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Sample records for abnormal cardiac ultrasound

  1. Cardiac abnormalities in birth asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Ranjit, M S

    2000-03-01

    Cardiac abnormalities in birth asphyxia were first recognised in 1970s. These include (i) transient tricuspid regurgitation which is the commonest cause of a systolic murmur in a newborn and tends to disappear without any treatment unless it is associated with transient myocardial ischemia or primary pulmonary hypertension of the new born (ii) transient mitral regurgitation which is much less common and is often a part of transient myocardial ischemia, at times with reduced left ventricular function and therefore, requires treatment in the form of inotropic and ventilatory support, (iii) transient myocardial ischemia (TMI) of the newborn. This should be suspected in any baby with asphyxia, respiratory distress and poor pulses especially if a murmur is audible. It is of five types (A to E) according to Rowe's classification. Type B is the most severe with respiratory distress, congestive heart failure and shock. Echocardiography helps to rule out critical left ventricular obstructive lesions like hypoplastic left heart syndrome or critical aortic stenosis. ECG is very important for diagnosis of TMI, and may show changes ranging from T wave inversion in one lead to a classical segmental infarction pattern with abnormal q waves. CPK-MB may rise and echocardiogram shows impaired left ventricular function, mitral and/or tricuspid regurgitation, and at times, wall motion abnormalities of left ventricle. Ejection fraction is often depressed and is a useful marker of severity and prognosis. Treatment includes fluid restriction, inotropic support, diuretics and ventilatory resistance if required, (v) persistent pulmonary hypertension of the new born (PPHN). Persistent hypoxia sometimes results in persistence of constricted fetal pulmonary vascular bed causing pulmonary arterial hypertension with consequent right to left shunt across patent ductus arteriosus and foramen ovale. This causes respiratory distress and cyanosis (sometimes differential). Clinical examination also reveals evidence of pulmonary arterial hypertension and right ventricular failure with systolic murmur of tricuspid and, at times, mitral regurgitation. Treatment consists of oxygen and general care for mild cases, ventilatory support, ECMO and nitric oxide for severe cases. Cardiac abnormalities in asphyxiated neonates are often underdiagnosed and require a high index of suspicion. ECG and Echo help in early recognition and hence better management of these cases. PMID:11129917

  2. Cardiac abnormalities in birth asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Ranjit, M S

    2000-07-01

    Cardiac abnormalities in birth asphyxia were first recognised in the 1970s. These include (i) transient tricuspid regurgitation which is the commonest cause of a systolic murmur in a newborn and tends to disappear without any treatment unless it is associated with transient myocardial ischemia or primary pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (ii) transient mitral regurgitation which is much less common and is often a part of transient myocardial ischemia, at times with reduced left ventricular function and, therefore, requires treatment in the form of inotropic and ventilatory support (iii) transient myocardial ischemia (TMI) of the newborn. This should be suspected in any baby with asphyxia, respiratory distress and poor pulses, especially if a murmur is audible. It is of five types (A to E) according to Rowe's classification. Type B is the most severe with respiratory distress, congestive heart failure and shock. Echocardiography helps to rule out critical left ventricular obstructive lesions like hypoplastic left heart syndrome or critical aortic stenosis. ECG is very important for diagnosis of TMI, and may show changes ranging from T wave inversion in one lead to a classical segmental infarction pattern with abnormal q waves. CPK-MB may rise and echocardiogram shows impaired left ventricular function, mitral and/or tricuspid regurgitation, and at times, wall motion abnormalities of left ventricle. Ejection fraction is often depressed and is a useful marker of severity and prognosis. Treatment includes fluid restriction, inotropic support, diuretics and ventilatory resistance if required (v) persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN). Persistent hypoxia sometimes results in persistence of constricted fetal pulmonary vascular bed causing pulmonary arterial hypertension with consequent right to left shunt across patent ductus arteriosus and foramen ovale. This causes respiratory tension and right ventricular failure with systolic murmur of tricuspid, and at times, mitral regurgitation. Treatment consists of oxygen and general care for mild cases, ventilatory support, ECMO and nitric oxide for severe cases. Cardiac abnormalities in asphyxiated neonates are often underdiagnosed and require a high index of suspicion. ECG and Echo help in early recognition and hence better management of these cases. PMID:10957839

  3. [No compression of cardiac cavities in transthoracic ultrasound does not exclude cardiac tamponade.

    PubMed

    Juhl-Olsen, Peter; Frederiksen, Christina Alcaraz; Sloth, Erik

    2014-11-24

    The clinical presentation of cardiac tamponade is difficult to distinguish from other causes of shock. Pericardial fluid is easy to visualize with cardiac ultrasound and a key sign of overt cardiac tamponade is the compression of right side cavities. We present two cases in which cardiac tamponade was present, but where compression of cardiac cavities could not be demon-strated with transthoracic cardiac ultrasound. This emphasizes that cardiac tamponade is still a clinical diagnosis. PMID:25430575

  4. Cardiac and Pulmonary Ultrasound for Diagnosing TRALI

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Fernández, J. I.; Prieto-Recio, J. R.; García-Bernardo, C.; García-Saiz, I.; Rico-Feijoo, J.; Aldecoa, C.

    2015-01-01

    Unexpected acute respiratory failure after anesthesia is a diagnostic challenge: residual neuromuscular blockade, bronchial hyperresponsiveness, laryngospasm, atelectasis, aspiration pneumonitis, and other more uncommon causes should be taken into account at diagnosis. Lung ultrasound and echocardiography are diagnostic tools that would provide the differential diagnosis. We report a suspected case of a transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) following administration of platelets. The usefulness of lung and cardiac ultrasound is discussed to facilitate the challenging diagnosis of the acute early postoperative respiratory failure. PMID:26605093

  5. Ultrasound image guidance of cardiac interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Terry M.; Pace, Danielle F.; Lang, Pencilla; Guiraudon, Gérard M.; Jones, Douglas L.; Linte, Cristian A.

    2011-03-01

    Surgical procedures often have the unfortunate side-effect of causing the patient significant trauma while accessing the target site. Indeed, in some cases the trauma inflicted on the patient during access to the target greatly exceeds that caused by performing the therapy. Heart disease has traditionally been treated surgically using open chest techniques with the patient being placed "on pump" - i.e. their circulation being maintained by a cardio-pulmonary bypass or "heart-lung" machine. Recently, techniques have been developed for performing minimally invasive interventions on the heart, obviating the formerly invasive procedures. These new approaches rely on pre-operative images, combined with real-time images acquired during the procedure. Our approach is to register intra-operative images to the patient, and use a navigation system that combines intra-operative ultrasound with virtual models of instrumentation that has been introduced into the chamber through the heart wall. This paper illustrates the problems associated with traditional ultrasound guidance, and reviews the state of the art in real-time 3D cardiac ultrasound technology. In addition, it discusses the implementation of an image-guided intervention platform that integrates real-time ultrasound with a virtual reality environment, bringing together the pre-operative anatomy derived from MRI or CT, representations of tracked instrumentation inside the heart chamber, and the intra-operatively acquired ultrasound images.

  6. Ultrasound catheters for circumferential cardiac ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diederich, Chris J.; Nau, William H.; Taylor, Kevin; Maguire, Mark T.; Picazo, Guillermo; Gangu, Madhuri; Lesh, Michael D.

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate performance characteristics of a catheter-based ultrasound applicator intended for circumferential ablation of cardiac tissue. The catheter design integrates a cylindrical ultrasound transducer within a distendable water filled balloon in order to produce circumferential lesions at sites in the atria (i.e., pulmonary vein ostia), intended for treatment of certain atrial arrhythmias. Biothermal simulations were used to investigate thermal lesion depths corresponding to variations in applied power, duration, balloon diameter, and acoustic efficiency. Prototype applicators of varying frequency (7 - 12 MHz) and balloon diameter were constructed and characterized using measurements of acoustic efficiency and rotational beam plots. In vitro studies were performed in freshly excised beef hearts to characterize the radial penetration, axial length, and angular uniformity of thermal lesions produced by these applicators. Selected applicators were tested in vivo within pulmonary veins, coronary sinus, and atrial appendage of canine and porcine hearts. These preliminary efforts have indicated that circumferential ablation of cardiac tissue using ultrasound balloon catheters is feasible, and devices between 7 - 12 MHz with balloon diameters of 1.5 - 2.0 cm are capable of producing uniform lesions between 1 - 5 mm depth or greater for treatment durations of 120 seconds or less.

  7. Using Ultrasound to Teach Medical Students Cardiac Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Floyd E., III; Wilson, L. Britt; Hoppmann, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound is being incorporated more into undergraduate medical education. Studies have shown that medical students have positive perceptions about the value of ultrasound in teaching courses like anatomy and physiology. The purpose of the present study was to provide objective evidence of whether ultrasound helps students learn cardiac

  8. Application of spatio-temporal image correlation technology in the diagnosis of fetal cardiac abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    HE, YIHUA; WANG, JUNLAN; GU, XIAOYAN; ZHANG, YE; HAN, JIANCHENG; LIU, XIAOWEI; LI, ZHIAN

    2013-01-01

    Congenital heart disease is the birth defect with the highest incidence in China. Its timely and accurate prenatal diagnosis is critical for appropriate perinatal and postnatal management and salvage treatment. With improvements in the diagnostic capabilities of ultrasound and clinical manipulation techniques, prenatal diagnosis is conducted increasingly early and with greater accuracy. However, the representations of tiny blood vessels and the determination of abnormal spatial structures in the fetal period continue to cause difficulties in prenatal diagnosis. In theory, spatio-temporal image correlation (STIC) technology is able to compensate for the defects of previous traditional two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound and improve the diagnostic accuracy. The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical application value of STIC technology combined with traditional 2D ultrasound in the diagnosis of fetal cardiac abnormalities. A total of 1,286 fetuses were subjected to sequential echocardiographic examination, during which STIC technology was used to collect heart volume data and carry out image post-processing and off-line analysis. In addition, the prenatal and postnatal echocardiography results were compared with the pathology results following the induced labor of fetuses with cardiac abnormalities. The sensitivity, specificity, misdiagnosis rate and rate of missed diagnosis for the STIC technology in the diagnosis of prenatal fetal cardiac abnormalities were 97.4, 99.6, 0.4 and 2.6%, respectively. The total coincidence rate was 99.2% and the positive and negative predictive values were 97.9 and 99.4%, respectively; the statistics for the consistency check of the STIC technology in the diagnosis of fetal cardiac abnormalities are ?=0.991, P=0.000. STIC technology combined with fetal echocardiography may be used for the definite diagnosis of fetal heart malformations, with high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:23837046

  9. Extracting Cardiac Myofiber Orientations from High Frequency Ultrasound Images.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xulei; Cong, Zhibin; Jiang, Rong; Shen, Ming; Wagner, Mary B; Kishbom, Paul; Fei, Baowei

    2013-03-29

    Cardiac myofiber plays an important role in stress mechanism during heart beating periods. The orientation of myofibers decides the effects of the stress distribution and the whole heart deformation. It is important to image and quantitatively extract these orientations for understanding the cardiac physiological and pathological mechanism and for diagnosis of chronic diseases. Ultrasound has been wildly used in cardiac diagnosis because of its ability of performing dynamic and noninvasive imaging and because of its low cost. An extraction method is proposed to automatically detect the cardiac myofiber orientations from high frequency ultrasound images. First, heart walls containing myofibers are imaged by B-mode high frequency (>20 MHz) ultrasound imaging. Second, myofiber orientations are extracted from ultrasound images using the proposed method that combines a nonlinear anisotropic diffusion filter, Canny edge detector, Hough transform, and K-means clustering. This method is validated by the results of ultrasound data from phantoms and pig hearts. PMID:24392208

  10. Prenatal Ultrasound Screening for External Ear Abnormality in the Fetuses

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jun; Ran, Suzhen; Yang, Zhengchun; Lin, Yun; Tang, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate the best time of examination and section chosen of routine prenatal ultrasound screening for external ear abnormalities and evaluate the feasibility of examining the fetal external ear with ultrasonography. Methods. From July 2010 until August 2011, 42118 pregnant women with single fetus during 16–40 weeks of pregnancy were enrolled in the study. Fetal auricles and external auditory canal in the second trimester of pregnancy were evaluated by routine color Doppler ultrasound screening and systematic screening. Ultrasound images of fetal external ears were obtained on transverse-incline view at cervical vertebra level and mandible level and on parasagittal view and coronal view at external ear level. Results. Five fetuses had anomalous ears including bilateral malformed auricles with malformed external auditory canal, unilateral deformed external ear, and unilateral microtia. The detection rate of both auricles was negatively correlated with gestational age. Of the 5843 fetuses undergoing a routine ultrasound screening, 5797 (99.21%) had bilateral auricles. Of the 4955 fetuses following systematic screening, all fetuses (100%) had bilateral auricles. The best time for fetal auricles observation with ultrasonography is 20–24 weeks of pregnancy. Conclusions. Detection of external ear abnormalities may assist in the diagnosis of chromosomal abnormalities. PMID:25050343

  11. Ultrasound of the fetal veins part 2: Veins at the cardiac level.

    PubMed

    Chaoui, R; Heling, K-S; Karl, K

    2014-08-01

    In recent years the advent of high-resolution and color Doppler ultrasound has enabled a more comprehensive examination of the veins at the cardiac level. These veins include both the superior and inferior vena cava, the pulmonary veins, the azygos vein, the coronary sinus, and the brachiocephalic (or innominate) vein. This article gives a review of the normal and abnormal conditions of the cardiac venous system. Normal anatomy and abnormal findings of these veins are demonstrated by grayscale and color Doppler. Three groups of anomalies are presented: 1) the interrupted inferior vena cava with azygos continuity, 2) the left persisting superior vena cava and 3) the total and partial anomalous pulmonary venous connections. Many of these abnormal findings can be detected by a dedicated examination of the veins during fetal echocardiography, but some anomalies are detectable by focusing on indirect signs such as the compensatory dilation of other veins. PMID:25127225

  12. Using ultrasound in the clinical management of placental implantation abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Vintzileos, Anthony M; Ananth, Cande V; Smulian, John C

    2015-10-01

    Placental implantation abnormalities, including placenta previa, placenta accreta, vasa previa, and velamentous cord insertion, can have catastrophic consequences for both mother and fetus, especially as pregnancy progresses to term. In these situations, current recommendations for management usually call for an indicated preterm delivery even in asymptomatic patients. However, the recommended gestational age(s) for delivery in asymptomatic patients are empirically determined without consideration of the recent literature regarding the usefulness of specific ultrasound findings to help individualize management. The purpose of this article is to propose literature-supported guidelines to the current opinion-based management of asymptomatic patients with placental implantation abnormalities based on relevant and specific ultrasound findings such as cervical length, distance between the internal cervical os and placenta, and placental edge thickness. PMID:26428505

  13. "Cataplexy" and muscle ultrasound abnormalities in Coffin-Lowry syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Crow, Y J; Zuberi, S M; McWilliam, R; Tolmie, J L; Hollman, A; Pohl, K; Stephenson, J B

    1998-01-01

    The Coffin-Lowry syndrome is a rare cause of mental retardation recognised by its distinctive facial and digital features. We have observed an unusual, non-epileptic, cataplexy-like phenomenon in three subjects with the syndrome and we speculate that this feature may go unrecognised. We also provide evidence of neuromuscular dysfunction as part of the phenotype by showing abnormalities on muscle ultrasound in four gene carriers. Images PMID:9507386

  14. Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Diagnosis of Cor Triatriatum Sinistrum in Pediatric Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Kehrl, Thompson; Dagen, Callie T.; Becker, Brent A.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac arrest in the adolescent population secondary to congenital heart disease (CHD) is rare. Focused cardiac ultrasound (FoCUS) in the emergency department (ED) can yield important clinical information, aid in resuscitative efforts during cardiac arrest and is commonly integrated into the evaluation of patients with pulseless electrical activity (PEA). We report a case of pediatric cardiac arrest in which FoCUS was used to diagnose a critical CHD known as cor triatriatum sinistrum as the likely cause for PEA cardiac arrest and help direct ED resuscitation. PMID:26587102

  15. Cardiac and Non-Cardiac Abnormalities in Heterotaxy Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Smita

    2015-12-01

    Thoraco-abdominal viscera have unique morphological asymmetry, unlike the body's external organs. Heterotaxy syndrome is a disorder in which there is a loss of normal left to right asymmetry of thoraco-abdominal viscera and their naturally proscribed spatial relationship. It has multiple anatomical alterations, culminating into physiological and hemodynamic consequences. It is divided into two groups on the basis of morphology of the two atrial appendages. These subgroups are - 1) Isomerism of right atrial appendage (asplenia syndrome); 2) Isomerism of left atrial appendage (polysplenia syndrome); Patients from group I, usually have severe cardiac malformations and present early. They may have duct dependent lesions and eventually may undergo Fontan surgery. However, extracardiac anomalies are more common in group II. All the patients must be evaluated in detail to rule out anomalies like gut-malrotation. Patients must be provided with special care for their susceptibility to infection due to absence of spleen or presence of splenic malfunction. Majority of these patients may have genetic link and may present in families. Hence, genetic evaluation is necessary before assuming long term outcome. PMID:26612104

  16. Pre-participation cardiovascular screening: is community screening using hand-held cardiac ultrasound feasible?

    PubMed Central

    Hurry, R; Le Page, P; MacLachlan, H

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the feasibility and costs of utilising hand-held cardiac ultrasound (HHCU) as part of a community-based pre-participation cardiovascular screening programme. Ninety-seven school children were screened using a personal history, a physical examination, a resting 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and a HHCU. A consultant cardiologist independently reviewed and reported the data. Previously undiagnosed cardiovascular abnormalities were identified in nine participants (9%). An additional three participants (3%) were diagnosed with hypertension. The nine abnormalities were identified at a cost of £460 per finding, with a cost of £43 per participant screened. The marginal cost of adding a HHCU to the personal history, physical examination and ECG was £16 per participant. Pre-participation screening in the community using hand-held echocardiography is practical and inexpensive. The additional sensitivity and specificity provided by the ultrasound may enhance screening programmes, thereby reducing false positives and the need for expensive follow-up testing. PMID:26693333

  17. Liver Abnormalities in Cardiac Diseases and Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Alicia M.; Mukherjee, Debabrata

    2011-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is characterized by the inability of systemic perfusion to meet the body's metabolic demands and is usually caused by cardiac pump dysfunction and may occasionally present with symptoms of a noncardiac disorder such as hepatic dysfunction. The primary pathophysiology involved in hepatic dysfunction from HF is either passive congestion from increased filling pressures or low cardiac output and the consequences of impaired perfusion. Passive hepatic congestion due to increased central venous pressure may cause elevations of liver enzymes and both direct and indirect serum bilirubin. Impaired perfusion from decreased cardiac output may be associated with acute hepatocellular necrosis with marked elevations in serum aminotransferases. Cardiogenic ischemic hepatitis (“shock liver”) may ensue following an episode of profound hypotension in patients with acute HF. We discuss pathophysiology and identification of liver abnormalities that are commonly seen in patients with HF. PMID:22942628

  18. ECG patch monitors for assessment of cardiac rhythm abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Lobodzinski, S Suave

    2013-01-01

    The primary goal of long-term monitoring is the improvement of diagnostic yield. Despite the clear utility of Holter monitoring in clinical cardiology, issues of relatively low diagnostic yield, cost and inconvenience have motivated the development of ultra-portable devices referred to as ECG patch monitors. Although the "gold standard" for assessing cardiac rhythm abnormalities remains a 12-lead Holter, there is an increasing interest in portable monitoring devices that provide the opportunity for evaluating cardiac rhythm in real-world environments such as the workplace or home. To facilitate patient acceptance these monitors underwent a radical miniaturization and redesign to include wireless communication, water proofing and a patch carrier for attaching devices directly to the skin. We review recent developments in the field of "patch" devices primarily designed for very long-term monitoring of cardiac arrhythmic events. As the body of supporting clinical validation data grows, these devices hold promise for a variety of cardiac monitoring applications. From a clinical and research standpoint, the capacity to obtain longitudinal cardiac activity data by patch devices may have significant implications for device selection, monitoring duration, and care pathways for arrhythmia evaluation and atrial fibrillation surveillance. From a research standpoint, the new devices may allow for the development of novel diagnostic algorithms with the goal of finding patterns and correlations with exercise and drug regimens. PMID:24215754

  19. The Impact of Trans-thoracic Ultrasound on Cardiac Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Plummer, JM; Condell, M; Ferron-Boothe, D; Johnson, P; Leake, PA; McDonald, AH

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the impact of trans-thoracic ultrasound (TTUS) in patients with chest trauma and potential cardiac injuries and to determine the outcome of patients with cardiac injury detected on TTUS. Method: Data were obtained from the Trauma Registry for all patients presenting alive to the University Hospital of the West Indies during the 10-year period commencing January 1, 2001 and who were subjected to a TTUS or emergency thoracotomy for cardiac injuries, or had cardiac injuries at postmortem. In addition to demographics, variables analysed included mechanism and site of injury and outcome. Results: Of 405 patients being subjected to a TTUS during the period, 12 (3%) had cardiac injuries. During the same period, 63 patients in the Trauma Registry had proven cardiac injuries. Transthoracic ultrasound was thus conducted on 19% of all patients with cardiac injuries. Three patients had positive TTUS but no cardiac injuries. Of the patients with injuries, the mean age was 30.4 years, 92.1% were male and 65% were as a result of stab wounds, while 22% were as a result of gunshot wounds. The right ventricle was the most common site of injury, accounting for 41% of cases, while the left ventricle, both ventricles and other sites accounted for 27%, 17% and 14%, respectively. Ninety per cent of the group was subjected to emergency thoracotomy; mortality of the entire group was 48%, including one patient who had TTUS. Conclusions: This review demonstrates that cardiac injuries remain lethal, diagnosis is largely clinical and TTUS may be over-utilized, having little impact on clinical outcome of patients presenting with this injury. PMID:25314284

  20. Proceedings of MICCAI 99, Pages 420-429, 1 3D Cardiac Deformation from Ultrasound

    E-print Network

    Duncan, James S.

    Proceedings of MICCAI 99, Pages 420-429, 1 3D Cardiac Deformation from Ultrasound Images Xenophon we describe a methodology for estimating cardiac deformations from 3D ultrasound images. The images regional 3D estimates of heart deformation from ultrasound images. 1 Introduction The fundamental goal

  1. Cardiac repolarization abnormalities and increased sympathetic activity in scleroderma.

    PubMed Central

    Ciftci, Orcun; Onat, Ahmet Mesut; Yavuz, Bunyamin; Akdogan, Ali; Aytemir, Kudret; Tokgozoglu, Lale; Sahiner, Levent; Deniz, Ali; Ureten, Kemal; Kizilca, Guler; Calguneri, Meral; Oto, Ali

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiac involvement in scleroderma is a poor prognostic sign and is usually underdiagnosed, particularly in asymptomatic patient. This paper focuses on QT dynamicity and heart rate variability (HRV) in patients with scleroderma and controls in an attempt to investigate the cardiac autonomic system and ventricular repolarization. METHODS: Sixty patients with scleroderma and 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls who had no cardiovascular risk factors were included in this study. All patients and the controls underwent a 24-hour holter recording as well as a transthoracic echocardiography. HRV and QT dynamicity parameters were calculated. RESULTS: In HRV analysis, autonomic balance was changed in favor of the sympathetic system in patients with diffuse scleroderma. In QT dynamicity analysis, QT/RR slopes were significantly steeper in patients with diffuse scleroderma compared to patients with limited scleroderma and controls (QTapex/RR: 0.24 +/- 0.16, 0.15 +/- 0.03, 0.14 +/- 0.03 respectively p < 0.001; QTend/RR: 0.26 +/- 0.17, 0.14 +/- 0.04, 0.13 +/- 0.05, respectively p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with diffuse scleroderma may have asymptomatic cardiac repolarization abnormalities and autonomic dysfunction. Our results may indicate that QT dynamicity and HRV can be useful noninvasive methods that may detect impaired state of autonomic balance and cardiac repolarization in patients with diffuse scleroderma. PMID:17393947

  2. Mapping cardiac fiber orientations from high-resolution DTI to high-frequency 3D ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xulei; Wang, Silun; Shen, Ming; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wagner, Mary B.; Fei, Baowei

    2014-03-01

    The orientation of cardiac fibers affects the anatomical, mechanical, and electrophysiological properties of the heart. Although echocardiography is the most common imaging modality in clinical cardiac examination, it can only provide the cardiac geometry or motion information without cardiac fiber orientations. If the patient's cardiac fiber orientations can be mapped to his/her echocardiography images in clinical examinations, it may provide quantitative measures for diagnosis, personalized modeling, and image-guided cardiac therapies. Therefore, this project addresses the feasibility of mapping personalized cardiac fiber orientations to three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound image volumes. First, the geometry of the heart extracted from the MRI is translated to 3D ultrasound by rigid and deformable registration. Deformation fields between both geometries from MRI and ultrasound are obtained after registration. Three different deformable registration methods were utilized for the MRI-ultrasound registration. Finally, the cardiac fiber orientations imaged by DTI are mapped to ultrasound volumes based on the extracted deformation fields. Moreover, this study also demonstrated the ability to simulate electricity activations during the cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) process. The proposed method has been validated in two rat hearts and three canine hearts. After MRI/ultrasound image registration, the Dice similarity scores were more than 90% and the corresponding target errors were less than 0.25 mm. This proposed approach can provide cardiac fiber orientations to ultrasound images and can have a variety of potential applications in cardiac imaging.

  3. Abnormal cardiac function associated with sympathetic nervous system hyperactivity in mice

    E-print Network

    Kobilka, Brian

    Abnormal cardiac function associated with sympathetic nervous system hyperactivity in mice PATRICIA Bernstein, and Brian Kobilka. Abnormal cardiac function associated with sympathetic nervous system hyper.1152/ ajpheart.01063.2001.-- 2A-Adrenergic receptors (ARs) in the midbrain regulate sympathetic nervous system

  4. Automated Heart Wall Motion Abnormality Detection From Ultrasound Images using Bayesian Networks

    E-print Network

    Rosales, Rómer E.

    Automated Heart Wall Motion Abnormality Detection From Ultrasound Images using Bayesian Networks± . maleeha.qazi@siemens.com , glenn.fung@siemens.com Abstract Coronary Heart Disease can be diagnosed by mea- suring and scoring regional motion of the heart wall in ultrasound images of the left ventricle (LV

  5. The role of the duty factor in ultrasound-mediated cardiac stimulation

    E-print Network

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    The role of the duty factor in ultrasound-mediated cardiac stimulation Olivia C. Coiado and William@illinois.edu, wdo@illinois.edu Abstract: The role of the duty factor (DF) in ultrasound-mediated car- diac An important aspect of therapeutic ultrasound is its ability to produce biological effects noninvasively

  6. Context indexing of digital cardiac ultrasound records in PACS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobodzinski, S. Suave; Meszaros, Georg N.

    1998-07-01

    Recent wide adoption of the DICOM 3.0 standard by ultrasound equipment vendors created a need for practical clinical implementations of cardiac imaging study visualization, management and archiving, DICOM 3.0 defines only a logical and physical format for exchanging image data (still images, video, patient and study demographics). All DICOM compliant imaging studies must presently be archived on a 650 Mb recordable compact disk. This is a severe limitation for ultrasound applications where studies of 3 to 10 minutes long are a common practice. In addition, DICOM digital echocardiography objects require physiological signal indexing, content segmentation and characterization. Since DICOM 3.0 is an interchange standard only, it does not define how to database composite video objects. The goal of this research was therefore to address the issues of efficient storage, retrieval and management of DICOM compliant cardiac video studies in a distributed PACS environment. Our Web based implementation has the advantage of accommodating both DICOM defined entity-relation modules (equipment data, patient data, video format, etc.) in standard relational database tables and digital indexed video with its attributes in an object relational database. Object relational data model facilitates content indexing of full motion cardiac imaging studies through bi-directional hyperlink generation that tie searchable video attributes and related objects to individual video frames in the temporal domain. Benefits realized from use of bi-directionally hyperlinked data models in an object relational database include: (1) real time video indexing during image acquisition, (2) random access and frame accurate instant playback of previously recorded full motion imaging data, and (3) time savings from faster and more accurate access to data through multiple navigation mechanisms such as multidimensional queries on an index, queries on a hyperlink attribute, free search and browsing.

  7. Ultrasound Current Source Density Imaging of the Cardiac Activation Wave Using a Clinical Cardiac Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yexian; Li, Qian; Ingram, Pier; Barber, Christy; Liu, Zhonglin

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound current source density imaging (UCSDI), based on the acoustoelectric (AE) effect, is a noninvasive method for mapping electrical current in 4-D (space + time). This technique potentially overcomes limitations with conventional electrical mapping procedures typically used during treatment of sustained arrhythmias. However, the weak AE signal associated with the electrocardiogram is a major challenge for advancing this technology. In this study, we examined the effects of the electrode configuration and ultrasound frequency on the magnitude of the AE signal and quality of UCSDI using a rabbit Langendorff heart preparation. The AE signal was much stronger at 0.5 MHz (2.99 ?V/MPa) than 1.0 MHz (0.42 ?V/MPa). Also, a clinical lasso catheter placed on the epicardium exhibited excellent sensitivity without penetrating the tissue. We also present, for the first time, 3-D cardiac activation maps of the live rabbit heart using only one pair of recording electrodes. Activation maps were used to calculate the cardiac conduction velocity for atrial (1.31 m/s) and apical (0.67 m/s) pacing. This study demonstrated that UCSDI is potentially capable of real-time 3-D cardiac activation wave mapping, which would greatly facilitate ablation procedures for treatment of arrhythmias. PMID:25122512

  8. Ultrasound current source density imaging of the cardiac activation wave using a clinical cardiac catheter.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yexian; Li, Qian; Ingram, Pier; Barber, Christy; Liu, Zhonglin; Witte, Russell S

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound current source density imaging (UCSDI), based on the acoustoelectric (AE) effect, is a noninvasive method for mapping electrical current in 4-D (space + time). This technique potentially overcomes limitations with conventional electrical mapping procedures typically used during treatment of sustained arrhythmias. However, the weak AE signal associated with the electrocardiogram is a major challenge for advancing this technology. In this study, we examined the effects of the electrode configuration and ultrasound frequency on the magnitude of the AE signal and quality of UCSDI using a rabbit Langendorff heart preparation. The AE signal was much stronger at 0.5 MHz (2.99 ?V/MPa) than 1.0 MHz (0.42 ?V/MPa). Also, a clinical lasso catheter placed on the epicardium exhibited excellent sensitivity without penetrating the tissue. We also present, for the first time, 3-D cardiac activation maps of the live rabbit heart using only one pair of recording electrodes. Activation maps were used to calculate the cardiac conduction velocity for atrial (1.31 m/s) and apical (0.67 m/s) pacing. This study demonstrated that UCSDI is potentially capable of real-time 3-D cardiac activation wave mapping, which would greatly facilitate ablation procedures for treatment of arrhythmias. PMID:25122512

  9. Pocket-sized focused cardiac ultrasound: strengths and limitations.

    PubMed

    Mirabel, Mariana; Celermajer, David; Beraud, Anne-Sophie; Jouven, Xavier; Marijon, Eloi; Hagège, Albert A

    2015-03-01

    Focused cardiac ultrasound (FCU) has emerged in recent years and has created new possibilities in the clinical assessment of patients both in and out of hospital. The increasing portability of echocardiographic devices, with some now only the size of a smartphone, has widened the spectrum of potential indications and users, from the senior cardiologist to the medical student. However, many issues still need to be addressed, especially the acknowledgment of the advantages and limitations of using such devices for FCU, and the extent of training required in this rapidly evolving field. In recent years, an increasing number of studies involving FCU have been published with variable results. This review outlines the evidence for the use of FCU with pocket-echo to address specific questions in daily clinical practice. PMID:25747662

  10. Fetal Ventricular Hypertrabeculation/Noncompaction: Clinical Presentation, Genetics, Associated Cardiac and Extracardiac Abnormalities and Outcome.

