These are representative sample records from Science.gov related to your search topic.
For comprehensive and current results, perform a real-time search at Science.gov.
1

Noise Abatement  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

SMART, Sound Modification and Regulated Temperature compound, is a liquid plastic mixture with exceptional energy and sound absorbing qualities. It is derived from a very elastic plastic which was an effective noise abatement material in the Apollo Guidance System. Discovered by a NASA employee, it is marketed by Environmental Health Systems, Inc. (EHS). The product has been successfully employed by a diaper company with noisy dryers and a sugar company with noisy blowers. The company also manufactures an audiometric test booth and acoustical office partitions.

1983-01-01

2

Clean artisanal gold mining: a utopian approach?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) provides an important source of livelihood for rural communities throughout the world. These activities are frequently accompanied by extensive environmental degradation and deplorable socio-economic conditions, both during operations and well after mining activities have ceased. As gold is easily sold and not influenced by the instability of local governments, it is the main mineral extracted

Jennifer J. Hinton; Marcello M. Veiga; A. Tadeu C Veiga

2003-01-01

3

ARTISAN/FARMSTEAD CHEESEMAKER FOOD SAFETY WORKSHOP  

E-print Network

ARTISAN/FARMSTEAD CHEESEMAKER FOOD SAFETY WORKSHOP WHEN: June 06 , 2014 8:00 AM ­ 6:00 PM WHERE looking to protect consumers and their businesses through good food safety practices · Extension to understand cheesemaking food safety from these specialty producers Instructor : Dennis D'Amico, Assistant

Alpay, S. Pamir

4

Artisan Training and Employment Outcomes in Tanzania  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents the main findings of a tracer survey of graduates from two artisan training centres in Tanzania, which was undertaken in early 2002. The two institutions are the Chang'ombe Regional Vocational Training and Service Centre (RVTSC) in Dar es Salaam and the Iringa RVTSC, which are owned and managed by the Vocational Education and

Bennell, Paul; Mukyanuzi, Faustin; Kasogela, Maurice; Mutashubirwa, Francis; Klim, Mikkel

2006-01-01

5

Noise Abatement Materials  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A former NASA employee who discovered a kind of plastic that soaked up energy, dampened vibrations, and was a good noise abatement material, founded a company to market noise deadening adhesives, sheets, panels and enclosures. Known as SMART products, they are 75-80% lighter than ordinary soundproofing material and have demonstrated a high degree of effectiveness. The company, Varian Associates, makes enclosures for high voltage terminals and other electronic system components, and easily transportable audiometric test booths.

1986-01-01

6

Emission Abatement System  

DOEpatents

Emission abatement system. The system includes a source of emissions and a catalyst for receiving the emissions. Suitable catalysts are absorber catalysts and selective catalytic reduction catalysts. A plasma fuel converter generates a reducing gas from a fuel source and is connected to deliver the reducing gas into contact with the absorber catalyst for regenerating the catalyst. A preferred reducing gas is a hydrogen rich gas and a preferred plasma fuel converter is a plasmatron. It is also preferred that the absorber catalyst be adapted for absorbing NO.sub.x.

Bromberg, Leslie (Sharon, MA); Cohn, Daniel R. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Rabinovich, Alexander (Swampscott, MA)

2003-05-13

7

Bioenergy technologies for carbon abatement  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, bioenergy technologies (BETs) are presented as potential carbon abatement opportunities substituting fossil fuel or traditional (less efficient) biomass energy systems. Cost of energy (produced or saved) of BETs is compared with fossil fuel and traditional biomass energy systems to estimate the incremental cost (IC). The IC of carbon abatement for each of the selected BETs (in $kWh?1

N. H. Ravindranath; P. Balachandra; S. Dasappa; K. Usha Rao

2006-01-01

8

Marginal Abatement Cost Analysis Tool  

EPA Science Inventory

The Non-CO2 Marginal Abatement Cost Analysis Tool is an extensive bottom-up engineering-economic spreadsheet model capturing the relevant cost and performance data on sectors emitting non-CO2 GHGs. The tool has 24 regions and 7 sectors and produces marginal abatement cost curves...

9

Artisanal Mining of Gold with Mercury in Ghana  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper examines the environmental impact of artisanal mining of gold with mercury (Hg) in Ghana. In spite of its positive socio- economic contributions, it is well known that artisanal mining of gold contributes in no small measure to land degradation, loss of biodiversity and natural resources, deforestation, water pollution, etc. In Ghana, these environmental problems remain poorly studied. In

A. K. Donkor; V. K. Nartey; J. C. Bonzongo; D. K. Adotey

10

Biological abatement of cellulase inhibitors.  

PubMed

Removal of enzyme inhibitors released during lignocellulose pretreatment is essential for economically feasible biofuel production. We tested bio-abatement to mitigate enzyme inhibitor effects observed in corn stover liquors after pretreatment with either dilute acid or liquid hot water at 10% (w/v) solids. Bio-abatement of liquors was followed by enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. To distinguish between inhibitor effects on enzymes and recalcitrance of the substrate, pretreated corn stover solids were removed and replaced with 1% (w/v) Solka Floc. Cellulose conversion in the presence of bio-abated liquors from dilute acid pretreatment was 8.6% (0.1x enzyme) and 16% (1x enzyme) higher than control (non-abated) samples. In the presence of bio-abated liquor from liquid hot water pretreated corn stover, 10% (0.1x enzyme) and 13% (1x enzyme) higher cellulose conversion was obtained compared to control. Bio-abatement yielded improved enzyme hydrolysis in the same range as that obtained using a chemical (overliming) method for mitigating inhibitors. PMID:23973982

Cao, Guangli; Ximenes, Eduardo; Nichols, Nancy N; Zhang, Leyu; Ladisch, Michael

2013-10-01

11

10 CFR 851.22 - Hazard prevention and abatement.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hazard prevention and abatement. 851.22...Specific Program Requirements 851.22 Hazard prevention and abatement. (a) Contractors must establish and implement a hazard prevention and abatement process to...

2010-01-01

12

Start-up and operating costs for artisan cheese companies.  

PubMed

Lack of valid economic data for artisan cheese making is a serious impediment to developing a realistic business plan and obtaining financing. The objective of this study was to determine approximate start-up and operating costs for an artisan cheese company. In addition, values are provided for the required size of processing and aging facilities associated with specific production volumes. Following in-depth interviews with existing artisan cheese makers, an economic model was developed to predict costs based on input variables such as production volume, production frequency, cheese types, milk types and cost, labor expenses, and financing. Estimated values for start-up cost for processing and aging facility ranged from $267,248 to $623,874 for annual production volumes of 3,402 kg (7,500 lb) and 27,216 kg (60,000 lb), respectively. First-year production costs ranged from $65,245 to $620,094 for the above-mentioned production volumes. It is likely that high start-up and operating costs remain a significant entry barrier for artisan cheese entrepreneurs. PMID:24746129

Bouma, Andrea; Durham, Catherine A; Meunier-Goddik, Lisbeth

2014-06-01

13

Reducing mercury pollution from artisanal gold mining in Munhena, Mozambique  

Microsoft Academic Search

Artisanal small-scale mining (ASM) is responsible for over 90% of gold production in Mozambique. In 2005, a 15-day pilot training project was held in the village of Munhena, a gold mining community. This intervention aimed at raising awareness related to the environmental and health impacts of mercury amalgamation and introduced alternative practices to reduce mercury release and exposure. In 2007,

Janis A. Shandro; Marcello M. Veiga; Rebecca Chouinard

2009-01-01

14

Changing ideologies of artisanal productivisation: ORT in late imperial Russia  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Society for the Promotion of Artisanal and Agricultural Work among the Jews in Russia (ORT) was established in St Petersburg in 1880. In its post?1921 form, as the World ORT Union, the organisation, with its headquarters in London, still operates in scores of countries throughout the world. This article analyses the ideological changes in ORT's craftsmen?related programmes during the

Gennady Estraikh

2009-01-01

15

MPM : a modular package manager Pietro Abate  

E-print Network

order, abort- ing the operation if problems are encountered. Until recently, package managers in FOSSMPM : a modular package manager Pietro Abate abate@pps.jussieu.fr Roberto Di Cosmo roberto-called package managers for the installation and removal of pack- ages on target machines. State

Zacchiroli, Stefano - Laboratoire Preuves, Programmes et Systèmes, Université Paris 7

16

Hanford Site Asbestos Abatement Plan. Revision 1  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Hanford Site Asbestos Abatement Plan (Plan) lists priorities for asbestos abatement activities to be conducted in Hanford Site facilities. The Plan is based on asbestos assessment information gathered in fiscal year 1989 that evaluated all Hanford Site facilities for the presence and condition of asbestos. Of those facilities evaluated, 414 contain asbestos-containing materials and are classified according to the

Mewes

1993-01-01

17

Effectiveness of conventional management in Mediterranean type artisanal fisheries  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Artisanal fisheries throughout the Mediterranean region are managed mostly by applying gear specific regulations. The data about the extent and dynamics by which littoral fish resources respond to commonly proposed changes of such regulations are lacking. Here the results of a 15 year (1995-2009) monitoring programme of littoral fish resources in a pilot region of island Vis aquatorium, central Adriatic Sea, are reported with the scope of investigating whether a more restrictive fishing regime (encompassing an increase in minimum inner layer mesh size of trammel net from 28 to 40 mm and excluding the trammel net from subsistence artisanal fishing) that has progressively been put in place during the study period has been accompanied by expected positive changes of littoral fish resources' abundance, biomass and structure. Significant increases over time were observed in most of the community indices analyzed (abundance and biomass catch per unit effort, diversity indices) as well as a directional change in abundance and biomass catch composition of littoral fish resources. Positive responses were, however, primarily related with a recovery of Mullus surmuletus stock. Additionally, time-series analysis of ABC curves and their corresponding W index revealed that fish community in the study area was still moderately disturbed. Limited extent of conventional management restorative potential is further exacerbated by social issues - noncompliant behavior mainly among subsistence artisanal fishers and consequent resentment of commercial artisanal fishers. In order to improve further the state of the resources a more comprehensive set of management measures incorporating closed areas and a new approach actively involving fishers in the management process should be adopted.

Mati?-Skoko, S.; Stagli?i?, N.; Pallaoro, A.; Kraljevi?, M.; Dul?i?, J.; Tutman, P.; Dragi?evi?, B.

2011-01-01

18

Endogenous technological change and pollution abatement  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nonpoint source pollution control is a more complicated process than traditional analysis suggests. Whether a new pollution abatement technology is developed exogenously or endogenously and the per unit reduction in the rate at which a pollutant associated with the use of a factor of production needed to produce an agricultural commodity due to this technology enters the environment are critical factors in the determination of the effects of agricultural production on the pollutant stock. These are the issues addressed here. The optimal current period research and development expenditures on an endogenously induced abatement technology associated with the use of a factor of production giving rise to environmental externalities are shown to be a function of, among other things, the cumulation of all research and development expenditures, the probability of an abatement technology being developed, the level of use of the factor of production, the unit pollution tax on the factor, the rate of time preference (discount rate), the rate at which the pollutant associated with the factor enters the environment, the rate of discharge of the pollutant stock, and so forth. Finally, the analysis demonstrates that a reduction in pollution by the adoption of an abatement technology may lead to an increase in the pollutant stock as a result of endogenous technological change associated with the pollution abatement. When the rate of pollution reduction is greater than a threshold, however, the adoption of an endogenously determined abatement technology will unequivocally lead to a reduction in the pollutant stock.

Kim, C. S.; Uri, N. D.; Sandretto, C.; Parry, I. W.

1996-04-01

19

Mercury contamination associated with artisanal gold mining on the island of Mindanao, the Philippines  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Agusan River basin of eastern Mindanao, the Philippines, hosts several centres of artisanal gold mining, the most important of which, Diwalwal, is a significant gold producer in global terms. An investigation of the environmental impacts of artisanal mining in the Agusan system, with particular reference to mercury contamination, was initiated in 1995 following reports of several incidents of human

J. D. Appleton; T. M. Williams; N. Breward; A. Apostol; J. Miguel; C. Miranda

1999-01-01

20

30 CFR 722.13 - Failure to abate.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Failure to abate. 722.13 Section 722.13 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING...INITIAL PROGRAM REGULATIONS ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES 722.13 Failure to abate. An authorized...

2010-07-01

21

The Solutions Data Base Component of the Water Pollution Abatement Subsystem (WPAS) of the Pollution Abatement Management System. (PAMS).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report describes the overall concept definition for the Solutions Data Base component of the Water Pollution Abatement System (WPAS) of the Pollution Abatement Management System (PAMS), which is being developed for use by DA planners and Facility Eng...

J. T. Bandy, E. D. Smith, R. D. Webster

1981-01-01

22

OPTIONS FOR ABATING GREENHOUSE GASES FROM EXHAUST STREAMS.  

SciTech Connect

This report examines different alternatives for replacing, treating, and recycling greenhouse gases. It is concluded that treatment (abatement) is the only viable short-term option. Three options for abatement that were tested for use in semiconductor facilities are reviewed, and their performance and costs compared. This study shows that effective abatement options are available to the photovoltaic (PV) industry, at reasonable cost.

FTHENAKIS,V.

2001-12-01

23

ABATEMENT OF DEPOSITION AND SCOUR IN SEWERS  

EPA Science Inventory

Feasible methods are identified for reducing first-flush pollution in new and existing storm and combined sewer systems. A mathematical model is described which was developed to simulate the behavior of solids in pipelines and to evaluate the costs of first-flush abatement altern...

24

Lead Abatement and Prevention of Developmental Disabilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews the literature on "safe" levels of lead in children and their association with developmental disabilities. It concludes that lead pollution in Australia, especially the Lake Macquarie area of New South Wales, continues to be a problem, that the current standard "safe" level should be reexamined, and that a lead-abatement strategy is

Chiang, Vico

1999-01-01

25

VOLUNTARY POLLUTION ABATEMENT: TESTING ALTERNATIVE THEORIES  

Microsoft Academic Search

We broaden the existing empirical literature on environmental regulation and voluntary pollution abatement programs by testing the effects of implicit boycott threats and a firm's participation in a partnership program on its subsequent regulatory oversight using EPA's 33\\/50 program as a research experiment. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis of a preemptive self-selection to deter consumer boycotts. The findings

Robert Innes; Abdoul G. Sam

2003-01-01

26

Adolescents Exiting Homelessness Over Two Years: The Risk Amplification and Abatement Model  

PubMed Central

The Risk Amplification and Abatement Model (RAAM), demonstrates that negative contact with socializing agents amplify risk, while positive contact abates risk for homeless adolescents. To test this model, the likelihood of exiting homelessness and returning to familial housing at 2 years and stably exiting over time are examined with longitudinal data collected from 183 newly homeless adolescents followed over 2 years in Los Angeles, CA. In support of RAAM, unadjusted odds of exiting at 2 years and stably exiting over2 years revealed that engagement with pro-social peers, maternal social support, and continued school attendance all promoted exiting behaviors. Simultaneously, exposure to family violence and reliance on shelter services discouraged stably exiting behaviors. Implications for family-based interventions are proposed. PMID:25067896

Milburn, Norweeta G.; Rice, Eric; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Mallett, Shelley; Rosenthal, Doreen; Batterham, Phillip; May, Susanne J.; Witkin, Andrea; Duan, Naihua

2014-01-01

27

the Engaged Outreach and Engagement  

E-print Network

, and Environments March 3, 2004 #12;An MSU Promise MSU will be an exemplary "engaged university," transforming, teaching and learning, to prepare educated, engaged citizens, to strengthen democratic values and civic citizen participation and civic responsibility to improve outcomes for community members ... Globalize

28

Engagement Indicators Theme Engagement Indicator  

E-print Network

in magnitude. Due to their positive associations with student learning and retention, special undergraduateSnapshot Engagement Indicators Theme Engagement Indicator Higher-Order Learning (HO) Reflective) Discussions with Diverse Others (DD) -- Student-Faculty Interaction (SF) Effective Teaching Practices (ET

Bogaerts, Steven

29

Utilising the Internet to Improve Peasant Artisan Incomes: Evidence from Mexico  

E-print Network

. Drawing upon new institutional economics, we propose that the Internet can be the catalyst for positive to a sustainable model for artisan economic development. Keywords: New Institutional Economics, Livelihoods

Boyer, Edmond

30

Locating Value in Artisan Cheese: Reverse Engineering Terroir for New-World Landscapes  

E-print Network

Terroir, the taste of place, is being adapted by artisan cheesemakers in the United States to reveal the range of valuesagrarian, environmental, social, and gastronomicthat they believe constitute their cheese and ...

Paxson, Heather Anne

31

Application of bi-directional ICT channels to increase livelihoods for artisans in rural India  

E-print Network

The handicraft industry is the second largest employer in rural India after agriculture, and has been the fastest-growing export growth sector since India's liberalization in 1991. Today, however, millions of artisans face ...

Emani, Sriram

2014-01-01

32

Artisan Aphakic Lens for Cataract Surgery in Anterior Megalophthalmos  

PubMed Central

A 44-year-old man with anterior megalophthalmos arrived at the clinic presenting a cataract in the right eye. The corneal diameter was 13 mm. Iridodonesis and phacodonesis were evident during slit lamp examination. Anterior chamber depth was 5.89 mm, and the diameter of the capsular bag was approximately 14.45 mm. Due to the large capsular bag, a standard posterior chamber intraocular lens was considered inadequate because of potential instability. Phacoemulsification and an implantation of an iris-claw lens (Artisan for aphakia, Ophtec) in the posterior chamber were performed with good results. In the fourth postoperative month, uncorrected distance visual acuity was 20/30, and 20/20 was achieved with +0.75 ?1.25 10. We consider retropupillary aphakic iris-claw intraocular lenses to be a worthwhile option in these cases of megalophthalmos and cataract, since instability is avoided and the procedure is less challenging than suturing the lens. PMID:23341820

Galvis, Virgilio; Tello, Alejandro; Miotto, Giuseppe; Rangel, Carlos M.

2012-01-01

33

Characterization and treatment of artisanal gold mine tailings.  

PubMed

The solid waste generated by artisanal gold mining, with high mercury and gold contents, can be found in several areas in the South America. The present study focused on the tailings of an artisanal gold mine area located in the Brazilian northeastern. Samples of the mine tailings were taken and used to perform a physical and chemical characterization study using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, neutron activation, X-ray fluorescence, induced coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, among others analytical methods. The results indicate that the material is composed mainly by quartz and goethite, the characteristic size of the particles (d(50)) is about 150 microm, and the density is close of that of quartz. The main constituents are silicon, iron, and aluminum. The tailings gold content is of about 1.8 mg/kg and the mercury content is of about 10 mg/kg. A remarkable feature of this solid waste is that the gold and mercury are both concentrated in both the fine and the coarse particles, but not in particles of intermediary size. Leaching studies indicated that the tailings are stable in weak organic acids, but soluble in alkaline and aired cyanide solutions, in which 89% of gold and 100% of mercury are extracted in 24 h. Electroleaching experiments, performed using sodium chloride as electrolyte, indicated that mercury and gold are extracted simultaneously and the recovery of both metals can be as high as 70% in 4 h. In addition, chromium, nickel, and lead are found in relatively large amounts in the solution, which indicate an effectively action of the electroleaching method to clean up solid wastes contaminated with metals. PMID:17583425

de Andrade Lima, L R P; Bernardez, L A; Barbosa, L A D

2008-02-11

34

Dowsing for Potential Temporary Autonomous Zones: A Psychotopology of the Alternative Lifestyles of Nomadic Artisans in Mexico.  

E-print Network

??By using qualitative data gathered from semi-structured interviews and participant observation, this study performs a psychotopological investigation of the lifestyles of nomadic artisans in Mexico (more)

Pope, Annaliese M

2014-01-01

35

Engaging Employers?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A key factor in the successful development of workplace learning is employer engagement (Leitch, 2006; DfES, 2007). However, despite numerous approaches by government in the United Kingdom to bring together employers, providers and learners so that economic success is generated by a skilled and flexible workforce, there continue to be challenges

Hillier, Yvonne

2008-01-01

36

Engaging Faculty in Community Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Researchers endorse the integration of community engagement (CE) into higher education as a way to improve the relevance of education, address community needs, and forge university-community partnerships (Zlotkowski, 1996). CE can help create stronger ties between universities and their communities and provide students with experiential learning

Fitzgerald, Glynis A.

2012-01-01

37

Mercury content in electrum from artisanal mining site of Mongolia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In Mongolia, artisanal gold mining, modern gold rush, in which people use mercury to extract gold, is being proliferated rapidly and the mercury contamination of mining site is becoming a serious social issue. For the risk assessment of mercury, it is necessary to understand how much mercury is introduced to the environment from what kind of materials during mining activity. It is already known that major contribution of the contamination comes from mercury that was bought at shops and brought to mining sites by miners. However, no information is available on how much mercury is removed from electrum (natural gold grain) to the environment. Since gold deposit is always accompanied by mercury anomaly, it is anticipated that electrum grains contain some amount of mercury of natural origin, and this mercury (primary mercury) contributes to some extent to the contamination. In order to clarify how much mercury is incorporated in electrum grains, micro-PIXE at CSIRO was used for grain-by-grain analysis. The result showed that electrum from study area contains mercury up to 8260 ppm. It is concluded that for the risk management of mercury contamination, release of natural mercury from electrum grains during smelting must not be ignored.

Murao, Satoshi; Naito, Kazuki; Dejidmaa, Gunchin; Sie, Soey H.

2006-08-01

38

Artisanal salt production in Aveiro/Portugal - an ecofriendly process  

PubMed Central

Solar salinas are man-made systems exploited for the extraction of salt, by solar and wind evaporation of seawater. Salt production achieved by traditional methods is associated with landscapes and environmental and patrimonial values generated throughout history. Since the mid-twentieth century, this activity has been facing a marked decline in Portugal, with most salinas either abandoned or subjected to destruction, making it necessary to find a strategy to reverse this trend. It is, however, possible to generate revenue from salinas at several levels, not merely in terms of good quality salt production, but also by obtaining other products that can be commercialized, or by exploring their potential for tourism, and as research facilities, among others. Furthermore, with an adequate management, biodiversity can be restored to abandoned salinas, which constitute important feeding and breeding grounds for resident and migratory aquatic birds, many of which are protected by European Community Directives. The aims of this manuscript are to present a brief overview on the current state of sea salt exploitation in Portugal and to stress the importance of recovering these salinas for the conservation of this particular environment, for the regional economy, the scientific community and the general public. The Aveiro salina complex is presented in detail, to exemplify salina structure and functioning, as well as current problems and potential solutions for artisanal salinas. PMID:22053788

2011-01-01

39

Emission abatement system utilizing particulate traps  

DOEpatents

Emission abatement system. The system includes a source of emissions and a catalyst for receiving the emissions. Suitable catalysts are absorber catalysts and selective catalytic reduction catalysts. A plasma fuel converter generates a reducing gas from a fuel source and is connected to deliver the reducing gas into contact with the absorber catalyst for regenerating the catalyst. A preferred reducing gas is a hydrogen rich gas and a preferred plasma fuel converter is a plasmatron. It is also preferred that the absorber catalyst be adapted for absorbing NO.sub.x.

Bromberg, Leslie (Sharon, MA); Cohn, Daniel R. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Rabinovich, Alexander (Swampscott, MA)

2004-04-13

40

5Year Prospective Follow-Up of Artisan Phakic Intraocular Lenses for the Correction of Myopia, Hyperopia and Astigmatism  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aim: To determine the efficacy and safety of Artisan phakic intraocular lenses (IOLs) for refractive error correction. Methods: A prospective study was conducted on patients undergoing Artisan phakic IOL implantation for myopia, hyperopia or astigmatism from 2002 to 2008. Visual acuity, manifest refractive spherical equivalent (MRSE), endothelial cell counts and higher order aberrations were recorded pre- and postoperatively. Results: One

Qasim Qasem; Caitriona Kirwan; Michael OKeefe

2010-01-01

41

76 FR 39368 - Migratory Bird Permits; Abatement Regulations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...abatement activities directed at protected migratory birds that do not amount to a take. We do not consider flushing, scaring, or hazing to meet the definition of take under the MBTA. Possession and use for abatement of exotic raptor species that are not on...

2011-07-06

42

ASBESTOS CONCENTRATIONS IN TWO YEARS AFTER ABATEMENT IN SEVENTEEN SCHOOLS  

EPA Science Inventory

Airborne asbestos concentrations were measured at 17 schools that underwent an asbestos abatement 2 years before in 1988. hese 17 schools, which involved 20 abatement sites, were part of a study conducted by the U.S Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the New Jersey Departm...

43

ASBESTOS CONCENTRATIONS TWO YEARS AFTER ABATEMENT IN SEVENTEEN SCHOOLS  

EPA Science Inventory

Airborne asbestos concentrations were measured at 17 schools that underwent an asbestos abatement 2 years before in 1988. These 17 schools, which involved 20 abatement sites, were part of a study conducted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the New Jersey Depar...

44

The allocative efficiency implications of water pollution abatement cost comparisons  

Microsoft Academic Search

Assessments of the efficiency of water pollution control allocations are usually based on abatement cost comparisons. The general rule is that efficiency is improved by reallocating abatement from sources with high marginal costs to low-cost sources. The welfare-theoretic foundation of this rule is well established for situations with nonstochastic emissions. In situations with stochastic emissions, pollution control involves improving the

James S. Shortle

1990-01-01

45

Analyses of PCM Asbestos Air Monitoring Results for a Major Abatement Project  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many asbestos abatement operations take place in the United States each year; however, little published information is available as to the concentrations of asbestos in and around abatement operations and the efficacy of abatement efforts. Most importantly, the use of glovebags is one of the most frequently encountered abatement methods, and only one published study exists on the effectiveness of

Jimmy L. Perkins; Vernon E. Rose; Michael S. Cleveland

1992-01-01

46

Emissions and environmental implications of mercury from artisanal gold mining in north Sulawesi, Indonesia  

Microsoft Academic Search

In artisanal gold mining practiced in North Sulawesi Island, Indonesia, gold is separated from ore by the use of mercury, which forms an amalgam with gold. All related processes are undertaken with a low level of technical knowledge and skills, no regulation, and with disregard for the safety of human and environment health. The situation is generating serious potential health

Daniel Limbong; Jeims Kumampung; Joice Rimper; Takaomi Arai; Nobuyuki Miyazaki

2003-01-01

47

Effects of Artisanal Fishing on Marine Communities in the Galpagos Islands  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Galpagos Islands harbor some of the least impacted marine ecosystems in the tropics, but there are indications that local artisanal fishing is affecting exploited marine communities. To quantify these effects, I sampled communities of fishes and sea urchins at a number of heavily fished and lightly fished sites throughout the central islands of the archipelago. Sites were selected based

Benjamin I. Ruttenberg

2001-01-01

48

The role of artisanal and small-scale mining in China's economy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The last decades have seen increased international attention paid to a number of features of artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM). The beneficial roles of ASM in society and the economy in many countries, however, are often overlooked, while its negative impacts dominate official press coverage and scholarly publications of the sector. Through a review of the available literature and statistics,

Lei Shen; Aaron James Gunson

2006-01-01

49

Occupational radiation exposures of artisans mining columbitetantalite in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo  

Microsoft Academic Search

Artisans in Masisi and other parts of the North Kivu province in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) mine columbitetantalite mineral ores (also called coltan) for the tantalum content. The potential occupational radiation exposures in the course of this operation, due to the presence of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), have been investigated in this screening survey. Activity concentrations

A O Mustapha; P Mbuzukongira; M J Mangala

2007-01-01

50

Locating Value in Artisan Cheese: Reverse Engineering Terroir for New-World Landscapes  

E-print Network

Locating Value in Artisan Cheese: Reverse Engineering Terroir for New-World Landscapes Heather--soil, topography, and microclimate--and also to the cultural know-how behind agricultural products that helps offers a theory of how people and place, cultural tradition and landscape ecology, are mutually

Seager, Sara

51

Occurrence of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Artisanal Palmero Cheese Smoked with Two Types of Vegetable Matter  

Microsoft Academic Search

Palmero cheese is a fresh smoked cheese from the Isle of Palma (Canary Islands), manufactured with goat's milk. To guarantee its safety, the occurrence of polycy- clic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in artisanal Palmero cheese smoked with 2 types of vegetable matter (almond shells and dry prickly pear) was studied. The determi- nation of PAH includes extraction and clean-up steps, followed

M. D. Guilln; G. Palencia; P. Sopelana; M. L. Ibargoitia

2007-01-01

52

The Master Artisan: A Framework for Master Tradespeople in Australia. Occasional Paper  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The author explores the prospect of improving pathways and opportunities for tradespeople in Australia through the introduction of a masters-level qualification. The study investigates the views and opinions of senior industry representatives and professional educators to determine whether the introduction of a master trade or master artisan

O'Reilly-Briggs, Karen

2011-01-01

53

Evolution of the Volatile Components of an Artisanal Blue Cheese During Ripening  

Microsoft Academic Search

The volatile fraction of artisanal Gamonedo blue cheeses has been ob- tained by simultaneous distillation and extraction and then analyzed by gas cb matography and mass spectrometry. About 40 compounds were identified and quantitatively determined among more than 100 detected components. The evo- lution of some of these compounds dur- ing the ripening process has been studied. The simultaneous distillation

D. Gonzales De Llano; M. Ramos; C. Polo; J. Sanz; I. Martinez-Castro

1990-01-01

54

A METHOD FOR COMPARING MULTICOMPONENT, MULTIMEDIA POLLUTION ABATEMENT PROCESSES  

EPA Science Inventory

The paper describes a comparison of the cost-effectiveness of four multicomponent, multimedia pollution abatement options: coal cleaning, limestone, limestone plus adipic acid, and coal cleaning plus limestone plus adipic acid. The comparison makes cost-effectiveness evaluations ...

55

Socio-Economic Impact Analysis: Centralia Mine Fire Abatement Alternatives.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The overall purpose of information contained in the following text is to document the likely social and economic impacts upon the Borough of Centralia through implementation of various mine fire abatement alternatives. Much of the data presented herein an...

1980-01-01

56

AIRBORNE ASBESTOS LEVELS MEASURED BEFORE, DURING AND AFTER ABATEMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

Airborne asbestos concentrations were measured before, during, and after removal of asbestos containing fireproofing at three university buildings. hese three abatement studies were not subject to the AHERA regulations and the procedures followed were not necessarily in complianc...

57

Crowd-funded micro-grants for genomics and "big data": an actionable idea connecting small (artisan) science, infrastructure science, and citizen philanthropy.  

PubMed

Biomedical science in the 21(st) century is embedded in, and draws from, a digital commons and "Big Data" created by high-throughput Omics technologies such as genomics. Classic Edisonian metaphors of science and scientists (i.e., "the lone genius" or other narrow definitions of expertise) are ill equipped to harness the vast promises of the 21(st) century digital commons. Moreover, in medicine and life sciences, experts often under-appreciate the important contributions made by citizen scholars and lead users of innovations to design innovative products and co-create new knowledge. We believe there are a large number of users waiting to be mobilized so as to engage with Big Data as citizen scientists-only if some funding were available. Yet many of these scholars may not meet the meta-criteria used to judge expertise, such as a track record in obtaining large research grants or a traditional academic curriculum vitae. This innovation research article describes a novel idea and action framework: micro-grants, each worth $1000, for genomics and Big Data. Though a relatively small amount at first glance, this far exceeds the annual income of the "bottom one billion"-the 1.4 billion people living below the extreme poverty level defined by the World Bank ($1.25/day). We describe two types of micro-grants. Type 1 micro-grants can be awarded through established funding agencies and philanthropies that create micro-granting programs to fund a broad and highly diverse array of small artisan labs and citizen scholars to connect genomics and Big Data with new models of discovery such as open user innovation. Type 2 micro-grants can be funded by existing or new science observatories and citizen think tanks through crowd-funding mechanisms described herein. Type 2 micro-grants would also facilitate global health diplomacy by co-creating crowd-funded micro-granting programs across nation-states in regions facing political and financial instability, while sharing similar disease burdens, therapeutics, and diagnostic needs. We report the creation of ten Type 2 micro-grants for citizen science and artisan labs to be administered by the nonprofit Data-Enabled Life Sciences Alliance International (DELSA Global, Seattle). Our hope is that these micro-grants will spur novel forms of disruptive innovation and genomics translation by artisan scientists and citizen scholars alike. We conclude with a neglected voice from the global health frontlines, the American University of Iraq in Sulaimani, and suggest that many similar global regions are now poised for micro-grant enabled collective innovation to harness the 21(st) century digital commons. PMID:23574338

zdemir, Vural; Badr, Kamal F; Dove, Edward S; Endrenyi, Laszlo; Geraci, Christy Jo; Hotez, Peter J; Milius, Djims; Neves-Pereira, Maria; Pang, Tikki; Rotimi, Charles N; Sabra, Ramzi; Sarkissian, Christineh N; Srivastava, Sanjeeva; Tims, Hesther; Zgheib, Nathalie K; Kickbusch, Ilona

2013-04-01

58

The Veterans Administration's Asbestos Abatement Program  

SciTech Connect

The Veterans Administration has developed a program of asbestos abatement for its more than 1000 buildings, where health care personnel from 173 hospitals and 238 ambulatory care clinics are likely to encounter respirable asbestos. This is a costly program, which has averaged about $25 million annually for the past ten years. The VA has banned the use of new asbestos products containing more than 1% of asbestos in building construction or renovation projects. Industrial hygiene engineering programs have been ordered instituted at all VA medical centers to monitor dust levels in compliance with OSHA and EPA requirements. Health surveillance programs, managed by an environmental health physician at each medical center, have been instituted for all personnel who have been identified to have breathed asbestos fibers in excess of OSHA-EPA threshold limit values. The health care program focuses on the identification of asbestosis and asbestos-related cancer through periodic X-ray films, lung function tests, and electrocardiographic and physical examination screening. The program also stresses cessation of smoking.

Schepers, G.W. (Institute of Industrial and Forensic Medicine, McLean, VA (United States))

1991-12-31

59

Strategy for the extraction of yeast DNA from artisan agave must for quantitative PCR analysis.  

PubMed

An efficient method for the direct extraction of yeast genomic DNA from agave must was developed. The optimized protocol, which was based on silica-adsorption of DNA on microcolumns, included an enzymatic cell wall degradation step followed by prolonged lysis with hot detergent. The resulting extracts were suitable templates for subsequent qPCR assays that quantified mixed yeast populations in artisan Mexican mezcal fermentations. PMID:21820955

Kirchmayr, Manuel Reinhart; Segura-Garcia, Luis Eduardo; Flores-Berrios, Ericka Patricia; Gschaedler, Anne

2011-11-01

60

Implantation of an Artisan phakic intraocular lens for the correction of high myopia after penetrating keratoplasty  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report 2 cases in which an Artisan phakic intraocular lens (IOL) (Ophtec) was used to successfully treat high myopia after penetrating keratoplasty (PKP). The first case was a 43-year-old man who had a manifest refraction of ?13.75 +3.00 50 with a best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of 20\\/402 after PKP in the left eye. Approximately 9 months after

Majid Moshirfar; Charles A Barsam; Jared W Parker

2004-01-01

61

Feeding goats on scrubby Mexican rangeland and pasteurization: influences on milk and artisan cheese quality  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of foraging on local scrubby rangeland versus stable feeding with high-protein\\u000a concentrate as well as the compulsory pasteurization process on goats milk and artisan soft cheese quality in terms of chemical\\u000a composition and fatty acid profile. The results indicated that there were no significant differences in the energy, fat, or

Mario Cuchillo Hilario; Claudia Delgadillo Puga; Nicole Wrage

2010-01-01

62

Environmental assessment of mercury contamination from the Rwamagasa artisanal gold mining centre, Geita District, Tanzania  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study presents the results of an environmental assessment of mercury (Hg) contamination in the Rwamagasa artisanal gold mining area, northwest Tanzania, and the potential downstream dispersion along the River Malagarasi to Lake Tanganyika. At the time of sampling, generally low concentrations of Hg (<0.05 mg\\/kg) occurred in most cultivated soils although higher Hg (0.059.2 mg\\/kg) was recorded in urban

H. Taylor; J. d. Appletonsupasu; R. Lister; B. Smith; D. Chitamweba; O. Mkumbo; J. F. Machiwa; A. L. Tesha; C. Beinhoff

2005-01-01

63

Costs and global impacts of black carbon abatement strategies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Abatement of particulate matter has traditionally been driven by health concerns rather than its role in global warming. Here we assess future abatement strategies in terms of how much they reduce the climate impact of black carbon (BC) and organic carbon (OC) from contained combustion. We develop global scenarios which take into account regional differences in climate impact, costs of abatement and ability to pay, as well as both the direct and indirect (snow-albedo) climate impact of BC and OC. To represent the climate impact, we estimate consistent region-specific values of direct and indirect global warming potential (GWP) and global temperature potential (GTP). The indirect GWP has been estimated using a physical approach and includes the effect of change in albedo from BC deposited on snow. The indirect GWP is highest in the Middle East followed by Russia, Europe and North America, while the total GWP is highest in the Middle East, Africa and South Asia. We conclude that prioritizing emission reductions in Asia represents the most cost-efficient global abatement strategy for BC because Asia is (1) responsible for a large share of total emissions, (2) has lower abatement costs compared to Europe and North America and (3) has large health cobenefits from reduced PM10 emissions.

Rypdal, Kristin; Rive, Nathan; Berntsen, Terje K.; Klimont, Zbigniew; Mideksa, Torben K.; Myhre, Gunnar; Skeie, Ragnhild B.

2009-09-01

64

Global forestry emission projections and abatement costs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper we present forestry emission projections and associated Marginal Abatement Cost Curves (MACCs) for individual countries, based on economic, social and policy drivers. The activities cover deforestation, afforestation, and forestry management. The global model tools G4M and GLOBIOM, developed at IIASA, are applied. GLOBIOM uses global scenarios of population, diet, GDP and energy demand to inform G4M about future land and commodity prices and demand for bioenergy and timber. G4M projects emissions from afforestation, deforestation and management of existing forests. Mitigation measures are simulated by introducing a carbon tax. Mitigation activities like reducing deforestation or enhancing afforestation are not independent of each other. In contrast to existing forestry mitigation cost curves the presented MACCs are not developed for individual activities but total forest land management which makes the estimated potentials more realistic. In the assumed baseline gross deforestation drops globally from about 12 Mha in 2005 to below 10 Mha after 2015 and reach 0.5 Mha in 2050. Afforestation rates remain fairly constant at about 7 Mha annually. Although we observe a net area increase of global forest area after 2015 net emissions from deforestation and afforestation are positive until 2045 as the newly afforested areas accumulate carbon rather slowly. About 200 Mt CO2 per year in 2030 in Annex1 countries could be mitigated at a carbon price of 50 USD. The potential for forest management improvement is very similar. Above 200 USD the potential is clearly constrained for both options. In Non-Annex1 countries avoided deforestation can achieve about 1200 Mt CO2 per year at a price of 50 USD. The potential is less constrained compared to the potential in Annex1 countries, achieving a potential of 1800 Mt CO2 annually in 2030 at a price of 1000 USD. The potential from additional afforestation is rather limited due to high baseline afforestation rates assumed. In addition we present results of several sensitivity analyses that were run to understand better model uncertainties and the mechanisms of drivers such as agricultural productivity, GDP, wood demand and national corruption rates.

Bttcher, H.; Gusti, M.; Mosnier, A.; Havlik, P.; Obersteiner, M.

2012-04-01

65

The Impact of Water Pollution Abatement on Competition and Pricing in the Alabama Textile Industry.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In order to access the impact of water pollution abatement on competition and pricing in the Alabama textile industry, three questions were answered. (1) How much is water pollution abatement costing the textile industry. (2) How is the intermediate consu...

A. C. Rucks

1973-01-01

66

Lead abatement training for supervisors and contractors. Instructors guide  

SciTech Connect

This training program is designed to be a 32 hour training course, and is intended for individuals supervising residential lead abatement projects. The course is designed to meet the requirements of 40 CFR Part 745-Lead. Requirements for Lead-Based Paint Activities in Target Housing and Child Occupied Facilities, a federal regulation under section 402 of the Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA). Topics covered in the course include; the history of lead; health effects; legal and insurance consideration; regulations overview; inspection and risk assessment; report interpretation; development and implementation of occupant protection plans; paint hazard recognition and materials identification; XRF testing/sampling and abatement methods.

Not Available

1999-01-01

67

Environmental projects. Volume 1: Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) abatement program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Six large parabolic dish antennas are located at the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex north of Barstow, California. Some of the ancillary electrical equipment of thes Deep Space Stations, particularly transformers and power capicitors, were filled with stable, fire-retardant, dielectric fluids containing substances called polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs). Because the Environmental Protection Agency has determined that PCBs are environmental pollutants toxic to humans, all NASA centers have been asked to participate in a PCB-abatement program. Under the supervision of JPL's Office of Telecommunications and Data Acquisition, a two-year long PCB-abatement program has eliminated PCBs from the Goldstone Complex.

Kushner, L.

1987-01-01

68

Community Engagement Under the Microscope Community Engagement  

E-print Network

not take place in a vacuum. Scientists and scientific processes operate within specific geographical shows, it is a slippery concept with which to work. As researchers, activists and artists, how we engage education. Engagement is about `exchange'. It is not just about providing information or disseminating ideas

Rambaut, Andrew

69

Influence of Artisan Bakery- or Laboratory-Propagated Sourdoughs on the Diversity of Lactic Acid Bacterium and Yeast Microbiotas  

PubMed Central

Seven mature type I sourdoughs were comparatively back-slopped (80 days) at artisan bakery and laboratory levels under constant technology parameters. The cell density of presumptive lactic acid bacteria and related biochemical features were not affected by the environment of propagation. On the contrary, the number of yeasts markedly decreased from artisan bakery to laboratory propagation. During late laboratory propagation, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) showed that the DNA band corresponding to Saccharomyces cerevisiae was no longer detectable in several sourdoughs. Twelve species of lactic acid bacteria were variously identified through a culture-dependent approach. All sourdoughs harbored a certain number of species and strains, which were dominant throughout time and, in several cases, varied depending on the environment of propagation. As shown by statistical permutation analysis, the lactic acid bacterium populations differed among sourdoughs propagated at artisan bakery and laboratory levels. Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus sakei, and Weissella cibaria dominated in only some sourdoughs back-slopped at artisan bakeries, and Leuconostoc citreum seemed to be more persistent under laboratory conditions. Strains of Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis were indifferently found in some sourdoughs. Together with the other stable species and strains, other lactic acid bacteria temporarily contaminated the sourdoughs and largely differed between artisan bakery and laboratory levels. The environment of propagation has an undoubted influence on the composition of sourdough yeast and lactic acid bacterium microbiotas. PMID:22635989

Minervini, Fabio; Lattanzi, Anna; De Angelis, Maria; Gobbetti, Marco

2012-01-01

70

Influence of artisan bakery- or laboratory-propagated sourdoughs on the diversity of lactic acid bacterium and yeast microbiotas.  

