Sample records for abatement engaging artisanal

  1. Engagement in co-management of marine benthic resources influences environmental perceptions of artisanal fishers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    STEFAN G ELCICH

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY The perceptions of resource users towards any conservation policy can be a major determinant of its success. While co-management policy can enhance the management of fisheries, to date there have been few reports concerning how engagement in co-management regimes may affect fishers' perceptions. This paper assesses the determinants of fishers' environmental perceptions within a co- management regime in Chile.

  2. Noise Abatement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    SMART, Sound Modification and Regulated Temperature compound, is a liquid plastic mixture with exceptional energy and sound absorbing qualities. It is derived from a very elastic plastic which was an effective noise abatement material in the Apollo Guidance System. Discovered by a NASA employee, it is marketed by Environmental Health Systems, Inc. (EHS). The product has been successfully employed by a diaper company with noisy dryers and a sugar company with noisy blowers. The company also manufactures an audiometric test booth and acoustical office partitions.

  3. Exercise Session 2 Alessandro Abate

    E-print Network

    Abate, Alessandro

    sc4026 Exercise Session 2 Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Jacopo Antonello j ­ Exercise Session 2 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, J. Antonello Review of Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors Computation with the aid of MATLAB. ­ Ac.Yr. 2012/13, 1e Sem. Q1 ­ Exercise Session 2 ­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate, J. Antonello

  4. Exercise Session 2 Alessandro Abate

    E-print Network

    Abate, Alessandro

    sc4026 Exercise Session 2 Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Pawel Stano p ­ Exercise Session 2 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, P. Stano Review of Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors Computation Find with the aid of MATLAB. ­ Ac.Yr. 2011/12, 1e Sem. Q1 ­ Exercise Session 2 ­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate, P. Stano

  5. Exercise Session 2 Alessandro Abate

    E-print Network

    Abate, Alessandro

    sc4026 Exercise Session 2 Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Aleksandar Haber a ­ Exercise Session 2 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, A. Haber Properties of the matrix exponential Show, by using/11, 1e Sem. Q1 ­ Exercise Session 2 ­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate, A. Haber Review of Eigenvalues

  6. STORMWATER POLLUTION ABATEMENT TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This publication presents information regarding best management practices (BMP's) and pollution abatement technologies that can provide treatment of urban stormwater runoff. ncluded in the text are a general approach which considers small storm hydrology, and watershed practices ...

  7. Exercise Session 3 Alessandro Abate

    E-print Network

    Abate, Alessandro

    sc4026 Exercise Session 3 Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Solomon Zegeye s ­ Exercise Session 3­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, S.K. Zegeye Lyapunov Stability Check Consider the continuous anything about the stability of the system. ­ Ac.Yr. 2009/10, 1e Sem. Q1 ­ Exercise Session 3­ sc4026 1 #12

  8. Exercise Session 5 Alessandro Abate

    E-print Network

    Abate, Alessandro

    sc4026 Exercise Session 5 Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Aleksandar Haber a.haber@tudelft.nl Delft Center for Systems and Control, TU Delft October 8, 2009 ­ Ac.Yr. 2009/10, 1e Sem. Q1 ­ Exercise ­ Exercise Session 5 ­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate, A. Haber Linear Quadratic Regulator, in Theory Consider

  9. Exercise Session 2 Alessandro Abate

    E-print Network

    Abate, Alessandro

    sc4026 Exercise Session 2 Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Aleksandar Haber a ­ Exercise Session 2­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, A. Haber Basic review of Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors Computation 5 Do similarly with the aid of MATLAB. ­ Ac.Yr. 2009/10, 1e Sem. Q1 ­ Exercise Session 2­ sc4026 1

  10. Highway noise abatement techniques

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gary L. Latshaw

    1973-01-01

    The ability of alternate highway designs, landscaping procedures, berms, and sound barriers to reduce the noise intrusion from highway traffic will be discussed. The effects of meteorology on the propagation of sound relative to these abatement techniques will also be presented. Traffic controls on speed and acceleration determine the noise emission levels from the traffic. The potential of these controls

  11. ARTISAN/FARMSTEAD CHEESEMAKER FOOD SAFETY WORKSHOP

    E-print Network

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    ARTISAN/FARMSTEAD CHEESEMAKER FOOD SAFETY WORKSHOP WHEN: June 06 , 2014 8:00 AM ­ 6:00 PM WHERE looking to protect consumers and their businesses through good food safety practices · Extension to understand cheesemaking food safety from these specialty producers Instructor : Dennis D'Amico, Assistant

  12. Marginal Abatement Cost Analysis Tool

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Non-CO2 Marginal Abatement Cost Analysis Tool is an extensive bottom-up engineering-economic spreadsheet model capturing the relevant cost and performance data on sectors emitting non-CO2 GHGs. The tool has 24 regions and 7 sectors and produces marginal abatement cost curves...

  13. Bonus Point Exercise 2 Alessandro Abate

    E-print Network

    Abate, Alessandro

    sc4026 Bonus Point Exercise 2 Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Aleksandar Haber a ­ Exercise Session 2 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, A. Haber Solution to state space models Find the output response Sem. Q1 ­ Exercise Session 2 ­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate, A. Haber Equilibria and Phase Portrait Determine

  14. Exercise Session 5 Alessandro Abate

    E-print Network

    Abate, Alessandro

    sc4026 Exercise Session 5 Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Pawel Stano p.stano@tudelft.nl Delft Center for Systems and Control, TU Delft October 7, 2010 ­ Ac.Yr. 2010/11, 1e Sem. Q1 ­ Exercise Session, s2 = -1, s3 = -1 + j, s4 = -1 - j. ­ Ac.Yr. 2010/11, 1e Sem. Q1 ­ Exercise Session 5 ­ sc4026 1 #12

  15. Exercise Session 5 Alessandro Abate

    E-print Network

    Abate, Alessandro

    sc4026 Exercise Session 5 Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Aleksandar Haber a.haber@tudelft.nl Delft Center for Systems and Control, TU Delft October 13, 2011 ­ Ac.Yr. 2011/12, 1e Sem. Q1 ­ Exercise, s2 = -1, s3 = -1 + j, s4 = -1 - j. ­ Ac.Yr. 2011/12, 1e Sem. Q1 ­ Exercise Session 5 ­ sc4026 1 #12

  16. Phakic intraocular lenses outcomes and complications: Artisan vs Visian ICL

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M A Hassaballa; T A Macky

    2011-01-01

    PurposeTo evaluate the safety and visual outcomes of two phakic intraocular lenses (IOLs) for correction of high myopia: Artisan and Visian ICL (ICL).Patients and methodsIn this retrospective study, a phakic IOL was implanted in 68 highly myopic eyes of 34 patients; 42 eyes received an Artisan IOL, and 26 eyes received ICL IOL.ResultsAll patients completed a 1-year follow-up. The mean

  17. Asbestos Abatement: Start to Finish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makruski, Edward D.

    1984-01-01

    An EPA survey of the largest school districts in the nation revealed that over 50 percent have not inspected for asbestos and two-thirds have failed to notify parents adequately. Seven steps are therefore provided for successful asbestos abatement, in anticipation of tougher regulations now under consideration. (TE)

  18. An interview-based approach to assess marine mammal and sea turtle captures in artisanal fisheries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. E. Moore; T. M. Cox; R. L. Lewison; A. J. Read; R. Bjorkland; S. L. McDonald; L. B. Crowder; E. Aruna; I. Ayissi; P. Espeut; C. Joynson-Hicks; N. Pilcher; C. N. S. Poonian; B. Solarin; J. Kiszka

    2010-01-01

    Recent case studies have highlighted high bycatch mortality of sea turtles and marine mammals in artisanal fisheries, but in most countries there are few data on artisanal fishing effort, catch, or bycatch. With artisanal fisheries comprising >95% of the world’s fishermen, this knowledge gap presents a major challenge to threatened species conservation and sustainable fisheries initiatives. We report on results

  19. Energy Modeling for the Artisan Food Center

    SciTech Connect

    Goel, Supriya

    2013-05-01

    The Artisan Food Center is a 6912 sq.ft food processing plant located in Dayton, Washington. PNNL was contacted by Strecker Engineering to assist with the building’s energy analysis as a part of the project’s U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) submittal requirements. The project is aiming for LEED Silver certification, one of the prerequisites to which is a whole building energy model to demonstrate compliance with American Society of Heating Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) 90.1 2007 Appendix G, Performance Rating Method. The building incorporates a number of energy efficiency measures as part of its design and the energy analysis aimed at providing Strecker Engineering with the know-how of developing an energy model for the project as well as an estimate of energy savings of the proposed design over the baseline design, which could be used to document points in the LEED documentation. This report documents the ASHRAE 90.1 2007 baseline model design, the proposed model design, the modeling assumptions and procedures as well as the energy savings results in order to inform the Strecker Engineering team on a possible whole building energy model.

  20. Start-up and operating costs for artisan cheese companies.

    PubMed

    Bouma, Andrea; Durham, Catherine A; Meunier-Goddik, Lisbeth

    2014-01-01

    Lack of valid economic data for artisan cheese making is a serious impediment to developing a realistic business plan and obtaining financing. The objective of this study was to determine approximate start-up and operating costs for an artisan cheese company. In addition, values are provided for the required size of processing and aging facilities associated with specific production volumes. Following in-depth interviews with existing artisan cheese makers, an economic model was developed to predict costs based on input variables such as production volume, production frequency, cheese types, milk types and cost, labor expenses, and financing. Estimated values for start-up cost for processing and aging facility ranged from $267,248 to $623,874 for annual production volumes of 3,402 kg (7,500 lb) and 27,216 kg (60,000 lb), respectively. First-year production costs ranged from $65,245 to $620,094 for the above-mentioned production volumes. It is likely that high start-up and operating costs remain a significant entry barrier for artisan cheese entrepreneurs. PMID:24746129

  1. Between Tradition and Tourism: Educational Strategies of a Zapotec Artisan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davenport, Melanie G.

    2007-01-01

    This case study examines the teaching and learning strategies employed by a Zapotec weaver in Oaxaca, Mexico, to draw attention to the personal agency of indigenous artisans participating in the tourist economy, and to examine ways in which non-formal and informal education in skills and understandings related to art can function in the lives of…

  2. Whale shark landings in Indonesian artisanal shark and ray fisheries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William T. White; Rachel D. Cavanagh

    2007-01-01

    Comprehensive surveys of the chondrichthyan catches landed at various localities in eastern Indonesia were conducted between April 2001 and October 2005 to obtain detailed catch composition data from local, artisanal fisheries. A total of 144 chondrichthyan species representing 36 families were identified in this study, including the whale shark Rhincodon typus. Of the 270 individual surveys conducted, only one specimen

  3. 2014 UNBC Artisans of the North Fair Dear Vendor

    E-print Network

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    in person to the Northern Sports Centre (NSC) Front Desk along with items that you are submitting mail your registration form and items to: Northern Sports Centre (Attn: Artisans of the North Fair a credit card, Interact Card, by cheque or cash. Pick-ups Once you have received notification regarding

  4. Exercise Session 5 (with solutions) Alessandro Abate

    E-print Network

    Abate, Alessandro

    sc4026 Exercise Session 5 (with solutions) Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Aleksandar Haber a.haber Consider a process in the state-space form with A = 0.5 1 1 0 , B = 0.1 0.5 , C = 1 0 , D = 0. Address

  5. MPM : a modular package manager Pietro Abate

    E-print Network

    Zacchiroli, Stefano - Laboratoire Preuves, Programmes et Systèmes, Université Paris 7

    on a target system. So-called package managers are used to per- form installation, upgrade and removalMPM : a modular package manager Pietro Abate abate@pps.jussieu.fr Roberto Di Cosmo roberto-called package managers for the installation and removal of pack- ages on target machines. State

  6. AHERA CLEARANCE AT TWENTY ABATEMENT SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was conducted during the summer of 1988 to document Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA) clearance air-sampling practices and clearance concentrations of airborne asbestos at 20 asbestos-abatement sites in New Jersey. Each abatement took place in a school buildi...

  7. AHERA CLEARANCE AT TWENTY ABATEMENT SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was conducted during the summer of 1988 to document Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA) clearance air sampling practices and clearance concentrations of airborne asbestos at 20 asbestos-abatement sites in New Jersey. ach abatement took place in a school buildin...

  8. 23 CFR 772.11 - Noise abatement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...PROCEDURES FOR ABATEMENT OF HIGHWAY TRAFFIC NOISE AND CONSTRUCTION NOISE...In determining and abating traffic noise impacts, primary...necessary only where frequent human use occurs and a lowered noise...activities to be affected by the traffic noise, or where the...

  9. 23 CFR 772.11 - Noise abatement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...PROCEDURES FOR ABATEMENT OF HIGHWAY TRAFFIC NOISE AND CONSTRUCTION NOISE...In determining and abating traffic noise impacts, primary...necessary only where frequent human use occurs and a lowered noise...activities to be affected by the traffic noise, or where the...

  10. 10 CFR 851.22 - Hazard prevention and abatement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false Hazard prevention and abatement. 851.22...Requirements § 851.22 Hazard prevention and abatement. (a...establish and implement a hazard prevention and abatement process to...abatement actions according to the risk to workers; (ii)...

  11. 10 CFR 851.22 - Hazard prevention and abatement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 false Hazard prevention and abatement. 851.22...Requirements § 851.22 Hazard prevention and abatement. (a...establish and implement a hazard prevention and abatement process to...abatement actions according to the risk to workers; (ii)...

  12. A methodological toolkit for field assessments of artisanally mined alluvial diamond deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chirico, Peter G.; Malpeli, Katherine C.

    2014-01-01

    This toolkit provides a standardized checklist of critical issues relevant to artisanal mining-related field research. An integrated sociophysical geographic approach to collecting data at artisanal mine sites is outlined. The implementation and results of a multistakeholder approach to data collection, carried out in the assessment of Guinea’s artisanally mined diamond deposits, also are summarized. This toolkit, based on recent and successful field campaigns in West Africa, has been developed as a reference document to assist other government agencies or organizations in collecting the data necessary for artisanal diamond mining or similar natural resource assessments.

  13. Artisanal fishers’ ethnobotany: from plant diversity use to agrobiodiversity management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nivaldo Peroni; Alpina Begossi; Natalia Hanazaki

    2008-01-01

    Artisanal fishers interact with plants in many ways, and with different intensities. In spite of being characterized by fisheries,\\u000a Caiçaras use plants with varied degrees of management, since the less intensive management actions, extraction of forest products,\\u000a until intensively management actions through the cultivation of the agrobiodiversity. This study presents the results of different\\u000a research projects and includes the North

  14. Interaction of pollution abatement with world dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. L.

    1973-01-01

    The world dynamics model of Jay W. Forrester was modified to account for pollution abatement. In the modified model, it is assumed that as pollution increases, efforts are made to control pollution. There is a competition between food supply, material standard of living, and pollution abatement for capital, and time is required for diversion of capital toward pollution abatement. Inclusion of pollution abatement in the model drastically alters the response of the world system for the case in which depletion of natural resources is not considered. Instead of undergoing a pollution catastrophe, all system levels move more or less smoothly toward an equilibrium. A FORTRAN program listing of the modified world dynamics model is included.

  15. Size distributions and sex ratios of sharks caught by Oman's artisanal fishery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. C. Henderson; J. L. McIlwain; H. S. Al-Oufi; S. Al-Sheile; N. Al-Abri

    2009-01-01

    Oman's fishery resources are exploited by artisanal and industrial fisheries, but the former accounts for almost 90% of landings. Within the artisanal fishery, sharks have traditionally been harvested for their flesh, but the development of a valuable export market for shark fin has led to increased utilisation of this resource, and anecdotal information suggests that shark abundance has decreased in

  16. 47 CFR 22.878 - Obligation to abate unacceptable interference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. 22.878 Section 22.878 Telecommunication... Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. This section applies only...contributes to causing unacceptable interference to a non-cellular part 90...

  17. 47 CFR 22.971 - Obligation to abate unacceptable interference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. 22.971 Section 22.971 Telecommunication... Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. (a) Strict Responsibility...contributes to causing unacceptable interference to a non-cellular part 90 of...

  18. 47 CFR 22.878 - Obligation to abate unacceptable interference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. 22.878 Section 22.878 Telecommunication... Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. This section applies only...contributes to causing unacceptable interference to a non-cellular part 90...

  19. 47 CFR 22.878 - Obligation to abate unacceptable interference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. 22.878 Section 22.878 Telecommunication... Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. This section applies only...contributes to causing unacceptable interference to a non-cellular part 90...

  20. 47 CFR 22.971 - Obligation to abate unacceptable interference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. 22.971 Section 22.971 Telecommunication... Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. (a) Strict Responsibility...contributes to causing unacceptable interference to a non-cellular part 90 of...

  1. 47 CFR 22.971 - Obligation to abate unacceptable interference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. 22.971 Section 22.971 Telecommunication... Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. (a) Strict Responsibility...contributes to causing unacceptable interference to a non-cellular part 90 of...

  2. 47 CFR 22.878 - Obligation to abate unacceptable interference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. 22.878 Section 22.878 Telecommunication... Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. This section applies only...contributes to causing unacceptable interference to a non-cellular part 90...

  3. 47 CFR 22.971 - Obligation to abate unacceptable interference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. 22.971 Section 22.971 Telecommunication... Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. (a) Strict Responsibility...contributes to causing unacceptable interference to a non-cellular part 90 of...

  4. 47 CFR 22.971 - Obligation to abate unacceptable interference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. 22.971 Section 22.971 Telecommunication... Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. (a) Strict Responsibility...contributes to causing unacceptable interference to a non-cellular part 90 of...

  5. 47 CFR 22.878 - Obligation to abate unacceptable interference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. 22.878 Section 22.878 Telecommunication... Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. This section applies only...contributes to causing unacceptable interference to a non-cellular part 90...

  6. "A little information excites us." Consumer sensory experience of Vermont artisan cheese as active practice.

    PubMed

    Lahne, Jacob; Trubek, Amy B

    2014-07-01

    This research is concerned with explaining consumer preference for Vermont artisan cheese and the relationship between that preference and sensory experience. Artisan cheesemaking is increasingly an important part of Vermont's dairy sector, and this tracks a growing trend of artisan agricultural practice in the United States. In popular discourse and academic research into products like artisan cheese, consumers explain their preferences in terms of intrinsic sensory and extrinsic - supposedly nonsensory - food qualities. In laboratory sensory studies, however, the relationship between preference, intrinsic, and extrinsic qualities changes or disappears. In contrast, this study explains this relationship by adopting a social theory of sensory perception as a practice in everyday life. This theory is applied to a series of focus group interviews with Vermont artisan cheese consumers about their everyday perceptions. Based on the data, a conceptual framework for the sensory perception of Vermont artisan cheese is suggested: consumers combine information about producer practice, social context, and the materiality of the product through an active, learned practice of sensory perception. Particular qualities that drive consumer sensory experience and preference are identified from the interview data. Many of these qualities are difficult to categorize as entirely intrinsic or extrinsic, highlighting the need for developing new approaches of sensory evaluation in order to fully capture everyday consumer sensory perception. Thus, this research demonstrates that social theory provides new and valuable insights into consumer sensory preference for Vermont artisan cheese. PMID:24681405

  7. Collaborative engagement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert L. Wade; Joseph M. Reames

    2004-01-01

    A need exists for United States military forces to perform collaborative engagement operations between unmanned systems. This capability has the potential to contribute significant tactical synergy to the Joint Force operating in the battlespace of the future. Collaborative engagements potentially offer force conservation, perform timely acquisition and dissemination of essential combat information, and can eliminate high value and time critical

  8. 23 CFR 772.13 - Analysis of noise abatement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...PROCEDURES FOR ABATEMENT OF HIGHWAY TRAFFIC NOISE AND CONSTRUCTION NOISE...noise abatement. (a) When traffic noise impacts are identified...decision-making. (b) In abating traffic noise impacts, a highway...exterior areas where frequent human use occurs. (c) If...

  9. 23 CFR 772.13 - Analysis of noise abatement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...PROCEDURES FOR ABATEMENT OF HIGHWAY TRAFFIC NOISE AND CONSTRUCTION NOISE...noise abatement. (a) When traffic noise impacts are identified...decision-making. (b) In abating traffic noise impacts, a highway...exterior areas where frequent human use occurs. (c) If...

  10. 23 CFR 772.13 - Analysis of noise abatement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...PROCEDURES FOR ABATEMENT OF HIGHWAY TRAFFIC NOISE AND CONSTRUCTION NOISE...noise abatement. (a) When traffic noise impacts are identified...decision-making. (b) In abating traffic noise impacts, a highway...exterior areas where frequent human use occurs. (c) If...

  11. Death, piety, and social engagement in the life of the seventeenth century London artisan, Nehemiah Wallington 

    E-print Network

    Oswald, Robert Meredith Trey

    2012-06-26

    Previous studies of the seven extant manuscripts of the seventeenth century Londoner, Nehemiah Wallington, have focused on the psychological effects of Puritan theology as the cause for his deep spiritual crisis and for ...

  12. The greenhouse effect: Damages, costs and abatement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert U. Ayres; Jörg Walter

    1991-01-01

    The buildup of so-called “greenhouse gases” in the atmosphere — CO2 in particular-appears to be having an adverse impact on the global climate. This paper briefly reviews current expectations with regard to physical and biological effects, their potential costs to society, and likely costs of abatement. For a “worst case” scenario it is impossible to assess, in economic terms, the

  13. ABATEMENT OF DEPOSITION AND SCOUR IN SEWERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Feasible methods are identified for reducing first-flush pollution in new and existing storm and combined sewer systems. A mathematical model is described which was developed to simulate the behavior of solids in pipelines and to evaluate the costs of first-flush abatement altern...

  14. Carbon Abatement Costs and Climate Change Finance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William R. Cline

    This study provides alternative estimates of the costs of greenhouse gas abatement through 2050 that would be necessary to limit CO2 atmospheric concentrations to approximately 450 parts per million and limiting warming to 2°C. Specific estimates are provided for 25 major economies (with the European Union as a single economy). Business as usual baselines are first developed, based on US

  15. 29 CFR 4208.3 - Abatement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Effects of abatement. If the plan sponsor determines that the employer...due and paid after the end of the plan year in which the conditions...overpaid withdrawal liability) shall be added if the plan sponsor does not issue a...

  16. Lead Abatement and Prevention of Developmental Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiang, Vico

    1999-01-01

    Reviews the literature on "safe" levels of lead in children and their association with developmental disabilities. It concludes that lead pollution in Australia, especially the Lake Macquarie area of New South Wales, continues to be a problem, that the current standard "safe" level should be reexamined, and that a lead-abatement strategy is…

  17. the Engaged Outreach and Engagement

    E-print Network

    workplace practice and economic strength ... Strengthen commitment to democracy/ diversity ... Strengthen Educated Community/World Values Civic Engagement Workplace Preparation Global Knowledge ... Improve: Grounded in Systems Theory and Change Models Diverse: Capitalizes on the Strengths of Diversity Contextual

  18. Proper asbestos abatement techniques and respirator selection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gerald J. Karches; James C. Faas

    1987-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) have recently recommended the use of self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or air-line respirators for worker protection from occupational exposure to airborne asbestos (EPA-560-OPTS-86–001). In light of the low level of worker exposure to airborne asbestos when proper asbestos abatement techniques are implemented, we argue that

  19. Abating exhaust noises in jet engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, I. R. (inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A noise abating improvement for jet engines including turbojets, turbofans, turboprops, ramjets, scramjets, and hybrid jets is introduced. A provision is made for an apparatus in the primary and/or secondary flow streams of the engines; the apparatus imparts to the exhaust gases a component rotation or swirl about the engine's longitudinal axis. The rotary component in the exhaust gases causes a substantial suppression of sound energy build up normally produced by an axial flow exhaust system.

  20. Engaging Faculty in Community Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Glynis A.

    2012-01-01

    Researchers endorse the integration of community engagement (CE) into higher education as a way to improve the relevance of education, address community needs, and forge university-community partnerships (Zlotkowski, 1996). CE can help create stronger ties between universities and their communities and provide students with experiential learning…

  1. Health assessment of artisanal gold miners in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Bose-O'Reilly, Stephan; Drasch, Gustav; Beinhoff, Christian; Tesha, Aloyce; Drasch, Katalin; Roider, Gabriele; Taylor, Helen; Appleton, Don; Siebert, Uwe

    2010-01-15

    In 2003 UNIDO (United Nations Industrial Development Organization) conducted an environmental and health assessment in a small-scale mining area in Tanzania. BGS (British Geological Survey) performed the environmental assessment. The Institute of Forensic Medicine - University of Munich performed the health assessment. The results of the medical, neurological and neuro-psychological examination of 180 participants from the affected area of Rwamagasa and 31 controls were analyzed. Urine, blood and hair samples were analyzed to detect the level of mercury body burden. Mercury concentrations in the bio-monitors urine, blood and hair were statistically significantly higher in the exposed population from Rwamagasa compared to the control group from Katoro. Only amalgam burners showed mercury levels above the toxicological threshold limits. A speciation of mercury in hair indicated that mainly elemental mercury vapor contributed to the high body burden of the artisanal miners. 104 amalgam-burners, the most exposed population group, were examined. 25 of these workers were found to be intoxicated. Small-scale mining is a serious health hazard for amalgam burners. Reduction of the exposure is essential to prevent further damage. PMID:19945738

  2. 5Year Prospective Follow-Up of Artisan Phakic Intraocular Lenses for the Correction of Myopia, Hyperopia and Astigmatism

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Qasim Qasem; Caitriona Kirwan; Michael O’Keefe

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To determine the efficacy and safety of Artisan phakic intraocular lenses (IOLs) for refractive error correction. Methods: A prospective study was conducted on patients undergoing Artisan phakic IOL implantation for myopia, hyperopia or astigmatism from 2002 to 2008. Visual acuity, manifest refractive spherical equivalent (MRSE), endothelial cell counts and higher order aberrations were recorded pre- and postoperatively. Results: One

  3. Implantation of iris-claw Artisan intraocular lens for aphakia in Fuchs’ heterochromic iridocyclitis

    PubMed Central

    Kheirkhah, Ahmad; Nikdel, Mojgan; Ghadimi, Hadi

    2014-01-01

    Implantation of iris-claw Artisan intraocular lens (IOL) is a surgical option for correction of aphakia; however, these IOLs have not been used in eyes with uveitis including Fuchs’ heterochromic iridocyclitis (FHI) due to possible risk of severe postoperative intraocular inflammation. In the case reported here, we secondarily implanted an Artisan IOL in a 28-year-old man with FHI who had aphakia with no capsular support due to a previous complicated cataract surgery. Enclavation was easily performed and no intraoperative complication was noted. Postoperative course was uneventful with no significant anterior chamber inflammation during 12 months of follow-up. Although there were few deposits on the IOL surface, the patient achieved a best-corrected visual acuity of 20/20 without developing glaucoma or other complications. Therefore, Artisan IOL may be considered for correction of aphakia in patients with FHI. However, studies on large number of patients are required to evaluate safety of the procedure. PMID:23571252

  4. Design of a Plasma Abatement System for Perfluoronated Compounds

    E-print Network

    Butler, Matthew

    2011-08-08

    the same amount of heat transfer. A liquid cooling system design had a cost of only $150/yr. A C4F8 abatement experiment was run on the liquid cooling design. The abatement process resulted in a destruction removal efficiency (DRE) of C4F8 of 97.5 percent...

  5. ASBESTOS CONCENTRATIONS TWO YEARS AFTER ABATEMENT IN SEVENTEEN SCHOOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Airborne asbestos concentrations were measured at 17 schools that underwent an asbestos abatement 2 years before in 1988. These 17 schools, which involved 20 abatement sites, were part of a study conducted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the New Jersey Depar...

  6. ASBESTOS CONCENTRATIONS IN TWO YEARS AFTER ABATEMENT IN SEVENTEEN SCHOOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Airborne asbestos concentrations were measured at 17 schools that underwent an asbestos abatement 2 years before in 1988. hese 17 schools, which involved 20 abatement sites, were part of a study conducted by the U.S Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the New Jersey Departm...

  7. VISUAL INSPECTION AND AHERA CLEARANCE AT ASBESTOS ABATEMENT SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Asbestos abatement carried out in schools is subject to regulations under the Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA) of 1986. The AHERA rule (40 CFR Part 763) specifies a bifactorial process for determining when an asbestos abatement site is clean enough for the primary ...

  8. VISUAL INSPECTION AND AHERA CLEARANCE AT ASBESTOS-ABATEMENT SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Asbestos abatement carried out in schools is subject to regulations under the Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA) of 1986. he AHERA rule (40 CFR Part 763) specifies a bifactorial process for determining when an asbestos abatement site is clean enough for the primary co...

  9. H{sub2}S Abatement at The Geysers

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek, N.L.

    1980-12-01

    This paper discusses the efforts by the inter-departmental task forces which have been formed by PG and E to improve and expedite the development, design, installation, and modifications to hydrogen sulfide abatement and abatement-related systems for The Geysers power plants.

  10. Stakeholder Engagement

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, Jessica W.; Petherick, J.T.; Basara, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Background Oklahoma law pre-empts local governments from enacting smoking restrictions inside public places that are stricter than state law, but the sovereign status of Oklahoma’s 38 Tribal nations means they are uniquely positioned to stand apart as leaders in the area of tobacco policy. Purpose To provide recommendations for employing university–Tribal partnerships as an effective strategy for tobacco policy planning in tribal communities. Methods Using a community-based participatory research approach, researchers facilitated a series of meetings with key Tribal stakeholders in order to develop a comprehensive tobacco policy plan. Ongoing engagement activities held between January 2011 and May 2012, including interdepartmental visits, facility site tours, interviews, and attendance at tribal activities, were critical for fostering constructive and trusting relationships between all partners involved in the policy planning process. Results The 17-month collaborative engagement produced a plan designed to regulate the use of commercial tobacco in all Tribally owned properties. The extended period of collaboration between the researchers and Tribal stakeholders facilitated: (1) levels of trust between partners; and (2) a steadfast commitment to the planning process, ensuring completion of the plan amid uncertain political climates and economic concerns about tobacco bans. Conclusions Extended engagement produced an effective foundation for policy planning that promoted collaboration between otherwise dispersed Tribal departments, and facilitated communication of diverse stakeholder interests related to the goal of tobacco policies. The findings of this study provide useful strategies and best practices for those looking to employ Tribal–university partnerships as strategies for tobacco control planning and policy-based research. PMID:25528706

  11. Community Engagement Under the Microscope Community Engagement

    E-print Network

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Community Engagement ­ Under the Microscope Community Engagement ­ Under the Microscope 12­15 June 2011 #12;#12;Contents Executive summary 4 Introduction 6 What is community engagement with health research? 7 Politics and power 11 Why do we engage with communities? 13 Who is the community? 15 Community

  12. Rapid shifts in catch composition in the artisanal Red Sea reef fisheries of Eritrea

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Iyob Tsehaye; Marcel A. M. Machiels; Leopold A. J. Nagelkerke

    2007-01-01

    Shifts in catch composition were registered in the Eritrean artisanal fisheries, which were launched into a renewed development after the end of the independence war in 1991. Our analysis of catch and effort data showed that total fishing effort as well as total annual catch increased more than two-fold from 1996 to 2002. Yet, overall CPUE remained unchanged upon the

  13. Emissions and environmental implications of mercury from artisanal gold mining in north Sulawesi, Indonesia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel Limbong; Jeims Kumampung; Joice Rimper; Takaomi Arai; Nobuyuki Miyazaki

    2003-01-01

    In artisanal gold mining practiced in North Sulawesi Island, Indonesia, gold is separated from ore by the use of mercury, which forms an amalgam with gold. All related processes are undertaken with a low level of technical knowledge and skills, no regulation, and with disregard for the safety of human and environment health. The situation is generating serious potential health

  14. Assessment of the Artisanal Shark Fishery and Local Shark Fin Trade on Unguja Island, Zanzibar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Deborah Schaeffer

    2004-01-01

    This study investigates the current state of the directed artisanal shark fishery off Unguja Island, Zanzibar, with a focus on the East Asian shark fin trade and its impact on the utilization of this valuable marine resource. The study concentrates on the two fish markets in Stone Town: Malindi and Darajani. Large fish are brought to these markets both from

  15. The Master Artisan: A Framework for Master Tradespeople in Australia. Occasional Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Reilly-Briggs, Karen

    2011-01-01

    The author explores the prospect of improving pathways and opportunities for tradespeople in Australia through the introduction of a masters-level qualification. The study investigates the views and opinions of senior industry representatives and professional educators to determine whether the introduction of a master trade or master artisan

  16. Effect of artisanal liquid rennet from kids and lambs abomasa on the characteristics of Feta cheese

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G Moatsou; E Moschopoulou; Aik Georgala; E Zoidou; I Kandarakis; S Kaminarides; E Anifantakis

    2004-01-01

    Feta cheeses were manufactured with commercial calf rennet and artisanal liquid rennet from kids and lambs abomasa with an aim to investigate the influence of rennet type on the characteristics of this cheese variety. The two rennets had similar chymosin to pepsin ratios and they were used in quantities with the same total milk coagulating activity. The use of traditional

  17. Nitrogen oxide abatement by distributed fuel addition

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, J.O.L.; Mereb, J.B.

    1989-02-28

    A screening study was performed on a laboratory scale downfired combustor to determine the effect of various variables on the effectiveness of the reburning process as a technique for NO{sub X} abatement. The objective was to define optimum conditions under which reburning can be used and to be able to compare the reburning performance of our combustor to those reported by others. For this purpose, a statistically designed parametric investigation was conducted to determine how a set of controlled variables (primary and secondary stoichiometric ratios, location and length of the reburn zone and primary fuel load) would affect the reduction in NO emissions due to reburning. Also, the effects of other variables (NO in the primary zone, temperatures in the primary, reburn and burnout zones and the residence time in the reburn zone) were also investigated.

  18. 26 CFR 1.507-9 - Abatement of taxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Private Foundations § 1.507-9 Abatement of taxes...respect thereof, if: (1) The private foundation distributes all of its net assets...has been issued with respect to a foundation, to advise the Commissioner...

  19. 23 CFR Table 1 to Part 772 - Noise Abatement Criteria

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...Criteria 1 Table 1 to Part 772 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RIGHT-OF-WAY AND ENVIRONMENT PROCEDURES FOR ABATEMENT OF HIGHWAY TRAFFIC NOISE AND CONSTRUCTION NOISE Pt. 772, Table...

  20. A METHOD FOR COMPARING MULTICOMPONENT, MULTIMEDIA POLLUTION ABATEMENT PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes a comparison of the cost-effectiveness of four multicomponent, multimedia pollution abatement options: coal cleaning, limestone, limestone plus adipic acid, and coal cleaning plus limestone plus adipic acid. The comparison makes cost-effectiveness evaluations ...

  1. 26 CFR 1.507-9 - Abatement of taxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Private Foundations § 1.507-9 Abatement of taxes...respect thereof, if: (1) The private foundation distributes all of its net assets...has been issued with respect to a foundation, to advise the Commissioner...

  2. 26 CFR 1.507-9 - Abatement of taxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Private Foundations § 1.507-9 Abatement of taxes...respect thereof, if: (1) The private foundation distributes all of its net assets...has been issued with respect to a foundation, to advise the Commissioner...

  3. 26 CFR 1.507-9 - Abatement of taxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Private Foundations § 1.507-9 Abatement of taxes...respect thereof, if: (1) The private foundation distributes all of its net assets...has been issued with respect to a foundation, to advise the Commissioner...

  4. Short-term CO? abatement in the European power sector

    E-print Network

    Delarue, Erik D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper focuses on the possibilities for short term abatement in response to a CO2 price through fuel switching in the European power sector. The model E-Simulate is used to simulate the electricity generation in Europe ...

  5. The Influence of Artisanal Small Scale Gold Mining on Deforestation Rates: The case of Seguenega, Burkina Faso. 

    E-print Network

    Palacios, Daniela

    2013-11-28

    This paper investigates how Remote Sensing and Geographical Information Systems can be used to assess the influence of Artisanal Small Scale Gold Mining (ASGM) on deforestation rates in Africa. Using the department of Seguenega in Burkina Faso...

  6. Nitrogen oxide abatement by distributed fuel addition

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, J.O.L.; Mereb, J.B.

    1988-12-27

    A screening study was performed on a laboratory scale downfired combustor to determine the effect of various variables on the effectiveness of the reburning process as a technique for NO{sub x} abatement. The objective was to define optimum conditions under which reburning can be used and to be able to compare the reburning performance of our combustor to those reported by others. For this purpose, a statistically designed parametric investigation was conducted to determine how a set of controlled variables (primary and secondary stoichiometric ratios, location of the reburn zone and primary fuel load) would affect the reduction in NO emissions in a classical reburning configuration. Also, the effects of other variables (NO in the primary zone, temperatures in the primary, reburn and burnout zones and the residence time in the reburn zone) were also investigated. Empirical correlations relating reburning effectiveness to various parameters were derived. There correlations were used to investigate the effect of each individual parameter on reburning effectiveness. An optimum reburn zone stoichiometric ratio was identified at 0.8. At this stoichiometry, a high level of NO reduction (up to 80%) can be achieved beyond which little or no improvement is easily achieved.

  7. The Veterans Administration's Asbestos Abatement Program

    SciTech Connect

    Schepers, G.W. (Institute of Industrial and Forensic Medicine, McLean, VA (United States))

    1991-12-31

    The Veterans Administration has developed a program of asbestos abatement for its more than 1000 buildings, where health care personnel from 173 hospitals and 238 ambulatory care clinics are likely to encounter respirable asbestos. This is a costly program, which has averaged about $25 million annually for the past ten years. The VA has banned the use of new asbestos products containing more than 1% of asbestos in building construction or renovation projects. Industrial hygiene engineering programs have been ordered instituted at all VA medical centers to monitor dust levels in compliance with OSHA and EPA requirements. Health surveillance programs, managed by an environmental health physician at each medical center, have been instituted for all personnel who have been identified to have breathed asbestos fibers in excess of OSHA-EPA threshold limit values. The health care program focuses on the identification of asbestosis and asbestos-related cancer through periodic X-ray films, lung function tests, and electrocardiographic and physical examination screening. The program also stresses cessation of smoking.

