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1

Noise Abatement  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

SMART, Sound Modification and Regulated Temperature compound, is a liquid plastic mixture with exceptional energy and sound absorbing qualities. It is derived from a very elastic plastic which was an effective noise abatement material in the Apollo Guidance System. Discovered by a NASA employee, it is marketed by Environmental Health Systems, Inc. (EHS). The product has been successfully employed by a diaper company with noisy dryers and a sugar company with noisy blowers. The company also manufactures an audiometric test booth and acoustical office partitions.

1983-01-01

2

Insect abatement system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An insect abatement system prevents adhesion of insect debris to surfaces which must be kept substantially free of insect debris. An article is coated with an insect abatement coating comprising polyorganosiloxane with a Shore A hardness of less than 50 and a tensile strength of less than 4 MPa. A method for preventing the adhesion of insect debris to surfaces includes the step of applying an insect abatement coating to a surface which must be kept substantially free of insect debris.

Spiro, Clifford Lawrence (Inventor); Burnell, Timothy Brydon (Inventor); Wengrovius, Jeffrey Hayward (Inventor)

1997-01-01

3

STORMWATER POLLUTION ABATEMENT TECHNOLOGIES  

EPA Science Inventory

This publication presents information regarding best management practices (BMP's) and pollution abatement technologies that can provide treatment of urban stormwater runoff. ncluded in the text are a general approach which considers small storm hydrology, and watershed practices ...

4

FRASER POLLUTION ABATEMENT OFFICE  

E-print Network

Environment Canada 224 West Esplanade North Vancouver, BC V7M 3H7 DOE FRAP 1997-01 March 1997 #12;ii, is taking action with the Fraser River Action Plan (FRAP). Announced in June 1991, FRAP's primary objectives. The Fraser Pollution Abatement Office (FPAO), established as a program of FRAP, has the responsibility

5

Noise Abatement Materials  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A former NASA employee who discovered a kind of plastic that soaked up energy, dampened vibrations, and was a good noise abatement material, founded a company to market noise deadening adhesives, sheets, panels and enclosures. Known as SMART products, they are 75-80% lighter than ordinary soundproofing material and have demonstrated a high degree of effectiveness. The company, Varian Associates, makes enclosures for high voltage terminals and other electronic system components, and easily transportable audiometric test booths.

1986-01-01

6

Emission Abatement System  

DOEpatents

Emission abatement system. The system includes a source of emissions and a catalyst for receiving the emissions. Suitable catalysts are absorber catalysts and selective catalytic reduction catalysts. A plasma fuel converter generates a reducing gas from a fuel source and is connected to deliver the reducing gas into contact with the absorber catalyst for regenerating the catalyst. A preferred reducing gas is a hydrogen rich gas and a preferred plasma fuel converter is a plasmatron. It is also preferred that the absorber catalyst be adapted for absorbing NO.sub.x.

Bromberg, Leslie (Sharon, MA); Cohn, Daniel R. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Rabinovich, Alexander (Swampscott, MA)

2003-05-13

7

Biological abatement of cellulase inhibitors  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Bio-abatement uses a fungus to metabolize and remove fermentation inhibitors. To determine whether bio-abatement could alleviate enzyme inhibitor effects observed in biomass liquors after pretreatment, corn stover at 10% (w/v) solids was pretreated with either dilute acid or liquid hot water. The ...

8

Marginal Abatement Cost Analysis Tool  

EPA Science Inventory

The Non-CO2 Marginal Abatement Cost Analysis Tool is an extensive bottom-up engineering-economic spreadsheet model capturing the relevant cost and performance data on sectors emitting non-CO2 GHGs. The tool has 24 regions and 7 sectors and produces marginal abatement cost curves...

9

Biological abatement of cellulase inhibitors.  

PubMed

Removal of enzyme inhibitors released during lignocellulose pretreatment is essential for economically feasible biofuel production. We tested bio-abatement to mitigate enzyme inhibitor effects observed in corn stover liquors after pretreatment with either dilute acid or liquid hot water at 10% (w/v) solids. Bio-abatement of liquors was followed by enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. To distinguish between inhibitor effects on enzymes and recalcitrance of the substrate, pretreated corn stover solids were removed and replaced with 1% (w/v) Solka Floc. Cellulose conversion in the presence of bio-abated liquors from dilute acid pretreatment was 8.6% (0.1x enzyme) and 16% (1x enzyme) higher than control (non-abated) samples. In the presence of bio-abated liquor from liquid hot water pretreated corn stover, 10% (0.1x enzyme) and 13% (1x enzyme) higher cellulose conversion was obtained compared to control. Bio-abatement yielded improved enzyme hydrolysis in the same range as that obtained using a chemical (overliming) method for mitigating inhibitors. PMID:23973982

Cao, Guangli; Ximenes, Eduardo; Nichols, Nancy N; Zhang, Leyu; Ladisch, Michael

2013-10-01

10

Recognizing and nurturing artisanal mining as a viable livelihood  

Microsoft Academic Search

Much of the discourse and literature on artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) in sub-Saharan Africa has inherently prescriptive recommendations on how the sector should develop. Devaluation, misrecognition, and criminalization of artisanal, largely illegal miners hamper their participation not only in environmental and political decision-making but also in negotiating potential alternative livelihoods. This article addresses the following three questions: (a) what

Petra Tschakert

2009-01-01

11

Production of Food Grade ?-Galactosidase from Artisanal Yogurt Strains  

Microsoft Academic Search

Superior artisanal isolates of thermophilic lactic acid bacteria producing high lactic acid and ?-galactosidase were isolated from traditional Turkish yogurt samples from the Toros mountain region from a highly bio-diverse environment. A full factorial statistical design, with the factors of types of strains and medium formulations under static and agitation conditions, were applied to investigate the effects on ?-galactosidase and

Canan Tari; Fatma Is?k Ustok; Sebnem Harsa

2010-01-01

12

Start-up and operating costs for artisan cheese companies.  

PubMed

Lack of valid economic data for artisan cheese making is a serious impediment to developing a realistic business plan and obtaining financing. The objective of this study was to determine approximate start-up and operating costs for an artisan cheese company. In addition, values are provided for the required size of processing and aging facilities associated with specific production volumes. Following in-depth interviews with existing artisan cheese makers, an economic model was developed to predict costs based on input variables such as production volume, production frequency, cheese types, milk types and cost, labor expenses, and financing. Estimated values for start-up cost for processing and aging facility ranged from $267,248 to $623,874 for annual production volumes of 3,402 kg (7,500 lb) and 27,216 kg (60,000 lb), respectively. First-year production costs ranged from $65,245 to $620,094 for the above-mentioned production volumes. It is likely that high start-up and operating costs remain a significant entry barrier for artisan cheese entrepreneurs. PMID:24746129

Bouma, Andrea; Durham, Catherine A; Meunier-Goddik, Lisbeth

2014-06-01

13

Between Tradition and Tourism: Educational Strategies of a Zapotec Artisan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This case study examines the teaching and learning strategies employed by a Zapotec weaver in Oaxaca, Mexico, to draw attention to the personal agency of indigenous artisans participating in the tourist economy, and to examine ways in which non-formal and informal education in skills and understandings related to art can function in the lives of…

Davenport, Melanie G.

2007-01-01

14

2014 UNBC Artisans of the North Fair Dear Vendor  

E-print Network

2014 UNBC Artisans of the North Fair Dear Vendor: Thank you once again for participating in UNBC efforts. Registration Registration for returning vendors will begin on April 1st 2014 and the deadline for returning Vendors will be May 1st 2014. Returning vendors do not have to have their pieces re juried unless

Northern British Columbia, University of

15

2014 UNBC Artisans of the North Fair Dear Vendor  

E-print Network

2014 UNBC Artisans of the North Fair Dear Vendor: Thank for your interest in participating in UNBC vendors will begin on April 1st 2014. Registration forms can be dropped off in person to the Northern Vendors who have passed the jury process will be able to pay at the NSC Front Desk, either in person

Northern British Columbia, University of

16

MEASURING AIRBORNE ASBESTOS FOLLOWING AN ABATEMENT ACTION  

EPA Science Inventory

One of the most critical points in an asbestos abatement project is knowing when the work has been completed, the contractor can be released, and the building can be reoccupied. This decision should be based on two factors: (1) satisfactory performance of the abatement work, and ...

17

AHERA CLEARANCE AT TWENTY ABATEMENT SITES  

EPA Science Inventory

A study was conducted during the summer of 1988 to document Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA) clearance air-sampling practices and clearance concentrations of airborne asbestos at 20 asbestos-abatement sites in New Jersey. Each abatement took place in a school buildi...

18

AHERA CLEARANCE AT TWENTY ABATEMENT SITES  

EPA Science Inventory

A study was conducted during the summer of 1988 to document Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA) clearance air sampling practices and clearance concentrations of airborne asbestos at 20 asbestos-abatement sites in New Jersey. ach abatement took place in a school buildin...

19

Artisanal fishers’ ethnobotany: from plant diversity use to agrobiodiversity management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Artisanal fishers interact with plants in many ways, and with different intensities. In spite of being characterized by fisheries,\\u000a Caiçaras use plants with varied degrees of management, since the less intensive management actions, extraction of forest products,\\u000a until intensively management actions through the cultivation of the agrobiodiversity. This study presents the results of different\\u000a research projects and includes the North

Nivaldo Peroni; Alpina Begossi; Natalia Hanazaki

2008-01-01

20

Interaction of pollution abatement with world dynamics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The world dynamics model of Jay W. Forrester was modified to account for pollution abatement. In the modified model, it is assumed that as pollution increases, efforts are made to control pollution. There is a competition between food supply, material standard of living, and pollution abatement for capital, and time is required for diversion of capital toward pollution abatement. Inclusion of pollution abatement in the model drastically alters the response of the world system for the case in which depletion of natural resources is not considered. Instead of undergoing a pollution catastrophe, all system levels move more or less smoothly toward an equilibrium. A FORTRAN program listing of the modified world dynamics model is included.

Smith, G. L.

1973-01-01

21

Environmental Funds, Public Abatement, and Welfare  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper addresses some features of environmental funds that the government uses to finance public abatement with pollution\\u000a tax revenue or tariff revenue. I find that when the pollution tax rate and the tariff rate are jointly chosen optimally, then\\u000a the optimal pollution tax rate is higher than the Pigouvian tax rate under public abatement financed by tariff revenue, and

Takumi Haibara

2009-01-01

22

The By-catch From the Artisanal Shrimp Trawl Fishery, Gulf of Paria, Trinidad  

E-print Network

The By-catch From the Artisanal Shrimp Trawl Fishery, Gulf of Paria, Trinidad VISHWANIE MAHARAJ in the GulfofParia, Trinidad. From August 1986 to May 1987, 34 late evening-early morning trawl trips were made, Animal and Veterinary Science, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI 02881. In Trinidad, the artisanal

23

Mercury contamination associated with artisanal gold mining on the island of Mindanao, the Philippines  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Agusan River basin of eastern Mindanao, the Philippines, hosts several centres of artisanal gold mining, the most important of which, Diwalwal, is a significant gold producer in global terms. An investigation of the environmental impacts of artisanal mining in the Agusan system, with particular reference to mercury contamination, was initiated in 1995 following reports of several incidents of human

J. D. Appleton; T. M. Williams; N. Breward; A. Apostol; J. Miguel; C. Miranda

1999-01-01

24

Developments in abatement technology for MOCVD processing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A newly developed technical solution has been developed for hydride gas abatement that utilizes a new material. The ULTIMA-Sorb™ material provides high capacity but low heat of reaction with the hydride gases. The new technology results in a low cost of ownership (COO) with stable operation and also reduces the cost and quantity of waste disposal. This can be significant benefit for device manufacturers since it provides a viable and cost effective solution without any risk of arsenic leakage that is a primary concern with wet chemical scrubber systems. The contents of this paper will discuss the technical and economic benefits of the newly developed material in comparison to conventional abatement materials and systems. The capacity of the dry abatement materials significantly influences both COO relating to cash outflow and the cost of lost production. High capacity materials enable significant savings in cost of lost production in cases of low and high factory utilization conditions. Capacity of the abatement material appears to be the largest single factor to reduce COO of dry abatement systems.

Sweeney, Joseph; Marganski, Paul; Olander, Karl; Watanabe, Tadaharu; Tomita, Nobuyasu; Orlando, Gary; Torres, Robert

2004-12-01

25

47 CFR 90.673 - Obligation to abate unacceptable interference.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. 90.673 Section 90.673 Telecommunication...Procedures and Process-Unacceptable Interference § 90.673 Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. (a) Strict...

2011-10-01

26

47 CFR 22.971 - Obligation to abate unacceptable interference.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. 22.971 Section 22.971 Telecommunication... Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. (a) Strict Responsibility...contributes to causing unacceptable interference to a non-cellular part 90 of...

2014-10-01

27

47 CFR 22.971 - Obligation to abate unacceptable interference.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. 22.971 Section 22.971 Telecommunication... Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. (a) Strict Responsibility...contributes to causing unacceptable interference to a non-cellular part 90 of...

2013-10-01

28

47 CFR 22.971 - Obligation to abate unacceptable interference.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. 22.971 Section 22.971 Telecommunication... Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. (a) Strict Responsibility...contributes to causing unacceptable interference to a non-cellular part 90 of...

2012-10-01

29

47 CFR 22.878 - Obligation to abate unacceptable interference.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. 22.878 Section 22.878 Telecommunication... Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. This section applies only...contributes to causing unacceptable interference to a non-cellular part 90...

2013-10-01

30

47 CFR 90.673 - Obligation to abate unacceptable interference.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. 90.673 Section 90.673 Telecommunication...Procedures and Process-Unacceptable Interference § 90.673 Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. (a) Strict...

2013-10-01

31

47 CFR 22.878 - Obligation to abate unacceptable interference.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. 22.878 Section 22.878 Telecommunication... Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. This section applies only...contributes to causing unacceptable interference to a non-cellular part 90...

2012-10-01

32

47 CFR 22.878 - Obligation to abate unacceptable interference.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. 22.878 Section 22.878 Telecommunication... Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. This section applies only...contributes to causing unacceptable interference to a non-cellular part 90...

2011-10-01

33

47 CFR 22.878 - Obligation to abate unacceptable interference.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. 22.878 Section 22.878 Telecommunication... Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. This section applies only...contributes to causing unacceptable interference to a non-cellular part 90...

2010-10-01

34

47 CFR 90.673 - Obligation to abate unacceptable interference.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. 90.673 Section 90.673 Telecommunication...Procedures and Process-Unacceptable Interference § 90.673 Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. (a) Strict...

2010-10-01

35

47 CFR 22.878 - Obligation to abate unacceptable interference.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. 22.878 Section 22.878 Telecommunication... Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. This section applies only...contributes to causing unacceptable interference to a non-cellular part 90...

2014-10-01

36

47 CFR 90.673 - Obligation to abate unacceptable interference.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. 90.673 Section 90.673 Telecommunication...Procedures and Process-Unacceptable Interference § 90.673 Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. (a) Strict...

2012-10-01

37

47 CFR 22.971 - Obligation to abate unacceptable interference.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. 22.971 Section 22.971 Telecommunication... Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. (a) Strict Responsibility...contributes to causing unacceptable interference to a non-cellular part 90 of...

2010-10-01

38

47 CFR 22.971 - Obligation to abate unacceptable interference.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. 22.971 Section 22.971 Telecommunication... Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. (a) Strict Responsibility...contributes to causing unacceptable interference to a non-cellular part 90 of...

2011-10-01

39

FEASIBILITY OF ELK CREEK ACID MINE DRAINAGE ABATEMENT PROJECT  

EPA Science Inventory

A study was conducted within the Elk Creek Watershed, West Virginia to determine the technical and economic feasibility of three acid mine drainage abatement techniques. Alkaline regarding and slurry trench construction were established as technically and economically viable abat...

40

76 FR 67650 - Migratory Bird Permits; Abatement Regulations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...91200-1231-9BPP] RIN 1018-AW75 Migratory Bird Permits; Abatement Regulations AGENCY: Fish...solicited comments and suggestions on migratory bird permit regulations for a permit to use raptors (birds of prey) in abatement activities....

2011-11-02

41

OPTIONS FOR ABATING GREENHOUSE GASES FROM EXHAUST STREAMS.  

SciTech Connect

This report examines different alternatives for replacing, treating, and recycling greenhouse gases. It is concluded that treatment (abatement) is the only viable short-term option. Three options for abatement that were tested for use in semiconductor facilities are reviewed, and their performance and costs compared. This study shows that effective abatement options are available to the photovoltaic (PV) industry, at reasonable cost.

FTHENAKIS,V.

2001-12-01

42

"A little information excites us." Consumer sensory experience of Vermont artisan cheese as active practice.  

PubMed

This research is concerned with explaining consumer preference for Vermont artisan cheese and the relationship between that preference and sensory experience. Artisan cheesemaking is increasingly an important part of Vermont's dairy sector, and this tracks a growing trend of artisan agricultural practice in the United States. In popular discourse and academic research into products like artisan cheese, consumers explain their preferences in terms of intrinsic sensory and extrinsic - supposedly nonsensory - food qualities. In laboratory sensory studies, however, the relationship between preference, intrinsic, and extrinsic qualities changes or disappears. In contrast, this study explains this relationship by adopting a social theory of sensory perception as a practice in everyday life. This theory is applied to a series of focus group interviews with Vermont artisan cheese consumers about their everyday perceptions. Based on the data, a conceptual framework for the sensory perception of Vermont artisan cheese is suggested: consumers combine information about producer practice, social context, and the materiality of the product through an active, learned practice of sensory perception. Particular qualities that drive consumer sensory experience and preference are identified from the interview data. Many of these qualities are difficult to categorize as entirely intrinsic or extrinsic, highlighting the need for developing new approaches of sensory evaluation in order to fully capture everyday consumer sensory perception. Thus, this research demonstrates that social theory provides new and valuable insights into consumer sensory preference for Vermont artisan cheese. PMID:24681405

Lahne, Jacob; Trubek, Amy B

2014-07-01

43

COMBINED SEWER OVERFLOW ABATEMENT PROGRAM, ROCHESTER, NY-VOLUME 1:ABATEMENT ANALYSIS  

EPA Science Inventory

Pollution abatement analyses conducted in conjunction with system network modeling studies and supported by combined sewer overflow (CSO) monitoring and sampling were initiated with the ultimate goal of formulating a cohesive and workable Master Plan for CSO reduction and control...

44

ABATEMENT OF DEPOSITION AND SCOUR IN SEWERS  

EPA Science Inventory

Feasible methods are identified for reducing first-flush pollution in new and existing storm and combined sewer systems. A mathematical model is described which was developed to simulate the behavior of solids in pipelines and to evaluate the costs of first-flush abatement altern...

45

Collaborative engagement  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A need exists for United States military forces to perform collaborative engagement operations between unmanned systems. This capability has the potential to contribute significant tactical synergy to the Joint Force operating in the battlespace of the future. Collaborative engagements potentially offer force conservation, perform timely acquisition and dissemination of essential combat information, and can eliminate high value and time critical targets. Collaborative engagements can also add considerably to force survivability by reducing soldier and equipment exposure during critical operations. This paper will address a multiphase U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) Joint Technology Center (JTC) Systems Integration Laboratory (SIL) program to assess information requirements, Joint Architecure for Unmanned Systems (JAUS), on-going Science and Technology initiatives, and conduct simulation based experiments to identify and resolve technical risks required to conduct collaborative engagements using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) and unmanned ground vehicles (UGV). The schedule outlines an initial effort to expand, update and exercise JAUS, provide early feedback to support user development of Concept of Operations (CONOPs) and Tactics, Techniques and Procedures (TTPs), and develop a Multiple Unified Simulation Environment (MUSE) system with JAUS interfaces necessary to support an unmanned system of systems collaboartive engagement.

Wade, Robert L.; Reames, Joseph M.

2004-09-01

46

Locating Value in Artisan Cheese: Reverse Engineering Terroir for New-World Landscapes  

E-print Network

Terroir, the taste of place, is being adapted by artisan cheesemakers in the United States to reveal the range of values—agrarian, environmental, social, and gastronomic—that they believe constitute their cheese and ...

Paxson, Heather Anne

47

Engaging Employers?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A key factor in the successful development of workplace learning is employer engagement (Leitch, 2006; DfES, 2007). However, despite numerous approaches by government in the United Kingdom to bring together employers, providers and learners so that economic success is generated by a skilled and flexible workforce, there continue to be challenges…

Hillier, Yvonne

2008-01-01

48

Monitoring techniques for odour abatement assessment.  

PubMed

Odorous emissions from sewers and wastewater treatment plants are a complex mixture of volatile chemicals that can cause annoyance to local populations, resulting in complaints to wastewater operators. Due to the variability in hedonic tone and chemical character of odorous emissions, no analytical technique can be applied universally for the assessment of odour abatement performance. Recent developments in analytical methodologies, specifically gas chromatography, odour assessment approaches (odour wheels, the odour profile method and dynamic olfactometry), and more recently combined gas chromatography-sensory analysis, have contributed to improvements in our ability to assesses odorous emissions in terms of odorant concentration and composition. This review collates existing knowledge with the aim of providing new insight into the effectiveness of sensorial and characterisation approaches to improve our understanding of the fate of odorous emissions during odour abatement. While research in non-specific sensor array (e-nose) technology has resulted in progress in the field of continuous odour monitoring, more successful long term case-studies are still needed to overcome the early overoptimistic performance expectations. Knowledge gaps still remain with regards to the decomposition of thermally unstable volatile compounds (especially sulfur compounds), the inability to predict synergistic, antagonistic, or additive interactions among odorants in combined chemical/sensorial analysis techniques, and the long term stability of chemical sensors due to sensor drift, aging, temperature/relative humidity effects, and temporal variations. Future odour abatement monitoring will require the identification of key odorants to facilitate improved process selection, design and management. PMID:20696458

Muñoz, Raul; Sivret, Eric C; Parcsi, Gavin; Lebrero, R; Wang, Xinguang; Suffet, I H Mel; Stuetz, Richard M

2010-10-01

49

Sewer odour abatement monitoring - an Australian survey.  

PubMed

Odourous emissions from sewer networks can significantly impact a local population causing odour annoyance. A survey of nine Australian wastewater utilities that serve over 8.4 million people and operate over 59,000 km of sewer networks was undertaken to summarise the current monitoring practices in Australia with the view to assist the water industry to further improve their practices in operating and monitoring sewer odour abatement systems. Results indicated that most odour abatement systems were monitored through complaints from the surrounding community, H(2)S is the dominant online and offline monitoring parameter and that a variety of different H(2)S instruments are used across the industry but the reported use is dominated by two manufacturers. The monitoring data were primarily used for decision making and diagnosis, and there was limited use of non-H(2)S odourant analysis. The water industry had several significant limitations in terms of its inability to provide gas flow data, process monitoring and complaint data as well as being able to link process monitoring data with maintenance information for instrumentation. The improved collection and management of this data would yield benefits to the water industry in terms of odour abatement design, performance and management. PMID:22907456

Sivret, Eric; Stuetz, Richard M

2012-01-01

50

Engaging Faculty in Community Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Researchers endorse the integration of community engagement (CE) into higher education as a way to improve the relevance of education, address community needs, and forge university-community partnerships (Zlotkowski, 1996). CE can help create stronger ties between universities and their communities and provide students with experiential learning…

Fitzgerald, Glynis A.

2012-01-01

51

Engaging Places  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

How does the built environment affect our daily lives? It's a valuable question, and one that is explored in-depth via the writings, photographs, lessons, and activities on the Engaging Places website. Based in Britain, the site includes the areas Teaching Resources, Network, and About Us. First-time visitors should browse around the In the Spotlight area first. Here they can learn about the accolades garnered by Engaging Places and the site's latest outreach efforts. The Browse by Topic area allows users to learn about the built environment via the topics Architecture in focus, School case studies, and Heritage. The Architecture in Focus area is brilliant, as it contains pieces on 10 Downing Street, Blenheim Palace, and the De La Warr Pavilion, a Modernist icon. Additionally, visitors can use the Recently Added area to look over new content or use the Google Maps interface to search for sites of note and related teaching materials.

2013-05-23

52

Emission abatement system utilizing particulate traps  

DOEpatents

Emission abatement system. The system includes a source of emissions and a catalyst for receiving the emissions. Suitable catalysts are absorber catalysts and selective catalytic reduction catalysts. A plasma fuel converter generates a reducing gas from a fuel source and is connected to deliver the reducing gas into contact with the absorber catalyst for regenerating the catalyst. A preferred reducing gas is a hydrogen rich gas and a preferred plasma fuel converter is a plasmatron. It is also preferred that the absorber catalyst be adapted for absorbing NO.sub.x.

Bromberg, Leslie (Sharon, MA); Cohn, Daniel R. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Rabinovich, Alexander (Swampscott, MA)

2004-04-13

53

Artisanal salt production in Aveiro/Portugal - an ecofriendly process  

PubMed Central

Solar salinas are man-made systems exploited for the extraction of salt, by solar and wind evaporation of seawater. Salt production achieved by traditional methods is associated with landscapes and environmental and patrimonial values generated throughout history. Since the mid-twentieth century, this activity has been facing a marked decline in Portugal, with most salinas either abandoned or subjected to destruction, making it necessary to find a strategy to reverse this trend. It is, however, possible to generate revenue from salinas at several levels, not merely in terms of good quality salt production, but also by obtaining other products that can be commercialized, or by exploring their potential for tourism, and as research facilities, among others. Furthermore, with an adequate management, biodiversity can be restored to abandoned salinas, which constitute important feeding and breeding grounds for resident and migratory aquatic birds, many of which are protected by European Community Directives. The aims of this manuscript are to present a brief overview on the current state of sea salt exploitation in Portugal and to stress the importance of recovering these salinas for the conservation of this particular environment, for the regional economy, the scientific community and the general public. The Aveiro salina complex is presented in detail, to exemplify salina structure and functioning, as well as current problems and potential solutions for artisanal salinas. PMID:22053788

2011-01-01

54

ARTISAN: a shape retrieval system based on boundary family indexing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Successful retrieval of images by shape feature is likely to be achieved only if we can mirror human similarity judgments. Following Biederman's theory of recognition-by-components, we postulate that shape analysis for retrieval should characterize an image by identifying properties such as collinearity, shape similarity and proximity in component boundaries. Such properties can then be used to group image components into families, from which indexing features can be derived. We are currently applying these principles in the development of the ARTISAN shape retrieval system for the UK Patent Office. The trademark images, supplied in compressed bit-map format, are processed using standard edge-extraction techniques to derive a set of region boundaries, which are approximated as a sequence of straight-line and circular-arc segments. These are then grouped into families using criteria such as proximity and shape similarity. Shape features for retrieval are then extracted from the image as a whole, each boundary family, and each individual boundary. Progress to date with the project is analyzed, evaluation plans described, and possible future directions for the research discussed.

Eakins, John P.; Shields, Kevin; Boardman, Jago

1996-03-01

55

Health assessment of artisanal gold miners in Tanzania.  

PubMed

In 2003 UNIDO (United Nations Industrial Development Organization) conducted an environmental and health assessment in a small-scale mining area in Tanzania. BGS (British Geological Survey) performed the environmental assessment. The Institute of Forensic Medicine - University of Munich performed the health assessment. The results of the medical, neurological and neuro-psychological examination of 180 participants from the affected area of Rwamagasa and 31 controls were analyzed. Urine, blood and hair samples were analyzed to detect the level of mercury body burden. Mercury concentrations in the bio-monitors urine, blood and hair were statistically significantly higher in the exposed population from Rwamagasa compared to the control group from Katoro. Only amalgam burners showed mercury levels above the toxicological threshold limits. A speciation of mercury in hair indicated that mainly elemental mercury vapor contributed to the high body burden of the artisanal miners. 104 amalgam-burners, the most exposed population group, were examined. 25 of these workers were found to be intoxicated. Small-scale mining is a serious health hazard for amalgam burners. Reduction of the exposure is essential to prevent further damage. PMID:19945738

Bose-O'Reilly, Stephan; Drasch, Gustav; Beinhoff, Christian; Tesha, Aloyce; Drasch, Katalin; Roider, Gabriele; Taylor, Helen; Appleton, Don; Siebert, Uwe

2010-01-15

56

VISUAL INSPECTION AND AHERA CLEARANCE AT ASBESTOS ABATEMENT SITES  

EPA Science Inventory

Asbestos abatement carried out in schools is subject to regulations under the Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA) of 1986. The AHERA rule (40 CFR Part 763) specifies a bifactorial process for determining when an asbestos abatement site is clean enough for the primary ...

57

VISUAL INSPECTION AND AHERA CLEARANCE AT ASBESTOS-ABATEMENT SITES  

EPA Science Inventory

Asbestos abatement carried out in schools is subject to regulations under the Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA) of 1986. he AHERA rule (40 CFR Part 763) specifies a bifactorial process for determining when an asbestos abatement site is clean enough for the primary co...

58

EXPERIENCE IN ABATING DISEASE AMONG BROOK TROUT By Albert Rosenberg  

E-print Network

EXPERIENCE IN ABATING DISEASE AMONG BROOK TROUT By Albert Rosenberg Proprietor Spring Brook Trout IN ABATING DISEASE AMONG BROOK TROUT. $ By ALBERT ROSENBERG, Proprietor Spring Brook Trout Hatchery the Spring Brook Trout Hatchery in 1895 without having had any practical experience. The site on which

59

ASBESTOS CONCENTRATIONS IN TWO YEARS AFTER ABATEMENT IN SEVENTEEN SCHOOLS  

EPA Science Inventory

Airborne asbestos concentrations were measured at 17 schools that underwent an asbestos abatement 2 years before in 1988. hese 17 schools, which involved 20 abatement sites, were part of a study conducted by the U.S Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the New Jersey Departm...

60

ASBESTOS CONCENTRATIONS TWO YEARS AFTER ABATEMENT IN SEVENTEEN SCHOOLS  

EPA Science Inventory

Airborne asbestos concentrations were measured at 17 schools that underwent an asbestos abatement 2 years before in 1988. These 17 schools, which involved 20 abatement sites, were part of a study conducted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the New Jersey Depar...

61

Pollution Abatement Costs, Regulation, and Plant-Level Productivity  

Microsoft Academic Search

We analyze the connection between productivity, pollution abatement expenditures, and other measures of environmental regulation for plants in three industries (paper, oil, and steel). We examine data from 1979 to 1990, considering both total factor productivity levels and growth rates. Plants with higher abatement cost levels have significantly lower productivity levels. The magnitude of the impact is somewhat larger than

Wayne B. Gray; Ronald J. Shadbegian

1995-01-01

62

The allocative efficiency implications of water pollution abatement cost comparisons  

Microsoft Academic Search

Assessments of the efficiency of water pollution control allocations are usually based on abatement cost comparisons. The general rule is that efficiency is improved by reallocating abatement from sources with high marginal costs to low-cost sources. The welfare-theoretic foundation of this rule is well established for situations with nonstochastic emissions. In situations with stochastic emissions, pollution control involves improving the

James S. Shortle

1990-01-01

63

Implantation of iris-claw Artisan intraocular lens for aphakia in Fuchs’ heterochromic iridocyclitis  

PubMed Central

Implantation of iris-claw Artisan intraocular lens (IOL) is a surgical option for correction of aphakia; however, these IOLs have not been used in eyes with uveitis including Fuchs’ heterochromic iridocyclitis (FHI) due to possible risk of severe postoperative intraocular inflammation. In the case reported here, we secondarily implanted an Artisan IOL in a 28-year-old man with FHI who had aphakia with no capsular support due to a previous complicated cataract surgery. Enclavation was easily performed and no intraoperative complication was noted. Postoperative course was uneventful with no significant anterior chamber inflammation during 12 months of follow-up. Although there were few deposits on the IOL surface, the patient achieved a best-corrected visual acuity of 20/20 without developing glaucoma or other complications. Therefore, Artisan IOL may be considered for correction of aphakia in patients with FHI. However, studies on large number of patients are required to evaluate safety of the procedure. PMID:23571252

Kheirkhah, Ahmad; Nikdel, Mojgan; Ghadimi, Hadi

2014-01-01

64

The Master Artisan: A Framework for Master Tradespeople in Australia. Occasional Paper  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The author explores the prospect of improving pathways and opportunities for tradespeople in Australia through the introduction of a masters-level qualification. The study investigates the views and opinions of senior industry representatives and professional educators to determine whether the introduction of a master trade or master artisan

O'Reilly-Briggs, Karen

2011-01-01

65

Quantifying the environmental impacts of artisanal fishing gear on Kenya’s coral reef ecosystems  

Microsoft Academic Search

The environmental impacts of artisanal fishing gear on coral reef ecosystems were studied in the multi-gear fishery of southern Kenya to evaluate which types of gear have the greatest impact on coral reef biodiversity. The gear types studied were large and small traps, gill nets, beach seines, hand lines and spear guns. Levels of coral damage, proportion of juvenile fish

S. C. Mangi; C. M. Roberts

2006-01-01

66

Emissions and environmental implications of mercury from artisanal gold mining in north Sulawesi, Indonesia  

Microsoft Academic Search

In artisanal gold mining practiced in North Sulawesi Island, Indonesia, gold is separated from ore by the use of mercury, which forms an amalgam with gold. All related processes are undertaken with a low level of technical knowledge and skills, no regulation, and with disregard for the safety of human and environment health. The situation is generating serious potential health

Daniel Limbong; Jeims Kumampung; Joice Rimper; Takaomi Arai; Nobuyuki Miyazaki

2003-01-01

67

The role of artisanal and small-scale mining in China's economy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The last decades have seen increased international attention paid to a number of features of artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM). The beneficial roles of ASM in society and the economy in many countries, however, are often overlooked, while its negative impacts dominate official press coverage and scholarly publications of the sector. Through a review of the available literature and statistics,

Lei Shen; Aaron James Gunson

2006-01-01

68

Chicago's Artisan Baker TM Job Title: Sr. Production Manager Department: Production  

E-print Network

Chicago's Artisan Baker TM Job Title: Sr. Production Manager Department: Production Revision Date: 07/15/2012 Reports To: Plant Manager Position Overview: The Manager's major responsibility is to oversee the operations of the production department. This position has the responsibility of coordinating

Heller, Barbara

69

DEMONSTRATION OF NONPOINT POLLUTION ABATEMENT THROUGH IMPROVED STREET CLEANING PRACTICES  

EPA Science Inventory

A presentation is given of the results and conclusions from the EPA-sponsored demonstration study of nonpoint pollution abatement through improved street cleaning practices. An important aspect was the development of sampling procedures to test street cleaning equipment performan...

70

AIRBORNE ASBESTOS LEVELS MEASURED BEFORE, DURING AND AFTER ABATEMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

Airborne asbestos concentrations were measured before, during, and after removal of asbestos containing fireproofing at three university buildings. hese three abatement studies were not subject to the AHERA regulations and the procedures followed were not necessarily in complianc...

71

Modeling and managing separation for noise abatement arrival procedures  

E-print Network

Aircraft noise is a significant concern to communities near airports, and therefore a constraint to the growth of aviation. Advanced noise abatement approach and arrival procedures have been shown in previous studies and ...

Ren, Liling

2007-01-01

72

Abatement of perfluorocompounds and chlorofluorocarbons using surface wave plasma technology  

E-print Network

Application of surface wave plasma technology for effective abatement of environmentally harmful gases such as perfluorocompounds and chlorofluorocarbons is investigated. Perfluorocompounds (PFCs) are gases that contribute to forced global warming...

Frantzen, Michelle E. Gunn

2007-04-25

73

Crowd-funded micro-grants for genomics and "big data": an actionable idea connecting small (artisan) science, infrastructure science, and citizen philanthropy.  

PubMed

Biomedical science in the 21(st) century is embedded in, and draws from, a digital commons and "Big Data" created by high-throughput Omics technologies such as genomics. Classic Edisonian metaphors of science and scientists (i.e., "the lone genius" or other narrow definitions of expertise) are ill equipped to harness the vast promises of the 21(st) century digital commons. Moreover, in medicine and life sciences, experts often under-appreciate the important contributions made by citizen scholars and lead users of innovations to design innovative products and co-create new knowledge. We believe there are a large number of users waiting to be mobilized so as to engage with Big Data as citizen scientists-only if some funding were available. Yet many of these scholars may not meet the meta-criteria used to judge expertise, such as a track record in obtaining large research grants or a traditional academic curriculum vitae. This innovation research article describes a novel idea and action framework: micro-grants, each worth $1000, for genomics and Big Data. Though a relatively small amount at first glance, this far exceeds the annual income of the "bottom one billion"-the 1.4 billion people living below the extreme poverty level defined by the World Bank ($1.25/day). We describe two types of micro-grants. Type 1 micro-grants can be awarded through established funding agencies and philanthropies that create micro-granting programs to fund a broad and highly diverse array of small artisan labs and citizen scholars to connect genomics and Big Data with new models of discovery such as open user innovation. Type 2 micro-grants can be funded by existing or new science observatories and citizen think tanks through crowd-funding mechanisms described herein. Type 2 micro-grants would also facilitate global health diplomacy by co-creating crowd-funded micro-granting programs across nation-states in regions facing political and financial instability, while sharing similar disease burdens, therapeutics, and diagnostic needs. We report the creation of ten Type 2 micro-grants for citizen science and artisan labs to be administered by the nonprofit Data-Enabled Life Sciences Alliance International (DELSA Global, Seattle). Our hope is that these micro-grants will spur novel forms of disruptive innovation and genomics translation by artisan scientists and citizen scholars alike. We conclude with a neglected voice from the global health frontlines, the American University of Iraq in Sulaimani, and suggest that many similar global regions are now poised for micro-grant enabled collective innovation to harness the 21(st) century digital commons. PMID:23574338

Özdemir, Vural; Badr, Kamal F; Dove, Edward S; Endrenyi, Laszlo; Geraci, Christy Jo; Hotez, Peter J; Milius, Djims; Neves-Pereira, Maria; Pang, Tikki; Rotimi, Charles N; Sabra, Ramzi; Sarkissian, Christineh N; Srivastava, Sanjeeva; Tims, Hesther; Zgheib, Nathalie K; Kickbusch, Ilona

2013-04-01

74

Air Sampling During Asbestos Abatement of Floor Tile and Mastic  

Microsoft Academic Search

Exposure measurements, area and personal samples, were collected during asbestos abatement of floor tile and mastic in a three story dormitory type building (25,000 square feet-abated) in Pennsylvania, USA. Floor tile and mastic were both identified as ACM by polarized light microscopy (PLM). Asbestos was determined to be of the chrysotile variety and was between 3-7% for both types of

J. H. Lange; K. W. Thomulka

2000-01-01

75

The Influence of Artisanal Small Scale Gold Mining on Deforestation Rates: The case of Seguenega, Burkina Faso.   

E-print Network

This paper investigates how Remote Sensing and Geographical Information Systems can be used to assess the influence of Artisanal Small Scale Gold Mining (ASGM) on deforestation rates in Africa. Using the department of Seguenega in Burkina Faso...

Palacios, Daniela

2013-11-28

76

Field characterization of external grease abatement devices.  

PubMed

This study characterized some of the physical and chemical features of large outside field grease abatement devices (GADs). 24-hour measurements of several food service establishments' (FSEs') influent GAD flowrates indicated highly intermittent conditions with hydraulic retention times (HRTs) that exceeded the common recommendation (30 minutes) by two to five times. Investigation into the chemical characteristics of GADs indicated highly variable influent and effluent fat, oil, and grease (FOG) concentrations. Low pH and dissolved oxygen values were measured throughout the GAD, indicating the likely occurrence of anaerobic microbial processes. Detailed spatial and temporal observations of the accumulation of FOG and food solids were also discussed. Though the FOG layer remained relatively constant for all GAD configurations investigated, results indicated that commonly-used GAD configurations with a straight submerged inlet tee or no-inlet tee configuration may result in the transport of food solids into the second compartment. The present research showed increased accumulation of food solids in the first compartment with a retro-fit flow distributive inlet. This retro-fit displays promise for potentially improving the separation characteristics of existing GADs. PMID:22755491

Aziz, Tarek N; Holt, Leon M; Keener, Kevin M; Groninger, John W; Ducoste, Joel J

2012-03-01

77

The Veterans Administration's Asbestos Abatement Program  

SciTech Connect

The Veterans Administration has developed a program of asbestos abatement for its more than 1000 buildings, where health care personnel from 173 hospitals and 238 ambulatory care clinics are likely to encounter respirable asbestos. This is a costly program, which has averaged about $25 million annually for the past ten years. The VA has banned the use of new asbestos products containing more than 1% of asbestos in building construction or renovation projects. Industrial hygiene engineering programs have been ordered instituted at all VA medical centers to monitor dust levels in compliance with OSHA and EPA requirements. Health surveillance programs, managed by an environmental health physician at each medical center, have been instituted for all personnel who have been identified to have breathed asbestos fibers in excess of OSHA-EPA threshold limit values. The health care program focuses on the identification of asbestosis and asbestos-related cancer through periodic X-ray films, lung function tests, and electrocardiographic and physical examination screening. The program also stresses cessation of smoking.

Schepers, G.W. (Institute of Industrial and Forensic Medicine, McLean, VA (United States))

1991-12-31

78

Artisanal and experimental Pecorino Siciliano cheese: microbial dynamics during manufacture assessed by culturing and PCR-DGGE analyses.  

PubMed

Traditional artisanal Pecorino Siciliano (PS) cheeses, and two experimental PS cheeses were manufactured using either raw or pasteurised ewes' milk with the addition of starter cultures. The bacterial diversity and dynamics of the different cheese types were evaluated both by culturing and characterisation of isolates, and a culture-independent approach based on the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene. Following cultivation, artisanal and experimental cheese types showed similar microbial counts, and isolates belonging to Lactococcus lactis, Streptococcus thermophilus, Enterococcus faecalis and Leuconostoc mesenteroides were identified by phenotypic characterisation and comparison of the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the 16S rRNA gene to that of reference species. The culture-independent fingerprinting technique PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of V6 to V8 regions of the 16S rRNA gene of samples taken during artisanal PS cheese manufacture, from raw milk to the ripened cheese, indicated relevant shifts in the microbial community structure. The dominance of Streptococcus bovis and Lactococcus lactis species in the traditional artisanal PS was revealed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Comparison of DGGE profiles of samples from milk to ripened cheese, derived from artisanal procedure and the two experimental PS cheeses during production showed similar trends with the presence of intense bands in common. Nevertheless, the profiles of several artisanal cheeses from different farms appeared more diverse, and these additional species are probably responsible for the generally superior flavour and aroma development of traditional PS cheese. PMID:16616965

Randazzo, Cinzia L; Vaughan, Elaine E; Caggia, Cinzia

2006-05-25

79

High-Throughput Sequencing for Detection of Subpopulations of Bacteria Not Previously Associated with Artisanal Cheeses  

PubMed Central

Here, high-throughput sequencing was employed to reveal the highly diverse bacterial populations present in 62 Irish artisanal cheeses and, in some cases, associated cheese rinds. Using this approach, we revealed the presence of several genera not previously associated with cheese, including Faecalibacterium, Prevotella, and Helcococcus and, for the first time, detected the presence of Arthrobacter and Brachybacterium in goats' milk cheese. Our analysis confirmed many previously observed patterns, such as the dominance of typical cheese bacteria, the fact that the microbiota of raw and pasteurized milk cheeses differ, and that the level of cheese maturation has a significant influence on Lactobacillus populations. It was also noted that cheeses containing adjunct ingredients had lower proportions of Lactococcus species. It is thus apparent that high-throughput sequencing-based investigations can provide valuable insights into the microbial populations of artisanal foods. PMID:22685131

Quigley, Lisa; O'Sullivan, Orla; Beresford, Tom P.; Ross, R. Paul; Fitzgerald, Gerald F.