PubMed

Seven mature type I sourdoughs were comparatively back-slopped (80 days) at artisan bakery and laboratory levels under constant technology parameters. The cell density of presumptive lactic acid bacteria and related biochemical features were not affected by the environment of propagation. On the contrary, the number of yeasts markedly decreased from artisan bakery to laboratory propagation. During late laboratory propagation, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) showed that the DNA band corresponding to Saccharomyces cerevisiae was no longer detectable in several sourdoughs. Twelve species of lactic acid bacteria were variously identified through a culture-dependent approach. All sourdoughs harbored a certain number of species and strains, which were dominant throughout time and, in several cases, varied depending on the environment of propagation. As shown by statistical permutation analysis, the lactic acid bacterium populations differed among sourdoughs propagated at artisan bakery and laboratory levels. Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus sakei, and Weissella cibaria dominated in only some sourdoughs back-slopped at artisan bakeries, and Leuconostoc citreum seemed to be more persistent under laboratory conditions. Strains of Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis were indifferently found in some sourdoughs. Together with the other stable species and strains, other lactic acid bacteria temporarily contaminated the sourdoughs and largely differed between artisan bakery and laboratory levels. The environment of propagation has an undoubted influence on the composition of sourdough yeast and lactic acid bacterium microbiotas. PMID:22635989

Minervini, Fabio; Lattanzi, Anna; De Angelis, Maria; Di Cagno, Raffaella; Gobbetti, Marco

2012-08-01

71

How inertia and limited potentials aect the timing of sectoral abatements in optimal climate policy  

E-print Network

How inertia and limited potentials aect the timing of sectoral abatements in optimal climate policy abatement eorts in a multi- sectoral model with economic inertia, each sector having a limited abatement potential. It denes economic inertia as the conjunction of technical inertia a social planner chooses

Boyer, Edmond

72

Valuation of public environmental assets by private companies: optimal dust abatement and air quality  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigates a new problem in the area of environmental valuation: how much is a public environmental asset worth to a private company? We ask this question in the context of dust abatement, where the asset is air quality. A company wants to know what level of dust abatement is optimal, given the engineering costs of abating and the

Peter Dunn; Steven Schilizzi

2003-01-01

73

TEACHING EXCELLENCE ENGAGED UNIVERSITY  

E-print Network

TEACHING EXCELLENCE ENGAGED UNIVERSITY Community partners Service learning Reflection Citizen. In this document UAA highlights just a few of our excellent service-learning courses. These stories demonstrate Foundation definition of community engagement as "collaborations between institutions of higher education

Pantaleone, Jim

74

Optimal Pollution Abatement - Whose Benefits Matter, and How Much?  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examine measures of environmental regulatory activity (inspections and enforcement actions) and levels of air and water pollution at approximately 300 U.S. pulp and paper mills, using data for 1985-1997. We find that levels of air and water pollution emissions are affected both by the benefits from pollution abatement and by the characteristics of the people exposed to the pollution.

Wayne B. Gray; Ronald J. Shadbegian

2002-01-01

75

Design of a Plasma Abatement System for Perfluoronated Compounds  

E-print Network

. A lower operational cost unit was developed, but the operational performance was less than previous investigations. The second goal was to simulate the semiconductor radio frequency etching process and abate the output gases of the C4F8 and SiO2...

Butler, Matthew

2011-08-08

76

Deterministic Linear Programming Model for acid rain abatement  

Microsoft Academic Search

A deterministic Linear Programming Model is presented for development of acid rain abatement strategies in eastern North America. Pollutant (SO) sources are categorized as either controllable or noncontrolled. The model determines the least-cost set of SO removal levels at each of the 235 largest point sources in eastern North America, such that stipulated maximum wet sulfate deposition rates are not

J. H. Ellis; G. J. Frayuhar; E. A. McBean

1985-01-01

77

Noise levels near streets, effectiveness and cost abatement measures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During the years 1975-1978, research was carried concerning the current noise levels near streets, the annoyance felt by the population, possible noise abatement measures for these streets, and the economic impact of such measures. The results of the research are summarized.

Lang, J.

1980-01-01

78

26 CFR 301.6404-2 - Abatement of interest.  

...on the return. To resolve the issue, advice is requested in a timely manner from the...federal tax law. The decision to request advice is a decision concerning the proper application...resulting from the decision to request advice cannot be abated under paragraph...

2014-04-01

79

Plasma abatement of perfluorocompounds in inductively coupled plasma reactors  

E-print Network

Plasma abatement of perfluorocompounds in inductively coupled plasma reactors Xudong ``Peter'' Xu PFCs , gases which have large global warming potentials, are widely used in plasma processing, the effluents from plasma tools using these gases typically have large mole fractions of PFCs. The use of plasma

Kushner, Mark

80

A Dialogue for Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Student engagement is perhaps the key element for almost any learning context. When engaged, learners are enthusiastic and excited about the subject. Their work is informed by the enjoyment of discovery. Engaged learners work willingly, instead of by coercion, and approach their assignments as something that matters to them personally. The spirit

Brown, Malcolm

2010-01-01

81

Engaged Learning in Mathematics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Engaged learning is an integral part of the 'Teach Less, Learn More' initiative. This paper will describe various strategies to engage secondary schools students in their learning of mathematics. It will provide concrete examples of how to use worksheets to guide students to discover certain mathematical concepts, and how to use real-life investigative tasks to engage the minds of the

Joseph Yeo; Hon Sok Foon; Timothy Cheng

82

Improving Student Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper reviews research literature in the area of student engagement to discover curricular and pedagogical ideas educators might successfully use to better engage student learning. Student engagement has historically focused upon increasing achievement, positive behaviors, and a sense of belonging to help students remain in school. The

Parsons, Jim; Taylor, Leah

2011-01-01

83

University Outreach & Engagement: Advancement Communication &  

E-print Network

, engaged citizens, ~ to strengthen democratic values and civic responsibility, ~ to address critical The Engaged University #12;An MSU Promise MSU will be an exemplary "engaged university," transforming

84

Plants used in artisanal fisheries on the Western Mediterranean coasts of Italy  

PubMed Central

Background Artisanal fisheries in the Mediterranean, especially in Italy, have been poorly investigated. There is a long history of fishing in this region, and it remains an important economic activity in many localities. Our research entails both a comprehensive review of the relevant literature and 58 field interviews with practitioners on plants used in fishing activities along the Western Mediterranean Italian coastal regions. The aims were to record traditional knowledge on plants used in fishery in these regions and to define selection criteria for plant species used in artisanal fisheries, considering ecology and intrinsic properties of plants, and to discuss the pattern of diffusion of shared uses in these areas. Methods Information was gathered both from a general review of ethnobotanical literature and from original data. A total of 58 semi-structured interviews were carried out in Liguria, Latium, Campania and Sicily (Italy). Information on plant uses related to fisheries were collected and analyzed through a chi-square residual analysis and the correspondence analysis in relation to habitat, life form and chorology. Results A total of 60 plants were discussed as being utilized in the fisheries of the Western Italian Mediterranean coastal regions, with 141 different uses mentioned. Of these 141 different uses, 32 are shared among different localities. A multivariate statistical analysis was performed on the entire dataset, resulting in details about specific selection criteria for the different usage categories (plants have different uses that can be classified into 11 main categories). In some uses, species are selected for their features (e.g., woody), or habitat (e.g., riverine), etc. The majority of uses were found to be obsolete (42%) and interviews show that traditional fishery knowledge is in decline. There are several reasons for this, such as climatic change, costs, reduction of fish stocks, etc. Conclusions Our research correlates functional characteristics of the plants used in artisanal fishery and habitats, and discusses the distribution of these uses. This research is the first comprehensive outline of plant role in artisanal fisheries and traditional fishery knowledge in the Mediterranean, specifically in Italy. PMID:23356937

2013-01-01

85

Limitations in small artisanal gold mining addressed by educational components paired with alternative mining methods.  

PubMed

Current solutions continue to be inadequate in addressing the longstanding, worldwide problem of mercury emissions from small artisanal gold mining. Mercury, an inexpensive and easily accessible heavy metal, is used in the process of extracting gold from ore. Mercury emissions disperse, affecting human populations by causing adverse health effects and environmental and social ramifications. Many developing nations have sizable gold ore deposits, making small artisanal gold mining a major source of employment in the world. Poverty drives vulnerable, rural populations into gold mining because of social and economic instabilities. Educational programs responding to this environmental hazard have been implemented in the past, but have had low positive results due to lack of governmental support and little economic incentive. Educational and enforced intervention programs must be developed in conjunction with governmental agencies in order to successfully eliminate this ongoing problem. Industry leaders offered hopeful suggestions, but revealed limitations when trying to develop encompassing solutions to halt mercury emissions. This research highlights potential options that have been attempted in the past and suggests alternative solutions to improve upon these methods. Some methods include buyer impact recognition, risk assessment proposals exposing a cost-benefit analysis and toxicokinetic modeling, public health awareness campaigns, and the education of miners, healthcare workers, and locals within hazardous areas of mercury exposure. These methods, paired with the implementation of alternative mining techniques, propose a substantial reduction of mercury emissions. PMID:22297251

Zolnikov, Tara R

2012-03-01

86

Effects of sediment contamination by artisanal gold mining on Chironomus riparius in Mabubi River, Tanzania  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The contamination of sediments by mercury from in artisanal gold mining has been only assessed through bulk chemical analysis and subsequent comparison with reference values from uncontaminated areas. However, measurement of contaminant levels alone has a limited ability to predict adverse effects on living resources. This study investigated the possible effects of contamination of sediments in Mabubi River by mercury drained from Mugusu artisanal gold mine on the survival, growth and emergency of the benthic midge Chironomus riparius. Sediments collected downstream from the Mugusu Mine impaired growth and delayed emergence of the midges but did not impair survival. Mean dry body weight of larvae from sediments collected 3 km down stream (1012 ?g) was significantly lower than those from the control sediment ( p < 0.05). Compared to the control sediment, the emergence of the midges from sediments collected up to 6 km downstream of the mining activity were delayed for four days. In conclusion, chemistry and ecotoxicity results from this study suggest that sediments collected in the Mabubi River downstream of the Mugusu mine adversely affect C. riparius and probably other fauna and as such present a considerable local environmental risk.

Chibunda, R. T.; Pereka, A. E.; Tungaraza, C.

87

Presence of enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus in artisan fruit salads in the city of San Luis, Argentina.  

PubMed

An increase in the consumption of fruit juices and minimally processed fruits salads has been observed in recent years all over the world. In this work, the microbiological quality of artisan fruit salads was analysed. Faecal coliforms, Salmonella spp, Shigella spp, Yersinia enterocolitica and Escherichia coli O157:H7 were not detected; nevertheless, eleven strains of Staphylococcus aureus were isolated. By multiplex PCR, all isolates showed positive results for S. aureus 16S rRNA gene and 63.6% of them were positive for sea gene. Furthermore, PCR sea positive strains were able to produce the corresponding enterotoxin. Finally, the inactivation of these strains in fruit salads by nisin, lysozyme and EDTA, was studied. EDTA produced a total S. aureus growth inhibition after 60 h of incubation at a concentration of 250 mg/L. The presence of S. aureus might indicate inadequate hygiene conditions during salad elaboration; however, the enterotoxigenicity of the strains isolated in this study, highlights the risk of consumers' intoxication. EDTA could be used to inhibit the growth of S. aureus in artisan fruit salads and extend the shelf life of these products. PMID:24688505

Estrada, Cecilia S M Lucero; Alcarz, Lucia E; Satorres, Sara E; Manfredi, Eduardo; Velzquez, Lidia Del C

2013-12-01

88

Environmental projects. Volume 12: Friable asbestos abatement, GDSCC  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex (GDSCC) is part of the NASA Deep Space Network, one of the world's largest and most sensitive scientific telecommunications and radio navigation networks. Activities at the GDSCC are carried out in support of six large parabolic dish antennas. These activities may give rise to a variety of environmental hazards, particularly the danger of exposure of GDSCC personnel to asbestos fibers that have been shown to be responsible for such serious ailments as asbestosis, lung cancer, and mesothelioma. Asbestos-containing materials (ACM's) were used in the construction of many of the approximately 100 buildings and structures that were built at the GDSCC during a 30-year period from the 1950s through 1980s. The friable asbestos-abatement program at the GDSCC is presented which consists of text, illustrations, and tables that describe the friable asbestos abatement carried out at the GDSCC from December 21, 1988 through May 11, 1989.

1990-01-01

89

The influence of geomorphology on the role of women at artisanal and small-scale mine sites  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The geologic and geomorphic expressions of a mineral deposit determine its location, size, and accessibility, characteristics which in turn greatly influence the success of artisans mining the deposit. Despite this critical information, which can be garnered through studying the surficial physical expression of a deposit, the geologic and geomorphic sciences have been largely overlooked in artisanal mining-related research. This study demonstrates that a correlation exists between the roles of female miners at artisanal diamond and gold mining sites in western and central Africa and the physical expression of the deposits. Typically, women perform ore processing and ancillary roles at mine sites. On occasion, however, women participate in the extraction process itself. Women were found to participate in the extraction of ore only when a deposit had a thin overburden layer, thus rendering the mineralized ore more accessible. When deposits required a significant degree of manual labour to access the ore due to thick overburden layers, women were typically relegated to other roles. The identification of this link encourages the establishment of an alternative research avenue in which the physical and social sciences merge to better inform policymakers, so that the most appropriate artisanal mining assistance programs can be developed and implemented.

Malpeli, Katherine C.; Chirico, Peter G.

2013-01-01

90

The Production of Parmigiano-Reggiano Cheese: The force of an artisanal system in an industrialised world  

Microsoft Academic Search

In many respects the Parmigiano-Reggiano production system is a unique dairy system. The processing of 1.35 million tons of milk into a high quality product in 600 small cheese dairies using predominantly artisan production techniques is not found anywhere else in Europe. The high labour input required both on the dairy farms and in the cheese dairies creates considerably more

Roest de K

2000-01-01

91

UNIDO's Strategy for Reducing the Impact of Artisanal Gold Mining on the Health and the Environment - Study case in Ghana  

Microsoft Academic Search

Additionally, recent cycles of floods and droughts as well as dramatic effects of structural adjustment in many developing countries have led more and more farmers to artisanal mining. For example, in the gold sector, the activity has increased steadily for the past 20 years. Now it almost accounts for one quarter of the world gold output. With the lack of

Ludovic Bernaudat

92

Effects of River Impoundment on Ecosystem Services of Large Tropical Rivers: Embodied Energy and Market Value of Artisanal Fisheries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Applying the ecosystem services concept to conservation initiatives or in managing ecosystem services requires understanding how environmental impacts affect the ecology of key species or functional groups providing the services. We examined effects of river impoundments, one of the leading threats to freshwater biodiversity, on an important ecosystem service provided by large tropical rivers (i.e., artisanal fisheries). The societal and

DAVID J. HOEINGHAUS; ANGELO A. AGOSTINHO; LUIZ C. GOMES; FERNANDO M. PELICICE; EDSON K. OKADA; JOO D. LATINI; ELAINE A. L. KASHIWAQUI; KIRK O. WINEMILLER

2009-01-01

93

Microwave plasma torch abatement of NF3 and SF6  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An atmospheric pressure microwave plasma torch as a tool for fluorinated compounds (FCs) abatement was presented. Detailed experiments were conducted on the abatement of NF3 and SF6 in terms of destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR). Swirl gas, compressed air for stable plasma, was tangentially injected into the microwave plasma torch and a mixture of N2, NF3, or SF6, and C2H4 was axially injected. The DRE of 99.1% for NF3 was achieved without an additive gas at the total flow rate of 50.1 liters per minute (lpm) by applying a microwave power of 1.4kW. Also, a DRE of SF6 up to 90.1% was obtained at the total flow rate of 40.6lpm using an applied microwave power of 1.4kW. Experimental results indicate that the microwave plasma abatement device can successfully eliminate FCs in the semiconductor industry.

Hong, Yong Cheol; Uhm, Han Sup; Chun, Byung Jun; Lee, Sun Ku; Hwang, Sang Kyu; Kim, Dong Su

2006-03-01

94

Engaging with Drama  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reports on a multi-site global, ethnographic, and mixed methods study on student engagement. Our research has closely examined how engagement and disengagement operate subtly, simultaneously and relationally in the places and spaces where drama is made. Through years of qualitative time in high school classrooms and two different

Gallagher, Kathleen

2013-01-01

95

Defining Student Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Few terms in the lexicon of higher education today are invoked more frequently, and in more varied ways, than "engagement". The phrase "student engagement" has come to refer to how "involved" or "interested" students appear to be in their learning and how "connected" they are to their classes, their institutions, and each other. As measured by

Axelson, Rick D.; Flick, Arend

2011-01-01

96

Conceptualizing Teacher Engagement.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper develops a working definition of teacher engagement, a definition based upon an understanding of how underlying assumptions about the goals of teaching affect what and whom teachers are engaged with, as well as how researchers' conceptions of proper power and authority in the school context influence what they see. Different dimensions

Lesko, Nancy

97

Civic Learning and Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For decades, the US education system has failed to adequately combat a decline of civic engagement and awareness, resulting in what many are now calling a "civics recession." The good news is that there is growing awareness, at all levels, that we need new and concerted efforts to make civic learning and engagement a core component of every

Kanter, Martha; Schneider, Carol Geary

2013-01-01

98

HIV/AIDS, artisanal fishing and food security in the Okavango Delta, Botswana  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Generally, rural households pursue all year round natural and non-natural resource-based livelihood systems to diversify these options in order to cope with risks emanating from a range of shocks and stressors. Artisanal fishing in the Delta is not only a major livelihood option but also a source of food security. This paper is based on analysis of primary data collected from a survey of 248 subsistence fishers households through simple random sampling in 22 villages in the Delta. The overall objectives of the survey were to assess the general prevalence of HIV/AIDS in the Ngamiland district of Botswana, to investigate potential effects of AIDS-related stressors, particularly chronic illness on artisanal fishing activities, and to assess implications towards food security. Results from this study indicate that HIV prevalence rates for pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in the Delta are approximately 30% and are related to factors such as marriage, education, and employment. Despite this relatively high prevalence percentage, most of the affected households do not have adequate access to HIV/AIDS support facilities. Support services are provided on the basis of population size and/or status of the settlement (i.e. urban, urban village, rural or remote). Therefore, since about 50% of the Deltas population lives in settlements of less than 500 people, they receive health services indirectly through major population centres whose capacity to deliver timely HIV/AIDS services is limited. This disproportionate access to HIV/AIDS services disadvantages the majority of fishing communities in the Delta, and may affect their ability to fish. Moreover, about 53% of sampled households had cared for a continuously ill person/s (CIPs) in the last 5 years, out of which approximately 29% felt that this seriously impacted fishing activities. These serious impacts included sale of family assets, depletion of savings, and switching or abandoning fishing activities. Subsequently, household food security is seriously affected because fish provides a significant proportion of food to CIP households where approximately 55% of households get their food from fish products. During food shortages, CIP households resorted to a hierarchy of strategies which included cutting down on meals or reducing meal portions, looking for paid work, gathering wild fruit, asking for food from relatives, selling livestock, and getting social assistance. In conclusion, artisanal fishing is a natural safety net which constitutes an important buffer for households affected by HIV/AIDS-related stressors in the Okavango Delta. Access to fish helps these households mitigate potentially adverse impacts such as deterioration into chronic poverty.

Ngwenya, B. N.; Mosepele, K.

99

The ABCs of Student Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Student engagement is an important consideration for teachers and administrators because it is explicitly associated with achievement. What the authors call the ABC's of engagement they outline as: Affective engagement, Behavioral engagement, and Cognitive engagement. They also present "Three Things Every Teacher Needs to Know about

Parsons, Seth A.; Nuland, Leila Richey; Parsons, Allison Ward

2014-01-01

100

Managing artisanal and small-scale mining in forest areas: perspectives from a poststructural political ecology.  

PubMed

Artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) is an activity intimately associated with social deprivation and environmental degradation, including deforestation. This paper examines ASM and deforestation using a broadly poststructural political ecology framework. Hegemonic discourses are shown to consistently influence policy direction, particularly in emerging approaches such as Corporate Social Responsibility and the Forest Stewardship Council. A review of alternative discourses reveals that the poststructural method is useful for critiquing the international policy arena but does not inform new approaches. Synthesis of the analysis leads to conclusions that echo a growing body of literature advocating for policies to become increasingly sensitive to local contexts, synergistic between actors at difference scales, and to be integrated across sectors. PMID:22180922

Hirons, Mark

2011-01-01

101

High-throughput sequencing of microbial communities in Poro cheese, an artisanal Mexican cheese.  

PubMed

The bacterial diversity and structure of Poro cheese, an artisanal food, was analysed by high-throughput sequencing (454 pyrosequencing) in order to gain insight about changes in bacterial communities associated with the cheese-making process. Dairy samples consisting of milk, fermented whey, curd and ripened cheese (during 7 and 60d) were collected from three manufacturers located in the state of Tabasco, Mxico during dry (March-June) and rainy (August-November) seasons. Independently of producer and season, raw milk samples displayed the highest diversity in bacterial communities. In raw milk, genera found were Macrococcus, Staphylococcus, Enterococcus, Streptococcus, Lactobacillus and Enhydrobacter. Diversity in whey, curd and cheese was lower, principally containing Streptococcus and Lactobacillus; however, bacteria such as Staphylococcus, Acinetobacter, Chryseobacterium, Bacillus, Sediminibacter, Lactococcus and Enterococcus were occasionally present. After curdling step, the most dominant and abundant species were Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii. PMID:25084655

Aldrete-Tapia, Alejandro; Escobar-Ramrez, Meyli C; Tamplin, Mark L; Hernndez-Iturriaga, Montserrat

2014-12-01

102

More than One Bag for the World Fishery Crisis and Keys for Co-management Successes in Selected Artisanal Latin American Shellfisheries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Global concerns about the depletion of marine stocks have been widely documented in industrial fisheries. However, small-scale\\u000a artisanal fisheries constitute a second component for the world fishery crisis, normally ignored or erroneously lumped into\\u000a the industrial component. In this paper we first present a brief comparison between industrial and artisanal fisheries, highlighting\\u000a the differences between them and the differential feasibility

Omar Defeo; Juan Carlos Castilla

2005-01-01

103

Linking geology and health sciences to assess childhood lead poisoning from artisanal gold mining in Nigeria  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Background: In 2010, Mdecins Sans Frontires discovered a lead poisoning outbreak linked to artisanal gold processing in northwestern Nigeria. The outbreak has killed approximately 400 young children and affected thousands more. Objectives: Our aim was to undertake an interdisciplinary geological- and health-science assessment to clarify lead sources and exposure pathways, identify additional toxicants of concern and populations at risk, and examine potential for similar lead poisoning globally. Methods: We applied diverse analytical methods to ore samples, soil and sweep samples from villages and family compounds, and plant foodstuff samples. Results: Natural weathering of lead-rich gold ores before mining formed abundant, highly gastric-bioaccessible lead carbonates. The same fingerprint of lead minerals found in all sample types confirms that ore processing caused extreme contamination, with up to 185,000 ppm lead in soils/sweep samples and up to 145 ppm lead in plant foodstuffs. Incidental ingestion of soils via hand-to-mouth transmission and of dusts cleared from the respiratory tract is the dominant exposure pathway. Consumption of water and foodstuffs contaminated by the processing is likely lesser, but these are still significant exposure pathways. Although young children suffered the most immediate and severe consequences, results indicate that older children, adult workers, pregnant women, and breastfed infants are also at risk for lead poisoning. Mercury, arsenic, manganese, antimony, and crystalline silica exposures pose additional health threats. Conclusions: Results inform ongoing efforts in Nigeria to assess lead contamination and poisoning, treat victims, mitigate exposures, and remediate contamination. Ore deposit geology, pre-mining weathering, and burgeoning artisanal mining may combine to cause similar lead poisoning disasters elsewhere globally.

Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Durant, James T.; Morman, Suzette A.; Neri, Antonio; Wolf, Ruth E.; Dooyema, Carrie A.; Hageman, Philip L.; Lowers, Heather A.; Fernette, Gregory L.; Meeker, Gregory P.; Benzel, William M.; Driscoll, Rhonda L.; Berry, Cyrus J.; Crock, James G.; Goldstein, Harland L.; Adams, Monique; Bartrem, Casey L.; Tirima, Simba; Behrooz, Behbod; von Lindern, Ian; Brown, Mary Jean

2013-01-01

104

Participatory research towards co-management: lessons from artisanal fisheries in coastal Uruguay.  

PubMed

Participatory research has become increasingly common in natural resources management. Even though participatory research is considered a strategy to facilitate co-management, there is little empirical evidence supporting this. The objective of the present paper is to analyze the contributions of participatory research to help encourage the emergence of co-management, based on a case study in Piripolis artisanal fishery in coastal Uruguay (where management has been top-down). We argue that participatory research involving artisanal fishers, government, and other stakeholders (university scientists and NGOs) can be a key stimulus towards co-management. We build this argument by considering "seven faces" by which co-management can be analyzed: (1) as power sharing; (2) as institution building; (3) as trust building; (4) as process; (5) as learning and knowledge co-production; (6) as problem solving; and (7) as governance. Our findings show that participatory research had an impact on these various faces: (1) power was shared when making research decisions; (2) a multi-stakeholder group (POPA), with a common vision and goals, was created; (3) trust among participants increased; (4) the process of group formation was valued by participants; (5) stakeholders learned skills for participation; (6) two problem-solving exercises were conducted; and (7) a diversity of stakeholders of the initial problem identified by fishers (sea lions' impact on long-line fishery) participated in the process. The case shows that participatory research functions as a platform which enhances learning and knowledge co-production among stakeholders, paving the way towards future co-management. PMID:23860379

Trimble, Micaela; Berkes, Fikret

2013-10-15

105

Spatial and temporal variability of water quality and zooplankton in an artisanal salina  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Conditions in artisanal salterns, or salinas, vary depending on their physical structure, seasonal effects, and the two periods of the salt production cycle. They therefore constitute unique wetland habitats, with particular communities that are still poorly studied. Water quality and zooplankton of a working artisanal salina were studied to evaluate spatial variability between sections and temporal variability between the salt production and flooded periods and between seasons. Zooplankton communities were related to environmental conditions. Sampling took place every second week, during almost two years, at six sites of the Tanoerias salina in Aveiro, Portugal: at the beginning and centre of the salina inlet channel, in a supply pond, in two evaporator and one crystalliser ponds. Since salt production occurs in the warm season only, seasonal effects concur with those caused by the salt production cycle. Results showed significant differences in temperature, dissolved oxygen (DO) and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD 5) between salt production and flooded periods, i.e. summer and spring/winter seasons. Salinity and alkalinity were linked to salt production with extreme values in the salt-producing crystalliser pond. Zooplankton communities varied between seasons, but also with the salina section and the salt production cycle. Zooplankton densities and diversity tended to be lower during salt production, particularly under the extreme living conditions in the salina crystalliser pond. Variation in zooplankton communities between samples was mainly influenced by temperature, i.e. season, at the salina inlet, by BOD 5 or DO, also related to temperature and season, in the first ponds and by nutrients throughout the system.

Vieira, Natividade; Bio, Ana

2011-02-01

106

the Engaged UOE Research Mission  

E-print Network

, to prepare educated, engaged citizens, to strengthen democratic values and civic responsibility, to address The Engaged University #12;An MSU Promise MSU will be an exemplary "engaged university," transforming

107

Achieving Provider Engagement  

PubMed Central

The literature on integrated care is limited with respect to practical learning and experience. Although some attention has been paid to organizational processes and structures, not enough is paid to people, relationships, and the importance of these in bringing about integration. Little is known, for example, about provider engagement in the organizational change process, how to obtain and maintain it, and how it is demonstrated in the delivery of integrated care. Based on qualitative data from the evaluation of a large-scale integrated care initiative in London, United Kingdom, we explored the role of provider engagement in effective integration of services. Using thematic analysis, we identified an evolving engagement narrative with three distinct phases: enthusiasm, antipathy, and ambivalence, and argue that health care managers need to be aware of the impact of professional engagement to succeed in advancing the integrated care agenda. PMID:25212855

Greenfield, Geva; Pappas, Yannis; Car, Josip; Majeed, Azeem; Harris, Matthew

2014-01-01

108

Trends in NO(x) abatement: a review.  

PubMed

Implementation of stringent regulations of NO(x) emission requires the development of new technologies for NO(x) removal from exhaust gases. This article summarizes current state of NO(x) abatement strategy. Firstly, the influence of NO(x) on environment and human health is described. The main focus is put on NO(x) control methods applied in combustion of fossil fuels in power stations and mobile vehicles, as well as methods used in chemical industry. Furthermore the implementation of ozone and other oxidizing agents in NO(x) oxidation is emphasized. PMID:20580060

Skalska, Kinga; Miller, Jacek S; Ledakowicz, Stanislaw

2010-09-01

109

Adolescents Exiting Homelessness over Two Years: The Risk Amplification and Abatement Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Risk Amplification and Abatement Model (RAAM) demonstrates that negative contact with socializing agents amplify risk, while positive contact abates risk for homeless adolescents. To test this model, the likelihood of exiting homelessness and returning to familial housing at 2 years and stably exiting over time are examined with longitudinal

Milburn, Norweeta G.; Rice, Eric; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Mallett, Shelley; Rosenthal, Doreen; Batterham, Phillip; May, Susanne J.; Witkin, Andrea; Duan, Naihua

2009-01-01

110

Underground coal mining methods to abate water pollution. A state of the art literature review  

Microsoft Academic Search

The report is a review of published information pertaining to the abatement of harmful drainage from underground coal mines. Reviewed are new physical approaches to the problem of interdicting water entry into coal mines. These include land management for surface and sub-surface water diversion, the exploitation of water carrying strata, and new mining methods. Some chemical approaches to abatement reviewed

L. W. Wilson; N. J. Matthews; J. L. Stump

1970-01-01

111

URBAN SOIL LEAD ABATEMENT DEMONSTRATION PROJECT: VOLUME I, U.S. EPA INTEGRATED REPORT  

EPA Science Inventory

The Urban Soil Lead Abatement Demonstration Project (USLADP), known also as the A Three City Lead Study,was authorized in 1986 under Section 111(b)(6) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA), which mandated that EPA conduct soil lead abatement projects in up to...

112

Water pollution abatement by Chinese industry: cost estimates and policy implications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Factory-level data are used to estimate water pollution abatement costs for Chinese industry. Joint abatement cost functions are utilized which relate total costs to treatment volume and the simultaneous effect of reductions in suspended solids, chemical oxygen demand, biological oxygen demand and other pollutants. Tests of alternative functional forms suggest that a very simple (constant elasticity) model fits the data

Susmita Dasgupta; Mainul Huq; David Wheeler; Chonghua Zhang

2001-01-01

113

DIRECT AND INDIRECT SHADOW PRICE AND COST ESTIMATES OF NITROGEN POLLUTION ABATEMENT  

Microsoft Academic Search

The implications of treating environmental pollution as an undesirable output (weak disposability) as well as a normal input (strong disposability) on the direct and indirect shadow price and cost estimates of nitrogen pollution abatement is analyzed using Nebraska agriculture sector data. The shadow price of nitrogen pollution abatement treated as an undesirable output represents the reduced revenue from reducing nitrogen

Saleem Shaik; Glenn A. Helmers; Michael R. Langemeier

2002-01-01

114

Cost effectiveness of abatement options for emissions control in Egyptian iron foundries  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study focuses on an evaluation of the cost effectiveness of abatement options for controlling emissions in existing iron foundries in Egypt. It is expected that such a study will enable decision by identifying concrete measures for abating total solid emissions (TSP). The structure of iron foundries in the country have been surveyed and the variant types of furnaces, the

Mahmoud A. Rabah

1999-01-01

115

ASSESSMENT OF ASSAY METHODS FOR EVALUATING ASBESTOS ABATEMENT TECHNOLOGY AT THE CORVALLIS ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORY  

EPA Science Inventory

Air sampling was conducted at an EPA office building which had undergone an asbestos abatement program. The aggressive sampling technique revealed that air-entrainable asbestos remained in work areas after completion of abatement actions. The ratio of aggressive to nonagressive P...

116

Mercury residues in free-grazing cattle and domestic fowl form the artisanal gold mining area of Geita district, Tanzania.  

PubMed

Environmental contamination with mercury from artisanal gold mines in Tanzania has been widely reported. People living around mining villages keep domestic animals which are allowed to feed freely in mercury-contaminated areas. This study investigated Hg accumulation in the liver and muscle tissue of cattle and domestic fowl reared in mining villages. Total mercury levels up to 436 and 820 microg/kg wet weight were found in liver samples taken from cattle and domestic fowl, respectively. Significantly higher mercury concentrations were found in liver samples collected at mining villages (p<0.05) than those taken from the reference area. While mercury concentrations in liver samples exceeded the acceptable maximum concentrations for humans set in the Netherlands and Poland, the Hg concentrations in muscle were below the limits of most countries. It is recommended that the keeping of freely grazing cattle and domestic fowl in or around artisanal gold mines should be avoided. PMID:19798780

Chibunda, R T; Janssen, C R

2009-11-01

117

Styrene emission abatement in a bathtub manufacturing plant  

SciTech Connect

EPA is moving forward on promulgating the National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP-MACT) for the Reinforced Plastics/Composites Source Category which affects styrene emitters like the American Standard plant. While most composites manufacturers are taking a wait and see approach, American Standard realized the need to move foreward with the controls. Styrene has a reputation of being a difficult VOC to abate. Most adsorption technologies shy away from this monomer due to reactions that cause fires. Weatherly refined their treatment of styrene emissions with experience from installations at similar plants in Europe. Weatherly installed a 35,000 scfm concentrator/oxidation Polyad{trademark} system in 1996 at American Standard`s bathtub manufacturing plant in Salem, Ohio. The styrene emissions are captured in the spray booth exhaust and discharged to the Polyad{trademark} system. The system is achieving 93% removal efficiency on the styrene emissions. This paper will describe the Weatherly Polyad{trademark} VOC abatement system at American Standard`s Salem Ohio plant.

Niezgodski, D.M. [Weatherly Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States)

1997-12-31

118

Genotyping and Toxigenic Potential of Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus pumilus Strains Occurring in Industrial and Artisanal Cured Sausages  

Microsoft Academic Search

Artisanal and industrial sausages were analyzed for their aerobic, heat-resistant microflora to assess wheth- er new emerging pathogens could be present among Bacillus strains naturally contaminating cured meat prod- ucts. Sixty-four isolates were characterized by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR and fluo- rescent amplified fragment length polymorphism (fAFLP). The biotypes, identified by partial 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, belonged to

Alessandra Matarante; Federico Baruzzi; Pier Sandro Cocconcelli; Maria Morea

2004-01-01

119

Whales, Walruses, and Elephants: Artisans in Ivory, Baleen, and Other Skeletal Materials in Seventeenth and Eighteenth-Century Amsterdam  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hard animal tissues obtained from whales, walruses, and elephants are baleen, whale bone, walrus ivory, walrus baculum, and\\u000a elephant ivory. Objects of these materials were manufactured by artisans in Amsterdam in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.\\u000a New archaeological and historical evidence show the import and importance if these materials. The importance of baleen is\\u000a evident from historical sources. Whale bone

Marloes Rijkelijkhuizen

2009-01-01

120

Environmental management of small-scale and artisanal mining: the Portovelo-Zaruma goldmining area, southern Ecuador  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper considers technical measures and policy initiatives needed to improve environmental management in the Portovelo-Zaruma mining district of southern Ecuador. In this area, gold is mined by a large number of small-scale and artisanal operators, and discharges of cyanide and metal-laden tailings have had a severe impact on the shared EcuadorianPeruvian Puyango river system. It is shown to be

N. H Tarras-Wahlberg

2002-01-01

121

Mars Public Engagement Overview  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This viewgraph presentation reviews the Mars public engagement goal to understand and protect our home planet, explore the Universe and search for life, and to inspire the next generation of explorers. Teacher workshops, robotics education, Mars student imaging and analysis programs, MARS Student Imaging Project (MSIP), Russian student participation, MARS museum visualization alliance, and commercialization concepts are all addressed in this project.

Johnson, Christine

2009-01-01

122

Tools of Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Alumni relations professionals need a method of measuring alumni engagement, including giving, that goes beyond counting event attendees and the number of Twitter followers. Social media are changing the way things have been done within the alumni relations profession, but that does not mean that people throw out everything they have done in the

Allen, Elizabeth

2012-01-01

123

Engaging students in programming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Poor student engagement and high failure rates in first year units were addressed at the Queensland University of Technology (QUT) with a course restructure involving a fresh approach to introducing programming. Students? first taste of programming in the new course focused less on the language and syntax, and more on problem solving and design, and the role of programming in

Malcolm Corney; Donna Teague; Richard N. Thomas

2010-01-01

124

Music Researchers' Musical Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is an increasing awareness of the importance of reflexivity across various disciplines, which encourages researchers to scrutinize their research perspectives. In order to contextualize and reflect upon research in music, this study explores the musical background, current level of musical engagement and the listening habits of music

Wollner, Clemens; Ginsborg, Jane; Williamon, Aaron

2011-01-01

125

Employer Engagement in Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The subject of this paper is employer engagement in education as it supports the learning and progression of young people through activities including work experience, job shadowing, workplace visits, career talks, mock interviews, CV workshops, business mentoring, enterprise competitions and the provision of learning resources. Interest has grown

Mann, Anthony; Dawkins, James

2014-01-01

126

Combination of hydrodechlorination and biodegradation for the abatement of chlorophenols.  

PubMed

A method for abatement for chlorophenols (CPs) in contaminated water based on successive steps of catalytic hydrodechlorination (HDC) over Pd/C at ambient temperature and pressure, followed by aerobic biodegradation using yeast Candida tropicalis (C. tropicalis) was studied. The results showed that 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) and 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) could be easily and completely dechlorinated under mild conditions, ultimately yielding phenol as product. Subsequently, phenol (0-900 mg L(-1)) could be completely degraded by C. tropicalis within 30 h. Moreover, during the biodegradation of phenol, definite mass of ethanol (?0.5%) caused a modest increase in the duration of the lag phase, but led to a great increase in the maximum degradation rates. This means that CPs with higher concentration could be efficiently detoxified under mild conditions by a combination of HDC and biodegradation in water or water-ethanol systems. PMID:22277240

Zhou, Shiwei; Jin, Xin; Sun, Feifei; Zhou, Hao; Yang, Cuiyun; Xia, Chuanhai

2012-01-01

127

Intermittent control procedures for the Geysers hydrogen sulfide emission abatement  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG and E) operates the world's largest geothermal steam electric power generation facility, currently about 1.140 megawatts (Mw). This facility is located about 80 miles north of San Francisco, California and is within a region referred to as the Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA). Pollutants resulting from this method of electric power generation are due to impurities in the geothermal steam. A major contaminate in the steam is hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S), a regulated pollutant in California. The ambient air quality standard (AAQS) for this pollutant in California is 0.03 parts per million (ppM) averaged over one hour. H/sub 2/S is an invisible, unpleasant smelling gas present in varying concentrations in the geothermal steam. Its odor has been compared to the smell of rotten eggs. Since PG and E is increasingly relying on this source of electrical power generation, it has committed millions of dollars to the development, testing, acquisition, and installation of abatement equipment to reduce H/sub 2/S emissions during the past ten years. In order to reduce the number of exceeds of the AAQS during this developmental period, a predictive model was needed for interim abatement purposes. Most of the high hourly H/sub 2/S values occur with meteorological conditions having poor ventilation resulting from a combination of low wind speed and reduced mixing layer depths. This weather condition is most common during the months of June through October in California. A predictive model was developed from three years of hourly H/sub 2/S measurements of 0.03 ppM or greater in populated areas downwind of the generation facility and from observations of associated meteorological data.

Buick, B.D.; Mooney, M.L.

1984-01-01

128

Feeding goats on scrubby Mexican rangeland and pasteurization: influences on milk and artisan cheese quality  

PubMed Central

The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of foraging on local scrubby rangeland versus stable feeding with high-protein concentrate as well as the compulsory pasteurization process on goats milk and artisan soft cheese quality in terms of chemical composition and fatty acid profile. The results indicated that there were no significant differences in the energy, fat, or ash content of milk and cheese due to feeding; however, a significant influence of feeding on cheese protein and fatty acids in both milk and cheese was detected. Feeding on scrubby rangeland tended to increase the amounts of major polyunsaturated fatty acids in milk and cheese from goats. Pasteurization, which is mandatory in Mexico, did not alter the fatty acid concentrations in milk or cheese. Small goat-keepers using rangeland resources might claim better economical returns for products recognized as healthier. Further investigations to assure ecosystem sustainability of shrubby rangeland joined with economical evaluations and best animal management to avoid deleterious effects are recommended. PMID:20229357

Hilario, Mario Cuchillo; Wrage, Nicole; Perez-Gil R., Fernando

2010-01-01

129

Microbiological aspects of the biofilm on wooden utensils used to make a Brazilian artisanal cheese  

PubMed Central

The artisanal Minas cheese is produced from raw cows milk and wooden utensils were employed in its manufacture, which were replaced by other materials at the request of local laws. This substitution caused changes in the traditional characteristics of cheese. Due to the absence of scientific studies indicating the microbial composition of biofilms formed on wooden forms, tables and shelves used in these cheese production, the present work evaluated the counts of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, coliforms at 32 C, yeasts, presumptive mesophilic Lactobacillus spp. and Lactococcus spp. in these biofilms, milk, whey endogenous culture and ripened cheese in two traditional regions: Serro and Serra da Canastra. Also, we checked for the presence of Salmonella sp. and Listeria monocytogenes in the ripened cheeses. The ultra structure of the biofilms was also assessed. Counts above legislation (> 2 log cfu/mL) for the pathogens evaluated were found in milk samples from both regions. Only one shelf and one form from Serro were above limits proposed (5 cfu/cm2 for S. aureus and E. coli and 25 cfu/cm2 for coliforms) in this study for contaminants evaluated. In Canastra, few utensils presented safe counting of pathogens. There was no Salmonella sp. and Listeria monocytogenes in the cheeses after ripening. Thus, the quality of the cheese is related to improving the microbiological quality of milk, implementation and maintenance of good manufacturing practices, correct cleaning of wooden utensils, and not its replacement. PMID:25242963

Galinari, Eder; da Nobrega, Juliana Escariao; de Andrade, Nelio Jose; de Luces Fortes Ferreira, Celia Lucia

2014-01-01

130

Yeast species composition differs between artisan bakery and spontaneous laboratory sourdoughs.  