    PubMed

    Stöllberger, Claudia; Wegner, Christian; Finsterer, Josef

    2015-10-01

    Left ventricular hypertrabeculation/noncompaction (LVHT) is a cardiac abnormality of unknown etiology. Aim of the review was to summarize the current knowledge about fetal LVHT, including clinical presentation, associated cardiac and extracardiac abnormalities and outcome. In 88 cases, LVHT was diagnosed by fetal echocardiography. In 36 %, no additional cardiac abnormalities were reported; in the remaining 64 %, one or more cardiac abnormalities were reported. Eight cases died prenatally, 17 were electively terminated, and 24 patients died after birth. Six patients were lost to follow-up, and 33 patients are alive at a mean age of 26 months. Surviving cases presented less frequently with fetal hydrops (13 vs. 62 %, p = 0.0004), complete heart block (27 vs. 78 %, p = 0.0076), more than three associated cardiac abnormalities (9 vs. 47 %, p = 0.0008) and more frequently with isolated LVHT (52 vs. 19 %, p = 0.009) than cases who died. Of the surviving patients, 16 received pharmacotherapy, three received pacemakers, eight underwent surgical procedures and four underwent heart transplantation. Postnatal regression of left ventricular hypertrophy and development of LVHT was found in four cases, improvement in cardiac function in two, and regression of right VHT in two. At autopsy, endocardial fibrosis was the most frequent abnormality in 92 %. Thirty-eight percentage of cases with fetal LVHT survived. Fetal and postnatal echocardiographic findings challenge the "embryonic pathogenetic" hypothesis of LVHT. Furthermore, fetal pathoanatomic findings like endocardial fibrosis might play a role in clarifying the still unsolved pathogenesis of LVHT. PMID:26008764

  11. Ultrasound and Cadaveric Prosections as Methods for Teaching Cardiac Anatomy: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griksaitis, Michael J.; Sawdon, Marina A.; Finn, Gabrielle M.

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the efficacy of two cardiac anatomy teaching modalities, ultrasound imaging and cadaveric prosections, for learning cardiac gross anatomy. One hundred and eight first-year medical students participated. Two weeks prior to the teaching intervention, students completed a pretest to assess their prior knowledge and to ensure that…

  12. Implementing capon beamforming on a GPU for real-time cardiac ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Åsen, Jon Petter; Buskenes, Jo Inge; Colombo Nilsen, Carl-Inge; Austeng, Andreas; Holm, Sverre

    2014-01-01

    Capon beamforming is associated with a high computational complexity, which limits its use as a real-time method in many applications. In this paper, we present an implementation of the Capon beamformer that exhibits realtime performance when applied in a typical cardiac ultrasound imaging setting. To achieve this performance, we make use of the parallel processing power found in modern graphics processing units (GPUs), combined with beamspace processing to reduce the computational complexity as the number of array elements increases. For a three-dimensional beamspace, we show that processing rates supporting real-time cardiac ultrasound imaging are possible, meaning that images can be processed faster than the image acquisition rate for a wide range of parameters. Image quality is investigated in an in vivo cardiac data set. These results show that Capon beamforming is feasible for cardiac ultrasound imaging, providing images with improved lateral resolution both in element-space and beamspace. PMID:24402897

  13. Automatic Detection of Dilated Cardiomyopathy in Cardiac Ultrasound Videos

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Raziuddin; Syeda-Mahmood, Tanveer

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we address the problem of automatic detection of dilated cardiomyopathy from cardiac ultrasound videos. Specifically, we present a new method of robustly locating the left ventricle by using the key idea that the region closest to the apex in a 4-chamber view is the left ventricular region. For this, we locate a region of interest containing the heart in an echocardiogram image using the bounding lines of the viewing sector to locate the apex of the heart. We then select low intensity regions as candidates, and find the low intensity region closest to the apex as the left ventricle. Finally, we refine the boundary by averaging the detection across the heart cycle using the successive frames of the echocardiographic video sequence. By extracting eigenvalues of the shape to represent the spread of the left ventricle in both length and width and augmenting it with pixel area, we form a small set of robust features to discriminate between normal and dilated left ventricles using a support vector machine classifier. Testing of the method of a collection of 654 patient cases from a dataset used to train echocardiographers has revealed the promise of this automated approach to detecting dilated cardiomyopathy in echocardiography video sequences. PMID:25954393

  14. Cardiac abnormalities in systemic lupus erythematosus: prevalence and relationship to disease activity.

    PubMed

    Ong, M L; Veerapen, K; Chambers, J B; Lim, M N; Manivasagar, M; Wang, F

    1992-01-01

    We conducted a prospective longitudinal study to determine the nature and prevalence of cardiac abnormalities in systemic lupus erythematosus and to study their natural history and relationship with disease activity. Forty consecutive inpatients with systemic lupus erythematosus were studied during their admission and subsequently 6 to 12 months later. On each occasion a clinical cardiovascular examination was carried out, disease activity was scored using the "Lupus Activity Criteria Count" and a Doppler echocardiographic examination was carried out. 72.5% of patients had an abnormal echocardiogram in the first study while 51.7% were abnormal during the follow-up study. Valvar disease occurred in 37.5% of patients. The mitral valve was most commonly affected. Libman-Sacks endocarditis was rare (2.5%). Pericardial effusions were seen in 36.2% of echocardiograms. The majority (76.0%) of these were associated with hypoalbuminaemia. 80.0% of patients had active disease during the first examination and 41.4% at follow-up. There was no correlation between activity of disease and prevalence of cardiac abnormalities at either examination. We conclude that cardiac disease is common in systemic lupus erythematosus. Prevalence of cardiac abnormality did not correlate with disease activity. PMID:1548111

  15. Non-cardiac thoracic ultrasound in 75 feline and canine patients.

    PubMed

    Reichle, J K; Wisner, E R

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the ultrasonographic appearance of non-cardiac diseases of the small animal thorax. Ultrasound images from a total of 75 animals (26 cats and 49 dogs) were compared to cytologic, histopathologic, and necropsy findings. Clinical diagnoses included neoplasia of the mediastinum, pleura, or lungs (43); idiopathic mediastinal cyst (3); diaphragmatic or peritoneopericardial hernia (4); lung lobe torsion (1); pulmonary eosinophilic infiltrates (1); and idiopathic, chylous, congestive heart failure, or lymphangiectasia associated pleural effusion (14). In the remaining 9 patients, a definitive diagnosis was not obtained. Ultrasound-guided fine needle aspirate was performed in 56 patients; 1 of these also had an ultrasound-guided tissue core biopsy. Of the fine needle aspirates, 51 (91%) were diagnostic. Ultrasound examination, particularly when accompanied by guided tissue sampling, can be a valuable tool in the diagnosis of non-cardiac intrathoracic lesions. PMID:10779076

  16. Distal 10q trisomy syndrome with unusual cardiac and pulmonary abnormalities.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, J; Jaffé, A; Bush, A

    1998-01-01

    Since its description in 1965, distal 10q trisomy has become recognised as a well defined, although rare syndrome, almost always the result of an unbalanced translocation. Typical features consist of psychomotor delay, a distinctive dysmorphic appearance, growth retardation, and, in some cases, cardiac, renal, and ocular abnormalities. Images PMID:9475101

  17. Crack Cocaine-Induced Cardiac Conduction Abnormalities Are Reversed by Sodium Bicarbonate Infusion

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Carlos Henrique; Pazin-Filho, Antônio

    2013-01-01

    We report a dramatic case of a 19-year-old man with crack cocaine overdose with important clinical complications as cardiac arrest due to ventricular fibrillation and epileptics status. During this intoxication, electrocardiographic abnormalities similar to those found in tricyclic antidepressant poisoning were observed, and they were reversed by intravenous sodium bicarbonate infusion. PMID:23762070

  18. Temporal compounding of cardiac ultrasound data: Improving image quality and clinical measurement repeatability.

    PubMed

    Perperidis, Antonios; Cusack, David; McDicken, Norman; Macgillivray, Tom; Anderson, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Echocardiography provides a powerful and versatile tool for assessing cardiac morphology and function. However, cardiac ultrasound suffers from speckle as well as static and dynamic noise. Over the last three decades, a number of studies have attempted to address the challenging problem of speckle/noise suppression in cardiac ultrasound data. No single method has managed to provide a widely accepted solution. Temporal Compounding is a noise suppression method that utilises spatial averaging of temporally aligned cardiac B-Mode data. Reliable temporal alignment is vital for effective Temporal Compounding. In this study we introduce a novel, accurate and robust technique for the temporal alignment of cardiac cycles with variable temporal characteristics and examine the effect of Temporal Compounding in four clinical measurements performed on routine echocardiographic examinations. Results from 32 patients demonstrate speckle/noise suppression, shadowing reduction, anatomical structure enhancement and improvement in measurement repeatability with no significant or systematic bias introduced. Temporally compound data may be able to provide a good alternative to B-Mode data in clinical measurements as well as a first step to further post-processing of cardiac ultrasound data. PMID:19964314

  19. Safety of ultrasound contrast agents in patients with known or suspected cardiac shunts.

    PubMed

    Parker, Jeremy M; Weller, Mark W; Feinstein, Linda Maiman; Adams, Robin J; Main, Michael L; Grayburn, Paul A; Cosgrove, David O; Goldberg, Barry A; Darge, Kassa; Nihoyannopoulos, Petros; Wilson, Stephanie; Monaghan, Mark; Piscaglia, Fabio; Fowlkes, Brian; Mathias, Wilson; Moriyasu, Fuminari; Chammas, Maria Christina; Greenbaum, Lennard; Feinstein, Steven B

    2013-10-01

    Contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging is a radiation-free diagnostic tool that uses biocompatible ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) to improve image clarity. UCAs, which do not contain dye, often salvage "technically difficult" ultrasound scans, increasing the accuracy and reliability of a front-line ultrasound diagnosis, reducing unnecessary downstream testing, lowering overall health care costs, changing therapy, and improving patient care. Two UCAs currently are approved and regulated by the US Food and Drug Administration. They have favorable safety profiles and risk/benefit ratios in adult and pediatric populations, including compromised patients with severe cardiovascular diseases. Nevertheless, these UCAs are contraindicated in patients with known or suspected right-to-left, bidirectional, or transient right-to-left cardiac shunts. These patients, who constitute 10% to 35% of the general population, typically receive no UCAs when they undergo echocardiography. If their echocardiographic images are suboptimal, they may receive inappropriate diagnosis and treatment, or they may be referred for additional diagnostic testing, including radiation-based procedures that increase their lifetime risk for cancer or procedures that use contrast agents containing dye, which may increase the risk for kidney damage. An exhaustive review of current peer-reviewed research demonstrated no scientific basis for the UCA contraindication in patients with known or suspected cardiac shunts. Initial safety concerns were based on limited rodent data and speculation related to macroaggregated albumin microspheres, a radioactive nuclear imaging agent with different physical and chemical properties and no relation to UCAs. Radioactive macroaggregated albumin is not contraindicated in adult or pediatric patients with cardiac shunts and is routinely used in these populations. In conclusion, the International Contrast Ultrasound Society Board recommends removal of the contraindication to further the public interest in safe, reliable, radiation-free diagnostic imaging options for patients with known or suspected cardiac shunts and to reduce their need for unnecessary downstream testing. PMID:23816393

  20. Quantitative study of cardiac motion estimation and abnormality classification in emission computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jing; Segars, W Paul; Lee, Taek-Soo; He, Xin; Rahmim, Arman; Tsui, Benjamin M W

    2011-06-01

    Quantitative description of cardiac motion is desirable to assist in detecting myocardial abnormalities from gated myocardial perfusion (GMP) emission computed tomography (ECT) images. While "optical flow" type of cardiac motion estimation (ME) techniques have been developed in the past, there has been no quantitative evaluation of their performance. Moreover, no investigation has been performed in terms of applying an ME technique to quantify cardiac motion abnormalities. Using the four-dimensional NCAT beating heart phantom with known built-in motion, the current work aimed at addressing the aforementioned two issues. A three-dimensional cardiac ME technique was developed to search for a motion vector field (MVF) that establishes voxel-by-voxel correspondence between two GMP ECT images. The weighted myocardial strain energy served as the constraint in the process to minimize the difference between one intensity image and the MVF warped other. We studied the convergence of the ME technique using different initial estimates and cost functions. The dependence of estimated MVF on the initialization was attributed to the tangential motion that is undetectable while not suppressed by the strain energy constraint. We optimized the strain energy constraint weighting using noise-free phantom images and noisy reconstructed images, the former against the known MVF and the later in the task of regional motion classification. While the results from the above two studies well coincide with each other, we also demonstrated that upon appropriate optimization the ME method has the capability of serving as a computer motion observer in separating simulated noisy reconstructed GMP SPECT images corresponding to hearts with and without regional motion abnormalities. PMID:21269868

  1. An interoperable system for automated diagnosis of cardiac abnormalities from electrocardiogram data.

    PubMed

    Tinnakornsrisuphap, Thidarat; Billo, Richard E

    2015-03-01

    Electrocardiogram (ECG) data are stored and analyzed in different formats, devices, and computer platforms. As a result, ECG data from different monitoring devices cannot be displayed unless the user has access to the proprietary software of each particular device. This research describes an ontology and encoding for representation of ECG data that allows open exchange and display of ECG data in a web browser. The ontology is based on the Health Level Seven (HL7) medical device communication standard. It integrates ECG waveform data, HL7 standard ECG data descriptions, and cardiac diagnosis rules, providing a capability to both represent ECG waveforms as well as perform automated diagnosis of 37 different cardiac abnormalities. The ECG ontology is encoded in XML, thus allowing ECG data from any digital ECG device that maps to it to be displayed in a general-purpose Internet browser. An experiment was conducted to test the interoperability of the system (ability to openly share ECG data without error in a web browser) and also to assess the accuracy of the diagnosis model. Results showed 100% interoperability using 276 ECG data files and 93% accuracy in diagnosis of abnormal cardiac conditions. PMID:24808416

  2. Association of Comorbidity Burden With Abnormal Cardiac Mechanics: Findings From the HyperGEN Study

    PubMed Central

    Selvaraj, Senthil; Aguilar, Frank G.; Martinez, Eva E.; Beussink, Lauren; Kim, Kwang?Youn A.; Peng, Jie; Rasmussen?Torvik, Laura; Sha, Jin; Irvin, Marguerite R.; Gu, C. Charles; Lewis, Cora E.; Hunt, Steven C.; Arnett, Donna K.; Shah, Sanjiv J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Comorbidities are common in heart failure (HF), and the number of comorbidities has been associated with poor outcomes in HF patients. However, little is known about the effect of multiple comorbidities on cardiac mechanics, which could impact the pathogenesis of HF. We sought to determine the relationship between comorbidity burden and adverse cardiac mechanics. Methods and Results We performed speckle?tracking analysis on echocardiograms from the HyperGEN study (n=2150). Global longitudinal, circumferential, and radial strain, and early diastolic (e') tissue velocities were measured. We evaluated the association between comorbidity number and cardiac mechanics using linear mixed effects models to account for relatedness among subjects. The mean age was 51±14 years, 58% were female, and 47% were African American. Dyslipidemia and hypertension were the most common comorbidities (61% and 58%, respectively). After adjusting for left ventricular (LV) mass index, ejection fraction, and several potential confounders, the number of comorbidities remained associated with all indices of cardiac mechanics except global circumferential strain (eg, ?=?0.32 [95% CI ?0.44, ?0.20] per 1?unit increase in number of comorbidities for global longitudinal strain; ?=?0.16 [95% CI ?0.20, ?0.11] for e' velocity; P?0.0001 for both comparisons). Results were similar after excluding participants with abnormal LV geometry (P<0.05 for all comparisons). Conclusions Higher comorbidity burden is associated with worse cardiac mechanics, even in the presence of normal LV geometry. The deleterious effect of multiple comorbidities on cardiac mechanics may explain both the high comorbidity burden and adverse outcomes in patients who ultimately develop HF. PMID:24780206

  3. Cardiac Repolarization Abnormalities and Potential Evidence for Loss of Cardiac Sodium Currents on ECGs of Patients with Chagas' Heart Disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, T. T.; Medina, R.; Jugo, D.; Nunez, T. J.; Borrego, A.; Arellano, E.; Arenare, B.; DePalma, J. L.; Greco, E. C.; Starc, V.

    2007-01-01

    Some individuals with Chagas disease develop right precordial lead ST segment elevation in response to an ajmaline challenge test, and the prevalence of right bundle branch block (RBBB) is also high in Chagas disease. Because these same electrocardiographic abnormalities occur in the Brugada syndrome, which involves genetically defective cardiac sodium channels, acquired damage to cardiac sodium channels may also occur in Chagas disease. We studied several conventional and advanced resting 12-lead/derived Frank-lead ECG parameters in 34 patients with Chagas -related heart disease (mean age 39 14 years) and in 34 age-/gender-matched healthy controls. All ECG recordings were of 5-10 min duration, obtained in the supine position using high fidelity hardware/software (CardioSoft, Houston, TX). Even after excluding those Chagas patients who had resting BBBs, tachycardia and/or pathologic arrhythmia (n=8), significant differences remained in multiple conventional and advanced ECG parameters between the Chagas and control groups (n=26/group), especially in their respective QT interval variability indices, maximal spatial QRS-T angles and low frequency HRV powers (p=0.0006, p=0.0015 and p=0.0314 respectively). In relation to the issue of potential damage to cardiac sodium channels, the Chagas patients had: 1) greater than or equal to twice the incidence of resting ST segment elevation in leads V1-V3 (n=10/26 vs. n=5/26) and of both leftward (n=5/26 versus n=0/26) and rightward (n=7/26 versus n=3/26) QRS axis deviation than controls; 2) significantly increased filtered (40-250 Hz) QRS interval durations (92.1 8.5 versus 85.3 plus or minus 9.0 ms, p=0.022) versus controls; and 3) significantly decreased QT and especially JT interval durations versus controls (QT interval: 387.5 plus or minus 26.4 versus 408.9 plus or minus 34.6 ms, p=0.013; JT interval: 290.5 plus or minus 26.3 versus 314.8 plus or minus 31.3 ms; p=0.0029). Heart rates and Bazett-corrected QTc/JTc intervals were not significantly different between groups. Patients with Chagas heart disease have increased cardiac repolarization abnormalities, especially by advanced ECG. Moreover, as a group, they have decreased uncorrected JT and QT interval durations and increased filtered QRS interval durations (versus age/gender-matched controls), all suggesting a potential loss of cardiac sodium channel function that might be mediated, in part, by cardiac autonomic damage. Overall findings support Brugada et al's recent hypothesis that the pathway leading to sudden death may often be similar in Chagas' disease and Brugada syndrome i.e., damage to the sodium channel (infectious/immunologic/autonomic in Chagas' genetic in Brugada) with consequent loss of sodium currents may facilitate a phase II-reentry based arrhythmic substrate for ventricular fibrillation in both conditions. In general, JT interval-related results have been underreported in the Chagas literature.

  4. Thyroid ultrasound abnormalities in persons exposed during childhood to 131I from the Hanford nuclear site.

    PubMed

    Kopecky, Kenneth J; Onstad, Lynn; Hamilton, Thomas E; Davis, Scott

    2005-06-01

    Approximately 740,000 Ci of 131I were released into the atmosphere from the Hanford Nuclear Site in Washington State during 1944-1957. The Hanford Thyroid Disease Study (HTDS), conducted to determine if thyroid disease is increased among persons exposed as children to that 131I, also investigated whether thyroid ultrasound (US) abnormalities might be increased. The HTDS cohort (n = 5199) was selected from 1940-1946 births to mothers with usual residence in seven Washington counties. Of these, 4350 were located alive, 3447 attended HTDS clinics (1992-1997), and 3440 (1747 females) had evaluable clinical results and sufficient data to characterize their Hanford 131I exposures. US abnormalities were observed in 55.5% of women and 37.4% of men. Thyroid radiation doses from Hanford 131I, which could be estimated for 3191 evaluable participants, ranged from 0.0029 to 2823 mGy (mean, 174 mGy). Estimated dose was not significantly associated with the prevalence of any US abnormality (p = 0.21), US nodules with maximum dimension 5 mm or more (p = 0.64), or average number of US nodules per person (p = 0.80 for nodules with maximum dimension 5 mm or more). These results remained unchanged after accounting for factors that might confound or modify dose-response relationships and for uncertainty of the dose estimates. This study does not support the hypothesis that 131I exposure at Hanford's dose levels and dose rates during infancy and childhood increases the prevalence of adult thyroid US abnormalities. PMID:16029129

  5. Physiologic abnormalities of cardiac function in progressive systemic sclerosis with diffuse scleroderma

    SciTech Connect

    Follansbee, W.P.; Curtiss, E.I.; Medsger, T.A. Jr.; Steen, V.D.; Uretsky, B.F.; Owens, G.R.; Rodnan, G.P.

    1984-01-19

    To investigate cardiopulmonary function in progressive systemic sclerosis with diffuse scleroderma, we studied 26 patients with maximal exercise and redistribution thallium scans, rest and exercise radionuclide ventriculography, pulmonary-function testing, and chest roentgenography. Although only 6 patients had clinical evidence of cardiac involvement, 20 had abnormal thallium scans, including 10 with reversible exercise-induced defects and 18 with fixed defects (8 had both). Seven of the 10 patients who had exercise-induced defects and underwent cardiac catheterization had normal coronary angiograms. Mean resting left ventricular ejection fraction and mean resting right ventricular ejection fraction were lower in patients with post-exercise left ventricular thallium defect scores above the median (59 +/- 13 per cent vs. 69 +/- 6 per cent, and 36 +/- 12 per cent vs. 47 +/- 7 per cent, respectively). The authors conclude that in progressive systemic sclerosis with diffuse scleroderma, abnormalities of myocardial perfusion are common and appear to be due to a disturbance of the myocardial microcirculation. Both right and left ventricular dysfunction appear to be related to this circulatory disturbance, suggesting ischemically mediated injury.

  6. Prenatal aneupioidy detection by fluorencence in situ hybridization (FISH) in 1,068 second trimester pregnancies with fetal ultrasound abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, B.E.; Wright, M.; Lytle, C. |

    1994-09-01

    One indication for rapid prenatal aneuploidy detection in uncultured amniocytes by FISH is the identification of fetal abnormalities by ultrasound. We analyzed 1,068 consecutive specimens from second trimester pregnancies with fetal ultrasound abnormalities referred for FISH plus cytogenetics. These specimens are a subset (14.7%) of the most recent 7,240 clinical referrals for these combined analyses. Hybridization with specific probes for chromosomes 21, 18, 13, X and Y were used to detect common aneuploidies. As defined by previously described criteria, specimens were reported as informative disomic, informative trisomic, or uninformative within two days of receipt. The rate of informative results from acceptable specimens was 90.1%. The vast majority of uninformative results was due to maternal cell contamination which precluded analysis. Within the informative group there were no false positives, false negatives nor reports of incorrect gender. Of the 1,068 tested specimens with ultrasound abnormalities, 135 (12.5%) were cytogenetically diagnosed as aneuploid. Prior to the cytogenetic analysis, a total of 107 aneuploidies were correctly identified by FISH. The remaining 26 aneuploidies generated an uninformative FISH result. The overall FISH detection rate for aneuploidy (including informative and uninformative results) was 79%. Other unbalanced chromosome abnormalities were present in 2.1% of specimens and 0.7% had balanced chromosome abnormalities. The inclusive total cytogenetic abnormality rate was 15.4%, of which 85% were potentially detectable by our FISH protocol. This clinical experience demonstrates that aneuploidy detection by FISH on uncultured amniocytes can provide accurate and rapid identification of aneuploidies, especially when such abnormalities are suspected following the diagnosis of fetal anomalies by ultrasound examination.

  7. Abnormal sodium current properties contribute to cardiac electrical and contractile dysfunction in a mouse model of myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    PubMed

    Algalarrondo, Vincent; Wahbi, Karim; Sebag, Frédéric; Gourdon, Geneviève; Beldjord, Chérif; Azibi, Kamel; Balse, Elise; Coulombe, Alain; Fischmeister, Rodolphe; Eymard, Bruno; Duboc, Denis; Hatem, Stéphane N

    2015-04-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is the most common neuromuscular disorder and is associated with cardiac conduction defects. However, the mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias in DM1 are unknown. We tested the hypothesis that abnormalities in the cardiac sodium current (INa) are involved, and used a transgenic mouse model reproducing the expression of triplet expansion observed in DM1 (DMSXL mouse). The injection of the class-I antiarrhythmic agent flecainide induced prominent conduction abnormalities and significantly lowered the radial tissular velocities and strain rate in DMSXL mice compared to WT. These abnormalities were more pronounced in 8-month-old mice than in 3-month-old mice. Ventricular action potentials recorded by standard glass microelectrode technique exhibited a lower maximum upstroke velocity [dV/dt](max) in DMSXL. This decreased [dV/dt](max) was associated with a 1.7 fold faster inactivation of INa in DMSXL myocytes measured by the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Finally in the DMSXL mouse, no mutation in the Scn5a gene was detected and neither cardiac fibrosis nor abnormalities of expression of the sodium channel protein were observed. Therefore, alterations in the sodium current markedly contributed to electrical conduction block in DM1. This result should guide pharmaceutical and clinical research toward better therapy for the cardiac arrhythmias associated with DM1. PMID:25613807

  8. In Vivo Evaluations of a Phased Ultrasound Array for Transesophageal Cardiac Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Devina; Werner, Jacob; Park, Eun-Joo; Francischelli, David; Smith, Nadine Barrie

    2010-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation is one of the most common arrhythmias that affects over 2.2 million Americans each year. Catheter ablation, one of the effective treatments, has shown high rate of success in treating paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Currently, radiofrequency which is being used for catheter ablation is an invasive procedure. Measurable morbidity and significant costs and time are associated with this modality of treatment of permanent or persistent atrial fibrillation. In order to address these issues, a transesophageal ultrasound applicator for noninvasive cardiac ablation was designed, developed and evaluated. The ultrasound energy delivered by the phased array was used to create a lesion in the myocardial tissue. Various factors, simulation results of transducer arrays, current transesophageal medical devices, and throat anatomy, were considered while designing a phased ultrasound transducer that can be inserted into the esophagus. For this research, a two-dimensional sparse phased array with flat tapered elements was fabricated and evaluated in in vivo experiments. Five pigs were anesthetized; the array was passed transesophagealy and positioned over the heart. An operating frequency of 1.6 MHz and 8˜15 minutes of array operation resulted in both single and multiple lesions on atrial and ventricular myocardium. The average size of lesions was 5.1±2.1 mm in diameter and 7.8±2.5 mm in length. Experimental results indicate that the array delivered sufficient power to produce ablation at the focal point while not grossly damaging the tissue surrounding the area of interest. These results demonstrate a potential application of the ultrasound applicator for noninvasive transesophageal cardiac surgery in atrial fibrillation treatment.

  9. Disruption of Ah Receptor Signaling during Mouse Development Leads to Abnormal Cardiac Structure and Function in the Adult

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Vinicius S.; Fan, Yunxia; Kurita, Hisaka; Wang, Qin; Ko, Chia-I; Naticchioni, Mindi; Jiang, Min; Koch, Sheryl; Zhang, Xiang; Biesiada, Jacek; Medvedovic, Mario; Xia, Ying; Rubinstein, Jack; Puga, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) Theory proposes that the environment encountered during fetal life and infancy permanently shapes tissue physiology and homeostasis such that damage resulting from maternal stress, poor nutrition or exposure to environmental agents may be at the heart of adult onset disease. Interference with endogenous developmental functions of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), either by gene ablation or by exposure in utero to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a potent AHR ligand, causes structural, molecular and functional cardiac abnormalities and altered heart physiology in mouse embryos. To test if embryonic effects progress into an adult phenotype, we investigated whether Ahr ablation or TCDD exposure in utero resulted in cardiac abnormalities in adult mice long after removal of the agent. Ten-months old adult Ahr-/- and in utero TCDD-exposed Ahr+/+ mice showed sexually dimorphic abnormal cardiovascular phenotypes characterized by echocardiographic findings of hypertrophy, ventricular dilation and increased heart weight, resting heart rate and systolic and mean blood pressure, and decreased exercise tolerance. Underlying these effects, genes in signaling networks related to cardiac hypertrophy and mitochondrial function were differentially expressed. Cardiac dysfunction in mouse embryos resulting from AHR signaling disruption seems to progress into abnormal cardiac structure and function that predispose adults to cardiac disease, but while embryonic dysfunction is equally robust in males and females, the adult abnormalities are more prevalent in females, with the highest severity in Ahr-/- females. The findings reported here underscore the conclusion that AHR signaling in the developing heart is one potential target of environmental factors associated with cardiovascular disease. PMID:26555816

  10. An Experimental Model Using Cultured Cardiac Myocytes for a Study of the Generation of Premature Ventricular Contractions Under Ultrasound Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Nobuki; Yamamoto, Masaya

    2011-09-01

    It is known that use of a contrast agents in echocardiography increases the probability of generation of premature ventricular contractions (PVCs). As a basic study to elucidate the mechanisms and to reduce adverse effects, the generation of PVCs was investigated using cultured cardiac myocytes instead of the intact heart in vivo. Cardiac myocytes were isolated from neonatal rats and cultured on a cover slip. The myocyte sample was exposed to pulsed ultrasound with microbubbles adjacent to the myocytes, and generation of PVCs was examined with ultrasound exposure at various delay times after onset of myocyte contraction. The experimental results showed that generation of PVCs had a stable threshold delay time and that PVCs were generated only when myocytes were exposed to ultrasound with delay times longer than the threshold. The results indicate that the model used in this study is useful for revealing the mechanisms by which PVCs are induced by ultrasound exposure.