2012-01-01

80

Waste treatment and optimal degree of pollution abatement  

SciTech Connect

Environmental impacts of industrial production processes are usually estimated by considering the emissions leaving the process. These emissions are often reduced using abatement processes, such as wastewater treatment technologies, in the belief that reducing emissions will reduce the environmental impact. Typical legislation focuses on reducing discharge levels, without considering the impact on the environment of the additional inputs required by the abatement process to achieve this reduction. This leads to the possibility that some waste streams may be over treated. In other words, industry might be devoting increased resources to reducing discharges and at the same time be worsening the environment. This paper presents a framework for the analysis of wastewater treatment technologies from an economic and environmental point of view. The work examines trade-offs in abatement processes between higher inputs (energy consumption and raw material) and lower discharge quantities (pollutant flow). As a result, an optimal degree of pollution abatement (ODPA), at which environmental impact is minimized, is identified. This value could act as a guideline to legislators who are setting discharge limits and to chemical engineers with waste discharge responsibilities. Case studies on two different abatement technologies, steam stripping and pervaporation, are presented to illustrate this framework.

Romero-Hernandez, O.; Pistikopoulos, E.N.; Livingston, A.G. [Imperial Coll. of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1998-12-31

81

An estimation of the artisanal small-scale production of gold in the world.  

PubMed

The increase in gold price of over 400% between 2002 and 2012, due to a shift towards safe investments in a period of crisis in the global economy, created a rapid increase in gold production. A response to this shift in production was observed for artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) units in remote locations of the world, but this phenomenon has not been quantified yet. The work presented here was done to provide a quantitative tool for estimation of the gold (Au) produced by ASM and the population of workers involved in the production process, and assessment of mercury (Hg) consumed. The following hypotheses were addressed: i) It is possible to estimate, on first approximation, the amount of Au production in the world by artisanal mining; ii) Au production by artisanal mining varies by country and continent and iii) Hg consumption due to ASM can be correlated with the methods applied in the different countries and continents for the production of Au. To do this we estimated the number of miners, calculated the change in Au price and production and then applied an adjustment factor to calculate Hg production by country and continent. The amount of Au produced depends on technology of the miners by continents (highest in South America, medium in Asia and Central America, and lowest in Africa), and the geologic setting (not investigated here). The results of the estimation show that, as of 2011, over 16 million Artisanal Miners, in the world, were involved in gold extraction (mining or treatment), producing between 380 and 450 t of gold per year, with clear global behavior between the continents in terms of recovery efficiency, confirmed by data on Hg release that is higher in countries with lower technology. PMID:24867677

Seccatore, Jacopo; Veiga, Marcello; Origliasso, Chiara; Marin, Tatiane; De Tomi, Giorgio

2014-10-15

82

Environmental assessment of mercury contamination from the Rwamagasa artisanal gold mining centre, Geita District, Tanzania  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study presents the results of an environmental assessment of mercury (Hg) contamination in the Rwamagasa artisanal gold mining area, northwest Tanzania, and the potential downstream dispersion along the River Malagarasi to Lake Tanganyika. At the time of sampling, generally low concentrations of Hg (<0.05 mg\\/kg) occurred in most cultivated soils although higher Hg (0.05–9.2 mg\\/kg) was recorded in urban

H. Taylor; J. d. Appletonsupasu; R. Lister; B. Smith; D. Chitamweba; O. Mkumbo; J. F. Machiwa; A. L. Tesha; C. Beinhoff

2005-01-01

83

41 CFR 102-80.20 - What are Federal agencies' responsibilities concerning the abatement of radon?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...responsibilities concerning the abatement of radon? 102-80.20 Section 102-80... Safety and Environmental Management Radon § 102-80.20 What are Federal agencies...responsibilities concerning the abatement of radon? Federal agencies have the...

2013-07-01

84

41 CFR 102-80.20 - What are Federal agencies' responsibilities concerning the abatement of radon?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...responsibilities concerning the abatement of radon? 102-80.20 Section 102-80... Safety and Environmental Management Radon § 102-80.20 What are Federal agencies...responsibilities concerning the abatement of radon? Federal agencies have the...

2011-01-01

85

41 CFR 102-80.20 - What are Federal agencies' responsibilities concerning the abatement of radon?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...responsibilities concerning the abatement of radon? 102-80.20 Section 102-80... Safety and Environmental Management Radon § 102-80.20 What are Federal agencies...responsibilities concerning the abatement of radon? Federal agencies have the...

2014-01-01

86

41 CFR 102-80.20 - What are Federal agencies' responsibilities concerning the abatement of radon?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...responsibilities concerning the abatement of radon? 102-80.20 Section 102-80... Safety and Environmental Management Radon § 102-80.20 What are Federal agencies...responsibilities concerning the abatement of radon? Federal agencies have the...

2010-07-01

87

41 CFR 102-80.20 - What are Federal agencies' responsibilities concerning the abatement of radon?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...responsibilities concerning the abatement of radon? 102-80.20 Section 102-80... Safety and Environmental Management Radon § 102-80.20 What are Federal agencies...responsibilities concerning the abatement of radon? Federal agencies have the...

2012-01-01

88

29 CFR 1960.30 - Abatement of unsafe or unhealthful working conditions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Abatement of unsafe or unhealthful working conditions. 1960.30 Section 1960...Abatement of unsafe or unhealthful working conditions. (a) The agency shall...of an Unsafe or Unhealthful Working Condition has been issued,...

2010-07-01

89

29 CFR 1960.30 - Abatement of unsafe or unhealthful working conditions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Abatement of unsafe or unhealthful working conditions. 1960.30 Section 1960...Abatement of unsafe or unhealthful working conditions. (a) The agency shall...of an Unsafe or Unhealthful Working Condition has been issued,...

2011-07-01

90

Global forestry emission projections and abatement costs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper we present forestry emission projections and associated Marginal Abatement Cost Curves (MACCs) for individual countries, based on economic, social and policy drivers. The activities cover deforestation, afforestation, and forestry management. The global model tools G4M and GLOBIOM, developed at IIASA, are applied. GLOBIOM uses global scenarios of population, diet, GDP and energy demand to inform G4M about future land and commodity prices and demand for bioenergy and timber. G4M projects emissions from afforestation, deforestation and management of existing forests. Mitigation measures are simulated by introducing a carbon tax. Mitigation activities like reducing deforestation or enhancing afforestation are not independent of each other. In contrast to existing forestry mitigation cost curves the presented MACCs are not developed for individual activities but total forest land management which makes the estimated potentials more realistic. In the assumed baseline gross deforestation drops globally from about 12 Mha in 2005 to below 10 Mha after 2015 and reach 0.5 Mha in 2050. Afforestation rates remain fairly constant at about 7 Mha annually. Although we observe a net area increase of global forest area after 2015 net emissions from deforestation and afforestation are positive until 2045 as the newly afforested areas accumulate carbon rather slowly. About 200 Mt CO2 per year in 2030 in Annex1 countries could be mitigated at a carbon price of 50 USD. The potential for forest management improvement is very similar. Above 200 USD the potential is clearly constrained for both options. In Non-Annex1 countries avoided deforestation can achieve about 1200 Mt CO2 per year at a price of 50 USD. The potential is less constrained compared to the potential in Annex1 countries, achieving a potential of 1800 Mt CO2 annually in 2030 at a price of 1000 USD. The potential from additional afforestation is rather limited due to high baseline afforestation rates assumed. In addition we present results of several sensitivity analyses that were run to understand better model uncertainties and the mechanisms of drivers such as agricultural productivity, GDP, wood demand and national corruption rates.

Böttcher, H.; Gusti, M.; Mosnier, A.; Havlik, P.; Obersteiner, M.

2012-04-01

91

Engaging Scholarship with Communities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A pedagogy of engagement links faculty and students to the needs of local communities while promoting academic success through higher retention and graduation rates in higher education. This work describes engaged scholarship and shares guidelines for documenting student engagement and critical reflection across the higher education curriculum.…

Núñez, Guillermina Gina

2014-01-01

92

Engagement and Institutional Advancement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research suggests that institutional commitment to community engagement can be understood by examining levels of student, faculty, and community involvement in engagement; organizational structure, rewards, and campus publications supporting engagement; and compatibility of an institution's mission with this work (Holland, 1997). Underlying all of…

Weerts, David; Hudson, Elizabeth

2009-01-01

93

Lead abatement training for supervisors and contractors. Instructors guide  

SciTech Connect

This training program is designed to be a 32 hour training course, and is intended for individuals supervising residential lead abatement projects. The course is designed to meet the requirements of 40 CFR Part 745-Lead. Requirements for Lead-Based Paint Activities in Target Housing and Child Occupied Facilities, a federal regulation under section 402 of the Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA). Topics covered in the course include; the history of lead; health effects; legal and insurance consideration; regulations overview; inspection and risk assessment; report interpretation; development and implementation of occupant protection plans; paint hazard recognition and materials identification; XRF testing/sampling and abatement methods.

Not Available

1999-01-01

94

QUANTITATIVE EVALUATION OF HEPA FILTRATION UNITS AT ASBESTOS ABATEMENT SITES  

EPA Science Inventory

A study was conducted to determine-the filtering efficiencies of 31 high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration units in use at asbestos-abatement projects. article-removal efficiencies for these units ranged from 90.53 to > 99.99 percent. ineteen (61%) of the units tested ...

95

WHAT DO LANDLORDS THINK ABOUT DRUG ABATEMENT LAWS?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Across the country, drug house abatement statutes have be- come a popular tool for reducing drug activities in targeted neighborhoods. These statutes vary in content; in the types of civil or criminal penalties that apply; and in the type of administrative\\/court proceedings and ap- peals available. Despite differences among the statutes, they share a common goal of ameliorating drug activity

Barbara E. Smith; Robert C. Davis

96

FRASER POLLUTION ABATEMENT OFFICE PROGRESS REPORT 1995 -1996  

E-print Network

FRAP 1997-21 Prepared for: Environment Canada Environmental Protection Fraser Pollution Abatement North (FRAP); and Hugh Liebscher, Groundwater Section; all of Environment Canada-Pacific and Yukon Region, is taking action with the Fraser River Action Plan (FRAP). Announced in June 1991, FRAP's primary objectives

97

EVALUATION OF POLLUTION ABATEMENT ALTERNATIVES: PICILLO PROPERTY, COVENTRY, RHODE ISLAND  

EPA Science Inventory

This report describes the second phase of a two-phase investigation undertaken by the MITRE Corp. to determine the nature and severity of ground and surface water contamination at the Picillo property in Coventry, Rhode Island and to make recommendations for permanent abatement o...

98

Noise levels near streets, effectiveness and cost abatement measures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During the years 1975-1978, research was carried concerning the current noise levels near streets, the annoyance felt by the population, possible noise abatement measures for these streets, and the economic impact of such measures. The results of the research are summarized.

Lang, J.

1980-01-01

99

Deterministic Linear Programming Model for acid rain abatement  

Microsoft Academic Search

A deterministic Linear Programming Model is presented for development of acid rain abatement strategies in eastern North America. Pollutant (SOâ) sources are categorized as either controllable or noncontrolled. The model determines the least-cost set of SOâ removal levels at each of the 235 largest point sources in eastern North America, such that stipulated maximum wet sulfate deposition rates are not

J. H. Ellis; G. J. Frayuhar; E. A. McBean

1985-01-01

100

Comparison of Artisan iris-claw intraocular lens implantation and posterior chamber intraocular lens sulcus fixation for aphakic eyes  

PubMed Central

AIM To compare the efficacy and complications of Artisan iris-claw intraocular lens (IOL) implantation and posterior chamber IOL sulcus fixation for the treatment of aphakic eyes without capsular support after vitrectomy. METHODS A prospective study of 45 cases was conducted. Forty-five eyes without sufficient lens capsule support following pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) combined lens extraction were divided into two groups. Group A: 25 eyes received Artisan iris-claw IOL implantation. Group B: 20 eyes received posterior chamber IOL sulcus fixation. The corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) and intraocular pressure (IOP), corneal endothelial cell loss rate, surgical time and complications were compared between the two groups. Pigment changes of trabecular meshwork and anterior chamber depths were measured at each time point in Artisan group. RESULTS The mean surgical time of Artisan group was significantly shorter (P<0.05). No statistically significant difference in endothelial cell loss rate was noted between two groups at any time point (P>0.05). CDVA of Artian group was better than that of the sulcus fixation group 1d after surgery (P<0.05) and there was no statistically significant difference 1 and 3mo after surgery (P>0.05). Mean IOP showed no significant differences between groups before and after surgery. The postoperative complications of Artisan group were anterior uveitis, iris depigmentation, pupillary distortion and spontaneous lens dislocation. The complications of sulcus fixation group include choroidal detachment, intraocular haemorrhage, tilt of IOL optic part and retinal detachment. CONCLUSION Secondary Artisan IOL implantation can be performed less invasively and in a shorter surgical time period with earlier visual recovery after surgery compared to transscleral suturing fixation of an IOL. This technique is an effective and safe procedure. It is a promising option for the treatment of aphakic eyes without capsular support after vitrectomy. PMID:24790871

Teng, He; Zhang, Hong

2014-01-01

101

Viability of Staphylococcus xylosus isolated from artisanal sausages for application as starter cultures in meat products.  

PubMed

Viability of Staphylococcus xylosus isolated from artisanal sausages for application as starter cultures in meat products Viability of Staphylococcus xylosus strains AD1 and U5 isolated from natural fermented sausages was investigated as starter cultures in fermented sausages produced in the South Region of Brazil. The study demonstrated that the Staphylococcus xylosus strains AD1 and U5 showed significant growth during fermentation, stability over freeze-dried process, negative reaction for staphylococcal enterotoxins and viability for using as a single-strain culture or associated with lactic acid bacteria for production of fermented sausages. PMID:24031331

Fiorentini, Angela Maria; Sawitzki, Maristela Cortez; Bertol, Teresinha Marisa; Sant'anna, Ernani S

2009-01-01

102

Viability of Staphylococcus xylosus isolated from artisanal sausages for application as starter cultures in meat products  

PubMed Central

Viability of Staphylococcus xylosus isolated from artisanal sausages for application as starter cultures in meat products Viability of Staphylococcus xylosus strains AD1 and U5 isolated from natural fermented sausages was investigated as starter cultures in fermented sausages produced in the South Region of Brazil. The study demonstrated that the Staphylococcus xylosus strains AD1 and U5 showed significant growth during fermentation, stability over freeze-dried process, negative reaction for staphylococcal enterotoxins and viability for using as a single-strain culture or associated with lactic acid bacteria for production of fermented sausages. PMID:24031331

Fiorentini, Ângela Maria; Sawitzki, Maristela Cortez; Bertol, Teresinha Marisa; Sant’Anna, Ernani S.

2009-01-01

103

Plants used in artisanal fisheries on the Western Mediterranean coasts of Italy  

PubMed Central

Background Artisanal fisheries in the Mediterranean, especially in Italy, have been poorly investigated. There is a long history of fishing in this region, and it remains an important economic activity in many localities. Our research entails both a comprehensive review of the relevant literature and 58 field interviews with practitioners on plants used in fishing activities along the Western Mediterranean Italian coastal regions. The aims were to record traditional knowledge on plants used in fishery in these regions and to define selection criteria for plant species used in artisanal fisheries, considering ecology and intrinsic properties of plants, and to discuss the pattern of diffusion of shared uses in these areas. Methods Information was gathered both from a general review of ethnobotanical literature and from original data. A total of 58 semi-structured interviews were carried out in Liguria, Latium, Campania and Sicily (Italy). Information on plant uses related to fisheries were collected and analyzed through a chi-square residual analysis and the correspondence analysis in relation to habitat, life form and chorology. Results A total of 60 plants were discussed as being utilized in the fisheries of the Western Italian Mediterranean coastal regions, with 141 different uses mentioned. Of these 141 different uses, 32 are shared among different localities. A multivariate statistical analysis was performed on the entire dataset, resulting in details about specific selection criteria for the different usage categories (plants have different uses that can be classified into 11 main categories). In some uses, species are selected for their features (e.g., woody), or habitat (e.g., riverine), etc. The majority of uses were found to be obsolete (42%) and interviews show that traditional fishery knowledge is in decline. There are several reasons for this, such as climatic change, costs, reduction of fish stocks, etc. Conclusions Our research correlates functional characteristics of the plants used in artisanal fishery and habitats, and discusses the distribution of these uses. This research is the first comprehensive outline of plant role in artisanal fisheries and traditional fishery knowledge in the Mediterranean, specifically in Italy. PMID:23356937

2013-01-01

104

Public engagement and education Public engagement and  

E-print Network

exhibitions and events. In the Zone was a national public engagement and education initiative that linked to collaborate, but stay true to your project vision. Linking to external anniversaries or national events (e to our project from the beginning ­ when you're trying to get buy-in from internal and external

Rambaut, Andrew

105

Engagement Means Everyone  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Employee engagement is not just HR's responsibility. While HR is responsible for the process of measuring and driving engagement, improving it is actually everyone's responsibility. And that means reducing the barriers to productivity to drive business performance. Training departments can play a pivotal role. Their job is to enhance curriculum or…

Patton, Carol

2012-01-01

106

Engaging with Drama  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reports on a multi-site global, ethnographic, and mixed methods study on student engagement. Our research has closely examined how engagement and disengagement operate subtly, simultaneously and relationally in the places and spaces where drama is made. Through years of qualitative time in high school classrooms and two different…

Gallagher, Kathleen

2013-01-01

107

Improving Student Engagement.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This action research project implemented and evaluated an intervention for improving student engagement in the learning process. The targeted population consisted of first, third, and fifth grade students in a small, traditional, middle class community, located in central Illinois. Evidence of non-engaged behaviors were documented from teacher…

Beuscher, Shonna; Keuer, Lynn; Muehlich, Sharon; Tyra, Carol

108

Engaging Online Learners.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Learner engagement ranges from passive interest to dynamic interaction to flow state. Engaged teaching and learning online also progresses through three levels: transfer (converting conventional instruction to technology-enhanced environments), translation (redefining instruction using technology's capabilities), and transcendence (inventing new…

Metros, Susan E.

2001-01-01

109

The Allocative Efficiency Implications of Water Pollution Abatement Cost Comparisons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Assessments of the efficiency of water pollution control allocations are usually based on abatement cost comparisons. The general rule is that efficiency is improved by reallocating abatement from sources with high marginal costs to low-cost sources. The welfare-theoretic foundation of this rule is well established for situations with nonstochastic emissions. In situations with stochastic emissions, pollution control involves improving the distribution of emissions. Nevertheless, efficiency analyses involving stochastic emissions usually sidestep formal consideration of the stochastic element by measuring pollution control and control costs with respect to changes in long-term average flows. An economic model of stochastic emissions is used to demonstrate that this approach can give misleading results. An alternative procedure is briefly discussed.

Shortle, James S.

1990-05-01

110

Environmental projects. Volume 12: Friable asbestos abatement, GDSCC  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex (GDSCC) is part of the NASA Deep Space Network, one of the world's largest and most sensitive scientific telecommunications and radio navigation networks. Activities at the GDSCC are carried out in support of six large parabolic dish antennas. These activities may give rise to a variety of environmental hazards, particularly the danger of exposure of GDSCC personnel to asbestos fibers that have been shown to be responsible for such serious ailments as asbestosis, lung cancer, and mesothelioma. Asbestos-containing materials (ACM's) were used in the construction of many of the approximately 100 buildings and structures that were built at the GDSCC during a 30-year period from the 1950s through 1980s. The friable asbestos-abatement program at the GDSCC is presented which consists of text, illustrations, and tables that describe the friable asbestos abatement carried out at the GDSCC from December 21, 1988 through May 11, 1989.

1990-01-01

111

Mercury contamination associated with artisanal gold mining on the island of Mindanao, the Philippines.  

PubMed

The Agusan River basin of eastern Mindanao, the Philippines, hosts several centres of artisanal gold mining, the most important of which, Diwalwal, is a significant gold producer in global terms. An investigation of the environmental impacts of artisanal mining in the Agusan system, with particular reference to mercury contamination, was initiated in 1995 following reports of several incidents of human Hg poisoning in the province of Davao del Norte. Results show drainage downstream of Diwalwal is characterised by extremely high levels of Hg both in solution (maximum 2906 micrograms/l) and in bottom sediments (> 20 mg/kg). Filtered surface water Hg levels exceed the WHO Drinking Water guideline and the US-EPA Water Quality Criteria for the Protection of Aquatic Life for a downstream distance of more than 14 km, including channel sections utilised for fishing and potable water supply. The Environment Canada sediment quality Hg Toxic Effect Threshold for the Protection of Aquatic Life is exceeded for a downstream distance of 20 km. Hair Hg data indicate that ballmill and CIP plant operators processing Hg contaminated tailings at eastern Mindanao's principal gold beneficiation centre, Apokon, may be subject to enhanced occupational Hg exposure. It appears that the wider population of this area has not been affected. PMID:10371050

Appleton, J D; Williams, T M; Breward, N; Apostol, A; Miguel, J; Miranda, C

1999-04-01

112

Limitations in small artisanal gold mining addressed by educational components paired with alternative mining methods.  

PubMed

Current solutions continue to be inadequate in addressing the longstanding, worldwide problem of mercury emissions from small artisanal gold mining. Mercury, an inexpensive and easily accessible heavy metal, is used in the process of extracting gold from ore. Mercury emissions disperse, affecting human populations by causing adverse health effects and environmental and social ramifications. Many developing nations have sizable gold ore deposits, making small artisanal gold mining a major source of employment in the world. Poverty drives vulnerable, rural populations into gold mining because of social and economic instabilities. Educational programs responding to this environmental hazard have been implemented in the past, but have had low positive results due to lack of governmental support and little economic incentive. Educational and enforced intervention programs must be developed in conjunction with governmental agencies in order to successfully eliminate this ongoing problem. Industry leaders offered hopeful suggestions, but revealed limitations when trying to develop encompassing solutions to halt mercury emissions. This research highlights potential options that have been attempted in the past and suggests alternative solutions to improve upon these methods. Some methods include buyer impact recognition, risk assessment proposals exposing a cost-benefit analysis and toxicokinetic modeling, public health awareness campaigns, and the education of miners, healthcare workers, and locals within hazardous areas of mercury exposure. These methods, paired with the implementation of alternative mining techniques, propose a substantial reduction of mercury emissions. PMID:22297251

Zolnikov, Tara R

2012-03-01

113

Cost-Effective Measures for Diffuse Load Abatement in Forestry  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper theoretically and empirically analyzes the design of cost-effective diffuse load abatement in forestry. Harvesting with related forest regeneration and drainage maintenance increases nutrient leaching, while riparian buffer strips and adjustments in drainage maintenance technology can be used to prevent this leaching. By utilizing a two-period model it is shown that cost-efficiency requires the establishment of a buffer strip

Jukka Matero

114

Several field tests of Abate larvicides for Aedes control  

Microsoft Academic Search

In preliminary field tests in woodlands swamps of southern Morava, ?SSR, it was found that Abate 500E at the rate 0.1 g\\/m of water surfaces killed Aëdes vexans, A. cinereus and A. sticticus larvae 3 instar during 24 hours, but in other case at the rate 0.05 g\\/m of water surfaces killed not the A. vexans pupae.In southern Morava, CSSR

Dušan Novák

1971-01-01

115

The ABCs of Student Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Student engagement is an important consideration for teachers and administrators because it is explicitly associated with achievement. What the authors call the ABC's of engagement they outline as: Affective engagement, Behavioral engagement, and Cognitive engagement. They also present "Three Things Every Teacher Needs to Know about…

Parsons, Seth A.; Nuland, Leila Richey; Parsons, Allison Ward

2014-01-01

116

Survey of Civic Engagement Activities  

E-print Network

Survey of Civic Engagement Activities in Higher Education in Ireland #12;Report co by CASTLE PRINT MAy 2011 #12;Survey of Civic Engagement Activities in Higher Education in Ireland #12;4 Campus EngagE Survey of Civic Engagement Activities in Higher Education in Ireland Acknowledgements

O'Mahony, Donal E.

117

Spatial distribution of effort by artisanal fishers: Exploring economic factors affecting the lobster fisheries of the Corn Islands, Nicaragua  

Microsoft Academic Search

Spatial distribution of fishing effort is increasingly recognised as an important consideration for fisheries management, as it can affect trends in catch rates, and be incorporated into planning of spatial management tools like marine protected areas (MPAs). One hundred and ninety-eight household questionnaires provided a coarse indication of effort distribution of artisanal lobster fishers around the Corn Islands, and 32

Tim M. Daw

2008-01-01

118

Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of lactic acid bacteria isolated from cow, ewe and goat dairy artisanal farmhouses  

PubMed Central

Lactic acid bacteria collected from artisanal farmhouses were characterized using a polyphasic approach. Phenotypic methods including biochemical assays, ribosomal DNA restriction analysis and 16S rDNA sequence analysis were performed. This approach provides accuracy for identification, and helps to avoid the loss of natural biodiversity including potentially valuable strains. PMID:24294232

Reginensi, Stella M.; González, Marcela J.; Bermúdez, Jorge

2013-01-01

119

The Education and Training of Artisans for the Informal Sector in Tanzania. Education Research. Serial No. 18.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines the structures and processes that assist in the training of youth who aspire to become artisans working in the informal sector. Chapter 1 serves as an introduction to the report. Chapter 2 addresses political and socioeconomic developments in post-independence Tanzania. Chapter 3 considers education, training, and youth…

Kent, David W.; Mushi, Paul S. D.

120

Loggerhead sea turtle bycatch data in artisanal fisheries within a marine protected area: fishermen surveys versus scientific observations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Loggerhead sea turtles can be incidentally captured by artisanal gears but information about the impact of this fishing is inconsistent and scarce. Recent studies have observed that the bycatch, or incidental catch rate, in fishermen surveys is irregular. The aim of this study was to compare direct data (onboard observers) concerning the incidental catch of loggerhead sea turtles by the

M. Lozano; J. Baro; T. García; A. Frías; J. Rey; J. C. Báez

2011-01-01

121

Chenderoh Reservoir, Malaysia: a characterization of a small-scale, multigear and multispecies artisanal fishery in the tropics  

Microsoft Academic Search

A study on the artisanal fishery of Chenderoh Reservoir, Perak River, Malaysia, was conducted from April 1988 to May 1989 using creel survey, rapid rural appraisal (RRA) and test fishing. The main landing site, used by 30 fishers and controlled by a middleman, was identified. The fishers indicated fishing as a secondary occupation supplementing income from farming or rubber tapping.

Ahyaudin B. Ali; K. Y. Lee

1995-01-01

122

Reducing pollution: Who pays the bill. [Public Utility Commissions allocate costs of pollution abatement  

SciTech Connect

Since the nation's lawmakers passed a final version of the Clean Air Act, many utilities will now face large capital expenditures for pollution abatement in the next ten years. That prospect is likely to create problems for the nation's public utility commissioners, who are concerned about the costs to utility customers. A survey of PUC staff and commissioners found that while many are concerned about such issues, few have dealt with pollution abatement problems in the past few years. This survey was conducted during 1989 with all but three states that have commissions. The survey dealt with the ways that commissions have been handling pollution abatement expenditures including: how PUCs handled expenditures in their rate bases; PUC experience with pollution abatement expenditures in rate cases; PUC flexibility in dealing with previous pollution abatement cases; PUC management involvement with utilities; communication between the PUCs and the state air quality offices over problems involving pollution abatement.

Williams, A.F.

1991-01-15

123

Threats posed by artisanal fisheries to the reproduction of coastal fish species in a Mediterranean marine protected area  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Artisanal fisheries are frequently considered as a sustainable activity compatible with the conservation objectives of marine protected areas (MPAs). Few studies have examined the impacts of these fisheries on the reproductive potential of exploited fish species within the marine reserves. This study evaluated the potential impact of artisanal fishing on the reproduction of coastal fish species in a Mediterranean MPA through onboard sampling from January 2008 to December 2010. Eleven sex-changing fish species constituted an important part of the catch (20% overall and up to 60% of the total gill net catch) and, in five of them, most individuals were of one sex. Artisanal fishing can negatively affect the sustainability of those coastal fishes showing sex reversal, particularly the protogynous ones such as Diplodus cervinus and Epinephelus marginatus, as well as the species with complex mating systems (e.g. some sparids, labrids and scorpaenids). In all species the average size for the individuals captured was above the minimum landing size (where this exists), but in four species (Conger conger, Diplodus puntazzo, Sphyraena spp. and Sparus aurata) it was below the size of first maturity (L50). Results show that sex and size selection by artisanal fishing not only can have an impact on the reproduction of coastal fish species but may also be exacerbating rather than reducing the impact of fishing on coastal resources. Thus, new management actions need to be urgently implemented in the MPAs where artisanal fisheries are allowed to operate in order to protect the reproductive potential of these species, particularly those showing a complicated reproductive strategy.

Lloret, J.; Muñoz, M.; Casadevall, M.

2012-11-01

124

Achieving Provider Engagement  

PubMed Central

The literature on integrated care is limited with respect to practical learning and experience. Although some attention has been paid to organizational processes and structures, not enough is paid to people, relationships, and the importance of these in bringing about integration. Little is known, for example, about provider engagement in the organizational change process, how to obtain and maintain it, and how it is demonstrated in the delivery of integrated care. Based on qualitative data from the evaluation of a large-scale integrated care initiative in London, United Kingdom, we explored the role of provider engagement in effective integration of services. Using thematic analysis, we identified an evolving engagement narrative with three distinct phases: enthusiasm, antipathy, and ambivalence, and argue that health care managers need to be aware of the impact of professional engagement to succeed in advancing the integrated care agenda. PMID:25212855

Greenfield, Geva; Pappas, Yannis; Car, Josip; Majeed, Azeem; Harris, Matthew

2014-01-01

125

Actively Engaging Educators to  

E-print Network

. A new easy-to-use booklet will give families tools for promoting early literacy. A second effort requirement for emerging literacy activities with children. Location: Statewide Actively engaging educators

126

Fostering youth engagement:  

E-print Network

on existing literature by defining distinctions among these constructs. After distinctions between concepts were made a model was derived: Systematic Degree of Engagement. From this research, program designers are able to develop programs and assess existing...

Maynard, Karen Kimberly

2009-05-15

127

HIV/AIDS, artisanal fishing and food security in the Okavango Delta, Botswana  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Generally, rural households pursue all year round natural and non-natural resource-based livelihood systems to diversify these options in order to cope with risks emanating from a range of shocks and stressors. Artisanal fishing in the Delta is not only a major livelihood option but also a source of food security. This paper is based on analysis of primary data collected from a survey of 248 subsistence fishers’ households through simple random sampling in 22 villages in the Delta. The overall objectives of the survey were to assess the general prevalence of HIV/AIDS in the Ngamiland district of Botswana, to investigate potential effects of AIDS-related stressors, particularly chronic illness on artisanal fishing activities, and to assess implications towards food security. Results from this study indicate that HIV prevalence rates for pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in the Delta are approximately 30% and are related to factors such as marriage, education, and employment. Despite this relatively high prevalence percentage, most of the affected households do not have adequate access to HIV/AIDS support facilities. Support services are provided on the basis of population size and/or status of the settlement (i.e. urban, urban village, rural or remote). Therefore, since about 50% of the Delta’s population lives in settlements of less than 500 people, they receive health services indirectly through major population centres whose capacity to deliver timely HIV/AIDS services is limited. This disproportionate access to HIV/AIDS services disadvantages the majority of fishing communities in the Delta, and may affect their ability to fish. Moreover, about 53% of sampled households had cared for a continuously ill person/s (CIP’s) in the last 5 years, out of which approximately 29% felt that this seriously impacted fishing activities. These serious impacts included sale of family assets, depletion of savings, and switching or abandoning fishing activities. Subsequently, household food security is seriously affected because fish provides a significant proportion of food to CIP households where approximately 55% of households get their food from fish products. During food shortages, CIP households resorted to a hierarchy of strategies which included cutting down on meals or reducing meal portions, looking for paid work, gathering wild fruit, asking for food from relatives, selling livestock, and getting social assistance. In conclusion, artisanal fishing is a natural safety net which constitutes an important buffer for households affected by HIV/AIDS-related stressors in the Okavango Delta. Access to fish helps these households mitigate potentially adverse impacts such as deterioration into chronic poverty.

Ngwenya, B. N.; Mosepele, K.

128

Assessment of Hg-contamination in soils and stream sediments in the mineral district of Nambija, Ecuadorian Amazon (example of an impacted area affected by artisanal gold mining)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Nambija Mineral District (NMD) is located in the southeastern part of Ecuador, east of Zamora (Zamora Chinch??pe's country), Ecuadorian Amazon. In this district, Au occurrences have been know since colonial and pre-colonial times, but only after the early 1980s has intensive artisanal Au mining activity been developed. Currently, the different NMD Au occurrences continue to be exploited by artisanal

M. E. Ram??rez Requelme; J. F. F. Ramos; R. S. Angélica; E. S. Brabo

2003-01-01

129

High-throughput sequencing of microbial communities in Poro cheese, an artisanal Mexican cheese.  

PubMed

The bacterial diversity and structure of Poro cheese, an artisanal food, was analysed by high-throughput sequencing (454 pyrosequencing) in order to gain insight about changes in bacterial communities associated with the cheese-making process. Dairy samples consisting of milk, fermented whey, curd and ripened cheese (during 7 and 60 d) were collected from three manufacturers located in the state of Tabasco, México during dry (March-June) and rainy (August-November) seasons. Independently of producer and season, raw milk samples displayed the highest diversity in bacterial communities. In raw milk, genera found were Macrococcus, Staphylococcus, Enterococcus, Streptococcus, Lactobacillus and Enhydrobacter. Diversity in whey, curd and cheese was lower, principally containing Streptococcus and Lactobacillus; however, bacteria such as Staphylococcus, Acinetobacter, Chryseobacterium, Bacillus, Sediminibacter, Lactococcus and Enterococcus were occasionally present. After curdling step, the most dominant and abundant species were Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii. PMID:25084655

Aldrete-Tapia, Alejandro; Escobar-Ramírez, Meyli C; Tamplin, Mark L; Hernández-Iturriaga, Montserrat

2014-12-01

130

Characterization, mapping, and mitigation of mercury vapour emissions from artisanal mining gold shops.  

PubMed

Artisanal miners sell their gold to shops that are usually located in the urban core, where the mercury-gold amalgam is burned to evaporate the mercury that was added during ore processing. People living and working near these gold shops are exposed to intermittent and extreme concentrations of mercury vapour. In the urban centres of Segovia, Colombia, and Andacollo, Chile, the average concentrations measured by mobile mercury vapour analyzer transects taken repeatedly over several weeks were 1.26 and 0.338?gm(-3), respectively. By World Health Organization standards, these towns are exposed to significant health hazard, and globally, the millions of miners, as well as non-miners who live near gold shops, are at serious risk of neurological and renal deficits. Measurements taken in Suriname, Ecuador and Peru reveal this to be a widespread phenomenon with unique regional variations and myriad attempts at remediation. Maps of average mercury concentrations show the spatial distribution of the hazard in relation to residential buildings and schools. Measurements from towers show the temporal variability of mercury concentrations, and suggest that large quantities of mercury are available for long-range atmospheric transport. Mercury mapping in Segovia in 2011 suggest a 10% reduction in airborne mercury concentrations over 2010, despite a 30% increase in gold production. This is attributable to the adoption of retorts by miners and regulations banning new processing centres to the rural periphery. This is the first full description of artisanal mining gold shop practices and of the character, quantity, and remediation of mercury emissions within urban mining centres. PMID:23541941

Cordy, Paul; Veiga, Marcello; Crawford, Ben; Garcia, Oseas; Gonzalez, Victor; Moraga, Daniel; Roeser, Monika; Wip, Dennis

2013-08-01

131

Linking Geological and Health Sciences to Assess Childhood Lead Poisoning from Artisanal Gold Mining in Nigeria  

PubMed Central

Background: In 2010, Médecins Sans Frontières discovered a lead poisoning outbreak linked to artisanal gold processing in northwestern Nigeria. The outbreak has killed approximately 400 young children and affected thousands more. Objectives: Our aim was to undertake an interdisciplinary geological- and health-science assessment to clarify lead sources and exposure pathways, identify additional toxicants of concern and populations at risk, and examine potential for similar lead poisoning globally. Methods: We applied diverse analytical methods to ore samples, soil and sweep samples from villages and family compounds, and plant foodstuff samples. Results: Natural weathering of lead-rich gold ores before mining formed abundant, highly gastric-bioaccessible lead carbonates. The same fingerprint of lead minerals found in all sample types confirms that ore processing caused extreme contamination, with up to 185,000 ppm lead in soils/sweep samples and up to 145 ppm lead in plant foodstuffs. Incidental ingestion of soils via hand-to-mouth transmission and of dusts cleared from the respiratory tract is the dominant exposure pathway. Consumption of water and foodstuffs contaminated by the processing is likely lesser, but these are still significant exposure pathways. Although young children suffered the most immediate and severe consequences, results indicate that older children, adult workers, pregnant women, and breastfed infants are also at risk for lead poisoning. Mercury, arsenic, manganese, antimony, and crystalline silica exposures pose additional health threats. Conclusions: Results inform ongoing efforts in Nigeria to assess lead contamination and poisoning, treat victims, mitigate exposures, and remediate contamination. Ore deposit geology, pre-mining weathering, and burgeoning artisanal mining may combine to cause similar lead poisoning disasters elsewhere globally. PMID:23524139

Durant, James T.; Morman, Suzette A.; Neri, Antonio; Wolf, Ruth E.; Dooyema, Carrie A.; Hageman, Philip L.; Lowers, Heather A.; Fernette, Gregory L.; Meeker, Gregory P.; Benzel, William M.; Driscoll, Rhonda L.; Berry, Cyrus J.; Crock, James G.; Goldstein, Harland L.; Adams, Monique; Bartrem, Casey L.; Tirima, Simba; Behbod, Behrooz; von Lindern, Ian; Brown, Mary Jean

2013-01-01

132

Emissions and environmental implications of mercury from artisanal gold mining in North Sulawesi, Indonesia.  

PubMed

In artisanal gold mining practiced in North Sulawesi Island, Indonesia, gold is separated from ore by the use of mercury, which forms an amalgam with gold. All related processes are undertaken with a low level of technical knowledge and skills, no regulation, and with disregard for the safety of human and environment health. The situation is generating serious potential health and environmental risks in the area. As part of an ongoing monitoring program, total mercury concentrations were examined in water, bottom sediment and fish samples from three main rivers in Talawaan Watershed, which receives drainage from gold mining practices. Monitoring began in May-June 2000, almost 2 years after artisanal gold mining had begun. At that time, the mercury concentration in the sediment was generally low, except in places close to the gold processing plants. In the present study, a more systematic sampling and analysis was conducted in May-June 2001. Bottom surface sediments, water, and fish samples were collected at 12 sites along the three main rivers in the watershed. In addition, one site outside the watershed was sampled to serve as a control. Sample collections were conducted in three phases in duplicate, with two-week intervals between each phase. The mercury concentration observed in this study indicated that an increase took place along the three main rivers in the watershed. Solutions to this problem must be formulated as soon as possible in order to avoid a major health, economic, and ecological disaster arising from the continuing discharge of Hg. The present study proposes that mercury dispersion occur downstream of the mining. PMID:12526911

Limbong, Daniel; Kumampung, Jeims; Rimper, Joice; Arai, Takaomi; Miyazaki, Nobuyuki

2003-01-20

133

Marginal abatement cost curves in general equilibrium: The influence of world energy prices  

Microsoft Academic Search

Marginal abatement cost curves (MACCs) are a favorite instrument to analyze international emissions trading. This paper focuses on the question of how to define MACCs in a general equilibrium context where the global abatement level influences energy prices and in turn national MACCs. We discuss the mechanisms theoretically and then use the CGE model DART for quantitative simulations. The result

Gernot Klepper; Sonja Peterson

2006-01-01

134

Water pollution abatement by Chinese industry: cost estimates and policy implications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Factory-level data are used to estimate water pollution abatement costs for Chinese industry. Joint abatement cost functions are utilized which relate total costs to treatment volume and the simultaneous effect of reductions in suspended solids, chemical oxygen demand, biological oxygen demand and other pollutants. Tests of alternative functional forms suggest that a very simple (constant elasticity) model fits the data

Susmita Dasgupta; Mainul Huq; David Wheeler; Chonghua Zhang

2001-01-01

135

Health and environmental outcomes of traditional and modified practices for abatement of residential lead-based paint  

Microsoft Academic Search

We evaluated traditional and modified practices for abating lead-based paint in homes of children with blood-lead concentrations (PbB) greater than 1.4 mumol\\/L (greater than 29 micrograms\\/dl). Traditional abatement resulted in acute increases in: (1) lead contaminated house dust (generally 3 to 6-fold over pre-abatement levels, but at abated sites typically 10 to 100-fold); and (2) the PbBs of nearly half

M. R. Farfel; J. J. Jr. Chisolm

1990-01-01

136

RENCI Engagement Center for Coastal  

E-print Network

and decision-making for ecological restoration, shoreline erosion abatement and planning for sustainability, AND MANAGEMENT: ECOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF SEA LEVEL RISE IN NORTH CAROLINA PROJECT BRIEF Challenge Coastal managers, the NOAA-supported North Carolina Ecological Effects of Sea-Level Rise (NCEESLR) project measured processes

137

Cost of abating greenhouse gas emissions with cellulosic ethanol.  

