieval of tropospheric VCD using complementary observations from ground and space which take into account the stratospheric contribution, which is a step forward compared to other similar studies. The detailed error budget indicates that the typical uncertainty on the retrieved NO2tropospheric VCD is less than 25%. The resulting ground-based data set is compared to satellite measurements from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2). For instance, on 18 July 2011, in an industrial area located at 47.03°N, 22.45°E, GOME-2 observes a tropospheric VCD value of (3.4 ± 1.9) × 1015 molec./cm2, while average mobile measurements in the same area give a value of (3.4 ± 0.7) × 10(15) molec./cm2. On 22 August 2011, around Ploiesti city (44.99°N, 26.1°E), the tropospheric VCD observed by satellites is (3.3 ± 1.9) × 10(15) molec./cm2 (GOME-2) and (3.2 ± 3.2) × 10(15) molec./cm2 (OMI), while average mobile measurements give (3.8 ± 0.8) × 10(15) molec./cm2. Average ground measurements over "clean areas", on 18 July 2011, give (2.5 ± 0.6) × 10(15) molec./cm2 while the satellite observes a value of (1.8 ± 1.3) × 10(15) molec./cm2. PMID:23519349

  2. Rain-induced emission pulses of NOx and HCHO from soils in African regions after dry spells as viewed by satellite sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zörner, Jan; Penning de Vries, Marloes; Beirle, Steffen; Veres, Patrick; Williams, Jonathan; Wagner, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Outside industrial areas, soil emissions of NOx (stemming from bacterial emissions of NO) represent a considerable fraction of total NOx emissions, and may even dominate in remote tropical and agricultural areas. NOx fluxes from soils are controlled by abiotic and microbiological processes which depend on ambient environmental conditions. Rain-induced spikes in NOx have been observed by in-situ measurements and also satellite observations. However, the estimation of soil emissions over broad geographic regions remains uncertain using bottom-up approaches. Independent, global satellite measurements can help constrain emissions used in chemical models. Laboratory experiments on soil fluxes suggest that significant HCHO emissions from soil can occur. However, it has not been previously attempted to detect HCHO emissions from wetted soils by using satellite observations. This study investigates the evolution of tropospheric NO2 (as a proxy for NOx) and HCHO column densities before and after the first rain fall event following a prolonged dry period in semi-arid regions, deserts as well as tropical regions in Africa. Tropospheric NO2 and HCHO columns retrieved from OMI aboard the AURA satellite, GOME-2 aboard METOP and SCIAMACHY aboard ENVISAT are used to study and inter-compare the observed responses of the trace gases with multiple space-based instruments. The observed responses are prone to be affected by other sources like lightning, fire, influx from polluted air masses, as well measurement errors in the satellite retrieval caused by manifold reasons such as an increased cloud contamination. Thus, much care is taken verify that the observed spikes reflect enhancements in soil emissions. Total column measurements of H2O from GOME-2 give further insight into the atmospheric state and help to explain the increase in humidity before the first precipitation event. The analysis is not only conducted for averages of distinct geographic regions, i.e. the Sahel, but also

  3. A comparative analysis of UV nadir-backscatter and infrared limb-emission ozone data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragani, Rossana

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a comparative assessment of ultraviolet nadir-backscatter and infrared limb-emission ozone profile assimilation. The Meteorological Operational Satellite A (MetOp-A) Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment 2 (GOME-2) nadir and the ENVISAT Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) limb profiles, generated by the ozone consortium of the European Space Agency Climate Change Initiative (ESA O3-CCI), were individually added to a reference set of ozone observations and assimilated in the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) data assimilation system (DAS). The two sets of resulting analyses were compared with that from a control experiment, only constrained by the reference dataset, and independent, unassimilated observations. Comparisons with independent observations show that both datasets improve the stratospheric ozone distribution. The changes inferred by the limb-based observations are more localized and, in places, more important than those implied by the nadir profiles, albeit they have a much lower number of observations. A small degradation (up to 0.25 mg kg-1 for GOME-2 and 0.5 mg kg-1 for MIPAS in the mass mixing ratio) is found in the tropics between 20 and 30 hPa. In the lowermost troposphere below its vertical coverage, the limb data are found to be able to modify the ozone distribution with changes as large as 60 %. Comparisons of the ozone analyses with sonde data show that at those levels the assimilation of GOME-2 leads to about 1 Dobson Unit (DU) smaller root mean square error (RMSE) than that of MIPAS. However, the assimilation of MIPAS can still improve the quality of the ozone analyses and - with a reduction in the RMSE of up to about 2 DU - outperform the control experiment thanks to its synergistic assimilation with total-column ozone data within the DAS. High vertical resolution ozone profile observations are essential to accurately monitor and forecast ozone concentrations in a DAS

