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Sample records for abnormal cardiac ultrasound

  1. Ultrasound diagnosis of structural abnormalities in the first trimester.

    PubMed

    Dugoff, Lorraine

    2002-04-01

    The advances in ultrasound technology have made it possible to identify fetal structural abnormalities and genetic syndromes in the first trimester. First trimester prenatal diagnosis of fetal central nervous system, renal, gastrointestinal, cardiac, and skeletal abnormalities is reviewed. PMID:11981912

  2. Ictal Cardiac Ryhthym Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Rushna

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac rhythm abnormalities in the context of epilepsy are a well-known phenomenon. However, they are under-recognized and often missed. The pathophysiology of these events is unclear. Bradycardia and asystole are preceded by seizure onset suggesting ictal propagation into the cortex impacting cardiac autonomic function, and the insula and amygdala being possible culprits. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) refers to the unanticipated death of a patient with epilepsy not related to status epilepticus, trauma, drowning, or suicide. Frequent refractory generalized tonic-clonic seizures, anti-epileptic polytherapy, and prolonged duration of epilepsy are some of the commonly identified risk factors for SUDEP. However, the most consistent risk factor out of these is an increased frequency of generalized tonic–clonic seizures (GTC). Prevention of SUDEP is extremely important in patients with chronic, generalized epilepsy. Since increased frequency of GTCS is the most consistently reported risk factor for SUDEP, effective seizure control is the most important preventive strategy. PMID:27347227

  3. Cardiac 4D Ultrasound Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'hooge, Jan

    Volumetric cardiac ultrasound imaging has steadily evolved over the last 20 years from an electrocardiography (ECC) gated imaging technique to a true real-time imaging modality. Although the clinical use of echocardiography is still to a large extent based on conventional 2D ultrasound imaging it can be anticipated that the further developments in image quality, data visualization and interaction and image quantification of three-dimensional cardiac ultrasound will gradually make volumetric ultrasound the modality of choice. In this chapter, an overview is given of the technological developments that allow for volumetric imaging of the beating heart by ultrasound.

  4. Sonography in Hypotension and Cardiac Arrest (SHoC): Rates of Abnormal Findings in Undifferentiated Hypotension and During Cardiac Arrest as a Basis for Consensus on a Hierarchical Point of Care Ultrasound Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Milne, James; Lewis, David; Fraser, Jacqueline; Diegelmann, Laura; Olszynski, Paul; Stander, Melanie; Lamprecht, Hein

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Point of care ultrasound (PoCUS) has become an established tool in the initial management of patients with undifferentiated hypotension. Current established protocols (RUSH and ACES) were developed by expert user opinion, rather than objective, prospective data. PoCUS also provides invaluable information during resuscitation efforts in cardiac arrest by determining presence/absence of cardiac activity and identifying reversible causes such as pericardial tamponade. There is no agreed guideline on how to safely and effectively incorporate PoCUS into the advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) algorithm. We wished to report disease incidence as a basis to develop a hierarchical approach to PoCUS in hypotension and during cardiac arrest. Methods We summarized the recorded incidence of PoCUS findings from the initial cohort during the interim analysis of two prospective studies. We propose that this will form the basis for developing a modified Delphi approach incorporating this data to obtain the input of a panel of international experts associated with five professional organizations led by the International Federation of Emergency Medicine (IFEM). The modified Delphi tool will be developed to reach an international consensus on how to integrate PoCUS for hypotensive emergency department patients as well as into cardiac arrest algorithms. Results Rates of abnormal PoCUS findings from 151 patients with undifferentiated hypotension included left ventricular dynamic changes (43%), IVC abnormalities (27%), pericardial effusion (16%), and pleural fluid (8%). Abdominal pathology was rare (fluid 5%, AAA 2%). During cardiac arrest there were no pericardial effusions, however abnormalities of ventricular contraction (45%) and valvular motion (39%) were common among the 43 patients included. Conclusions A prospectively collected disease incidence-based hierarchy of scanning can be developed based on the reported findings. This will inform an international consensus

  5. A multimodal (MRI/ultrasound) cardiac phantom for imaging experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakoli, Vahid; Kendrick, Michael; Shakeri, Mostafa; Alshaher, Motaz; Stoddard, Marcus F.; Amini, Amir

    2013-03-01

    A dynamic cardiac phantom can play a significant role in the evaluation and development of ultrasound and cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) motion tracking and registration methods. A four chamber multimodal cardiac phantom has been designed and built to simulate normal and pathologic hearts with different degrees of "infarction" and "scar tissues". In this set up, cardiac valves have been designed and modeled as well. The four-chamber structure can simulate the asymmetric ventricular, atrial and valve motions. Poly Vinyl Alcohol (PVA) is used as the principal material since it can simulate the shape, elasticity, and MR and ultrasound properties of the heart. The cardiac shape is simulated using a four-chamber mold made of polymer clay. An additional pathologic heart phantom containing stiff inclusions has been manufactured in order to simulate an infracted heart. The stiff inclusions are of different shapes and different degrees of elasticity and are able to simulate abnormal cardiac segments. The cardiac elasticity is adjusted based on freeze-thaw cycles of the PVA cryogel for normal and scarred regions. Ultrasound and MRI markers were inserted in the cardiac phantom as landmarks for validations. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first multimodal phantom that models a dynamic four-chamber human heart including the cardiac valve.

  6. Pleural abnormalities: thoracic ultrasound to the rescue!

    PubMed Central

    Pathmanathan, Sega; Lakshminarayana, Umesh B.; Avery, Gerard R.; Kastelik, Jack A.; Morjaria, Jaymin B.

    2013-01-01

    Diaphragmatic hernias that are diagnosed in adulthood may be traumatic or congenital in nature. Therefore, respiratory specialists need to be aware of the presentation of patients with these conditions. In this report, we describe a case series of patients with congenital and traumatic diaphragmatic hernias and highlight a varied range of their presentations. Abnormalities were noted in the thorax on the chest radiographs, but it was unclear as to the nature of the anomaly. The findings on thoracic ultrasound conducted by a pulmonologist helped to direct appropriate investigations avoiding unnecessary interventions. Instead of pleural effusions, consolidation or collapse, thoracic computed tomography demonstrated diaphragmatic hernias which were managed either conservatively or by surgery. There is increasing evidence that pulmonary specialists should be trained in thoracic ultrasonography to identify pleural pathology as well as safely conducting pleural-based interventions. PMID:23819018

  7. Pleural abnormalities: thoracic ultrasound to the rescue!

    PubMed

    Aslam, Imran; Pathmanathan, Sega; Lakshminarayana, Umesh B; Avery, Gerard R; Kastelik, Jack A; Morjaria, Jaymin B

    2013-07-01

    Diaphragmatic hernias that are diagnosed in adulthood may be traumatic or congenital in nature. Therefore, respiratory specialists need to be aware of the presentation of patients with these conditions. In this report, we describe a case series of patients with congenital and traumatic diaphragmatic hernias and highlight a varied range of their presentations. Abnormalities were noted in the thorax on the chest radiographs, but it was unclear as to the nature of the anomaly. The findings on thoracic ultrasound conducted by a pulmonologist helped to direct appropriate investigations avoiding unnecessary interventions. Instead of pleural effusions, consolidation or collapse, thoracic computed tomography demonstrated diaphragmatic hernias which were managed either conservatively or by surgery. There is increasing evidence that pulmonary specialists should be trained in thoracic ultrasonography to identify pleural pathology as well as safely conducting pleural-based interventions. PMID:23819018

  8. Ultrasound imaging in teaching cardiac physiology.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Christopher D; Montgomery, Laura E A; Quinn, Joe G; Roe, Sean M; Stewart, Michael T; Tansey, Etain A

    2016-09-01

    This laboratory session provides hands-on experience for students to visualize the beating human heart with ultrasound imaging. Simple views are obtained from which students can directly measure important cardiac dimensions in systole and diastole. This allows students to derive, from first principles, important measures of cardiac function, such as stroke volume, ejection fraction, and cardiac output. By repeating the measurements from a subject after a brief exercise period, an increase in stroke volume and ejection fraction are easily demonstrable, potentially with or without an increase in left ventricular end-diastolic volume (which indicates preload). Thus, factors that affect cardiac performance can readily be discussed. This activity may be performed as a practical demonstration and visualized using an overhead projector or networked computers, concentrating on using the ultrasound images to teach basic physiological principles. This has proved to be highly popular with students, who reported a significant improvement in their understanding of Frank-Starling's law of the heart with ultrasound imaging. PMID:27445285

  9. Ultrasound image guidance of cardiac interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Terry M.; Pace, Danielle F.; Lang, Pencilla; Guiraudon, Gérard M.; Jones, Douglas L.; Linte, Cristian A.

    2011-03-01

    Surgical procedures often have the unfortunate side-effect of causing the patient significant trauma while accessing the target site. Indeed, in some cases the trauma inflicted on the patient during access to the target greatly exceeds that caused by performing the therapy. Heart disease has traditionally been treated surgically using open chest techniques with the patient being placed "on pump" - i.e. their circulation being maintained by a cardio-pulmonary bypass or "heart-lung" machine. Recently, techniques have been developed for performing minimally invasive interventions on the heart, obviating the formerly invasive procedures. These new approaches rely on pre-operative images, combined with real-time images acquired during the procedure. Our approach is to register intra-operative images to the patient, and use a navigation system that combines intra-operative ultrasound with virtual models of instrumentation that has been introduced into the chamber through the heart wall. This paper illustrates the problems associated with traditional ultrasound guidance, and reviews the state of the art in real-time 3D cardiac ultrasound technology. In addition, it discusses the implementation of an image-guided intervention platform that integrates real-time ultrasound with a virtual reality environment, bringing together the pre-operative anatomy derived from MRI or CT, representations of tracked instrumentation inside the heart chamber, and the intra-operatively acquired ultrasound images.

  10. Cardiac Arrhythmias and Abnormal Electrocardiograms After Acute Stroke.

    PubMed

    Ruthirago, Doungporn; Julayanont, Parunyou; Tantrachoti, Pakpoom; Kim, Jongyeol; Nugent, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias and electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities occur frequently but are often underrecognized after strokes. Acute ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes in some particular area of brain can disrupt central autonomic control of the heart, precipitating cardiac arrhythmias, ECG abnormalities, myocardial injury and sometimes sudden death. Identification of high-risk patients after acute stroke is important to arrange appropriate cardiac monitoring and effective management of arrhythmias, and to prevent cardiac morbidity and mortality. More studies are needed to better clarify pathogenesis, localization of areas associated with arrhythmias and practical management of arrhythmias and abnormal ECGs after acute stroke. PMID:26802767

  11. Ultrasound catheters for circumferential cardiac ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diederich, Chris J.; Nau, William H.; Taylor, Kevin; Maguire, Mark T.; Picazo, Guillermo; Gangu, Madhuri; Lesh, Michael D.

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate performance characteristics of a catheter-based ultrasound applicator intended for circumferential ablation of cardiac tissue. The catheter design integrates a cylindrical ultrasound transducer within a distendable water filled balloon in order to produce circumferential lesions at sites in the atria (i.e., pulmonary vein ostia), intended for treatment of certain atrial arrhythmias. Biothermal simulations were used to investigate thermal lesion depths corresponding to variations in applied power, duration, balloon diameter, and acoustic efficiency. Prototype applicators of varying frequency (7 - 12 MHz) and balloon diameter were constructed and characterized using measurements of acoustic efficiency and rotational beam plots. In vitro studies were performed in freshly excised beef hearts to characterize the radial penetration, axial length, and angular uniformity of thermal lesions produced by these applicators. Selected applicators were tested in vivo within pulmonary veins, coronary sinus, and atrial appendage of canine and porcine hearts. These preliminary efforts have indicated that circumferential ablation of cardiac tissue using ultrasound balloon catheters is feasible, and devices between 7 - 12 MHz with balloon diameters of 1.5 - 2.0 cm are capable of producing uniform lesions between 1 - 5 mm depth or greater for treatment durations of 120 seconds or less.

  12. A Retrospective Study of Congenital Cardiac Abnormality Associated with Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Ucpunar, Hanifi; Sevencan, Ahmet; Balioglu, Mehmet Bulent; Albayrak, Akif; Polat, Veli

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To identify the incidence of congenital cardiac abnormalities in patients who had scoliosis and underwent surgical treatment for scoliosis. Overview of Literature Congenital and idiopathic scoliosis (IS) are associated with cardiac abnormalities. We sought to establish and compare the incidence of congenital cardiac abnormalities in patients with idiopathic and congenital scoliosis (CS) who underwent surgical treatment for scoliosis. Methods Ninety consecutive scoliosis patients, who underwent surgical correction of scoliosis, were classified as CS (55 patients, 28 female [51%]) and IS (35 patients, 21 female [60%]). The complete data of the patients, including medical records, plain radiograph and transthoracic echocardiography were retrospectively assessed. Results We found that mitral valve prolapse was the most common cardiac abnormality in both patients with IS (nine patients, 26%) and CS (13 patients, 24%). Other congenital cardiac abnormalities were atrial septal aneurysm (23% of IS patients, 18% of CS patients), pulmonary insufficiency (20% of IS patients, 4% of CS patients), aortic insufficiency (17% of IS patients), atrial septal defect (11% of IS patients, 13% of CS patients), patent foramen ovale (15% of CS patients), dextrocardia (4% of CS patients), bicuspid aortic valve (3% of IS patients), aortic stenosis (2% of CS patients), ventricular septal defect (2% of CS patients), and cardiomyopathy (2% of CS patients). Conclusions We determined the increased incidence of congenital cardiac abnormalities among patients with congenital and IS. Mitral valve prolapse appeared to be the most prevalent congenital cardiac abnormality in both groups. PMID:27114761

  13. Extracting cardiac myofiber orientations from high frequency ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xulei; Cong, Zhibin; Jiang, Rong; Shen, Ming; Wagner, Mary B.; Kirshbom, Paul; Fei, Baowei

    2013-03-01

    Cardiac myofiber plays an important role in stress mechanism during heart beating periods. The orientation of myofibers decides the effects of the stress distribution and the whole heart deformation. It is important to image and quantitatively extract these orientations for understanding the cardiac physiological and pathological mechanism and for diagnosis of chronic diseases. Ultrasound has been wildly used in cardiac diagnosis because of its ability of performing dynamic and noninvasive imaging and because of its low cost. An extraction method is proposed to automatically detect the cardiac myofiber orientations from high frequency ultrasound images. First, heart walls containing myofibers are imaged by B-mode high frequency (<20 MHz) ultrasound imaging. Second, myofiber orientations are extracted from ultrasound images using the proposed method that combines a nonlinear anisotropic diffusion filter, Canny edge detector, Hough transform, and K-means clustering. This method is validated by the results of ultrasound data from phantoms and pig hearts.

  14. Extracting Cardiac Myofiber Orientations from High Frequency Ultrasound Images.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xulei; Cong, Zhibin; Jiang, Rong; Shen, Ming; Wagner, Mary B; Kishbom, Paul; Fei, Baowei

    2013-03-29

    Cardiac myofiber plays an important role in stress mechanism during heart beating periods. The orientation of myofibers decides the effects of the stress distribution and the whole heart deformation. It is important to image and quantitatively extract these orientations for understanding the cardiac physiological and pathological mechanism and for diagnosis of chronic diseases. Ultrasound has been wildly used in cardiac diagnosis because of its ability of performing dynamic and noninvasive imaging and because of its low cost. An extraction method is proposed to automatically detect the cardiac myofiber orientations from high frequency ultrasound images. First, heart walls containing myofibers are imaged by B-mode high frequency (>20 MHz) ultrasound imaging. Second, myofiber orientations are extracted from ultrasound images using the proposed method that combines a nonlinear anisotropic diffusion filter, Canny edge detector, Hough transform, and K-means clustering. This method is validated by the results of ultrasound data from phantoms and pig hearts. PMID:24392208

  15. Cardiac Limited Ultrasound Examination Techniques to Augment the Bedside Cardiac Physical Examination.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Bruce J; Shaw, David J; Amundson, Stan A; Phan, James N; Blanchard, Daniel G; DeMaria, Anthony N

    2015-09-01

    The current practice of physical diagnosis is dependent on physician skills and biases, inductive reasoning, and time efficiency. Although the clinical utility of echocardiography is well known, few data exist on how to integrate 2-dimensional screening "quick-look" ultrasound applications into a novel, modernized cardiac physical examination. We discuss the evidence basis behind ultrasound "signs" pertinent to the cardiovascular system and elemental in synthesis of bedside diagnoses and propose the application of a brief cardiac limited ultrasound examination based on these signs. An ultrasound-augmented cardiac physical examination can be taught in traditional medical education and has the potential to improve bedside diagnosis and patient care. PMID:26269293

  16. Cardiac phase detection in intravascular ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Monica M. S.; Lemos, Pedro Alves; Yoneyama, Takashi; Furuie, Sergio Shiguemi

    2008-03-01

    Image gating is related to image modalities that involve quasi-periodic moving organs. Therefore, during intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) examination, there is cardiac movement interference. In this paper, we aim to obtain IVUS gated images based on the images themselves. This would allow the reconstruction of 3D coronaries with temporal accuracy for any cardiac phase, which is an advantage over the ECG-gated acquisition that shows a single one. It is also important for retrospective studies, as in existing IVUS databases there are no additional reference signals (ECG). From the images, we calculated signals based on average intensity (AI), and, from consecutive frames, average intensity difference (AID), cross-correlation coefficient (CC) and mutual information (MI). The process includes a wavelet-based filter step and ascendant zero-cross detection in order to obtain the phase information. Firstly, we tested 90 simulated sequences with 1025 frames each. Our method was able to achieve more than 95.0% of true positives and less than 2.3% of false positives ratio, for all signals. Afterwards, we tested in a real examination, with 897 frames and ECG as gold-standard. We achieved 97.4% of true positives (CC and MI), and 2.5% of false positives. For future works, methodology should be tested in wider range of IVUS examinations.

  17. Diagnostic accuracy of postnatal ultrasound screening for urinary tract abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Hálek, Jan; Flögelová, Hana; Michálková, Kamila; Smakal, Oldrich; Dubrava, Lubomír; Zapletalová, Jana; Janout, Vladimír

    2010-02-01

    The study was aimed at (1) the determination of the incidence of abnormalities of the urinary tract in newborn infants detected by postnatal ultrasound screening, and (2) the evaluation of the diagnostic accuracy of postnatal ultrasound screening for detecting surgical urinary tract abnormalities. The prospective study was of full-term neonates born in the University Hospital of Olomouc in 2005-2008 who underwent renal ultrasound screening after 72 h of life. Significant findings were recorded. Subsequent diagnostic and therapeutic procedures were recorded and evaluated in a group of children with detected renal pelvic dilatation (RPD). (1) A total of 6,088 newborn infants was examined. The absolute and relative RPD incidence rates (anteroposterior diameter, APD) were as follows: 5-7 mm, 146 (2.4%); 7-10 mm, 70 (1.15%); 10-15 mm, 13 (0.21%), and 15 mm or more, 5 (0.08%). Of those, 16 children were operated on for abnormalities of the urinary tract, of which nine (56%) had been detected by prenatal screening. Other findings: six cases of unilateral renal agenesis, four cases of multicystic renal dysplasia, four of renal dystopia, one of polycystic kidney disease and one of renal hypoplasia. (2) A group of 224 children with postnatally detected RPD was examined, of whom 40 (17.9%) underwent voiding cystourethrography and/or scintigraphy and 16 (7.1%) were treated surgically. The receiver operating characteristic curves were analyzed, and the areas under the curves were calculated. Postnatal renal ultrasound screening is probably a suitable test for detecting significant urinary tract abnormalities. PMID:19856001

  18. Resolution of abnormal cardiac MRI T2 signal following immune suppression for cardiac sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Crouser, Elliott D; Ruden, Emily; Julian, Mark W; Raman, Subha V

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac MR (CMR) with late gadolinium enhancement is commonly used to detect cardiac damage in the setting of cardiac sarcoidosis. The addition of T2 mapping to CMR was recently shown to enhance cardiac sarcoidosis detection and correlates with increased cardiac arrhythmia risk. This study was conducted to determine if CMR T2 abnormalities and related arrhythmias are reversible following immune suppression therapy. A retrospective study of subjects with cardiac sarcoidosis with abnormal T2 signal on baseline CMR and a follow-up CMR study at least 4 months later was conducted at The Ohio State University from 2011 to 2015. Immune suppression treated participants had a significant reduction in peak myocardial T2 value (70.0±5.5 vs 59.2±6.1 ms, pretreatment vs post-treatment; p=0.017), and 83% of immune suppression treated subjects had objective improvement in cardiac arrhythmias. Two subjects who had received inadequate immune suppression treatment experienced progression of cardiac sarcoidosis. This report indicates that abnormal CMR T2 signal represents an acute inflammatory manifestation of cardiac sarcoidosis that is potentially reversible with adequate immune suppression therapy. PMID:27354042

  19. Cardiac abnormalities in end stage renal failure and anaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Morris, K P; Skinner, J R; Wren, C; Hunter, S; Coulthard, M G

    1993-01-01

    Thirteen anaemic children on dialysis were assessed to determine the incidence of cardiac changes in end stage renal failure. Nine children had an increased cardiothoracic ratio on radiography. The electrocardiogram was abnormal in every case but no child had left ventricular hypertrophy as assessed by voltage criteria. However, left ventricular hypertrophy, often gross, was found on echocardiography in 12 children and affected the interventricular septum disproportionately. Cardiac index was increased in 10 patients as a result of an increased left ventricular stroke volume rather than heart rate. Left ventricular hypertrophy was significantly greater in those on treatment for hypertension and in those with the highest cardiac index. Abnormal diastolic ventricular function was found in 6/11 children. Children with end stage renal failure have significant cardiac abnormalities that are likely to contribute to the high cardiovascular mortality in this group. Anaemia and hypertension, or its treatment, probably contribute to these changes. Voltage criteria on electrocardiogram are of no value in detecting left ventricular hypertrophy. Echocardiography must be performed, with the results corrected for age and surface area, in order to detect and follow these abnormalities. Images PMID:8323332

  20. Using Reduced Interference Distribution to Analyze Abnormal Cardiac Signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousa, Allam; Saleem, Rashid

    2011-05-01

    Due to the non-stationary, multicomponent nature of biomedical signals, the use of time-frequency analysis can be inevitable for these signals. The choice and selection of the proper Time-Frequency Distribution (TFD) that can reveal the exact multicomponent structure of biological signals is vital in many applications, including the diagnosis of medical abnormalities. In this paper, the instantaneous frequency techniques using two distribution functions are applied for analysis of biological signals. These distributions are the Wigner-Ville Distribution and the Bessel Distribution. The simulation performed on normaland abnormal cardiac signals show that the Bessel Distribution can clearly detect the QRS complexes. However, Wigner-Ville Distribution was able to detect the QRS complexes in the normal signa, but fails to detect these complexes in the abnormal cardiac signal.

  1. Prenatal diagnostic testing of the Noonan syndrome genes in fetuses with abnormal ultrasound findings.

    PubMed

    Croonen, Ellen A; Nillesen, Willy M; Stuurman, Kyra E; Oudesluijs, Gretel; van de Laar, Ingrid M B M; Martens, Liesbeth; Ockeloen, Charlotte; Mathijssen, Inge B; Schepens, Marga; Ruiterkamp-Versteeg, Martina; Scheffer, Hans; Faas, Brigitte H W; van der Burgt, Ineke; Yntema, Helger G

    2013-09-01

    In recent studies on prenatal testing for Noonan syndrome (NS) in fetuses with an increased nuchal translucency (NT) and a normal karyotype, mutations have been reported in 9-16% of cases. In this study, DNA of 75 fetuses with a normal karyotype and abnormal ultrasound findings was tested in a diagnostic setting for mutations in (a subset of) the four most commonly mutated NS genes. A de novo mutation in either PTPN11, KRAS or RAF1 was detected in 13 fetuses (17.3%). Ultrasound findings were increased NT, distended jugular lymphatic sacs (JLS), hydrothorax, renal anomalies, polyhydramnios, cystic hygroma, cardiac anomalies, hydrops fetalis and ascites. A second group, consisting of anonymized DNA of 60 other fetuses with sonographic abnormalities, was tested for mutations in 10 NS genes. In this group, five possible pathogenic mutations have been identified (in PTPN11 (n=2), RAF1, BRAF and MAP2K1 (each n=1)). We recommend prenatal testing of PTPN11, KRAS and RAF1 in pregnancies with an increased NT and at least one of the following additional features: polyhydramnios, hydrops fetalis, renal anomalies, distended JLS, hydrothorax, cardiac anomalies, cystic hygroma and ascites. If possible, mutation analysis of BRAF and MAP2K1 should be considered. PMID:23321623

  2. Cardiac ultrasonography in structural abnormalities and arrhythmias. Recognition and treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Brook, M M; Silverman, N H; Villegas, M

    1993-01-01

    Fetal cardiac ultrasonography has become an important tool in the evaluation of fetuses at risk for cardiac anomalies. It can both guide prenatal treatment and assist the management and timing of delivery. We recommend that a fetal echocardiogram be done when there is a family history of congenital heart disease; maternal disease that may affect the fetus; a history of maternal drug use, either therapeutic or illegal; evidence of other fetal abnormalities; or evidence of fetal hydrops. The optimal timing of evaluation is 18 to 22 weeks' gestation. An entire range of structural cardiac defects can be visualized prenatally, including atrioventricular septal defect, ventricular septal defect, cardiomyopathy, ventricular outlet obstruction, and complex cardiac defects. The outcome for a fetus with a recognized abnormality is unfavourable, with less than 50% surviving the neonatal period. Fetal cardiac arrhythmias are also a common occurrence, 15% in the series described here. Premature atrial or ventricular contractions are most commonly seen and usually require no treatment. Supraventricular tachycardia can result in hydrops and require in utero treatment to prevent fetal demise. Complete heart block, particularly in association with structural heart disease, has a poor prognosis for fetal survival. Images PMID:8236970

  3. Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Diagnosis of Cor Triatriatum Sinistrum in Pediatric Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Kehrl, Thompson; Dagen, Callie T.; Becker, Brent A.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac arrest in the adolescent population secondary to congenital heart disease (CHD) is rare. Focused cardiac ultrasound (FoCUS) in the emergency department (ED) can yield important clinical information, aid in resuscitative efforts during cardiac arrest and is commonly integrated into the evaluation of patients with pulseless electrical activity (PEA). We report a case of pediatric cardiac arrest in which FoCUS was used to diagnose a critical CHD known as cor triatriatum sinistrum as the likely cause for PEA cardiac arrest and help direct ED resuscitation. PMID:26587102

  4. Cardiac and other abnormalities in the sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Naeye, R L; Whalen, P; Ryser, M; Fisher, R

    1976-01-01

    Many victims of the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) have abnormally heavy cardiac right ventricles. The degree of this abnormality is directly proportional to: a) the mass of muscle about small pulmonary arteries, b) the amount of brown fat retention about adrenal glands, and c) the presence of hepatic erythropoiesis. The pulmonary arterial abnormality is probably the result of chronic alveolar hypoventilation, while brown fat retention and hepatic erythropoiesis are likely consequences of chronic hypoxemia. These abnormalities are found in both SIDS victims who die with and those who die without mild respiratory tract infections. However, there are some differences between the two SIDS groups. Infected victims die at an older age and have smaller thymus glands and larger spleens; there is a greater proportion of males in the infected victims than in the noninfected victims. PMID:1247080

  5. Electrocardiographic abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Goudis, Christos A; Konstantinidis, Athanasios K; Ntalas, Ioannis V; Korantzopoulos, Panagiotis

    2015-11-15

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is independently associated with an increased burden of cardiovascular disease. Besides coronary artery disease (CAD) and congestive heart failure (CHF), specific electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias seem to have a significant impact on cardiovascular prognosis of COPD patients. Disturbances of heart rhythm include premature atrial contractions (PACs), premature ventricular contractions (PVCs), atrial fibrillation (AF), atrial flutter (AFL), multifocal atrial tachycardia (MAT), and ventricular tachycardia (VT). Of note, the identification of ECG abnormalities and the evaluation of the arrhythmic risk may have significant implications in the management and outcome of patients with COPD. This article provides a concise overview of the available data regarding ECG abnormalities and arrhythmias in these patients, including an elaborated description of the underlying arrhythmogenic mechanisms. The clinical impact and prognostic significance of ECG abnormalities and arrhythmias in COPD as well as the appropriate antiarrhythmic therapy and interventions in this setting are also discussed. PMID:26218181

  6. Cardiac Abnormalities in Youth with Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bacha, Fida; Gidding, Samuel S

    2016-07-01

    Childhood obesity has been linked to cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in adulthood. Of great concern is the expected increase in the population's CVD burden in relation to childhood obesity. This is compounded by the risk related to chronic hyperglycemia exposure in youth with type 2 diabetes. We herein provide an overview of the spectrum of early cardiovascular disease manifestation in youth with obesity and type 2 diabetes, in particular abnormalities in cardiac structure and function. Cardiac remodeling and adverse target organ damage is already evident in the pediatric age group in children with obesity and type 2 diabetes. This supports the importance of intensifying obesity prevention efforts and early intervention to treat comorbidities of obesity in the pediatric age group to prevent cardiac events in early adulthood. PMID:27168062

  7. ECG patch monitors for assessment of cardiac rhythm abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Lobodzinski, S Suave

    2013-01-01

    The primary goal of long-term monitoring is the improvement of diagnostic yield. Despite the clear utility of Holter monitoring in clinical cardiology, issues of relatively low diagnostic yield, cost and inconvenience have motivated the development of ultra-portable devices referred to as ECG patch monitors. Although the "gold standard" for assessing cardiac rhythm abnormalities remains a 12-lead Holter, there is an increasing interest in portable monitoring devices that provide the opportunity for evaluating cardiac rhythm in real-world environments such as the workplace or home. To facilitate patient acceptance these monitors underwent a radical miniaturization and redesign to include wireless communication, water proofing and a patch carrier for attaching devices directly to the skin. We review recent developments in the field of "patch" devices primarily designed for very long-term monitoring of cardiac arrhythmic events. As the body of supporting clinical validation data grows, these devices hold promise for a variety of cardiac monitoring applications. From a clinical and research standpoint, the capacity to obtain longitudinal cardiac activity data by patch devices may have significant implications for device selection, monitoring duration, and care pathways for arrhythmia evaluation and atrial fibrillation surveillance. From a research standpoint, the new devices may allow for the development of novel diagnostic algorithms with the goal of finding patterns and correlations with exercise and drug regimens. PMID:24215754

  8. Cardiac arrhythmias produced by ultrasound and contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rota, Claudio

    Ultrasound is used widely in medicine for both diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Ultrasound contrast agents are suspensions of gas-filled microbubbles used to enhance diagnostic imaging. Microbubble contrast agents can increase the likelihood of bioeffects of ultrasound associated with acoustic cavitation. Under certain exposure conditions, the interaction of ultrasound with cardiac tissues can produce cardiac arrhythmias. The general objective of this thesis was to develop a greater understanding of ultrasound-induced premature cardiac beats. The hypothesis guiding this work was that acoustic cavitation is the physical mechanism for the production of arrhythmias with ultrasound. This hypothesis was tested through a series of experiments with mice in vivo and theoretical investigations. Results of this research supported the acoustic cavitation hypothesis. The acoustic pressure threshold for premature beats was significantly lower with microbubble contrast agents present in the blood than without. With microbubbles, the threshold for premature beats was below the current output limits of diagnostic devices. The threshold was not significantly dependent upon contrast agent type and was not influenced by contrast agent dose over three orders of magnitude. Furthermore, the dependence of the threshold on acoustic frequency was consistent with the frequency dependence of acoustic cavitation. Experimentally determined thresholds for premature beats in vivo were in excellent agreement with theoretically estimated thresholds for inertial cavitation. A passive cavitation detector (PCD) was used to measure the acoustic emissions produced by cavitating microbubbles in vivo. A direct correlation between the amplitude of the PCD and the percentage of ultrasound pulses producing a premature beat was consistent with cavitation as a mechanism for this bioeffect. Although this thesis focused on the mechanistic understanding of ultrasound-induced arrhythmias, more persistent

  9. Cardiac repolarization abnormalities and increased sympathetic activity in scleroderma.

    PubMed Central

    Ciftci, Orcun; Onat, Ahmet Mesut; Yavuz, Bunyamin; Akdogan, Ali; Aytemir, Kudret; Tokgozoglu, Lale; Sahiner, Levent; Deniz, Ali; Ureten, Kemal; Kizilca, Guler; Calguneri, Meral; Oto, Ali

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiac involvement in scleroderma is a poor prognostic sign and is usually underdiagnosed, particularly in asymptomatic patient. This paper focuses on QT dynamicity and heart rate variability (HRV) in patients with scleroderma and controls in an attempt to investigate the cardiac autonomic system and ventricular repolarization. METHODS: Sixty patients with scleroderma and 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls who had no cardiovascular risk factors were included in this study. All patients and the controls underwent a 24-hour holter recording as well as a transthoracic echocardiography. HRV and QT dynamicity parameters were calculated. RESULTS: In HRV analysis, autonomic balance was changed in favor of the sympathetic system in patients with diffuse scleroderma. In QT dynamicity analysis, QT/RR slopes were significantly steeper in patients with diffuse scleroderma compared to patients with limited scleroderma and controls (QTapex/RR: 0.24 +/- 0.16, 0.15 +/- 0.03, 0.14 +/- 0.03 respectively p < 0.001; QTend/RR: 0.26 +/- 0.17, 0.14 +/- 0.04, 0.13 +/- 0.05, respectively p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with diffuse scleroderma may have asymptomatic cardiac repolarization abnormalities and autonomic dysfunction. Our results may indicate that QT dynamicity and HRV can be useful noninvasive methods that may detect impaired state of autonomic balance and cardiac repolarization in patients with diffuse scleroderma. PMID:17393947

  10. Pericardial Fat and Echocardiographic Measures of Cardiac Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiankang; Fox, Caroline S.; Hickson, DeMarc A.; May, Warren L.; Ding, Jingzhong; Carr, J. Jeffery; Taylor, Herman A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Pericardial adipose tissue (PAT), a regional fat depot adjacent to the myocardium, may mediate the complex relation between obesity and cardiac left ventricular (LV) abnormalities. We sought to evaluate the association of PAT with echocardiographic measures of LV abnormalities in the Jackson Heart Study (JHS). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 1,414 African Americans (35% men; mean age 58 years) from the JHS underwent computed tomographic assessment of PAT and abdominal visceral adipose tissue (VAT) from 2007 to 2009 and echocardiography examination between 2000 and 2004. Echocardiographic measures of left atrial (LA) internal diameter, LV mass, LV ejection fraction (LVEF), and E-wave velocity-to-A-wave velocity ratio (E/A ratio) were examined in relation to PAT, VAT, BMI, and waist circumference (WC). RESULTS All adiposity measures were positively correlated with LA diameter and LV mass and negatively correlated with E/A ratio (P = 0.02 to 0.0001) and were not with LVEF (P = 0.36–0.61). In women, per 1-SD increment of PAT, we observed association with higher LV mass (9.0 ± 1.7 gm, P = 0.0001) and LA diameter (1.0 ± 0.1 mm, P = 0.0001). However, the magnitude of the association between PAT and cardiac measures was similar compared with VAT (P = 0.65 [LV mass]; P = 0.26 [LA diameter]) and was smallercompared with BMI (P = 0.002 [LV mass]; P = 0.01 [LA diameter]) and WC (P = 0.009 [LA diameter]). CONCLUSIONS PAT is correlated with echocardiographic measures of cardiac LV abnormalities, but the association is not stronger than other adiposity measures. PMID:21228247

  11. Chromosomal abnormalities among children born with conotruncal cardiac defects

    PubMed Central

    Lammer, Edward J.; Chak, Jacqueline S.; Iovannisci, David M.; Schultz, Kathleen; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Yang, Wei; Carmichael, Suzan L.; Shaw, Gary M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Conotruncal heart defects comprise 25%-30% of non-syndromic congenital heart defects. This study describes the frequency of chromosome abnormalities and microdeletion 22q11 associated with conotruncal heart malformations. METHODS From a population base of 974,579 infants/fetuses delivered, 622 Californian infants/fetuses were ascertained with a defect of aortico-pulmonary septation. Infants whose primary cardiac defect was tetralogy of Fallot (n=296) or D-transposition of the great vessels (n=189) were screened for microdeletions of 22q11. RESULTS Fourteen (2.3%) of the 622 infants/fetuses had chromosomal abnormalities. Thirty infants, 10% of those whose primary defect was tetralogy of Fallot, had chromosome 22q11 microdeletions. Right aortic arch, abnormal branching patterns of the major arteries arising from the thoracic aorta, and pulmonary artery abnormalities were observed more frequently in these children. CONCLUSIONS We found an unusual number of infants with an extra sex chromosome and a conotruncal defect. Infants with tetralogy of Fallot due to 22q11 microdeletion showed more associated vascular anomalies than infants with tetralogy but no 22q11 microdeletion. Although these associated vascular anomalies provide clues as to which infants with tetralogy of Fallot are more likely to carry the microdeletion, the overall risk of 10% among all infants with tetralogy of Fallot warrants chromosome analysis and FISH testing routinely. PMID:19067405

  12. Associations between Kidney Function and Subclinical Cardiac Abnormalities in CKD

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chi-yuan; Li, Yongmei; Mishra, Rakesh K.; Keane, Martin; Rosas, Sylvia E.; Dries, Daniel; Xie, Dawei; Chen, Jing; He, Jiang; Anderson, Amanda; Go, Alan S.; Shlipak, Michael G.