PubMed

We develop an integrated framework to determine and compare greenhouse gas (GHG) intensities and production costs of cellulosic ethanol derived from corn stover, switchgrass, and miscanthus grown on high and low quality soils for three representative counties in the Eastern United States. This information is critical for assessing the cost-effectiveness of utilizing cellulosic ethanol for mitigating GHG emissions and designing appropriate policy incentives to support cellulosic ethanol production nationwide. We find considerable variations in the GHG intensities and production costs of ethanol across feedstocks and locations mostly due to differences in yields and soil characteristics. As compared to gasoline, the GHG savings from miscanthus-based ethanol ranged between 130% and 156% whereas that from switchgrass ranged between 97% and 135%. The corresponding range for GHG savings with corn stover was 57% to 95% and marginally below the threshold of at least 60% for biofuels classified as cellulosic biofuels under the Renewable Fuels Standard. Estimates of the costs of producing ethanol relative to gasoline imply an abatement cost of at least $48 Mg(-1) of GHG emissions (carbon dioxide equivalent) abated and can be used to infer the minimum carbon tax rate needed to induce consumption of cellulosic ethanol. PMID:25588032

Dwivedi, Puneet; Wang, Weiwei; Hudiburg, Tara; Jaiswal, Deepak; Parton, William; Long, Stephen; DeLucia, Evan; Khanna, Madhu

2015-02-17

138

Engaging students: encouraging success  

Microsoft Academic Search

New university students need to enjoy early academic success to engage fully with their learning community from the start of their first year. Yet in the first few weeks students are so overwhelmed with new experiences and demands that they can misread the learning environment and underestimate the relevance of early attendance and assessment to their final grades. Students unaccustomed

Helen Johnston; Syed Mahfuzul Aziz; C. Yalçõn Kaya; Diana Quinn

139

Tools of Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Alumni relations professionals need a method of measuring alumni engagement, including giving, that goes beyond counting event attendees and the number of Twitter followers. Social media are changing the way things have been done within the alumni relations profession, but that does not mean that people throw out everything they have done in the…

Allen, Elizabeth

2012-01-01

140

Collaborative Information User Engagement and  

E-print Network

Collaborative Information Behavior: User Engagement and Communication Sharing Jonathan Foster Cataloging-in-Publication Data Collaborative information behavior : user engagement and communication sharing coordinates and integrates current research and practices in the area of collaborative information behavior

Jansen, James

141

University Outreach & Engagement: Advancement Communication &  

E-print Network

University Outreach & Engagement: Advancement ­ Communication & Information Strategies Burton A of University Outreach & Engagement How We Are Organized ADVANCEMENT ­ COMMUNICATION AND INFORMATION STRATEGIES and events ­ Marketing and public relations ­ Evaluation #12;Advancement ­ Communication and Information

142

the Engaged Michigan State University  

E-print Network

and food safety ­ Urban and regional development ­ Environmental health ­ Public policy ­ TechnologyAdvocating & Modeling the Engaged University Michigan State University Cultural Engagement Council usability and accessibility Colleges & Academic Units Departments Schools Institutes Centers MSU

143

SMA Hybrid Composites for Dynamic Response Abatement Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A recently developed constitutive model and a finite element formulation for predicting the thermomechanical response of Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) hybrid composite (SMAHC) structures is briefly described. Attention is focused on constrained recovery behavior in this study, but the constitutive formulation is also capable of modeling restrained or free recovery. Numerical results are shown for glass/epoxy panel specimens with embedded Nitinol actuators subjected to thermal and acoustic loads. Control of thermal buckling, random response, sonic fatigue, and transmission loss are demonstrated and compared to conventional approaches including addition of conventional composite layers and a constrained layer damping treatment. Embedded SMA actuators are shown to be significantly more effective in dynamic response abatement applications than the conventional approaches and are attractive for combination with other passive and/or active approaches.

Turner, Travis L.

2000-01-01

144

Engaging Students in Mathematics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This series of brief videos (1-10 min. each) demonstrates how a three-part lesson in a classroom focused on accountable talk empowers and engages students to learn through collaborative problem solving in a technology-rich environment. While solving a problem involving rates and proportional reasoning students exemplify shared criteria for successful group work. The teacher explains her strategies for planning, grouping, and peer evaluation. Print resources (pdf) include a Viewer's Guide, organizers, and supporting monographs.

2013-01-01

145

Collaborative engagement experiment (CEE)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Unmanned ground and air systems operating in collaboration have the potential to provide future Joint Forces a significant capability for operations in complex terrain. Ground and air collaborative engagements potentially offer force conservation, perform timely acquisition and dissemination of essential combat information, and can eliminate high value and time critical targets. These engagements can also add considerably to force survivability by reducing soldier and equipment exposure during critical operations. The Office of the Secretary of Defense, Joint Robotics Program (JRP) sponsored Collaborative Engagement Experiment (CEE) is a consolidation of separate Air Force, Army and Navy collaborative efforts to provide a Joint capability. The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), Material and Manufacturing Directorate, Aerospace Expeditionary Force Division, Force Protection Branch (AFRLMLQF), The Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) Joint Technology Center (JTC)/Systems Integration Laboratory (SIL), and the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center-San Diego (SSC San Diego) are conducting technical research and proof of principle for an envisioned operational concept for extended range, three dimensional, collaborative operations between unmanned systems, with enhanced situational awareness for lethal operations in complex terrain. This program will assess information requirements and conduct experiments to identify and resolve technical risks for collaborative engagements using Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGVs) and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). It will research, develop and physically integrate multiple unmanned systems and conduct live collaborative experiments. Modeling and Simulation systems will be upgraded to reflect engineering fidelity levels to greater understand technical challenges to operate as a team. This paper will provide an update of a multi-year program and will concentrate primarily on the JTC/SIL efforts. Other papers will outline in detail the Air Force and Navy portions of this effort.

Wade, Robert L.; Reames, Joseph M.

2005-05-01

146

A Computational Study of Stimulus Driven Epileptic Seizure Abatement  

PubMed Central

Active brain stimulation to abate epileptic seizures has shown mixed success. In spike-wave (SW) seizures, where the seizure and background state were proposed to coexist, single-pulse stimulations have been suggested to be able to terminate the seizure prematurely. However, several factors can impact success in such a bistable setting. The factors contributing to this have not been fully investigated on a theoretical and mechanistic basis. Our aim is to elucidate mechanisms that influence the success of single-pulse stimulation in noise-induced SW seizures. In this work, we study a neural population model of SW seizures that allows the reconstruction of the basin of attraction of the background activity as a four dimensional geometric object. For the deterministic (noise-free) case, we show how the success of response to stimuli depends on the amplitude and phase of the SW cycle, in addition to the direction of the stimulus in state space. In the case of spontaneous noise-induced seizures, the basin becomes probabilistic introducing some degree of uncertainty to the stimulation outcome while maintaining qualitative features of the noise-free case. Additionally, due to the different time scales involved in SW generation, there is substantial variation between SW cycles, implying that there may not be a fixed set of optimal stimulation parameters for SW seizures. In contrast, the model suggests an adaptive approach to find optimal stimulation parameters patient-specifically, based on real-time estimation of the position in state space. We discuss how the modelling work can be exploited to rationally design a successful stimulation protocol for the abatement of SW seizures using real-time SW detection. PMID:25531883

Goodfellow, Marc; Dauwels, Justin; Moeller, Friederike; Stephani, Ulrich; Baier, Gerold

2014-01-01

147

Client Engagement in Drug Treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Client engagement in drug abuse treatment is associated with favorable treatment outcomes, but it is not completely understood why some clients are more likely to engage in treatment. This study examines a wide array of client characteristics and treatment experiences potentially associated with engagement. Findings from the Los Angeles Target Cities Project, funded by the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment,

Robert Fiorentine; John Nakashima; M. Douglas Anglin

1999-01-01

148

Microbiological characterization of artisanal Raschera PDO cheese: analysis of its indigenous lactic acid bacteria.  

PubMed

The aim of this research was to study the bacterial populations involved in the production of artisanal Raschera PDO cheese (Italian Maritime Alps, northwest Italy) in order to collect preliminary knowledge on indigenous lactic acid bacteria (LAB). A total of 21 samples of Raschera PDO cheese, collected from six dairy farms located in the production area, were submitted to microbiological analysis. LAB were randomly isolated from M17 agar, MRS agar and KAA plates and identified by combining PCR 16S-23S rRNA gene spacer analysis, species-specific primers and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Biodiversity of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis isolates was investigated by RAPD-PCR. LAB microflora showed the highest count values among all microbial groups targeted. They reached counts of 10(9) colony forming unit (cfu)/g in cheese samples after 3 days of salting and 15 days of ripening. Yeast population also showed considerable count values, while enterococci and coagulase-negative cocci (CNC) did not overcome 10(7)cfu/g. L. lactis subsp. lactis was the species most frequently isolated from Raschera PDO samples at all different production stages while in aged cheeses Lactobacillus paracasei was frequently isolated. RAPD-PCR highlighted that isolates of L. lactis subsp. lactis isolated from Raschera PDO were highly homogeneous. PMID:18206782

Dolci, Paola; Alessandria, Valentina; Zeppa, Giuseppe; Rantsiou, Kalliopi; Cocolin, Luca

2008-04-01

149

Microbiological aspects of the biofilm on wooden utensils used to make a Brazilian artisanal cheese  

PubMed Central

The artisanal Minas cheese is produced from raw cow’s milk and wooden utensils were employed in its manufacture, which were replaced by other materials at the request of local laws. This substitution caused changes in the traditional characteristics of cheese. Due to the absence of scientific studies indicating the microbial composition of biofilms formed on wooden forms, tables and shelves used in these cheese production, the present work evaluated the counts of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, coliforms at 32 °C, yeasts, presumptive mesophilic Lactobacillus spp. and Lactococcus spp. in these biofilms, milk, whey endogenous culture and ripened cheese in two traditional regions: Serro and Serra da Canastra. Also, we checked for the presence of Salmonella sp. and Listeria monocytogenes in the ripened cheeses. The ultra structure of the biofilms was also assessed. Counts above legislation (> 2 log cfu/mL) for the pathogens evaluated were found in milk samples from both regions. Only one shelf and one form from Serro were above limits proposed (5 cfu/cm2 for S. aureus and E. coli and 25 cfu/cm2 for coliforms) in this study for contaminants evaluated. In Canastra, few utensils presented safe counting of pathogens. There was no Salmonella sp. and Listeria monocytogenes in the cheeses after ripening. Thus, the quality of the cheese is related to improving the microbiological quality of milk, implementation and maintenance of good manufacturing practices, correct cleaning of wooden utensils, and not its replacement. PMID:25242963

Galinari, Éder; da Nóbrega, Juliana Escarião; de Andrade, Nélio José; de Luces Fortes Ferreira, Célia Lúcia

2014-01-01

150

A survey of the lactic acid bacteria isolated from Serbian artisanal dairy product kajmak.  

PubMed

Kajmak is an artisanal Serbian dairy product made by fermentation of milk fat. Overall, 374 bacterial isolates were collected from six kajmak samples of different ages produced in the households located in distinct regions of Serbia. In order to identify lactic acid bacteria present in chosen samples of kajmak, total 349 Gram-positive and catalase-negative isolates were analyzed. The recognition of isolates was performed by phenotypic characterization followed by molecular identification using (GTG)(5)-PCR and sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene. Leuconostoc mesenteroides and Enterococcus faecium were the most frequently isolated species from kajmak samples. In contrast, leuconostocs and enterococci were found in BGMK3 and BGMK1 kajmak respectively, only after using enrichment technique for isolation suggesting they are present in low numbers in these kajmaks. Lactococcus lactis, Lactococcus raffinolactis and Lactococcus garvieae were also found in those samples but in lower proportion. Results showed that Lactobacillus plantarum, Lb. paracasei and Lb. kefiri were the most frequently isolated Lactobacillus species in analyzed kajmaks. PMID:18775578

Jokovic, Natasa; Nikolic, Milica; Begovic, Jelena; Jovcic, Branko; Savic, Dragisa; Topisirovic, Ljubisa

2008-10-31

151

Microbiological aspects of the biofilm on wooden utensils used to make a Brazilian artisanal cheese.  

PubMed

The artisanal Minas cheese is produced from raw cow's milk and wooden utensils were employed in its manufacture, which were replaced by other materials at the request of local laws. This substitution caused changes in the traditional characteristics of cheese. Due to the absence of scientific studies indicating the microbial composition of biofilms formed on wooden forms, tables and shelves used in these cheese production, the present work evaluated the counts of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, coliforms at 32 °C, yeasts, presumptive mesophilic Lactobacillus spp. and Lactococcus spp. in these biofilms, milk, whey endogenous culture and ripened cheese in two traditional regions: Serro and Serra da Canastra. Also, we checked for the presence of Salmonella sp. and Listeria monocytogenes in the ripened cheeses. The ultra structure of the biofilms was also assessed. Counts above legislation (> 2 log cfu/mL) for the pathogens evaluated were found in milk samples from both regions. Only one shelf and one form from Serro were above limits proposed (5 cfu/cm(2) for S. aureus and E. coli and 25 cfu/cm(2) for coliforms) in this study for contaminants evaluated. In Canastra, few utensils presented safe counting of pathogens. There was no Salmonella sp. and Listeria monocytogenes in the cheeses after ripening. Thus, the quality of the cheese is related to improving the microbiological quality of milk, implementation and maintenance of good manufacturing practices, correct cleaning of wooden utensils, and not its replacement. PMID:25242963

Galinari, Éder; da Nóbrega, Juliana Escarião; de Andrade, Nélio José; de Luces Fortes Ferreira, Célia Lúcia

2014-01-01

152

Facility-Specific “House” Microbiome Drives Microbial Landscapes of Artisan Cheesemaking Plants  

PubMed Central

Cheese fermentations involve the growth of complex microbial consortia, which often originate in the processing environment and drive the development of regional product qualities. However, the microbial milieus of cheesemaking facilities are largely unexplored and the true nature of the fermentation-facility relationship remains nebulous. Thus, a high-throughput sequencing approach was employed to investigate the microbial ecosystems of two artisanal cheesemaking plants, with the goal of elucidating how the processing environment influences microbial community assemblages. Results demonstrate that fermentation-associated microbes dominated most surfaces, primarily Debaryomyces and Lactococcus, indicating that establishment of these organisms on processing surfaces may play an important role in microbial transfer, beneficially directing the course of sequential fermentations. Environmental organisms detected in processing environments dominated the surface microbiota of washed-rind cheeses maturing in both facilities, demonstrating the importance of the processing environment for populating cheese microbial communities, even in inoculated cheeses. Spatial diversification within both facilities reflects the functional adaptations of microbial communities inhabiting different surfaces and the existence of facility-specific “house” microbiota, which may play a role in shaping site-specific product characteristics. PMID:23793641

Bokulich, Nicholas A.

2013-01-01

153

30 CFR 75.401 - Abatement of dust; water or water with a wetting agent.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Combustible Materials and Rock Dusting § 75.401 Abatement of dust; water or water with a wetting agent. [Statutory Provision] Where...

2011-07-01

154

30 CFR 75.401 - Abatement of dust; water or water with a wetting agent.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Combustible Materials and Rock Dusting § 75.401 Abatement of dust; water or water with a wetting agent. [Statutory Provision] Where...

2012-07-01

155

30 CFR 75.401 - Abatement of dust; water or water with a wetting agent.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Combustible Materials and Rock Dusting § 75.401 Abatement of dust; water or water with a wetting agent. [Statutory Provision] Where...

2010-07-01

156

QUANTITATIVE EVALUATION OF AIR FILTRATION SYSTEMS IN USE AT ASBESTOS ABATEMENT SITES: RESEARCH IN PROGRESS  

EPA Science Inventory

High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filtration systems serve as the principal engineering control to remove asbestos particulate from airstreams at abatement projects. owever, little quantitative information is available on the integrity of these air filtration systems in prev...

157

CO2 Abatement in the UK Power Sector: Evidence from the EU ETS Trial Period  

E-print Network

This paper provides an empirical assessment of CO2 emissions abatement in the UK power sector during the trial period of the EU ETS. Using an econometrically estimated model of fuel switching, it separates the impacts of ...

Ellerman, A. Denny

2008-01-01

158

What Governmental Agencies Should Look for in a Mosquito Abatement Company  

E-print Network

Cities, counties and school districts often must contract for mosquito control services. This publication explains what Texas law requires of pest control companies and what a contract for mosquito abatement should contain....

Renchie, Don L.

2005-10-06

159

General Equilibrium, Electricity Generation Technologies and the Cost of Carbon Abatement  

E-print Network

Electricity generation is a major contributor to carbon dioxide emissions, and a key determinant of abatement costs. Ex-ante assessments of carbon policies mainly rely on either of two modeling paradigms: (i) partial ...

Lanz, Bruno, 1980-

160

Design of aircraft noise abatement approach procedures for near-term implementation  

E-print Network

Advanced aircraft noise abatement approach procedures -- characterized by decelerating, continuous descent approaches using idle thrust, and enabled by flight guidance technologies such as GPS and FMS -- have been shown ...

Ho, Nhut Tan, 1974-

2005-01-01

161

Artisan iris-fixated toric phakic intraocular lens for the correction of high astigmatism after deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty  

PubMed Central

Summary We report the refractive correction of high astigmatism in one eye of a 23-year-old woman following deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (DALK) using an Artisan iris-fixated, toric, phakic intraocular lens (IOL). One year after implantation, uncorrected and corrected distance visual acuities were both 20/25, refraction was ?1.00 D cylinder, and the endothelial cell count was 1827 cells/mm2. Iris-fixated phakic IOLs are not recommended for every postkeratoplasty patient with high refractive error; however, this procedure can offer good outcomes in carefully selected cases of previous DALK. PMID:24109249

Al-Dreihi, Madonna G.; Louka, Bachar I.; Anbari, Anas A.

2013-01-01

162

Characterization of the bacterial biodiversity in Pico cheese (an artisanal Azorean food).  

PubMed

This work presents the first study on the bacterial communities in Pico cheese, a traditional cheese of the Azores (Portugal), made from raw cow's milk. Pyrosequencing of tagged amplicons of the V3-V4 regions of the 16S rDNA and Operational Taxonomic Unit-based (OTU-based) analysis were applied to obtain an overall idea of the microbiota in Pico cheese and to elucidate possible differences between cheese-makers (A, B and C) and maturation times. Pyrosequencing revealed a high bacterial diversity in Pico cheese. Four phyla (Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes) and 54 genera were identified. The predominant genus was Lactococcus (77% of the sequences). Sequences belonging to major cheese-borne pathogens were not found. Staphylococcus accounted for 0.5% of the sequences. Significant differences in bacterial community composition were observed between cheese-maker B and the other two units that participated in the study. However, OTU analysis identified a set of taxa (Lactococcus, Streptococcus, Acinetobacter, Enterococcus, Lactobacillus, Staphylococcus, Rothia, Pantoea and unclassified genera belonging to the Enterobacteriaceae family) that would represent the core components of artisanal Pico cheese microbiota. A diverse bacterial community was present at early maturation, with an increase in the number of phylotypes up to 2weeks, followed by a decrease at the end of ripening. The most remarkable trend in abundance patterns throughout ripening was an increase in the number of sequences belonging to the Lactobacillus genus, with a concomitant decrease in Acinetobacter, and Stenotrophomonas. Microbial rank abundance curves showed that Pico cheese's bacterial communities are characterized by a few dominant taxa and many low-abundance, highly diverse taxa that integrate the so-called "rare biosphere". PMID:25440551

Riquelme, Cristina; Câmara, Sandra; Enes Dapkevicius, Maria de Lurdes N; Vinuesa, Pablo; da Silva, Célia Costa Gomes; Malcata, F Xavier; Rego, Oldemiro A

2015-01-01

163

Local Ecological Knowledge and Scientific Data Reveal Overexploitation by Multigear Artisanal Fisheries in the Southwestern Atlantic  

PubMed Central

In the last decades, a number of studies based on historical records revealed the diversity loss in the oceans and human-induced changes to marine ecosystems. These studies have improved our understanding of the human impacts in the oceans. They also drew attention to the shifting baseline syndrome and the importance of assessing appropriate sources of data in order to build the most reliable environmental baseline. Here we amassed information from artisanal fishermen's local ecological knowledge, fisheries landing data and underwater visual census to assess the decline of fish species in Southeastern Brazil. Interviews with 214 fishermen from line, beach seine and spearfishing revealed a sharp decline in abundance of the bluefish Pomatomus saltatrix, the groupers Epinephelus marginatus, Mycteroperca acutirostris, M. bonaci and M. microlepis, and large parrotfishes in the past six decades. Fisheries landing data from a 16-year period support the decline of bluefish as pointed by fishermen's local knowledge, while underwater visual census campaigns show reductions in groupers' abundance and a sharp population decline of the Brazilian endemic parrotfish Scarus trispinosus. Despite the marked decline of these fisheries, younger and less experienced fishermen recognized fewer species as overexploited and fishing sites as depleted than older and more experienced fishermen, indicating the occurrence of the shifting baseline syndrome. Here we show both the decline of multigear fisheries catches – combining anecdotal and scientific data – as well as changes in environmental perceptions over generations of fishermen. Managing ocean resources requires looking into the past, and into traditional knowledge, bringing historical baselines to the present and improving public awareness. PMID:25333661

Bender, Mariana G.; Machado, Gustavo R.; Silva, Paulo José de Azevedo; Floeter, Sergio R.; Monteiro-Netto, Cassiano; Luiz, Osmar J.; Ferreira, Carlos E. L.

2014-01-01

164

Optimized acid rain abatement strategies using ecological goals  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This article addresses the use of critical loads in optimized emission abatement strategies. Critical loads represent the maximum tolerable deposition possible without adverse impacts, a limit that is highly spatially variable. As deposition targets, critical loads cannot be satisfied at all receptors in Europe. Consequently, there is a need for alternative criteria that still relate to ecological indicators, yet that are feasible, consistent, and equitable. Two criteria are suggested: the relative critical load coverage and the relative deposition reduction. Deposition goals based on these criteria will guarantee that a specified fraction of ecosystems will attain target loads and thus will be protected from adverse environmental impacts. In areas that cannot achieve target loads with the best available control measures, deposition can be reduced to a specified fraction of the unabated level. Examples are presented that demonstrate their derivation and application of the two criteria. The criteria have been implemented in the European-scale Regional Acidification Information and Simulation (RAINS) model. Results obtained indicate that optimized emission strategies based on critical loads may be similar to emission strategies based on deposition reductions at certain levels of the two criteria. This suggests that it may not be necessary to utilize critical loads to formulate deposition targets. A second example shows the effect of excluding countries from European cost minimization. A country's participation can save costs with moderate deposition targets; however, significant costs can be imposed with low (stringent) deposition targets. These preliminary results have significant implications for multilateral negotiations.

Batterman, Stuart

1992-01-01

165

Engaging Digital Tibet  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Columbia Center for New Media Teaching and Learning presents this resource for the study of Tibet. Primarily a database of digital objects, Engaging Digital Tibet provides tools that should enable instructors to create valuable learning experiences. For each object, lengthy annotations are provided, often linked to various details of the item. A silk Hevajra Tapestry, ca. 13th century, can be displayed accompanied by 9 notes, contextualizing the piece, explaining that Hevajra is a semi-wrathful form of Buddha, discussing the symbolism of the tapestry, and that it was created for religious use. There is also a bibliographic note with citations for more information, both online and in print. Another example is a 20th century Medicine Buddha Wall Mural located inside the Amgon Monastery. The object comes complete with a formal analysis, pointing out that although the mural was created for religious purposes, it is indeed a work of art.

166

Adult Music Engagement: Perspectives from Three Musically Engaged Cases  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to explore the phenomenon of adult music engagement from the perspectives of musically engaged adults not currently participating in activities that are direct extensions of the typical K-12 music curriculum. Three participants were purposefully chosen and include an avid listener, a church praise team member, and a…

Thornton, Darrin H.

2010-01-01

167

Transfer Student Engagement: Blurring of Social and Academic Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Transfer students are a distinct population. Their characteristics lead to a qualitatively different student experience. Drawing on interviews with a cross-sectional sample of transfer students at George Mason University (GMU), this study focused on the ways transfer students perceived their social and academic engagement, on the ways they engaged

Lester, Jaime; Leonard, Jeannie Brown; Mathias, David

2013-01-01

168

‘By Merit Raised to That Bad Eminence’: Christopher Merrett, Artisanal Knowledge, and Professional Reform in Restoration London  

PubMed Central

This article examines the career and reform agenda of Christopher Merrett as a means of evaluating the changing conditions of medical knowledge production in late seventeenth-century London. This period was characterised by increasing competition between medical practitioners, resulting from the growing consumer demand for medical commodities and services, the reduced ability of elite physicians to control medical practice, and the appearance of alternative methods of producing medical knowledge – particularly experimental methods. This competition resulted in heated exchanges between physicians, apothecaries, and virtuosi, in which Merrett played an active part. As a prominent member of both the Royal Society and the Royal College of Physicians, Merrett sought to mediate between the two institutions by introducing professional reforms designed to alleviate competition and improve medical knowledge.These reforms entailed sweeping changes to medical regulation and education that integrated the traditional reliance on Galenic principles with knowledge derived from experiment and artisanal practices. The emphasis Merrett placed on the trades suggests the important role artisanal knowledge played in his efforts to reorganise medicine and improve knowledge of bodily processes. PMID:23752982

Mauck, Aaron

2012-01-01

169

Effects of river impoundment on ecosystem services of large tropical rivers: embodied energy and market value of artisanal fisheries.  

PubMed

Applying the ecosystem services concept to conservation initiatives or in managing ecosystem services requires understanding how environmental impacts affect the ecology of key species or functional groups providing the services. We examined effects of river impoundments, one of the leading threats to freshwater biodiversity, on an important ecosystem service provided by large tropical rivers (i.e., artisanal fisheries). The societal and economic importance of this ecosystem service in developing countries may provide leverage to advance conservation agendas where future impoundments are being considered. We assessed impoundment effects on the energetic costs of fisheries production (embodied energy) and commercial market value of the artisanal fishery of the Paraná River, Brazil, before and after formation of Itaipu Reservoir. High-value migratory species that dominated the fishery before the impoundment was built constituted a minor component of the contemporary fishery that is based heavily on reservoir-adapted introduced species. Cascading effects of river impoundment resulted in a mismatch between embodied energy and market value: energetic costs of fisheries production increased, whereas market value decreased. This was partially attributable to changes in species functional composition but also strongly linked to species identities that affected market value as a result of consumer preferences even when species were functionally similar. Similar trends are expected in other large tropical rivers following impoundment. In addition to identifying consequences of a common anthropogenic impact on an important ecosystem service, our assessment provides insight into the sustainability of fisheries production in tropical rivers and priorities for regional biodiversity conservation. PMID:19459891

Hoeinghaus, David J; Agostinho, Angelo A; Gomes, Luiz C; Pelicice, Fernando M; Okada, Edson K; Latini, João D; Kashiwaqui, Elaine A L; Winemiller, Kirk O

2009-10-01

170

Engaged Scholarship Summit Event Agenda  

E-print Network

Engaged Scholarship Summit Event Agenda March 20, 2013 WID Town:35-1:45 Reflections on Public Scholarship at UW Madison, UW Madison Chancellor, David Ward 1:45-1:55 Overview of the Morgridge Match Program and intent to support engaged scholarship

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

171

INSTITUTIONAL STRUCTURES AND STUDENT ENGAGEMENT  

Microsoft Academic Search

A common finding in the literature is that institutional structures have little to no impact on student engagement and development. I argue that theory suggests peer ability (as measured by selectivity), institutional density, the differentiation of the curriculum, and the research orientation of the institution should all affect student engagement. Using the nationally representative Beginning Post-secondary Student survey, a non-linear

Stephen R. Porter

2006-01-01

172

Who Engages with Moral Beauty?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aristotle considered moral beauty to be the "telos" of the human virtues. Displays of moral beauty have been shown to elicit the moral emotion of elevation and cause a desire to become a better person and to engage in prosocial behavior. Study 1 ("N" = 5380) shows engagement with moral beauty is related to several psychological…

Diessner, Rhett; Iyer, Ravi; Smith, Meghan M.; Haidt, Jonathan

2013-01-01

173

Instructional Discourse and Student Engagement.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper examines two kinds of student engagement: "procedural," which concerns classroom rules and regulations; and "substantive," which involves sustained commitment to the content and issues of academic study. It describes the manifestations of these two forms of engagement, explains how they relate differently to student outcomes, and offers…

Nystrand, Martin; Gamoran, Adam

174

Student Engagement and Study Abroad  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study the authors assessed student engagement during a short-term study-abroad program using the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE). Data were collected from a group of Canadian undergraduates spending six weeks in Mexico. Their program included a 10-day bus tour, three half-credit courses, and accommodations with local families.…

Rourke, Liam; Kanuka, Heather

2012-01-01

175

Student Engagement: Buzzword of Fuzzword?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Global interest in the value of student engagement in higher education has led researchers to question whether the use of the term is clear and consistent. This article investigates the construction of the term "student engagement" at three US universities through an analysis of qualitative data. Whereas a shared understanding of the…

Vuori, Johanna

2014-01-01

176

Student Engagement: Rhetoric and Reality  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recently, there has been much interest in higher education literature and policy on the concepts of student engagement and disengagement. While most academic writings recognise the significance of student engagement, they have tended to concentrate on it in relation to academic activities. Increasingly, universities are "cascading" down the need…

Baron, Paula; Corbin, Lillian

2012-01-01

177

STUDENT ENGAGEMENT & ENROLLMENT SERVICES (SEES)  

E-print Network

STUDENT ENGAGEMENT & ENROLLMENT SERVICES (SEES) Mission, Vision, Core Values, & Strategic Goals #12 to achieve success. Mission As a student-centered educational partner, Student Engagement & Enrollment Value: Exemplary Service We value exemplary service, believe serving others is a noble and worthy

178

Students Individual Engagement in GIS  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper develops two sets of concepts to theorize why students engage differently in Geographical Information Systems (GIS). These theoretical concepts are used as an analytical lens to explore empirical data on the experiences and engagement of students enrolled in an undergraduate GIS course in planning and management. The analysis shows that…

Madsen, Lene Møller; Christiansen, Frederik; Rump, Camilla

2014-01-01

179

Student engagement and student voices  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Through classroom observation, digital videos, and face-to face-interviews, this study investigated the phenomenon of student engagement within one inquiry-oriented secondary science classroom. The data suggests that students engage in very different ways and these individual approaches often do not match with the narrow vision of engagement held by classroom teachers and espoused in existing research literature. Classroom behaviors are frequently misread and misinterpreted when students are not given opportunities to explain what their behaviors mean. Furthermore, students cited an array of emotional, cognitive, and intangible factors that significantly impact their behavioral engagement on a daily basis. This study provides an in-depth analysis and description of student engagement across behavioral, emotional and cognitive dimensions that rely on both verbal and nonverbal aspects of student voices.

Trygstad, Peggy

180

The New School Collaborates: Organization and Communication in Immersive International Field Programs with Artisan Communities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Under the umbrella terms of "humanitarian design," "social design" and "social responsibility," educational institutions and specifically design programs are more and more searching for opportunities to engage their students in critical and hands-on learning via collaborations between students, faculty, communities in need and nonprofit…

Lawson, Cynthia

2010-01-01

181

Is H2S a suitable process indicator for odour abatement performance of sewer odours?  

PubMed

Odour abatement units are typically designed and maintained on H(2)S concentrations, but operational failures are reported in terms of overall odour removal, suggesting a wide range of malodorous compounds emitted from sewers that may not be efficiently removed by existing odour abatement processes. Towards providing greater insight into this issue, several activated carbon filters and biofilters treating odorous emissions from sewer systems in Sydney (Australia) were monitored by collecting and analysing gas samples before and after treatment. The monitoring studies were conducted by both olfactometric measurements and gas-chromatography-based chemical analysis. Single H(2)S assessment often failed to indicate the odour abatement performance for treatment systems in the abatement units studied, particularly when the incoming H(2)S concentrations were in the sub-ppm range (i.e. below H(2)S odour threshold). Chemical analysis indicated that some non-H(2)S odorous compounds were not removed efficiently during odour treatment. Additionally, when odour eliminations were correlated with the removal of individual compounds (Pearson's correlations) it was observed that the correlation (with a coefficient of 0.79) was best when the overall removal of all the measured odorous compounds that exceeded their odour threshold values was used for the analysis. These findings may help to further advance the design and operation of odour abatement processes to address the treatment of sewer odour emissions. PMID:24434973

Wang, B; Sivret, E C; Parcsi, G; Wang, X; Le, N M; Kenny, S; Bustamante, H; Stuetz, R M

2014-01-01

182

Cost-effective strategies for the abatement of ammonia emissions from European agriculture  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Anthropogenic emissions of ammonia, primarily from agriculture, have been recognised as a significant contributor to overall nitrogen deposition in Europe and are being incorporated within the development of a new international protocol on total nitrogen emissions aimed at protecting natural ecosystems from acidification and eutrophication. In response, the MARACCAS model has been developed to assess the cost-effectiveness of potential abatement measures, mainly relating to the management of livestock wastes, and to assist in the design of efficient abatement strategies. Results indicate that although maximum feasible reductions in emissions are fairly limited, most of the possible abatement can be achieved at relatively low cost. By analysis of the measures which consistently produce cost-effective emissions reductions, a set of guideline measures has been identified which could provide significant reductions at costs competitive with those for NO x abatement measures. Greater inherent uncertainties in the estimation of ammonia emissions and abatement potential as compared to NO x, and practical obstacles to ensuring compliance suggest that a more flexible 'soft' protocol may be more appropriate in tackling ammonia.

Cowell, D. A.; Apsimon, H. M.

183

Save water to save carbon and money: developing abatement costs for expanded greenhouse gas reduction portfolios.  

PubMed

The water-energy nexus is of growing interest for researchers and policy makers because the two critical resources are interdependent. Their provision and consumption contribute to climate change through the release of greenhouse gases (GHGs). This research considers the potential for conserving both energy and water resources by measuring the life-cycle economic efficiency of greenhouse gas reductions through the water loss control technologies of pressure management and leak management. These costs are compared to other GHG abatement technologies: lighting, building insulation, electricity generation, and passenger transportation. Each cost is calculated using a bottom-up approach where regional and temporal variations for three different California water utilities are applied to all alternatives. The costs and abatement potential for each technology are displayed on an environmental abatement cost curve. The results reveal that water loss control can reduce GHGs at lower cost than other technologies and well below California's expected carbon trading price floor. One utility with an energy-intensive water supply could abate 135,000 Mg of GHGs between 2014 and 2035 and save--rather than spend--more than $130/Mg using the water loss control strategies evaluated. Water loss control technologies therefore should be considered in GHG abatement portfolios for utilities and policy makers. PMID:25369123

Stokes, Jennifer R; Hendrickson, Thomas P; Horvath, Arpad

2014-12-01

184

Quantifying the environmental impacts of artisanal fishing gear on Kenya's coral reef ecosystems.  

PubMed

The environmental impacts of artisanal fishing gear on coral reef ecosystems were studied in the multi-gear fishery of southern Kenya to evaluate which types of gear have the greatest impact on coral reef biodiversity. The gear types studied were large and small traps, gill nets, beach seines, hand lines and spear guns. Levels of coral damage, proportion of juvenile fish and discards, size and maturity stage at first capture were quantified and compared amongst the gear types. Results indicate that fishers using beach seines, spears and gill nets cause the most direct physical damage to corals. Spear fishers showed the highest number of contacts to live corals per unit catch followed by fishers using gill nets (12.6+/-1.8 and 5.9+/-2.0 coral contacts per kg fish caught per trip respectively). Apart from discarding 6.5% of their daily catch in the sea, as it was too small, beach seine fishers also landed the highest percentage of juvenile fish (68.4+/-15.7%), a proportion significantly higher (p<0.001) than in any other gear. The size and maturity stage at first capture for 150 of 195 species caught by all gear types was well below the lengths at which they mature. For example, 100% of Lethrinus xanthochilus, 99% of Lethrinus nebulosus and 94% of Lethrinus harak caught were juveniles. Across all gear types, 50.1+/-22.7% of the catch consisted of juvenile fish, indicating serious growth overfishing. Field assessment of levels of coral density showed that fishing grounds where beach seines were still in use had a significantly lower density than where beach seining was not used. This correlation is likely to arise in part because seines cannot be used in the most coral rich areas, and in part because coral loss is a consequence of seine use. On a per gear basis therefore, beach seines had the most impact on coral reef biodiversity. This study emphasizes the need to enforce restrictions on destructive gear and mesh sizes. PMID:16904703

Mangi, S C; Roberts, C M

2006-12-01

185

Comparison of two head-up displays in simulated standard and noise abatement night visual approaches  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Situation and command head-up displays were evaluated for both standard and two segment noise abatement night visual approaches in a fixed base simulation of a DC-8 transport aircraft. The situation display provided glide slope and pitch attitude information. The command display provided glide slope information and flight path commands to capture a 3 deg glide slope. Landing approaches were flown in both zero wind and wind shear conditions. For both standard and noise abatement approaches, the situation display provided greater glidepath accuracy in the initial phase of the landing approaches, whereas the command display was more effective in the final approach phase. Glidepath accuracy was greater for the standard approaches than for the noise abatement approaches in all phases of the landing approach. Most of the pilots preferred the command display and the standard approach. Substantial agreement was found between each pilot's judgment of his performance and his actual performance.

Cronn, F.; Palmer, E. A., III

1975-01-01

186

What is the best distribution for pollution abatement efforts? Information for optimizing the WFD Programs of measures.  

E-print Network

to encourage E.U. Member States to reach desirable environmental water pollution levels by conciliating number of effort "levels". Keywords: Abatement effort discrimination, Pollution control cost, Water1 What is the best distribution for pollution abatement efforts? Information for optimizing the WFD

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

187

Tannin extracts abate ammonia emissions from simulated dairy barn floors.  

PubMed

Feeding more tannin and less crude protein (CP) to dairy cows may have synergistic impacts on reducing NH emissions from dairy barns. Three trials using lab-scale ventilated chambers with concrete floors were conducted to determine the impacts on NH emission of tannin and CP feeding, tannin feeding on urease activity in feces, and tannin application directly to the barn floor. For Trial 1, mixtures of feces and urine from lactating Holstein dairy cows () fed four levels (g kg) of dietary tannin extract [a mixture from red quebracho () and chestnut () trees]: 0 tannin (0T), 4.5 (low tannin [LT]), 9.0 (medium tannin [MT]), and 18.0 (high tannin [HT]); each fed at two levels (g kg) of dietary CP: 155 low CP (LCP) and 168 high CP (HCP) were applied to chambers. For Trial 2, urea solution was added to feces obtained from cows fed 0T, MT, and HT at HCP. For Trial 3, tannin amounts equivalent to those fed at 0T, MT, and HT were applied directly to feces-urine mixtures from 0T-HCP. For all trials, NH emissions were measured 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, 36, and 48 h after treatment application. For Trial 1, reductions in NH emission due to tannin feeding were greatest when fed at LCP: The LCP-LT and LCP-HT treatments emitted 30.6% less NH than LCP-0T, and the HCP-LT and HCP-HT treatments emitted 16.3% less NH than HCP-0T. For Trial 2, feeding tannin decreased urease activity in feces, resulting in an 11.5% reduction in cumulative NH loss. For Trial 3, the application of tannin directly to simulated barn floors also apparently decreased urease activity, resulting in an average reduction in cumulative NH emissions of 19.0%. Larger-scale trails are required to ascertain the effectiveness of tannin extracts in abating NH loss from dairy barn floors. PMID:21546676

Powell, J M; Aguerre, M J; Wattiaux, M A

2011-01-01

188

Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBL) is working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) to determine the role of distributed generation (DG) in greenhouse gas reductions. The impact of DG on large industrial sites is well known, and mostly, the potentials are already harvested. In contrast, little is known about the impact of DG on commercial buildings with peak electric loads ranging from 100 kW to 5 MW. We examine how DG with combined heat and power (CHP) may be implemented within the context of a cost minimizing microgrid that is able to adopt and operate various smart energy technologies, such as thermal and photovoltaic (PV) on-site generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and storage systems. We use a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that has the minimization of a site's annual energy costs as objective. Using 138 representative commercial sites in California (CA) with existing tariff rates and technology data, we find the greenhouse gas reduction potential for California's commercial sector. This paper shows results from the ongoing research project and finished work from a two year U.S. Department of Energy research project. To show the impact of the different technologies on CO2 emissions, several sensitivity runs for different climate zones within CA with different technology performance expectations for 2020 were performed. The considered sites can contribute between 1 Mt/a and 1.8 Mt/a to the California Air Resources Board (CARB) goal of 6.7Mt/a CO2 abatement potential in 2020. Also, with lower PV and storage costs as well as consideration of a CO2 pricing scheme, our results indicate that PV and electric storage adoption can compete rather than supplement each other when the tariff structure and costs of electricity supply have been taken into consideration. To satisfy the site's objective of minimizing energy costs, the batteries will be charged also by CHP systems during off-peak and mid-peak hours and not only by PV during sunny on-peak hours.

Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Cardoso, Goncalo; Megel, Olivier; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy

2009-08-15

189

Employee Engagement: Manipulation or Voice?  

E-print Network

as the opposite of burnout, exhaustion and cynicism. (Shaufeli - Utrecht) #12;Attitudinal Work Engagement: An Assessment · Grew out of research on burnout. Originally seen as opposite end of a continuum (Maslach

Viglas, Anastasios

190

National Center for Media Engagement  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Funded by the Center for Public Broadcasting, the National Center for Media Engagement is dedicated to supporting "public media organizations nationwide in engaging their communities." They provide resources for stations and producers to engage citizens in a range of platforms, and their website is a great place to learn about their work. On the homepage, visitors will find seven sections, including "Think & Strategize", "Plan & Design", "Execute", "Renew & Upgrade" and "Communicate Impact". Public media organizations will be able to use these sections to use social media to communicate their mission to the public. Further down on the homepage, visitors can also learn about "Public Media Stories of Impact". These stories are taken from a range of public media organizations, such as pieces from Austin on the arts community and Columbus, Ohio's work on community engagement. It's also worth taking a look at their blog, which contains direct links to other resources created by public radio and television stations from around the United States.

191

Client engagement in drug treatment.  

PubMed

Client engagement in drug abuse treatment is associated with favorable treatment outcomes, but it is not completely understood why some clients are more likely to engage in treatment. This study examines a wide array of client characteristics and treatment experiences potentially associated with engagement. Findings from the Los Angeles Target Cities Project, funded by the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, indicate that the predictors of treatment engagement are generally confined to current treatment experiences. For both women and men, the perceived utility of treatment, ancillary services, and the client-counselor relationship are the strongest predictors of client engagement in treatment. Client characteristics are generally not strong predictors of treatment engagement. Concerning the client-counselor relationship, the findings suggest that women may respond more favorably to an empathic counseling style, whereas men may respond to a more utilitarian style. The findings contradict popular stereotypes about the treatment-"receptive" client, identify possible directions for treatment improvement, and highlight the need for more research examining the treatment experience of the client. Other research, clinical, and policy implications are discussed. PMID:10531626

Fiorentine, R; Nakashima, J; Anglin, M D

1999-10-01

192

Tobacco litter costs and public policy: a framework and methodology for considering the use of fees to offset abatement costs  

PubMed Central

Objectives Growing concern over the costs, environmental impact and safety of tobacco product litter (TPL) has prompted states and cities to undertake a variety of policy initiatives, of which litter abatement fees are part. The present work describes a framework and methodology for calculating TPL costs and abatement fees. Methods Abatement is associated with four categories of costs: (1) mechanical and manual abatement from streets, sidewalks and public places, (2) mechanical and manual abatement from storm water and sewer treatment systems, (3) the costs associated with harm to the ecosystem and harm to industries dependent on clean and healthy ecosystems, and (4) the costs associated with direct harm to human health. The experiences of the City of San Francisco's recently proposed tobacco litter abatement fee serve as a case study. Results City and municipal TPL costs are incurred through manual and mechanical clean-up of surfaces and catchment areas. According to some studies, public litter abatement costs to US cities range from US$3 million to US$16 million. TPL typically comprises between 22% and 36% of all visible litter, implying that total public TPL direct abatement costs range from about US$0.5 million to US$6 million for a city the size of San Francisco. The costs of mitigating the negative externalities of TPL in a city the size of San Francisco can be offset by implementing a fee of approximately US$0.20 per pack. Conclusions Tobacco litter abatement costs to cities can be substantial, even when the costs of potential environmental pollution and tourism effects are excluded. One public policy option to address tobacco litter is levying of fees on cigarettes sold. The methodology described here for calculating TPL costs and abatement fees may be useful to state and local authorities who are considering adoption of this policy initiative. PMID:21504923

Peterson, N Andrew; Kiss, Noemi; Ebeid, Omar; Doyle, Alexis S

2011-01-01

193

Mercury Exposure and Health Impacts among Individuals in the Artisanal and Small-Scale Gold Mining Community: A Comprehensive Review  

PubMed Central

Background: Mercury (Hg) is used in gold mining to extract gold from ore by forming “amalgam”—a mixture composed of approximately equal parts mercury and gold. Approximately 15 million people, including approximately 3 million women and children, participate in artisanal small-scale gold mining (ASGM) in developing countries. Thirty-seven percent of global air emissions of Hg are produced by ASGM. The recently adopted Minamata Convention calls for nations to gather health data, train health-care workers, and raise awareness in regard to ASGM activity. Objective: The purpose of our review was to evaluate the current literature regarding the health effects of Hg among those working and/or living in or near ASGM communities. Methods: We searched PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Google Scholar for studies relating to health effects and biomarkers of Hg exposure in ASGM communities. Articles published from 1990 through December 2012 were evaluated for relevance. Discussion: Studies reporting health assessments, kidney dysfunction, neurological disorders and symptoms, and immunotoxicity/autoimmune dysfunction in individuals living in or near an ASGM community were identified. More than 60 studies that measured biomarkers of Hg exposure in individuals living in or near ASGM communities were also identified. These studies, conducted in 19 different countries in South America, Asia, and Africa, demonstrated that hair and urine concentrations are well above World Health Organization health guidance values in ASGM communities. Conclusions: ASGM workers and their families are exposed to Hg vapor, and workers, workers’ families, and residents of nearby and downstream communities are consuming fish heavily contaminated with methylmercury. Citation: Gibb H, O’Leary KG. 2014. Mercury exposure and health impacts among individuals in the artisanal and small-scale gold mining community: a comprehensive review. Environ Health Perspect 122:667–672;?http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307864 PMID:24682486

O’Leary, Keri Grace

2014-01-01

194

Environmental assessment of mercury contamination from the Rwamagasa artisanal gold mining centre, Geita District, Tanzania.  

