Sample records for abnormal brain activity

  1. Abnormal Activation of the Social Brain During Face Perception in Autism

    E-print Network

    Hadjikhani, Nouchine

    measured by the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule was correlated with the right IFC cortical thicknessAbnormal Activation of the Social Brain During Face Perception in Autism Nouchine Hadjikhani,1. Several recent studies have challenged earlier findings that individuals with autism spec- trum disorder

  2. Abnormal baseline brain activity in patients with pulsatile tinnitus: a resting-state FMRI study.

    PubMed

    Han, Lv; Zhaohui, Liu; Fei, Yan; Ting, Li; Pengfei, Zhao; Wang, Du; Cheng, Dong; Pengde, Guo; Xiaoyi, Han; Xiao, Wang; Rui, Li; Zhenchang, Wang

    2014-01-01

    Numerous investigations studying the brain functional activity of the tinnitus patients have indicated that neurological changes are important findings of this kind of disease. However, the pulsatile tinnitus (PT) patients were excluded in previous studies because of the totally different mechanisms of the two subtype tinnitus. The aim of this study is to investigate whether altered baseline brain activity presents in patients with PT using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) technique. The present study used unilateral PT patients (n = 42) and age-, sex-, and education-matched normal control subjects (n = 42) to investigate the changes in structural and amplitude of low-frequency (ALFF) of the brain. Also, we analyzed the relationships between these changes with clinical data of the PT patients. Compared with normal controls, PT patients did not show any structural changes. PT patients showed significant increased ALFF in the bilateral precuneus, and bilateral inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and decreased ALFF in multiple occipital areas. Moreover, the increased THI score and PT duration was correlated with increased ALFF in precuneus and bilateral IFG. The abnormalities of spontaneous brain activity reflected by ALFF measurements in the absence of structural changes may provide insights into the neural reorganization in PT patients. PMID:24872895

  3. Abnormal neuronal activity in Tourette syndrome and its modulation using deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Israelashvili, Michal; Loewenstern, Yocheved; Bar-Gad, Izhar

    2015-07-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a common childhood-onset disorder characterized by motor and vocal tics that are typically accompanied by a multitude of comorbid symptoms. Pharmacological treatment options are limited, which has led to the exploration of deep brain stimulation (DBS) as a possible treatment for severe cases. Multiple lines of evidence have linked TS with abnormalities in the motor and limbic cortico-basal ganglia (CBG) pathways. Neurophysiological data have only recently started to slowly accumulate from multiple sources: noninvasive imaging and electrophysiological techniques, invasive electrophysiological recordings in TS patients undergoing DBS implantation surgery, and animal models of the disorder. These converging sources point to system-level physiological changes throughout the CBG pathway, including both general altered baseline neuronal activity patterns and specific tic-related activity. DBS has been applied to different regions along the motor and limbic pathways, primarily to the globus pallidus internus, thalamic nuclei, and nucleus accumbens. In line with the findings that also draw on the more abundant application of DBS to Parkinson's disease, this stimulation is assumed to result in changes in the neuronal firing patterns and the passage of information through the stimulated nuclei. We present an overview of recent experimental findings on abnormal neuronal activity associated with TS and the changes in this activity following DBS. These findings are then discussed in the context of current models of CBG function in the normal state, during TS, and finally in the wider context of DBS in CBG-related disorders. PMID:25925326

  4. Abnormal autonomic and associated brain activities during rest in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Eilam-Stock, Tehila; Xu, Pengfei; Cao, Miao; Gu, Xiaosi; Van Dam, Nicholas T; Anagnostou, Evdokia; Kolevzon, Alexander; Soorya, Latha; Park, Yunsoo; Siller, Michael; He, Yong; Hof, Patrick R; Fan, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders are associated with social and emotional deficits, the aetiology of which are not well understood. A growing consensus is that the autonomic nervous system serves a key role in emotional processes, by providing physiological signals essential to subjective states. We hypothesized that altered autonomic processing is related to the socio-emotional deficits in autism spectrum disorders. Here, we investigated the relationship between non-specific skin conductance response, an objective index of sympathetic neural activity, and brain fluctuations during rest in high-functioning adults with autism spectrum disorder relative to neurotypical controls. Compared with control participants, individuals with autism spectrum disorder showed less skin conductance responses overall. They also showed weaker correlations between skin conductance responses and frontal brain regions, including the anterior cingulate and anterior insular cortices. Additionally, skin conductance responses were found to have less contribution to default mode network connectivity in individuals with autism spectrum disorders relative to controls. These results suggest that autonomic processing is altered in autism spectrum disorders, which may be related to the abnormal socio-emotional behaviours that characterize this condition. PMID:24424916

  5. Tinnitus Perception and Distress Is Related to Abnormal Spontaneous Brain Activity as Measured by Magnetoencephalography

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nathan Weisz; Stephan Moratti; Marcus Meinzer; Katalin Dohrmann; Thomas Elbert

    2005-01-01

    BackgroundThe neurophysiological mechanisms underlying tinnitus perception are not well understood. Surprisingly, there have been no group studies comparing abnormalities in ongoing, spontaneous neuronal activity in individuals with and without tinnitus perception.Methods and FindingsHere, we show that the spontaneous neuronal activity of a group of individuals with tinnitus (n = 17) is characterised by a marked reduction in alpha (8–12 Hz)

  6. Quantification of abnormal coordination of brain activity during an auditory task in epilepsy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Perez; G. Ivanova; M. E. Kirlangic; G. Henning; D. Muller; R. Both

    2003-01-01

    Brain electrical activity acquired under cognitive paradigms is quantified using several different methods. To compare the elicited response to an auditory oddball task between normal subjects and a group of refractory epilepsy patients, event-related synchronization\\/ desynchronization (ERS\\/ERD) was analyzed in this study. Our objective is to test whether such a quantitative parameter can be a feature to distinguish the epilepsy

  7. Abnormal Baseline Brain Activity in Patients with Pulsatile Tinnitus: A Resting-State fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Han, Lv; Zhaohui, Liu; Fei, Yan; Ting, Li; Pengfei, Zhao; Wang, Du; Cheng, Dong; Pengde, Guo; Xiaoyi, Han; Xiao, Wang; Rui, Li; Zhenchang, Wang

    2014-01-01

    Numerous investigations studying the brain functional activity of the tinnitus patients have indicated that neurological changes are important findings of this kind of disease. However, the pulsatile tinnitus (PT) patients were excluded in previous studies because of the totally different mechanisms of the two subtype tinnitus. The aim of this study is to investigate whether altered baseline brain activity presents in patients with PT using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) technique. The present study used unilateral PT patients (n = 42) and age-, sex-, and education-matched normal control subjects (n = 42) to investigate the changes in structural and amplitude of low-frequency (ALFF) of the brain. Also, we analyzed the relationships between these changes with clinical data of the PT patients. Compared with normal controls, PT patients did not show any structural changes. PT patients showed significant increased ALFF in the bilateral precuneus, and bilateral inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and decreased ALFF in multiple occipital areas. Moreover, the increased THI score and PT duration was correlated with increased ALFF in precuneus and bilateral IFG. The abnormalities of spontaneous brain activity reflected by ALFF measurements in the absence of structural changes may provide insights into the neural reorganization in PT patients. PMID:24872895

  8. Abnormal Intrinsic Brain Activity Patterns in Patients with Subcortical Ischemic Vascular Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xuntao; Yang, Jun; Zhou, Daiquan; Gui, Li; Wang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) alteration of whole brain in patients with subcortical ischemic vascular dementia (SIVD). Materials and Methods Thirty patients with SIVD and 35 control subjects were included in this study. All of them underwent structural MRI and rs-fMRI scan. The structural data were processed using the voxel-based morphometry 8 toolbox (VBM8). The rs-fMRI data were processed using Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM8) and Data Processing Assistant for Resting-State fMRI (DPARSF) software. Within-group analysis was performed with a one-sample Student's t-test to identify brain regions with ALFF value larger than the mean. Intergroup analysis was performed with a two-sample Student's t-test to identify ALFF differences of whole brain between SIVD and control subjects. Partial correlations between ALFF values and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores were analyzed in the SIVD group across the parameters of age, gender, years of education, and GM volume. Results Within-group analysis showed that the bilateral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), posterior cingulate cortex, medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC), inferior parietal lobe (IPL), occipital lobe, and adjacent precuneus had significantly higher standardized ALFF values than the global mean ALFF value in both groups. Compared to the controls, patients with SIVD presented lower ALFF values in the bilateral precuneus and higher ALFF values in the bilateral ACC, left insula and hippocampus. Including GM volume as an extra covariate, the ALFF inter-group difference exhibited highly similar spatial patterns to those without GM volume correcting. Close negative correlations were found between the ALFF values of left insula and the MoCA and MMSE scores of SIVD patients. Conclusion SIVD is associated with a unique spontaneous aberrant activity of rs-fMRI signals, and measurement of ALFF in the precuneus, ACC, insula, and hippocampus may aid in the detection of SIVD. PMID:24498389

  9. Abnormal Brain Activity During a Reward and Loss Task in Opiate-Dependent Patients Receiving Methadone Maintenance Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gradin, Victoria B; Baldacchino, Alex; Balfour, David; Matthews, Keith; Steele, J Douglas

    2014-01-01

    A core feature of human drug dependency is persistence in seeking and using drugs at the expense of other life goals. It has been hypothesized that addiction is associated with overvaluation of drug-related rewards and undervaluation of natural, nondrug-related rewards. Humans additionally tend to persist in using drugs despite adverse consequences. This suggests that the processing of both rewarding and aversive information may be abnormal in addictions. We used fMRI to examine neural responses to reward and loss events in opiate-dependent patients receiving methadone maintenance treatment (MMT, n=30) and healthy controls (n=23) using nondrug-related stimuli. Half of the patients were scanned after/before daily methadone intake (ADM/BDM patient groups). During reward trials, patients as a whole exhibited decreased neural discrimination between rewarding and nonrewarding outcomes in the dorsal caudate. Patients also showed reduced neural discrimination in the ventral striatum with regard to aversive and nonaversive outcomes and failed to encode successful loss avoidance as a reward signal in the ventral striatum. Patients also showed decreased insula activation during the anticipation/decision phase of loss events. ADM patients exhibited increased loss signals in the midbrain/parahippocampal gyrus, possibly related to a disinhibition of dopamine neurons. This study suggests that patients with opiate dependency on MMT exhibit abnormal brain activations to nondrug-related rewarding and loss events. Our findings add support to proposals that treatments for opiate addiction should aim to increase the reward value of nondrug-related rewarding events and highlight the importance of potential abnormalities in aversive information processing. PMID:24132052

  10. Abnormal Brain Activation in Excoriation (Skin Picking) Disorder: Evidence from an Executive Planning fMRI Study

    E-print Network

    Odlaug, Brian L.; Hampshire, Adam; Chamberlain, Samuel R.; Grant, Jon E.

    2015-01-01

    and 15 matched healthy controls undertook an executive planning task (Tower of London) during functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). Activation during planning was compared between groups using region of interest and whole-brain permutation cluster...

  11. Brain Abnormalities in Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woojun; Kim, Su-Hyun; Huh, So-Young; Kim, Ho Jin

    2012-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an idiopathic inflammatory syndrome of the central nervous system that is characterized by severe attacks of optic neuritis (ON) and myelitis. Until recently, NMO was considered a disease without brain involvement. However, since the discovery of NMO-IgG/antiaqaporin-4 antibody, the concept of NMO was broadened to NMO spectrum disorder (NMOSD), and brain lesions are commonly recognized. Furthermore, some patients present with brain symptoms as their first manifestation and develop recurrent brain symptoms without ON or myelitis. Brain lesions with characteristic locations and configurations can be helpful in the diagnosis of NMOSD. Due to the growing recognition of brain abnormalities in NMOSD, these have been included in the NMO and NMOSD diagnostic criteria or guidelines. Recent technical developments such as diffusion tensor imaging, MR spectroscopy, and voxel-based morphometry reveal new findings related to brain abnormalities in NMOSD that were not identified using conventional MRI. This paper focuses on the incidence and characteristics of the brain lesions found in NMOSD and the symptoms that they cause. Recent studies using advanced imaging techniques are also introduced. PMID:23259063

  12. Brain Stem MRI Signal Abnormalities in CADASIL

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Chabriat; R. Mrissa; C. Levy; K. Vahedi; H. Taillia; M. T. Iba-Zizen; A. Joutel; E. Tournier-Lasserve; M.-G. Bousser

    Background—We recently showed that the severity of MRI signal abnormalities increases with age in CADASIL, an arteriopathy due to mutations of notch 3 gene on chromosome 19. Previous results also suggest that the various hemispheric subcortical areas have a different vulnerability to ischemia in this disease. The distribution of the lesions at the brain stem level has not yet been

  13. Impaired associative taste learning and abnormal brain activation in kinase-defective eEF2K mice

    PubMed Central

    Gildish, Iness; Manor, David; David, Orit; Sharma, Vijendra; Williams, David; Agarwala, Usha; Wang, Xuemin; Kenney, Justin W.; Proud, Chris G.; Rosenblum, Kobi

    2012-01-01

    Memory consolidation is defined temporally based on pharmacological interventions such as inhibitors of mRNA translation (molecular consolidation) or post-acquisition deactivation of specific brain regions (systems level consolidation). However, the relationship between molecular and systems consolidation are poorly understood. Molecular consolidation mechanisms involved in translation initiation and elongation have previously been studied in the cortex using taste-learning paradigms. For example, the levels of phosphorylation of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2) were found to be correlated with taste learning in the gustatory cortex (GC), minutes following learning. In order to isolate the role of the eEF2 phosphorylation state at Thr-56 in both molecular and system consolidation, we analyzed cortical-dependent taste learning in eEF2K (the only known kinase for eEF2) ki mice, which exhibit reduced levels of eEF2 phosphorylation but normal levels of eEF2 and eEF2K. These mice exhibit clear attenuation of cortical-dependent associative, but not of incidental, taste learning. In order to gain a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms, we compared brain activity as measured by MEMRI (manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging) between eEF2K ki mice and WT mice during conditioned taste aversion (CTA) learning and observed clear differences between the two but saw no differences under basal conditions. Our results demonstrate that adequate levels of phosphorylation of eEF2 are essential for cortical-dependent associative learning and suggest that malfunction of memory processing at the systems level underlies this associative memory impairment. PMID:22366775

  14. Abnormal Reward System Activation in Mania

    PubMed Central

    Abler, Birgit; Greenhouse, Ian; Ongur, Dost; Walter, Henrik; Heckers, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    Transmission of reward signals is a function of dopamine, a neurotransmitter known to be involved in the mechanism of psychosis. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we investigated how expectation and receipt of monetary rewards modulate brain activation in patients with bipolar mania and schizophrenia. We studied 12 acutely manic patients with a history of bipolar disorder, 12 patients with a current episode of schizoaffective disorder or schizophrenia and 12 healthy subjects. All patients were treated with dopamine antagonists at the time of the study. Subjects performed a delayed incentive paradigm with monetary reward in the scanner that allowed for investigating effects of expectation, receipt, and omission of rewards. Patients with schizophrenia and healthy control subjects showed the expected activation of dopaminergic brain areas, that is, ventral tegmentum activation upon expectation of monetary rewards and nucleus accumbens activation during receipt vs omission of rewards. In manic patients, however, we did not find a similar pattern of brain activation and the differential signal in the nucleus accumbens upon receipt vs omission of rewards was significantly lower compared to the healthy control subjects. Our findings provide evidence for abnormal function of the dopamine system during receipt or omission of expected rewards in bipolar disorder. These deficits in prediction error processing in acute mania may help to explain symptoms of disinhibition and abnormal goal pursuit regulation. PMID:17987058

  15. Connectivity and functional profiling of abnormal brain structures in pedophilia.

    PubMed

    Poeppl, Timm B; Eickhoff, Simon B; Fox, Peter T; Laird, Angela R; Rupprecht, Rainer; Langguth, Berthold; Bzdok, Danilo

    2015-06-01

    Despite its 0.5-1% lifetime prevalence in men and its general societal relevance, neuroimaging investigations in pedophilia are scarce. Preliminary findings indicate abnormal brain structure and function. However, no study has yet linked structural alterations in pedophiles to both connectional and functional properties of the aberrant hotspots. The relationship between morphological alterations and brain function in pedophilia as well as their contribution to its psychopathology thus remain unclear. First, we assessed bimodal connectivity of structurally altered candidate regions using meta-analytic connectivity modeling (MACM) and resting-state correlations employing openly accessible data. We compared the ensuing connectivity maps to the activation likelihood estimation (ALE) maps of a recent quantitative meta-analysis of brain activity during processing of sexual stimuli. Second, we functionally characterized the structurally altered regions employing meta-data of a large-scale neuroimaging database. Candidate regions were functionally connected to key areas for processing of sexual stimuli. Moreover, we found that the functional role of structurally altered brain regions in pedophilia relates to nonsexual emotional as well as neurocognitive and executive functions, previously reported to be impaired in pedophiles. Our results suggest that structural brain alterations affect neural networks for sexual processing by way of disrupted functional connectivity, which may entail abnormal sexual arousal patterns. The findings moreover indicate that structural alterations account for common affective and neurocognitive impairments in pedophilia. The present multimodal integration of brain structure and function analyses links sexual and nonsexual psychopathology in pedophilia. Hum Brain Mapp 36:2374-2386, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25733379

  16. Abnormal baseline brain activity in patients with HBV-related cirrhosis without overt hepatic encephalopathy revealed by resting-state functional MRI.

    PubMed

    Lv, Xiao-Fei; Ye, Min; Han, Lu-Jun; Zhang, Xue-Lin; Cai, Pei-Qiang; Jiang, Gui-Hua; Qiu, Ying-Wei; Qiu, Shi-Jun; Wu, Yao-Pan; Liu, Kai; Liu, Zhen-Yin; Wu, Pei-Hong; Xie, Chuan-Miao

    2013-09-01

    Neurocognitive dysfunction of varying degrees is common in patients with hepatitis B virus-related cirrhosis (HBV-RC) without overt hepatic encephalopathy (OHE). However, the neurobiological mechanisms underlying these dysfunctions are not well understood. We sought to identify changes in the neural activity of patients with HBV-RC without OHE in the resting state by using the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) method and to determine whether these changes were related to impaired cognition. Resting-state functional MRI data from 30 patients with HBV-RC and 30 healthy controls matched for age, sex, and years of education were compared to determine any differences in the ALFF between the two groups. Cognition was measured with the psychometric hepatic encephalopathy score (PHES), and the relationship between these scores and ALFF variation was assessed. Compared with controls, patients showed widespread lower standardized ALFF (mALFF) values in visual association areas (bilateral lingual gyrus, middle occipital gyrus, and left inferior temporal gyrus), motor-related areas (bilateral precentral gyrus, paracentral lobule, and right postcentral gyrus), and the default mode network (bilateral cuneus/precuneus and inferior parietal lobule). Higher mALFF values were found in the bilateral orbital gyrus/rectal gyrus. In patients, mALFF values were significantly positive correlated with the PHES in the right middle occipital gyrus and bilateral precentral gyrus. Our findings of resting-state abnormalities in patients with HBV-RC without OHE suggest that neurocognitive dysfunction in patients with HBV-RC without OHE may be caused by abnormal neural activity in multiple brain regions. PMID:23836055

  17. Abnormal brain synchrony in Down Syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Jeffrey S.; Nielsen, Jared A.; Ferguson, Michael A.; Burback, Melissa C.; Cox, Elizabeth T.; Dai, Li; Gerig, Guido; Edgin, Jamie O.; Korenberg, Julie R.

    2013-01-01

    Down Syndrome is the most common genetic cause for intellectual disability, yet the pathophysiology of cognitive impairment in Down Syndrome is unknown. We compared fMRI scans of 15 individuals with Down Syndrome to 14 typically developing control subjects while they viewed 50 min of cartoon video clips. There was widespread increased synchrony between brain regions, with only a small subset of strong, distant connections showing underconnectivity in Down Syndrome. Brain regions showing negative correlations were less anticorrelated and were among the most strongly affected connections in the brain. Increased correlation was observed between all of the distributed brain networks studied, with the strongest internetwork correlation in subjects with the lowest performance IQ. A functional parcellation of the brain showed simplified network structure in Down Syndrome organized by local connectivity. Despite increased interregional synchrony, intersubject correlation to the cartoon stimuli was lower in Down Syndrome, indicating that increased synchrony had a temporal pattern that was not in response to environmental stimuli, but idiosyncratic to each Down Syndrome subject. Short-range, increased synchrony was not observed in a comparison sample of 447 autism vs. 517 control subjects from the Autism Brain Imaging Exchange (ABIDE) collection of resting state fMRI data, and increased internetwork synchrony was only observed between the default mode and attentional networks in autism. These findings suggest immature development of connectivity in Down Syndrome with impaired ability to integrate information from distant brain regions into coherent distributed networks. PMID:24179822

  18. Mitochondrial abnormalities in temporal lobe of autistic brain.

    PubMed

    Tang, Guomei; Gutierrez Rios, Puri; Kuo, Sheng-Han; Akman, Hasan Orhan; Rosoklija, Gorazd; Tanji, Kurenai; Dwork, Andrew; Schon, Eric A; Dimauro, Salvatore; Goldman, James; Sulzer, David

    2013-06-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) consists of a group of complex developmental disabilities characterized by impaired social interactions, deficits in communication and repetitive behavior. Multiple lines of evidence implicate mitochondrial dysfunction in ASD. In postmortem BA21 temporal cortex, a region that exhibits synaptic pathology in ASD, we found that compared to controls, ASD patients exhibited altered protein levels of mitochondria respiratory chain protein complexes, decreased Complex I and IV activities, decreased mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme SOD2, and greater oxidative DNA damage. Mitochondrial membrane mass was higher in ASD brain, as indicated by higher protein levels of mitochondrial membrane proteins Tom20, Tim23 and porin. No differences were observed in either mitochondrial DNA or levels of the mitochondrial gene transcription factor TFAM or cofactor PGC1?, indicating that a mechanism other than alterations in mitochondrial genome or mitochondrial biogenesis underlies these mitochondrial abnormalities. We further identified higher levels of the mitochondrial fission proteins (Fis1 and Drp1) and decreased levels of the fusion proteins (Mfn1, Mfn2 and Opa1) in ASD patients, indicating altered mitochondrial dynamics in ASD brain. Many of these changes were evident in cortical pyramidal neurons, and were observed in ASD children but were less pronounced or absent in adult patients. Together, these findings provide evidence that mitochondrial function and intracellular redox status are compromised in pyramidal neurons in ASD brain and that mitochondrial dysfunction occurs during early childhood when ASD symptoms appear. PMID:23333625

  19. Abnormal Electrical Brain Responses to Pitch in

    E-print Network

    by prior brain lesion, hearing loss, or any cog- nitive or socioaffective disturbance. Recent behavioral re Brattico, MA,2 and Mari Tervaniemi, PhD2 Congenital amusia is a lifelong disability that prevents afflicted

  20. Brain abnormalities in antisocial, psychopathic individuals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yaling Yang; Adrian Raine

    2007-01-01

    Since the 19th century it has been speculated that structural and functional impairment of the prefrontal cortex predisposes\\u000a to antisocial, psychopathic behaviour, but it is only in the last few years that brain imaging research has been utilised\\u000a to scientifically test this hypothesis. This review summarises findings from brain imaging research on antisocial, psychopathic,\\u000a and aggressive individuals. It is concluded

  1. Mapping brain volumetric abnormalities in never-treated pathological gamblers.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Daniel; Rzezak, Patricia; Pereira, Fabricio R; Malloy-Diniz, Leandro F; Santos, Luciana C; Duran, Fábio L S; Barreiros, Maria A; Castro, Cláudio C; Busatto, Geraldo F; Tavares, Hermano; Gorenstein, Clarice

    2015-06-30

    Several magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies to date have investigated brain abnormalities in association with the diagnosis of pathological gambling (PG), but very few of these have specifically searched for brain volume differences between PG patients and healthy volunteers (HV). To investigate brain volume differences between PG patients and HV, 30 male never-treated PG patients (DSM-IV-TR criteria) and 30 closely matched HV without history of psychiatric disorders in the past 2 years underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging with a 1.5-T instrument. Using Freesurfer software, we performed an exploratory whole-brain voxelwise volume comparison between the PG group and the HV group, with false-discovery rate correction for multiple comparisons (p<0.05). Using a more flexible statistical threshold (p<0.01, uncorrected for multiple comparisons), we also measured absolute and regional volumes of several brain structures separately. The voxelwise analysis showed no clusters of significant regional differences between the PG and HV groups. The additional analyses of absolute and regional brain volumes showed increased absolute global gray matter volumes in PG patients relative to the HV group, as well as relatively decreased volumes specifically in the left putamen, right thalamus and right hippocampus (corrected for total gray matter). Our findings indicate that structural brain abnormalities may contribute to the functional changes associated with the symptoms of PG, and they highlight the relevance of the brain reward system to the pathophysiology of this disorder. PMID:25952288

  2. DETECTION & MAPPING OF ABNORMAL BRAIN STRUCTURE IN METHAMPHETAMINE USERS

    E-print Network

    Thompson, Paul

    DETECTION & MAPPING OF ABNORMAL BRAIN STRUCTURE IN METHAMPHETAMINE USERS 1 P.M. Thompson, 1 K, beginning in their mid-twenties, consuming about 3 g/week of MA. All 43 MRI scans were aligned to ICBM space correspondence, using a covariant fluid PDE model for data alignment on non-flat manifolds. At each aligned

  3. Structural brain abnormalities in cervical dystonia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Idiopathic cervical dystonia is characterized by involuntary spasms, tremors or jerks. It is not restricted to a disturbance in the basal ganglia system because non-conventional voxel-based MRI morphometry (VBM) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) have detected numerous regional changes in the brains of patients. In this study scans of 24 patients with cervical dystonia and 24 age-and sex-matched controls were analysed using VBM, DTI and magnetization transfer imaging (MTI) using a voxel-based approach and a region-of-interest analysis. Results were correlated with UDRS, TWSTRS and disease duration. Results We found structural alterations in the basal ganglia; thalamus; motor cortex; premotor cortex; frontal, temporal and parietal cortices; visual system; cerebellum and brainstem of the patients with dystonia. Conclusions Cervical dystonia is a multisystem disease involving several networks such as the motor, sensory and visual systems. PMID:24131497

  4. Brain abnormality segmentation based on l1-norm minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Ke; Erus, Guray; Tanwar, Manoj; Davatzikos, Christos

    2014-03-01

    We present a method that uses sparse representations to model the inter-individual variability of healthy anatomy from a limited number of normal medical images. Abnormalities in MR images are then defined as deviations from the normal variation. More precisely, we model an abnormal (pathological) signal y as the superposition of a normal part ~y that can be sparsely represented under an example-based dictionary, and an abnormal part r. Motivated by a dense error correction scheme recently proposed for sparse signal recovery, we use l1- norm minimization to separate ~y and r. We extend the existing framework, which was mainly used on robust face recognition in a discriminative setting, to address challenges of brain image analysis, particularly the high dimensionality and low sample size problem. The dictionary is constructed from local image patches extracted from training images aligned using smooth transformations, together with minor perturbations of those patches. A multi-scale sliding-window scheme is applied to capture anatomical variations ranging from fine and localized to coarser and more global. The statistical significance of the abnormality term r is obtained by comparison to its empirical distribution through cross-validation, and is used to assign an abnormality score to each voxel. In our validation experiments the method is applied for segmenting abnormalities on 2-D slices of FLAIR images, and we obtain segmentation results consistent with the expert-defined masks.

  5. Neuroanatomical abnormalities in chronic tinnitus in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Adjamian, Peyman; Hall, Deborah A.; Palmer, Alan R.; Allan, Thomas W.; Langers, Dave R.M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we review studies that have investigated brain morphology in chronic tinnitus in order to better understand the underlying pathophysiology of the disorder. Current consensus is that tinnitus is a disorder involving a distributed network of peripheral and central pathways in the nervous system. However, the precise mechanism remains elusive and it is unclear which structures are involved. Given that brain structure and function are highly related, identification of anatomical differences may shed light upon the mechanism of tinnitus generation and maintenance. We discuss anatomical changes in the auditory cortex, the limbic system, and prefrontal cortex, among others. Specifically, we discuss the gating mechanism of tinnitus and evaluate the evidence in support of the model from studies of brain anatomy. Although individual studies claim significant effects related to tinnitus, outcomes are divergent and even contradictory across studies. Moreover, results are often confounded by the presence of hearing loss. We conclude that, at present, the overall evidence for structural abnormalities specifically related to tinnitus is poor. As this area of research is expanding, we identify some key considerations for research design and propose strategies for future research. PMID:24892904

  6. Abnormal brain activation during working memory in children with prenatal exposure to drugs of abuse: The effects of methamphetamine, alcohol, and polydrug exposure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Florence F. Roussotte; Jennifer E. Bramen; S. Christopher Nunez; Lorna C. Quandt; Lynne Smith; Mary J. O'Connor; Susan Y. Bookheimer; Elizabeth R. Sowell

    2011-01-01

    Structural and metabolic abnormalities in fronto-striatal structures have been reported in children with prenatal methamphetamine (MA) exposure. The current study was designed to quantify functional alterations to the fronto-striatal circuit in children with prenatal MA exposure using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Because many women who use MA during pregnancy also use alcohol, a known teratogen, we examined 50 children

  7. The influence of brain abnormalities on psychosocial development, criminal history and paraphilias in sexual murderers.

    PubMed

    Briken, Peer; Habermann, Niels; Berner, Wolfgang; Hill, Andreas

    2005-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the number and type of brain abnormalities and their influence on psychosocial development, criminal history and paraphilias in sexual murderers. We analyzed psychiatric court reports of 166 sexual murderers and compared a group with notable signs of brain abnormalities (N = 50) with those without any signs (N = 116). Sexual murderers with brain abnormalities suffered more from early behavior problems. They were less likely to cohabitate with the victim at the time of the homicide and had more victims at the age of six years or younger. Psychiatric diagnoses revealed a higher total number of paraphilias: Transvestic fetishism and paraphilias not otherwise specified were more frequent in offenders with brain abnormalities. A binary logistic regression identified five predictors that accounted for 46.8% of the variance explaining the presence of brain abnormalities. Our results suggest the importance of a comprehensive neurological and psychological examination of this special offender group. PMID:16225232

  8. Multivariate examination of brain abnormality using both structural and functional MRI

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yong Fan; Hengyi Rao; Hallam Hurt; Joan Giannetta; Marc Korczykowski; David Shera; Brian B. Avants; James C. Gee; Jiongjiong Wang; Dinggang Shen

    2007-01-01

    A multivariate classification approach has been presented to examine the brain abnormalities, i.e., due to prenatal cocaine exposure, using both structural and functional brain images. First, a regional statistical feature extraction scheme was adopted to capture discriminative features from voxel-wise morphometric and functional representations of brain images, in order to reduce the dimensionality of the features used for classification, as

  9. Neurobiology of Disease Structural Abnormalities in the Brains of Human Subjects

    E-print Network

    Thompson, Paul

    Neurobiology of Disease Structural Abnormalities in the Brains of Human Subjects Who Use of Neuroimaging, Brain Mapping Division, Department of Neurology, Departments of 2Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences and 3Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, and 4Brain Research Institute, University of California

  10. Co-localisation of abnormal brain structure and function in specific language impairment

    PubMed Central

    Badcock, Nicholas A.; Bishop, Dorothy V.M.; Hardiman, Mervyn J.; Barry, Johanna G.; Watkins, Kate E.

    2012-01-01

    We assessed the relationship between brain structure and function in 10 individuals with specific language impairment (SLI), compared to six unaffected siblings, and 16 unrelated control participants with typical language. Voxel-based morphometry indicated that grey matter in the SLI group, relative to controls, was increased in the left inferior frontal cortex and decreased in the right caudate nucleus and superior temporal cortex bilaterally. The unaffected siblings also showed reduced grey matter in the caudate nucleus relative to controls. In an auditory covert naming task, the SLI group showed reduced activation in the left inferior frontal cortex, right putamen, and in the superior temporal cortex bilaterally. Despite spatially coincident structural and functional abnormalities in frontal and temporal areas, the relationships between structure and function in these regions were different. These findings suggest multiple structural and functional abnormalities in SLI that are differently associated with receptive and expressive language processing. PMID:22137677

  11. mTOR signaling and its roles in normal and abnormal brain development

    PubMed Central

    Takei, Nobuyuki; Nawa, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Target of rapamycin (TOR) was first identified in yeast as a target molecule of rapamycin, an anti-fugal and immunosuppressant macrolide compound. In mammals, its orthologue is called mammalian TOR (mTOR). mTOR is a serine/threonine kinase that converges different extracellular stimuli, such as nutrients and growth factors, and diverges into several biochemical reactions, including translation, autophagy, transcription, and lipid synthesis among others. These biochemical reactions govern cell growth and cause cells to attain an anabolic state. Thus, the disruption of mTOR signaling is implicated in a wide array of diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and obesity. In the central nervous system, the mTOR signaling cascade is activated by nutrients, neurotrophic factors, and neurotransmitters that enhances protein (and possibly lipid) synthesis and suppresses autophagy. These processes contribute to normal neuronal growth by promoting their differentiation, neurite elongation and branching, and synaptic formation during development. Therefore, disruption of mTOR signaling may cause neuronal degeneration and abnormal neural development. While reduced mTOR signaling is associated with neurodegeneration, excess activation of mTOR signaling causes abnormal development of neurons and glia, leading to brain malformation. In this review, we first introduce the current state of molecular knowledge of mTOR complexes and signaling in general. We then describe mTOR activation in neurons, which leads to translational enhancement, and finally discuss the link between mTOR and normal/abnormal neuronal growth during development. PMID:24795562

  12. Abnormal iron accumulation in the brain of neonatal hypotransferrinemic mice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Atsushi Takeda; Keiko Takatsuka; James R Connor; Naoto Oku

    2001-01-01

    Transferrin is a plasma protein involved in iron delivery to tissues. To study iron transport into the brain under a transferrin deficiency, iron concentration and 59Fe uptake in the brain were measured in neonatal hypotransferrinemic (HP) mice at 7 days of age. Brain iron concentration of the HP mice, in which iron concentration was relatively high in the cerebral cortex

  13. Lateralized Tinnitus Studied With Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Abnormal Inferior Colliculus Activation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. R. MELCHER; I. S. SIGALOVSKY; J. J. GUINAN; R. A. LEVINE

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents an approach for using functionalmagnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the physiology oftinnitus and demonstrates that the approach is effective in revealingtinnitus-related abnormalities in brain function. Our approach as appliedhere included 1) using a masking noise stimulus to change tinnitusloudness and examining the inferior colliculus (IC) for correspondingchanges in activity, 2) separately considering subpopulations with particulartinnitus...

  14. The neural underpinnings of associative learning in health and psychosis: how can performance be preserved when brain responses are abnormal?

    PubMed

    Murray, Graham K; Corlett, Philip R; Fletcher, Paul C

    2010-05-01

    Associative learning experiments in schizophrenia and other psychoses reveal subtle abnormalities in patients' brain responses. These are sometimes accompanied by intact task performance. An important question arises: How can learning occur if the brain system is not functioning normally? Here, we examine a series of possible explanations for this apparent discrepancy: (1) standard brain activation patterns may be present in psychosis but partially obscured by greater noise, (2) brain signals may be more sensitive to real group differences than behavioral measures, and (3) patients may achieve comparable levels of performance to control subjects by employing alternative or compensatory neural strategies. We consider these explanations in relation to data from causal- and reward-learning imaging experiments in first-episode psychosis patients. The findings suggest that a combination of these factors may resolve the question of why performance is sometimes preserved when brain patterns are disrupted. PMID:20154201

  15. Abnormal metabolic brain networks in Parkinson's disease from blackboard to bedside.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chris C; Eidelberg, David

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic imaging in the rest state has provided valuable information concerning the abnormalities of regional brain function that underlie idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD). Moreover, network modeling procedures, such as spatial covariance analysis, have further allowed for the quantification of these changes at the systems level. In recent years, we have utilized this strategy to identify and validate three discrete metabolic networks in PD associated with the motor and cognitive manifestations of the disease. In this chapter, we will review and compare the specific functional topographies underlying parkinsonian akinesia/rigidity, tremor, and cognitive disturbance. While network activity progressed over time, the rate of change for each pattern was distinctive and paralleled the development of the corresponding clinical symptoms in early-stage patients. This approach is already showing great promise in identifying individuals with prodromal manifestations of PD and in assessing the rate of progression before clinical onset. Network modulation was found to correlate with the clinical effects of dopaminergic treatment and surgical interventions, such as subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) and gene therapy. Abnormal metabolic networks have also been identified for atypical parkinsonian syndromes, such as multiple system atrophy (MSA) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). Using multiple disease-related networks for PD, MSA, and PSP, we have developed a novel, fully automated algorithm for accurate classification at the single-patient level, even at early disease stages. PMID:20887874

  16. Quantitative analysis of MRI signal abnormalities of brain white matter with high reproducibility and accuracy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xingchang Wei; Simon K. Warfield; Kelly H. Zou; Ying Wu; Xiaoming Li; Alexandre Guimond; John P. Mugler; Randall R. Benson; Leslie Wolfson; Howard L. Weiner; Charles R. G. Guttmann

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the reproducibility and accuracy com- pared to radiologists of three automated segmentation pipe- lines for quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) mea- surement of brain white matter signal abnormalities (WMSA). Materials and Methods: WMSA segmentation was per- formed on pairs of whole brain scans from 20 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and 10 older subjects who were positioned

  17. r Human Brain Mapping 000:000000 (2013) r Structural Abnormalities in the Thalamus

    E-print Network

    Hadjikhani, Nouchine

    2013-01-01

    r Human Brain Mapping 000:000­000 (2013) r Structural Abnormalities in the Thalamus of Migraineurs-channel coil. We acquired whole-brain T1 relaxation maps and computed magnetization transfer ratio (MTR and to assess iron deposition. We also correlated the obtained parametric values with the average monthly

  18. Predicting intrinsic brain activity.

    PubMed

    Craddock, R Cameron; Milham, Michael P; LaConte, Stephen M

    2013-11-15

    Multivariate supervised learning methods exhibit a remarkable ability to decode externally driven sensory, behavioral, and cognitive states from functional neuroimaging data. Although they are typically applied to task-based analyses, supervised learning methods are equally applicable to intrinsic effective and functional connectivity analyses. The obtained models of connectivity incorporate the multivariate interactions between all brain regions simultaneously, which will result in a more accurate representation of the connectome than the ones available with standard bivariate methods. Additionally the models can be applied to decode or predict the time series of intrinsic brain activity of a region from an independent dataset. The obtained prediction accuracy provides a measure of the integration between a brain region and other regions in its network, as well as a method for evaluating acquisition and preprocessing pipelines for resting state fMRI data. This article describes a method for learning multivariate models of connectivity. The method is applied in the non-parametric prediction accuracy, influence, and reproducibility-resampling (NPAIRS) framework, to study the regional variation of prediction accuracy and reproducibility (Strother et al., 2002). The resulting spatial distribution of these metrics is consistent with the functional hierarchy proposed by Mesulam (1998). Additionally we illustrate the utility of the multivariate regression connectivity modeling method for optimizing experimental parameters and assessing the quality of functional neuroimaging data. PMID:23707580

  19. Midline electrographic abnormalities and cerebral lesions in the newborn brain.

    PubMed

    Scher, M S

    1988-04-01

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) abnormalities arising from the midline region were identified in 154 of 1008 (15.2%) consecutive neonatal EEGs during a 24-month period. These records were obtained on 97 neonates with a variety of clinical diagnoses. Premature infants made up 79% (77/97) of this group. All patients received at least one cranial ultrasound at 7 to 10 days of life. Sixty-two percent (60/97) of the patients had radiographic and/or neuropathological documentation of cerebral lesions: intraventricular hemorrhage (25), periventricular leukomalacia (18), cerebral infarction (10), cerebral malformation (4), and miscellaneous lesions (3). Six types of midline EEG abnormalities are described: negative sharp waves, positive sharp waves, electrographic discharges associated with myoclonus, electrographic seizures, attenuation of background, and rhythmic monofrequencies. Approximately 90% of the patients with background attenuation, discharges with myoclonus, and positive sharp waves and 72% of patients with EEG seizures had cerebral lesions. Midline positive sharp waves were associated with periventricular leukomalacia as well as intraventricular hemorrhage. No midline positive sharp waves, attenuation, EEG seizures or discharges with myoclonus were found in 25 healthy, asymptomatic neonates. Besides positive sharp waves, other specific midline EEG abnormalities can be associated with cerebral lesions in the neonate. The rapid identification of midline EEG abnormalities in neonatal recordings can enhance the accuracy of both electrographic diagnosis and anatomic localization of associated cerebral lesions. PMID:3286747

  20. Sensor-Based Abnormal Human-Activity Detection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jie Yin; Qiang Yang; Jeffrey Junfeng Pan

    2008-01-01

    With the availability of affordable sensors and sensor networks, sensor-based human-activity recognition has attracted much attention in artificial intelligence and ubiquitous computing. In this paper, we present a novel two-phase approach for detecting abnormal activities based on wireless sensors attached to a human body. Detecting abnormal activities is a particularly important task in security monitoring and healthcare applications of sensor

  1. Altered structure of cortical sulci in gilles de la Tourette syndrome: Further support for abnormal brain development.

    PubMed

    Muellner, Julia; Delmaire, Christine; Valabrégue, Romain; Schüpbach, Michael; Mangin, Jean-François; Vidailhet, Marie; Lehéricy, Stéphane; Hartmann, Andreas; Worbe, Yulia

    2015-04-15

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by the presence of motor and vocal tics. We hypothesized that patients with this syndrome would present an aberrant pattern of cortical formation, which could potentially reflect global alterations of brain development. Using 3 Tesla structural neuroimaging, we compared sulcal depth, opening, and length and thickness of sulcal gray matter in 52 adult patients and 52 matched controls. Cortical sulci were automatically reconstructed and identified over the whole brain, using BrainVisa software. We focused on frontal, parietal, and temporal cortical regions, in which abnormal structure and functional activity were identified in previous neuroimaging studies. Partial correlation analysis with age, sex, and treatment as covariables of noninterest was performed amongst relevant clinical and neuroimaging variables in patients. Patients with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome showed lower depth and reduced thickness of gray matter in the pre- and post-central as well as superior, inferior, and internal frontal sulci. In patients with associated obsessive-compulsive disorder, additional structural changes were found in temporal, insular, and olfactory sulci. Crucially, severity of tics and of obsessive-compulsive disorder measured by Yale Global Tic severity scale and Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive scale, respectively, correlated with structural sulcal changes in sensorimotor, temporal, dorsolateral prefrontal, and middle cingulate cortical areas. Patients with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome displayed an abnormal structural pattern of cortical sulci, which correlated with severity of clinical symptoms. Our results provide further evidence of abnormal brain development in GTS. PMID:25820811

  2. Brain morphological abnormalities in 49,XXXXY syndrome: A pediatric magnetic resonance imaging study???

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, Jonathan D.; Baker, Eva H.; Lee, Nancy Raitano; Wade, Benjamin; Clasen, Liv S.; Lenroot, Rhoshel K.; Giedd, Jay N.

    2013-01-01

    As a group, people with the sex chromosome aneuploidy 49,XXXXY have characteristic physical and cognitive/behavioral tendencies, although there is high individual variation. In this study we use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to examine brain morphometry in 14 youth with 49,XXXXY compared to 42 age-matched healthy controls. Total brain size was significantly smaller (t = 9.0, p < .001), and rates of brain abnormalities such as colpocephaly, plagiocephaly, periventricular cysts, and minor craniofacial abnormalities were significantly increased. White matter lesions were identified in 50% of subjects, supporting the inclusion of 49,XXXXY in the differential diagnosis of small multifocal white matter lesions. Further evidence of abnormal development of white matter was provided by the smaller cross sectional area of the corpus callosum. These results suggest that increased dosage of genes on the X chromosome has adverse effects on white matter development. PMID:23667827

  3. Chronic cholinergic imbalances promote brain diffusion and transport abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Meshorer, Eran; Biton, Inbal E; Ben-Shaul, Yoram; Ben-Ari, Shani; Assaf, Yaniv; Soreq, Hermona; Cohen, Yoram

    2005-06-01

    Cholinergic imbalances occur after traumatic effects and in the initial stages of neurodegenerative diseases, but their long-lasting effects remained largely unexplained. To address this, we used TgS transgenic mice constitutively overexpressing synaptic acetylcholinesterase (AChE-S) and presenting a complex phenotype of progressive neurodeterioration. T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) brain images appeared similar. However, diffusion-weighted MRI showed decreased baseline water apparent diffusion coefficient in the brains of TgS animals. Furthermore, contrast-enhanced MRI after gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) injection demonstrated slower recovery of normal signals in the TgS brains than with controls. Perfusion MR imaging and difference T1 maps calculated from pre- postcontrast T1-weighted MR images indicated accumulation of more Gd-DTPA molecules in the TgS brains than in the parent strain, reflecting impaired blood-brain barrier (BBB) functioning in these transgenic mice. To explore the molecular mechanism(s) underlying these global phenotypes, we performed microarray analysis in the stress-controlling prefrontal cortex of TgS vs. strain-matched wild-type animals. Profound overexpression of numerous ion channels, transporters, and adhesion genes was confirmed by real time RT-PCR tests. Immunohistochemical and immunoblot analyses revealed corresponding increases in the level and cellular distributions of the chloride channel CLCN3 and the water channel AQP4, both of which contribute to BBB maintenance. Our study attributes to balanced cholinergic neurotransmission, a central role in the brain's maintenance of water diffusion and ion transport, and indicates that chronic impairments in this maintenance facilitate neurodeterioration through interference with BBB function. PMID:15923401

  4. Abnormal deposits of chromium in the pathological human brain.

    PubMed Central

    Duckett, S

    1986-01-01

    Three patients presented with encephalopathies: an undiagnosed degenerative disease of the brain, a degenerative cerebral disease in a patient with a myeloma but without a myelomatous deposit in the CNS and a malignant astrocytoma. Perivascular pallidal deposits (vascular siderosis) containing chromium, phosphorus and calcium plus sometimes traces of other elements were present in the three cases. Such deposits were present in the pallidal parenchyma and around vessels in the cerebellum in one case. Calcium and phosphorus are always present in any CNS calcification but the presence of chromium has not been reported. Chromium and its compounds (ingested, injected or inhaled) are toxic to humans and animals in trace doses. Approximately 900 cases of chromium intoxication have been reported and usually have had dermatological or pulmonary lesions (including cancer) but there is no report of involvement of the CNS. Sublethal doses of chromium nitrate injected intraperitoneally in rats and rabbits results in the presence of chromium in the brain. A thorough investigation was made to find the source of the chromium in these patients. Chromium was found to be present in trace amounts in the radiological contrast agents administered to these patients and in the KCl replacement solution and in mylanta, an antacid, given to one case. The evidence that chromium induced pathological changes in these three brains is circumstantial but shows that chromium can penetrate the human brain. This study indicates that vascular siderosis found in the brains of the majority of middle-aged and elderly humans is not simply an anecdotal pathological curiosity, but that it can serve as a route of entry for toxic products into the brain. Images PMID:3958742

  5. Intermittent rhythmic delta activity (IRDA) morphology cannot distinguish between focal and diffuse brain disturbances.

    PubMed

    Neufeld, M Y; Chistik, V; Chapman, J; Korczyn, A D

    1999-03-15

    IRDA (intermittent rhythmic delta activity) is an abnormal generalized EEG pattern that is not specific to any single etiology and can occur with diffuse or focal cerebral disturbances. To determine whether different electrographic features of IRDA and associated EEG findings can differentiate underlying focal from diffuse brain disturbances, we performed a blind analysis of 58 consecutive EEGs with an IRDA pattern, recorded from 1993 until 1996, in which we evaluated posterior background activity, focal slowing and IRDA characteristics (frequency, distribution, duration, symmetry and abundance). The clinical diagnosis, state of consciousness and CT brain findings were retrieved from the patients' hospital records. There were 58 patients (33 females; mean age, 58+/-21 years). Twelve (21%) had only focal brain lesions, while 46 (79%) had diffuse brain abnormalities, (15 diffuse structural, 19 metabolic abnormalities, 12 postictal). Normal consciousness and focal EEG slowing were more frequent in patients with focal abnormalities, however, this was not statistically significant. Of the patients with focal abnormality, 11 (92%) had normal posterior background activity either bilaterally (n=4) or contralateral to the focal lesion (n=7). Bilaterally normal posterior background activity was observed in about 30% in both groups. Bilaterally abnormal posterior background activity was apparent in one patient (8%) with focal brain lesion and in 31 patients (67%) with diffuse brain abnormalities (P<0.0001). There were no significant differences in IRDA electrographic features between the focal group and the group with diffuse brain disturbances. We conclude that IRDA morphology cannot distinguish between focal and diffuse brain abnormalities. PMID:10385048

  6. The Abnormal Regulation of Gene Expression in Autistic Brain Tissue

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amy E. Purcell; Ok-Hee Jeon; Jonathan Pevsner

    2001-01-01

    Autism is a pervasive developmental disorder of unknown etiology. It is likely caused by mutations in one or more genes. One approach to understanding the molecular changes that occur in autism is to measure gene expression in post-mortem brain samples from individuals diagnosed with autism. This may be accomplished with techniques such as cDNA microarrays or subtractive hybridization. In general,

  7. Childhood Onset Schizophrenia: Cortical Brain Abnormalities as Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenstein, Deanna; Lerch, Jason; Shaw, Philip; Clasen, Liv; Giedd, Jay; Gochman, Peter; Rapoport, Judith; Gogtay, Nitin

    2006-01-01

    Background: Childhood onset schizophrenia (COS) is a rare but severe form of the adult onset disorder. While structural brain imaging studies show robust, widespread, and progressive gray matter loss in COS during adolescence, there have been no longitudinal studies of sufficient duration to examine comparability with the more common adult onset…

  8. Genetic abnormality predicts benefit from treatment for a rare brain tumor:

    Cancer.gov

    A clinical trial has shown that addition of chemotherapy to radiation therapy leads to a near doubling of median survival time in patients with a form of brain tumor (oligodendroglioma) that carries a chromosomal abnormality called the 1p19q co-deletion. This abnormality is characterized by the simultaneous deletion of the short arm of chromosome 1 and long arm of chromosome 19. The presence of the chromosomal abnormality was associated with substantially better prognosis and marked improvements in survival in a treatment program of combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy compared to radiation therapy alone.

  9. AMPK is abnormally activated in tangle and pre-tanglebearing neurons in Alzheimer’s disease and other tauopathies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Valérie Vingtdeux; Peter Davies; Dennis W. Dickson; Philippe Marambaud

    2011-01-01

    Tauopathies represent a class of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by abnormal tau phosphorylation and aggregation\\u000a into neuronal paired helical filaments (PHFs) and neurofibrillary tangles. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a metabolic\\u000a sensor expressed in most mammalian cell types. In the brain, AMPK controls neuronal maintenance and is overactivated during\\u000a metabolic stress. Here, we show that activated AMPK (p-AMPK) is abnormally accumulated

  10. Migraine With Aura and Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging Abnormalities in Patients With CADASIL

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Katayoun Vahedi; Hugues Chabriat; Claude Levy; Anne Joutel; Elisabeth Tournier-Lasserve; Marie-Germaine Bousser

    2004-01-01

    Background:Migrainewithaura(MA)isoneoftheclini- cal hallmarks of CADASIL (cerebral autosomal domi- nant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoen- cephalopathy), a small vessel disease of the brain caused by mutations in the NOTCH3 gene, but its exact mecha- nisms are unknown. Objectives:TodescribethepatternsofMAinCADASIL andtocomparebrainmagneticresonancesignalabnormali- ties between CADASIL patients with and without MA. Design: Comparison of brain magnetic resonance sig- nal abnormalities between cases and controls.

  11. Chronic cholinergic imbalances promote brain diffusion and transport abnormalities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eran Meshorer; Inbal E. Biton; Yoram Ben-Shaul; Shani Ben-Ari; Yaniv Assaf; Hermona Soreq; Yoram Cohen

    2005-01-01

    Cholinergic imbalances occur after traumatic effects and in the initial stages of neuro- degenerative diseases, but their long-lasting effects remained largely unexplained. To address this, we used TgS transgenic mice constitutively overexpress- ing synaptic acetylcholinesterase (AChE-S) and pre- senting a complex phenotype of progressive neuro- deterioration. T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) brain images appeared similar. How- ever, diffusion-weighted MRI

  12. Abnormal T2Weighted MRI Signal Surrounding Leads in a Subset of Deep Brain Stimulation Patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dario J. Englot; Christine M. Glastonbury; Paul S. Larson

    2011-01-01

    Background: Deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery is a common treatment option for numerous neurological disorders. However, it is not without potential complications, such as hemorrhage and infection. Interestingly, we have observed several instances of abnormal T2-weighted signal hyperintensity surrounding DBS leads on postoperative MRI that are not associated with hemorrhage or infection. Methods: To better characterize the incidence and timing

  13. Optic nerve hypoplasia in association with brain anomalies and an abnormal electroretinogram

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gerhard W. Cibis; Kathleen M. Fitzgerald

    1994-01-01

    Abnormal electroretinograms (decreased amplitude and prolonged implicit time > 2 standard deviations) in several patients with optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) and developmental brain anomalies led us to study the electroretinogram (ERG) in 34 consecutive cases of ONH presenting to our practice. Ages of the subjects were between 7 months and 13 years (mean, 4 years). ERGs were recorded from each

  14. Three-dimensional brain growth abnormalities in childhood-onset schizophrenia visualized by

    E-print Network

    Thompson, Paul

    during adolescent years (7). As COS patients matured into young adults, this GM loss gradually merged a neurobiological continuity between COS and adult-onset schizophrenia (AOS) (2). Studies of monozygotic twinsThree-dimensional brain growth abnormalities in childhood-onset schizophrenia visualized by using

  15. Abnormal brain magnetic resonance imaging in two patients with Smith-Magenis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Maya, Idit; Vinkler, Chana; Konen, Osnat; Kornreich, Liora; Steinberg, Tamar; Yeshaya, Josepha; Latarowski, Victoria; Shohat, Mordechai; Lev, Dorit; Baris, Hagit N

    2014-08-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a clinically recognizable contiguous gene syndrome ascribed to an interstitial deletion in chromosome 17p11.2. Seventy percent of SMS patients have a common deletion interval spanning 3.5 megabases (Mb). Clinical features of SMS include characteristic mild dysmorphic features, ocular anomalies, short stature, brachydactyly, and hypotonia. SMS patients have a unique neurobehavioral phenotype that includes intellectual disability, self-injurious behavior and severe sleep disturbance. Little has been reported in the medical literature about anatomical brain anomalies in patients with SMS. Here we describe two patients with SMS caused by the common deletion in 17p11.2 diagnosed using chromosomal microarray (CMA). Both patients had a typical clinical presentation and abnormal brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. One patient had subependymal periventricular gray matter heterotopia, and the second had a thin corpus callosum, a thin brain stem and hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis. This report discusses the possible abnormal MRI images in SMS and reviews the literature on brain malformations in SMS. Finally, although structural brain malformations in SMS patients are not a common feature, we suggest baseline routine brain imaging in patients with SMS in particular, and in patients with chromosomal microdeletion/microduplication syndromes in general. Structural brain malformations in these patients may affect the decision-making process regarding their management. PMID:24788350

  16. Abnormal amygdala activation profile in pedophilia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexander Sartorius; Matthias Ruf; Christine Kief; Traute Demirakca; Josef Bailer; Gabriele Ende; Fritz A. Henn; Andreas Meyer-Lindenberg; Harald Dressing

    2008-01-01

    Despite considerable public interest research in neurobiological correlates of pedophilia is scarce. Since amygdala activation\\u000a is central for emotional valuation, arousal, and salience, we investigated the activation profile of this structure in 10\\u000a male subjects with pedophilia (exclusively attracted to boys), all convicted sex-offenders and sentenced to forensic psychiatric\\u000a treatment along with ten male heterosexual matched controls. We used a

  17. Classification of Abnormal Activities in Video Justin Muncaster

    E-print Network

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    Classification of Abnormal Activities in Video Justin Muncaster UCSB Computer Science Department, security, and surveillance there is a strong push for advances in our ability to recognize both normal networks, deterministic annealing. 1. INTRODUCTION Activity recognition in video analytics has developed

  18. Abnormal brain aging as a radical-related disease: A new target for nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Fujibayashi, Y.; Yamamoto, S.; Waki, A. [Fukui Medical School (Japan)]|[Kyoto Univ. (Japan)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    DNA damages caused by endogenously produced radicals are closely correlated with aging. Among them, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions have been reported as a memory of DNA damage by oxygen radicals. In fact, clinical as well as experimental studies indicated the accumulation of deleted mtDNA in the brain, myocardium and son on, in aged subjects. In our previous work, radioiodinated radical trapping agent, p-iodophenyl-N-t-butylnitrone, and hypoxia imaging agent, Cu-62 diacetyl-bis-N-4-methyl-thiosemicarbazone have been developed for the diagnosis of radical-related diseases, such as ischemic, inflammation, cancer or aging. The aim of the present work was to evaluate these agents for brain aging studies. In our university, an unique animal model, a senescence accelerated model mouse (SAM), has been established. Among the various substrains, SAMP8 showing memory deterioration in its young age ({approximately}3 month) was basically evaluated as an abnormal brain aging model with mtDNA deletion. As controls, SAMR1 showing normal aging and ddY mice were used. MtDNA deletion n the brain was analyzed with polymerase-chain reaction (PCR) method, and relationship between mtDNA deletion and brain uptake of IPBN or Cu-62-ATSM was studied. In 1-3 month old SAMP8 brain, multiple mtDNa deletions were already found and their content was significantly higher than that of SAMR1 or age-matched ddY control. Thus, it was cleared that SAMP8 brain has high tendency to be attacked by endogenously produced oxygen radicals, possibly from its birth. Both IPBN and Cu-ATSM showed significantly higher accumulation in the SAMP8 brain than in the SAMR1 brain, indicating that these agents have high possibility for the early detection of abnormal brain aging as a radical-related disease.

  19. Brain Gym. Simple Activities for Whole Brain Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennison, Paul E.; Dennison, Gail E.

    This booklet contains simple movements and activities that are used with students in Educational Kinesiology to enhance their experience of whole brain learning. Whole brain learning through movement repatterning and Brain Gym activities enable students to access those parts of the brain previously unavailable to them. These movements of body and…

  20. Diffusion tensor imaging of brain abnormalities induced by prenatal exposure to radiation in rodents.

    PubMed

    Saito, Shigeyoshi; Sawada, Kazuhiko; Hirose, Miwa; Mori, Yuki; Yoshioka, Yoshichika; Murase, Kenya

    2014-01-01

    We assessed brain abnormalities in rats exposed prenatally to radiation (X-rays) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histological experiments. Pregnant rats were divided into 4 groups: the control group (n?=?3) and 3 groups that were exposed to different radiation doses (0.5, 1.0, or 1.5 Gy; n?=?3 each). Brain abnormalities were assessed in 32 neonatal male rats (8 per group). Ex vivo T2-weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) were performed using 11.7-T MRI. The expression of markers of myelin production (Kluver-Barrera staining, KB), nonpyramidal cells (calbindin-D28k staining, CaBP), and pyramidal cells (staining of the nonphosphorylated heavy-chain neurofilament SMI-32) were histologically evaluated. Decreased brain volume, increased ventricle volume, and thinner cortices were observed by MRI in irradiated rats. However, no abnormalities in the cortical 6-layered structure were observed via KB staining in radiation-exposed rats. The DTI color-coded map revealed a dose-dependent reduction in the anisotropic signal (vertical direction), which did not represent reduced numbers of pyramidal cells; rather, it indicated a signal reduction relative to the vertical direction because of low nerve cell density in the entire cortex. We conclude that DTI and histological experiments are useful tools for assessing cortical and hippocampal abnormalities after prenatal exposure to radiation in rats. PMID:25202992

  1. A mechanical model predicts morphological abnormalities in the developing human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budday, Silvia; Raybaud, Charles; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-07-01

    The developing human brain remains one of the few unsolved mysteries of science. Advancements in developmental biology, neuroscience, and medical imaging have brought us closer than ever to understand brain development in health and disease. However, the precise role of mechanics throughout this process remains underestimated and poorly understood. Here we show that mechanical stretch plays a crucial role in brain development. Using the nonlinear field theories of mechanics supplemented by the theory of finite growth, we model the human brain as a living system with a morphogenetically growing outer surface and a stretch-driven growing inner core. This approach seamlessly integrates the two popular but competing hypotheses for cortical folding: axonal tension and differential growth. We calibrate our model using magnetic resonance images from very preterm neonates. Our model predicts that deviations in cortical growth and thickness induce morphological abnormalities. Using the gyrification index, the ratio between the total and exposed surface area, we demonstrate that these abnormalities agree with the classical pathologies of lissencephaly and polymicrogyria. Understanding the mechanisms of cortical folding in the developing human brain has direct implications in the diagnostics and treatment of neurological disorders, including epilepsy, schizophrenia, and autism.

