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Sample records for aberrant alternative splicing

  1. Aberrant alternative splicing and extracellular matrix gene expression in mouse models of myotonic dystrophy.

    E-print Network

    Ares Jr., Manny

    Aberrant alternative splicing and extracellular matrix gene expression in mouse models of myotonic dystrophy. Hongqing Du1 , Melissa S. Cline1 , Robert J. Osborne2 , Daniel L. Tuttle3 , Tyson A. Clark4

  2. Aberrant Alternative Splicing of Thyroid Hormone Receptor in a TSH-Secreting Pituitary Tumor Is

    E-print Network

    Aberrant Alternative Splicing of Thyroid Hormone Receptor in a TSH-Secreting Pituitary Tumor Is A Mechanism for Hormone Resistance SHINICHIRO ANDO, NICHOLAS J. SARLIS, JAY KRISHNAN, XU FENG, SAMUEL REFETOFF serum TSH levels despite elevated thyroid hormone levels. The mechanism for this defect in the negative

  3. Alternative splicing and disease.

    PubMed

    Tazi, Jamal; Bakkour, Nadia; Stamm, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Almost all protein-coding genes are spliced and their majority is alternatively spliced. Alternative splicing is a key element in eukaryotic gene expression that increases the coding capacity of the human genome and an increasing number of examples illustrates that the selection of wrong splice sites causes human disease. A fine-tuned balance of factors regulates splice site selection. Here, we discuss well-studied examples that show how a disturbance of this balance can cause human disease. The rapidly emerging knowledge of splicing regulation now allows the development of treatment options. PMID:18992329

  4. Alternative Splice in Alternative Lice

    PubMed Central

    Tovar-Corona, Jaime M.; Castillo-Morales, Atahualpa; Chen, Lu; Olds, Brett P.; Clark, John M.; Reynolds, Stuart E.; Pittendrigh, Barry R.; Feil, Edward J.; Urrutia, Araxi O.

    2015-01-01

    Genomic and transcriptomics analyses have revealed human head and body lice to be almost genetically identical; although con-specific, they nevertheless occupy distinct ecological niches and have differing feeding patterns. Most importantly, while head lice are not known to be vector competent, body lice can transmit three serious bacterial diseases; epidemictyphus, trench fever, and relapsing fever. In order to gain insights into the molecular bases for these differences, we analyzed alternative splicing (AS) using next-generation sequencing data for one strain of head lice and one strain of body lice. We identified a total of 3,598 AS events which were head or body lice specific. Exon skipping AS events were overrepresented among both head and body lice, whereas intron retention events were underrepresented in both. However, both the enrichment of exon skipping and the underrepresentation of intron retention are significantly stronger in body lice compared with head lice. Genes containing body louse-specific AS events were found to be significantly enriched for functions associated with development of the nervous system, salivary gland, trachea, and ovarian follicle cells, as well as regulation of transcription. In contrast, no functional categories were overrepresented among genes with head louse-specific AS events. Together, our results constitute the first evidence for transcript pool differences in head and body lice, providing insights into molecular adaptations that enabled human lice to adapt to clothing, and representing a powerful illustration of the pivotal role AS can play in functional adaptation. PMID:26169943

  5. Alternative Splice in Alternative Lice.

    PubMed

    Tovar-Corona, Jaime M; Castillo-Morales, Atahualpa; Chen, Lu; Olds, Brett P; Clark, John M; Reynolds, Stuart E; Pittendrigh, Barry R; Feil, Edward J; Urrutia, Araxi O

    2015-10-01

    Genomic and transcriptomics analyses have revealed human head and body lice to be almost genetically identical; although con-specific, they nevertheless occupy distinct ecological niches and have differing feeding patterns. Most importantly, while head lice are not known to be vector competent, body lice can transmit three serious bacterial diseases; epidemictyphus, trench fever, and relapsing fever. In order to gain insights into the molecular bases for these differences, we analyzed alternative splicing (AS) using next-generation sequencing data for one strain of head lice and one strain of body lice. We identified a total of 3,598 AS events which were head or body lice specific. Exon skipping AS events were overrepresented among both head and body lice, whereas intron retention events were underrepresented in both. However, both the enrichment of exon skipping and the underrepresentation of intron retention are significantly stronger in body lice compared with head lice. Genes containing body louse-specific AS events were found to be significantly enriched for functions associated with development of the nervous system, salivary gland, trachea, and ovarian follicle cells, as well as regulation of transcription. In contrast, no functional categories were overrepresented among genes with head louse-specific AS events. Together, our results constitute the first evidence for transcript pool differences in head and body lice, providing insights into molecular adaptations that enabled human lice to adapt to clothing, and representing a powerful illustration of the pivotal role AS can play in functional adaptation. PMID:26169943

  6. Reactivation of latently infected HIV-1 viral reservoirs and correction of aberrant alternative splicing in the LMNA gene via AMPK activation: Common mechanism of action linking HIV-1 latency and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Finley, Jahahreeh

    2015-09-01

    Although the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has proven highly effective in controlling and suppressing HIV-1 replication, the persistence of latent but replication-competent proviruses in a small subset of CD4(+) memory T cells presents significant challenges to viral eradication from infected individuals. Attempts to eliminate latent reservoirs are epitomized by the 'shock and kill' approach, a strategy involving the combinatorial usage of compounds that influence epigenetic modulation and initiation of proviral transcription. However, efficient regulation of viral pre-mRNA splicing through manipulation of host cell splicing machinery is also indispensible for HIV-1 replication. Interestingly, aberrant alternative splicing of the LMNA gene via the usage of a cryptic splice site has been shown to be the cause of most cases of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), a rare genetic condition characterized by an accelerated aging phenotype due to the accumulation of a truncated form of lamin A known as progerin. Recent evidence has shown that inhibition of the splicing factors ASF/SF2 (or SRSF1) and SRp55 (or SRSF6) leads to a reduction or an increase in progerin at both the mRNA and protein levels, respectively, thus altering the LMNA pre-mRNA splicing ratio. It is also well-established that during the latter stages of HIV-1 infection, an increase in the production and nuclear export of unspliced viral mRNA is indispensible for efficient HIV-1 replication and that the presence of ASF/SF2 leads to excessive viral pre-mRNA splicing and a reduction of unspliced mRNA, while the presence of SRp55 inhibits viral pre-mRNA splicing and aids in the generation and translation of unspliced HIV-1 mRNAs. The splicing-factor associated protein and putative mitochondrial chaperone p32 has also been shown to inhibit ASF/SF2, increase unspliced HIV-1 viral mRNA, and enhance mitochondrial DNA replication and oxidative phosphorylation. It is our hypothesis that activation of AMPK, a master regulator of cellular metabolism which has been shown to activate PKC-theta (?) and is essential for T cell activation, may modulate the splicing activities of SRp55 as well as enhance a p32-mediated inhibition of ASF/SF2-induced alternative splicing, potentially correcting aberrant alternative splicing in the LMNA gene and reactivating latent viral HIV-1 reservoirs. Moreover, similar epigenetic modifications and cell cycle regulators also characterize the analogous stages of premature senescence in progeroid cells and latency in HIV-1 infected T cells. AMPK-activating compounds including metformin and resveratrol may thus embody a novel treatment paradigm linking the pathophysiology of HGPS with that of HIV-1 latency. PMID:26115946

  7. Methods for Characterization of Alternative RNA Splicing.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Samuel E; Cheng, Chonghui

    2016-01-01

    Quantification of alternative splicing to detect the abundance of differentially spliced isoforms of a gene in total RNA can be accomplished via RT-PCR using both quantitative real-time and semi-quantitative PCR methods. These methods require careful PCR primer design to ensure specific detection of particular splice isoforms. We also describe analysis of alternative splicing using a splicing "minigene" in mammalian cell tissue culture to facilitate investigation of the regulation of alternative splicing of a particular exon of interest. PMID:26721495

  8. Alternative Splicing in Plant Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shengming; Tang, Fang; Zhu, Hongyan

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) occurs widely in plants and can provide the main source of transcriptome and proteome diversity in an organism. AS functions in a range of physiological processes, including plant disease resistance, but its biological roles and functional mechanisms remain poorly understood. Many plant disease resistance (R) genes undergo AS, and several R genes require alternatively spliced transcripts to produce R proteins that can specifically recognize pathogen invasion. In the finely-tuned process of R protein activation, the truncated isoforms generated by AS may participate in plant disease resistance either by suppressing the negative regulation of initiation of immunity, or by directly engaging in effector-triggered signaling. Although emerging research has shown the functional significance of AS in plant biotic stress responses, many aspects of this topic remain to be understood. Several interesting issues surrounding the AS of R genes, especially regarding its functional roles and regulation, will require innovative techniques and additional research to unravel. PMID:24918296

  9. Regulation of alternative splicing in obesity and weight loss

    PubMed Central

    Kaminska, Dorota; Pihlajamäki, Jussi

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is a mechanism by which multiple mRNA transcripts are generated from a single gene. According to recent reports approximately 95–100% of human multi-exon genes undergo AS. This increases the amount of functionally different protein isoforms, and in some cases leads to metabolic diseases. Herein we provide a brief overview of the basic aspects of splicing regulation in obesity and insulin resistance with specific examples. In addition, we review our recent findings demonstrating that weight loss regulates AS of TCF7L2 gene in both liver and adipose tissue, and that this splicing associates with changes in fatty acid and glucose metabolism. Future studies using global analysis of transcript variants and splicing regulators are needed for exploring the association of AS with metabolic alterations in obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind the aberrantly spliced transcripts may also provide opportunities for new diagnostic approaches. PMID:23991360

  10. COMMUNICATION: Alternative splicing and genomic stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, Kevin

    2004-06-01

    Alternative splicing allows an organism to make different proteins in different cells at different times, all from the same gene. In a cell that uses alternative splicing, the total length of all the exons is much shorter than in a cell that encodes the same set of proteins without alternative splicing. This economical use of exons makes genes more stable during reproduction and development because a genome with a shorter exon length is more resistant to harmful mutations. Genomic stability may be the reason why higher vertebrates splice alternatively. For a broad class of alternatively spliced genes, a formula is given for the increase in their stability.

  11. Alternative Splicing Events I. Elizabeth Cha1

    E-print Network

    Rouchka, Eric

    splicing variation in which the coding regions for a eukaryotic gene, called exons, are ex- tractedAlternative Splicing Events I. Elizabeth Cha1 , Katherine L. Hoblitzell1 , and Eric C. Rouchka1 TR Technical Report Series 1 Bioinformatics Review Alternative Splicing Events I. Elizabeth Cha1 , Katherine L

  12. Evolution of alternative splicing after gene duplication.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhixi; Wang, Jianmin; Yu, Jun; Huang, Xiaoqiu; Gu, Xun

    2006-02-01

    Alternative splicing and gene duplication are two major sources of proteomic function diversity. Here, we study the evolutionary trend of alternative splicing after gene duplication by analyzing the alternative splicing differences between duplicate genes. We observed that duplicate genes have fewer alternative splice (AS) forms than single-copy genes, and that a negative correlation exists between the mean number of AS forms and the gene family size. Interestingly, we found that the loss of alternative splicing in duplicate genes may occur shortly after the gene duplication. These results support the subfunctionization model of alternative splicing in the early stage after gene duplication. Further analysis of the alternative splicing distribution in human duplicate pairs showed the asymmetric evolution of alternative splicing after gene duplications; i.e., the AS forms between duplicates may differ dramatically. We therefore conclude that alternative splicing and gene duplication may not evolve independently. In the early stage after gene duplication, young duplicates may take over a certain amount of protein function diversity that previously was carried out by the alternative splicing mechanism. In the late stage, the gain and loss of alternative splicing seem to be independent between duplicates. PMID:16365379

  13. ASGS: an alternative splicing graph web service.

    PubMed

    Bollina, Durgaprasad; Lee, Bernett T K; Tan, Tin Wee; Ranganathan, Shoba

    2006-07-01

    Alternative transcript diversity manifests itself a prime cause of complexity in higher eukaryotes. The Alternative Splicing Graph Server (ASGS) is a web service facilitating the systematic study of alternatively spliced genes of higher eukaryotes by generating splicing graphs for the compact visual representation of transcript diversity from a single gene. Taking a set of transcripts in General Feature Format as input, ASGS identifies distinct reference and variable exons, generates a transcript splicing graph, an exon summary, splicing events classification and a single line graph to facilitate experimental analysis. This freely available web service can be accessed at http://asgs.biolinfo.org. PMID:16845045

  14. Chromatin, DNA structure and alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Nieto Moreno, Nicolás; Giono, Luciana E; Cambindo Botto, Adrián E; Muñoz, Manuel J; Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2015-11-14

    Coupling of transcription and alternative splicing via regulation of the transcriptional elongation rate is a well-studied phenomenon. Template features that act as roadblocks for the progression of RNA polymerase II comprise histone modifications and variants, DNA-interacting proteins and chromatin compaction. These may affect alternative splicing decisions by inducing pauses or decreasing elongation rate that change the time-window for splicing regulatory sequences to be recognized. Herein we discuss the evidence supporting the influence of template structural modifications on transcription and splicing, and provide insights about possible roles of non-B DNA conformations on the regulation of alternative splicing. PMID:26296319

  15. ASGS: an alternative splicing graph web service

    PubMed Central

    Bollina, Durgaprasad; Lee, Bernett T. K.; Tan, Tin Wee; Ranganathan, Shoba

    2006-01-01

    Alternative transcript diversity manifests itself a prime cause of complexity in higher eukaryotes. The Alternative Splicing Graph Server (ASGS) is a web service facilitating the systematic study of alternatively spliced genes of higher eukaryotes by generating splicing graphs for the compact visual representation of transcript diversity from a single gene. Taking a set of transcripts in General Feature Format as input, ASGS identifies distinct reference and variable exons, generates a transcript splicing graph, an exon summary, splicing events classification and a single line graph to facilitate experimental analysis. This freely available web service can be accessed at . PMID:16845045

  16. Regulation of Splicing Factors by Alternative Splicing and NMD Is Conserved between Kingdoms Yet Evolutionarily Flexible

    E-print Network

    Brenner, Steven E.

    Article Regulation of Splicing Factors by Alternative Splicing and NMD Is Conserved between of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine *Corresponding author: E-mail: brenner) splicing factors. Expression of these genes is regulated via alternative splicing of the ultraconserved

  17. Molecular Cell Alternative Splicing Regulates Biogenesis

    E-print Network

    Sharan, Roded

    miRNA and a spliced RNA can be generated from the same transcription unit. We have identified a mechanism in which RNA splicing negatively regu- lates the processing of pre-miRNAs that overlap exon-specific alternative splicing regulates maturation of one such miRNA, miR-412, resulting in effects on its targets

  18. Regulated functional alternative splicing in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Venables, Julian P.; Tazi, Jamal; Juge, François

    2012-01-01

    Alternative splicing expands the coding capacity of metazoan genes, and it was largely genetic studies in the fruit-fly Drosophila melanogaster that established the principle that regulated alternative splicing results in tissue- and stage-specific protein isoforms with different functions in development. Alternative splicing is particularly prominent in germ cells, muscle and the central nervous system where it modulates the expression of various proteins including cell-surface molecules and transcription factors. Studies in flies have given us numerous insights into alternative splicing in terms of upstream regulation, the exquisite diversity of their forms and the key differential cellular functions of alternatively spliced gene products. The current inundation of transcriptome sequencing data from Drosophila provides an unprecedented opportunity to gain a comprehensive view of alternative splicing. PMID:21908400

  19. Analysis of SRrp86-regulated alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Solis, Amanda S

    2010-01-01

    Previous work led to the hypothesis that SRrp86, a related member of the SR protein superfamily, can interact with and modulate the activity of other SR proteins. Here, we sought to test this hypothesis by examining the effect of changing SRrp86 concentrations on overall alternative splicing patterns. SpliceArrays were used to examine 9,854 splicing events in wild-type cells, cells overexpressing SRrp86, and cells treated with siRNAs to knockdown SRrp86. From among the 500 splicing events exhibiting altered splicing under these conditions, the splicing of c-Jun and I?B? were validated as being regulated by SRrp86 resulting in altered regulation of their downstream targets. In both cases, functionally distinct isoforms were generated that demonstrate the role SRrp86 plays in controlling alternative splicing. PMID:20400856

  20. ASDB: database of alternatively spliced genes.

    PubMed

    Gelfand, M S; Dubchak, I; Dralyuk, I; Zorn, M

    1999-01-01

    A database of alternatively spliced genes (ASDB) has been constructed based on (i) the results of the analysis of Swiss-Prot entries containing products of these genes and (ii) clustering procedure joining proteins that could arise by alternative splicing of the same gene. ASDB incorporates information about alternatively spliced genes, their products and expression patterns. It can be searched in order to find all products of alternative splicing produced in a particular tissue or a given organism, or all variants generated by a particular transcript. ASDB currently contains about 1700 protein sequences and can be accessed via the Internet at URL http://cbcg.nersc.gov/asdb PMID:9847209

  1. Transcriptome sequencing of human breast cancer reveals aberrant intronic transcription in amplicons and dysregulation of alternative splicing with major therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Forootan, Shiva Seyed; Butler, Joe M; Gardener, Derek; Baird, Alison E; Dodson, Andrew; Darby, Alistair; Kenny, John; Hall, Neil; Cossins, Andrew R; Foster, Christopher S; Gosden, Christine M

    2016-01-01

    Advances in genomic and transcriptome sequencing are revealing the massive scale of previously unrecognised alterations occurring during neoplastic transformation. Breast cancers are genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous. Each of the three major subtypes [ERBB2 amplified, estrogen receptor (ESR)-positive and triple-negative] poses diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Here we show, using high-resolution next-generation transcriptome sequencing, that in all three breast cancer subtypes, but not matched controls, there was significant overexpression of transcripts from intronic and untranslated regions in addition to exons from specific genes, particularly amplified oncogenes and hormone receptors. For key genes ERBB2 and ESR1, we demonstrate that overexpression is linked to the production of highly modified and truncated splice variants in tumours, but not controls, correlated with tumour subtype. Translation of these tumour-specific splice variants generates truncated proteins with altered subcellular locations and functions, modifying the phenotype, affecting tumour biology, and targeted antitumour therapies. In contrast, tumour suppressors TP53, BRCA1/2 and NF1 did not show intronic overexpression or truncated splice variants in cancers. These findings emphasize the detection of intronic as well as exonic changes in the transcriptional landscapes of cancers have profound therapeutic implications. PMID:26530297

  2. Connections between Alternative Transcription and Alternative Splicing in Mammals

    E-print Network

    Spiridonov, Alexey Nikolaevich

    The majority of mammalian genes produce multiple transcripts resulting from alternative splicing (AS) and/or alternative transcription initiation (ATI) and alternative transcription termination (ATT). Comparative analysis ...

  3. Selecting for Functional Alternative Splices in ESTs

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Zhengyan; States, David; Gish, Warren

    2002-01-01

    The expressed sequence tag (EST) collection in dbEST provides an extensive resource for detecting alternative splicing on a genomic scale. Using genomically aligned ESTs, a computational tool (TAP) was used to identify alternative splice patterns for 6400 known human genes from the RefSeq database. With sufficient EST coverage, one or more alternatively spliced forms could be detected for nearly all genes examined. To identify high (>95%) confidence observations of alternative splicing, splice variants were clustered on the basis of having mutually exclusive structures, and sample statistics were then applied. Through this selection, alternative splices expected at a frequency of >5% within their respective clusters were seen for only 17%–28% of genes. Although intron retention events (potentially unspliced messages) had been seen for 36% of the genes overall, the same statistical selection yielded reliable cases of intron retention for <5% of genes. For high-confidence alternative splices in the human ESTs, we also noted significantly higher rates both of cross-species conservation in mouse ESTs and of validation in the GenBank mRNA collection. We suggest quantitative analytical approaches such as these can aid in selecting useful targets for further experimental characterization and in so doing may help elucidate the mechanisms and biological implications of alternative splicing. PMID:12466287

  4. The evolving roles of alternative splicing Liana F Lareau1

    E-print Network

    or localization domains by alternative splicing. Alternative splicing can also regulate gene expression forms. Comparisons of alternative splicing between human and mouse genes show that predominant splice, human genes are alternatively spliced. Although estimates vary between studies, and increase as more

  5. Aberrant Splicing of Estrogen Receptor, HER2, and CD44 Genes in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Kazushi; Fry, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most common cause of cancer-related death among women under the age of 50 years. Established biomarkers, such as hormone receptors (estrogen receptor [ER]/progesterone receptor) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), play significant roles in the selection of patients for endocrine and trastuzumab therapies. However, the initial treatment response is often followed by tumor relapse with intrinsic resistance to the first-line therapy, so it has been expected to identify novel molecular markers to improve the survival and quality of life of patients. Alternative splicing of pre-messenger RNAs is a ubiquitous and flexible mechanism for the control of gene expression in mammalian cells. It provides cells with the opportunity to create protein isoforms with different, even opposing, functions from a single genomic locus. Aberrant alternative splicing is very common in cancer where emerging tumor cells take advantage of this flexibility to produce proteins that promote cell growth and survival. While a number of splicing alterations have been reported in human cancers, we focus on aberrant splicing of ER, HER2, and CD44 genes from the viewpoint of BC development. ER?36, a splice variant from the ER1 locus, governs nongenomic membrane signaling pathways triggered by estrogen and confers 4-hydroxytamoxifen resistance in BC therapy. The alternative spliced isoform of HER2 lacking exon 20 (?16HER2) has been reported in human BC; this isoform is associated with transforming ability than the wild-type HER2 and recapitulates the phenotypes of endocrine therapy-resistant BC. Although both CD44 splice isoforms (CD44s, CD44v) play essential roles in BC development, CD44v is more associated with those with favorable prognosis, such as luminal A subtype, while CD44s is linked to those with poor prognosis, such as HER2 or basal cell subtypes that are often metastatic. Hence, the detection of splice variants from these loci will provide keys to understand the pathogenesis, predict the prognosis, and choose specific therapies for BC. PMID:26692764

  6. Transcriptome assembly and alternative splicing analysis.

    PubMed

    Bonizzoni, Paola; Della Vedova, Gianluca; Pesole, Graziano; Picardi, Ernesto; Pirola, Yuri; Rizzi, Raffaella

    2015-01-01

    Alternative Splicing (AS) is the molecular phenomenon whereby multiple transcripts are produced from the same gene locus. As a consequence, it is responsible for the expansion of eukaryotic transcriptomes. Aberrant AS is involved in the onset and progression of several human diseases. Therefore, the characterization of exon-intron structure of a gene and the detection of corresponding transcript isoforms is an extremely relevant biological task. Nonetheless, the computational prediction of AS events and the repertoire of alternative transcripts is yet a challenging issue. Hereafter we introduce PIntron, a software package to predict the exon-intron structure and the full-length isoforms of a gene given a genomic region and a set of transcripts (ESTs and/or mRNAs). The software is open source and available at http://pintron.algolab.eu. PIntron has been designed for (and extensively tested on) a standard workstation without requiring dedicated expensive hardware. It easily manages large genomic regions and more than 20,000 ESTs, achieving good accuracy as shown in an experimental evaluation performed on 112 well-annotated genes selected from the ENCODE human regions used as training set in the EGASP competition. PMID:25577379

  7. A Genome-Wide Aberrant RNA Splicing in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Identifies Novel Potential Disease Markers and Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Adamia, Sophia; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin; Pilarski, Patrick M.; Bar-Natan, Michal; Pevzner, Samuel; Avet-Loiseau, Herve; Lode, Laurence; Verselis, Sigitas; Fox, Edward A.; Burke, John; Galinsky, Ilene; Dagogo-Jack, Ibiayi; Wadleigh, Martha; Steensma, David P.; Motyckova, Gabriela; Deangelo, Daniel J.; Quackenbush, John; Stone, Richard; Griffin, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Despite new treatments, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains an incurable disease. More effective drug design requires an expanded view of the molecular complexity that underlies AML. Alternative splicing of RNA is used by normal cells to generate protein diversity. Growing evidence indicates that aberrant splicing of genes plays a key role in cancer. We investigated genome-wide splicing abnormalities in AML and based on these abnormalities, we aimed to identify novel potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Experimental Design We used genome-wide alternative splicing screening to investigate alternative splicing abnormalities in two independent AML patient cohorts [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) (Boston, MA) and University Hospital de Nantes (UHN) (Nantes, France)] and normal donors. Selected splicing events were confirmed through cloning and sequencing analysis, and than validated in 193 patients with AML. Results Our results show that approximately 29% of expressed genes genome-wide were differentially and recurrently spliced in patients with AML compared with normal donors bone marrow CD34+ cells. Results were reproducible in two independent AML cohorts. In both cohorts, annotation analyses indicated similar proportions of differentially spliced genes encoding several oncogenes, tumor suppressor proteins, splicing factors, and heterogeneous-nuclear-ribonucleoproteins, proteins involved in apoptosis, cell proliferation, and spliceosome assembly. Our findings are consistent with reports for other malignances and indicate that AML-specific aberrations in splicing mechanisms are a hallmark of AML pathogenesis. Conclusions Overall, our results suggest that aberrant splicing is a common characteristic for AML. Our findings also suggest that splice variant transcripts that are the result of splicing aberrations create novel disease markers and provide potential targets for small molecules or antibody therapeutics for this disease. PMID:24284058

  8. Studies of exon scrambling and mutually exclusive alternative splicing

    E-print Network

    Kong, Rong, 1979-

    2005-01-01

    The goals of this thesis work were to study two special alternative splicing events: exon scrambling at the RNA splicing level and mutually exclusive alternative splicing (MEAS) by computational and experimental methods. ...

  9. TCGASpliceSeq a compendium of alternative mRNA splicing in cancer.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Michael; Wong, Wing Chung; Brown, Robert; Akbani, Rehan; Su, Xiaoping; Broom, Bradley; Melott, James; Weinstein, John

    2016-01-01

    TCGA's RNASeq data represent one of the largest collections of cancer transcriptomes ever assembled. RNASeq technology, combined with computational tools like our SpliceSeq package, provides a comprehensive, detailed view of alternative mRNA splicing. Aberrant splicing patterns in cancers have been implicated in such processes as carcinogenesis, de-differentiation and metastasis. TCGA SpliceSeq (http://bioinformatics.mdanderson.org/TCGASpliceSeq) is a web-based resource that provides a quick, user-friendly, highly visual interface for exploring the alternative splicing patterns of TCGA tumors. Percent Spliced In (PSI) values for splice events on samples from 33 different tumor types, including available adjacent normal samples, have been loaded into TCGA SpliceSeq. Investigators can interrogate genes of interest, search for the genes that show the strongest variation between or among selected tumor types, or explore splicing pattern changes between tumor and adjacent normal samples. The interface presents intuitive graphical representations of splicing patterns, read counts and various statistical summaries, including percent spliced in. Splicing data can also be downloaded for inclusion in integrative analyses. TCGA SpliceSeq is freely available for academic, government or commercial use. PMID:26602693

  10. Mechanism of alternative splicing and its regulation

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YAN; LIU, JING; HUANG, BO; XU, YAN-MEI; LI, JING; HUANG, LIN-FENG; LIN, JIN; ZHANG, JING; MIN, QING-HUA; YANG, WEI-MING; WANG, XIAO-ZHONG

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing of precursor mRNA is an essential mechanism to increase the complexity of gene expression, and it plays an important role in cellular differentiation and organism development. Regulation of alternative splicing is a complicated process in which numerous interacting components are at work, including cis-acting elements and trans-acting factors, and is further guided by the functional coupling between transcription and splicing. Additional molecular features, such as chromatin structure, RNA structure and alternative transcription initiation or alternative transcription termination, collaborate with these basic components to generate the protein diversity due to alternative splicing. All these factors contributing to this one fundamental biological process add up to a mechanism that is critical to the proper functioning of cells. Any corruption of the process may lead to disruption of normal cellular function and the eventuality of disease. Cancer is one of those diseases, where alternative splicing may be the basis for the identification of novel diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers, as well as new strategies for therapy. Thus, an in-depth understanding of alternative splicing regulation has the potential not only to elucidate fundamental biological principles, but to provide solutions for various diseases. PMID:25798239

  11. Identification of alternative 5?/3? splice sites based on the mechanism of splice site competition

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Huiyu; Bi, Jianning; Li, Yanda

    2006-01-01

    Alternative splicing plays an important role in regulating gene expression. Currently, most efficient methods use expressed sequence tags or microarray analysis for large-scale detection of alternative splicing. However, it is difficult to detect all alternative splice events with them because of their inherent limitations. Previous computational methods for alternative splicing prediction could only predict particular kinds of alternative splice events. Thus, it would be highly desirable to predict alternative 5?/3? splice sites with various splicing levels using genomic sequences alone. Here, we introduce the competition mechanism of splice sites selection into alternative splice site prediction. This approach allows us to predict not only rarely used but also frequently used alternative splice sites. On a dataset extracted from the AltSplice database, our method correctly classified ?70% of the splice sites into alternative and constitutive, as well as ?80% of the locations of real competitors for alternative splice sites. It outperforms a method which only considers features extracted from the splice sites themselves. Furthermore, this approach can also predict the changes in activation level arising from mutations in flanking cryptic splice sites of a given splice site. Our approach might be useful for studying alternative splicing in both computational and molecular biology. PMID:17098928

  12. Global regulation of alternative splicing during myogenic differentiation

    E-print Network

    Bland, Christopher S.

    Recent genome-wide analyses have elucidated the extent of alternative splicing (AS) in mammals, often focusing on comparisons of splice isoforms between differentiated tissues. However, regulated splicing changes are likely ...

  13. Cross-kingdom patterns of alternative splicing and splice recognition

    E-print Network

    McGuire, Abigail Manson

    Background: Variations in transcript splicing can reveal how eukaryotes recognize intronic splice sites. Retained introns (RIs) commonly appear when the intron definition (ID) mechanism of splice site recognition inconsistently ...

  14. Vitamin D and alternative splicing of RNA.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Rui; Chun, Rene F; Lisse, Thomas S; Garcia, Alejandro J; Xu, Jianzhong; Adams, John S; Hewison, Martin

    2015-04-01

    The active form of vitamin D (1?,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, 1,25(OH)2D) exerts its genomic effects via binding to a nuclear high-affinity vitamin D receptor (VDR). Recent deep sequencing analysis of VDR binding locations across the complete genome has significantly expanded our understanding of the actions of vitamin D and VDR on gene transcription. However, these studies have also promoted appreciation of the extra-transcriptional impact of vitamin D on gene expression. It is now clear that vitamin D interacts with the epigenome via effects on DNA methylation, histone acetylation, and microRNA generation to maintain normal biological functions. There is also increasing evidence that vitamin D can influence pre-mRNA constitutive splicing and alternative splicing, although the mechanism for this remains unclear. Pre-mRNA splicing has long been thought to be a post-transcription RNA processing event, but current data indicate that this occurs co-transcriptionally. Several steroid hormones have been recognized to coordinately control gene transcription and pre-mRNA splicing through the recruitment of nuclear receptor co-regulators that can both control gene transcription and splicing. The current review will discuss this concept with specific reference to vitamin D, and the potential role of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C (hnRNPC), a nuclear factor with an established function in RNA splicing. hnRNPC, has been shown to be involved in the VDR transcriptional complex as a vitamin D-response element-binding protein (VDRE-BP), and may act as a coupling factor linking VDR-directed gene transcription with RNA splicing. In this way hnRNPC may provide an additional mechanism for the fine-tuning of vitamin D-regulated target gene expression. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled '17th Vitamin D Workshop'. PMID:25447737

  15. Alternative splicing regulation at tandem 30 splice sites

    E-print Network

    Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    splicing of the distal NAG are highly regulated. INTRODUCTION In eukaryotic cells, gene expression splicing (AS). The intron/exon boundaries in euka- ryotic genes are defined by short and degenerate in recognition and interaction with the basal splicing machinery. AS allows an individual gene to express

  16. SplicingTypesAnno: annotating and quantifying alternative splicing events for RNA-Seq data.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoyong; Zuo, Fenghua; Ru, Yuanbin; Guo, Jiqiang; Yan, Xiaoyan; Sablok, Gaurav

    2015-04-01

    Alternative splicing plays a key role in the regulation of the central dogma. Four major types of alternative splicing have been classified as intron retention, exon skipping, alternative 5 splice sites or alternative donor sites, and alternative 3 splice sites or alternative acceptor sites. A few algorithms have been developed to detect splice junctions from RNA-Seq reads. However, there are few tools targeting at the major alternative splicing types at the exon/intron level. This type of analysis may reveal subtle, yet important events of alternative splicing, and thus help gain deeper understanding of the mechanism of alternative splicing. This paper describes a user-friendly R package, extracting, annotating and analyzing alternative splicing types for sequence alignment files from RNA-Seq. SplicingTypesAnno can: (1) provide annotation for major alternative splicing at exon/intron level. By comparing the annotation from GTF/GFF file, it identifies the novel alternative splicing sites; (2) offer a convenient two-level analysis: genome-scale annotation for users with high performance computing environment, and gene-scale annotation for users with personal computers; (3) generate a user-friendly web report and additional BED files for IGV visualization. SplicingTypesAnno is a user-friendly R package for extracting, annotating and analyzing alternative splicing types at exon/intron level for sequence alignment files from RNA-Seq. It is publically available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/splicingtypes/files/ or http://genome.sdau.edu.cn/research/software/SplicingTypesAnno.html. PMID:25720307

  17. Alternative-splicing-mediated gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qianliang; Zhou, Tianshou

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is a fundamental process during gene expression and has been found to be ubiquitous in eukaryotes. However, how AS impacts gene expression levels both quantitatively and qualitatively remains to be fully explored. Here, we analyze two common models of gene expression, each incorporating a simple splice mechanism that a pre-mRNA is spliced into two mature mRNA isoforms in a probabilistic manner. In the constitutive expression case, we show that the steady-state molecular numbers of two mature mRNA isoforms follow mutually independent Poisson distributions. In the bursting expression case, we demonstrate that the tail decay of the steady-state distribution for both mature mRNA isoforms that in general are not mutually independent can be characterized by the product of mean burst size and splicing probability. In both cases, we find that AS can efficiently modulate both the variability (measured by variance) and the noise level of the total mature mRNA, and in particular, the latter is always lower than the noise level of the pre-mRNA, implying that AS always reduces the noise. These results altogether reveal that AS is a mechanism of efficiently controlling the gene expression noise.

  18. Integrating alternative splicing detection into gene prediction

    PubMed Central

    Foissac, Sylvain; Schiex, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Background Alternative splicing (AS) is now considered as a major actor in transcriptome/proteome diversity and it cannot be neglected in the annotation process of a new genome. Despite considerable progresses in term of accuracy in computational gene prediction, the ability to reliably predict AS variants when there is local experimental evidence of it remains an open challenge for gene finders. Results We have used a new integrative approach that allows to incorporate AS detection into ab initio gene prediction. This method relies on the analysis of genomically aligned transcript sequences (ESTs and/or cDNAs), and has been implemented in the dynamic programming algorithm of the graph-based gene finder EuGÈNE. Given a genomic sequence and a set of aligned transcripts, this new version identifies the set of transcripts carrying evidence of alternative splicing events, and provides, in addition to the classical optimal gene prediction, alternative optimal predictions (among those which are consistent with the AS events detected). This allows for multiple annotations of a single gene in a way such that each predicted variant is supported by a transcript evidence (but not necessarily with a full-length coverage). Conclusions This automatic combination of experimental data analysis and ab initio gene finding offers an ideal integration of alternatively spliced gene prediction inside a single annotation pipeline. PMID:15705189

  19. ECgene: an alternative splicing database update

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yeunsook; Lee, Younghee; Kim, Bumjin; Shin, Youngah; Nam, Seungyoon; Kim, Pora; Kim, Namshin; Chung, Won-Hyong; Kim, Jaesang; Lee, Sanghyuk

    2007-01-01

    ECgene () was developed to provide functional annotation for alternatively spliced genes. The applications encompass the genome-based transcript modeling for alternative splicing (AS), domain analysis with Gene Ontology (GO) annotation and expression analysis based on the EST and SAGE data. We have expanded the ECgene's AS modeling and EST clustering to nine organisms for which sufficient EST data are available in the GenBank. As for the human genome, we have also introduced several new applications to analyze differential expression. ECprofiler is an ontology-based candidate gene search system that allows users to select an arbitrary combination of gene expression pattern and GO functional categories. DEGEST is a database of differentially expressed genes and isoforms based on the EST information. Importantly, gene expression is analyzed at three distinctive levels—gene, isoform and exon levels. The user interfaces for functional and expression analyses have been substantially improved. ASviewer is a dedicated java application that visualizes the transcript structure and functional features of alternatively spliced variants. The SAGE part of the expression module provides many additional features including SNP, differential expression and alternative tag positions. PMID:17132829

  20. Vials: Visualizing Alternative Splicing of Genes.

    PubMed

    Strobelt, Hendrik; Alsallakh, Bilal; Botros, Joseph; Peterson, Brant; Borowsky, Mark; Pfister, Hanspeter; Lex, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a process by which the same DNA sequence is used to assemble different proteins, called protein isoforms. Alternative splicing works by selectively omitting some of the coding regions (exons) typically associated with a gene. Detection of alternative splicing is difficult and uses a combination of advanced data acquisition methods and statistical inference. Knowledge about the abundance of isoforms is important for understanding both normal processes and diseases and to eventually improve treatment through targeted therapies. The data, however, is complex and current visualizations for isoforms are neither perceptually efficient nor scalable. To remedy this, we developed Vials, a novel visual analysis tool that enables analysts to explore the various datasets that scientists use to make judgments about isoforms: the abundance of reads associated with the coding regions of the gene, evidence for junctions, i.e., edges connecting the coding regions, and predictions of isoform frequencies. Vials is scalable as it allows for the simultaneous analysis of many samples in multiple groups. Our tool thus enables experts to (a) identify patterns of isoform abundance in groups of samples and (b) evaluate the quality of the data. We demonstrate the value of our tool in case studies using publicly available datasets. PMID:26529712

  1. Dual-specificity splice sites function alternatively as 5 and 3 splice sites

    E-print Network

    -scale sequencing projects and recent splicing- microarray studies, estimates of mammalian genes expressing multiple the implications of this unusual splicing pattern for the diverse mech- anisms of exon recognition and for gene evolution. alternative splicing competition mRNA/EST Eukaryotic genes are split into exons and introns

  2. CUG-BP1 regulates RyR1 ASI alternative splicing in skeletal muscle atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yinglong; Wang, Huiwen; Wei, Bin; Guo, Yuting; Gu, Lei; Yang, Zhiguang; Zhang, Qing; Wu, Yanyun; Yuan, Qi; Zhao, Gang; Ji, Guangju

    2015-01-01

    RNA binding protein is identified as an important mediator of aberrant alternative splicing in muscle atrophy. The altered splicing of calcium channels, such as ryanodine receptors (RyRs), plays an important role in impaired excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling in muscle atrophy; however, the regulatory mechanisms of ryanodine receptor 1 (RyR1) alternative splicing leading to skeletal muscle atrophy remains to be investigated. In this study we demonstrated that CUG binding protein 1 (CUG-BP1) was up-regulated and the alternative splicing of RyR1 ASI (exon70) was aberrant during the process of neurogenic muscle atrophy both in human patients and mouse models. The gain and loss of function experiments in vivo demonstrated that altered splicing pattern of RyR1 ASI was directly mediated by an up-regulated CUG-BP1 function. Furthermore, we found that CUG-BP1 affected the calcium release activity in single myofibers and the extent of atrophy was significantly reduced upon gene silencing of CUG-BP1 in atrophic muscle. These findings improve our understanding of calcium signaling related biological function of CUG-BP1 in muscle atrophy. Thus, we provide an intriguing perspective of involvement of mis-regulated RyR1 splicing in muscular disease. PMID:26531141

  3. CUG-BP1 regulates RyR1 ASI alternative splicing in skeletal muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yinglong; Wang, Huiwen; Wei, Bin; Guo, Yuting; Gu, Lei; Yang, Zhiguang; Zhang, Qing; Wu, Yanyun; Yuan, Qi; Zhao, Gang; Ji, Guangju

    2015-01-01

    RNA binding protein is identified as an important mediator of aberrant alternative splicing in muscle atrophy. The altered splicing of calcium channels, such as ryanodine receptors (RyRs), plays an important role in impaired excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling in muscle atrophy; however, the regulatory mechanisms of ryanodine receptor 1 (RyR1) alternative splicing leading to skeletal muscle atrophy remains to be investigated. In this study we demonstrated that CUG binding protein 1 (CUG-BP1) was up-regulated and the alternative splicing of RyR1 ASI (exon70) was aberrant during the process of neurogenic muscle atrophy both in human patients and mouse models. The gain and loss of function experiments in vivo demonstrated that altered splicing pattern of RyR1 ASI was directly mediated by an up-regulated CUG-BP1 function. Furthermore, we found that CUG-BP1 affected the calcium release activity in single myofibers and the extent of atrophy was significantly reduced upon gene silencing of CUG-BP1 in atrophic muscle. These findings improve our understanding of calcium signaling related biological function of CUG-BP1 in muscle atrophy. Thus, we provide an intriguing perspective of involvement of mis-regulated RyR1 splicing in muscular disease. PMID:26531141

  4. Regulation of Splicing Factors by Alternative Splicing and NMD Is Conserved between Kingdoms Yet Evolutionarily Flexible

    PubMed Central

    Lareau, Liana F.; Brenner, Steven E.

    2015-01-01

    Ultraconserved elements, unusually long regions of perfect sequence identity, are found in genes encoding numerous RNA-binding proteins including arginine-serine rich (SR) splicing factors. Expression of these genes is regulated via alternative splicing of the ultraconserved regions to yield mRNAs that are degraded by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), a process termed unproductive splicing (Lareau et al. 2007; Ni et al. 2007). As all human SR genes are affected by alternative splicing and NMD, one might expect this regulation to have originated in an early SR gene and persisted as duplications expanded the SR family. But in fact, unproductive splicing of most human SR genes arose independently (Lareau et al. 2007). This paradox led us to investigate the origin and proliferation of unproductive splicing in SR genes. We demonstrate that unproductive splicing of the splicing factor SRSF5 (SRp40) is conserved among all animals and even observed in fungi; this is a rare example of alternative splicing conserved between kingdoms, yet its effect is to trigger mRNA degradation. As the gene duplicated, the ancient unproductive splicing was lost in paralogs, and distinct unproductive splicing evolved rapidly and repeatedly to take its place. SR genes have consistently employed unproductive splicing, and while it is exceptionally conserved in some of these genes, turnover in specific events among paralogs shows flexible means to the same regulatory end. PMID:25576366

  5. Splicing factor SRSF1 negatively regulates alternative splicing of MDM2 under damage

    PubMed Central

    Comiskey, Daniel F.; Jacob, Aishwarya G.; Singh, Ravi K.; Tapia-Santos, Aixa S.; Chandler, Dawn S.

    2015-01-01

    Genotoxic stress induces alternative splicing of the oncogene MDM2 generating MDM2-ALT1, an isoform attributed with tumorigenic properties. However, the mechanisms underlying this event remain unclear. Here we explore MDM2 splicing regulation by utilizing a novel minigene that mimics endogenous MDM2 splicing in response to UV and cisplatinum-induced DNA damage. We report that exon 11 is necessary and sufficient for the damage-specific alternative splicing of the MDM2 minigene and that the splicing factor SRSF1 binds exon 11 at evolutionarily conserved sites. Interestingly, mutations disrupting this interaction proved sufficient to abolish the stress-induced alternative splicing of the MDM2 minigene. Furthermore, SRSF1 overexpression promoted exclusion of exon 11, while its siRNA-mediated knockdown prevented the stress-induced alternative splicing of endogenous MDM2. Additionally, we observed elevated SRSF1 levels under stress and in tumors correlating with the expression of MDM2-ALT1. Notably, we demonstrate that MDM2-ALT1 splicing can be blocked by targeting SRSF1 sites on exon 11 using antisense oligonucleotides. These results present conclusive evidence supporting a negative role for SRSF1 in MDM2 alternative splicing. Importantly, we define for the first time, a clear-cut mechanism for the regulation of damage-induced MDM2 splicing and present potential strategies for manipulating MDM2 expression via splicing modulation. PMID:25845590

  6. MAASE: An alternative splicing database designed for supporting splicing microarray applications

    PubMed Central

    ZHENG, CHRISTINA L.; KWON, YOUNG-SOO; LI, HAI-RI; ZHANG, KUI; COUTINHO-MANSFIELD, GABRIELA; YANG, CANZHU; NAIR, T. MURLIDHARAN; GRIBSKOV, MICHAEL; FU, XIANG-DONG

    2005-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a prominent feature of higher eukaryotes. Understanding of the function of mRNA isoforms and the regulation of alternative splicing is a major challenge in the post-genomic era. The development of mRNA isoform sensitive microarrays, which requires precise splice-junction sequence information, is a promising approach. Despite the availability of a large number of mRNAs and ESTs in various databases and the efforts made to align transcript sequences to genomic sequences, existing alternative splicing databases do not offer adequate information in an appropriate format to aid in splicing array design. Here we describe our effort in constructing the Manually Annotated Alternatively Spliced Events (MAASE) database system, which is specifically designed to support splicing microarray applications. MAASE comprises two components: (1) a manual/computational annotation tool for the efficient extraction of critical sequence and functional information for alternative splicing events and (2) a user-friendly database of annotated events that allows convenient export of information to aid in microarray design and data analysis. We provide a detailed introduction and a step-by-step user guide to the MAASE database system to facilitate future large-scale annotation efforts, integration with other alternative splicing databases, and splicing array fabrication. PMID:16251387

  7. Regulation of Alternative Splicing in Vivo by Overexpression of Antagonistic Splicing Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caceres, Javier F.; Stamm, Stefan; Helfman, David M.; Krainer, Adrian R.

    1994-09-01

    The opposing effects of SF2/ASF and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A1 influence alternative splicing in vitro. SF2/ASF or hnRNP A1 complementary DNAs were transiently overexpressed in HeLa cells, and the effect on alternative splicing of several cotransfected reporter genes was measured. Increased expression of SF2/ASF activated proximal 5' splice sites, promoted inclusion of a neuron-specific exon, and prevented abnormal exon skipping. Increased expression of hnRNP A1 activated distal 5' splice sites. Therefore, variations in the intracellular levels of antagonistic splicing factors influence different modes of alternative splicing in vivo and may be a natural mechanism for tissue-specific or developmental regulation of gene expression.

  8. Impacts of Alternative Splicing Events on the Differentiation of Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jung-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing was found to be a common phenomenon after the advent of whole transcriptome analyses or next generation sequencing. Over 90% of human genes were demonstrated to undergo at least one alternative splicing event. Alternative splicing is an effective mechanism to spatiotemporally expand protein diversity, which influences the cell fate and tissue development. The first focus of this review is to highlight recent studies, which demonstrated effects of alternative splicing on the differentiation of adipocytes. Moreover, use of evolving high-throughput approaches, such as transcriptome analyses (RNA sequencing), to profile adipogenic transcriptomes, is also addressed. PMID:26389882

  9. Alternative Splicing Regulation of Telomerase: A New Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Mandy S.; Wright, Woodring E.; Shay, Jerry W.

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing affects ~95% of eukaryotic genes, greatly expanding the coding capacity of complex genomes. Although our understanding of alternative splicing has increased rapidly, current knowledge of splicing regulation has largely been derived from studies of highly expressed mRNAs. Telomerase is a key example of a protein that is alternatively spliced, but it is expressed at very low levels, and although it is known that misregulation of telomerase splicing is a hallmark of nearly all cancers, the details of this process are unclear. Here we review work showing that hTERT expression is in part regulated by atypical alternative splicing, perhaps due to its exceptionally low expression level. We propose these differential regulatory mechanisms may be widely applicable to other genes and may provide new opportunities for development of cancer therapeutics. PMID:25172021

  10. Cauliflower mosaic virus Transcriptome Reveals a Complex Alternative Splicing Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Bouton, Clément; Geldreich, Angèle; Ramel, Laëtitia; Ryabova, Lyubov A.; Dimitrova, Maria; Keller, Mario

    2015-01-01

    The plant pararetrovirus Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) uses alternative splic-ing to generate several isoforms from its polycistronic pregenomic 35S RNA. This pro-cess has been shown to be essential for infectivity. Previous works have identified four splice donor sites and a single splice acceptor site in the 35S RNA 5’ region and sug-gested that the main role of CaMV splicing is to downregulate expression of open read-ing frames (ORFs) I and II. In this study, we show that alternative splicing is a conserved process among CaMV isolates. In Cabb B-JI and Cabb-S isolates, splicing frequently leads to different fusion between ORFs, particularly between ORF I and II. The corresponding P1P2 fusion proteins expressed in E. coli interact with viral proteins P2 and P3 in vitro. However, they are detected neither during infection nor upon transient expression in planta, which suggests rapid degradation after synthesis and no important biological role in the CaMV infectious cycle. To gain a better understanding of the functional relevance of 35S RNA alternative splicing in CaMV infectivity, we inactivated the previously described splice sites. All the splicing mutants were as pathogenic as the corresponding wild-type isolate. Through RT-PCR-based analysis we demonstrate that CaMV 35S RNA exhibits a complex splicing pattern, as we identify new splice donor and acceptor sites whose selection leads to more than thirteen 35S RNA isoforms in infected turnip plants. Inactivating splice donor or acceptor sites is not lethal for the virus, since disrupted sites are systematically rescued by the activation of cryptic and/or seldom used splice sites. Taken together, our data depict a conserved, complex and flexible process, involving multiple sites, that ensures splicing of 35S RNA. PMID:26162084

  11. BIPASS: BioInformatics Pipeline Alternative Splicing Services

    PubMed Central

    Lacroix, Zoé; Legendre, Christophe; Raschid, Louiqa; Snyder, Ben

    2007-01-01

    BioInformatics Pipeline Alternative Splicing Services (BIPASS) offer support to scientists interested in gathering information related to alternative splicing (AS) events. The service BIPAS–SpliceDB provides access to AS information that has been extracted a priori from various public databases and stored in a data warehouse. In contrast, the BIPAS–Align&Splice service allows scientists to submit their own sequences and genome to compute AS analysis results. BIPAS services offer various user-friendly ways to navigate through the results. AS results are organized at different conceptual levels (clusters and sequences), and are displayed in graphs or summarized in tables that can be downloaded in XML or text format. The two BIPAS services SpliceDB and Align&Splice are available online at http://bip.umiacs.umd.edu:8080/. PMID:17584795

  12. Short Communication Revisit on the evolutionary relationship between alternative splicing and

    E-print Network

    Gu, Xun

    Short Communication Revisit on the evolutionary relationship between alternative splicing and gene duplication Alternative splicing Copy number variation Exon­intron structure Gene duplications and alternative sophisticated hypothesis, invoking that less alternative splicing genes tend to be duplicated more frequently

  13. Insights into alternative splicing of sarcomeric genes in the heart.

    PubMed

    Weeland, Cornelis J; van den Hoogenhof, Maarten M; Beqqali, Abdelaziz; Creemers, Esther E

    2015-04-01

    Driven by rapidly evolving technologies in next-generation sequencing, alternative splicing has emerged as a crucial layer in gene expression, greatly expanding protein diversity and governing complex biological processes in the cardiomyocyte. At the core of cardiac contraction, the physical properties of the sarcomere are carefully orchestrated through alternative splicing to fit the varying demands on the heart. By the recent discovery of RBM20 and RBM24, two major heart and skeletal muscle-restricted splicing factors, it became evident that alternative splicing events in the heart occur in regulated networks rather than in isolated events. Analysis of knockout mice of these splice factors has shed light on the importance of these fundamental processes in the heart. In this review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the role and regulation of alternative splicing in the developing and diseased heart, specifically within the sarcomere. Through various examples (titin, myomesin, troponin T, tropomyosin and LDB3) we illustrate how alternative splicing regulates the functional properties of the sarcomere. Finally, we evaluate opportunities and obstacles to modulate alternative splicing in therapeutic approaches for cardiac disease. PMID:25683494

  14. Alternative Splicing in Next Generation Sequencing Data of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Konrad; Csaba, Gergely; Haslbeck, Martin; Zimmer, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    mRNA splicing is required in about 4% of protein coding genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The gene structure of those genes is simple, generally comprising two exons and one intron. In order to characterize the impact of alternative splicing on the S. cerevisiae transcriptome, we perform a systematic analysis of mRNA sequencing data. We find evidence of a pervasive use of alternative splice sites and detect several novel introns both within and outside protein coding regions. We also find a predominance of alternative splicing on the 3’ side of introns, a finding which is consistent with existing knowledge on conservation of exon-intron boundaries in S. cerevisiae. Some of the alternatively spliced transcripts allow for a translation into different protein products. PMID:26469855

  15. Tissue-specific classification of alternatively spliced human exons

    E-print Network

    Rothman, Craig Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    Alternative splicing is involved in numerous cellular functions and is often disrupted and involved in disease. Previous research has identified methods to distinguish alternative conserved exons (ACEs) in human and mouse. ...

  16. Alternative splicing generates secretory isoforms of human CD1.

    PubMed Central

    Woolfson, A; Milstein, C

    1994-01-01

    Human CD1 genes are a family of five non-polymorphic genes that, although homologous to both class I and II major histocompatibility complex genes, map to chromosome 1. Only three of the antigens, CD1a, -b, and -c, have been clustered with monoclonal antibodies. They are noncovalently associated with beta 2-microglobulin and may function as nonclassical antigen-presenting molecules. Here we analyze their expression in mouse myeloma transfectants and human thymocytes and find mRNA splicing complexity. This manifests itself as incomplete splicing, alternative splicing, utilization of cryptic splice sites, and the generation of alternative reading frames. In the case of CD1A transfectants, we demonstrate that the major protein product is secreted and show by amino acid sequence analysis that this is derived from an unspliced transcript. A second major CD1a component appears to be retained intracellularly. The production of alternatively spliced transcripts in the thymus is not a feature of all CD1 genes. Although in the case of CD1A only the transcript encoding the cell surface CD1a isoform is found, CD1C and -E produce complex intrathymic splicing patterns. The CD1C transcripts predict the expression of a secreted CD1c isoform in the human thymus, which we detect in CD1C transfectant culture supernatants. CD1 gene expression is thus characterized by considerable splicing complexity, and the difference between the splicing patterns found in different environments suggests that this is tissue specific. Images PMID:7517559

  17. Functional characterization of alternatively spliced human SECISBP2 transcript variants.

    PubMed

    Papp, Laura V; Wang, Junning; Kennedy, Derek; Boucher, Didier; Zhang, Yan; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Singh, Ravindra N; Khanna, Kum Kum

    2008-12-01

    Synthesis of selenoproteins depends on decoding of the UGA stop codon as the amino acid selenocysteine (Sec). This process requires the presence of a Sec insertion sequence element (SECIS) in the 3'-untranslated region of selenoprotein mRNAs and its interaction with the SECIS binding protein 2 (SBP2). In humans, mutations in the SBP2-encoding gene Sec insertion sequence binding protein 2 (SECISBP2) that alter the amino acid sequence or cause splicing defects lead to abnormal thyroid hormone metabolism. Herein, we present the first in silico and in vivo functional characterization of alternative splicing of SECISBP2. We report a complex splicing pattern in the 5'-region of human SECISBP2, wherein at least eight splice variants encode five isoforms with varying N-terminal sequence. One of the isoforms, mtSBP2, contains a mitochondrial targeting sequence and localizes to mitochondria. Using a minigene-based in vivo splicing assay we characterized the splicing efficiency of several alternative transcripts, and show that the splicing event that creates mtSBP2 can be modulated by antisense oligonucleotides. Moreover, we show that full-length SBP2 and some alternatively spliced variants are subject to a coordinated transcriptional and translational regulation in response to ultraviolet type A irradiation-induced stress. Overall, our data broadens the functional scope of a housekeeping protein essential to selenium metabolism. PMID:19004874

  18. Should pharmacologists care about alternative splicing? IUPHAR Review 4

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, T I

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing of mRNAs occurs in the majority of human genes, and most differential splicing results in different protein isoforms with possibly different functional properties. However, there are many reported splicing variations that may be quite rare, and not all combinatorially possible variants of a given gene are expressed at significant levels. Genes of interest to pharmacologists are frequently expressed at such low levels that they are not adequately represented in genome-wide studies of transcription. In single-gene studies, data are commonly available on the relative abundance and functional significance of individual alternatively spliced exons, but there are rarely data that quantitate the relative abundance of full-length transcripts and define which combinations of exons are significant. A number of criteria for judging the significance of splice variants and suggestions for their nomenclature are discussed. PMID:24670145

  19. Mechanisms and Regulation of Alternative Pre-mRNA Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Precursor messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) splicing is a critical step in the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression, providing significant expansion of the functional proteome of eukaryotic organisms with limited gene numbers. Split eukaryotic genes contain intervening sequences or introns disrupting protein-coding exons, and intron removal occurs by repeated assembly of a large and highly dynamic ribonucleoprotein complex termed the spliceosome, which is composed of five small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles, U1, U2, U4/U6, and U5. Biochemical studies over the past 10 years have allowed the isolation as well as compositional, functional, and structural analysis of splicing complexes at distinct stages along the spliceosome cycle. The average human gene contains eight exons and seven introns, producing an average of three or more alternatively spliced mRNA isoforms. Recent high-throughput sequencing studies indicate that 100% of human genes produce at least two alternative mRNA isoforms. Mechanisms of alternative splicing include RNA–protein interactions of splicing factors with regulatory sites termed silencers or enhancers, RNA–RNA base-pairing interactions, or chromatin-based effects that can change or determine splicing patterns. Disease-causing mutations can often occur in splice sites near intron borders or in exonic or intronic RNA regulatory silencer or enhancer elements, as well as in genes that encode splicing factors. Together, these studies provide mechanistic insights into how spliceosome assembly, dynamics, and catalysis occur; how alternative splicing is regulated and evolves; and how splicing can be disrupted by cis- and trans-acting mutations leading to disease states. These findings make the spliceosome an attractive new target for small-molecule, antisense, and genome-editing therapeutic interventions. PMID:25784052

  20. Designing oligo libraries taking alternative splicing into account

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoshan, Avi; Grebinskiy, Vladimir; Magen, Avner; Scolnicov, Ariel; Fink, Eyal; Lehavi, David; Wasserman, Alon

    2001-06-01

    We have designed sequences for DNA microarrays and oligo libraries, taking alternative splicing into account. Alternative splicing is a common phenomenon, occurring in more than 25% of the human genes. In many cases, different splice variants have different functions, are expressed in different tissues or may indicate different stages of disease. When designing sequences for DNA microarrays or oligo libraries, it is very important to take into account the sequence information of all the mRNA transcripts. Therefore, when a gene has more than one transcript (as a result of alternative splicing, alternative promoter sites or alternative poly-adenylation sites), it is very important to take all of them into account in the design. We have used the LEADS transcriptome prediction system to cluster and assemble the human sequences in GenBank and design optimal oligonucleotides for all the human genes with a known mRNA sequence based on the LEADS predictions.

  1. [Alternative splicing regulation: implications in cancer diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Montiel, Nancy; Rosas-Murrieta, Nora; Martínez-Contreras, Rebeca

    2015-04-01

    The accurate expression of the genetic information is regulated by processes like mRNA splicing, proposed after the discoveries of Phil Sharp and Richard Roberts, who demonstrated the existence of intronic sequences, present in almost every structural eukaryotic gene, which should be precisely removed. This intron removal is called "splicing", which generates different proteins from a single mRNA, with different or even antagonistic functions. We currently know that alternative splicing is the most important source of protein diversity, given that 70% of the human genes undergo splicing and that mutations causing defects in this process could originate up to 50% of genetic diseases, including cancer. When these defects occur in genes involved in cell adhesion, proliferation and cell cycle regulation, there is an impact on cancer progression, rising the opportunity to diagnose and treat some types of cancer according to a particular splicing profile. PMID:24725854

  2. The evolutionary landscape of alternative splicing in vertebrate species.

    PubMed

    Barbosa-Morais, Nuno L; Irimia, Manuel; Pan, Qun; Xiong, Hui Y; Gueroussov, Serge; Lee, Leo J; Slobodeniuc, Valentina; Kutter, Claudia; Watt, Stephen; Colak, Recep; Kim, TaeHyung; Misquitta-Ali, Christine M; Wilson, Michael D; Kim, Philip M; Odom, Duncan T; Frey, Brendan J; Blencowe, Benjamin J

    2012-12-21

    How species with similar repertoires of protein-coding genes differ so markedly at the phenotypic level is poorly understood. By comparing organ transcriptomes from vertebrate species spanning ~350 million years of evolution, we observed significant differences in alternative splicing complexity between vertebrate lineages, with the highest complexity in primates. Within 6 million years, the splicing profiles of physiologically equivalent organs diverged such that they are more strongly related to the identity of a species than they are to organ type. Most vertebrate species-specific splicing patterns are cis-directed. However, a subset of pronounced splicing changes are predicted to remodel protein interactions involving trans-acting regulators. These events likely further contributed to the diversification of splicing and other transcriptomic changes that underlie phenotypic differences among vertebrate species. PMID:23258890

  3. Splicing: is there an alternative contribution to Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed

    La Cognata, Valentina; D'Agata, Velia; Cavalcanti, Francesca; Cavallaro, Sebastiano

    2015-10-01

    Alternative splicing is a crucial mechanism of gene expression regulation that enormously increases the coding potential of our genome and represents an intermediate step between messenger RNA (mRNA) transcription and protein posttranslational modifications. Alternative splicing occupies a central position in the development and functions of the nervous system. Therefore, its deregulation frequently leads to several neurological human disorders. In the present review, we provide an updated overview on the impact of alternative splicing in Parkinson's disease (PD), the second most common neurodegenerative disorder worldwide. We will describe the alternative splicing of major PD-linked genes by collecting the current evidences about this intricate and not carefully explored aspect. Assessing the role of this mechanism on PD pathobiology may represent a central step toward an improved understanding of this complex disease. PMID:25980689

  4. Regulation of Telomerase Alternative Splicing: A New Target for Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Mandy S.; Chen, Ling; Foster, Christopher; Kainthla, Radhika; Shay, Jerry W.; Wright, Woodring E.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Telomerase is present in human cancer cells but absent in most somatic tissues. The mRNA of human telomerase (hTERT) is alternatively spliced into mostly non-functional products. We sought to understand splicing so we could decrease functional splice isoforms to reduce telomerase activity to complement direct enzyme inhibition. Unexpectedly, minigenes containing hTERT exons 5–10 flanked by 150–300bp intronic sequences did not produce alternative splicing. A 1.1kb region of 38bp repeats ~2kb from the exon 6/intron junction restored exclusion of exons 7/8. An element within intron 8, also >1kb from intron/exon junctions, modulated this effect. Transducing an oligonucleotide complementary to this second element increased non-functional hTERT mRNA from endogenous telomerase. These results demonstrate the potential of manipulating hTERT splicing for both chemotherapy and regenerative medicine, and provide the first specific sequences deep within introns that regulate alternative splicing in mammalian cells by mechanisms other than introducing cryptic splice sites. PMID:23562158

  5. Analysis of aberrantly spliced transcripts of a novel de novo GNAS mutant in a male with albright hereditary osteodystrophy and PHP1A.

    PubMed

    Ham, H-J; Baek, K-H; Lee, J-Y; Kim, S Y; Mo, E Y; Kim, E S; Han, J H; Moon, S-D

    2015-07-01

    Pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP) is a genetic disorder due to target-organ unresponsiveness to parathyroid hormone (PTH). PHP type 1A (PHP1A) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO) and PTH resistance caused by defects at the GNAS locus. We analyzed the GNAS gene in a male with typical AHO and elevated PTH levels. We identified a novel de novo heterozygous mutation at the splice donor site in intron-7 (IVS7+1G>A, c.585+1G>A) of the GNAS gene. No GNAS mutations were detected in his parents. Our patient was diagnosed with PHP1A due to a heterozygous de novo mutation in the GNAS gene. Reverse transcriptase (RT) PCR analysis and sequencing revealed that this de novo splice mutation generated alternative splicing errors leading to the formation of 2 mutant transcripts: one with exon-7 deleted, the other with whole intron-7 included. To investigate whether these aberrantly spliced transcripts were stable, we assessed the differential expression of GNAS mRNAs in the proband's blood by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. In the proband, the relative expression levels of wild-type, exon-7-deleted, and intron-7-included GNAS mRNAs were 0.21, 6.12E-07, and 1.08E-04, respectively, relative to wild-type GNAS mRNA from a healthy control (set at 1.0). This suggests that this novel de novo splicing mutation generates rapidly decaying mutant transcripts, which might affect stimulatory G-protein activity and give rise to this sporadic case. In conclusion, this is an interesting report of aberrantly spliced mRNAs from a de novo splice mutation of the GNAS gene causing PHP1A in a male. PMID:25502941

  6. Abnormalities in Alternative Splicing of Apoptotic Genes and Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dlamini, Zodwa; Tshidino, Shonisani C.; Hull, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is required for normal heart development in the embryo, but has also been shown to be an important factor in the occurrence of heart disease. Alternative splicing of apoptotic genes is currently emerging as a diagnostic and therapeutic target for heart disease. This review addresses the involvement of abnormalities in alternative splicing of apoptotic genes in cardiac disorders including cardiomyopathy, myocardial ischemia and heart failure. Many pro-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family have alternatively spliced isoforms that lack important active domains. These isoforms can play a negative regulatory role by binding to and inhibiting the pro-apoptotic forms. Alternative splicing is observed to be increased in various cardiovascular diseases with the level of alternate transcripts increasing elevated in diseased hearts compared to healthy subjects. In many cases these isoforms appear to be the underlying cause of the disease, while in others they may be induced in response to cardiovascular pathologies. Regardless of this, the detection of alternate splicing events in the heart can serve as useful diagnostic or prognostic tools, while those splicing events that seem to play a causative role in cardiovascular disease make attractive future drug targets. PMID:26580598

  7. Abnormalities in Alternative Splicing of Apoptotic Genes and Cardiovascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Dlamini, Zodwa; Tshidino, Shonisani C; Hull, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is required for normal heart development in the embryo, but has also been shown to be an important factor in the occurrence of heart disease. Alternative splicing of apoptotic genes is currently emerging as a diagnostic and therapeutic target for heart disease. This review addresses the involvement of abnormalities in alternative splicing of apoptotic genes in cardiac disorders including cardiomyopathy, myocardial ischemia and heart failure. Many pro-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family have alternatively spliced isoforms that lack important active domains. These isoforms can play a negative regulatory role by binding to and inhibiting the pro-apoptotic forms. Alternative splicing is observed to be increased in various cardiovascular diseases with the level of alternate transcripts increasing elevated in diseased hearts compared to healthy subjects. In many cases these isoforms appear to be the underlying cause of the disease, while in others they may be induced in response to cardiovascular pathologies. Regardless of this, the detection of alternate splicing events in the heart can serve as useful diagnostic or prognostic tools, while those splicing events that seem to play a causative role in cardiovascular disease make attractive future drug targets. PMID:26580598

  8. Role of an SNP in Alternative Splicing of Bovine NCF4 and Mastitis Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiuge; Yang, Chunhong; Sun, Yan; Jiang, Qiang; Wang, Fei; Li, Mengjiao; Zhong, Jifeng; Huang, Jinming

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil cytosolic factor 4 (NCF4) is component of the nicotinamide dinucleotide phosphate oxidase complex, a key factor in biochemical pathways and innate immune responses. In this study, splice variants and functional single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of NCF4 were identified to determine the variability and association of the gene with susceptibility to bovine mastitis characterized by inflammation. A novel splice variant, designated as NCF4-TV and characterized by the retention of a 48 bp sequence in intron 9, was detected in the mammary gland tissues of infected cows. The expression of the NCF4-reference main transcript in the mastitic mammary tissues was higher than that in normal tissues. A novel SNP, g.18174 A>G, was also found in the retained 48 bp region of intron 9. To determine whether NCF4-TV could be due to the g.18174 A>G mutation, we constructed two mini-gene expression vectors with the wild-type or mutant NCF4 g.18174 A>G fragment. The vectors were then transiently transfected into 293T cells, and alternative splicing of NCF4 was analyzed by reverse transcription-PCR and sequencing. Mini-gene splicing assay demonstrated that the aberrantly spliced NCF4-TV with 48 bp retained fragment in intron 9 could be due to g.18174 A>G, which was associated with milk somatic count score and increased risk of mastitis infection in cows. NCF4 expression was also regulated by alternative splicing. This study proposes that NCF4 splice variants generated by functional SNP are important risk factors for mastitis susceptibility in dairy cows. PMID:26600390

  9. Functional roles of alternative splicing factors in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Cieply, Benjamin; Carstens, Russ P

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is an important mechanism used to generate greater transcriptomic and proteomic diversity from a finite genome. Nearly all human gene transcripts are alternatively spliced and can produce protein isoforms with divergent and even antagonistic properties that impact cell functions. Many AS events are tightly regulated in a cell-type or tissue-specific manner, and at different developmental stages. AS is regulated by RNA-binding proteins, including cell- or tissue-specific splicing factors. In the past few years, technological advances have defined genome-wide programs of AS regulated by increasing numbers of splicing factors. These splicing regulatory networks (SRNs) consist of transcripts that encode proteins that function in coordinated and related processes that impact the development and phenotypes of different cell types. As such, it is increasingly recognized that disruption of normal programs of splicing regulated by different splicing factors can lead to human diseases. We will summarize examples of diseases in which altered expression or function of splicing regulatory proteins has been implicated in human disease pathophysiology. As the role of AS continues to be unveiled in human disease and disease risk, it is hoped that further investigations into the functions of numerous splicing factors and their regulated targets will enable the development of novel therapies that are directed at specific AS events as well as the biological pathways they impact. WIREs RNA 2015, 6:311–326. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1276 For further resources related to this article, please visit the http://wires.wiley.com/remdoi.cgi?doi=10.1002/wrna.1276WIREs website. Conflict of interest: The authors have declared no conflicts of interest for this article. PMID:25630614

  10. Gene Selection, Alternative Splicing, and Post-translational Processing Regulate Neuroligin Selectivity for -Neurexins

    E-print Network

    Sandini, Giulio

    Gene Selection, Alternative Splicing, and Post-translational Processing Regulate Neuroligin1/NX1 binding. Our data indicate that gene selection, mRNA splicing, and post spliced inserts in their extracellular domains. Using analytical ultracentrifugation, we determined

  11. The Caenorhabditis elegans Gene mfap-1 Encodes a Nuclear Protein That Affects Alternative Splicing

    E-print Network

    Horvitz, H. Robert

    RNA splicing is a major regulatory mechanism for controlling eukaryotic gene expression. By generating various splice isoforms from a single pre–mRNA, alternative splicing plays a key role in promoting the evolving complexity ...

  12. A serine–arginine-rich (SR) splicing factor modulates alternative splicing of over a thousand genes in Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Yeoh, Lee M.; Goodman, Christopher D.; Hall, Nathan E.; van Dooren, Giel G.; McFadden, Geoffrey I.; Ralph, Stuart A.

    2015-01-01

    Single genes are often subject to alternative splicing, which generates alternative mature mRNAs. This phenomenon is widespread in animals, and observed in over 90% of human genes. Recent data suggest it may also be common in Apicomplexa. These parasites have small genomes, and economy of DNA is evolutionarily favoured in this phylum. We investigated the mechanism of alternative splicing in Toxoplasma gondii, and have identified and localized TgSR3, a homologue of ASF/SF2 (alternative-splicing factor/splicing factor 2, a serine-arginine–rich, or SR protein) to a subnuclear compartment. In addition, we conditionally overexpressed this protein, which was deleterious to growth. qRT-PCR was used to confirm perturbation of splicing in a known alternatively-spliced gene. We performed high-throughput RNA-seq to determine the extent of splicing modulated by this protein. Current RNA-seq algorithms are poorly suited to compact parasite genomes, and hence we complemented existing tools by writing a new program, GeneGuillotine, that addresses this deficiency by segregating overlapping reads into distinct genes. In order to identify the extent of alternative splicing, we released another program, JunctionJuror, that detects changes in intron junctions. Using this program, we identified about 2000 genes that were constitutively alternatively spliced in T. gondii. Overexpressing the splice regulator TgSR3 perturbed alternative splicing in over 1000 genes. PMID:25870410

  13. Structural insights into RNA recognition by the alternative-splicing regulator muscleblind-like MBNL1

    PubMed Central

    Teplova, Marianna; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2015-01-01

    Muscleblind-like (MBNL) proteins, regulators of developmentally programmed alternative splicing, harbor tandem CCCH zinc-finger (ZnF) domains that target pre-mRNAs containing YGCU(U/G)Y sequence elements (where Y is a pyrimidine). In myotonic dystrophy, reduced levels of MBNL proteins lead to aberrant alternative splicing of a subset of pre-mRNAs. The crystal structure of MBNL1 ZnF3/4 bound to r(CGCUGU) establishes that both ZnF3 and ZnF4 target GC steps, with site-specific recognition mediated by a network of hydrogen bonds formed primarily with main chain groups of the protein. The relative alignment of ZnF3 and ZnF4 domains is dictated by the topology of the interdomain linker, with a resulting antiparallel orientation of bound GC elements, supportive of a chain-reversal loop trajectory for MBNL1-bound pre-mRNA targets. We anticipate that MBNL1-mediated targeting of looped RNA segments proximal to splice-site junctions could contribute to pre-mRNA alternative-splicing regulation. PMID:19043415

  14. Structural insights into RNA recognition by the alternative-splicing regulator muscleblind-like MBNL1

    SciTech Connect

    Teplova, Marianna; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2009-01-15

    Muscleblind-like (MBNL) proteins, regulators of developmentally programmed alternative splicing, harbor tandem CCCH zinc-finger (ZnF) domains that target pre-mRNAs containing YGCU(U/G)Y sequence elements (where Y is a pyrimidine). In myotonic dystrophy, reduced levels of MBNL proteins lead to aberrant alternative splicing of a subset of pre-mRNAs. The crystal structure of MBNL1 ZnF3/4 bound to r(CGCUGU) establishes that both ZnF3 and ZnF4 target GC steps, with site-specific recognition mediated by a network of hydrogen bonds formed primarily with main chain groups of the protein. The relative alignment of ZnF3 and ZnF4 domains is dictated by the topology of the interdomain linker, with a resulting antiparallel orientation of bound GC elements, supportive of a chain-reversal loop trajectory for MBNL1-bound pre-mRNA targets. We anticipate that MBNL1-mediated targeting of looped RNA segments proximal to splice-site junctions could contribute to pre-mRNA alternative-splicing regulation.