  11. Register cardiac fiber orientations from 3D DTI volume to 2D ultrasound image of rat hearts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xulei; Wang, Silun; Shen, Ming; Zhang, Xiaodong; Lerakis, Stamatios; Wagner, Mary B.; Fei, Baowei

    2015-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound or echocardiography is one of the most widely used examinations for the diagnosis of cardiac diseases. However, it only supplies the geometric and structural information of the myocardium. In order to supply more detailed microstructure information of the myocardium, this paper proposes a registration method to map cardiac fiber orientations from three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (MR-DTI) volume to the 2D ultrasound image. It utilizes a 2D/3D intensity based registration procedure including rigid, log-demons, and affine transformations to search the best similar slice from the template volume. After registration, the cardiac fiber orientations are mapped to the 2D ultrasound image via fiber relocations and reorientations. This method was validated by six images of rat hearts ex vivo. The evaluation results indicated that the final Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) achieved more than 90% after geometric registrations; and the inclination angle errors (IAE) between the mapped fiber orientations and the gold standards were less than 15 degree. This method may provide a practical tool for cardiologists to examine cardiac fiber orientations on ultrasound images and have the potential to supply additional information for diagnosis of cardiac diseases.

  12. Experimental high-intensity focused ultrasound lesion formation in cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muratore, Robert; Kalisz, Andrew; Lee, Paul; Lizzi, Frederic; Fujikura, Kana; Otsuka, Ryo; Homma, Shunichi

    2001-05-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) (4.5-7.5 MHz) was used to form lesions in cardiac tissue, with an ultimate objective of treating conditions such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and ventricular tachycardia. Ultrasound attenuation coefficients were experimentally determined in vitro for calf myocardial tissue, both muscle and pericardial fat. These coefficients were employed in computational models of linear beam propagation, tissue heating profiles and thermal lesion formation for a variety of focused transducers. Modeling was performed for continuous and pulsed exposures. These models suggested initial power levels and exposure durations for in vitro experiments on calf ventricles and septa and ex vivo experiments on canine whole hearts. Repeatability of lesion size and placement was studied as power and exposure parameters varied around the initial values. With these experimental results, power and exposure parameters were selected to create lesions in vivo in canine ventricles and septa in open-chest, anesthetized dogs. Pulsed exposures were synchronized to cardiac and respiration cycles to ensure accurate placement of the lesions. These initial in vivo experiments showed that HIFU treatments in the beating heart are feasible; they also identified refinements that are now being implemented for better control of lesion size and placement. [Work supported by NCI and NHLBI Grant 5R01 CA84588.

  13. Pituitary and ovarian abnormalities demonstrated by CT and ultrasound in children with features of the McCune-Albright syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Rieth, K.G.; Comite, F.; Shawker, T.H.; Cutler, G.B. Jr.

    1984-11-01

    In a random series of 97 children referred to the National Institutes of Health with a presumptive diagnosis of precocious puberty, eight girls were found to have features of the McCune-Albright syndrome, including fibrous dysplasia of bone and/or skin lesions resembling cafe au lait spots. Radiographic evaluation of these patients included computed tomography of the head and pelvic ultrasound. The pituitary glands were suspicious for abnormality in five of the eight girls. Seven girls underwent pelvic ultrasound, and in all of them the ovaries were considered to be abnormal for their chronological age; in addition, two had functional ovarian cysts. The role of diagnostic radiological studies in the diagnosis of this syndrome is discussed.

  14. Critical care ultrasound in cardiac arrest. Technological requirements for performing the SESAME-protocol - a holistic approach.

    PubMed

    Lichtenstein, Daniel; Malbrain, Manu L N G

    2015-01-01

    The use of ultrasound has gained its place in critical care as part of our day-to-day monitoring tools. A better understanding of ultrasound techniques and recent publications including protocols for the lungs, the abdomen and the blood vessels has introduced ultrasound to the bedside of our ICU patients. However, we will prove in this paper that early machines, dating back more than 25 years, were perfectly able to do the job as compared to modern laptop machines with more features but few additional advantages. Ultrasound is not only a diagnostic tool, but should also be seen as an extension of the traditional physical examination. This paper will focus on the use of the SESAME-protocol in cardiac arrest. The SESAME-protocol suggests starting with a lung scan to rule out possible causes leading to cardiac arrest. Firstly, pneumothorax needs to be ruled out. Secondly, a partial diagnosis of pulmonary embolism is done following the BLUE-protocol. Thirdly, fluid therapy can be guided, following the FALLS-protocol. The SESAME-protocol continues by scanning the lower femoral veins to check for signs of deep venous thrombosis, followed by (or before, in case of trauma) the abdomen to detect massive bleeding. Next comes the pericardium, to exclude pericardial tamponade. Finally, a transthoracic cardiac ultrasound is performed to check for other (cardiac) causes leading to cardiac arrest. The emphasis is on a holistic approach, where ultrasound can be seen as the modern stethoscope needed by clinicians to complete the full physiological examination of their critically ill unstable patients. PMID:26578398

  15. Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Improves the Functional Properties of Cardiac Mesoangioblasts.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Aurora; Pérez, Laura M; De Lucas, Beatriz; Martín, Nuria San; Kadow-Romacker, Anke; Plaza, Gustavo; Raum, Kay; Gálvez, Beatriz G

    2015-12-01

    Cell-based therapy is a promising approach for many diseases, including ischemic heart disease. Cardiac mesoangioblasts are committed vessel-associated progenitors that can restore to a significant, although partial, extent, heart structure and function in a murine model of myocardial infarction. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) is a non-invasive form of mechanical energy that can be delivered into biological tissues as acoustic pressure waves, and is widely used for clinical applications including bone fracture healing. We hypothesized that the positive effects of LIPUS on bone and soft tissue, such as increased cell differentiation and cytoskeleton reorganization, could be applied to increase the therapeutic potential of mesoangioblasts for heart repair. In this work, we show that LIPUS stimulation of cardiac mesoangioblasts isolated from mouse and human heart results in significant cellular modifications that provide beneficial effects to the cells, including increased malleability and improved motility. Additionally, LIPUS stimulation increased the number of binucleated cells and induced cardiac differentiation to an extent comparable with 5'-azacytidine treatment. Mechanistically, LIPUS stimulation activated the BMP-Smad signalling pathway and increased the expression of myosin light chain-2 together with upregulation of ?1 integrin and RhoA, highlighting a potentially important role for cytoskeleton reorganization. Taken together, these results provide functional evidence that LIPUS might be a useful tool to explore in the field of heart cell therapy. PMID:26201830

  16. Relationship between elevated serum troponin values in end-stage renal disease patients and abnormal isotopic cardiac scans following stress.

    PubMed

    Porter, George A; Norton, Theadore L; Lindsley, Jessie; Stevens, Jeffrey S; Phillips, David S; Bennett, William M

    2003-01-01

    One hundred asymptomatic high-risk renal transplant candidates were screened for asymptomatic coronary artery disease using stress cardiac isotopic imaging. The cardiac markers, serum cTnT, cTnI, and CKMB, were collected pre and post stress testing. Of the 99 patients whose cardiac scans were technically satisfactory, 32 were normal, 49 had a definite imaging abnormality and the scan was indeterminate in the remaining 18 patients. Based on these results, patients were stratified into either normal, indeterminate or abnormal scan groups. They then were analyzed to detect any correlations between cardiac perfusion defects and either elevated pre-stress cardiac markers or consistent changes 24h after stress testing. While the mean pre-stress serum values for both cardiac troponin T (0.117 +/- 0.12 microgram/L) and cardiac troponin I (0.235 +/- 0.89 microgram/L) were increased in the abnormal cardiac scan group, only the cTnT value proved to differ significantly from the normal group (p < 0.01). For the indeterminate group neither marker was different from the normal scan group. Only an elevated serum cTnT > 0.1 microgram/L (OR 3.042, p = 0.030) proved to discriminate an abnormal scan in this population. It is concluded that the increase in pre-stress serum cTnT encountered in patients with chronic renal failure, with or without evidence of overt, symptomatic coronary artery disease, may represent a combination of subclinical myocardial damage and a prolonged half-life of the marker in the serum. Because of the frequency of elevated serum concentrations of cTnT and, to a lesser degree cTnI, the physician should exercise caution when interpreting a single elevated Troponin value during the evaluation of chest pain in patients with end-stage renal disease. A cTnT > 0.1 microgram/L increases the likelihood of finding significant coronary artery disease three fold in high-risk ESRD patients being evaluated for renal transplantation. PMID:12617333

  17. Abnormal FISH in patients with immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis is a risk factor for cardiac involvement and for death

    PubMed Central

    Warsame, R; Kumar, S K; Gertz, M A; Lacy, M Q; Buadi, F K; Hayman, S R; Leung, N; Dingli, D; Lust, J A; Ketterling, R P; Lin, Y; Russell, S; Hwa, L; Kapoor, P; Go, R S; Zeldenrust, S R; Kyle, R A; Rajkumar, S V; Dispenzieri, A

    2015-01-01

    Importance of interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with cytoplasmic staining of immunoglobulin FISH (cIg-FISH) on bone marrow is not well understood in light chain amyloidosis (AL). This is in contrast with multiple myeloma where prognostic and treatment related decisions are dependent on cytogenetic testing. This retrospective study reviewed 401 AL patients with cIg-FISH testing performed at our institution between 2004 and 2012. Eighty-one percent of patients had an abnormal cIg-FISH. Common abnormalities involved translocations of chromosome 14q32 (52%), specifically: t(11;14) (43%), t(14;16) (3%) and t(4;14) (2%). Other common abnormalities include monosomy 13/deletion 13q (30%), trisomies 9 (20%), 15 (14%), 11 (10%) and 3 (10%). Median overall survival for this cohort of patients is 3.5 years. When plasma cell burden was greater than 10% trisomies predicted for worse survival (44 vs 19 months), and when it was ?10% t(11;14) predicted for worse survival (53 months vs not reached). Abnormal cIg-FISH was significantly associated with advanced cardiac involvement, and remained a prognostic factor on multivariate analysis. This large AL cohort demonstrates that abnormal FISH at diagnosis is prognostic for survival and advanced cardiac disease. Particularly, trisomies and t(11;14) affect survival when degree of plasma cell burden is considered. PMID:25933374

  18. Abnormal expression of histocompatibility and mitochondrial antigens by cardiac tissue from patients with myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ansari, A A; Wang, Y C; Danner, D J; Gravanis, M B; Mayne, A; Neckelmann, N; Sell, K W; Herskowitz, A

    1991-08-01

    Autoantibodies against the adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT), the branched chain alpha-ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKD) complex proteins, and myosin have been implicated in the pathogenesis of human dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Cardiac tissue from patients with DCM and, for control purposes, cardiac tissue from patients with other forms of cardiomyopathy and from patients with no history of cardiac disease were stained with heterologous and ANT-, BCKD-, and myosin-specific affinity-purified sera from DCM patients. Data demonstrate that although anti-myosin stains tissues from both patients and normal controls, the ANT- and BCKD-specific heterologous and affinity-purified sera from DCM patients stain only cardiac tissues from DCM patients. Intense staining in patchy areas of cardiac tissue suggests that abnormal increased expression of these putative autoantigens occurs in discrete areas of cardiac myocytes. The reactivity of the antisera was organ specific and only seen in tissues from DCM patients. The organ and disease specificity of these findings suggests that such expression may play an important role in the pathogenesis of human DCM. PMID:1867322

  19. Association Between Tangential Beam Treatment Parameters and Cardiac Abnormalities After Definitive Radiation Treatment for Left-Sided Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Correa, Candace R.; Das, Indra J. Litt, Harold I.; Ferrari, Victor; Hwang, W.-T.; Solin, Lawrence J.; Harris, Eleanor E.

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To examine the association between radiation treatment (RT) parameters, cardiac diagnostic test abnormalities, and clinical cardiovascular diagnoses among patients with left-sided breast cancer after breast conservation treatment with tangential beam RT. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 416 patients treated between 1977 and 1995 with RT for primary left-sided breast cancer were reviewed for myocardial perfusion imaging and echocardiograms. Sixty-two patients (62/416, 15%) underwent these cardiac diagnostic tests for cardiovascular symptoms and were selected for further study. Central lung distance and maximum heart width and length in the treatment field were determined for each patient. Medical records were reviewed for cardiovascular diagnoses and evaluation of cardiac risk factors. Results: At a median of 12 years post-RT the incidence of cardiac diagnostic test abnormalities among symptomatic left-sided irradiated women was significantly higher than the predicted incidence of cardiovascular disease in the patient population, 6/62 (9%) predicted vs. 24/62 (39%) observed, p 0.001. As compared with patients with normal tests, patients with cardiac diagnostic test abnormalities had a larger median central lung distance (2.6 cm vs. 2.2 cm, p = 0.01). Similarly, patients with vs. without congestive heart failure had a larger median central lung distance (2.8 cm vs. 2.3 cm, p = 0.008). Conclusions: Contemporary RT for early breast cancer may be associated with a small, but potentially avoidable, risk of cardiovascular morbidity that is associated with treatment technique.

  20. Role and importance of ultrasound lung comets in acute cardiac care.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Fabrizio; Aquilani, Roberta; Radico, Francesco; Bianco, Francesco; Dipace, Gioacchino Giuseppe; Miniero, Ester; De Caterina, Raffaele; Gallina, Sabina

    2015-04-01

    Lung ultrasonography is an emerging, user-friendly and easy-to-use technique that can be performed quickly at the patient's bedside to evaluate several pathologic conditions affecting the lung. Ultrasound lung comets (ULCs) are an echographic sign of uncertain biophysical characterisation mostly attributed to water-thickened subpleural interlobular septa, but invariably associated with increased extravascular lung water. ULCs have thus been proposed as a complementary tool for the assessment and monitoring of acute heart failure and are now entering into statements in international recommendation documents. Adding lung ultrasonography to conventional echocardiography allows for performing an integrated cardiopulmonary ultrasound examination, and this is an important opportunity for the cardiologist. The technique allows the simultaneous gathering of considerable information about the heart and the lungs to investigate acute and chronic cardio-pulmonary conditions within a non-invasive, radiation-free, single-probe, all-in-one examination. We have here reviewed the pertinent literature on the physical origin of ULCs and on their role and importance in intensive and acute cardiac care settings. We also here propose a new algorithm aimed at implementing evaluation in the diagnostic work-up of patients with suspected acute heart failure. PMID:25267879

  1. High-frequency ultrasound M-mode monitoring of HIFU ablation in cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumon, R. E.; Gudur, M. S. R.; Zhou, Y.; Deng, C. X.

    2012-10-01

    Effective real-time HIFU lesion detection is important for expanded use of HIFU in interventional electrophysiology (e.g., epicardial ablation of cardiac arrhythmia). The goal of this study was to investigate rapid, high-frequency M-mode ultrasound imaging for monitoring spatiotemporal changes in tissue during HIFU application. The HIFU application (4.33 MHz, 1000 Hz PRF, 50% duty cycle, 1 s exposure, 6100 W/cm2) was perpendicularly applied to porcine cardiac tissue with a high-frequency imaging system (Visualsonics Vevo 770, 55 MHz, 4.5 mm focal distance) confocally aligned. Radiofrequency (RF) M-mode data (1 kHz PRF, 4 s × 7 mm) was acquired before, during, and after HIFU treatment. Gross lesions were compared with M-mode data to correlate lesion and cavity formation. Integrated backscatter, echo-decorrelation parameters, and their cumulative extrema over time were analyzed for automatically identifying lesion width and bubble formation. Cumulative maximum integrated backscatter showed the best results for identifying the final lesion width, and a criterion based on line-to-line decorrelation was proposed for identification of transient bubble activity.

  2. Adaptive volume rendering of cardiac 3D ultrasound images: utilizing blood pool statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åsen, Jon Petter; Steen, Erik; Kiss, Gabriel; Thorstensen, Anders; Rabben, Stein Inge

    2012-03-01

    In this paper we introduce and investigate an adaptive direct volume rendering (DVR) method for real-time visualization of cardiac 3D ultrasound. DVR is commonly used in cardiac ultrasound to visualize interfaces between tissue and blood. However, this is particularly challenging with ultrasound images due to variability of the signal within tissue as well as variability of noise signal within the blood pool. Standard DVR involves a global mapping of sample values to opacity by an opacity transfer function (OTF). While a global OTF may represent the interface correctly in one part of the image, it may result in tissue dropouts, or even artificial interfaces within the blood pool in other parts of the image. In order to increase correctness of the rendered image, the presented method utilizes blood pool statistics to do regional adjustments of the OTF. The regional adaptive OTF was compared with a global OTF in a dataset of apical recordings from 18 subjects. For each recording, three renderings from standard views (apical 4-chamber (A4C), inverted A4C (IA4C) and mitral valve (MV)) were generated for both methods, and each rendering was tuned to the best visual appearance by a physician echocardiographer. For each rendering we measured the mean absolute error (MAE) between the rendering depth buffer and a validated left ventricular segmentation. The difference d in MAE between the global and regional method was calculated and t-test results are reported with significant improvements for the regional adaptive method (dA4C = 1.5 +/- 0.3 mm, dIA4C = 2.5 +/- 0.4 mm, dMV = 1.7 +/- 0.2 mm, d.f. = 17, all p < 0.001). This improvement by the regional adaptive method was confirmed through qualitative visual assessment by an experienced physician echocardiographer who concluded that the regional adaptive method produced rendered images with fewer tissue dropouts and less spurious structures inside the blood pool in the vast majority of the renderings. The algorithm has been implemented on a GPU, running an average of 16 fps with a resolution of 512x512x100 samples (Nvidia GTX460).

  3. Noninvasive Ambient Pressure Estimation using Ultrasound Contrast Agents -- Invoking Subharmonics for Cardiac and Hepatic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dave, Jaydev K.

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are encapsulated microbubbles that provide a source for acoustic impedance mismatch with the blood, due to difference in compressibility between the gas contained within these microbubbles and the blood. When insonified by an ultrasound beam, these UCAs act as nonlinear scatterers and enhance the echoes of the incident pulse, resulting in scattering of the incident ultrasound beam and emission of fundamental (f0), subharmonic (f0/2), harmonic (n*f0; n ? N) and ultraharmonic (((2n-1)/2)*f0; n ? N & n > 1) components in the echo response. A promising approach to monitor in vivo pressures revolves around the fact that the ultrasound transmit and receive parameters can be selected to induce an ambient pressure amplitude dependent subharmonic signal. This subharmonic signal may be used to estimate ambient pressure amplitude; such technique of estimating ambient pressure amplitude is referred to as subharmonic aided pressure estimation or SHAPE. This project develops and evaluates the feasibility of SHAPE to noninvasively monitor cardiac and hepatic pressures (using commercially available ultrasound scanners and UCAs) because invasive catheter based pressure measurements are used currently for these applications. Invasive catheter based pressure measurements pose risk of introducing infection while the catheter is guided towards the region of interest in the body through a percutaneous incision, pose risk of death due to structural or mechanical failure of the catheter (which has also triggered product recalls by the USA Food and Drug Administration) and may potentially modulate the pressures that are being measured. Also, catheterization procedures require fluoroscopic guidance to advance the catheter to the site of pressure measurements and such catheterization procedures are not performed in all clinical centers. Thus, a noninvasive technique to obtain ambient pressure values without the catheterization process is clinically helpful. While an intravenous injection is required to inject the UCAs into the body, this procedure is considered noninvasive as per the definition provided by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services; invasive procedures include surgical procedures as well as catheterization procedures while minor procedures such as drawing blood (which requires a similar approach as injecting UCAs) are considered noninvasive. In vitro results showed that the standard error between catheter pressures and SHAPE results is below 10 mmHg with a correlation coefficient value of above 0.9—this experimental error of 10 mmHg is less than the errors associated with other techniques utilizing UCAs for ambient pressure estimation. In vivo results proved the feasibility of SHAPE to noninvasively estimate clinically relevant left and right ventricular (LV and RV) pressures. The maximum error in estimating the LV and RV systolic and diastolic pressures was 3.5 mmHg. Thus, the SHAPE technique may be useful for systolic and diastolic pressure estimation given that the standard recommendations require the errors for these pressure measurements to be within 5 mmHg. The ability of SHAPE to identify induced portal hypertension (PH) was also proved. The changes in the SHAPE data correlated significantly (p < 0.05) with the changes in the portal vein (PV) pressures and the absolute amplitudes of the subharmonic signal also correlated with absolute PV pressures. The SHAPE technique provides the ability to noninvasively obtain in vivo pressures. This technique is applicable not only for critically ill patients, but also for screening symptomatic patients and potentially for other clinical pressure monitoring applications, as well.

  4. Hybrid Pixel-Based Method for Cardiac Ultrasound Fusion Based on Integration of PCA and DWT

    PubMed Central

    Sulaiman, Puteri Suhaiza; Wirza, Rahmita; Dimon, Mohd Zamrin; Khalid, Fatimah; Moosavi Tayebi, Rohollah

    2015-01-01

    Medical image fusion is the procedure of combining several images from one or multiple imaging modalities. In spite of numerous attempts in direction of automation ventricle segmentation and tracking in echocardiography, due to low quality images with missing anatomical details or speckle noises and restricted field of view, this problem is a challenging task. This paper presents a fusion method which particularly intends to increase the segment-ability of echocardiography features such as endocardial and improving the image contrast. In addition, it tries to expand the field of view, decreasing impact of noise and artifacts and enhancing the signal to noise ratio of the echo images. The proposed algorithm weights the image information regarding an integration feature between all the overlapping images, by using a combination of principal component analysis and discrete wavelet transform. For evaluation, a comparison has been done between results of some well-known techniques and the proposed method. Also, different metrics are implemented to evaluate the performance of proposed algorithm. It has been concluded that the presented pixel-based method based on the integration of PCA and DWT has the best result for the segment-ability of cardiac ultrasound images and better performance in all metrics. PMID:26089965

  5. Relation of autonomic and cardiac abnormalities to ventricular fibrillation in a rat model of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Naggar, Isaac; Lazar, Jason; Kamran, Haroon; Orman, Rena; Stewart, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac autonomic, conduction, and structural changes may occur in epilepsy and may contribute to sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP), e.g. by increasing the risk for ventricular fibrillation (VF). In a model of chronic seizures in rats, we sought to study (1) cardiac and autonomic derangements that accompany the epileptic state, (2) whether chronically seizing rats experienced more significant cardiac effects after severe acute seizures, and (3) the susceptibility of chronically seizing rats to VF arising from autonomic and hypoxemic changes, which commonly occur during seizures. Sprague-Dawely rats were injected with saline or kainic acid to induce chronic seizures. At 2-3 months or 7-11 months after injection, these rats were studied with both 12-lead electrocardiography (to assess heart rate variability and QT dispersion) and echocardiography under ketamine/xylazine or urethane anesthesia. Hearts were subsequently excised, weighed, and examined histologically. Epileptic rats exhibited decreased vagal tone, increased QT dispersion, and eccentric cardiac hypertrophy without significant cardiac fibrosis, especially at 7-11 months post-injection. Of these three findings, vagal tone was inversely correlated with heart weights. Epileptic rats exhibited diminished systolic function compared to controls after severe acute seizures. However, animals with long-standing chronic seizures were less susceptible to autonomic/hypoxemia-driven VF, and their susceptibility inversely correlated with mean left ventricular wall thickness on histology. On the basis of this model, we conclude that cardiac changes accompany epilepsy and these can lead to significant seizure-associated cardiac performance decreases, but these cardiac changes actually lower the probability of VF. PMID:24286892

  6. Pathological prenatal Doppler sonography findings and their association with neonatal cranial ultrasound abnormalities in a high risk collective.

    PubMed

    Meyberg-Solomayer, G C; Soen, M; Speer, R; Poets, C; Goelz, R; Wallwiener, D; Solomayer, E-F

    2008-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether prenatal Doppler ultrasound plays a role in the risk assessment of neonatal abnormal cranial ultrasound findings (NACU). Doppler examinations of blood flow velocities in the umbilical artery (n = 132), the fetal middle cerebral artery (n = 96) and the ductus venosus (n = 46) were conducted in 132 consecutive high-risk cases. The cases were divided into three groups: normal (I), pathological (II) and highly pathological Doppler (III) results, according to the resistance index calculated and were assessed for any association between the Doppler groups and the short-term outcome of the neonate, especially NACU. A significant association was found between Doppler groups and gestational age at delivery, birth weight, length and head circumference, growth restriction, cesarean section rate, Apgar score and pH values. NACU was diagnosed significantly more often in the pathological (12.1%) and highly pathological (38.5%) Doppler groups than in the group with normal Doppler (1.7%; p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that the Doppler groups (odds ratio 1.67, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.14-2.84, p < 0.001) and gestational age at delivery (odds ratio 1.37, 95% CI 1.08-2.74; p < 0.001) were independent variables that could be used to predict NACU. The present study showed that a pathological prenatal Doppler result is highly predictive for NACU in addition to gestational age and can therefore be used for risk assessment. PMID:17904726

  7. Optical coherence tomography monitoring of cardiac ablation by high-intensity focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Matthew; Zhou, Yun; Wang, Hesheng; Deng, Cheri X.; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2005-04-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a promising method for ablation therapy in the heart. Little is understood about early lesion development with HIFU because the lesions cannot be imaged reliably with sufficient resolution, and no other real time monitoring techniques are available to date. We investigated Optical coherence tomography (OCT) for monitoring early lesion formation. We created a series of lesions in fresh canine cardiac tissue using 5W (frequency=4.23Mhz, F#=1.2) of acoustic power with 10sec., 7sec., and 5sec. exposures. The lesions were then imaged using an OCT imaging system with an axial resolution of 12?m and a lateral resolution of 15?m. The maximum width of the lesions were measured using custom software. In separate experiments, lesion formation was investigated under varying acoustic power levels ranging from 5W to 20W at 0.1sec. and 0.2 sec. exposures. The average maximum widths of the lesions were 1.06mm for 10sec. lesions, .65mm for 7sec. lesions, and .59mm for 5sec. lesions. We observed both subsurface lesions and superficial blister-like formations, which may be a precursor of cavitation inception or tissue vaporization. The subsurface lesion forms over time as expected from thermal energy deposition. The surface blister forms prior to the subsurface lesion at high power, and after subsurface lesion formation at lower powers. OCT provides a method for monitoring HIFU lesion formation at high resolution, and can potentially be used to optimize HIFU dose for clinical applications.

  8. Ultrasound

    Cancer.gov

    Ultrasound uses sound waves with frequencies above those humans can hear. A transducer sends sound waves traveling into the body which are reflected back from organs and tissues, allowing a picture to be made of the internal organs. Ultrasound can show

  9. Ultrasound of the equine acute abdomen.

    PubMed

    le Jeune, Sarah; Whitcomb, Mary Beth

    2014-08-01

    Abdominal ultrasound is an invaluable aid in the evaluation of the colic patient but can be heavily influenced by patient preparation, individual horse-to-horse variation, availability of ultrasound transducers, technique, experience level of the examiner, and complexity of the abdominal disorder. This article describes ultrasonographic anatomy of the normal equine abdomen and technique for examination of the equine colic patient. Common abnormalities of the stomach, small intestine, large intestine, and peritoneal cavity are described along with other abnormalities that may be discovered with abdominal ultrasonography of the colic patient, such as masses, urolithiasis, cholelithiasis, and thoracic or cardiac lesions. PMID:25016496

  10. Ultrasound

    MedlinePLUS

    ... findings that might indicate an increased risk for Down syndrome A pregnancy ultrasound may also be done in ... weeks of pregnancy to look for signs of Down syndrome or other problems in the developing baby. This ...

  11. Ultrasound

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... baby’s development in the uterus. Ultrasound uses inaudible sound waves to produce a two-dimensional image of the baby while inside the mother’s uterus. The sound waves bounce off solid structures in the body ...