  8. Integrated Assessment of Artisanal and Small-Scale Gold Mining in Ghana - Part 3: Social Sciences and Economics.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mark L; Renne, Elisha; Roncoli, Carla; Agyei-Baffour, Peter; Tenkorang, Emmanuel Yamoah

    2015-07-01

    This article is one of three synthesis reports resulting from an integrated assessment (IA) of artisanal and small-scale gold mining (ASGM) in Ghana. Given the complexities that involve multiple drivers and diverse disciplines influencing ASGM, an IA framework was used to analyze economic, social, health, and environmental data and to co-develop evidence-based responses in collaboration with pertinent stakeholders. We look at both micro- and macro-economic processes surrounding ASGM, including causes, challenges, and consequences. At the micro-level, social and economic evidence suggests that the principal reasons whereby most people engage in ASGM involve "push" factors aimed at meeting livelihood goals. ASGM provides an important source of income for both proximate and distant communities, representing a means of survival for impoverished farmers as well as an engine for small business growth. However, miners and their families often end up in a "poverty trap" of low productivity and indebtedness, which reduce even further their economic options. At a macro level, Ghana's ASGM activities contribute significantly to the national economy even though they are sometimes operating illegally and at a disadvantage compared to large-scale industrial mining companies. Nevertheless, complex issues of land tenure, social stability, mining regulation and taxation, and environmental degradation undermine the viability and sustainability of ASGM as a livelihood strategy. Although more research is needed to understand these complex relationships, we point to key findings and insights from social science and economics research that can guide policies and actions aimed to address the unique challenges of ASGM in Ghana and elsewhere. PMID:26184277

  9. Environmental mercury contamination of an artisanal zinc smelting area in Weining County, Guizhou, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Guanghui; Feng, Xinbin; Qiu, Guangle; Bi, Xiangyang; Li, Zhonggen; Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Dingyong; Shang, Lihai; Guo, Yanna

    2008-07-01

    To investigate the extent of Hg contamination due to artisanal Zn smelting activities in Weining County, northwestern Guizhou, China, total Hg and methyl mercury (MeHg) concentrations in soil and surface water were determined. Samples of corn plants growing in the study area were also collected for total Hg analysis. A high geometric mean Hg emission factor of 75gHgt(-1)Zn was estimated and significantly elevated total gaseous mercury (TGM) concentrations were found in the atmosphere adjacent to the Zn smelting sites, ranging from 30 to 3814ngm(-3). Total Hg and MeHg concentrations in topsoil samples ranged from 62 to 355microgkg(-1) and from 0.20 to 1.1microgkg(-1), respectively. Total Hg Concentrations in corn plant tissues increased in the order of grainsartisanal Zn smelting activities. PMID:18162270

  10. Human co-exposure to mercury vapor and methylmercury in artisanal mercury mining areas, Guizhou, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Feng, Xinbin; Shang, Lihai; Qiu, Guangle; Meng, Bo; Zhang, Hua; Guo, Yanna; Liang, Peng

    2011-03-01

    Mercury (Hg) concentrations were determined in human urine and hair samples from Gouxi (GX, n=25) and Laowuchang (LWC, n=18), Tongren, Guizhou, China, to evaluate human exposure from artisanal Hg mining. Geometric means of urinary Hg (U-Hg) were 216 and 560 ?g g(-1) Creatinine (?g g(-1) Cr) for artisanal mining workers from GX and LWC, respectively, and clinical symptoms (finger tremor) were observed in three workers. The means of hair Me-Hg concentrations were 4.26 ?g g(-1) (1.87-10.6 ?g g(-1)) and 4.55 ?g g(-1) (2.29-9.55 ?g g(-1)) for the population in GX and LWC, respectively. Significant relationship was found between estimated rice Me-Hg intake and hair Me-Hg levels (r=0.73, p<0.001). Co-exposure to Hg vapor and Me-Hg may pose health risks for the study population. PMID:21056470

  11. Environmental assessment of mercury contamination from the Rwamagasa artisanal gold mining centre, Geita District, Tanzania

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Taylor; J. d. Appletonsupasu; R. Lister; B. Smith; D. Chitamweba; O. Mkumbo; J. F. Machiwa; A. L. Tesha; C. Beinhoff

    2005-01-01

    This study presents the results of an environmental assessment of mercury (Hg) contamination in the Rwamagasa artisanal gold mining area, northwest Tanzania, and the potential downstream dispersion along the River Malagarasi to Lake Tanganyika. At the time of sampling, generally low concentrations of Hg (<0.05 mg\\/kg) occurred in most cultivated soils although higher Hg (0.05–9.2 mg\\/kg) was recorded in urban

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Enterococcus faecium Strain CRL 1879, Isolated from a Northwestern Argentinian Artisanal Cheese.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Nadia E; Saavedra, Lucila; Slozilová, Ivana; Bonacina, Julieta; Demnerová, Katerina; Sesma, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of the bacteriocin producer Enterococcus faecium strain CRL 1879, isolated from a northwestern Argentinian artisanal cheese. The draft genome sequence is composed of 73 contigs for 2,886,747 bp, with 3,140 protein-coding genes. Six biosynthetic clusters for bacteriocin class II production were found. Typical virulence determinants, which have relevance in food safety, were not present. PMID:23868133

  13. Small cetacean captures in Peruvian artisanal fisheries: High despite protective legislation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeffrey C. Mangel; Joanna Alfaro-Shigueto; Koen Van Waerebeek; Celia Cáceres; Stuart Bearhop; Matthew J. Witt; Brendan J. Godley

    2010-01-01

    We detail the first direct, at sea monitoring of small cetacean interactions with Peruvian artisanal drift gillnet and longline fisheries. A total of 253 small cetaceans were captured during 66 monitored fishing trips (Gillnet: 46 trips; Longline: 20 trips) from the port of Salaverry, northern Peru (8o14?S, 78o59?W) from March 2005 to July 2007. The most commonly captured species were

  14. Strategy for the extraction of yeast DNA from artisan agave must for quantitative PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Kirchmayr, Manuel Reinhart; Segura-Garcia, Luis Eduardo; Flores-Berrios, Ericka Patricia; Gschaedler, Anne

    2011-11-01

    An efficient method for the direct extraction of yeast genomic DNA from agave must was developed. The optimized protocol, which was based on silica-adsorption of DNA on microcolumns, included an enzymatic cell wall degradation step followed by prolonged lysis with hot detergent. The resulting extracts were suitable templates for subsequent qPCR assays that quantified mixed yeast populations in artisan Mexican mezcal fermentations. PMID:21820955

  15. Atmospheric mercury emission from artisanal mercury mining in Guizhou Province, Southwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ping; Feng, Xinbin; Qiu, Guangle; Shang, Lihai; Wang, Shaofeng; Meng, Bo

    Mercury (Hg) mining is an important anthropogenic source of atmospheric Hg emissions. The Guizhou Province in Southwestern China is a region with extensive artisanal mercury mining (AMM), but little Hg emission data from this area is available. Using a mass balance method, we estimated emission factors from artisanal mercury mining in Wuchuan mercury mining area (WMMA) and Gouxi area (GX). Average emission factors were 18.2% in WMMA (ranging from 6.9% to 32.1%) and 9.8% in GX (ranging from 6.6% to 14.5%), respectively, which were 2.2-36.4 times higher than the literature values used to estimate Hg emission from Hg mining. Furthermore, the average Hg emission factor of AMM in WMMA was much higher than that in GX, indicating that double condensation processes practiced in GX resulted in higher recoveries and lower emission factors compared to single condensation process applied in WMMA. Atmospheric Hg emission was estimated to be 3.7-9.6 metric tons in 2004 for WMMA and 1.3-2.7 metric tons in 2006 for GX, indicating artisanal Hg mining was an important atmospheric Hg emission source in the study area.

  16. Costs and global impacts of black carbon abatement strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rypdal, Kristin; Rive, Nathan; Berntsen, Terje K.; Klimont, Zbigniew; Mideksa, Torben K.; Myhre, Gunnar; Skeie, Ragnhild B.

    2009-09-01

    Abatement of particulate matter has traditionally been driven by health concerns rather than its role in global warming. Here we assess future abatement strategies in terms of how much they reduce the climate impact of black carbon (BC) and organic carbon (OC) from contained combustion. We develop global scenarios which take into account regional differences in climate impact, costs of abatement and ability to pay, as well as both the direct and indirect (snow-albedo) climate impact of BC and OC. To represent the climate impact, we estimate consistent region-specific values of direct and indirect global warming potential (GWP) and global temperature potential (GTP). The indirect GWP has been estimated using a physical approach and includes the effect of change in albedo from BC deposited on snow. The indirect GWP is highest in the Middle East followed by Russia, Europe and North America, while the total GWP is highest in the Middle East, Africa and South Asia. We conclude that prioritizing emission reductions in Asia represents the most cost-efficient global abatement strategy for BC because Asia is (1) responsible for a large share of total emissions, (2) has lower abatement costs compared to Europe and North America and (3) has large health cobenefits from reduced PM10 emissions.

  17. 41 CFR 102-80.20 - What are Federal agencies' responsibilities concerning the abatement of radon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...responsibilities concerning the abatement of radon? 102-80.20 Section 102-80... Safety and Environmental Management Radon § 102-80.20 What are Federal agencies...responsibilities concerning the abatement of radon? Federal agencies have the...

  18. 41 CFR 102-80.20 - What are Federal agencies' responsibilities concerning the abatement of radon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...responsibilities concerning the abatement of radon? 102-80.20 Section 102-80... Safety and Environmental Management Radon § 102-80.20 What are Federal agencies...responsibilities concerning the abatement of radon? Federal agencies have the...

  19. 41 CFR 102-80.20 - What are Federal agencies' responsibilities concerning the abatement of radon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...responsibilities concerning the abatement of radon? 102-80.20 Section 102-80... Safety and Environmental Management Radon § 102-80.20 What are Federal agencies...responsibilities concerning the abatement of radon? Federal agencies have the...

  20. Does Technological Innovation Really Reduce Marginal Abatement Costs? Some Theory, Algebraic Evidence, and Policy Implications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yoram Bauman; Myunghun Lee; Karl Seeley

    2008-01-01

    The existing literature models innovation in pollution control as a reduction in marginal abatement costs. We show that this\\u000a assumption is inappropriate for production process innovations such as fuel switching. Algebraically, we examine the effects\\u000a of different innovation types on marginal abatement cost curves, showing that some desirable innovations increase marginal abatement costs. Empirically, we estimate marginal abatement costs for

  1. Influence of Artisan Bakery- or Laboratory-Propagated Sourdoughs on the Diversity of Lactic Acid Bacterium and Yeast Microbiotas

    PubMed Central

    Minervini, Fabio; Lattanzi, Anna; De Angelis, Maria; Gobbetti, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Seven mature type I sourdoughs were comparatively back-slopped (80 days) at artisan bakery and laboratory levels under constant technology parameters. The cell density of presumptive lactic acid bacteria and related biochemical features were not affected by the environment of propagation. On the contrary, the number of yeasts markedly decreased from artisan bakery to laboratory propagation. During late laboratory propagation, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) showed that the DNA band corresponding to Saccharomyces cerevisiae was no longer detectable in several sourdoughs. Twelve species of lactic acid bacteria were variously identified through a culture-dependent approach. All sourdoughs harbored a certain number of species and strains, which were dominant throughout time and, in several cases, varied depending on the environment of propagation. As shown by statistical permutation analysis, the lactic acid bacterium populations differed among sourdoughs propagated at artisan bakery and laboratory levels. Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus sakei, and Weissella cibaria dominated in only some sourdoughs back-slopped at artisan bakeries, and Leuconostoc citreum seemed to be more persistent under laboratory conditions. Strains of Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis were indifferently found in some sourdoughs. Together with the other stable species and strains, other lactic acid bacteria temporarily contaminated the sourdoughs and largely differed between artisan bakery and laboratory levels. The environment of propagation has an undoubted influence on the composition of sourdough yeast and lactic acid bacterium microbiotas. PMID:22635989

  2. Improving Student Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Jim; Taylor, Leah

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews research literature in the area of student engagement to discover curricular and pedagogical ideas educators might successfully use to better engage student learning. Student engagement has historically focused upon increasing achievement, positive behaviors, and a sense of belonging to help students remain in school. The…

  3. A Dialogue for Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Malcolm

    2010-01-01

    Student engagement is perhaps the key element for almost any learning context. When engaged, learners are enthusiastic and excited about the subject. Their work is informed by the enjoyment of discovery. Engaged learners work willingly, instead of by coercion, and approach their assignments as something that matters to them personally. The spirit…

  4. Contracting for Asbestos Abatement: What You Need to Know.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bittle, Edgar H.; McAllister, Jane B.

    1990-01-01

    School districts are required to determine if asbestos-containing materials exist at school facilities and design and implement asbestos abatement. Reviews how to select a contractor, draft the contract, and ensure its proper implementation by complying with the law and avoiding liability. (MLF)

  5. Effective and cooperative noise abatement implementation at a new racetrack

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher Menge

    2008-01-01

    The paper describes a successful case study of noise assessment and abatement for a new racetrack in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia. The first races at the new facility generated widespread concern about noise. In the absence of applicable noise regulations, the county administration contracted for a noise study to evaluate the impact of racing noise in the adjacent rural

  6. SO2 ABATEMENT FOR COAL-FIRED BOILERS IN JAPAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is a compilation of information on the current status of SO2 abatement technologies for coal-fired boilers in Japan, where strict ambient air quality standards for SO2 and NOx mandate the use of various air pollution control technologies. It focuses on flue gas desulfu...

  7. Deterministic Linear Programming Model for acid rain abatement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. H. Ellis; G. J. Frayuhar; E. A. McBean

    1985-01-01

    A deterministic Linear Programming Model is presented for development of acid rain abatement strategies in eastern North America. Pollutant (SOâ) sources are categorized as either controllable or noncontrolled. The model determines the least-cost set of SOâ removal levels at each of the 235 largest point sources in eastern North America, such that stipulated maximum wet sulfate deposition rates are not

  8. Plasma abatement of perfluorocompounds in inductively coupled plasma reactors

    E-print Network

    Kushner, Mark

    Plasma abatement of perfluorocompounds in inductively coupled plasma reactors Xudong ``Peter'' Xu PFCs , gases which have large global warming potentials, are widely used in plasma processing, the effluents from plasma tools using these gases typically have large mole fractions of PFCs. The use of plasma

  9. the Engaged An Applied Developmental

    E-print Network

    by University Outreach & Engagement Positive Outcomes for Children, Youth & Families Community & Family SecurityAdvocating & Modeling the Engaged University An Applied Developmental Science Approach to Outreach Scholarship Hiram E. Fitzgerald Assistant Provost University Outreach & Engagement #12;The Engaged University

  10. Limitations in small artisanal gold mining addressed by educational components paired with alternative mining methods.

    PubMed

    Zolnikov, Tara R

    2012-03-01

    Current solutions continue to be inadequate in addressing the longstanding, worldwide problem of mercury emissions from small artisanal gold mining. Mercury, an inexpensive and easily accessible heavy metal, is used in the process of extracting gold from ore. Mercury emissions disperse, affecting human populations by causing adverse health effects and environmental and social ramifications. Many developing nations have sizable gold ore deposits, making small artisanal gold mining a major source of employment in the world. Poverty drives vulnerable, rural populations into gold mining because of social and economic instabilities. Educational programs responding to this environmental hazard have been implemented in the past, but have had low positive results due to lack of governmental support and little economic incentive. Educational and enforced intervention programs must be developed in conjunction with governmental agencies in order to successfully eliminate this ongoing problem. Industry leaders offered hopeful suggestions, but revealed limitations when trying to develop encompassing solutions to halt mercury emissions. This research highlights potential options that have been attempted in the past and suggests alternative solutions to improve upon these methods. Some methods include buyer impact recognition, risk assessment proposals exposing a cost-benefit analysis and toxicokinetic modeling, public health awareness campaigns, and the education of miners, healthcare workers, and locals within hazardous areas of mercury exposure. These methods, paired with the implementation of alternative mining techniques, propose a substantial reduction of mercury emissions. PMID:22297251

  11. Antimicrobial resistance profiles of Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium isolated from artisanal food of animal origin in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Delpech, Gastón; Pourcel, Gisela; Schell, Celia; De Luca, María; Basualdo, Juan; Bernstein, Judith; Grenovero, Silvia; Sparo, Mónica

    2012-10-01

    Enterococci are part of the indigenous microbiota of human gastrointestinal tract and food of animal origin. Enterococci inhabiting non-human reservoirs play a critical role in the acquisition and dissemination of antimicrobial resistance determinants. The aim of this work was to investigate the antimicrobial resistance in Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium strains recovered from artisanal food of animal origin. Samples of goat cheese (n = 42), cow cheese (n = 40), artisanal salami (n = 30), and minced meat for the manufacture of hamburgers (n = 60) were analyzed. Phenotypic and genotypic tests for species-level identification of the recovered isolates were carried out. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) study for in vitro quantitative antimicrobial resistance assessment was performed, and 71 E. faecalis and 22 E. faecium were isolated. The recovered enterococci showed different multi-drug resistance patterns that included tretracycline, erythromycin, ciprofloxacin, linezolid, penicillin, ampicillin, vancomycin, teicoplanin, gentamicin (high-level resistance), and streptomycin (high-level resistance). VanA-type E. faecium were detected. ?-lactamase activity was not observed. Artisanal foods of animal origin act as a non-human reservoir of E. faecalis and E. faecuim strains, expressing multi-resistance to antimicrobials. In conclusion, the implementation of a continuous antimicrobial resistance surveillance in enterococci isolated from artisanal food of animal origin is important. PMID:22953740

  12. The role of conflict minerals, artisanal mining, and informal trading networks in African intrastate and regional conflicts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chirico, Peter G.; Malpeli, Katherine C.

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between natural resources and armed conflict gained public and political attention in the 1990s, when it became evident that the mining and trading of diamonds were connected with brutal rebellions in several African nations. Easily extracted resources such as alluvial diamonds and gold have been and continue to be exploited by rebel groups to fund their activities. Artisanal and small-scale miners operating under a quasi-legal status often mine these mineral deposits. While many African countries have legalized artisanal mining and established flow chains through which production is intended to travel, informal trading networks frequently emerge in which miners seek to evade taxes and fees by selling to unauthorized buyers. These networks have the potential to become international in scope, with actors operating in multiple countries. The lack of government control over the artisanal mining sector and the prominence of informal trade networks can have severe social, political, and economic consequences. In the past, mineral extraction fuelled violent civil wars in Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Angola, and it continues to do so today in several other countries. The significant influence of the informal network that surrounds artisanal mining is therefore an important security concern that can extend across borders and have far-reaching impacts.

  13. Development of Pupils' Transfer Skills by Means of Hands On Activities with Artisan Materials in Natural Sciences Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciascai, Liliana; Chicinas, Luminita

    2008-01-01

    Hands on activities with artisan materials used in order to realize different practical devices helpful in learning process are one of the most frequently used activity in science classes. Usually, the main strength of these activities are: a deeper learning, an increased motivation of pupils for actively learning and development of practical…

  14. The artisanal fishery of Cynoscion guatucupa in Argentina: Exploring the possible causes of the collapse in Bahía Blanca estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez Cazorla, Andrea; Molina, Juan Manuel; Ruarte, Claudio

    2014-04-01

    Cynoscion guatucupa Cuvier 1829 is a migratory pelagic fish species, which has a wide geographical distribution. It is the most important fishing resource for local communities in Bahía Blanca estuary and has been captured by artisanal fishermen since the 1900s. The industrial fleet has been fishing this species in the coastal area of Buenos Aires province since the 1950s, and, since 1970, landings have increased sharply. Between 2000 and 2004, the artisanal fishery in the estuarine waters of Bahía Blanca collapsed. Variations in total landings of the artisanal fleet might have arisen from the environmental variables within the estuary, fishing activity in the surrounding sea region, local pressure within the estuary and/or several other variables. Our results suggest that neither oceanographic parameters nor local pressure seem to have influenced the artisanal fishery of C. guatucupa in the estuarine region. Instead, this fishery seems to have been partially influenced by the increasing fishing pressure exerted by the industrial fishing fleet operating in open waters around the estuary. This study emphasizes the need to take into account fisheries data from both the estuarine environment and the surrounding sea region, particularly when designing management plans for the sustainable use of migrating fish resources.

  15. Changes in the Accommodation-convergence Relationship after the Artisan Phakic Intraocular Lens Implantation for Myopic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Ik Hee; Han, Jinu; Lee, Hyung Keun; Kim, Jin Kook

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the change of accommodation-convergence parameters after implantation of Artisan phakic intraocular lens (PIOL). Methods Prospective study for the patients with the Artisan PIOL implantation was performed. A total of 37 patients (3 males and 34 females) enrolled the study. Preoperatively, convergence amplitude, the stimulus accommodative convergence per unit of accommodation (AC/A) ratio and the near point of convergence (NPC) were evaluated. After the Artisan PIOL implantation, the identical evaluations were repeated at 1 week, 1, 3, and 6 months after the surgery. Results Mean age was 24.3 ± 4.8 years old, and preoperative refractive error was -8.92 ± 4.13 diopters (D). After the implantation, mean refractive errors significantly decreased to within ±1.00 D, and noticeable complications were not found. The convergence amplitude and the stimulus AC/A ratio increased 1 month after the surgery, but progressively stabilized afterward to near preoperative values. NPC didn't show any significant change over follow-up period up to 6 months. Conclusions These results regarding implantation of the Artisan PIOL revealed the increase of accommodation-convergence relationship within first 1 month after the surgery, but progressive stabilization was noted during follow-up periods. PMID:24688257

  16. The Allocative Efficiency Implications of Water Pollution Abatement Cost Comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shortle, James S.

    1990-05-01

    Assessments of the efficiency of water pollution control allocations are usually based on abatement cost comparisons. The general rule is that efficiency is improved by reallocating abatement from sources with high marginal costs to low-cost sources. The welfare-theoretic foundation of this rule is well established for situations with nonstochastic emissions. In situations with stochastic emissions, pollution control involves improving the distribution of emissions. Nevertheless, efficiency analyses involving stochastic emissions usually sidestep formal consideration of the stochastic element by measuring pollution control and control costs with respect to changes in long-term average flows. An economic model of stochastic emissions is used to demonstrate that this approach can give misleading results. An alternative procedure is briefly discussed.

  17. Optimal control based seizure abatement using patient derived connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Peter N.; Thomas, Jijju; Sinha, Nishant; Dauwels, Justin; Kaiser, Marcus; Thesen, Thomas; Ruths, Justin

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder in which patients have recurrent seizures. Seizures occur in conjunction with abnormal electrical brain activity which can be recorded by the electroencephalogram (EEG). Often, this abnormal brain activity consists of high amplitude regular spike-wave oscillations as opposed to low amplitude irregular oscillations in the non-seizure state. Active brain stimulation has been proposed as a method to terminate seizures prematurely, however, a general and widely-applicable approach to optimal stimulation protocols is still lacking. In this study we use a computational model of epileptic spike-wave dynamics to evaluate the effectiveness of a pseudospectral method to simulated seizure abatement. We incorporate brain connectivity derived from magnetic resonance imaging of a subject with idiopathic generalized epilepsy. We find that the pseudospectral method can successfully generate time-varying stimuli that abate simulated seizures, even when including heterogeneous patient specific brain connectivity. The strength of the stimulus required varies in different brain areas. Our results suggest that seizure abatement, modeled as an optimal control problem and solved with the pseudospectral method, offers an attractive approach to treatment for in vivo stimulation techniques. Further, if optimal brain stimulation protocols are to be experimentally successful, then the heterogeneity of cortical connectivity should be accounted for in the development of those protocols and thus more spatially localized solutions may be preferable.

  18. Engaging with Drama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on a multi-site global, ethnographic, and mixed methods study on student engagement. Our research has closely examined how engagement and disengagement operate subtly, simultaneously and relationally in the places and spaces where drama is made. Through years of qualitative time in high school classrooms and two different…

  19. Parental Engagement Pays Off

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessoff, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Although data directly linking parental engagement with positive results is limited, administrators, teachers, and parent cite anecdotal evidence--and some numbers about test scores and attendance from individual schools--to affirm the effectiveness of engagement programs. Meanwhile, researchers are studying the keys to successful programs and…

  20. Collaborative engagement experiment (CEE)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert L. Wade; Joseph M. Reames

    2005-01-01

    Unmanned ground and air systems operating in collaboration have the potential to provide future Joint Forces a significant capability for operations in complex terrain. Ground and air collaborative engagements potentially offer force conservation, perform timely acquisition and dissemination of essential combat information, and can eliminate high value and time critical targets. These engagements can also add considerably to force survivability

  1. Prospective life cycle carbon abatement for pyrolysis biochar systems in the UK

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jim Hammond; Simon Shackley; Saran Sohi; Peter Brownsort

    2011-01-01

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) of slow pyrolysis biochar systems (PBS) in the UK for small, medium and large scale process chains and ten feedstocks was performed, assessing carbon abatement and electricity production. Pyrolysis biochar systems appear to offer greater carbon abatement than other bioenergy systems. Carbon abatement of 0.7–1.3tCO2 equivalent per oven dry tonne of feedstock processed was found. In

  2. The ABCs of Student Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Seth A.; Nuland, Leila Richey; Parsons, Allison Ward

    2014-01-01

    Student engagement is an important consideration for teachers and administrators because it is explicitly associated with achievement. What the authors call the ABC's of engagement they outline as: Affective engagement, Behavioral engagement, and Cognitive engagement. They also present "Three Things Every Teacher Needs to Know about…

  3. Scholarship-Focused Outreach and Engagement Public Scholarship, Civic Engagement,

    E-print Network

    Scholarship-Focused Outreach and Engagement Public Scholarship, Civic Engagement, and Campus experience · Enrich community, economic, and family life · Expand international reach · Increase research opportunities · Strengthen stewardship President Lou Anna K. Simon Outreach and Engagement are Embedded in MSU

  4. HIV/AIDS, artisanal fishing and food security in the Okavango Delta, Botswana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngwenya, B. N.; Mosepele, K.

    Generally, rural households pursue all year round natural and non-natural resource-based livelihood systems to diversify these options in order to cope with risks emanating from a range of shocks and stressors. Artisanal fishing in the Delta is not only a major livelihood option but also a source of food security. This paper is based on analysis of primary data collected from a survey of 248 subsistence fishers’ households through simple random sampling in 22 villages in the Delta. The overall objectives of the survey were to assess the general prevalence of HIV/AIDS in the Ngamiland district of Botswana, to investigate potential effects of AIDS-related stressors, particularly chronic illness on artisanal fishing activities, and to assess implications towards food security. Results from this study indicate that HIV prevalence rates for pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in the Delta are approximately 30% and are related to factors such as marriage, education, and employment. Despite this relatively high prevalence percentage, most of the affected households do not have adequate access to HIV/AIDS support facilities. Support services are provided on the basis of population size and/or status of the settlement (i.e. urban, urban village, rural or remote). Therefore, since about 50% of the Delta’s population lives in settlements of less than 500 people, they receive health services indirectly through major population centres whose capacity to deliver timely HIV/AIDS services is limited. This disproportionate access to HIV/AIDS services disadvantages the majority of fishing communities in the Delta, and may affect their ability to fish. Moreover, about 53% of sampled households had cared for a continuously ill person/s (CIP’s) in the last 5 years, out of which approximately 29% felt that this seriously impacted fishing activities. These serious impacts included sale of family assets, depletion of savings, and switching or abandoning fishing activities. Subsequently, household food security is seriously affected because fish provides a significant proportion of food to CIP households where approximately 55% of households get their food from fish products. During food shortages, CIP households resorted to a hierarchy of strategies which included cutting down on meals or reducing meal portions, looking for paid work, gathering wild fruit, asking for food from relatives, selling livestock, and getting social assistance. In conclusion, artisanal fishing is a natural safety net which constitutes an important buffer for households affected by HIV/AIDS-related stressors in the Okavango Delta. Access to fish helps these households mitigate potentially adverse impacts such as deterioration into chronic poverty.

  5. Managing artisanal and small-scale mining in forest areas: perspectives from a poststructural political ecology.

    PubMed

    Hirons, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) is an activity intimately associated with social deprivation and environmental degradation, including deforestation. This paper examines ASM and deforestation using a broadly poststructural political ecology framework. Hegemonic discourses are shown to consistently influence policy direction, particularly in emerging approaches such as Corporate Social Responsibility and the Forest Stewardship Council. A review of alternative discourses reveals that the poststructural method is useful for critiquing the international policy arena but does not inform new approaches. Synthesis of the analysis leads to conclusions that echo a growing body of literature advocating for policies to become increasingly sensitive to local contexts, synergistic between actors at difference scales, and to be integrated across sectors. PMID:22180922

  6. Genomic diversity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts associated with alcoholic fermentation of bacanora produced by artisanal methods.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Ainza, M L; Zamora-Quiñonez, K A; Moreno-Ibarra, G M; Acedo-Félix, E

    2015-03-01

    Bacanora is a spirituous beverage elaborated with Agave angustifolia Haw in an artisanal process. Natural fermentation is mostly performed with native yeasts and bacteria. In this study, 228 strains of yeast like Saccharomyces were isolated from the natural alcoholic fermentation on the production of bacanora. Restriction analysis of the amplified region ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 of the ribosomal DNA genes (RFLPr) were used to confirm the genus, and 182 strains were identified as Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These strains displayed high genomic variability in their chromosomes profiles by karyotyping. Electrophoretic profiles of the strains evaluated showed a large number of chromosomes the size of which ranged between 225 and 2200 kpb approximately. PMID:25561061

  7. Assessment of Hg-contamination in soils and stream sediments in the mineral district of Nambija, Ecuadorian Amazon (example of an impacted area affected by artisanal gold mining)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. E. Ram??rez Requelme; J. F. F. Ramos; R. S. Angélica; E. S. Brabo

    2003-01-01

    The Nambija Mineral District (NMD) is located in the southeastern part of Ecuador, east of Zamora (Zamora Chinch??pe's country), Ecuadorian Amazon. In this district, Au occurrences have been know since colonial and pre-colonial times, but only after the early 1980s has intensive artisanal Au mining activity been developed. Currently, the different NMD Au occurrences continue to be exploited by artisanal

  8. More than One Bag for the World Fishery Crisis and Keys for Co-management Successes in Selected Artisanal Latin American Shellfisheries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Omar Defeo; Juan Carlos Castilla

    2005-01-01

    Global concerns about the depletion of marine stocks have been widely documented in industrial fisheries. However, small-scale\\u000a artisanal fisheries constitute a second component for the world fishery crisis, normally ignored or erroneously lumped into\\u000a the industrial component. In this paper we first present a brief comparison between industrial and artisanal fisheries, highlighting\\u000a the differences between them and the differential feasibility

  9. Linking geology and health sciences to assess childhood lead poisoning from artisanal gold mining in Nigeria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Durant, James T.; Morman, Suzette A.; Neri, Antonio; Wolf, Ruth E.; Dooyema, Carrie A.; Hageman, Philip L.; Lowers, Heather A.; Fernette, Gregory L.; Meeker, Gregory P.; Benzel, William M.; Driscoll, Rhonda L.; Berry, Cyrus J.; Crock, James G.; Goldstein, Harland L.; Adams, Monique; Bartrem, Casey L.; Tirima, Simba; Behrooz, Behbod; von Lindern, Ian; Brown, Mary Jean

    2013-01-01

    Background: In 2010, Médecins Sans Frontières discovered a lead poisoning outbreak linked to artisanal gold processing in northwestern Nigeria. The outbreak has killed approximately 400 young children and affected thousands more. Objectives: Our aim was to undertake an interdisciplinary geological- and health-science assessment to clarify lead sources and exposure pathways, identify additional toxicants of concern and populations at risk, and examine potential for similar lead poisoning globally. Methods: We applied diverse analytical methods to ore samples, soil and sweep samples from villages and family compounds, and plant foodstuff samples. Results: Natural weathering of lead-rich gold ores before mining formed abundant, highly gastric-bioaccessible lead carbonates. The same fingerprint of lead minerals found in all sample types confirms that ore processing caused extreme contamination, with up to 185,000 ppm lead in soils/sweep samples and up to 145 ppm lead in plant foodstuffs. Incidental ingestion of soils via hand-to-mouth transmission and of dusts cleared from the respiratory tract is the dominant exposure pathway. Consumption of water and foodstuffs contaminated by the processing is likely lesser, but these are still significant exposure pathways. Although young children suffered the most immediate and severe consequences, results indicate that older children, adult workers, pregnant women, and breastfed infants are also at risk for lead poisoning. Mercury, arsenic, manganese, antimony, and crystalline silica exposures pose additional health threats. Conclusions: Results inform ongoing efforts in Nigeria to assess lead contamination and poisoning, treat victims, mitigate exposures, and remediate contamination. Ore deposit geology, pre-mining weathering, and burgeoning artisanal mining may combine to cause similar lead poisoning disasters elsewhere globally.

  10. Characterization, mapping, and mitigation of mercury vapour emissions from artisanal mining gold shops.

    PubMed

    Cordy, Paul; Veiga, Marcello; Crawford, Ben; Garcia, Oseas; Gonzalez, Victor; Moraga, Daniel; Roeser, Monika; Wip, Dennis

    2013-08-01

    Artisanal miners sell their gold to shops that are usually located in the urban core, where the mercury-gold amalgam is burned to evaporate the mercury that was added during ore processing. People living and working near these gold shops are exposed to intermittent and extreme concentrations of mercury vapour. In the urban centres of Segovia, Colombia, and Andacollo, Chile, the average concentrations measured by mobile mercury vapour analyzer transects taken repeatedly over several weeks were 1.26 and 0.338?gm(-3), respectively. By World Health Organization standards, these towns are exposed to significant health hazard, and globally, the millions of miners, as well as non-miners who live near gold shops, are at serious risk of neurological and renal deficits. Measurements taken in Suriname, Ecuador and Peru reveal this to be a widespread phenomenon with unique regional variations and myriad attempts at remediation. Maps of average mercury concentrations show the spatial distribution of the hazard in relation to residential buildings and schools. Measurements from towers show the temporal variability of mercury concentrations, and suggest that large quantities of mercury are available for long-range atmospheric transport. Mercury mapping in Segovia in 2011 suggest a 10% reduction in airborne mercury concentrations over 2010, despite a 30% increase in gold production. This is attributable to the adoption of retorts by miners and regulations banning new processing centres to the rural periphery. This is the first full description of artisanal mining gold shop practices and of the character, quantity, and remediation of mercury emissions within urban mining centres. PMID:23541941

  11. Fostering youth engagement

    E-print Network

    Maynard, Karen Kimberly

    2009-05-15

    FOSTERING YOUTH ENGAGEMENT: A MODEL OF YOUTH VOICE, EMPOWERMENT, AND PARTICIPATION A Thesis by KAREN KIMBERLY MAYNARD Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 2008 Major Subject: Recreation, Park, and Tourism Sciences FOSTERING YOUTH ENGAGEMENT: A MODEL OF YOUTH VOICE, EMPOWERMENT, AND PARTICIPATION A Thesis by KAREN KIMBERLY MAYNARD Submitted...

  12. Marginal Abatement Costs and Marginal Welfare Costs for Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reductions: Results from the EPPA Model

    E-print Network

    Morris, Jennifer

    Marginal abatement cost (MAC) curves, relationships between tons of emissions abated and the CO2 (or GHG) price, have been widely used as pedagogic devices to illustrate simple economic concepts such as the benefits of ...

  13. Waste abatement: recycling, disposal practices can cut costs.

    PubMed

    Paul, A; Strout, P

    1997-09-01

    On average, most healthcare facilities are doing less than they should in the areas of source reduction and recycling, and will likely do so until mandated by law. The main reasons for this are ever-tightening healthcare budgets, limited staffing, and the cost of operating recycling programs compared to the cost of general solid waste disposal. Poor record keeping also may also be hampering the final decision to recycle. This article, Part II on waste abatement practices in healthcare organizations, examines what factors facilities should consider in establishing a recycling program, and analyzes cost-effective collection and disposal practices. PMID:10173843

  14. Environmental electrochemistry: Fundamentals and applications in pollution abatement

    SciTech Connect

    Rajeshwar, K.; Ibanez, J.

    1996-12-31

    Electrochemistry is used both to detect and quantitatively analyze pollutants and to undertake the remediation of polluted environments. In these areas electrochemistry offers the advantages of detectability, selectivity, portability, and cost effectiveness. This book is a comprehensive review that covers a vast amount of territory, from basic electrochemical science to the use of commercially available remediation procedures. The first three chapters are introductory in nature. The subjects covered in chapters 4--7 include: electroanalytical techniques, electrochemical approaches to pollution abatement, photoelectrochemical methods for treating polluted air and water, and the disinfection of water.

  15. ASSESSMENT OF ASSAY METHODS FOR EVALUATING ASBESTOS ABATEMENT TECHNOLOGY AT THE CORVALLIS ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air sampling was conducted at an EPA office building which had undergone an asbestos abatement program. The aggressive sampling technique revealed that air-entrainable asbestos remained in work areas after completion of abatement actions. The ratio of aggressive to nonagressive P...

  16. 29 CFR 1903.14a - Petitions for modification of abatement date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR INSPECTIONS, CITATIONS AND PROPOSED PENALTIES § 1903.14a...comply with the abatement requirements of a citation, but such abatement has not been completed...States Department of Labor who issued the citation no later than the close of the...

  17. 29 CFR 1903.14a - Petitions for modification of abatement date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR INSPECTIONS, CITATIONS AND PROPOSED PENALTIES § 1903.14a...comply with the abatement requirements of a citation, but such abatement has not been completed...States Department of Labor who issued the citation no later than the close of the...

  18. 29 CFR 1903.14a - Petitions for modification of abatement date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR INSPECTIONS, CITATIONS AND PROPOSED PENALTIES § 1903.14a...comply with the abatement requirements of a citation, but such abatement has not been completed...States Department of Labor who issued the citation no later than the close of the...

  19. 29 CFR 1903.14a - Petitions for modification of abatement date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR INSPECTIONS, CITATIONS AND PROPOSED PENALTIES § 1903.14a...comply with the abatement requirements of a citation, but such abatement has not been completed...States Department of Labor who issued the citation no later than the close of the...

  20. 29 CFR 1903.14a - Petitions for modification of abatement date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR INSPECTIONS, CITATIONS AND PROPOSED PENALTIES § 1903.14a...comply with the abatement requirements of a citation, but such abatement has not been completed...States Department of Labor who issued the citation no later than the close of the...