    2012-01-01

    Heart failure is a common consequence of CKD, and it portends high risk for mortality. However, among patients without known heart failure, the associations of different stages of estimated GFR (eGFR) with changes in cardiac structure and function are not well described. Here, we performed a cross-sectional analysis to study these associations among 3487 participants of the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study. We estimated GFR using cystatin C. The prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) assessed by echocardiography was 32%, 48%, 57%, and 75% for eGFR categories ≥60, 45–59, 30–44, and <30 ml/min per 1.73 m2, respectively. In fully adjusted multivariable analyses, subjects with eGFR levels of <30 ml/min per 1.73 m2 had twofold higher odds of LVH (OR=2.20, 95% CI=1.40–3.40; P<0.001) relative to subjects with eGFR≥60 ml/min per 1.73 m2. This reduction in kidney function also significantly associated with abnormal LV geometry but not diastolic or systolic dysfunction. An eGFR of 30–44 ml/min per 1.73 m2 also significantly associated with LVH and abnormal LV geometry compared with eGFR≥60 ml/min per 1.73 m2. In summary, in this large CKD cohort, reduced kidney function associated with abnormal cardiac structure. We did not detect significant associations between kidney function and systolic or diastolic function after adjusting for potential confounding variables. PMID:22935481

  13. Automated detection of cardiac phase from intracoronary ultrasound image sequences.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zheng; Dong, Yi; Li, Mengchan

    2015-01-01

    Intracoronary ultrasound (ICUS) is a widely used interventional imaging modality in clinical diagnosis and treatment of cardiac vessel diseases. Due to cyclic cardiac motion and pulsatile blood flow within the lumen, there exist changes of coronary arterial dimensions and relative motion between the imaging catheter and the lumen during continuous pullback of the catheter. The action subsequently causes cyclic changes to the image intensity of the acquired image sequence. Information on cardiac phases is implied in a non-gated ICUS image sequence. A 1-D phase signal reflecting cardiac cycles was extracted according to cyclical changes in local gray-levels in ICUS images. The local extrema of the signal were then detected to retrieve cardiac phases and to retrospectively gate the image sequence. Results of clinically acquired in vivo image data showed that the average inter-frame dissimilarity of lower than 0.1 was achievable with our technique. In terms of computational efficiency and complexity, the proposed method was shown to be competitive when compared with the current methods. The average frame processing time was lower than 30 ms. We effectively reduced the effect of image noises, useless textures, and non-vessel region on the phase signal detection by discarding signal components caused by non-cardiac factors. PMID:26406038

  14. Electrocardiographic abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias in structural brain lesions.

    PubMed

    Katsanos, Aristeidis H; Korantzopoulos, Panagiotis; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Kyritsis, Athanassios P; Kosmidou, Maria; Giannopoulos, Sotirios

    2013-07-31

    Cardiac arrhythmias and electrocardiographic abnormalities are frequently observed after acute cerebrovascular events. The precise mechanism that leads to the development of these arrhythmias is still uncertain, though increasing evidence suggests that it is mainly due to autonomic nervous system dysregulation. In massive brain lesions sympathetic predominance and parasympathetic withdrawal during the first 72 h are associated with the occurrence of severe secondary complications in the first week. Right insular cortex lesions are also related with sympathetic overactivation and with a higher incidence of electrocardiographic abnormalities, mostly QT prolongation, in patients with ischemic stroke. Additionally, female sex and hypokalemia are independent risk factors for severe prolongation of the QT interval which subsequently results in malignant arrhythmias and poor outcome. The prognostic value of repolarization changes commonly seen after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, such as ST segment, T wave, and U wave abnormalities, still remains controversial. In patients with traumatic brain injury both intracranial hypertension and cerebral hypoperfusion correlate with low heart rate variability and increased mortality. Given that there are no firm guidelines for the prevention or treatment of the arrhythmias that appear after cerebral incidents this review aims to highlight important issues on this topic. Selected patients with the aforementioned risk factors could benefit from electrocardiographic monitoring, reassessment of the medications that prolong QTc interval, and administration of antiadrenergic agents. Further research is required in order to validate these assumptions and to establish specific therapeutic strategies. PMID:22809542

  15. Bedside emergency cardiac ultrasound in children

    PubMed Central

    Doniger, Stephanie J

    2010-01-01

    Bedside emergency ultrasound has rapidly developed over the past several years and has now become part of the standard of care for several applications. While it has only recently been applied to critically ill pediatric patients, several of the well-established adult indications may be applied to pediatric patients. One of the most important and life-saving applications is bedside echocardiography. While bedside emergency ultrasonography does not serve to replace formal comprehensive studies, it serves as an extension of the physical examination. It is especially useful as a rapid and effective tool in the diagnosis of pericardial effusions, tamponade and in distinguishing potentially reversible causes of pulseless electrical activity from asystole. Most recently, left ventricular function and inferior vena cava measurements have proven helpful in the assessment of undifferentiated hypotension and shock in adults and children. Future research remains to be carried out in determining the efficacy of bedside ultrasonography in pediatric-specific pathology such as congenital heart disease. This article serves as a comprehensive review of the adult literature and a review of the recent applications in the pediatric emergency department. It also highlights the techniques of bedside ultrasonography with examples of normal and pathologic images. PMID:20930974

  16. Mapping cardiac fiber orientations from high-resolution DTI to high-frequency 3D ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xulei; Wang, Silun; Shen, Ming; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wagner, Mary B.; Fei, Baowei

    2014-03-01

    The orientation of cardiac fibers affects the anatomical, mechanical, and electrophysiological properties of the heart. Although echocardiography is the most common imaging modality in clinical cardiac examination, it can only provide the cardiac geometry or motion information without cardiac fiber orientations. If the patient's cardiac fiber orientations can be mapped to his/her echocardiography images in clinical examinations, it may provide quantitative measures for diagnosis, personalized modeling, and image-guided cardiac therapies. Therefore, this project addresses the feasibility of mapping personalized cardiac fiber orientations to three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound image volumes. First, the geometry of the heart extracted from the MRI is translated to 3D ultrasound by rigid and deformable registration. Deformation fields between both geometries from MRI and ultrasound are obtained after registration. Three different deformable registration methods were utilized for the MRI-ultrasound registration. Finally, the cardiac fiber orientations imaged by DTI are mapped to ultrasound volumes based on the extracted deformation fields. Moreover, this study also demonstrated the ability to simulate electricity activations during the cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) process. The proposed method has been validated in two rat hearts and three canine hearts. After MRI/ultrasound image registration, the Dice similarity scores were more than 90% and the corresponding target errors were less than 0.25 mm. This proposed approach can provide cardiac fiber orientations to ultrasound images and can have a variety of potential applications in cardiac imaging.

  17. Pre-participation cardiovascular screening: is community screening using hand-held cardiac ultrasound feasible?

    PubMed

    Mitchell, A R J; Hurry, R; Le Page, P; MacLachlan, H

    2015-06-01

    We evaluated the feasibility and costs of utilising hand-held cardiac ultrasound (HHCU) as part of a community-based pre-participation cardiovascular screening programme. Ninety-seven school children were screened using a personal history, a physical examination, a resting 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and a HHCU. A consultant cardiologist independently reviewed and reported the data. Previously undiagnosed cardiovascular abnormalities were identified in nine participants (9%). An additional three participants (3%) were diagnosed with hypertension. The nine abnormalities were identified at a cost of £460 per finding, with a cost of £43 per participant screened. The marginal cost of adding a HHCU to the personal history, physical examination and ECG was £16 per participant. Pre-participation screening in the community using hand-held echocardiography is practical and inexpensive. The additional sensitivity and specificity provided by the ultrasound may enhance screening programmes, thereby reducing false positives and the need for expensive follow-up testing. PMID:26693333

  18. Pre-participation cardiovascular screening: is community screening using hand-held cardiac ultrasound feasible?

    PubMed Central

    Hurry, R; Le Page, P; MacLachlan, H

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the feasibility and costs of utilising hand-held cardiac ultrasound (HHCU) as part of a community-based pre-participation cardiovascular screening programme. Ninety-seven school children were screened using a personal history, a physical examination, a resting 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and a HHCU. A consultant cardiologist independently reviewed and reported the data. Previously undiagnosed cardiovascular abnormalities were identified in nine participants (9%). An additional three participants (3%) were diagnosed with hypertension. The nine abnormalities were identified at a cost of £460 per finding, with a cost of £43 per participant screened. The marginal cost of adding a HHCU to the personal history, physical examination and ECG was £16 per participant. Pre-participation screening in the community using hand-held echocardiography is practical and inexpensive. The additional sensitivity and specificity provided by the ultrasound may enhance screening programmes, thereby reducing false positives and the need for expensive follow-up testing. PMID:26693333

  19. Ultrasound Current Source Density Imaging of the Cardiac Activation Wave Using a Clinical Cardiac Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yexian; Li, Qian; Ingram, Pier; Barber, Christy; Liu, Zhonglin

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound current source density imaging (UCSDI), based on the acoustoelectric (AE) effect, is a noninvasive method for mapping electrical current in 4-D (space + time). This technique potentially overcomes limitations with conventional electrical mapping procedures typically used during treatment of sustained arrhythmias. However, the weak AE signal associated with the electrocardiogram is a major challenge for advancing this technology. In this study, we examined the effects of the electrode configuration and ultrasound frequency on the magnitude of the AE signal and quality of UCSDI using a rabbit Langendorff heart preparation. The AE signal was much stronger at 0.5 MHz (2.99 μV/MPa) than 1.0 MHz (0.42 μV/MPa). Also, a clinical lasso catheter placed on the epicardium exhibited excellent sensitivity without penetrating the tissue. We also present, for the first time, 3-D cardiac activation maps of the live rabbit heart using only one pair of recording electrodes. Activation maps were used to calculate the cardiac conduction velocity for atrial (1.31 m/s) and apical (0.67 m/s) pacing. This study demonstrated that UCSDI is potentially capable of real-time 3-D cardiac activation wave mapping, which would greatly facilitate ablation procedures for treatment of arrhythmias. PMID:25122512

  20. Augmenting CT cardiac roadmaps with segmented streaming ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Qi; Shechter, Guy; Gutiérrez, Luis F.; Stanton, Douglas; Zagorchev, Lyubomir; Laine, Andrew F.; Elgort, Daniel R.

    2007-03-01

    Static X-ray computed tomography (CT) volumes are often used as anatomic roadmaps during catheter-based cardiac interventions performed under X-ray fluoroscopy guidance. These CT volumes provide a high-resolution depiction of soft-tissue structures, but at only a single point within the cardiac and respiratory cycles. Augmenting these static CT roadmaps with segmented myocardial borders extracted from live ultrasound (US) provides intra-operative access to real-time dynamic information about the cardiac anatomy. In this work, using a customized segmentation method based on a 3D active mesh, endocardial borders of the left ventricle were extracted from US image streams (4D data sets) at a frame rate of approximately 5 frames per second. The coordinate systems for CT and US modalities were registered using rigid body registration based on manually selected landmarks, and the segmented endocardial surfaces were overlaid onto the CT volume. The root-mean squared fiducial registration error was 3.80 mm. The accuracy of the segmentation was quantitatively evaluated in phantom and human volunteer studies via comparison with manual tracings on 9 randomly selected frames using a finite-element model (the US image resolutions of the phantom and volunteer data were 1.3 x 1.1 x 1.3 mm and 0.70 x 0.82 x 0.77 mm, respectively). This comparison yielded 3.70+/-2.5 mm (approximately 3 pixels) root-mean squared error (RMSE) in a phantom study and 2.58+/-1.58 mm (approximately 3 pixels) RMSE in a clinical study. The combination of static anatomical roadmap volumes and dynamic intra-operative anatomic information will enable better guidance and feedback for image-guided minimally invasive cardiac interventions.

  1. Pocket-sized focused cardiac ultrasound: strengths and limitations.

    PubMed

    Mirabel, Mariana; Celermajer, David; Beraud, Anne-Sophie; Jouven, Xavier; Marijon, Eloi; Hagège, Albert A

    2015-03-01

    Focused cardiac ultrasound (FCU) has emerged in recent years and has created new possibilities in the clinical assessment of patients both in and out of hospital. The increasing portability of echocardiographic devices, with some now only the size of a smartphone, has widened the spectrum of potential indications and users, from the senior cardiologist to the medical student. However, many issues still need to be addressed, especially the acknowledgment of the advantages and limitations of using such devices for FCU, and the extent of training required in this rapidly evolving field. In recent years, an increasing number of studies involving FCU have been published with variable results. This review outlines the evidence for the use of FCU with pocket-echo to address specific questions in daily clinical practice. PMID:25747662

  2. New developments in paediatric cardiac functional ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    de Korte, Chris L; Nillesen, Maartje M; Saris, Anne E C M; Lopata, Richard G P; Thijssen, Johan M; Kapusta, Livia

    2014-07-01

    Ultrasound imaging can be used to estimate the morphology as well as the motion and deformation of tissues. If the interrogated tissue is actively deforming, this deformation is directly related to its function and quantification of this deformation is normally referred as 'strain imaging'. Tissue can also be deformed by applying an internal or external force and the resulting, induced deformation is a function of the mechanical tissue characteristics. In combination with the load applied, these strain maps can be used to estimate or reconstruct the mechanical properties of tissue. This technique was named 'elastography' by Ophir et al. in 1991. Elastography can be used for atherosclerotic plaque characterisation, while the contractility of the heart or skeletal muscles can be assessed with strain imaging. Rather than using the conventional video format (DICOM) image information, radio frequency (RF)-based ultrasound methods enable estimation of the deformation at higher resolution and with higher precision than commercial methods using Doppler (tissue Doppler imaging) or video image data (2D speckle tracking methods). However, the improvement in accuracy is mainly achieved when measuring strain along the ultrasound beam direction, so it has to be considered a 1D technique. Recently, this method has been extended to multiple directions and precision further improved by using spatial compounding of data acquired at multiple beam steered angles. Using similar techniques, the blood velocity and flow can be determined. RF-based techniques are also beneficial for automated segmentation of the ventricular cavities. In this paper, new developments in different techniques of quantifying cardiac function by strain imaging, automated segmentation, and methods of performing blood flow imaging are reviewed and their application in paediatric cardiology is discussed. PMID:27277901

  3. Abnormal Cardiac Autonomic Regulation in Mice Lacking ASIC3

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ching-Feng; Kuo, Terry B. J.; Chen, Wei-Nan

    2014-01-01

    Integration of sympathetic and parasympathetic outflow is essential in maintaining normal cardiac autonomic function. Recent studies demonstrate that acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3) is a sensitive acid sensor for cardiac ischemia and prolonged mild acidification can open ASIC3 and evoke a sustained inward current that fires action potentials in cardiac sensory neurons. However, the physiological role of ASIC3 in cardiac autonomic regulation is not known. In this study, we elucidate the role of ASIC3 in cardiac autonomic function using Asic3−/− mice. Asic3−/− mice showed normal baseline heart rate and lower blood pressure as compared with their wild-type littermates. Heart rate variability analyses revealed imbalanced autonomic regulation, with decreased sympathetic function. Furthermore, Asic3−/− mice demonstrated a blunted response to isoproterenol-induced cardiac tachycardia and prolonged duration to recover to baseline heart rate. Moreover, quantitative RT-PCR analysis of gene expression in sensory ganglia and heart revealed that no gene compensation for muscarinic acetylcholines receptors and beta-adrenalin receptors were found in Asic3−/− mice. In summary, we unraveled an important role of ASIC3 in regulating cardiac autonomic function, whereby loss of ASIC3 alters the normal physiological response to ischemic stimuli, which reveals new implications for therapy in autonomic nervous system-related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24804235

  4. Abnormal cardiac autonomic regulation in mice lacking ASIC3.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ching-Feng; Kuo, Terry B J; Chen, Wei-Nan; Lin, Chao-Chieh; Chen, Chih-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Integration of sympathetic and parasympathetic outflow is essential in maintaining normal cardiac autonomic function. Recent studies demonstrate that acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3) is a sensitive acid sensor for cardiac ischemia and prolonged mild acidification can open ASIC3 and evoke a sustained inward current that fires action potentials in cardiac sensory neurons. However, the physiological role of ASIC3 in cardiac autonomic regulation is not known. In this study, we elucidate the role of ASIC3 in cardiac autonomic function using Asic3(-/-) mice. Asic3(-/-) mice showed normal baseline heart rate and lower blood pressure as compared with their wild-type littermates. Heart rate variability analyses revealed imbalanced autonomic regulation, with decreased sympathetic function. Furthermore, Asic3(-/-) mice demonstrated a blunted response to isoproterenol-induced cardiac tachycardia and prolonged duration to recover to baseline heart rate. Moreover, quantitative RT-PCR analysis of gene expression in sensory ganglia and heart revealed that no gene compensation for muscarinic acetylcholines receptors and beta-adrenalin receptors were found in Asic3(-/-) mice. In summary, we unraveled an important role of ASIC3 in regulating cardiac autonomic function, whereby loss of ASIC3 alters the normal physiological response to ischemic stimuli, which reveals new implications for therapy in autonomic nervous system-related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24804235

  5. Cardiac Gene Expression Knockdown Using Small Inhibitory RNA-Loaded Microbubbles and Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Kopechek, Jonathan A; Carson, Andrew R; McTiernan, Charles F; Chen, Xucai; Klein, Edwin C; Villanueva, Flordeliza S

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference has potential therapeutic value for cardiac disease, but targeted delivery of interfering RNA is a challenge. Custom designed microbubbles, in conjunction with ultrasound, can deliver small inhibitory RNA to target tissues in vivo. The efficacy of cardiac RNA interference using a microbubble-ultrasound theranostic platform has not been demonstrated in vivo. Therefore, our objective was to test the hypothesis that custom designed microbubbles and ultrasound can mediate effective delivery of small inhibitory RNA to the heart. Microbubble and ultrasound mediated cardiac RNA interference was tested in transgenic mice displaying cardiac-restricted luciferase expression. Luciferase expression was assayed in select tissues of untreated mice (n = 14). Mice received intravenous infusion of cationic microbubbles bearing small inhibitory RNA directed against luciferase (n = 9) or control RNA (n = 8) during intermittent cardiac-directed ultrasound at mechanical index of 1.6. Simultaneous echocardiography in a separate group of mice (n = 3) confirmed microbubble destruction and replenishment during treatment. Three days post treatment, cardiac luciferase messenger RNA and protein levels were significantly lower in ultrasound-treated mice receiving microbubbles loaded with small inhibitory RNA directed against luciferase compared to mice receiving microbubbles bearing control RNA (23±7% and 33±7% of control mice, p<0.01 and p = 0.03, respectively). Passive cavitation detection focused on the heart confirmed that insonification resulted in inertial cavitation. In conclusion, small inhibitory RNA-loaded microbubbles and ultrasound directed at the heart significantly reduced the expression of a reporter gene. Ultrasound-targeted destruction of RNA-loaded microbubbles may be an effective image-guided strategy for therapeutic RNA interference in cardiac disease. PMID:27471848

  6. Cardiac Gene Expression Knockdown Using Small Inhibitory RNA-Loaded Microbubbles and Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    McTiernan, Charles F.; Chen, Xucai; Klein, Edwin C.; Villanueva, Flordeliza S.

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference has potential therapeutic value for cardiac disease, but targeted delivery of interfering RNA is a challenge. Custom designed microbubbles, in conjunction with ultrasound, can deliver small inhibitory RNA to target tissues in vivo. The efficacy of cardiac RNA interference using a microbubble-ultrasound theranostic platform has not been demonstrated in vivo. Therefore, our objective was to test the hypothesis that custom designed microbubbles and ultrasound can mediate effective delivery of small inhibitory RNA to the heart. Microbubble and ultrasound mediated cardiac RNA interference was tested in transgenic mice displaying cardiac-restricted luciferase expression. Luciferase expression was assayed in select tissues of untreated mice (n = 14). Mice received intravenous infusion of cationic microbubbles bearing small inhibitory RNA directed against luciferase (n = 9) or control RNA (n = 8) during intermittent cardiac-directed ultrasound at mechanical index of 1.6. Simultaneous echocardiography in a separate group of mice (n = 3) confirmed microbubble destruction and replenishment during treatment. Three days post treatment, cardiac luciferase messenger RNA and protein levels were significantly lower in ultrasound-treated mice receiving microbubbles loaded with small inhibitory RNA directed against luciferase compared to mice receiving microbubbles bearing control RNA (23±7% and 33±7% of control mice, p<0.01 and p = 0.03, respectively). Passive cavitation detection focused on the heart confirmed that insonification resulted in inertial cavitation. In conclusion, small inhibitory RNA-loaded microbubbles and ultrasound directed at the heart significantly reduced the expression of a reporter gene. Ultrasound-targeted destruction of RNA-loaded microbubbles may be an effective image-guided strategy for therapeutic RNA interference in cardiac disease. PMID:27471848

  7. Ultrasound and Cadaveric Prosections as Methods for Teaching Cardiac Anatomy: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griksaitis, Michael J.; Sawdon, Marina A.; Finn, Gabrielle M.

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the efficacy of two cardiac anatomy teaching modalities, ultrasound imaging and cadaveric prosections, for learning cardiac gross anatomy. One hundred and eight first-year medical students participated. Two weeks prior to the teaching intervention, students completed a pretest to assess their prior knowledge and to ensure that…

  8. Echocardiographic abnormalities in the assessment of cardiac organ damage in never-treated hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Milan, Alberto; Avenatti, Eleonora; Puglisi, Elisabetta; Abram, Sara; Magnino, Corrado; Naso, Diego; Tosello, Francesco; Fabbri, Ambra; Vairo, Alessandro; Mulatero, Paolo; Rabbia, Franco; Veglio, Franco

    2012-01-01

    Hypertension-related cardiac organ damage, other than left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy (LVH), has been described: in particular, concentric remodeling, LV diastolic dysfunction (DD), and left atrial (LA) enlargement are significantly associated with cardiovascular morbility and mortality in different populations. This study evaluated the prevalence of these latter morphofunctional abnormalities, in never-treated essential hypertensive patients and the role of such a serial assessment of hypertensive cardiac damage in improving cardiovascular risk stratification in these patients. A total of 100 never-treated essential hypertensive subjects underwent a complete clinical and echocardiographic evaluation. Left ventricular morphology, systolic and diastolic function, and LA dimension (linear and volume) were evaluated by echocardiography. Left ventricular hypertrophy was present in 14% of the patients, whereas concentric remodeling was present in 25% of the subjects. Among patients free from LV morphology abnormalities, the most frequent abnormality was LA enlargement (global prevalence 57%); the percentage of patients with at least one parameter consistent with DD was 22% in the entire population, but DD was present as the only cardiac abnormality in 1% of our patient. Left atrial volume indexed for body surface area was the most sensitive parameter in identifying hypertension-related cardiac modification. The global prevalence of cardiac alteration reached 73% in never-treated hypertensive patients. Left ventricular remodeling and LA enlargement evaluation may grant a better assessment of cardiac organ damage and cardiovascular risk stratification of hypertensive patients without evidence of LVH after routine examination. PMID:22738434

  9. Unusual association between cardiac, skeletal, urogenital and renal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Goryaeva, Maria; Sykes, Mark Christopher; Lau, Benjamin; West, Simon

    2016-01-01

    We present a 33-year-old woman with an array of congenital abnormalities. She has been diagnosed with polycystic kidney disease (PCKD) with no detectable mutations in PKD1 or PKD2, spina bifida occulta, thoracic skeletal abnormalities, a uterus didelphys and a patent foramen ovale (PFO). There are several associations reported in the literature that include abnormalities similar to the patient's, but none describe her presentation in its entirety. The MURCS association is characterised by (MU)llerian duct aplasia, (R)enal dysplasia and (C)ervical (S)omite anomalies and goes some way in explaining these condition. Patients with both MURCS and PCKD have not been described in current literature. Through this report, we hope to bring a potential diagnosis to light and provide the patient with an improved understanding of her health. PMID:27402585

  10. Contrast imaging ultrasound detects abnormalities in the marmoset ovary.

    PubMed

    Hastings, J M; Morris, K D; Allan, D; Wilson, H; Millar, R P; Fraser, H M; Moran, C M

    2012-12-01

    The development of a functional vascular tree within the primate ovary is critical for reproductive health. To determine the efficacy of contrast agents to image the microvascular environment within the primate ovary, contrast ultrasonography was performed in six reproductive-aged female common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) during the late luteal phase of the cycle, following injection of Sonovue™. Regions of interest (ROIs), representing the corpus luteum (CL) and noncorpus luteum ovarian tissue (NCLOT), were selected during gray-scale B-mode ultrasound imaging. The magnitude of backscatter intensity of CL and NCLOT ROIs were calculated in XnView, post hoc: subsequent gamma-variate modeling was implemented in Matlab to determine perfusion parameters. Histological analysis of these ovaries revealed a total of 11 CL, nine of which were identified during contrast ultrasonography. The median enhancement ratio was significantly increased in the CL (5.54AU; 95% CI -2.21-68.71) compared to the NCLOT (2.82AU; 95% CI 2.73-15.06; P < 0.05). There was no difference in time parameters between the CL and NCLOT. An additional avascular ROI was identified in the ovary of Animal 5, both histologically and by ultrasonography. This cystic ROI displayed a markedly lower enhancement ratio (0.79AU) and higher time parameters than mean CL and NCLOT, including time to peak and time to wash out. These data demonstrate, for the first time, the ability of commercially available contrast agents, to differentiate structures within the nonhuman primate ovary. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography has a promising future in reproductive medicine. PMID:22890799

  11. Using Ultrasound to Teach Medical Students Cardiac Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Floyd E., III; Wilson, L. Britt; Hoppmann, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound is being incorporated more into undergraduate medical education. Studies have shown that medical students have positive perceptions about the value of ultrasound in teaching courses like anatomy and physiology. The purpose of the present study was to provide objective evidence of whether ultrasound helps students learn cardiac…

  12. Cardiac, skeletal, and ocular abnormalities in patients with Marfan's syndrome and in their relatives. Comparison with the cardiac abnormalities in patients with kyphoscoliosis.

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, L; Tredici, S; Mangiavacchi, M; Colombo, V; Mazzotta, G F; Sirtori, C R

    1984-01-01

    Polygraphic (including apexcardiograms and carotid pulse tracings) and M mode echocardiographic examinations were carried out in 34 symptomatic patients with Marfan's syndrome; similar studies were performed in 32 relatives and in 34 young patients with kyphoscoliotic disease. The purpose of these investigations was to determine the association between cardiac and oculoskeletal abnormalities and to identify specific patterns of disease with a poor prognosis. Polygraphic tests showed significant changes in all patients with Marfan's syndrome: 74% showed the apical systolic click and murmur of mitral valve prolapse; 48% had the diastolic murmur of aortic regurgitation; isolated mitral valve prolapse was found in 52%, 26% had isolated aortic regurgitation, and 22% had a combination of the two. Echocardiographic changes were also found in all patients: 79% had aortic root dilatation; 48% fluttering of the anterior mitral leaflet; 79% mitral valve prolapse, mostly pansystolic; 34% both mitral prolapse and aortic root dilatation; and 34% left ventricular dilatation. The severities of the cardiac and oculoskeletal abnormalities were not correlated. The high prevalence of mitral valve prolapse found in these patients, which did not vary with age or sex, was also present in their relatives: mitral prolapse was present in 38% and aortic dilatation, with or without regurgitation, in 14%. Four of the relatives had clearcut Marfan's syndrome, and at least four others a forme fruste. The metacarpal index was abnormal in 41% of the relatives; ocular abnormalities were rare. In kyphoscoliotic patients only an increase in the prevalence of mitral prolapse (18.2% in women, none in men) was found. These findings underline a complex pattern of association between cardiac, ocular, and skeletal abnormalities in patients with Marfan's syndrome and confirm an appreciable inheritability of several of the markers of the disease. Images PMID:6691872

  13. Abnormal Myocardial Blood Flow Reserve Observed in Cardiac Amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Nel, Karen; Senior, Roxy; Greaves, Kim

    2016-01-01

    We performed real-time myocardial contrast echocardiography on a patient with cardiac amyloidosis and previous normal coronary angiography presenting with atypical chest pain to assess myocardial blood flow reserve (MBFR). Myocardial contrast echocardiography was performed and flash microbubble destruction and replenishment analysis was used to calculate myocardial blood flow. Dipyridamole was used to achieve hyperemia. MBFR was derived from the ratio of peak myocardial blood flow at hyperemia and rest. The results show a marked reduction in MBFR in our patient. Previous reports of luminal obstruction of intramyocardial rather than epicardial vessels by amyloid deposition may be causing microvascular dysfunction. PMID:27081447

  14. Improving the performance of cardiac abnormality detection from PCG signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sujit, N. R.; Kumar, C. Santhosh; Rajesh, C. B.

    2016-03-01

    The Phonocardiogram (PCG) signal contains important information about the condition of heart. Using PCG signal analysis prior recognition of coronary illness can be done. In this work, we developed a biomedical system for the detection of abnormality in heart and methods to enhance the performance of the system using SMOTE and AdaBoost technique have been presented. Time and frequency domain features extracted from the PCG signal is input to the system. The back-end classifier to the system developed is Decision Tree using CART (Classification and Regression Tree), with an overall classification accuracy of 78.33% and sensitivity (alarm accuracy) of 40%. Here sensitivity implies the precision obtained from classifying the abnormal heart sound, which is an essential parameter for a system. We further improve the performance of baseline system using SMOTE and AdaBoost algorithm. The proposed approach outperforms the baseline system by an absolute improvement in overall accuracy of 5% and sensitivity of 44.92%.

  15. Determining cardiac fiber orientation using FSL and registered ultrasound/DTI volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dormer, James; Qin, Xulei; Shen, Ming; Wang, Silun; Zhang, Xiaodong; Jiang, Rong; Wagner, Mary B.; Fei, Baowei

    2016-04-01

    Accurate extraction of cardiac fiber orientation from diffusion tensor imaging is important for determining heart structure and function. However, the acquisition of magnetic resonance (MR) diffusion tensor images is costly and time consuming. By comparison, cardiac ultrasound imaging is rapid and relatively inexpensive, but it lacks the capability to directly measure fiber orientations. In order to create a detailed heart model from ultrasound data, a three-dimensional (3D) diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with known fiber orientations can be registered to an ultrasound volume through a geometric mask. After registration, the cardiac orientations from the template DTI can be mapped to the heart using a deformable transformation field. This process depends heavily on accurate fiber orientation extraction from the DTI. In this study, we use the FMRIB Software Library (FSL) to determine cardiac fiber orientations in diffusion weighted images. For the registration between ultrasound and MRI volumes, we achieved an average Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) of 81.6+/-2.1%. For the estimation of fiber orientations from the proposed method, we achieved an acute angle error (AAE) of 22.7+/-3.1° as compared to the direct measurements from DTI. This work provides a new approach to generate cardiac fiber orientation that may be used for many cardiac applications.

  16. Abnormal Heart Rate Turbulence Predicts Cardiac Mortality in Low, Intermediate and High Risk Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Phyllis K.; Barzilay, Joshua I.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction We examined whether heart rate turbulence (HRT) adds to traditional risk factors for cardiac mortality in older adults at low, intermediate and high risk. Methods and Results N=1298, age ≥65 years, with 24-hour Holter recordings were studied. HRT, which quantifies heart rate response to ventricular premature contractions, was categorized as: both turbulence onset (TO) and turbulence slope (TS) normal; TO abnormal; TS abnormal; or both abnormal. Independent risks for cardiac mortality associated with HRT or, for comparison, elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) (>3.0 mg/L), were calculated using Cox regression analysis adjusted for traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors and stratified by the presence of no, isolated subclinical (i.e., intermediate risk) or clinical CVD. Having both TS and TO abnormal compared to both normal was associated with cardiac mortality in the low risk group [HR 7.9, 95% CI 2.8–22.5, (p<0.001)]. In the high and intermediate risk groups, abnormal TS and TO ([HR 2.2, 95% CI 1.5–4.0, p=0.016] and [HR 2.7, 95% CI 1.2–5.9, p=0.012]), respectively, were also significantly associated with cardiac mortality. In contrast, elevated CRP was associated with increased cardiac mortality risk only in low risk individuals [HR 2.5, 95% CI 1.3–5.1, p=0.009]. In the low risk group, the c-statistic was 0.706 for the base model, 0.725 for the base model with CRP, and 0.767 for the base model with HRT. Conclusions Abnormal HRT independently adds to risk stratification of low, intermediate and high risk individuals but appears to add especially to the stratification of those considered at low risk. PMID:21134026

  17. Ultrasound screening of periarticular soft tissue abnormality around metal-on-metal bearings.

    PubMed

    Nishii, Takashi; Sakai, Takashi; Takao, Masaki; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Sugano, Nobuhiko

    2012-06-01

    Although metal hypersensitivity or pseudotumors are concerns for metal-on-metal (MoM) bearings, detailed pathologies of patterns, severity, and incidence of periprosthetic soft tissue lesions are incompletely understood. We examined the potential of ultrasound for screening of periarticular soft tissue lesions around MoM bearings. Ultrasound examinations were conducted in 88 hips (79 patients) with MoM hip resurfacings or MoM total hip arthroplasties with a large femoral head. Four qualitative ultrasound patterns were shown, including normal pattern in 69 hips, joint-expansion pattern in 11 hips, cystic pattern in 5 hips, and mass pattern in 3 hips. Hips with the latter 3 abnormal patterns showed significantly higher frequency of clinical symptoms, without significant differences of sex, duration of implantation, head sizes, and cup abduction/anteversion angles, compared with hips with normal pattern. Ultrasound examination provides sensitive screening of soft tissue reactions around MoM bearings and may be useful in monitoring progression and defining treatment for periarticular soft tissue abnormalities. PMID:22047978

  18. Electrocardiographic T Wave Abnormalities and the Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death: The Finnish Perspective.