PubMed

This study presents the results of an environmental assessment of mercury (Hg) contamination in the Rwamagasa artisanal gold mining area, northwest Tanzania, and the potential downstream dispersion along the River Malagarasi to Lake Tanganyika. At the time of sampling, generally low concentrations of Hg (<0.05 mg/kg) occurred in most cultivated soils although higher Hg (0.05-9.2 mg/kg) was recorded in urban soils and vegetable plot soils where these are impacted by Hg-contaminated water and sediment derived from mineral processing activities. Hg in vegetable and grain samples is mostly below the detection limit of 0.004 mg/kg Hg, apart from 0.007 and 0.092 mg/kg Hg in two yam samples and 0.011 to 0.013 mg/kg Hg in three rice samples. The standardized (i.e., standardized to 10 cm length) Hg concentrations in Clarias spp. increase from about 0.01 mg Hg/kg for the River Malagarasi delta to 0.07, 0.2, and 1.6 mg/kg, respectively, for the Rwamagasa 'background', moderately and most contaminated sites. For piscivorous (Lates, Brycinus, and Hydrocynus spp.), insectivorous (Barbus spp.), and planktivorous (Haplochromis spp.) fish species, the 10-cm standardized Hg concentrations increase from about 0.006 mg/kg for the River Malagarasi-Lake Tanganyika area to 0.5 and 3.5 mg/kg, respectively, for the Rwamagasa moderately and most contaminated sites. The low concentrations of Hg in fish from the Malagarasi River delta and Lake Tanganyika indicate that Hg contamination from the Rwamagasa area does not have a readily discernible impact on the biota of Lake Tanganyika. Many of the fish samples from Rwamagasa exceed guidelines for human consumption (0.5 mg/kg) as well as the WHO recommended limit for vulnerable groups (0.2 mg/kg). Tissue total Hg (THg) of all fish collected from the River Malagarasi-Lake Tanganyika subarea is well below these guidelines. Potential human exposure through consumption of 300 g/day of rice grown on Hg-contaminated soils is 5.5 microg/week. Consumption of 250 g Nile perch (Lates spp.), 500 g tilapia (Oreochromis spp.), and 250 g of catfish (Clarias spp.) each week would result in an intake of 65 microg Hg/week for people consuming only fish from the Mara and Mwanza regions of Lake Victoria and 116 microg Hg/week for people in the Rwamagasa area consuming tilapia and Nile perch from Lake Victoria and catfish from mining-impacted streams. This is lower than the Provisional Tolerable Weekly Intake (PTWI) of 300 microg for Hg in the diet set by the WHO and the FAO. Inadvertent ingestion of soil containing 9 mg Hg/kg at a rate of 80 mg/day would give an additional estimated weekly intake of 5 microg THg, whereas the persistent and purposeful consumption of soil (geophagia) at a rate of 26 g soil/day would produce an additional chemical exposure of 230 microg Hg/day. PMID:15862840

Taylor, H; Appleton, J D; Lister, R; Smith, B; Chitamweba, D; Mkumbo, O; Machiwa, J F; Tesha, A L; Beinhoff, C

2005-05-01

195

Control Systems Design, SC4026 SC4026 Fall 2009, dr. A. Abate, DCSC, TU Delft  

E-print Network

and the steam engine. The centrifugal governor on the left consists of a set of flyballs that spread apart as the speed of the engine increases. The steam engine on the right uses a centrifugal governor (above engineering: a few examples SC4026 Fall 2009, dr. A. Abate, DCSC, TU Delft 1 #12;The concept of feedback

Abate, Alessandro

196

WET/DRY COOLING SYSTEMS FOR FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS: WATER CONSERVATION AND PLUME ABATEMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

The report gives results of a study of technical and economic feasibilities of wet/dry cooling towers for water conservation and vapor plume abatement. Results of cost optimizations of wet/dry cooling for 1000-MWe fossil-fueled power plants are presented. Five sites in the wester...

197

Predator evasion in Daphnia : the adaptive value of aggregation associated with attack abatement  

Microsoft Academic Search

To evaluate the adaptive value of daphnian aggregation associated with attack abatement, a combined laboratory and field experiment was performed. As the lake investigated does not contain planktivorous fish, only invertebrate predation is important. In the laboratory, newly collected Chaoborus flavicans, among the most important predators to exploit the Daphnia population in the lake, were individually placed in a spherical

K. H. Jensen; P. Larsson

2002-01-01

198

ECOLOGICAL RESPONSES TO POLLUTION ABATEMENT: A FRAMEWORK FOR MEASUREMENT AND ASSESSMENT FOR COASTAL ECOSYSTEMS  

EPA Science Inventory

Ecological Responses to Pollution Abatement: A Framework for Measurement and Assessment for Coastal Ecosystems (Abstract). To be presented at the 16th Biennial Conference of the Estuarine Research Foundation, ERF 2001: An Estuarine Odyssey, 4-8 November 2001, St. Pete Beach, FL. ...

199

LEAD-BASED PAINT ABATEMENT RESEARCH PROGRAM (INDUSTRIAL MULTIMEDIA BRANCH, SUSTAINABLE TECHNOLOGY DIVISION, NRMRL)  

EPA Science Inventory

NRMRL's Industrial Multimedia Branch's lead-based paint abatement research program is nearly completed and encompasses many research efforts to find less costly and more effective ways to remove lead paint from interior and exterior painted surfaces. The first of three projects ...

200

PROCEEDINGS: SYMPOSIUM ON IRON AND STEEL POLLUTION ABATEMENT TECHNOLOGY FOR 1984  

EPA Science Inventory

The proceedings document presentations at the Symposium on Iron and Steel Pollution Abatement Technology for 1984, the sixth in a series, held in Cleveland on October 16-l8, 1984. t provided a forum for the exchange of information on technological problems related to multimedia p...

201

30 CFR 75.401 - Abatement of dust; water or water with a wetting agent.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

Where underground mining operations in active workings create or raise excessive amounts of dust, water or water with a wetting agent added to it, or other no less effective methods approved by the Secretary or his authorized representative, shall be used to abate such...

2013-07-01

202

30 CFR 75.401 - Abatement of dust; water or water with a wetting agent.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

Where underground mining operations in active workings create or raise excessive amounts of dust, water or water with a wetting agent added to it, or other no less effective methods approved by the Secretary or his authorized representative, shall be used to abate such...

2014-07-01

203

Biological inhibitor abatement and ethanol fermentation of sugars from dilute acid-pretreated rice hulls  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Fermentation inhibitors arise from lignin, hemicellulose, and degraded sugar during pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass. Use of a microbe has been explored for abatement of pretreated biomass in which fermentation inhibitors, if left untreated, can complicate microbial conversion of biomass to f...

204

ACHIEVING A TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY CLEARANCE CRITERION AT ASBESTOS ABATEMENT SITES IN NEW JERSEY  

EPA Science Inventory

Representatives of the New Jersey Department of Health's Asbestos Control Service conducted final clearance evaluations at 79 schools where asbestos removal took place during the Summer of 1987. The evaluations entailed a thorough visual inspection of each abatement area by an ex...

205

Should marginal abatement costs differ across sectors? The effect of low-carbon capital accumulation  

E-print Network

the information contained in the carbon price signal, but also knowledge of the date when the sector reaches itsShould marginal abatement costs differ across sectors? The effect of low-carbon capital D.C., USA Abstract Climate mitigation is largely done through investments in low-carbon capital

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

206

SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY/X-RAY FLUORESCENCE CHARACTERIZATION OF POST-ABATEMENT DUST  

EPA Science Inventory

Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and laboratory X-ray fluorescence (XRF) were used to characterize post-abatement dust collected with a HEPA filtered vacuum. hree size fractions of resuspended dust (0-30 pm, 2.5-15 pm, and ...

207

Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Applied Research: Luciano L'Abate  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Luciano L'Abate, recipient of the Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Applied Research, contributed to applied research through the introduction of the laboratory method in clinical psychology assessment and intervention, leading to the development of the first automated playroom, linking play therapy with research in child…

American Psychologist, 2009

2009-01-01

208

The strategies of abating emission of CO 2 and nuclear energy development in China  

Microsoft Academic Search

In China, annual coal consumption accounts for the first place all over the world in order to meet the high speed development of economy and improvement of the people's living quality. CO2 emission from coal fire is a main contributor to the climate change. We must abate CO2 emission besides developing economy for mitigating the global climate change. In the

Fang Dong; Li Hong

1998-01-01

209

Engaged Scholarship and Promotion and Tenure  

E-print Network

Engaged Scholarship and Promotion and Tenure at Michigan State University Diane M. Doberneck, Ph faculty and engaged scholarship · Professional development for community engagement for undergrads, grad students, and faculty Studying the processes, relationships, and impacts of engaged scholarship on faculty

210

Game Engagement Theory and Adult Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One of the benefits of computer game-based learning is the ability of certain types of game to engage and motivate learners. However, theories of learning and engagement, particularly in the sphere of higher education, typically fail to consider gaming engagement theory. In this article, the author examines the principles of engagement from games…

Whitton, Nicola

2011-01-01

211

Standard atmospheres for engagement modeling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The use of model atmospheres for Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) engagement modeling is reviewed. BMD engagement models simulate a ballistic missile attack from launch to interception. Model atmospheres are descriptions of atmospheric density and temperature as functions of altitude. However, BMD applications are not consistent in the choice of model atmosphere within a system application and, in fact, may employ more than one model atmosphere within an engagement model. The most widely used model atmospheres are the US-62 and US-76 models. These two differ significantly in the variable of solar activity. Thus, if engagement models run using both the US-62 and US-76 model atmospheres give the same result, the effect of the model atmosphere can probably be ruled out. It is recommended that to measure the effects of atmospheric variability on a particular BMD application, engagement models be run using both the US-62 and US-76 model atmospheres. If the results differ, more detailed examination of the physics of the atmosphere for the problem under consideration may be called for.

Bauer, Ernest

1993-06-01

212

Effects of dietary ABATE? on reproductive success, duckling survival, behavior, and clinical pathology in game-farm mallards  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Forty-four pairs of game-farm mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) were fed ABATE? E (temephos) to yield 0, 1, or 10 ppm ABATE? beginning before the initiation of lay, and terminating when ducklings were 21 days of age. The mean interval between eggs laid was greater for hens fed 10 ppm ABATE? than for controls. Clutch size, fertility, hatchability, nest attentiveness of incubating hens, and avoidance behavior of ducklings were not significantly affected by ABATE? ingestion. The percentage survival of ducklings to 21 days of age was significantly lower in both treated groups than in controls, but brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was not inhibited in young which died before termination of the study. In 21-day-old ducklings, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activity increased and plasma nonspecific cholinesterase (ChE) activity was inhibited by about 20% in both treatment groups, but there were no significant differences in brain AChE or plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activities, or plasma uric acid concentration. Clinical chemistry values of adults were not affected. No ABATE?, ABATE? sulfoxide, or ABATE? sulfone residues were found in eggs or tissue samples.

Franson, J.C.; Spann, J.W.; Heinz, G.H.; Bunck, C.M.; Lamont, T.

1983-01-01

213

Gillnet Mesh Selectivity for the Shovelnose Guitarfish ( Rhinobatos productus ) from Fishery-Dependent Data in the Artisanal Ray Fishery of the Gulf of California, Mexico  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Gulf of California supports the largest ray fishery in Mexico. Sonora is a major ray-fishing state, reporting 56% (live weight) of the Pacific Ocean rays production. Bottom-set gillnets are the principal fishing gear deployed in this artisanal fishery. In the absence of long-term monitoring and complex biological data for fishery stock assessment, an understanding of the selectivity properties of

J. Fernando Márquez-Farias

2005-01-01

214

Engagement Peer Educator: Volunteer Profile Position: Engagement Peer Educator  

E-print Network

. They work as a team to develop promotional strategies for student involvement beyond the classroom opportunities Personal Goal: Three 30-minute meetings on personal goal with Peer Coach. Evaluation: 30-minute the duties of your role as a Engagement Peer Educator, including effective communication, resource

215

Abatement costs of soil conservation in China's Loess Plateau: balancing income with conservation in an agricultural system.  

PubMed

This study proposes the use of marginal abatement cost curves to calculate environmental damages of agricultural systems in China's Loess Plateau. Total system costs and revenues, management characteristics and pollution attributes are imputed into a directional output distance function, which is then used to determine shadow prices and abatement cost curves for soil and nitrogen loss. Marginal abatement costs curves are an effective way to compare economic and conservation tradeoffs when field-specific data are scarce. The results show that sustainable agricultural practices can balance soil conservation and agricultural production; land need not be retired, as is current policy. PMID:25463565

Hou, Lingling; Hoag, Dana L K; Keske, Catherine M H

2015-02-01

216

Civic engagement and nursing education.  

PubMed

Significant declines in indicators of civic behavior identify Americans' decreased connectedness to each other, their communities, and participation in the process of government and solving problems together. Universities across the United States are working to revitalize college students' involvement in the processes of democracy. This move to increase students' engagement in their communities and nation has implications for nursing education and the profession. Nurse educators are advised to use experiential learning to teach skills of civic engagement, political advocacy, and policymaking and to be role models and mentors to foster the growth of nurse citizens in the profession. PMID:20531269

Gehrke, Pamela M

2008-01-01

217

Understanding Visitor Engagement and Behaviors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors examine a model of visitor engagement that has been in development over the past 3 years at the Smithsonian Institution. A total of 390 visitors comprised the sample with a subsample ("n" = 102) of visitors who were tracked through an exhibit in the National Museum of Natural History. A 5-factor visitor preference model was…

Schreiber, James B.; Pekarik, Andrew J.; Hanemann, Nadine; Doering, Zahava; Lee, Ah-Jin

2013-01-01

218

Engage, Enhance, and Extend Learning!  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Educators often say that technology is more than a gimmick or add-on, and that it should engage, enhance, or extend learning in ways that traditional tools do not. Yet they seldom stop to define these terms, and they can be confusing, especially for teachers and preservice teachers. Recently, while collaborating on an English language arts and…

Keren-Kolb, Liz

2013-01-01

219

Civic Engagement and Environmental Literacy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examining the intersection of civic engagement and environmental literacy is particularly timely because 2012 marked a critical juncture in history: the United Nations Literacy Decade ended, and a 20-year appraisal of the United Nation's Earth Summit commenced. The Literacy Decade, launched in 2003 under the slogan "Literacy as Freedom," situated…

Hill, Robert J.

2012-01-01

220

Discover Engage Measuring Rail Transit's  

E-print Network

Discover · Engage · Transform Measuring Rail Transit's Sustainability Goals: A Before-A:er, Experimental-Control EvaluaBon of Los Angeles' Expo Light Rail Line Angeles' rail transforma@on · Six new lines opening between 2012 and 2020 · Expo

California at Davis, University of

221

Engaging Students with Audio Feedback  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students express widespread dissatisfaction with academic feedback. Teaching staff perceive a frequent lack of student engagement with written feedback, much of which goes uncollected or unread. Published evidence shows that audio feedback is highly acceptable to students but is underused. This paper explores methods to produce and deliver audio…

Cann, Alan

2014-01-01

222

Community Engagement: Lost in Translation  

E-print Network

Community Engagement: Lost in Translation #12;Translational Role · Life scientist, biotechnology · Research information, health informatics and translational science · Play several roles to support our Translational Science efforts #12;How I Became Involved · Research partner for community grant proposal

Napp, Nils

223

Behaviour of Sotalia guianensis (van Bénéden, 1864) (Cetacea, Delphinidae) and ethnoecological knowledge of artisanal fishermen from Canavieiras, Bahia, Brazil  

PubMed Central

Artisanal fishermen, because of their direct and frequent contact with the aquatic environment, possess a wealth of knowledge about the natural history of the fauna of the region in which they live. This knowledge, both practical and theoretical, has been frequently utilized and integrated into academic research. Taking this into consideration, this study discusses the ethnoecological knowledge of artisanal fishermen from a community in Canavieiras, state of Bahia, Brazil regarding the Guiana dolphin (Sotalia guianensis), a typically costal member of the family Delphinidae that is little studied in this region. To this end, the behaviour of S. guianensis in Canavieiras was recorded over one year and the data obtained were compared with fishermen’s reports. A total of 609 hours of behavioural observations of S. guianensis was conducted from a fixed point in alternate morning and afternoon sessions between October 2009 and September 2010. Observations were conducted from a pier (15°40’59”S and 38°56’38”W) situated on the banks of the Pardo River estuary - the region’s main river - at 5.5?m above water level. For ethnoecological data collection, semi-structured interviews were carried out with 26 fishermen in May, June and September 2010 and January 2011 in the fishing community of Atalaia. Occasional boat expeditions were made with the fishermen to compare their reports with direct observations of the behaviour of S. guianensis. The results demonstrate that fishermen possess a body of knowledge about S. guianensis that describes in detail the main behavioural aspects of the species. They reported the presence of S. guianensis in the Pardo River estuary throughout the year and its gregarious behaviour. They cited a relationship between the movement of dolphins and tidal cycles, and their presence in the estuary associated with the search for food. In addition, the fishermen reported that numbers of infants in groups were proportional to group size. Behaviours described were compatible with the observations made in situ and with data found in the scientific literature, confirming the importance of traditional knowledge in complementing scientific data. One behaviour mentioned by the fishermen that had no equivalence in the scientific literature was confirmed in situ and, therefore, constitutes the first record for this species. PMID:22584063

2012-01-01

224

Public Engagement on Climate Change  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Climate change communication is complicated by complexity of the scientific problem, multiple perspectives on the magnitude of the risk from climate change, often acrimonious disputes between scientists, high stakes policy options, and overall politicization of the issue. Efforts to increase science literacy as a route towards persuasion around the need for a policy like cap and trade have failed, because the difficulty that a scientist has in attempting to make sense of the social and political complexity is very similar to the complexity facing the general public as they try to make sense of climate science itself. In this talk I argue for a shift from scientists and their institutions as information disseminators to that of public engagement and enablers of public participation. The goal of engagement is not just to inform, but to enable, motivate and educate the public regarding the technical, political, and social dimensions of climate change. Engagement is a two-way process where experts and decision-makers seek input and learn from the public about preferences, needs, insights, and ideas relative to climate change impacts, vulnerabilities, solutions and policy options. Effective public engagement requires that scientists detach themselves from trying to control what the public does with the acquired knowledge and motivation. The goal should not be to "sell" the public on particular climate change solutions, since such advocacy threatens public trust in scientists and their institutions. Conduits for public engagement include the civic engagement approach in the context of community meetings, and perhaps more significantly, the blogosphere. Since 2006, I have been an active participant in the climate blogosphere, focused on engaging with people that are skeptical of AGW. A year ago, I started my own blog Climate Etc. at judithcurry.com. The demographic that I have focused my communication/engagement activities are the technically educated and scientifically literate public, many of whom have become increasingly skeptical of climate science the more they investigate the topic. Specific issues that this group has with climate science include concerns that science that cannot easily be separated from risk assessment and value judgments; concern that assessments (e.g. IPCC) have become a Maxwell's daemon for climate research; inadequate assessment of our ignorance of this complex scientific issue; elite scientists and scientific institutions losing credibility with the public; political exploitation of the public's lack of understanding; and concerns about the lack of public accountability of climate science and climate models that are being used as the basis for far reaching decisions and policies. Individuals in this group have the technical ability to understand and examine climate science arguments and are not prepared to cede judgment on this issue to the designated and self-proclaimed experts. This talk will describe my experiences in engaging with this group and what has been learned, both by myself and by participants in the discussion at Climate Etc.

Curry, J.

2011-12-01

225

Formation of fluorine for abating sulfur hexafluoride in an atmospheric-pressure plasma environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, a large amount of toxic and reactive fluorine (F2) was produced in the atmospheric-pressure microwave discharge environment by adding additives to abate sulfur hexafluoride (SF6). When H2 was added, the selectivity of F2 was as high as 89.7% at inlet H2\\/SF6 molar ratio (RH2)=1. Moreover, the conversion of SF6 significantly increased from 33.7% (without additive) to 97.7%

Cheng-Hsien Tsai; Jen-Min Shao

2008-01-01

226

Advanced oxidation processes coupled with electrocoagulation for the exhaustive abatement of Cr-EDTA.  

PubMed

Using Cr-EDTA as a model system, a two-step method has been investigated for the abatement of persistent chromium complexes in water. The treatment consists of an oxidative decomposition of the organic ligands by means of ozonization or electrochemical oxidation at a boron doped diamond (BDD) electrode, followed by removal of the metal via electrochemical coagulation. In the designed synthetic waste, EDTA has been used both as a chelating agent and as a mimic of the organic content of a typical wastewater provided by a purification leather plant. A crucial point evaluated is the influence of the oxidative pretreatment on the chemical modification of the synthetic waste and hence on the electrocoagulation efficacy. Because of the great stability of Cr complexes, such as Cr-EDTA, the classical coagulation methods, based on ligand exchange between Cr(III) and Fe(II) or Fe(III), are ineffective toward Cr abatement in the presence of organic substances. On the contrary, when advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), such as ozonization or electrooxidation at a BDD anode are applied in series with electrocoagulation (EC), complete abatement of the recalcitrant Cr fraction can be achieved. ECs have been carried out by using Fe sacrificial anodes, with alternating polarization and complete Cr abatement (over 99%) has been obtained with modest charge consumption. It has been found that Cr(III) is first oxidized to Cr(VI) in the AOP preceding EC. Then, during EC, Cr(VI) is mainly reduced back to Cr(III) by electrogenerated Fe(II). Thus, Cr is mainly eliminated as Cr(III). However, a small fraction of Cr(VI) goes with the precipitate as confirmed by XPS analysis of the sludge. PMID:21255817

Durante, Christian; Cuscov, Marco; Isse, Abdirisak Ahmed; Sandonà, Giancarlo; Gennaro, Armando

2011-02-01

227

Multimedia-based decision support system for hazards recognition and abatement  

DOEpatents

A system for monitoring a site includes a portable data collection module used in the field to collect site specific data, and a processor module located at a central location. The data collection module displays choices of categories of findings, and then specific findings within each category. A selected specific finding is then displayed in report form with a citation to the specific code or statutory requirement, as well as a recommended course of action and an abatement date.

Czachowski, John B. (Knoxville, TN); Zoldak, John T. (Alexandria, VA)

1998-01-01

228

Urban Parks: Volunteers and Civic Engagement  

E-print Network

When citizens are engaged with urban park and recreation departments, everyone benefits. This publication describes successful programs that involve community volunteers, and explains what managers can do to engage citizens in such programs....

Schuett, Michael A.

2007-03-02

229

Technology-induced selection towards the spoilage microbiota of artisan-type cooked ham packed under modified atmosphere.  

PubMed

The microbiota associated with a highly-perishable Belgian artisan-type cooked ham was analyzed through plating and (GTG)(5)-fingerprinting of isolates throughout its processing chain. The raw tumbled meat was characterized by the presence of a versatile microbiota around 4.8 log(cfu g(-1)), consisting of lactic acid bacteria, staphylococci, Brochothrix thermosphacta, Gram-negative bacteria, and yeasts. Pasteurisation of the ham logs reduced bacterial counts below 2 log(cfu g(-1)) and subsequent manipulations selected for leuconostocs and carnobacteria. Also, B. thermosphacta and several Enterobacteriaceae were found at this stage. During storage in an intermediate high-care area for 2 days, a selection towards certain Enterobacteriaceae (Hafnia alvei, Enterobacter spp., and Pantoea agglomerans) and lactic acid bacteria (mainly vagococci and Streptococcus parauberis) was observed. B. thermosphacta, Leuconostoc carnosum and carnobacteria were also detected, but only after allowing bacterial outgrowth by incubating the meat logs at 7 degrees C for four weeks. After a mild post-pasteurisation process and subsequent handling, incubation of the meat logs at 7 degrees C for four weeks led to outgrowth of Enterobacteriaceae (mainly Enterobacter spp. and Serratia spp.). B. thermosphacta, and lactic acid bacteria (Enterococcus faecalis, Leuc. carnosum, and Carnobacterium maltaromaticum) were also found. After slicing and packaging under modified atmosphere, the microbiota of the refrigerated end-product consisted of leuconostocs, carnobacteria, and B. thermosphacta. PMID:19913696

Vasilopoulos, Charalampos; De Maere, Hannelore; De Mey, Eveline; Paelinck, Hubert; De Vuyst, Luc; Leroy, Frédéric

2010-02-01

230

Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for Mitchell Branch  

SciTech Connect

A proposed Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) for the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP; currently the Oak Ridge K-25 Site) was prepared in December 1986, as required by the modified National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit that was issued on September 11, 1986. The effluent discharges to Mitchell Branch are complex, consisting of trace elements, organic chemicals, and radionuclides in addition to various conventional pollutants. Moreover, the composition of these effluent streams will be changing over time as various pollution abatement measures are implemented over the next several years. Although contaminant inputs to the stream originate primarily as point sources from existing plant operations, area sources, such as the classified burial grounds and the K-1407-C holding pond, can not be eliminated as potential sources of contaminants. The proposed BMAP consists of four tasks. These tasks include (1) ambient toxicity testing, (2) bioaccumulation studies, (3) biological indicator studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the benthic invertebrate and fish communities. BMAP will determine whether the effluent limits established for ORGDP protect the designated use of the receiving stream (Mitchell Branch) for growth and propagation of fish and aquatic life. Another objective of the program is to document the ecological effects resulting from various pollution abatement projects, such as the Central Neutralization Facility.

Loar, J.M.; Adams, S.M.; Kszos, L.A.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.

1992-01-01

231

Wearable music in engaging technologies  

Microsoft Academic Search

We address the relationship between a music performer and her instrument as a possible model for re-thinking wearable technologies.\\u000a Both musical instruments and textiles invite participation and by engaging with them we intuitively develop a sense of their\\u000a malleability, resistance and fragility. In the action of touching we not only sense, but more importantly we react. We adjust\\u000a the nature

Franziska Schroeder; Pedro Rebelo

2007-01-01

232

Worm Gear With Hydrostatic Engagement  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In proposed worm-gear transmission, oil pumped at high pressure through meshes between teeth of gear and worm coil. Pressure in oil separates meshing surfaces slightly, and oil reduces friction between surfaces. Conceived for use in drive train between gas-turbine engine and rotor of helicopter. Useful in other applications in which weight critical. Test apparatus simulates and measures some loading conditions of proposed worm gear with hydrostatic engagement.

Chaiko, Lev I.

1994-01-01

233

Institutional Level Student Engagement and Organisational Cultures  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Driven by the growing presence of market forces within higher education worldwide, universities are changing the way they engage with students. This article explores how a university's internal culture relates to engagement with students and their views. It builds on wider research into student engagement and organisational cultures. The…

van der Velden, Gwen

2012-01-01

234

Civic Engagement and the "Research College"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Liberal arts colleges infrequently appear as prominent models of civic engagement. Yet their low profile and limited role in the higher education engagement discourse masks great potential. This article challenges these institutions to connect liberal education and civic engagement and argues that this is practicable within current priorities and…

Bloomgarden, Alan H.

2007-01-01

235

Theorising Student Engagement in Higher Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Student engagement has become problematic following the rise of mass and universal forms of higher education. Significant attention has been devoted to identifying factors that are associated with higher levels of engagement, but it remains the case that the underlying reasons for student engagement and, indeed, the notion itself of "student…

Kahn, Peter E.

2014-01-01

236

Framing student engagement in higher education  

Microsoft Academic Search

Student engagement is widely recognised as an important influence on achievement and learning in higher education and as such is being widely theorised and researched. This article firstly reviews and critiques the four dominant research perspectives on student engagement: the behavioural perspective, which foregrounds student behaviour and institutional practice; the psychological perspective, which clearly defines engagement as an individual psycho-social

Ella R. Kahu

2011-01-01

237

Identifying Teaching Methods that Engage Entrepreneurship Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: Entrepreneurship education particularly requires student engagement because of the complexity of the entrepreneurship process. The purpose of this paper is to describe how an established measure of engagement can be used to identify relevant teaching methods that could be used to engage any group of entrepreneurship students.…

Balan, Peter; Metcalfe, Mike

2012-01-01

238

Engagement versus Participation: A Difference that Matters  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Engagement has become a buzzword in higher education. Research by Alexander Astin, George Kuh, and others has demonstrated that engagement in campus life contributes to students' learning, increases their satisfaction with their college experiences, and reduces the likelihood that they will drop out. The kind of engagement that transforms a person…

Hoffman, David; Perillo, Patty; Calizo, Lee S. Hawthorne; Hadfield, Jordan; Lee, Diane M.

2005-01-01

239

Becoming an Engaged Campus: A Practical Guide for Institutionalizing Public Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Becoming an Engaged Campus" offers campus leaders a systematic and detailed approach to creating an environment where public engagement can grow and flourish. The book explains not only what to do to expand community engagement and how to do it, but it also explores how to document, evaluate, and communicate university engagement efforts. An…

Beere, Carole A.; Votruba, James C.; Wells, Gail W.

2011-01-01

240

Science for all: is public engagement engaging the public? 34 April 2006  

E-print Network

Science for all: is public engagement engaging the public? 3­4 April 2006 Manchester Conference Centre Conference Report ENGAGING SCIENCE CONFERENCE #12;2 INTRODUCTION Public engagement with science the people involved to meet and consider what they are doing. The Wellcome Trust Conference, `Science for all

Rambaut, Andrew

241

14 CFR 120.221 - Consequences for employees engaging in alcohol-related conduct.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Air Surgeon, Federal Aviation Administration, Office of Aerospace Medicine, Attn: Drug Abatement Division (AAM-800...must be sent to: Federal Aviation Administration, Office of Aerospace Medicine, Drug Abatement Division (AAM-800), 800...

2010-01-01

242

14 CFR 120.221 - Consequences for employees engaging in alcohol-related conduct.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Air Surgeon, Federal Aviation Administration, Office of Aerospace Medicine, Attn: Drug Abatement Division (AAM-800...must be sent to: Federal Aviation Administration, Office of Aerospace Medicine, Drug Abatement Division (AAM-800), 800...

2011-01-01

243

14 CFR 120.221 - Consequences for employees engaging in alcohol-related conduct.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Air Surgeon, Federal Aviation Administration, Office of Aerospace Medicine, Attn: Drug Abatement Division (AAM-800...must be sent to: Federal Aviation Administration, Office of Aerospace Medicine, Drug Abatement Division (AAM-800), 800...

2014-01-01

244

14 CFR 120.221 - Consequences for employees engaging in alcohol-related conduct.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Air Surgeon, Federal Aviation Administration, Office of Aerospace Medicine, Attn: Drug Abatement Division (AAM-800...must be sent to: Federal Aviation Administration, Office of Aerospace Medicine, Drug Abatement Division (AAM-800), 800...

2013-01-01

245

14 CFR 120.221 - Consequences for employees engaging in alcohol-related conduct.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Air Surgeon, Federal Aviation Administration, Office of Aerospace Medicine, Attn: Drug Abatement Division (AAM-800...must be sent to: Federal Aviation Administration, Office of Aerospace Medicine, Drug Abatement Division (AAM-800), 800...

2012-01-01

246

Short communication: Sensory profile of raw goat milk cheeses made with artisan kid rennet pastes from commercial-weight animals: alternative to farmhouse goat cheeses.  

PubMed

The loss of traditional kid rennet pastes in the Canary Islands (Spain), as in many other regions, is most likely due to the custom of using abomasa from very young animals killed below desirable commercial weight. In addition, the reasonable price of commercial rennets (CR) has resulted in the loss of typical sensory characteristics for most farmhouse raw goat milk cheeses, placing them at a disadvantage when local and international markets are full of different cheeses, often with aggressive marketing strategies. This paper analyzes the sensory characteristics of raw goat milk cheeses made with rennet pastes prepared from commercial kid abomasa in 2 ways: dried while full of ingested milk [full, commercial, artisan kid rennet (FCKR)], or dried after being emptied of ingested milk and refilled with raw goat milk [empty, commercial, artisan kid rennet (ECKR)]. This latter practice allows the use of empty abomasa, or abomasa with grass, soil, and so on. Sensory profiles of cheeses made with FCKR and ECKR rennets were compared with those made with CR by an expert panel (n=7). The FCKR and ECKR cheeses had similar sensory profiles. Although scores for FCKR cheeses were somewhat higher than for ECKR cheeses, they were in the range found for traditional cheeses made with rennet prepared with abomasa from very young animals. The sensory profile of CR cheeses was very different. Almost 90% of consumer panelists (n=90) preferred cheeses made with the experimental rennet pastes. These results demonstrate the possibility to prepare artisan rennet pastes from commercial-weight kids in an easy way for farmhouse cheese makers using local resources that would otherwise be destroyed in abattoirs. PMID:25064646

Fresno, M; Álvarez, S; Díaz, E; Virto, M; de Renobales, M

2014-10-01

247

The Comprehensive Process Model of Engagement  

PubMed Central

Background Engagement refers to the act of being occupied or involved with an external stimulus. In dementia, engagement is the antithesis of apathy. Objective The Comprehensive Process Model of Engagement was examined, in which environmental, person, and stimulus characteristics impact the level of engagement of persons with dementia. Methods Participants were 193 residents of 7 Maryland nursing homes. All participants had a diagnosis of dementia. Stimulus engagement was assessed via the Observational Measure of Engagement. Engagement was measured by duration, attention, and attitude to the stimulus. 25 stimuli were presented, which were categorized as live human social stimuli, simulated social stimuli, inanimate social stimuli, a reading stimulus, manipulative stimuli, a music stimulus, task and work-related stimuli, and two different self-identity stimuli. Results All stimuli elicited significantly greater engagement in comparison to the control stimulus. In the multivariate model, music significantly increased engagement duration, while all other stimuli significantly increased duration, attention, and attitude. Significant environmental variables in the multivariate model that increased engagement were: use of the long introduction with modeling (relative to minimal introduction), any level of sound (most especially moderate sound), and the presence of between 2 to 24 people in the room. Significant personal attributes included MMSE scores, ADL performance and clarity of speech, which were positively associated with higher engagement scores. Conclusions Results are consistent with the Comprehensive Process Model of Engagement. Person attributes, environmental factors, and stimulus characteristics all contribute to the level and nature of engagement, with a secondary finding being that exposure to any stimulus elicits engagement in persons with dementia. PMID:21946802

Cohen-Mansfield, Jiska; Marx, Marcia S.; Freedman, Laurence S.; Murad, Havi; Regier, Natalie G.; Thein, Khin; Dakheel-Ali, Maha

2010-01-01

248

Patient engagement in research: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Background A compelling ethical rationale supports patient engagement in healthcare research. It is also assumed that patient engagement will lead to research findings that are more pertinent to patients’ concerns and dilemmas. However; it is unclear how to best conduct this process. In this systematic review we aimed to answer 4 key questions: what are the best ways to identify patient representatives? How to engage them in designing and conducting research? What are the observed benefits of patient engagement? What are the harms and barriers of patient engagement? Methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycInfo, Cochrane, EBSCO, CINAHL, SCOPUS, Web of Science, Business Search Premier, Academic Search Premier and Google Scholar. Included studies were published in English, of any size or design that described engaging patients or their surrogates in research design. We conducted an environmental scan of the grey literature and consulted with experts and patients. Data were analyzed using a non-quantitative, meta-narrative approach. Results We included 142 studies that described a spectrum of engagement. In general, engagement was feasible in most settings and most commonly done in the beginning of research (agenda setting and protocol development) and less commonly during the execution and translation of research. We found no comparative analytic studies to recommend a particular method. Patient engagement increased study enrollment rates and aided researchers in securing funding, designing study protocols and choosing relevant outcomes. The most commonly cited challenges were related to logistics (extra time and funding needed for engagement) and to an overarching worry of a tokenistic engagement. Conclusions Patient engagement in healthcare research is likely feasible in many settings. However, this engagement comes at a cost and can become tokenistic. Research dedicated to identifying the best methods to achieve engagement is lacking and clearly needed. PMID:24568690

2014-01-01

249

VP Development & Alumni Engagement (DAE) www.supporting.ubc.ca  

E-print Network

May 2011 VP Development & Alumni Engagement (DAE) www.supporting.ubc.ca Barbara Miles Vice President Development & Alumni Engagement Cindy Goundrey Director, Office of VP Development & Alumni Engagement Richard Fisher Chief Communications Officer Development & Alumni Engagement Jennifer Bendl

Michelson, David G.

250

A cross-sectional survey on knowledge and perceptions of health risks associated with arsenic and mercury contamination from artisanal gold mining in Tanzania  

PubMed Central

Background An estimated 0.5 to 1.5 million informal miners, of whom 30-50% are women, rely on artisanal mining for their livelihood in Tanzania. Mercury, used in the processing gold ore, and arsenic, which is a constituent of some ores, are common occupational exposures that frequently result in widespread environmental contamination. Frequently, the mining activities are conducted haphazardly without regard for environmental, occupational, or community exposure. The primary objective of this study was to assess community risk knowledge and perception of potential mercury and arsenic toxicity and/or exposure from artisanal gold mining in Rwamagasa in northwestern Tanzania. Methods A cross-sectional survey of respondents in five sub-villages in the Rwamagasa Village located in Geita District in northwestern Tanzania near Lake Victoria was conducted. This area has a history of artisanal gold mining and many of the population continue to work as miners. Using a clustered random selection approach for recruitment, a total of 160 individuals over 18 years of age completed a structured interview. Results The interviews revealed wide variations in knowledge and risk perceptions concerning mercury and arsenic exposure, with 40.6% (n=65) and 89.4% (n=143) not aware of the health effects of mercury and arsenic exposure respectively. Males were significantly more knowledgeable (n=59, 36.9%) than females (n=36, 22.5%) with regard to mercury (x2=3.99, p<0.05). An individual’s occupation category was associated with level of knowledge (x2=22.82, p=<0.001). Individuals involved in mining (n=63, 73.2%) were more knowledgeable about the negative health effects of mercury than individuals in other occupations. Of the few individuals (n=17, 10.6%) who knew about arsenic toxicity, the majority (n=10, 58.8%) were miners. Conclusions The knowledge of individuals living in Rwamagasa, Tanzania, an area with a history of artisanal gold mining, varied widely with regard to the health hazards of mercury and arsenic. In these communities there was limited awareness of the threats to health associated with exposure to mercury and arsenic. This lack of knowledge, combined with minimal environmental monitoring and controlled waste management practices, highlights the need for health education, surveillance, and policy changes. PMID:23351708

2013-01-01

251

Reproduction, food dynamics and exploitation level of Oreochromis niloticus (Perciformes: Cichlidae) from artisanal fisheries in Barra Bonita Reservoir, Brazil.  