  12. Protective effect of Nardostachys jatamansi on oxidative injury and cellular abnormalities during doxorubicin-induced cardiac damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Subashini, Rajakannu; Yogeeta, Surinderkumar; Gnanapragasam, Arunachalam; Devaki, Thiruvengadam

    2006-02-01

    Nardostachys jatamansi is a medicinally important herb of Indian origin. It has been used for centuries in the Ayurvedic and Unani systems of medicine for the treatment of various ailments. We have evaluated the effect of N. jatamansi (rhizomes) on the biochemical changes, tissue peroxidative damage and abnormal antioxidant levels in doxorubicin (adriamycin)-induced cardiac damage. Preliminary studies on the effect of the graded dose of extract showed that 500 mg kg(-1) orally for seven days was found to be optimum and hence all further study was carried out with this particular dose. Rats administered doxorubicin (15 mg kg(-1), i.p.) showed myocardial damage that was manifested by the elevation of serum marker enzymes (lactate dehydrogenase, creatine phosphokinase, aspartate aminotransaminase and alanine aminotransaminase). The animals showed significant changes in the antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione-S-transferase) and lipid peroxidation levels. Pretreatment with N. jatamansi extract significantly prevented these alterations and restored the enzyme activity and lipid peroxides to near normal levels. Restoration of cellular normality accredits the N. jatamansi with a cytoprotective role in doxorubicin-induced cardiac damage. PMID:16451755

  13. Walker-Warburg syndrome diagnosed by findings of typical ocular abnormalities on prenatal ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Brasseur-Daudruy, M; Vivier, P H; Ickowicz, V; Eurin, D; Verspyck, E

    2012-04-01

    Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) is a rare, lethal autosomal recessive disorder characterized by congenital muscular dystrophy and brain and eye anomalies. A prenatal finding of hydrocephalus associated with posterior fossa anomalies and/or encephalocele is nonspecific, whereas additional ocular anomalies are typical for WWS. We report a fetus of consanguineous parents found to have encephalocele at US in week 15 of gestation. The parents did not wish to terminate the pregnancy. Follow-up US revealed bilateral abnormal ocular echoic structures suggesting a major form of persistent primary vitreous. WWS was suspected. The POMT2 mutation confirmed this diagnosis. In hydrocephalus associated with posterior fossa anomalies and/or encephalocele, we recommend detailed US examination of the fetal eyes. Ocular anomalies in this context strongly suggest WWS. PMID:22002842

  14. Mechanical and non-mechanical functions of Dystrophin can prevent cardiac abnormalities in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Taghli-Lamallem, Ouarda; Jagla, Krzysztof; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S; Bodmer, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Dystrophin-deficiency causes cardiomyopathies and shortens the life expectancy of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients. Restoring Dystrophin expression in the heart by gene transfer is a promising avenue to explore as a therapy. Truncated Dystrophin gene constructs have been engineered and shown to alleviate dystrophic skeletal muscle disease, but their potential in preventing the development of cardiomyopathy is not fully understood. In the present study, we found that either the mechanical or the signaling functions of Dystrophin were able to reduce the dilated heart phenotype of Dystrophin mutants in a Drosophila model. Our data suggest that Dystrophin retains some function in fly cardiomyocytes in the absence of a predicted mechanical link to the cytoskeleton. Interestingly, cardiac-specific manipulation of nitric oxide synthase expression also modulates cardiac function, which can in part be reversed by loss of Dystrophin function, further implying a signaling role of Dystrophin in the heart. These findings suggest that the signaling functions of Dystrophin protein are able to ameliorate the dilated cardiomyopathy, and thus might help to improve heart muscle function in micro-Dystrophin-based gene therapy approaches. PMID:24231130

  15. Robust algorithmic detection of the developed cardiac pathologies and emerging or transient abnormalities from short periods of RR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrishchaka, Valeriy V.; Senyukova, Olga

    2011-06-01

    Numerous research efforts and clinical testing have confirmed validity of heart rate variability (HRV) analysis as one of the cardiac diagnostics modalities. The majority of HRV analysis tools currently used in practice are based on linear indicators. Methods from nonlinear dynamics (NLD) provide more natural modeling framework for adaptive biological systems with multiple feedback loops. Compared to linear indicators, many NLD-based measures are much less sensitive to data artifacts and non-stationarity. However, majority of NLD measures require long time series for stable calculation. Similar restrictions also apply for linear indicators. Such requirements could drastically limit practical usability of HRV analysis in many applications, including express diagnostics, early indication of subtle directional changes during personalization of medical treatment, and robust detection of emerging or transient abnormalities. Recently we have illustrated that these challenges could be overcome by using classification framework based on boosting-like ensemble learning techniques that are capable of discovering robust meta-indicators from existing HRV measures and other incomplete empirical knowledge. In this paper we demonstrate universality of such meta-indicators and discuss operational details of their practical usage. Using such pathology examples as congestive heart failure (CHF) and arrhythmias, we show that classifiers trained on short RR segments (down to several minutes) could achieve reasonable classification accuracy (˜80-85% and higher). These indicators calculated from longer RR segments could be applicable for accurate diagnostics with classification accuracy approaching 100%. In addition, it is feasible to discover single "normal-abnormal" meta-classifier capable of detecting multiple abnormalities.

  16. Cardiac shear-wave elastography using a transesophageal transducer: application to the mapping of thermal lesions in ultrasound transesophageal cardiac ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiecinski, Wojciech; Bessière, Francis; Constanciel Colas, Elodie; Apoutou N’Djin, W.; Tanter, Mickaël; Lafon, Cyril; Pernot, Mathieu

    2015-10-01

    Heart rhythm disorders, such as atrial fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia can be treated by catheter-based thermal ablation. However, clinically available systems based on radio-frequency or cryothermal ablation suffer from limited energy penetration and the lack of lesion’s extent monitoring. An ultrasound-guided transesophageal device has recently successfully been used to perform High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) ablation in targeted regions of the heart in vivo. In this study we investigate the feasibility of a dual therapy and imaging approach on the same transesophageal device. We demonstrate in vivo that quantitative cardiac shear-wave elastography (SWE) can be performed with the device and we show on ex vivo samples that transesophageal SWE can map the extent of the HIFU lesions. First, SWE was validated with the transesophageal endoscope in one sheep in vivo. The stiffness of normal atrial and ventricular tissues has been assessed during the cardiac cycle (n=11 ) and mapped (n= 7 ). Second, HIFU ablation has been performed with the therapy-imaging transesophageal device in ex vivo chicken breast samples (n??=??3), then atrial (left, n= 2 ) and ventricular (left n=1 , right n=1 ) porcine heart tissues. SWE provided stiffness maps of the tissues before and after ablation. Areas of the lesions were obtained by tissue color change with gross pathology and compared to SWE. During the cardiac cycle stiffness varied from 0.5???±???0.1 kPa to 6.0???±???0.3 kPa in the atrium and from 1.3???±???0.3 kPa to 13.5???±???9.1 kPa in the ventricles. The thermal lesions were visible on all SWE maps performed after ablation. Shear modulus of the ablated zones increased to 16.3???±???5.5 kPa (versus 4.4???±???1.6 kPa before ablation) in the chicken breast, to 30.3???±???10.3 kPa (versus 12.2???±???4.3 kPa) in the atria and to 73.8???±???13.9 kPa (versus 21.2???±???3.3 kPa) in the ventricles. On gross pathology, the size of the lesions ranged from 0.1 to 1.5?cm2 in the imaging plane area. Elasticity-estimated depths and widths of the lesions differed respectively with a median of 0.2?mm (first quartile Q1:???0.8?mm third quartile Q3: 2.6?mm) for a mean squared error (MSE) of 5.1?mm2 and a median of 0.2?mm (Q1:???2.7?mm Q3: 2.7?mm) for a MSE of 11.1?mm2 from gross pathology. We have demonstrated the feasibility of the HIFU thermal ablation monitoring using a dual therapy and imaging transesophageal device. The combination of HIFU, ultrasound imaging and SWE on the same transesophageal system could lead to a new clinical device for a safer and controlled treatment of a wide variety of cardiac arrhythmias.

  17. Cardiac shear-wave elastography using a transesophageal transducer: application to the mapping of thermal lesions in ultrasound transesophageal cardiac ablation.

    PubMed

    Kwiecinski, Wojciech; Bessière, Francis; Colas, Elodie Constanciel; N'Djin, W Apoutou; Tanter, Mickaël; Lafon, Cyril; Pernot, Mathieu

    2015-10-21

    Heart rhythm disorders, such as atrial fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia can be treated by catheter-based thermal ablation. However, clinically available systems based on radio-frequency or cryothermal ablation suffer from limited energy penetration and the lack of lesion's extent monitoring. An ultrasound-guided transesophageal device has recently successfully been used to perform High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) ablation in targeted regions of the heart in vivo. In this study we investigate the feasibility of a dual therapy and imaging approach on the same transesophageal device. We demonstrate in vivo that quantitative cardiac shear-wave elastography (SWE) can be performed with the device and we show on ex vivo samples that transesophageal SWE can map the extent of the HIFU lesions. First, SWE was validated with the transesophageal endoscope in one sheep in vivo. The stiffness of normal atrial and ventricular tissues has been assessed during the cardiac cycle (n = 11) and mapped (n = 7). Second, HIFU ablation has been performed with the therapy-imaging transesophageal device in ex vivo chicken breast samples (n??=??3), then atrial (left, n = 2) and ventricular (left n = 1, right n = 1) porcine heart tissues. SWE provided stiffness maps of the tissues before and after ablation. Areas of the lesions were obtained by tissue color change with gross pathology and compared to SWE. During the cardiac cycle stiffness varied from 0.5???±???0.1 kPa to 6.0???±???0.3 kPa in the atrium and from 1.3???±???0.3 kPa to 13.5???±???9.1 kPa in the ventricles. The thermal lesions were visible on all SWE maps performed after ablation. Shear modulus of the ablated zones increased to 16.3???±???5.5 kPa (versus 4.4???±???1.6 kPa before ablation) in the chicken breast, to 30.3???±???10.3 kPa (versus 12.2???±???4.3 kPa) in the atria and to 73.8???±???13.9 kPa (versus 21.2???±???3.3 kPa) in the ventricles. On gross pathology, the size of the lesions ranged from 0.1 to 1.5?cm(2) in the imaging plane area. Elasticity-estimated depths and widths of the lesions differed respectively with a median of 0.2?mm (first quartile Q1:??-0.8?mm; third quartile Q3: 2.6?mm) for a mean squared error (MSE) of 5.1?mm(2) and a median of 0.2?mm (Q1:??-2.7?mm; Q3: 2.7?mm) for a MSE of 11.1?mm(2) from gross pathology. We have demonstrated the feasibility of the HIFU thermal ablation monitoring using a dual therapy and imaging transesophageal device. The combination of HIFU, ultrasound imaging and SWE on the same transesophageal system could lead to a new clinical device for a safer and controlled treatment of a wide variety of cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:26406354

  18. Fetal cardiac scanning today.

    PubMed

    Allan, Lindsey

    2010-07-01

    The ability to examine the structure of the fetal heart in real-time started over 30 years ago now. The field has seen very great advances since then, both in terms of technical improvements in ultrasound equipment and in dissemination of operator skills. A great deal has been learnt about normal cardiac function in the human fetus throughout gestation and how it is affected by pathologies of pregnancy. There is increasing recognition of abnormal heart structure during routine obstetric scanning, allowing referral for specialist diagnosis and counselling. It is now possible to make accurate diagnosis of cardiac malformations as early as 12 weeks of gestation. Early diagnosis of a major cardiac malformation in the fetus can provide the parents with a comprehensive prognosis, enabling them to make the most informed choice about the management of the pregnancy. PMID:20572107

  19. 0.5 Mb array as a first-line prenatal cytogenetic test in cases without ultrasound abnormalities and its implementation in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Srebniak, Malgorzata I; Mout, Lisanne; Van Opstal, Diane; Galjaard, Robert-Jan H

    2013-09-01

    Using whole-genome array testing instead of karyotyping in prenatal diagnosis for all indications may be desirable because of the higher diagnostic yield and shorter reporting time. The goal of this research was finding the optimal array resolution that could replace routine prenatal karyotyping in cases without ultrasound abnormalities, for example, referred for advanced maternal age or abnormal first trimester screening. As variants of unknown clinical significance (VOUS), if reported, might complicate decision-making about continuation of pregnancy, such an optimal array resolution should have a high abnormality detection rate and reveal a minimal amount of VOUS. The array data of 465 fetuses were retrospectively evaluated with several resolution levels, and the Decipher microdeletion/microduplication syndrome list was reviewed to assess what could be theoretically missed with a lower resolution. A 0.5-Mb resolution showed a high diagnostic yield potential and significantly minimized the number of VOUS. Based on our experience, we recommend genomic SNP array as a first-tier test in prenatal diagnosis. The resolution should be chosen based on the indication. In cases of fetal ultrasound abnormalities or intrauterine fetal death (IUFD), high-resolution analysis should be done. In other cases, we advise replacing karyotyping by SNP array analysis with 0.5 Mb resolution. PMID:23674485

  20. The Value of Ultrasound and Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Diagnostics and Prediction of Morbidity in Cases of Placenta Previa with Abnormal Placentation

    PubMed Central

    Algebally, Ahmed M.; Yousef, Reda Ramadan Hussein; Badr, Sanaa Sayed Hussein; Al Obeidly, Amal; Szmigielski, Wojciech; Al Ibrahim, Abdullah A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background The purpose of the study was to evaluate the role of ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnostics and management of abnormal placentation in women with placenta previa and to compare the morbidity associated with that to placenta previa alone. Material/Methods The study includes 100 pregnant women with placenta previa with and without abnormal placentation. The results of MRI and US in abnormal placentation were compared with post-operative data. The patients’ files were reviewed for assessment of operative and post-operative morbidity. The results of our statistical analysis were compared with data from the literature. Results US and MRI showed no significant difference in sensitivity and specificity in diagnosing abnormal placentation (97–100% and 94–100%, respectively). MRI was more sensitive than US for the detection of myometrial invasion and the type of abnormal placentation (73.5% and 47%, respectively). The difference between pre- and post-operative hemoglobin values and estimated blood loss were the most significant risk factors for abnormal placentation, added to risk factors known for placenta previa. Post-partum surgical complications and prolonged hospital stay were more common in the cases of placenta previa with abnormal placentation, however statistically insignificant. Conclusions US and MRI are accurate imaging modalities for diagnosing abnormal placentation. MRI was more sensitive for the detection of the degree of placental invasion. The patient’s morbidity increased in cases with abnormal placentation. There was no significant difference in post operative-complications and hospitalization time due to pre-operative planning when the diagnosis was established with US and MRI. PMID:25411586

  1. Ultrasound-induced modulation of cardiac rhythm in neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Fleischman, Andrew; Vecchio, Christopher; Sunny, Youhan; Bawiec, Christopher R; Lewin, Peter A; Kresh, J Yasha; Kohut, Andrew R

    2015-06-01

    Isolated neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes were used to study the influence of ultrasound on the chronotropic response in a tissue culture model. The beat frequency of the cells, varying from 40 to 90 beats/min, was measured based upon the translocation of the nuclear membrane captured by a high-speed camera. Ultrasound pulses (frequency = 2.5 MHz) were delivered at 300-ms intervals [3.33 Hz pulse repetition frequency (PRF)], in turn corresponding to 200 pulses/min. The intensity of acoustic energy and pulse duration were made variable, 0.02-0.87 W/cm(2) and 1-5 ms, respectively. In 57 of 99 trials, there was a noted average increase in beat frequency of 25% with 8-s exposures to ultrasonic pulses. Applied ultrasound energy with a spatial peak time average acoustic intensity (Ispta) of 0.02 W/cm(2) and pulse duration of 1 ms effectively increased the contraction rate of cardiomyocytes (P < 0.05). Of the acoustic power tested, the lowest level of acoustic intensity and shortest pulse duration proved most effective at increasing the electrophysiological responsiveness and beat frequency of cardiomyocytes. Determining the optimal conditions for delivery of ultrasound will be essential to developing new models for understanding mechanoelectrical coupling (MEC) and understanding novel nonelectrical pacing modalities for clinical applications. PMID:25858493

  2. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound to evaluate changes in renal cortical perfusion around cardiac surgery: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is a new technique that might enable portable and non-invasive organ perfusion quantification at the bedside. However, it has not yet been tested in critically ill patients. We sought to establish CEUS's feasibility, safety, reproducibility and potential diagnostic value in the assessment of renal cortical perfusion in the peri-operative period in cardiac surgery patients. Methods We recruited twelve patients deemed at risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) planned for elective cardiac surgery. We performed renal CEUS with destruction-replenishment sequences before the operation, on ICU arrival and the day following the admission. Enhancement was obtained with Sonovue® (Bracco, Milano, Italy) at an infusion rate of 1 ml/min. We collected hemodynamic parameters before, during and after contrast agent infusion. At each study time, we obtained five video sequences, which were analysed using dedicated software by two independent radiologists blinded to patient and time. The main output was a perfusion index (PI), corresponding to the ratio of relative blood volume (RBV) over mean transit time (mTT). Results All 36 renal CEUS studies, including 24 in the immediate post-operative period could be performed and were well tolerated. Correlation between readers for PI was excellent (R2 = 0.96, P < 0.0001). Compared with baseline, there was no overall difference in median PI's on ICU admission. However, the day after surgery, median PI's had decreased by 50% (P < 0.01) (22% decrease in RBV (P = 0.09); 48% increase in mTT (P = 0.04), both suggestive of decreased perfusion). These differences persisted after correction for haemoglobin; vasopressors use and mean arterial pressure. Four patients developed AKI in the post-operative period. Conclusions CEUS appears feasible and well-tolerated in patients undergoing cardiac surgery even immediately after ICU admission. CEUS derived-parameters suggest a decrease in renal perfusion occurring within 24 hours of surgery. PMID:23849270

  3. Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Using a Pocket-Size Device in the Emergency Room

    PubMed Central

    Mancuso, Frederico José Neves; Siqueira, Vicente Nicoliello; Moisés, Valdir Ambrósio; Gois, Aécio Flavio Teixeira; de Paola, Angelo Amato Vincenzo; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Camargo; Campos, Orlando

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular urgencies are frequent reasons for seeking medical care. Prompt and accurate medical diagnosis is critical to reduce the morbidity and mortality of these conditions. Objective To evaluate the use of a pocket-size echocardiography in addition to clinical history and physical exam in a tertiary medical emergency care. Methods One hundred adult patients without known cardiac or lung diseases who sought emergency care with cardiac complaints were included. Patients with ischemic changes in the electrocardiography or fever were excluded. A focused echocardiography with GE Vscan equipment was performed after the initial evaluation in the emergency room. Cardiac chambers dimensions, left and right ventricular systolic function, intracardiac flows with color, pericardium, and aorta were evaluated. Results The mean age was 61 ± 17 years old. The patient complaint was chest pain in 51 patients, dyspnea in 32 patients, arrhythmia to evaluate the left ventricular function in ten patients, hypotension/dizziness in five patients and edema in one patient. In 28 patients, the focused echocardiography allowed to confirm the initial diagnosis: 19 patients with heart failure, five with acute coronary syndrome, two with pulmonary embolism and two patients with cardiac tamponade. In 17 patients, the echocardiography changed the diagnosis: ten with suspicious of heart failure, two with pulmonary embolism suspicious, two with hypotension without cause, one suspicious of acute coronary syndrome, one of cardiac tamponade and one of aortic dissection. Conclusion The focused echocardiography with pocket-size equipment in the emergency care may allow a prompt diagnosis and, consequently, an earlier initiation of the therapy. PMID:25590933

  4. Comparison of cardiac displacement and strain imaging using ultrasound radiofrequency and envelope signals

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chi; Varghese, Tomy

    2012-01-01

    Echocardiographic strain imaging is a promising new method for quantifying and displaying the health of cardiac muscle. Accurate regional myocardial function analysis requires high spatial and temporal resolution in addition to fidelity to the underlying deformation. However, all current clinical approaches use speckle-tracking algorithms applied to B-mode images derived from envelope signals. Such approaches are inherently of lower spatial resolution, since they require larger data blocks for deformation tracking due to the absence of phase information. In this paper, we compare the strain estimation performance using B-mode, envelope and radiofrequency signals, utilizing data acquired from a uniformly elastic tissue mimicking phantom, cardiac simulation, and clinical in vivo data. Signal-to-noise ratio improvements using radiofrequency signals for linear and phased array geometries were 5.80 dB and 9.48 dB over that obtained with envelope signals (at peak strain) in phantom studies, respectively. Cardiac simulation studies demonstrate that when averaged over the two cardiac cycles, the mean standard deviation of estimated strain using envelope signals from two of the six segments for a short-axes view (anterior and anterolateral) were 48% and 44% higher than that obtained using radiofrequency signals. These segments were chosen since one was along while the other was situated lateral to the beam propagation direction. In a similar manner, in vivo analysis on a volunteer also indicate that the standard deviation of the estimated strain using B-mode and envelope signals were 16% and 42% higher than that obtained using radiofrequency signals in the anteroseptal segment, and 45% and 27% in the anterior segment. These results demonstrate the significant reduction in the variability of strain estimated along with improvements in the spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratios obtained using radiofrequency signals. PMID:23259981

  5. Outpatient Use of Focused Cardiac Ultrasound to Assess the Inferior Vena Cava in Patients With Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Saha, Narayan M; Barbat, Julian J; Fedson, Savitri; Anderson, Allen; Rich, Jonathan D; Spencer, Kirk T

    2015-10-15

    Accurate assessment of volume status is critical in the management of patients with heart failure (HF). We studied the utility of a pocket-sized ultrasound device in an outpatient cardiology clinic as a tool to guide volume assessment. Inferior vena cava (IVC) size and collapsibility were assessed in 95 patients by residents briefly trained in focused cardiac ultrasound (FCU). Cardiologist assessment of volume status and changes in diuretic medication were also recorded. Patients were followed for occurrence of 30-day events. There was a 94% success rate of obtaining IVC size and collapsibility, and agreement between visual and calculated IVC parameters was excellent. Most patients were euvolemic by both FCU IVC and clinical bedside assessment (51%) and had no change in diuretic dose. Thirty-two percent had discrepant FCU IVC and clinical volume assessments. In clinically hypervolemic patients, the FCU evaluation of the IVC suggested that the wrong diuretic management plan might have been made 46% of the time. At 30 days, 14 events occurred. The incidence of events increased significantly with FCU IVC imaging categorization, from 11% to 23% to 36% in patients with normal, intermediate, and plethoric IVCs. By comparison, when grouped in a binary manner, there was no significant difference in event rates for patients who were deemed to be clinically volume overloaded. Assessment of volume status in an outpatient cardiology clinic using FCU imaging of the IVC is feasible in a high percentage of patients. A group of patients were identified with volume status discordant between FCU IVC and routine clinic assessment, suggesting that IVC parameters may provide a valuable supplement to the in-office physical examination. PMID:26279108

  6. Update on the safety and efficacy of commercial ultrasound contrast agents in cardiac applications

    PubMed Central

    Tracy, Melissa J; Feinstein, Steven B

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are currently used throughout the world in both clinical and research settings. The concept of contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging originated in the late 1960s, and the first commercially available agents were initially developed in the 1980s. Today's microbubbles are designed for greater utility and are used for both approved and off-label indications. In October 2007, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) imposed additional product label warnings that included serious cardiopulmonary reactions, several new disease-state contraindications, and a mandated 30?min post-procedure monitoring period for the agents Optison and Definity. These additional warnings were prompted by reports of cardiopulmonary reactions that were temporally related but were not clearly attributable to these UCAs. Subsequent published reports over the following months established not only the safety but also the improved efficacy of clinical ultrasound applications with UCAs. The FDA consequently updated the product labeling in June 2008 and reduced contraindications, although it continued to monitor select patients. In addition, a post-marketing program was proposed to the sponsors for a series of safety studies to further assess the risk of UCAs. Then in October 2011, the FDA leadership further downgraded the warnings after hearing the results of the post-marketing data, which revealed continued safety and improved efficacy. The present review focuses on the use of UCAs in today's clinical practice, including the approved indications, a variety of off-label uses, and the most recent data, which affirms the safety and efficacy of UCAs. PMID:26693339

  7. Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Using a Pocket-Size Device in the Emergency Room.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, Frederico José Neves; Siqueira, Vicente Nicoliello; Moisés, Valdir Ambrósio; Gois, Aécio Flavio Teixeira; Paola, Angelo Amato Vincenzo de; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Camargo; Campos, Orlando

    2014-10-28

    Background: Cardiovascular urgencies are frequent reasons for seeking medical care. Prompt and accurate medical diagnosis is critical to reduce the morbidity and mortality of these conditions. Objective: To evaluate the use of a pocket-size echocardiography in addition to clinical history and physical exam in a tertiary medical emergency care. Methods: One hundred adult patients without known cardiac or lung diseases who sought emergency care with cardiac complaints were included. Patients with ischemic changes in the electrocardiography or fever were excluded. A focused echocardiography with GE Vscan equipment was performed after the initial evaluation in the emergency room. Cardiac chambers dimensions, left and right ventricular systolic function, intracardiac flows with color, pericardium, and aorta were evaluated. Results: The mean age was 61 ± 17 years old. The patient complaint was chest pain in 51 patients, dyspnea in 32 patients, arrhythmia to evaluate the left ventricular function in ten patients, hypotension/dizziness in five patients and edema in one patient. In 28 patients, the focused echocardiography allowed to confirm the initial diagnosis: 19 patients with heart failure, five with acute coronary syndrome, two with pulmonary embolism and two patients with cardiac tamponade. In 17 patients, the echocardiography changed the diagnosis: ten with suspicious of heart failure, two with pulmonary embolism suspicious, two with hypotension without cause, one suspicious of acute coronary syndrome, one of cardiac tamponade and one of aortic dissection. Conclusion: The focused echocardiography with pocket-size equipment in the emergency care may allow a prompt diagnosis and, consequently, an earlier initiation of the therapy.Fundamento: As urgências cardiovasculares são causas importantes de procura por atendimento médico, sendo fundamentais a rapidez e a precisão no diagnóstico para diminuir sua morbimortalidade. Objetivo: Avaliar o uso da ecocardiografia direcionada como complemento diagnóstico ao exame físico em um serviço terciário de emergências clínicas. Métodos: Foram incluídos cem pacientes adultos sem doenças cardíacas ou pulmonares conhecidas que procuraram atendimento de urgência com queixas cardiológicas. Foram excluídos pacientes com alterações isquêmicas no eletrocardiograma ou febre. A ecocardiografia direcionada foi realizada logo após a avaliação inicial do paciente na sala de emergência, com aparelho ultraportátil GE Vscan, avaliando subjetivamente: dimensões das cavidades, função sistólica ventricular, fluxos intracardíacos pelo mapeamento de fluxo em cores, pericárdio e aorta. Resultados: A idade média dos pacientes foi 61 ± 17 anos. O quadro clínico inicial foi dor torácica (52 pacientes), dispneia (32 pacientes), arritmia/avaliação da função ventricular (dez pacientes), hipotensão/tontura (cinco pacientes) e edema periférico (um paciente). Em 28 pacientes a ecocardiografia direcionada confirmou a hipótese diagnóstica inicial: 19 pacientes com insuficiência cardíaca, cinco com síndrome coronariana aguda, dois com tromboembolismo pulmonar e dois com tamponamento cardíaco. Em 17 pacientes, a ecocardiografia direcionada alterou o diagnóstico, afastando a hipótese clínica inicial em dez casos com suspeita de insuficiência cardíaca, dois com suspeita de tromboembolismo pulmonar, dois com hipotensão a esclarecer, e em cada um dos três restantes com suspeitas de síndrome coronariana aguda, tamponamento cardíaco e dissecção de aorta. Conclusão: A ecocardiografia direcionada ultraportátil em serviço de emergências clínicas pode definir rapidamente o diagnóstico e, com isso, é possível iniciar mais precocemente o tratamento adequado. PMID:25352461

  8. Ultrasound for the Anesthesiologists: Present and Future

    PubMed Central

    Terkawi, Abdullah S.; Karakitsos, Dimitrios; Elbarbary, Mahmoud; Blaivas, Michael; Durieux, Marcel E.

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound is a safe, portable, relatively inexpensive, and easily accessible imaging modality, making it a useful diagnostic and monitoring tool in medicine. Anesthesiologists encounter a variety of emergent situations and may benefit from the application of such a rapid and accurate diagnostic tool in their routine practice. This paper reviews current and potential applications of ultrasound in anesthesiology in order to encourage anesthesiologists to learn and use this useful tool as an adjunct to physical examination. Ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blockade and vascular access represent the most popular ultrasound applications in anesthesiology. Ultrasound has recently started to substitute for CT scans and fluoroscopy in many pain treatment procedures. Although the application of airway ultrasound is still limited, it has a promising future. Lung ultrasound is a well-established field in point-of-care medicine, and it could have a great impact if utilized in our ORs, as it may help in rapid and accurate diagnosis in many emergent situations. Optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) measurement and transcranial color coded duplex (TCCD) are relatively new neuroimaging modalities, which assess intracranial pressure and cerebral blood flow. Gastric ultrasound can be used for assessment of gastric content and diagnosis of full stomach. Focused transthoracic (TTE) and transesophageal (TEE) echocardiography facilitate the assessment of left and right ventricular function, cardiac valve abnormalities, and volume status as well as guiding cardiac resuscitation. Thus, there are multiple potential areas where ultrasound can play a significant role in guiding otherwise blind and invasive interventions, diagnosing critical conditions, and assessing for possible anatomic variations that may lead to plan modification. We suggest that ultrasound training should be part of any anesthesiology training program curriculum. PMID:24348179

  9. Ultrasound simulator-assisted teaching of cardiac anatomy to preclinical anatomy students: A pilot randomized trial of a three-hour learning exposure.

    PubMed

    Canty, David Jeffrey; Hayes, Jenny A; Story, David Andrew; Royse, Colin Forbes

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound simulation allows students to virtually explore internal anatomy by producing accurate, moving, color, three-dimensional rendered slices from any angle or approach leaving the organs and their relationships intact without requirement for consumables. The aim was to determine the feasibility and efficacy of self-directed learning of cardiac anatomy with an ultrasound simulator compared to cadavers and plastic models. After a single cardiac anatomy lecture, fifty university anatomy students participated in a three-hour supervised self-directed learning exposure in groups of five, randomized to an ultrasound simulator or human cadaveric specimens and plastic models. Pre- and post-tests were conducted using pictorial and non-pictorial multiple-choice questions (MCQs). Simulator students completed a survey on their experience. Four simulator and seven cadaver group students did not attend after randomization. Simulator use in groups of five students was feasible and feedback from participants was very positive. Baseline test scores were similar (P = 0.9) between groups. After the learning intervention, there was no difference between groups in change in total test score (P = 0.37), whether they were pictorial (P = 0.6) or non-pictorial (P = 0.21). In both groups there was an increase in total test scores (simulator +19.8 ±12.4%% and cadaver: +16.4% ± 10.2, P < 0.0001), pictorial question scores (+22.9 ±18.0%, 19.7 ±19.3%, P < 0.001) and non-pictorial question scores (+16.7 ±18.2%, +13 ±15.4%, P = 0.002). The ultrasound simulator appears equivalent to human cadaveric prosections for learning cardiac anatomy. PMID:24706544

  10. Segmentation of left atrial intracardiac ultrasound images for image guided cardiac ablation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettmann, M. E.; Stephens, T.; Holmes, D. R.; Linte, C.; Packer, D. L.; Robb, R. A.