  2. Normal and abnormal fetal brain development during the third trimester as demonstrated by neurosonography.

    PubMed

    Malinger, G; Lev, D; Lerman-Sagie, T

    2006-02-01

    The multiplanar neurosonographic examination of the fetus enables superb visualization of brain anatomy during pregnancy. The examination may be performed using a transvaginal or a transfundal approach and it is indicated in patients at high risk for CNS anomalies or in those with a suspicious finding during a routine examination. The purpose of this paper is to present a description of the normal brain and of abnormal findings usually diagnosed late in pregnancy, including malformations of cortical development, infratentorial anomalies, and prenatal insults. PMID:16387462

  3. Fueling and imaging brain activation

    PubMed Central

    Dienel, Gerald A

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic signals are used for imaging and spectroscopic studies of brain function and disease and to elucidate the cellular basis of neuroenergetics. The major fuel for activated neurons and the models for neuron–astrocyte interactions have been controversial because discordant results are obtained in different experimental systems, some of which do not correspond to adult brain. In rats, the infrastructure to support the high energetic demands of adult brain is acquired during postnatal development and matures after weaning. The brain's capacity to supply and metabolize glucose and oxygen exceeds demand over a wide range of rates, and the hyperaemic response to functional activation is rapid. Oxidative metabolism provides most ATP, but glycolysis is frequently preferentially up-regulated during activation. Underestimation of glucose utilization rates with labelled glucose arises from increased lactate production, lactate diffusion via transporters and astrocytic gap junctions, and lactate release to blood and perivascular drainage. Increased pentose shunt pathway flux also causes label loss from C1 of glucose. Glucose analogues are used to assay cellular activities, but interpretation of results is uncertain due to insufficient characterization of transport and phosphorylation kinetics. Brain activation in subjects with low blood-lactate levels causes a brain-to-blood lactate gradient, with rapid lactate release. In contrast, lactate flooding of brain during physical activity or infusion provides an opportunistic, supplemental fuel. Available evidence indicates that lactate shuttling coupled to its local oxidation during activation is a small fraction of glucose oxidation. Developmental, experimental, and physiological context is critical for interpretation of metabolic studies in terms of theoretical models. PMID:22612861

  4. Sex moderates the relationship between worry and performance monitoring brain activity in undergraduates

    E-print Network

    Liu, Taosheng

    Sex moderates the relationship between worry and performance monitoring brain activity Sex-differences Biomarkers Research suggests that abnormal performance-monitoring contributes to the etiology and maintenance of anxious pathology. Moreover, the anxiety­performance monitoring relationship

  5. Decoding Patterns of Human Brain Activity

    E-print Network

    Tong, Frank

    Decoding Patterns of Human Brain Activity Frank Tong and Michael S. Pratte Psychology Department be decoded from noninvasive measures of human brain activity. Analyses of brain activ- ity patterns can into a neuroimaging lab and asked to lie back comfortably on a padded bed ta- ble, which is slowly glided into a brain

  6. Morphometric abnormalities in brains of great blue heron hatchlings exposed in the wild to PCDDs.

    PubMed Central

    Henshel, D S; Martin, J W; Norstrom, R; Whitehead, P; Steeves, J D; Cheng, K M

    1995-01-01

    Great blue heron hatchlings from colonies in the Strait of Georgia, British Columbia, Canada are being monitored for environmental contaminant exposure and effects by the Canadian Wildlife Service. The contaminants of concern are polychlorinated dibenzodioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), primarily derived from kraft pulp mill effluent. The levels of PCDDs and PCDFs in eggs from the most contaminated colonies peaked in 1988 and 1989 and dropped dramatically through 1990 to 1992. Brains of heron hatchlings (taken as eggs from the wild and hatched in the laboratory) were analyzed for gross morphological abnormalities. Brains from highly contaminated colonies (Crofton, British Columbia and University of British Columbia Endowment Lands) in 1988 exhibited a high frequency of intercerebral asymmetry. The frequency of this abnormality decreased in subsequent years as the levels of TCDD and TCDD-TEQs (toxic equivalence factors) decreased. The asymmetry was significantly correlated with the level of TCDD and TCDD-TEQs in eggs taken from the same nest. Yolk-free body weight negatively correlated and the brain somatic index positively correlated with the TCDD level in such pair-matched eggs. These results indicate that gross brain morphology, and specifically intercerebral asymmetry, may be useful as a biomarker for the developmental neurotoxic effects of PCDDs and related chemicals. Images Figure 1. PMID:7556025

  7. Thalamic abnormalities are a cardinal feature of alcohol-related brain dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Pitel, Anne Lise; Segobin, Shailendra H; Ritz, Ludivine; Eustache, Francis; Beaunieux, Hélène

    2015-07-01

    Two brain networks are particularly affected by the harmful effect of chronic and excessive alcohol consumption: the circuit of Papez and the frontocerebellar circuit, in both of which the thalamus plays a key role. Shrinkage of the thalamus is more severe in alcoholics with Korsakoff's syndrome (KS) than in those without neurological complication (AL). In accordance with the gradient effect of thalamic abnormalities between AL and KS, the pattern of brain dysfunction in the Papez's circuit results in anterograde amnesia in KS and only mild-to-moderate episodic memory disorders in AL. On the opposite, dysfunction of the frontocerebellar circuit results in a similar pattern of working memory and executive deficits in the AL and KS. Several hypotheses, mutually compatible, can be drawn to explain that the severe thalamic shrinkage observed in KS has different consequences in the neuropsychological profile associated with the two brain networks. PMID:25108034

  8. Abnormal face identity coding in the middle fusiform gyrus of two brain-damaged prosopagnosic patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jennifer Steeves; Laurence Dricot; Herbert C. Goltz; Bettina Sorger; Judith Peters; A. David Milner; Melvyn A. Goodale; Rainer Goebel; Bruno Rossion

    2009-01-01

    We report a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) adaptation study of two well-described patients, DF and PS, who present face identity recognition impairments (prosopagnosia) following brain-damage. Comparing faces to non-face objects elicited activation in all visual areas of the cortical face processing network that were spared subsequent to brain damage. The common brain lesion in the two patients was in

  9. Brain abnormalities in bipolar disorder detected by quantitative T1? mapping.

    PubMed

    Johnson, C P; Follmer, R L; Oguz, I; Warren, L A; Christensen, G E; Fiedorowicz, J G; Magnotta, V A; Wemmie, J A

    2015-02-01

    Abnormal metabolism has been reported in bipolar disorder, however, these studies have been limited to specific regions of the brain. To investigate whole-brain changes potentially associated with these processes, we applied a magnetic resonance imaging technique novel to psychiatric research, quantitative mapping of T1 relaxation in the rotating frame (T1?). This method is sensitive to proton chemical exchange, which is affected by pH, metabolite concentrations and cellular density with high spatial resolution relative to alternative techniques such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy and positron emission tomography. Study participants included 15 patients with bipolar I disorder in the euthymic state and 25 normal controls balanced for age and gender. T1? maps were generated and compared between the bipolar and control groups using voxel-wise and regional analyses. T1? values were found to be elevated in the cerebral white matter and cerebellum in the bipolar group. However, volumes of these areas were normal as measured by high-resolution T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Interestingly, the cerebellar T1? abnormalities were normalized in participants receiving lithium treatment. These findings are consistent with metabolic or microstructural abnormalities in bipolar disorder and draw attention to roles of the cerebral white matter and cerebellum. This study highlights the potential utility of high-resolution T1? mapping in psychiatric research. PMID:25560762

  10. Decoding Patterns of Human Brain Activity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frank Tong; Michael S. Pratte

    Considerable information about mental states can be decoded from noninvasive measures of human brain activity. Analyses of brain activity patterns can reveal what a person is seeing, perceiving, attending to, or remembering. Moreover, multidimensional models can be used to investigate how the brain encodes complex visual scenes or abstract semantic information. Such feats of “brain reading” or “mind reading,” though

  11. Decoding Patterns of Human Brain Activity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frank Tong; Michael S. Pratte

    2012-01-01

    Considerable information about mental states can be decoded from noninvasive measures of human brain activity. Analyses of brain activity patterns can reveal what a person is seeing, perceiving, attending to, or remembering. Moreover, multidimensional models can be used to investigate how the brain encodes complex visual scenes or abstract semantic information. Such feats of “brain reading” or “mind reading,” though

  12. Neural Stem Cells in Drosophila: Molecular Genetic Mechanisms Underlying Normal Neural Proliferation and Abnormal Brain Tumor Formation

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Nidhi; Reichert, Heinrich

    2012-01-01

    Neural stem cells in Drosophila are currently one of the best model systems for understanding stem cell biology during normal development and during abnormal development of stem cell-derived brain tumors. In Drosophila brain development, the proliferative activity of neural stem cells called neuroblasts gives rise to both the optic lobe and the central brain ganglia, and asymmetric cell divisions are key features of this proliferation. The molecular mechanisms that underlie the asymmetric cell divisions by which these neuroblasts self-renew and generate lineages of differentiating progeny have been studied extensively and involve two major protein complexes, the apical complex which maintains polarity and controls spindle orientation and the basal complex which is comprised of cell fate determinants and their adaptors that are segregated into the differentiating daughter cells during mitosis. Recent molecular genetic work has established Drosophila neuroblasts as a model for neural stem cell-derived tumors in which perturbation of key molecular mechanisms that control neuroblast proliferation and the asymmetric segregation of cell fate determinants lead to brain tumor formation. Identification of novel candidate genes that control neuroblast self-renewal and differentiation as well as functional analysis of these genes in normal and tumorigenic conditions in a tissue-specific manner is now possible through genome-wide transgenic RNAi screens. These cellular and molecular findings in Drosophila are likely to provide valuable genetic links for analyzing mammalian neural stem cells and tumor biology. PMID:22737173

  13. Neural activation abnormalities during self-referential processing in schizophrenia: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiacheng; Corbera, Silvia; Wexler, Bruce Edward

    2014-06-30

    Impairments in self-awareness contribute to disability in schizophrenia. Studies have revealed activation abnormalities in schizophrenia in cortical midline structures associated with self-reference. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to compare activation throughout the brain in people with schizophrenia and healthy controls (Kelly et al., 2002) while they indicated whether trait adjectives described attributes of themselves, their mother or a former president of the United States. Blood oxygenation level dependent signal in each condition was compared to resting fixation. Patients were less likely and slower to endorse positive self-attributes, and more likely and quicker to endorse negative self-attributes than controls. Activation abnormalities reported previously in cortical midline structures were again noted. In addition, patients showed greater signal increases in frontal, temporal gyri and insula, and smaller signal decreases in posterior regions than healthy controls when thinking about themselves. Group differences were less evident when subjects were thinking about their mothers and tended to go in the opposite direction when thinking about a president. Many of the areas showing abnormality have been shown in other studies to differ between patients and controls in structure and with other activation paradigms. We suggest that general neuropathology in schizophrenia alters the neural system configurations associated with self-representation. PMID:24795158

  14. Cerebrovascular risk factors and brain microstructural abnormalities on diffusion tensor images in HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Beau K; Jahanshad, Neda; McMurtray, Aaron; Kallianpur, Kalpana J; Chow, Dominic C; Valcour, Victor G; Paul, Robert H; Marotz, Liron; Thompson, Paul M; Shikuma, Cecilia M

    2012-08-01

    HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder remains prevalent in HIV-infected individuals despite effective antiretroviral therapy. As these individuals age, comorbid cerebrovascular disease will likely impact cognitive function. Effective tools to study this impact are needed. This study used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to characterize brain microstructural changes in HIV-infected individuals with and without cerebrovascular risk factors. Diffusion-weighted MRIs were obtained in 22 HIV-infected subjects aged 50 years or older (mean age?=?58 years, standard deviation?=?6 years; 19 males, three females). Tensors were calculated to obtain fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) maps. Statistical comparisons accounting for multiple comparisons were made between groups with and without cerebrovascular risk factors. Abnormal glucose metabolism (i.e., impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, or diabetes mellitus) was associated with significantly higher MD (false discovery rate (FDR) critical p value?=?0.008) and lower FA (FDR critical p value?=?0.002) in the caudate and lower FA in the hippocampus (FDR critical p value?=?0.004). Pearson correlations were performed between DTI measures in the caudate and hippocampus and age- and education-adjusted composite scores of global cognitive function, memory, and psychomotor speed. There were no detectable correlations between the neuroimaging measures and measures of cognition. In summary, we demonstrate that brain microstructural abnormalities are associated with abnormal glucose metabolism in the caudate and hippocampus of HIV-infected individuals. Deep gray matter structures and the hippocampus may be vulnerable in subjects with comorbid abnormal glucose metabolism, but our results should be confirmed in further studies. PMID:22585287

  15. Cerebrovascular risk factors and brain microstructural abnormalities on diffusion tensor images in HIV-infected individuals

    PubMed Central

    Jahanshad, Neda; McMurtray, Aaron; Kallianpur, Kalpana J.; Chow, Dominic C.; Valcour, Victor G.; Paul, Robert H.; Marotz, Liron; Thompson, Paul M.; Shikuma, Cecilia M.

    2012-01-01

    HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder remains prevalent in HIV-infected individuals despite effective antiretroviral therapy. As these individuals age, comorbid cerebrovascular disease will likely impact cognitive function. Effective tools to study this impact are needed. This study used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to characterize brain microstructural changes in HIV-infected individuals with and without cerebrovascular risk factors. Diffusion-weighted MRIs were obtained in 22 HIV-infected subjects aged 50 years or older (mean age = 58 years, standard deviation = 6 years; 19 males, three females). Tensors were calculated to obtain fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) maps. Statistical comparisons accounting for multiple comparisons were made between groups with and without cerebrovascular risk factors. Abnormal glucose metabolism (i.e., impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, or diabetes mellitus) was associated with significantly higher MD (false discovery rate (FDR) critical p value = 0.008) and lower FA FDR critical p value = 0.002) in the caudate and lower FA in the hippocampus (FDR critical p value = 0.004). Pearson correlations were performed between DTI measures in the caudate and hippocampus and age- and education-adjusted composite scores of global cognitive function, memory, and psychomotor speed. There were no detectable correlations between the neuroimaging measures and measures of cognition. In summary, we demonstrate that brain microstructural abnormalities are associated with abnormal glucose metabolism in the caudate and hippocampus of HIV-infected individuals. Deep gray matter structures and the hippocampus may be vulnerable in subjects with comorbid abnormal glucose metabolism, but our results should be confirmed in further studies. PMID:22585287

  16. Cerebral abnormalities in cocaine abusers: Demonstration by SPECT perfusion brain scintigraphy. Work in progress

    SciTech Connect

    Tumeh, S.S.; Nagel, J.S.; English, R.J.; Moore, M.; Holman, B.L. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (USA))

    1990-09-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) perfusion brain scans with iodine-123 isopropyl iodoamphetamine (IMP) were obtained in 12 subjects who acknowledged using cocaine on a sporadic to a daily basis. The route of cocaine administration varied from nasal to intravenous. Concurrent abuse of other drugs was also reported. None of the patients were positive for human immunodeficiency virus. Brain scans demonstrated focal defects in 11 subjects, including seven who were asymptomatic, and no abnormality in one. Among the findings were scattered focal cortical deficits, which were seen in several patients and which ranged in severity from small and few to multiple and large, with a special predilection for the frontal and temporal lobes. No perfusion deficits were seen on I-123 SPECT images in five healthy volunteers. Focal alterations in cerebral perfusion are seen commonly in asymptomatic drug users, and these focal deficits are readily depicted by I-123 IMP SPECT.

  17. Enhancement of oscillatory activity in the endopiriform nucleus of rats raised under abnormal oral conditions.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Hiroshi; Hasumoto-Honjo, Miho; Sugai, Tokio; Segami, Natsuki; Kato, Nobuo

    2014-02-21

    Endopiriform nucleus (EPN) is located deep to the piriform cortex, and has neural connections with not only neighboring sensory areas but also subcortical areas where emotional and nociceptive information is processed. Well-balanced oral condition might play an important role in stability of brain activities. When the oral condition is impaired, several areas in the brain might be affected. In the present study, we investigated whether abnormal conditions of oral region influence neural activities in the EPN. Orthodontic appliance that generates continuous force and chronic pain-related stress was fixed to maxillary incisors of rats, and raised. Field potential recordings were made from the EPN of brain slices. We previously reported that the EPN has an ability to generate membrane potential oscillation. In the present study, we have applied the same methods to assess activities of neuron clusters in the EPN. In the case of normal rats, stable field potential oscillations were induced in the EPN by application of low-frequency electrical stimulation under the medium with caffeine. In the case of rats with the orthodontic appliance, stable field potential oscillations were also induced, but both duration of oscillatory activities and wavelet number were increased. The enhanced oscillations were depressed by blockade of NMDA receptors. Thus, impairment of oral health under application of continuous orthodontic force and chronic pain-related stress enhanced neural activities in the EPN, in which up-regulation of NMDA receptors may be concerned. These findings suggest that the EPN might be involved in information processing with regard to abnormal conditions of oral region. PMID:24406147

  18. Retinal microvascular abnormalities and subclinical magnetic resonance imaging brain infarct: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Ning; Mosley, Thomas; Islam, Amirul; Kawasaki, Ryo; Sharrett, A Richey; Klein, Ronald; Coker, Laura H; Knopman, David S; Shibata, Dean K; Catellier, Diane; Wong, Tien Y

    2010-07-01

    Silent brain infarct and white matter lesions are common radiological findings associated with the risk of clinical stroke and dementia; however, our understanding of their underlying pathophysiology and risk factors remains limited. This study aimed to determine whether assessment of retinal microvascular abnormalities could provide prognostic information regarding the risk of brain infarct and white matter lesions on magnetic resonance imaging. This study is based on a subset of 810 middle-aged persons without clinical stroke or baseline magnetic resonance imaging infarct enrolled in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study, a prospective, population-based study. Participants had a baseline magnetic resonance imaging brain examination and retinal photography in 1993-1995, and returned for a repeat magnetic resonance imaging examination in 2004-2006. Magnetic resonance images were graded for presence of any cerebral infarct, infarct with lacunar characteristics and white matter lesions according to standardized protocols. Retinal photographs were graded for presence of retinopathy lesions and retinal arteriolar abnormalities following a standardized protocol. Over a median follow-up of 10.5 years, 164 (20.2%) participants developed cerebral infarct, 131 (16.2%) developed lacunar infarct, 182 (24.2%) developed new white matter lesions and 49 (6.1%) had evidence of white matter lesion progression. After adjusting for age, gender, race, cardiovascular risk factors and carotid intima-media thickness, retinopathy was associated with incident cerebral infarct (odds ratio 2.82; 95% confidence interval 1.42-5.60) and lacunar infarct (odds ratio 3.19; 95% confidence interval: 1.56-6.50). Retinal arteriovenous nicking was associated with incident cerebral infarct (odds ratio 2.82; 95% confidence interval: 1.66-4.76), lacunar infarct (odds ratio 2.48; 95% confidence interval: 1.39-4.40) and white matter lesion incidence (odds ratio 2.12; 95% confidence interval: 1.18-3.81) and progression (odds ratio 2.22; 95% confidence interval: 1.00-5.88). In conclusion, retinal microvascular abnormalities are associated with emergence of subclinical magnetic resonance imaging brain infarcts and white matter lesions, independent of shared risk factors. Retinal vascular imaging may offer a non-invasive tool to investigate the pathogenesis and natural history of cerebral small-vessel disease. PMID:20519327

  19. Abnormal structural connectivity in the brain networks of children with hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Weihong; Holland, Scott K.; Shimony, Joshua S.; Altaye, Mekibib; Mangano, Francesco T.; Limbrick, David D.; Jones, Blaise V.; Nash, Tiffany; Rajagopal, Akila; Simpson, Sarah; Ragan, Dustin; McKinstry, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Increased intracranial pressure and ventriculomegaly in children with hydrocephalus are known to have adverse effects on white matter structure. This study seeks to investigate the impact of hydrocephalus on topological features of brain networks in children. The goal was to investigate structural network connectivity, at both global and regional levels, in the brains in children with hydrocephalus using graph theory analysis and diffusion tensor tractography. Three groups of children were included in the study (29 normally developing controls, 9 preoperative hydrocephalus patients, and 17 postoperative hydrocephalus patients). Graph theory analysis was applied to calculate the global network measures including small-worldness, normalized clustering coefficients, normalized characteristic path length, global efficiency, and modularity. Abnormalities in regional network parameters, including nodal degree, local efficiency, clustering coefficient, and betweenness centrality, were also compared between the two patients groups (separately) and the controls using two tailed t-test at significance level of p < 0.05 (corrected for multiple comparison). Children with hydrocephalus in both the preoperative and postoperative groups were found to have significantly lower small-worldness and lower normalized clustering coefficient than controls. Children with hydrocephalus in the postoperative group were also found to have significantly lower normalized characteristic path length and lower modularity. At regional level, significant group differences (or differences at trend level) in regional network measures were found between hydrocephalus patients and the controls in a series of brain regions including the medial occipital gyrus, medial frontal gyrus, thalamus, cingulate gyrus, lingual gyrus, rectal gyrus, caudate, cuneus, and insular. Our data showed that structural connectivity analysis using graph theory and diffusion tensor tractography is sensitive to detect abnormalities of brain network connectivity associated with hydrocephalus at both global and regional levels, thus providing a new avenue for potential diagnosis and prognosis tool for children with hydrocephalus.

  20. Rapid Morphological Brain Abnormalities during Acute Methamphetamine Intoxication in the Rat. An Experimental study using Light and Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Hari S.; Kiyatkin, Eugene A.

    2009-01-01

    This study describes morphological abnormalities of brain cells during acute methamphetamine (METH) intoxication in the rat and demonstrates the role of hyperthermia, disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and edema in their development. Rats with chronically implanted brain, muscle and skin temperature probes and an intravenous (iv) catheter were exposed to METH (9 mg/kg) at standard (23°C) and warm (29°C) ambient temperatures, allowing for the observation of hyperthermia ranging from mild to pathological levels (38–42°C). When brain temperature peaked or reached a level suggestive of possible lethality (>41.5°C), rats were injected with Evans blue (EB), rapidly anesthetized, perfused, and their brains were taken for further analyses. Four brain areas (cortex, hippocampus, thalamus and hypothalamus) were analyzed for EB extravasation, water and electrolyte (Na+, K+, Cl?) contents, immunostained for albumin and glial fibrillary acidic protein, and examined for neuronal, glial and axonal alterations using standard light and electron microscopy. These examinations revealed profound abnormalities in neuronal, glial, and endothelial cells, which were stronger with METH administered at 29°C than 23°C and tightly correlated with brain and body hyperthermia. These changes had some structural specificity, but in each structure they tightly correlated with increases in EB levels, the numbers of albumin-positive cells, and water and ion contents, suggesting leakage of the BBB, acutely developing brain edema, and serious shifts in brain ion homeostasis as leading factors underlying brain abnormalities. While most of these acute structural and functional abnormalities appear to be reversible, they could trigger subsequent cellular alterations in the brain and accelerate neurodegeneration—the most dangerous complication of chronic amphetamine-like drug abuse. PMID:18773954

  1. The nature of white matter abnormalities in blast-related mild traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Jasmeet P.; Miller, Danielle R.; Lafleche, Ginette; Salat, David H.; Verfaellie, Mieke

    2015-01-01

    Blast-related traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been a common injury among returning troops due to the widespread use of improvised explosive devices in the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars. As most of the TBIs sustained are in the mild range, brain changes may not be detected by standard clinical imaging techniques such as CT. Furthermore, the functional significance of these types of injuries is currently being debated. However, accumulating evidence suggests that diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is sensitive to subtle white matter abnormalities and may be especially useful in detecting mild TBI (mTBI). The primary aim of this study was to use DTI to characterize the nature of white matter abnormalities following blast-related mTBI, and in particular, examine the extent to which mTBI-related white matter abnormalities are region-specific or spatially heterogeneous. In addition, we examined whether mTBI with loss of consciousness (LOC) was associated with more extensive white matter abnormality than mTBI without LOC, as well as the potential moderating effect of number of blast exposures. A second aim was to examine the relationship between white matter integrity and neurocognitive function. Finally, a third aim was to examine the contribution of PTSD symptom severity to observed white matter alterations. One hundred fourteen OEF/OIF veterans underwent DTI and neuropsychological examination and were divided into three groups including a control group, blast-related mTBI without LOC (mTBI - LOC) group, and blast-related mTBI with LOC (mTBI + LOC) group. Hierarchical regression models were used to examine the extent to which mTBI and PTSD predicted white matter abnormalities using two approaches: 1) a region-specific analysis and 2) a measure of spatial heterogeneity. Neurocognitive composite scores were calculated for executive functions, attention, memory, and psychomotor speed. Results showed that blast-related mTBI + LOC was associated with greater odds of having spatially heterogeneous white matter abnormalities. Region-specific reduction in fractional anisotropy (FA) in the left retrolenticular part of the internal capsule was observed in the mTBI + LOC group as the number of blast exposures increased. A mediation analysis revealed that mTBI + LOC indirectly influenced verbal memory performance through its effect on white matter integrity. PTSD was not associated with spatially heterogeneous white matter abnormalities. However, there was a suggestion that at higher levels of PTSD symptom severity, LOC was associated with reduced FA in the left retrolenticular part of the internal capsule. These results support postmortem reports of diffuse axonal injury following mTBI and suggest that injuries with LOC involvement may be particularly detrimental to white matter integrity. Furthermore, these results suggest that LOC-associated white matter abnormalities in turn influence neurocognitive function.

  2. Abnormalities of functional brain networks in pathological gambling: a graph-theoretical approach

    PubMed Central

    Tschernegg, Melanie; Crone, Julia S.; Eigenberger, Tina; Schwartenbeck, Philipp; Fauth-Bühler, Mira; Lemènager, Tagrid; Mann, Karl; Thon, Natasha; Wurst, Friedrich M.; Kronbichler, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging studies of pathological gambling (PG) demonstrate alterations in frontal and subcortical regions of the mesolimbic reward system. However, most investigations were performed using tasks involving reward processing or executive functions. Little is known about brain network abnormalities during task-free resting state in PG. In the present study, graph-theoretical methods were used to investigate network properties of resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging data in PG. We compared 19 patients with PG to 19 healthy controls (HCs) using the Graph Analysis Toolbox (GAT). None of the examined global metrics differed between groups. At the nodal level, pathological gambler showed a reduced clustering coefficient in the left paracingulate cortex and the left juxtapositional lobe (supplementary motor area, SMA), reduced local efficiency in the left SMA, as well as an increased node betweenness for the left and right paracingulate cortex and the left SMA. At an uncorrected threshold level, the node betweenness in the left inferior frontal gyrus was decreased and increased in the caudate. Additionally, increased functional connectivity between fronto-striatal regions and within frontal regions has also been found for the gambling patients. These findings suggest that regions associated with the reward system demonstrate reduced segregation but enhanced integration while regions associated with executive functions demonstrate reduced integration. The present study makes evident that PG is also associated with abnormalities in the topological network structure of the brain during rest. Since alterations in PG cannot be explained by direct effects of abused substances on the brain, these findings will be of relevance for understanding functional connectivity in other addictive disorders. PMID:24098282

  3. Downstream targets of methyl CpG binding protein 2 and their abnormal expression in the frontal cortex of the human Rett syndrome brain

    E-print Network

    Gibson, Joanne H

    Background: The Rett Syndrome (RTT) brain displays regional histopathology and volumetric reduction, with frontal cortex showing such abnormalities, whereas the occipital cortex is relatively less affected. Results: Using ...

  4. Brain Abnormalities in Congenital Fibrosis of the Extraocular Muscles Type 1: A Multimodal MRI Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shaoqin; Lv, Bin; Wang, Zhenchang; Xian, Junfang; Sabel, Bernhard A.; He, Huiguang; Jiao, Yonghong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To explore the possible brain structural and functional alterations in congenital fibrosis of extraocular muscles type 1 (CFEOM1) patients using multimodal MRI imaging. Methods T1-weighted, diffusion tensor images and functional MRI data were obtained from 9 KIF21A positive patients and 19 age- and gender- matched healthy controls. Voxel based morphometry and tract based spatial statistics were applied to the T1-weighted and diffusion tensor images, respectively. Amplitude of low frequency fluctuations and regional homogeneity were used to process the functional MRI data. We then compared these multimodal characteristics between CFEOM1 patients and healthy controls. Results Compared with healthy controls, CFEOM1 patients demonstrated increased grey matter volume in bilateral frontal orbital cortex and in the right temporal pole. No diffusion indices changes were detected, indicating unaffected white matter microstructure. In addition, from resting state functional MRI data, trend of amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations increases were noted in the right inferior parietal lobe and in the right frontal cortex, and a trend of ReHo increase (p<0.001 uncorrected) in the left precentral gyrus, left orbital frontal cortex, temporal pole and cingulate gyrus. Conclusions CFEOM1 patients had structural and functional changes in grey matter, but the white matter was unaffected. These alterations in the brain may be due to the abnormality of extraocular muscles and their innervating nerves. Future studies should consider the possible correlations between brain morphological/functional findings and clinical data, especially pertaining to eye movements, to obtain more precise answers about the role of brain area changes and their functional consequence in CFEOM1. PMID:26186732

  5. Research Article Human Brain Activity Time-

    E-print Network

    Zacks, Jeffrey M.

    Research Article Human Brain Activity Time- Locked to Narrative Event Boundaries Nicole K. Speer into a series of events in order to understand and remember the text. In this study, subjects read brief narratives describing every- day activities while brain activity was recorded with functional magnetic

  6. Cognitive impairment as marker of diffuse brain abnormalities in early relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Deloire, M; Salort, E; Bonnet, M; Arimone, Y; Boudineau, M; Amieva, H; Barroso, B; Ouallet, J; Pachai, C; Galliaud, E; Petry, K; Dousset, V; Fabrigoule, C; Brochet, B

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To establish the frequency of cognitive impairment in a population based sample of patients with recently diagnosed relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), and to determine the relation between cognitive abnormalities and the extent of macroscopic and microscopic tissue damage revealed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetisation transfer (MT) imaging. Methods: 58 patients with RRMS consecutively diagnosed in the previous six months in Aquitaine and 70 healthy controls underwent a battery of neuropsychological tests. Lesion load and atrophy indices (brain parenchymal fraction and ventricular fraction) were measured on brain MRI. MT ratio (MTR) histograms were obtained from lesions, normal appearing white matter (NAWM), and normal appearing grey matter (NAGM). Gadolinium enhanced lesions were counted. Results: 44 RRMS patients could be individually matched with healthy controls for age, sex, and education. Patients performed worse in tests of verbal and spatial memory, attention, information processing speed, inhibition, and conceptualisation. Measures of attention and information processing speed were correlated with lesion load, mean NAWM MTR, and the peak location of the NAGM MTR histogram in the patients. Multivariate regression analysis showed that lesion load and mean NAWM MTR were among the MR indices that were most significantly associated with impairment of attention and information processing speed in these early RRMS cases. Conclusions: Cognitive impairment appears to be common in the early stages of RRMS, mainly affecting attention, information processing speed, memory, inhibition, and conceptualisation. The severity of these deficits reflects the extent of the lesions and the severity of tissue disorganisation outside lesions. PMID:15774439

  7. Brain structural abnormalities in patients with major depression with or without generalized anxiety disorder comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Canu, Elisa; Kosti?, Milutin; Agosta, Federica; Munjiza, Ana; Ferraro, Pilar M; Pesic, Danilo; Copetti, Massimiliano; Peljto, Amir; Tosevski, Dusica Lecic; Filippi, Massimo

    2015-05-01

    An overlap frequently occurs between major depression disorder (MDD) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Aim of this study was to assess cortical and white matter (WM) alterations in MDD patients with or without GAD comorbidity. Seventy-one MDD patients and 71 controls were recruited. All subjects underwent T1-weighted and diffusion tensor (DT)/MRI. MRI metrics of cortical thickness and WM integrity were obtained from atlas-based cortical regions and the interhemispheric and major long association WM tracts. Between-group MRI comparisons and multiple regressions with clinical scale scores were performed. Compared to controls, both MDD and MDD-GAD patients showed a cortical thinning of the middle frontal cortex bilaterally, left medial frontal gyrus and frontal pole. Compared to controls and MDD patients, MDD-GAD cases also showed a thinning of the right medial orbitofrontal and fusiform gyri, and left temporal pole and lateral occipital cortices. Compared to controls, MDD patients showed DT MRI abnormalities of the right parahippocampal tract and superior longitudinal fasciculus bilaterally, while no WM alterations were found in MDD-GAD. In all patients, brain abnormalities were related with symptom severity. MDD and MDD-GAD share a common pattern of cortical alterations located in the frontal regions. However, while both the cortex and WM integrity are affected in MDD, only the former is affected in MDD-GAD. These findings support the notion of MDD-GAD as a distinct clinical entity, providing insights into patient vulnerability for specific networks as well as into patient resilience factors reflected by the integrity of other cerebral circuits. PMID:25794861

  8. Neural Activity and the Development of Brain

    E-print Network

    Sur, Mriganka

    Neural Activity and the Development of Brain Circuits Carsten D Hohnke, Massachusetts Institute, Massachusetts, USA The development of highly interconnected circuits in the brain relies on patterns of neural into precise circuits. The presence of neural activity is particularly important during well-defined critical

  9. Incidence of Brain Abnormalities Detected on Preoperative Brain MR Imaging and Their Effect on the Outcome of Cochlear Implantation in Children with Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao-Quan; Wu, Fei-Yun; Hu, Hao; Su, Guo-Yi; Shen, Jie

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) increased gradually in the past decades. High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, as an important part of preimplantation evaluation for children with SNHL, could provide the detailed information about the inner ear, the vestibulocochlear nerve, and the brain, so as to select suitable candidate for cochlear implantation (CI). Brain abnormalities were not rare in the brain MR imaging of SNHL children; however, its influence on the effect of CI has not been clarified. After retrospectively analyzing the CT and MR imaging of 157 children with SNHL that accepted preoperative evaluation from June 2011 to February 2013 in our hospital and following them during a period of 14.09 ± 5.08 months, we found that the white matter change, which might be associated with the history of medical condition, was the most common brain abnormality. Usually CI was still beneficial to the children with brain abnormalities, and the short-term hearing improvement could be achieved. Further study with more patients and longer follow-up time was needed to confirm our results. PMID:25685142

  10. Incidence of Brain Abnormalities Detected on Preoperative Brain MR Imaging and Their Effect on the Outcome of Cochlear Implantation in Children with Sensorineural Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-Quan; Wu, Fei-Yun; Hu, Hao; Su, Guo-Yi; Shen, Jie

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) increased gradually in the past decades. High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, as an important part of preimplantation evaluation for children with SNHL, could provide the detailed information about the inner ear, the vestibulocochlear nerve, and the brain, so as to select suitable candidate for cochlear implantation (CI). Brain abnormalities were not rare in the brain MR imaging of SNHL children; however, its influence on the effect of CI has not been clarified. After retrospectively analyzing the CT and MR imaging of 157 children with SNHL that accepted preoperative evaluation from June 2011 to February 2013 in our hospital and following them during a period of 14.09 ± 5.08 months, we found that the white matter change, which might be associated with the history of medical condition, was the most common brain abnormality. Usually CI was still beneficial to the children with brain abnormalities, and the short-term hearing improvement could be achieved. Further study with more patients and longer follow-up time was needed to confirm our results. PMID:25685142

  11. Neurological and behavioral abnormalities, ventricular dilatation, altered cellular functions, inflammation, and neuronal injury in brains of mice due to common, persistent, parasitic infection

    PubMed Central

    Hermes, Gretchen; Ajioka, James W; Kelly, Krystyna A; Mui, Ernest; Roberts, Fiona; Kasza, Kristen; Mayr, Thomas; Kirisits, Michael J; Wollmann, Robert; Ferguson, David JP; Roberts, Craig W; Hwang, Jong-Hee; Trendler, Toria; Kennan, Richard P; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Reardon, Catherine; Hickey, William F; Chen, Lieping; McLeod, Rima

    2008-01-01

    Background Worldwide, approximately two billion people are chronically infected with Toxoplasma gondii with largely unknown consequences. Methods To better understand long-term effects and pathogenesis of this common, persistent brain infection, mice were infected at a time in human years equivalent to early to mid adulthood and studied 5–12 months later. Appearance, behavior, neurologic function and brain MRIs were studied. Additional analyses of pathogenesis included: correlation of brain weight and neurologic findings; histopathology focusing on brain regions; full genome microarrays; immunohistochemistry characterizing inflammatory cells; determination of presence of tachyzoites and bradyzoites; electron microscopy; and study of markers of inflammation in serum. Histopathology in genetically resistant mice and cytokine and NRAMP knockout mice, effects of inoculation of isolated parasites, and treatment with sulfadiazine or ?PD1 ligand were studied. Results Twelve months after infection, a time equivalent to middle to early elderly ages, mice had behavioral and neurological deficits, and brain MRIs showed mild to moderate ventricular dilatation. Lower brain weight correlated with greater magnitude of neurologic abnormalities and inflammation. Full genome microarrays of brains reflected inflammation causing neuronal damage (Gfap), effects on host cell protein processing (ubiquitin ligase), synapse remodeling (Complement 1q), and also increased expression of PD-1L (a ligand that allows persistent LCMV brain infection) and CD 36 (a fatty acid translocase and oxidized LDL receptor that mediates innate immune response to beta amyloid which is associated with pro-inflammation in Alzheimer's disease). Immunostaining detected no inflammation around intra-neuronal cysts, practically no free tachyzoites, and only rare bradyzoites. Nonetheless, there were perivascular, leptomeningeal inflammatory cells, particularly contiguous to the aqueduct of Sylvius and hippocampus, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and activated microglia in perivascular areas and brain parenchyma. Genetically resistant, chronically infected mice had substantially less inflammation. Conclusion In outbred mice, chronic, adult acquired T. gondii infection causes neurologic and behavioral abnormalities secondary to inflammation and loss of brain parenchyma. Perivascular inflammation is prominent particularly contiguous to the aqueduct of Sylvius and hippocampus. Even resistant mice have perivascular inflammation. This mouse model of chronic T. gondii infection raises questions of whether persistence of this parasite in brain can cause inflammation or neurodegeneration in genetically susceptible hosts. PMID:18947414

  12. Loss of neuronal integrity: a cause of hypometabolism in patients with traumatic brain injury without MRI abnormality in the chronic stage

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tohru Shiga; Katsunori Ikoma; Chietsugu Katoh; Hirotaka Isoyama; Tetsuaki Matsuyama; Yuji Kuge; Hiroyuki Kageyama; Tomoya Kohno; Satoshi Terae; Nagara Tamaki

    2006-01-01

    Purpose  Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes brain dysfunction in many patients. However, some patients have severe brain dysfunction\\u000a but display no abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). There have been some reports of hypometabolism even in such\\u000a patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between metabolic abnormality and loss of neuronal\\u000a integrity in TBI patients with some

  13. Are Structural Brain Abnormalities Associated With Suicidal Behavior In Patients With Psychotic Disorders?

    PubMed Central

    Giakoumatos, Christoforos I; Tandon, Neeraj; Shah, Jai; Mathew, Ian T; Brady, Roscoe O; Clementz, Brett A; Pearlson, Godfrey D; Thaker, Gunvant K; Tamminga, Carol A; Sweeney, John A; Keshavan, Matcheri S

    2014-01-01

    Suicide represents a major health problem world-wide. Nevertheless, the understanding of the neurobiological underpinnings of suicidal behavior remains far from complete. We compared suicide attempters to non-attempters, and high vs. low lethality attempters, to identify brain regions associated with suicidal behavior in patients with psychotic disorders. 489 individuals with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, or psychotic bipolar disorder I and 262 healthy controls enrolled in the B-SNIP study were studied. Groups were compared by attempt history and the highest medical lethality of previous suicide attempts. 97 patients had a history of a high lethality attempt, 51 of a low lethality attempt and 341 had no attempt history. Gray matter volumes were obtained from 3T structural MRI scans using FreeSurfer. ANCOVAs were used to examine differences between groups, followed by Hochberg multiple comparison correction. Compared to non-attempters, attempters had significantly less gray matter volume in bilateral inferior temporal and superior temporal cortices, left superior parietal, thalamus and supramarginal regions, right insula, superior frontal and rostral middle frontal regions. Among attempters, a history of high lethality attempts was associated with significantly smaller volumes in the left lingual gyrus and right cuneus. Compared to non-attempters, low lethality attempters had significant decreases in the left supramarginal gyrus, thalamus and the right insula. Structural brain abnormalities may distinguish suicide attempters from non-attempters and high from low lethality attempters among individuals with psychotic disorders. Regions in which differences were observed are part of neural circuitries that mediate inhibition, impulsivity and emotion, visceral, visual and auditory perception. PMID:23866739

  14. The restless brain: how intrinsic activity organizes brain function

    PubMed Central

    Raichle, Marcus E.

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally studies of brain function have focused on task-evoked responses. By their very nature such experiments tacitly encourage a reflexive view of brain function. While such an approach has been remarkably productive at all levels of neuroscience, it ignores the alternative possibility that brain functions are mainly intrinsic and ongoing, involving information processing for interpreting, responding to and predicting environmental demands. I suggest that the latter view best captures the essence of brain function, a position that accords well with the allocation of the brain's energy resources, its limited access to sensory information and a dynamic, intrinsic functional organization. The nature of this intrinsic activity, which exhibits a surprising level of organization with dimensions of both space and time, is revealed in the ongoing activity of the brain and its metabolism. As we look to the future, understanding the nature of this intrinsic activity will require integrating knowledge from cognitive and systems neuroscience with cellular and molecular neuroscience where ion channels, receptors, components of signal transduction and metabolic pathways are all in a constant state of flux. The reward for doing so will be a much better understanding of human behaviour in health and disease. PMID:25823869

  15. Abnormal hemodynamic response to forepaw stimulation in rat brain after cocaine injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Park, Kicheon; Choi, Jeonghun; Pan, Yingtian; Du, Congwu

    2015-03-01

    Simultaneous measurement of hemodynamics is of great importance to evaluate the brain functional changes induced by brain diseases such as drug addiction. Previously, we developed a multimodal-imaging platform (OFI) which combined laser speckle contrast imaging with multi-wavelength imaging to simultaneously characterize the changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF), oxygenated- and deoxygenated- hemoglobin (HbO and HbR) from animal brain. Recently, we upgraded our OFI system that enables detection of hemodynamic changes in response to forepaw electrical stimulation to study potential brain activity changes elicited by cocaine. The improvement includes 1) high sensitivity to detect the cortical response to single forepaw electrical stimulation; 2) high temporal resolution (i.e., 16Hz/channel) to resolve dynamic variations in drug-delivery study; 3) high spatial resolution to separate the stimulation-evoked hemodynamic changes in vascular compartments from those in tissue. The system was validated by imaging the hemodynamic responses to the forepaw-stimulations in the somatosensory cortex of cocaine-treated rats. The stimulations and acquisitions were conducted every 2min over 40min, i.e., from 10min before (baseline) to 30min after cocaine challenge. Our results show that the HbO response decreased first (at ~4min) followed by the decrease of HbR response (at ~6min) after cocaine, and both did not fully recovered for over 30min. Interestingly, while CBF decreased at 4min, it partially recovered at 18min after cocaine administration. The results indicate the heterogeneity of cocaine's effects on vasculature and tissue metabolism, demonstrating the unique capability of optical imaging for brain functional studies.

  16. Brain tissue- and region-specific abnormalities on volumetric MRI scans in 21 patients with Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a heterogeneous human disorder inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern, and characterized by the primary findings of obesity, polydactyly, hypogonadism, and learning and behavioural problems. BBS mouse models have a neuroanatomical phenotype consisting of third and lateral ventriculomegaly, thinning of the cerebral cortex, and reduction in the size of the corpus striatum and hippocampus. These abnormalities raise the question of whether humans with BBS have a characteristic morphologic brain phenotype. Further, although behavioral, developmental, neurological and motor defects have been noted in patients with BBS, to date, there are limited reports of brain findings in BBS. The present study represents the largest systematic evaluation for the presence of structural brain malformations and/or progressive changes, which may contribute to these functional problems. Methods A case-control study of 21 patients, most aged 13-35 years, except for 2 patients aged 4 and 8 years, who were diagnosed with BBS by clinical criteria and genetic analysis of known BBS genes, and were evaluated by qualitative and volumetric brain MRI scans. Healthy controls were matched 3:1 by age, sex and race. Statistical analysis was performed using SAS language with SAS STAT procedures. Results All 21 patients with BBS were found to have statistically significant region- and tissue-specific patterns of brain abnormalities. There was 1) normal intracranial volume; 2) reduced white matter in all regions of the brain, but most in the occipital region; 3) preserved gray matter volume, with increased cerebral cortex volume in only the occipital lobe; 4) reduced gray matter in the subcortical regions of the brain, including the caudate, putamen and thalamus, but not in the cerebellum; and 5) increased cerebrospinal fluid volume. Conclusions There are distinct and characteristic abnormalities in tissue- and region- specific volumes of the brain in patients with BBS, which parallel the findings, described in BBS mutant mouse models. Some of these brain abnormalities may be progressive and associated with the reported neurological and behavioral problems. Further future correlation of these MRI scan findings with detailed neurologic and neuropsychological exams together with genotype data will provide better understanding of the pathophysiology of BBS. PMID:21794117

  17. Abnormal fusiform activation during emotional-face encoding in children and adults with bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Adleman, Nancy E.; Kayser, Reilly R.; Olsavsky, Aviva K.; Bones, Brian L.; Muhrer, Eli J.; Fromm, Stephen J.; Pine, Daniel S.; Zarate, Carlos; Leibenluft, Ellen; Brotman, Melissa A.

    2013-01-01

    This fMRI study shows that, compared to healthy subjects, children and adults with bipolar disorder (BD) exhibit impaired memory for emotional faces and abnormal fusiform activation during encoding. Fusiform activation abnormalities in BD were correlated with mania severity and may therefore represent a trait and state BD biomarker. PMID:23541333

  18. Activities That Build the Young Child's Brain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gellens, Suzanne R.

    This book presents 350 classroom-tested activities for use with children to create an environment that will stimulate young children's brains. Designed to be used by families, classroom teachers, family childcare providers, or others caring for young children, the book includes information on current brain research and describes interest areas in…

  19. Dentate gyrus abnormalities in sudden unexplained death in infants: morphological marker of underlying brain vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Kinney, Hannah C; Cryan, Jane B; Haynes, Robin L; Paterson, David S; Haas, Elisabeth A; Mena, Othon J; Minter, Megan; Journey, Kelley W; Trachtenberg, Felicia L; Goldstein, Richard D; Armstrong, Dawna D

    2015-01-01

    Sudden unexplained death in infants, including the sudden infant death syndrome, is likely due to heterogeneous causes that involve different intrinsic vulnerabilities and/or environmental factors. Neuropathologic research focuses upon the role of brain regions, particularly the brainstem, that regulate or modulate autonomic and respiratory control during sleep or transitions to waking. The hippocampus is a key component of the forebrain-limbic network that modulates autonomic/respiratory control via brainstem connections, but its role in sudden infant death has received little attention. We tested the hypothesis that a well-established marker of hippocampal pathology in temporal lobe epilepsy-focal granule cell bilamination in the dentate, a variant of granule cell dispersion-is associated with sudden unexplained death in infants. In a blinded study of hippocampal morphology in 153 infants with sudden and unexpected death autopsied in the San Diego County medical examiner's office, deaths were classified as unexplained or explained based upon autopsy and scene investigation. Focal granule cell bilamination was present in 41.2% (47/114) of the unexplained group compared to 7.7% (3/39) of the explained (control) group (p < 0.001). It was associated with a cluster of other dentate developmental abnormalities that reflect defective neuronal proliferation, migration, and/or survival. Dentate lesions in a large subset of infants with sudden unexplained death may represent a developmental vulnerability that leads to autonomic/respiratory instability or autonomic seizures, and sleep-related death when the infants are challenged with homeostatic stressors. Importantly, these lesions can be recognized in microscopic sections prepared in current forensic practice. Future research is needed to determine the relationship between hippocampal and previously reported brainstem pathology in sudden infant death. PMID:25421424

  20. The hyperactive syndrome: Metanalysis of genetic alterations, pharmacological treatments and brain lesions which increase locomotor activity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Davide Viggiano

    2008-01-01

    The large number of transgenic mice realized thus far with different purposes allows addressing new questions, such as which animals, over the entire set of transgenic animals, show a specific behavioural abnormality. In the present study, we have used a metanalytical approach to organize a database of genetic modifications, brain lesions and pharmacological interventions that increase locomotor activity in animal

  1. Mechanism of gastrointestinal abnormal motor activity induced by cisplatin in conscious dogs

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Hiroyuki; Mochiki, Erito; Ohno, Tetsuro; Yanai, Mitsuhiro; Toyomasu, Yoshitaka; Ogata, Kyoichi; Tabe, Yuichi; Aihara, Ryuusuke; Nakabayashi, Toshihiro; Asao, Takayuki; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin; 5-HT) is involved in mediating abnormal motor activity in dogs after cisplatin administration. METHODS: After the dogs had been given a 2-wk recovery period, all of them were administered cisplatin, and the motor activity was recorded using strain gauge force transducers. Blood and intestinal fluid samples were collected to measure 5-HT for 24 h. To determine whether 5-HT in plasma or that in intestinal fluids is more closely related to abnormal motor activity we injected 5-HT into the bloodstream and the intestinal tract of the dogs. RESULTS: Cisplatin given intravenously produced abnormal motor activity that lasted up to 5 h. From 3 to 4 h after cisplatin administration, normal intact dogs exhibited retropropagation of motor activity accompanied by emesis. The concentration of 5-HT in plasma reached the peak at 4 h, and that in intestinal fluids reached the peak at 3 h. In normal intact dogs with resection of the vagus nerve that were administered kytril, cisplatin given intravenously did not produce abnormal motor activity. Intestinal serotonin administration did not produce abnormal motor activity, but intravenous serotonin administration did. CONCLUSION: After the intravenous administration of cisplatin, abnormal motor activity was produced in the involved vagus nerve and in the involved serotonergic neurons via another pathway. This study was the first to determine the relationship between 5-HT and emesis-induced motor activity. PMID:25400453

  2. Annual Research Review: Growth connectomics – the organization and reorganization of brain networks during normal and abnormal development

    PubMed Central

    Vértes, Petra E; Bullmore, Edward T

    2015-01-01

    Background We first give a brief introduction to graph theoretical analysis and its application to the study of brain network topology or connectomics. Within this framework, we review the existing empirical data on developmental changes in brain network organization across a range of experimental modalities (including structural and functional MRI, diffusion tensor imaging, magnetoencephalography and electroencephalography in humans). Synthesis We discuss preliminary evidence and current hypotheses for how the emergence of network properties correlates with concomitant cognitive and behavioural changes associated with development. We highlight some of the technical and conceptual challenges to be addressed by future developments in this rapidly moving field. Given the parallels previously discovered between neural systems across species and over a range of spatial scales, we also review some recent advances in developmental network studies at the cellular scale. We highlight the opportunities presented by such studies and how they may complement neuroimaging in advancing our understanding of brain development. Finally, we note that many brain and mind disorders are thought to be neurodevelopmental in origin and that charting the trajectory of brain network changes associated with healthy development also sets the stage for understanding abnormal network development. Conclusions We therefore briefly review the clinical relevance of network metrics as potential diagnostic markers and some recent efforts in computational modelling of brain networks which might contribute to a more mechanistic understanding of neurodevelopmental disorders in future. PMID:25441756

  3. Single-subject-based whole-brain MEG slow-wave imaging approach for detecting abnormality in patients with mild traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ming-Xiong; Nichols, Sharon; Baker, Dewleen G.; Robb, Ashley; Angeles, Annemarie; Yurgil, Kate A.; Drake, Angela; Levy, Michael; Song, Tao; McLay, Robert; Theilmann, Rebecca J.; Diwakar, Mithun; Risbrough, Victoria B.; Ji, Zhengwei; Huang, Charles W.; Chang, Douglas G.; Harrington, Deborah L.; Muzzatti, Laura; Canive, Jose M.; Christopher Edgar, J.; Chen, Yu-Han; Lee, Roland R.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of sustained impairment in military and civilian populations. However, mild TBI (mTBI) can be difficult to detect using conventional MRI or CT. Injured brain tissues in mTBI patients generate abnormal slow-waves (1–4 Hz) that can be measured and localized by resting-state magnetoencephalography (MEG). In this study, we develop a voxel-based whole-brain MEG slow-wave imaging approach for detecting abnormality in patients with mTBI on a single-subject basis. A normative database of resting-state MEG source magnitude images (1–4 Hz) from 79 healthy control subjects was established for all brain voxels. The high-resolution MEG source magnitude images were obtained by our recent Fast-VESTAL method. In 84 mTBI patients with persistent post-concussive symptoms (36 from blasts, and 48 from non-blast causes), our method detected abnormalities at the positive detection rates of 84.5%, 86.1%, and 83.3% for the combined (blast-induced plus with non-blast causes), blast, and non-blast mTBI groups, respectively. We found that prefrontal, posterior parietal, inferior temporal, hippocampus, and cerebella areas were particularly vulnerable to head trauma. The result also showed that MEG slow-wave generation in prefrontal areas positively correlated with personality change, trouble concentrating, affective lability, and depression symptoms. Discussion is provided regarding the neuronal mechanisms of MEG slow-wave generation due to deafferentation caused by axonal injury and/or blockages/limitations of cholinergic transmission in TBI. This study provides an effective way for using MEG slow-wave source imaging to localize affected areas and supports MEG as a tool for assisting the diagnosis of mTBI. PMID:25009772

  4. Nanotools for Neuroscience and Brain Activity Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Andrews, Anne M.; Boyden, Edward S.; Chun, Miyoung; Church, George M.; Deisseroth, Karl; Donoghue, John P.; Fraser, Scott E.; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Looger, Loren L.; Masmanidis, Sotiris; McEuen, Paul L.; Nurmikko, Arto V.; Park, Hongkun; Peterka, Darcy S.; Reid, Clay; Roukes, Michael L.; Scherer, Axel; Schnitzer, Mark; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Shepard, Kenneth L.; Tsao, Doris; Turrigiano, Gina; Weiss, Paul S.; Xu, Chris; Yuste, Rafael; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2013-01-01

    Neuroscience is at a crossroads. Great effort is being invested into deciphering specific neural interactions and circuits. At the same time, there exist few general theories or principles that explain brain function. We attribute this disparity, in part, to limitations in current methodologies. Traditional neurophysiological approaches record the activities of one neuron or a few neurons at a time. Neurochemical approaches focus on single neurotransmitters. Yet, there is an increasing realization that neural circuits operate at emergent levels, where the interactions between hundreds or thousands of neurons, utilizing multiple chemical transmitters, generate functional states. Brains function at the nanoscale, so tools to study brains must ultimately operate at this scale, as well. Nanoscience and nanotechnology are poised to provide a rich toolkit of novel methods to explore brain function by enabling simultaneous measurement and manipulation of activity of thousands or even millions of neurons. We and others refer to this goal as the Brain Activity Mapping Project. In this Nano Focus, we discuss how recent developments in nanoscale analysis tools and in the design and synthesis of nanomaterials have generated optical, electrical, and chemical methods that can readily be adapted for use in neuroscience. These approaches represent exciting areas of technical development and research. Moreover, unique opportunities exist for nanoscientists, nanotechnologists, and other physical scientists and engineers to contribute to tackling the challenging problems involved in understanding the fundamentals of brain function. PMID:23514423

  5. Characterization of Subtle Brain Abnormalities in a Mouse Model of Hedgehog Pathway Antagonist-Induced Cleft Lip and Palate

    PubMed Central

    Lipinski, Robert J.; Holloway, Hunter T.; O'Leary-Moore, Shonagh K.; Ament, Jacob J.; Pecevich, Stephen J.; Cofer, Gary P.; Budin, Francois; Everson, Joshua L.; Johnson, G. Allan; Sulik, Kathleen K.

    2014-01-01

    Subtle behavioral and cognitive deficits have been documented in patient cohorts with orofacial clefts (OFCs). Recent neuroimaging studies argue that these traits are associated with structural brain abnormalities but have been limited to adolescent and adult populations where brain plasticity during infancy and childhood may be a confounding factor. Here, we employed high resolution magnetic resonance microscopy to examine primary brain morphology in a mouse model of OFCs. Transient in utero exposure to the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway antagonist cyclopamine resulted in a spectrum of facial dysmorphology, including unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate, cleft of the secondary palate only, and a non-cleft phenotype marked by midfacial hypoplasia. Relative to controls, cyclopamine-exposed fetuses exhibited volumetric differences in several brain regions, including hypoplasia of the pituitary gland and olfactory bulbs, hyperplasia of the forebrain septal region, and expansion of the third ventricle. However, in affected fetuses the corpus callosum was intact and normal division of the forebrain was observed. This argues that temporally-specific Hh signaling perturbation can result in typical appearing OFCs in the absence of holoprosencephaly—a condition classically associated with Hh pathway inhibition and frequently co-occurring with OFCs. Supporting the premise that some forms of OFCs co-occur with subtle brain malformations, these results provide a possible ontological basis for traits identified in clinical populations. They also argue in favor of future investigations into genetic and/or environmental modulation of the Hh pathway in the etiopathogenesis of orofacial clefting. PMID:25047453

  6. Novel Molecular Pathways Elicited by Mutant FGFR2 May Account for Brain Abnormalities in Apert Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Erika; Fanganiello, Roberto D.; Sunaga, Daniele Y.; Zhou, Xueyan; Holmes, Gregory; Rocha, Katia M.; Alonso, Nivaldo; Matushita, Hamilton; Wang, Yingli; Jabs, Ethylin W.; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2013-01-01

    Apert syndrome (AS), the most severe form craniosynostosis, is characterized by premature fusion of coronal sutures. Approximately 70% of AS patients carry S252W gain-of-function mutation in FGFR2. Besides the cranial phenotype, brain dysmorphologies are present and are not seen in other FGFR2-asociated craniosynostosis, such as Crouzon syndrome (CS). Here, we hypothesized that S252W mutation leads not only to overstimulation of FGFR2 downstream pathway, but likewise induces novel pathological signaling. First, we profiled global gene expression of wild-type and S252W periosteal fibroblasts stimulated with FGF2 to activate FGFR2. The great majority (92%) of the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were divergent between each group of cell populations and they were regulated by different transcription factors. We than compared gene expression profiles between AS and CS cell populations and did not observe correlations. Therefore, we show for the first time that S252W mutation in FGFR2 causes a unique cell response to FGF2 stimulation. Since our gene expression results suggested that novel signaling elicited by mutant FGFR2 might be associated with central nervous system (CNS) development and maintenance, we next investigated if DEGs found in AS cells were also altered in the CNS of an AS mouse model. Strikingly, we validated Strc (stereocilin) in newborn Fgfr2S252W/+ mouse brain. Moreover, immunostaining experiments suggest a role for endothelial cells and cerebral vasculature in the establishment of characteristic CNS dysmorphologies in AS that has not been proposed by previous literature. Our approach thus led to the identification of new target genes directly or indirectly associated with FGFR2 which are contributing to the pathophysiology of AS. PMID:23593218

  7. Downstream targets of methyl CpG binding protein 2 and their abnormal expression in the frontal cortex of the human Rett syndrome brain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joanne H Gibson; Barry Slobedman; Harikrishnan KN; Sarah L Williamson; Dimitri Minchenko; Assam El-Osta; Joshua L Stern; John Christodoulou

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Rett Syndrome (RTT) brain displays regional histopathology and volumetric reduction, with frontal cortex showing such abnormalities, whereas the occipital cortex is relatively less affected. RESULTS: Using microarrays and quantitative PCR, the mRNA expression profiles of these two neuroanatomical regions were compared in postmortem brain tissue from RTT patients and normal controls. A subset of genes was differentially expressed

  8. Red-backed vole brain promotes highly efficient in vitro amplification of abnormal prion protein from macaque and human brains infected with variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease agent.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nemecek, Julie; Nag, Nabanita; Carlson, Christina M.; Schneider, Jay R.; Heisey, Dennis M.; Johnson, Christopher J.; Asher, David M.; Gregori, Luisa

    2013-01-01

    Rapid antemortem tests to detect individuals with transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) would contribute to public health. We investigated a technique known as protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) to amplify abnormal prion protein (PrPTSE) from highly diluted variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD)-infected human and macaque brain homogenates, seeking to improve the rapid detection of PrPTSE in tissues and blood. Macaque vCJD PrPTSE did not amplify using normal macaque brain homogenate as substrate (intraspecies PMCA). Next, we tested interspecies PMCA with normal brain homogenate of the southern red-backed vole (RBV), a close relative of the bank vole, seeded with macaque vCJD PrPTSE. The RBV has a natural polymorphism at residue 170 of the PrP-encoding gene (N/N, S/S, and S/N). We investigated the effect of this polymorphism on amplification of human and macaque vCJD PrPTSE. Meadow vole brain (170N/N PrP genotype) was also included in the panel of substrates tested. Both humans and macaques have the same 170S/S PrP genotype. Macaque PrPTSE was best amplified with RBV 170S/S brain, although 170N/N and 170S/N were also competent substrates, while meadow vole brain was a poor substrate. In contrast, human PrPTSE demonstrated a striking narrow selectivity for PMCA substrate and was successfully amplified only with RBV 170S/S brain. These observations suggest that macaque PrPTSE was more permissive than human PrPTSE in selecting the competent RBV substrate. RBV 170S/S brain was used to assess the sensitivity of PMCA with PrPTSE from brains of humans and macaques with vCJD. PrPTSE signals were reproducibly detected by Western blot in dilutions through 10-12 of vCJD-infected 10% brain homogenates. This is the first report showing PrPTSE from vCJD-infected human and macaque brains efficiently amplified with RBV brain as the substrate. Based on our estimates, PMCA showed a sensitivity that might be sufficient to detect PrPTSE in vCJD-infected human and macaque blood.

  9. Deletion in the N-terminal Half of Olfactomedin 1 Modifies Its Interaction with Synaptic Proteins and Causes Brain Dystrophy and Abnormal Behavior in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nakaya, Naoki; Sultana, Afia; Munasinghe, Jeeva; Cheng, Aiwu; Mattson, Mark P.; Tomarev, Stanislav I.

    2013-01-01

    Olfactomedin 1 (Olfm1) is a secreted glycoprotein that is preferentially expressed in neuronal tissues. Here we show that deletion of exons 4 and 5 from the Olfm1 gene, which encodes a 52 amino acid long region in the N-terminal part of the protein, increased neonatal death and reduced body weight of surviving homozygous mice. Magnetic resonance imaging analyses revealed reduced brain volume and attenuated size of white matter tracts such as the anterior commissure, corpus callosum, and optic nerve. Adult Olfm1 mutant mice demonstrated abnormal behavior in several tests including reduced marble digging, elevated plus maze test, nesting activity and latency on balance beam tests as compared with their wild-type littermates. The olfactory system was both structurally and functionally disturbed by the mutation in the Olfm1 gene as shown by functional magnetic resonance imaging analysis and a smell test. Deficiencies of the olfactory system may contribute to the neonatal death and loss of body weight of Olfm1 mutant. Shotgun proteomics revealed 59 candidate proteins that co-precipitated with wild-type or mutant Olfm1 proteins in postnatal day 1 brain. Olfm1-binding targets included GluR2, Cav2.1, Teneurin-4 and Kidins220. Modified interaction of Olfm1 with binding targets led to an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration and activation of ERK1/2, MEK1 and CaMKII in the hippocampus and olfactory bulb of Olfm1 mutant mice compared with their wild-type littermates. Excessive activation of the CaMKII and Ras-ERK pathways in the Olfm1 mutant olfactory bulb and hippocampus by elevated intracellular calcium may contribute to the abnormal behavior and olfactory activity of Olfm1 mutant mice. PMID:24095980

  10. Structural brain abnormalities in the frontostriatal system and cerebellum in pedophilia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Boris Schiffer; Thomas Peschel; Thomas Paul; Elke Gizewski; Michael Forsting; Norbert Leygraf; Manfred Schedlowski; Tillmann H. C. Krueger

    2007-01-01

    Even though previous neuropsychological studies and clinical case reports have suggested an association between pedophilia and frontocortical dysfunction, our knowledge about the neurobiological mechanisms underlying pedophilia is still fragmentary. Specifically, the brain morphology of such disorders has not yet been investigated using MR imaging techniques.Whole brain structural T1-weighted MR images from 18 pedophile patients (9 attracted to males, 9 attracted

  11. Cerebral abnormalities in cocaine abusers: Demonstration by SPECT perfusion brain scintigraphy. Work in progress

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. S. Tumeh; J. S. Nagel; R. J. English; M. Moore; B. L. Holman

    1990-01-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) perfusion brain scans with iodine-123 isopropyl iodoamphetamine (IMP) were obtained in 12 subjects who acknowledged using cocaine on a sporadic to a daily basis. The route of cocaine administration varied from nasal to intravenous. Concurrent abuse of other drugs was also reported. None of the patients were positive for human immunodeficiency virus. Brain scans

  12. Cardiac repolarization abnormalities and increased sympathetic activity in scleroderma.

    PubMed Central

    Ciftci, Orcun; Onat, Ahmet Mesut; Yavuz, Bunyamin; Akdogan, Ali; Aytemir, Kudret; Tokgozoglu, Lale; Sahiner, Levent; Deniz, Ali; Ureten, Kemal; Kizilca, Guler; Calguneri, Meral; Oto, Ali

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiac involvement in scleroderma is a poor prognostic sign and is usually underdiagnosed, particularly in asymptomatic patient. This paper focuses on QT dynamicity and heart rate variability (HRV) in patients with scleroderma and controls in an attempt to investigate the cardiac autonomic system and ventricular repolarization. METHODS: Sixty patients with scleroderma and 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls who had no cardiovascular risk factors were included in this study. All patients and the controls underwent a 24-hour holter recording as well as a transthoracic echocardiography. HRV and QT dynamicity parameters were calculated. RESULTS: In HRV analysis, autonomic balance was changed in favor of the sympathetic system in patients with diffuse scleroderma. In QT dynamicity analysis, QT/RR slopes were significantly steeper in patients with diffuse scleroderma compared to patients with limited scleroderma and controls (QTapex/RR: 0.24 +/- 0.16, 0.15 +/- 0.03, 0.14 +/- 0.03 respectively p < 0.001; QTend/RR: 0.26 +/- 0.17, 0.14 +/- 0.04, 0.13 +/- 0.05, respectively p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with diffuse scleroderma may have asymptomatic cardiac repolarization abnormalities and autonomic dysfunction. Our results may indicate that QT dynamicity and HRV can be useful noninvasive methods that may detect impaired state of autonomic balance and cardiac repolarization in patients with diffuse scleroderma. PMID:17393947

  13. Abnormal gate oxide thickening at active edge with SiN-linered shallow trench isolation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kong-Soo Lee; Jae-Jong Ban; Seung-Mok Shin; Ki-Hyun Hwang; Seok-Woo Nam; Hyeon-Deok Lee; Chang-Lyong Song

    2003-01-01

    Abnormal gate oxide thickening at active edge (GOTAE) has been investigated in dynamic random access memories (DRAMs) with SiN-lineared shallow trench isolation (STI). 1% of gaseous HCl, which is added during dry oxidation, plays a major role in inducing abnormal GOTAE by the mechanical interaction with thin SiN layers in STI. Other structural parameters, such as the thickness of trench

  14. Glucose Metabolism during Resting State Reveals Abnormal Brain Networks Organization in the Alzheimer’s Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Montes, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to study the abnormal patterns of brain glucose metabolism co-variations in Alzheimer disease (AD) and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) patients compared to Normal healthy controls (NC) using the Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database. The local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRgl) in a set of 90 structures belonging to the AAL atlas was obtained from Fluro-Deoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography data in resting state. It is assumed that brain regions whose CMRgl values are significantly correlated are functionally associated; therefore, when metabolism is altered in a single region, the alteration will affect the metabolism of other brain areas with which it interrelates. The glucose metabolism network (represented by the matrix of the CMRgl co-variations among all pairs of structures) was studied using the graph theory framework. The highest concurrent fluctuations in CMRgl were basically identified between homologous cortical regions in all groups. Significant differences in CMRgl co-variations in AD and MCI groups as compared to NC were found. The AD and MCI patients showed aberrant patterns in comparison to NC subjects, as detected by global and local network properties (global and local efficiency, clustering index, and others). MCI network’s attributes showed an intermediate position between NC and AD, corroborating it as a transitional stage from normal aging to Alzheimer disease. Our study is an attempt at exploring the complex association between glucose metabolism, CMRgl covariations and the attributes of the brain network organization in AD and MCI. PMID:23894356

  15. Abnormal structure of frontostriatal brain systems is associated with aspects of impulsivity and compulsivity in cocaine dependence.

    PubMed

    Ersche, Karen D; Barnes, Anna; Jones, P Simon; Morein-Zamir, Sharon; Robbins, Trevor W; Bullmore, Edward T

    2011-07-01

    A growing body of preclinical evidence indicates that addiction to cocaine is associated with neuroadaptive changes in frontostriatal brain systems. Human studies in cocaine-dependent individuals have shown alterations in brain structure, but it is less clear how these changes may be related to the clinical phenotype of cocaine dependence characterized by impulsive behaviours and compulsive drug-taking. Here we compared self-report, behavioural and structural magnetic resonance imaging data on a relatively large sample of cocaine-dependent individuals (n?=?60) with data on healthy volunteers (n?=?60); and we investigated the relationships between grey matter volume variation, duration of cocaine use, and measures of impulsivity and compulsivity in the cocaine-dependent group. Cocaine dependence was associated with an extensive system of abnormally decreased grey matter volume in orbitofrontal, cingulate, insular, temporoparietal and cerebellar cortex, and with a more localized increase in grey matter volume in the basal ganglia. Greater duration of cocaine dependence was correlated with greater grey matter volume reduction in orbitofrontal, cingulate and insular cortex. Greater impairment of attentional control was associated with reduced volume in insular cortex and increased volume of caudate nucleus. Greater compulsivity of drug use was associated with reduced volume in orbitofrontal cortex. Cocaine-dependent individuals had abnormal structure of corticostriatal systems, and variability in the extent of anatomical changes in orbitofrontal, insular and striatal structures was related to individual differences in duration of dependence, inattention and compulsivity of cocaine consumption. PMID:21690575

  16. Modulation of Brain Activity during Phonological Familiarization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majerus, S.; Van der Linden, M.; Collette, F.; Laureys, S.; Poncelet, M.; Degueldre, C.; Delfiore, G.; Luxen, A.; Salmon, E.