  1. Optimal management scenarios for the artisanal fisheries in the ecosystem of La Paz Bay, Baja California Sur, Mexico

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francisco Arregu??n-Sánchez; Agust??n Hernández-Herrera; Mauricio Ram??rez-Rodr??guez; Horacio Pérez-España

    2004-01-01

    In La Paz Bay, two artisanal fisheries operate, one based on hook-and-line, targeting snappers and groupers, and the other mainly based on gillnets, targeting species such as tilefish and haemulids. A shrimp fishery, which is not permitted to expand, also operates. We analyzed various harvesting strategies with the Ecopath with Ecosim modelling software, using catch-and-effort data for target species to

  2. Key questions regarding work engagement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arnold B. Bakker; Simon L. Albrecht; Michael P. Leiter

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses the concept of work engagement and summarizes research on its most important antecedents. The authors formulate 10 key questions and shape a research agenda for engagement. In addition to the conceptual development and measurement of enduring work engagement, the authors discuss the importance of state work engagement. Further, they argue that the social context is crucial and

  3. Field study of the safety of Abate for treating potable water and observations on the effectiveness of a control programme involving both Abate and malathion*

    PubMed Central

    Laws, Edward R.; Sedlak, Vincent A.; Miles, James W.; Joseph, Charles Romney; Lacomba, Juan R.; Rivera, Andres Diaz

    1968-01-01

    Abate is a larvicide for Aedes aegypti, a vector of yellow fever, dengue, and haemorrhagic fever. It is less toxic than malathion or DDT. Tests in human volunteers had previously indicated it would be safe to add to drinking-water where the mosquito often breeds. In a 19-month test in Puerto Rico, Abate was added to the drums and cisterns in which a community of about 2000 persons stored their drinking-water. This use of Abate and other insecticidal measures (malathion spraying) gradually achieved control of A. aegypti during the first 4 months of treatment and control was maintained thereafter although the test area was surrounded by active breeding-sites. There was no accumulation of Abate in the water in spite of monthly additions of the compound. With minor exceptions, residents readily accepted this use of Abate. Careful surveillance failed to reveal any illness or significant side-effects attributable to measures adopted in the control programme. Abate is considered safe for full-scale field use according to directions. PMID:5302335

  4. Introduction to the Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Mark J [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides an introduction to a long-term biological monitoring program and the Environmental Management special issue titled Long-term Biological Monitoring of an Impaired Stream: Implications for Environmental Management. The Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program, or BMAP, was implemented to assess biological impairment downstream of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, beginning in 1985. Several of the unique aspects of the program include its long-term consistent sampling, a focus on evaluating the effectiveness of specific facility abatement and remedial actions, and the use of quantitative sampling protocols using a multidisciplinary approach. This paper describes the need and importance of long-term watershed-based biological monitoring strategies, in particular for addressing long-term stewardship goals at DOE sites, and provides a summary of the BMAP's objectives, spatial and temporal extent, and overall focus. The primary components of the biological monitoring program for East Fork Poplar Creek in Oak Ridge, Tennessee are introduced, as are the additional 9 papers in this Environmental Management special issue.

  5. Styrene emission abatement in a bathtub manufacturing plant

    SciTech Connect

    Niezgodski, D.M. [Weatherly Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    EPA is moving forward on promulgating the National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP-MACT) for the Reinforced Plastics/Composites Source Category which affects styrene emitters like the American Standard plant. While most composites manufacturers are taking a wait and see approach, American Standard realized the need to move foreward with the controls. Styrene has a reputation of being a difficult VOC to abate. Most adsorption technologies shy away from this monomer due to reactions that cause fires. Weatherly refined their treatment of styrene emissions with experience from installations at similar plants in Europe. Weatherly installed a 35,000 scfm concentrator/oxidation Polyad{trademark} system in 1996 at American Standard`s bathtub manufacturing plant in Salem, Ohio. The styrene emissions are captured in the spray booth exhaust and discharged to the Polyad{trademark} system. The system is achieving 93% removal efficiency on the styrene emissions. This paper will describe the Weatherly Polyad{trademark} VOC abatement system at American Standard`s Salem Ohio plant.

  6. Posición de la lente intraocular por biomicroscopia ultrasónica en pacientes operados de catarata traumática y con lentes intraoculares fáquicas Artisan\\/Artiflex Position of intraocular lens by ultrasonic biomicroscopy in patients operated on from trauma cataract and with Artisan\\/Artiflex phakic intraocular lens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yanay Ramos Pereira; Yanele Ruiz Rodríguez; Armando Capote Cabrera; Eneida Pérez Candelaria; Juan Raúl; Hernández Silva; Belkys Rodríguez Suárez

    OBJECTIVE: to determine the relationship of the position of intraocular lens in patients operated on from trauma cataract and from high myopia with the Artisan\\/Artiflex phakic intraocular lens implant at \\

  7. Music Researchers' Musical Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wollner, Clemens; Ginsborg, Jane; Williamon, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    There is an increasing awareness of the importance of reflexivity across various disciplines, which encourages researchers to scrutinize their research perspectives. In order to contextualize and reflect upon research in music, this study explores the musical background, current level of musical engagement and the listening habits of music…

  8. Adolescent Engagement and Alienation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathunde, Kevin

    2001-01-01

    Delineates the mismatch between adolescent needs and school contexts, pointing out necessity for more hand-and- head work for better integration of abstract and concrete processes, sensory richness, and a variety of engagement opportunities. Suggests that schools move beyond the usual precollegiate over-emphasis on higher reasoning skills,…

  9. Parental Engagement with Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Joanna; Harbinson, Terence

    2010-01-01

    A programme of parental engagement with school science is described, in which parents and their children take part in scientific debate and practical science lessons. Three sessions, in biology, chemistry and physics, of this ongoing programme are described, through which parents have been able to support their children by learning science with…

  10. Mars Public Engagement Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Christine

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Mars public engagement goal to understand and protect our home planet, explore the Universe and search for life, and to inspire the next generation of explorers. Teacher workshops, robotics education, Mars student imaging and analysis programs, MARS Student Imaging Project (MSIP), Russian student participation, MARS museum visualization alliance, and commercialization concepts are all addressed in this project.

  11. Actively Engaging Educators to

    E-print Network

    models of service delivery to children and their families. The Foster Care component care and in schools with educators, social service administrators, foster parents, and community Services: Foster Kids and Education With MSU Outreach & Engagement Partnerships and the School of Social

  12. Involvement or Engagement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferlazzo, Larry

    2011-01-01

    To create the kinds of school-family partnerships that raise student achievement, improve local communities, and increase public support, schools need to understand the difference between family involvement and family engagement. Schools that emphasize the latter tend toward doing with families, rather than doing to families. These schools do more…

  13. Collaborative engagement experiment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Katherine Mullens; Bradley Troyer; Robert Wade; Brian Skibba; Michael Dunn

    2006-01-01

    Unmanned ground and air systems operating in collaboration have the potential to provide future Joint Forces a significant capability for operations in complex terrain. Collaborative Engagement Experiment (CEE) is a consolidation of separate Air Force, Army and Navy collaborative efforts within the Joint Robotics Program (JRP) to provide a picture of the future of unmanned warfare. The Air Force Research

  14. Employer Engagement in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Anthony; Dawkins, James

    2014-01-01

    The subject of this paper is employer engagement in education as it supports the learning and progression of young people through activities including work experience, job shadowing, workplace visits, career talks, mock interviews, CV workshops, business mentoring, enterprise competitions and the provision of learning resources. Interest has grown…

  15. Employee engagement – completely

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patrick Townsend; Joan Gebhardt

    2008-01-01

    Purpose – Looks at how the world has changed in terms of providing goods and services and what that means to the employees providing them Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Examines how a complete quality process can encourage employee engagement. Findings – A complete quality process takes concentration and times: surprisingly little time. The elapsed time between the decision to pursue this option

  16. ENGAGING UNH Corporate Resources

    E-print Network

    New Hampshire, University of

    .Sciences.and.Engineering Materials.Sciences Social.and.Health.Sciences Sustainability.Programs TABLE OF CONTENTS #12;CorporateENGAGING UNH Corporate Resources www.unh.edu/corporateresources Strategic relationships to connect the University's educational, research, and outreach mission with your corporate or company goals 2007 Connecting

  17. Feeding goats on scrubby Mexican rangeland and pasteurization: influences on milk and artisan cheese quality

    PubMed Central

    Hilario, Mario Cuchillo; Wrage, Nicole; Pérez-Gil R., Fernando

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of foraging on local scrubby rangeland versus stable feeding with high-protein concentrate as well as the compulsory pasteurization process on goats’ milk and artisan soft cheese quality in terms of chemical composition and fatty acid profile. The results indicated that there were no significant differences in the energy, fat, or ash content of milk and cheese due to feeding; however, a significant influence of feeding on cheese protein and fatty acids in both milk and cheese was detected. Feeding on scrubby rangeland tended to increase the amounts of major polyunsaturated fatty acids in milk and cheese from goats. Pasteurization, which is mandatory in Mexico, did not alter the fatty acid concentrations in milk or cheese. Small goat-keepers using rangeland resources might claim better economical returns for products recognized as healthier. Further investigations to assure ecosystem sustainability of shrubby rangeland joined with economical evaluations and best animal management to avoid deleterious effects are recommended. PMID:20229357

  18. A survey of the lactic acid bacteria isolated from Serbian artisanal dairy product kajmak.

    PubMed

    Jokovic, Natasa; Nikolic, Milica; Begovic, Jelena; Jovcic, Branko; Savic, Dragisa; Topisirovic, Ljubisa

    2008-10-31

    Kajmak is an artisanal Serbian dairy product made by fermentation of milk fat. Overall, 374 bacterial isolates were collected from six kajmak samples of different ages produced in the households located in distinct regions of Serbia. In order to identify lactic acid bacteria present in chosen samples of kajmak, total 349 Gram-positive and catalase-negative isolates were analyzed. The recognition of isolates was performed by phenotypic characterization followed by molecular identification using (GTG)(5)-PCR and sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene. Leuconostoc mesenteroides and Enterococcus faecium were the most frequently isolated species from kajmak samples. In contrast, leuconostocs and enterococci were found in BGMK3 and BGMK1 kajmak respectively, only after using enrichment technique for isolation suggesting they are present in low numbers in these kajmaks. Lactococcus lactis, Lactococcus raffinolactis and Lactococcus garvieae were also found in those samples but in lower proportion. Results showed that Lactobacillus plantarum, Lb. paracasei and Lb. kefiri were the most frequently isolated Lactobacillus species in analyzed kajmaks. PMID:18775578

  19. Diversity of lactic acid bacteria in two Flemish artisan raw milk Gouda-type cheeses.

    PubMed

    Van Hoorde, Koenraad; Verstraete, Tine; Vandamme, Peter; Huys, Geert

    2008-10-01

    PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) was used to study the diversity of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in two Flemish artisan raw milk Gouda-type cheeses. In parallel, conventional culturing was performed. Isolates were identified using (GTG)(5)-PCR and sequence analysis of 16S rRNA and pheS genes. Discriminant analysis revealed some differences in overall LAB diversity between the two batches and between the two cheeses. Within each batch, the diversity of 8- and 12-week-old cheeses was relatively similar. Conventional isolation mainly revealed the presence of Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Pediococcus pentosaceus. PCR-DGGE revealed the presence of three species of which no isolates were recovered, i.e. Enterococcus faecalis, Lactobacillus parabuchneri and Lactobacillus gallinarum. Conversely, not all isolated bacteria were detected by PCR-DGGE. We recommend the integrated use of culture-dependent and -independent approaches to maximally encompass the taxonomic spectrum of LAB occurring in Gouda-type and other cheeses. PMID:18721684

  20. Mercury exposures and symptoms in smelting workers of artisanal mercury mines in Wuchuan, Guizhou, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Feng, Xinbin; Qiu, Guangle; Li, Zhonggen; Fu, Xuewu; Sakamoto, Minishi; Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, Dingyong

    2008-05-01

    Mercury exposures to smelting workers of artisanal mercury mines in Wuchuan, Guizhou, China were evaluated by urine and hair mercury survey. The mean urinary mercury (U-Hg), hair total mercury (T-Hg), and hair methyl mercury (Me-Hg) for smelting workers was 1060 microg/g creatinine (microg/g Cr), 69.3 and 2.32 microg/g, respectively. The results were significantly higher than that of control group, which is 1.30 microg/g Cr, 0.78 and 0.65 microg/g, correspondingly. The average urinary beta2-microglobulin (beta2-MG) was 248 microg/g Cr for the exposed group contrasting to 73.5 microg/g Cr for the control group and the data showed a serious adverse effect on renal system for the smelting workers. The workers were exposed to mercury vapor through inhalation, and the exposure route of Me-Hg may be through intake of polluted diet. The results indicate that age, alcohol drinking, and smoking are not crucial factors controlling the urine and hair mercury levels for the exposed and the control group. Clinical symptoms including finger and eyelid tremor, gingivitis, and typical dark-line on gums were observed in six workers. This study indicated that the smelting workers in Wuchuan were seriously exposed to mercury vapor. PMID:17897640

  1. SMA Hybrid Composites for Dynamic Response Abatement Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.

    2000-01-01

    A recently developed constitutive model and a finite element formulation for predicting the thermomechanical response of Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) hybrid composite (SMAHC) structures is briefly described. Attention is focused on constrained recovery behavior in this study, but the constitutive formulation is also capable of modeling restrained or free recovery. Numerical results are shown for glass/epoxy panel specimens with embedded Nitinol actuators subjected to thermal and acoustic loads. Control of thermal buckling, random response, sonic fatigue, and transmission loss are demonstrated and compared to conventional approaches including addition of conventional composite layers and a constrained layer damping treatment. Embedded SMA actuators are shown to be significantly more effective in dynamic response abatement applications than the conventional approaches and are attractive for combination with other passive and/or active approaches.

  2. Rotary concentrator followed by thermal or catalytic oxidation - a hybrid approach to economical styrene abatement

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, A. [Duerr Industries, Inc., Plymouth, MI (United States)

    1997-12-31

    There are varied challenges in deciding appropriate technology for styrene abatement. Due to high costs of using RTOs for styrene abatement the small businesses, which form the bulk of styrene emitters, are faced with economically difficult choices. The proposed Rotary Concentrator technology can reduce operating cost up to six times and reduce CO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions by more than half over the currently preferred RTO technology. It is also less expensive in capital expenditure and its viability for styrene abatement has been sufficiently demonstrated by pilot studies in the US and existing installations overseas. In both cases styrene destruction of more than 95% was achieved.

  3. Intermittent control procedures for the Geysers hydrogen sulfide emission abatement

    SciTech Connect

    Buick, B.D.; Mooney, M.L.

    1984-01-01

    Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG and E) operates the world's largest geothermal steam electric power generation facility, currently about 1.140 megawatts (Mw). This facility is located about 80 miles north of San Francisco, California and is within a region referred to as the Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA). Pollutants resulting from this method of electric power generation are due to impurities in the geothermal steam. A major contaminate in the steam is hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S), a regulated pollutant in California. The ambient air quality standard (AAQS) for this pollutant in California is 0.03 parts per million (ppM) averaged over one hour. H/sub 2/S is an invisible, unpleasant smelling gas present in varying concentrations in the geothermal steam. Its odor has been compared to the smell of rotten eggs. Since PG and E is increasingly relying on this source of electrical power generation, it has committed millions of dollars to the development, testing, acquisition, and installation of abatement equipment to reduce H/sub 2/S emissions during the past ten years. In order to reduce the number of exceeds of the AAQS during this developmental period, a predictive model was needed for interim abatement purposes. Most of the high hourly H/sub 2/S values occur with meteorological conditions having poor ventilation resulting from a combination of low wind speed and reduced mixing layer depths. This weather condition is most common during the months of June through October in California. A predictive model was developed from three years of hourly H/sub 2/S measurements of 0.03 ppM or greater in populated areas downwind of the generation facility and from observations of associated meteorological data.

  4. Scholarship-Focused Outreach and Engagement Public Scholarship, Civic Engagement,

    E-print Network

    Scholarship-Focused Outreach and Engagement Public Scholarship, Civic Engagement, and Campus-Community Partnerships Hiram E. Fitzgerald, Ph.D. Associate Provost, University Outreach and Engagement Michigan State the student experience · Enrich community, economic, and family life · Expand international reach · Increase

  5. Engaging with community engagement: public libraries and citizen involvement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anne Goulding

    2009-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore the concept of community engagement within a public library context Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The paper analyses selected literature discussing the concept of community engagement, focusing particularly on that considering community engagement activities in public libraries. Key issues are illustrated using examples from the literature and data from an interview-based study of

  6. Career Engagement: Bridging Career Counseling and Employee Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neault, Roberta A.; Pickerell, Deirdre A.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors present a model of career engagement that helps bridge the gap between career counselors' focus on supporting individuals to find meaningful work and employers' desire for an engaged, productive, and committed workforce. They briefly review highlights of the employee engagement literature, introduce the Career…

  7. Science Education & Civic Engagement

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The mission of the Science Education & Civic Engagement Journal is "to explore constructive connections between science education and civic engagement that will enhance both experiences for our students." The journal is edited by an international team, including professors from the University of Johannesburg and Santa Clara University. The journal has been published twice a year since 2007 and visitors can access all of the issues on this site. On the homepage, visitors can look over recently published articles, such as "Designing Healthy Meals to Counter Nutrition-Related Diseases: A Learning Activity." Also, visitors can read over submission guidelines, learn about the editorial board, and also look through back issues for articles of interest.

  8. Collaborative engagement experiment (CEE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Robert L.; Reames, Joseph M.

    2005-05-01

    Unmanned ground and air systems operating in collaboration have the potential to provide future Joint Forces a significant capability for operations in complex terrain. Ground and air collaborative engagements potentially offer force conservation, perform timely acquisition and dissemination of essential combat information, and can eliminate high value and time critical targets. These engagements can also add considerably to force survivability by reducing soldier and equipment exposure during critical operations. The Office of the Secretary of Defense, Joint Robotics Program (JRP) sponsored Collaborative Engagement Experiment (CEE) is a consolidation of separate Air Force, Army and Navy collaborative efforts to provide a Joint capability. The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), Material and Manufacturing Directorate, Aerospace Expeditionary Force Division, Force Protection Branch (AFRLMLQF), The Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) Joint Technology Center (JTC)/Systems Integration Laboratory (SIL), and the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center-San Diego (SSC San Diego) are conducting technical research and proof of principle for an envisioned operational concept for extended range, three dimensional, collaborative operations between unmanned systems, with enhanced situational awareness for lethal operations in complex terrain. This program will assess information requirements and conduct experiments to identify and resolve technical risks for collaborative engagements using Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGVs) and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). It will research, develop and physically integrate multiple unmanned systems and conduct live collaborative experiments. Modeling and Simulation systems will be upgraded to reflect engineering fidelity levels to greater understand technical challenges to operate as a team. This paper will provide an update of a multi-year program and will concentrate primarily on the JTC/SIL efforts. Other papers will outline in detail the Air Force and Navy portions of this effort.

  9. Engaging Stakeholders in Curriculum Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Jo Nell

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates the importance of parent and community engagement in curriculum development, along with curriculum leadership, engaging stakeholders, and the importance of curriculum. Parent and community member engagement is examined in light of curriculum committee participation as reported by Missouri superintendents. Survey responses…

  10. Phrase versus Phase: Family Engagement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Margaret M. Ferrara

    2011-01-01

    A qualitative research design was developed to explore a simple question: Is “family engagement” simply a new phrase or is it a synonym for “family involvement?” This study explored to what degree school leaders gained an understanding of family engagement; more importantly, to what degree did the administrators and teachers implement” family engagement” by the end of the first year?

  11. Results Report Employee Engagement Survey

    E-print Network

    Results Report Employee Engagement Survey October 2011 Report for: Colorado School of Mines (033 or strongly agreed to an item) - the percent of employees who feel good about a topic. Internal Best: Average Percent Favorable across the most engaged groups across the organization (i.e., top 20% on Engagement

  12. Employee Engagement: Manipulation or Voice?

    E-print Network

    Viglas, Anastasios

    Employee Engagement: Manipulation or Voice? David E Guest Department of Management King's College, London Sydney University Seminar: December 2013 #12;The Interest in Engagement · Focus of academic and implications for the workforce #12;Structure of Presentation · Explore the meanings of engagement · Evaluate

  13. QUANTITATIVE EVALUATION OF AIR FILTRATION SYSTEMS IN USE AT ASBESTOS ABATEMENT SITES: RESEARCH IN PROGRESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filtration systems serve as the principal engineering control to remove asbestos particulate from airstreams at abatement projects. owever, little quantitative information is available on the integrity of these air filtration systems in prev...

  14. What Governmental Agencies Should Look for in a Mosquito Abatement Company

    E-print Network

    Renchie, Don L.

    2005-10-06

    Cities, counties and school districts often must contract for mosquito control services. This publication explains what Texas law requires of pest control companies and what a contract for mosquito abatement should contain....

  15. COMBINED SEWER OVERFLOW ABATEMENT PROGRAM, ROCHESTER, NY. VOLUME II. PILOT PLANT EVALUATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The pilot plant treatability studies were designed to interact with combined sewer overflow (CSO) monitoring and system modeling efforts for the Rochester Pure Water District with the ultimate objective of evaluating CSO abatement alternatives. The studies covered treatment by th...

  16. Analysis of post-Kyoto CO? emissions trading using marginal abatement curves

    E-print Network

    Ellerman, A. Denny.; Decaux, Annelène.

    Marginal abatement curves (MACs) are often used heuristically to demonstrate the advantages of emissions trading. In this paper, the authors derive MACs from EPPA, the MIT Joint Program's computable general equilibrium ...

  17. 29 CFR 1960.30 - Abatement of unsafe or unhealthful working conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...employee representatives, and all personnel subject to the hazard shall be advised of this action and of interim protective measures in effect, and shall be kept informed of subsequent progress on the abatement plan. (e) When a hazard cannot...

  18. 30 CFR 75.401 - Abatement of dust; water or water with a wetting agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Combustible Materials and Rock Dusting § 75.401 Abatement of dust; water or water with a wetting agent. [Statutory Provision] Where...

  19. 30 CFR 75.401 - Abatement of dust; water or water with a wetting agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Combustible Materials and Rock Dusting § 75.401 Abatement of dust; water or water with a wetting agent. [Statutory Provision] Where...

  20. 30 CFR 75.401 - Abatement of dust; water or water with a wetting agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Combustible Materials and Rock Dusting § 75.401 Abatement of dust; water or water with a wetting agent. [Statutory Provision] Where...

  1. 30 CFR 75.401 - Abatement of dust; water or water with a wetting agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Combustible Materials and Rock Dusting § 75.401 Abatement of dust; water or water with a wetting agent. [Statutory Provision] Where...

  2. 23 CFR 772.9 - Analysis of traffic noise impacts and abatement measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...measures. 772.9 Section 772.9 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RIGHT-OF-WAY AND ENVIRONMENT PROCEDURES FOR ABATEMENT OF HIGHWAY TRAFFIC NOISE AND CONSTRUCTION NOISE § 772.9...

  3. What Governmental Agencies Should Look for in a Mosquito Abatement Company 

    E-print Network

    Renchie, Don L.

    2005-10-06

    Cities, counties and school districts often must contract for mosquito control services. This publication explains what Texas law requires of pest control companies and what a contract for mosquito abatement should contain....

  4. General equilibrium, electricity generation technologies and the cost of carbon abatement: A structural sensitivity analysis

    E-print Network

    General equilibrium, electricity generation technologies and the cost of carbon abatement-down General equilibrium Electricity generation is a major contributor to carbon dioxide emissions Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Electricity generation is a significant contributor

  5. 23 CFR 772.9 - Analysis of traffic noise impacts and abatement measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...impacts, giving weight to the benefits and cost of abatement, and to the overall social, economic and environmental effects. (b) The...developed lands, and undeveloped lands for which development is planned, designed and programmed,...

  6. Optimal CO 2 Abatement in the Presence of Induced Technological Change

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lawrence H. Goulder; Koshy Mathai

    2000-01-01

    This paper explores the significance of policy-induced technological change for the design of carbon-abatement policies. We derive analytical expressions characterizing optimal CO2 abatement and carbon tax profiles under different specifications for the channels through which technological progress occurs. We consider both R&D-based and learning-by-doing-based knowledge accumulation, and we examine each specification under both a cost-effectiveness and a benefit–cost policy criterion.We

  7. Artisan iris-fixated toric phakic intraocular lens for the correction of high astigmatism after deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty.

    PubMed

    Al-Dreihi, Madonna G; Louka, Bachar I; Anbari, Anas A

    2013-01-01

    We report the refractive correction of high astigmatism in one eye of a 23-year-old woman following deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (DALK) using an Artisan iris-fixated, toric, phakic intraocular lens (IOL). One year after implantation, uncorrected and corrected distance visual acuities were both 20/25, refraction was -1.00 D cylinder, and the endothelial cell count was 1827 cells/mm(2). Iris-fixated phakic IOLs are not recommended for every postkeratoplasty patient with high refractive error; however, this procedure can offer good outcomes in carefully selected cases of previous DALK. PMID:24109249

  8. A review of "The Artisan of Ipswich: Craftmanship and Community in Colonial New England" by Robert Tarule.

    E-print Network

    William J. Scheick

    2004-01-01

    Dennis, an English joiner who immigrated to Ipswich in 1663. By the time of his death in 1706, his particular joining skills were pass?, supplanted by more fash- ionable sawn-board cabinet work. Nevertheless, in his day Dennis was highly regarded... as an artisan, and today his carved furniture is collected by connoisseurs. In 1670, it is interesting to note, he was convicted of and fined for felling more trees than his commu- nity grant permitted. Much of what Tarule reveals is imagined through Dennis...

  9. Aphakia correction with retropupillary fixated iris-claw lens (Artisan) – long-term results

    PubMed Central

    Schallenberg, Maurice; Dekowski, Dirk; Hahn, Angela; Laube, Thomas; Steuhl, Klaus-Peter; Meller, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the technique, safety, and efficacy of the retropupillary implantation of iris-claw intraocular lenses in a long-term follow-up study. Patients and methods This retrospective study included 31 eyes of 31 patients who underwent an Artisan aphakic intraocular lens implantation between January 2006 and February 2011 at the University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany and at the Zentrum für Augenheilkunde PD Dr Laube, Düsseldorf, Germany. Preoperative data collected included demographics, etiology of aphakia, previous surgeries, preoperative eye pathology, intraocular pressure, clinical signs of endothelial cell loss, and best corrected visual acuity. Operative data and postoperative outcomes included the best corrected visual acuity, lens position, intraocular pressure, pigment dispersion, clinical signs of endothelial cell loss, development of macular edema, and other complications. Results Thirty-one patients were included. The mean follow-up was 25.2 months (range: 4–48 months). The mean best corrected visual acuity postoperatively was 0.64 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR) and varied from 0 logMAR to 3 logMAR. Some patients had a low visual acuity preoperatively because of preoperative eye pathologies. In 22 patients the visual acuity improved, in two patients the visual acuity remained unchanged, and seven patients showed a decreased visual acuity. Complications were peaked pupils (n=10) and retinal detachment in one case. Four patients showed an iris atrophy and high intraocular pressure was observed only in one patient. Subluxation of the intraocular lens, endothelial cell loss, and macular edema were not observed. Conclusion The presented long-term results demonstrate that retropupillary iris-claw lens implantation is a safe and effective method for the correction of aphakia in patients without capsule support. This surgical procedure has the advantages of a posterior chamber implantation with a low intraoperative and postoperative risk profile. PMID:24391439

  10. Local ecological knowledge and scientific data reveal overexploitation by multigear artisanal fisheries in the southwestern Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Bender, Mariana G; Machado, Gustavo R; Silva, Paulo José de Azevedo; Floeter, Sergio R; Monteiro-Netto, Cassiano; Luiz, Osmar J; Ferreira, Carlos E L

    2014-01-01

    In the last decades, a number of studies based on historical records revealed the diversity loss in the oceans and human-induced changes to marine ecosystems. These studies have improved our understanding of the human impacts in the oceans. They also drew attention to the shifting baseline syndrome and the importance of assessing appropriate sources of data in order to build the most reliable environmental baseline. Here we amassed information from artisanal fishermen's local ecological knowledge, fisheries landing data and underwater visual census to assess the decline of fish species in Southeastern Brazil. Interviews with 214 fishermen from line, beach seine and spearfishing revealed a sharp decline in abundance of the bluefish Pomatomus saltatrix, the groupers Epinephelus marginatus, Mycteroperca acutirostris, M. bonaci and M. microlepis, and large parrotfishes in the past six decades. Fisheries landing data from a 16-year period support the decline of bluefish as pointed by fishermen's local knowledge, while underwater visual census campaigns show reductions in groupers' abundance and a sharp population decline of the Brazilian endemic parrotfish Scarus trispinosus. Despite the marked decline of these fisheries, younger and less experienced fishermen recognized fewer species as overexploited and fishing sites as depleted than older and more experienced fishermen, indicating the occurrence of the shifting baseline syndrome. Here we show both the decline of multigear fisheries catches - combining anecdotal and scientific data - as well as changes in environmental perceptions over generations of fishermen. Managing ocean resources requires looking into the past, and into traditional knowledge, bringing historical baselines to the present and improving public awareness. PMID:25333661

  11. Characterization of the bacterial biodiversity in Pico cheese (an artisanal Azorean food).

    PubMed

    Riquelme, Cristina; Câmara, Sandra; Dapkevicius, Maria de Lurdes N Enes; Vinuesa, Pablo; da Silva, Célia Costa Gomes; Malcata, F Xavier; Rego, Oldemiro A

    2015-01-01

    This work presents the first study on the bacterial communities in Pico cheese, a traditional cheese of the Azores (Portugal), made from raw cow's milk. Pyrosequencing of tagged amplicons of the V3-V4 regions of the 16S rDNA and Operational Taxonomic Unit-based (OTU-based) analysis were applied to obtain an overall idea of the microbiota in Pico cheese and to elucidate possible differences between cheese-makers (A, B and C) and maturation times. Pyrosequencing revealed a high bacterial diversity in Pico cheese. Four phyla (Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes) and 54 genera were identified. The predominant genus was Lactococcus (77% of the sequences). Sequences belonging to major cheese-borne pathogens were not found. Staphylococcus accounted for 0.5% of the sequences. Significant differences in bacterial community composition were observed between cheese-maker B and the other two units that participated in the study. However, OTU analysis identified a set of taxa (Lactococcus, Streptococcus, Acinetobacter, Enterococcus, Lactobacillus, Staphylococcus, Rothia, Pantoea and unclassified genera belonging to the Enterobacteriaceae family) that would represent the core components of artisanal Pico cheese microbiota. A diverse bacterial community was present at early maturation, with an increase in the number of phylotypes up to 2 weeks, followed by a decrease at the end of ripening. The most remarkable trend in abundance patterns throughout ripening was an increase in the number of sequences belonging to the Lactobacillus genus, with a concomitant decrease in Acinetobacter, and Stenotrophomonas. Microbial rank abundance curves showed that Pico cheese's bacterial communities are characterized by a few dominant taxa and many low-abundance, highly diverse taxa that integrate the so-called "rare biosphere". PMID:25440551

  12. Scope for active noise abatement in vehicle diesel engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summerauer, I.; Boesch, N.

    1984-04-01

    Noise reduction measures must be directed to the engine, the exhaust system, and the cooling system (fan) all of which contribute approximately 90% of the sound energy emitted from commercial diesel trucks. The noise generation processes were visualized and limiting conditions fixed by law were considered in establishing criteria for active solar noise abatement measures. A more effective silencer and better vibration damping on the surface of the silencer and exhaust pipes can reduce noise from the exhaust system. Acoustic emission generated by the fan and air flow can be reduced by decreasing flow velocity or by turning on the fan only when a full cooling output is required (10% of the time). Active measures are needed on the engine itself either at the point of the solid-borne sound transmission or at the point of the solid-borne vibrations. The predominant effect is on the engine casing; oil sump; air suction pipe or air charge line; the flywheel casing; and the clutch housing.

  13. Risk management for sulfur dioxide abatement under multiple uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, C.; Sun, W.; Tan, Q.; Liu, Y.; Lu, W. T.; Guo, H. C.

    2015-04-01

    In this study, interval-parameter programming, two-stage stochastic programming (TSP), and conditional value-at-risk (CVaR) were incorporated into a general optimization framework, leading to an interval-parameter CVaR-based two-stage programming (ICTP) method. The ICTP method had several advantages: (i) its objective function simultaneously took expected cost and risk cost into consideration, and also used discrete random variables and discrete intervals to reflect uncertain properties; (ii) it quantitatively evaluated the right tail of distributions of random variables which could better calculate the risk of violated environmental standards; (iii) it was useful for helping decision makers to analyze the trade-offs between cost and risk; and (iv) it was effective to penalize the second-stage costs, as well as to capture the notion of risk in stochastic programming. The developed model was applied to sulfur dioxide abatement in an air quality management system. The results indicated that the ICTP method could be used for generating a series of air quality management schemes under different risk-aversion levels, for identifying desired air quality management strategies for decision makers, and for considering a proper balance between system economy and environmental quality.

  14. Engaging with Policy Makers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, R.; Miller, S.; Heward, A.

    2011-10-01

    The need to engage with Europe's policy makers is more crucial now than ever. MEPs' understanding of the contribution and importance of planetary science to European research, industry, culture, education and job-creation may have major implications for both the direction of research and future funding for Europe's planetary science community. The mid-term review of the European Commission's Seventh Framework Programme is currently in progress and these discussions will feed into the drafting of Framework Eight. With space-going nations around the world redefining priorities, Europe may have an opportunity to take a lead in planetology on a global scale. This should be taken into account when considering planetology within the frameworks of the European Space Policy. This panel discussion, hosted by Dr Robert Massey, Deputy Executive of the Royal Astronomical Session, will look at engaging with policy makers from the point of view of those working in the European Parliament, European Commission, industry, as well as the planetary community.

  15. Effects of river impoundment on ecosystem services of large tropical rivers: embodied energy and market value of artisanal fisheries.

    PubMed

    Hoeinghaus, David J; Agostinho, Angelo A; Gomes, Luiz C; Pelicice, Fernando M; Okada, Edson K; Latini, João D; Kashiwaqui, Elaine A L; Winemiller, Kirk O

    2009-10-01

    Applying the ecosystem services concept to conservation initiatives or in managing ecosystem services requires understanding how environmental impacts affect the ecology of key species or functional groups providing the services. We examined effects of river impoundments, one of the leading threats to freshwater biodiversity, on an important ecosystem service provided by large tropical rivers (i.e., artisanal fisheries). The societal and economic importance of this ecosystem service in developing countries may provide leverage to advance conservation agendas where future impoundments are being considered. We assessed impoundment effects on the energetic costs of fisheries production (embodied energy) and commercial market value of the artisanal fishery of the Paraná River, Brazil, before and after formation of Itaipu Reservoir. High-value migratory species that dominated the fishery before the impoundment was built constituted a minor component of the contemporary fishery that is based heavily on reservoir-adapted introduced species. Cascading effects of river impoundment resulted in a mismatch between embodied energy and market value: energetic costs of fisheries production increased, whereas market value decreased. This was partially attributable to changes in species functional composition but also strongly linked to species identities that affected market value as a result of consumer preferences even when species were functionally similar. Similar trends are expected in other large tropical rivers following impoundment. In addition to identifying consequences of a common anthropogenic impact on an important ecosystem service, our assessment provides insight into the sustainability of fisheries production in tropical rivers and priorities for regional biodiversity conservation. PMID:19459891

  16. Is the Cape Roux marine protected area (Saint-Raphaël, Mediterranean Sea) an efficient tool to sustain artisanal fisheries? First indications from visual censuses and trammel net sampling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Catherine Seytre; Patrice Francoura

    2008-01-01

    In recent decades, marine reserves have been established either to protect ecosystem structure and biolog- ical diversity or to serve as management tools to counter the overexploitation of fish stocks. The Cape Roux marine protected area (MPA), in the Mediterranean Sea, was established in December 2003 for the management of artisanal fisheries and enhancement target fish stocks. Monitoring of littoral

  17. Operational interaction between South American sea lions Otaria flavescens and artisanal (small-scale) fishing in Chile: Results from interview surveys and on-board observations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Sepúlveda; M. J. Pérez; W. Sielfeld; D. Oliva; L. R. Durán; L. Rodríguez; V. Araos; M. Buscaglia

    2007-01-01

    A longstanding competition for fishery resources has existed in Chile between the South American sea lion (Otaria flavescens) and artisanal (small-scale) fisheries. This competition is viewed as a conflict by the fishermen because sea lions prey on fish caught in their fishing gear, often causing its damage. The objective of the study was to describe the interaction between sea lions

  18. The New School Collaborates: Organization and Communication in Immersive International Field Programs with Artisan Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    Under the umbrella terms of "humanitarian design," "social design" and "social responsibility," educational institutions and specifically design programs are more and more searching for opportunities to engage their students in critical and hands-on learning via collaborations between students, faculty, communities in need and nonprofit…

  19. Injury Profiles Associated with Artisanal and Small-Scale Gold Mining in Tarkwa, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Calys-Tagoe, Benedict N L; Ovadje, Lauretta; Clarke, Edith; Basu, Niladri; Robins, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Artisanal and small-scale gold mining (ASGM) is inherently risky, but little is known about mining-associated hazards and injuries despite the tremendous growth worldwide of ASGM and the benefits it offers. The current study aimed to characterize the physical injuries associated with ASGM in Ghana to guide policy formulation. A cross-sectional survey was carried out in the Tarkwa mining district of the Western Region of Ghana in 2014. A total of 404 small-scale miners were recruited and interviewed regarding their occupational injury experiences over the preceding 10 years using a paper-based structured questionnaire. Nearly one-quarter (23.5%) of the miners interviewed reported getting injured over the previous 10 years, and the overall injury rate was calculated to be 5.39 per 100 person years. The rate was significantly higher for women (11.93 per 100 person years) and those with little mining experience (e.g., 25.31 per 100 person years for those with less than one year of work experience). The most injury-prone mining activities were excavation (58.7%) and crushing (23.1%), and over 70% of the injuries were reported to be due to miners being hit by an object. The majority of the injuries (57%) were lacerations, and nearly 70% of the injuries were to the upper or lower limbs. Approximately one-third (34.7%) of the injuries resulted in miners missing more than two weeks of work. One-quarter of the injured workers believed that abnormal work pressure played a role in their injuries, and nearly two-fifths believed that their injuries could have been prevented, with many citing personal protective equipment as a solution. About one-quarter of the employees reported that their employers never seemed to be interested in the welfare or safety of their employees. These findings greatly advance our understanding of occupational hazards and injuries amongst ASGM workers and help identify several intervention points. PMID:26184264

  20. Collaborative engagement experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullens, Katherine; Troyer, Bradley; Wade, Robert; Skibba, Brian; Dunn, Michael

    2006-05-01

    Unmanned ground and air systems operating in collaboration have the potential to provide future Joint Forces a significant capability for operations in complex terrain. Collaborative Engagement Experiment (CEE) is a consolidation of separate Air Force, Army and Navy collaborative efforts within the Joint Robotics Program (JRP) to provide a picture of the future of unmanned warfare. The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), Material and Manufacturing Directorate, Aerospace Expeditionary Force Division, Force Protection Branch (AFRL/MLQF), The Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) Joint Technology Center (JTC)/Systems Integration Laboratory (SIL), and the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center - San Diego (SSC San Diego) are conducting technical research and proof of principle experiments for an envisioned operational concept for extended range, three dimensional, collaborative operations between unmanned systems, with enhanced situational awareness for lethal operations in complex terrain. This paper describes the work by these organizations to date and outlines some of the plans for future work.