  15. Tissue-specific alternative splicing of TCF7L2

    PubMed Central

    Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Welch, Cullan; Hansson, Ola; Adhikari, Neeta; Scott, Laura J.; Usher, Nicolle; Tong, Maurine; Sprau, Andrew; Swift, Amy; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Erdos, Michael R.; He, Zhi; Saxena, Richa; Harmon, Brennan; Kotova, Olga; Hoffman, Eric P.; Altshuler, David; Groop, Leif; Boehnke, Michael; Collins, Francis S.; Hall, Jennifer L.

    2009-01-01

    Common variants in the transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2) gene have been identified as the strongest genetic risk factors for type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, the mechanisms by which these non-coding variants increase risk for T2D are not well-established. We used 13 expression assays to survey mRNA expression of multiple TCF7L2 splicing forms in up to 380 samples from eight types of human tissue (pancreas, pancreatic islets, colon, liver, monocytes, skeletal muscle, subcutaneous adipose tissue and lymphoblastoid cell lines) and observed a tissue-specific pattern of alternative splicing. We tested whether the expression of TCF7L2 splicing forms was associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs7903146 and rs12255372, located within introns 3 and 4 of the gene and most strongly associated with T2D. Expression of two splicing forms was lower in pancreatic islets with increasing counts of T2D-associated alleles of the SNPs: a ubiquitous splicing form (P = 0.018 for rs7903146 and P = 0.020 for rs12255372) and a splicing form found in pancreatic islets, pancreas and colon but not in other tissues tested here (P = 0.009 for rs12255372 and P = 0.053 for rs7903146). Expression of this form in glucose-stimulated pancreatic islets correlated with expression of proinsulin (r2 = 0.84–0.90, P < 0.00063). In summary, we identified a tissue-specific pattern of alternative splicing of TCF7L2. After adjustment for multiple tests, no association between expression of TCF7L2 in eight types of human tissue samples and T2D-associated genetic variants remained significant. Alternative splicing of TCF7L2 in pancreatic islets warrants future studies. GenBank Accession Numbers: FJ010164–FJ010174. PMID:19602480

  16. HP1 Is Involved in Regulating the Global Impact of DNA Methylation on Alternative Splicing

    E-print Network

    Rippe, Karsten

    this gene's alternative splicing in a methylation-dependent manner by recruiting splicing factors to itsArticle HP1 Is Involved in Regulating the Global Impact of DNA Methylation on Alternative Splicing Graphical Abstract Highlights d DNA methylation directly affects mRNA alternative splicing d Methylation

  17. Modulators of alternative splicing as novel therapeutics in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oltean, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS), the process of removing introns from pre-mRNA and re-arrangement of exons to give several types of mature transcripts, has been described more than 40 years ago. However, until recently, it has not been clear how extensive it is. Genome-wide studies have now conclusively shown that more than 90% of genes are alternatively spliced in humans. This makes AS one of the main drivers of proteomic diversity and, consequently, determinant of cellular function repertoire. Unsurprisingly, given its extent, numerous splice isoforms have been described to be associated with several diseases including cancer. Many of them have antagonistic functions, e.g., pro- and anti-angiogenic or pro- and anti-apoptotic. Additionally several splice factors have been recently described to have oncogene or tumour suppressors activities, like SF3B1 which is frequently mutated in myelodysplastic syndromes. Beside the implications for cancer pathogenesis, de-regulated AS is recognized as one of the novel areas of cell biology where therapeutic manipulations may be designed. This editorial discusses the possibilities of manipulation of AS for therapeutic benefit in cancer. Approaches involving the use of oligonucleotides as well as small molecule splicing modulators are presented as well as thoughts on how specificity might be accomplished in splicing therapeutics. PMID:26468443

  18. Cell-to-cell variability of alternative RNA splicing

    PubMed Central

    Waks, Zeev; Klein, Allon M; Silver, Pamela A

    2011-01-01

    Heterogeneity in the expression levels of mammalian genes is large even in clonal populations and has phenotypic consequences. Alternative splicing is a fundamental aspect of gene expression, yet its contribution to heterogeneity is unknown. Here, we use single-molecule imaging to characterize the cell-to-cell variability in mRNA isoform ratios for two endogenous genes, CAPRIN1 and MKNK2. We show that isoform variability in non-transformed, diploid cells is remarkably close to the minimum possible given the stochastic nature of individual splicing events, while variability in HeLa cells is considerably higher. Analysis of the potential sources of isoform ratio heterogeneity indicates that a difference in the control over splicing factor activity is one origin of this increase. Our imaging approach also visualizes non-alternatively spliced mRNA and active transcription sites, and yields spatial information regarding the relationship between splicing and transcription. Together, our work demonstrates that mammalian cells minimize fluctuations in mRNA isoform ratios by tightly regulating the splicing machinery. PMID:21734645

  19. Modulators of alternative splicing as novel therapeutics in cancer.

    PubMed

    Oltean, Sebastian

    2015-10-10

    Alternative splicing (AS), the process of removing introns from pre-mRNA and re-arrangement of exons to give several types of mature transcripts, has been described more than 40 years ago. However, until recently, it has not been clear how extensive it is. Genome-wide studies have now conclusively shown that more than 90% of genes are alternatively spliced in humans. This makes AS one of the main drivers of proteomic diversity and, consequently, determinant of cellular function repertoire. Unsurprisingly, given its extent, numerous splice isoforms have been described to be associated with several diseases including cancer. Many of them have antagonistic functions, e.g., pro- and anti-angiogenic or pro- and anti-apoptotic. Additionally several splice factors have been recently described to have oncogene or tumour suppressors activities, like SF3B1 which is frequently mutated in myelodysplastic syndromes. Beside the implications for cancer pathogenesis, de-regulated AS is recognized as one of the novel areas of cell biology where therapeutic manipulations may be designed. This editorial discusses the possibilities of manipulation of AS for therapeutic benefit in cancer. Approaches involving the use of oligonucleotides as well as small molecule splicing modulators are presented as well as thoughts on how specificity might be accomplished in splicing therapeutics. PMID:26468443

  20. Modulation of SMN pre-mRNA splicing by inhibition of alternative 3' splice site pairing Sharlene R. Lim and Klemens J. Hertel*

    E-print Network

    Hertel, Klemens J.

    of a non-functional gene product. It has been suggested that differential SMN2 splicing is causedModulation of SMN pre-mRNA splicing by inhibition of alternative 3' splice site pairing Sharlene R-4025, USA Running Title: SMN Differential Splicing Key words: alternative splicing, Spinal Muscular Atrophy

  1. Alternative splicing of the androgen receptor in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fangfang; Pan, Jiexue; Liu, Ye; Meng, Qing; Lv, Pingping; Qu, Fan; Ding, Guo-Lian; Klausen, Christian; Leung, Peter C K; Chan, Hsiao Chang; Yao, Weimiao; Zhou, Cai-Yun; Shi, Biwei; Zhang, Junyu; Sheng, Jianzhong; Huang, Hefeng

    2015-04-14

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common female endocrine disorders and a leading cause of female subfertility. The mechanism underlying the pathophysiology of PCOS remains to be illustrated. Here, we identify two alternative splice variants (ASVs) of the androgen receptor (AR), insertion and deletion isoforms, in granulosa cells (GCs) in ?62% of patients with PCOS. AR ASVs are strongly associated with remarkable hyperandrogenism and abnormalities in folliculogenesis, and are absent from all control subjects without PCOS. Alternative splicing dramatically alters genome-wide AR recruitment and androgen-induced expression of genes related to androgen metabolism and folliculogenesis in human GCs. These findings establish alternative splicing of AR in GCs as the major pathogenic mechanism for hyperandrogenism and abnormal folliculogenesis in PCOS. PMID:25825716

  2. Widespread and subtle: alternative splicing at short-distance tandem sites

    E-print Network

    Will, Sebastian

    gene structures is that the typical eukaryotic gene contains introns [1]. In the splicing process together (Box 1). Alterna- tive splicing enables one gene to produce multiple mature transcripts [2], with 75% of the human genes estimated to undergo alternative splicing [3]. Alternative splicing

  3. ORIGINAL PAPER Identification of alternatively spliced mRNA variants related to cancers by

    E-print Network

    Tian, Weidong

    (ASA), to look for splicing variants of human gene transcripts by genome-wide ESTs alignment. Using ASA as splicing variants. Of 4322 genes screened, 3490 (81%) were observed with at least one alternative splicing as the indicators for gene expression level. Using Fisher's exact test, alternative splicing variants, of which EST

  4. A knockin mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 exhibits prominent aggregate pathology and aberrant splicing of the disease gene transcript.

    PubMed

    Ramani, Biswarathan; Harris, Ginny M; Huang, Rogerio; Seki, Takahiro; Murphy, Geoffrey G; Costa, Maria do Carmo; Fischer, Svetlana; Saunders, Thomas L; Xia, Guangbin; McEachin, Richard C; Paulson, Henry L

    2015-03-01

    Polyglutamine diseases, including spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3), are caused by CAG repeat expansions that encode abnormally long glutamine repeats in the respective disease proteins. While the mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration remain uncertain, evidence supports a proteotoxic role for the mutant protein dictated in part by the specific genetic and protein context. To further define pathogenic mechanisms in SCA3, we generated a mouse model in which a CAG expansion of 82 repeats was inserted into the murine locus by homologous recombination. SCA3 knockin mice exhibit region-specific aggregate pathology marked by intranuclear accumulation of the mutant Atxn3 protein, abundant nuclear inclusions and, in select brain regions, extranuclear aggregates localized to neuritic processes. Knockin mice also display altered splicing of the disease gene, promoting expression of an alternative isoform in which the intron immediately downstream of the CAG repeat is retained. In an independent mouse model expressing the full human ATXN3 disease gene, expression of this alternatively spliced transcript is also enhanced. These results, together with recent findings in other polyglutamine diseases, suggest that CAG repeat expansions can promote aberrant splicing to produce potentially more aggregate-prone isoforms of the disease proteins. This report of a SCA3 knockin mouse expands the repertoire of existing models of SCA3, and underscores the potential contribution of alternative splicing to disease pathogenesis in SCA3 and other polyglutamine disorders. PMID:25320121

  5. Hypoxia-Induced Alternative Splicing in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Weigand, Julia E.; Boeckel, Jes-Niels; Gellert, Pascal; Dimmeler, Stefanie

    2012-01-01

    Background Adaptation to low oxygen by changing gene expression is vitally important for cell survival and tissue development. The sprouting of new blood vessels, initiated from endothelial cells, restores the oxygen supply of ischemic tissues. In contrast to the transcriptional response induced by hypoxia, which is mainly mediated by members of the HIF family, there are only few studies investigating alternative splicing events. Therefore, we performed an exon array for the genome-wide analysis of hypoxia-related changes of alternative splicing in endothelial cells. Methodology/Principal findings Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were incubated under hypoxic conditions (1% O2) for 48 h. Genome-wide transcript and exon expression levels were assessed using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Exon 1.0 ST Array. We found altered expression of 294 genes after hypoxia treatment. Upregulated genes are highly enriched in glucose metabolism and angiogenesis related processes, whereas downregulated genes are mainly connected to cell cycle and DNA repair. Thus, gene expression patterns recapitulate known adaptations to low oxygen supply. Alternative splicing events, until now not related to hypoxia, are shown for nine genes: six which are implicated in angiogenesis-mediated cytoskeleton remodeling (cask, itsn1, larp6, sptan1, tpm1 and robo1); one, which is involved in the synthesis of membrane-anchors (pign) and two universal regulators of gene expression (cugbp1 and max). Conclusions/Significance For the first time, this study investigates changes in splicing in the physiological response to hypoxia on a genome-wide scale. Nine alternative splicing events, until now not related to hypoxia, are reported, considerably expanding the information on splicing changes due to low oxygen supply. Therefore, this study provides further knowledge on hypoxia induced gene expression changes and presents new starting points to study the hypoxia adaptation of endothelial cells. PMID:22876330

  6. Splicing Express: a software suite for alternative splicing analysis using next-generation sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Kroll, Jose E.; Kim, Jihoon; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2015-01-01

    Motivation. Alternative splicing events (ASEs) are prevalent in the transcriptome of eukaryotic species and are known to influence many biological phenomena. The identification and quantification of these events are crucial for a better understanding of biological processes. Next-generation DNA sequencing technologies have allowed deep characterization of transcriptomes and made it possible to address these issues. ASEs analysis, however, represents a challenging task especially when many different samples need to be compared. Some popular tools for the analysis of ASEs are known to report thousands of events without annotations and/or graphical representations. A new tool for the identification and visualization of ASEs is here described, which can be used by biologists without a solid bioinformatics background. Results. A software suite named Splicing Express was created to perform ASEs analysis from transcriptome sequencing data derived from next-generation DNA sequencing platforms. Its major goal is to serve the needs of biomedical researchers who do not have bioinformatics skills. Splicing Express performs automatic annotation of transcriptome data (GTF files) using gene coordinates available from the UCSC genome browser and allows the analysis of data from all available species. The identification of ASEs is done by a known algorithm previously implemented in another tool named Splooce. As a final result, Splicing Express creates a set of HTML files composed of graphics and tables designed to describe the expression profile of ASEs among all analyzed samples. By using RNA-Seq data from the Illumina Human Body Map and the Rat Body Map, we show that Splicing Express is able to perform all tasks in a straightforward way, identifying well-known specific events. Availability and Implementation.Splicing Express is written in Perl and is suitable to run only in UNIX-like systems. More details can be found at: http://www.bioinformatics-brazil.org/splicingexpress. PMID:26618088

  7. Comprehensive annotation of splice junctions supports pervasive alternative splicing at the BRCA1 locus: a report from the ENIGMA consortium.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Mara; Blok, Marinus J; Whiley, Phillip; Santamariña, Marta; Gutiérrez-Enríquez, Sara; Romero, Atocha; Garre, Pilar; Becker, Alexandra; Smith, Lindsay Denise; De Vecchi, Giovanna; Brandão, Rita D; Tserpelis, Demis; Brown, Melissa; Blanco, Ana; Bonache, Sandra; Menéndez, Mireia; Houdayer, Claude; Foglia, Claudia; Fackenthal, James D; Baralle, Diana; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Díaz-Rubio, Eduardo; Caldés, Trinidad; Walker, Logan; Díez, Orland; Vega, Ana; Spurdle, Amanda B; Radice, Paolo; De La Hoya, Miguel

    2014-07-15

    Loss-of-function germline mutations in BRCA1 (MIM #113705) confer markedly increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer. The full-length transcript codifies for a protein involved in DNA repair pathways and cell-cycle checkpoints. Several BRCA1 splicing isoforms have been described in public domain databases, but the physiological role (if any) of BRCA1 alternative splicing remains to be established. An accurate description of 'naturally occurring' alternative splicing at this locus is a prerequisite to understand its biological significance. However, a systematic analysis of alternative splicing at the BRCA1 locus is yet to be conducted. Here, the Evidence-Based Network for the Interpretation of Germ-Line Mutant Alleles consortium combines RT-PCR, exon scanning, cloning, sequencing and relative semi-quantification to describe naturally occurring BRCA1 alternative splicing with unprecedented resolution. The study has been conducted in blood-related RNA sources, commonly used for clinical splicing assays, as well as in one healthy breast tissue. We have characterized a total of 63 BRCA1 alternative splicing events, including 35 novel findings. A minimum of 10 splicing events (?1Aq, ?5, ?5q, ?8p, ?9, ?(9,10), ?9_11, ?11q, ?13p and ?14p) represent a substantial fraction of the full-length expression level (ranging from 5 to 100%). Remarkably, our data indicate that BRCA1 alternative splicing is similar in blood and breast, a finding supporting the clinical relevance of blood-based in vitro splicing assays. Overall, our data suggest an alternative splicing model in which most non-mutually exclusive alternative splicing events are randomly combined into individual mRNA molecules to produce hundreds of different BRCA1 isoforms. PMID:24569164

  8. An Alternative Splicing Switch Regulates Embryonic Stem Cell

    E-print Network

    Zandstra, Peter W.

    An Alternative Splicing Switch Regulates Embryonic Stem Cell Pluripotency and Reprogramming Mathieu for Systems Biology, Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute 4Center for Stem Cells and Tissue Engineering, Samuel expression. Here, we identify an evolutionarily conserved embryonic stem cell (ESC)- specific AS event

  9. An alternative splicing event amplifies evolutionary differences between vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Gueroussov, Serge; Gonatopoulos-Pournatzis, Thomas; Irimia, Manuel; Raj, Bushra; Lin, Zhen-Yuan; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Blencowe, Benjamin J

    2015-08-21

    Alternative splicing (AS) generates extensive transcriptomic and proteomic complexity. However, the functions of species- and lineage-specific splice variants are largely unknown. Here we show that mammalian-specific skipping of polypyrimidine tract-binding protein 1 (PTBP1) exon 9 alters the splicing regulatory activities of PTBP1 and affects the inclusion levels of numerous exons. During neurogenesis, skipping of exon 9 reduces PTBP1 repressive activity so as to facilitate activation of a brain-specific AS program. Engineered skipping of the orthologous exon in chicken cells induces a large number of mammalian-like AS changes in PTBP1 target exons. These results thus reveal that a single exon-skipping event in an RNA binding regulator directs numerous AS changes between species. Our results further suggest that these changes contributed to evolutionary differences in the formation of vertebrate nervous systems. PMID:26293963

  10. Intrasplicing coordinates alternative first exons with alternative splicing in the protein 4.1R gene

    SciTech Connect

    Conboy, John G.; Parra, Marilyn K.; Tan, Jeff S.; Mohandas, Narla; Conboy, John G.

    2008-11-07

    In the protein 4.1R gene, alternative first exons splice differentially to alternative 3' splice sites far downstream in exon 2'/2 (E2'/2). We describe a novel intrasplicing mechanism by which exon 1A (E1A) splices exclusively to the distal E2'/2 acceptor via two nested splicing reactions regulated by novel properties of exon 1B (E1B). E1B behaves as an exon in the first step, using its consensus 5' donor to splice to the proximal E2'/2 acceptor. A long region of downstream intron is excised, juxtaposing E1B with E2'/2 to generate a new composite acceptor containing the E1B branchpoint/pyrimidine tract and E2 distal 3' AG-dinucleotide. Next, the upstream E1A splices over E1B to this distal acceptor, excising the remaining intron plus E1B and E2' to form mature E1A/E2 product. We mapped branch points for both intrasplicing reactions and demonstrated that mutation of the E1B 5' splice site or branchpoint abrogates intrasplicing. In the 4.1R gene, intrasplicing ultimately determines N-terminal protein structure and function. More generally, intrasplicing represents a new mechanism whereby alternative promoters can be coordinated with downstream alternative splicing.

  11. Identification, Improved Modeling and Integration of Signals to Predict Constitutive and Alternative Splicing

    E-print Network

    Poggio, Tomaso

    of pre-messenger RNA splicing by the spliceosomal machinery via interactions between cis- regulatory elements and splicing trans-factors to generate a specific mRNA i.e. constitutive splicing, or sometimes many distinct mRNA isoforms i.e. alternative splicing, is still a poorly understood process. Progress

  12. Inference of alternative splicing from RNA-Seq data with probabilistic splice graphs

    PubMed Central

    LeGault, Laura H.; Dewey, Colin N.

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: Alternative splicing and other processes that allow for different transcripts to be derived from the same gene are significant forces in the eukaryotic cell. RNA-Seq is a promising technology for analyzing alternative transcripts, as it does not require prior knowledge of transcript structures or genome sequences. However, analysis of RNA-Seq data in the presence of genes with large numbers of alternative transcripts is currently challenging due to efficiency, identifiability and representation issues. Results: We present RNA-Seq models and associated inference algorithms based on the concept of probabilistic splice graphs, which alleviate these issues. We prove that our models are often identifiable and demonstrate that our inference methods for quantification and differential processing detection are efficient and accurate. Availability: Software implementing our methods is available at http://deweylab.biostat.wisc.edu/psginfer. Contact: cdewey@biostat.wisc.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:23846746

  13. Canis familiaris telomerase reverse transcriptase undergoes alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Angelopoulou, Katerina; Zavlaris, Michael; Papaioannou, Nikolaos; Vlemmas, Ioannis

    2008-09-01

    The enzyme telomerase is essential for cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) represents the catalytic subunit of the enzyme. In humans, TERT expression is regulated by several different mechanisms, including alternative splicing. Canis familiaris TERT (dogTERT) has been shown to have a high level of sequence similarity with human TERT, indicating that the dog may represent a suitable animal model for telomerase studies. In the present report we sought to investigate whether dogTERT undergoes alternative splicing. During the analysis of canine mammary tissues (both tumor and paired adjacent to the tumor normal tissues) for dogTERT expression by RT-PCR, we identified eight samples-one tumor and seven adjacent normal-which gave PCR products of unexpected sizes. DNA sequencing revealed two insertions (175 and 28 bp long) and two deletions (17 and 32 bp long), which were encountered in different combinations and gave rise to five different transcripts. The generation of all variants could be explained by the employment of alternative splicing sites within dogTERT genomic sequences. The 175-bp and 28-bp insertions, identified between exons 7 and 8 and between 8 and 9, respectively, constituted unspliced sequences of introns 7 and 8, respectively. Both deletions originated from exon 8 sequence removals due to alternative splicing. All five variants encoded truncated proteins, which lacked essential motifs for reverse transcription and might have thus lost their ability to compose active telomerase enzymes. This is the first identification of alternative splicing events within dogTERT. The results presented here may provide the basis for more thorough studies on the regulation of telomerase activity in canine normal and cancer cells. PMID:18836773

  14. Alternatively spliced, spliceosomal twin introns in Helminthosporium solani.

    PubMed

    Ág, Norbert; Flipphi, Michel; Karaffa, Levente; Scazzocchio, Claudio; Fekete, Erzsébet

    2015-12-01

    Spliceosomal twin introns, "stwintrons", have been defined as complex intervening sequences that carry a second intron ("internal intron") interrupting one of the conserved sequence domains necessary for their correct splicing via consecutive excision events. Previously, we have described and experimentally verified stwintrons in species of Sordariomycetes, where an "internal intron" interrupted the donor sequence of an "external intron". Here we describe and experimentally verify two novel stwintrons of the potato pathogen Helminthosporium solani. One instance involves alternative splicing of an internal intron interrupting the donor domain of an external intron and a second one interrupting the acceptor domain of an overlapping external intron, both events leading to identical mature mRNAs. In the second case, an internal intron interrupts the donor domain of the external intron, while an alternatively spliced intron leads to an mRNA carrying a premature chain termination codon. We thus extend the stwintron concept to the acceptor domain and establish a link of the occurrence of stwintrons with that of alternative splicing. PMID:26514742

  15. Comprehensive splicing graph analysis of alternative splicing patterns in chicken, compared to human and mouse

    PubMed Central

    Chacko, Elsa; Ranganathan, Shoba

    2009-01-01

    Background Alternative transcript diversity manifests itself as a prime cause of complexity in higher eukaryotes. Recently, transcript diversity studies have suggested that 60–80% of human genes are alternatively spliced. We have used a splicing pattern approach for the bioinformatics analysis of Alternative Splicing (AS) in chicken, human and mouse. Exons involved in splicing are subdivided into distinct and variant exons, based on the prevalence of the exons across the transcripts. Four possible permutations of these two different groups of exons were categorised as class I (distinct-variant), class II (distinct-variant), class III (variant-distinct) and class IV (variant-variant). This classification quantifies the variation in transcript diversity in the three species. Results In all, 3901 chicken AS genes have been compared with 16,715 human and 16,491 mouse AS genes, with 23% of chicken genes being alternatively spliced, compared to 68% in humans and 57% in mice. To minimize any gene structure bias in the input data, comparative genome analysis has been carried out on the orthologous subset of AS genes for the three species. Gene-level analysis suggested that chicken genes show fewer AS events compared to human and mouse. An event-level analysis showed that the percentage of AS events in chicken is similar to that of human, which implies that a smaller number of chicken genes show greater transcript diversity. Overall, chicken genes were found to have fewer transcripts per gene and shorter introns than human and mouse genes. Conclusion In chicken, the majority of genes generate only two or three isoforms, compared to almost eight in human and six in mouse. We observed that intron definition is expressed strongly when compared to exon definition for chicken genome, based on 3% intron retention in chicken, compared to 2% in human and mouse. Splicing patterns with variant exons account for 33% of AS chicken orthologous genes compared to 24% in human and 27% in mouse, providing a novel measure to describe the species-wise complexity due to alternative transcript diversity. PMID:19594882

  16. Regulation+of+splicing+factors+by+alternative+splicing+and+NMD+is+conserved+ between+kingdoms+yet+evolutionarily+flexible+

    E-print Network

    +elements,+unusually+long+regions+of+perfect+sequence+identity,+ are+found+in+genes+encoding+numerous+RNA@binding+proteins+including+SR+ splicing+factors.+Expression+of+these+genes+is+regulated+via+alternative+splicing+ (Lareau+et+al.+2007;+Ni+et+al.+2007).+As+all+human+SR+genes+are+affected+by+ alternative+splicing+and+NMD,+one+might+expect+this+regulation+to+have+ originated+in+an+early+SR+gene+and+persisted+as+duplications+expanded+the+SR+ family.+But+in+fact,+unproductive+splicing+of+most+human+SR+genes

  17. Interplay between estrogen receptor and AKT in Estradiol-induced alternative splicing

    E-print Network

    Bhat-Nakshatri, Poornima; Song, Eun-Kyung; Collins, Nikail R.; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Dunker, A. K.; O’Malley, Bert W.; Geistlinger, Tim R.; Carroll, Jason S.; Brown, Myles; Nakshatri, Harikrishna

    2013-06-11

    Abstract Background Alternative splicing is critical for generating complex proteomes in response to extracellular signals. Nuclear receptors including estrogen receptor alpha (ER?) and their ligands promote alternative splicing. The endogenous...

  18. Technologies for the global discovery and analysis of alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Calarco, John A; Saltzman, Arneet L; Ip, Joanna Y; Blencowe, Benjamin J

    2007-01-01

    During the past approximately 20 years, studies on alternative splicing (AS) have largely been directed at the identification and characterization of factors and mecha nisms responsible for the control of splice site selection, using model substrates and on a case by case basis. These studies have provided a wealth of information on the factors and interactions that control formation of the spliceosome. However, relatively little is known about the global regulatory properties of AS. Important questions that need to be addressed are: which exons are alternatively spliced and under which cellular contexts, what are the functional roles of AS events in different cellular contexts, and how are AS events controlled and coordinated with each other and with other levels of gene regulation to achieve cell- and development-specific functions. During the past several years, new technologies and experimental strategies have provided insight into these questions. For example, custom microarrays and data analysis tools are playing a prominent role in the discovery and analysis of splicing regulation. Moreover, several non-microarray-based technologies are emerging that will likely further fuel progress in this area. This review focuses on recent advances made in the development and application of high-throughput methods to study AS. PMID:18380341

  19. Leveraging transcript quantification for fast computation of alternative splicing profiles.

    PubMed

    Alamancos, Gael P; Pagès, Amadís; Trincado, Juan L; Bellora, Nicolás; Eyras, Eduardo

    2015-09-01

    Alternative splicing plays an essential role in many cellular processes and bears major relevance in the understanding of multiple diseases, including cancer. High-throughput RNA sequencing allows genome-wide analyses of splicing across multiple conditions. However, the increasing number of available data sets represents a major challenge in terms of computation time and storage requirements. We describe SUPPA, a computational tool to calculate relative inclusion values of alternative splicing events, exploiting fast transcript quantification. SUPPA accuracy is comparable and sometimes superior to standard methods using simulated as well as real RNA-sequencing data compared with experimentally validated events. We assess the variability in terms of the choice of annotation and provide evidence that using complete transcripts rather than more transcripts per gene provides better estimates. Moreover, SUPPA coupled with de novo transcript reconstruction methods does not achieve accuracies as high as using quantification of known transcripts, but remains comparable to existing methods. Finally, we show that SUPPA is more than 1000 times faster than standard methods. Coupled with fast transcript quantification, SUPPA provides inclusion values at a much higher speed than existing methods without compromising accuracy, thereby facilitating the systematic splicing analysis of large data sets with limited computational resources. The software is implemented in Python 2.7 and is available under the MIT license at https://bitbucket.org/regulatorygenomicsupf/suppa. PMID:26179515

  20. Leveraging transcript quantification for fast computation of alternative splicing profiles

    PubMed Central

    Alamancos, Gael P.; Pagès, Amadís; Trincado, Juan L.; Bellora, Nicolás; Eyras, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing plays an essential role in many cellular processes and bears major relevance in the understanding of multiple diseases, including cancer. High-throughput RNA sequencing allows genome-wide analyses of splicing across multiple conditions. However, the increasing number of available data sets represents a major challenge in terms of computation time and storage requirements. We describe SUPPA, a computational tool to calculate relative inclusion values of alternative splicing events, exploiting fast transcript quantification. SUPPA accuracy is comparable and sometimes superior to standard methods using simulated as well as real RNA-sequencing data compared with experimentally validated events. We assess the variability in terms of the choice of annotation and provide evidence that using complete transcripts rather than more transcripts per gene provides better estimates. Moreover, SUPPA coupled with de novo transcript reconstruction methods does not achieve accuracies as high as using quantification of known transcripts, but remains comparable to existing methods. Finally, we show that SUPPA is more than 1000 times faster than standard methods. Coupled with fast transcript quantification, SUPPA provides inclusion values at a much higher speed than existing methods without compromising accuracy, thereby facilitating the systematic splicing analysis of large data sets with limited computational resources. The software is implemented in Python 2.7 and is available under the MIT license at https://bitbucket.org/regulatorygenomicsupf/suppa. PMID:26179515

  1. Resveratrol, by modulating RNA processing factor levels, can influence the alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Markus, M Andrea; Marques, Francine Z; Morris, Brian J

    2011-01-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing defects can contribute to, or result from, various diseases, including cancer. Aberrant mRNAs, splicing factors and other RNA processing factors have therefore become targets for new therapeutic interventions. Here we report that the natural polyphenol resveratrol can modulate alternative splicing in a target-specific manner. We transfected minigenes of several alternatively spliceable primary mRNAs into HEK293 cells in the presence or absence of 1, 5, 20 and 50 µM resveratrol and measured exon levels by semi-quantitative PCR after separation by agarose gel electrophoresis. We found that 20 µg/ml and 50 µg/ml of resveratrol affected exon inclusion of SRp20 and SMN2 pre-mRNAs, but not CD44v5 or tau pre-mRNAs. By Western blotting and immunofluorescence we showed that this effect may be due to the ability of resveratrol to change the protein level but not the localization of several RNA processing factors. The processing factors that increased significantly were ASF/SF2, hnRNPA1 and HuR, but resveratrol did not change the levels of RBM4, PTBP1 and U2AF35. By means of siRNA-mediated knockdown we depleted cells of SIRT1, regarded as a major target of resveratrol, and showed that the effect on splicing was not dependent on SIRT1. Our results suggest that resveratrol might be an attractive small molecule to treat diseases in which aberrant splicing has been implicated, and justify more extensive research on the effects of resveratrol on the splicing machinery. PMID:22174926

  2. Identication of a novel alternative splicing isoform of human amyloid precursor protein gene, APP639

    E-print Network

    Tian, Weidong

    Identi®cation of a novel alternative splicing isoform of human amyloid precursor protein gene, APP, Meibergdreef 33, 1105 AZ Amsterdam ZO, the Netherlands Keywords: alternative splicing, Alzheimer's disease, APP derived from a large amyloid precursor protein (APP). To date, several alternatively spliced human APP

  3. SRSF1-Regulated Alternative Splicing in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Anczuków, Olga; Akerman, Martin; Cléry, Antoine; Wu, Jie; Shen, Chen; Shirole, Nitin H; Raimer, Amanda; Sun, Shuying; Jensen, Mads A; Hua, Yimin; Allain, Frédéric H-T; Krainer, Adrian R

    2015-10-01

    Splicing factor SRSF1 is upregulated in human breast tumors, and its overexpression promotes transformation of mammary cells. Using RNA-seq, we identified SRSF1-regulated alternative splicing (AS) targets in organotypic three-dimensional MCF-10A cell cultures that mimic a context relevant to breast cancer. We identified and validated hundreds of endogenous SRSF1-regulated AS events. De novo discovery of the SRSF1 binding motif reconciled discrepancies in previous motif analyses. Using a Bayesian model, we determined positional effects of SRSF1 binding on cassette exons: binding close to the 5' splice site generally promoted exon inclusion, whereas binding near the 3' splice site promoted either exon skipping or inclusion. Finally, we identified SRSF1-regulated AS events deregulated in human tumors; overexpressing one such isoform, exon-9-included CASC4, increased acinar size and proliferation, and decreased apoptosis, partially recapitulating SRSF1's oncogenic effects. Thus, we uncovered SRSF1 positive and negative regulatory mechanisms, and oncogenic AS events that represent potential targets for therapeutics development. PMID:26431027

  4. A General Definition and Nomenclature for Alternative Splicing Events

    PubMed Central

    Guigó, Roderic

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms responsible for the regulation of the transcriptome present in eukaryotic cells is one of the most challenging tasks in the postgenomic era. In this regard, alternative splicing (AS) is a key phenomenon contributing to the production of different mature transcripts from the same primary RNA sequence. As a plethora of different transcript forms is available in databases, a first step to uncover the biology that drives AS is to identify the different types of reflected splicing variation. In this work, we present a general definition of the AS event along with a notation system that involves the relative positions of the splice sites. This nomenclature univocally and dynamically assigns a specific “AS code” to every possible pattern of splicing variation. On the basis of this definition and the corresponding codes, we have developed a computational tool (AStalavista) that automatically characterizes the complete landscape of AS events in a given transcript annotation of a genome, thus providing a platform to investigate the transcriptome diversity across genes, chromosomes, and species. Our analysis reveals that a substantial part—in human more than a quarter—of the observed splicing variations are ignored in common classification pipelines. We have used AStalavista to investigate and to compare the AS landscape of different reference annotation sets in human and in other metazoan species and found that proportions of AS events change substantially depending on the annotation protocol, species-specific attributes, and coding constraints acting on the transcripts. The AStalavista system therefore provides a general framework to conduct specific studies investigating the occurrence, impact, and regulation of AS. PMID:18688268

  5. Induced transcription and stability of CELF2 mRNA drives widespread alternative splicing during

    E-print Network

    Lynch, Kristen W.

    important example of gene-regulation cascades is the coordinated alternative splicing of functionallyRNA and guide the activity of the spliceosome (5). In most described cases, alternative splicing of a given gene splicing regulatory protein can impact the expression pattern of hundreds of genes, as had been

  6. Identification of recurrent regulated alternative splicing events across human solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Danan-Gotthold, Miri; Golan-Gerstl, Regina; Eisenberg, Eli; Meir, Keren; Karni, Rotem; Levanon, Erez Y.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a complex disease that involves aberrant gene expression regulation. Discriminating the modified expression patterns driving tumor biology from the many that have no or little contribution is important for understanding cancer molecular basis. Recurrent deregulation patterns observed in multiple cancer types are enriched for such driver events. Here, we studied splicing alterations in hundreds of matched tumor and normal RNA-seq samples of eight solid cancer types. We found hundreds of cassette exons for which splicing was altered in multiple cancer types and identified a set of highly frequent altered splicing events. Specific splicing regulators, including RBFOX2, MBNL1/2 and QKI, appear to account for many splicing alteration events in multiple cancer types. Together, our results provide a first global analysis of regulated splicing alterations in cancer and identify common events with a potential causative role in solid tumor development. PMID:25908786

  7. WT1 interacts with the splicing protein RBM4 and regulates its ability to modulate alternative splicing in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Markus, M. Andrea; Heinrich, Bettina; Raitskin, Oleg; Adams, David J.; Mangs, Helena; Goy, Christine; Ladomery, Michael; Sperling, Ruth; Stamm, Stefan; Morris, Brian J. . E-mail: brianm@medsci.usyd.edu.au

    2006-10-15

    Wilm's tumor protein 1 (WT1), a protein implicated in various cancers and developmental disorders, consists of two major isoforms: WT1(-KTS), a transcription factor, and WT1(+KTS), a post-transcriptional regulator that binds to RNA and can interact with splicing components. Here we show that WT1 interacts with the novel splicing regulator RBM4. Each protein was found to colocalize in nuclear speckles and to cosediment with supraspliceosomes in glycerol gradients. RBM4 conferred dose-dependent and cell-specific regulation of alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs transcribed from several reporter genes. We found that overexpressed WT1(+KTS) abrogated this effect of RBM4 on splice-site selection, whereas WT1(-KTS) did not. We conclude that the (+KTS) form of WT1 is able to inhibit the effect of RBM4 on alternative splicing.

  8. Alternative splicing as a biomarker and potential target for drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Le, Kai-qin; Prabhakar, Bellur S; Hong, Wan-jin; Li, Liang-cheng

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a key process of multi-exonic gene expression during pre-mRNA maturation. In this process, particular exons of a gene will be included within or excluded from the final matured mRNA, and the resulting transcripts generate diverse protein isoforms. Recent evidence demonstrates that approximately 95% of human genes with multiple exons undergo alternative splicing during pre-mRNA maturation. Thus, alternative splicing plays a critical role in physiological processes and cell development programs, and.dysregulation of alternative splicing is highly associated with human diseases, such as cancer, diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we discuss the regulation of alternative splicing, examine the relationship between alternative splicing and human diseases, and describe several approaches that modify alternative splicing, which could aid in human disease diagnosis and therapy. PMID:26073330

  9. Distinctive Features of Drosophila Alternative Splicing Factor RS Domain: Implication for Specific Phosphorylation, Shuttling, and Splicing Activation

    PubMed Central

    Allemand, Eric; Gattoni, Renata; Bourbon, Henri-Marc; Stevenin, James; Cáceres, Javier F.; Soret, Johann; Tazi, Jamal

    2001-01-01

    The human splicing factor 2, also called human alternative splicing factor (hASF), is the prototype of the highly conserved SR protein family involved in constitutive and regulated splicing of metazoan mRNA precursors. Here we report that the Drosophila homologue of hASF (dASF) lacks eight repeating arginine-serine dipeptides at its carboxyl-terminal region (RS domain), previously shown to be important for both localization and splicing activity of hASF. While this difference has no effect on dASF localization, it impedes its capacity to shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm and abolishes its phosphorylation by SR protein kinase 1 (SRPK1). dASF also has an altered splicing activity. While being competent for the regulation of 5? alternative splice site choice and activation of specific splicing enhancers, dASF fails to complement S100-cytoplasmic splicing-deficient extracts. Moreover, targeted overexpression of dASF in transgenic flies leads to higher deleterious developmental defects than hASF overexpression, supporting the notion that the distinctive structural features at the RS domain between the two proteins are likely to be functionally relevant in vivo. PMID:11158320

  10. Integrative Analysis of Many RNA-Seq Datasets to Study Alternative Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenyuan; Dai, Chao; Kang, Shuli; Zhou, Xianghong Jasmine

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing is an important gene regulatory mechanism that dramatically increases the complexity of the proteome. However, how alternative splicing is regulated and how transcription and splicing are coordinated are still poorly understood, and functions of transcript isoforms have been studied only in a few limited cases. Nowadays, RNA-seq technology provides an exceptional opportunity to study alternative splicing on genome-wide scales and in an unbiased manner. With the rapid accumulation of data in public repositories, new challenges arise from the urgent need to effectively integrate many different RNA-seq datasets for study alterative splicing. This paper discusses a set of advanced computational methods that can integrate and analyze many RNA-seq datasets to systematically identify splicing modules, unravel the coupling of transcription and splicing, and predict the functions of splicing isoforms on a genome-wide scale. PMID:24583115

  11. The cardiotonic steroid digitoxin regulates alternative splicing through depletion of the splicing factors SRSF3 and TRA2B

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Erik S.

    Modulation of alternative pre-mRNA splicing is a potential approach to therapeutic targeting for a variety of human diseases. We investigated the mechanism by which digitoxin, a member of the cardiotonic steroid class of ...

  12. Regulation of alternative splicing in Drosophila by 56 RNA binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Angela N.; Duff, Michael O.; May, Gemma; Yang, Li; Bolisetty, Mohan; Landolin, Jane; Wan, Ken; Sandler, Jeremy; Booth, Benjamin W.; Celniker, Susan E.; Graveley, Brenton R.; Brenner, Steven E.

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing is regulated by RNA binding proteins (RBPs) that recognize pre-mRNA sequence elements and activate or repress adjacent exons. Here, we used RNA interference and RNA-seq to identify splicing events regulated by 56 Drosophila proteins, some previously unknown to regulate splicing. Nearly all proteins affected alternative first exons, suggesting that RBPs play important roles in first exon choice. Half of the splicing events were regulated by multiple proteins, demonstrating extensive combinatorial regulation. We observed that SR and hnRNP proteins tend to act coordinately with each other, not antagonistically. We also identified a cross-regulatory network where splicing regulators affected the splicing of pre-mRNAs encoding other splicing regulators. This large-scale study substantially enhances our understanding of recent models of splicing regulation and provides a resource of thousands of exons that are regulated by 56 diverse RBPs. PMID:26294686

  13. Regulation of alternative splicing in Drosophila by 56 RNA binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Angela N; Duff, Michael O; May, Gemma; Yang, Li; Bolisetty, Mohan; Landolin, Jane; Wan, Ken; Sandler, Jeremy; Booth, Benjamin W; Celniker, Susan E; Graveley, Brenton R; Brenner, Steven E

    2015-11-01

    Alternative splicing is regulated by RNA binding proteins (RBPs) that recognize pre-mRNA sequence elements and activate or repress adjacent exons. Here, we used RNA interference and RNA-seq to identify splicing events regulated by 56 Drosophila proteins, some previously unknown to regulate splicing. Nearly all proteins affected alternative first exons, suggesting that RBPs play important roles in first exon choice. Half of the splicing events were regulated by multiple proteins, demonstrating extensive combinatorial regulation. We observed that SR and hnRNP proteins tend to act coordinately with each other, not antagonistically. We also identified a cross-regulatory network where splicing regulators affected the splicing of pre-mRNAs encoding other splicing regulators. This large-scale study substantially enhances our understanding of recent models of splicing regulation and provides a resource of thousands of exons that are regulated by 56 diverse RBPs. PMID:26294686

  14. The Caenorhabditis elegans Gene mfap-1 Encodes a Nuclear Protein That Affects Alternative Splicing

    E-print Network

    Horvitz, H. Robert

    The Caenorhabditis elegans Gene mfap-1 Encodes a Nuclear Protein That Affects Alternative Splicing regulatory mechanism for controlling eukaryotic gene expression. By generating various splice isoforms from used the endogenous gene tos-1 as a reporter for splicing and detected increased intron 1 retention

  15. Analysis of pollen-specific alternative splicing in Arabidopsis thaliana via semi-quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Estrada, April D.; Freese, Nowlan H.; Blakley, Ivory C.

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing enables a single gene to produce multiple mRNA isoforms by varying splice site selection. In animals, alternative splicing of mRNA isoforms between cell types is widespread and supports cellular differentiation. In plants, at least 20% of multi-exon genes are alternatively spliced, but the extent and significance of tissue-specific splicing is less well understood, partly because it is difficult to isolate cells of a single type. Pollen is a useful model system to study tissue-specific splicing in higher plants because pollen grains contain only two cell types and can be collected in large amounts without damaging cells. Previously, we identified pollen-specific splicing patterns by comparing RNA-Seq data from Arabidopsis pollen and leaves. Here, we used semi-quantitative PCR to validate pollen-specific splicing patterns among genes where RNA-Seq data analysis indicated splicing was most different between pollen and leaves. PCR testing confirmed eight of nine alternative splicing patterns, and results from the ninth were inconclusive. In four genes, alternative transcriptional start sites coincided with alternative splicing. This study highlights the value of the low-cost PCR assay as a method of validating RNA-Seq results. PMID:25945312

  16. Alternative splicing of synuclein gamma in endometrial cancer: identification of a novel isoform

    PubMed Central

    Schaal, Kathrin; Hirschfeld, Marc; Bronsert, Peter; Füllgraf, Hannah; Jäger, Markus; Herde, Bettina; Nöthling, Claudia; Mayer, Sebastian; Erbes, Thalia; Stickeler, Elmar

    2015-01-01

    Synuclein gamma (SNCG) is under consideration as a potential biomarker in cancer biology. Up to date four different SNCG variants are described. Due to growing evidence suggesting correlations between aberrant alternative splicing processes and cancer progression, we investigated the effects of peritumoural conditions on expression pattern of SNCG in endometrial cancer (EC) in vitro. Compared to breast cancer cell lines, mRNA expression levels of all known SNCG isoforms 1–4 are significantly reduced in EC cell lines. We identified a novel alternatively spliced variant of isoform 2 (isoform 2 short) which is found highly expressed in EC cell lines. Hypoxia and acidosis trigger an up-regulation of isoform 2 short. EC cell lines are characterized by low SNCG protein levels under control conditions, but exhibit a significant increase triggered by hypoxia and acidosis. In addition we analysed the potential association between SNCG protein expression and clinico-pathological parameters in human EC samples. Our findings indicate a grade-dependent induction of SNCG protein expression in endometrial cancer. We identified for the first time a novel isoform of SNCG that is found specifically expressed in EC. Our results also strongly indicate the existence of a corresponding protein of isoform 2 short that potentially plays a critical role in EC cancer progression. PMID:26265438

  17. Alternative splicing of synuclein gamma in endometrial cancer: identification of a novel isoform.

    PubMed

    Schaal, Kathrin; Hirschfeld, Marc; Bronsert, Peter; Füllgraf, Hannah; Jäger, Markus; Herde, Bettina; Nöthling, Claudia; Mayer, Sebastian; Erbes, Thalia; Stickeler, Elmar

    2015-09-01

    Synuclein gamma (SNCG) is under consideration as a potential biomarker in cancer biology. Up to date four different SNCG variants are described. Due to growing evidence suggesting correlations between aberrant alternative splicing processes and cancer progression, we investigated the effects of peritumoural conditions on expression pattern of SNCG in endometrial cancer (EC) in vitro. Compared to breast cancer cell lines, mRNA expression levels of all known SNCG isoforms 1-4 are significantly reduced in EC cell lines. We identified a novel alternatively spliced variant of isoform 2 (isoform 2 short) which is found highly expressed in EC cell lines. Hypoxia and acidosis trigger an up-regulation of isoform 2 short. EC cell lines are characterized by low SNCG protein levels under control conditions, but exhibit a significant increase triggered by hypoxia and acidosis. In addition we analysed the potential association between SNCG protein expression and clinico-pathological parameters in human EC samples. Our findings indicate a grade-dependent induction of SNCG protein expression in endometrial cancer. We identified for the first time a novel isoform of SNCG that is found specifically expressed in EC. Our results also strongly indicate the existence of a corresponding protein of isoform 2 short that potentially plays a critical role in EC cancer progression. PMID:26265438

  18. Transcriptome Bioinformatical Analysis of Vertebrate Stages of Schistosoma japonicum Reveals Alternative Splicing Events

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinye; Xu, Xindong; Lu, Xingyu; Zhang, Yuanbin; Pan, Weiqing

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a molecular process that contributes greatly to the diversification of proteome and to gene functions. Understanding the mechanisms of stage-specific alternative splicing can provide a better understanding of the development of eukaryotes and the functions of different genes. Schistosoma japonicum is an infectious blood-dwelling trematode with a complex lifecycle that causes the tropical disease schistosomiasis. In this study, we analyzed the transcriptome of Schistosoma japonicum to discover alternative splicing events in this parasite, by applying RNA-seq to cDNA library of adults and schistosomula. Results were validated by RT-PCR and sequencing. We found 11,623 alternative splicing events among 7,099 protein encoding genes and average proportion of alternative splicing events per gene was 42.14%. We showed that exon skip is the most common type of alternative splicing events as found in high eukaryotes, whereas intron retention is the least common alternative splicing type. According to intron boundary analysis, the parasite possesses same intron boundaries as other organisms, namely the classic “GT-AG” rule. And in alternative spliced introns or exons, this rule is less strict. And we have attempted to detect alternative splicing events in genes encoding proteins with signal peptides and transmembrane helices, suggesting that alternative splicing could change subcellular locations of specific gene products. Our results indicate that alternative splicing is prevalent in this parasitic worm, and that the worm is close to its hosts. The revealed secretome involved in alternative splicing implies new perspective into understanding interaction between the parasite and its host. PMID:26407301

  19. My road to alternative splicing control: from simple paths to loops and interconnections.

    PubMed

    Chabot, Benoit

    2015-06-01

    With the functional importance of alternative splicing being validated in nearly every mammalian biological system and implicated in many human diseases, it is now crucial to identify the molecular programs that control the production of splice variants. In this article, I will survey how our knowledge of the basic principles of alternative splicing control evolved over the last 25 years. I will also describe how investigation of the splicing control of an apoptotic regulator led us to identify novel effectors and revealed the existence of converging pathways linking splicing decisions to DNA damage. Finally, I will review how our efforts at developing tools designed to monitor and redirect splicing helped assess the impact of misregulated splicing in cancer. PMID:25759250

  20. PTBP1-dependent regulation of USP5 alternative RNA splicing plays a role in glioblastoma tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Izaguirre, Daisy I; Zhu, Wen; Hai, Tao; Cheung, Hannah C; Krahe, Ralf; Cote, Gilbert J

    2012-11-01

    Aberrant RNA splicing is thought to play a key role in tumorigenesis. The assessment of its specific contributions is limited by the complexity of information derived from genome-wide array-based approaches. We describe how performing splicing factor-specific comparisons using both tumor and cell line data sets may more readily identify physiologically relevant tumor-specific splicing events. Affymetrix exon array data derived from glioblastoma (GBM) tumor samples with defined polypyrimidine tract-binding protein 1 (PTBP1) levels were compared with data from U251 GBM cells with and without PTBP1 knockdown. This comparison yielded overlapping gene sets that comprised only a minor fraction of each data set. The identification of a novel GBM-specific splicing event involving the USP5 gene led us to further examine its role in tumorigenesis. In GBM, USP5 generates a shorter isoform 2 through recognition of a 5' splice site within exon 15. Production of the USP5 isoform 2 was strongly correlated with PTBP1 expression in GBM tumor samples and cell lines. Splicing regulation was consistent with the presence of an intronic PTBP1 binding site and could be modulated through antisense targeting of the isoform 2 splice site to force expression of isoform 1 in GBM cells. The forced expression of USP5 isoform 1 in two GBM cell lines inhibited cell growth and migration, implying an important role for USP5 splicing in gliomagenesis. These results support a role for aberrant RNA splicing in tumorigenesis and suggest that changes in relatively few genes may be sufficient to drive the process. PMID:21976412

  1. Context-dependent control of alternative splicing by RNA-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiang-Dong; Ares, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Sequence-specific RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) bind to pre-mRNA to control alternative splicing, but it is not yet possible to read the ‘splicing code’ that dictates splicing regulation on the basis of genome sequence. Each alternative splicing event is controlled by multiple RBPs, the combined action of which creates a distribution of alternatively spliced products in a given cell type. As each cell type expresses a distinct array of RBPs, the interpretation of regulatory information on a given RNA target is exceedingly dependent on the cell type. RBPs also control each other’s functions at many levels, including by mutual modulation of their binding activities on specific regulatory RNA elements. In this Review, we describe some of the emerging rules that govern the highly context-dependent and combinatorial nature of alternative splicing regulation. PMID:25112293

  2. Global regulation of alternative splicing by adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR)

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Oz; Oren, Shirley; Safran, Michal; Deshet-Unger, Naamit; Akiva, Pinchas; Jacob-Hirsch, Jasmine; Cesarkas, Karen; Kabesa, Reut; Amariglio, Ninette; Unger, Ron; Rechavi, Gideon; Eyal, Eran

    2013-01-01

    Alternative mRNA splicing is a major mechanism for gene regulation and transcriptome diversity. Despite the extent of the phenomenon, the regulation and specificity of the splicing machinery are only partially understood. Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing of pre-mRNA by ADAR enzymes has been linked to splicing regulation in several cases. Here we used bioinformatics approaches, RNA-seq and exon-specific microarray of ADAR knockdown cells to globally examine how ADAR and its A-to-I RNA editing activity influence alternative mRNA splicing. Although A-to-I RNA editing only rarely targets canonical splicing acceptor, donor, and branch sites, it was found to affect splicing regulatory elements (SREs) within exons. Cassette exons were found to be significantly enriched with A-to-I RNA editing sites compared with constitutive exons. RNA-seq and exon-specific microarray revealed that ADAR knockdown in hepatocarcinoma and myelogenous leukemia cell lines leads to global changes in gene expression, with hundreds of genes changing their splicing patterns in both cell lines. This global change in splicing pattern cannot be explained by putative editing sites alone. Genes showing significant changes in their splicing pattern are frequently involved in RNA processing and splicing activity. Analysis of recently published RNA-seq data from glioblastoma cell lines showed similar results. Our global analysis reveals that ADAR plays a major role in splicing regulation. Although direct editing of the splicing motifs does occur, we suggest it is not likely to be the primary mechanism for ADAR-mediated regulation of alternative splicing. Rather, this regulation is achieved by modulating trans-acting factors involved in the splicing machinery. PMID:23474544

  3. Genome-wide analysis of alternative splicing in medulloblastoma identifies splicing patterns characteristic of normal cerebellar development

    PubMed Central

    Menghi, Francesca; Jacques, Thomas S.; Barenco, Martino; Schwalbe, Ed C.; Clifford, Steven C.; Hubank, Mike; Ham, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Alternative splicing is an important mechanism for the generation of protein diversity at a post-transcriptional level. Modifications in the splicing patterns of several genes have been shown to contribute to the malignant transformation of different tissue types. In this study, we used the Affymetrix Exon arrays to investigate patterns of differential splicing between paediatric medulloblastomas and normal cerebellum on a genome-wide scale. Of the 1262 genes identified as potentially generating tumour-associated splice forms, we selected 14 examples of differential splicing of known cassette exons and successfully validated 11 of them by RT-PCR. The pattern of differential splicing of three validated events was characteristic for the molecular subset of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh)-driven medulloblastomas, suggesting that their unique gene signature includes the expression of distinctive transcript variants. Generally, we observed that tumour and normal fetal cerebellar samples shared significantly lower exon inclusion rates compared to normal adult cerebellum. We investigated whether tumour-associated splice forms were expressed in primary cultures of Shh-dependent mouse cerebellar granule cell precursors (GCPs) and found that Shh caused a decrease in the cassette exon inclusion rate of five out of the seven tested genes. Furthermore, we observed a significant increase in exon inclusion between post-natal days 7 and 14 of mouse cerebellar development, at the time when GCPs mature into post-mitotic neurons. We conclude that inappropriate splicing frequently occurs in human medulloblastomas and may be linked to the activation of developmental signalling pathways and a failure of cerebellar precursor cells to differentiate. PMID:21248070

  4. Oncogenic fusion protein EWS-FLI1 is a network hub that regulates alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Selvanathan, Saravana P.; Erkizan, Hayriye V.; Dirksen, Uta; Natarajan, Thanemozhi G.; Dakic, Aleksandra; Yu, Songtao; Liu, Xuefeng; Paulsen, Michelle T.; Ljungman, Mats E.; Wu, Cathy H.; Lawlor, Elizabeth R.; Üren, Aykut; Toretsky, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis and processing of mRNA, from transcription to translation initiation, often requires splicing of intragenic material. The final mRNA composition varies based on proteins that modulate splice site selection. EWS-FLI1 is an Ewing sarcoma (ES) oncoprotein with an interactome that we demonstrate to have multiple partners in spliceosomal complexes. We evaluate the effect of EWS-FLI1 on posttranscriptional gene regulation using both exon array and RNA-seq. Genes that potentially regulate oncogenesis, including CLK1, CASP3, PPFIBP1, and TERT, validate as alternatively spliced by EWS-FLI1. In a CLIP-seq experiment, we find that EWS-FLI1 RNA-binding motifs most frequently occur adjacent to intron–exon boundaries. EWS-FLI1 also alters splicing by directly binding to known splicing factors including DDX5, hnRNP K, and PRPF6. Reduction of EWS-FLI1 produces an isoform of ?-TERT that has increased telomerase activity compared with wild-type (WT) TERT. The small molecule YK-4–279 is an inhibitor of EWS-FLI1 oncogenic function that disrupts specific protein interactions, including helicases DDX5 and RNA helicase A (RHA) that alters RNA-splicing ratios. As such, YK-4–279 validates the splicing mechanism of EWS-FLI1, showing alternatively spliced gene patterns that significantly overlap with EWS-FLI1 reduction and WT human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). Exon array analysis of 75 ES patient samples shows similar isoform expression patterns to cell line models expressing EWS-FLI1, supporting the clinical relevance of our findings. These experiments establish systemic alternative splicing as an oncogenic process modulated by EWS-FLI1. EWS-FLI1 modulation of mRNA splicing may provide insight into the contribution of splicing toward oncogenesis, and, reciprocally, EWS-FLI1 interactions with splicing proteins may inform the splicing code. PMID:25737553

  5. Intronic Sequences Flanking Alternatively Spliced Exons Are Conserved Between Human and Mouse

    E-print Network

    Sorek, Rotem

    Intronic Sequences Flanking Alternatively Spliced Exons Are Conserved Between Human and Mouse Rotem, Ramat Aviv 69978, Israel; 2 Compugen, Ltd., Tel Aviv 69512, Israel Comparison of the sequences of mouse in both human and mouse. We compiled two exon sets: one of alternatively spliced conserved exons

  6. Global variability in gene expression and alternative splicing is modulated by mitochondrial content

    E-print Network

    Guantes, Raúl

    Global variability in gene expression and alternative splicing is modulated by mitochondrial, Spain; 3 MRC Molecular Haematology Unit, Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, John Radcliffe and activities. Moreover, we find that mitochondrial levels have a large impact on alternative splicing, thus

  7. Alternative splicing in concert with protein intrinsic disorder enables increased functional diversity

    E-print Network

    Obradovic, Zoran

    Alternative splicing in concert with protein intrinsic disorder enables increased functional Biology and Center for Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, Indiana University School of Medicine, 2006 (received for review September 12, 2005) Alternative splicing of pre-mRNA generates two or more

  8. How prevalent is functional alternative splicing in the human genome?q

    E-print Network

    Ast, Gil

    How prevalent is functional alternative splicing in the human genome?q Rotem Sorek1,2 , Ron Shamir3 and Gil Ast1 1 Department of Human Genetics, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv predict a high frequency of alternative splicing in human genes. However, there is an ongoing debate

  9. FULL-GENOME ANALYSIS OF ALTERNATIVE SPLICING IN MOUSE LIVER AFTER HEPATOTOXICANT EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alternative splicing plays a role in determining gene function and protein diversity. We have employed whole genome exon profiling using Affymetrix Mouse Exon 1.0 ST arrays to understand the significance of alternative splicing on a genome-wide scale in response to multiple toxic...

  10. nAture methods | vol.6 No.11 | November2009 | 825 Alternative splicing is generally regulated by trans-acting

    E-print Network

    Cai, Long

    reaction. this regulation is critical for normal gene expression, and dysregulation of splicing is closely of effector domains from natural splicing factors and to modulate splicing of an endogenous human gene, Bcl. As a key regulatory step in gene expression, alternative splicing is widespread in humans with most genes

  11. Alternative splicing and expression profile analysis of expressed sequence tags in domestic pig.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Tao, Lin; Ye, Lin; He, Ling; Zhu, Yuan-Zhong; Zhu, Yue-Dong; Zhou, Yan

    2007-02-01

    Domestic pig (Sus scrofa domestica) is one of the most important mammals to humans. Alternative splicing is a cellular mechanism in eukaryotes that greatly increases the diversity of gene products. Expression sequence tags (ESTs) have been widely used for gene discovery, expression profile analysis, and alternative splicing detection. In this study, a total of 712,905 ESTs extracted from 101 different non-normalized EST libraries of the domestic pig were analyzed. These EST libraries cover the nervous system, digestive system, immune system, and meat production related tissues from embryo, newborn, and adult pigs, making contributions to the analysis of alternative splicing variants as well as expression profiles in various stages of tissues. A modified approach was designed to cluster and assemble large EST datasets, aiming to detect alternative splicing together with EST abundance of each splicing variant. Much efforts were made to classify alternative splicing into different types and apply different filters to each type to get more reliable results. Finally, a total of 1,223 genes with average 2.8 splicing variants were detected among 16,540 unique genes. The overview of expression profiles would change when we take alternative splicing into account. PMID:17572361

  12. High-throughput alternative splicing detection using dually constrained correspondence analysis (DCCA).

    PubMed

    Baty, Florent; Klingbiel, Dirk; Zappa, Francesco; Brutsche, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Alternative splicing is an important component of tumorigenesis. Recent advent of exon array technology enables the detection of alternative splicing at a genome-wide scale. The analysis of high-throughput alternative splicing is not yet standard and methodological developments are still needed. We propose a novel statistical approach-Dually Constrained Correspondence Analysis-for the detection of splicing changes in exon array data. Using this methodology, we investigated the genome-wide alteration of alternative splicing in patients with non-small cell lung cancer treated by bevacizumab/erlotinib. Splicing candidates reveal a series of genes related to carcinogenesis (SFTPB), cell adhesion (STAB2, PCDH15, HABP2), tumor aggressiveness (ARNTL2), apoptosis, proliferation and differentiation (PDE4D, FLT3, IL1R2), cell invasion (ETV1), as well as tumor growth (OLFM4, FGF14), tumor necrosis (AFF3) or tumor suppression (TUSC3, CSMD1, RHOBTB2, SERPINB5), with indication of known alternative splicing in a majority of genes. DCCA facilitates the identification of putative biologically relevant alternative splicing events in high-throughput exon array data. PMID:26483173

  13. Alternative splicing of the FMR1 gene in human fetal brain neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Tao Huang; Yan Shen; Xue-bin Qin; Guan-Yun Wu

    1996-08-09

    The alternative splicing expression of the FMR1 gene was reported in several human and mouse tissues. Five regions of FMR1 gene can be alternatively spliced, but the combination of them has not been investigated fully. We reported here the analysis of alternative splicing pattern of the FMR1 gene in cultured fetal human neurons, using a RT-PCR and cloning strategy. Eleven splicing types were cloned and different isoforms were not equally represented. The dominant isoform represents nearly 40%, and the other isoforms were relatively rare. One isoform has a different carboxyl-terminus. Most of the alternative spliced regions appear hydrophilic; thus, they may locate on the surface of the FMR1 protein. 16 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Genome-Wide Analysis of Alternative Splicing during Development and Drought Stress in Maize.

    PubMed

    Thatcher, Shawn R; Danilevskaya, Olga N; Meng, Xin; Beatty, Mary; Zastrow-Hayes, Gina; Harris, Charlotte; Van Allen, Brandon; Habben, Jeffrey; Li, Bailin

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing plays a crucial role in plant development as well as stress responses. Although alternative splicing has been studied during development and in response to stress, the interplay between these two factors remains an open question. To assess the effects of drought stress on developmentally regulated splicing in maize (Zea mays), 94 RNA-seq libraries from ear, tassel, and leaf of the B73 public inbred line were constructed at four developmental stages under both well-watered and drought conditions. This analysis was supplemented with a publicly available series of 53 libraries from developing seed, embryo, and endosperm. More than 48,000 novel isoforms, often with stage- or condition-specific expression, were uncovered, suggesting that developmentally regulated alternative splicing occurs in thousands of genes. Drought induced large developmental splicing changes in leaf and ear but relatively few in tassel. Most developmental stage-specific splicing changes affected by drought were tissue dependent, whereas stage-independent changes frequently overlapped between leaf and ear. A linear relationship was found between gene expression changes in splicing factors and alternative spicing of other genes during development. Collectively, these results demonstrate that alternative splicing is strongly associated with tissue type, developmental stage, and stress condition. PMID:26582726

  15. Unmasking alternative splicing inside protein-coding exons defines exitrons and their role in proteome plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Marquez, Yamile; Höpfler, Markus; Ayatollahi, Zahra; Barta, Andrea; Kalyna, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) diversifies transcriptomes and proteomes and is widely recognized as a key mechanism for regulating gene expression. Previously, in an analysis of intron retention events in Arabidopsis, we found unusual AS events inside annotated protein-coding exons. Here, we also identify such AS events in human and use these two sets to analyse their features, regulation, functional impact, and evolutionary origin. As these events involve introns with features of both introns and protein-coding exons, we name them exitrons (exonic introns). Though exitrons were detected as a subset of retained introns, they are clearly distinguishable, and their splicing results in transcripts with different fates. About half of the 1002 Arabidopsis and 923 human exitrons have sizes of multiples of 3 nucleotides (nt). Splicing of these exitrons results in internally deleted proteins and affects protein domains, disordered regions, and various post-translational modification sites, thus broadly impacting protein function. Exitron splicing is regulated across tissues, in response to stress and in carcinogenesis. Intriguingly, annotated intronless genes can be also alternatively spliced via exitron usage. We demonstrate that at least some exitrons originate from ancestral coding exons. Based on our findings, we propose a “splicing memory” hypothesis whereby upon intron loss imprints of former exon borders defined by vestigial splicing regulatory elements could drive the evolution of exitron splicing. Altogether, our studies show that exitron splicing is a conserved strategy for increasing proteome plasticity in plants and animals, complementing the repertoire of AS events. PMID:25934563

  16. Structure of the human myelin/oligodendrocyte glycoprotein gene and multiple alternative spliced isoforms

    SciTech Connect

    Pham-Dinh, D.; Gaspera, D.B.; Dautigny, A.

    1995-09-20

    Myelin/oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), a special component of the central nervous system localization on the outermost lamellae of mature myelin, is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily. We report here the organization of the human MOG gene, which spans approximately 17 kb, and the characterization of six MOG mRNA splicing variants. The intron/exon structure of the human MOG gene confirmed the splicing pattern, supporting the hypothesis that mRNA isoforms could arise by alternative splicing of a single gene. In addition to the eight exons coding for the major MOG isoform, the human MOG gene also contains 3` region, a previously unknown alternatively spliced coding exon, VIA. Alternative utilization of two acceptor splicing sites for exon VIII could produce two different C-termini. The nucleotide sequences presented here may be a useful tool to study further possible involvement if the MOG gene in hereditary neurological disorders. 23 refs., 5 figs.

  17. An evolutionary analysis of cAMP-specific Phosphodiesterase 4 alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) hydrolyze the intracellular second messengers: cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanine monophosphate (cGMP). The cAMP-specific PDE family 4 (PDE4) is widely expressed in vertebrates. Each of the four PDE4 gene isoforms (PDE4 A-D) undergo extensive alternative splicing via alternative transcription initiation sites, producing unique amino termini and yielding multiple splice variant forms from each gene isoform termed long, short, super-short and truncated super-short. Many species across the vertebrate lineage contain multiple splice variants of each gene type, which are characterized by length and amino termini. Results A phylogenetic approach was used to visualize splice variant form genesis and identify conserved splice variants (genome conservation with EST support) across the vertebrate taxa. Bayesian and maximum likelihood phylogenetic inference indicated PDE4 gene duplication occurred at the base of the vertebrate lineage and reveals additional gene duplications specific to the teleost lineage. Phylogenetic inference and PDE4 splice variant presence, or absence as determined by EST screens, were further supported by the genomic analysis of select vertebrate taxa. Two conserved PDE4 long form splice variants were found in each of the PDE4A, PDE4B, and PDE4C genes, and eight conserved long forms from the PDE4 D gene. Conserved short and super-short splice variants were found from each of the PDE4A, PDE4B, and PDE4 D genes, while truncated super-short variants were found from the PDE4C and PDE4 D genes. PDE4 long form splice variants were found in all taxa sampled (invertebrate through mammals); short, super-short, and truncated super-short are detected primarily in tetrapods and mammals, indicating an increasing complexity in both alternative splicing and cAMP metabolism through vertebrate evolution. Conclusions There was a progressive independent incorporation of multiple PDE4 splice variant forms and amino termini, increasing PDE4 proteome complexity from primitive vertebrates to humans. While PDE4 gene isoform duplicates with limited alternative splicing were found in teleosts, an expansion of both PDE4 splice variant forms, and alternatively spliced amino termini predominantly occurs in mammals. Since amino termini have been linked to intracellular targeting of the PDE4 enzymes, the conservation of amino termini in PDE4 splice variants in evolution highlights the importance of compartmentalization of PDE4-mediated cAMP hydrolysis. PMID:20701803

  18. Regulation of BCL-X splicing reveals a role for the polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTBP1/hnRNP I) in alternative 5? splice site selection

    PubMed Central

    Bielli, Pamela; Bordi, Matteo; Biasio, Valentina Di; Sette, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) modulates many physiological and pathological processes. For instance, AS of the BCL-X gene balances cell survival and apoptosis in development and cancer. Herein, we identified the polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTBP1) as a direct regulator of BCL-X AS. Overexpression of PTBP1 promotes selection of the distal 5? splice site in BCL-X exon 2, generating the pro-apoptotic BCL-Xs splice variant. Conversely, depletion of PTBP1 enhanced splicing of the anti-apoptotic BCL-XL variant. In vivo cross-linking experiments and site-directed mutagenesis restricted the PTBP1 binding site to a polypyrimidine tract located between the two alternative 5? splice sites. Binding of PTBP1 to this site was required for its effect on splicing. Notably, a similar function of PTBP1 in the selection of alternative 5? splice sites was confirmed using the USP5 gene as additional model. Mechanistically, PTBP1 displaces SRSF1 binding from the proximal 5? splice site, thus repressing its selection. Our study provides a novel mechanism of alternative 5? splice site selection by PTBP1 and indicates that the presence of a PTBP1 binding site between two alternative 5? splice sites promotes selection of the distal one, while repressing the proximal site by competing for binding of a positive regulator. PMID:25294838

  19. Regulation of BCL-X splicing reveals a role for the polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTBP1/hnRNP I) in alternative 5' splice site selection.

    PubMed

    Bielli, Pamela; Bordi, Matteo; Di Biasio, Valentina; Sette, Claudio

    2014-10-29

    Alternative splicing (AS) modulates many physiological and pathological processes. For instance, AS of the BCL-X gene balances cell survival and apoptosis in development and cancer. Herein, we identified the polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTBP1) as a direct regulator of BCL-X AS. Overexpression of PTBP1 promotes selection of the distal 5' splice site in BCL-X exon 2, generating the pro-apoptotic BCL-Xs splice variant. Conversely, depletion of PTBP1 enhanced splicing of the anti-apoptotic BCL-XL variant. In vivo cross-linking experiments and site-directed mutagenesis restricted the PTBP1 binding site to a polypyrimidine tract located between the two alternative 5' splice sites. Binding of PTBP1 to this site was required for its effect on splicing. Notably, a similar function of PTBP1 in the selection of alternative 5' splice sites was confirmed using the USP5 gene as additional model. Mechanistically, PTBP1 displaces SRSF1 binding from the proximal 5' splice site, thus repressing its selection. Our study provides a novel mechanism of alternative 5' splice site selection by PTBP1 and indicates that the presence of a PTBP1 binding site between two alternative 5' splice sites promotes selection of the distal one, while repressing the proximal site by competing for binding of a positive regulator. PMID:25294838

  20. Ancient nature of alternative splicing and functions of introns

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Kemin; Salamov, Asaf; Kuo, Alan; Aerts, Andrea; Grigoriev, Igor

    2011-03-21

    Using four genomes: Chamydomonas reinhardtii, Agaricus bisporus, Aspergillus carbonarius, and Sporotricum thermophile with EST coverage of 2.9x, 8.9x, 29.5x, and 46.3x respectively, we identified 11 alternative splicing (AS) types that were dominated by intron retention (RI; biased toward short introns) and found 15, 35, 52, and 63percent AS of multiexon genes respectively. Genes with AS were more ancient, and number of AS correlated with number of exons, expression level, and maximum intron length of the gene. Introns with tendency to be retained had either stop codons or length of 3n+1 or 3n+2 presumably triggering nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), but introns retained in major isoforms (0.2-6percent of all introns) were biased toward 3n length and stop codon free. Stopless introns were biased toward phase 0, but 3n introns favored phase 1 that introduced more flexible and hydrophilic amino acids on both ends of introns which would be less disruptive to protein structure. We proposed a model in which minor RI intron could evolve into major RI that could facilitate intron loss through exonization.

  1. Alternatively spliced orcokinin isoforms and their functions in Tribolium castaneum.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hongbo; Kim, Hong Geun; Park, Yoonseong

    2015-10-01

    Orcokinin and orcomyotropin were originally described as neuropeptides in crustaceans but have now been uncovered in many species of insects in which they are called orcokinin-A (OK-A) and orcokinin-B (OK-B), respectively. The two groups of mature peptides are products of alternatively spliced transcripts of the single copy gene orcokinin in insects. We investigated the expression patterns and the functions of OK-A and OK-B in the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry using isoform-specific probes and antibodies for each OK-A and OK-B suggests that both peptides are co-expressed in 5-7 pairs of brain cells and in the midgut enteroendocrine cells, which contrasts to expression patterns in other insects in which the two peptides are expressed in different cells. We developed a novel behavioral assay to assess the phenotypes of orcokinin RNA interference (RNAi) in T. castaneum. RNAi of ok-a and ok-b alone or in combination resulted in higher frequencies and longer durations of death feigning in response to mechanical stimulation in the adult assay. In the larval behavioral assays, we observed longer recovery times from knockout induced by water submergence in the insects treated with RNAi for ok-a and ok-b alone or in combination. We conclude that both OK-A and OK-B have "awakening" activities and are potentially involved in the control of circadian rhythms. PMID:26235678

  2. A novel zinc finger gene on human chromosome 1qter that is alternatively spliced in human tissues and cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Saleh, M.; Selleri, L.; Evans, G.A. )

    1993-01-01

    DNA-binding proteins that share the conserved C[sub 2]-H[sub 2] zinc finger motif have been shown to have important roles as transcriptional regulators of gene expression and have been implicated in several hereditary human diseases. In order to define potential candidate genes for inherited disorders characterized by aberrant gene expression, the authors utilized Kruppel-related sequences to isolate zinc finger-containing cDNAs. They isolated and characterized two novel zinc finger-encoding cDNAs from a human hepatoblastoma cell line, which demonstrate DNA sequence homology to a recently described human Kruppel-related gene HZF-3 and appear to be derived from a single gene by alternate mRNA splicing. This gene, denoted HZF-16,' gives rise to at least two gene products. One cDNA (i.e., HZF-16.2) has nine zinc finger domains, while alternative splicing of the message gives rise to a smaller product (i.e., HZF-16.1) that has four domains. Despite the internal splicing event, both the 5[prime]- and 3[prime]-untranslated sequences in both cDNAs are identical, as are the first three domains. In the HZF-16.1 cDNA, the fourth zinc finger domain is a fusion product of domains four and nine of HZF-16.2 and could potentially give rise to a new DNA-binding specificity. These alternatively spliced transcripts are differentially regulated in human tissues and transformed cell lines and show a different distribution of expression between human cell lines and normal human tissue. This novel gene was mapped to human chromosome 1q44 by chromosomal in situ suppression hybridization and thus represents a candidate gene for trisomy 1q syndrome and for several other disorders. 40 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Effects of alternative splicing on function of Bestrophin-1 calcium-activated chloride channels

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Yu-Hung; Abdullaev, Iskandar F.; Hyzinski-García, María C.; Mongin, Alexander A.