    2005-01-01

    We measured brain activity in 12 adults for the repetition of auditorily presented words and nonwords, before and after repeated exposure to their phonological form. The nonword phoneme combinations were either of high (HF) or low (LF) phonotactic frequency. After familiarization, we observed, for both word and nonword conditions, decreased…

  17. Brain Activity with Reading Sentences and Emoticons

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Masahide Yuasa; Keiichi Saito; Naoki Mukawa

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a person's brain activity when he\\/she sees an emoticon at the end of a sentence. An emoticon consists of some characters that resemble the human face and expresses a sender's emotion. With the help of a computer network, we use e-mail, messenger, avatars and so on, in order to convey what we wish to, to

  18. Visualization and Mapping of Anatomic Abnormalities Using a Probabilistic Brain Atlas Based on Random Fluid Transformations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul M. Thompson; Arthur W. Toga

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the design, implementation and preliminary results of a technique for creating a comprehensive probabilistic\\u000a atlas of the human brain based on high-dimensional fluid transformations. The goal of the atlas is to detect and quantify\\u000a subtle and distributed patterns of deviation from normal anatomy, in a 3D brain image from any given subject. The algorithm\\u000a analyzes a reference

  19. Social reinforcement can regulate localized brain activity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Krystyna A. MathiakYury; Yury Koush; Miriam Dyck; Tilman J. Gaber; Eliza Alawi; Florian D. Zepf; Mikhail Zvyagintsev; Klaus Mathiak

    2010-01-01

    Social learning is essential for adaptive behavior in humans. Neurofeedback based on functional magnetic resonance imaging\\u000a (fMRI) trains control over localized brain activity. It can disentangle learning processes at the neural level and thus investigate\\u000a the mechanisms of operant conditioning with explicit social reinforcers. In a pilot study, a computer-generated face provided\\u000a a positive feedback (smiling) when activity in the

  20. Electromagnetic imaging of dynamic brain activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.; Leahy, R. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Lewis, P.; Lewine, J.; George, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Singh, M. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1991-12-31

    Neural activity in the brain produces weak dynamic electromagnetic fields that can be measured by an array of sensors. Using a spatio-temporal modeling framework, we have developed a new approach to localization of multiple neural sources. This approach is based on the MUSIC algorithm originally developed for estimating the direction of arrival of signals impinging on a sensor array. We present applications of this technique to magnetic field measurements of a phantom and of a human evoked somatosensory response. The results of the somatosensory localization are mapped onto the brain anatomy obtained from magnetic resonance images.

  1. Electromagnetic imaging of dynamic brain activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.; Leahy, R. (University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Lewis, P.; Lewine, J.; George, J. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Singh, M. (University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology)

    1991-01-01

    Neural activity in the brain produces weak dynamic electromagnetic fields that can be measured by an array of sensors. Using a spatio-temporal modeling framework, we have developed a new approach to localization of multiple neural sources. This approach is based on the MUSIC algorithm originally developed for estimating the direction of arrival of signals impinging on a sensor array. We present applications of this technique to magnetic field measurements of a phantom and of a human evoked somatosensory response. The results of the somatosensory localization are mapped onto the brain anatomy obtained from magnetic resonance images.

  2. Divergent structural brain abnormalities between different genetic subtypes of children with Prader–Willi syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Prader–Willi syndrome (PWS) is a complex neurogenetic disorder with symptoms that indicate not only hypothalamic, but also a global, central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction. However, little is known about developmental differences in brain structure in children with PWS. Thus, our aim was to investigate global brain morphology in children with PWS, including the comparison between different genetic subtypes of PWS. In addition, we performed exploratory cortical and subcortical focal analyses. Methods High resolution structural magnetic resonance images were acquired in 20 children with genetically confirmed PWS (11 children carrying a deletion (DEL), 9 children with maternal uniparental disomy (mUPD)), and compared with 11 age- and gender-matched typically developing siblings as controls. Brain morphology measures were obtained using the FreeSurfer software suite. Results Both children with DEL and mUPD showed smaller brainstem volume, and a trend towards smaller cortical surface area and white matter volume. Children with mUPD had enlarged lateral ventricles and larger cortical cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volume. Further, a trend towards increased cortical thickness was found in children with mUPD. Children with DEL had a smaller cerebellum, and smaller cortical and subcortical grey matter volumes. Focal analyses revealed smaller white matter volumes in left superior and bilateral inferior frontal gyri, right cingulate cortex, and bilateral precuneus areas associated with the default mode network (DMN) in children with mUPD. Conclusions Children with PWS show signs of impaired brain growth. Those with mUPD show signs of early brain atrophy. In contrast, children with DEL show signs of fundamentally arrested, although not deviant brain development and presented few signs of cortical atrophy. Our results of global brain measurements suggest divergent neurodevelopmental patterns in children with DEL and mUPD. PMID:24144356

  3. Classification of whole brain fMRI activation patterns

    E-print Network

    Balc?, Serdar Kemal

    2008-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is an imaging technology which is primarily used to perform brain activation studies by measuring neural activity in the brain. It is an interesting question whether patterns ...

  4. Do Exercise and Physical Activity Protect the Brain?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Do Exercise and Physical Activity Protect the Brain? Exercise and physical activity have many benefits. Studies show ... what about brain health? Some studies suggest that exercise also may play a role in reducing risk ...

  5. Comparison of nine tractography algorithms for detecting abnormal structural brain networks in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Liang; Zhou, Jiayu; Wang, Yalin; Jin, Yan; Jahanshad, Neda; Prasad, Gautam; Nir, Talia M.; Leonardo, Cassandra D.; Ye, Jieping; Thompson, Paul M.; for the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) involves a gradual breakdown of brain connectivity, and network analyses offer a promising new approach to track and understand disease progression. Even so, our ability to detect degenerative changes in brain networks depends on the methods used. Here we compared several tractography and feature extraction methods to see which ones gave best diagnostic classification for 202 people with AD, mild cognitive impairment or normal cognition, scanned with 41-gradient diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging as part of the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) project. We computed brain networks based on whole brain tractography with nine different methods – four of them tensor-based deterministic (FACT, RK2, SL, and TL), two orientation distribution function (ODF)-based deterministic (FACT, RK2), two ODF-based probabilistic approaches (Hough and PICo), and one “ball-and-stick” approach (Probtrackx). Brain networks derived from different tractography algorithms did not differ in terms of classification performance on ADNI, but performing principal components analysis on networks helped classification in some cases. Small differences may still be detectable in a truly vast cohort, but these experiments help assess the relative advantages of different tractography algorithms, and different post-processing choices, when used for classification. PMID:25926791

  6. Words in the brain: lexical determinants of word-induced brain activity

    E-print Network

    Coulson, Seana

    Words in the brain: lexical determinants of word-induced brain activity Lee Osterhout*, Mark Allen Abstract Many studies have shown that open- and closed-class words elicit different patterns of brain. Introduction Is the brain response to words determined primarily by their linguistic functions

  7. Temporal organization of ongoing brain activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardi, F.; de Arcangelis, L.

    2014-10-01

    Ongoing brain activity results from the mutual interaction of hundred billions non-linear units and represents a significant part of the overall brain activity. Although its complex dynamics has been widely investigated, a large number of fundamental questions are still open, many of them concerning its temporal structure. Why does a certain population of neurons fires synchronously? Are these synchronized bursts following each other randomly or are they correlated according to some organizing principle? Far from addressing the fundamental problem of its functions, in the present article we focus on the problem of temporal correlations of ongoing cortical activity. We first overview the major features of its temporal structure and review recent experimental results, with particular emphasis on alternative approaches inspired in the theory of stochastic processes; then we introduce a neuronal network model inspired in self organized criticality and compare numerical results with experimental findings.

  8. Microstructural abnormalities of the brain white matter in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lizhou; Huang, Xiaoqi; Lei, Du; He, Ning; Hu, Xinyu; Chen, Ying; Li, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Jinbo; Guo, Lanting; Kemp, Graham J.; Gong, Qiyong

    2015-01-01

    Background Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is an early-onset neurodevelopmental disorder with multiple behavioural problems and executive dysfunctions for which neuroimaging studies have reported a variety of abnormalities, with inconsistencies partly owing to confounding by medication and concurrent psychiatric disease. We aimed to investigate the microstructural abnormalities of white matter in unmedicated children and adolescents with pure ADHD and to explore the association between these abnormalities and behavioural symptoms and executive functions. Methods We assessed children and adolescents with ADHD and healthy controls using psychiatric interviews. Behavioural problems were rated using the revised Conners’ Parent Rating Scale, and executive functions were measured using the Stroop Colour-Word Test and the Wisconsin Card Sorting test. We acquired diffusion tensor imaging data using a 3 T MRI system, and we compared diffusion parameters, including fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean, axial and radial diffusivities, between the 2 groups. Results Thirty-three children and adolescents with ADHD and 35 healthy controls were included in our study. In patients compared with controls, FA was increased in the left posterior cingulum bundle as a result of both increased axial diffusivity and decreased radial diffusivity. In addition, the averaged FA of the cluster in this region correlated with behavioural measures as well as executive function in patients with ADHD. Limitations This study was limited by its cross-sectional design and small sample size. The cluster size of the significant result was small. Conclusion Our findings suggest that white matter abnormalities within the limbic network could be part of the neural underpinning of behavioural problems and executive dysfunction in patients with ADHD. PMID:25853285

  9. Quantitative observation and study on rhythmic abnormalities of activities in animals prior to earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Chungao; Jiang, Jinchang

    1992-11-01

    In this paper, the normal daily activities and abnormal activities related to earthquake premonitory information are given by a quantitative observation and analysis of activities in the sparrow (SR, Passer montanus), budgerigar (BG, Melopsittacus undulatus) and rat (RT, Rattus norvegicus). The results show that the quantitative observation of habitual abnormalities in animals may provide some cues for the short-term earthquake prediction. The normal activity rhythms for the SR and BG are similar, and both present M mode. The high activities occurs during 07h 10h and 15h 16h, respectively, the low activities occurs during 12h 13h, and at night both birds are basically silent. For the RT, the normal rhythmic activity has the middle magnitude during 07h 10h and 17h 18h, the low and high magnitudes occur during 11h 16h and from 19h to 06h at the next day. For the SR, BG and RT, observable abnormal changes of the normal activity rhythm were found before earthquakes. The night activities of the SR and BG were increased noticeably. For the RT the activities during the low magnitude of activities at the day time were also increased. They both are about 300 times greater than the normal activity value. Moreover, the total activity values per day were increased, and were about 2 times of the normal value. The x 2-test shows that the abnormalities of the daily activity rhythm and following increase of the daily activity events are significantly correlated with earthquakes of magnitude over 4.3 in Tangshan seismic area within the region of 200 km distance from the observation station.

  10. 3D PATTERN OF BRAIN ABNORMALITIES IN WILLIAMS SYNDROME VISUALIZED USING TENSOR-BASED MORPHOMETRY

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Ming-Chang; Reiss, Allan L.; Lee, Agatha D.; Bellugi, Ursula; Galaburda, Albert M.; Korenberg, Julie R.; Mills, Debra L.; Toga, Arthur W.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with deletion of ~20 contiguous genes in chromosome band 7q11.23. Individuals with WS exhibit mild to moderate mental retardation, but are relatively more proficient in specific language and musical abilities. We used tensor-based morphometry (TBM) to visualize the complex pattern of gray/white matter reductions in WS, based on fluid registration of structural brain images. Methods 3D T1-weighted brain MRIs of 41 WS subjects (age: 29.2±9.2SD years; 23F/18M) and 39 age-matched healthy controls (age: 27.5±7.4 years; 23F/16M) were fluidly registered to a minimum deformation target. Fine-scale volumetric differences were mapped between diagnostic groups. Local regions were identified where regional structure volumes were associated with diagnosis, and with intelligence quotient (IQ) scores. Brain asymmetry was also mapped and compared between diagnostic groups. Results WS subjects exhibited widely distributed brain volume reductions (~10–15% reduction; P < 0.0002, permutation test). After adjusting for total brain volume, the frontal lobes, anterior cingulate, superior temporal gyrus, amygdala, fusiform gyrus and cerebellum were found to be relatively preserved in WS, but parietal and occipital lobes, thalamus and basal ganglia, and midbrain were disproportionally decreased in volume (P < 0.0002). These regional volumes also correlated positively with performance IQ in adult WS subjects (age ? 30 years, P = 0.038). Conclusion TBM facilitates 3D visualization of brain volume reductions in WS. Reduced parietal/occipital volumes may be associated with visuospatial deficits in WS. By contrast, frontal lobes, amygdala, and cingulate gyrus are relatively preserved or even enlarged, consistent with unusual affect regulation and language production in WS. PMID:17512756

  11. Targeted training modifies oscillatory brain activity in schizophrenia patients

    PubMed Central

    Popov, Tzvetan G.; Carolus, Almut; Schubring, David; Popova, Petia; Miller, Gregory A.; Rockstroh, Brigitte S.

    2015-01-01

    Effects of both domain-specific and broader cognitive remediation protocols have been reported for neural activity and overt performance in schizophrenia (SZ). Progress is limited by insufficient knowledge of relevant neural mechanisms. Addressing neuronal signal resolution in the auditory system as a mechanism contributing to cognitive function and dysfunction in schizophrenia, the present study compared effects of two neuroplasticity-based training protocols targeting auditory–verbal or facial affect discrimination accuracy and a standard rehabilitation protocol on magnetoencephalographic (MEG) oscillatory brain activity in an auditory paired-click task. SZ were randomly assigned to either 20 daily 1-hour sessions over 4 weeks of auditory–verbal training (N = 19), similarly intense facial affect discrimination training (N = 19), or 4 weeks of treatment as usual (TAU, N = 19). Pre-training, the 57 SZ showed smaller click-induced posterior alpha power modulation than did 28 healthy comparison participants, replicating Popov et al. (2011b). Abnormally small alpha decrease 300–800 ms around S2 improved more after targeted auditory–verbal training than after facial affect training or TAU. The improvement in oscillatory brain dynamics with training correlated with improvement on a measure of verbal learning. Results replicate previously reported effects of neuroplasticity-based psychological training on oscillatory correlates of auditory stimulus differentiation, encoding, and updating and indicate specificity of cortical training effects.

  12. Using Brain Electrical Activity Mapping to Diagnose Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torello, Michael, W.; Duffy, Frank H.

    1985-01-01

    Cognitive neuroscience assumes that measurement of brain electrical activity should relate to cognition. Brain Electrical Activity Mapping (BEAM), a non-invasive technique, is used to record changes in activity from one brain area to another and is 80 to 90 percent successful in classifying subjects as dyslexic or normal. (MT)

  13. Relationship of clinical and cognitive variables with brain morphometric abnormalities in Alzheimer's disease: a voxel based morphometric study using 3-tesla MRI.

    PubMed

    Bagepally, Bhavani S; John, John P; Varghese, Mathew; Halahalli, Harsha N; Kota, Lakshminarayanan; Sivakumar, Palanimuthu T; Bharath, Srikala; Jain, Sanjeev

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with widespread structural and functional brain alterations. The current study examined the gray matter (GM) voxel based morphometric (VBM) correlates of cognitive and clinical severity scores in patients with AD. The study included 34 patients with AD according to NINCDS/ADRDA AD criteria and 28 matched elderly controls. All subjects were clinically evaluated using Hindi Mental Status Examination (HMSE), Everyday Abilities Scale for India (EASI) and the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) scale. The structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data were acquired using a 3 Tesla MRI scanner and VBM analysis was performed using VBM5.1 toolbox. The patients with AD had significantly lower GM volume, white matter volume and total brain volume as compared to controls. The HMSE scores were positively correlated (p=0.009) and EASI (p=0.04) & CDR (p=0.0004) were negatively correlated with the total GM volumes in patients with AD. The VBM analysis revealed diffuse GM atrophy in patients with AD. Frontal& temporal GM volumes were positively correlated with the HMSE scores. Thus the results of the study replicate the previous observations of generalized GM atrophy, in an Indian sample with AD. The cognitive decline, clinical dementia severity and impairment in activities of daily living were correlated whole brain GM and WM volumes as well as with specific brain regional atrophy in AD. However further studies with larger samples & with more detailed cognitive evaluation are required for confirmation & validation of the relationship between regional morphometric abnormalities and cognitive deficits in AD. PMID:24124629

  14. Abnormal Functional MRI BOLD Contrast in the Vegetative State after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heelmann, Volker

    2010-01-01

    For the rehabilitation process, the treatment of patients surviving brain injury in a vegetative state is still a serious challenge. The aim of this study was to investigate patients exhibiting severely disturbed consciousness using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Five cases of posttraumatic vegetative state and one with minimal…

  15. Gait Variability Is Associated with Subclinical Brain Vascular Abnormalities in High-Functioning Older Adults

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Caterina Rosano; Jennifer Brach; Stephanie Studenski; W. T. Longstreth Jr.; Anne B. Newman

    2007-01-01

    Background: Gait variability is an index of how much gait parameters, such as step length, change from one step to the next. Gait variability increases with age and in individuals affected by cortical and subcortical neurodegenerative conditions, and it is associated with falls and incident mobility disability. The brain anatomical correlates of gait variability have not been studied in high-functioning

  16. Air pollution, cognitive deficits and brain abnormalities: A pilot study with children and dogs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lilian Calderón-Garcidueñas; Antonieta Mora-Tiscareño; Esperanza Ontiveros; Gilberto Gómez-Garza; Gerardo Barragán-Mejía; James Broadway; Susan Chapman; Gildardo Valencia-Salazar; Valerie Jewells; Robert R. Maronpot; Carlos Henríquez-Roldán; Beatriz Pérez-Guillé; Ricardo Torres-Jardón; Lou Herrit; Diane Brooks; Norma Osnaya-Brizuela; Maria E. Monroy; Angelica González-Maciel; Rafael Reynoso-Robles; Rafael Villarreal-Calderon; Anna C Solt; Randall W. Engle

    2008-01-01

    Exposure to air pollution is associated with neuroinflammation in healthy children and dogs in Mexico City. Comparative studies were carried out in healthy children and young dogs similarly exposed to ambient pollution in Mexico City. Children from Mexico City (n: 55) and a low polluted city (n:18) underwent psychometric testing and brain magnetic resonance imaging MRI. Seven healthy young dogs

  17. Normal and abnormal fetal brain development during the third trimester as demonstrated by neurosonography

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Malinger; D. Lev; T. Lerman-Sagie

    2006-01-01

    The multiplanar neurosonographic examination of the fetus enables superb visualization of brain anatomy during pregnancy. The examination may be performed using a transvaginal or a transfundal approach and it is indicated in patients at high risk for CNS anomalies or in those with a suspicious finding during a routine examination. The purpose of this paper is to present a description

  18. Whole Brain Approaches for Identification of Microstructural Abnormalities in Individual Patients: Comparison of Techniques Applied to Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Namhee; Branch, Craig A.; Kim, Mimi; Lipton, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Group-wise analyses of DTI in mTBI have demonstrated evidence of traumatic axonal injury (TAI), associated with adverse clinical outcomes. Although mTBI is likely to have a unique spatial pattern in each patient, group analyses implicitly assume that location of injury will be the same across patients. The purpose of this study was to optimize and validate a procedure for analysis of DTI images acquired in individual patients, which could detect inter-individual differences and be applied in the clinical setting, where patients must be assessed as individuals. Materials and Methods After informed consent and in compliance with HIPAA, 34 mTBI patients and 42 normal subjects underwent 3.0 Tesla DTI. Four voxelwise assessment methods (standard Z-score, “one vs. many” t-test, Family-Wise Error Rate control using pseudo t-distribution, EZ-MAP) for use in individual patients, were applied to each patient’s fractional anisotropy (FA) maps and tested for its ability to discriminate patients from controls. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analyses were used to define optimal thresholds (voxel-level significance and spatial extent) for reliable and robust detection of mTBI pathology. Results ROC analyses showed EZ-MAP (specificity 71%, sensitivity 71%), “one vs. many” t-test and standard Z-score (sensitivity 65%, specificity 76% for both methods) resulted in a significant area under the curve (AUC) score for discriminating mTBI patients from controls in terms of the total number of abnormal white matter voxels detected while the FWER test was not significant. EZ-MAP is demonstrated to be robust to assumptions of Gaussian behavior and may serve as an alternative to methods that require strict Gaussian assumptions. Conclusion EZ-MAP provides a robust approach for delineation of regional abnormal anisotropy in individual mTBI patients. PMID:23555665

  19. Apathy is associated with white matter abnormalities in anterior, medial brain regions in persons with HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Kamat, Rujvi; Brown, Gregory G.; Bolden, Khalima; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Archibald, Sarah; Marcotte, Thomas D.; Letendre, Scott L.; Ellis, Ronald J.; Woods, Steven Paul; Grant, Igor; Heaton, Robert K.

    2015-01-01

    Apathy is a relatively common psychiatric syndrome in HIV infection, but little is known about its neural correlates. In the present study, we examined the associations between apathy and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) indices in key frontal white matter regions in the thalamocorticostriatal circuit that has been implicated in the expression of apathy. Nineteen participants with HIV infection and 19 demographically comparable seronegative comparison subjects completed the Apathy subscale of the Frontal Systems Behavioral Scale as a part of a comprehensive neuropsychiatric research evaluation. When compared to the seronegative participants, the HIV+ group had significantly more frontal white matter abnormalities. Within HIV+ persons, and as predicted, higher ratings of apathy were associated with greater white matter alterations in the anterior corona radiata, genu, and orbital medial prefrontal cortex. The associations between white matter alterations and apathy were independent of depression and were stronger among participants with lower current CD4 counts. All told, these findings indicate that apathy is independently associated with white matter abnormalities in anterior, medial brain regions in persons infected with HIV, particularly in the setting of lower current immune functioning, which may have implications for antiretroviral therapy. PMID:25275424

  20. Functional abnormalities in normally appearing athletes following mild traumatic brain injury: a functional MRI study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Semyon M. Slobounov; K. Zhang; D. Pennell; W. Ray; B. Johnson; W. Sebastianelli

    2010-01-01

    Memory problems are one of the most common symptoms of sport-related mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI), known as concussion.\\u000a Surprisingly, little research has examined spatial memory in concussed athletes given its importance in athletic environments.\\u000a Here, we combine functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with a virtual reality (VR) paradigm designed to investigate\\u000a the possibility of residual functional deficits in recently

  1. Relation between abnormal patterns of muscle activation and response to common peroneal nerve stimulation in hemiplegia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J H Burridge; D L McLellan

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVETo investigate the relation between response to common peroneal nerve stimulation, timed to the swing phase of walking, and abnormal ankle movement and muscle activation patterns.METHODEighteen patients who took part had a drop foot and had had a stroke at least 6 months before the study Twelve age matched normal subjects were also studied. Response to stimulation was measured by

  2. Abnormal postural reflex activity and voice usage deviations in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Keesee, P D

    1976-12-01

    A relationship is considered between abnormal postural reflex activity and its effect on vocal processes in infants and very young children having cerebral palsy. Neurodevelopmental treatment concepts are interpreted as they may apply to evaluation and intiial management of hypertonic children who exhibit voice usage deviations. Interdisciplinary team function in the areas of physical therapy, occupational therapy, and speech pathology is suggested. PMID:996091

  3. Decreased calcium-activated potassium channels by hypoxia causes abnormal firing in the spontaneous firing medial vestibular nuclei neurons.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hong; Zhang, Yu-Qin; Pan, Xin-Liang; Wu, Shu-Hui; Chen, Xiang; Wang, Jie; Liu, Hua; Qian, Xiao-Zhong; Liu, Zhi-Guo; Liu, Lie-Ju

    2014-08-31

    Vertebrobasilar insufficiency (VBI) presents complex varied clinical symptoms, including vertigo and hearing loss. Little is known, however, about how Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel attributes to the medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) neural activity in VBI. To address this issue, we performed whole-cell patch clamp and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to examine the effects of hypoxia on neural activity and the changes of the large conductance Ca(2+) activated K(+) channels (BKCa channels) in the MVN neurons in brain slices of male C57BL/6 mice. Brief hypoxic stimuli of the brain slices containing MVN were administrated by switching the normoxic artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF) equilibrated with 21 % O2/5 % CO2 to hypoxic ACSF equilibrated with 5 % O2/5 % CO2 (balance N2). 3-min hypoxia caused a depolarization in the resting membrane potential (RM) in 8/11 non-spontaneous firing MVN neurons. 60/72 spontaneous firing MVN neurons showed a dramatic increase in firing frequency and a depolarization in the RM following brief hypoxia. The amplitude of the afterhyperpolarization (AHPA) was significantly decreased in both type A and type B spontaneous firing MVN neurons. Hypoxia-induced firing response was alleviated by pretreatment with NS1619, a selective BKCa activator. Furthermore, brief hypoxia caused a decrease in the amplitude of iberiotoxin-sensitive outward currents and mRNA level of BKCa in MVN neurons. These results suggest that BKCa channels protect against abnormal MVN neuronal activity induced by hypoxia, and might be a key target for treatment of vertigo and hearing loss in VBI. PMID:25173490

  4. Detection, visualization and animation of abnormal anatomic structure with a deformable probabilistic brain atlas based on random vector field transformations.

    PubMed

    Thompson, P M; Toga, A W

    1997-09-01

    This paper describes the design, implementation and preliminary results of a technique for creating a comprehensive probabilistic atlas of the human brain based on high-dimensional vector field transformations. The goal of the atlas is to detect and quantify distributed patterns of deviation from normal anatomy, in a 3-D brain image from any given subject. The algorithm analyzes a reference population of normal scans and automatically generates color-coded probability maps of the anatomy of new subjects. Given a 3-D brain image of a new subject, the algorithm calculates a set of high-dimensional volumetric maps (with typically 384(2) x 256 x 3 approximately 10(8) degrees of freedom) elastically deforming this scan into structural correspondence with other scans, selected one by one from an anatomic image database. The family of volumetric warps thus constructed encodes statistical properties and directional biases of local anatomical variation throughout the architecture of the brain. A probability space of random transformations, based on the theory of anisotropic Gaussian random fields, is then developed to reflect the observed variability in stereotaxic space of the points whose correspondences are found by the warping algorithm. A complete system of 384(2) x 256 probability density functions is computed, yielding confidence limits in stereotaxic space for the location of every point represented in the 3-D image lattice of the new subject's brain. Color-coded probability maps are generated, densely defined throughout the anatomy of the new subject. These indicate locally the probability of each anatomic point being unusually situated, given the distributions of corresponding points in the scans of normal subjects. 3-D MRI and high-resolution cryosection volumes are analyzed from subjects with metastatic tumors and Alzheimer's disease. Gradual variations and continuous deformations of the underlying anatomy are simulated and their dynamic effects on regional probability maps are animated in video format (on the accompanying CD-ROM). Applications of the deformable probabilistic atlas include the transfer of multi-subject 3-D functional, vascular and histologic maps onto a single anatomic template, the mapping of 3-D atlases onto the scans of new subjects, and the rapid detection, quantification and mapping of local shape changes in 3-D medical images in disease and during normal or abnormal growth and development. PMID:9873911

  5. Regulation of brain aromatase activity in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Roselli, C.E.; Ellinwood, W.E.; Resko, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    The distribution and regulation of aromatase activity in the adult rat brain with a sensitive in vitro assay that measures the amount of /sup 3/H/sub 2/O formed during the conversion of (1 beta-/sup 3/H)androstenedione to estrone. The rate of aromatase activity in the hypothalamus-preoptic area (HPOA) was linear with time up to 1 h, and with tissue concentrations up to 5 mgeq/200 microliters incubation mixture. The enzyme demonstrated a pH optimum of 7.4 and an apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) of 0.04 microns. The greatest amount of aromatase activity was found in amygdala and HPOA from intact male rats. The hippocampus, midbrain tegmentum, cerebral cortex, cerebellum, and anterior pituitary all contained negligible enzymatic activity. Castration produced a significant decrease in aromatase activity in the HPOA, but not in the amygdala or cerebral cortex. The HPOAs of male rats contained significantly greater aromatase activity than the HPOAs of female rats. In females, this enzyme activity did not change during the estrous cycle or after ovariectomy. Administration of testosterone to gonadectomized male and female rats significantly enhanced HPOA aromatase activities to levels approximating those found in HPOA from intact males. Therefore, the results suggest that testosterone, or one of its metabolites, is a major steroidal regulator of HPOA aromatase activity in rats.

  6. Abnormal metabolic network activity in Parkinson’s disease: test–retest reproducibility

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yilong; Tang, Chengke; Spetsieris, Phoebe G; Dhawan, Vijay; Eidelberg, David

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is associated with an abnormal pattern of regional brain function. The expression of this PD-related covariance pattern (PDRP) has been used to assess disease progression and the response to treatment. In this study, we validated the PDRP network as a measure of parkinsonism by prospectively computing its expression (PDRP scores) in 15O-water (H2 15O) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) scans from PD patients and healthy volunteers. The reliability of this measure was also assessed within subjects using a test–retest design in mildly affected and advanced PD patients scanned at baseline and during treatment with levodopa or deep brain stimulation (DBS). We found that PDRP expression was significantly elevated in PD patients (P < 0.001) relative to controls in a prospective analysis of brain scans obtained with either H2 15O or FDG PET. A significant correlation (R2 = 0.61; P < 0.001) was evident between PDRP scores computed from H2 15O and FDG images in PD subjects scanned with both tracers. Test–retest reproducibility was very high (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) > 0.92) for PDRP scores measured both within PET session and between sessions separated by up to 2 months. This high reproducibility was observed in both early stage and advanced PD patients scanned at baseline and during treatment. The within-subject variability of this measure was less than 10% for both unmedicated and treated conditions. These findings suggest that the PDRP network is a reproducible and stable descriptor of regional functional abnormalities in parkinsonism. The quantification of PDRP expression in PD patients can serve as a potential biomarker in PET intervention studies for this disorder. PMID:16804550

  7. Investigation of the diffusion abnormality index as a new imaging biomarker for early assessment of brain tumor response to radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Farjam, Reza; Tsien, Christina I.; Feng, Felix Y.; Gomez-Hassan, Diana; Hayman, James A.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Cao, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Background Diffusion MRI, although having the potential to be a biomarker for early assessment of tumor response to therapy, could be confounded by edema and necrosis in or near the brain tumors. This study aimed to develop and investigate the ability of the diffusion abnormality index (DAI) to be a new imaging biomarker for early assessment of brain metastasis response to radiation therapy (RT). Methods Patients with either radiosensitive or radioresistant brain metastases that were treated by whole brain RT alone or combined with bortezomib as a radiation sensitizer had diffusion-weighted (DW) MRI pre-RT and 2 weeks (2W) after starting RT. A patient-specific diffusion abnormality probability function (DAProF) was created to account for abnormal low and high apparent diffusion coefficients differently, reflecting respective high cellularity and edema/necrosis. The DAI of a lesion was then calculated by the integral of DAProF-weighted tumor apparent diffusion coefficient histogram. The changes in DAI from pre-RT to 2W were evaluated for differentiating the responsive, stable, and progressive tumors and compared with the changes in gross tumor volume and conventional diffusion metrics during the same time interval. Results In lesions treated with whole brain RT, the DAI performed the best among all metrics in predicting the posttreatment response of brain metastases to RT. In lesions treated with whole brain RT + bortezomib, although DAI was the best predictor, the performance of all metrics worsened compared with the first group. Conclusions The ability of DAI for early assessment of brain metastasis response to RT depends upon treatment regimes. PMID:24327584

  8. Spread of epileptic activity in human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milton, John

    1997-03-01

    For many patients with medically refractory epilepsy surgical resection of the site of seizure onset (epileptic focus) offers the best hope for cure. Determination of the nature of seizure propagation should lead to improved methods for locating the epileptic focus (and hence reduce patient morbidity) and possibly to new treatment modalities directed at blocking seizure spread. Theoretical studies of neural networks emphasize the role of traveling waves for the propagation of activity. However, the nature of seizure propagation in human brain remains poorly characterized. The spread of epileptic activity in patients undergoing presurgical evaluation for epilepsy surgery was measured by placing subdural grids of electrodes (interelectrode spacings of 3-10 mm) over the frontal and temporal lobes. The exact location of each electrode relative to the surface of the brain was determined using 3--D MRI imaging techniques. Thus it is possible to monitor the spread of epileptic activity in both space and time. The observations are discussed in light of models for seizure propagation.

  9. Knockdown of zebrafish Lgi1a results in abnormal development, brain defects and a seizure-like behavioral phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Yong; Xie, Xiayang; Walker, Steven; Rempala, Grzegorz; Kozlowski, David J.; Mumm, Jeff S.; Cowell, John K.

    2010-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common disorder, typified by recurrent seizures with underlying neurological disorders or disease. Approximately one-third of patients are unresponsive to currently available therapies. Thus, a deeper understanding of the genetics and etiology of epilepsy is needed to advance the development of new therapies. Previously, treatment of zebrafish with epilepsy-inducing pharmacological agents was shown to result in a seizure-like phenotype, suggesting that fish provide a tractable model to understand the function of epilepsy-predisposing genes. Here, we report the first model of genetically linked epilepsy in zebrafish and provide an initial characterization of the behavioral and neurological phenotypes associated with morpholino (MO) knockdown of leucine-rich, glioma-inactivated 1a (lgi1a) expression. Mutations in the LGI1 gene in humans have been shown to predispose to a subtype of autosomal dominant epilepsy. Low-dose Lgi1a MO knockdown fish (morphants) appear morphologically normal but are sensitized to epilepsy-inducing drugs. High-dose Lgi1a morphants have morphological defects which persist into adult stages that are typified by smaller brains and eyes and abnormalities in tail shape, and display hyperactive swimming behaviors. Increased apoptosis was observed throughout the central nervous system of high-dose morphant fish, accounting for the size reduction of neural tissues. These observations demonstrate that zebrafish can be exploited to dissect the embryonic function(s) of genes known to predispose to seizure-like behavior in humans, and offer potential insight into the relationship between developmental neurobiological abnormalities and seizure. PMID:20819949

  10. Structural brain abnormalities in postural tachycardia syndrome: A VBM-DARTEL study.

    PubMed

    Umeda, Satoshi; Harrison, Neil A; Gray, Marcus A; Mathias, Christopher J; Critchley, Hugo D

    2015-01-01

    Postural tachycardia syndrome (PoTS), a form of dysautonomia, is characterized by orthostatic intolerance, and is frequently accompanied by a range of symptoms including palpitations, lightheadedness, clouding of thought, blurred vision, fatigue, anxiety, and depression. Although the estimated prevalence of PoTS is approximately 5-10 times as common as the better-known condition orthostatic hypotension, the neural substrates of the syndrome are poorly characterized. In the present study, we used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with voxel-based morphometry (VBM) applying the diffeomorphic anatomical registration through exponentiated lie algebra (DARTEL) procedure to examine variation in regional brain structure associated with PoTS. We recruited 11 patients with established PoTS and 23 age-matched normal controls. Group comparison of gray matter volume revealed diminished gray matter volume within the left anterior insula, right middle frontal gyrus and right cingulate gyrus in the PoTS group. We also observed lower white matter volume beneath the precentral gyrus and paracentral lobule, right pre- and post-central gyrus, paracentral lobule and superior frontal gyrus in PoTS patients. Subsequent ROI analyses revealed significant negative correlations between left insula volume and trait anxiety and depression scores. Together, these findings of structural differences, particularly within insular and cingulate components of the salience network, suggest a link between dysregulated physiological reactions arising from compromised central autonomic control (and interoceptive representation) and increased vulnerability to psychiatric symptoms in PoTS patients. PMID:25852449

  11. NeuroimagingDecoding mental states from brain activity in humans

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Geraint Rees; John-Dylan Haynes

    2006-01-01

    Recent advances in human neuroimaging have shown that it is possible to accurately decode a person's conscious experience based only on non-invasive measurements of their brain activity. Such 'brain reading' has mostly been studied in the domain of visual perception, where it helps reveal the way in which individual experiences are encoded in the human brain. The same approach can

  12. Order/disorder in brain electrical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosso, O. A.; Figliola, Y. A.

    2004-04-01

    The processing of information by the brain is reflected in dynamical changes of the electrical activity in time, frequency, and space. Therefore, the concomitant studies require methods capable of describing the quantitative variation of the signal in both time and frequency. Here we present a quantitative EEG (qEEG) analysis, based on the Orthogonal Discrete Wavelet Transform (ODWT), of generalized epileptic tonic-clonic EEG signals. Two quantifiers: the Relative Wavelet Energy (RWE) and the Normalized Total Wavelet Entropy (NTWS) have been used. The RWE gives information about the relative energy associated with the different frequency bands present in the EEG and their corresponding degree of importance. The NTWS is a measure of the order/disorder degree in the EEG signal. These two quantifiers were computing in EEG signals as provided by scalp electrodes of epileptic patients. We showed that the epileptic recruitment rhythm observed for generalized epileptic tonic-clonic seizures is accurately described by the RWE quantifier. In addition, a significant decrease in the NTWS was observed in the recruitment epoch, indicating a more rhythmic and ordered behavior in the brain electrical activity.

  13. Topiramate: effect on EEG interictal abnormalities and background activity in patients affected by focal epilepsy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fabio Placidi; Mario Tombini; Andrea Romigi; Luigi Bianchi; Francesca Izzi; Francesca Sperli; Donatella Mattia; Angela Cervellino; Maria Grazia Marciani

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of topiramate (TPM) on interictal epileptiform abnormalities (IEA) and background activity by means of a computerized EEG analysis, in adult patients affected by focal epilepsy, with or without secondarily generalization, treated with TPM as adjunctive therapy or monotherapy.Methods: Twenty-four patients affected by symptomatic or cryptogenic focal epilepsy underwent long-term video-EEG recording before and after TPM

  14. Brain Activity with Reading Sentences and Emoticons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuasa, Masahide; Saito, Keiichi; Mukawa, Naoki

    In this paper, we describe a person's brain activity when he/she sees an emoticon at the end of a sentence. An emoticon consists of some characters that resemble the human face and expresses a sender's emotion. With the help of a computer network, we use e-mail, messenger, avatars and so on, in order to convey what we wish to, to a receiver. Moreover, we send an emotional expression by using an emoticon at the end of a sentence. In this research, we investigate the effect of an emoticon as nonverbal information, using an fMRI study. The experimental results show that the right and left inferior frontal gyrus were activated and we detect a sentence with an emoticon as the verbal and nonverval information.

  15. Abnormal cortical activation during response inhibition in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gothelf, Doron; Hoeft, Fumiko; Hinard, Christine; Hallmayer, Joachim F; Stoecker, John Van Dover; Antonarakis, Stylianos E; Morris, Michael A; Reiss, Allan L

    2007-06-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is a well-known genetic risk factor for schizophrenia. The catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene falls within the 22q11.2 minimal critical region of the deletion. Brain activity, as measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during a Go/NoGo, response inhibition task was assessed in adolescents with 22q11.2DS (n = 13), typically developing (TD) controls (n = 14), and controls with developmental disability (DD, n = 9). Subjects with 22q11.2DS were also genotyped for the COMT Met/Val polymorphism. Groups did not differ on task performance. However, compared to both control groups, the 22q11.2DS group showed greater brain activation within left parietal regions. Comparison of brain activation between 22q11.2DS Met and Val subgroups revealed significantly increased activation (Met>Val) in the cingulate but not the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. These preliminary findings suggest that adolescents with 22q11.2DS compensate for executive dysfunction via recruitment of parietal regions. Further, the COMT Met subgroup of 22q11.2DS may recruit additional cingulate activation for tasks requiring attention and inhibition. 22q11.2DS is a unique model for learning about the deleterious effects of decreased dosage of the COMT gene on brain function. PMID:17427209

  16. "Shape activity": a continuous-state HMM for moving/deforming shapes with application to abnormal activity detection.

    PubMed

    Vaswani, Namrata; Roy-Chowdhury, Amit K; Chellappa, Rama

    2005-10-01

    The aim is to model "activity" performed by a group of moving and interacting objects (which can be people, cars, or different rigid components of the human body) and use the models for abnormal activity detection. Previous approaches to modeling group activity include co-occurrence statistics (individual and joint histograms) and dynamic Bayesian networks, neither of which is applicable when the number of interacting objects is large. We treat the objects as point objects (referred to as "landmarks") and propose to model their changing configuration as a moving and deforming "shape" (using Kendall's shape theory for discrete landmarks). A continuous-state hidden Markov model is defined for landmark shape dynamics in an activity. The configuration of landmarks at a given time forms the observation vector, and the corresponding shape and the scaled Euclidean motion parameters form the hidden-state vector. An abnormal activity is then defined as a change in the shape activity model, which could be slow or drastic and whose parameters are unknown. Results are shown on a real abnormal activity-detection problem involving multiple moving objects. PMID:16238065

  17. On a Quantum Model of Brain Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fichtner, K.-H.; Fichtner, L.; Freudenberg, W.; Ohya, M.

    2010-01-01

    One of the main activities of the brain is the recognition of signals. A first attempt to explain the process of recognition in terms of quantum statistics was given in [6]. Subsequently, details of the mathematical model were presented in a (still incomplete) series of papers (cf. [7, 2, 5, 10]). In the present note we want to give a general view of the principal ideas of this approach. We will introduce the basic spaces and justify the choice of spaces and operations. Further, we bring the model face to face with basic postulates any statistical model of the recognition process should fulfill. These postulates are in accordance with the opinion widely accepted in psychology and neurology.

  18. High-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Microscopy and Diffusion Tensor Imaging to Assess Brain Structural Abnormalities in the Murine Mucopolysaccharidosis VII Model

    PubMed Central

    Poptani, Harish; Kumar, Manoj; Nasrallah, Ilya M; Kim, Sungheon; Ittyerah, Ranjit; Pickup, Stephen; Li, Joel; Parente, Michael K; Wolfe, John H.

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution microscopic magnetic resonance imaging (?MRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) were performed to characterize brain structural abnormalities in a mouse model of mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPS VII). ?MRI demonstrated a decrease in the volume of anterior commissure and corpus callosum and a slight increase in the volume of the hippocampus in MPS VII vs. wild-type mice. DTI indices were analyzed in gray and white matter. In vivo and ex vivo DTI demonstrated significantly reduced fractional anisotropy in the anterior commissure, corpus callosum, external capsule and hippocampus in MPS VII vs. control brains. Significantly increased mean diffusivity was also found in the anterior commissure and corpus callosum from ex-vivo DTI. Significantly reduced linear anisotropy was observed from the hippocampus from in-vivo DTI, whereas significantly decreased planar anisotropy and spherical anisotropy were observed in the external capsule from only ex-vivo DTI. There were corresponding morphological differences in the brains of MPS VII mice by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Luxol fast blue staining demonstrated less intense staining of the corpus callosum and external capsule; myelin abnormalities in the corpus callosum were also demonstrated quantitatively in toluidine blue-stained sections and confirmed by electron microscopy. These results demonstrate the potential for ?MRI and DTI for quantitative assessment of brain pathology in murine models of brain diseases. PMID:24335527

  19. Reduced Activity of Protein Kinase C in the Frontal Cortex of Subjects with Regressive Autism: Relationship with Developmental Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Lina; Chauhan, Abha; Chauhan, Ved

    2012-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder with unknown etiology. In some cases, typically developing children regress into clinical symptoms of autism, a condition known as regressive autism. Protein kinases are essential for G-protein-coupled receptor-mediated signal transduction, and are involved in neuronal functions, gene expression, memory, and cell differentiation. Recently, we reported decreased activity of protein kinase A (PKA) in the frontal cortex of subjects with regressive autism. In the present study, we analyzed the activity of protein kinase C (PKC) in the cerebellum and different regions of cerebral cortex from subjects with regressive autism, autistic subjects without clinical history of regression, and age-matched control subjects. In the frontal cortex of subjects with regressive autism, PKC activity was significantly decreased by 57.1% as compared to age-matched control subjects (p = 0.0085), and by 65.8% as compared to non-regressed autistic subjects (p = 0.0048). PKC activity was unaffected in the temporal, parietal and occipital cortices, and in the cerebellum in both autism groups, i.e., regressive and non-regressed autism as compared to control subjects. These results suggest brain region-specific alteration of PKC activity in the frontal cortex of subjects with regressive autism. Further studies showed a negative correlation between PKC activity and restrictive, repetitive and stereotyped pattern of behavior (r= -0.084, p = 0.0363) in autistic individuals, suggesting involvement of PKC in behavioral abnormalities in autism. These findings suggest that regression in autism may be attributed, in part, to alterations in G-protein-coupled receptor-mediated signal transduction involving PKA and PKC in the frontal cortex. PMID:22949890

  20. Artifact suppression and analysis of brain activities with electroencephalography signals

    PubMed Central

    Rashed-Al-Mahfuz, Md.; Islam, Md. Rabiul; Hirose, Keikichi; Molla, Md. Khademul Islam

    2013-01-01

    Brain-computer interface is a communication system that connects the brain with computer (or other devices) but is not dependent on the normal output of the brain (i.e., peripheral nerve and muscle). Electro-oculogram is a dominant artifact which has a significant negative influence on further analysis of real electroencephalography data. This paper presented a data adaptive technique for artifact suppression and brain wave extraction from electroencephalography signals to detect regional brain activities. Empirical mode decomposition based adaptive thresholding approach was employed here to suppress the electro-oculogram artifact. Fractional Gaussian noise was used to determine the threshold level derived from the analysis data without any training. The purified electroencephalography signal was composed of the brain waves also called rhythmic components which represent the brain activities. The rhythmic components were extracted from each electroencephalography channel using adaptive wiener filter with the original scale. The regional brain activities were mapped on the basis of the spatial distribution of rhythmic components, and the results showed that different regions of the brain are activated in response to different stimuli. This research analyzed the activities of a single rhythmic component, alpha with respect to different motor imaginations. The experimental results showed that the proposed method is very efficient in artifact suppression and identifying individual motor imagery based on the activities of alpha component. PMID:25206446

  1. Potential moderators of physical activity on brain health.

    PubMed

    Leckie, Regina L; Weinstein, Andrea M; Hodzic, Jennifer C; Erickson, Kirk I

    2012-01-01

    Age-related cognitive decline is linked to numerous molecular, structural, and functional changes in the brain. However, physical activity is a promising method of reducing unfavorable age-related changes. Physical activity exerts its effects on the brain through many molecular pathways, some of which are regulated by genetic variants in humans. In this paper, we highlight genes including apolipoprotein E (APOE), brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) along with dietary omega-3 fatty acid, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), as potential moderators of the effect of physical activity on brain health. There are a growing number of studies indicating that physical activity might mitigate the genetic risks for disease and brain dysfunction and that the combination of greater amounts of DHA intake with physical activity might promote better brain function than either treatment alone. Understanding whether genes or other lifestyles moderate the effects of physical activity on neurocognitive health is necessary for delineating the pathways by which brain health can be enhanced and for grasping the individual variation in the effectiveness of physical activity interventions on the brain and cognition. There is a need for future research to continue to assess the factors that moderate the effects of physical activity on neurocognitive function. PMID:23304508

  2. Potential Moderators of Physical Activity on Brain Health

    PubMed Central

    Leckie, Regina L.; Weinstein, Andrea M.; Hodzic, Jennifer C.; Erickson, Kirk I.

    2012-01-01

    Age-related cognitive decline is linked to numerous molecular, structural, and functional changes in the brain. However, physical activity is a promising method of reducing unfavorable age-related changes. Physical activity exerts its effects on the brain through many molecular pathways, some of which are regulated by genetic variants in humans. In this paper, we highlight genes including apolipoprotein E (APOE), brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) along with dietary omega-3 fatty acid, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), as potential moderators of the effect of physical activity on brain health. There are a growing number of studies indicating that physical activity might mitigate the genetic risks for disease and brain dysfunction and that the combination of greater amounts of DHA intake with physical activity might promote better brain function than either treatment alone. Understanding whether genes or other lifestyles moderate the effects of physical activity on neurocognitive health is necessary for delineating the pathways by which brain health can be enhanced and for grasping the individual variation in the effectiveness of physical activity interventions on the brain and cognition. There is a need for future research to continue to assess the factors that moderate the effects of physical activity on neurocognitive function. PMID:23304508

  3. Abnormal photocurrent response and enhanced photocatalytic activity induced by charge transfer between WS(2) nanosheets and WO(3) nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Huo, Nengjie; Yue, Qu; Yang, Juehan; Yang, Shengxue; Li, Jingbo

    2013-12-16

    Sun trap: Pure WS2 nanosheets are prepared that exhibit excellent photosensitive properties. After functionalization with WO3 nanoparticles, abnormal photocurrent responses, enhanced photocatalytic activity, and induced photoluminescence is observed. PMID:24227745

  4. High Prevalence of Chronic Pituitary and Target-Organ Hormone Abnormalities after Blast-Related Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Charles W.; Pagulayan, Kathleen F.; Petrie, Eric C.; Mayer, Cynthia L.; Colasurdo, Elizabeth A.; Shofer, Jane B.; Hart, Kim L.; Hoff, David; Tarabochia, Matthew A.; Peskind, Elaine R.

    2011-01-01

    Studies of traumatic brain injury from all causes have found evidence of chronic hypopituitarism, defined by deficient production of one or more pituitary hormones at least 1?year after injury, in 25–50% of cases. Most studies found the occurrence of posttraumatic hypopituitarism (PTHP) to be unrelated to injury severity. Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) and hypogonadism were reported most frequently. Hypopituitarism, and in particular adult GHD, is associated with symptoms that resemble those of PTSD, including fatigue, anxiety, depression, irritability, insomnia, sexual dysfunction, cognitive deficiencies, and decreased quality of life. However, the prevalence of PTHP after blast-related mild TBI (mTBI), an extremely common injury in modern military operations, has not been characterized. We measured concentrations of 12 pituitary and target-organ hormones in two groups of male US Veterans of combat in Iraq or Afghanistan. One group consisted of participants with blast-related mTBI whose last blast exposure was at least 1?year prior to the study. The other consisted of Veterans with similar military deployment histories but without blast exposure. Eleven of 26, or 42% of participants with blast concussions were found to have abnormal hormone levels in one or more pituitary axes, a prevalence similar to that found in other forms of TBI. Five members of the mTBI group were found with markedly low age-adjusted insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) levels indicative of probable GHD, and three had testosterone and gonadotropin concentrations consistent with hypogonadism. If symptoms characteristic of both PTHP and PTSD can be linked to pituitary dysfunction, they may be amenable to treatment with hormone replacement. Routine screening for chronic hypopituitarism after blast concussion shows promise for appropriately directing diagnostic and therapeutic decisions that otherwise may remain unconsidered and for markedly facilitating recovery and rehabilitation. PMID:22347210

  5. High prevalence of chronic pituitary and target-organ hormone abnormalities after blast-related mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Charles W; Pagulayan, Kathleen F; Petrie, Eric C; Mayer, Cynthia L; Colasurdo, Elizabeth A; Shofer, Jane B; Hart, Kim L; Hoff, David; Tarabochia, Matthew A; Peskind, Elaine R

    2012-01-01

    Studies of traumatic brain injury from all causes have found evidence of chronic hypopituitarism, defined by deficient production of one or more pituitary hormones at least 1?year after injury, in 25-50% of cases. Most studies found the occurrence of posttraumatic hypopituitarism (PTHP) to be unrelated to injury severity. Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) and hypogonadism were reported most frequently. Hypopituitarism, and in particular adult GHD, is associated with symptoms that resemble those of PTSD, including fatigue, anxiety, depression, irritability, insomnia, sexual dysfunction, cognitive deficiencies, and decreased quality of life. However, the prevalence of PTHP after blast-related mild TBI (mTBI), an extremely common injury in modern military operations, has not been characterized. We measured concentrations of 12 pituitary and target-organ hormones in two groups of male US Veterans of combat in Iraq or Afghanistan. One group consisted of participants with blast-related mTBI whose last blast exposure was at least 1?year prior to the study. The other consisted of Veterans with similar military deployment histories but without blast exposure. Eleven of 26, or 42% of participants with blast concussions were found to have abnormal hormone levels in one or more pituitary axes, a prevalence similar to that found in other forms of TBI. Five members of the mTBI group were found with markedly low age-adjusted insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) levels indicative of probable GHD, and three had testosterone and gonadotropin concentrations consistent with hypogonadism. If symptoms characteristic of both PTHP and PTSD can be linked to pituitary dysfunction, they may be amenable to treatment with hormone replacement. Routine screening for chronic hypopituitarism after blast concussion shows promise for appropriately directing diagnostic and therapeutic decisions that otherwise may remain unconsidered and for markedly facilitating recovery and rehabilitation. PMID:22347210

  6. Early social enrichment rescues adult behavioral and brain abnormalities in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Oddi, Diego; Subashi, Enejda; Middei, Silvia; Bellocchio, Luigi; Lemaire-Mayo, Valerie; Guzmán, Manuel; Crusio, Wim E; D'Amato, Francesca R; Pietropaolo, Susanna

    2015-04-01

    Converging lines of evidence support the use of environmental stimulation to ameliorate the symptoms of a variety of neurodevelopmental disorders. Applying these interventions at very early ages is critical to achieve a marked reduction of the pathological phenotypes. Here we evaluated the impact of early social enrichment in Fmr1-KO mice, a genetic mouse model of fragile X syndrome (FXS), a major developmental disorder and the most frequent monogenic cause of autism. Enrichment was achieved by providing male KO pups and their WT littermates with enhanced social stimulation, housing them from birth until weaning with the mother and an additional nonlactating female. At adulthood they were tested for locomotor, social, and cognitive abilities; furthermore, dendritic alterations were assessed in the hippocampus and amygdala, two brain regions known to be involved in the control of the examined behaviors and affected by spine pathology in Fmr1-KOs. Enrichment rescued the behavioral FXS-like deficits displayed in adulthood by Fmr1-KO mice, that is, hyperactivity, reduced social interactions, and cognitive deficits. Early social enrichment also eliminated the abnormalities shown by adult KO mice in the morphology of hippocampal and amygdala dendritic spines, namely an enhanced density of immature vs mature types. Importantly, enrichment did not induce neurobehavioral changes in WT mice, thus supporting specific effects on FXS-like pathology. These findings show that early environmental stimulation has profound and long-term beneficial effects on the pathological FXS phenotype, thereby encouraging the use of nonpharmacological interventions for the treatment of this and perhaps other neurodevelopmental diseases. PMID:25348604

  7. Abnormal Activation of BMP Signaling Causes Myopathy in Fbn2 Null Mice.

    PubMed

    Sengle, Gerhard; Carlberg, Valerie; Tufa, Sara F; Charbonneau, Noe L; Smaldone, Silvia; Carlson, Eric J; Ramirez, Francesco; Keene, Douglas R; Sakai, Lynn Y

    2015-06-01

    Fibrillins are large extracellular macromolecules that polymerize to form the backbone structure of connective tissue microfibrils. Mutations in the gene for fibrillin-1 cause the Marfan syndrome, while mutations in the gene for fibrillin-2 cause Congenital Contractural Arachnodactyly. Both are autosomal dominant disorders, and both disorders affect musculoskeletal tissues. Here we show that Fbn2 null mice (on a 129/Sv background) are born with reduced muscle mass, abnormal muscle histology, and signs of activated BMP signaling in skeletal muscle. A delay in Myosin Heavy Chain 8, a perinatal myosin, was found in Fbn2 null forelimb muscle tissue, consistent with the notion that muscle defects underlie forelimb contractures in these mice. In addition, white fat accumulated in the forelimbs during the early postnatal period. Adult Fbn2 null mice are already known to demonstrate persistent muscle weakness. Here we measured elevated creatine kinase levels in adult Fbn2 null mice, indicating ongoing cycles of muscle injury. On a C57Bl/6 background, Fbn2 null mice showed severe defects in musculature, leading to neonatal death from respiratory failure. These new findings demonstrate that loss of fibrillin-2 results in phenotypes similar to those found in congenital muscular dystrophies and that FBN2 should be considered as a candidate gene for recessive congenital muscular dystrophy. Both in vivo and in vitro evidence associated muscle abnormalities and accumulation of white fat in Fbn2 null mice with abnormally activated BMP signaling. Genetic rescue of reduced muscle mass and accumulation of white fat in Fbn2 null mice was accomplished by deleting a single allele of Bmp7. In contrast to other reports that activated BMP signaling leads to muscle hypertrophy, our findings demonstrate the exquisite sensitivity of BMP signaling to the fibrillin-2 extracellular environment during early postnatal muscle development. New evidence presented here suggests that fibrillin-2 can sequester BMP complexes in a latent state. PMID:26114882

  8. Abnormal Activation of BMP Signaling Causes Myopathy in Fbn2 Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sengle, Gerhard; Carlberg, Valerie; Tufa, Sara F.; Charbonneau, Noe L.; Smaldone, Silvia; Carlson, Eric J.; Ramirez, Francesco; Keene, Douglas R.; Sakai, Lynn Y.

    2015-01-01

    Fibrillins are large extracellular macromolecules that polymerize to form the backbone structure of connective tissue microfibrils. Mutations in the gene for fibrillin-1 cause the Marfan syndrome, while mutations in the gene for fibrillin-2 cause Congenital Contractural Arachnodactyly. Both are autosomal dominant disorders, and both disorders affect musculoskeletal tissues. Here we show that Fbn2 null mice (on a 129/Sv background) are born with reduced muscle mass, abnormal muscle histology, and signs of activated BMP signaling in skeletal muscle. A delay in Myosin Heavy Chain 8, a perinatal myosin, was found in Fbn2 null forelimb muscle tissue, consistent with the notion that muscle defects underlie forelimb contractures in these mice. In addition, white fat accumulated in the forelimbs during the early postnatal period. Adult Fbn2 null mice are already known to demonstrate persistent muscle weakness. Here we measured elevated creatine kinase levels in adult Fbn2 null mice, indicating ongoing cycles of muscle injury. On a C57Bl/6 background, Fbn2 null mice showed severe defects in musculature, leading to neonatal death from respiratory failure. These new findings demonstrate that loss of fibrillin-2 results in phenotypes similar to those found in congenital muscular dystrophies and that FBN2 should be considered as a candidate gene for recessive congenital muscular dystrophy. Both in vivo and in vitro evidence associated muscle abnormalities and accumulation of white fat in Fbn2 null mice with abnormally activated BMP signaling. Genetic rescue of reduced muscle mass and accumulation of white fat in Fbn2 null mice was accomplished by deleting a single allele of Bmp7. In contrast to other reports that activated BMP signaling leads to muscle hypertrophy, our findings demonstrate the exquisite sensitivity of BMP signaling to the fibrillin-2 extracellular environment during early postnatal muscle development. New evidence presented here suggests that fibrillin-2 can sequester BMP complexes in a latent state. PMID:26114882

  9. Cerebral blood volume changes during brain activation

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, Steffen Norbert; Streicher, Markus Nikolar; Trampel, Robert; Turner, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral blood volume (CBV) changes significantly with brain activation, whether measured using positron emission tomography, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), or optical microscopy. If cerebral vessels are considered to be impermeable, the contents of the skull incompressible, and the skull itself inextensible, task- and hypercapnia-related changes of CBV could produce intolerable changes of intracranial pressure. Because it is becoming clear that CBV may be useful as a well-localized marker of neural activity changes, a resolution of this apparent paradox is needed. We have explored the idea that much of the change in CBV is facilitated by exchange of water between capillaries and surrounding tissue. To this end, we developed a novel hemodynamic boundary-value model and found approximate solutions using a numerical algorithm. We also constructed a macroscopic experimental model of a single capillary to provide biophysical insight. Both experiment and theory model capillary membranes as elastic and permeable. For a realistic change of input pressure, a relative pipe volume change of 21±5% was observed when using the experimental setup, compared with the value of approximately 17±1% when this quantity was calculated from the mathematical model. Volume, axial flow, and pressure changes are in the expected range. PMID:22569192

  10. Abnormal dynamics of activation of object use information in apraxia: evidence from eyetracking

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chia-lin; Mirman, Daniel; Buxbaum, Laurel J.

    2014-01-01

    Action representations associated with object use may be incidentally activated during visual object processing, and the time course of such activations may be influenced by lexical-semantic context (e.g., Lee, Middleton, Mirman, Kalénine, & Buxbaum, 2012). In this study we used the “visual world” eye-tracking paradigm to examine whether a deficit in producing skilled object-use actions (apraxia) is associated with abnormalities in incidental activation of action information, and assessed the neuroanatomical substrates of any such deficits. Twenty left hemisphere stroke patients, ten of whom were apraxic, performed a task requiring identification of a named object in a visual display containing manipulation-related and unrelated distractor objects. Manipulation relationships among objects were not relevant to the identification task. Objects were cued with neutral (“S/he saw the….”), or action-relevant (“S/he used the….”) sentences. Non-apraxic participants looked at use-related non-target objects significantly more than at unrelated non-target objects when cued both by neutral and action-relevant sentences, indicating that action information is incidentally activated. In contrast, apraxic participants showed delayed activation of manipulation-based action information during object identification when cued by neutral sentences. The magnitude of delayed activation in the neutral sentence condition was reliably predicted by lower scores on a test of gesture production to viewed objects, as well as by lesion loci in the inferior parietal and posterior temporal lobes. However, when cued by a sentence containing an action verb, apraxic participants showed fixation patterns that were statistically indistinguishable from non-apraxic controls. In support of grounded theories of cognition, these results suggest that apraxia and temporal-parietal lesions may be associated with abnormalities in incidental activation of action information from objects. Further, they suggest that the previously-observed facilitative role of action verbs in the retrieval of object-related action information extends to participants with apraxia. PMID:24746946

  11. Altered spontaneous brain activity in patients with hemifacial spasm: a resting-state functional MRI study.

    PubMed

    Tu, Ye; Wei, Yongxu; Sun, Kun; Zhao, Weiguo; Yu, Buwei

    2015-01-01

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been used to detect the alterations of spontaneous neuronal activity in various neurological and neuropsychiatric diseases, but rarely in hemifacial spasm (HFS), a nervous system disorder. We used resting-state fMRI with regional homogeneity (ReHo) analysis to investigate changes in spontaneous brain activity of patients with HFS and to determine the relationship of these functional changes with clinical features. Thirty patients with HFS and 33 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy controls were included in this study. Compared with controls, HFS patients had significantly decreased ReHo values in left middle frontal gyrus (MFG), left medial cingulate cortex (MCC), left lingual gyrus, right superior temporal gyrus (STG) and right precuneus; and increased ReHo values in left precentral gyrus, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), right brainstem, and right cerebellum. Furthermore, the mean ReHo value in brainstem showed a positive correlation with the spasm severity (r = 0.404, p = 0.027), and the mean ReHo value in MFG was inversely related with spasm severity in HFS group (r = -0.398, p = 0.028). This study reveals that HFS is associated with abnormal spontaneous brain activity in brain regions most involved in motor control and blinking movement. The disturbances of spontaneous brain activity reflected by ReHo measurements may provide insights into the neurological pathophysiology of HFS. PMID:25603126

  12. Changes of Enzyme Activities and Compositions of Abnormal Fruiting Bodies Grown under Artificial Environmental Conditions in Pleurotus ostreatus

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Soo Muk; June, Chang Sung; Weon, Hang Yeon; Park, Jeong Sik; Choi, Sun Gyu; Cheong, Jong Chun; Sung, Jae Mo

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the biochemical changes of abnormal fruiting bodies grown under artificial environmental conditions in P. ostreatus. Abnormal mushroom growth during cultivation damages the production of good quality mushroom. This study showed that different environmental conditions produced morphological changes in the fruiting bodies of P. ostreatus. The fruiting bodies with morphological changes were collected and examined for differences in biochemical properties, enzyme activities, and carbohydrates composition. The enzyme activities assay showed that glucanase and chitinase activities decreased when the temperature was below or above the optimum cultivation temperature for P. ostreatus. The biochemical compositions of the abnormal mushroom were significantly different from the normal fruiting bodies. It was suggested that the changes in the biochemical composition of abnormal mushroom were caused by the unfavorable environmental conditions during mushroom cultivation. PMID:24049471

  13. Brain Activation during Working Memory after Traumatic Brain Injury in Children

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary R. Newsome; Randall S. Scheibel; Jill V. Hunter; Zhiyue J. Wang; Zili Chu; Xiaoqi Li; Harvey S. Levin

    2007-01-01

    Eight children with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and eight matched, uninjured control children underwent fMRI during an N-back task to test effects of TBI on working memory performance and brain activation. Two patterns in the TBI group were observed. Patients whose criterion performance was reached at lower memory loads than control children demonstrated less extensive frontal and

  14. Anxiolytic activity of a brain delivery system for GABA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. R. Anderson; J. W. Simpkins; P. A. Woodard; D. Winwood; W. C. Stern; N. Bodor

    1987-01-01

    We evaluated the anxiolytic property of a brain-specific gamma-aminobutyric acid delivery system (GABA-CDS) in male rats by means of a drink-foot shock conflict procedure. Brain-specific delivery of the active compound was achieved by combination of GABA benzyl ester with an interconvertible dihydropyridine?pyridinium salt carrier, which is “locked in” to the brain upon its oxidation. Pharmacokinetic studies revealed that the hydrophilic

  15. Brain Activation during Sight Gags and Language-Dependent Humor

    E-print Network

    Allman, John M.