  1. Engaging Digital Tibet

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Columbia Center for New Media Teaching and Learning presents this resource for the study of Tibet. Primarily a database of digital objects, Engaging Digital Tibet provides tools that should enable instructors to create valuable learning experiences. For each object, lengthy annotations are provided, often linked to various details of the item. A silk Hevajra Tapestry, ca. 13th century, can be displayed accompanied by 9 notes, contextualizing the piece, explaining that Hevajra is a semi-wrathful form of Buddha, discussing the symbolism of the tapestry, and that it was created for religious use. There is also a bibliographic note with citations for more information, both online and in print. Another example is a 20th century Medicine Buddha Wall Mural located inside the Amgon Monastery. The object comes complete with a formal analysis, pointing out that although the mural was created for religious purposes, it is indeed a work of art.

  2. Conceptualizing Engagement: Contributions of Faculty to Student Engagement in Engineering

    Microsoft Academic Search

    HELEN L. CHEN; LISA R. LATTUCA; ERIC R. HAMILTON

    The concept of student engagement, now prominent in the engi- neering education and higher education communities, has a long intellectual history. Yet only recently has attention focused on the role that faculty play as designers of educational environments to support student engagement. Drawing from examples and data from the Engineering Change study (which evaluated the impact of the new EC2000

  3. Adult Music Engagement: Perspectives from Three Musically Engaged Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Darrin H.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the phenomenon of adult music engagement from the perspectives of musically engaged adults not currently participating in activities that are direct extensions of the typical K-12 music curriculum. Three participants were purposefully chosen and include an avid listener, a church praise team member, and a…

  4. Mast cells are required for phototolerance induction and scratching abatement.

    PubMed

    Schweintzger, Nina A; Bambach, Isabella; Reginato, Eleonora; Mayer, Gerlinde; Limón-Flores, Alberto Y; Ullrich, Stephen E; Byrne, Scott N; Wolf, Peter

    2015-07-01

    Dermal mast cells protect the skin from inflammatory effects of ultraviolet (UV) radiation and are required for UV-induced immune suppression. We sought to determine a potential mechanistic role of mast cells in reducing the sensitivity to UV radiation (i.e. phototolerance induction) through photohardening. We administered single UV exposures as well as a chronic UV irradiation regime to mast cell-deficient Kit(W-Sh/W-Sh) mice and their controls. The chronic irradiation protocol was similar to that given for prophylaxis in certain photodermatoses in humans. Compared to controls, UV-exposed Kit(W-Sh/W-Sh) mice were more susceptible to epidermal hyperplasia and dermal oedema which was linked to blood vessel dilation. Unexpectedly, Kit(W-Sh/W-Sh) mice exhibited an excessive scratching behaviour following broadband UVB plus UVA or solar simulated UV irradiation at doses far below their minimal skin-swelling dose. Protection from this UV-induced scratching phenotype was dependent on mast cells, as engraftment of bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells abated it entirely. Kit(W-Sh/W-Sh) mice were entirely resistant to phototolerance induction by photohardening treatment. Compared to controls, these mice also showed reduced numbers of regulatory T cells and neutrophils in the skin 24 h after UV irradiation. While it is well known that mast cell-deficient mice are resistant to UV-induced immune suppression, we have discovered that they are prone to develop photo-itch and are more susceptible to UV-induced epidermal hyperplasia and skin oedema. PMID:25776520

  5. Abatement of perfluorinated compounds using microwave plasmas at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabouzi, Y.; Moisan, M.; Rostaing, J. C.; Trassy, C.; Guérin, D.; Kéroack, D.; Zakrzewski, Z.

    2003-06-01

    Microwave plasmas sustained at atmospheric pressure, for instance by electromagnetic surface waves, can be efficiently used to abate greenhouse-effect gases such as perfluorinated compounds. As a working example, we study the destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) of SF6 at concentrations ranging from 0.1% to 2.4% of the total gas flow where N2, utilized as a purge gas, is the carrier gas. O2 is added to the mixture at a fixed ratio of 1.2-1.5 times the concentration of SF6 to ensure full oxidation of the SF6 fragments, providing thereby scrubbable by-products. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy has been utilized for identification of the by-products and quantification of the residual concentration of SF6. Optical emission spectroscopy was employed to determine the gas temperature of the nitrogen plasma. In terms of operating parameters, the DRE is found to increase with increasing microwave power and decrease with increasing gas flow rate and discharge tube radius. Increasing the microwave power, in the case of a surface-wave discharge, or decreasing the gas flow rate increases the residence time of the molecules to be processed, hence, the observed DRE increase. In contrast, increasing the tube radius or the gas-flow rate increases the degree of radial contraction of the discharge and, therefore, the plasma-free space close to the tube wall: this comparatively colder region favors the reformation of the fragmented SF6 molecules, and enlarging it lowers the destruction rate. DRE values higher than 95% have been achieved at a microwave power of 6 kW with 2.4% SF6 in N2 flow rates up to 30 standard l/min.

  6. Facilitating University Engagement with Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weerts, David J.

    2007-01-01

    During the past decade, leaders of university engagement have strived to create reciprocal relationships between their campuses and the external partners they serve. Relying on a knowledge flow theoretical framework, this article examines the concept of university engagement in the context of school-university partnerships. Challenges and…

  7. Engaged Time in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns E., Beverly H.; Crowley, Paula; Guetzloe, Eleanor

    2008-01-01

    Foremost in an effective curriculum for students with emotional and behavioral disorder (E/BD) is a high level of engaged time--time spent doing meaningful learning activities. Engaged time (time-on-task) is the portion of instructional time that students spend directly involved in learning activities. Walker and Severson (1992) defined the…

  8. Student Engagement and Study Abroad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rourke, Liam; Kanuka, Heather

    2012-01-01

    In this study the authors assessed student engagement during a short-term study-abroad program using the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE). Data were collected from a group of Canadian undergraduates spending six weeks in Mexico. Their program included a 10-day bus tour, three half-credit courses, and accommodations with local families.…

  9. Student Engagement: Rhetoric and Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baron, Paula; Corbin, Lillian

    2012-01-01

    Recently, there has been much interest in higher education literature and policy on the concepts of student engagement and disengagement. While most academic writings recognise the significance of student engagement, they have tended to concentrate on it in relation to academic activities. Increasingly, universities are "cascading" down the need…

  10. Affordable moving surface target engagement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Veth; J. Busque; D. Heesch; T. Burgess; F. Douglas; B. Kish

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency-funded Affordable Moving Surface Target Engagement program. The overall objective was to develop affordable technologies to engage moving surface targets such as tanks, tactical ballistic missile transporters and small boats. The Northrop Grumman team used moving target indicator sensors on multiple aircraft to individually track moving ground targets. Report

  11. Improvement of lake water quality by paying farmers to abate nonpoint source pollution. Research report

    SciTech Connect

    Lupi, F.; Farnsworth, R.L.; Braden, J.B.

    1988-12-01

    To mitigate damages caused by agricultural runoff, private lake owners' associations are paying for inlake and instream pollution abatement measures and on land-conservation practices. This phenomenon supports the notion that individuals who benefit from improved water quality should be willing to pay part of the abatement costs. The research suggests that on land-conservation measures can substantially reduce sediment delivery at low cost. The Sediment Economics (SEDEC) model was modified and then used to select and to site management systems that achieved stated sediment goals at least cost. Other resource policies such as T value, no-till, and contouring were compared with the least-cost frontier and shown to be more costly. The noncropland areas substantially reduced sediment delivery to water channels and lowered abatement costs. Further research is needed for long-range watershed-planning models such as SEDEC.

  12. Achieving a transmission-electron-microscopy clearance criterion at asbestos abatement sites in ew Jersey

    SciTech Connect

    Brownlee, J.A.; Lucas, J.H.; Walls, K.J.; Murphy, J.J.; DiNardo, C.

    1988-10-01

    Representatives of the New Jersey Department of Health's Asbestos Control Service conducted final clearance evaluations at 79 schools where asbestos removal took place during the Summer of 1987. The evaluations entailed a thorough visual inspection of each abatement area by an experienced inspector, the performance of aggressive air sampling, and sample analysis by transmission electron microscopy (Yamate-revised Method). Each abatement site was evaluated against an absolute air-clearance criterion of 0.01 fiber per cubic centimeter (f/cu cm). The results of the study support the premise that a thorough visual inspection strongly influences passing a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) clearance test. These data also demonstrate that post-abatement air concentrations that meet the clearance criterion (0.01 f/cu cm) can be achieved by a detailed cleaning, thorough visual inspection, and subsequent use of aggressive air-sampling techniques.

  13. OBSERVATIONAL STUDY OF FINAL CLEANING AND AHERA CLEARANCE SAMPLING AT ASBESTOS-ABATEMENT SITES IN NEW JERSEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was conducted during the summer of 1988 to document final cleaning procedures and evaluate Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA) clearance air sampling practices used at 20 asbestos-abatement sites in New Jersey. Each abatement took place in a school building and...

  14. Using performance indicators to evaluate an environmental education program in artisanal gold mining communities in the Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Rodolfo N; Veiga, Marcello M

    2009-02-01

    The Tapajos River Basin in the Brazilian Amazon is the location of one of the largest concentrations of artisanal and small-scale miners in the world. Today, 40,000 miners produce 8 t of gold annum(-1) and at least double this amount of mercury is released into the environment. This region was selected under the Global Mercury Project, a United Nations program that aims to reduce the environmental and health impacts caused by mercury through the application of cleaner technologies and increased awareness. A group of educators provided support to miners, training 4200 people in 141 mining locations. The effectiveness of this training was evaluated based on 20 performance indicators. After 120 days of training, an absolute improvement of approximately 29% had been achieved. As a result of this training, it is estimated that annual mercury emissions in Tapajos have been reduced by 1762 kg or around 10% of the total mercury released in the region. PMID:19260346

  15. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Cardoso, Goncalo; Megel, Olivier; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy

    2009-08-15

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBL) is working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) to determine the role of distributed generation (DG) in greenhouse gas reductions. The impact of DG on large industrial sites is well known, and mostly, the potentials are already harvested. In contrast, little is known about the impact of DG on commercial buildings with peak electric loads ranging from 100 kW to 5 MW. We examine how DG with combined heat and power (CHP) may be implemented within the context of a cost minimizing microgrid that is able to adopt and operate various smart energy technologies, such as thermal and photovoltaic (PV) on-site generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and storage systems. We use a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that has the minimization of a site's annual energy costs as objective. Using 138 representative commercial sites in California (CA) with existing tariff rates and technology data, we find the greenhouse gas reduction potential for California's commercial sector. This paper shows results from the ongoing research project and finished work from a two year U.S. Department of Energy research project. To show the impact of the different technologies on CO2 emissions, several sensitivity runs for different climate zones within CA with different technology performance expectations for 2020 were performed. The considered sites can contribute between 1 Mt/a and 1.8 Mt/a to the California Air Resources Board (CARB) goal of 6.7Mt/a CO2 abatement potential in 2020. Also, with lower PV and storage costs as well as consideration of a CO2 pricing scheme, our results indicate that PV and electric storage adoption can compete rather than supplement each other when the tariff structure and costs of electricity supply have been taken into consideration. To satisfy the site's objective of minimizing energy costs, the batteries will be charged also by CHP systems during off-peak and mid-peak hours and not only by PV during sunny on-peak hours.

  16. Environmental assessment of mercury contamination from the Rwamagasa artisanal gold mining centre, Geita District, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Taylor, H; Appleton, J D; Lister, R; Smith, B; Chitamweba, D; Mkumbo, O; Machiwa, J F; Tesha, A L; Beinhoff, C

    2005-05-01

    This study presents the results of an environmental assessment of mercury (Hg) contamination in the Rwamagasa artisanal gold mining area, northwest Tanzania, and the potential downstream dispersion along the River Malagarasi to Lake Tanganyika. At the time of sampling, generally low concentrations of Hg (<0.05 mg/kg) occurred in most cultivated soils although higher Hg (0.05-9.2 mg/kg) was recorded in urban soils and vegetable plot soils where these are impacted by Hg-contaminated water and sediment derived from mineral processing activities. Hg in vegetable and grain samples is mostly below the detection limit of 0.004 mg/kg Hg, apart from 0.007 and 0.092 mg/kg Hg in two yam samples and 0.011 to 0.013 mg/kg Hg in three rice samples. The standardized (i.e., standardized to 10 cm length) Hg concentrations in Clarias spp. increase from about 0.01 mg Hg/kg for the River Malagarasi delta to 0.07, 0.2, and 1.6 mg/kg, respectively, for the Rwamagasa 'background', moderately and most contaminated sites. For piscivorous (Lates, Brycinus, and Hydrocynus spp.), insectivorous (Barbus spp.), and planktivorous (Haplochromis spp.) fish species, the 10-cm standardized Hg concentrations increase from about 0.006 mg/kg for the River Malagarasi-Lake Tanganyika area to 0.5 and 3.5 mg/kg, respectively, for the Rwamagasa moderately and most contaminated sites. The low concentrations of Hg in fish from the Malagarasi River delta and Lake Tanganyika indicate that Hg contamination from the Rwamagasa area does not have a readily discernible impact on the biota of Lake Tanganyika. Many of the fish samples from Rwamagasa exceed guidelines for human consumption (0.5 mg/kg) as well as the WHO recommended limit for vulnerable groups (0.2 mg/kg). Tissue total Hg (THg) of all fish collected from the River Malagarasi-Lake Tanganyika subarea is well below these guidelines. Potential human exposure through consumption of 300 g/day of rice grown on Hg-contaminated soils is 5.5 microg/week. Consumption of 250 g Nile perch (Lates spp.), 500 g tilapia (Oreochromis spp.), and 250 g of catfish (Clarias spp.) each week would result in an intake of 65 microg Hg/week for people consuming only fish from the Mara and Mwanza regions of Lake Victoria and 116 microg Hg/week for people in the Rwamagasa area consuming tilapia and Nile perch from Lake Victoria and catfish from mining-impacted streams. This is lower than the Provisional Tolerable Weekly Intake (PTWI) of 300 microg for Hg in the diet set by the WHO and the FAO. Inadvertent ingestion of soil containing 9 mg Hg/kg at a rate of 80 mg/day would give an additional estimated weekly intake of 5 microg THg, whereas the persistent and purposeful consumption of soil (geophagia) at a rate of 26 g soil/day would produce an additional chemical exposure of 230 microg Hg/day. PMID:15862840

  17. Tobacco litter costs and public policy: a framework and methodology for considering the use of fees to offset abatement costs

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, N Andrew; Kiss, Noemi; Ebeid, Omar; Doyle, Alexis S

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Growing concern over the costs, environmental impact and safety of tobacco product litter (TPL) has prompted states and cities to undertake a variety of policy initiatives, of which litter abatement fees are part. The present work describes a framework and methodology for calculating TPL costs and abatement fees. Methods Abatement is associated with four categories of costs: (1) mechanical and manual abatement from streets, sidewalks and public places, (2) mechanical and manual abatement from storm water and sewer treatment systems, (3) the costs associated with harm to the ecosystem and harm to industries dependent on clean and healthy ecosystems, and (4) the costs associated with direct harm to human health. The experiences of the City of San Francisco's recently proposed tobacco litter abatement fee serve as a case study. Results City and municipal TPL costs are incurred through manual and mechanical clean-up of surfaces and catchment areas. According to some studies, public litter abatement costs to US cities range from US$3 million to US$16 million. TPL typically comprises between 22% and 36% of all visible litter, implying that total public TPL direct abatement costs range from about US$0.5 million to US$6 million for a city the size of San Francisco. The costs of mitigating the negative externalities of TPL in a city the size of San Francisco can be offset by implementing a fee of approximately US$0.20 per pack. Conclusions Tobacco litter abatement costs to cities can be substantial, even when the costs of potential environmental pollution and tourism effects are excluded. One public policy option to address tobacco litter is levying of fees on cigarettes sold. The methodology described here for calculating TPL costs and abatement fees may be useful to state and local authorities who are considering adoption of this policy initiative. PMID:21504923

  18. Therapeutic engagement: a proposed model of engagement in medical rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Lequerica, Anthony H; Kortte, Kathleen

    2010-05-01

    A major goal of physical medicine and rehabilitation is the recovery of function after an injury or the underlying medical condition that has caused impairment in one's daily functioning. The rehabilitation process involves a complex interplay of many factors that influence how well a person benefits from medical rehabilitation. There is burgeoning evidence that for patients to maximize rehabilitation benefits, they must be actively involved or engaged in the process. In this article, the construct of therapeutic engagement is defined, and a theoretical model is proposed to illustrate how and why individuals engage in medical rehabilitation treatment. It is hoped that such a model can form the basis for further research on therapeutic engagement that facilitates the understanding of the process variables that play a role in rehabilitation outcomes. Areas for future research and the implications for clinical application are discussed. PMID:20407308

  19. National Center for Media Engagement

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Funded by the Center for Public Broadcasting, the National Center for Media Engagement is dedicated to supporting "public media organizations nationwide in engaging their communities." They provide resources for stations and producers to engage citizens in a range of platforms, and their website is a great place to learn about their work. On the homepage, visitors will find seven sections, including "Think & Strategize", "Plan & Design", "Execute", "Renew & Upgrade" and "Communicate Impact". Public media organizations will be able to use these sections to use social media to communicate their mission to the public. Further down on the homepage, visitors can also learn about "Public Media Stories of Impact". These stories are taken from a range of public media organizations, such as pieces from Austin on the arts community and Columbus, Ohio's work on community engagement. It's also worth taking a look at their blog, which contains direct links to other resources created by public radio and television stations from around the United States.

  20. 30 CFR 75.401 - Abatement of dust; water or water with a wetting agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    Where underground mining operations in active workings create or raise excessive amounts of dust, water or water with a wetting agent added to it, or other no less effective methods approved by the Secretary or his authorized representative, shall be used to abate such...

  1. ACHIEVING A TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY CLEARANCE CRITERION AT ASBESTOS ABATEMENT SITES IN NEW JERSEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Representatives of the New Jersey Department of Health's Asbestos Control Service conducted final clearance evaluations at 79 schools where asbestos removal took place during the Summer of 1987. The evaluations entailed a thorough visual inspection of each abatement area by an ex...

  2. Guidelines for Assessment and Abatement of Asbestos-Containing Materials in Buildings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pielert, James H.; Mathey, Robert G.

    This report presents guidelines, based on available information, for the assessment and abatement of asbestos-containing materials in buildings. Section 1 provides background information on the history and use of asbestos-containing products in buildings, the characteristics of asbestos fibers, products and materials containing asbestos, and…

  3. Abatement and Pollution Control Training and Educational Programs Presented by the United States Environmental Protection Agency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    This catalog is a compilation of training course and educational program descriptions in abatement and pollution control scheduled by the Environmental Protection Agency. Descriptions of programs include prerequisites, class size, and length of time with the content goals. Also given is general information concerning tuition fees, waiver requests,…

  4. Beating Poisson encapsulation statistics using close-packed ordering Adam R. Abate,a

    E-print Network

    Weeks, Eric R.

    Beating Poisson encapsulation statistics using close-packed ordering Adam R. Abate,a Chia-Hung Chen statistics lead to a large number of empty drops with a much smaller number having a single particle. Moreover, it is slow, having a maximum speed of only a few hertz. Alternatively, inertial ordering can

  5. WET/DRY COOLING SYSTEMS FOR FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS: WATER CONSERVATION AND PLUME ABATEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of technical and economic feasibilities of wet/dry cooling towers for water conservation and vapor plume abatement. Results of cost optimizations of wet/dry cooling for 1000-MWe fossil-fueled power plants are presented. Five sites in the wester...

  6. PHOTOCATALYTIC OXIDATION FOR NOx ABATEMENT: DEVELOPMENT OF A KINETIC EXPRESSION AND DESIGN TOOLS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rajiv Srivastava; M. A. Ebadian

    2000-01-01

    The ''Nitrogen Oxides Emission Reduction Program'' and ''Ozone Non-Attainment Program'' in the 1990 Clean Air Act provide guidelines for controlling NOx (NO and NOâ) emissions in new and existing stationary sources. NOx emissions have local (air quality), regional (acid rain), and global (ozone production) consequences. This study aids in developing the photocatalyst technology that has potential for use in abatement

  7. Molecular simulation design of a multisite solid for the abatement of cold start emissions.

    PubMed

    Puértolas, B; Navlani-García, M; López, J M; García, T; Murillo, R; Mastral, A M; Navarro, M V; Lozano-Castelló, D; Bueno-López, A; Cazorla-Amorós, D

    2012-07-01

    A highly effective hydrocarbon (HC) trap for the abatement of cold start HC emissions with specific adsorption sites for the different molecules present in the exhaust gases has been designed by means of molecular simulation tools, and later synthesized. PMID:22627844

  8. Control Systems Design, SC4026 SC4026 Fall 2009, dr. A. Abate, DCSC, TU Delft

    E-print Network

    Abate, Alessandro

    and the steam engine. The centrifugal governor on the left consists of a set of flyballs that spread apart as the speed of the engine increases. The steam engine on the right uses a centrifugal governor (above engineering: a few examples SC4026 Fall 2009, dr. A. Abate, DCSC, TU Delft 1 #12;The concept of feedback

  9. PROCESS DESIGN AND CONTROL Market-Based Pollution Abatement Strategies: Risk Management

    E-print Network

    Maranas, Costas

    for the availability of derivative instruments such as emission option contracts. The model quantifies the benefitsPROCESS DESIGN AND CONTROL Market-Based Pollution Abatement Strategies: Risk Management Using Emission Option Contracts Anshuman Gupta and Costas D. Maranas* Department of Chemical Engineering

  10. Box Invariance for biologically-inspired dynamical systems Alessandro Abate Ashish Tiwari Shankar Sastry

    E-print Network

    Tiwari, Ashish

    Box Invariance for biologically-inspired dynamical systems Alessandro Abate Ashish Tiwari Shankar@csl.sri.com Abstract-- In this paper, motivated by models drawn from biology, we introduce the notion of box invariant dynamical systems. We argue that box invariance, that is, the existence of a "box"-shaped positively

  11. Box Invariance for biologically-inspired dynamical systems Alessandro Abate Ashish Tiwari Shankar Sastry

    E-print Network

    Abate, Alessandro

    Box Invariance for biologically-inspired dynamical systems Alessandro Abate Ashish Tiwari Shankar of box invariant dynamical systems. We argue that box invariance, that is, the existence of a box-shaped positively invariant region, is a characteristic of many biologically-inspired dynamical models. Box

  12. SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY/X-RAY FLUORESCENCE CHARACTERIZATION OF POST-ABATEMENT DUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and laboratory X-ray fluorescence (XRF) were used to characterize post-abatement dust collected with a HEPA filtered vacuum. hree size fractions of resuspended dust (0-30 pm, 2.5-15 pm, and ...

  13. Optimal Management of a Eutrophied Coastal Ecosystem: Balancing Agricultural and Municipal Abatement Measures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marita Laukkanen; Anni Huhtala

    2006-01-01

    Agriculture and municipal wastewater are the principal sources of eutrophying nutrients in many water ecosystems. We develop a model which considers the characteristics of agricultural and municipal nutrient abatement. The model explicitly accounts for the investment needed to set up wastewater treatment facilities, and makes it possible to determine the optimal timing of investment as well as the optimal agricultural

  14. Optimal Management of a Eutrophied Coastal Ecosystem: Balancing Agricultural and Municipal Abatement Measures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marita Laukkanenand Anni Huhtalay

    Agriculture and municipal wastewater are the principal sources of eutrophying nutrients in many water ecosystems. We develop a model which considers the char- acteristics of agricultural and municipal nutrient abatement. The model explicitly accounts for the investment needed to set up wastewater treatment facilities, and makes it possible to determine the optimal timing of investment as well as the optimal

  15. Optimal combination of pollution prevention and abatement policies: The case of agricultural drainage

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Farhed Shah; David Zilberman; Erik Lichtenberg

    1995-01-01

    The adoption of pollution prevention and abatement practices is examined in the context of a model of exhaustible resource use with a backstop technology. For the sake of concreteness, the paper focuses on the problem of water-logging caused by the subsurface accumulation of agricultural drainwater. In modelling this problem, a region's underground capacity to store drainwater is considered an exhaustible

  16. An analysis of the role of tile-drained farmland under alternative nitrogen abatement policies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural nitrogen is a major contributor to Gulf of Mexico hypoxia, and research has shown that agricultural drainage is a major reason why. This work compared the results of abating nitrogen under a land-efficient policy with those of a cost-efficient policy, paying particular attention to the...

  17. ECOLOGICAL RESPONSES TO POLLUTION ABATEMENT: A FRAMEWORK FOR MEASUREMENT AND ASSESSMENT FOR COASTAL ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecological Responses to Pollution Abatement: A Framework for Measurement and Assessment for Coastal Ecosystems (Abstract). To be presented at the 16th Biennial Conference of the Estuarine Research Foundation, ERF 2001: An Estuarine Odyssey, 4-8 November 2001, St. Pete Beach, FL. ...

  18. Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Applied Research: Luciano L'Abate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Luciano L'Abate, recipient of the Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Applied Research, contributed to applied research through the introduction of the laboratory method in clinical psychology assessment and intervention, leading to the development of the first automated playroom, linking play therapy with research in child…

  19. Effects of dietary ABATE? on reproductive success, duckling survival, behavior, and clinical pathology in game-farm mallards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J.C.; Spann, J.W.; Heinz, G.H.; Bunck, C.M.; Lamont, T.

    1983-01-01

    Forty-four pairs of game-farm mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) were fed ABATE? E (temephos) to yield 0, 1, or 10 ppm ABATE? beginning before the initiation of lay, and terminating when ducklings were 21 days of age. The mean interval between eggs laid was greater for hens fed 10 ppm ABATE? than for controls. Clutch size, fertility, hatchability, nest attentiveness of incubating hens, and avoidance behavior of ducklings were not significantly affected by ABATE? ingestion. The percentage survival of ducklings to 21 days of age was significantly lower in both treated groups than in controls, but brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was not inhibited in young which died before termination of the study. In 21-day-old ducklings, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activity increased and plasma nonspecific cholinesterase (ChE) activity was inhibited by about 20% in both treatment groups, but there were no significant differences in brain AChE or plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activities, or plasma uric acid concentration. Clinical chemistry values of adults were not affected. No ABATE?, ABATE? sulfoxide, or ABATE? sulfone residues were found in eggs or tissue samples.

  20. CO2 abatement costs of greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation by different biogas conversion pathways.

    PubMed

    Rehl, T; Müller, J

    2013-01-15

    Biogas will be of increasing importance in the future as a factor in reducing greenhouse gas emissions cost-efficiently by the optimal use of available resources and technologies. The goal of this study was to identify the most ecological and economical use of a given resource (organic waste from residential, commercial and industry sectors) using one specific treatment technology (anaerobic digestion) but applying different energy conversion technologies. Average and marginal abatement costs were calculated based on Life Cycle Cost (LCC) and Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) methodologies. Eight new biogas systems producing electricity, heat, gas or automotive fuel were analyzed in order to identify the most cost-efficient way of reducing GHG emissions. A system using a combined heat and power station (which is connected to waste treatment and digestion operation facilities and located nearby potential residential, commercial or industrial heat users) was found to be the most cost-efficient biogas technology for reducing GHG emissions. Up to € 198 per tonne of CO(2) equivalents can be saved by replacing the "business as usual" systems based on fossil resources with ones based on biogas. Limited gas injection (desulfurized and dried biogas, without compression and upgrading) into the gas grid can also be a viable option with an abatement cost saving of € 72 per tonne of CO(2) equivalents, while a heating plant with a district heating grid or a system based on biogas results in higher abatement costs (€ 267 and € 270 per tonne CO(2) eq). Results from all systems are significantly influenced by whether average or marginal data are used as a reference. Beside that energy efficiency, the reference system that was replaced and the by-products as well as feedstock and investment costs were identified to be parameters with major impacts on abatement costs. The quantitative analysis was completed by a discussion of the role that abatement cost methodology can play in decision-making. PMID:23201601

  1. Higher Education and Civic Engagement: Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Peter

    2006-01-01

    CIRCLE has recently published three detailed fact sheets that update, refine, and in some respects complicate, our knowledge of the links between college education and civic engagement (see "College Attendance and Civic Engagement Among 18 to 25 Year Olds," "Civic Engagement among Recent College Graduates," and "Civic Engagement among 2-year and…

  2. Integration: Faculty Creating Connections Across Engaged

    E-print Network

    staff employees Office of University Outreach & Engagement ­ Academic support office, reports to ProvostIntegration: Faculty Creating Connections Across Engaged Research, Teaching, and Service Diane M of University Engagement University Outreach and Engagement, Michigan State University connordm@msu.edu National

  3. February 7, 2011 Employee Engagement Survey

    E-print Network

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    February 7, 2011 Employee Engagement Survey Employee Feedback Continues to Shape the Health System, the Health System will conduct an Employee Engagement Survey in follow up to the employee engagement surveys conducted in 2007 and 2009. The Employee Engagement Survey provides employees with an opportunity to take

  4. How can leaders achieve high employee engagement?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jessica Xu; Helena Cooper Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – Organizations aspire to have engaged employees, and spend considerable resources to measure and improve employee engagement. Theoretically, leadership is a key antecedent of engagement, yet there is no research directly linking leader behaviors and follower engagement. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the evidence for such a link. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Research was conducted with a large

  5. Measuring Engagement in Fourth to Twelfth Grade Classrooms: The Classroom Engagement Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Ze; Bergin, Christi; Bergin, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Research on factors that may promote engagement is hampered by the absence of a measure of classroom-level engagement. Literature has suggested that engagement may have 3 dimensions--affective, behavioral, and cognitive. No existing engagement scales measure all 3 dimensions at the classroom level. The Classroom Engagement Inventory (CEI) was…

  6. A perfect match: decoding employee engagement – Part I: Engaging cultures and leaders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cristina de Mello e Souza Wildermuth; Patrick David Pauken

    2008-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this two-part article is to introduce engagement and review key research on engagement-related factors. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The author conducted a literature search on employee engagement and pilot interviews with ten professionals. Findings – Environment, leadership, job, and individual factors are connected to employee engagement. Environmental engagement factors include congruency between organizational and individual values, the

  7. Engagement and Uncertainty: Emerging Technologies Challenge the Work of Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, Weston; Wright, Wynne; Whyte, Kyle; Gasteyer, Stephen P.; Gehrke, Pat J.

    2014-01-01

    Universities' increasing applications of science and technology to address a wide array of societal problems may serve to thwart democratic engagement strategies. For emerging technologies, such challenges are particularly salient, as knowledge is incomplete and application and impact are uncertain or contested. Insights from science and…

  8. The effect of noise-abatement profiles on noise immissions and human annoyance underneath a subsequent climbpath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbell, Maurice A.

    1990-01-01

    En route noise emissions on the ground can be affected by the detailed characteristics of intended noise-abatement climb profiles and procedures to an extent of 10 or more nautical miles from the start of the takeoff roll of a large or heavy air-carrier-type aircraft. Suggestions submitted to the noise abatement officials of the airports at Frankfurt, Federal Republic of Germany, and Zurick, Switzerland, and the aircarriers Lufthansa German Airlines and SWISSAIR are explained and discussed.

  9. A study of personal and area airborne asbestos concentrations during asbestos abatement: a statistical evaluation of fibre concentration data.

    PubMed

    Lange, J H; Lange, P R; Reinhard, T K; Thomulka, K W

    1996-08-01

    Data were collected and analysed on airborne concentrations of asbestos generated by abatement of different asbestos-containing materials using various removal practices. Airborne concentrations of asbestos are dramatically variable among the types of asbestos-containing material being abated. Abatement practices evaluated in this study were removal of boiler/pipe insulation in a crawl space, ceiling tile, transite, floor tile/mastic with traditional methods, and mastic removal with a high-efficiency particulate air filter blast track (shot-blast) machine. In general, abatement of boiler and pipe insulation produces the highest airborne fibre levels, while abatement of floor tile and mastic was observed to be the lowest. A comparison of matched personal and area samples was not significantly different, and exhibited a good correlation using regression analysis. After adjusting data for outliers, personal sample fibre concentrations were greater than area sample fibre concentrations. Statistical analysis and sample distribution of airborne asbestos concentrations appear to be best represented in a logarithmic form. Area sample fibre concentrations were shown in this study to have a larger variability than personal measurements. Evaluation of outliers in fibre concentration data and the ability of these values to skew sample populations is presented. The use of personal and area samples in determining exposure, selecting personal protective equipment and its historical relevance as related to future abatement projects is discussed. PMID:8806215

  10. Mercury pollution in Wuchuan mercury mining area, Guizhou, Southwestern China: the impacts from large scale and artisanal mercury mining.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Feng, Xinbin; Qiu, Guangle; Shang, Lihai; Wang, Shaofeng

    2012-07-01

    To evaluate the environmental impacts from large scale mercury mining (LSMM) and artisanal mercury mining (AMM), total mercury (THg) and methyl mercury (MeHg) were determined in mine waste, ambient air, stream water and soil samples collected from Wuchuan mercury (Hg) mining area, Guizhou, Southwestern China. Mine wastes from both LSMM and AMM contained high THg concentrations, which are important Hg contamination sources to the local environment. Total gaseous mercury (TGM) concentrations in the ambient air near AMM furnaces were highly elevated, which indicated that AMM retorting is a major source of Hg emission. THg concentrations in the stream water varied from 43 to 2100 ng/L, where the elevated values were mainly found in the vicinity of AMM and mine waste heaps of LSMM. Surface soils were seriously contaminated with Hg, and land using types and organic matter played an important role in accumulation and transportation of Hg in soil. The results indicated heavy Hg contaminations in the study area, which were resulted from both LSMM and AMM. The areas impacted by LSMM were concentrated in the historical mining and smelting facilities, while Hg pollution resulted from AMM can be distributed anywhere in the Hg mining area. PMID:21600653

  11. Integrated assessment of artisanal and small-scale gold mining in Ghana--part 1: human health review.

    PubMed

    Basu, Niladri; Clarke, Edith; Green, Allyson; Calys-Tagoe, Benedict; Chan, Laurie; Dzodzomenyo, Mawuli; Fobil, Julius; Long, Rachel N; Neitzel, Richard L; Obiri, Samuel; Odei, Eric; Ovadje, Lauretta; Quansah, Reginald; Rajaee, Mozhgon; Wilson, Mark L

    2015-05-01

    This report is one of three synthesis documents produced via an integrated assessment (IA) that aims to increase understanding of artisanal and small-scale gold mining (ASGM) in Ghana. Given the complexities surrounding ASGM, an IA framework was utilized to analyze economic, social, health, and environmental data, and co-develop evidence-based responses with pertinent stakeholders. The current analysis focuses on the health of ASGM miners and community members, and synthesizes extant data from the literature as well as co-authors' recent findings regarding the causes, status, trends, and consequences of ASGM in Ghana. The results provide evidence from across multiple Ghanaian ASGM sites that document relatively high exposures to mercury and other heavy metals, occupational injuries and noise exposure. The work also reviews limited data on psychosocial health, nutrition, cardiovascular and respiratory health, sexual health, and water and sanitation. Taken together, the findings provide a thorough overview of human health issues in Ghanaian ASGM communities. Though more research is needed to further elucidate the relationships between ASGM and health outcomes, the existing research on plausible health consequences of ASGM should guide policies and actions to better address the unique challenges of ASGM in Ghana and potentially elsewhere. PMID:25985314

  12. Integrated Assessment of Artisanal and Small-Scale Gold Mining in Ghana—Part 1: Human Health Review

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Niladri; Clarke, Edith; Green, Allyson; Calys-Tagoe, Benedict; Chan, Laurie; Dzodzomenyo, Mawuli; Fobil, Julius; Long, Rachel N.; Neitzel, Richard L.; Obiri, Samuel; Odei, Eric; Ovadje, Lauretta; Quansah, Reginald; Rajaee, Mozhgon; Wilson, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    This report is one of three synthesis documents produced via an integrated assessment (IA) that aims to increase understanding of artisanal and small-scale gold mining (ASGM) in Ghana. Given the complexities surrounding ASGM, an IA framework was utilized to analyze economic, social, health, and environmental data, and co-develop evidence-based responses with pertinent stakeholders. The current analysis focuses on the health of ASGM miners and community members, and synthesizes extant data from the literature as well as co-authors’ recent findings regarding the causes, status, trends, and consequences of ASGM in Ghana. The results provide evidence from across multiple Ghanaian ASGM sites that document relatively high exposures to mercury and other heavy metals, occupational injuries and noise exposure. The work also reviews limited data on psychosocial health, nutrition, cardiovascular and respiratory health, sexual health, and water and sanitation. Taken together, the findings provide a thorough overview of human health issues in Ghanaian ASGM communities. Though more research is needed to further elucidate the relationships between ASGM and health outcomes, the existing research on plausible health consequences of ASGM should guide policies and actions to better address the unique challenges of ASGM in Ghana and potentially elsewhere. PMID:25985314

  13. Air pollution caused by opencast mining and its abatement measures in India.

    PubMed

    Ghose, M K; Majee, S R

    2001-10-01

    Opencast mining dominates coal production in India. A survey was conducted to evaluate its local atmospheric impact. Emissions data were utilised to compute dust generation due to different mining activities. Work zone air quality, ambient air quality and seasonal variations are described revealing high pollution potential due to suspended particulate matter (SPM) and consequent impact on human health. Air pollution control measures involve planning and implementing a series of preventive and suppressive measures in addition to dust extraction systems. Different abatement measures are enumerated. Pollution control by trees, the tolerance of trees to different air pollutants and plant species useful for controlling pollution are also discussed. There is a need for wider application of dust control chemicals on haul roads. Sustainable management of pollution can be achieved by the proper implementation of suggested abatement measures. PMID:11721598

  14. Modelling air pollution abatement in deep street canyons by means of air scrubbers

    E-print Network

    De Giovanni, Marina; Avveduto, Alessandro; Pace, Lorenzo; Salisburgo, Cesare Dari; Giammaria, Franco; Monaco, Alessio; Spanto, Giuseppe; Tripodi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Deep street canyons are characterized by weak ventilation and recirculation of air. In such environment, the exposure to particulate matter and other air pollutants is enhanced, with a consequent worsening of both safety and health. The main solution adopted by the international community is aimed at the reduction of the emissions. In this theoretical study, we test a new solution: the removal of air pollutants close to their sources by a network of Air Pollution Abatement (APA) devices. The APA technology depletes gaseous and particulate air pollutants by a portable and low-consuming scrubbing system, that mimics the processes of wet and dry deposition. We estimate the potential pollutant abatement efficacy of a single absorber by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method. The presence of the scrubber effectively creates an additional sink at the bottom of the canyon, accelerating its cleaning process by up to 70%, when an almost perfect scrubber (90% efficiency) is simulated. The efficacy of absorber is not...