PubMed

Sourdough fermentations are characterized by the combined activity of lactic acid bacteria and yeasts. An investigation of the microbial composition of 21 artisan sourdoughs from 11 different Belgian bakeries yielded 127 yeast isolates. Also, 12 spontaneous 10-day laboratory sourdough fermentations with daily backslopping were performed with rye, wheat, and spelt flour, resulting in the isolation of 217 yeast colonies. The isolates were grouped according to PCR-fingerprints obtained with the primer M13. Representative isolates of each M13 fingerprint group were identified using the D1/D2 region of the large subunit rRNA gene, internal transcribed spacer sequences, and partial actin gene sequences, leading to the detection of six species. The dominant species in the bakery sourdoughs were Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Wickerhamomyces anomalus (formerly Pichia anomala), while the dominant species in the laboratory sourdough fermentations were W. anomalus and Candida glabrata. The presence of S. cerevisiae in the bakery sourdoughs might be due to contamination of the bakery environment with commercial bakers yeast, while the yeasts in the laboratory sourdoughs, which were carried out under aseptic conditions with flour as the only nonsterile component, could only have come from the flour used. PMID:20384785

Vrancken, Gino; De Vuyst, Luc; Van der Meulen, Roel; Huys, Geert; Vandamme, Peter; Daniel, Heide-Marie

2010-06-01

131

Facility-Specific "House" Microbiome Drives Microbial Landscapes of Artisan Cheesemaking Plants  

PubMed Central

Cheese fermentations involve the growth of complex microbial consortia, which often originate in the processing environment and drive the development of regional product qualities. However, the microbial milieus of cheesemaking facilities are largely unexplored and the true nature of the fermentation-facility relationship remains nebulous. Thus, a high-throughput sequencing approach was employed to investigate the microbial ecosystems of two artisanal cheesemaking plants, with the goal of elucidating how the processing environment influences microbial community assemblages. Results demonstrate that fermentation-associated microbes dominated most surfaces, primarily Debaryomyces and Lactococcus, indicating that establishment of these organisms on processing surfaces may play an important role in microbial transfer, beneficially directing the course of sequential fermentations. Environmental organisms detected in processing environments dominated the surface microbiota of washed-rind cheeses maturing in both facilities, demonstrating the importance of the processing environment for populating cheese microbial communities, even in inoculated cheeses. Spatial diversification within both facilities reflects the functional adaptations of microbial communities inhabiting different surfaces and the existence of facility-specific house microbiota, which may play a role in shaping site-specific product characteristics. PMID:23793641

Bokulich, Nicholas A.

2013-01-01

132

Rotary concentrator followed by thermal or catalytic oxidation - a hybrid approach to economical styrene abatement  

SciTech Connect

There are varied challenges in deciding appropriate technology for styrene abatement. Due to high costs of using RTOs for styrene abatement the small businesses, which form the bulk of styrene emitters, are faced with economically difficult choices. The proposed Rotary Concentrator technology can reduce operating cost up to six times and reduce CO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions by more than half over the currently preferred RTO technology. It is also less expensive in capital expenditure and its viability for styrene abatement has been sufficiently demonstrated by pilot studies in the US and existing installations overseas. In both cases styrene destruction of more than 95% was achieved.

Gupta, A. [Duerr Industries, Inc., Plymouth, MI (United States)

1997-12-31

133

Science Education & Civic Engagement  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The mission of the Science Education & Civic Engagement Journal is "to explore constructive connections between science education and civic engagement that will enhance both experiences for our students." The journal is edited by an international team, including professors from the University of Johannesburg and Santa Clara University. The journal has been published twice a year since 2007 and visitors can access all of the issues on this site. On the homepage, visitors can look over recently published articles, such as "Designing Healthy Meals to Counter Nutrition-Related Diseases: A Learning Activity." Also, visitors can read over submission guidelines, learn about the editorial board, and also look through back issues for articles of interest.

134

Engaging Students in Mathematics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This series of brief videos (1-10 min. each) demonstrates how a three-part lesson in a classroom focused on accountable talk empowers and engages students to learn through collaborative problem solving in a technology-rich environment. While solving a problem involving rates and proportional reasoning students exemplify shared criteria for successful group work. The teacher explains her strategies for planning, grouping, and peer evaluation. Print resources (pdf) include a Viewer's Guide, organizers, and supporting monographs.

2013-01-01

135

Eligibility of Noise Abatement Proposals for Grants-in-Aid under the Airport Improvement Program,  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report summarizes the provisions of existing Federal laws, regulations, administrative policies and grant program procedures which relate to funding of noise abatement projects. The report also presents historical data on Federally assisted noise com...

E. Ohnstad

1989-01-01

136

General Equilibrium, Electricity Generation Technologies and the Cost of Carbon Abatement  

E-print Network

Electricity generation is a major contributor to carbon dioxide emissions, and a key determinant of abatement costs. Ex-ante assessments of carbon policies mainly rely on either of two modeling paradigms: (i) partial ...

Lanz, Bruno, 1980-

137

30 CFR 75.401 - Abatement of dust; water or water with a wetting agent.  

...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Combustible Materials and Rock Dusting 75.401 Abatement of dust; water or water with a wetting agent. [Statutory Provision] Where...

2014-07-01

138

30 CFR 75.401 - Abatement of dust; water or water with a wetting agent.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Combustible Materials and Rock Dusting 75.401 Abatement of dust; water or water with a wetting agent. [Statutory Provision] Where...

2011-07-01

139

30 CFR 75.401 - Abatement of dust; water or water with a wetting agent.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Combustible Materials and Rock Dusting 75.401 Abatement of dust; water or water with a wetting agent. [Statutory Provision] Where...

2013-07-01

140

30 CFR 75.401 - Abatement of dust; water or water with a wetting agent.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Combustible Materials and Rock Dusting 75.401 Abatement of dust; water or water with a wetting agent. [Statutory Provision] Where...

2012-07-01

141

30 CFR 75.401 - Abatement of dust; water or water with a wetting agent.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Combustible Materials and Rock Dusting 75.401 Abatement of dust; water or water with a wetting agent. [Statutory Provision] Where...

2010-07-01

142

Design of aircraft noise abatement approach procedures for near-term implementation  

E-print Network

Advanced aircraft noise abatement approach procedures -- characterized by decelerating, continuous descent approaches using idle thrust, and enabled by flight guidance technologies such as GPS and FMS -- have been shown ...

Ho, Nhut Tan, 1974-

2005-01-01

143

26 CFR 53.4961-1 - Abatement of second tier taxes for correction within correction period.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) FOUNDATION AND SIMILAR EXCISE TAXES Second Tier Excise Taxes 53.4961-1 Abatement of second tier taxes for correction...

2010-04-01

144

26 CFR 53.4961-1 - Abatement of second tier taxes for correction within correction period.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) FOUNDATION AND SIMILAR EXCISE TAXES Second Tier Excise Taxes 53.4961-1 Abatement of second tier taxes for correction...

2011-04-01

145

CO? abatement by multi-fueled electric utilities: an analysis based on Japanese data  

E-print Network

Multi-fueled electric utilities are commonly seen as offering relatively greater opportunities for reasonably priced carbon abatement through changes in the dispatch of generating units from capacity using high emission ...

Ellerman, A. Denny.; Tsukada, Natsuki.

146

COMBINED SEWER OVERFLOW ABATEMENT PROGRAM, ROCHESTER, NY. VOLUME II. PILOT PLANT EVALUATIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

The pilot plant treatability studies were designed to interact with combined sewer overflow (CSO) monitoring and system modeling efforts for the Rochester Pure Water District with the ultimate objective of evaluating CSO abatement alternatives. The studies covered treatment by th...

147

29 CFR 1960.30 - Abatement of unsafe or unhealthful working conditions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) BASIC PROGRAM ELEMENTS FOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS...changes in an abatement plan will require the preparation of a new plan in accordance with the provisions of this...

2011-07-01

148

29 CFR 1960.30 - Abatement of unsafe or unhealthful working conditions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) BASIC PROGRAM ELEMENTS FOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS...changes in an abatement plan will require the preparation of a new plan in accordance with the provisions of this...

2012-07-01

149

29 CFR 1960.30 - Abatement of unsafe or unhealthful working conditions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) BASIC PROGRAM ELEMENTS FOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS...changes in an abatement plan will require the preparation of a new plan in accordance with the provisions of this...

2013-07-01

150

29 CFR 1960.30 - Abatement of unsafe or unhealthful working conditions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) BASIC PROGRAM ELEMENTS FOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS...changes in an abatement plan will require the preparation of a new plan in accordance with the provisions of this...

2010-07-01

151

What Governmental Agencies Should Look for in a Mosquito Abatement Company  

E-print Network

Cities, counties and school districts often must contract for mosquito control services. This publication explains what Texas law requires of pest control companies and what a contract for mosquito abatement should contain....

Renchie, Don L.

2005-10-06

152

The benefits of public engagement  

E-print Network

to encourage researchers to engage with the public and embed public engagement in the higher education Education Institutes (HEIs) and help researchers in overcoming barriers that they may encounter in engaging improved communication and influencing skills. Other benefits include a higher personal and institutional

Rambaut, Andrew

153

the Engaged An Applied Developmental  

E-print Network

Academic Service-Learning #12;What University Outreach & Engagement Does... Partners · With faculty teams in building Service-Learning/Civic Engagement into their courses Funds · Seed grants for pursuing outreach the mutual benefits of university-community collaborations #12;Engaged Learning Communities sponsored

154

Economic measurement of benefits of water-pollution abatement in an irrigated river basin  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study addressed the problem of measuring the economic benefits of water-pollution abatement in a multiple-use river setting. The primary objective of this study was to develop a multiple-parameter analytical procedure for estimating benefits of water-pollution abatement. An analytical model consisting of a water-quality submodel and an economic submodel was specified. The water-quality index functions, and an aggregation rule. The

Gutema

1982-01-01

155

Blood Lead Levels in Toronto Children and Abatement of Lead-Contaminated Soil and House Dust  

Microsoft Academic Search

South Riverdale in Toronto, Canada, underwent a lead-abatement program. In 1988, lead-contaminated soil was replaced at 970 properties, and in 1989, professional housecleaning for lead removal was conducted in 717 households. The effect of abatement on blood lead levels in young children was investigated. Data were analyzed from 12 cross-sectional blood-screening surveys that were conducted during an 8-y period in

Peter Langlois; Lesbia Smith; Scott Fleming; Richard Gould; Vivek Goel; Brian Gibson

1996-01-01

156

Lead abatement training for underserved populations: lessons learned.  

PubMed

An environmental-justice (equity) grant program was used to make accessible an existing lead-training program to minority persons and residents of low-income communities. The purpose of the program was to enhance the knowledge base within the communities concerning lead hazards and intervention strategies and expand possibilities for employment in the lead abatement industry. Barriers to attendance were anticipated and addressed, and included transportation, meals, license application fees, reminders of course date and location, and day care. The program was evaluated through measures of recruitment rates, pre- and post-testing scores, and change in perception of confidence at pre-test, post-test, and at four-month follow-up. Fee-paying registrants over the same time period were used as a comparison group. First day attendance rates for individuals recruited into the equity-grant was 59 percent, of these 94 percent completed all days. Equity and fee-paying groups had similar scores on the pre-test (p = .209), while mean scores on the final exam differed significantly (p < .001) between the groups and were 77 percent and 85 percent, respectively. After adjusting for demographic and course type attended, perceptions of self-efficacy (benefit) and outcome-effectiveness (confidence) increased significantly from pre- to post-tests for both groups and remained at post-course levels at four months follow-up. Lessons learned include: (1) Lead abatement and other related activities can be successfully taught through traditional training methods; (2) A necessary element for delivery of educational services to minority groups is forming workable ties with local community groups, but eligibility requirements must be maintained; (3) Once barriers to first-day attendance are overcome, the information necessary to perform specific work skills can be taught; (4) Positive changes in belief are not dependent on minority status, income, or education levels; (5) Training and education increased confidence in ability to perform learned skills, and belief that there will be a beneficial outcome when performed for themselves, their families, and communities; and, (6) A consensus regarding applicability of regulations must be achieved among federal, state, and local communities. PMID:10675980

Sterling, D A; Lewis, R D; Serrano, F; Dugbatey, K; Evans, R G; Sterling, L S

2000-02-01

157

A review of "The Artisan of Ipswich: Craftmanship and Community in Colonial New England" by Robert Tarule.  

E-print Network

Dennis, an English joiner who immigrated to Ipswich in 1663. By the time of his death in 1706, his particular joining skills were pass?, supplanted by more fash- ionable sawn-board cabinet work. Nevertheless, in his day Dennis was highly regarded... as an artisan, and today his carved furniture is collected by connoisseurs. In 1670, it is interesting to note, he was convicted of and fined for felling more trees than his commu- nity grant permitted. Much of what Tarule reveals is imagined through Dennis...

William J. Scheick

2004-01-01

158

Local Ecological Knowledge and Scientific Data Reveal Overexploitation by Multigear Artisanal Fisheries in the Southwestern Atlantic  

PubMed Central

In the last decades, a number of studies based on historical records revealed the diversity loss in the oceans and human-induced changes to marine ecosystems. These studies have improved our understanding of the human impacts in the oceans. They also drew attention to the shifting baseline syndrome and the importance of assessing appropriate sources of data in order to build the most reliable environmental baseline. Here we amassed information from artisanal fishermen's local ecological knowledge, fisheries landing data and underwater visual census to assess the decline of fish species in Southeastern Brazil. Interviews with 214 fishermen from line, beach seine and spearfishing revealed a sharp decline in abundance of the bluefish Pomatomus saltatrix, the groupers Epinephelus marginatus, Mycteroperca acutirostris, M. bonaci and M. microlepis, and large parrotfishes in the past six decades. Fisheries landing data from a 16-year period support the decline of bluefish as pointed by fishermen's local knowledge, while underwater visual census campaigns show reductions in groupers' abundance and a sharp population decline of the Brazilian endemic parrotfish Scarus trispinosus. Despite the marked decline of these fisheries, younger and less experienced fishermen recognized fewer species as overexploited and fishing sites as depleted than older and more experienced fishermen, indicating the occurrence of the shifting baseline syndrome. Here we show both the decline of multigear fisheries catches combining anecdotal and scientific data as well as changes in environmental perceptions over generations of fishermen. Managing ocean resources requires looking into the past, and into traditional knowledge, bringing historical baselines to the present and improving public awareness. PMID:25333661

Bender, Mariana G.; Machado, Gustavo R.; Silva, Paulo Jose de Azevedo; Floeter, Sergio R.; Monteiro-Netto, Cassiano; Luiz, Osmar J.; Ferreira, Carlos E. L.

2014-01-01

159

Implications of urbanization for artisanal parrotfish fisheries in the Western Solomon Islands.  

PubMed

Increasing migration into urbanized centers in the Solomon Islands poses a great threat to adjacent coral reef fisheries because of negative effects on the fisheries and because it further erodes customary management systems. Parrotfish fisheries are of particular importance because the feeding habits of parrotfish (scrape and excavate coral) are thought to be critical to the resilience of coral reefs and to maintaining coral reef health within marine protected areas. We investigated the ecological impact of localized subsistence and artisanal fishing pressure on parrotfish fisheries in Gizo Town, Western Solomon Islands, by analyzing the density and size distribution of parrotfish with an underwater visual census (UVC), recall diary (i.e., interviews with fishers), and creel surveys to independently assess changes in abundance and catch-per-unit-effort (CPUE) over 2 years. We then compared parrotfish data from Gizo Town with equivalent data from sites open to and closed to fishing in Kida and Nusa Hope villages, which have different customary management regimes. Results indicated a gradient of customary management effectiveness. Parrotfish abundance was greater in customary management areas closed to fishing, especially with regard to larger fish sizes, than in areas open to fishing. The decline in parrotfish abundance from 2004 to 2005 in Gizo was roughly the same magnitude as the difference in abundance decline between inside and outside customary management marine reserves. Our results highlight how weak forms of customary management can result in the rapid decline of vulnerable fisheries around urbanized regions, and we present examples in which working customary management systems (Kinda and Nusa Hope) can positively affect the conservation of parrotfish--and reef fisheries in general--in the highly biodiverse Coral Triangle region. PMID:19961509

Aswani, Shankar; Sabetian, Armagan

2010-04-01

160

Vulnerability of artisanal fisheries to climate change in the Venice Lagoon.  

PubMed

Within the context of global warming, the western coast of the northern Adriatic Sea can be regarded as an extremely vulnerable area. Owing to the local geographic features, this area has been described as the Venetian lacuna, where Mediterranean Sea climatic conditions are replaced by Atlantic Ocean ones, supporting the presence of glacial relicts, such as sprat Sprattus sprattus, flounder Platichthys flesus and brown shrimp Crangon crangon. Nektonic assemblage therefore represents a good candidate in terms of an early proxy for thermal regime alterations. It represents a dynamic component of the lagoon ecosystem, changing in space and time, actively moving through the entire system, and dynamically exchanging with the open sea. Here, the first signals of the change have been already detected, such as the presence of alien thermophilic species. Within this context, since the beginning of the century, sampling of the nektonic assemblage has been carried out, integrating them with landings data from the fish market. Vulnerabilities to thermal regime changes have been tested by (1) categorizing species according to the mean distribution area in terms of latitudinal range (over 45, 30-45 and below 30), and (2) analysing both spatial and temporal variations within fishing grounds. Results indicated a high potential vulnerability of the artisanal fishery to climate change, as the commercial catch is entirely composed of species from cold (>45 N) and temperate (between 45 and 30 N) latitudes. At present no alien thermophilic species have been recorded within the lagoon, which is possibly a sign of good resilience of the assemblage. Finally, abundance of species from cold latitudes has decreased during the past decade. All of this has been discussed in the context of the mean annual temperature trend. PMID:24090551

Pranovi, F; Caccin, A; Franzoi, P; Malavasi, S; Zucchetta, M; Torricelli, P

2013-10-01

161

Abatement of malodorants from pesticide factory in dielectric barrier discharges.  

PubMed

Traditional odor control methods are limitative technically and economically for the abatement of odor from pesticide factory due to its toxicity and complicated composition. Non-thermal plasma (NTP) methods, typically characterized by high removal efficiency, energy yields and good economy, offer possible alternative solutions. This paper provides laboratory scale experimental data on the removal of simulated odors from pesticide factory with various humidity (0-0.8 vol%) and oxygen contents (0-21%) by a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor. Peak voltage and initial dimethylamine (DML) concentration are important factors that influence the DML removal efficiency and energy yield. The conversion of DML of 761 mg/m(3) reaches 100% at a peak voltage of 41.25 kV. Under the experiment conditions, the conversion of DML increases with an increase of oxygen contents. And the highest DML conversion was achieved with the gas stream containing 0.3% water. Simultaneously, the concentration of O(3) and OH radical in reactor was measured. Higher conversion, higher energy yield and fewer byproducts were found in mixed odor (DML+dimethyl sulfide (DMS)) treatment than that in single odor treatment. The energy yield is promoted from 2.13 to 5.20mg/kJ. PMID:20116170

Chen, Jie; Yang, Jiantao; Pan, Hua; Su, Qingfa; Liu, Yamin; Shi, Yao

2010-05-15

162

Abatement of an aircraft exhaust plume using aerodynamic baffles.  

PubMed

The exhaust jet from a departing commercial aircraft will eventually rise buoyantly away from the ground; given the high thrust/power (i.e., momentum/buoyancy) ratio of modern aero-engines, however, this is a slow process, perhaps requiring ? 1 min or more. Supported by theoretical and wind tunnel modeling, we have experimented with an array of aerodynamic baffles on the surface behind a set of turbofan engines of 124 kN thrust. Lidar and point sampler measurements show that, as long as the intervention takes place within the zone where the Coanda effect holds the jet to the surface (i.e., within about 70 m in this case), then quite modest surface-mounted baffles can rapidly lift the jet away from the ground. This is of potential benefit in abating both surface concentrations and jet blast downstream. There is also some modest acoustic benefit. By distributing the aerodynamic lift and drag across an array of baffles, each need only be a fraction of the height of a single blast fence. PMID:23343109

Bennett, Michael; Christie, Simon M; Graham, Angus; Garry, Kevin P; Velikov, Stefan; Poll, D Ian; Smith, Malcolm G; Mead, M Iqbal; Popoola, Olalekan A M; Stewart, Gregor B; Jones, Roderic L

2013-03-01

163

Engaging with Policy Makers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The need to engage with Europe's policy makers is more crucial now than ever. MEPs' understanding of the contribution and importance of planetary science to European research, industry, culture, education and job-creation may have major implications for both the direction of research and future funding for Europe's planetary science community. The mid-term review of the European Commission's Seventh Framework Programme is currently in progress and these discussions will feed into the drafting of Framework Eight. With space-going nations around the world redefining priorities, Europe may have an opportunity to take a lead in planetology on a global scale. This should be taken into account when considering planetology within the frameworks of the European Space Policy. This panel discussion, hosted by Dr Robert Massey, Deputy Executive of the Royal Astronomical Session, will look at engaging with policy makers from the point of view of those working in the European Parliament, European Commission, industry, as well as the planetary community.

Massey, R.; Miller, S.; Heward, A.

2011-10-01

164

Short term impact of artisanal dredges in a Patagonian mussel fishery: Comparisons with commercial diving and control sites.  

PubMed

Mussels in the San Matas Gulf fishery are targeted using artisanal dredges and diving. The main objective of this study was to assess the direct impact of artisanal dredging on the biota and sediments, and to compare the composition of the catches and the individual damage induced by fishing between dredging and commercial diving. The experimental design included samplings from dredge catches, dredge tracks, control sites and commercial diving. According to their damage level, individuals were scored as undamaged, lightly damaged and severely damaged. Sediment characteristics were analyzed using coring samples and traps. Damage of mussels, mostly corresponding to the severely damaged category, was less than 5% both in samples from dredging and diving. Conversely, mean damage of the main bycatch species (sea urchins and ophiuroids) was 75 and 65% in samples from dredging and diving respectively, being most of the individuals lightly damaged. Considering also the catch sample composition of both fishing methods, dredging affected relatively more individuals than diving. Although sediment removal in dredged areas was three times higher than that in non-dredged ones, mean grain size and gravel percentage of sea floor sediments showed subtle differences between them. PMID:22119540

Narvarte, Maite; Gonzlez, Ral; Medina, Alonso; Avaca, Mara Soledad; Ginsberg, Susana; Aliotta, Salvador

2012-02-01

165

'By Merit Raised to That Bad Eminence': Christopher Merrett, Artisanal Knowledge, and Professional Reform in Restoration London  

PubMed Central

This article examines the career and reform agenda of Christopher Merrett as a means of evaluating the changing conditions of medical knowledge production in late seventeenth-century London. This period was characterised by increasing competition between medical practitioners, resulting from the growing consumer demand for medical commodities and services, the reduced ability of elite physicians to control medical practice, and the appearance of alternative methods of producing medical knowledge particularly experimental methods. This competition resulted in heated exchanges between physicians, apothecaries, and virtuosi, in which Merrett played an active part. As a prominent member of both the Royal Society and the Royal College of Physicians, Merrett sought to mediate between the two institutions by introducing professional reforms designed to alleviate competition and improve medical knowledge.These reforms entailed sweeping changes to medical regulation and education that integrated the traditional reliance on Galenic principles with knowledge derived from experiment and artisanal practices. The emphasis Merrett placed on the trades suggests the important role artisanal knowledge played in his efforts to reorganise medicine and improve knowledge of bodily processes. PMID:23752982

Mauck, Aaron

2012-01-01

166

Effects of river impoundment on ecosystem services of large tropical rivers: embodied energy and market value of artisanal fisheries.  

PubMed

Applying the ecosystem services concept to conservation initiatives or in managing ecosystem services requires understanding how environmental impacts affect the ecology of key species or functional groups providing the services. We examined effects of river impoundments, one of the leading threats to freshwater biodiversity, on an important ecosystem service provided by large tropical rivers (i.e., artisanal fisheries). The societal and economic importance of this ecosystem service in developing countries may provide leverage to advance conservation agendas where future impoundments are being considered. We assessed impoundment effects on the energetic costs of fisheries production (embodied energy) and commercial market value of the artisanal fishery of the Paran River, Brazil, before and after formation of Itaipu Reservoir. High-value migratory species that dominated the fishery before the impoundment was built constituted a minor component of the contemporary fishery that is based heavily on reservoir-adapted introduced species. Cascading effects of river impoundment resulted in a mismatch between embodied energy and market value: energetic costs of fisheries production increased, whereas market value decreased. This was partially attributable to changes in species functional composition but also strongly linked to species identities that affected market value as a result of consumer preferences even when species were functionally similar. Similar trends are expected in other large tropical rivers following impoundment. In addition to identifying consequences of a common anthropogenic impact on an important ecosystem service, our assessment provides insight into the sustainability of fisheries production in tropical rivers and priorities for regional biodiversity conservation. PMID:19459891

Hoeinghaus, David J; Agostinho, Angelo A; Gomes, Luiz C; Pelicice, Fernando M; Okada, Edson K; Latini, Joo D; Kashiwaqui, Elaine A L; Winemiller, Kirk O

2009-10-01

167

Going public: The first Portuguese National Engineering Meeting and the popularization of the image of the engineer as an artisan of progress (Portugal, 1931)  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we explore the use of the Portuguese generalist press as a tool to convey to the lay public the image of the engineer as the main artisan of progress and of the modern twentieth century society. In 1931, Portuguese engineers met for the first time in a national congress. Besides the obvious intention of asserting their professional

Maria Paula Diogo; Ana Cardoso de Matos

2012-01-01

168

Blue Shark (Prionace glauca) Fishery in Baja California, Mexico: An example of Artisanal and Middle Scale Fisheries Interaction (Elasmobranch Symposium - Oral)  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the development of a new market, since the beginning of the 1990s, blue shark (Prionace glauca) is the main target species of the artisanal pelagic longline fishery (25-feet long boats) along the western coast of the Baja California Peninsula. Also this species is targeted or caught incidentally by the middle scale (35-feet long vessels) swordfish fishery. Although the fisheries

O. Sosa-Nishizaki; E. Furlong-Estrada; J. A. Reyes-Gonzlez; J. C. Prez-Jimnez

169

Population dynamics of lactococci from industrial, artisanal and non-dairy origins in defined strain starters for Gouda-type cheese  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lactococcal strains from various artisanal and natural niches were studied for the development of defined strain starter (DSS) mesophilic cultures with specific flavour forming characteristics as well as with other properties required for Gouda-type cheese. These wild lactococcal strains were found to be stable up to 50 subcultivations with regard to their morphology, genetic profile, bacteriocin production, proteolytic and acidification

Eman H. E Ayad; Annette Verheul; Jan T. M Wouters; Gerrit Smit

2001-01-01

170

Electrochemical abatement of the antibiotic sulfamethoxazole from water.  

PubMed

The electrochemical abatement of the antibiotic sulfamethoxazole (SMX) from aqueous solutions at pH 3.0 has been carried out by anodic oxidation and electro-Fenton (EF) processes with H(2)O(2) electrogeneration. The electrolyses have been performed using a small, undivided cell equipped with a Pt or thin film boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode and a carbon-felt cathode. The higher performance of the EF process with 0.2mM Fe(2+) in a BDD/carbon felt cell is demonstrated. This is due to the higher production of ()OH radicals, as well as to the simultaneous degradation at the anode surface and in the bulk solution. At low current, the oxidation at the anode was predominant; at high current, SMX was pre-eminently degraded in the bulk. SMX was quickly destroyed under all the conditions tested, following pseudo first-order kinetics; however, the almost total removal of the total organic carbon was only achieved in the BDD/carbon felt cell. The reaction by-products were quantified by chromatographic techniques and thus, the reaction pathway for the mineralization of SMX by EF has been elucidated. Hydroxylation of SMX on the sulfanilic ring is suggested as the first step, followed by the formation of p-benzoquinone and 3-amino-5-methylisoxazole. Their oxidative cleavage led to the formation of five carboxylic acids that were finally mineralized to CO(2); the release of NH(4)(+), NO(3)(-), and SO(4)(2-) accounted for almost 100% of the initial nitrogen and sulfur content. The absolute rate constants for the oxidative degradation of SMX and the detected aromatic by-products have also been determined. PMID:20833409

Dirany, Ahmad; Sirs, Ignasi; Oturan, Nihal; Oturan, Mehmet A

2010-10-01

171

Is H2S a suitable process indicator for odour abatement performance of sewer odours?  

PubMed

Odour abatement units are typically designed and maintained on H(2)S concentrations, but operational failures are reported in terms of overall odour removal, suggesting a wide range of malodorous compounds emitted from sewers that may not be efficiently removed by existing odour abatement processes. Towards providing greater insight into this issue, several activated carbon filters and biofilters treating odorous emissions from sewer systems in Sydney (Australia) were monitored by collecting and analysing gas samples before and after treatment. The monitoring studies were conducted by both olfactometric measurements and gas-chromatography-based chemical analysis. Single H(2)S assessment often failed to indicate the odour abatement performance for treatment systems in the abatement units studied, particularly when the incoming H(2)S concentrations were in the sub-ppm range (i.e. below H(2)S odour threshold). Chemical analysis indicated that some non-H(2)S odorous compounds were not removed efficiently during odour treatment. Additionally, when odour eliminations were correlated with the removal of individual compounds (Pearson's correlations) it was observed that the correlation (with a coefficient of 0.79) was best when the overall removal of all the measured odorous compounds that exceeded their odour threshold values was used for the analysis. These findings may help to further advance the design and operation of odour abatement processes to address the treatment of sewer odour emissions. PMID:24434973

Wang, B; Sivret, E C; Parcsi, G; Wang, X; Le, N M; Kenny, S; Bustamante, H; Stuetz, R M

2014-01-01

172

Transfer Student Engagement: Blurring of Social and Academic Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Transfer students are a distinct population. Their characteristics lead to a qualitatively different student experience. Drawing on interviews with a cross-sectional sample of transfer students at George Mason University (GMU), this study focused on the ways transfer students perceived their social and academic engagement, on the ways they engaged

Lester, Jaime; Leonard, Jeannie Brown; Mathias, David

2013-01-01

173

Conceptualizing Engagement: Contributions of Faculty to Student Engagement in Engineering  

Microsoft Academic Search

The concept of student engagement, now prominent in the engi- neering education and higher education communities, has a long intellectual history. Yet only recently has attention focused on the role that faculty play as designers of educational environments to support student engagement. Drawing from examples and data from the Engineering Change study (which evaluated the impact of the new EC2000

HELEN L. CHEN; LISA R. LATTUCA; ERIC R. HAMILTON

174

Hearing Voices, Creating Spaces: The Craft of the "Artisan Teacher" in a Mass Higher Education System  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this paper I explore the concepts of voice and space as critical to the issues of widening participation, inclusive learning and teaching and academic engagement. Drawing on research conducted between 2006 and 2008 within two universities in England, and developmental work carried out with some of the teacher participants subsequently, I

Hockings, Christine

2011-01-01

175

Non-thermal plasmas chemistry as a tool for environmental pollutants abatement.  

PubMed

Over the past several decades, interest in environmental pollutants abatement has greatly increased. This interest is derived from growing concern about environmental pollution and the serious deterioration of many ecosystems as a result of environmental pollution. NTPs chemistry is a proven and effective tool both for decomposing a range of pollutants and for cleaning contaminated surfaces. NTPs chemistry has crucial advantages such as high energy efficiency, higher treatment effectiveness, effective treatment in more confined spaces, and near zero-emissions. When NTPs chemistry is combined with the use of certain catalysts, synergetic pollution abatement results may be achieved; however, the mechanism by which the synergy occurs is still unclear. The purpose of this paper is to provide a basic understanding of NTPs chemistry, including the commonly employed chemical mechanisms, examples of NTPs chemistry applications, and an opinion on the future for NTPs chemistry in the field of environmental pollutants abatement. PMID:19484590

Bai, Yan-hong; Chen, Jie-rong; Li, Xiao-yong; Zhang, Chun-hong

2009-01-01

176

Student Engagement: Buzzword of Fuzzword?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Global interest in the value of student engagement in higher education has led researchers to question whether the use of the term is clear and consistent. This article investigates the construction of the term "student engagement" at three US universities through an analysis of qualitative data. Whereas a shared understanding of the

Vuori, Johanna

2014-01-01

177

Who Engages with Moral Beauty?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aristotle considered moral beauty to be the "telos" of the human virtues. Displays of moral beauty have been shown to elicit the moral emotion of elevation and cause a desire to become a better person and to engage in prosocial behavior. Study 1 ("N" = 5380) shows engagement with moral beauty is related to several psychological

Diessner, Rhett; Iyer, Ravi; Smith, Meghan M.; Haidt, Jonathan

2013-01-01

178

Students Individual Engagement in GIS  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper develops two sets of concepts to theorize why students engage differently in Geographical Information Systems (GIS). These theoretical concepts are used as an analytical lens to explore empirical data on the experiences and engagement of students enrolled in an undergraduate GIS course in planning and management. The analysis shows that

Madsen, Lene Mller; Christiansen, Frederik; Rump, Camilla

2014-01-01

179

Student Engagement and Study Abroad  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study the authors assessed student engagement during a short-term study-abroad program using the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE). Data were collected from a group of Canadian undergraduates spending six weeks in Mexico. Their program included a 10-day bus tour, three half-credit courses, and accommodations with local families.

Rourke, Liam; Kanuka, Heather

2012-01-01

180

Student Engagement: Rhetoric and Reality  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recently, there has been much interest in higher education literature and policy on the concepts of student engagement and disengagement. While most academic writings recognise the significance of student engagement, they have tended to concentrate on it in relation to academic activities. Increasingly, universities are "cascading" down the need

Baron, Paula; Corbin, Lillian

2012-01-01

181

Community Leadership and Civic Engagement  

E-print Network

, Circle K, and We Care 4 NIU. Expanded Horizons Majors often choose to study abroad, like Jacob, who spentCommunity Leadership and Civic Engagement The Make a Difference Major Community Leadership and Civic Engagement (CLCE) is an exciting new major at Northern Illinois University. It was created

Karonis, Nicholas T.

182

GUIDE READY LISTEN --ENGAGE --EDUCATE  

E-print Network

the opportunity for you to learn and grow. It is our goal to be a resource through listening, engagingREBEL GUIDE READY LISTEN -- ENGAGE -- EDUCATE #12;COMMUNITY2CAMPUS DI VI SIO N O F EDU C AT IO NA L a certificate program, the University of Nevada, Las Vegas provides the opportunity for you to learn and grow

Hemmers, Oliver

183

the Engaged Michigan State University  

E-print Network

scholarship and research, to enhance curriculum, teaching and learning, to prepare educated, engaged citizens will be an exemplary "engaged university," transforming and strengthening outreach partnerships to address key Michigan to democracy/ diversity ... Strengthen citizen participation and civic responsibility to improve outcomes

184

Community Leadership and Civic Engagement  

E-print Network

Community Leadership and Civic Engagement The Make a Difference Major Community Leadership-time All-American athlete, finalist for NCAA Woman of the Year, and CLCE student, is currently attending of the State of Illinois. www.niu.edu F016 8/13 Community Leadership and Civic Engagement (CLCE) is a cutting

Kostic, Milivoje M.

185

Men's meaning of walking engagement  

Microsoft Academic Search

Understanding men's perceptions and beliefs about physical activity could help us improve the effectiveness of health promotion walking programs. This study explores men's perceptions and beliefs about a structured walking program, including what hinders and what enhances their engagement. Qualitative methods were used to explore men's lived experiences of engaging in a walking program over a one-year period.Focus groups and

Elisabeth Lord; Robert Bush

2012-01-01

186

Student engagement and student voices  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Through classroom observation, digital videos, and face-to face-interviews, this study investigated the phenomenon of student engagement within one inquiry-oriented secondary science classroom. The data suggests that students engage in very different ways and these individual approaches often do not match with the narrow vision of engagement held by classroom teachers and espoused in existing research literature. Classroom behaviors are frequently misread and misinterpreted when students are not given opportunities to explain what their behaviors mean. Furthermore, students cited an array of emotional, cognitive, and intangible factors that significantly impact their behavioral engagement on a daily basis. This study provides an in-depth analysis and description of student engagement across behavioral, emotional and cognitive dimensions that rely on both verbal and nonverbal aspects of student voices.

Trygstad, Peggy

187

Electronic copy available at: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1558744 The Role of Abatement, Technology Policies, and  

E-print Network

year 2100 carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration targets. Technological change depends stochastically technologies can delay abatement. The type of technology targeted by public R&D depends on the level of the CO2Electronic copy available at: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1558744 The Role of Abatement, Technology

Kammen, Daniel M.

188

What is the best distribution for pollution abatement efforts? Information for optimizing the WFD Programs of measures.  

E-print Network

to encourage E.U. Member States to reach desirable environmental water pollution levels by conciliating number of effort "levels". Keywords: Abatement effort discrimination, Pollution control cost, Water1 What is the best distribution for pollution abatement efforts? Information for optimizing the WFD

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

189

High altitude artisanal small-scale gold mines are hot spots for Mercury in soils and plants.  

PubMed

Mercury releases from artisanal and small-scale gold mines (ASGM) condense and settle on plants, soils and water bodies. We collected soil and plant samples to add knowledge to the likely transfer of Hg from soils into plants and eventually predict Hg accumulation in livestock around ASGM in Bolivia. Mean contents of Hg in soils range from 0.5 to 48.6 mg Hg kg(-1) soil (5 to 60 more compared to control sites) and exceeded the soil Hg threshold levels in some European countries. The Hg contents ranged from 0.6 to 18 and 0.2 to 28.3 mg Hg kg(-1) leaf and root, respectively. The high Hg in Poaceae and Rosaceae may elevate Hg accumulation into the food chain because llama and alpaca solely thrive on these plants for food. Erosion of soils around ASGM in Bolivia contributes to the Hg contamination in lower reaches of the Amazon basin. PMID:23202639

Tern-Mita, Tania A; Faz, Angel; Salvador, Flor; Arocena, Joselito M; Acosta, Jose A

2013-02-01

190

Mercury Exposure and Health Impacts among Individuals in the Artisanal and Small-Scale Gold Mining Community: A Comprehensive Review  

PubMed Central

Background: Mercury (Hg) is used in gold mining to extract gold from ore by forming amalgama mixture composed of approximately equal parts mercury and gold. Approximately 15 million people, including approximately 3 million women and children, participate in artisanal small-scale gold mining (ASGM) in developing countries. Thirty-seven percent of global air emissions of Hg are produced by ASGM. The recently adopted Minamata Convention calls for nations to gather health data, train health-care workers, and raise awareness in regard to ASGM activity. Objective: The purpose of our review was to evaluate the current literature regarding the health effects of Hg among those working and/or living in or near ASGM communities. Methods: We searched PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Google Scholar for studies relating to health effects and biomarkers of Hg exposure in ASGM communities. Articles published from 1990 through December 2012 were evaluated for relevance. Discussion: Studies reporting health assessments, kidney dysfunction, neurological disorders and symptoms, and immunotoxicity/autoimmune dysfunction in individuals living in or near an ASGM community were identified. More than 60 studies that measured biomarkers of Hg exposure in individuals living in or near ASGM communities were also identified. These studies, conducted in 19 different countries in South America, Asia, and Africa, demonstrated that hair and urine concentrations are well above World Health Organization health guidance values in ASGM communities. Conclusions: ASGM workers and their families are exposed to Hg vapor, and workers, workers families, and residents of nearby and downstream communities are consuming fish heavily contaminated with methylmercury. Citation: Gibb H, OLeary KG. 2014. Mercury exposure and health impacts among individuals in the artisanal and small-scale gold mining community: a comprehensive review. Environ Health Perspect 122:667672;?http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307864 PMID:24682486

O'Leary, Keri Grace

2014-01-01

191

Liver and renal function tests in artisans occupationally exposed to lead in mechanic village in Nnewi, Nigeria.  

PubMed

Additives in petroleum solvents have been reported to have adverse health implications. An evaluation study on some toxicological effects of occupational exposure to petroleum products (especially petrol which contains tetraethyl lead) amongst twenty five occupationally exposed artisans and twenty five graduate students of College of Health Sciences, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Nnewi, Nigeria as controls, was carried out using the following biochemical markers: electrolytes, urea, uric acid, inorganic phosphorus, creatinine, zinc and blood lead, as well as the activities of alanine and aspartate aminotransferases, and alkaline phosphatase. The results showed that occupational exposure of human subjects to lead in petrol increases the concentrations of uric acid (357 +/- 123micro mol/L) and phosphate (1.5 +/- 0.5m mol/L) in exposed subjects compared with unexposed subjects (uric acid 228 +/- 105micro mol/L, phosphate 1.2 +/- 0.41m mol/L; p < 0.01 in both cases). Significantly lower activities were observed for alkaline phosphatase (66 +/- 18.9 iu/L). The activities of alanine aminotransferase (11.4 +/- 4.0 iu/L) and aspartate aminotransferase (15.8 +/- 4.4 iu/L) in occupationally exposed artisans were higher compared with unexposed subjects (alkaline phosphatase = 78 +/- 22.4 iu/L alanine aminotranferase = 6.8 +/- 2.7 iu/L, aspartate aminotranferase = 9.6 +/- 3.5i u+/-L; p < 0.01 in all cases). Occupational exposure of human subjects to lead significantly increased blood lead (59.6 +/- 15.9 microg/dL) and decreased plasma zinc (71.3 +/- 14.4 microg/L) in exposed compared with unexposed subjects (blood lead = 35 +/- 7 microg/dL, zinc = 108.4 +/- 16.9 microg/dL; p < 0.01). The results indicate that occupational exposure to lead in petrol may compromise liver and renal function. PMID:16696177

Dioka, C E; Orisakwe, O E; Adeniyi, F A A; Meludu, S C

2004-03-01

192

Guidelines for conducting the AHERA (Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act) TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) clearance test to determine completion of an asbestos abatement project. Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Asbestos abatement carried out in schools is subject to regulations under the Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act of 1986 (AHERA). The AHERA rule (40 CFR Part 763) includes procedures for determining when an asbestos abatement site is sufficiently clean for the containment barriers to be removed. After the abatement site has been subject to a thorough visual inspection, air samples

J. Chesson; B. Leczynski; T. Berner; T. Hudson

1989-01-01

193

The Challenges of Community Engagement  

PubMed Central

Lyons and Whelan provide a useful list of recommendations as to how community engagement on nanotechnology could be improved, which very few people working in community engagement could disagree with. However, as the conclusions of any study are dependent on the data obtained, if more data had been obtained and analysed then different conclusions might have been reached. Addressing the key issues in the paper and providing more data, also allows an opportunity to expand on current issues relating to community engagement on nanotechnology and the challenges it provides for practitioners. PMID:21258427

2010-01-01

194

[Estimate the abatement rate of septic tank sewage outfall soil on nitrogen pollutants of typical farmer household sewage].  