    Brain Activation during Sight Gags and Language-Dependent Humor Karli K. Watson1 , Benjamin J humor (sight gags) and language- based humor. Our findings indicate that the brain networks re- cruited 2003). Humor also has a strong social aspect, and in fact, measure- ments of extroversion in human

  16. OPTICAL IMAGING OF NEURAL AND HEMODYNAMIC BRAIN ACTIVITY

    E-print Network

    McCluskey, Matthew

    OPTICAL IMAGING OF NEURAL AND HEMODYNAMIC BRAIN ACTIVITY By JENNIFER LYNN SCHEI A dissertation his brain. His generosity has provided me with endless op- portunities to grow as a scientist in which, who thoroughly read every piece of writing I sent and asked questions about the content

  17. Focused ultrasound modulates region-specific brain activity

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Seung-Schik; Bystritsky, Alexander; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Zhang, Yongzhi; Fischer, Krisztina; Min, Byoung-Kyong; McDannold, Nathan J.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Jolesz, Ferenc A.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrated the in vivo feasibility of using focused ultrasound (FUS) to transiently modulate (through either stimulation or suppression) the function of regional brain tissue in rabbits. FUS was delivered in a train of pulses at low acoustic energy, far below the cavitation threshold, to the animal's somatomotor and visual areas, as guided by anatomical and functional information from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The temporary alterations in the brain function affected by the sonication were characterized by both electrophysiological recordings and functional brain mapping achieved through the use of functional MRI (fMRI). The modulatory effects were bimodal, whereby the brain activity could either be stimulated or selectively suppressed. Histological analysis of the excised brain tissue after the sonication demonstrated that the FUS did not elicit any tissue damages. Unlike transcranial magnetic stimulation, FUS can be applied to deep structures in the brain with greater spatial precision. Transient modulation of brain function using image-guided and anatomically-targeted FUS would enable the investigation of functional connectivity between brain regions and will eventually lead to a better understanding of localized brain functions. It is anticipated that the use of this technology will have an impact on brain research and may offer novel therapeutic interventions in various neurological conditions and psychiatric disorders. PMID:21354315

  18. Abnormal n-6 fatty acid metabolism in cystic fibrosis is caused by activation of AMP-activated protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Umunakwe, Obi C.; Seegmiller, Adam C.

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and model systems exhibit consistent abnormalities in PUFA metabolism, including increased metabolism of linoleate to arachidonate. Recent studies have connected these abnormalities to increased expression and activity of the ?6- and ?5-desaturase enzymes. However, the mechanism connecting these changes to the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mutations responsible for CF is unknown. This study tests the hypothesis that increased activity of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), previously described in CF bronchial epithelial cells, causes these changes in fatty acid metabolism by driving desaturase expression. Using CF bronchial epithelial cell culture models, we confirm elevated activity of AMPK in CF cells and show that it is due to increased phosphorylation of AMPK by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase ? (CaMKK?). We also show that inhibition of AMPK or CaMKK? reduces desaturase expression and reverses the metabolic alterations seen in CF cells. These results signify a novel AMPK-dependent mechanism linking the genetic defect in CF to alterations in PUFA metabolism. PMID:24859760

  19. Nanotools for Neuroscience and Brain Activity Mapping

    E-print Network

    Alivisatos, A. Paul

    Neuroscience is at a crossroads. Great effort is being invested into deciphering specific neural interactions and circuits. At the same time, there exist few general theories or principles that explain brain function. We ...

  20. Regional Brain Activation during Hypoglycemia in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Musen, Gail; Simonson, Donald C.; Bolo, Nicolas R.; Driscoll, Amy; Weinger, Katie; Raji, Annaswamy; Théberge, Jean; Renshaw, Perry F.; Jacobson, Alan M.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Mechanisms underlying the brain response to hypoglycemia are not well understood. Objective: Our objective was to determine the blood glucose level at which the hypothalamus and other brain regions are activated in response to hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetic patients and control subjects. Design: This was a cross-sectional study evaluating brain activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging in conjunction with a hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemic clamp to lower glucose from euglycemia (90 mg/dl) to hypoglycemia (50 mg/dl). Setting: The study was performed at the Brain Imaging Center in the McLean Hospital. Study Participants: Seven type 1 diabetic patients between 18 and 50 yr old and six matched control subjects were included in the study. Intervention: Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemic clamp was performed. Main Outcome Measures: Blood glucose level at peak hypothalamic activation, amount of regional brain activity during hypoglycemia in both groups, and difference in regional brain activation between groups were calculated. Results: The hypothalamic region activates at 68 ± 9 mg/dl in control subjects and 76 ± 8 mg/dl in diabetic patients during hypoglycemia induction. Brainstem, anterior cingulate cortex, uncus, and putamen were activated in both groups (P < 0.001). Each group also activated unique brain areas not active in the other group. Conclusions: This application of functional magnetic resonance imaging can be used to identify the glucose level at which the hypothalamus is triggered in response to hypoglycemia and whether this threshold differs across patient populations. This study suggests that a core network of brain regions is recruited during hypoglycemia in both diabetic patients and control subjects. PMID:18198228

  1. Anatomical atlas-guided diffuse optical tomography of brain activation

    E-print Network

    Custo, Anna

    We describe a neuroimaging protocol that utilizes an anatomical atlas of the human head to guide diffuse optical tomography of human brain activation. The protocol is demonstrated by imaging the hemodynamic response to ...

  2. Oppositional Children Differ from Healthy Children in Frontal Brain Activation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lioba Baving; Manfred Laucht; Martin H. Schmidt

    2000-01-01

    An atypical EEG pattern of frontal brain activation, which has been found in children and adults with emotional disorders, also is hypothesized to be present in disruptive behavior disorders. One hundred nineteen children (4\\u000a

  3. Reversal of brain metabolic abnormalities following treatment of AIDS dementia complex with 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine (AZT, zidovudine): a PET-FDG study

    SciTech Connect

    Brunetti, A.; Berg, G.; Di Chiro, G.; Cohen, R.M.; Yarchoan, R.; Pizzo, P.A.; Broder, S.; Eddy, J.; Fulham, M.J.; Finn, R.D.

    1989-05-01

    Brain glucose metabolism was evaluated in four patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) dementia complex using (/sup 18/F)fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and positron emission tomography (PET) scans at the beginning of therapy with 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine (AZT, zidovudine), and later in the course of therapy. In two patients, baseline, large focal cortical abnormalities of glucose utilization were reversed during the course of therapy. In the other two patients, the initial PET study did not reveal pronounced focal alterations, while the post-treatment scans showed markedly increased cortical glucose metabolism. The improved cortical glucose utilization was accompanied in all patients by immunologic and neurologic improvement. PET-FDG studies can detect cortical metabolic abnormalities associated with AIDS dementia complex, and may be used to monitor the metabolic improvement in response to AZT treatment.

  4. BRAIN NETWORKS. Correlated gene expression supports synchronous activity in brain networks.

    PubMed

    Richiardi, Jonas; Altmann, Andre; Milazzo, Anna-Clare; Chang, Catie; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J; Bokde, Arun L W; Bromberg, Uli; Büchel, Christian; Conrod, Patricia; Fauth-Bühler, Mira; Flor, Herta; Frouin, Vincent; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Gowland, Penny; Heinz, Andreas; Lemaître, Hervé; Mann, Karl F; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Nees, Frauke; Paus, Tomáš; Pausova, Zdenka; Rietschel, Marcella; Robbins, Trevor W; Smolka, Michael N; Spanagel, Rainer; Ströhle, Andreas; Schumann, Gunter; Hawrylycz, Mike; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Greicius, Michael D

    2015-06-12

    During rest, brain activity is synchronized between different regions widely distributed throughout the brain, forming functional networks. However, the molecular mechanisms supporting functional connectivity remain undefined. We show that functional brain networks defined with resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging can be recapitulated by using measures of correlated gene expression in a post mortem brain tissue data set. The set of 136 genes we identify is significantly enriched for ion channels. Polymorphisms in this set of genes significantly affect resting-state functional connectivity in a large sample of healthy adolescents. Expression levels of these genes are also significantly associated with axonal connectivity in the mouse. The results provide convergent, multimodal evidence that resting-state functional networks correlate with the orchestrated activity of dozens of genes linked to ion channel activity and synaptic function. PMID:26068849

  5. Abnormal activity in hypothalamus and amygdala during humour processing in human narcolepsy with cataplexy.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Sophie; Ponz, Aurélie; Poryazova, Rositsa; Werth, Esther; Boesiger, Peter; Khatami, Ramin; Bassetti, Claudio L

    2008-02-01

    Narcolepsy with cataplexy (NC) is a complex sleep-wake disorder, which was recently found to be associated with a reduction or loss of hypocretin (HCRT, also called orexin). HCRT is a hypothalamic peptide implicated in the regulation of sleep/wake, motor and feeding functions. Cataplexy refers to episodes of sudden and transient loss of muscle tone triggered by strong, mostly positive emotions, such as hearing or telling jokes. Cataplexy is thought to reflect the recruitment of ponto-medullary mechanisms that normally underlie muscle atonia during REM-sleep. In contrast, the suprapontine brain mechanisms associated with the cataplectic effects of emotions in human narcolepsy with cataplexy remain essentially unknown. Here, we used event-related functional MRI to assess brain activity in 12 NC patients and 12 controls while they watched sequences of humourous pictures. Patients and controls were similar in humour appreciation and activated regions known to contribute to humour processing, including limbic and striatal regions. A direct statistical comparison between patients and controls revealed that humourous pictures elicited reduced hypothalamic response together with enhanced amygdala response in the patients. These results suggest (i) that hypothalamic HCRT activity physiologically modulates the processing of emotional inputs within the amygdala, and (ii) that suprapontine mechanisms of cataplexy involve a dysfunction of hypothalamic-amygdala interactions triggered by positive emotions. PMID:18094020

  6. Brain MRI abnormalities and spectrum of neurological and clinical findings in three patients with proximal 16p11.2 microduplication.

    PubMed

    Filges, Isabel; Sparagana, Steven; Sargent, Michael; Selby, Kathryn; Schlade-Bartusiak, Kamilla; Lueder, Gregg T; Robichaux-Viehoever, Amy; Schlaggar, Bradley L; Shimony, Joshua S; Shinawi, Marwan

    2014-08-01

    The phenotype of recurrent ?600 kb microdeletion and microduplication on proximal 16p11.2 is characterized by a spectrum of neurodevelopmental impairments including developmental delay and intellectual disability, epilepsy, autism and psychiatric disorders which are all subject to incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity. A variety of brain MRI abnormalities were reported in patients with 16p11.2 rearrangements, but no systematic correlation has been studied among patients with similar brain anomalies, their neurodevelopmental and clinical phenotypes. We present three patients with the proximal 16p11.2 microduplication exhibiting significant developmental delay, anxiety disorder and other variable clinical features. Our patients have abnormal brain MRI findings of cerebral T2 hyperintense foci (3/3) and ventriculomegaly (2/3). The neuroradiological or neurological findings in two cases prompted an extensive diagnostic work-up. One patient has exhibited neurological regression and progressive vision impairment and was diagnosed with juvenile neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinosis. We compare the clinical course and phenotype of these patients in regard to the clinical significance of the cerebral lesions and the need for MRI surveillance. We conclude that in all three patients the lesions were not progressive, did not show any sign of malignant transformation and could not be correlated to specific clinical features. We discuss potential etiologic mechanisms that may include overexpression of genes within the duplicated region involved in control of cell proliferation and complex molecular mechanisms such as the MAPK/ERK pathway. Systematic studies in larger cohorts are needed to confirm our observation and to establish the prevalence and clinical significance of these neuroanatomical abnormalities in patients with 16p11.2 duplications. PMID:24891046

  7. Anxiety and abnormal eating behaviors associated with cyclical readiness testing in a naval hospital active duty population.

    PubMed

    Carlton, Janis R; Manos, Gail H; Van Slyke, John A

    2005-08-01

    Studies of abnormal eating behaviors in active duty military personal have found rates similar to or higher than the general population. We have reviewed these studies and extended the research to examine abnormal eating behaviors in a heterogeneous population at a major military medical center. We found high rates of body dissatisfaction, abnormal eating behaviors, and worry about passing the semiannual personal fitness assessment in both men and women. Abnormal eating behaviors were associated with worrying about the personal fitness assessment, and these measures were associated with body mass index and gender. Our data extend previous research indicating that cyclic or external pressure to maintain body weight within specified standards can produce unsafe eating and dieting behaviors. We recommend changes to the current system to incorporate treatment programs aimed at recognizing and treating eating disorders with a goal of producing more fit and healthy service members. PMID:16173205

  8. Linking neuronal brain activity to the glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Energy homeostasis ensures the functionality of the entire organism. The human brain as a missing link in the global regulation of the complex whole body energy metabolism is subject to recent investigation. The goal of this study is to gain insight into the influence of neuronal brain activity on cerebral and peripheral energy metabolism. In particular, the tight link between brain energy supply and metabolic responses of the organism is of interest. We aim to identifying regulatory elements of the human brain in the whole body energy homeostasis. Methods First, we introduce a general mathematical model describing the human whole body energy metabolism. It takes into account the two central roles of the brain in terms of energy metabolism. The brain is considered as energy consumer as well as regulatory instance. Secondly, we validate our mathematical model by experimental data. Cerebral high-energy phosphate content and peripheral glucose metabolism are measured in healthy men upon neuronal activation induced by transcranial direct current stimulation versus sham stimulation. By parameter estimation we identify model parameters that provide insight into underlying neurophysiological processes. Identified parameters reveal effects of neuronal activity on regulatory mechanisms of systemic glucose metabolism. Results Our examinations support the view that the brain increases its glucose supply upon neuronal activation. The results indicate that the brain supplies itself with energy according to its needs, and preeminence of cerebral energy supply is reflected. This mechanism ensures balanced cerebral energy homeostasis. Conclusions The hypothesis of the central role of the brain in whole body energy homeostasis as active controller is supported. PMID:23988084

  9. Brain Activity Patterns Uniquely Supporting Visual Feature Integration after Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Raja Beharelle, Anjali; Tisserand, Danielle; Stuss, Donald T.; McIntosh, Anthony R.; Levine, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients typically respond more slowly and with more variability than controls during tasks of attention requiring speeded reaction time. These behavioral changes are attributable, at least in part, to diffuse axonal injury (DAI), which affects integrated processing in distributed systems. Here we use a multivariate method sensitive to distributed neural activity to compare brain activity patterns of patients with chronic phase moderate to-severe TBI to those of controls during performance on a visual feature integration task assessing complex attentional processes that has previously shown sensitivity to TBI. The TBI patients were carefully screened to be free of large focal lesions that can affect performance and brain activation independently of DAI. The task required subjects to hold either one or three features of a Target in mind while suppressing responses to distracting information. In controls, the multi-feature condition activated a distributed network including limbic, prefrontal, and medial temporal structures. TBI patients engaged this same network in the single-feature and baseline conditions. In multi-feature presentations, TBI patients alone activated additional frontal, parietal, and occipital regions. These results are consistent with neuroimaging studies using tasks assessing different cognitive domains, where increased spread of brain activity changes was associated with TBI. Our results also extend previous findings that brain activity for relatively moderate task demands in TBI patients is similar to that associated with of high task demands in controls. PMID:22180740

  10. Reconstructing visual experiences from brain activity evoked by natural movies

    PubMed Central

    Nishimoto, Shinji; Vu, An T.; Naselaris, Thomas; Benjamini, Yuval; Yu, Bin; Gallant, Jack L.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Quantitative modeling of human brain activity can provide crucial insights about cortical representations [1, 2], and can form the basis for brain decoding devices [3–5]. Recent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have modeled brain activity elicited by static visual patterns, and have shown that it is possible to reconstruct these images from brain activity measurements [6–8]. However, blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signals measured using fMRI are very slow [9], so it has been difficult to model brain activity elicited by dynamic stimuli such as natural movies. Here we present a new motion-energy [10, 11] encoding model that largely overcome this limitation. Our motion-energy model describes fast visual information and slow hemodynamics by separate components. We recorded BOLD signals in occipito-temporal visual cortex of human subjects who passively watched natural movies, and fit the encoding model separately to individual voxels. Visualization of the fit models reveals how early visual areas represent moving stimuli. To demonstrate the power of our approach we also constructed a Bayesian decoder [8], by combining estimated encoding models with a sampled natural movie prior. The decoder provides remarkable reconstructions of natural movies, capturing the spatio-temporal structure of the viewed movie. These results demonstrate that dynamic brain activity measured under naturalistic conditions can be decoded using current fMRI technology. PMID:21945275

  11. Detection, visualization and animation of abnormal anatomic structure with a deformable probabilistic brain atlas based on random vector field transformations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul M. Thompson; Arthur W. Toga

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the design, implementation and preliminary results of a technique for creat- ing a comprehensive probabilistic atlas of the human brain based on high-dimensional vector field transformations. The goal of the atlas is to detect and quantify distributed patterns of deviation from normal anatomy, in a 3-D brain image from any given subject. The algorithm analyzes a reference

  12. Lateralization of Brain Activation in Fluent and Non-Fluent Preschool Children: A Magnetoencephalographic Study of Picture-Naming

    PubMed Central

    Sowman, Paul F.; Crain, Stephen; Harrison, Elisabeth; Johnson, Blake W.

    2014-01-01

    The neural causes of stuttering remain unknown. One explanation comes from neuroimaging studies that have reported abnormal lateralization of activation in the brains of people who stutter. However, these findings are generally based on data from adults with a long history of stuttering, raising the possibility that the observed lateralization anomalies are compensatory rather than causal. The current study investigated lateralization of brain activity in language-related regions of interest in young children soon after the onset of stuttering. We tested 24 preschool-aged children, half of whom had a positive diagnosis of stuttering. All children participated in a picture-naming experiment whilst their brain activity was recorded by magnetoencephalography. Source analysis performed during an epoch prior to speech onset was used to assess lateralized activation in three regions of interest. Activation was significantly lateralized to the left hemisphere in both groups and not different between groups. This study shows for the first time that significant speech preparatory brain activation can be identified in young children during picture-naming and supports the contention that, in stutterers, aberrant lateralization of brain function may be the result of neuroplastic adaptation that occurs as the condition becomes chronic. PMID:24904388

  13. Inference of brain pathway activities for Alzheimer's disease classification

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative and progressive disorder that results in brain malfunctions. Resting-state (RS) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) techniques have been successfully applied for quantifying brain activities of both Alzheimer's disease (AD) and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) patients. Region-based approaches are widely utilized to classify patients from cognitively normal subjects (CN). Nevertheless, region-based approaches have a few limitations, reproducibility owing to selection of disease-specific brain regions, and heterogeneity of brain activities during disease progression. For coping with these issues, network-based approaches have been suggested in the field of molecular bioinformatics. In comparison with individual gene-based approaches, they acquired more accurate results in diverse disease classification, and reproducibility was confirmed by replication studies. In our work, we applied a similar methodology integrating brain pathway information into pathway activity inference, and permitting classification of both aMCI and AD patients based on pathway activities rather than single region activities. Results After aggregating the 59 brain pathways from literature, we estimated brain pathway activities by using exhaustive search algorithms between patients and cognitively normal subjects, and identified discriminatory pathways according to disease progression. We used three different data sets and each data set consists of two different groups. Our results show that the pathway-based approach (AUC = 0.89, 0.9, 0.75) outperformed the region-based approach (AUC = 0.69, 0.8, 0.68). Also, our approach provided enhanced diagnostic power achieving higher accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity (pathway-based approach: accuracy = 83%; sensitivity = 86%; specificity = 78%, region-based approach: accuracy = 74%; sensitivity = 78%; specificity = 76%). Conclusions We proposed a novel method inferring brain pathway activities for disease classification. Our approach shows better classification performance than region-based approach in four classification models. We expect that brain pathway-based approach would be helpful for precise classification of brain disorders, and provide new opportunities for uncovering disrupted brain pathways caused by disease. Moreover, discriminatory pathways between patients and cognitively normal subjects may facilitate the interpretation of functional alterations during disease progression. PMID:26044913

  14. In vivo recordings of brain activity using organic transistors

    PubMed Central

    Khodagholy, Dion; Doublet, Thomas; Quilichini, Pascale; Gurfinkel, Moshe; Leleux, Pierre; Ghestem, Antoine; Ismailova, Esma; Hervé, Thierry; Sanaur, Sébastien; Bernard, Christophe; Malliaras, George G.

    2013-01-01

    In vivo electrophysiological recordings of neuronal circuits are necessary for diagnostic purposes and for brain-machine interfaces. Organic electronic devices constitute a promising candidate because of their mechanical flexibility and biocompatibility. Here we demonstrate the engineering of an organic electrochemical transistor embedded in an ultrathin organic film designed to record electrophysiological signals on the surface of the brain. The device, tested in vivo on epileptiform discharges, displayed superior signal-to-noise ratio due to local amplification compared with surface electrodes. The organic transistor was able to record on the surface low-amplitude brain activities, which were poorly resolved with surface electrodes. This study introduces a new class of biocompatible, highly flexible devices for recording brain activity with superior signal-to-noise ratio that hold great promise for medical applications. PMID:23481383

  15. Decoding mental states from brain activity in humans.

    PubMed

    Haynes, John-Dylan; Rees, Geraint

    2006-07-01

    Recent advances in human neuroimaging have shown that it is possible to accurately decode a person's conscious experience based only on non-invasive measurements of their brain activity. Such 'brain reading' has mostly been studied in the domain of visual perception, where it helps reveal the way in which individual experiences are encoded in the human brain. The same approach can also be extended to other types of mental state, such as covert attitudes and lie detection. Such applications raise important ethical issues concerning the privacy of personal thought. PMID:16791142

  16. Brain modularity controls the critical behavior of spontaneous activity.

    PubMed

    Russo, R; Herrmann, H J; de Arcangelis, L

    2014-01-01

    The human brain exhibits a complex structure made of scale-free highly connected modules loosely interconnected by weaker links to form a small-world network. These features appear in healthy patients whereas neurological diseases often modify this structure. An important open question concerns the role of brain modularity in sustaining the critical behaviour of spontaneous activity. Here we analyse the neuronal activity of a model, successful in reproducing on non-modular networks the scaling behaviour observed in experimental data, on a modular network implementing the main statistical features measured in human brain. We show that on a modular network, regardless the strength of the synaptic connections or the modular size and number, activity is never fully scale-free. Neuronal avalanches can invade different modules which results in an activity depression, hindering further avalanche propagation. Critical behaviour is solely recovered if inter-module connections are added, modifying the modular into a more random structure. PMID:24621482

  17. Brain modularity controls the critical behavior of spontaneous activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, R.; Herrmann, H. J.; de Arcangelis, L.

    2014-03-01

    The human brain exhibits a complex structure made of scale-free highly connected modules loosely interconnected by weaker links to form a small-world network. These features appear in healthy patients whereas neurological diseases often modify this structure. An important open question concerns the role of brain modularity in sustaining the critical behaviour of spontaneous activity. Here we analyse the neuronal activity of a model, successful in reproducing on non-modular networks the scaling behaviour observed in experimental data, on a modular network implementing the main statistical features measured in human brain. We show that on a modular network, regardless the strength of the synaptic connections or the modular size and number, activity is never fully scale-free. Neuronal avalanches can invade different modules which results in an activity depression, hindering further avalanche propagation. Critical behaviour is solely recovered if inter-module connections are added, modifying the modular into a more random structure.

  18. Mapping human brain activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mazziotta, J C

    1994-09-01

    A wide range of structural and functional techniques now exists to map the human brain in health and disease. These approaches span the gamut from external tomographic imaging devices (positron-emission tomography, single photon-emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography), to surface detectors (electroencephalography, magnetoencephalography, transcranial magnetic stimulation), to measurements made directly on the brain's surface or beneath it (intrinsic signal imaging, electrocorticography). The noninvasive methods have been combined to provide unique and previously unavailable insights into the macroscopic organization of the functional neuroanatomy of human vision, sensation, hearing, movement, language, learning, and memory. All methods have been applied to patients with neurologic, neurosurgical, and psychiatric disease and have provided a rapidly expanding knowledge of the pathophysiology of diseases such as epilepsy, cerebrovascular disease, neoplasms, neurodegenerative diseases, mental illness, and addiction states. In addition, these new methods have become a mainstay of preoperative surgical planning and the monitoring of pharmacologic or surgical (transplantation) interventions. Most recently, the ability to observe the reorganization of the human nervous system after acute injury, such as occurs with cerebral infarction or head trauma, or in the course of a progressive degenerative process such as Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease, may provide new insights and methods in the rapidly expanding field of neurorehabilitation. Our newfound ability to generate maps and databases of human brain development, maturation, skill acquisition, aging, and disease states is both an exciting and formidable task. PMID:7975566

  19. Synchronous brain activity across individuals underlies shared psychological perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Lahnakoski, Juha M.; Glerean, Enrico; Jääskeläinen, Iiro P.; Hyönä, Jukka; Hari, Riitta; Sams, Mikko; Nummenmaa, Lauri

    2014-01-01

    For successful communication, we need to understand the external world consistently with others. This task requires sufficiently similar cognitive schemas or psychological perspectives that act as filters to guide the selection, interpretation and storage of sensory information, perceptual objects and events. Here we show that when individuals adopt a similar psychological perspective during natural viewing, their brain activity becomes synchronized in specific brain regions. We measured brain activity with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) from 33 healthy participants who viewed a 10-min movie twice, assuming once a ‘social’ (detective) and once a ‘non-social’ (interior decorator) perspective to the movie events. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to derive multisubject voxelwise similarity measures (inter-subject correlations; ISCs) of functional MRI data. We used k-nearest-neighbor and support vector machine classifiers as well as a Mantel test on the ISC matrices to reveal brain areas wherein ISC predicted the participants' current perspective. ISC was stronger in several brain regions—most robustly in the parahippocampal gyrus, posterior parietal cortex and lateral occipital cortex—when the participants viewed the movie with similar rather than different perspectives. Synchronization was not explained by differences in visual sampling of the movies, as estimated by eye gaze. We propose that synchronous brain activity across individuals adopting similar psychological perspectives could be an important neural mechanism supporting shared understanding of the environment. PMID:24936687

  20. Synchronous brain activity across individuals underlies shared psychological perspectives.

    PubMed

    Lahnakoski, Juha M; Glerean, Enrico; Jääskeläinen, Iiro P; Hyönä, Jukka; Hari, Riitta; Sams, Mikko; Nummenmaa, Lauri

    2014-10-15

    For successful communication, we need to understand the external world consistently with others. This task requires sufficiently similar cognitive schemas or psychological perspectives that act as filters to guide the selection, interpretation and storage of sensory information, perceptual objects and events. Here we show that when individuals adopt a similar psychological perspective during natural viewing, their brain activity becomes synchronized in specific brain regions. We measured brain activity with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) from 33 healthy participants who viewed a 10-min movie twice, assuming once a 'social' (detective) and once a 'non-social' (interior decorator) perspective to the movie events. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to derive multisubject voxelwise similarity measures (inter-subject correlations; ISCs) of functional MRI data. We used k-nearest-neighbor and support vector machine classifiers as well as a Mantel test on the ISC matrices to reveal brain areas wherein ISC predicted the participants' current perspective. ISC was stronger in several brain regions--most robustly in the parahippocampal gyrus, posterior parietal cortex and lateral occipital cortex--when the participants viewed the movie with similar rather than different perspectives. Synchronization was not explained by differences in visual sampling of the movies, as estimated by eye gaze. We propose that synchronous brain activity across individuals adopting similar psychological perspectives could be an important neural mechanism supporting shared understanding of the environment. PMID:24936687

  1. Brain acetycholinesterase activity in botulism-intoxicated mallards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rocke, T.E.; Samuel, M.D.

    1991-01-01

    Brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in captive-reared mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) that died of botulism was compared with euthanized controls. AChE levels for both groups were within the range reported for normal mallards, and there was no significant difference in mean AChE activity between birds that ingested botulism toxin and died and those that did not.

  2. Uncovering Intrinsic Modular Organization of Spontaneous Brain Activity in Humans

    PubMed Central

    He, Yong; Wang, Jinhui; Wang, Liang; Chen, Zhang J.; Yan, Chaogan; Yang, Hong; Tang, Hehan; Zhu, Chaozhe; Gong, Qiyong; Zang, Yufeng; Evans, Alan C.

    2009-01-01

    The characterization of topological architecture of complex brain networks is one of the most challenging issues in neuroscience. Slow (<0.1 Hz), spontaneous fluctuations of the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal in functional magnetic resonance imaging are thought to be potentially important for the reflection of spontaneous neuronal activity. Many studies have shown that these fluctuations are highly coherent within anatomically or functionally linked areas of the brain. However, the underlying topological mechanisms responsible for these coherent intrinsic or spontaneous fluctuations are still poorly understood. Here, we apply modern network analysis techniques to investigate how spontaneous neuronal activities in the human brain derived from the resting-state BOLD signals are topologically organized at both the temporal and spatial scales. We first show that the spontaneous brain functional networks have an intrinsically cohesive modular structure in which the connections between regions are much denser within modules than between them. These identified modules are found to be closely associated with several well known functionally interconnected subsystems such as the somatosensory/motor, auditory, attention, visual, subcortical, and the “default” system. Specifically, we demonstrate that the module-specific topological features can not be captured by means of computing the corresponding global network parameters, suggesting a unique organization within each module. Finally, we identify several pivotal network connectors and paths (predominantly associated with the association and limbic/paralimbic cortex regions) that are vital for the global coordination of information flow over the whole network, and we find that their lesions (deletions) critically affect the stability and robustness of the brain functional system. Together, our results demonstrate the highly organized modular architecture and associated topological properties in the temporal and spatial brain functional networks of the human brain that underlie spontaneous neuronal dynamics, which provides important implications for our understanding of how intrinsically coherent spontaneous brain activity has evolved into an optimal neuronal architecture to support global computation and information integration in the absence of specific stimuli or behaviors. PMID:19381298

  3. Abnormal Brain Iron Metabolism in Irp2 Deficient Mice Is Associated with Mild Neurological and Behavioral Impairments

    PubMed Central

    Zumbrennen-Bullough, Kimberly B.; Becker, Lore; Garrett, Lillian; Hölter, Sabine M.; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Mossbrugger, Ilona; Quintanilla-Fend, Leticia; Racz, Ildiko; Rathkolb, Birgit; Klopstock, Thomas; Wurst, Wolfgang; Zimmer, Andreas; Wolf, Eckhard; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; de Angelis, Martin Hrab?; Romney, Steven J.; Leibold, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Iron Regulatory Protein 2 (Irp2, Ireb2) is a central regulator of cellular iron homeostasis in vertebrates. Two global knockout mouse models have been generated to explore the role of Irp2 in regulating iron metabolism. While both mouse models show that loss of Irp2 results in microcytic anemia and altered body iron distribution, discrepant results have drawn into question the role of Irp2 in regulating brain iron metabolism. One model shows that aged Irp2 deficient mice develop adult-onset progressive neurodegeneration that is associated with axonal degeneration and loss of Purkinje cells in the central nervous system. These mice show iron deposition in white matter tracts and oligodendrocyte soma throughout the brain. A contrasting model of global Irp2 deficiency shows no overt or pathological signs of neurodegeneration or brain iron accumulation, and display only mild motor coordination and balance deficits when challenged by specific tests. Explanations for conflicting findings in the severity of the clinical phenotype, brain iron accumulation and neuronal degeneration remain unclear. Here, we describe an additional mouse model of global Irp2 deficiency. Our aged Irp2?/? mice show marked iron deposition in white matter and in oligodendrocytes while iron content is significantly reduced in neurons. Ferritin and transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1, Tfrc), expression are increased and decreased, respectively, in the brain from Irp2?/? mice. These mice show impairments in locomotion, exploration, motor coordination/balance and nociception when assessed by neurological and behavioral tests, but lack overt signs of neurodegenerative disease. Ultrastructural studies of specific brain regions show no evidence of neurodegeneration. Our data suggest that Irp2 deficiency dysregulates brain iron metabolism causing cellular dysfunction that ultimately leads to mild neurological, behavioral and nociceptive impairments. PMID:24896637

  4. Subanesthetic ketamine treatment promotes abnormal interactions between neural subsystems and alters the properties of functional brain networks.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Neil; McDonald, Martin; Higham, Desmond J; Morris, Brian J; Pratt, Judith A

    2014-06-01

    Acute treatment with subanesthetic ketamine, a non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist, is widely utilized as a translational model for schizophrenia. However, how acute NMDA receptor blockade impacts on brain functioning at a systems level, to elicit translationally relevant symptomatology and behavioral deficits, has not yet been determined. Here, for the first time, we apply established and recently validated topological measures from network science to brain imaging data gained from ketamine-treated mice to elucidate how acute NMDA receptor blockade impacts on the properties of functional brain networks. We show that the effects of acute ketamine treatment on the global properties of these networks are divergent from those widely reported in schizophrenia. Where acute NMDA receptor blockade promotes hyperconnectivity in functional brain networks, pronounced dysconnectivity is found in schizophrenia. We also show that acute ketamine treatment increases the connectivity and importance of prefrontal and thalamic brain regions in brain networks, a finding also divergent to alterations seen in schizophrenia. In addition, we characterize how ketamine impacts on bipartite functional interactions between neural subsystems. A key feature includes the enhancement of prefrontal cortex (PFC)-neuromodulatory subsystem connectivity in ketamine-treated animals, a finding consistent with the known effects of ketamine on PFC neurotransmitter levels. Overall, our data suggest that, at a systems level, acute ketamine-induced alterations in brain network connectivity do not parallel those seen in chronic schizophrenia. Hence, the mechanisms through which acute ketamine treatment induces translationally relevant symptomatology may differ from those in chronic schizophrenia. Future effort should therefore be dedicated to resolve the conflicting observations between this putative translational model and schizophrenia. PMID:24492765

  5. Subanesthetic Ketamine Treatment Promotes Abnormal Interactions between Neural Subsystems and Alters the Properties of Functional Brain Networks

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Neil; McDonald, Martin; Higham, Desmond J; Morris, Brian J; Pratt, Judith A

    2014-01-01

    Acute treatment with subanesthetic ketamine, a non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist, is widely utilized as a translational model for schizophrenia. However, how acute NMDA receptor blockade impacts on brain functioning at a systems level, to elicit translationally relevant symptomatology and behavioral deficits, has not yet been determined. Here, for the first time, we apply established and recently validated topological measures from network science to brain imaging data gained from ketamine-treated mice to elucidate how acute NMDA receptor blockade impacts on the properties of functional brain networks. We show that the effects of acute ketamine treatment on the global properties of these networks are divergent from those widely reported in schizophrenia. Where acute NMDA receptor blockade promotes hyperconnectivity in functional brain networks, pronounced dysconnectivity is found in schizophrenia. We also show that acute ketamine treatment increases the connectivity and importance of prefrontal and thalamic brain regions in brain networks, a finding also divergent to alterations seen in schizophrenia. In addition, we characterize how ketamine impacts on bipartite functional interactions between neural subsystems. A key feature includes the enhancement of prefrontal cortex (PFC)-neuromodulatory subsystem connectivity in ketamine-treated animals, a finding consistent with the known effects of ketamine on PFC neurotransmitter levels. Overall, our data suggest that, at a systems level, acute ketamine-induced alterations in brain network connectivity do not parallel those seen in chronic schizophrenia. Hence, the mechanisms through which acute ketamine treatment induces translationally relevant symptomatology may differ from those in chronic schizophrenia. Future effort should therefore be dedicated to resolve the conflicting observations between this putative translational model and schizophrenia. PMID:24492765

  6. Brain feminization requires active repression of masculinization via DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Nugent, Bridget M; Wright, Christopher L; Shetty, Amol C; Hodes, Georgia E; Lenz, Kathryn M; Mahurkar, Anup; Russo, Scott J; Devine, Scott E; McCarthy, Margaret M

    2015-05-01

    The developing mammalian brain is destined for a female phenotype unless exposed to gonadal hormones during a perinatal sensitive period. It has been assumed that the undifferentiated brain is masculinized by direct induction of transcription by ligand-activated nuclear steroid receptors. We found that a primary effect of gonadal steroids in the highly sexually dimorphic preoptic area (POA) is to reduce activity of DNA methyltransferase (Dnmt) enzymes, thereby decreasing DNA methylation and releasing masculinizing genes from epigenetic repression. Pharmacological inhibition of Dnmts mimicked gonadal steroids, resulting in masculinized neuronal markers and male sexual behavior in female rats. Conditional knockout of the de novo Dnmt isoform, Dnmt3a, also masculinized sexual behavior in female mice. RNA sequencing revealed gene and isoform variants modulated by methylation that may underlie the divergent reproductive behaviors of males versus females. Our data show that brain feminization is maintained by the active suppression of masculinization via DNA methylation. PMID:25821913

  7. Abnormal Tc-99m-MDP/GA-67 scan patterns in association with active chronic osteomyelitis

    SciTech Connect

    Tumeh, S.S.; Aliabadi, P.; Weissman, B.; McNeil, B.J.

    1985-05-01

    In this study the authors reviewed data from 136 patients (pts) in order to refine the interpretive criteria used to diagnose active osteomyelitis (AOM) in patients with previous bone disease (e.g., old osteomyelitis, fractures, orthopedic devices excluding prostheses). They evaluated bone (Tc-99mMDP) and gallium 67 studies and obtained followup in all pts. AOM was diagnosed by surgery or biopsy and culture in 49 pts and was excluded by the same criteria in 16 pts. An additional 71 pts had the diagnosis excluded by followup clinical criteria. Five patterns were found. T1: abnormal Tc-99m-MDP, normal Ga-67. T2: diffuse increased uptake of both radiopharmaceuticals with Tc-99m-MDP greater than Ga-67. T3: different geographic distribution, but similar intensities of uptake of both. T4: very similar uptake and distribution of both. T5: Ga-67 exceeded Tc-99m-MDP. The authors conclude that T5 is diagnostic of AOM, T3 and T4 raise the probability of AOM than before scanning, T1 and T2 decrease it.

  8. Dominant frequencies of resting human brain activity as measured by the electrocorticogram

    PubMed Central

    Groppe, David M.; Bickel, Stephan; Keller, Corey J.; Jain, Sanjay K.; Hwang, Sean T.; Harden, Cynthia; Mehta, Ashesh D.

    2014-01-01

    The brain’s spontaneous, intrinsic activity is increasingly being shown to reveal brain function, delineate large scale brain networks, and diagnose brain disorders. One of the most studied and clinically utilized types of intrinsic brain activity are oscillations in the electrocorticogram (ECoG), a relatively localized measure of cortical synaptic activity. Here we objectively characterize the types of ECoG oscillations commonly observed over particular cortical areas when an individual is awake and immobile with eyes closed, using a surface-based cortical atlas and cluster analysis. Both methods show that [1] there is generally substantial variability in the dominant frequencies of cortical regions and substantial overlap in dominant frequencies across the areas sampled (primarily lateral central, temporal, and frontal areas), [2] theta (4–8 Hz) is the most dominant type of oscillation in the areas sampled with a mode around 7 Hz, [3] alpha (8–13 Hz) is largely limited to parietal and occipital regions, and [4] beta (13–30 Hz) is prominent peri-Rolandically, over the middle frontal gyrus, and the pars opercularis. In addition, the cluster analysis revealed seven types of ECoG spectral power densities (SPDs). Six of these have peaks at 3, 5, 7 (narrow), 7 (broad), 10, and 17 Hz, while the remaining cluster is broadly distributed with less pronounced peaks at 8, 19, and 42 Hz. These categories largely corroborate conventional sub-gamma frequency band distinctions (delta, theta, alpha, and beta) and suggest multiple sub-types of theta. Finally, we note that gamma/high gamma activity (30+ Hz) was at times prominently observed, but was too infrequent and variable across individuals to be reliably characterized. These results should help identify abnormal patterns of ECoG oscillations, inform the interpretation of EEG/MEG intrinsic activity, and provide insight into the functions of these different oscillations and the networks that produce them. Specifically, our results support theories of the importance of theta oscillations in general cortical function, suggest that alpha activity is primarily related to sensory processing/attention, and demonstrate that beta networks extend far beyond primary sensorimotor regions. PMID:23639261

  9. Abnormal Initiation and Conduction of Slow-Wave Activity in Gastroparesis, Defined by High-Resolution Electrical Mapping

    PubMed Central

    O’Grady, Gregory; Angeli, Timothy R.; Du, Peng; Lahr, Chris; Lammers, Wim JEP; Windsor, John A.; Abell, Thomas L.; Farrugia, Gianrico; Pullan, Andrew J.; Cheng, Leo K.

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) generate slow waves. Disrupted ICC networks and gastric dysrhythmias are each associated with gastroparesis. However, there are no data on the initiation and propagation of slow waves in gastroparesis, because research tools have lacked spatial resolution. We applied high-resolution electrical mapping to quantify and classify gastroparesis slow-wave abnormalities in spatiotemporal detail. Methods Serosal HR mapping was performed, using flexible arrays (256 electrodes; 36 cm2), at stimulator implantation in 12 patients with diabetic or idiopathic gastroparesis. Data were analyzed by isochronal mapping, velocity and amplitude field mapping, and propagation animation. ICC numbers were determined from gastric biopsies. Results Mean ICC counts were reduced in patients with gastroparesis (2.3 vs 5.4 bodies/field; P<.001). Slow-wave abnormalities were detected by HR mapping in 11/12 patients. Several new patterns were observed and classified as ‘abnormal initiation’ (10/12; stable ectopic pacemakers or diffuse focal events; median 3.3 c/min, range 2.1-5.7), or ‘abnormal conduction’ (7/10; reduced velocities or conduction blocks; median 2.9 c/min; range 2.1-3.6). Circumferential conduction emerged during aberrant initiation or incomplete block and was associated with velocity elevation (7.3 vs 2.9 mm s?1; P=.002) and increased amplitudes beyond a low base value (415 vs 170 ?V; P=.002). Conclusions HR mapping revealed new categories of abnormal human slow-wave activity. Abnormalities of slow-wave initiation and conduction occur in gastroparesis, often at normal frequency, which could be missed by tests that lack spatial resolution. Irregular initiation, aberrant conduction, and low amplitude activity could contribute to the pathogenesis of gastroparesis. PMID:22643349

  10. Concomitant treatment of brain metastasis with Whole Brain Radiotherapy [WBRT] and Temozolomide [TMZ] is active and improves Quality of Life

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Raffaele Addeo; Michele Caraglia; Vincenzo Faiola; Elena Capasso; Bruno Vincenzi; Liliana Montella; Rosario Guarrasi; Luigi Caserta; Salvatore Del Prete

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brain metastases (BM) represent one of the most frequent complications related to cancer, and their treatment continues to evolve. We have evaluated the activity, toxicity and the impact on Quality of Life (QoL) of a concomitant treatment with whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) and Temozolomide (TMZ) in patients with brain metastases from solid tumors in a prospective Simon two stage

  11. Methamphetamine Causes Microglial Activation in the Brains of Human Abusers

    PubMed Central

    Sekine, Yoshimoto; Ouchi, Yasuomi; Sugihara, Genichi; Takei, Nori; Yoshikawa, Etsuji; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Iwata, Yasuhide; Tsuchiya, Kenji J.; Suda, Shiro; Suzuki, Katsuaki; Kawai, Masayoshi; Takebayashi, Kiyokazu; Yamamoto, Shigeyuki; Matsuzaki, Hideo; Ueki, Takatoshi; Mori, Norio; Gold, Mark S.; Cadet, Jean L.

    2008-01-01

    Methamphetamine is a popular addictive drug whose use is associated with multiple neuropsychiatric adverse events and toxic to the dopaminergic and serotonergic systems of the brain. Methamphetamine-induced neuropathology is associated with increased expression of microglial cells that are thought to participate in either pro-toxic or protective mechanisms in the brain. Although reactive microgliosis has been observed in animal models of methamphetamine neurotoxicity, no study has reported on the status of microglial activation in human methamphetamine abusers. The present study reports on 12 abstinent methamphetamine abusers and 12 age-, gender-, education-matched control subjects who underwent positron emission tomography using a radiotracer for activated microglia, [11C](R)-(1-[2-chlorophenyl]-N-methyl-N-[1-methylpropyl]-3-isoquinoline carboxamide) ([11C](R)-PK11195). Compartment analysis was used to estimate quantitative levels of binding potentials of [11C](R)-PK11195 in brain regions with dopaminergic and/or serotonergic innervation. The mean levels of [11C](R)-PK11195 binding were higher in methamphetamine abusers than those in control subjects in all brain regions (> 250% higher, p < 0.01 for all). In addition, the binding levels in the midbrain, striatum, thalamus, and orbitofrontal and insular cortices (p < 0.05) correlated inversely with the duration of methamphetamine abstinence. These results suggest that chronic self-administration of methamphetamine can cause reactive microgliosis in the brains of human methamphetamine abusers, a level of activation that appears to subside over longer periods of abstinence. PMID:18509037

  12. Brain activation of the defensive and appetitive survival systems in obsessive compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Óscar F; Soares, José Miguel; Carvalho, Sandra; Leite, Jorge; Ganho, Ana; Fernandes-Gonçalves, Ana; Frank, Brandon; Pocinho, Fernando; Relvas, João; Carracedo, Angel; Sampaio, Adriana

    2015-06-01

    Several studies have shown that basic emotions are responsible for a significant enhancement of early visual processes and increased activation in visual processing brain regions. It may be possible that the cognitive uncertainty and repeated behavioral checking evident in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is due to the existence of abnormalities in basic survival circuits, particularly those associated with the visual processing of the physical characteristics of emotional-laden stimuli. The objective of the present study was to test if patients with OCD show evidence of altered basic survival circuits, particularly those associated with the visual processing of the physical characteristics of emotional stimuli. Fifteen patients with OCD and 12 healthy controls underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging acquisition while being exposed to emotional pictures, with different levels of arousal, intended to trigger the defensive and appetitive basic survival circuits. Overall, the present results seem to indicate dissociation in the activity of the defense and appetitive survival systems in OCD. Results suggest that the clinical group reacts to basic threat with a strong activation of the defensive system mobilizing widespread brain networks (i.e., frontal, temporal, occipital-parietal, and subcortical nucleus) and blocking the activation of the appetitive system when facing positive emotional triggers from the initial stages of visual processing (i.e., superior occipital gyrus). PMID:24760279

  13. Lasting Neurobehavioral Abnormalities in Rats After Neonatal Activation of Serotonin 1A and 1B Receptors: Possible Mechanisms for Serotonin Dysfunction in Autistic Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Khatri, Nidhi; Simpson, Kimberly L.; Lin, Rick C.S.; Paul, Ian A.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Perinatal exposure of rats to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) produces sensory and social abnormalities paralleling those seen in Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD). However, the possible mechanism(s) by which this exposure produces behavioral abnormalities is unclear. Objective We hypothesized that the lasting effects of neonatal SSRI exposure are a consequence of abnormal stimulation of 5-HT1A and/or 5-HT1B receptors during brain development. We examined whether such stimulation would result in lasting sensory and social deficits in rats in a manner similar to SSRIs using both direct agonist stimulation of receptors as well as selective antagonism of these receptors during SSRI exposure. Methods Male and female rat pups were treated from postnatal day 8 to 21. In Experiment 1, pups received citalopram (20mg/kg/d), saline, 8-OH-DPAT (0.5 mg/kg/d) or CGS-12066B (10 mg/kg/d). In Experiment 2, a separate cohort of pups received an citalopram (20 mg/kg/d), or saline which was combined with either WAY-100635 (0.6 mg/kg/d) or GR-127935 (6 mg/kg/d) or vehicle. Rats were then tested in paradigms designed to assess sensory and social response behaviors at different time points during development. Results Direct and indirect neonatal stimulation of 5-HT1A or 5-HT1B receptors disrupts sensory processing, produces neophobia, increases stereotypic activity, and impairs social interactions in manner analogous to that observed in ASD. Conclusion Increased stimulation of 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B receptors plays a significant role in the production of lasting social and sensory deficits in adult animals exposed as neonates to SSRIs. PMID:23975037

  14. Identification of hematomas in mild traumatic brain injury using an index of quantitative brain electrical activity.

    PubMed

    Prichep, Leslie S; Naunheim, Rosanne; Bazarian, Jeffrey; Mould, W Andrew; Hanley, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Rapid identification of traumatic intracranial hematomas following closed head injury represents a significant health care need because of the potentially life-threatening risk they present. This study demonstrates the clinical utility of an index of brain electrical activity used to identify intracranial hematomas in traumatic brain injury (TBI) presenting to the emergency department (ED). Brain electrical activity was recorded from a limited montage located on the forehead of 394 closed head injured patients who were referred for CT scans as part of their standard ED assessment. A total of 116 of these patients were found to be CT positive (CT+), of which 46 patients with traumatic intracranial hematomas (CT+) were identified for study. A total of 278 patients were found to be CT negative (CT-) and were used as controls. CT scans were subjected to quantitative measurements of volume of blood and distance of bleed from recording electrodes by blinded independent experts, implementing a validated method for hematoma measurement. Using an algorithm based on brain electrical activity developed on a large independent cohort of TBI patients and controls (TBI-Index), patients were classified as either positive or negative for structural brain injury. Sensitivity to hematomas was found to be 95.7% (95% CI = 85.2, 99.5), specificity was 43.9% (95% CI = 38.0, 49.9). There was no significant relationship between the TBI-Index and distance of the bleed from recording sites (F = 0.044, p = 0.833), or volume of blood measured F = 0.179, p = 0.674). Results of this study are a validation and extension of previously published retrospective findings in an independent population, and provide evidence that a TBI-Index for structural brain injury is a highly sensitive measure for the detection of potentially life-threatening traumatic intracranial hematomas, and could contribute to the rapid, quantitative evaluation and treatment of such patients. PMID:25054838

  15. Active tactile exploration enabled by a brain-machine-brain interface

    PubMed Central

    O’Doherty, Joseph E.; Lebedev, Mikhail A.; Ifft, Peter J.; Zhuang, Katie Z.; Shokur, Solaiman; Bleuler, Hannes; Nicolelis, Miguel A. L.

    2011-01-01

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs)1,2 use neuronal activity recorded from the brain to establish direct communication with external actuators, such as prosthetic arms. While BMIs aim to restore the normal sensorimotor functions of the limbs, so far they have lacked tactile sensation. Here we demonstrate the operation of a brain-machine-brain interface (BMBI) that both controls the exploratory reaching movements of an actuator and enables the signalling of artificial tactile feedback through intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) of the primary somatosensory cortex (S1). Monkeys performed an active-exploration task in which an actuator (a computer cursor or a virtual-reality hand) was moved using a BMBI that derived motor commands from neuronal ensemble activity recorded in primary motor cortex (M1). ICMS feedback occurred whenever the actuator touched virtual objects. Temporal patterns of ICMS encoded the artificial tactile properties of each object. Neuronal recordings and ICMS epochs were temporally multiplexed to avoid interference. Two monkeys operated this BMBI to search and discriminate one out of three visually undistinguishable objects, using the virtual hand to identify the unique artificial texture (AT) associated with each. These results suggest that clinical motor neuroprostheses might benefit from the addition of ICMS feedback to generate artificial somatic perceptions associated with mechanical, robotic, or even virtual prostheses. PMID:21976021

  16. Brief Communications Brain Monoamine Oxidase A Activity Predicts Trait

    E-print Network

    Goldstein, Rita

    aggression. Brain MAO A activity was measured in vivo in healthy non- smoking men with positron emission-third of the variability. Because trait aggression is a measure used to predict antisocial behavior, these results under), it may also provide an explanation for the high rate of cigarette smoking in depression (Glassman et al

  17. Brain Activation during Sentence Comprehension among Good and Poor Readers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ann Meyler; Timothy A. Keller; Vladimir L. Cherkassky; Donghoon Lee; Fumiko Hoeft; Susan Whitfield-Gabrieli; John D. E. Gabrieli; Marcel Adam Just

    2007-01-01

    This study sought to increase current understanding of the neuro- psychological basis of poor reading ability by using fMRI to examine brain activation during a visual sentence comprehension task among good and poor readers in the third (n 5 32) and fifth (n 5 35) grades. Reading ability, age, and the combination of both factors made unique contributions to cortical

  18. Brain Activity while Reading Sentences with Kanji Characters Expressing Emotions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Masahide Yuasa; Keiichi Saito; Naoki Mukawa

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the brain activity associated with kanji characters expressing emotion, which are places at the end of a sentence. Japanese people use a special kanji character in brackets at the end of sentences in text messages such as those sent through e-mail and messenger tools. Such kanji characters plays a role to expresses the sender's emotion

  19. Learning to See Biological Motion: Brain Activity Parallels Behavior

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emily D. Grossman; Randolph Blake; Chai-Youn Kim

    2004-01-01

    Individuals improve with practice on a variety of perceptual tasks, presumably reflecting plasticity in underlying neural mechanisms. We trained observers to discriminate biological motion from scrambled (nonbiological) motion and examined whether the resulting improvement in perceptual performance was accompanied by changes in activation within the posterior superior temporal sulcus and the fusiform face area, brain areas involved in perception of

  20. On a Mathematical Model of Brain Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Fichtner, K.-H. [Friedrich Schiller Unversity Jena, Institute of Applied Mathematics, E.-Abbe-Platz 2, 07743 Jena (Germany); Fichtner, L. [Friedrich Schiller Unversity Jena, Institute of Psychology, Am Steiger 3, 07743 Jena (Germany); Freudenberg, W. [Brandenb. Techn. University Cottbus, Dep. of Mathematics, PO box 10 13 44, 03013 Cottbus (Germany); Ohya, M. [Tokyo University of Science, Department of Information Science, Noda City, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan)

    2007-12-03

    The procedure of recognition can be described as follows: There is a set of complex signals stored in the memory. Choosing one of these signals may be interpreted as generating a hypothesis concerning an 'expexted view of the world'. Then the brain compares a signal arising from our senses with the signal chosen from the memory leading to a change of the state of both signals. Furthermore, measurements of that procedure like EEG or MEG are based on the fact that recognition of signals causes a certain loss of excited neurons, i.e. the neurons change their state from 'excited' to 'nonexcited'. For that reason a statistical model of the recognition process should reflect both--the change of the signals and the loss of excited neurons. A first attempt to explain the process of recognition in terms of quantum statistics was given. In the present note it is not possible to present this approach in detail. In lieu we will sketch roughly a few of the basic ideas and structures of the proposed model of the recognition process (Section). Further, we introduce the basic spaces and justify the choice of spaces used in this approach. A more elaborate presentation including all proofs will be given in a series of some forthcoming papers. In this series also the procedures of creation of signals from the memory, amplification, accumulation and transformation of input signals, and measurements like EEG and MEG will be treated in detail.

  1. Early white matter abnormalities, progressive brain pathology and motor deficits in a novel knock-in mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jing; Peng, Qi; Hou, Zhipeng; Jiang, Mali; Wang, Xin; Langseth, Abraham J; Tao, Michael; Barker, Peter B; Mori, Susumu; Bergles, Dwight E; Ross, Christopher A; Detloff, Peter J; Zhang, Jiangyang; Duan, Wenzhen

    2015-05-01

    White matter abnormalities have been reported in premanifest Huntington's disease (HD) subjects before overt striatal neuronal loss, but whether the white matter changes represent a necessary step towards further pathology and the underlying mechanism of these changes remains unknown. Here, we characterized a novel knock-in mouse model that expresses mouse HD gene homolog (Hdh) with extended CAG repeat- HdhQ250, which was derived from the selective breeding of HdhQ150 mice. HdhQ250 mice manifest an accelerated and robust phenotype compared with its parent line. HdhQ250 mice exhibit progressive motor deficits, reduction in striatal and cortical volume, accumulation of mutant huntingtin aggregation, decreased levels of DARPP32 and BDNF and altered striatal metabolites. The abnormalities detected in this mouse model are reminiscent of several aspects of human HD. In addition, disturbed myelination was evident in postnatal Day 14 HdhQ250 mouse brain, including reduced levels of myelin regulatory factor and myelin basic protein, and decreased numbers of myelinated axons in the corpus callosum. Thinner myelin sheaths, indicated by increased G-ratio of myelin, were also detected in the corpus callosum of adult HdhQ250 mice. Moreover, proliferation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells is altered by mutant huntingtin both in vitro and in vivo. Our data indicate that this model is suitable for understanding comprehensive pathogenesis of HD in white matter and gray matter as well as developing therapeutics for HD. PMID:25609071

  2. Drastically Abnormal Gluco- and Galactosylceramide Composition Does Not Affect Ganglioside Metabolism in the Brain of Mice Deficient in Galactosylceramide Synthase

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kunihiko Suzuki; Marie T. Vanier; Timothy Coetzee; Brian Popko

    1999-01-01

    Mice that are genetically deficient in UDP-galactose: ceramide galactosyltransferase are unable to synthesize galactosylceramide. Consequently, sulfatide, which can be synthesized only by sulfation of galactosylceramide, is also totally absent in affected mouse brain. a-Hydroxy fatty acid-containing glucosylceramide partially replaces the missing galactosylceramide. A substantial proportion of sphingomyelin, which normally contains only non-hydroxy fatty acids, also contains a-hydroxy fatty acids. These

  3. Use of brain electrical activity for the identification of hematomas in mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Daniel F; Chabot, Robert; Mould, W Andrew; Morgan, Timothy; Naunheim, Rosanne; Sheth, Kevin N; Chiang, William; Prichep, Leslie S

    2013-12-15

    This study investigates the potential clinical utility in the emergency department (ED) of an index of brain electrical activity to identify intracranial hematomas. The relationship between this index and depth, size, and type of hematoma was explored. Ten minutes of brain electrical activity was recorded from a limited montage in 38 adult patients with traumatic hematomas (CT scan positive) and 38 mild head injured controls (CT scan negative) in the ED. The volume of blood and distance from recording electrodes were measured by blinded independent experts. Brain electrical activity data were submitted to a classification algorithm independently developed traumatic brain injury (TBI) index to identify the probability of a CT+traumatic event. There was no significant relationship between the TBI-Index and type of hematoma, or distance of the bleed from recording sites. A significant correlation was found between TBI-Index and blood volume. The sensitivity to hematomas was 100%, positive predictive value was 74.5%, and positive likelihood ratio was 2.92. The TBI-Index, derived from brain electrical activity, demonstrates high accuracy for identification of traumatic hematomas. Further, this was not influenced by distance of the bleed from the recording electrodes, blood volume, or type of hematoma. Distance and volume limitations noted with other methods, (such as that based on near-infrared spectroscopy) were not found, thus suggesting the TBI-Index to be a potentially important adjunct to acute assessment of head injury. Because of the life-threatening risk of undetected hematomas (false negatives), specificity was permitted to be lower, 66%, in exchange for extremely high sensitivity. PMID:24040943

  4. Blue Light Stimulates Cognitive Brain Activity in Visually Blind Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Vandewalle, Gilles; Collignon, Olivier; Hull, Joseph T.; Daneault, Véronique; Albouy, Geneviève; Lepore, Franco; Phillips, Christophe; Doyon, Julien; Czeisler, Charles A.; Dumont, Marie; Lockley, Steven W.; Carrier, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Light regulates multiple non-image-forming (or non-visual) circadian, neuroendocrine and neurobehavioral functions, via outputs from intrinsically-photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs). Exposure to light directly enhances alertness and performance, so that light is an important regulator of wakefulness and cognition. The roles of rods, cones and ipRGCs in the impact of light on cognitive brain functions remain unclear, however. A small percentage of blind individuals retain non-image-forming photoreception and offer a unique opportunity to investigate light impacts in the absence of conscious vision, presumably through ipRGCs. Here, we show that three such patients were able to choose non-randomly about the presence of light despite their complete lack of sight. Furthermore, 2s of blue light modified EEG activity when administered simultaneously to auditory stimulations. FMRI further showed that, during an auditory working memory task, less than a minute of blue light triggered the recruitment of supplemental prefrontal and thalamic brain regions involved in alertness and cognition regulation, as well as key areas of the default mode network. These results, which have to be considered as a proof of concept, show that non-image-forming photoreception triggers some awareness for light and can have a more rapid impact on human cognition than previously understood, if brain processing is actively engaged. Furthermore, light stimulates higher cognitive brain activity, independently of vision, and engages supplemental brain areas to perform an ongoing cognitive process. To our knowledge, our results constitute the first indication that ipRGC signaling may rapidly affect fundamental cerebral organization, so that it could potentially participate to the regulation of numerous aspects of human brain function. PMID:23859643

  5. Alteration of Interictal Brain Activity in Patients with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy in the Left Dominant Hemisphere: A Resting-State MEG Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Haitao; Zhu, Jinlong; Zhao, Tiezhu; Wu, Yong; Liu, Hongyi; Wu, Ting; Yang, Lu; Zou, Yuanjie; Zhang, Rui; Zheng, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Resting MEG activities were compared between patients with left temporal lobe epilepsy (LTLE) and normal controls. Using SAMg2, the activities of MEG data were reconstructed and normalized. Significantly elevated SAMg2 signals were found in LTLE patients in the left temporal lobe and medial structures. Marked decreases of SAMg2 signals were found in the wide extratemporal lobe regions, such as the bilateral visual cortex. The study also demonstrated a positive correlation between the seizure frequency and brain activities of the abnormal regions after the multiple linear regression analysis. These results suggested that the aberrant brain activities not only were related to the epileptogenic zones, but also existed in other extratemporal regions in patients with LTLE. The activities of the aberrant regions could be further damaged with the increase of the seizure frequency. Our findings indicated that LTLE could be a multifocal disease, including complex epileptic networks and brain dysfunction networks. PMID:25136558

  6. Altered brain activity for phonological manipulation in dyslexic Japanese children

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Hisako; Oba, Kentaro; Terasawa, Yuri; Moriguchi, Yoshiya; Uchiyama, Hitoshi; Seki, Ayumi; Koeda, Tatsuya; Inagaki, Masumi

    2013-01-01

    Because of unique linguistic characteristics, the prevalence rate of developmental dyslexia is relatively low in the Japanese language. Paradoxically, Japanese children have serious difficulty analysing phonological processes when they have dyslexia. Neurobiological deficits in Japanese dyslexia remain unclear and need to be identified, and may lead to better understanding of the commonality and diversity in the disorder among different linguistic systems. The present study investigated brain activity that underlies deficits in phonological awareness in Japanese dyslexic children using functional magnetic resonance imaging. We developed and conducted a phonological manipulation task to extract phonological processing skills and to minimize the influence of auditory working memory on healthy adults, typically developing children, and dyslexic children. Current experiments revealed that several brain regions participated in manipulating the phonological information including left inferior and middle frontal gyrus, left superior temporal gyrus, and bilateral basal ganglia. Moreover, dyslexic children showed altered activity in two brain regions. They showed hyperactivity in the basal ganglia compared with the two other groups, which reflects inefficient phonological processing. Hypoactivity in the left superior temporal gyrus was also found, suggesting difficulty in composing and processing phonological information. The altered brain activity shares similarity with those of dyslexic children in countries speaking alphabetical languages, but disparity also occurs between these two populations. These are initial findings concerning the neurobiological impairments in dyslexic Japanese children. PMID:24052613

  7. Brain activation during micturition in women

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bertil F. M. Blok; Leontien M. Sturms; Gert Holstege

    1998-01-01

    Summary Experiments in the cat have led to a concept of how the CNS controls micturition. In a previous study this concept was tested in a PET study in male volunteers. It was demonstrated that specific brainstem and forebrain areas are activated during micturition. It was unfortunate that this study did not involve women, because such results are important for

  8. Tesaglitazar, a Dual Peroxisome Proliferator- Activated Receptor Agonist (PPAR?\\/?), Improves Metabolic Abnormalities and Reduces Renal Injury in Obese Zucker Rats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jie Liao; Zohreh Soltani; Philip Ebenezer; Angel A. Isidro-Carrión; Rubin Zhang; Arshad Asghar; Erwin Aguilar; Joseph Francis; Xuejiao Hu; León Ferder; Efrain Reisin

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome increases the risk of developing diabetes as well as cardiovascular and kidney diseases. This research studied the effects of tesaglitazar, a dual-acting peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)?\\/? agonist, on metabolic abnormalities and kidney injury in obese Zucker rats (OZR). Lean Zucker rats (LZR) and OZR were used as control groups. Tesaglitazar (1 ?mol\\/kg\\/day) was given for 8 weeks in

  9. Motor impairments related to brain injury timing in early hemiparesis Part II: abnormal upper extremity joint torque synergies

    PubMed Central

    Sukal-Moulton, Theresa; Krosschell, Kristin J.; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah J.; Dewald, Julius P.A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Extensive neuromotor development occurs early in human life, and the timing of brain injury may affect the resulting motor impairment. In part I of this paper series it was demonstrated that the distribution of weakness in the upper extremity depended on the timing of brain injury in individuals with childhood-onset hemiparesis. Objective The goal of this study was to characterize how timing of brain injury impacts joint torque synergies, or losses of independent joint control. Method Twenty-four individuals with hemiparesis were divided into three groups based on the timing of their injury: before birth (PRE-natal, n=8), around the time of birth (PERI-natal, n=8) and after 6 months of age (POST-natal, n=8). Individuals with hemiparesis, as well as 8 typically developing peers participated in maximal isometric shoulder, elbow, wrist, and finger torque generation tasks while their efforts were recorded by a multiple degree-of-freedom load cell. Motor output in 4 joints of the upper extremity were concurrently measured during 8 primary torque generation tasks to quantify joint torque synergies. Results There were a number of significant coupling patterns identified in individuals with hemiparesis that differed from the typically developing group. POST-natal differences were most noted in the coupling of shoulder abductors with elbow, wrist, and finger flexors, while the PRE-natal group demonstrated significant distal joint coupling with elbow flexion. Conclusion The torque synergies measured provide indirect evidence for the use of bulbospinal pathways in the POST-natal group, while those with earlier injury may utilize relatively preserved ipsilateral corticospinal motor pathways. PMID:23911972

  10. Whole-brain gray matter volume abnormalities in patients with generalized anxiety disorder: voxel-based morphometry.

    PubMed

    Moon, Chung-Man; Kim, Gwang-Won; Jeong, Gwang-Woo

    2014-02-12

    Patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) experience psychological distress because of excessive and uncontrollable anxiety in everyday life. Only a few morphological studies have so far focused on specific brain regions of interest as well as the gray matter volume changes in GAD patients. This study evaluated gray matter volume alterations in whole-brain areas between GAD patients and healthy controls, and sex differences between the specific brain areas with significant volume changes in GAD patients using voxel-based morphometry. Twenty-two patients with GAD (13 men and nine women), who were diagnosed using the DSM-IV-TR, and 22 age-matched healthy controls (13 men and nine women) participated in this study. The high-resolution MRI data were processed using voxel-based morphometry analysis on the basis of diffeomorphic anatomical registration through an exponentiated Lie algebra algorithm in Statistical Parametric Mapping 8. There was no significant difference in the total intracranial volume between GAD patients and controls, but a significant difference was observed between sexes (P<0.05). Patients with GAD showed significant volume reductions in the hippocampus, midbrain, thalamus, insula, and superior temporal gyrus compared with the controls. As for the sex comparison, female patients showed a significant increase in the volume of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex relative to male patients. Also, the volume of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in female patients was correlated positively with the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale score (?=0.68, P=0.04). The specific morphological variations in patient with GAD will be helpful to understand the neural mechanism associated with a symptom of GAD. Furthermore, the findings would be valuable for the diagnostic accuracy of GAD using morphometric MRI analysis. PMID:24476839

  11. Brain temperature fluctuation: a reflection of functional neural activation.

    PubMed

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Brown, P Leon; Wise, Roy A

    2002-07-01

    Although it is known that relatively large increases in local brain temperature can occur during behaviour and in response to various novel, stressful and emotionally arousing environmental stimuli, the source of this heat is not clearly established. To clarify this issue, we monitored the temperature in three brain structures (dorsal and ventral striatum, cerebellum) and in arterial blood at the level of the abdominal aorta in freely moving rats exposed to several environmental challenges ranging from traditional stressors to simple sensory stimuli (cage change, tail pinch, exposure to another male rat, a female rat, a mouse or an unexpected sound). We found that brain temperature was consistently higher than arterial blood temperature, and that brain temperature increased prior to, and to a greater extent than, the increase in blood temperature evoked by each test challenge. Thus, the local metabolic consequences of widely correlated neural activity appear to be the primary source of increases in brain temperature and a driving force behind the associated changes in body temperature. PMID:12153543

  12. DOI: 10.1093/brain/awh199 Brain (2004), 127, 18111821 Cortical activation and synchronization during

    E-print Network

    2004-01-01

    temporal) area and reliably less activation than the control group in Broca's (left inferior frontal gyrus, more informally, Broca's area, was involved in a number of processes that could play an integratingDOI: 10.1093/brain/awh199 Brain (2004), 127, 1811­1821 Cortical activation and synchronization

  13. Congenital Abnormalities

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and may develop serious health problems (e.g. Down syndrome ). Single-Gene Abnormalities Sometimes the chromosomes are normal ... Detecting Genetic Abnormalities Prenatal Genetic Counseling Children with Down Syndrome: Health Care Information for Families Last Updated 5/ ...