  15. Understanding Visitor Engagement and Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreiber, James B.; Pekarik, Andrew J.; Hanemann, Nadine; Doering, Zahava; Lee, Ah-Jin

    2013-01-01

    The authors examine a model of visitor engagement that has been in development over the past 3 years at the Smithsonian Institution. A total of 390 visitors comprised the sample with a subsample ("n" = 102) of visitors who were tracked through an exhibit in the National Museum of Natural History. A 5-factor visitor preference model was…

  16. GUIDE READY LISTEN --ENGAGE --EDUCATE

    E-print Network

    Hemmers, Oliver

    REBEL GUIDE READY LISTEN -- ENGAGE -- EDUCATE #12;COMMUNITY2CAMPUS DI VI SIO N O F EDU C AT IO NA L, and guiding. We are strong supporters of your future, and by empowering your academic choices, we are building throughout your educational experience at UNLV. As a result of becoming aware of your educational environment

  17. Thenmozhi Soundararajan Residency Engagement Schedule

    E-print Network

    Virginia Tech

    two people," says Soundararajan. They are ubiquitous forms of communication and those engaged by the Producers Guild of America Diversity Program, The Museum of Contemporary Art, The Annenberg Innovation Narrative Praxis Collaboration funded in part by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. VT Learning

  18. Refreshing Engagement: NSSE at 13

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormick, Alexander C.; Gonyea, Robert M.; Kinzie, Jillian

    2013-01-01

    Thirteen years ago, 276 bachelor's-granting colleges and universities inaugurated a new approach to assessing college quality by participating in the first national administration of the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE). This report summarizes what was learned over the NSSE's first 13 years, why the survey is being updated, and new…

  19. Engaging Immigrant Students. Classroom Tips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Lynn; Bloomdahl, Susana Contreras

    2011-01-01

    For an educator who speaks only English, engaging immigrant English language learners (ELL) in the classroom can be a significant challenge. As a former classroom teacher, elementary school principal and guidance counselor, the authors have worked with immigrant student populations in K-12 schools. They have found that a good way to overcome the…

  20. University Affairs Student Engagement Report

    E-print Network

    de Lijser, Peter

    University Affairs Student Engagement Report FY 2012-2013 Mission Statement The ASI University and concerns about CSUF and to take that feedback and facilitate dialogue about university issues with faculty and administration. Program Overview The ASI University Affairs Committee hosts events and coordinates campaigns

  1. Engaging Students with Audio Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cann, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Students express widespread dissatisfaction with academic feedback. Teaching staff perceive a frequent lack of student engagement with written feedback, much of which goes uncollected or unread. Published evidence shows that audio feedback is highly acceptable to students but is underused. This paper explores methods to produce and deliver audio…

  2. Engage, Enhance, and Extend Learning!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keren-Kolb, Liz

    2013-01-01

    Educators often say that technology is more than a gimmick or add-on, and that it should engage, enhance, or extend learning in ways that traditional tools do not. Yet they seldom stop to define these terms, and they can be confusing, especially for teachers and preservice teachers. Recently, while collaborating on an English language arts and…

  3. Faculty Forward Initiative Faculty Engagement

    E-print Network

    Public #12;· Appointment information · Nature of work · Focus on medical school mission · Medical school Forward=Faculty Engagement measures which go beyond critique to planning and action · Shared experience #12;Peer Cohort List Medical School Name City ST Region Student Enrollment* Full-time Basic Science

  4. Motivation, Engagement, and Student Voice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toshalis, Eric; Nakkula, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Figuring out what motivates and engages individual students is essential. Indeed, it is the prerequisite for implementing student-centered approaches to learning. However, today's teachers--confronting large class sizes, fast-paced academic calendars, and standardized assessments--face particular pressures to lump all students together and "teach…

  5. Engaging Students in Their Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Clarence Motts

    2004-01-01

    Several years ago, the question was posed, "How could a school like Pomona College encourage its students to affirm a more socially engaged self?" In answering that question Pomona College has developed programs that stress association, allowing the development of relationships and trust. These are essential to the highest forms of happiness and…

  6. Engaging Teachers in Ed Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steans, Robin

    2012-01-01

    Teacher engagement is crucial to the success of education reforms. Not only can teachers serve as policymakers' eyes and ears on the ground, sharing firsthand knowledge of challenges in the classroom, but their advocacy can be instrumental to passing smart, sensible policies, and their buy-in can make or break reform implementation. Ongoing…

  7. The Meaning of Employee Engagement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    WILLIAM H. MACEY; BENJAMIN SCHNEIDER

    2008-01-01

    The meaning of employee engagement is ambiguous among both academic researchers and among practitioners who use it in conversations with clients. We show that the term is used at different times to refer to psychological states, traits, and behaviors as well as their antecedents and outcomes. Drawing on diverse relevant literatures, we offer a series of propositions about (a) psychological

  8. Abating climate change. What will be done and the consequences for investors

    SciTech Connect

    Raskin, A.; Mellquist, N.; Shah, S.; Winton, B.

    2008-01-15

    This report is meant for institutional investors. Sections discuss: the science of climate change; global emissions - abatement scenario; coal - the world's dominant fuel for electric generation; CO{sub 2} transport and storage; nuclear energy - the new green solution; renewable energy - harnessing the power of water, wind and sun; regulation; increasing energy efficiency - the lowest cost option; enhancing the efficiency of electric applications; enhancing the efficiency of transportation; macroeconomic implications; and investment implications.

  9. Multimedia-based decision support system for hazards recognition and abatement

    DOEpatents

    Czachowski, John B. (Knoxville, TN); Zoldak, John T. (Alexandria, VA)

    1998-01-01

    A system for monitoring a site includes a portable data collection module used in the field to collect site specific data, and a processor module located at a central location. The data collection module displays choices of categories of findings, and then specific findings within each category. A selected specific finding is then displayed in report form with a citation to the specific code or statutory requirement, as well as a recommended course of action and an abatement date.

  10. Optimal management of a eutrophied coastal ecosystem: balancing agricultural and municipal abatement measures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marita Laukkanen; Anni Huhtala

    2008-01-01

    Agriculture and municipal wastewater are the principal sources of eutrophying nutrients in many water ecosystems. We develop\\u000a a model which considers the characteristics of agricultural and municipal nutrient abatement. The model explicitly accounts\\u000a for the investment needed to set up wastewater treatment facilities, and makes it possible to determine the optimal timing\\u000a of investment as well as the optimal agricultural

  11. Modeling Dynamics of Culex pipiens Complex Populations and Assessing Abatement Strategies for West Nile Virus

    PubMed Central

    Pawelek, Kasia A.; Hager, Elizabeth J.; Hunt, Gregg J.

    2014-01-01

    The primary mosquito species associated with underground stormwater systems in the United States are the Culex pipiens complex species. This group represents important vectors of West Nile virus (WNV) throughout regions of the continental U.S. In this study, we designed a mathematical model and compared it with surveillance data for the Cx. pipiens complex collected in Beaufort County, South Carolina. Based on the best fit of the model to the data, we estimated parameters associated with the effectiveness of public health insecticide (adulticide) treatments (primarily pyrethrin products) as well as the birth, maturation, and death rates of immature and adult Cx. pipiens complex mosquitoes. We used these estimates for modeling the spread of WNV to obtain more reliable disease outbreak predictions and performed numerical simulations to test various mosquito abatement strategies. We demonstrated that insecticide treatments produced significant reductions in the Cx. pipiens complex populations. However, abatement efforts were effective for approximately one day and the vector mosquitoes rebounded until the next treatment. These results suggest that frequent insecticide applications are necessary to control these mosquitoes. We derived the basic reproductive number (?0) to predict the conditions under which disease outbreaks are likely to occur and to evaluate mosquito abatement strategies. We concluded that enhancing the mosquito death rate results in lower values of ?0, and if ?0<1, then an epidemic will not occur. Our modeling results provide insights about control strategies of the vector populations and, consequently, a potential decrease in the risk of a WNV outbreak. PMID:25268229

  12. Inland subsurface water system role for coastal nitrogen load dynamics and abatement responses.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Georg A; Destouni, Georgia; Darracq, Amélie

    2007-04-01

    We simulate and analyze long-term dynamics of coastal nitrogen (N) loading and the inland source changes and processes that may have determined its development over the past 60-year period and may govern its possible future responses to various N source management scenarios. With regard to processes, the results show that average basin-scale N delivery fractions to the coast may not be representative of the coastal impacts of either diffuse or point inland sources. The effects of inland source changes may be greatly redistributed in space-time and delayed by slow N transport and mass transfer processes in the subsurface water system of coastal catchments. Extrapolation of current N transport-attenuation conditions for quantification of future abatement effects may therefore be misleading if the extrapolation models do not realistically represent delayed long-term influences of slow subsurface processes. With regard to policy, the results show that and why national Swedish and international Baltic Sea region policies for coastal N load abatement may be difficult or impossible to achieve by inland source abatement only. Large mitigation of both point and diffuse sources may be necessary to achieve targeted coastal N load reductions fast and maintain them also in the long term. PMID:17438757

  13. Public Engagement on Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, J.

    2011-12-01

    Climate change communication is complicated by complexity of the scientific problem, multiple perspectives on the magnitude of the risk from climate change, often acrimonious disputes between scientists, high stakes policy options, and overall politicization of the issue. Efforts to increase science literacy as a route towards persuasion around the need for a policy like cap and trade have failed, because the difficulty that a scientist has in attempting to make sense of the social and political complexity is very similar to the complexity facing the general public as they try to make sense of climate science itself. In this talk I argue for a shift from scientists and their institutions as information disseminators to that of public engagement and enablers of public participation. The goal of engagement is not just to inform, but to enable, motivate and educate the public regarding the technical, political, and social dimensions of climate change. Engagement is a two-way process where experts and decision-makers seek input and learn from the public about preferences, needs, insights, and ideas relative to climate change impacts, vulnerabilities, solutions and policy options. Effective public engagement requires that scientists detach themselves from trying to control what the public does with the acquired knowledge and motivation. The goal should not be to "sell" the public on particular climate change solutions, since such advocacy threatens public trust in scientists and their institutions. Conduits for public engagement include the civic engagement approach in the context of community meetings, and perhaps more significantly, the blogosphere. Since 2006, I have been an active participant in the climate blogosphere, focused on engaging with people that are skeptical of AGW. A year ago, I started my own blog Climate Etc. at judithcurry.com. The demographic that I have focused my communication/engagement activities are the technically educated and scientifically literate public, many of whom have become increasingly skeptical of climate science the more they investigate the topic. Specific issues that this group has with climate science include concerns that science that cannot easily be separated from risk assessment and value judgments; concern that assessments (e.g. IPCC) have become a Maxwell's daemon for climate research; inadequate assessment of our ignorance of this complex scientific issue; elite scientists and scientific institutions losing credibility with the public; political exploitation of the public's lack of understanding; and concerns about the lack of public accountability of climate science and climate models that are being used as the basis for far reaching decisions and policies. Individuals in this group have the technical ability to understand and examine climate science arguments and are not prepared to cede judgment on this issue to the designated and self-proclaimed experts. This talk will describe my experiences in engaging with this group and what has been learned, both by myself and by participants in the discussion at Climate Etc.

  14. A Regionally-Specific Assessment of the Carbon Abatement Potential of Biochar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, G.; Field, J.; Keske, C.; DeFoort, M.; Cotrufo, M.

    2012-12-01

    Biochar, the solid carbon-rich co-product of certain bioenergy conversion technologies, is receiving a great deal of attention as a strategy for sequestering carbon in soils and improving the performance of agricultural systems. Several studies have attempted to quantify the lifecycle carbon abatement potential of biochar systems, considering emissions associated with feedstock provisioning and processing, energy co-production, agronomic system impacts (yield increases and nitrous oxide emission suppression), and the recalcitrance of biochar in soil, as well as accounting for the carbon abatement value of using the char as a fuel that is foregone when it is used as a soil amendment instead. These assessments typically focus on biochar production in advanced, efficient slow pyrolysis systems, despite the fact that much biochar is currently produced through small-scale carbonization or gasification systems that lack energy recovery or even emission control capability. Here, a mechanistic biochar system assessment model is presented, capable of estimating system carbon abatement value and profitability for different feedstocks, conversion technologies and temperatures, and application into different agricultural soils. The variation of biochar recalcitrance in soil as a function of production temperature is considered, and agricultural impacts are assessed in the context of biochar's liming value, an effect that is straightforward to quantify and that has often been implicated in observed crop yield increases or nitrous oxide emission reductions. The analysis is rigorous in that tradeoffs between biochar production quantity and quality are endogenized, but conservative in that other potential agronomic benefits of biochar (e.g. improved soil water holding capacity) are not considered. This model is applied to a case study of bioenergy and biochar co-production in northern Colorado using beetle-killed pine wood and slash as a feedstock. Preliminary results suggest that a) high system carbon abatement potentials are possible in the case study scenario, but only in systems that control air pollutant emissions and recover energy; b) biochar has more value as a soil amendment than a fuel when produced at high temperatures and applied to soils of low pH and low buffering capacity; and c) the carbon abatement value of agronomic impacts in temperate systems is relatively minor compared to other parts of the lifecycle. Additional results will be presented for which an optimal system design is identified and the analysis scaled-up to reflect the total beetle-kill feedstock availability in the state of Colorado in order to estimate the total regional carbon-mitigation potential of the technology.

  15. 40 CFR 155.52 - Stakeholder engagement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Stakeholder engagement. 155.52 Section 155.52 Protection of Environment... Registration Review Procedures § 155.52 Stakeholder engagement. In addition to the public participation...

  16. 40 CFR 155.52 - Stakeholder engagement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stakeholder engagement. 155.52 Section 155.52 Protection of Environment... Registration Review Procedures § 155.52 Stakeholder engagement. In addition to the public participation...

  17. 40 CFR 155.52 - Stakeholder engagement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Stakeholder engagement. 155.52 Section 155.52 Protection...Procedures § 155.52 Stakeholder engagement. In addition to the public...individuals that are not government employees to discuss matters relating to a...

  18. 40 CFR 155.52 - Stakeholder engagement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Stakeholder engagement. 155.52 Section 155.52 Protection...Procedures § 155.52 Stakeholder engagement. In addition to the public...individuals that are not government employees to discuss matters relating to a...

  19. 40 CFR 155.52 - Stakeholder engagement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Stakeholder engagement. 155.52 Section 155.52 Protection...Procedures § 155.52 Stakeholder engagement. In addition to the public...individuals that are not government employees to discuss matters relating to a...

  20. Urban Parks: Volunteers and Civic Engagement

    E-print Network

    Schuett, Michael A.

    2007-03-02

    When citizens are engaged with urban park and recreation departments, everyone benefits. This publication describes successful programs that involve community volunteers, and explains what managers can do to engage citizens in such programs....

  1. Engaging with Massive Online Courses

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Ashton; Kleinberg, Jon; Leskovec, Jure

    2014-01-01

    The Web has enabled one of the most visible recent developments in education---the deployment of massive open online courses. With their global reach and often staggering enrollments, MOOCs have the potential to become a major new mechanism for learning. Despite this early promise, however, MOOCs are still relatively unexplored and poorly understood. In a MOOC, each student's complete interaction with the course materials takes place on the Web, thus providing a record of learner activity of unprecedented scale and resolution. In this work, we use such trace data to develop a conceptual framework for understanding how users currently engage with MOOCs. We develop a taxonomy of individual behavior, examine the different behavioral patterns of high- and low-achieving students, and investigate how forum participation relates to other parts of the course. We also report on a large-scale deployment of badges as incentives for engagement in a MOOC, including randomized experiments in which the presentation of badge...

  2. Using the soil and water assessment tool to estimate dissolved inorganic nitrogen water pollution abatement cost functions in central portugal.

    PubMed

    Roebeling, P C; Rocha, J; Nunes, J P; Fidélis, T; Alves, H; Fonseca, S

    2014-01-01

    Coastal aquatic ecosystems are increasingly affected by diffuse source nutrient water pollution from agricultural activities in coastal catchments, even though these ecosystems are important from a social, environmental and economic perspective. To warrant sustainable economic development of coastal regions, we need to balance marginal costs from coastal catchment water pollution abatement and associated marginal benefits from coastal resource appreciation. Diffuse-source water pollution abatement costs across agricultural sectors are not easily determined given the spatial heterogeneity in biophysical and agro-ecological conditions as well as the available range of best agricultural practices (BAPs) for water quality improvement. We demonstrate how the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) can be used to estimate diffuse-source water pollution abatement cost functions across agricultural land use categories based on a stepwise adoption of identified BAPs for water quality improvement and corresponding SWAT-based estimates for agricultural production, agricultural incomes, and water pollution deliveries. Results for the case of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) surface water pollution by the key agricultural land use categories ("annual crops," "vineyards," and "mixed annual crops & vineyards") in the Vouga catchment in central Portugal show that no win-win agricultural practices are available within the assessed BAPs for DIN water quality improvement. Estimated abatement costs increase quadratically in the rate of water pollution abatement, with largest abatement costs for the "mixed annual crops & vineyards" land use category (between 41,900 and 51,900 € tDIN yr) and fairly similar abatement costs across the "vineyards" and "annual crops" land use categories (between 7300 and 15,200 € tDIN yr). PMID:25602550

  3. Spearfishing Regulation Benefits Artisanal Fisheries: The ReGS Indicator and Its Application to a Multiple-Use Mediterranean Marine Protected Area

    PubMed Central

    Rocklin, Delphine; Tomasini, Jean-Antoine; Culioli, Jean-Michel; Pelletier, Dominique; Mouillot, David

    2011-01-01

    The development of fishing efficiency coupled with an increase of fishing effort led to the overexploitation of numerous natural marine resources. In addition to this commercial pressure, the impact of recreational activities on fish assemblages remains barely known. Here we examined the impact of spearfishing limitation on resources in a marine protected area (MPA) and the benefit it provides for the local artisanal fishery through the use of a novel indicator. We analysed trends in the fish assemblage composition using artisanal fisheries data collected in the Bonifacio Strait Natural Reserve (BSNR), a Mediterranean MPA where the spearfishing activity has been forbidden over 15% of its area. Fish species were pooled into three response groups according to their target level by spearfishing. We developed the new flexible ReGS indicator reflecting shifts in species assemblages according to the relative abundance of each response group facing external pressure. The catch per unit effort (CPUE) increased by ca. 60% in the BSNR between 2000 and 2007, while the MPA was established in 1999. The gain of CPUE strongly depended on the considered response group: for the highly targeted group, the CPUE doubled while the CPUE of the untargeted group increased by only 15.5%. The ReGS value significantly increased from 0.31 to 0.45 (on a scale between 0 and 1) in the general perimeter of this MPA while it has reached a threshold of 0.43, considered as a reference point, in the area protected from spearfishing since 1982. Our results demonstrated that limiting recreational fishing by appropriate zoning in multiple-use MPAs represents a real benefit for artisanal fisheries. More generally we showed how our new indicator may reveal a wide range of impacts on coastal ecosystems such as global change or habitat degradation. PMID:21966357

  4. Service Learning and Civic Engagement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary Prentice

    2007-01-01

    Outside work can complement what goes on in the classroom in ways that benefit both the community and students. Of course,\\u000a AQ readers may have heard of tendentious programs and faculty ideologues, who channel student enthusiasm into partisan activism.\\u000a Still, statistical survey analysis presented here by Mary Prentice suggests that participation in service learning can increase\\u000a students’ civic engagement, when

  5. Worm Gear With Hydrostatic Engagement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaiko, Lev I.

    1994-01-01

    In proposed worm-gear transmission, oil pumped at high pressure through meshes between teeth of gear and worm coil. Pressure in oil separates meshing surfaces slightly, and oil reduces friction between surfaces. Conceived for use in drive train between gas-turbine engine and rotor of helicopter. Useful in other applications in which weight critical. Test apparatus simulates and measures some loading conditions of proposed worm gear with hydrostatic engagement.

  6. Strategies for data management engagement.

    PubMed

    Charbonneau, Deborah H

    2013-01-01

    The research landscape is growing dramatically, and librarians are examining new roles, services, and types of collaborations to support data-intensive research. This column describes curricular enhancements at one School of Library and Information Science in the United States. Several key areas of data management in which health sciences librarians may wish to build or enhance their skills are outlined. Possible roles and opportunities for health sciences librarians to strategically engage in data management initiatives are also presented. PMID:23869641

  7. Civic Engagement: A Tool for Building Democracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calderon, Jose Zapata

    2011-01-01

    With the growth of a global economy, there is the need for a type of educational system that promotes civic engagement as a means of building new models toward a democratic society. In this article, the author discusses civic engagement as a tool for building democracy. As educators seek to develop models of civic engagement in teacher education,…

  8. Sustaining Student Engagement in Learning Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ateh, Comfort M.; Charpentier, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    Many students perceive science to be a difficult subject and are minimally engaged in learning it. This article describes a lesson that embedded an activity to engage students in learning science. It also identifies features of a science lesson that are likely to enhance students' engagement and learning of science and possibly reverse…

  9. Framing student engagement in higher education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ella R. Kahu

    2011-01-01

    Student engagement is widely recognised as an important influence on achievement and learning in higher education and as such is being widely theorised and researched. This article firstly reviews and critiques the four dominant research perspectives on student engagement: the behavioural perspective, which foregrounds student behaviour and institutional practice; the psychological perspective, which clearly defines engagement as an individual psycho-social

  10. The Centrality of Engagement in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Hiram E.; Bruns, Karen; Sonka, Steven T.; Furco, Andrew; Swanson, Louis

    2012-01-01

    The centrality of engagement is critical to the success of higher education in the future. Engagement is essential to most effectively achieving the overall purpose of the university, which is focused on the knowledge enterprise. Today's engagement is scholarly, is an aspect of learning and discovery, and enhances society and higher education.…

  11. School engagement and rights?respecting schools

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Katherine Covell

    2010-01-01

    Disengagement in school is associated with behavioral problems and decreased academic achievement. In contrast, pupils who are engaged in school develop the academic and social efficacies that underlie successful adulthood. Moreover, engagement promotes educational resilience. This study examines pupils’ self?reported level of engagement in schools that are explicitly respecting of children’s rights compared with pupils in traditional schools. The Young

  12. Identifying Teaching Methods that Engage Entrepreneurship Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balan, Peter; Metcalfe, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Entrepreneurship education particularly requires student engagement because of the complexity of the entrepreneurship process. The purpose of this paper is to describe how an established measure of engagement can be used to identify relevant teaching methods that could be used to engage any group of entrepreneurship students.…

  13. Meaningful Family Engagement: Just Imagine the Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Karen

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author emphasizes on starting with a family relations philosophy and creating environments to entice family engagement. She also talks about selecting, training, and scheduling staff for family engagement. The author presents family engagement strategies to be considered, as well as staff training resources for family…

  14. Supporting Family Engagement in Weight Management

    E-print Network

    Chen, Zhuo

    Supporting Family Engagement in Weight Management AbstractNathalie Colineau, CSIRO ­ ICT Centre a collaborative environment to engage a family in support of an individual needing to manage his or her weight for them and their family. Keywords Family Engagement; Weight Management Website ACM Classification

  15. Extreme Users WHY engage with extreme users

    E-print Network

    Prinz, Friedrich B.

    Extreme Users METHOD WHY engage with extreme users HOW to engage extreme users Designers engage inspiration from their work-arounds and frameworks. When you speak with and observe extreme users, their needs extreme users are often also needs of a wider population. Determine who's extreme Determining who

  16. Community Engagement Request Form General Information

    E-print Network

    Carmichael, Owen

    Community Engagement Request Form General Information First Name: Last Name: Title / Profession Please fill out the following if applicable List Funded Community Engagement Projects: List publications relevant to your consultation request: I have participated in a previous community-engaged research effort

  17. Student and Staff Engagement: Developing an Engagement Framework in a Faculty of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittaway, Sharon M.

    2012-01-01

    Student engagement is emerging as a key focus in higher education, as engagement is increasingly understood as a prerequisite for effective learning. This paper reports on the development of an Engagement Framework that provides a practical understanding of student (and staff) engagement which can be applied to any discipline, year level or…

  18. A perfect match: decoding employee engagement – Part II: engaging jobs and individuals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cristina de Mello e Souza Wildermuth; Patrick David Pauken

    2008-01-01

    Purpose – Part I of this paper addressed the environmental and leadership factors that contribute to employee engagement. Next, the purpose of this paper is to add the job and person to the engagement equation. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Summarizes the characteristics of engaging jobs. Then, reviews individual personality traits that engaged individuals are more likely to exhibit: hardiness, internal locus of

  19. The Comprehensive Process Model of Engagement

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Mansfield, Jiska; Marx, Marcia S.; Freedman, Laurence S.; Murad, Havi; Regier, Natalie G.; Thein, Khin; Dakheel-Ali, Maha

    2010-01-01

    Background Engagement refers to the act of being occupied or involved with an external stimulus. In dementia, engagement is the antithesis of apathy. Objective The Comprehensive Process Model of Engagement was examined, in which environmental, person, and stimulus characteristics impact the level of engagement of persons with dementia. Methods Participants were 193 residents of 7 Maryland nursing homes. All participants had a diagnosis of dementia. Stimulus engagement was assessed via the Observational Measure of Engagement. Engagement was measured by duration, attention, and attitude to the stimulus. 25 stimuli were presented, which were categorized as live human social stimuli, simulated social stimuli, inanimate social stimuli, a reading stimulus, manipulative stimuli, a music stimulus, task and work-related stimuli, and two different self-identity stimuli. Results All stimuli elicited significantly greater engagement in comparison to the control stimulus. In the multivariate model, music significantly increased engagement duration, while all other stimuli significantly increased duration, attention, and attitude. Significant environmental variables in the multivariate model that increased engagement were: use of the long introduction with modeling (relative to minimal introduction), any level of sound (most especially moderate sound), and the presence of between 2 to 24 people in the room. Significant personal attributes included MMSE scores, ADL performance and clarity of speech, which were positively associated with higher engagement scores. Conclusions Results are consistent with the Comprehensive Process Model of Engagement. Person attributes, environmental factors, and stimulus characteristics all contribute to the level and nature of engagement, with a secondary finding being that exposure to any stimulus elicits engagement in persons with dementia. PMID:21946802

  20. Patient engagement in research: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A compelling ethical rationale supports patient engagement in healthcare research. It is also assumed that patient engagement will lead to research findings that are more pertinent to patients’ concerns and dilemmas. However; it is unclear how to best conduct this process. In this systematic review we aimed to answer 4 key questions: what are the best ways to identify patient representatives? How to engage them in designing and conducting research? What are the observed benefits of patient engagement? What are the harms and barriers of patient engagement? Methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycInfo, Cochrane, EBSCO, CINAHL, SCOPUS, Web of Science, Business Search Premier, Academic Search Premier and Google Scholar. Included studies were published in English, of any size or design that described engaging patients or their surrogates in research design. We conducted an environmental scan of the grey literature and consulted with experts and patients. Data were analyzed using a non-quantitative, meta-narrative approach. Results We included 142 studies that described a spectrum of engagement. In general, engagement was feasible in most settings and most commonly done in the beginning of research (agenda setting and protocol development) and less commonly during the execution and translation of research. We found no comparative analytic studies to recommend a particular method. Patient engagement increased study enrollment rates and aided researchers in securing funding, designing study protocols and choosing relevant outcomes. The most commonly cited challenges were related to logistics (extra time and funding needed for engagement) and to an overarching worry of a tokenistic engagement. Conclusions Patient engagement in healthcare research is likely feasible in many settings. However, this engagement comes at a cost and can become tokenistic. Research dedicated to identifying the best methods to achieve engagement is lacking and clearly needed. PMID:24568690

  1. Reforestation as a novel abatement and compliance measure for ground-level ozone

    PubMed Central

    Kroeger, Timm; Escobedo, Francisco J.; Hernandez, José L.; Varela, Sebastián; Delphin, Sonia; Fisher, Jonathan R. B.; Waldron, Janice

    2014-01-01

    High ambient ozone (O3) concentrations are a widespread and persistent problem globally. Although studies have documented the role of forests in removing O3 and one of its precursors, nitrogen dioxide (NO2), the cost effectiveness of using peri-urban reforestation for O3 abatement purposes has not been examined. We develop a methodology that uses available air quality and meteorological data and simplified forest structure growth-mortality and dry deposition models to assess the performance of reforestation for O3 precursor abatement. We apply this methodology to identify the cost-effective design for a hypothetical 405-ha, peri-urban reforestation project in the Houston–Galveston–Brazoria O3 nonattainment area in Texas. The project would remove an estimated 310 tons of (t) O3 and 58 t NO2 total over 30 y. Given its location in a nitrogen oxide (NOx)-limited area, and using the range of Houston area O3 production efficiencies to convert forest O3 removal to its NOx equivalent, this is equivalent to 127–209 t of the regulated NOx. The cost of reforestation per ton of NOx abated compares favorably to that of additional conventional controls if no land costs are incurred, especially if carbon offsets are generated. Purchasing agricultural lands for reforestation removes this cost advantage, but this problem could be overcome through cost-share opportunities that exist due to the public and conservation benefits of reforestation. Our findings suggest that peri-urban reforestation should be considered in O3 control efforts in Houston, other US nonattainment areas, and areas with O3 pollution problems in other countries, wherever O3 formation is predominantly NOx limited. PMID:25201970

  2. PHOTOCATALYTIC OXIDATION FOR NOx ABATEMENT: DEVELOPMENT OF A KINETIC EXPRESSION AND DESIGN TOOLS

    SciTech Connect

    Rajiv Srivastava; M. A. Ebadian

    2000-09-15

    The ''Nitrogen Oxides Emission Reduction Program'' and ''Ozone Non-Attainment Program'' in the 1990 Clean Air Act provide guidelines for controlling NOx (NO and NO{sub 2}) emissions in new and existing stationary sources. NOx emissions have local (air quality), regional (acid rain), and global (ozone production) consequences. This study aids in developing the photocatalyst technology that has potential for use in abatement of NOx. The objective of the proposed project is to apply the principles of chemical engineering fundamentals--reaction kinetics, transport phenomena and thermodynamics--in the process design for a system that will utilize a photocatalytic reactor to oxidize NOx to nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}). HNO{sub 3} can be more easily trapped than NOx on adsorbent surfaces or in water. The project dealt with the engineering aspect of the gas-solid heterogeneous oxidation of NOx. The experiments were conducted in a photocatalyst wash-coated glass flow tube reactor. A mathematical model was developed based on a rigorous description of the physical and chemical processes occurring in the reactor. The mathematical model took into account (1) intrinsic reaction kinetics (i.e., true reaction rates), (2) transport phenomena that deal with the mass transfer effects in the reactor, and (3) the geometry of the reactor. The experimental results were used for validation of the mathematical model that provides the basis for a versatile and reliable method for the purpose of design, scale-up and process control. The NOx abatement was successfully carried out in a flow tube reactor surrounded by black lights under the exploratory grant. Due to lack of funds, a comprehensive kinetic analysis for the photocatalytic reaction scheme could not be carried out. The initial experiments look very promising for use of photocatalysis for NOx abatement.

  3. Reforestation as a novel abatement and compliance measure for ground-level ozone.

    PubMed

    Kroeger, Timm; Escobedo, Francisco J; Hernandez, José L; Varela, Sebastián; Delphin, Sonia; Fisher, Jonathan R B; Waldron, Janice

    2014-10-01

    High ambient ozone (O3) concentrations are a widespread and persistent problem globally. Although studies have documented the role of forests in removing O3 and one of its precursors, nitrogen dioxide (NO2), the cost effectiveness of using peri-urban reforestation for O3 abatement purposes has not been examined. We develop a methodology that uses available air quality and meteorological data and simplified forest structure growth-mortality and dry deposition models to assess the performance of reforestation for O3 precursor abatement. We apply this methodology to identify the cost-effective design for a hypothetical 405-ha, peri-urban reforestation project in the Houston-Galveston-Brazoria O3 nonattainment area in Texas. The project would remove an estimated 310 tons of (t) O3 and 58 t NO2 total over 30 y. Given its location in a nitrogen oxide (NOx)-limited area, and using the range of Houston area O3 production efficiencies to convert forest O3 removal to its NOx equivalent, this is equivalent to 127-209 t of the regulated NOx. The cost of reforestation per ton of NOx abated compares favorably to that of additional conventional controls if no land costs are incurred, especially if carbon offsets are generated. Purchasing agricultural lands for reforestation removes this cost advantage, but this problem could be overcome through cost-share opportunities that exist due to the public and conservation benefits of reforestation. Our findings suggest that peri-urban reforestation should be considered in O3 control efforts in Houston, other US nonattainment areas, and areas with O3 pollution problems in other countries, wherever O3 formation is predominantly NOx limited. PMID:25201970

  4. Engineering analysis and economic impacts of air pollution abatement strategies for cotton gins

    E-print Network

    Ramaiyer, Anantharaman

    1997-01-01

    48 48 52 58 61 64 77 78 81 83 87 90 94 96 LIST OF TABLES TABLE AP-42 emission factors for cotton gins Abatement strategies defined by Yarlagadda Percent (%) air flow from centrifugal and axial fan exhausts using data from Shaw et al.... (1977) . Air flow from centrifugal and axial fan exhausts for representative glns Average % air flow from each process exhaust for picker and stripper gins Emission concentrations for cyclones in series Emission concentrations for a 2D2D cyclone...

  5. Removable Thin Films used for the Abatement and Mitigation of Beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    M. Lumia; C. Gentile; K. Creek; R. Sandoval

    2003-11-06

    The use of removable thin films for the abatement of hazardous particulates has many advantages. Removable thin films are designed to trap and fix particulates in the film's matrix by adhesion. Thin films can be applied to an existing contaminated area to fix and capture the particulates for removal. The nature of the removable thin films, after sufficient cure time, is such that it can typically be removed as one continuous entity. The removable thin films can be applied to almost any surface type with a high success rate of removal.

  6. Niobium(V) saponite clay for the catalytic oxidative abatement of chemical warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Carniato, Fabio; Bisio, Chiara; Psaro, Rinaldo; Marchese, Leonardo; Guidotti, Matteo

    2014-09-15

    A Nb(V)-containing saponite clay was designed to selectively transform toxic organosulfur chemical warfare agents (CWAs) under extremely mild conditions into nontoxic products with reduced environmental impact. Thanks to the insertion of Nb(V) sites within the saponite framework, a bifunctional catalyst with strong oxidizing and acid properties was obtained. Remarkable activity and high selectivity were observed for the oxidative abatement of (2-chloroethyl)ethyl sulfide (CEES), a simulant of sulfur mustard, at room temperature with aqueous hydrogen peroxide. This performance was significantly better compared to a conventional commercial decontamination powder. PMID:25056451

  7. Learners' Engagement in Adult Literacy Education. NCSALL Reports #28

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beder, Hal; Tomkins, Jessica; Medina, Patsy; Riccioni, Regina; Deng, Weiling

    2006-01-01

    This study is about engagement in adult literacy education. Engagement is mental effort focused on learning. It is important to understand how and why adult learners engage in literacy instruction because engagement is a precondition to learning progress. Researchers who study engagement conceive of it in different ways. Some focus on engagement

  8. Language Universals Engage Broca's Area

    PubMed Central

    Berent, Iris; Pan, Hong; Zhao, Xu; Epstein, Jane; Bennett, Monica L.; Deshpande, Vibhas; Seethamraju, Ravi Teja; Stern, Emily

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that natural languages share certain aspects of their design. For example, across languages, syllables like blif are preferred to lbif. But whether language universals are myths or mentally active constraints—linguistic or otherwise—remains controversial. To address this question, we used fMRI to investigate brain response to four syllable types, arrayed on their linguistic well-formedness (e.g., blif?bnif?bdif?lbif, where ? indicates preference). Results showed that syllable structure monotonically modulated hemodynamic response in Broca's area, and its pattern mirrored participants' behavioral preferences. In contrast, ill-formed syllables did not systematically tax sensorimotor regions—while such syllables engaged primary auditory cortex, they tended to deactivate (rather than engage) articulatory motor regions. The convergence between the cross-linguistic preferences and English participants' hemodynamic and behavioral responses is remarkable given that most of these syllables are unattested in their language. We conclude that human brains encode broad restrictions on syllable structure. PMID:24743423

  9. Human exposure and risk assessment associated with mercury contamination in artisanal gold mining areas in the Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Castilhos, Zuleica; Rodrigues-Filho, Saulo; Cesar, Ricardo; Rodrigues, Ana Paula; Villas-Bôas, Roberto; de Jesus, Iracina; Lima, Marcelo; Faial, Kleber; Miranda, Antônio; Brabo, Edilson; Beinhoff, Christian; Santos, Elisabeth

    2015-08-01

    Mercury (Hg) contamination is an issue of concern in the Amazon region due to potential health effects associated with Hg exposure in artisanal gold mining areas. The study presents a human health risk assessment associated with Hg vapor inhalation and MeHg-contaminated fish ingestion, as well as Hg determination in urine, blood, and hair, of human populations (about 325 miners and 321 non-miners) from two gold mining areas in the Brazilian Amazon (São Chico and Creporizinho, Pará State). In São Chico and Creporizinho, 73 fish specimens of 13 freshwater species, and 161 specimens of 11 species, were collected for total Hg determination, respectively. The hazard quotient (HQ) is a risk indicator which defines the ratio of the exposure level and the toxicological reference dose and was applied to determine the threat of MeHg exposure. The mean Hg concentrations in fish from São Chico and Creporizinho were 0.83?±?0.43 and 0.36?±?0.33 ?g/g, respectively. More than 60 and 22 % of fish collected in São Chico and Creporizinho, respectively, were above the Hg limit (0.5 ?g/g) recommended by WHO for human consumption. For all sampling sites, HQ resulted from 1.5 to 28.5, except for the reference area. In Creporizinho, the values of HQ are close to 2 for most sites, whereas in São Chico, there is a hot spot of MeHg contamination in fish (A2-São Chico Reservoir) with the highest risk level (HQ?=?28) associated with its human consumption. Mean Hg concentrations in urine, blood, and hair samples indicated that the miners group (in São Chico: urine?=?17.37 ?g/L; blood?=?27.74 ?g/L; hair?=?4.50 ?g/g and in Creporizinho: urine?=?13.75 ?g/L; blood?=?25.23 ?g/L; hair: 4.58 ?g/g) was more exposed to mercury compared to non-miners (in São Chico: urine?=?5.73 ?g/L; blood?=?16.50 ?g/L; hair?=?3.16 ?g/g and in Creporizinho: urine?=?3.91 ?g/L; blood?=?21.04 ?g/L, hair?=?1.88 ?g/g). These high Hg levels (found not only in miners but also in non-miners who live near the mining areas) are likely to be related to a potential hazard due to exposure to both Hg vapor by inhalation and to MeHg-contaminated fish ingestion. PMID:25797016

  10. Demolition Range Noise Abatement Technique Demonstration and Evaluation for the McAlester Army Ammunition Plant

    SciTech Connect

    CALDERONE,JAMES J.; GARBIN,H. DOUGLAS

    2001-08-01

    Public concern regarding the effects of noise generated by the detonation of excess and obsolete explosive munitions at U.S. Army demolition ranges is a continuing issue for the Army's demilitarization and disposal groups. Recent concerns of citizens living near the McAlester Army Ammunition Plant (MCAAP) in Oklahoma have lead the U.S. Army Defense Ammunition Center (DAC) to conduct a demonstration and evaluation of noise abatement techniques that could be applied to the MCAAP demolition range. With the support of the DAC, MCAAP, and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), three types of noise abatement techniques were applied: aqueous foams, overburden (using combinations of sand beds and dirt coverings), and rubber or steel blast mats. Eight test configurations were studied and twenty-four experiments were conducted on the MCAAP demolition range in July of 2000. Instrumentation and data acquisition systems were fielded for the collection of near-field blast pressures, far-field acoustic pressures, plant boundary seismic signals, and demolition range meteorological conditions. The resulting data has been analyzed and reported, and a ranking of each technique's effects has been provided to the DAC.