PubMed

Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), which is exotic to South America, is the most common species caught in artisanal fisheries at the Barra Bonita Reservoir, Southeastern Brazil. This species is of great socioeconomic importance for the region and keeps active a population of about 500 fishers. In the present study we assess reproduction, food dynamics and level of exploitation of O. niloticus, caught by artisanal fisheries in the Barra Bonita Reservoir. Specimens were collected monthly, from July 2004-June 2005, and a total of 1 715 specimens were analyzed. Each specimen was examined to obtain biological and biometric data: standard length (cm), total weight (g), reproductive data (sex and stage of maturation), and stomach contents (empty, partly full, and full). We also estimated the sex ratio (by macroscopic observation of gonads), reproductive period (by ovarian development and seasonal average of gonadosomatic index in females), and feeding habits (by stomach contents). The possible relationship between abiotic factors and the reproductive period was statistically verified using Spearman's Rank Correlation. The FiSAT (ELEFAN I) package was used to assess growth parameters, mortality rates and to infer exploitation rate from standard length frequencies. The O. niloticus population had a sex ratio of 1.3:1 (M:F). Results indicated that ripe females were captured throughout the year, with a higher frequency during the winter-2004 (with a frequency of 59%, at a mean temperature of 20.5 degreeC), and in spring-2004 (with a frequency of 60.5% at a mean temperature of 21.18 degreeC). The GSI mean values obtained by season were: winter-2004: 1.71; spring-2004: 1.72; summer-2005: 0.80, and autumn-2005: 1.19. The Spearman correlation indicated positive values with respect to pH, dissolved oxygen, electric conductivity, transparency and chlorophyll a, and negative values with respect to temperature, accumulated rainfall and altimetric benchmark. The main food items were phytoplankton and periphytic algae, observed in 99.6% of the analyzed stomachs. The estimated growth and mortality parameters were: Linfinity=33.60cm, k=0.63/year, longevity= 4.76years, Z=2.81/ year, M=1.20/year and F=1.61/year. The weight-length relationship was Ln Wt=-2.8532+2.8835 Ln Lp. The estimated yield per recruit values were as follows: E=0.570, Emax=0.776, E0.1=0.604 and E0.5=0.349. These results indicate that a well established population of O. niloticus is present at Barra Bonita Reservoir; with an active reproduction throughout the year, more intense during winter and spring, and that O. niloticus is a phyto-planktophagus species. There were no indications that this species is being overfished, we therefore recommend that, due to its exotic condition, no restrictions need to be taken on its fishing activities. PMID:23894941

Novaes, José Luís Costa; Carvalho, Edmir Daniel

2012-06-01

252

Genotyping and Toxigenic Potential of Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus pumilus Strains Occurring in Industrial and Artisanal Cured Sausages  

PubMed Central

Artisanal and industrial sausages were analyzed for their aerobic, heat-resistant microflora to assess whether new emerging pathogens could be present among Bacillus strains naturally contaminating cured meat products. Sixty-four isolates were characterized by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR and fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism (fAFLP). The biotypes, identified by partial 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, belonged to Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus pumilus, and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens species. Both RAPD-PCR and fAFLP analyses demonstrated that a high genetic heterogeneity is present in the B. subtilis group even in strains harvested from the same source, making it possible to isolate 56 different biotypes. Moreover, fAFLP analysis made it possible to distinguish B. subtilis from B. pumilus strains. The strains were characterized for their toxigenic potential by molecular, physiological, and immunological techniques. Specific PCR analyses revealed the absence of DNA sequences related to HBL, BcET, NHE, and entFM Bacillus cereus enterotoxins and the enzymes sphingomyelinase Sph and phospholipase PI-PLC in all strains; also, the immunological analyses showed that Bacillus strains did not react with NHE- and HBL-specific antibodies. However, some isolates were found to be positive for hemolytic and lecithinase activity. The absence of toxigenic potential in Bacillus strains from the sausages analyzed indicates that these products can be considered safe under the processing conditions they were produced; however, great care should be taken when the ripening time is shortened, particularly in the case of traditional sausages, which could contain high amounts of Bacillus strains and possibly some B. cereus cells. PMID:15345396

Matarante, Alessandra; Baruzzi, Federico; Cocconcelli, Pier Sandro; Morea, Maria

2004-01-01

253

Language Universals Engage Broca's Area  

PubMed Central

It is well known that natural languages share certain aspects of their design. For example, across languages, syllables like blif are preferred to lbif. But whether language universals are myths or mentally active constraints—linguistic or otherwise—remains controversial. To address this question, we used fMRI to investigate brain response to four syllable types, arrayed on their linguistic well-formedness (e.g., blif?bnif?bdif?lbif, where ? indicates preference). Results showed that syllable structure monotonically modulated hemodynamic response in Broca's area, and its pattern mirrored participants' behavioral preferences. In contrast, ill-formed syllables did not systematically tax sensorimotor regions—while such syllables engaged primary auditory cortex, they tended to deactivate (rather than engage) articulatory motor regions. The convergence between the cross-linguistic preferences and English participants' hemodynamic and behavioral responses is remarkable given that most of these syllables are unattested in their language. We conclude that human brains encode broad restrictions on syllable structure. PMID:24743423

Berent, Iris; Pan, Hong; Zhao, Xu; Epstein, Jane; Bennett, Monica L.; Deshpande, Vibhas; Seethamraju, Ravi Teja; Stern, Emily

2014-01-01

254

Impact of the choice of emission metric on greenhouse gas abatement and costs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper analyses the effect of different emission metrics and metric values on timing and costs of greenhouse gas mitigation in least-cost emission pathways aimed at a forcing level of 3.5 W m?2 in 2100. Such an assessment is currently relevant in view of UNFCCC’s decision to replace the values currently used. An emission metric determines the relative weights of non-CO2 greenhouse gases in obtaining CO2-equivalent emissions. For the first commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol, the UNFCCC has used 100 year global warming potential (GWP) values as reported in IPCC’s Second Assessment Report. For the second commitment period, the UNFCCC has decided to use 100 year GWP values from IPCC’s Fourth Assessment Report. We find that such a change has only a minor impact on (the optimal timing of) global emission reductions and costs. However, using 20 year or 500 year GWPs to value non-CO2 greenhouse gases does result in a significant change in both costs and emission reductions in our model. CO2 reductions are favored over non-CO2 gases when the time horizon of the GWPs is increased. Application of GWPs with time horizons longer than 100 year can increase abatement costs substantially, by about 20% for 500 year GWPs. Surprisingly, we find that implementation of a metric based on a time-dependent global temperature potential does not necessary lead to lower abatement costs. The crucial factor here is how fast non-CO2 emissions can be reduced; if this is limited, the delay in reducing methane emissions cannot be (fully) compensated for later in the century, which increases total abatement costs.

van den Berg, Maarten; Hof, Andries F.; van Vliet, Jasper; van Vuuren, Detlef P.

2015-02-01

255

Reforestation as a novel abatement and compliance measure for ground-level ozone.  

PubMed

High ambient ozone (O3) concentrations are a widespread and persistent problem globally. Although studies have documented the role of forests in removing O3 and one of its precursors, nitrogen dioxide (NO2), the cost effectiveness of using peri-urban reforestation for O3 abatement purposes has not been examined. We develop a methodology that uses available air quality and meteorological data and simplified forest structure growth-mortality and dry deposition models to assess the performance of reforestation for O3 precursor abatement. We apply this methodology to identify the cost-effective design for a hypothetical 405-ha, peri-urban reforestation project in the Houston-Galveston-Brazoria O3 nonattainment area in Texas. The project would remove an estimated 310 tons of (t) O3 and 58 t NO2 total over 30 y. Given its location in a nitrogen oxide (NOx)-limited area, and using the range of Houston area O3 production efficiencies to convert forest O3 removal to its NOx equivalent, this is equivalent to 127-209 t of the regulated NOx. The cost of reforestation per ton of NOx abated compares favorably to that of additional conventional controls if no land costs are incurred, especially if carbon offsets are generated. Purchasing agricultural lands for reforestation removes this cost advantage, but this problem could be overcome through cost-share opportunities that exist due to the public and conservation benefits of reforestation. Our findings suggest that peri-urban reforestation should be considered in O3 control efforts in Houston, other US nonattainment areas, and areas with O3 pollution problems in other countries, wherever O3 formation is predominantly NOx limited. PMID:25201970

Kroeger, Timm; Escobedo, Francisco J; Hernandez, José L; Varela, Sebastián; Delphin, Sonia; Fisher, Jonathan R B; Waldron, Janice

2014-10-01

256

Removable Thin Films used for the Abatement and Mitigation of Beryllium  

SciTech Connect

The use of removable thin films for the abatement of hazardous particulates has many advantages. Removable thin films are designed to trap and fix particulates in the film's matrix by adhesion. Thin films can be applied to an existing contaminated area to fix and capture the particulates for removal. The nature of the removable thin films, after sufficient cure time, is such that it can typically be removed as one continuous entity. The removable thin films can be applied to almost any surface type with a high success rate of removal.

M. Lumia; C. Gentile; K. Creek; R. Sandoval

2003-11-06

257

Niobium(V) saponite clay for the catalytic oxidative abatement of chemical warfare agents.  

PubMed

A Nb(V)-containing saponite clay was designed to selectively transform toxic organosulfur chemical warfare agents (CWAs) under extremely mild conditions into nontoxic products with reduced environmental impact. Thanks to the insertion of Nb(V) sites within the saponite framework, a bifunctional catalyst with strong oxidizing and acid properties was obtained. Remarkable activity and high selectivity were observed for the oxidative abatement of (2-chloroethyl)ethyl sulfide (CEES), a simulant of sulfur mustard, at room temperature with aqueous hydrogen peroxide. This performance was significantly better compared to a conventional commercial decontamination powder. PMID:25056451

Carniato, Fabio; Bisio, Chiara; Psaro, Rinaldo; Marchese, Leonardo; Guidotti, Matteo

2014-09-15

258

Initial flight and simulator evaluation of a head up display for standard and noise abatement visual approaches  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A preliminary assessment was made of the adequacy of a simple head up display (HUD) for providing vertical guidance for flying noise abatement and standard visual approaches in a jet transport. The HUD featured gyro-stabilized approach angle scales which display the angle of declination to any point on the ground and a horizontal flight path bar which aids the pilot in his control of the aircraft flight path angle. Thirty-three standard and noise abatement approaches were flown in a Boeing 747 aircraft equipped with a head up display. The HUD was also simulated in a research simulator. The simulator was used to familiarize the pilots with the display and to determine the most suitable way to use the HUD for making high capture noise abatement approaches. Preliminary flight and simulator data are presented and problem areas that require further investigation are identified.

Bourquin, K.; Palmer, E. A.; Cooper, G.; Gerdes, R. M.

1973-01-01

259

Social Media and Political Engagement  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

How much do people use social media as a way to be politically engaged? This question has been posed by a team of researchers at the Pew Internet & American Life Project, resulting in this 13-page report. The report was authored by a team of scholars including Lee Rainie and Aaron Smith and found that 60% of adults use social networking sites like Facebook or Twitter and that approximately 39% of all adults have done at least one of eight civic or political activities with social media. The findings here are based on a nationally representative survey of 2,253 adults conducted in the summer of 2012. Visitors can view the report in its entirety online or download the file. Additionally, persons with an interest in psychometrics and survey design can explore all of the survey questions here.

2012-10-19

260

Automobile air pollution. Part 1. Abatement through management and planning. A bibliography with abstracts. Period covered by report: 1970December 1974. [89 citations  

Microsoft Academic Search

A bibliography containing 89 abstracts is presented on planning and management studies for the abatement of air pollution from automobiles. Included in the citations are reports on maintenance and inspection programs, emission factors, urban planning related to pollution, Government policies, and the effects of these strategies on citizens and urban growth. Reports which give background information pertinent to such abatement

1975-01-01

261

Engaging Students in Earthquake Science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Southern California Earthquake Center Communication, Education, and Outreach program (SCEC CEO) has been collaborating with the University of Southern California (USC) Joint Education Project (JEP) and the Education Consortium of Central Los Angeles (ECCLA) to work directly with the teachers and schools in the local community around USC. The community surrounding USC is 57 % Hispanic (US Census, 2000) and 21% African American (US Census, 2000). Through the partnership with ECCLA SCEC has created a three week enrichment intersession program, targeting disadvantaged students at the fourth/fifth grade level, dedicated entirely to earthquakes. SCEC builds partnerships with the intersession teachers, working together to actively engage the students in learning about earthquakes. SCEC provides a support system for the teachers, supplying them with the necessary content background as well as classroom manipulatives. SCEC goes into the classrooms with guest speakers and take the students out of the classroom on two field trips. There are four intersession programs each year. SCEC is also working with USC's Joint Education Project program. The JEP program has been recognized as one of the "oldest and best organized" Service-Learning programs in the country (TIME Magazine and the Princeton Review, 2000). Through this partnership SCEC is providing USC students with the necessary tools to go out to the local schools and teach students of all grade levels about earthquakes. SCEC works with the USC students to design engaging lesson plans that effectively convey content regarding earthquakes. USC students can check out hands-on/interactive materials to use in the classrooms from the SCEC Resource Library. In both these endeavors SCEC has expanded our outreach to the local community. SCEC is reaching over 200 minority children each year through our partnerships, and this number will increase as our programs grow.

Cooper, I. E.; Benthien, M.

2004-12-01

262

Effects of Altosid and Abate-4E on deformities and survival in southern leopard frogs under semi-natural conditions  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Experimental wetlands were sprayed with Abate-4E (a.i. temephos) and Altosid (a.i. methoprene) through the summer following label directions. In late August and early Septemeber metamorphing tadpoles were captured and examined for deformities. Tadpoles captured from ponds sprayed with Altosid had a 15% deformity rate mostly involving total or partially missing hind limbs. Tadpoles from control ponds had a 5% rate of deformities. The difference was statistically significant. The relative abundance of tadpoles from ponds sprayed with Abate-4E was significantly lower than those from Altosid-sprayed or control wetlands.

Sparling, D.W.

2000-01-01

263

Diffusion of gases in air and its affect on oxygen deficiency hazard abatement  

SciTech Connect

Density differences between air and released gases of cryogenic systems have been used to either require special oxygen deficiency hazard (ODH) control measures, or as a means of abatement. For example, it is not uncommon to assume that helium spills will quickly collect at the ceiling of a building or enclosure and will efficiently exit at the nearest vertical penetration or vent. Oxygen concentration reduction was found to be detectable during a localized helium spill throughout the entire 6.3 km Tevatron tunnel. This prompted us to perform diffusion tests in air with common gases used at Fermilab. The tests showed that gases, more readily than expected, diffused through an air column in the direction opposing buoyancy. Test results for helium and sulfur hexafluoride are presented. A system of tests were performed to better understand how easily released gases would fully mix with air and whether they remained fully mixed. The test results have been applied to a new system at Fermilab for ODH abatement.

Theilacker, J.C.; White, M.J.; /Fermilab

2005-09-01

264

Two-liquid phase partitioning biotrickling filters for methane abatement: Exploring the potential of hydrophobic methanotrophs.  

PubMed

The potential of two-liquid phase biotrickling filters (BTFs) to overcome mass transfer limitations derived from the poor aqueous solubility of CH4 has been scarcely investigated to date. In this context, the abatement of diluted methane emissions in two-liquid phase BTFs was evaluated using two different inocula: a type II methanotrophs culture in BTF 1 and a hydrophobic microbial consortium capable of growing inside silicone oil in BTF 2. Both BTFs supported stable elimination capacities above 45 g m(-3) h(-1) regardless of the inoculum, whereas no improvement derived from the presence of hydrophobic microorganisms compared to the type II metanotrophs culture was observed. Interestingly, the addition of silicone oil mediated a reduced metabolites concentration in the recycling aqueous phase, thus decreasing the needs for mineral medium renewal. Moreover, a 78% similarity was recorded between the microbial communities enriched in both BTFs at the end of the experimental period in spite of the differences in the initial inoculum structure. The results obtained confirmed the superior performance of two-liquid phase BTFs for CH4 abatement compared with conventional biotrickling filters. PMID:25555135

Lebrero, Raquel; Hernández, Laura; Pérez, Rebeca; Estrada, José M; Muñoz, Raúl

2015-03-15

265

Abatement of xenon and iodine emissions from medical isotope production facilities.  

PubMed

The capability of the International Monitoring System (IMS) to detect xenon from underground nuclear explosions is dependent on the radioactive xenon background. Adding to the background, medical isotope production (MIP) by fission releases several important xenon isotopes including xenon-133 and iodine-133 that decays to xenon-133. The amount of xenon released from these facilities may be equivalent to or exceed that released from an underground nuclear explosion. Thus the release of gaseous fission products within days of irradiation makes it difficult to distinguish MIP emissions from a nuclear explosion. In addition, recent shortages in molybdenum-99 have created interest and investment opportunities to design and build new MIP facilities in the United States and throughout the world. Due to the potential increase in the number of MIP facilities, a discussion of abatement technologies provides insight into how the problem of emission control from MIP facilities can be tackled. A review of practices is provided to delineate methods useful for abatement of medical isotopes. PMID:24418952

Doll, Charles G; Sorensen, Christina M; Bowyer, Theodore W; Friese, Judah I; Hayes, James C; Hoffmann, Emmy; Kephart, Rosara

2014-04-01

266

Abatement of Xenon and Iodine Emissions from Medical Isotope Production Facilities  

SciTech Connect

The capability of the International Monitoring System (IMS) to detect xenon from underground nuclear explosions is dependent on the radioactive xenon background. Adding to the background, medical isotope production (MIP) by fission releases several important xenon isotopes including xenon-133 and iodine-133 that decays to xenon-133. The amount of xenon released from these facilities may be equivalent to or exceed that released from an underground nuclear explosion. Thus the release of gaseous fission products within days of irradiation makes it difficult to distinguish MIP emissions from a nuclear explosion. In addition, recent shortages in molybdenum-99 have created interest and investment opportunities to design and build new MIP facilities in the United States and throughout the world. Due to the potential increase in the number of MIP facilities, a discussion of abatement technologies provides insight into how the problem of emission control from MIP facilities can be tackled. A review of practices is provided to delineate methods useful for abatement of medical isotopes.

Doll, Charles G. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sorensen, Christina M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bowyer, Ted W. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Friese, Judah I. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hayes, James C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hoffman, Emma L. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Menai (Australia); Kephart, Rosara F. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

2014-04-01

267

TiO2-Al2O3 binary mixed oxide surfaces for photocatalytic NOx abatement  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

TiO2-Al2O3 binary oxide surfaces were utilized in order to develop an alternative photocatalytic NOx abatement approach, where TiO2 sites were used for ambient photocatalytic oxidation of NO with O2 and alumina sites were exploited for NOx storage. Chemical, crystallographic and electronic structure of the TiO2-Al2O3 binary oxide surfaces were characterized (via BET surface area measurements, XRD, Raman spectroscopy and DR-UV-Vis Spectroscopy) as a function of the TiO2 loading in the mixture as well as the calcination temperature used in the synthesis protocol. 0.5 Ti/Al-900 photocatalyst showed remarkable photocatalytic NOx oxidation and storage performance, which was found to be much superior to that of a Degussa P25 industrial benchmark photocatalyst (i.e. 160% higher NOx storage and 55% lower NO2(g) release to the atmosphere). Our results indicate that the onset of the photocatalytic NOx abatement activity is concomitant to the switch between amorphous to a crystalline phase with an electronic band gap within 3.05-3.10 eV; where the most active photocatalyst revealed predominantly rutile phase together and anatase as the minority phase.

Soylu, Asli Melike; Polat, Meryem; Erdogan, Deniz Altunoz; Say, Zafer; Y?ld?r?m, Cansu; Birer, Özgür; Ozensoy, Emrah

2014-11-01

268

Hexane abatement and spore emission control in a fungal biofilter-photoreactor hybrid unit.  

PubMed

The performance of a fungal perlite-based biofilter coupled to a post-treatment photoreactor was evaluated over 234 days in terms of n-hexane removal, emission and deactivation of fungal spores. The biofilter and photoreactor were operated at gas residence times of 1.20 and 0.14min, respectively, and a hexane loading rate of 115±5gm(-3)h(-1). Steady n-hexane elimination capacities of 30-40gm(-3)h(-1) were achieved, concomitantly with pollutant mineralization efficiencies of 60-90%. No significant influence of biofilter irrigation frequency or irrigation nitrogen concentration on hexane abatement was recorded. Photolysis did not support an efficient hexane post-treatment likely due to the short EBRT applied in the photoreactor, while overall hexane removal and mineralization enhancements of 25% were recorded when the irradiated photoreactor was packed with ZnO-impregnated perlite. However, a rapid catalyst deactivation was observed, which required a periodic reactivation every 48h. Biofilter irrigation every 3 days supported fungal spore emissions at concentrations ranging from 2.4×10(3) to 9.0×10(4)CFUm(-3). Finally, spore deactivation efficiencies of ?98% were recorded for the photolytic and photocatalytic post-treatment processes. This study confirmed the potential of photo-assisted post-treatment processes to mitigate the emission of hazardous fungal spores and boost the abatement performance of biotechnologies. PMID:24887128

Saucedo-Lucero, J O; Quijano, G; Arriaga, S; Muñoz, R

2014-07-15

269

{open_quotes}BIOX{close_quotes} hydrogen sulfide abatement process - application analysis  

SciTech Connect

A new hydrogen sulfide abatement process, known as {open_quotes}BIOX,{close_quotes} has been specifically developed for the geothermal industry. {open_quotes}BIOX{close_quotes} (biocide induced oxidation) successfully controls both primary and secondary emissions from cooling towers in pilot, demonstration, and commercial operations by air-wet oxidation. Independent laboratory tests recently controverted the efficacy of {open_quotes}BIOX{close_quotes} to catalytically oxidize sulfides to sulfate. Studies conducted in our laboratory with a simulated cooling tower indicate that the experimental conditions employed by Nardini, et al, are unrealistic for geothermal cooling towers. Furthermore, our investigations demonstrate that the {open_quotes}BIOX{close_quotes} process performs optimally at near neutral pH, a condition common to most geothermal cooling tower circulating water systems. A {open_quotes}BIOX{close_quotes} agent, trichloroisocyanuric acid (TCCA), proved to mitigate sulfide emissions much more efficiently than air, sodium hypochlorite or chlorine dioxide. {open_quotes}BIOX{close_quotes} is a proven, cost-effective H{sub 2}S abatement technology.

Gallup, D.L. [UNOCAL Corp., Santa Rosa, CA (United States)

1996-12-31

270

Extreme flood abatement in large dams with gate-controlled spillways  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study the flood abatement effect at dams with gated spillways under a wide range of extreme floods is analysed (100 < return period <10,000 years). A group of integrated models (rainfall generator, hydrological model and dam operation model) interacting within a Monte Carlo simulation framework is used for producing numerous hydrologic events at 21 sites across mainland Spain, and the hydrologic response applied to 81 configurations of dams and reservoirs. Common behavioural patterns are identified and dimensionless coefficients classified, based on the hydrologic variables and the dam and reservoir characteristics. The relationships between these coefficients are analysed, with a significant degree of correlation both among the cases and the varying magnitude of floods being obtained. Finally, models that enable evaluation of the abatement capacity of a dam with a gated spillway in the event of a flood with Tr between 500 and 10,000 years are offered. In addition, they allow the frequency curve of such a maximum flow to be obtained, something which could serve of use not only during the design phase but also in the evaluation of the hydrologic safety of dams.

Sordo-Ward, Alvaro; Garrote, Luis; Bejarano, M. Dolores; Castillo, Luis G.

2013-08-01

271

The Engaged Community College: Supporting the Institutionalization of Engagement through Collaborative Action Inquiry  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this action research study was to explore how community colleges increase their capacity for community engagement. Faculty and staff members who were identified as community engagement leaders within a public community college participated in a series of interventions to improve community engagement practices within the college. The…

Purcell, Jennifer W.

2014-01-01

272

Sociocultural Affordances of Online Peer Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

University learning increasingly includes online learning experiences embedded within teaching with the dual policy intentions of increasing flexibility and learner engagement. In this research project, three university lecturers from different teaching contexts selected technologies for online learning to enhance learner engagement by encouraging…

Willis, Jill; Davis, Kate; Chaplin, Sally

2013-01-01

273

Civic Engagement in the Field of Psychology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this article is to describe the importance of, and recommendations for how best to promote, civic engagement among undergraduate psychology majors. In this article, we will describe how the goals of civic engagement are consistent with the specific curricular goals of undergraduate psychology programs. We also will (a) review the…

Chenneville, Tiffany; Toler, Susan; Gaskin-Butler, Vicki T.

2012-01-01

274

Fostering Student Engagement Campuswide. Annual Results 2011  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) documents dimensions of quality in undergraduate education and provides information and assistance to colleges, universities, and other organizations to improve student learning. Its primary activity is annually surveying college students to assess the extent to which they engage in educational…

National Survey of Student Engagement, 2011

2011-01-01

275

Research and Engagement Academy Scholarly Coaches  

E-print Network

-chair, Research and Engagement Academy Research Professor Emerita Ocean Process Analysis Laboratory (OPAL) CameronResearch and Engagement Academy Scholarly Coaches 2011-2014 #12;College of Engineering and Physical Provost for Research Brad Kinsey (2011-2014) Professor and Chair Mechanical Engineering Faculty co

Pohl, Karsten

276

Research and Engagement Academy Scholarly Coaches  

E-print Network

, Oceans and Space Janet Campbell (2011, 2012) Research Professor Emerita, Ocean Process AnalysisResearch and Engagement Academy Scholarly Coaches 2011 & 2012 A Community Engaged Research University The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching #12;University of New Hampshire Research

Pohl, Karsten

277

Parental Involvement to Parental Engagement: A Continuum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Based on the literature of the field, this article traces a continuum between parental involvement with schools, and parental engagement with children's learning. The article seeks to shed light on an area of confusion; previous research has shown that different stakeholder groups understand "parental engagement" in different ways.…

Goodall, Janet; Montgomery, Caroline

2014-01-01

278

Issues in Benchmarking and Assessing Institutional Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The process of assessing and benchmarking community engagement can take many forms. To date, more than two dozen assessment tools for measuring community engagement institutionalization have been published. These tools vary substantially in purpose, level of complexity, scope, process, structure, and focus. While some instruments are designed to…

Furco, Andrew; Miller, William

2009-01-01

279

Employer Engagement in Education: Literature Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The subject of this paper is employer engagement in education. In this, the authors consider the range of different ways that employers can support the learning and progression of young people in British schools. The paper draws on a wide range of source material to ask: What are the typical benefits of different types of employer engagement? Do…

Mann, Anthony; Dawkins, James

2014-01-01

280

NATURALIZING COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT IN INFORMATION STUDIES  

Microsoft Academic Search

Researchers and professionals in the information fields are increasingly recognizing that they should engage themselves more closely with local, marginalized and under-empowered communities in addressing a range of challenges in diverse information contexts. Education employing critical pedagogy and dialogic action can provide a fertile ground for preparing future graduates for such engagement, and break down over-simplified dichotomies between academic and

Andrew J. Lau; Anne J. Gilliland; Kimberly Anderson

2011-01-01

281

NATURALIZING COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT IN INFORMATION STUDIES  

Microsoft Academic Search

Researchers and professionals in the information fields are increasingly recognizing that they should engage themselves more closely with local, marginalized and under-empowered communities in addressing a range of challenges in diverse information contexts. Education employing critical pedagogy and dialogic action can provide a fertile ground for preparing future graduates for such engagement, and break down over-simplified dichotomies between academic and

Andrew J. Lau; Anne J. Gilliland; Kimberly Anderson

2012-01-01

282

Learning at a Distance: Engaged or Not?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, Pu-Shih Chen, Robert Gonyea, and George Kuh compare the engagement of distance learners in educationally effective activities with that of their campus-based counterparts and compare the engagement of older distance learners relative to younger online students. Although distance learning is the fastest growing segment of…

Chen, Pu-Shih Daniel; Gonyea, Robert; Kuh, George

2008-01-01

283

Enhancing physician engagement: an international perspective.  

PubMed

The purpose of this article is to provide specific recommendations to enhance physician engagement in health care organizations. It summarizes the evidence on physician engagement, drawing on peer-reviewed articles and reports from the gray literature, and suggests an integrative framework to help health care managers better understand and improve physician engagement. While we examine some other international examples and experiences, we mainly focus on physician engagement in Canada, the United States, and the United Kingdom. Physician engagement can be conceptualized as an ongoing two-way social process in which both the individual and organizational/cultural components are considered. Building on several frameworks and examples, we propose a new integrative framework for enhancing physician engagement in health care organizations. We suggest that in order to enhance physician engagement, organizations should focus on the following strategies: developing clear and efficient communication channels with physicians; building trust, understanding, and respect with physicians; and identifying and developing physician leaders. We propose that the time is now for health care managers to set aside traditional differences and historical conflicts and to engage their physicians for the betterment of their organizations. PMID:25618990

Kaissi, Amer

2014-01-01

284

Engaging Students: Promoting Mutual Support and Exploration  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Prenskey (2005) asserted that a major problem within education is not that the information being taught lacks "relevance" to students lives, but that there is a lack of engagement with educational tasks. When attempting to engage classes, tutors are aiming to draw students into learning activities--to involve them--and thus promote active learning…

Williamson, Stella; Haigney, Di

2009-01-01

285

Engaging Mathematics Students Using Cooperative Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this book, the author offers a wide selection of student engagement strategies for math teachers in grades K-12. He shares his class-tested ideas in a clear and spirited voice, with his devotion to the teaching profession and his students apparent on every page. With invaluable ideas to help students remain engaged for longer time periods, this…

Strebe, John D.

2009-01-01

286

Employee Engagement: Motivating and Retaining Tomorrow's Workforce  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Tomorrow's workforce is seeking more than a paycheck; they want their work to meet their needs for affiliation, meaning, and self-development. Companies willing to meet these demands will capture the enormous profit potential of a workforce of fully engaged workers. This piece explores what engagement is, why it matters, and how human resource…

Shuck, Michael Bradley; Wollard, Karen Kelly

2008-01-01

287

Consistency of Toddler Engagement across Two Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study documented the consistency of child engagement across two settings, toddler child care classrooms and mother-child dyadic play. One hundred twelve children, aged 14-36 months (M = 25.17, SD = 6.06), randomly selected from 30 toddler child care classrooms from the district of Porto, Portugal, participated. Levels of engagement were…

Aguiar, Cecilia; McWilliam, R. A.

2013-01-01

288

Teaching through Interactive Engagement: Communication is Experience  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author discusses the advantages of using the interactive engagement instructional method. A model of interactive engagement (IE) instructional method involves questioning students by challenging them to think deeply about a problem or complex question. Essential to this process is frequent and thoughtful interaction with the…

Ezrailson, Cathy; Kamon, Teruki; Loving, Cathleen C.; McIntyre, Peter M.

2006-01-01

289

Design for Engaging Experience and Social Interaction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One of the goals of game designers is to design for an engaging experience and for social interaction. The question is how. We know that games can be engaging and allow for social interaction, but how do we achieve this or even improve on it? This article provides an overview of several scientific approaches that deal with this question. It…

Harteveld, Casper; ten Thij, Eleonore; Copier, Marinka

2011-01-01

290

The pleasure principle: immersion, engagement, flow  

Microsoft Academic Search

While few critics writing on readers and hypertext have focused on the affective pleasures of reading hypertext fiction or interactive narratives like Myst, those who assess the experience of reading them tend to assume interactive texts should be either immersive or engaging. This study uses schema theory to define the characteristics of immersion and engagement in both conventional and new

Yellowlees Douglas; Andrew Hargadon

2000-01-01

291

Student Engagement and Making Community Happen  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Student engagement and making community happen is a policy manoeuvre that shapes the political subjectivity of the undergraduate student In Australia, making community happen as a practice of student engagement is described as one of the major challenges for policy and practice in research-led universities (Krause, 2005). Current efforts to meet…

McGowan, Wayne S.; Partridge, Lee

2014-01-01

292

Underground coal mining methods to abate water pollution: a state of the art literature review. Water pollution control research series  

Microsoft Academic Search

The report reviews published information concerning the abatement of harmful drainage from underground coal mines. Although much has been written on mine water management, very little literature is available on the specific area of preventing the formation of acid water. The references used in this report include mining engineering and hydrology studies and spans the period of time when water

L. W. Wilson; N. J. Matthews; J. L. Stump

1970-01-01

293

A bottom-up method to develop pollution abatement cost curves for coal-fired utility boilers  

EPA Science Inventory

This paper illustrates a new method to create supply curves for pollution abatement using boiler-level data that explicitly accounts for technology costs and performance. The Coal Utility Environmental Cost (CUECost) model is used to estimate retrofit costs for five different NO...

294

Abatement of cockroach allergen (bla g 1) in low-income, urban housing: A randomized controlled trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Clinically relevant reductions in exposure to cockroach allergen, an important risk factor for asthma in inner-city households, have proven difficult to achieve in intervention trials. Objective: This study investigated a method for the abatement of cockroach allergen in low-income, urban homes. The goal was to reduce mean Bla g 1 concentrations below the previously proposed thresholds for allergic sensitization

Samuel J. Arbes; Michelle Sever; Janet Archer; Elizabeth H. Long; J. Chad Gore; Coby Schal; Michelle Walter; Betsy Nuebler; Ben Vaughn; Herman Mitchell; Eric Liu; Nicholas Collette; Peter Adler; Megan Sandel; Darryl C. Zeldin

2003-01-01

295

METHODOLOGY FOR EVALUATING THE IMPACT AND ABATEMENT OF COMBINED SEWER OVERFLOWS. A CASE STUDY OF ONONDAGA LAKE, NEW YORK  

EPA Science Inventory

A general methodology is presented for the evaluation of the impact and abatement of combined sewer overflows on receiving waters. It was developed from experience with Onondaga Lake, an urban lake in central New York that receives combined sewer overflows from the City of Syracu...

296

Students' anticipated situational engagement: the roles of teacher behavior, personal engagement, and gender.  

PubMed

Among 9th-grade students (248 girls, 255 boys) from a large multiethnic school, the authors examined 2 aspects of anticipated situational engagement in relation to 3 types of hypothetical teacher behavior: authoritarian, authoritative, permissive. Furthermore, the authors investigated the moderating roles of students' personal (trait-like) engagement and gender. Multilevel analyses showed differential effects of teacher behavior type. Anticipated situational engagement was generally highest with the authoritative teacher and lowest with the authoritarian teacher. However, students' personal engagement and gender qualified these effects. The effects of the authoritative and authoritarian teachers versus the permissive teachers on anticipated situational engagement were more positive (or less negative) for students with high versus low personal engagement. Also, the positive effects of the authoritative and permissive teachers versus the authoritarian teacher were stronger for female students than for male students. Results show that anticipated situational engagement should be understood by examining the combined influences of contextual and individual characteristics. PMID:19928319

Thijs, Jochem; Verkuyten, Maykel

2009-09-01

297

Scaffolding student engagement via online peer learning  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We describe one aspect of a UK inter-institutional project wherein an online tool was used to support student generation of multiple choice questions. Across three universities and in five modules in physics, chemistry and biology, we introduced the PeerWise online system as a summative assessment tool in our classes, the desire being to increase student engagement, academic attainment and level of cognitive challenge. Engagement with the system was high with many students exceeding the minimum requirements set out in the assessment criteria. We explore the nature of student engagement and describe a working model to enable high-impact student-learning and academic gain with minimal instructor intervention.

Casey, M. M.; Bates, S. P.; Galloway, K. W.; Galloway, R. K.; Hardy, J. A.; Kay, A. E.; Kirsop, P.; McQueen, H. A.

2014-07-01

298

Abatement of gaseous and particulate contamination in a space instrument application to a solar telescope  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Methods to prevent the ingestion of external contaminants into the instrument and to limit the effect of the self-generated contaminants during ground, launch, orbiting and landing phases of flight were investigated. It is proposed that a positive pressure and purging flow of clean gas inside the instrument be maintained while on the ground, during launch, and for a period of time in orbit. The pressure to be maintained and the required purging flow are examined in terms of the effectiveness in preventing gaseous and particulate contaminants ingestion and the abatement of the self-generated contaminants. Considerations have been given to the venting requirements for the structural integrity of the instrument during launch, the limitations on the volume and the pressure of the purging gas to be carried along in orbit, and the required venting area is established based on the internal volume of the instrument, the allowable pressure differential, and the rate of external pressure change during launch.

Scialdone, J. J.

1983-01-01

299

Environmental influence on the thermoeconomic optimization of a combined plant with NO{sub x} abatement  

SciTech Connect

Methods to analyze, improve, and optimize thermal energy systems have to take into account not only energy (exergy) consumption and economic resources, but also pollution and degradation of the environment. The term environomics implies a method that takes thermodynamic, economic, and environmental aspects systematically into consideration for the analysis and optimization of energy systems. For optimization of energy systems, the environmental aspects are quantified and introduced into the objective function. In this particular work, the environomic approach is followed of the analysis and optimal design of a combined-cycle plant. In addition to the basic configuration, two alternatives for NO{sub x} abatement are studied: Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) and steam injection. The optimization problem is solved for each configuration, and the results are compared with each other. The effect of the unit pollution penalties and of the limits imposed by regulations is studied. Some general conclusions are drawn.

Agazzani, A.; Massardo, A.F. [Univ. of Genova (Italy). Ist. di Macchine e Sistemi Energetici; Fangopoulos, C.A. [National Technical Univ. of Athens (Greece). Dept. of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering

1998-07-01

300

RECOVERY OF FISH COMMUNITIES IN A WARMWATER STREAM FOLLOWING POLLUTION ABATEMENT  

SciTech Connect

The long-term recovery process for fish communities in a warm water stream in East Tennessee was studied using quantitative measurements over 20 years. The stream receives effluents from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility, but since 1985 these effluents have been greatly reduced, eliminated, or diluted as part of a substantial long-term pollution abatement program. The resulting changes in water quantity and quality led to a recovery of the fish communities, evidenced by significant changes in species richness, abundance (density and biomass), and community composition (e.g., number of fish species sensitive to stress). The fish community changes occurred over a spatial gradient (downstream from the headwater release zone nearest the DOE facility) and temporally, at multiple sampling locations in the stream. Changes in measured parameters were associated with specific remedial actions and the intervening steps within the recovery process are discussed with regard to changes in treatment processes.

Ryon, Michael G [ORNL

2011-01-01

301

Comparison of non-thermal plasma techniques for abatement of volatile organic compounds and nitrogen oxides  

SciTech Connect

Non-thermal plasma processing is an emerging technology for the abatement of dilute concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and other hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) in atmospheric-pressure gas streams. Either electrical discharge or electron beam methods can produce these plasmas. Recent laboratory-scale experiments show that the electron beam method is remarkably more energy efficient than competing non-thermal plasma techniques based on pulsed corona and other types of electrical discharge plasma. Preliminary cost analysis based on these data also show that the electron beam method may be cost-competitive to thermal and catalytic methods that employ heat recovery or hybrid techniques.

Penetrante, B.M.; Hsiao, M.C.; Bardsley, J.N. [and others

1996-01-11

302

Population patterns of Anopheles albimanus and their significance to malaria abatement*  

PubMed Central

Data obtained between 1967 and 1972 on naturally occurring populations of A. albimanus in El Salvador were used to construct 24-hour and seasonal patterns of activity for the species. The resulting patterns are discussed in terms of control implications, and specific examples are given to relate the importance of a knowledge of population dynamics to the success of conventional and alternative methods of anopheline control in malaria abatement programmes. A retrospective view of a successful feasibility study of the sterile-male release technique illustrates the importance of population studies in the selection of release sites, the formulation of release schedules, and the selection of survey methodology for the evaluation of results. PMID:4548395

Breeland, Samuel G.

1974-01-01

303

Pre-engagement process improvement in IBM PC services  

E-print Network

The front end of the IBM PC factory integration & deployment process is a pre-engagement process. In this study, the pre-engagement process, was analyzed. The organizational structure in the pre-engagement process and the ...

Zuo, Jie, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01

304

Abatement of indoor air pollution achieved with coal-biomass household briquettes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigated the abatement of indoor pollution achieved when two types of coal-biomass briquettes (L-BBs and H-BBs) were used in place of honeycombed coal briquettes (H-coal) in household stoves in rural Chongqing, China. Indoor concentrations of sulfur dioxide (SO 2), carbon monoxide (CO), and gaseous fluoride were measured. Additionally, we evaluated the factors that affected indoor concentrations of these gases, including the amount of fuel used as well as its sulfur content, the sulfur-emission ratio determined from the amount of sulfur retained in the combustion ash, and the combustion temperature in the stoves. The average 8-h and 24-h SO 2 concentrations for L-BBs were nearly equal to or less than the World Health Organization's 40 ppb guideline, whereas those for H-coal and H-BBs exceeded the guideline. The average 8-h SO 2 concentrations for L-BBs were from 63 to 89% lower than those for H-coal, even though the 8-h average weight of fuel and its sulfur content for L-BBs were equal to those of H-coal. A chemical analysis of combustion ash indicated that the sulfur-emission ratio was from 26 to 48% for L-BBs, as compared with 86% for H-coal, and this difference resulted in reduction of indoor SO 2 concentrations for L-BBs as compared with H-coal. Most of the 8-h average concentrations of CO and gaseous fluoride for all fuels were lower than the WHO guidelines. We concluded that BBs are a useful domestic fuel for the abatement of indoor air pollution.

Yamada, Kimiko; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Wang, Qingyue; Yi, Jing; Cheng, Shuqun; Zhou, Yanrong; Sakamoto, Kazuhiko

305

Diversity, Dynamics, and Activity of Bacterial Communities during Production of an Artisanal Sicilian Cheese as Evaluated by 16S rRNA Analysis†  

PubMed Central

The diversity and dynamics of the microbial communities during the manufacturing of Ragusano cheese, an artisanal cheese produced in Sicily (Italy), were investigated by a combination of classical and culture-independent approaches. The latter included PCR, reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR), and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S rRNA genes (rDNA). Bacterial and Lactobacillus group-specific primers were used to amplify the V6 to V8 and V1 to V3 regions of the 16S rRNA gene, respectively. DGGE profiles from samples taken during cheese production indicated dramatic shifts in the microbial community structure. Cloning and sequencing of rDNA amplicons revealed that mesophilic lactic acid bacteria (LAB), including species of Leuconostoc, Lactococcus lactis, and Macrococcus caseolyticus were dominant in the raw milk, while Streptococcus thermophilus prevailed during lactic fermentation. Other thermophilic LAB, especially Lactobacillus delbrueckii and Lactobacillus fermentum, also flourished during ripening. Comparison of the rRNA-derived patterns obtained by RT-PCR to the rDNA DGGE patterns indicated a substantially different degree of metabolic activity for the microbial groups detected. Identification of cultivated LAB isolates by phenotypic characterization and 16S rDNA analysis indicated a variety of species, reflecting to a large extent the results obtained from the 16S rDNA clone libraries, with the significant exception of the Lactobacillus delbrueckii species, which dominated in the ripening cheese but was not detected by cultivation. The present molecular approaches combined with culture can effectively describe the complex ecosystem of natural fermented dairy products, giving useful information for starter culture design and preservation of artisanal fermented food technology. PMID:11916708

Randazzo, Cinzia L.; Torriani, Sandra; Akkermans, Antoon D. L.; de Vos, Willem M.; Vaughan, Elaine E.

2002-01-01

306

The Relationship Between Student Engagement and Professionalism in Pharmacy Students.  

E-print Network

??This study investigates the relationship between student engagement (as measured by the National Survey of Student Engagement benchmarks) and pharmacy student professionalism (as measured by… (more)

Flaherty, Anne Guerin

2011-01-01

307

Engaging in Education: By Invitation Only  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article argues for the use of dialogue journals as a means to engage students individually in their educational communities. Practical considerations, such as choice of form and methodology, are included.

Lenoir, W. David

2011-01-01

308

Getting Students Engaged in Nonfiction Text  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article describes how to help students engage with nonfiction text by asking questions, identifying facts, making connections, and reflecting on the text. A template for use with students is included.

Allen, Tracey; Reeson, Clarissa

309

Technology, Political Debates, and Civic Engagement  

E-print Network

The 2007 CNN-YouTube presidential candidate debates provide a unique opportunity for the American populace to become engaged in national political discussion through the submission of video questions to YouTube for inclusion in two nationally...

Ricke, LaChrystal Dawn

2008-08-18

310

Engaging by design: How engagement strategies in popular computer and video games can inform instructional design  

Microsoft Academic Search

Computer and video games are a prevalent form of entertainment in which the purpose of the design is to engage players. Game\\u000a designers incorporate a number of strategies and tactics for engaging players in “gameplay.” These strategies and tactics\\u000a may provide instructional designers with new methods for engaging learners. This investigation presents a review of game design\\u000a strategies and the

Michele D. Dickey; Sid Meier

2005-01-01

311

Adoption of Emissions Abating Technologies by U.S. Electricity Producing Firms Under the SO2 Emission Allowance Market  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The objective of this research is to determine the adaptation strategies that coal-based, electricity producing firms in the United States utilize to comply with the emission control regulations imposed by the SO2 Emissions Allowance Market created by the Clean Air Act Amendment of 1990, and the effect of market conditions on the decision making process. In particular, I take into consideration (1) the existence of carbon contracts for the provision of coal that may a affect coal prices at the plant level, and (2) local and geographical conditions, as well as political arrangements that may encourage firms to adopt strategies that appear socially less efficient. As the electricity producing sector is a regulated sector, firms do not necessarily behave in a way that maximizes the welfare of society when reacting to environmental regulations. In other words, profit maximization actions taken by the firm do not necessarily translate into utility maximization for society. Therefore, the environmental regulator has to direct firms into adopting strategies that are socially efficient, i.e., that maximize utility. The SO 2 permit market is an instrument that allows each firm to reduce marginal emissions abatement costs according to their own production conditions and abatement costs. Companies will be driven to opt for a cost-minimizing emissions abatement strategy or a combination of abatement strategies when adapting to new environmental regulations or markets. Firms may adopt one or more of the following strategies to reduce abatement costs while meeting the emission constraints imposed by the SO2 Emissions Allowance Market: (1) continue with business as usual on the production site while buying SO2 permits to comply with environmental regulations, (2) switch to higher quality, lower sulfur coal inputs that will generate less SO2 emissions, or (3) adopting new emissions abating technologies. A utility optimization condition is that the marginal value of each input should be equal to the product generated by using it and to the activities that are required by new regulations. The comparative technological and scale efficiency factors of coal-based electricity producing plants are calculated using the Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) framework, and used as proxies to test this condition. In the empirical analysis, econometric models of the response of firms to emissions control are analyzed around the following aspects: (1) characterization of the behavior of firms and their efficiency, (2) relevant variables that trigger the adoption of technology, that is, the acquisition of scrubbers , and (3) the influence of exogenous variables, such as the existence of contracts, distance from mine to plant, and local conditions of the region where plants are located.