    PubMed

    Tikkanen, Jani T; Kenttä, Tuomas; Porthan, Kimmo; Huikuri, Heikki V; Junttila, M Juhani

    2015-11-01

    The identification of patients at risk for sudden cardiac death (SCD) is still a significant challenge to clinicians and scientists. Noninvasive identification of high-risk patients has been of great interest, and several ventricular depolarization and repolarization abnormalities in the standard 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) have been associated with increased vulnerability to lethal ventricular arrhythmias. Several benign and pathological conditions can induce changes in repolarization detected as alteration of the ST segment or T wave. Changes in the ST segment and T waves can be early markers of an underlying cardiovascular disease, and even minor ST-T abnormalities have predicted reduced survival and increased risk of SCD in the adult population. In this review, we will discuss the current knowledge of the SCD risk with standard 12-lead ECG T wave abnormalities in the general population, and possible T wave changes in various cardiac conditions predisposing to SCD. PMID:26391699

  19. Ultrasound findings in critical care patients: the "liver sign" and other abnormal abdominal air patterns.

    PubMed

    Dahine, Joseph; Giard, Annie; Chagnon, David-Olivier; Denault, André

    2016-12-01

    In critical care patients, point of care abdominal ultrasound examination, although it has been practiced for over 30 years, is not as widespread as its cardiac or pulmonary counterparts. We report two cases in which detection of air during abdominal ultrasound allowed the early detection of life-threatening pathologies. In the first case, a patient with severe Clostridium difficile was found to have portal venous gas but its significance was confounded by a recent surgery. Serial ultrasonographic exams triggered a surgical intervention. In the second case, we report what we call the "liver sign" a finding in patients with pneumoperitoneum. These findings, all obtained prior to conventional abdominal imaging, had immediate clinical impact and avoided unnecessary delays and radiation. Detection of abdominal air should be part of the routine-focused ultrasonographic exam and for critically ill patients an algorithm is proposed. PMID:26968407

  20. Detection of Cardiac Abnormalities from Multilead ECG using Multiscale Phase Alternation Features.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, R K; Dandapat, S

    2016-06-01

    The cardiac activities such as the depolarization and the relaxation of atria and ventricles are observed in electrocardiogram (ECG). The changes in the morphological features of ECG are the symptoms of particular heart pathology. It is a cumbersome task for medical experts to visually identify any subtle changes in the morphological features during 24 hours of ECG recording. Therefore, the automated analysis of ECG signal is a need for accurate detection of cardiac abnormalities. In this paper, a novel method for automated detection of cardiac abnormalities from multilead ECG is proposed. The method uses multiscale phase alternation (PA) features of multilead ECG and two classifiers, k-nearest neighbor (KNN) and fuzzy KNN for classification of bundle branch block (BBB), myocardial infarction (MI), heart muscle defect (HMD) and healthy control (HC). The dual tree complex wavelet transform (DTCWT) is used to decompose the ECG signal of each lead into complex wavelet coefficients at different scales. The phase of the complex wavelet coefficients is computed and the PA values at each wavelet scale are used as features for detection and classification of cardiac abnormalities. A publicly available multilead ECG database (PTB database) is used for testing of the proposed method. The experimental results show that, the proposed multiscale PA features and the fuzzy KNN classifier have better performance for detection of cardiac abnormalities with sensitivity values of 78.12 %, 80.90 % and 94.31 % for BBB, HMD and MI classes. The sensitivity value of proposed method for MI class is compared with the state-of-art techniques from multilead ECG. PMID:27118009

  1. Abnormal Calcium Handling and Exaggerated Cardiac Dysfunction in Mice with Defective Vitamin D Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Sangita; Bae, Soochan; Ke, Qingen; Lee, Ji Yoo; Singh, Sylvia S.; St-Arnaud, René; del Monte, Federica; Kang, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    Aim Altered vitamin D signaling is associated with cardiac dysfunction, but the pathogenic mechanism is not clearly understood. We examine the mechanism and the role of vitamin D signaling in the development of cardiac dysfunction. Methods and Results We analyzed 1α-hydroxylase (1α-OHase) knockout (1α-OHase−/−) mice, which lack 1α-OH enzymes that convert the inactive form to hormonally active form of vitamin D. 1α-OHase−/− mice showed modest cardiac hypertrophy at baseline. Induction of pressure overload by transverse aortic constriction (TAC) demonstrated exaggerated cardiac dysfunction in 1α-OHase−/− mice compared to their WT littermates with a significant increase in fibrosis and expression of inflammatory cytokines. Analysis of calcium (Ca2+) transient demonstrated profound Ca2+ handling abnormalities in 1α-OHase−/− mouse cardiomyocytes (CMs), and treatment with paricalcitol (PC), an activated vitamin D3 analog, significantly attenuated defective Ca2+ handling in 1α-OHase−/− CMs. We further delineated the effect of vitamin D deficiency condition to TAC by first correcting the vitamin D deficiency in 1α-OHase−/− mice, followed then by either a daily maintenance dose of vitamin D or vehicle (to achieve vitamin D deficiency) at the time of sham or TAC. In mice treated with vitamin D, there was a significant attenuation of TAC-induced cardiac hypertrophy, interstitial fibrosis, inflammatory markers, Ca2+ handling abnormalities and cardiac function compared to the vehicle treated animals. Conclusions Our results provide insight into the mechanism of cardiac dysfunction, which is associated with severely defective Ca2+ handling and defective vitamin D signaling in 1α-OHase−/− mice. PMID:25268137

  2. A developmental analysis of clonidine's effects on cardiac rate and ultrasound production in infant rats.

    PubMed

    Blumberg, M S; Sokoloff, G; Kent, K J

    2000-04-01

    Under controlled conditions, infant rats emit ultrasonic vocalizations during extreme cold exposure and after administration of the alpha(2) adrenoceptor agonist, clonidine. Previous investigations have determined that, in response to clonidine, ultrasound production increases through the 2nd-week postpartum and decreases thereafter. Given that sympathetic neural dominance exhibits a similar developmental pattern, and given that clonidine induces sympathetic withdrawal and bradycardia, we hypothesized that clonidine's developmental effects on cardiac rate and ultrasound production would mirror each other. Therefore, in the present experiment, the effects of clonidine administration (0.5 mg/kg) on cardiac rate and ultrasound production were examined in 2-, 8-, 15-, and 20-day-old rats. Age-related changes in ultrasound production corresponded with changes in cardiovascular variables, including baseline cardiac rate and clonidine-induced bradycardia. This experiment is discussed with regard to the hypothesis that ultrasound production is the acoustic by-product of a physiological maneuver that compensates for clonidine's detrimental effects on cardiovascular function. PMID:10737864

  3. Active cardiac model and its application on structure detection from early fetal ultrasound sequences.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yinhui; Wang, Yuanyuan; Shen, Yuzhong; Chen, Ping

    2012-04-01

    The structure of an early fetal heart provides vital information for the diagnosis of fetus defects. However, early fetal hearts are difficult to detect due to their relatively small size and the low signal-to-noise ratio of ultrasound images. In this paper, a novel method is proposed for automatic detection of early fetal cardiac structure from ultrasound images. The proposed method consists of two major parts which are the preprocessing phase and the active cardiac model: (1) The preprocessing phase consists of two sub-steps. (a) The region of interest is first automatically selected based on an accumulated motion image, which is able to represent the motion information of the fetal heart more accurately. (b) Then by combining Rayleigh-trimmed filter and anisotropic diffusion in 3-dimensional space, a despeckling method is developed to suppress the speckle noise and emphasize the motion information for subsequent cardiac structure detection. (2) The active cardiac model is proposed for the detection of fetal heart structure, which is a key contribution of this paper. It takes into account both the structure and motion information of fetal hearts simultaneously. Both learning and inference of the active cardiac model are described in the paper. Experiments on seven ultrasound sequences demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:21620676

  4. The role of surgeon-performed ultrasound in patients with possible cardiac wounds.

    PubMed Central

    Rozycki, G S; Feliciano, D V; Schmidt, J A; Cushman, J G; Sisley, A C; Ingram, W; Ansley, J D

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors evaluate surgeon-performed ultrasound in determining the need for operation in patients with possible cardiac wounds. BACKGROUND DATA: Ultrasound quickly is becoming part of the surgeon's diagnostic armamentarium; however, its role for the patient with penetrating injury is less well-defined. Although accurate for the detection of hemopericardium, the lack of immediate availability of the cardiologist to perform the test may delay the diagnosis, adversely affecting patient outcome. To be an effective diagnostic test in trauma centers, ultrasound must be immediately available in the resuscitation area and performed and interpreted by surgeons. METHODS: Surgeons performed pericardial ultrasound examinations on patients with penetrating truncal wounds but no immediate indication for operation. The subcostal view detected hemopericardium, and patients with positive examinations underwent immediate operation by the same surgeon. Vital signs, base deficit, time from examination to operation, operative findings, treatment, and outcome were recorded. RESULTS: During 13 months, 247 patients had surgeon-performed ultrasound. There were 236 true-negative and 10 true-positive results, and no false-negative or false-positive results; however, the pericardial region could not be visualized in one patient. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 100%; mean examination time was 0.8 minute (246 patients). Of the ten true-positive examinations, three were hypotensive. The mean time (8 patients) from ultrasound to operation was 12.1 minutes; all survived. Operative findings (site of cardiac wounds) were: left ventricle (4), right ventricle (3), right atrium (2), right atrium/superior vena cava (1), and right atrium/inferior vena cava (1). CONCLUSIONS: Surgeon-performed ultrasound is a rapid and accurate technique for diagnosing hemopericardium. Delay times from admission to operating room are minimized when the surgeon performs the ultrasound examination

  5. First applications of a targeted exome sequencing approach in fetuses with ultrasound abnormalities reveals an important fraction of cases with associated gene defects.

    PubMed

    Pangalos, Constantinos; Hagnefelt, Birgitta; Lilakos, Konstantinos; Konialis, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Background. Fetal malformations and other structural abnormalities are relatively frequent findings in the course of routine prenatal ultrasonographic examination. Due to their considerable genetic and clinical heterogeneity, the underlying genetic cause is often elusive and the resulting inability to provide a precise diagnosis precludes proper reproductive and fetal risk assessment. We report the development and first applications of an expanded exome sequencing-based test, coupled to a bioinformatics-driven prioritization algorithm, targeting gene disorders presenting with abnormal prenatal ultrasound findings. Methods. We applied the testing strategy to14 euploid fetuses, from 11 on-going pregnancies and three products of abortion, all with various abnormalities or malformations detected through prenatal ultrasound examination. Whole exome sequencing (WES) was followed by variant prioritization, utilizing a custom analysis pipeline (Fetalis algorithm), targeting 758 genes associated with genetic disorders which may present with abnormal fetal ultrasound findings. Results. A definitive or highly-likely diagnosis was made in 6 of 14 cases (43%), of which 3 were abortuses (Ellis-van Creveld syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and Nemaline myopathy 2) and 3 involved on-going pregnancies (Citrullinemia, Noonan syndrome, PROKR2-related Kallmann syndrome). In the remaining eight on-going pregnancy cases (57%), a ZIC1 variant of unknown clinical significance was detected in one case, while in seven cases testing did not reveal any pathogenic variant(s). Pregnancies were followed-up to birth, resulting in one neonate harboring the PROKR2 mutation, presenting with isolated minor structural cardiac abnormalities, and in seven apparently healthy neonates. Discussion. The expanded targeted exome sequencing-based approach described herein (Fetalis), provides strong evidence suggesting a definite and beneficial increase in our diagnostic capabilities in prenatal diagnosis of

  6. First applications of a targeted exome sequencing approach in fetuses with ultrasound abnormalities reveals an important fraction of cases with associated gene defects

    PubMed Central

    Pangalos, Constantinos; Hagnefelt, Birgitta; Lilakos, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Background. Fetal malformations and other structural abnormalities are relatively frequent findings in the course of routine prenatal ultrasonographic examination. Due to their considerable genetic and clinical heterogeneity, the underlying genetic cause is often elusive and the resulting inability to provide a precise diagnosis precludes proper reproductive and fetal risk assessment. We report the development and first applications of an expanded exome sequencing-based test, coupled to a bioinformatics-driven prioritization algorithm, targeting gene disorders presenting with abnormal prenatal ultrasound findings. Methods. We applied the testing strategy to14 euploid fetuses, from 11 on-going pregnancies and three products of abortion, all with various abnormalities or malformations detected through prenatal ultrasound examination. Whole exome sequencing (WES) was followed by variant prioritization, utilizing a custom analysis pipeline (Fetalis algorithm), targeting 758 genes associated with genetic disorders which may present with abnormal fetal ultrasound findings. Results. A definitive or highly-likely diagnosis was made in 6 of 14 cases (43%), of which 3 were abortuses (Ellis-van Creveld syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and Nemaline myopathy 2) and 3 involved on-going pregnancies (Citrullinemia, Noonan syndrome, PROKR2-related Kallmann syndrome). In the remaining eight on-going pregnancy cases (57%), a ZIC1 variant of unknown clinical significance was detected in one case, while in seven cases testing did not reveal any pathogenic variant(s). Pregnancies were followed-up to birth, resulting in one neonate harboring the PROKR2 mutation, presenting with isolated minor structural cardiac abnormalities, and in seven apparently healthy neonates. Discussion. The expanded targeted exome sequencing-based approach described herein (Fetalis), provides strong evidence suggesting a definite and beneficial increase in our diagnostic capabilities in prenatal diagnosis of

  7. Cardiac Catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cardiac Catheterization? Cardiac catheterization (KATH-eh-ter-ih-ZA-shun) is a ... disease. Doctors also can use ultrasound during cardiac catheterization to see blockages in the coronary arteries. Ultrasound ...

  8. An interoperable system for automated diagnosis of cardiac abnormalities from electrocardiogram data.

    PubMed

    Tinnakornsrisuphap, Thidarat; Billo, Richard E

    2015-03-01

    Electrocardiogram (ECG) data are stored and analyzed in different formats, devices, and computer platforms. As a result, ECG data from different monitoring devices cannot be displayed unless the user has access to the proprietary software of each particular device. This research describes an ontology and encoding for representation of ECG data that allows open exchange and display of ECG data in a web browser. The ontology is based on the Health Level Seven (HL7) medical device communication standard. It integrates ECG waveform data, HL7 standard ECG data descriptions, and cardiac diagnosis rules, providing a capability to both represent ECG waveforms as well as perform automated diagnosis of 37 different cardiac abnormalities. The ECG ontology is encoded in XML, thus allowing ECG data from any digital ECG device that maps to it to be displayed in a general-purpose Internet browser. An experiment was conducted to test the interoperability of the system (ability to openly share ECG data without error in a web browser) and also to assess the accuracy of the diagnosis model. Results showed 100% interoperability using 276 ECG data files and 93% accuracy in diagnosis of abnormal cardiac conditions. PMID:24808416

  9. Therapeutic Ultrasound to Non-Invasively Create Intra-Cardiac Communications in an Intact Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Gabe E.; Miller, Ryan M.; Ensing, Greg; Ives, Kimberly; Gordon, David; Ludomirsky, Achi; Xu, Zhen

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine if pulsed cavitational ultrasound therapy (histotripsy) can accurately and safely generate ventricular septal defects (VSDs) through the intact chest of a neonatal animal, with the eventual goal of developing a non-invasive technique of creating intra-cardiac communications in patients with congenital heart disease. Background Histotripsy is an innovative ultrasonic technique that generates demarcated, mechanical tissue fractionation utilizing high intensity ultrasound pulses. Previous work has shown that histotripsy can create atrial septal defects in a beating heart in an open-chest canine model. Methods Nine neonatal pigs were treated with transcutaneous histotripsy targeting the ventricular septum. Ultrasound pulses of 5μs duration at a peak negative pressure of 13 MPa and a pulse repetition frequency of 1 kHz were generated by a 1 MHz focused transducer. The procedure was guided by real-time ultrasound imaging. Results VSDs were created in all pigs with diameters ranging from 2–6.5mm. Six pigs were euthanized within 2 hrs of treatment, while 3 were recovered and maintained for 2–3 days to evaluate lesion maturation and clinical side effects. There were only transient clinical effects and pathology revealed mild collateral damage around the VSD with no significant damage to other cardiac or extra-cardiac structures. Conclusions Histotripsy can accurately and safely generate VSDs through the intact chest in a neonatal animal model. These results suggest that with further advances, histotripsy can be a useful, non-invasive technique to create intra-cardiac communications, which currently require invasive catheter-based or surgical procedures, to clinically stabilize newborn infants with complex congenital heart disease. PMID:20853366

  10. Fetal cardiac circulation in isolated aortic atresia assessed with ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Sayit, Aslı Tanrıvermiş; Ipek, Ali; Kurt, Aydın; Aghdasi, Bayan G; Arslan, Halil; Gümüş, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    Congenital heart diseases are common, with an incidence of more than 8 in 1000 live births. Aortic atresia is a rare diagnosis and its prognosis is very poor. In this article, we present a case of isolated aortic atresia, a very rare cardiovascular anomaly, and its fetal ultrasound findings which include blood flow at foramen ovale from left to right, right deviation of the interventricular septum, dysfunction of the mitral valve and cardiomegaly. Aortic stenosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of aortic atresia. However, in the case of severe aortic stenosis and/or accompanying ventricular septal defect, differential diagnosis may not be done. PMID:24592058

  11. Analysis of 2-d ultrasound cardiac strain imaging using joint probability density functions.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chi; Varghese, Tomy

    2014-06-01

    Ultrasound frame rates play a key role for accurate cardiac deformation tracking. Insufficient frame rates lead to an increase in signal de-correlation artifacts resulting in erroneous displacement and strain estimation. Joint probability density distributions generated from estimated axial strain and its associated signal-to-noise ratio provide a useful approach to assess the minimum frame rate requirements. Previous reports have demonstrated that bi-modal distributions in the joint probability density indicate inaccurate strain estimation over a cardiac cycle. In this study, we utilize similar analysis to evaluate a 2-D multi-level displacement tracking and strain estimation algorithm for cardiac strain imaging. The effect of different frame rates, final kernel dimensions and a comparison of radio frequency and envelope based processing are evaluated using echo signals derived from a 3-D finite element cardiac model and five healthy volunteers. Cardiac simulation model analysis demonstrates that the minimum frame rates required to obtain accurate joint probability distributions for the signal-to-noise ratio and strain, for a final kernel dimension of 1 λ by 3 A-lines, was around 42 Hz for radio frequency signals. On the other hand, even a frame rate of 250 Hz with envelope signals did not replicate the ideal joint probability distribution. For the volunteer study, clinical data was acquired only at a 34 Hz frame rate, which appears to be sufficient for radio frequency analysis. We also show that an increase in the final kernel dimensions significantly affect the strain probability distribution and joint probability density function generated, with a smaller effect on the variation in the accumulated mean strain estimated over a cardiac cycle. Our results demonstrate that radio frequency frame rates currently achievable on clinical cardiac ultrasound systems are sufficient for accurate analysis of the strain probability distribution, when a multi-level 2-D

  12. Cardiac conduction abnormalities and Stokes-Adams attacks in myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Noel, C.; Gagnon, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy is a well known cause of cardiomyopathy. While various cardiac conduction abnormalities have been described in patients with myotonic dystrophy, so far only sporadic cases of Stokes-Adams attacks have been reported. Of 27 patients with this disease various conduction disturbances were detected in 17 (63%), 5 of whom presented with Stokes-Adams attacks and were found to have intracardiac conduction defects. The prognosis in four of the five patients was greatly improved with permanent pacemaker implantation. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:657033

  13. Cardiac Repolarization Abnormalities and Potential Evidence for Loss of Cardiac Sodium Currents on ECGs of Patients with Chagas' Heart Disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, T. T.; Medina, R.; Jugo, D.; Nunez, T. J.; Borrego, A.; Arellano, E.; Arenare, B.; DePalma, J. L.; Greco, E. C.; Starc, V.

    2007-01-01

    Some individuals with Chagas disease develop right precordial lead ST segment elevation in response to an ajmaline challenge test, and the prevalence of right bundle branch block (RBBB) is also high in Chagas disease. Because these same electrocardiographic abnormalities occur in the Brugada syndrome, which involves genetically defective cardiac sodium channels, acquired damage to cardiac sodium channels may also occur in Chagas disease. We studied several conventional and advanced resting 12-lead/derived Frank-lead ECG parameters in 34 patients with Chagas -related heart disease (mean age 39 14 years) and in 34 age-/gender-matched healthy controls. All ECG recordings were of 5-10 min duration, obtained in the supine position using high fidelity hardware/software (CardioSoft, Houston, TX). Even after excluding those Chagas patients who had resting BBBs, tachycardia and/or pathologic arrhythmia (n=8), significant differences remained in multiple conventional and advanced ECG parameters between the Chagas and control groups (n=26/group), especially in their respective QT interval variability indices, maximal spatial QRS-T angles and low frequency HRV powers (p=0.0006, p=0.0015 and p=0.0314 respectively). In relation to the issue of potential damage to cardiac sodium channels, the Chagas patients had: 1) greater than or equal to twice the incidence of resting ST segment elevation in leads V1-V3 (n=10/26 vs. n=5/26) and of both leftward (n=5/26 versus n=0/26) and rightward (n=7/26 versus n=3/26) QRS axis deviation than controls; 2) significantly increased filtered (40-250 Hz) QRS interval durations (92.1 8.5 versus 85.3 plus or minus 9.0 ms, p=0.022) versus controls; and 3) significantly decreased QT and especially JT interval durations versus controls (QT interval: 387.5 plus or minus 26.4 versus 408.9 plus or minus 34.6 ms, p=0.013; JT interval: 290.5 plus or minus 26.3 versus 314.8 plus or minus 31.3 ms; p=0.0029). Heart rates and Bazett-corrected QTc/JTc intervals

  14. Design, development, and evaluation of focused ultrasound arrays for transesophageal cardiac ablations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hotaik

    The ultimate purpose of this dissertation is the evaluation of the feasibility of transesophageal cardiac surgery in arrhythmia treatment, using therapeutic ultrasound energy without the requirement for surgical incisions or blood contact. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, affecting over 2.2 million Americans. One effective treatment is cardiac ablation, which shows a high rate of success in treating paroxysmal AF. As a prevailing modality for this treatment, catheter ablation using radiofrequency has been effective, but there is measurable morbidity and significant costs and time associated with this invasive procedure for permanent or persistent AF. To address these issues, a transesophageal ultrasound applicator for noninvasive cardiac ablations has been designed, developed and evaluated in this dissertation. Focused ultrasound for thermal ablation has gained interest for decades due to its noninvasive characteristics. Since the esophagus is close to the posterior of the left atrium, its position makes it attractive for the incision-less surgery of the selected area of the heart using ultrasound. The overall goal of this study is to bring an applicator as closely as possible to the heart in order to effectively deliver ultrasound energy, and create electrically isolating lesions in myocardial tissue, replicating the currently used Maze procedure. The Maze procedure is a surgical operation that treats AF by creating a grid of incisions resulting in non-conductive scar tissue in the atria. The initial design of an ultrasound applicator capable of creating atrial lesions from the esophagus, involved evaluating sound pressure fields within layers of the esophagus and myocardium. Based on the multiple factors of the simulation results of transducer arrays, current transesophageal medical devices, and the throat anatomy, a focused ultrasound transducer that can be inserted into the esophagus has been designed and tested. In this study, a

  15. Detection of abnormalities in ultrasound lung image using multi-level RVM classification.

    PubMed

    Veeramani, Senthil Kumar; Muthusamy, Ezhilarasi

    2016-06-01

    The classification of abnormalities in ultrasound images is the monitoring tool of fluid to air passage in the lung. In this study, the adaptive median filtering technique is employed for the preprocessing step. The preprocessed image is then extracted the features by the convoluted local tetra pattern, histogram of oriented gradient, Haralick feature extraction and the complete local binary pattern. The extracted features are selected by applying particle swarm optimization and differential evolution feature selection. In the final stage, classifiers namely relevance vector machine (RVM), and multi-level RVM are employed to perform classification of the lung diseases. The diseases respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), transient tachypnea of the new born, meconium aspiration syndrome, pneumothorax, bronchiolitis, pneumonia, and lung cancer are used for training and testing. The experimental analysis exhibits better accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, pixel count and fitness value than the other existing methods. The classification accuracy of above 90% is accomplished by multi-level RVM classifier. The system has been tested with a number of ultrasound lung images and has achieved satisfactory results in classifying the lung diseases. PMID:26135771

  16. Prenatal aneupioidy detection by fluorencence in situ hybridization (FISH) in 1,068 second trimester pregnancies with fetal ultrasound abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, B.E.; Wright, M.; Lytle, C. |

    1994-09-01

    One indication for rapid prenatal aneuploidy detection in uncultured amniocytes by FISH is the identification of fetal abnormalities by ultrasound. We analyzed 1,068 consecutive specimens from second trimester pregnancies with fetal ultrasound abnormalities referred for FISH plus cytogenetics. These specimens are a subset (14.7%) of the most recent 7,240 clinical referrals for these combined analyses. Hybridization with specific probes for chromosomes 21, 18, 13, X and Y were used to detect common aneuploidies. As defined by previously described criteria, specimens were reported as informative disomic, informative trisomic, or uninformative within two days of receipt. The rate of informative results from acceptable specimens was 90.1%. The vast majority of uninformative results was due to maternal cell contamination which precluded analysis. Within the informative group there were no false positives, false negatives nor reports of incorrect gender. Of the 1,068 tested specimens with ultrasound abnormalities, 135 (12.5%) were cytogenetically diagnosed as aneuploid. Prior to the cytogenetic analysis, a total of 107 aneuploidies were correctly identified by FISH. The remaining 26 aneuploidies generated an uninformative FISH result. The overall FISH detection rate for aneuploidy (including informative and uninformative results) was 79%. Other unbalanced chromosome abnormalities were present in 2.1% of specimens and 0.7% had balanced chromosome abnormalities. The inclusive total cytogenetic abnormality rate was 15.4%, of which 85% were potentially detectable by our FISH protocol. This clinical experience demonstrates that aneuploidy detection by FISH on uncultured amniocytes can provide accurate and rapid identification of aneuploidies, especially when such abnormalities are suspected following the diagnosis of fetal anomalies by ultrasound examination.

  17. Physiologic abnormalities of cardiac function in progressive systemic sclerosis with diffuse scleroderma

    SciTech Connect

    Follansbee, W.P.; Curtiss, E.I.; Medsger, T.A. Jr.; Steen, V.D.; Uretsky, B.F.; Owens, G.R.; Rodnan, G.P.

    1984-01-19

    To investigate cardiopulmonary function in progressive systemic sclerosis with diffuse scleroderma, we studied 26 patients with maximal exercise and redistribution thallium scans, rest and exercise radionuclide ventriculography, pulmonary-function testing, and chest roentgenography. Although only 6 patients had clinical evidence of cardiac involvement, 20 had abnormal thallium scans, including 10 with reversible exercise-induced defects and 18 with fixed defects (8 had both). Seven of the 10 patients who had exercise-induced defects and underwent cardiac catheterization had normal coronary angiograms. Mean resting left ventricular ejection fraction and mean resting right ventricular ejection fraction were lower in patients with post-exercise left ventricular thallium defect scores above the median (59 +/- 13 per cent vs. 69 +/- 6 per cent, and 36 +/- 12 per cent vs. 47 +/- 7 per cent, respectively). The authors conclude that in progressive systemic sclerosis with diffuse scleroderma, abnormalities of myocardial perfusion are common and appear to be due to a disturbance of the myocardial microcirculation. Both right and left ventricular dysfunction appear to be related to this circulatory disturbance, suggesting ischemically mediated injury.

  18. Do thallium myocardial perfusion scan abnormalities predict survival in sarcoid patients without cardiac symptoms

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, E.L.; Caldwell, J.W. )

    1990-07-01

    Whereas the total mortality rate for sarcoidosis is 0.2 per 100,000, the prognosis, when the heart is involved, is very much worse. The authors used the difference in mortality rate to infer whether thallium 201 myocardial perfusion scan abnormalities correspond to myocardial sarcoid by making the simplifying assumption that if they do, then patients with abnormal scans will be found to have a death rate similar to patients with sarcoid heart disease. The authors therefore analyzed complete survival data on 52 sarcoid patients without cardiac symptoms an average of eighty-nine months after they had been scanned as part of a protocol. By use of survival analysis (the Cox proportional hazards model), the only variable that was significantly associated with survival was age. The patients' scan pattern, treatment status, gender, and race were not significantly related to survival. The authors conclude that thallium myocardial perfusion scans cannot reliably be used to diagnose sarcoid heart disease in sarcoid patients without cardiac symptoms.

  19. Exome sequencing improves genetic diagnosis of structural fetal abnormalities revealed by ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Carss, Keren J.; Hillman, Sarah C.; Parthiban, Vijaya; McMullan, Dominic J.; Maher, Eamonn R.; Kilby, Mark D.; Hurles, Matthew E.

    2014-01-01

    The genetic etiology of non-aneuploid fetal structural abnormalities is typically investigated by karyotyping and array-based detection of microscopically detectable rearrangements, and submicroscopic copy-number variants (CNVs), which collectively yield a pathogenic finding in up to 10% of cases. We propose that exome sequencing may substantially increase the identification of underlying etiologies. We performed exome sequencing on a cohort of 30 non-aneuploid fetuses and neonates (along with their parents) with diverse structural abnormalities first identified by prenatal ultrasound. We identified candidate pathogenic variants with a range of inheritance models, and evaluated these in the context of detailed phenotypic information. We identified 35 de novo single-nucleotide variants (SNVs), small indels, deletions or duplications, of which three (accounting for 10% of the cohort) are highly likely to be causative. These are de novo missense variants in FGFR3 and COL2A1, and a de novo 16.8 kb deletion that includes most of OFD1. In five further cases (17%) we identified de novo or inherited recessive or X-linked variants in plausible candidate genes, which require additional validation to determine pathogenicity. Our diagnostic yield of 10% is comparable to, and supplementary to, the diagnostic yield of existing microarray testing for large chromosomal rearrangements and targeted CNV detection. The de novo nature of these events could enable couples to be counseled as to their low recurrence risk. This study outlines the way for a substantial improvement in the diagnostic yield of prenatal genetic abnormalities through the application of next-generation sequencing. PMID:24476948

  20. Abnormal left ventricular torsion and cardiac autonomic dysfunction in subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Piya, Milan K.; Shivu, Ganesh Nallur; Tahrani, Abd; Dubb, Kiran; Abozguia, Khalid; Phan, T.T.; Narendran, Parth; Pop-Busui, Rodica; Frenneaux, Michael; Stevens, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    Left ventricular torsion is increased and cardiac energetics are reduced in uncomplicated type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Our aim was to determine the relationships of these abnormalities to cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) in subjects with T1DM. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 20 subjects with T1DM free of known coronary heart disease attending an outpatient clinic. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy was assessed using heart rate variability studies and the continuous wavelet transform method. Left ventricular function was determined by speckle tracking echocardiography. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy and stress magnetic resonance imaging were used to measure cardiac energetics and myocardial perfusion reserve index, respectively. Twenty subjects (age, 35 ± 8 years; diabetes duration, 16 ± 9 years; hemoglobin A1c, 8.0% ± 1.1%) were recruited. Forty percent of the subjects exhibited definite or borderline CAN. Log peak radial strain was significantly increased in subjects with CAN compared with those without (1.56 ± 0.06 vs 1.43 ± 0.14, respectively; P = .011). Data were adjusted for log duration of diabetes, and log left ventricular torsion correlated (r = 0.593, P = .01) with log low-frequency to high-frequency ratio during the Valsalva maneuver. Log isovolumic relaxation time correlated significantly with log Valsalva ratio and log proportion of differences in consecutive RR intervals of normal beats greater than 50 milliseconds during deep breathing. However, CAN did not correlate with cardiac energetics or myocardial perfusion reserve index. Spectral analysis of low-frequency to high-frequency ratio power during the Valsalva maneuver is associated with altered left ventricular torsion in subjects with T1DM. Parasympathetic dysfunction is closely associated with diastolic deficits. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy is not however the principal cause of impaired cardiac energetics. The role of CAN in the development of cardiomyopathy

  1. Abnormal sodium current properties contribute to cardiac electrical and contractile dysfunction in a mouse model of myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    PubMed

    Algalarrondo, Vincent; Wahbi, Karim; Sebag, Frédéric; Gourdon, Geneviève; Beldjord, Chérif; Azibi, Kamel; Balse, Elise; Coulombe, Alain; Fischmeister, Rodolphe; Eymard, Bruno; Duboc, Denis; Hatem, Stéphane N

    2015-04-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is the most common neuromuscular disorder and is associated with cardiac conduction defects. However, the mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias in DM1 are unknown. We tested the hypothesis that abnormalities in the cardiac sodium current (INa) are involved, and used a transgenic mouse model reproducing the expression of triplet expansion observed in DM1 (DMSXL mouse). The injection of the class-I antiarrhythmic agent flecainide induced prominent conduction abnormalities and significantly lowered the radial tissular velocities and strain rate in DMSXL mice compared to WT. These abnormalities were more pronounced in 8-month-old mice than in 3-month-old mice. Ventricular action potentials recorded by standard glass microelectrode technique exhibited a lower maximum upstroke velocity [dV/dt](max) in DMSXL. This decreased [dV/dt](max) was associated with a 1.7 fold faster inactivation of INa in DMSXL myocytes measured by the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Finally in the DMSXL mouse, no mutation in the Scn5a gene was detected and neither cardiac fibrosis nor abnormalities of expression of the sodium channel protein were observed. Therefore, alterations in the sodium current markedly contributed to electrical conduction block in DM1. This result should guide pharmaceutical and clinical research toward better therapy for the cardiac arrhythmias associated with DM1. PMID:25613807

  2. In Vivo Evaluations of a Phased Ultrasound Array for Transesophageal Cardiac Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Devina; Werner, Jacob; Park, Eun-Joo; Francischelli, David; Smith, Nadine Barrie

    2010-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation is one of the most common arrhythmias that affects over 2.2 million Americans each year. Catheter ablation, one of the effective treatments, has shown high rate of success in treating paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Currently, radiofrequency which is being used for catheter ablation is an invasive procedure. Measurable morbidity and significant costs and time are associated with this modality of treatment of permanent or persistent atrial fibrillation. In order to address these issues, a transesophageal ultrasound applicator for noninvasive cardiac ablation was designed, developed and evaluated. The ultrasound energy delivered by the phased array was used to create a lesion in the myocardial tissue. Various factors, simulation results of transducer arrays, current transesophageal medical devices, and throat anatomy, were considered while designing a phased ultrasound transducer that can be inserted into the esophagus. For this research, a two-dimensional sparse phased array with flat tapered elements was fabricated and evaluated in in vivo experiments. Five pigs were anesthetized; the array was passed transesophagealy and positioned over the heart. An operating frequency of 1.6 MHz and 8˜15 minutes of array operation resulted in both single and multiple lesions on atrial and ventricular myocardium. The average size of lesions was 5.1±2.1 mm in diameter and 7.8±2.5 mm in length. Experimental results indicate that the array delivered sufficient power to produce ablation at the focal point while not grossly damaging the tissue surrounding the area of interest. These results demonstrate a potential application of the ultrasound applicator for noninvasive transesophageal cardiac surgery in atrial fibrillation treatment.

  3. Diastolic abnormalities in systemic sclerosis: evidence for associated defective cardiac functional reserve.

    PubMed Central

    Valentini, G; Vitale, D F; Giunta, A; Maione, S; Gerundo, G; Arnese, M; Tirri, E; Pelaggi, N; Giacummo, A; Tirri, G; Condorelli, M

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the pattern of diastolic abnormalities in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) and the relationship between impaired ventricular filling and systolic function. METHODS: Twenty four patients with SSc underwent M-mode and two dimensional echocardiography using echo-Doppler and gated blood pool cardiac angiography, both at rest and after exercise. RESULTS: An impaired diastolic relaxation of the left ventricle was detected in 10 of the 24 patients with SSc. Left ventricular ejection fraction at rest in these 10 patients with impaired ventricular filling did not differ from that in the remaining 14 patients, but eight of the 10 failed to increase their ejection fraction during exercise, compared with two of the 14 with normal ventricular filling (p = 0.003). CONCLUSION: Impaired relaxation of the left ventricle is a recently described feature of scleroderma heart disease. Diastolic dysfunction in SSc could depend on myocardial fibrosis or myocardial ischaemia, or both. It was found to be associated with a defective cardiac functional reserve. However, its prognostic significance remains to be clarified. PMID:8774164

  4. An Experimental Model Using Cultured Cardiac Myocytes for a Study of the Generation of Premature Ventricular Contractions Under Ultrasound Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Nobuki; Yamamoto, Masaya

    2011-09-01

    It is known that use of a contrast agents in echocardiography increases the probability of generation of premature ventricular contractions (PVCs). As a basic study to elucidate the mechanisms and to reduce adverse effects, the generation of PVCs was investigated using cultured cardiac myocytes instead of the intact heart in vivo. Cardiac myocytes were isolated from neonatal rats and cultured on a cover slip. The myocyte sample was exposed to pulsed ultrasound with microbubbles adjacent to the myocytes, and generation of PVCs was examined with ultrasound exposure at various delay times after onset of myocyte contraction. The experimental results showed that generation of PVCs had a stable threshold delay time and that PVCs were generated only when myocytes were exposed to ultrasound with delay times longer than the threshold. The results indicate that the model used in this study is useful for revealing the mechanisms by which PVCs are induced by ultrasound exposure.

  5. Disruption of Ah Receptor Signaling during Mouse Development Leads to Abnormal Cardiac Structure and Function in the Adult.

    PubMed

    Carreira, Vinicius S; Fan, Yunxia; Kurita, Hisaka; Wang, Qin; Ko, Chia-I; Naticchioni, Mindi; Jiang, Min; Koch, Sheryl; Zhang, Xiang; Biesiada, Jacek; Medvedovic, Mario; Xia, Ying; Rubinstein, Jack; Puga, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) Theory proposes that the environment encountered during fetal life and infancy permanently shapes tissue physiology and homeostasis such that damage resulting from maternal stress, poor nutrition or exposure to environmental agents may be at the heart of adult onset disease. Interference with endogenous developmental functions of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), either by gene ablation or by exposure in utero to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a potent AHR ligand, causes structural, molecular and functional cardiac abnormalities and altered heart physiology in mouse embryos. To test if embryonic effects progress into an adult phenotype, we investigated whether Ahr ablation or TCDD exposure in utero resulted in cardiac abnormalities in adult mice long after removal of the agent. Ten-months old adult Ahr-/- and in utero TCDD-exposed Ahr+/+ mice showed sexually dimorphic abnormal cardiovascular phenotypes characterized by echocardiographic findings of hypertrophy, ventricular dilation and increased heart weight, resting heart rate and systolic and mean blood pressure, and decreased exercise tolerance. Underlying these effects, genes in signaling networks related to cardiac hypertrophy and mitochondrial function were differentially expressed. Cardiac dysfunction in mouse embryos resulting from AHR signaling disruption seems to progress into abnormal cardiac structure and function that predispose adults to cardiac disease, but while embryonic dysfunction is equally robust in males and females, the adult abnormalities are more prevalent in females, with the highest severity in Ahr-/- females. The findings reported here underscore the conclusion that AHR signaling in the developing heart is one potential target of environmental factors associated with cardiovascular disease. PMID:26555816

  6. Disruption of Ah Receptor Signaling during Mouse Development Leads to Abnormal Cardiac Structure and Function in the Adult

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Vinicius S.; Fan, Yunxia; Kurita, Hisaka; Wang, Qin; Ko, Chia-I; Naticchioni, Mindi; Jiang, Min; Koch, Sheryl; Zhang, Xiang; Biesiada, Jacek; Medvedovic, Mario; Xia, Ying; Rubinstein, Jack; Puga, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) Theory proposes that the environment encountered during fetal life and infancy permanently shapes tissue physiology and homeostasis such that damage resulting from maternal stress, poor nutrition or exposure to environmental agents may be at the heart of adult onset disease. Interference with endogenous developmental functions of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), either by gene ablation or by exposure in utero to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a potent AHR ligand, causes structural, molecular and functional cardiac abnormalities and altered heart physiology in mouse embryos. To test if embryonic effects progress into an adult phenotype, we investigated whether Ahr ablation or TCDD exposure in utero resulted in cardiac abnormalities in adult mice long after removal of the agent. Ten-months old adult Ahr-/- and in utero TCDD-exposed Ahr+/+ mice showed sexually dimorphic abnormal cardiovascular phenotypes characterized by echocardiographic findings of hypertrophy, ventricular dilation and increased heart weight, resting heart rate and systolic and mean blood pressure, and decreased exercise tolerance. Underlying these effects, genes in signaling networks related to cardiac hypertrophy and mitochondrial function were differentially expressed. Cardiac dysfunction in mouse embryos resulting from AHR signaling disruption seems to progress into abnormal cardiac structure and function that predispose adults to cardiac disease, but while embryonic dysfunction is equally robust in males and females, the adult abnormalities are more prevalent in females, with the highest severity in Ahr-/- females. The findings reported here underscore the conclusion that AHR signaling in the developing heart is one potential target of environmental factors associated with cardiovascular disease. PMID:26555816

  7. Pituitary and ovarian abnormalities demonstrated by CT and ultrasound in children with features of the McCune-Albright syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Rieth, K.G.; Comite, F.; Shawker, T.H.; Cutler, G.B. Jr.