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis The proposed Ca2+-activated Cl? channel protein Bestrophin 1 (Best1) is expressed and functionally important in the retina and in the brain. Human BEST1 has two known splice variants, Best1V1 and Best1V2, which arise from alternative splicing of two exons: exon 2 splicing results in a unique N-terminal domain, whereas alternative splicing of exon 11 produces two mutually exclusive C-termini. Prior studies were limited to Best1V1 and its clinically relevant mutations. In the present work, we cloned a novel splice variant of Best1V1 missing exon 2 (Best1V1?ex2) and differing from each of the two previously identified isoforms by one alternatively spliced domain. This finding allowed us to determine the role for alternative splicing of the Best1 N- and C-termini. We heteroexpressed Best1V1?ex2 in HEK293 cells, and compared its properties to Best1V1 and Best1V2. Western blot analysis confirmed protein expression from all three splice variants. Both Best1V1 and Best1V1?ex2 successfully formed Ca2+-activated Cl? channels, demonstrating that the N-terminus encoded by exon 2 is not essential for channel function. In contrast, Best1V2 expressing cells had no detectable Ca2+-activated Cl? currents, pointing to a critical role for splicing of the C-terminus. Surface protein biotinylation demonstrated that Best1V1 and Best1V1?ex2 are trafficked to the plasma membrane, whereas Best1V2 is not. These results define the impact of alternative splicing on Best1 function, and should be taken into consideration in future modeling of the Best1 protein structure. PMID:24341532

  4. The Evolutionary Fate of Alternatively Spliced Homologous Exons after Gene Duplication

    PubMed Central

    Abascal, Federico; Tress, Michael L.; Valencia, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing and gene duplication are the two main processes responsible for expanding protein functional diversity. Although gene duplication can generate new genes and alternative splicing can introduce variation through alternative gene products, the interplay between the two processes is complex and poorly understood. Here, we have carried out a study of the evolution of alternatively spliced exons after gene duplication to better understand the interaction between the two processes. We created a manually curated set of 97 human genes with mutually exclusively spliced homologous exons and analyzed the evolution of these exons across five distantly related vertebrates (lamprey, spotted gar, zebrafish, fugu, and coelacanth). Most of these exons had an ancient origin (more than 400 Ma). We found examples supporting two extreme evolutionary models for the behaviour of homologous axons after gene duplication. We observed 11 events in which gene duplication was accompanied by splice isoform separation, that is, each paralog specifically conserved just one distinct ancestral homologous exon. At other extreme, we identified genes in which the homologous exons were always conserved within paralogs, suggesting that the alternative splicing event cannot easily be separated from the function in these genes. That many homologous exons fall in between these two extremes highlights the diversity of biological systems and suggests that the subtle balance between alternative splicing and gene duplication is adjusted to the specific cellular context of each gene. PMID:25931610

  5. The evolutionary fate of alternatively spliced homologous exons after gene duplication.

    PubMed

    Abascal, Federico; Tress, Michael L; Valencia, Alfonso

    2015-06-01

    Alternative splicing and gene duplication are the two main processes responsible for expanding protein functional diversity. Although gene duplication can generate new genes and alternative splicing can introduce variation through alternative gene products, the interplay between the two processes is complex and poorly understood. Here, we have carried out a study of the evolution of alternatively spliced exons after gene duplication to better understand the interaction between the two processes. We created a manually curated set of 97 human genes with mutually exclusively spliced homologous exons and analyzed the evolution of these exons across five distantly related vertebrates (lamprey, spotted gar, zebrafish, fugu, and coelacanth). Most of these exons had an ancient origin (more than 400 Ma). We found examples supporting two extreme evolutionary models for the behaviour of homologous axons after gene duplication. We observed 11 events in which gene duplication was accompanied by splice isoform separation, that is, each paralog specifically conserved just one distinct ancestral homologous exon. At other extreme, we identified genes in which the homologous exons were always conserved within paralogs, suggesting that the alternative splicing event cannot easily be separated from the function in these genes. That many homologous exons fall in between these two extremes highlights the diversity of biological systems and suggests that the subtle balance between alternative splicing and gene duplication is adjusted to the specific cellular context of each gene. PMID:25931610

  6. The Role of Alternative Splicing in the Control of Immune Homeostasis and Cellular Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yabas, Mehmet; Elliott, Hannah; Hoyne, Gerard F

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNA helps to enhance the genetic diversity within mammalian cells by increasing the number of protein isoforms that can be generated from one gene product. This provides a great deal of flexibility to the host cell to alter protein function, but when dysregulation in splicing occurs this can have important impact on health and disease. Alternative splicing is widely used in the mammalian immune system to control the development and function of antigen specific lymphocytes. In this review we will examine the splicing of pre-mRNAs yielding key proteins in the immune system that regulate apoptosis, lymphocyte differentiation, activation and homeostasis, and discuss how defects in splicing can contribute to diseases. We will describe how disruption to trans-acting factors, such as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs), can impact on cell survival and differentiation in the immune system. PMID:26703587

  7. Determination of Alternate Splicing Events using the Affymetrix Exon 1.0 ST Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Subbaram, Sita; Kuentzel, Marcy; Frank, David; DiPersio, C. Michael; Chittur, Sridar V.

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing plays an important role in regulation of normal cellular function. Alternative splicing of pre-mRNA leads to the diversity of downstream protein products in the cell. The Affymetrix Exon arrays allow for a high throughput evaluation of the differences in spliced mRNA expressed in a biological system. In this study, we describe a method using this technology to study the generation of alternative mRNA transcripts in breast cancer cells that differ in the levels of a particular integrin, ?3?1. PMID:20217571

  8. Alternative splicing, a new target to block cellular gene expression by poliovirus 2A protease

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, Enrique; Castello, Alfredo; Carrasco, Luis; Izquierdo, Jose M.

    2011-10-14

    Highlights: {yields} Novel role for poliovirus 2A protease as splicing modulator. {yields} Poliovirus 2A protease inhibits the alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs. {yields} Poliovirus 2A protease blocks the second catalytic step of splicing. -- Abstract: Viruses have developed multiple strategies to interfere with the gene expression of host cells at different stages to ensure their own survival. Here we report a new role for poliovirus 2A{sup pro} modulating the alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs. Expression of 2A{sup pro} potently inhibits splicing of reporter genes in HeLa cells. Low amounts of 2A{sup pro} abrogate Fas exon 6 skipping, whereas higher levels of protease fully abolish Fas and FGFR2 splicing. In vitro splicing of MINX mRNA using nuclear extracts is also strongly inhibited by 2A{sup pro}, leading to accumulation of the first exon and the lariat product containing the unspliced second exon. These findings reveal that the mechanism of action of 2A{sup pro} on splicing is to selectively block the second catalytic step.

  9. Genome-Wide Identification of Alternative Splice Forms Down-Regulated by Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay in

    E-print Network

    of thousands of genes in Drosophila melanogaster. Not all alternative splicing results in functional proteinRNA decay (NMD) pathway. This coupling of alternative splicing and NMD provides a mechanism for gene splicing and NMD decrease expression of these genes, which may in turn have a downstream effect

  10. HuR Regulates Alternative Splicing of the TRA2 Gene in Human Colon Cancer Cells under Oxidative Stress

    E-print Network

    Dever, Jennifer A.

    HuR Regulates Alternative Splicing of the TRA2 Gene in Human Colon Cancer Cells under Oxidative the translation of target mRNAs. The human TRA2 gene encodes splicing factor transformer 2 (Tra2 ) and generates 5 mRNA isoforms (TRA2 1 to -5) through alternative splicing. Exposure of HCT116 colon cancer cells

  11. Regulation of alternative splicing in Drosophila by 56 RNA binding proteins Angela N. Brooks1,5,6

    E-print Network

    Brenner, Steven E.

    uses different splice sites, thus creating different mRNAs, and frequently proteins, from a single gene. Alternative splicing is an important aspect of gene regulation that is used to produce different transcriptRegulation of alternative splicing in Drosophila by 56 RNA binding proteins Angela N. Brooks1

  12. Alternatively spliced isoforms of the human constitutive androstane receptor

    PubMed Central

    Auerbach, Scott S.; Ramsden, Richard; Stoner, Matthew A.; Verlinde, Christophe; Hassett, Christopher; Omiecinski, Curtis J.

    2003-01-01

    The nuclear receptor CAR (NR1I3) regulates transcription of genes encoding xenobiotic- and steroid-metabolizing enzymes. Regulatory processes that are mediated by CAR are modulated by a structurally diverse array of chemicals including common pharmaceutical and environmental agents. Here we describe four in-frame splice variants of the human CAR receptor gene. The variant mRNA splice transcripts were expressed in all human livers evaluated. Molecular modeling of the splice variant proteins predicts that the structural effects are localized within the receptor’s ligand-binding domain. Assays to assess function indicate that the variant proteins, when compared with the reference protein isoform, exhibit compromised activities with respect to DNA binding, transcriptional activation and coactivator recruitment. PMID:12799447

  13. Alternative splicing regulates vesicular trafficking genes in cardiomyocytes during postnatal heart development

    E-print Network

    Giudice, Jimena

    During postnatal development the heart undergoes a rapid and dramatic transition to adult function through transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms, including alternative splicing (AS). Here we perform deep ...

  14. SRSF10 Plays a Role in Myoblast Differentiation and Glucose Production via Regulation of Alternative Splicing.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ning; Cheng, Yuanming; Wang, Zhijia; Liu, Yuguo; Luo, Chunling; Liu, Lina; Chen, Linlin; Xie, Zhiqin; Lu, Yun; Feng, Ying

    2015-11-24

    Alternative splicing is a major mechanism of controlling gene expression and protein diversity in higher eukaryotes. We report that the splicing factor SRSF10 functions during striated muscle development, myoblast differentiation, and glucose production both in cells and in mice. A combination of RNA-sequencing and molecular analysis allowed us to identify muscle-specific splicing events controlled by SRSF10 that are critically involved in striated muscle development. Inclusion of alternative exons 16 and 17 of Lrrfip1 is a muscle-specific event that is activated by SRSF10 and essential for myoblast differentiation. On the other hand, in mouse primary hepatocytes, PGC1? is a key target of SRSF10 that regulates glucose production by fasting. SRSF10 represses inclusion of PGC1? exon 7a and facilitates the production of functional protein. The results highlight the biological significance of SRSF10 and regulated alternative splicing in vivo. PMID:26586428

  15. Genome-wide analysis of alternative splicing events in Hordeum vulgare: Highlighting retention of intron-based splicing and its possible function through network analysis.

    PubMed

    Panahi, Bahman; Mohammadi, Seyed Abolghasem; Ebrahimi Khaksefidi, Reyhaneh; Fallah Mehrabadi, Jalil; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil

    2015-11-30

    In this study, using homology mapping of assembled expressed sequence tags against the genomic data, we identified alternative splicing events in barley. Results demonstrated that intron retention is frequently associated with specific abiotic stresses. Network analysis resulted in discovery of some specific sub-networks between miRNAs and transcription factors in genes with high number of alternative splicing, such as cross talk between SPL2, SPL10 and SPL11 regulated by miR156 and miR157 families. To confirm the alternative splicing events, elongation factor protein (MLOC_3412) was selected followed by experimental verification of the predicted splice variants by Semi quantitative Reverse Transcription PCR (qRT-PCR). Our novel integrative approach opens a new avenue for functional annotation of alternative splicing through regulatory-based network discovery. PMID:26454178

  16. Lineage-specific splicing of a brain-enriched alternative exon promotes glioblastoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Ferrarese, Roberto; Harsh, Griffith R.; Yadav, Ajay K.; Bug, Eva; Maticzka, Daniel; Reichardt, Wilfried; Dombrowski, Stephen M.; Miller, Tyler E.; Masilamani, Anie P.; Dai, Fangping; Kim, Hyunsoo; Hadler, Michael; Scholtens, Denise M.; Yu, Irene L.Y.; Beck, Jürgen; Srinivasasainagendra, Vinodh; Costa, Fabrizio; Baxan, Nicoleta; Pfeifer, Dietmar; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Backofen, Rolf; Weyerbrock, Astrid; Duarte, Christine W.; He, Xiaolin; Prinz, Marco; Chandler, James P.; Vogel, Hannes; Chakravarti, Arnab; Rich, Jeremy N.; Carro, Maria S.; Bredel, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Tissue-specific alternative splicing is critical for the emergence of tissue identity during development, yet the role of this process in malignant transformation is undefined. Tissue-specific splicing involves evolutionarily conserved, alternative exons that represent only a minority of the total alternative exons identified. Many of these conserved exons have functional features that influence signaling pathways to profound biological effect. Here, we determined that lineage-specific splicing of a brain-enriched cassette exon in the membrane-binding tumor suppressor annexin A7 (ANXA7) diminishes endosomal targeting of the EGFR oncoprotein, consequently enhancing EGFR signaling during brain tumor progression. ANXA7 exon splicing was mediated by the ribonucleoprotein PTBP1, which is normally repressed during neuronal development. PTBP1 was highly expressed in glioblastomas due to loss of a brain-enriched microRNA (miR-124) and to PTBP1 amplification. The alternative ANXA7 splicing trait was present in precursor cells, suggesting that glioblastoma cells inherit the trait from a potential tumor-initiating ancestor and that these cells exploit this trait through accumulation of mutations that enhance EGFR signaling. Our data illustrate that lineage-specific splicing of a tissue-regulated alternative exon in a constituent of an oncogenic pathway eliminates tumor suppressor functions and promotes glioblastoma progression. This paradigm may offer a general model as to how tissue-specific regulatory mechanisms can reprogram normal developmental processes into oncogenic ones. PMID:24865424

  17. Lineage-specific splicing of a brain-enriched alternative exon promotes glioblastoma progression.

    PubMed

    Ferrarese, Roberto; Harsh, Griffith R; Yadav, Ajay K; Bug, Eva; Maticzka, Daniel; Reichardt, Wilfried; Dombrowski, Stephen M; Miller, Tyler E; Masilamani, Anie P; Dai, Fangping; Kim, Hyunsoo; Hadler, Michael; Scholtens, Denise M; Yu, Irene L Y; Beck, Jürgen; Srinivasasainagendra, Vinodh; Costa, Fabrizio; Baxan, Nicoleta; Pfeifer, Dietmar; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Backofen, Rolf; Weyerbrock, Astrid; Duarte, Christine W; He, Xiaolin; Prinz, Marco; Chandler, James P; Vogel, Hannes; Chakravarti, Arnab; Rich, Jeremy N; Carro, Maria S; Bredel, Markus

    2014-07-01

    Tissue-specific alternative splicing is critical for the emergence of tissue identity during development, yet the role of this process in malignant transformation is undefined. Tissue-specific splicing involves evolutionarily conserved, alternative exons that represent only a minority of the total alternative exons identified. Many of these conserved exons have functional features that influence signaling pathways to profound biological effect. Here, we determined that lineage-specific splicing of a brain-enriched cassette exon in the membrane-binding tumor suppressor annexin A7 (ANXA7) diminishes endosomal targeting of the EGFR oncoprotein, consequently enhancing EGFR signaling during brain tumor progression. ANXA7 exon splicing was mediated by the ribonucleoprotein PTBP1, which is normally repressed during neuronal development. PTBP1 was highly expressed in glioblastomas due to loss of a brain-enriched microRNA (miR-124) and to PTBP1 amplification. The alternative ANXA7 splicing trait was present in precursor cells, suggesting that glioblastoma cells inherit the trait from a potential tumor-initiating ancestor and that these cells exploit this trait through accumulation of mutations that enhance EGFR signaling. Our data illustrate that lineage-specific splicing of a tissue-regulated alternative exon in a constituent of an oncogenic pathway eliminates tumor suppressor functions and promotes glioblastoma progression. This paradigm may offer a general model as to how tissue-specific regulatory mechanisms can reprogram normal developmental processes into oncogenic ones. PMID:24865424

  18. Benzo[a]pyrene treatment leads to changes in nuclear protein expression and alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chunlan; Wu, Wei; Li, Haiyan; Zhang, Guanglin; Duerksen-Hughes, Penelope J; Zhu, Xinqiang; Yang, Jun

    2010-04-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is a potent pro-carcinogen generated from the combustion of fossil fuel and cigarette smoke. Previously, using a proteomic approach, we have shown that BaP can induce changes in the expression of many cellular proteins, including transcription regulators. In the present study, using a similar approach, we examined the nuclear protein response to BaP in HeLa cells and found that BaP treatment caused expression changes in many nuclear proteins. Twenty-four of these proteins were successfully identified, several of which are involved in the alternative splicing of mRNA, DNA replication, recombination, and repair. The changed expression levels were further confirmed by immunoblot analysis using specific antibodies for two proteins, Lamin A and mitotic checkpoint protein Bub3. The nuclear localization of these two proteins was also confirmed by confocal microscopy. To determine whether alternative splicing was activated following BaP treatment, we examined Fas and CD44, two genes previously shown to be targets of alternative splicing in respond to DNA damage. While no significant activation of alternative splicing was observed for Fas, CD44 splicing variants were found after BaP treatment. Together, these data show that DNA damage induces dramatic changes in nuclear protein expression, and that alternative splicing might be involved in the cellular response to DNA damage. PMID:20097212

  19. nAture methods | VOL.7 NO.12 | DECEMBER2010 | 1009 through alternative splicing, most human genes express

    E-print Network

    Cai, Long

    metazoan genes through alternative splicing can be important in development, differen- tiation and disease1. For example, the pyruvate kinase gene pro- duces two distinct tissue-specific spliced isoforms that differ-seq data have recently been used to show that the vast majority of human genes are alter- natively spliced

  20. In Vitro and In Vivo Modulation of Alternative Splicing by the Biguanide Metformin.

    PubMed

    Laustriat, Delphine; Gide, Jacqueline; Barrault, Laetitia; Chautard, Emilie; Benoit, Clara; Auboeuf, Didier; Boland, Anne; Battail, Christophe; Artiguenave, François; Deleuze, Jean-François; Bénit, Paule; Rustin, Pierre; Franc, Sylvia; Charpentier, Guillaume; Furling, Denis; Bassez, Guillaume; Nissan, Xavier; Martinat, Cécile; Peschanski, Marc; Baghdoyan, Sandrine

    2015-01-01

    Major physiological changes are governed by alternative splicing of RNA, and its misregulation may lead to specific diseases. With the use of a genome-wide approach, we show here that this splicing step can be modified by medication and demonstrate the effects of the biguanide metformin, on alternative splicing. The mechanism of action involves AMPK activation and downregulation of the RBM3 RNA-binding protein. The effects of metformin treatment were tested on myotonic dystrophy type I (DM1), a multisystemic disease considered to be a spliceopathy. We show that this drug promotes a corrective effect on several splicing defects associated with DM1 in derivatives of human embryonic stem cells carrying the causal mutation of DM1 as well as in primary myoblasts derived from patients. The biological effects of metformin were shown to be compatible with typical therapeutic dosages in a clinical investigation involving diabetic patients. The drug appears to act as a modifier of alternative splicing of a subset of genes and may therefore have novel therapeutic potential for many more diseases besides those directly linked to defective alternative splicing. PMID:26528939

  1. The Nuclear-Retained Noncoding RNA MALAT1 Regulates Alternative Splicing by Modulating SR Splicing Factor Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Vidisha; Ellis, Jonathan D.; Shen, Zhen; Song, David Y.; Pan, Qun; Watt, Andrew T.; Freier, Susan M.; Bennett, C. Frank; Sharma, Alok; Bubulya, Paula A.; Blencowe, Benjamin J.; Prasanth, Supriya G.; Prasanth, Kannanganattu V.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Alternative splicing (AS) of pre-mRNA is utilized by higher eukaryotes to achieve increased transcriptome and proteomic complexity. The serine/arginine (SR) splicing factors regulate tissue- or cell-type-specific AS in a concentration- and phosphorylation-dependent manner. However, the mechanisms that modulate the cellular levels of active SR proteins remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we provide evidence for a role for the long nuclear-retained regulatory RNA (nrRNA), MALAT1 in AS regulation. MALAT1 interacts with SR proteins and influences the distribution of these and other splicing factors in nuclear speckle domains. Depletion of MALAT1 or overexpression of an SR protein changes the AS of a similar set of endogenous pre-mRNAs. Furthermore, MALAT1 regulates cellular levels of phosphorylated forms of SR proteins. Taken together, our results suggest that MALAT1 regulates AS by modulating the levels of active SR proteins. Our results further highlight the role for an nrRNA in the regulation of gene expression. PMID:20797886

  2. Alternative pre-mRNA splicing switches modulate gene expression in late erythropoiesis

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Miki L.; Clark, Tyson A.; Gee, Sherry L.; Kang, Jeong-Ah; Schweitzer, Anthony C.; Wickrema, Amittha; Conboy, John G.

    2009-02-03

    Differentiating erythroid cells execute a unique gene expression program that insures synthesis of the appropriate proteome at each stage of maturation. Standard expression microarrays provide important insight into erythroid gene expression but cannot detect qualitative changes in transcript structure, mediated by RNA processing, that alter structure and function of encoded proteins. We analyzed stage-specific changes in the late erythroid transcriptome via use of high-resolution microarrays that detect altered expression of individual exons. Ten differentiation-associated changes in erythroblast splicing patterns were identified, including the previously known activation of protein 4.1R exon 16 splicing. Six new alternative splicing switches involving enhanced inclusion of internal cassette exons were discovered, as well as 3 changes in use of alternative first exons. All of these erythroid stage-specific splicing events represent activated inclusion of authentic annotated exons, suggesting they represent an active regulatory process rather than a general loss of splicing fidelity. The observation that 3 of the regulated transcripts encode RNA binding proteins (SNRP70, HNRPLL, MBNL2) may indicate significant changes in the RNA processing machinery of late erythroblasts. Together, these results support the existence of a regulated alternative pre-mRNA splicing program that is critical for late erythroid differentiation.

  3. The polypyrimidine tract binding protein regulates desaturase alternative splicing and PUFA composition.

    PubMed

    Reardon, Holly T; Park, Woo Jung; Zhang, Jimmy; Lawrence, Peter; Kothapalli, Kumar S D; Brenna, J Thomas

    2011-12-01

    The ?6 desaturase, encoded by FADS2, plays a crucial role in omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acid synthesis. These fatty acids are essential components of the central nervous system, and they act as precursors for eicosanoid signaling molecules and as direct modulators of gene expression. The polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB or hnRNP I) is a splicing factor that regulates alternative pre-mRNA splicing. Here, PTB is shown to bind an exonic splicing silencer element and repress alternative splicing of FADS2 into FADS2 AT1. PTB and FADS2AT1 were inversely correlated in neonatal baboon tissues, implicating PTB as a major regulator of tissue-specific FADS2 splicing. In HepG2 cells, PTB knockdown modulated alternative splicing of FADS2, as well as FADS3, a putative desaturase of unknown function. Omega-3 fatty acids decreased by nearly one half relative to omega-6 fatty acids in PTB knockdown cells compared with controls, with a particularly strong decrease in eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) concentration and its ratio to arachidonic acid (ARA). This is a rare demonstration of a mechanism specifically altering the cellular omega-3 to omega-6 fatty acid ratio without any change in diet/media. These findings reveal a novel role for PTB, regulating availability of membrane components and eicosanoid precursors for cell signaling. PMID:21980057

  4. Coordinately regulated alternative splicing of genes involved in cholesterol biosynthesis and uptake.

    PubMed

    Medina, Marisa Wong; Gao, Feng; Naidoo, Devesh; Rudel, Lawrence L; Temel, Ryan E; McDaniel, Allison L; Marshall, Stephanie M; Krauss, Ronald M

    2011-01-01

    Genes involved in cholesterol biosynthesis and uptake are transcriptionally regulated in response to cellular sterol content in a coordinated manner. A number of these genes, including 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) and LDL receptor (LDLR), undergo alternative splicing, resulting in reductions of enzyme or protein activity. Here we demonstrate that cellular sterol depletion suppresses, and sterol loading induces, alternative splicing of multiple genes involved in the maintenance of cholesterol homeostasis including HMGCR and LDLR, the key regulators of cellular cholesterol biosynthesis and uptake, respectively. These changes were observed in both in vitro studies of the HepG2 human hepatoma derived cell line, as well as in vivo studies of St. Kitts vervets, also known as African green monkeys, a commonly used primate model for investigating cholesterol metabolism. These effects are mediated in part by sterol regulation of polypyrimidine tract binding protein 1 (PTBP1), since knock-down of PTBP1 eliminates sterol induced changes in alternative splicing of several of these genes. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that influence HMGCR and LDLR alternative splicing (rs3846662 and rs688, respectively), have been associated with variation in plasma LDL-cholesterol levels. Sterol-induced changes in alternative splicing are blunted in carriers of the minor alleles for each of these SNPs, indicating an interaction between genetic and non-genetic regulation of this process. Our results implicate alternative splicing as a novel mechanism of enhancing the robust transcriptional response to conditions of cellular cholesterol depletion or accumulation. Thus coordinated regulation of alternative splicing may contribute to cellular cholesterol homeostasis as well as plasma LDL levels. PMID:21559365

  5. Alternative splicing and genomic structure of the Wilms tumor gene WT1.

    PubMed Central

    Haber, D A; Sohn, R L; Buckler, A J; Pelletier, J; Call, K M; Housman, D E

    1991-01-01

    The chromosome 11p13 Wilms tumor susceptibility gene WT1 appears to play a crucial role in regulating the proliferation and differentiation of nephroblasts and gonadal tissue. The WT1 gene consists of 10 exons, encoding a complex pattern of mRNA species: four distinct transcripts are expressed, reflecting the presence or absence of two alternative splices. Splice I consists of a separate exon, encoding 17 amino acids, which is inserted between the proline-rich amino terminus and the zinc finger domains. Splice II arises from the use of an alternative 5' splice junction and results in the insertion of 3 amino acids between zinc fingers 3 and 4. RNase protection analysis demonstrates that the most prevalent splice variant in both human and mouse is that which contains both alternative splices, whereas the least common is the transcript missing both splices. The relative distribution of splice variants is highly conserved between normal fetal kidney tissue and Wilms tumors that have intact WT1 transcripts. The ratio of these different WT1 mRNA species is also maintained as a function of development in the mouse kidney and in various mouse tissues expressing WT1. The conservation in structure and relative levels of each of the four WT1 mRNA species suggests that each encoded polypeptide makes a significant contribution to normal gene function. The control of cellular proliferation and differentiation exerted by the WT1 gene products may involve interactions between four polypeptides with distinct targets and functions. Images PMID:1658787

  6. AB171. RNA alternative splicing modulator can effectively increase lymphoblast enzyme activity in patients with cardiac fabry disease caused by IVS4+919G >A mutation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yung-Hsiu; Li, Cheng-Fang; Huang, Chun-Kai; Lin, Yu-Ting; Hsu, Ting-Rong; Niu, Dau-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background In Taiwan, DNA-based newborn screening showed a surprisingly high incidence (1/875 in males and 1/399 in females) of a cardiac fabry mutation (IVS4?+?919G >A). The common cardiac variant fabry mutation, IVS4+919G >A, affects the splicing of GLA RNA by introducing a 57-nucleotide insertion between exons 4 and 5 that contains a stop codon and leads to a truncated protein and inactive enzyme. And this mutation affected males have up to 10% residual enzyme activity and present clinically with late-onset hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Due to the high cost of enzyme replacement therapy and the large number of patients with this mutation, the development of alternative therapies is essential. Several low-molecular-mass compounds, such as histone deacetylase inhibitors or kinase/phosphatase inhibitors, have been identified as modulators of alternative splicing. It may offer a potential alternative to enzyme replacement therapy. We expect to find out a more economic and effective drug by the detailed study of the mechanism of the small molecule modulators on the IVS4+919G >A mutation for the greater benefits of patients with this mutation. Methods In this study, we used to generate Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblast cell lines and incubated with different concentrations of three HDIs (sodium butyrate, valproic acid, and trichostatin A) and Amiloride hydrochloride (Amiloride HCl). To identify the respond of these compound, we were monitored the relative amounts of normal and aberrant splice forms by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, the relative amounts of the normal and truncated ?-Gal A protein products were analyzed by Western blotting and enzyme activities. Results Western blotting revealed those females heterozygous for the IVS4+919G >A mutation had approximately 50% of the normal level of ?-Gal A protein, whereas hemizygous males had approximately 10% of the normal level. The three HDIs were all found to rescue the aberrant RNA splicing and to increase the amount of normal ?-Gal A protein. And amiloride HCl increased the splicing ratio (2.5 fold) and enzyme activity (2.2 fold) of ?-Gal A in the lymphoblasts with IVS4+919G >A mutation. Conclusions Our results provide proof-of-concept that aberrant RNA splicing caused by the cardiac variant fabry mutation, IVS4+919G >A, can be rescued by HDIs. The use of HDIs may become a viable therapeutic strategy for patients with this highly prevalent mutation in the Han population.

  7. Nuclear matrix protein Matrin3 regulates alternative splicing and forms overlapping regulatory networks with PTB

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Miguel B; Attig, Jan; Bellora, Nicolás; König, Julian; Hallegger, Martina; Kayikci, Melis; Eyras, Eduardo; Ule, Jernej; Smith, Christopher WJ

    2015-01-01

    Matrin3 is an RNA- and DNA-binding nuclear matrix protein found to be associated with neural and muscular degenerative diseases. A number of possible functions of Matrin3 have been suggested, but no widespread role in RNA metabolism has yet been clearly demonstrated. We identified Matrin3 by its interaction with the second RRM domain of the splicing regulator PTB. Using a combination of RNAi knockdown, transcriptome profiling and iCLIP, we find that Matrin3 is a regulator of hundreds of alternative splicing events, principally acting as a splicing repressor with only a small proportion of targeted events being co-regulated by PTB. In contrast to other splicing regulators, Matrin3 binds to an extended region within repressed exons and flanking introns with no sharply defined peaks. The identification of this clear molecular function of Matrin3 should help to clarify the molecular pathology of ALS and other diseases caused by mutations of Matrin3. PMID:25599992

  8. Cardiac glycosides correct aberrant splicing of IKBKAP-encoded mRNA in familial dysautonomia derived cells by suppressing expression of SRSF3.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Anderson, Sylvia L; Qiu, Jinsong; Rubin, Berish Y

    2013-08-01

    The ability to modulate the production of the wild-type transcript in cells bearing the splice-altering familial dysautonomia (FD) causing mutation in the IKBKAP gene prompted a study of the impact of a panel of pharmaceuticals on the splicing of this transcript, which revealed the ability of the cardiac glycoside digoxin to increase the production of the wild-type, exon-20-containing, IKBKAP-encoded transcript and the full-length I?B-kinase-complex-associated protein in FD-derived cells. Characterization of the cis elements and trans factors involved in the digoxin-mediated effect on splicing reveals that this response is dependent on an SRSF3 binding site(s) located in the intron 5' of the alternatively spliced exon and that digoxin mediates its effect by suppressing the level of the SRSF3 protein. Characterization of the digoxin-mediated effect on the RNA splicing process was facilitated by the identification of several RNA splicing events in which digoxin treatment mediates the enhanced inclusion of exonic sequence. Moreover, we demonstrate the ability of digoxin to impact the splicing process in neuronal cells, a cell type profoundly impacted by FD. This study represents the first demonstration that digoxin possesses splice-altering capabilities that are capable of reversing the impact of the FD-causing mutation. These findings support the clinical evaluation of the impact of digoxin on the FD patient population. PMID:23711097

  9. Computational Analysis of an Evolutionarily Conserved VertebrateMuscle Alternative Splicing Program

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Debopriya; Clark, Tyson A.; Schweitzer, Anthony; Marr,Henry; Yamamoto, Miki L.; Parra, Marilyn K.; Arribere, Josh; Minovitsky,Simon; Dubchak, Inna; Blume, John E.; Conboy, John G.

    2006-06-15

    A novel exon microarray format that probes gene expression with single exon resolution was employed to elucidate critical features of a vertebrate muscle alternative splicing program. A dataset of 56 microarray-defined, muscle-enriched exons and their flanking introns were examined computationally in order to investigate coordination of the muscle splicing program. Candidate intron regulatory motifs were required to meet several stringent criteria: significant over-representation near muscle-enriched exons, correlation with muscle expression, and phylogenetic conservation among genomes of several vertebrate orders. Three classes of regulatory motifs were identified in the proximal downstream intron, within 200nt of the target exons: UGCAUG, a specific binding site for Fox-1 related splicing factors; ACUAAC, a novel branchpoint-like element; and UG-/UGC-rich elements characteristic of binding sites for CELF splicing factors. UGCAUG was remarkably enriched, being present in nearly one-half of all cases. These studies suggest that Fox and CELF splicing factors play a major role in enforcing the muscle-specific alternative splicing program, facilitating expression of a set of unique isoforms of cytoskeletal proteins that are critical to muscle cell differentiation. Supplementary materials: There are four supplementary tables and one supplementary figure. The tables provide additional detailed information concerning the muscle-enriched datasets, and about over-represented oligonucleotide sequences in the flanking introns. The supplementary figure shows RT-PCR data confirming the muscle-enriched expression of exons predicted from the microarray analysis.

  10. Self-regulated alternative splicing at the AHNAK locus.

    PubMed

    de Morrée, Antoine; Droog, Marjolein; Grand Moursel, Laure; Bisschop, Ilona J M; Impagliazzo, Antonietta; Frants, Rune R; Klooster, Rinse; van der Maarel, Silvère M

    2012-01-01

    AHNAK is a 700-kDa protein involved in cytoarchitecture and calcium signaling. It is secondarily reduced in muscle of dysferlinopathy patients and accumulates in muscle of calpainopathy patients, both affected by a muscular dystrophy. AHNAK directly interacts with dysferlin. This interaction is lost on cleavage of AHNAK by the protease calpain 3, explaining the molecular observations in patients. Currently, little is known of AHNAK regulation. We describe the self-regulation of multiple mRNA transcripts emanating from the AHNAK locus in muscle cells. We show that the AHNAK gene consists of a 17-kb exon flanked by multiple small exons. This genetic structure is shared by AHNAK2 and Periaxin, which share a common ancestor. Two major AHNAK transcripts are differentially expressed during muscle differentiation that encode for a small (17-kDa) and a large (700-kDa) protein isoform. These proteins interact in the cytoplasm, but the small AHNAK is also present in the nucleus. During muscle differentiation the small AHNAK is strongly increased, thereby establishing a positive feedback loop to regulate mRNA splicing of its own locus. A small 17-kDa isoform of Periaxin similarly traffics between the cytoplasm and the nucleus to regulate mRNA splicing. Thus, AHNAK constitutes a novel mechanism in post-transcriptional control of gene expression. PMID:21940993

  11. Splicing inhibition of U2AF65 leads to alternative exon skipping

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sunghee; Moon, Heegyum; Loh, Tiing Jen; Jang, Ha Na; Liu, Yongchao; Zhou, Jianhua; Ohn, Takbum; Zheng, Xuexiu; Shen, Haihong

    2015-01-01

    U2 snRNP auxiliary factor 65 kDa (U2AF65) is a general splicing factor that contacts polypyrimidine (Py) tract and promotes prespliceosome assembly. In this report, we show that U2AF65 stimulates alternative exon skipping in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA)-related survival motor neuron (SMN) pre-mRNA. A stronger 5? splice-site mutation of alternative exon abolishes the stimulatory effects of U2AF65. U2AF65 overexpression promotes its own binding only on the weaker, not the stronger, Py tract. We further demonstrate that U2AF65 inhibits splicing of flanking introns of alternative exon in both three-exon and two-exon contexts. Similar U2AF65 effects were observed in Fas (Apo-1/CD95) pre-mRNA. Strikingly, we demonstrate that U2AF65 even inhibits general splicing of adenovirus major late (Ad ML) or ?-globin pre-mRNA. Thus, we conclude that U2AF65 possesses a splicing Inhibitory function that leads to alternative exon skipping. PMID:26216990

  12. Sam68 Regulates S6K1 Alternative Splicing during Adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jingwen

    2015-01-01

    The requirement for alternative splicing during adipogenesis is poorly understood. The Sam68 RNA binding protein is a known regulator of alternative splicing, and mice deficient for Sam68 exhibit adipogenesis defects due to defective mTOR signaling. Sam68 null preadipocytes were monitored for alternative splicing imbalances in components of the mTOR signaling pathway. Herein, we report that Sam68 regulates isoform expression of the ribosomal S6 kinase gene (Rps6kb1). Sam68-deficient adipocytes express Rps6kb1-002 and its encoded p31S6K1 protein, in contrast to wild-type adipocytes that do not express this isoform. Sam68 binds an RNA sequence encoded by Rps6kb1 intron 6 and prevents serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 1 (SRSF1)-mediated alternative splicing of Rps6kb1-002, as assessed by cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (CLIP) and minigene assays. Depletion of p31S6K1 with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) partially restored adipogenesis of Sam68-deficient preadipocytes. The ectopic expression of p31S6K1 in wild-type 3T3-L1 cells resulted in adipogenesis differentiation defects, showing that p31S6K1 is an inhibitor of adipogenesis. Our findings indicate that Sam68 is required to prevent the expression of p31S6K1 in adipocytes for adipogenesis to occur. PMID:25776557

  13. Identification of Regulatory-RNAs for Alternative Splicing of Ron Proto-Oncogene

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Heegyum; Zheng, Xuexiu; Loh, Tiing Jen; Jang, Ha Na; Liu, Yongchao; Jung, Da-Woon; Williams, Darren R; Shen, Haihong

    2015-01-01

    RON receptor tyrosine kinase is a proto-oncogene that induces cell migration and matrix invasion. RON?160 protein, which is produced by exclusion of exon 5 and 6, promotes cell migration, matrix invasion and protection from apoptosis. Alternative splicing regulation of exon 5 and 6 is not well understood. In this manuscript, we identified several new RNA regulatory elements for alternative splicing of Ron proto-oncogene. Firstly, we demonstrated that RNA sequences from EcoRI cleavage sites regulate alternative splicing of Ron exon 5 and 6. Secondly, we showed that the ~30 nt RNA at upstream end of exon 4 and the ~33 nt RNA at downstream end of exon 7 also modulate splicing of exon 5 and 6. Thirdly, our results indicate that the RNA sequences of the ends in exon 4 and 7 are required for the regulatory functions of the RNA from restriction enzyme cleavage sites. Our results provide a new insight for regulation of alternative splicing of Ron proto-oncogene. PMID:26640595

  14. The transcription factor FBI-1 inhibits SAM68-mediated BCL-X alternative splicing and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Bielli, Pamela; Busà, Roberta; Di Stasi, Savino M; Munoz, Manuel J; Botti, Flavia; Kornblihtt, Alberto R; Sette, Claudio

    2014-04-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is tightly coupled to transcription for the majority of human genes. However, how these two processes are linked is not well understood. Here, we unveil a direct role for the transcription factor FBI-1 in the regulation of AS. FBI-1 interacts with the splicing factor SAM68 and reduces its binding to BCL-X mRNA. This, in turn, results in the selection of the proximal 5' splice site in BCL-X exon 2, thereby favoring the anti-apoptotic BCL-XL variant and counteracting SAM68-mediated apoptosis. Conversely, depletion of FBI-1, or expression of a SAM68 mutant lacking the FBI-1 binding region, restores the ability of SAM68 to induce BCL-XS splicing and apoptosis. FBI-1's role in splicing requires the activity of histone deacetylases, whose pharmacological inhibition recapitulates the effects of FBI-1 knockdown. Our study reveals an unexpected function for FBI-1 in splicing modulation with a direct impact on cell survival. PMID:24514149

  15. The exosome controls alternative splicing by mediating the gene expression and assembly of the spliceosome complex

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Wan, Yufeng; Huang, Guobin; Wang, Dongni; Yu, Xinyang; Huang, Guocun; Guo, Jinhu

    2015-01-01

    The exosome is a complex with exoribonuclease activity that regulates RNA surveillance and turnover. The exosome also plays a role in regulating the degradation of precursor mRNAs to maintain the expression of splicing variants. In Neurospora, the silencing of rrp44, which encodes the catalytic subunit of the exosome, changed the expression of a set of spliceosomal snRNA, snRNP genes and SR protein related genes. The knockdown of rrp44 also affected the assembly of the spliceosome. RNA-seq analysis revealed a global change in bulk splicing events. Exosome-mediated splicing may regulate alternative splicing of NCU05290, NCU07421 and the circadian clock gene frequency (frq). The knockdown of rrp44 led to an increased ratio of splicing variants without intron 6 (I-6) and shorter protein isoform small FRQ (s-FRQ) as a consequence. These findings suggest that the exosome controls splicing events by regulating the degradation of precursor mRNAs and the gene expression, assembly and function of the spliceosome. PMID:26306464

  16. The transcription factor FBI-1 inhibits SAM68-mediated BCL-X alternative splicing and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Bielli, Pamela; Busà, Roberta; Di Stasi, Savino M; Munoz, Manuel J; Botti, Flavia; Kornblihtt, Alberto R; Sette, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is tightly coupled to transcription for the majority of human genes. However, how these two processes are linked is not well understood. Here, we unveil a direct role for the transcription factor FBI-1 in the regulation of AS. FBI-1 interacts with the splicing factor SAM68 and reduces its binding to BCL-X mRNA. This, in turn, results in the selection of the proximal 5? splice site in BCL-X exon 2, thereby favoring the anti-apoptotic BCL-XL variant and counteracting SAM68-mediated apoptosis. Conversely, depletion of FBI-1, or expression of a SAM68 mutant lacking the FBI-1 binding region, restores the ability of SAM68 to induce BCL-XS splicing and apoptosis. FBI-1's role in splicing requires the activity of histone deacetylases, whose pharmacological inhibition recapitulates the effects of FBI-1 knockdown. Our study reveals an unexpected function for FBI-1 in splicing modulation with a direct impact on cell survival. PMID:24514149

  17. Alternative splicing at NAGNAG acceptors in Arabidopsis thaliana SR and SR-related protein-coding genes

    PubMed Central

    Schindler, Stefanie; Szafranski, Karol; Hiller, Michael; Ali, Gul Shad; Palusa, Saiprasad G; Backofen, Rolf; Platzer, Matthias; Reddy, Anireddy SN

    2008-01-01

    Background Several recent studies indicate that alternative splicing in Arabidopsis and other plants is a common mechanism for post-transcriptional modulation of gene expression. However, few analyses have been done so far to elucidate the functional relevance of alternative splicing in higher plants. Representing a frequent and universal subtle alternative splicing event among eukaryotes, alternative splicing at NAGNAG acceptors contributes to transcriptome diversity and therefore, proteome plasticity. Alternatively spliced NAGNAG acceptors are overrepresented in genes coding for proteins with RNA-recognition motifs (RRMs). As SR proteins, a family of RRM-containing important splicing factors, are known to be extensively alternatively spliced in Arabidopsis, we analyzed alternative splicing at NAGNAG acceptors in SR and SR-related genes. Results In a comprehensive analysis of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, we identified 6,772 introns that exhibit a NAGNAG acceptor motif. Alternative splicing at these acceptors was assessed using available EST data, complemented by a sequence-based prediction method. Of the 36 identified introns within 30 SR and SR-related protein-coding genes that have a NAGNAG acceptor, we selected 15 candidates for an experimental analysis of alternative splicing under several conditions. We provide experimental evidence for 8 of these candidates being alternatively spliced. Quantifying the ratio of NAGNAG-derived splice variants under several conditions, we found organ-specific splicing ratios in adult plants and changes in seedlings of different ages. Splicing ratio changes were observed in response to heat shock and most strikingly, cold shock. Interestingly, the patterns of differential splicing ratios are similar for all analyzed genes. Conclusion NAGNAG acceptors frequently occur in the Arabidopsis genome and are particularly prevalent in SR and SR-related protein-coding genes. A lack of extensive EST coverage can be compensated by using the proposed sequence-based method to predict alternative splicing at these acceptors. Our findings indicate that the differential effects on NAGNAG alternative splicing in SR and SR-related genes are organ- and condition-specific rather than gene-specific. PMID:18402682

  18. Identification and analysis of alternative splicing events conserved in human and mouse

    E-print Network

    Poggio, Tomaso

    Identification and analysis of alternative splicing events conserved in human and mouse Gene W. Yeo. Alternative splic- ing (AS) events conserved since the divergence of human and mouse are likely of primary (ACEs), from other orthologous human mouse exons and integrate these features into an exon

  19. A deep survey of alternative splicing in grape reveals changes in the splicing machinery related to tissue, stress condition and genotype

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Alternative splicing (AS) significantly enhances transcriptome complexity. It is differentially regulated in a wide variety of cell types and plays a role in several cellular processes. Here we describe a detailed survey of alternative splicing in grape based on 124 SOLiD RNAseq analyses from different tissues, stress conditions and genotypes. Results We used the RNAseq data to update the existing grape gene prediction with 2,258 new coding genes and 3,336 putative long non-coding RNAs. Several gene structures have been improved and alternative splicing was described for about 30% of the genes. A link between AS and miRNAs was shown in 139 genes where we found that AS affects the miRNA target site. A quantitative analysis of the isoforms indicated that most of the spliced genes have one major isoform and tend to simultaneously co-express a low number of isoforms, typically two, with intron retention being the most frequent alternative splicing event. Conclusions As described in Arabidopsis, also grape displays a marked AS tissue-specificity, while stress conditions produce splicing changes to a minor extent. Surprisingly, some distinctive splicing features were also observed between genotypes. This was further supported by the observation that the panel of Serine/Arginine-rich splicing factors show a few, but very marked differences between genotypes. The finding that a part the splicing machinery can change in closely related organisms can lead to some interesting hypotheses for evolutionary adaptation, that could be particularly relevant in the response to sudden and strong selective pressures. PMID:24739459

  20. Polypyrimidine tract-binding protein 1 regulates the alternative splicing of dopamine receptor D2.

    PubMed

    Sasabe, Toshikazu; Futai, Eugene; Ishiura, Shoichi

    2011-01-01

    Dopamine receptor D(2) (DRD2) has two splicing isoforms, a long form (D2L) and short form (D2S), which have distinct functions in the dopaminergic system. However, the regulatory mechanism of the alternative splicing of DRD2 is unknown. In this study, we examined which splicing factors regulate the expression of D2L and D2S by over-expressing several RNA-binding proteins in HEK293 cells. In a cellular splicing assay, the over-expression of polypyrimidine tract-binding protein 1 (PTBP1) reduced the expression of D2S, whereas the knockdown of PTBP1 increased the expression of D2S. We also identified the regions of DRD2 that are responsive to PTBP1 using heterologous minigenes and deletion mutants. Our results indicate that PTBP1 regulates the alternative splicing of DRD2. Considering that DRD2 inhibits cAMP-dependent protein kinase A, which modulates the intracellular localization of PTBP1, PTBP1 may contribute to the autoregulation of DRD2 by regulating the expression of its isoforms. PMID:21054383

  1. The Ski2-family helicase Obelus regulates Crumbs alternative splicing and cell polarity.

    PubMed

    Vichas, Athea; Laurie, Matthew T; Zallen, Jennifer A

    2015-12-01

    Alternative splicing can have profound consequences for protein activity, but the functions of most alternative splicing regulators are not known. We show that Obelus, a conserved Ski2-family helicase, is required for cell polarity and adherens junction organization in the Drosophila melanogaster embryo. In obelus mutants, epithelial cells display an expanded apical domain, aggregation of adherens junctions at the cell membrane, and microtubule-dependent defects in centrosome positioning. Through whole-genome transcriptome analysis, we found that Obelus is required for the alternative splicing of a small number of transcripts in the early embryo, including the pre-mRNA that encodes the apical polarity protein Crumbs. In obelus mutants, inclusion of an alternative exon results in increased expression of a Crumbs isoform that contains an additional epidermal growth factor-like repeat in the extracellular domain. Overexpression of this alternative Crumbs isoform recapitulates the junctional aggregation and centrosome positioning defects of obelus mutants. These results indicate that regulation of Crumbs alternative splicing by the Obelus helicase modulates epithelial polarity during development. PMID:26644515

  2. Alternative splicing and differential gene expression in colon cancer detected by a whole genome exon array

    PubMed Central

    Gardina, Paul J; Clark, Tyson A; Shimada, Brian; Staples, Michelle K; Yang, Qing; Veitch, James; Schweitzer, Anthony; Awad, Tarif; Sugnet, Charles; Dee, Suzanne; Davies, Christopher; Williams, Alan; Turpaz, Yaron

    2006-01-01

    Background Alternative splicing is a mechanism for increasing protein diversity by excluding or including exons during post-transcriptional processing. Alternatively spliced proteins are particularly relevant in oncology since they may contribute to the etiology of cancer, provide selective drug targets, or serve as a marker set for cancer diagnosis. While conventional identification of splice variants generally targets individual genes, we present here a new exon-centric array (GeneChip Human Exon 1.0 ST) that allows genome-wide identification of differential splice variation, and concurrently provides a flexible and inclusive analysis of gene expression. Results We analyzed 20 paired tumor-normal colon cancer samples using a microarray designed to detect over one million putative exons that can be virtually assembled into potential gene-level transcripts according to various levels of prior supporting evidence. Analysis of high confidence (empirically supported) transcripts identified 160 differentially expressed genes, with 42 genes occupying a network impacting cell proliferation and another twenty nine genes with unknown functions. A more speculative analysis, including transcripts based solely on computational prediction, produced another 160 differentially expressed genes, three-fourths of which have no previous annotation. We also present a comparison of gene signal estimations from the Exon 1.0 ST and the U133 Plus 2.0 arrays. Novel splicing events were predicted by experimental algorithms that compare the relative contribution of each exon to the cognate transcript intensity in each tissue. The resulting candidate splice variants were validated with RT-PCR. We found nine genes that were differentially spliced between colon tumors and normal colon tissues, several of which have not been previously implicated in cancer. Top scoring candidates from our analysis were also found to substantially overlap with EST-based bioinformatic predictions of alternative splicing in cancer. Conclusion Differential expression of high confidence transcripts correlated extremely well with known cancer genes and pathways, suggesting that the more speculative transcripts, largely based solely on computational prediction and mostly with no previous annotation, might be novel targets in colon cancer. Five of the identified splicing events affect mediators of cytoskeletal organization (ACTN1, VCL, CALD1, CTTN, TPM1), two affect extracellular matrix proteins (FN1, COL6A3) and another participates in integrin signaling (SLC3A2). Altogether they form a pattern of colon-cancer specific alterations that may particularly impact cell motility. PMID:17192196

  3. CIR, a corepressor of CBF1, binds to PAP-1 and effects alternative splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Maita, Hiroshi; Kitaura, Hirotake; Ariga, Hiroyoshi . E-mail: hiro@pharm.hokudai.ac.jp; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M.M.

    2005-02-15

    We have reported that PAP-1, a product of a causative gene for autosomal retinitis pigmentosa, plays a role in splicing. In this study, CIR, a protein originally identified as a CBF1-interacting protein and reported to act as a transcriptional corepressor, was identified as a PAP-1 binding protein and its function as a splicing factor was investigated. In addition to a basic lysine and acidic serine-rich (BA) domain and a zinc knuckle-like motif, CIR has an arginine/serine dipeptide repeat (RS) domain in its C terminal region. The RS domain has been reported to be present in the superfamily of SR proteins, which are involved in splicing reactions. We generated CIR mutants with deletions of each BA and RS domain and studied their subcellular localizations and interactions with PAP-1 and other SR proteins, including SC35, SF2/ASF, and U2AF{sup 35}. CIR was found to interact with U2AF{sup 35} through the BA domain, with SC35 and SF2/ASF through the RS domain, and with PAP-1 outside the BA domain in vivo and in vitro. CIR was found to be colocalized with SC35 and PAP-1 in nuclear speckles. Then the effect of CIR on splicing was investigated using the E1a minigene as a reporter in HeLa cells. Ectopic expression of CIR with the E1a minigene changed the ratio of spliced isoforms of E1a that were produced by alternative selection of 5'-splice sites. These results indicate that CIR is a member of the family of SR-related proteins and that CIR plays a role in splicing regulation.

  4. Cartography of neurexin alternative splicing mapped by single-molecule long-read mRNA sequencing

    E-print Network

    Quake, Stephen R.

    Cartography of neurexin alternative splicing mapped by single-molecule long-read mRNA sequencing of a Bioengineering and c Molecular and Cellular Physiology, School of Medicine, b Department of Applied Physics. Indirect evidence has indicated that exten- sive alternative splicing of neurexin mRNAs may produce

  5. Synaptic Effects of Munc18-1 Alternative Splicing in Excitatory Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Toonen, Ruud F.; Verhage, Matthijs

    2015-01-01

    The munc18-1 gene encodes two splice-variants that vary at the C-terminus of the protein and are expressed at different levels in different regions of the adult mammalian brain. Here, we investigated the expression pattern of these splice variants within the brainstem and tested whether they are functionally different. Munc18-1a is expressed in specific nuclei of the brainstem including the LRN, VII and SOC, while Munc18-1b expression is relatively low/absent in these regions. Furthermore, Munc18-1a is the major splice variant in the Calyx of Held. Synaptic transmission was analyzed in autaptic hippocampal munc18-1 KO neurons re-expressing either Munc18-1a or Munc18-1b. The two splice variants supported synaptic transmission to a similar extent, but Munc18-1b was slightly more potent in sustaining synchronous release during high frequency stimulation. Our data suggest that alternative splicing of Munc18-1 support synaptic transmission to a similar extent, but could modulate presynaptic short-term plasticity. PMID:26407320

  6. Novel RNA structural features of an alternatively splicing group II intron from Clostridium tetani.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Bonnie A; Zimmerly, Steven

    2014-06-01

    Group II introns are ribozymes in bacterial and organellar genomes that function as self-splicing introns and as retroelements. Previously, we reported that the group II intron C.te.I1 of Clostridium tetani alternatively splices in vivo to produce five distinct coding mRNAs. Accurate fusion of upstream and downstream reading frames requires a shifted 5' splice site located 8 nt upstream of the usual 5' GUGYG motif. This site is specified by the ribozyme through an altered intron/exon-binding site 1 (IBS1-EBS1) pairing. Here we use mutagenesis and self-splicing assays to investigate in more detail the significance of the structural features of the C.te.I1 ribozyme. The shifted 5' splice site is shown to be affected by structures in addition to IBS1-EBS1, and unlike other group II introns, C.te.I1 appears to require a spacer between IBS1 and the GUGYG motif. In addition, the mechanism of 3' exon recognition is modified from the ancestral IIB mechanism to a IIA-like mechanism that appears to be longer than the typical single base-pair interaction and may extend up to 4 bp. The novel ribozyme properties that have evolved for C.te.I1 illustrate the plasticity of group II introns in adapting new structural and catalytic properties that can be utilized to affect gene expression. PMID:24751650

  7. Alternative Splicing Shapes the Phenotype of a Mutation in BBS8 To Cause Nonsyndromic Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Daniel; Singh, Ratnesh; Kolandaivelu, Saravanan

    2015-01-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a genetic disorder affecting multiple systems and organs in the body. Several mutations in genes associated with BBS affect only photoreceptor cells and cause nonsyndromic retinitis pigmentosa (RP), raising the issue of why certain mutations manifest as a systemic disorder whereas other changes in the same gene affect only a specific cell type. Here, we show that cell-type-specific alternative splicing is responsible for confining the phenotype of the A-to-G substitution in the 3? splice site of BBS8 exon 2A (IVS1-2A>G mutation) in the BBS8 gene to photoreceptor cells. The IVS1-2A>G mutation leads to missplicing of BBS8 exon 2A, producing a frameshift in the BBS8 reading frame and thus eliminating the protein specifically in photoreceptor cells. Cell types other than photoreceptors skip exon 2A from the mature BBS8 transcript, which renders them immune to the mutation. We also show that the splicing of Bbs8 exon 2A in photoreceptors is directed exclusively by redundant splicing enhancers located in the adjacent introns. These intronic sequences are sufficient for photoreceptor-cell-specific splicing of heterologous exons, including an exon with a randomized sequence. PMID:25776555

  8. Nuclear matrix-associated protein SMAR1 regulates alternative splicing via HDAC6-mediated deacetylation of Sam68.

    PubMed

    Nakka, Kiran Kumar; Chaudhary, Nidhi; Joshi, Shruti; Bhat, Jyotsna; Singh, Kulwant; Chatterjee, Subhrangsu; Malhotra, Renu; De, Abhijit; Santra, Manas Kumar; Dilworth, F Jeffrey; Chattopadhyay, Samit

    2015-06-30

    Pre-mRNA splicing is a complex regulatory nexus modulated by various trans-factors and their posttranslational modifications to create a dynamic transcriptome through alternative splicing. Signal-induced phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of trans-factors are known to regulate alternative splicing. However, the role of other posttranslational modifications, such as deacetylation/acetylation, methylation, and ubiquitination, that could modulate alternative splicing in either a signal-dependent or -independent manner remain enigmatic. Here, we demonstrate that Scaffold/matrix-associated region-binding protein 1 (SMAR1) negatively regulates alternative splicing through histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6)-mediated deacetylation of RNA-binding protein Sam68 (Src-associated substrate during mitosis of 68 kDa). SMAR1 is enriched in nuclear splicing speckles and associates with the snRNAs that are involved in splice site recognition. ERK-MAPK pathway that regulates alternative splicing facilitates ERK-1/2-mediated phosphorylation of SMAR1 at threonines 345 and 360 and localizes SMAR1 to the cytoplasm, preventing its interaction with Sam68. We showed that endogenously, SMAR1 through HDAC6 maintains Sam68 in a deacetylated state. However, knockdown or ERK-mediated phosphorylation of SMAR1 releases the inhibitory SMAR1-HDAC6-Sam68 complex, facilitating Sam68 acetylation and alternative splicing. Furthermore, loss of heterozygosity at the Chr.16q24.3 locus in breast cancer cells, wherein the human homolog of SMAR1 (BANP) has been mapped, enhances Sam68 acetylation and CD44 variant exon inclusion. In addition, tail-vein injections in mice with human breast cancer MCF-7 cells depleted for SMAR1 showed increased CD44 variant exon inclusion and concomitant metastatic propensity, confirming the functional role of SMAR1 in regulation of alternative splicing. Thus, our results reveal the complex molecular mechanism underlying SMAR1-mediated signal-dependent and -independent regulation of alternative splicing via Sam68 deacetylation. PMID:26080397

  9. Nuclear matrix-associated protein SMAR1 regulates alternative splicing via HDAC6-mediated deacetylation of Sam68

    PubMed Central

    Nakka, Kiran Kumar; Chaudhary, Nidhi; Joshi, Shruti; Bhat, Jyotsna; Singh, Kulwant; Chatterjee, Subhrangsu; Malhotra, Renu; De, Abhijit; Santra, Manas Kumar; Dilworth, F. Jeffrey; Chattopadhyay, Samit

    2015-01-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing is a complex regulatory nexus modulated by various trans-factors and their posttranslational modifications to create a dynamic transcriptome through alternative splicing. Signal-induced phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of trans-factors are known to regulate alternative splicing. However, the role of other posttranslational modifications, such as deacetylation/acetylation, methylation, and ubiquitination, that could modulate alternative splicing in either a signal-dependent or -independent manner remain enigmatic. Here, we demonstrate that Scaffold/matrix-associated region-binding protein 1 (SMAR1) negatively regulates alternative splicing through histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6)-mediated deacetylation of RNA-binding protein Sam68 (Src-associated substrate during mitosis of 68 kDa). SMAR1 is enriched in nuclear splicing speckles and associates with the snRNAs that are involved in splice site recognition. ERK–MAPK pathway that regulates alternative splicing facilitates ERK-1/2–mediated phosphorylation of SMAR1 at threonines 345 and 360 and localizes SMAR1 to the cytoplasm, preventing its interaction with Sam68. We showed that endogenously, SMAR1 through HDAC6 maintains Sam68 in a deacetylated state. However, knockdown or ERK-mediated phosphorylation of SMAR1 releases the inhibitory SMAR1–HDAC6–Sam68 complex, facilitating Sam68 acetylation and alternative splicing. Furthermore, loss of heterozygosity at the Chr.16q24.3 locus in breast cancer cells, wherein the human homolog of SMAR1 (BANP) has been mapped, enhances Sam68 acetylation and CD44 variant exon inclusion. In addition, tail-vein injections in mice with human breast cancer MCF-7 cells depleted for SMAR1 showed increased CD44 variant exon inclusion and concomitant metastatic propensity, confirming the functional role of SMAR1 in regulation of alternative splicing. Thus, our results reveal the complex molecular mechanism underlying SMAR1-mediated signal-dependent and -independent regulation of alternative splicing via Sam68 deacetylation. PMID:26080397

  10. The Dscam Homologue of the Crustacean Daphnia Is Diversified by Alternative Splicing Like in Insects

    E-print Network

    Obbard, Darren

    The Dscam Homologue of the Crustacean Daphnia Is Diversified by Alternative Splicing Like, and evolutionary aspects of a Dscam homolog in 2 species of the crustacean Daphnia. The Dscam of Daphnia generates the taxonomic range of a highly diversified Dscam beyond the insects. Additionally, we have identified 4

  11. ALTERNATE PATCHED SPLICE FORMS ARE EXPRESSED IN A TISSUE SPECIFIC MANNER DURING EARLY EMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway is critical for embryonic patterning of nearly every organ system in the developing fetus and is highly conserved across phylogeny. We have previously characterized three alternate splice forms of the Ptc gene, including a novel Exon 1C isoform in the mouse, but...

  12. TWO ISOFORMS OF RUBISCO ACTIVASE IN COTTON, THE PRODUCTS OF SEPARATE GENES NOT ALTERNATIVE SPLICING.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In several plants, Rubisco activase consists of two isoforms that are produced by alternative splicing of a pre-mRNA. Two forms of activase corresponding to the longer, alpha and the shorter, beta forms were detected in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) leaves, but their N-termini differed. The cDNAs...

  13. A Subtle Alternative Splicing Event Gives Rise to a Widely Expressed Human RNase k Isoform

    PubMed Central

    Karousis, Evangelos D.; Sideris, Diamantis C.

    2014-01-01

    Subtle alternative splicing leads to the formation of RNA variants lacking or including a small number of nucleotides. To date, the impact of subtle alternative splicing phenomena on protein biosynthesis has been studied in frame-preserving incidents. On the contrary, mRNA isoforms derived from frame-shifting events were poorly studied and generally characterized as non-coding. This work provides evidence for a frame-shifting subtle alternative splicing event which results in the production of a novel protein isoform. We applied a combined molecular approach for the cloning and expression analysis of a human RNase ? transcript (RNase ?-02) which lacks four consecutive bases compared to the previously isolated RNase ? isoform. RNase ?-02 mRNA is expressed in all human cell lines tested end encodes the synthesis of a 134-amino-acid protein by utilizing an alternative initiation codon. The expression of RNase ?-02 in the cytoplasm of human cells was verified by Western blot and immunofluorescence analysis using a specific polyclonal antibody developed on the basis of the amino-acid sequence difference between the two protein isoforms. The results presented here show that subtle changes during mRNA splicing can lead to the expression of significantly altered protein isoforms. PMID:24797913

  14. DNA methylation dynamics, metabolic fluxes, gene splicing, and alternative phenotypes in honey bees

    E-print Network

    Robinson, Gene E.

    DNA methylation dynamics, metabolic fluxes, gene splicing, and alternative phenotypes in honey bees, February 13, 2012 (sent for review November 7, 2011) In honey bees (Apis mellifera), the development in Apis. polyphenism | ubiquitin | spliceosome As in other eusocial insects, the defining feature of honey

  15. RNA interference knockdown of DNA methyl-transferase 3 affects gene alternative splicing

    E-print Network

    Robinson, Gene E.

    on develop- ment and social behavior, and DNA methylation in honey bees is predominantly on gene bodies. Here methylation is to regulate alternative splicing. epigenetics | gene regulation | gene silencing | insect One inherited, it is also environmentally responsive. DNA cytosine methylation is an epigenetic mechanism

  16. Identification of new alternative splice events in the TCIRG1 gene in different human tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnova, Anna S.; Morgun, Andrey . E-mail: anemorgun@hotmail.com; Shulzhenko, Natalia; Silva, Ismael D.C.G.; Gerbase-DeLima, Maria

    2005-05-13

    Two transcript variants (TV) of the T cell immune regulator gene 1 (TCIRG1) have already been characterized. TV1 encodes a subunit of the osteoclast vacuolar proton pump and TV2 encodes a T cell inhibitory receptor. Based on the search in dbEST, we validated by RT-PCR six new alternative splice events in TCIRG1 in most of the 28 human tissues studied. In addition, we observed that transcripts using the TV1 transcription start site and two splice forms previously described in a patient with infantile malignant osteopetrosis are also expressed in various tissues of healthy individuals. Studies of these nine splice forms in cytoplasmic RNA of peripheral blood mononuclear cells showed that at least six of them could be efficiently exported from the nucleus. Since various products with nearly ubiquitous tissue distribution are generated from TCIRG1, this gene may be involved in other processes besides immune response and bone resorption.

  17. Alternative Splicing of the Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Polypeptide Receptor PAC1: Mechanisms of Fine Tuning of Brain Activity

    PubMed Central

    Blechman, Janna; Levkowitz, Gil

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing of the precursor mRNA encoding for the neuropeptide receptor PAC1/ADCYAP1R1 generates multiple protein products that exhibit pleiotropic activities. Recent studies in mammals and zebrafish have implicated some of these splice isoforms in control of both cellular and body homeostasis. Here, we review the regulation of PAC1 splice variants and their underlying signal transduction and physiological processes in the nervous system. PMID:23734144

  18. Alternative splicing of the sheep MITF gene: novel transcripts detectable in skin.

    PubMed

    Saravanaperumal, Siva Arumugam; Pediconi, Dario; Renieri, Carlo; La Terza, Antonietta

    2014-11-15

    Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) is a basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper (bHLH-LZ) transcription factor, which regulates the differentiation and development of melanocytes and pigment cell-specific transcription of the melanogenesis enzyme genes. Though multiple splice variants of MITF have been reported in humans, mice and other vertebrate species, in merino sheep (Ovis aries), MITF gene splicing has not yet been investigated until now. To investigate the sheep MITF isoforms, the full length mRNA/cDNAs from the skin of merino sheep were cloned, sequenced and characterized. Reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR analysis and molecular prediction revealed two basic splice variants with (+) and without (-) an 18 bp insertion viz. CGTGTATTTTCCCCACAG, in the coding region (CDS) for the amino acids 'ACIFPT'. It was further confirmed by the complete nucleotide sequencing of splice junction covering intron-6 (2463 bp), wherein an 18bp intronic sequence is retained into the CDS of MITF (+) isoform. Further, full-length cDNA libraries were enriched by the method of 5' and 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE-PCR). A total of seven sheep MITF splice variants, with distinct N-terminus sequences such as MITF-A, B, E, H, and M, the counterparts of human and mouse MITF, were identified by 5' RACE. The other two 5' RACE products were found to be novel splice variants of MITF and represented as 'MITF truncated form (Trn)-1, 2'. These alternative splice (AS) variants were illustrated using comparative genome analysis. By means of 3' RACE three different MITF 3' UTRs (625, 1083, 3167bp) were identified and characterized. We also demonstrated that the MITF gene expression determined at transcript level is mediated via an intron-6 splicing event. Here we summarize for the first time, the expression of seven MITF splice variants with three distinct 3' UTRs in the skin of merino sheep. Our data refine the structure of the MITF gene in sheep beyond what was previously known in humans, mice, dogs and other mammals. PMID:25239663

  19. Regulation and functional significance of CDC42 alternative splicing in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaolong; Yuan, Chengfu; Yang, Jilai

    2015-10-01

    Our previous study found that splicing factor polypyrimidine tract-binding protein 1 (PTBP1) had a role in tumorigenesis but the underlying mechanism remained unclear. In this study, we observed that knockdown of PTBP1 inhibited filopodia formation. Subsequently, we found that PTBP1 regulated the alternative splicing of CDC42, a major regulator of filopodia formation. Two CDC42 variants, CDC42-v1 and CDC42-v2, can be generated through alternative splicing. Knockdown of PTBP1 increased the expression of CDC42-v2. Ectopic expression of individual variants showed that CDC42-v2 suppressed filopodia formation, opposite to the effect of CDC42-v1. Quantitative RT-PCR revealed that CDC42-v2 was expressed at lower levels in ovarian cancer cell lines and ovarian tumor tissues than in normal control cells and tissues. Further, CDC42-v2 was observed to have inhibitory effects on ovarian tumor cell growth, colony formation in soft agar and invasiveness. In contrast, these inhibitory effects were not found with CDC42-v1. Taken together, above results suggest that the role of PTBP1 in tumorigenesis may be partly mediated by its regulation of CDC42 alternative splicing and CDC42-v2 might function as a tumor suppressor. PMID:26336992

  20. Global variability in gene expression and alternative splicing is modulated by mitochondrial content

    PubMed Central

    Guantes, Raul; Rastrojo, Alberto; Neves, Ricardo; Lima, Ana; Aguado, Begoña; Iborra, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    Noise in gene expression is a main determinant of phenotypic variability. Increasing experimental evidence suggests that genome-wide cellular constraints largely contribute to the heterogeneity observed in gene products. It is still unclear, however, which global factors affect gene expression noise and to what extent. Since eukaryotic gene expression is an energy demanding process, differences in the energy budget of each cell could determine gene expression differences. Here, we quantify the contribution of mitochondrial variability (a natural source of ATP variation) to global variability in gene expression. We find that changes in mitochondrial content can account for ?50% of the variability observed in protein levels. This is the combined result of the effect of mitochondria dosage on transcription and translation apparatus content and activities. Moreover, we find that mitochondrial levels have a large impact on alternative splicing, thus modulating both the abundance and type of mRNAs. A simple mathematical model in which mitochondrial content simultaneously affects transcription rate and splicing site choice can explain the alternative splicing data. The results of this study show that mitochondrial content (and/or probably function) influences mRNA abundance, translation, and alternative splicing, which ultimately affects cellular phenotype. PMID:25800673

  1. Reversion to an embryonic alternative splicing program enhances leukemia stem cell self-renewal

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Frida; Hellqvist, Eva; Mason, Cayla N.; Ali, Shawn A.; Delos-Santos, Nathaniel; Barrett, Christian L.; Chun, Hye-Jung; Minden, Mark D.; Moore, Richard A.; Marra, Marco A.; Runza, Valeria; Frazer, Kelly A.; Sadarangani, Anil; Jamieson, Catriona H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Formative research suggests that a human embryonic stem cell-specific alternative splicing gene regulatory network, which is repressed by Muscleblind-like (MBNL) RNA binding proteins, is involved in cell reprogramming. In this study, RNA sequencing, splice isoform-specific quantitative RT-PCR, lentiviral transduction, and in vivo humanized mouse model studies demonstrated that malignant reprogramming of progenitors into self-renewing blast crisis chronic myeloid leukemia stem cells (BC LSCs) was partially driven by decreased MBNL3. Lentiviral knockdown of MBNL3 resulted in reversion to an embryonic alternative splice isoform program typified by overexpression of CD44 transcript variant 3, containing variant exons 8–10, and BC LSC proliferation. Although isoform-specific lentiviral CD44v3 overexpression enhanced chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) progenitor replating capacity, lentiviral shRNA knockdown abrogated these effects. Combined treatment with a humanized pan-CD44 monoclonal antibody and a breakpoint cluster region - ABL proto-oncogene 1, nonreceptor tyrosine kinase (BCR-ABL1) antagonist inhibited LSC maintenance in a niche-dependent manner. In summary, MBNL3 down-regulation–related reversion to an embryonic alternative splicing program, typified by CD44v3 overexpression, represents a previously unidentified mechanism governing malignant progenitor reprogramming in malignant microenvironments and provides a pivotal opportunity for selective BC LSC detection and therapeutic elimination. PMID:26621726

  2. Differential expression and alternative splicing of cell cycle genes in imatinib-treated K562 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Lin, Jin; Huang, Lin-Feng; Huang, Bo; Xu, Yan-Mei; Li, Jing; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Wei-Ming; Min, Qing-Hua; Wang, Xiao-Zhong

    2015-09-01

    Cancer progression often involves the disorder of the cell cycle, and a number of effective chemotherapeutic drugs have been shown to induce cell cycle arrest. The purpose of this study was to comprehensively investigate the effects of imatinib on the expression profile of cell cycle genes in the chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) K562 cell line. In addition, we also investigated alternative splicing of the cell cycle genes affected by imatinib, since an important relationship has been shown to exist between RNA splicing and cell cycle progression. Exon array analysis was performed using total RNA purified from normal and imatinib-treated K562 cells. We identified 185 differentially expressed genes and 277 alternative splicing events between the two cell groups. A detailed analysis by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) of key genes confirmed the experimental results of the exon array. These results suggested that treatment of K562 cells with imatinib shifts the expression and alternative splicing profiles of several cell cycle-related genes. Importantly, these findings may help improve imatinib treatment strategies in patients with CML and may be useful for imatinib resistance research and CML drug development. PMID:25983000

  3. Global Gene Expression Profiling and Alternative Splicing Events during the Chondrogenic Differentiation of Human Cartilage Endplate-Derived Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Jin; Fan, Xin; Shangguan, Lei; Liu, Huan; Zhou, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a very prevalent disease and degenerative disc diseases (DDDs) usually account for the LBP. However, the pathogenesis of DDDs is complicated and difficult to elucidate. Alternative splicing is a sophisticated regulatory process which greatly increases cellular complexity and phenotypic diversity of eukaryotic organisms. In addition, the cartilage endplate-derived stem cells have been discovered and identified by our research group. In this paper, we continue to investigate gene expression profiling and alternative splicing events during chondrogenic differentiation of cartilage endplate-derived stem cells. We adopted Affymetrix Human Transcriptome Array 2.0 (HTA 2.0) to compare the transcriptional and splicing changes between the control and differentiated samples. RT-PCR and quantitative PCR are used to validate the microarray results. The GO and KEGG pathway analysis was also performed. After bioinformatics analysis of the data, we detected 1953 differentially expressed genes. In terms of alternative splicing, the Splicing Index algorithm was used to select alternatively spliced genes. We detected 4411 alternatively spliced genes. GO and KEGG pathway analysis also revealed several functionally involved biological processes and signaling pathways. To our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the alternative splicing mechanisms in chondrogenic differentiation of stem cells on a genome-wide scale. PMID:26649308

  4. Analyzing alternative splicing data of splice junction arrays from Parkinson patients' leukocytes before and after deep brain stimulation as compared with control donors

    PubMed Central

    Soreq, Lilach; Salomonis, Nathan; Israel, Zvi; Bergman, Hagai; Soreq, Hermona

    2015-01-01

    Few studies so far examined alternative splicing alterations in blood cells of neurodegenerative disease patients, particularly Parkinson's disease (PD). Prototype junction microarrays interrogate known human genome junctions and enable characterization of alternative splicing events; however, the analysis is not straightforward and different methods can be used to estimate junction-specific alternative splicing events (some of which can also be applied for analyzing RNA sequencing junction-level data). In this study, we characterized alternative splicing changes in blood leukocyte samples from Parkinson's patients prior to, and following deep brain stimulation (DBS) treatment; both on stimulation and following 1 h off electrical stimulation. Here, we describe in detail analysis approaches for junction microarrays and provide suggestions for further analyses to delineate transcript level effects of the observed alterations as well as detection of microRNA binding sites and protein domains in the alternatively spliced target regions spanning across both untranslated and the coding regions of the targets. The raw expression data files are publically available in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database (accession number: GSE37591) and in Synapse, and can be re-analyzed. The results may be useful for designing of future experiments and cross correlations with other datasets from PD or patients having other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26484282

  5. Identification of alternative splice variants in Aspergillus flavus through comparison of multiple tandem MS search algorithms

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Database searching is the most frequently used approach for automated peptide assignment and protein inference of tandem mass spectra. The results, however, depend on the sequences in target databases and on search algorithms. Recently by using an alternative splicing database, we identified more proteins than with the annotated proteins in Aspergillus flavus. In this study, we aimed at finding a greater number of eligible splice variants based on newly available transcript sequences and the latest genome annotation. The improved database was then used to compare four search algorithms: Mascot, OMSSA, X! Tandem, and InsPecT. Results The updated alternative splicing database predicted 15833 putative protein variants, 61% more than the previous results. There was transcript evidence for 50% of the updated genes compared to the previous 35% coverage. Database searches were conducted using the same set of spectral data, search parameters, and protein database but with different algorithms. The false discovery rates of the peptide-spectrum matches were estimated < 2%. The numbers of the total identified proteins varied from 765 to 867 between algorithms. Whereas 42% (1651/3891) of peptide assignments were unanimous, the comparison showed that 51% (568/1114) of the RefSeq proteins and 15% (11/72) of the putative splice variants were inferred by all algorithms. 12 plausible isoforms were discovered by focusing on the consensus peptides which were detected by at least three different algorithms. The analysis found different conserved domains in two putative isoforms of UDP-galactose 4-epimerase. Conclusions We were able to detect dozens of new peptides using the improved alternative splicing database with the recently updated annotation of the A. flavus genome. Unlike the identifications of the peptides and the RefSeq proteins, large variations existed between the putative splice variants identified by different algorithms. 12 candidates of putative isoforms were reported based on the consensus peptide-spectrum matches. This suggests that applications of multiple search engines effectively reduced the possible false positive results and validated the protein identifications from tandem mass spectra using an alternative splicing database. PMID:21745387

  6. Alternative splicing of Drosophila Nmnat functions as a switch to enhance neuroprotection under stress

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Kai; Zhu, Yi; Li, Chong; Brazill, Jennifer M.; Zhai, R. Grace

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase (NMNAT) is a conserved enzyme in the NAD synthetic pathway. It has also been identified as an effective and versatile neuroprotective factor. However, it remains unclear how healthy neurons regulate the dual functions of NMNAT and achieve self-protection under stress. Here we show that Drosophila Nmnat (DmNmnat) is alternatively spliced into two mRNA variants, RA and RB, which translate to protein isoforms with divergent neuroprotective capacities against spinocerebellar ataxia 1-induced neurodegeneration. Isoform PA/PC translated from RA is nuclear-localized with minimal neuroprotective ability, and isoform PB/PD translated from RB is cytoplasmic and has robust neuroprotective capacity. Under stress, RB is preferably spliced in neurons to produce the neuroprotective PB/PD isoforms. Our results indicate that alternative splicing functions as a switch that regulates the expression of functionally distinct DmNmnat variants. Neurons respond to stress by driving the splicing switch to produce the neuroprotective variant and therefore achieve self-protection. PMID:26616331

  7. REMAS: a new regression model to identify alternative splicing events from exon array data

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hao; Hang, Xingyi; Zhu, Ji; Qian, Minping; Qu, Wubin; Zhang, Chenggang; Deng, Minghua

    2009-01-01

    Background Alternative splicing (AS) is an important regulatory mechanism for gene expression and protein diversity in eukaryotes. Previous studies have demonstrated that it can be causative for, or specific to splicing-related diseases. Understanding the regulation of AS will be helpful for diagnostic efforts and drug discoveries on those splicing-related diseases. As a novel exon-centric microarray platform, exon array enables a comprehensive analysis of AS by investigating the expression of known and predicted exons. Identifying of AS events from exon array has raised much attention, however, new and powerful algorithms for exon array data analysis are still absent till now. Results Here, we considered identifying of AS events in the framework of variable selection and developed a regression method for AS detection (REMAS). Firstly, features of alternatively spliced exons were scaled by reasonably defined variables. Secondly, we designed a hierarchical model which can represent gene structure and transcriptional influence to exons, and the lasso type penalties were introduced in calculation because of huge variable size. Thirdly, an iterative two-step algorithm was developed to select alternatively spliced genes and exons. To avoid negative effects introduced by small sample size, we ranked genes as parameters indicating their AS capabilities in an iterative manner. After that, both simulation and real data evaluation showed that REMAS could efficiently identify potential AS events, some of which had been validated by RT-PCR or supported by literature evidence. Conclusion As a new lasso regression algorithm based on hierarchical model, REMAS has been demonstrated as a reliable and effective method to identify AS events from exon array data. PMID:19208117

  8. Principles of 3 splice site selection and alternative splicing for an unusual group II intron from Bacillus anthracis

    E-print Network

    Zimmerly, Steven

    , California 94550, USA ABSTRACT We investigated the self-splicing properties of two introns from the bacterium of a highly structured RNA and an internally encoded reverse tran- scriptase (RT) open reading frame (ORF). The intron RNA is a ribozyme that provides the catalytic activity for splicing, while the RT, in combination

  9. Aberrant splicing of genes involved in haemoglobin synthesis and impaired terminal erythroid maturation in SF3B1 mutated refractory anaemia with ring sideroblasts.