Creamer, Gregorio Bernardo

312

Evaluation and abatement of noise from aircraft auxiliary power units and airport ground power units. Technical report (final)  

SciTech Connect

APUs and GPUs provide essential service to aircraft during ground operations. Sound levels near these devices range from 80 to 87 dBA at 30 m for APUs, 83 to 103 dBA at 10 m for turbine-engined GPUs, and 71 to 80 dBA at 10 m for piston-engined GPUs. Procedures are provided for: (1) estimating community sound levels due to APUs and GPUs, (2) estimating their exposures in terms of day-night sound levels, and (3) assessing the desirability of noise abatement by comparison to recommended levels for acceptability. Noise abatement options include: operational changes, equipment movement, equipment substitution, equipment quieting, and sound barrier usage.

Staiano, M.A.; Samis, R.A.; Toth, S.

1980-10-07

313

Engaging Music and Media: Technology as a Universal Language  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The ambiguity in the first half of the paper's title--"Engaging music and media"--is intentional. Music is engaging in the sense that it implicates our hearts and minds. Music can also be engaged by and with media. And, of course, engagement is core to effective learning. The role of music education is always in flux. Aesthetic aims sometimes take…

Carruthers, Glen

2009-01-01

314

A Model for Creating Engaged Land-Grant Universities: Penn State's Engagement Ladder Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The original mission of the state and land-grant university was to engage with communities to solve problems and improve the quality of life for the citizenry. Today most state and land-grant universities have moved far away from their original mission and are struggling to become engaged with the communities they serve. In this case study, we…

Aronson, Keith R.; Webster, Nicole

2007-01-01

315

Creating Effective Student Engagement in Online Courses: What Do Students Find Engaging?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While this paper set out to discover what activities and/or interaction channels might be expected to lead to more highly engaged students, what it found was a bit different. After first creating a scale to measure online student engagement, and then surveying 186 students from six campuses in the Midwest, the results indicate that there is no…

Dixson, Marcia D.

2010-01-01

316

Conceptualising and Measuring Student Engagement through the Australasian Survey of Student Engagement (AUSSE): A Critique  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Student engagement has rapidly developed a central place in the quality agenda of Australian universities since the introduction of the Australasian Survey of Student Engagement (AUSSE). The AUSSE is based on one developed in the USA. The main arguments given for adopting this survey in Australia are that it provides a valid instrument for…

Hagel, Pauline; Carr, Rodney; Devlin, Marcia

2012-01-01

317

Embedding Engagement in an Australian "Sandstone" University: From Community Service to University Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There has been much recent interest and debate in Australia around the topics of university engagement, knowledge transfer, and engaged scholarship. Diverse responses relating to teaching and learning, research, and community service are evident in many institutions. However, there is a paucity of empirical research describing institutional…

Cuthill, Michael

2011-01-01

318

Voices of Students on Engagement: A Report on the 2006 High School Survey of Student Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The goal of the High School Survey of Student Engagement (HSSSE) is to document, describe, and monitor student engagement in secondary schools nationally. HSSSE is a powerful tool in the assessment arena that can complement performance tests and stimulate discussions on teaching and learning. This overview report highlights findings from across…

Yazzie-Mintz, Ethan

2007-01-01

319

The Engaged University: International Perspectives on Civic Engagement. International Studies in Higher Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"The Engaged University" is a comprehensive empirical account of the global civic engagement movement in higher education. In universities around the world, something extraordinary is underway. Mobilizing their human and intellectual resources, institutions of higher education are directly tackling community problems--combating poverty, improving…

Watson, David; Hollister, Robert; Stroud, Susan E.; Babcock, Elizabeth

2011-01-01

320

Measuring Student Engagement among Elementary Students: Pilot of the Student Engagement Instrument--Elementary Version  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Early school withdrawal, commonly referred to as dropout, is associated with a plethora of negative outcomes for students, schools, and society. Student engagement, however, presents as a promising theoretical model and cornerstone of school completion interventions. The purpose of the present study was to validate the Student Engagement

Carter, Chandra P.; Reschly, Amy L.; Lovelace, Matthew D.; Appleton, James J.; Thompson, Dianne

2012-01-01

321

NO{sub x} Abatement Pilot Plant 90-day test results report  

SciTech Connect

High-level radioactive liquid wastes produced during nuclear fuel reprocessing at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant are calcined in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) to provide both volume reduction and a more stable waste form. Because a large component of the HLW is nitric acid, high levels of oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) are produced in the process and discharged to the environment via the calciner off-gas. The NO{sub x} abatement program is required by the new Fuel Processing Restoration (FPR) project permit to construct to reduce NO{sub x} emissions from the NWCF. Extensive research and development has indicated that the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) process is the most promising technology for treating the NWCF off-gas. Pilot plant tests were performed to determine the compatibility of the SCR process with actual NWCF off-gas. Test results indicate that the SCR process is a viable method for abating the NO{sub x} from the NWCF off-gas. Reduction efficiencies over 95% can be obtained, with minimal amounts of ammonia slip, provided favorable operating conditions exist. Two reactors operated with series flow will provide optimum reduction capabilities. Typical operation should be performed with a first reactor stage gas space velocity of 20,000 hr{sup {minus}1} and an inlet temperature of 320{degrees}C. The first stage exhaust NO{sub x} concentration will then dictate the parameter settings for the second stage. Operation should always strive for a peak reactor temperature of 520{degrees}C in both reactors, with minimal NH{sub 3} slip from the second reactor. Frequent fluctuations in the NWCF off-gas NO{sub x} concentration will require a full-scale reduction facility that is versatile and quick-responding. Sudden changes in NWCF off-gas NO{sub x} concentrations will require quick detection and immediate response to avoid reactor bed over-heating and/or excessive ammonia slip.

McCray, J.A.; Boardman, R.D. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1991-08-30

322

Comprehensive and workable plan for the abatement of lead-based paint in privately owned housing. Report to the Congress  

SciTech Connect

The report proposes a balanced and comprehensive plan designed to overcome the barriers that have inhibited efforts to address the hazards of lead-based paint in the past, and to support State and local governments and the private sector in the difficult but necessary task of reducing these hazards in American homes. The report focuses on lead paint abatement, as mandated by the Congress.

Weitz, S.; Clickner, R.P.; Blackburn, A.; Buches, D.

1991-01-01

323

Active and Engaged Citizenship: Multi-Group and Longitudinal Factorial Analysis of an Integrated Construct of Civic Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Civic participation does not necessarily equate to civic engagement. However, to date, integrated measures of civic engagement that go beyond civic behaviors have not been developed. In this article, we propose an integrated construct of civic engagement, active and engaged citizenship (AEC), that includes behavioral, cognitive, and socioemotional…

Zaff, Jonathan; Boyd, Michelle; Li, Yibing; Lerner, Jacqueline V.; Lerner, Richard M.

2010-01-01

324

Psychometric Properties of Three New National Survey of Student Engagement Based Engagement Scales: An Item Response Theory Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We sought to develop and psychometrically describe three new student engagement scales to measure college students' engagement with their faculty (student-faculty engagement: SFE), community-based activities (CBA), and transformational learning opportunities (TLO) using items selected from the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE), a widely…

Carle, Adam C.; Jaffee, David; Vaughan, Neil W.; Eder, Douglas

2009-01-01

325

Begin your partnership: the process of engagement.  

PubMed

Community Partnered-Participatory Research (CPPR) is based on and utilizes community engagement as its central method and principle. In this chapter, we explain the key differences between engaging the community vs merely involving the community. The chapter also reviews the plan-do-action cycle of work that is used in each stage of CPPR. We define five key values of CPPR: respect for diversity, openness, equality, redirected power (empowerment), and an asset-based approach. In addition, we present 12 operational principles, which guide work throughout every stage of all CPPR initiatives. PMID:20088077

Jones, Loretta; Meade, Barbara; Forge, Nell; Moini, Moraya; Jones, Felica; Terry, Chrystene; Norris, Keith

2009-01-01

326

Abatement of toluene from gas streams via ferro-electric packed bed dielectric barrier discharge plasma.  

PubMed

Destruction of gaseous toluene via ferro-electric packed bed dielectric barrier discharge plasma in a coaxial cylindrical reactor was carried out at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. The difference among three kinds of reactors was compared in terms of specific energy density (SED), energy yield (EY), toluene decomposition. In order to optimize the geometry of the reactor, the removal efficiency of toluene was compared for various inner electrode diameters. In addition, qualitative analysis on by-products and particular discussion on toluene abatement mechanisms were also presented. It has been found that ferro-electric packed bed DBD reactor could effectively decompose toluene. Toluene removal efficiency enhanced with increasing SED. With respect to toluene conversion, 1.62 mm electrode appeared to be superior to 1.06 mm electrodes. BaTiO3 reactor had the highest toluene removal efficiency among the reactors. For NaNO2 reactor, the highest EY could reach 17.0 mg/kWh to a certain extent. PMID:19515490

Liang, Wenjun; Li, Jian; Li, Jie; Jin, Yuquan

2009-10-30

327

Assessing the real-world performance of modern pollutant abatement systems on motorcycles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The present statutory pollutant emission limits Euro-3 for motorcycles imply the use of modern emission abatement systems such as three-way catalytic converters. Determining the quality of implementation of these new systems in different driving situations such as real-world driving is important, since motorcycles are commonly used for personal transportation in urban areas. For this reason, a test bench series was carried out with a sample of 10 motorcycles of state-of-the-art certification category Euro-3. Emission factors of regulated pollutants and CO 2 are presented on the basis of the statutory driving cycle, the latest version of the real-world Worldwide Motorcycle Test Cycle (WMTC) and the real-world Common Artemis Driving Cycle (CADC). The results of the statutory driving cycle show that 7 out of 10 motorcycles fail to comply with the present emission limits. The results of both real-world driving cycles confirm notable emissions of HC in urban and NO x in motorway driving conditions. CO emissions of motorcycles with small displacement increase significantly in the urban and extra-urban sections of the CADC, which has a more dynamic velocity profile than the equivalent WMTC. Although pollutant emissions of motorcycles show a marked improvement compared with earlier certification classes, they clearly exceed the emission levels of modern light gasoline passenger cars, especially for CO and HC.

Alvarez, Robert; Weilenmann, Martin; Favez, Jean-Yves

328

Artificial recharge for subsidence abatement at the NASA-Johnson Space Center, Phase I  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Regional decline of aquifer head due to ground-water withdrawal in the Houston area has caused extensive land-surface subsidence. The NASA-Johnson Space Center (NASA-JSC) in southeastern Harris County, Texas, was about 13 to 19 feet above mean sea level in 1974 and sinking at a rate of more than 0.2 foot per year. NASA-JSC officials, concerned about the hurricane flooding hazard, requested the U.S. Geological Survey to study the feasibility of artificially recharging the aquifers for subsidence abatement. Hydrologic digital models were developed for theoretical determinations of quantities of water needed, under various well-array plans, for artificial recharge of the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers in order to halt the local subsidence at NASA-JSC. The programs for the models were developed for analysis of three-dimensional ground-water flow. Total injection rates of between 2,000 and 14,000 gallons per minute under three general well-array plans were determined for a range of residual clay pore pressures of 10 to 70 feet of hydraulic head. The space distributions of the resultant hydraulic heads, illustrated for injection rates of 3,600 and 8 ,400 gallons per minute, indicated that, for the same rate, increasing the number and spread of the injection locations reduces the head gradients within NASA-JSC. (Woodard-USGS)

Garza, Sergio

1977-01-01

329

Monitoring Fish Contaminant Responses to Abatement Actions: Factors that Affect Recovery  

SciTech Connect

Monitoring of contaminant accumulation in fish has been conducted in East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee since 1985. Bioaccumulation trends are examined over a twenty year period coinciding with major pollution abatement actions by a Department of Energy facility at the stream s headwaters. Although EFPC is enriched in many contaminants relative to other local streams, only polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and mercury (Hg) were found to accumulate in the edible portions of fish to levels of human health concern. Mercury concentrations in redbreast sunfish were found to vary with season of collection, sex and size of individual fish. Over the course of the monitoring, waterborne Hg concentrations were reduced[80%; however, this did not translate into a comparable decrease in Hg bioaccumulation at most sites. Mercury bioaccumulation in fish did respond to decreased inputs in the industrialized headwater reach, but paradoxically increased in the lowermost reach of EFPC. As a result, the downstream pattern of Hg concentration in fish changed from one resembling dilution of a headwater point source in the 1980s to a uniform distribution in the 2000s. The reason for this remains unknown, but is hypothesized to involve changes in the chemical form and reactivity of waterborne Hg associated with the removal of residual chlorine and the addition of suspended particulates to the streamflow. PCB concentrations in fish varied greatly from year-to-year, but always exhibited a pronounced downstream decrease, and appeared to respond to management practices that limited episodic inputs from legacy sources within the facility.

Southworth, George R [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Roy, W Kelly [ORNL; Mathews, Teresa J [ORNL

2011-01-01

330

Modelling agro-forestry scenarios for ammonia abatement in the landscape  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ammonia emissions from livestock production can have negative impacts on nearby protected sites and ecosystems that are sensitive to eutrophication and acidification. Trees are effective scavengers of both gaseous and particulate pollutants from the atmosphere making tree belts potentially effective landscape features to support strategies aiming to reduce ammonia impacts. This research used the MODDAS-THETIS a coupled turbulence and deposition turbulence model, to examine the relationships between tree canopy structure and ammonia capture for three source types—animal housing, slurry lagoon, and livestock under a tree canopy. By altering the canopy length, leaf area index, leaf area density, and height of the canopy in the model the capture efficiencies varied substantially. A maximum of 27% of the emitted ammonia was captured by tree canopy for the animal housing source, for the slurry lagoon the maximum was 19%, while the livestock under trees attained a maximum of 60% recapture. Using agro-forestry systems of differing tree structures near ‘hot spots’ of ammonia in the landscape could provide an effective abatement option for the livestock industry that complements existing source reduction measures.

Bealey, W. J.; Loubet, B.; Braban, C. F.; Famulari, D.; Theobald, M. R.; Reis, S.; Reay, D. S.; Sutton, M. A.

2014-12-01

331

Acoustic flight tests of rotorcraft noise-abatement approaches using local differential GPS guidance  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents the test design, instrumentation set-up, data acquisition, and the results of an acoustic flight experiment to study how noise due to blade-vortex interaction (BVI) may be alleviated. The flight experiment was conducted using the NASA/Army Rotorcraft Aircrew Systems Concepts Airborne Laboratory (RASCAL) research helicopter. A Local Differential Global Positioning System (LDGPS) was used for precision navigation and cockpit display guidance. A laser-based rotor state measurement system on board the aircraft was used to measure the main rotor tip-path-plane angle-of-attack. Tests were performed at Crows Landing Airfield in northern California with an array of microphones similar to that used in the standard ICAO/FAA noise certification test. The methodology used in the design of a RASCAL-specific, multi-segment, decelerating approach profile for BVI noise abatement is described, and the flight data pertaining to the flight technical errors and the acoustic data for assessing the noise reduction effectiveness are reported.

Chen, Robert T. N.; Hindson, William S.; Mueller, Arnold W.

1995-01-01

332

Response of meiofaunal and nematode communities to sewage pollution abatement: a field transplantation experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To assess the recovery rate of meiofaunal and nematode communities upon abatement of sewage pollution, a field transplantation experiment was conducted in Tai Tam, which is a non-polluted, shallow subtidal habitat on the southern portion of Hong Kong Island. The sediments used were from one site located in Victoria Harbour that was heavily influenced by sewage pollution, and one site in the outside-harbor area, which was relatively clean. In addition, sediments from Tai Tam were used as a control. Fresh sediments with meiofauna were collected from the aforementioned sites, placed in plastic trays and transplanted to Tai Tam. Sediments were retrieved at the beginning of the experiment and at 1-, 3-, and 8-weeks after transplantation for analysis of the meiofaunal and nematode communities as well as the sediment characteristics. The results showed that the meiofaunal and nematode communities in the control sediments were consistent at the four sampling periods, while it took three and eight weeks, respectively, for the nematode communities from the outside-harbor and inside-harbor sites to become similar to the control. These findings indicated that the relatively poor habitat quality and the nematode community composition in the sewage polluted inside-harbor sediments required a longer time for recovery than samples from the better habitat quality and the nematode community composition in the outside-harbor sediments.

Liu, Xiaoshou; Cheung, Siu Gin; Shin, Paul K. S.

2011-11-01

333

Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 2): Pollution Abatement Services, Oswego, NY, December 1993  

SciTech Connect

This Record of Decision (ROD) documents the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) selection of a remedial action to augment the previously implemented remedial action (PB85-213734) and to address contamination detected outside the containment system at the Pollution Abatement Services (PAS) site. The selected remedial action represents the third operable unit of site remediation. The first operable unit was for removal actions taken from 1973 to 1982 by EPA and NYSDEC. The remedy for the second operable unit which addressed the on-site contaminated groundwater was specified in a ROD issued in June 1984. The selected remedy for this operable unit will incorporate all of the existing components of the second operable unit of site remediation. These components include: the existing containment system (including a cover, slurry wall and leachate and groundwater collection system); treatment and disposal of the collected leachate and groundwater; site security and access control by a perimeter fence; site maintenance; and long-term monitoring.

Not Available

1994-07-01

334

Transport Sector Marginal Abatement Cost Curves in Computable General Equilibrium Model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the last decade, computable general equilibrium (CGE) models have emerged a standard tool for climate policy evaluation due to their abilities to prospectively elucidate the character and magnitude of the economic impacts of energy and environmental policies. Furthermore, marginal abatement cost (MAC) curves which represent GHG emissions reduction potentials and costs can be derived from these top-down economic models. However, most studies have never address MAC curves for a specific sector that have a large coverage of countries which are needed for allocation of optimal emission reductions. This paper aims to explicitly describe the meaning and character of MAC curves for transport sector in a CGE context through using the AIM/CGE Model developed by Toshihiko Masui. It found that the MAC curves derived in this study are the inverse of the general equilibrium reduction function for CO2 emissions. Moreover, the transport sector MAC curves for six regions including USA, EU-15, Japan, China, India, and Brazil, derived from this study are compared to the reduction potentials under 100 USD/tCO2 in 2020 from a bottom-up study. The results showed that the ranking of the regional reduction potentials in transport sector from this study are almost same with the bottom-up study except the ranks of the EU-15 and China. In addition, the range of the reduction potentials from this study is wider and only the USA has higher potentials than those derived from the bottom-up study.

Tippichai, Atit; Fukuda, Atsushi; Morisugi, Hisayoshi

335

Diffuse PM 10 emission factors associated with dust abatement technologies in the ceramic industry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, an analytical methodology is proposed for estimating diffuse dust emissions from bulk solids managing (storage, handling, and transport) activities in the ceramic industry. The methodology is based on analytical methods drawn from the AP-42, US Environmental Protection Agency reports and the Emission Estimation Technique (EET) Manual for Mining from Environment Australia. The analytical methods were evaluated by means of experimental campaigns in open and closed bulk solids storage and managing facilities in ceramic plants. Dust concentrations and meteorological variables were recorded in experimental field studies in order to implement the experimental models: a method based on Reverse Dispersion Modelling (RDM) was applied in open facilities, and the Roof Monitor Method (RMM) was used to estimate diffuse dust emissions in closed facilities. The proposed methodology was applied to 13 ceramic plants with different technological scenarios. The methodology enabled the diffuse PM 10 emission factors associated with different dust abatement technologies to be determined. This methodology thus allows the Best Available Techniques (BATs) to be selected for reducing these emissions in ceramic and similar facilities.

Monfort, E.; Sanfélix, V.; Celades, I.; Gomar, S.; Martín, F.; Aceña, B.; Pascual, A.

2011-12-01

336

Formation of fluorine for abating sulfur hexafluoride in an atmospheric-pressure plasma environment.  

PubMed

In this study, a large amount of toxic and reactive fluorine (F(2)) was produced in the atmospheric-pressure microwave discharge environment by adding additives to abate sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)). When H(2) was added, the selectivity of F(2) was as high as 89.7% at inlet H(2)/SF(6) molar ratio (R(H2)) = 1. Moreover, the conversion of SF(6) significantly increased from 33.7% (without additive) to 97.7% (R(H2) = 5) at [SF(6)]=1%, and 0.8 kW because the addition of H(2) inhibited the recombination of SF(6). With the addition of O(2), H(2)+O(2) or H(2)O, the selectivity of F(2) was still greater than 81.2%, though toxic byproducts, including SO(2)F(2), SOF(2), SOF(4), SO(2), NO, and HF, were detected. From optical emission spectra, SF(2) was identified, revealing the SF(6) dissociation process might be carried out rapidly through an electron impaction reaction: SF(6)-->SF(2)+4F. Subsequently, F(2) was formed via the recombination of F atoms. PMID:18280035

Tsai, Cheng-Hsien; Shao, Jen-Min

2008-08-30

337

Engaging the Next Generation of Faculty  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

At a roundtable meeting of 18 college and university presidents convened by American Council on Education (ACE) in the spring of 2007, there was a worried discussion about the perception that younger faculty currently entering the professoriate are increasingly less engaged in the affairs of their institutions, in fulfilling their responsibilities…

Maxwell, David

2009-01-01

338

Pedagogies of Engagement: Classroom-Based Practices  

Microsoft Academic Search

Educators, researchers, and policy makers have advocated student involvement for some time as an essential aspect of meaningful learning. In the past twenty years engineering educators have implemented several means of better engaging their undergraduate students, including active and cooperative learning, learning communities, service learning, cooperative education, inquiry and problem-based learning, and team projects. This paper focuses on classroom-based pedagogies

KARL A. SMITH; SHERI D. SHEPPARD; DAVID W. JOHNSON

2005-01-01

339

Social Work in the Engaged University  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article identifies the importance of educating social work students and enlisting social work faculty to embrace the university-community engagement arena as a critical subfield of community practice. Through the lens of social work knowledge, values, and skills, the authors present three case studies of social workers who are working in the…

Martin, Elisa M.; Pyles, Loretta

2013-01-01

340

Visual Journaling: Engaging Adolescents in Sketchbook Activities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A wonderful way to engage high-school students in sketchbook activities is to have them create journals that combine images with words to convey emotions, ideas, and understandings. Visual journaling is a creative way for them to share their experiences and personal responses to life's events in visual and written form. Through selecting and…

Cummings, Karen L.

2011-01-01

341

Value Perceptions as Influences upon Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study was designed to assess whether changes in stakeholders' perceptions about the value generated by an institution might influence the nature of their engagement with it. Quantitative and qualitative analysis of research data revealed a positive correlation between stakeholders who believed an institution generated social or economic value…

Swanson, Lee A.

2009-01-01

342

Higher Education and Civic Engagement: Comparative Perspectives  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Higher Education and Civic Engagement provides an original and challenging contribution to contemporary debates on the civic purpose of higher education. It explores teaching and learning, research, and service in a range of international contexts. This book is essential reading for higher education leaders, faculty, administrators, and members of…

McIlrath, Lorraine, Ed.; Lyons, Ann, Ed.; Munck, Ronaldo, Ed.

2012-01-01

343

Advisory Boards: Gateway to Business Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Interest has been growing in how to build or manage an effective business advisory board. Developing an advisory board is crucial to keeping CTE programs relevant and viable by engaging the support of business and industry. This article delves into how to build and manage a board, and how to re-energize boards that already exist but may be lacking.

Meeder, Hans; Pawlowski, Brett

2012-01-01

344

From Global Knowledge to Global Civic Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, I argue that student learning is enhanced when civic engagement is a component of international education initiatives. When only presented with knowledge about global challenges, students can become frustrated and overwhelmed unless they also understand how they might contribute to solutions. Political science programs are…

Lorenzini, Michelle

2013-01-01

345

Workplace affordances and individual engagement at work  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses factors that influence how learning in workplaces proceeds. It focuses on the dual considerations of how workplaces afford opportunities for learning and how individuals elect to engage in activities and with the guidance provided by the workplace. Together, these dual bases for coparticipation at work, and the relations between them, are central to the kinds of learning

Stephen Billett

346

Measuring Master's Student Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Master's education is the largest segment of graduate education in the United States yet there is a paucity of research about how master's students experience their programs. Empirical research on student engagement--defined as the time and effort students devote to activities that are linked to educational outcomes and what institutions…

O'Dair, Katherine G.

2012-01-01

347

What Do We Know about Civic Engagement?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A decade ago, research on the civic engagement and learning of young people was still in a "bear market" (Cook 1985). The body of literature was strikingly small, considering that the future of democracy depends on the preparation of young citizens. Today, the situation is dramatically different. There is a torrent of research on youth civic…

Levine, Peter

2011-01-01

348

Sexual Meaning Systems of Engaged Couples.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Administered Sexual Meaning Survey to 526 couples. Findings supported hypothesis that engaged couples would be less discrepant in sexual meanings than randomly paired men and women. Regression analyses provided evidence that level of education, church attendance, discrepancy in religious affiliation, cohabitation status, and agreement on family…

Lally, Catherine Fourre; Maddock, James W.

1994-01-01

349

Engaging All Students with "Impossible Geometry"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Geometry is an area in which Australian students performed particularly poorly on the 2007 Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS). One innovative area of recreational geometry that has rich potential to engage and challenge a wide variety of students is "impossible geometry." An impossible geometric object is a…

Wiest, Lynda R.; Ayebo, Abraham; Dornoo, Michael D.

2010-01-01

350

The Role of Choice in Reader Engagement  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two experiments investigated the effect of choice on cognitive and affective engagement during reading. Both experiments compared college students who either selected what they read or were assigned the same story without being allowed to choose. Experiment 1 found that unrestricted choice heightened favorable affective perceptions of the reading experience compared with denied-choice and control groups but had no effect

Gregory Schraw; Marcy F. Reisetter

1998-01-01

351

Applying employer brand management to employee engagement  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – This paper aims to examine the degree to which employer brand management is being deployed to support internal employee engagement, in addition to its more common application in external image building and talent acquisition. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – This paper presents findings from an international benchmark survey conducted among 104 companies actively involved in employer brand development, alongside a more

Bernard Kunerth; Richard Mosley

2011-01-01

352

Adolescents and the New Literacies: Writing Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article shares the results of a 3-year study of the use of threaded discussion groups within intact eighth-grade classrooms in a middle school in Southern California. Using mixed-methods data collection and analysis, it addresses questions about how technology may be used effectively to create engaged writers and how student access to…

Wolsey, Thomas DeVere; Grisham, Dana L.

2007-01-01

353

TSU Space Program Student Engagement Report  

E-print Network

TSU Space Program Student Engagement Report FY 2012-2013 Mission Statement The Titan Student Centers Governing Board allocates space in the Titan Student Union each semester to give recognized clubs and organizations space to plan events, conduct small meetings and store club/organization property. Program

de Lijser, Peter

354

UBC Linguistics Dept. Engagement with Endangered Languages  

E-print Network

UBC Linguistics Dept. Engagement with Endangered Languages University of British Columbia - Draft Nata (Northern Tanzania, East Africa) ·Speaker Linguist/Community Member (current grad student) ·Documenting his language for both linguists and learners. ·Involved in Partiipcatory Research with community

Michelson, David G.

355

Promoting the Priorities of Practitioner Research Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One of the aims of the Library and Information Science Research Coalition is to promote library and information science practitioner research. Successfully meeting this aim should result in greater use of the existing knowledge base and the creation of new knowledge on Library and Information Science (LIS) practice. LIS practitioner engagement in…

Hall, Hazel

2010-01-01

356

Elevating Engagement and Community in Online Courses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Community, while inherent in assumptions about online education, rarely materializes as an integral component of the experience. Misconceptions and misguided motivations can derail participation and engagement in the online setting. Creating a successful online community is dependent on knowing what works in the face-to-face environment and…

Cuthbertson, William; Falcone, Andrea

2014-01-01

357

Facebook Use and Engagement of College Freshmen  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this research was to investigate the effects of intensity of Facebook use and compare the effects of Facebook use with retention program participation on the engagement of college freshmen. The sample consisted of 141 freshmen at the University of West Florida (UWF). The participants were surveyed using questions from the National…

Burkart, Edith Jenae

2013-01-01

358

Transformative Professional Development and Teacher Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This quasi-experimental study attempts to estimate the effect that participation in Courage to Teach (CTT), a transformative professional development (TPD) program, has on subsequent engagement with teaching. The primary focus of a TPD program is on the "person" who teaches, as opposed to content or technique. The subjects of the study are a…

Geil, Kimberly E.

2011-01-01

359

Student Engagement in South African Higher Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The relationship between student engagement and student outcome achievement is well documented in the higher education literature for US students and has recently gained traction for students in other countries such as Australia, New Zealand, Malaysia, and England. Yet, few studies have examined this relationship in countries with evolving or…

Wawrzynski, Matthew R.; Heck, Ashleigh M.; Remley, Christopher T.

2012-01-01

360

Intellectual Engagement: A Search for Practical Meaning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Three authors, writing from different perspectives in different time periods, share the view that students' sense of personal agency is fundamental to their intellectual engagement and deep understanding. The learner's imagination leads to powerful questions that grow when exposed to processes of productive inquiry and social interaction and when…

Milton, Penny; Kennedy, Robert

2011-01-01

361

South Yorkshire Coalfields Engaging coalfield communities  

E-print Network

South Yorkshire Coalfields Engaging coalfield communities objectives The transformation of former more places for birds to nest'. The wishes are planted on-site and they get involved in making sculptures based on local history and wildlife. · Artwork designed by primary schools and painted by local

362

"Red Eyes": Engaging Emotions in Multicultural Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Engaging emotions in multicultural education is an important but a relatively neglected issue in teacher education. This essay calls for pedagogical attention to the role of emotions and attempts to analyze how teaching autobiographies and films sheds light on the emotional dynamics of multicultural education. Two films, "The Color of Fear", and…

Wang, Hongyu

2008-01-01

363

Geography, Community Engagement and Citizenship: Introduction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is strong evidence that all students can gain significant learning benefit when their courses include opportunities for engagement with real-world problems, beyond the walls of their higher education institution (HEI). Internationally, cross-disciplinary discussions are increasing around the value of student learning that involves community…

McEwen, Lindsey

2013-01-01

364

Fieldwork, Heritage and Engaging Landscape Texts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper outlines and analyses efforts to critically engage with "heritage" through the development and responses to a series of undergraduate residential fieldwork trips held in the North Coast of Jamaica. The ways in which we read heritage through varied "texts"--specifically, material landscapes, guided heritage tours,…

Mains, Susan P.

2014-01-01

365

Advocating and Modeling the Engaged University  

E-print Network

Engagement/Service-Learning #12;Outreach is a form of scholarship that cuts across teaching, research-based Evaluation · Promoting Civic Literacy · Measuring Quality Outreach · Marketing Outreach Activities #12, beliefs, morals, ethics, world views Mutual understanding Mutual agreement Group/Family relationships

366

Engaging Emergent Writers with Anchor Lessons  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This project focused on the creation of curriculum that would support writing development for emergent writers aged 5 to 7 years old. The research-base of the project explored how beginning writers can be scaffolded in their attempts to learn how to write. Past research was also examined to discover how emergent writers can be engaged in…

Meyer, Jamie; Weih, Timothy G.

2013-01-01

367

Interteach and Student Engagement in Political Science  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Interteach" is a method of guided discussion and feedback developed by Thomas Boyce and Philip Hineline in 2002. This method, primarily used in the psychology classroom, encourages greater student engagement and responsibility for learning by requiring extensive student preparation, peer-to-peer instruction, and peer evaluation. How can…

Slagter, Tracy H.; Scribner, Druscilla L.

2014-01-01

368

Barriers to Citizen Engagement in Developing Countries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Developing countries often face distinct and formidable challenges in their efforts to build citizen engagement and democratic governance processes. In this article, we examine these challenges and consider how they relate to international efforts to foster democratic governance in developing countries. We consider the impact on developing nations of external incentives, the absence of democratic culture and civil society, profound

Janet Denhardt; Larry Terry; Edgar Ramirez Delacruz; Ljubinka Andonoska

2009-01-01

369

Engagement as Co-Generative Theorizing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To meet current and ever shifting problems people continually need new and better ways to attend to, talk about, and respond in the world. All communities can have an impoverished language for talking about human interaction and making decisions in times of fundamental and rapid change. Three current impoverishments are discussed. Engaged

Deetz, Stanley

2008-01-01

370

the Engaged UOE Centers and Institutes  

E-print Network

and food safety ­ Urban and regional development ­ Environmental health ­ Public policy ­ Technology usability and accessibility Colleges & Academic Units Departments Schools Institutes Centers MSU on Institutional Cooperation: Committee on Engagement ­ National Association of State Universities and Land Grant

371

Social engagement and attachment: a phylogenetic perspective.  

PubMed

This article focuses on the importance of social engagement and the behavioral and neurophysiological mechanisms that allow individuals to reduce psychological and physical distance. A model of social engagement derived from the Polyvagal Theory is presented. The model emphasizes phylogeny as an organizing principle and includes the following points: (1) there are well-defined neural circuits to support social engagement behaviors and the defensive strategies of fight, flight, and freeze; (2) these neural circuits form a phylogenetically organized hierarchy; (3) without being dependent on conscious awareness, the nervous system evaluates risk in the environment and regulates the expression of adaptive behavior to match the neuroception of a safe, dangerous, or life-threatening environment; (4) social engagement behaviors and the benefits of the physiological states associated with social support require a neuroception of safety; (5) social behaviors associated with nursing, reproduction, and the formation of strong pair bonds require immobilization without fear; and (6) immobilization without fear is mediated by a co-opting of the neural circuit regulating defensive freezing behaviors through the involvement of oxytocin, a neuropeptide in mammals involved in the formation of social bonds. The model provides a phylogenetic interpretation of the neural mechanisms mediating the behavioral and physiological features associated with stress and several psychiatric disorders. PMID:14998870

Porges, Stephen W

2003-12-01

372

Workplace Engagement and Generational Differences in Values  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article summarizes literature on workplace engagement, an issue that affects organizations' financial results and individuals' personal lives. The newest of the four generations in the workplace, Millennials, were recently shown to have different values than the other two prevalent generations. Surveys taken by 16,000 high school seniors of…

Schullery, Nancy M.

2013-01-01

373

Attaining Carnegie's Community-Engagement Classification  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Now that the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching has designated a first round of institutions that meet its criteria for engagement with their communities, in this article, the authors offer their reflections on the process for other colleges and universities preparing similar applications. They learned a great deal about their own…

Zuiches, James J.

2008-01-01

374

Helping Young People Engage with Scientists  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There can be multiple benefits of scientists engaging with young people, including motivation and inspiration for all involved. But there are risks, particularly if scientists do not consider the interests and needs of young people or listen to what they have to say. We argue that "dialogue" between scientists, young people and teachers…

Leggett, Maggie; Sykes, Kathy

2014-01-01

375

CONFERENCE ANNOUNCEMENT African Engagements: On whose terms?  

E-print Network

and the United States, emerging powers like China and India have stepped up their engagement, in what some have education and basic research in the face of equally daunting challenges including poverty, and post post-Cold war order is not in doubt. From being in a state of neglect and marginality in the immediate

376

Tutors' Forum: Engaging Distributed Communities of Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The need to engage students studying at a distance in order to reduce isolation, foster a sense of belonging and enhance learning has received significant attention over the past few years. Conversely, very little research has focused on teachers working in this type of environment. In fact, we argue, they appear to be the forgotten dimension in…

Beaumont, Rosemary; Stirling, Jeannette; Percy, Alisa

2009-01-01

377

Uncertainty and Engagement with Learning Games  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Uncertainty may be an important component of the motivation provided by learning games, especially when associated with gaming rather than learning. Three studies are reported that explore the influence of gaming uncertainty on engagement with computer-based learning games. In the first study, children (10-11 years) played a simple maths quiz.…

Howard-Jones, Paul A.; Demetriou, Skevi

2009-01-01

378

Engaging Millennial Students in Leadership Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Leadership, regardless of definition, cannot be taught by a textbook alone, and if educators are to embrace the idea of highly engaged, holistic classrooms for Millennials, they must teach students to participate in real changes as both leaders and followers through practice and experiences. As new generations of young people mature and enter…

Arensdorf, Jill R.; Andenoro, Anthony C.

2009-01-01

379

Material Matters: Increasing Emotional Engagement in Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Organizational scholars and neuroscientists suggest that when people are more emotionally engaged, they learn more effectively. Clinical art therapists suggest that the experience as well as the expression of emotions can be enabled or constrained by different materials. So then, what materials can be employed by management educators to achieve…

Taylor, Steven S.; Statler, Matt

2014-01-01

380

[Deterritorialization of artisanal fisheries in Sepetiba Bay (State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil): an overview of occupational health and environmental issues].  

PubMed

This paper outlines the consequences of deterritorialization of artisan fishing folk in Sepetiba Bay in the State of Rio de Janeiro on the occupational and health status of this population living in the area. By means of the concept of social determinants in health, it compares the new patterns of growth in the region with the living and occupational health conditions of these workers. This relationship was explained after conducting semi-structured interviews and focus groups. The results point to a strong relationship between the port undertakings and the installations of the nuclear program of the Brazilian Navy with subsistence and extractive fishing, contributing to an increase in the time spent at sea and the inherent occupational risks involved in subsistence fishing. This is in addition to the economic and environmental impacts on the productivity and quality of fishing production, which are a direct consequence of the dredging works and the new navigation and anchoring norms established and imposed by the state. PMID:25272109

Freitas, Marcelo Bessa; Rodrigues, Silvio Cesar Alves

2014-10-01

381

Novel starters for old processes: use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains isolated from artisanal sourdough for craft beer production at a brewery scale.  

PubMed

The deliberate inoculation of yeast strains isolated from food matrices such as wine or bread, could allow the transfer of novel properties to beer. In this work, the feasibility of the use of baker's yeast strains as starters for craft beer production has been evaluated at laboratory and brewery scale. Nine out of 12 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains isolated from artisanal sourdoughs metabolized 2 % maltose, glucose and trehalose and showed growth rates and cell populations higher than those of the brewer's strain Safbrew-S33. Analysis of allelic variation at 12 microsatellite loci clustered seven baker's strains and Safbrew-S33 in the main group of bread isolates. Chemical analyses of beers produced at a brewery scale showed significant differences among the beers produced with the baker's strain S38 or Safbrew-S33, while no significant differences were observed when S38 or the brewer's strain Safbrew-F2 was used for re-fermentation. The sensory profile of beers obtained with S38 or the brewer's yeasts did not show significant differences, thus suggesting that baker's strains of S. cerevisiae could represent a reservoir of biodiversity for the selection of starter strains for craft beer production. PMID:25387611

Marongiu, Antonella; Zara, Giacomo; Legras, Jean-Luc; Del Caro, Alessandra; Mascia, Ilaria; Fadda, Costantino; Budroni, Marilena

2015-01-01

382

Using a Partial Sum Method and GPS Tracking Data to Identify Area Restricted Search by Artisanal Fishers at Moored Fish Aggregating Devices in the Commonwealth of Dominica  

PubMed Central

Foragers must often travel from a central place to exploit aggregations of prey. These patches can be identified behaviorally when a forager shifts from travel to area restricted search, identified by a decrease in speed and an increase in sinuosity of movement. Faster, more directed movement is associated with travel. Differentiating foraging behavior at patches from travel to patches is important for a variety of research questions and has now been made easier by the advent of small, GPS devices that can track forager movement with high resolution. In the summer and fall of 2012, movement data were collected from GPS devices placed on foraging trips originating in the artisanal fishing village of Desa Ikan (pseudonym), on the east coast of the Caribbean island nation of the Commonwealth Dominica. Moored FADs are human-made structures anchored to the ocean floor with fish attraction material on or near the surface designed to effectively create a resource patch. The ultimate goal of the research is to understand how property rights are emerging after the introduction of fish aggregating device (FAD) technology at the site in 1999. This paper reports on research to identify area-restricted search foraging behavior at FAD patches. For 22 foraging trips simultaneous behavioral observations were made to ground-truth the GPS movement data. Using a cumulative sum method, area restricted search was identified as negative deviations from the mean travel speed and the method was able to correctly identify FAD patches in every case. PMID:25647288

Alvard, Michael; Carlson, David; McGaffey, Ethan

2015-01-01

383

Toward quantifying water pollution abatement in response to installing buffers on crop land.  

PubMed

The scientific research literature is reviewed (i) for evidence of how much reduction in nonpoint source pollution can be achieved by installing buffers on crop land, (ii) to summarize important factors that can affect this response, and (iii) to identify remaining major information gaps that limit our ability to make probable estimates. This review is intended to clarify the current scientific foundation of the USDA and similar buffer programs designed in part for water pollution abatement and to highlight important research needs. At this time, research reports are lacking that quantify a change in pollutant amounts (concentration and/or load) in streams or lakes in response to converting portions of cropped land to buffers. Most evidence that such a change should occur is indirect, coming from site-scale studies of individual functions of buffers that act to retain pollutants from runoff: (1) reduce surface runoff from fields, (2) filter surface runoff from fields, (3) filter groundwater runoff from fields, (4) reduce bank erosion, and (5) filter stream water. The term filter is used here to encompass the range of specific processes that act to reduce pollutant amounts in runoff flow. A consensus of experimental research on functions of buffers clearly shows that they can substantially limit sediment runoff from fields, retain sediment and sediment-bound pollutants from surface runoff, and remove nitrate N from groundwater runoff. Less certain is the magnitude of these functions compared to the cultivated crop condition that buffers would replace within the context of buffer installation programs. Other evidence suggests that buffer installation can substantially reduce bank erosion sources of sediment under certain circumstances. Studies have yet to address the degree to which buffer installation can enhance channel processes that remove pollutants from stream flow. Mathematical models offer an alternative way to develop estimates for water quality changes in response to buffer installation. Numerous site conditions and buffer design factors have been identified that can determine the magnitude of each buffer function. Accurate models must be able to account for and integrate these functions and factors over whole watersheds. At this time, only pollutant runoff and surface filtration functions have been modeled to this extent. Capability is increasing as research data is produced, models become more comprehensive, and new techniques provide means to describe variable conditions across watersheds. A great deal of professional judgment is still required to extrapolate current knowledge of buffer functions into broadly accurate estimates of water pollution abatement in response to buffer installation on crop land. Much important research remains to be done to improve this capability. The greatest need is to produce direct quantitative evidence of this response. Such data would confirm the hypothesis and enable direct testing of watershed-scale prediction models as they become available. Further study of individual pollution control functions is also needed, particularly to generate comparative evidence for how much they can be manipulated through buffer installation and management. PMID:11568840

Dosskey, M G

2001-11-01

384

Youth engagement in high schools: Developing a multidimensional, critical approach to improving engagement for all students  

Microsoft Academic Search

What keeps students interested and engaged in school? Unfortunately, in today’s climate of increased rigor in classrooms,\\u000a we are simultaneously losing sight of the need to provide students with an education that is both challenging and stimulating.\\u000a In this paper, we discuss youth disengagement and offer suggestions to improve our overall knowledge of academic engagement\\u000a issues. We discuss the historical

Susan Yonezawa; Makeba Jones; Francine Joselowsky

2009-01-01

385

Dioxin abatement strategies and mass balance at a municipal waste management plant.  