    1984-11-01

    In a random series of 97 children referred to the National Institutes of Health with a presumptive diagnosis of precocious puberty, eight girls were found to have features of the McCune-Albright syndrome, including fibrous dysplasia of bone and/or skin lesions resembling cafe au lait spots. Radiographic evaluation of these patients included computed tomography of the head and pelvic ultrasound. The pituitary glands were suspicious for abnormality in five of the eight girls. Seven girls underwent pelvic ultrasound, and in all of them the ovaries were considered to be abnormal for their chronological age; in addition, two had functional ovarian cysts. The role of diagnostic radiological studies in the diagnosis of this syndrome is discussed.

  8. Register cardiac fiber orientations from 3D DTI volume to 2D ultrasound image of rat hearts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xulei; Wang, Silun; Shen, Ming; Zhang, Xiaodong; Lerakis, Stamatios; Wagner, Mary B.; Fei, Baowei

    2015-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound or echocardiography is one of the most widely used examinations for the diagnosis of cardiac diseases. However, it only supplies the geometric and structural information of the myocardium. In order to supply more detailed microstructure information of the myocardium, this paper proposes a registration method to map cardiac fiber orientations from three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (MR-DTI) volume to the 2D ultrasound image. It utilizes a 2D/3D intensity based registration procedure including rigid, log-demons, and affine transformations to search the best similar slice from the template volume. After registration, the cardiac fiber orientations are mapped to the 2D ultrasound image via fiber relocations and reorientations. This method was validated by six images of rat hearts ex vivo. The evaluation results indicated that the final Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) achieved more than 90% after geometric registrations; and the inclination angle errors (IAE) between the mapped fiber orientations and the gold standards were less than 15 degree. This method may provide a practical tool for cardiologists to examine cardiac fiber orientations on ultrasound images and have the potential to supply additional information for diagnosis of cardiac diseases.

  9. Identifying regional cardiac abnormalities from myocardial strains using nontracking-based strain estimation and spatio-temporal tensor analysis.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zhen; Liu, Qingshan; Metaxas, Dimitris N; Axel, Leon

    2011-12-01

    Myocardial strain is a critical indicator of many cardiac diseases and dysfunctions. The goal of this paper is to extract and use the myocardial strain pattern from tagged magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to identify and localize regional abnormal cardiac function in human subjects. In order to extract the myocardial strains from the tagged images, we developed a novel nontracking-based strain estimation method for tagged MRI. This method is based on the direct extraction of tag deformation, and therefore avoids some limitations of conventional displacement or tracking-based strain estimators. Based on the extracted spatio-temporal strain patterns, we have also developed a novel tensor-based classification framework that better conserves the spatio-temporal structure of the myocardial strain pattern than conventional vector-based classification algorithms. In addition, the tensor-based projection function keeps more of the information of the original feature space, so that abnormal tensors in the subspace can be back-projected to reveal the regional cardiac abnormality in a more physically meaningful way. We have tested our novel methods on 41 human image sequences, and achieved a classification rate of 87.80%. The regional abnormalities recovered from our algorithm agree well with the patient's pathology and clinical image interpretation, and provide a promising avenue for regional cardiac function analysis. PMID:21606022

  10. Experimental high-intensity focused ultrasound lesion formation in cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muratore, Robert; Kalisz, Andrew; Lee, Paul; Lizzi, Frederic; Fujikura, Kana; Otsuka, Ryo; Homma, Shunichi

    2001-05-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) (4.5-7.5 MHz) was used to form lesions in cardiac tissue, with an ultimate objective of treating conditions such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and ventricular tachycardia. Ultrasound attenuation coefficients were experimentally determined in vitro for calf myocardial tissue, both muscle and pericardial fat. These coefficients were employed in computational models of linear beam propagation, tissue heating profiles and thermal lesion formation for a variety of focused transducers. Modeling was performed for continuous and pulsed exposures. These models suggested initial power levels and exposure durations for in vitro experiments on calf ventricles and septa and ex vivo experiments on canine whole hearts. Repeatability of lesion size and placement was studied as power and exposure parameters varied around the initial values. With these experimental results, power and exposure parameters were selected to create lesions in vivo in canine ventricles and septa in open-chest, anesthetized dogs. Pulsed exposures were synchronized to cardiac and respiration cycles to ensure accurate placement of the lesions. These initial in vivo experiments showed that HIFU treatments in the beating heart are feasible; they also identified refinements that are now being implemented for better control of lesion size and placement. [Work supported by NCI and NHLBI Grant 5R01 CA84588.

  11. Is it possible to identify infrahissian cardiac conduction abnormalities in myotonic dystrophy by non-invasive methods?

    PubMed Central

    Babuty, D; Fauchier, L; Tena-Carbi, D; Poret, P; Leche, J; Raynaud, M; Fauchier, J; Cosnay, P

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To identify intracardiac conduction abnormalities in patients with myotonic dystrophy from their clinical, ECG, and genetic features.
METHODS—39 consecutive patients (mean (SD) age 42.9 (12.1) years; 16 female, 23 male) underwent clinical examination, genetic studies, resting and 24 hour ambulatory ECG, signal averaged ECG, and electrophysiological studies.
RESULTS—23 patients suffered from cardiac symptoms, 23 had one or more cardiac conduction abnormality on resting ECG, one had sinus deficiency, and 21 (53.8%) had prolonged HV intervals. No correlation was found between the severity of the neurological symptoms, onset of disease, cardiac conduction abnormalities on ECG, and the intracardiac conduction abnormalities on electrophysiological study. The size of the DNA mutation was longer in the abnormal HV interval group than in the normal HV interval group (3.5 (1.8) v 2.2 (1.0) kb, p < 0.02). Signal averaged ECG parameters (total QRS duration (QRSD) and duration of low amplitude signals ⩽ 40 µV (LAS 40)) were greater in patients with an abnormal HV interval than in those with a normal HV interval (123.4 (24.6) v 102.8 (12.3) ms and 47.5 (12.8) v 35.3 (8.8) ms, respectively; p < 0.005). Only the association of QRSD ⩾ 100 ms with LAS 40 ⩾ 36 ms identified patients with an abnormal HV interval with good sensitivity (80%) and specificity (83.3%).
CONCLUSIONS—Infrahissian conduction abnormalities are common in myotonic dystrophy and can be identified using signal averaged electrocardiography.


Keywords: myotonic dystrophy; atrioventricular block; genetic factors; signal averaged ECG PMID:10525524

  12. The Effect of Sorafenib, Tadalafil and Macitentan Treatments on Thyroxin-Induced Hemodynamic Changes and Cardiac Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Saad, Nancy S.; Floyd, Kyle; Ahmed, Amany A. E.; Mohler, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Multikinase inhibitors (e.g. Sorafenib), phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors (e.g. Tadalafil), and endothelin-1 receptor blockers (e.g. Macitentan) exert influential protection in a variety of animal models of cardiomyopathy; however, their effects on thyroxin-induced cardiomyopathy have never been investigated. The goal of the present study was to assess the functional impact of these drugs on thyroxin-induced hemodynamic changes, cardiac hypertrophy and associated altered responses of the contractile myocardium both in-vivo at the whole heart level and ex-vivo at the cardiac tissue level. Control and thyroxin (500 μg/kg/day)-treated mice with or without 2-week treatments of sorafenib (10 mg/kg/day; I.P), tadalafil (1 mg/kg/day; I.P or 4 mg/kg/day; oral), macitentan (30 and 100 mg/kg/day; oral), and their vehicles were studied. Blood pressure, echocardiography and electrocardiogram were non-invasively evaluated, followed by ex-vivo assessments of isolated multicellular cardiac preparations. Thyroxin increased blood pressure, resulted in cardiac hypertrophy and left ventricular dysfunction in-vivo. Also, it caused contractile abnormalities in right ventricular papillary muscles ex-vivo. None of the drug treatments were able to significantly attenuate theses hemodynamic changes or cardiac abnormalities in thyroxin-treated mice. We show here for the first time that multikinase (raf1/b, VEGFR, PDGFR), phosphodiesterase-5, and endothelin-1 pathways have no major role in thyroxin-induced hemodynamic changes and cardiac abnormalities. In particular, our data show that the involvement of endothelin-1 pathway in thyroxine-induced cardiac hypertrophy/dysfunction seems to be model-dependent and should be carefully interpreted. PMID:27082116

  13. The Effect of Sorafenib, Tadalafil and Macitentan Treatments on Thyroxin-Induced Hemodynamic Changes and Cardiac Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Saad, Nancy S; Floyd, Kyle; Ahmed, Amany A E; Mohler, Peter J; Janssen, Paul M L; Elnakish, Mohammad T

    2016-01-01

    Multikinase inhibitors (e.g. Sorafenib), phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors (e.g. Tadalafil), and endothelin-1 receptor blockers (e.g. Macitentan) exert influential protection in a variety of animal models of cardiomyopathy; however, their effects on thyroxin-induced cardiomyopathy have never been investigated. The goal of the present study was to assess the functional impact of these drugs on thyroxin-induced hemodynamic changes, cardiac hypertrophy and associated altered responses of the contractile myocardium both in-vivo at the whole heart level and ex-vivo at the cardiac tissue level. Control and thyroxin (500 μg/kg/day)-treated mice with or without 2-week treatments of sorafenib (10 mg/kg/day; I.P), tadalafil (1 mg/kg/day; I.P or 4 mg/kg/day; oral), macitentan (30 and 100 mg/kg/day; oral), and their vehicles were studied. Blood pressure, echocardiography and electrocardiogram were non-invasively evaluated, followed by ex-vivo assessments of isolated multicellular cardiac preparations. Thyroxin increased blood pressure, resulted in cardiac hypertrophy and left ventricular dysfunction in-vivo. Also, it caused contractile abnormalities in right ventricular papillary muscles ex-vivo. None of the drug treatments were able to significantly attenuate theses hemodynamic changes or cardiac abnormalities in thyroxin-treated mice. We show here for the first time that multikinase (raf1/b, VEGFR, PDGFR), phosphodiesterase-5, and endothelin-1 pathways have no major role in thyroxin-induced hemodynamic changes and cardiac abnormalities. In particular, our data show that the involvement of endothelin-1 pathway in thyroxine-induced cardiac hypertrophy/dysfunction seems to be model-dependent and should be carefully interpreted. PMID:27082116

  14. Critical care ultrasound in cardiac arrest. Technological requirements for performing the SESAME-protocol--a holistic approach.

    PubMed

    Lichtenstein, Daniel; Malbrain, Manu L N G

    2015-01-01

    The use of ultrasound has gained its place in critical care as part of our day-to-day monitoring tools. A better understanding of ultrasound techniques and recent publications including protocols for the lungs, the abdomen and the blood vessels has introduced ultrasound to the bedside of our ICU patients. However, we will prove in this paper that early machines, dating back more than 25 years, were perfectly able to do the job as compared to modern laptop machines with more features but few additional advantages. Ultrasound is not only a diagnostic tool, but should also be seen as an extension of the traditional physical examination. This paper will focus on the use of the SESAME-protocol in cardiac arrest. The SESAME-protocol suggests starting with a lung scan to rule out possible causes leading to cardiac arrest. Firstly, pneumothorax needs to be ruled out. Secondly, a partial diagnosis of pulmonary embolism is done following the BLUE-protocol. Thirdly, fluid therapy can be guided, following the FALLS-protocol. The SESAME-protocol continues by scanning the lower femoral veins to check for signs of deep venous thrombosis, followed by (or before, in case of trauma) the abdomen to detect massive bleeding. Next comes the pericardium, to exclude pericardial tamponade. Finally, a transthoracic cardiac ultrasound is performed to check for other (cardiac) causes leading to cardiac arrest. The emphasis is on a holistic approach, where ultrasound can be seen as the modern stethoscope needed by clinicians to complete the full physiological examination of their critically ill unstable patients. PMID:26578398

  15. Flow-regulated extracorporeal arteriovenous tubing loop for cardiac output measurements by ultrasound velocity dilution: validation in post-cardiac surgery intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Eremenko, Alexsandr A; Safarov, Perviz N

    2010-01-01

    Assessment of cardiac output (CO) is crucial in the management of the critically ill, especially in post cardiac surgery intensive care unit (ICU) patients. In this study, we validated CO measured by the novel ultrasound dilution (COUD) with those measured by pulmonary artery (PA) thermodilution (COTD) in 26 adult post cardiac surgery patients. For COUD, blood was circulated through an extracorporeal arteriovenous (AV) loop from the radial artery catheter to the introducer of PA catheter for 5-8 minutes. Three to four injections of 25 ml body temperature isotonic saline were performed into the venous limb of the AV loop. For COTD, five injections of 10 ml ice cold saline were performed. A total of 77 COUD and COTD measurement sets were compared. Cardiac output measured by thermodilution ranged from 3.28 to 9.4 L/min, whereas COUD ranged from 2.85 to 10.1 L/min. The correlation between the methods was found to be r = 0.91, COUD = 0.93(COTD) + 0.42 L/min. Bias and precision (mean difference ± 2SDs) was -0.004 ± 1.34 L/min between the two methods. The percentage error (2SD/mean) was 22.2%, which is below the clinically acceptable limit (<30%). Cardiac output measured by ultrasound dilution and thermodilution methods agreed well in post cardiac surgery ICU patients and hence can be interchangeably used. PMID:21245798

  16. Detection of abnormal cardiac activity using principal component analysis--a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Greisas, Ariel; Zafrir, Zohar; Zlochiver, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Electrogram-guided ablation has been recently developed for allowing better detection and localization of abnormal atrial activity that may be the source of arrhythmogeneity. Nevertheless, no clear indication for the benefit of using electrograms guided ablation over empirical ablation was established thus far, and there is a clear need of improving the localization of cardiac arrhythmogenic targets for ablation. In this paper, we propose a new approach for detection and localization of irregular cardiac activity during ablation procedures that is based on dimension reduction algorithms and principal component analysis (PCA). Using an 8×8 electrode array, our method produces manifolds that allow easy visualization and detection of possible arrhythmogenic ablation targets characterized by irregular conduction. We employ mathematical modeling and computer simulations to demonstrate the feasibility of the new approach for two well established arrhythmogenic sources for irregular conduction--spiral waves and patchy fibrosis. Our results show that the PCA method can differentiate between focal ectopic activity and spiral wave activity, as these two types of activity produce substantially different manifold shapes. Moreover, the technique allows the detection of spiral wave cores and their general meandering and drifting pattern. Fibrotic patches larger than 2 mm(2) could also be visualized using the PCA method, both for quiescent atrial tissue and for tissue exhibiting spiral wave activity. We envision that this method, contingent to further numerical and experimental validation studies in more complex, realistic geometrical configurations and with clinical data, can improve existing atrial ablation mapping capabilities, thus increasing success rates and optimizing arrhythmia management. PMID:25073163

  17. Simulated 3D ultrasound LV cardiac images for active shape model training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butakoff, Constantine; Balocco, Simone; Ordas, Sebastian; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2007-03-01

    In this paper a study of 3D ultrasound cardiac segmentation using Active Shape Models (ASM) is presented. The proposed approach is based on a combination of a point distribution model constructed from a multitude of high resolution MRI scans and the appearance model obtained from simulated 3D ultrasound images. Usually the appearance model is learnt from a set of landmarked images. The significant level of noise, the low resolution of 3D ultrasound images (3D US) and the frequent failure to capture the complete wall of the left ventricle (LV) makes automatic or manual landmarking difficult. One possible solution is to use artificially simulated 3D US images since the generated images will match exactly the shape in question. In this way, by varying simulation parameters and generating corresponding images, it is possible to obtain a training set where the image matches the shape exactly. In this work the simulation of ultrasound images is performed by a convolutional approach. The evaluation of segmentation accuracy is performed on both simulated and in vivo images. The results obtained on 567 simulated images had an average error of 1.9 mm (1.73 +/- 0.05 mm for epicardium and 2 +/- 0.07 mm for endocardium, with 95% confidence) with voxel size being 1.1 × 1.1 × 0.7 mm. The error on 20 in vivo data was 3.5 mm (3.44 +/- 0.4 mm for epicardium and 3.73 +/- 0.4 mm for endocardium). In most images the model was able to approximate the borders of myocardium even when the latter was indistinguishable from the surrounding tissues.

  18. The Cardiac Electrophysiologic Substrate Underlying the ECG Phenotype and Electrogram Abnormalities in Brugada Syndrome Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junjie; Sacher, Frédéric; Hoffmayer, Kurt; O’Hara, Thomas; Strom, Maria; Cuculich, Phillip; Silva, Jennifer; Cooper, Daniel; Faddis, Mitchell; Hocini, Mélèze; Haïssaguerre, Michel; Scheinman, Melvin; Rudy, Yoram

    2015-01-01

    Background Brugada syndrome (BrS) is a highly arrhythmogenic cardiac disorder, associated with an increased incidence of sudden death. Its arrhythmogenic substrate in the intact human heart remains ill-defined. Methods and Results Using noninvasive ECG imaging (ECGI), we studied 25 BrS patients to characterize the electrophysiologic substrate, and 6 patients with right bundle branch block (RBBB) for comparison. Seven normal subjects provided control data. Abnormal substrate was observed exclusively in the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) with the following properties (compared to normal controls; p<0.005): (1)ST-segment elevation (STE) and inverted T-wave of unipolar electrograms (EGMs) (2.21±0.67 vs. 0 mV); (2)delayed RVOT activation (82±18 vs. 37±11 ms); (3)low amplitude (0.47±0.16 vs. 3.74±1.60 mV) and fractionated EGMs, suggesting slow discontinuous conduction; (4)prolonged recovery time (RT; 381±30 vs. 311±34 ms) and activation-recovery intervals (ARIs; 318±32 vs. 241±27 ms), indicating delayed repolarization; (5)steep repolarization gradients (ΔRT/Δx= 96±28 vs. 7±6 ms/cm, ΔARI/Δx= 105±24 vs. 7±5 ms/cm) at RVOT borders. With increased heart rate in 6 BrS patients, reduced STE and increased fractionation were observed. Unlike BrS, RBBB had delayed activation in the entire RV, without STE, fractionation, or repolarization abnormalities on EGMs. Conclusions The results indicate that both, slow discontinuous conduction and steep dispersion of repolarization are present in the RVOT of BrS patients. ECGI could differentiate between BrS and RBBB. PMID:25810336

  19. Breaking bad news to a pregnant woman with a fetal abnormality on ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Greiner, Andrea L; Conklin, Jona

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound is a common procedure performed in pregnancy. Most obstetric patients have an ultrasound between 18 and 20 weeks' gestation. While there is debate regarding the utility of this ultrasound, it has become a routine part of prenatal care. Discovery of a fetal anomaly on ultrasound is most commonly an unexpected, emotionally devastating event for pregnant women. Counseling these women about the ultrasound findings requires empathy and sensitivity. This task falls on the physicians caring for pregnant women: maternal-fetal medicine specialists, radiologists, generalist obstetricians, and family medicine physicians. Their training regarding breaking bad news is varied. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to provide a framework to break bad news of an anomalous fetus for physicians caring for pregnant women using the SPIKES protocol. The SPIKES acronym stands for setting, perception, invitation, knowledge, empathize, summary, and strategy. PMID:25616346

  20. The Use of Standard Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Ultrasound to Assess Cardiac Anatomy.

    PubMed

    Sentissi, Kinza; Sawhney, Mandeep S; Pleskow, Douglas; Sepe, Paul; Mella, Jose M; Kwittken, Benjamin; Ketwaroo, Gyanprakash; Subramaniam, Balachundhar

    2016-09-01

    In this prospective observational study, conducted at an academic medical center, we evaluated the feasibility of performing a basic transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) examination using endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) technology to determine what cardiac structures could be assessed. This may be potentially beneficial during hemodynamic emergencies in the endoscopy suite resulting from hypovolemia, depressed ventricular function, aortic dissection, pericardial effusions, or aortic stenosis. Of the 20 patients enrolled, 18 underwent EUS with a linear echoendoscope for standard clinical indications followed by a cardiac assessment performed under the guidance of a TEE-certified cardiac anesthesiologist. Eight of the 20 standard views of cardiovascular structures per the 1999 American Society of Echocardiography/Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists guidelines for TEE could be obtained using the linear echoendoscope. The following cardiac valvular structures were visualized: aortic valve (100%), mitral valve (100%), tricuspid valve (33%), and pulmonic valve (11%). Left ventricular and right ventricular systolic function could be assessed in 89% and 67% of patients, respectively. Other structures such as the ascending and descending aorta, pericardium, left atrial appendage, and interatrial septum were identified in 100% of patients. Doppler-dependent functions could not be assessed. Given that the EUS images were not directly compared with TEE in these patients, we cannot comment definitively on the quality of these assessments and further studies would need to be performed to make a formal comparison. Based on this study, EUS technology can consistently assess the mitral valve, aortic valve, aorta, pericardium, and left ventricular function. Given its limitations, EUS technology, although not a substitute for formal echocardiography, could be a helpful early diagnostic tool in an emergency setting. PMID:27541718

  1. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Ultrasound is a useful procedure for monitoring the baby's development in the uterus. Ultrasound uses inaudible sound waves to ... no known risks for ultrasound at present, it is highly recommended that pregnant women consult their physician ...

  2. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Ultrasound is a type of imaging. It uses high-frequency sound waves to look at organs and ... liver, and other organs. During pregnancy, doctors use ultrasound to view the fetus. Unlike x-rays, ultrasound ...

  3. Brugada syndrome and right ventricle morphofunctional abnormalities on echocardiography in young male with family anamnesis of sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Robert; Makarovic, Sandra; Makarovic, Zorin; Bilic-Curcic, Ines

    2014-03-01

    First presented by Brugada and Brugada in 1992, Brugada Syndrome (BrS) is a primary electrical disease of the heart that causes sudden cardiac death or life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. This disease is hereditary autosomic dominant transmitted and genetically determined. The syndrome has been linked to mutations in SCN5A, the gene encoding for the a-subunit of the sodium channel. Electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities indicating Brugada syndrome, include repolarization and depolarization abnormalities in the absence of identifiable structural cardiac abnormalities or other conditions or agents known to lead to ST-segment elevation in the right precordial leads (V1-V3). Intravenous administration of sodium channel blocking drugs may modify the ECG pattern. Ajmaline, flecainide, procainamide and propafenone exaggerate the ST-segment elevation or unmask it when it is initially absent. An implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) is the only proven effective device treatment for the disease. Although BrS is primary electrical disease, some authors have suggested the presence of morphological and functional abnormalities mainly located in the right ventricle (RV), notably in the outflow tract (RVOT). In this short report we will present a young male, with predisposition and positive family history of sudden cardiac death, with complete diagnostic procedure including propafenon testing unmasking Brugada syndrome. An echosonography revealed dilated apical right ventricle, suggesting BrS is not only electrical disorder, but may include morphofunctional abnormalities, described in previous reports. In addition, we reviewed the possible connection between Brugada syndrome and morphological abnormalities in RV. PMID:24851643

  4. Association Between Tangential Beam Treatment Parameters and Cardiac Abnormalities After Definitive Radiation Treatment for Left-Sided Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Correa, Candace R.; Das, Indra J. Litt, Harold I.; Ferrari, Victor; Hwang, W.-T.; Solin, Lawrence J.; Harris, Eleanor E.

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To examine the association between radiation treatment (RT) parameters, cardiac diagnostic test abnormalities, and clinical cardiovascular diagnoses among patients with left-sided breast cancer after breast conservation treatment with tangential beam RT. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 416 patients treated between 1977 and 1995 with RT for primary left-sided breast cancer were reviewed for myocardial perfusion imaging and echocardiograms. Sixty-two patients (62/416, 15%) underwent these cardiac diagnostic tests for cardiovascular symptoms and were selected for further study. Central lung distance and maximum heart width and length in the treatment field were determined for each patient. Medical records were reviewed for cardiovascular diagnoses and evaluation of cardiac risk factors. Results: At a median of 12 years post-RT the incidence of cardiac diagnostic test abnormalities among symptomatic left-sided irradiated women was significantly higher than the predicted incidence of cardiovascular disease in the patient population, 6/62 (9%) predicted vs. 24/62 (39%) observed, p 0.001. As compared with patients with normal tests, patients with cardiac diagnostic test abnormalities had a larger median central lung distance (2.6 cm vs. 2.2 cm, p = 0.01). Similarly, patients with vs. without congestive heart failure had a larger median central lung distance (2.8 cm vs. 2.3 cm, p = 0.008). Conclusions: Contemporary RT for early breast cancer may be associated with a small, but potentially avoidable, risk of cardiovascular morbidity that is associated with treatment technique.

  5. High-frequency ultrasound M-mode monitoring of HIFU ablation in cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumon, R. E.; Gudur, M. S. R.; Zhou, Y.; Deng, C. X.

    2012-10-01

    Effective real-time HIFU lesion detection is important for expanded use of HIFU in interventional electrophysiology (e.g., epicardial ablation of cardiac arrhythmia). The goal of this study was to investigate rapid, high-frequency M-mode ultrasound imaging for monitoring spatiotemporal changes in tissue during HIFU application. The HIFU application (4.33 MHz, 1000 Hz PRF, 50% duty cycle, 1 s exposure, 6100 W/cm2) was perpendicularly applied to porcine cardiac tissue with a high-frequency imaging system (Visualsonics Vevo 770, 55 MHz, 4.5 mm focal distance) confocally aligned. Radiofrequency (RF) M-mode data (1 kHz PRF, 4 s × 7 mm) was acquired before, during, and after HIFU treatment. Gross lesions were compared with M-mode data to correlate lesion and cavity formation. Integrated backscatter, echo-decorrelation parameters, and their cumulative extrema over time were analyzed for automatically identifying lesion width and bubble formation. Cumulative maximum integrated backscatter showed the best results for identifying the final lesion width, and a criterion based on line-to-line decorrelation was proposed for identification of transient bubble activity.

  6. Adaptive volume rendering of cardiac 3D ultrasound images: utilizing blood pool statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åsen, Jon Petter; Steen, Erik; Kiss, Gabriel; Thorstensen, Anders; Rabben, Stein Inge

    2012-03-01

    In this paper we introduce and investigate an adaptive direct volume rendering (DVR) method for real-time visualization of cardiac 3D ultrasound. DVR is commonly used in cardiac ultrasound to visualize interfaces between tissue and blood. However, this is particularly challenging with ultrasound images due to variability of the signal within tissue as well as variability of noise signal within the blood pool. Standard DVR involves a global mapping of sample values to opacity by an opacity transfer function (OTF). While a global OTF may represent the interface correctly in one part of the image, it may result in tissue dropouts, or even artificial interfaces within the blood pool in other parts of the image. In order to increase correctness of the rendered image, the presented method utilizes blood pool statistics to do regional adjustments of the OTF. The regional adaptive OTF was compared with a global OTF in a dataset of apical recordings from 18 subjects. For each recording, three renderings from standard views (apical 4-chamber (A4C), inverted A4C (IA4C) and mitral valve (MV)) were generated for both methods, and each rendering was tuned to the best visual appearance by a physician echocardiographer. For each rendering we measured the mean absolute error (MAE) between the rendering depth buffer and a validated left ventricular segmentation. The difference d in MAE between the global and regional method was calculated and t-test results are reported with significant improvements for the regional adaptive method (dA4C = 1.5 +/- 0.3 mm, dIA4C = 2.5 +/- 0.4 mm, dMV = 1.7 +/- 0.2 mm, d.f. = 17, all p < 0.001). This improvement by the regional adaptive method was confirmed through qualitative visual assessment by an experienced physician echocardiographer who concluded that the regional adaptive method produced rendered images with fewer tissue dropouts and less spurious structures inside the blood pool in the vast majority of the renderings. The algorithm has been

  7. Transmural Ultrasound Imaging of Thermal Lesion and Action Potential Changes in Perfused Canine Cardiac Wedge Preparations by High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ziqi; Gudur, Madhu S. R.; Deng, Cheri X.

    2013-01-01

    Intra-procedural imaging is important for guiding cardiac arrhythmia ablation. It is difficult to obtain intra-procedural correlation of thermal lesion formation with action potential (AP) changes in the transmural plane during ablation. This study tested parametric ultrasound imaging for transmural imaging of lesion and AP changes in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation using coronary perfused canine ventricular wedge preparations (n = 13). The preparations were paced from epi/endocardial surfaces and subjected to HIFU application (3.5 MHz, 11 Hz pulse-repetition-frequency, 70% duty cycle, duration 4 s, 3500 W/cm2), during which simultaneous optical mapping (1 kframes/s) using di-4-ANEPPS and ultrasound imaging (30 MHz) of the same transmural surface of the wedge were performed. Spatiotemporally correlated AP measurements and ultrasound imaging allowed quantification of the reduction of AP amplitude (APA), shortening of AP duration at 50% repolarization, AP triangulation, decrease of optical AP rise, and change of conduction velocity along tissue depth direction within and surrounding HIFU lesions. The threshold of irreversible change in APA correlating to lesions was determined to be 43±1% with a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) area under curve (AUC) of 0.96±0.01 (n = 13). Ultrasound imaging parameters such as integrated backscatter, Rayleigh (α) and log-normal (σ) parameters, cumulative extrema of σ were tested, with the cumulative extrema of σ performing the best in detecting lesion (ROC AUC 0.89±0.01, n = 13) and change of APA (ROC AUC 0.79±0.03, n = 13). In conclusion, characteristic tissue and AP changes in HIFU ablation were identified and spatiotemporally correlated using optical mapping and ultrasound imaging. Parametric ultrasound imaging using cumulative extrema of σ can detect HIFU lesion and APA reduction. PMID:24349337

  8. Incidence of cardiac abnormalities in children with human immunodeficiency virus infection: The Prospective P2C2 HIV Study

    PubMed Central

    Starc, Thomas J.; Lipshultz, Steven E.; Easley, Kirk A.; Kaplan, Samuel; Bricker, J. Timothy; Colan, Steven D.; Lai, Wyman W.; Gersony, Welton M.; Sopko, George; Moodie, Douglas S.; Schluchter, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the 5-year cumulative incidence of cardiac dysfunction in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children. Study design We used a prospective cohort design, enrolling children at 10 hospitals. Group I included 205 vertically HIV-infected children enrolled at a median age of 1.9 years. Group II consisted of 600 HIV-exposed children enrolled prenatally or as neonates, of whom 93 were ultimately HIV-infected. The main outcome measures were echocardiographic indexes of left ventricular dysfunction. Results In group I, the 5-year cumulative incidence of left ventricular fractional shortening ≤25% was 28.0%. The 5-year incidence of left ventricular end-diastolic dilatation was 21.7%, and heart failure and/or the use of cardiac medications 28.8%. The mortality rate 1 year after the diagnosis of heart failure was 52.5% [95% CI, 30.5-74.5]. Within group II, the 5-year cumulative incidence of decreased fractional shortening was 10.7% in the HIV-infected compared with 3.1% in the HIV-uninfected children (P = .01). Left ventricular dilation, heart failure, and/or the use of cardiac medications were more common in infected compared with uninfected children. Conclusions During 5 years of follow-up, cardiac dysfunction occurred in 18% to 39% of HIV-infected children and was associated with an increased risk of death. We recommend that HIV-infected children undergo routine echocardiographic surveillance for cardiac abnormalities. PMID:12219051

  9. A transgenic zebrafish model of a human cardiac sodium channel mutation exhibits bradycardia, conduction-system abnormalities and early death.

    PubMed

    Huttner, Inken G; Trivedi, Gunjan; Jacoby, Arie; Mann, Stefan A; Vandenberg, Jamie I; Fatkin, Diane

    2013-08-01

    The recent exponential increase in human genetic studies due to the advances of next generation sequencing has generated unprecedented numbers of new gene variants. Determining which of these are causative of human disease is a major challenge. In-vitro studies and murine models have been used to study inherited cardiac arrhythmias but have several limitations. Zebrafish models provide an attractive alternative for modeling human heart disease due to similarities in cardiac electrophysiology and contraction, together with ease of genetic manipulation, external development and optical transparency. Although zebrafish cardiac mutants and morphants have been widely used to study loss and knockdown of zebrafish gene function, the phenotypic effects of human dominant-negative gene mutations expressed in transgenic zebrafish have not been evaluated. The aim of this study was to generate and characterize a transgenic zebrafish arrhythmia model harboring the pathogenic human cardiac sodium channel mutation SCN5A-D1275N, that has been robustly associated with a range of cardiac phenotypes, including conduction disease, sinus node dysfunction, atrial and ventricular arrhythmias, and dilated cardiomyopathy in humans and in mice. Stable transgenic fish with cardiac expression of human SCN5A were generated using Tol2-mediated transgenesis and cardiac phenotypes were analyzed using video microscopy and ECG. Here we show that transgenic zebrafish expressing the SCN5A-D1275N mutation, but not wild-type SCN5A, exhibit bradycardia, conduction-system abnormalities and premature death. We furthermore show that SCN5A-WT, and to a lesser degree SCN5A-D1275N, are able to compensate the loss of endogenous zebrafish cardiac sodium channels, indicating that the basic pathways, through which SCN5A acts, are conserved in teleosts. This proof-of-principle study suggests that zebrafish may be highly useful in vivo models to differentiate functional from benign human genetic variants in cardiac

  10. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Ultrasound uses high-frequency sound waves to make images of organs and structures inside the body. ... An ultrasound machine makes images so that organs inside the body can be examined. The machine sends out high- ...

  11. Focused Cardiac Ultrasound in Place of Repeat Echocardiography: Reliability and Cost Implications

    PubMed Central

    Kini, Vinay; Mehta, Nidhi; Mazurek, Jeremy A.; Ferrari, Victor A.; Epstein, Andrew J.; Groeneveld, Peter W.; Kirkpatrick, James N.

    2016-01-01

    Background Health care systems are increasingly moving toward models that emphasize the delivery of high-quality health care at lower costs. Rates of repeat echocardiography (two or more transthoracic echocardiographic studies performed within a short interval) are high and can contribute substantially to the cost of providing cardiovascular care. Certain findings from handheld ultrasound scans performed by echocardiographers have been shown to correlate well with findings on transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). It therefore may be feasible and cost effective to use expert focused cardiac ultrasound (eFCU) in place of repeat TTE for highly selected indications in certain settings. The aim of this study was to determine the reliability and cost implications of using eFCU in place of repeat TTE in selected inpatients. Methods Inpatients who underwent repeat TTE (prior TTE within 30 days) ordered for the assessment of ventricular function, pericardial effusion, or inferior vena cava collapse were prospectively enrolled. Subjects underwent eFCU in addition to TTE, and results were compared for correlation using the weighted κ statistic. The potential cost savings of using eFCU in place of TTE were modeled from the provider perspective (i.e., physicians and hospitals). Results Over 45 days, 105 patients were enrolled. The majority of scans were performed for assessment of left ventricular function and pericardial effusions. eFCU showed excellent correlation with TTE for most parameters, including left ventricular systolic function (κ = 0.80) and the presence and size of pericardial effusions (κ = 0.81) (P < .001 for both). Adoption of this eFCU protocol could save between $41 and $64 per study, or between $34,512 and $53,871 annually at the authors’ institution. Conclusions Findings from eFCU correlate well with those from TTE when used in the setting of repeat testing for assessment of ventricular function, pericardial effusion, and inferior vena cava collapse

  12. Noninvasive Ambient Pressure Estimation using Ultrasound Contrast Agents -- Invoking Subharmonics for Cardiac and Hepatic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dave, Jaydev K.