    PubMed

    Conte, Simona; Katayama, Shintaro; Vesterlund, Liselotte; Karimi, Mohsen; Dimitriou, Marios; Jansson, Monika; Mortera-Blanco, Teresa; Unneberg, Per; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Sander, Birgitta; Skoog, Tiina; Campbell, Peter; Walfridsson, Julian; Kere, Juha; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva

    2015-11-01

    Refractory anaemia with ring sideroblasts (RARS) is distinguished by hyperplastic inefficient erythropoiesis, aberrant mitochondrial ferritin accumulation and anaemia. Heterozygous mutations in the spliceosome gene SF3B1 are found in a majority of RARS cases. To explore the link between SF3B1 mutations and anaemia, we studied mutated RARS CD34(+) marrow cells with regard to transcriptome sequencing, splice patterns and mutational allele burden during erythroid differentiation. Transcriptome profiling during early erythroid differentiation revealed a marked up-regulation of genes involved in haemoglobin synthesis and in the oxidative phosphorylation process, and down-regulation of mitochondrial ABC transporters compared to normal bone marrow. Moreover, mis-splicing of genes involved in transcription regulation, particularly haemoglobin synthesis, was confirmed, indicating a compromised haemoglobinization during RARS erythropoiesis. In order to define the phase during which erythroid maturation of SF3B1 mutated cells is most affected, we assessed allele burden during erythroid differentiation in vitro and in vivo and found that SF3B1 mutated erythroblasts showed stable expansion until late erythroblast stage but that terminal maturation to reticulocytes was significantly reduced. In conclusion, SF3B1 mutated RARS progenitors display impaired splicing with potential downstream consequences for genes of key importance for haemoglobin synthesis and terminal erythroid differentiation. PMID:26255870

  10. Global analysis of CPSF2-mediated alternative splicing: Integration of global iCLIP and transcriptome profiling data

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Ashish; Ou, Jianhong; Zhu, Lihua Julie; Green, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a key mechanism for generating proteome diversity, however the mechanisms regulating alternative splicing are poorly understood. Using a genome-wide RNA interference screening strategy, we identified cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF) and symplekin (SYMPK) as cofactors of the well-known splicing regulator RBFOX2. To determine the role of CPSF in alternative splicing on a genome-wide level, we performed paired-end RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to compare splicing events in control cells and RBFOX2 or CPSF2 knockdown cells. We also performed individual-nucleotide resolution UV cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (iCLIP) to identify direct binding targets of RBFOX2 and CPSF2. Here, we describe the experimental design, and the quality control and data analyses that were performed on the dataset. The raw sequencing data have been deposited in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus and are accessible through GEO Series accession number GSE60392.

  11. Exon Organization and Novel Alternative Splicing of Ank3 in Mouse Heart

    PubMed Central

    Yamankurt, Gokay; Wu, Henry C.; McCarthy, Michael; Cunha, Shane R.

    2015-01-01

    Ankyrin-G is an adaptor protein that links membrane proteins to the underlying cytoskeletal network. Alternative splicing of the Ank3 gene gives rise to multiple ankyrin-G isoforms in numerous tissues. To date, only one ankyrin-G isoform has been characterized in heart and transcriptional regulation of the Ank3 gene is completely unknown. In this study, we describe the first comprehensive analysis of Ank3 expression in heart. Using a PCR-based screen of cardiac mRNA transcripts, we identify two new exons and 28 alternative splice variants of the Ank3 gene. We measure the relative expression of each splice variant using quantitative real-time PCR and exon-exon boundary spanning primers that specifically amplify individual Ank3 variants. Six variants are rarely expressed (<1%), while the remaining variants display similar expression patterns in three hearts. Of the five first exons in the Ank3 gene, exon 1d is only expressed in heart and skeletal muscle as it was not detected in brain, kidney, cerebellum, and lung. Immunoblot analysis reveals multiple ankyrin-G isoforms in heart, and two ankyrin-G subpopulations are detected in adult cardiomyocytes by immunofluorescence. One population co-localizes with the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.5 at the intercalated disc, while the other population expresses at the Z-line. Two of the rare splice variants excise a portion of the ZU5 motif, which encodes the minimal spectrin-binding domain, and these variants lack ?-spectrin binding. Together, these data demonstrate that Ank3 is subject to complex splicing regulation resulting in a diverse population of ankyrin-G isoforms in heart. PMID:26024478

  12. Review: Alternative Splicing (AS) of Genes As An Approach for Generating Protein Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Bishakha; Haupt, Larisa M; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2013-01-01

    Prior to the completion of the human genome project, the human genome was thought to have a greater number of genes as it seemed structurally and functionally more complex than other simpler organisms. This along with the belief of “one gene, one protein”, were demonstrated to be incorrect. The inequality in the ratio of gene to protein formation gave rise to the theory of alternative splicing (AS). AS is a mechanism by which one gene gives rise to multiple protein products. Numerous databases and online bioinformatic tools are available for the detection and analysis of AS. Bioinformatics provides an important approach to study mRNA and protein diversity by various tools such as expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences obtained from completely processed mRNA. Microarrays and deep sequencing approaches also aid in the detection of splicing events. Initially it was postulated that AS occurred only in about 5% of all genes but was later found to be more abundant. Using bioinformatic approaches, the level of AS in human genes was found to be fairly high with 35-59% of genes having at least one AS form. Our ability to determine and predict AS is important as disorders in splicing patterns may lead to abnormal splice variants resulting in genetic diseases. In addition, the diversity of proteins produced by AS poses a challenge for successful drug discovery and therefore a greater understanding of AS would be beneficial. PMID:24179441

  13. Complexity of the Alternative Splicing Landscape in Plants[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Anireddy S.N.; Marquez, Yamile; Kalyna, Maria; Barta, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) of precursor mRNAs (pre-mRNAs) from multiexon genes allows organisms to increase their coding potential and regulate gene expression through multiple mechanisms. Recent transcriptome-wide analysis of AS using RNA sequencing has revealed that AS is highly pervasive in plants. Pre-mRNAs from over 60% of intron-containing genes undergo AS to produce a vast repertoire of mRNA isoforms. The functions of most splice variants are unknown. However, emerging evidence indicates that splice variants increase the functional diversity of proteins. Furthermore, AS is coupled to transcript stability and translation through nonsense-mediated decay and microRNA-mediated gene regulation. Widespread changes in AS in response to developmental cues and stresses suggest a role for regulated splicing in plant development and stress responses. Here, we review recent progress in uncovering the extent and complexity of the AS landscape in plants, its regulation, and the roles of AS in gene regulation. The prevalence of AS in plants has raised many new questions that require additional studies. New tools based on recent technological advances are allowing genome-wide analysis of RNA elements in transcripts and of chromatin modifications that regulate AS. Application of these tools in plants will provide significant new insights into AS regulation and crosstalk between AS and other layers of gene regulation. PMID:24179125

  14. Cartography of neurexin alternative splicing mapped by single-molecule long-read mRNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Treutlein, Barbara; Gokce, Ozgun; Quake, Stephen R; Südhof, Thomas C

    2014-04-01

    Neurexins are evolutionarily conserved presynaptic cell-adhesion molecules that are essential for normal synapse formation and synaptic transmission. Indirect evidence has indicated that extensive alternative splicing of neurexin mRNAs may produce hundreds if not thousands of neurexin isoforms, but no direct evidence for such diversity has been available. Here we use unbiased long-read sequencing of full-length neurexin (Nrxn)1?, Nrxn1?, Nrxn2?, Nrxn3?, and Nrxn3? mRNAs to systematically assess how many sites of alternative splicing are used in neurexins with a significant frequency, and whether alternative splicing events at these sites are independent of each other. In sequencing more than 25,000 full-length mRNAs, we identified a novel, abundantly used alternatively spliced exon of Nrxn1? and Nrxn3? (referred to as alternatively spliced sequence 6) that encodes a 9-residue insertion in the flexible hinge region between the fifth LNS (laminin-?, neurexin, sex hormone-binding globulin) domain and the third EGF-like sequence. In addition, we observed several larger-scale events of alternative splicing that deleted multiple domains and were much less frequent than the canonical six sites of alternative splicing in neurexins. All of the six canonical events of alternative splicing appear to be independent of each other, suggesting that neurexins may exhibit an even larger isoform diversity than previously envisioned and comprise thousands of variants. Our data are consistent with the notion that ?-neurexins represent extracellular protein-interaction scaffolds in which different LNS and EGF domains mediate distinct interactions that affect diverse functions and are independently regulated by independent events of alternative splicing. PMID:24639501

  15. Inferring Alternative Splicing Patterns in Mouse from a Full-Length cDNA Library and Microarray Data

    PubMed Central

    Kochiwa, Hiromi; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Washio, Takanori; Saito, Rintaro; Phase, The RIKEN Genome Exploration Research Group; Bono, Hidemasa; Carninci, Piero; Okazaki, Yasushi; Miki, Rika; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Tomita, Masaru

    2002-01-01

    Although many studies on alternative splicing of specific genes have been reported in the literature, the general mechanism that regulates alternative splicing has not been clearly understood. In this study, we systematically aligned each pair of the 21,076 cDNA sequences of Mus musculus, searched for putative alternative splicing patterns, and constructed a list of potential alternative splicing sites. Two cDNAs are suspected to be alternatively spliced and originating from a common gene if they share most of their region with a high degree of sequence homology, but parts of the sequences are very distinctive or deleted in either cDNA. The list contains the following information: (1) tissue, (2) developmental stage, (3) sequences around splice sites, (4) the length of each gapped region, and (5) other comments. The list is available at http://www.bioinfo.sfc.keio.ac.jp/intron. Our results have predicted a number of unreported alternatively spliced genes, some of which are expressed only in a specific tissue or at a specific developmental stage. PMID:12176936

  16. Evidence of Extensive Alternative Splicing in Post Mortem Human Brain HTT Transcription by mRNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Labadorf, Adam T.; Myers, Richard H.

    2015-01-01

    Despite 20 years since its discovery, the gene responsible for Huntington’s Disease, HTT, has still not had its function or transcriptional profile completely characterized. In response to a recent report by Ruzo et al. of several novel splice forms of HTT in human embryonic stem cell lines, we have analyzed a set of mRNA sequencing datasets from post mortem human brain from Huntington’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and neurologically normal control subjects to evaluate support for previously observed and to identify novel splice patterns. A custom analysis pipeline produced supporting evidence for some of the results reported by two previous studies of alternative isoforms as well as identifying previously unreported splice patterns. All of the alternative splice patterns were of relatively low abundance compared to the canonical splice form. PMID:26496077

  17. ALS-linked TDP-43 mutations produce aberrant RNA splicing and adult-onset motor neuron disease without aggregation or loss of nuclear TDP-43.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Eveline S; Ling, Shuo-Chien; Huelga, Stephanie C; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Polymenidou, Magdalini; Ditsworth, Dara; Kordasiewicz, Holly B; McAlonis-Downes, Melissa; Platoshyn, Oleksandr; Parone, Philippe A; Da Cruz, Sandrine; Clutario, Kevin M; Swing, Debbie; Tessarollo, Lino; Marsala, Martin; Shaw, Christopher E; Yeo, Gene W; Cleveland, Don W

    2013-02-19

    Transactivating response region DNA binding protein (TDP-43) is the major protein component of ubiquitinated inclusions found in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) with ubiquitinated inclusions. Two ALS-causing mutants (TDP-43(Q331K) and TDP-43(M337V)), but not wild-type human TDP-43, are shown here to provoke age-dependent, mutant-dependent, progressive motor axon degeneration and motor neuron death when expressed in mice at levels and in a cell type-selective pattern similar to endogenous TDP-43. Mutant TDP-43-dependent degeneration of lower motor neurons occurs without: (i) loss of TDP-43 from the corresponding nuclei, (ii) accumulation of TDP-43 aggregates, and (iii) accumulation of insoluble TDP-43. Computational analysis using splicing-sensitive microarrays demonstrates alterations of endogenous TDP-43-dependent alternative splicing events conferred by both human wild-type and mutant TDP-43(Q331K), but with high levels of mutant TDP-43 preferentially enhancing exon exclusion of some target pre-mRNAs affecting genes involved in neurological transmission and function. Comparison with splicing alterations following TDP-43 depletion demonstrates that TDP-43(Q331K) enhances normal TDP-43 splicing function for some RNA targets but loss-of-function for others. Thus, adult-onset motor neuron disease does not require aggregation or loss of nuclear TDP-43, with ALS-linked mutants producing loss and gain of splicing function of selected RNA targets at an early disease stage. PMID:23382207

  18. RAN-Binding Protein 9 is Involved in Alternative Splicing and is Critical for Male Germ Cell Development and Male Fertility

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Jianqiang; Tang, Chong; Li, Jiachen; Zhang, Ying; Bhetwal, Bhupal P.; Zheng, Huili; Yan, Wei

    2014-01-01

    As a member of the large Ran-binding protein family, Ran-binding protein 9 (RANBP9) has been suggested to play a critical role in diverse cellular functions in somatic cell lineages in vitro, and this is further supported by the neonatal lethality phenotype in Ranbp9 global knockout mice. However, the exact molecular actions of RANBP9 remain largely unknown. By inactivation of Ranbp9 specifically in testicular somatic and spermatogenic cells, we discovered that Ranbp9 was dispensable for Sertoli cell development and functions, but critical for male germ cell development and male fertility. RIP-Seq and proteomic analyses revealed that RANBP9 was associated with multiple key splicing factors and directly targeted >2,300 mRNAs in spermatocytes and round spermatids. Many of the RANBP9 target and non-target mRNAs either displayed aberrant splicing patterns or were dysregulated in the absence of Ranbp9. Our data uncovered a novel role of Ranbp9 in regulating alternative splicing in spermatogenic cells, which is critical for normal spermatogenesis and male fertility. PMID:25474150

  19. Survey of Programs Used to Detect Alternative Splicing Isoforms from Deep Sequencing Data In Silico

    PubMed Central

    Min, Feng; Wang, Sumei; Zhang, Li

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing techniques have been rapidly emerging. However, the massive sequencing reads hide a great deal of unknown important information. Advances have enabled researchers to discover alternative splicing (AS) sites and isoforms using computational approaches instead of molecular experiments. Given the importance of AS for gene expression and protein diversity in eukaryotes, detecting alternative splicing and isoforms represents a hot topic in systems biology and epigenetics research. The computational methods applied to AS prediction have improved since the emergence of next-generation sequencing. In this study, we introduce state-of-the-art research on AS and then compare the research methods and software tools available for AS based on next-generation sequencing reads. Finally, we discuss the prospects of computational methods related to AS. PMID:26421304

  20. ASTALAVISTA: dynamic and flexible analysis of alternative splicing events in custom gene datasets

    PubMed Central

    Foissac, Sylvain; Sammeth, Michael

    2007-01-01

    In the process of establishing more and more complete annotations of eukaryotic genomes, a constantly growing number of alternative splicing (AS) events has been reported over the last decade. Consequently, the increasing transcript coverage also revealed the real complexity of some variations in the exon–intron structure between transcript variants and the need for computational tools to address ‘complex’ AS events. ASTALAVISTA (alternative splicing transcriptional landscape visualization tool) employs an intuitive and complete notation system to univocally identify such events. The method extracts AS events dynamically from custom gene annotations, classifies them into groups of common types and visualizes a comprehensive picture of the resulting AS landscape. Thus, ASTALAVISTA can characterize AS for whole transcriptome data from reference annotations (GENCODE, REFSEQ, ENSEMBL) as well as for genes selected by the user according to common functional/structural attributes of interest: http://genome.imim.es/astalavista PMID:17485470

  1. Drosophila hnRNP A1 homologs Hrp36/Hrp38 enhance U2-type versus U12-type splicing to regulate alternative splicing of the prospero twintron

    PubMed Central

    Borah, Sumit; Wong, Anthony C.; Steitz, Joan A.

    2009-01-01

    During Drosophila embryogenesis, the transcription factor Prospero is critical for neuronal differentiation and axonal outgrowth. The prospero pre-mRNA undergoes alternative splicing, but is unique in that it harbors a rare twintron whereby one intron lies embedded within another. The innermost intron is excised by the major U2-type spliceosome and the outermost is excised by the minor U12-type spliceosome. Previously, an intronic purine-rich element (PRE) was identified as an enhancer of both U2- and U12-type splicing, with a greater effect on the U2-type pathway. We find that the PRE binds Drosophila homologs of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A1, Hrp38 and Hrp36. RNAi-mediated knockdown of these proteins in S2 cells specifically decreases U2-type splicing of the twintron, which is surprising because hnRNPs usually are repressive. Conversely, tethering Hrp38 to the twintron increases U2-type splicing. Thus, developmentally regulated alternative splicing of the prospero twintron can be explained by documented changes in the abundance of these hnRNP A1-like proteins during embryogenesis. PMID:19196985

  2. Role of tissue specific alternative pre-mRNA splicing in the differentiation of the erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Benz, E. J.; Huang, S. C.

    1997-01-01

    Regulated alternative pre-mRNA splicing is neither as widely appreciated as a fundamental aspect of controlled gene expression nor as thoroughly studied as transcriptional regulation. However, as exemplified by the phenomena cited in this review, alternative splicing is a fundamentally important mechanism used in the eukaryotic world to enhance the range, versatility and plasticity of the structural information contained within a gene, and to create additional strategies by which the net quantitative output of a given gene product can be controlled. Regulation of RNA splicing gives genes a modularity that adds flexibility, and, therefore, selective advantage, to eukaryotes. It is likely, though unproven, that this opportunity for refined regulation and diversification provides at least one basis for the existence of the tandem exon-intron-exon structure found in the vast majority of eukaryotic genes and many viral genes. Many examples of alternative splicing are known, but, for the majority, no obvious biological impact of the alternatively spliced proteins on known cellular functions can be appreciated. Examples by which selectively regulated splicing pathways alter both the physiology and pathology of a major cellular event, such as differentiation and mechanical function of the red cell membrane, are thus relatively rare. The protein 4.1 gene and mRNA products thus provide an instructive and unusual system in which to explore the broader issue of the role of these regulatory mechanisms in the overall scheme of gene regulation and adaptation. The fact that hereditary hemolytic anemias result from mutations that directly or indirectly disrupt the splicing system emphasized the relevance of these mechanisms to molecular medicine. The features of splicing that we have reviewed in this paper, and the specific impact that regulated splicing exerts on differentiating red cells have, we hope, convinced the reader that RNA splicing is an important, fascinating, and potentially fruitful area for future study of human disease processes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:9108669

  3. Functional analysis of splicing mutations in the IDS gene and the use of antisense oligonucleotides to exploit an alternative therapy for MPS II.

    PubMed

    Matos, Liliana; Gonçalves, Vânia; Pinto, Eugénia; Laranjeira, Francisco; Prata, Maria João; Jordan, Peter; Desviat, Lourdes R; Pérez, Belén; Alves, Sandra

    2015-12-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis II is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the IDS gene, including exonic alterations associated with aberrant splicing. In the present work, cell-based splicing assays were performed to study the effects of two splicing mutations in exon 3 of IDS, i.e., c.241C>T and c.257C>T, whose presence activates a cryptic splice site in exon 3 and one in exon 8, i.e., c.1122C>T that despite being a synonymous mutation is responsible for the creation of a new splice site in exon 8 leading to a transcript shorter than usual. Mutant minigene analysis and overexpression assays revealed that SRSF2 and hnRNP E1 might be involved in the use and repression of the constitutive 3' splice site of exon 3 respectively. For the c.1122C>T the use of antisense therapy to correct the splicing defect was explored, but transfection of patient fibroblasts with antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (n=3) and a locked nucleic acid failed to abolish the abnormal transcript; indeed, it resulted in the appearance of yet another aberrant splicing product. Interestingly, the oligonucleotides transfection in control fibroblasts led to the appearance of the aberrant transcript observed in patients' cells after treatment, which shows that the oligonucleotides are masking an important cis-acting element for 5' splice site regulation of exon 8. These results highlight the importance of functional studies for understanding the pathogenic consequences of mis-splicing and highlight the difficulty in developing antisense therapies involving gene regions under complex splicing regulation. PMID:26407519

  4. Alternative splicing of the mRNA encoding the human cholesteryl ester transfer protein

    SciTech Connect

    Inazu, Akihiro; Quinet, E.M.; Suke Wang; Brown, M.L.; Stevenson, S.; Barr, M.L.; Moulin, P.; Tall, A.R. )

    1992-03-03

    The plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) is known to facilitate the transfer of lipids between plasma lipoproteins. The human CETP gene is a complex locus encompassing 16 exons. The CETP mRNA is found in liver and small intestine as well as in a variety of peripheral tissues. While the CETP cDNA from human adipose tissue was being cloned, a variant CETP cDNA was discovered which excluded the complete sequence encoded by exon 9, but which was otherwise identical to the full-length CETP cDNA, suggesting modification of the CETP gene transcript by an alternative RNA splicing mechanism. RNase protection analysis of tissue RNA confirmed the presence of exon 9 deleted transcripts and showed that they represented a variable proportion of the total CETP mRNA in various human tissues including adipose tissue (25%), liver (33%), and spleen (46%). Transient expression of the exon 9 deleted cDNA in COS cells or stable expression in CHO cells showed that the protein encoded by the alternatively spliced transcript was inactive in neutral lipid transfer, smaller, and poorly secreted compared to the protein derived from the full-length cDNA. Endo H digestion suggested that the inactive, cell-associated protein was present within the endoplasmic reticulum. The experiments show that the expression of the human CETP gene is modified by alternative splicing of the ninth exon, in a tissue-specific fashion. The function of alternative splicing is unknown but could serve to produce a protein with a function other than plasma neutral lipid transfer, or as an on-off switch to regulate the local concentration of biologically active protein.

  5. RNA-Seq analysis in mutant zebrafish reveals role of U1C protein in alternative splicing regulation

    PubMed Central

    Rösel, Tanja Dorothe; Hung, Lee-Hsueh; Medenbach, Jan; Donde, Katrin; Starke, Stefan; Benes, Vladimir; Rätsch, Gunnar; Bindereif, Albrecht

    2011-01-01

    Precise 5? splice-site recognition is essential for both constitutive and regulated pre-mRNA splicing. The U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (snRNP)-specific protein U1C is involved in this first step of spliceosome assembly and important for stabilizing early splicing complexes. We used an embryonically lethal U1C mutant zebrafish, hi1371, to investigate the potential genomewide role of U1C for splicing regulation. U1C mutant embryos contain overall stable, but U1C-deficient U1 snRNPs. Surprisingly, genomewide RNA-Seq analysis of mutant versus wild-type embryos revealed a large set of specific target genes that changed their alternative splicing patterns in the absence of U1C. Injection of ZfU1C cRNA into mutant embryos and in vivo splicing experiments in HeLa cells after siRNA-mediated U1C knockdown confirmed the U1C dependency and specificity, as well as the functional conservation of the effects observed. In addition, sequence motif analysis of the U1C-dependent 5? splice sites uncovered an association with downstream intronic U-rich elements. In sum, our findings provide evidence for a new role of a general snRNP protein, U1C, as a mediator of alternative splicing regulation. PMID:21468032

  6. ASPicDB: a database of annotated transcript and protein variants generated by alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Martelli, Pier L.; D’Antonio, Mattia; Bonizzoni, Paola; Castrignanò, Tiziana; D’Erchia, Anna M.; D’Onorio De Meo, Paolo; Fariselli, Piero; Finelli, Michele; Licciulli, Flavio; Mangiulli, Marina; Mignone, Flavio; Pavesi, Giulio; Picardi, Ernesto; Rizzi, Raffaella; Rossi, Ivan; Valletti, Alessio; Zauli, Andrea; Zambelli, Federico; Casadio, Rita; Pesole, Graziano

    2011-01-01

    Alternative splicing is emerging as a major mechanism for the expansion of the transcriptome and proteome diversity, particularly in human and other vertebrates. However, the proportion of alternative transcripts and proteins actually endowed with functional activity is currently highly debated. We present here a new release of ASPicDB which now provides a unique annotation resource of human protein variants generated by alternative splicing. A total of 256?939 protein variants from 17?191 multi-exon genes have been extensively annotated through state of the art machine learning tools providing information of the protein type (globular and transmembrane), localization, presence of PFAM domains, signal peptides, GPI-anchor propeptides, transmembrane and coiled-coil segments. Furthermore, full-length variants can be now specifically selected based on the annotation of CAGE-tags and polyA signal and/or polyA sites, marking transcription initiation and termination sites, respectively. The retrieval can be carried out at gene, transcript, exon, protein or splice site level allowing the selection of data sets fulfilling one or more features settled by the user. The retrieval interface also enables the selection of protein variants showing specific differences in the annotated features. ASPicDB is available at http://www.caspur.it/ASPicDB/. PMID:21051348

  7. Systematically Differentiating Functions for Alternatively Spliced Isoforms through Integrating RNA-seq Data

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Rajasree; Wen, Yuchen; Omenn, Gilbert S.; Kretzler, Matthias; Guan, Yuanfang

    2013-01-01

    Integrating large-scale functional genomic data has significantly accelerated our understanding of gene functions. However, no algorithm has been developed to differentiate functions for isoforms of the same gene using high-throughput genomic data. This is because standard supervised learning requires ‘ground-truth’ functional annotations, which are lacking at the isoform level. To address this challenge, we developed a generic framework that interrogates public RNA-seq data at the transcript level to differentiate functions for alternatively spliced isoforms. For a specific function, our algorithm identifies the ‘responsible’ isoform(s) of a gene and generates classifying models at the isoform level instead of at the gene level. Through cross-validation, we demonstrated that our algorithm is effective in assigning functions to genes, especially the ones with multiple isoforms, and robust to gene expression levels and removal of homologous gene pairs. We identified genes in the mouse whose isoforms are predicted to have disparate functionalities and experimentally validated the ‘responsible’ isoforms using data from mammary tissue. With protein structure modeling and experimental evidence, we further validated the predicted isoform functional differences for the genes Cdkn2a and Anxa6. Our generic framework is the first to predict and differentiate functions for alternatively spliced isoforms, instead of genes, using genomic data. It is extendable to any base machine learner and other species with alternatively spliced isoforms, and shifts the current gene-centered function prediction to isoform-level predictions. PMID:24244129

  8. Adaptive thermal control of stem gravitropism through alternative RNA splicing in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jae Yong; Kim, Joo-Young; Park, Chung-Mo

    2015-11-01

    Gravitropism is an important growth movement in response to gravity in virtually all higher plants: the roots showing positive gravitropism and the shoots showing negative gravitropism. The gravitropic orientation of plant organs is also influenced by environmental factors, such as light and temperature. It is known that a zinc finger (ZF)-containing transcription factor SHOOT GRAVITROPISM 5/INDETERMINATE DOMAIN 15 (SGR5/IDD15) mediates the early events of gravitropic responses occurring in inflorescence stems. We have recently found that SGR5 gene undergoes alternative splicing to produce 2 protein variants, the full-size SGR5? transcription factor and the truncated SGR5? form lacking functional ZF motifs. The SGR5? form inhibits SGR5? function possibly by forming nonfunctional heterodimers that are excluded from DNA binding. Notably, SGR5 alternative splicing is accelerated at high temperatures, resulting in a high-level accumulation of SGR5? proteins. Accordingly, transgenic plants overexpressing SGR5? exhibit a reduction in the negative gravitropism of inflorescence stems, as observed in the SGR5-defective mutant. It is proposed that the thermos-responsive alternative splicing of SGR5 gene provides an adaptation strategy by which plants protect the shoots from aerial heat frequently occurring in natural habitats. PMID:26452406

  9. Alternative splicing in the human interleukin enhancer binding factor 3 (ILF3) gene.

    PubMed

    Duchange, N; Pidoux, J; Camus, E; Sauvaget, D

    2000-12-31

    The Interleukin Enhancer Binding Factor 3 (ILF3) gene has been mapped to chromosome 19 in humans and to chromosome 9 in mice. Several reported double-stranded RNA binding proteins including NF90, ILF3, MPP4 and DRBP76 have been suggested to be isoforms of the ILF3 gene but this has not been clearly established. We isolated several ilf3 transcripts from a melanoma cDNA library and two corresponding genomic fragments, and report alternative splicing and polyadenylation site selection in the human ILF3 gene. We show the existence of an alternative splice site responsible for the sequence divergence in the 3' part of the transcripts. Another alternative splicing event at a site between the two double-stranded RNA binding motifs leads to the additional presence in some cases of a four amino acids NVKQ peptide. We also describe the utilization of three distinct polyadenylation signals and the generation of an ilf3 transcript with a long extended 3' UTR. The expression of the different transcripts was evaluated. We used a GenBank sequence for the part of chromosome 19 corresponding to the ILF3 gene to determine the exon-intron organization of the entire gene which spans 38 kb and is divided into 21 exons. PMID:11167023

  10. Alternative splicing of VEGFA, APP and NUMB genes in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yi-Jun; Han, Hua-Zhong; Liang, Yong; Shi, Chen-Zhang; Zhu, Qing-Chao; Yang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate alternative splicing in vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), amyloid beta precursor protein (APP), and Numb homolog (NUMB) in colorectal cancer (CRC). METHODS: Real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses were performed to detect the expression of VEGFA, APP, and NUMB mRNA in 20 CRC tissues and matched adjacent normal tissues, as well as their alternative splicing variants. RESULTS: qRT-PCR analysis revealed that the expression of APP, NUMB, and VEGFA165b mRNA were significantly downregulated, while VEGFA mRNA was upregulated, in CRC tissues (all P < 0.05). PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis revealed that the expression of VEGFA165a/b in CRC tissues was significantly higher than in adjacent normal tissues (P < 0.05). Compared with adjacent normal tissues, the expression of NUMB-PRRS in CRC tissues was significantly decreased (P < 0.05), and the expression of NUMB-PRRL was increased (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Alternative splicing of VEGFA, APP, and NUMB may regulate the development of CRC, and represent new targets for its diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. PMID:26074693

  11. The role played by alternative splicing in antigenic variability in human endo-parasites

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Endo-parasites that affect humans include Plasmodium, the causative agent of malaria, which remains one of the leading causes of death in human beings. Despite decades of research, vaccines to this and other endo-parasites remain elusive. This is in part due to the hyper-variability of the parasites surface proteins. Generally these surface proteins are encoded by a large family of genes, with only one being dominantly expressed at certain life stages. Another layer of complexity can be introduced through the alternative splicing of these surface proteins. The resulting isoforms may differ from each other with regard to cell localisation, substrate affinities and functions. They may even differ in structure to the extent that they are no longer recognised by the host’s immune system. In many cases this leads to changes in the N terminus of these proteins. The geographical localisation of endo-parasitic infections around the tropics and the highest incidences of HIV-1 infection in the same areas, adds a further layer of complexity as parasitic infections affect the host immune system resulting in higher HIV infection rates, faster disease progression, and an increase in the severity of infections and complications in HIV diagnosis. This review discusses some examples of parasite surface proteins that are alternatively spliced in trypanosomes, Plasmodium and the parasitic worm Schistosoma as well as what role alternate splicing may play in the interaction between HIV and these endo-parasites. PMID:24472559

  12. Generation of functionally distinct isoforms of PTBP3 by alternative splicing and translation initiation

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Lit-Yeen; Whitfield, Peter; Llorian, Miriam; Monzon-Casanova, Elisa; Diaz-Munoz, Manuel D.; Turner, Martin; Smith, Christopher W.J.

    2015-01-01

    Polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTBP1) is a widely expressed RNA binding protein that acts as a regulator of alternative splicing and of cytoplasmic mRNA functions. Vertebrates contain two closely-related paralogs with >75% amino acid sequence identity. Early replacement of PTBP1 by PTBP2 during neuronal differentiation causes a concerted set of splicing changes. By comparison, very little is known about the molecular functions or physiological roles of PTBP3, although its expression and conservation throughout the vertebrates suggest a role in haematopoietic cells. To begin to understand its functions we have characterized the mRNA and protein isoform repertoire of PTBP3. Combinatorial alternative splicing events at the 5? end of the gene allow for the generation of eight mRNA and three major protein isoforms. Individual mRNAs generate up to three protein isoforms via alternative translation initiation by re-initiation and leaky scanning using downstream AUG codons. The N-terminally truncated PTBP3 isoforms lack nuclear localization signals and/or most of the RRM1 domain and vary in their RNA binding properties and nuclear/cytoplasmic distribution, suggesting that PTBP3 may have major post-transcriptional cytoplasmic roles. Our findings set the stage for understanding the non-redundant physiological roles of PTBP3. PMID:25940628

  13. Generation of functionally distinct isoforms of PTBP3 by alternative splicing and translation initiation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lit-Yeen; Whitfield, Peter; Llorian, Miriam; Monzon-Casanova, Elisa; Diaz-Munoz, Manuel D; Turner, Martin; Smith, Christopher W J

    2015-06-23

    Polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTBP1) is a widely expressed RNA binding protein that acts as a regulator of alternative splicing and of cytoplasmic mRNA functions. Vertebrates contain two closely-related paralogs with >75% amino acid sequence identity. Early replacement of PTBP1 by PTBP2 during neuronal differentiation causes a concerted set of splicing changes. By comparison, very little is known about the molecular functions or physiological roles of PTBP3, although its expression and conservation throughout the vertebrates suggest a role in haematopoietic cells. To begin to understand its functions we have characterized the mRNA and protein isoform repertoire of PTBP3. Combinatorial alternative splicing events at the 5' end of the gene allow for the generation of eight mRNA and three major protein isoforms. Individual mRNAs generate up to three protein isoforms via alternative translation initiation by re-initiation and leaky scanning using downstream AUG codons. The N-terminally truncated PTBP3 isoforms lack nuclear localization signals and/or most of the RRM1 domain and vary in their RNA binding properties and nuclear/cytoplasmic distribution, suggesting that PTBP3 may have major post-transcriptional cytoplasmic roles. Our findings set the stage for understanding the non-redundant physiological roles of PTBP3. PMID:25940628

  14. Discrimination of Alternative Spliced Isoforms by Real-Time PCR Using Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA) Substituted Primer

    E-print Network

    Wan, Guoqiang

    Determination of quantitative expression levels of alternatively spliced isoforms provides an important approach to the understanding of the functional significance of each isoform. Real-time PCR using exon junction ...

  15. IL-1? promotes Th17 differentiation by inducing alternative splicing of FOXP3

    PubMed Central

    Mailer, Reiner K. W.; Joly, Anne-Laure; Liu, Sang; Elias, Szabolcs; Tegner, Jesper; Andersson, John

    2015-01-01

    CD4+FOXP3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells are essential for maintaining immunological self-tolerance. Treg cell development and function depend on the transcription factor FOXP3, which is present in several distinct isoforms due to alternative splicing. Despite the importance of FOXP3 in the proper maintenance of Treg cells, the regulation and functional consequences of FOXP3 isoform expression remains poorly understood. Here, we show that in human Treg cells IL-1? promotes excision of FOXP3 exon 7. FOXP3 is not only expressed by Treg cells but is also transiently expressed when naïve T cells differentiate into Th17 cells. Forced splicing of FOXP3 into FOXP3?2?7 strongly favored Th17 differentiation in vitro. We also found that patients with Crohn’s disease express increased levels of FOXP3 transcripts lacking exon 7, which correlate with disease severity and IL-17 production. Our results demonstrate that alternative splicing of FOXP3 modulates T cell differentiation. These results highlight the importance of characterizing FOXP3 expression on an isoform basis and suggest that immune responses may be manipulated by modulating the expression of FOXP3 isoforms, which has broad implications for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:26441347

  16. Alternative splicing of a single transcription factor drives selfish reproductive behavior in honeybee workers (Apis mellifera).

    PubMed

    Jarosch, Antje; Stolle, Eckart; Crewe, Robin M; Moritz, Robin F A

    2011-09-13

    In eusocial insects the production of daughters is generally restricted to mated queens, and unmated workers are functionally sterile. The evolution of this worker sterility has been plausibly explained by kin selection theory [Hamilton W (1964) J Theor Biol 7:1-52], and many traits have evolved to prevent conflict over reproduction among the females in an insect colony. In honeybees (Apis mellifera), worker reproduction is regulated by the queen, brood pheromones, and worker policing. However, workers of the Cape honeybee, Apis mellifera capensis, can evade this control and establish themselves as social parasites by activating their ovaries, parthenogenetically producing diploid female offspring (thelytoky) and producing queen-like amounts of queen pheromones. All these traits have been shown to be strongly influenced by a single locus on chromosome 13 [Lattorff HMG, et al. (2007) Biol Lett 3:292-295]. We screened this region for candidate genes and found that alternative splicing of a gene homologous to the gemini transcription factor of Drosophila controls worker sterility. Knocking out the critical exon in a series of RNAi experiments resulted in rapid worker ovary activation-one of the traits characteristic of the social parasites. This genetic switch may be controlled by a short intronic splice enhancer motif of nine nucleotides attached to the alternative splice site. The lack of this motif in parasitic Cape honeybee clones suggests that the removal of nine nucleotides from the altruistic worker genome may be sufficient to turn a honeybee from an altruistic worker into a parasite. PMID:21896748

  17. Alternative splicing of a single transcription factor drives selfish reproductive behavior in honeybee workers (Apis mellifera)

    PubMed Central

    Jarosch, Antje; Stolle, Eckart; Crewe, Robin M.; Moritz, Robin F. A.

    2011-01-01

    In eusocial insects the production of daughters is generally restricted to mated queens, and unmated workers are functionally sterile. The evolution of this worker sterility has been plausibly explained by kin selection theory [Hamilton W (1964) J Theor Biol 7:1–52], and many traits have evolved to prevent conflict over reproduction among the females in an insect colony. In honeybees (Apis mellifera), worker reproduction is regulated by the queen, brood pheromones, and worker policing. However, workers of the Cape honeybee, Apis mellifera capensis, can evade this control and establish themselves as social parasites by activating their ovaries, parthenogenetically producing diploid female offspring (thelytoky) and producing queen-like amounts of queen pheromones. All these traits have been shown to be strongly influenced by a single locus on chromosome 13 [Lattorff HMG, et al. (2007) Biol Lett 3:292–295]. We screened this region for candidate genes and found that alternative splicing of a gene homologous to the gemini transcription factor of Drosophila controls worker sterility. Knocking out the critical exon in a series of RNAi experiments resulted in rapid worker ovary activation—one of the traits characteristic of the social parasites. This genetic switch may be controlled by a short intronic splice enhancer motif of nine nucleotides attached to the alternative splice site. The lack of this motif in parasitic Cape honeybee clones suggests that the removal of nine nucleotides from the altruistic worker genome may be sufficient to turn a honeybee from an altruistic worker into a parasite. PMID:21896748

  18. TISA: tissue-specific alternative splicing in human and mouse genes.

    PubMed

    Noh, Seung-Jae; Lee, Kyooyeol; Paik, Hyojung; Hur, Cheol-Goo

    2006-10-31

    Alternative splicing (AS) is a mechanism by which multiple transcripts are produced from a single gene and is thought to be an important mechanism for tissue-specific expression of transcript isoforms. Here, we report a novel graphing method for transcript reconstruction and statistical prediction of tissue-specific AS. We applied three selection steps to generate the splice graph and predict the transcript isoforms: (i) a custom scoring rule for exon/intron sets, (ii) binomial statistics for selecting valid alternative splicing with a frequency of at least 1% for the predominant form and (iii) evaluation of transcript structure. We obtained 97 286 and 66 022 valid transcripts from 26 143 human and 27 741 mouse genes, respectively. In addition, we discovered 33 481 AS events for nine types of AS patterns in human. The statistical significance of tissue specificity for each gene, transcript and AS event was assessed based on EST tissue information, followed by a multiple testing correction procedure. In human, 12 711 genes, 16 016 transcripts and 1035 AS events were predicted to be tissue-specific (false discovery rate <0.01). This information on genes, transcript structures, AS events and their tissue specificities in human and mouse are freely accessible on the TISA website (http://tisa.kribb.re.kr/AGC/). PMID:17107969

  19. Drosophila and human RecQ5 exist in different isoforms generated by alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Sekelsky, J J; Brodsky, M H; Rubin, G M; Hawley, R S

    1999-09-15

    Members of the RecQ helicase superfamily have been implicated in DNA repair, recombination and replication. Although the genome of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes only a single member of this family, there are at least five human RecQ-related genes: RecQL, BLM, WRN, RecQ4 and RecQ5. Mutations in at least three of these are associated with diseases involving a predisposition to malignancies and a cellular phenotype that includes increased chromosome instability. Metazoan RecQ helicases are defined by a core region with characteristic helicase motifs and sequence similarity to Escherichia coli RecQ protein. This core region is typically flanked by extensive, highly charged regions, of largely unknown function. The recently reported human RecQ5, however, has only the core RecQ-homologous region. We describe here the identification of the Drosophila RecQ5 gene. We recovered cDNAs corresponding to three alternative splice forms of the RecQ5 transcript. Two of these generate nearly identical 54 kDa proteins that, like human RecQ5, consist of the helicase core only. The third splice variant encodes a 121 kDa isoform that, like other family members, has a C-terminal extension rich in charged residues. A combination of RACE and cDNA analysis of human RECQ5 demonstrates extensive alternative splicing for this gene also, including some forms lacking helicase motifs and other conserved regions. PMID:10471747

  20. Alternative splicing modulates Kv channel clustering through a molecular ball and chain mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandany, Nitzan; Marciano, Shir; Magidovich, Elhanan; Frimerman, Teddy; Yehezkel, Rinat; Shem-Ad, Tzilhav; Lewin, Limor; Abdu, Uri; Orr, Irit; Yifrach, Ofer

    2015-03-01

    Ion channel clustering at the post-synaptic density serves a fundamental role in action potential generation and transmission. Here, we show that interaction between the Shaker Kv channel and the PSD-95 scaffold protein underlying channel clustering is modulated by the length of the intrinsically disordered C terminal channel tail. We further show that this tail functions as an entropic clock that times PSD-95 binding. We thus propose a ‘ball and chain’ mechanism to explain Kv channel binding to scaffold proteins, analogous to the mechanism describing channel fast inactivation. The physiological relevance of this mechanism is demonstrated in that alternative splicing of the Shaker channel gene to produce variants of distinct tail lengths resulted in differential channel cell surface expression levels and clustering metrics that correlate with differences in affinity of the variants for PSD-95. We suggest that modulating channel clustering by specific spatial-temporal spliced variant targeting serves a fundamental role in nervous system development and tuning.

  1. Alternative splicing of the auxin biosynthesis gene YUCCA4 determines its subcellular compartmentation.

    PubMed

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; Wang, Pengwei; Hawes, Chris; Abell, Ben M

    2012-04-01

    Auxin is a major growth hormone in plants, and recent studies have elucidated many of the molecular mechanisms underlying its action, including transport, perception and signal transduction. However, major gaps remain in our knowledge of auxin biosynthetic control, partly due to the complexity and probable redundancy of multiple pathways that involve the YUCCA family of flavin-dependent mono-oxygenases. This study reveals the differential localization of YUCCA4 alternative splice variants to the endoplasmic reticulum and the cytosol, which depends on tissue-specific splicing. One isoform is restricted to flowers, and is anchored to the cytosolic face of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane via a hydrophobic C-terminal transmembrane domain. The other isoform is present in all tissues and is distributed throughout the cytosol. These findings are consistent with previous observations of yucca4 phenotypes in flowers, and suggest a role for intracellular compartmentation in auxin biosynthesis. PMID:22233288

  2. Unique synteny and alternate splicing of the chitin synthases in closely related heliothine moths.

    PubMed

    Shirk, Paul D; Perera, Omaththage P; Shelby, Kent S; Furlong, Richard B; LoVullo, Eric D; Popham, Holly J R

    2015-12-10

    Chitin is an extracellular biopolymer that contributes to the cuticular structural matrix in arthropods. As a consequence of its rigid structure, the chitinous cuticle must be shed and replaced to accommodate growth. Two chitin synthase genes that encode for chitin synthase A (ChSA), which produces cuticular exoskeleton, and chitin synthase B (ChSB), which produces peritrophic membrane, were characterized in the genomes of two heliothine moths: the corn earworm/cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). In both moths, the two genes were arranged in tandem with the same orientation on the same strand with ChSB located 5' of ChSA. Sequence comparisons showed that the coding sequences were highly conserved with homologues from other species but that the tandem juxtaposed genomic arrangement of the two genes was unique in these insects. The mechanism that has led to this arrangement is unclear but is most likely a recent recombinational event. Transcript mapping of HzChSB and HzChSA in H. zea demonstrated that both transcripts were differentially spliced in various tissues and larval stages. The identification of the HzChSB-E12b alternate spliced transcript is the first report of alternate splicing for the ChSB group. The importance of this splice form is not clear because the protein produced would lack any enzymatic activity but retain the membrane insertion motifs. As for other insects, these genes provide an important target for potential control through RNAi but also provide a subject for broad scale genomic recombinational events. PMID:26253161

  3. LSD1 Neurospecific Alternative Splicing Controls Neuronal Excitability in Mouse Models of Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Rusconi, Francesco; Paganini, Leda; Braida, Daniela; Ponzoni, Luisa; Toffolo, Emanuela; Maroli, Annalisa; Landsberger, Nicoletta; Bedogni, Francesco; Turco, Emilia; Pattini, Linda; Altruda, Fiorella; De Biasi, Silvia; Sala, Mariaelvina; Battaglioli, Elena

    2015-09-01

    Alternative splicing in the brain is dynamic and instrumental to adaptive changes in response to stimuli. Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1/KDM1A) is a ubiquitously expressed histone H3Lys4 demethylase that acts as a transcriptional co-repressor in complex with its molecular partners CoREST and HDAC1/2. In mammalian brain, alternative splicing of LSD1 mini-exon E8a gives rise to neuroLSD1, a neurospecific isoform that, upon phosphorylation, acts as a dominant-negative causing disassembly of the co-repressor complex and de-repression of target genes. Here we show that the LSD1/neuroLSD1 ratio changes in response to neuronal activation and such effect is mediated by neurospecific splicing factors NOVA1 and nSR100/SRRM4 together with a novel cis-silencer. Indeed, we found that, in response to epileptogenic stimuli, downregulation of NOVA1 reduces exon E8a splicing and expression of neuroLSD1. Using behavioral and EEG analyses we observed that neuroLSD1-specific null mice are hypoexcitable and display decreased seizure susceptibility. Conversely, in a mouse model of Rett syndrome characterized by hyperexcitability, we measured higher levels of NOVA1 protein and upregulation of neuroLSD1. In conclusion, we propose that, in the brain, correct ratio between LSD1 and neuroLSD1 contributes to excitability and, when altered, could represent a pathogenic event associated with neurological disorders involving altered E/I. PMID:24735673

  4. Functional characterisation of an intron retaining K(+) transporter of barley reveals intron-mediated alternate splicing.

    PubMed

    Shahzad, K; Rauf, M; Ahmed, M; Malik, Z A; Habib, I; Ahmed, Z; Mahmood, K; Ali, R; Masmoudi, K; Lemtiri-Chlieh, F; Gehring, C; Berkowitz, G A; Saeed, N A

    2015-07-01

    Intron retention in transcripts and the presence of 5' and 3' splice sites within these introns mediate alternate splicing, which is widely observed in animals and plants. Here, functional characterisation of the K(+) transporter, HvHKT2;1, with stably retained introns from barley (Hordeum vulgare) in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), and transcript profiling in yeast and transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) is presented. Expression of intron-retaining HvHKT2;1 cDNA (HvHKT2;1-i) in trk1, trk2 yeast strain defective in K(+) uptake restored growth in medium containing hygromycin in the presence of different concentrations of K(+) and mediated hypersensitivity to Na(+) . HvHKT2;1-i produces multiple transcripts via alternate splicing of two regular introns and three exons in different compositions. HKT isoforms with retained introns and exon skipping variants were detected in relative expression analysis of (i) HvHKT2;1-i in barley under native conditions, (ii) in transgenic tobacco plants constitutively expressing HvHKT2;1-i, and (iii) in trk1, trk2 yeast expressing HvHKT2;1-i under control of an inducible promoter. Mixed proportions of three HKT transcripts: HvHKT2;1-e (first exon region), HvHKT2;1-i1 (first intron) and HvHKT2;1-i2 (second intron) were observed. The variation in transcript accumulation in response to changing K(+) and Na(+) concentrations was observed in both heterologous and plant systems. These findings suggest a link between intron-retaining transcripts and different splice variants to ion homeostasis, and their possible role in salt stress. PMID:25631371

  5. Alternative splicing of endothelial cell fibronectin mRNA in the IIICS region. Functional significance.

    PubMed Central

    Kocher, O.; Kennedy, S. P.; Madri, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) is thought to play a role in modulating vascular cell function in vivo. In vitro, it decreases endothelial cell proliferation and migration. We postulated that these biologic activities could be mediated through TGF-beta 1 modulation of specific gene expression. Therefore we differentially screened a human umbilical vein endothelial cell cDNA library with cDNAs prepared from both untreated and TGF-beta 1-treated bovine aortic endothelial cells. Using this technique, we isolated many TGF-beta 1-induced cDNA clones. Sequence analysis of these cDNAs showed that many of them corresponded to alternatively spliced fibronectin mRNAs. These fibronectin clones all contained the extradomain I (ED I) but three different forms of the type III connecting segment (IIICS). These different fibronectin cDNAs were expressed in bacteria and the recombinant proteins used to study the effects of IIICS alternative splicing on cell attachment, spreading, and migration in bovine aortic endothelial and smooth muscle cells and B16F10 melanoma cells. The results of these experiments show that attachment and spreading of bovine aortic endothelial and smooth muscle cells depend primarily on the presence of the Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (RGDS) sequence in the recombinant fibronectin proteins. However attachment and spreading of bovine aortic endothelial cells are modulated by alternative splicing in the IIICS region. Specifically splicing of the IIICS region decreases spreading and increases migration rates of the endothelial cells. On the contrary, using a cell line (B16F10 melanoma cells) that is known not to require the RGDS sequence for adhesion confirmed previous findings that B16F10 melanoma cells do not require the presence of the RGDS sequence for attachment and spreading. Indeed B16F10 cells were able to attach and spread on two recombinant proteins that did not contain the RGDS sequence. However attachment and spreading of B16F10 were dramatically inhibited when a 75-base pair DNA fragment was removed from the 5' end of the IIICS region. These results suggest that various regions of the fibronectin molecule may be able to interact with different cell populations to promote cell attachment and spreading, and that alternative splicing may modulate this process. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 8 Figure 11 PMID:2260635

  6. Control of fibroblast fibronectin expression and alternative splicing via the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway

    SciTech Connect

    White, Eric S.; Sagana, Rommel L.; Booth, Adam J.; Yan, Mei; Cornett, Ashley M.; Bloomheart, Christopher A.; Tsui, Jessica L.; Wilke, Carol A.; Moore, Bethany B.; Ritzenthaler, Jeffrey D.; Roman, Jesse; Muro, Andres F.

    2010-10-01

    Fibronectin (FN), a ubiquitous glycoprotein that plays critical roles in physiologic and pathologic conditions, undergoes alternative splicing which distinguishes plasma FN (pFN) from cellular FN (cFN). Although both pFN and cFN can be incorporated into the extracellular matrix, a distinguishing feature of cFN is the inclusion of an alternatively spliced exon termed EDA (for extra type III domain A). The molecular steps involved in EDA splicing are well-characterized, but pathways influencing EDA splicing are less clear. We have previously found an obligate role for inhibition of the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homologue on chromosome 10 (PTEN), the primary regulator of the PI3K/Akt pathway, in fibroblast activation. Here we show TGF-{beta}, a potent inducer of both EDA splicing and fibroblast activation, inhibits PTEN expression and activity in mesenchymal cells, corresponding with enhanced PI3K/Akt signaling. In pten{sup -/-} fibroblasts, which resemble activated fibroblasts, inhibition of Akt attenuated FN production and decreased EDA alternative splicing. Moreover, inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in pten{sup -/-} cells also blocked FN production and EDA splicing. This effect was due to inhibition of Akt-mediated phosphorylation of the primary EDA splicing regulatory protein SF2/ASF. Importantly, FN silencing in pten{sup -/-} cells resulted in attenuated proliferation and migration. Thus, our results demonstrate that the PI3K/Akt/mTOR axis is instrumental in FN transcription and alternative splicing, which regulates cell behavior.

  7. RNA-Seq analysis reveals new gene models and alternative splicing in the fungal pathogen Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The genome of Fusarium graminearum has been sequenced and annotated previously, but correct gene annotation remains a challenge. In addition, posttranscriptional regulations, such as alternative splicing and RNA editing, are poorly understood in F. graminearum. Here we took advantage of RNA-Seq to improve gene annotations and to identify alternative splicing and RNA editing in F. graminearum. Results We identified and revised 655 incorrectly predicted gene models, including revisions of intron predictions, intron splice sites and prediction of novel introns. 231 genes were identified with two or more alternative splice variants, mostly due to intron retention. Interestingly, the expression ratios between different transcript isoforms appeared to be developmentally regulated. Surprisingly, no RNA editing was identified in F. graminearum. Moreover, 2459 novel transcriptionally active regions (nTARs) were identified and our analysis indicates that many of these could be missed genes. Finally, we identified the 5? UTR and/or 3? UTR sequences of 7666 genes. A number of representative novel gene models and alternatively spliced genes were validated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and sequencing of the generated amplicons. Conclusions We have developed novel and efficient strategies to identify alternatively spliced genes and incorrect gene models based on RNA-Seq data. Our study identified hundreds of alternatively spliced genes in F. graminearum and for the first time indicated that alternative splicing is developmentally regulated in filamentous fungi. In addition, hundreds of incorrect predicted gene models were identified and revised and thousands of nTARs were discovered in our study, which will be helpful for the future genomic and transcriptomic studies in F. graminearum. PMID:23324402

  8. Aberration measurement of projection optics in lithographic tools by use of an alternating phase-shifting mask

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Fan; Wang Xiangzhao; Ma Mingying; Zhang Dongqing; Shi Weijie; Hu Jianming

    2006-01-10

    As a critical dimension shrinks, the degradation in image quality caused by wavefront aberrations of projection optics in lithographic tools becomes a serious problem. It is necessary to establish a technique for a fast and accurate in situ aberration measurement. We introduce what we believe to be a novel technique for characterizing the aberrations of projection optics by using an alternating phase-shifting mask. The even aberrations, such as spherical aberration and astigmatism, and the odd aberrations, such as coma, are extracted from focus shifts and image displacements of the phase-shifted pattern, respectively. The focus shifts and the image displacements are measured by a transmission image sensor. The simulation results show that, compared with the accuracy of the previous straightforward measurement technique, the accuracy of the coma measurement increases by more than 30% and the accuracy of the spherical-aberration measurement increases by approximately 20%.

  9. PTBP-dependent PSD-95 and CamKII? alternative splicing in the lens

    PubMed Central

    Nandanoor, Anoop; Kasinathan, Chinnaswamy

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Parallels described between neurons and lens fiber cells include detailed similarities in sub-cellular structures that increasingly show shared expression of genes involved in the construction and function of these structures in neurons. Intriguingly, associated modes of molecular regulation of these genes that had been thought to distinguish neurons have been identified in the lens as well. Both elongated cell types form membrane protrusions with similar size, shape, and spacing that exclude microtubules, contain F-actin, and are coated with the clathrin/AP-2 adaptor. Lenses express glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors with signaling and channel proteins shown to act together at neuronal membranes. Postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95) and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII?) expression and functions illustrate the integration of aspects of neuronal molecular and cell biology and were investigated here in the lens. Methods Immunofluorescence, immunoblot, and RT–PCR methods were used to assess protein expression and alternative transcript splicing. Results We showed the essential dendritic spine scaffold protein PSD-95 is expressed in lenses and demonstrated lens PSD-95 transcripts undergo polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTBP)-dependent alternative splicing of its pivotal exon 18 required to avoid nonsense-mediated decay, and showed PTBP-dependent alternative splicing of CaMKII? transcripts in the lens. The PSD-95 protein was observed at fiber cell membranes overlapping with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and ?-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) glutamate and GABA receptor proteins, tyrosine phosphatase STEP, CaMKII?, the Ca(V)1.3 calcium channel, and clathrin, which were previously identified at lens fiber cell membranes. During neurogenesis, miR-124 is expressed that suppresses PTBP1 and promotes these splicing events. miR-124 is also expressed in mammalian lenses and upregulated during lens regeneration in amphibians, consistent with previous demonstrations of PTBP1,2 and PTBP-dependent PTBP2 exon 10 splicing in rodent lenses. Conclusions Findings of this dendritic spine scaffold protein and conservation of its key mode of molecular regulation in the lens provides further evidence that key aspects of the neuron morphogenetic program are shared with the lens. PMID:25540577

  10. Alternative splicing by participation of the group II intron ORF in extremely halotolerant and alkaliphilic Oceanobacillus iheyensis.

    PubMed

    Chee, Gab-Joo; Takami, Hideto

    2011-01-01

    Group II introns inserted into genes often undergo splicing at unexpected sites, and participate in the transcription of host genes. We identified five copies of a group II intron, designated Oi.Int, in the genome of an extremely halotolerant and alkaliphilic bacillus, Oceanobacillus iheyensis. The Oi.Int4 differs from the Oi.Int3 at four bases. The ligated exons of the Oi.Int4 could not be detected by RT-PCR assays in vivo or in vitro although group II introns can generally self-splice in vitro without the involvement of an intron-encoded open reading frame (ORF). In the Oi.Int4 mutants with base substitutions within the ORF, ligated exons were detected by in vitro self-splicing. It was clear that the ligation of exons during splicing is affected by the sequence of the intron-encoded ORF since the splice sites corresponded to the joining sites of the intron. In addition, the mutant introns showed unexpected multiple products with alternative 5' splice sites. These findings imply that alternative 5' splicing which causes a functional change of ligated exons presumably has influenced past adaptations of O. iheyensis to various environmental changes. PMID:21487203

  11. ASPIC: a web resource for alternative splicing prediction and transcript isoforms characterization.

    PubMed

    Castrignanò, Tiziana; Rizzi, Raffaella; Talamo, Ivano Giuseppe; De Meo, Paolo D'Onorio; Anselmo, Anna; Bonizzoni, Paola; Pesole, Graziano

    2006-07-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is now emerging as a major mechanism contributing to the expansion of the transcriptome and proteome complexity of multicellular organisms. The fact that a single gene locus may give rise to multiple mRNAs and protein isoforms, showing both major and subtle structural variations, is an exceptionally versatile tool in the optimization of the coding capacity of the eukaryotic genome. The huge and continuously increasing number of genome and transcript sequences provides an essential information source for the computational detection of genes AS pattern. However, much of this information is not optimally or comprehensively used in gene annotation by current genome annotation pipelines. We present here a web resource implementing the ASPIC algorithm which we developed previously for the investigation of AS of user submitted genes, based on comparative analysis of available transcript and genome data from a variety of species. The ASPIC web resource provides graphical and tabular views of the splicing patterns of all full-length mRNA isoforms compatible with the detected splice sites of genes under investigation as well as relevant structural and functional annotation. The ASPIC web resource-available at http://www.caspur.it/ASPIC/--is dynamically interconnected with the Ensembl and Unigene databases and also implements an upload facility. PMID:16845044

  12. ASPIC: a web resource for alternative splicing prediction and transcript isoforms characterization

    PubMed Central

    Castrignanò, Tiziana; Rizzi, Raffaella; Talamo, Ivano Giuseppe; De Meo, Paolo D'Onorio; Anselmo, Anna; Bonizzoni, Paola; Pesole, Graziano

    2006-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is now emerging as a major mechanism contributing to the expansion of the transcriptome and proteome complexity of multicellular organisms. The fact that a single gene locus may give rise to multiple mRNAs and protein isoforms, showing both major and subtle structural variations, is an exceptionally versatile tool in the optimization of the coding capacity of the eukaryotic genome. The huge and continuously increasing number of genome and transcript sequences provides an essential information source for the computational detection of genes AS pattern. However, much of this information is not optimally or comprehensively used in gene annotation by current genome annotation pipelines. We present here a web resource implementing the ASPIC algorithm which we developed previously for the investigation of AS of user submitted genes, based on comparative analysis of available transcript and genome data from a variety of species. The ASPIC web resource provides graphical and tabular views of the splicing patterns of all full-length mRNA isoforms compatible with the detected splice sites of genes under investigation as well as relevant structural and functional annotation. The ASPIC web resource—available at —is dynamically interconnected with the Ensembl and Unigene databases and also implements an upload facility. PMID:16845044

  13. Detection of recurrent alternative splicing switches in tumor samples reveals novel signatures of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sebestyén, Endre; Zawisza, Micha?; Eyras, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    The determination of the alternative splicing isoforms expressed in cancer is fundamental for the development of tumor-specific molecular targets for prognosis and therapy, but it is hindered by the heterogeneity of tumors and the variability across patients. We developed a new computational method, robust to biological and technical variability, which identifies significant transcript isoform changes across multiple samples. We applied this method to more than 4000 samples from the The Cancer Genome Atlas project to obtain novel splicing signatures that are predictive for nine different cancer types, and find a specific signature for basal-like breast tumors involving the tumor-driver CTNND1. Additionally, our method identifies 244 isoform switches, for which the change occurs in the most abundant transcript. Some of these switches occur in known tumor drivers, including PPARG, CCND3, RALGDS, MITF, PRDM1, ABI1 and MYH11, for which the switch implies a change in the protein product. Moreover, some of the switches cannot be described with simple splicing events. Surprisingly, isoform switches are independent of somatic mutations, except for the tumor-suppressor FBLN2 and the oncogene MYH11. Our method reveals novel signatures of cancer in terms of transcript isoforms specifically expressed in tumors, providing novel potential molecular targets for prognosis and therapy. Data and software are available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1061917 and https://bitbucket.org/regulatorygenomicsupf/iso-ktsp. PMID:25578962

  14. Multiple molecular determinants for allosteric modulation of alternatively spliced AMPA receptors.

    PubMed

    Quirk, Jennifer C; Nisenbaum, Eric S

    2003-11-26

    Positive allosteric regulation of glutamate AMPA receptors involves conformational changes that can attenuate receptor desensitization and enhance ion flux through the channel pore. Many allosteric modulators (e.g., cyclothiazide and aniracetam) preferentially affect the flip (i) or flop (o) alternatively spliced isoform of AMPA receptors, implicating residues in the flip-flop domain as critical determinants of splice variant sensitivity. Indeed, previous mutational analyses have demonstrated that the differential sensitivity to cyclothiazide and aniracetam depends on a single amino acid, Ser (flip) and Asn (flop), suggesting that this residue may be solely responsible for differences in modulation of AMPA receptor isoforms. The present studies tested this hypothesis by investigating the molecular determinants of modulation of AMPA receptor splice variants by a structurally distinct compound, LY404187, which displays strikingly different and opposing kinetics of allosteric regulation characterized by a time-dependent enhancement in potentiation of homomeric GluR1-GluR4i and a time-dependent reduction in potentiation of GluR1-GluR4o. Site-directed mutagenesis of residues in the flip-flop domain of GluR2 revealed that, although exchange of Asn775 for Ser in GluR2o was sufficient to confer the GluR2i phenotype of potentiation, the corresponding mutation, Ser775Asn, in GluR2i did not impart the GluR2o response. In fact, the GluR2o kinetics of modulation depended on a novel set of substitutions in GluR2i, including Thr765Asn, Pro766Ala, and Val779Leu in combination with Ser775Asn. Collectively, these results show that, unlike cyclothiazide and aniracetam, the residues that confer splice variant differences in modulation by LY404187 are not identical and indicate that allosteric regulation of AMPA receptors can arise from multiple molecular determinants. PMID:14645491

  15. Differential regulation of alternative 3{prime} splicing of {epsilon} messenger RNA variants

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Sanchez, D.; Zhang, K.; Saxon, A.

    1995-08-15

    Alternative 3{prime} splicing of the one active human {epsilon} heavy chain gene results in variants of {epsilon} mRNA encoding distinct IgE proteins. The same relative amounts of these {epsilon} mRNA variants were produced by non-atopic donor B cells when driven in a variety of T-dependent or T-independent systems. The most abundant variants were those for classic secreted {epsilon} and a novel secreted form (CH4-M2{double_prime}). In contrast, cells from subjects with high levels of serum IgE secondary to parasitic infection or atopy spontaneously produced higher relative levels of the CH4-M2{prime} {epsilon} mRNA variant, lower relative amounts of both the membrane and CH4-M2{double_prime} secreted variants, and very low levels of the CH4{prime}-CH5 variant. The existence of and corresponding changes in levels of the CH4-M2{prime}-enclosed secreted protein were demonstrated. IL-10 induced this same differential expression of {epsilon} splice variants in vitro when used to costimulate IL-4 plus CD40-driven B cells and could differentially enhance the production of CH4-M2{prime} protein by established IgE-secreting cell lines. Inhibition of IgE by cross-linking the low affinity IgE receptor (CD23) decreased the levels of {epsilon} mRNA and resulted in a distinct pattern of {epsilon} mRNA characterized by a dramatic decrease in CH4-M2{prime} splice variant. IL-6, IL-2, or IFN-{gamma} did not change the {epsilon} mRNA pattern. Overall, the absolute and relative amounts of the different {epsilon} mRNA splice variants produced appear to be controlled in a differentiation-related fashion.

  16. The alternative splicing regulator Tra2b is required for somitogenesis and regulates splicing of an inhibitory Wnt11b isoform.

    PubMed

    Dichmann, Darwin S; Walentek, Peter; Harland, Richard M

    2015-02-01

    Alternative splicing is pervasive in vertebrates, yet little is known about most isoforms or their regulation. transformer-2b (tra2b) encodes a splicing regulator whose endogenous function is poorly understood. Tra2b knockdown in Xenopus results in embryos with multiple defects, including defective somitogenesis. Using RNA sequencing, we identify 142 splice changes (mostly intron retention and exon skipping), 89% of which are not in current annotations. A previously undescribed isoform of wnt11b retains the last intron, resulting in a truncated ligand (Wnt11b-short). We show that this isoform acts as a dominant-negative ligand in cardiac gene induction and pronephric tubule formation. To determine the contribution of Wnt11b-short to the tra2b phenotype, we induce retention of intron 4 in wnt11b, which recapitulates the failure to form somites but not other tra2b morphant defects. This alternative splicing of a Wnt ligand adds intricacy to a complex signaling pathway and highlights intron retention as a regulatory mechanism. PMID:25620705

  17. Drosophila Muscleblind Is Involved in troponin T Alternative Splicing and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Vicente-Crespo, Marta; Pascual, Maya; Fernandez-Costa, Juan M.; Garcia-Lopez, Amparo; Monferrer, Lidón; Miranda, M. Eugenia; Zhou, Lei; Artero, Ruben D.

    2008-01-01

    Background Muscleblind-like proteins (MBNL) have been involved in a developmental switch in the use of defined cassette exons. Such transition fails in the CTG repeat expansion disease myotonic dystrophy due, in part, to sequestration of MBNL proteins by CUG repeat RNA. Four protein isoforms (MblA-D) are coded by the unique Drosophila muscleblind gene. Methodology/Principal Findings We used evolutionary, genetic and cell culture approaches to study muscleblind (mbl) function in flies. The evolutionary study showed that the MblC protein isoform was readily conserved from nematods to Drosophila, which suggests that it performs the most ancestral muscleblind functions. Overexpression of MblC in the fly eye precursors led to an externally rough eye morphology. This phenotype was used in a genetic screen to identify five dominant suppressors and 13 dominant enhancers including Drosophila CUG-BP1 homolog aret, exon junction complex components tsunagi and Aly, and pro-apoptotic genes Traf1 and reaper. We further investigated Muscleblind implication in apoptosis and splicing regulation. We found missplicing of troponin T in muscleblind mutant pupae and confirmed Muscleblind ability to regulate mouse fast skeletal muscle Troponin T (TnnT3) minigene splicing in human HEK cells. MblC overexpression in the wing imaginal disc activated apoptosis in a spatially restricted manner. Bioinformatics analysis identified a conserved FKRP motif, weakly resembling a sumoylation target site, in the MblC-specific sequence. Site-directed mutagenesis of the motif revealed no change in activity of mutant MblC on TnnT3 minigene splicing or aberrant binding to CUG repeat RNA, but altered the ability of the protein to form perinuclear aggregates and enhanced cell death-inducing activity of MblC overexpression. Conclusions/Significance Taken together our genetic approach identify cellular processes influenced by Muscleblind function, whereas in vivo and cell culture experiments define Drosophila troponin T as a new Muscleblind target, reveal a potential involvement of MblC in programmed cell death and recognize the FKRP motif as a putative regulator of MblC function and/or subcellular location in the cell. PMID:18286170

  18. Aberrant transcript produced by a splice donor site deletion in the TECTA gene is associated with autosomal dominant deafness in a Brazilian family.