  11. Abatement of volatile organic sulfur compounds in odorous emissions from the bio-industry.

    PubMed

    Smet, E; Van Langenhove, H

    1998-01-01

    Compounds of interest in this work are methanethiol (MeSH), dimethyl sulfide (Me2S), dimethyl polysulfides (Me2Sx) and carbon disulfide (CS2) since these volatiles have been identified as predominant odorants in the emission of a wide range of activities in the bio-industry (e.g. aerobic waste water treatment plants, composting plants, rendering plants). In these processes, the occurrence of volatile organic sulfur compounds is mainly related to the presence of anaerobic microsites with consecutive fermentation of sulfur containing organic material and/or to the breakdown of the latter due to thermal heating. Due to the chemical complexity of these low-concentrated waste gas streams and the high flow rates to be handled, mainly biotechnological techniques and scrubbers can be used to control the odour emission. When using biofilters or trickling filters, inoculation with specific microorganisms and pH-control strategies should be implemented to optimise the removal of volatile organic sulfur compounds. In scrubbers, chemical oxidation of the volatile organic sulfur compounds can be obtained by dosing hypochlorite, ozone or hydrogen peroxide to the scrubbing liquid. However, optimal operational conditions for each of these abatement techniques requires a further research in order to guarantee a long-term and efficient overall odour abatement. PMID:10022070

  12. TiO2-Al2O3 binary mixed oxide surfaces for photocatalytic NOx abatement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soylu, Asli Melike; Polat, Meryem; Erdogan, Deniz Altunoz; Say, Zafer; Y?ld?r?m, Cansu; Birer, Özgür; Ozensoy, Emrah

    2014-11-01

    TiO2-Al2O3 binary oxide surfaces were utilized in order to develop an alternative photocatalytic NOx abatement approach, where TiO2 sites were used for ambient photocatalytic oxidation of NO with O2 and alumina sites were exploited for NOx storage. Chemical, crystallographic and electronic structure of the TiO2-Al2O3 binary oxide surfaces were characterized (via BET surface area measurements, XRD, Raman spectroscopy and DR-UV-Vis Spectroscopy) as a function of the TiO2 loading in the mixture as well as the calcination temperature used in the synthesis protocol. 0.5 Ti/Al-900 photocatalyst showed remarkable photocatalytic NOx oxidation and storage performance, which was found to be much superior to that of a Degussa P25 industrial benchmark photocatalyst (i.e. 160% higher NOx storage and 55% lower NO2(g) release to the atmosphere). Our results indicate that the onset of the photocatalytic NOx abatement activity is concomitant to the switch between amorphous to a crystalline phase with an electronic band gap within 3.05-3.10 eV; where the most active photocatalyst revealed predominantly rutile phase together and anatase as the minority phase.

  13. Abatement of sulfur hexafluoride emissions from the semiconductor manufacturing process by atmospheric-pressure plasmas.

    PubMed

    Lee, How Ming; Chang, Moo Been; Wu, Kuan Yu

    2004-08-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) is an important gas for plasma etching processes in the semiconductor industry. SF6 intensely absorbs infrared radiation and, consequently, aggravates global warming. This study investigates SF6 abatement by nonthermal plasma technologies under atmospheric pressure. Two kinds of nonthermal plasma processes--dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) and combined plasma catalysis (CPC)--were employed and evaluated. Experimental results indicated that as much as 91% of SF6 was removed with DBDs at 20 kV of applied voltage and 150 Hz of discharge frequency for the gas stream containing 300 ppm SF6, 12% oxygen (O2), and 40% argon (Ar), with nitrogen (N2) as the carrier gas. Four additives, including Ar, O2, ethylene (C2H4), and H2O(g), are effective in enhancing SF6 abatement in the range of conditions studied. DBD achieves a higher SF6 removal efficiency than does CPC at the same operation condition. But CPC achieves a higher electrical energy utilization compared with DBD. However, poisoning of catalysts by sulfur (S)-containing species needs further investigation. SF6 is mainly converted to SOF2, SO2F4, sulfur dioxide (SO2), oxygen difluoride (OF2), and fluoride (F2). They do not cause global warming and can be captured by either wet scrubbing or adsorption. This study indicates that DBD and CPC are feasible control technologies for reducing SF6 emissions. PMID:15373364

  14. Abatements of reduced sulphur compounds, colour, and organic matter from indigo dyeing effluents by electrocoagulation.

    PubMed

    Tünay, Olcay; Sim?eker, Merve; Kabda?li, Isik; Olmez-Hanci, Tugba

    2014-08-01

    In the present study, the treatability of indigo dyeing effluents by the electrocoagulation (EC) process using stainless steel electrodes was experimentally investigated. The samples used were concentrated with main pollutant parameters of chemical oxygen demand (COD) (1000-1100 mg/L), reduced sulphur species (over 2000 mg SO2-(3)/L), and colour (0.12-0.13 1/cm). The study focused on the effect of main operation parameters on the EC process performance in terms of abatement of reduced sulphur compounds as well as decolourization and organic matter reduction. Results indicated that the performance of EC proved to be high providing total oxidation of the reduced sulphur compounds, almost complete decolourization, and COD removal up to 90%. Increasing applied current density from 22.5 to 45 mA/cm2 appreciably improved abatement of the reduced sulphur compounds for Sample I, but a further increase in the applied current density to 67.5 mA/cm2 did not accelerate the conversion rate to sulphate. The process performance was adversely affected by increasing initial concentration of the reduced sulphur compounds. Decolourization and organic matter removal efficiency enhanced with increasing applied current density. The main removal mechanism of the reduced sulphur compounds by EC was explained as conversion to sulphate via oxidation. Conversion rate to sulphate fitted pseudo-first-order kinetics very well. PMID:24956747

  15. Noise exposure assessment and abatement strategies at an indoor firing range.

    PubMed

    Kardous, Chucri A; Willson, Robert D; Hayden, Charles S; Szlapa, Piotr; Murphy, William J; Reeves, Efrem R

    2003-08-01

    Exposure to hazardous impulse noise is common during the firing of weapons at indoor firing ranges. The aims of this study were to characterize the impulse noise environment at a law enforcement firing range; document the insufficiencies found at the range from a health and safety standpoint; and provide noise abatement recommendations to reduce the overall health hazard to the auditory system. Ten shooters conducted a typical live-fire exercise using three different weapons--the Beretta.40 caliber pistol, the Remington.308 caliber shotgun, and the M4.223 caliber assault rifle. Measurements were obtained at 12 different positions throughout the firing range and adjacent areas using dosimeters and sound level meters. Personal and area measurements were recorded to a digital audio tape (DAT) recorder for further spectral analysis. Peak pressure levels inside the firing range reached 163 decibels (dB) in peak pressure. Equivalent sound levels (Leq) ranged from 78 decibels, A-weighted (dBA), in office area adjacent to the range to 122 dBA inside the range. Noise reductions from wall structures ranged from 29-44 dB. Noise abatement strategies ranged from simple noise control measures (such as sealing construction joints and leaks) to elaborate design modifications to eliminate structural-borne sounds using acoustical treatments. Further studies are needed to better characterize the effects of firing weapons in enclosed spaces on hearing and health in general. PMID:12851012

  16. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant biological monitoring and abatement program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    SciTech Connect

    Loar, J.M.; Adams, S.M.; Allison, L.J.; Giddings, J.M.; McCarthy, J.F.; Southworth, G.R.; Smith, J.G.; Stewart, A.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA); Springborn Bionomics, Inc., Wareham, MA (USA); Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1989-10-01

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, a nuclear weapons components production facility located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for the US Department of Energy. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek), in particular, the growth and propagation of fish and aquatic life, as designated by the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment. A second purpose for the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from implementation of a water pollution control program that will include construction of nine new wastewater treatment facilities over the next 4 years. Because of the complex nature of the effluent discharged to East Fork Poplar Creek and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the effluent (i.e., temporal variability related to various pollution abatement measures that will be implemented over the next several years and spatial variability caused by pollutant inputs downstream of the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant), a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed for the BMAP. 39 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs.

  17. Social Engagement and Attachment: A Phylogenetic Perspective

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen W. Porges

    Abstract The manuscript focuses on the importance of social engagement and the behavioral and neurophysiological mechanisms,that allow individuals to reduce psychological and physical distance. A model of social engagement derived from the Polyvagal Theory is presented. The model emphasizes,phylogeny,as an organizing principle and includes the following points: 1) there are well defined neural circuits to support social engagement behaviors and

  18. Social Media and Political Engagement

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-10-19

    How much do people use social media as a way to be politically engaged? This question has been posed by a team of researchers at the Pew Internet & American Life Project, resulting in this 13-page report. The report was authored by a team of scholars including Lee Rainie and Aaron Smith and found that 60% of adults use social networking sites like Facebook or Twitter and that approximately 39% of all adults have done at least one of eight civic or political activities with social media. The findings here are based on a nationally representative survey of 2,253 adults conducted in the summer of 2012. Visitors can view the report in its entirety online or download the file. Additionally, persons with an interest in psychometrics and survey design can explore all of the survey questions here.

  19. Engaging Students in Earthquake Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, I. E.; Benthien, M.

    2004-12-01

    The Southern California Earthquake Center Communication, Education, and Outreach program (SCEC CEO) has been collaborating with the University of Southern California (USC) Joint Education Project (JEP) and the Education Consortium of Central Los Angeles (ECCLA) to work directly with the teachers and schools in the local community around USC. The community surrounding USC is 57 % Hispanic (US Census, 2000) and 21% African American (US Census, 2000). Through the partnership with ECCLA SCEC has created a three week enrichment intersession program, targeting disadvantaged students at the fourth/fifth grade level, dedicated entirely to earthquakes. SCEC builds partnerships with the intersession teachers, working together to actively engage the students in learning about earthquakes. SCEC provides a support system for the teachers, supplying them with the necessary content background as well as classroom manipulatives. SCEC goes into the classrooms with guest speakers and take the students out of the classroom on two field trips. There are four intersession programs each year. SCEC is also working with USC's Joint Education Project program. The JEP program has been recognized as one of the "oldest and best organized" Service-Learning programs in the country (TIME Magazine and the Princeton Review, 2000). Through this partnership SCEC is providing USC students with the necessary tools to go out to the local schools and teach students of all grade levels about earthquakes. SCEC works with the USC students to design engaging lesson plans that effectively convey content regarding earthquakes. USC students can check out hands-on/interactive materials to use in the classrooms from the SCEC Resource Library. In both these endeavors SCEC has expanded our outreach to the local community. SCEC is reaching over 200 minority children each year through our partnerships, and this number will increase as our programs grow.

  20. Stakeholder engagement for sustainability : a mixed method study of corporate strategies and engagement outcomes

    E-print Network

    Isaacs, Katherine W

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation contributes to our understanding of the strategies the companies use to engage external stakeholders, as well as the processes and outcomes of engagement. The first essay proposes a framework for evaluating ...

  1. Graduate Certification in Community Engagement Michigan State University's Graduate Certification in Community Engagement prepares

    E-print Network

    professionals ·Translating health and scientific research findings for general public audiences ·Involving-based service-learning or civic engagement ·Developing activities or curricula to engage general public and nationally Developing the skills and competencies needed for exemplary university- community engagement #12

  2. The Engaged Community College: Supporting the Institutionalization of Engagement through Collaborative Action Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purcell, Jennifer W.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this action research study was to explore how community colleges increase their capacity for community engagement. Faculty and staff members who were identified as community engagement leaders within a public community college participated in a series of interventions to improve community engagement practices within the college. The…

  3. Scholarship-Focused Outreach and Engagement Public Scholarship, Civic Engagement, and Campus-Community Partnerships

    E-print Network

    Scholarship-Focused Outreach and Engagement Public Scholarship, Civic Engagement, and Campus-Community Partnerships Hiram E. Fitzgerald Associate Provost, University Outreach and Engagement fitzger9@msu.edu Burton Imperatives: · Enhance the student experience · Enrich community, economic, and family life · Expand

  4. Student Engagement in Two Countries: A Comparative Study Using National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) Data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. B. KANDIKO

    To compare college and university student engagement in two countries with different responses to global forces, Canada and the United States (US), a series of hierarchical linear regression (HLM) models were developed to analyse data from the 2006 administration of the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE). Overall, students in the U.S. are more engaged, particularly in areas of active

  5. Full engagement: the integration of employee engagement and psychological well-being

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ivan T. Robertson; Cary L. Cooper

    2010-01-01

    Purpose – By introducing the concept of “full engagement,” this article aims to propose that employee engagement is more likely to be sustainable when employee well-being is also high. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Research evidence covering the separate concepts is reviewed and evidence of the benefits that both engagement and well-being confer on organizations is presented. Findings – Most current perspectives on

  6. Abatement of 3-methylbutanal and trimethylamine with combined plasma1 and photocatalysisin a continuous planar reactor2

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , photocatalysis and plasma SDBD/photocatalysis combination.29 30 Keywords:31 32 Synergetic effect; planar reactor1 Abatement of 3-methylbutanal and trimethylamine with combined plasma1 and photocatalysisin a continuous planar reactor2 3 ASSADI Aymen Amine a.b , PALAU Jordi c ,BOUZAZA Abdelkrim a,b* ,PENYA

  7. Analysis of Post-Kyoto CO2 Emissions Trading Using Marginal Abatement Curves A. Denny Ellerman and Annelne Decaux

    E-print Network

    Analysis of Post-Kyoto CO2 Emissions Trading Using Marginal Abatement Curves A. Denny Ellerman the advantages of emissions trading. In this paper, the authors derive MACs from EPPA, the MIT Joint Program the benefits of emissions trading in achieving the emission reduction targets implied by the Kyoto Protocol

  8. Abatement of mercury pollution in the small-scale gold mining industry: Restructuring the policy and research agendas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gavin Hilson

    2006-01-01

    This paper critiques contemporary research and policy approaches taken toward the analysis and abatement of mercury pollution in the small-scale gold mining sector. Unmonitored releases of mercury from gold amalgamation have caused considerable environmental contamination and human health complications in rural reaches of sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America and Asia. Whilst these problems have caught the attention of the scientific community

  9. Financial sustainability of environmental investment under an empirical pollution abatement policy instrument in India: the case of wastewater treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. K. Malik; S. Datta

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the financial viability of private sector investment in effluent treatment plants (ETPs) in India by employing an assumed abatement policy instrument. The policy instrument proposed in this study is framed on a deposit–refund system. The focus of the study is to gauge the economic benefit of the investment in ETPs under the

  10. METHODOLOGY FOR EVALUATING THE IMPACT AND ABATEMENT OF COMBINED SEWER OVERFLOWS. A CASE STUDY OF ONONDAGA LAKE, NEW YORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    A general methodology is presented for the evaluation of the impact and abatement of combined sewer overflows on receiving waters. It was developed from experience with Onondaga Lake, an urban lake in central New York that receives combined sewer overflows from the City of Syracu...

  11. Analysis of the United States Air Force nonpoint-source water-pollution-abatement program. Master's thesis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Seaman

    1990-01-01

    This theses examined the Air Force nonpoint source pollution abatement program by evaluating Major Command, Air Force Regional Civil Engineer and installations compliance to the official Air Force policy. Seventy-two installations in 37 states and ten Major Commands were represented in the data. The evaluation classified nonpoint source pollutants into five categories: urban, agricultural, construction, silvacultural and other. The research

  12. First report on the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M. Loar; S. M. Adams; L. J. Allison; H. L. Boston; M. A. Huston; J. F. McCarthy; J. G. Smith; G. R. Southworth; A. J. Stewart; M. C. Black; A. J. Jr. Gatz; R. L. Hinzman; B. D. Jimenez

    1992-01-01

    As stipulated in the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant on May 24, 1985, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for the receiving stream, East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). The objectives of the BMAP are (1) to demonstrate that the current effluent limitations established for the Oak Ridge Y-12

  13. Underground coal mining methods to abate water pollution: a state of the art literature review. Water pollution control research series

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. W. Wilson; N. J. Matthews; J. L. Stump

    1970-01-01

    The report reviews published information concerning the abatement of harmful drainage from underground coal mines. Although much has been written on mine water management, very little literature is available on the specific area of preventing the formation of acid water. The references used in this report include mining engineering and hydrology studies and spans the period of time when water

  14. Estimating the role of spatial varietal diversity on crop productivity within an abatement framework: The case of banana in Uganda

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Norman Kwikiriza; Enid Katungi; Daniela Horna

    2011-01-01

    Increasingly, research has indicated that in more risky production environments, genetic variation within species and within population increases the ability to respond to the increasing challenges of environmental stress. This paper analyses the role of banana variety diversity in reducing yield losses associated with biophysical production constraints in Uganda. A damage abatement framework is applied to enable estimation of the

  15. The pleasure principle: immersion, engagement, flow

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yellowlees Douglas; Andrew Hargadon

    2000-01-01

    While few critics writing on readers and hypertext have focused on the affective pleasures of reading hypertext fiction or interactive narratives like Myst, those who assess the experience of reading them tend to assume interactive texts should be either immersive or engaging. This study uses schema theory to define the characteristics of immersion and engagement in both conventional and new

  16. Employer Engagement in Education: Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Anthony; Dawkins, James

    2014-01-01

    The subject of this paper is employer engagement in education. In this, the authors consider the range of different ways that employers can support the learning and progression of young people in British schools. The paper draws on a wide range of source material to ask: What are the typical benefits of different types of employer engagement? Do…

  17. Engaging Mathematics Students Using Cooperative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strebe, John D.

    2009-01-01

    In this book, the author offers a wide selection of student engagement strategies for math teachers in grades K-12. He shares his class-tested ideas in a clear and spirited voice, with his devotion to the teaching profession and his students apparent on every page. With invaluable ideas to help students remain engaged for longer time periods, this…

  18. Education and Innovation Enterprise and Engagement

    E-print Network

    Education and Innovation Enterprise and Engagement The Impact of Princeton University #12;#12;1 Executive Summary 2 Introduction 12 Part One: Educating Students for the Future 16 Part Two: Research and Sustainability 64 Table of Contents Education and Innovation Enterprise and Engagement The Impact of Princeton

  19. Research Engagement in English Language Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borg, Simon

    2007-01-01

    Despite the substantial amount of work which has been conducted into teachers' research engagement in mainstream education, this topic has been awarded scant attention in the field of English language teaching. This paper presents the results of a survey representing the first stage of multi-method investigation of research engagement in ELT.…

  20. Engagement in a Community College Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troy, David

    2013-01-01

    There is an abundance of research concerning the definition measurement, and promotion of engagement across various work-related organizations. However, little is known about how we might begin to understand and facilitate engagement among community college faculty. Community college faculty face a unique set of challenges that render them at…

  1. Predictors of Early Engagement in Home Visitation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert T. Ammerman; Jack Stevens; Frank W. Putnam; Mekibib Altaye; Jaclyn E. Hulsmann; Heather D. Lehmkuhl; Jennifer C. Monroe; Thomas A. Gannon; Judith B. Van Ginkel

    2006-01-01

    Predictors of engagement in mothers receiving home visitation in the first year of service was examined. Early engagement was studied in three ways: (1) length of time active in the program during the first year of service (duration), (2) number of visits received (quantity), and (3) gaps in service between visits (consistency). Examined visits received in 515 first-time mothers in

  2. Why Community Engagement Matters in School Turnaround

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAlister, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Research shows that an authentically engaged community improves schools--not just by participating in school events, but also by helping to shape reform. Family and community engagement is a proven strategy for strengthening schools. There is also ample evidence that schools serving large populations of students of color and students living in…

  3. Legitimizing Community Engagement with K-12 Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furco, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the issue of internal legitimization and its importance in securing high-quality community engagement in K-12 schools. Drawing on the literature from the fields of community engagement, school reform, school-university partnerships, and school-community partnerships, this article describes some of the prevailing challenges…

  4. Caregiver Engagement in Religious Urban Elementary Schools

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martin Scanlan

    2008-01-01

    This article examines how school leaders in a religious school serving traditionally marginalized students improve their school communities through constructing space for caregiver engagement. This study suggests how counter-narratives of critical care can inform social justice leadership in schools. The results, from a case study of a Catholic urban elementary school that uses innovative and effective strategies to engage caregivers,

  5. Civic Engagement in the Field of Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenneville, Tiffany; Toler, Susan; Gaskin-Butler, Vicki T.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the importance of, and recommendations for how best to promote, civic engagement among undergraduate psychology majors. In this article, we will describe how the goals of civic engagement are consistent with the specific curricular goals of undergraduate psychology programs. We also will (a) review the…

  6. Engaging Young Children in Science and Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallenstein, Nancy L.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present various techniques that will engage young children, ages 3-8, in learning science and mathematics. Children actively engage in acquiring basic science and mathematics concepts as they explore their environment. The methods presented are intended to meet the developmental levels of young learners as they…

  7. Civic Engagement Patterns of Undocumented Mexican Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, William; Espinoza, Roberta; Ramos, Karina; Coronado, Heidi; Cortes, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the civic engagement of undocumented Mexican students. Civic engagement was defined as providing a social service, activism, tutoring, and functionary work. Survey data results (n = 126) suggest that despite high feelings of rejection because of their undocumented status, part-time employment, and household responsibilities,…

  8. Measuring Parent Engagement in Foster Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alpert, Lily T.; Britner, Preston A.

    2009-01-01

    Today, child welfare agencies widely endorse a family-centered approach to foster care casework. This approach centers on a collaborative parent-caseworker relationship as a mechanism for maintaining parents' engagement in services and presumes that continued engagement will propel parents toward reunification. However, despite the importance of…

  9. Employee Engagement and Organizational Behavior Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludwig, Timothy D.; Frazier, Christopher B.

    2012-01-01

    Engagement is a "buzz" word that has gained popularity in Industrial/Organizational Psychology. Based on a "Positive Psychology" approach, engagement is perceived as a valuable state for employees, because surveys on the construct have found it correlates with some organizational tactics (e.g., human resource policies, procedural justice) and…

  10. Developmental Antecedents of Young Adult Civic Engagement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jelena Obradovi?; Ann S. Masten

    2007-01-01

    Civic engagement was studied in relation to overall development in adolescence, emerging adulthood, and young adulthood to examine how earlier activity involvement and success in prior and concurrent age-salient domains of competence may contribute to 2 forms of civic engagement in adulthood (citizenship and volunteering). Data on 163 youth were drawn from a longitudinal study of competence in a normative,

  11. Consistency of Toddler Engagement across Two Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguiar, Cecilia; McWilliam, R. A.

    2013-01-01

    This study documented the consistency of child engagement across two settings, toddler child care classrooms and mother-child dyadic play. One hundred twelve children, aged 14-36 months (M = 25.17, SD = 6.06), randomly selected from 30 toddler child care classrooms from the district of Porto, Portugal, participated. Levels of engagement were…

  12. The University and Student Political Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, James R.; Lilly, Bryan

    2010-01-01

    Prior research has identified a substantial positive relationship between college attendance and civic engagement. This article examines student experiences with university academics and ancillary programs to determine which of these, if any, motivate increased student engagement. Various student characteristics were evaluated to determine their…

  13. Engaging Students: Promoting Mutual Support and Exploration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Stella; Haigney, Di

    2009-01-01

    Prenskey (2005) asserted that a major problem within education is not that the information being taught lacks "relevance" to students lives, but that there is a lack of engagement with educational tasks. When attempting to engage classes, tutors are aiming to draw students into learning activities--to involve them--and thus promote active learning…

  14. Parental Engagement Proves No Easy Goal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2012-01-01

    Few would quarrel with the goal of increasing parents' and families' engagement in education in the name of school improvement. But there is far less consensus on what that engagement should look like--and on how educators and policymakers should be promoting it. Those questions are evident in the federal No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act, which…

  15. Expedited family group engagement and child permanency

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joan Pennell; Myles Edwards; Gale Burford

    2010-01-01

    Family group engagement is a means by which child welfare can involve the family, the extended family, and community supports in making plans for the care of children. Such engagement can enlarge supports to help children stay with their parents or as needed, identify relative caregivers. It, however, would appear especially challenging when children are removed on an emergency basis,

  16. The University of Calgary Student Engagement

    E-print Network

    Garousi, Vahid

    The University of Calgary Student Engagement Progress Report #1 Written by the NSSE Action Team Guide · New Student Registration Assistants · Summer Orientation · Parent & Family Orientation · Fall. 6 ­ Graduation Guarantee #12;3 Student Engagement Progress Report #1 The NSSE Action Team is working

  17. Engagement and Perception's Influence on Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abendroth, Dorinda

    2012-01-01

    Can increasing student perception and engagement though alternative teaching methods, such as introducing math in an everyday context improve student test scores? Literature on this subject suggests improving student engagement and introduction of math in everyday applications can improve student comprehension. This study looks at a second grade…

  18. Social Identity Theories and Educational Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Sean

    2009-01-01

    There is a large body of research in studies of schooling, particularly ethnographic case studies, which posits that collective action among students undermines engagement in school and contributes to educational inequality. In this paper I review studies of engagement from a social identity theory perspective. To what extent can collective action…

  19. Parental Involvement to Parental Engagement: A Continuum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodall, Janet; Montgomery, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Based on the literature of the field, this article traces a continuum between parental involvement with schools, and parental engagement with children's learning. The article seeks to shed light on an area of confusion; previous research has shown that different stakeholder groups understand "parental engagement" in different ways.…

  20. Public engagement to build trust: false hopes?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Judith Petts

    2008-01-01

    Public engagement through deliberative processes is promoted in both academic and policy circles as a potential means to build public trust in risk decisions and decision?makers. Governments in particular seem to optimistically take a positive relationship between public engagement and trust almost for granted. This paper provides a new and critical analysis of this hoped?for relationship, questioning whether such a

  1. Explorations in engagement for humans and robots

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Candace L. Sidner; Christopher Lee; Cory D. Kidd; Neal Lesh; Charles Rich

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores the concept of engagement, the process by which individuals in an interac- tion start, maintain and end their perceived connection to one another. The paper reports on one aspect of engagement among human interactors - the effects of tracking faces during an interac- tion. It also provides details for an architecture of a robot that can participate

  2. Building an engaged and certified nursing workforce.

    PubMed

    Callicutt, Dale; Norman, Karen; Smith, Lesa; Nichols, Audrey; Kring, Daria

    2011-03-01

    Professional certification has been linked to positive patient, system, and nurse outcomes. However, certification rates among nurses remain low. Using tenets from employee engagement theory, we designed strategies to fully engage nurses within our nursing division to pursue certification. After 1 year, certification rates more than doubled in our cardiac departments. PMID:21320663

  3. The crucial importance of employee engagement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles Woodruffe

    2006-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to advance the view that having employees who are thoroughly motivated and truly engaged is the most powerful competitive weapon an organization can enjoy, and to offer advice on how to achieve this condition. Findings – The paper highlights the importance of 14 non-financial ways of engaging the employee, and offers a

  4. Employee Engagement: Motivating and Retaining Tomorrow's Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shuck, Michael Bradley; Wollard, Karen Kelly

    2008-01-01

    Tomorrow's workforce is seeking more than a paycheck; they want their work to meet their needs for affiliation, meaning, and self-development. Companies willing to meet these demands will capture the enormous profit potential of a workforce of fully engaged workers. This piece explores what engagement is, why it matters, and how human resource…

  5. Antecedents and consequences of employee engagement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alan M. Saks

    2006-01-01

    Purpose – Employee engagement has become a hot topic in recent years among consulting firms and in the popular business press. However, employee engagement has rarely been studied in the academic literature and relatively little is known about its antecedents and consequences. The purpose of this study was to test a model of the antecedents and consequences of job and

  6. University of Delaware Community Engagement Survey 2013

    E-print Network

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Engagement Survey was sent to all employees via University email on September 25, 2013 with an accompanyingUniversity of Delaware Community Engagement Survey ­ 2013 Preliminary Report The Delaware Community using SPSS. The number of employees responding to the survey was 1,121 representing approximately 25

  7. Primary School English Teachers' Research Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Xuesong; Chow, Alice Wai Kwan

    2012-01-01

    Research engagement is an important means for teachers to develop their professional competence. This paper reports on an enquiry into the research engagement of a group of primary school English language teachers in Guangdong province on the Chinese mainland. Drawing on questionnaire data and teachers' interview narratives, the paper examines how…

  8. Stakeholder engagement, social auditing and corporate sustainability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Simon S. Gao; Jane J. Zhang

    2006-01-01

    Purpose – To identify the applicability of social auditing as an approach of engaging stakeholders in assessing and reporting on corporate sustainability and its performance. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Drawing upon the framework of AA1000 and the social auditing studies, this paper links stakeholder engagement, social auditing and corporate sustainability with a view to applying dialogue-based social auditing to address corporate sustainability.

  9. Value from hedonic experience and engagement.

    PubMed

    Higgins, E Tory

    2006-07-01

    Recognizing that value involves experiencing pleasure or pain is critical to understanding the psychology of value. But hedonic experience is not enough. I propose that it is also necessary to recognize that strength of engagement can contribute to experienced value through its contribution to the experience of motivational force--an experience of the intensity of the force of attraction to or repulsion from the value target. The subjective pleasure/pain properties of a value target influence strength of engagement, but factors separate from the hedonic properties of the value target also influence engagement strength and thus contribute to the experience of attraction or repulsion. These additional sources of engagement strength include opposition to interfering forces, overcoming personal resistance, using the right or proper means of goal pursuit, and regulatory fit between the orientation and manner of goal pursuit. Implications of the contribution of engagement strength to value are discussed for judgment and decision making, persuasion, and emotional experiences. PMID:16802877

  10. [Spatio-temporal dynamics of fishing effort in a multi-species artisanal diving fishery and its effects on catch variability: insights for sustainable management].

    PubMed

    Naranjo Madrigall, Helven; Salas Marquez, Silvia

    2014-12-01

    Artisanal diving fisheries are a source of income, employment and food security of coastal areas in many countries. Understanding the dynamics of these fisheries, including the spatial and temporal dynamics of fishing effort, gears and species can help to address the challenges involved in fisheries management. We aimed to analyze the differences in fishing strategies undertaken by fishers that use two different diving methods (hookah and free diving), the conditions and their potential impacts on catches when adjustments to those strategies are applied over time. For this, detailed information of fishing operations from artisanal boats in the North Pacific coast of Costa Rica was analyzed in two fishing seasons (2007-2008 and 2011-2012). Data were collected by onboard observers (fishing site, fishing time, species composition, depth and visibility). Additionally, interviews with divers were applied to obtain information of price per species, species volume and fishing operations. From the total number of trips during both seasons, hookah diving was represented by a sample size of 69.3%, while free diving, with a sample of 41.9%. More than 15 species were identified in each fishing season. Nevertheless, three categories had substantial contributions in both seasons with differences in the proportions for each case: green lobster (Panulirus gracilis), octopus (Octopus sp.) and parrotfish (Scarus perrico and S. ghobban). It is worth noting that an important proportion of catch was retained by fishers for personal consumption purposes, including species of high commercial value. Additional night diving activity, increased the number of dives from one season to another. Besides, cooperation processes in free diving fishing operations, and changes in fishing effort between seasons, defined important changes in fishing strategies. Potential causes of changes in fishing strategies and the implications for management to ensure the sustainability of these fisheries in the long term are discussed. PMID:25720188

  11. Population structure and stock assessment of Hoplias malabaricus (Characiformes: Erythrinidae) caught by artisanal fishermen in river-reservoir transition area in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Novaes, José Luís Costa; Carvalho, Edmir Daniel

    2011-03-01

    Hoplias malabaricus is a viable economic alternative for artisanal fishermen who used to live on the banks of rivers that now are dammed in Brazil. In order to preserve the species' natural stock, the main objectives of this study were to obtain bio-ecological information on this species reproduction, feeding dynamics and the description of the extent of its exploitation in river-reservoir transition area in Brazil. This way, from January to December 2005, different fishery catches were made with gill nets by artisanal fishermen, and a total of 426 individual H. malabaricus were obtained and sampled. From each specimen, the following biometric and biological data were analyzed: standard length, total weight, stomach contents, reproductive data such as sex, weight and gonadal maturation stage; with these data we estimated sex ratio, reproduction period and feeding habits. To assess growth parameters and infer on the degree of exploitation, the standard length frequency data were analysed using the FISAT (ELEFAN I) computer program. Data revealed a sex ratio of 0.8:1 (M:F), that reproduction occurs all year around, being more intense during spring and summer; it also showed that H. malabaricus is piscivorous. The growth parameters and mortality were estimated at: L(infinity) = 35.18 cm, k = 0.32 year, longevity = 9.3 years, Z = 1.25 years, M = 0.63 year and F = 0.62 year. The weight-length relationship was: In Wt = -3.1663+2.7456 In Lp. The yield-per-recruit analysis produced the following values: E = 0.496, E(max) = 0.916, E0.1 = 0.701 and E0.5 = 0.378. Overall, our data suggest that the stock of H. malabaricus is not yet overfished in the studied area. PMID:21513193

  12. Radiological survey and assessment of associated activity concentration of the naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in the Migori artisanal gold mining belt of southern Nyanza, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Odumo, O B; Mustapha, A O; Patel, J P; Angeyo, H K

    2011-06-01

    A radiological survey and assessment was carried out at selected sites (Osiri, Mikei, Masara and Macalder) in the Migori gold mines of southern Nyanza, Kenya to determine the levels of exposure of the artisanal miners to the naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) and dust. The activity concentrations of (40)K and the decay products of (232)Th and (226)Ra were obtained using an innovative method in single channel NaI(Tl) gamma-ray spectrometry. The counts for both the sample and the reference material in a specific window for a particular radionuclide were compared to arrive at the activity concentration of the radionuclide in the sample. Measurement of dust loading at various crushing sites was carried out by trapping the dust particles on a 0.45 ?m cellulose acetate filter paper (47 mm diameter) using a vacuum pump. The activity concentration levels range widely 80-413, 12-145 and 21-258 Bq/kg for (40)K, (232)Th and (226)Ra, respectively. The calculated absorbed dose in air range from 16 to 178 nGy/h (with a mean of 42 nGy/h). Dust loading was found to range from 1.3 to 3.7 mg/m(3). Although the activity concentration of the radionuclides and the calculated annual absorbed dose is below the world's average, the dust level at the mines was relatively high. The results obtained show that the artisanal miners are exposed to various levels of radionuclides and dust and necessary precautions need to be taken. PMID:21393006

  13. Environmental influence on the thermoeconomic optimization of a combined plant with NO{sub x} abatement

    SciTech Connect

    Agazzani, A.; Massardo, A.F. [Univ. of Genova (Italy). Ist. di Macchine e Sistemi Energetici; Fangopoulos, C.A. [National Technical Univ. of Athens (Greece). Dept. of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering

    1998-07-01

    Methods to analyze, improve, and optimize thermal energy systems have to take into account not only energy (exergy) consumption and economic resources, but also pollution and degradation of the environment. The term environomics implies a method that takes thermodynamic, economic, and environmental aspects systematically into consideration for the analysis and optimization of energy systems. For optimization of energy systems, the environmental aspects are quantified and introduced into the objective function. In this particular work, the environomic approach is followed of the analysis and optimal design of a combined-cycle plant. In addition to the basic configuration, two alternatives for NO{sub x} abatement are studied: Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) and steam injection. The optimization problem is solved for each configuration, and the results are compared with each other. The effect of the unit pollution penalties and of the limits imposed by regulations is studied. Some general conclusions are drawn.

  14. Cost-effective analysis of carbon abatement options in China`s electricity sector

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.X. [Univ. of Groningen (Netherlands). Dept. of Economics and Public Finance

    1998-05-01

    This article attempts to shed light on technological aspects of carbon abatement in China`s power industry and is thus devoted to satisfying electricity planning requirements in the CO{sub 2} context. To that end, a technology-oriented dynamic optimization model for power system expansion planning has been developed. Fifteen types of power plants are represented explicitly in the model in terms of their technical, economic, and environmental characteristics. These plants have first been compared in terms of both the levelized cost of generation and the marginal cost of CO{sub 2} reduction. Driven by the baseline electricity demands that are estimated by a newly developed time-recursive dynamic computable general equilibrium model of the Chinese economy, the power planning model has then been used to develop the baseline scenario for China`s electricity supply and to analyze the impacts of compliance with CO{sub 2} limits in the power industry.

  15. Photocatalytic NOx abatement: the role of the material supporting the TiO2 active layer.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Claudia L; Pirola, Carlo; Selli, Elena; Biella, Serena

    2012-04-15

    The importance of the choice of a suitable substrate as supporting material for photoactive TiO(2), either in the form of powders or thin films or in photoactive paints, is frequently disregarded. In this paper four different supports (stainless steel, sand-blasted stainless steel, Teflon and glass) are object of investigation. The final aim is to verify the presence of interactions between the photocatalyst (AEROXIDE(®) TiO(2) P25 by Evonik Degussa Corporation) and the support, directly involved in the photocatalytic activity in the NO(x) abatement. The characterization results have been correlated with the photoactivity of the different samples. In particular, a coating of about 6-9 ?m seems to allow a photocatalytic result free from any positive or negative interference with the supporting material, therefore giving reliable results about the photoactivity of the TiO(2) under investigation. PMID:22119301

  16. Comparison of non-thermal plasma techniques for abatement of volatile organic compounds and nitrogen oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Penetrante, B.M.; Hsiao, M.C.; Bardsley, J.N. [and others

    1996-01-11

    Non-thermal plasma processing is an emerging technology for the abatement of dilute concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and other hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) in atmospheric-pressure gas streams. Either electrical discharge or electron beam methods can produce these plasmas. Recent laboratory-scale experiments show that the electron beam method is remarkably more energy efficient than competing non-thermal plasma techniques based on pulsed corona and other types of electrical discharge plasma. Preliminary cost analysis based on these data also show that the electron beam method may be cost-competitive to thermal and catalytic methods that employ heat recovery or hybrid techniques.