  14. Abnormal induction of heat shock proteins in an Escherichia coli mutant deficient in adenosylmethionine synthetase activity.

    PubMed

    Matthews, R G; Neidhardt, F C

    1988-04-01

    Most prototrophic strains of Escherichia coli become restricted for methionine at 44 degrees C. A mutant strain (RG62 metK) in which the level of S-adenosylmethionine synthetase activity is only 10 to 20% of normal shows constitutive expression of one of the heat shock proteins, the lysU gene product, lysyl-tRNA synthetase form II, at 37 degrees C. These findings suggested a possible linkage between methionine metabolism and heat shock. We examined the induction of heat shock polypeptides in strain RG62 (metK) and in its parent, RG (metK+), from which it was derived by spontaneous mutation. Exponential-phase cultures of the two strains were pulse-labeled with [3H]leucine shortly after a shift from 37 to 44 degrees C, and the total cellular polypeptides were examined by two-dimensional electrophoresis. The results confirmed the constitutive production of the lysU gene product previously reported for strain RG62, but also revealed that the induction of 2 of the 17 heat shock polypeptides, C14.7 and G13.5, was markedly depressed. Otherwise the heat shock induction pattern was similar in timing and magnitude in the two strains. Transformation of the mutant strain with a plasmid, pK8, containing the metK coding sequence and promoter region as a 1.8-kilobase insert into pBR322 restored normal induction of C14.7 and G13.5, but did not prevent constitutive expression of the lysU gene product in the medium required for growth of this strain. The three heat shock polypeptides abnormally controlled in strain RG62 are the three polypeptides which are not induced when rapid synthesis of the htpR gene product is induced by isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside at 28 degree C (R. A. VanBogelen, M. A. Acton, and F. C. Neidhardt, Genes Dev. 1:525-531, 1987). We postulate that induction of these three polypeptides involves metabolic signals in addition to the synthesis of the htpR gene product and that strain RG62 (metK) fails to produce the signals involved in induction of C14.7 and G13.5 on a shift-up in temperature and produces the signal related to lysU induction even at 37 degree C. PMID:3280549

  15. Disruption of wave-associated Rac GTPase-activating protein (Wrp) leads to abnormal adult neural progenitor migration associated with hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Il Hwan; Carlson, Benjamin R; Heindel, Clifford C; Kim, Hyun; Soderling, Scott H

    2012-11-01

    Hydrocephalus is the most common developmental disability and leading cause of brain surgery for children. Current treatments are limited to surgical intervention, as the factors that contribute to the initiation of hydrocephalus are poorly understood. Here, we describe the development of obstructive hydrocephalus in mice that are null for Wrp (Srgap3). Wrp is highly expressed in the ventricular stem cell niche, and it is a gene required for cytoskeletal organization and is associated with syndromic and psychiatric disorders in humans. During the postnatal period of progenitor cell expansion and ventricular wall remodeling, loss of Wrp results in the abnormal migration of lineage-tagged cells from the ventricular region into the corpus callosum. Within this region, mutant progenitors appear to give rise to abnormal astroglial cells and induce periventricular lesions and hemorrhage that leads to cerebral aqueductal occlusion. These results indicate that periventricular abnormalities arising from abnormal migration from the ventricular niche can be an initiating cause of noncommunicating hydrocephalus. PMID:23007397

  16. Fast transient networks in spontaneous human brain activity

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Adam P; Brookes, Matthew J; Rezek, Iead A; Smith, Stephen M; Behrens, Timothy; Probert Smith, Penny J; Woolrich, Mark

    2014-01-01

    To provide an effective substrate for cognitive processes, functional brain networks should be able to reorganize and coordinate on a sub-second temporal scale. We used magnetoencephalography recordings of spontaneous activity to characterize whole-brain functional connectivity dynamics at high temporal resolution. Using a novel approach that identifies the points in time at which unique patterns of activity recur, we reveal transient (100–200 ms) brain states with spatial topographies similar to those of well-known resting state networks. By assessing temporal changes in the occurrence of these states, we demonstrate that within-network functional connectivity is underpinned by coordinated neuronal dynamics that fluctuate much more rapidly than has previously been shown. We further evaluate cross-network interactions, and show that anticorrelation between the default mode network and parietal regions of the dorsal attention network is consistent with an inability of the system to transition directly between two transient brain states. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01867.001 PMID:24668169

  17. Emotions promote social interaction by synchronizing brain activity across individuals.

    PubMed

    Nummenmaa, Lauri; Glerean, Enrico; Viinikainen, Mikko; Jääskeläinen, Iiro P; Hari, Riitta; Sams, Mikko

    2012-06-12

    Sharing others' emotional states may facilitate understanding their intentions and actions. Here we show that networks of brain areas "tick together" in participants who are viewing similar emotional events in a movie. Participants' brain activity was measured with functional MRI while they watched movies depicting unpleasant, neutral, and pleasant emotions. After scanning, participants watched the movies again and continuously rated their experience of pleasantness-unpleasantness (i.e., valence) and of arousal-calmness. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to derive multisubject voxelwise similarity measures [intersubject correlations (ISCs)] of functional MRI data. Valence and arousal time series were used to predict the moment-to-moment ISCs computed using a 17-s moving average. During movie viewing, participants' brain activity was synchronized in lower- and higher-order sensory areas and in corticolimbic emotion circuits. Negative valence was associated with increased ISC in the emotion-processing network (thalamus, ventral striatum, insula) and in the default-mode network (precuneus, temporoparietal junction, medial prefrontal cortex, posterior superior temporal sulcus). High arousal was associated with increased ISC in the somatosensory cortices and visual and dorsal attention networks comprising the visual cortex, bilateral intraparietal sulci, and frontal eye fields. Seed-voxel-based correlation analysis confirmed that these sets of regions constitute dissociable, functional networks. We propose that negative valence synchronizes individuals' brain areas supporting emotional sensations and understanding of another's actions, whereas high arousal directs individuals' attention to similar features of the environment. By enhancing the synchrony of brain activity across individuals, emotions may promote social interaction and facilitate interpersonal understanding. PMID:22623534

  18. Contributions of glycogen to astrocytic energetics during brain activation.

    PubMed

    Dienel, Gerald A; Cruz, Nancy F

    2015-02-01

    Glycogen is the major store of glucose in brain and is mainly in astrocytes. Brain glycogen levels in unstimulated, carefully-handled rats are 10-12 ?mol/g, and assuming that astrocytes account for half the brain mass, astrocytic glycogen content is twice as high. Glycogen turnover is slow under basal conditions, but it is mobilized during activation. There is no net increase in incorporation of label from glucose during activation, whereas label release from pre-labeled glycogen exceeds net glycogen consumption, which increases during stronger stimuli. Because glycogen level is restored by non-oxidative metabolism, astrocytes can influence the global ratio of oxygen to glucose utilization. Compensatory increases in utilization of blood glucose during inhibition of glycogen phosphorylase are large and approximate glycogenolysis rates during sensory stimulation. In contrast, glycogenolysis rates during hypoglycemia are low due to continued glucose delivery and oxidation of endogenous substrates; rates that preserve neuronal function in the absence of glucose are also low, probably due to metabolite oxidation. Modeling studies predict that glycogenolysis maintains a high level of glucose-6-phosphate in astrocytes to maintain feedback inhibition of hexokinase, thereby diverting glucose for use by neurons. The fate of glycogen carbon in vivo is not known, but lactate efflux from brain best accounts for the major metabolic characteristics during activation of living brain. Substantial shuttling coupled with oxidation of glycogen-derived lactate is inconsistent with available evidence. Glycogen has important roles in astrocytic energetics, including glucose sparing, control of extracellular K(+) level, oxidative stress management, and memory consolidation; it is a multi-functional compound. PMID:24515302

  19. Phosphatase and tensin homolog, deleted on chromosome 10 deficiency in brain causes defects in synaptic structure, transmission and plasticity, and myelination abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Fraser, M M; Bayazitov, I T; Zakharenko, S S; Baker, S J

    2008-01-24

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway modulates growth, proliferation and cell survival in diverse tissue types and plays specialized roles in the nervous system including influences on neuronal polarity, dendritic branching and synaptic plasticity. The tumor-suppressor phosphatase with tensin homology (PTEN) is the central negative regulator of the PI3K pathway. Germline PTEN mutations result in cancer predisposition, macrocephaly and benign hamartomas in many tissues, including Lhermitte-Duclos disease, a cerebellar growth disorder. Neurological abnormalities including autism, seizures and ataxia have been observed in association with inherited PTEN mutation with variable penetrance. It remains unclear how loss of PTEN activity contributes to neurological dysfunction. To explore the effects of Pten deficiency on neuronal structure and function, we analyzed several ultra-structural features of Pten-deficient neurons in Pten conditional knockout mice. Using Golgi stain to visualize full neuronal morphology, we observed that increased size of nuclei and somata in Pten-deficient neurons was accompanied by enlarged caliber of neuronal projections and increased dendritic spine density. Electron microscopic evaluation revealed enlarged abnormal synaptic structures in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum. Severe myelination defects included thickening and unraveling of the myelin sheath surrounding hypertrophic axons in the corpus callosum. Defects in myelination of axons of normal caliber were observed in the cerebellum, suggesting intrinsic abnormalities in Pten-deficient oligodendrocytes. We did not observe these abnormalities in wild-type or conditional Pten heterozygous mice. Moreover, conditional deletion of Pten drastically weakened synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity at excitatory synapses between CA3 and CA1 pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus. These data suggest that Pten is involved in mechanisms that control development of neuronal and synaptic structures and subsequently synaptic function. PMID:18082964

  20. Learning from M/EEG data with variable brain activation delays

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    the electromagnetic fields induced by brain activity. Typically, when collecting M/EEG data in neurosciences, the same- and electroencephalography (M/EEG) measure the electromagnetic signals produced by brain activity. In order to ad- dressLearning from M/EEG data with variable brain activation delays Wojciech Zaremba1,2 , M. Pawan Kumar

  1. From the Cover: Reactivation of encoding-related brain activity during memory retrieval

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lars Nyberg; Reza Habib; Anthony R. McIntosh; Endel Tulving

    2000-01-01

    Neuronal models predict that retrieval of specific event information reactivates brain regions that were active during encoding of this information. Consistent with this prediction, this positron-emission tomography study showed that remembering that visual words had been paired with sounds at encoding activated some of the auditory brain regions that were engaged during encoding. After word-sound encoding, activation of auditory brain

  2. Brain cholinesterase activity of apparently normal wild birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, E.F.

    1988-01-01

    Organophosphorus and carbamate pesticides are potent anticholinesterase substances that have killed large numbers of wild birds of various species. Cause of death is diagnosed by demonstration of depressed brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity in combination with chemical detection of anticholinesterase residue in the affected specimen. ChE depression is determined by comparison of the affected specimen to normal ChE activity for a sample of control specimens of the same species, but timely procurement of controls is not always possible. Therefore, a reference file of normal whole brain ChE activity is provided for 48 species of wild birds from North America representing 11 orders and 23 families for use as emergency substitutes in diagnosis of anticholinesterase poisoning. The ChE values, based on 83 sets of wild control specimens from across the United States, are reproducible provided the described procedures are duplicated. Overall, whole brain ChE activity varied nearly three-fold among the 48 species represented, but it was usually similar for closely related species. However, some species were statistically separable in most families and some species of the same genus differed as much as 50%.

  3. Brain activation during a social attribution task in adolescents with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Scheibel, Randall S.; Newsome, Mary R.; Wilde, Elisabeth A.; McClelland, Michelle M.; Hanten, Gerri; Krawczyk, Daniel C.; Cook, Lori G.; Chu, Zili D.; Vásquez, Ana C.; Yallampalli, Ragini; Lin, Xiaodi; Hunter, Jill V.; Levin, Harvey S.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to make accurate judgments about the mental states of others, sometimes referred to as theory of mind (ToM), is often impaired following traumatic brain injury (TBI), and this deficit may contribute to problems with interpersonal relationships. The present study used an animated social attribution task (SAT) with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine structures mediating ToM in adolescents with moderate to severe TBI. The study design also included a comparison group of matched, typically developing (TD) adolescents. The TD group exhibited activation within a number of areas that are thought to be relevant to ToM, including the medial prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortex, fusiform gyrus, and posterior temporal and parietal areas. The TBI subjects had significant activation within many of these same areas, but their activation was generally more intense and excluded the medial prefrontal cortex. Exploratory regression analyses indicated a negative relation between ToM-related activation and measures of white matter integrity derived from diffusion tensor imaging, while there was also a positive relation between activation and lesion volume. These findings are consistent with alterations in the level and pattern of brain activation that may be due to the combined influence of diffuse axonal injury and focal lesions. PMID:21777109

  4. Quantitative Brain Electrical Activity in the Initial Screening of Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries

    PubMed Central

    O’Neil, Brian; Prichep, Leslie S.; Naunheim, Roseanne; Chabot, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The incidence of emergency department (ED) visits for Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) in the United States exceeds 1,000,000 cases/year with the vast majority classified as mild (mTBI). Using existing computed tomography (CT) decision rules for selecting patients to be referred for CT, such as the New Orleans Criteria (NOC), approximately 70% of those scanned are found to have a negative CT. This study investigates the use of quantified brain electrical activity to assess its possible role in the initial screening of ED mTBI patients as compared to NOC. Methods: We studied 119 patients who reported to the ED with mTBI and received a CT. Using a hand-held electroencephalogram (EEG) acquisition device, we collected data from frontal leads to determine the likelihood of a positive CT. The brain electrical activity was processed off-line to generate an index (TBI-Index, biomarker). This index was previously derived using an independent population, and the value found to be sensitive for significant brain dysfunction in TBI patients. We compared this performance of the TBI-Index to the NOC for accuracy in prediction of positive CT findings. Results: Both the brain electrical activity TBI-Index and the NOC had sensitivities, at 94.7% and 92.1% respectively. The specificity of the TBI-Index was more than twice that of NOC, 49.4% and 23.5% respectively. The positive predictive value, negative predictive value and the positive likelihood ratio were better with the TBI-Index. When either the TBI-Index or the NOC are positive (combining both indices) the sensitivity to detect a positive CT increases to 97%. Conclusion: The hand-held EEG device with a limited frontal montage is applicable to the ED environment and its performance was superior to that obtained using the New Orleans criteria. This study suggests a possible role for an index of brain function based on EEG to aid in the acute assessment of mTBI patients. PMID:23359586

  5. Human brain activity with near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Qingming; Chance, Britton

    1999-09-01

    Human brain activity was studied with a real time functional Near-InfraRed Imager (fNIRI). The imager has 16 measurement channels and covers 4 cm by 9 cm detection area. Brain activities in occipital, motor and prefrontal area were studied with the fNIRI. In prefrontal stimulation, language cognition, analogies, forming memory for new associations, emotional thinking, and mental arithmetic were carried out. Experimental results measured with fNIRI are demonstrated in this paper. It was shown that fNIRI technique is able to reveal the occipital activity during visual stimulation, and co-register well with results of fMRI in the motor cortex activity during finger tapping. In the studies of the effects of left prefrontal lobe on forming memory for new associations, it is shown that left prefrontal lobe activated more under deep conditions than that under shallow encoding, especially the dorsal part. In the studies of emotional thinking, it was shown that the responses were different between positive- negative emotional thinking and negative-positive emotional thinking. In mental arithmetic studies, higher activation was found in the first task than in the second, regardless of the difficulty, and higher activation was measured in subtraction of 17 than in subtraction of 3.

  6. Functional interactions between intrinsic brain activity and behavior.

    PubMed

    Sadaghiani, Sepideh; Kleinschmidt, Andreas

    2013-10-15

    The brain continuously maintains a remarkably high level of intrinsic activity. This activity is non-stationary and its dynamics reveal highly structured patterns across several spatial scales, from fine-grained functional architecture in sensory cortices to large-scale networks. The mechanistic function of this activity is only poorly understood. The central goal of the current review is to provide an integrated summary of recent studies on structure, dynamics and behavioral consequences of spontaneous brain activity. In light of these empirical observations we propose that the structure of ongoing activity and its itinerant nature can be understood as an indispensible memory system modeling the statistical structure of the world. We review the dynamic properties of ongoing activity, and how they are malleable over short to long temporal scales that permit adapting over a range of short- to long-term cognitive challenges. We conclude by reviewing how the functional significance of ongoing activity manifests in its impact on human action, perception, and higher cognitive function. PMID:23643921

  7. Constitutively Activated NLRP3 Inflammasome Causes Inflammation and Abnormal Skeletal Development in Mice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sheri L. Bonar; Susannah D. Brydges; James L. Mueller; Matthew D. McGeough; Carla Pena; Debbie Chen; Susan K. Grimston; Cynthia L. Hickman-Brecks; Soumya Ravindran; Audrey McAlinden; Deborah V. Novack; Daniel L. Kastner; Roberto Civitelli; Hal M. Hoffman; Gabriel Mbalaviele

    2012-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome complex is responsible for maturation of the pro-inflammatory cytokine, IL-1?. Mutations in NLRP3 are responsible for the cryopyrinopathies, a spectrum of conditions including neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease (NOMID). While excessive production of IL-1? and systemic inflammation are common to all cryopyrinopathy disorders, skeletal abnormalities, prominently in the knees, and low bone mass are unique features of patients

  8. Methyl parathion activation by a partially purified rat brain fraction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jaime Silva de Lima; Jayme da Cunha Bastos Neto; Vera Lucia Freire da Cunha Bastos; Julia Claro da Cunha; Flavia Franchini de Mattos Moraes; Maria de Fatima Alves Ferreira; Josino da Costa Moreira; Mauro Velho de Castro Faria

    1996-01-01

    Organophosphorus pesticides are one of the most commonly used insecticide classes. They act through a potent inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Many of them must undergo transformation into the corresponding oxon analogs to inhibit AChE. This study showed that a brain tissue subfraction transformed methyl parathion (O,O-dimethyl O-p-nitrophenyl phosphorothioate) in vitro. Methyl parathion activation was assayed by solvent extraction of the

  9. Seizures, refractory status epilepticus, and depolarization block as endogenous brain activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Houssaini, Kenza; Ivanov, Anton I.; Bernard, Christophe; Jirsa, Viktor K.

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy, refractory status epilepticus, and depolarization block are pathological brain activities whose mechanisms are poorly understood. Using a generic mathematical model of seizure activity, we show that these activities coexist under certain conditions spanning the range of possible brain activities. We perform a detailed bifurcation analysis and predict strategies to escape from some of the pathological states. Experimental results using rodent data provide support of the model, highlighting the concept that these pathological activities belong to the endogenous repertoire of brain activities.

  10. Beneficial effects of sodium butyrate in 6-OHDA induced neurotoxicity and behavioral abnormalities: Modulation of histone deacetylase activity.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sorabh; Taliyan, Rajeev; Singh, Sumel

    2015-09-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. Recent studies have investigated the involvement of epigenetic modifications in PD. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have been reported to be beneficial in cognitive and motor deficit states. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of sodium butyrate, a HDAC inhibitor in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) - induced experimental PD like symptoms in rats. To produce motor deficit, 6-OHDA was administered unilaterally in the right medial forebrain bundle. Three weeks after 6-OHDA administration, the rats were challenged with apomorphine. Following this, the animals were treated with sodium butyrate (150 and 300mg/kg i.p.) once daily for 14 days. Movement abnormalities were assessed by battery of behavioral tests. Biochemically, oxidative stress markers, neuroinflammation and dopamine were measured in striatal brain homogenate. Further, to explore the molecular mechanism(s), we measured the level of global H3 histone acetylation and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). 6-OHDA administration results in significant motor deficit along with reduction in striatal dopamine level. 6-OHDA treated rats showed elevated oxidative stress and neuroinflammatory markers. Treatment with sodium butyrate results in significant attenuation of motor deficits and increased striatal dopamine level. Moreover, sodium butyrate treatment attenuated the oxidative stress and neuroinflammatory markers. These effects occur concurrently with increased global H3 histone acetylation and BDNF levels. Thus, the observed results of the present study are indicative for the therapeutic potential of HDAC inhibitors in PD. PMID:26048426

  11. Brain activation during self- and other-reflection in bipolar disorder with a history of psychosis: Comparison to schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liwen; Opmeer, Esther M.; Ruhé, Henricus G.; Aleman, André; van der Meer, Lisette

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Reflecting on the self and on others activates specific brain areas and contributes to metacognition and social cognition. The aim of the current study is to investigate brain activation during self- and other-reflection in patients with bipolar disorder (BD). In addition, we examined whether potential abnormal brain activation in BD patients could distinguish BD from patients with schizophrenia (SZ). Methods During functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), 17 BD patients, 17 SZ patients and 21 healthy controls (HCs) performed a self-reflection task. The task consisted of sentences divided into three conditions: self-reflection, other-reflection and semantic control. Results BD patients showed less activation in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) extending to the precuneus during other-reflection compared to HCs (p = 0.028 FWE corrected on cluster-level within the regions of interest). In SZ patients, the level of activation in this area was in between BD patients and HCs, with no significant differences between patients with SZ and BD. There were no group differences in brain activation during self-reflection. Moreover, there was a positive correlation between the PCC/precuneus activation during other-reflection and cognitive insight in SZ patients, but not in BD patients. Conclusions BD patients showed less activation in the PCC/precuneus during other-reflection. This may support an account of impaired integration of emotion and memory (evaluation of past and current other-related information) in BD patients. Correlation differences of the PCC/precuneus activation with the cognitive insight in patients with BD and SZ might reflect an important difference between these disorders, which may help to further explore potentially distinguishing markers. PMID:26106544

  12. Ultradian oscillations in cranial thermoregulation and electroencephalographic slow-wave activity during sleep are abnormal in humans with annual winter depression

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul J. Schwartz; Norman E. Rosenthal; Naofumi Kajimura; Ling Han; Erick H. Turner; Charles Bender; Thomas A. Wehr

    2000-01-01

    The level of core body, and presumably brain temperature during sleep varies with clinical state in patients with seasonal affective disorder (SAD), becoming elevated during winter depression and lowered during clinical remission induced by either light treatment or summer. During sleep, brain temperatures are in part determined by the level of brain cooling activity, which may be reflected by facial

  13. Early Oxygen-Utilization and Brain Activity in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Linda S.; Groenendaal, Floris; Toet, Mona C.; Lemmers, Petra M. A.; Vosse van de, Renè E.; van Bel, Frank; Benders, Manon J. N. L.

    2015-01-01

    The combined monitoring of oxygen supply and delivery using Near-InfraRed spectroscopy (NIRS) and cerebral activity using amplitude-integrated EEG (aEEG) could yield new insights into brain metabolism and detect potentially vulnerable conditions soon after birth. The relationship between NIRS and quantitative aEEG/EEG parameters has not yet been investigated. Our aim was to study the association between oxygen utilization during the first 6 h after birth and simultaneously continuously monitored brain activity measured by aEEG/EEG. Forty-four hemodynamically stable babies with a GA < 28 weeks, with good quality NIRS and aEEG/EEG data available and who did not receive morphine were included in the study. aEEG and NIRS monitoring started at NICU admission. The relation between regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rScO2) and cerebral fractional tissue oxygen extraction (cFTOE), and quantitative measurements of brain activity such as number of spontaneous activity transients (SAT) per minute (SAT rate), the interval in seconds (i.e. time) between SATs (ISI) and the minimum amplitude of the EEG in ?V (min aEEG) were evaluated. rScO2 was negatively associated with SAT rate (?=-3.45 [CI=-5.76- -1.15], p=0.004) and positively associated with ISI (?=1.45 [CI=0.44-2.45], p=0.006). cFTOE was positively associated with SAT rate (?=0.034 [CI=0.009-0.059], p=0.008) and negatively associated with ISI (?=-0.015 [CI=-0.026- -0.004], p=0.007). Oxygen delivery and utilization, as indicated by rScO2 and cFTOE, are directly related to functional brain activity, expressed by SAT rate and ISI during the first hours after birth, showing an increase in oxygen extraction in preterm infants with increased early electro-cerebral activity. NIRS monitored oxygenation may be a useful biomarker of brain vulnerability in high-risk infants. PMID:25965343

  14. Brain catalase activity is highly correlated with ethanol-induced locomotor activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Correa, M; Sanchis-Segura, C; Aragon, C M

    2001-07-01

    It has been demonstrated that acute administration of lead to mice enhances brain catalase activity and ethanol-induced locomotion. These effects of lead seem to be related, since they show similar time courses and occur at similar doses. In the present study, in an attempt to further evaluate the relation between brain catalase activity and lead-induced changes in ethanol-stimulated locomotion, the interaction between lead acetate and 3-amino-1H,2,4-triazole (AT), a well-known catalase inhibitor, was assessed. In this study, lead acetate or saline was acutely injected intraperitoneally to Swiss mice at doses of 50 or 100 mg/kg 7 days before testing. On the test day, animals received an intraperitoneal injection of AT (0, 10, or 500 mg/kg). Five hours following AT treatment, ethanol (0.0 or 2.5 g/kg, ip) was injected and the animals were placed in open-field chambers, in which locomotion was measured for 10 min. Neither lead exposure nor AT administration, either alone or in combination, had any effect on spontaneous locomotor activity. AT treatment reduced ethanol-induced locomotion as well as brain catalase activity. On the other hand, ambulation and brain catalase activity were significantly increased by both doses of lead. Furthermore, AT significantly reduced the potentiation produced by lead acetate on brain catalase and on ethanol-induced locomotor activity in a dose-dependent manner. A significant correlation was found between locomotion and catalase activity across all test conditions. The results show that brain catalase activity is involved in the effects of lead acetate on ethanol-induced locomotion in mice. Thus, this study confirms the notion that brain catalase provides the molecular basis for understanding some of the mechanisms of the action of ethanol in the central nervous system. PMID:11495670

  15. Brain mechanical property measurement using MRE with intrinsic activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, John B.; Pattison, Adam J.; McGarry, Matthew D.; Perreard, Irina M.; Swienckowski, Jessica G.; Eskey, Clifford J.; Lollis, S. Scott; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2012-11-01

    Many pathologies alter the mechanical properties of tissue. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) has been developed to noninvasively characterize these quantities in vivo. Typically, small vibrations are induced in the tissue of interest with an external mechanical actuator. The resulting displacements are measured with phase contrast sequences and are then used to estimate the underlying mechanical property distribution. Several MRE studies have quantified brain tissue properties. However, the cranium and meninges, especially the dura, are very effective at damping externally applied vibrations from penetrating deeply into the brain. Here, we report a method, termed ‘intrinsic activation’, that eliminates the requirement for external vibrations by measuring the motion generated by natural blood vessel pulsation. A retrospectively gated phase contrast MR angiography sequence was used to record the tissue velocity at eight phases of the cardiac cycle. The velocities were numerically integrated via the Fourier transform to produce the harmonic displacements at each position within the brain. The displacements were then reconstructed into images of the shear modulus based on both linear elastic and poroelastic models. The mechanical properties produced fall within the range of brain tissue estimates reported in the literature and, equally important, the technique yielded highly reproducible results. The mean shear modulus was 8.1 kPa for linear elastic reconstructions and 2.4 kPa for poroelastic reconstructions where fluid pressure carries a portion of the stress. Gross structures of the brain were visualized, particularly in the poroelastic reconstructions. Intra-subject variability was significantly less than the inter-subject variability in a study of six asymptomatic individuals. Further, larger changes in mechanical properties were observed in individuals when examined over time than when the MRE procedures were repeated on the same day. Cardiac pulsation, termed intrinsic activation, produces sufficient motion to allow mechanical properties to be recovered. The poroelastic model is more consistent with the measured data from brain at low frequencies than the linear elastic model. Intrinsic activation allows MRE to be performed without a device shaking the head so the patient notices no differences between it and the other sequences in an MR examination.

  16. The activation of mice's behavior and reduction of brain beta-adrenergic receptor binding following repeated administration of antidepressant drugs.

    PubMed

    Nomura, S; Shimizu, J; Ukei, N; Sakaida, S; Nakazawa, T

    1984-11-01

    In view of the fact that antidepressant drugs have almost no effect on a normal person's emotion and behavior, it seems necessary to examine their effects on animal behavior under abnormal, or stressful conditions. When mice were put into a water wheel apparatus, they tried to escape from the water by turning the wheel. This "wheel-turning behavior" was activated by repeated doses of imipramine or amitriptyline. The increase was paralleled by a reduction of brain beta-adrenergic receptor binding. It was speculated that chronic doses of antidepressants would increase escape behavior in mice when they were placed in a critical situation. The causal relationships between this behavioral change and beta-receptor function in brain remains to be further examined. PMID:6099942

  17. Neuroprotective effect of the active components of three Chinese herbs on brain iron load in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    DONG, XIAN-HUI; GAO, WEI-JUAN; KONG, WEI-NA; XIE, HONG-LIN; PENG, YAN; SHAO, TIE-MEI; YU, WEN-GUO; CHAI, XI-QING

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative brain disorder and the most common cause of dementia. New treatments for AD are required due to its increasing prevalence in aging populations. The present study evaluated the effects of the active components of Epimedium, Astragalus and Radix Puerariae on learning and memory impairment, ?-amyloid (A?) reduction and brain iron load in an APPswe/PS1?E9 transgenic mouse model of AD. Increasing evidence indicates that a disturbance of normal iron homeostasis may contribute to the pathology of AD. However, the underlying mechanisms resulting in abnormal iron load in the AD brain remain unclear. It has been hypothesized that the brain iron load is influenced by the deregulation of certain proteins associated with brain iron metabolism, including divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) and ferroportin 1 (FPN1). The present study investigated the effects of the active components of Epimedium, Astragalus and Radix Puerariae on the expression levels of DMT1 and FPN1. The treatment with the active components reduced cognitive deficits, inhibited A? plaque accumulation, reversed A? burden and reduced the brain iron load in AD model mice. A significant increase was observed in the levels of DMT1-iron-responsive element (IRE) and DMT1-nonIRE in the hippocampus of the AD mouse brain, which was reduced by treatment with the active components. In addition, the levels of FPN1 were significantly reduced in the hippocampus of the AD mouse brain compared with those of control mice, and these levels were increased following treatment with the active components. Thus, the present study indicated that the active components of Epimedium, Astragalus and Radix Puerariae may exert a neuroprotective effect against AD by reducing iron overload in the AD brain and may provide a novel approach for the development of drugs for the treatment of AD. PMID:25780429

  18. Fast 3D Brain Segmentation Using Dual-Front Active Contours with Optional User-Interaction

    E-print Network

    Cohen, Laurent

    Fast 3D Brain Segmentation Using Dual-Front Active Contours with Optional User-Interaction Hua Li1 attributes of 3D brain segmentation algorithms in- clude robustness, accuracy, computational efficiency result. We propose a novel 3D brain cortex segmentation procedure utilizing dual- front active contours

  19. Circadian Abnormalities in Motor Activity in a BAC Transgenic Mouse Model of Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Oakeshott, Stephen; Balci, Fuat; Filippov, Igor; Murphy, Carol; Port, Russell; Connor, David; Paintdakhi, Ahmad; LeSauter, Joseph; Menalled, Liliana; Ramboz, Sylvie; Kwak, Seung; Howland, David; Silver, Rae; Brunner, Dani

    2011-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease marked by psychiatric and motor problems. Recently, these findings have been extended to deficits in sleep and circadian function that can be observed in HD patients and in HD mouse models, with abnormal sleep patterns correlating with symptom severity in patients. Here, we studied the behavior of the BAC HD mouse model using an 24/7 automated system; the results indicate significant lengthening of the circadian period in the mutant mice. These results reinforce previous findings in HD models and symptomatic HD patients, indicating that circadian dysfunction is a core feature of HD. PMID:21479110

  20. Mapping brain activity at scale with cluster computing.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Jeremy; Vladimirov, Nikita; Kawashima, Takashi; Mu, Yu; Sofroniew, Nicholas J; Bennett, Davis V; Rosen, Joshua; Yang, Chao-Tsung; Looger, Loren L; Ahrens, Misha B

    2014-09-01

    Understanding brain function requires monitoring and interpreting the activity of large networks of neurons during behavior. Advances in recording technology are greatly increasing the size and complexity of neural data. Analyzing such data will pose a fundamental bottleneck for neuroscience. We present a library of analytical tools called Thunder built on the open-source Apache Spark platform for large-scale distributed computing. The library implements a variety of univariate and multivariate analyses with a modular, extendable structure well-suited to interactive exploration and analysis development. We demonstrate how these analyses find structure in large-scale neural data, including whole-brain light-sheet imaging data from fictively behaving larval zebrafish, and two-photon imaging data from behaving mouse. The analyses relate neuronal responses to sensory input and behavior, run in minutes or less and can be used on a private cluster or in the cloud. Our open-source framework thus holds promise for turning brain activity mapping efforts into biological insights. PMID:25068736

  1. Source localization of brain activity using helium-free interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Dammers, Jürgen, E-mail: J.Dammers@fz-juelich.de; Chocholacs, Harald; Eich, Eberhard; Boers, Frank [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-4), Forschungszentrum Jülich, Jülich (Germany); Faley, Michael; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E. [Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI-5), Forschungszentrum Jülich, Jülich (Germany); Jon Shah, N. [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-4), Forschungszentrum Jülich, Jülich (Germany); Department of Neurology, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Jülich Aachen Research Alliance (JARA)—Translational Brain Medicine, Jülich (Germany)

    2014-05-26

    To detect extremely small magnetic fields generated by the human brain, currently all commercial magnetoencephalography (MEG) systems are equipped with low-temperature (low-T{sub c}) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensors that use liquid helium for cooling. The limited and increasingly expensive supply of helium, which has seen dramatic price increases recently, has become a real problem for such systems and the situation shows no signs of abating. MEG research in the long run is now endangered. In this study, we report a MEG source localization utilizing a single, highly sensitive SQUID cooled with liquid nitrogen only. Our findings confirm that localization of neuromagnetic activity is indeed possible using high-T{sub c} SQUIDs. We believe that our findings secure the future of this exquisitely sensitive technique and have major implications for brain research and the developments of cost-effective multi-channel, high-T{sub c} SQUID-based MEG systems.

  2. Nail abnormalities

    MedlinePLUS

    Beau's lines; Fingernail abnormalities; Spoon nails; Onycholysis; Leukonychia; Koilonychia; Brittle nails ... of the nail bed from the nail plate (onycholysis). Severe illness or surgery may cause horizontal depressions ...

  3. Effects of cranial electrotherapy stimulation on resting state brain activity

    PubMed Central

    Feusner, Jamie D; Madsen, Sarah; Moody, Teena D; Bohon, Cara; Hembacher, Emily; Bookheimer, Susan Y; Bystritsky, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Cranial electrotherapy stimulation (CES) is a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved treatment for insomnia, depression, and anxiety consisting of pulsed, low-intensity current applied to the earlobes or scalp. Despite empirical evidence of clinical efficacy, its mechanism of action is largely unknown. The goal was to characterize the acute effects of CES on resting state brain activity. Our primary hypothesis was that CES would result in deactivation in cortical and subcortical regions. Eleven healthy controls were administered CES applied to the earlobes at subsensory thresholds while being scanned with functional magnetic resonance imaging in the resting state. We tested 0.5- and 100-Hz stimulation, using blocks of 22 sec “on” alternating with 22 sec of baseline (device was “off”). The primary outcome measure was differences in blood oxygen level dependent data associated with the device being on versus baseline. The secondary outcome measures were the effects of stimulation on connectivity within the default mode, sensorimotor, and fronto-parietal networks. Both 0.5- and 100-Hz stimulation resulted in significant deactivation in midline frontal and parietal regions. 100-Hz stimulation was associated with both increases and decreases in connectivity within the default mode network (DMN). Results suggest that CES causes cortical brain deactivation, with a similar pattern for high- and low-frequency stimulation, and alters connectivity in the DMN. These effects may result from interference from high- or low-frequency noise. Small perturbations of brain oscillations may therefore have significant effects on normal resting state brain activity. These results provide insight into the mechanism of action of CES, and may assist in the future development of optimal parameters for effective treatment. PMID:22741094

  4. Brain Oscillatory Activity during Spatial Navigation: Theta and Gamma Activity Link Medial Temporal and Parietal Regions

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Brain Oscillatory Activity during Spatial Navigation: Theta and Gamma Activity Link Medial oscillatory correlates of spatial navigation were investigated using blind source separation (BSS-five participants were instructed to navigate to distinct landmark buildings in a previously learned virtual reality

  5. Classification of Types of Stuttering Symptoms Based on Brain Activity

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jing; Lu, Chunming; Peng, Danling; Zhu, Chaozhe; Howell, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Among the non-fluencies seen in speech, some are more typical (MT) of stuttering speakers, whereas others are less typical (LT) and are common to both stuttering and fluent speakers. No neuroimaging work has evaluated the neural basis for grouping these symptom types. Another long-debated issue is which type (LT, MT) whole-word repetitions (WWR) should be placed in. In this study, a sentence completion task was performed by twenty stuttering patients who were scanned using an event-related design. This task elicited stuttering in these patients. Each stuttered trial from each patient was sorted into the MT or LT types with WWR put aside. Pattern classification was employed to train a patient-specific single trial model to automatically classify each trial as MT or LT using the corresponding fMRI data. This model was then validated by using test data that were independent of the training data. In a subsequent analysis, the classification model, just established, was used to determine which type the WWR should be placed in. The results showed that the LT and the MT could be separated with high accuracy based on their brain activity. The brain regions that made most contribution to the separation of the types were: the left inferior frontal cortex and bilateral precuneus, both of which showed higher activity in the MT than in the LT; and the left putamen and right cerebellum which showed the opposite activity pattern. The results also showed that the brain activity for WWR was more similar to that of the LT and fluent speech than to that of the MT. These findings provide a neurological basis for separating the MT and the LT types, and support the widely-used MT/LT symptom grouping scheme. In addition, WWR play a similar role as the LT, and thus should be placed in the LT type. PMID:22761887

  6. Brain Activity Associated with Emoticons: An fMRI Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuasa, Masahide; Saito, Keiichi; Mukawa, Naoki

    In this paper, we describe that brain activities associated with emoticons by using fMRI. In communication over a computer network, we use abstract faces such as computer graphics (CG) avatars and emoticons. These faces convey users' emotions and enrich their communications. However, the manner in which these faces influence the mental process is as yet unknown. The human brain may perceive the abstract face in an entirely different manner, depending on its level of reality. We conducted an experiment using fMRI in order to investigate the effects of emoticons. The results show that right inferior frontal gyrus, which associated with nonverbal communication, is activated by emoticons. Since the emoticons were created to reflect the real human facial expressions as accurately as possible, we believed that they would activate the right fusiform gyrus. However, this region was not found to be activated during the experiment. This finding is useful in understanding how abstract faces affect our behaviors and decision-making in communication over a computer network.

  7. Human sexual behavior related to pathology and activity of the brain.

    PubMed

    Komisaruk, Barry R; Rodriguez Del Cerro, Maria Cruz

    2015-01-01

    Reviewed in this chapter are: (1) correlations among human sexual behavior, brain pathology, and brain activity, including caveats regarding the interpretation of "cause and effect" among these factors, and the degree to which "hypersexuality" and reported changes in sexual orientation correlated with brain pathology are uniquely sexual or are attributable to a generalized disinhibition of brain function; (2) the effects, in some cases inhibitory, in others facilitatory, on sexual behavior and motivation, of stroke, epileptic seizures, traumatic brain injury, and brain surgery; and (3) insights into sexual motivation and behavior recently gained from functional brain imaging research and its interpretive limitations. We conclude from the reviewed research that the neural orchestra underlying the symphony of human sexuality comprises, rather than brain "centers," multiple integrated brain systems, and that there are more questions than answers in our understanding of the control of human sexual behavior by the brain - a level of understanding that is still in embryonic form. PMID:26003240

  8. Protein trafficking abnormalities in Drosophila tissues with impaired activity of the ZIP7 zinc transporter Catsup.

    PubMed

    Groth, Casper; Sasamura, Takeshi; Khanna, Mansi R; Whitley, Michael; Fortini, Mark E

    2013-07-01

    Developmental patterning requires the precise interplay of numerous intercellular signaling pathways to ensure that cells are properly specified during tissue formation and organogenesis. The spatiotemporal function of the Notch signaling pathway is strongly influenced by the biosynthesis and intracellular trafficking of signaling components. Receptors and ligands must be trafficked to the cell surface where they interact, and their subsequent endocytic internalization and endosomal trafficking is crucial for both signal propagation and its down-modulation. In a forward genetic screen for mutations that alter intracellular Notch receptor trafficking in Drosophila epithelial tissues, we recovered mutations that disrupt the Catsup gene, which encodes the Drosophila ortholog of the mammalian ZIP7 zinc transporter. Loss of Catsup function causes Notch to accumulate abnormally in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi compartments, resulting in impaired Notch signaling. In addition, Catsup mutant cells exhibit elevated ER stress, suggesting that impaired zinc homeostasis causes increased levels of misfolded proteins within the secretory compartment. PMID:23785054

  9. Altered Resting-State Brain Activity and Connectivity in Depressed Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Erfeng; Liu, Jiajia; Yuan, Yonggui; Liu, Weiguo; Liu, Yijun

    2015-01-01

    Depressive symptoms are common in Parkinson’s disease (PD), but the neurophysiological mechanisms of depression in PD are poorly understood. The current study attempted to examine disrupted spontaneous local brain activities and functional connectivities that underlie the depression in PD. We recruited a total of 20 depressed PD patients (DPD), 40 non-depressed PD patients (NDPD) and 43 matched healthy controls (HC). All the subjects underwent neuropsychological tests and resting-state fMRI scanning. The between-group differences in the amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (ALFF) of BOLD signals were examined using post-hoc tests after the analysis of covariance. Compared with the NDPD and HC, the DPD group showed significantly increased ALFF in the left median cingulated cortex (MCC). The functional connectivity (FC) between left MCC and all the other voxels in the brain were then calculated. Compared with the HC and NDPD group, the DPD patients showed stronger FC between the left MCC and some of the major nodes of the default mode network (DMN), including the post cingulated cortex/precuneus, medial prefrontal cortex, inferior frontal gyrus, and cerebellum. Correlation analysis revealed that both the ALFF values in the left MCC and the FC between the left MCC and the nodes of DMN were significantly correlated with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score. Moreover, higher local activities in the left MCC were associated with increased functional connections between the MCC and the nodes of DMN in PD. These abnormal activities and connectivities of the limbic-cortical circuit may indicate impaired high-order cortical control or uncontrol of negative mood in DPD, which suggested a possible neural mechanism of the depression in PD. PMID:26147571

  10. Methyl parathion activation by a partially purified rat brain fraction.

    PubMed

    de Lima, J S; Bastos Neto, J da D; Bastos, V L; da Cunha, J C; Moraes, F F; Ferreira, M de F; Moreira, J da D; Faria, M V

    1996-09-01

    Organophosphorus pesticides are one of the most commonly used insecticide classes. They act through a potent inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Many of them must undergo transformation into the corresponding oxon analogs to inhibit AChE. This study showed that a brain tissue subfraction transformed methyl parathion (O,O-dimethyl O-p-nitrophenyl phosphorothioate) in vitro. Methyl parathion activation was assayed by solvent extraction of the products followed by HPLC and GC-MS analyses and, indirectly, by the inhibition of AChE present in the incubation mixture. The lack of impairment of AChE after 2 h of incubation of the brain subfraction with methyl parathion and, alternatively, with NADPH, CO, SKF 525-A, piperonyl butoxide or nitrogen indicated that this brain subfraction transformed methyl parathion without the involvement of a mixed-function oxidative pathway. The results from HPLC analysis did not show a peak corresponding to methyl paraoxon (O,O-dimethyl O-p-nitrophenylphosphate), but showed the production of an unidentified peak which eluted nearby standard methyl parathion (retention times of 10.65 and 8.86 min, respectively). GC-MS analysis suggested that the unidentified product could be a methyl parathion isomer. PMID:8701445

  11. Calcium imaging of infrared-stimulated activity in rodent brain

    PubMed Central

    Cayce, Jonathan Matthew; Bouchard, Matthew B.; Chernov, Mykyta M.; Chen, Brenda R.; Grosberg, Lauren E.; Jansen, E. Duco; Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2014-01-01

    Summary Infrared neural stimulation (INS) is a promising neurostimulation technique that can activate neural tissue with high spatial precision and without the need for exogenous agents. However, little is understood about how infrared light interacts with neural tissue on a cellular level, particularly within the living brain. In this study, we use calcium sensitive dye imaging on macroscopic and microscopic scales to explore the spatiotemporal effects of INS on cortical calcium dynamics. The INS-evoked calcium signal that was observed exhibited a fast and slow component suggesting activation of multiple cellular mechanisms. The slow component of the evoked signal exhibited wave-like properties suggesting network activation, and was verified to originate from astrocytes through pharmacology and 2-photon imaging. We also provide evidence that the fast calcium signal may have been evoked through modulation of glutamate transients. This study demonstrates that pulsed infrared light can induce intracellular calcium modulations in both astrocytes and neurons, providing new insights into the mechanisms of action of INS in the brain. PMID:24674600

  12. Calcium imaging of infrared-stimulated activity in rodent brain.

    PubMed

    Cayce, Jonathan Matthew; Bouchard, Matthew B; Chernov, Mykyta M; Chen, Brenda R; Grosberg, Lauren E; Jansen, E Duco; Hillman, Elizabeth M C; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2014-04-01

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) is a promising neurostimulation technique that can activate neural tissue with high spatial precision and without the need for exogenous agents. However, little is understood about how infrared light interacts with neural tissue on a cellular level, particularly within the living brain. In this study, we use calcium sensitive dye imaging on macroscopic and microscopic scales to explore the spatiotemporal effects of INS on cortical calcium dynamics. The INS-evoked calcium signal that was observed exhibited a fast and slow component suggesting activation of multiple cellular mechanisms. The slow component of the evoked signal exhibited wave-like properties suggesting network activation, and was verified to originate from astrocytes through pharmacology and 2-photon imaging. We also provide evidence that the fast calcium signal may have been evoked through modulation of glutamate transients. This study demonstrates that pulsed infrared light can induce intracellular calcium modulations in both astrocytes and neurons, providing new insights into the mechanisms of action of INS in the brain. PMID:24674600

  13. Investigating the physiology of brain activation with MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxton, Richard B.; Uludag, Kamil; Dubowitz, David J.

    2004-04-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has become a powerful tool for investigating the working human brain based on the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) effect on the MR signal. However, despite the widespread use of fMRI techniques for mapping brain activation, the basic physiological mechanisms underlying the observed signal changes are still poorly understood. Arterial spin labeling (ASL) techniques, which measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) and the BOLD effect simultaneously, provide a useful tool for investigating these physiological questions. In this paper, recent results of studies manipulating the baseline CBF both pharmacologically and physiologically will be discussed. These data are consistent with a feed-forward mechanism of neurovascular coupling, and suggest that the CBF change itself may be a more robust reflection of neural activity changes than the BOLD effect. Consistent with these data, a new thermodynamic hypothesis is proposed for the physiological function of CBF regulation: maintenance of the [O2]/[CO2] concentration ratio at the mitochondria in order to preserve the free energy available from oxidative metabolism. A kinetic model based on this hypothesis provides a reasonable quantitative description of the CBF changes associated with neural activity and altered blood gases (CO2 and O2).

  14. Biometrics from brain electrical activity: a machine learning approach.

    PubMed

    Palaniappan, Ramaswamy; Mandic, Danilo P

    2007-04-01

    The potential of brain electrical activity generated as a response to a visual stimulus is examined in the context of the identification of individuals. Specifically, a framework for the Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)-based biometrics is established, whereby energy features of the gamma band within VEP signals were of particular interest. A rigorous analysis is conducted which unifies and extends results from our previous studies, in particular, with respect to 1) increased bandwidth, 2) spatial averaging, 3) more robust power spectrum features, and 4) improved classification accuracy. Simulation results on a large group of subject support the analysis. PMID:17299228

  15. Neural Activation during Response Inhibition Differentiates Blast from Mechanical Causes of Mild to Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Barbara L.; Parsons, Michael; Durgerian, Sally; Reece, Christine; Mourany, Lyla; Lowe, Mark J.; Beall, Erik B.; Koenig, Katherine A.; Jones, Stephen E.; Newsome, Mary R.; Scheibel, Randall S.; Wilde, Elisabeth A.; Troyanskaya, Maya; Merkley, Tricia L.; Walker, Mark; Levin, Harvey S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Military personnel involved in Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) commonly experience blast-induced mild to moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI). In this study, we used task-activated functional MRI (fMRI) to determine if blast-related TBI has a differential impact on brain activation in comparison with TBI caused primarily by mechanical forces in civilian settings. Four groups participated: (1) blast-related military TBI (milTBI; n=21); (2) military controls (milCON; n=22); (3) non-blast civilian TBI (civTBI; n=21); and (4) civilian controls (civCON; n=23) with orthopedic injuries. Mild to moderate TBI (MTBI) occurred 1 to 6 years before enrollment. Participants completed the Stop Signal Task (SST), a measure of inhibitory control, while undergoing fMRI. Brain activation was evaluated with 2 (mil, civ)×2 (TBI, CON) analyses of variance, corrected for multiple comparisons. During correct inhibitions, fMRI activation was lower in the TBI than CON subjects in regions commonly associated with inhibitory control and the default mode network. In contrast, inhibitory failures showed significant interaction effects in the bilateral inferior temporal, left superior temporal, caudate, and cerebellar regions. Specifically, the milTBI group demonstrated more activation than the milCON group when failing to inhibit; in contrast, the civTBI group exhibited less activation than the civCON group. Covariance analyses controlling for the effects of education and self-reported psychological symptoms did not alter the brain activation findings. These results indicate that the chronic effects of TBI are associated with abnormal brain activation during successful response inhibition. During failed inhibition, the pattern of activation distinguished military from civilian TBI, suggesting that blast-related TBI has a unique effect on brain function that can be distinguished from TBI resulting from mechanical forces associated with sports or motor vehicle accidents. The implications of these findings for diagnosis and treatment of TBI are discussed. PMID:24020449

  16. Neural activation during response inhibition differentiates blast from mechanical causes of mild to moderate traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Barbara L; Parsons, Michael; Durgerian, Sally; Reece, Christine; Mourany, Lyla; Lowe, Mark J; Beall, Erik B; Koenig, Katherine A; Jones, Stephen E; Newsome, Mary R; Scheibel, Randall S; Wilde, Elisabeth A; Troyanskaya, Maya; Merkley, Tricia L; Walker, Mark; Levin, Harvey S; Rao, Stephen M

    2014-01-15

    Military personnel involved in Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) commonly experience blast-induced mild to moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI). In this study, we used task-activated functional MRI (fMRI) to determine if blast-related TBI has a differential impact on brain activation in comparison with TBI caused primarily by mechanical forces in civilian settings. Four groups participated: (1) blast-related military TBI (milTBI; n=21); (2) military controls (milCON; n=22); (3) non-blast civilian TBI (civTBI; n=21); and (4) civilian controls (civCON; n=23) with orthopedic injuries. Mild to moderate TBI (MTBI) occurred 1 to 6 years before enrollment. Participants completed the Stop Signal Task (SST), a measure of inhibitory control, while undergoing fMRI. Brain activation was evaluated with 2 (mil, civ)×2 (TBI, CON) analyses of variance, corrected for multiple comparisons. During correct inhibitions, fMRI activation was lower in the TBI than CON subjects in regions commonly associated with inhibitory control and the default mode network. In contrast, inhibitory failures showed significant interaction effects in the bilateral inferior temporal, left superior temporal, caudate, and cerebellar regions. Specifically, the milTBI group demonstrated more activation than the milCON group when failing to inhibit; in contrast, the civTBI group exhibited less activation than the civCON group. Covariance analyses controlling for the effects of education and self-reported psychological symptoms did not alter the brain activation findings. These results indicate that the chronic effects of TBI are associated with abnormal brain activation during successful response inhibition. During failed inhibition, the pattern of activation distinguished military from civilian TBI, suggesting that blast-related TBI has a unique effect on brain function that can be distinguished from TBI resulting from mechanical forces associated with sports or motor vehicle accidents. The implications of these findings for diagnosis and treatment of TBI are discussed. PMID:24020449

  17. Failure to Maintain Eye-Specific Segregation in nob, a Mutant with Abnormally Patterned Retinal Activity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jay Demas; Botir T. Sagdullaev; Erick Green; Lisa Jaubert-Miazza; Maureen A. McCall; Ronald G. Gregg; Rachel O. L. Wong; William Guido

    2006-01-01

    Summary Axonterminalsfromthetwoeyesinitiallyoverlapinthe dorsal-lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) but subse- quently refine to occupy nonoverlapping territories. Retinal activity is required to establish and maintain this segregation. We show that despite the presence of retinal activity, segregated projections desegregate when the structure of activity is altered. Early in devel- opment, spontaneous retinal activity in the no b-wave (nob) mouse is indistinguishable from that

  18. Inaudible high-frequency sounds affect brain activity: hypersonic effect.

    PubMed

    Oohashi, T; Nishina, E; Honda, M; Yonekura, Y; Fuwamoto, Y; Kawai, N; Maekawa, T; Nakamura, S; Fukuyama, H; Shibasaki, H

    2000-06-01

    Although it is generally accepted that humans cannot perceive sounds in the frequency range above 20 kHz, the question of whether the existence of such "inaudible" high-frequency components may affect the acoustic perception of audible sounds remains unanswered. In this study, we used noninvasive physiological measurements of brain responses to provide evidence that sounds containing high-frequency components (HFCs) above the audible range significantly affect the brain activity of listeners. We used the gamelan music of Bali, which is extremely rich in HFCs with a nonstationary structure, as a natural sound source, dividing it into two components: an audible low-frequency component (LFC) below 22 kHz and an HFC above 22 kHz. Brain electrical activity and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were measured as markers of neuronal activity while subjects were exposed to sounds with various combinations of LFCs and HFCs. None of the subjects recognized the HFC as sound when it was presented alone. Nevertheless, the power spectra of the alpha frequency range of the spontaneous electroencephalogram (alpha-EEG) recorded from the occipital region increased with statistical significance when the subjects were exposed to sound containing both an HFC and an LFC, compared with an otherwise identical sound from which the HFC was removed (i.e., LFC alone). In contrast, compared with the baseline, no enhancement of alpha-EEG was evident when either an HFC or an LFC was presented separately. Positron emission tomography measurements revealed that, when an HFC and an LFC were presented together, the rCBF in the brain stem and the left thalamus increased significantly compared with a sound lacking the HFC above 22 kHz but that was otherwise identical. Simultaneous EEG measurements showed that the power of occipital alpha-EEGs correlated significantly with the rCBF in the left thalamus. Psychological evaluation indicated that the subjects felt the sound containing an HFC to be more pleasant than the same sound lacking an HFC. These results suggest the existence of a previously unrecognized response to complex sound containing particular types of high frequencies above the audible range. We term this phenomenon the "hypersonic effect." PMID:10848570

  19. Abnormal cytoplasmic extensions associated with active ?IIb?3 are probably the cause for macrothrombocytopenia in Glanzmann thrombasthenia-like syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hauschner, Hagit; Mor-Cohen, Ronit; Messineo, Stefania; Mansour, Wissam; Seligsohn, Uri; Savoia, Anna; Rosenberg, Nurit

    2015-04-01

    Mutations in the ITGA2B or ITGB3 genes that encode for the ?IIb?3 platelet integrin usually cause Glanzmann thrombasthenia, a severe autosomal recessive bleeding disorder characterized by absence of platelet aggregation, but normal platelet number and size. Several rare mutations cause a Glanzmann-like syndrome which manifests macrothrombocytopenia and usually displays autosomal dominant inheritance. The exact mechanism causing Glanzmann-like syndrome is unknown. One typical example of Glanzmann-like mutations causes deletion of 40 amino acids (p.647-686) in the ?3 ?-tail domain (?TD_del) that was found in the heterozygous state in Italian and Japanese families. A second example is a missense mutation, C560R, located in the epidermal growth factor-like domain, found in the homozygous state in a French patient. Both mutations cause constitutive activation of ?IIb?3, but differ in their surface expression. In the current study, we generated cultured cells expressing ?3-?TD_del or ?3-C560R mutations along with wild-type ?IIb, and examined the cells' ability to create tubulin-dependent protrusions compared to cells expressing wild-type ?IIb?3. Unlike cells expressing wild-type ?IIb?3, cells harboring each of the mutations exhibited abnormal cytoplasmic extensions on immobilized fibrinogen or Von Willebrand factor, which resembled extensions formed in megakaryocyte leading to proplatelets. Moreover, we showed that formation of abnormal extensions occurred also in wild-type ?IIb?3 cells when activated by activating antibody. These results suggest that the active conformation of ?IIb?3 can induce cytoskeletal rearrangements that lead to impaired proplatelet formation. PMID:25806962

  20. Imaging of brain tumor proliferative activity with iodine-131-iododeoxyuridine

    SciTech Connect

    Tjuvajev, J.G.; Macapinlac, H.A.; Daghighian, F. [Cotzias Neuro-Oncology Lab., New York, NY (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Iodine-131-iododeoxyuridine (IUdR) uptake and retention was imaged with SPECT at 2 and 24 hr after administering a 10-mCi dose to six patients with primary brain tumors. The SPECT images were directly compared to gadolinium contrast-enhanced MR images as well as to ({sup 18}F) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET scans and {sup 201}Tl SPECT scans. Localized uptake and retention of IUdR-derived radioactivity was observed in five of six patients. The plasma half-life of ({sup 131}I) IUdR was short (1.5 min) in comparison to the half-life of total plasma radioactivity (6.4 hr). The pattern of ({sup 131}I)IUdR-derived radioactivity was markedly different in the 2-hr compared to 24-hr images. Radioactivity was localized along the periphery of the tumor and extended beyond the margin of tumor identified by contrast enhancement on MRI. The estimated levels of tumor radioactivity at 24 hr, based on semiquantitative phantom studies, ranged between <0.1 and 0.2 {mu}Ci/cc (<0.001% and 0.002% dose/cc); brain levels were not measurable. Iodine-131-IUdR SPECT imaging of brain tumor proliferation has low (marginal) sensitivity due to low count rates and can detect only the most active regions of tumor growth. Imaging at 24 hr represents a washout strategy to reduce {sup 131}I-labeled metabolites contributing to background activity in the tumors, and is more likely to show the pattern of ({sup 131}I)IUdR-DNA incorporation and thereby increase image specificity. Iodine-123-IUdR SPECT imaging at 12 hr and the use of ({sup 124}I)IUdR and PET will improve count acquisitions and image quality. 74 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. EEGSOLVER -BRAIN ACTIVITY AND GENETIC ALGORITHMS Paulo Aguiar Andr6 David Sandra Paulo Agostinho Rosa

    E-print Network

    Boetticher, Gary D.

    an electroencephalogram (EEG), findingout where the spots of activity in the brain are. Our Brain is a mysterious machine Electroencephalogram Every moment our brain cells generate millions of nervous impulses (nerve action potentials. A record of such waves is named electroencephalogram (EEG). The human EEG was discovered by Berger (1929

  2. Accumulated source imaging of brain activity with both low and high-frequency neuromagnetic signals

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Jing; Luo, Qian; Kotecha, Rupesh; Korman, Abraham; Zhang, Fawen; Luo, Huan; Fujiwara, Hisako; Hemasilpin, Nat; Rose, Douglas F.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed the importance of high-frequency brain signals (>70 Hz). One challenge of high-frequency signal analysis is that the size of time-frequency representation of high-frequency brain signals could be larger than 1 terabytes (TB), which is beyond the upper limits of a typical computer workstation's memory (<196 GB). The aim of the present study is to develop a new method to provide greater sensitivity in detecting high-frequency magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals in a single automated and versatile interface, rather than the more traditional, time-intensive visual inspection methods, which may take up to several days. To address the aim, we developed a new method, accumulated source imaging, defined as the volumetric summation of source activity over a period of time. This method analyzes signals in both low- (1~70 Hz) and high-frequency (70~200 Hz) ranges at source levels. To extract meaningful information from MEG signals at sensor space, the signals were decomposed to channel-cross-channel matrix (CxC) representing the spatiotemporal patterns of every possible sensor-pair. A new algorithm was developed and tested by calculating the optimal CxC and source location-orientation weights for volumetric source imaging, thereby minimizing multi-source interference and reducing computational cost. The new method was implemented in C/C++ and tested with MEG data recorded from clinical epilepsy patients. The results of experimental data demonstrated that accumulated source imaging could effectively summarize and visualize MEG recordings within 12.7 h by using approximately 10 GB of computer memory. In contrast to the conventional method of visually identifying multi-frequency epileptic activities that traditionally took 2–3 days and used 1–2 TB storage, the new approach can quantify epileptic abnormalities in both low- and high-frequency ranges at source levels, using much less time and computer memory. PMID:24904402

  3. Altered Spontaneous Brain Activity in Schizophrenia: A Meta-Analysis and a Large-Sample Study

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yongjie; Zhuo, Chuanjun; Qin, Wen; Zhu, Jiajia; Yu, Chunshui

    2015-01-01

    Altered spontaneous brain activity as measured by ALFF, fALFF, and ReHo has been reported in schizophrenia, but no consensus has been reached on alternations of these indexes in the disorder. We aimed to clarify the regional alterations in ALFF, fALFF, and ReHo in schizophrenia using a meta-analysis and a large-sample validation. A meta-analysis of activation likelihood estimation was conducted based on the abnormal foci of ten studies. A large sample of 86 schizophrenia patients and 89 healthy controls was compared to verify the results of the meta-analysis. Meta-analysis demonstrated that the alternations in ALFF and ReHo had similar distribution in schizophrenia patients. The foci with decreased ALFF/fALFF and ReHo in schizophrenia were mainly located in the somatosensory cortex, posterior parietal cortex, and occipital cortex; however, foci with increased ALFF/fALFF and ReHo were mainly located in the bilateral striatum, medial temporal cortex, and medial prefrontal cortex. The large-sample study showed consistent findings with the meta-analysis. These findings may expound the pathophysiological hypothesis and guide future research. PMID:26180786

  4. Brain Activity During Landmark and Line Bisection Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Çiçek, Metehan; Deouell, Leon Y.; Knight, Robert T.