    PubMed

    Lezirovitz, Karina; Batissoco, Ana C; Lima, Fernanda T; Auricchio, Maria T B M; Nonose, Renata W; dos Santos, Simone R; Guilherme, Luiza; Oiticica, Jeanne; Mingroni-Netto, Regina C

    2012-12-15

    We ascertained a Brazilian family with nine individuals affected by autosomal dominant nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss. The bilateral hearing loss affected mainly mid-high frequencies, was apparently stable with an early onset. Microsatellites close to the DFNA8/DFNA12 locus, which harbors the TECTA gene, showed significant multipoint lod scores (3.2) close to marker D11S4107. Sequencing of the exons and exon-intron boundaries of the TECTA gene in one affected subject revealed the deletion c.5383+5delGTGA in the 5' end of intron 16, that includes the last two bases of the donor splice site consensus sequence. This mutation segregates with deafness within the family. To date, 33 different TECTA mutations associated with autossomal dominant hearing loss have been described. Among them is the mutation reported herein, first described by Hildebrand et al. (2011) in a UK family. The audioprofiles from the UK and Brazilian families were similar. In order to investigate the transcripts produced by the mutated allele, we performed cDNA analysis of a lymphoblastoid cell line from an affected heterozygote with the c.5383+5delGTGA and a noncarrier from the same family. The analysis allowed us to identify an aberrant transcript with skipping of exon 16, without affecting the reading frame. One of the dominant TECTA mutations already described, a synonymous substitution in exon 16 (c.5331Gsplicing, resulting in an aberrant transcript lacking exon 16. Despite the difference in the DNA level, both the synonymous substitution in exon 16 (c.5331Gsplicing of exon 16, leading to its skipping. At the protein level they would have the same effect, an in-frame deletion of 37 amino-acids (p.S1758Y/G1759_N1795del) probably leading to an impaired function of the ZP domain. Thus, like the TECTA missense mutations associated with dominant hearing loss, the c.5383+5delGTGA mutation does not have an inactivating effect on the protein. PMID:22995349

  19. Aging and Loss of Circulating 17?-Estradiol Alters the Alternative Splicing of ER? in the Female Rat Brain.

    PubMed

    Shults, Cody L; Pinceti, Elena; Rao, Yathindar S; Pak, Toni R

    2015-11-01

    Loss of circulating 17?-estradiol (E2) that occurs during menopause can have detrimental effects on cognitive function. The efficacy of hormone replacement therapy declines as women become farther removed from the menopausal transition, yet the molecular mechanisms underlying this age-related switch in E2 efficacy are unknown. We hypothesized that aging and varying lengths of E2 deprivation alters the ratio of alternatively spliced estrogen receptor (ER)? isoforms in the brain of female rats. Further, we tested whether changes in global transcriptional activity and splicing kinetics regulate the alternative splicing of ER?. Our results revealed brain region-specific changes in ER? alternative splicing in both aging and E2-deprivation paradigms and showed that ER? could mediate E2-induced alternative splicing. Global transcriptional activity, as measured by phosphorylated RNA polymerase II, was also regulated by age and E2 in specific brain regions. Finally, we show that inhibition of topoisomerase I resulted in increased ER?2 splice variant expression. PMID:26295370

  20. Functional implications of structural predictions for alternative splice proteins expressed in Her2/neu-induced breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Menon, Rajasree; Roy, Ambrish; Mukherjee, Srayanta; Belkin, Saveliy; Zhang, Yang; Omenn, Gilbert S

    2011-12-01

    Alternative splicing allows a single gene to generate multiple mRNA transcripts, which can be translated into functionally diverse proteins. However, experimentally determined structures of protein splice isoforms are rare, and homology modeling methods are poor at predicting atomic-level structural differences because of high sequence identity. Here we exploit the state-of-the-art structure prediction method I-TASSER to analyze the structural and functional consequences of alternative splicing of proteins differentially expressed in a breast cancer model. We first successfully benchmarked the I-TASSER pipeline for structure modeling of all seven pairs of protein splice isoforms, which are known to have experimentally solved structures. We then modeled three cancer-related variant pairs reported to have opposite functions. In each pair, we observed structural differences in regions where the presence or absence of a motif can directly influence the distinctive functions of the variants. Finally, we applied the method to five splice variants overexpressed in mouse Her2/neu mammary tumor: anxa6, calu, cdc42, ptbp1, and tax1bp3. Despite >75% sequence identity between the variants, structural differences were observed in biologically important regions of these protein pairs. These results demonstrate the feasibility of integrating proteomic analysis with structure-based conformational predictions of differentially expressed alternative splice variants in cancers and other conditions. PMID:22003824

  1. Alternative splicing of the tuberous sclerosis 2 (TSC2) gene in human and mouse tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Lin; Sterner, C.; Maheshwar, M.M.

    1995-06-10

    The recently isolated gene for tuberous sclerosis 2 (TSC2) encodes a 5.5.kb transcript that is widely expressed. The TSC2 gene product, named tuberin, is a 1784-amino-acid protein that shows a small stretch of homology to the GTPase activating protein rap1GAP. We have detected a novel variant of the TSC2 mRNA lacking 129 nucleotides, predicting an in-frame deletion of 43 amino acids spanning codons 946-988 of tuberin. This 129-bp deletion precisely corresponds to exon 25 of the TSC2 gene suggesting that alternative splicing leads to production of two forms of transcripts designated isoforms 1 and 2. Further molecular analysis revealed a third isoform exhibiting a deletion of 44 amino acids spanning codons 946-989 of tuberin. Amino acid 989 is a Ser residue encoded by the first codon of exon 26. The two isoforms also exist in newborn and adult mouse tissues, reinforcing the potential functional importance of these alternatively spliced products. These alternative isoforms should have implications for efforts aimed at identifying mutations in TSC patients. The distinct polypeptides encoded by the TSC2 gene may have different targets as well as functions involved in the regulation of cell growth. 26 refs., 4 figs.

  2. The consensus sequence of FAMLF alternative splice variants is overexpressed in undifferentiated hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, W L; Luo, D F; Gao, C; Ding, Y; Wang, S Y

    2015-07-01

    The familial acute myeloid leukemia related factor gene (FAMLF) was previously identified from a familial AML subtractive cDNA library and shown to undergo alternative splicing. This study used real-time quantitative PCR to investigate the expression of the FAMLF alternative-splicing transcript consensus sequence (FAMLF-CS) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 119 patients with de novo acute leukemia (AL) and 104 healthy controls, as well as in CD34+ cells from 12 AL patients and 10 healthy donors. A 429-bp fragment from a novel splicing variant of FAMLF was obtained, and a 363-bp consensus sequence was targeted to quantify total FAMLF expression. Kruskal-Wallis, Nemenyi, Spearman's correlation, and Mann-Whitney U-tests were used to analyze the data. FAMLF-CS expression in PBMCs from AL patients and CD34+ cells from AL patients and controls was significantly higher than in control PBMCs (P < 0.0001). Moreover, FAMLF-CS expression in PBMCs from the AML group was positively correlated with red blood cell count (rs =0.317, P=0.006), hemoglobin levels (rs = 0.210, P = 0.049), and percentage of peripheral blood blasts (rs = 0.256, P = 0.027), but inversely correlated with hemoglobin levels in the control group (rs = -0.391, P < 0.0001). AML patients with high CD34+ expression showed significantly higher FAMLF-CS expression than those with low CD34+ expression (P = 0.041). Our results showed that FAMLF is highly expressed in both normal and malignant immature hematopoietic cells, but that expression is lower in normal mature PBMCs. PMID:26083996

  3. Loss of Pnn expression attenuates expression levels of SR family splicing factors and modulates alternative pre-mRNA splicing in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu Yali; Ouyang Pin . E-mail: ouyang@mail.cgu.edu.tw

    2006-03-10

    SR and SR-related proteins have been implicated as trans-acting factors that play an important role in splice selection and are involved at specific stages of spliceosome formation. A well-established property of SR protein splicing factors is their ability to influence selection of alternative splice sites in a concentration-dependent manner. Identification of molecules that regulate SR family protein expression is therefore of vital importance in RNA biology. Here we report that depletion of Pnn expression, a SR-related protein with functions involved in pre-mRNA splicing and mRNA export, induces reduced expression of a subset of cellular proteins, especially that of SR family proteins, including SC35, SRm300, SRp55, and SRp40, but not that of other nuclear proteins, such as p53, Mdm2, and ki67. Knocking down Pnn expression was achieved in vitro by siRNA transfection. Expression levels of SR and SR-related proteins in Pnn-depleted cells as compared to those in control cells were evaluated by immunofluorescent staining and Western blot with specific antibodies. In addition, we also demonstrate that loss of Pnn expression could modulate splice site selection of model reporter gene in vivo. Our finding is significant in terms of regulation of SR protein cellular concentration because it reveals that Pnn may play a general role in the control of the cellular amount of family SR proteins through down-regulation of its own expression, thereby providing us with a better understanding of the cellular mechanism by which Pnn fulfills its biological function.

  4. rMATS: Robust and flexible detection of differential alternative splicing from replicate RNA-Seq data

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shihao; Park, Juw Won; Lin, Lan; Henry, Michael D.; Wu, Ying Nian; Zhou, Qing; Xing, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Ultra-deep RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) has become a powerful approach for genome-wide analysis of pre-mRNA alternative splicing. We previously developed multivariate analysis of transcript splicing (MATS), a statistical method for detecting differential alternative splicing between two RNA-Seq samples. Here we describe a new statistical model and computer program, replicate MATS (rMATS), designed for detection of differential alternative splicing from replicate RNA-Seq data. rMATS uses a hierarchical model to simultaneously account for sampling uncertainty in individual replicates and variability among replicates. In addition to the analysis of unpaired replicates, rMATS also includes a model specifically designed for paired replicates between sample groups. The hypothesis-testing framework of rMATS is flexible and can assess the statistical significance over any user-defined magnitude of splicing change. The performance of rMATS is evaluated by the analysis of simulated and real RNA-Seq data. rMATS outperformed two existing methods for replicate RNA-Seq data in all simulation settings, and RT-PCR yielded a high validation rate (94%) in an RNA-Seq dataset of prostate cancer cell lines. Our data also provide guiding principles for designing RNA-Seq studies of alternative splicing. We demonstrate that it is essential to incorporate biological replicates in the study design. Of note, pooling RNAs or merging RNA-Seq data from multiple replicates is not an effective approach to account for variability, and the result is particularly sensitive to outliers. The rMATS source code is freely available at rnaseq-mats.sourceforge.net/. As the popularity of RNA-Seq continues to grow, we expect rMATS will be useful for studies of alternative splicing in diverse RNA-Seq projects. PMID:25480548

  5. Structural and functional analyses of Barth syndrome-causing mutations and alternative splicing in the tafazzin acyltransferase domain

    PubMed Central

    Hijikata, Atsushi; Yura, Kei; Ohara, Osamu; Go, Mitiko

    2015-01-01

    Tafazzin is a mitochondrial phospholipid transacylase, and its mutations cause Barth syndrome (BTHS). Human tafazzin gene produces four distinct alternatively spliced transcripts. To understand the molecular mechanisms of tafazzin deficiency, we performed an atomic resolution analysis of the influence of the BTHS mutations and of alternative splicing on the structure and function of tafazzin. From the three-dimensional (3D) homology modeling of tafazzin, we identified candidate amino acid residues that contribute to cardiolipin binding and to mitochondrial membrane associations that facilitate acyl-transfer reactions. Primate specific exon 5, which is alternatively spliced, is predicted to correspond to an intrinsically unstructured region in the protein. We proposed that this region should change the substrate-binding affinity and/or contribute to primate-specific molecular interactions. Exon 7, another alternatively spliced exon, encodes a region forming a part of the putative substrate-binding cleft, suggesting that the gene products lacking exon 7 will lose their substrate-binding ability. We demonstrate a clear localization of the BTHS mutations at residues responsible for membrane association, substrate binding, and the conformational stability of tafazzin. These findings provide new insights into the function of defective tafazzin and the pathogenesis of BTHS at the level of protein 3D structure and the evolution of alternatively spliced exons in primates. PMID:25941633

  6. Quantitative evaluation of alternatively spliced mRNA isoforms by label-free real-time plasmonic sensing.

    PubMed

    Huertas, César S; Carrascosa, L G; Bonnal, S; Valcárcel, J; Lechuga, L M

    2016-04-15

    Alternative splicing of mRNA precursors enables cells to generate different protein outputs from the same gene depending on their developmental or homeostatic status. Its deregulation is strongly linked to disease onset and progression. Current methodologies for monitoring alternative splicing demand elaborate procedures and often present difficulties in discerning between closely related isoforms, e.g. due to cross-hybridization during their detection. Herein, we report a general methodology using a Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) biosensor for label-free monitoring of alternative splicing events in real-time, without any cDNA synthesis or PCR amplification requirements. We applied this methodology to RNA isolated from HeLa cells for the quantification of alternatively spliced isoforms of the Fas gene, involved in cancer progression through regulation of programmed cell death. We demonstrate that our methodology is isoform-specific, with virtually no cross-hybridization, achieving limits of detection (LODs) in the picoMolar (pM) range. Similar results were obtained for the detection of the BCL-X gene mRNA isoforms. The results were independently validated by RT-qPCR, with excellent concordance in the determination of isoform ratios. The simplicity and robustness of this biosensor technology can greatly facilitate the exploration of alternative splicing biomarkers in disease diagnosis and therapy. PMID:26599481

  7. Detection of alternative splice and gene duplication by RNA sequencing in Japanese flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenji; Wang, Jing; You, Feng; Ma, Liman; Yang, Xiao; Gao, Jinning; He, Yan; Qi, Jie; Yu, Haiyang; Wang, Zhigang; Wang, Xubo; Wu, Zhihao; Zhang, Quanqi

    2014-12-01

    Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) is one of the economic important fish in China. Sexual dimorphism, especially the different growth rates and body sizes between two sexes, makes this fish a good model to investigate mechanisms responsible for such dimorphism for both fundamental questions in evolution and applied topics in aquaculture. However, the lack of "omics" data has hindered the process. The recent advent of RNA-sequencing technology provides a robust tool to further study characteristics of genomes of nonmodel species. Here, we performed de novo transcriptome sequencing for a double haploid Japanese flounder individual using Illumina sequencing. A single lane of paired-end sequencing produced more than 27 million reads. These reads were assembled into 107,318 nonredundant transcripts, half of which (51,563; 48.1%) were annotated by blastx to public protein database. A total of 1051 genes that had potential alternative splicings were detected by Chrysalis implemented in Trinity software. Four of 10 randomly picked genes were verified truly containing alternative splicing by cloning and Sanger sequencing. Notably, using a doubled haploid Japanese flounder individual allow us to analyze gene duplicates. In total, 3940 "single-nucleotide polymorphisms" were detected form 1859 genes, which may have happened gene duplicates. This study lays the foundation for structural and functional genomics studies in Japanese flounder. PMID:25512620

  8. Multiple non-coding exons and alternative splicing in the mouse Mas protooncogene.

    PubMed

    Alenina, Natalia; Böhme, Ilka; Bader, Michael; Walther, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    The Mas protooncogene encodes a G protein-coupled receptor with the common seven transmembrane domains, expressed mainly in the testis and brain. We provided evidence that Mas is a functional angiotensin-(1-7) receptor and can interact with the angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor. The gene is transcriptionally regulated during development in the brain and testis, but its structure was unresolved. In this study we used 5'- and 3'-RACE, RT-PCR, and RNase-protection assays to elucidate the complete Mas gene structure and organization. We identified 12 exons in the mouse Mas gene with 11 in the 5' untranslated mRNA, which can be alternatively spliced. We also showed that Mas transcription can start from 4 tissue-specific promoters, whereby testis-specific Mas mRNA is transcribed from two upstream promoters, and the expression of Mas in the brain starts from two downstream promoters. Alternative splicing and multiple promoter usage result in at least 12 Mas transcripts in which different 5' untranslated regions are fused to a common coding sequence. Moreover, termination of Mas mRNA is regulated by two different polyadenylation signals. The gene spans approximately 27 kb, and the longest detected mRNA contains 2,451 bp. Thus, our results characterize the Mas protooncogene as the gene with the most complex gene structure of all described members of the gene family coding for G protein-coupled receptors. PMID:26003294

  9. A novel mechanism of myostatin regulation by its alternative splicing variant during myogenesis in avian species.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sangsu; Song, Yan; Ahn, Jinsoo; Kim, Eunsoo; Chen, Paula; Yang, Shujin; Suh, Yeunsu; Lee, Kichoon

    2015-11-15

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a key negative regulator of muscle growth and development, and an increase of muscle mass is achieved by inhibiting MSTN signaling. In the current study, five alternative splicing isoforms of MSTN mRNAs in avian species were identified in various tissues. Among these five, three truncated forms of myostatin, MSTN-B, -C, and -E created premature stop codons and produced partial MSTN prodomains encoded from exon 1. MSTN-B is the second dominant isoform following full-length MSTN-A, and their expression was dynamically regulated during muscle development of chicken, turkey, and quail in vivo and in vitro. To clarify the function of MSTN-B, two stable cell lines of quail myoblasts (QM7) were generated to overexpress MSTN-A or MSTN-B. Interestingly, MSTN-B promoted both cell proliferation and differentiation similar to the function of the MSTN prodomain to counteract the negative role of MSTN on myogenesis. The coimmunoprecipitation assay revealed that MSTN-B binds to MSTN-A and reduces the generation of mature MSTN. Furthermore, the current study demonstrated that the partial prodomain encoded from exon 1 is critical for binding of MSTN-B to MSTN-A. Altogether, these data imply that alternative splicing isoforms of MSTN could negatively regulate pro-myostatin processing in muscle cells and prevent MSTN-mediated inhibition of myogenesis in avian species. PMID:26354750

  10. A novel splice site mutation in SMARCAL1 results in aberrant exon definition in a child with schimke immunoosseous dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Clinton; Hunley, Tracy E; Guo, Yan; Cortez, David

    2015-10-01

    Schimke Immunoosseous Dysplasia (SIOD) is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder of childhood characterized by spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and renal failure, T-cell immunodeficiency, and cancer in certain instances. Approximately half of patients with SIOD are reported to have biallelic mutations in SMARCAL1 (SWI/SNF-related matrix-associated actin-dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily a-like 1), which encodes a DNA translocase that localizes to sites of DNA replication and repairs damaged replication forks. We present a novel mutation (NM_014140.3:c.2070+2insT) that results in defective SMARCAL1 mRNA splicing in a child with SIOD. This mutation, within the donor site of intron 12, results in the skipping of exon 12, which encodes part of a critical hinge region connecting the two lobes of the ATPase domain. This mutation was not recognized as deleterious by diagnostic SMARCAL1 sequencing, but discovered through next generation sequencing and found to result in absent SMARCAL1 expression in patient-derived lymphoblasts. The splicing defect caused by this mutation supports the concept of exon definition. Furthermore, it illustrates the need to broaden the search for SMARCAL1 mutations in patients with SIOD lacking coding sequence variants. PMID:25943327

  11. Mask roughness induced LER control and mitigation: aberrations sensitivity study and alternate illumination scheme

    SciTech Connect

    McClinton, Brittany M.; Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2011-03-11

    Here we conduct a mask-roughness-induced line-edge-roughness (LER) aberrations sensitivity study both as a random distribution amongst the first 16 Fringe Zernikes (for overall aberration levels of 0.25, 0.50, and 0.75nm rms) as well as an individual aberrations sensitivity matrix over the first 37 Fringe Zernikes. Full 2D aerial image modeling for an imaging system with NA = 0.32 was done for both the 22-nm and 16-nm half-pitch nodes on a rough mask with a replicated surface roughness (RSR) of 100 pm and a correlation length of 32 nm at the nominal extreme-ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) wavelength of 13.5nm. As the ideal RSR value for commercialization of EUVL is 50 pm and under, and furthermore as has been shown elsewhere, a correlation length of 32 nm of roughness on the mask sits on the peak LER value for an NA = 0.32 imaging optic, these mask roughness values and consequently the aberration sensitivity study presented here, represent a worst-case scenario. The illumination conditions were chosen based on the possible candidates for the 22-nm and 16-nm half-pitch nodes, respectively. In the 22-nm case, a disk illumination setting of {sigma} = 0.50 was used, and for the 16-nm case, crosspole illumination with {sigma} = 0.10 at an optimum offset of dx = 0 and dy = .67 in sigma space. In examining how to mitigate mask roughness induced LER, we considered an alternate illumination scheme whereby a traditional dipole's angular spectrum is extended in the direction parallel to the line-and-space mask absorber pattern to represent a 'strip'. While this illumination surprisingly provides minimal improvement to the LER as compared to several alternate illumination schemes, the overall imaging quality in terms of image-log-slope (ILS) and contrast is improved.

  12. Differential splicing and alternative polyadenylation generates distinct NCAM transcripts and proteins in the mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Barbas, J A; Chaix, J C; Steinmetz, M; Goridis, C

    1988-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) exists in at least three different protein isoforms which are selectively expressed by different cell types and at different stages of development. They are encoded by four to five different transcripts that are derived from a single gene. Here we report the exon--intron structure of the 3' part of the mouse NCAM gene. This region contains six exons. The 5' exon is constitutively expressed in all four prominent size classes of NCAM mRNAs detected in the mouse brain. The second exon contains the poly(A) addition sites for the two smaller mRNAs of 5.2 and 2.9 kb which differ in the length of their 3' non-coding regions and seem both to encode NCAM-120. This second exon is absent in the largest 7.4 kb transcript which encodes NCAM-180; in the 6.7 kb mRNA, which appears to code for NCAM-140, the second and the fifth exon have been spliced out. This data explains how the prominent four transcripts and three protein isoforms of mouse NCAM are generated from a single gene. The alternatively spliced fifth exon is surrounded by inverted repeats potentially capable of secondary structure formation, that may sequester this exon in a loop. Images PMID:3396534

  13. Differential gene expression and alternative splicing between diploid and tetraploid watermelon.

    PubMed

    Saminathan, Thangasamy; Nimmakayala, Padma; Manohar, Sumanth; Malkaram, Sridhar; Almeida, Aldo; Cantrell, Robert; Tomason, Yan; Abburi, Lavanya; Rahman, Mohammad A; Vajja, Venkata G; Khachane, Amit; Kumar, Brajendra; Rajasimha, Harsha K; Levi, Amnon; Wehner, Todd; Reddy, Umesh K

    2015-03-01

    The exploitation of synthetic polyploids for producing seedless fruits is well known in watermelon. Tetraploid progenitors of triploid watermelon plants, compared with their diploid counterparts, exhibit wide phenotypic differences. Although many factors modulate alternative splicing (AS) in plants, the effects of autopolyploidization on AS are still unknown. In this study, we used tissues of leaf, stem, and fruit of diploid and tetraploid sweet watermelon to understand changes in gene expression and the occurrence of AS. RNA-sequencing analysis was performed along with reverse transcription quantitative PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE)-PCR to demonstrate changes in expression and splicing. All vegetative tissues except fruit showed an increased level of AS in the tetraploid watermelon throughout the growth period. The ploidy levels of diploids and the tetraploid were confirmed using a ploidy analyser. We identified 5362 and 1288 genes that were up- and downregulated, respectively, in tetraploid as compared with diploid plants. We further confirmed that 22 genes underwent AS events across tissues, indicating possibilities of generating different protein isoforms with altered functions of important transcription factors and transporters. Arginine biosynthesis, chlorophyllide synthesis, GDP mannose biosynthesis, trehalose biosynthesis, and starch and sucrose degradation pathways were upregulated in autotetraploids. Phloem protein 2, chloroplastic PGR5-like protein, zinc-finger protein, fructokinase-like 2, MYB transcription factor, and nodulin MtN21 showed AS in fruit tissues. These results should help in developing high-quality seedless watermelon and provide additional transcriptomic information related to other cucurbits. PMID:25520388

  14. Chemical Modifications Mark Alternatively Spliced and Uncapped Messenger RNAs in Arabidopsis[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Vandivier, Lee E.; Silverman, Ian M.; Wang, Li-San

    2015-01-01

    Posttranscriptional chemical modification of RNA bases is a widespread and physiologically relevant regulator of RNA maturation, stability, and function. While modifications are best characterized in short, noncoding RNAs such as tRNAs, growing evidence indicates that mRNAs and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are likewise modified. Here, we apply our high-throughput annotation of modified ribonucleotides (HAMR) pipeline to identify and classify modifications that affect Watson-Crick base pairing at three different levels of the Arabidopsis thaliana transcriptome (polyadenylated, small, and degrading RNAs). We find this type of modifications primarily within uncapped, degrading mRNAs and lncRNAs, suggesting they are the cause or consequence of RNA turnover. Additionally, modifications within stable mRNAs tend to occur in alternatively spliced introns, suggesting they regulate splicing. Furthermore, these modifications target mRNAs with coherent functions, including stress responses. Thus, our comprehensive analysis across multiple RNA classes yields insights into the functions of covalent RNA modifications in plant transcriptomes. PMID:26561561

  15. Coding sequence and alternative splicing of the mouse {alpha}1(XI) collagen gene (Col11a1)

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshioka, Hidekatsu; Inoguchi, Kazuhito; Khaleduzzaman, Mohammed; Ninomiya, Yoshifumi

    1995-07-20

    Several overlapping cDNA clones corresponding to the entire coding sequence of the mouse {alpha}1(XI) collagen gene (Col11a1) were isolated. The conceptual amino acid translation indicated a high degree of sequence identity (93%) with the human {alpha}1(XI) chain. The cloning experiments also revealed alternative splicing of the sequence coding for 85 residues located within the acidic region of the amino-globular domain of {alpha}1(XI). Analysis of RNA samples from different embryonic tissues suggested that alternative splicing might be confined to tissue destined to become bone. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Toll-Like Receptor 9 Alternatively Spliced Isoform Negatively Regulates TLR9 Signaling in Teleost Fish

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Nai-Yu; Nagarajan, Govindarajulu; Chiou, Pinwen Peter

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) recognizes and binds unmethylated CpG motifs in DNA, which are found in the genomes of bacteria and DNA viruses. In fish, Tlr9 is highly diverse, with the number of introns ranging from 0 to 4. A fish Tlr9 gene containing two introns has been reported to express two alternatively spliced isoforms, namely gTLR9A (full-length) and gTLR9B (with a truncated C?-terminal signal transducing domain), whose regulation and function remain unclear. Here, we report a unique regulatory mechanism of gTLR9 signaling in orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides), whose gTlr9 sequence also contains two introns. We demonstrated that the grouper gTlr9 gene indeed has the capacity to produce two gTLR9 isoforms via alternative RNA splicing. We found that gTLR9B could function as a negative regulator to suppress gTLR9 signaling as demonstrated by the suppression of downstream gene expression. Following stimulation with CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN), gTLR9A and gTLR9B were observed to translocate into endosomes and co-localize with ODN and the adaptor protein gMyD88. Both gTLR9A and gTLR9B could interact with gMyD88; however, gTLR9B could not interact with downstream IRAK4 and TRAF6. Further analysis of the expression profile of gTlr9A and gTlr9B upon immune-stimulation revealed that the two isoforms were differentially regulated in a time-dependent manner. Overall, these data suggest that fish TLR9B functions as a negative regulator, and that its temporal expression is mediated by alternative RNA splicing. This has not been observed in mammalian TLR9s and might have been acquired relatively recently in the evolution of fish. PMID:25955250

  17. A broadly applicable high-throughput screening strategy identifies new regulators of Dlg4 (Psd-95) alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Sika; Damoiseaux, Robert; Chen, Liang; Black, Douglas L

    2013-06-01

    Most mammalian genes produce multiple mRNA isoforms derived from alternative pre-mRNA splicing, with each alternative exon controlled by a complex network of regulatory factors. The identification of these regulators can be laborious and is usually carried out one factor at a time. We have developed a broadly applicable high-throughput screening method that simultaneously identifies multiple positive and negative regulators of a particular exon. Two minigene reporters were constructed: One produces green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the mRNA including an exon, and red fluorescent protein (RFP) from the mRNA lacking the exon; the other switches these fluorescent products of exon inclusion and exclusion. Combining results from these two reporters eliminates many false positives and greatly enriches for true splicing regulators. After extensive optimization of this method, we performed a gain-of-function screen of 15,779 cDNA clones and identified 40 genes affecting exon 18 of Discs large homolog 4 (Dlg4; also known as post-synaptic density protein 95 [Psd-95]). We confirmed that 28 of the 34 recoverable clones alter reporter splicing in RT-PCR assays. Remarkably, 18 of the identified genes encode splicing factors or RNA binding proteins, including PTBP1, a previously identified regulator of this exon. Loss-of-function experiments examining endogenous Dlg4 transcripts validated the effects of five of eight genes tested in independent cell lines, and two genes were further confirmed to regulate Dlg4 splicing in primary neurons. These results identify multiple new regulators of Dlg4 splicing, and validate an approach to isolating splicing regulators for almost any cassette exon from libraries of cDNAs, shRNAs, or small molecules. PMID:23636947

  18. Alternative splicing and immune response of Crassostrea gigas tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 3.

    PubMed

    Huang, Baoyu; Zhang, Linlin; Du, Yishuai; Li, Li; Qu, Tao; Meng, Jie; Zhang, Guofan

    2014-10-01

    Diverse alternative splicing isoforms play an important role in immune diversity and specificity. Their role in molluscan host-defense is however poorly understood. We characterized two alternative isoforms of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3) in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, which were named CgTRAF3-S and CgTRAF3-L. An intron was retained in CgTRAF3-L, introducing a premature termination codon. Comparison and phylogenetic analysis revealed that CgTRAF3 shared a higher identity with other species, suggesting the conservation of the two gene transcripts. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed and the expression levels of CgTRAF3 isoforms were found to be significantly changed after Vibrio anguillarum and ostreid herpesvirus 1 challenges. These two isoforms represented contrary trends, indicating that CgTRAF3-L might function as a negative regulator of CgTRAF3-S. We also investigated the expression level of the transcripts of the two CgTRAF3 isoforms, following the silence of C. gigas mitochondrial anti-viral signaling protein like gene (CgMAVS-like). We concluded that CgTRAF3 might be involved in a MAVS-mediated immune signaling pathway. This study suggests that CgTRAF3 may be a response to bacterial and viral stimulation and that the two isoforms may be involved in immune response pathways. It is also possible that the two alternative splicing isoforms could be inter-coordinated and may promote survival of these oysters under immune stress conditions. PMID:25012913

  19. Alternative 5' exons and differential splicing regulate expression of protein 4.1R isoforms with distinct n-termini

    SciTech Connect

    Parra, Marilyn K.; Gee, Sherry L.; Koury, Mark J.; Mohandas, Narla; Conboy, John G.

    2003-03-25

    Among the alternative pre-mRNA splicing events that characterize protein 4.1R gene expression, one involving exon 2' plays a critical role in regulating translation initiation and N-terminal protein structure. Exon 2' encompasses translation initiation site AUG1 and is located between alternative splice acceptor sites at the 5' end of exon 2; its inclusion or exclusion from mature 4.1R mRNA regulates expression of longer or shorter isoforms of 4.1R protein, respectively. The current study reports unexpected complexity in the 5' region of the 4.1R gene that directly affects alternative splicing of exon 2'. Three mutually exclusive alternative 5' exons, designated 1A, 1B, and 1C, were identified far upstream of exon 2 in both mouse and human genomes; all three are associated with strong transcriptional promoters in the flanking genomic sequence. Importantly, exons 1A and 1B splice differentially with respect to exon 2', generating transcripts with different 5' ends and distinct N-terminal protein coding capacity. Exon 1A-type transcripts splice so as to exclude exon 2' and therefore utilize the downstream AUG2 for translation of 80kD 4.1R protein, whereas exon 1B transcripts include exon 2' and initiate at AUG1 to synthesize 135kD isoforms. RNA blot analyses revealed that 1A transcripts increase in abundance in late erythroblasts, consistent with the previously demonstrated upregulation of 80kD 4.1R during terminal erythroid differentiation. Together these results suggest that synthesis of structurally distinct 4.1R protein isoforms in various cell types is regulated by a novel mechanism requiring coordination between upstream transcription initiation events and downstream alternative splicing events.

  20. Long Non-Coding RNA and Alternative Splicing Modulations in Parkinson's Leukocytes Identified by RNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Soreq, Lilach; Guffanti, Alessandro; Salomonis, Nathan; Simchovitz, Alon; Israel, Zvi; Bergman, Hagai; Soreq, Hermona

    2014-01-01

    The continuously prolonged human lifespan is accompanied by increase in neurodegenerative diseases incidence, calling for the development of inexpensive blood-based diagnostics. Analyzing blood cell transcripts by RNA-Seq is a robust means to identify novel biomarkers that rapidly becomes a commonplace. However, there is lack of tools to discover novel exons, junctions and splicing events and to precisely and sensitively assess differential splicing through RNA-Seq data analysis and across RNA-Seq platforms. Here, we present a new and comprehensive computational workflow for whole-transcriptome RNA-Seq analysis, using an updated version of the software AltAnalyze, to identify both known and novel high-confidence alternative splicing events, and to integrate them with both protein-domains and microRNA binding annotations. We applied the novel workflow on RNA-Seq data from Parkinson's disease (PD) patients' leukocytes pre- and post- Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) treatment and compared to healthy controls. Disease-mediated changes included decreased usage of alternative promoters and N-termini, 5?-end variations and mutually-exclusive exons. The PD regulated FUS and HNRNP A/B included prion-like domains regulated regions. We also present here a workflow to identify and analyze long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) via RNA-Seq data. We identified reduced lncRNA expression and selective PD-induced changes in 13 of over 6,000 detected leukocyte lncRNAs, four of which were inversely altered post-DBS. These included the U1 spliceosomal lncRNA and RP11-462G22.1, each entailing sequence complementarity to numerous microRNAs. Analysis of RNA-Seq from PD and unaffected controls brains revealed over 7,000 brain-expressed lncRNAs, of which 3,495 were co-expressed in the leukocytes including U1, which showed both leukocyte and brain increases. Furthermore, qRT-PCR validations confirmed these co-increases in PD leukocytes and two brain regions, the amygdala and substantia-nigra, compared to controls. This novel workflow allows deep multi-level inspection of RNA-Seq datasets and provides a comprehensive new resource for understanding disease transcriptome modifications in PD and other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24651478

  1. Alternative splicing generates functionally distinct N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, N; Axel, R; Shneider, N A

    1992-01-01

    We have used expression cloning in Xenopus oocytes to isolate two different cDNAs encoding functional N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits. The two receptors (NMDA-R1A and -R1B) display different pharmacologic properties as a consequence of alternative exon addition within the putative ligand-binding domain. The splicing choice is regulated such that R1B is the predominant form of receptor in the cerebellum, whereas R1A predominates in other brain regions. Expression of either of the subunits alone in oocytes results in an NMDA-evoked inward current with electrophysiologic properties closely resembling those of the NMDA receptors observed in neurons. Thus, the complex properties exhibited by the NMDA receptor in neurons can be generated by the expression of a single receptor subunit. Images PMID:1388270

  2. The alternative splicing factor Nova2 regulates vascular development and lumen formation.

    PubMed

    Giampietro, Costanza; Deflorian, Gianluca; Gallo, Stefania; Di Matteo, Anna; Pradella, Davide; Bonomi, Serena; Belloni, Elisa; Nyqvist, Daniel; Quaranta, Valeria; Confalonieri, Stefano; Bertalot, Giovanni; Orsenigo, Fabrizio; Pisati, Federica; Ferrero, Elisabetta; Biamonti, Giuseppe; Fredrickx, Evelien; Taveggia, Carla; Wyatt, Chris D R; Irimia, Manuel; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Dejana, Elisabetta; Ghigna, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Vascular lumen formation is a fundamental step during angiogenesis; yet, the molecular mechanisms underlying this process are poorly understood. Recent studies have shown that neural and vascular systems share common anatomical, functional and molecular similarities. Here we show that the organization of endothelial lumen is controlled at the post-transcriptional level by the alternative splicing (AS) regulator Nova2, which was previously considered to be neural cell-specific. Nova2 is expressed during angiogenesis and its depletion disrupts vascular lumen formation in vivo. Similarly, Nova2 depletion in cultured endothelial cells (ECs) impairs the apical distribution and the downstream signalling of the Par polarity complex, resulting in altered EC polarity, a process required for vascular lumen formation. These defects are linked to AS changes of Nova2 target exons affecting the Par complex and its regulators. Collectively, our results reveal that Nova2 functions as an AS regulator in angiogenesis and is a novel member of the 'angioneurins' family. PMID:26446569

  3. The alternative splicing factor Nova2 regulates vascular development and lumen formation

    PubMed Central

    Giampietro, Costanza; Deflorian, Gianluca; Gallo, Stefania; Di Matteo, Anna; Pradella, Davide; Bonomi, Serena; Belloni, Elisa; Nyqvist, Daniel; Quaranta, Valeria; Confalonieri, Stefano; Bertalot, Giovanni; Orsenigo, Fabrizio; Pisati, Federica; Ferrero, Elisabetta; Biamonti, Giuseppe; Fredrickx, Evelien; Taveggia, Carla; Wyatt, Chris D. R.; Irimia, Manuel; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo; Blencowe, Benjamin J.; Dejana, Elisabetta; Ghigna, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Vascular lumen formation is a fundamental step during angiogenesis; yet, the molecular mechanisms underlying this process are poorly understood. Recent studies have shown that neural and vascular systems share common anatomical, functional and molecular similarities. Here we show that the organization of endothelial lumen is controlled at the post-transcriptional level by the alternative splicing (AS) regulator Nova2, which was previously considered to be neural cell-specific. Nova2 is expressed during angiogenesis and its depletion disrupts vascular lumen formation in vivo. Similarly, Nova2 depletion in cultured endothelial cells (ECs) impairs the apical distribution and the downstream signalling of the Par polarity complex, resulting in altered EC polarity, a process required for vascular lumen formation. These defects are linked to AS changes of Nova2 target exons affecting the Par complex and its regulators. Collectively, our results reveal that Nova2 functions as an AS regulator in angiogenesis and is a novel member of the ‘angioneurins' family. PMID:26446569

  4. Sequence Discrimination by Alternatively Spliced Isoforms of a DNA Binding Zinc Finger Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogos, Joseph A.; Hsu, Tien; Bolton, Jesse; Kafatos, Fotis C.

    1992-09-01

    Two major developmentally regulated isoforms of the Drosophila chorion transcription factor CF2 differ by an extra zinc finger within the DNA binding domain. The preferred DNA binding sites were determined and are distinguished by an internal duplication of TAT in the site recognized by the isoform with the extra finger. The results are consistent with modular interactions between zinc fingers and trinucleotides and also suggest rules for recognition of AT-rich DNA sites by zinc finger proteins. The results show how modular finger interactions with trinucleotides can be used, in conjunction with alternative splicing, to alter the binding specificity and increase the spectrum of sites recognized by a DNA binding domain. Thus, CF2 may potentially regulate distinct sets of target genes during development.

  5. Role of alternative pre-mRNA splicing in temperature signaling.

    PubMed

    Capovilla, Giovanna; Pajoro, Alice; Immink, Richard Gh; Schmid, Markus

    2015-10-01

    Developmental plasticity enables plants to respond rapidly to changing environmental conditions, such as temperature fluctuations. Understanding how plants measure temperature and integrate this information into developmental programs at the molecular level will be essential to breed thermo-tolerant crop varieties. Recent studies identified alternative splicing (AS) as a possible 'molecular thermometer', allowing plants to quickly adjust the abundance of functional transcripts to environmental perturbations. In this review, recent advances regarding the effects of temperature-responsive AS on plant development will be discussed, with emphasis on the circadian clock and flowering time control. The challenge for the near future will be to understand the molecular mechanisms by which temperature can influence AS regulation. PMID:26190743

  6. Evolutionarily Dynamic Alternative Splicing of GPR56 Regulates Regional Cerebral Cortical Patterning

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Byoung-Il; Tietjen, Ian; Atabay, Kutay D.; Evrony, Gilad D.; Johnson, Matthew B.; Asare, Ebenezer; Wang, Peter P.; Murayama, Ayako Y.; Im, Kiho; Lisgo, Steven N.; Overman, Lynne; Šestan, Nenad; Chang, Bernard S.; Barkovich, A. James; Grant, P. Ellen; Topçu, Meral; Politsky, Jeffrey; Okano, Hideyuki; Piao, Xianhua; Walsh, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    The human neocortex has numerous specialized functional areas whose formation is poorly understood. Here, we describe a 15–base pair deletion mutation in a regulatory element of GPR56 that selectively disrupts human cortex surrounding the Sylvian fissure bilaterally including “Broca’s area,” the primary language area, by disrupting regional GPR56 expression and blocking RFX transcription factor binding. GPR56 encodes a heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide–binding protein (G protein)–coupled receptor required for normal cortical development and is expressed in cortical progenitor cells. GPR56 expression levels regulate progenitor proliferation. GPR56 splice forms are highly variable between mice and humans, and the regulatory element of gyrencephalic mammals directs restricted lateral cortical expression. Our data reveal a mechanism by which control of GPR56 expression pattern by multiple alternative promoters can influence stem cell proliferation, gyral patterning, and, potentially, neocortex evolution. PMID:24531968

  7. Identification of cis-acting elements and splicing factors involved in the regulation of BIM Pre-mRNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Juan, Wen Chun; Roca, Xavier; Ong, S Tiong

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant changes in the expression of the pro-apoptotic protein, BCL-2-like 11 (BIM), can result in either impaired or excessive apoptosis, which can contribute to tumorigenesis and degenerative disorders, respectively. Altering BIM pre-mRNA splicing is an attractive approach to modulate apoptosis because BIM activity is partly determined by the alternative splicing of exons 3 or 4, whereby exon 3-containing transcripts are not apoptotic. Here we identified several cis-acting elements and splicing factors involved in BIM alternative splicing, as a step to better understand the regulation of BIM expression. We analyzed a recently discovered 2,903-bp deletion polymorphism within BIM intron 2 that biased splicing towards exon 3, and which also impaired BIM-dependent apoptosis. We found that this region harbors multiple redundant cis-acting elements that repress exon 3 inclusion. Furthermore, we have isolated a 23-nt intronic splicing silencer at the 3' end of the deletion that is important for excluding exon 3. We also show that PTBP1 and hnRNP C repress exon 3 inclusion, and that downregulation of PTBP1 inhibited BIM-mediated apoptosis. Collectively, these findings start building our understanding of the cis-acting elements and splicing factors that regulate BIM alternative splicing, and also suggest potential approaches to alter BIM splicing for therapeutic purposes. PMID:24743263

  8. Intronic Non-CG DNA hydroxymethylation and alternative mRNA splicing in honey bees

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous whole-genome shotgun bisulfite sequencing experiments showed that DNA cytosine methylation in the honey bee (Apis mellifera) is almost exclusively at CG dinucleotides in exons. However, the most commonly used method, bisulfite sequencing, cannot distinguish 5-methylcytosine from 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, an oxidized form of 5-methylcytosine that is catalyzed by the TET family of dioxygenases. Furthermore, some analysis software programs under-represent non-CG DNA methylation and hydryoxymethylation for a variety of reasons. Therefore, we used an unbiased analysis of bisulfite sequencing data combined with molecular and bioinformatics approaches to distinguish 5-methylcytosine from 5-hydroxymethylcytosine. By doing this, we have performed the first whole genome analyses of DNA modifications at non-CG sites in honey bees and correlated the effects of these DNA modifications on gene expression and alternative mRNA splicing. Results We confirmed, using unbiased analyses of whole-genome shotgun bisulfite sequencing (BS-seq) data, with both new data and published data, the previous finding that CG DNA methylation is enriched in exons in honey bees. However, we also found evidence that cytosine methylation and hydroxymethylation at non-CG sites is enriched in introns. Using antibodies against 5-hydroxmethylcytosine, we confirmed that DNA hydroxymethylation at non-CG sites is enriched in introns. Additionally, using a new technique, Pvu-seq (which employs the enzyme PvuRts1l to digest DNA at 5-hydroxymethylcytosine sites followed by next-generation DNA sequencing), we further confirmed that hydroxymethylation is enriched in introns at non-CG sites. Conclusions Cytosine hydroxymethylation at non-CG sites might have more functional significance than previously appreciated, and in honey bees these modifications might be related to the regulation of alternative mRNA splicing by defining the locations of the introns. PMID:24079845

  9. Localization during development of alternatively spliced forms of cytotactin mRNA by in situ hybridization

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Cytotactin, an extracellular glycoprotein found in neural and nonneural tissues, influences a variety of cellular phenomena, particularly cell adhesion and cell migration. Northern and Western blot analysis and in situ hybridization were used to determine localization of alternatively spliced forms of cytotactin in neural and nonneural tissues using a probe (CT) that detected all forms of cytotactin mRNA, and one (VbVc) that detected two of the differentially spliced repeats homologous to the type III repeats of fibronectin. In the brain, the levels of mRNA and protein increased from E8 through E15 and then gradually decreased until they were barely detectable by P3. Among the three cytotactin mRNAs (7.2, 6.6, and 6.4 kb) detected in the brain, the VbVc probe hybridized only to the 7.2-kb message. In isolated cerebella, the 220- kD polypeptide and 7.2-kb mRNA were the only cytotactin species present at hatching, indicating that the 220-kD polypeptide is encoded by the 7.2-kb message that contains the VbVc alternatively spliced insert. In situ hybridization showed cytotactin mRNA in glia and glial precursors in the ventricular zone throughout the central nervous system. In all regions of the nervous system, cytotactin mRNAs were more transient and more localized than the polypeptides. For example, in the radial glia, cytotactin mRNA was observed in the soma whereas the protein was present externally along the glial fibers. In the telencephalon, cytotactin mRNAs were found in a narrow band at the edge of a larger region in which the protein was wide-spread. Hybridization with the VbVc probe generally overlapped that of the CT probe in the spinal cord and cerebellum, consistent with the results of Northern blot analysis. In contrast, in the outermost tectal layers, differential hybridization was observed with the two probes. In nonneural tissues, hybridization with the CT probe, but not the VbVc probe, was detected in chondroblasts, tendinous tissues, and certain mesenchymal cells in the lung. In contrast, hybridization with both probes was observed in smooth muscle and lung epithelium. Both epithelium and mesenchyme expressed cytotactin mRNA in varying combinations: in the choroid plexus, only epithelial cells expressed cytotactin mRNA; in kidney, only mesenchymal cells; and in the lung, both of these cell types contained cytotactin mRNA. These spatiotemporal changes during development suggest that the synthesis of the various alternatively spliced cytotactin mRNAs is responsive to tissue-specific local signals and prompt a search for functional differences in the various molecular forms of the protein. PMID:1696267

  10. The protein factors MBNL1 and U2AF65 bind alternative RNA structures to regulate splicing

    PubMed Central

    Warf, M. Bryan; Diegel, Julien V.; von Hippel, Peter H.; Berglund, J. Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a genetic disorder linked to a (CTG)n repeat expansion in the 3? untranslated region of the DMPK gene. Upon transcription in the nucleus, the CUG repeats form a stable RNA stem-loop that sequesters the RNA-binding protein MBNL1 from its normal function in the cell. MBNL1 regulates the alternative splicing of many pre-mRNAs, and upon MBNL1's sequestration, the alternative splicing of many genes is mis-regulated, leading to disease symptoms. MBNL1 is known to bind directly to at least 3 of the pre-mRNAs that it regulates, but how MBNL1 binding mechanistically regulates alternative splicing is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that MBNL1 controls the splicing of exon 5 in the cardiac troponin T (cTNT) pre-mRNA by competing directly with the essential splicing factor U2AF65 for binding at the 3? end of intron 4. When U2AF65 is prevented from binding to the pre-mRNA, the U2 snRNP can no longer be recruited and the following exon is skipped. Furthermore, MBNL1 and U2AF65 appear to compete by binding to mutually exclusive RNA structures. When bound by splicing factors, the 3? end of intron 4 can form either a stem-loop or a single-stranded structure. MBNL1 binds a portion of the intron as a stem-loop, whereas U2AF65 binds the same region in a single-strand structure. Mutations that strengthen the stem-loop decrease U2AF65 binding affinity and also repress exon 5 inclusion, independently of MBNL1. Thus, U2AF65 binding can be blocked either by MBNL1 binding or by the stabilization of RNA secondary structure. PMID:19470458

  11. Design of a High-Throughput Assay for Alternative Splicing Using Polymerase Colonies J.D. Buhler, R.M. Souvenir, W. Zhang, and R.D. Mitra

    E-print Network

    Mitra, Rob

    Design of a High-Throughput Assay for Alternative Splicing Using Polymerase Colonies J.D. Buhler, R-THROUGHPUT ASSAY FOR ALTERNATIVE SPLICING USING POLYMERASE COLONIES J. D. BUHLER, R. M. SOUVENIR, AND W. ZHANG University School of Medicine 660 S. Euclid Ave., St. Louis, MO 63110 Email: rmitra@genetics.wustl.edu We

  12. MADS: A new and improved method for analysis of differential alternative splicing by exon-tiling microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Yi; Stoilov, Peter; Kapur, Karen; Han, Areum; Jiang, Hui; Shen, Shihao; Black, Douglas L.; Wong, Wing Hung

    2008-01-01

    We describe a method, microarray analysis of differential splicing (MADS), for discovery of differential alternative splicing from exon-tiling microarray data. MADS incorporates a series of low-level analysis algorithms motivated by the “probe-rich” design of exon arrays, including background correction, iterative probe selection, and removal of sequence-specific cross-hybridization to off-target transcripts. We used MADS to analyze Affymetrix Exon 1.0 array data on a mouse neuroblastoma cell line after shRNA-mediated knockdown of the splicing factor polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB). From a list of exons with predetermined inclusion/exclusion profiles in response to PTB depletion, MADS recognized all exons known to have large changes in transcript inclusion levels and offered improvement over Affymetrix's analysis procedure. We also identified numerous novel PTB-dependent splicing events. Thirty novel events were tested by RT-PCR and 27 were confirmed. This work demonstrates that the exon-tiling microarray design is an efficient and powerful approach for global, unbiased analysis of pre-mRNA splicing. PMID:18566192

  13. RNA interference knockdown of DNA methyl-transferase 3 affects gene alternative splicing in the honey bee

    PubMed Central

    Li-Byarlay, Hongmei; Li, Yang; Stroud, Hume; Feng, Suhua; Newman, Thomas C.; Kaneda, Megan; Hou, Kirk K.; Worley, Kim C.; Elsik, Christine G.; Wickline, Samuel A.; Jacobsen, Steven E.; Ma, Jian; Robinson, Gene E.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of DNA methylation from fungi, plants, and animals indicate that gene body methylation is ancient and highly conserved in eukaryotic genomes, but its role has not been clearly defined. It has been postulated that regulation of alternative splicing of transcripts was an original function of DNA methylation, but a direct experimental test of the effect of methylation on alternative slicing at the whole genome level has never been performed. To do this, we developed a unique method to administer RNA interference (RNAi) in a high-throughput and noninvasive manner and then used it to knock down the expression of DNA methyl-transferase 3 (dnmt3), which is required for de novo DNA methylation. We chose the honey bee (Apis mellifera) for this test because it has recently emerged as an important model organism for studying the effects of DNA methylation on development and social behavior, and DNA methylation in honey bees is predominantly on gene bodies. Here we show that dnmt3 RNAi decreased global genomic methylation level as expected and in addition caused widespread and diverse changes in alternative splicing in fat tissue. Four different types of splicing events were affected by dnmt3 gene knockdown, and change in two types, exon skipping and intron retention, was directly related to decreased methylation. These results demonstrate that one function of gene body DNA methylation is to regulate alternative splicing. PMID:23852726

  14. Alternative Splicing of the Sodium Channel SCN8A Predicts a Truncated Two-domain Protein in Fetal Brain

    E-print Network

    Meisler, Miriam

    Alternative Splicing of the Sodium Channel SCN8A Predicts a Truncated Two-domain Protein in Fetal, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1H 8M5 The voltage-gated sodium channel subunit SCN8A is one of the most abundant sodium channels in neurons from brain and spinal cord. We have identified two al

  15. THE GRK4 SUBFAMILY OF G PROTEIN-COUPLED RECEPTOR KINASES: ALTERNATIVE SPLICING, GENE ORGANIZATION, AND SEQUENCE CONSERVATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The GRK4 subfamily of G protein-coupled receptor kinases. Alternative splicing, gene organization, and sequence conservation.

    Premont RT, Macrae AD, Aparicio SA, Kendall HE, Welch JE, Lefkowitz RJ.

    Department of Medicine, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Duke Univer...

  16. Human Tra2 proteins jointly control a CHEK1 splicing switch among alternative and constitutive target exons

    PubMed Central

    Best, Andrew; James, Katherine; Dalgliesh, Caroline; Hong, Elaine; Kheirolahi-Kouhestani, Mahsa; Curk, Tomaz; Xu, Yaobo; Danilenko, Marina; Hussain, Rafiq; Keavney, Bernard; Wipat, Anil; Klinck, Roscoe; Cowell, Ian G.; Cheong Lee, Ka; Austin, Caroline A.; Venables, Julian P.; Chabot, Benoit; Santibanez Koref, Mauro; Tyson-Capper, Alison; Elliott, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing—the production of multiple messenger RNA isoforms from a single gene—is regulated in part by RNA binding proteins. While the RBPs transformer2 alpha (Tra2?) and Tra2? have both been implicated in the regulation of alternative splicing, their relative contributions to this process are not well understood. Here we find simultaneous—but not individual—depletion of Tra2? and Tra2? induces substantial shifts in splicing of endogenous Tra2? target exons, and that both constitutive and alternative target exons are under dual Tra2?–Tra2? control. Target exons are enriched in genes associated with chromosome biology including CHEK1, which encodes a key DNA damage response protein. Dual Tra2 protein depletion reduces expression of full-length CHK1 protein, results in the accumulation of the DNA damage marker ?H2AX and decreased cell viability. We conclude Tra2 proteins jointly control constitutive and alternative splicing patterns via paralog compensation to control pathways essential to the maintenance of cell viability. PMID:25208576

  17. Influence of ageing and essential amino acids on quantitative patterns of troponin T alternative splicing in human skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Arthur; Drummond, Micah J.; Rasmussen, Blake B.; Kimball, Scot R.

    2015-01-01

    Ageing is associated with a loss of skeletal muscle performance, a condition referred to as sarcopenia. In part, the age-related reduction in performance is due to a selective loss in muscle fiber mass, but mass-independent effects have also been demonstrated. An important mass-independent determinant of muscle performance is the pattern of expression of isoforms of proteins that participate in muscle contraction, e.g. the troponins. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that ageing impairs alternative splicing of the pre-mRNA encoding fast troponin T (Tnnt3) in human vastus lateralis muscle. Furthermore, we hypothesized that resistance exercise alone or in combination with consumption of essential amino acids will attenuate age-associated effects on Tnnt3 alternative splicing. Our results indicate that ageing negatively affects the pattern of Tnnt3 pre-mRNA alternative splicing in a manner that correlates quantitatively with age-associated reductions in muscle performance. Interestingly, whereas vastus lateralis Tnnt3 alternative splicing was unaffected by a bout of resistance exercise 24 hour prior to muscle biopsy, ingestion of a mixture of essential amino acids after resistance exercise resulted in a significant shift in the pattern of Tnnt3 spliceform expression in both age groups to one predicted to promote greater muscle performance. We conclude that essential amino acid supplementation after resistance exercise may provide a means to reduce impairments in skeletal muscle quality during ageing in humans. PMID:26201856

  18. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition: focus on metastatic cascade, alternative splicing, non-coding RNAs and modulating compounds

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a key process in embryonic development and metastases formation during malignant progression. This review focuses on transcriptional regulation, non-coding RNAs, alternative splicing events and cell adhesion molecules regulation during EMT. Additionally, we summarize the knowledge with regard to the small potentially druggable molecules capable of modulating EMT for cancer therapy. PMID:24053443

  19. Distinct Turnover of Alternatively Spliced Isoforms of the RET Kinase Receptor Mediated by Differential Recruitment of the

    E-print Network

    Ibáñez, Carlos

    Distinct Turnover of Alternatively Spliced Isoforms of the RET Kinase Receptor Mediated did RET9, leading to increased ubiquitylation and faster turnover of RET51. The asso- ciation of Cbl protein unable to recruit the Grb2 Cbl complex de- creased the turnover and prolonged the half-life of RET

  20. NF-YC Complexity Is Generated by Dual Promoters and Alternative Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Ceribelli, Michele; Benatti, Paolo; Imbriano, Carol; Mantovani, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    The CCAAT box is a DNA element present in the majority of human promoters, bound by the trimeric NF-Y, composed of NF-YA, NF-YB, and NF-YC subunits. We describe and characterize novel isoforms of one of the two histone-like subunits, NF-YC. The locus generates a minimum of four splicing products, mainly located within the Q-rich activation domain. The abundance of each isoform is cell-dependent; only one major NF-YC isoform is present in a given cell type. The 37- and 50-kDa isoforms are mutually exclusive, and preferential pairings with NF-YA isoforms possess different transcriptional activities, with specific combinations being more active on selected promoters. The transcriptional regulation of the NF-YC locus is also complex, and mRNAs arise from the two promoters P1 and P2. Transient transfections, chromatin immunoprecipitations, and reverse transcription-PCRs indicate that P1 has a robust housekeeping activity; P2 possesses a lower basal activity, but it is induced in response to DNA damage in a p53-dependent way. Alternative promoter usage directly affects NF-YC splicing, with the 50-kDa transcript being excluded from P2. Specific functional inactivation of the 37-kDa isoform affects the basal levels of G1/S blocking and pro-apoptotic genes but not G2/M promoters. In summary, our data highlight an unexpected degree of complexity and regulation of the NF-YC gene, demonstrating the existence of a discrete cohort of NF-Y trimer subtypes resulting from the functional diversification of Q-rich transactivating subunits and a specific role of the 37-kDa isoform in suppression of the DNA damage-response under growing conditions. PMID:19690168

  1. Alternative splicing of the AGAMOUS orthologous gene in double flower of Magnolia stellata (Magnoliaceae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Liu, Zhi-Xiong; Ma, Jiang; Song, Yi; Chen, Fa-Ju

    2015-12-01

    Magnolia stellata is a woody ornamental shrub with more petaloid tepals than related plants from family Magnoliaceae. Recent studies revealed that expression changes in an AGAMOUS (AG) orthologous gene could resulted in double flowers with increased numbers of petals. We isolated three transcripts encoding different isoforms of a single AG orthologous gene, MastAG, mastag_2 and mastag_3, from M. stellata. Sequence alignments and Southern blot analyses suggested that MastAG was a single-copy gene in M. stellata genomes, and that mastag_2 and mastag_3 were abnormally spliced isoforms of MastAG. An 144bp exon skipping in MastAG results in the truncated mastag_2 protein lacking the completely I domain and 18 aa of the K1 subdomain, whereas an 165bp exon skipping of MastAG produces a truncated mastag_3 protein lacking 6 aa of the K3 subdomain and the completely C terminal region. Expression analyses showed that three alternative splicing (AS) isoforms expressed only in developing stamens and carpels. Functional analyses revealed that MastAG could mimic the endogenous AG to specify carpel identity, but failed to regulate stamen development in an Arabidopsis ag-1 mutant. Moreover, the key domain or subdomain deletions represented by mastag_2 and mastag_3 resulted in loss of C-function. However, ectopic expression of mastag_2 in Arabidopsis produced flowers with sepals converted into carpeloid organs, but without petals and stamens, whereas ectopic expression of mastag_3 in Arabidopsis could mimic the flower phenotype of the ag mutant and produced double flowers with homeotic transformation of stamens into petals and carpels into another ag flower. Our results also suggest that mastag_3 holds some potential for biotechnical engineering to create multi-petal phenotypes in commercial ornamental cultivars. PMID:26706078

  2. Alternatively Spliced Human TREK-1 Variants Alter TREK-1 Channel Function and Localization.

    PubMed

    Cowles, Chad L; Wu, Yi-Ying; Barnett, Scott D; Lee, Michael T; Burkin, Heather R; Buxton, Iain L O

    2015-11-01

    TREK-1, an outward-rectifying potassium channel activated by stretch, is found in the myometrium of pregnant women. Decreased expression of TREK-1 near term suggests that TREK-1 may contribute to uterine quiescence during gestation. Five alternatively spliced TREK-1 variants were identified in the myometrium of mothers who delivered spontaneously preterm (<37 wk), leading to the hypothesis that these TREK-1 variants could interfere with TREK-1 function or expression. To investigate a potential role for these variants, immunofluorescence, cell surface assays, Western blots, and patch clamp were employed to study TREK-1 and TREK-1 variants expressed in HEK293T cells. The results of this study demonstrate that coexpression of TREK-1 with TREK-1 variants alters TREK-1 expression and suppresses channel function. Each variant affected TREK-1 in a disparate manner. In HEK293T cells coexpressing TREK-1 and each variant, TREK-1 membrane expression was diminished with compartmentalization inside the cell. When expressed alone, individual variants displayed channel properties that were significantly decreased compared to full-length TREK-1. In coexpression studies using patch clamp, basal TREK-1 currents were reduced by ?64% (4.3 vs. 12.0 pA/pF) on average at 0 mV when coexpressed with each variant. TREK-1 currents that were activated by intracellular acidosis were reduced an average of ?77% (21.4 vs. 94.5 pA/pF) at 0 mV when cells were transfected with TREK-1 and any one of the splice variants. These data correlate the presence of TREK-1 variants to reduced TREK-1 activity, suggesting a pathological role for TREK-1 variants in preterm labor. PMID:26400398

  3. Mutations in Tau Gene Exon 10 Associated with FTDP-17 Alter the Activity of an Exonic Splicing Enhancer to Interact with Tra2?*

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhihong; Tang, Hao; Havlioglu, Necat; Zhang, Xiaochun; Stamm, Stefan; Yan, Riqiang; Wu, Jane Y.

    2007-01-01

    Mutations in the human tau gene leading to aberrant splicing have been identified in FTDP-17, an autosomal dominant hereditary neurodegenerative disorder. Molecular mechanisms by which such mutations cause tau aberrant splicing were not understood. We characterized two mutations in exon 10 of the tau gene, N279K and Del280K. Our results revealed an exonic splicing enhancer element located in exon 10. The activity of this AG-rich splicing enhancer was altered by N279K and Del280K mutations. This exonic enhancer element interacts with human Tra2? protein. The interaction between Tra2? and the exonic splicing enhancer correlates with the activity of this enhancer element in stimulating splicing. Biochemical studies including in vitro splicing and RNA interference experiments in transfected cells support a role for Tra2? protein in regulating alternative splicing of human tau gene. Our results implicate the human tau gene as a target gene for the alternative splicing regulator Tra2?, suggesting that Tra2? may play a role in aberrant tau exon 10 alternative splicing and in the pathogenesis of tauopathies. PMID:12649279

  4. G to A substitution in 5{prime} donor splice site of introns 18 and 48 of COL1A1 gene of type I collagen results in different splicing alternatives in osteogenesis imperfecta type I cell strains

    SciTech Connect

    Willing, M.; Deschenes, S.

    1994-09-01

    We have identified a G to A substitution in the 5{prime} donor splice site of intron 18 of one COL1A1 allele in two unrelated families with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I. A third OI type I family has a G to A substitution at the identical position in intron 48 of one COL1A1 allele. Both mutations abolish normal splicing and lead to reduced steady-state levels of mRNA from the mutant COL1A1 allele. The intron 18 mutation leads to both exon 18 skipping in the mRNA and to utilization of a single alternative splice site near the 3{prime} end of exon 18. The latter results in deletion of the last 8 nucleotides of exon 18 from the mRNA, a shift in the translational reading-frame, and the creation of a premature termination codon in exon 19. Of the potential alternative 5{prime} splice sites in exon 18 and intron 18, the one utilized has a surrounding nucleotide sequence which most closely resembles that of the natural splice site. Although a G to A mutation was detected at the identical position in intron 48 of one COL1A1 allele in another OI type I family, nine complex alternative splicing patterns were identified by sequence analysis of cDNA clones derived from fibroblast mRNA from this cell strain. All result in partial or complete skipping of exon 48, with in-frame deletions of portions of exons 47 and/or 49. The different patterns of RNA splicing were not explained by their sequence homology with naturally occuring 5{prime} splice sites, but rather by recombination between highly homologous exon sequences, suggesting that we may not have identified the major splicing alternative(s) in this cell strain. Both G to A mutations result in decreased production of type I collagen, the common biochemical correlate of OI type I.

  5. Turning on a fuel switch of cancer: hnRNP proteins regulate alternative splicing of pyruvate kinase mRNA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mo; Zhang, Jian; Manley, James L

    2010-11-15

    Unlike normal cells, which metabolize glucose by oxidative phosphorylation for efficient energy production, tumor cells preferentially metabolize glucose by aerobic glycolysis, which produces less energy but facilitates the incorporation of more glycolytic metabolites into the biomass needed for rapid proliferation. The metabolic shift from oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis is partly achieved by a switch in the splice isoforms of the glycolytic enzyme pyruvate kinase. Although normal cells express the pyruvate kinase M1 isoform (PKM1), tumor cells predominantly express the M2 isoform (PKM2). Switching from PKM1 to PKM2 promotes aerobic glycolysis and provides a selective advantage for tumor formation. The PKM1/M2 isoforms are generated through alternative splicing of two mutually exclusive exons. A recent study shows that the alternative splicing event is controlled by heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) family members hnRNPA1, hnRNPA2, and polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB; also known as hnRNPI). These findings not only provide additional evidence that alternative splicing plays an important role in tumorigenesis, but also shed light on the molecular mechanism by which hnRNP proteins regulate cell proliferation in cancer. PMID:20978194

  6. Diagnostic significance of alternative splice variants of REST and DOPEY1 in the peripheral blood of patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lend, Ave Kris; Kazantseva, Anna; Kivil, Anri; Valvere, Vahur; Palm, Kaia

    2015-04-01

    Changes in alternative splicing have been linked to cancer development. We hypothesized that changes occurring in tumor tissue can also be detected in the peripheral blood of cancer patients leading to discovery of blood biomarkers of breast cancer. Alternative splicing profiles of 94 genes were examined in cancerous breast tissue. Discriminating splice variants were analyzed in the peripheral blood of early stage (BCI/II) (stage I-II; n?=?26), neoadjuvant receiving locally advanced breast cancer patients (LABC) (stage IIb-IIIa, b; n?=?10) and healthy volunteers (n?=?26) using qRT-PCR analysis. Changes in marker expression during neoadjuvant therapy were analyzed at 15 timepoints. High expression of REST-N50, the alternatively spliced variant of REST, was detected in the blood of LABC patients but not in BCI/II and healthy controls (p?=?0.0032 and p?=?0.0029, respectively). Expression levels of DOPEY1v2, the alternative splice variant of DOPEY1, in the blood could differentiate cancer from healthy controls (p?=?0.024) and discriminate between patient groups (BCI/II vs LABC, p?=?0.002). Positive response to neoadjuvant therapy of REST-N50-positive LABC patients correlated with a decrease in REST-N50 levels (p?

  7. Alternative splicing contributes to the coordinated regulation of ferritin subunit levels in Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel)

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xuan-Zhao; Cong, Lin; Niu, Jin-Zhi; Dou, Wei; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2014-01-01

    A constant ratio of ferritin heavy chain homolog (HCH) and light chain homolog (LCH) subunits seems to be required to compose the ferritin heteropolymer protein in insects. However, the mechanism by which insect LCH genes regulate protein levels remains unclear. We report that alternative promoters and alternative splicing contribute to maintaining a constant ratio of the two subunits, BdFer1HCH and BdFer2LCH (ferritin 1 HCH and ferritin 2 LCH), in Bactrocera dorsalis, a notorious quarantine pest. The genes BdFer1HCH and BdFer2LCH were identified with a series of potential transcription factor binding sites and were shown to be clustered within the genome in a “head to head” fashion. Thus, we unearthed a potential post-transcriptional mechanism to regulate the levels of LCH subunits, and confirmed that the expressions of BdFer1HCH and BdFer2LCH were induced by 20-hydroecdysone, iron overload, and immune challenge. PMID:24763285

  8. Alternative splicing contributes to the coordinated regulation of ferritin subunit levels in Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xuan-Zhao; Cong, Lin; Niu, Jin-Zhi; Dou, Wei; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2014-01-01

    A constant ratio of ferritin heavy chain homolog (HCH) and light chain homolog (LCH) subunits seems to be required to compose the ferritin heteropolymer protein in insects. However, the mechanism by which insect LCH genes regulate protein levels remains unclear. We report that alternative promoters and alternative splicing contribute to maintaining a constant ratio of the two subunits, BdFer1HCH and BdFer2LCH (ferritin 1 HCH and ferritin 2 LCH), in Bactrocera dorsalis, a notorious quarantine pest. The genes BdFer1HCH and BdFer2LCH were identified with a series of potential transcription factor binding sites and were shown to be clustered within the genome in a "head to head" fashion. Thus, we unearthed a potential post-transcriptional mechanism to regulate the levels of LCH subunits, and confirmed that the expressions of BdFer1HCH and BdFer2LCH were induced by 20-hydroecdysone, iron overload, and immune challenge. PMID:24763285

  9. Cell Type and Culture ConditionDependent Alternative Splicing in Human Breast Cancer Cells Revealed by

    E-print Network

    Ares Jr., Manny

    in Matrigel and in xenograft in nude mice shows that splicing is similar under both conditions. Thus, our detected in breast cancer cell lines or tumor tissues (1). Little is known about the relationship between

  10. Alternative Splicing of RNA Triplets Is Often Regulated and Accelerates Proteome Evolution

    E-print Network

    Bradley, Robert K.

    Thousands of human genes contain introns ending in NAGNAG (N any nucleotide), where both NAGs can function as 3? splice sites, yielding isoforms that differ by inclusion/exclusion of three bases. However, few models exist ...

  11. Subcellular RNA profiling links splicing and nuclear DICER1 to alternative cleavage and polyadenylation.

    PubMed

    Neve, Jonathan; Burger, Kaspar; Li, Wencheng; Hoque, Mainul; Patel, Radhika; Tian, Bin; Gullerova, Monika; Furger, Andre

    2016-01-01

    Alternative cleavage and polyadenylation (APA) plays a crucial role in the regulation of gene expression across eukaryotes. Although APA is extensively studied, its regulation within cellular compartments and its physiological impact remains largely enigmatic. Here, we used a rigorous subcellular fractionation approach to compare APA profiles of cytoplasmic and nuclear RNA fractions from human cell lines. This approach allowed us to extract APA isoforms that are subjected to differential regulation and provided us with a platform to interrogate the molecular regulatory pathways that shape APA profiles in different subcellular locations. Here, we show that APA isoforms with shorter 3' UTRs tend to be overrepresented in the cytoplasm and appear to be cell-type-specific events. Nuclear retention of longer APA isoforms occurs and is partly a result of incomplete splicing contributing to the observed cytoplasmic bias of transcripts with shorter 3' UTRs. We demonstrate that the endoribonuclease III, DICER1, contributes to the establishment of subcellular APA profiles not only by expected cytoplasmic miRNA-mediated destabilization of APA mRNA isoforms, but also by affecting polyadenylation site choice. PMID:26546131

  12. Structural Insights into RNA Recognition by the Alternate-Splicing Regulator CUG-Binding Protein 1

    SciTech Connect

    M Teplova; J Song; H Gaw; A Teplov; D Patel

    2011-12-31

    CUG-binding protein 1 (CUGBP1) regulates multiple aspects of nuclear and cytoplasmic mRNA processing, with implications for onset of myotonic dystrophy. CUGBP1 harbors three RRM domains and preferentially targets UGU-rich mRNA elements. We describe crystal structures of CUGBP1 RRM1 and tandem RRM1/2 domains bound to RNAs containing tandem UGU(U/G) elements. Both RRM1 in RRM1-RNA and RRM2 in RRM1/2-RNA complexes use similar principles to target UGU(U/G) elements, with recognition mediated by face-to-edge stacking and water-mediated hydrogen-bonding networks. The UG step adopts a left-handed Z-RNA conformation, with the syn guanine recognized through Hoogsteen edge-protein backbone hydrogen-bonding interactions. NMR studies on the RRM1/2-RNA complex establish that both RRM domains target tandem UGUU motifs in solution, whereas filter-binding assays identify a preference for recognition of GU over AU or GC steps. We discuss the implications of CUGBP1-mediated targeting and sequestration of UGU(U/G) elements on pre-mRNA alternative-splicing regulation, translational regulation, and mRNA decay.

  13. Short antisense-locked nucleic acids (all-LNAs) correct alternative splicing abnormalities in myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Wojtkowiak-Szlachcic, Agnieszka; Taylor, Katarzyna; Stepniak-Konieczna, Ewa; Sznajder, Lukasz J.; Mykowska, Agnieszka; Sroka, Joanna; Thornton, Charles A.; Sobczak, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is an autosomal dominant multisystemic disorder caused by expansion of CTG triplet repeats in 3?-untranslated region of DMPK gene. The pathomechanism of DM1 is driven by accumulation of toxic transcripts containing expanded CUG repeats (CUGexp) in nuclear foci which sequester several factors regulating RNA metabolism, such as Muscleblind-like proteins (MBNLs). In this work, we utilized very short chemically modified antisense oligonucleotides composed exclusively of locked nucleic acids (all-LNAs) complementary to CUG repeats, as potential therapeutic agents against DM1. Our in vitro data demonstrated that very short, 8- or 10-unit all-LNAs effectively bound the CUG repeat RNA and prevented the formation of CUGexp/MBNL complexes. In proliferating DM1 cells as well as in skeletal muscles of DM1 mouse model the all-LNAs induced the reduction of the number and size of CUGexp foci and corrected MBNL-sensitive alternative splicing defects with high efficacy and specificity. The all-LNAs had low impact on the cellular level of CUGexp-containing transcripts and did not affect the expression of other transcripts with short CUG repeats. Our data strongly indicate that short all-LNAs complementary to CUG repeats are a promising therapeutic tool against DM1. PMID:25753670

  14. ASePCR: alternative splicing electronic RT–PCR in multiple tissues and organs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Namshin; Lim, Dajeong; Lee, Sanghyuk; Kim, Heebal

    2005-01-01

    RT–PCR is one of the most powerful and direct methods to detect transcript variants due to alternative splicing (AS) that increase transcript diversity significantly in vertebrates. ASePCR is an efficient web-based application that emulates RT–PCR in various tissues. It estimates the amplicon size for a given primer pair based on the transcript models identified by the reverse e-PCR program of the NCBI. The tissue specificity of each PCR band is deduced from the tissue information of expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences compatible with each transcript structure. The output page shows PCR bands like a gel electrophoresis in various tissues. Each band in the output picture represents a putative isoform that could happen in a tissue-specific manner. It also shows the EST alignment and tissue information in the genome browser. Furthermore, the user can compare the AS patterns of orthologous genes in other species. The ASePCR, available at , supports the transcriptome models of the RefSeq, Ensembl, ECgene and AceView for human, mouse, rat and chicken genomes. It will be a valuable web resource to explore the transcriptome diversity associated with different tissues and organs in multiple species. PMID:15980562

  15. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of a mouse gene upregulated by lipopolysaccharide treatment reveals alternative splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Kejun; Chen, Yaoming; Dai, Zongming; Bi, Yuan; Cai, Tongjian; Hou, Lichao; Chai, Yubo; Song, Qinghe; Chen, Sumin; Luo, Wenjing; Chen, Jingyuan

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of mouse cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) potently initiates an inflammatory response, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. We therefore sought to characterize cDNA sequences of a new mouse LPS-responsive gene, and to evaluate the effects of MLrg. Full-length cDNAs were obtained from LPS-treated NIH3T3 cells. We report that the MLrg gene produces two alternative splice products (GenBank Accession Nos. (DQ316984) and (DQ320011)), respectively, encoding MLrgW and MLrgS polypeptides. Both proteins contain zinc finger and leucine zipper domains and are thus potential regulators of transcription. Expression of MLrgW and MLrgS were robustly upregulated following LPS treatment, and the proteins were localized predominantly in the nuclear membrane and cytoplasm. In stable transfectants over-expressing MLrgW the proportion of cells in G1 phase was significantly reduced, while in cells over-expressing MLrgS the proportion of cells in G2 was significantly increased; both proteins are thus potential regulators of cell cycle progression. Upregulation of MLrgW and MLrgS may be an important component of the LPS inflammatory pathway and of the host response to infection with GNB.