PubMed

Since the thermal management of municipal solid waste (MSW) is considered to be one of the major sources of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs), the purpose of this study was to show the results of a dioxin abatement program performed in the municipal waste incineration (MWI) plant of Tarragona (NE Spain). Previously, stack gas emission levels of PCDDs/PCDFs around 3.26 ng I-TEQ/Nm3 were determined when the gas-cleaning system consisted only of an electrostatic precipitator (ESP). Decreased levels, below 0.1 ng I-TEQ/ Nm3, were observed when a new air pollution control system was installed. This new system was improved by the injection of activated carbon, which helped to lower the levels of PCDDs/PCDFs to around 0.01 ng I-TEQ/Nm3. Considering the absence of a particular impact on herbages, soils, and ambient air around the plant, as reported in previous works, and the hypothesis that a modern installation could become a sink for dioxins instead of a source, a dioxin mass balance was evaluated. The study compared in a large-scale MWI plant the levels of PCDDs/PCDFs of all input and output contributors (MSW, ambient air, stack gas emission, fly ash, and slag) forming part of the inventory collected in various monitoring campaigns. The findings revealed a remarkable homogeneity in output values (between 1.19 and 2.62 ng I-TEQ/yr) in contrast to the large variability observed in input values. In the first sampling campaign, the dioxin content in MSW was around 64.15 ng I-TEQ/kg, and a negative balance of 7.68 g I-TEQ/yr was calculated. However, in the latest campaign, levels were about 2.36 ng I-TEQ/kg MSW, resulting in a positive balance of 2.28 g I-TEQ/yr. PMID:11811497

Abad, E; Adrados, M A; Caixach, J; Rivera, Josep

2002-01-01

386

Improvements in dioxin abatement strategies at a municipal waste management plant in Barcelona.  

PubMed

This study presents the results of a dioxin abatement programme undertaken in the municipal waste incineration plant of Montcada i Reixac (Barcelona, Spain) after the replacement of an obsolete air cleaning device by a new flue gas treatment system. A number of sampling campaigns were conducted with the aim of characterising stack gas emission levels of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs)/polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and to evaluate initial specifications of dioxin stack gas emission values below 0.1 ng I-TEQ/Nm(3). Preliminary results revealed levels between 44 and 111 ng I-TEQ/Nm(3) when the gas-cleaning system consisted only of an old electrostatic precipitator (ESP). Decreased levels around 15 ng I-TEQ/Nm(3) were observed when the semi-dry scrubber began to operate and the ESP was switched off. Again, remarkable dioxin removal was observed after the installation of the fabric filter and levels around 0.3-0.4 ng I-TEQ/Nm(3) were soon achieved. Nevertheless, the limit of 0.1 ng I-TEQ/Nm(3) was reached by additional injection of activated carbon which helped to lower PCDD/PCDF levels to around 0.036 ng I-TEQ/Nm(3). The results also demonstrated a significant change in the dioxin distribution present in combustion-derived materials (stack gas emission, bottom ash and solid waste from gas treatment). The major dioxin fraction was found in gaseous matrices before the flue gas control system was upgraded. After this step, the major dioxin fraction content was observed in solid waste from gas treatment. PMID:12547331

Abad, Esteban; Caixach, Josep; Rivera, Josep

2003-03-01

387

Non-thermal plasma techniques for abatement of volatile organic compounds and nitrogen oxides  

SciTech Connect

Non-thermal plasma processing is an emerging technology for the abatement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) in atmospheric-pressure air streams. Either electrical discharge or electron beam methods can produce these plasmas. Each of these methods can be implemented in many ways. There are many types of electrical discharge reactors, the variants depending on the electrode configuration and electrical power supply (pulsed, AC or DC). Two of the more extensively investigated types of discharge reactors are based on the pulsed corona and dielectric-barrier discharge. Recently, compact low-energy (<200 keV) electron accelerators have been developed to meet the requirements of industrial applications such as crosslinking of polymer materials, curing of solvent-free coatings, and drying of printing inks. Special materials have also been developed to make the window thin and rugged. Some of these compact electron beam sources are already commercially available and could be utilized for many pollution control applications. In this paper we will present a comparative assessment of various nonthermal plasma reactors. The thrust of our work has been two-fold: (1) to understand the scalability of various non-thermal plasma reactors by focusing on the energy efficiency of the electron and chemical kinetics, and (2) to identify the byproducts to ensure that the effluent gases from the processor are either benign or much easier and less expensive to dispose of compared to the original pollutants. We will present experimental results using a compact electron beam reactor and various types of electrical discharge reactors. We have used these reactors to study the removal of NO{sub x} and a wide variety of VOCS. We have studied the effects of background gas composition and gas temperature on the decomposition chemistry.

Penetrante, B.M.; Hsiao, M.C.; Bardsley, J.N.; Merritt, B.T.; Vogtlin, G.E.; Wallman, P.H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Kuthi, A.; Burkhart, C.P.; Bayless, J.R. [First Point Scientific, Inc., Agoura Hills, CA (United States)

1995-12-04

388

Photolysis of inorganic chloramines and efficiency of trichloramine abatement by UV treatment of swimming pool water.  

PubMed

Trichloramine, one of the three inorganic chloramines (mono-, di- and trichloramine), is a problematic disinfection by-product in recreational pool water since it causes skin and eye irritations as well as irritations of the respiratory tract. The most commonly used chloramine mitigation strategy in pool water is UV treatment. Experiments with membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS) confirmed that inorganic chloramines are effectively degraded by UV irradiation with low-pressure (LP) and medium-pressure (MP) mercury lamps (apparent quantum yields (QY): NH2Cl = 0.50 (LP) and 0.31 (MP) mol einstein(-1), NHCl2: 1.06 (LP) and 0.85 (MP) mol einstein(-1)). Trichloramine showed the fastest depletion with a quantum yield slightly above 2 mol einstein(-1) in purified (LP and MP) and pool water (MP). This high quantum yield can partly be explained by reactions involving OH radicals (purified water) and the reaction of trichloramine with moieties formed during UV irradiation of pool water. The presence of free chlorine affects trichloramine degradation (QY: ?1.5 mol einstein(-1)) since it scavenges OH radicals and competes with trichloramine for reactive species (e.g. organic amines). Measurements in a pool facility revealed that the installed UV reactors degraded trichloramine by 40-50% as expected from laboratory experiments. However, trichloramine reduction in the pools was less pronounced than in the UV reactors. Model calculations combining pool hydraulics with formation/abatement of trichloramine showed that there was a fast trichloramine formation in the pool from the residual chlorine and nitrogenous precursors. The main factors influencing trichloramine concentrations in pool water are the free chlorine concentration and the UV treatment in combination with the recirculation rate through the water treatment system. PMID:24699420

Soltermann, Fabian; Widler, Tobias; Canonica, Silvio; von Gunten, Urs

2014-06-01

389

Long term trends in sewage abatement and water quality in the Hudson-Raritan Estuary  

SciTech Connect

Long-term trends in dissolved oxygen (DO) and coliform bacteria concentrations are used to evaluate the impact of 70 years of sewage abatement and treatment in the Hudson-Raritan Estuary near New York City (NYC). Regional construction of wastewater treatment plants since the 1920`s has reduced discharges of untreated sewage into the estuary from approximately 47 M{sup 3}/S in 1936 to less than 0.1 M{sup 3}/S by 1994. From at least 1922 through the early 1960s, average summer DO percent saturation in the Hudson River varied between 35--50% in surface waters and 25--40% in bottom waters. Beginning in the late 1970s, DO concentrations increased through the 1980s and especially into the 1990s, coinciding with the secondary treatment upgrade of the 7.4 M3/s North River plant in the spring of 1991. Average summer percent saturation in the early 1 990s exceeded 80% in surface waters and 60% in bottom waters. In addition, summer DO minima increased from less than 1.5 mg/L in the early 1970s, to greater than 3.0 mg/L in the 1990s, and the duration of hypoxia during summer months has been reduced. While this general trend has been observed throughout the estuary, some areas have displayed recent declines in DO, possibly due to increasing eutrophication. Total coliforms also display strong decreasing trends from the 1960s into the 1990s, with declines attributed to plant construction and expansion, and improved operation of the sewer system. Metal loadings have also decreased significantly. Signs of improved ecosystem quality include reopened beaches and shellfish beds, re-infestation of woodpilings by marine wood-borers, and the resurgence of wading birds in several areas of the estuary.

Brosnan, T.M.; O`Shea, M.L. [New York City Dept. of Environmental Protection, NY (United States)

1995-12-31

390

Work engagement in nursing practice: a relational ethics perspective.  

PubMed

The concept of work engagement has existed in business and psychology literature for some time. There is a significant body of research that positively correlates work engagement with organizational outcomes. To date, the interest in the work engagement of nurses has primarily been related to these organizational outcomes. However, the value of work engagement in nursing practice is not only an issue of organizational interest, but of ethical interest. The dialogue on work engagement in nursing must expand to include the ethical importance of engagement. The relational nature of work engagement and the multiple levels of influence on nurses' work engagement make a relational ethics approach to work engagement in nursing appropriate and necessary. Within a relational ethics perspective, it is evident that work engagement enables nurses to have meaningful relationships in their work and subsequently deliver ethical care. In this article, I argue that work engagement is essential for ethical nursing practice. If engagement is essential for ethical nursing practice, the environmental and organizational factors that influence work engagement must be closely examined to pursue the creation of moral communities within healthcare environments. PMID:24714045

Keyko, Kacey

2014-12-01

391

Getting Students to Read: Anticipation Guides as Tools to Encourage Engagement with Academic Texts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Supporting the reading development of college students is the responsibility of all professors. As experts in the field, with experience navigating and interpreting readings in a particular discipline, professors are obligated to think of themselves as master artisans apprenticing their students to the craft of reading. Texts in all subject areas…

Kaback, Suzanne

2012-01-01

392

Brownbag Presentation Exceptional Students, Marginal Lives: Achievement and Civic Engagement  

E-print Network

Brownbag Presentation Exceptional Students, Marginal Lives: Achievement and Civic Engagement Among achievement and higher education access of Latino students. His most recent work examines the achievement motivation and civic engagement of undocumented students. Before joining CGU, Professor Perez worked

Rose, Michael R.

393

Agile Customer Engagement: a Longitudinal Qualitative Case Study  

E-print Network

Agile Customer Engagement: a Longitudinal Qualitative Case Study Geir Kjetil Hanssen SINTEF ICT S Customer Engagement, Agile Process, Stakeholder Management, Process Transition. 1. INTRODUCTION Software characteristics of traditional approaches, agile methodologies suggest a different approach, emphasizing close

394

PRINCIPAL'S TASK FORCE ON DIVERSITY, EXCELLENCE AND COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT  

E-print Network

1 PRINCIPAL'S TASK FORCE ON DIVERSITY, EXCELLENCE AND COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT (DRAFT) Final Report)............................................................. 13 5. PART FIVE, CONCLUSION: MOVING FORWARD: DIVERSITY, EXCELLENCE, AND COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT COMMUNITIES ...................... 22 7.2 ON RECRUITING AND RETAINING A DIVERSE STUDENT BODY

Barthelat, Francois

395

Effects of temephos (Abate? 4E) on fiddler crabs (Uca pugnax and Uca minax) on a Delaware salt marsh  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The non-target effects of temephos (as Abate 4E, 44.6% active ingredient) on fiddler crabs were examined on the salt marsh at Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), near Dover, DE. Six 170 x 170 m plots were established; 3 were sprayed on 4 occasions at a rate of 1.5 fl oz/acre (0.054 kg active ingredient/ha) and 3 were controls. On each plot, marsh fiddler crab (Uca pugnax) populations were monitored by repeatedly counting the number of burrow holes in 2 counting areas marked out along tidal guts. One half of each counting area was covered with bird netting to evaluate sublethal toxic effects, which, if present, could result in increased susceptibility to bird predation. A statistically significant linear association was established between the number of holes and the number of crabs. No significant differences were found in the numbers of holes (or crabs) in the sprayed vs. control plots and in the covered vs. uncovered sections. However, survival of juvenile crabs in in situ bioassays was significantly reduced (16% lower) by the spraying. Median acetylcholinesterase activity in claw muscle of red-jointed fiddler crabs (U. minax) collected 2 days after an operational spray with Abate 4E was significantly reduced (28% lower) compared to unsprayed crabs. In view of the toxicity to juvenile crabs and the cholinesterase inhibition, we recommend continued monitoring and research for non-target impacts of Abate 4E on fiddler crabs to establish whether the reported level of cholinesterase inhibition results in acute or chronic toxicity.

Pinkney, A.E.; McGowan, P.C.; Murphy, D.R.; Lowe, T.P.; Sparling, D.W.; Meredith, W.H.

1999-01-01

396

Identity and civic engagement in adolescence.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to examine the links between identity (statuses and processes) and adolescent civic engagement (volunteer and political participation). Participants were 392 Italian high school students (42% males) aged 14-20 years (M(age) = 16.23 years; SD(age) = 1.53) who completed a self-report questionnaire. First, using a person-centered approach, we found that achieved adolescents were more involved in volunteer activities, reported higher civic efficacy, and stronger aspirations to contribute to their communities than their diffused counterparts. Second, by means of a variable-centered approach, we demonstrated that the link between identity processes (i.e., commitment and in-depth exploration) and past and future volunteer and political participation was mediated by social responsibility. Implications of the findings for current understanding of the link between adolescent identity formation and civic engagement are discussed and suggestions for future research are outlined. PMID:21868083

Crocetti, Elisabetta; Jahromi, Parissa; Meeus, Wim

2012-06-01

397

Overcoming Breakdowns and Engaging the Public  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With strong climate science evidence readily available, why do major segments of the public remain disengaged? Decades of social science research and practical communications experience indicate that prioritizing and structuring information, choosing appropriate messengers, and adapting to audience interests and learning styles are vital, yet often ignored criteria. This session will explore key differences between communications models within the science community and effective outreach to non-scientist audiences. Here, prioritizing goals, understanding preconceptions and identifying intervention opportunities require careful examination. "Public engagement" is defined as encouraging and enabling people to make informed choices on their own behalf. Crucial barriers identified in economics, political psychology and audience segmentation research will be addressed, and recommendations for more effective engagement will emerge including: defining realistic goals, simplifying science content accurately, avoiding values conflicts that prevent learning, enlisting trusted messengers, and matching a call to action to the scale of the challenge in ways people can embrace.

Bowman, T. E.

2012-12-01

398

Engaging and Supporting Culturally Diverse Audiences  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This two hour special workshop was held during the 2012 ASP conference in Tucson. There are a variety of reasons that science education needs to reach out to culturally diverse audiences. Each culture, and each individual community, has its own challenges; each brings special insight to science. What does the research say about engaging these different audiences? How can science educators attract and sustain programs with various cultures? How do the needs of our audiences vary with culture and within communities? Moderators Shupla, Sanlyn, and Peticolas invited a variety of presenters with expertise to share their experiences: Salvador Acevado, David Begay, Michelle Higgins, Bryan Mendez, and Dara Norman. During the first hour, presenters shared a variety of best practices for engaging and supporting culturally diverse audiences; in the second hour, participants and presenters discussed specific programmatic challenges and possible directions.

Shupla, C.; Buxner, S.; Peticolas, L. M.; Mendez, B.; Acevedo, S.; Begay, D.; Higgins, M. L.; Norman, D.

2013-04-01

399

Force Generation upon T Cell Receptor Engagement  

PubMed Central

T cells are major players of adaptive immune response in mammals. Recognition of an antigenic peptide in association with the major histocompatibility complex at the surface of an antigen presenting cell (APC) is a specific and sensitive process whose mechanism is not fully understood. The potential contribution of mechanical forces in the T cell activation process is increasingly debated, although these forces are scarcely defined and hold only limited experimental evidence. In this work, we have implemented a biomembrane force probe (BFP) setup and a model APC to explore the nature and the characteristics of the mechanical forces potentially generated upon engagement of the T cell receptor (TCR) and/or lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1). We show that upon contact with a model APC coated with antibodies towards TCR-CD3, after a short latency, the T cell developed a timed sequence of pushing and pulling forces against its target. These processes were defined by their initial constant growth velocity and loading rate (force increase per unit of time). LFA-1 engagement together with TCR-CD3 reduced the growing speed during the pushing phase without triggering the same mechanical behavior when engaged alone. Intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) was monitored simultaneously to verify the cell commitment in the activation process. [Ca2+]i increased a few tens of seconds after the beginning of the pushing phase although no strong correlation appeared between the two events. The pushing phase was driven by actin polymerization. Tuning the BFP mechanical properties, we could show that the loading rate during the pulling phase increased with the target stiffness. This indicated that a mechanosensing mechanism is implemented in the early steps of the activation process. We provide here the first quantified description of force generation sequence upon local bidimensional engagement of TCR-CD3 and discuss its potential role in a T cell mechanically-regulated activation process. PMID:21572959

Husson, Julien; Chemin, Karine; Bohineust, Armelle; Hivroz, Claire; Henry, Nelly

2011-01-01

400

Burnout and work engagement among teachers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Job Demands–Resources Model was used as the basis of the proposal that there are two parallel processes involved in work-related well-being among teachers, namely an energetical process (i.e., job demands?burnout?ill health) and a motivational process (i.e., job resources?engagement?organizational commitment). In addition, some cross-links between both processes were hypothesized. Structural equation modeling was used to simultaneously test the hypotheses in

Jari J. Hakanen; Arnold B. Bakker; Wilmar B. Schaufeli

2006-01-01

401

Technical and economic assessment for asbestos abatement within Facility 20470, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a technical and economic assessment of available alternatives for asbestos abatement within Facility 20470 at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, Ohio. Each alternative was screened on the basis of technical feasibility, environmental impact, economics, and fulfillment of the IRP goals. Four alternatives for study are: establishing a special operations and maintenance program; enclosure; encapsulation with sealants; and removal, disposal, and replacement. Each of these alternatives was assessed for capability to control the release of asbestos fibers within Facility 20470. Alternatives 1 and 4 were determined to be acceptable, while Alternatives 2 and 3 were found to be unacceptable. 2 refs., 6 figs.

Gibson, S.M.; Ogle, R.B.

1988-03-01

402

Creating Space: Engaging Deliberation about Climate Action  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the United States public discourse, climate change is often framed as a polarized and intractable issue. The purpose of this dissertation was to explore deliberation about climate action, and to evaluate whether effective responses to climate change can be facilitated through new structures and processes that enable and encourage dialogue on the subject of how to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Working with sustainability leaders at the University of Montana and in the community of Missoula, Montana, the author convened three public deliberations, in which a variety of solutions to climate change were discussed. Three questions guided this study: 1) what motivated individuals to engage in deliberation about climate action; 2) how did individual engagement vary and affect the quality of the deliberation; and 3) how effective were the deliberations in building a sense of individual agency and generating collaborative action strategies to address climate change. Based on a rigorous statistical analysis of survey responses combined with qualitative data, this action research study offers a holistic exploration of the three deliberative events convened. The deliberative processes generated collaborative action strategies and increased participants' sense of agency to take action on climate change; the findings also revealed differences in the ways individuals engaged and affected the quality of the overall group deliberation. This dissertation contributes to the literature on collaborative responses and collective action on climate change, broadens understanding of deliberative processes, and provides new insight into opportunities for leading deliberation about climate action.

Phear, Nicolette

403

Rhythmic engagement with music in infancy  

PubMed Central

Humans have a unique ability to coordinate their motor movements to an external auditory stimulus, as in music-induced foot tapping or dancing. This behavior currently engages the attention of scholars across a number of disciplines. However, very little is known about its earliest manifestations. The aim of the current research was to examine whether preverbal infants engage in rhythmic behavior to music. To this end, we carried out two experiments in which we tested 120 infants (aged 5–24 months). Infants were exposed to various excerpts of musical and rhythmic stimuli, including isochronous drumbeats. Control stimuli consisted of adult- and infant-directed speech. Infants’ rhythmic movements were assessed by multiple methods involving manual coding from video excerpts and innovative 3D motion-capture technology. The results show that (i) infants engage in significantly more rhythmic movement to music and other rhythmically regular sounds than to speech; (ii) infants exhibit tempo flexibility to some extent (e.g., faster auditory tempo is associated with faster movement tempo); and (iii) the degree of rhythmic coordination with music is positively related to displays of positive affect. The findings are suggestive of a predisposition for rhythmic movement in response to music and other metrically regular sounds. PMID:20231438

Zentner, Marcel; Eerola, Tuomas

2010-01-01

404

Towards an Africanisation of Community Engagement and Service Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article argues that the South African research community could benefit by engaging in more collaborative partnerships within the African continent in relation to community engagement. This argument relates to literature in South Africa concerning an Africanised notion of service learning (SL) and community engagement (CE), university…

Preece, Julia

2013-01-01

405

The Role of University Engagement in the Community  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

University-community engagement is increasingly emphasized at institutions throughout the United States, yet there remains concern and confusion about how to conceptualize community engagement to provide benefits for both the university and the public. This article summarizes the history of community engagement and describes dominant paradigms of…

Gupton, Jarrett T.; Sullivan, Amanda L.; Johnston-Goodstar, Katie

2014-01-01

406

Constructivist Practices to Increase Student Engagement in the Orchestra Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Rehearsal engagement is an important concept sometimes neglected by conductors. For students, to be engaged means that they are actively involved with the music during the rehearsal. Even if the director leads a perfect rehearsal, he or she has not necessarily engaged students in a meaningful musical experience. This may be because conductors…

Scruggs, Bernadette

2009-01-01

407

Engagement and Academic Promotion: A Review of the Literature  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Universities in Australia are becoming increasingly concerned with their reputation as "engaged" institutions. Yet there is significant confusion about what this idea of "engagement" means and no clear way of measuring or reporting it. In part, this is because of the nature of engagement itself which is dependent on local…

Smith, Kylie M.; Else, Fabienne; Crookes, Patrick A.

2014-01-01

408

Leading, Learning, and Unleashing Potential: Youth Leadership and Civic Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Innovation Center for Community and Youth Development is a Washington, D.C.-based organization engaged in programming, research, and policy development related to youth civic engagement. Its mission is to unleash the potential of youth, adults, organizations, and communities to engage together in creating a just and equitable society. Strong…

Wheeler, Wendy; Edlebeck, Carolyn

2006-01-01

409

The Relationship between Student Engagement and Professionalism in Pharmacy Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates the relationship between student engagement (as measured by the National Survey of Student Engagement benchmarks) and pharmacy student professionalism (as measured by the Pharmacy Professionalism Domain instrument) in first and third year pharmacy students at seven different schools of pharmacy. Engagement provides the…

Flaherty, Anne Guerin

2011-01-01

410

Program structure, staff perceptions, and client engagement in treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

A key goal of drug abuse treatment providers is getting their clients to engage and participate in therapeutic activities as a first step toward deriving longer-term benefits. Much research had focused on personal characteristics that relate to client engagement; program characteristics have received less attention. This study explored client and program differences in engagement ratings using data from a nationwide

Kirk M. Broome; Patrick M. Flynn; Danica K. Knight; D. Dwayne Simpson

2007-01-01

411

Civic Engagement Measures for Latina/o College Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This chapter uses a critical quantitative approach to study models and measures of civic engagement for Latina/o college students. The chapter describes the importance of a critical quantitative approach to study civic engagement of Latina/o college students, then uses Hurtado et al.'s (Hurtado, S., 2012) model to examine the civic engagement

Alcantar, Cynthia M.

2014-01-01

412

Faculty Perceptions of Engagement as a Scholarly, Cross-Cutting  

E-print Network

their engagement work #12;Selected Preliminary Findings: MSU's College of Natural Sciences · Faculty identify of their engagement work and how these perceptions align with the university's definition in light of institutional-level changes aimed at promoting and fostering engagement as scholarship. #12;Context of Study MSU Definition

413

Sustaining Civic Engagement: Faculty Development, Roles, and Rewards  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Civic engagement of students, faculty, and staff is identified as central to the IUPUI's mission. Although nearly all of the Campus Compact Indicators of Engagement could be cited as mechanisms through which IUPUI's civic engagement mission is supported (see Bringle & Hatcher, 2004), this article will focus on faculty roles and rewards. Following…

Bringle, Robert G.; Hatcher, Julie A.; Jones, Steven; Plater, William M.

2006-01-01

414

An Engagement Model of Cognitive Optimization Through Adulthood  

Microsoft Academic Search

The engagement hypothesis suggests that social and intellectual engagement may buffer age-related declines in intellectual functioning. At the same time, some have argued that social structures that afford opportunities for intellectual engagement throughout the life span have lagged behind the demographic shift toward an expanding older population. Against this backdrop, we developed the Senior Odyssey, an existing team-based program of

Elizabeth A. L. Stine-Morrow; Jeanine M. Parisi; Daniel G. Morrow; Jennifer Greene; Denise C. Park

2007-01-01

415

Critical Engagement with Technology in the Computer Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Proposes a model for critically engaging technology in technical communication graduate curricula. Suggests that technical communicators have an ethical as well as intellectual responsibility to engage the interface between technology and culture. Describes one example, a graduate class in information architecture, as a model for engaging the…

Salvo, Michael J.

2002-01-01

416

Fostering Civic Engagement in the Communication Research Methods Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Civic engagement has become an essential learning goal for institutions throughout higher education. Communication scholars employ various pedagogical tools to foster civic engagement. For instance, service learning has been shown to increase political and community engagement in courses such as family communication and public relations. Teachers…

Liu, Min

2011-01-01

417

University of Delaware Chapter 5 Undergraduate Research and Community Engagement  

E-print Network

University of Delaware ­ Chapter 5 Undergraduate Research and Community Engagement Essay Undergraduate Research and Community Engagement Essay competition must be written by a University of Delaware undergraduate presenting an account of a significant research or community engagement project for which

Firestone, Jeremy

418

Research Staff and Public Engagement: A UK Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Public engagement plays an important role in the contemporary UK academy, and is promoted through initiatives such as Beacons of Public Engagement and research grant "Pathways to Impact". Relatively little is known, however, about academic experiences of such engagement activities. This study focuses on one staff group, contract…

Davies, Sarah R.

2013-01-01

419

Strategic Plan DIVISION OF DIVERSITY AND COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT  

E-print Network

Strategic Plan 2011­2016 DIVISION OF DIVERSITY AND COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT 2013-2014 PROGRESS REPORT Report DIVISION OF DIVERSITY AND COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT · THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN Vision The Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, as a national model, will strengthen the university

John, Lizy Kurian

420

Strategic Plan DIVISION OF DIVERSITY AND COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT  

E-print Network

Strategic Plan 2011­2016 DIVISION OF DIVERSITY AND COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT #12;Strategic Plan 2011­2016 DIVISION OF DIVERSITY AND COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT · THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN Vision The Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, as a national model, will strengthen the university's academic

Texas at Austin, University of

421

Fostering Civic Engagement by Building a Virtual City  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article focuses on the design and use of networked technologies to create learning environments to foster the civic engagement of youth. First, we briefly describe the Zora three-dimensional multiuser environment that engages children in the design of a graph- ical virtual city and its social organization. Anecdotal data are then used to help define different aspects of civic engagement,

Marina Umaschi Bers; Clement Chau

2006-01-01

422

Principals' Engagement of Low Ability Students in Singapore Secondary Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes a grounded theory constructed from a study of Singapore neighbourhood secondary school principals' engagement of their lowest stream, the Normal Technical students, in their schools. This substantive theory is labelled the "theory of selective engagement". It implies that how principals engage their lowest streamed students…

Ong, Chye Hin; Dimmock, Clive

2013-01-01

423

THE CO2 ABATEMENT POTENTIAL OF CALIFORNIA'S MID-SIZED COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS  

SciTech Connect

The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) todetermine the potential role of commercial sector distributed generation (DG) with combined heat and power (CHP) capability deployment in greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) reductions. CHP applications at large industrial sites are well known, and a large share of their potential has already been harvested. In contrast, relatively little attention has been paid to the potential of medium-sized commercial buildings, i.e. ones with peak electric loads ranging from 100 kW to 5 MW. We examine how this sector might implement DG with CHP in cost minimizing microgrids that are able to adopt and operate various energy technologies, such as solar photovoltaics (PV), on-site thermal generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and storage systems. We apply a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that minimizes a site?s annual energy costs as its objective. Using 138 representative mid-sized commercial sites in California (CA), existing tariffs of three major electricity distribution ultilities, and performance data of available technology in 2020, we find the GHG reduction potential for this CA commercial sector segment, which represents about 35percent of total statewide commercial sector sales. Under the assumptions made, in a reference case, this segment is estimated to be capable of economically installing 1.4 GW of CHP, 35percent of the California Air Resources Board (CARB) statewide 4 GW goal for total incremental CHP deployment by 2020. However, because CARB?s assumed utilization is far higher than is found by the MILP, the adopted CHP only contributes 19percent of the CO2 target. Several sensitivity runs were completed. One applies a simple feed-in tariff similar to net metering, and another includes a generous self-generation incentive program (SGIP) subsidy for fuel cells. The feed-in tariff proves ineffective at stimulating CHP deployment, while the SGIP buy down is more powerful. The attractiveness of CHP varies widely by climate zone and service territory, but in general, hotter inlandareas and San Diego are the more attractive regions because high cooling loads achieve higher equipment utilization. Additionally, large office buildings are surprisingly good hosts for CHP, so large office buildings in San Diego and hotter urban centers emerge as promising target hosts. Overall the effect on CO2 emissions is limited, never exceeding 27 percent of the CARB target. Nonetheless, results suggest that the CO2 emissions abatement potential of CHP in mid-sized CA buildings is significant, and much more promising than is typically assumed.

Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Cardoso, Goncalo; Lipman, Tim; Megel, Olivier; Ganguly, Srirupa; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy

2009-12-31

424

River transport of mercury from artisanal and small-scale gold mining and risks for dietary mercury exposure in Madre de Dios, Peru.  

PubMed

Artisanal and small-scale gold mining (ASGM) is a major contributor to deforestation and the largest anthropogenic source of atmospheric mercury worldwide. Despite significant information on the direct health impacts of mercury to ASGM miners, the impact of mercury contamination on downstream communities has not been well characterized, particularly in Peru's Madre de Dios region. In this area, ASGM has increased significantly since 2000 and has led to substantial political and social controversy. This research examined the spatial distribution and transport of mercury through the Madre de Dios River with distance from ASGM activity. This study also characterized risks for dietary mercury exposure to local residents who depend on fish from the river. River sediment, suspended solids from the water column, and fish samples were collected in 2013 at 62 sites near 17 communities over a 560 km stretch of the Madre de Dios River and its major tributaries. In areas downstream of known ASGM activity, mercury concentrations in sediment, suspended solids, and fish within the Madre de Dios River were elevated relative to locations upstream of mining. Fish tissue mercury concentrations were observed at levels representing a public health threat, with greater than one-third of carnivorous fish exceeding the international health standard of 0.5 mg kg(-1). This study demonstrates that communities located hundreds of kilometers downstream of ASGM activity, including children and indigenous populations who may not be involved in mining, are at risk of dietary mercury exposure that exceed acceptable body burdens. This report represents the first systematic study of the region to aid policy decision-making related to ASGM activities in Peru. PMID:25573610

Diringer, Sarah E; Feingold, Beth J; Ortiz, Ernesto J; Gallis, John A; Araújo-Flores, Julio M; Berky, Axel; Pan, William K Y; Hsu-Kim, Heileen

2015-02-11

425

Optimizing the performance of catalytic traps for hydrocarbon abatement during the cold-start of a gasoline engine.  

PubMed

A key target to reduce current hydrocarbon emissions from vehicular exhaust is to improve their abatement under cold-start conditions. Herein, we demonstrate the potential of factorial analysis to design a highly efficient catalytic trap. The impact of the synthesis conditions on the preparation of copper-loaded ZSM-5 is clearly revealed by XRD, N2 sorption, FTIR, NH3-TPD, SEM and TEM. A high concentration of copper nitrate precursor in the synthesis improves the removal of hydrocarbons, providing both strong adsorption sites for hydrocarbon retention at low temperature and copper oxide nanoparticles for full hydrocarbon catalytic combustion at high temperature. The use of copper acetate precursor leads to a more homogeneous dispersion of copper oxide nanoparticles also providing enough catalytic sites for the total oxidation of hydrocarbons released from the adsorption sites, although lower copper loadings are achieved. Thus, synthesis conditions leading to high copper loadings jointly with highly dispersed copper oxide nanoparticles would result in an exceptional catalytic trap able to reach superior hydrocarbon abatement under highly demanding operational conditions. PMID:25108828

Puértolas, B; Navlani-García, M; García, T; Navarro, M V; Lozano-Castelló, D; Cazorla-Amorós, D

2014-08-30

426

Dissolved oxygen in the rehabilitation phase of an estuary: influence of sewage pollution abatement and hydro-climatic factors.  

PubMed

Seasonal and inter-annual variations of dissolved oxygen (DO) along the estuary of Bilbao were investigated from 1998 to 2008, during its rehabilitation phase from pollution, to determine whether anthropogenic or natural forcings or both govern DO dynamics and hypoxia. Both seasonal and inter-annual variations of DO were best explained by hydro-climatic factors, sewage pollution and phytoplankton dynamics in the inner, intermediate and outer estuary respectively. The most remarkable intra-decadal improvement in DO occurred in the halocline layer of the intermediate estuary, where the factor that best explained these changes was sewage pollution abatement. However, in the estuarine hotspot for hypoxia, i.e. inner estuary bottom waters, no parallel response to sewage pollution abatement was observed and hydro-climatic factors were the main drivers of inter-annual DO variations. Differences in the degree of stratification and flushing accounted for this differential response of DO to anthropogenic and climate-related forcings at both axial and vertical scales. PMID:23601887

Villate, Fernando; Iriarte, Arantza; Uriarte, Ibon; Intxausti, Lander; de la Sota, Alejandro

2013-05-15

427

Process modeling of an advanced NH? abatement and recycling technology in the ammonia-based CO? capture process.  

PubMed

An advanced NH3 abatement and recycling process that makes great use of the waste heat in flue gas was proposed to solve the problems of ammonia slip, NH3 makeup, and flue gas cooling in the ammonia-based CO2 capture process. The rigorous rate-based model, RateFrac in Aspen Plus, was thermodynamically and kinetically validated by experimental data from open literature and CSIRO pilot trials at Munmorah Power Station, Australia, respectively. After a thorough sensitivity analysis and process improvement, the NH3 recycling efficiency reached as high as 99.87%, and the NH3 exhaust concentration was only 15.4 ppmv. Most importantly, the energy consumption of the NH3 abatement and recycling system was only 59.34 kJ/kg CO2 of electricity. The evaluation of mass balance and temperature steady shows that this NH3 recovery process was technically effective and feasible. This process therefore is a promising prospect toward industrial application. PMID:24850444

Li, Kangkang; Yu, Hai; Tade, Moses; Feron, Paul; Yu, Jingwen; Wang, Shujuan

2014-06-17

428

Third report on the Oak Ridge K-25 Site Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for Mitchell Branch  

SciTech Connect

As a condition of the modified National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP; now referred to as the Oak Ridge K-25 Site) on September 11, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for the receiving stream (Mitchell Branch or K-1700 stream). On October 1, 1992, a renewed NPDES permit was issued for the K-25 Site. A biological monitoring plan was submitted for Mitchell Branch, Poplar Creek, Poplar Creek Embayment of the Clinch River and any unnamed tributaries of these streams. The objectives of BMAP are to (1) demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Oak Ridge K-25 Site protect and maintain the use of Mitchell Branch for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life and (2) document the effects on stream biota resulting from operation of major new pollution abatement facilities, including the Central Neutralization Facility (CNF) and the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) incinerator. The BMAP consists of four tasks: (1) toxicity monitoring; (2) bioaccumulation monitoring; (3) assessment of fish health; and (4) instream monitoring of biological communities, including benthic macroinvertebrates and fish. This document, the third in a series, reports on the results of the Oak Ridge K-25 Site BMAP; it describes studies that were conducted over various periods of time between June 1990 and December 1993, although monitoring conducted outside this time period is included, as appropriate.

Hinzman, R.L. [ed.; Adams, S.M.; Ashwood, T.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

1995-08-01

429

Reaction-Diffusion-Delay Model for EPO/TNF-? Interaction in articular cartilage lesion abatement  

PubMed Central

Background Injuries to articular cartilage result in the development of lesions that form on the surface of the cartilage. Such lesions are associated with articular cartilage degeneration and osteoarthritis. The typical injury response often causes collateral damage, primarily an effect of inflammation, which results in the spread of lesions beyond the region where the initial injury occurs. Results and discussion We present a minimal mathematical model based on known mechanisms to investigate the spread and abatement of such lesions. The first case corresponds to the parameter values listed in Table 1, while the second case has parameter values as in Table 2. In particular we represent the "balancing act" between pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines that is hypothesized to be a principal mechanism in the expansion properties of cartilage damage during the typical injury response. We present preliminary results of in vitro studies that confirm the anti-inflammatory activities of the cytokine erythropoietin (EPO). We assume that the diffusion of cytokines determine the spatial behavior of injury response and lesion expansion so that a reaction diffusion system involving chemical species and chondrocyte cell state population densities is a natural way to represent cartilage injury response. We present computational results using the mathematical model showing that our representation is successful in capturing much of the interesting spatial behavior of injury associated lesion development and abatement in articular cartilage. Further, we discuss the use of this model to study the possibility of using EPO as a therapy for reducing the amount of inflammation induced collateral damage to cartilage during the typical injury response. Table 1 Model Parameter Values for Results in Figure 5 Table of Parameter Values Corresponding to Simulations in Figure 5 Parameter Value Units Reason D R 0.1 c m 2 day Determined from [13] D M 0.05 c m 2 day Determined from [13] D F 0.05 c m 2 day Determined from [13] D P 0.005 c m 2 day Determined from [13] ? R 0.01 1 day Approximated ? M 0.6 1 day Approximated ? F 0.6 1 day Approximated ? P 0.0087 1 day Approximated ? U 0.0001 1 day Approximated ? R 0.0001 micromolar ? c m 2 day ? cells Approximated ? M 0.00001 micromolar ? c m 2 day ? cells Approximated ? F 0.0001 micromolar ? c m 2 day ? cells Approximated ? P 0 micromolar ? c m 2 day ? cells Case with no anti-inflammatory response ? 10 micromolar Approximated ? R 10 micromolar Approximated ? M 10 micromolar Approximated ? F 10 micromolar Approximated ? P 10 micromolar Approximated ? 0 1 day Case with no anti-inflammatory response ? 1 100 1 day Approximated ? 2 50 1 day Approximated ? 10 1 day Approximated ? 0.5 1 day Approximated ? S A 1 1 day Approximated ? D N 0.5 1 day Approximated ? 1 0.5 days Taken from [5] ? 2 1 days Taken from [5] Table 2 Model Parameter Values for Results in Figure 6 Table of Parameter Values Corresponding to Simulations in Figure 6 Parameter Value Units Reason D R 0.1 c m 2 day Determined from [13] D M 0.05 c m 2 day Determined from [13] D F 0.05 c m 2 day Determined from [13] DP 0.005 c m 2 day Determined from [13] ? R 0.01 1 day Approximated ? M 0.6 1 day Approximated ? F 0.6 1 day Approximated ? P 0.0087 1 day Approximated ? U 0.0001 1 day Approximated ? R 0.0001 micromolar ? c m 2 day ? cells Approximated ? M 0.00001 micromolar ? c m 2 day ? cells Approximated ? F 0.0001 micromolar ? c m 2 day ? cells Approximated ? P 0.001 micromolar ? c m 2 day ? cells Approximated ? 10 micromolar Approximated ? R 10 micromolar Approximated ? M 10 micromolar Approximated ? F 10 micromolar Approximated ? P 10 micromolar Approximated ? 10 1 day Approximated ? 1 100 1 day Appro

2012-01-01

430

Engaging the Public in Climate Change Research  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Providing opportunities for individuals to contribute to a better understanding of climate change is the hallmark of Project BudBurst (www.budburst.org). This highly successful, national citizen science program, currently finishing its third year, is bringing climate change education outreach to thousands of individuals. Project BudBurst is a national citizen science initiative designed to engage the public in observations of phenological (life cycle) events that raise awareness of climate change, and create a cadre of informed citizen scientists. Citizen science programs such as Project BudBurst provide the opportunity for students and interested laypersons to actively participate in scientific research. Such programs are important not only from an educational perspective, but because they also enable scientists to broaden the geographic and temporal scale of their observations. The goals of Project BudBurst are to 1) increase awareness of phenology as an area of scientific study; 2) Increase awareness of the impacts of changing climates on plants; and 3) increase science literacy by engaging participants in the scientific process. In anticipation of the 2010 campaign, Project BudBurst has developed and released innovative and exciting projects with a special focus in the field of phenology and climate change. The collaborations between Project BudBurst and other organizations are producing unique campaigns for engaging the public in environmental research. The special project foci include on-the-spot and in-the-field data reporting via mobile phones, an emphasis on urban tree phenology data, as well as monitoring of native gardens across the US National Wildlife Refuge System. This presentation will provide an overview of Project Budburst and the new special projects, and share results from 2007-2009. Project BudBurst is managed by the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, the Chicago Botanic Garden, and the University of Montana.

Meymaris, K. K.; Henderson, S.; Alaback, P.; Havens, K.; Schwarz Ballard, J.

2009-12-01

431

Engaging Students through Mapping Local History  

PubMed Central

This article argues that the integration of local history and geography through collaborative digital mapping can lead to greater interest in civic participation by early adolescent learners. In the study, twenty-nine middle school students were asked to research, represent, and discuss local urban sites of historical significance on an interactive Web platform. As students learned more about local community events, people, and historical forces, they became increasingly engaged with the material and enthusiastic about making connections to larger issues and processes. In the final session, students expressed interest in participating in their own communities through joining nonprofit organizations and educating others about community history and daily life.

Mitchell, Katharyne; Elwood, Sarah

2015-01-01

432

Evaluating community engagement in an academic medical center.  