    2008-01-01

    Neglect patients bisect lines far rightward of center whereas normal subjects typically bisect lines with a slight leftward bias supporting a right hemisphere bias for attention allocation. We used fMRI to assess the brain regions related to this function in normals, using two complementary tasks. In the Landmark task subjects were required to judge whether or not a presented line was bisected correctly. During the line bisection task, subjects moved a cursor and indicated when it reached the center of the line. The conjunction of BOLD activity for both tasks showed right lateralized intra-parietal sulcus and lateral peristriate cortex activity. The results provide evidence that predominantly right hemisphere lateralized processes are engaged in normal subjects during tasks that are failed in patients with unilateral neglect and highlight the importance of a right fronto-parietal network in attention allocation. PMID:19521543

  5. BRAIN CHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY OF NESTLING GREAT EGRETS, SNOWY EGRETS AND BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERONS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas W. Custer; Harry M. Ohlendorf

    1989-01-01

    Inhibition of brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity in birds is often used to diagnose exposure or death from organophosphorus or carbamate pesticides. Brain ChE activity in the young of altricial species increases with age; however, this relationship has only been demonstrated in tile European starling (Sturnus vulgaris). Brain ChE activity of nestling great egrets (Casme- rodius albus) collected from a colony

  6. Control of Abnormal Synchronization in Neurological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Popovych, Oleksandr V.; Tass, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    In the nervous system, synchronization processes play an important role, e.g., in the context of information processing and motor control. However, pathological, excessive synchronization may strongly impair brain function and is a hallmark of several neurological disorders. This focused review addresses the question of how an abnormal neuronal synchronization can specifically be counteracted by invasive and non-invasive brain stimulation as, for instance, by deep brain stimulation for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease, or by acoustic stimulation for the treatment of tinnitus. On the example of coordinated reset (CR) neuromodulation, we illustrate how insights into the dynamics of complex systems contribute to successful model-based approaches, which use methods from synergetics, non-linear dynamics, and statistical physics, for the development of novel therapies for normalization of brain function and synaptic connectivity. Based on the intrinsic multistability of the neuronal populations induced by spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP), CR neuromodulation utilizes the mutual interdependence between synaptic connectivity and dynamics of the neuronal networks in order to restore more physiological patterns of connectivity via desynchronization of neuronal activity. The very goal is to shift the neuronal population by stimulation from an abnormally coupled and synchronized state to a desynchronized regime with normalized synaptic connectivity, which significantly outlasts the stimulation cessation, so that long-lasting therapeutic effects can be achieved. PMID:25566174

  7. Targeting blood-brain barrier sphingolipid signaling reduces basal P-glycoprotein activity and improves drug delivery to the brain.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Ronald E; Peart, John C; Hawkins, Brian T; Campos, Christopher R; Miller, David S

    2012-09-25

    P-glycoprotein, an ATP-driven drug efflux pump, is a major obstacle to the delivery of small-molecule drugs across the blood-brain barrier and into the CNS. Here we test a unique signaling-based strategy to overcome this obstacle. We used a confocal microscopy-based assay with isolated rat brain capillaries to map a signaling pathway that within minutes abolishes P-glycoprotein transport activity without altering transporter protein expression or tight junction permeability. This pathway encompasses elements of proinflammatory- (TNF-?) and sphingolipid-based signaling. Critical to this pathway was signaling through sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1PR1). In brain capillaries, S1P acted through S1PR1 to rapidly and reversibly reduce P-glycoprotein transport activity. Sphingosine reduced transport by a sphingosine kinase-dependent mechanism. Importantly, fingolimod (FTY720), a S1P analog recently approved for treatment of multiple sclerosis, also rapidly reduced P-glycoprotein activity; similar effects were found with the active, phosphorylated metabolite (FTY720P). We validated these findings in vivo using in situ brain perfusion in rats. Administration of S1P, FTY720, or FTY729P increased brain uptake of three radiolabeled P-glycoprotein substrates, (3)H-verapamil (threefold increase), (3)H-loperamide (fivefold increase), and (3)H-paclitaxel (fivefold increase); blocking S1PR1 abolished this effect. Tight junctional permeability, measured as brain (14)C-sucrose accumulation, was not altered. Therefore, targeting signaling through S1PR1 at the blood-brain barrier with the sphingolipid-based drugs, FTY720 or FTY720P, can rapidly and reversibly reduce basal P-glycoprotein activity and thus improve delivery of small-molecule therapeutics to the brain. PMID:22949658

  8. Action of a modulated electromagnetic field on experimentally evoked epileptiform brain activity in rats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. D. Antimonii; R. A. Salamov

    1980-01-01

    The effect of a modulated electromagnetic field (MEMF) on experimentally evoked epileptiform activity of brain structures was studied in rats. Exposure to an MEMF with modulation frequencies of 2–30 Hz was shown to induce depression of paroxysmal brain electrical activity in 41% of experiments. Marked weakening of epileptiform activity was observed in 23% of experiments and potentiation in 10.1%. In

  9. Sexual Differentiation of Aromatase Activity in the Rat Brain: Effects of Perinatal Steroid Exposure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    CHARLES E. ROSELLI; SCOTT A. KLOSTERMAN

    1998-01-01

    Androgens regulate aromatase activity in the medial preoptic area and other components of the brain circuit that mediates male sexual behavior. The levels of aromatase activity within these brain regions are greater in males than in females. As the activation of copulation requires aromatization of testosterone to estradiol, this quantitative enzymatic difference between sexes could contribute to the greater behavioral

  10. Recovery of brain and plasma cholinesterase activities in ducklings exposed to organophosphorus pesticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, W.J.

    1981-01-01

    Brain and plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activities were determined for mallard ducklings (Anas platyrhynchos) exposed to dicrotophos and fenthion. Recovery rates of brain ChE did not differ between ducklings administered a single oral dose vs. a 2-week dietary dose of these organophosphates. Exposure to the organophosphates, followed by recovery of brain ChE, did not significantly affect the degree of brain ChE inhibition or the recovery of ChE activity at a subsequent exposure. Recovery of brain ChE activity followed the general model Y = a + b(logX) with rapid recovery to about 50% of normal, followed by a slower rate of recovery until normal ChE activity levels were attained. Fenthion and dicrotophos-inhibited brain ChE were only slightly reactivated in vitro by pyridine-2-aldoxime methiodide, which suggested that spontaneous reactivation was not a primary method of recovery of ChE activity. Recovery of brain ChE activity can be modeled for interpretation of sublethal inhibition of brain ChE activities in wild birds following environmental applications of organophosphates. Plasma ChE activity is inferior to brain ChE activity for environmental monitoring, because of its rapid recovery and large degree of variation among individuals.

  11. Microglial activation induced by brain trauma is suppressed by post-injury treatment with a PARP inhibitor

    E-print Network

    2012-01-01

    brain devoid of NeuN staining (because both astrocytes andand astrocyte activation. (A) Coronal rat brain sectionsAstrocyte, Behavioral, Forelimb, Inflammation, Microglia, Minocycline, Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, trau- matic brain

  12. The role of the extrapersonal brain systems in religious activity.

    PubMed

    Previc, Fred H

    2006-09-01

    The neuropsychology of religious activity in normal and selected clinical populations is reviewed. Religious activity includes beliefs, experiences, and practice. Neuropsychological and functional imaging findings, many of which have derived from studies of experienced meditators, point to a ventral cortical axis for religious behavior, involving primarily the ventromedial temporal and frontal regions. Neuropharmacological studies generally point to dopaminergic activation as the leading neurochemical feature associated with religious activity. The ventral dopaminergic pathways involved in religious behavior most closely align with the action-extrapersonal system in the model of 3-D perceptual-motor interactions proposed by . These pathways are biased toward distant (especially upper) space and also mediate related extrapersonally dominated brain functions such as dreaming and hallucinations. Hyperreligiosity is a major feature of mania, obsessive-compulsive disorder, schizophrenia, temporal-lobe epilepsy and related disorders, in which the ventromedial dopaminergic systems are highly activated and exaggerated attentional or goal-directed behavior toward extrapersonal space occurs. The evolution of religion is linked to an expansion of dopaminergic systems in humans, brought about by changes in diet and other physiological influences. PMID:16439158

  13. Brain projects think big When you read these words, hundreds of million of nerve cells are electrically and chemically active in your brain. This

    E-print Network

    Segev, Idan

    Brain projects think big When you read these words, hundreds of million of nerve cells are electrically and chemically active in your brain. This activity enables you to recognize words, sense the world, learn, enjoy and create new things, and be curious about the world around you. Indeed, our brain

  14. Glycosaminoglycan-Mediated Loss of Cathepsin K Collagenolytic Activity in MPS I Contributes to Osteoclast and Growth Plate Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Susan; Hashamiyan, Saadat; Clarke, Lorne; Saftig, Paul; Mort, John; Dejica, Valeria M.; Brömme, Dieter

    2009-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidoses are a group of lysosomal storage diseases characterized by the build-up of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and severe skeletal abnormalities. As GAGs can regulate the collagenolytic activity of the major osteoclastic protease cathepsin K, we investigated the presence and activity of cathepsin K and its co-localization with GAGs in mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type I bone. The most dramatic difference between MPS I and wild-type mice was an increase in the amount of cartilage in the growth plates in MPS I bones. Though the number of cathepsin K-expressing osteoclasts was increased in MPS I mice, these mice revealed a significant reduction in cathepsin K-mediated cartilage degradation. As excess heparan and dermatan sulfates inhibit type II collagen degradation by cathepsin K and the spatial overlap between cathepsin K and heparan sulfate strongly increased in MPS I mice, the build up of subepiphyseal cartilage is speculated to be a direct consequence of cathepsin K inhibition by MPS I-associated GAGs. Moreover, isolated MPS I and Ctsk?/? osteoclasts displayed fewer actin rings and formed fewer resorption pits on dentine disks, as compared with wild-type cells. These results suggest that the accumulation of GAGs in murine MPS I bone has an inhibitory effect on cathepsin K activity, resulting in impaired osteoclast activity and decreased cartilage resorption, which may contribute to the bone pathology seen in MPS diseases. PMID:19834056

  15. NMDA receptor activation strengthens weak electrical coupling in mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Turecek, Josef; Yuen, Genevieve S; Han, Victor Z; Zeng, Xiao-Hui; Bayer, K Ulrich; Welsh, John P

    2014-03-19

    Electrical synapses are formed by gap junctions and permit electrical coupling, which shapes the synchrony of neuronal ensembles. Here, we provide a direct demonstration of receptor-mediated strengthening of electrical coupling in mammalian brain. Electrical coupling in the inferior olive of rats was strengthened by activation of NMDA-type glutamate receptors (NMDARs), which were found at synaptic loci and at extrasynaptic loci 20-100 nm proximal to gap junctions. Electrical coupling was strengthened by pharmacological and synaptic activation of NMDARs, whereas costimulation of ionotropic non-NMDAR glutamate receptors transiently antagonized the effect of NMDAR activation. NMDAR-dependent strengthening (1) occurred despite increased input conductance, (2) induced Ca(2+)-influx microdomains near dendritic spines, (3) required activation of the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein-kinase II, (4) was restricted to neurons that were weakly coupled, and (5) thus strengthened coupling, mainly between nonadjacent neurons. This provided a mechanism to expand the synchronization of rhythmic membrane potential oscillations by chemical neurotransmitter input. PMID:24656255

  16. Whole-brain mapping of behaviourally induced neural activation in mice.

    PubMed

    Vousden, Dulcie A; Epp, Jonathan; Okuno, Hiroyuki; Nieman, Brian J; van Eede, Matthijs; Dazai, Jun; Ragan, Timothy; Bito, Haruhiko; Frankland, Paul W; Lerch, Jason P; Henkelman, R Mark

    2015-07-01

    The ability to visualize behaviourally evoked neural activity patterns across the rodent brain is essential for understanding the distributed brain networks mediating particular behaviours. However, current imaging methods are limited in their spatial resolution and/or ability to obtain brain-wide coverage of functional activity. Here, we describe a new automated method for obtaining cellular-level, whole-brain maps of behaviourally induced neural activity in the mouse. This method combines the use of transgenic immediate-early gene reporter mice to visualize neural activity; serial two-photon tomography to image the entire brain at cellular resolution; advanced image processing algorithms to count the activated neurons and align the datasets to the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas; and statistical analysis to identify the network of activated brain regions evoked by behaviour. We demonstrate the use of this approach to determine the whole-brain networks activated during the retrieval of fear memories. Consistent with previous studies, we identified a large network of amygdalar, hippocampal, and neocortical brain regions implicated in fear memory retrieval. Our proposed methods can thus be used to map cellular networks involved in the expression of normal behaviours as well as to investigate in depth circuit dysfunction in mouse models of neurobiological disease. PMID:24760545

  17. Detection of cocaine induced rat brain activation by photoacoustic tomography

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Janggun; Yang, Xinmai

    2011-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) was used to detect the progressive changes on the cerebral cortex of Sprague Dawley rats after the administration of cocaine hydrochloride. Different concentrations (0, 2.5, and 5.0 mg per kg body) of cocaine hydrochloride in saline solution were injected into Sprague Dawley rats through tail veins. Cerebral cortex images of the animals were continuously acquired by PAT. For continuous observation, PAT system used multi-transducers to reduce the scanning time and maintain a good signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The obtained photoacoustic images were compared with each other and confirmed that changes in blood volume were induced by cocaine hydrochloride injection. The results demonstrate that PAT may be used to detect the effects of drug abuse-induced brain activation. PMID:21163301

  18. Abnormal cortical sensorimotor activity during "Target" sound detection in subjects with acute acoustic trauma

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    at frequencies above 3 kHz and tinnitus. In this study, we have used functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to visualize neuronal activation patterns in military adults with AAT and various tinnitus sequelae during. Tinnitus is a common feature of military life, due to exposure to impulse noise associated with the use

  19. Abnormal fMRI Activation Pattern during Story Listening in Individuals with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds Losin, Elizabeth A.; Rivera, Susan M.; O'Hare, Elizabeth D.; Sowell, Elizabeth R.; Pinter, Joseph D.

    2009-01-01

    Down syndrome is characterized by disproportionately severe impairments of speech and language, yet little is known about the neural underpinnings of these deficits. We compared fMRI activation patterns during passive story listening in 9 young adults with Down syndrome and 9 approximately age-matched, typically developing controls. The typically…

  20. Intracytoplasmic sperm injection in the bovine induces abnormal [Ca 2+ ] i responses and oocyte activation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher MalcuitA; Marc Maserati; Yoshiyuki Takahashi; Raymond Page; Rafael A. Fissore

    2006-01-01

    Fertilisation by intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), a technique that bypasses the membrane fusion of the gametes, has been widely used to produce offspring in humans and mice. Success with this technique has lent support to the hypothesis that in mammalian fertilisation, a factor from the sperm, the so-called sperm factor, is responsible for oocyte activation and that the fusion process

  1. Intracytoplasmic sperm injection in the bovine induces abnormal [Ca ]i responses and oocyte activation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher Malcuit; Marc Maserati; Yoshiyuki Takahashi; Raymond Page; Rafael A. Fissore

    Abstract. Fertilisation by intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), a technique that bypasses the membrane fusion of the gametes, has been widely used to produce offspring in humans and mice. Success with this technique has lent support to the hypothesis that in mammalian fertilisation, a factor from the sperm, the so-called sperm factor, is responsible for oocyte activation and that the fusion

  2. The Right Brain: An Active Partner in Written Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stahl-Gemake, Josephine; And Others

    The human brain is composed of two interdependent systems, the left hemisphere and the right hemisphere. While the left brain analyzes sequentially the phonemes of our language and names or reads words, the right brain produces the images, feelings, and associations connected with the words. Current educational systems, however, are doing little…

  3. Association of abnormal lipid spectrum with the disease activity of Takayasu arteritis.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Chen, B; Lv, N; Liu, Q; Dang, Aimin

    2015-07-01

    Our study aimed to determine whether proatherogenic lipid profiles exist in patients with active Takayasu arteritis (TA) and assess the relationship between different lipid profiles and disease activity in TA. A total of 132 premenopausal female patients with TA and 100 sex-, age-, and body mass index-matched healthy controls were included in our study. The clinical data were collected in detail from all participants. Patients with active TA had significantly lower levels of apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1) (1.47?±?0.30 vs. 1.99?±?0.33 mmol/L, p?activity (??=?0.38, p?=?0.04). In addition, multivariate stepwise forward regression analysis showed that the apoB/apoA1 ratio was the major determinant for high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (??=?0.58, p?=?0.002). Our findings indicate that patients with active TA had proatherogenic lipid profiles. In addition, the ratio of apoB to apoA1 could be used as a marker for monitoring and targeting patients with TA. PMID:25388645

  4. Chromosomal abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Goh, K.; Jacox, R.F.; Anderson, F.W.

    1980-09-01

    Cytogenetic studies from the peripheral blood of a patient with malignant lymphoma and rhematoid arthritis who was treated with intra-articular gold Au 198 revealed mosaicism with a normal female metaphase and a 43-chromosome metaphase. The abnormal cell line showed six missing normal chromosomes and three morphologically abnormal chromosomes. The trypsin-digested G-banding metaphases showed that the marker chromosomes were an isochromosome of the long arm of chromosome 17, a translocated chromosome that involved the long arm of chromosome 4 and a chromosome 16, and a translocated chromosome that involved the long arm of chromosome 4 and a chromosome 5. It is tempting to conclude that these abnormalities were due to the gold Au 198 treatment, but we cannot exclude other possibilities.

  5. Brain Na+, K+-ATPase Activity In Aging and Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Lores Arnaiz, Georgina Rodríguez; Ordieres, María Graciela López

    2014-01-01

    Na+/K+ pump or sodium- and potassium-activated adenosine 5’-triphosphatase (Na+, K+-ATPase), its enzymatic version, is a crucial protein responsible for the electrochemical gradient across the cell membranes. It is an ion transporter, which in addition to exchange cations, is the ligand for cardenolides. This enzyme regulates the entry of K+ with the exit of Na+ from cells, being the responsible for Na+/K+ equilibrium maintenance through neuronal membranes. This transport system couples the hydrolysis of one molecule of ATP to exchange three sodium ions for two potassium ions, thus maintaining the normal gradient of these cations in animal cells. Oxidative metabolism is very active in brain, where large amounts of chemical energy as ATP molecules are consumed, mostly required for the maintenance of the ionic gradients that underlie resting and action potentials which are involved in nerve impulse propagation, neurotransmitter release and cation homeostasis. Protein phosphorylation is a key process in biological regulation. At nervous system level, protein phosphorylation is the major molecular mechanism through which the function of neural proteins is modulted in response to extracellular signals, including the response to neurotransmitter stimuli. It is the major mechanism of neural plasticity, including memory processing. The phosphorylation of Na+, K+-ATPase catalytic subunit inhibits enzyme activity whereas the inhibition of protein kinase C restores the enzyme activity. The dephosphorylation of neuronal Na+, K+-ATPase is mediated by calcineurin, a serine / threonine phosphatase. The latter enzyme is involved in a wide range of cellular responses to Ca2+ mobilizing signals, in the regulation of neuronal excitability by controlling the activity of ion channels, in the release of neurotransmitters and hormones, as well as in synaptic plasticity and gene transcription. In the present article evidence showing Na+, K+-ATPase involvement in signaling pathways, enzyme changes in diverse neurological diseases as well as during aging, have been summarized. Issues refer mainly to Na+, K+-ATPase studies in ischemia, brain injury, depression and mood disorders, mania, stress, Alzheimer´s disease, learning and memory, and neuronal hyperexcitability and epilepsy. PMID:25018677

  6. Visual image reconstruction from human brain activity: A modular decoding approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyawaki, Yoichi; Uchida, Hajime; Yamashita, Okito; Sato, Masa-aki; Morito, Yusuke; Tanabe, Hiroki C.; Sadato, Norihiro; Kamitani, Yukiyasu

    2009-12-01

    Brain activity represents our perceptual experience. But the potential for reading out perceptual contents from human brain activity has not been fully explored. In this study, we demonstrate constraint-free reconstruction of visual images perceived by a subject, from the brain activity pattern. We reconstructed visual images by combining local image bases with multiple scales, whose contrasts were independently decoded from fMRI activity by automatically selecting relevant voxels and exploiting their correlated patterns. Binary-contrast, 10 x 10-patch images (2100 possible states), were accurately reconstructed without any image prior by measuring brain activity only for several hundred random images. The results suggest that our approach provides an effective means to read out complex perceptual states from brain activity while discovering information representation in multi-voxel patterns.

  7. Accuracy of a Custom Physical Activity and Knee Angle Measurement Sensor System for Patients with Neuromuscular Disorders and Gait Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Feldhege, Frank; Mau-Moeller, Anett; Lindner, Tobias; Hein, Albert; Markschies, Andreas; Zettl, Uwe Klaus; Bader, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Long-term assessment of ambulatory behavior and joint motion are valuable tools for the evaluation of therapy effectiveness in patients with neuromuscular disorders and gait abnormalities. Even though there are several tools available to quantify ambulatory behavior in a home environment, reliable measurement of joint motion is still limited to laboratory tests. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a novel inertial sensor system for ambulatory behavior and joint motion measurement in the everyday environment. An algorithm for behavior classification, step detection, and knee angle calculation was developed. The validation protocol consisted of simulated daily activities in a laboratory environment. The tests were performed with ten healthy subjects and eleven patients with multiple sclerosis. Activity classification showed comparable performance to commercially available activPAL sensors. Step detection with our sensor system was more accurate. The calculated flexion-extension angle of the knee joint showed a root mean square error of less than 5° compared with results obtained using an electro-mechanical goniometer. This new system combines ambulatory behavior assessment and knee angle measurement for long-term measurement periods in a home environment. The wearable sensor system demonstrated high validity for behavior classification and knee joint angle measurement in a laboratory setting. PMID:25954954

  8. Accuracy of a custom physical activity and knee angle measurement sensor system for patients with neuromuscular disorders and gait abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Feldhege, Frank; Mau-Moeller, Anett; Lindner, Tobias; Hein, Albert; Markschies, Andreas; Zettl, Uwe Klaus; Bader, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Long-term assessment of ambulatory behavior and joint motion are valuable tools for the evaluation of therapy effectiveness in patients with neuromuscular disorders and gait abnormalities. Even though there are several tools available to quantify ambulatory behavior in a home environment, reliable measurement of joint motion is still limited to laboratory tests. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a novel inertial sensor system for ambulatory behavior and joint motion measurement in the everyday environment. An algorithm for behavior classification, step detection, and knee angle calculation was developed. The validation protocol consisted of simulated daily activities in a laboratory environment. The tests were performed with ten healthy subjects and eleven patients with multiple sclerosis. Activity classification showed comparable performance to commercially available activPAL sensors. Step detection with our sensor system was more accurate. The calculated flexion-extension angle of the knee joint showed a root mean square error of less than 5° compared with results obtained using an electro-mechanical goniometer. This new system combines ambulatory behavior assessment and knee angle measurement for long-term measurement periods in a home environment. The wearable sensor system demonstrated high validity for behavior classification and knee joint angle measurement in a laboratory setting. PMID:25954954

  9. ROBUST VOXEL-WISE JOINT DETECTION ESTIMATION OF BRAIN ACTIVITY IN fMRI Lotfi Chaari1,2

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    the whole brain data set. This approach is mainly based on: (i) the non-parametric modelling of the HRFROBUST VOXEL-WISE JOINT DETECTION ESTIMATION OF BRAIN ACTIVITY IN fMRI Lotfi Chaari1,2 , Florence We address the issue of jointly detecting brain activity and esti- mating brain hemodynamics from

  10. Signal abnormalities on 1.5 and 3 Tesla brain MRI in multiple sclerosis patients and healthy controls. A morphological and spatial quantitative comparison study.

    PubMed

    Di Perri, Carol; Dwyer, Michael G; Wack, David S; Cox, Jennifer L; Hashmi, Komal; Saluste, Erik; Hussein, Sara; Schirda, Claudiu; Stosic, Milena; Durfee, Jacqueline; Poloni, Guy U; Nayyar, Navdeep; Bergamaschi, Roberto; Zivadinov, Robert

    2009-10-01

    Previous studies in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) revealed increased lesion count and volume on 3 T compared to 1.5 T. Morphological and spatial lesion characteristics between 1.5 T and 3 T have not been examined. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of changing from a 1.5 T to a 3 T MRI scanner on the number, volume and spatial distribution of signal abnormalities (SA) on brain MRI in a sample of MS patients and normal controls (NC), using pair- and voxel-wise comparison procedures. Forty-one (41) MS patients (32 relapsing-remitting and 9 secondary-progressive) and 38 NC were examined on both 1.5 T and 3 T within one week in random order. T2-weighted hyperintensities (T2H) and T1-weighted hypointensities (T1H) were outlined semiautomatically by two operators in a blinded fashion on 1.5 T and 3 T images. Spatial lesion distribution was assessed using T2 and T1 voxel-wise SA probability maps (SAPM). Pair-wise analysis examined the proportion of SA not simultaneously outlined on 1.5 T and 3 T. A posteriori unblinded analysis was conducted to examine the non-overlapping identifications of SA between the 1.5 T and 3 T. For pair-wise T2- and T1-analyses, a higher number and individual volume of SA were detected on 3 T compared to 1.5 T (p<0.0001) in both MS and NC. Logistic regression analysis showed that the likelihood of missing SA on 1.5 T was significantly higher for smaller SA in both MS and NC groups. SA probability map (SAPM) analysis revealed significantly more regionally distinct spatial SA differences on 3 T compared to 1.5 T in both groups (p<0.05); these were most pronounced in the occipital, periventricular and cortical regions for T2H. This study provides important information regarding morphological and spatial differences between data acquired using 1.5 T and 3 T protocols at the two scanner field strengths. PMID:19371784

  11. Brain activity associated with illusory correlations in animal phobia.

    PubMed

    Wiemer, Julian; Schulz, Stefan M; Reicherts, Philipp; Glotzbach-Schoon, Evelyn; Andreatta, Marta; Pauli, Paul

    2015-07-01

    Anxiety disorder patients were repeatedly found to overestimate the association between disorder-relevant stimuli and aversive outcomes despite random contingencies. Such an illusory correlation (IC) might play an important role in the return of fear after extinction learning; yet, little is known about how this cognitive bias emerges in the brain. In a functional magnetic resonance imaging study, 18 female patients with spider phobia and 18 healthy controls were exposed to pictures of spiders, mushrooms and puppies followed randomly by either a painful electrical shock or nothing. In advance, both patients and healthy controls expected more shocks after spider pictures. Importantly, only patients with spider phobia continued to overestimate this association after the experiment. The strength of this IC was predicted by increased outcome aversiveness ratings and primary sensory motor cortex activity in response to the shock after spider pictures. Moreover, increased activation of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) to spider pictures predicted the IC. These results support the theory that phobia-relevant stimuli amplify unpleasantness and sensory motor representations of aversive stimuli, which in turn may promote their overestimation. Hyper-activity in dlPFC possibly reflects a pre-occupation of executive resources with phobia-relevant stimuli, thus complicating the accurate monitoring of objective contingencies and the unlearning of fear. PMID:25411452

  12. Right Frontal Brain Activity, Cortisol, and Withdrawal Behavior in 6-Month-Old Infants

    E-print Network

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Right Frontal Brain Activity, Cortisol, and Withdrawal Behavior in 6-Month-Old Infants Kristin A examined anterior asymmetric brain electrical activity and cortisol in infants, children, and adults, the direct association between asymmetry and cortisol has not systematically been reported. In nonhuman

  13. APOE-dependent PET patterns of brain activation in Alzheimer disease

    E-print Network

    APOE-dependent PET patterns of brain activation in Alzheimer disease N. Scarmeas, MD; K.E. Anderson nonverbal recognition memory task. Patterns of brain activation differed as a function of APOE genotype: 4, precuneus, parahippocampal, and right precentral gyrus. The APOE genotype seems to play a role in cerebral

  14. Early microglial activation following neonatal excitotoxic brain damage in mice: a potential target for neuroprotection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M.-A Dommergues; F Plaisant; C Verney; P Gressens

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies in a mouse model of neonatal excitotoxic brain damage mimicking the brain lesions in human cerebral palsy showed microglial activation within 24 h after intracerebral injection of the glutamatergic analog ibotenate. Using this model, we studied the expression of CD-45 antigen, a marker of blood-derived cells, by these activated microglial cells labeled by Griffonia simplicifolia I isolectin B4.

  15. Patterns of Brain Activity Supporting Autobiographical Memory, Prospection, and Theory of Mind, and

    E-print Network

    Spreng, R. Nathan

    Patterns of Brain Activity Supporting Autobiographical Memory, Prospection, and Theory of Mind above the present environment and reflect upon the past, the future, and the minds of othersMRI to examine brain activity during autobiographical remembering, prospection, and theory- of-mind reasoning

  16. Sex differences in brain activity related to general and emotional intelligence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Norbert Jaušovec; Ksenija Jaušovec

    2005-01-01

    The study investigated gender differences in resting EEG (in three individually determined narrow ? frequency bands) related to the level of general and emotional intelligence. Brain activity of males decreased with the level of general intelligence, whereas an opposite pattern of brain activity was observed in females. This difference was most pronounced in the upper-? band which is related to

  17. Sex differences in how stress affects brain activity during face viewing Mara Mather1

    E-print Network

    Mather, Mara

    Sex differences in how stress affects brain activity during face viewing Mara Mather1 , Nichole R title: Stressed men and women process faces differently Contact for correspondence: Mara Mather, mara indicates that stress also affects brain activity while viewing emotional faces differently for men

  18. Local potassium signaling couples neuronal activity to vasodilation in the brain

    E-print Network

    Newman, Eric A.

    + wave that propagates to astrocytic endfeet, which encase penetrating arterioles in the brain2Local potassium signaling couples neuronal activity to vasodilation in the brain Jessica A Filosa1 T Nelson1 The mechanisms by which active neurons, via astrocytes, rapidly signal intracerebral arterioles

  19. A Three-Dimensional Statistical Analysis for CBF Activation Studies in Human Brain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. J. Worsley; A. C. Evans; S. Marrett; P. Neelin

    1992-01-01

    SUMMARY Many studies of brain function with positron emission tomography (PET) involve the interpretation of a subtracted PET image, usually the difierence between two images under baseline and stimulation conditions. The purpose of these studies is to see which areas of the brain are activated by the stimulation condition. In many cognitive studies, the activation is so slight that the

  20. Abstract Combining differential conditioning with opto-physiological recordings of bee brain activity allows the

    E-print Network

    Menzel, Randolf - Institut für Biologie

    Abstract Combining differential conditioning with opto- physiological recordings of bee brain activity allows the investigation of learning-related changes in complex neural systems. In this study we in the insect brain. As an inte- grative neural network, enhanced activation of the mush- room body lip may

  1. Distinguishing Natural Language Processes on the Basis of fMRI-Measured Brain Activation

    E-print Network

    in sentence processing, the Left Inferior Frontal Gyrus (LIFG), also known as Broca's area, and the LeftDistinguishing Natural Language Processes on the Basis of fMRI-Measured Brain Activation Francisco of the underlying brain activation measured with fMRI. The method uses a classifier to learn to distinguish between

  2. Protease Activated Receptor Signaling Is Required for African Trypanosome Traversal of Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dennis J. Grab; Jose C. Garcia-Garcia; Olga V. Nikolskaia; Yuri V. Kim; Amanda Brown; Carlos A. Pardo; Yongqing Zhang; Kevin G. Becker; Brenda A. Wilson; Julio Scharfstein; J. Stephen Dumler

    2009-01-01

    Background: Using human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) as an in vitro model for how African trypanosomes cross the human blood-brain barrier (BBB) we recently reported that the parasites cross the BBB by generating calcium activation signals in HBMECs through the activity of parasite cysteine proteases, particularly cathepsin L (brucipain). In the current study, we examined the possible role of

  3. Protease Activated Receptor Signaling Is Required for African Trypanosome Traversal of Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dennis J. Grab; Jose C. Garcia-Garcia; Olga V. Nikolskaia; Yuri V. Kim; Amanda Brown; Carlos A. Pardo; Yongqing Zhang; Kevin G. Becker; Brenda A. Wilson; Julio Scharfstein; J. Stephen Dumler

    2009-01-01

    BackgroundUsing human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) as an in vitro model for how African trypanosomes cross the human blood-brain barrier (BBB) we recently reported that the parasites cross the BBB by generating calcium activation signals in HBMECs through the activity of parasite cysteine proteases, particularly cathepsin L (brucipain). In the current study, we examined the possible role of a

  4. Untangling the Temporal Dynamics of Bilateral Neural Activation in the Bilingual Brain

    E-print Network

    Untangling the Temporal Dynamics of Bilateral Neural Activation in the Bilingual Brain by Kaja the Temporal Dynamics of Bilateral Neural Activation in the Bilingual Brain Kaja Kinga Jasiska Doctor lateralized to the left-hemisphere, however, lateralization varies with language experience. Bilinguals

  5. Kamin Blocking Is Associated with Reduced Medial-Frontal Gyrus Activation: Implications for Prediction Error Abnormality in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Benjamin; Corcoran, Rhiannon

    2012-01-01

    The following study used 3-T functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the neural signature of Kamin blocking. Kamin blocking is an associative learning phenomenon seen where prior association of a stimulus (A) with an outcome blocks subsequent learning to an added stimulus (B) when both stimuli are later presented together (AB) with the same outcome. While there are a number of theoretical explanations of Kamin blocking, it is widely considered to exemplify the use of prediction error in learning, where learning occurs in proportion to the difference between expectation and outcome. In Kamin blocking as stimulus A fully predicts the outcome no prediction error is generated by the addition of stimulus B to form the compound stimulus AB, hence learning about it is “blocked”. Kamin blocking is disrupted in people with schizophrenia, their relatives and healthy individuals with high psychometrically-defined schizotypy. This disruption supports suggestions that abnormal prediction error is a core deficit that can help to explain the symptoms of schizophrenia. The present study tested 9 healthy volunteers on an f-MRI adaptation of Oades' “mouse in the house task”, the only task measuring Kamin blocking that shows disruption in schizophrenia patients that has been independently replicated. Participant's Kamin blocking scores were found to inversely correlate with Kamin-blocking-related activation within the prefrontal cortex, specifically the medial frontal gyrus. The medial frontal gyrus has been associated with the psychological construct of uncertainty, which we suggest is consistent with disrupted Kamin blocking and demonstrated in people with schizophrenia. These data suggest that the medial frontal gyrus merits further investigation as a potential locus of reduced Kamin blocking and abnormal prediction error in schizophrenia. PMID:23028415

  6. Abnormal functional connectivity density in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiuquan; Bi, Wenwei; Zhang, Yuling; Zhu, Maohu; Zhang, Yanling; Feng, Hua; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Yuanchao; Jiang, Tianzi

    2015-03-01

    The pathology of Parkinson's disease (PD) is not confined to the nigrostriatal pathway, but also involves widespread cerebral cortical areas. Using seed-based resting state functional connectivity, many previous studies have demonstrated that PD patients have abnormal functional integration. However, this technique strongly relies on a priori selection of the seed regions and may miss important unpredictable findings. Using an ultrafast voxel-wise functional connectivity density approach, this study performed a whole brain functional connectivity analysis to investigate the abnormal resting-state functional activities in PD patients. Compared with healthy controls, PD patients exhibited decreased short-range functional connectivity densities in regions that were mainly located in the ventral visual pathway and decreased long-range functional connectivity densities in the right middle and superior frontal gyrus, which have been speculated to be associated with visual hallucinations and cognitive dysfunction, respectively. PD patients also exhibited increased short- and long-range functional connectivity densities in the bilateral precuneus and posterior cingulate cortex, which may represent a compensatory process for maintaining normal brain function. The observed functional connectivity density alterations might be related to the disturbed structural connectivity of PD patients, leading to abnormal functional integration. Our results suggest that functional connectivity density mapping may provide a useful means to assess PD-related neurodegeneration and to study the pathophysiology of PD. PMID:25496782

  7. Automatic classification of squamosal abnormality in micro-CT images for the evaluation of rabbit fetal skull defects using active shape models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Antong; Dogdas, Belma; Mehta, Saurin; Bagchi, Ansuman; Wise, L. David; Winkelmann, Christopher

    2014-03-01

    High-throughput micro-CT imaging has been used in our laboratory to evaluate fetal skeletal morphology in developmental toxicology studies. Currently, the volume-rendered skeletal images are visually inspected and observed abnormalities are reported for compounds in development. To improve the efficiency and reduce human error of the evaluation, we implemented a framework to automate the evaluation process. The framework starts by dividing the skull into regions of interest and then measuring various geometrical characteristics. Normal/abnormal classification on the bone segments is performed based on identifying statistical outliers. In pilot experiments using rabbit fetal skulls, the majority of the skeletal abnormalities can be detected successfully in this manner. However, there are shape-based abnormalities that are relatively subtle and thereby difficult to identify using the geometrical features. To address this problem, we introduced a model-based approach and applied this strategy on the squamosal bone. We will provide details on this active shape model (ASM) strategy for the identification of squamosal abnormalities and show that this method improved the sensitivity of detecting squamosal-related abnormalities from 0.48 to 0.92.

  8. Abnormal motor activity during anaesthesia in a dog: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Seizures or convulsions that occur during anaesthesia in veterinary patients are infrequently reported in the literature. Consequently, the incidence of such events is unknown. Several drugs commonly used in clinical veterinary anaesthesia have been shown to induce epileptiform activity in both human clinical patients and experimental candidates. The present case report describes convulsions in a four-year old male Bernese mountain dog during maintenance of anaesthesia with isoflurane after premedication with acepromazine and methadone followed by co-induction with propofol and ketamine. The dog had no history of previous convulsions. The use of several sedative and anaesthetic drugs makes it difficult to find one single causative pharmaceutical. PMID:21118580

  9. Six3 represses nodal activity to establish early brain asymmetry in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Inbal, Adi; Kim, Seok-Hyung; Shin, Jimann; Solnica-Krezel, Lilianna

    2007-08-01

    The vertebrate brain is anatomically and functionally asymmetric; however, the molecular mechanisms that establish left-right brain patterning are largely unknown. In zebrafish, asymmetric left-sided Nodal signaling within the developing dorsal diencephalon is required for determining the direction of epithalamic asymmetries. Here, we show that Six3, a transcription factor essential for forebrain formation and associated with holoprosencephaly in humans, regulates diencephalic Nodal activity during initial establishment of brain asymmetry. Reduction of Six3 function causes brain-specific deregulation of Nodal pathway activity, resulting in epithalamic laterality defects. Based on misexpression and genetic epistasis experiments, we propose that Six3 acts in the neuroectoderm to establish a prepattern of bilateral repression of Nodal activity. Subsequently, Nodal signaling from the left lateral plate mesoderm alleviates this repression ipsilaterally. Our data reveal a Six3-dependent mechanism for establishment of correct brain laterality and provide an entry point to understanding the genetic regulation of Nodal signaling in the brain. PMID:17678854

  10. Enzymatic activities in brains of diabetic rats treated with vanadyl sulphate and sodium tungstate.

    PubMed

    Lemberg, A; Fernández, M A; Ouviña, G; Rodríguez, R R; Peredo, H A; Susemihl, C; Villarreal, I; Filinger, E J

    2007-12-01

    The hypothesis of the present study was that diabetes mellitus might affect brain metabolism. Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats, treated with vanadyl sulphate (V) and sodium tungstate (T) were employed to observe the aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and creatine kinase (CK) activities in brain homogenates. Significant increases in AST, ALT and CK activities were found in diabetic brain homogenates against controls, suggesting increments of transamination in brain and/or increases in cell membrane permeability to these enzymes. The increase in brain CK possibly expresses alterations in energy production. The decrease in CK activity caused by V and T treatment in diabetic rats suggests that both agents tend to normalize energy consumption. It is also possible that V and T-induced hypoglycemic effects cause metabolic alterations in brain. PMID:18038759

  11. IL-6 blockade reverses the abnormal STAT activation of peripheral blood leukocytes from rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, M A; Diaz-Torné, C; Hernández, M V; Reina, D; de la Fuente, D; Castellví, I; Moya, P; Ruiz, J M; Corominas, H; Zamora, C; Cantó, E; Sanmartí, R; Juarez, C; Vidal, S

    2015-06-01

    Considering the interplay of multiple STATs in response to cytokines, we investigated how IL-6 and its blocking affect STAT signaling in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Leukocytes obtained from RA patients before and after tocilizumab treatment and healthy donors (HDs) were cytokine-stimulated and STAT phosphorylation was analyzed by cytometry. RA patients had significantly fewer pSTAT1+, pSTAT3+, and pSTAT6+ monocytes and pSTAT5+ lymphocytes than HDs. After 24weeks of treatment, percentages of IFN?-induced pSTAT1+ and IL-10-induced pSTAT3+ monocytes in RA patients increased, reaching levels comparable to HDs. pSTAT1+ and pSTAT3+ cells correlated inversely with RA disease activity index and levels of pSTAT+ cells at baseline were higher in patients with good EULAR response to tocilizumab. IFN?-induced pSTAT1+ cells correlated inversely with memory T cells and anti-CCP levels. IL-10-induced pSTAT3+ cells correlated with Treg/Teff ratio. Our findings suggest that IL-6 blocking reduces the inflammatory mechanisms through the correction of STAT1 and STAT3 activation status. PMID:25847223

  12. Early exposure to urethane anesthesia: Effects on neuronal activity in the piriform cortex of the developing brain.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, Riichi; Takashima, Ichiro

    2015-07-23

    Exposure to urethane anesthesia reportedly produces selective neuronal cell loss in the piriform cortex of young brains; however, resulting functional deficits have not been investigated. The present study found abnormalities in piriform cortex activity of isolated brains in vitro that were harvested from guinea pigs exposed to urethane anesthesia at 14 days of age. Current source density (CSD) analysis and voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) imaging experiments were conducted 48h after urethane injection. We applied paired-pulse stimulation to the lateral olfactory tract (LOT) and assessed short-interval intra-cortical inhibition in the piriform cortex. CSD analysis revealed that a current sink in layer Ib remained active in response to successive stimuli, with an inter-stimulus interval of 30-60ms, which was typically strongly inhibited. VSD imaging demonstrated stronger and extended neural activity in the urethane-treated piriform cortex, even in response to a second stimulus delivered in short succession. We identified gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) ergic neurons in the piriform cortex of sham and urethane-treated animals and found a decrease in GABA-immunoreactive cell density in the urethane group. These results suggest that urethane exposure induces loss of GABAergic interneurons and a subsequent reduction in paired-pulse inhibition in the immature piriform cortex. PMID:26067404

  13. High pulse pressure is not associated with abnormal activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in repaired aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, T A L; Pedersen, E B; Munk, K; Hjortdal, V E; Emmertsen, K; Andersen, N H

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the relationship between pulse pressure (PP)--a surrogate marker of arterial stiffness-and activity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) in adult patients with repaired coarctation and normal left ventricular (LV) function. A total of 114 patients (44 (26-74) years, 13 (0.1-40) years at repair) and 20 healthy controls were examined with 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, echocardiography, vasoactive hormone levels and magnetic resonance of the thoracic aorta. Forty-one patients (36%) were taking antihypertensives (28 RAAS inhibitors). Fifty-one had mean 24-h blood pressures >130/80?mm?Hg. Hypertension was not associated with age at repair (P=0.257). Patients had higher PP and LV mass compared with controls (52±11 vs. 45±5?mm?Hg and 221±71 vs. 154±55?g, respectively; both P<0.05). Differences were more pronounced in the presence of recoarctation, but independently of RAA levels. Even normotensive patients had higher LV mass than controls. LV mass and recoarctation were correlated with PP levels. In conclusion, adult patients with repaired coarctation have increased PP and LV mass compared with controls. PP increased with increasing recoarctation. Hypertension was present also in the absence of recoarctation. These changes could not be explained by abnormal activation of the RAAS. PMID:25355011

  14. Abnormal p38? mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling in dilated cardiomyopathy caused by lamin A/C gene mutation

    PubMed Central

    Muchir, Antoine; Wu, Wei; Choi, Jason C.; Iwata, Shinichi; Morrow, John; Homma, Shunichi; Worman, Howard J.

    2012-01-01

    We previously interrogated the transcriptome in heart tissue from LmnaH222P/H222P mice, a mouse model of cardiomyopathy caused by lamin A/C gene (LMNA) mutation, and found that the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and Jun N-terminal kinase branches of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling pathway were abnormally hyperactivated prior to the onset of significant cardiac impairment. We have now used an alternative gene expression analysis tool to reanalyze this transcriptome and identify hyperactivation of a third branch of the MAP kinase cascade, p38? signaling. Biochemical analysis of hearts from LmnaH222P/H222P mice showed enhanced p38? activation prior to and after the onset of heart disease as well as in hearts from human subjects with cardiomyopathy caused by LMNA mutations. Treatment of LmnaH222P/H222P mice with the p38? inhibitor ARRY-371797 prevented left ventricular dilatation and deterioration of fractional shortening compared with placebo-treated mice but did not block the expression of collagen genes involved in cardiac fibrosis. These results demonstrate that three different branches of the MAP kinase signaling pathway with overlapping consequences are involved in the pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy caused by LMNA mutations. They further suggest that pharmacological inhibition of p38? may be useful in the treatment of this disease. PMID:22773734

  15. Abnormally Short Activated Partial Thromboplastin Times Are Related to Elevated Plasma Levels of TAT, F1+2, D-Dimer and FVIII:C

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edwin ten Boekel; Piet Bartels

    2002-01-01

    Abnormally short activated partial thromboplastin times (APTTs) are associated with an increased risk of thrombotic disorders. We have examined the status of coagulation activity in subjects with short APTTs. In addition, the presence of the thrombotic risk factors G1691A-factor V, G20210A-prothrombin gene mutation and factor VIII coagulant activity (FVIII:C) was determined. Plasma levels of TAT, F1+2, D-dimer and FVIII:C were

  16. Experimental human endotoxemia enhances brain activity during social cognition.

    PubMed

    Kullmann, Jennifer S; Grigoleit, Jan-Sebastian; Wolf, Oliver T; Engler, Harald; Oberbeck, Reiner; Elsenbruch, Sigrid; Forsting, Michael; Schedlowski, Manfred; Gizewski, Elke R

    2014-06-01

    Acute peripheral inflammation with corresponding increases in peripheral cytokines affects neuropsychological functions and induces depression-like symptoms. However, possible effects of increased immune responses on social cognition remain unknown. Therefore, this study investigated the effects of experimentally induced acute inflammation on performance and neural responses during a social cognition task assessing Theory of Mind (ToM) ability. In this double-blind randomized crossover functional magnetic resonance imaging study, 18 healthy right-handed male volunteers received an injection of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 0.4 ng/kg) or saline, respectively. Plasma levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines as well as mood ratings were analyzed together with brain activation during a validated ToM task (i.e. Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test). LPS administration induced pronounced transient increases in pro- (IL-6, TNF-?) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10, IL-1ra) cytokines as well as decreases in mood. Social cognition performance was not affected by acute inflammation. However, altered neural activity was observed during the ToM task after LPS administration, reflected by increased responses in the fusiform gyrus, temporo-parietal junction, superior temporal gyrus and precuneus. The increased task-related neural responses in the LPS condition may reflect a compensatory strategy or a greater social cognitive processing as a function of sickness. PMID:23547245

  17. Experimental human endotoxemia enhances brain activity during social cognition

    PubMed Central

    Kullmann, Jennifer S.; Grigoleit, Jan-Sebastian; Wolf, Oliver T.; Engler, Harald; Oberbeck, Reiner; Elsenbruch, Sigrid; Forsting, Michael; Gizewski, Elke R.

    2014-01-01

    Acute peripheral inflammation with corresponding increases in peripheral cytokines affects neuropsychological functions and induces depression-like symptoms. However, possible effects of increased immune responses on social cognition remain unknown. Therefore, this study investigated the effects of experimentally induced acute inflammation on performance and neural responses during a social cognition task assessing Theory of Mind (ToM) ability. In this double-blind randomized crossover functional magnetic resonance imaging study, 18 healthy right-handed male volunteers received an injection of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 0.4 ng/kg) or saline, respectively. Plasma levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines as well as mood ratings were analyzed together with brain activation during a validated ToM task (i.e. Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test). LPS administration induced pronounced transient increases in pro- (IL-6, TNF-?) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10, IL-1ra) cytokines as well as decreases in mood. Social cognition performance was not affected by acute inflammation. However, altered neural activity was observed during the ToM task after LPS administration, reflected by increased responses in the fusiform gyrus, temporo-parietal junction, superior temporal gyrus and precuneus. The increased task-related neural responses in the LPS condition may reflect a compensatory strategy or a greater social cognitive processing as a function of sickness. PMID:23547245

  18. Brain Activity while Reading Sentences with Kanji Characters Expressing Emotions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuasa, Masahide; Saito, Keiichi; Mukawa, Naoki

    In this paper, we describe the brain activity associated with kanji characters expressing emotion, which are places at the end of a sentence. Japanese people use a special kanji character in brackets at the end of sentences in text messages such as those sent through e-mail and messenger tools. Such kanji characters plays a role to expresses the sender's emotion (such as fun, laughter, sadness, tears), like emoticons. It is a very simple and effective way to convey the senders' emotions and his/her thoughts to the receiver. In this research, we investigate the effects of emotional kanji characters by using an fMRI study. The experimental results show that both the right and left inferior frontal gyrus, which have been implicated on verbal and nonverbal information, were activated. We found that we detect a sentence with an emotional kanji character as the verbal and nonverval information, and a sentence with emotional kanji characters enrich communication between the sender and the reciever.

  19. Brain spatial microstates of human spontaneous alpha activity in relaxed wakefulness, drowsiness period, and REM sleep.

    PubMed

    Cantero, J L; Atienza, M; Salas, R M; Gómez, C M

    1999-01-01

    Spontaneous alpha activity clearly present in relaxed wakefulness with closed eyes, drowsiness period at sleep onset, and REM sleep was studied with spatial segmentation methods in order to determine if the brain activation state would be modulating the alpha spatial microstates composition and duration. These methods of spatial segmentation show some advantages: i) they extract topographic descriptors independent of the chosen reference (reference-free methods), and ii) they achieve spatial data reduction that are more data-driven than dipole source analysis. The results obtained with this study revealed that alpha activity presented a different spatio-temporal pattern of brain electric fields in each arousal state used in this study. These differences were reflected in a) the mean duration of alpha microstates (longer in relaxed wakefulness than in drowsy period and REM sleep), b) the number of brain microstates contained in one second (drowsiness showed more different microstates than did relaxed wakefulness and REM state), and c) the number of different classes (more abundant in drowsiness than in the rest of brain states). If we assume that longer segments of stable brain activity imply a lesser amount of different information to process (as reflected by a higher stability of the brain generator), whereas shorter segments imply a higher number of brain microstates caused by more different steps of information processing, it is possible that the alpha activity appearing in the sleep onset period could be indexing the hypnagogic imagery self-generated by the sleeping brain, and a phasic event in the case of REM sleep. Probably, REM-alpha bursts are associated with a brain microstate change (such as sleep spindles), as demonstrated by its phasic intrusion in a desynchronized background of brain activity. On the other hand, alpha rhythm could be the "baseline" of brain activity when the sensory inputs are minimum and the state is relaxed wakefulness. PMID:10449257

  20. Estimating cognitive load during self-regulation of brain activity and neurofeedback with therapeutic brain-computer interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Robert; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Neurofeedback (NFB) training with brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) is currently being studied in a variety of neurological and neuropsychiatric conditions in an aim to reduce disorder-specific symptoms. For this purpose, a range of classification algorithms has been explored to identify different brain states. These neural states, e.g., self-regulated brain activity vs. rest, are separated by setting a threshold parameter. Measures such as the maximum classification accuracy (CA) have been introduced to evaluate the performance of these algorithms. Interestingly enough, precisely these measures are often used to estimate the subject’s ability to perform brain self-regulation. This is surprising, given that the goal of improving the tool that differentiates between brain states is different from the aim of optimizing NFB for the subject performing brain self-regulation. For the latter, knowledge about mental resources and work load is essential in order to adapt the difficulty of the intervention accordingly. In this context, we apply an analytical method and provide empirical data to determine the zone of proximal development (ZPD) as a measure of a subject’s cognitive resources and the instructional efficacy of NFB. This approach is based on a reconsideration of item-response theory (IRT) and cognitive load theory for instructional design, and combines them with the CA curve to provide a measure of BCI performance. PMID:25762908

  1. Estimating cognitive load during self-regulation of brain activity and neurofeedback with therapeutic brain-computer interfaces.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Robert; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Neurofeedback (NFB) training with brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) is currently being studied in a variety of neurological and neuropsychiatric conditions in an aim to reduce disorder-specific symptoms. For this purpose, a range of classification algorithms has been explored to identify different brain states. These neural states, e.g., self-regulated brain activity vs. rest, are separated by setting a threshold parameter. Measures such as the maximum classification accuracy (CA) have been introduced to evaluate the performance of these algorithms. Interestingly enough, precisely these measures are often used to estimate the subject's ability to perform brain self-regulation. This is surprising, given that the goal of improving the tool that differentiates between brain states is different from the aim of optimizing NFB for the subject performing brain self-regulation. For the latter, knowledge about mental resources and work load is essential in order to adapt the difficulty of the intervention accordingly. In this context, we apply an analytical method and provide empirical data to determine the zone of proximal development (ZPD) as a measure of a subject's cognitive resources and the instructional efficacy of NFB. This approach is based on a reconsideration of item-response theory (IRT) and cognitive load theory for instructional design, and combines them with the CA curve to provide a measure of BCI performance. PMID:25762908

  2. [Regulation of brain microvessel function].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Yokoo, Hiroki; Yanagita, Toshihiko; Wada, Akihiko

    2002-05-01

    The brain microvessels are formed by a specialized endothelium and regulate the movement of solutes between blood and brain. The endothelial cells are sealed together by tight junctions and play a role as the blood-brain barrier. The brain microvessels express GLUT1 as the major form of glucose transporter, aquaporin-4 as a water channel, and p-glycoprotein as a xenobiotic transporter. Occludin and claudin-5 have been identified as the components of tight junction. Increasing evidence suggests that the activities of the transporters are regulated by adrenergic nerve activity as well as by bioactive peptides such as adrenomedullin. The regulation of the activity as well as expression of these transporters may become a strategy for prophylaxis and treatment of not only cerebral vascular diseases but also neurodegenerative disorders, developmental abnormalities and aging of the brain. PMID:12061139

  3. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor beta/delta in the Brain: Facts and Hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Hall, M G; Quignodon, Laure; Desvergne, Béatrice

    2008-01-01

    peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are nuclear receptors acting as lipid sensors. Besides its metabolic activity in peripheral organs, the PPAR beta/delta isotype is highly expressed in the brain and its deletion in mice induces a brain developmental defect. Nevertheless, exploration of PPARbeta action in the central nervous system remains sketchy. The lipid content alteration observed in PPARbeta null brains and the positive action of PPARbeta agonists on oligodendrocyte differentiation, a process characterized by lipid accumulation, suggest that PPARbeta acts on the fatty acids and/or cholesterol metabolisms in the brain. PPARbeta could also regulate central inflammation and antioxidant mechanisms in the damaged brain. Even if not fully understood, the neuroprotective effect of PPARbeta agonists highlights their potential benefit to treat various acute or chronic neurological disorders. In this perspective, we need to better understand the basic function of PPARbeta in the brain. This review proposes different leads for future researches. PMID:19009042

  4. Brain Activity during Lower-Limb Movement with Manual Facilitation: An fMRI Study.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Patrícia Maria Duarte; Vieira, Ana Isabel Correia Matos de Ferreira; Canário, Nádia Isabel Silva; Castelo-Branco, Miguel; de Castro Caldas, Alexandre Lemos

    2015-01-01

    Brain activity knowledge of healthy subjects is an important reference in the context of motor control and reeducation. While the normal brain behavior for upper-limb motor control has been widely explored, the same is not true for lower-limb control. Also the effects that different stimuli can evoke on movement and respective brain activity are important in the context of motor potentialization and reeducation. For a better understanding of these processes, a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to collect data of 10 healthy subjects performing lower-limb multijoint functional movement under three stimuli: verbal stimulus, manual facilitation, and verbal?+?manual facilitation. Results showed that, with verbal stimulus, both lower limbs elicit bilateral cortical brain activation; with manual facilitation, only the left lower limb (LLL) elicits bilateral activation while the right lower limb (RLL) elicits contralateral activation; verbal?+?manual facilitation elicits bilateral activation for the LLL and contralateral activation for the RLL. Manual facilitation also elicits subcortical activation in white matter, the thalamus, pons, and cerebellum. Deactivations were also found for lower-limb movement. Manual facilitation is stimulus capable of generating brain activity in healthy subjects. Stimuli need to be specific for bilateral activation and regarding which brain areas we aim to activate. PMID:25722890

  5. Reciprocal Effects of Oxidative Stress on Heme Oxygenase Expression and Activity Contributes to Reno-Vascular Abnormalities in EC-SOD Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Tomoko; Puri, Nitin; Sodhi, Komal; Bellner, Lars; Takahashi, Toru; Morita, Kiyoshi; Rezzani, Rita; Oury, Tim D.; Abraham, Nader G.

    2012-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) system is one of the key regulators of cellular redox homeostasis which responds to oxidative stress (ROS) via HO-1 induction. However, recent reports have suggested an inhibitory effect of ROS on HO activity. In light of these conflicting reports, this study was designed to evaluate effects of chronic oxidative stress on HO system and its role in contributing towards patho-physiological abnormalities observed in extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD, SOD3) KO animals. Experiments were performed in WT and EC-SOD(?/?) mice treated with and without HO inducer, cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP). EC-SOD(?/?) mice exhibited oxidative stress, renal histopathological abnormalities, elevated blood pressure, impaired endothelial function, reduced p-eNOS, p-AKT and increased HO-1 expression; although, HO activity was significantly (P < 0.05) attenuated along with attenuation of serum adiponectin and vascular epoxide levels (P < 0.05). CoPP, in EC-SOD(?/?) mice, enhanced HO activity (P < 0.05) and reversed aforementioned pathophysiological abnormalities along with restoration of vascular EET, p-eNOS, p-AKT and serum adiponectin levels in these animals. Taken together our results implicate a causative role of insufficient activation of heme-HO-adiponectin system in pathophysiological abnormalities observed in animal models of chronic oxidative stress such as EC-SOD(?/?) mice. PMID:22292113

  6. Identification of neural circuits underlying P300 abnormalities in schizophrenia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    BRIAN F. O'DONNELL; ROBERT W. McCARLEY; GEOFFREY F. POTTS; DEAN F. SALISBURY; PAUL G. NESTOR; YOSHIO HIRAYASU; MARGARET A. NIZNIKIEWICZ; JOHN BARNARD; ZI JEN SHEN; DAVID M. WEINSTEIN; FRED L. BOOKSTEIN; MARTHA E. SHENTON

    1999-01-01

    Event-related potentials ~ERPs! provide a noninvasive method to evaluate neural activation and cognitive processes in schizophrenia. The pathophysiological significance of these findings would be greatly enhanced if scalp-recorded ERP abnormalities could be related to specific neural circuits and0or regions of the brain. Using quantitative approaches in which scalp-recorded ERP components are correlated with underlying neuroanatomy in schizophrenia, we focused on

  7. Long-term recovery from hippocampal-related behavioral and biochemical abnormalities induced by noise exposure during brain development. Evaluation of auditory pathway integrity.

    PubMed

    Uran, S L; Gómez-Casati, M E; Guelman, L R

    2014-10-01

    Sound is an important part of man's contact with the environment and has served as critical means for survival throughout his evolution. As a result of exposure to noise, physiological functions such as those involving structures of the auditory and non-auditory systems might be damaged. We have previously reported that noise-exposed developing rats elicited hippocampal-related histological, biochemical and behavioral changes. However, no data about the time lapse of these changes were reported. Moreover, measurements of auditory pathway function were not performed in exposed animals. Therefore, with the present work, we aim to test the onset and the persistence of the different extra-auditory abnormalities observed in noise-exposed rats and to evaluate auditory pathway integrity. Male Wistar rats of 15 days were exposed to moderate noise levels (95-97 dB SPL, 2 h a day) during one day (acute noise exposure, ANE) or during 15 days (sub-acute noise exposure, SANE). Hippocampal biochemical determinations as well as short (ST) and long term (LT) behavioral assessments were performed. In addition, histological and functional evaluations of the auditory pathway were carried out in exposed animals. Our results show that hippocampal-related behavioral and biochemical changes (impairments in habituation, recognition and associative memories as well as distortion of anxiety-related behavior, decreases in reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and increases in antioxidant enzymes activities) induced by noise exposure were almost completely restored by PND 90. In addition, auditory evaluation shows that increased cochlear thresholds observed in exposed rats were re-established at PND 90, although with a remarkable supra-threshold amplitude reduction. These data suggest that noise-induced hippocampal and auditory-related alterations are mostly transient and that the effects of noise on the hippocampus might be, at least in part, mediated by the damage on the auditory pathway. However, we cannot exclude that a different mechanism might be responsible for the observed hippocampal-related changes. PMID:24911434

  8. Test-Retest Reliability of fMRI Brain Activity during Memory Encoding

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, David J.; Sommer, Jens; Krach, Sören; Bedenbender, Johannes; Kircher, Tilo; Paulus, Frieder M.; Jansen, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying hemispheric specialization of memory are not completely understood. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can be used to develop and test models of hemispheric specialization. In particular for memory tasks however, the interpretation of fMRI results is often hampered by the low reliability of the data. In the present study we therefore analyzed the test-retest reliability of fMRI brain activation related to an implicit memory encoding task, with a particular focus on brain activity of the medial temporal lobe (MTL). Fifteen healthy subjects were scanned with fMRI on two sessions (average retest interval 35?days) using a commonly applied novelty encoding paradigm contrasting known and unknown stimuli. To assess brain lateralization, we used three different stimuli classes that differed in their verbalizability (words, scenes, fractals). Test-retest reliability of fMRI brain activation was assessed by an intraclass-correlation coefficient (ICC), describing the stability of inter-individual differences in the brain activation magnitude over time. We found as expected a left-lateralized brain activation network for the words paradigm, a bilateral network for the scenes paradigm, and predominantly right-hemispheric brain activation for the fractals paradigm. Although these networks were consistently activated in both sessions on the group level, across-subject reliabilities were only poor to fair (ICCs???0.45). Overall, the highest ICC values were obtained for the scenes paradigm, but only in strongly activated brain regions. In particular the reliability of brain activity of the MTL was poor for all paradigms. In conclusion, for novelty encoding paradigms the interpretation of fMRI results on a single subject level is hampered by its low reliability. More studies are needed to optimize the retest reliability of fMRI activation for memory tasks. PMID:24367338

  9. Using fMRI Brain Activation to Identify Cognitive States Associated with Perception of Tools and Dwellings

    E-print Network

    Using fMRI Brain Activation to Identify Cognitive States Associated with Perception of Tools a simple cognitive state (such as the thought of a hammer) and the underlying brain activity. Moreover function uses machine learning techniques to identify the neural pattern of brain activity underlying

  10. PET with F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose measures of local brain activity and memory in schizophrenia and in depression

    SciTech Connect

    Riege, W.H.; Metter, E.J.; Kuhl, D.E.; Phelps, M.E.; Kling, A.

    1984-01-01

    Positron emission tomography with (F-18) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) scan has provided non-invasive measures of regional cerebral glucose utilization which are directly related with levels of functional activity in regions of the brain. The FDG technique was applied to the study of brain activity thought to be impaired in 6 chronic schizophrenics (SCH) and 6 depressed (D) patients in comparison with 6 healthy age-matched controls (C). Local cerebral metabolic rates of glucose utilization LCMRglc were determined for 8 regions in both left and right hemispheres and were expressed in reference to a person's mean CMRglc. Multivariate comparisons of the 16 measures showed no significant differences between the 3 groups; follow-up step-down analyses and t-tests failed to specify any regional or global LCMRglc reliable to separate patients from controls. They also did not differ in any of 18 multidimensional tests of memory and decision, except for lower delayed verbal recall in D patients. When both SCH and D were classified into those with CT large and those with CT small ventricles, there were no multivariate differences. Only partial LCMRglc separated large from small ventricle patients (F(1,7) = 6.12, p<0.042), but finding no multivariate significance makes this result questionable. The ventricular grouping of SCH alone may reveal a marginal difference in global CMRglc t(4) = 2.58, p<0.06, given a larger patient sample. In contrast to recent reports, indices to brain activity in schizophrenic and depressed patients do not seem to be abnormal.