  16. Alarin but not its alternative-splicing form, GALP (Galanin-like peptide) has antimicrobial activity

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, Akihiro; Wong, Pooi-Fong; Hojo, Hironobu; Hasegawa, Makoto; Ichinose, Akitoyo; Llanes, Rafael; Kubo, Yoshinao; Senba, Masachika; Ichinose, Yoshio

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: • Alarin inhibits the growth of E. coli but not S. aureus. • Alarin’s potency is comparable to LL-37 in inhibiting the growth of E. coli. • Alarin can cause bacterial membrane blebbing. • Alalin does not induce hemolysis on erythrocytes. -- Abstract: Alarin is an alternative-splicing form of GALP (galanin-like peptide). It shares only 5 conserved amino acids at the N-terminal region with GALP which is involved in a diverse range of normal brain functions. This study seeks to investigate whether alarin has additional functions due to its differences from GALP. Here, we have shown using a radial diffusion assay that alarin but not GALP inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli (strain ML-35). The conserved N-terminal region, however, remained essential for the antimicrobial activity of alarin as truncated peptides showed reduced killing effect. Moreover, alarin inhibited the growth of E. coli in a similar potency as human cathelicidin LL-37, a well-studied antimicrobial peptide. Electron microscopy further showed that alarin induced bacterial membrane blebbing but unlike LL-37, it did not cause hemolysis of erythrocytes. In addition, alarin is only active against the gram-negative bacteria, E. coli but not the gram-positive bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus. Thus, these data suggest that alarin has potentials as an antimicrobial and should be considered for the development in human therapeutics.

  17. Identification of novel alternative splicing transcript and expression analysis of bovine TMEM95 gene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sihuan; Cai, Hanfang; Yang, Qing; Shi, Tao; Pan, Chuanying; Lei, Chuzhao; Dang, Ruihua; Chen, Hong; Lan, Xianyong

    2016-01-10

    Transmembrane protein 95 (TMEM95) is closely related to male reproductive performance in cattle, but does not affect semen quality. Alternative splicing plays an important role in regulating biological function as well as in generating proteomic and functional diversity in metazoan organisms. Thus, the aim of this study was to clone and identify transcripts of the TMEM95 gene in cattle using RT-PCR, characterize them via bioinformatics analysis, and detect their expression patterns using qRT-PCR. Two transcripts of TMEM95 were identified in cattle, including TMEM95-SV1 and TMEM95-SV2. Bioinformatics predicted that TMEM95-SV1 has a leucine-rich repeat C-terminal domain and a Pfam: IZUMO. These regions are closely related to protein interactions and the acrosome reaction, respectively. Interestingly, the two transcripts were exclusively expressed in the testes and brain in male fetus cattle, and TMEM95-SV1 was expressed in the brain at significantly higher levels than in the testis (P<0.05, 4.06-fold) and TMEM95-SV2 in the brain (P<0.05, 4.95-fold). These findings enrich the understanding of the TMEM95 gene function and benefit for enhancing male reproduction in cattle industry. PMID:26385321

  18. Genome-Wide Identification of Evolutionarily Conserved Alternative Splicing Events in Flowering Plants

    PubMed Central

    Chamala, Srikar; Feng, Guanqiao; Chavarro, Carolina; Barbazuk, W. Brad

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) plays important roles in many plant functions, but its conservation across the plant kingdom is not known. We describe a methodology to identify AS events and identify conserved AS events across large phylogenetic distances using RNA-Seq datasets. We applied this methodology to transcriptome data from nine angiosperms including Amborella, the single sister species to all other extant flowering plants. AS events within 40–70% of the expressed multi-exonic genes per species were found, 27,120 of which are conserved among two or more of the taxa studied. While many events are species specific, many others are shared across long evolutionary distances suggesting they have functional significance. Conservation of AS event data provides an estimate of the number of ancestral AS events present at each node of the tree representing the nine species studied. Furthermore, the presence or absence of AS isoforms between species with different whole genome duplication (WGD) histories provides the opportunity to examine the impact of WDG on AS potential. Examining AS in gene families identifies those with high rates of AS, and conservation can distinguish ancient events vs. recent or species specific adaptations. The MADS-box and SR protein families are found to represent families with low and high occurrences of AS, respectively, yet their AS events were likely present in the MRCA of angiosperms. PMID:25859541

  19. Alternative Splicing of SNAP-25 Regulates Secretion through Nonconservative Substitutions in the SNARE Domain

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Gábor; Milosevic, Ira; Fasshauer, Dirk; Müller, E. Matthias; de Groot, Bert L.; Lang, Thorsten; Wilson, Michael C.; Sørensen, Jakob B.

    2005-01-01

    The essential membrane fusion apparatus in mammalian cells, the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex, consists of four ?-helices formed by three proteins: SNAP-25, syntaxin 1, and synaptobrevin 2. SNAP-25 contributes two helices to the complex and is targeted to the plasma membrane by palmitoylation of four cysteines in the linker region. It is alternatively spliced into two forms, SNAP-25a and SNAP-25b, differing by nine amino acids substitutions. When expressed in chromaffin cells from SNAP-25 null mice, the isoforms support different levels of secretion. Here, we investigated the basis of that different secretory phenotype. We found that two nonconservative substitutions in the N-terminal SNARE domain and not the different localization of one palmitoylated cysteine cause the functional difference between the isoforms. Biochemical and molecular dynamic simulation experiments revealed that the two substitutions do not regulate secretion by affecting the property of SNARE complex itself, but rather make the SNAP-25b-containing SNARE complex more available for the interaction with accessory factor(s). PMID:16195346

  20. Alternative Splicing Regulates the Subcellular Localization of a-Kinase Anchoring Protein 18 Isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Trotter, Kevin W.; Fraser, Iain D.C.; Scott, Gregory K.; Stutts, M. Jackson; Scott, John D.; Milgram, Sharon L.

    1999-01-01

    The cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is localized to specific subcellular compartments by association with A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). AKAPs are a family of functionally related proteins that bind the regulatory (R) subunit of PKA with high affinity and target the kinase to specific subcellular organelles. Recently, AKAP18, a low molecular weight plasma membrane AKAP that facilitates PKA-mediated phosphorylation of the L-type Ca2+ channel, was cloned. We now report the cloning of two additional isoforms of AKAP18, which we have designated AKAP18? and AKAP18?, that arise from alternative mRNA splicing. The AKAP18 isoforms share a common R subunit binding site, but have distinct targeting domains. The original AKAP18 (renamed AKAP18?) and AKAP18? target the plasma membrane when expressed in HEK-293 cells, while AKAP18? is cytosolic. When expressed in epithelial cells, AKAP18? is targeted to lateral membranes, whereas AKAP18? is accumulated at the apical membrane. A 23-amino acid insert, following the plasma membrane targeting domain, facilitates the association of AKAP18? with the apical membrane. The data suggest that AKAP18 isoforms are differentially targeted to modulate distinct intracellular signaling events. Furthermore, the data suggest that plasma membrane AKAPs may be targeted to subdomains of the cell surface, adding additional specificity in intracellular signaling. PMID:10613906

  1. Alternative splicing variant of the hypoxia marker carbonic anhydrase IX expressed independently of hypoxia and tumour phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Barathova, M; Takacova, M; Holotnakova, T; Gibadulinova, A; Ohradanova, A; Zatovicova, M; Hulikova, A; Kopacek, J; Parkkila, S; Supuran, C T; Pastorekova, S; Pastorek, J

    2007-01-01

    CA IX is a hypoxia-induced, cancer-associated carbonic anhydrase isoform with functional involvement in pH control and cell adhesion. Here we describe an alternative splicing variant of the CA9 mRNA, which does not contain exons 8–9 and is expressed in tumour cells independently of hypoxia. It is also detectable in normal tissues in the absence of the full-length transcript and can therefore produce false-positive data in prognostic studies based on the detection of the hypoxia- and cancer-related CA9 expression. The splicing variant encodes a truncated CA IX protein lacking the C-terminal part of the catalytic domain. It shows diminished catalytic activity and is intracellular or secreted. When overexpressed, it reduces the capacity of the full-length CA IX protein to acidify extracellular pH of hypoxic cells and to bind carbonic anhydrase inhibitor. HeLa cells transfected with the splicing variant cDNA generate spheroids that do not form compact cores, suggesting that they fail to adapt to hypoxic stress. Our data indicate that the splicing variant can functionally interfere with the full-length CA IX. This might be relevant particularly under conditions of mild hypoxia, when the cells do not suffer from severe acidosis and do not need excessive pH control. PMID:18026188

  2. Induced transcription and stability of CELF2 mRNA drives widespread alternative splicing during T-cell signaling

    PubMed Central

    Mallory, Michael J.; Allon, Samuel J.; Qiu, Jinsong; Gazzara, Matthew R.; Tapescu, Iulia; Martinez, Nicole M.; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Lynch, Kristen W.

    2015-01-01

    Studies in several cell types have highlighted dramatic and diverse changes in mRNA processing that occur upon cellular stimulation. However, the mechanisms and pathways that lead to regulated changes in mRNA processing remain poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that expression of the splicing factor CELF2 (CUGBP, Elav-like family member 2) is regulated in response to T-cell signaling through combined increases in transcription and mRNA stability. Transcriptional induction occurs within 6 h of stimulation and is dependent on activation of NF-?B. Subsequently, there is an increase in the stability of the CELF2 mRNA that correlates with a change in CELF2 3?UTR length and contributes to the total signal-induced enhancement of CELF2 expression. Importantly, we uncover dozens of splicing events in cultured T cells whose changes upon stimulation are dependent on CELF2 expression, and provide evidence that CELF2 controls a similar proportion of splicing events during human thymic T-cell development. Taken together, these findings expand the physiologic impact of CELF2 beyond that previously documented in developing neuronal and muscle cells to T-cell development and function, identify unappreciated instances of alternative splicing in the human thymus, and uncover novel mechanisms for CELF2 regulation that may broadly impact CELF2 expression across diverse cell types. PMID:25870297

  3. Functional Consequences for Apoptosis by Transcription Elongation Regulator 1 (TCERG1)-Mediated Bcl-x and Fas/CD95 Alternative Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Montes, Marta; Coiras, Mayte; Becerra, Soraya; Moreno-Castro, Cristina; Mateos, Elena; Majuelos, Jara; Oliver, F. Javier; Hernández-Munain, Cristina; Alcamí, José; Suñé, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present evidence for a specific role of the splicing-related factor TCERG1 in regulating apoptosis in live cells by modulating the alternative splicing of the apoptotic genes Bcl-x and Fas. We show that TCERG1 modulates Bcl-x alternative splicing during apoptosis and its activity in Bcl-x alternative splicing correlates with the induction of apoptosis, as determined by assessing dead cells, sub-G1-phase cells, annexin-V binding, cell viability, and cleavage of caspase-3 and PARP-1. Furthermore, the effect of TCERG1 on apoptosis involved changes in mitochondrial membrane permeabilization. We also found that depletion of TCERG1 reduces the expression of the activated form of the pro-apoptotic mitochondrial membrane protein Bak, which remains inactive by heterodimerizing with Bcl-xL, preventing the initial step of cytochrome c release in Bak-mediated mitochondrial apoptosis. In addition, we provide evidence that TCERG1 also participates in the death receptor-mediated apoptosis pathway. Interestingly, TCERG1 also modulates Fas/CD95 alternative splicing. We propose that TCERG1 sensitizes a cell to apoptotic agents, thus promoting apoptosis by regulating the alternative splicing of both the Bcl-x and Fas/CD95 genes. Our findings may provide a new link between the control of alternative splicing and the molecular events leading to apoptosis. PMID:26462236

  4. Identification of cDNA sequences and alternative splicing patterns of canine AMEL genes (AMELX and AMELY).

    PubMed

    Yan, S Q; Li, Y M; Bai, C Y; Guo, P C; Si, S; Sun, J H; Zhao, Z H

    2015-01-01

    Amelogenin is a major protein of the developing enamel matrix. There are two amelogenin genes (AMELX and AMELY) located on the X and Y chromosomes, respectively, in dogs. In the present study, we characterized full-length cDNAs and alternative splicing patterns of the AMEL genes in the tooth tissue of a dog by 5'- and 3'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends and AMEL-specific RT-PCR. Sequence analysis revealed that the coding regions of AMELX and AMELY were 579 and 576 bp (accession Nos. KP244310 and KP244311), respectively. The coding sequence of AMELX had 95.1% identity to that of AMELY. The AMEL genes on X and Y chromosomes were both expressed in developing tooth tissue. Eight different alternatively spliced transcripts were identified, five from AMELX and three from AMELY. PMID:26662417

  5. RNA-Seq Uncovers SNPs and Alternative Splicing Events in Asian Lotus (Nelumbo nucifera)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mei; Xu, Liming; Liu, Yanling; Yang, Pingfang

    2015-01-01

    RNA-Seq is an efficient way to comprehensively identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and alternative splicing (AS) events from the expressed genes. In this study, we conducted transcriptome sequencing of four Asian lotus (Nelumbo nucifera) cultivars using Illumina HiSeq2000 platform to identify SNPs and AS events in lotus. A total of 505 million pair-end RNA-Seq reads were generated from four cultivars, of which 86% were mapped to the lotus reference genome. Using the four sets of data together, a total of 357,689 putative SNPs were identified with an average density of one SNP per 2.2 kb. These SNPs were located in 1,253 scaffolds and 15,016 expressed genes. A/G and C/T were the two major types of SNPs in the Asian lotus transcriptome. In parallel, a total of 177,540 AS events were detected in the four cultivars and were distributed in 64% of the expressed genes of lotus. The predominant type of AS events was alternative 5’ first exon, which accounted for 41.2% of all the observed AS events, and exon skipping only accounted for 4.3% of all AS. Gene Ontology analysis was conducted to analyze the function of the genes containing SNPs and AS events. Validation of selected SNPs and AS events revealed that 74% of SNPs and 80% of AS events were reliable, which indicates that RNA-Seq is an efficient approach to uncover gene-associated SNPs and AS events. A large number of SNPs and AS events identified in our study will facilitate further genetic and functional genomics research in lotus. PMID:25928215

  6. Structure of the human laminin {gamma}2 chain gene (LAMC2): Alternative splicing with different tissue distribution of two transcripts

    SciTech Connect

    Airenne, T.; Haakana, H.; Kallunki, T.

    1996-02-15

    This article discusses the exon-intron structure and tissue distribution of the laminin {gamma}2 chain (LAMC2) gene, which is mutated in some cases of junctional epidermolysis bullosa. The article also discusses the transcription and splicing of this gene, which result in alternative uses of the last two exons of the gene. The different tissue distributions of the transcripts indicate different functions for the gene in vivo. 36 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. High temperature attenuates the gravitropism of inflorescence stems by inducing SHOOT GRAVITROPISM 5 alternative splicing in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo-Young; Ryu, Jae Yong; Baek, Kon; Park, Chung-Mo

    2016-01-01

    In higher plants, gravitropism proceeds through three sequential steps in the responding organs: perception of gravity signals, signal transduction and asymmetric cell elongation. Light and temperature also influence the gravitropic orientation of plant organs. A series of Arabidopsis shoot gravitropism (sgr) mutants has been shown to exhibit disturbed shoot gravitropism. SGR5 is functionally distinct from other SGR members in that it mediates the early events of gravitropic responses in inflorescence stems. Here, we demonstrated that SGR5 alternative splicing produces two protein variants (SGR5? and SGR5?) in modulating the gravitropic response of inflorescence stems at high temperatures. SGR5? inhibits SGR5? function by forming non-DNA-binding heterodimers. Transgenic plants overexpressing SGR5? (35S:SGR5?) exhibit reduced gravitropic growth of inflorescence stems, as observed in the SGR5-deficient sgr5-5 mutant. Interestingly, SGR5 alternative splicing is accelerated at high temperatures, resulting in the high-level accumulation of SGR5? transcripts. When plants were exposed to high temperatures, whereas gravitropic curvature was reduced in Col-0 inflorescence stems, it was uninfluenced in the inflorescence stems of 35S:SGR5? transgenic plants and sgr5-5 mutant. We propose that the thermoresponsive alternative splicing of SGR5 provides an adaptation strategy by which plants protect the shoots from hot air under high temperature stress in natural habitats. PMID:26256266

  8. Species-Specific Expression of Full-Length and Alternatively Spliced Variant Forms of CDK5RAP2

    PubMed Central

    Park, John S. Y.; Lee, Marie-Katrina; Kang, SungMyung; Jin, Yan; Fu, Songbin; Rosales, Jesusa L.; Lee, Ki-Young

    2015-01-01

    CDK5RAP2 is one of the primary microcephaly genes that are associated with reduced brain size and mental retardation. We have previously shown that human CDK5RAP2 exists as a full-length form (hCDK5RAP2) or an alternatively spliced variant form (hCDK5RAP2-V1) that is lacking exon 32. The equivalent of hCDK5RAP2-V1 has been reported in rat and mouse but the presence of full-length equivalent hCDK5RAP2 in rat and mouse has not been examined. Here, we demonstrate that rat expresses both a full length and an alternatively spliced variant form of CDK5RAP2 that are equivalent to our previously reported hCDK5RAP2 and hCDK5RAP2-V1, repectively. However, mouse expresses only one form of CDK5RAP2 that is equivalent to the human and rat alternatively spliced variant forms. Knowledge of this expression of different forms of CDK5RAP2 in human, rat and mouse is essential in selecting the appropriate model for studies of CDK5RAP2 and primary microcephaly but our findings further indicate the evolutionary divergence of mouse from the human and rat species. PMID:26550838

  9. Steroid responsive regulation of IFN?2 alternative splicing and its possible role in germ cell proliferation in medaka.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, Sipra; Chakraborty, Tapas; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Zhou, Linyan; Ohta, Kohei; Iguchi, Taisen; Nagahama, Yoshitaka

    2015-01-15

    Interferon gamma (IFN?) is an active player in estrogen dependent immuno-regulation of fish. The present work was aimed to characterize the alternatively spliced isoforms of IFN?2 in the gonadal sex development in medaka. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that IFN?2a and 2b were clustered with fish specific interferon gamma. Our in vitro promoter and mini-genome analysis data confirmed that alternative splicing of IFN?2 is regulated by estrogens and androgens. Tissue distribution, quantitative PCR and ISH data demonstrated ubiquitous expression of IFN?2a, while IFN?2b was only expressed predominantly in female germ cells than males. This was further confirmed by germ cell specific GFP signals in the IFN?2b-GFP over-expressed embryos and specific induction of IFN?2b expression in the BrdU positive cells. All together our data suggest that steroid responsive alternatively spliced IFN?2b isoforms might have some indirect roles in germ cell proliferation and thus can be an important candidate for immuno-reproductive interaction studies. PMID:25458697

  10. ZNF265—a novel spliceosomal protein able to induce alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Adams, David J.; van der Weyden, Louise; Mayeda, Akila; Stamm, Stefan; Morris, Brian J.; Rasko, John E.J.

    2001-01-01

    The formation of the active spliceosome, its recruitment to active areas of transcription, and its role in pre-mRNA splicing depends on the association of a number of multifunctional serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins. ZNF265 is an arginine/serine-rich (RS) domain containing zinc finger protein with conserved pre-mRNA splicing protein motifs. Here we show that ZNF265 immunoprecipitates from splicing extracts in association with mRNA, and that it is able to alter splicing patterns of Tra2-?1 transcripts in a dose-dependent manner in HEK 293 cells. Yeast two-hybrid analysis and immunoprecipitation indicated interaction of ZNF265 with the essential splicing factor proteins U1-70K and U2AF35. Confocal microscopy demonstrated colocalization of ZNF265 with the motor neuron gene product SMN, the snRNP protein U1-70K, the SR protein SC35, and with the transcriptosomal components p300 and YY1. Transfection of HT-1080 cells with ZNF265–EGFP fusion constructs showed that nuclear localization of ZNF265 required the RS domain. Alignment with other RS domain–containing proteins revealed a high degree of SR dipeptide conservation. These data show that ZNF265 functions as a novel component of the mRNA processing machinery. PMID:11448987

  11. Tau Splicing and the Intricacies of Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Andreadis, Athena

    2011-01-01

    Tau is a microtubule associated protein that fulfills several functions critical for neuronal formation and health. Tau discharges its functions by producing multiple isoforms via regulated alternative splicing. These isoforms modulate tau function in normal brain by altering the domains of the protein, thereby influencing its localization, conformation and post-translational modifications and hence its availability and affinity for microtubules and other ligands. Disturbances in tau expression result in disruption of the neuronal cytoskeleton and formation of tau structures (neurofibrillary tangles) found in brains of dementia sufferers. More specifically, aberrations in tau splicing regulation directly cause several neurodegenerative diseases which lead to dementia. In this review, I present our cumulative knowledge of tau splicing regulation in connection with neurodegeneration and also briefly go over the still-extensive list of questions that are connected to tau (dys)function. PMID:21604267

  12. Differential Expressions of the Alternatively Spliced Variant mRNAs of the µ Opioid Receptor Gene, OPRM1, in Brain Regions of Four Inbred Mouse Strains

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jin; Lu, Zhigang; Xu, Mingming; Rossi, Grace C.; Kest, Benjamin; Waxman, Amanda R.; Pasternak, Gavril W.; Pan, Ying-Xian

    2014-01-01

    The µ opioid receptor gene, OPRM1, undergoes extensive alternative pre-mRNA splicing in rodents and humans, with dozens of alternatively spliced variants of the OPRM1 gene. The present studies establish a SYBR green quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay to more accurately quantify mouse OPRM1 splice variant mRNAs. Using these qPCR assays, we examined the expression of OPRM1 splice variant mRNAs in selected brain regions of four inbred mouse strains displaying differences in µ opioid-induced tolerance and physical dependence: C56BL/6J, 129P3/J, SJL/J and SWR/J. The complete mRNA expression profiles of the OPRM1 splice variants reveal marked differences of the variant mRNA expression among the brain regions in each mouse strain, suggesting region-specific alternative splicing of the OPRM1 gene. The expression of many variants was also strain-specific, implying a genetic influence on OPRM1 alternative splicing. The expression levels of a number of the variant mRNAs in certain brain regions appear to correlate with strain sensitivities to morphine analgesia, tolerance and physical dependence in four mouse strains. PMID:25343478

  13. SARP, a new alternatively spliced protein phosphatase 1 and DNA interacting protein

    PubMed Central

    Browne, Gareth J.; Fardilha, Margarida; Oxenham, Senga K.; Wu, Wenjuan; Helps, Nicholas R.; da Cruz E Silva, Odete A. B.; Cohen, Patricia T. W.; Cruz E Silva, Edgar F. da

    2006-01-01

    PP1 (protein phosphatase 1) is a ubiquitously expressed serine/threonine-specific protein phosphatase whose activity towards different substrates appears to be mediated via binding to specific proteins that play critical regulatory and targeting roles. In the present paper we report the cloning and characterization of a new protein, termed SARP (several ankyrin repeat protein), which is shown to interact with all isoforms of PP1 by a variety of techniques. A region encompassing a consensus PP1-binding motif in SARP (K354VHF357) modulates endogenous SARP–PP1 activity in mammalian cells. This SARP–PP1 interaction motif lies partially within the first ankyrin repeat in contrast with other proteins [53BP2 (p53 binding protein 2), MYPT1/M110/MBS (myosin binding protein of PP1) and TIMAP (transforming growth factor ? inhibited, membrane-associated protein)], where a PP1-binding motif precedes the ankyrin repeats. Alternative mRNA splicing produces several isoforms of SARP from a single human gene at locus 11q14. SARP1 and/or SARP2 (92–95 kDa) are ubiquitously expressed in all tissues with high levels in testis and sperm, where they are shown to interact with both PP1?1 and PP1?2. SARP3 (65 kDa) is most abundant in brain where SARP isoforms interact with both PP1? and PP1?1. SARP is highly abundant in the nucleus of mammalian cells, consistent with the putative nuclear localization signal at the N-terminus. The presence of a leucine zipper near the C-terminus of SARP1 and SARP2, and the binding of mammalian DNA to SARP2, suggests that SARP1 and SARP2 may be transcription factors or DNA-associated proteins that modulate gene expression. PMID:17123353

  14. Identification of two alternatively spliced forms of human tubulointerstitial nephritis antigen (TIN-Ag).

    PubMed

    Zhou, B; Nelson, T R; Kashtan, C; Gleason, B; Michael, A F; Vlassi, M; Charonis, A S

    2000-04-01

    Tubulointerstitial nephritis antigen (TIN-Ag) is a recently described basement membrane glycoprotein reactive with autoantibodies in some forms of immunologically mediated human tubulointerstitial nephritis. This report presents the complete cDNA and predicted amino acid sequences of two human TIN-Ag mRNA species referred to as TIN1 and TIN2. Translation through the open reading frames of these clones indicates the presence of a signal peptide and putative pre-propeptide. TIN1 additionally contains a characteristic laminin-like epidermal growth factor (EGF) motif and significant homology within the carboxy terminus with the cysteine proteinase family of enzymes. The EGF motif bears important similarities in the positions of cysteines with two motifs in the propeptide of von Willebrand factor. The EGF motif and part of the region that is homologous with the cysteine proteinase family are removed from the TIN2 cDNA. However, the rest of the sequence is identical in these two forms, indicating an alternatively spliced TIN-Ag mRNA product. Both forms contain putative calcium-binding sites. Secondary structure predictions strongly suggest differences between TIN1 and TIN2 leading to the hypothesis that these two forms of TIN-Ag may exhibit differences in their function. Expression studies with appropriate probes demonstrate expression mainly in the kidney and in the intestinal epithelium and lack of expression in other tissues. In the kidney, both TIN1 and TIN2 transcripts are detected, however, TIN1 appears to be the predominant form. PMID:10752525

  15. Alternatively spliced proline-rich cassettes link WNK1 to aldosterone action.

    PubMed

    Roy, Ankita; Al-Qusairi, Lama; Donnelly, Bridget F; Ronzaud, Caroline; Marciszyn, Allison L; Gong, Fan; Chang, Y P Christy; Butterworth, Michael B; Pastor-Soler, Núria M; Hallows, Kenneth R; Staub, Olivier; Subramanya, Arohan R

    2015-09-01

    The thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter (NCC) is important for renal salt handling and blood-pressure homeostasis. The canonical NCC-activating pathway consists of With-No-Lysine (WNK) kinases and their downstream effector kinases SPAK and OSR1, which phosphorylate NCC directly. The upstream mechanisms that connect physiological stimuli to this system remain obscure. Here, we have shown that aldosterone activates SPAK/OSR1 via WNK1. We identified 2 alternatively spliced exons embedded within a proline-rich region of WNK1 that contain PY motifs, which bind the E3 ubiquitin ligase NEDD4-2. PY motif-containing WNK1 isoforms were expressed in human kidney, and these isoforms were efficiently degraded by the ubiquitin proteasome system, an effect reversed by the aldosterone-induced kinase SGK1. In gene-edited cells, WNK1 deficiency negated regulatory effects of NEDD4-2 and SGK1 on NCC, suggesting that WNK1 mediates aldosterone-dependent activity of the WNK/SPAK/OSR1 pathway. Aldosterone infusion increased proline-rich WNK1 isoform abundance in WT mice but did not alter WNK1 abundance in hypertensive Nedd4-2 KO mice, which exhibit high baseline WNK1 and SPAK/OSR1 activity toward NCC. Conversely, hypotensive Sgk1 KO mice exhibited low WNK1 expression and activity. Together, our findings indicate that the proline-rich exons are modular cassettes that convert WNK1 into a NEDD4-2 substrate, thereby linking aldosterone and other NEDD4-2-suppressing antinatriuretic hormones to NCC phosphorylation status. PMID:26241057

  16. Population genetics of duplicated alternatively spliced exons of the Dscam gene in Daphnia and Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Brites, Daniela; Encinas-Viso, Francisco; Ebert, Dieter; Du Pasquier, Louis; Haag, Christoph R

    2011-01-01

    In insects and crustaceans, the Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule (Dscam) occurs in many different isoforms. These are produced by mutually exclusive alternative splicing of dozens of tandem duplicated exons coding for parts or whole immunoglobulin (Ig) domains of the Dscam protein. This diversity plays a role in the development of the nervous system and also in the immune system. Structural analysis of the protein suggested candidate epitopes where binding to pathogens could occur. These epitopes are coded by regions of the duplicated exons and are therefore diverse within individuals. Here we apply molecular population genetics and molecular evolution analyses using Daphnia magna and several Drosophila species to investigate the potential role of natural selection in the divergence between orthologs of these duplicated exons among species, as well as between paralogous exons within species. We found no evidence for a role of positive selection in the divergence of these paralogous exons. However, the power of this test was low, and the fact that no signs of gene conversion between paralogous exons were found suggests that paralog diversity may nonetheless be maintained by selection. The analysis of orthologous exons in Drosophila and in Daphnia revealed an excess of non-synonymous polymorphisms in the epitopes putatively involved in pathogen binding. This may be a sign of balancing selection. Indeed, in Dr. melanogaster the same derived non-synonymous alleles segregate in several populations around the world. Yet other hallmarks of balancing selection were not found. Hence, we cannot rule out that the excess of non-synonymous polymorphisms is caused by segregating slightly deleterious alleles, thus potentially indicating reduced selective constraints in the putative pathogen binding epitopes of Dscam. PMID:22174757

  17. Alternatively spliced proline-rich cassettes link WNK1 to aldosterone action

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Ankita; Al-Qusairi, Lama; Donnelly, Bridget F.; Ronzaud, Caroline; Marciszyn, Allison L.; Gong, Fan; Chang, Y.P. Christy; Butterworth, Michael B.; Pastor-Soler, Núria M.; Hallows, Kenneth R.; Staub, Olivier; Subramanya, Arohan R.

    2015-01-01

    The thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter (NCC) is important for renal salt handling and blood-pressure homeostasis. The canonical NCC-activating pathway consists of With-No-Lysine (WNK) kinases and their downstream effector kinases SPAK and OSR1, which phosphorylate NCC directly. The upstream mechanisms that connect physiological stimuli to this system remain obscure. Here, we have shown that aldosterone activates SPAK/OSR1 via WNK1. We identified 2 alternatively spliced exons embedded within a proline-rich region of WNK1 that contain PY motifs, which bind the E3 ubiquitin ligase NEDD4-2. PY motif–containing WNK1 isoforms were expressed in human kidney, and these isoforms were efficiently degraded by the ubiquitin proteasome system, an effect reversed by the aldosterone-induced kinase SGK1. In gene-edited cells, WNK1 deficiency negated regulatory effects of NEDD4-2 and SGK1 on NCC, suggesting that WNK1 mediates aldosterone-dependent activity of the WNK/SPAK/OSR1 pathway. Aldosterone infusion increased proline-rich WNK1 isoform abundance in WT mice but did not alter WNK1 abundance in hypertensive Nedd4-2 KO mice, which exhibit high baseline WNK1 and SPAK/OSR1 activity toward NCC. Conversely, hypotensive Sgk1 KO mice exhibited low WNK1 expression and activity. Together, our findings indicate that the proline-rich exons are modular cassettes that convert WNK1 into a NEDD4-2 substrate, thereby linking aldosterone and other NEDD4-2–suppressing antinatriuretic hormones to NCC phosphorylation status. PMID:26241057

  18. Ultra-deep profiling of alternatively spliced Drosophila Dscam isoforms by circularization-assisted multi-segment sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei; You, Xintian; Gogol-Döring, Andreas; He, Haihuai; Kise, Yoshiaki; Sohn, Madlen; Chen, Tao; Klebes, Ansgar; Schmucker, Dietmar; Chen, Wei

    2013-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster gene Dscam (Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule) can generate thousands of different ectodomains via mutual exclusive splicing of three large exon clusters. The isoform diversity plays a profound role in both neuronal wiring and pathogen recognition. However, the isoform expression pattern at the global level remained unexplored. Here, we developed a novel method that allows for direct quantification of the alternatively spliced exon combinations from over hundreds of millions of Dscam transcripts in one sequencing run. With unprecedented sequencing depth, we detected a total of 18?496 isoforms, out of 19?008 theoretically possible combinations. Importantly, we demonstrated that alternative splicing between different clusters is independent. Moreover, the isoforms were expressed across a broad dynamic range, with significant bias in cell/tissue and developmental stage-specific patterns. Hitherto underappreciated, such bias can dramatically reduce the ability of neurons to display unique surface receptor codes. Therefore, the seemingly excessive diversity encoded in the Dscam locus might nevertheless be essential for a robust self and non-self discrimination in neurons. PMID:23792425

  19. Cloning and characterization of the mouse Mcoln1 gene reveals an alternatively spliced transcript not seen in humans

    PubMed Central

    Falardeau, John L; Kennedy, John C; Acierno, James S; Sun, Mei; Stahl, Stefanie; Goldin, Ehud; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A

    2002-01-01

    Background Mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder characterized by severe neurologic and ophthalmologic abnormalities. Recently the MLIV gene, MCOLN1, has been identified as a new member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channel superfamily. Here we report the cloning and characterization of the mouse homologue, Mcoln1, and report a novel splice variant that is not seen in humans. Results The human and mouse genes display a high degree of synteny. Mcoln1 shows 91% amino acid and 86% nucleotide identity to MCOLN1. Also, Mcoln1 maps to chromosome 8 and contains an open reading frame of 580 amino acids, with a transcript length of approximately 2 kb encoded by 14 exons, similar to its human counterpart. The transcript that results from murine specific alternative splicing encodes a 611 amino acid protein that differs at the c-terminus. Conclusions Mcoln1 is highly similar to MCOLN1, especially in the transmembrane domains and ion pore region. Also, the late endosomal/lysosomal targeting signal is conserved, supporting the hypothesis that the protein is localized to these vesicle membranes. To date, there are very few reports describing species-specific splice variants. While identification of Mcoln1 is crucial to the development of mouse models for MLIV, the fact that there are two transcripts in mice suggests an additional or alternate function of the gene that may complicate phenotypic assessment. PMID:11897010

  20. Alternative Splicing Events Identified in Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Neural Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Gene W; Xu, Xiangdong; Liang, Tiffany Y; Muotri, Alysson R; Carson, Christian T; Coufal, Nicole G; Gage, Fred H

    2007-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and neural progenitor (NP) cells are excellent models for recapitulating early neuronal development in vitro, and are key to establishing strategies for the treatment of degenerative disorders. While much effort had been undertaken to analyze transcriptional and epigenetic differences during the transition of hESC to NP, very little work has been performed to understand post-transcriptional changes during neuronal differentiation. Alternative RNA splicing (AS), a major form of post-transcriptional gene regulation, is important in mammalian development and neuronal function. Human ESC, hESC-derived NP, and human central nervous system stem cells were compared using Affymetrix exon arrays. We introduced an outlier detection approach, REAP (Regression-based Exon Array Protocol), to identify 1,737 internal exons that are predicted to undergo AS in NP compared to hESC. Experimental validation of REAP-predicted AS events indicated a threshold-dependent sensitivity ranging from 56% to 69%, at a specificity of 77% to 96%. REAP predictions significantly overlapped sets of alternative events identified using expressed sequence tags and evolutionarily conserved AS events. Our results also reveal that focusing on differentially expressed genes between hESC and NP will overlook 14% of potential AS genes. In addition, we found that REAP predictions are enriched in genes encoding serine/threonine kinase and helicase activities. An example is a REAP-predicted alternative exon in the SLK (serine/threonine kinase 2) gene that is differentially included in hESC, but skipped in NP as well as in other differentiated tissues. Lastly, comparative sequence analysis revealed conserved intronic cis-regulatory elements such as the FOX1/2 binding site GCAUG as being proximal to candidate AS exons, suggesting that FOX1/2 may participate in the regulation of AS in NP and hESC. In summary, a new methodology for exon array analysis was introduced, leading to new insights into the complexity of AS in human embryonic stem cells and their transition to neural stem cells. PMID:17967047

  1. Cytokines Interleukin-1? and Tumor Necrosis Factor-? Regulate Different Transcriptional and Alternative Splicing Networks in Primary ?-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ortis, Fernanda; Naamane, Najib; Flamez, Daisy; Ladrière, Laurence; Moore, Fabrice; Cunha, Daniel A.; Colli, Maikel L.; Thykjaer, Thomas; Thorsen, Kasper; Ørntoft, Torben F.; Eizirik, Decio L.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Cytokines contribute to pancreatic ?-cell death in type 1 diabetes. This effect is mediated by complex gene networks that remain to be characterized. We presently utilized array analysis to define the global expression pattern of genes, including spliced variants, modified by the cytokines interleukin (IL)-1? + interferon (IFN)-? and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? + IFN-? in primary rat ?-cells. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Fluorescence-activated cell sorter–purified rat ?-cells were exposed to IL-1? + IFN-? or TNF-? + IFN-? for 6 or 24 h, and global gene expression was analyzed by microarray. Key results were confirmed by RT-PCR, and small-interfering RNAs were used to investigate the mechanistic role of novel and relevant transcription factors identified by pathway analysis. RESULTS Nearly 16,000 transcripts were detected as present in ?-cells, with temporal differences in the number of genes modulated by IL-1? + IFN? or TNF-? + IFN-?. These cytokine combinations induced differential expression of inflammatory response genes, which is related to differential induction of IFN regulatory factor-7. Both treatments decreased the expression of genes involved in the maintenance of ?-cell phenotype and growth/regeneration. Cytokines induced hypoxia-inducible factor-?, which in this context has a proapoptotic role. Cytokines also modified the expression of >20 genes involved in RNA splicing, and exon array analysis showed cytokine-induced changes in alternative splicing of >50% of the cytokine-modified genes. CONCLUSIONS The present study doubles the number of known genes expressed in primary ?-cells, modified or not by cytokines, and indicates the biological role for several novel cytokine-modified pathways in ?-cells. It also shows that cytokines modify alternative splicing in ?-cells, opening a new avenue of research for the field. PMID:19934004

  2. Translational-symmetry alternating phase shifting mask grating mark used in a linear measurement model of lithographic projection lens aberrations

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu Zicheng; Wang Xiangzhao; Bi Qunyu; Yuan Qiongyan; Peng Bo; Duan Lifeng

    2009-07-01

    A linear measurement model of lithographic projection lens aberrations is studied numerically based on the Hopkins theory of partially-coherent imaging and positive resist optical lithography (PROLITH) simulation. In this linearity model, the correlation between the mark's structure and its sensitivities to aberrations is analyzed. A method to design a mark with high sensitivity is proved and declared. By use of this method, a translational-symmetry alternating phase shifting mask (Alt-PSM) grating mark is redesigned with all of the even orders, {+-}3rd and {+-}5th order diffraction light missing. In the evaluation simulation, the measurement accuracies of aberrations prove to be enhanced apparently by use of the redesigned mark instead of the old ones.

  3. Alternative Splicing Variants and DNA Methylation Status of BDNF in Inbred Chicken Lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays essential roles in neuronal survival and differentiation, synaptic plasticity, central regulation of energy homeostasis, and neuronal development of the central and peripheral nerve system. Here, we report two new splicing variants of the chicken BDNF g...

  4. Muscleblind-like 2-mediated alternative splicing in the developing brain and dysregulation in myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Charizanis, Konstantinos; Lee, Kuang-Yung; Batra, Ranjan; Goodwin, Marianne; Zhang, Chaolin; Yuan, Yuan; Shiue, Lily; Cline, Melissa; Scotti, Marina M; Xia, Guangbin; Kumar, Ashok; Ashizawa, Tetsuo; Clark, H Brent; Kimura, Takashi; Takahashi, Masanori P; Fujimura, Harutoshi; Jinnai, Kenji; Yoshikawa, Hiroo; Gomes-Pereira, Mário; Gourdon, Geneviève; Sakai, Noriaki; Nishino, Seiji; Foster, Thomas C; Ares, Manuel; Darnell, Robert B; Swanson, Maurice S

    2012-08-01

    The RNA-mediated disease model for myotonic dystrophy (DM) proposes that microsatellite C(C)TG expansions express toxic RNAs that disrupt splicing regulation by altering MBNL1 and CELF1 activities. While this model explains DM manifestations in muscle, less is known about the effects of C(C)UG expression on the brain. Here, we report that Mbnl2 knockout mice develop several DM-associated central nervous system (CNS) features including abnormal REM sleep propensity and deficits in spatial memory. Mbnl2 is prominently expressed in the hippocampus and Mbnl2 knockouts show a decrease in NMDA receptor (NMDAR) synaptic transmission and impaired hippocampal synaptic plasticity. While Mbnl2 loss did not significantly alter target transcript levels in the hippocampus, misregulated splicing of hundreds of exons was detected using splicing microarrays, RNA-seq, and HITS-CLIP. Importantly, the majority of the Mbnl2-regulated exons examined were similarly misregulated in DM. We propose that major pathological features of the DM brain result from disruption of the MBNL2-mediated developmental splicing program. PMID:22884328

  5. Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres: Recurrent Cytogenetic Aberrations and Chromosome Stability under Extreme Telomere Dysfunction12

    PubMed Central

    Sakellariou, Despoina; Chiourea, Maria; Raftopoulou, Christina; Gagos, Sarantis

    2013-01-01

    Human tumors using the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) exert high rates of telomere dysfunction. Numerical chromosomal aberrations are very frequent, and structural rearrangements are widely scattered among the genome. This challenging context allows the study of telomere dysfunction-driven chromosomal instability in neoplasia (CIN) in a massive scale. We used molecular cytogenetics to achieve detailed karyotyping in 10 human ALT neoplastic cell lines. We identified 518 clonal recombinant chromosomes affected by 649 structural rearrangements. While all human chromosomes were involved in random or clonal, terminal, or pericentromeric rearrangements and were capable to undergo telomere healing at broken ends, a differential recombinatorial propensity of specific genomic regions was noted. We show that ALT cells undergo epigenetic modifications rendering polycentric chromosomes functionally monocentric, and because of increased terminal recombinogenicity, they generate clonal recombinant chromosomes with interstitial telomeric repeats. Losses of chromosomes 13, X, and 22, gains of 2, 3, 5, and 20, and translocation/deletion events involving several common chromosomal fragile sites (CFSs) were recurrent. Long-term reconstitution of telomerase activity in ALT cells reduced significantly the rates of random ongoing telomeric and pericentromeric CIN. However, the contribution of CFS in overall CIN remained unaffected, suggesting that in ALT cells whole-genome replication stress is not suppressed by telomerase activation. Our results provide novel insights into ALT-driven CIN, unveiling in parallel specific genomic sites that may harbor genes critical for ALT cancerous cell growth. PMID:24339742

  6. Messenger RNA Processing I. Splicing

    E-print Network

    Dever, Jennifer A.

    , 2012 #12;3/27/15 5 Genes can undergo alternative splicing Splicing 1 variant: Splicing3/27/15 1 Messenger RNA Processing I. Splicing II. Capping III.Polyadenlya>on Overview · In prokaryotes - RNA pol transcribes the gene (or set of genes

  7. Splicing Regulation: A Molecular Device to Enhance Cancer Cell Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Pagliarini, Vittoria; Naro, Chiara; Sette, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) represents a major resource for eukaryotic cells to expand the coding potential of their genomes and to finely regulate gene expression in response to both intra- and extracellular cues. Cancer cells exploit the flexible nature of the mechanisms controlling AS in order to increase the functional diversity of their proteome. By altering the balance of splice isoforms encoded by human genes or by promoting the expression of aberrant oncogenic splice variants, cancer cells enhance their ability to adapt to the adverse growth conditions of the tumoral microenvironment. Herein, we will review the most relevant cancer-related splicing events and the underlying regulatory mechanisms allowing tumour cells to rapidly adapt to the harsh conditions they may face during the occurrence and development of cancer. PMID:26273627

  8. TILLING mutants of durum wheat result in a high amylose phenotype and provide information on alternative splicing mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sestili, Francesco; Palombieri, Samuela; Botticella, Ermelinda; Mantovani, Paola; Bovina, Riccardo; Lafiandra, Domenico

    2015-04-01

    The amylose/amylopectin ratio has a major influence over the properties of starch and determines its optimal end use. Here, high amylose durum wheat has been bred by combining knock down alleles at the two homoelogous genes encoding starch branching enzyme IIa (SBEIIa-A and SBEIIa-B). The complete silencing of these genes had a number of pleiotropic effects on starch synthesis: it affected the transcriptional activity of SBEIIb, ISA1 (starch debranching enzyme) and all of the genes encoding starch synthases (SSI, SSIIa, SSIII and GBSSI). The starch produced by grain of the double SBEIIa mutants was high in amylose (up to ?1.95 fold that of the wild type) and contained up to about eight fold more resistant starch. A single nucleotide polymorphism adjacent to the splice site at the end of exon 10 of the G364E mutant copies of both SBEIIa-A and SBEIIa-B resulted in the loss of a conserved exonic splicing silencer element. Its starch was similar to that of the SBEIIa double mutant. G364E SBEIIa pre-mRNA was incorrectly processed, resulting in the formation of alternative, but non-functional splicing products. PMID:25711820

  9. Insulin-like growth factor mRNA in Barramundi (Lates calcarifer): alternative splicing and nonresponsiveness to growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Ståhlbom, A K; Sara, V R; Hoeben, P

    1999-04-01

    Barramundi (Lates calcarifer) is a teleost of the superorder Acanthopterygii. Barramundi IGF-I cDNA was cloned and the distribution of alternative transcripts in various barramundi tissues was investigated using rt-PCR and RPA. It was demonstrated that in barramundi tissues, IGF-I mRNAs were represented by two transcripts corresponding to the reported salmonid Ea-2 and Ea-4. The acute effect of GH on hepatic IGF-I mRNA levels was investigated. Seven hours after intraperitonal administration of either 6 micrograms of recombinant bream GH/g body weight or saline, no significant increase in the levels of either of the two transcripts could be observed. The presence of GH receptors in the barramundi liver was demonstrated in binding assays using recombinant bream GH and liver membrane preparations. An analysis of a barramundi IGF-I genomic sequence encompassing the three exons that encode the E domain suggested that the pattern of splice site utilization is determined by the degree of homology of the splicing signals to the consensus splice site sequences. PMID:10495884

  10. Fox-2 Splicing Factor Binds to a Conserved Intron Motif to PromoteInclusion of Protein 4.1R Alternative Exon 16

    SciTech Connect

    Ponthier, Julie L.; Schluepen, Christina; Chen, Weiguo; Lersch,Robert A.; Gee, Sherry L.; Hou, Victor C.; Lo, Annie J.; Short, Sarah A.; Chasis, Joel A.; Winkelmann, John C.; Conboy, John G.

    2006-03-01

    Activation of protein 4.1R exon 16 (E16) inclusion during erythropoiesis represents a physiologically important splicing switch that increases 4.1R affinity for spectrin and actin. Previous studies showed that negative regulation of E16 splicing is mediated by the binding of hnRNP A/B proteins to silencer elements in the exon and that downregulation of hnRNP A/B proteins in erythroblasts leads to activation of E16 inclusion. This paper demonstrates that positive regulation of E16 splicing can be mediated by Fox-2 or Fox-1, two closely related splicing factors that possess identical RNA recognition motifs. SELEX experiments with human Fox-1 revealed highly selective binding to the hexamer UGCAUG. Both Fox-1 and Fox-2 were able to bind the conserved UGCAUG elements in the proximal intron downstream of E16, and both could activate E16 splicing in HeLa cell co-transfection assays in a UGCAUG-dependent manner. Conversely, knockdown of Fox-2 expression, achieved with two different siRNA sequences resulted in decreased E16 splicing. Moreover, immunoblot experiments demonstrate mouse erythroblasts express Fox-2, but not Fox-1. These findings suggest that Fox-2 is a physiological activator of E16 splicing in differentiating erythroid cells in vivo. Recent experiments show that UGCAUG is present in the proximal intron sequence of many tissue-specific alternative exons, and we propose that the Fox family of splicing enhancers plays an important role in alternative splicing switches during differentiation in metazoan organisms.

  11. Genome-wide analysis of alternative splicing in cow: implications in bovine as a model for human diseases

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Alternative splicing (AS) is a primary mechanism of functional regulation in the human genome, with 60% to 80% of human genes being alternatively spliced. As part of the bovine genome annotation team, we have analysed 4567 bovine AS genes, compared to 16715 human and 16491 mouse AS genes, along with Gene Ontology (GO) analysis. We also analysed the two most important events, cassette exons and intron retention in 94 human disease genes and mapped them to the bovine orthologous genes. Of the 94 human inherited disease genes, a protein domain analysis was carried out for the transcript sequences of 12 human genes that have orthologous genes and have been characterised in cow. Results Of the 21,755 bovine genes, 4,567 genes (21%) are alternatively spliced, compared to 16,715 (68%) in human and 16,491 (57%) in mouse. Gene-level analysis of the orthologous set suggested that bovine genes show fewer AS events compared to human and mouse genes. A detailed examination of cassette exons across human and cow for 94 human disease genes, suggested that a majority of cassette exons in human were present and constitutive in bovine as opposed to intron retention which exhibited 50% of the exons as present and 50% as absent in cow. We observed that AS plays a major role in disease implications in human through manipulations of essential/functional protein domains. It was also evident that majority of these 12 genes had conservation of all essential domains in their bovine orthologous counterpart, for these human diseases. Conclusion While alternative splicing has the potential to create many mRNA isoforms from a single gene, in cow the majority of genes generate two to three isoforms, compared to six in human and four in mouse. Our analyses demonstrated that a smaller number of bovine genes show greater transcript diversity. GO definitions for bovine AS genes provided 38% more functional information than currently available in the sequence database. Our protein domain analysis helped us verify the suitability of using bovine as a model for human diseases and also recognize the contribution of AS towards the disease phenotypes. PMID:19958474

  12. Modulation of p53? and p53? expression by regulating the alternative splicing of TP53 gene modifies cellular response

    PubMed Central

    Marcel, V; Fernandes, K; Terrier, O; Lane, D P; Bourdon, J-C

    2014-01-01

    In addition to the tumor suppressor p53 protein, also termed p53?, the TP53 gene produces p53? and p53? through alternative splicing of exons 9? and 9? located within TP53 intron 9. Here we report that both TG003, a specific inhibitor of Cdc2-like kinases (Clk) that regulates the alternative splicing pre-mRNA pathway, and knockdown of SFRS1 increase expression of endogenous p53? and p53? at mRNA and protein levels. Development of a TP53 intron 9 minigene shows that TG003 treatment and knockdown of SFRS1 promote inclusion of TP53 exons 9?/9?. In a series of 85 primary breast tumors, a significant association was observed between expression of SFRS1 and ? variant, supporting our experimental data. Using siRNA specifically targeting exons 9?/9?, we demonstrate that cell growth can be driven by modulating p53? and p53? expression in an opposite manner, depending on the cellular context. In MCF7 cells, p53? and p53? promote apoptosis, thus inhibiting cell growth. By transient transfection, we show that p53? enhanced p53? transcriptional activity on the p21 and Bax promoters, while p53? increased p53? transcriptional activity on the Bax promoter only. Moreover, p53? and p53? co-immunoprecipitate with p53? only in the presence of p53-responsive promoter. Interestingly, although p53? and p53? promote apoptosis in MCF7 cells, p53? and p53? maintain cell growth in response to TG003 in a p53?-dependent manner. The dual activities of p53? and p53? isoforms observed in non-treated and TG003-treated cells may result from the impact of TG003 on both expression and activities of p53 isoforms. Overall, our data suggest that p53? and p53? regulate cellular response to modulation of alternative splicing pre-mRNA pathway by a small drug inhibitor. The development of novel drugs targeting alternative splicing process could be used as a novel therapeutic approach in human cancers. PMID:24926616

  13. Modulation of p53? and p53? expression by regulating the alternative splicing of TP53 gene modifies cellular response.

    PubMed

    Marcel, V; Fernandes, K; Terrier, O; Lane, D P; Bourdon, J-C

    2014-09-01

    In addition to the tumor suppressor p53 protein, also termed p53?, the TP53 gene produces p53? and p53? through alternative splicing of exons 9? and 9? located within TP53 intron 9. Here we report that both TG003, a specific inhibitor of Cdc2-like kinases (Clk) that regulates the alternative splicing pre-mRNA pathway, and knockdown of SFRS1 increase expression of endogenous p53? and p53? at mRNA and protein levels. Development of a TP53 intron 9 minigene shows that TG003 treatment and knockdown of SFRS1 promote inclusion of TP53 exons 9?/9?. In a series of 85 primary breast tumors, a significant association was observed between expression of SFRS1 and ? variant, supporting our experimental data. Using siRNA specifically targeting exons 9?/9?, we demonstrate that cell growth can be driven by modulating p53? and p53? expression in an opposite manner, depending on the cellular context. In MCF7 cells, p53? and p53? promote apoptosis, thus inhibiting cell growth. By transient transfection, we show that p53? enhanced p53? transcriptional activity on the p21 and Bax promoters, while p53? increased p53? transcriptional activity on the Bax promoter only. Moreover, p53? and p53? co-immunoprecipitate with p53? only in the presence of p53-responsive promoter. Interestingly, although p53? and p53? promote apoptosis in MCF7 cells, p53? and p53? maintain cell growth in response to TG003 in a p53?-dependent manner. The dual activities of p53? and p53? isoforms observed in non-treated and TG003-treated cells may result from the impact of TG003 on both expression and activities of p53 isoforms. Overall, our data suggest that p53? and p53? regulate cellular response to modulation of alternative splicing pre-mRNA pathway by a small drug inhibitor. The development of novel drugs targeting alternative splicing process could be used as a novel therapeutic approach in human cancers. PMID:24926616

  14. Variant max protein, derived by alternative splicing, associates with c-Myc in vivo and inhibits transactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Arsura, M.; Deshpande, A.; Sonenshein, G.E.

    1995-12-01

    This report identifies a variant form of Myc-associated factor X (Max) protein, which plays a central role in the functional activity of c-Myc as a transcriptional activator. This variation, termed dMax, lacks the basic region as well as helix 1 and loop regions as a result of alternative splicing of max mRNA. This nuclear dMax was unable to bind E-box Myc site DNA but associated with c-Myc in vitro and in vivo and repressed transactivation. 42 refs., 8 figs.

  15. Genome-Wide Identification of Alternative Splice Forms Down-Regulated by Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Blanchette, Marco; Green, Richard E.; Meng, Qi; Rehwinkel, Jan; Gallusser, Fabian L.; Izaurralde, Elisa; Rio, Donald C.; Dudoit, Sandrine; Brenner, Steven E.

    2009-01-01

    Alternative mRNA splicing adds a layer of regulation to the expression of thousands of genes in Drosophila melanogaster. Not all alternative splicing results in functional protein; it can also yield mRNA isoforms with premature stop codons that are degraded by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway. This coupling of alternative splicing and NMD provides a mechanism for gene regulation that is highly conserved in mammals. NMD is also active in Drosophila, but its effect on the repertoire of alternative splice forms has been unknown, as has the mechanism by which it recognizes targets. Here, we have employed a custom splicing-sensitive microarray to globally measure the effect of alternative mRNA processing and NMD on Drosophila gene expression. We have developed a new algorithm to infer the expression change of each mRNA isoform of a gene based on the microarray measurements. This method is of general utility for interpreting splicing-sensitive microarrays and high-throughput sequence data. Using this approach, we have identified a high-confidence set of 45 genes where NMD has a differential effect on distinct alternative isoforms, including numerous RNA–binding and ribosomal proteins. Coupled alternative splicing and NMD decrease expression of these genes, which may in turn have a downstream effect on expression of other genes. The NMD–affected genes are enriched for roles in translation and mitosis, perhaps underlying the previously observed role of NMD factors in cell cycle progression. Our results have general implications for understanding the NMD mechanism in fly. Most notably, we found that the NMD–target mRNAs had significantly longer 3? untranslated regions (UTRs) than the nontarget isoforms of the same genes, supporting a role for 3? UTR length in the recognition of NMD targets in fly. PMID:19543372

  16. The Choice of Alternative 5' Splice Sites in Influenza Virus M1 mRNA is Regulated by the Viral Polymerase Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Shin-Ru; Nemeroff, Martin E.; Krug, Robert M.

    1995-07-01

    The influenza virus M1 mRNA has two alternative 5' splice sites: a distal 5' splice site producing mRNA_3 that has the coding potential for 9 amino acids and a proximal 5' splice site producing M2 mRNA encoding the essential M2 ion-channel protein. Only mRNA_3 was made in uninfected cells transfected with DNA expressing M1 mRNA. Similarly, using nuclear extracts from uninfected cells, in vitro splicing of M1 mRNA yielded only mRNA_3. Only when the mRNA_3 5' splice site was inactivated by mutation was M2 mRNA made in uninfected cells and in uninfected cell extracts. In influenza virus-infected cells, M2 mRNA was made, but only after a delay, suggesting that newly synthesized viral gene product(s) were needed to activate the M2 5' splice site. We present strong evidence that these gene products are the complex of the three polymerase proteins, the same complex that functions in the transcription and replication of the viral genome. Gel shift experiments showed that the viral polymerase complex bound to the 5' end of the viral M1 mRNA in a sequence-specific and cap-dependent manner. During in vitro splicing catalyzed by uninfected cell extracts, the binding of the viral polymerase complex blocked the mRNA_3 5' splice site, resulting in the switch to the M2 mRNA 5' splice site and the production of M2 mRNA.

  17. Genome-Wide Analysis of Heat-Sensitive Alternative Splicing in Physcomitrella patens1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chiung-Yun; Lin, Wen-Dar; Tu, Shih-Long

    2014-01-01

    Plant growth and development are constantly influenced by temperature fluctuations. To respond to temperature changes, different levels of gene regulation are modulated in the cell. Alternative splicing (AS) is a widespread mechanism increasing transcriptome complexity and proteome diversity. Although genome-wide studies have revealed complex AS patterns in plants, whether AS impacts the stress defense of plants is not known. We used heat shock (HS) treatments at nondamaging temperature and messenger RNA sequencing to obtain HS transcriptomes in the moss Physcomitrella patens. Data analysis identified a significant number of novel AS events in the moss protonema. Nearly 50% of genes are alternatively spliced. Intron retention (IR) is markedly repressed under elevated temperature but alternative donor/acceptor site and exon skipping are mainly induced, indicating differential regulation of AS in response to heat stress. Transcripts undergoing heat-sensitive IR are mostly involved in specific functions, which suggests that plants regulate AS with transcript specificity under elevated temperature. An exonic GAG-repeat motif in these IR regions may function as a regulatory cis-element in heat-mediated AS regulation. A conserved AS pattern for HS transcription factors in P. patens and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) reveals that heat regulation for AS evolved early during land colonization of green plants. Our results support that AS of specific genes, including key HS regulators, is fine-tuned under elevated temperature to modulate gene regulation and reorganize metabolic processes. PMID:24777346

  18. Regulation of mRNA Abundance by Polypyrimidine Tract-Binding Protein-Controlled Alternate 5? Splice Site Choice

    PubMed Central

    Hamid, Fursham M.; Makeyev, Eugene V.

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) provides a potent mechanism for increasing protein diversity and modulating gene expression levels. How alternate splice sites are selected by the splicing machinery and how AS is integrated into gene regulation networks remain important questions of eukaryotic biology. Here we report that polypyrimidine tract-binding protein 1 (Ptbp1/PTB/hnRNP-I) controls alternate 5? and 3? splice site (5?ss and 3?ss) usage in a large set of mammalian transcripts. A top scoring event identified by our analysis was the choice between competing upstream and downstream 5?ss (u5?ss and d5?ss) in the exon 18 of the Hps1 gene. Hps1 is essential for proper biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles and loss of its function leads to a disease called type 1 Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome (HPS). We show that Ptbp1 promotes preferential utilization of the u5?ss giving rise to stable mRNAs encoding a full-length Hps1 protein, whereas bias towards d5?ss triggered by Ptbp1 down-regulation generates transcripts susceptible to nonsense-mediated decay (NMD). We further demonstrate that Ptbp1 binds to pyrimidine-rich sequences between the u5?ss and d5?ss and activates the former site rather than repressing the latter. Consistent with this mechanism, u5?ss is intrinsically weaker than d5?ss, with a similar tendency observed for other genes with Ptbp1-induced u5?ss bias. Interestingly, the brain-enriched Ptbp1 paralog Ptbp2/nPTB/brPTB stimulated the u5?ss utilization but with a considerably lower efficiency than Ptbp1. This may account for the tight correlation between Hps1 with Ptbp1 expression levels observed across mammalian tissues. More generally, these data expand our understanding of AS regulation and uncover a post-transcriptional strategy ensuring co-expression of a subordinate gene with its master regulator through an AS-NMD tracking mechanism. PMID:25375251

  19. Regulation of mRNA abundance by polypyrimidine tract-binding protein-controlled alternate 5' splice site choice.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Fursham M; Makeyev, Eugene V

    2014-11-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) provides a potent mechanism for increasing protein diversity and modulating gene expression levels. How alternate splice sites are selected by the splicing machinery and how AS is integrated into gene regulation networks remain important questions of eukaryotic biology. Here we report that polypyrimidine tract-binding protein 1 (Ptbp1/PTB/hnRNP-I) controls alternate 5' and 3' splice site (5'ss and 3'ss) usage in a large set of mammalian transcripts. A top scoring event identified by our analysis was the choice between competing upstream and downstream 5'ss (u5'ss and d5'ss) in the exon 18 of the Hps1 gene. Hps1 is essential for proper biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles and loss of its function leads to a disease called type 1 Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome (HPS). We show that Ptbp1 promotes preferential utilization of the u5'ss giving rise to stable mRNAs encoding a full-length Hps1 protein, whereas bias towards d5'ss triggered by Ptbp1 down-regulation generates transcripts susceptible to nonsense-mediated decay (NMD). We further demonstrate that Ptbp1 binds to pyrimidine-rich sequences between the u5'ss and d5'ss and activates the former site rather than repressing the latter. Consistent with this mechanism, u5'ss is intrinsically weaker than d5'ss, with a similar tendency observed for other genes with Ptbp1-induced u5'ss bias. Interestingly, the brain-enriched Ptbp1 paralog Ptbp2/nPTB/brPTB stimulated the u5'ss utilization but with a considerably lower efficiency than Ptbp1. This may account for the tight correlation between Hps1 with Ptbp1 expression levels observed across mammalian tissues. More generally, these data expand our understanding of AS regulation and uncover a post-transcriptional strategy ensuring co-expression of a subordinate gene with its master regulator through an AS-NMD tracking mechanism. PMID:25375251

  20. Mutational bias is the driving force for shaping the synonymous codon usage pattern of alternatively spliced genes in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingpo; Hu, Haichao; Wang, Hong

    2015-04-01

    Alternative splicing plays important roles in diverse aspects of plant development, metabolism, and stress responses. However, the regulatory mechanisms of alternative splicing of genes still remain incompletely elucidated, especially in plants. In this study, the synonymous codon usage pattern of alternatively spliced (AS) genes in rice was firstly explored using the combination of correspondence analysis (CA), internal CA, correlation and ANOVA analyses. The results show that alternatively and non-alternatively spliced (non-AS) genes have similar tendency for overall codon usage, but exhibit significant difference in 58 out of 64 codons. AS and non-AS genes are both under strong purifying selection, but the former ones have significant lower mutation rate and are prone to be enriched towards the chromosomal ends. In the group of AS genes, the variability in synonymous codon usage between genes is mainly due to the variations in GC content, CDS length, as well as gene functions. Mutational bias that accounts for 25.85 % of the total codon usage variability plays a major role in shaping the codon usage pattern of AS genes. In contrast, no obvious evidence is found for the contributions of translational selection, AS types, the conservation of AS events, and numbers of AS variants to the codon usage divergence between AS genes. These findings may be useful for further understanding the mechanisms of origination, differentiation and regulation of alternatively spliced genes in plants. PMID:25407289

  1. Data in support of a functional analysis of splicing mutations in the IDS gene and the use of antisense oligonucleotides to exploit an alternative therapy for MPS II.

    PubMed

    Matos, Liliana; Gonçalves, Vânia; Pinto, Eugénia; Laranjeira, Francisco; Prata, Maria João; Jordan, Peter; Desviat, Lourdes R; Pérez, Belén; Alves, Sandra

    2015-12-01

    This data article contains insights into the methodology used for the analysis of three exonic mutations altering the splicing of the IDS gene: c.241C>T, c.257C>T and c.1122C>T. We have performed splicing assays for the wild-type and mutant minigenes corresponding to these substitutions. In addition, bioinformatic predictions of splicing regulatory sequence elements as well as RNA interference and overexpression experiments were conducted. The interpretation of these data and further extensive experiments into the analysis of these three mutations and also into the methodology applied to correct one of them can be found in "Functional analysis of splicing mutations in the IDS gene and the use of antisense oligonucleotides to exploit an alternative therapy for MPS II" Matos et al. (2015) [1]. PMID:26693516

  2. Data in support of a functional analysis of splicing mutations in the IDS gene and the use of antisense oligonucleotides to exploit an alternative therapy for MPS II

    PubMed Central

    Matos, Liliana; Gonçalves, Vânia; Pinto, Eugénia; Laranjeira, Francisco; Prata, Maria João; Jordan, Peter; Desviat, Lourdes R.; Pérez, Belén; Alves, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    This data article contains insights into the methodology used for the analysis of three exonic mutations altering the splicing of the IDS gene: c.241C>T, c.257C>T and c.1122C>T. We have performed splicing assays for the wild-type and mutant minigenes corresponding to these substitutions. In addition, bioinformatic predictions of splicing regulatory sequence elements as well as RNA interference and overexpression experiments were conducted. The interpretation of these data and further extensive experiments into the analysis of these three mutations and also into the methodology applied to correct one of them can be found in “Functional analysis of splicing mutations in the IDS gene and the use of antisense oligonucleotides to exploit an alternative therapy for MPS II” Matos et al. (2015) [1]. PMID:26693516

  3. NOTCH2 and FLT3 gene mis-splicings are common events in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML): new potential targets in AML

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Natan, Michal; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin; Pilarski, Patrick M.; Bach, Christian; Pevzner, Samuel; Calimeri, Teresa; Avet-Loiseau, Herve; Lode, Laurence; Verselis, Sigitas; Fox, Edward A.; Galinsky, Ilene; Mathews, Steven; Dagogo-Jack, Ibiayi; Wadleigh, Martha; Steensma, David P.; Motyckova, Gabriela; Deangelo, Daniel J.; Quackenbush, John; Tenen, Daniel G.; Stone, Richard M.; Griffin, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Our previous studies revealed an increase in alternative splicing of multiple RNAs in cells from patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) compared with CD34+ bone marrow cells from normal donors. Aberrantly spliced genes included a number of oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, and genes involved in regulation of apoptosis, cell cycle, and cell differentiation. Among the most commonly mis-spliced genes (>70% of AML patients) were 2, NOTCH2 and FLT3, that encode myeloid cell surface proteins. The splice variants of NOTCH2 and FLT3 resulted from complete or partial exon skipping and utilization of cryptic splice sites. Longitudinal analyses suggested that NOTCH2 and FLT3 aberrant splicing correlated with disease status. Correlation analyses between splice variants of these genes and clinical features of patients showed an association between NOTCH2-Va splice variant and overall survival of patients. Our results suggest that NOTCH2 and FLT3 mis-splicing is a common characteristic of AML and has the potential to generate transcripts encoding proteins with altered function. Thus, splice variants of these genes might provide disease markers and targets for novel therapeutics. PMID:24574459

  4. Short linear motif acquisition, exon formation and alternative splicing determine a pathway to diversity for NCoR-family co-repressors

    PubMed Central

    Short, Stephen; Peterkin, Tessa; Guille, Matthew; Patient, Roger; Sharpe, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Vertebrate NCoR-family co-repressors play central roles in the timing of embryo and stem cell differentiation by repressing the activity of a range of transcription factors. They interact with nuclear receptors using short linear motifs (SLiMs) termed co-repressor for nuclear receptor (CoRNR) boxes. Here, we identify the pathway leading to increasing co-repressor diversity across the deuterostomes. The final complement of CoRNR boxes arose in an ancestral cephalochordate, and was encoded in one large exon; the urochordates and vertebrates then split this region between 10 and 12 exons. In Xenopus, alternative splicing is prevalent in NCoR2, but absent in NCoR1. We show for one NCoR1 exon that alternative splicing can be recovered by a single point mutation, suggesting NCoR1 lost the capacity for alternative splicing. Analyses in Xenopus and zebrafish identify that cellular context, rather than gene sequence, predominantly determines species differences in alternative splicing. We identify a pathway to diversity for the NCoR family beginning with the addition of a SLiM, followed by gene duplication, the generation of alternatively spliced isoforms and their differential deployment. PMID:26289800

  5. restless, an active Ac-like transposon from the fungus Tolypocladium inflatum: structure, expression, and alternative RNA splicing.

    PubMed Central

    Kempken, F; Kück, U

    1996-01-01

    Elements of the hAT transposon family, such as the maize activator (Ac), have been discovered in a large number of eukaryotic species. This type of class II transposon, present in both plants and animals, has not been previously detected in any fungal organism. However, using a differential screening method to detect repetitive DNA, we have identified a hAT transposon in the hyphomycete Tolypocladium inflatum. The transposon, which we named restless, is 4,097 bp long, carries 20-bp inverted repeats and an 8-bp target site duplication, and encodes a long open reading frame which is interrupted by a single intronic sequence. The derived mRNA exhibits alternative splicing, resulting in the formation of two transcripts that may be translated into polypeptides of 157 or 803 amino acids. The predicted amino acid sequence of the larger polypeptide demonstrates significant homology with transposases from the hAT transposon family. A chromosomal analysis using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed that all seven chromosomal bands carry copies of the 4.1-kb transposon. This was confirmed in hybridization experiments with rare-cutting restriction endonucleases which indicate that about 15 copies are present in T. inflatum. The genomic distribution of restless and its transcriptional expression, alternative mRNA splicing, and genomic mobility all imply a potential role for this element in developing a transposon tagging system for use in filamentous fungi. PMID:8887685

  6. Regulation of Shootin1 Gene Expression Involves NGF-induced Alternative Splicing during Neuronal Differentiation of PC12 Cells.