PubMed

The surface soil on sewage outfall and effluent of farmer household septic tank were collected in situ from the typical region of plain river network areas in Taihu Lake Basin, and the typical rainfall (summer 30 mm . times-1, winter 5 mm times -1), temperature (summer 27 degrees C, winter 5 degrees C ) condition and pollutant load were artificial simulated by indoor simulation soil column experiments for estimating nitrogen abatement rate of rural sewage treated by the outfall soil and exploring the abatement rule in different seasons and weather process (7 days before the rain, 3 rainy days, 7 days after the rain). Results showed that: there was the significant difference (P <0.05) in abatement/increase rate of outfall soil on nitrogen between summer and winter. The TN abatement rate, NO-3 -N increase rate of summer showed a significant difference (P <0.01) among different weather processes, but the NH+4 -N abatement rate of summer and the TN, NH+4 -N abatement rate, NO -N increase rate of winter were not significant (P > 0. 05). Therefore, the TN, NH+4 -N abatement rate, NO-3 -N increase rate need to be divided by seasons, TN abatement rate, NO-3 -N increase rate of summer need to be divided by the weather process, which were 38.5% , - 25.0% , 46. 0% and 478. 1%, 913.8%, 382. 0% , before the rain, in rainy day, after the rain, respectively; while the NH+4 -N abatement rate of summer and the TN, NH+4 -N abatement rate, NO-3 -N increase rate of winter do not need to be divided by weather process, were 91.7% , 50.4% , 85.5% and 276.0% , respectively. In the summer, the TN abatement rate in different weather processes was not correlated with NH+4 -N abatement rate, but significantly negative correlated with NO-3 -N increase rate. In the winter, the stable accumulation of TN in soil was an important reason of the TN abatement rate which had no significant difference and kept a high level among different weather processes, and it was closely related to the stable accumulation of NH+4 -N in soil. PMID:24364316

Zhou, Feng; Wang, Wen-Lin; Wang, Guo-Xiang; Ma, Jiu-Yuan; Wan, Yin-Jing; Tang, Xiao-Yan; Liang, Bin; Ji, Bin

2013-10-01

195

Multiattribute analysis of the impact on society of phosphorus abatement measures  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have constructed a decision goal hierarchy evaluating the impact and cost to society of phosphorus abatement measures to improve lake water quality. We examine three primary measures: sewage treatment, ban of detergents containing phosphorus, and changes in agricultural practice, and combinations of these measures. The water system studied is lakes in Norway represented by eight typical water bodies. The

Knut L. Seip; Harald Ibrekk; Fred Wenstp

1987-01-01

196

Long-Term Mitigation Strategies and Marginal Abatement Cost Curves: A Case Study on Brazil  

E-print Network

, waste recycling, forest manage- ment, etc. Policy makers have to compare and assess these differentLong-Term Mitigation Strategies and Marginal Abatement Cost Curves: A Case Study on Brazil Adrien World Bank, Washington D.C., USA 3The World Bank, Brasilia, Brazil Abstract Decision makers facing

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

197

The Effect of Uncertainty on Pollution Abatement Investments: Measuring Hurdle Rates for Swedish Industry  

E-print Network

using a panel of firms from the Swedish pulp and paper industry, and the energy and heating sector of investment vary from 2.7 to 3.1 in the pulp and paper industry and from 3.4 to 3.6 in the energy and heating, oil price uncertainty, abatement investment, sulfur emissions, pulp and paper industry, energy

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

198

Abatement and Pollution Control Training and Educational Programs Presented by the United States Environmental Protection Agency.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This catalog is a compilation of training course and educational program descriptions in abatement and pollution control scheduled by the Environmental Protection Agency. Descriptions of programs include prerequisites, class size, and length of time with the content goals. Also given is general information concerning tuition fees, waiver requests,

Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

199

The strategies of abating emission of CO 2 and nuclear energy development in China  

Microsoft Academic Search

In China, annual coal consumption accounts for the first place all over the world in order to meet the high speed development of economy and improvement of the people's living quality. CO2 emission from coal fire is a main contributor to the climate change. We must abate CO2 emission besides developing economy for mitigating the global climate change. In the

Fang Dong; Li Hong

1998-01-01

200

Impact of inlet channel geometry on microfluidic drop formation A. R. Abate,1  

E-print Network

Impact of inlet channel geometry on microfluidic drop formation A. R. Abate,1 A. Poitzsch,2 Y manuscript received 23 May 2009; published 19 August 2009 We study the impact of inlet channel geometry. We study several variations in TJ and FF drop makers and intro- duce a geometry we dub pinned-jet

201

Noise Exposure Assessment and Abatement Strategies at an Indoor Firing Range  

Microsoft Academic Search

Exposure to hazardous impulse noise is common during the firing of weapons at indoor firing ranges. The aims of this study were to characterize the impulse noise environment at a law enforcement firing range; document the insufficiencies found at the range from a health and safety standpoint; and provide noise abatement recommendations to reduce the overall health hazard to the

Chucri A. Kardous; Robert D. Willson; Charles S. Hayden; Piotr Szlapa; William J. Murphy; Efrem R. Reeves

2003-01-01

202

Controlling a Stock Pollutant with Endogenous Abatement Capital and Asymmetric Information  

E-print Network

Development Bank. #12;1 Introduction The possible relation between carbon stocks and global warming has led abatement costs. If environmental damages are related to the stock of pollution, as with global warming an emissions policy but ignore endogenous investment (e.g., the Kyoto Protocol). In virtually any real

Karp, Larry S.

203

HumanWildlife Interactions 5(2):315320, Fall 2011 Canada goose crop damage abatement  

E-print Network

Dakota State University, Brookings, SD 57007, USA Abstract: Canada geese (Branta canadensis) can cause effective at reducing damage to soybeans by Canada geese. Key words: abatement, Branta canadensis, Canada losses to farmers. Here, we evaluate the Many Canada goose (Branta canadensis) populations have increased

204

Influence of carbon dioxide abatement and recreational services on optimal forest rotation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents and applies a theoretical framework to integrate the influence of carbon dioxide abatement as well as recreational services on the optimal bio-economic determination of forest rotation. Recreational services are included in the standard way proposed by Hartman, but carbon fixation benefits are introduced in a different manner to previous studies, concentrating on total permanent carbon fixation produced

Alejandro Caparros; Pablo Campos; David Martin

2003-01-01

205

SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY/X-RAY FLUORESCENCE CHARACTERIZATION OF POST-ABATEMENT DUST  

EPA Science Inventory

Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and laboratory X-ray fluorescence (XRF) were used to characterize post-abatement dust collected with a HEPA filtered vacuum. hree size fractions of resuspended dust (0-30 pm, 2.5-15 pm, and ...

206

ACHIEVING A TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY CLEARANCE CRITERION AT ASBESTOS ABATEMENT SITES IN NEW JERSEY  

EPA Science Inventory

Representatives of the New Jersey Department of Health's Asbestos Control Service conducted final clearance evaluations at 79 schools where asbestos removal took place during the Summer of 1987. The evaluations entailed a thorough visual inspection of each abatement area by an ex...

207

WET/DRY COOLING SYSTEMS FOR FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS: WATER CONSERVATION AND PLUME ABATEMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

The report gives results of a study of technical and economic feasibilities of wet/dry cooling towers for water conservation and vapor plume abatement. Results of cost optimizations of wet/dry cooling for 1000-MWe fossil-fueled power plants are presented. Five sites in the wester...

208

Southern California Bunkering Operations Get On Board with Volatile Organic Compound Abatement No. 42  

Microsoft Academic Search

Volatile organic compound (VOC) abatement regulations in Southern California have driven the development of a vapor processing plant that is suitable for the bunkering barges it serves. A system was required that could be mounted on board existing bunker barges, could be operated by existing tankerman crews and had no need for additional pumps and blowers, which would require additional

Kevin J. Reynolds; Foss Maritime

209

National Center for Media Engagement  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Funded by the Center for Public Broadcasting, the National Center for Media Engagement is dedicated to supporting "public media organizations nationwide in engaging their communities." They provide resources for stations and producers to engage citizens in a range of platforms, and their website is a great place to learn about their work. On the homepage, visitors will find seven sections, including "Think & Strategize", "Plan & Design", "Execute", "Renew & Upgrade" and "Communicate Impact". Public media organizations will be able to use these sections to use social media to communicate their mission to the public. Further down on the homepage, visitors can also learn about "Public Media Stories of Impact". These stories are taken from a range of public media organizations, such as pieces from Austin on the arts community and Columbus, Ohio's work on community engagement. It's also worth taking a look at their blog, which contains direct links to other resources created by public radio and television stations from around the United States.

210

Clinical engagement: improving healthcare together.  

PubMed

Clinical engagement can achieve lasting change in the delivery of healthcare. In October 2011, Healthcare Improvement Scotland formulated a clinical engagement strategy to ensure that a progressive and sustainable approach to engaging healthcare professionals is firmly embedded in its health improvement and public assurance activities. The strategy was developed using a 90-day process, combining an evidence base of best practice and feedback from semi-structured interviews and focus groups. The strategy aims to create a culture where clinicians view working with Healthcare Improvement Scotland as a worthwhile venture, which offers a number of positive benefits such as training, career development and research opportunities. The strategy works towards developing a respectful partnership between Healthcare Improvement Scotland, the clinical community and key stakeholders whereby clinicians' contributions are recognised in a non-financial reward system. To do this, the organisation needs a sustainable infrastructure and an efficient, cost-effective approach to clinical engagement. There are a number of obstacles to achieving successful clinical engagement and these must be addressed as key drivers in its implementation. The implementation of the strategy is supported by an action and resource plan, and its impact will be monitored by a measurement plan to ensure the organisation reviews its approaches towards clinical engagement. PMID:24434856

Riches, E; Robson, B

2014-02-01

211

Cost-effective emission abatement in europe considering interrelations in agriculture.  

PubMed

Agriculture is an important source of ammonia (NH3), which contributes to acidification and eutrophication, as well as emissions of the greenhouse gases nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4). Controlling emissions of one of these pollutants through application of technical measures might have an impact (either beneficial or adverse) on emissions of the others. These side effects are usually ignored in policy making. This study analyses cost-effectiveness of measures to reduce acidification and eutrophication as well as agricultural emissions of N2O and CH4 in Europe, taking into account interrelations between abatement of NH3, N2O, and CH4 in agriculture. The model used is based on the RAINS (Regional Air pollution INformation and Simulation) model for air pollution in Europe, which includes emissions, abatement options, and atmospheric source-receptor relationships for pollutants contributing to acidification and eutrophication. We used an optimisation model that is largely based on the RAINS model but that also includes emissions of N2O and CH4 from agriculture and technical measures to reduce these emissions. For abatement options for agricultural emissions we estimated side effects on other emissions. The model determines abatement strategies to meet restrictions on emission and/or deposition levels at the least cost. Cost-effective strategies to reduce acidification and eutrophication in Europe were analysed. We found that NH3 abatement may cause an increase in N2O emissions. If total agricultural N2O and CH4 emissions in Europe were not allowed to increase, cost-effective allocation of emission reductions over countries in Europe changed considerably. PMID:12805885

Brink, C; van Ierland, E; Hordijk, L; Kroeze, C

2001-10-30

212

CO2 abatement costs of greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation by different biogas conversion pathways.  

PubMed

Biogas will be of increasing importance in the future as a factor in reducing greenhouse gas emissions cost-efficiently by the optimal use of available resources and technologies. The goal of this study was to identify the most ecological and economical use of a given resource (organic waste from residential, commercial and industry sectors) using one specific treatment technology (anaerobic digestion) but applying different energy conversion technologies. Average and marginal abatement costs were calculated based on Life Cycle Cost (LCC) and Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) methodologies. Eight new biogas systems producing electricity, heat, gas or automotive fuel were analyzed in order to identify the most cost-efficient way of reducing GHG emissions. A system using a combined heat and power station (which is connected to waste treatment and digestion operation facilities and located nearby potential residential, commercial or industrial heat users) was found to be the most cost-efficient biogas technology for reducing GHG emissions. Up to 198 per tonne of CO(2) equivalents can be saved by replacing the "business as usual" systems based on fossil resources with ones based on biogas. Limited gas injection (desulfurized and dried biogas, without compression and upgrading) into the gas grid can also be a viable option with an abatement cost saving of 72 per tonne of CO(2) equivalents, while a heating plant with a district heating grid or a system based on biogas results in higher abatement costs ( 267 and 270 per tonne CO(2) eq). Results from all systems are significantly influenced by whether average or marginal data are used as a reference. Beside that energy efficiency, the reference system that was replaced and the by-products as well as feedstock and investment costs were identified to be parameters with major impacts on abatement costs. The quantitative analysis was completed by a discussion of the role that abatement cost methodology can play in decision-making. PMID:23201601

Rehl, T; Mller, J

2013-01-15

213

[A survey on physiological strains of asbestos abatement work wearing protective clothing in summer].  

PubMed

Since the health hazard of asbestos fibers has been widely recognized, the number of asbestos abatement projects in schools has increased rapidly. Most of these projects were planned during summer vacation from school. However, in Japan, it is hot and humid in summer. Moreover, the workers have to wear impermeable protective clothing because of the asbestos exposure risk. The purpose of this survey is to study the workload of asbestos abatement work by measuring physiological reactions. Physiological strains of 12 male workers and working conditions during asbestos abatements work in two schools were measured in August in 1988 and in 1989. Body weight loss by the work of all workers was measured, and heart rate, rectal temperature and skin temperatures at five sites of some of them were measured every minute. In both workplaces, the workers wore disposable coveralls with hoods and shoes covers and protective masks. Air temperature in the workplaces was between 24.6 degrees C and 28.8 degrees C, and air humidity was between 85% and 96%. The high humidity was result of covering the floor, ceiling and wall of the workplaces were covered with vinyl seats, and sprinkling the asbestos fibers with water to lower the amount of asbestos in the air. Working hours of asbestos abatement were between 46 minutes and 95 minutes. Sweat rates were between 217 g/h and 605 g/h. These values were greater compared to the estimate values when work was done wearing commonly used light clothing. Heart rates during asbestos abatement work did not exceed 150 beats/min in one school where the temperature was 25 degrees C-27 degrees C.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8507292

Tochihara, Y; Ohnaka, T; Nagai, Y; Muramatsu, T

1993-01-01

214

Effects of dietary ABATE? on reproductive success, duckling survival, behavior, and clinical pathology in game-farm mallards  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Forty-four pairs of game-farm mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) were fed ABATE? E (temephos) to yield 0, 1, or 10 ppm ABATE? beginning before the initiation of lay, and terminating when ducklings were 21 days of age. The mean interval between eggs laid was greater for hens fed 10 ppm ABATE? than for controls. Clutch size, fertility, hatchability, nest attentiveness of incubating hens, and avoidance behavior of ducklings were not significantly affected by ABATE? ingestion. The percentage survival of ducklings to 21 days of age was significantly lower in both treated groups than in controls, but brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was not inhibited in young which died before termination of the study. In 21-day-old ducklings, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activity increased and plasma nonspecific cholinesterase (ChE) activity was inhibited by about 20% in both treatment groups, but there were no significant differences in brain AChE or plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activities, or plasma uric acid concentration. Clinical chemistry values of adults were not affected. No ABATE?, ABATE? sulfoxide, or ABATE? sulfone residues were found in eggs or tissue samples.

Franson, J.C.; Spann, J.W.; Heinz, G.H.; Bunck, C.M.; Lamont, T.

1983-01-01

215

Interactions between bacterial isolates from modified-atmosphere-packaged artisan-type cooked ham in view of the development of a bioprotective culture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Growth and metabolite production of three dominant bacterial isolates (Carnobacterium divergens 3M14, Leuconostoc carnosum 3M42, and Brochothrix thermosphacta RMS6) from modified-atmosphere-packaged (MAP), artisan-type cooked ham were assessed for their interactions in view of the development of a bioprotective culture. During monoculture experiments in cooked ham simulation medium, Leuc. carnosum 3M42 converted the available glucose into lactic acid and ethanol, whereas

Charalampos Vasilopoulos; Eveline De Mey; Lore Dewulf; Hubert Paelinck; Anny De Smedt; Frank Vandendriessche; Luc De Vuyst; Frdric Leroy

2010-01-01

216

Service-Learning Partnerships: Paths of Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article furthers research and theory on the initiation and development of service-learning partnerships. It identifies three paths of engagement between university and community agencies: tentative engagement, aligned engagement, and committed engagement. This conceptualization helps to understand how service-learning partnerships evolve over

Dorado, Silvia; Giles, Dwight E., Jr.

2004-01-01

217

Probabilistic meta-analysis of risk from the exposure to Hg in artisanal gold mining communities in Colombia.  

PubMed

Colombia is one of the largest per capita mercury polluters in the world as a consequence of its artisanal gold mining activities. The severity of this problem in terms of potential health effects was evaluated by means of a probabilistic risk assessment carried out in the twelve departments (or provinces) in Colombia with the largest gold production. The two exposure pathways included in the risk assessment were inhalation of elemental Hg vapors and ingestion of fish contaminated with methyl mercury. Exposure parameters for the adult population (especially rates of fish consumption) were obtained from nation-wide surveys and concentrations of Hg in air and of methyl-mercury in fish were gathered from previous scientific studies. Fish consumption varied between departments and ranged from 0 to 0.3 kg d(-1). Average concentrations of total mercury in fish (70 data) ranged from 0.026 to 3.3 ?g g(-1). A total of 550 individual measurements of Hg in workshop air (ranging from

artisanal gold mining communities in Colombia. PMID:24534152

De Miguel, Eduardo; Clavijo, Diana; Ortega, Marcelo F; Gmez, Amaia

2014-08-01

218

Environmental management of small-scale and artisanal mining: the Portovelo-Zaruma goldmining area, southern Ecuador.  

PubMed

This paper considers technical measures and policy initiatives needed to improve environmental management in the Portovelo-Zaruma mining district of southern Ecuador. In this area, gold is mined by a large number of small-scale and artisanal operators, and discharges of cyanide and metal-laden tailings have had a severe impact on the shared Ecuadorian-Peruvian Puyango river system. It is shown to be technically possible to confine mining waste and tailings at a reasonable cost. However, the complex topography of the mining district forces tailings management to be communal, where all operators are connected to one central tailings impoundment. This, in turn, implies two things: (i) that a large number of operators must agree to pool resources to bring such a facility into reality; and (ii) that miners must move away from rudimentary operations that survive on a day-to-day basis, towards bigger, mechanized and longer-term sustainable operations that are based on proven ore reserves. It is deemed unlikely that existing environmental regulations and the provision of technical solutions will be sufficient to resolve the environmental problems. Important impediments relate to the limited financial resources available to each individual miner and the problems of pooling these resources, and to the fact that the main impacts of pollution are suffered downstream of the mining district and, hence, do not affect the miners themselves. Three policy measures are therefore suggested. First, the enforcement of existing regulations must be improved, and this may be achieved by the strengthening of the central authority charged with supervision and control of mining activities. Second, local government involvement and local public participation in environmental management needs to be promoted. Third, a clear policy should be defined which promotes the reorganisation of small operations into larger units that are strong enough to sustain rational exploration and environmental obligations. The case study suggests that mining policy in lesser-developed countries should develop to enable small-scale and artisanal miners to form entities that are of a sufficiently large scale to allow adequate and cost-effective environmental protection. PMID:12197078

Tarras-Wahlberg, N H

2002-06-01

219

Engagement and Uncertainty: Emerging Technologies Challenge the Work of Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Universities' increasing applications of science and technology to address a wide array of societal problems may serve to thwart democratic engagement strategies. For emerging technologies, such challenges are particularly salient, as knowledge is incomplete and application and impact are uncertain or contested. Insights from science and

Eaton, Weston; Wright, Wynne; Whyte, Kyle; Gasteyer, Stephen P.; Gehrke, Pat J.

2014-01-01

220

Predispositional Engagement, Activity Engagement, and Cognition among Older Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigated interrelationships between the predisposition toward approaching experiences in a mindful and creative way, participation in specific activities, and cognition among older adults. Participants were administered a battery measuring cognition (i.e., working memory, processing speed, divergent thinking, inductive reasoning, visuo-spatial processing), activity level, and the predisposition towards mental engagement (Need for Cognition, Mindfulness, and Openness to Experience). Results indicated

Jeanine M. Parisi; Elizabeth A. L. Stine-Morrow; Soo Rim Noh; Daniel G. Morrow

2009-01-01

221

Scholarship-Focused Outreach and Engagement Public Scholarship, Civic Engagement,  

E-print Network

, and service. It involves generating, transmitting, applying, and preserving knowledge for the direct benefit and Learning � Service-learning � Study abroad programs � Distance education and off-campus instruction and workshops � Educational programs for alumni � Participatory curriculum development #12;Engaged Service

222

Player Character Engagement in Computer Games  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article argues how players can control a player character influence interpretation and facilitate engagement within a game. Engagement with player characters can be goal-related or empathic, where goal-related engagement depends on affects elicited by goal-status evaluations whereas characters facilitate empathic engagement. The concepts of recognition, alignment, and allegiance are used to describe how engagement is structured in games. Recognition

Petri Lankoski

2011-01-01

223

Air and Noise Pollution Abatement Services: An Examination of U.S. and Foreign Markets. Investigation No. 332-461.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

As requested by the United States Trade Representative (USTR), this report examines global markets for air and noise pollution abatement services and trade in these services markets for the purpose of providing information that would be useful in conducti...

2005-01-01

224

Directed Technical Change and the Adoption of CO2 Abatement Technology: The Case of CO2 Capture and Storage  

E-print Network

This paper studies the cost effectiveness of combining traditional environmental policy, such as CO2 trading schemes, and technology policy that has aims of reducing the cost and speeding the adoption of CO2 abatement ...

Otto, Vincent M.

225

The effect of noise-abatement profiles on noise immissions and human annoyance underneath a subsequent climbpath  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

En route noise emissions on the ground can be affected by the detailed characteristics of intended noise-abatement climb profiles and procedures to an extent of 10 or more nautical miles from the start of the takeoff roll of a large or heavy air-carrier-type aircraft. Suggestions submitted to the noise abatement officials of the airports at Frankfurt, Federal Republic of Germany, and Zurick, Switzerland, and the aircarriers Lufthansa German Airlines and SWISSAIR are explained and discussed.

Garbell, Maurice A.

1990-01-01

226

BTX abatement using Chilean natural zeolite: the role of Brnsted acid sites.  

PubMed

In wastewater treatment facilities, air quality is not only affected by conventional unpleasant odour compounds; toxic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are also found. In this study, the adsorptive capacity of Chilean natural zeolite toward VOC removal was evaluated. Moreover, the influence of zeolite chemical surface properties on VOC elimination was also investigated. Three modified zeolite samples were prepared from a natural Chilean zeolite (53% clinoptilolite, 40% mordenite and 7% quartz). Natural and modified zeolite samples were characterised by nitrogen adsorption at 77 K, elemental analyses and X-ray fluorescence (XRF). Chemical modifications of natural zeolite showed the important role of Brnsted acid sites on the abatement of VOCs. The presence of humidity has a negative effect on zeolite adsorption capacity. Natural zeolites could be an interesting option for benzene, toluene and xylene vapour emission abatement. PMID:22907462

Alejandro, S; Valds, H; Manero, M-H; Zaror, C A

2012-01-01

227

Efficiency, equity or disagreement? The economics of international carbon abatement negotiations  

SciTech Connect

The current international effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, as embodied in the Framework Convention on Climate Change, is often criticized as inefficient by economists because it uses uniform targets instead of more theoretically efficient instruments such as international taxes. However, the effectiveness of any international treaty in producing environmental benefits is not wholly dependent on its economic efficiency but also on its political stability and the ability to accurately monitor and enforce its conditions. Stability depends on the magnitude and distribution of costs and benefits between countries which have heterogeneous economies, environmental damages, trading partners and abatement costs. The distribution of costs between countries will also depend on the type of policy instrument used to coordinate international abatement efforts. This paper analyses trade-offs that must be made when negotiating international agreements in order to balance the need for administrative convenience and economic efficiency with the realization that any agreement is better than no agreement.

Mabey, N.; Smith, C. [London Business School (United Kingdom). Centre for Economic Forecasting

1995-06-01

228

Pollution by nitrogen oxides: an approach to NO(x) abatement by using sorbing catalytic materials.  

PubMed

This article summarises the abatement of NO(x) pollution by using sorbing catalytic materials with special relevance to the challenge presented in fixed installations sources. A general vision of the origins of the different pollutants, with emphasis on nitrogen oxides formation, is presented as introduction. The impact of NO(x) pollution comprises additionally a quick view of its toxicity and environmental effects. Actual solutions are presented especially the case of the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) process with its advantages and difficulties. The new concepts for NO(x) abatement are also analysed. In such a way, updated information on solid sorbents for NO(x) removal is provided by including metal oxides, spinelles, perovskites, double-layered cuprates, zeolites, carbonaceous materials, heteropolyacids (HPAs), and supported heteropolyacids. The possibility of reducing those sorbed NO(x) is also underlined. Sorption mechanisms are analysed and clarified by emphasising convergence and disagreement points. PMID:15734196

Gmez-Garca, M A; Pitchon, V; Kiennemann, A

2005-04-01

229

Characterization of artisanal honey produced on the Northwest of Portugal by melissopalynological and physico-chemical data.  

PubMed

Honey has always been regarded as a food which is advantageous for one's health and as a product which has healing qualities. For this reason, is necessary to protect consumers from the fraudulent mislabeling of inferior honeys. The purpose of this study was to investigate some properties of artisanal honey samples (n=45) collected from the Northwest of Portugal by using different honey analysis tests such as moisture, ash, pH, free acidity, electrical conductivity, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), apparent sucrose, reducing sugars and diastase activity. 77.8% of the total exceeded the quality parameters and should be labeled as "virgin" (humidity ?18% and HMF ?25 mg/kg). The present study found a linear correlation (y=0.551x-0.089; R=0.995) between the electrical conductivity of honeys and their ash content. All of the samples showed an Erica sp. pollen percentage ?15%, and 42% of the total were monofloral Erica sp. In respect to coliforms and Salmonella's presence, all the honey's samples shown to be negative. The existence of sulphite-reducing Clostridia was low, and well below the established limit by MERCOSUR. Yeasts, moulds and aerobic mesophiles were detected in low amounts. PMID:20870005

Fes, Xess; Pires, Jos; Iglesias, Antonio; Estevinho, Mara Letcia

2010-12-01

230

Probiotic screening and safety evaluation of Lactobacillus strains from plants, artisanal goat cheese, human stools, and breast milk.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to select autochthonous strains of Lactobacillus from stools of healthy infants and adults, human milk, artisanal goat cheese, and fruits and vegetables according to their probiotic properties and safety. From 421 strains of Lactobacillus isolated, 102 (24.2%) were shown to be tolerant to gastric pH and bile salts; they were used to determine their anti-Helicobacter pylori (agar diffusion assay), antioxidant (oxygen radical absorption capacity), and anti-inflammatory (inhibition of interleukin-8 release by tumor necrosis factor-?-stimulated HT-29 cells) activities as well as their ability to adhere to intestinal (Caco-2) and gastric (AGS) epithelial cells. Results obtained were compared with three commercial probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, L. plantarum 299v, and L. johnsonii NCC533. The five strains most efficient according to these activities were subsequently identified by sequencing their 16S rRNA gene, their susceptibility to antibiotics was determined, and their safety evaluated in mice. One strain of L. plantarum was discarded due to the higher prevalence of liver bacterial translocation observed in the animals fed this strain. In conclusion, four autochthonous strains of L. rhamnosus were finally selected with probiotic properties and safety allowing their eventual use in human studies. These results contribute to increase the diversity of probiotic strains available for the development of nutraceuticals and functional foods. PMID:24433075

Gotteland, Martin; Cires, Maria Jose; Carvallo, Claudia; Vega, Natalia; Ramirez, Maria Antonieta; Morales, Pamela; Rivas, Patricia; Astudillo, Fernanda; Navarrete, Paola; Dubos, Cline; Figueroa, Alvaro; Troncoso, Miriam; Ulloa, Carolina; Mizgier, Maria Luisa; Carrasco-Pozo, Catalina; Speisky, Hernan; Brunser, Oscar; Figueroa, Guillermo

2014-04-01

231

Technology-induced selection towards the spoilage microbiota of artisan-type cooked ham packed under modified atmosphere.  

PubMed

The microbiota associated with a highly-perishable Belgian artisan-type cooked ham was analyzed through plating and (GTG)(5)-fingerprinting of isolates throughout its processing chain. The raw tumbled meat was characterized by the presence of a versatile microbiota around 4.8 log(cfu g(-1)), consisting of lactic acid bacteria, staphylococci, Brochothrix thermosphacta, Gram-negative bacteria, and yeasts. Pasteurisation of the ham logs reduced bacterial counts below 2 log(cfu g(-1)) and subsequent manipulations selected for leuconostocs and carnobacteria. Also, B. thermosphacta and several Enterobacteriaceae were found at this stage. During storage in an intermediate high-care area for 2 days, a selection towards certain Enterobacteriaceae (Hafnia alvei, Enterobacter spp., and Pantoea agglomerans) and lactic acid bacteria (mainly vagococci and Streptococcus parauberis) was observed. B. thermosphacta, Leuconostoc carnosum and carnobacteria were also detected, but only after allowing bacterial outgrowth by incubating the meat logs at 7 degrees C for four weeks. After a mild post-pasteurisation process and subsequent handling, incubation of the meat logs at 7 degrees C for four weeks led to outgrowth of Enterobacteriaceae (mainly Enterobacter spp. and Serratia spp.). B. thermosphacta, and lactic acid bacteria (Enterococcus faecalis, Leuc. carnosum, and Carnobacterium maltaromaticum) were also found. After slicing and packaging under modified atmosphere, the microbiota of the refrigerated end-product consisted of leuconostocs, carnobacteria, and B. thermosphacta. PMID:19913696

Vasilopoulos, Charalampos; De Maere, Hannelore; De Mey, Eveline; Paelinck, Hubert; De Vuyst, Luc; Leroy, Frdric

2010-02-01

232

Lactic acid bacteria isolated from artisanal dry sausages: characterization of antibacterial compounds and study of the factors affecting bacteriocin production.  

PubMed

Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were isolated from artisanal dry sausages sampled from north-eastern region of Chaco, Argentina. Among 141 isolates, 27 showed antimicrobial activity against Listeria innocua, Staphyloccus aureus or Brochothrix spp. One isolate, identified as Lb. curvatus/sakei, produced bacteriocin like substances (BLIS). These BLIS were heat stable, effective after refrigerated storage and freeze/thaw cycles and even active against pathogens when produced under refrigeration at 3% NaCl concentration. The influence of several factors on production of BLIS was assessed in MRS broth added with: EDTA, ascorbic acid, KCl, potassium sorbate, sodium citrate, 3 and 6% NaCl, Tween 20 or Brij 35. These additives showed different effects towards the effectiveness of the bacteriocin produced by Lb. sakei/curvatus against L. innocua and S. aureus. Conditions that provided high cell density favored high bacteriocin production. BLIS production by this LAB strain was greatly influenced by NaCl concentration and the presence of surfactants. PMID:21131135

Castro, M P; Palavecino, N Z; Herman, C; Garro, O A; Campos, C A

2011-04-01

233

The construction of ergonomic demands: application on artisan fishing using jangada fishing rafts in the beach of Ponta Negra.  

PubMed

The present article seeks the process of construction of ergonomics demand referring to the artisan fishing activityfound in Ponta Negra beach located in the city of Natal, Brazil. The instruction/construction of demands correspond to the first stage of Work Ergonomic Analysis and allows the understanding of real issues existent in a work situation, rank them and route the providences. The demand presented on this study, features itself as a induced demand, process which some potential demands or hypothetical demands are taken to an organization, after a preview analysis of the work aimed by the study, resulting from a theoretical research (state of the art) and/or from analysis of a reference situation (state of practice), where demands hypothesis are taken in consideration about the pretended work. The demands construction process using interactional methods and techniques, observation methods and techniques and bibliographic research, researches in state of reference or document. This article demonstrates the efficiency of the methodological choice to construct real ergonomic demands and highlights the importance of social construction on that process, which main goal is to refer the ergonomic actions that allow the improvement of work and life conditions for the fishers and sustainability to Jangadeira activity. PMID:22316793

Saldanha, Maria Christine Werba; Carvalho, Ricardo Jos Matos de; Oliveira, Larissa Praa de; Celestino, Joyce Elanne Mateus; Veloso, Isis Tatiane de Barros Macdo; Jaeschke, Anelena

2012-01-01

234

Multimedia-based decision support system for hazards recognition and abatement  

DOEpatents

A system for monitoring a site includes a portable data collection module used in the field to collect site specific data, and a processor module located at a central location. The data collection module displays choices of categories of findings, and then specific findings within each category. A selected specific finding is then displayed in report form with a citation to the specific code or statutory requirement, as well as a recommended course of action and an abatement date.

Czachowski, John B. (Knoxville, TN); Zoldak, John T. (Alexandria, VA)

1998-01-01

235

Engineering analysis and economic impacts of air pollution abatement strategies for cotton gins  

E-print Network

of Tests on Cyclones and RDF Filter Media. . . . Emission Concentrations for BBACT Proposed Additional Control Strategies ACT 1 ACT 2 ACT 3 ACT 4 Emission Factors Air Pollution Abatement Equipment Costs Simulation of Ginning Volumes in Texas... Emission concentrations from axial fan exhausts for stripper gins using Baseline Best Available Control Technology . . . . . . . . Emission factors in kg/b (lb/b) from each process exhaust of picker gins using Additional Control Technologies (ACT...

Ramaiyer, Anantharaman

2012-06-07

236

ABATEMENT MEASURES TO REDUCE AMMONIA EMISSIONS FROM OPEN-LOT FEEDYARDS AND DAIRIES  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reduction of ammonia emissions from animal feeding operations is important from the perspective of environmental policy and its impact on agriculture. Control measures for the abatement of ammonia from open- lot beef cattle feedyards and dairies can be grouped into pre-excretion and post-excretion strategies. Pre-excretion strategies include developing nutritional strategies to improve the utilization of crude protein (CP). Decreasing CP

D. B. Parker; N. A. Cole; B. H. Baek; J. A. Koziel; M. B. Rhoades; Z. Perschbacher-Buser; L. W. Greene; J. M. Sweeten

237

Storage and analysis of samples of water, fish, and mud from environments contaminated with Abate  

Microsoft Academic Search

Methods for extraction, cleanup, and analysis of samples of water, mud, and fish containing trace quantities of Abate have been developed. Water was extracted by high-speed stirring of 10 ml of hexane in a 300-ml sample. The extracts were evaporated and analyzed by gas chromatography with a limit of detection of 0.00003 ppm. Dried mud samples were extracted by shaking

James W. Miles; William E. Dale; Frederick C. Churchill

1977-01-01

238

Improvements in dioxin abatement strategies at a municipal waste management plant in Barcelona  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study presents the results of a dioxin abatement programme undertaken in the municipal waste incineration plant of Montcada i Reixac (Barcelona, Spain) after the replacement of an obsolete air cleaning device by a new flue gas treatment system. A number of sampling campaigns were conducted with the aim of characterising stack gas emission levels of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs)\\/polychlorinated dibenzofurans

Esteban Abad; Josep Caixach; Josep Rivera

2003-01-01

239

Socio-economic impact analysis: Centralia mine fire abatement alternatives. Draft report  

SciTech Connect

The overall purpose of information contained in the following text is to document the likely social and economic impacts upon the Borough of Centralia through implementation of various mine fire abatement alternatives. Much of the data presented herein and utilized in preparing conclusions and recommendations have been derived from those individuals whose lives are now, or may eventually be, impacted by the underground mine fire.

Not Available

1980-11-07

240

Valuation of marginal CO 2 abatement options for electric power plants in Korea  

Microsoft Academic Search

The electricity generation sector in Korea is under pressure to mitigate greenhouse gases as directed by the Kyoto Protocol. The principal compliance options for power companies under the cap-and-trade include the application of direct CO2 emission abatement and the procurement of emission allowances. The objective of this paper is to provide an analytical framework for assessing the cost-effectiveness of these

Jaekyu Lim

2009-01-01

241

Nutrient emission reduction scenarios in the North Sea: An abatement cost and ecosystem integrity analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Economic costbenefit appraisal (and its sub-set cost-effectiveness) of ecosystem conservation and\\/or pollution abatement strategies have proved to be powerful decision-making aids. But the monetary economic valuation of ecosystem goods and services (gains and losses) can only provide a good indication of social welfare impacts under certain conditions and in selective contexts. The values derived through this appraisal process will, for

Corinna Nunneri; Wilhelm Windhorst; R. Kerry Turner; Hermann Lenhart

2007-01-01

242

Abatement of concentration polarization in ultrafiltration using n-hexadecane\\/water two-phase flow  

Microsoft Academic Search

A novel method using n-hexadecane\\/water two-phase flow to abate concentration polarization in ultrafiltration was proposed. Compared with a corresponding air-sparged ultrafiltration, the n-hexadecane\\/water ultrafiltration was shown to have a higher permeate flux when concentrating a crude lipase solution. This was attributable to the much higher shear force induced by n-hexadecane droplets, and the reduction in concentration polarization was thus more

Hui-Min Wang; Chen-You Li; Shu-Jen Chen; Tung-Wen Cheng; Teh-Liang Chen

2004-01-01

243

Understanding Visitor Engagement and Behaviors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors examine a model of visitor engagement that has been in development over the past 3years at the Smithsonian Institution. A total of 390 visitors comprised the sample with a subsample ("n" = 102) of visitors who were tracked through an exhibit in the National Museum of Natural History. A 5-factor visitor preference model was

Schreiber, James B.; Pekarik, Andrew J.; Hanemann, Nadine; Doering, Zahava; Lee, Ah-Jin

2013-01-01

244

Engaging Immigrant Students. Classroom Tips  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For an educator who speaks only English, engaging immigrant English language learners (ELL) in the classroom can be a significant challenge. As a former classroom teacher, elementary school principal and guidance counselor, the authors have worked with immigrant student populations in K-12 schools. They have found that a good way to overcome the

Patterson, Lynn; Bloomdahl, Susana Contreras

2011-01-01

245

Community Engagement: Lost in Translation  

E-print Network

Community Engagement: Lost in Translation #12;Translational Role · Life scientist, biotechnology · Research information, health informatics and translational science · Play several roles to support our Translational Science efforts #12;How I Became Involved · Research partner for community grant proposal

Napp, Nils

246

Results Report Employee Engagement Survey  

E-print Network

Results Report Employee Engagement Survey October 2011 Report for: Colorado School of Mines (033 and Financing, Higher Education, Human Services, Labor and Employment, Local Affairs, Military and Veterans Technology, Office of Economic Development and International Trade, Office of State Planning and Budgeting

247

Engaging staff with intentional rounding.  

PubMed

This article describes the introduction of intentional rounding on a busy medical assessment unit and how staff engagement and understanding of the process is essential to its successful rollout. Staff's reaction to the implementation is highlighted and the benefits to care delivery discussed. PMID:22359853

Dix, Greg; Phillips, Jackee; Braide, Mark

248

Children's Center Student Engagement Report  

E-print Network

Children's Center Student Engagement Report FY 2012-2013 Mission Statement The Children's Center supports the University community by providing high quality care and education for young children to higher education and university employees will have an on-campus facility for their children

de Lijser, Peter

249

Children's Center Student Engagement Report  

E-print Network

Children's Center Student Engagement Report FY 2010-2011 Mission Statement The Children's Center supports the University community by providing high quality care and education for young children to higher education and university employees will have an on-campus facility for their children

de Lijser, Peter

250

Children's Center Student Engagement Report  

E-print Network

Children's Center Student Engagement Report FY 2011-2012 Mission Statement The Children's Center supports the University community by providing high quality care and education for young children to higher education and university employees will have an on-campus facility for their children

de Lijser, Peter

251

Student Engagement and Marketing Classes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study is reported that investigates the goals underlying undergraduate students' engagement in their major classes, nonmajor classes, and in extracurricular activities. The qualitative study employs both focus groups and goal-mapping exercises. The results suggest that students tend to focus on utilitarian, attribute-level considerations mainly

Taylor, Steven A.; Hunter, Gary L.; Melton, Horace; Goodwin, Stephen A.

2011-01-01

252

Refreshing Engagement: NSSE at 13  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Thirteen years ago, 276 bachelor's-granting colleges and universities inaugurated a new approach to assessing college quality by participating in the first national administration of the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE). This report summarizes what was learned over the NSSE's first 13 years, why the survey is being updated, and new

McCormick, Alexander C.; Gonyea, Robert M.; Kinzie, Jillian

2013-01-01

253

Supporting engagement in asynchronous education  

Microsoft Academic Search

A key challenge for software that supports asynchronous distance education is to engage and guide students who are not interacting in real-time. We describe a first study of two approaches to adding interactive exercises to the viewing of videotaped lectures. We found individual differences, but a surprising tendency to prefer more intrusive exercises. We conclude with possible next steps.