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are encapsulated microbubbles that provide a source for acoustic impedance mismatch with the blood, due to difference in compressibility between the gas contained within these microbubbles and the blood. When insonified by an ultrasound beam, these UCAs act as nonlinear scatterers and enhance the echoes of the incident pulse, resulting in scattering of the incident ultrasound beam and emission of fundamental (f0), subharmonic (f0/2), harmonic (n*f0; n ∈ N) and ultraharmonic (((2n-1)/2)*f0; n ∈ N & n > 1) components in the echo response. A promising approach to monitor in vivo pressures revolves around the fact that the ultrasound transmit and receive parameters can be selected to induce an ambient pressure amplitude dependent subharmonic signal. This subharmonic signal may be used to estimate ambient pressure amplitude; such technique of estimating ambient pressure amplitude is referred to as subharmonic aided pressure estimation or SHAPE. This project develops and evaluates the feasibility of SHAPE to noninvasively monitor cardiac and hepatic pressures (using commercially available ultrasound scanners and UCAs) because invasive catheter based pressure measurements are used currently for these applications. Invasive catheter based pressure measurements pose risk of introducing infection while the catheter is guided towards the region of interest in the body through a percutaneous incision, pose risk of death due to structural or mechanical failure of the catheter (which has also triggered product recalls by the USA Food and Drug Administration) and may potentially modulate the pressures that are being measured. Also, catheterization procedures require fluoroscopic guidance to advance the catheter to the site of pressure measurements and such catheterization procedures are not performed in all clinical centers. Thus, a noninvasive technique to obtain ambient pressure values without the catheterization process is clinically

  13. Hybrid Pixel-Based Method for Cardiac Ultrasound Fusion Based on Integration of PCA and DWT

    PubMed Central

    Sulaiman, Puteri Suhaiza; Wirza, Rahmita; Dimon, Mohd Zamrin; Khalid, Fatimah; Moosavi Tayebi, Rohollah

    2015-01-01

    Medical image fusion is the procedure of combining several images from one or multiple imaging modalities. In spite of numerous attempts in direction of automation ventricle segmentation and tracking in echocardiography, due to low quality images with missing anatomical details or speckle noises and restricted field of view, this problem is a challenging task. This paper presents a fusion method which particularly intends to increase the segment-ability of echocardiography features such as endocardial and improving the image contrast. In addition, it tries to expand the field of view, decreasing impact of noise and artifacts and enhancing the signal to noise ratio of the echo images. The proposed algorithm weights the image information regarding an integration feature between all the overlapping images, by using a combination of principal component analysis and discrete wavelet transform. For evaluation, a comparison has been done between results of some well-known techniques and the proposed method. Also, different metrics are implemented to evaluate the performance of proposed algorithm. It has been concluded that the presented pixel-based method based on the integration of PCA and DWT has the best result for the segment-ability of cardiac ultrasound images and better performance in all metrics. PMID:26089965

  14. Hybrid Pixel-Based Method for Cardiac Ultrasound Fusion Based on Integration of PCA and DWT.

    PubMed

    Mazaheri, Samaneh; Sulaiman, Puteri Suhaiza; Wirza, Rahmita; Dimon, Mohd Zamrin; Khalid, Fatimah; Moosavi Tayebi, Rohollah

    2015-01-01

    Medical image fusion is the procedure of combining several images from one or multiple imaging modalities. In spite of numerous attempts in direction of automation ventricle segmentation and tracking in echocardiography, due to low quality images with missing anatomical details or speckle noises and restricted field of view, this problem is a challenging task. This paper presents a fusion method which particularly intends to increase the segment-ability of echocardiography features such as endocardial and improving the image contrast. In addition, it tries to expand the field of view, decreasing impact of noise and artifacts and enhancing the signal to noise ratio of the echo images. The proposed algorithm weights the image information regarding an integration feature between all the overlapping images, by using a combination of principal component analysis and discrete wavelet transform. For evaluation, a comparison has been done between results of some well-known techniques and the proposed method. Also, different metrics are implemented to evaluate the performance of proposed algorithm. It has been concluded that the presented pixel-based method based on the integration of PCA and DWT has the best result for the segment-ability of cardiac ultrasound images and better performance in all metrics. PMID:26089965

  15. Feasibility of remote real-time guidance of a cardiac examination performed by novices using a pocket-sized ultrasound device.

    PubMed

    Mai, Tuan V; Ahn, David T; Phillips, Colin T; Agan, Donna L; Kimura, Bruce J

    2013-01-01

    Background. The potential of pocket-sized ultrasound devices (PUDs) to improve global healthcare delivery is limited by the lack of a suitable imaging protocol and trained users. Therefore, we investigated the feasibility of performing a brief, evidence-based cardiac limited ultrasound exam (CLUE) through wireless guidance of novice users. Methods. Three trainees applied PUDs on 27 subjects while directed by an off-site cardiologist to obtain a CLUE to screen for LV systolic dysfunction (LVSD), LA enlargement (LAE), ultrasound lung comets (ULC+), and elevated CVP (eCVP). Real-time remote audiovisual guidance and interpretation by the cardiologist were performed using the iPhone 4/iPod (FaceTime, Apple, Inc.) attached to the PUD and transmitted data wirelessly. Accuracy and technical quality of transmitted images were compared to on-site, gold-standard echo thresholds. Results. Novice versus sonographer imaging yielded technically adequate views in 122/135 (90%) versus 130/135 (96%) (P < 0.05). CLUE's combined SN, SP, and ACC were 0.67, 0.96, and 0.90. Technical adequacy (%) and accuracy for each abnormality (n) were LVSD (85%, 0.93, n = 5), LAE (89%, 0.74, n = 16), ULC+ (100%, 0.94, n = 5), and eCVP (78%, 0.91, n = 1). Conclusion. A novice can perform the CLUE using PUD when wirelessly guided by an expert. This method could facilitate PUD use for off-site bedside medical decision making and triaging of patients. PMID:24024032

  16. Clinical investigation: thyroid function test abnormalities in cardiac arrest associated with acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Iltumur, Kenan; Olmez, Gonul; Arıturk, Zuhal; Taskesen, Tuncay; Toprak, Nizamettin

    2005-01-01

    Introduction It is known that thyroid homeostasis is altered during the acute phase of cardiac arrest. However, it is not clear under what conditions, how and for how long these alterations occur. In the present study we examined thyroid function tests (TFTs) in the acute phase of cardiac arrest caused by acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and at the end of the first 2 months after the event. Method Fifty patients with cardiac arrest induced by ACS and 31 patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) who did not require cardioversion or cardiopulmonary resuscitation were enrolled in the study, as were 40 healthy volunteers. The patients were divided into three groups based on duration of cardiac arrest (<5 min, 5–10 min and >10 min). Blood samples were collected for thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), tri-iodothyronine (T3), free T3, thyroxine (T4), free T4, troponin-I and creatine kinase-MB measurements. The blood samples for TFTs were taken at 72 hours and at 2 months after the acute event in the cardiac arrest and AMI groups, but only once in the control group. Results The T3 and free T3 levels at 72 hours in the cardiac arrest group were significantly lower than in both the AMI and control groups (P < 0.0001). On the other hand, there were no significant differences between T4, free T4 and TSH levels between the three groups (P > 0.05). At the 2-month evaluation, a dramatic improvement was observed in T3 and free T3 levels in the cardiac arrest group (P < 0.0001). In those patients whose cardiac arrest duration was in excess of 10 min, levels of T3, free T3, T4 and TSH were significantly lower than those in patients whose cardiac arrest duration was under 5 min (P < 0.001, P < 0.001, P < 0.005 and P < 0.05, respectively). Conclusion TFTs are significantly altered in cardiac arrest induced by ACS. Changes in TFTs are even more pronounced in patients with longer periods of resuscitation. The changes in the surviving patients were characterized by euthyroid sick

  17. Ultrasound screening: Status of markers and efficacy of screening for structural abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Rao, Rashmi; Platt, Lawrence D

    2016-02-01

    Aneuploidy is a major cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality and can have a significant impact on expecting parents and their families. With early screening and diagnosis it is important to be able to educate parents regarding the potential impact of the diagnosis. This knowledge allows parents the opportunity to consider management options early in the pregnancy, permitting more time to mentally and emotionally prepare both for the course of the pregnancy, and after the birth of the child should the pregnancy continue. Prenatal screening provides pregnant women a non-invasive risk assessment for the most common aneuploidies. Those who are considered "high-risk" then have the option for additional diagnostic (invasive) testing. Prior to the 1980s, prenatal screening consisted of risk assessment through maternal age; however, with the advent of maternal serum biochemical analysis and ultrasound, the field of prenatal screening developed significantly. As biochemical and sonographic advances continued into the 1990s, the emphasis shifted to risk assessment in the first trimester, with the combination of maternal serum analytes and sonographic evaluation of the nuchal translucency.(1) Within the last decade, the introduction of non-invasive screening (NIPT/S) has shown great impact on the expansion and evolving practice of prenatal screening. Although in many places the standard for prenatal testing continues to include maternal serum analytes and sonographic evaluation, the role of each marker alone and in combination remains important. In the era of increasingly available screening tests, especially with NIPT/(NIPS), this article attempts to review the current role of ultrasound in prenatal care and elucidate the role of ultrasound markers in prenatal screening. PMID:26777687

  18. Automatic left-atrial segmentation from cardiac 3D ultrasound: a dual-chamber model-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Nuno; Sarvari, Sebastian I.; Orderud, Fredrik; Gérard, Olivier; D'hooge, Jan; Samset, Eigil

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present an automatic solution for segmentation and quantification of the left atrium (LA) from 3D cardiac ultrasound. A model-based framework is applied, making use of (deformable) active surfaces to model the endocardial surfaces of cardiac chambers, allowing incorporation of a priori anatomical information in a simple fashion. A dual-chamber model (LA and left ventricle) is used to detect and track the atrio-ventricular (AV) plane, without any user input. Both chambers are represented by parametric surfaces and a Kalman filter is used to fit the model to the position of the endocardial walls detected in the image, providing accurate detection and tracking during the whole cardiac cycle. This framework was tested in 20 transthoracic cardiac ultrasound volumetric recordings of healthy volunteers, and evaluated using manual traces of a clinical expert as a reference. The 3D meshes obtained with the automatic method were close to the reference contours at all cardiac phases (mean distance of 0.03+/-0.6 mm). The AV plane was detected with an accuracy of -0.6+/-1.0 mm. The LA volumes assessed automatically were also in agreement with the reference (mean +/-1.96 SD): 0.4+/-5.3 ml, 2.1+/-12.6 ml, and 1.5+/-7.8 ml at end-diastolic, end-systolic and pre-atrial-contraction frames, respectively. This study shows that the proposed method can be used for automatic volumetric assessment of the LA, considerably reducing the analysis time and effort when compared to manual analysis.

  19. Precise reconstruction of fast moving cardiac valve in high frame rate synthetic transmit aperture ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Mayumi; Ikeda, Teiichiro; Ishihara, Chizue; Takano, Shinta; Masuzawa, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    To diagnose heart valve incompetence, i.e., one of the most serious cardiac dysfunctions, it is essential to obtain images of fast-moving valves at high spatial and temporal resolution. Ultrasound synthetic transmit aperture (STA) imaging has the potential to achieve high spatial resolution by synthesizing multiple pre-beamformed images obtained with corresponding multiple transmissions. However, applying STA to fast-moving targets is difficult due to serious target deformation. We propose a high-frame-rate STA (fast STA) imaging method that uses a reduced number of transmission events needed for each image. Fast STA is expected to suppress deformation of moving targets; however, it may result in deteriorated spatial resolution. In this study, we conducted a simulation study to evaluate fast STA. We quantitatively evaluated the reduction in deformation and deterioration of spatial resolution with a model involving a radially moving valve at the maximum speed of 0.5 m/s. The simulated raw channel data of the valve phantom was processed with offline beamforming programs. We compared B-mode images obtained through single received-line in a transmission (SRT) method, STA, and fast STA. The results show that fast STA with four-times-reduced events is superior in reconstructing the original shape of the moving valve to other methods. The accuracy of valve location is 97 and 100% better than those with SRT and STA, respectively. The resolution deterioration was found to be below the annoyance threshold considering the improved performance of the shape reconstruction. The obtained results are promising for providing more precise diagnostic information on cardiovascular diseases.

  20. Optical coherence tomography monitoring of cardiac ablation by high-intensity focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Matthew; Zhou, Yun; Wang, Hesheng; Deng, Cheri X.; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2005-04-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a promising method for ablation therapy in the heart. Little is understood about early lesion development with HIFU because the lesions cannot be imaged reliably with sufficient resolution, and no other real time monitoring techniques are available to date. We investigated Optical coherence tomography (OCT) for monitoring early lesion formation. We created a series of lesions in fresh canine cardiac tissue using 5W (frequency=4.23Mhz, F#=1.2) of acoustic power with 10sec., 7sec., and 5sec. exposures. The lesions were then imaged using an OCT imaging system with an axial resolution of 12μm and a lateral resolution of 15μm. The maximum width of the lesions were measured using custom software. In separate experiments, lesion formation was investigated under varying acoustic power levels ranging from 5W to 20W at 0.1sec. and 0.2 sec. exposures. The average maximum widths of the lesions were 1.06mm for 10sec. lesions, .65mm for 7sec. lesions, and .59mm for 5sec. lesions. We observed both subsurface lesions and superficial blister-like formations, which may be a precursor of cavitation inception or tissue vaporization. The subsurface lesion forms over time as expected from thermal energy deposition. The surface blister forms prior to the subsurface lesion at high power, and after subsurface lesion formation at lower powers. OCT provides a method for monitoring HIFU lesion formation at high resolution, and can potentially be used to optimize HIFU dose for clinical applications.

  1. Echocardiographic abnormalities in the mucopolysaccharide storage diseases.

    PubMed

    Gross, D M; Williams, J C; Caprioli, C; Dominguez, B; Howell, R R

    1988-01-01

    The mucopolysaccharide storage diseases express themselves clinically with a wide variety of abnormalities, including growth and mental retardation, skeletal abnormalities, clouded corneas, nerve compression syndromes, upper airway obstruction and cardiovascular involvement, to name the most common. In most cases the cause of early death is cardiorespiratory failure secondary to cardiovascular involvement and upper airway obstruction. The findings of cardiac ultrasound examination in 29 children, adolescents and young adults are presented. In addition to the previously well-described abnormalities of the mitral and aortic valves in several types of mucopolysaccharide storage disease, we report patchy involvement in some cases, 3 instances of asymmetric septal hypertrophy not previously reported in mucopolysaccharide storage diseases, cardiac involvement in half of our patients with Sanfilippo syndrome and a lack of age-related severity of cardiac involvement even within the specific syndromes. PMID:3122547

  2. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... please enable JavaScript. Ultrasound uses high-frequency sound waves to make images of organs and structures inside ... examined. The machine sends out high-frequency sound waves, which reflect off body structures. A computer receives ...

  3. Relationship between pulmonary and cardiac abnormalities in sickle cell disease: implications for the management of patients

    PubMed Central

    Maioli, Maria Christina Paixão; Soares, Andrea Ribeiro; Bedirian, Ricardo; Alves, Ursula David; de Lima Marinho, Cirlene; Lopes, Agnaldo José

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association between clinical, pulmonary, and cardiovascular findings in patients with sickle cell disease and, secondarily, to compare these findings between sickle cell anemia patients and those with other sickle cell diseases. Methods Fifty-nine adults were included in this cross-sectional study; 47 had sickle cell anemia, and 12 had other sickle cell diseases. All patients underwent pulmonary function tests, chest computed tomography, and echocardiography. Results Abnormalities on computed tomography, echocardiography, and pulmonary function tests were observed in 93.5%, 75.0%; and 70.2% of patients, respectively. A higher frequency of restrictive abnormalities was observed in patients with a history of acute chest syndrome (85% vs. 21.6%; p-value < 0.0001) and among patients with increased left ventricle size (48.2% vs. 22.2%; p-value = 0.036), and a higher frequency of reduced respiratory muscle strength was observed in patients with a ground-glass pattern (33.3% vs. 4.3%; p-value = 0.016). Moreover, a higher frequency of mosaic attenuation was observed in patients with elevated tricuspid regurgitation velocity (61.1% vs. 24%; p-value = 0.014). Compared to patients with other sickle cell diseases, sickle cell anemia patients had suffered increased frequencies of acute pain episodes, and acute chest syndrome, and exhibited mosaic attenuation on computed tomography, and abnormalities on echocardiography. Conclusion A significant interrelation between abnormalities of the pulmonary and cardiovascular systems was observed in sickle cell disease patients. Furthermore, the severity of the cardiopulmonary parameters among patients with sickle cell anemia was greater than that of patients with other sickle cell diseases. PMID:26969771

  4. Abnormal autonomic cardiac response to transient hypoxia in sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    Sangkatumvong, S; Coates, T D; Khoo, M C K

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to non-invasively assess cardiac autonomic control in subjects with sickle cell anemia (SCA) by tracking the changes in heart rate variability (HRV) that occur following brief exposure to a hypoxic stimulus. Five African–American SCA patients and seven healthy control subjects were recruited to participate in this study. Each subject was exposed to a controlled hypoxic stimulus consisting of five breaths of nitrogen. Time-varying spectral analysis of HRV was applied to estimate the cardiac autonomic response to the transient episode of hypoxia. The confounding effects of changes in respiration on the HRV spectral indices were reduced by using a computational model. A significant decrease in the parameters related to parasympathetic control was detected in the post-hypoxic responses of the SCA subjects relative to normal controls. The spectral index related to sympathetic activity, on the other hand, showed a tendency to increase the following hypoxic stimulation, but the change was not significant. This study suggests that there is some degree of cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in SCA that is revealed by the response to transient hypoxia. PMID:18460753

  5. Object identification accuracy under ultrasound enhanced virtual reality for minimally invasive cardiac surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiles, Andrew D.; Moore, John; Linte, Cristian A.; Wedlake, Christopher; Ahmad, Anis; Peters, Terry M.

    2008-03-01

    A 2D ultrasound enhanced virtual reality surgical guidance system has been under development for some time in our lab. The new surgical guidance platform has been shown to be effective in both the laboratory and clinical settings, however, the accuracy of the tracked 2D ultrasound has not been investigated in detail in terms of the applications for which we intend to use it (i.e., mitral valve replacement and atrial septal defect closure). This work focuses on the development of an accuracy assessment protocol specific to the assessment of the calibration methods used to determine the rigid transformation between the ultrasound image and the tracked sensor. Specifically, we test a Z-bar phantom calibration method and a phantomless calibration method and compared the accuracy of tracking ultrasound images from neuro, transesophageal, intracardiac and laparoscopic ultrasound transducers. This work provides a fundamental quantitative description of the image-guided accuracy that can be obtained with this new surgical guidance system.

  6. Successful Localization of Abnormal Parathyroid Gland Using Ultrasound-Guided Methylene Blue Dye Injection in the Reoperative Neck.

    PubMed

    Haciyanli, Mehmet; Koruyucu, Melike Bedel; Erdoğan, Nezahat Karaca; Dere, Ozcan; Sarı, Erdem; Kumkumoğlu, Yusuf; Tavusbay, Cengiz; Kamer, Erdinc

    2015-12-01

    Persistent or recurrent hyperparathyroidism is a challenging problem for endocrine surgeons. The aim of this study was to review our experience using ultrasound-guided (US-G) methylene blue dye injection for the localization and removal of abnormal parathyroid glands in patients having primary hyperparathyroidism and previous neck surgery. Between January 2012 and May 2013, six consecutive patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) and previous neck surgery underwent focused parathyroidectomy with the use of US-G methylene blue dye injections to localize the presumed parathyroid adenoma were included in the study. We analyzed the data of six patients who underwent reoperative parathyroid surgery using US-G methylene blue dye injection retrospectively. The dye injection was performed just prior to surgery. All patients were successfully treated for their hyperparathyroidism which was confirmed by at least 50 % drop in intraoperative parathormone level 10 min after resection. There were no complications related with US-G dye injection or with surgery. US-G methylene blue dye injection is a cheap, safe, and effective method for localization of diseased parathyroid glands and guiding surgery in the reoperative neck. PMID:27011517

  7. Heart rate, conduction and ultrasound abnormalities in adults with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type.

    PubMed

    Camerota, Filippo; Castori, Marco; Celletti, Claudia; Colotto, Marco; Amato, Silvia; Colella, Alessandra; Curione, Mario; Danese, Chiara

    2014-07-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (EDS-HT) are two clinically overlapping heritable connective tissue disorders strongly associating with pain, fatigue and other secondary aspects. Though not considered a diagnostic criterion for most EDS subtypes, cardiovascular involvement is a well-known complication in EDS. A case-control study was carried out on 28 adults with JHS/EDS-HT diagnosed according to current criteria, compared to 29 healthy subjects evaluating resting electrocardiographic (ECG), 24-h ECG and resting heart ultrasound data. Results obtained in the ECG studies showed a moderate excess in duration of the PR interval and P wave, an excess of heart conduction and rate abnormalities and an increased rate of mitral and tricuspid valve insufficiency often complicating with "true" mitral valve prolapse in the ecocardiographic study. These variable ECG subclinical anomalies reported in our sample may represent the resting surrogate of such a subnormal cardiovascular response to postural changes that are known to be present in patients with JHS/EDS-HT. Our findings indicate the usefulness of a full cardiologic evaluation of adults with JHS/EDS-HT for the correct management. PMID:24752348

  8. Ultrasound-Guided Transesophageal High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Cardiac Ablation in a Beating Heart: A Pilot Feasibility Study in Pigs.

    PubMed

    Bessiere, Francis; N'djin, W Apoutou; Colas, Elodie Constanciel; Chavrier, Françoise; Greillier, Paul; Chapelon, Jean Yves; Chevalier, Philippe; Lafon, Cyril

    2016-08-01

    Catheter ablation for the treatment of arrhythmia is associated with significant complications and often-repeated procedures. Consequently, a less invasive and more efficient technique is required. Because high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) enables the generation of precise thermal ablations in deep-seated tissues without harming the tissues in the propagation path, it has the potential to be used as a new ablation technique. A system capable of delivering HIFU into the heart by a transesophageal route using ultrasound (US) imaging guidance was developed and tested in vivo in six male pigs. HIFU exposures were performed on atria and ventricles. At the time of autopsy, visual inspection identified thermal lesions in the targeted areas in three of the animals. These lesions were confirmed by histologic analysis (mean size: 5.5 mm(2) × 11 mm(2)). No esophageal thermal injury was observed. One animal presented with bradycardia due to an atrio-ventricular block, which provides real-time confirmation of an interaction between HIFU and the electrical circuits of the heart. Thus, US-guided HIFU has the potential to minimally invasively create myocardial lesions without an intra-cardiac device. PMID:27158083

  9. Robust algorithmic detection of the developed cardiac pathologies and emerging or transient abnormalities from short periods of RR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrishchaka, Valeriy V.; Senyukova, Olga

    2011-06-01

    Numerous research efforts and clinical testing have confirmed validity of heart rate variability (HRV) analysis as one of the cardiac diagnostics modalities. The majority of HRV analysis tools currently used in practice are based on linear indicators. Methods from nonlinear dynamics (NLD) provide more natural modeling framework for adaptive biological systems with multiple feedback loops. Compared to linear indicators, many NLD-based measures are much less sensitive to data artifacts and non-stationarity. However, majority of NLD measures require long time series for stable calculation. Similar restrictions also apply for linear indicators. Such requirements could drastically limit practical usability of HRV analysis in many applications, including express diagnostics, early indication of subtle directional changes during personalization of medical treatment, and robust detection of emerging or transient abnormalities. Recently we have illustrated that these challenges could be overcome by using classification framework based on boosting-like ensemble learning techniques that are capable of discovering robust meta-indicators from existing HRV measures and other incomplete empirical knowledge. In this paper we demonstrate universality of such meta-indicators and discuss operational details of their practical usage. Using such pathology examples as congestive heart failure (CHF) and arrhythmias, we show that classifiers trained on short RR segments (down to several minutes) could achieve reasonable classification accuracy (˜80-85% and higher). These indicators calculated from longer RR segments could be applicable for accurate diagnostics with classification accuracy approaching 100%. In addition, it is feasible to discover single "normal-abnormal" meta-classifier capable of detecting multiple abnormalities.

  10. Alzheimer Disease in a Mouse Model: MR Imaging–guided Focused Ultrasound Targeted to the Hippocampus Opens the Blood-Brain Barrier and Improves Pathologic Abnormalities and Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Sonam; Yeung, Sharon; Hough, Olivia; Eterman, Naomi; Aubert, Isabelle; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To validate whether repeated magnetic resonance (MR) imaging–guided focused ultrasound treatments targeted to the hippocampus, a brain structure relevant for Alzheimer disease (ADAlzheimer disease), could modulate pathologic abnormalities, plasticity, and behavior in a mouse model. Materials and Methods All animal procedures were approved by the Animal Care Committee and are in accordance with the Canadian Council on Animal Care. Seven-month-old transgenic (TgCRND8) (Tg) mice and their nontransgenic (non-Tg) littermates were entered in the study. Mice were treated weekly with MR imaging–guided focused ultrasound in the bilateral hippocampus (1.68 MHz, 10-msec bursts, 1-Hz burst repetition frequency, 120-second total duration). After 1 month, spatial memory was tested in the Y maze with the novel arm prior to sacrifice and immunohistochemical analysis. The data were compared by using unpaired t tests and analysis of variance with Tukey post hoc analysis. Results Untreated Tg mice spent 61% less time than untreated non-Tg mice exploring the novel arm of the Y maze because of spatial memory impairments (P < .05). Following MR imaging–guided focused ultrasound, Tg mice spent 99% more time exploring the novel arm, performing as well as their non-Tg littermates. Changes in behavior were correlated with a reduction of the number and size of amyloid plaques in the MR imaging–guided focused ultrasound–treated animals (P < .01). Further, after MR imaging–guided focused ultrasound treatment, there was a 250% increase in the number of newborn neurons in the hippocampus (P < .01). The newborn neurons had longer dendrites and more arborization after MR imaging–guided focused ultrasound, as well (P < .01). Conclusion Repeated MR imaging–guided focused ultrasound treatments led to spatial memory improvement in a Tg mouse model of ADAlzheimer disease. The behavior changes may be mediated by decreased amyloid pathologic abnormalities and increased neuronal

  11. Cardiac shear-wave elastography using a transesophageal transducer: application to the mapping of thermal lesions in ultrasound transesophageal cardiac ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiecinski, Wojciech; Bessière, Francis; Constanciel Colas, Elodie; Apoutou N'Djin, W.; Tanter, Mickaël; Lafon, Cyril; Pernot, Mathieu

    2015-10-01

    Heart rhythm disorders, such as atrial fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia can be treated by catheter-based thermal ablation. However, clinically available systems based on radio-frequency or cryothermal ablation suffer from limited energy penetration and the lack of lesion’s extent monitoring. An ultrasound-guided transesophageal device has recently successfully been used to perform High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) ablation in targeted regions of the heart in vivo. In this study we investigate the feasibility of a dual therapy and imaging approach on the same transesophageal device. We demonstrate in vivo that quantitative cardiac shear-wave elastography (SWE) can be performed with the device and we show on ex vivo samples that transesophageal SWE can map the extent of the HIFU lesions. First, SWE was validated with the transesophageal endoscope in one sheep in vivo. The stiffness of normal atrial and ventricular tissues has been assessed during the cardiac cycle (n=11 ) and mapped (n= 7 ). Second, HIFU ablation has been performed with the therapy-imaging transesophageal device in ex vivo chicken breast samples (n  =  3), then atrial (left, n= 2 ) and ventricular (left n=1 , right n=1 ) porcine heart tissues. SWE provided stiffness maps of the tissues before and after ablation. Areas of the lesions were obtained by tissue color change with gross pathology and compared to SWE. During the cardiac cycle stiffness varied from 0.5   ±   0.1 kPa to 6.0   ±   0.3 kPa in the atrium and from 1.3   ±   0.3 kPa to 13.5   ±   9.1 kPa in the ventricles. The thermal lesions were visible on all SWE maps performed after ablation. Shear modulus of the ablated zones increased to 16.3   ±   5.5 kPa (versus 4.4   ±   1.6 kPa before ablation) in the chicken breast, to 30.3   ±   10.3 kPa (versus 12.2   ±   4.3 kPa) in the atria and to 73.8   ±   13

  12. Cardiac shear-wave elastography using a transesophageal transducer: application to the mapping of thermal lesions in ultrasound transesophageal cardiac ablation.

    PubMed

    Kwiecinski, Wojciech; Bessière, Francis; Colas, Elodie Constanciel; N'Djin, W Apoutou; Tanter, Mickaël; Lafon, Cyril; Pernot, Mathieu

    2015-10-21

    Heart rhythm disorders, such as atrial fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia can be treated by catheter-based thermal ablation. However, clinically available systems based on radio-frequency or cryothermal ablation suffer from limited energy penetration and the lack of lesion's extent monitoring. An ultrasound-guided transesophageal device has recently successfully been used to perform High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) ablation in targeted regions of the heart in vivo. In this study we investigate the feasibility of a dual therapy and imaging approach on the same transesophageal device. We demonstrate in vivo that quantitative cardiac shear-wave elastography (SWE) can be performed with the device and we show on ex vivo samples that transesophageal SWE can map the extent of the HIFU lesions. First, SWE was validated with the transesophageal endoscope in one sheep in vivo. The stiffness of normal atrial and ventricular tissues has been assessed during the cardiac cycle (n = 11) and mapped (n = 7). Second, HIFU ablation has been performed with the therapy-imaging transesophageal device in ex vivo chicken breast samples (n  =  3), then atrial (left, n = 2) and ventricular (left n = 1, right n = 1) porcine heart tissues. SWE provided stiffness maps of the tissues before and after ablation. Areas of the lesions were obtained by tissue color change with gross pathology and compared to SWE. During the cardiac cycle stiffness varied from 0.5   ±   0.1 kPa to 6.0   ±   0.3 kPa in the atrium and from 1.3   ±   0.3 kPa to 13.5   ±   9.1 kPa in the ventricles. The thermal lesions were visible on all SWE maps performed after ablation. Shear modulus of the ablated zones increased to 16.3   ±   5.5 kPa (versus 4.4   ±   1.6 kPa before ablation) in the chicken breast, to 30.3   ±   10.3 kPa (versus 12.2   ±   4.3 kPa) in the atria and to 73.8

  13. Real-time dynamic display of registered 4D cardiac MR and ultrasound images using a GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Huang, X.; Eagleson, R.; Guiraudon, G.; Peters, T. M.

    2007-03-01

    In minimally invasive image-guided surgical interventions, different imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and real-time three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound (US), can provide complementary, multi-spectral image information. Multimodality dynamic image registration is a well-established approach that permits real-time diagnostic information to be enhanced by placing lower-quality real-time images within a high quality anatomical context. For the guidance of cardiac procedures, it would be valuable to register dynamic MRI or CT with intraoperative US. However, in practice, either the high computational cost prohibits such real-time visualization of volumetric multimodal images in a real-world medical environment, or else the resulting image quality is not satisfactory for accurate guidance during the intervention. Modern graphics processing units (GPUs) provide the programmability, parallelism and increased computational precision to begin to address this problem. In this work, we first outline our research on dynamic 3D cardiac MR and US image acquisition, real-time dual-modality registration and US tracking. Then we describe image processing and optimization techniques for 4D (3D + time) cardiac image real-time rendering. We also present our multimodality 4D medical image visualization engine, which directly runs on a GPU in real-time by exploiting the advantages of the graphics hardware. In addition, techniques such as multiple transfer functions for different imaging modalities, dynamic texture binding, advanced texture sampling and multimodality image compositing are employed to facilitate the real-time display and manipulation of the registered dual-modality dynamic 3D MR and US cardiac datasets.

  14. Autonomic, locomotor and cardiac abnormalities in a mouse model of muscular dystrophy: targeting the renin-angiotensin system.

    PubMed

    Sabharwal, Rasna; Chapleau, Mark W

    2014-04-01

    New Findings What is the topic of this review? This symposium report summarizes autonomic, cardiac and skeletal muscle abnormalities in sarcoglycan-δ-deficient mice (Sgcd-/-), a mouse model of limb girdle muscular dystrophy, with emphasis on the roles of autonomic dysregulation and activation of the renin-angiotensin system at a young age. What advances does it highlight? The contributions of the autonomic nervous system and the renin-angiotensin system to the pathogenesis of muscular dystrophy are highlighted. Results demonstrate that autonomic dysregulation precedes and predicts later development of cardiac dysfunction in Sgcd-/- mice and that treatment of young Sgcd-/- mice with the angiotensin type 1 receptor antagonist losartan or with angiotensin-(1-7) abrogates the autonomic dysregulation, attenuates skeletal muscle pathology and increases spontaneous locomotor activity. Muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of genetic muscle diseases characterized by muscle weakness and atrophy. Mutations in sarcoglycans and other subunits of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex cause muscular dystrophy and dilated cardiomyopathy in animals and humans. Aberrant autonomic signalling is recognized in a variety of neuromuscular disorders. We hypothesized that activation of the renin-angiotensin system contributes to skeletal muscle and autonomic dysfunction in mice deficient in the sarcoglycan-δ (Sgcd) gene at a young age and that this early autonomic dysfunction contributes to the later development of left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and increased mortality. We demonstrated that young Sgcd-/- mice exhibit histopathological features of skeletal muscle dystrophy, decreased locomotor activity and severe autonomic dysregulation, but normal LV function. Autonomic regulation continued to deteriorate in Sgcd-/- mice with age and was accompanied by LV dysfunction and dilated cardiomyopathy at older ages. Autonomic dysregulation at a young age predicted later development of

  15. The Value of Ultrasound and Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Diagnostics and Prediction of Morbidity in Cases of Placenta Previa with Abnormal Placentation

    PubMed Central

    Algebally, Ahmed M.; Yousef, Reda Ramadan Hussein; Badr, Sanaa Sayed Hussein; Al Obeidly, Amal; Szmigielski, Wojciech; Al Ibrahim, Abdullah A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background The purpose of the study was to evaluate the role of ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnostics and management of abnormal placentation in women with placenta previa and to compare the morbidity associated with that to placenta previa alone. Material/Methods The study includes 100 pregnant women with placenta previa with and without abnormal placentation. The results of MRI and US in abnormal placentation were compared with post-operative data. The patients’ files were reviewed for assessment of operative and post-operative morbidity. The results of our statistical analysis were compared with data from the literature. Results US and MRI showed no significant difference in sensitivity and specificity in diagnosing abnormal placentation (97–100% and 94–100%, respectively). MRI was more sensitive than US for the detection of myometrial invasion and the type of abnormal placentation (73.5% and 47%, respectively). The difference between pre- and post-operative hemoglobin values and estimated blood loss were the most significant risk factors for abnormal placentation, added to risk factors known for placenta previa. Post-partum surgical complications and prolonged hospital stay were more common in the cases of placenta previa with abnormal placentation, however statistically insignificant. Conclusions US and MRI are accurate imaging modalities for diagnosing abnormal placentation. MRI was more sensitive for the detection of the degree of placental invasion. The patient’s morbidity increased in cases with abnormal placentation. There was no significant difference in post operative-complications and hospitalization time due to pre-operative planning when the diagnosis was established with US and MRI. PMID:25411586

  16. Point of Care Cardiac Ultrasound Applications in the Emergency Department and Intensive Care Unit - A Review

    PubMed Central

    Arntfield, Robert T; Millington, Scott J

    2012-01-01

    The use of point of care echocardiography by non-cardiologist in acute care settings such as the emergency department (ED) or the intensive care unit (ICU) is very common. Unlike diagnostic echocardiography, the scope of such point of care exams is often restricted to address the clinical questions raised by the patient’s differential diagnosis or chief complaint in order to inform immediate management decisions. In this article, an overview of the most common applications of this focused echocardiography in the ED and ICU is provided. This includes but is not limited to the evaluation of patients experiencing hypotension, cardiac arrest, cardiac trauma, chest pain and patients after cardiac surgery. PMID:22894759

  17. Clinical application of whole-genome array CGH during prenatal diagnosis: Study of 25 selected pregnancies with abnormal ultrasound findings or apparently balanced structural aberrations

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The purpose of the study was the application and evaluation of array Comparative Genomic Hybridization (array CGH) in selected cases during prenatal diagnosis. Array CGH was applied in 25 fetal samples out of which 15 had normal karyotypes and abnormal ultrasound findings and 10 had apparently balanced structural aberrations with or without abnormal ultrasound findings. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood, chorionic villi samples (CV) and amniotic fluid. Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) array CGH (Cytochip, BlueGnome Ltd.) of 1 Mb was applied and results were confirmed with either Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH), Multiplex Ligation-dependant Probe Amplification (MLPA) or Real-Time PCR. Results Three out of 25 samples (12%), referred for prenatal array CGH, were found to carry copy number alterations. The number of cases with clinically significant alterations was 2/25 (8%), while one (4%) was of uncertain clinical significance. Two benign Copy Number Variations (CNVs) were also found in 1/25 cases (4%). Conclusions The outcome of this study indicates the ability of array CGH to identify chromosomal abnormalities which cannot be detected during routine prenatal cytogenetic analysis, therefore increasing the overall detection rate. PMID:21110858

  18. Cardiac amyloidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the way electrical signals move through the heart (conduction system). This can lead to abnormal heart beats ( ... due to medication) Sick sinus syndrome Symptomatic cardiac conduction system disease (arrhythmias related to abnormal conduction of ...