    2013-03-01

    Intracardiac echocardiography (ICE), a technique in which structures of the heart are imaged using a catheter navigated inside the cardiac chambers, is an important imaging technique for guidance in cardiac ablation therapy. Automatic segmentation of these images is valuable for guidance and targeting of treatment sites. In this paper, we describe an approach to segment ICE images by generating an empirical model of blood pool and tissue intensities. Normal, Weibull, Gamma, and Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) distributions are fit to histograms of tissue and blood pool pixels from a series of ICE scans. A total of 40 images from 4 separate studies were evaluated. The model was trained and tested using two approaches. In the first approach, the model was trained on all images from 3 studies and subsequently tested on the 40 images from the 4th study. This procedure was repeated 4 times using a leave-one-out strategy. This is termed the between-subjects approach. In the second approach, the model was trained on 10 randomly selected images from a single study and tested on the remaining 30 images in that study. This is termed the within-subjects approach. For both approaches, the model was used to automatically segment ICE images into blood and tissue regions. Each pixel is classified using the Generalized Liklihood Ratio Test across neighborhood sizes ranging from 1 to 49. Automatic segmentation results were compared against manual segmentations for all images. In the between-subjects approach, the GEV distribution using a neighborhood size of 17 was found to be the most accurate with a misclassification rate of approximately 17%. In the within-subjects approach, the GEV distribution using a neighborhood size of 19 was found to be the most accurate with a misclassification rate of approximately 15%. As expected, the majority of misclassified pixels were located near the boundaries between tissue and blood pool regions for both methods.

  11. Rest perfusion abnormalities in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: correlation with myocardial fibrosis and risk factors for sudden cardiac death

    PubMed Central

    Chiribiri, A.; Leuzzi, S.; Conte, M.R.; Bongioanni, S.; Bratis, K.; Olivotti, L.; De Rosa, C.; Lardone, E.; Di Donna, P.; Villa, A.D.M.; Cesarani, F.; Nagel, E.; Gaita, F.; Bonamini, R.

    2015-01-01

    Aim To measure the prevalence of abnormal rest perfusion in a population of consecutive patients with known hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) referred for cardiovascular MRI (CMR), and to assess any associations between abnormal rest perfusion and the presence, pattern, and severity of myocardial scar and the presence of risk factors for sudden death. Materials and methods Eighty consecutive patients with known HCM referred for CMR underwent functional imaging, rest first-pass perfusion, and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE). Results Thirty percent of the patients had abnormal rest perfusion, all of them corresponding to areas of mid-myocardial LGE and to a higher degree of segmental hypertrophy. Rest perfusion abnormalities correlated with more extensive and confluent LGE. The subgroup of patients with myocardial fibrosis and rest perfusion abnormalities (fibrosis+/perfusion+) had more than twice the incidence of episodes of non-sustained ventricular tachycardia on Holter monitoring in comparison to patients with myocardial fibrosis and normal rest perfusion (fibrosis+/perfusion–) and patients with no fibrosis and normal rest perfusion (fibrosis–/perfusion–). Conclusions First-pass perfusion CMR identifies abnormal rest perfusion in a significant proportion of patients with HCM. These abnormalities are associated with the presence and distribution of myocardial scar and the degree of hypertrophy. Rest perfusion abnormalities identify patients with increased incidence of episodes of non-sustained ventricular tachycardia on Holter monitoring, independently from the presence of myocardial fibrosis. PMID:25659937

  12. Validation of On-Orbit Methodology for the Assessment of Cardiac Function and Changes in the Circulating Volume Using Ultrasound and Braslet-M Occlusion Cuffs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Douglas; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Ebert, Douglas; Duncan, Michael; Bogomolov, Valery V.; Alferova, Irina V.; Matveev, Vladimir P.; Dulchavsky, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this joint U.S. - Russian project was the development and validation of an in-flight methodology to assess a number of cardiac and vascular parameters associated with circulating volume and its manipulation in long-duration space flight. Responses to modified Valsalva and Mueller maneuvers were measured by cardiac and vascular ultrasound (US) before, during, and after temporary volume reduction by means of Braslet-M thigh occlusion cuffs (Russia). Materials and Methods: The study protocol was conducted in 14 sessions on 9 ISS crewmembers, with an average exposure to microgravity of 122 days. Baseline cardiovascular measurements were taken by echocardiography in multiple modes (including tissue Doppler of both ventricles) and femoral and jugular vein imaging on the International Space Station (ISS). The Braslet devices were then applied and measurements were repeated after >10 minutes. The cuffs were then released and the hemodynamic recovery process was monitored. Modified Valsalva and Mueller maneuvers were used throughout the protocol. All US data were acquired by the HDI-5000 ultrasound system aboard the ISS (ATL/Philips, USA) during remotely guided sessions. The study protocol, including the use of Braslet-M for this purpose, was approved by the ISS Human Research Multilateral Review Board (HRMRB). Results: The effects of fluid sequestration on a number of echocardiographic and vascular parameters were readily detectable by in-flight US, as were responses to respiratory maneuvers. The overall volume status assessment methodology appears to be valid and practical, with a decrease in left heart lateral E (tissue Doppler) as one of the most reliable measures. Increase in the femoral vein cross-sectional areas was consistently observed with Braslet application. Other significant differences and trends within the extensive cardiovascular data were also observed. (Decreased - RV and LV preload indices, Cardiac Output, LV E all maneuvers, LV Stroke Volume). Conclusions: This Study: 1) Addressed specific aspects of operational space medicine and space physiology, including assessment of circulating volume disturbances 2) Expanded the applications of diagnostic ultrasound imaging and Doppler techniques in microgravity. 3) Used respiratory maneuvers against the background of acute circulating volume manipulations which appear to enhance our ability to noninvasively detect volume-dependency in a number of cardiac and vascular parameters. 4) Determined that Tei index is not clinically changed therefore contractility not altered in the face of reduced preload. 5) Determined that increased Femoral Vein Area indicating blood being sequestered in lower extremities correlates with reduced preload and cardiac output. 6) That Braslet may be the only feasible means of acutely treating high pressure pulmonary edema in reduced gravity environments.

  13. Abnormal splicing in the N?terminal variable region of cardiac troponin T impairs systolic function of the heart with preserved Frank?Starling compensation

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Han?Zhong; Chen, Guozhen; Nan, Changlong; Huang, Xupei; Jin, Jian?Ping

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Abnormal splice?out of the exon 7?encoded segment in the N?terminal variable region of cardiac troponin T (cTnT??E7) was found in turkeys and, together with the inclusion of embryonic exon (eTnT), in adult dogs with a correlation with dilated cardiomyopathy. Overexpression of these cTnT variants in transgenic mouse hearts significantly decreased cardiac function. To further investigate the functional effect of cTnT??E7 or ?E7+eTnT in vivo under systemic regulation, echocardiography was carried out in single and double?transgenic mice. No atrial enlargement, ventricular hypertrophy or dilation was detected in the hearts of 2?month?old cTnT??E7 and ?E7+eTnT mice in comparison to wild?type controls, indicating a compensated state. However, left ventricular fractional shortening and ejection fraction were decreased in ?E7 and ?E7+eTnT mice, and the response to isoproterenol was lower in ?E7+eTnT mice. Left ventricular outflow tract velocity and gradient were decreased in the transgenic mouse hearts, indicating decreased systolic function. Ex vivo working heart function showed that high afterload or low preload resulted in more severe decreases in the systolic function and energetic efficiency of cTnT??E7 and ?E7+eTnT hearts. On the other hand, increases in preload demonstrated preserved Frank?Starling responses and minimized the loss of cardiac function and efficiency. The data demonstrate that the N?terminal variable region of cardiac TnT regulates systolic function of the heart. PMID:25194024

  14. Ex vivo viscoelastic characterization of head and neck tissue abnormalities using ultrasound-stimulated vibro-acoustography (USVA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccabi, Ashkan; Garritano, James; Arshi, Armin; Saddik, George; Tajudeen, Bobby A.; St. John, Maie; Grundfest, Warren S.; Taylor, Zachary D.

    2014-03-01

    In the absence of an imaging technique that offers a highly dynamic range detection of malignant tissue intra-operatively, surgeons are often forced to excise excess healthy tissue to ensure clear margins of resection. Techniques that are currently used in the detection of tumor regions include palpation, optical coherence tomography (OCT) elastography, dye injections, and conventional ultrasound to pinpoint the affected area. However, these methods suffer from limitations such as minimal specificity, low contrast, and limited depth of penetration. Lack of specificity and low contrast result in the production of vague disease margins and fail to provide a reliable guidance tool for surgeons. The proposed work presents an alternative diagnostic technique, ultrasound-stimulated vibro-acoustography (USVA), which may potentially provide surgeons with detailed intra-operative imagery characterized by enhanced structural boundaries and well-defined borders based on the viscoelastic properties of tissues. We demonstrate selective imaging using ex vivo tissue samples of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) with the presence of both malignant and normal areas. Spatially resolved maps of varying acoustic properties were generated and show good contrast between the areas of interest. While the results are promising, determining the precision and sensitivity of the USVA imaging system in identifying boundary regions as well as intensities of ex vivo tissue targets may provide additional information to non-invasively assess confined regions of diseased tissues from healthy areas.

  15. Mixed partial anomalous pulmonary venous drainage coexistent with an aortic valve abnormality – analysis of ultrasound diagnostics in a 10-year-old girl with Turner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Karolczak, Maciej A.; Komarnicka, Justyna; Mirecka, Ma?gorzata

    2014-01-01

    The authors present a case of echocardiographic diagnosis of a rare congenital cardiovascular anomaly in the form of mixed partial anomalous pulmonary veins connection in a 10-year-old girl with Turner syndrome and congenital mild stenosis of insufficient bicuspid aortic valve, made while diagnosing the causes of intestinal tract bleeding. The article presents various diagnostic difficulties leading to the delayed determination of a correct diagnosis, resulting from the absence of symptoms of circulatory failure in the early stage of the disease and the occurrence of severe and dominant auscultatory phenomena typical for congenital aortic valve defect which effectively masked the syndromes of increased pulmonary flow. The authors discuss the role of the impact of phenotypic characteristics of the Turner syndrome, in particular a short webbed neck restricting the suprasternal echocardiographic access and the presence of psychological factors associated with a long-term illness. The importance of indirect echocardiographic symptoms suggesting partial anomalous pulmonary veins connection in the presence of bicuspid aortic valve, e.g. enlargement of the right atrium and right ventricle, and paradoxical interventricular septum motion were emphasized in patients lacking ASD, pulmonary hypertension or tricupid and pulmonary valve abnormalities. The methodology of echocardiographic examination enabling direct visualization of the abnormal vascular structures was presented. Special attention was paid to the significance of highly sensitive echocardiographic projections: high right and left parasternal views in sagittal and transverse planes with patient lying on the side, with the use of two-dimensional imaging and color Doppler. Finally, the limitations of echocardiography resulting from the visualization and tracking of abnormal vascular structures hidden behind ultrasound non-conductive tissues were indicated, as was the role of other diagnostic modalities, such as angio-CT and/or nuclear magnetic resonance. PMID:26672491

  16. 42 CFR 37.54 - Notification of abnormal radiographic findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...abnormality of cardiac shape or size, tuberculosis, lung cancer, or any other significant abnormal findings other...abnormality of cardiac shape or size, tuberculosis, cancer, complicated pneumoconiosis, and any other...

  17. 42 CFR 37.54 - Notification of abnormal radiographic findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...abnormality of cardiac shape or size, tuberculosis, lung cancer, or any other significant abnormal findings other...abnormality of cardiac shape or size, tuberculosis, cancer, complicated pneumoconiosis, and any other...

  18. Noninvasive Assessment of Cardiac Abnormalities in Experimental Autoimmune Myocarditis by Magnetic Resonance Microscopy Imaging in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Massilamany, Chandirasegaran; Khalilzad-Sharghi, Vahid; Gangaplara, Arunakumar; Steffen, David; Othman, Shadi F.; Reddy, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Myocarditis is an inflammation of the myocardium, but only ~10% of those affected show clinical manifestations of the disease. To study the immune events of myocardial injuries, various mouse models of myocarditis have been widely used. This study involved experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) induced with cardiac myosin heavy chain (Myhc)-? 334–352 in A/J mice; the affected animals develop lymphocytic myocarditis but with no apparent clinical signs. In this model, the utility of magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) as a non-invasive modality to determine the cardiac structural and functional changes in animals immunized with Myhc-? 334–352 is shown. EAM and healthy mice were imaged using a 9.4 T (400 MHz) 89 mm vertical core bore scanner equipped with a 4 cm millipede radio-frequency imaging probe and 100 G/cm triple axis gradients. Cardiac images were acquired from anesthetized animals using a gradient-echo-based cine pulse sequence, and the animals were monitored by respiration and pulse oximetry. The analysis revealed an increase in the thickness of the ventricular wall in EAM mice, with a corresponding decrease in the interior diameter of ventricles, when compared with healthy mice. The data suggest that morphological and functional changes in the inflamed hearts can be non-invasively monitored by MRM in live animals. In conclusion, MRM offers an advantage of assessing the progression and regression of myocardial injuries in diseases caused by infectious agents, as well as response to therapies. PMID:24998332

  19. Noninvasive assessment of cardiac abnormalities in experimental autoimmune myocarditis by magnetic resonance microscopy imaging in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Massilamany, Chandirasegaran; Khalilzad-Sharghi, Vahid; Gangaplara, Arunakumar; Steffen, David; Othman, Shadi F; Reddy, Jay

    2014-01-01

    Myocarditis is an inflammation of the myocardium, but only -10% of those affected show clinical manifestations of the disease. To study the immune events of myocardial injuries, various mouse models of myocarditis have been widely used. This study involved experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) induced with cardiac myosin heavy chain (Myhc)-? 334-352 in A/J mice; the affected animals develop lymphocytic myocarditis but with no apparent clinical signs. In this model, the utility of magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) as a non-invasive modality to determine the cardiac structural and functional changes in animals immunized with Myhc-? 334-352 is shown. EAM and healthy mice were imaged using a 9.4 T (400 MHz) 89 mm vertical core bore scanner equipped with a 4 cm millipede radio-frequency imaging probe and 100 G/cm triple axis gradients. Cardiac images were acquired from anesthetized animals using a gradient-echo-based cine pulse sequence, and the animals were monitored by respiration and pulse oximetry. The analysis revealed an increase in the thickness of the ventricular wall in EAM mice, with a corresponding decrease in the interior diameter of ventricles, when compared with healthy mice. The data suggest that morphological and functional changes in the inflamed hearts can be non-invasively monitored by MRM in live animals. In conclusion, MRM offers an advantage of assessing the progression and regression of myocardial injuries in diseases caused by infectious agents, as well as response to therapies. PMID:24998332

  20. Mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for the infarcted heart: a role in minimizing abnormalities in cardiac-specific energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Johnsen, Virginia L.; Ma, Lianli; James, Freyja D.; Young, Pampee P.; Wasserman, David H.; Rottman, Jeffrey N.; Hittel, Dustin S.; Shearer, Jane

    2012-01-01

    Intense interest has been focused on cell-based therapy for the infarcted heart given that stem cells have exhibited the ability to reduce infarct size and mitigate cardiac dysfunction. Despite this, it is unknown whether mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy can prevent metabolic remodeling following a myocardial infarction (MI). This study examines the ability of MSCs to rescue the infarcted heart from perturbed substrate uptake in vivo. C57BL/6 mice underwent chronic ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery to induce a MI. Echocardiography was performed on conscious mice at baseline as well as 7 and 23 days post-MI. Twenty-eight days following the ligation procedure, hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps assessed in vivo insulin sensitivity. Isotopic tracer administration evaluated whole body, peripheral tissue, and cardiac-specific glucose and fatty acid utilization. To gain insight into the mechanisms by which MSCs modulate metabolism, mitochondrial function was assessed by high-resolution respirometry using permeabilized cardiac fibers. Data show that MSC transplantation preserves insulin-stimulated fatty acid uptake in the peri-infarct region (4.25 ± 0.64 vs. 2.57 ± 0.34 vs. 3.89 ± 0.54 ?mol·100 g?1·min?1, SHAM vs. MI + PBS vs. MI + MSC; P < 0.05) and prevents increases in glucose uptake in the remote left ventricle (3.11 ± 0.43 vs. 3.81 ± 0.79 vs. 6.36 ± 1.08 ?mol·100 g?1·min?1, SHAM vs. MI + PBS vs. MI + MSC; P < 0.05). This was associated with an enhanced efficiency of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation with a respiratory control ratio of 3.36 ± 0.18 in MSC-treated cardiac fibers vs. 2.57 ± 0.14 in the infarct-only fibers (P < 0.05). In conclusion, MSC therapy exhibits the potential to rescue the heart from metabolic aberrations following a MI. Restoration of metabolic flexibility is important given the metabolic demands of the heart and the role of energetics in the progression to heart failure. PMID:21971524

  1. Cardiac Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Birnie, David; Ha, Andrew C T; Gula, Lorne J; Chakrabarti, Santabhanu; Beanlands, Rob S B; Nery, Pablo

    2015-12-01

    Studies suggest clinically manifest cardiac involvement occurs in 5% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis. The principal manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) are conduction abnormalities, ventricular arrhythmias, and heart failure. Data indicate that an 20% to 25% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis have asymptomatic (clinically silent) cardiac involvement. An international guideline for the diagnosis and management of CS recommends that patients be screened for cardiac involvement. Most studies suggest a benign prognosis for patients with clinically silent CS. Immunosuppression therapy is advocated for clinically manifest CS. Device therapy, with implantable cardioverter defibrillators, is recommended for some patients. PMID:26593140

  2. Association of interatrial septal abnormalities with cardiac impulse conduction disorders in adult patients: experience from a tertiary center in Kosovo

    PubMed Central

    Bakalli, Aurora; Pllana, Ejup; Koçinaj, Dardan; Bekteshi, Tefik; Dragusha, Gani; Gashi, Masar; Musliu, Nebih; Gashi, Zaim

    2011-01-01

    Interatrial septal disorders, which include: atrial septal defect, patent foramen ovale and atrial septal aneurysm, are frequent congenital anomalies found in adult patients. Early detection of these anomalies is important to prevent their hemodynamic and/or thromboembolic consequences. The aims of this study were: to assess the association between impulse conduction disorders and anomalies of interatrial septum; to determine the prevalence of different types of interatrial septum abnormalities; to assess anatomic, hemodynamic, and clinical consequences of interatrial septal pathologies. Fifty-three adult patients with impulse conduction disorders and patients without ECG changes but with signs of interatrial septal abnormalities, who were referred to our center for echocardiography, were included in a prospective transesophageal echocardiography study. Interatrial septal anomalies were detected in around 85% of the examined patients. Patent foramen ovale was encountered in 32% of the patients, and in combination with atrial septal aneurysm in an additional 11.3% of cases. Atrial septal aneurysm and atrial septal defect were diagnosed with equal frequency in 20.7% of our study population. Impulse conduction disorders were significantly more suggestive of interatrial septal anomalies than clinical signs and symptoms observed in our patients (84.91% vs 30.19%, P=0.002). Right bundle branch block was the most frequent impulse conduction disorder, found in 41 (77.36%) cases. We conclude that interatrial septal anomalies are highly associated with impulse conduction disorders, particularly with right bundle branch block. Impulse conduction disorders are more indicative of interatrial septal abnormalities in earlier stages than can be understood from the patient’s clinical condition. PMID:21977304

  3. Abnormal Calcium Cycling and Cardiac Arrhythmias Associated With the Human Ser96Ala Genetic Variant of Histidine?Rich Calcium?Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vivek P.; Rubinstein, Jack; Arvanitis, Demetrios A.; Ren, Xiaoping; Gao, Xiaoqian; Haghighi, Kobra; Gilbert, Mark; Iyer, Venkat R.; Kim, Do Han; Cho, Chunghee; Jones, Keith; Lorenz, John N.; Armstrong, Clara F.; Wang, Hong?Sheng; Gyorke, Sandor; Kranias, Evangelia G.

    2013-01-01

    Background A human genetic variant (Ser96Ala) in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) histidine?rich Ca2+?binding (HRC) protein has been linked to ventricular arrhythmia and sudden death in dilated cardiomyopathy. However, the precise mechanisms affecting SR function and leading to arrhythmias remain elusive. Methods and Results We generated transgenic mice with cardiac?specific expression of human Ala96 HRC or Ser96 HRC in the null background to assess function in absence of endogenous protein. Ala96 HRC decreased (25% to 30%) cardiomyocyte contractility and Ca2+ kinetics compared with Ser96 HRC in the absence of any structural or histological abnormalities. Furthermore, the frequency of Ca2+ waves was significantly higher (10?fold), although SR Ca2+ load was reduced (by 27%) in Ala96 HRC cells. The underlying mechanisms involved diminished interaction of Ala96 HRC with triadin, affecting ryanodine receptor (RyR) stability. Indeed, the open probability of RyR, assessed by use of ryanodine binding, was significantly increased. Accordingly, stress conditions (5 Hz plus isoproterenol) induced aftercontractions (65% in Ala96 versus 12% in Ser96) and delayed afterdepolarizations (70% in Ala96 versus 20% in Ser96). The increased SR Ca2+ leak was accompanied by hyperphosphorylation (1.6?fold) of RyR at Ser2814 by calmodulin?dependent protein kinase II. Accordingly, inclusion of the calmodulin?dependent protein kinase II inhibitor KN93 prevented Ser2814 phosphorylation and partially reversed the increases in Ca2+ spark frequency and wave production. Parallel in vivo studies revealed ventricular ectopy on short?term isoproterenol challenge and increased (4?fold) propensity to arrhythmias, including nonsustained ventricular tachycardia, after myocardial infarction in Ala96 HRC mice. Conclusions These findings suggest that aberrant SR Ca2+ release and increased susceptibility to delayed afterdepolarizations underlie triggered arrhythmic activity in human Ala96 HRC carriers. PMID:24125847

  4. Rapid evaluation by lung-cardiac-inferior vena cava (LCI) integrated ultrasound for differentiating heart failure from pulmonary disease as the cause of acute dyspnea in the emergency setting

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Rapid and accurate diagnosis and management can be lifesaving for patients with acute dyspnea. However, making a differential diagnosis and selecting early treatment for patients with acute dyspnea in the emergency setting is a clinical challenge that requires complex decision-making in order to achieve hemodynamic balance, improve functional capacity, and decrease mortality. In the present study, we examined the screening potential of rapid evaluation by lung-cardiac-inferior vena cava (LCI) integrated ultrasound for differentiating acute heart failure syndromes (AHFS) from primary pulmonary disease in patients with acute dyspnea in the emergency setting. Methods Between March 2011 and March 2012, 90 consecutive patients (45 women, 78.1?±?9.9?years) admitted to the emergency room of our hospital for acute dyspnea were enrolled. Within 30?minutes of admission, all patients underwent conventional physical examination, rapid ultrasound (lung-cardiac-inferior vena cava [LCI] integrated ultrasound) examination with a hand-held device, routine laboratory tests, measurement of brain natriuretic peptide, and chest X-ray in the emergency room. Results The final diagnosis was acute dyspnea due to AHFS in 53 patients, acute dyspnea due to pulmonary disease despite a history of heart failure in 18 patients, and acute dyspnea due to pulmonary disease in 19 patients. Lung ultrasound alone showed a sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, and positive predictive value of 96.2, 54.0, 90.9, and 75.0%, respectively, for differentiating AHFS from pulmonary disease. On the other hand, LCI integrated ultrasound had a sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, and positive predictive value of 94.3, 91.9, 91.9, and 94.3%, respectively. Conclusions Our study demonstrated that rapid evaluation by LCI integrated ultrasound is extremely accurate for differentiating acute dyspnea due to AHFS from that caused by primary pulmonary disease in the emergency setting. PMID:23210515

  5. Progress in Ring Array Transducers for Real-Time 3D Ultrasound Guidance of Cardiac Interventional Devices

    PubMed Central

    Light, Edward D.; Lieu, Victor; Suhocki, Paul; Wolf, Patrick D.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2012-01-01

    As a treatment for aortic stenosis, several companies have recently introduced prosthetic heart valves designed to be deployed through a catheter using an intravenous or trans-apical approach. This procedure can either take the place of open heart surgery with some of the devices, or delay it with others. Real-time 3D ultrasound could enable continuous monitoring of these structures before, during and after deployment. We have developed a 2D ring array integrated with a 30 French catheter that is used for trans-apical prosthetic heart valve implantation. The transducer array was built using three 46 cm long flex circuits from MicroConnex (Snoqualmie, WA) which terminate in an interconnect that plugs directly into our system cable, thus no cable soldering is required. This transducer consists of 210 elements at .157 mm inter-element spacing and operates at 5 MHz. Average measured element bandwidth was 26% and average round-trip 50 Ohm insertion loss was -81.1 dB. The transducer were wrapped around the 1 cm diameter lumen of a heart valve deployment catheter. Prosthetic heart valve images were obtained in water tank studies. PMID:21842583

  6. Ultrasound in perinatology

    SciTech Connect

    Maklad, N.F.

    1986-01-01

    This 19th volume in the series Clinics in Diagnostic Ultrasound provides an overview and update of some of the recent applications of ultrasound (US) in the pernatal period. Prenatal topics include estimation of gestational age; evaluation of intrauterine growth retardation, non-immune hydrops, and fetal urinary abnormalities; fetal echocardiography; and biophysical scoring. The discussion of postnatal topics includes US studies of the head and abdomen, echocardiography, and interventional procedures.

  7. Duplex ultrasound

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ultrasound with Doppler ultrasound . Traditional ultrasound uses sound waves that bounce off blood vessels to create pictures. Doppler ultrasound records sound waves reflecting off moving objects, such as blood, to ...

  8. Complex patterns of abnormal heartbeats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte-Frohlinde, Verena; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Goldberger, Ary L.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Costa, Madalena; Morley-Davies, Adrian; Stanley, H. Eugene; Glass, Leon

    2002-01-01

    Individuals having frequent abnormal heartbeats interspersed with normal heartbeats may be at an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. However, mechanistic understanding of such cardiac arrhythmias is limited. We present a visual and qualitative method to display statistical properties of abnormal heartbeats. We introduce dynamical "heartprints" which reveal characteristic patterns in long clinical records encompassing approximately 10(5) heartbeats and may provide information about underlying mechanisms. We test if these dynamics can be reproduced by model simulations in which abnormal heartbeats are generated (i) randomly, (ii) at a fixed time interval following a preceding normal heartbeat, or (iii) by an independent oscillator that may or may not interact with the normal heartbeat. We compare the results of these three models and test their limitations to comprehensively simulate the statistical features of selected clinical records. This work introduces methods that can be used to test mathematical models of arrhythmogenesis and to develop a new understanding of underlying electrophysiologic mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmia.

  9. Thallium-201 is comparable to technetium-99m-sestamibi for estimating cardiac function in patients with abnormal myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming-Che; Tsai, Cheng-Ting; Lin, Hui-Chun; Sun, Fang-Ju; Lin, Ku-Hung

    2015-11-01

    We analyzed the left-ventricular functional data obtained by cardiac-gated single-photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with thallium-201 (Tl-201) and technetium-99m-sestamibi (MIBI) protocols in different groups of patients, and compared the data between Tl-201 and MIBI. Two hundred and seventy-two patients undergoing dipyridamole stress/redistribution Tl-201 MPI and 563 patients undergoing 1-day rest/dipyridamole stress MIBI MPI were included. Higher mean stress ejection fraction (EF), rest EF, and change in EF (?EF) were noticed in the normal MPI groups by both Tl-201 and MIBI protocols. Higher mean EF was observed in the females with normal MPI results despite their higher mean age. Comparisons between the Tl-201 and MIBI groups suggested a significant difference in all functional parameters, except for the rest end diastolic volume/end systolic volume and ?EF between groups with negative MPI results. For the positive MPI groups, there was no significant difference in all parameters, except for the change in end diastolic volume and change in end systolic volume after stress between both protocols. The Tl-201 provides comparable left-ventricular functional data to MIBI cardiac-gated single-photon emission computed tomography in patients with positive MPI results, and may therefore be undertaken routinely for incremental functional information that is especially valuable to this patient group. PMID:26678935

  10. Normal and Abnormal US Findings in Early First-Trimester Pregnancy: Review of the Society of Radiologists in Ultrasound 2012 Consensus Panel Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Shuchi K; Chang, Crystal; DeBardeleben, John T; Horrow, Mindy M

    2015-01-01

    Since being introduced more than 30 years ago, endovaginal ultrasonography (US) and quantitative testing of serum levels of the beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin have become the standard means of establishing the presence of normal intrauterine pregnancy (IUP), failed IUP, and ectopic pregnancy. Appropriate use of these powerful tools requires clear, standardized interpretations based on conservative criteria to protect both the pregnancy and the mother. Since diagnoses are assigned earlier and available medical treatments for ectopic pregnancy and failed IUP are expanding, emphasis must carefully shift toward watchful waiting when the mother is clinically stable and a definitive location for the pregnancy cannot be established with US. To this end and to prevent inadvertent harm to early normal pregnancies, the Society of Radiologists in Ultrasound convened a consensus panel of radiologists, obstetricians, and emergency medicine physicians in 2012 with the goal of reviewing current literature and clinical practices and formulating modern criteria and terminology for the various first-trimester outcomes. (©)RSNA, 2015. PMID:26562242

  11. Level of urinary liver-type fatty acid-binding protein is associated with cardiac markers and electrocardiographic abnormalities in type-2 diabetes with chronic kidney disease stage G1 and G2.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Yoshiteru; Suzuki, Atsushi; Ishii, Junnichi; Sekiguchi-Ueda, Sahoko; Shibata, Megumi; Yoshino, Yasumasa; Asano, Shogo; Hayakawa, Nobuki; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Akiyama, Yasukazu; Kitagawa, Fumihiko; Sakuishi, Toshiaki; Fujita, Takashi; Hashimoto, Shuji; Ozaki, Yukio; Itoh, Mitsuyasu

    2015-05-01

    Urinary liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) reflects the degree of stress in proximal tubules of the kidney. We examined the level of L-FABP in type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage G1 and G2, and its relationship with cardiac markers and electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities. T2DM patients whose estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was ?60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) were recruited [n = 276 (165 males), mean age 64 years]. The median level of urinary L-FABP was 6.6 ?g/gCr. Urinary L-FABP showed significant correlation with urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) (r = 0.51, p < 0.0001). Median (25th-75th percentile) eGFR was 82 (72-95) mL/min/1.73 m2. We divided patients into four subgroups (group 1, L-FABP ?8.4 ?g/gCr and ACR ?30 mg/gCr; group 2, L-FABP ?8.4 ?g/gCr and ACR >30 mg/gCr; group 3, L-FABP >8.4 ?g/gCr and ACR ?30 mg/gCr; group 4, L-FABP >8.4 ?g/gCr and ACR >30 mg/gCr). Compared with group 1, group 4 was significantly higher in systolic blood pressure, and eGFR using standardized serum cystatin C, high-sensitivity troponin T, and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP). Group 4 had significantly higher level of NT-proBNP than group 3. Groups 2, 3 and 4 showed more ECG abnormalities than group 1. These findings suggest that simultaneous measurement of urinary L-FABP and ACR should be useful to assess cardiovascular damage reflecting on the elevation of cardiac markers and ECG abnormalities in T2DM with CKD G1 and G2. PMID:24626813

  12. Ultrasound imaging during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gold, R B

    1984-01-01

    Review by a panel of experts convened by the National Institute of Health (NIH) and the Federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) resulted in a recommendation for diagnostic ultrasound imaging in about 1/3 of pregnancies only when medically indicated but not routinely. Ultrasound technology, 1st developed for use in submarine warfare sonar devices, is widely used by physicians because of its clinical significance and because it allows seeing intrauterine structures without exposing the fetus to dangerous radiation. Its most important uses include estimating the gestational age for patients with uncertain clinical dates, evaluating fetal growth, determining the cause of vaginal bleeding, determining fetal presentation, identifying multiple gestation, supplementing amniocentesis or other special procedures, diagnosing, confirming fetal death and locating intrauterine devices. Recently, many physicians have been advocating routine ultrasound screening of all pregnancies but this is an issue of concern among leading physicians and the NIH. The panel stressed the urgent need for additional research on the safety and efficacy of the procedure. Many studies that found adverse reactions associated with ultrasound use in humans suffer from sever methodological flaws. The panel recommended ultrasound not to be used for routine screening. Some studies indicate that no clear benefit from routine screening results. The panel's recommendations were criticized for unnecessarily restricting ultrasound use and for inappropriately sanctioning widespread use of the technology. Human Life International, an anti-abortion organization, opposed using ultrasound to detect fetal abnormalities, contending that this would promote abortion. Some abortion opponents, however, believe ultrasound would cause bonding between the mother and the fetus and discourage abortion. The panel underscored the importance of the skill and training of ultrasound examiners. In regard to informed consent, the panel recommended that it be obtained. Further intensive research on the use of ultrasound was highly recommended. PMID:6389174

  13. Image guidance in cardiac electrophysiology

    E-print Network

    Malchano, Zachary John

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are characterized by a disruption or abnormal conduction of electrical signals within the heart. Treatment of arrhythmias has dramatically evolved over the past half-century, and today, minimally-invasive ...