Scott LeeTiernan; Jonathan Grudin

2003-01-01

254

Public engagement Guidelines for working  

E-print Network

: · The purpose of working with schools, in terms of overall objectives and specific activities (e.g. to inspire a strategic approach? · Recognition of researchers' participation in engagement activities. · Training: · tocommunicatewithandengagethepublicindiscussionrelatingtoscience and technology relevant to Diamond · toencourageuptakeofcareersandhighlighttherelevanceofscience

Rambaut, Andrew

255

Participatory Multimedia Learning: Engaging Learners  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this paper is to present a participatory multimedia learning model for use in designing multimedia learning environments that support an active learning process, creative participation, and learner engagement. Participatory multimedia learning can be defined as learning with systems that enable learners to produce part of the

Kiili, Kristian

2005-01-01

256

Center for Community Engagement, Learning,  

E-print Network

CCELL Center for Community Engagement, Learning, and Leadership Service-Learning Community Partner Shoemaker. Thank you to Michele James-Deramo, Director of the Virginia Tech Service-Learning Center of Service-Learning and Volunteer Programs at Colorado State University for permission to adapt portions

Harms, Kyle E.

257

Reordering Histology to Enhance Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In redesigning the preclinical curriculum and shifting from a discipline-based approach to an organ system-based approach, faculty at the University of Arizona College of Medicine in Tucson took the opportunity to restructure the sequence of introductory histology content to make it more engaging and relevant. In this article, the author describes

Amerongen, Helen

2011-01-01

258

Lively Discussions! Fostering Engaged Reading.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Offering practical, classroom-based strategies teachers can use to promote literacy development, this book presents many examples of children engaging in discussion activities about narrative and informational text that emphasize collaborating, constructing meaning, and using these different types of texts to arrive at new understandings. Chapters

Gambrell, Linda B., Ed.; Almasi, Janice F., Ed.

259

Student Engagement in Elementary Surveying  

Microsoft Academic Search

Western Kentucky University (WKU) is a leading proponent of community engagement of all students. The faculty is encouraged to seek opportunities to involve students in projects of community interest. A project that involves students and provides a significant learning experience is the ultimate aim of this paradigm. For example, senior hydrology students at WKU developed a set of improved flood

Shane M. Palmquist; C. Warren Campbell

260

for public engagement with research  

E-print Network

that will enable public aspirations and concerns to contribute to Councils' policies and research strategies. RCUK processes will also be a priority. We will: Bring public attitudes and values into decision-making processesour vision for public engagement with research Research Councils UK #12;Research Councils UK

Berzins, M.

261

Media Engagement and Advertising Effectiveness  

Microsoft Academic Search

In an era of extreme advertising clutter and consumer avoidance, perhaps no other recent concept has captured more interest from marketers than engagement .T his interest is symptomatic of changes in the field. Traditionally, marketers have thought about advertising as a process of translating a brand, expressed as a benefit, a promise to the con- sumer, a value proposition, or

BOBBY J. C ALDER; EDWARD C. MALTHOUSE

262

Discover Engage Measuring Rail Transit's  

E-print Network

Discover · Engage · Transform Measuring Rail Transit's Sustainability Goals: A Before-A:er, Experimental-Control EvaluaBon of Los Angeles' Expo Light Rail Line Angeles' rail transforma@on · Six new lines opening between 2012 and 2020 · Expo

California at Davis, University of

263

Networked User Engagement Janette Lehmann  

E-print Network

of interaction with a site. Widely-used metrics include click-through rates, time spent on a site, page views.1145/2512875.2512877 ...$15.00. social media, news and mail services. Their aim is not only to engage users with each site by spending time on these sites and returning regularly to them. The standard ap- proach to evaluate

Lalmas, Mounia

264

Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for Mitchell Branch  

SciTech Connect

A proposed Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) for the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP; currently the Oak Ridge K-25 Site) was prepared in December 1986, as required by the modified National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit that was issued on September 11, 1986. The effluent discharges to Mitchell Branch are complex, consisting of trace elements, organic chemicals, and radionuclides in addition to various conventional pollutants. Moreover, the composition of these effluent streams will be changing over time as various pollution abatement measures are implemented over the next several years. Although contaminant inputs to the stream originate primarily as point sources from existing plant operations, area sources, such as the classified burial grounds and the K-1407-C holding pond, can not be eliminated as potential sources of contaminants. The proposed BMAP consists of four tasks. These tasks include (1) ambient toxicity testing, (2) bioaccumulation studies, (3) biological indicator studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the benthic invertebrate and fish communities. BMAP will determine whether the effluent limits established for ORGDP protect the designated use of the receiving stream (Mitchell Branch) for growth and propagation of fish and aquatic life. Another objective of the program is to document the ecological effects resulting from various pollution abatement projects, such as the Central Neutralization Facility.

Loar, J.M.; Adams, S.M.; Kszos, L.A.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.

1992-01-01

265

Microwave plasma torch abatement of NF{sub 3} and SF{sub 6}  

SciTech Connect

An atmospheric pressure microwave plasma torch as a tool for fluorinated compounds (FCs) abatement was presented. Detailed experiments were conducted on the abatement of NF{sub 3} and SF{sub 6} in terms of destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR). Swirl gas, compressed air for stable plasma, was tangentially injected into the microwave plasma torch and a mixture of N{sub 2}, NF{sub 3}, or SF{sub 6}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} was axially injected. The DRE of 99.1% for NF{sub 3} was achieved without an additive gas at the total flow rate of 50.1 liters per minute (lpm) by applying a microwave power of 1.4 kW. Also, a DRE of SF{sub 6} up to 90.1% was obtained at the total flow rate of 40.6 lpm using an applied microwave power of 1.4 kW. Experimental results indicate that the microwave plasma abatement device can successfully eliminate FCs in the semiconductor industry.

Hong, Yong Cheol; Uhm, Han Sup; Chun, Byung Jun; Lee, Sun Ku; Hwang, Sang Kyu; Kim, Dong Su [Department of Molecular Science and Technology, Ajou University, San 5, Wonchon-Dong, Youngtong-Gu, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of); LWSmartech Co., Ltd., Kyonggido Small Business Center, Suwon 443-766 (Korea, Republic of); M.A.T. Co., Ltd., 50-2 Mangjung-Ri, Gongdo-Eup, Ansung 456-823 (Korea, Republic of)

2006-03-15

266

Modeling Dynamics of Culex pipiens Complex Populations and Assessing Abatement Strategies for West Nile Virus  

PubMed Central

The primary mosquito species associated with underground stormwater systems in the United States are the Culex pipiens complex species. This group represents important vectors of West Nile virus (WNV) throughout regions of the continental U.S. In this study, we designed a mathematical model and compared it with surveillance data for the Cx. pipiens complex collected in Beaufort County, South Carolina. Based on the best fit of the model to the data, we estimated parameters associated with the effectiveness of public health insecticide (adulticide) treatments (primarily pyrethrin products) as well as the birth, maturation, and death rates of immature and adult Cx. pipiens complex mosquitoes. We used these estimates for modeling the spread of WNV to obtain more reliable disease outbreak predictions and performed numerical simulations to test various mosquito abatement strategies. We demonstrated that insecticide treatments produced significant reductions in the Cx. pipiens complex populations. However, abatement efforts were effective for approximately one day and the vector mosquitoes rebounded until the next treatment. These results suggest that frequent insecticide applications are necessary to control these mosquitoes. We derived the basic reproductive number (?0) to predict the conditions under which disease outbreaks are likely to occur and to evaluate mosquito abatement strategies. We concluded that enhancing the mosquito death rate results in lower values of ?0, and if ?0<1, then an epidemic will not occur. Our modeling results provide insights about control strategies of the vector populations and, consequently, a potential decrease in the risk of a WNV outbreak. PMID:25268229

Pawelek, Kasia A.; Hager, Elizabeth J.; Hunt, Gregg J.

2014-01-01

267

Health and housing collaboration at LAST: the Philadelphia Lead Abatement Strike Team.  

PubMed Central

The Lead Abatement Strike Team (LAST) was developed in 2002 by the Philadelphia Department of Public Health (PDPH) in response to community concern about management of children with elevated blood lead levels (EBLLs). Fourteen hundred backlog properties (housing at least one child with EBLLs) were identified through inspection as having housing-based lead hazards for which no satisfactory environmental remediation (control of lead hazards) had been achieved. In the first two years of LAST, 834 new housing cases also were identified. The heightened awareness of this problem, sparked in part by community advocacy efforts, led to the appropriation of 1.5 million dollars for environmental remediation. A collaborative group of health, housing, and other officials was convened. Enforcement for remediation of properties with lead hazards was strengthened with the development of the Lead Court, a special judicial court devoted exclusively to hearing cases where owners had violated local lead poisoning prevention laws. Identifying a group of Pennsylvania-certified lead abatement contractors, expanding the health department's abatement team, creating temporary relocation capacity, and providing funding for basic housing system repair work were crucial to obtaining rapid remediation of homes. In the first two years of the LAST program, 1,037 properties (both backlog and new properties) that housed 1,476 children were remediated, representing a significant increase in remediation capacity. PMID:16134560

Campbell, Carla; Himmelsbach, Robert; Palermo, Peter; Tobin, Richard

2005-01-01

268

Investigation of Microbial Respirometry for Monitoring Natural Sulfide Abatement in Geothermal Cooling Tower Basins  

SciTech Connect

Geothermal plant operators are interested in investigating the ability of micro-organisms found in the cooling tower basin to metabolize and cycle sulfide to less toxic sulfur compounds. If the growth or activity of the organisms participating in sulfur-oxidation could be selectively enhanced, then hydrogen sulfide could be naturally abated in the cooling basin, substantially reducing the costs associated with the chemicals used for abatement. The use of respirometry has been proposed as a technique for monitoring the response of the microbial populations found in geothermal cooling towers to various conditions, including the addition of nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus. Respiro-metry is a manometric measurement of dissolved gases that are in equilibrium in a con-fined sample volume. Since microbes expire varying amounts of carbon dioxide or oxygen as they metabolize nutrients, this technique can be used to evaluate their activities in process streams. This report describes a series of experiments designed to determine the suitability of respirometry for tracking microbial activity for evaluating and enhancing natural abatement processes in geothermal cooling basins.

Peter A. Pryfogle

2005-09-01

269

Public Engagement on Climate Change  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Climate change communication is complicated by complexity of the scientific problem, multiple perspectives on the magnitude of the risk from climate change, often acrimonious disputes between scientists, high stakes policy options, and overall politicization of the issue. Efforts to increase science literacy as a route towards persuasion around the need for a policy like cap and trade have failed, because the difficulty that a scientist has in attempting to make sense of the social and political complexity is very similar to the complexity facing the general public as they try to make sense of climate science itself. In this talk I argue for a shift from scientists and their institutions as information disseminators to that of public engagement and enablers of public participation. The goal of engagement is not just to inform, but to enable, motivate and educate the public regarding the technical, political, and social dimensions of climate change. Engagement is a two-way process where experts and decision-makers seek input and learn from the public about preferences, needs, insights, and ideas relative to climate change impacts, vulnerabilities, solutions and policy options. Effective public engagement requires that scientists detach themselves from trying to control what the public does with the acquired knowledge and motivation. The goal should not be to "sell" the public on particular climate change solutions, since such advocacy threatens public trust in scientists and their institutions. Conduits for public engagement include the civic engagement approach in the context of community meetings, and perhaps more significantly, the blogosphere. Since 2006, I have been an active participant in the climate blogosphere, focused on engaging with people that are skeptical of AGW. A year ago, I started my own blog Climate Etc. at judithcurry.com. The demographic that I have focused my communication/engagement activities are the technically educated and scientifically literate public, many of whom have become increasingly skeptical of climate science the more they investigate the topic. Specific issues that this group has with climate science include concerns that science that cannot easily be separated from risk assessment and value judgments; concern that assessments (e.g. IPCC) have become a Maxwell's daemon for climate research; inadequate assessment of our ignorance of this complex scientific issue; elite scientists and scientific institutions losing credibility with the public; political exploitation of the public's lack of understanding; and concerns about the lack of public accountability of climate science and climate models that are being used as the basis for far reaching decisions and policies. Individuals in this group have the technical ability to understand and examine climate science arguments and are not prepared to cede judgment on this issue to the designated and self-proclaimed experts. This talk will describe my experiences in engaging with this group and what has been learned, both by myself and by participants in the discussion at Climate Etc.

Curry, J.

2011-12-01

270

A Regionally-Specific Assessment of the Carbon Abatement Potential of Biochar  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Biochar, the solid carbon-rich co-product of certain bioenergy conversion technologies, is receiving a great deal of attention as a strategy for sequestering carbon in soils and improving the performance of agricultural systems. Several studies have attempted to quantify the lifecycle carbon abatement potential of biochar systems, considering emissions associated with feedstock provisioning and processing, energy co-production, agronomic system impacts (yield increases and nitrous oxide emission suppression), and the recalcitrance of biochar in soil, as well as accounting for the carbon abatement value of using the char as a fuel that is foregone when it is used as a soil amendment instead. These assessments typically focus on biochar production in advanced, efficient slow pyrolysis systems, despite the fact that much biochar is currently produced through small-scale carbonization or gasification systems that lack energy recovery or even emission control capability. Here, a mechanistic biochar system assessment model is presented, capable of estimating system carbon abatement value and profitability for different feedstocks, conversion technologies and temperatures, and application into different agricultural soils. The variation of biochar recalcitrance in soil as a function of production temperature is considered, and agricultural impacts are assessed in the context of biochar's liming value, an effect that is straightforward to quantify and that has often been implicated in observed crop yield increases or nitrous oxide emission reductions. The analysis is rigorous in that tradeoffs between biochar production quantity and quality are endogenized, but conservative in that other potential agronomic benefits of biochar (e.g. improved soil water holding capacity) are not considered. This model is applied to a case study of bioenergy and biochar co-production in northern Colorado using beetle-killed pine wood and slash as a feedstock. Preliminary results suggest that a) high system carbon abatement potentials are possible in the case study scenario, but only in systems that control air pollutant emissions and recover energy; b) biochar has more value as a soil amendment than a fuel when produced at high temperatures and applied to soils of low pH and low buffering capacity; and c) the carbon abatement value of agronomic impacts in temperate systems is relatively minor compared to other parts of the lifecycle. Additional results will be presented for which an optimal system design is identified and the analysis scaled-up to reflect the total beetle-kill feedstock availability in the state of Colorado in order to estimate the total regional carbon-mitigation potential of the technology.

Birch, G.; Field, J.; Keske, C.; DeFoort, M.; Cotrufo, M.

2012-12-01

271

Engaging with Massive Online Courses  

E-print Network

The Web has enabled one of the most visible recent developments in education---the deployment of massive open online courses. With their global reach and often staggering enrollments, MOOCs have the potential to become a major new mechanism for learning. Despite this early promise, however, MOOCs are still relatively unexplored and poorly understood. In a MOOC, each student's complete interaction with the course materials takes place on the Web, thus providing a record of learner activity of unprecedented scale and resolution. In this work, we use such trace data to develop a conceptual framework for understanding how users currently engage with MOOCs. We develop a taxonomy of individual behavior, examine the different behavioral patterns of high- and low-achieving students, and investigate how forum participation relates to other parts of the course. We also report on a large-scale deployment of badges as incentives for engagement in a MOOC, including randomized experiments in which the presentation of badge...

Anderson, Ashton; Kleinberg, Jon; Leskovec, Jure

2014-01-01

272

Service Learning and Civic Engagement  

Microsoft Academic Search

Outside work can complement what goes on in the classroom in ways that benefit both the community and students. Of course,\\u000a AQ readers may have heard of tendentious programs and faculty ideologues, who channel student enthusiasm into partisan activism.\\u000a Still, statistical survey analysis presented here by Mary Prentice suggests that participation in service learning can increase\\u000a students civic engagement, when

Mary Prentice

2007-01-01

273

Short communication: Sensory profile of raw goat milk cheeses made with artisan kid rennet pastes from commercial-weight animals: Alternative to farmhouse goat cheeses.  

PubMed

The loss of traditional kid rennet pastes in the Canary Islands (Spain), as in many other regions, is most likely due to the custom of using abomasa from very young animals killed below desirable commercial weight. In addition, the reasonable price of commercial rennets (CR) has resulted in the loss of typical sensory characteristics for most farmhouse raw goat milk cheeses, placing them at a disadvantage when local and international markets are full of different cheeses, often with aggressive marketing strategies. This paper analyzes the sensory characteristics of raw goat milk cheeses made with rennet pastes prepared from commercial kid abomasa in 2 ways: dried while full of ingested milk [full, commercial, artisan kid rennet (FCKR)], or dried after being emptied of ingested milk and refilled with raw goat milk [empty, commercial, artisan kid rennet (ECKR)]. This latter practice allows the use of empty abomasa, or abomasa with grass, soil, and so on. Sensory profiles of cheeses made with FCKR and ECKR rennets were compared with those made with CR by an expert panel (n=7). The FCKR and ECKR cheeses had similar sensory profiles. Although scores for FCKR cheeses were somewhat higher than for ECKR cheeses, they were in the range found for traditional cheeses made with rennet prepared with abomasa from very young animals. The sensory profile of CR cheeses was very different. Almost 90% of consumer panelists (n=90) preferred cheeses made with the experimental rennet pastes. These results demonstrate the possibility to prepare artisan rennet pastes from commercial-weight kids in an easy way for farmhouse cheese makers using local resources that would otherwise be destroyed in abattoirs. PMID:25064646

Fresno, M; Alvarez, S; Daz, E; Virto, M; de Renobales, M

2014-10-01

274

Urban Parks: Volunteers and Civic Engagement  

E-print Network

When citizens are engaged with urban park and recreation departments, everyone benefits. This publication describes successful programs that involve community volunteers, and explains what managers can do to engage citizens in such programs....

Schuett, Michael A.

2007-03-02

275

Identifying Cognitive Engagement in the Mathematics Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reports an analysis of videotape and interview data from four Year 8 mathematics lessons from the perspective of student cognitive engagement. Reports that cognitive engagement can be consistently recognized by specific linguistic and behavioral indicators. (Author/MM)

Helme, Sue; Clarke, David

2001-01-01

276

Reproduction, food dynamics and exploitation level of Oreochromis niloticus (Perciformes: Cichlidae) from artisanal fisheries in Barra Bonita Reservoir, Brazil.  

PubMed

Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), which is exotic to South America, is the most common species caught in artisanal fisheries at the Barra Bonita Reservoir, Southeastern Brazil. This species is of great socioeconomic importance for the region and keeps active a population of about 500 fishers. In the present study we assess reproduction, food dynamics and level of exploitation of O. niloticus, caught by artisanal fisheries in the Barra Bonita Reservoir. Specimens were collected monthly, from July 2004-June 2005, and a total of 1 715 specimens were analyzed. Each specimen was examined to obtain biological and biometric data: standard length (cm), total weight (g), reproductive data (sex and stage of maturation), and stomach contents (empty, partly full, and full). We also estimated the sex ratio (by macroscopic observation of gonads), reproductive period (by ovarian development and seasonal average of gonadosomatic index in females), and feeding habits (by stomach contents). The possible relationship between abiotic factors and the reproductive period was statistically verified using Spearman's Rank Correlation. The FiSAT (ELEFAN I) package was used to assess growth parameters, mortality rates and to infer exploitation rate from standard length frequencies. The O. niloticus population had a sex ratio of 1.3:1 (M:F). Results indicated that ripe females were captured throughout the year, with a higher frequency during the winter-2004 (with a frequency of 59%, at a mean temperature of 20.5 degreeC), and in spring-2004 (with a frequency of 60.5% at a mean temperature of 21.18 degreeC). The GSI mean values obtained by season were: winter-2004: 1.71; spring-2004: 1.72; summer-2005: 0.80, and autumn-2005: 1.19. The Spearman correlation indicated positive values with respect to pH, dissolved oxygen, electric conductivity, transparency and chlorophyll a, and negative values with respect to temperature, accumulated rainfall and altimetric benchmark. The main food items were phytoplankton and periphytic algae, observed in 99.6% of the analyzed stomachs. The estimated growth and mortality parameters were: Linfinity=33.60cm, k=0.63/year, longevity= 4.76years, Z=2.81/ year, M=1.20/year and F=1.61/year. The weight-length relationship was Ln Wt=-2.8532+2.8835 Ln Lp. The estimated yield per recruit values were as follows: E=0.570, Emax=0.776, E0.1=0.604 and E0.5=0.349. These results indicate that a well established population of O. niloticus is present at Barra Bonita Reservoir; with an active reproduction throughout the year, more intense during winter and spring, and that O. niloticus is a phyto-planktophagus species. There were no indications that this species is being overfished, we therefore recommend that, due to its exotic condition, no restrictions need to be taken on its fishing activities. PMID:23894941

Novaes, Jos Lus Costa; Carvalho, Edmir Daniel

2012-06-01

277

Artisanal Green Turtle, Chelonia mydas, Fishery of Caribbean Nicaragua: I. Catch Rates and Trends, 1991-2011  

PubMed Central

This is the first assessment of catch rates for the legal, artisanal green turtle, Chelonia mydas, fishery in Caribbean Nicaragua. Data were collected by community members, monitoring up to 14 landing sites from 1991 to 2011. We examined take levels, and temporal and spatial variability in catch rates for the overall fishery, by region, and community using General Additive Mixed Models (GAMMs). More than 171,556 green turtles were killed during the period, with a mean estimated minimum 8,1692,182 annually. There was a statistically significant decline in catch rates overall. Catch rates peaked in 1997 and 2002, followed by a downward trend, particularly from mid-2008 to the end of the study period. Similar downward trends were evident in both study regions. Community specific catch rate trends also indicated declines with decreases ranging from 21% to 90%. Decrease in catch rates in Nicaragua is cause for concern even though the principal source rookery at Tortuguero, Costa Rica, shows an increase in nesting activity. Explanations for the apparent discrepancy between the increasing trend at Tortuguero and decreasing catch rate trends in Nicaragua include: i) an increase in reproductive output, ii) insufficient time has passed to observe the impact of the fishery on the rookery due to a time lag, iii) changes in other segments of the population have not been detected since only nesting activity is monitored, iv) the expansive northern Nicaragua foraging ground may provide a refuge for a sufficient portion of the Tortuguero rookery, and/or v) a larger than expected contribution of non-Tortuguero rookeries occurring in Nicaragua turtle fishing areas. Our results highlight the need for close monitoring of rookeries and in-water aggregations in the Caribbean. Where consumptive use still occurs, nations sharing this resource should implement scientifically based limits on exploitation to ensure sustainability and mitigate impacts to regional population diversity. PMID:24740258

Lagueux, Cynthia J.; Campbell, Cathi L.; Strindberg, Samantha

2014-01-01

278

Community dynamics of coagulase-negative staphylococci during spontaneous artisan-type meat fermentations differ between smoking and moulding treatments.  

PubMed

Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) that are naturally present in the raw meat batter of fermented sausages or that originate from the addition of a starter culture play a role in flavour development. A wide species diversity of CNS can be present in fermented meats, but it is not fully clear yet how specific process parameters select for specific CNS by affecting their community dynamics. Therefore, the influence of smoking and moulding treatments on the CNS community dynamics in spontaneously fermented, artisan-type sausages was investigated. During the fermentation stage, the meat batter was in all cases dominated by Staphylococcus saprophyticus, in addition to Lactobacillus sakei as governing lactic acid bacterium. Following fermentation, the bacterial communities were not perturbed by the smoking treatment, since both L. sakei and S. saprophyticus remained dominant throughout the ripening stage and prevailed in the end-products. Yet, when fermentation was followed by a moulding step with Penicillium nalgiovense, a shift of the CNS communities towards dominance by Staphyloccocus equorum was seen, despite a similar evolution of L. sakei. This effect was possibly due to a pH rise caused by the mould, a hypothesis which was reinforced by the finding that the isolated strain S. equorum DBX-S-17 was more sensitive to low pH than the isolated strain S. saprophyticus DFL-S-12 during growth experiments in brain heart infusion (BHI). Differences in CNS communities may affect sausage flavour, due to intraspecies variations in metabolic conversions of, for instance, amino acids. The fact that 3-methyl-butanal was only found in the moulded sausage, which was dominated by S. equorum, may be related to the finding that the isolated strain of this species was able to produce this compound in BHI medium, whereas the isolated strain of S. saprophyticus was not. PMID:23880244

Janssens, M; Myter, N; De Vuyst, L; Leroy, F

2013-08-16

279

Artisanal Green Turtle, Chelonia mydas, fishery of Caribbean Nicaragua: I. Catch rates and trends, 1991-2011.  

PubMed

This is the first assessment of catch rates for the legal, artisanal green turtle, Chelonia mydas, fishery in Caribbean Nicaragua. Data were collected by community members, monitoring up to 14 landing sites from 1991 to 2011. We examined take levels, and temporal and spatial variability in catch rates for the overall fishery, by region, and community using General Additive Mixed Models (GAMMs). More than 171,556 green turtles were killed during the period, with a mean estimated minimum 8,1692,182 annually. There was a statistically significant decline in catch rates overall. Catch rates peaked in 1997 and 2002, followed by a downward trend, particularly from mid-2008 to the end of the study period. Similar downward trends were evident in both study regions. Community specific catch rate trends also indicated declines with decreases ranging from 21% to 90%. Decrease in catch rates in Nicaragua is cause for concern even though the principal source rookery at Tortuguero, Costa Rica, shows an increase in nesting activity. Explanations for the apparent discrepancy between the increasing trend at Tortuguero and decreasing catch rate trends in Nicaragua include: i) an increase in reproductive output, ii) insufficient time has passed to observe the impact of the fishery on the rookery due to a time lag, iii) changes in other segments of the population have not been detected since only nesting activity is monitored, iv) the expansive northern Nicaragua foraging ground may provide a refuge for a sufficient portion of the Tortuguero rookery, and/or v) a larger than expected contribution of non-Tortuguero rookeries occurring in Nicaragua turtle fishing areas. Our results highlight the need for close monitoring of rookeries and in-water aggregations in the Caribbean. Where consumptive use still occurs, nations sharing this resource should implement scientifically based limits on exploitation to ensure sustainability and mitigate impacts to regional population diversity. PMID:24740258

Lagueux, Cynthia J; Campbell, Cathi L; Strindberg, Samantha

2014-01-01

280

Assessment of environmental mercury discharge at a four-year-old artisanal gold mining area on Lombok Island, Indonesia.  

PubMed

Indonesian artisanal and small-scale gold mining activities (ASGM) have been described for the islands of Borneo (Kalimantan) and Sulawesi. But the increased gold price over recent years has seen operations extend to the islands of Lombok and Sumbawa. For the current research, an environmental assessment was conducted across three new ASGM locations. Gold is recovered by miners through a two-stage process of whole-ore amalgamation and cyanidation. Waste (tailings) is discharged to land or sea with no concern for contaminants in the tailings. The gold grade of ore is up to 5000 mg kg(-1). The mean gold grade of the amalgamation tailings is 7 mg kg(-1), dropping to 1.2 mg kg(-1) for the cyanidation tailings. The mean mercury concentration of the amalgamation tailings is about 3000 mg kg(-1) and greater than 1600 mg kg(-1) for the cyanidation tailings. Samples of paddy rice grain collected adjacent to cyanidation tailings ponds showed methyl mercury concentrations greater than 100 ng g(-1). This is five times above the Chinese permissible level for total mercury in food crops. The mean total mercury concentration in hair of Lombok ASGM workers was greater than that in a non-exposed population; however there was no difference in methyl mercury concentration. This indicates the primary pathway of mercury exposure is inhalation of volatile mercury in the atmosphere. Future exposure may come from ingestion of methyl mercury contaminated rice where discharge of cyanide tailings to paddies continues. To protect the environment and to enhance the sustainability of ASGM, appropriate tailings management must be implemented. The gold grade of the tailings indicates that the residual value might be recoverable with appropriate technology. Ongoing research is investigating systems such as phytoextraction that might assist ASGM operators in Lombok and Sumbawa to improve their environmental performance. PMID:22914762

Krisnayanti, Baiq Dewi; Anderson, Christopher W N; Utomo, Wani Hadi; Feng, Xinbin; Handayanto, Eko; Mudarisna, Nurul; Ikram, Hadiman; Khususiah

2012-10-26

281

Genotyping and Toxigenic Potential of Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus pumilus Strains Occurring in Industrial and Artisanal Cured Sausages  

PubMed Central

Artisanal and industrial sausages were analyzed for their aerobic, heat-resistant microflora to assess whether new emerging pathogens could be present among Bacillus strains naturally contaminating cured meat products. Sixty-four isolates were characterized by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR and fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism (fAFLP). The biotypes, identified by partial 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, belonged to Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus pumilus, and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens species. Both RAPD-PCR and fAFLP analyses demonstrated that a high genetic heterogeneity is present in the B. subtilis group even in strains harvested from the same source, making it possible to isolate 56 different biotypes. Moreover, fAFLP analysis made it possible to distinguish B. subtilis from B. pumilus strains. The strains were characterized for their toxigenic potential by molecular, physiological, and immunological techniques. Specific PCR analyses revealed the absence of DNA sequences related to HBL, BcET, NHE, and entFM Bacillus cereus enterotoxins and the enzymes sphingomyelinase Sph and phospholipase PI-PLC in all strains; also, the immunological analyses showed that Bacillus strains did not react with NHE- and HBL-specific antibodies. However, some isolates were found to be positive for hemolytic and lecithinase activity. The absence of toxigenic potential in Bacillus strains from the sausages analyzed indicates that these products can be considered safe under the processing conditions they were produced; however, great care should be taken when the ripening time is shortened, particularly in the case of traditional sausages, which could contain high amounts of Bacillus strains and possibly some B. cereus cells. PMID:15345396

Matarante, Alessandra; Baruzzi, Federico; Cocconcelli, Pier Sandro; Morea, Maria

2004-01-01

282

The Centrality of Engagement in Higher Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The centrality of engagement is critical to the success of higher education in the future. Engagement is essential to most effectively achieving the overall purpose of the university, which is focused on the knowledge enterprise. Today's engagement is scholarly, is an aspect of learning and discovery, and enhances society and higher education.

Fitzgerald, Hiram E.; Bruns, Karen; Sonka, Steven T.; Furco, Andrew; Swanson, Louis

2012-01-01

283

Sustaining Student Engagement in Learning Science  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many students perceive science to be a difficult subject and are minimally engaged in learning it. This article describes a lesson that embedded an activity to engage students in learning science. It also identifies features of a science lesson that are likely to enhance students' engagement and learning of science and possibly reverse

Ateh, Comfort M.; Charpentier, Alicia

2014-01-01

284

Research and Engagement Academy Scholarly Coaches  

E-print Network

Research and Engagement Academy 2011 Scholarly Coaches A Community Engaged Research University The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching #12;University of New Hampshire Research and Engagement/Chairperson, Department of Sociology Janet Campbell Research Professor, Ocean Process Analysis Laboratory (OPAL) Charles

New Hampshire, University of

285

Research and Engagement Academy Scholarly Coaches  

E-print Network

Research and Engagement Academy Scholarly Coaches 2011 & 2012 A Community Engaged Research University The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching #12;University of New Hampshire Research for Research Brad Kinsey (2011, 2012) Faculty co-chair, Research and Engagement Academy Associate Professor

Pohl, Karsten

286

Service-Learning & Student Civic Engagement  

E-print Network

Service-Learning & Student Civic Engagement: Journeys toward Discovery, Contribution & CivicKnight Casey, Director Center for Service-Learning and Civic Engagement Michigan State University #12;What is service-learning? Intentional student engagement that combines community service with academic instruction

287

the Engaged A Conceptual Framework for  

E-print Network

-led Initiatives Model Partnerships Academic Service-Learning #12;What University Outreach & Engagement Does · Faculty in building service-learning/civic engagement into their courses Funds · Seed grants for pursuing organizations about the mutual benefits of university-community collaborations #12;Engaged Learning Communities

288

Engaging Student Learning in Physical Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explores the significance of engagement as a stance toward teaching and learning, noting how engagement can affect the way teachers and students interact in physical education settings and surrounding environments and presenting activities to encourage engagement (develop performance routines, say and switch, roundtable brainstorm, bubble gum

Anderson, Andy

2002-01-01

289

LEADERSHIP STRATEGIES FOR AN ENGAGED WORKFORCE  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ability to create and maintain an engaged workforce is a powerful tool in retaining top talent, improving productivity, and increasing customer loyalty. However, the majority of workers, both in the United States and abroad, are not fully engaged in their work. In this paper we explore one important solution to overcoming the lack of employee engagement: leadership. First, we

Shawn A. Serrano; Rebecca J. Reichard

2011-01-01

290

Civic Engagement and the Transition to Adulthood  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Constance Flanagan and Peter Levine survey research on civic engagement among U.S. adolescents and young adults. Civic engagement, they say, is important both for the functioning of democracies and for the growth and maturation it encourages in young adults, but opportunities for civic engagement are not evenly distributed by social class or race

Flanagan, Constance; Levine, Peter

2010-01-01

291

The influence of metal source uncertainty on cost-effective allocation of mine water pollution abatement in catchments.  

PubMed

In mine water pollution abatement, it is commonly assumed that known mine waste sites are the major pollution sources, thus neglecting the possibility of significant contribution from other old and diffuse sources within a catchment. We investigate the influence of different types of pollution source uncertainty on cost-effective allocation of abatement measures for mine water pollution. A catchment-scale cost-minimization model is developed and applied to the catchment of the river Dallven, Sweden, in order to exemplify important effects of such source uncertainty. Results indicate that, if the pollution distribution between point and diffuse sources is partly unknown, downstream abatement measures, such as constructed wetlands, at given compliance boundaries are often cost-effective. If downstream abatement measures are not practically feasible, the pollution source distribution between point and diffuse mine water sources is critical for cost-effective solutions to abatement measure allocation in catchments. In contrast, cost-effective solutions are relatively insensitive to uncertainty in total pollutant discharge from mine water sources. PMID:16095805

Baresel, Christian; Destouni, Georgia; Gren, Ing-Marie

2006-01-01

292

Becoming an Engaged Campus: A Practical Guide for Institutionalizing Public Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Becoming an Engaged Campus" offers campus leaders a systematic and detailed approach to creating an environment where public engagement can grow and flourish. The book explains not only what to do to expand community engagement and how to do it, but it also explores how to document, evaluate, and communicate university engagement efforts. An

Beere, Carole A.; Votruba, James C.; Wells, Gail W.

2011-01-01

293

Student and Staff Engagement: Developing an Engagement Framework in a Faculty of Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Student engagement is emerging as a key focus in higher education, as engagement is increasingly understood as a prerequisite for effective learning. This paper reports on the development of an Engagement Framework that provides a practical understanding of student (and staff) engagement which can be applied to any discipline, year level or

Pittaway, Sharon M.

2012-01-01

294

Secondary Teachers' Conceptions of Student Engagement: Engagement in Learning or in Schooling?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teacher actions can influence how students engage at school, making it relevant to understand their conceptions of student engagement and how to facilitate it. Reviews of existing literature suggested that a distinction between engagement in schooling and engagement in learning might help differentiate between social and academic outcomes. Data

Harris, Lois

2011-01-01

295

Reforestation as a novel abatement and compliance measure for ground-level ozone.  

PubMed

High ambient ozone (O3) concentrations are a widespread and persistent problem globally. Although studies have documented the role of forests in removing O3 and one of its precursors, nitrogen dioxide (NO2), the cost effectiveness of using peri-urban reforestation for O3 abatement purposes has not been examined. We develop a methodology that uses available air quality and meteorological data and simplified forest structure growth-mortality and dry deposition models to assess the performance of reforestation for O3 precursor abatement. We apply this methodology to identify the cost-effective design for a hypothetical 405-ha, peri-urban reforestation project in the Houston-Galveston-Brazoria O3 nonattainment area in Texas. The project would remove an estimated 310 tons of (t) O3 and 58 t NO2 total over 30 y. Given its location in a nitrogen oxide (NOx)-limited area, and using the range of Houston area O3 production efficiencies to convert forest O3 removal to its NOx equivalent, this is equivalent to 127-209 t of the regulated NOx. The cost of reforestation per ton of NOx abated compares favorably to that of additional conventional controls if no land costs are incurred, especially if carbon offsets are generated. Purchasing agricultural lands for reforestation removes this cost advantage, but this problem could be overcome through cost-share opportunities that exist due to the public and conservation benefits of reforestation. Our findings suggest that peri-urban reforestation should be considered in O3 control efforts in Houston, other US nonattainment areas, and areas with O3 pollution problems in other countries, wherever O3 formation is predominantly NOx limited. PMID:25201970

Kroeger, Timm; Escobedo, Francisco J; Hernandez, Jos L; Varela, Sebastin; Delphin, Sonia; Fisher, Jonathan R B; Waldron, Janice

2014-10-01

296

Reforestation as a novel abatement and compliance measure for ground-level ozone  

PubMed Central

High ambient ozone (O3) concentrations are a widespread and persistent problem globally. Although studies have documented the role of forests in removing O3 and one of its precursors, nitrogen dioxide (NO2), the cost effectiveness of using peri-urban reforestation for O3 abatement purposes has not been examined. We develop a methodology that uses available air quality and meteorological data and simplified forest structure growth-mortality and dry deposition models to assess the performance of reforestation for O3 precursor abatement. We apply this methodology to identify the cost-effective design for a hypothetical 405-ha, peri-urban reforestation project in the HoustonGalvestonBrazoria O3 nonattainment area in Texas. The project would remove an estimated 310 tons of (t) O3 and 58 t NO2 total over 30 y. Given its location in a nitrogen oxide (NOx)-limited area, and using the range of Houston area O3 production efficiencies to convert forest O3 removal to its NOx equivalent, this is equivalent to 127209 t of the regulated NOx. The cost of reforestation per ton of NOx abated compares favorably to that of additional conventional controls if no land costs are incurred, especially if carbon offsets are generated. Purchasing agricultural lands for reforestation removes this cost advantage, but this problem could be overcome through cost-share opportunities that exist due to the public and conservation benefits of reforestation. Our findings suggest that peri-urban reforestation should be considered in O3 control efforts in Houston, other US nonattainment areas, and areas with O3 pollution problems in other countries, wherever O3 formation is predominantly NOx limited. PMID:25201970

Kroeger, Timm; Escobedo, Francisco J.; Hernandez, Jos L.; Varela, Sebastin; Delphin, Sonia; Fisher, Jonathan R. B.; Waldron, Janice

2014-01-01

297

Particle settling after lead-based paint abatement work and clearance waiting period.  

PubMed

This study investigated the evolution of airborne particle concentration and size distribution following abatement work in a controlled environment utilizing direct real-time particle monitoring and used it to project potential lead loadings as those particles settle. An 860 ft3 environmental test chamber with sophisticated ventilation and air purifying systems was built. Wooden doors with lead-based paint were dry sanded or scraped to generate the highest feasible airborne lead concentrations. Size-fractional airborne particle concentrations decreased exponentially with time in all tests, even with no air exchange, consistent with the stirred model of constantly mixed air, which predicts longer settling than for tranquil settling. Very low levels of air mixing generated by temperature gradients and initial room air turbulence affected particle settling. About 90% of airborne lead mass settled within 1 hour after active abatement, before final cleaning began. During the second waiting period of 1 hour, which followed cleaning of the floor, additional dust settled so that the additional potential lead loading from remaining airborne lead was less than 20 microg/ft2. For this worst case scenario, the underestimate of the lead loading done by the clearance sampling did not exceed about 30%. For more realistic conditions, the underestimates are projected to be much lower than the new 40 microg/ft2 Housing and Urban Development (HUD) clearance standards for floor dust lead. These results were obtained for the first waiting period (between the end of active abatement and the beginning of cleaning) of 1 hour, as recommended by HUD guidelines. Thus, this study demonstrates no need to increase either the first or second waiting period. PMID:11192211

Choe, K T; Trunov, M; Grinshpun, S A; Willeke, K; Harney, J; Trakumas, S; Mainelis, G; Bornschein, R; Clark, S; Friedman, W

2000-01-01

298

PHOTOCATALYTIC OXIDATION FOR NOx ABATEMENT: DEVELOPMENT OF A KINETIC EXPRESSION AND DESIGN TOOLS  

SciTech Connect

The ''Nitrogen Oxides Emission Reduction Program'' and ''Ozone Non-Attainment Program'' in the 1990 Clean Air Act provide guidelines for controlling NOx (NO and NO{sub 2}) emissions in new and existing stationary sources. NOx emissions have local (air quality), regional (acid rain), and global (ozone production) consequences. This study aids in developing the photocatalyst technology that has potential for use in abatement of NOx. The objective of the proposed project is to apply the principles of chemical engineering fundamentals--reaction kinetics, transport phenomena and thermodynamics--in the process design for a system that will utilize a photocatalytic reactor to oxidize NOx to nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}). HNO{sub 3} can be more easily trapped than NOx on adsorbent surfaces or in water. The project dealt with the engineering aspect of the gas-solid heterogeneous oxidation of NOx. The experiments were conducted in a photocatalyst wash-coated glass flow tube reactor. A mathematical model was developed based on a rigorous description of the physical and chemical processes occurring in the reactor. The mathematical model took into account (1) intrinsic reaction kinetics (i.e., true reaction rates), (2) transport phenomena that deal with the mass transfer effects in the reactor, and (3) the geometry of the reactor. The experimental results were used for validation of the mathematical model that provides the basis for a versatile and reliable method for the purpose of design, scale-up and process control. The NOx abatement was successfully carried out in a flow tube reactor surrounded by black lights under the exploratory grant. Due to lack of funds, a comprehensive kinetic analysis for the photocatalytic reaction scheme could not be carried out. The initial experiments look very promising for use of photocatalysis for NOx abatement.