  19. Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Using a Pocket-Size Device in the Emergency Room

    PubMed Central

    Mancuso, Frederico José Neves; Siqueira, Vicente Nicoliello; Moisés, Valdir Ambrósio; Gois, Aécio Flavio Teixeira; de Paola, Angelo Amato Vincenzo; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Camargo; Campos, Orlando

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular urgencies are frequent reasons for seeking medical care. Prompt and accurate medical diagnosis is critical to reduce the morbidity and mortality of these conditions. Objective To evaluate the use of a pocket-size echocardiography in addition to clinical history and physical exam in a tertiary medical emergency care. Methods One hundred adult patients without known cardiac or lung diseases who sought emergency care with cardiac complaints were included. Patients with ischemic changes in the electrocardiography or fever were excluded. A focused echocardiography with GE Vscan equipment was performed after the initial evaluation in the emergency room. Cardiac chambers dimensions, left and right ventricular systolic function, intracardiac flows with color, pericardium, and aorta were evaluated. Results The mean age was 61 ± 17 years old. The patient complaint was chest pain in 51 patients, dyspnea in 32 patients, arrhythmia to evaluate the left ventricular function in ten patients, hypotension/dizziness in five patients and edema in one patient. In 28 patients, the focused echocardiography allowed to confirm the initial diagnosis: 19 patients with heart failure, five with acute coronary syndrome, two with pulmonary embolism and two patients with cardiac tamponade. In 17 patients, the echocardiography changed the diagnosis: ten with suspicious of heart failure, two with pulmonary embolism suspicious, two with hypotension without cause, one suspicious of acute coronary syndrome, one of cardiac tamponade and one of aortic dissection. Conclusion The focused echocardiography with pocket-size equipment in the emergency care may allow a prompt diagnosis and, consequently, an earlier initiation of the therapy. PMID:25590933

  20. Crossed pulmonary arteries: a report on 20 cases with an emphasis on the clinical features and the genetic and cardiac abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Babaoğlu, Kadir; Altun, Gürkan; Binnetoğlu, Köksal; Dönmez, Muhammed; Kayabey, Özlem; Anık, Yonca

    2013-01-01

    Crossed pulmonary arteries (CPAs) are a rare abnormality in which the ostium of the left pulmonary artery originates superior to the right pulmonary artery and to its right. Recognition of this rare pathology is important because it generally is accompanied by other congenital heart defects, extracardiac anomalies, and certain genetic problems. To date, only a few cases have been reported, and most of these cases have been associated with complex cardiac abnormalities. The authors detected 20 cases of CPA between June 2009 and November 2012 through their increasing awareness of this anomaly. Approximately 9,250 echocardiograms were performed during this period, and all of them also were checked for this anomaly. This report describes 20 cases of this CPA, with an emphasis on the clinical features and the genetic and cardiac abnormalities. The patients ranged in age from 1 day to 13 years at the time of the initial diagnosis. Four patients had complex cardiac pathologies such as tetralogy of Fallot, truncus arteriosus, transposition of the great arteries, and complete atrioventricular septal defect. Of the 20 patients, 11 had ventricular septal defects, and 12 had atrial septal defects. Pulmonary artery stenosis was detected in 12 (55 %) of the 20 patients. Aortic arch abnormalities such as interrupted aortic arch, right aortic arch, and coarctation of the aorta were detected in six patients. One patient had a left persistent superior vena cava. In 45 % of the cases, an associated genetic syndrome (DiGeorge-, Noonan-, Holt-Oram syndromes, vertebral, anal, cardiac, tracheal, esophageal, renal, limb anomalies [VACTERL] anomalies) was present. These syndromes were diagnosed based on their clinical features. Karyotype and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses for a 22q11 deletion were performed for 11 patients, with 10 patients found to have normal karyotype and FISH results. Only one patient had a 22q11 deletion. Six patients underwent successful operations

  1. Update on the safety and efficacy of commercial ultrasound contrast agents in cardiac applications

    PubMed Central

    Tracy, Melissa J; Feinstein, Steven B

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are currently used throughout the world in both clinical and research settings. The concept of contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging originated in the late 1960s, and the first commercially available agents were initially developed in the 1980s. Today's microbubbles are designed for greater utility and are used for both approved and off-label indications. In October 2007, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) imposed additional product label warnings that included serious cardiopulmonary reactions, several new disease-state contraindications, and a mandated 30 min post-procedure monitoring period for the agents Optison and Definity. These additional warnings were prompted by reports of cardiopulmonary reactions that were temporally related but were not clearly attributable to these UCAs. Subsequent published reports over the following months established not only the safety but also the improved efficacy of clinical ultrasound applications with UCAs. The FDA consequently updated the product labeling in June 2008 and reduced contraindications, although it continued to monitor select patients. In addition, a post-marketing program was proposed to the sponsors for a series of safety studies to further assess the risk of UCAs. Then in October 2011, the FDA leadership further downgraded the warnings after hearing the results of the post-marketing data, which revealed continued safety and improved efficacy. The present review focuses on the use of UCAs in today's clinical practice, including the approved indications, a variety of off-label uses, and the most recent data, which affirms the safety and efficacy of UCAs. PMID:26693339

  2. Ultrasound - Breast

    MedlinePlus

    ... discharge) and to characterize potential abnormalities seen on mammography or breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ultrasound imaging ... supply in breast lesions . Supplemental Breast Cancer Screening Mammography is the only screening tool for breast cancer ...

  3. Robust spatio-temporal registration of 4D cardiac ultrasound sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bersvendsen, Jørn; Toews, Matthew; Danudibroto, Adriyana; Wells, William M.; Urheim, Stig; Estépar, Raúl San José; Samset, Eigil

    2016-04-01

    Registration of multiple 3D ultrasound sectors in order to provide an extended field of view is important for the appreciation of larger anatomical structures at high spatial and temporal resolution. In this paper, we present a method for fully automatic spatio-temporal registration between two partially overlapping 3D ultrasound sequences. The temporal alignment is solved by aligning the normalized cross correlation-over-time curves of the sequences. For the spatial alignment, corresponding 3D Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) features are extracted from all frames of both sequences independently of the temporal alignment. A rigid transform is then calculated by least squares minimization in combination with random sample consensus. The method is applied to 16 echocardiographic sequences of the left and right ventricles and evaluated against manually annotated temporal events and spatial anatomical landmarks. The mean distances between manually identified landmarks in the left and right ventricles after automatic registration were (mean+/-SD) 4.3+/-1.2 mm compared to a reference error of 2.8 +/- 0.6 mm with manual registration. For the temporal alignment, the absolute errors in valvular event times were 14.4 +/- 11.6 ms for Aortic Valve (AV) opening, 18.6 +/- 16.0 ms for AV closing, and 34.6 +/- 26.4 ms for mitral valve opening, compared to a mean inter-frame time of 29 ms.

  4. Clinical Applicability of Assessment of Jugular Flow over the Individual Cardiac Cycle Compared with Current Ultrasound Methodology.

    PubMed

    Sisini, Francesco; Tessari, Mirko; Menegatti, Erica; Vannini, Maria Elena; Gianesini, Sergio; Tavoni, Valentina; Gadda, Giacomo; Gambaccini, Mauro; Taibi, Angelo; Zamboni, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    There is growing interest in measuring cerebral venous outflow with ultrasound (US). However, results obtained with the current US Doppler methodology, which uses just a single value of cross-sectional area (CSA) of the vessel, are highly variable and inconclusive. The product of CSA and time-averaged velocity in the case of pulsatile vessels may be a possible source of error, particularly for a pulsatile vein like the internal jugular vein (IJV), where the cardiac pump transmits a sequence of well-established waves along the conduit. We herein propose a novel technique for US IJV flow assessment that accurately accounts for IJV CSA variations during the cardiac cycle. Five subjects were investigated with a high-resolution real-time B-mode video, synchronized with an electrocardiography trace. In this approach, CSA variations representing the pulsatility of the IJV are overlapped with the velocity curve obtained by the usual spectral Doppler trace. The overlap is then phased point by point using the electrocardiography pacemaker. This allows us to experimentally measure the velocity variation in relation to the change in CSA precisely, ultimately enabling calculation of IJV flow. (i) The sequence of CSA variation with respect to the electrocardiography waves corresponds exactly to the jugular venous pulse as measured in physiology. (ii) The methodology permits us to phase the velocity and CSA, which is ultimately what is currently lacking to precisely calculate the flow in the IJV with US. (iii) The time-averaged flow, calculated with the described technique, is very close to that calculated assuming a constant IJV CSA, whereas the time-dependent flow shows differs as much as 40%. (iv) Finally, we tested the accuracy of the technique with a methodology that may allow for universal assessment of the accuracy of each personal US-based evaluation of flow rate. PMID:27108038

  5. Parametric ultrasound and fluoroscopy image fusion for guidance of left ventricle lead placement in cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    PubMed

    Babic, Aleksandar; Odland, Hans Henrik; Gérard, Olivier; Samset, Eigil

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies show that the response rate to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) could be improved if the left ventricle (LV) is paced at the site of the latest mechanical activation, but away from the myocardial scar. A prototype system for CRT lead placement guidance that combines LV functional information from ultrasound with live x-ray fluoroscopy was developed. Two mean anatomical models, each containing LV epi-, LV endo- and right ventricle endocardial surfaces, were computed from a database of 33 heart failure patients as a substitute for a patient-specific model. The sphericity index was used to divide the observed population into two groups. The distance between the mean and the patient-specific models was determined using a signed distance field metric (reported in mm). The average error values for LV epicardium were [Formula: see text] and for LV endocardium were [Formula: see text]. The validity of using average LV models for a CRT procedure was tested by simulating coronary vein selection in a group of 15 CRT candidates. The probability of selecting the same coronary branch, when basing the selection on the average model compared to a patient-specific model, was estimated to be [Formula: see text]. This was found to be clinically acceptable. PMID:26158110

  6. Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Using a Pocket-Size Device in the Emergency Room.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, Frederico José Neves; Siqueira, Vicente Nicoliello; Moisés, Valdir Ambrósio; Gois, Aécio Flavio Teixeira; Paola, Angelo Amato Vincenzo de; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Camargo; Campos, Orlando

    2014-10-28

    Background: Cardiovascular urgencies are frequent reasons for seeking medical care. Prompt and accurate medical diagnosis is critical to reduce the morbidity and mortality of these conditions. Objective: To evaluate the use of a pocket-size echocardiography in addition to clinical history and physical exam in a tertiary medical emergency care. Methods: One hundred adult patients without known cardiac or lung diseases who sought emergency care with cardiac complaints were included. Patients with ischemic changes in the electrocardiography or fever were excluded. A focused echocardiography with GE Vscan equipment was performed after the initial evaluation in the emergency room. Cardiac chambers dimensions, left and right ventricular systolic function, intracardiac flows with color, pericardium, and aorta were evaluated. Results: The mean age was 61 ± 17 years old. The patient complaint was chest pain in 51 patients, dyspnea in 32 patients, arrhythmia to evaluate the left ventricular function in ten patients, hypotension/dizziness in five patients and edema in one patient. In 28 patients, the focused echocardiography allowed to confirm the initial diagnosis: 19 patients with heart failure, five with acute coronary syndrome, two with pulmonary embolism and two patients with cardiac tamponade. In 17 patients, the echocardiography changed the diagnosis: ten with suspicious of heart failure, two with pulmonary embolism suspicious, two with hypotension without cause, one suspicious of acute coronary syndrome, one of cardiac tamponade and one of aortic dissection. Conclusion: The focused echocardiography with pocket-size equipment in the emergency care may allow a prompt diagnosis and, consequently, an earlier initiation of the therapy.Fundamento: As urgências cardiovasculares são causas importantes de procura por atendimento médico, sendo fundamentais a rapidez e a precisão no diagnóstico para diminuir sua morbimortalidade. Objetivo: Avaliar o uso da ecocardiografia

  7. Registration of 2D cardiac images to real-time 3D ultrasound volumes for 3D stress echocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, K. Y. Esther; van Stralen, Marijn; Voormolen, Marco M.; van Burken, Gerard; Nemes, Attila; ten Cate, Folkert J.; Geleijnse, Marcel L.; de Jong, Nico; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.; Reiber, Johan H. C.; Bosch, Johan G.

    2006-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) stress echocardiography is a novel technique for diagnosing cardiac dysfunction, by comparing wall motion of the left ventricle under different stages of stress. For quantitative comparison of this motion, it is essential to register the ultrasound data. We propose an intensity based rigid registration method to retrieve two-dimensional (2D) four-chamber (4C), two-chamber, and short-axis planes from the 3D data set acquired in the stress stage, using manually selected 2D planes in the rest stage as reference. The algorithm uses the Nelder-Mead simplex optimization to find the optimal transformation of one uniform scaling, three rotation, and three translation parameters. We compared registration using the SAD, SSD, and NCC metrics, performed on four resolution levels of a Gaussian pyramid. The registration's effectiveness was assessed by comparing the 3D positions of the registered apex and mitral valve midpoints and 4C direction with the manually selected results. The registration was tested on data from 20 patients. Best results were found using the NCC metric on data downsampled with factor two: mean registration errors were 8.1mm, 5.4mm, and 8.0° in the apex position, mitral valve position, and 4C direction respectively. The errors were close to the interobserver (7.1mm, 3.8mm, 7.4°) and intraobserver variability (5.2mm, 3.3mm, 7.0°), and better than the error before registration (9.4mm, 9.0mm, 9.9°). We demonstrated that the registration algorithm visually and quantitatively improves the alignment of rest and stress data sets, performing similar to manual alignment. This will improve automated analysis in 3D stress echocardiography.

  8. Ex vivo viscoelastic characterization of head and neck tissue abnormalities using ultrasound-stimulated vibro-acoustography (USVA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccabi, Ashkan; Garritano, James; Arshi, Armin; Saddik, George; Tajudeen, Bobby A.; St. John, Maie; Grundfest, Warren S.; Taylor, Zachary D.

    2014-03-01

    In the absence of an imaging technique that offers a highly dynamic range detection of malignant tissue intra-operatively, surgeons are often forced to excise excess healthy tissue to ensure clear margins of resection. Techniques that are currently used in the detection of tumor regions include palpation, optical coherence tomography (OCT) elastography, dye injections, and conventional ultrasound to pinpoint the affected area. However, these methods suffer from limitations such as minimal specificity, low contrast, and limited depth of penetration. Lack of specificity and low contrast result in the production of vague disease margins and fail to provide a reliable guidance tool for surgeons. The proposed work presents an alternative diagnostic technique, ultrasound-stimulated vibro-acoustography (USVA), which may potentially provide surgeons with detailed intra-operative imagery characterized by enhanced structural boundaries and well-defined borders based on the viscoelastic properties of tissues. We demonstrate selective imaging using ex vivo tissue samples of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) with the presence of both malignant and normal areas. Spatially resolved maps of varying acoustic properties were generated and show good contrast between the areas of interest. While the results are promising, determining the precision and sensitivity of the USVA imaging system in identifying boundary regions as well as intensities of ex vivo tissue targets may provide additional information to non-invasively assess confined regions of diseased tissues from healthy areas.

  9. Value of Artisanal Simulators to Train Veterinary Students in Performing Invasive Ultrasound-Guided Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hage, Maria Cristina F. N. S.; Massaferro, Ana Beatriz; Lopes, Érika Rondon; Beraldo, Carolina Mariano; Daniel, Jéssika

    2016-01-01

    Pericardial effusion can lead to cardiac tamponade, which endangers an animal's life. Ultrasound-guided pericardiocentesis is used to remove abnormal liquid; however, it requires technical expertise. In veterinary medical education, the opportunity to teach this procedure to save lives during emergencies is rare; therefore, simulators are…

  10. Abnormal splicing in the N‐terminal variable region of cardiac troponin T impairs systolic function of the heart with preserved Frank‐Starling compensation

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Han‐Zhong; Chen, Guozhen; Nan, Changlong; Huang, Xupei; Jin, Jian‐Ping

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Abnormal splice‐out of the exon 7‐encoded segment in the N‐terminal variable region of cardiac troponin T (cTnT‐ΔE7) was found in turkeys and, together with the inclusion of embryonic exon (eTnT), in adult dogs with a correlation with dilated cardiomyopathy. Overexpression of these cTnT variants in transgenic mouse hearts significantly decreased cardiac function. To further investigate the functional effect of cTnT‐ΔE7 or ΔE7+eTnT in vivo under systemic regulation, echocardiography was carried out in single and double‐transgenic mice. No atrial enlargement, ventricular hypertrophy or dilation was detected in the hearts of 2‐month‐old cTnT‐ΔE7 and ΔE7+eTnT mice in comparison to wild‐type controls, indicating a compensated state. However, left ventricular fractional shortening and ejection fraction were decreased in ΔE7 and ΔE7+eTnT mice, and the response to isoproterenol was lower in ΔE7+eTnT mice. Left ventricular outflow tract velocity and gradient were decreased in the transgenic mouse hearts, indicating decreased systolic function. Ex vivo working heart function showed that high afterload or low preload resulted in more severe decreases in the systolic function and energetic efficiency of cTnT‐ΔE7 and ΔE7+eTnT hearts. On the other hand, increases in preload demonstrated preserved Frank‐Starling responses and minimized the loss of cardiac function and efficiency. The data demonstrate that the N‐terminal variable region of cardiac TnT regulates systolic function of the heart. PMID:25194024

  11. Validation of On-Orbit Methodology for the Assessment of Cardiac Function and Changes in the Circulating Volume Using Ultrasound and Braslet-M Occlusion Cuffs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Douglas; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Ebert, Douglas; Duncan, Michael; Bogomolov, Valery V.; Alferova, Irina V.; Matveev, Vladimir P.; Dulchavsky, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this joint U.S. - Russian project was the development and validation of an in-flight methodology to assess a number of cardiac and vascular parameters associated with circulating volume and its manipulation in long-duration space flight. Responses to modified Valsalva and Mueller maneuvers were measured by cardiac and vascular ultrasound (US) before, during, and after temporary volume reduction by means of Braslet-M thigh occlusion cuffs (Russia). Materials and Methods: The study protocol was conducted in 14 sessions on 9 ISS crewmembers, with an average exposure to microgravity of 122 days. Baseline cardiovascular measurements were taken by echocardiography in multiple modes (including tissue Doppler of both ventricles) and femoral and jugular vein imaging on the International Space Station (ISS). The Braslet devices were then applied and measurements were repeated after >10 minutes. The cuffs were then released and the hemodynamic recovery process was monitored. Modified Valsalva and Mueller maneuvers were used throughout the protocol. All US data were acquired by the HDI-5000 ultrasound system aboard the ISS (ATL/Philips, USA) during remotely guided sessions. The study protocol, including the use of Braslet-M for this purpose, was approved by the ISS Human Research Multilateral Review Board (HRMRB). Results: The effects of fluid sequestration on a number of echocardiographic and vascular parameters were readily detectable by in-flight US, as were responses to respiratory maneuvers. The overall volume status assessment methodology appears to be valid and practical, with a decrease in left heart lateral E (tissue Doppler) as one of the most reliable measures. Increase in the femoral vein cross-sectional areas was consistently observed with Braslet application. Other significant differences and trends within the extensive cardiovascular data were also observed. (Decreased - RV and LV preload indices, Cardiac Output, LV E all maneuvers, LV Stroke

  12. Noninvasive assessment of cardiac abnormalities in experimental autoimmune myocarditis by magnetic resonance microscopy imaging in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Massilamany, Chandirasegaran; Khalilzad-Sharghi, Vahid; Gangaplara, Arunakumar; Steffen, David; Othman, Shadi F; Reddy, Jay

    2014-01-01

    Myocarditis is an inflammation of the myocardium, but only -10% of those affected show clinical manifestations of the disease. To study the immune events of myocardial injuries, various mouse models of myocarditis have been widely used. This study involved experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) induced with cardiac myosin heavy chain (Myhc)-α 334-352 in A/J mice; the affected animals develop lymphocytic myocarditis but with no apparent clinical signs. In this model, the utility of magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) as a non-invasive modality to determine the cardiac structural and functional changes in animals immunized with Myhc-α 334-352 is shown. EAM and healthy mice were imaged using a 9.4 T (400 MHz) 89 mm vertical core bore scanner equipped with a 4 cm millipede radio-frequency imaging probe and 100 G/cm triple axis gradients. Cardiac images were acquired from anesthetized animals using a gradient-echo-based cine pulse sequence, and the animals were monitored by respiration and pulse oximetry. The analysis revealed an increase in the thickness of the ventricular wall in EAM mice, with a corresponding decrease in the interior diameter of ventricles, when compared with healthy mice. The data suggest that morphological and functional changes in the inflamed hearts can be non-invasively monitored by MRM in live animals. In conclusion, MRM offers an advantage of assessing the progression and regression of myocardial injuries in diseases caused by infectious agents, as well as response to therapies. PMID:24998332

  13. Design and evaluation of a transesophageal HIFU probe for ultrasound-guided cardiac ablation: simulation of a HIFU mini-maze procedure and preliminary ex vivo trials.

    PubMed

    Constanciel, Elodie; N'Djin, W Apoutou; Bessière, Francis; Chavrier, Françoise; Grinberg, Daniel; Vignot, Alexandre; Chevalier, Philippe; Chapelon, Jean Yves; Lafon, Cyril

    2013-09-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most frequent cardiac arrhythmia. Left atrial catheter ablation is currently performed to treat this disease. Several energy sources are used, such as radio-frequency or cryotherapy. The main target of this procedure is to isolate the pulmonary veins. However, significant complications caused by the invasive procedure are described, such as stroke, tamponade, and atrioesophageal fistula, and a second intervention is often needed to avoid atrial fibrillation recurrence. For these reasons, a minimally-invasive device allowing performance of more complex treatments is still needed. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) can cause deep tissue lesions without damaging intervening tissues. Left atrial ultrasound-guided transesophageal HIFU ablation could have the potential to become a new ablation technique. The goal of this study was to design and test a minimally-invasive ultrasound-guided transesophageal HIFU probe under realistic treatment conditions. First, numerical simulations were conducted to determine the probe geometry, and to validate the feasibility of performing an AF treatment using a HIFU mini-maze (HIFUMM) procedure. Then, a prototype was manufactured and characterized. The 18-mm-diameter probe head housing contained a 3-MHz spherical truncated HIFU transducer divided into 8 rings, with a 5-MHz commercial transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) transducer integrated in the center. Finally, ex vivo experiments were performed to test the impact of the esophagus layer between the probe and the tissue to treat, and also the influence of the lungs and the vascularization on lesion formation. First results show that this prototype successfully created ex vivo transmural myocardial lesions under ultrasound guidance, while preserving intervening tissues (such as the esophagus). Ultrasound-guided transesophageal HIFU can be a good candidate for treatment of AF in the future. PMID:24658718

  14. Abnormal interactions of calsequestrin with the ryanodine receptor calcium release channel complex linked to exercise-induced sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Terentyev, Dmitry; Nori, Alessandra; Santoro, Massimo; Viatchenko-Karpinski, Serge; Kubalova, Zuzana; Gyorke, Inna; Terentyeva, Radmila; Vedamoorthyrao, Srikanth; Blom, Nico A; Valle, Giorgia; Napolitano, Carlo; Williams, Simon C; Volpe, Pompeo; Priori, Silvia G; Gyorke, Sandor

    2006-05-12

    Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is a familial arrhythmogenic disorder associated with mutations in the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) and cardiac calsequestrin (CASQ2) genes. Previous in vitro studies suggested that RyR2 and CASQ2 interact as parts of a multimolecular Ca(2+)-signaling complex; however, direct evidence for such interactions and their potential significance to myocardial function remain to be determined. We identified a novel CASQ2 mutation in a young female with a structurally normal heart and unexplained syncopal episodes. This mutation results in the nonconservative substitution of glutamine for arginine at amino acid 33 of CASQ2 (R33Q). Adenoviral-mediated expression of CASQ2(R33Q) in adult rat myocytes led to an increase in excitation-contraction coupling gain and to more frequent occurrences of spontaneous propagating (Ca2+ waves) and local Ca2+ signals (sparks) with respect to control cells expressing wild-type CASQ2 (CASQ2WT). As revealed by a Ca2+ indicator entrapped inside the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of permeabilized myocytes, the increased occurrence of spontaneous Ca2+ sparks and waves was associated with a dramatic decrease in intra-SR [Ca2+]. Recombinant CASQ2WT and CASQ2R33Q exhibited similar Ca(2+)-binding capacities in vitro; however, the mutant protein lacked the ability of its WT counterpart to inhibit RyR2 activity at low luminal [Ca2+] in planar lipid bilayers. We conclude that the R33Q mutation disrupts interactions of CASQ2 with the RyR2 channel complex and impairs regulation of RyR2 by luminal Ca2+. These results show that intracellular Ca2+ cycling in normal heart relies on an intricate interplay of CASQ2 with the proteins of the RyR2 channel complex and that disruption of these interactions can lead to cardiac arrhythmia. PMID:16601229

  15. Mitochondria-targeted ROS scavenger improves post-ischemic recovery of cardiac function and attenuates mitochondrial abnormalities in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Escobales, Nelson; Nuñez, Rebeca E.; Jang, Sehwan; Parodi-Rullan, Rebecca; Ayala-Peña, Sylvette; Sacher, Joshua R.; Skoda, Erin M.; Wipf, Peter; Frontera, Walter; Javadov, Sabzali

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of aging and age-associated diseases. In this study, we evaluated the effects of XJB-5-131 (XJB), a mitochondria-targeted ROS and electron scavenger, on cardiac resistance to ischemia-reperfusion (IR)-induced oxidative stress in aged rats. Male adult (5-month old, n=17) and aged (29-month old, n=19) Fischer Brown Norway (F344/BN) rats were randomly assigned to the following groups: adult (A), adult+XJB (AX), aged (O), and aged+XJB (OX). XJB was administered 3 times per week (3 mg/kg body weight, IP) for four weeks. At the end of the treatment period, cardiac function was continuously monitored in excised hearts using the Langendorff technique for 30 min, followed by 20-min of global ischemia, and 60-min reperfusion. XJB improved post-ischemic recovery of aged hearts, as evidenced by greater left ventricular developed-pressures and rate-pressure products than the untreated, aged-matched group. The state 3 respiration rates at complexes I, II and IV of mitochondria isolated from XJB-treated aged hearts were 57% (P<0.05), 25% (P<0.05) and 28% (P<0.05), respectively, higher than controls. Ca2+-induced swelling, an indicator of permeability transition pore opening, was reduced in mitochondria of XJB-treated aged rats. In addition, XJB significantly attenuated the H2O2-induced depolarization of the mitochondrial inner membrane as well as total and mitochondrial ROS levels in cultured cardiomyocytes. This study underlines the importance of mitochondrial ROS in aging-induced cardiac dysfunction and suggests that targeting mitochondrial ROS may be an effective therapeutic approach to protect the aged heart against IR injury. PMID:25451170

  16. Mitochondria-targeted ROS scavenger improves post-ischemic recovery of cardiac function and attenuates mitochondrial abnormalities in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Escobales, Nelson; Nuñez, Rebeca E; Jang, Sehwan; Parodi-Rullan, Rebecca; Ayala-Peña, Sylvette; Sacher, Joshua R; Skoda, Erin M; Wipf, Peter; Frontera, Walter; Javadov, Sabzali

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondria-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of aging and age-associated diseases. In this study, we evaluated the effects of XJB-5-131 (XJB), a mitochondria-targeted ROS and electron scavenger, on cardiac resistance to ischemia-reperfusion (IR)-induced oxidative stress in aged rats. Male adult (5-month old, n=17) and aged (29-month old, n=19) Fischer Brown Norway (F344/BN) rats were randomly assigned to the following groups: adult (A), adult+XJB (AX), aged (O), and aged+XJB (OX). XJB was administered 3 times per week (3mg/kg body weight, IP) for four weeks. At the end of the treatment period, cardiac function was continuously monitored in excised hearts using the Langendorff technique for 30 min, followed by 20 min of global ischemia, and 60-min reperfusion. XJB improved post-ischemic recovery of aged hearts, as evidenced by greater left ventricular developed-pressures and rate-pressure products than the untreated, aged-matched group. The state 3 respiration rates at complexes I, II and IV of mitochondria isolated from XJB-treated aged hearts were 57% (P<0.05), 25% (P<0.05) and 28% (P<0.05), respectively, higher than controls. Ca(2+)-induced swelling, an indicator of permeability transition pore opening, was reduced in the mitochondria of XJB-treated aged rats. In addition, XJB significantly attenuated the H2O2-induced depolarization of the mitochondrial inner membrane as well as the total and mitochondrial ROS levels in cultured cardiomyocytes. This study underlines the importance of mitochondrial ROS in aging-induced cardiac dysfunction and suggests that targeting mitochondrial ROS may be an effective therapeutic approach to protect the aged heart against IR injury. PMID:25451170

  17. Duplex ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Vascular ultrasound; Peripheral vascular ultrasound ... A duplex ultrasound combines traditional ultrasound with Doppler ultrasound . Traditional ultrasound uses sound waves that bounce off blood vessels to create ...

  18. Association of interatrial septal abnormalities with cardiac impulse conduction disorders in adult patients: experience from a tertiary center in Kosovo

    PubMed Central

    Bakalli, Aurora; Pllana, Ejup; Koçinaj, Dardan; Bekteshi, Tefik; Dragusha, Gani; Gashi, Masar; Musliu, Nebih; Gashi, Zaim

    2011-01-01

    Interatrial septal disorders, which include: atrial septal defect, patent foramen ovale and atrial septal aneurysm, are frequent congenital anomalies found in adult patients. Early detection of these anomalies is important to prevent their hemodynamic and/or thromboembolic consequences. The aims of this study were: to assess the association between impulse conduction disorders and anomalies of interatrial septum; to determine the prevalence of different types of interatrial septum abnormalities; to assess anatomic, hemodynamic, and clinical consequences of interatrial septal pathologies. Fifty-three adult patients with impulse conduction disorders and patients without ECG changes but with signs of interatrial septal abnormalities, who were referred to our center for echocardiography, were included in a prospective transesophageal echocardiography study. Interatrial septal anomalies were detected in around 85% of the examined patients. Patent foramen ovale was encountered in 32% of the patients, and in combination with atrial septal aneurysm in an additional 11.3% of cases. Atrial septal aneurysm and atrial septal defect were diagnosed with equal frequency in 20.7% of our study population. Impulse conduction disorders were significantly more suggestive of interatrial septal anomalies than clinical signs and symptoms observed in our patients (84.91% vs 30.19%, P=0.002). Right bundle branch block was the most frequent impulse conduction disorder, found in 41 (77.36%) cases. We conclude that interatrial septal anomalies are highly associated with impulse conduction disorders, particularly with right bundle branch block. Impulse conduction disorders are more indicative of interatrial septal abnormalities in earlier stages than can be understood from the patient’s clinical condition. PMID:21977304

  19. Association of interatrial septal abnormalities with cardiac impulse conduction disorders in adult patients: experience from a tertiary center in Kosovo.

    PubMed

    Bakalli, Aurora; Pllana, Ejup; Koçinaj, Dardan; Bekteshi, Tefik; Dragusha, Gani; Gashi, Masar; Musliu, Nebih; Gashi, Zaim

    2011-01-01

    INTERATRIAL SEPTAL DISORDERS, WHICH INCLUDE: atrial septal defect, patent foramen ovale and atrial septal aneurysm, are frequent congenital anomalies found in adult patients. Early detection of these anomalies is important to prevent their hemodynamic and/or thromboembolic consequences. The aims of this study were: to assess the association between impulse conduction disorders and anomalies of interatrial septum; to determine the prevalence of different types of interatrial septum abnormalities; to assess anatomic, hemodynamic, and clinical consequences of interatrial septal pathologies. Fifty-three adult patients with impulse conduction disorders and patients without ECG changes but with signs of interatrial septal abnormalities, who were referred to our center for echocardiography, were included in a prospective transesophageal echocardiography study. Interatrial septal anomalies were detected in around 85% of the examined patients. Patent foramen ovale was encountered in 32% of the patients, and in combination with atrial septal aneurysm in an additional 11.3% of cases. Atrial septal aneurysm and atrial septal defect were diagnosed with equal frequency in 20.7% of our study population. Impulse conduction disorders were significantly more suggestive of interatrial septal anomalies than clinical signs and symptoms observed in our patients (84.91% vs 30.19%, P=0.002). Right bundle branch block was the most frequent impulse conduction disorder, found in 41 (77.36%) cases. We conclude that interatrial septal anomalies are highly associated with impulse conduction disorders, particularly with right bundle branch block. Impulse conduction disorders are more indicative of interatrial septal abnormalities in earlier stages than can be understood from the patient's clinical condition. PMID:21977304

  20. Comparison of rootMUSIC and discrete wavelet transform analysis of Doppler ultrasound blood flow waveforms to detect microvascular abnormalities in type I diabetes.

    PubMed

    Agnew, Christina Elizabeth; McCann, A J; Lockhart, C J; Hamilton, P K; McVeigh, G E; McGivern, R C

    2011-04-01

    The earliest signs of cardiovascular disease occur in microcirculations. Changes to mechanical and structural properties of these small resistive vessels alter the impedance to flow, subsequent reflected waves, and consequently, flow waveform morphology. In this paper, we compare two frequency analysis techniques: 1) rootMUSIC and 2) the discrete wavelet transform (DWT) to extract features of flow velocity waveform morphology captured using Doppler ultrasound from the ophthalmic artery (OA) in 30 controls and 38 age and sex matched Type I diabetics. Conventional techniques for characterizing Doppler velocity waveforms, such as mean velocity, resistive index, and pulsatility index, revealed no significant differences between the groups. However, rootMUSIC and the DWT provided highly correlated results with the spectral content in bands 2-7 (30-0.8 Hz) significantly elevated in the diabetic group (p < 0.05). The spectral distinction between the groups may be attributable to manifestations of underlying pathophysiological processes in vascular impedance and consequent wave reflections, with bands 5 and 7 related to age. Spectral descriptors of OA blood velocity waveforms are better indicators of preclinical microvascular abnormalities in Type I diabetes than conventional measures. Although highly correlated DWT proved slightly more discriminatory than rootMUSIC and has the advantage of extending to subheart rate frequencies, which may be of interest. PMID:21138796

  1. Protective effect of oleanolic acid on oxidative injury and cellular abnormalities in doxorubicin induced cardiac toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Sameer N; Mahajan, Umesh B; Chandrayan, Govind; Kumawat, Vivek S; Kamble, Sarika; Patil, Pradip; Agrawal, Yogeeta O; Patil, Chandragouda R; Ojha, Shreesh

    2016-01-01

    The prevention of doxorubicin (Dox) induced cardiotoxicity may be co-operative to recover future Dox treatment. The aim of this study was to explore the cardioprotective effects of oleanolic acid (OA), an antioxidant agent, on Dox induced cardiotoxicity. OA is a triterpenoid compound, which exist widely in plant kingdom in free acid form or as a glycosidic triterpenoids saponins. Cardiotoxicity was induced in Wistar rats with single intravenous injection of doxorubicin at dose of 67.75 mg/kg i.v for 48 hrs. At 12 hrs of interval following Dox administration the cardioprotective effect of OA (1.5 mg/kg, i.v.) and Amifostine (AMF) (90 mg/kg i.v., single dose prior 30 min) were evaluated. Induction of cardiotoxicity was confirmed by increase in systolic, diastolic, mean arterial pressures, maximal positive rate of developed left ventricular pressure (+LVdP/dtmax, an indicator of myocardial contraction), maximal negative rate of developed left ventricular pressure (-LVdP/dtmax, a meter of myocardial relaxation) and an increase in left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP, a marker of pre-load). Cardiac markers in such as CK-MB, LDH and alterations in ECG. Dox administration showed alteration in Biochemical parameters and endogenous antioxidants. Administration of OA Showed maximal protection against Dox induced cardiac toxicity as observed by reduction in blood pressure, prevention of left ventricular function and attenuation of biochemical and antioxidant parameters. Based on the findings, its concluded that OA can be used as an adjuvant with Dox therapy in treating cancers. PMID:27069540

  2. Protective effect of oleanolic acid on oxidative injury and cellular abnormalities in doxorubicin induced cardiac toxicity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Sameer N; Mahajan, Umesh B; Chandrayan, Govind; Kumawat, Vivek S; Kamble, Sarika; Patil, Pradip; Agrawal, Yogeeta O; Patil, Chandragouda R; Ojha, Shreesh

    2016-01-01

    The prevention of doxorubicin (Dox) induced cardiotoxicity may be co-operative to recover future Dox treatment. The aim of this study was to explore the cardioprotective effects of oleanolic acid (OA), an antioxidant agent, on Dox induced cardiotoxicity. OA is a triterpenoid compound, which exist widely in plant kingdom in free acid form or as a glycosidic triterpenoids saponins. Cardiotoxicity was induced in Wistar rats with single intravenous injection of doxorubicin at dose of 67.75 mg/kg i.v for 48 hrs. At 12 hrs of interval following Dox administration the cardioprotective effect of OA (1.5 mg/kg, i.v.) and Amifostine (AMF) (90 mg/kg i.v., single dose prior 30 min) were evaluated. Induction of cardiotoxicity was confirmed by increase in systolic, diastolic, mean arterial pressures, maximal positive rate of developed left ventricular pressure (+LVdP/dtmax, an indicator of myocardial contraction), maximal negative rate of developed left ventricular pressure (-LVdP/dtmax, a meter of myocardial relaxation) and an increase in left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP, a marker of pre-load). Cardiac markers in such as CK-MB, LDH and alterations in ECG. Dox administration showed alteration in Biochemical parameters and endogenous antioxidants. Administration of OA Showed maximal protection against Dox induced cardiac toxicity as observed by reduction in blood pressure, prevention of left ventricular function and attenuation of biochemical and antioxidant parameters. Based on the findings, its concluded that OA can be used as an adjuvant with Dox therapy in treating cancers. PMID:27069540

  3. Mesenteric lymph from rats with trauma-hemorrhagic shock causes abnormal cardiac myocyte function and induces myocardial contractile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Sambol, Justin T.; Lee, Marlon A.; Jiang, Mingshan; Dosi, Garima; Dong, Wei; Deitch, Edwin A.