  11. Resting brain activity varies with dream recall frequency between subjects.

    PubMed

    Eichenlaub, Jean-Baptiste; Nicolas, Alain; Daltrozzo, Jérôme; Redouté, Jérôme; Costes, Nicolas; Ruby, Perrine

    2014-06-01

    Dreaming is still poorly understood. Notably, its cerebral underpinning remains unclear. Neuropsychological studies have shown that lesions in the temporoparietal junction (TPJ) and/or the white matter of the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) lead to the global cessation of dream reports, suggesting that these regions of the default mode network have key roles in the dreaming process (forebrain 'dream-on' hypothesis). To test this hypothesis, we measured regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) using [(15)O]H2O positron emission tomography in healthy subjects with high and low dream recall frequencies (DRFs) during wakefulness (rest) and sleep (rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, N2, and N3). Compared with Low recallers (0.5 ± 0.3 dream recall per week in average), High recallers (5.2 ± 1.4) showed higher rCBF in the TPJ during REM sleep, N3, and wakefulness, and in the MPFC during REM sleep and wakefulness. We demonstrate that the resting states of High recallers and Low recallers differ during sleep and wakefulness. It coheres with previous ERP results and confirms that a high/low DRF is associated with a specific functional organization of the brain. These results support the forebrain 'dream-on' hypothesis and suggest that TPJ and MPFC are not only involved in dream recall during wakefulness but also have a role in dreaming during sleep (production and/or encoding). Increased activity in the TPJ and MPFC might promote the mental imagery and/or memory encoding of dreams. Notably, increased activity in TPJ might facilitate attention orienting toward external stimuli and promote intrasleep wakefulness, facilitating the encoding of the dreams in memory. PMID:24549103

  12. The change of the brain activation patterns as children learn algebra equation solving.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yulin; Carter, Cameron S; Silk, Eli M; Stenger, V Andrew; Fissell, Kate; Goode, Adam; Anderson, John R

    2004-04-13

    In a brain imaging study of children learning algebra, it is shown that the same regions are active in children solving equations as are active in experienced adults solving equations. As with adults, practice in symbol manipulation produces a reduced activation in prefrontal cortex area. However, unlike adults, practice seems also to produce a decrease in a parietal area that is holding an image of the equation. This finding suggests that adolescents' brain responses are more plastic and change more with practice. These results are integrated in a cognitive model that predicts both the behavioral and brain imaging results. PMID:15064407

  13. Composition and On Demand Deployment of Distributed Brain Activity Analysis Application on Global Grids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Buyya; S. Date; Y. Mizuno-Matsumoto; S. Venugopal; D. Abramson

    The distribution of knowledge (by scientists) and data sources (advanced scientific instruments), and the need of large-scale computational resources for analyzing massive scientific data are two major problems commonly observed in scientific disciplines. The two popular scientific disciplines of this nature are brain science and high-energy physics. The analysis of brain activity data gathered from the MEG (Magnetoencephalography) instrument is

  14. Blood flow and oxygen delivery to human brain during functional activity: Theoretical modeling and experimental data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark A. Mintun; Brian N. Lundstrom; Abraham Z. Snyder; Andrei G. Vlassenko; Gordon L. Shulman; Marcus E. Raichle

    2001-01-01

    Coupling of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (CMRO2) in physiologically activated brain states remains the subject of debates. Recently it was suggested that CBF is tightly coupled to oxidative metabolism in a nonlinear fashion. As part of this hypothesis, mathematical models of oxygen delivery to the brain have been described in which disproportionately large increases

  15. A. A. Ukhtomskii's dominance principle of brain activity in the perception of electromagnetic fields

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yu. A. Kholodov; Yu. A

    1994-01-01

    Preliminary instruction of the subject plays an important role in the perception of weak electromagnetic fields acting on the hand. Active attention to a potential effect amplifies a brain state that can be called caution dominance and arises spontaneously with a “placebo” or an electromagnetic field. The radar principle of brain operation is discussed among the physiological mechanisms through which

  16. A. A. Ukhtomskii's dominance principle of brain activity in the perception of electromagnetic fields

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yu. A. Kholodov

    1994-01-01

    Preliminary instruction of the subject plays an important role in the perception of weak electromagnetic fields acting on the hand. Active attention to a potential effect amplifies a brain state that can be called caution dominance and arises spontaneously with a ``placebo'' or an electromagnetic field. The radar principle of brain operation is discussed among the physiological mechanisms through which

  17. LEARNING-INDUCED MODULATION OF SCALE-FREE PROPERTIES OF BRAIN ACTIVITY MEASURED WITH MEG

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Previous studies have suggested that infraslow brain activity could play an important role in cognition contrasted conscious states (sleep vs. awake). However, finer modu- lations remain to be investigated. Here Traditionally, the analysis of brain signals acquired with electroen- cephalography (EEG

  18. 8.3. Brain NOS activity regulates reproductive state-related behaviors in grasshoppers

    E-print Network

    Giron, David - Institut de Recherche sur la Biologie de l'Insecte, Université François Rabelais

    8.3. Brain NOS activity regulates reproductive state-related behaviors in grasshoppers Heinrich, R is the control of grasshopper acoustic communica- tion mediated by neural circuits in the central body (CB) of the brain. The CB of grasshoppers contains both NO- generating and NO-responsive neurons. Pharmacological

  19. How Curriculum Leaders Can Involve the Right Brain in Active Reading and Writing Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinatra, Richard; Stahl-Gemake, Josephine

    Curriculum leaders, program specialists, and teachers can intentionally arouse the activation of one hemisphere of the brain over the other through the use of right brain strategies in language learning. While most functions of the left hemisphere are concerned with convergent production (getting the right answer), functions of the right…

  20. Peers Increase Adolescent Risk Taking by Enhancing Activity in the Brain's Reward Circuitry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chein, Jason; Albert, Dustin; O'Brien, Lia; Uckert, Kaitlyn; Steinberg, Laurence

    2011-01-01

    The presence of peers increases risk taking among adolescents but not adults. We posited that the presence of peers may promote adolescent risk taking by sensitizing brain regions associated with the anticipation of potential rewards. Using fMRI, we measured brain activity in adolescents, young adults, and adults as they made decisions in a…

  1. Distribution of Aromatase Activity in the Brain and Peripheral Tissues of Passerine and Nonpasserine Avian Species

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bengt Silverin; Michelle Baillien; Agnès Foidart; Jacques Balthazart

    2000-01-01

    Many behavioral effects of testosterone on hypothalamic and limbic brain areas are mediated by the action, at the cellular level, of estrogens derived from local testosterone aromatization. Aromatase activity and cells containing the aromatase protein and mRNA have accordingly been identified in the brain areas involved in the control of behavior. The presence of an unusually high level of aromatase

  2. Linking brain-wide multivoxel activation patterns to behaviour: Examples from language and math

    E-print Network

    brain volume as a single multi-voxel pattern. The brain­behaviour correlations emerged despite the fact into a region-of-interest, or ROI. Multivariate pattern-based fMRI analysis methods use classifiers to analyse selection of voxels, pre-selecting activated regions, or principal components analysis. We show here

  3. “Lets see what you think! Bayesian reconstruction of perceptual experiences from human brain activity”

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Gallant

    2009-01-01

    Summary form only given. Recent interest in brain-computer interfaces has pushed development of decoding models that aim to classify, identify or reconstruct visual stimuli directly from measured brain activity. Most decoding models are based on non-parametric algorithms such as SVM and do not exploit current computational models of visual processing. We have pioneered an alternative approach in which the decoding

  4. Pain reactivity in Alzheimer patients with different degrees of cognitive impairment and brain electrical activity deterioration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fabrizio Benedetti; Claudia Arduino; Sergio Vighetti; Giovanni Asteggiano; Luisella Tarenzi; Innocenzo Rainero

    2004-01-01

    Pain perception and autonomic responses to pain are known to be altered in dementia, although the mechanisms are poorly understood. We studied patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) whose cognitive status was assessed through the Mini Mental State Examination test and whose brain electrical activity was measured by means of quantitative electroencephalography. After assessment of both cognitive impairment and brain electrical

  5. Concentration of rare earth elements, As, and Th in human brain and brain tumors, determined by neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, G; Zhou, Y; Lu, H; Lu, W; Zhou, M; Wang, Y; Tan, M

    1996-01-01

    Toxic elements As and Th, six rare-earth elemental profiles of brain tumor tissues from 16 patients of astrocytomas (grade I-III), and normal human brain tissues of 18 male, age-matched autopsies serving as controls have been studied by radiochemical neutron activation analysis. P-204 [di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate] extraction chromatography column was used for group separation of rare-earth element (REE) by one step. Compared with the normal brain tissues, the analytical results showed that the concentrations of Th, La, Ce, Gd, and Lu were significantly higher in tumor tissues (P < 0.01 or 0.001). The possible effects of REE on tumor cell were discussed. PMID:8862736

  6. Quantitative alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase activity staining in brain sections and in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Park, L C; Calingasan, N Y; Sheu, K F; Gibson, G E

    2000-01-01

    The activity of a key mitochondrial enzyme, the alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC), declines in the brains of patients with neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, as well as in thiamine-deficient (TD) animals. The decreased activity often occurs without a reduction in enzyme protein, which negates the use of immunocytochemistry to study cellular or regional changes in enzyme activity within the brain. To overcome this limitation, an activity staining method using nitroblue tetrazolium was developed. The histochemical activity staining was standardized in cultured cells. The assay was linear with time and was highly specific for KGDHC. The dark-blue reaction product (formazan) formed a pattern that was consistent with mitochondrial localization. Treatment of the cultured cells with both reversible and irreversible inhibitors decreased formazan production, whereas conventional enzyme assays on cell lysates only revealed loss of KGDHC activity with irreversible inhibitors. The activity staining was also linear with time and highly specific for KGDHC activity in mouse brain sections. Staining occurred throughout the brain, and discrete neuronal populations exhibited particularly intense staining. The pattern of staining differed markedly from the distribution of KGDHC protein by immunocytochemistry. Generalized decreases in the intensity of activity staining that occurred in the TD brains compared to controls were comparable with the loss of KGDHC activity by conventional enzyme assay. Thus, the present study introduces a new histochemical method to measure KGDHC activity at the cellular and regional level, which will be useful to determine changes of in situ enzyme activity. PMID:10610692

  7. Time-varying functional network information extracted from brief instances of spontaneous brain activity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao; Duyn, Jeff H.

    2013-01-01

    Recent functional magnetic resonance imaging studies have shown that the brain is remarkably active even in the absence of overt behavior, and this activity occurs in spatial patterns that are reproducible across subjects and follow the brain’s established functional subdivision. Investigating the distribution of these spatial patterns is an active area of research with the goal of obtaining a better understanding of the neural networks underlying brain function. One intriguing aspect of spontaneous activity is an apparent nonstationarity, or variability of interaction between brain regions. It was recently proposed that spontaneous brain activity may be dominated by brief traces of activity, possibly originating from a neuronal avalanching phenomenon. Such traces may involve different subregions in a network at different times, potentially reflecting functionally relevant relationships that are not captured with conventional data analysis. To investigate this, we examined publicly available functional magnetic resonance imaging data with a dedicated analysis method and found indications that functional networks inferred from conventional correlation analysis may indeed be driven by activity at only a few critical time points. Subsequent analysis of the activity at these critical time points revealed multiple spatial patterns, each distinctly different from the established functional networks. The spatial distribution of these patterns suggests a potential functional relevance. PMID:23440216

  8. Sexual dimorphism of brain aromatase activity in medaka: induction of a female phenotype by estradiol.

    PubMed Central

    Melo, A C; Ramsdell, J S

    2001-01-01

    In this study we identified sex-dependent dimorphism of brain aromatase in the teleost medaka and examined its regulation by sex steriods. We first investigated differential distribution of brain aromatase activity in sexually mature male and female medaka in serial coronal sections of the brain and identified the hypothalamic nuclei contained in each section using the brain atlas of medaka. In the brain of male medaka, high levels of activity are localized in sections containing the preoptic (POA) and suprachiasmatic nuclei (SC) (63-75 fmol/hr) and low levels in the nuclei periventricular dorsalis (HD), ventralis (HV), and caudalis (Hc), nuclei diffusus of lobulus inferiores (NDIL), and nuclei tuberi anteriores (TA) and posteriores (TP) (< 25 fmol/hr). In the brain of female medaka high aromatase activity is localized in sections containing the HD, HV, Hc, NDIL, TA, and TP (85-80 fmol/hr) and highly variable levels in the POA and SC (23-70 fmol/hr). The concentration and time dependency of the exposure of male medaka to estradiol on the total brain aromatase activity and morphologic sex characteristics were determined next. Estradiol increased the activity of brain aromatase in a concentration-dependent manner at 2.5 and 25 microg/L, but the increase was lower at higher concentrations of the hormone. The effect was time dependent, gradually increasing up to the fifth day of exposure, after which it reached a plateau. Estradiol induction of brain aromatase analyzed using Lineweaver-Burke plots of saturation assays revealed a non-first-order reaction. The results indicate that a positive feedback mechanism regulates brain aromatase and imply that the sexual dimorphic distribution of aromatase may be highly sensitive to physiologic cues and environmental perturbations in fish. PMID:11333187

  9. Brain activity for chronic knee osteoarthritis: dissociating evoked pain from spontaneous pain

    PubMed Central

    Parks, Elle L.; Geha, Paul Y.; Baliki, Marwan N.; Katz, Jeffrey; Schnitzer, Thomas J.; Apkarian, A. Vania

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pain is a hallmark of osteoarthritis (OA), yet little is known about its properties and representation in the brain. Here we use fMRI combined with psychophysics to study knee pain in 14 OA patients and 9 healthy controls. Mechanical painful pressure stimuli were applied to the knee in both groups and ratings of evoked pain and related brain activity examined. We observe that psychophysical properties and brain activation patterns of evoked pain are essentially the same between OA patients and healthy subjects, and between worse and better OA knees. In OA patients, stimulus-related brain activity could be distinguished from brain activity associated with spontaneous pain. The former activated brain regions commonly observed for acute painful stimuli in healthy subjects, while the spontaneous pain of OA engaged prefrontal-limbic regions closely corresponding to areas observed for spontaneous pain in other chronic pain conditions, such as chronic back pain and post-herpetic neuralgia. Arthritis-related clinical characteristics of knee OA also mapped to prefrontal-limbic regions. In a subgroup of patients (n = 6) we examined brain activity changes for a 2-week, repeat measure, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor (valdecoxib) therapy. Treatment decreased spontaneous pain for the worse knee and clinical characteristics of OA, and increased blood and csf levels of the drug which correlated positively with prefrontal-limbic brain activity. These findings indicate dissociation between mechanically induced and spontaneous OA knee pain, the latter engaging brain regions involved in emotional assessment of the self, and challenge the standard clinical view regarding the nature of OA pain. PMID:21315627

  10. A reliability study on brain activation during active and passive arm movements supported by an MRI-compatible robot.

    PubMed

    Estévez, Natalia; Yu, Ningbo; Brügger, Mike; Villiger, Michael; Hepp-Reymond, Marie-Claude; Riener, Robert; Kollias, Spyros

    2014-11-01

    In neurorehabilitation, longitudinal assessment of arm movement related brain function in patients with motor disability is challenging due to variability in task performance. MRI-compatible robots monitor and control task performance, yielding more reliable evaluation of brain function over time. The main goals of the present study were first to define the brain network activated while performing active and passive elbow movements with an MRI-compatible arm robot (MaRIA) in healthy subjects, and second to test the reproducibility of this activation over time. For the fMRI analysis two models were compared. In model 1 movement onset and duration were included, whereas in model 2 force and range of motion were added to the analysis. Reliability of brain activation was tested with several statistical approaches applied on individual and group activation maps and on summary statistics. The activated network included mainly the primary motor cortex, primary and secondary somatosensory cortex, superior and inferior parietal cortex, medial and lateral premotor regions, and subcortical structures. Reliability analyses revealed robust activation for active movements with both fMRI models and all the statistical methods used. Imposed passive movements also elicited mainly robust brain activation for individual and group activation maps, and reliability was improved by including additional force and range of motion using model 2. These findings demonstrate that the use of robotic devices, such as MaRIA, can be useful to reliably assess arm movement related brain activation in longitudinal studies and may contribute in studies evaluating therapies and brain plasticity following injury in the nervous system. PMID:24718725

  11. Pain Measurement and Brain Activity: Will Neuroimages Replace Pain Ratings?

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Michael E.; Staud, Roland; Price, Donald D.

    2013-01-01

    Arguments made for the advantages of replacing pain ratings with brain imaging data include assumptions that pain ratings are less reliable and objective and that brain image data would greatly benefit the measurement of treatment efficacy. None of these assumptions are supported by available evidence. Self-report of pain is predictable and does not necessarily reflect unreliability or error. Since pain is defined as an experience, magnitudes of its dimensions can be estimated by well established methods, including those used to validate brain imaging of pain. Brain imaging helps to study pain mechanisms and might be used as proxy measures of pain in persons unable to provide verbal reports. Yet eliminating pain ratings or replacing them with neuroimaging data is misguided because brain images only help explain pain if they are used in conjunction with self-report. There is no ‘objective readout’ mechanism of pain (“pain thermometer”) that is unaffected by psychological factors. Benefits from including neuroimaging data might include increased understanding of underlying neural mechanisms of treatment efficacy, discovery of new treatment vectors, and support of conclusions derived from self-report. However, neither brain imaging nor self-report data are privileged over the other. The assumption that treatment efficacy is hampered by self-report has not been shown; there are a plethora of treatment studies showing that self-report is sensitive to treatment. Dismissal of patients’ self-reports (pain ratings) by brain imaging data is potentially harmful. The aim of replacing self-report with brain imaging data is misguided and has no scientific or philosophical foundation. PMID:23548484

  12. Activated Brain Endothelial Cells Cross-Present Malaria Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Howland, Shanshan W.; Poh, Chek Meng; Rénia, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    In the murine model of cerebral malaria caused by P. berghei ANKA (PbA), parasite-specific CD8+ T cells directly induce pathology and have long been hypothesized to kill brain endothelial cells that have internalized PbA antigen. We previously reported that brain microvessel fragments from infected mice cross-present PbA epitopes, using reporter cells transduced with epitope-specific T cell receptors. Here, we confirm that endothelial cells are the population responsible for cross-presentation in vivo, not pericytes or microglia. PbA antigen cross-presentation by primary brain endothelial cells in vitro confers susceptibility to killing by CD8+ T cells from infected mice. IFN? stimulation is required for brain endothelial cross-presentation in vivo and in vitro, which occurs by a proteasome- and TAP-dependent mechanism. Parasite strains that do not induce cerebral malaria were phagocytosed and cross-presented less efficiently than PbA in vitro. The main source of antigen appears to be free merozoites, which were avidly phagocytosed. A human brain endothelial cell line also phagocytosed P. falciparum merozoites. Besides being the first demonstration of cross-presentation by brain endothelial cells, our results suggest that interfering with merozoite phagocytosis or antigen processing may be effective strategies for cerebral malaria intervention. PMID:26046849

  13. Activated Brain Endothelial Cells Cross-Present Malaria Antigen.

    PubMed

    Howland, Shanshan W; Poh, Chek Meng; Rénia, Laurent

    2015-06-01

    In the murine model of cerebral malaria caused by P. berghei ANKA (PbA), parasite-specific CD8+ T cells directly induce pathology and have long been hypothesized to kill brain endothelial cells that have internalized PbA antigen. We previously reported that brain microvessel fragments from infected mice cross-present PbA epitopes, using reporter cells transduced with epitope-specific T cell receptors. Here, we confirm that endothelial cells are the population responsible for cross-presentation in vivo, not pericytes or microglia. PbA antigen cross-presentation by primary brain endothelial cells in vitro confers susceptibility to killing by CD8+ T cells from infected mice. IFN? stimulation is required for brain endothelial cross-presentation in vivo and in vitro, which occurs by a proteasome- and TAP-dependent mechanism. Parasite strains that do not induce cerebral malaria were phagocytosed and cross-presented less efficiently than PbA in vitro. The main source of antigen appears to be free merozoites, which were avidly phagocytosed. A human brain endothelial cell line also phagocytosed P. falciparum merozoites. Besides being the first demonstration of cross-presentation by brain endothelial cells, our results suggest that interfering with merozoite phagocytosis or antigen processing may be effective strategies for cerebral malaria intervention. PMID:26046849

  14. Photoacoustic imaging to detect rat brain activation after cocaine hydrochloride injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Janggun; Yang, Xinmai

    2011-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) was employed to detect small animal brain activation after the administration of cocaine hydrochloride. Sprague Dawley rats were injected with different concentrations (2.5, 3.0, and 5.0 mg per kg body) of cocaine hydrochloride in saline solution through tail veins. The brain functional response to the injection was monitored by photoacoustic tomography (PAT) system with horizontal scanning of cerebral cortex of rat brain. Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) was also used for coronal view images. The modified PAT system used multiple ultrasonic detectors to reduce the scanning time and maintain a good signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The measured photoacoustic signal changes confirmed that cocaine hydrochloride injection excited high blood volume in brain. This result shows PAI can be used to monitor drug abuse-induced brain activation.

  15. Neurobiology of Aging xxx (2006) xxxxxx Age-related changes in brain activation during

    E-print Network

    2006-01-01

    Neurobiology of Aging xxx (2006) xxx­xxx Age-related changes in brain activation during a delayed. / Neurobiology of Aging xxx (2006) xxx­xxx impairment in several different memory variables [78], including WM [9

  16. Brain cholinesterase activity of nestling great egrets, snowy egrets and black-crowned night-herons.

    PubMed

    Custer, T W; Ohlendorf, H M

    1989-07-01

    inhibition of brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity in birds is often used to diagnose exposure or death from organophosphorus or carbamate pesticides. Brain ChE activity in the young of altricial species increases with age; however, this relationship has only been demonstrated in the European starling (Sturnus vulgaris). Brain ChE activity of nestling great egrets (Casmerodius albus) collected from a colony in Texas (USA) increased significantly with age and did not differ among individuals from different nests. Brain ChE activity of nestling snowy egrets (Egretta thula) and black-crowned night-herons (Nycticorax nycticorax) collected in one colony each from Rhode Island, Texas and California (USA) also increased significantly with age and did not differ among individuals from different nests or colonies. This study further demonstrates that age must be considered when evaluating exposure of nestling altricial birds to ChE inhibitors. PMID:2761008

  17. Towards brain-activity-controlled information retrieval: Decoding image relevance from MEG signals.

    PubMed

    Kauppi, Jukka-Pekka; Kandemir, Melih; Saarinen, Veli-Matti; Hirvenkari, Lotta; Parkkonen, Lauri; Klami, Arto; Hari, Riitta; Kaski, Samuel

    2015-05-15

    We hypothesize that brain activity can be used to control future information retrieval systems. To this end, we conducted a feasibility study on predicting the relevance of visual objects from brain activity. We analyze both magnetoencephalographic (MEG) and gaze signals from nine subjects who were viewing image collages, a subset of which was relevant to a predetermined task. We report three findings: i) the relevance of an image a subject looks at can be decoded from MEG signals with performance significantly better than chance, ii) fusion of gaze-based and MEG-based classifiers significantly improves the prediction performance compared to using either signal alone, and iii) non-linear classification of the MEG signals using Gaussian process classifiers outperforms linear classification. These findings break new ground for building brain-activity-based interactive image retrieval systems, as well as for systems utilizing feedback both from brain activity and eye movements. PMID:25595505

  18. Constitutively active Notch4 receptor elicits brain arteriovenous malformations through enlargement of

    E-print Network

    Schaffer, Chris B.

    Constitutively active Notch4 receptor elicits brain arteriovenous malformations through enlargement the arteriovenous (AV) interface are critical for tissue function. AV malformation (AVM) is a pathological, MA, and approved November 11, 2014 (received for review August 13, 2014) Arteriovenous (AV

  19. Brain cholinesterase activity of nestling great egrets, snowy egrets, and black-crowned night-herons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Ohlendorf, H.M.

    1989-01-01

    Inhibition of brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity in birds is often used to diagnose exposure or death from organophosphorus or carbmate pesticides. Brain ChE activity in the young of altricial species increase with age; however, this relationship has only been demonstrated in the European starling (Sturnus vulgaris). Brain ChE activity of nestling great egrets (Casmerodius albus) collected from a colony in Texas increased significantly with age and did not differ among individuals from different nests. Brain ChE activity of nestling snowy egrets (Egretta thula) and black-crowned night -herons (Nycticorax nycticorax) collected in one colony each from Rhode Island, Texas, and California also increased significantly with age and did not differ among individuals from different nests or colonies. This study further demonstrates that age must be considered when evaluating exposure of nestling altricial birds to ChE inhibitors.

  20. Brain cholinesterase activity of nestling great egrets snowy egrets and black-crowned night-herons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Ohlendorf, H.M.

    1989-01-01

    Inhibition of brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity in birds is often used to diagnose exposure or death from organophosphorus or carbamate pesticides. Brain ChE activity in the young of altricial species increases with age; however, this relationship has only been demonstrated in the European starling (Sturnus vulgaris). Brain ChE activity of nestling great egrets (Casmerodius albus) collected from a colony in Texas (USA) increased significantly with age and did not differ among individuals from different nests. Brain ChE activity of nestling snowy egrets (Egretta thula) and black-crowned night-herons (Nycticorax nycticorax) collected in one colony each from Rhode Island, Texas and California (USA) also increased significantly with age and did not differ among individuals from different nests or colonies. This study further demonstrates that age must be considered when evaluating exposure of nestling altricial birds to ChE inhibitors.

  1. Disturbances of the VLF/LF radio signal reception at Dobrogea Seismological Observatory due to local abnormal electric activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldovan, Iren-Adelina; Toader, Victorin; Dolea, Paul; Biagi, Pier Francesco

    2015-04-01

    The National Institute for Earth Physics, as part of the INFREP initiative, has monitored radio waves emitted by 10 transmitters all over Europe in relation with seismicity in the last 5 years. In Romania a radio receiving system is located in only one site (Dobrogea Seismological Observatory) situated in Eforie Nord, in the Eastern part of Romania. The electro-magnetic field monitored both at the ground and (sub) ionospheric level, in different frequency ranges (VLF/LF) is considered to be promising for earthquake forecasting. Because the abnormal behavior of the VLF/LF recordings that could not be correlated with the tectonic activity of the seismogenic zones crossed by the radio paths, we decided to monitor other two parameters, at the receiving site: the vertical component of the atmospheric electric field, which indicates variations of electrical properties of the near-ground air (Boltek electric field mill), and the atmospheric local conditions (WS-3600 weather station). The zone is also surveyed by seismic devices (seismometers, accelerometers and infrasonic equipment) and GPS/GNSS base stations to emphasize the local tectonic conditions. We obtained in such way a multiple-parameter monitoring system that increases the confidence in observational data and decreases uncertainties regarding the accuracy of the data recorded until now. As we are exploring different parameters we have obtained some conclusions regarding the correlation of the anomalies with their possible causes. The final expectation of the monitoring system regard the chance to take a snapshot of the geophysical medium before, during and after a significant earthquake occurrence and to reveal if there was or wasn't a noticeable trace of the preparatory stage of it. This work was partially supported by a grant of the Romanian National Authority for Scientific Research, Programe for research- Space Technology and Avanced Research - STAR, project number 84/2013, and by the NUCLEU project, PN 09 30/2009.

  2. Melanoma Brain Metastases: An Unmet Challenge in the Era of Active Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gorantla, Vikram; Kirkwood, John M.; Tawbi, Hussein A.

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic disease to the brain is a frequent manifestation of melanoma and is associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and poor prognosis. Surgery and stereotactic radiosurgery provide local control but less frequently affect the overall outcome of melanoma brain metastases (MBM). The role of systemic therapies for active brain lesions has been largely under-investigated and those patients are excluded from the vast majority of clinical trials. The advent of active systemic therapy has revolutionized the care of melanoma patients but this benefit has not been systematically translated into intracranial activity. In this article, we review the biology and clinical outcomes of patients with MBM, the evidence supporting the use of radiation, surgery, and systemic therapy in MBM. Prospective studies that included patients with active MBM have shown clinical intracranial activity that parallels systemic activity and support the inclusion of patients with active MBM in clinical trials involving novel agents and combination therapies. PMID:23954973

  3. Deoxyglucose mapping of nervous activity induced in Drosophila brain by visual movement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erich Buchner; Sigrid Buchner; Isabelle Bülthoff

    1984-01-01

    Local metabolic activity was mapped in the brain ofDrosophila by the radioactive deoxyglucose technique. The distribution of label in serial autoradiographs allows us to draw the following conclusions concerning neuronal processing of visual movement information in the brain ofDrosophila.1.The visual stimuli used (homogeneous flicker, moving gratings, reversing contrast gratings) cause only a small increase in metabolic activity in the first

  4. Evaluation of Brain Activity Related to Speech and Handwriting Using NIRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Hirotoshi; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Ide, Hideto

    The difference by the brain activity when writing it down speech the use of the near-infrared spectroscopy is examined in the present study. It is thought that it becomes a help of the communications between the nurse and people requiring long-term care if the identification of the information transmission means can be evaluated and be detected from the brain activity. Because the possibility of the evaluation of result, “Speech”, and “Writing” was shown, it reports.

  5. Detecting stable phase structures in EEG signals to classify brain activity amplitude patterns

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yusely Ruiz; Guang Li; Walter J. Freeman; Eduardo Gonzalez

    2009-01-01

    Obtaining an electrocorticograms (ECoG) signal requires an invasive procedure in which brain activity is recorded from the\\u000a cortical surface. In contrast, obtaining electroencephalograms (EEG) recordings requires the non-invasive procedure of recording\\u000a the brain activity from the scalp surface, which allows EEG recordings to be performed more easily on healthy humans. In this\\u000a work, a technique previously used to study spatial-temporal

  6. Effects of ambient temperature on brain acetylcholinesterase activity and protein content in three Egyptian vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, M I; Aly, M S; Selim, M F

    1983-01-01

    Exposure to cold caused an increase in AChE activity of the different brain regions of both Arvicanthis and Columbia and a decrease in the enzyme activity of Scincus midbrain. Heat exposure provoked variable changes in AChE activity of the various brain regions of the three experimental species. The changes in AChE activities may be one of the mechanisms by which birds and mammals tend to acclimatize themselves to various forms of stress. In reptiles, AChE activity varied with changes in ambient temperature and this is probably due to the adaptive significance of thermally directed changes in enzyme substrate affinity. PMID:6139239

  7. Total Variation regularization enhances regression-based brain activity prediction Vincent Michel , Alexandre Gramfort , Gael Varoquaux , Bertrand Thirion

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Total Variation regularization enhances regression-based brain activity prediction Vincent MichelMRI), the data provide an indirect measurement of brain activity, that can be related to behavioral information brain is used to predict a target, typically a behavioral variable. In order to cope with the high

  8. Impaired neurovascular coupling to ictal epileptic activity and spreading depolarization in a patient with subarachnoid hemorrhage: Possible link to blood–brain barrier dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Maren K. L.; Chassidim, Yoash; Lublinsky, Svetlana; Revankar, Gajanan S.; Major, Sebastian; Kang, Eun-Jeung; Oliveira-Ferreira, Ana I.; Woitzik, Johannes; Sandow, Nora; Scheel, Michael; Friedman, Alon; Dreier, Jens P.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Spreading depolarization describes a sustained neuronal and astroglial depolarization with abrupt ion translocation between intraneuronal and extracellular space leading to a cytotoxic edema and silencing of spontaneous activity. Spreading depolarizations occur abundantly in acutely injured human brain and are assumed to facilitate neuronal death through toxic effects, increased metabolic demand, and inverse neurovascular coupling. Inverse coupling describes severe hypoperfusion in response to spreading depolarization. Ictal epileptic events are less frequent than spreading depolarizations in acutely injured human brain but may also contribute to lesion progression through increased metabolic demand. Whether abnormal neurovascular coupling can occur with ictal epileptic events is unknown. Herein we describe a patient with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in whom spreading depolarizations and ictal epileptic events were measured using subdural opto-electrodes for direct current electrocorticography and regional cerebral blood flow recordings with laser-Doppler flowmetry. Simultaneously, changes in tissue partial pressure of oxygen were recorded with an intraparenchymal oxygen sensor. Isolated spreading depolarizations and clusters of recurrent spreading depolarizations with persistent depression of spontaneous activity were recorded over several days followed by a status epilepticus. Both spreading depolarizations and ictal epileptic events where accompanied by hyperemic blood flow responses at one optode but mildly hypoemic blood flow responses at another. Of note, quantitative analysis of Gadolinium-diethylene-triamine-pentaacetic acid (DTPA)–enhanced magnetic resonance imaging detected impaired blood–brain barrier integrity in the region where the optode had recorded the mildly hypoemic flow responses. The data suggest that abnormal flow responses to spreading depolarizations and ictal epileptic events, respectively, may be associated with blood–brain barrier dysfunction. PMID:23134492

  9. Exploring the motivational brain: effects of implicit power motivation on brain activation in response to facial expressions of emotion

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, Michelle M.; Waugh, Christian E.; Stanton, Steven J.; Meier, Elizabeth A.; Reuter-Lorenz, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that implicit power motivation (nPower), in interaction with power incentives, influences activation of brain systems mediating motivation. Twelve individuals low (lowest quartile) and 12 individuals high (highest quartile) in nPower, as assessed per content coding of picture stories, were selected from a larger initial participant pool and participated in a functional magnetic resonance imaging study during which they viewed high-dominance (angry faces), low-dominance (surprised faces) and control stimuli (neutral faces, gray squares) under oddball-task conditions. Consistent with hypotheses, high-power participants showed stronger activation in response to emotional faces in brain structures involved in emotion and motivation (insula, dorsal striatum, orbitofrontal cortex) than low-power participants. PMID:19015083

  10. Detecting resting-state brain activity by spontaneous cerebral blood volume fluctuations using whole brain vascular space occupancy imaging.

    PubMed

    Miao, Xinyuan; Gu, Hong; Yan, Lirong; Lu, Hanzhang; Wang, Danny J J; Zhou, Xiaohong Joe; Zhuo, Yan; Yang, Yihong

    2014-01-01

    Resting-state brain activity has been investigated extensively using BOLD contrast. However, BOLD signal represents the combined effects of multiple physiological processes and its spatial localization is less accurate than that of cerebral blood flow and volume (CBF and CBF, respectively). In this study, we demonstrate that resting-state brain activity can be reliably detected by spontaneous fluctuations of CBV-weighted signal using whole-brain gradient and spin echo (GRASE) based vascular space occupancy (VASO) imaging. Specifically, using independent component analysis, intrinsic brain networks, including default mode, salience, executive control, visual, auditory, and sensorimotor networks were revealed robustly by the VASO technique. We further demonstrate that task-evoked VASO signal aligned well with expected gray matter areas, while blood-oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal extended outside of these areas probably due to their different spatial specificity. The improved spatial localization of VASO is consistent with previous studies using animal models. Moreover, we showed that the 3D-GRASE VASO images had reduced susceptibility-induced signal voiding, compared to the BOLD technique. This is attributed to the fact that VASO does not require T2* weighting, thus the acquisition can use a shorter TE and can employ spin-echo scheme. Consequently VASO-based functional connectivity signals were well preserved in brain regions that tend to suffer from signal loss and geometric distortion in BOLD, such as orbital prefrontal cortex. Our study suggests that 3D-GRASE VASO imaging, with its improved spatial specificity and less sensitivity to susceptibility artifacts, may have advantages in resting-state fMRI studies. PMID:24055705

  11. Postischemic Hyperthermia Induced Caspase3 Activation in the Newborn Rat Brain after Hypoxia-Ischemia and Exacerbated the Brain Damage

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hirotsugu Fukuda; Takuji Tomimatsu; Takeshi Kanagawa; Junwu Mu; Masatomo Kohzuki; Koichiro Shimoya; Takayoshi Hosono; Toru Kanzaki; Yuji Murata

    2003-01-01

    The effects of postischemic hyperthermia were investigated in the newborn rat brain after hypoxia-ischemia (HI). Seven-day-old rats were subjected to left carotid artery ligation followed by 8% oxygen for 30 min, and divided into a hyperthermia group (rectal temperature at 39°C for 6 h) and a normothermia group. Hyperthermia resulted in an approximately 5-fold increase in activated caspase-3 24 h

  12. Abnormal Regional Cerebral Blood Flow found by Technetium99m Ethyl Cysteinate Dimer Brain Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients with Normal Brain MRI Findings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. J.-H. Chen; R.-F. Yen; A. Kao; C.-C. Lin; C.-C. Lee

    2002-01-01

    :   In this study, technetium-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer (99mTc ECD) brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was used to detect regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) of\\u000a the brain in SLE patients with normal brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. Twenty female SLE patients were enrolled\\u000a in this study, divided into two groups. Group 1 consisted of 10 patients with

  13. Adaptive filtering for global interference cancellation and real-time recovery of evoked brain activity: a Monte Carlo simulation study

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Quan

    The sensitivity of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to evoked brain activity is reduced by physiological interference in at least two locations: 1. the superficial scalp and skull layers, and 2. in brain tissue itself. ...

  14. Quantitative ?-Ketoglutarate Dehydrogenase Activity Staining in Brain Sections and in Cultured Cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Larry C. H. Park; Noel Y. Calingasan; Kwan-Fu Rex Sheu; Gary E. Gibson

    2000-01-01

    The activity of a key mitochondrial enzyme, the ?-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC), declines in the brains of patients with neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, as well as in thiamine-deficient (TD) animals. The decreased activity often occurs without a reduction in enzyme protein, which negates the use of immunocytochemistry to study cellular or regional changes in enzyme activity within the

  15. Variability in Stroop Task Performance and Functional Activation among a Small Brain-Injured Group

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tanja M. Mani; L. Stephen Miller; Nathan Yanasak; Stephen Macciocchi

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of moderate to severe brain injury on cognitive task performance and cortical activation. Five participants completed a Stroop task while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) at two time points post-injury. Results revealed activation within regions typically activated during a Stroop task (the region of interest: ROI), though variability among participants was evident. Regions outside

  16. Atypical Brain Activation of Reading Processes in Children With Developmental Dyslexia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Walter Backes; Eric Vuurman; Rianne Wennekes; Patricia Spronk; Mea Wuisman; Jos van Engelshoven; Jelle Jolles

    2002-01-01

    Brain activation differences of reading-related processes between dyslexic and normal reading children were localized with functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The children performed tasks that varied in visuospatial, orthographic, phonologic, and semantic processing demands. Enhanced activation of the left extrastriate cortex was found during all tasks in the dyslexic group. During orthographic processing, dyslexic children predominantly showed activation in the

  17. The Effect of Varying Stimulus Rate and Duration on Brain Activity during Reading

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. J. Price; C. J. Moore; R. S. J. Frackowiak

    1996-01-01

    The effect of the presentation rate and exposure duration of visually presented words on brain activity was investigated using positron emission tomography. Subjects either read aloud or silently mouthed the names of words. In regions associated with early visual analysis, activity increased with both rate and duration; in regions associated with response generation, activity increased with increasing rate but was

  18. Activation and degradation of the phosphorothionate insecticides parathion and EPN by rat brain.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, C S; Chambers, J E

    1989-05-15

    Cytochrome P-450-dependent monooxygenases are known to activate phosphorothionate insecticides to their oxon (phosphate) analogs by oxidative desulfuration. These activations produced potent anticholinesterases, decreasing the I50 values to rat brain acetylcholinesterase almost 1000-fold (from the 10(-5) M range to the 10(-8) M range). Since the usual cause of death in mammals from organophosphorus insecticide poisoning is respiratory failure resulting, in part, from a failure of the respiratory control center of the brain, we investigated the ability of rat brain to activate and subsequently degrade two phosphorothionate insecticides, parathion (diethyl 4-nitrophenyl phosphorothioate) and EPN (ethyl 4-nitrophenyl phenylphosphonothioate). Microsomes from specific regions (cerebral cortex, corpus striatum, cerebellum, and medulla/pons) of the brains of male and female rats and from liver were incubated with the phosphorothionate and an NADPH-generating system. Oxon production was quantified indirectly by the amount of inhibition resulting in an exogenous source of acetylcholinesterase added to the incubation mixture as an oxon trap. The microsomal activation specific activity was low for brain when compared to liver [0.23 to 0.44 and 5.1 to 12.0 nmol.min-1.(g tissue)-1 respectively]. The mitochondrial fraction of the brain possessed an activation activity for parathion similar to that of microsomes [about 0.35 nmol.min-1.(g tissue)-1 for each fraction], but mitochondrial activity was slightly greater than microsomal activity for EPN activation [0.53 to 0.58 and 0.23 to 0.47 nmole.min-1.(g tissue)-1]. Whole homogenates were tested for their ability to degrade paraoxon and EPN-oxon (ethyl 4-nitrophenyl phenylphosphonate), quantitated by 4-nitrophenol production. Specific activity for oxon degradation in liver was greater than that in brain [31 to 74 and 1.1 to 10.7 nmole.min-1.(g tissue)-1 respectively]. Overall, the brain and liver had about 1.5- to 12-fold higher specific activities for degradation than activation depending on the compound used. These findings demonstrate that the brain possesses both phosphorothionate activation and oxon degradation abilities, both of which may be significant during exposures to organophosphorus insecticides. PMID:2730675

  19. Affection of Fundamental Brain Activity By Using Sounds For Patients With Prosodic Disorders: A Pilot Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Emiko; Katagiri, Yoshitada; Seki, Keiko; Kawamata, Toshio

    2011-06-01

    We present a neural model of the production of modulated speech streams in the brain, referred to as prosody, which indicates the limbic structure essential for producing prosody both linguistically and emotionally. This model suggests that activating the fundamental brain including monoamine neurons at the basal ganglia will potentially contribute to helping patients with prosodic disorders coming from functional defects of the fundamental brain to overcome their speech problem. To establish effective clinical treatment for such prosodic disorders, we examine how sounds affect the fundamental activity by using electroencephalographic measurements. Throughout examinations with various melodious sounds, we found that some melodies with lilting rhythms successfully give rise to the fast alpha rhythms at the electroencephalogram which reflect the fundamental brain activity without any negative feelings.

  20. Functional neuroimaging abnormalities in idiopathic generalized epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    McGill, Megan L.; Devinsky, Orrin; Wang, Xiuyuan; Quinn, Brian T.; Pardoe, Heath; Carlson, Chad; Butler, Tracy; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Thesen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques have been used to quantitatively assess focal and network abnormalities. Idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) is characterized by bilateral synchronous spike–wave discharges on electroencephalography (EEG) but normal clinical MRI. Dysfunctions involving the neocortex, particularly the prefrontal cortex, and thalamus likely contribute to seizure activity. To identify possible morphometric and functional differences in the brains of IGE patients and normal controls, we employed measures of thalamic volumes, cortical thickness, gray–white blurring, fractional anisotropy (FA) measures from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (fALFF) in thalamic subregions from resting state functional MRI. Data from 27 patients with IGE and 27 age- and sex-matched controls showed similar thalamic volumes, cortical thickness and gray–white contrast. There were no differences in FA values on DTI in tracts connecting the thalamus and prefrontal cortex. Functional analysis revealed decreased fALFF in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) subregion of the thalamus in patients with IGE. We provide minimum detectable effect sizes for each measure used in the study. Our analysis indicates that fMRI-based methods are more sensitive than quantitative structural techniques for characterizing brain abnormalities in IGE. PMID:25383319

  1. The Active Compression Test: A New and Effective Test for Diagnosing Labral Tears and Acromioclavicular Joint Abnormality

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen J. OBrien; Michael J. Pagnani; Stephen Fealy; Scott R. McGlynn; Joseph B. Wilson

    1998-01-01

    Labral tears and acromioclavicular joint abnormalities were differentiated on physical examination using a new diagnostic test. The standing patient forward flexed the arm to 90° with the elbow in full extension and then adducted the arm 10° to 15° medial to the sagittal plane of the body and internally rotated it so that the thumb pointed downward. The examiner, standing

  2. Brain Activation during Addition and Subtraction Tasks In-Noise and In-Quiet

    PubMed Central

    Abd Hamid, Aini Ismafairus; Yusoff, Ahmad Nazlim; Mukari, Siti Zamratol-Mai Sarah; Mohamad, Mazlyfarina

    2011-01-01

    Background: In spite of extensive research conducted to study how human brain works, little is known about a special function of the brain that stores and manipulates information—the working memory—and how noise influences this special ability. In this study, Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to investigate brain responses to arithmetic problems solved in noisy and quiet backgrounds. Methods: Eighteen healthy young males performed simple arithmetic operations of addition and subtraction with in-quiet and in-noise backgrounds. The MATLAB-based Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM8) was implemented on the fMRI datasets to generate and analyse the activated brain regions. Results: Group results showed that addition and subtraction operations evoked extended activation in the left inferior parietal lobe, left precentral gyrus, left superior parietal lobe, left supramarginal gyrus, and left middle temporal gyrus. This supported the hypothesis that the human brain relatively activates its left hemisphere more compared with the right hemisphere when solving arithmetic problems. The insula, middle cingulate cortex, and middle frontal gyrus, however, showed more extended right hemispheric activation, potentially due to the involvement of attention, executive processes, and working memory. For addition operations, there was extensive left hemispheric activation in the superior temporal gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus, and thalamus. In contrast, subtraction tasks evoked a greater activation of similar brain structures in the right hemisphere. For both addition and subtraction operations, the total number of activated voxels was higher for in-noise than in-quiet conditions. Conclusion: These findings suggest that when arithmetic operations were delivered auditorily, the auditory, attention, and working memory functions were required to accomplish the executive processing of the mathematical calculation. The respective brain activation patterns appear to be modulated by the noisy background condition. PMID:22135581

  3. Active zones for presynaptic plasticity in the brain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P García-Junco-Clemente; P Linares-Clemente; R Fernández-Chacón

    2005-01-01

    Some of the most abundant synapses in the brain such as the synapses formed by the hippocampal mossy fibers, cerebellar parallel fibers and several types of cortical afferents express presynaptic forms of long-term potentiation (LTP), a putative cellular model for spatial, motor and fear learning. Those synapses often display presynaptic mechanisms of LTP induction, which are either NMDA receptor independent

  4. Do Differences in Brain Activation Challenge Universal Theories of Dyslexia?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziegler, Johannes C.

    2006-01-01

    It has been commonly agreed that developmental dyslexia in different languages has a common biological origin: a dysfunction of left posterior temporal brain regions dealing with phonological processes. Siok, Perfetti, Jin, and Tan (2004, "Nature," 431, 71-76) challenge this biological unity theory of dyslexia: Chinese dyslexics show no deficits…

  5. Breastfeeding, Brain Activation to Own Infant Cry, and Maternal Sensitivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Pilyoung; Feldman, Ruth; Mayes, Linda C.; Eicher, Virginia; Thompson, Nancy; Leckman, James F.; Swain, James E.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Research points to the importance of breastfeeding for promoting close mother-infant contact and social-emotional development. Recent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have identified brain regions related to maternal behaviors. However, little research has addressed the neurobiological mechanisms underlying the…

  6. Active Microelectronic Neurosensor Arrays for Implantable Brain Communication Interfaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y.-K. Song; D. A. Borton; W. R. Patterson; C. W. Bull; F. Laiwalla; J. Mislow; J. D. Simeral; J. P. Donoghue; A. V. Nurmikko

    2009-01-01

    We have built a wireless implantable microelectronic device for transmitting cortical signals transcutaneously. The device is aimed at interfacing a cortical microelectrode array to an external computer for neural control applications. Our implantable microsystem enables 16-channel broadband neural recording in a nonhuman primate brain by converting these signals to a digital stream of infrared light pulses for transmission through the

  7. Effects of Traumatic Brain Injury on Working Memory-Related Brain Activation in Adolescents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary R. Newsome; Joel L. Steinberg; Randall S. Scheibel; Maya Troyanskaya; Z. Chu; Gerri Hanten; Hanzhang Lu; Xiaodi Lin; Jill V. Hunter; Carmen Vasquez; Jennifer Zientz; Xiaoqi Li; Elisabeth A. Wilde; Harvey S. Levin

    2008-01-01

    Eight adolescents (ages 13–18 years) who sustained traumatic brain injury (TBI) and eight gender- and age-matched typically developing (TD) adolescents underwent event-related functional MRI (fMRI) while performing a Sternberg letter recognition task. Encoding, maintenance, and retrieval were examined with memory loads of one or four items during imaging. Both groups performed above a 70% accuracy criterion and did not differ

  8. Brain activation during a social attribution task in adolescents with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Randall S. Scheibel; Mary R. Newsome; Elisabeth A. Wilde; Michelle M. McClelland; Gerri Hanten; Daniel C. Krawczyk; Lori G. Cook; Zili D. Chu; Ana C. Vásquez; Ragini Yallampalli; Xiaodi Lin; Jill V. Hunter; Harvey S. Levin

    2011-01-01

    The ability to make accurate judgments about the mental states of others, sometimes referred to as theory of mind (ToM), is often impaired following traumatic brain injury (TBI), and this deficit may contribute to problems with interpersonal relationships. The present study used an animated social attribution task (SAT) with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine structures mediating ToM in

  9. Vanadium improves brain acetylcholinesterase activity on early stage alloxan-diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Ghareeb, Doaa A; Hussen, Hend M

    2008-05-01

    The present study is designed to screen the possible effects of sodium orthovanadate therapy on the kinetic parameters of brain membrane-bound and soluble acetylcholinesterase (AChE) forms in alloxan-induced diabetic rats. The diabetic rats were treated with 300 mg/kg sodium orthovanadate orally for 45 days. While diabetes significantly decreased the brain specific activity (V(max)) of AChE soluble form by 42%, it caused a fivefold increase of the K(m) of the membrane-bound form. Furthermore, the activity of brain glutathione-S-transferase (GST) was significantly decreased and this was associated with a remarkable increase in brain lipid peroxidative parameter, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), as compared to sham control. The alterations of both AChE forms observed in diabetic state could be attributed to hyperglycemia and lipid peroxidation that triggered brain dysfunction by disturbing the neurotransmitter acetylcholine level. Administration of sodium orthovanadate reversed the diabetic conditions by lowering the blood glucose level and normalized the blood Hb(A1C) level. It also normalized the levels of brain AChE, GST and TBARS as compared to diabetic state and control. Therefore, vanadate administration could protect against direct action of lipid peroxidation on brain AChE and in this way, it might be useful in the prevention of cholinergic neural dysfunction, which is one of the major complications in diabetes. PMID:18378083

  10. Laterality of brain activity during motor imagery is modulated by the provision of source level neurofeedback.

    PubMed

    Boe, Shaun; Gionfriddo, Alicia; Kraeutner, Sarah; Tremblay, Antoine; Little, Graham; Bardouille, Timothy

    2014-11-01

    Motor imagery (MI) may be effective as an adjunct to physical practice for motor skill acquisition. For example, MI is emerging as an effective treatment in stroke neurorehabilitation. As in physical practice, the repetitive activation of neural pathways during MI can drive short- and long-term brain changes that underlie functional recovery. However, the lack of feedback about MI performance may be a factor limiting its effectiveness. The provision of feedback about MI-related brain activity may overcome this limitation by providing the opportunity for individuals to monitor their own performance of this endogenous process. We completed a controlled study to isolate neurofeedback as the factor driving changes in MI-related brain activity across repeated sessions. Eighteen healthy participants took part in 3 sessions comprised of both actual and imagined performance of a button press task. During MI, participants in the neurofeedback group received source level feedback based on activity from the left and right sensorimotor cortex obtained using magnetoencephalography. Participants in the control group received no neurofeedback. MI-related brain activity increased in the sensorimotor cortex contralateral to the imagined movement across sessions in the neurofeedback group, but not in controls. Task performance improved across sessions but did not differ between groups. Our results indicate that the provision of neurofeedback during MI allows healthy individuals to modulate regional brain activity. This finding has the potential to improve the effectiveness of MI as a tool in neurorehabilitation. PMID:24999037

  11. Brain fibronectin expression in prenatally irradiated mice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. K. Meznarich; L. S. McCoy; T. L. Bale; G. L. Stiegler; M. R. Sikov

    1993-01-01

    Activation of gene transcription by radiation has been recently demonstrated in vitro. However, little is known on the specificity of these alterations on gene transcription. Prenatal irradiation is a known teratogen that affects the developing mammalian central nervous system (CNS). Altered neuronal migration has been suggested as a mechanism for abnormal development of prenatally irradiated brains. Fibronectin (FN), an extracellular

  12. An fMRI Study Investigating Adolescent Brain Activation by Rewards and Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won-Hee; Kim, Yeoung-Rang; Oh, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Ick; Shin, Chul-Jin; Kim, Sie-Kyeong; Ju, Gawon; Lee, Seungbok; Jo, Seongwoo; Ha, Tae Hyon

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to investigate the adolescent brain activation patterns in response to performance feedback (PF), social reward (SR) and monetary reward (MR) and their association with psychological factors. Methods Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was performed while middle school boys (n=15) performed tests pertained to PF, SR and MR. The brain activation pattern in each condition was investigated, and the extent of brain activation in each of the three conditions was compared at once. Results The caudate and the dorsal prefrontal area were activated in all three conditions. Furthermore, the cuneus showed significantly greater activation in the PF condition than the SR or MR condition. And the self - related areas, such as the right precentral gyrus and paracenral lobule, were more activated in the SR condition than the PF or MR condition. The left middle frontal gyrus was more activated in the MR condition than the PF or SR condition. Conclusion Not only various reward stimuli but also feedback stimulus might commonly activate dorsal prefrontal and subcortical area in adolescents. Moreover, several different brain activation patterns were also observed in each condition. The results of this study could be applied to planning of learning and teaching strategy for adolescents in various ways. PMID:23482680

  13. A. A. Ukhtomskii`s dominance principle of brain activity in the perception of electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kholodov, Yu.A.

    1994-07-01

    Preliminary instruction of the subject plays an important role in the perception of weak electromagnetic fields acting on the hand. Active attention to a potential effect amplifies a brain state that can be called caution dominance and arises spontaneously with a {open_quotes}placebo{close_quotes} or an electromagnetic field. The radar principle of brain operation is discussed among the physiological mechanisms through which electromagnetic fields act on an organism.

  14. A. A. Ukhtomskii's dominance principle of brain activity in the perception of electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholodov, Yu. A.

    1994-01-01

    Preliminary instruction of the subject plays an important role in the perception of weak electromagnetic fields acting on the hand. Active attention to a potential effect amplifies a brain state that can be called caution dominance and arises spontaneously with a “placebo” or an electromagnetic field. The radar principle of brain operation is discussed among the physiological mechanisms through which electromagnetic fields act on an organism.

  15. Local brain atrophy accounts for functional activity differences in normal aging

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Grégoria Kalpouzos; Jonas Persson; Lars Nyberg

    Functional brain imaging studies of normal aging typically show age-related under- and overactivations during episodic memory tasks. Older individuals also undergo nonuniform gray matter volume (GMv) loss. Thus, age differences in functional brain activity could at least in part result from local atrophy. We conducted a series of voxel-based blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD)-GMv analyses to highlight whether age-related under- and

  16. Effect of Social Rank on Brain Monoaminergic Activity in a Cichlid Fish

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Svante Winberg; Yvonne Winberg; Russell D. Fernald

    1997-01-01

    In Haplochromis burtoni, an African cichlid fish, male sexual maturation is regulated via social interactions, and these effects are mediated by gonadotropin-releasing-hormone (GnRH)-containing neurons in the preoptic area of the brain. Since brain monoaminergic systems are known to be involved in the regulation of GnRH release, and the activity of these systems is influenced by agonistic interactions, we analyzed the

  17. Oxidative stress-mediated inhibition of brain creatine kinase activity by methylmercury

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Viviane Glaser; Guilhian Leipnitz; Marcos Raniel Straliotto; Jade Oliveira; Vanessa Valgas dos Santos; Clóvis Milton Duval Wannmacher; Andreza Fabro de Bem; João Batista Teixeira Rocha; Marcelo Farina; Alexandra Latini

    2010-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg), a potent neurotoxicant, easily passes through the blood–brain barrier and accumulates in brain causing severe irreversible damage. However, the underlying neurotoxic mechanisms elicited by MeHg are still not completed defined. In this study, we aimed to investigate the in vitro toxic effects elicited by crescent concentrations (0–1500?M) of MeHg on creatine kinase (CK) activity, thiol content (NPSH) and

  18. Localization of Alkaline Phosphatase Activity in Endothelia of Developing and Mature Mouse Blood-Brain Barrier

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrzej W. Vorbrodt; Albert S. Lossinsky; Henryk M. Wisniewski

    1986-01-01

    The relationship between alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity and maturation of blood-brain barrier (BBB) in mouse brain was studied ultracytochemically. The permeability of micro-blood vessels (MBVs) to intravenously injected horseradish peroxidase was considered to be a criterion of BBB maturation, which occurs between the 12th and 24th day of mouse life. This process coincides with the appearance of cytochemically detectable AP

  19. Todd, Faraday and the electrical basis of brain activity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edward Reynolds

    2007-01-01

    The origins of our understanding of brain electricity and electrical discharges in epilepsy can be traced to Robert Bentley Todd (1809–60). Todd was influenced by his contemporary in London, Michael Faraday (1791–1867), who in the 1830s and 1840s was laying the foundations of our modern understanding of electromagnetism. Todd’s concept of nervous polarity, generated in nerve vesicles and transmitted in

  20. Microglia Activation as a Biomarker for Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Ontiveros, Diana G.; Tajiri, Naoki; Acosta, Sandra; Giunta, Brian; Tan, Jun; Borlongan, Cesar V.

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has become the signature wound of wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Injury may result from a mechanical force, a rapid acceleration-deceleration movement, or a blast wave. A cascade of secondary cell death events ensues after the initial injury. In particular, multiple inflammatory responses accompany TBI. A series of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines spreads to normal brain areas juxtaposed to the core impacted tissue. Among the repertoire of immune cells involved, microglia is a key player in propagating inflammation to tissues neighboring the core site of injury. Neuroprotective drug trials in TBI have failed, likely due to their sole focus on abrogating neuronal cell death and ignoring the microglia response despite these inflammatory cells’ detrimental effects on the brain. Another relevant point to consider is the veracity of results of animal experiments due to deficiencies in experimental design, such as incomplete or inadequate method description, data misinterpretation, and reporting may introduce bias and give false-positive results. Thus, scientific publications should follow strict guidelines that include randomization, blinding, sample-size estimation, and accurate handling of all data (Landis et al., 2012). A prolonged state of inflammation after brain injury may linger for years and predispose patients to develop other neurological disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease. TBI patients display progressive and long-lasting impairments in their physical, cognitive, behavioral, and social performance. Here, we discuss inflammatory mechanisms that accompany TBI in an effort to increase our understanding of the dynamic pathological condition as the disease evolves over time and begin to translate these findings for defining new and existing inflammation-based biomarkers and treatments for TBI. PMID:23531681

  1. Imaging of brain tumor proliferative activity with iodine-131-iododeoxyuridine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Juri G. Tjuvajev; Homer A. Macapinlac; Farhad Daghighian

    1994-01-01

    Iodine-131-iododeoxyuridine (IUdR) uptake and retention was imaged with SPECT at 2 and 24 hr after administering a 10-mCi dose to six patients with primary brain tumors. The SPECT images were directly compared to gadolinium contrast-enhanced MR images as well as to (¹⁸F) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET scans and ²°¹Tl SPECT scans. Localized uptake and retention of IUdR-derived radioactivity was observed in

  2. Chelating compound, chrysoidine, is more effective in both antiprion activity and brain endothelial permeability than quinacrine.

    PubMed

    Doh-ura, Katsumi; Tamura, Kazuhiko; Karube, Yoshiharu; Naito, Mikihiko; Tsuruo, Takashi; Kataoka, Yasufumi

    2007-05-01

    1. As an extension of our previous study of quinacrine and its derivatives, chelating chemicals were screened to obtain more effective, better brain-permeable antiprion compounds using either prion-infected neuroblastoma cells or brain capillary endothelial cells.2. Eleven chemicals were found to have antiprion activity. Most of them shared a common structure consisting of benzene or naphthalene at either end of an azo bond. Structure-activity data suggest that chelating activity is not necessary but might contribute to the antiprion action.3. Chrysoidine, a representative compound found here, was about 27 times more effective in the antiprion activity and five times more efficiently permeable through the brain capillary endothelial cells than quinacrine was.4. These chemicals might be useful as compounds for development of therapeutics for prion diseases. PMID:17235694

  3. Anticipation of monetary and social reward differently activates mesolimbic brain structures in men and women.

    PubMed

    Spreckelmeyer, Katja N; Krach, Sören; Kohls, Gregor; Rademacher, Lena; Irmak, Arda; Konrad, Kerstin; Kircher, Tilo; Gründer, Gerhard

    2009-06-01

    Motivation for goal-directed behaviour largely depends on the expected value of the anticipated reward. The aim of the present study was to examine how different levels of reward value are coded in the brain for two common forms of human reward: money and social approval. To account for gender differences 16 male and 16 female participants performed an incentive delay task expecting to win either money or positive social feedback. fMRI recording during the anticipation phase revealed proportional activation of neural structures constituting the human reward system for increasing levels of reward, independent of incentive type. However, in men activation in the prospect of monetary rewards encompassed a wide network of mesolimbic brain regions compared to only limited activation for social rewards. In contrast, in women, anticipation of either incentive type activated identical brain regions. Our findings represent an important step towards a better understanding of motivated behaviour by taking into account individual differences in reward valuation. PMID:19174537

  4. Abnormal axonal guidance and brain anatomy in mouse mutants for the cell recognition molecules close homolog of L1 and NgCAM-related cell adhesion molecule

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Heyden; F. Angenstein; M. Sallaz; C. Seidenbecher; D. Montag

    2008-01-01

    Cell recognition molecules of the L1 family serve important functions in the developing and the mature nervous system. Mutations in genes encoding the L1 family members close homolog of L1 (CHL1) and NgCAM-related cell adhesion molecule (NrCAM) have been found to alter connectivity and morphology of several brain regions. In order to emphasize similarities and differences of these two structurally

  5. siRNA inhibition of brain insulin or insulin-like growth factor receptors causes developmental cerebellar abnormalities: relevance to fetal alcohol spectrum disorder

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Suzanne M de la Monte; Ming Tong; Nathaniel Bowling; Peter Moskal

    2011-01-01

    Background  In experimental models of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD), cerebellar hypoplasia and hypofoliation are associated with\\u000a insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) resistance with impaired signaling through pathways that mediate growth, survival,\\u000a plasticity, metabolism, and neurotransmitter function. To more directly assess the roles of impaired insulin and IGF signaling\\u000a during brain development, we administered intracerebroventricular (ICV) injections of si-RNA targeting

  6. Dietary omega-3 fatty acid deficiency and high fructose intake in the development of metabolic syndrome, brain metabolic abnormalities, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Simopoulos, Artemis P

    2013-08-01

    Western diets are characterized by both dietary omega-3 fatty acid deficiency and increased fructose intake. The latter found in high amounts in added sugars such as sucrose and high fructose corn syrup (HFCS). Both a low intake of omega-3 fatty acids or a high fructose intake contribute to metabolic syndrome, liver steatosis or non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), promote brain insulin resistance, and increase the vulnerability to cognitive dysfunction. Insulin resistance is the core perturbation of metabolic syndrome. Multiple cognitive domains are affected by metabolic syndrome in adults and in obese adolescents, with volume losses in the hippocampus and frontal lobe, affecting executive function. Fish oil supplementation maintains proper insulin signaling in the brain, ameliorates NAFLD and decreases the risk to metabolic syndrome suggesting that adequate levels of omega-3 fatty acids in the diet can cope with the metabolic challenges imposed by high fructose intake in Western diets which is of major public health importance. This review presents the current status of the mechanisms involved in the development of the metabolic syndrome, brain insulin resistance, and NAFLD a most promising area of research in Nutrition for the prevention of these conditions, chronic diseases, and improvement of Public Health. PMID:23896654

  7. Expression of progerin in aging mouse brains reveals structural nuclear abnormalities without detectible significant alterations in gene expression, hippocampal stem cells or behavior.