Rajiv Srivastava; M. A. Ebadian

2000-09-15

299

Estimating the financial risks of Andropogon gayanus to greenhouse gas abatement projects in northern Australia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Financial mechanisms such as offsets are one strategy to abate greenhouse gas emissions, and the carbon market is expanding with a growing demand for offset products. However, in the case of carbon offsets, if the carbon is released due to intentional or unintentional reversal through environmental events such as fire, the financial liability to replace lost offsets will likely fall on the provider. This liability may have implications for future participation in programmes, but common strategies such as buffer pool and insurance products can be used to minimize this liability. In order for these strategies to be effective, an understanding of the spatial and temporal distributions of expected reversals is needed. We use the case study of savanna burning, an approved greenhouse gas abatement methodology under the Carbon Farming Initiative in Australia, to examine potential risks to carbon markets in northern Australia and quantify the financial risks. We focus our analysis on the threat of Andropogon gayanus (gamba grass) to savanna burning due to its documented impacts of increased fuel loads and altered fire regimes. We assess the spatial and financial extent to which gamba grass poses a risk to savanna burning programmes in northern Australia. We find that 75% of the eligible area for savanna burning is spatially coincident with the high suitability range for gamba grass. Our analysis demonstrates that the presence of gamba grass seriously impacts the financial viability of savanna burning projects. For example, in order to recuperate the annual costs of controlling 1 ha of gamba grass infestation, 290 ha of land must be enrolled in annual carbon abatement credits. Our results show an immediate need to contain gamba grass to its current extent to avoid future spread into large expanses of land, which are currently profitable for savanna burning.

Adams, Vanessa M.; Setterfield, Samantha A.

2013-06-01

300

Cheyne-Stokes respiration due to chronic heart failure abates with coronary artery revascularization.  

PubMed

A 78-year-old man presented with dyspnea and mild heart failure with Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR). Workup revealed inferolateral ischemia in the setting of significant triple vessel coronary disease, and nil else to adequately explain his dyspnea and eventual respiratory failure. After he underwent surgical revascularization, his ventricular function improved, leading to resolution of his respiratory failure and, of interest, his CSR. CSR is a central sleep apnea common in heart failure patients and has been associated with increased mortality. Here, we present the first English-literature report of CSR abating with surgical coronary revascularization, and briefly review the literature. PMID:22261183

Nagpal, A Dave; Manji, Farah; Lenssen, Leslie; Schulz, Valerie; Novick, Richard J; Kao, Raymond

2012-01-01

301

The Comprehensive Process Model of Engagement  

PubMed Central

Background Engagement refers to the act of being occupied or involved with an external stimulus. In dementia, engagement is the antithesis of apathy. Objective The Comprehensive Process Model of Engagement was examined, in which environmental, person, and stimulus characteristics impact the level of engagement of persons with dementia. Methods Participants were 193 residents of 7 Maryland nursing homes. All participants had a diagnosis of dementia. Stimulus engagement was assessed via the Observational Measure of Engagement. Engagement was measured by duration, attention, and attitude to the stimulus. 25 stimuli were presented, which were categorized as live human social stimuli, simulated social stimuli, inanimate social stimuli, a reading stimulus, manipulative stimuli, a music stimulus, task and work-related stimuli, and two different self-identity stimuli. Results All stimuli elicited significantly greater engagement in comparison to the control stimulus. In the multivariate model, music significantly increased engagement duration, while all other stimuli significantly increased duration, attention, and attitude. Significant environmental variables in the multivariate model that increased engagement were: use of the long introduction with modeling (relative to minimal introduction), any level of sound (most especially moderate sound), and the presence of between 2 to 24 people in the room. Significant personal attributes included MMSE scores, ADL performance and clarity of speech, which were positively associated with higher engagement scores. Conclusions Results are consistent with the Comprehensive Process Model of Engagement. Person attributes, environmental factors, and stimulus characteristics all contribute to the level and nature of engagement, with a secondary finding being that exposure to any stimulus elicits engagement in persons with dementia. PMID:21946802

Cohen-Mansfield, Jiska; Marx, Marcia S.; Freedman, Laurence S.; Murad, Havi; Regier, Natalie G.; Thein, Khin; Dakheel-Ali, Maha

2010-01-01

302

Language Universals Engage Broca's Area  

PubMed Central

It is well known that natural languages share certain aspects of their design. For example, across languages, syllables like blif are preferred to lbif. But whether language universals are myths or mentally active constraintslinguistic or otherwiseremains controversial. To address this question, we used fMRI to investigate brain response to four syllable types, arrayed on their linguistic well-formedness (e.g., blif?bnif?bdif?lbif, where ? indicates preference). Results showed that syllable structure monotonically modulated hemodynamic response in Broca's area, and its pattern mirrored participants' behavioral preferences. In contrast, ill-formed syllables did not systematically tax sensorimotor regionswhile such syllables engaged primary auditory cortex, they tended to deactivate (rather than engage) articulatory motor regions. The convergence between the cross-linguistic preferences and English participants' hemodynamic and behavioral responses is remarkable given that most of these syllables are unattested in their language. We conclude that human brains encode broad restrictions on syllable structure. PMID:24743423

Berent, Iris; Pan, Hong; Zhao, Xu; Epstein, Jane; Bennett, Monica L.; Deshpande, Vibhas; Seethamraju, Ravi Teja; Stern, Emily

2014-01-01

303

Abatement of xenon and iodine emissions from medical isotope production facilities.  

PubMed

The capability of the International Monitoring System (IMS) to detect xenon from underground nuclear explosions is dependent on the radioactive xenon background. Adding to the background, medical isotope production (MIP) by fission releases several important xenon isotopes including xenon-133 and iodine-133 that decays to xenon-133. The amount of xenon released from these facilities may be equivalent to or exceed that released from an underground nuclear explosion. Thus the release of gaseous fission products within days of irradiation makes it difficult to distinguish MIP emissions from a nuclear explosion. In addition, recent shortages in molybdenum-99 have created interest and investment opportunities to design and build new MIP facilities in the United States and throughout the world. Due to the potential increase in the number of MIP facilities, a discussion of abatement technologies provides insight into how the problem of emission control from MIP facilities can be tackled. A review of practices is provided to delineate methods useful for abatement of medical isotopes. PMID:24418952

Doll, Charles G; Sorensen, Christina M; Bowyer, Theodore W; Friese, Judah I; Hayes, James C; Hoffmann, Emmy; Kephart, Rosara

2014-04-01

304

Hexane abatement and spore emission control in a fungal biofilter-photoreactor hybrid unit.  

PubMed

The performance of a fungal perlite-based biofilter coupled to a post-treatment photoreactor was evaluated over 234 days in terms of n-hexane removal, emission and deactivation of fungal spores. The biofilter and photoreactor were operated at gas residence times of 1.20 and 0.14min, respectively, and a hexane loading rate of 1155gm(-3)h(-1). Steady n-hexane elimination capacities of 30-40gm(-3)h(-1) were achieved, concomitantly with pollutant mineralization efficiencies of 60-90%. No significant influence of biofilter irrigation frequency or irrigation nitrogen concentration on hexane abatement was recorded. Photolysis did not support an efficient hexane post-treatment likely due to the short EBRT applied in the photoreactor, while overall hexane removal and mineralization enhancements of 25% were recorded when the irradiated photoreactor was packed with ZnO-impregnated perlite. However, a rapid catalyst deactivation was observed, which required a periodic reactivation every 48h. Biofilter irrigation every 3 days supported fungal spore emissions at concentrations ranging from 2.410(3) to 9.010(4)CFUm(-3). Finally, spore deactivation efficiencies of ?98% were recorded for the photolytic and photocatalytic post-treatment processes. This study confirmed the potential of photo-assisted post-treatment processes to mitigate the emission of hazardous fungal spores and boost the abatement performance of biotechnologies. PMID:24887128

Saucedo-Lucero, J O; Quijano, G; Arriaga, S; Muoz, R

2014-07-15

305

The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant biological monitoring and abatement program for East Fork Poplar Creek  

SciTech Connect

In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, a nuclear weapons components production facility located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for the US Department of Energy. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek), in particular, the growth and propagation of fish and aquatic life, as designated by the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment. A second purpose for the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from implementation of a water pollution control program that will include construction of nine new wastewater treatment facilities over the next 4 years. Because of the complex nature of the effluent discharged to East Fork Poplar Creek and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the effluent (i.e., temporal variability related to various pollution abatement measures that will be implemented over the next several years and spatial variability caused by pollutant inputs downstream of the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant), a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed for the BMAP. 39 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs.

Loar, J.M.; Adams, S.M.; Allison, L.J.; Giddings, J.M.; McCarthy, J.F.; Southworth, G.R.; Smith, J.G.; Stewart, A.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA); Springborn Bionomics, Inc., Wareham, MA (USA); Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1989-10-01

306

Plume abatement and water conservation with the wet/dry cooling tower  

SciTech Connect

Wet/dry towers, sometimes referred to in Europe as hybrid cooling towers, evolved beginning about 1970 due to concerns regarding the environment. The United States Environmental Protection Agency classified the visible discharge plume from evaporative or wet cooling towers as visual pollution. Tower designs evolved which incorporated readily available air-cooled or dry heat exchangers to introduce a non-evaporative air heating process. The combination of evaporative and non-evaporative heating results in reduction of the relative humidity of the air leaving these wet/dry cooling towers. For a period of time, environmental impact statement requirements required review of the plume abatement option on most large industrial and power sites. A result was construction of some large industrial and power plant sized wet/dry cooling towers for plume abatement. Higher capital cost and operating power consumption than that of wet towers was typical of this generation of wet/dry towers. The higher off-design cold water temperatures of wet-dry towers resulted in higher heat rates and fuel costs for power plants. By the end of the decade, economic influences led to diminished pressure from the EPA. For these reasons, the number of wet/dry towers studied and purchased subsided drastically during the late 1970`s.

Lindahl, P.A. Jr.; Jameson, R.W. [Marley Cooling Tower Co., Mission, KS (United States)

1995-02-01

307

CFD modeling of a UV-LED photocatalytic odor abatement process in a continuous reactor.  

PubMed

This paper presents a model study of a UV light-emitting-diode (UV-LED) based photocatalytic odor abatement process. It integrated computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of the gas flow in the reactor with LED-array radiation field calculation and Langmuir-Hinshelwood reaction kinetics. It was applied to simulate the photocatalytic degradation of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) in a UV-LED reactor based on experimentally determined chemical kinetic parameters. A non-linear power law relating reaction rate to irradiation intensity was adopted. The model could predict the steady state DMS concentration profiles by calculating the advection, diffusion and Langmuir-Hinshelwood reaction kinetics. By affecting the radiation intensity and uniformity, the position of the LED array relative to the catalyst appeared to be a critical parameter determining DMS removal efficiency. Too small distances might yield low quantum efficiency and consequently poor abatement performance. This study provided an example of LED-based photocatalytic process modeling and gave insights into the optimization of light source design for photocatalytic applications. PMID:22417398

Wang, Zimeng; Liu, Jing; Dai, Yuancan; Dong, Weiyang; Zhang, Shicheng; Chen, Jianmin

2012-05-15

308

Defining engagement in adolescent substance abuse treatment.  

PubMed

Youth engagement in substance use treatment is an important construct for research and practice, but it has been thinly and inconsistently defined in the literature. Most research has measured engagement by initiation, attendance, and retention in treatment. Because youth generally enter substance use treatment as a result of compliance with external requirements, defining engagement in this way might be insufficient. This qualitative participatory research study describes five focus groups with 31 adults working with youth in substance use treatment. Focus groups were designed and conducted by youth researchers in collaboration with university-based partners. We categorized participants' descriptions of engagement into five domains, identified as "CARES": Conduct, Attitudes, Relationships, Empowerment, and Social Context. These domains represent a comprehensive and ecologically-based definition of engagement that situates engagement in the context and trajectory of youth development, has clear implications for assertive clinical practice, and provides a foundation for developing an operationalized measure. PMID:24046184

Pullmann, Michael D; Ague, Starcia; Johnson, Tamara; Lane, Stephanie; Beaver, Kevon; Jetton, Elizabeth; Rund, Evangejalynn

2013-12-01

309

Social Media and Political Engagement  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

How much do people use social media as a way to be politically engaged? This question has been posed by a team of researchers at the Pew Internet & American Life Project, resulting in this 13-page report. The report was authored by a team of scholars including Lee Rainie and Aaron Smith and found that 60% of adults use social networking sites like Facebook or Twitter and that approximately 39% of all adults have done at least one of eight civic or political activities with social media. The findings here are based on a nationally representative survey of 2,253 adults conducted in the summer of 2012. Visitors can view the report in its entirety online or download the file. Additionally, persons with an interest in psychometrics and survey design can explore all of the survey questions here.

2012-10-19

310

Social Engagement and Attachment: A Phylogenetic Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract The manuscript focuses on the importance of social engagement and the behavioral and neurophysiological mechanisms,that allow individuals to reduce psychological and physical distance. A model of social engagement derived from the Polyvagal Theory is presented. The model emphasizes,phylogeny,as an organizing principle and includes the following points: 1) there are well defined neural circuits to support social engagement behaviors and

Stephen W. Porges

311

Identifying cognitive engagement in the mathematics classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper reports an analysis of videotape and interview data from four Year 8 mathematics lessons from the perspective of student cognitive engagement. The study extends our understanding of cognitive engagement by locating empirical evidence for its occurrence within the classroom. On the basis of the data we have examined, it appears that cognitive engagement can be consistently recognised by specific linguistic and behavioural indicators and is promoted by particular aspects of the classroom situation, the task, and the individual.

Helme, Sue; Clarke, David

2001-09-01

312

The Two Cultures of Undergraduate Academic Engagement  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using data on upper-division students in the University of California system, we show that two distinct cultures of engagement\\u000a exist on campus. The culture of engagement in the arts, humanities and social sciences focuses on interaction, participation,\\u000a and interest in ideas. The culture of engagement in the natural sciences and engineering focuses on improvement of quantitative\\u000a skills through collaborative study

Steven Brint; Allison M. Cantwell; Robert A. Hannerman

2008-01-01

313

Community of Engaged Scholars Funding Opportunities  

E-print Network

Community of Engaged Scholars Funding Opportunities Summer Institute, 2013 #12; Table of Contents The Arts..................................................................................pg. 127-142 Youth Development and Education.......................................................pg. 143

Saldin, Dilano

314

Stakeholder engagement for sustainability : a mixed method study of corporate strategies and engagement outcomes  

E-print Network

This dissertation contributes to our understanding of the strategies the companies use to engage external stakeholders, as well as the processes and outcomes of engagement. The first essay proposes a framework for evaluating ...

Isaacs, Katherine W

2013-01-01

315

A bottom-up method to develop pollution abatement cost curves for coal-fired utility boilers  

EPA Science Inventory

This paper illustrates a new method to create supply curves for pollution abatement using boiler-level data that explicitly accounts for technology costs and performance. The Coal Utility Environmental Cost (CUECost) model is used to estimate retrofit costs for five different NO...

316

Abatement cost curves: a viable management tool for enabling the achievement of winwin waste reduction strategies?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Environmental regulation of industrial activity is generally believed to have a negative impact on the industry. Recent literature has suggested, however, that reducing industrial waste outputs can, in some circumstances, result in a winwin, or at least windraw, scenario for industry and the environment. The viability of using the abatement cost curve method as a management tool to enable the

Nicola J Beaumont; Robert Tinch

2004-01-01

317

Abatement of mercury pollution in the small-scale gold mining industry: Restructuring the policy and research agendas  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper critiques contemporary research and policy approaches taken toward the analysis and abatement of mercury pollution in the small-scale gold mining sector. Unmonitored releases of mercury from gold amalgamation have caused considerable environmental contamination and human health complications in rural reaches of sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America and Asia. Whilst these problems have caught the attention of the scientific community

Gavin Hilson

2006-01-01

318

Proposal to Establish the "Center for Excellence in Curricular Engagement" "Curricular engagement" refers to teaching, learning, and scholarship that engages faculty, students,  

E-print Network

..................................................................................................................... 7 Section II: Curricular Engagement / Service-Learning and Higher Education .............................................................................................................................................. 11 Section IV: Analysis of the NC State Service-Learning Program ...................................................................................................................................... 33 Appendix D: Engagement, Student Engagement, and Service-Learning at NC State

Langerhans, Brian

319

Conceptualising and measuring student engagement through the Australasian Survey of Student Engagement (AUSSE): a critique  

Microsoft Academic Search

Student engagement has rapidly developed a central place in the quality agenda of Australian universities since the introduction of the Australasian Survey of Student Engagement (AUSSE). The AUSSE is based on one developed in the USA. The main arguments given for adopting this survey in Australia are that it provides a valid instrument for measuring engagement and that it enables

Pauline Hagel; Rodney Carr; Marcia Devlin

2011-01-01

320

Conceptualising and measuring student engagement through the Australasian Survey of Student Engagement (AUSSE): a critique  

Microsoft Academic Search

Student engagement has rapidly developed a central place in the quality agenda of Australian universities since the introduction of the Australasian Survey of Student Engagement (AUSSE). The AUSSE is based on one developed in the USA. The main arguments given for adopting this survey in Australia are that it provides a valid instrument for measuring engagement and that it enables

Pauline Hagel; Rodney Carr; Marcia Devlin

2012-01-01

321

Public Engagement Issue Area Network Initiative Planning Guide Public Engagement Issue Area Network Initiative  

E-print Network

Initiative PLANNING GUIDE This guide parallels the structure of the Proposal Narrative section of the request for proposals for the Public Engagement Issue Area Network Grant Program. The guide is designed to guidePublic Engagement Issue Area Network Initiative Planning Guide Public Engagement Issue Area Network

Amin, S. Massoud

322

Engaging By Design: How Engagement Strategies in Popular Computer and Video Games Can Inform Instructional Design  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Computer and video games are a prevalent form of entertainment in which the purpose of the design is to engage players. Game designers incorporate a number of strategies and tactics for engaging players in "gameplay." These strategies and tactics may provide instructional designers with new methods for engaging learners. This investigation

Dickey, Michele D.

2005-01-01

323

Learning at a Distance: Engaged or Not?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, Pu-Shih Chen, Robert Gonyea, and George Kuh compare the engagement of distance learners in educationally effective activities with that of their campus-based counterparts and compare the engagement of older distance learners relative to younger online students. Although distance learning is the fastest growing segment of

Chen, Pu-Shih Daniel; Gonyea, Robert; Kuh, George

2008-01-01

324

Engagement in a Community College Setting  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is an abundance of research concerning the definition measurement, and promotion of engagement across various work-related organizations. However, little is known about how we might begin to understand and facilitate engagement among community college faculty. Community college faculty face a unique set of challenges that render them at

Troy, David

2013-01-01

325

Social Identity Theories and Educational Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is a large body of research in studies of schooling, particularly ethnographic case studies, which posits that collective action among students undermines engagement in school and contributes to educational inequality. In this paper I review studies of engagement from a social identity theory perspective. To what extent can collective action

Kelly, Sean

2009-01-01

326

Employee Engagement and Organizational Behavior Management  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Engagement is a "buzz" word that has gained popularity in Industrial/Organizational Psychology. Based on a "Positive Psychology" approach, engagement is perceived as a valuable state for employees, because surveys on the construct have found it correlates with some organizational tactics (e.g., human resource policies, procedural justice) and

Ludwig, Timothy D.; Frazier, Christopher B.

2012-01-01

327

Engagement in Two Interdisciplinary Graduate Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This qualitative study examines two US interdisciplinary graduate programs which involve faculty and students from different disciplines. Haworth and Conrad's engagement theory of quality graduate education was applied. It was found that when interdisciplinary programs facilitate engagement by supporting diversity, participation, connections, and

Newswander, Lynita K.; Borrego, Maura

2009-01-01

328

Community Engagement for Student Learning in Geography  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines the role and purpose of community engagement as a learning and teaching strategy within higher education geography. It explores different interpretations of the concept of community engagement and illustrates different examples of this kind of learning through six case studies drawn from Australia, New Zealand, the UK, and

Bednarz, Sarah Witham; Chalkley, Brian; Fletcher, Stephen; Hay, Iain; Le Heron, Erena; Mohan, Audrey; Trafford, Julie

2008-01-01

329

Student Engagement and Making Community Happen  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Student engagement and making community happen is a policy manoeuvre that shapes the political subjectivity of the undergraduate student In Australia, making community happen as a practice of student engagement is described as one of the major challenges for policy and practice in research-led universities (Krause, 2005). Current efforts to meet

McGowan, Wayne S.; Partridge, Lee

2014-01-01

330

The University and Student Political Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Prior research has identified a substantial positive relationship between college attendance and civic engagement. This article examines student experiences with university academics and ancillary programs to determine which of these, if any, motivate increased student engagement. Various student characteristics were evaluated to determine their

Simmons, James R.; Lilly, Bryan

2010-01-01

331

Framing Student Engagement in Higher Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Student engagement is widely recognised as an important influence on achievement and learning in higher education and as such is being widely theorised and researched. This article firstly reviews and critiques the four dominant research perspectives on student engagement: the behavioural perspective, which foregrounds student behaviour and

Kahu, Ella R.

2013-01-01

332

Integration: Faculty Creating Connections Across Engaged  

E-print Network

,489 undergraduate students; 10,789 graduate and professional students; 4,985 faculty & academic staff; 6,335 support staff employees Office of University Outreach & Engagement ­ Academic support office, reports to Provost) ­ Integration at liberal arts college (Bloomgarden & O'Meara, 2007) ­ Motivations for engaged scholarship (O

333

Civic Engagement among Young Men and Women  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Political scientists and sociologists have long established significant differences in civic engagement between women and men. Utilizing data from the 2006 Civic and Political Health of the Nation Survey, and several other sources, new information is provided on the civic engagement of youth, confidence in government, and following public affairs

Marcelo, Karlo Barrios; Lopez, Mark Hugo; Kirby, Emily Hoban

2007-01-01

334

Factors Promoting Engaged Exploration with Computer Simulations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper extends prior research on student use of computer simulations (sims) to engage with and explore science topics, in this case wave interference. We describe engaged exploration; a process that involves students actively interacting with educational materials, sense making, and exploring primarily via their own questioning. We analyze

Podolefsky, Noah S.; Perkins, Katherine K.; Adams, Wendy K.

2010-01-01

335

Developmental Antecedents of Young Adult Civic Engagement  

Microsoft Academic Search

Civic engagement was studied in relation to overall development in adolescence, emerging adulthood, and young adulthood to examine how earlier activity involvement and success in prior and concurrent age-salient domains of competence may contribute to 2 forms of civic engagement in adulthood (citizenship and volunteering). Data on 163 youth were drawn from a longitudinal study of competence in a normative,

Jelena Obradovi?; Ann S. Masten

2007-01-01

336

the Engaged UOE Centers and Institutes  

E-print Network

scholarship and research, to enhance curriculum, teaching and learning, to prepare educated, engaged citizens will be an exemplary "engaged university," transforming and strengthening outreach partnerships to address key Michigan to democracy/ diversity ... Strengthen citizen participation and civic responsibility to improve outcomes

337

Design for Engaging Experience and Social Interaction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One of the goals of game designers is to design for an engaging experience and for social interaction. The question is how. We know that games can be engaging and allow for social interaction, but how do we achieve this or even improve on it? This article provides an overview of several scientific approaches that deal with this question. It

Harteveld, Casper; ten Thij, Eleonore; Copier, Marinka

2011-01-01

338

FACULTY/STAFF COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT NEWSLETTER  

E-print Network

Opportunities - Education Sciences - Americorps State and National Grants 4. Save The Date - Service-Learning Technological Innovation 2. CCE Resources - Civic Engagement in Higher Education books - ASL and Public in Higher Education The Center for Civic Engagement (CCE) is pleased to present our first Faculty/ Staff e

Suzuki, Masatsugu

339

Engaging Young Children in Science and Mathematics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this article is to present various techniques that will engage young children, ages 3-8, in learning science and mathematics. Children actively engage in acquiring basic science and mathematics concepts as they explore their environment. The methods presented are intended to meet the developmental levels of young learners as they

Gallenstein, Nancy L.

2005-01-01

340

Education and Innovation Enterprise and Engagement  

E-print Network

Education and Innovation Enterprise and Engagement The Impact of Princeton University #12;#12;1 Executive Summary 2 Introduction 12 Part One: Educating Students for the Future 16 Part Two: Research and Sustainability 64 Table of Contents Education and Innovation Enterprise and Engagement The Impact of Princeton

341

Engaging Mathematics Students Using Cooperative Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this book, the author offers a wide selection of student engagement strategies for math teachers in grades K-12. He shares his class-tested ideas in a clear and spirited voice, with his devotion to the teaching profession and his students apparent on every page. With invaluable ideas to help students remain engaged for longer time periods, this

Strebe, John D.

2009-01-01

342

The Engaged Classroom: A Review and Critique  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this paper was to analyze and critique the proposals made in "The Engaged Classroom" by Sam Intrator to increase student engagement in the classroom. The methodology used was to analyze, compare, and critique the proposals based on educational research on apathy and boredom in the instruction of history. The results were that the

Savich, Carl; Bizzotto, Glenda

2005-01-01

343

Improving student engagement: Ten proposals for action  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since the 1980s an extensive research literature has investigated how to improve student success in higher education focusing on student outcomes such as retention, completion and employability. A parallel research programme has focused on how students engage with their studies and what they, institutions and educators can do to enhance their engagement, and hence success. This article reports on two

Nick Zepke; Linda Leach

2010-01-01

344

Civic Engagement in the Field of Psychology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this article is to describe the importance of, and recommendations for how best to promote, civic engagement among undergraduate psychology majors. In this article, we will describe how the goals of civic engagement are consistent with the specific curricular goals of undergraduate psychology programs. We also will (a) review the

Chenneville, Tiffany; Toler, Susan; Gaskin-Butler, Vicki T.

2012-01-01

345

Models of User Engagement Janette Lehmann1  

E-print Network

users, click-through rates, page views, and time spent on a web site. Although these metrics actually types (ranging from news to e-commerce to social media). We first show the diversity of engagement- cessful web applications are not just used, they are engaged with; users invest time, attention

Lalmas, Mounia

346

RECOVERY OF FISH COMMUNITIES IN A WARMWATER STREAM FOLLOWING POLLUTION ABATEMENT  

SciTech Connect

The long-term recovery process for fish communities in a warm water stream in East Tennessee was studied using quantitative measurements over 20 years. The stream receives effluents from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility, but since 1985 these effluents have been greatly reduced, eliminated, or diluted as part of a substantial long-term pollution abatement program. The resulting changes in water quantity and quality led to a recovery of the fish communities, evidenced by significant changes in species richness, abundance (density and biomass), and community composition (e.g., number of fish species sensitive to stress). The fish community changes occurred over a spatial gradient (downstream from the headwater release zone nearest the DOE facility) and temporally, at multiple sampling locations in the stream. Changes in measured parameters were associated with specific remedial actions and the intervening steps within the recovery process are discussed with regard to changes in treatment processes.

Ryon, Michael G [ORNL

2011-01-01

347

NO /SUB x/ abatement via water injection in aircraft-derivative turbine engines  

SciTech Connect

The results of analytical and experimental investigations to develop efficient and reliable water injection methods for reducing the nitrogen oxides (NO /SUB x/ ) levels of the LM2500 and LM5000 engines are presented. These aircraft-derivative turbine engines are equipped with compact annular combustors. In these investigations, various methods of injecting water into the combustor primary zone were evaluated in combustor and engine tests to identify methods with minimal water flow requirements for a given degree of NO /SUB x/ abatement. Primary emphasis was focused on the development of methods of injecting liquid water into the engines when operating with distillate fuels. Methods of injecting both liquid water and steam when operating with natural gas were also investigated. The impacts of water injection on combustor and engine performance and operability were additionally assessed. Satisfactory accommodation of water/fuel weight ratios above unity and associated NO /SUB x/ level reductions as high as 90 percent were demonstrated.

Bahr, D.W.; Lyon, T.F.

1984-06-01

348

Cost-effective analysis of carbon abatement options in China`s electricity sector  

SciTech Connect

This article attempts to shed light on technological aspects of carbon abatement in China`s power industry and is thus devoted to satisfying electricity planning requirements in the CO{sub 2} context. To that end, a technology-oriented dynamic optimization model for power system expansion planning has been developed. Fifteen types of power plants are represented explicitly in the model in terms of their technical, economic, and environmental characteristics. These plants have first been compared in terms of both the levelized cost of generation and the marginal cost of CO{sub 2} reduction. Driven by the baseline electricity demands that are estimated by a newly developed time-recursive dynamic computable general equilibrium model of the Chinese economy, the power planning model has then been used to develop the baseline scenario for China`s electricity supply and to analyze the impacts of compliance with CO{sub 2} limits in the power industry.

Zhang, Z.X. [Univ. of Groningen (Netherlands). Dept. of Economics and Public Finance

1998-05-01

349

Reduction of Baltic Sea nutrient inputs and allocation of abatement costs within the Baltic Sea catchment.  

PubMed

The Baltic Sea Action Plan (BSAP) requires tools to simulate effects and costs of various nutrient abatement strategies. Hierarchically connected databases and models of the entire catchment have been created to allow decision makers to view scenarios via the decision support system NEST. Increased intensity in agriculture in transient countries would result in increased nutrient loads to the Baltic Sea, particularly from Poland, the Baltic States, and Russia. Nutrient retentions are high, which means that the nutrient reduction goals of 135 000 tons N and 15 000 tons P, as formulated in the BSAP from 2007, correspond to a reduction in nutrient loadings to watersheds by 675 000 tons N and 158 000 tons P. A cost-minimization model was used to allocate nutrient reductions to measures and countries where the costs for reducing loads are low. The minimum annual cost to meet BSAP basin targets is estimated to 4.7 billion Euro. PMID:24414801

Wulff, Fredrik; Humborg, Christoph; Andersen, Hans Estrup; Blicher-Mathiesen, Gitte; Czajkowski, Miko?aj; Elofsson, Katarina; Fonnesbech-Wulff, Anders; Hasler, Berit; Hong, Bongghi; Jansons, Viesturs; Mrth, Carl-Magnus; Smart, James C R; Smedberg, Erik; Stlnacke, Per; Swaney, Dennis P; Thodsen, Hans; Was, Adam; Zylicz, Tomasz

2014-02-01

350

Diversity, Dynamics, and Activity of Bacterial Communities during Production of an Artisanal Sicilian Cheese as Evaluated by 16S rRNA Analysis  

PubMed Central

The diversity and dynamics of the microbial communities during the manufacturing of Ragusano cheese, an artisanal cheese produced in Sicily (Italy), were investigated by a combination of classical and culture-independent approaches. The latter included PCR, reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR), and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S rRNA genes (rDNA). Bacterial and Lactobacillus group-specific primers were used to amplify the V6 to V8 and V1 to V3 regions of the 16S rRNA gene, respectively. DGGE profiles from samples taken during cheese production indicated dramatic shifts in the microbial community structure. Cloning and sequencing of rDNA amplicons revealed that mesophilic lactic acid bacteria (LAB), including species of Leuconostoc, Lactococcus lactis, and Macrococcus caseolyticus were dominant in the raw milk, while Streptococcus thermophilus prevailed during lactic fermentation. Other thermophilic LAB, especially Lactobacillus delbrueckii and Lactobacillus fermentum, also flourished during ripening. Comparison of the rRNA-derived patterns obtained by RT-PCR to the rDNA DGGE patterns indicated a substantially different degree of metabolic activity for the microbial groups detected. Identification of cultivated LAB isolates by phenotypic characterization and 16S rDNA analysis indicated a variety of species, reflecting to a large extent the results obtained from the 16S rDNA clone libraries, with the significant exception of the Lactobacillus delbrueckii species, which dominated in the ripening cheese but was not detected by cultivation. The present molecular approaches combined with culture can effectively describe the complex ecosystem of natural fermented dairy products, giving useful information for starter culture design and preservation of artisanal fermented food technology. PMID:11916708

Randazzo, Cinzia L.; Torriani, Sandra; Akkermans, Antoon D. L.; de Vos, Willem M.; Vaughan, Elaine E.

2002-01-01

351

Faculty intent to engage in interprofessional education  

PubMed Central

Background This descriptive correlational and comparative study explored health-care faculty (HCF) attitudes toward interprofessional education (IPE) and interprofessional health-care teams, HCF perceptions of subjective norms, the influence of subjective norms on HCF intent to engage in IPE, and HCF intent to engage in IPE. In addition, differences among seven disciplines of HCF were explored. Methods Nursing, medicine, pharmacy, physical therapy, occupational therapy, physician assistants, and social work faculty were identified. Stratified random sampling was used to ensure that the population surveyed was representative of the target population. The total sample for this study included 439 HCF from the seven identified health-care professions in the US. Data collection included measures of attitudes toward IPE and attitudes toward interprofessional health-care teams. Subjective norms were measured using two 7-point rating scales. Intent to engage in IPE was measured using a 10-point rating scale. Results There were no significant differences among HCF groups regarding attitudes toward IPE or interprofessional health-care teams. Administrative faculty reported greater intent to engage in IPE than teaching faculty. HCF who were currently in or had previously engaged in IPE reported greater intent to engage in or continue to engage, and had higher attitude and subjective norm scores than faculty without IPE experience. The combination of perceived pressure from school administrators and attitudes toward IPE was the best predictor of intent to engage in IPE. Conclusion IPE has the potential to influence patient quality of care and lead to better working relationships between health-care providers. HCF are more likely to engage in IPE when they believe their schools administrators think they should engage in IPE and when they have positive attitudes toward IPE. PMID:23637541

Olenick, Maria; Allen, Lois Ryan

2013-01-01

352

Exploring Increased Productivity Through Employee Engagement  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Disengaged employees cost U.S. companies billions of dollars annually in lowered productivity, a cost which has been compounded by the difficult economic situations in the country. The potential for increasing productivity through increased employee engagement was examined in this study. Using personal engagement theory and the theory of planned behavior, the purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore how the experiences of salaried aerospace employees affected productivity and the financial performance of an organization. Interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 20 aerospace employees whose responses were codified and analyzed to identify themes. The analysis indicated that (a) the lived experiences of employees influenced employee engagement, (b) employee engagement affects organizational commitment and performance, and (c) trust and respect and leadership are essential components to keep employees engaged. Eighty percent of the participants indicated that as employee engagement increases so too does organizational performance. The implications for positive social change include new insights for leaders seeking to increase productivity and financial performance, and to support employee engagement for maintaining sustainability, retaining talent, increasing profits, and improving the economy.

Richards, Wayne K., Jr.

353

Modified engagement method for matrix operation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We describe a modified engagement method for matrix operation based on a two-dimensional crossed-ring interconnection network. Our method incorporates fewer steps than that reported by Bocker et al. [Appl. Opt. 22, 804 (1983)], and its performance is found to be the most efficient (minimum steps) in comparison with other systolic and/or engagement methods for matrix operation. Thus, it may be helpful for other optical and electronic implementations of matrix operations. One compact optoelectronic integrity approach for implementing the modified engagement method is briefly described.

Zhou, Changhe; Liu, Liren; Li, Guoqiang; Ying, Yaozu

1995-11-01

354

Scaffolding student engagement via online peer learning  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We describe one aspect of a UK inter-institutional project wherein an online tool was used to support student generation of multiple choice questions. Across three universities and in five modules in physics, chemistry and biology, we introduced the PeerWise online system as a summative assessment tool in our classes, the desire being to increase student engagement, academic attainment and level of cognitive challenge. Engagement with the system was high with many students exceeding the minimum requirements set out in the assessment criteria. We explore the nature of student engagement and describe a working model to enable high-impact student-learning and academic gain with minimal instructor intervention.

Casey, M. M.; Bates, S. P.; Galloway, K. W.; Galloway, R. K.; Hardy, J. A.; Kay, A. E.; Kirsop, P.; McQueen, H. A.

2014-07-01

355

Technology, Political Debates, and Civic Engagement  

E-print Network

The 2007 CNN-YouTube presidential candidate debates provide a unique opportunity for the American populace to become engaged in national political discussion through the submission of video questions to YouTube for inclusion in two nationally...

Ricke, LaChrystal Dawn

2008-08-18

356

the Engaged Standards of Practice for  

E-print Network

based · Grounded in diverse research and evidence-based qualitative and quantitative methodologies #12Advocating & Modeling the Engaged University Standards of Practice for University, and instructional programs #12;Standards of Practice in University- Community Partnerships Shared Values

357

The Faculty Role in Civic Engagement.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses why liberal and professional education must be reinvented to include socially responsive knowledge as a key component of every college student's education. Describes faculty attitudes toward civic engagement and faculty initiatives at Portland State University. (EV)

Zlotkowski, Edward; Williams, Dilafruz

2003-01-01

358

Business engagement on Twitter: a path analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social media services, such as Twitter, enable commercial businesses to participate actively in online word-of-mouth communication.\\u000a In this project, we examined the potential influences of business engagement in online word-of-mouth communication on the\\u000a level of consumers engagement and investigated the trajectories of a business online word-of-mouth message diffusion in\\u000a the Twitter community. We used path analysis to examine 164,478 tweets

Mimi Zhang; Bernard J. Jansen; Abdur Chowdhury

359

Investigating User Engagement with Synthetic Characters  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses a persona based approach for investigating user engagement with synthetic characters. It presents a study of 75 participants who engaged with FearNot! a 3D virtual school populated by synthetic characters involved in scenarios related to exploring strategies for coping with bullying. Participants created character persona posters for FearNot! characters. Analysis of these posters identify that users empathize

Lynne E. Hall; Susan Jones; Marc Hall

2008-01-01

360

Determining target engagement in living systems  

PubMed Central

Chemical probes are critical tools for elucidating the biological functions of proteins and can lead to new medicines for treating disease. The pharmacological validation of protein function requires verification that chemical probes engage their intended targets in vivo. Here we discuss technologies, both established and emergent, for measuring target engagement in living systems and propose that determining this parameter should become standard practice for chemical probe and drug discovery programs. PMID:23508173

Simon, Gabriel M.; Niphakis, Micah J.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

2014-01-01

361

Getting first-year students engaged  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research briefing offers a snapshot of how Australian students engage in their first year of university study. It reviews participation in key learning activities, perceptions of support, correlates of retention, and important educational outcomes. The Australasian Survey of Student Engagement (AUSSE) is the largest cross-institutional survey of first-year students yet conducted in Australia, with 12,356 respondents in 2009 from

Hamish Coates

2010-01-01

362

Facilitating neurorehabilitation through principles of engagement.  

PubMed

A primary goal of neurorehabilitation is to guide recovery of functional skills after injury through evidence-based interventions that operate to manipulate the sensorimotor environment of the client. While choice of intervention is an important decision for clinicians, we contend it is only one part of producing optimal activity-dependent neuroplastic changes. A key variable in the rehabilitation equation is engagement. Applying principles of engagement may yield greater neuroplastic changes and functional outcomes for clients. We review the principles of neuroplasticity and engagement and their potential linkage through concepts of attention and motivation and strategies such as mental practice and enriched environments. Clinical applications and challenges for enhancing engagement during rehabilitation are presented. Engagement strategies, such as building trust and rapport, motivational interviewing, enhancing the client education process, and interventions that empower clients, are reviewed. Well-controlled research is needed to test our theoretical framework and suggested outcomes. Clinicians may enhance engagement by investing time and energy in the growth and development of the therapeutic relationship with clients, as this is paramount to maintaining clients' investment in continuing therapy and also may act as a driver of neuroplastic changes. PMID:22544406

Danzl, Megan M; Etter, Nicole M; Andreatta, Richard D; Kitzman, Patrick H

2012-01-01

363

Community Engagement about Genetic Variation Research  

PubMed Central

Abstract The aim of this article is to describe the methods and effectiveness of the Public Engagement in Genetic Variation and Haplotype Mapping Issues (PEGV) Project, which engaged a community in policy discussion about genetic variation research. The project implemented a 6-stage community engagement model in New Rochelle, New York. First, researchers recruited community partners. Second, the project team created community oversight. Third, focus groups discussed concerns generated by genetic variation research. Fourth, community dialogue sessions addressed focus group findings and developed policy recommendations. Fifth, a conference was held to present these policy recommendations and to provide a forum for HapMap (haplotype mapping) researchers to dialogue directly with residents. Finally, findings were disseminated via presentations and papers to the participants and to the wider community beyond. The project generated a list of proposed guidelines for genetic variation research that addressed the concerns of New Rochelle residents. Project team members expressed satisfaction with the engagement model overall but expressed concerns about how well community groups were utilized and what segment of the community actually engaged in the project. The PEGV Project represents a model for researchers to engage the general public in policy development about genetic research. There are benefits of such a process beyond the desired genetic research. (Population Health Management 2012;15:7889) PMID:21815821

Christensen, Kurt D.; Metosky, Susan; Rudofsky, Gayle; Deignan, Kathleen P.; Martinez, Hulda; Johnson-Moore, Penelope; Citrin, Toby

2012-01-01

364

Efficiency of final cleaning for lead-based paint abatement in indoor environments.  

PubMed

The effectiveness of procedures used for the final indoor cleaning after active lead-based paint abatement were evaluated in a 830 ft3 test chamber. Dry and wet scraping and dry machine sanding were applied to wooden doors obtained from lead-hazard control sites. The airborne particle concentration and size distribution were monitored using a real-time particle size spectrometer. Particulates were also collected on filters and analyzed for total dust and lead. The resulting airborne lead mass was determined for each cleaning procedure, and the potential floor lead loading resulting from the dust settling was calculated. Wipe samples were collected to measure the actual floor lead loading. The effectiveness of final cleaning was evaluated first for dry abatement methods. Various cleaning work practices were tested by applying wet and dry debris sweeping as well as no sweeping in combinations with wet and dry removal of plastic sheeting. Considerable resuspension of leaded particles was detected during dry sweeping: the airborne lead mass increase ranged between 65 and 220 percent. However, this increase did not exceed 22 percent when wet sweeping was applied. Minimal or no resuspension was found when the plastic was folded with leaded debris inside (no sweeping was performed prior to the sheeting removal). During folding activity, the "clean" (uncovered) floor surface may be significantly contaminated with leaded dust from workers' shoes and cleaning tools. The first HEPA vacuuming resulted in a 15- to 20-fold decrease of the airborne lead mass; however, it was not sufficient to reduce the floor lead loading to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) clearance level of 40 microg/ft2, as determined by wipe sampling. Wet mopping following the first HEPA vacuuming was proven to be effective to reduce the lead loading significantly below 40 microg/ft2. The second HEPA vacuuming resulted in further reduction of the airborne lead mass concentration. The floor lead loading remained much lower than 40 microg/ft2. These results were confirmed in the tests when using wet scraping. Overall, the HUD-recommended cleaning protocol was found to be sufficient in reducing the floor lead loading below 40 microg/ft2. At the same time, several modifications are proposed in this study to further improve the cleaning effectiveness. PMID:11871758

Grinshpun, Sergey A; Choe, Kyoo T; Trunov, Mikhaylo; Willeke, Klaus; Menrath, William; Friedman, Warren

2002-03-01

365

The Relationship Between Student Engagement and Professionalism in Pharmacy Students.  