  14. Introduction: December 2015 HeartWeek Issue of Cardiology in the Young - Highlights of HeartWeek 2015: Challenges and Dilemmas of Pediatric Cardiac Care including Heart Failure in Children and Congenital Abnormalities of the Coronary Arteries.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P

    2015-12-01

    This December Issue of Cardiology in the Young represents the 13th annual publication in Cardiology in the Young generated from the two meetings that composed "HeartWeek in Florida". "HeartWeek in Florida", the joint collaborative project sponsored by the Cardiac Centre at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, together with Johns Hopkins All Children's Heart Institute of Saint Petersburg, Florida, averages over 1000 attendees every year and is now recognised as one of the major planks of continuing medical and nursing education for those working in the fields of diagnosis and treatment of cardiac disease in the foetus, neonate, infant, child, and adult. "HeartWeek in Florida" combines the International Symposium on Congenital Heart Disease, organised by All Children's Hospital and Johns Hopkins Medicine, and entering its 16th year, with the Annual Postgraduate Course in Paediatric Cardiovascular Disease, organised by The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia entering its 19th year. This December 2015 Issue of Cardiology in the Young features highlights of the two meetings that compose HeartWeek. Johns Hopkins All Children's Heart Institute's 15th Annual International Symposium on Congenital Heart Disease was held at the Renaissance Vinoy Resort & Golf Club, Saint Petersburg, Florida, from Friday, 6 February, 2015, to Monday, 9 February, 2015. This Symposium was co-sponsored by The American Association for Thoracic Surgery and its special focus was "Congenital Abnormalities of the Coronary Arteries". The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia's annual meeting - Cardiology 2015, the 18th Annual Update on Paediatric and Congenital Cardiovascular Disease: "Challenges and Dilemmas" - was held at the Hyatt Regency Scottsdale Resort and Spa at Gainey Ranch, Scottsdale, Arizona, from Wednesday, 11 February, 2015, to Sunday, 15 February, 2015. We would like to acknowledge the tremendous contributions made to paediatric and congenital cardiac care by Juan Valentín Comas, MD, PhD (13 May, 1960 to 16 June, 2015) and Donald Nixon Ross, FRCS (4 October, 1922 to 7 July, 2014); and therefore, we dedicate this December 2015 HeartWeek Issue of Cardiology in the Young to them. PMID:26675589

  15. Ultrasound Despeckling for Contrast Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Tay, Peter C.; Garson, Christopher D.; Acton, Scott T.; Hossack, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Images produced by ultrasound systems are adversely hampered by a stochastic process known as speckle. A despeckling method based upon removing outlier is proposed. The method is developed to contrast enhance B-mode ultrasound images. The contrast enhancement is with respect to decreasing pixel variations in homogeneous regions while maintaining or improving differences in mean values of distinct regions. A comparison of the proposed despeckling filter is compared with the other well known despeckling filters. The evaluations of despeckling performance are based upon improvements to contrast enhancement, structural similarity, and segmentation results on a Field II simulated image and actual B-mode cardiac ultrasound images captured in vivo. PMID:20227984

  16. Diagnostic ultrasound features and outcome of restrictive foramen ovale in fetuses with structurally normal hearts.

    PubMed

    Uzun, Orhan; Babaoglu, Kadir; Ayhan, Yusuf I; Moselhi, Marsham; Rushworth, Fran; Morris, Sue; Beattie, Bryan; Wiener, Jarmilla; Lewis, Michael J

    2014-08-01

    Intrauterine foramen ovale (FO) restriction in association with congenital heart disease (CHD) carries a poor prognosis. However, in the absence of CHD, the clinical importance of restrictive FO in the fetus is not well understood. We evaluated the antenatal prevalence, clinical presentation, diagnostic ultrasound features, and outcome of restrictive FO in fetuses without CHD. We reviewed the echocardiographic and clinical records of 23 fetuses diagnosed with a restrictive FO and structurally normal heart between 2001 and 2012. The atrial septum, dimensions of cardiac structures, left and right cardiac output and Doppler interrogation of cardiac flows were examined. The clinical outcomes of all fetuses with restrictive FO were analysed. Restrictive FO was identified in 23 of 1,682 (1.4%) fetuses with no CHD. Enlarged right heart structures (100%), hypermobile or redundant primum atrial septum (91%), increased right-to-left ventricular cardiac output ratio (91%), and posteriorly angulated ductus arteriosus (68%) were the most common echocardiographic findings associated with this rare phenomenon. Additional noncardiac systemic abnormalities were identified in 13 (56%) babies. Seven (30%) neonates developed persistent pulmonary hypertension, and 7 infants died. Antenatal restrictive FO is an underrecognised entity despite being a common cause of right heart dilatation in the fetus. In the absence of CHD, restrictive FO is well tolerated antenatally, but its frequent association with noncardiac abnormalities and pulmonary hypertension in the neonate are noteworthy. PMID:24585219

  17. Validation of On-Orbit Methodology for the Assessment of Cardiac Function and Changes in the Circulating Volume Using Ultrasound and "Braslet-M" Occlusion Cuffs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogomolov, V. V.; Duncan, J. M.; Alferova, I. V.; Dulchavsky, S. A.; Ebert, D.; Hamilton, D. R.; Matveev, V. P.; Sargsyan, A. E.

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in remotely guided imaging techniques on ISS allow the acquisition of high quality ultrasound data using crewmember operators with no medical background and minimal training. However, ongoing efforts are required to develop and validate methodology for complex imaging protocols to ensure their repeatability, efficiency, and suitability for use aboard the ISS. This Station Developmental Test Objective (SDTO) tests a cardiovascular evaluation methodology that takes advantage of the ISS Ultrasound capability, the Braslet-M device, and modified respiratory maneuvers (Valsalva and Mueller), to broaden the spectrum of anatomical and functional information on human cardiovascular system during long-duration space missions. The proposed methodology optimizes and combines new and previously demonstrated methods, and is expected to benefit medically indicated assessments, operational research protocols, and data collections for science. Braslet-M is a current Russian operational countermeasure that compresses the upper thigh to impede the venous return from lower extremities. The goal of the SDTO is to establish and validate a repeatable ultrasound-based methodology for the assessment of a number of cardiovascular criteria in microgravity. Braslet-M device is used as a means to acutely alter volume distribution while focused ultrasound measurements are performed. Modified respiratory maneuvers are done upon volume manipulations to record commensurate changes in anatomical and functional parameters. The overall cardiovascular effects of the Braslet-M device are not completely understood, and although not a primary objective of this SDTO, this effort will provide pilot data regarding the suitability of Braslet-M for its intended purpose, effects, and the indications for its use.

  18. Detecting ECG Abnormalities via Transductive Transfer Department of Computer

    E-print Network

    Buffalo, State University of New York

    cardiac cycle (heart beat). In ECG signal mon- itoring, existing studies usually classify these instancesDetecting ECG Abnormalities via Transductive Transfer Learning Kang Li Department of Computer@buffalo.edu ABSTRACT Detecting Electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities is the pro- cess of identifying irregular cardiac

  19. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Nuclear imaging for cardiac amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Noordzij, Walter; Glaudemans, Andor W J M; Longhi, Simone; Slart, Riemer H J A; Lorenzini, Massimiliano; Hazenberg, Bouke P C; Rapezzi, Claudio

    2015-03-01

    Histological analysis of endomyocardial tissue is still the gold standard for the diagnosis of cardiac amyloidosis, but has its limitations. Accordingly, there is a need for non-invasive modalities to diagnose cardiac amyloidosis. Echocardiography and ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging can show characteristics which may not be very specific for cardiac amyloid. Nuclear medicine has gained a precise role in this context: several imaging modalities have become available for the diagnosis and prognostic stratification of cardiac amyloidosis during the last two decades. The different classes of radiopharmaceuticals have the potential to bind different constituents of the amyloidotic infiltrates, with some relevant differences among the various aetiologic types of amyloidosis and the different organs and tissues involved. This review focuses on the background of the commonly used modalities, their present clinical applications, and future clinical perspectives in imaging patients with (suspected) cardiac amyloidosis. The main focus is on conventional nuclear medicine (bone scintigraphy, cardiac sympathetic innervation) and positron emission tomography. PMID:25424887

  1. Application of Ultrasound in Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Carovac, Aladin; Smajlovic, Fahrudin; Junuzovic, Dzelaludin

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasound device, essentially, consists of a transducer, transmitter pulse generator, compensating amplifiers, the control unit for focusing, digital processors and systems for display. It is used in cases of: abdominal, cardiac, maternity, gynecological, urological and cerebrovascular examination, breast examination, and small pieces of tissue as well as in pediatric and operational review. PMID:23408755

  2. Nail abnormalities

    MedlinePLUS

    Nail abnormalities are problems with the color, shape, texture, or thickness of the fingernails or toenails. ... Fungus or yeast cause changes in the color, texture, and shape of the nails. Bacterial infection may ...

  3. Chromosome Abnormalities

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of a condition caused by numerical abnormalities is Down syndrome, which is marked by mental retardation, learning difficulties, ... muscle tone (hypotonia) in infancy. An individual with Down syndrome has three copies of chromosome 21 rather than ...

  4. Congenital Abnormalities

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Ribbon Commands Skip to main content Turn off Animations Turn on Animations Our Sponsors Log in | Register Menu Log in | ... course of action. Additional Information Your Family Health History & Genetics Detecting Genetic Abnormalities Prenatal Genetic Counseling Children ...

  5. Craniofacial Abnormalities

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of the skull and face. Craniofacial abnormalities are birth defects of the face or head. Some, like cleft ... palate, are among the most common of all birth defects. Others are very rare. Most of them affect ...

  6. Cardiac effects of the c.1583 C?G LMNA mutation in two families with Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, LI; SHEN, HONGRUI; ZHAO, ZHE; BING, QI; HU, JING

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine and analyze cardiac involvement in two Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD) pedigrees caused by the c.1583 C?G mutation of the lamin A/C gene (LMNA). The clinical and genetic characteristics of members of two families with EDMD were evaluated by performing neurological examinations, skeletal muscle biopsies, cardiac evaluations, including electrocardiography, 24 h Holter, ultrasound cardiography and 99TcM-MIBI-gated myocardiac perfusion imaging, and genomic DNA sequencing. Family history investigations revealed an autosomal dominant transmission pattern of the disease in Family 1 and a sporadic case in Family 2. The three affected patients exhibited typical clinical features of EDMD, including joint contractures, muscle weakness and cardiac involvement. Muscle histopathological investigation revealed dystrophic features. In addition, each affected individual exhibited either cardiac arrhythmia, which was evident as sinus tachycardia, atrial flutter or complete atrioventricular inhibition. Cardiac imaging revealed dilated cardiomyopathy in two of the individuals, one of whom was presented with heart failure. The second patient presented with no significant abnormalities in cardiac structure or function. The three affected individuals exhibited a heterozygous missense mutation in the LMNA gene (c.1583 C?G), which caused a T528R amino acid change in the LMNA protein. In conclusion, the present study identified three patients with EDMD, exhibiting the same dominant LMNA mutation and presenting with a spectrum of severe cardiac abnormalities, including cardiac conduction system defects, cardiomyopathy and heart failure. As LMNA mutations have been associated with at least six clinical disorders, including EDMD, the results of the present study provide additional mutational and functional data, which may assist in further establishing LMNA mutational variation and disease pathogenesis. PMID:26165385

  7. Abnormal Pup 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    samples, appropriate reference genes were needed that showed stable, non-fluctuating levels in both normal and abnormal kidney tissue and urine sediment in dogs. Tested genes included Glyceraldehyde 3- phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), 40S ribosomal... into the pathogenesis and treatment of CKD in dogs. 3 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Primary glomerular diseases are a leading cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in both humans and animals. These disorders are characterized by abnormal structure and function...

  8. Fetal Arrhythmias Associated with Cardiac Rhabdomyomas

    PubMed Central

    Wacker-Gussmann, Annette; Strasburger, Janette F; Cuneo, Bettina; Wiggins, Delonia; Gotteiner, Nina; Wakai, Ronald T

    2014-01-01

    Background Primary heart tumors in fetuses are rare and mainly represent rhabdomyomas. The tumors have a variable expression and can be associated with arrhythmias, including both wide and narrow QRS tachycardia. Although multiple Doppler techniques exist to assess fetal heart rhythm, it can be difficult to record precise electrophysiological pathologies in fetal life. Objective Investigations defining precise electrophysiological diagnosis were performed using fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG). Methods In addition to routine fetal echocardiography, fMCG was used to investigate electrophysiologic rhythm patterns in a series of 10 fetuses with cardiac rhabdomyomas. Results The mean gestational age of the fetuses was 28.6 weeks (SD ± 4.7 weeks). The multiple rhabdomyomas were mainly located in the right and left ventricles as well as around the AV groove. Arrhythmias or conduction abnormalities were diagnosed in all 10 patients, although only six of them were referred due to that indication. Remarkably, 80% (8/10) had associated Wolff-Parkinson-White pre-excitation. In addition, we found prominent p waves in four fetuses. Conclusion In fetuses with rhabdomyomas, a disease where rhythm pathology is common, precise electrophysiological diagnosis can now be made by fMCG. fMCG is complimentary to echocardiography for rhythm assessment, and can detect conduction abnormalities that are not possible to diagnose prenatally with M-mode or pulsed Doppler ultrasound. Risk factor assessment using fMCG can support pregnancy management and post-natal treatment and follow-up. PMID:24333285

  9. Renal Perfusion Index Reflects Cardiac Systolic Function in Chronic Cardio-Renal Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lubas, Arkadiusz; Ryczek, Robert; Kade, Grzegorz; Niemczyk, Stanis?aw

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiac dysfunction can modify renal perfusion, which is crucial to maintain sufficient kidney tissue oxygenation. Renal cortex perfusion assessed by dynamic ultrasound method is related both to renal function and cardiac hemodynamics. The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that Renal Perfusion Index (RPI) can more closely reflect cardiac hemodynamics and differentiate etiology of chronic cardio-renal syndrome. Material/Methods Twenty-four patients with hypertension and chronic kidney disease (CKD) at 2–4 stage (12 with hypertensive nephropathy and 12 with CKD prior to hypertension) were enrolled in the study. Blood tests, 24-h ABPM, echocardiography, and ultrasonography with estimation of Total renal Cortical Perfusion intensity and Renal Perfusion Index (RPI) were performed. Results In the group of all patients, RPI correlated with left ventricular stoke volume (LVSV), and cardiac index, but not with markers of renal function. In multiple stepwise regression analysis CKD-EPI(Cys-Cr) (b=?0.360), LVSV (b=0.924) and MAP (b=0.376) together independently influenced RPI (R2=0.74; p<0.0001). RPI<0.567 allowed for the identification of patients with chronic cardio-renal syndrome with sensitivity of 41.7% and specificity of 83.3%. Conclusions Renal perfusion index relates more strongly to cardiac output than to renal function, and could be helpful in recognizing chronic cardio-renal syndrome. Applicability of RPI in diagnosing early abnormalities in the cardio-renal axis requires further investigation. PMID:25881555

  10. Ultrasound -- Vascular

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ultrasound uses sound waves to evaluate the body’s circulatory system and help identify blockages and detect blood clots. ... is a useful way of evaluating the body's circulatory system. Vascular ultrasound is performed to: help monitor the ...

  11. Thyroid ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Vikas; Bano, Shahina

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid ultrasonography has established itself as a popular and useful tool in the evaluation and management of thyroid disorders. Advanced ultrasound techniques in thyroid imaging have not only fascinated the radiologists but also attracted the surgeons and endocrinologists who are using these techniques in their daily clinical and operative practice. This review provides an overview of indications for ultrasound in various thyroid diseases, describes characteristic ultrasound findings in these diseases, and illustrates major diagnostic pitfalls of thyroid ultrasound. PMID:23776892

  12. Development of an Electrophysiology (EP)-Enabled Intracardiac Ultrasound Catheter Integrated With NavX 3-Dimensional Electrofield Mapping for Guiding Cardiac EP Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao Kui; Pemberton, James; Thomenius, Kai; Dentinger, Aaron; Lowe, Robert I.; Ashraf, Muhammad; Shung, K. Kirk; Chia, Raymond; Stephens, Douglas N.; O'Donnell, Matthew; Mahajan, Aman; Balaji, Seshadri; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; Sahn, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We have developed an integrated high-resolution intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) catheter for electrophysiology (EP) testing, which can be coregistered in 3-dimensional space with EP testing and ablation catheters using electrofield sensing. Methods Twelve open-chest pigs (34–55 kg) and 3 closed-chest pigs were studied. After introduction from the jugular or femoral venous locations, the 9F side-looking, highly steerable (0°–180°), 64-element array catheters could be manipulated easily throughout the right side of the heart. Multisite cardiac pacing was performed for assessing left ventricular (LV) synchrony using tissue Doppler methods. Also, in the open-chest pigs, right atrial (RA) and right ventricular (RV) ablations were performed with a separate radio frequency catheter under fluoroscopic guidance and visualized with ICE to characterize the changes. In the 3 closed-chest pigs, electrofield NavX 3-dimensional coregistration (St Jude Medical Corp, Minneapolis, MN) allowed us to test whether this additional feature could shorten the time necessary to perform 4 targeted ablations in each animal while imaging the ablation catheter and the adjacent region by ICE. Results Intracardiac anatomy, tricuspid, aortic, pulmonary, and mitral valve function, and pulmonary vein flow were all imaged reproducibly from scanning locations in the RA or RV in all animals, along with assessment of cardiac motion and the effects of multisite pacing. Three-dimensional electrofield displays detailed the spatial relationship between the ICE catheter and ablation catheters such that the time to visualize and ablate 4 sites in each of the 3 closed-chest animals was reduced. Conclusions This new technology is a first step in the integration of ICE with EP procedures. PMID:17957051

  13. Nonlinear properties of cardiac rhythm abnormalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebovitch, Larry S.; Todorov, Angelo T.; Zochowski, Michal; Scheurle, Daniela; Colgin, Laura; Wood, Mark A.; Ellenbogen, Kenneth A.; Herre, John M.; Bernstein, Robert C.

    1999-03-01

    Many physical processes have distributions of times between events that have non-normalizable, power law probability density functions (PDF's). The moments of such distributions are not defined. We found that the PDF's of the times between events of ventricular tachyarrhythmia (rapid heart rate) and premature ventricular contractions have a power law form indicative of a non-normalizable distribution, and that the timing between these events cannot be meaningfully characterized by the mean frequency of such events. The Hurst analysis showed that there were self-similar correlations in the data. These results indicate that the physical processes that disrupt the normal rhythm of the heart produce a fractal pattern in the timing between these events. It also suggests that the mean and the variance of the frequency of these events may not be good measures to assess the status of patients with these arrhythmias and determine the effectiveness of therapeutic procedures.

  14. Cardiac Syndrome X: Update.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Shilpa; Mehta, Puja K; Bairey Merz, C Noel

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac Syndrome X (CSX), characterized by angina-like chest discomfort, ST segment depression during exercise, and normal epicardial coronary arteries at angiography, is highly prevalent in women. CSX is not benign, and linked to adverse cardiovascular outcomes and a poor quality of life. Coronary microvascular and endothelial dysfunction and abnormal cardiac nociception have been implicated in the pathogenesis of CSX. Treatment includes life-style modification, anti-anginal, anti-atherosclerotic, and anti-ischemic medications. Non-pharmacological options include cognitive behavioral therapy, enhanced external counterpulsation, neurostimulation, and stellate ganglionectomy. Studies have shown the efficacy of individual treatments but guidelines outlining the best course of therapy are lacking. PMID:26567981

  15. Interventional ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Holm, H.H.; Kristensen, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    This book discusses: Introduction to interventional ultrasound/handling of aspirated material/general principles of fine needle aspiration cytology/procedure and principles in ultrasonically guided puncture/puncture of focal liver lesions/intraoperative puncture of the liver guided by ultrasound/Interventional ultrasound in cancer therapy/Interventional echocardiography/Fine-needle aspiration biopsy: Are there any risks./Puncture of renal mass lesions/Intrauterine needle diagnosis/Percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

  16. 42 CFR 37.53 - Notification of abnormal roentgenographic findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...findings suggesting, enlarged heart, tuberculosis, lung cancer, or any other...interpreted to show enlarged heart, tuberculosis, cancer, complicated pneumoconiosis...abnormality of cardiac shape or size, tuberculosis, lung cancer, or any other...

  17. Use of Ultrasound Imaging to Map Propagating Action Potential Waves in the

    E-print Network

    Otani, Niels F.

    Use of Ultrasound Imaging to Map Propagating Action Potential Waves in the Heart NF Otani1 , R understanding of cardiac dynamics remains elusive. Here we present a technique using ultrasound, including VF. In this paper, we describe the ability of ultrasound to see wave-induced tissue deformation

  18. 3D in vivo imaging of rat hearts by high frequency ultrasound and its application in myofiber orientation wrapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xulei; Wang, Silun; Shen, Ming; Zhang, Xiaodong; Lerakis, Stamatios; Wagner, Mary B.; Fei, Baowei

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac ultrasound plays an important role in the imaging of hearts in basic cardiovascular research and clinical examinations. 3D ultrasound imaging can provide the geometry or motion information of the heart. Especially, the wrapping of cardiac fiber orientations to the ultrasound volume could supply useful information on the stress distributions and electric action spreading. However, how to acquire 3D ultrasound volumes of the heart of small animals in vivo for cardiac fiber wrapping is still a challenging problem. In this study, we provide an approach to acquire 3D ultrasound volumes of the rat hearts in vivo. The comparison between both in vivo and ex vivo geometries indicated 90.1% Dice similarity. In this preliminary study, the evaluations of the cardiac fiber orientation wrapping errors were 24.7° for the acute angle error and were 22.4° for the inclination angle error. This 3D ultrasound imaging and fiber orientation estimation technique have potential applications in cardiac imaging.

  19. Athletes at Risk for Sudden Cardiac Death

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subasic, Kim

    2010-01-01

    High school athletes represent the largest group of individuals affected by sudden cardiac death, with an estimated incidence of once or twice per week. Structural cardiovascular abnormalities are the most frequent cause of sudden cardiac death. Athletes participating in basketball, football, track, soccer, baseball, and swimming were found to…

  20. [Perianal ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Dietrich, C F; Barreiros, A P; Nuernberg, D; Schreiber-Dietrich, D G; Ignee, A

    2008-06-01

    Perianal and perineal ultrasound is an effective but rarely applied diagnostic modality. Transmural inflammation, fistula and abscesses in patients with inflammatory bowel disease can be delineated and perirectal tumours can be staged. The method is complementary to endorectal ultrasound. Also oblique transsphincteric fistula can be displayed in detail. PMID:18537090

  1. Fetal cardiac screening and variation in prenatal detection rates of congenital heart disease: why bother with screening at all?

    PubMed

    Sharland, Gurleen

    2012-03-01

    Antenatal screening for fetal cardiac abnormalities was introduced over 25 years ago, yet detection of congenital heart disease before birth remains a challenge. While experienced tertiary centers report a high level of diagnostic accuracy, with most major forms of congenital heart disease being detectable before birth, the overall detection rate remains low. Pregnancies at increased risk of having an affected baby are referred to tertiary centers for fetal ECG, but most cases of congenital heart disease will occur in low-risk pregnancies. These cases will only be detected by screening the low-risk population at the time of routine obstetric scanning. Many obstetric ultrasound units have learnt to successfully obtain, and correctly interpret, views of the heart, including the four-chamber view and outflow tract views. However, standards for doing this are not uniform, nationally or internationally, so there is a significant variation in detection rates across individual countries and between different countries. Early diagnosis of babies with lesions that can result in cardiovascular collapse and death, could improve their survival as well as reducing morbidity. In addition, detection of a cardiac abnormality during pregnancy allows time to prepare parents for the likely course of events after birth. It also facilitates detection of other abnormalities in the baby and gives parents a choice, even if the choice is difficult and unwelcome. As well as providing parents with accurate and up-to-date information regarding the their baby's abnormality, it is vital to provide continuing support to help them deal with the problem, regardless of what decisions they make. Much work remains to establish a uniform standard for antenatal detection of cardiac abnormalities. More recent national guidelines for examining the fetal heart along with formalized auditing processes should help to achieve this, although considerable time and effort will be required, particularly with regard to the teaching and training required. PMID:22413979

  2. Congestive cardiac failure following laxative withdrawal.

    PubMed Central

    Riley, J. A.; Brown, A. R.; Walker, B. E.

    1996-01-01

    We report the case of a 60-year-old woman who presented with weakness and hypokalaemia due to excessive use of laxatives. When the laxatives were withdrawn, she developed severe congestive cardiac failure requiring treatment with a diuretic and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor. There was no underlying cardiac abnormality, and these drugs were eventually stopped with no recurrence of the cardiac failure. The possible mechanisms of heart failure following laxative withdrawal is discussed. PMID:8796216

  3. Diagnostic Ophthalmic Ultrasound for Radiologists.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Cynthia J; Prager, Thomas C; Cheng, Han; Gombos, Dan; Tang, Rosa A; Schiffman, Jade S

    2015-08-01

    Ophthalmic ultrasound is an invaluable tool that provides quick and noninvasive evaluation of the eye and the orbit. It not only allows the clinicians to view structures that may not be visible with routine ophthalmic equipment or neuroimaging techniques but also provides unique diagnostic information in various ophthalmic conditions. In this article, the basic principles of ophthalmic ultrasound and examination techniques are discussed. Its clinical application is illustrated through a variety of ocular pathologic abnormalities (eg, narrow angles, ciliary body tumor, detached retina, choroidal melanoma, and papilledema). PMID:26208413

  4. Ultrasound of the athletic groin.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Rob

    2013-02-01

    Athletic groin pain may be the result of a wide variety of different pathologic processes. Clinical diagnosis may be difficult, and imaging can play a vital role in diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging is frequently used as the primary imaging modality. However, ultrasound is the best image modality for dynamic assessment of soft tissue abnormality and for guided intervention. Ultrasound (US) is often used as a problem-solving tool. This article briefly reviews the specific roles for US in management of groin pain in the athlete. PMID:23487332

  5. Detection of microemboli by transcranial Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed Central

    Grosset, D G; Georgiadis, D; Kelman, A W; Cowburn, P; Stirling, S; Lees, K R; Faichney, A; Mallinson, A; Quin, R; Bone, I; Pettigrew, L; Brodie, E; MacKay, T; Wheatley, D J

    1996-01-01

    Doppler ultrasound detection of abnormally high-pitched signals within the arterial waveform offers a new method for diagnosis, and potentially for prediction, of embolic complications in at-risk patients. The nature of Doppler "microembolic" signals is of particular interest in patients with prosthetic heart valves, where a high prevalence of these signals is observed. Monitoring the middle cerebral artery with 2-MHz transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TC-2000, Nicolet Biomedical; Warwick, UK), we looked for microemboli signals in 150 patients (95 women and 55 men), and found 1 or more signals during a 30-min recording in 89% of 70 patients with Bjork-Shiley valves (principally monostrut), 54% of 50 patients with Medtronic-Hall valves, and 50% of 30 patients with Carpentier-Edwards valves (p < 0.001, chi 2). In the patients with Bjork-Shiley valves, the mean number of signals per hour was 59 (range, 42-86; 95% confidence interval), which was significantly higher than the mean in patients with Medtronic-Hall and Carpentier-Edwards valves (1.5[range, 0.5-2.5] and 1 [range, 0-5.3], respectively; both p < 0.04, multiple comparisons. Bonferroni correction). In the patients undergoing serial pre- and postoperative studies, the causative role of the valve implant was emphasized. There was no correlation between the number of emboli signals and a prior history of neurologic deficit, cardiac rhythm, previous cardiac surgery, or the intensity of oral anticoagulation, in patients with prosthetic heart valves. In Bjork-Shiley patients, dual (mitral and aortic) valves were associated with more signals than were single valves. In Medtronic-Hall patients, the signal count was greater for valves in the aortic position than it was for valves in the mitral position. Comparative studies of Doppler emboli signals in other clinical settings suggest a difference in composition or size of the underlying maternal between prosthetic valve patients and patients with carotid stenosis. These studies also suggest that the signals are of gaseous origin in valve patients. The clinical significance of continuing microembolism remains to be determined. PMID:8969029

  6. Vascular ultrasound for atherosclerosis imaging

    PubMed Central

    de Korte, Chris L.; Hansen, Hendrik H. G.; van der Steen, Anton F. W.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death in the Western world. Therefore, detection and quantification of atherosclerotic disease is of paramount importance to monitor treatment and possible prevention of acute events. Vascular ultrasound is an excellent technique to assess the geometry of vessel walls and plaques. The high temporal as well as spatial resolution allows quantification of luminal area and plaque size and volume. While carotid arteries can be imaged non-invasively, scanning of coronary arteries requires invasive intravascular catheters. Both techniques have already demonstrated their clinical applicability. Using linear array technology, detection of disease as well as monitoring of pharmaceutical treatment in carotid arteries are feasible. Data acquired with intravascular ultrasound catheters have proved to be especially beneficial in understanding the development of atherosclerotic disease in coronary arteries. With the introduction of vascular elastography not only the geometry of plaques but also the risk for rupture of plaques might be identified. These so-called vulnerable plaques are frequently not flow-limiting and rupture of these plaques is responsible for the majority of cerebral and cardiac ischaemic events. Intravascular ultrasound elastography studies have demonstrated a high correlation between high strain and vulnerable plaque features, both ex vivo and in vivo. Additionally, pharmaceutical intervention could be monitored using this technique. Non-invasive vascular elastography has recently been developed for carotid applications by using compound scanning. Validation and initial clinical evaluation is currently being performed. Since abundance of vasa vasorum (VV) is correlated with vulnerable plaque development, quantification of VV might be a unique tool to even prevent this from happening. Using ultrasound contrast agents, it has been demonstrated that VV can be identified and quantified. Although far from routine clinical application, non-invasive and intravascular ultrasound VV imaging might pave the road to prevent atherosclerotic disease in an early phase. This paper reviews the conventional vascular ultrasound techniques as well as vascular ultrasound strain and vascular ultrasound VV imaging. PMID:22866231

  7. 42 CFR 37.53 - Notification of abnormal roentgenographic findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... suggesting, enlarged heart, tuberculosis, lung cancer, or any other significant abnormal findings other than... to the miner by MSHA in accordance with section 203 of the act (see 30 CFR part 90). Positive... findings suggesting, abnormality of cardiac shape or size, tuberculosis, lung cancer, or any...