    PubMed

    Ergin, Volkan; Erdogan, Mutlu; Menevse, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    Shootin1 is a protein involved in neuronal polarization, and has been shown to be a key molecule for the positive/negative feedback loop for axon induction required during neuronal symmetry breaking. To better understand the molecular basis of shootin1 dynamics, we analysed the regulatory pathways and the expressional status of shootin1 gene during NGF-induced neuronal differentiation. We demonstrated that the isoform-1 and isoform-2 of shootin1 is differentially expressed during neuronal differentiation. By blocking individual downstream pathways of NGF signalling, we found that PI3K/Akt pathway plays a major role in the expression of shootin1 isoform-2. Western blot and RT-PCR results showed that the isoform-1 of shootin1 is constitutively expressed, while the isoform-2 is expressed in a manner that is strictly dependent on NGF-stimulation. Isoform-specific RT-PCR results demonstrated that the differential expression of the isoform-1 and isoform-2 of shootin1 is a consequence of alternative splicing of shootin1 pre-mRNA, in response to NGF-signalling. Collectively these findings provide the first information on the molecular mechanisms regulating the expression of shootin1 gene and represent the first example of NGF-induced alternative splicing process that has a regulatory role in neuritogenesis. PMID:26648138

  7. Regulation of Shootin1 Gene Expression Involves NGF-induced Alternative Splicing during Neuronal Differentiation of PC12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ergin, Volkan; Erdogan, Mutlu; Menevse, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    Shootin1 is a protein involved in neuronal polarization, and has been shown to be a key molecule for the positive/negative feedback loop for axon induction required during neuronal symmetry breaking. To better understand the molecular basis of shootin1 dynamics, we analysed the regulatory pathways and the expressional status of shootin1 gene during NGF-induced neuronal differentiation. We demonstrated that the isoform-1 and isoform-2 of shootin1 is differentially expressed during neuronal differentiation. By blocking individual downstream pathways of NGF signalling, we found that PI3K/Akt pathway plays a major role in the expression of shootin1 isoform-2. Western blot and RT-PCR results showed that the isoform-1 of shootin1 is constitutively expressed, while the isoform-2 is expressed in a manner that is strictly dependent on NGF-stimulation. Isoform-specific RT-PCR results demonstrated that the differential expression of the isoform-1 and isoform-2 of shootin1 is a consequence of alternative splicing of shootin1 pre-mRNA, in response to NGF-signalling. Collectively these findings provide the first information on the molecular mechanisms regulating the expression of shootin1 gene and represent the first example of NGF-induced alternative splicing process that has a regulatory role in neuritogenesis. PMID:26648138

  8. Functional Cross-Talking between Differentially Expressed and Alternatively Spliced Genes in Human Liver Cancer Cells Treated with Berberine

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Zhen; Sun, Yi; Zhu, Ruixin; Jiao, Na; Tang, Kailin; Cao, Zhiwei; Ma, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Berberine has been identified with anti-proliferative effects on various cancer cells. Many researchers have been trying to elucidate the anti-cancer mechanisms of berberine based on differentially expressed genes. However, differentially alternative splicing genes induced by berberine might also contribute to its pharmacological actions and have not been reported yet. Moreover, the potential functional cross-talking between the two sets of genes deserves further exploration. In this study, RNA-seq technology was used to detect the differentially expressed genes and differentially alternative spliced genes in BEL-7402 cancer cells induced by berberine. Functional enrichment analysis indicated that these genes were mainly enriched in the p53 and cell cycle signalling pathway. In addition, it was statistically proven that the two sets of genes were locally co-enriched along chromosomes, closely connected to each other based on protein-protein interaction and functionally similar on Gene Ontology tree. These results suggested that the two sets of genes regulated by berberine might be functionally cross-talked and jointly contribute to its cell cycle arresting effect. It has provided new clues for further researches on the pharmacological mechanisms of berberine as well as the other botanical drugs. PMID:26606055

  9. The oncogenic role of JC virus T antigen in lens tumors without cell specificity of alternative splicing of its intron

    PubMed Central

    Gou, Wen-feng; Zhao, Shuang; Shen, Dao-fu; Yang, Xue-feng; Liu, Yun-peng; Sun, Hong-zhi; Luo, Jun-sheng; Zheng, Hua-chuan

    2015-01-01

    JC virus (JCV), a ubiquitous polyoma virus that commonly infects the human, is identified as the etiologic agent for progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy and some malignancies. To clarify the oncogenic role of JCV T antigen, we established two transgenic mice of T antigen using either ?-crystallin A (?AT) or cytokeratin 19(KT) promoter. Lens tumors were found in high-copy ?AT mice with the immunopositivity of T antigen, p53, ?-catenin and N-cadherin. Enlarged eyeballs were observed and tumor invaded into the brain by magnetic resonance imaging and hematoxylin-and-eosin staining. The overall survival time of homozygous mice was shorter than that of hemizygous mice (p<0.01), the latter than wild-type mice (p<0.01). The spontaneous salivary tumor and hepatocellular carcinoma were seen in ?AT5 transgenic mice with no positivity of T antigen. KT7 mice suffered from lung tumor although JCV T antigen was strongly expressed in gastric epithelial cells. The alternative splicing of T antigen intron was detectable in the lens tumor of ?AT mice, gastric mucosa of KT mice, and various cells transfected with pEGFP-N1-T antigen. It was suggested that JCV T antigen might induce carcinogenesis at a manner of cell specificity, which is not linked to alternative splicing of its intron. Both spontaneous lens and lung tumor models provide good tools to investigate the oncogenic role of JCV T antigen. PMID:25868857

  10. A Mef2 gene that generates a muscle-specific isoform via alternative mRNA splicing.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, J F; Miano, J M; Hustad, C M; Copeland, N G; Jenkins, N A; Olson, E N

    1994-01-01

    Members of the myocyte-specific enhancer-binding factor 2 (MEF2) family of transcription factors bind a conserved A/T-rich sequence in the control regions of numerous muscle-specific genes. Mammalian MEF2 proteins have been shown previously to be encoded by three genes, Mef2, xMef2, and Mef2c, each of which gives rise to multiple alternatively spliced transcripts. We describe the cloning of a new member of the MEF2 family from mice, termed MEF2D, which shares extensive homology with other MEF2 proteins but is the product of a separate gene. MEF2D binds to and activates transcription through the MEF2 site and forms heterodimers with other members of the MEF2 family. Deletion mutations show that the carboxyl terminus of MEF2D is required for efficient transactivation. MEF2D transcripts are widely expressed, but alternative splicing of MEF2D transcripts gives rise to a muscle-specific isoform which is induced during myoblast differentiation. The mouse Mef2, Mef2c, and Mef2d genes map to chromosomes 7, 13, and 3, respectively. The complexity of the MEF2 family of regulatory proteins provides the potential for fine-tuning of transcriptional responses as a consequence of combinatorial interactions among multiple MEF2 isoforms encoded by the four Mef2 genes. Images PMID:8114702

  11. Alternative splicing converts STIM2 from an activator to an inhibitor of store-operated calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Anshul; Yen, Michelle; Sadaghiani, Amir Masoud; Malmersjö, Seth

    2015-01-01

    Store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) regulates a wide variety of essential cellular functions. SOCE is mediated by STIM1 and STIM2, which sense depletion of ER Ca2+ stores and activate Orai channels in the plasma membrane. Although the amplitude and dynamics of SOCE are considered important determinants of Ca2+-dependent responses, the underlying modulatory mechanisms are unclear. In this paper, we identify STIM2?, a highly conserved alternatively spliced isoform of STIM2, which, in contrast to all known STIM isoforms, is a potent inhibitor of SOCE. Although STIM2? does not by itself strongly bind Orai1, it is recruited to Orai1 channels by forming heterodimers with other STIM isoforms. Analysis of STIM2? mutants and Orai1-STIM2? chimeras suggested that it actively inhibits SOCE through a sequence-specific allosteric interaction with Orai1. Our results reveal a previously unrecognized functional flexibility in the STIM protein family by which alternative splicing creates negative and positive regulators of SOCE to shape the amplitude and dynamics of Ca2+ signals. PMID:26033257

  12. Multiple effects of digoxin on subsets of cancer-associated genes through the alternative splicing pathway.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guan-Yu; Liu, Shu-Ting; Huang, Shih-Ming; Chang, Yung-Lung; Lin, Wei-Shiang

    2014-11-01

    The signaling characteristics of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase are distinct from its ion pumping activity. Cardiac glycosides modulate the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase protein complex upon binding, activate downstream signaling pathways and increase [Ca(2+)]i. Recent studies demonstrate that the depletion of p53 and hypoxia-induced factor 1? proteins is caused by cardiac glycosides. However, the detailed mechanisms governing this process are not well known. In this study, we showed that the depletion of p53 proteins by digoxin involved not only inhibition of protein synthesis but also inhibition at the post-transcriptional level. Post-transcriptional regulation occurs via down-regulation of SRSF3, the primary splicing factor responsible for the switch from p53? to the p53? isoform. Digoxin also modulated G2/M arrest, DNA damage and apoptosis through the p53-dependent pathway in HeLa cells. In addition, digoxin was involved in epithelial-mesenchymal-transition progression via E-cadherin reduction and snail induction. Digoxin had similar effects to caffeine, another SRSF3-reduced agent, on the cell cycle profile and DNA damage of cells. Interestingly, combined digoxin and caffeine treatment blocked cell cycle progression and conferred resistance to cell death via snail induction. These findings demonstrate that down-regulation of splicing factor, such as SRSF3, to alter cell cycle progression, cell death and invasion is a potential target for the drug repositioning of cardiac glycosides. PMID:25193633

  13. Evidence for the Possible Biological Significance of the igf-1 Gene Alternative Splicing in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Philippou, Anastassios; Armakolas, Athanasios; Koutsilieris, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of prostate cancer (PCa), since it plays a key role in cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. The IGF-I actions are mediated mainly via its binding to the type I IGF receptor (IGF-IR), however IGF-I signaling via insulin receptor (IR) and hybrid IGF-I/IR is also evident. Different IGF-I mRNA splice variants, namely IGF-IEa, IGF-IEb, and IGF-IEc, are expressed in human cells and tissues. These transcripts encode several IGF-I precursor proteins which contain the same bioactive product (mature IGF-I), however, they differ by the length of their signal peptides on the amino-terminal end and the structure of the extension peptides (E-peptides) on the carboxy-terminal end. There is an increasing interest in the possible different role of the IGF-I transcripts and their respective non-(mature)IGF-I products in the regulation of distinct biological activities. Moreover, there is strong evidence of a differential expression profile of the IGF-I splice variants in normal versus PCa tissues and PCa cells, implying that the expression pattern of the various IGF-I transcripts and their respective protein products may possess different functions in cancer biology. Herein, the evidence that the IGF-IEc transcript regulates PCa growth via Ec peptide specific and IGF-IR/IR-independent signaling is discussed. PMID:23519101

  14. P01.08LINEAGE-SPECIFIC SPLICING OF AN ALTERNATIVE EXON OF ANXA7 PROMOTES EGFR SIGNALING ACTIVATION AND TUMOR PROGRESSION IN GLIOBLASTOMA

    PubMed Central

    Ferrarese, R.; Bug, E.; Maticzka, D.; Reichardt, W.; Masilamani, A.P.; Dai, F.; Weyerbrock, A.; Prinz, M.; Bredel, M.; Carro, M.S.

    2014-01-01

    Tissue-specific alternative splicing is critical to the emergence of tissue identity during development, yet its role in malignant transformation is undefined. Tissue-specific splicing involves evolutionarily-conserved, alternative exons, which represent only a minority of total alternative exons. Many, however, have functional features that influence signaling pathways to profound biological effect. In the brain, Annexin A7 isoform 1 (ANXA7-I1) is exclusively expressed in mature neurons, while isoform 2 (ANXA7-I2) in which exon 6 is skipped, is expressed in glial and progenitor cells. We show that lineage-specific splicing of the cassette exon 6 in the membrane-binding tumor suppressor ANXA7diminishes endosomal targeting and consequent signal termination of the EGFR oncoprotein during brain tumor progression. Splicing of this exon is mediated by Polypyrimidine Tract-Binding Protein 1 (PTBP1), a ribonucleoprotein normally repressed during neuronal development but which we found to be highly expressed also in glioblastomas through loss of a brain-enriched microRNA, miR-124, and gene amplification. Here, we show that the PTBP1-ANXA7 splicing-EGFR signal activation axis promotes in vitro cell migration and invasion, and tumor angiogenesis in vivo. In glioblastoma, ANXA7 splicing is likely inherited from a potential tumor-initiating ancestor but this trait is further exploited through accumulation of mutations that enhance EGFR signaling. Our data illustrate how lineage-specific splicing of a tissue-regulated alternative exon in a constituent of an oncogenic pathway eliminates its tumor suppressor function and promotes glioblastoma progression. This paradigm may offer a general model as to how tissue-specific regulatory mechanisms can contribute to reprogramming normal development to oncogenesis.

  15. The MicroRNA miR-124 promotes neuronal differentiation by triggering brain-specific alternative pre-mRNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Makeyev, Eugene V; Zhang, Jiangwen; Carrasco, Monica A; Maniatis, Tom

    2007-08-01

    Both microRNAs and alternative pre-mRNA splicing have been implicated in the development of the nervous system (NS), but functional interactions between these two pathways are poorly understood. We demonstrate that the neuron-specific microRNA miR-124 directly targets PTBP1 (PTB/hnRNP I) mRNA, which encodes a global repressor of alternative pre-mRNA splicing in nonneuronal cells. Among the targets of PTBP1 is a critical cassette exon in the pre-mRNA of PTBP2 (nPTB/brPTB/PTBLP), an NS-enriched PTBP1 homolog. When this exon is skipped, PTBP2 mRNA is subject to nonsense-mediated decay (NMD). During neuronal differentiation, miR-124 reduces PTBP1 levels, leading to the accumulation of correctly spliced PTBP2 mRNA and a dramatic increase in PTBP2 protein. These events culminate in the transition from non-NS to NS-specific alternative splicing patterns. We also present evidence that miR-124 plays a key role in the differentiation of progenitor cells to mature neurons. Thus, miR-124 promotes NS development, at least in part by regulating an intricate network of NS-specific alternative splicing. PMID:17679093

  16. The neuron-specific RNA-binding protein ELAV regulates neuroglian alternative splicing in neurons and binds directly to its pre-mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Lisbin, Michael J.; Qiu, Jan; White, Kalpana

    2001-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster neural-specific protein, ELAV, has been shown to regulate the neural-specific splicing of three genes: neuroglian (nrg), erect wing, and armadillo. Alternative splicing of the nrg transcript involves alternative inclusion of a 3?-terminal exon. Here, using a minigene reporter, we show that the nrg alternatively spliced intron (nASI) has all the determinants required to recreate proper neural-specific RNA processing seen with the endogenous nrg transcript, including regulation by ELAV. An in vitro UV cross-linking assay revealed that ELAV from nuclear extracts cross-links to four distinct sites along the 3200 nucleotide long nASI; one EXS is positioned at the polypyrimidine tract of the default 3? splice site. ELAV cross-linking sites (EXSs) have in common long tracts of (U)-rich sequence rather than a precise consensus; moreover, each tract has at least two 8/10U elements; their importance is validated by mutant transgene reporter analysis. Further, we propose criteria for ELAV target sequence recognition based on the four EXSs, sites within the nASI that are (U) rich but do not cross-link with ELAV, and predicted EXSs from a phylogenetic comparison with Drosophila virilis nASI. These results suggest that ELAV regulates nrg alternative splicing by direct interaction with the nASI. PMID:11581160

  17. Alternative Splicing in CaV2.2 Regulates Neuronal Trafficking via Adaptor Protein Complex-1 Adaptor Protein Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Macabuag, Natsuko

    2015-01-01

    N-type voltage-gated calcium (CaV2.2) channels are expressed in neurons and targeted to the plasma membrane of presynaptic terminals, facilitating neurotransmitter release. Here, we find that the adaptor protein complex-1 (AP-1) mediates trafficking of CaV2.2 from the trans-Golgi network to the cell surface. Examination of splice variants of CaV2.2, containing either exon 37a (selectively expressed in nociceptors) or 37b in the proximal C terminus, reveal that canonical AP-1 binding motifs, Yxx? and [DE]xxxL[LI], present only in exon 37a, enhance intracellular trafficking of exon 37a-containing CaV2.2 to the axons and plasma membrane of rat DRG neurons. Finally, we identify differential effects of dopamine-2 receptor (D2R) and its agonist-induced activation on trafficking of CaV2.2 isoforms. D2R slowed the endocytosis of CaV2.2 containing exon 37b, but not exon 37a, and activation by the agonist quinpirole reversed the effect of the D2R. Our work thus reveals key mechanisms involved in the trafficking of N-type calcium channels. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT CaV2.2 channels are important for neurotransmitter release, but how they are trafficked is still poorly understood. Here, we describe a novel mechanism for trafficking of CaV2.2 from the trans-Golgi network to the cell surface which is mediated by the adaptor protein AP-1. Alternative splicing of exon 37 produces CaV2.2-exon 37a, selectively expressed in nociceptors, or CaV2.2-exon 37b, which is the major splice isoform. Our study reveals that canonical AP-1 binding motifs (Yxx? and [DE]xxxL[LI]), present in exon 37a, but not 37b, enhance intracellular trafficking of exon 37a-containing CaV2.2 to axons and plasma membrane of DRG neurons. Interaction of APs with CaV2.2 channels may also be key underlying mechanisms for differential effects of the dopamine D2 receptor on trafficking of CaV2.2 splice variants. PMID:26511252

  18. The C-terminal domain of Brd2 is important for chromatin interaction and regulation of transcription and alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Hnilicová, Jarmila; Hozeifi, Samira; Stejskalová, Eva; Dušková, Eva; Poser, Ina; Humpolí?ková, Jana; Hof, Martin; Stan?k, David

    2013-01-01

    Brd2 is a member of the bromodomain extra terminal (BET) protein family, which consists of four chromatin-interacting proteins that regulate gene expression. Each BET protein contains two N-terminal bromodomains, which recognize acetylated histones, and the C-terminal protein–protein interaction domain. Using a genome-wide screen, we identify 1450 genes whose transcription is regulated by Brd2. In addition, almost 290 genes change their alternative splicing pattern upon Brd2 depletion. Brd2 is specifically localized at promoters of target genes, and our data show that Brd2 interaction with chromatin cannot be explained solely by histone acetylation. Using coimmunoprecipitation and live-cell imaging, we show that the C-terminal part is crucial for Brd2 association with chromatin. Live-cell microscopy also allows us to map the average binding time of Brd2 to chromatin and quantify the contributions of individual Brd2 domains to the interaction with chromatin. Finally, we show that bromodomains and the C-terminal domain are equally important for transcription and splicing regulation, which correlates with the role of these domains in Brd2 binding to chromatin. PMID:24048450

  19. Alternative splicing, expression and cellular localization of Calneuron-1 in the rat and human brain.

    PubMed

    Hradsky, Johannes; Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Marunde, Monika; Mikhaylova, Marina; Kreutz, Michael R

    2015-10-01

    Calneuron-1 and -2 are members of the neuronal calcium-binding protein family (nCaBP). They are transmembrane Calmodulin-like EF-hand Ca(2+)-sensors, and a function in the control of Golgi-to-plasma membrane vesicle trafficking has been assigned to both proteins. In this paper, we describe the distribution of Calneuron-1 in rat and human brains. We show that Calneuron-1 is ubiquitously expressed in all brain regions examined. The protein is most abundant in Purkinje cells of the cerebellum and principal neurons of the cortex and limbic brain whereas no expression in glial cells is apparent. In addition, we identify two novel splice isoforms of Calneuron-1 with extended N-termini. These isoforms are particular abundant in the cerebellum. Taken together, these data set grounds for a better understanding of the cellular function of Calneurons. PMID:26116628

  20. Genetic Variation in the Alternative Splicing Regulator, RBM20, is associated with Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Refaat, Marwan M.; Lubitz, Steven A.; Makino, Seiko; Islam, Zahid; Frangiskakis, J. Michael; Mehdi, Haider; Gutmann, Rebecca; Zhang, Michael L.; Bloom, Heather L.; MacRae, Calum A.; Dudley, Samuel C.; Shalaby, Alaa A.; Weiss, Raul; McNamara, Dennis M.; London, Barry; Ellinor, Patrick T.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a leading cause of heart failure and death. The etiology of DCM is genetically heterogeneous. OBJECTIVES We sought to define the prevalence of mutations in the RNA splicing protein, RBM20, in a large cohort with DCM, and to determine if genetic variation in RBM20 is associated with clinical outcomes. METHODS Subjects included in the GRADE (Genetic Risk Assessment of Defibrillator Events) study were at least 18 years of age, had an ejection fraction of ? 30%, and an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD). The coding region and splice junctions of RBM20 were screened in DCM subjects; two common polymorphisms in RBM20, rs942077 and rs35141404, were genotyped in all GRADE subjects. RESULTS 1465 subjects were enrolled in the GRADE study and 283 with DCM were screened for RBM20 mutations. The mean age of subjects with DCM was 58 ± 13 years, 64% were male and the mean follow up was 24.2 ± 17.1 months after ICD placement. RBM20 mutations were identified in eight subjects with DCM (2.8%). Mutation carriers had a similar survival, transplantation rate, and frequency of ICD therapy compared to non-mutation carriers. Three of eight subjects (37.5%) with RBM20 mutations had atrial fibrillation (AF) whereas 19 (7.4%) subjects without mutations had AF (p= 0.02). Among all GRADE subjects, rs35141404 was associated with AF (minor allele OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.44–0.86, p=0.006). In the subset of GRADE subjects with DCM, rs35141404 was associated with AF (minor allele OR 0.58, p=0.047). CONCLUSIONS Mutations in RBM20 were observed in approximately 3% of subjects with DCM. There were no differences in survival, transplantation rate, and frequency of ICD therapy in mutation carriers. PMID:22004663

  1. Epilepsy Caused by an Abnormal Alternative Splicing with Dosage Effect of the SV2A Gene in a Chicken Model

    PubMed Central

    Douaud, Marine; Feve, Katia; Pituello, Fabienne; Gourichon, David; Boitard, Simon; Leguern, Eric; Coquerelle, Gérard; Vieaud, Agathe; Batini, Cesira; Vignal, Alain; Tixier-Boichard, Michèle; Pitel, Frédérique

    2011-01-01

    Photosensitive reflex epilepsy is caused by the combination of an individual's enhanced sensitivity with relevant light stimuli, such as stroboscopic lights or video games. This is the most common reflex epilepsy in humans; it is characterized by the photoparoxysmal response, which is an abnormal electroencephalographic reaction, and seizures triggered by intermittent light stimulation. Here, by using genetic mapping, sequencing and functional analyses, we report that a mutation in the acceptor site of the second intron of SV2A (the gene encoding synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2A) is causing photosensitive reflex epilepsy in a unique vertebrate model, the Fepi chicken strain, a spontaneous model where the neurological disorder is inherited as an autosomal recessive mutation. This mutation causes an aberrant splicing event and significantly reduces the level of SV2A mRNA in homozygous carriers. Levetiracetam, a second generation antiepileptic drug, is known to bind SV2A, and SV2A knock-out mice develop seizures soon after birth and usually die within three weeks. The Fepi chicken survives to adulthood and responds to levetiracetam, suggesting that the low-level expression of SV2A in these animals is sufficient to allow survival, but does not protect against seizures. Thus, the Fepi chicken model shows that the role of the SV2A pathway in the brain is conserved between birds and mammals, in spite of a large phylogenetic distance. The Fepi model appears particularly useful for further studies of physiopathology of reflex epilepsy, in comparison with induced models of epilepsy in rodents. Consequently, SV2A is a very attractive candidate gene for analysis in the context of both mono- and polygenic generalized epilepsies in humans. PMID:22046416

  2. The Orthologue of the Fruitfly Sex Behaviour Gene Fruitless in the Mosquito Aedes aegypti: Evolution of Genomic Organisation and Alternative Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Salvemini, Marco; D'Amato, Rocco; Petrella, Valeria; Aceto, Serena; Nimmo, Derric; Neira, Marco; Alphey, Luke; Polito, Lino C.; Saccone, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster the doublesex (dsx) and fruitless (fru) regulatory genes act at the bottom of the somatic sex determination pathway. Both are regulated via alternative splicing by an upstream female-specific TRA/TRA-2 complex, recognizing a common cis element. dsx controls somatic sexual differentiation of non-neural as well as of neural tissues. fru, on the other hand, expresses male-specific functions only in neural system where it is required to built the neural circuits underlying proper courtship behaviour. In the mosquito Aedes aegypti sex determination is different from Drosophila. The key male determiner M, which is located on one of a pair of homomorphic sex chromosomes, controls sex-specific splicing of the mosquito dsx orthologue. In this study we report the genomic organization and expression of the fru homologue in Ae. aegypti (Aeafru). We found that it is sex-specifically spliced suggesting that it is also under the control of the sex determination pathway. Comparative analyses between the Aeafru and Anopheles gambiae fru (Angfru) genomic loci revealed partial conservation of exon organization and extensive divergence of intron lengths. We find that Aeadsx and Aeafru share novel cis splicing regulatory elements conserved in the alternatively spliced regions. We propose that in Aedes aegypti sex-specific splicing of dsx and fru is most likely under the control of splicing regulatory factors which are different from TRA and TRA-2 found in other dipteran insects and discuss the potential use of fru and dsx for developing new genetic strategies in vector control. PMID:23418412

  3. Detection of splice junctions from paired-end RNA-seq data by SpliceMap

    E-print Network

    Wong, Wing Hung

    Detection of splice junctions from paired-end RNA-seq data by SpliceMap Kin Fai Au1 , Hui Jiang1 technique provides high- throughput data (RNA-seq data) to study alternative splicing events in different types of cells. Here, we present a computational method, SpliceMap, to detect splice junctions from RNA

  4. Severe hypoxia exerts parallel and cell-specific regulation of gene expression and alternative splicing in human mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The endosteum of the bone marrow provides a specialized hypoxic niche that may serve to preserve the integrity, pluripotency, longevity and stemness of resident mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). To explore the molecular genetic consequences of such a niche we subjected human (h) MSCs to a pO2 of 4 mmHg and analyzed global gene expression and alternative splicing (AS) by genome-exon microarray and RT-qPCR, and phenotype by western blot and immunostaining. Results Out of 446 genes differentially regulated by >2.5-fold, down-regulated genes outnumbered up-regulated genes by 243:203. Exon analyses revealed 60 hypoxia-regulated AS events with splice indices (SI) >1.0 from 53 genes and a correlation between high SI and degree of transcript regulation. Parallel analyses of a publicly available AS study on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) showed that there was a strong cell-specific component with only 11 genes commonly regulated in hMSCs and HUVECs and 17 common differentially spliced genes. Only 3 genes were differentially responsive to hypoxia at the gene (>2.0) and AS levels in both cell types. Functional assignments revealed unique profiles of gene expression with complex regulation of differentiation, extracellular matrix, intermediate filament and metabolic marker genes. Antioxidant genes, striated muscle genes and insulin/IGF-1 signaling intermediates were down-regulated. There was a coordinate induction of 9 out of 12 acidic keratins that along with other epithelial and cell adhesion markers implies a partial mesenchymal to epithelial transition. Conclusions We conclude that severe hypoxia confers a quiescent phenotype in hMSCs that is reflected by both the transcriptome profile and gene-specific changes of splicosome actions. The results reveal that severe hypoxia imposes markedly different patterns of gene regulation of MSCs compared with more moderate hypoxia. This is the first study to report hypoxia-regulation of AS in stem/progenitor cells and the first molecular genetic characterization of MSC in a hypoxia-induced quiescent immobile state. PMID:24758227

  5. Differential transcription initiation and alternative RNA splicing of Knox7, a class 2 homeobox gene of maize.

    PubMed

    Morère-Le Paven, Marie-Christine; Anzala, Fabiola; Recton, Arnaud; Limami, Anis M

    2007-10-15

    Knox7, a class 2 homeobox gene has been characterized in maize. A combination of experimental (3'- and 5'-RACE) and bioinformatics approaches supported the idea that Knox7 would be transcribed into two alternative transcripts by differential initiation of transcription. Sequence differences between alternative transcripts, Knox7L the larger and Knox7S the smaller, were confined to their 5' end regions and exon 1 was only found in Knox7L transcripts. Deduced proteins shared the same homeodomain, while an Ala and Ala/Gly rich domain was found only in KNOX7L protein. We hypothesize that KNOX7L and KNOX7S might regulate (differentially) the expression of the same gene(s) by binding competitively to the same cis-acting element(s). Further expression analysis using RT-PCR to amplify cDNA portions corresponding to ORFs of both Knox7 alternative transcripts showed that seven cDNA clones were probably generated by alternative splicing of Knox7L. Alignment of these sequences showed that they are in frame suggesting the existence of the corresponding proteins. Quantitative RT-PCR experiments indicated that Knox7S and Knox7L were expressed in maize embryos during germination. In the same tissue, expression of Knox7S was stimulated by light and ABA and inhibited by GA, two hormones that control germination process. PMID:17716832

  6. Body weight-dependent troponin T alternative splicing is evolutionarily conserved from insects to mammals and is partially impaired in skeletal muscle of obese rats

    PubMed Central

    Schilder, Rudolf J.; Kimball, Scot R.; Marden, James H.; Jefferson, Leonard S.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Do animals know at a physiological level how much they weigh, and, if so, do they make homeostatic adjustments in response to changes in body weight? Skeletal muscle is a likely tissue for such plasticity, as weight-bearing muscles receive mechanical feedback regarding body weight and consume ATP in order to generate forces sufficient to counteract gravity. Using rats, we examined how variation in body weight affected alternative splicing of fast skeletal muscle troponin T (Tnnt3), a component of the thin filament that regulates the actin–myosin interaction during contraction and modulates force output. In response to normal growth and experimental body weight increases, alternative splicing of Tnnt3 in rat gastrocnemius muscle was adjusted in a quantitative fashion. The response depended on weight per se, as externally attached loads had the same effect as an equal change in actual body weight. Examining the association between Tnnt3 alternative splicing and ATP consumption rate, we found that the Tnnt3 splice form profile had a significant association with nocturnal energy expenditure, independently of effects of weight. For a subset of the Tnnt3 splice forms, obese Zucker rats failed to make the same adjustments; that is, they did not show the same relationship between body weight and the relative abundance of five Tnnt3 ? splice forms (i.e. Tnnt3 ?2–?5 and ?8), four of which showed significant effects on nocturnal energy expenditure in Sprague–Dawley rats. Heavier obese Zucker rats displayed certain splice form relative abundances (e.g. Tnnt3 ?3) characteristic of much lighter, lean animals, resulting in a mismatch between body weight and muscle molecular composition. Consequently, we suggest that body weight-inappropriate skeletal muscle Tnnt3 expression in obesity is a candidate mechanism for muscle weakness and reduced mobility. Weight-dependent quantitative variation in Tnnt3 alternative splicing appears to be an evolutionarily conserved feature of skeletal muscle and provides a quantitative molecular marker to track how an animal perceives and responds to body weight. PMID:21490260

  7. B-raf Alternative Splicing Is Dispensable for Development but Required for Learning and Memory Associated with the Hippocampus in the Adult Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Druillennec, Sabine; Larcher, Magalie; Laroche, Serge; Eychène, Alain

    2010-01-01

    The B-raf proto-oncogene exerts essential functions during development and adulthood. It is required for various processes, such as placental development, postnatal nervous system myelination and adult learning and memory. The mouse B-raf gene encodes several isoforms resulting from alternative splicing of exons 8b and 9b located in the hinge region upstream of the kinase domain. These alternative sequences modulate the biochemical and biological properties of B-Raf proteins. To gain insight into the physiological importance of B-raf alternative splicing, we generated two conditional knockout mice of exons 8b and 9b. Homozygous animals with a constitutive deletion of either exon are healthy and fertile, and survive up to 18 months without any visible abnormalities, demonstrating that alternative splicing is not essential for embryonic development and brain myelination. However, behavioural analyses revealed that expression of exon 9b-containing isoforms is required for B-Raf function in hippocampal-dependent learning and memory. In contrast, mice mutated on exon 8b are not impaired in this function. Interestingly, our results suggest that exon 8b is present only in eutherians and its splicing is differentially regulated among species. PMID:21203559

  8. Characterization of an alternative splice variant of human nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 3 (NTPDase3): A possible modulator of nucleotidase activity and purinergic signaling

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Patrick A.; Gaddie, Keith J.; Smith, Thomas M.; Kirley, Terence L.

    2007-01-01

    Nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 3 (NTPDase3) is a cell surface, membrane-bound enzyme that hydrolyzes extracellular nucleotides, thereby modulating purinergic signaling. An alternatively spliced variant of NTPDase3 was obtained and analyzed. This alternatively spliced variant, termed “NTPDase3?”, is produced through the use of an alternative terminal exon (exon 11) in place of the terminal exon (exon 12) in the full-length NTPDase3, now termed “NTPDase3?". This results in an expressed protein lacking the C-terminal cytoplasmic sequence, the C-terminal transmembrane helix, and apyrase conserved region 5. The cDNA encoding this truncated splice variant was detected in a human lung library by PCR. Like the full-length NTPDase3?, the alternatively spliced NTPDase3? was expressed in COS cells after transfection, but only the full-length NTPDase3? is enzymatically active and properly trafficked to the plasma membrane. However, when the truncated NTPDase3? was co-transfected with full-length NTPDase3?, there was a significant reduction in the amount of NTPDase3? that was properly processed and trafficked to the plasma membrane as active enzyme, indicating that the truncated form interferes with normal biosynthetic processing of the full-length enzyme. This suggests a role for the NTPDase3? variant in the regulation of NTPDase3 nucleotidase activity, and therefore the control of purinergic signaling, in those cells and tissues expressing both NTPDase3? and NTPDase3?. PMID:17126282

  9. Alternative splicing of TIA-1 in human colon cancer regulates VEGF isoform expression, angiogenesis, tumour growth and bevacizumab resistance.

    PubMed

    Hamdollah Zadeh, Maryam A; Amin, Elianna M; Hoareau-Aveilla, Coralie; Domingo, Enric; Symonds, Kirsty E; Ye, Xi; Heesom, Katherine J; Salmon, Andrew; D'Silva, Olivia; Betteridge, Kai B; Williams, Ann C; Kerr, David J; Salmon, Andrew H J; Oltean, Sebastian; Midgley, Rachel S; Ladomery, Michael R; Harper, Steven J; Varey, Alexander H R; Bates, David O

    2015-01-01

    The angiogenic capability of colorectal carcinomas (CRC), and their susceptibility to anti-angiogenic therapy, is determined by expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) isoforms. The intracellular protein T-cell Intracellular Antigen (TIA-1) alters post-transcriptional RNA processing and binds VEGF-A mRNA. We therefore tested the hypothesis that TIA-1 could regulate VEGF-A isoform expression in colorectal cancers. TIA-1 and VEGF-A isoform expression was measured in colorectal cancers and cell lines. We discovered that an endogenous splice variant of TIA-1 encoding a truncated protein, short TIA-1 (sTIA-1) was expressed in CRC tissues and invasive K-Ras mutant colon cancer cells and tissues but not in adenoma cell lines. sTIA-1 was more highly expressed in CRC than in normal tissues and increased with tumour stage. Knockdown of sTIA-1 or over-expression of full length TIA-1 (flTIA-1) induced expression of the anti-angiogenic VEGF isoform VEGF-A165b. Whereas flTIA-1 selectively bound VEGF-A165 mRNA and increased translation of VEGF-A165b, sTIA-1 prevented this binding. In nude mice, xenografted colon cancer cells over-expressing flTIA-1 formed smaller, less vascular tumours than those expressing sTIA-1, but flTIA-1 expression inhibited the effect of anti-VEGF antibodies. These results indicate that alternative splicing of an RNA binding protein can regulate isoform specific expression of VEGF providing an added layer of complexity to the angiogenic profile of colorectal cancer and their resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy. PMID:25224594

  10. Enhancer-dependent 5 -Splice Site Control of fruitless Pre-mRNA Splicing*

    E-print Network

    Hertel, Klemens J.

    - and 3 -splice sites. Alternative pre-mRNA splicing is commonly used to regulate the expression of genes% of human genes are alternatively spliced (5), some- times leading to thousands of different mRNA isoforms from a single gene. Numerous examples describe how alternative splicing regulates gene expression

  11. Pax2/5/8 and Pax6 alternative splicing events in basal chordates and vertebrates: a focus on paired box domain

    PubMed Central

    Fabian, Peter; Kozmikova, Iryna; Kozmik, Zbynek; Pantzartzi, Chrysoula N.

    2015-01-01

    Paired box transcription factors play important role in development and tissue morphogenesis. The number of Pax homologs varies among species studied so far, due to genome and gene duplications that have affected PAX family to a great extent. Based on sequence similarity and functional domains, four Pax classes have been identified in chordates, namely Pax1/9, Pax2/5/8, Pax3/7, and Pax4/6. Numerous splicing events have been reported mainly for Pax2/5/8 and Pax6 genes. Of significant interest are those events that lead to Pax proteins with presumed novel properties, such as altered DNA-binding or transcriptional activity. In the current study, a thorough analysis of Pax2/5/8 splicing events from cephalochordates and vertebrates was performed. We focused more on Pax2/5/8 and Pax6 splicing events in which the paired domain is involved. Three new splicing events were identified in Oryzias latipes, one of which seems to be conserved in Acanthomorphata. Using representatives from deuterostome and protostome phyla, a comparative analysis of the Pax6 exon-intron structure of the paired domain was performed, during an attempt to estimate the time of appearance of the Pax6(5a) mRNA isoform. As shown in our analysis, this splicing event is characteristic of Gnathostomata and is absent in the other chordate subphyla. Moreover, expression pattern of alternative spliced variants was compared between cephalochordates and fish species. In summary, our data indicate expansion of alternative mRNA variants in paired box region of Pax2/5/8 and Pax6 genes during the course of vertebrate evolution. PMID:26191073

  12. An EMT-Driven Alternative Splicing Program Occurs in Human Breast Cancer and Modulates Cellular Phenotype

    E-print Network

    Shapiro, Irina M.

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a mechanism important for embryonic development, plays a critical role during malignant transformation. While much is known about transcriptional regulation of EMT, alternative ...

  13. An Aberrant Splice Acceptor Site Due to a Novel Intronic Nucleotide Substitution in MSX1 Gene Is the Cause of Congenital Tooth Agenesis in a Japanese Family

    PubMed Central

    Tatematsu, Tadashi; Kimura, Masashi; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Machida, Junichiro; Yamaguchi, Seishi; Shibata, Akio; Goto, Hiroki; Nakayama, Atsuo; Higashi, Yujiro; Miyachi, Hitoshi; Shimozato, Kazuo; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Tokita, Yoshihito

    2015-01-01

    Congenital tooth agenesis is caused by mutations in the MSX1, PAX9, WNT10A, or AXIN2 genes. Here, we report a Japanese family with nonsyndromic tooth agenesis caused by a novel nucleotide substitution in the intronic region between exons 1 and 2 of the MSX1 gene. Because the mutation is located 9?bp before exon 2 (c.452-9G>A), we speculated that the nucleotide substitution would generate an abnormal splice site. Using cDNA analysis of an immortalized patient blood cell, we confirmed that an additional 7-nucleotide sequence was inserted at the splice junction between exons 1 and 2 (c.451_452insCCCTCAG). The consequent frameshift generated a homeodomain-truncated MSX1 (p.R151fsX20). We then studied the subcellular localization of truncated MSX1 protein in COS cells, and observed that it had a whole cell distribution more than a nuclear localization, compared to that of wild-type protein. This result suggests a deletion of the nuclear localization signal, which is mapped to the MSX1 homeodomain. These results indicate that this novel intronic nucleotide substitution is the cause of tooth agenesis in this family. To date, most MSX1 variants isolated from patients with tooth agenesis involve single amino acid substitutions in the highly conserved homeodomain or deletion mutants caused by frameshift or nonsense mutations. We here report a rare case of an intronic mutation of the MSX1 gene responsible for human tooth agenesis. In addition, the missing tooth patterns were slightly but significantly different between an affected monozygotic twin pair of this family, showing that epigenetic or environmental factors also affect the phenotypic variations of missing teeth among patients with nonsyndromic tooth agenesis caused by an MSX1 haploinsufficiency. PMID:26030286

  14. Changes of telomerase activity by alternative splicing of full-length and beta variants of hTERT in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Rha, Sun Young; Jeung, Hei Cheul; Park, Kyu Hyun; Kim, Jin Ju; Chung, Hyun Cheol

    2009-01-01

    Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) expression level may not always correlate with telomerase activity. Although the positions of the spliced sites suggest that many of the variants do not code for functional reverse transcriptase, the functions of the spliced variants of hTERT are unknown. We analyzed hTERT splicing patterns with respect to telomerase activity in breast cancer. We examined telomerase activity by telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assay and detected spliced variants of hTERT by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Of 45 breast cancer patients, 38 (84%) were found to express telomerase activity and 41 (91%) expressed hTERT. In patients with telomerase activity, 14 (37%) expressed all four types of variants (full length, alpha, beta, and alpha/beta). Eleven patients (29%) expressed both the full-length and beta variant. Eight patients (22%) expressed the beta variant only and 3 (8%) expressed the full-length type only. When comparing telomerase activity to the expression of splicing variants, a tendency was found for lower telomerase activity in patients expressing the beta variant only (45 +/- 11) versus those expressing all four types (64 +/- 32) and those coexpressing the full-length type with the beta variant (61 +/- 22) (p = 0.06, respectively). In patients with both full-length and beta variants coexpression, increment of beta variant showed a decreased telomerase activity regardless of the full-length variant expression (p = 0.027). Telomerase activity changed with alternative splicing of the full-length and beta variants expression of hTERT in breast cancer. PMID:20225759

  15. RBFOX and PTBP1 proteins regulate the alternative splicing of micro-exons in human brain transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Pulido, Luis; Haerty, Wilfried

    2015-01-01

    Ninety-four percent of mammalian protein-coding exons exceed 51 nucleotides (nt) in length. The paucity of micro-exons (? 51 nt) suggests that their recognition and correct processing by the splicing machinery present greater challenges than for longer exons. Yet, because thousands of human genes harbor processed micro-exons, specialized mechanisms may be in place to promote their splicing. Here, we survey deep genomic data sets to define 13,085 micro-exons and to study their splicing mechanisms and molecular functions. More than 60% of annotated human micro-exons exhibit a high level of sequence conservation, an indicator of functionality. While most human micro-exons require splicing-enhancing genomic features to be processed, the splicing of hundreds of micro-exons is enhanced by the adjacent binding of splice factors in the introns of pre-messenger RNAs. Notably, splicing of a significant number of micro-exons was found to be facilitated by the binding of RBFOX proteins, which promote their inclusion in the brain, muscle, and heart. Our analyses suggest that accurate regulation of micro-exon inclusion by RBFOX proteins and PTBP1 plays an important role in the maintenance of tissue-specific protein–protein interactions. PMID:25524026

  16. RBFOX and PTBP1 proteins regulate the alternative splicing of micro-exons in human brain transcripts.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang I; Sanchez-Pulido, Luis; Haerty, Wilfried; Ponting, Chris P

    2015-01-01

    Ninety-four percent of mammalian protein-coding exons exceed 51 nucleotides (nt) in length. The paucity of micro-exons (? 51 nt) suggests that their recognition and correct processing by the splicing machinery present greater challenges than for longer exons. Yet, because thousands of human genes harbor processed micro-exons, specialized mechanisms may be in place to promote their splicing. Here, we survey deep genomic data sets to define 13,085 micro-exons and to study their splicing mechanisms and molecular functions. More than 60% of annotated human micro-exons exhibit a high level of sequence conservation, an indicator of functionality. While most human micro-exons require splicing-enhancing genomic features to be processed, the splicing of hundreds of micro-exons is enhanced by the adjacent binding of splice factors in the introns of pre-messenger RNAs. Notably, splicing of a significant number of micro-exons was found to be facilitated by the binding of RBFOX proteins, which promote their inclusion in the brain, muscle, and heart. Our analyses suggest that accurate regulation of micro-exon inclusion by RBFOX proteins and PTBP1 plays an important role in the maintenance of tissue-specific protein-protein interactions. PMID:25524026

  17. Rethinking gene regulatory networks in light of alternative splicing, intrinsically disordered protein domains, and post-translational modifications

    PubMed Central

    Niklas, Karl J.; Bondos, Sarah E.; Dunker, A. Keith; Newman, Stuart A.

    2015-01-01

    Models for genetic regulation and cell fate specification characteristically assume that gene regulatory networks (GRNs) are essentially deterministic and exhibit multiple stable states specifying alternative, but pre-figured cell fates. Mounting evidence shows, however, that most eukaryotic precursor RNAs undergo alternative splicing (AS) and that the majority of transcription factors contain intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) domains whose functionalities are context dependent as well as subject to post-translational modification (PTM). Consequently, many transcription factors do not have fixed cis-acting regulatory targets, and developmental determination by GRNs alone is untenable. Modeling these phenomena requires a multi-scale approach to explain how GRNs operationally interact with the intra- and intercellular environments. Evidence shows that AS, IDP, and PTM complicate gene expression and act synergistically to facilitate and promote time- and cell-specific protein modifications involved in cell signaling and cell fate specification and thereby disrupt a strict deterministic GRN-phenotype mapping. The combined effects of AS, IDP, and PTM give proteomes physiological plasticity, adaptive responsiveness, and developmental versatility without inefficiently expanding genome size. They also help us understand how protein functionalities can undergo major evolutionary changes by buffering mutational consequences. PMID:25767796

  18. Even aberration measurement of lithographic projection optics based on intensity difference of adjacent peaks in alternating phase-shifting mask image

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Bo; Wang Xiangzhao; Qiu Zicheng; Cao Yuting; Duan Lifeng

    2010-05-20

    We propose an in situ technique for measuring an even aberration of lithographic projection optics. By using the Hopkins theory of partially coherent imaging and the thick-mask model, the linear relationship between the intensity difference of adjacent peaks in an alternating phase-shifting mask image and an even aberration is established by equations and verified by numerical results. The sensitivity of measuring the even aberration of lithographic projection optics based on this linear relationship is analyzed, and the measurement mark is designed accordingly. Measurement performance of the present technique is evaluated using the lithographic simulator PROLITH, which shows that the present technique is capable of measuring the even aberration of lithographic projection optics with ultrahigh measurement accuracy.

  19. MBNL proteins repress ES-cell-specific alternative splicing and reprogramming

    E-print Network

    Han, Hong

    Previous investigations of the core gene regulatory circuitry that controls the pluripotency of embryonic stem (ES) cells have largely focused on the roles of transcription, chromatin and non-coding RNA regulators. Alternative ...

  20. A novel BRD4-NUT fusion in an undifferentiated sinonasal tumor highlights alternative splicing as a contributing oncogenic factor in NUT midline carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Stirnweiss, A; McCarthy, K; Oommen, J; Crook, M L; Hardy, K; Kees, U R; Wilton, S D; Anazodo, A; Beesley, A H

    2015-01-01

    NUT midline carcinoma (NMC) is a fatal cancer that arises in various tissues along the upper midline of the body. The defining molecular feature of NMC is a chromosomal translocation that joins (in the majority of cases) the nuclear testis gene NUT (NUTM1) to the bromodomain protein family member 4 (BRD4) and thereby creating a fusion oncogene that disrupts cellular differentiation and drives the disease. In this study, we report the case of an adolescent NMC patient presenting with severe facial pain, proptosis and visual impairment due to a mass arising from the ethmoid sinus that invaded the right orbit and frontal lobe. Treatment involved radical resection, including exenteration of the affected eye with the view to consolidate treatment with radiation therapy; however, the patient experienced rapid tumor progression and passed away 79 days post resection. Molecular analysis of the tumor tissue identified a novel in-frame BRD4-NUT transcript, with BRD4 exon 15 fused to the last 124 nucleotides of NUT exon 2 (BRD4-NUT ex15:ex2?nt1–585). The partial deletion of NUT exon 2 was attributed to a mid-exonic genomic breakpoint and the subsequent activation of a cryptic splice site further downstream within the exon. Inhibition of the canonical 3? acceptor splice site of NUT intron 1 in cell lines expressing the most common NMC fusion transcripts (PER-403, BRD4-NUT ex11:ex2; PER-624, BRD4-NUT ex15:ex2) induced alternative splicing from the same cryptic splice site as identified in the patient. Detection of low levels of an in-frame BRD4-NUT ex11:ex2?nt1–585 transcript in PER-403 confirmed endogenous splicing from this alternative exon 2 splice site. Although further studies are necessary to assess the clinical relevance of the increasing number of variant fusions described in NMC, the findings presented in this case identify alternative splicing as a mechanism that contributes to this pathogenic complexity. PMID:26551281

  1. A novel BRD4-NUT fusion in an undifferentiated sinonasal tumor highlights alternative splicing as a contributing oncogenic factor in NUT midline carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Stirnweiss, A; McCarthy, K; Oommen, J; Crook, M L; Hardy, K; Kees, U R; Wilton, S D; Anazodo, A; Beesley, A H

    2015-01-01

    NUT midline carcinoma (NMC) is a fatal cancer that arises in various tissues along the upper midline of the body. The defining molecular feature of NMC is a chromosomal translocation that joins (in the majority of cases) the nuclear testis gene NUT (NUTM1) to the bromodomain protein family member 4 (BRD4) and thereby creating a fusion oncogene that disrupts cellular differentiation and drives the disease. In this study, we report the case of an adolescent NMC patient presenting with severe facial pain, proptosis and visual impairment due to a mass arising from the ethmoid sinus that invaded the right orbit and frontal lobe. Treatment involved radical resection, including exenteration of the affected eye with the view to consolidate treatment with radiation therapy; however, the patient experienced rapid tumor progression and passed away 79 days post resection. Molecular analysis of the tumor tissue identified a novel in-frame BRD4-NUT transcript, with BRD4 exon 15 fused to the last 124 nucleotides of NUT exon 2 (BRD4-NUT ex15:ex2?nt1-585). The partial deletion of NUT exon 2 was attributed to a mid-exonic genomic breakpoint and the subsequent activation of a cryptic splice site further downstream within the exon. Inhibition of the canonical 3' acceptor splice site of NUT intron 1 in cell lines expressing the most common NMC fusion transcripts (PER-403, BRD4-NUT ex11:ex2; PER-624, BRD4-NUT ex15:ex2) induced alternative splicing from the same cryptic splice site as identified in the patient. Detection of low levels of an in-frame BRD4-NUT ex11:ex2?nt1-585 transcript in PER-403 confirmed endogenous splicing from this alternative exon 2 splice site. Although further studies are necessary to assess the clinical relevance of the increasing number of variant fusions described in NMC, the findings presented in this case identify alternative splicing as a mechanism that contributes to this pathogenic complexity. PMID:26551281

  2. Non-coding RNAs derived from an alternatively spliced REST transcript (REST-003) regulate breast cancer invasiveness

    PubMed Central

    Sook Lee, Nan; Evgrafov, Oleg V.; Souaiaia, Tade; Bonyad, Adrineh; Herstein, Jennifer; Yeun Lee, Joo; Kim, Jihong; Ning, Yan; Sixto, Marcos; Weitz, Andrew C.; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Wang, Kai; Knowles, James A.; Press, Michael F.; Salvaterra, Paul M.; Kirk Shung, K.; Chow, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    RE1-Silencing Transcription factor (REST) has a well-established role in regulating transcription of genes important for neuronal development. Its role in cancer, though significant, is less well understood. We show that REST downregulation in weakly invasive MCF-7 breast cancer cells converts them to a more invasive phenotype, while REST overexpression in highly invasive MDA-MB-231 cells suppresses invasiveness. Surprisingly, the mechanism responsible for these phenotypic changes does not depend directly on the transcriptional function of REST protein. Instead, it is driven by previously unstudied mid-size (30–200?nt) non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) derived from the first exon of an alternatively spliced REST transcript: REST-003. We show that processing of REST-003 into ncRNAs is controlled by an uncharacterized serine/arginine repeat-related protein, SRRM3. SRRM3 expression may be under REST-mediated transcriptional control, as it increases following REST downregulation. The SRRM3-dependent regulation of REST-003 processing into ncRNAs has many similarities to recently described promoter-associated small RNA-like processes. Targeting ncRNAs that control invasiveness could lead to new therapeutic approaches to limit breast cancer metastasis. PMID:26053433

  3. Nematogalectin, a nematocyst protein with GlyXY and galectin domains, demonstrates nematocyte-specific alternative splicing in Hydra

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jung Shan; Takaku, Yasuharu; Momose, Tsuyoshi; Adamczyk, Patrizia; Özbek, Suat; Ikeo, Kazuho; Khalturin, Konstantin; Hemmrich, Georg; Bosch, Thomas C. G.; Holstein, Thomas W.; David, Charles N.; Gojobori, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    Taxonomically restricted genes or lineage-specific genes contribute to morphological diversification in metazoans and provide unique functions for particular taxa in adapting to specific environments. To understand how such genes arise and participate in morphological evolution, we have investigated a gene called nematogalectin in Hydra, which has a structural role in the formation of nematocysts, stinging organelles that are unique to the phylum Cnidaria. Nematogalectin is a 28-kDa protein with an N-terminal GlyXY domain (glycine followed by two hydrophobic amino acids), which can form a collagen triple helix, followed by a galactose-binding lectin domain. Alternative splicing of the nematogalectin transcript allows the gene to encode two proteins, nematogalectin A and nematogalectin B. We demonstrate that expression of nematogalectin A and B is mutually exclusive in different nematocyst types: Desmonemes express nematogalectin B, whereas stenoteles and isorhizas express nematogalectin B early in differentiation, followed by nematogalectin A. Like Hydra, the marine hydrozoan Clytia also has two nematogalectin transcripts, which are expressed in different nematocyte types. By comparison, anthozoans have only one nematogalectin gene. Gene phylogeny indicates that tandem duplication of nematogalectin B exons gave rise to nematogalectin A before the divergence of Anthozoa and Medusozoa and that nematogalectin A was subsequently lost in Anthozoa. The emergence of nematogalectin A may have played a role in the morphological diversification of nematocysts in the medusozoan lineage. PMID:20937891

  4. Regulation of Human Neurotropic JC Virus Replication by Alternative Splicing Factor SF2/ASF in Glial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sariyer, Ilker Kudret; Khalili, Kamel

    2011-01-01

    Background The human neurotropic virus, JC virus (JCV), is the etiologic agent of the fatal demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephlopathy (PML) that is seen primarily in immunodeficient individuals. Productive infection of JCV occurs only in glial cells, and this restriction is, to a great extent, due to the activation of the viral promoter that has cell type-specific characteristics. Earlier studies led to the hypothesis that glial-specific activation of the JCV promoter is mediated through positive and negative transcription factors that control reactivation of the JCV genome under normal physiological conditions and suppress its activation in non-glial cells. Methodololgy/Principal Findings Using a variety of virological and molecular biological approaches, we demonstrate that the alternative splicing factor SF2/ASF has the capacity to exert a negative effect on transcription of the JCV promoter in glial cells through direct association with a specific DNA sequence within the viral enhancer/promoter region. Our results show that down-regulation of SF2/ASF in fetal and adult glial cells increases the level of JCV gene expression and its replication indicating that negative regulation of the JCV promoter by SF2/ASF may control reactivation of JCV replication in brain. Conclusions/Significance Our results establish a new regulatory role for SF2/ASF in controlling gene expression at the transcriptional level. PMID:21297941

  5. Successful detection, expression and purification of the alternatively spliced truncated Sm14 antigen of an Egyptian strain of Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Ewaisha, R E; Bahey-El-Din, M; Mossallam, S F; Khalil, A M; Aboushleib, H M

    2015-11-01

    Schistosoma mansoni causes intestinal schistosomiasis, a disease that is prevalent in several regions worldwide. To date, a protective vaccine against S. mansoni is still lacking. Several promising antigens have been discovered and evaluated for vaccine protection, such as Sm14 and Sm28GST. In this short communication, we report the successful detection of an alternatively spliced truncated form of Sm14 which was highly expressed in an Egyptian strain of S. mansoni. This truncated Sm14 (TrSm14) protein was formerly reported to be practically non-existent and its complementary DNA (cDNA) was thought to be 'a rare misprocessing of mRNA precursor'. Our finding demonstrates that there is inter-strain variation in the S. mansoni transcriptome and subsequently in the role/function of the expressed proteins. We expressed TrSm14 successfully in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with the schistosomal antigen Sm28GST. The fusion protein was purified using metal affinity chromatography and was found to be reactive with serum from S. mansoni-infected patients. This suggests a possible diagnostic value for this protein in detection of anti-schistosomal antibodies. In addition, this fusion protein could offer a potential bivalent vaccine candidate against S. mansoni that is worthy of further investigation. PMID:25058316

  6. RNA-Binding Proteins: Splicing Factors and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fredericks, Alger M.; Cygan, Kamil J.; Brown, Brian A.; Fairbrother, William G.

    2015-01-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing is mediated by interactions of the Core Spliceosome and an array of accessory RNA binding proteins with cis-sequence elements. Splicing is a major regulatory component in higher eukaryotes. Disruptions in splicing are a major contributor to human disease. One in three hereditary disease alleles are believed to cause aberrant splicing. Hereditary disease alleles can alter splicing by disrupting a splicing element, creating a toxic RNA, or affecting splicing factors. One of the challenges of medical genetics is identifying causal variants from the thousands of possibilities discovered in a clinical sequencing experiment. Here we review the basic biochemistry of splicing, the mechanisms of splicing mutations, the methods for identifying splicing mutants, and the potential of therapeutic interventions. PMID:25985083

  7. Quality control of MATa1 splicing and exon skipping by nuclear RNA degradation

    E-print Network

    Chanfreau, Guillaume

    Quality control of MATa1 splicing and exon skipping by nuclear RNA degradation Defne E. Egecioglu), identifying a novel nuclear quality control pathway for aberrantly spliced RNAs that have skipped exons

  8. The splicing fate of plant SPO11 genes

    PubMed Central

    Sprink, Thorben; Hartung, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Toward the global understanding of plant meiosis, it seems to be essential to decipher why all as yet sequenced plants need or at least encode for two different meiotic SPO11 genes. This is in contrast to mammals and fungi, where only one SPO11 is present. Both SPO11 in Arabidopsis thaliana are essential for the initiation of double strand breaks (DSBs) during the meiotic prophase. In nearly all eukaryotic organisms DSB induction during prophase I by SPO11 leads to meiotic DSB repair, thereby ensuring the formation of a necessary number of crossovers (CO) as physical connections between the homologous chromosomes. We aim to investigate the specific functions and evolution of both SPO11 genes in land plants. Therefore, we identified and cloned the respective orthologous genes from Brassica rapa, Carica papaya, Oryza sativa, and Physcomitrella patens. In parallel we determined the full length cDNA sequences of SPO11-1 and -2 from all of these plants by RT-PCR. During these experiments we observed that the analyzed plants exhibit a pattern of alternative splicing products of both SPO11 mRNAs. Such an aberrant splicing has previously been described for Arabidopsis and therefore seems to be conserved throughout evolution. Most of the splicing forms of SPO11-1 and -2 seem to be non-functional as they either showed intron retention (IR) or shortened exons. However, the positional distribution and number of alternative splicing events vary strongly between the different plants. The cDNAs showed in most cases premature termination codons (PTCs) due to frameshift. Nevertheless, in some cases we found alternatively spliced but functional cDNAs. These findings let us suggest that alternative splicing of SPO11 depends on the respective gene sequence and on the plant species. Therefore, this conserved mechanism might play a role concerning regulation of SPO11. PMID:25018755

  9. The distribution pattern of genetic variation in the transcript isoforms of the alternatively spliced protein-coding genes in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting; Lin, Kui

    2015-05-01

    By enabling the transcription of multiple isoforms from the same gene locus, alternative-splicing mechanisms greatly expand the diversity of the human transcriptome and proteome. Currently, the alternatively spliced transcripts from each protein-coding gene locus in the human genome can be classified as either principal or non-principal isoforms, providing that they differ with respect to cross-species conservation or biological features. By mapping the variants from the 1000 Genomes Project onto the coding region of each isoform, an interesting pattern of the genetic variation distributions of the coding regions for these two types of transcript isoforms was revealed on a whole-genome scale: compared with the principal isoform-specific coding regions, the non-principal isoform-specific coding regions are significantly enriched in amino acid-changing variants, particularly those that have a strong impact on protein function and have higher derived allele frequencies, suggesting that non-principal isoform-specific substitutions are less likely to be related to phenotype changes or disease. The results herein can help us better understand the potential consequences of alternatively spliced products from a population perspective. PMID:25820936

  10. The evolution of mRNA splicing in mammals

    E-print Network

    Merkin, Jason Jay

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis, I describe investigations into the evolution of splicing in mammals. I first investigate a small class of alternative splicing events, tandem splice sites, and show how they are used to introduce and remove ...

  11. Pinpointing retrovirus entry sites in cells expressing alternatively spliced receptor isoforms by single virus imaging

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The majority of viruses enter host cells via endocytosis. Current knowledge of viral entry pathways is largely based upon infectivity measurements following genetic and/or pharmacological interventions that disrupt vesicular trafficking and maturation. Imaging of single virus entry in living cells provides a powerful means to delineate viral trafficking pathways and entry sites under physiological conditions. Results Here, we visualized single avian retrovirus co-trafficking with markers for early (Rab5) and late (Rab7) endosomes, acidification of endosomal lumen and the resulting viral fusion measured by the viral content release into the cytoplasm. Virus-carrying vesicles either merged with the existing Rab5-positive early endosomes or slowly accumulated Rab5. The Rab5 recruitment to virus-carrying endosomes correlated with acidification of their lumen. Viral fusion occurred either in early (Rab5-positive) or intermediate (Rab5- and Rab7-positive) compartments. Interestingly, different isoforms of the cognate receptor directed virus entry from distinct endosomes. In cells expressing the transmembrane receptor, viruses preferentially entered and fused with slowly maturing early endosomes prior to accumulation of Rab7. By comparison, in cells expressing the GPI-anchored receptor, viruses entered both slowly and quickly maturing endosomes and fused with early (Rab5-positive) and intermediate (Rab5- and Rab7-positive) compartments. Conclusions Since the rate of low pH-triggered fusion was independent of the receptor isoform, we concluded that the sites of virus entry are determined by the kinetic competition between endosome maturation and viral fusion. Our findings demonstrate the ability of this retrovirus to enter cells via alternative endocytic pathways and establish infection by releasing its content from distinct endosomal compartments. PMID:24935247

  12. Hydroxybenzothiophene Ketones Are Efficient Pre-mRNA Splicing Modulators Due to Dual Inhibition of Dyrk1A and Clk1/4

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulated usage of pre-mRNA splicing sites contributes to the progression of cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and viral infections. Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins play major roles in the splice site recognition and are largely regulated by phosphorylation. This provides an option for the pharmacological correction of aberrant splicing by inhibiting the relevant kinases. Cdc2-like kinases (Clks) and dual specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinases (Dyrks) were both reported to phosphorylate numerous SR proteins in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we describe the discovery of new selective dual Clk/Dyrk1A/1B inhibitors, which are able to modulate alternative pre-mRNA splicing of model gene transcripts in cells with submicromolar potencies. The optimization process yielded a dual Clk and Dyrk inhibitor with exceptionally high ligand efficiency. Our results suggested that dual inhibition of both Clk1 and Dyrk1A increased the efficacy of pre-mRNA splicing modulation. PMID:25221649

  13. Molecular Characterization, mRNA Expression and Alternative Splicing of Ryanodine Receptor Gene in the Brown Citrus Aphid, Toxoptera citricida (Kirkaldy)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ke-Yi; Jiang, Xuan-Zhao; Yuan, Guo-Rui; Shang, Feng; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) play a critical role in regulating the release of intracellular calcium, which enables them to be effectively targeted by the two novel classes of insecticides, phthalic acid diamides and anthranilic diamides. However, less information is available about this target site in insects, although the sequence and structure information of target molecules are essential for designing new control agents of high selectivity and efficiency, as well as low non-target toxicity. Here, we provided sufficient information about the coding sequence and molecular structures of RyR in T. citricida (TciRyR), an economically important pest. The full-length TciRyR cDNA was characterized with an open reading frame of 15,306 nucleotides, encoding 5101 amino acid residues. TciRyR was predicted to embrace all the hallmarks of ryanodine receptor, typically as the conserved C-terminal domain with consensus calcium-biding EF-hands (calcium-binding motif) and six transmembrane domains, as well as a large N-terminal domain. qPCR analysis revealed that the highest mRNA expression levels of TciRyR were observed in the adults, especially in the heads. Alternative splicing in TciRyR was evidenced by an alternatively spliced exon, resulting from intron retention, which was different from the case of RyR in Myzus persicae characterized with no alternative splicing events. Diagnostic PCR analysis indicated that the splicing of this exon was not only regulated in a body-specific manner but also in a stage-dependent manner. Taken together, these results provide useful information for new insecticide design and further insights into the molecular basis of insecticide action. PMID:26154764

  14. Analysis of Mutually Exclusive Alternatively Spliced Serpin-1 Isoforms and Identification of Serpin-1 Proteinase Complexes in Manduca sexta Hemolymph*

    PubMed Central

    Ragan, Emily J.; An, Chunju; Yang, Celeste T.; Kanost, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    Mutually exclusive alternative splicing produces transcripts for 12 serpin-1 isoforms in Manduca sexta that differ only in the region encoding the carboxyl-terminal 36–40-amino acid residues. This variable region includes the reactive center loop, which determines the inhibitory selectivity of the serpin. We investigated mRNA levels of individual serpin-1 isoforms by quantitative PCR. The 12 isoforms were expressed at similar levels in hemocytes, but in fat body isoform B mRNA was present at significantly higher levels than isoforms C, D, E, F, G, J, K, and Z. To investigate the presence of individual serpin-1 isoforms in plasma we used immunoaffinity purification of serpin-1 isoforms from M. sexta plasma, followed by two-dimensional PAGE and identification of protein spots by digestion with a series of proteinases and analysis of the resulting peptides by MALDI-TOF/TOF. We identified nine of the 12 serpin-1 isoforms and, through analysis of putative serpin-1-proteinase complexes, identified three endogenous M. sexta proteinase targets of serpin-1. Our results suggest that M. sexta serpin-1 isoforms A, E, and J can inhibit hemolymph proteinase 8, which activates the cytokine spätzle. At least one isoform of serpin-1 can inhibit hemocyte proteinase 1, another M. sexta blood proteinase. In addition, a complex of serpin-1K in a complex with M. sexta midgut chymotrypsin was identified, suggesting serpin-1 isoforms may also function to protect insect tissues from digestive proteinases that may leak into the hemocoel. PMID:20624920

  15. Alternative splicing introduces a nuclear localization signal that targets multifunctional CaM kinase to the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Intracellular targeting may enable protein kinases with broad substrate- specificities, such as multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaM kinase) to achieve a selectivity of action in vivo. We have examined the intracellular targeting of three delta-CaM kinase isoforms. The delta B-CaM kinase isoform is targeted to the nucleus in transfected cells while the delta A- and delta C-CaM kinase isoforms are cytosolic/cytoskeletal. A chimeric construct of alpha-CaM kinase containing the delta B-CaM kinase variable domain is rerouted to the nucleus while the native alpha-CaM kinase and chimeras of alpha-CaM kinase which contain the delta A- or delta C-CaM kinase variable domains are retained in the cytoplasm. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we have defined a nuclear localization signal (NLS) within an 11-amino acid sequence, likely inserted by alternative splicing, in the variable domain of delta B-CaM kinase. Isoform-specific nuclear targeting of CaM kinase is probably a key mechanism in the selective regulation of nuclear functions by CaM kinase. CaM kinase is a multimer that can be composed of several isoforms. We find that when cells express two different isoforms of CaM kinase, cellular targeting is determined by the ratio of the isoforms. When an excess of the cytoplasmic isoform of CaM kinase is coexpressed along with the nuclear isoform, both isoforms are localized in the cytoplasm. Conversely an excess of the nuclear isoform can reroute the cytoplasmic isoform to the nucleus. The nuclear isoform likely coassembles with the cytosolic isoform, to form a heteromultimeric holoenzyme which is transported into the nucleus. These experiments demonstrate isoform-specific targeting of CaM kinase and indicate that such targeting can be modified by the expression of multiple isoforms of the enzyme. PMID:7519621

  16. Characterization of the Tomato ARF Gene Family Uncovers a Multi-Levels Post-Transcriptional Regulation Including Alternative Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Chateigner-Boutin, Anne-Laure; Mila, Isabelle; Frasse, Pierre; Wang, Hua; Audran, Corinne; Roustan, Jean-Paul; Bouzayen, Mondher

    2014-01-01

    Background The phytohormone auxin is involved in a wide range of developmental processes and auxin signaling is known to modulate the expression of target genes via two types of transcriptional regulators, namely, Aux/IAA and Auxin Response Factors (ARF). ARFs play a major role in transcriptional activation or repression through direct binding to the promoter of auxin-responsive genes. The present study aims at gaining better insight on distinctive structural and functional features among ARF proteins. Results Building on the most updated tomato (Solanum lycopersicon) reference genome sequence, a comprehensive set of ARF genes was identified, extending the total number of family members to 22. Upon correction of structural annotation inconsistencies, renaming the tomato ARF family members provided a consensus nomenclature for all ARF genes across plant species. In silico search predicted the presence of putative target site for small interfering RNAs within twelve Sl-ARFs while sequence analysis of the 5?-leader sequences revealed the presence of potential small uORF regulatory elements. Functional characterization carried out by transactivation assay partitioned tomato ARFs into repressors and activators of auxin-dependent gene transcription. Expression studies identified tomato ARFs potentially involved in the fruit set process. Genome-wide expression profiling using RNA-seq revealed that at least one third of the gene family members display alternative splicing mode of regulation during the flower to fruit transition. Moreover, the regulation of several tomato ARF genes by both ethylene and auxin, suggests their potential contribution to the convergence mechanism between the signaling pathways of these two hormones. Conclusion All together, the data bring new insight on the complexity of the expression control of Sl-ARF genes at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels supporting the hypothesis that these transcriptional mediators might represent one of the main components that enable auxin to regulate a wide range of physiological processes in a highly specific and coordinated manner. PMID:24427281

  17. TRIMe7-CypA, an alternative splicing isoform of TRIMCyp in rhesus macaque, negatively modulates TRIM5? activity

    SciTech Connect

    Na, Lei; Tang, Yan-Dong; Liu, Jian-Dong; Yu, Chang-Qing; Sun, Liu-Ke; Lin, Yue-Zhi; Wang, Xue-Feng; Wang, Xiaojun; Zhou, Jian-Hua

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • TRIMe7-CypA expresses in rhesus and pig-tailed, but not long-tailed macaques. • TRIMe7-CypA does not show the restriction to a HIV-GFP report virus in vitro. • It acts as a negative modulator to TRIM5? likely by competitive inhibition. - Abstract: The existence of innate, host-specific restriction factors is a major obstacle to the development of nonhuman primate models for AIDS studies, and TRIM5? is one of the most important of these restriction factors. In recent years, a TRIM5 chimeric gene that was retrotransposed by a cyclophilin A (CypA) cDNA was identified in certain macaque species. The TRIM5?-CypA fusion protein, TRIMCyp, which was expressed in these monkeys, had lost its restriction ability toward HIV-1. We previously found that TRIMe7-CypA, an alternative splicing isoform of the TRIMCyp transcripts, was expressed in pig-tailed and rhesus macaques but absent in long-tailed macaques. In this study, the anti-HIV-1 activity of TRIMe7-CypA in the rhesus macaque (RhTRIMe7-CypA) was investigated. The over-expression of RhTRIMe7-CypA in CrFK, HeLa and HEK293T cells did not restrict the infection or replication of an HIV-1-GFP reporter virus in these cells. As a positive control, rhesus (rh)TRIM5? strongly inhibited the reporter virus. Intriguingly, the anti-HIV-1 activity of RhTRIM5? was significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner by the co-repression of RhTRIMe7-CypA. Our data indicate that although the RhTRIMe7-CypA isoform does not appear to restrict HIV-1, it may act as a negative modulator of TRIM family proteins, presumably by competitive inhibition.

  18. Single-target high-throughput transcription analyses reveal high levels of alternative splicing present in the FPPS/GGPPS from Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Heloisa B; de Azevedo, Mauro F; Palmisano, Giuseppe; Wunderlich, Gerhard; Kimura, Emília A; Katzin, Alejandro M; Alves, João M P

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is a tropical disease with significant morbidity and mortality. A better understanding of the metabolism of its most important etiological agent, Plasmodium falciparum, is paramount to the development of better treatment and other mitigation measures. Farnesyldiphosphate synthase/geranylgeranyldiphosphate synthase (FPPS/GGPPS) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of isoprenic chains present in many essential structures. In P. falciparum, as well as a handful of other organisms, FPPS/GGPPS has been shown to be a bifunctional enzyme. By genetic tagging and microscopy, we observed a changing localization of FPPS/GGPPS in blood stage parasites. Given the great importance of alternative splicing and other transcriptional phenomena in gene regulation and the generation of protein diversity, we have investigated the processing of the FPPS/GGPPS transcript in P. falciparum by high-throughput sequencing methods in four time-points along the intraerythrocytic cycle of P. falciparum. We have identified levels of transcript diversity an order of magnitude higher than previously observed in this organism, as well as a few stage-specific splicing events. Our data suggest that alternative splicing in P. falciparum is an important feature for gene regulation and the generation of protein diversity. PMID:26688062

  19. Hibernation-specific alternative splicing of the mRNA encoding cold-inducible RNA-binding protein in the hearts of hamsters.

    PubMed

    Sano, Yuuki; Shiina, Takahiko; Naitou, Kiyotada; Nakamori, Hiroyuki; Shimizu, Yasutake

    2015-07-10

    The hearts of hibernating animals are capable of maintaining constant beating despite a decrease in body temperature to less than 10 °C during hibernation, suggesting that the hearts of hibernators are highly tolerant to a cold temperature. In the present study, we examined the expression pattern of cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) in the hearts of hibernating hamsters, since CIRP plays important roles in protection of various types of cells against harmful effects of cold temperature. RT-PCR analysis revealed that CIRP mRNA is constitutively expressed in the heart of a non-hibernating euthermic hamster with several different forms probably due to alternative splicing. The short product contained the complete open reading frame for full-length CIRP. On the other hand, the long product had inserted sequences containing a stop codon, suggesting production of a C-terminal deletion isoform of CIRP. In contrast to non-hibernating hamsters, only the short product was amplified in hibernating animals. Induction of artificial hypothermia in non-hibernating hamsters did not completely mimic the splicing patterns observed in hibernating animals, although a partial shift from long form mRNA to short form was observed. Our results indicate that CIRP expression in the hamster heart is regulated at the level of alternative splicing, which would permit a rapid increment of functional CIRP when entering hibernation. PMID:25960293

  20. Single-target high-throughput transcription analyses reveal high levels of alternative splicing present in the FPPS/GGPPS from Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, Heloisa B.; de Azevedo, Mauro F.; Palmisano, Giuseppe; Wunderlich, Gerhard; Kimura, Emília A.; Katzin, Alejandro M.; Alves, João M. P.

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is a tropical disease with significant morbidity and mortality. A better understanding of the metabolism of its most important etiological agent, Plasmodium falciparum, is paramount to the development of better treatment and other mitigation measures. Farnesyldiphosphate synthase/geranylgeranyldiphosphate synthase (FPPS/GGPPS) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of isoprenic chains present in many essential structures. In P. falciparum, as well as a handful of other organisms, FPPS/GGPPS has been shown to be a bifunctional enzyme. By genetic tagging and microscopy, we observed a changing localization of FPPS/GGPPS in blood stage parasites. Given the great importance of alternative splicing and other transcriptional phenomena in gene regulation and the generation of protein diversity, we have investigated the processing of the FPPS/GGPPS transcript in P. falciparum by high-throughput sequencing methods in four time-points along the intraerythrocytic cycle of P. falciparum. We have identified levels of transcript diversity an order of magnitude higher than previously observed in this organism, as well as a few stage-specific splicing events. Our data suggest that alternative splicing in P. falciparum is an important feature for gene regulation and the generation of protein diversity. PMID:26688062

  1. Alternative splicing and co-option of transposable elements: the case of TMPO/LAP2? and ZNF451 in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Abascal, Federico; Tress, Michael L.; Valencia, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Transposable elements constitute a large fraction of vertebrate genomes and, during evolution, may be co-opted for new functions. Exonization of transposable elements inserted within or close to host genes is one possible way to generate new genes, and alternative splicing of the new exons may represent an intermediate step in this process. The genes TMPO and ZNF451 are present in all vertebrate lineages. Although they are not evolutionarily related, mammalian TMPO and ZNF451 do have something in common—they both code for splice isoforms that contain LAP2alpha domains. We found that these LAP2alpha domains have sequence similarity to repetitive sequences in non-mammalian genomes, which are in turn related to the first ORF from a DIRS1-like retrotransposon. This retrotransposon domestication happened separately and resulted in proteins that combine retrotransposon and host protein domains. The alternative splicing of the retrotransposed sequence allowed the production of both the new and the untouched original isoforms, which may have contributed to the success of the colonization process. The LAP2alpha-specific isoform of TMPO (LAP2?) has been co-opted for important roles in the cell, whereas the ZNF451 LAP2alpha isoform is evolving under strong purifying selection but remains uncharacterized. Contact: mtress@cnio.es or valencia@cnio.es Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25735770

  2. Activation of c-myb by 5' retrovirus promoter insertion in myeloid neoplasms is dependent upon an intact alternative splice donor site (SD') in gag

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, Jean Marie; Houzet, Laurent; Koller, Richard; Bies, Juraj; Wolff, Linda; Mougel, Marylene . E-mail: mmougel@univ-montp1.fr

    2004-12-20

    Alternative splicing in Mo-MuLV recruits a splice donor site, SD', within the gag that is required for optimal replication in vitro. Remarkably, this SD' site was also found to be utilized for production of oncogenic gag-myb fusion RNA in 100% of murine-induced myeloid leukemia (MML) in pristane-treated BALB/c mice. Therefore, we investigated the influence of silent mutations of SD' in this model. Although there was no decrease in the overall incidence of disease, there was a decrease in the incidence of myeloid leukemia with a concomitant increase in lymphoid leukemia. Importantly, there was a complete lack of myeloid tumors associated with 5' insertional mutagenic activation of c-myb, suggesting the specific requirement of the SD' site in this mechanism.