E-print Network

??This study investigates the relationship between student engagement (as measured by the National Survey of Student Engagement benchmarks) and pharmacy student professionalism (as measured by (more)

Flaherty, Anne Guerin

2011-01-01

366

Interdisciplinary studies students' academic and social engagement a quantitative study.  

E-print Network

??This study explored interdisciplinary studies students' academic and social engagement. As the review of literature demonstrated, student engagement and satisfaction are important to retention and (more)

Simmons, Jessica

2011-01-01

367

A bottom-up method to develop pollution abatement cost curves for coal-fired utility boilers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper illustrates a new method to create supply curves for pollution abatement using boiler-level data that explicitly accounts for technology cost and performance. The Coal Utility Environmental Cost (CUECost) model is used to estimate retrofit costs for five different NOx control configurations on a large subset of the existing coal-fired, utility-owned boilers in the US. The resultant data are

Samudra Vijay; Joseph F. DeCarolis; Ravi K. Srivastava

2010-01-01

368

Amores de Abat-jour: A cena teatral brasileira e a escrita de mulheres nos anos vinte  

E-print Network

FALL 2001 75 Amores de Abat-jour: a cena teatral brasileira e a escrita de mulheres nos anos vinte Ktia da Costa Bezerra Nas ltimas dcadas, muitos pesquisadores tm se dedicado a um verdadeiro trabalho de escavao arqueolgica na busca por..., no caso especfico das mulheres, o que se verifica que o processo de excluso da produo literria feminina das histrias de literatura obedece a uma sistemtica prpria, uma vez que algumas das escritoras, poetas e/ou dramaturgas que conseguiram...

Costa Bezerra, Ká tia da

2001-10-01

369

Engaging by design: How engagement strategies in popular computer and video games can inform instructional design  

Microsoft Academic Search

Computer and video games are a prevalent form of entertainment in which the purpose of the design is to engage players. Game\\u000a designers incorporate a number of strategies and tactics for engaging players in gameplay. These strategies and tactics\\u000a may provide instructional designers with new methods for engaging learners. This investigation presents a review of game design\\u000a strategies and the

Michele D. Dickey; Sid Meier

2005-01-01

370

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for White Oak Creek Watershed and the Clinch River  

SciTech Connect

On April 1, 1986, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) (EPA 1986). As specified in Part 3: Special Conditions (Item H) of the permit, a plan for biological monitoring of the Clinch River, White Oak Creek (WOC), Northwest Tributary (NWT) of WOC, Melton Branch (MB), Fifth Creek, and First Creek shall be submitted for approval to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDHE) within 90 days of the effective date of the permit. The plan, which is referred to in Part 3 (H) of the permit as the Biological Monitoring Plan and Abatement Program (BMPAP), describes characterization monitoring studies to be conducted for the duration of the permit (5 years). In order to be consistent with the terminology used for the Biological Monitoring and Abatement Programs for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plan and the Oak Ridge K-25 Plant, BMPAP will subsequently be referred to as the Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP). The proposed BMAP outlined in this document is based on preliminary discussions held on December 9, 1985, between staff of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (ORNL and Central Management), the US Department of Energy (DOE), EPA, and TDHE. 232 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs.

Loar, J.M.; Adams, S.M.; Allison, L.J.; Blaylock, B.G.; Boston, H.L.; Huston, M.A.; Kimmel, B.L.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.; Walton, B.T.; Kitchings, J.T.; Olsen, C.R.

1991-09-01

371

Effects of olive mill wastewater physico-chemical treatments on polyphenol abatement and Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.) germinability.  

PubMed

Direct spreading on agricultural lands may represent an environmentally friendly disposal method and a possible use of water and nutrients from olive mill wastewaters (OMWs). However, the agronomic use of OMWs is limited, among others by polyphenols, which exert phytotoxic effects. Activated charcoal (AC) has been recognized as a very effective agent for polyphenol abatement, as it enables an irreversible process of phenol adsorption. Addition of calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) has also been described as a cheap and effective method in polyphenols abatement. However, the effects of Ca(OH)2 addition to OMW on seed germination are unclear. In this paper, the effects of AC and/or Ca(OH)2 on OMW polyphenols abatement, and Lolium multiflorum seed germination have been investigated. The highest polyphenols removal, approximately 95%, was observed when 80gL(-1) of AC was added to OMWs (the maximum dose in this investigation). The addition of Ca(OH)2 not only improved the effectiveness of the AC treatment but also resulted in a significant rise in Lolium seed germination at the highest AC doses (60 and 80gL(-1)). Considering the high salinity (7300?Scm(-1)) of these wastewaters, low quantities of Ca(OH)2 may also exert a protective effect on soil structure counteracting the sodium-induced dispersion through the binding action of calcium cation on clays and organic matter. PMID:24289894

Barbera, A C; Maucieri, C; Ioppolo, A; Milani, M; Cavallaro, V

2014-04-01

372

Enhancement of NOx abatement by advancing initiation of C3H6 oxidation chemistry with a corona radical shower  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is well known that propylene plays a very important role in decreasing the energy consumption of plasma abatement of flue gas containing NOx, but how to further improve the utilization efficiency of C3H6 needs to be studied. This paper presents an improved wire-plate type discharge reactor for plasma remediation of flue gas of utility or boiler facilities, in which nozzle electrodes for injection of additives such as C3H6 and NH3 were installed in the front of wire electrodes. This paper mainly focused on the study of advancing initiation of C3H6 oxidation chemistry and thus NO abatement by a pulsed and dc corona radical shower. The experimental results indicate that the NO removal rate was increased by over 10% with a pulsed corona radical shower; a dc corona C3H6 radical shower could increase the NO removal rate by 7%-24% under an energy-cost of 0.09-0.355 Wh Nm-3. Water vapour or ammonia injection decreased the NO abatement with the corona C3H6 radical shower, but the NOx removal rate was increased.

Shang, Kefeng; Wu, Yan; Li, Jie; Li, Guofeng; Li, Duan

2007-02-01

373

Monitoring Fish Contaminant Responses to Abatement Actions: Factors that Affect Recovery  

SciTech Connect

Monitoring of contaminant accumulation in fish has been conducted in East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee since 1985. Bioaccumulation trends are examined over a twenty year period coinciding with major pollution abatement actions by a Department of Energy facility at the stream s headwaters. Although EFPC is enriched in many contaminants relative to other local streams, only polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and mercury (Hg) were found to accumulate in the edible portions of fish to levels of human health concern. Mercury concentrations in redbreast sunfish were found to vary with season of collection, sex and size of individual fish. Over the course of the monitoring, waterborne Hg concentrations were reduced[80%; however, this did not translate into a comparable decrease in Hg bioaccumulation at most sites. Mercury bioaccumulation in fish did respond to decreased inputs in the industrialized headwater reach, but paradoxically increased in the lowermost reach of EFPC. As a result, the downstream pattern of Hg concentration in fish changed from one resembling dilution of a headwater point source in the 1980s to a uniform distribution in the 2000s. The reason for this remains unknown, but is hypothesized to involve changes in the chemical form and reactivity of waterborne Hg associated with the removal of residual chlorine and the addition of suspended particulates to the streamflow. PCB concentrations in fish varied greatly from year-to-year, but always exhibited a pronounced downstream decrease, and appeared to respond to management practices that limited episodic inputs from legacy sources within the facility.

Southworth, George R [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Roy, W Kelly [ORNL; Mathews, Teresa J [ORNL

2011-01-01

374

Injection of alkaline ashes into underground coal mines for acid mine drainage abatement  

SciTech Connect

The injection of alkaline coal combustion waste products into abandoned underground coal mines for acid mine drainage (AMD) abatement has obvious conceptual appeal. This paper summarizes the findings of the baseline hydrogeologic and water quality evaluations at two sites--one in West Virginia and one in Maryland--where field demonstrations of the technique are being pursued in cooperative efforts among State and Federal agencies and/or private companies. The West Virginia site produces severe AMD from three to seven AMD sources that are spaced over about a 1.2 km stretch of the down-dip side of the mine workings. By completely filling the most problematic portion of the mine workings with coal combustion ashes, the State expects that the costs and problems associated with AMD treatment will be greatly reduced. At the Maryland site, it is expected that the AMD from a relatively small target mine will be eliminated completely by filling the entire mine void with a grout composed of a mixture of fly ash, fluidized-bed combustion ash, and flue gas desulfurization sludge. This project will also demonstrate the potential cost-effectiveness of the technique at other sites, both for the purpose of AMD remediation and control of land subsidence.

Aljoe, W.W. [Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Pittsburgh Research Center

1996-12-31

375

Monitoring Fish Contaminant Responses to Abatement Actions: Factors that Affect Recovery  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Monitoring of contaminant accumulation in fish has been conducted in East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee since 1985. Bioaccumulation trends are examined over a twenty year period coinciding with major pollution abatement actions by a Department of Energy facility at the stream's headwaters. Although EFPC is enriched in many contaminants relative to other local streams, only polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and mercury (Hg) were found to accumulate in the edible portions of fish to levels of human health concern. Mercury concentrations in redbreast sunfish were found to vary with season of collection, sex and size of individual fish. Over the course of the monitoring, waterborne Hg concentrations were reduced >80%; however, this did not translate into a comparable decrease in Hg bioaccumulation at most sites. Mercury bioaccumulation in fish did respond to decreased inputs in the industrialized headwater reach, but paradoxically increased in the lowermost reach of EFPC. As a result, the downstream pattern of Hg concentration in fish changed from one resembling dilution of a headwater point source in the 1980s to a uniform distribution in the 2000s. The reason for this remains unknown, but is hypothesized to involve changes in the chemical form and reactivity of waterborne Hg associated with the removal of residual chlorine and the addition of suspended particulates to the streamflow. PCB concentrations in fish varied greatly from year-to-year, but always exhibited a pronounced downstream decrease, and appeared to respond to management practices that limited episodic inputs from legacy sources within the facility.

Southworth, George R.; Peterson, Mark J.; Roy, W. Kelly; Mathews, Teresa J.

2011-06-01

376

Toxicity of Abate? 4E (temephos) in mallard ducklings and the influence of cold  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Diets mixed to contain 0,0.1, 1.0, 10 and 100 ppm temephos (determined chemically to contain less than 0.5, less than 0.5, 0.89, 6..0 and 59 ppm temephos, respectively) in an Abate ? 4E formulation, were fed to mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) ducklings for 7 d. During this period, half of the ducklings in each dietary treatment group were housed in a heated brooder (39 to 41?C) and half were housed in an unheated brooder (10 to 18?C). Mortality in all dietary groups in the unheated brooder was higher than in the heated brooder. High temephos-related mortality occurred in the 100 ppm group in the unheated brooder but not in any other diet-temperature groups. Ingestion of the 100 ppm temephos diet inhibited plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activity and elevated plasma corticosterone concentration and creatine phosphokinase activity, but other selected plasma chemistries were not affected in a dose-related manner. Brain ChE activity was depressed only in the 100 ppm dietary groups; maximum inhibition of brain ChE activity was 48%. These findings suggest that diets containing up to 10 ppm temephos do not directly affect duckling survival during the first week of life and that the toxicity of 100 ppm temephos is markedly enhanced by cold.

Fleming, W.J.; Heinz, G.H.; Franson, J.C.; Rattner, B.A.

1985-01-01

377

Electro-oxidative abatement of low-salinity reverse osmosis membrane concentrates.  

PubMed

The present study encompasses the application of electrolysis as novel treatment technique for the abatement of low-salinity concentrates generated from the filtrative treatment of water and wastewater. Four different materials have been tested as anode for a number of brine samples in a one-compartment electrolytic cell in galvanostatic mode. It was found that PbO(2) and SnO(2) anodes initiated electrochemical precipitation through an increase of the pH. Boron-doped diamond (BDD) and RuO(2) anodes successfully oxidised the pollutants in the brine and a linear removal of total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) was observed during the first phase of oxidation. Oxidation was predominantly achieved through indirect hypochlorite bulk oxidation; the higher oxidation rate and extent for the BDD anode was attributed to the higher selectivity and activity of the latter. Overall performance of the BDD electrode was higher than for RuO(2): higher rates for TAN (17.9 vs. 13.5mg/Ah) and COD (74.5 vs. 20.0mg/Ah) removal as well as higher overall current efficiencies (35.2% vs. 14.5%). Extensive colour removal was observed for both anodes (>90% decrease in absorbency at 455 nm). PMID:15016532

Van Hege, K; Verhaege, M; Verstraete, W

2004-03-01

378

Response of meiofaunal and nematode communities to sewage pollution abatement: a field transplantation experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To assess the recovery rate of meiofaunal and nematode communities upon abatement of sewage pollution, a field transplantation experiment was conducted in Tai Tam, which is a non-polluted, shallow subtidal habitat on the southern portion of Hong Kong Island. The sediments used were from one site located in Victoria Harbour that was heavily influenced by sewage pollution, and one site in the outside-harbor area, which was relatively clean. In addition, sediments from Tai Tam were used as a control. Fresh sediments with meiofauna were collected from the aforementioned sites, placed in plastic trays and transplanted to Tai Tam. Sediments were retrieved at the beginning of the experiment and at 1-, 3-, and 8-weeks after transplantation for analysis of the meiofaunal and nematode communities as well as the sediment characteristics. The results showed that the meiofaunal and nematode communities in the control sediments were consistent at the four sampling periods, while it took three and eight weeks, respectively, for the nematode communities from the outside-harbor and inside-harbor sites to become similar to the control. These findings indicated that the relatively poor habitat quality and the nematode community composition in the sewage polluted inside-harbor sediments required a longer time for recovery than samples from the better habitat quality and the nematode community composition in the outside-harbor sediments.

Liu, Xiaoshou; Cheung, Siu Gin; Shin, Paul K. S.

2011-11-01

379

Acoustic flight tests of rotorcraft noise-abatement approaches using local differential GPS guidance  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents the test design, instrumentation set-up, data acquisition, and the results of an acoustic flight experiment to study how noise due to blade-vortex interaction (BVI) may be alleviated. The flight experiment was conducted using the NASA/Army Rotorcraft Aircrew Systems Concepts Airborne Laboratory (RASCAL) research helicopter. A Local Differential Global Positioning System (LDGPS) was used for precision navigation and cockpit display guidance. A laser-based rotor state measurement system on board the aircraft was used to measure the main rotor tip-path-plane angle-of-attack. Tests were performed at Crows Landing Airfield in northern California with an array of microphones similar to that used in the standard ICAO/FAA noise certification test. The methodology used in the design of a RASCAL-specific, multi-segment, decelerating approach profile for BVI noise abatement is described, and the flight data pertaining to the flight technical errors and the acoustic data for assessing the noise reduction effectiveness are reported.

Chen, Robert T. N.; Hindson, William S.; Mueller, Arnold W.

1995-01-01

380

Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for the Oak Ridge K-25 Site  

SciTech Connect

A proposed Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) for the Oak Ridge K-25 Site was prepared in December 1992 as required by the renewed National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit that was issued on October 1, 1992. The proposed BMAP is based on results of biological monitoring conducted from 1986 to 1992 and discussions held on November 12, 1992, between staff of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the K-25 Site), and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Department of Energy Oversight Division. The proposed BMAP consists of four tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of K-25 Site effluents on the ecological integrity of Mitchell Branch, Poplar Creek, and the Poplar Creek embayment of the Clinch River. These tasks include (1) ambient toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation monitoring, (3) assessment of fish health, and (4) instream monitoring of biological communities. This overall BMAP plan combines established protocols with current biological monitoring techniques to assess environmental compliance and quantify ecological recovery. The BMAP will also determine whether the effluent limits established for the K-25 Site protect the designated use of the receiving streams (Mitchell Branch, Poplar Creek, and Clinch River) for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life. Results obtained from this biological monitoring program will also be used to document the ecological effects (and effectiveness) of remedial actions.

Kszos, L.A.; Adams, S.M.; Ashwood, T.L.; Blaylock, B.G.; Greeley, M.S.; Loar, J.M.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hinzman, R.L. [Oak Ridge Research Inst., TN (United States); Shoemaker, B.A. [Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States). Environmental Management Div.

1993-04-01

381

Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for the Oak Ridge K-25 Site  

SciTech Connect

A proposed Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) for the Oak Ridge K-25 Site was prepared in December 1992 as required by the renewed National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit that was issued on October 1, 1992. The proposed BMAP consists of four tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of K-25 Site effluents on the ecological integrity of Mitchell Branch, Poplar Creek, and the Poplar Creek embayment of the Clinch River. These tasks include (1) ambient toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation monitoring, (3) assessment of fish health, and (4) instream monitoring of biological communities. This overall BMAP plan combines established protocols with current biological monitoring techniques to assess environmental compliance and quantify ecological recovery. The BMAP will also determine whether the effluent limits established for the K-25 Site protect the designated use of the receiving streams (Mitchell Branch, Poplar Creek, and Clinch River) for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life. Results obtained from this biological monitoring program will also be used to document the ecological effects (and effectiveness) of remedial actions.

Kszos, L.A.; Adams, S.M.; Ashwood, T.L.; Blaylock, B.G.; Greeley, M.S.; Loar, J.M.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Shoemaker, B.A. [Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States); Hinzman, R.L. [Oak Ridge Research Inst., TN (United States)

1993-02-01

382

Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant biological monitoring and abatement program (BMAP) plan  

SciTech Connect

The proposed Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) for East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, as described, will be conducted for the duration of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit issued for the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995, and which became effective July 1, 1995. The basic approach to biological monitoring used in this program was developed by the staff in the Environmental Sciences Division at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the request of Y-12 Plant personnel. The proposed BMAP plan is based on results of biological monitoring conducted since 1985. Details of the specific procedures used in the current routine monitoring program are provided, but experimental designs for future studies are described in less detail. The overall strategy used in developing this plan was, and continues to be, to use the results obtained from each task to define the scope of future monitoring efforts. Such efforts may require more intensive sampling than initially proposed in some areas or a reduction in sampling intensity in others. By using the results of previous monitoring efforts to define the current program and to guide them in the development of future studies, an effective integrated monitoring program has been developed to assess the impacts of the Y-12 Plant operation on the biota of EFPC and to document the ecological effects of remedial actions.

Adams, S.M.; Brandt, C.C.; Cicerone, D.S. [and others

1998-02-01

383

Artificial recharge for subsidence abatement at the NASA-Johnson Space Center, Phase I  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Regional decline of aquifer head due to ground-water withdrawal in the Houston area has caused extensive land-surface subsidence. The NASA-Johnson Space Center (NASA-JSC) in southeastern Harris County, Texas, was about 13 to 19 feet above mean sea level in 1974 and sinking at a rate of more than 0.2 foot per year. NASA-JSC officials, concerned about the hurricane flooding hazard, requested the U.S. Geological Survey to study the feasibility of artificially recharging the aquifers for subsidence abatement. Hydrologic digital models were developed for theoretical determinations of quantities of water needed, under various well-array plans, for artificial recharge of the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers in order to halt the local subsidence at NASA-JSC. The programs for the models were developed for analysis of three-dimensional ground-water flow. Total injection rates of between 2,000 and 14,000 gallons per minute under three general well-array plans were determined for a range of residual clay pore pressures of 10 to 70 feet of hydraulic head. The space distributions of the resultant hydraulic heads, illustrated for injection rates of 3,600 and 8 ,400 gallons per minute, indicated that, for the same rate, increasing the number and spread of the injection locations reduces the head gradients within NASA-JSC. (Woodard-USGS)

Garza, Sergio

1977-01-01

384

Abatement of wetland loss through diversions of Mississippi River water using siphons  

SciTech Connect

The long-term maintenance and renewal of Louisiana's wetlands cannot be accomplished without diversion of sediment laden water from the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers. Because of ramifications for flood control, navigation, and established estuarine resource uses, such diversions, at least initially, are likely to be limited to structures that permit flow to be taken from the upper part of the water column. To evaluate the potential benefits from such diversions in terms of sediment introduction into the wetlands, and the possibility of abatement of wetland loss through small structures that could be implemented at a local level, an existing diversion by means of a siphon was investigated. The investigation focused on the White's Ditch Siphon, in Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana. Siphon operation was monitored for the 1989-1990 water year to determine water and sediment discharge characteristics and their relationship to those of the Mississippi River and to estuarine hydrology To determine sedimentation benefits to the adjacent marsh and the need for outfall management, sediment dispersal was evaluated and sediment deposition was compared for a site within the siphon outfall area and a control site. Results of the siphon monitoring are extended to larger scale diversions. On the basis of suspended load characteristics of the Mississippi River and the operational characteristics of a major structure, as related to the estuarine salinity regime and resource constraints, the extent to which such diversions are likely to offset subsidence and related wetland loss is evaluated.

Van Beek, J.L.; Roberts, D.W.; Fournet, S. (Coastal Environments, Inc., Baton Rouge, LA (USA))

1990-09-01

385

Behaviour of Sotalia guianensis (van B?n?den, 1864) (Cetacea, Delphinidae) and ethnoecological knowledge of artisanal fishermen from Canavieiras, Bahia, Brazil  

PubMed Central

Artisanal fishermen, because of their direct and frequent contact with the aquatic environment, possess a wealth of knowledge about the natural history of the fauna of the region in which they live. This knowledge, both practical and theoretical, has been frequently utilized and integrated into academic research. Taking this into consideration, this study discusses the ethnoecological knowledge of artisanal fishermen from a community in Canavieiras, state of Bahia, Brazil regarding the Guiana dolphin (Sotalia guianensis), a typically costal member of the family Delphinidae that is little studied in this region. To this end, the behaviour of S. guianensis in Canavieiras was recorded over one year and the data obtained were compared with fishermens reports. A total of 609 hours of behavioural observations of S. guianensis was conducted from a fixed point in alternate morning and afternoon sessions between October 2009 and September 2010. Observations were conducted from a pier (154059S and 385638W) situated on the banks of the Pardo River estuary - the regions main river - at 5.5?m above water level. For ethnoecological data collection, semi-structured interviews were carried out with 26 fishermen in May, June and September 2010 and January 2011 in the fishing community of Atalaia. Occasional boat expeditions were made with the fishermen to compare their reports with direct observations of the behaviour of S. guianensis. The results demonstrate that fishermen possess a body of knowledge about S. guianensis that describes in detail the main behavioural aspects of the species. They reported the presence of S. guianensis in the Pardo River estuary throughout the year and its gregarious behaviour. They cited a relationship between the movement of dolphins and tidal cycles, and their presence in the estuary associated with the search for food. In addition, the fishermen reported that numbers of infants in groups were proportional to group size. Behaviours described were compatible with the observations made in situ and with data found in the scientific literature, confirming the importance of traditional knowledge in complementing scientific data. One behaviour mentioned by the fishermen that had no equivalence in the scientific literature was confirmed in situ and, therefore, constitutes the first record for this species. PMID:22584063

2012-01-01

386

Neonatal brainstem dysfunction risks infant social engagement  

PubMed Central

The role of the brainstem in mediating social signaling in phylogenetic ancestral organisms has been demonstrated. Evidence for its involvement in social engagement in human infants may deepen the understanding of the evolutionary pathway of humans as social beings. In this longitudinal study, neonatal brainstem functioning was measured by auditory brainstem-evoked responses (ABRs) in 125 healthy neonates born prematurely before 35 weeks gestational age. At 4 months, infants were tested in a set of structured vignettes that required varying levels of social engagement and cardiac vagal tone was assessed. Data show that neonates with a disrupted IV waveform, evident mostly by delayed wave V, exhibit shorter latencies to gaze averts in episodes involving direct face-to-face interactions but engage gaze as controls when interacting with masked agents or with agents whose faces are partly veiled by toys. Analysis of variance of infants social engagement with ABR, neonatal risk, maternal stress and cardiac vagal tone showed a main effect for ABR and an ABR by gestational age interaction. The integrity of brainstem transmission of sensory information during the final weeks of gestation may scaffold the development of social disengagement, thereby attesting to the brainstem's preserved evolutionary role in developing humans as social organisms prior to engaging in social encounters. PMID:22146141

Sopher, Koreen; Kurtzman, Lea; Galili, Giora; Feldman, Ruth; Kuint, Jacob

2013-01-01

387

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT IN CHILDREN'S ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH RESEARCH  

PubMed Central

Community engagement strategies and skills can build trust and reduce historical mistrust between researchers, communities and populations being studied, as well as contribute to the quality of study designs, methods and dissemination of findings. This review paper discusses why community engagement is of increasing importance in childrens environmental health research, describes models and the continuum of methods that are used and discusses their challenges and benefits. Two case studies, representing different study designs and using different community engagement models and methods, and lessons learned from these cases are described. Community engagement methods are best understood on a continuum based on the degree to which community members or representatives of community populations are involved in research planning, decision making and dissemination. Methods along this continuum include community consultation, community based participatory research(CBPR) and community consent to research. Community engagement knowledge and skills are especially important in the conduct of childrens environmental health research with its emphasis on reducing environmental risks at the community level; the increasing focus on genetics and gene-environment interactions; and the importance placed on translation of scientific results into behaviors and policies that protect the community. Across study designs, whether qualitative survey research, an observational epidemiology study, or a randomized intervention trial, understanding community interests, norms and values is necessary to describe attitudes and behaviors of specific population groups, build evidence of cause and effect between environmental exposures and health and/or that demonstrate the effectiveness of interventions to reduce risks. PMID:21259265

Brenner, Barbara L.; Manice, Melissa P.

2010-01-01

388

The development of the Game Engagement Questionnaire: A measure of engagement in video game-playing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Deep engagement in video game-playing has the potential to be to be one important determinant of the impact of playing violent video games, but there are currently no reliable measures of this subjective experience. To fill this gap, the Game Engagement Questionnaire (GEQ) was developed using both classical and Rasch analyses. In Study 1 Rasch analyses provide support for the

Jeanne H. Brockmyer; Christine M. Fox; Kathleen A. Curtiss; Evan McBroom; Kimberly M. Burkhart; Jacquelyn N. Pidruzny

2009-01-01

389

Strategies for Faculty-Student Engagement: How Community College Faculty Engage Latino Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Student-faculty engagement has been identified as the best predictor of Latino student persistence (Hurtado & Carter, 1997). This study explores the strategies that community college faculty employ to engage Latino students. Findings indicate that knowledge, appreciation, and sensitivity to Hispanic cultures and an understanding of the preferred

Cejda, Brent D.; Hoover, Richard E.

2011-01-01

390

Using Public Displays to Stimulate Passive Engagement, Active Engagement, and Discovery in Public Spaces  

E-print Network

Using Public Displays to Stimulate Passive Engagement, Active Engagement, and Discovery in Public in public spaces ­ public displays ­ can be used to stimulate these needs. In this paper we argue for a new research direction that explores how public displays can stimulate such essential needs in public spaces

Langheinrich, Marc

391

A Model for Creating Engaged Land-Grant Universities: Penn State's Engagement Ladder Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The original mission of the state and land-grant university was to engage with communities to solve problems and improve the quality of life for the citizenry. Today most state and land-grant universities have moved far away from their original mission and are struggling to become engaged with the communities they serve. In this case study, we

Aronson, Keith R.; Webster, Nicole

2007-01-01

392

Measuring Student Engagement among Elementary Students: Pilot of the Student Engagement Instrument--Elementary Version  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Early school withdrawal, commonly referred to as dropout, is associated with a plethora of negative outcomes for students, schools, and society. Student engagement, however, presents as a promising theoretical model and cornerstone of school completion interventions. The purpose of the present study was to validate the Student Engagement

Carter, Chandra P.; Reschly, Amy L.; Lovelace, Matthew D.; Appleton, James J.; Thompson, Dianne

2012-01-01

393

Measuring Students' Engagement on College Campuses: Is the NSSE an Appropriate Measure of Adult Students' Engagement?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As institutions seek to promote student engagement, the National Survey of Student Engagement has become a measure commonly used to document how institutions are meeting educational goals, but there is some question as to its applicability for certain undergraduate populations. 2010 survey results were analyzed for 125 adult and 69 traditional-age

Price, Karen; Baker, Sandra Nicks

2012-01-01

394

Conceptualising and Measuring Student Engagement through the Australasian Survey of Student Engagement (AUSSE): A Critique  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Student engagement has rapidly developed a central place in the quality agenda of Australian universities since the introduction of the Australasian Survey of Student Engagement (AUSSE). The AUSSE is based on one developed in the USA. The main arguments given for adopting this survey in Australia are that it provides a valid instrument for

Hagel, Pauline; Carr, Rodney; Devlin, Marcia

2012-01-01

395

Voices of Students on Engagement: A Report on the 2006 High School Survey of Student Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The goal of the High School Survey of Student Engagement (HSSSE) is to document, describe, and monitor student engagement in secondary schools nationally. HSSSE is a powerful tool in the assessment arena that can complement performance tests and stimulate discussions on teaching and learning. This overview report highlights findings from across

Yazzie-Mintz, Ethan

2007-01-01

396

Designing for Learner Engagement in Middle School Science: Technology, Inquiry, and the Hierarchies of Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Engaging middle-school students in scientific inquiry is typically recognized as important, but difficult. Designed to foster learner engagement, this method used an online, problem-based, science inquiry that investigated the West Nile virus during four weeks of collaborative classroom sessions. The inquiry prototype was authored in WISE, the

Harmer, Andrea J.; Cates, Ward Mitchell

2007-01-01

397

Creating Effective Student Engagement in Online Courses: What Do Students Find Engaging?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While this paper set out to discover what activities and/or interaction channels might be expected to lead to more highly engaged students, what it found was a bit different. After first creating a scale to measure online student engagement, and then surveying 186 students from six campuses in the Midwest, the results indicate that there is no

Dixson, Marcia D.

2010-01-01

398

Engagement in Learning after Errors at Work: Enabling Conditions and Types of Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article addresses two research questions concerning nurses' engagement in social learning activities after errors at work. Firstly, we investigated how this engagement relates to nurses' interpretations of the error situation and perceptions of a safe team climate. The results indicate that the individual estimation of an error as relevant to

Bauer, Johannes; Mulder, Regina H.

2013-01-01

399

Validating an Approach to Examining Cognitive Engagement within Online Groups  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Tools for measuring cognitive engagement within online groups have been concerned only with measuring an individual participant's cognitive engagement, without any concern for measuring cognitive engagement within groups. There remains a serious need for a scheme that measures cognitive engagement of groups and the validation of such a scheme

Oriogun, Peter K.; Ravenscroft, Andrew; Cook, John

2005-01-01

400

Engaging Music and Media: Technology as a Universal Language  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The ambiguity in the first half of the paper's title--"Engaging music and media"--is intentional. Music is engaging in the sense that it implicates our hearts and minds. Music can also be engaged by and with media. And, of course, engagement is core to effective learning. The role of music education is always in flux. Aesthetic aims sometimes take

Carruthers, Glen

2009-01-01

401

Begin your partnership: the process of engagement.  

PubMed

Community Partnered-Participatory Research (CPPR) is based on and utilizes community engagement as its central method and principle. In this chapter, we explain the key differences between engaging the community vs merely involving the community. The chapter also reviews the plan-do-action cycle of work that is used in each stage of CPPR. We define five key values of CPPR: respect for diversity, openness, equality, redirected power (empowerment), and an asset-based approach. In addition, we present 12 operational principles, which guide work throughout every stage of all CPPR initiatives. PMID:20088077

Jones, Loretta; Meade, Barbara; Forge, Nell; Moini, Moraya; Jones, Felica; Terry, Chrystene; Norris, Keith

2009-01-01

402

Processes to engage and motivate staff.  

PubMed

Nursing has a history of poor workplace contexts in which the focus has been on performing and completing tasks, rather than engaging fully with patients. Further, nursing practice is increasingly driven by bureaucratic demands and service requirements, which can result in neglect of the workplace needs of staff. This article describes how a nurse unit manager changed a poor working environment in one surgical unit by using transformational leadership techniques to address procedural employment practices and poor team relationships. With support from nurse educators in the nursing practice development unit, clinical staff engaged in a series of activities that improved their work relationships, as well as professional and clinical development. PMID:24266575

Henderson, Amanda; Schoonbeek, Sue; Auditore, Anthony

2013-12-01

403

Modeling unmanned system collaborative target engagement  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes a novel algorithm for collaborative target engagement by unmanned systems (UMS) resulting in emergent behavior. We demonstrate UMS collaborative engagement using a simulation testbed model of a road, convoy vehicles traveling along the road, a squadron of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), and multiple unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs) which are set to detonate when within close proximity to a convoy vehicle. No explicit artificial intelligence or swarming algorithms were used. Collision avoidance was an intrinsic phenomena. All entities acted independently throughout the simulation, but were given similar local instructions for possible courses of action (COAs) depending on current situations. Our algorithm and results are summarized in this paper.

Jaenisch, Holger M.; Handley, James W.; Hicklen, Michael L.

2007-04-01

404

Encouraging engagement at work to improve retention.  

PubMed

Similar professional standards link nurses together but healthcare professionals practise across a variety of areas and have different experiences of the workplace. It cannot be assumed that a positive experience in one setting will be replicated in another, even if it is in the same organisation. This article explores the factors that affect workplace culture and outlines the rudiments underpinning nurse engagement from a work perspective. It also analyses staff engagement in the health service sector by examining the status, certainty, autonomy, relatedness and fairness (Scarf) model, and demonstrates the relevance of this framework. PMID:23577562

Tillott, Sarah; Walsh, Ken; Moxham, Lorna

2013-03-01

405

Physical demands during the hauling of fishing nets for artisan fishing using rafts in beach of Ponta Negra, Natal--Brasil.  

PubMed

The current article aims to analyse the activity and the repercussions in the health of the artisan fishermen who use rafts in the urban Beach of Ponta Negra in Natal - RN, with emphasis on the physical demands at the step of hauling the nets from the ocean. It has been taken as a reference the methodology of Work Ergonomic Analysis-WEA. 21 fishermen participated in the study (50% of the population). It was used applying observational techniques and methodologies (open and sistematic observations and simulations) interactional ( social and economic questionnaire, conversational actions, verbalizations, self confrontations and collective analysis) and health assessment (static postural assessment, movement flexibility of flexo extension of the shoulder and the ischiotibial muscle, lumbar region and hang grip. Applying the diagram of painful areas and the Nordic Questionnaire of mucleskeletal symptoms). The results were submeted to restitutions and validations with the raftmen. The hauling of the nets represents a high muscleskeletal risk, joining physical effort, adopting forced postures with the rotation of the spine and movement repetition, mainly flexo extension of vertebral spine, aggravated by the demand of strength fo the stabilizing muscles of the human body to keep the poise. The impacts of the activity of the fisherman of Ponta Negra, related to postures and strength demand were observed in the postural assessment and are related to the activity. PMID:22316760

Jaeschke, Anelena; Saldanha, Maria Christine Werba

2012-01-01

406

[Deterritorialization of artisanal fisheries in Sepetiba Bay (State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil): an overview of occupational health and environmental issues].  

PubMed

This paper outlines the consequences of deterritorialization of artisan fishing folk in Sepetiba Bay in the State of Rio de Janeiro on the occupational and health status of this population living in the area. By means of the concept of social determinants in health, it compares the new patterns of growth in the region with the living and occupational health conditions of these workers. This relationship was explained after conducting semi-structured interviews and focus groups. The results point to a strong relationship between the port undertakings and the installations of the nuclear program of the Brazilian Navy with subsistence and extractive fishing, contributing to an increase in the time spent at sea and the inherent occupational risks involved in subsistence fishing. This is in addition to the economic and environmental impacts on the productivity and quality of fishing production, which are a direct consequence of the dredging works and the new navigation and anchoring norms established and imposed by the state. PMID:25272109

Freitas, Marcelo Bessa; Rodrigues, Silvio Cesar Alves

2014-10-01

407

Psychometric Properties of Three New National Survey of Student Engagement Based Engagement Scales: An Item Response Theory Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We sought to develop and psychometrically describe three new student engagement scales to measure college students' engagement with their faculty (student-faculty engagement: SFE), community-based activities (CBA), and transformational learning opportunities (TLO) using items selected from the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE), a widely

Carle, Adam C.; Jaffee, David; Vaughan, Neil W.; Eder, Douglas

2009-01-01

408

Local Engagement Agreement Checklist The Local Engagement Agreement is a University approved form. When using this form, or other University-  

E-print Network

Local Engagement Agreement Checklist The Local Engagement Agreement is a University approved form in proper implementation and payment. Prior to Entering into a Local Engagement Agreement: Contractor has to begin services without a contract in place. Completing the Local Engagement Agreement: When completing

Barrash, Warren

409

Randomized Trial of a Delirium Abatement Program for Post-acute Skilled Nursing Facilities  

PubMed Central

Objectives To determine whether a Delirium Abatement Program (DAP) can shorten the duration of delirium among new admissions to post-acute care (PAC). Design Cluster randomized controlled trial. Setting Eight skilled nursing facilities specializing in PAC within a single metropolitan region. Participants Four hundred fifty-seven participants with delirium at PAC admission. Intervention The DAP consisted of four steps: 1) assessment for delirium within 5 days of PAC admission, 2) assessment and correction of common reversible causes of delirium, 3) prevention of complications of delirium, and 4) restoration of function. Measurements Eligible patients were screened by trained researchers. Those with Confusion Assessment Method defined delirium were eligible for participation via proxy consent. Two weeks and one month after enrollment, regardless of location, participants were re-assessed for delirium by researchers blind to intervention status. Results Nurses at DAP sites detected delirium in 41% of participants vs. 12% in usual care (UC) sites (p<.001) and completed DAP documentation in most delirium-detected participants. However, the DAP intervention had no impact on delirium persistence based on two measurements at 2 weeks (DAP 68% vs. UC 66%) and 1 month (DAP 60% vs. UC 51%), adjusted p values ? 0.20. Adjusting for baseline differences between DAP and UC participants and restricting analysis to delirium-detected DAP participants did not alter the results. Conclusion Detection of delirium improved at the DAP sites, however, the DAP had no impact on the persistence of delirium. This effectiveness trial demonstrated that a nurse-led DAP intervention was not effective in typical PAC facilities. PMID:20487083

Marcantonio, Edward R.; Bergmann, Margaret A.; Kiely, Dan K.; Orav, E John; Jones, Richard N.

2010-01-01

410

Long term trends in sewage abatement and water quality in the Hudson-Raritan Estuary  

SciTech Connect

Long-term trends in dissolved oxygen (DO) and coliform bacteria concentrations are used to evaluate the impact of 70 years of sewage abatement and treatment in the Hudson-Raritan Estuary near New York City (NYC). Regional construction of wastewater treatment plants since the 1920`s has reduced discharges of untreated sewage into the estuary from approximately 47 M{sup 3}/S in 1936 to less than 0.1 M{sup 3}/S by 1994. From at least 1922 through the early 1960s, average summer DO percent saturation in the Hudson River varied between 35--50% in surface waters and 25--40% in bottom waters. Beginning in the late 1970s, DO concentrations increased through the 1980s and especially into the 1990s, coinciding with the secondary treatment upgrade of the 7.4 M3/s North River plant in the spring of 1991. Average summer percent saturation in the early 1 990s exceeded 80% in surface waters and 60% in bottom waters. In addition, summer DO minima increased from less than 1.5 mg/L in the early 1970s, to greater than 3.0 mg/L in the 1990s, and the duration of hypoxia during summer months has been reduced. While this general trend has been observed throughout the estuary, some areas have displayed recent declines in DO, possibly due to increasing eutrophication. Total coliforms also display strong decreasing trends from the 1960s into the 1990s, with declines attributed to plant construction and expansion, and improved operation of the sewer system. Metal loadings have also decreased significantly. Signs of improved ecosystem quality include reopened beaches and shellfish beds, re-infestation of woodpilings by marine wood-borers, and the resurgence of wading birds in several areas of the estuary.

Brosnan, T.M.; O`Shea, M.L. [New York City Dept. of Environmental Protection, NY (United States)

1995-12-31

411

Photolysis of inorganic chloramines and efficiency of trichloramine abatement by UV treatment of swimming pool water.  

PubMed

Trichloramine, one of the three inorganic chloramines (mono-, di- and trichloramine), is a problematic disinfection by-product in recreational pool water since it causes skin and eye irritations as well as irritations of the respiratory tract. The most commonly used chloramine mitigation strategy in pool water is UV treatment. Experiments with membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS) confirmed that inorganic chloramines are effectively degraded by UV irradiation with low-pressure (LP) and medium-pressure (MP) mercury lamps (apparent quantum yields (QY): NH2Cl=0.50 (LP) and 0.31 (MP)moleinstein(-1), NHCl2: 1.06 (LP) and 0.85 (MP)moleinstein(-1)). Trichloramine showed the fastest depletion with a quantum yield slightly above 2moleinstein(-1) in purified (LP and MP) and pool water (MP). This high quantum yield can partly be explained by reactions involving OH radicals (purified water) and the reaction of trichloramine with moieties formed during UV irradiation of pool water. The presence of free chlorine affects trichloramine degradation (QY: ?1.5moleinstein(-1)) since it scavenges OH radicals and competes with trichloramine for reactive species (e.g. organic amines). Measurements in a pool facility revealed that the installed UV reactors degraded trichloramine by 40-50% as expected from laboratory experiments. However, trichloramine reduction in the pools was less pronounced than in the UV reactors. Model calculations combining pool hydraulics with formation/abatement of trichloramine showed that there was a fast trichloramine formation in the pool from the residual chlorine and nitrogenous precursors. The main factors influencing trichloramine concentrations in pool water are the free chlorine concentration and the UV treatment in combination with the recirculation rate through the water treatment system. PMID:24699420

Soltermann, Fabian; Widler, Tobias; Canonica, Silvio; von Gunten, Urs

2014-06-01

412

Non-thermal plasma techniques for abatement of volatile organic compounds and nitrogen oxides  

SciTech Connect

Non-thermal plasma processing is an emerging technology for the abatement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) in atmospheric-pressure air streams. Either electrical discharge or electron beam methods can produce these plasmas. Each of these methods can be implemented in many ways. There are many types of electrical discharge reactors, the variants depending on the electrode configuration and electrical power supply (pulsed, AC or DC). Two of the more extensively investigated types of discharge reactors are based on the pulsed corona and dielectric-barrier discharge. Recently, compact low-energy (<200 keV) electron accelerators have been developed to meet the requirements of industrial applications such as crosslinking of polymer materials, curing of solvent-free coatings, and drying of printing inks. Special materials have also been developed to make the window thin and rugged. Some of these compact electron beam sources are already commercially available and could be utilized for many pollution control applications. In this paper we will present a comparative assessment of various nonthermal plasma reactors. The thrust of our work has been two-fold: (1) to understand the scalability of various non-thermal plasma reactors by focusing on the energy efficiency of the electron and chemical kinetics, and (2) to identify the byproducts to ensure that the effluent gases from the processor are either benign or much easier and less expensive to dispose of compared to the original pollutants. We will present experimental results using a compact electron beam reactor and various types of electrical discharge reactors. We have used these reactors to study the removal of NO{sub x} and a wide variety of VOCS. We have studied the effects of background gas composition and gas temperature on the decomposition chemistry.