  8. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... is safe, noninvasive and does not use ionizing radiation. This procedure requires little to no special preparation. ... an image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is ...

  9. Ultrasound studies in ectopic pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Goes, E; Breucq, C; Osteaux, M

    1998-02-01

    Early diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy reduces the mortality and morbidity associated with the disease, and the morbidity associated with the therapy. When diagnosis was limited to the cases presenting with tubal rupture, salpingectomy was the only possible treatment. If ectopic pregnancy can be diagnosed earlier, clinicians are able to use new therapies such as laparoscopic microsurgery or medical therapy with methrotrexate, which are less invasive and less tissue destructive. Transvaginal ultrasound has proven to be an essential tool in the early diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy. Colour Doppler capacities further enhance the diagnostic sensitivity of transvaginal ultrasound for the early recognition of abnormal and normal intrauterine pregnancy, and small extrauterine masses. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the major sonographic signs and pitfalls in the ultrasound diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy. PMID:9563270

  10. [Cardiac auscultation in children].

    PubMed

    Ratti, Carlo; Grassi, Laura; De Maria, Elia; Bonetti, Lorenzo; Borghi, Adriana; Cappelli, Stefano

    2014-12-01

    Cardiac auscultation permits to distinguish between the innocent heart murmurs and pathologic murmurs; characteristics of pathologic murmurs include a holosystolic or diastolic murmur, maximal murmur intensity at the upper left sternal border and increased intensity when the patient stands. Murmurs should be described by their timing in the cardiac cycle, intensity, shape, pitch, location, radiation, and response to dynamic maneuvers. When the medical history and physical examination support the diagnosis of innocent heart murmur, neither further investigation nor referal is indicated. On the contrary, echocardiography is recommended for patients with any other abnormal physical examination findings that increase the likelihood of structural heart disease. In this review we discuss the definition and classification of murmurs, how to evaluate it. PMID:25533235

  11. [Craniofacial malformations in prenatal ultrasound evaluation. Literature review].

    PubMed

    Zieli?ski, Rafa?; Respondek-Liberska, Maria

    2013-09-01

    Fetal face is the key anatomical location, both psychologically and clinically for the mother and the clinician. Ultrasound prenatal examination of the maxillofacial region allows to evaluate the fetal face in the first weeks of gestation. In ambulatory intravaginal ultrasound, sensitivity of the facial defect detection is 20-30% in cases without the risk of TORCH and fetal abnormalities, which may arouse suspicion of the presence of facial malformation. Facial defects form a wide group of pathologies. Unfortunately challenges connected with 2D and 3D ultrasound imaging cause frequent misdiagnoses in early gestation. Maxillofacial abnormalities can be solitary or they can coexist with other abnormalities or syndromes. In case of detecting a facial defect, a precise and thorough ultrasound of whole fetal body is necessary whereas in case of detecting any fetal body abnormality a precise and thorough ultrasound examination of the fetal face is obligatory Unfortunately most contemporary prenatal ultrasound standards propose only the overall "face and orbits" evaluation of the fetal face. The evaluation is difficult at 23 and 24 weeks of gestation and seems to be rather challenging in the third trimester of gestation. Not only facial malformations but also facial dimorphic features may lead to the suspicion of genetic syndrome and they may be extremely important in making correct diagnosis. Attempts at standardization in fetal face ultrasound evaluation have proved to be extremely difficult. Advantages of 2D ultrasound over 3D ultrasound and 3D ultrasound over 2D ultrasound in fetal face evaluation have been a topic of much debate. Most typically fetal face is examined with 2D ultrasound in a few basic planes: coronary sagittal, frontal and oblique. The planes preferred in the evaluation of facial structures are discussed in details in the paper Fetal facial defects evaluated in the ultrasound examination may be divided into a few main groups: examination of the orbit and eyeball defects, examination of the external nose and nasal cavity defects, examination of the cleft defects involving the lip, hard and soft palate which may be unilateral or bilateral, examination of external ear defects, examination of mandibular defects and detection of fetal tumors. 3D ultrasound evaluation of the fetal face is extremely useful in visualization of the face, thus presenting a problem to parents and clinicians. Prenatal ultrasound examination provides necessary and extremely useful data concerning fetal facial abnormalities, which allows to plan care and further treatment including interventions in pediatric ENT, pediatric surgery and plastic surgery areas. Cooperation of ultrasound diagnostician and clinicians taking care of a child in the future is therefore necessary when designing treatment scheme in cases of fetal facial defects. PMID:24191520

  12. Cardiac Mechanics Evaluated by Speckle Tracking Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Abduch, Maria Cristina Donadio; Alencar, Adriano Mesquita; Mathias, Wilson; Vieira, Marcelo Luiz de Campos

    2014-01-01

    Natural myocardial markers, or speckles, originated from constructive and destructive interference of ultrasound in the tissues may provide early diagnosis of myocardial changes and be used in the prediction of some cardiac events. Due to its relatively temporal stability, speckles can be tracked by dedicated software along the cardiac cycle, enabling the analysis of the systolic and diastolic function. They are identified by either conventional 2D grey scale and by 3D echo, conferring independence of the insonation angle, thus allowing assessment of cardiac mechanics in the three spatial planes: longitudinal, circumferential, and radial. The purposes of the present paper are: to discuss the role and the meaning of cardiac strain obtained by speckle tracking during the evaluation of cardiac physiology and to discuss clinical applications of this novel echocardiographic technology. PMID:24844877

  13. Medical ultrasound education for bioengineers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaezy, Shahram

    2005-04-01

    The widespread adoption of ultrasound technologies in medicine has necessitated the development of educational programs to address the growing demand for trained expertise in both academia and industry. The demand has been especially great in the field of therapeutic ultrasound that has experienced a significant level of research and development activities in the past decade. The applications cover a wide range including cancer treatment, hemorrhage control, cardiac ablation, gene therapy, and cosmetic surgery. A comprehensive educational program in ultrasound is well suited for bioengineering departments at colleges and universities. Our educational program for students in Bioengineering at the University of Washington includes a year-long coursework covering theory and practice of ultrasound, conducting research projects, attending and presenting at weekly seminars on literature survey, presentations at scientific meetings, and attending specialized workshops offered by various institutions for specific topics. An important aspect of this training is its multi-disciplinary approach, encompassing science, engineering, and medicine. The students are required to build teams with expertise in these disciplines. Our experience shows that these students are well prepared for careers in academia, conducting cutting edge research, as well as industry, being involved in the transformation of research end-products to commercially viable technology.

  14. Cardiovascular applications of therapeutic ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Nazer, Babak; Gerstenfeld, Edward P; Hata, Akiko; Crum, Lawrence A; Matula, Thomas J

    2014-04-01

    Ultrasound (US) has gained widespread use in diagnostic cardiovascular applications. At amplitudes and frequencies typical of diagnostic use, its biomechanical effects on tissue are largely negligible. However, these parameters can be altered to harness US's thermal and non-thermal effects for therapeutic indications. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ECWT) are two therapeutic US modalities which have been investigated for treating cardiac arrhythmias and ischemic heart disease, respectively. Here, we review the biomechanical effects of HIFU and ECWT, their potential therapeutic mechanisms, and pre-clinical and clinical studies demonstrating their efficacy and safety limitations. Furthermore, we discuss other potential clinical applications of therapeutic US and areas in which future research is needed. PMID:24297498

  15. Role of scintigraphy in focally abnormal sonograms of fatty livers

    SciTech Connect

    Lisbona, R.; Mishkin, S.; Derbekyan, V.; Novales-Diaz, J.A.; Roy, A.; Sanders, L.

    1988-06-01

    Fatty infiltration of the liver may cause a range of focal abnormalities on hepatic sonography which may simulate hepatic nodular lesions. Discrete deposits of fat or islands of normal tissue which are uninvolved by fatty infiltration may stand out as potential space-occupying lesions on the sonograms. Twelve patients with such focally abnormal ultrasound images were referred for liver scintigraphy with /sup 133/Xe and /sup 99m/Tc colloidal SPECT studies to clarify the issue. These examinations helped identify, in nine of 12 patients, the innocent nature of the sonographic abnormalities which were simply related to the fat deposition process. Further, (/sup 99m/Tc)RBC scans defined the additional pathologic process in three patients in whom actual space-occupying lesions were indeed present in the liver. Scintigraphy has an important role to play in the understanding of focal hepatic ultrasound abnormalities particularly in unsuspected hepatic steatosis.

  16. Ultrasound Annual, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, R.C.; Hill, M.C.

    1984-01-01

    The 1984 edition of Ultrasound Annual explores new applications of ultrasound in speech and swallowing and offers guidelines on the use of ultrasound and nuclear medicine in thyroid and biliary tract disease. Other areas covered include Doppler sonography of the abdomen, intraoperative abdominal ultrasound, sonography of the placenta, ultrasound of the neonatal head and abdomen, and sonographic echo patterns created by fat.

  17. First-Trimester Detection of Surface Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Rousian, Melek; Koning, Anton H. J.; Bonsel, Gouke J.; Eggink, Alex J.; Cornette, Jérôme M. J.; Schoonderwaldt, Ernst M.; Husen-Ebbinge, Margreet; Teunissen, Katinka K.; van der Spek, Peter J.; Steegers, Eric A. P.; Exalto, Niek

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to determine the diagnostic performance of 3-dimensional virtual reality ultrasound (3D_VR_US) and conventional 2- and 3-dimensional ultrasound (2D/3D_US) for first-trimester detection of structural abnormalities. Forty-eight first trimester cases (gold standard available, 22 normal, 26 abnormal) were evaluated offline using both techniques by 5 experienced, blinded sonographers. In each case, we analyzed whether each organ category was correctly indicated as normal or abnormal and whether the specific diagnosis was correctly made. Sensitivity in terms of normal or abnormal was comparable for both techniques (P = .24). The general sensitivity for specific diagnoses was 62.6% using 3D_VR_US and 52.2% using 2D/3D_US (P = .075). The 3D_VR_US more often correctly diagnosed skeleton/limb malformations (36.7% vs 10%; P = .013). Mean evaluation time in 3D_VR_US was 4:24 minutes and in 2D/3D_US 2:53 minutes (P < .001). General diagnostic performance of 3D_VR_US and 2D/3D_US apparently is comparable. Malformations of skeleton and limbs are more often detected using 3D_VR_US. Evaluation time is longer in 3D_VR_US. PMID:24440996

  18. Calibration and Evaluation of Ultrasound Thermography Using Infrared Imaging.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Yi-Sing; Deng, Cheri X

    2016-02-01

    Real-time monitoring of the spatiotemporal evolution of tissue temperature is important to ensure safe and effective treatment in thermal therapies including hyperthermia and thermal ablation. Ultrasound thermography has been proposed as a non-invasive technique for temperature measurement, and accurate calibration of the temperature-dependent ultrasound signal changes against temperature is required. Here we report a method that uses infrared thermography for calibration and validation of ultrasound thermography. Using phantoms and cardiac tissue specimens subjected to high-intensity focused ultrasound heating, we simultaneously acquired ultrasound and infrared imaging data from the same surface plane of a sample. The commonly used echo time shift-based method was chosen to compute ultrasound thermometry. We first correlated the ultrasound echo time shifts with infrared-measured temperatures for material-dependent calibration and found that the calibration coefficient was positive for fat-mimicking phantom (1.49 ± 0.27) but negative for tissue-mimicking phantom (-0.59 ± 0.08) and cardiac tissue (-0.69 ± 0.18°C-mm/ns). We then obtained the estimation error of the ultrasound thermometry by comparing against the infrared-measured temperature and revealed that the error increased with decreased size of the heated region. Consistent with previous findings, the echo time shifts were no longer linearly dependent on temperature beyond 45°C-50°C in cardiac tissues. Unlike previous studies in which thermocouples or water bath techniques were used to evaluate the performance of ultrasound thermography, our results indicate that high-resolution infrared thermography is a useful tool that can be applied to evaluate and understand the limitations of ultrasound thermography methods. PMID:26547634

  19. Drosophila Models of Cardiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, Nicole; Wessells, R.J.

    2013-01-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has emerged as a useful model for cardiac diseases, both developmental abnormalities and adult functional impairment. Using the tools of both classical and molecular genetics, the study of the developing fly heart has been instrumental in identifying the major signaling events of cardiac field formation, cardiomyocyte specification, and the formation of the functioning heart tube. The larval stage of fly cardiac development has become an important model system for testing isolated preparations of living hearts for the effects of biological and pharmacological compounds on cardiac activity. Meanwhile, the recent development of effective techniques to study adult cardiac performance in the fly has opened new uses for the Drosophila model system. The fly system is now being used to study long-term alterations in adult performance caused by factors such as diet, exercise, and normal aging. The fly is a unique and valuable system for the study of such complex, long-term interactions, as it is the only invertebrate genetic model system with a working heart developmentally homologous to the vertebrate heart. Thus, the fly model combines the advantages of invertebrate genetics (such as large populations, facile molecular genetic techniques, and short lifespan) with physiological measurement techniques that allow meaningful comparisons with data from vertebrate model systems. As such, the fly model is well situated to make important contributions to the understanding of complicated interactions between environmental factors and genetics in the long-term regulation of cardiac performance. PMID:21377627

  20. Cardiac Catheterization

    MedlinePLUS

    ... done during a cardiac catheterization include: closing small holes inside the heart repairing leaky or narrow heart ... bandage. It's normal for the site to be black and blue, red, or slightly swollen for a ...

  1. Temperature estimation with ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Matthew

    Hepatocelluar carcinoma is the fastest growing type of cancer in the United States. In addition, the survival rate after one year is approximately zero without treatment. In many instances, patients with hepatocelluar carcinoma may not be suitable candidates for the primary treatment options, i.e. surgical resection or liver transplantation. This has led to the development of minimally invasive therapies focused on destroying hepatocelluar by thermal or chemical methods. The focus of this dissertation is on the development of ultrasound-based image-guided monitoring options for minimally invasive therapies such as radiofrequency ablation. Ultrasound-based temperature imaging relies on relating the gradient of locally estimated tissue displacements to a temperature change. First, a realistic Finite Element Analysis/ultrasound simulation of ablation was developed. This allowed evaluation of the ability of ultrasound-based temperature estimation algorithms to track temperatures for three different ablation scenarios in the liver. It was found that 2-Dimensional block matching and a 6 second time step was able to accurately track the temperature over a 12 minute ablation procedure. Next, a tissue-mimicking phantom was constructed to determine the accuracy of the temperature estimation method by comparing estimated temperatures to that measured using invasive fiber-optic temperature probes. The 2-Dimensional block matching was able to track the temperature accurately over the entire 8 minute heating procedure in the tissue-mimicking phantom. Finally, two separate in-vivo experiments were performed. The first experiment examined the ability of our algorithm to track frame-to-frame displacements when external motion due to respiration and the cardiac cycle were considered. It was determined that a frame rate between 13 frames per second and 33 frames per second was sufficient to track frame-to-frame displacements between respiratory cycles. The second experiment examined the ability of a novel dynamic frame selection based temperature algorithm to track temperatures during ablation of porcine kidney tissue. Here a novel multi-level 2-Dimensional cross-correlation algorithm was required to accurately track the temperature over an 8 minute ablation procedure.

  2. Standards of the Polish Ultrasound Society – update. Ultrasound examination of thyroid gland and ultrasound-guided thyroid biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Dobruch-Sobczak, Katarzyna; Jakubowski, Wies?aw; J?drzejowski, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasonography is a primary imaging technique in patients with suspected thyroid disease. It allows to assess the location, size and echostructures of the thyroid gland as well as detect focal lesions, along with indication of their size, echogenicity, echostructure and vascularity. Based on these features, ultrasound examination allows to predict abnormal focal lesions for biopsy and monitor the biopsy needle track. This paper presents the standards of thyroid ultrasound examination regarding ultrasound apparatus technical requirements, scanning techniques, readings, measurements, and the description of the examination. It discusses the ultrasound features of increased malignancy risk in focal lesions (nodules) found in the thyroid gland. It presents indications for fine needle aspiration biopsy of the thyroid gland for the visibility of single nodules (focal lesions) and numerous lesions as well as discusses contraindications for thyroid biopsy. It describes the biopsy technique, possible complications and rules for post-biopsy monitoring of benign lesions. The paper is an update of the Standards of the Polish Ultrasound Society issued in 2011. It has been prepared on the basis of current literature, taking into account the information contained in the following publications: Thyroid ultrasound examination and Recommendations of the Polish Ultrasound Society for the performance of the FNAB of the thyroid.

  3. [Ultrasound elastography].

    PubMed

    Goertz, R S

    2015-11-01

    Noninvasive, ultrasound-based methods for visualizing and measuring tissue elasticity are becoming more and more common in routine practice. Using hepatic shear wave elastography, cut-off levels can help to detect the degree of relevant fibrosis (F ? 2) with a diagnostic accuracy using the area under the reader operating characteristic (AUROC) of 87?% and cirrhosis (F = 4, AUROC 93?%). Normal values virtually exclude liver cirrhosis (negative predictive value up to 97?%) and high shear wave velocities predict complications in the course of primary sclerosing cholangitis, liver cirrhosis and chronic hepatitis B or C. Elastography is of no relevant help in the differentiation of the dignity of hepatic lesions. Concerning thyroid or breast lesions, low shear wave velocities are indicative of benign lesions and in contrast, high velocities of malignant lesions. A differentiation between benign and malignant thyroid nodules is performed by elastography with a sensitivity of 89?% and a specificity of 82?%. In breast lesions a differentiation of nodes can be improved with elastography compared to B-mode ultrasound alone with a sensitivity of 97?% and a specificity of 83?%. Invasive biopsy punctures can therefore be specifically performed or can be omitted. Due to several influencing factors, in particular during liver elastography, the measurements need to be interpreted in the clinical context. In summary, ultrasound-based elastography provides helpful information for the detection of hepatic fibrosis and for further characterization of thyroid or breast lesions in addition to classical techniques, such as B-mode imaging and color Doppler. PMID:26438090

  4. Eye and orbit ultrasound

    MedlinePLUS

    Echography - eye orbit; Ultrasound - eye orbit; Ocular ultrasonography; Orbital ultrasonography ... ophthalmology department of a hospital or clinic. Your eye is numbed with medicine (anesthetic drops). The ultrasound ...

  5. New technologies and therapies for cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Nazarian, S

    2010-12-01

    Catheter ablation of cardiac arrhythmia has evolved to an important treatment modality for patients with various cardiac rhythm abnormalities. Over the past three decades, the understanding of arrhythmia mechanisms and technology for catheter based diagnostic and ablation procedures have evolved rapidly. New technologies and therapies for treatment of cardiac arrhythmia include ablation catheters designed to destroy targeted tissue with improved precision and safety, robotic systems to guide accurate catheter movements, electrical mapping systems, and improved imaging to complement such systems. This review focuses on improved imaging modalities used in the modern electrophysiology laboratory. PMID:21135812

  6. Abnormal Head Position

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cause. Can a longstanding head turn lead to any permanent problems? Yes, a significant abnormal head posture could cause permanent ... occipitocervical synostosis and unilateral hearing loss. Are there any ... postures? Yes. Abnormal head postures can usually be improved depending ...

  7. Hyperinsulinism in a child presenting with cardiac ischemia and bradycardia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Fayyadh, Majid; Bulbul, Ziad; Al Maneea, Waleed; Abbas, Bassam Bin

    2014-01-01

    A 5-year-old boy referred to our service with suspected sinus node dysfunction. In addition to the arrhythmia, he had moderate mitral valve regurgitation and depressed ventricular function during a hypoglycemic episode. Cardiac abnormalities resolved with glucose infusion. We believe that hypoglycemia was responsible for the cardiac manifestations and it should be considered in unexplained rhythm disturbances or ischemia. PMID:25544821

  8. Pearls and pitfalls of early obstetric ultrasound in the acute setting.

    PubMed

    DelProposto, Zachary; Rheinboldt, Matthew

    2015-10-01

    First trimester ultrasound is commonly performed to establish dates or evaluate early pregnancy complications. With improvement in ultrasound technology, visualization of fetal structures has improved. While the emergent evaluation does not typically focus on detailed fetal anatomic evaluation (since this is typically performed at 18-20 weeks), various fetal structural abnormalities can now be visualized, especially during the late first trimester and early second trimester. We present a pictorial review of potential pitfalls encountered in early obstetric ultrasound with an emphasis on fetal structural abnormalities as well as normal fetal anatomy that can be confused with developmental abnormalities. PMID:25757460

  9. Segmentation of the Left Heart Ventricle in Ultrasound Images Using a Region Based Snake

    E-print Network

    Lunds Universitet

    Segmentation of the Left Heart Ventricle in Ultrasound Images Using a Region Based Snake Matilda that uses a region based snake. To avoid any unwanted concavities in the segmentations due to the cardiac valve we use two anchor points in the snake that are located to the left and to the right of the cardiac

  10. [Ultrasound in emergency medicine].

    PubMed

    Lapostolle, F; Deltour, S; Petrovic, T

    2015-12-01

    Ultrasound has revolutionized the practice of emergency medicine, particularly in prehospital setting. About a patient with dyspnea, we present the role of ultrasound in the diagnosis and emergency treatment. Echocardiography, but also hemodynamic ultrasound (vena cava) and lung exam are valuable tools. Achieving lung ultrasound and diagnostic value of B lines B are detailed. PMID:26574136

  11. Ultrasound annual, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, R.C.; Hill, M.C.

    1986-01-01

    This book provides an analyses of developments in the field of diagnostic ultrasound. Endoscopic ultrasound and ultrasound-guided aspiration of ovarian follicles for in vitro fertilization are addressed. The use of Doppler ultrasound to measure blood flow in obstetrics is also examined.

  12. Ultrasound in Space Medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Sargsyan, A.E.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of ultrasound as a diagnostic tool in microgravity environments. The goals of research in ultrasound usage in space environments are: (1) Determine accuracy of ultrasound in novel clinical conditions. (2) Determine optimal training methodologies, (3) Determine microgravity associated changes and (4) Develop intuitive ultrasound catalog to enhance autonomous medical care. Also uses of Ultrasound technology in terrestrial applications are reviewed.

  13. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... prevent future heart problems and even death. Exercise training as part of cardiac rehab might not be safe for all patients. For example, if you have very high blood pressure or severe heart disease, you might not be ready for exercise. However, ...

  14. Cardiac Involvement in Hypereosinophilia Associated with Toxocariasis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun-Joon; You, Ga-In; Yang, Joung-Wook; Kim, Soo-Young; Kim, Hyun-Su; Cha, Tae-Joon

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac involvement in hypereosinophilia is rare; when present, it manifests as ventricular thickening, usually with fibrous tissue and mural thrombosis. We present a case of a 57-year-old man with an abnormal right ventricular apex with eosinophilia, which was caused by Toxocara canis infection. PMID:25580199

  15. Ultrasound mediated nanoparticle drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullin, Lee B.

    Ultrasound is not only a powerful diagnostic tool, but also a promising therapeutic technology that can be used to improve localized drug delivery. Microbubble contrast agents are micron sized encapsulated gas filled bubbles that are administered intravenously. Originally developed to enhance ultrasound images, microbubbles are highly echogenic due to the gas core that provides a detectable impedance difference from the surrounding medium. The core also allows for controlled response of the microbubbles to ultrasound pulses. Microbubbles can be pushed using acoustic radiation force and ruptured using high pressures. Destruction of microbubbles can increase permeability at the cellular and vascular level, which can be advantageous for drug delivery. Advances in drug delivery methods have been seen with the introduction of nanoparticles, nanometer sized objects often carrying a drug payload. In chemotherapy, nanoparticles can deliver drugs to tumors while limiting systemic exposure due to abnormalities in tumor vasculature such large gaps between endothelial cells that allow nanoparticles to enter into the interstitial space; this is referred to as the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. However, this effect may be overestimated in many tumors. Additionally, only a small percentage of the injected dose accumulates in the tumor, which most the nanoparticles accumulating in the liver and spleen. It is hypothesized that combining the acoustic activity of an ultrasound contrast agent with the high payload and extravasation ability of a nanoparticle, localized delivery to the tumor with reduced systemic toxicity can be achieved. This method can be accomplished by either loading nanoparticles onto the shell of the microbubble or through a coadministration method of both nanoparticles and microbubbles. The work presented in this dissertation utilizes novel and commercial nanoparticle formulations, combined with microbubbles and a variety of ultrasound systems. Ultrasound parameters are optimized to achieve maximum cell internalization of molecules and increased nanoparticle delivery to a cell layer on a coverslip. In-vivo studies demonstrate the possibility of using a lower dose of paclitaxel to slow tumor growth rates, increase doxorubicin concentration in tumor tissue, and enhance tumor delivery of fluorescent molecules through treatments that combine nanoparticles with ultrasound and microbubbles.

  16. Using DNA Microarray to Identify Sp1 as a Transcriptional Regulatory Element of Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 in Cardiac Muscle Cells

    E-print Network

    Kibler, Dennis F.

    -like Growth Factor-1 in Cardiac Muscle Cells Tao Li1 , Yung-Hsiang Chen1,2 , Tsun-Jui Liu1,2 , Jia Jia1 during cardiac muscle growth, repair, and remodeling in normal and abnormal cardiac muscle. #12 important cardiac muscle functions (1,2). In theory, a growth factor such as IGF-1 activates a specific set

  17. Interventional ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Otto, R

    2002-02-01

    Modern cross-sectional imaging methods of computed tomography, sonography and lately MRI have contributed greatly to non-invasive studies of different parenchymal organs and permit the evaluation of pathological changes in different areas of the body. Although these techniques have reached a very high level of refinement, it is often not possible to define whether a focal lesion is benign or malignant. Ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNA) or core-needle biopsy (including high-speed- and vacuum-assisted techniques) are essential to find out the character of the disease in these cases. Experience of more than 10,000 interventions of different organs are presented. Technique, results, problems, as well as risks are discussed. Moreover, it is shown how the results of percutaneous biopsies often change the treatment of a patient. This is especially of interest in those suffering from lymphomas, pancreatic carcinomas, and breast cancers, as well as relapsing tumors. PMID:11870423

  18. Abnormal muscle mechanosignaling triggers cardiomyopathy in mice with Marfan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Jason R.; Carta, Luca; Bénard, Ludovic; Chemaly, Elie R.; Chiu, Emily; Rao, Satish K.; Hampton, Thomas G.; Yurchenco, Peter; Costa, Kevin D.; Hajjar, Roger J.; Ramirez, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS), a multisystem disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding the extracellular matrix (ECM) protein fibrillin 1, are unusually vulnerable to stress-induced cardiac dysfunction. The prevailing view is that MFS-associated cardiac dysfunction is the result of aortic and/or valvular disease. Here, we determined that dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in fibrillin 1–deficient mice is a primary manifestation resulting from ECM-induced abnormal mechanosignaling by cardiomyocytes. MFS mice displayed spontaneous emergence of an enlarged and dysfunctional heart, altered physical properties of myocardial tissue, and biochemical evidence of chronic mechanical stress, including increased angiotensin II type I receptor (AT1R) signaling and abated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activity. Partial fibrillin 1 gene inactivation in cardiomyocytes was sufficient to precipitate DCM in otherwise phenotypically normal mice. Consistent with abnormal mechanosignaling, normal cardiac size and function were restored in MFS mice treated with an AT1R antagonist and in MFS mice lacking AT1R or ?-arrestin 2, but not in MFS mice treated with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or lacking angiotensinogen. Conversely, DCM associated with abnormal AT1R and FAK signaling was the sole abnormality in mice that were haploinsufficient for both fibrillin 1 and ?1 integrin. Collectively, these findings implicate fibrillin 1 in the physiological adaptation of cardiac muscle to elevated workload. PMID:24531548

  19. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePLUS

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... The appearance of normal teeth varies, especially the molars. ... conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth ...

  20. Systematic training in focused cardiopulmonary ultrasound affects decision-making in the prehospital setting - two case reports.