  17. A watershed-scale assessment of cost-effectiveness of sediment abatement with flow diversion terraces.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qi; Zhao, Zhengyong; Benoy, Glenn; Chow, Thien Lien; Rees, Herb W; Bourque, Charles P-A; Meng, Fan-Rui

    2010-01-01

    Soil conservation beneficial management practices (BMPs) are effective at controlling soil loss from farmlands and minimizing water pollution in agricultural watersheds. However, costs associated with implementing and maintaining these practices are high and often deter farmers from using them. Consequently, it is necessary to conduct cost-benefit analysis of BMP implementation to assist decision-makers with planning to provide the greatest level of environmental protection with limited resources and funding. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was used to evaluate the efficacy of flow diversion terraces (FDT) in abating sediment yield at the outlet of Black Brook Watershed (BBW), northwestern New Brunswick. Different FDT-implementation scenarios were expressed as the ratio of land area protected by FDT to the total cultivated area. From this analysis, we found that average annual sediment yield decreased exponentially with increased FDT protection. When the proportion of FDT-protected areas was low, sediment reductions caused by FDT increased sharply with increasing use of FDT. Similarly, marginal sediment yield abatement costs (dollar per tonne of sediment reduction) increased exponentially with increasing proportion of FDT-protected area. The results indicated that increasing land protection with FDT from 6 to 50% would result in a reduction of about 2.1 tonne ha(-1) yr(-1) and costs of sediment reduction increased from $7 to $12 per tonne. Increasing FDT-protected cropland from 50 to 100%, a reduction of about 0.9 tonne of sediment ha(-1) yr(-1) would occur and the costs would increase from $12 to $53 per tonne of sediment yield reduction. PMID:20048309

  18. Abatement of indoor air pollution achieved with coal-biomass household briquettes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Kimiko; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Wang, Qingyue; Yi, Jing; Cheng, Shuqun; Zhou, Yanrong; Sakamoto, Kazuhiko

    We investigated the abatement of indoor pollution achieved when two types of coal-biomass briquettes (L-BBs and H-BBs) were used in place of honeycombed coal briquettes (H-coal) in household stoves in rural Chongqing, China. Indoor concentrations of sulfur dioxide (SO 2), carbon monoxide (CO), and gaseous fluoride were measured. Additionally, we evaluated the factors that affected indoor concentrations of these gases, including the amount of fuel used as well as its sulfur content, the sulfur-emission ratio determined from the amount of sulfur retained in the combustion ash, and the combustion temperature in the stoves. The average 8-h and 24-h SO 2 concentrations for L-BBs were nearly equal to or less than the World Health Organization's 40 ppb guideline, whereas those for H-coal and H-BBs exceeded the guideline. The average 8-h SO 2 concentrations for L-BBs were from 63 to 89% lower than those for H-coal, even though the 8-h average weight of fuel and its sulfur content for L-BBs were equal to those of H-coal. A chemical analysis of combustion ash indicated that the sulfur-emission ratio was from 26 to 48% for L-BBs, as compared with 86% for H-coal, and this difference resulted in reduction of indoor SO 2 concentrations for L-BBs as compared with H-coal. Most of the 8-h average concentrations of CO and gaseous fluoride for all fuels were lower than the WHO guidelines. We concluded that BBs are a useful domestic fuel for the abatement of indoor air pollution.

  19. Exploring Increased Productivity Through Employee Engagement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Wayne K., Jr.

    Disengaged employees cost U.S. companies billions of dollars annually in lowered productivity, a cost which has been compounded by the difficult economic situations in the country. The potential for increasing productivity through increased employee engagement was examined in this study. Using personal engagement theory and the theory of planned behavior, the purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore how the experiences of salaried aerospace employees affected productivity and the financial performance of an organization. Interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 20 aerospace employees whose responses were codified and analyzed to identify themes. The analysis indicated that (a) the lived experiences of employees influenced employee engagement, (b) employee engagement affects organizational commitment and performance, and (c) trust and respect and leadership are essential components to keep employees engaged. Eighty percent of the participants indicated that as employee engagement increases so too does organizational performance. The implications for positive social change include new insights for leaders seeking to increase productivity and financial performance, and to support employee engagement for maintaining sustainability, retaining talent, increasing profits, and improving the economy.

  20. Diabetes Topics Associated With Engagement on Twitter

    PubMed Central

    Mart, Adelina; Moreland-Russell, Sarah; Caburnay, Charlene A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Social media are widely used by the general public and by public health and health care professionals. Emerging evidence suggests engagement with public health information on social media may influence health behavior. However, the volume of data accumulating daily on Twitter and other social media is a challenge for researchers with limited resources to further examine how social media influence health. To address this challenge, we used crowdsourcing to facilitate the examination of topics associated with engagement with diabetes information on Twitter. Methods We took a random sample of 100 tweets that included the hashtag “#diabetes” from each day during a constructed week in May and June 2014. Crowdsourcing through Amazon’s Mechanical Turk platform was used to classify tweets into 9 topic categories and their senders into 3 Twitter user categories. Descriptive statistics and Tweedie regression were used to identify tweet and Twitter user characteristics associated with 2 measures of engagement, “favoriting” and “retweeting.” Results Classification was reliable for tweet topics and Twitter user type. The most common tweet topics were medical and nonmedical resources for diabetes. Tweets that included information about diabetes-related health problems were positively and significantly associated with engagement. Tweets about diabetes prevalence, nonmedical resources for diabetes, and jokes or sarcasm about diabetes were significantly negatively associated with engagement. Conclusion Crowdsourcing is a reliable, quick, and economical option for classifying tweets. Public health practitioners aiming to engage constituents around diabetes may want to focus on topics positively associated with engagement. PMID:25950569

  1. ACTION PLANS STRATEGIC PRIORITY: Engaging Our Current Students

    E-print Network

    Thompson, Michael

    ACTION PLANS STRATEGIC PRIORITY: Engaging Our Current Students GOAL Increase student engagement Cultivate current students to become active future alumni, outstanding university ambassadors, and volunteer new programs to engage students, build Association profile and contribute to a positive Summer 2010

  2. 29 CFR 793.20 - Exclusive engagement in exempt work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exclusive engagement in exempt work. 793.20 Section 793.20 Labor ...Workweek Application of Exemption § 793.20 Exclusive engagement in exempt work. An employee who engages exclusively...

  3. 29 CFR 793.20 - Exclusive engagement in exempt work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Exclusive engagement in exempt work. 793.20 Section 793.20 Labor ...Workweek Application of Exemption § 793.20 Exclusive engagement in exempt work. An employee who engages exclusively...

  4. Symptom severity, treatment engagement, and outcomes for culturally diverse youth

    E-print Network

    Tsai, Katherine HsiuJung; Tsai, Katherine HsiuJung

    2012-01-01

    family therapy versus community control: Engagement,Family-based treatment for childhood antisocial behavior: Experimental influences on dropout and engagement.perceptions of engagement levels for these families were

  5. 29 CFR 793.20 - Exclusive engagement in exempt work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Exclusive engagement in exempt work. 793.20...RADIO AND TELEVISION STATION EMPLOYEES FROM OVERTIME PAY REQUIREMENTS...Exemption § 793.20 Exclusive engagement in exempt work. An employee who engages exclusively...

  6. 29 CFR 793.20 - Exclusive engagement in exempt work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Exclusive engagement in exempt work. 793.20...RADIO AND TELEVISION STATION EMPLOYEES FROM OVERTIME PAY REQUIREMENTS...Exemption § 793.20 Exclusive engagement in exempt work. An employee who engages exclusively...

  7. 29 CFR 793.20 - Exclusive engagement in exempt work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Exclusive engagement in exempt work. 793.20...RADIO AND TELEVISION STATION EMPLOYEES FROM OVERTIME PAY REQUIREMENTS...Exemption § 793.20 Exclusive engagement in exempt work. An employee who engages exclusively...

  8. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart I of... - Alternative Procedures for Measuring Point-of-Use Abatement Device Destruction or Removal Efficiency

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...sample at the inlet of the point-of-use abatement...ventilation system at a point downstream of the sample...conditions such as electron energy, secondary electron...concentrations including a zero. The zero point is defined as...

  9. The MSU Graduate Certification in Community Engagement

    E-print Network

    -college programs · Technical assistance · Consulting · Policy analysis · Expert testimony · Knowledge transfer · Commercialization of discoveries · Creation of new business ventures · Clinical services · Human and animal patient online modules: Tools of Engagement · Desire for systemic impact ­ undergrad, grad, faculty · MSU track

  10. Igniting Engaged Scholars: The Graduate Certification in

    E-print Network

    · Pre-college programs · Technical assistance · Consulting · Policy analysis · Expert testimony services · Human and animal patient care © 2009 Michigan State University Board of Trustees What and intentions · Undergraduate online modules: Tools of Engagement · Desire for systemic impact ­ undergrad, grad

  11. Technology, Political Debates, and Civic Engagement

    E-print Network

    Ricke, LaChrystal Dawn

    2008-08-18

    The 2007 CNN-YouTube presidential candidate debates provide a unique opportunity for the American populace to become engaged in national political discussion through the submission of video questions to YouTube for inclusion in two nationally...

  12. Community Engagement Newark African-American Alzheimer's

    E-print Network

    Gluck, Mark

    Roselle Senior Center Services Tri-City Peoples Corporation St. James AME Church Missionary Society Vision #12;On and Off Campus Engagement · 4 Luncheons 478 · 2 Outreach sessions [2008-2009] 145 ­ Roselle

  13. Engaging the Community in Education Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortes, Ernesto, Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Community engagement should be at the heart of public school reform. In Texas, the Industrial Areas Foundation Alliance Schools demonstrate how parents and community leaders are serious partners in shaping school environments and educational programs. (SK)

  14. Community Engagement in Observational Human Exposure Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although observational human exposure studies do not deliberately expose participants to chemicals or environmental conditions, merely involving people as research participants and conducting research inside homes raises ethical issues. Community engagement offers a promising st...

  15. the Engaged Standards of Practice for

    E-print Network

    based · Grounded in diverse research and evidence-based qualitative and quantitative methodologies #12Advocating & Modeling the Engaged University Standards of Practice for University, and instructional programs #12;Standards of Practice in University- Community Partnerships Shared Values

  16. Community Engagement about Genetic Variation Research

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Kurt D.; Metosky, Susan; Rudofsky, Gayle; Deignan, Kathleen P.; Martinez, Hulda; Johnson-Moore, Penelope; Citrin, Toby

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this article is to describe the methods and effectiveness of the Public Engagement in Genetic Variation and Haplotype Mapping Issues (PEGV) Project, which engaged a community in policy discussion about genetic variation research. The project implemented a 6-stage community engagement model in New Rochelle, New York. First, researchers recruited community partners. Second, the project team created community oversight. Third, focus groups discussed concerns generated by genetic variation research. Fourth, community dialogue sessions addressed focus group findings and developed policy recommendations. Fifth, a conference was held to present these policy recommendations and to provide a forum for HapMap (haplotype mapping) researchers to dialogue directly with residents. Finally, findings were disseminated via presentations and papers to the participants and to the wider community beyond. The project generated a list of proposed guidelines for genetic variation research that addressed the concerns of New Rochelle residents. Project team members expressed satisfaction with the engagement model overall but expressed concerns about how well community groups were utilized and what segment of the community actually engaged in the project. The PEGV Project represents a model for researchers to engage the general public in policy development about genetic research. There are benefits of such a process beyond the desired genetic research. (Population Health Management 2012;15:78–89) PMID:21815821

  17. Spatiotemporal Model of Family Engagement: A Qualitative Study of Family-Driven Perspectives on Family Engagement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Claudette V Fette; Cynthia R Glimpse; Staci Lee Rodarmel; Aurelia Carter; Patti Derr; Helene Fallon; Kim Miller

    2009-01-01

    The Family-School-Community Partnerships Practice Group of the National Community of Practice on Collaborative School Behavioral Health conducted a survey of 30 families across the United States in an effort to develop a family-driven definition of family engagement. Literature on family engagement is reviewed, qualitative methods using a grounded theory approach are described and a model of family engagement is presented.

  18. Measuring patient engagement: development and psychometric properties of the Patient Health Engagement (PHE) Scale

    PubMed Central

    Graffigna, Guendalina; Barello, Serena; Bonanomi, Andrea; Lozza, Edoardo

    2015-01-01

    Beyond the rhetorical call for increasing patients' engagement, policy makers recognize the urgency to have an evidence-based measure of patients' engagement and capture its effect when planning and implementing initiatives aimed at sustaining the engagement of consumers in their health. In this paper, authors describe the Patient Health Engagement Scale (PHE-scale), a measure of patient engagement that is grounded in rigorous conceptualization and appropriate psychometric methods. The scale was developed based on our previous conceptualization of patient engagement (the PHE-model). In particular, the items of the PHE-scale were developed based on the findings from the literature review and from interviews with chronic patients. Initial psychometric analysis was performed to pilot test a preliminary version of the items. The items were then refined and administered to a national sample of chronic patients (N = 382) to assess the measure's psychometric performance. A final phase of test-retest reliability was performed. The analysis showed that the PHE Scale has good psychometric properties with good correlation with concurrent measures and solid reliability. Having a valid and reliable measure to assess patient engagement is the first step in understanding patient engagement and its role in health care quality, outcomes, and cost containment. The PHE Scale shows a promising clinical relevance, indicating that it can be used to tailor intervention and assess changes after patient engagement interventions. PMID:25870566

  19. Physiological and Subjective Responses to Working in Disposable Protective Coveralls and Respirators Commonly Used by the Asbestos Abatement Industry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MARY KAY WHITE; THOMAS K. HODOUS; JUDITH B. HUDNALL

    1989-01-01

    The physiological and subjective effects of working with different respirators while wearing lightweight disposable (Tyvek® 1412 polyclefin) coveralls commonly used by the asbestos abatement industry were studied. Nine healthy men (mean age=27.3?yr, weight=76.9?kg) each performed a series of four exercise tests with four different respirator ensembles in counterbalanced order. Treadmill work was performed at a set walking speed of 4?kph

  20. The effect of oil spills on workers involved in containment and abatement: the role of the occupational health nurse.

    PubMed

    Moore, Roberta; Burns, Candace M

    2011-11-01

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill is the most recent manmade disaster to challenge occupational health nurses caring for a unique worker population. The effects of oil spills on wildlife, marine life, and the ecosystem are well studied and documented, but the effects on workers who contain and abate such disasters are not. These workers can suffer from a multitude of illnesses and injuries, such as ataxia, migraines, and various lung diseases, which can be a challenge for occupational health nurses. PMID:22045010

  1. What is the Best Distribution for Pollution Abatement Efforts? Information for Optimizing the WFD Programs of Measures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francois Destandau; Amir Nafi

    2010-01-01

    The Water Framework Directive (WFD) has mobilized economic theory in order to encourage E.U. Member States to reach desirable\\u000a environmental water pollution levels by conciliating economic and ecological interests. For this purpose, a stringent standard\\u000a (“good status”) has been set. Nevertheless, it will be possible to relax this standard if it appears that total abatement\\u000a costs required for reaching this

  2. NO{sub x} Abatement Pilot Plant 90-day test results report

    SciTech Connect

    McCray, J.A.; Boardman, R.D. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1991-08-30

    High-level radioactive liquid wastes produced during nuclear fuel reprocessing at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant are calcined in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) to provide both volume reduction and a more stable waste form. Because a large component of the HLW is nitric acid, high levels of oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) are produced in the process and discharged to the environment via the calciner off-gas. The NO{sub x} abatement program is required by the new Fuel Processing Restoration (FPR) project permit to construct to reduce NO{sub x} emissions from the NWCF. Extensive research and development has indicated that the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) process is the most promising technology for treating the NWCF off-gas. Pilot plant tests were performed to determine the compatibility of the SCR process with actual NWCF off-gas. Test results indicate that the SCR process is a viable method for abating the NO{sub x} from the NWCF off-gas. Reduction efficiencies over 95% can be obtained, with minimal amounts of ammonia slip, provided favorable operating conditions exist. Two reactors operated with series flow will provide optimum reduction capabilities. Typical operation should be performed with a first reactor stage gas space velocity of 20,000 hr{sup {minus}1} and an inlet temperature of 320{degrees}C. The first stage exhaust NO{sub x} concentration will then dictate the parameter settings for the second stage. Operation should always strive for a peak reactor temperature of 520{degrees}C in both reactors, with minimal NH{sub 3} slip from the second reactor. Frequent fluctuations in the NWCF off-gas NO{sub x} concentration will require a full-scale reduction facility that is versatile and quick-responding. Sudden changes in NWCF off-gas NO{sub x} concentrations will require quick detection and immediate response to avoid reactor bed over-heating and/or excessive ammonia slip.

  3. Effects of olive mill wastewater physico-chemical treatments on polyphenol abatement and Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.) germinability.

    PubMed

    Barbera, A C; Maucieri, C; Ioppolo, A; Milani, M; Cavallaro, V

    2014-04-01

    Direct spreading on agricultural lands may represent an environmentally friendly disposal method and a possible use of water and nutrients from olive mill wastewaters (OMWs). However, the agronomic use of OMWs is limited, among others by polyphenols, which exert phytotoxic effects. Activated charcoal (AC) has been recognized as a very effective agent for polyphenol abatement, as it enables an irreversible process of phenol adsorption. Addition of calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) has also been described as a cheap and effective method in polyphenols abatement. However, the effects of Ca(OH)2 addition to OMW on seed germination are unclear. In this paper, the effects of AC and/or Ca(OH)2 on OMW polyphenols abatement, and Lolium multiflorum seed germination have been investigated. The highest polyphenols removal, approximately 95%, was observed when 80 g L(-1) of AC was added to OMWs (the maximum dose in this investigation). The addition of Ca(OH)2 not only improved the effectiveness of the AC treatment but also resulted in a significant rise in Lolium seed germination at the highest AC doses (60 and 80 g L(-1)). Considering the high salinity (7300 ?S cm(-1)) of these wastewaters, low quantities of Ca(OH)2 may also exert a protective effect on soil structure counteracting the sodium-induced dispersion through the binding action of calcium cation on clays and organic matter. PMID:24289894

  4. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for White Oak Creek Watershed and the Clinch River

    SciTech Connect

    Loar, J.M.; Adams, S.M.; Allison, L.J.; Blaylock, B.G.; Boston, H.L.; Huston, M.A.; Kimmel, B.L.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.; Walton, B.T.; Kitchings, J.T.; Olsen, C.R.

    1991-09-01

    On April 1, 1986, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) (EPA 1986). As specified in Part 3: Special Conditions (Item H) of the permit, a plan for biological monitoring of the Clinch River, White Oak Creek (WOC), Northwest Tributary (NWT) of WOC, Melton Branch (MB), Fifth Creek, and First Creek shall be submitted for approval to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDHE) within 90 days of the effective date of the permit. The plan, which is referred to in Part 3 (H) of the permit as the Biological Monitoring Plan and Abatement Program (BMPAP), describes characterization monitoring studies to be conducted for the duration of the permit (5 years). In order to be consistent with the terminology used for the Biological Monitoring and Abatement Programs for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plan and the Oak Ridge K-25 Plant, BMPAP will subsequently be referred to as the Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP). The proposed BMAP outlined in this document is based on preliminary discussions held on December 9, 1985, between staff of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (ORNL and Central Management), the US Department of Energy (DOE), EPA, and TDHE. 232 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs.

  5. Measuring Student Engagement among Elementary Students: Pilot of the Student Engagement Instrument--Elementary Version

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Chandra P.; Reschly, Amy L.; Lovelace, Matthew D.; Appleton, James J.; Thompson, Dianne

    2012-01-01

    Early school withdrawal, commonly referred to as dropout, is associated with a plethora of negative outcomes for students, schools, and society. Student engagement, however, presents as a promising theoretical model and cornerstone of school completion interventions. The purpose of the present study was to validate the Student Engagement

  6. Voices of Students on Engagement: A Report on the 2006 High School Survey of Student Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yazzie-Mintz, Ethan

    2007-01-01

    The goal of the High School Survey of Student Engagement (HSSSE) is to document, describe, and monitor student engagement in secondary schools nationally. HSSSE is a powerful tool in the assessment arena that can complement performance tests and stimulate discussions on teaching and learning. This overview report highlights findings from across…

  7. Conceptualising and Measuring Student Engagement through the Australasian Survey of Student Engagement (AUSSE): A Critique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagel, Pauline; Carr, Rodney; Devlin, Marcia

    2012-01-01

    Student engagement has rapidly developed a central place in the quality agenda of Australian universities since the introduction of the Australasian Survey of Student Engagement (AUSSE). The AUSSE is based on one developed in the USA. The main arguments given for adopting this survey in Australia are that it provides a valid instrument for…

  8. The Ebook: Maintaining the Engaged Reading Experience, Creating New Reading Engagements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Suzanne Cardwell

    2009-01-01

    As the electronic book slowly emerges into the cultures of reading and publishing, questions are raised about the types of reading experience the ebook can offer. Criticism levelled at the ebook states that it cannot offer the same engaged and immersive reading experience as that offered by print. Proponents of the ebook counter that engagement with the book comes not

  9. Medical Humanities and Engagement grant funding data Figure 1. Current Medical Humanities and Engagement grants

    E-print Network

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Medical Humanities and Engagement grant funding data Figure 1. Current Medical Humanities and Engagement grants Numbers represent active grants as at 1 October 2013 Figure 2. MH&E grant expenditure 2012/13 by value On 1 October 2013 we were funding 465 active grants with a total value of £91 million through our

  10. Positive emotional engagement and autism risk.

    PubMed

    Lambert-Brown, Brittany L; McDonald, Nicole M; Mattson, Whitney I; Martin, Katherine B; Ibañez, Lisa V; Stone, Wendy L; Messinger, Daniel S

    2015-06-01

    Positive emotional engagement develops in the context of face-to-face interactions during the first 6 months of life. Deficits in emotional engagement are characteristic of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and may characterize the younger siblings of children with ASD (high-risk siblings). High-risk siblings are likely to exhibit a broad range of positive emotional engagement that may or may not be associated with ASD outcomes. We examined positive emotional engagement (i.e., smiling rate and contingent responsiveness to the partner's smile) during the infant-parent interaction episodes of the face-to-face/still face protocol at 6 months of age. The sample included 43 high-risk infant siblings, 11 of whom went on to an ASD diagnosis, and 25 low-risk siblings with no family history of ASD. Low-risk siblings and high-risk siblings without ASD showed the typical still-face effect (i.e., decreases in smiling rate after period of parental nonresponsiveness), but high-risk siblings with later ASD outcomes did not show this decrease. Although high-risk siblings without an ASD diagnosis were less likely to respond to their parents' smiles than were low-risk siblings, the children with eventual ASD did not differ from the other groups in contingent responsiveness. Findings suggest that subtle differences in positive emotional engagement are present in the early development of high-risk siblings but are not consistently associated with ASD outcomes. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:25938555

  11. Neonatal brainstem dysfunction risks infant social engagement

    PubMed Central

    Sopher, Koreen; Kurtzman, Lea; Galili, Giora; Feldman, Ruth; Kuint, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    The role of the brainstem in mediating social signaling in phylogenetic ancestral organisms has been demonstrated. Evidence for its involvement in social engagement in human infants may deepen the understanding of the evolutionary pathway of humans as social beings. In this longitudinal study, neonatal brainstem functioning was measured by auditory brainstem-evoked responses (ABRs) in 125 healthy neonates born prematurely before 35 weeks’ gestational age. At 4 months, infants were tested in a set of structured vignettes that required varying levels of social engagement and cardiac vagal tone was assessed. Data show that neonates with a disrupted I–V waveform, evident mostly by delayed wave V, exhibit shorter latencies to gaze averts in episodes involving direct face-to-face interactions but engage gaze as controls when interacting with masked agents or with agents whose faces are partly veiled by toys. Analysis of variance of infants’ social engagement with ABR, neonatal risk, maternal stress and cardiac vagal tone showed a main effect for ABR and an ABR by gestational age interaction. The integrity of brainstem transmission of sensory information during the final weeks of gestation may scaffold the development of social disengagement, thereby attesting to the brainstem's preserved evolutionary role in developing humans as social organisms prior to engaging in social encounters. PMID:22146141

  12. Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for the Oak Ridge K-25 Site

    SciTech Connect

    Kszos, L.A.; Adams, S.M.; Ashwood, T.L.; Blaylock, B.G.; Greeley, M.S.; Loar, J.M.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hinzman, R.L. [Oak Ridge Research Inst., TN (United States); Shoemaker, B.A. [Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States). Environmental Management Div.

    1993-04-01

    A proposed Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) for the Oak Ridge K-25 Site was prepared in December 1992 as required by the renewed National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit that was issued on October 1, 1992. The proposed BMAP is based on results of biological monitoring conducted from 1986 to 1992 and discussions held on November 12, 1992, between staff of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the K-25 Site), and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Department of Energy Oversight Division. The proposed BMAP consists of four tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of K-25 Site effluents on the ecological integrity of Mitchell Branch, Poplar Creek, and the Poplar Creek embayment of the Clinch River. These tasks include (1) ambient toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation monitoring, (3) assessment of fish health, and (4) instream monitoring of biological communities. This overall BMAP plan combines established protocols with current biological monitoring techniques to assess environmental compliance and quantify ecological recovery. The BMAP will also determine whether the effluent limits established for the K-25 Site protect the designated use of the receiving streams (Mitchell Branch, Poplar Creek, and Clinch River) for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life. Results obtained from this biological monitoring program will also be used to document the ecological effects (and effectiveness) of remedial actions.

  13. Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for the Oak Ridge K-25 Site

    SciTech Connect

    Kszos, L.A.; Adams, S.M.; Ashwood, T.L.; Blaylock, B.G.; Greeley, M.S.; Loar, J.M.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Shoemaker, B.A. [Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States); Hinzman, R.L. [Oak Ridge Research Inst., TN (United States)

    1993-02-01

    A proposed Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) for the Oak Ridge K-25 Site was prepared in December 1992 as required by the renewed National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit that was issued on October 1, 1992. The proposed BMAP consists of four tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of K-25 Site effluents on the ecological integrity of Mitchell Branch, Poplar Creek, and the Poplar Creek embayment of the Clinch River. These tasks include (1) ambient toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation monitoring, (3) assessment of fish health, and (4) instream monitoring of biological communities. This overall BMAP plan combines established protocols with current biological monitoring techniques to assess environmental compliance and quantify ecological recovery. The BMAP will also determine whether the effluent limits established for the K-25 Site protect the designated use of the receiving streams (Mitchell Branch, Poplar Creek, and Clinch River) for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life. Results obtained from this biological monitoring program will also be used to document the ecological effects (and effectiveness) of remedial actions.

  14. Abatement of wetland loss through diversions of Mississippi River water using siphons

    SciTech Connect

    Van Beek, J.L.; Roberts, D.W.; Fournet, S. (Coastal Environments, Inc., Baton Rouge, LA (USA))

    1990-09-01

    The long-term maintenance and renewal of Louisiana's wetlands cannot be accomplished without diversion of sediment laden water from the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers. Because of ramifications for flood control, navigation, and established estuarine resource uses, such diversions, at least initially, are likely to be limited to structures that permit flow to be taken from the upper part of the water column. To evaluate the potential benefits from such diversions in terms of sediment introduction into the wetlands, and the possibility of abatement of wetland loss through small structures that could be implemented at a local level, an existing diversion by means of a siphon was investigated. The investigation focused on the White's Ditch Siphon, in Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana. Siphon operation was monitored for the 1989-1990 water year to determine water and sediment discharge characteristics and their relationship to those of the Mississippi River and to estuarine hydrology To determine sedimentation benefits to the adjacent marsh and the need for outfall management, sediment dispersal was evaluated and sediment deposition was compared for a site within the siphon outfall area and a control site. Results of the siphon monitoring are extended to larger scale diversions. On the basis of suspended load characteristics of the Mississippi River and the operational characteristics of a major structure, as related to the estuarine salinity regime and resource constraints, the extent to which such diversions are likely to offset subsidence and related wetland loss is evaluated.

  15. Injection of alkaline ashes into underground coal mines for acid mine drainage abatement

    SciTech Connect

    Aljoe, W.W. [Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Pittsburgh Research Center

    1996-12-31

    The injection of alkaline coal combustion waste products into abandoned underground coal mines for acid mine drainage (AMD) abatement has obvious conceptual appeal. This paper summarizes the findings of the baseline hydrogeologic and water quality evaluations at two sites--one in West Virginia and one in Maryland--where field demonstrations of the technique are being pursued in cooperative efforts among State and Federal agencies and/or private companies. The West Virginia site produces severe AMD from three to seven AMD sources that are spaced over about a 1.2 km stretch of the down-dip side of the mine workings. By completely filling the most problematic portion of the mine workings with coal combustion ashes, the State expects that the costs and problems associated with AMD treatment will be greatly reduced. At the Maryland site, it is expected that the AMD from a relatively small target mine will be eliminated completely by filling the entire mine void with a grout composed of a mixture of fly ash, fluidized-bed combustion ash, and flue gas desulfurization sludge. This project will also demonstrate the potential cost-effectiveness of the technique at other sites, both for the purpose of AMD remediation and control of land subsidence.

  16. Assessing the real-world performance of modern pollutant abatement systems on motorcycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, Robert; Weilenmann, Martin; Favez, Jean-Yves

    The present statutory pollutant emission limits Euro-3 for motorcycles imply the use of modern emission abatement systems such as three-way catalytic converters. Determining the quality of implementation of these new systems in different driving situations such as real-world driving is important, since motorcycles are commonly used for personal transportation in urban areas. For this reason, a test bench series was carried out with a sample of 10 motorcycles of state-of-the-art certification category Euro-3. Emission factors of regulated pollutants and CO 2 are presented on the basis of the statutory driving cycle, the latest version of the real-world Worldwide Motorcycle Test Cycle (WMTC) and the real-world Common Artemis Driving Cycle (CADC). The results of the statutory driving cycle show that 7 out of 10 motorcycles fail to comply with the present emission limits. The results of both real-world driving cycles confirm notable emissions of HC in urban and NO x in motorway driving conditions. CO emissions of motorcycles with small displacement increase significantly in the urban and extra-urban sections of the CADC, which has a more dynamic velocity profile than the equivalent WMTC. Although pollutant emissions of motorcycles show a marked improvement compared with earlier certification classes, they clearly exceed the emission levels of modern light gasoline passenger cars, especially for CO and HC.

  17. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 2): Pollution Abatement Services, Oswego, NY, December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    This Record of Decision (ROD) documents the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) selection of a remedial action to augment the previously implemented remedial action (PB85-213734) and to address contamination detected outside the containment system at the Pollution Abatement Services (PAS) site. The selected remedial action represents the third operable unit of site remediation. The first operable unit was for removal actions taken from 1973 to 1982 by EPA and NYSDEC. The remedy for the second operable unit which addressed the on-site contaminated groundwater was specified in a ROD issued in June 1984. The selected remedy for this operable unit will incorporate all of the existing components of the second operable unit of site remediation. These components include: the existing containment system (including a cover, slurry wall and leachate and groundwater collection system); treatment and disposal of the collected leachate and groundwater; site security and access control by a perimeter fence; site maintenance; and long-term monitoring.

  18. Transport Sector Marginal Abatement Cost Curves in Computable General Equilibrium Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tippichai, Atit; Fukuda, Atsushi; Morisugi, Hisayoshi

    In the last decade, computable general equilibrium (CGE) models have emerged a standard tool for climate policy evaluation due to their abilities to prospectively elucidate the character and magnitude of the economic impacts of energy and environmental policies. Furthermore, marginal abatement cost (MAC) curves which represent GHG emissions reduction potentials and costs can be derived from these top-down economic models. However, most studies have never address MAC curves for a specific sector that have a large coverage of countries which are needed for allocation of optimal emission reductions. This paper aims to explicitly describe the meaning and character of MAC curves for transport sector in a CGE context through using the AIM/CGE Model developed by Toshihiko Masui. It found that the MAC curves derived in this study are the inverse of the general equilibrium reduction function for CO2 emissions. Moreover, the transport sector MAC curves for six regions including USA, EU-15, Japan, China, India, and Brazil, derived from this study are compared to the reduction potentials under 100 USD/tCO2 in 2020 from a bottom-up study. The results showed that the ranking of the regional reduction potentials in transport sector from this study are almost same with the bottom-up study except the ranks of the EU-15 and China. In addition, the range of the reduction potentials from this study is wider and only the USA has higher potentials than those derived from the bottom-up study.

  19. Formation of fluorine for abating sulfur hexafluoride in an atmospheric-pressure plasma environment.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Cheng-Hsien; Shao, Jen-Min

    2008-08-30

    In this study, a large amount of toxic and reactive fluorine (F(2)) was produced in the atmospheric-pressure microwave discharge environment by adding additives to abate sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)). When H(2) was added, the selectivity of F(2) was as high as 89.7% at inlet H(2)/SF(6) molar ratio (R(H2)) = 1. Moreover, the conversion of SF(6) significantly increased from 33.7% (without additive) to 97.7% (R(H2) = 5) at [SF(6)]=1%, and 0.8 kW because the addition of H(2) inhibited the recombination of SF(6). With the addition of O(2), H(2)+O(2) or H(2)O, the selectivity of F(2) was still greater than 81.2%, though toxic byproducts, including SO(2)F(2), SOF(2), SOF(4), SO(2), NO, and HF, were detected. From optical emission spectra, SF(2) was identified, revealing the SF(6) dissociation process might be carried out rapidly through an electron impaction reaction: SF(6)-->SF(2)+4F. Subsequently, F(2) was formed via the recombination of F atoms. PMID:18280035

  20. Active noise control technique for diesel train locomotor exhaust noise abatement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotana, Franco; Rossi, Federico

    2002-11-01

    An original prototype for train locomotor exhaust gas pipe noise reduction (electronic muffler) is proposed: the system is based on an active noise control technique. An acoustical measurement campaign has shown that locomotor exhaust noise is characterized by very low frequency components (less than 80 Hz) and very high acoustic power (up to 110 dB). A peculiar electronic muffler characterized by high acoustical efficiency at very low frequencies has been designed and realized at Perugia University Acoustic Laboratory; it has been installed on an Italian D.245 train locomotor, equipped with a 500-kW diesel engine. The electronic muffler has been added to the traditional passive muffler. Very low transmission losses are introduced by the electronic muffler because of its particular shape; thus, engine efficiency does not further decrease. Canceling noise is generated by means of DSP-based numerical algorithm. Disturbing noise and canceling noise destructively interfere at the exhaust duct outlet section; outgoing noise is thus reduced. The control system reduces exhaust noise both in the steady and unsteady engine regime. Measurement results have shown that electronic muffler introduces up to 15 dB noise abatement in the low-frequency components.

  1. First annual report on the Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Loar, J.M. [ed.; Adams, S.M.; Blaylock, B.G.; Boston, H.L.; Frank, M.L.; Garten, C.T.; Houston, M.A.; Kimmel, B.L.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.; Walton, B.T.; Berry, J.B.; Talmage, S.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Amano, H. [JAERI, Tokai Res., Establishment, Ibari-Ken (Japan); Jimenez, B.D. [School of Pharmacy, Univ. of Puerto Rico (San Juan); Kitchings, J.T. [ERCE, Denver, CO (United States); Meyers-Schoene, L. [Advanced Sciences, Inc., Fernald, OH (United States); Mohrbacher, D.A. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Olsen, C.R. [USDOE Office of Energy Research, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Health and Environmental Research

    1992-08-01

    As a condition of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on April 1, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for White Oak Creek (WOC); selected tributaries of WOC, including Fifth Creek, First Creek, Melton Branch, and Northwest Tributary; and the Clinch River. BMAP consists of seven major tasks that address both radiological and nonradiological contaminants in the aquatic and terrestrial environs on-site and the aquatic environs off-site. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring; (2) bioaccumulation monitoring of nonradiological contaminants in aquatic biota; (3) biological indicator studies; (4) instream ecological monitoring; (5) assessment of contaminants in the terrestrial environment; (6) radioecology of WOC and White Oak Lake (WOL); and (7) contaminant transport, distribution, and fate in the WOC embayment-Clinch River-Watts Bar Reservoir system. This document, the first of a series of annual reports presenting the results of BMAP, describes studies that were conducted from March through December 1986.

  2. Irreversible membrane fouling abatement through pre-deposited layer of hierarchical porous carbons.

    PubMed

    Hamad, Juma Z; Dua, Rubal; Kurniasari, Novita; Kennedy, Maria D; Wang, Peng; Amy, Gary L

    2014-11-15

    In this work, dual-templated hierarchical porous carbons (HPCs), produced from a coupled ice-hard templating approach, are shown to be a highly effective solution to the commonly occurring problem of irreversible fouling of low-pressure membranes used for pre-treatment in wastewater reuse. For the first time, dual-templated HPCs, along with their respective counterparts - single-templated meso-porous carbon (MPCs) (without macropores) - are tested in terms of their fouling reduction capacity and ability to remove different effluent organic matter fractions present in wastewater and compared with a commercially available powdered activated carbon (PAC). The synthesized HPCs provided exceptional fouling abatement, a 4-fold higher fouling reduction as compared to the previously reported best performing commercial PAC and ?2.5-fold better fouling reduction than their respective mesoporous counterpart. Thus, it is shown that not only mesoporosity, but macroporosity is also necessary to achieve high fouling reduction, thus emphasizing the need for dual templating. In the case of HPCs, the pre-deposition technique is also found to outperform the traditional sorbent-feed mixing approach, mainly in terms of removal of fouling components. Based on their superior performance, a high permeability (ultra-low-pressure) membrane consisting of the synthesized HPC pre-deposited on a large pore size membrane support (0.45 ?m membrane), is shown to give excellent pre-treatment performance for wastewater reuse application. PMID:25128660

  3. Active and Engaged Citizenship: Multi-Group and Longitudinal Factorial Analysis of an Integrated Construct of Civic Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaff, Jonathan; Boyd, Michelle; Li, Yibing; Lerner, Jacqueline V.; Lerner, Richard M.

    2010-01-01

    Civic participation does not necessarily equate to civic engagement. However, to date, integrated measures of civic engagement that go beyond civic behaviors have not been developed. In this article, we propose an integrated construct of civic engagement, active and engaged citizenship (AEC), that includes behavioral, cognitive, and socioemotional…

  4. Novel starters for old processes: use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains isolated from artisanal sourdough for craft beer production at a brewery scale.