    2011-01-01

    Myocardial contractile dysfunction develops following trauma-hemorrhagic shock (T/HS). We have previously shown that, in a rat fixed pressure model of T/HS (mean arterial pressure of 30–35 mmHg for 90 min), mesenteric lymph duct ligation before T/HS prevented T/HS-induced myocardial contractile depression. To determine whether T/HS lymph directly alters myocardial contractility, we examined the functional effects of physiologically relevant concentrations of mesenteric lymph collected from rats undergoing trauma-sham shock (T/SS) or T/HS on both isolated cardiac myocytes and Langendorff-perfused whole hearts. Acute application of T/HS lymph (0.1–2%), but not T/SS lymph, induced dual inotropic effects on myocytes with an immediate increase in the amplitude of cell shortening (1.4 ± 0.1-fold) followed by a complete block of contraction. Similarly, T/HS lymph caused dual, positive and negative effects on cellular Ca2+ transients. These effects were associated with changes in the electrophysiological properties of cardiac myocytes; T/HS lymph initially prolonged the action potential duration (action potential duration at 90% repolarization, 3.3 ± 0.4-fold), and this was followed by a decrease in the plateau potential and membrane depolarization. Furthermore, intravenous infusion of T/HS lymph, but not T/SS lymph, caused myocardial contractile dysfunction at 24 h after injection, which mimicked actual T/HS-induced changes; left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP) and the maximal rate of LVDP rise and fall (±dP/dtmax) were decreased and inotropic response to Ca2+ was blunted. However, the contractile responsiveness to β-adrenergic receptor stimulation in the T/HS lymph-infused hearts remained unchanged. These results suggest that T/HS lymph directly causes negative inotropic effects on the myocardium and that T/HS lymph-induced changes in myocyte function are likely to contribute to the development of T/HS-induced myocardial dysfunction. PMID:21700891

  4. Association between FGF23, α-Klotho, and Cardiac Abnormalities among Patients with Various Chronic Kidney Disease Stages

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Suguru; Fujita, Shu-ichi; Kizawa, Shun; Morita, Hideaki; Ishizaka, Nobukazu

    2016-01-01

    Background Several experimental studies have demonstrated that fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) may induce myocardial hypertrophy via pathways independent of α-Klotho, its co-factor in the induction of phosphaturia. On the other hand, few studies have clearly demonstrated the relationship between FGF23 level and left ventricular hypertrophy among subjects without chronic kidney disease (CKD; i.e., CKD stage G1 or G2). Purpose To investigate the data from 903 patients admitted to the cardiology department with various degrees of renal function, including 234 patients with CKD stage G1/G2. Methods and Results Serum levels of full-length FGF23 and α-Klotho were determined by enzyme immunoassay. After adjustment for sex, age, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), the highest FGF23 tertile was significantly associated with left ventricular hypertrophy among patients with CKD stage G1/G2 and those with CKD stage G3a/G3b/G4 as compared with the lowest FGF23 tertile, and the association retained significance after further adjustment for serum levels of corrected calcium, inorganic phosphate, and C-reactive protein, as well as diuretic use, history of hypertension, and systolic blood pressure. FGF23 was also associated with low left ventricular ejection fraction among patients with CKD stage G1/G2 and those with CKD stage G3a/G3b/G4 after adjusting for age, sex, eGFR, corrected calcium, and inorganic phosphate. On the other hand, compared with the highest α-Klotho tertile, the lowest α-Klotho tertile was associated with left ventricular hypertrophy and systolic dysfunction only among patients with CKD stage G3b and stage G3a, respectively. Conclusions An association between FGF23 and cardiac hypertrophy and systolic dysfunction was observed among patients without CKD as well as those with CKD after multivariate adjustment. However, the association between α-Klotho and cardiac hypertrophy and systolic dysfunction was significant only among patients with

  5. Abnormalities in Cardiac Structure and Function in Adults with Sickle Cell Disease are not Associated with Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Knight-Perry, Jessica E.; de las Fuentes, Lisa; Waggoner, Alan D.; Hoffmann, Raymond G.; Blinder, Morey A.; Dávila-Román, Victor G.; Field, Joshua J.

    2011-01-01

    Background In sickle cell disease (SCD), pulmonary hypertension (assessed by tricuspid regurgitant jet [TRJ] velocity ≥ 2.5 m/s) is associated with increased mortality. The relationships between TRJ velocity, left ventricular (LV) and right ventricular (RV) systolic and diastolic function (i.e., relaxation and compliance) have not been well characterized in SCD. Design and Methods Prospective study of 53 ambulatory SCD adults (age, mean: 34 years; range 21-65 years) and 33 African American controls to define the relationship between LV and RV function and TRJ velocity by use of echocardiography. Results SCD subjects had larger left and right atrial volumes and increased LV mass compared to controls. When SCD cases were compared to controls, LV and RV relaxation (i.e., E’) were similar. Among SCD subjects, pulmonary hypertension (TRJ ≥ 2.5 m/s) was present in 40% of cases. Higher TRJ velocity was correlated with larger LA volumes and areas in SCD cases. Additionally, some measures of LV (peak A, lateral and septal annulus E/E’) and RV compliance (TV E/E’) were correlated with TRJ velocity. No other measures of LV/RV systolic function or LV diastolic function (i.e., relaxation and compliance) were associated with TRJ velocity. Conclusions Ambulatory adults with SCD exhibited structural (i.e., LV and RV chamber enlargement) and functional (i.e., higher surrogate measures of LV and RV filling pressure) abnormalities compared to the control group. In SCD subjects, few abnormalities of LV and RV structure/function were associated with TRJ velocity. PMID:21873028

  6. Effects of metabolic and myocardial microcirculatory abnormalities on the pathogenesis of cardiac autonomic neuropathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus: A prospective study in Japanese patients*

    PubMed Central

    Komori, Hiromi

    2005-01-01

    Background: In diabetic patients, cardiac autonomic neuropathy is an important factor affecting prognosis. Whether this condition in diabetic patients is caused directly by neurovisceral metabolic disorder and/or indirectly by micro circulation remains to be clarified. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine whether cardiac sympathetic nerve dysfunction can be detected using adenosine triphosphate (ATP) testing, while also investigating the effects of metabolic and/or myocardial microcirculatory abnormalities on the pathogenesis of cardiac autonomic nerve dysfunction in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM-2) in Japan. Methods: This prospective study was performed at the Division of Diabetology Department of Internal Medicine, Toho University, Ohashi Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. Patients aged ≥ 18 years with DM-2 with no abnormalities on electrocardiography (ECG) or echocardiography were enrolled. An ATP thallium (Tl)-201 myocardial scintigraphy test (ATP test) and iodine (I)-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy were performed. ATP was administered by continuous IV infusion over 6 minutes at 0.16 mg/kg · min. Five minutes after the ATP infusion was started, T1-201 111 MBq IV was administered. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging was begun immediately after the end of ATP infusion and was completed 3 hours after stress to show washout from stress to rest. I-123 MIBG 111 MBq IV was administered. A planar image from the front side and a SPECT image (early phase) was obtained 15 to 30 minutes later. After 3 hours, a planar image from the front side and a SPECT image (late phase) were obtained to show washout from stress to rest. The mean TI washout rate (ATP-WR) and heart-to-mediastinum (H/M) ratio in the late-phase scintigraphic images and the washout rate of MIBG (MIBG-WR) in the left ventricle was determined. The correlations of these measurements with the mean values of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and fasting

  7. Assessment of Time and Frequency Domain Parameters of Heart Rate Variability and Interictal Cardiac Rhythm Abnormalities in Drug-naïve Patients with Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Kilinc, Ozden; Cincin, Altug; Pehlivan, Aslihan; Midi, Ipek; Kepez, Alper; Agan, Kadriye

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Epilepsy is a disease known to occur with autonomous phenomenons. Earlier studies indicate decreased heart rate variability (HRV) during ictal and interictal periods among epilepsy patients. In this study, we aim to investigate cardiac rhythm abnormalities and HRV during interictal period between drug-naïve patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) and healthy control group. Methods: Twenty-six patients with IGE and 26 healthy individuals included in the study. In order to eliminate any structural cardiac pathology, transthoracic echocardiography was performed in all subjects and time and frequency domain parameters of HRV were evaluated after 24-hour rhythm holter monitoring. Results: Between two groups, no significant difference was detected in terms of mean heart rate and maximum duration between the start of the Q waves and the end of the T waves (QT intervals). In the time domain analysis of HRV, no statically significant difference was detected for standard deviation of all R - R intervals and root-mean-square of successive differences between patient and control group (p = 0,070 and p = 0,104 respectively). In the frequency domain analysis of HRV, patients tended to display lower total power and very low frequency power than did healthy subjects, but the differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Our results suggest that there is no major effect of the epilepsy on HRV in patients with IGE. It should be emphasized that, in this study, HRV was evaluated only in patients with IGE and that the results are not proper to be generalized for patients with partial seizures. PMID:27390676

  8. Pulmonary ultrasound findings in a bottlenose dolphin Tursiops truncatus population.

    PubMed

    Smith, Cynthia R; Solano, Mauricio; Lutmerding, Betsy A; Johnson, Shawn P; Meegan, Jennifer M; Le-Bert, Carolina R; Emory-Gomez, Forrest; Cassle, Stephen; Carlin, Kevin; Jensen, Eric D

    2012-11-19

    Lung disease is common among wild and managed populations of bottlenose dolphins Tursiops truncatus. The purpose of the study was to apply standardized techniques to the ultrasound evaluation of dolphin lungs, and to identify normal and abnormal sonographic findings associated with pleuropulmonary diseases. During a 5 yr period (2005 to 2010), 498 non-cardiac thoracic ultrasound exams were performed on bottlenose dolphins at the Navy Marine Mammal Program in San Diego, California, USA. Exams were conducted as part of routine physical exams, diagnostic workups, and disease monitoring. In the majority of routine exams, no abnormal pleural or pulmonary findings were detected with ultrasound. Abnormal findings were typically detected during non-routine exams to identify and track disease progression or resolution; therefore, abnormal results are overrepresented in the study. In order of decreasing prevalence, abnormal sonographic findings included evidence of alveolar-interstitial syndrome, pleural effusion, pulmonary masses, and pulmonary consolidation. Of these findings, alveolar-interstitial syndrome was generally nonspecific as it represented several possible disease states. Pairing ultrasound findings with clinical signs was critical to determine relevance. Pleural effusion, pulmonary masses, and pulmonary consolidation were relatively straightforward to diagnose and interpret. Further diagnostics were performed to obtain definitive diagnoses when appropriate, specifically ultrasound-guided thoracocentesis, fine needle aspirates, and lung biopsies, as well as radiographs and computed tomography (CT) exams. Occasionally, post mortem gross necropsy and histopathology data were available to provide confirmation of diagnoses. Thoracic ultrasound was determined to be a valuable diagnostic tool for detecting pleural and pulmonary diseases in dolphins. PMID:23324421

  9. Feasibility Study on Prenatal Cardiac Screening Using Four-Dimensional Ultrasound with Spatiotemporal Image Correlation: A Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sun; Ren, Yunyun; Chen, Ping; Niu, Jianmei; Li, Cao; Sun, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed at investigating the feasibility of using the spatiotemporal image correlation (STIC) technology for prenatal cardiac screening, finding factors that influence the offline evaluation of reconstructed fetal heart, and establishing an optimal acquisition scheme. Methods The study included 452 gravidae presenting for routine screening at 3 maternity centers at 20–38 gestational weeks. The factors influencing the quality of STIC volume data were evaluated using t test, chi-square test, and logistic regression analysis. The predictive power was evaluated using the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Results Among the 452 fetuses enrolled, 353 (78.1%) were identified as successful and 99 (21.9%) as failure of evaluation of the reconstructed fetal heart. The total success rate of qualified STIC images was 78.1%. The display rates of reconstructed cardiac views were 86.5% (four-chamber view), 92.5% (left ventricular outflow tract view), 92.7% (right ventricular outflow tract view), 89.9% (three-vessel trachea view), 63.9% (aortic arch view), 81.4% (ductal arch view), 81% (short-axis view of great vessels), 80.1% (long-cava view), and 86.9% (abdominal view). A logistic regression analysis showed that more than 28 gestational weeks [OR = 0.39 (CI 95% 0.16, 0.19), P = 0.035], frequent fetal movements [OR = 0.37 (CI 95% 0.16, 0.87), P = 0.022], shadowing [OR = 0.36 (CI 95% 0.19, 0.72), P = 0.004], spine location at 10–2 o’clock [OR = 0.08 (CI 95% 0.02, 0.27), P = 0.0], and original cardiac view [OR = 0.51 (0.25, 0.89), P = 0.019] had a significant impact on the quality of STIC. The area under the ROC curve was 0.775. Conclusions Fetal cardiac-STIC seems a feasible tool for prenatal screening of congenital heart diseases. The influence factors on the quality of STIC images included the intensity of training, gestational age, fetal conditions and parameter settings. The optimal acquisition scheme may improve the application and

  10. Ultrasound in pregnancy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The ultrasound has become a standard procedure used during pregnancy. It can demonstrate fetal growth and can detect increasing ... abnormalities, hydrocephalus, anencephaly, club feet, and other ... does not produce ionizing radiation and is considered ...

  11. Point-of-care screening for left ventricular hypertrophy and concentric geometry using hand-held cardiac ultrasound in hypertensive patients

    PubMed Central

    Stoica, Roxana; Heller, Eliot N; Bella, Jonathan N

    2011-01-01

    Background: The introduction of the hand-held cardiac ultrasound (HCU) may potentially increase detection of LV hypertrophy in hypertensive patients. However, whether point-of-care screening for LV hypertrophy and concentric LV geometry by HCU in hypertensive patients is feasible and comparable to that of standard state-of-the-art echocardiography (SE) evaluation remains to be elucidated. Methods and Results: Accordingly, one hundred consecutive patients (66 female, mean age=58±13 years, 32% African-American, mean body mass index=31±8 kg/m2) with the diagnosis of hypertension underwent both HCU and SE examinations in tandem. A cardiology fellow-in-training performed the HCU exam while a cardiac sonographer performed the SE. 37% of hypertensive patients had electrocardiographic LV hypertrophy by Sokolow-Lyon or Cornell voltage criteria. Mean LV mass was 210±42 g with the HCU and 209±40 g with SE. Mean relative wall thickness was 0.45±0.05 by the HCUD and 0.44±0.05 by SE. There was excellent correlation between LV mass and relative wall thickness measurements by HCU and SE (r=0.985, SEE=6.8 g and r=0.762, SEE=0.33, respectively, both p<0.001). The prevalence of LV hypertrophy using prognostically-validated partition values for LV mass/height2.7 of 46.7 and 49.2 g/m2.7 in women and men, respectively was 76% by HCU and 78% by SE (p=NS), with excellent agreement (92%, κ=0.774, p<0.001). Agreement for detection of concentric LV geometry (relative wall thickness>0.43) was also excellent (88%, κ =0.756, p<0.001). Agreement for LV hypertrophy and concentric geometry detection between the cardiology fellow-in-training and sonographer was excellent (κ =0.786, p<0.001). Conclusion: Point-of-care screening for LV hypertrophy and concentric LV geometry by HCU is feasible and correlates very well with that of SE. HCU may allow for immediate point-of-care assessment and treatment of cardiac target organ damage in hypertensive patients. PMID:22254192

  12. Progress in Ring Array Transducers for Real-Time 3D Ultrasound Guidance of Cardiac Interventional Devices

    PubMed Central

    Light, Edward D.; Lieu, Victor; Suhocki, Paul; Wolf, Patrick D.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2012-01-01

    As a treatment for aortic stenosis, several companies have recently introduced prosthetic heart valves designed to be deployed through a catheter using an intravenous or trans-apical approach. This procedure can either take the place of open heart surgery with some of the devices, or delay it with others. Real-time 3D ultrasound could enable continuous monitoring of these structures before, during and after deployment. We have developed a 2D ring array integrated with a 30 French catheter that is used for trans-apical prosthetic heart valve implantation. The transducer array was built using three 46 cm long flex circuits from MicroConnex (Snoqualmie, WA) which terminate in an interconnect that plugs directly into our system cable, thus no cable soldering is required. This transducer consists of 210 elements at .157 mm inter-element spacing and operates at 5 MHz. Average measured element bandwidth was 26% and average round-trip 50 Ohm insertion loss was -81.1 dB. The transducer were wrapped around the 1 cm diameter lumen of a heart valve deployment catheter. Prosthetic heart valve images were obtained in water tank studies. PMID:21842583

  13. Cardiac Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Birnie, David H; Nery, Pablo B; Ha, Andrew C; Beanlands, Rob S B

    2016-07-26

    Clinically manifest cardiac involvement occurs in perhaps 5% of patients with sarcoidosis. The 3 principal manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) are conduction abnormalities, ventricular arrhythmias, and heart failure. An estimated 20% to 25% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis have asymptomatic cardiac involvement (clinically silent disease). In 2014, the first international guideline for the diagnosis and management of CS was published. In patients with clinically manifest CS, the extent of left ventricular dysfunction seems to be the most important predictor of prognosis. There is controversy in published reports as to the outcome of patients with clinically silent CS. Despite a paucity of data, immunosuppression therapy (primarily with corticosteroids) has been advocated for the treatment of clinically manifest CS. Device therapy, primarily with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators, is often recommended for patients with clinically manifest disease. PMID:27443438

  14. Ultrasound biomicroscopy in mouse cardiovascular development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, Daniel H.

    2001-05-01

    The mouse is the preferred animal model for studying mammalian cardiovascular development and many human congenital heart diseases. Ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM), utilizing high-frequency (40-50-MHz) ultrasound, is uniquely capable of providing in vivo, real-time microimaging and Doppler blood velocity measurements in mouse embryos and neonates. UBM analyses of normal and abnormal mouse cardiovascular function will be described to illustrate the power of this microimaging approach. In particular, real-time UBM images have been used to analyze dimensional changes in the mouse heart from embryonic to neonatal stages. UBM-Doppler has been used recently to examine the precise timing of onset of a functional circulation in early-stage mouse embryos, from the first detectable cardiac contractions. In other experiments, blood velocity waveforms have been analyzed to characterize the functional phenotype of mutant mouse embryos having defects in cardiac valve formation. Finally, UBM has been developed for real-time, in utero image-guided injection of mouse embryos, enabling cell transplantation and genetic gain-of-function experiments with transfected cells and retroviruses. In summary, UBM provides a unique and powerful approach for in vivo analysis and image-guided manipulation in normal and genetically engineered mice, over a wide range of embryonic to neonatal developmental stages.

  15. Intravascular ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    IVUS; Ultrasound - coronary artery; Endovascular ultrasound; Intravascular echocardiography ... A tiny ultrasound wand is attached to the top of a thin tube called a catheter. This ultrasound catheter is inserted ...

  16. Duplex ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... ultrasound with Doppler ultrasound . Traditional ultrasound uses sound waves that bounce off blood vessels to create pictures. Doppler ultrasound records sound waves reflecting off moving objects, such as blood, to ...

  17. Ultrasound in perinatology

    SciTech Connect

    Maklad, N.F.

    1986-01-01

    This 19th volume in the series Clinics in Diagnostic Ultrasound provides an overview and update of some of the recent applications of ultrasound (US) in the pernatal period. Prenatal topics include estimation of gestational age; evaluation of intrauterine growth retardation, non-immune hydrops, and fetal urinary abnormalities; fetal echocardiography; and biophysical scoring. The discussion of postnatal topics includes US studies of the head and abdomen, echocardiography, and interventional procedures.

  18. A Prospective Exploratory Analysis of Cardiac Biomarkers and Electrocardiogram Abnormalities in Patients Receiving Thoracic Radiation Therapy with High-Dose Heart Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Daniel R.; Yusuf, Syed Wamique; Munsell, Mark; Welsh, James W.; Liao, Zhongxing; Lin, Steven H.; Pan, Hubert; Chang, Joe Y.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; McAleer, Mary Frances; Grosshans, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Acute effects of incidental cardiac irradiation in patients treated for thoracic cancer are not well characterized. We evaluated longitudinal changes in cardiac biomarkers for patients undergoing conformal radiation therapy (RT) with thoracic malignancies with high-dose cardiac exposure. Methods Twenty-five patients enrolled in a prospective trial (February 2009–December 2012) received ≥45 Gy to the thorax, with pretreatment estimates of ≥20 Gy to the heart. Chemotherapy was allowed except for doxorubicin or fluorouracil. Electrocardiographic (ECG), troponin-I (TnI), and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) measurements were obtained before RT, within 24 hours of the first fraction, at the end of RT, and at first follow-up (1–2 months). These biomarkers were quantified at specific times and changes from baseline were evaluated with paired t tests. Results The median heart dose was 25.9 Gy (range 10.1–35.1 Gy). After the first RT fraction, no changes were noted in ECG or median Tnl or BNP levels; at the end of RT, two patients had elevated TnI and BNP, but neither difference was statistically significant. At first follow-up, TnI had returned to normal but the median BNP remained elevated (P=0.042). BNP did not increase over time in the 18 patients who received only RT. Twelve patients experienced acute ECG changes during RT, which resolved in seven patients by the next measurement. No patients experienced clinically significant RT-related events. Conclusion Increases in BNP and ECG changes were observed during high doses of radiation to the heart. The findings of this pilot study warrant further investigation and validation. PMID:25521400

  19. Complex patterns of abnormal heartbeats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte-Frohlinde, Verena; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Goldberger, Ary L.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Costa, Madalena; Morley-Davies, Adrian; Stanley, H. Eugene; Glass, Leon

    2002-01-01

    Individuals having frequent abnormal heartbeats interspersed with normal heartbeats may be at an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. However, mechanistic understanding of such cardiac arrhythmias is limited. We present a visual and qualitative method to display statistical properties of abnormal heartbeats. We introduce dynamical "heartprints" which reveal characteristic patterns in long clinical records encompassing approximately 10(5) heartbeats and may provide information about underlying mechanisms. We test if these dynamics can be reproduced by model simulations in which abnormal heartbeats are generated (i) randomly, (ii) at a fixed time interval following a preceding normal heartbeat, or (iii) by an independent oscillator that may or may not interact with the normal heartbeat. We compare the results of these three models and test their limitations to comprehensively simulate the statistical features of selected clinical records. This work introduces methods that can be used to test mathematical models of arrhythmogenesis and to develop a new understanding of underlying electrophysiologic mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmia.

  20. Albuminuria is Independently Associated with Cardiac Remodeling, Abnormal Right and Left Ventricular Function, and Worse Outcomes in Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Daniel H.; Burns, Jacob A.; Aguilar, Frank G.; Beussink, Lauren; Shah, Sanjiv J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine the relationship between albuminuria and cardiac structure/function in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Background Albuminuria, a marker of endothelial dysfunction, has been associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes in HFpEF. However, the relationship between albuminuria and cardiac structure/function in HFpEF has not been well studied. Methods We measured urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) and performed comprehensive echocardiography, including tissue Doppler imaging and right ventricular (RV) evaluation, in a prospective study of 144 patients with HFpEF. Multivariable-adjusted linear regression was used to determine the association between UACR and echocardiographic parameters. Cox proportional hazards analyses were used to determine the association between UACR and outcomes. Results The mean age was 66±11 years, 62% were female, and 42% were African-American. Higher UACR was associated with greater left ventricular (LV) mass, lower preload-recruitable stroke work, and lower global longitudinal strain. Higher UACR was also significantly associated with RV remodeling (for each doubling of UACR, RV wall thickness was 0.9 mm higher [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.05–0.14 mm; P=0.001, adjusted P=0.01]) and worse RV systolic function (for each doubling of UACR, RV fractional area change was 0.56% lower [95% CI 0.14–0.98%; P=0.01, adjusted P=0.03]. The association between UACR and RV parameters persisted after excluding patients with macroalbuminuria (UACR > 300 mg/g). Increased UACR was also independently associated with worse outcomes. Conclusions In HFpEF, increased UACR is a prognostic marker and is associated with increased RV and LV remodeling, and longitudinal systolic dysfunction. PMID:25282032

  1. Level of urinary liver-type fatty acid-binding protein is associated with cardiac markers and electrocardiographic abnormalities in type-2 diabetes with chronic kidney disease stage G1 and G2.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Yoshiteru; Suzuki, Atsushi; Ishii, Junnichi; Sekiguchi-Ueda, Sahoko; Shibata, Megumi; Yoshino, Yasumasa; Asano, Shogo; Hayakawa, Nobuki; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Akiyama, Yasukazu; Kitagawa, Fumihiko; Sakuishi, Toshiaki; Fujita, Takashi; Hashimoto, Shuji; Ozaki, Yukio; Itoh, Mitsuyasu

    2015-05-01

    Urinary liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) reflects the degree of stress in proximal tubules of the kidney. We examined the level of L-FABP in type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage G1 and G2, and its relationship with cardiac markers and electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities. T2DM patients whose estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was ≥60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) were recruited [n = 276 (165 males), mean age 64 years]. The median level of urinary L-FABP was 6.6 μg/gCr. Urinary L-FABP showed significant correlation with urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) (r = 0.51, p < 0.0001). Median (25th-75th percentile) eGFR was 82 (72-95) mL/min/1.73 m2. We divided patients into four subgroups (group 1, L-FABP ≤8.4 μg/gCr and ACR ≤30 mg/gCr; group 2, L-FABP ≤8.4 μg/gCr and ACR >30 mg/gCr; group 3, L-FABP >8.4 μg/gCr and ACR ≤30 mg/gCr; group 4, L-FABP >8.4 μg/gCr and ACR >30 mg/gCr). Compared with group 1, group 4 was significantly higher in systolic blood pressure, and eGFR using standardized serum cystatin C, high-sensitivity troponin T, and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP). Group 4 had significantly higher level of NT-proBNP than group 3. Groups 2, 3 and 4 showed more ECG abnormalities than group 1. These findings suggest that simultaneous measurement of urinary L-FABP and ACR should be useful to assess cardiovascular damage reflecting on the elevation of cardiac markers and ECG abnormalities in T2DM with CKD G1 and G2. PMID:24626813

  2. Prostate Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  3. Hip Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  4. Ultrasound -- Vascular

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  5. Musculoskeletal Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  6. Ultrasound - Scrotum

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  7. Cardiac Complications in Children With Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Starc, Thomas J.; Lipshultz, Steven E.; Kaplan, Samuel; Easley, Kirk A.; Bricker, J. Timothy; Colan, Steven D.; Lai, Wyman W.; Gersony, Welton M.; Sopko, George; Moodie, Douglas S.; Schluchter, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    of CHF was 75%. Conclusions This study reports that in addition to subclinical cardiac abnormalities previously reported by the P2C2 Study Group, an important number of HIV-infected children develop clinical heart disease. Over a 2-year period, approximately 10% of HIV-infected children had CHF or were treated with cardiac medications. In addition, approximately 20% of HIV-infected children developed depressed LV function or LV dilatation and it is likely that these abnormalities are hallmarks of future clinically important cardiac dysfunction. Cardiac abnormalities were found in both the older (Group I) as well as the neonatal cohort (Group II) (whose HIV infection status was unknown before enrollment) thereby minimizing potential selection bias based on previously known heart disease. Based on these findings, we recommend that clinicians need to maintain a high degree of suspicion for heart disease in HIV-infected children. All HIV-infected infants and children should have a thorough baseline cardiac evaluation. Patients who develop symptoms of heart or lung disease should undergo more detailed cardiac examinations including ECG and cardiac ultrasound. PMID:10429132

  8. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Validation of On-Orbit Methodology for the Assessment of Cardiac Function and Changes in the Circulating Volume Using Ultrasound and "Braslet-M" Occlusion Cuffs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogomolov, V. V.; Duncan, J. M.; Alferova, I. V.; Dulchavsky, S. A.; Ebert, D.; Hamilton, D. R.; Matveev, V. P.; Sargsyan, A. E.

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in remotely guided imaging techniques on ISS allow the acquisition of high quality ultrasound data using crewmember operators with no medical background and minimal training. However, ongoing efforts are required to develop and validate methodology for complex imaging protocols to ensure their repeatability, efficiency, and suitability for use aboard the ISS. This Station Developmental Test Objective (SDTO) tests a cardiovascular evaluation methodology that takes advantage of the ISS Ultrasound capability, the Braslet-M device, and modified respiratory maneuvers (Valsalva and Mueller), to broaden the spectrum of anatomical and functional information on human cardiovascular system during long-duration space missions. The proposed methodology optimizes and combines new and previously demonstrated methods, and is expected to benefit medically indicated assessments, operational research protocols, and data collections for science. Braslet-M is a current Russian operational countermeasure that compresses the upper thigh to impede the venous return from lower extremities. The goal of the SDTO is to establish and validate a repeatable ultrasound-based methodology for the assessment of a number of cardiovascular criteria in microgravity. Braslet-M device is used as a means to acutely alter volume distribution while focused ultrasound measurements are performed. Modified respiratory maneuvers are done upon volume manipulations to record commensurate changes in anatomical and functional parameters. The overall cardiovascular effects of the Braslet-M device are not completely understood, and although not a primary objective of this SDTO, this effort will provide pilot data regarding the suitability of Braslet-M for its intended purpose, effects, and the indications for its use.

  10. Ultrasound Despeckling for Contrast Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Tay, Peter C.; Garson, Christopher D.; Acton, Scott T.; Hossack, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Images produced by ultrasound systems are adversely hampered by a stochastic process known as speckle. A despeckling method based upon removing outlier is proposed. The method is developed to contrast enhance B-mode ultrasound images. The contrast enhancement is with respect to decreasing pixel variations in homogeneous regions while maintaining or improving differences in mean values of distinct regions. A comparison of the proposed despeckling filter is compared with the other well known despeckling filters. The evaluations of despeckling performance are based upon improvements to contrast enhancement, structural similarity, and segmentation results on a Field II simulated image and actual B-mode cardiac ultrasound images captured in vivo. PMID:20227984

  11. Ultrasound despeckling for contrast enhancement.

    PubMed

    Tay, Peter C; Garson, Christopher D; Acton, Scott T; Hossack, John A

    2010-07-01

    Images produced by ultrasound systems are adversely hampered by a stochastic process known as speckle. A despeckling method based upon removing outlier is proposed. The method is developed to contrast enhance B-mode ultrasound images. The contrast enhancement is with respect to decreasing pixel variations in homogeneous regions while maintaining or improving differences in mean values of distinct regions. A comparison of the proposed despeckling filter is compared with the other well known despeckling filters. The evaluations of despeckling performance are based upon improvements to contrast enhancement, structural similarity, and segmentation results on a Field II simulated image and actual B-mode cardiac ultrasound images captured in vivo. PMID:20227984

  12. Ultrasound in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, David S.; South, Donna A.; Garcia, Kathleen M.; Arbeille, Philippe

    2003-01-01

    Physiology of the human body in space has been a major concern for space-faring nations since the beginning of the space era. Ultrasound (US) is one of the most cost effective and versatile forms of medical imaging. As such, its use in characterizing microgravity-induced changes in physiology is being realized. In addition to the use of US in related ground-based studies, equipment has also been modified to fly in space. This involves alteration to handle the stresses of launch and different power and cooling requirements. Study protocols also have been altered to accommodate the microgravity environment. Ultrasound studies to date have shown a pattern of adaptation to microgravity that includes changes in cardiac chamber sizes and vertebral spacing. Ultrasound has been and will continue to be an important component in the investigation of physiological and, possibly, pathologic changes occurring in space or as a result of spaceflight.

  13. Craniofacial Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the skull and face. Craniofacial abnormalities are birth defects of the face or head. Some, like cleft ... palate, are among the most common of all birth defects. Others are very rare. Most of them affect ...

  14. Walking abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... include: Arthritis of the leg or foot joints Conversion disorder (a psychological disorder) Foot problems (such as a ... injuries. For an abnormal gait that occurs with conversion disorder, counseling and support from family members are strongly ...

  15. Congenital Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... serious health problems (e.g. Down syndrome ). Single-Gene Abnormalities Sometimes the chromosomes are normal in number, ... blood flow to the fetus impair fetal growth. Alcohol consumption and certain drugs during pregnancy significantly increase ...

  16. Chromosome Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... decade, newer techniques have been developed that allow scientists and doctors to screen for chromosomal abnormalities without using a microscope. These newer methods compare the patient's DNA to a normal DNA ...

  17. Nail abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Nail abnormalities are problems with the color, shape, texture, or thickness of the fingernails or toenails. ... Fungus or yeast cause changes in the color, texture, and shape of the nails. Bacterial infection may ...

  18. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? Cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) is a medically supervised program ... be designed to meet your needs. The Cardiac Rehabilitation Team Cardiac rehab involves a long-term commitment ...

  19. Safe and easy method with little modification in technique is useful for successful internal jugular vein cannulation on same side even after intra-arterial puncture without using ultrasound guidance in adult cardiac patients

    PubMed Central

    Thosani, Rajesh; Patel, Jigar; Gandhi, Hemang; Doshi, Chirag; Kothari, Jignesh

    2016-01-01

    Background: The modification in technique is useful for successful right-sided internal jugular vein (IJV) cannulation on the same side even after intra-arterial puncture without using ultrasound guidance in adult patients. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out in total 160 adult patient from American Society of Anesthesiologists Grade II to III patients male (n = 95) and female (n = 65) who underwent cardiac surgery where cannulation was done on right sided by triple lumen catheter (7 French) using Seldinger technique. Results: Majority of patients were cannulated successfully by Seldinger technique with single or double attempt except for five patients in which arterial puncture occurred. All five patients were cannulated successfully on the same side with this modified technique without any significant major complications. They were managed by application of blocker at the end of arterial needle puncture without removing it. In our routine practice, we were used to removing this needle and applying compression for few minutes to prevent hematoma formation after an arterial puncture. In this study, cannula was used as a marker or guideline for the relocation of IJV on the same side and recannulation was performed by changing the direction of needle on same side lateral to the previous one and without going towards the same direction to prevent the arterial puncture again. Conclusion: Most simple and useful modified technique for institutes where the complications are most common with trainee doctors and in hospitals where there is no advanced facility like ultrasound-guided cannulation available. By this modification, it will be time saving, very comfortable, and user-friendly technique with high success rate. PMID:27052069

  20. Translational Paradigms in Scientific and Clinical Imaging of Cardiac Development

    PubMed Central

    Gregg, Chelsea L.; Butcher, Jonathan T.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHD) are the most prevalent congenital disease with 45% of deaths resulting from a congenital defect are due to a cardiac malformation. Clinically significant CHD permit survival upon birth but may become immediately life threatening. Advances in surgical intervention have significantly reduced perinatal mortality, but the outcome for many malformations is bleak. Furthermore, patients living while tolerating a CHD often acquire additional complications due to the long-term systemic blood flow changes caused by even subtle anatomical abnormalities. Accurate diagnosis of defects during fetal development is critical for interventional planning and improving patient outcomes. Advances in quantitative, multi-dimensional imaging is necessary to uncover the basic scientific and clinically relevant morphogenetic changes and associated hemodynamic consequences influencing normal and abnormal heart development. Ultrasound is the most widely used clinical imaging technology for assessing fetal cardiac development. Ultrasound-based fetal assessment modalities include M-mode, 2D, and 3D/4D imaging. These datasets can be combined with computational fluid dynamics analysis to yield quantitative, volumetric and physiological data. Additional imaging modalities, however are available to study basic mechanisms of cardiogenesis, including optical coherence tomography, micro-computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. Each imaging technology has its advantages and disadvantages regarding resolution, depth of penetration, soft tissue contrast considerations, and cost. In this review, we analyze the current clinical and scientific imaging technologies, research studies utilizing them, and appropriate animal models reflecting clinically relevant cardiogenesis and cardiac malformations. We conclude with discussing the translational impact and future opportunities for cardiovascular development imaging research. PMID:23897595

  1. Ultrasonographic assessment of abnormal pregnancy.

    PubMed

    England, G C

    1998-07-01

    Ultrasonographic imaging is widely used in small animal practice for the diagnosis of pregnancy and the determination of fetal number. Ultrasonography can also be used to monitor abnormal pregnancies, for example, conceptuses that are poorly developed for their gestational age (and therefore are likely to fail), and pregnancies in which there is embryonic resorption or fetal abortion. An ultrasound examination may reveal fetal abnormalities and therefore alter the management of the pregnant bitch or queen prior to parturition. There are, however, a number of ultrasonographic features of normal pregnancies that may mimic disease, and these must be recognized. PMID:9698618

  2. Methodological approach for the assessment of ultrasound reproducibility of cardiac structure and function: a proposal of the study group of Echocardiography of the Italian Society of Cardiology (Ultra Cardia SIC) Part I

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    When applying echo-Doppler imaging for either clinical or research purposes it is very important to select the most adequate modality/technology and choose the most reliable and reproducible measurements. Quality control is a mainstay to reduce variability among institutions and operators and must be obtained by using appropriate procedures for data acquisition, storage and interpretation of echo-Doppler data. This goal can be achieved by employing an echo core laboratory (ECL), with the responsibility for standardizing image acquisition processes (performed at the peripheral echo-labs) and analysis (by monitoring and optimizing the internal intra- and inter-reader variability of measurements). Accordingly, the Working Group of Echocardiography of the Italian Society of Cardiology decided to design standardized procedures for imaging acquisition in peripheral laboratories and reading procedures and to propose a methodological approach to assess the reproducibility of echo-Doppler parameters of cardiac structure and function by using both standard and advanced technologies. A number of cardiologists experienced in cardiac ultrasound was involved to set up an ECL available for future studies involving complex imaging or including echo-Doppler measures as primary or secondary efficacy or safety end-points. The present manuscript describes the methodology of the procedures (imaging acquisition and measurement reading) and provides the documentation of the work done so far to test the reproducibility of the different echo-Doppler modalities (standard and advanced). These procedures can be suggested for utilization also in non referall echocardiographic laboratories as an "inside" quality check, with the aim at optimizing clinical consistency of echo-Doppler data. PMID:21943283

  3. Application of Ultrasound in Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Carovac, Aladin; Smajlovic, Fahrudin; Junuzovic, Dzelaludin

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasound device, essentially, consists of a transducer, transmitter pulse generator, compensating amplifiers, the control unit for focusing, digital processors and systems for display. It is used in cases of: abdominal, cardiac, maternity, gynecological, urological and cerebrovascular examination, breast examination, and small pieces of tissue as well as in pediatric and operational review. PMID:23408755

  4. Application of ultrasound in medicine.

    PubMed

    Carovac, Aladin; Smajlovic, Fahrudin; Junuzovic, Dzelaludin

    2011-09-01

    Ultrasound device, essentially, consists of a transducer, transmitter pulse generator, compensating amplifiers, the control unit for focusing, digital processors and systems for display. It is used in cases of: abdominal, cardiac, maternity, gynecological, urological and cerebrovascular examination, breast examination, and small pieces of tissue as well as in pediatric and operational review. PMID:23408755

  5. Endoscopic ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Endoscopic ultrasound is a type of imaging test. It is used to see organs in and near the digestive ... Ultrasound is a way to see the inside of the body using high-frequency sound waves. Endoscopic ...