  4. Global inventory of nitrogen oxide emissions constrained by space-based observations of NO2 columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Randall V.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Chance, Kelly; Kurosu, Thomas P.; Palmer, Paul I.; Evans, Mathew J.

    2003-09-01

    We use tropospheric NO2 columns from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) satellite instrument to derive top-down constraints on emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx ≡ NO + NO2), and combine these with a priori information from a bottom-up emission inventory (with error weighting) to achieve an optimized a posteriori estimate of the global distribution of surface NOx emissions. Our GOME NO2 retrieval improves on previous work by accounting for scattering and absorption of radiation by aerosols; the effect on the air mass factor (AMF) ranges from +10 to -40% depending on the region. Our AMF also includes local information on relative vertical profiles (shape factors) of NO2 from a global 3-D chemical transport model (GEOS-CHEM); assumption of a globally uniform shape factor, as in most previous retrievals, would introduce regional biases of up to 40% over industrial regions and a factor of 2 over remote regions. We derive a top-down NOx emission inventory from the GOME data by using the local GEOS-CHEM relationship between NO2 columns and NOx emissions. The resulting NOx emissions for industrial regions are aseasonal, despite large seasonal variation in NO2 columns, providing confidence in the method. Top-down errors in monthly NOx emissions are comparable with bottom-up errors over source regions. Annual global a posteriori errors are half of a priori errors. Our global a posteriori estimate for annual land surface NOx emissions (37.7 Tg N yr-1) agrees closely with the GEIA-based a priori (36.4) and with the EDGAR 3.0 bottom-up inventory (36.6), but there are significant regional differences. A posteriori NOx emissions are higher by 50-100% in the Po Valley, Tehran, and Riyadh urban areas, and by 25-35% in Japan and South Africa. Biomass burning emissions from India, central Africa, and Brazil are lower by up to 50%; soil NOx emissions are appreciably higher in the western United States, the Sahel, and southern Europe.

  5. New Developments in the SCIAMACHY Level 2 Ground Processor Towards Version 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meringer, Markus; Noël, Stefan; Lichtenberg, Günter; Lerot, Christophe; Theys, Nicolas; Fehr, Thorsten; Dehn, Angelika; Liebing, Patricia; Gretschany, Sergei

    2016-07-01

    SCIAMACHY (SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric ChartographY) aboard ESA's environmental satellite ENVISAT observed the Earth's atmosphere in limb, nadir, and solar/lunar occultation geometries covering the UV-Visible to NIR spectral range. It is a joint project of Germany, the Netherlands and Belgium and was launched in February 2002. SCIAMACHY doubled its originally planned in-orbit lifetime of five years before the communication to ENVISAT was severed in April 2012, and the mission entered its post-operational phase. In order to preserve the best quality of the outstanding data recorded by SCIAMACHY, data processors are still being updated. This presentation will highlight three new developments that are currently being incorporated into the forthcoming version 7 of ESA's operational level 2 processor: 1. Tropospheric BrO, a new retrieval based on the scientific algorithm of (Theys et al., 2011). This algorithm had originally been developed for the GOME-2 sensor and was later adapted for SCIAMACHY. The main principle of the new algorithm is to split BrO total columns, which are already an operational product, into stratospheric VCD_{strat} and tropospheric VCD_{trop} fractions. BrO VCD_{strat} is determined from a climatological approach, driven by SCIAMACHY O_3 and NO_2 observations. Tropospheric vertical column densities are then determined as difference VCD_{trop}=VCD_{total}-VCD_{strat}. 2. Improved cloud flagging using limb measurements (Liebing, 2015). Limb cloud flags are already part of the SCIAMACHY L2 product. They are currently calculated employing the scientific algorithm developed by (Eichmann et al., 2015). Clouds are categorized into four types: water, ice, polar stratospheric and noctilucent clouds. High atmospheric aerosol loadings, however, often lead to spurious cloud flags, when aerosols had been misidentified as clouds. The new algorithm will better discriminate between aerosol and clouds. It will also have a higher