    PubMed

    Marongiu, Antonella; Zara, Giacomo; Legras, Jean-Luc; Del Caro, Alessandra; Mascia, Ilaria; Fadda, Costantino; Budroni, Marilena

    2015-01-01

    The deliberate inoculation of yeast strains isolated from food matrices such as wine or bread, could allow the transfer of novel properties to beer. In this work, the feasibility of the use of baker's yeast strains as starters for craft beer production has been evaluated at laboratory and brewery scale. Nine out of 12 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains isolated from artisanal sourdoughs metabolized 2 % maltose, glucose and trehalose and showed growth rates and cell populations higher than those of the brewer's strain Safbrew-S33. Analysis of allelic variation at 12 microsatellite loci clustered seven baker's strains and Safbrew-S33 in the main group of bread isolates. Chemical analyses of beers produced at a brewery scale showed significant differences among the beers produced with the baker's strain S38 or Safbrew-S33, while no significant differences were observed when S38 or the brewer's strain Safbrew-F2 was used for re-fermentation. The sensory profile of beers obtained with S38 or the brewer's yeasts did not show significant differences, thus suggesting that baker's strains of S. cerevisiae could represent a reservoir of biodiversity for the selection of starter strains for craft beer production. PMID:25387611

  5. Using a partial sum method and GPS tracking data to identify area restricted search by artisanal fishers at moored fish aggregating devices in the Commonwealth of Dominica.

    PubMed

    Alvard, Michael; Carlson, David; McGaffey, Ethan

    2015-01-01

    Foragers must often travel from a central place to exploit aggregations of prey. These patches can be identified behaviorally when a forager shifts from travel to area restricted search, identified by a decrease in speed and an increase in sinuosity of movement. Faster, more directed movement is associated with travel. Differentiating foraging behavior at patches from travel to patches is important for a variety of research questions and has now been made easier by the advent of small, GPS devices that can track forager movement with high resolution. In the summer and fall of 2012, movement data were collected from GPS devices placed on foraging trips originating in the artisanal fishing village of Desa Ikan (pseudonym), on the east coast of the Caribbean island nation of the Commonwealth Dominica. Moored FADs are human-made structures anchored to the ocean floor with fish attraction material on or near the surface designed to effectively create a resource patch. The ultimate goal of the research is to understand how property rights are emerging after the introduction of fish aggregating device (FAD) technology at the site in 1999. This paper reports on research to identify area-restricted search foraging behavior at FAD patches. For 22 foraging trips simultaneous behavioral observations were made to ground-truth the GPS movement data. Using a cumulative sum method, area restricted search was identified as negative deviations from the mean travel speed and the method was able to correctly identify FAD patches in every case. PMID:25647288

  6. Mapping Public Engagement with Research in a UK University

    PubMed Central

    Grand, Ann; Davies, Gareth; Holliman, Richard; Adams, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Notwithstanding that ‘public engagement’ is conceptualised differently internationally and in different academic disciplines, higher education institutions largely accept the importance of public engagement with research. However, there is limited evidence on how researchers conceptualise engagement, their views on what constitutes engagement and the communities they would (or would not) like to engage with. This paper presents the results of a survey of researchers in the Open University that sought to gather data to fill these gaps. This research was part of an action research project designed to embed engagement in the routine practices of researchers at all levels. The findings indicate that researchers have a relatively narrow view of public engagement with research and the communities with which they interact. It also identified that very few strategically evaluate their public engagement activities. We conclude by discussing some of the interventions we have introduced with the aim of broadening and deepening future researcher engagement. PMID:25837803

  7. Measuring Student Engagement in an Online Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigatel, Paula; Williams, Vicki

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to measure the effectiveness of faculty development courses promoting student engagement, the faculty development unit of Penn State's Online Campus conducted a pilot study within a large online Bachelor of Science in Business (BSB) program. In all, 2,296 students were surveyed in the spring and summer semesters of 2014 in order to…

  8. Real Problems, Virtual Solutions: Engaging Students Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, A. Fiona

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author explains how she used online blogs with more than 263 students over a period of four semesters in an introductory social problems course. She describes how she uses blogs to enhance student participation, engagement, and skill building. Finally, she provides an overview of students' qualitative assessments of the blog…

  9. What we are engaging in at

    E-print Network

    Sarkar, Nilanjan

    to discover the biological basis and best treat- ments for autism, learning and language disorders, mental of the brain are engaged. Brain wave measures are being combined with behavioral research measures in new ways that may advance knowledge of typical and atypical development, predict response to treatment, and measure

  10. Engaging Students with Feedback through Adaptive Release

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irwin, Brian; Hepplestone, Stuart; Holden, Graham; Parkin, Helen J.; Thorpe, Louise

    2013-01-01

    Feedback to students has been highlighted in the literature as an area where improvements are needed. Students need high quality, prompt feedback, but they also need guidance and tools to help them engage with and learn from that feedback. This case study explores staff and student perceptions of a tool at Sheffield Hallam University which…

  11. Burnout and Work Engagement among Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hakanen, Jari J.; Bakker, Arnold B.; Schaufeli, Wilmar B.

    2006-01-01

    The Job Demands-Resources Model was used as the basis of the proposal that there are two parallel processes involved in work-related well-being among teachers, namely an energetical process (i.e., job demands --> burnout --> ill health) and a motivational process (i.e., job resources --> engagement --> organizational commitment). In…

  12. Promoting Student Engagement in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bundick, Matthew J.; Quaglia, Russell J.; Corso, Michael J.; Haywood, Dawn E.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Context: Much progress has been made toward a greater understanding of student engagement and its role in promoting a host of desirable outcomes, including academic outcomes such as higher achievement and reduced dropout, as well as various well-being and life outcomes. Nonetheless, disengagement in our schools is widespread. This may…

  13. Inferences about Action Engage Action Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Lawrence J.; Lev-Ari, Shiri; Zwaan, Rolf A.

    2008-01-01

    Verbal descriptions of actions activate compatible motor responses [Glenberg, A. M., & Kaschak, M. P. (2002). Grounding language in action. "Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 9", 558-565]. Previous studies have found that the motor processes for manual rotation are engaged in a direction-specific manner when a verb disambiguates the direction of…

  14. Intellectual Engagement: A Search for Practical Meaning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milton, Penny; Kennedy, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Three authors, writing from different perspectives in different time periods, share the view that students' sense of personal agency is fundamental to their intellectual engagement and deep understanding. The learner's imagination leads to powerful questions that grow when exposed to processes of productive inquiry and social interaction and when…

  15. Why Catholic Universities Should Engage International Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, William P.

    2008-01-01

    This article argues that Catholic universities should vigorously engage international law for at least three reasons. First, international law is an indispensible dialogue partner for Catholic Social Teaching (CST). Since CST belongs in Catholic higher education, so too does international law. Second, in numerous ways and on a global scale,…

  16. The Outreach & Engagement Measurement Instrument (OEMI)

    E-print Network

    ­ Extension Reporting System · New unit-based instructional outreach data collection · Faculty committee Outreach and Engagement fitzger9@msu.edu Florida Atlantic University July 26, 2007 #12;· Data collection collection at MSU ­ Three years of data · 1,885 non-duplicative respondents ­ Beta test of a scaleable online

  17. Engagement with Peru Active Partnership Agreements

    E-print Network

    Behmer, Spencer T.

    Engagement with Peru Active Partnership Agreements: Pending Partnership Agreements: CORBIDI (Centro Peru (2008) Universidad Nacional Agraria La Molina (2000) Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia (2012 Texas A&M University students studying in Peru Conference ­ 0 Internship ­ 1 Research ­ 3 Short Term

  18. Value from Hedonic Experience and Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, E. Tory

    2006-01-01

    Recognizing that value involves experiencing pleasure or pain is critical to understanding the psychology of value. But hedonic experience is not enough. I propose that it is also necessary to recognize that strength of engagement can contribute to experienced value through its contribution to the experience of motivational force--an experience of…

  19. Further Assessment of Material for Engaging Students

    E-print Network

    Froelich, Amy G.

    1 1 Further Assessment of Material for Engaging Students in Statistical Discovery Amy G. Froelich W. Robert Stephenson William M. Duckworth 2 NSF Funded Project1 · Develop course activities: H M 4.3427.80 A20Experimental Std. Dev.MeanNumberGroup 8 Project ­ Year 1 8.3636.25 C18Control: Reg

  20. Examining School Engagement of African American Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sirin, Selcuk; Jackson, Lisa R.

    This study investigated the impact of behavioral and affective factors on 688 African American high school students' academic performance, examining the relationship between school engagement, educational expectations, self-esteem, and school achievement; noting differences between males and females; and discussing whether behavioral and affective…

  1. Higher Education and Civic Engagement: Comparative Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIlrath, Lorraine, Ed.; Lyons, Ann, Ed.; Munck, Ronaldo, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Higher Education and Civic Engagement provides an original and challenging contribution to contemporary debates on the civic purpose of higher education. It explores teaching and learning, research, and service in a range of international contexts. This book is essential reading for higher education leaders, faculty, administrators, and members of…

  2. Tutors' Forum: Engaging Distributed Communities of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaumont, Rosemary; Stirling, Jeannette; Percy, Alisa

    2009-01-01

    The need to engage students studying at a distance in order to reduce isolation, foster a sense of belonging and enhance learning has received significant attention over the past few years. Conversely, very little research has focused on teachers working in this type of environment. In fact, we argue, they appear to be the forgotten dimension in…

  3. Developing Stakeholder Engagement To Support School Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camarena, Margaret M.

    This document is the first of a series that will address five stages of the school reform process. It focuses on the first stage of the change process, managing key stakeholders and external groups and engaging them in the planning and development of the reform or innovation. A stakeholder is any group or individual who can affect or is affected…

  4. Engagement with Australia Active Partnership Agreements

    E-print Network

    Behmer, Spencer T.

    Engagement with Australia Active Partnership Agreements: Expired Partnership Agreements: University of Southern Queensland University of Queensland University of Western Australia University of Western Sydney&M University 58 Texas A&M University students studying in Australia Internship ­ 1 Research ­ 1 Short Term

  5. Economic Inequality and Democratic Political Engagement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frederick Solt

    2005-01-01

    Although economic inequality has been rising in nearly all of the advanced democracies, the consequences of inequality for democratic politics have been almost completely neglected. Because economic re- sources are political resources, greater inequality should be expected to skew the shape of politics in ways that discourage lower-income citizens from being politically engaged. This study combines cross- national survey data

  6. ASI Student Research Grants Student Engagement Report

    E-print Network

    de Lijser, Peter

    ASI Student Research Grants Student Engagement Report FY 2012-2013 Mission Statement The ASI Board of Directors established the ASI Student Research Grant Program to support the academic research of students. Program Overview ASI Student Research Grants, for up to $450 each, are available annually to CSUF graduate

  7. Sensing Dance Engagement for Collaborative Music Control

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Kuhn; Roger Wattenhofer; Martin Wirz; Matthias Fluckiger; Gerhard Troster

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a concept that allows attendees of a party to collaboratively influence the music selection process. As explicit feedback is likely to disturb the atmosphere, we introduce an unobtrusive, implicit feedback mechanism. In particular, we propose to sense the partygoers’ dance engagement by means of their mobile phones. Since people tend to dance more when they enjoy the music,

  8. Using Technology to Engage and Educate Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Monica; Schilling, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Given that information age technologies are as natural to the Net generation as breathing, it is time to provide learning experiences that maximize their use in schools. The authors argue that integrating technology into learning is central to creating the meaningful learning opportunities needed to engage and motivate youth today. To achieve this…

  9. Pedagogies of Engagement: Classroom-Based Practices

    Microsoft Academic Search

    KARL A. SMITH; SHERI D. SHEPPARD; DAVID W. JOHNSON

    2005-01-01

    Educators, researchers, and policy makers have advocated student involvement for some time as an essential aspect of meaningful learning. In the past twenty years engineering educators have implemented several means of better engaging their undergraduate students, including active and cooperative learning, learning communities, service learning, cooperative education, inquiry and problem-based learning, and team projects. This paper focuses on classroom-based pedagogies

  10. Titan Tusk Force Student Engagement Report

    E-print Network

    de Lijser, Peter

    Titan Tusk Force Student Engagement Report FY 2008-2009 Mission Statement The mission of Titan Tusk Force is to develop a strong sense of campus unity, pride and identity with CSUF. Titan Tusk Force, Incorporated here at California State University, Fullerton. Program Overview Titan Tusk Force (TTF) functions

  11. Titan Tusk Force Student Engagement Report

    E-print Network

    de Lijser, Peter

    Titan Tusk Force Student Engagement Report FY 2009-2010 Mission Statement The mission of Titan Tusk Force is to develop a strong sense of campus unity, pride and identity with CSUF. Titan Tusk Force, Incorporated here at California State University, Fullerton. Program Overview Titan Tusk Force (TTF) functions

  12. Titan Tusk Force Student Engagement Report

    E-print Network

    de Lijser, Peter

    Titan Tusk Force Student Engagement Report FY 2011-2012 Mission Statement The mission of Titan Tusk Force is to develop a strong sense of campus unity, pride and identity with CSUF. Titan Tusk Force, Incorporated here at California State University, Fullerton. Program Overview Titan Tusk Force (TTF) functions

  13. Titan Tusk Force Student Engagement Report

    E-print Network

    de Lijser, Peter

    Titan Tusk Force Student Engagement Report FY 2010-2011 Mission Statement The mission of Titan Tusk Force is to develop a strong sense of campus unity, pride and identity with CSUF. Titan Tusk Force, Incorporated here at California State University, Fullerton. Program Overview Titan Tusk Force (TTF) functions

  14. Improving Student Engagement: Ten Proposals for Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zepke, Nick; Leach, Linda

    2010-01-01

    Since the 1980s an extensive research literature has investigated how to improve student success in higher education focusing on student outcomes such as retention, completion and employability. A parallel research programme has focused on how students engage with their studies and what they, institutions and educators can do to enhance their…

  15. Student Voice and Engagement: Connecting through Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Claire; Swain, Julie; Rodway-Dyer, Sue

    2014-01-01

    This paper draws on research conducted across an English higher education partnership to investigate the ways in which student voice was engaged in further education colleges offering university awards through partnership arrangements. Such collaborations are characterised by the marginal presence of higher education students in an environment…

  16. Parents and Children Engaging in Storybook Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saracho, Olivia N.; Spodek, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Family literacy studies have shown that the role of parental storybook reading has an impact on children's success in school-based literacy instruction. Storybook reading is when adults read an appropriate text to their children. This review describes studies in which parents and children engage in storybook reading. It specifically reports…

  17. Transformative Professional Development and Teacher Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geil, Kimberly E.

    2011-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study attempts to estimate the effect that participation in Courage to Teach (CTT), a transformative professional development (TPD) program, has on subsequent engagement with teaching. The primary focus of a TPD program is on the "person" who teaches, as opposed to content or technique. The subjects of the study are a…

  18. Engaging students in an undergraduate research course.

    PubMed

    Kohtz, Cindy

    2011-01-01

    Nursing educators must be creative and dynamic in course design and seek to adopt pedagogical strategies that promote learner outcomes. Using multiple teaching strategies and experiential methods, the author describes one such attempt to engage students enrolled in an undergraduate nursing research course. PMID:21670631

  19. Adolescents and the New Literacies: Writing Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolsey, Thomas DeVere; Grisham, Dana L.

    2007-01-01

    This article shares the results of a 3-year study of the use of threaded discussion groups within intact eighth-grade classrooms in a middle school in Southern California. Using mixed-methods data collection and analysis, it addresses questions about how technology may be used effectively to create engaged writers and how student access to…

  20. Engage and Excite Students with Educational Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petsche, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Using educational games to learn or reinforce lessons engages students and turns a potentially boring subject into something exciting and desirable to know! Games offer teachers and parents a new way to grab students' attention so that they will retain information. Games have become a teaching tool, an invaluable resource for reaching students in…

  1. Productive Tensions: Ethnographic Engagement, Complexity, and Contradiction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wendy Chapkis

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses engagement, complexity, and contradiction as resources for, rather than simply impediments to, good research. Drawing on examples from her own work of the past three decades on body image, commercial sex, and the medical use of marijuana, the author examines the benefits of, as well as some of the challenges presented by, this approach to scholarly practice.

  2. Effective Strategies for Engaging Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karge, Belinda Dunnick; Phillips, Kathleen M.; Jessee, Tammy; McCabe, Marjorie

    2011-01-01

    Innovative methods in teaching should be used in every college classroom to enhance student engagement, support any teaching environment and encourage inquiry among learners. Adults learn best by participation in relevant experiences and utilization of practical information. When adult students are active in their learning they are able to develop…

  3. Elevating Engagement and Community in Online Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuthbertson, William; Falcone, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Community, while inherent in assumptions about online education, rarely materializes as an integral component of the experience. Misconceptions and misguided motivations can derail participation and engagement in the online setting. Creating a successful online community is dependent on knowing what works in the face-to-face environment and…

  4. A Framework for Engaging Parents in Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randolph, Karen A.; Fincham, Frank; Radey, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    The literature on engaging families in prevention programs is informed by the Health Beliefs Model (HBM), Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA), and Family Systems theory. Although useful, these frameworks have not facilitated the development of prevention-based practice strategies that recognize different levels of prevention (i.e., universal,…

  5. Moving from Content Knowledge to Engagement

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    James McDonald

    2005-11-01

    Combining service learning with environmental and science issues allows students to move beyond awareness toward engagement. The action team service project requires students to build in-depth knowledge, apply skills directly related to taking action, and reflect on their learning. The research conducted increases the science literacy of students.

  6. Mapping Stone Walls and Text Engagement

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this lesson, students will understand that local rocks are different and are used in various ways. Following a directed reading and discussion, the students engage in an activity in which they 'dig up' rocks from a sand-filled bucket and state what type of rock they think it is and why.

  7. Sustainable Campus: Engaging the Community in Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Too, Linda; Bajracharya, Bhishna

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify the major factors necessary for engaging university campus community in sustainability. While general awareness in sustainability issues has improved in recent years through mass media coverage, this knowledge is not always translated into actual sustainable practice. Studies have indicated that…

  8. Engaging Families in Sustainable Healthy Living

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nathalie Colineau; Cécile Paris; Shlomo Berkovsky

    As obesity is increasing in many countries, helping people manage their weight has become an important issue. Medical research has shown that the family context may be important to promote lifestyle changes. Our work aims at designing a collaborative and interactive environment to engage a family in support of an individual needing to manage his or her weight. Author Keywords

  9. Community Engagement: Home School Partnership Marilyn Holmes

    E-print Network

    Spagnolo, Filippo

    246 Community Engagement: Home School Partnership Marilyn Holmes University of Otago College school partnership is an attempt by schools and children's families to bring understanding family they have at school. Even with their high success rate in the Trends in International Mathematics

  10. Supporting family engagement in weight management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nathalie Colineau; Cécile Paris; Peter Marendy; Dipak Bhandari; Yanfeng Shu

    2009-01-01

    As obesity is increasing in many countries, helping people manage their weight has become an important issue. Medical research has shown that the family context may be important to promote lifestyle changes. Our work aims at designing a collaborative environment to engage a family in support of an individual needing to manage his or her weight. This paper presents the

  11. Social Work Social work engages with individuals,

    E-print Network

    Social Work Social work engages with individuals, families, communities and societies to improve and professional development. www.uwindsor.ca/socialwork A Bachelor of Social Work degree can lead to careers and advocacy associations. A Rigorous, Enriching Program The mission of the School of Social Work is to promote

  12. Social Work in the Engaged University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Elisa M.; Pyles, Loretta

    2013-01-01

    This article identifies the importance of educating social work students and enlisting social work faculty to embrace the university-community engagement arena as a critical subfield of community practice. Through the lens of social work knowledge, values, and skills, the authors present three case studies of social workers who are working in the…

  13. Uncertainty and Engagement with Learning Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard-Jones, Paul A.; Demetriou, Skevi

    2009-01-01

    Uncertainty may be an important component of the motivation provided by learning games, especially when associated with gaming rather than learning. Three studies are reported that explore the influence of gaming uncertainty on engagement with computer-based learning games. In the first study, children (10-11 years) played a simple maths quiz.…

  14. Engaging Students and the Community with

    E-print Network

    Jawitz, James W.

    in Agricultural and Life Sciences. U ndergraduate animal sciences students are getting real-world experiences months. "Students create marketing videos, ride for prospective buyers and honestly answer buyer and no time constraint. BY JESSICA ROBERTS Engage and Give Back G reetings and Happy 2014! It's another

  15. Engaging and Informing Students through Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Stella

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this action research was to explore the benefits of group work as a tool for engaging students with introductory material. It was the researcher's expectation that group work, would provide a means of reducing cognitive load (Kirschner, Sweller & Clark, 2006) and encouraging on task behaviour (Wentzel & Watkins, 2002). This would result…

  16. Creating a Common Space for Community Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McRae, Heather

    2012-01-01

    The increased interest in community engagement within higher education provides new opportunities for examining the role of university continuing education (UCE) units in relation to their participation in community university partnerships. This article is based on findings from a qualitative study that used a social theory lens to examine the…

  17. Life Satisfaction and Student Engagement in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Ashley D.; Huebner, E. Scott; Malone, Patrick S.; Valois, Robert F.

    2011-01-01

    Situated within a positive psychology perspective, this study explored linkages between adolescent students' positive subjective well-being and their levels of engagement in schooling. Specifically, using structural equation modeling techniques, we evaluated the nature and directionality of longitudinal relationships between life satisfaction and…

  18. LIBRE Model: Engagement Styles in Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerra, Norma S.

    2007-01-01

    Engagement is essential for the processing of information. It is presented here as 2 points along a continuum: initial attention (primary self-presentation) and sustained attention (continued self-regulation). The LIBRE (Listen, Identify, Brainstorm, Reality Test, Encourage) Stick Figure Tool (N. S. Guerra, 2003) provides a graphic organizer for…

  19. Employee engagement and manager self-efficacy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fred Luthans; Suzanne J. Peterson

    2002-01-01

    Although technology still dominates, human resources and how they are managed is receiving increased attention in the analysis of gaining competitive advantage. Yet, many complex questions remain. This study first examines the theoretical understanding of employee engagement. Then an empirical investigation is made of the role that a wide variety of managers’ (n = 170) psychological state of self-efficacy plays

  20. Applying employer brand management to employee engagement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bernard Kunerth; Richard Mosley

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – This paper aims to examine the degree to which employer brand management is being deployed to support internal employee engagement, in addition to its more common application in external image building and talent acquisition. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – This paper presents findings from an international benchmark survey conducted among 104 companies actively involved in employer brand development, alongside a more

  1. Engaging Emergent Writers with Anchor Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Jamie; Weih, Timothy G.

    2013-01-01

    This project focused on the creation of curriculum that would support writing development for emergent writers aged 5 to 7 years old. The research-base of the project explored how beginning writers can be scaffolded in their attempts to learn how to write. Past research was also examined to discover how emergent writers can be engaged in…

  2. Engaging Undergraduates through Interdisciplinary Research in Nanotechnology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goonewardene, Anura U.; Offutt, Christine; Whitling, Jacqueline; Woodhouse, Donald

    2012-01-01

    To recruit and retain more students in all science disciplines at our small (5,000 student) public university, we implemented an interdisciplinary strategy focusing on nanotechnology and enhanced undergraduate research. Inherently interdisciplinary, the novelty of nanotechnology and its growing career potential appeal to students. To engage

  3. Public engagement initiative on food and drink

    E-print Network

    Rambaut, Andrew

    .g. Biotechnology and alternative foods E.g. Preservatives E.g. Chemical migration from food packaging E.g. GlobalPublic engagement initiative on food and drink #12;The Wellcome Trust is a global charitable initiative on food and drink 2 #12;We support the brightest minds in biomedical research and the medical

  4. Attentional Engagement Deficits in Dyslexic Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruffino, Milena; Trussardi, Anna Noemi; Gori, Simone; Finzi, Alessandra; Giovagnoli, Sara; Menghini, Deny; Benassi, Mariagrazia; Molteni, Massimo; Bolzani, Roberto; Vicari, Stefano; Facoetti, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Reading acquisition requires, in addition to appropriate phonological abilities, accurate and rapid selection of sublexical orthographic units by attentional letter string parsing. Spatio-temporal distribution of attentional engagement onto 3-pseudoletter strings was studied in 28 dyslexic and 55 normally reading children by measuring attentional…

  5. Injection of alkaline ashes into underground coal mines for acid mine drainage abatement

    SciTech Connect

    Aljoe, W.W.

    1996-12-31

    The injection of fly ash, scrubber sludge, fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) ash, and other alkaline waste materials into abandoned underground coal mines for acid mine drainage (AMD) abatement has obvious conceptual appeal. This report describes three ongoing projects -- one each in West Virginia, Maryland, and Ohio -- where field demonstrations of the technique are being pursued in cooperative efforts among State and Federal agencies and/or private companies. The West Virginia site produces AMD that is causing the State to incur very high treatment costs and operational problems, especially in the storage and disposal of metal hydroxide sludges that result from treatment. In an attempt to achieve a more cost-effective long-term remediation scheme, the State is working with local coal companies and power generators on a plan to fill part or all of the mine voids with slurries of fly ash and/or FBC ash. At the Maryland site, the goal is to demonstrate the feasibility of completely filling a very small underground mine with an FEC ash slurry. The information gained here will determine whether large-scale AMD remediation can be achieved if deep mine disposal of ash is incorporated into the design of a new FBC power plant. In Ohio, it is believed that sealing and complete flooding of a relatively small mine will be able to curtail its AMD production. In order to accelerate the flooding process and insure that alkaline conditions will prevail in the mine, a waste slurry of calcium hydroxide from a nearby source will be injected into the mine voids in conjunction with mine sealing.

  6. Non-thermal plasma techniques for abatement of volatile organic compounds and nitrogen oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Penetrante, B.M.; Hsiao, M.C.; Bardsley, J.N.; Merritt, B.T.; Vogtlin, G.E.; Wallman, P.H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Kuthi, A.; Burkhart, C.P.; Bayless, J.R. [First Point Scientific, Inc., Agoura Hills, CA (United States)

    1995-12-04

    Non-thermal plasma processing is an emerging technology for the abatement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) in atmospheric-pressure air streams. Either electrical discharge or electron beam methods can produce these plasmas. Each of these methods can be implemented in many ways. There are many types of electrical discharge reactors, the variants depending on the electrode configuration and electrical power supply (pulsed, AC or DC). Two of the more extensively investigated types of discharge reactors are based on the pulsed corona and dielectric-barrier discharge. Recently, compact low-energy (<200 keV) electron accelerators have been developed to meet the requirements of industrial applications such as crosslinking of polymer materials, curing of solvent-free coatings, and drying of printing inks. Special materials have also been developed to make the window thin and rugged. Some of these compact electron beam sources are already commercially available and could be utilized for many pollution control applications. In this paper we will present a comparative assessment of various nonthermal plasma reactors. The thrust of our work has been two-fold: (1) to understand the scalability of various non-thermal plasma reactors by focusing on the energy efficiency of the electron and chemical kinetics, and (2) to identify the byproducts to ensure that the effluent gases from the processor are either benign or much easier and less expensive to dispose of compared to the original pollutants. We will present experimental results using a compact electron beam reactor and various types of electrical discharge reactors. We have used these reactors to study the removal of NO{sub x} and a wide variety of VOCS. We have studied the effects of background gas composition and gas temperature on the decomposition chemistry.

  7. Use of multi-transition-metal-ion-exchanged zeolite 13X catalysts in methane emissions abatement

    SciTech Connect

    Hui, K.S.; Chao, C.Y.H.; Kwong, C.W.; Wan, M.P. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2008-04-15

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas. It has a global warming potential (GWP) 23 times greater than carbon dioxide. Reducing methane emissions would lead to substantial economic and environmental benefits. This study investigated the performance of multi-transition-metal-(Cu, Cr, Ni, and Co)-ion-exchanged zeolite 13X catalysts in methane emissions abatement. The catalytic activity in methane combustion using multi-ion-exchanged catalysts was studied with different parameters including the molar percentage of metal loading, the space velocity, and the inlet methane concentration under atmospheric pressure and at a relatively low reaction temperature of 500 C. The performance of the catalysts was determined in terms of the apparent activation energy, the number of active sites of the catalyst, and the BET surface area of the catalyst. This study showed that multi-ion-exchanged catalysts outperformed single-ion-exchanged and acidified 13X catalysts and that lengthening the residence time led to a higher methane conversion percentage. The enhanced catalytic activity in the multi-ion-exchanged catalysts was attributed to the presence of exchanged transition ions instead of acid sites in the catalyst. The catalytic activity of the catalysts was influenced by the metal loading amount, which played an important role in affecting the apparent activation energy for methane combustion, the active sites, and the BET surface area of the catalyst. Increasing the amount of metal loading in the catalyst decreased the apparent activation energy for methane combustion and also the BET surface area of the catalyst. An optimized metal loading amount at which the highest catalytic activity was observed due to the combined effects of the various factors was determined. (author)

  8. Photolysis of inorganic chloramines and efficiency of trichloramine abatement by UV treatment of swimming pool water.

    PubMed

    Soltermann, Fabian; Widler, Tobias; Canonica, Silvio; von Gunten, Urs

    2014-06-01

    Trichloramine, one of the three inorganic chloramines (mono-, di- and trichloramine), is a problematic disinfection by-product in recreational pool water since it causes skin and eye irritations as well as irritations of the respiratory tract. The most commonly used chloramine mitigation strategy in pool water is UV treatment. Experiments with membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS) confirmed that inorganic chloramines are effectively degraded by UV irradiation with low-pressure (LP) and medium-pressure (MP) mercury lamps (apparent quantum yields (QY): NH2Cl = 0.50 (LP) and 0.31 (MP) mol einstein(-1), NHCl2: 1.06 (LP) and 0.85 (MP) mol einstein(-1)). Trichloramine showed the fastest depletion with a quantum yield slightly above 2 mol einstein(-1) in purified (LP and MP) and pool water (MP). This high quantum yield can partly be explained by reactions involving OH radicals (purified water) and the reaction of trichloramine with moieties formed during UV irradiation of pool water. The presence of free chlorine affects trichloramine degradation (QY: ?1.5 mol einstein(-1)) since it scavenges OH radicals and competes with trichloramine for reactive species (e.g. organic amines). Measurements in a pool facility revealed that the installed UV reactors degraded trichloramine by 40-50% as expected from laboratory experiments. However, trichloramine reduction in the pools was less pronounced than in the UV reactors. Model calculations combining pool hydraulics with formation/abatement of trichloramine showed that there was a fast trichloramine formation in the pool from the residual chlorine and nitrogenous precursors. The main factors influencing trichloramine concentrations in pool water are the free chlorine concentration and the UV treatment in combination with the recirculation rate through the water treatment system. PMID:24699420

  9. Engagement with Health Agencies on Twitter

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Sanmitra; Srinivasan, Padmini; Polgreen, Phil

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate factors associated with engagement of U.S. Federal Health Agencies via Twitter. Our specific goals are to study factors related to a) numbers of retweets, b) time between the agency tweet and first retweet and c) time between the agency tweet and last retweet. Methods We collect 164,104 tweets from 25 Federal Health Agencies and their 130 accounts. We use negative binomial hurdle regression models and Cox proportional hazards models to explore the influence of 26 factors on agency engagement. Account features include network centrality, tweet count, numbers of friends, followers, and favorites. Tweet features include age, the use of hashtags, user-mentions, URLs, sentiment measured using Sentistrength, and tweet content represented by fifteen semantic groups. Results A third of the tweets (53,556) had zero retweets. Less than 1% (613) had more than 100 retweets (mean ?=?284). The hurdle analysis shows that hashtags, URLs and user-mentions are positively associated with retweets; sentiment has no association with retweets; and tweet count has a negative association with retweets. Almost all semantic groups, except for geographic areas, occupations and organizations, are positively associated with retweeting. The survival analyses indicate that engagement is positively associated with tweet age and the follower count. Conclusions Some of the factors associated with higher levels of Twitter engagement cannot be changed by the agencies, but others can be modified (e.g., use of hashtags, URLs). Our findings provide the background for future controlled experiments to increase public health engagement via Twitter. PMID:25379727

  10. Strategies for steam handling and H2S abatement at geothermal power plants in the geysers area of Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, W. F.; Stephens, F. B.

    1981-08-01

    Strict limitations on the emission of H2S from new geothermal power plants in The Geysers area of northern California were imposed by Lake and Northern Sonoma County Air Pollution Control Districts. Lake County, under new source review rules, stipulated that specific technologies should be utilized to limit H2S emissions to 5 lb/h as a condition for determination of compliance. The status of these technologies as well as other ongoing technology development efforts to conserve steam and abate H2S are evaluated.

  11. Infant characteristics and parental engagement at the transition to parenthood.

    PubMed

    Kotila, Letitia E; Schoppe-Sullivan, Sarah J; Kamp Dush, Claire M

    2014-11-01

    Positive engagement activities support children's adaptive development and new parents are encouraged to be highly engaged with infants. Yet, fathers' engagement is widely understudied and maternal engagement quantity is frequently overlooked. Our study contributes to growing knowledge on associations between infant temperament and parental engagement by testing transactional and moderation models in a recent sample of first-time parents when infants were 3, 6, and 9 months old. Stringent longitudinal, reciprocal structural equation models partially confirmed an engagement "benefit". Mothers' engagement marginally contributed to their children's gains in effortful control from 3 to 6 months regardless of child gender. Further, mothers' engagement reduced infant negative affect from 6 to 9 months regardless of child gender. Mothers' ratings of infant negative affect were gendered; mothers' ratings of infant negative affect increases more from 3 to 6 months for boys. Fathers' engagement was contextually sensitive; child gender moderated the link between negative affect and engagement from 6 to 9 months, such that fathers became more engaged with boys whom they rated higher on negative affect; there was no effect for daughters. Finally, we found that effortful control moderated associations between negative affect and maternal engagement; mothers' engagement increases from 3 to 6 months were greater for children initially rated lower in effortful control. Implications for future research and parenting education and support services are discussed. PMID:25459796

  12. Getting Students to Read: Anticipation Guides as Tools to Encourage Engagement with Academic Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaback, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    Supporting the reading development of college students is the responsibility of all professors. As experts in the field, with experience navigating and interpreting readings in a particular discipline, professors are obligated to think of themselves as master artisans apprenticing their students to the craft of reading. Texts in all subject areas…

  13. Engaging Students in Active Learning: Case Studies in Geography, Environment

    E-print Network

    Al-Qahtani, Mohammad

    Hazard mitigation practical: predicting a volcanic eruption Phil GravestockEngaging Students in Active Learning: Case Studies in Geography, Environment and Related copies of this publication are available from this address Engaging Students in Active Learning: Case

  14. 29 CFR 780.910 - Engagement in transportation and preparation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engagement in transportation and preparation. 780.910 Section... Exempt Operations on Fruits Or Vegetables § 780.910 Engagement in transportation and preparation. Since...

  15. 29 CFR 780.910 - Engagement in transportation and preparation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Engagement in transportation and preparation. 780.910 Section... Exempt Operations on Fruits Or Vegetables § 780.910 Engagement in transportation and preparation. Since...

  16. Connecting Knowledge to Serve Society Scholarship Focused Outreach and Engagement

    E-print Network

    Connecting Knowledge to Serve Society Scholarship Focused Outreach and Engagement Hiram E. Fitzgerald, Ph.D. Associate Provost University Outreach and Engagement United Association Instructor Training Program August 18, 2006 #12;America's Future · Education: The key to individual, family, corporate

  17. Application of Object Based Image Analysis (OBIA) in detecting and quantifying forest loss caused by artisanal gold mining activities in Upper Mazaruni River Basin, Guyana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengisteab, B. S.; Blesius, L.; Hennessy, L.

    2014-12-01

    Artisanal gold mining in Guyana is mostly done in forest covered areas, causing forest loss and land degradation. Data from the Guyana Geology and Mining commission show there has been an increase of 2074% between 1986 and 2009. Our analysis of Landsat data between 1986 and 2013 for a part of the Upper Mazaruni area shows an increase from 34.2 to 278.4 hectares, which amounts to more than 800%. While the frequent coverage of Landsat data is useful for multitemporal studies, the lower resolution may not be adequate for accurate detection of mining sites. Therefore, RapidEye imagery from 2011 at a resolution of 5m was used to detect gold mining activity and to compare the results with the Landsat study. Processing was conducted in eCognition, an object-based image analysis (OBIA) software. OBIA is an image processing technique that has proven to be advantageous over traditional pixel based image processing techniques, with the primary advantage being the ability of the approach in combining both the spatial and spectral information. The satellite image was subjected to segmentation at multiple scales and classified using fuzzy sets of membership functions. Classification explicitly incorporated the different scales in order to accommodate different sizes of real-world objects and spatial relationships were utilized to establish connections between related objects. For example the presence or absence of water in pits, or the existence of sediments in the river may serve as additional indicators of mining sites besides the spectral components. Preliminary results show that OBIA approach was able to successfully detect and quantify small scale mining activities in the basin, and that the Landsat data were giving an acceptable estimate of mining sites over time. Keywords:Object Based Image Analysis, Gold Mining, Remote Sensing, Guyana

  18. Engaging and Supporting Culturally Diverse Audiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shupla, C.; Buxner, S.; Peticolas, L. M.; Mendez, B.; Acevedo, S.; Begay, D.; Higgins, M. L.; Norman, D.

    2013-04-01

    This two hour special workshop was held during the 2012 ASP conference in Tucson. There are a variety of reasons that science education needs to reach out to culturally diverse audiences. Each culture, and each individual community, has its own challenges; each brings special insight to science. What does the research say about engaging these different audiences? How can science educators attract and sustain programs with various cultures? How do the needs of our audiences vary with culture and within communities? Moderators Shupla, Sanlyn, and Peticolas invited a variety of presenters with expertise to share their experiences: Salvador Acevado, David Begay, Michelle Higgins, Bryan Mendez, and Dara Norman. During the first hour, presenters shared a variety of best practices for engaging and supporting culturally diverse audiences; in the second hour, participants and presenters discussed specific programmatic challenges and possible directions.

  19. Astropixie: Astronomy Engagement Through Blogging and Twitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, A. E.

    2013-04-01

    I discuss the astronomy outreach and public engagement potential of blogging, based on experience writing and maintaining my astropixie blog since 2006 and maintaining a twitter account as @astropixie since 2008. These methods of social media allow for direct engagement with a public audience, increase public science literacy, provide understandable information beyond what can be presented in the media, diversify the image of scientists, publicize and provide feedback on current research, develop a community among readers, and inspire students. I also briefly discuss some professional benefits of using the social media resource of twitter. The goal of this paper is to give an idea of what blogs and twitter can provide as outreach tools, and to provide basic information about using these media.

  20. Ground moving target engagement by cooperative UAVs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Corey Schumacher; Wright-Patterson AFB

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this tutorial paper is to present an application example for the MultiUAV cooperative control simulation. MultiUAV has been used to simulate a cooperative moving target engagement (CMTE) scenario, with a team of UAVs acting as a sensor and communication network to cooperatively track and attack moving ground targets. This scenario illustrates the utility of MultiUAV for cooperative