    PubMed

    Baek, Jean-Ha; Schmidt, Eva; Viceconte, Nikenza; Strandgren, Charlotte; Pernold, Karin; Richard, Thibaud J C; Van Leeuwen, Fred W; Dantuma, Nico P; Damberg, Peter; Hultenby, Kjell; Ulfhake, Brun; Mugnaini, Enrico; Rozell, Björn; Eriksson, Maria

    2015-03-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a segmental progeroid syndrome with multiple features suggestive of premature accelerated aging. Accumulation of progerin is thought to underlie the pathophysiology of HGPS. However, despite ubiquitous expression of lamin A in all differentiated cells, the HGPS mutation results in organ-specific defects. For example, bone and skin are strongly affected by HGPS, while the brain appears to be unaffected. There are no definite explanations as to the variable sensitivity to progeria disease among different organs. In addition, low levels of progerin have also been found in several tissues from normal individuals, but it is not clear if low levels of progerin contribute to the aging of the brain. In an attempt to clarify the origin of this phenomenon, we have developed an inducible transgenic mouse model with expression of the most common HGPS mutation in brain, skin, bone and heart to investigate how the mutation affects these organs. Ultrastructural analysis of neuronal nuclei after 70 weeks of expression of the LMNA c.1824C>T mutation showed severe distortion with multiple lobulations and irregular extensions. Despite severe distortions in the nuclei of hippocampal neurons of HGPS animals, there were only negligible changes in gene expression after 63 weeks of transgenic expression. Behavioral analysis and neurogenesis assays, following long-term expression of the HGPS mutation, did not reveal significant pathology. Our results suggest that certain tissues are protected from functional deleterious effects of progerin. PMID:25343989

  8. Annotation: What Electrical Brain Activity Tells Us about Brain Function that Other Techniques Cannot Tell Us--A Child Psychiatric Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banaschewski, Tobias; Brandeis, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Background: Monitoring brain processes in real time requires genuine subsecond resolution to follow the typical timing and frequency of neural events. Non-invasive recordings of electric (EEG/ERP) and magnetic (MEG) fields provide this time resolution. They directly measure neural activations associated with a wide variety of brain states and…

  9. Rapid and Quantitative Assay of Amyloid-Seeding Activity in Human Brains Affected with Prion Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Takatsuki, Hanae; Satoh, Katsuya; Sano, Kazunori; Fuse, Takayuki; Nakagaki, Takehiro; Mori, Tsuyoshi; Ishibashi, Daisuke; Mihara, Ban; Takao, Masaki; Iwasaki, Yasushi; Yoshida, Mari; Atarashi, Ryuichiro; Nishida, Noriyuki

    2015-01-01

    The infectious agents of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are composed of amyloidogenic prion protein, PrPSc. Real-time quaking-induced conversion can amplify very small amounts of PrPSc seeds in tissues/body fluids of patients or animals. Using this in vitro PrP-amyloid amplification assay, we quantitated the seeding activity of affected human brains. End-point assay using serially diluted brain homogenates of sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease patients demonstrated that 50% seeding dose (SD50) is reached approximately 1010/g brain (values varies 108.79–10.63/g). A genetic case (GSS-P102L) yielded a similar level of seeding activity in an autopsy brain sample. The range of PrPSc concentrations in the samples, determined by dot-blot assay, was 0.6–5.4 ?g/g brain; therefore, we estimated that 1 SD50 unit was equivalent to 0.06–0.27 fg of PrPSc. The SD50 values of the affected brains dropped more than three orders of magnitude after autoclaving at 121°C. This new method for quantitation of human prion activity provides a new way to reduce the risk of iatrogenic prion transmission. PMID:26070208

  10. AGE-DEPENDENT CHANGES IN PLASMA AND BRAIN CHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITIES OF HOUSE WRENS AND EUROPEAN STARLINGS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David T. Mayack; Tim Martin

    2003-01-01

    We determined age-dependent changes in plasma and brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity for two species of passerines: house wren (Troglodytes aedon) and European starling (Sturnus vulgaris, starling). In plasma from nestlings of both species, total ChE activity increased with age, acetylcholinesterase (AChE, EC 3.1.1.7) activity declined rapidly immediately after hatching, and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE, EC 3.1.1.8) activity increased steadily. For both spe-

  11. Working memory brain activity and capacity link MAOA polymorphism to aggressive behavior during development

    PubMed Central

    Ziermans, T; Dumontheil, I; Roggeman, C; Peyrard-Janvid, M; Matsson, H; Kere, J; Klingberg, T

    2012-01-01

    A developmental increase in working memory capacity is an important part of cognitive development, and low working memory (WM) capacity is a risk factor for developing psychopathology. Brain activity represents a promising endophenotype for linking genes to behavior and for improving our understanding of the neurobiology of WM development. We investigated gene–brain–behavior relationships by focusing on 18 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in six dopaminergic candidate genes (COMT, SLC6A3/DAT1, DBH, DRD4, DRD5, MAOA). Visuospatial WM (VSWM) brain activity, measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging, and VSWM capacity were assessed in a longitudinal study of typically developing children and adolescents. Behavioral problems were evaluated using the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). One SNP (rs6609257), located ?6.6?kb downstream of the monoamine oxidase A gene (MAOA) on human chromosome X, significantly affected brain activity in a network of frontal, parietal and occipital regions. Increased activity in this network, but not in caudate nucleus or anterior prefrontal regions, was correlated with VSWM capacity, which in turn predicted externalizing (aggressive/oppositional) symptoms, with higher WM capacity associated with fewer externalizing symptoms. There were no direct significant correlations between rs6609257 and behavioral symptoms. These results suggest a mediating role of WM brain activity and capacity in linking the MAOA gene to aggressive behavior during development. PMID:22832821

  12. First demonstration that brain CYP2D-mediated opiate metabolic activation alters analgesia in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Kaidi; Khokhar, Jibran Y.; Zhao, Bin; Tyndale, Rachel F.

    2013-01-01

    The response to centrally-acting drugs is highly variable between individuals and does not always correlate with plasma drug levels. Drug-metabolizing CYP enzymes in the brain may contribute to this variability by affecting local drug and metabolite concentrations. CYP2D metabolizes codeine to the active morphine metabolite. We investigate the effect of inhibiting brain, and not liver, CYP2D activity on codeine-induced analgesia. Rats received intracerebroventricular injections of CYP2D inhibitors (20 ?g propranolol or 40 ?g propafenone) or vehicle controls. Compared to vehicle-pretreated rats, inhibitor-pretreated rats had: a) lower analgesia in the tail-flick test (p<0.05) and lower areas under the analgesia-time curve (p<0.02) within the first hour after 30 mg/kg subcutaneous codeine, b) lower morphine concentrations and morphine to codeine ratios in the brain (p<0.02 and p<0.05, respectively), but not in plasma (p>0.6 and p>0.7, respectively), tested at 30 min after 30 mg/kg subcutaneous codeine, and c) lower morphine formation from codeine ex vivo by brain membranes (p<0.04), but not by liver microsomes (p>0.9). Analgesia trended toward a correlation with brain morphine concentrations (p=0.07) and correlated with brain morphine to codeine ratios (p<0.005), but not with plasma morphine concentrations (p>0.8) or plasma morphine to codeine ratios (p>0.8). Our findings suggest that brain CYP2D affects brain morphine levels after peripheral codeine administration, and may thereby alter codeine's therapeutic efficacy, side-effect profile and abuse liability. Brain CYPs are highly variable due to genetics, environmental factors and age, and may therefore contribute to interindividual variation in the response to centrally-acting drugs. PMID:23623752

  13. Brain Computer Interface Vs Walking Interface in VR: The Impact of Motor Activity on Spatial Transfer

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    on spatial cognition, and more precisely the question of the spatial learning transfer. We present a userBrain Computer Interface Vs Walking Interface in VR: The Impact of Motor Activity on Spatial study comparing two interfaces with different motor activities: the first one, a walking interface (a

  14. Microglia: active sensor and versatile effector cells in the normal and pathologic brain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Uwe-Karsten Hanisch; Helmut Kettenmann

    2007-01-01

    Microglial cells constitute the resident macrophage population of the CNS. Recent in vivo studies have shown that microglia carry out active tissue scanning, which challenges the traditional notion of 'resting' microglia in the normal brain. Transformation of microglia to reactive states in response to pathology has been known for decades as microglial activation, but seems to be more diverse and

  15. Activity of glycogen depolymerizing enzymes in extracts from brain tumor tissue (anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastoma multiforme)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joanna Wilczek; Janusz Madej; Andrzej Zarzycki; Jan Hutny

    An approximately threefold increase in glycogenolytic activity of the neutral -1,4-glucosidase and a twofold increase in the same activity of the acid isoform have been found in extracts of anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastoma multiforme tumors of brain tissue. \\

  16. Activity in the human brain predicting differential heart rate responses to emotional facial expressions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hugo D. Critchley; Pia Rotshtein; Yoko Nagai; John O'Doherty; Christopher J. Mathias; Raymond J. Dolan

    2005-01-01

    The James-Lange theory of emotion proposes that automatically generated bodily reactions not only color subjective emotional experience of stimuli, but also necessitate a mechanism by which these bodily reactions are differentially generated to reflect stimulus quality. To examine this putative mechanism, we simultaneously measured brain activity and heart rate to identify regions where neural activity predicted the magnitude of heart

  17. Sex differences in how stress affects brain activity during face viewing

    E-print Network

    Mather, Mara

    Sex differences in how stress affects brain activity during face viewing Mara Mathera , Nichole R activity while viewing emotional faces differently for men and women. Fusiform face area response to faces. These findings suggest that stress influences emotional perception differently for men and women. NeuroReport 21

  18. Neuropeptide Y Activates Protein Kinase C in Hamster Suprachiasmatic Nuclei Brain Slices

    E-print Network

    Harrington, Mary

    Neuropeptide Y Activates Protein Kinase C in Hamster Suprachiasmatic Nuclei Brain Slices Kathryn M in the SCN of a variety of animal species including the hamster (Biello et al., 1997; Van der Zee & Bult to test the hypothesis that neuropeptide Y should increase PKC activity in the hamster SCN. Material

  19. Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging of human brain activity during primary sensory stimulation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kenneth K. Kwong; J. W. Belliveau; D. A. Chesler; I. E. Goldberg; R. M. Weisskoff; B. P. Poncelet; D. N. Kennedy; B. E. Hoppel; M. S. Cohen; Robert Turner

    1992-01-01

    Neuronal activity causes local changes in cerebral blood flow, blood volume, and blood oxygenation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques sensitive to changes in cerebral blood flow and blood oxygenation were developed by high-speed echo planar imaging. These techniques were used to obtain completely noninvasive tomographic maps of human brain activity, by using visual and motor stimulus paradigms. Changes in blood

  20. Activity in human reward-sensitive brain areas is strongly context dependent

    E-print Network

    Yeung, Nick

    , or no gain of money) and a bloseQ condition (in which the possible outcomes were a large monetary loss, a small loss, or no loss of money). We observed reward-sensitive activity in a number of brain areas activated to a comparable degree by the best outcomes in each condition­a large gain in the win condition

  1. Patterns of Brain-Electrical Activity during Declarative Memory Performance in 10-Month-Old Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morasch, Katherine C.; Bell, Martha Ann

    2009-01-01

    This study of infant declarative memory concurrently examined brain-electrical activity and deferred imitation performance in 10-month-old infants. Continuous electroencephalogram (EEG) measures were collected throughout the activity-matched baseline, encoding (modeling) and retrieval (delayed test) phases of a within-subjects deferred imitation…

  2. On Altered Patterns of Brain Activation in At-Risk Adolescents and Young Adults

    E-print Network

    Editorial On Altered Patterns of Brain Activation in At-Risk Adolescents and Young Adults activity in 60 adolescents and young adults at risk for psychosis and 38 healthy comparison subjects, using in individuals diagnosed with or at risk for schizophrenia. Thus, we focus our comments on the findings

  3. Learned regulation of spatially localized brain activation using real-time fMRI

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Christopher deCharms; Kalina Christoff; Gary H. Glover; John M. Pauly; Susan Whitfield; John D. E Gabrieli

    2004-01-01

    It is not currently known whether subjects can learn to voluntarily control activation in localized regions of their own brain using neuroimaging. Here, we show that subjects were able to learn enhanced voluntary control over task-specific activation in a chosen target region, the somatomotor cortex. During an imagined manual action task, subjects were provided with continuous direction regarding their cognitive

  4. The Brain in Space: A Teacher's Guide with Activities for Neuroscience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLeish, Marlene Y.; McLean, Bernice R.

    This educators guide discusses the brain and contains activities on neuroscience. Activities include: (1) "The Space Life Sciences"; (2) "Space Neuroscience: A Special Area within the Space Life Sciences"; (3) "Space Life Sciences Research"; (4) "Neurolab: A Special Space Mission to Study the Nervous System"; (5) "The Nervous System"; (6)…

  5. Can Cognitive Models Explain Brain Activation During Word and Pseudoword Reading? A Meta-Analysis of 36 Neuroimaging Studies

    E-print Network

    Royal Holloway, University of London

    Can Cognitive Models Explain Brain Activation During Word and Pseudoword Reading? A Meta-Analysis of 36 Neuroimaging Studies J. S. H. Taylor Medical Research Council Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit of London Matthew H. Davis Medical Research Council Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge, England

  6. Age-dependent changes in plasma and brain cholinesterase activities of house wrens and European starlings.

    PubMed

    Mayack, David T; Martin, Tim

    2003-07-01

    We determined age-dependent changes in plasma and brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity for two species of passerines: house wren (Troglodytes aedon) and European starling (Sturnus vulgaris, starling). In plasma from nestlings of both species, total ChE activity increased with age, acetycholinesterase (AChE, EC 3.1.1.7) activity declined rapidly immediately after hatching, and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE, EC 3.1.1.8) activity increased steadily. For both species, total ChE and BChE activities and the BChE:AChE ratio in plasma were significantly greater in adults than nestlings suggesting trends observed in nestlings continue post fledging. In older nestlings and adults, AChE activity in plasma was significantly greater and BChE:AChE ratio less in house wrens than starlings. For house wrens as compared with starlings, ChE activity in brain increased at a significantly greater rate with age in nestlings and was significantly greater in adults. However, ChE activity in brain was similar at fledging for both species suggesting that the increase in ChE in brain is more directly related to ontogeny than chronologic age in nestlings of passerines. For both species, ChE activity increased significantly with brain weight of nestlings but not adults. House wrens hold similar patterns of age-dependent change in ChE activity in common with starlings but also exhibit differences in AChE activity in plasma that should be considered as a factor potentially affecting their relative toxicologic response to ChE inhibitors. PMID:14567225

  7. Abnormal movement preparation in task-specific focal hand dystonia.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, Jakob; Paus, Sebastian; Scheef, Lukas; Bewersdorff, Malte; Schild, Hans H; Klockgether, Thomas; Boecker, Henning

    2013-01-01

    Electrophysiological and behavioral studies in primary dystonia suggest abnormalities during movement preparation, but this crucial phase preceding movement onset has not yet been studied specifically with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). To identify abnormalities in brain activation during movement preparation, we used event-related fMRI to analyze behaviorally unimpaired sequential finger movements in 18 patients with task-specific focal hand dystonia (FHD) and 18 healthy subjects. Patients and controls executed self-initiated or externally cued prelearnt four-digit sequential movements using either right or left hands. In FHD patients, motor performance of the sequential finger task was not associated with task-related dystonic posturing and their activation levels during motor execution were highly comparable with controls. On the other hand reduced activation was observed during movement preparation in the FHD patients in left premotor cortex / precentral gyrus for all conditions, and for self-initiation additionally in supplementary motor area, left mid-insula and anterior putamen, independent of effector side. Findings argue for abnormalities of early stages of motor control in FHD, manifesting during movement preparation. Since deficits map to regions involved in the coding of motor programs, we propose that task-specific dystonia is characterized by abnormalities during recruitment of motor programs: these do not manifest at the behavioral level during simple automated movements, however, errors in motor programs of complex movements established by extensive practice (a core feature of FHD), trigger the inappropriate movement patterns observed in task-specific dystonia. PMID:24167610

  8. Abnormal Movement Preparation in Task-Specific Focal Hand Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Scheef, Lukas; Bewersdorff, Malte; Schild, Hans H.; Klockgether, Thomas; Boecker, Henning

    2013-01-01

    Electrophysiological and behavioral studies in primary dystonia suggest abnormalities during movement preparation, but this crucial phase preceding movement onset has not yet been studied specifically with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). To identify abnormalities in brain activation during movement preparation, we used event-related fMRI to analyze behaviorally unimpaired sequential finger movements in 18 patients with task-specific focal hand dystonia (FHD) and 18 healthy subjects. Patients and controls executed self-initiated or externally cued prelearnt four-digit sequential movements using either right or left hands. In FHD patients, motor performance of the sequential finger task was not associated with task-related dystonic posturing and their activation levels during motor execution were highly comparable with controls. On the other hand reduced activation was observed during movement preparation in the FHD patients in left premotor cortex / precentral gyrus for all conditions, and for self-initiation additionally in supplementary motor area, left mid-insula and anterior putamen, independent of effector side. Findings argue for abnormalities of early stages of motor control in FHD, manifesting during movement preparation. Since deficits map to regions involved in the coding of motor programs, we propose that task-specific dystonia is characterized by abnormalities during recruitment of motor programs: these do not manifest at the behavioral level during simple automated movements, however, errors in motor programs of complex movements established by extensive practice (a core feature of FHD), trigger the inappropriate movement patterns observed in task-specific dystonia. PMID:24167610

  9. Determinants of brain activation-induced cortical NAD/NADH responses in vivo.

    PubMed

    Dóra, E; Gyulai, L; Kovách, A G

    1984-05-01

    In order to elucidate that which are the factors that may influence the direction of brain activation-induced changes in the redox state of oxidized/reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD/NADH), the brain cortex was electrically stimulated during arterial hypotension and following reinfusion of the shed blood, during arterial hyper- and hypoxia, and during the second phase of spreading cortical depression (SD). Cerebrocortical NADH fluorescence and vascular volume ( CVV ) of cats, anaesthetized by chloralose, were measured with a microscope fluororeflectometer . Under physiologically normal conditions electrical stimulation resulted in pronounced cortical NAD reduction and increase in CVV . These reactions were not altered by arterial hyperoxia and continuous superfusion of the brain cortex with oxygenated artificial cerebrospinal fluid (mock CSF). Arterial hypotension and SD (in phase II) increased NAD reduction and CVV markedly, and the superimposed electrical stimulation brought about NADH oxidation and greatly depressed CVV responses. Reinfusion of the shed blood did not restore NAD/NADH redox state and CVV to their reference levels, and electrical stimulation under this condition led to NADH oxidation and negligible vascular reactions. Since under physiologically normal conditions electrical activation of the brain cortex resulted in NAD reduction and marked increase in CVV and the magnitude of these reactions were not altered by arterial hyperoxia or by superfusion of the brain cortex with oxygenated CSF, it is very unlikely that the brain cortex became hypoxic during stimulation. Because when the steady NAD/NADH redox state of the brain cortex was shifted toward reduction by arterial hypotension and reinfusion and SD, electrical stimulation led to NADH oxidation, it is suggested that the prestimulatory steady redox state has great importance in determining the direction of NAD/NADH redox reactions evoked by activation of the brain cortex. PMID:6326966

  10. Estrogen-induced uterine abnormalities in TIMP-1 deficient mice are associated with elevated plasmin activity and reduced expression of the novel uterine plasmin protease inhibitor serpinb71

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuan; Hoang, Etter; Nothnick, Warren B.

    2008-01-01

    Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) is a multifunctional protein capable of regulating a variety of biological processes in a wide array of tissue and cell types. We have previously demonstrated that TIMP-1 deficient mice exhibit alterations in normal uterine morphology and physiology. Most notably, absence of TIMP-1 is associated with an altered uterine phenotype characterized by profound branching of the uterine lumen and altered adenogenesis. To begin to assess the mechanism by which TIMP-1 may control these uterine events, we utilized steroid-treated ovariectomized wild-type and TIMP-1 null mice exposed to estrogen for 72 hours. Administration of estrogen to TIMP-1 deficient mice resulted in development of an abnormal uterine histo-architecture characterized by increased endometrial gland density, luminal epithelial cell height, and abnormal lumen structure. To determine the mediators which may contribute to the abnormal uterine morphology in the TIMP-1 deficient mice, cDNA microarray analysis was performed. Analysis revealed that expression of two plasmin inhibitors (serpbinb2 and serbinb7) was significantly reduced in the TIMP-1 null mice. Associated with the reduction in expression of these inhibitors was a significant increase in plasmin activity. Localization of the novel uterine serpinb7 revealed that expression was confined to the luminal and glandular epithelial cells. Further, expression of uterine serpinb7 was decreased by estrogen and showed an inverse relationship with plasmin activity. We conclude from these studies that in addition to controlling MMP activity, TIMP-1 may also control activity of serine proteases through modulation of serine protease inhibitors such as serpinb7. PMID:18537133

  11. Transglutaminase Activity Is Present in Highly Purified Nonsynaptosomal Mouse Brain and Liver Mitochondria†

    PubMed Central

    Krasnikov, Boris F.; Kim, Soo-Youl; McConoughey, Stephen J.; Ryu, Hoon; Xu, Hui; Stavrovskaya, Irina; Iismaa, Siiri E.; Mearns, Bryony M.; Ratan, Rajiv R.; Blass, John P.; Gibson, Gary E.; Cooper, Arthur J. L.

    2008-01-01

    Several active transglutaminase (TGase) isoforms are known to be present in human and rodent tissues, at least three of which, namely, TGase 1, TGase 2 (tissue transglutaminase), and TGase 3, are present in the brain. TGase activity is known to be present in the cytosolic, nuclear, and extracellular compartments of the brain. Here, we show that highly purified mouse brain nonsynaptosomal mitochondria and mouse liver mitochondria and mitoplast fractions derived from these preparations possess TGase activity. Western blotting and experiments with TGase 2 knock-out (KO) mice ruled out the possibility that most of the mitochondrial/mitoplast TGase activity is due to TGase 2, the TGase isoform responsible for the majority of the activity ([14C]putrescine-binding assay) in whole brain and liver homogenates. The identity of the mitochondrial/mitoplast TGase(s) is not yet known. Possibly, the activity may be due to one of the other TGase isoforms or perhaps to a protein that does not belong to the classical TGase family. This activity may play a role in regulation of mitochondrial function both in normal physiology and in disease. Its nature and regulation deserve further study. PMID:15909997

  12. A balancing act of the brain: activations and deactivations driven by cognitive load

    PubMed Central

    Arsalidou, Marie; Pascual-Leone, Juan; Johnson, Janice; Morris, Drew; Taylor, Margot J

    2013-01-01

    The majority of neuroimaging studies focus on brain activity during performance of cognitive tasks; however, some studies focus on brain areas that activate in the absence of a task. Despite the surge of research comparing these contrasted areas of brain function, their interrelation is not well understood. We systematically manipulated cognitive load in a working memory task to examine concurrently the relation between activity elicited by the task versus activity during control conditions. We presented adults with six levels of task demand, and compared those with three conditions without a task. Using whole-brain analysis, we found positive linear relations between cortical activity and task difficulty in areas including middle frontal gyrus and dorsal cingulate; negative linear relations were found in medial frontal gyrus and posterior cingulate. These findings demonstrated balancing of activation patterns between two mental processes, which were both modulated by task difficulty. Frontal areas followed a graded pattern more closely than other regions. These data also showed that working memory has limited capacity in adults: an upper bound of seven items and a lower bound of four items. Overall, working memory and default-mode processes, when studied concurrently, reveal mutually competing activation patterns. PMID:23785659

  13. Low mass-specific brain Na+/K+-ATPase activity in elasmobranch compared to teleost fishes: implications for the large brain size of elasmobranchs.

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, G E; Routley, M H; Renshaw, G M

    2000-01-01

    Elasmobranch fishes have long been noted for having unusually large brains for ectotherms, and therefore may be exceptions to the rule that vertebrates in general devote less than 8% of their resting metabolic rate to the central nervous system. The brain mass of sharks, skates and rays is often several times larger than that of teleost fishes of the same size. Still, the underlying reasons for this have remained unclear. Ion pumping by the Na+/K+-ATPase is the single most energy consuming process in the brain. In this study, Na+/K+-ATPase activity was measured in the brain of four species of elasmobranchs and 11 species of teleosts. While the average brain mass of the elasmobranchs examined was approximately three times that of the teleosts, the mean specific Na+/K+-ATPase activity was only about one-third of that of the teleosts. Thus, the total brain Na+/K+-ATPase activity was similar in elasmobranchs and teleosts. This suggests that the large brain size of elasmobranchs is at least partly related to a low mass-specific rate of brain energy use. PMID:10972129

  14. Objectively Measured Physical Activity Is Associated with Brain Volumetric Measurements in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Klaren, Rachel E.; Hubbard, Elizabeth A.; Motl, Robert W.; Pilutti, Lara A.; Wetter, Nathan C.; Sutton, Bradley P.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Little is known about physical activity and its association with volumes of whole brain gray matter and white matter and deep gray matter structures in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS). Purpose. This study examined the association between levels of physical activity and brain volumetric measures from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in MS. Method. 39 persons with MS wore an accelerometer for a 7-day period and underwent a brain MRI. Normalized GM volume (NGMV), normalized WM volume (NWMV), and deep GM structures were calculated from 3D T1-weighted structural brain images. We conducted partial correlations (pr) controlling for demographic and clinical variables. Results. Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was significantly associated with NGMV (pr = 0.370, p < 0.05), NWMV (pr = 0.433, p < 0.01), hippocampus (pr = 0.499, p < 0.01), thalamus (pr = 0.380, p < 0.05), caudate (pr = 0.539, p < 0.01), putamen (pr = 0.369, p < 0.05), and pallidum (pr = 0.498, p < 0.01) volumes, when controlling for sex, age, clinical course of MS, and Expanded Disability Status Scale score. There were no associations between sedentary and light physical activity with MRI outcomes. Conclusion. Our results provide the first evidence that MVPA is associated with volumes of whole brain GM and WM and deep GM structures that are involved in motor and cognitive functions in MS. PMID:26146460

  15. Measurement of brain activation during an upright stepping reaction task using functional near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Huppert, Theodore; Schmidt, Benjamin; Beluk, Nancy; Furman, Joseph; Sparto, Patrick

    2013-11-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a non-invasive brain imaging technology that uses light to measure changes in cortical hemoglobin concentrations. FNIRS measurements are recorded through fiber optic cables, which allow the participant to wear the fNIRS sensors while standing upright. Thus, fNIRS technology is well suited to study cortical brain activity during upright balance, stepping, and gait tasks. In this study, fNIRS was used to measure changes in brain activation from the frontal, motor, and premotor brain regions during an upright step task that required subjects to step laterally in response to visual cues that required executive function control. We hypothesized that cognitive processing during complex stepping cues would elicit brain activation of the frontal cortex in areas involved in cognition. Our results show increased prefrontal activation associated with the processing of the stepping cues. Moreover, these results demonstrate the potential to use fNIRS to investigate cognitive processing during cognitively demanding balance and gait studies. PMID:23161494

  16. Classification Accuracy of Serum Apo A-I and S100B for the Diagnosis of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Prediction of Abnormal Initial Head Computed Tomography Scan

    PubMed Central

    Blyth, Brian J.; He, Hua; Mookerjee, Sohug; Jones, Courtney; Kiechle, Karin; Moynihan, Ryan; Wojcik, Susan M.; Grant, William D.; Secreti, LaLainia M.; Triner, Wayne; Moscati, Ronald; Leinhart, August; Ellis, George L.; Khan, Jawwad

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The objective of the current study was to determine the classification accuracy of serum S100B and apolipoprotein (apoA-I) for mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and abnormal initial head computed tomography (CT) scan, and to identify ethnic, racial, age, and sex variation in classification accuracy. We performed a prospective, multi-centered study of 787 patients with mTBI who presented to the emergency department within 6?h of injury and 467 controls who presented to the outpatient laboratory for routine blood work. Serum was analyzed for S100B and apoA-I. The outcomes were disease status (mTBI or control) and initial head CT scan. At cutoff values defined by 90% of controls, the specificity for mTBI using S100B (0.899 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.78–0.92]) was similar to that using apoA-I (0.902 [0.87–0.93]), and the sensitivity using S100B (0.252 [0.22–0.28]) was similar to that using apoA-I (0.249 [0.22–0.28]). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for the combination of S100B and apoA-I (0.738, 95% CI: 0.71, 0.77), however, was significantly higher than the AUC for S100B alone (0.709, 95% CI: 0.68, 0.74, p=0.001) and higher than the AUC for apoA-I alone (0.645, 95% CI: 0.61, 0.68, p<0.0001). The AUC for prediction of abnormal initial head CT scan using S100B was 0.694 (95%CI: 0.62, 0.77) and not significant for apoA-I. At a S100B cutoff of <0.060??g/L, the sensitivity for abnormal head CT was 98%, and 22.9% of CT scans could have been avoided. There was significant age and race-related variation in the accuracy of S100B for the diagnosis of mTBI. The combined use of serum S100B and apoA-I maximizes classification accuracy for mTBI, but only S100B is needed to classify abnormal head CT scan. Because of significant subgroup variation in classification accuracy, age and race need to be considered when using S100B to classify subjects for mTBI. PMID:23758329

  17. Mapping brain region activity during chewing: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Onozuka, M; Fujita, M; Watanabe, K; Hirano, Y; Niwa, M; Nishiyama, K; Saito, S

    2002-11-01

    Mastication has been suggested to increase neuronal activities in various regions of the human brain. However, because of technical difficulties, the fine anatomical and physiological regions linked to mastication have not been fully elucidated. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging during cycles of rhythmic gum-chewing and no chewing, we therefore examined the interaction between chewing and brain regional activity in 17 subjects (aged 20-31 years). In all subjects, chewing resulted in a bilateral increase in blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signals in the sensorimotor cortex, supplementary motor area, insula, thalamus, and cerebellum. In addition, in the first three regions, chewing of moderately hard gum produced stronger BOLD signals than the chewing of hard gum. However, the signal was higher in the cerebellum and not significant in the thalamus, respectively. These results suggest that chewing causes regional increases in brain neuronal activities which are related to biting force. PMID:12407087

  18. Brain Electrophysiological Endophenotypes for Externalizing Psychopathology: A Multivariate Approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Casey S. Gilmore; Stephen M. Malone; William G. Iacono

    2010-01-01

    Abnormalities in electrophysiological measures of stimulus-evoked brain activity (including the P3 event-related potential\\u000a (ERP) and its associated delta and theta time–frequency (TF) components), and intrinsic, resting state brain activity (including\\u000a EEG in the beta frequency band) have each been associated with biological vulnerability to a variety of externalizing (EXT)\\u000a spectrum disorders, such as substance use disorders, conduct disorder, and antisocial

  19. Regional Brain Activation During Meditation Shows Time and Practice Effects: An Exploratory FMRI Study†

    PubMed Central

    Baron Short, E.; Kose, Samet; Mu, Qiwen; Borckardt, Jeffery; Newberg, Andrew; George, Mark S.; Kozel, F. Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Meditation involves attentional regulation and may lead to increased activity in brain regions associated with attention such as dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we examined whether DLPFC and ACC were activated during meditation. Subjects who meditate were recruited and scanned on a 3.0 Tesla scanner. Subjects meditated for four sessions of 12 min and performed four sessions of a 6 min control task. Individual and group t-maps were generated of overall meditation response versus control response and late meditation response versus early meditation response for each subject and time courses were plotted. For the overall group (n = 13), and using an overall brain analysis, there were no statistically significant regional activations of interest using conservative thresholds. A region of interest analysis of the entire group time courses of DLPFC and ACC were statistically more active throughout meditation in comparison to the control task. Moreover, dividing the cohort into short (n = 8) and long-term (n = 5) practitioners (>10 years) revealed that the time courses of long-term practitioners had significantly more consistent and sustained activation in the DLPFC and the ACC during meditation versus control in comparison to short-term practitioners. The regional brain activations in the more practised subjects may correlate with better sustained attention and attentional error monitoring. In summary, brain regions associated with attention vary over the time of a meditation session and may differ between long- and short-term meditation practitioners. PMID:18955268

  20. Early microglial activation following neonatal excitotoxic brain damage in mice: a potential target for neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Dommergues, M-A; Plaisant, F; Verney, C; Gressens, P

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies in a mouse model of neonatal excitotoxic brain damage mimicking the brain lesions in human cerebral palsy showed microglial activation within 24 h after intracerebral injection of the glutamatergic analog ibotenate. Using this model, we studied the expression of CD-45 antigen, a marker of blood-derived cells, by these activated microglial cells labeled by Griffonia simplicifolia I isolectin B4. Immunohistochemistry performed during early development of excitotoxic lesions showed that most cells labeled with the isolectin B4 were CD-45-negative, suggesting that these early activated microglial cells were deriving chiefly from resident microglia and not from circulating monocytes. We also directly tested the hypothesis that activated resident microglia and/or blood-derived monocytes play a role in the pathophysiology of excitotoxic brain damage. Repeated i.p. administrations of chloroquine, chloroquine+colchicine, minocycline, or an anti-MAC1 antibody coupled to the toxin saporin before and/or after ibotenate injection induced a significant reduction in the density of isolectin B4-positive cells. This inhibition of resident microglial and/or blood-derived monocytes activation was accompanied by a significant reduction in the severity of ibotenate-induced brain lesions (up to 79% lesion size reduction with the highest minocycline dose) as well as of ibotenate-induced cortical caspase-3 activation (49% reduction). PMID:14568022

  1. The time-course and spatial distribution of brain activity associated with sentence processing.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Jonathan; Pylkkänen, Liina

    2012-04-01

    Sentence comprehension involves a host of highly interrelated processes, including syntactic parsing, semantic composition, and pragmatic inferencing. In neuroimaging, a primary paradigm for examining the brain bases of sentence processing has been to compare brain activity elicited by sentences versus unstructured lists of words. These studies commonly find an effect of increased activity for sentences in the anterior temporal lobes (aTL). Together with neuropsychological data, these findings have motivated the hypothesis that the aTL is engaged in sentence level combinatorics. Combinatoric processing during language comprehension, however, occurs within tens and hundreds of milliseconds, i.e., at a time-scale much faster than the temporal resolution of hemodynamic measures. Here, we examined the time-course of sentence-level processing using magnetoencephalography (MEG) to better understand the temporal profile of activation in this common paradigm and to test a key prediction of the combinatoric hypothesis: because sentences are interpreted incrementally, word-by-word, activity associated with basic linguistic combinatorics should be time-locked to word-presentation. Our results reveal increased anterior temporal activity for sentences compared to word lists beginning approximately 250 ms after word onset. We also observed increased activation in a network of other brain areas, extending across posterior temporal, inferior frontal, and ventral medial areas. These findings confirm a key prediction of the combinatoric hypothesis for the aTL and further elucidate the spatio-temporal characteristics of sentence-level computations in the brain. PMID:22248581

  2. Category-specific brain activation in fMRI during picture naming.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, M; Kwong, K K; Kennedy, W; Rosen, B R; Belliveau, J W

    1995-11-13

    Neuropsychological, computational, and psycholinguistic data suggest the existence of semantic maps, i.e. localized representations of semantic information in the brain. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, this hypothesis was directly tested with a picture naming task involving items from four different semantic categories. Small left lateralized fronto-temporal cortical sites of category-specific activation were found when brain activation signals were averaged. Data suggest the existence of multiple maps coding high-level representations of objects, such that meaningful distinctions, at least in part, govern the physical distribution of cortical semantic storage. PMID:8595181

  3. AGE-DEPENDENT CHANGES IN PLASMA AND BRAIN CHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITIES OF EASTERN BLUEBIRDS AND EUROPEAN STARLINGS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicholas W. Gard; Michael J. Hooper

    1993-01-01

    Age-dependent changes in plasma and brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity were char- acterized in two altricial passerine species: eastern bluebirds (Sialia sialis) and European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris). Plasma acetyicholinesterase (AChE) activity declined rapidly immediately after hatching, while plasma butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) activity increased throughout the nest- ling period. These patterns continued after birds fledged, since the BChE: AChE ratio was higher in

  4. Changes in polyamine levels in rat brain after systemic kainic acid administration: relationship to convulsant activity and brain damage.

    PubMed

    de Vera, N; Artigas, F; Serratosa, J; Martínez, E

    1991-07-01

    We have examined the effects of systemic kainic acid (KA) administration (9 mg/kg, i.p.) on rat behavior, brain damage, and polyamine levels and the action of the specific ornithine decarboxylase inhibitor alpha-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) on these effects. KA elicited convulsant activity in 63% of the animals. In the acute convulsant phase (1-3 h after KA), a rapid decline (-39% at 3 h) of spermidine content in frontal cortex was found. After the acute convulsant phase, levels of hippocampal spermidine and spermine were reduced (-70 and -66%, respectively, at 8 h). A dramatic increase of putrescine content (68.1, 1,382, and 336% at 8 h, 24 h, and 9 days, respectively, after KA) was found, associated with histological signs of cortical brain damage (ischemia and necrosis). There was a close relationship between the concentration of putrescine and signs of delayed toxicity (body weight losses) 24 h and 9 days after KA. DFMO partially antagonized the convulsant activity and reduced the increased putrescine levels to approximately 50% of values in KA-treated animals at 24 h but did not change the pattern of histological damage. The role of polyamines in the early and late phases of KA-induced neurotoxicity is discussed. PMID:2051159

  5. Can brain scans prove criminals unaccountable?

    PubMed Central

    Roache, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Leonard Berlin reports that neuroscientific data play an increasing role in court. They have been used to argue that criminals are not morally responsible for their behaviour because their brains are ‘faulty’, and there is evidence that such data lead judges to pass more lenient sentences. I raise two concerns about the view that neuroscience can show criminals not to be morally responsible: That the brains of (say) violent criminals differ from most people’s brains does not straightforwardly show that violent criminals are less morally responsible. Behavioral states arise inter alia from brain states, and since violent criminals’ behavioral states differ from those of most people, it is unsurprising that violent criminals’ brains should differ from most people’s brains. This no more shows violent criminals to have diminished moral responsibility than differences between the brains of cheerful and uncheerful people show either group to have diminished moral responsibility.Those who view brain abnormalities as evidence of reduced moral responsibility rely on the assumptions that people with normal brains have free will and that we know what sorts of brain activity undermine free will. However, both of these assumptions are highly controversial. As a result, neuroscience is not a reliable source of information about moral responsibility. I conclude that, until we settle whether and under what circumstances brain activity is incompatible with free will, neuroscience cannot tell us anything useful about criminal accountability. PMID:25009758

  6. Visual and audiovisual effects of isochronous timing on visual perception and brain activity.

    PubMed

    Marchant, Jennifer L; Driver, Jon

    2013-06-01

    Understanding how the brain extracts and combines temporal structure (rhythm) information from events presented to different senses remains unresolved. Many neuroimaging beat perception studies have focused on the auditory domain and show the presence of a highly regular beat (isochrony) in "auditory" stimulus streams enhances neural responses in a distributed brain network and affects perceptual performance. Here, we acquired functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measurements of brain activity while healthy human participants performed a visual task on isochronous versus randomly timed "visual" streams, with or without concurrent task-irrelevant sounds. We found that visual detection of higher intensity oddball targets was better for isochronous than randomly timed streams, extending previous auditory findings to vision. The impact of isochrony on visual target sensitivity correlated positively with fMRI signal changes not only in visual cortex but also in auditory sensory cortex during audiovisual presentations. Visual isochrony activated a similar timing-related brain network to that previously found primarily in auditory beat perception work. Finally, activity in multisensory left posterior superior temporal sulcus increased specifically during concurrent isochronous audiovisual presentations. These results indicate that regular isochronous timing can modulate visual processing and this can also involve multisensory audiovisual brain mechanisms. PMID:22508766

  7. Functional Brain Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this analysis is to review a spectrum of functional brain imaging technologies to identify whether there are any imaging modalities that are more effective than others for various brain pathology conditions. This evidence-based analysis reviews magnetoencephalography (MEG), magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), positron emission tomography (PET), and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) for the diagnosis or surgical management of the following conditions: Alzheimer’s disease (AD), brain tumours, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis (MS), and Parkinson’s disease (PD). Clinical Need: Target Population and Condition Alzheimer’s disease is a progressive, degenerative, neurologic condition characterized by cognitive impairment and memory loss. The Canadian Study on Health and Aging estimated that there will be 97,000 incident cases (about 60,000 women) of dementia (including AD) in Canada in 2006. In Ontario, there will be an estimated 950 new cases and 580 deaths due to brain cancer in 2006. Treatments for brain tumours include surgery and radiation therapy. However, one of the limitations of radiation therapy is that it damages tissue though necrosis and scarring. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may not distinguish between radiation effects and resistant tissue, creating a potential role for functional brain imaging. Epilepsy is a chronic disorder that provokes repetitive seizures. In Ontario, the rate of epilepsy is estimated to be 5 cases per 1,000 people. Most people with epilepsy are effectively managed with drug therapy; but about 50% do not respond to drug therapy. Surgical resection of the seizure foci may be considered in these patients, and functional brain imaging may play a role in localizing the seizure foci. Multiple sclerosis is a progressive, inflammatory, demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). The cause of MS is unknown; however, it is thought to be due to a combination of etiologies, including genetic and environmental components. The prevalence of MS in Canada is 240 cases per 100,000 people. Parkinson’s disease is the most prevalent movement disorder; it affects an estimated 100,000 Canadians. Currently, the standard for measuring disease progression is through the use of scales, which are subjective measures of disease progression. Functional brain imaging may provide an objective measure of disease progression, differentiation between parkinsonian syndromes, and response to therapy. The Technology Being Reviewed Functional Brain Imaging Functional brain imaging technologies measure blood flow and metabolism. The results of these tests are often used in conjunction with structural imaging (e.g., MRI or CT). Positron emission tomography and MRS identify abnormalities in brain tissues. The former measures abnormalities through uptake of radiotracers in the brain, while the latter measures chemical shifts in metabolite ratios to identify abnormalities. The potential role of functional MRI (fMRI) is to identify the areas of the brain responsible for language, sensory and motor function (sensorimotor cortex), rather than identifying abnormalities in tissues. Magnetoencephalography measures magnetic fields of the electric currents in the brain, identifying aberrant activity. Magnetoencephalography may have the potential to localize seizure foci and to identify the sensorimotor cortex, visual cortex and auditory cortex. In terms of regulatory status, MEG and PET are licensed by Health Canada. Both MRS and fMRI use a MRI platform; thus, they do not have a separate licence from Health Canada. The radiotracers used in PET scanning are not licensed by Health Canada for general use but can be used through a Clinical Trials Application. Review Strategy The literature published up to September 2006 was searched in the following databases: MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, EMBASE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, CENTRAL, and International Network of Agencies for H

  8. Todd, Faraday and the electrical basis of brain activity.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Edward

    2007-10-01

    The origins of our understanding of brain electricity and electrical discharges in epilepsy can be traced to Robert Bentley Todd (1809-60). Todd was influenced by his contemporary in London, Michael Faraday (1791-1867), who in the 1830 s and 1840 s was laying the foundations of our modern understanding of electromagnetism. Todd's concept of nervous polarity, generated in nerve vesicles and transmitted in nerve fibres (neurons in later terminology), was confirmed a century later by the Nobel Prize-winning work of Hodgkin and Huxley, who demonstrated the ionic basis of neuro-transmission, involving the same ions which had had been discovered by Faraday's mentor, Sir Humphry Davy (1778-1829). PMID:17885273

  9. Social deviance activates the brain's error-monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bo-Rin; Liss, Alison; Rao, Monica; Singer, Zachary; Compton, Rebecca J

    2012-03-01

    Social psychologists have long noted the tendency for human behavior to conform to social group norms. This study examined whether feedback indicating that participants had deviated from group norms would elicit a neural signal previously shown to be elicited by errors and monetary losses. While electroencephalograms were recorded, participants (N = 30) rated the attractiveness of 120 faces and received feedback giving the purported average rating made by a group of peers. The feedback was manipulated so that group ratings either were the same as a participant's rating or deviated by 1, 2, or 3 points. Feedback indicating deviance from the group norm elicited a feedback-related negativity, a brainwave signal known to be elicited by objective performance errors and losses. The results imply that the brain treats deviance from social norms as an error. PMID:22038705

  10. Effects of cyclodiene compounds on calcium pump activity in rat brain and heart.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, B D; Moorthy, K S; Reddy, S R; Desaiah, D

    1989-01-01

    The in vitro and in vivo effects of aldrin, dieldrin, and endrin on calmodulin regulated Ca2+-pump activity in rat brain synaptosomes and heart sarcoplasmic reticulum were investigated. All the 3 cyclodiene compounds inhibited both brain synaptosomal and heart sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-pump activity in vitro in a concentration dependent manner. Calmodulin depleted Ca2+-pump activity was insensitive to the action of toxic compounds. Oral administration of pesticides (0.5-10 mg/kg) to rats similarly decreased the Ca2+-pump activity, in addition to decreasing the levels of calmodulin of both brain and heart thus indicating disruption in membrane Ca2+ transport mechanisms. Exogenous addition of calmodulin (1-20 micrograms) could effectively reverse the pesticide induced inhibition. Ca2+-pump activity is more sensitive to the 3 cyclodiene compounds in brain than in heart. The results of the present study indicate that the cyclodiene compounds may produce neurotoxic effects by altering calmodulin regulated calcium dependent events in neurons. PMID:2536969

  11. Brain activation during phonological and semantic processing of Chinese characters in deaf signers.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanyan; Peng, Danling; Liu, Li; Booth, James R; Ding, Guosheng

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies found altered brain function in deaf individuals reading alphabetic orthographies. However, it is not known whether similar alterations of brain function are characteristic of non-alphabetic writing systems and whether alterations are specific to certain kinds of lexical tasks. Here we examined differences in brain activation between Chinese congenitally deaf individuals (CD) and hearing controls (HC) during character reading tasks requiring phonological and semantic judgments. For both tasks, we found that CD showed less activation than HC in left inferior frontal gyrus, but greater activation in several right hemisphere regions including inferior frontal gyrus, angular gyrus, and inferior temporal gyrus. Although many group differences were similar across tasks, greater activation in right middle frontal gyrus was more pronounced for the rhyming compared to the meaning task. Finally, within the deaf individuals better performance on the rhyming task was associated with less activation in right inferior parietal lobule and angular gyrus. Our results in Chinese CD are broadly consistent with previous studies in alphabetic languages suggesting greater engagement of inferior frontal gyrus and inferior parietal cortex for reading that is largely independent of task, with the exception of right middle frontal gyrus for phonological processing. The brain behavior correlations potentially indicate that CD that more efficiently use the right hemisphere are better readers. PMID:24795593

  12. Dynamics of fMRI signals during human brain activations to a stimulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haiying; Kato, Toshinori; Neves, Carlos

    2001-05-01

    In fMRI memory study, the temporal behavior of BOLD fMRI signals were consistently observed from various brain processing areas at 1.5 Tesla and consistent with the expected functions. Also, all the activations generally exhibit three types of temporal characteristics: short, sustained and delayed responses in relation to the primary stimuli. To address these cerebral multiphasic responses, a suitable functional data analysis scheme has been used, in which the neural response of a specific brain area to a pre-determined stimulation input of some sort was assumed to be linear. The visual memory study was performed on 6 normal subjects on a clinical MR scanner using a 5 min long rapid dynamical whole brain imaging using EPI acquisition during a single memory task, which involved a 45 sec visual presentation of three simple abstract geometric figures to the subject via LCD projector. The results showed that the activations in visual cortex were tightly correlated with the visual stimulus, while the activations detected in interior temporal, entorhinal cortex and inferior temporal area were delayed. Using the new technique, the brian activations were further characterized quantitatively in terms of delay and prolonged response. The resulting effective impulse response functions corresponding to these brain activations revealed much clearly all the temporal components.

  13. Activity in human reward-sensitive brain areas is strongly context dependent.

    PubMed

    Nieuwenhuis, Sander; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; von Geusau, Niels J Alting; Mars, Rogier B; Holroyd, Clay B; Yeung, Nick

    2005-05-01

    Functional neuroimaging research in humans has identified a number of brain areas that are activated by the delivery of primary and secondary reinforcers. The present study investigated how activity in these reward-sensitive regions is modulated by the context in which rewards and punishments are experienced. Fourteen healthy volunteers were scanned during the performance of a simple monetary gambling task that involved a "win" condition (in which the possible outcomes were a large monetary gain, a small gain, or no gain of money) and a "lose" condition (in which the possible outcomes were a large monetary loss, a small loss, or no loss of money). We observed reward-sensitive activity in a number of brain areas previously implicated in reward processing, including the striatum, prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate, and inferior parietal lobule. Critically, activity in these reward-sensitive areas was highly sensitive to the range of possible outcomes from which an outcome was selected. In particular, these regions were activated to a comparable degree by the best outcomes in each condition-a large gain in the win condition and no loss of money in the lose condition-despite the large difference in the objective value of these outcomes. In addition, some reward-sensitive brain areas showed a binary instead of graded sensitivity to the magnitude of the outcomes from each distribution. These results provide important evidence regarding the way in which the brain scales the motivational value of events by the context in which these events occur. PMID:15945130

  14. Immune activation of human brain microvascular endothelial cells inhibits HIV replication in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jieliang; Wang, Yizhong; Wang, Xu; Ye, Li; Zhou, Yu; Persidsky, Yuri

    2013-01-01

    There is limited information about the role of blood-brain barrier (BBB) endothelial cells (ECs) in the central nervous system (CNS) and their innate immunity against HIV. We examined whether brain ECs can be immunologically activated to produce antiviral factors that inhibit HIV replication in macrophages. Human brain microvascular ECs expressed functional toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) that could be activated by polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (PolyI:C), resulting in the induction of endogenous interferon-? (IFN-?) and IFN-?. The TLR3 activation of ECs also induced the phosphorylation of interferon regulatory transcription factor 3 (IRF3) and IRF7, the key regulators of IFN signaling pathway. When supernatant (SN) of PolyI:C-activated EC cultures was applied to infected macrophage cultures, HIV replication was significantly suppressed. This SN action of ECs on HIV was mediated through both IFN-? and IFN-? because antibodies to their receptors could neutralize the SN-mediated anti-HIV effect. The role of IFNs in EC-mediated anti-HIV activity is further supported by the observation that treatment with SN from EC cultures induced the expression of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs: ISG56, OAS-1, and MxA) in macrophages. These observations indicate that brain microvascular ECs may be a key regulatory bystander, playing a crucial role in the BBB innate immunity against HIV infection. PMID:23401273

  15. Brain antioxidant markers, cognitive performance and acetylcholinesterase activity of rats: efficiency of Sonchus asper

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sonchus asper (SA) is traditionally used as a folk medicine to treat mental disorders in Pakistan. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of polyphenolic rich methanolic fraction of SA on cognitive performance, brain antioxidant activities and acetylcholinesterase activity in male rats. Methods 30 male Sprague–Dawley rats were equally divided into three groups in this study. Animals of group I (control) received saline (vehicle), group II received SA (50 mg/kg) body weight (b.w.), and group III treated with SA (100 mg/kg b.w.,) orally in dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) for 7 days. The effect of SA was checked on rat cognitive performance, brain antioxidatant and acetylcholinesterase activities. Evaluation of learning and memory was assessed by a step-through a passive avoidance test on day 6 after two habituation trials and an initial acquisition trial on day 5. Antioxidant potential was determined by measuring activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), contents of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and reduced glutathione (GSH) in whole-brain homogenates. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was determined by the colorimetric method. Results Results showed that 100 mg/kg b.w., SA treated rats exhibited a significant improvement in learning and memory (step-through latency time). SA administration reduced lipid peroxidation products and elevated glutathione levels in the SA100-treated group. Furthermore, salt and detergent soluble AChE activity was significantly decreased in both SA-treated groups. Short-term orally supplementation of SA showed significant cognitive enhancement as well as elevated brain antioxidant enzymes and inhibited AChE activity. Conclusion These findings stress the critical impact of Sonchus asper bioactive components on brain function. PMID:22591917

  16. Brain activity and cognition: a connection from thermodynamics and information theory

    PubMed Central

    Collell, Guillem; Fauquet, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    The connection between brain and mind is an important scientific and philosophical question that we are still far from completely understanding. A crucial point to our work is noticing that thermodynamics provides a convenient framework to model brain activity, whereas cognition can be modeled in information-theoretical terms. In fact, several models have been proposed so far from both approaches. A second critical remark is the existence of deep theoretical connections between thermodynamics and information theory. In fact, some well-known authors claim that the laws of thermodynamics are nothing but principles in information theory. Unlike in physics or chemistry, a formalization of the relationship between information and energy is currently lacking in neuroscience. In this paper we propose a framework to connect physical brain and cognitive models by means of the theoretical connections between information theory and thermodynamics. Ultimately, this article aims at providing further insight on the formal relationship between cognition and neural activity.

  17. Brain but not retinal glial cells have carbonic anhydrase activity in the honeybee drone.

    PubMed

    Walz, B

    1988-02-15

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity was localized histochemically in the retina and brain of the honeybee drone. A positive reaction that could be inhibited with 10(-5) M acetazolamide was found only in brain glial cells such as those in the lamina and medulla of the optic lobes. In the retina, neither the photoreceptors nor the pigmented glial cells showed CA activity. Hence, there is a marked difference between retinal and brain glial cells with respect to those functions thought to be performed by CA. This study extends the range of tissues in which CA has been shown to be localized in glial cells, but the absence of CA from the retina will impose constraints on a general explanation of the role of CA in nervous tissue. PMID:3129680

  18. In Pursuit of Delay-Related Brain Activity for Anticipatory Eye Movements

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Melanie R.; Barnes, Graham R.

    2013-01-01

    How the brain stores motion information and subsequently uses it to follow a moving target is largely unknown. This is mainly due to previous fMRI studies using paradigms in which the eye movements cannot be segregated from the storage of this motion information. To avoid this problem we used a novel paradigm designed in our lab in which we interlaced a delay (2, 4 or 6 seconds) between the 1st and 2nd presentation of a moving stimulus. Using this design we could examine brain activity during a delay period using fMRI and have subsequently found a number of brain areas that reveal sustained activity during predictive pursuit. These areas include, the V5 complex and superior parietal lobe. This study provides new evidence for the network involved in the storage of visual information to generate early motor responses in pursuit. PMID:24039911

  19. Statistic parametric mapping of changes in gene activity in animal brain during acoustic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Amelchenko, E M; Osokin, A A; Zworikina, S V; Chekhov, S A; Lebedev, A E; Voronin, P A; Galatenko, V V; Vetrov, D P; Anokhin, K V

    2013-03-01

    We analyzed the expression of transcription factor c-Fos induced by neural activity in the mouse brain after acoustic stimulation. The brain sections of the animals subjected to acoustic stimulation and controls were immunohistochemically stained for c-Fos protein. Statistical parametric mapping (SPM) was used to identify group differences in the acquired images. c-Fos expression was significantly higher in the auditory cortex, amygdala, and hippocampus CA3 area after tone presentation. The proposed combination of SPM with molecular-biological approach to visualization of transcription in the nerve cells makes it possible to identify the collaborative activation of distant brain structures assumed to be the components of united functional systems. PMID:23658901

  20. Dopamine D4 receptors modulate brain metabolic activity in the prefrontal cortex and cerebellum at rest and in response to methylphenidate

    SciTech Connect

    Michaelides, M.; Wang, G.; Michaelides, M.; Pascau, J.; Gispert, J.-D.; Delis, F.; Grandy, D.K.; Wang, G.-J.; Desco, M.; Rubinstein, M.; Volkow, N.D.; Thanos, P.K.

    2010-07-16

    Methylphenidate (MP) is widely used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Variable number of tandem repeats polymorphisms in the dopamine D4 receptor (D{sub 4}) gene have been implicated in vulnerability to ADHD and the response to MP. Here we examined the contribution of dopamine D4 receptors (D4Rs) to baseline brain glucose metabolism and to the regional metabolic responses to MP. We compared brain glucose metabolism (measured with micro-positron emission tomography and [{sup 18}F]2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose) at baseline and after MP (10 mg/kg, i.p.) administration in mice with genetic deletion of the D{sub 4}. Images were analyzed using a novel automated image registration procedure. Baseline D{sub 4}{sup -/-} mice had lower metabolism in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and greater metabolism in the cerebellar vermis (CBV) than D{sub 4}{sup +/+} and D{sub 4}{sup +/-} mice; when given MP, D{sub 4}{sup -/-} mice increased metabolism in the PFC and decreased it in the CBV, whereas in D{sub 4}{sup +/+} and D{sub 4}{sup +/-} mice, MP decreased metabolism in the PFC and increased it in the CBV. These findings provide evidence that D4Rs modulate not only the PFC, which may reflect the activation by dopamine of D4Rs located in this region, but also the CBV, which may reflect an indirect modulation as D4Rs are minimally expressed in this region. As individuals with ADHD show structural and/or functional abnormalities in these brain regions, the association of ADHD with D4Rs may reflect its modulation of these brain regions. The differential response to MP as a function of genotype could explain differences in brain functional responses to MP between patients with ADHD and healthy controls and between patients with ADHD with different D{sub 4} polymorphisms.

  1. Linking brain-wide multivoxel activation patterns to behaviour: Examples from language and math.

    PubMed

    Raizada, Rajeev D S; Tsao, Feng-Ming; Liu, Huei-Mei; Holloway, Ian D; Ansari, Daniel; Kuhl, Patricia K

    2010-05-15

    A key goal of cognitive neuroscience is to find simple and direct connections between brain and behaviour. However, fMRI analysis typically involves choices between many possible options, with each choice potentially biasing any brain-behaviour correlations that emerge. Standard methods of fMRI analysis assess each voxel individually, but then face the problem of selection bias when combining those voxels into a region-of-interest, or ROI. Multivariate pattern-based fMRI analysis methods use classifiers to analyse multiple voxels together, but can also introduce selection bias via data-reduction steps as feature selection of voxels, pre-selecting activated regions, or principal components analysis. We show here that strong brain-behaviour links can be revealed without any voxel selection or data reduction, using just plain linear regression as a classifier applied to the whole brain at once, i.e. treating each entire brain volume as a single multi-voxel pattern. The brain-behaviour correlations emerged despite the fact that the classifier was not provided with any information at all about subjects' behaviour, but instead was given only the neural data and its condition-labels. Surprisingly, more powerful classifiers such as a linear SVM and regularised logistic regression produce very similar results. We discuss some possible reasons why the very simple brain-wide linear regression model is able to find correlations with behaviour that are as strong as those obtained on the one hand from a specific ROI and on the other hand from more complex classifiers. In a manner which is unencumbered by arbitrary choices, our approach offers a method for investigating connections between brain and behaviour which is simple, rigorous and direct. PMID:20132896

  2. Persistent differences in patterns of brain activation after sports-related concussion: A longitudinal fMRI study

    E-print Network

    Osherson, Daniel

    brain activation differences persist at 2 months after injury in concussed athletes, despite the fact1 Persistent differences in patterns of brain activation after sports- related concussion.D Director, Athletic Medicine Services 134 McCosh Health Center University Health Services Princeton

  3. Brain morphometry by probabilistic Latent Semantic Analysis

    E-print Network

    Castellani, Umberto

    Brain morphometry by probabilistic Latent Semantic Analysis U. Castellani1 , A. Perina1 , V. Murino in or- der to identify morphological abnormalities on brain surface. The overall aim is to improve of different brains [1]. The ultimate goal is to automatically identify structural brain abnormalities

  4. Sandwich masking eliminates both visual awareness of faces and face-specific brain activity through a

    E-print Network

    Sandwich masking eliminates both visual awareness of faces and face-specific brain activity through a sandwich-masking paradigm, a commonly used approach for attenuating conscious awareness of visual stimulus without awareness. The electrophysiological measures revealed that the sandwich masking abolished

  5. An AdaBoost-Based Weighting Method for Localizing Human Brain Magnetic Activity

    E-print Network

    Takiguchi, Tetsuya

    . Takashima, Y. Ariki, T. Imada, J.-F. L. Lin, P. K. Kuhl, M. Kawakatsu, and M. Kotani Kobe University, JapanAn AdaBoost-Based Weighting Method for Localizing Human Brain Magnetic Activity T. Takiguchi, R E-mail: takigu@kobe-u.ac.jp, takashima@me.cs.scitec.kobe-u.ac.jp, ariki@kobe-u.ac.jp Institute

  6. Neural activity and diurnal variation of cortisol: Evidence from brain electrical tomography analysis and

    E-print Network

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Neural activity and diurnal variation of cortisol: Evidence from brain electrical tomography electroencephalographic and cortisol were obtained from healthy and anhedonic groups. Low-resolution electromagnetic found a relationship between current density in beta and gamma bands and steeper cortisol slope

  7. Right Hemisphere Activation of Joke-related Information: An Event-related Brain Potential Study

    E-print Network

    Coulson, Seana

    Right Hemisphere Activation of Joke-related Information: An Event-related Brain Potential Study engages in relatively coarse semantic coding that aids high-level language tasks such as joke words (CRAZY ) preceded either by jokes or nonfunny controls (``Everyone had so much fun jumping

  8. The Relations between Frontal Brain Electrical Activity and Cognitive Development during Infancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Martha Ann; Fox, Nathan A.

    1992-01-01

    Examined the relationship between changes in electroencephalograms and the development of the ability to perform cognitive tasks involving frontal lobe functioning in infants of 7 to 12 months of age. Infants who successfully found a hidden object showed changes in the power of brain electrical activity in the frontal lobe. (BC)

  9. The Physiochemistry of Capped Nanosilver Predicts Its Biological Activity in Rat Brain Endothelial Cells (REBEC4)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The “capping” or coating of nanosilver (nanoAg) extends its potency by limiting its oxidation and aggregation and stabilizing its size and shape. The ability of such coated nanoAg to alter the permeability and activate oxidative stress pathways in rat brain endothelia...

  10. GENERIC BRAIN ACTIVATION MAPPING IN FUNCTIONAL MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING: A NONPARAMETRIC APPROACH

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. J. BRAMMER; E. T. BULLMORE; A. SIMMONS; S. C. R. WILLIAMS; P. M. GRASBYJ; R. J. HOWARD; P. W. R. WOODRUFF; S. RABE-HESKETH

    1997-01-01

    We report a novel method to identify brain regions generically activated by periodic experimental design in functional magnetic resonance imaging data. This involves: 1) registering each of N individual functional magnetic resonance imaging datasets in a standard space; 2) computing the median standardised power of response to the experimental design; 3) testing median standardised power at each voxel against its

  11. How Different Types of Conceptual Relations Modulate Brain Activation during Semantic Priming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sachs, Olga; Weis, Susanne; Zellagui, Nadia; Sass, Katharina; Huber, Walter; Zvyagintsev, Mikhail; Mathiak, Klaus; Kircher, Tilo

    2011-01-01

    Semantic priming, a well-established technique to study conceptual representation, has thus far produced variable fMRI results, both regarding the type of priming effects and their correlation with brain activation. The aims of the current study were (a) to investigate two types of semantic relations--categorical versus associative--under…

  12. Brain Activity of Regular and Dyslexic Readers while Reading Hebrew as Compared to English Sentences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breznitz, Zvia; Oren, Revital; Shaul, Shelley

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine differences among "regular" and dyslexic adult bilingual readers when processing reading and reading related skills in their first (L1 Hebrew) and second (L2 English) languages. Brain activity during reading Hebrew and English unexpected sentence endings was also studied. Behavioral and…

  13. Chronic, Wireless Recordings of Large Scale Brain Activity in Freely Moving Rhesus

    E-print Network

    Cai, Long

    Chronic, Wireless Recordings of Large Scale Brain Activity in Freely Moving Rhesus Monkeys David A integration of signals (LFP, waveform, EMG) recorded from either Plexon or spikes from our wireless system Methods: doi:10.1038/nmeth.2936 #12;Supplementary Figure 7 | Wireless block diagram Each panel shows

  14. Statistical properties of BOLD magnetic resonance activity in the human brain

    E-print Network

    Chen, Chein Chung

    Statistical properties of BOLD magnetic resonance activity in the human brain Chien-Chung Chen-Gaussian properties is highly correlated with the magnitude of head movement of the observers. In all observers. spiral) and magnetic field strength (1.5 vs. 3 T). In most cases, the non-Gaussian tails of the spatial

  15. The influence of sex differences and individual task performance on brain activation during planning

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M. Unterrainer; C. C. Ruff; B. Rahm; C. P. Kaller; J. Spreer; R. Schwarzwald; U. Halsband

    2005-01-01

    Several studies have attempted to identify the neuronal basis of sex differences in cognition. However, group differences in cognitive ability rather than genuine neurocognitive differences between the sexes may account for their results. Here, we compare with functional magnetic resonance imaging the relation between gender, individual task performance, and planning-related brain activation. Men and women preselected to display identical performance

  16. Abstract Recent evidence suggests that brain injury can impair the ability to independently activate shoulder and

    E-print Network

    Abstract Recent evidence suggests that brain injury can impair the ability to independently activate shoulder and elbow muscles. We hypothesized that if muscle activa- tion patterns are constrained coactivation during isometric force generation, especially between elbow flexors and shoulder abduc- tors

  17. Molecular mechanism identified for activation and desensitization of prominent neurotransmitter receptor in the brain

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists at the NIH have used a technique called cryo-electron microscopy to determine a molecular mechanism for the activation and desensitization of ionotropic glutamate receptors, a prominent class of neurotransmitter receptors in the brain and spinal cord that have also been implicated in some cancers.

  18. Effects of citalopram on worry and brain activation in patients with generalized anxiety disorder

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rudolf Hoehn-Saric; Michael W Schlund; Steven H. Y Wong

    2004-01-01

    The effects of auditory statements describing a personal worry on brain activation as measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging were examined in patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) before and after anxiety reduction with citalopram. Six patients were imaged while listening to verbal descriptions of a personal worry or a neutral statement before treatment with citalopram and after 7 weeks

  19. Brain Activation Sequences Following Electrical Limb Stimulation of Normal and Paraplegic Subjects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andreas A. Ioannides; Lichan Liu; Ara Khurshudyan; Roger Bodley; Vahe Poghosyan; Tadahiko Shibata; Jürgen Dammers; Ali Jamous

    2002-01-01

    In current clinical practice the degree of paraplegia or quadriplegia is objectively determined with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and somatosensory-evoked potentials (SSEP). We measured the MEG signal following electrical stimulation of upper and lower limbs in two normal and three clinically complete paraplegic subjects. From the MEG signal we computed distributed estimates of brain activity and identified foci just behind

  20. Brief Report: Brain Activation to Social Words in a Sedated Child with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmody, Dennis P.; Moreno, Rosanne; Mars, Audrey E.; Seshadri, Kapila; Lambert, George H.; Lewis, Michael

    2007-01-01

    A functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study was performed on a 4-year-old girl with autism. While sedated, she listened to three utterances (numbers, hello, her own first name) played through headphones. Based on analyses of the fMRI data, the amount of total brain activation varied with the content of the utterance. The greatest volume…