  3. Human [delta]-aminolevulinate dehydratase (ALAD) gene: Structure and alternative splicing of the erythroid and housekeeping mRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Kaya, A.H.; Plewinska, M.; Wong, D.M.; Desnick, R.J.; Wetmur, J.G. )

    1994-01-15

    Genomic clones containing ALAD, the second enzyme in the heme pathway, were isolated, and the entire sequence was determined in both orientations. The gene contained two alternative noncoding exons, 1A and 1B, and 1q coding exons, 2-12. Ten Alu-repetitive elements were within the gene, including an inverted repeat that may have resulted from gene conversion. The housekeeping transcript, which included exon 1A and not 1B, was identified in a human adult liver cDNA library, while an erythroid-specific transcript, which contained exon 1B and not 1A, was detected in a human K562 erythroleukemia cDNA library. The promoter region upstream of housekeeping exon 1A was GC-rich and contained three potential Sp1 elements and a CCAAT box. Further upstream, there were three potential GATA-1 binding sites and an AP1 site. The promoter region upstream of erythroid-specific exon 1B had several CACCC boxes and two potential GATA-1 binding sites. To assess the tissue-specific expression of exons 1A and 1B, HeLa and K562 cells were transduced with CAT constructs containing either exon 1A or 1B and their respective upstream promoter region. Two housekeeping CAT constructs, with 450 and 1400 bp upstream of exon 1A, were expressed at similar levels in HeLa cells, whereas the erythroid-specific construct, containing the entire 450-bp promoter region upstream of exon 1B, was not. In contrast, the housekeeping and erythroid constructs were both expressed in K562 cells. These findings demonstrate that the human ALAD gene contains two promoter regions that generate housekeeping and erythroid-specific transcripts by alternative splicing, analogous to the expression of the human hydroxymethylbilane synthase gene, which encodes the third enzyme of the heme biosynthetic pathway. The expression of housekeeping and erythroid-specific transcripts apparently evolved to ensure sufficient heme biosynthesis for the high-level tissue-specific production of hemoglobin required. 39 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Modulating Roles of Amiloride in Irradiation-Induced Antiproliferative Effects in Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells Involving Akt Phosphorylation and the Alternative Splicing of Apoptotic Genes

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jen-Yang

    2013-01-01

    Apoptosis is a key mechanism for enhanced cellular radiosensitivity in radiation therapy. Studies suggest that Akt signaling may play a role in apoptosis and radioresistance. This study evaluates the possible modulating role of amiloride, an antihypertensive agent with a modulating effect to alternative splicing for regulating apoptosis, in the antiproliferative effects induced by ionizing radiation (IR) in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) 8401 cells. Analysis of cell viability showed that amiloride treatment significantly inhibited cell proliferation in irradiated GBM8401 cells (p<0.05) in a time-dependent manner, especially in cells treated with amiloride with IR post-treatment. In comparison with GBM8401 cells treated with amiloride alone, with GBM8401 cells treated with IR alone, and with human embryonic lung fibroblast control cells (HEL 299), GBM8401 cells treated with IR combined with amiloride showed increased overexpression of phosphorylated Akt, regardless of whether IR treatment was performed before or after amiloride administration. The alternative splicing pattern of apoptotic protease-activating factor-1 (APAF1) in cells treated with amiloride alone, IR alone, and combined amiloride-IR treatments showed more consistent cell proliferation compared to that in other apoptosis-related genes such as baculoviral IAP repeat containing 5 (BIRC5), Bcl-X, and homeodomain interacting protein kinase-3 (HIPK3). In GBM8401 cells treated with amiloride with IR post-treatment, the ratio of prosurvival (-XL,-LC) to proapoptotic (-LN,-S) splice variants of APAF1 was lower than that seen in cells treated with amiloride with IR pretreatment, suggesting that proapoptotic splice variants of APAF1 (APAF1-LN,-S) were higher in the glioblastoma cells treated with amiloride with IR post-treatment, as compared to glioblastoma cells and fibroblast control cells that had received other treatments. Together, these results suggest that amiloride modulates cell radiosensitivity involving the Akt phosphorylation and the alternative splicing of APAF1, especially for the cells treated with amiloride with IR post-treatment. Therefore, amiloride may improve the effectiveness of radiation therapy for GBMs. PMID:23822711

  5. Sxl-Dependent, tra/tra2-Independent Alternative Splicing of the Drosophila melanogaster X-Linked Gene found in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xia; Yang, Haiwang; Sturgill, David; Oliver, Brian; Rabinow, Leonard; Samson, Marie-Laure

    2015-01-01

    Somatic sexual determination and behavior in Drosophila melanogaster are under the control of a genetic cascade initiated by Sex lethal (Sxl). In the female soma, SXL RNA-binding protein regulates the splicing of transformer (tra) transcripts into a female-specific form. The RNA-binding protein TRA and its cofactor TRA2 function in concert in females, whereas SXL, TRA, and TRA2 are thought to not function in males. To better understand sex-specific regulation of gene expression, we analyzed male and female head transcriptome datasets for expression levels and splicing, quantifying sex-biased gene expression via RNA-Seq and qPCR. Our data uncouple the effects of Sxl and tra/tra2 in females in the-sex-biased alternative splicing of head transcripts from the X-linked locus found in neurons (fne), encoding a pan-neuronal RNA-binding protein of the ELAV family. We show that FNE protein levels are downregulated by Sxl in female heads, also independently of tra/tra2. We argue that this regulation may have important sexually dimorphic consequences for the regulation of nervous system development or function. PMID:26511498

  6. Ultraconserved cDNA segments in the human transcriptome exhibit resistance to folding and implicate function in translation and alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Sathirapongsasuti, J. Fah; Sathira, Nuankanya; Suzuki, Yutaka; Huttenhower, Curtis; Sugano, Sumio

    2011-01-01

    Ultraconservation, defined as perfect human-to-rodent sequence identity at least 200-bp long, is a strong indicator of evolutionary and functional importance and has been explored extensively at the genome level. However, it has not been investigated at the transcript level, where such extreme conservation might highlight loci with important post-transcriptional regulatory roles. We present 96 ultraconserved cDNA segments (UCSs), stretches of human mature mRNAs that match identically with orthologous regions in the mouse and rat genomes. UCSs can span multiple exons, a feature we leverage here to elucidate the role of ultraconservation in post-transcriptional regulation. UCS sites are implicated in functions at essentially every post-transcriptional stage: pre-mRNA splicing and degradation through alternative splicing and nonsense-mediated decay (AS-NMD), mature mRNA silencing by miRNA, fast mRNA decay rate and translational repression by upstream AUGs. We also found UCSs to exhibit resistance to formation of RNA secondary structure. These multiple layers of regulation underscore the importance of the UCS-containing genes as key global RNA processing regulators, including members of the serine/arginine-rich protein and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) families of essential splicing regulators. The discovery of UCSs shed new light on the multifaceted, fine-tuned and tight post-transcriptional regulation of gene families as conserved through the majority of the mammalian lineage. PMID:21062826

  7. Sxl-Dependent, tra/tra2-Independent Alternative Splicing of the Drosophila melanogaster X-Linked Gene found in neurons.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xia; Yang, Haiwang; Sturgill, David; Oliver, Brian; Rabinow, Leonard; Samson, Marie-Laure

    2015-01-01

    Somatic sexual determination and behavior in Drosophila melanogaster are under the control of a genetic cascade initiated by Sex lethal (Sxl). In the female soma, SXL RNA-binding protein regulates the splicing of transformer (tra) transcripts into a female-specific form. The RNA-binding protein TRA and its cofactor TRA2 function in concert in females, whereas SXL, TRA, and TRA2 are thought to not function in males. To better understand sex-specific regulation of gene expression, we analyzed male and female head transcriptome datasets for expression levels and splicing, quantifying sex-biased gene expression via RNA-Seq and qPCR. Our data uncouple the effects of Sxl and tra/tra2 in females in the-sex-biased alternative splicing of head transcripts from the X-linked locus found in neurons (fne), encoding a pan-neuronal RNA-binding protein of the ELAV family. We show that FNE protein levels are downregulated by Sxl in female heads, also independently of tra/tra2. We argue that this regulation may have important sexually dimorphic consequences for the regulation of nervous system development or function. PMID:26511498

  8. Two novel exonic point mutations in HEXA identified in a juvenile Tay-Sachs patient: role of alternative splicing and nonsense-mediated mRNA decay.

    PubMed

    Levit, A; Nutman, D; Osher, E; Kamhi, E; Navon, R

    2010-06-01

    We have identified three mutations in the beta-hexoseaminidase A (HEXA) gene in a juvenile Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) patient, which exhibited a reduced level of HEXA mRNA. Two mutations are novel, c.814G>A (p.Gly272Arg) and c.1305C>T (p.=), located in exon 8 and in exon 11, respectively. The third mutation, c.1195A>G (p.Asn399Asp) in exon 11, has been previously characterized as a common polymorphism in African-Americans. Hex A activity measured in TSD Glial cells, transfected with HEXA cDNA constructs bearing these mutations, was unaltered from the activity level measured in normal HEXA cDNA. Analysis of RT-PCR products revealed three aberrant transcripts in the patient, one where exon 8 was absent, one where exon 11 was absent and a third lacking both exons 10 and 11. All three novel transcripts contain frameshifts resulting in premature termination codons (PTCs). Transfection of mini-gene constructs carrying the c.814G>A and c.1305C>T mutations proved that the two mutations result in exon skipping. mRNAs that harbor a PTC are detected and degraded by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway to prevent synthesis of abnormal proteins. However, although NMD is functional in the patient's fibroblasts, aberrant transcripts are still present. We suggest that the level of correctly spliced transcripts as well as the efficiency in which NMD degrade the PTC-containing transcripts, apparently plays an important role in the phenotype severity of the unique patient and thus should be considered as a potential target for drug therapy. PMID:20363167

  9. De-regulation of gene expression and alternative splicing affects distinct cellular pathways in the aging hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Stilling, Roman M.; Benito, Eva; Gertig, Michael; Barth, Jonas; Capece, Vincenzo; Burkhardt, Susanne; Bonn, Stefan; Fischer, Andre

    2014-01-01

    Aging is accompanied by gradually increasing impairment of cognitive abilities and constitutes the main risk factor of neurodegenerative conditions like Alzheimer's disease (AD). The underlying mechanisms are however not well understood. Here we analyze the hippocampal transcriptome of young adult mice and two groups of mice at advanced age using RNA sequencing. This approach enabled us to test differential expression of coding and non-coding transcripts, as well as differential splicing and RNA editing. We report a specific age-associated gene expression signature that is associated with major genetic risk factors for late-onset AD (LOAD). This signature is dominated by neuroinflammatory processes, specifically activation of the complement system at the level of increased gene expression, while de-regulation of neuronal plasticity appears to be mediated by compromised RNA splicing. PMID:25431548

  10. Analysis of cryptic splice sites with deep convolutional networks

    E-print Network

    Toronto, University of

    Neural Network Percent spliced-in 5' 3' #12;Alternative 3' Splice Site Dataset Bodymap 2 Mixed Tissue (WDS) #12;Splice Site Detection Model Model Architecture Convolution Fully connected Fully connected regularization · Dropout on fully connected layer #12;Alternative 3' Splice Site Code Sequence Convolutional

  11. Seed Dormancy in Arabidopsis Requires Self-Binding Ability of DOG1 Protein and the Presence of Multiple Isoforms Generated by Alternative Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jia; Soppe, Wim J. J.

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis protein DELAY OF GERMINATION 1 (DOG1) is a key regulator of seed dormancy, which is a life history trait that determines the timing of seedling emergence. The amount of DOG1 protein in freshly harvested seeds determines their dormancy level. DOG1 has been identified as a major dormancy QTL and variation in DOG1 transcript levels between accessions contributes to natural variation for seed dormancy. The DOG1 gene is alternatively spliced. Alternative splicing increases the transcriptome and proteome diversity in higher eukaryotes by producing transcripts that encode for proteins with altered or lost function. It can also generate tissue specific transcripts or affect mRNA stability. Here we suggest a different role for alternative splicing of the DOG1 gene. DOG1 produces five transcript variants encoding three protein isoforms. Transgenic dog1 mutant seeds expressing single DOG1 transcript variants from the endogenous DOG1 promoter did not complement because they were non-dormant and lacked DOG1 protein. However, transgenic plants overexpressing single DOG1 variants from the 35S promoter could accumulate protein and showed complementation. Simultaneous expression of two or more DOG1 transcript variants from the endogenous DOG1 promoter also led to increased dormancy levels and accumulation of DOG1 protein. This suggests that single isoforms are functional, but require the presence of additional isoforms to prevent protein degradation. Subsequently, we found that the DOG1 protein can bind to itself and that this binding is required for DOG1 function but not for protein accumulation. Natural variation for DOG1 binding efficiency was observed among Arabidopsis accessions and contributes to variation in seed dormancy. PMID:26684465

  12. Seed Dormancy in Arabidopsis Requires Self-Binding Ability of DOG1 Protein and the Presence of Multiple Isoforms Generated by Alternative Splicing.

    PubMed

    Nakabayashi, Kazumi; Bartsch, Melanie; Ding, Jia; Soppe, Wim J J

    2015-12-01

    The Arabidopsis protein DELAY OF GERMINATION 1 (DOG1) is a key regulator of seed dormancy, which is a life history trait that determines the timing of seedling emergence. The amount of DOG1 protein in freshly harvested seeds determines their dormancy level. DOG1 has been identified as a major dormancy QTL and variation in DOG1 transcript levels between accessions contributes to natural variation for seed dormancy. The DOG1 gene is alternatively spliced. Alternative splicing increases the transcriptome and proteome diversity in higher eukaryotes by producing transcripts that encode for proteins with altered or lost function. It can also generate tissue specific transcripts or affect mRNA stability. Here we suggest a different role for alternative splicing of the DOG1 gene. DOG1 produces five transcript variants encoding three protein isoforms. Transgenic dog1 mutant seeds expressing single DOG1 transcript variants from the endogenous DOG1 promoter did not complement because they were non-dormant and lacked DOG1 protein. However, transgenic plants overexpressing single DOG1 variants from the 35S promoter could accumulate protein and showed complementation. Simultaneous expression of two or more DOG1 transcript variants from the endogenous DOG1 promoter also led to increased dormancy levels and accumulation of DOG1 protein. This suggests that single isoforms are functional, but require the presence of additional isoforms to prevent protein degradation. Subsequently, we found that the DOG1 protein can bind to itself and that this binding is required for DOG1 function but not for protein accumulation. Natural variation for DOG1 binding efficiency was observed among Arabidopsis accessions and contributes to variation in seed dormancy. PMID:26684465

  13. U2AF1 Mutations Alter Sequence Specificity of pre-mRNA Binding and Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Okeyo-Owuor, Theresa; White, Brian S.; Chatrikhi, Rakesh; Mohan, Dipika R.; Kim, Sanghyun; Griffith, Malachi; Ding, Li; Ketkar-Kulkarni, Shamika; Hundal, Jasreet; Laird, Kholiswa M.; Kielkopf, Clara L.; Ley, Timothy J.; Walter, Matthew J.; Graubert, Timothy A.

    2014-01-01

    We previously identified missense mutations in the U2AF1 splicing factor affecting codons S34 (S34F and S34Y) or Q157 (Q157R and Q157P) in 11% of patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Although the role of U2AF1 as an accessory factor in the U2 snRNP is well established, it is not yet clear how mutations affect splicing or contribute to MDS pathophysiology. We analyzed splice junctions in RNA-seq data generated from transfected CD34+ hematopoietic cells and found significant differences in the abundance of known and novel junctions in samples expressing mutant U2AF1 (S34F). For selected transcripts, splicing alterations detected by RNA-seq were confirmed by analysis of primary de novo MDS patient samples. These effects were not due to impaired U2AF1 (S34F) localization as it co-localized normally with U2AF2 within nuclear speckles. We further found evidence in the RNA-seq data for decreased affinity of U2AF1 (S34F) for uridine (relative to cytidine) at the e-3 position immediately upstream of the splice acceptor site and corroborated this finding using affinity binding assays. These data suggest that the S34F mutation alters U2AF1 function in the context of specific RNA sequences, leading to aberrant alternative splicing of target genes, some of which may be relevant for MDS pathogenesis. PMID:25311244

  14. Alternatively Spliced Isoforms of KV10.1 Potassium Channels Modulate Channel Properties and Can Activate Cyclin-dependent Kinase in Xenopus Oocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Ramos Gomes, Fernanda; Romaniello, Vincenzo; Sánchez, Araceli; Weber, Claudia; Narayanan, Pratibha; Psol, Maryna; Pardo, Luis A.

    2015-01-01

    KV10.1 is a voltage-gated potassium channel expressed selectively in the mammalian brain but also aberrantly in cancer cells. In this study we identified short splice variants of KV10.1 resulting from exon-skipping events (E65 and E70) in human brain and cancer cell lines. The presence of the variants was confirmed by Northern blot and RNase protection assays. Both variants completely lacked the transmembrane domains of the channel and produced cytoplasmic proteins without channel function. In a reconstituted system, both variants co-precipitated with the full-length channel and induced a robust down-regulation of KV10.1 current when co-expressed with the full-length form, but their effect was mechanistically different. E65 required a tetramerization domain and induced a reduction in the overall expression of full-length KV10.1, whereas E70 mainly affected its glycosylation pattern. E65 triggered the activation of cyclin-dependent kinases in Xenopus laevis oocytes, suggesting a role in cell cycle control. Our observations highlight the relevance of noncanonical functions for the oncogenicity of KV10.1, which need to be considered when ion channels are targeted for cancer therapy. PMID:26518875

  15. Alternatively Spliced Isoforms of KV10.1 Potassium Channels Modulate Channel Properties and Can Activate Cyclin-dependent Kinase in Xenopus Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Ramos Gomes, Fernanda; Romaniello, Vincenzo; Sánchez, Araceli; Weber, Claudia; Narayanan, Pratibha; Psol, Maryna; Pardo, Luis A

    2015-12-18

    KV10.1 is a voltage-gated potassium channel expressed selectively in the mammalian brain but also aberrantly in cancer cells. In this study we identified short splice variants of KV10.1 resulting from exon-skipping events (E65 and E70) in human brain and cancer cell lines. The presence of the variants was confirmed by Northern blot and RNase protection assays. Both variants completely lacked the transmembrane domains of the channel and produced cytoplasmic proteins without channel function. In a reconstituted system, both variants co-precipitated with the full-length channel and induced a robust down-regulation of KV10.1 current when co-expressed with the full-length form, but their effect was mechanistically different. E65 required a tetramerization domain and induced a reduction in the overall expression of full-length KV10.1, whereas E70 mainly affected its glycosylation pattern. E65 triggered the activation of cyclin-dependent kinases in Xenopus laevis oocytes, suggesting a role in cell cycle control. Our observations highlight the relevance of noncanonical functions for the oncogenicity of KV10.1, which need to be considered when ion channels are targeted for cancer therapy. PMID:26518875

  16. Transcriptome analyses of the human retina identify unprecedented transcript diversity and 3.5 Mb of novel transcribed sequence via significant alternative splicing and novel genes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The retina is a complex tissue comprised of multiple cell types that is affected by a diverse set of diseases that are important causes of vision loss. Characterizing the transcripts, both annotated and novel, that are expressed in a given tissue has become vital for understanding the mechanisms underlying the pathology of disease. Results We sequenced RNA prepared from three normal human retinas and characterized the retinal transcriptome at an unprecedented level due to the increased depth of sampling provided by the RNA-seq approach. We used a non-redundant reference transcriptome from all of the empirically-determined human reference tracks to identify annotated and novel sequences expressed in the retina. We detected 79,915 novel alternative splicing events, including 29,887 novel exons, 21,757 3? and 5? alternate splice sites, and 28,271 exon skipping events. We also identified 116 potential novel genes. These data represent a significant addition to the annotated human transcriptome. For example, the novel exons detected increase the number of identified exons by 3%. Using a high-throughput RNA capture approach to validate 14,696 of these novel transcriptome features we found that 99% of the putative novel events can be reproducibly detected. Further, 15-36% of the novel splicing events maintain an open reading frame, suggesting they produce novel protein products. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first application of RNA capture to perform large-scale validation of novel transcriptome features. In total, these analyses provide extensive detail about a previously uncharacterized level of transcript diversity in the human retina. PMID:23865674

  17. Control of Human PLP1 Expression Through Transcriptional Regulatory Elements and Alternatively Spliced Exons in Intron 1

    PubMed Central

    Hamdan, Hamdan; Kockara, Neriman T.; Jolly, Lee Ann; Haun, Shirley

    2015-01-01

    *These authors contributed equally to this work.Although the myelin proteolipid protein gene (PLP1) encodes the most abundant protein in central nervous system (CNS) myelin, not much is known about the mechanisms that govern expression of the human gene (hPLP1). Much more is known about the processes that regulate Plp1 gene expression in rodents. From studies with Plp1-lacZ transgenic mice, it was determined that the first intron of mouse Plp1 (mPlp1) is required to attain high levels of expression in brain, concurrent with the active myelination period. Other studies have suggested that within mPlp1 intron 1 (>8?kb) lie several regions with enhancer-like activity. To test whether these sequences (and possibly others) in hPLP1 intron 1 are functional, deletion-transfection analysis was performed with hPLP1-lacZ constructs that contain various portions of the intron, or lack it altogether. Results presented here demonstrate the importance of hPLP1 intron 1 in achieving maximal levels of expression in the immortalized oligodendroglial cell line, Oli-neu. Deletion analysis indicates that the intron contains multiple positive regulatory elements which are active in Oli-neu cells. Some of these elements appear to be functionally conserved between human and mouse, while others are not. Furthermore, our studies demonstrate that multiple splice variants can be formed due to inclusion of extra (supplementary) exons from what is classically thought of as hPLP1 intron 1. Thus, splicing of these novel exons (which are not recognized as such in mPlp1 due to lack of conserved splice sites) must utilize factors common to both human and mouse since Oli-neu cells are of mouse origin. PMID:25694552

  18. HnRNP L represses exon splicing via a regulated exonic splicing silencer

    E-print Network

    Sharp, Kim

    , Dallas, TX, USA Skipping of mammalian exons during pre-mRNA splicing is commonly mediated by the activity online 7 July 2005 Subject Categories: RNA Keywords: alternative splicing; CD45; ESS; hnRNP Introduction complexity is alternative pre-mRNA splicing, which is estimated to occur in 60­75% of human genes (Modrek et

  19. A liver X receptor (LXR)-{beta} alternative splicing variant (LXRBSV) acts as an RNA co-activator of LXR-{beta}

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Koshi; Ishida, Emi; Matsumoto, Shunichi; Shibusawa, Nobuyuki; Okada, Shuichi; Monden, Tsuyoshi; Satoh, Tetsurou; Yamada, Masanobu; Mori, Masatomo

    2009-12-25

    We report the isolation and functional characterization of a novel transcriptional co-activator, termed LXRBSV. LXRBSV is an alternative splicing variant of liver X receptor (LXR)-{beta} LXRBSV has an intronic sequence between exons 2 and 3 in the mouse LXR-{beta} gene. The LXRBSV gene is expressed in various tissues including the liver and brain. We sub-cloned LXRBSV into pSG5, a mammalian expression vector, and LXRBSV in pSG5 augmented human Sterol Response Element Binding Protein (SREBP)-1c promoter activity in HepG2 cells in a ligand (TO901317) dependent manner. The transactivation mediated by LXRBSV is selective for LXR-{beta}. The LXRBSV protein was deduced to be 64 amino acids in length; however, a GAL4-LXRBSV fusion protein was not able to induce transactivation. Serial deletion constructs of LXRBSV demonstrated that the intronic sequence inserted in LXRBSV is required for its transactivation activity. An ATG mutant of LXRBSV was able to induce transactivation as wild type. Furthermore, LXRBSV functions in the presence of cycloheximide. Taken together, we have concluded that LXRBSV acts as an RNA transcript not as a protein. In the current study, we have demonstrated for the first time that an alternative splicing variant of a nuclear receptor acts as an RNA co-activator.

  20. Developmental expression of p107 mRNA and evidence for alternative splicing of the p107 (RBL1) gene product

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyung Keun; Soonpaa, M.H.; Wang, He

    1995-08-10

    Expression of p107, a protein with homology to the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor (pRB), was monitored during murine development. Northern blot tissue surveys identified two transcripts of 4.9 and 2.4 kb that hybridized to a p107 cDNA clone. Expression of both transcripts was detected in fetal tissues, with particularly high levels in the liver and heart. In contrast, p107 transcripts were markedly decreased in most adult tissues examined. Molecular cloning analyses revealed that the 4.9- and 2.4-kb transcripts encoded proteins with deduced molecular masses of 119 and 68 kDa, respectively. Genetic mapping studies suggested that the two p107 transcripts arose by alternative splicing of a common precursor. The protein encoded by the 2.4-kb transcript lacks the spacer and B motif of the {open_quotes}pocket domain,{close_quotes} a region of homology between p107 and pRB that is required for binding to cell cycle regulatory proteins. Structural modifications resulting from alternative splicing may this confer functional diversity upon the 119- and 68-kDa proteins. 52 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Identification of beta1C-2, a novel variant of the integrin beta1 subunit generated by utilization of an alternative splice acceptor site in exon C.

    PubMed Central

    Svineng, G; Fässler, R; Johansson, S

    1998-01-01

    A new splice variant of the human integrin subunit beta1 has been identified and designated beta1C-2. It differs from the previously reported beta1C (in this report designated beta1C-1) by 18 nucleotides, and is generated by splicing from exon 6 to an alternative splice acceptor site within exon C, causing an in-frame deletion of six amino acids of the cytoplasmic region of beta1C-1. The beta1C-2 mRNA is present in several human cell lines and tissues at low levels, similarly to beta1C-1. In peripheral T-lymphocytes, beta1C-2 is the selectively expressed isoform. Neither beta1C-1 nor beta1C-2 mRNA could be detected in mouse tissues, and Southern hybridization of a mouse genomic beta1 clone with a human exon-C-specific probe failed to identify a corresponding mouse exon. The antisense orientation of exon C is highly homologous to an Alu element. Since Alu elements are restricted to primates, the beta1C-1 and beta1C-2 variants of the integrin subunit beta1 are specific for these species. The protein coded for by the beta1C-2 cDNA can be expressed and localized to the surface of beta1 deficient mouse cells. However, while stable transformed clones expressing high levels of the beta1A were commonly found, the beta1C-1 and beta1C-2 expressing clones expressed barely detectable amounts of the beta1 protein. Hence, high levels of beta1C-2 may be incompatible with cell proliferation, as previously suggested for beta1C-1. PMID:9494094

  2. An alternative splice variant in Abcc6, the gene causing dystrophic calcification, leads to protein deficiency in C3H/He mice.

    PubMed

    Aherrahrou, Zouhair; Doehring, Lars C; Ehlers, Eva-Maria; Liptau, Henrike; Depping, Reinhard; Linsel-Nitschke, Patrick; Kaczmarek, Piotr M; Erdmann, Jeanette; Schunkert, Heribert

    2008-03-21

    Dystrophic cardiac calcification (DCC) is an autosomal recessive trait characterized by calcium phosphate deposits in myocardial tissue. The Abcc6 gene locus was recently found to mediate DCC; however, at the molecular level the causative variants remain to be determined. Examining the sequences of Abcc6 cDNA in DCC-resistant C57BL/6 and DCC-susceptible C3H/He mice, we identified a missense mutation (Cys to Thr at codon 619, rs32756904) at the 3'-border of exon 14 that creates an additional donor splice site (GT). Accordingly, an alternative transcript variant was detected, lacking the last 5 bp of exon 14 (-AGG(C/T)GCTgtga-) in DCC-susceptible C3H/He mice that carry the Thr allele. The 5-bp deletion was found to result in premature termination at codon 684, in turn leading to protein deficiency in DCC-susceptible mouse tissue as well as in cells transfected with Abcc6 cDNA lacking the last 5 bp of exon 14. All mouse strains that were found to carry the Thr allele, including C3H/He, DBA/2J, and 129S1/SvJ, were also found to be positive for DCC. In summary, we identified a splice variant leading to a 5-bp deletion in the Abcc6 transcript that gives rise to protein deficiency both in vivo and in vitro. The fact that all mouse strains that carry the deletion also develop dystrophic calcifications further suggests that the underlying splice variant affects the biological function of MRP6 protein and is a cause of DCC in mice. PMID:18201967

  3. RESEARCH Open Access Integrating many co-splicing networks to

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Xianghong Jasmine

    Background: Alternative splicing is a ubiquitous gene regulatory mechanism that dramatically increases splicing of a set of genes that shape the synapse [6]. However, the study of such coordinated splicing can belong to different genes, but they exhibit correlated splicing patterns (in terms of being

  4. Exploitation of a thermosensitive splicing event to study pre-mRNA splicing in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Cizdziel, P.E.; De Mars, M.; Murphy, E.C. Jr.

    1988-04-01

    The spliced form of MuSVts110 viral RNA is approximately 20-fold more abundant at growth temperatures of 33/sup 0/C or lower than at 37 to 41/sup 0/C. This difference is due to changes in the efficiency of MuSVts110 RNA splicing rather than selective thermolability of the spliced species at 37 to 41/sup 0/C or general thermosensitivity of RNA splicing in MuSVts110-infected cells. Moreover, RNA transcribed from MuSVts110 DNA introduced into a variety of cell lines is spliced in a temperature-sensitive fashion, suggesting that the structure of the viral RNA controls the efficiency of the event. The authors exploited this novel splicing event to study the cleavage and ligation events during splicing in vivo. No spliced viral mRNA or splicing intermediates were observed in MuSVts110-infected cells (6m2 cells) at 39/sup 0/C. However, after a short (about 30-min) lag following a shift to 33/sup 0/C, viral pre-mRNA cleaved at the 5' splice site began to accumulate. Ligated exons were not detected until about 60 min following the initial detection of cleavage at the 5' splice site, suggesting that these two splicing reactions did not occur concurrently. Splicing of viral RNA in the MuSVts110 revertant 54-5A4, which lacks the sequence -AG/TGT- at the usual 3' splice site, was studied. Cleavage at the 5' splice site in the revertant viral RNA proceeded in a temperature-sensitive fashion. No novel cryptic 3' splice sites were activated; however, splicing at an alternate upstream 3' splice site used at low efficiency in normal MuSVts110 RNA was increased to a level close to that of 5'-splice-site cleavage in the revertant viral RNA.

  5. The RNA Splicing Response to DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Shkreta, Lulzim; Chabot, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    The number of factors known to participate in the DNA damage response (DDR) has expanded considerably in recent years to include splicing and alternative splicing factors. While the binding of splicing proteins and ribonucleoprotein complexes to nascent transcripts prevents genomic instability by deterring the formation of RNA/DNA duplexes, splicing factors are also recruited to, or removed from, sites of DNA damage. The first steps of the DDR promote the post-translational modification of splicing factors to affect their localization and activity, while more downstream DDR events alter their expression. Although descriptions of molecular mechanisms remain limited, an emerging trend is that DNA damage disrupts the coupling of constitutive and alternative splicing with the transcription of genes involved in DNA repair, cell-cycle control and apoptosis. A better understanding of how changes in splice site selection are integrated into the DDR may provide new avenues to combat cancer and delay aging. PMID:26529031

  6. The RNA Splicing Response to DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Shkreta, Lulzim; Chabot, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    The number of factors known to participate in the DNA damage response (DDR) has expanded considerably in recent years to include splicing and alternative splicing factors. While the binding of splicing proteins and ribonucleoprotein complexes to nascent transcripts prevents genomic instability by deterring the formation of RNA/DNA duplexes, splicing factors are also recruited to, or removed from, sites of DNA damage. The first steps of the DDR promote the post-translational modification of splicing factors to affect their localization and activity, while more downstream DDR events alter their expression. Although descriptions of molecular mechanisms remain limited, an emerging trend is that DNA damage disrupts the coupling of constitutive and alternative splicing with the transcription of genes involved in DNA repair, cell-cycle control and apoptosis. A better understanding of how changes in splice site selection are integrated into the DDR may provide new avenues to combat cancer and delay aging. PMID:26529031

  7. Mapping Splicing Quantitative Trait Loci in RNA-Seq

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Cheng; Hu, Yu; Liu, Yichuan; Li, Mingyao

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND One of the major mechanisms of generating mRNA diversity is alternative splicing, a regulated process that allows for the flexibility of producing functionally different proteins from the same genomic sequences. This process is often altered in cancer cells to produce aberrant proteins that drive the progression of cancer. A better understanding of the misregulation of alternative splicing will shed light on the development of novel targets for pharmacological interventions of cancer. METHODS In this study, we evaluated three statistical methods, random effects meta-regression, beta regression, and generalized linear mixed effects model, for the analysis of splicing quantitative trait loci (sQTL) using RNA-Seq data. All the three methods use exon-inclusion levels estimated by the PennSeq algorithm, a statistical method that utilizes paired-end reads and accounts for non-uniform sequencing coverage. RESULTS Using both simulated and real RNA-Seq datasets, we compared these three methods with GLiMMPS, a recently developed method for sQTL analysis. Our results indicate that the most reliable and powerful method was the random effects meta-regression approach, which identified sQTLs at low false discovery rates but higher power when compared to GLiMMPS. CONCLUSIONS We have evaluated three statistical methods for the analysis of sQTLs in RNA-Seq. Results from our study will be instructive for researchers in selecting the appropriate statistical methods for sQTL analysis. PMID:25733796

  8. Mapping Splicing Quantitative Trait Loci in RNA-Seq

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Cheng; Hu, Yu; Liu, Yichuan; Li, Mingyao

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND One of the major mechanisms of generating mRNA diversity is alternative splicing, a regulated process that allows for the flexibility of producing functionally different proteins from the same genomic sequences. This process is often altered in cancer cells to produce aberrant proteins that drive the progression of cancer. A better understanding of the misregulation of alternative splicing will shed light on the development of novel targets for pharmacological interventions of cancer. METHODS In this study, we evaluated three statistical methods, random effects meta-regression, beta regression, and generalized linear mixed effects model, for the analysis of splicing quantitative trait loci (sQTL) using RNA-Seq data. All the three methods use exon-inclusion levels estimated by the PennSeq algorithm, a statistical method that utilizes paired-end reads and accounts for non-uniform sequencing coverage. RESULTS Using both simulated and real RNA-Seq datasets, we compared these three methods with GLiMMPS, a recently developed method for sQTL analysis. Our results indicate that the most reliable and powerful method was the random effects meta-regression approach, which identified sQTLs at low false discovery rates but higher power when compared to GLiMMPS. CONCLUSIONS We have evaluated three statistical methods for the analysis of sQTLs in RNA-Seq. Results from our study will be instructive for researchers in selecting the appropriate statistical methods for sQTL analysis. PMID:25452687

  9. Contrasting effects of two alternative splicing forms of coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 on thyroid hormone receptor-mediated transcription in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Hiroki; Paul, Bindu D; Choi, Cheol Young; Shi, Yun-Bo

    2007-05-01

    Thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) can repress or activate target genes depending on the absence or presence of thyroid hormone (T3), respectively. This hormone-dependent gene regulation is mediated by the recruitment of corepressors in the absence of T3 and coactivators in its presence. Many TR-interacting coactivators have been characterized in vitro. Among them is coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1), which methylates histone H3. We are interested in investigating the role of CARM1 in TR-mediated gene expression in vivo during postembryonic development by using T3-dependent frog metamorphosis as a model. We first cloned the Xenopus laevis CARM1 and obtained two alternative splicing forms, CARM1a and CARM1b. Both isoforms are expressed throughout metamorphosis, supporting a role for these isoforms during the process. To investigate whether Xenopus CARM1s participate in gene regulation by TRs, transcriptional analysis was conducted in Xenopus oocyte, where the effects of cofactors can be studied in the context of chromatin in vivo. Surprisingly, overexpression of CARM1b had little effect on TR-mediated transcription, whereas CARM1a enhanced gene activation by liganded TR. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that both endogenous CARM1a and overexpressed CARM1a and b were recruited to the promoter by liganded TR. However, the binding of liganded TR to the target promoter was reduced when CARM1b was overexpressed, accompanied by a slight reduction in histone methylation at the promoter. These results suggest that CARM1 may play a role in TR-mediated transcriptional regulation during frog development and that its function is regulated by alternative splicing. PMID:17312273

  10. Novel variants of human SCaMC-3, an isoform of the ATP-Mg/Pi mitochondrial carrier, generated by alternative splicing from 3?-flanking transposable elements

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    CaMCs (calcium-dependent mitochondrial carriers) represent a novel subfamily of metabolite carriers of mitochondria. The ATP-Mg/Pi co-transporter, functionally characterized more than 20 years ago, has been identified to be a CaMC member. There are three isoforms of the ATP-Mg/Pi carrier in mammals, SCaMC-1 (short CaMC-1), -2 and -3 (or APC-1, -3 and -2 respectively), corresponding to the genes SLC25A24, SLC25A25 and SLC25A23 respectively, as well as six N-terminal variants generated by alternative splicing for SCaMC-1 and -2 isoforms. In the present study, we describe four new variants of human SCaMC-3 generated by alternative splicing. The new mRNAs use the exon 9 3?-donor site and distinct 5?-acceptor sites from repetitive elements, in regions downstream of exon 10, the last exon in all SCaMCs. Transcripts lacking exon 10 (SCaMC-3b, -3b?, -3c and -3d) code for shortened proteins lacking the last transmembrane domain of 422, 456 and 435 amino acids, and were found in human tissues and HEK-293T cells. Mitochondrial targeting of overexpressed SCaMC-3 variants is incomplete. Surprisingly, the import impairment is overcome by removing the N-terminal extension of these proteins, suggesting that the hydrophilic N-terminal domain also participates in the mitochondrial import process, as shown for the CaMC members aralar and citrin [Roesch, Hynds, Varga, Tranebjaerg and Koehler (2004) Hum. Mol. Genet. 13, 2101–2111]. PMID:15801905

  11. Molecular characterization of the ?-subunit of Na?/K? ATPase from the euryhaline barnacle Balanus improvisus reveals multiple genes and differential expression of alternative splice variants.

    PubMed

    Lind, Ulrika; Alm Rosenblad, Magnus; Wrange, Anna-Lisa; Sundell, Kristina S; Jonsson, Per R; André, Carl; Havenhand, Jonathan; Blomberg, Anders

    2013-01-01

    The euryhaline bay barnacle Balanus improvisus has one of the broadest salinity tolerances of any barnacle species. It is able to complete its life cycle in salinities close to freshwater (3 PSU) up to fully marine conditions (35 PSU) and is regarded as one of few truly brackish-water species. Na?/K? ATPase (NAK) has been shown to be important for osmoregulation when marine organisms are challenged by changing salinities, and we therefore cloned and examined the expression of different NAKs from B. improvisus. We found two main gene variants, NAK1 and NAK2, which were approximately 70% identical at the protein level. The NAK1 mRNA existed in a long and short variant with the encoded proteins differing only by 27 N-terminal amino acids. This N-terminal stretch was coded for by a separate exon, and the two variants of NAK1 mRNAs appeared to be created by alternative splicing. We furthermore showed that the two NAK1 isoforms were differentially expressed in different life stages and in various tissues of adult barnacle, i.e the long isoform was predominant in cyprids and in adult cirri. In barnacle cyprid larvae that were exposed to a combination of different salinities and pCO2 levels, the expression of the long NAK1 mRNA increased relative to the short in low salinities. We suggest that the alternatively spliced long variant of the Nak1 protein might be of importance for osmoregulation in B. improvisus in low salinity conditions. PMID:24130836

  12. Molecular Characterization of the ?-Subunit of Na+/K+ ATPase from the Euryhaline Barnacle Balanus improvisus Reveals Multiple Genes and Differential Expression of Alternative Splice Variants

    PubMed Central

    Lind, Ulrika; Alm Rosenblad, Magnus; Wrange, Anna-Lisa; Sundell, Kristina S.; Jonsson, Per R.; André, Carl; Havenhand, Jonathan; Blomberg, Anders

    2013-01-01

    The euryhaline bay barnacle Balanus improvisus has one of the broadest salinity tolerances of any barnacle species. It is able to complete its life cycle in salinities close to freshwater (3 PSU) up to fully marine conditions (35 PSU) and is regarded as one of few truly brackish-water species. Na+/K+ ATPase (NAK) has been shown to be important for osmoregulation when marine organisms are challenged by changing salinities, and we therefore cloned and examined the expression of different NAKs from B. improvisus. We found two main gene variants, NAK1 and NAK2, which were approximately 70% identical at the protein level. The NAK1 mRNA existed in a long and short variant with the encoded proteins differing only by 27 N-terminal amino acids. This N-terminal stretch was coded for by a separate exon, and the two variants of NAK1 mRNAs appeared to be created by alternative splicing. We furthermore showed that the two NAK1 isoforms were differentially expressed in different life stages and in various tissues of adult barnacle, i.e the long isoform was predominant in cyprids and in adult cirri. In barnacle cyprid larvae that were exposed to a combination of different salinities and pCO2 levels, the expression of the long NAK1 mRNA increased relative to the short in low salinities. We suggest that the alternatively spliced long variant of the Nak1 protein might be of importance for osmoregulation in B. improvisus in low salinity conditions. PMID:24130836

  13. Alternative splicing and highly variable cadherin transcripts associated with field-evolved resistance of pink bollworm to bt cotton in India.

    PubMed

    Fabrick, Jeffrey A; Ponnuraj, Jeyakumar; Singh, Amar; Tanwar, Raj K; Unnithan, Gopalan C; Yelich, Alex J; Li, Xianchun; Carrière, Yves; Tabashnik, Bruce E

    2014-01-01

    Evolution of resistance by insect pests can reduce the benefits of insecticidal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) that are used extensively in sprays and transgenic crops. Despite considerable knowledge of the genes conferring insect resistance to Bt toxins in laboratory-selected strains and in field populations exposed to Bt sprays, understanding of the genetic basis of field-evolved resistance to Bt crops remains limited. In particular, previous work has not identified the genes conferring resistance in any cases where field-evolved resistance has reduced the efficacy of a Bt crop. Here we report that mutations in a gene encoding a cadherin protein that binds Bt toxin Cry1Ac are associated with field-evolved resistance of pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella) in India to Cry1Ac produced by transgenic cotton. We conducted laboratory bioassays that confirmed previously reported resistance to Cry1Ac in pink bollworm from the state of Gujarat, where Bt cotton producing Cry1Ac has been grown extensively. Analysis of DNA from 436 pink bollworm from seven populations in India detected none of the four cadherin resistance alleles previously reported to be linked with resistance to Cry1Ac in laboratory-selected strains of pink bollworm from Arizona. However, DNA sequencing of pink bollworm derived from resistant and susceptible field populations in India revealed eight novel, severely disrupted cadherin alleles associated with resistance to Cry1Ac. For these eight alleles, analysis of complementary DNA (cDNA) revealed a total of 19 transcript isoforms, each containing a premature stop codon, a deletion of at least 99 base pairs, or both. Seven of the eight disrupted alleles each produced two or more different transcript isoforms, which implicates alternative splicing of messenger RNA (mRNA). This represents the first example of alternative splicing associated with field-evolved resistance that reduced the efficacy of a Bt crop. PMID:24840729

  14. Functional Classification of BRCA2 DNA Variants by Splicing Assays in a Large Minigene with 9 Exons

    PubMed Central

    Acedo, Alberto; Hernández-Moro, Cristina; Curiel-García, Álvaro; Díez-Gómez, Beatriz; Velasco, Eladio A

    2015-01-01

    Numerous pathogenic DNA variants impair the splicing mechanism in human genetic diseases. Minigenes are optimal approaches to test variants under the splicing viewpoint without the need of patient samples. We aimed to design a robust minigene construct of the breast cancer gene BRCA2 in order to investigate the impact of variants on splicing. BRCA2 exons 19–27 (MGBR2_ex19–27) were cloned in the new vector pSAD. It produced a large transcript of the expected size (2,174 nucleotides) and exon structure (V1-ex19-27-V2). Splicing assays showed that 18 (17 splice-site and 1 silencer variants) out of 40 candidate DNA variants induced aberrant patterns. Twenty-four anomalous transcripts were accurately detected by fluorescent-RT-PCR that were generated by exon-skipping, alternative site usage, and intron-retention events. Fourteen variants induced major anomalies and were predicted to disrupt protein function so they could be classified as pathogenic. Furthermore, minigene mimicked previously reported patient RNA outcomes of seven variants supporting the reproducibility of minigene assays. Therefore, a relevant fraction of variants are involved in breast cancer through splicing alterations. MGBR2_ex19–27 is the largest reported BRCA2 minigene and constitutes a valuable tool for the functional and clinical classification of sequence variations. PMID:25382762

  15. Transcriptome analysis provides insights into the regulatory function of alternative splicing in antiviral immunity in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella)

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Quanyuan; Su, Jianguo

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of the transcriptomic response to infection is an effective approach to understanding the immune mechanisms. Herein we challenged grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) with grass carp reovirus (GCRV) and sequenced four cDNA libraries obtained from head-kidney and spleen by using Illumina Miseq. As a result, we gained a total of 21.52?Gb clean data with 107.96 million reads, and de novo assembled 55,199 unigenes with an average length of 1,470?bp. Comparative transcriptome analysis reveals that 217 unigenes are differentially expressed (fold-change of at least 4) between resistant and susceptible fish in both head-kidney and spleen, and of which 36 unigenes were validated by RT-qPCR experiment. The expression profile of immune-related genes demonstrates that the immune response of spleen is more intense than that of head-kidney. Remarkably, 11,811 unigenes contain multiple transcripts, of which 322 unigenes possess notably differentially expressed transcripts between the four transcriptomic datasets. Furthermore, the splicing transcripts of IL-12p40 and IL-1R1 are firstly found to play diverse roles in the antiviral response of fishes. This study provides a complete transcriptome dataset of C. idella, which is valuable for the studies of immune complexity and, moreover, throws light on the regulatory role of AS in antiviral immunity. PMID:26248502

  16. Identification of a truncated alternative splicing variant of human PPAR{gamma}1 that exhibits dominant negative activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyo Jung; Woo, Im Sun; Kang, Eun Sil; Eun, So Young; Kim, Hye Jung; Lee, Jae Heun; Chang, Ki Churl; Kim, Jin-Hoi; Seo, Han Geuk . E-mail: hgseo@gnu.ac.kr

    2006-09-01

    We have identified a novel variant of human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (hPPAR{gamma}), derived from insertion of a novel exon 3'. Insertion leads to the introduction of a premature stop codon, resulting in the formation of a truncated splice variant of PPAR{gamma}1 (PPAR{gamma}1{sub tr}). Western blot analysis confirmed the presence of PPAR{gamma}1{sub tr} in tumor-derived cell lines. Although PPAR{gamma}1{sub tr} interfered with transcriptional activity of wild-type PPAR{gamma}1 (PPAR{gamma}1{sub wt}), activity could be rescued by cotransfection with a vector expressing p300. Overexpression of PPAR{gamma}1{sub tr} protein in CHO cells greatly enhanced their proliferation and anchorage-independent colony growth on soft agar. These data demonstrate that PPAR{gamma}1{sub tr} is an important physiologic isoform of PPAR{gamma} that modulates cellular functions of PPAR{gamma}1{sub wt}.

  17. BRCA1 Exon 11, a CERES (Composite Regulatory Element of Splicing) Element Involved in Splice Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Tammaro, Claudia; Raponi, Michela; Wilson, David I.; Baralle, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Unclassified variants (UV) of BRCA1 can affect normal pre-mRNA splicing. Here, we investigate the UV c.693G>A, a “silent” change in BRCA1 exon 11, which we have found induces aberrant splicing in patient carriers and in vitro. Using a minigene assay, we show that the UV c.693G>A has a strong effect on the splicing isoform ratio of BRCA1. Systematic site-directed mutagenesis of the area surrounding the nucleotide position c.693G>A induced variable changes in the level of exon 11 inclusion/exclusion in the mRNA, pointing to the presence of a complex regulatory element with overlapping enhancer and silencer functions. Accordingly, protein binding analysis in the region detected several splicing regulatory factors involved, including SRSF1, SRSF6 and SRSF9, suggesting that this sequence represents a composite regulatory element of splicing (CERES). PMID:25056543

  18. BRCA1 EXON 11, a CERES (composite regulatory element of splicing) element involved in splice regulation.

    PubMed

    Tammaro, Claudia; Raponi, Michela; Wilson, David I; Baralle, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Unclassified variants (UV) of BRCA1 can affect normal pre-mRNA splicing. Here, we investigate the UV c.693G>A, a "silent" change in BRCA1 exon 11, which we have found induces aberrant splicing in patient carriers and in vitro. Using a minigene assay, we show that the UV c.693G>A has a strong effect on the splicing isoform ratio of BRCA1. Systematic site-directed mutagenesis of the area surrounding the nucleotide position c.693G>A induced variable changes in the level of exon 11 inclusion/exclusion in the mRNA, pointing to the presence of a complex regulatory element with overlapping enhancer and silencer functions. Accordingly, protein binding analysis in the region detected several splicing regulatory factors involved, including SRSF1, SRSF6 and SRSF9, suggesting that this sequence represents a composite regulatory element of splicing (CERES). PMID:25056543

  19. Unproductive splicing of SR genes associated with highly conserved and ultraconserved DNA elements

    E-print Network

    Lareau, Liana F; Inada, Maki; Green, Richard E; Wengrod, Jordan C; Brenner, Steven E

    2007-01-01

    serine-rich splicing factors in RNA processing. Biochem.splicing events target the resulting messenger RNAs forRNA processing including control of export, translation, stability, and constitutive and alternative splicing

  20. First Trimester Pregnancy Loss and the Expression of Alternatively Spliced NKp30 Isoforms in Maternal Blood and Placental Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Shemesh, Avishai; Tirosh, Dan; Sheiner, Eyal; Benshalom-Tirosh, Neta; Brusilovsky, Michael; Segev, Rotem; Rosental, Benyamin; Porgador, Angel

    2015-01-01

    Capsule: We observed that first trimester pregnancy loss is associated with an altered expression profile of the three isoforms of the NK receptor NKp30 expressed by NKs in PBMC and placental tissue. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether first trimester pregnancy loss is associated with differences in expression of NKp30 splice variants (isoforms) in maternal peripheral blood or placental tissue. We conducted a prospective case–control study; a total of 33 women undergoing dilation and curettage due to first trimester pregnancy loss were further subdivided into groups with sporadic or recurrent pregnancy loss. The control group comprises women undergoing elective termination of pregnancy. The qPCR approach was employed to assess the relative expression of NKp30 isoforms as well as the total expression of NKp30 and NKp46 receptors between the selected groups. Results show that in both PBMC and placental tissue, NKp46 and NKp30 expressions were mildly elevated in the pregnancy loss groups compared with the elective group. In particular, NKp46 elevation was significant. Moreover, expression analysis of NKp30 isoforms manifested a different profile between PBMC and the placenta. NKp30-a and NKp30-b isoforms in the placental tissue, but not in PBMC, showed a significant increase in the pregnancy loss groups compared with the elective group. Placental expression of NKp30 activating isoforms-a and -b in the pregnancy loss groups was negatively correlated with PLGF expression. By contrast, placental expression of these isoforms in the elective group was positively correlated with TNF?, IL-10, and VEGF-A expression. The altered expression of NKp30 activating isoforms in placental tissue from patients with pregnancy loss compared to the elective group and the different correlations with cytokine expression point to the involvement of NKp30-mediated function in pregnancy loss. PMID:26082773

  1. Enhancer-dependent 5?-Splice Site Control of fruitless Pre-mRNA Splicing*

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Bianca J.; Bakshi, Arati; Ekinci, Fatma Y.; Webb, Jenny; Graveley, Brenton R.; Hertel, Klemens J.

    2008-01-01

    The Drosophila fruitless (fru) gene encodes a transcription factor that essentially regulates all aspects of male courtship behavior. The use of alternative 5?-splice sites generates fru isoforms that determine gender-appropriate sexual behaviors. Alternative splicing of fru is regulated by TRA and TRA2 and depends on an exonic splicing enhancer (fruRE) consisting of three 13-nucleotide repeat elements, nearly identical to those that regulate alternative sex-specific 3?-splice site choice in the doublesex (dsx) gene. dsx has provided a useful model system to investigate the mechanisms of enhancer-dependent 3?-splice site choice. However, little is known about enhancer-dependent regulation of alternative 5?-splice sites. The mechanisms of this process were investigated using an in vitro system in which recombinant TRA/TRA2 could activate the female-specific 5?-splice site of fru. Mutational analysis demonstrated that one 13-nucleotide repeat element within the fruRE is required and sufficient to activate the regulated female-specific splice site. As was established for dsx, the fruRE can be replaced by a short element encompassing tandem 13-nucleotide repeat elements, by heterologous splicing enhancers, and by artificially tethering a splicing activator to the pre-mRNA. Complementation experiments showed that Ser/Arg-rich proteins facilitate enhancer-dependent 5?-splice site activation. We conclude that splicing enhancers function similarly in activating regulated 5?- and 3?-splice sites. These results suggest that exonic splicing enhancers recruit multiple spliceosomal components required for the initial recognition of 5?- and 3?-splice sites. PMID:12646561

  2. Novel mutations in the GH gene (GH1) uncover putative splicing regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Babu, Deepak; Mellone, Simona; Fusco, Ileana; Petri, Antonella; Walker, Gillian E; Bellone, Simonetta; Prodam, Flavia; Momigliano-Richiardi, Patricia; Bona, Gianni; Giordano, Mara

    2014-05-01

    Mutations affecting exon 3 splicing are the main cause of autosomal dominant Isolated GH Deficiency II (IGHDII) by increasing the level of exon 3-skipped mRNA encoding the functionally inactive dominant-negative 17.5-kDa isoform. The exons and introns of the gene encoding GH (GH1) were screened for the presence of mutations in 103 sporadic isolated GH deficiency cases. Four different variations within exon 3 were identified in 3 patients. One carried c.261C>T (p.Pro87Pro) and c.272A>T (p.Glu91Val), the second c.255G>A (p.Pro85Pro) and c.261 C>T, and the third c.246G>C (p.Glu82Asp). All the variants were likely generated by gene conversion from an homologous gene in the GH1 cluster. In silico analysis predicted that positions c.255 and c.272 were included within 2 putative novel exon splicing enhancers (ESEs). Their effect on splicing was confirmed in vitro. Constructs bearing these 2 variants induced consistently higher levels both of transcript and protein corresponding to the 17.5-kDa isoform. When c.255 and c.272 were combined in cis with the c.261 variant, as in our patients, their effect was weaker. In conclusion, we identified 2 variations, c.255G>A and c.272A>T, located in 2 novel putative exon splicing enhancers and affecting GH1 splicing in vitro by increasing the production of alternatively spliced isoforms. The amount of aberrant isoforms is further regulated by the presence in cis of the c.261 variant. Thus, our results evidenced novel putative splicing regulatory elements within exon 3, confirming the crucial role of this exon in mRNA processing. PMID:24635352

  3. Cloning and characterization of an alternatively spliced gene in proximal Xq28 deleted in two patients with intersexual genitalia and myotubular myopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Laporte, J.; Hu, Ling-Jia; Kretz, C.

    1997-05-01

    We have identified a novel human gene that is entirely deleted in two boys with abnormal genital development and myotubular myopathy (MTM1). The gene, F18, is located in proximal Xq28, approximately 80 kb centromeric to the recently isolated MTM1 gene. Northern analysis of mRNA showed a ubiquitous pattern and suggested high levels of expression in skeletal muscle, brain, and heart. A transcript of 4.6 kb was detected in a range of tissues, and additional alternate forms of 3.8 and 2.6 kb were present in placenta and pancreas, respectively. The gene extends over 100 kb and is composed of at least seven exons, of which two are non-coding. Sequence analysis of a 4.6-kb cDNA contig revealed two overlapping open reading frames (ORFs) that encode putative proteins of 701 and 424 amino acids, respectively. Two alternative spliced transcripts affecting the large open reading frame were identified that, together with the Northern blot results, suggest that distinct proteins are derived from the gene. No significant homology to other known proteins was detected, but segments of the first ORF encode polyglutamine tracts and proline-rich domains, which are frequently observed in DNA-binding proteins. The F18 gene is a strong candidate for being implicated in the intersexual genitalia present in the two MTM1-deleted patients. The gene also serves as a candidate for other disorders that map to proximal Xq28. 15 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Molecular characteristics, mRNA expression, and alternative splicing of a ryanodine receptor gene in the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel).

    PubMed

    Yuan, Guo-Rui; Shi, Wen-Zhi; Yang, Wen-Jia; Jiang, Xuan-Zhao; Dou, Wei; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are a distinct class of ligand-gated channels controlling the release of calcium from intracellular stores. The emergence of diamide insecticides, which selectively target insect RyRs, has promoted the study of insect RyRs. In the present study, the full-length RyR cDNA (BdRyR) was cloned and characterized from the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), a serious pest of fruits and vegetables throughout East Asia and the Pacific Rim. The cDNA of BdRyR contains a 15,420-bp open reading frame encoding 5,140 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 582.4 kDa and an isoelectric point of 5.38. BdRyR shows a high level of amino acid sequence identity (78 to 97%) to other insect RyR isoforms. All common structural features of the RyRs are present in the BdRyR, including a well-conserved C-terminal domain containing consensus calcium-binding EF-hands and six transmembrane domains, and a large N-terminal domain. Quantitative real-time PCR analyses revealed that BdRyR was expressed at the lowest and highest levels in egg and adult, respectively, and that the BdRyR expression levels in the third instar larva, pupa and adult were 166.99-, 157.56- and 808.56-fold higher, respectively, than that in the egg. Among different adult body parts, the highest expression level was observed in the thorax compared with the head and abdomen. In addition, four alternative splice sites were identified in the BdRyR gene, with the first, ASI, being located in the central part of the predicted second spore lysis A/RyR domain. Diagnostic PCR analyses revealed that alternative splice variants were generated not only in a tissue-specific manner but also in a developmentally regulated manner. These results lay the foundation for further understanding the structural and functional properties of BdRyR, and the molecular mechanisms for target site resistance in B. dorsalis. PMID:24740254

  5. Identification, mRNA expression, and functional analysis of chitin synthase 1 gene and its two alternative splicing variants in oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen-Jia; Xu, Kang-Kang; Cong, Lin; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Two alternative splicing variants of chitin synthase 1 gene (BdCHS1) were cloned and characterized from the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel). The cDNA of both variants (BdCHS1a and BdCHS1b) consisted of 5,552 nucleotides (nt), with an open reading frame (ORF) of 4,776 nt, encoding a protein of 1,592 amino acid residues, plus 685- and 88-nt of 5'- and 3'-noncoding regions, respectively. The alternative splicing site was located between positions 3,784-3,960 and formed a pair of mutually exclusive exons (a/b) that were same in size (177 nt), but showed only 65% identity at the nucleotide level. During B. dorsalis growth and development, BdCHS1 and BdCHS1a were both mainly expressed during the larval-pupal and pupal-adult transitions, while BdCHS1b was mainly expressed during pupal-adult metamorphosis and in the middle of the pupal stage. BdCHS1a was predominately expressed in the integument whereas BdCHS1b was mainly expressed in the trachea. The 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) induced the expression of BdCHS1 and its variants. Injection of dsRNA of BdCHS1, BdCHS1a, and BdCHS1b into third-instar larvae significantly reduced the expression levels of the corresponding variants, generated phenotypic defects, and killed most of the treated larvae. Furthermore, silencing of BdCHS1 and BdCHS1a had a similar result in that the larva was trapped in old cuticle and died without tanning completely, while silencing of BdCHS1b has no effect on insect morphology. These results demonstrated that BdCHS1 plays an important role in the larval-pupal transition and the expression of BdCHS1 in B. dorsalis is regulated by 20E. PMID:23569438

  6. Alternative splicing in the brain of mice and rats generates transferrin transcripts lacking, as in humans, the signal peptide sequence.

    PubMed

    Duchange, Nathalie; Saleh, Marla-Carla; de Arriba Zerpa, Gonzalo; Pidoux, Josette; Guillou, Florian; Zakin, Mario M; Baron, Bruno

    2002-11-01

    Transferrin (Tf), the iron-transport protein of vertebrate serum, is mainly synthesized in hepatocytes but is also found in other cell-types including oligodendrocytes. Our laboratory has characterized in a human oligodendrial cell line the presence of a new Tf transcript containing an alternative exon 1b replacing the classical exon 1 and conducting to the elimination of the signal peptide sequence. In this manuscript, we show by RT-PCR and 5'-RACE experiments that alternative transcripts also exist in mouse and rat and are found in brain mRNA preparations. Mouse alternative first exon is homologous to human exon 1b while rat Tf gene was found to use a new first exon named 1c. In all species, the alternative transcript does not contain the signal peptide sequence and possibly encode for a Tf protein devoid of signal peptide showing that this phenomenon is not restricted to human gene. We also present genomic sequence data from the previously unknown 5' genomic rat region, which allowed the alignment of the alternative exons 1 in the three species. PMID:12512950

  7. Alternatively spliced products of the maize P gene encode proteins with homology to the DNA-binding domain of myb-like transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Grotewold, E; Athma, P; Peterson, T

    1991-01-01

    The Zea mays P gene has been postulated to regulate the biosynthetic pathway of a flavonoid-derived pigment in certain floral tissues [Styles, E. D. & Ceska, O. (1977) Can. J. Genet. Cytol. 19, 289-302]. We have characterized two P transcripts that are alternatively spliced at their 3' ends. One message of 1802 nucleotides encodes a 43.7-kDa protein with an N-terminal region showing approximately 40% homology to the DNA-binding domain of several members of the myb family of protooncogene proteins. A second message of 945 nucleotides encodes a 17.3-kDa protein that contains most of the myb-homologous domain but differs from the first protein at the C terminus. The deduced P-encoded proteins show an even higher homology (70%) in the myb-homologous domain to the maize regulatory gene C1. Additionally, the P and C1 genes are structurally similar in the sizes and positions of the first and second exons and first intron. We show that P is required for accumulation in the pericarp of transcripts of two genes (A1 and C2) encoding enzymes for flavonoid biosynthesis--genes also regulated by C1 in the aleurone. Images PMID:2052542

  8. Chicken vinculin and meta-vinculin are derived from a single gene by alternative splicing of a 207-base pair exon unique to meta-vinculin.

    PubMed

    Byrne, B J; Kaczorowski, Y J; Coutu, M D; Craig, S W

    1992-06-25

    meta-Vinculin and vinculin are closely related proteins that are cytoplasmic components of microfilament-associated cell junctions. This report describes the structural relationship between these two proteins and the genetic basis for tissue-specific expression of meta-vinculin. Analysis of genomic DNA coding for amino acids 676-1066 of vinculin revealed 9 exons spanning an 11.7-kilobase pair region of the genome. In the 4 kilobase pairs of intervening sequence that separates vinculin exons E896-E915 and E916-E984, there is an open reading frame that predicts a sequence homologous to the 68-amino acid peptide specific to porcine meta-vinculin (Gimona, M., Small, J. V., Moeremans, M., Van Damme, J., Puype, M., and Van-dekerckhove, J. (1988) EMBO J. 7, 2329-2334). Analysis of the corresponding cDNA established that chicken meta-vinculin contains a 69-amino acid insertion between residues 915 and 916 of vinculin and that there are no other amino acid sequence differences between chicken vinculin and meta-vinculin. Muscle-specific expression of meta-vinculin occurs by alternative splicing of a transcript produced from a single gene because: all 20 genomic isolates that contain the 3' vinculin exons, also contain the meta-vinculin-specific exon; Southern blots performed at high stringency with exon-specific probes indicate the presence of a single gene; and the 3'-untranslated sequences of vinculin and meta-vinculin cDNAs are identical. PMID:1618784

  9. FGFR2 exon IIIa and IIIc mutations in Crouzon, Jackson-Weiss, and Pfeiffer syndromes: Evidence for missense changes, insertions, and a deletion due to alternative RNA splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, G.A.; Przylepa, K.A.; Scott, A.F.

    1996-03-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) mutations have been associated with the craniosynostotic conditions Crouzon, Jackson-Weiss, and Pfeiffer syndromes. Previously, mutations were described in the exons IIIa and IIIc, which form the extracellular, third immunoglobulin-like domain (IgM) and adjacent linker regions, both of which are normally involved in ligand binding. For all three conditions, mutations were found in exon IIIc. Only in Crouzon syndrome were mutations identified in exon IIIa. In this study, 39 cases with one of these three conditions were screened for exon IIIa or IIIc mutations. Eleven mutations are reported in 17 unrelated cases. Mutations in exon IIIa are identified for not only Crouzon but also Jackson-Weiss and Pfeiffer syndromes. Four mutations in either exon IIIa or exon IIIc reported only in Crouzon syndrome are present also in one of the other two syndromes. Two insertions, one in exon IIIa in a Crouzon syndrome patient and the other in exon IIIc in a Pfeiffer syndrome patient, were observed. The latter mutation has the same alternative RNA splicing effect as a reported synonymous mutation for Crouzon syndrome. A missense mutation was detected in one Pfeiffer syndrome family in which two members had craniosynostosis without limb anomalies. The inter- and intrafamilial variability in expression of FGFR2 mutations suggests that these three syndromes, presumed to be clinically distinct, are instead representative of a spectrum of related craniosynostotic and digital disorders. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Sequence Information for the Splicing of Human Pre-mRNA Identified by Support Vector

    E-print Network

    Heller, Katherine

    been analyzed, the proportion of genes recognized to give rise to alternatively spliced products has in a gene are subject to alternative splicing, the great majority of exons remain constitutively splicedSequence Information for the Splicing of Human Pre-mRNA Identified by Support Vector Machine

  11. RNA sequencing for the study of splicing

    E-print Network

    Gonza?lez-Porta, Mar

    2014-10-07

    reaction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.2.1 Key players in mRNA splicing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.2.2 Splicing by the major spliceosome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1.2.3 Diversifying the message: alternative... platform . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 1.6 Overview of the mapping algorithm implemented in TopHat . . . . 20 1.7 Overview of htseq-count . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 1.8 Overview...

  12. A Heroin Addiction Severity-Associated Intronic Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Modulates Alternative Pre-mRNA Splicing of the ? Opioid Receptor Gene OPRM1 via hnRNPH Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jin; Lu, Zhigang; Xu, Mingming; Pan, Ling; Deng, Yi; Xie, Xiaohu; Liu, Huifen; Ding, Shixiong; Hurd, Yasmin L.; Pasternak, Gavril W.; Klein, Robert J.; Cartegni, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the OPRM1 gene have been associated with vulnerability to opioid dependence. The current study identifies an association of an intronic SNP (rs9479757) with the severity of heroin addiction among Han-Chinese male heroin addicts. Individual SNP analysis and haplotype-based analysis with additional SNPs in the OPRM1 locus showed that mild heroin addiction was associated with the AG genotype, whereas severe heroin addiction was associated with the GG genotype. In vitro studies such as electrophoretic mobility shift assay, minigene, siRNA, and antisense morpholino oligonucleotide studies have identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H (hnRNPH) as the major binding partner for the G-containing SNP site. The G-to-A transition weakens hnRNPH binding and facilitates exon 2 skipping, leading to altered expressions of OPRM1 splice-variant mRNAs and hMOR-1 proteins. Similar changes in splicing and hMOR-1 proteins were observed in human postmortem prefrontal cortex with the AG genotype of this SNP when compared with the GG genotype. Interestingly, the altered splicing led to an increase in hMOR-1 protein levels despite decreased hMOR-1 mRNA levels, which is likely contributed by a concurrent increase in single transmembrane domain variants that have a chaperone-like function on MOR-1 protein stability. Our studies delineate the role of this SNP as a modifier of OPRM1 alternative splicing via hnRNPH interactions, and suggest a functional link between an SNP-containing splicing modifier and the severity of heroin addiction. PMID:25122903

  13. Molecular Cell Tissue-Specific Splicing of Disordered

    E-print Network

    Babu, M. Madan

    . INTRODUCTION Together with gene duplication and recombination, alternative splicing plays a major role genes are alterna- tively spliced (Wang et al., 2008). While some of the transcript isoforms are likelyMolecular Cell Article Tissue-Specific Splicing of Disordered Segments that Embed Binding Motifs

  14. A general role for splicing enhancers in exon definition

    E-print Network

    Hertel, Klemens J.

    are alternatively spliced, sometimes leading to hundreds of different mRNA isoforms from a single gene+ HoweverREPORT A general role for splicing enhancers in exon definition BIANCA J. LAM and KLEMENS J. HERTEL, California 92697-4025, USA ABSTRACT Exonic splicing enhancers (ESEs) facilitate exon definition by assisting

  15. Deciphering the splicing code Yoseph Barash1,2

    E-print Network

    Toronto, University of

    of hundreds of RNA features to predict tissue-dependent changes in alternative splicing for thousands of exons of RNA features that can account for abundances of spliced isoforms4­8 . Through detailed investigationARTICLES Deciphering the splicing code Yoseph Barash1,2 *, John A. Calarco2 *, Weijun Gao1 , Qun

  16. In silico to in vivo splicing analysis using splicing code models Matthew R. Gazzara a,b

    E-print Network

    Lynch, Kristen W.

    splicing's role in gene regulation, development, and disease, researchers from diverse fields find in mature mRNAs can greatly vary, with $95% of human multi-exon genes undergoing alternative splicing (AS splicing's key role in post-transcriptional control of gene expression and its pervasiveness motivated much

  17. Identification and characterization of a functional, alternatively spliced Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) and genomic disruption of TLR8 in chickens

    PubMed Central

    Philbin, Victoria J; Iqbal, Muhammad; Boyd, Yvonne; Goodchild, Marianne J; Beal, Richard K; Bumstead, Nat; Young, John; Smith, Adrian L

    2005-01-01

    Based upon the recognition of antiviral compounds and single stranded viral RNA the Toll-like receptors TLR7 and TLR8 are suggested to play a significant role in initiating antiviral immune responses. Here we report the molecular characterization of the chicken TLR7/8 loci which revealed an intact TLR7 gene and fragments of a TLR8-like gene with a 6-kilobase insertion containing chicken repeat 1 (CR1) retroviral-like insertion elements. The chicken TLR7 gene encodes a 1047-amino-acid protein with 62% identity to human TLR7 and a conserved pattern of predicted leucine-rich repeats. Highest levels of chicken TLR7 mRNA were detected in immune-related tissues and cells, especially the spleen, caecal, tonsil and splenic B cells. Alternative spliced forms of TLR7 mRNA were identified in chicken, mouse and human and expressed in similar tissues and cell types to the major form of chicken TLR7. The chicken TLR7+ HD11 cell line and fresh splenocytes produced elevated levels of interleukin-1? (IL-1?) mRNA after exposure to the agonists R848 and loxoribine. Interestingly, none of the TLR7 agonists stimulated increased type I interferon (IFN) mRNA whereas poly(I:C) (a TLR3 agonist) up-regulated both chicken IFN-? and chicken IFN-? mRNA. In contrast, TLR7 agonists, particularly R848 and poly(U) stimulated up-regulation of chicken IL-1?, and chicken IL-8 mRNAs more effectively than poly(I:C). Stimulation of chicken TLR7 with R848 was chloroquine sensitive, suggesting signalling within an endosomal compartment, as for mammalian TLR7. The deletion of TLR8 in galliforms, accompanied with the differential response after exposure to TLR7 agonists, offers insight into the evolution of vertebrate TLR function. PMID:15804288

  18. Alternative splicing in the fiddler crab cognate ecdysteroid receptor: variation in receptor isoform expression and DNA binding properties in response to hormone.

    PubMed

    Durica, David S; Das, Sunetra; Najar, Fares; Roe, Bruce; Phillips, Barret; Kappalli, Sudha; Anilkumar, Gopinathan

    2014-09-15

    RXR cDNA cloning from three Uca species led to the identification of 4 conserved isoforms, indicative of alternative splicing in the hinge and ligand binding domains (LBD). Sequencing of overlapping clones from a Ucapugilator genomic library identified EcR isoforms matching previously identified cDNA variants; in addition, a cryptic exon in the LBD was detected and evidence for expression of this new isoform was obtained from next-generation sequencing. RNA-seq analysis also identified a new amino terminal EcR variant. EcR and RXR transcript abundance increases throughout ovarian maturation in U. pugilator, while cognate receptor transcript abundance remains constant in a related Indo-Pacific species with a different reproductive strategy. To examine if crab RXR LBD isoforms have different physical properties in vitro, electromobility shift assays were performed with different EcR isoforms. The cognate crab and fruit fly receptors differ in their responses to hormone. Ecdysteroids did not increase DNA binding for the crab heterodimers, while ecdysteroids stimulate binding for Drosophilamelanogaster EcR/USP heterodimers. In swapping experiments, UpEcR/USP heterodimers did not show ligand-responsive differences in DNA binding; both crab RXR LBD isoforms, however, conferred ligand-responsive increases in DNA binding with DmEcRs. These data indicate that both UpRXR LBD isoforms can heterodimerize with the heterologous DmEcR receptors and promote ligand and DNA binding. Unresponsiveness of the cognate receptors to ecdysteroid, however, suggest additional factors may be required to mediate endogenous, perhaps isoform-specific, differences in EcR conformation, consistent with previously reported effects of UpRXR isoforms on UpEcR ligand-binding affinities. PMID:25025945

  19. Enzyme kinetics of an alternative splicing isoform of mitochondrial 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase, ogg1-1b, and compared with the nuclear ogg1-1a.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Akira; Watanabe, Takashi; Shoji, Sayaka; Furihata, Chie

    2015-02-01

    Eight alternatively spliced isoforms of human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) (OGG1-1a to -1c and -2a to -2e) are registered in the National Center for Biotechnology Information. OGG1(s) in mitochondria have not yet been fully characterized biochemically. In this study, we purified mitochondrial recombinant OGG1-1b protein and compared its activity with nuclear OGG1-1a protein. The reaction rate constant (kg ) of the 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) glycosylase activity of OGG1-1b was 8-oxoG:C > 8-oxoG:T > 8-oxoG:G > 8-oxoG:A (7.96, 0.805, 0.070, and 0.015 min(-1) , respectively) and that of the N-glycosylase/DNA lyase activity (kgl ) of OGG1-1b was 8-oxoG:C > 8-oxoG:T ?8-oxoG:G > 8-oxoG:A (0.286, 0.079, 0