  6. Measurements of Tropospheric NO2 in Romania Using a Zenith-Sky Mobile DOAS System and Comparisons with Satellite Observations

    PubMed Central

    Constantin, Daniel-Eduard; Merlaud, Alexis; Van Roozendael, Michel; Voiculescu, Mirela; Fayt, Caroline; Hendrick, François; Pinardi, Gaia; Georgescu, Lucian

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a new method for retrieving tropospheric NO2 Vertical Column Density (VCD) from zenith-sky Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) measurements using mobile observations. This method was used during three days in the summer of 2011 in Romania, being to our knowledge the first mobile DOAS measurements peformed in this country. The measurements were carried out over large and different areas using a mobile DOAS system installed in a car. We present here a step-by-step retrieval of tropospheric VCD using complementary observations from ground and space which take into account the stratospheric contribution, which is a step forward compared to other similar studies. The detailed error budget indicates that the typical uncertainty on the retrieved NO2tropospheric VCD is less than 25%. The resulting ground-based data set is compared to satellite measurements from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2). For instance, on 18 July 2011, in an industrial area located at 47.03°N, 22.45°E, GOME-2 observes a tropospheric VCD value of (3.4 ± 1.9) × 1015 molec./cm2, while average mobile measurements in the same area give a value of (3.4 ± 0.7) × 1015 molec./cm2. On 22 August 2011, around Ploiesti city (44.99°N, 26.1°E), the tropospheric VCD observed by satellites is (3.3 ± 1.9) × 1015 molec./cm2 (GOME-2) and (3.2 ± 3.2) × 1015 molec./cm2 (OMI), while average mobile measurements give (3.8 ± 0.8) × 1015 molec./cm2. Average ground measurements over “clean areas”, on 18 July 2011, give (2.5 ± 0.6) × 1015 molec./cm2 while the satellite observes a value of (1.8 ± 1.3) × 1015 molec./cm2. PMID:23519349

  7. The Impact Rate on Solar System Satellites During the Late Heavy Bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dones, Henry C. Luke; Levison, H. F.

    2012-10-01

    Nimmo and Korycansky (2012; henceforth NK12) found that if the outer Solar System underwent a Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB) in the Nice model, the mass striking the icy satellites at speeds up to tens of km/s would have vaporized so much ice that moons such as Mimas, Enceladus, and Miranda would have been devolatilized. NK12's possible explanations of this apparent discrepancy with observations include (1) the mass influx was a factor of 10 less than that in the Nice model; (2) the mass distribution of the impactors was top-heavy, so that luck might have saved some of the moons from suffering large, vapor-removing impacts; or (3) the inner moons formed after the LHB. NK12 calculated the mass influx onto the satellites from the lunar impact rate estimated by Gomes et al. (2005) and scaling factors calculated by Zahnle et al. (1998, 2003; also see Barr and Canup 2010). Production of vapor in hypervelocity impacts was calculated from Kraus et al. (2011). We are calculating impact rates onto the giant planets and their moons in the context of the "Nice II" model (Levison et al. 2011). We find that NK12's assumed influx is an overestimate, by an amount we are quantifying. We will discuss implications for the origin of icy satellites. We thank the NASA Lunar Science Institute (http://lunarscience.nasa.gov/) for support. Barr, A.C., Canup, R.M., Nature Geoscience 3, 164-167 (2010). Gomes, R., Levison, H.F., Tsiganis, K., Morbidelli, A., Nature 435, 466-469 (2005). Kraus, R.G., Senft, L.E., Stewart, S.T., Icarus 214, 724-738 (2011). Levison, H.F., Morbidelli, A., Tsiganis, K., Nesvorný, D., Gomes, R., Astron. J. 142, article id. 152 (2011). Nimmo, F., Korycansky, D.G., Icarus 219, 508-510 (2012). Zahnle, K., Dones, L., Levison, H.F., Icarus 136, 202-222 (1998). Zahnle, K., Schenk, P., Levison, H.F., Dones, L., Icarus 163, 263-289 (2003).