PubMed

From the perspective of academic medical centers (AMCs), community engagement is a collaborative process of working toward mutually defined goals to improve the community's health, and involves partnerships between AMCs, individuals, and entities representing the surrounding community. AMCs increasingly recognize the importance of community engagement, and recent programs such as Prevention Research Centers and Clinical and Translational Science Awards have highlighted community engagement activities. However, there is no standard or accepted metric for evaluating AMCs' performance and impact of community engagement activities.In this article, the authors present a framework for evaluating AMCs' community engagement activities. The framework includes broad goals and specific activities within each goal, wherein goals and activities are evaluated using a health services research framework consisting of structure, process, and outcome criteria. To illustrate how to use this community engagement evaluation framework, the authors present specific community engagement goals and activities of the University of Rochester Medical Center to (1) improve the health of the community served by the AMC; (2) increase the AMC's capacity for community engagement; and (3) increase generalizable knowledge and practices in community engagement and public health.Using a structure-process-outcomes framework, a multidisciplinary team should regularly evaluate an AMC's community engagement program with the purpose of measurably improving the performance of the AMC and the health of its surrounding community. PMID:24556768

Szilagyi, Peter G; Shone, Laura P; Dozier, Ann M; Newton, Gail L; Green, Theresa; Bennett, Nancy M

2014-04-01

433

The Mission and Purpose of TRUCEN (The Research University Civic Engagement Network)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The mission of The Research University Civic Engagement Network (TRUCEN) is to advance civic engagement and engaged scholarship among research universities. TRUCEN has adopted the following goals for advancing civic engagement and engaged scholarship as part of the core mission of all research universities: (1) Encourage community-engaged

Journal of Higher Education Outreach and Engagement, 2012

2012-01-01

434

Why do patients engage in medical tourism?  

PubMed

Medical tourism is commonly perceived and popularly depicted as an economic issue, both at the system and individual levels. The decision to engage in medical tourism, however, is more complex, driven by patients' unmet need, the nature of services sought and the manner by which treatment is accessed. In order to beneficially employ the opportunities medical tourism offers, and address and contain possible threats and harms, an informed decision is crucial. This paper aims to enhance the current knowledge on medical tourism by isolating the focal content of the decisions that patients make. Based on the existing literature, it proposes a sequential decision-making process in opting for or against medical care abroad, and engaging in medical tourism, including considerations of the required treatments, location of treatment, and quality and safety issues attendant to seeking care. Accordingly, it comments on the imperative of access to health information and the current regulatory environment which impact on this increasingly popular and complex form of accessing and providing medical care. PMID:23007007

Runnels, Vivien; Carrera, P M

2012-12-01

435

Engaging doctors in the health care revolution.  

PubMed

A health care revolution is under way, and doctors must be part of it. But many are deeply anxious and angry about the transformation, fearing loss of autonomy, respect, and income. Given their resistance, how can health system Leaders engage them in redesigning care? In this article, Dr. Thomas H. Lee, Press Ganey's chief medical officer, and Dr. Toby Cosgrove, the CEO of the Cleveland Clinic, describe a framework they've developed for encouraging buy-in. Adapting Max Weber's "typology of motives," and applying behavioral economics and other motivational principles, they describe four tactics leadership must apply in concert: engaging doctors in a noble shared purpose; addressing their economic self-interest; leveraging their desire for respect; and appealing to their sense of tradition. Drawing from experiences at the Mayo Clinic, Geisinger Health System, Partners HealthCare, the Cleveland Clinic, Ascension Health, and others, the authors show how the four motivational levers work together to bring this critical group of stakeholders on board. PMID:25051859

Lee, Thomas H; Cosgrove, Toby

2014-06-01

436

Scholarship of Engagement and Engaged Scholars: Through the Eyes of Exemplars  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

How do leaders of the scholarship of engagement (SOE) experience and define this field? Although there have been a significant number of reports and national forums, the field continues to experience diversity of understandings and ambiguity in this discourse. To gain insights into these differing understandings of SOE, this study explored the…

Kasworm, Carol E.; Abdrahim, Nur Aira B.

2014-01-01

437

i Engaging as an innovative approach to engage patients in their own fall prevention care  

PubMed Central

Decreasing patient fall injuries during hospitalization continues to be a challenge at the bedside. Empowering patients to become active participants in their own fall prevention care could be a solution. In a previous study, elderly patients recently discharged from a United States hospital expressed a need for nurses to give and repeat directives about fall prevention; when the nurse left a brochure on the topic, but did not provide any (or limited) verbal explanations about the content or the importance of the information, the patient felt that the information was insufficient. To address patients’ needs, we developed “i Engaging”, a Web-based software application for use at the bedside. i Engaging is an innovative approach that is used to engage patients in their own fall prevention care during hospital stays. The application was designed based on the assumption that patients are the best and most critical sources of information about their health status. i Engaging has not yet been tested in clinical trials. PMID:24868148

Tzeng, Huey-Ming; Yin, Chang-Yi

2014-01-01

438

Engaged-Learning: Community Engagement Classifications at U.S. Land-Grant Institutions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Engagement has evolved from concerns of "access," "diversity," and "public service" between the academy and communities. Land-grant institutions (LGI), considered the "public's universities," have represented a unique population in American higher education with their historic 150-year tradition of teaching, research, and service. Carnegie…

Scott, Leodis

2012-01-01

439

Burnt-Out but Engaged: The Co-Existence of Psychological Burnout and Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: This research sought to identify groups of school employees who were more similar in their responses to burnout and engagement measures, for the purpose of exploring what was similar in their school experiences. The profiles created in the present research enable a clearer appreciation of what is common to groups of school employees who…

Timms, Carolyn; Brough, Paula; Graham, Deborah

2012-01-01

440

Writing Instruction in Elementary Classrooms: Why Teachers Engage or Do Not Engage Students in Writing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This qualitative study explored reasons K-6 teachers did or did not engage students regularly in writing. Interviews with 14 teachers, classified as high, transitional, and low implementers of writing instruction, revealed three themes: hindrances and helps, beliefs concerning practice, and preparation and professional development. Both high and…

Harward, Stan; Peterson, Nancy; Korth, Byran; Wimmer, Jennifer; Wilcox, Brad; Morrison, Timothy G.; Black, Sharon; Simmerman, Sue; Pierce, Linda

2014-01-01

441

Strategies for Engagement: Knowledge Building and Intellectual Engagement in Participatory Learning Environments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Intellectual engagement is an absorbing, creatively energized focus resulting in a deep personal commitment to exploration, investigation, problem-solving and inquiry over a sustained period of time. In this article, the authors argue that participatory learning environments with a focus on knowledge building offer clear learning benefits to…

Jacobsen, Michele; Lock, Jennifer; Friesen, Sharon

2013-01-01

442

Successful Engagement: Guidance for Colleges and Providers on Effective Employer Engagement in Post-16 Learning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Successful employer engagement requires that colleges in the United Kingdom secure employers' involvement in the design, development, management, and delivery of post-16 learning so that the skill needs of employers and the workforce will be met and the increased productivity, competitiveness, and efficiency of individual organizations and the…

Hughes, Maria

443

Students' Anticipated Situational Engagement: The Roles of Teacher Behavior, Personal Engagement, and Gender  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Among 9th-grade students (248 girls, 255 boys) from a large multiethnic school, the authors examined 2 aspects of anticipated situational engagement in relation to 3 types of hypothetical teacher behavior: authoritarian, authoritative, permissive. Furthermore, the authors investigated the moderating roles of students' personal (trait-like)…

Thijs, Jochem; Verkuyten, Maykel

2009-01-01

444

Heat-stress abatement during the dry period: does cooling improve transition into lactation?  

PubMed

Environmental factors, especially temperature and light exposure, influence the health and productivity of dairy cows during lactation, possibly via similar physiological mechanisms. For example, heat stress is a critical component of decreased milk yield during summer. However, less is known about the effect of heat stress during the dry period. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of heat stress prepartum under a controlled photoperiod on lactation performance and hepatic metabolic gene expression of periparturient multiparous Holstein cows (n = 16). Cows were dried off approximately 46 d before expected calving date and assigned to treatment randomly after blocking by mature equivalent milk production and parity. Treatments consisted of either heat stress (HT) or cooling (CL) with fans and sprinklers, both under a photoperiod of 14L:10D. Rectal temperature was measured twice daily during the dry period. After calving, cows were housed in a freestall barn with cooling devices, and milk yield was recorded daily up to 210 d in milk. Blood samples were taken from dry off until +42 d relative to calving for metabolites and from -2 until +2 d relative to calving for hormone analysis. Daily dry matter intake was measured from -35 to +42 d relative to calving. Liver biopsies were collected at dry off, -20, +2, and +20 d relative to calving for cows on HT (n = 5) and CL (n = 4) to measure mRNA expression of suppressors of cytokine signaling-2 (SOCS-2), insulin-like growth factor binding protein-5 (IGFBP-5), a key transcription factor in lipid biosynthesis (SREBP-1c), and enzymes of lipid metabolism (FASN, ACACA, and ACADVL) by real-time quantitative PCR. Heat stress increased rectal temperatures (39.2 vs. 38.8 degrees C), plasma prolactin concentrations at -1 (171 vs. 79 ng/mL) and 0 d (210 vs. 115 ng/mL) relative to calving, and decreased dry matter intake at 0 and +14 d relative to calving and 3.5% fat-corrected milk postpartum (26.1 vs. 35.4 kg/d) compared with CL cows. Relative to CL cows, hepatic mRNA expression of SOCS-2 and IGFBP-5 was downregulated in HT cows. Expression of ACADVL was upregulated in CL cows at d +2 but downregulated at d +20 relative to HT cows. Concentrations of C16:0 and cis C18:1 were greater in the milk and liver of CL cows compared with HT cows, which reflects greater lipid mobilization. These results suggest that heat-stress abatement in the dry period improves subsequent lactation, possibly via suppression of plasma prolactin surge around calving, SOCS-2 expression, and regulation of hepatic lipid metabolism. PMID:19923602

do Amaral, B C; Connor, E E; Tao, S; Hayen, J; Bubolz, J; Dahl, G E

2009-12-01

445

Abatement of CF{sub 4} and CHF{sub 3} byproducts using low-pressure plasmas generated by annular-shaped electrodes  

SciTech Connect

Three different driving schemes are tested for a plasma reactor designed to abate the greenhouse gases emitted by the semiconductor industry. The reactor and electrodes all have a concentric annular shape, which allows them to be easily connected to pre-existing pipelines without any disturbance to the exhaust stream. The destruction and removal efficiencies are measured for CF{sub 4} by varying the O{sub 2}/CF{sub 4} ratio and pressure. The influences of adding O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O to the byproducts of the CHF{sub 3} abatement process are investigated by analyzing the spectra resulting from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements. Based on the experimental results we suggest an appropriate combination of driving scheme and reactant gas species for efficient and economical abatement of a mixture of CHF{sub 3} and CF{sub 4}. Then, the optimal flow rate of the reactant gas is presented. Finally, the reduction rates for global warming emissions are estimated to demonstrate the feasibility of using our device for abatement of greenhouse gases emitted by the semiconductor industry.

Hur, Min; Lee, Jae O. K.; Hoon Song, Young; Yoo, Hoon A. [Environmental Systems Research Division, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, 104 Sinseongno, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-03-15

446

GROUP 1 GROUP 2 GROUP 3 GROUP 4 GROUP 5 GROUP 6 ANDERSON, JENNIFER AYENI, MARY ABATE BESSOMO, ANNA BARRETT, CIAN ADAMS, NICOLE BARTON, MICHAEL  

E-print Network

GROUP 1 GROUP 2 GROUP 3 GROUP 4 GROUP 5 GROUP 6 ANDERSON, JENNIFER AYENI, MARY ABATE BESSOMO, ANNA, CAOIMHE HESKIN, CLODAGH MC GOVERN, MARIE-CLAIREMURRAY, AINE GROGAN, CLARE GERARD, ALLISON MC QUAID, RACHEL, JESSICA NESBITT, ASHLING KEMMY, NOEL HARAN, PAUL MULLEN, ROSS LYNCH, MARIE NOLAN, FELIX NOLAN, EMMA KEOGAN

O'Mahony, Donal E.

447

PROCEEDINGS: SYMPOSIUM ON IRON AND STEEL POLLUTION ABATEMENT TECHNOLOGY FOR 1982. HELD AT PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA, ON NOVEMBER 16-18, 1982  

EPA Science Inventory

The proceedings document presentations at the Symposium on Iron and Steel Pollution Abatement Technology for 1982, the fourth in this series, held in Pittsburgh on November 16-18, 1982. It provided a forum for the exchange of information on technological problems related to multi...

448

PROCEEDINGS: SYMPOSIUM ON IRON AND STEEL POLLUTION ABATEMENT TECHNOLOGY FOR 1983. HELD IN CHICAGO, ILLINOIS ON OCTOBER 18-20, 1983  

EPA Science Inventory

The proceeding document presentations at the Symposium on Iron and Steel Pollution Abatement Technology for 1983, the fifth in this series, held in Chicago on October 18-20, 1983. It provided a forum for the exchange of information on technological problems related to multimedia ...

449

An evaluation of air pollution abatement relaxation strategies for Tennessee during periods of pending or actual energy emergencies. (Tennessee State science, engineering, and technology project). Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report addresses problems associated with the relaxation of air pollution abatement strategies, during periods of pending or actual energy emergencies, for coal-fired plants in Tennessee. Several general and specific constraints which policymakers face in implementing the relaxation of air pollution standards are reviewed: the emission standards required for compliance with the Tennessee State Implementation Plan; a pending consent decree,

L. Clinard; D. Backhus; W. Koehler

1980-01-01

450

GROUP 1 GROUP 2 GROUP 3 GROUP 4 GROUP 5 GROUP 6 CARR, DANIEL ANDERSON, JENNY BANGU, LINA ABATE BESSOMO, ANNA BEHAN, LIAM ANDERSON, ARAN  

E-print Network

GROUP 1 GROUP 2 GROUP 3 GROUP 4 GROUP 5 GROUP 6 CARR, DANIEL ANDERSON, JENNY BANGU, LINA ABATE, DYLAN CONNAUGHTON, LARA CLIFFORD, NIAMH ENNIS, SEAN DENNEHY, ROSEMARY DINGEMANS, ALEX HUGHES, ALAN, MICHELLE OBRIEN, DANIEL JORDAN, EMILY MC ELROY, ALEXANDER MC MAHON, MARK MILEY, HUGO MULLIGAN, LIAM PAHUJA

O'Mahony, Donal E.

451

PROCEEDINGS: SYMPOSIUM ON IRON AND STEEL POLLUTION ABATEMENT TECHNOLOGY FOR 1981 HELD AT CHICAGO, ILLINOIS ON OCTOBER 6-8, 1981  

EPA Science Inventory

The report documents presentations at the Symposium on Iron and Steel Pollution Abatement Technology for 1981, Chicago, IL, October 6-8. The Symposium provided a forum for the exchange of information on technology problems related to air, water, and solid waste pollution abatemen...

452

PROCEEDINGS: SYMPOSIUM ON IRON AND STEEL POLLUTION ABATEMENT TECHNOLOGY FOR 1980 HELD AT PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA ON NOVEMBER 18-20, 1980  

EPA Science Inventory

The report documents presentations at the second EPA-sponsored symposium on iron and steel pollution abatement technology, in Philadelphia, PA, November 18-20, 1980. (The first was in Chicago, IL, in October 1979.) The symposium provided participants an opportunity to exchange in...

453

BATCH PRETREATMENT PROCESS TECHNOLOGY FOR ABATEMENT OF EMISSIONS AND CONSERVATION OF ENERGY IN GLASS MELTING FURNACES. PHASE I. PROCESS DESIGN MANUAL  

EPA Science Inventory

The Environmental Protection Agency contracted with Corning Glass Works for the development of glass batch pretreatment process which would abate emissions and reduce energy usage in the melting furnace. The contract consists of two phases of work. Phase I, now completed and repo...

454

Control of dangerous substances in discharges and microbiological abatement: European framework and a case study of an ozone disinfection system.  

PubMed

Directive 2000/60/EC requires the achievement of a 'good chemical status' for surface water within pre-established dates. Disinfection is needed to achieve compulsory final microbial limit values (in Italy for wastewater discharges the parameter Escherichia coli - EC - is imposed by law with a maximum limit value of 5,000 cfu/100 mL). Liquid waste and disinfection by-products must be considered when designing appropriate monitoring of dangerous substances; the specific classes of substances must be investigated according to the typology of received wastewaters and liquid wastes (where applicable) and specific analytical techniques, with Limit of Detection (LOD) lower than the limit values, must be applied; the difficulties faced by national and regional environmental control Agencies is that these techniques have to be applied during ordinary activity and not only for research purposes. The study aims to present the control of dangerous substances, as a screening view, in wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) discharges in the province of Venice (Northern Italy) for the period 2007-2010 based on available data from institutional controls. In addition, the wastewater disinfection process with ozone applied to a medium size WWTP (45,000 Population Equivalents) is presented as a case study, with a view to assessing the microbiological abatement efficacy and the presence of dangerous substances. Discharge quality of the WWTPs in the province of Venice presented mean values that were higher than the LOD, but only for certain metals. For the Paese plant, zinc and chloroform were the only micro-pollutants detected with a higher level than the LOD. From microbiological data in the period 2006-2011 the disinfection abatement efficiency for Paese was, in most cases above 99% for EC, faecal coliform (FC), faecal streptococci (FS) while efficiency was slightly lower for total coliform (TC); however, the proposed criterion aimed at respecting 99.99% abatement was not completely satisfied. Therefore, despite the high organic and industrial load of the considered plant and the need to find an alternative system for chlorine, as chlorine disinfection has been banned in the Veneto region since December 2012, ozone efficiency is not completely satisfactory and other systems such as peracetic or performic acids and UV systems must be considered. PMID:23508147

Ostoich, M; Serena, F; Falletti, L; Fantoni, A

2013-01-01

455

Engagement in persons with dementia: the concept and its measurement  

PubMed Central

Purpose: The aim of this paper is to delineate the underlying premises of the concept of engagement in persons with dementia and present a new theoretical framework of engagement. Setting/Subjects: The sample included 193 residents of 7 Maryland nursing homes. All participants had a diagnosis of dementia. Methodology: We describe a model of factors that affect engagement of persons with dementia. Moreover, we present the psychometric qualities of an assessment designed to capture the dimensions of engagement (OME, Observational Measurement of Engagement). Finally, we detail plans for future research as well as data analyses that are currently underway. Discussion: This paper lays the foundation for a new theoretical framework concerning the mechanisms of interactions between persons with cognitive impairment and environmental stimuli. Additionally, the study examines what factors are associated with interest and negative and positive feelings in engagement. PMID:19307858

Cohen-Mansfield, Jiska; Dakheel-Ali, Maha; Marx, Marcia S.

2009-01-01

456

Mercury abatement report on the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Y- 12 Plant for fiscal year 1995  

SciTech Connect

This Annual Mercury Abatement Report for fiscal year 1995 summarizes the status of activities and the levels of mercury contamination in East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) resulting from activities at the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The report outlines the status of the on-going project activities in support of project compliance, the results of the ongoing sampling and characterization efforts, the biological monitoring activities, and our conclusions relative to the progress in demonstrating compliance with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination (NPDES) permit. Overall, the pace of mercury activities at the Y-12 Plant is ahead of the compliance schedules in the NPDES permit and new and exciting opportunities are being recognized for achieving additional mercury reductions. These opportunities were not felt to be achievable several years ago.

NONE

1995-11-01

457

Impact of Atmospheric Plasma Generated by a DBD Device on Quality-Related Attributes of "Abate Fetel" Pear Fruit  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effects of gas plasma generated by a Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) device on "Abate Fetel" fresh pears were assessed following exposure times from 10 to 90 min. In particular the decontamination efficacy towards the indigenous microflora naturally occurring on the surface of the fruit was evaluated. The main results showed that total mesophilic bacteria, yeasts and moulds had different inactivation dynamics. However, maximum cell decreases of 2.5 Log CFU/fruit were achieved for all the microbial groups after 90 min of treatment at a relative humidity level of 60% (22°C). Immediately after the treatments, no significant effects were observed on the measured quality traits. After storage for 5 days at 20°C significant changes were detected only in the peel (colour and antioxidant capacity) of fruit samples treated for 90 min. The Magness-Taylor flesh firmness (MTf), the soluble solid content (SSC) and the antioxidant capacity of fruits were unaffected by the tested treatments.

Berardinelli, Annachiara; Vannini, Lucia; Ragni, Luigi; Guerzoni, M. Elisabetta

458

Community engagement in US and Canadian medical schools  

PubMed Central

Introduction This study examines the integration of community engagement and community-engaged scholarship at all accredited US and Canadian medical schools in order to better understand and assess their current state of engagement. Methods A 32-question data abstraction instrument measured the role of community engagement and community-engaged scholarship as represented on the Web sites of all accredited US and Canadian medical schools. The instrument targeted a medical school’s mission and vision statements, institutional structure, student and faculty awards and honors, and faculty tenure and promotion guidelines. Results Medical school Web sites demonstrate little evidence that schools incorporate community engagement in their mission or vision statements or their promotion and tenure guidelines. The majority of medical schools do not include community service terms and/or descriptive language in their mission statements, and only 8.5% of medical schools incorporate community service and engagement as a primary or major criterion in promotion and tenure guidelines. Discussion This research highlights significant gaps in the integration of community engagement or community-engaged scholarship into medical school mission and vision statements, promotion and tenure guidelines, and service administrative structures. PMID:23745075

Goldstein, Adam O; Bearman, Rachel Sobel

2011-01-01

459

Civic Engagement is active involvement in the discourse  

E-print Network

Transitions Projects Inc. Excellence in Departmental Civic Engagement Regional Research Institute for Human from undiagnosed health conditions, while preventive self-care measures are vastly under- utilized

Bertini, Robert L.

460

Campus Environmental Factors Influencing Student Leadership Development and Civic Engagement  

E-print Network

examined undergraduate students’ perceptions of personal leadership, influences on personal leadership development, and experiences with leadership and civic engagement. Following a naturalistic qualitative research method, interviews were conducted...

Boren, Laura

2012-02-14

461

SEAT: A strategic engagement analysis tool  

SciTech Connect

The Strategic Engagement Analysis Tool (SEAT) is a prototype of an expert system knowledge-based discrete event simulation. SEAT realistically represents the interrelationships between the eight major subsystems in the strategic targeting and assault domain. Some of the subsystems employ run-time cognitive decision making and reasoning capabilities to represent human tactical and operational strategy decisions. SEAT's goal is to allow analysts to conduct sensitivity analysis and to determine cause-effect relationships. An intelligent interface mechanism is provided to aid the analyst in scenario creation. The interface was designed to provide on-line documentation, support for model input, logic control, and data validation prior to simulation execution. 4 refs., 3 figs.

Dreicer, J.; Michelsen, C.; Morgeson, D.

1988-01-01

462

Abatement cost of GHG emissions for wood-based electricity and ethanol at production and consumption levels.  

PubMed

Woody feedstocks will play a critical role in meeting the demand for biomass-based energy products in the US. We developed an integrated model using comparable system boundaries and common set of assumptions to ascertain unit cost and greenhouse gas (GHG) intensity of electricity and ethanol derived from slash pine (Pinus elliottii) at the production and consumption levels by considering existing automobile technologies. We also calculated abatement cost of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions with respect to comparable energy products derived from fossil fuels. The production cost of electricity derived using wood chips was at least cheaper by 1 ¢ MJ-1 over electricity derived from wood pellets. The production cost of ethanol without any income from cogenerated electricity was costlier by about 0.7 ¢ MJ-1 than ethanol with income from cogenerated electricity. The production cost of electricity derived from wood chips was cheaper by at least 0.7 ¢ MJ-1 than the energy equivalent cost of ethanol produced in presence of cogenerated electricity. The cost of using ethanol as a fuel in a flex-fuel vehicle was at least higher by 6 ¢ km-1 than a comparable electric vehicle. The GHG intensity of per km distance traveled in a flex-fuel vehicle was greater or lower than an electric vehicle running on electricity derived from wood chips depending on presence and absence of GHG credits related with co-generated electricity. A carbon tax of at least $7 Mg CO2e-1 and $30 Mg CO2e-1 is needed to promote wood-based electricity and ethanol production in the US, respectively. The range of abatement cost of GHG emissions is significantly dependent on the harvest age and selected baseline especially for electricity generation. PMID:24937461

Dwivedi, Puneet; Khanna, Madhu

2014-01-01

463

Engaging Generation Now, Inspiring Generation Next  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In 2008, the Education and Public Outreach Committee of the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO) initiated several new strategies for disseminating accurate, stimulating, engaging information on general astronomy and variable star science to thousands of students, parents, and amateur astronomers each year through astronomy clubs, societies, and star party events. We are initiating contact with astronomy clubs and organizations to offer qualified speakers from the AAVSO Speakers Bureau for their meetings and activities. The current roster of speakers include, professional astronomers, doctors, engineers, teachers and some of the world's leading variable star observers. Request information is available on the AAVSO website. For organizations and individuals unable to engage one of our speakers due to time, distance or financial constraints, we have made PowerPoint presentations used in previous talks available free for download from the same web pages. Thousands of amateur astronomers and their children attend star parties each year. As an extension of our speakers’ bureau, our goal is to have an AAVSO representative at each of the major star parties each year giving an enthusiastic talk on variable stars or related astronomical subject and supplying inspirational printed materials on astronomy and amateur contributions to science. The nation's largest astronomy clubs have monthly newsletters they distribute to their membership. Newsletter editors are constantly in need of quality, interesting content to fill out their issues each month. We are offering a `writers’ bureau’ service to newsletter editors, similar to the news wire services used by newspapers. We will supply up to a half dozen articles on astronomy and variable star science each month for editors to use at their discretion in their publications. Our goal is to provide information, inspiration and encourage participation among amateur astronomers and their kids, our next generation of astronomers.

Simonsen, Mike; Gay, P.

2008-05-01

464

Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) are bowling-ball sized spherical satellites. They will be used inside the space station to test a set of well-defined instructions for spacecraft performing autonomous rendezvous and docking maneuvers. Three free-flying spheres will fly within the cabin of the station, performing flight formations. Each satellite is self-contained with power, propulsion, computers and navigation equipment. The results are important for satellite servicing, vehicle assembly and formation flying spacecraft configurations. SPHERES is a testbed for formation flying by satellites, the theories and calculations that coordinate the motion of multiple bodies maneuvering in microgravity. To achieve this inside the ISS cabin, bowling-ball-sized spheres perform various maneuvers (or protocols), with one to three spheres operating simultaneously . The Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) experiment will test relative attitude control and station-keeping between satellites, re-targeting and image plane filling maneuvers, collision avoidance and fuel balancing algorithms, and an array of geometry estimators used in various missions. SPHERES consists of three self-contained satellites, which are 18 sided polyhedrons that are 0.2 meter in diameter and weigh 3.5 kilograms. Each satellite contains an internal propulsion system, power, avionics, software, communications, and metrology subsystems. The propulsion system uses CO2, which is expelled through the thrusters. SPHERES satellites are powered by AA batteries. The metrology subsystem provides real-time position and attitude information. To simulate ground station-keeping, a laptop will be used to transmit navigational data and formation flying algorithms. Once these data are uploaded, the satellites will perform autonomously and hold the formation until a new command is given.

Miller, David W.; Wilson, Edward; How, Jonathan; Sanenz-Otero, Alvar; Chamitoff, Gregory

2009-01-01

465

Engaged teaching for engaged learning: sharing your passion for gerontology and geriatrics.  

PubMed

Gerontologists face a unique set of obstacles in attracting newcomers to the field. Despite demographic trends favorable to a wide range of employment opportunities and job security, aging is rarely top of mind for many students when it comes to career choices. For most gerontologists, aging is our passion. How do we share that passion with others who have yet to discover its interdisciplinary opportunities, or who may be held at bay by negative stereotypes of aging and older persons? This article explores various approaches to enhance engaged teaching and engaged learning that can help personalize and contextualize the field so that educators and students at all levels and disciplines can find their passion for gerontology and geriatrics. PMID:22490070

Karasik, Rona J

2012-01-01

466

Conceptualizing and Measuring Engagement: An Analysis of the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article analyzes the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES; Schaufeli et al. in J Happiness Stud 3:71–92, 2002b) on a variety of levels. Study 1 critiques the method by which the original scale was developed, and analyzes a similar sample\\u000a using both exploratory and, subsequently, confirmatory factor analyses. Study 2 uses three samples to explore the 17-item\\u000a UWES-17, and the

Maura J. Mills; Satoris S. Culbertson; Clive J. Fullagar

2012-01-01

467

Informing Educational Psychology Training with Students' Community Engagement Experiences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this article was to describe students' experiences of community engagement in an Educational Psychology practicum in order to inform relevant educational psychology training literature with experiences of students' community engagement. Experiential learning served as our theoretical framework and we employed an instrumental case…

Ebersohn, Liesel; Bender, C. J. Gerda; Carvalho-Malekane, Wendy M.

2010-01-01

468

Engaging Musical Practices: A Sourcebook for Middle School General Music  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Middle school general music may be a student's last encounter with school music. A practical book with accessible pedagogical resources on middle school general music is needed for methods courses and music practitioners' use. The book "Engaging Musical Practices: A Sourcebook for Middle School General Music" presents numerous ways to engage

Burton, Suzanne L., Ed.

2012-01-01

469

Student Response Systems and Learner Engagement in Large Classes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The use of student response systems is becoming more prevalent in higher level education. Evidence on the effectiveness of this technology can be an important resource for tutors seeking to engage with learners and raise the quality of learning experiences. Student response systems have been found to increase student engagement and participation…

Heaslip, Graham; Donovan, Paul; Cullen, John G.

2014-01-01

470

Monitoring Student Engagement for Intercollegiate Athletics Program Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine the impact that athletics participation in both revenue and non-revenue intercollegiate sport had on the engagement of students as measured by the "National Survey of Student Engagement." In addition, the study reported results to the institution's athletics department for application as a tool for…

Symonds, Matthew L.

2009-01-01

471

Reading Motivation and Reading Engagement: Clarifying Commingled Conceptions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The constructs of motivation for reading and reading engagement have frequently become blurred and ambiguous in both research and discussions of practice. To address this commingling of constructs, the authors provide a concise review of the literature on motivation for reading and reading engagement and illustrate the blurring of those concepts…

Unrau, Norman J.; Quirk, Matthew

2014-01-01

472

Mechanics of post-cam engagement during simulated dynamic activity.  

PubMed

Posterior-stabilized (PS) total knee arthroplasty (TKA) components employ a tibial post and femoral cam mechanism to guide anteroposterior knee motion in lieu of the posterior cruciate ligament. Some PS TKA patients report a clicking sensation when the post and cam engage, while severe wear and fracture of the post; we hypothesize that these complications are associated with excessive impact velocity at engagement. We evaluated the effect of implant design on engagement dynamics of the post-cam mechanism and resulting polyethylene stresses during dynamic activity. In vitro simulation of a knee bend activity was performed for four cadaveric specimens implanted with PS TKA components. Post-cam engagement velocity and flexion angle at initial contact were determined. The experimental data were used to validate computational predictions of PS mechanics using the same loading conditions. A lower limb model was subsequently utilized to compare engagement mechanics of eight TKA designs, relating differences between implants to geometric design features. Flexion angle and post-cam velocity at engagement demonstrated considerable ranges among designs (23°-89°, and 0.05-0.22 mm/°, respectively). Post-cam velocity was correlated (r = 0.89) with tibiofemoral condylar design features. Condylar geometry, in addition to post-cam geometry, played a significant role in minimizing engagement velocity and forces and stresses in the post. This analysis guides selection and design of PS implants that facilitate smooth post-cam engagement and reduce edge loading of the post. PMID:23606458

Fitzpatrick, Clare K; Clary, Chadd W; Cyr, Adam J; Maletsky, Lorin P; Rullkoetter, Paul J

2013-09-01

473

An Analysis of White Student Engagement at Public HBCUs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The steady increase of White undergraduates attending public Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) compels educators to better understand White students' collegiate experiences at HBCUs. One lens to assess these experiences is through examining their engagement on campus. Student engagement is defined as the amount of time and…

Carter, Joelle Davis; Fountaine, Tiffany Patrice

2012-01-01

474

Center for Civic Engagement -Fact Sheet #12 "Free" Donations Websites  

E-print Network

Center for Civic Engagement - Fact Sheet #12 "Free" Donations Websites Updated February 2010 cats, primates, (environmental) The Hunger Site ­ www.thehungersite.com -click to donate free food Site ­ www.theanimalrescuesite.com -feed an animal Center for Civic Engagement -- Fact Sheet #12

Suzuki, Masatsugu

475

Student-Community Engagement and the Development of Graduate Attributes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of student-community engagement in ensuring relevance of higher education to civil, social, economic and moral issues. It reviews the literature around three inter-related themes: calls for higher education institutions to engage with their communities; the kinds of attributes university…

O'Connor, Kristine Mason; Lynch, Kenny; Owen, David

2011-01-01

476

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS Professional Development Initiative for Public Engagement Leaders  

E-print Network

within the University's public engagement units and centers. Grants of up to $750 each will be awarded of the Twin Cities Public Engagement Network (TCPEN). The purpose of these professional development grants-Point Plan. Eligibility Because this grant program builds off of the strategic issues discussed at the Twin

Amin, S. Massoud

477

Using "Petites Projects" to Further Engage Students in Geography  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The challenge of teaching AP Human Geography to high school students is to make geography relevant, engaging and "real world." Often the pace of teaching AP classes constrains the ability of teachers to do creative projects and truly engage students until after the exam is over in May. In this lesson plan, the author suggests using "Petites…

Katz, Richard

2013-01-01

478

Educational Expenditures and Student Engagement: When Does Money Matter?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Studies of the relationships between higher education expenditures and student outcomes are relatively rare. The present research examined the relationships between higher education expenditures and students' engagement in educationally purposeful activities. Findings indicate that the relationships between expenditures and student engagement are…

Pike, Gary R.; Smart, John C.; Kuh, George D.; Hayek, John C.

2005-01-01

479

Maternal Affection Moderates Friend Influence on Schoolwork Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated friend influence over adolescent schoolwork engagement in 160 same-sex friend dyads (94 female dyads and 66 male dyads). Participants were approximately 16 years of age at the outset. Each friend described his or her own schoolwork engagement, school burnout, and perceptions of maternal affection. The results revealed that…

Marion, Donna; Laursen, Brett; Kiuru, Noona; Nurmi, Jari-Erik; Salmela-Aro, Katariina

2014-01-01

480

Defending the Ivory Tower: Toward Critical Community Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The ideal of community engagement suggests that both a student's career and his college's mission are (or ought to be) inextricable from the community in which they are embedded. That students, faculty, and academic institutions should serve community purposes, actively engage in community affairs, and network themselves in real and virtual…

Bowker, Matthew H.

2012-01-01

481

Engagement Style (Agent vs. Patient) in Childhood and Adolescence.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigates the validity of a semiprojective measure of "engagement" with respect to the differential effects of family size. Engagement style refers to the perception one has of oneself as either doing (agent) or being done to (patient). Subjects were 51 male college students ranging in age from 18 to 26 years. (SS)

McKinney, J. P.

1980-01-01

482

Help Teachers Engage Students: Action Tools for Administrators  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This unique, hands-on reference for school administrators offers guidelines for effective student engagement as well as reproducible action tools that will enable you to: (1) Identify and share "The Big Eight Student Engagement Strategies" with your teachers; (2) Promote teacher growth and provide support for new and/or struggling teachers; (3)…

Brinkman, Annette; Forlini, Gary; Williams, Ellen

2009-01-01

483

Student Engagement and Its Relationship with Early High School Dropout  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although the concept of school engagement figures prominently in most school dropout theories, there has been little empirical research conducted on its nature and course and, more importantly, the association with dropout. Information on the natural development of school engagement would greatly benefit those interested in preventing student…

Archambault, Isabelle; Janosz, Michel; Fallu, Jean-Sebastien; Pagani, Linda S.

2009-01-01

484

Serious Gaming at School: Reflections on Students' Performance, Engagement and  

E-print Network

Serious Gaming at School: Reflections on Students' Performance, Engagement and Motivation Rosa experiment showed that: 1) there is a strong correlation between school achievement and the ability to play and solve this kind of games and that 2) motivation and engagement in game-based learning tasks is very high

Boyer, Edmond

485

Influences on Achievement: Goals, Perceived Ability, and Cognitive Engagement  

Microsoft Academic Search

Relationships among college students’ self-reported goal orientation, perceived ability, cognitive engagement while studying, and course achievement were examined. Theoretically important intercorrelations that replicated previous research were found. Both perceived ability and learning goal scores were positively correlated with meaningful cognitive engagement (self-regulation and deep strategy use). Additionally, learning goals and perceived ability were positively correlated with each other. Performance goals

Barbara A. Greene; Raymond B. Miller

1996-01-01

486

Teaching to Strengths: Engaging Young Boys in Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Traditional teaching methods often fail to engage male students in learning. The purpose of this research was to increase student engagement in the story writing process and increase self-confidence in boys at risk. A qualitative approach included student surveys as well as teacher journaling and portfolios (including e-portfolios). The student…

Johnson, Cynthia; Gooliaff, Shauna

2013-01-01

487

Learners Reconceptualising Education: Widening Participation through Creative Engagement?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Engaging imaginatively with how education is manifested is necessary for providers both in higher education and in preceding contexts and phases. Fostering dispositions for creativity in dynamic engagement and the consideration of pedagogy, curriculum, inclusion, policy and the management of change, requires innovative provision to span school,…

Craft, Anna; Chappell, Kerry; Twining, Peter

2008-01-01

488

The Changing Landscape of Trustee and Board Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Attitudes about trustee and board engagement are changing. Presidents, board chairs, and trustees increasingly are discussing the need for greater board engagement in governance and more productive partnerships among the board, president and executive staff. Even boards that already consider themselves to be high performing are finding that…

Johnston, Susan Whealler; Summerville, Martha W.; Roberts, Charlotte

2010-01-01

489

Mechanics of post-cam engagement during simulated dynamic activity  

PubMed Central

Posterior-stabilized (PS) total knee arthroplasty (TKA) components employ a tibial post and femoral cam mechanism to guide anteroposterior knee motion in lieu of the posterior cruciate ligament. Some PS TKA patients report a clicking sensation when the post and cam engage, while severe wear and fracture of the post; we hypothesize that these complications are associated with excessive impact velocity at engagement. We evaluated the effect of implant design on engagement dynamics of the post-cam mechanism and resulting polyethylene stresses during dynamic activity. In vitro simulation of a knee bend activity was performed for four cadaveric specimens implanted with PS TKA components. Post-cam engagement velocity and flexion angle at initial contact were determined. The experimental data were used to validate computational predictions of PS mechanics using the same loading conditions. A lower limb model was subsequently utilized to compare engagement mechanics of eight TKA designs, relating differences between implants to geometric design features. Flexion angle and post-cam velocity at engagement demonstrated considerable ranges among designs (23°–89°, and 0.05–0.22?mm/°, respectively). Post-cam velocity was correlated (r?=?0.89) with tibiofemoral condylar design features. Condylar geometry, in addition to post-cam geometry, played a significant role in minimizing engagement velocity and forces and stresses in the post. This analysis guides selection and design of PS implants that facilitate smooth post-cam engagement and reduce edge loading of the post. PMID:23606458

Fitzpatrick, Clare K; Clary, Chadd W; Cyr, Adam J; Maletsky, Lorin P; Rullkoetter, Paul J

2013-01-01

490

An Evolving Framework for Describing Student Engagement in Classroom Activities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Student engagement in classroom activities is usually described as a function of factors such as human needs, affect, intention, motivation, interests, identity, and others. We take a different approach and develop a framework that models classroom engagement as a function of students' "conceptual competence" in the "specific content" (e.g., the…

Azevedo, Flavio S.; diSessa, Andrea A.; Sherin, Bruce L.

2012-01-01

491

Learner Engagement: Has the Child Been Lost in Translation?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A corpus of literature has argued the fundamental importance of learner engagement in early years' classrooms and identified the association between engagement and academic and social success. In the current education policy, educational theories typically influence curriculum development which, in turn, guides pedagogical practice. In the case of…

Harcourt, Deborah; Keen, Deb

2012-01-01

492

Class Participation: Promoting In-Class Student Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Class participation has long been valued by faculty members interested in engaging students in the learning process. This paper discusses class participation and shares participation techniques that promote active student engagement during class meetings. Emphasis is placed on techniques that invite a larger number of students into a course's…

O'Connor, Kevin J.

2013-01-01

493

Effectively Involving Faculty in the Assessment of Student Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The formal assessment of student engagement, as it has developed in recent years, is not necessarily a faculty-driven activity. Most faculty members who teach undergraduates are involved in the informal assessment of student engagement by taking attendance, observing student behaviors or expressions in class, providing feedback on assignments, and…

Nelson Laird, Thomas F.; Smallwood, Robert; Niskode-Dossett, Amanda Suniti; Garver, Amy K.

2009-01-01

494

Community-Engaged Teaching: A Project-Based Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The classroom offers a unique and effective venue for community engagement and an opportunity for teaching artists to dive into a topic on both practical and theoretical levels, resulting in well-informed input. That well-informed input is then translated into thoughtful action. It is exciting to engage students early on in shaping their community…

Christensen, Carrie Ann

2015-01-01

495

Mindfulness, Authentic Functioning, and Work Engagement: A Growth Modeling Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Previous research has demonstrated that mindfulness helps reduce symptoms of work stress but research has yet to clarify "whether" and "how" mindfulness is linked to work engagement. Using self-determination theory we hypothesize that mindfulness is positively related to work engagement and that this relationship can be better understood through…

Leroy, Hannes; Anseel, Frederik; Dimitrova, Nicoletta G.; Sels, Luc

2013-01-01

496

Student Engagement: Stakeholder Perspectives on Course Representation in University Governance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Student engagement has become a key feature of UK higher education policy and analysis. At the core of this is a notion of engagement characterised by dialogue and joint venture. The article explores this by considering the role of student representation in university governance. It focuses on the system of course representation that is a feature…

Carey, Philip

2013-01-01

497

Using Teacher Greetings to Increase Speed to Task Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We used a multiple baseline design across participants to determine if teacher greetings would reduce the latency to task engagement. Three participants were identified by their respective teachers as having difficulty initiating task-appropriate engagement at the beginning of class. Latency was measured from teacher greeting until the participant…

Allday, R. Allan; Bush, Miranda; Ticknor, Nicole; Walker, Lindsay

2011-01-01

498

Beyond Hard Outcomes: "Soft" Outcomes and Engagement as Student Success  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper questions current policy discourses that equate student success with hard outcomes like retention, completion and employment. It offers another view, one that uses "soft" outcomes and student engagement literature to widen our understanding of student success. In the paper, we first draw on literature to explore student engagement,…

Zepke, Nick; Leach, Linda

2010-01-01

499

Reforming Middle Schools: Focus on Continuity, Social Connectedness, and Engagement  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article provides a brief historical context and analysis of current middle school reform efforts to promote student engagement by facilitating social relationships. International comparisons of perceived social climate are presented to assess whether sense of belonging and support are lacking in American schools. Research documenting associations between student engagement and relationships with teachers and fellow students, in turn, sheds

JAANA JUVONEN

2007-01-01

500

Gardening and the social engagement of older people  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – This paper identifies ways in which community action can enhance the quality of life of older residents and reports specifically on four community gardening initiatives developed with older people living in disadvantaged communities in Manchester. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The Community Action in Later Life – Manchester Engagement (CALL_ME) project used an action research approach to engage older people. Older

Sharon Middling; Jan Bailey; Sian Maslin-Prothero; Thomas Scharf

2011-01-01