Penetrante, B.M.; Hsiao, M.C.; Bardsley, J.N.; Merritt, B.T.; Vogtlin, G.E.; Wallman, P.H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Kuthi, A.; Burkhart, C.P.; Bayless, J.R. [First Point Scientific, Inc., Agoura Hills, CA (United States)

1995-12-04

413

Improvements in dioxin abatement strategies at a municipal waste management plant in Barcelona.  

PubMed

This study presents the results of a dioxin abatement programme undertaken in the municipal waste incineration plant of Montcada i Reixac (Barcelona, Spain) after the replacement of an obsolete air cleaning device by a new flue gas treatment system. A number of sampling campaigns were conducted with the aim of characterising stack gas emission levels of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs)/polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and to evaluate initial specifications of dioxin stack gas emission values below 0.1 ng I-TEQ/Nm(3). Preliminary results revealed levels between 44 and 111 ng I-TEQ/Nm(3) when the gas-cleaning system consisted only of an old electrostatic precipitator (ESP). Decreased levels around 15 ng I-TEQ/Nm(3) were observed when the semi-dry scrubber began to operate and the ESP was switched off. Again, remarkable dioxin removal was observed after the installation of the fabric filter and levels around 0.3-0.4 ng I-TEQ/Nm(3) were soon achieved. Nevertheless, the limit of 0.1 ng I-TEQ/Nm(3) was reached by additional injection of activated carbon which helped to lower PCDD/PCDF levels to around 0.036 ng I-TEQ/Nm(3). The results also demonstrated a significant change in the dioxin distribution present in combustion-derived materials (stack gas emission, bottom ash and solid waste from gas treatment). The major dioxin fraction was found in gaseous matrices before the flue gas control system was upgraded. After this step, the major dioxin fraction content was observed in solid waste from gas treatment. PMID:12547331

Abad, Esteban; Caixach, Josep; Rivera, Josep

2003-03-01

414

Injection of alkaline ashes into underground coal mines for acid mine drainage abatement  

SciTech Connect

The injection of fly ash, scrubber sludge, fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) ash, and other alkaline waste materials into abandoned underground coal mines for acid mine drainage (AMD) abatement has obvious conceptual appeal. This report describes three ongoing projects -- one each in West Virginia, Maryland, and Ohio -- where field demonstrations of the technique are being pursued in cooperative efforts among State and Federal agencies and/or private companies. The West Virginia site produces AMD that is causing the State to incur very high treatment costs and operational problems, especially in the storage and disposal of metal hydroxide sludges that result from treatment. In an attempt to achieve a more cost-effective long-term remediation scheme, the State is working with local coal companies and power generators on a plan to fill part or all of the mine voids with slurries of fly ash and/or FBC ash. At the Maryland site, the goal is to demonstrate the feasibility of completely filling a very small underground mine with an FEC ash slurry. The information gained here will determine whether large-scale AMD remediation can be achieved if deep mine disposal of ash is incorporated into the design of a new FBC power plant. In Ohio, it is believed that sealing and complete flooding of a relatively small mine will be able to curtail its AMD production. In order to accelerate the flooding process and insure that alkaline conditions will prevail in the mine, a waste slurry of calcium hydroxide from a nearby source will be injected into the mine voids in conjunction with mine sealing.

Aljoe, W.W.

1996-12-31

415

Dissimilatory Iron Reduction and Odor Indicator Abatement by Biofilm Communities in Swine Manure Microcosms  

PubMed Central

Animal waste odors arising from products of anaerobic microbial metabolism create community relations problems for livestock producers. We investigated a novel approach to swine waste odor reduction: the addition of FeCl3, a commonly used coagulant in municipal wastewater treatment, to stimulate degradation of odorous compounds by dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria (DIRB). Two hypotheses were tested: (i) FeCl3 is an effective source of redox-active ferric iron (Fe3+) for dissimilatory reduction by bacteria indigenous to swine manure, and (ii) dissimilatory iron reduction results in significant degradation of odorous compounds within 7 days. Our results demonstrated that Fe3+ from FeCl3 was reduced biologically as well as chemically in laboratory microcosms prepared with prefiltered swine manure slurry and limestone gravel, which provided pH buffering and a substrate for microbial biofilm development. Addition of a 1-g liter?1 equivalent concentration of Fe3+ from FeCl3, but not from presynthesized ferrihydrite, caused initial, rapid solids flocculation, chemical Fe3+ reduction, and Eh increase, followed by a 2-day lag period. Between 2 and 6 days of incubation, increases in Fe2+ concentrations were accompanied by significant reductions in concentrations of volatile fatty acids used as odor indicators. Increases in Fe2+ concentrations between 2 and 6 days did not occur in FeCl3-treated microcosms that were sterilized by gamma irradiation or amended with NaN3, a respiratory inhibitor. DNA sequences obtained from rRNA gene amplicons of bacterial communities in FeCl3-treated microcosms were closely related to Desulfitobacterium spp., which are known representatives of DIRB. Use of iron respiration to abate wastewater odors warrants further investigation. PMID:16151075

Castillo-Gonzalez, Hugo A.; Bruns, Mary Ann

2005-01-01

416

OAK RIDGE Y-12 PLANT BIOLOGICAL MONITORING AND ABATEMENT PROGRAM (BMAP) PLAN  

SciTech Connect

The proposed Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) for East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, as described, will be conducted for the duration of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit issued for the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995, and which became effective July 1, 1995. The basic approach to biological monitoring used in this program was developed by the staff in the Environmental Sciences Division at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the request of Y- 12 Plant personnel. The proposed BMAP plan is based on results of biological monitoring conducted since 1985. Details of the specific procedures used in the current routine monitoring program are provided but experimental designs for future studies are described in less detail. The overall strategy used in developing this plan was, and continues to be, to use the results obtained from each task to define the scope of future monitoring efforts. Such efforts may require more intensive sampling than initially proposed in some areas (e.g., additional toxicity testing if initial results indicate low survival or reproduction) or a reduction in sampling intensity in others (e.g., reduction in the number of sampling sites when no impact is observed). By using the results of previous monitoring efforts to define the current program and to guide us in the development of future studies, an effective integrated monitoring program has been developed to assess the impacts of the Y-12 Plant operation on the biota of EFPC and to document the ecological effects of remedial actions.

ADAMS, S.M.; BRANDT, C.C.; CHRISTENSEN, S.W.; CICERONE, D.S.; GREELEY, M.S.JR; HILL, W.R.; HUSTON, M.S.; KSZOS, L.A.; MCCARTHY, J.F.; PETERSON, M.J.; RYON, M.G.; SMITH, J.G.; SOUTHWORTH, G.R.; STEWART, A.J.

1998-10-01

417

Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

The revised Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) for East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, as described, will be conducted as required by the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit issued for the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995 and became effective July 1, 1995. The basic approach to biological monitoring used in this program was developed by the staff in the Environmental Science Division (ESD) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) at the request of the Y-12 Plant. The revision to the BMAP plan is based on results of biological monitoring conducted during the period of 1985 to present. Details of the specific procedures used in the current routine monitoring program are provided; experimental designs for future studies are described in less detail. The overall strategy used in developing this plan was, and continues to be, to use the results obtained from each task to define the scope of future monitoring efforts. Such efforts may require more intensive sampling than initially proposed in some areas (e.g., additional bioaccumulation monitoring if results indicate unexpectedly high PCBs or Hg) or a reduction in sampling intensity in others (e.g., reduction in the number of sampling sites when no impact is still observed). The program scope will be re-evaluated annually. By using the results of previous monitoring efforts to define the current program and to guide us in the development of future studies, an effective integrated monitoring program has been developed to assess the impacts of Y-12 Plant operations (past and present) on the biota of EFPC and to document the ecological effects of remedial actions.

Adams, S.M.; Brandt, C.C.; Christensen, S.W.; Greeley, M.S.JR.; Hill, W.R.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.

2000-09-01

418

Use of multi-transition-metal-ion-exchanged zeolite 13X catalysts in methane emissions abatement  

SciTech Connect

Methane is a potent greenhouse gas. It has a global warming potential (GWP) 23 times greater than carbon dioxide. Reducing methane emissions would lead to substantial economic and environmental benefits. This study investigated the performance of multi-transition-metal-(Cu, Cr, Ni, and Co)-ion-exchanged zeolite 13X catalysts in methane emissions abatement. The catalytic activity in methane combustion using multi-ion-exchanged catalysts was studied with different parameters including the molar percentage of metal loading, the space velocity, and the inlet methane concentration under atmospheric pressure and at a relatively low reaction temperature of 500 C. The performance of the catalysts was determined in terms of the apparent activation energy, the number of active sites of the catalyst, and the BET surface area of the catalyst. This study showed that multi-ion-exchanged catalysts outperformed single-ion-exchanged and acidified 13X catalysts and that lengthening the residence time led to a higher methane conversion percentage. The enhanced catalytic activity in the multi-ion-exchanged catalysts was attributed to the presence of exchanged transition ions instead of acid sites in the catalyst. The catalytic activity of the catalysts was influenced by the metal loading amount, which played an important role in affecting the apparent activation energy for methane combustion, the active sites, and the BET surface area of the catalyst. Increasing the amount of metal loading in the catalyst decreased the apparent activation energy for methane combustion and also the BET surface area of the catalyst. An optimized metal loading amount at which the highest catalytic activity was observed due to the combined effects of the various factors was determined. (author)

Hui, K.S.; Chao, C.Y.H.; Kwong, C.W.; Wan, M.P. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

2008-04-15

419

Perceptions of Control Facilitate Reading Engagement  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined how global locus of control influences children's reading engagement or reading involvement and interest in stories. It is based on locus of control, interest, and dual information processing theories. One hundred and seventy students from schools in the northeastern United States, ages 9 to 12, participated. They completed a preread survey measuring autonomy and general reading interest

Edward T. Vieira Jr; Susan Grantham

2011-01-01

420

Engaging Gifted Boys in New Literacies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article illustrates the serious challenge of engaging boys in reading and writing which has become more complex and even influences the lives of gifted adolescent males. This article attempts to address this concern. In order to do so, the authors examine the scholarly literature on boys' reading preferences and report findings from that

Hebert, Thomas P.; Pagnani, Alexander R.

2010-01-01

421

Transforming Practice the philosophies, methodsthe philosophies, methodsthe philosophies, methodsthe philosophies, methods and impacts ofand impacts ofand impacts ofand impacts of our engagements withour engagements withour engagements withour engagements  

E-print Network

, methodsthe philosophies, methods and impacts ofand impacts ofand impacts ofand impacts of our engagements Society of Edinburgh and the Landscape Research Group and organised by researchers/practitioners from been the impact of the European Landscape Convention? · How have strategic plans for landscapes been

Guo, Zaoyang

422

Perceptions of Control Facilitate Reading Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined how global locus of control influences children's reading engagement or reading involvement and interest in stories. It is based on locus of control, interest, and dual information processing theories. One hundred and seventy students from schools in the northeastern United States, ages 9 to 12, participated. They completed a

Vieira, Edward T., Jr.; Grantham, Susan

2011-01-01

423

Advocating and Modeling the Engaged University  

E-print Network

& Economic DevelopmentCommunity & Family SecurityPositive Outcomes for Children, Youth & Families TechnologyPositive Outcomes for Children, Youth & Families Technology & Human Development Scholarship of Engagement Community & Economic DevelopmentCommunity & Family SecurityPositive Outcomes for Children, Youth & Families

424

Children's Engagement in Different Classroom Activities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A multiple case study is reported aiming at identifying the degree of taking part and of being engaged in classroom activities for children with and without reading and writing difficulties/dyslexia. The aim was also to investigate the accordance between "effective literacy teaching" and children's expressed interest and observed taking part and

Sandstrom Kjellin, Margareta; Granlund, Mats

2006-01-01

425

Burnout and Work Engagement among Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Job Demands-Resources Model was used as the basis of the proposal that there are two parallel processes involved in work-related well-being among teachers, namely an energetical process (i.e., job demands --> burnout --> ill health) and a motivational process (i.e., job resources --> engagement --> organizational commitment). In

Hakanen, Jari J.; Bakker, Arnold B.; Schaufeli, Wilmar B.

2006-01-01

426

Engagement as Co-Generative Theorizing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To meet current and ever shifting problems people continually need new and better ways to attend to, talk about, and respond in the world. All communities can have an impoverished language for talking about human interaction and making decisions in times of fundamental and rapid change. Three current impoverishments are discussed. Engaged

Deetz, Stanley

2008-01-01

427

Kindergarten students' cognitive engagement in science learning  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The study is based on a secondary analysis of data from the 3rd year of the Scientific Literacy Project (SLP), a federally funded research project that examines how kindergarten students learn science in inquiry settings (Mantzicopoulos, Patrick, & Samarapungavan, 2005). Videotapes of classroom lessons implemented as part of the Year 3 intervention were analyzed to identify kindergarten students' patterns of cognitive engagement during inquiry-based science learning, as well as to identify patterns of teacher discourse that promoted students' cognitive engagement. The data for the current study were drawn from videotapes and transcriptions of classroom discourse in 3 intervention classrooms that participated in the SLP. Three teachers and 55 kindergarten students participated in the study. Twelve categories of kindergarten students' cognitive engagement and eleven categories of teacher discourse were identified. The initial 12 student and 11 teacher discourse categories were further grouped into two superordinate categories (Higher Order and Basic) respectively. Chi Square analyses indicated that there was a statistically significant association between student and teacher superordinate discourse (alpha = .05). MANOVA analyses indicated that there was no significant difference on overall rates of kindergarten students' cognitive engagement by class (alpha = .05).

Tsai, Meng-Fang

428

Engaging the Adult Learner Generational Mix  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Educators and Trainers both focus on adult learning theory when teaching. In the workforce, as well as in higher education, current literature pertaining to adult learners tends to lump all adults into the same category. Scant research exists that reviews the adult learner through a generational lens. This paper examines the elements that engage

Holyoke, Laura; Larson, Erick

2009-01-01

429

The Project Approach: Three Avenues of Engagement  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines the rationale of the spirit, material, and method of educa- tion behind the Project Approach. The paper describes some of the conditions and opportunities offered by project work that support childrens disposi- tions to become lifelong learners and presents a model of three avenues of engagement for the mind of the child as it functions intellectually and

Ann-Marie Clark

430

Parents and Children Engaging in Storybook Reading  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Family literacy studies have shown that the role of parental storybook reading has an impact on children's success in school-based literacy instruction. Storybook reading is when adults read an appropriate text to their children. This review describes studies in which parents and children engage in storybook reading. It specifically reports

Saracho, Olivia N.; Spodek, Bernard

2010-01-01

431

Engagement and talent management of Gen Y  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose This article aims to underline that Generation Y have specific traits, needs and expectations and that it is vital that organizations understand these when looking to engage and support them and support in their development. Design\\/methodology\\/approach The article deals with defining who Generation Y are how they behave and what motivates them. Based on these insights,

Anita Weyland

2011-01-01

432

Interactive Engagement: How Much Is Enough?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It is now widely known that interactive engagement (IE) teaching methods are the most effective methods of teaching physics. As physics instructors, we now have a variety of methods and models to choose from to make courses interactive. Included in these are methods that function as interactive adaptations to the traditional structure of physics

Keiner, Louis E.; Burns, Teresa E.

2010-01-01

433

Tutors' Forum: Engaging Distributed Communities of Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The need to engage students studying at a distance in order to reduce isolation, foster a sense of belonging and enhance learning has received significant attention over the past few years. Conversely, very little research has focused on teachers working in this type of environment. In fact, we argue, they appear to be the forgotten dimension in

Beaumont, Rosemary; Stirling, Jeannette; Percy, Alisa

2009-01-01

434

Engaging a University: The CCHERS Experience.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes experiences of the Center for Community Health Education Research and Service, Inc. (CCHERS), in Boston, Massachusetts as a catalyst for engaging universities in collaboration for the social and economic development of an urban community. The partnership involved two private universities, an academic medical center, the city public

Freeman, Elmer

2000-01-01

435

Inferences about Action Engage Action Systems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Verbal descriptions of actions activate compatible motor responses [Glenberg, A. M., & Kaschak, M. P. (2002). Grounding language in action. "Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 9", 558-565]. Previous studies have found that the motor processes for manual rotation are engaged in a direction-specific manner when a verb disambiguates the direction of

Taylor, Lawrence J.; Lev-Ari, Shiri; Zwaan, Rolf A.

2008-01-01

436

Uncertainty and Engagement with Learning Games  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Uncertainty may be an important component of the motivation provided by learning games, especially when associated with gaming rather than learning. Three studies are reported that explore the influence of gaming uncertainty on engagement with computer-based learning games. In the first study, children (10-11 years) played a simple maths quiz.

Howard-Jones, Paul A.; Demetriou, Skevi

2009-01-01

437

"Red Eyes": Engaging Emotions in Multicultural Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Engaging emotions in multicultural education is an important but a relatively neglected issue in teacher education. This essay calls for pedagogical attention to the role of emotions and attempts to analyze how teaching autobiographies and films sheds light on the emotional dynamics of multicultural education. Two films, "The Color of Fear", and

Wang, Hongyu

2008-01-01

438

Online Social Ties and Political Engagement  

Microsoft Academic Search

While positive effects of social interaction on political participation have been widely confirmed, questions have been raised about whether the relationship holds in the online environment. This paper uses data from the 2007 Australian Election Study to address this debate by testing whether greater online social interaction predicts increased political engagement, and whether this differs for interactions within homogenous (bonding)

Rachel K. Gibson; Ian McAllister

2012-01-01

439

Adolescents' Moral Engagement in Urban Settings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Adolescents who live in urban settings regularly encounter a complex array of people and circumstances that require sophisticated decision-making skills. Using their personal standards, adolescents coordinate moral thoughts and emotions when deciding how to act. After defining what the author refers to as moral engagement, several empirical examples are introduced to illustrate how parents and teachers might incorporate conversations into

Theresa A. Thorkildsen

2007-01-01

440

Engaging students in an undergraduate research course.  

PubMed

Nursing educators must be creative and dynamic in course design and seek to adopt pedagogical strategies that promote learner outcomes. Using multiple teaching strategies and experiential methods, the author describes one such attempt to engage students enrolled in an undergraduate nursing research course. PMID:21670631

Kohtz, Cindy

2011-01-01

441

Sustainability Innovation & Engagement Fund Proposal Report  

E-print Network

Sustainability Innovation & Engagement Fund Proposal Report Summer 2014 Prepared by Ezra Small Campus Sustainability Manager #12;Current Status � 1 Project Completed � 6 Projects in Implementation remaining $27,285 not yet allocated) #12;Save Water: Shower with a Sustainable Head � All 192 showerheads

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

442

Engaging Undergraduates through Interdisciplinary Research in Nanotechnology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To recruit and retain more students in all science disciplines at our small (5,000 student) public university, we implemented an interdisciplinary strategy focusing on nanotechnology and enhanced undergraduate research. Inherently interdisciplinary, the novelty of nanotechnology and its growing career potential appeal to students. To engage

Goonewardene, Anura U.; Offutt, Christine; Whitling, Jacqueline; Woodhouse, Donald

2012-01-01

443

Engaging Secondary Students in Reasoning and Proving  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In mathematics, the generation and validation of new knowledge frequently involves alternating between two major activities: (1) making generalizations; and (2) developing arguments. Engaging students in reasoning-and-proving is a challenging goal, but also an important one for deep learning and sense making in mathematics. In this article, the

Stylianides, Gabriel

2010-01-01

444

Life Satisfaction and Student Engagement in Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Situated within a positive psychology perspective, this study explored linkages between adolescent students' positive subjective well-being and their levels of engagement in schooling. Specifically, using structural equation modeling techniques, we evaluated the nature and directionality of longitudinal relationships between life satisfaction and

Lewis, Ashley D.; Huebner, E. Scott; Malone, Patrick S.; Valois, Robert F.

2011-01-01

445

Moving from Content Knowledge to Engagement  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Combining service learning with environmental and science issues allows students to move beyond awareness toward engagement. The action team service project requires students to build in-depth knowledge, apply skills directly related to taking action, and reflect on their learning. The research conducted increases the science literacy of students.

Mcdonald, James; Dominguez, Lynn

2005-11-01

446

Improving Student Engagement: Ten Proposals for Action  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since the 1980s an extensive research literature has investigated how to improve student success in higher education focusing on student outcomes such as retention, completion and employability. A parallel research programme has focused on how students engage with their studies and what they, institutions and educators can do to enhance their

Zepke, Nick; Leach, Linda

2010-01-01

447

Interteach and Student Engagement in Political Science  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Interteach" is a method of guided discussion and feedback developed by Thomas Boyce and Philip Hineline in 2002. This method, primarily used in the psychology classroom, encourages greater student engagement and responsibility for learning by requiring extensive student preparation, peer-to-peer instruction, and peer evaluation. How can

Slagter, Tracy H.; Scribner, Druscilla L.

2014-01-01

448

Promoting Student Engagement in the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background/Context: Much progress has been made toward a greater understanding of student engagement and its role in promoting a host of desirable outcomes, including academic outcomes such as higher achievement and reduced dropout, as well as various well-being and life outcomes. Nonetheless, disengagement in our schools is widespread. This may

Bundick, Matthew J.; Quaglia, Russell J.; Corso, Michael J.; Haywood, Dawn E.

2014-01-01

449

Research and Engagement Academy Faculty Scholars  

E-print Network

Scholars College of Liberal Arts Rebecca Glauber `11 Assistant Professor Sociology Josh Lauer `12 Assistant-McDonald `12 Associate Professor Education Thomas Safford `12 Assistant Professor Sociology #12;University of Earth, Oceans and Space University of New Hampshire Research and Engagement Academy -- Faculty Scholars

Pohl, Karsten

450

LES ENGAGEMENTS CONTRACTUELS DES ACTIONNAIRES DE REFERENCE  

E-print Network

-acquisitions, gouvernance, introduction en bourse, Q de Tobin, OPA amicales, OPA hostiles, pactes d'actionnaires, valeur deLES ENGAGEMENTS CONTRACTUELS DES ACTIONNAIRES DE REFERENCE LORS DE L'INTRODUCTION EN BOURSE tel'introduction en bourse Eric DUCROS Sous la direction de : Edith GINGLINGER Professeur à l'Université Paris

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

451

Effective Strategies for Engaging Adult Learners  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Innovative methods in teaching should be used in every college classroom to enhance student engagement, support any teaching environment and encourage inquiry among learners. Adults learn best by participation in relevant experiences and utilization of practical information. When adult students are active in their learning they are able to develop

Karge, Belinda Dunnick; Phillips, Kathleen M.; Jessee, Tammy; McCabe, Marjorie

2011-01-01

452

Advisory Boards: Gateway to Business Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Interest has been growing in how to build or manage an effective business advisory board. Developing an advisory board is crucial to keeping CTE programs relevant and viable by engaging the support of business and industry. This article delves into how to build and manage a board, and how to re-energize boards that already exist but may be lacking.

Meeder, Hans; Pawlowski, Brett

2012-01-01

453

Facebook Use and Engagement of College Freshmen  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this research was to investigate the effects of intensity of Facebook use and compare the effects of Facebook use with retention program participation on the engagement of college freshmen. The sample consisted of 141 freshmen at the University of West Florida (UWF). The participants were surveyed using questions from the National

Burkart, Edith Jenae

2013-01-01

454

Increasing engagement through early recommender intervention  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social network sites rely on the contributions of t heir members to create a lively and enjoyable space. Recent rese arch has focused on using personalization and recommender technologies to encourage participation of existing members. In this work we present an early-intervention approach to encouragi ng participation and engagement, which makes recommendations to new users during their sign-up process. Our

Jill Freyne; Michal Jacovi; Ido Guy; Werner Geyer

2009-01-01

455

Districts Deploy Digital Tools to Engage Parents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Digital technology is providing a growing variety of methods for school leaders to connect with parents anywhere, anytime--a tactic mirroring how technology is used to engage students. Through Twitter feeds, Facebook pages, and text messages sent in multiple languages, school staff members are giving parents instant updates, news, and information

Fleming, Nora

2012-01-01

456

Mapping Stone Walls and Text Engagement  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this lesson, students will understand that local rocks are different and are used in various ways. Following a directed reading and discussion, the students engage in an activity in which they 'dig up' rocks from a sand-filled bucket and state what type of rock they think it is and why.

457

Engaging Families in Sustainable Healthy Living  

Microsoft Academic Search

As obesity is increasing in many countries, helping people manage their weight has become an important issue. Medical research has shown that the family context may be important to promote lifestyle changes. Our work aims at designing a collaborative and interactive environment to engage a family in support of an individual needing to manage his or her weight. Author Keywords

Nathalie Colineau; Ccile Paris; Shlomo Berkovsky

458

Levels of Engagement in Establishing Coaching Relationships  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Case studies of two coaches that examine the levels of engagement of each coach as they worked to establish effective coaching relationships were examined in this study. Data were collected during a seven-month period and included: (a) the coaches' reflective journals; (b) pre- and post-surveys from each coach and teacher; (c) audio-recorded

McGatha, Maggie

2008-01-01

459

Workplace Engagement and Generational Differences in Values  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article summarizes literature on workplace engagement, an issue that affects organizations' financial results and individuals' personal lives. The newest of the four generations in the workplace, Millennials, were recently shown to have different values than the other two prevalent generations. Surveys taken by 16,000 high school seniors of

Schullery, Nancy M.

2013-01-01

460

SHAPING GLOBAL GOVERNANCE 2012 ENGAGEMENT REVIEW  

E-print Network

. But we are not interested in symbols--we care about results. And we believe that effective stewardship requires much more robust engagement than simply casting negative proxy votes. Further, we find sufficient space to be able to take the same long-term perspective we do to investing and in parti- cular

Glasgow, University of

461

Empowering Reflective Ethical Engagement in Field Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Intrinsic to experiential learning is the challenge of empowering students to both reflectively engage with and inquire into ethical issues, while facing time, task, social, and other daily pressures. As designated "learners" in a professional setting, experiential education students typically see themselves as having little authority within the

Cohen, Perrin

2010-01-01

462

A Closer Look: Student Engagement in Artmaking  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author describes her research study about student engagement in artmaking. The study takes place at a suburban middle school on the East coast. For the purpose of her research, she developed a book-making unit. "The Artist's Book," comprised four art problems, challenging students to transform an old hardback book into a

Levine, Rebecca Sokol

2009-01-01

463

Chapter 1: Locating Youth Civic Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is a moral panic in the US about youth civic engagement because data show decreasing rates of involvement in organized groups and with voting. There are multiple interpretations of what this means for democracy and about young people. One major reading is that interest in civic life is decreasing and this is seen to be related to

Roholt, Ross VeLure; Hildreth, R. W.; Baizerman, Michael

2007-01-01

464

Material Matters: Increasing Emotional Engagement in Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Organizational scholars and neuroscientists suggest that when people are more emotionally engaged, they learn more effectively. Clinical art therapists suggest that the experience as well as the expression of emotions can be enabled or constrained by different materials. So then, what materials can be employed by management educators to achieve

Taylor, Steven S.; Statler, Matt

2014-01-01

465

Titan Tusk Force Student Engagement Report  

E-print Network

Titan Tusk Force Student Engagement Report FY 2009-2010 Mission Statement The mission of Titan Tusk Force is to develop a strong sense of campus unity, pride and identity with CSUF. Titan Tusk Force, Incorporated here at California State University, Fullerton. Program Overview Titan Tusk Force (TTF) functions

de Lijser, Peter

466

Titan Tusk Force Student Engagement Report  

E-print Network

Titan Tusk Force Student Engagement Report FY 2008-2009 Mission Statement The mission of Titan Tusk Force is to develop a strong sense of campus unity, pride and identity with CSUF. Titan Tusk Force, Incorporated here at California State University, Fullerton. Program Overview Titan Tusk Force (TTF) functions

de Lijser, Peter

467

Titan Tusk Force Student Engagement Report  

E-print Network

Titan Tusk Force Student Engagement Report FY 2010-2011 Mission Statement The mission of Titan Tusk Force is to develop a strong sense of campus unity, pride and identity with CSUF. Titan Tusk Force, Incorporated here at California State University, Fullerton. Program Overview Titan Tusk Force (TTF) functions

de Lijser, Peter

468

Titan Tusk Force Student Engagement Report  

E-print Network

Titan Tusk Force Student Engagement Report FY 2012-2013 Mission Statement The mission of Titan Tusk Force is to develop a strong sense of campus unity, pride and identity with CSUF. Titan Tusk Force, CSUF, Incorporated here at California State University, Fullerton. Program Overview Titan Tusk Force

de Lijser, Peter

469

Titan Pride Center Student Engagement Report  

E-print Network

Titan Pride Center Student Engagement Report FY 2012-2013 Mission Statement The vision of the Titan Pride Center is to instill Titan Pride into all Cal State Fullerton students by connecting them a Titan. Program Overview The core services of the Titan Pride Center include being a campus history

de Lijser, Peter

470

Titan Tusk Force Student Engagement Report  

E-print Network

athletic games. The group hosts weekly meetings for their volunteers and other students that might where a student can earn points for attending certain athletic games. Engagement Results Event/Chalking once a week (Marketing goals such as a Twitter and Instagram page) - Connecting tailgates

de Lijser, Peter

471

Value Perceptions as Influences upon Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study was designed to assess whether changes in stakeholders' perceptions about the value generated by an institution might influence the nature of their engagement with it. Quantitative and qualitative analysis of research data revealed a positive correlation between stakeholders who believed an institution generated social or economic value

Swanson, Lee A.

2009-01-01

472

Information Services and Systems Customer Engagement Strategy  

E-print Network

. To be effective, we need to: Understand our customers' needs for Library, ICT, Media, Corporate Information Committee). Regular customer engagement will be made possible through a variety of social media sites to respond to the comments and questions posted by users in a timely manner. (see ISS Social Media Policy

Martin, Ralph R.

473

Community Engagement Request Form General Information  

E-print Network

Identifying funding sources Learning about community-based participatory research Getting feedback on your to learn from a consultation (please be as specific as possible)? #12;Community Engagement Request Form/instruments Training staff or community partners in community-based participatory research Establishing an evaluation

Carmichael, Owen

474

Value from Hedonic Experience and Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recognizing that value involves experiencing pleasure or pain is critical to understanding the psychology of value. But hedonic experience is not enough. I propose that it is also necessary to recognize that strength of engagement can contribute to experienced value through its contribution to the experience of motivational force--an experience of

Higgins, E. Tory

2006-01-01

475

Productive Tensions: Ethnographic Engagement, Complexity, and Contradiction  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article discusses engagement, complexity, and contradiction as resources for, rather than simply impediments to, good research. Drawing on examples from her own work of the past three decades on body image, commercial sex, and the medical use of marijuana, the author examines the benefits of, as well as some of the challenges presented by, this approach to scholarly practice.

Wendy Chapkis

2010-01-01

476

UBC Linguistics Dept. Engagement with Endangered Languages  

E-print Network

UBC Linguistics Dept. Engagement with Endangered Languages University of British Columbia - Draft Nata (Northern Tanzania, East Africa) �Speaker Linguist/Community Member (current grad student) �Documenting his language for both linguists and learners. �Involved in Partiipcatory Research with community

Michelson, David G.

477

Special Operations in the Theater Engagement Plan.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this Strategic Research Project is to explore the roles that Special Operations Forces (SOF) play in the Commander-in-Chiefs Theater Engagement Plan (CINC's TEP) and specifically how SOF can help provide the situational awareness and Indica...

J. M. Symington

2001-01-01

478

OHSU: Serving and Engaging LGBT Patients,  

E-print Network

OHSU: Serving and Engaging LGBT Patients, Employees and Students Center for Diversity and Inclusion opportunity, affirmative action institution. LGBT Employee and Student Resource Groups OHSU Pride, an OHSU LGBT patients and their needs, 2) develop training guidelines for best practices in treating

Chapman, Michael S.

479

Higher Education and Civic Engagement: Comparative Perspectives  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Higher Education and Civic Engagement provides an original and challenging contribution to contemporary debates on the civic purpose of higher education. It explores teaching and learning, research, and service in a range of international contexts. This book is essential reading for higher education leaders, faculty, administrators, and members of

McIlrath, Lorraine, Ed.; Lyons, Ann, Ed.; Munck, Ronaldo, Ed.

2012-01-01

480

Engaged Service Learning - Implications for Higher Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dwindling resources for tertiary education, has resulted in reduced emphasis on intensive, small group, staff - student collaborative project-based service learning. However, training scientists to manage significant issues, such as sustainable water use, requires an ability to engage both industry and community stakeholders. This paper describes the results of an 'action conversations' approach to explore community perceptions, teach students skills

Tony Webb; Shelley Burgin

2009-01-01

481

Advocating and Modeling the Engaged University  

E-print Network

Engagement/Service-Learning #12;Outreach is a form of scholarship that cuts across teaching, research, and service. It involves generating, transmitting, applying, and preserving knowledge for the direct benefit Approaches of Outreach Office Academic Service-Learning Co-curricular and Student-led Initiatives Outreach

482

Student Voice and Engagement: Connecting through Partnership  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper draws on research conducted across an English higher education partnership to investigate the ways in which student voice was engaged in further education colleges offering university awards through partnership arrangements. Such collaborations are characterised by the marginal presence of higher education students in an environment

Gray, Claire; Swain, Julie; Rodway-Dyer, Sue

2014-01-01

483

A SHAPSHOT OF 2010: ENGAGEMENT METRICS,  

E-print Network

2010 50 start-ups since FY2005 20 start-ups in process Venture Capital raised to date by a selection FY10 Technology Licensing 354 Innovations reported by UW researchers 115 Consultations requested 155 Touchpoints (early meetings with investigators to evaluate a technology) 55 Engagements (team

Hochberg, Michael

484

E-learning: engagement, enhancement and execution  

Microsoft Academic Search

Explores the practical and theoretical issues involved in the evaluation, quality assurance and engagement of operating an e-learning programme as a distance learning service on an international basis for people in employment. Focuses on the experiences of delivery of e-learning of a case at the University of Wales, Lampeter that has been adapted from a project into mainstream provision. Suggests

Ian Roffe

2002-01-01

485

Public engagement initiative on food and drink  

E-print Network

engagement and sustained local partnerships Families Focusing on socioeconomic disadvantage and the hard-to-reach Adults Testing creative formats for discussing contentious issues Impact research Investigating% Percentage of primary schools surveyed in 2010 that had used the kits. 41% Percentage of secondary schools

Rambaut, Andrew

486

Engaging Students and the Community with  

E-print Network

Agriculture Teaming Up to Stop Hunger VOLUME 20 WINTER 2013/2014 #12;3Winter 2013/2014 | CALS CONNECTION Up to Stop Hunger 7 CALS Students Get Hands-On Research Experience with the BodPod 8 Engaging hunger. You will find our students working with the latest technology, such as the futuristic Bod

Jawitz, James W.

487

Factor Structure of the Group Engagement Measure  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Group Engagement Measure (GEM) assesses a commonly used, but rarely measured, process in group work. Earlier studies examined the reliability and validity of the GEM, but none empirically examined its factor structure. The authors examined the seven-factor, 37-item structure of the GEM, using confirmatory factor analysis involving a combined

Macgowan, Mark J.; Newman, Frederick L.

2005-01-01

488

Engaging African American Males in Reading  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

By selecting appropriate reading materials, teachers can engage African American adolescent males with text, particularly students who have not mastered the skills, strategies, and knowledge that will lead to positive life outcomes. This approach takes into account students' four literacy needs--academic, cultural, emotional, and social--and

Tatum, Alfred W.

2006-01-01

489

Engaging Students with Feedback through Adaptive Release  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Feedback to students has been highlighted in the literature as an area where improvements are needed. Students need high quality, prompt feedback, but they also need guidance and tools to help them engage with and learn from that feedback. This case study explores staff and student perceptions of a tool at Sheffield Hallam University which

Irwin, Brian; Hepplestone, Stuart; Holden, Graham; Parkin, Helen J.; Thorpe, Louise

2013-01-01

490

Social Work Social work engages with individuals,  

E-print Network

Social Work Social work engages with individuals, families, communities and societies to improve and professional development. www.uwindsor.ca/socialwork A Bachelor of Social Work degree can lead to careers and advocacy associations. A Rigorous, Enriching Program The mission of the School of Social Work is to promote

491

Social Work in the Engaged University  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article identifies the importance of educating social work students and enlisting social work faculty to embrace the university-community engagement arena as a critical subfield of community practice. Through the lens of social work knowledge, values, and skills, the authors present three case studies of social workers who are working in the

Martin, Elisa M.; Pyles, Loretta

2013-01-01

492

CONFERENCE ANNOUNCEMENT African Engagements: On whose terms?  

E-print Network

and the United States, emerging powers like China and India have stepped up their engagement, in what some have education and basic research in the face of equally daunting challenges including poverty, and post post-Cold war order is not in doubt. From being in a state of neglect and marginality in the immediate

493

TSU Space Program Student Engagement Report  

E-print Network

TSU Space Program Student Engagement Report FY 2012-2013 Mission Statement The Titan Student Centers Governing Board allocates space in the Titan Student Union each semester to give recognized clubs and organizations space to plan events, conduct small meetings and store club/organization property. Program

de Lijser, Peter

494

Pedagogies of Engagement: Classroom-Based Practices  

Microsoft Academic Search

Educators, researchers, and policy makers have advocated student involvement for some time as an essential aspect of meaningful learning. In the past twenty years engineering educators have implemented several means of better engaging their undergraduate students, including active and cooperative learning, learning communities, service learning, cooperative education, inquiry and problem-based learning, and team projects. This paper focuses on classroom-based pedagogies

KARL A. SMITH; SHERI D. SHEPPARD; DAVID W. JOHNSON

2005-01-01

495

Engagement with Health Agencies on Twitter  

PubMed Central

Objective To investigate factors associated with engagement of U.S. Federal Health Agencies via Twitter. Our specific goals are to study factors related to a) numbers of retweets, b) time between the agency tweet and first retweet and c) time between the agency tweet and last retweet. Methods We collect 164,104 tweets from 25 Federal Health Agencies and their 130 accounts. We use negative binomial hurdle regression models and Cox proportional hazards models to explore the influence of 26 factors on agency engagement. Account features include network centrality, tweet count, numbers of friends, followers, and favorites. Tweet features include age, the use of hashtags, user-mentions, URLs, sentiment measured using Sentistrength, and tweet content represented by fifteen semantic groups. Results A third of the tweets (53,556) had zero retweets. Less than 1% (613) had more than 100 retweets (mean ?=?284). The hurdle analysis shows that hashtags, URLs and user-mentions are positively associated with retweets; sentiment has no association with retweets; and tweet count has a negative association with retweets. Almost all semantic groups, except for geographic areas, occupations and organizations, are positively associated with retweeting. The survival analyses indicate that engagement is positively associated with tweet age and the follower count. Conclusions Some of the factors associated with higher levels of Twitter engagement cannot be changed by the agencies, but others can be modified (e.g., use of hashtags, URLs). Our findings provide the background for future controlled experiments to increase public health engagement via Twitter. PMID:25379727

Bhattacharya, Sanmitra; Srinivasan, Padmini; Polgreen, Phil

2014-01-01

496

Effects of temephos (Abate? 4E) on fiddler crabs (Uca pugnax and Uca minax) on a Delaware salt marsh  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The non-target effects of temephos (as Abate 4E, 44.6% active ingredient) on fiddler crabs were examined on the salt marsh at Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), near Dover, DE. Six 170 x 170 m plots were established; 3 were sprayed on 4 occasions at a rate of 1.5 fl oz/acre (0.054 kg active ingredient/ha) and 3 were controls. On each plot, marsh fiddler crab (Uca pugnax) populations were monitored by repeatedly counting the number of burrow holes in 2 counting areas marked out along tidal guts. One half of each counting area was covered with bird netting to evaluate sublethal toxic effects, which, if present, could result in increased susceptibility to bird predation. A statistically significant linear association was established between the number of holes and the number of crabs. No significant differences were found in the numbers of holes (or crabs) in the sprayed vs. control plots and in the covered vs. uncovered sections. However, survival of juvenile crabs in in situ bioassays was significantly reduced (16% lower) by the spraying. Median acetylcholinesterase activity in claw muscle of red-jointed fiddler crabs (U. minax) collected 2 days after an operational spray with Abate 4E was significantly reduced (28% lower) compared to unsprayed crabs. In view of the toxicity to juvenile crabs and the cholinesterase inhibition, we recommend continued monitoring and research for non-target impacts of Abate 4E on fiddler crabs to establish whether the reported level of cholinesterase inhibition results in acute or chronic toxicity.

Pinkney, A.E.; McGowan, P.C.; Murphy, D.R.; Lowe, T.P.; Sparling, D.W.; Meredith, W.H.

1999-01-01

497

Effects of temephos (Abate 4E) on fiddler crabs (Uca pugnax and Uca minax) on a Delaware salt marsh.  

PubMed

The nontarget effects of temephos (as Abate 4E, 44.6% active ingredient) on fiddler crabs were examined on the salt marsh at Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge, near Dover, DE. Six 170 x 170-m plots were established; 3 were sprayed on 4 occasions at a rate of 1.5 fl oz/acre (0.054 kg active ingredient/ha) and 3 were controls. On each plot, marsh fiddler crab (Uca pugnax) populations were monitored by repeatedly counting the number of burrow holes in 2 counting areas marked out along tidal guts. One half of each counting area was covered with bird netting to evaluate sublethal toxic effects, which, if present, could result in increased susceptibility to bird predation. A statistically significant linear a