  6. Scrotal ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... the scrotal sac to help transmit the sound waves. A handheld probe (the ultrasound transducer) is then ... The ultrasound machine sends out high-frequency sound waves. These waves reflect off areas in the scrotum ...

  7. Pregnancy ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... 3D ultrasound References Richards DS. Obstetrical ultrasound: Imaging, dating, and growth. In: Gabbe SG, Niebyl JR, Simpson ... the first to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A. ...

  8. Ultrasound, normal fetus - abdomen measurements (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Many health care providers like to have fetal measurements to verify the size of the fetus and ... any abnormalities. This ultrasound is of an abdominal measurement. It shows a cross-section of the abdomen, ...

  9. Ultrasound, normal fetus - head measurements (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Many health care providers like to have fetal measurements to verify the size of the fetus and ... any abnormalities. This ultrasound is of a head measurement, indicated by the cross hairs and dotted lines.

  10. Predicting fetal karyotype in fetuses with omphalocele: the current role of ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Zork, Noelia M; Pierce, Sara; Zollinger, Terrell; Kominiarek, Michelle A

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the ability of ultrasound in predicting abnormal karyotype in pregnancies with prenatally diagnosed omphaloceles and to compare its test characteristics to previously published studies. Methods A retrospective case-control study of omphaloceles diagnosed at one center was performed from 1995–2007. Cases were those with an abnormal karyotype and controls were those with a normal karyotype. Data collection included demographics, karyotype results, and ultrasound findings. The number and type of associated anomalies were compared between the cases and controls. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for predicting an abnormal karyotype were calculated from previously published studies. Results Of the 73 subjects, there were 12 cases and 61 controls. The majority of women were Caucasian and primigravida. The cases were less likely to have an isolated omphalocele [1(8.3%) vs. 27(42.6%), OR 0.122 95% CI 0.02–0.08] but were more likely to have two or more major anomalies [8 (66.7%) vs. 17(27.9%), OR 5.18 95% CI 1.19–24.04)] compared to the controls. Cardiac anomalies and only one additional major anomaly were not different between the two groups, P>0.05. The test characteristics for this study were similar to previously published studies. Conclusions Isolated omphaloceles were more likely to have a normal karyotype; however fetuses with multiple anomalies were more likely to have an abnormal karyotype. Despite advances in ultrasound technology, its ability for predicting an abnormal karyotype in these fetuses has not improved. PMID:24815707

  11. Nonlinear properties of cardiac rhythm abnormalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebovitch, Larry S.; Todorov, Angelo T.; Zochowski, Michal; Scheurle, Daniela; Colgin, Laura; Wood, Mark A.; Ellenbogen, Kenneth A.; Herre, John M.; Bernstein, Robert C.

    1999-03-01

    Many physical processes have distributions of times between events that have non-normalizable, power law probability density functions (PDF's). The moments of such distributions are not defined. We found that the PDF's of the times between events of ventricular tachyarrhythmia (rapid heart rate) and premature ventricular contractions have a power law form indicative of a non-normalizable distribution, and that the timing between these events cannot be meaningfully characterized by the mean frequency of such events. The Hurst analysis showed that there were self-similar correlations in the data. These results indicate that the physical processes that disrupt the normal rhythm of the heart produce a fractal pattern in the timing between these events. It also suggests that the mean and the variance of the frequency of these events may not be good measures to assess the status of patients with these arrhythmias and determine the effectiveness of therapeutic procedures.

  12. The use of ultrasound to guide interventions: from bench to bedside and back again.

    PubMed

    Bainbridge, Daniel

    2010-09-01

    The ultrasound machine was originally devised as a diagnostic tool to help evaluate heart structure and function. With recent advances in ultrasound, including live 3D ultrasound, its potential to guide interventions within the heart has increasingly been recognized. Cardiologists have adapted this technology and have now published guidelines on the use of ultrasound to guide interventional procedures. Anesthesiologists have also used ultrasound with much success in cardiac operating rooms (ORs) to guide cannula placement and, to a limited extent, interventions. The focus of this article is a review of the author's work on ultrasound and virtual reality-guided cardiac interventions, both in the research laboratory and in the OR. PMID:20705640

  13. Fetal Arrhythmias Associated with Cardiac Rhabdomyomas

    PubMed Central

    Wacker-Gussmann, Annette; Strasburger, Janette F; Cuneo, Bettina; Wiggins, Delonia; Gotteiner, Nina; Wakai, Ronald T

    2014-01-01

    Background Primary heart tumors in fetuses are rare and mainly represent rhabdomyomas. The tumors have a variable expression and can be associated with arrhythmias, including both wide and narrow QRS tachycardia. Although multiple Doppler techniques exist to assess fetal heart rhythm, it can be difficult to record precise electrophysiological pathologies in fetal life. Objective Investigations defining precise electrophysiological diagnosis were performed using fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG). Methods In addition to routine fetal echocardiography, fMCG was used to investigate electrophysiologic rhythm patterns in a series of 10 fetuses with cardiac rhabdomyomas. Results The mean gestational age of the fetuses was 28.6 weeks (SD ± 4.7 weeks). The multiple rhabdomyomas were mainly located in the right and left ventricles as well as around the AV groove. Arrhythmias or conduction abnormalities were diagnosed in all 10 patients, although only six of them were referred due to that indication. Remarkably, 80% (8/10) had associated Wolff-Parkinson-White pre-excitation. In addition, we found prominent p waves in four fetuses. Conclusion In fetuses with rhabdomyomas, a disease where rhythm pathology is common, precise electrophysiological diagnosis can now be made by fMCG. fMCG is complimentary to echocardiography for rhythm assessment, and can detect conduction abnormalities that are not possible to diagnose prenatally with M-mode or pulsed Doppler ultrasound. Risk factor assessment using fMCG can support pregnancy management and post-natal treatment and follow-up. PMID:24333285

  14. Neonatal urological ultrasound: diagnostic inaccuracies and pitfalls.

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, N W; Gough, D C; Cohen, S J

    1989-01-01

    Ninety one patients with urinary tract abnormalities diagnosed before birth were reviewed. Diagnoses based on prenatal and postnatal ultrasound scans alone were compared with the final diagnoses after full urological investigations, with operative or necropsy confirmation in 79 cases. The results confirmed that ultrasound examination before birth usually detects nonspecific abnormalities and although scanning after birth is more accurate it is not absolutely reliable. A diagnosis of "multicystic kidney' made on ultrasound scan alone is especially prone to error. Such mistakes can be avoided if full urological investigation is undertaken in every case. PMID:2665660

  15. Diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome. Ultrasound versus electromyography.

    PubMed

    Lee, D; van Holsbeeck, M T; Janevski, P K; Ganos, D L; Ditmars, D M; Darian, V B

    1999-07-01

    This article presents a new technique for diagnosing carpal tunnel syndrome using ultrasound. The ultrasound characteristics of the normal and abnormal median nerve are discussed in relation to carpal tunnel syndrome. The development of ultrasound as a new diagnostic modality for carpal tunnel syndrome is presented in a three-part study correlating the ultrasound measurements of the median nerve and electromyogram of the median nerve. A new algorithm for evaluating patients with carpal tunnel syndrome is presented. PMID:10442084

  16. Interventional ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Holm, H.H.; Kristensen, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    This book discusses: Introduction to interventional ultrasound/handling of aspirated material/general principles of fine needle aspiration cytology/procedure and principles in ultrasonically guided puncture/puncture of focal liver lesions/intraoperative puncture of the liver guided by ultrasound/Interventional ultrasound in cancer therapy/Interventional echocardiography/Fine-needle aspiration biopsy: Are there any risks./Puncture of renal mass lesions/Intrauterine needle diagnosis/Percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

  17. An overview of cardiac morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Schleich, Jean-Marc; Abdulla, Tariq; Summers, Ron; Houyel, Lucile

    2013-11-01

    Accurate knowledge of normal cardiac development is essential for properly understanding the morphogenesis of congenital cardiac malformations that represent the most common congenital anomaly in newborns. The heart is the first organ to function during embryonic development and is fully formed at 8 weeks of gestation. Recent studies stemming from molecular genetics have allowed specification of the role of cellular precursors in the field of heart development. In this article we review the different steps of heart development, focusing on the processes of alignment and septation. We also show, as often as possible, the links between abnormalities of cardiac development and the main congenital heart defects. The development of animal models has permitted the unraveling of many mechanisms that potentially lead to cardiac malformations. A next step towards a better knowledge of cardiac development could be multiscale cardiac modelling. PMID:24138816

  18. A Short History of Cardiac Inspection: A Quest "To See with a Better Eye".

    PubMed

    Evans, William N

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac examination has evolved over centuries. The goal of cardiac evaluation, regardless the era, is to "see" inside the heart to diagnose congenital and acquired intra-cardiac structural and functional abnormalities. This article briefly reviews the history of cardiac examination and discusses contemporary best, evidence-based methods of cardiac inspection. PMID:25835202

  19. [Cardiac sarcoidosis - clinical manifestation and diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Błaut-Jurkowska, Justyna; Podolec, Piotr; Olszowska, Maria

    2016-08-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem inflammatory disease defined histologically by the formation of noncaseating granulomas. The etiology of sarcoidosis remains unknown. Heart involvement in the course of sarcoidosis concerns about 5% of patients. The most common manifestation of cardiac sarcoidosis are conduction abnormalities, arrhythmias and heart failure. The diagnostic algorithm includes performing a clinical history, a 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and an echocardiogram. If any of the initial screening investigations yields an abnormality, diagnostics should be continue using advanced imaging techniques: cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) or fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). Nowadays endomyocardial biopsy is not performed routinely.The clinical picture of cardiac sarcoidosis is highly variable. Screening for cardiac sarcoidosis should be performed in all patients diagnosed with extracardiac sarcoidosis. Cardiac sarcoidosis should also be suspected in young patients without a diagnosis of sarcoidosis who present with conduction abnormalities of unknown etiology, because cardiac sarcoidosis may be the first or the only manifestation of the disease. PMID:27591449

  20. [Cardiac sarcoidosis - clinical manifestation and diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Błaut-Jurkowska, Justyna; Podolec, Piotr; Olszowska, Maria

    2016-07-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem inflammatory disease defined histologically by the formation of noncaseating granulomas. The etiology of sarcoidosis remains unknown. Heart involvement in the course of sarcoidosis concerns about 5% of patients. The most common manifestation of cardiac sarcoidosis are conduction abnormalities, arrhythmias and heart failure. The diagnostic algorithm includes performing a clinical history, a 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and an echocardiogram. If any of the initial screening investigations yields an abnormality, diagnostics should be continue using advanced imaging techniques: cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) or fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). Nowadays endomyocardial biopsy is not performed routinely.The clinical picture of cardiac sarcoidosis is highly variable. Screening for cardiac sarcoidosis should be performed in all patients diagnosed with extracardiac sarcoidosis. Cardiac sarcoidosis should also be suspected in young patients without a diagnosis of sarcoidosis who present with conduction abnormalities of unknown etiology, because cardiac sarcoidosis may be the first or the only manifestation of the disease. PMID:27590654

  1. Carney complex with biatrial cardiac myxoma.

    PubMed

    Havrankova, Eniko; Stenova, Emoke; Olejarova, Ingrid; Sollarova, Katarina; Kinova, Sona

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac myxomas make up approximately 50% of all benign cardiac tumors and represented 86% of all surgically treated cardiac tumors. Most of them originated from the left atrium, in some cases from both of atria. We report a case of male patient with biatrial myxomas and other extra-cardiac involvement: hypophyseal adenoma, enlargement of thyroid gland, tubular adenoma polyp of colon and bilateral large cell calcifying Sertoli cell tumor (LCCSCT) of testis. These findings led to the diagnosis of Carney's complex, which is a syndrome with multiple neoplasias, cardiac myxomas, lentigines, and endocrine abnormalities. A genetic test confirm this diagnosis. PMID:24088910

  2. Cardiac Imaging In Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Asaad A.; Safi, Lucy; Wood, Malissa

    2016-01-01

    Athletic heart syndrome refers to the physiological and morphological changes that occur in a human heart after repetitive strenuous physical exercise. Examples of exercise-induced changes in the heart include increases in heart cavity dimensions, augmentation of cardiac output, and increases in heart muscle mass. These cardiac adaptations vary based on the type of exercise performed and are often referred to as sport-specific cardiac remodeling. The hemodynamic effects of endurance and strength training exercise lead to these adaptations. Any abnormalities in chamber dilatation and left ventricular function usually normalize with cessation of exercise. Athletic heart syndrome is rare and should be differentiated from pathologic conditions such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, left ventricular noncompaction, and arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia when assessing a patient for athletic heart syndrome. This paper describes specific adaptations that occur in athletic heart syndrome and tools to distinguish between healthy alterations versus underlying pathology. PMID:27486490

  3. Prenatal diagnosis of sirenomelia by two-dimensional and three-dimensional skeletal imaging ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rong; Chen, Xin-lin; Yang, Xiao-hong; Ma, Hui-jing

    2015-12-01

    This study sought to evaluate the contribution of two-dimensional ultrasound (2D-US) and three-dimensional skeletal imaging ultrasound (3D-SUIS) in the prenatal diagnosis of sirenomelia. Between September 2010 and April 2014, a prospective study was conducted in a single referral center using 3D-SUIS performed after 2D-US in 10 cases of sirenomelia. Diagnostic accuracy and detailed findings were compared with postnatal three-dimensional helical computed tomography (3D-HCT), radiological findings and autopsy. Pregnancy was terminated in all 10 sirenomelia cases, including 9 singletons and 1 conjoined twin pregnancy, for a total of 5 males and 5 females. These cases of sirenomelia were determined by autopsy and/or chromosomal examination. Initial 2D-US showed that there were 10 cases of oligohydramnios, bilateral renal agenesis, bladder agenesis, single umbilical artery, fusion of the lower limbs and spinal abnormalities; 8 cases of dipus or monopus; 2 cases of apus; and 8 cases of cardiac abnormalities. Subsequent 3D-SUIS showed that there were 9 cases of scoliosis, 10 cases of sacrococcygeal vertebra dysplasia, 3 cases of hemivertebra, 1 case of vertebral fusion, 3 cases of spina bifida, and 5 cases of rib abnormalities. 3D-SUIS identified significantly more skeletal abnormalities than did 2D-US, and its accuracy was 79.5% (70/88) compared with 3D-HCT and radiography. 3D-SUIS seems to be a useful complementary method to 2D-US and may improve the accuracy of identifying prenatal skeletal abnormalities related to sirenomelia. PMID:26670448

  4. Non-coronary abnormalities of the left heart: CT angiography findings.

    PubMed

    Öztürk, Ersin; Kafadar, Cahit; Tutar, Süleyman; Bozlar, Uğur; Hagspiel, Klaus D

    2016-09-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) is most commonly performed for the evaluation of the coronary arteries; however, non-coronary cardiac pathologies are frequently detected on these scans. In cases where magnetic resonance imaging cannot be used, cardiac CT can serve as the first-line imaging modality to evaluate many non-coronary cardiac pathologies. In this article, we discuss congenital non-coronary abnormalities of the left heart and their cardiac CT imaging features. PMID:27609435

  5. Transvaginal ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... germ cell neoplasms, sex-cord stromal tumors. In: Lentz GM, Lobo RA, Gershenson DM, Katz VL, eds. ... oviduct, ovary, ultrasound imaging of pelvic structures. In: Lentz GM, Lobo RA, Gershenson DM, Katz VL, eds. ...

  6. Thyroid ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Performed Ultrasound is a painless method that uses sound waves to create images of the inside of the ... neck to help with the transmission of the sound waves. Next, the technician moves a wand, called a ...

  7. Breast ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... JavaScript. Breast ultrasound is a test that uses sound waves to examine the breasts. How the Test is ... to the left or right. The device sends sound waves to the breast tissue. The sound waves help ...

  8. Pregnancy ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... findings that might indicate an increased risk for Down syndrome A pregnancy ultrasound may also be done in ... weeks of pregnancy to look for signs of Down syndrome or other problems in the developing baby. This ...

  9. Abdominal Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ... Ultrasound scanners consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a ...

  10. Obstetrical Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ... Ultrasound scanners consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a ...

  11. Detection of microemboli by transcranial Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed Central

    Grosset, D G; Georgiadis, D; Kelman, A W; Cowburn, P; Stirling, S; Lees, K R; Faichney, A; Mallinson, A; Quin, R; Bone, I; Pettigrew, L; Brodie, E; MacKay, T; Wheatley, D J

    1996-01-01

    Doppler ultrasound detection of abnormally high-pitched signals within the arterial waveform offers a new method for diagnosis, and potentially for prediction, of embolic complications in at-risk patients. The nature of Doppler "microembolic" signals is of particular interest in patients with prosthetic heart valves, where a high prevalence of these signals is observed. Monitoring the middle cerebral artery with 2-MHz transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TC-2000, Nicolet Biomedical; Warwick, UK), we looked for microemboli signals in 150 patients (95 women and 55 men), and found 1 or more signals during a 30-min recording in 89% of 70 patients with Bjork-Shiley valves (principally monostrut), 54% of 50 patients with Medtronic-Hall valves, and 50% of 30 patients with Carpentier-Edwards valves (p < 0.001, chi 2). In the patients with Bjork-Shiley valves, the mean number of signals per hour was 59 (range, 42-86; 95% confidence interval), which was significantly higher than the mean in patients with Medtronic-Hall and Carpentier-Edwards valves (1.5[range, 0.5-2.5] and 1 [range, 0-5.3], respectively; both p < 0.04, multiple comparisons. Bonferroni correction). In the patients undergoing serial pre- and postoperative studies, the causative role of the valve implant was emphasized. There was no correlation between the number of emboli signals and a prior history of neurologic deficit, cardiac rhythm, previous cardiac surgery, or the intensity of oral anticoagulation, in patients with prosthetic heart valves. In Bjork-Shiley patients, dual (mitral and aortic) valves were associated with more signals than were single valves. In Medtronic-Hall patients, the signal count was greater for valves in the aortic position than it was for valves in the mitral position. Comparative studies of Doppler emboli signals in other clinical settings suggest a difference in composition or size of the underlying maternal between prosthetic valve patients and patients with carotid stenosis. These

  12. [Interventional ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Blázquez Sánchez, N; Fernández Canedo, I; Valdés Vilches, L; de Troya Martín, M

    2015-11-01

    High-frequency ultrasound has become increasingly used in dermatology. This technique is accessible, non-invasive, and rapid and provides information in real time. Consequently, it has become of great diagnostic value in dermatology. However, high-frequency ultrasound also has a promising future as a complementary technique in interventional diagnostic procedures, even though its application in this field has been little studied by dermatologists. PMID:26895944

  13. Athletes at Risk for Sudden Cardiac Death

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subasic, Kim

    2010-01-01

    High school athletes represent the largest group of individuals affected by sudden cardiac death, with an estimated incidence of once or twice per week. Structural cardiovascular abnormalities are the most frequent cause of sudden cardiac death. Athletes participating in basketball, football, track, soccer, baseball, and swimming were found to…

  14. Cranial Ultrasound/Head Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ... Ultrasound scanners consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a ...

  15. Value of artisanal simulators to train veterinary students in performing invasive ultrasound-guided procedures.

    PubMed

    Hage, Maria Cristina F N S; Massaferro, Ana Beatriz; Lopes, Érika Rondon; Beraldo, Carolina Mariano; Daniel, Jéssika

    2016-03-01

    Pericardial effusion can lead to cardiac tamponade, which endangers an animal's life. Ultrasound-guided pericardiocentesis is used to remove abnormal liquid; however, it requires technical expertise. In veterinary medical education, the opportunity to teach this procedure to save lives during emergencies is rare; therefore, simulators are recommended for this practice. The present study aimed to create a model that can be made "at home" at low cost for ultrasound-guided pericardiocentesis training and to gather feedback about this model through questionnaires given to the participants. Eighteen professionals and thirty-six students were introduced to the simulator in pairs. After the simulation training session, participants filled out the questionnaire. Participants considered the model strong in the following areas: visualization of the pericardium, the heart, fluid in the pericardium, and fluid decrease during fictitious pericardiocentesis and its realism. They considered the model weak or moderate in the following areas: visualization of the surrounding tissues, difficulty of pericardial puncture, and visualization of the catheter. The professionals classified the realism of the experimental heart as moderate, whereas the undergraduate students classified it as strong. All participants believed that the experimental model could be useful in preparing for a future real situation. This model fulfills the need for a practical, realistic, and cost-effective model for ultrasound-guided pericardiocentesis training. PMID:26873896

  16. Endobronchial ultrasound echoic image of pulmonary hamartoma.

    PubMed

    Kajikawa, Shigehisa; Imai, Naoyuki; Takashima, Kouji; Imaizumi, Kazuyoshi; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2014-06-01

    A 62-year-old man with an indicated chest radiographic abnormality was referred to our hospital for more thorough examinations. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration was performed because of a mass at the left hilum. Endobronchial ultrasound images showed scattered high-density spots in a low echoic and mosaic density. The pathological findings revealed pulmonary hamartoma. Subsequently, the mass was resected and comparison of ultrasound findings and pathological findings indicated that the scattered high echoic spots appeared to reflect cartilaginous tissues and bronchial epithelium inside the tumor. PMID:25473576

  17. Intravascular Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... and a procedure called cardiac catheterization . IVUS uses sound waves to produce an image of the coronary arteries and to see their condition. The sound waves travel through a tube called a catheter. The ...

  18. Dipyridamole cardiac imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Iskandrian, A.S.; Heo, J.; Askenase, A.; Segal, B.L.; Auerbach, N.

    1988-02-01

    Dipyridamole cardiac imaging is a useful alternative technique to exercise stress testing in the evaluation of patients with ischemic heart disease. Intravenous dipyridamole is still in the investigational phase, while oral dipyridamole is widely available. The hemodynamic effects of dipyridamole include an increase in coronary blood flow (due to coronary vasodilation) which is in excess of the increase in myocardial oxygen consumption and cardiac output. The disparity in the increase in coronary blood flow relative to the cardiac output results in an increase in myocardial thallium activity and an increase in the myocardial/background activity ratio. The quality of the thallium images is better or similar to that of exercise thallium images. The optimal dose of intravenous dipyridamole is 0.56 mg/kg, and of the oral dose it is 300 to 400 mg, although higher doses may be necessary in some patients. Analysis of the thallium images has been to a large extent based on visual inspection of the planar images. Delayed images are helpful to establish the nature of the perfusion abnormalities (transient or fixed). The process of redistribution is based on disparate rates of washout from the normal and abnormal zones. The sensitivity and specificity of dipyridamole thallium imaging, whether intravenous or oral, have been shown in a number of studies to be quite adequate and comparable to that achieved during exercise thallium imaging. Dipyridamole two-dimensional echocardiography has also been used in the detection of coronary artery disease; transient (new or worsening of preexisting) wall motion abnormalities have been found to be a specific marker of coronary artery disease. Transmural as well as regional coronary steal phenomena have been postulated as the mechanism for dipyridamole-induced regional wall motion abnormalities. 65 references.

  19. The ultrasound challenge 2.0: introducing interinstitutional competition in medical student ultrasound education.

    PubMed

    Cortez, Eric J; Boulger, Creagh T; Eastin, Travis; Adkins, Eric J; Granitto, Emily; Pollard, Katherine; Bahner, David P

    2014-12-01

    The Ultrasound Challenge was developed at The Ohio State University College of Medicine to introduce focused ultrasound to medical students. The goal was to develop experience in ultrasound through practice and competition. Initially this competition was held between Ohio State University College of Medicine students from years 1 through 4. The Ultrasound Challenge 2.0 was held in 2013. The event expanded on the previous structure by including students from the Wayne State University College of Medicine. The goal of this article is to describe our experiences with expansion of our interinstitutional ultrasound event. The challenge consisted of 6 stations: focused assessment with sonography for trauma, aortic ultrasound, cardiac ultrasound, pelvic ultrasound, musculoskeletal ultrasound, and vascular access. The participants were given a handbook outlining the expectations for each station ahead of time. Vascular access was graded in real time using the Brightness Mode Quality Ultrasound Imaging Examination Technique (B-QUIET) method. The remainder were timed, saved, and graded after the event by 3 independent faculty members using the B-QUIET method. The highest score with the fastest time was the winner. The Ultrasound Challenge 2.0 included 40 participants: 31 from The Ohio State University College of Medicine and 9 from the Wayne State University College of Medicine. The makeup of the winners in all categories consisted of 1 first-year medical student, 7 second-year medical students, 3 third-year medical students, and 10 fourth-year medical students. The Ultrasound Challenge 2.0 was a success for those who participated. It provided the first known interinstitutional medical student ultrasound competition. Students from both institutions were able to practice their image acquisition skills, demonstrate abilities in a competitive environment, and develop collegiality and teamwork. PMID:25425378

  20. [Quantitative ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Barkmann, R; Glüer, C-C

    2006-10-01

    Methods of quantitative ultrasound (QUS) can be used to obtain knowledge about bone fragility. Comprehensive study results exist showing the power of QUS for the estimation of osteoporotic fracture risk. Nevertheless, the variety of technologies, devices, and variables as well as different degrees of validation of the single devices have to be taken into account. Using methods to simulate ultrasound propagation, the complex interaction between ultrasound and bone could be understood and the propagation could be visualized. Preceding widespread clinical use, it has to be clarified if patients with low QUS values will profit from therapy, as it has been shown for DXA. Moreover, the introduction of quality assurance measures is essential. The user should know the limitations of the methods and be able to interpret the results correctly. Applied in an adequate manner QUS methods could then, due to lower costs and absence of ionizing radiation, become important players in osteoporosis management. PMID:16896637

  1. Physiological and pathological cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Ippei; Minamino, Tohru

    2016-08-01

    The heart must continuously pump blood to supply the body with oxygen and nutrients. To maintain the high energy consumption required by this role, the heart is equipped with multiple complex biological systems that allow adaptation to changes of systemic demand. The processes of growth (hypertrophy), angiogenesis, and metabolic plasticity are critically involved in maintenance of cardiac homeostasis. Cardiac hypertrophy is classified as physiological when it is associated with normal cardiac function or as pathological when associated with cardiac dysfunction. Physiological hypertrophy of the heart occurs in response to normal growth of children or during pregnancy, as well as in athletes. In contrast, pathological hypertrophy is induced by factors such as prolonged and abnormal hemodynamic stress, due to hypertension, myocardial infarction etc. Pathological hypertrophy is associated with fibrosis, capillary rarefaction, increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and cellular dysfunction (impairment of signaling, suppression of autophagy, and abnormal cardiomyocyte/non-cardiomyocyte interactions), as well as undesirable epigenetic changes, with these complex responses leading to maladaptive cardiac remodeling and heart failure. This review describes the key molecules and cellular responses involved in physiological/pathological cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:27262674

  2. Methods in pharmacology: measurement of cardiac output

    PubMed Central

    Geerts, Bart F; Aarts, Leon P; Jansen, Jos R

    2011-01-01

    Many methods of cardiac output measurement have been developed, but the number of methods useful for human pharmacological studies is limited. The ‘holy grail’ for the measurement of cardiac output would be a method that is accurate, precise, operator independent, fast responding, non-invasive, continuous, easy to use, cheap and safe. This method does not exist today. In this review on cardiac output methods used in pharmacology, the Fick principle, indicator dilution techniques, arterial pulse contour analysis, ultrasound and bio-impedance are reviewed. PMID:21284692

  3. Dynamic changes in the myometrium during the third stage of labor, evaluated using two-dimensional ultrasound, in women with normal and abnormal third stage of labor and in women with obstetric complications

    PubMed Central

    Patwardhan, Manasi; Hernandez-Andrade, Edgar; Ahn, Hyunyoung; Korzeniewski, Steven J; Schwartz, Alyse; Hassan, Sonia S; Romero, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate dynamic changes in myometrial thickness during the third stage of labor. Methods Myometrial thickness was measured using ultrasound at one-minute time intervals during the third stage of labor in the mid-region of the upper and lower uterine segments in 151 patients including: women with a long third stage of labor (n=30), post-partum hemorrhage (n=4), preterm delivery (n=7) or clinical chorioamnionitis (n=4). Differences between uterine segments and as a function of time were evaluated. Results There was a significant linear increase in the mean myometrial thickness of the upper uterine segments, as well as a significant linear decrease in the mean myometrial thickness of the lower uterine segments until the expulsion of the placenta (p<0.001). The ratio of the measurements of the upper to the lower uterine segments increased significantly as a function of time (p<0.0001). In women with postpartum hemorrhage, preterm delivery and clinical chorioamnionitis, an uncoordinated pattern between the uterine segments was observed. Conclusion A well-coordinated activity between the upper and lower uterine segments is demonstrated in normal placental delivery. In some clinical conditions this pattern is not observed, increasing the time for placental delivery and the risk for post-partum hemorrhage. PMID:25634647

  4. Hepato-cardiac disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fouad, Yasser Mahrous; Yehia, Reem

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mutual relationship between the liver and the heart is important for both hepatologists and cardiologists. Hepato-cardiac diseases can be classified into heart diseases affecting the liver, liver diseases affecting the heart, and conditions affecting the heart and the liver at the same time. Differential diagnoses of liver injury are extremely important in a cardiologist’s clinical practice calling for collaboration between cardiologists and hepatologists due to the many other diseases that can affect the liver and mimic haemodynamic injury. Acute and chronic heart failure may lead to acute ischemic hepatitis or chronic congestive hepatopathy. Treatment in these cases should be directed to the primary heart disease. In patients with advanced liver disease, cirrhotic cardiomyopathy may develop including hemodynamic changes, diastolic and systolic dysfunctions, reduced cardiac performance and electrophysiological abnormalities. Cardiac evaluation is important for patients with liver diseases especially before and after liver transplantation. Liver transplantation may lead to the improvement of all cardiac changes and the reversal of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy. There are systemic diseases that may affect both the liver and the heart concomitantly including congenital, metabolic and inflammatory diseases as well as alcoholism. This review highlights these hepatocardiac diseases PMID:24653793

  5. Recurrent proptotic diplopia due to congestive expansion of cavernous haemangioma with relapsing right-sided cardiac failure

    PubMed Central

    O'Mahony, D.; O'Neill, E.

    1999-01-01

    A 75-year-old man with a recent history of pulmonary embolism, presented with collapse followed by a gran mal seizure and right-sided non-pulsatile proptosis. On recovery, he had diplopia on lateral and upward gaze and signs of congestive cardiac failure. Further pulmonary embolism was proven by lung scintigraphy. Computed tomography of his orbits confirmed a contrast-enhancing space-occupying lesion of the medial wall of the right orbit, with no intracranial abnormality. The patient was investigated for metastatic tumour as a possible cause of the space-occupying lesion and the unprovoked thromboembolic event, but no evidence of malignancy was found. The orbital lesion was not biopsied because of the risk of bleeding from anticoagulation. Three weeks later, the patient re-presented with recurrent cardiac failure, proptosis, and diplopia. A transorbital ultrasound confirmed an encapsulated, well-defined vascular lesion, with typical appearances and Doppler flow characteristics of a cavernous haemangioma. Diuretic therapy abolished the proptosis and diplopia in tandem with relief of the cardiac failure. This is the first description of recurrent proptosis with diplopia due to recurrent congestive expansion of an orbital cavernous haemangioma.


Keywords: haemangioma; proptosis; diplopia; cardiac failure PMID:10621902

  6. Transvaginal ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... findings on a physical exam, such as cysts, fibroid tumors, or other growths Abnormal vaginal bleeding and ... the uterus and ovaries (such as cysts or fibroids) Twisting of the ovaries Risks There are no ...

  7. Cardiac metastases

    PubMed Central

    Bussani, R; De‐Giorgio, F; Abbate, A; Silvestri, F

    2007-01-01

    Tumours metastatic to the heart (cardiac metastases) are among the least known and highly debated issues in oncology, and few systematic studies are devoted to this topic. Although primary cardiac tumours are extremely uncommon (various postmortem studies report rates between 0.001% and 0.28%), secondary tumours are not, and at least in theory, the heart can be metastasised by any malignant neoplasm able to spread to distant sites. In general, cardiac metastases are considered to be rare; however, when sought for, the incidence seems to be not as low as expected, ranging from 2.3% and 18.3%. Although no malignant tumours are known that diffuse preferentially to the heart, some do involve the heart more often than others—for example, melanoma and mediastinal primary tumours. This paper attempts to review the pathophysiology of cardiac metastatic disease, epidemiology and clinical presentation of cardiac metastases, and pathological characterisation of the lesions. PMID:17098886

  8. Medical ultrasound education for bioengineers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaezy, Shahram

    2005-04-01

    The widespread adoption of ultrasound technologies in medicine has necessitated the development of educational programs to address the growing demand for trained expertise in both academia and industry. The demand has been especially great in the field of therapeutic ultrasound that has experienced a significant level of research and development activities in the past decade. The applications cover a wide range including cancer treatment, hemorrhage control, cardiac ablation, gene therapy, and cosmetic surgery. A comprehensive educational program in ultrasound is well suited for bioengineering departments at colleges and universities. Our educational program for students in Bioengineering at the University of Washington includes a year-long coursework covering theory and practice of ultrasound, conducting research projects, attending and presenting at weekly seminars on literature survey, presentations at scientific meetings, and attending specialized workshops offered by various institutions for specific topics. An important aspect of this training is its multi-disciplinary approach, encompassing science, engineering, and medicine. The students are required to build teams with expertise in these disciplines. Our experience shows that these students are well prepared for careers in academia, conducting cutting edge research, as well as industry, being involved in the transformation of research end-products to commercially viable technology.

  9. Ultrasound Annual, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, R.C.; Hill, M.C.

    1984-01-01

    The 1984 edition of Ultrasound Annual explores new applications of ultrasound in speech and swallowing and offers guidelines on the use of ultrasound and nuclear medicine in thyroid and biliary tract disease. Other areas covered include Doppler sonography of the abdomen, intraoperative abdominal ultrasound, sonography of the placenta, ultrasound of the neonatal head and abdomen, and sonographic echo patterns created by fat.

  10. [Cardiac failure in the newborn. Diagnostic pitfalls].

    PubMed

    Anca, Ioana Alina; Acs, Beata; Popp, Alina Stănescu; Ciomârtan, Tatiana; Predescu, D; Iagăru, N; Ritivoiu, Mirela; Brezan, F

    2007-01-01

    Echocardiography commonly represents the diagnostic clue in neonatal heart failure (HF). Congenital heart diseases are the most frequent causes of HF in this age group. Arterio-venous malformations are the most common noncardiac causes of HF. Normal cardiac structural findings on echocardiography require further investigations in order to exclude other causes of HF. We present three male patients admitted in the interval 2003-2007 with neonatal HF, systolic murmur, cardiomegaly, normal cardiac structure on echocardiography and intracranial bruit. All three cases were diagnosed with vein of Galen aneurysmal malformation (VGAM) by head ultrasound. According to age and malformation type, different presentation patterns were noticed: early neonatal intractable HF mimicking aortic coarctation, postnatal HF stabilized by drug treatment, and chronic HF in a VGAM with tendency to spontaneous regression. Both head ultrasound and cranial auscultation are mandatory in newborns or infants with no cardiac primary cause of HF. PMID:18389779