  8. Overview of Global Monitoring of Terrestrial Chlorophyll Fluorescence from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guanter, Luis; Zhang, Yongguang; Kohler, Philipp; Walther, Sophia; Frankenberg, Christian; Joiner, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Despite the critical importance of photosynthesis for the Earth system, understanding how it is influenced by factors such as climate variability, disturbance history, and water or nutrient availability remains a challenge because of the complex interactions and the lack of GPP measurements at various temporal and spatial scales. Space observations of the sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) electromagnetic signal emitted by plants in the 650-850nm spectral range hold the promise of providing a new view of vegetation photosynthesis on a global basis. Global retrievals of SIF from space have recently been achieved from a number of spaceborne spectrometers originally intended for atmospheric research. Despite not having been designed for land applications, such instruments have turned out to provide the necessary spectral and radiometric sensitivity for SIF retrieval from space. The first global measurements of SIF were achieved in 2011 from spectra acquired by the Japanese GOSAT mission launched in 2009. The retrieval takes advantage of the high spectral resolution provided by GOSATs Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) which allows the evaluation of the in-filling of solar Fraunhofer lines by SIF. Unfortunately, GOSAT only provides a sparse spatial sampling with individual soundings separated by several hundred kilometers. Complementary, the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) instruments onboard MetOp-A and MetOp-B enable SIF retrievals since 2007 with a continuous and global spatial coverage. GOME-2 measures in the red and near-infrared (NIR) spectral regions with a spectral resolution of 0.5 nm and a pixel size of up to 40x40 km2. Most recently, another global and spatially continuous data set of SIF retrievals at 740 nm spanning the 2003-2012 time frame has been produced from ENVISATSCIAMACHY. This observational scenario has been completed by the first fluorescence data from the NASA-JPL OCO-2 mission (launched in July 2014) and the upcoming

  9. Retrieval Studies with LIDORT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor); Spurr, Robert J. D.; Chance, K. V.

    2003-01-01

    This short program of LIDORT-based research in atmospheric trace gas retrieval was conducted over the 1 year period 01 July 2002 to 30 June 2003. After consultation with the NASA reporting officer, the first of the two original proposal activities (development of a direct-fitting total O3 column retrieval algorithm with operational capability for GOME data) was replaced by other tasks. The three activities addressed were: (1) Sensitivity studies for column and profile retrieval of NO2 distributions from a new generation of multi-axis ground-based spectrometers; (2) use of the LIDORT-RRS model to determine the effect of inelastic rotational Raman scattering at SBUV wavelengths; (3) an examination of ozone profile weighting functions in the presence of optically thick tropospheric clouds.

  10. Undersampling Correction for Array Detector-Based Satellite Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chance, Kelly; Kurosu, Thomas P.; Sioris, Christopher E.

    2004-01-01

    Array detector-based instruments are now fundamental to measurements of ozone and other atmospheric trace gases from space in the ultraviolet, visible, and infrared. The present generation of such instruments suffers, to a greater or lesser degree, from undersampling of the spectra, leading to difficulties in the analysis of atmospheric radiances. We provide extended analysis of the undersampling suffered by modem satellite spectrometers, which include Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME), Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY), Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), and Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS). The analysis includes basic undersampling, the effects of binning into separate detector pixels, and the application of high-resolution Fraunhofer spectral data to correct for undersampling in many useful cases.