    PubMed

    Jakobsen, Louise Kollander; Bøtker, Morten Thingemann; Lawrence, Lars Peter; Sloth, Erik; Knudsen, Lars

    2014-01-01

    We present two cases from the Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS) in Denmark, in which prehospital physicians trained in cardiac ultrasound (FATE) disclosed significant pathology that induced a radical change for the critical patient's course. PMID:24886932

  1. Echocardiographic assessment of cardiac involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    PubMed

    Shazzad, M N; Islam, M N; Ara, R; Ahmed, C M; Fatema, N; Azad, A K; Salimulla, S M; Haider, M S; Haq, S A

    2013-10-01

    This study was designed to assess cardiac abnormalities in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) by echocardiography. It was an analytic type of cross sectional study, conducted in lupus clinic, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU), Dhaka, Bangladesh from July 2008 to June 2009. Fifty lupus patients, diagnosed on the basis of ACR criteria, without cardiovascular symptoms, were enrolled in the study and were evaluated by standard echocardiography with color Doppler. SLEDAI was applied for assessment of disease activity. Out of 50 patients 80% had abnormal echocardiographic findings. Pericardial thickening was found in 38% patients, pericardial effusion 20%, diastolic dysfunction 72%, hypokinesia of ventricular wall 8%, overall valvular abnormalities 20%, commonest being aortic regurgitation (12%), followed by mitral regurgitation (8%), and 6% had pulmonary hypertension. Males (100%) were more vulnerable to cardiac involvement than females (68.2%) and later age of disease onset (31-40 years) was associated with higher (87.5%) chance of echo abnormalities. The differences, however, were not statistically significant (p>0.05). There was significant relationship between disease duration and cardiac abnormalities (p<0.01). Active disease (80.08%) was associated with higher frequency of cardiac involvement than disease in remission (62.50%) but the result was not statistically significant (p=0.151). Cardiac abnormalities are very common in lupus patients even when clinically asymptomatic from cardiac aspect. Echocardiography is an excellent non-invasive tool for cardiac evaluation. These observations emphasize a need for further assessment of early intervention to reduce subsequent cardiac morbidity and mortality among the lupus patients. PMID:24292305

  2. Monitoring cardiac function during idebenone therapy in Friedreich's ataxia.

    PubMed

    Giovanni, Di Salvo; Valeria, Pergola; Bahaa, Fadel; Majid, Al Fayyadh

    2015-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia (FA) is associated with progressive cardiac hypertrophy resulting from a genetic abnormality in the frataxin gene. Cardiac involvement is the most common cause of death (59%) in FA patients. Cardiac related death occurs at a significantly younger age than non-cardiac related death. Idebenone is a short-chain quinone analogue with a potent free-radical scavenger action. This drug has the potential to preserve and even improve mitochondrial function.Studies on Idebenone treatment showed rather conflicting results on FA cardiomyopathy. The present article reviews the clinical features of FA cardiomyopathy, imaging techniques used to diagnose, follow and monitor therapy which aimed to revert FA cardiomyopathy. PMID:25483949

  3. Breast ultrasound tomography with total-variation regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cuiping; Duric, Neb; Huang, Lianjie

    2009-02-01

    Breast ultrasound tomography is a rapidly developing imaging modality that that has the potential to impact breast cancer screening and diagnosis. A new ultrasound breast imaging device (CURE) with a ring array of transducers has been designed and built at Karmanos Cancer Institute, which acquires both reflection and transmission ultrasound signals. To extract the sound-speed information from the breast data acquired by CURE, we have developed an iterative sound-speed image reconstruction algorithm for breast ultrasound transmission tomography based on total-variation (TV) minimization. We investigate applicability of the TV tomography algorithm using in vivo ultrasound breast data from 61 patients, and compare the results with those obtained using the Tikhonov regularization method. We demonstrate that, compared to the Tikhonov regularization scheme, the TV regularization method significantly improves image quality, resulting in sound-speed tomography images with sharp (preserved) edges of abnormalities and few artifacts.

  4. Breast ultrasound tomography with total-variation regularization

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Lianjie; Li, Cuiping; Duric, Neb

    2009-01-01

    Breast ultrasound tomography is a rapidly developing imaging modality that has the potential to impact breast cancer screening and diagnosis. A new ultrasound breast imaging device (CURE) with a ring array of transducers has been designed and built at Karmanos Cancer Institute, which acquires both reflection and transmission ultrasound signals. To extract the sound-speed information from the breast data acquired by CURE, we have developed an iterative sound-speed image reconstruction algorithm for breast ultrasound transmission tomography based on total-variation (TV) minimization. We investigate applicability of the TV tomography algorithm using in vivo ultrasound breast data from 61 patients, and compare the results with those obtained using the Tikhonov regularization method. We demonstrate that, compared to the Tikhonov regularization scheme, the TV regularization method significantly improves image quality, resulting in sound-speed tomography images with sharp (preserved) edges of abnormalities and few artifacts.

  5. Cardiac lipoma

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Imtiaz; Al-Khafaji, Khalid; Mutyala, Monica; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Cotter, William; Hakim, Hosam; Khosla, Sandeep; Arora, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    Lipomas of the heart are encapsulated tumors that are composed primarily of mature fat cells. Cardiac lipomas can originate either from subendocardium (approximately 50%), subpericardium (25%), or from the myocardium (25%) and may be located more frequently in left ventricle or right atrium. We report a 74-year-old female who presented with dyspnea on exertion and was found to have 5×5 cm mass occupying most of the right atrium on a transesophageal echocardiogram. PMID:26486106

  6. Automated whole breast ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Stuart S

    2014-05-01

    Bilateral whole breast (screening) ultrasound has been well established in multiple single- and multi-institution published studies as a valuable adjunct to mammography screening for early detection of breast cancer. However, implementation of screening breast ultrasound programs has been limited and has met with resistance because of the number of potential false positives generated by ultrasound screening, and the lack of available personnel to perform the examination. Automated breast ultrasound, which has recently been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in whole-breast ultrasound screening, is a potential option for providing breast ultrasound screening on a widespread basis. PMID:24792655

  7. Ultrasound Annual, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, R.C.; Hill, M.C.

    1983-01-01

    The 1983 edition of Ultrasound Annual features a state-of-the-art assessment of real-time ultrasound technology and a look at improvements in real-time equipment. Chapters discuss important new obstetric applications of ultrasound in measuring fetal umbilical vein blood flow and monitoring ovarian follicular development in vivo and in vitro fertilization. Other topics covered include transrectal prostate ultrasound using a linear array system; ultrasound of the common bile duct; ultrasound in tropical diseases; prenatal diagnosis of craniospinal anomalies; scrotal ultrasonography; opthalmic ultrasonography; and sonography of the upper abdominal venous system.

  8. Cardiac optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Optogenetics is an emerging technology for optical interrogation and control of biological function with high specificity and high spatiotemporal resolution. Mammalian cells and tissues can be sensitized to respond to light by a relatively simple and well-tolerated genetic modification using microbial opsins (light-gated ion channels and pumps). These can achieve fast and specific excitatory or inhibitory response, offering distinct advantages over traditional pharmacological or electrical means of perturbation. Since the first demonstrations of utility in mammalian cells (neurons) in 2005, optogenetics has spurred immense research activity and has inspired numerous applications for dissection of neural circuitry and understanding of brain function in health and disease, applications ranging from in vitro to work in behaving animals. Only recently (since 2010), the field has extended to cardiac applications with less than a dozen publications to date. In consideration of the early phase of work on cardiac optogenetics and the impact of the technique in understanding another excitable tissue, the brain, this review is largely a perspective of possibilities in the heart. It covers the basic principles of operation of light-sensitive ion channels and pumps, the available tools and ongoing efforts in optimizing them, overview of neuroscience use, as well as cardiac-specific questions of implementation and ideas for best use of this emerging technology in the heart. PMID:23457014

  9. Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weisse, Allen B.

    2011-01-01

    Well into the first decades of the 20th century, medical opinion held that any surgical attempts to treat heart disease were not only misguided, but unethical. Despite such reservations, innovative surgeons showed that heart wounds could be successfully repaired. Then, extracardiac procedures were performed to correct patent ductus arteriosus, coarctation of the aorta, and tetralogy of Fallot. Direct surgery on the heart was accomplished with closed commissurotomy for mitral stenosis. The introduction of the heart-lung machine and cardiopulmonary bypass enabled the surgical treatment of other congenital and acquired heart diseases. Advances in aortic surgery paralleled these successes. The development of coronary artery bypass grafting greatly aided the treatment of coronary heart disease. Cardiac transplantation, attempts to use the total artificial heart, and the application of ventricular assist devices have brought us to the present day. Although progress in the field of cardiovascular surgery appears to have slowed when compared with the halcyon times of the past, substantial challenges still face cardiac surgeons. It can only be hoped that sufficient resources and incentive can carry the triumphs of the 20th century into the 21st. This review covers past developments and future opportunities in cardiac surgery. PMID:22163121

  10. Urine - abnormal color

    MedlinePLUS

    The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine may be cloudy, dark, or blood-colored. ... Abnormal urine color may be caused by infection, disease, medicines, or food you eat. Cloudy or milky urine is a sign ...

  11. Structurally abnormal human autosomes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 25, discusses structurally abnormal human autosomes. This discussion includes: structurally abnormal chromosomes, chromosomal polymorphisms, pericentric inversions, paracentric inversions, deletions or partial monosomies, cri du chat (cat cry) syndrome, ring chromosomes, insertions, duplication or pure partial trisomy and mosaicism. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  12. Myocardial perfusion abnormalities in asymptomatic patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    Hosenpud, J.D.; Montanaro, A.; Hart, M.V.; Haines, J.E.; Specht, H.D.; Bennett, R.M.; Kloster, F.E.

    1984-08-01

    Accelerated coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction in young patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is well documented; however, the prevalence of coronary involvement is unknown. Accordingly, 26 patients with systemic lupus were selected irrespective of previous cardiac history to undergo exercise thallium-201 cardiac scintigraphy. Segmental perfusion abnormalities were present in 10 of the 26 studies (38.5 percent). Five patients had reversible defects suggesting ischemia, four patients had persistent defects consistent with scar, and one patient had both reversible and persistent defects in two areas. There was no correlation between positive thallium results and duration of disease, amount of corticosteroid treatment, major organ system involvement or age. Only a history of pericarditis appeared to be associated with positive thallium-201 results (p less than 0.05). It is concluded that segmental myocardial perfusion abnormalities are common in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Whether this reflects large-vessel coronary disease or small-vessel abnormalities remains to be determined.

  13. Three Dimension Filamentous Human Cardiac Tissue Model

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhen; Koo, Sangmo; Finnegan, Micaela A.; Loskill, Peter; Huebsch, Nathaniel; Marks, Natalie C.; Conklin, Bruce R.; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Healy, Kevin E.

    2013-01-01

    A human in vitro cardiac tissue model would be a significant advancement for understanding, studying, and developing new strategies for treating cardiac arrhythmias and related cardiovascular diseases. We developed an in vitro model of three-dimensional (3D) human cardiac tissue by populating synthetic filamentous matrices with cardiomyocytes derived from healthy wild-type volunteer (WT) and patient-specific long QT syndrome type 3 (LQT3) induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS-CMs) to mimic the condensed and aligned human ventricular myocardium. Using such a highly controllable cardiac model, we studied the contractility malfunctions associated with the electrophysiological consequences of LQT3 and their response to a panel of drugs. By varying the stiffness of filamentous matrices, LQT3 iPS-CMs exhibited different level of contractility abnormality and susceptibility to drug-induced cardiotoxicity. PMID:24268663

  14. Smart Ultrasound Remote Guidance Experiment (SURGE) Preliminary Findings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurst, Victor; Dulchavsky, Scott; Garcia, Kathleen; Sargsyan, Ashot; Ebert, Doug

    2009-01-01

    To date, diagnostic quality ultrasound images were obtained aboard the International Space Station (ISS) using the ultrasound of the Human Research Facility (HRF) rack in the Laboratory module. Through the Advanced Diagnostic Ultrasound in Microgravity (ADUM) and the Braslet-M Occlusion Cuffs (BRASLET SDTO) studies, non-expert ultrasound operators aboard the ISS have performed cardiac, thoracic, abdominal, vascular, ocular, and musculoskeletal ultrasound assessments using remote guidance from ground-based ultrasound experts. With exploration class missions to the lunar and Martian surfaces on the horizon, crew medical officers will necessarily need to operate with greater autonomy given communication delays (round trip times of up to 5 seconds for the Moon and 90 minutes for Mars) and longer periods of communication blackouts (due to orbital constraints of communication assets). The SURGE project explored the feasibility and training requirements of having non-expert ultrasound operators perform autonomous ultrasound assessments in a simulated exploration mission outpost. The project aimed to identify experience, training, and human factors requirements for crew medical officers to perform autonomous ultrasonography. All of these aims pertained to the following risks from the NASA Bioastronautics Road Map: 1) Risk 18: Major Illness and Trauna; 2) Risk 20) Ambulatory Care; 3) Risk 22: Medical Informatics, Technologies, and Support Systems; and 4) Risk 23: Medical Skill Training and Maintenance.

  15. Medical Ultrasound Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Explains the basic principles of ultrasound using everyday physics. Topics include the generation of ultrasound, basic interactions with material, and the measurement of blood flow using the Doppler effect. (Author/MM)

  16. Guide to the ultrasound examination of the abdomen

    SciTech Connect

    Skolnick, M.L.

    1986-01-01

    This book is written to assist the operator when performing an organized and directed ultrasound examination. It provides, in outline form, a sequential approach to the scanning of abdominal organs and regions by; indicating the structures within the organ or region that should be scanned; suggesting other regions for examination if abnormalities within the initially imaged structures are detected and; suggesting differential diagnostic possibilities when abnormalities are seen.

  17. Transthoracic Cardiac Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradway, David Pierson

    This dissertation investigates the feasibility of a real-time transthoracic Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging system to measure myocardial function non-invasively in clinical setting. Heart failure is an important cardiovascular disease and contributes to the leading cause of death for developed countries. Patients exhibiting heart failure with a low left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) can often be identified by clinicians, but patients with preserved LVEF might be undetected if they do not exhibit other signs and symptoms of heart failure. These cases motivate development of transthoracic ARFI imaging to aid the early diagnosis of the structural and functional heart abnormalities leading to heart failure. M-Mode ARFI imaging utilizes ultrasonic radiation force to displace tissue several micrometers in the direction of wave propagation. Conventional ultrasound tracks the response of the tissue to the force. This measurement is repeated rapidly at a location through the cardiac cycle, measuring timing and relative changes in myocardial stiffness. ARFI imaging was previously shown capable of measuring myocardial properties and function via invasive open-chest and intracardiac approaches. The prototype imaging system described in this dissertation is capable of rapid acquisition, processing, and display of ARFI images and shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) movies. Also presented is a rigorous safety analysis, including finite element method (FEM) simulations of tissue heating, hydrophone intensity and mechanical index (MI) measurements, and thermocouple transducer face heating measurements. For the pulse sequences used in later animal and clinical studies, results from the safety analysis indicates that transthoracic ARFI imaging can be safely applied at rates and levels realizable on the prototype ARFI imaging system. Preliminary data are presented from in vivo trials studying changes in myocardial stiffness occurring under normal and abnormal heart function. Presented is the first use of transthoracic ARFI imaging in a serial study of heart failure in a porcine model. Results demonstrate the ability of transthoracic ARFI to image cyclically-varying stiffness changes in healthy and infarcted myocardium under good B-mode imaging conditions at depths in the range of 3-5 cm. Challenging imaging scenarios such as deep regions of interest, vigorous lateral motion and stable, reverberant clutter are analyzed and discussed. Results are then presented from the first study of clinical feasibility of transthoracic cardiac ARFI imaging. At the Duke University Medical Center, healthy volunteers and patients having magnetic resonance imaging-confirmed apical infarcts were enrolled for the study. The number of patients who met the inclusion criteria in this preliminary clinical trial was low, but results showed that the limitations seen in animal studies were not overcome by allowing transmit power levels to exceed the FDA mechanical index (MI) limit. The results suggested the primary source of image degradation was clutter rather than lack of radiation force. Additionally, the transthoracic method applied in its present form was not shown capable of tracking propagating ARFI-induced shear waves in the myocardium. Under current instrumentation and processing methods, results of these studies support feasibility for transthoracic ARFI in high-quality B-Mode imaging conditions. Transthoracic ARFI was not shown sensitive to infarct or to tracking heart failure in the presence of clutter and signal decorrelation. This work does provide evidence that transthoracic ARFI imaging is a safe non-invasive tool, but clinical efficacy as a diagnostic tool will need to be addressed by further development to overcome current challenges and increase robustness to sources of image degradation.

  18. Echocardiographic assessment of cardiac disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popp, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    The physical principles and current applications of echocardiography in assessment of heart diseases are reviewed. Technical considerations and unresolved points relative to the use of echocardiography in various disease states are stressed. The discussion covers normal mitral valve motion, mitral stenosis, aortic regurgitation, atrial masses, mitral valve prolapse, and idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis. Other topics concern tricuspic valve abnormalities, aortic valve disease, pulmonic valve, pericardial effusion, intraventricular septal motion, and left ventricular function. The application of echocardiography to congenital heart disease diagnosis is discussed along with promising ultrasonic imaging systems. The utility of echocardiography in quantitative evaluation of cardiac disease is demonstrated.

  19. Cardiac evaluation of the newborn.

    PubMed

    Fillipps, Donald J; Bucciarelli, Richard L

    2015-04-01

    The physical examination of the term newborn's cardiovascular system is reviewed detailing the normal and abnormal variants that can be found within the first few days after birth. The authors discuss the pathophysiologic changes that occur in the presence of congenital heart disease and how these changes affect the clinical presentation. The major common cardiac defects are described and discussed. Pulse oximetry screening is reviewed in detail indicating its value in the early detection of most cases of critical congenital heart disease. Finally, the reader is given several suggestions on diagnosis, stabilization, and when to refer to specialists. PMID:25836709

  20. [Cardiac involvement in systemic autoimmune disease].

    PubMed

    Dropi?ski, Jerzy; Szczeklik, Wojciech; Rubi?, Pawe?

    2003-04-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases form a diverse group which includes: systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD), scleroderma, dermato-polymyositis, Wegener's granulomatosis, Sjögren syndrome. Although multisystem involvement is the hallmark of these diseases, the heart seems to be less affected than other organ systems. The aim of the study was to study possible cardiac abnormalities in patients with documented systemic autoimmune diseases and to assess whether there was any relation between antiphospholipid, anti-dsDNA antibodies and myocardial dysfunction findings. 76 patients (53 with SLE, 9 with MCTD, 8 with scleroderma, 6 with Wegener's granulomatosis) were subjected to our study, 69% of these patients manifested cardiac involvement, based on two-dimentional echocardiografic examination (36%--post-inflammatory valvular thickening, 20%--pericardial effusions, 15%--valvular regurgitation, 7%--left atrial enlargement, 5%--left ventricular hypertrophy, 4%--left ventricular dysfunction). None of the patients showed characteristic, acute Libman-Sacks endocarditis, which probably can be explained by chronic corticosteroid-treatment. Clinical evidence of cardiac abnormalities has been observed, in as many as 58% of cases with positive echocardiographic findings. The frequency and extend of cardiac pathology positively correlated with the detection of antiphospholipid antibodies. No such relationship was observed in patients with the presence of very high titers of antinuclear antibodies (anti-dsDNA). In conclusion, our results indicate that echocardiography is a useful method for assessment and monitoring cardiac involvement in the systemic autoimmune diseases. PMID:12931489

  1. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  2. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    MedlinePLUS

    ... as cancer of the uterus, cervix, or vagina • Polycystic ovary syndrome How is abnormal bleeding diagnosed? Your health care ... before the fetus can survive outside the uterus. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A condition characterized by two of the following ...

  3. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    MedlinePLUS

    ... other than your normal monthly period. Having extremely heavy bleeding during your period can also be considered abnormal uterine bleeding. Very heavy bleeding during a period and/or bleeding that ...

  4. Ultrasound in medical diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Shia

    Diagnostic ultrasonography uses high frequency sound waves of frequencies from 2-15 mHz. These are propagated in pulses into the tissues by a transducer in contact with the body surface. The pattern of their reflection is detected by the same transducer and can be used to construct a sectional image of the tissues and organs under the body surface. Distortions of anatomical contours and altered patterns of tissue reflectivity make it possible for a physician, using ultrasonography, to make inferences about the location of disease and sometimes to identify a particular disease process. Indeed the quantitation of tissue impedance is being examined as a potential method of characterizing tissues and making subtle distinctions between normal and diseased organs. Equally the use of ultrasonographically guided biopsy needles makes it possible to avoid exploratory surgery in some patients. Real-time ultrasonography also allows for the visualization of moving structures such as cardiac valves while the Doppler principle can be applied to the ultrasonographic study of blood flow in vessels. Because diagnostic ultrasonography does not use ionizing radiation, the lack of hazard involved means that the technique lends itself particularly well to monitoring the development of human fetuses and the detection of anatomical abnormalities complicating pregnancy.

  5. 3D in vivo imaging of rat hearts by high frequency ultrasound and its application in myofiber orientation wrapping

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xulei; Wang, Silun; Shen, Ming; Zhang, Xiaodong; Lerakis, Stamatios; Wagner, Mary B.; Fei, Baowei

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac ultrasound plays an important role in the imaging of hearts in basic cardiovascular research and clinical examinations. 3D ultrasound imaging can provide the geometry or motion information of the heart. Especially, the wrapping of cardiac fiber orientations to the ultrasound volume could supply useful information on the stress distributions and electric action spreading. However, how to acquire 3D ultrasound volumes of the heart of small animals in vivo for cardiac fiber wrapping is still a challenging problem. In this study, we provide an approach to acquire 3D ultrasound volumes of the rat hearts in vivo. The comparison between both in vivo and ex vivo geometries indicated 90.1% Dice similarity. In this preliminary study, the evaluations of the cardiac fiber orientation wrapping errors were 24.7° for the acute angle error and were 22.4° for the inclination angle error. This 3D ultrasound imaging and fiber orientation estimation technique have potential applications in cardiac imaging. PMID:26412926

  6. Cardiac Syndrome X – Update 2014

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Shilpa; Mehta, Puja K.; Merz, C. Noel Bairey

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cardiac Syndrome X (CSX), a condition characterized by angina-like chest discomfort, ST segment depression during exercise, and normal coronary epicardial arteries at angiography, has the highest prevalence in post-menopausal women. Historically CSX was considered to be a benign condition but recent reports have shown that individuals with CSX have a higher prevalence of adverse cardiovascular events compared to control subjects and a poor quality of life. Diagnosis of CSX is often difficult and expensive because the diagnosis is primarily one of exclusion. Furthermore, treatment of CSX is challenging because the underlying pathogenesis of the condition is not well understood. The two most popular theories of pathogenesis are coronary microvascular dysfunction, in which symptoms are thought to result from myocardial ischemia secondary to abnormal coronary microvasculature function, and abnormal cardiac pain sensitivity, in which symptoms are thought to be a result of myocardial hypersensitivity and exaggerated pain perception. Treatment options include traditional anti-ischemic medications such as nitrates, beta-blockers, and calcium channel antagonists. Furthermore, other anti-ischemic medications such as ranolazine, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and statins can be used. Analgesic medications such as xanthine derivatives and tricyclic antidepressants have also shown efficacy. Non-pharmacological treatments include cognitive behavioral therapy, enhanced external counterpulsation, neurostimulation, stellate ganglionectomy, and lifestyle modifications. Studies have shown the efficacy of individual treatments but guidelines outlining the best course of therapy are lacking. PMID:25091971

  7. Models of Abnormal Scarring

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Bommie F.; Lee, Jun Yong; Jung, Sung-No

    2013-01-01

    Keloids and hypertrophic scars are thick, raised dermal scars, caused by derailing of the normal scarring process. Extensive research on such abnormal scarring has been done; however, these being refractory disorders specific to humans, it has been difficult to establish a universal animal model. A wide variety of animal models have been used. These include the athymic mouse, rats, rabbits, and pigs. Although these models have provided valuable insight into abnormal scarring, there is currently still no ideal model. This paper reviews the models that have been developed. PMID:24078916

  8. Robust temporal alignment of multimodal cardiac sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perissinotto, Andrea; Queirós, Sandro; Morais, Pedro; Baptista, Maria J.; Monaghan, Mark; Rodrigues, Nuno F.; D'hooge, Jan; Vilaça, João. L.; Barbosa, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Given the dynamic nature of cardiac function, correct temporal alignment of pre-operative models and intraoperative images is crucial for augmented reality in cardiac image-guided interventions. As such, the current study focuses on the development of an image-based strategy for temporal alignment of multimodal cardiac imaging sequences, such as cine Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) or 3D Ultrasound (US). First, we derive a robust, modality-independent signal from the image sequences, estimated by computing the normalized cross-correlation between each frame in the temporal sequence and the end-diastolic frame. This signal is a resembler for the left-ventricle (LV) volume curve over time, whose variation indicates different temporal landmarks of the cardiac cycle. We then perform the temporal alignment of these surrogate signals derived from MRI and US sequences of the same patient through Dynamic Time Warping (DTW), allowing to synchronize both sequences. The proposed framework was evaluated in 98 patients, which have undergone both 3D+t MRI and US scans. The end-systolic frame could be accurately estimated as the minimum of the image-derived surrogate signal, presenting a relative error of 1.6 +/- 1.9% and 4.0 +/- 4.2% for the MRI and US sequences, respectively, thus supporting its association with key temporal instants of the cardiac cycle. The use of DTW reduces the desynchronization of the cardiac events in MRI and US sequences, allowing to temporally align multimodal cardiac imaging sequences. Overall, a generic, fast and accurate method for temporal synchronization of MRI and US sequences of the same patient was introduced. This approach could be straightforwardly used for the correct temporal alignment of pre-operative MRI information and intra-operative US images.

  9. Inherited arrhythmias: The cardiac channelopathies.

    PubMed

    Behere, Shashank P; Weindling, Steven N

    2015-01-01

    Ion channels in the myocardial cellular membrane are responsible for allowing the cardiac action potential. Genetic abnormalities in these channels can predispose to life-threatening arrhythmias. We discuss the basic science of the cardiac action potential; outline the different clinical entities, including information regarding overlapping diagnoses, touching upon relevant genetics, new innovations in screening, diagnosis, risk stratification, and management. The special considerations of sudden unexplained death and sudden infant death syndrome are discussed. Scientists and clinicians continue to reconcile the rapidly growing body of knowledge regarding the molecular mechanisms and genetics while continuing to improve our understanding of the various clinical entities and their diagnosis and management in clinical setting. Two separate searches were run on the National Center for Biotechnology Information's website. The first using the term cardiac channelopathies was run on the PubMed database using filters for time (published in past 5 years) and age (birth-18 years), yielding 47 results. The second search using the medical subject headings (MeSH) database with the search terms "Long QT Syndrome" (MeSH) and "Short QT Syndrome" (MeSH) and "Brugada Syndrome" (MeSH) and "Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia" (MeSH), applying the same filters yielded 467 results. The abstracts of these articles were studied, and the articles were categorized and organized. Articles of relevance were read in full. As and where applicable, relevant references and citations from the primary articles where further explored and read in full. PMID:26556967

  10. CARDIAC MUSCLE

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Joachim R.; Johnson, Edward A.

    1968-01-01

    With light and electron microscopy a comparison has been made of the morphology of ventricular (V) and Purkinje (P) fibers of the hearts of guinea pig, rabbit, cat, dog, goat, and sheep. The criteria, previously established for the rabbit heart, that V fibers are distinguished from P fibers by the respective presence and absence of transverse tubules is shown to be true for all animals studied. No evidence was found of a permanent connection between the sarcoplasmic reticulum and the extracellular space. The sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of V fibers formed couplings with the sarcolemma of a transverse tubule (interior coupling) and with the peripheral sarcolemma (peripheral coupling), whereas in P fibers the SR formed only peripheral couplings. The forms of the couplings were identical. The significance, with respect to excitation-contraction coupling, of the difference in the form of the couplings in cardiac versus skeletal muscle is discussed together with the electrophysiological implications of the differing geometries of bundles of P fibers from different animals. PMID:5645545

  11. Ultrasound skin tightening.

    PubMed

    Minkis, Kira; Alam, Murad

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound skin tightening is a noninvasive, nonablative method that allows for energy deposition into the deep dermal and subcutaneous tissue while avoiding epidermal heating. Ultrasound coagulation is confined to arrays of 1-mm(3) zones that include the superficial musculoaponeurotic system and connective tissue. This technology gained approval from the Food and Drug Administration as the first energy-based skin "lifting" device, specifically for lifting lax tissue on the neck, submentum, and eyebrows. Ultrasound has the unique advantage of direct visualization of treated structures during treatment. Ultrasound is a safe and efficacious treatment for mild skin tightening and lifting. PMID:24267423

  12. Relation of coronary hypersensitivity to serotonin in cardiac transplant recipients to vessel wall morphology and effect of vitamin C.

    PubMed

    Berkenboom, Guy; Preumont, Nicolas; Pradier, Olivier; Goldman, Michel; Carpentier, Yvon; Vachiery, Jean-Luc; Antoine, Martine

    2006-02-15

    Coronary hypersensitivity to serotonin promotes platelet aggregation, entailing the progression of the atherosclerotic process. This abnormality is a common finding in cardiac transplant recipients and may be triggered by reactive oxygen species, which plays a main role in the inflammatory process. Hence, this study aimed to determine the influence of intimal hyperplasia on this abnormality and its reversibility after acute supplementation with the superoxide anion scavenger vitamin C. Therefore, intracoronary injections of serotonin (3 microg), bradykinin (600 ng), and nitroglycerin (isosorbide dinitrate 200 microg) were administered to 21 cardiac transplant recipients (1 year after transplantation) with normal coronary angiographic results; the serotonin injections were repeated after intracoronary vitamin C supplementation (40 mg/min for 14 minutes). In the segments in which serotonin effects were the most pronounced, the diameter changes were measured by quantitative angiography, and vessel wall morphology was studied by intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). The IVUS examination revealed moderate to severe intimal thickening (total area - luminal area/total area) in 9 patients (group 1) of 25 +/- 2%, compatible with the early stage of graft vasculopathy. In this group, hypersensitivity to serotonin remained unchanged after intracoronary vitamin C supplementation, from -21 +/- 3% (percentage from baseline) to -25 +/- 3%, whereas in the other 12 patients with mild intimal thickening (9 +/- 1%; group 2), hypersensitivity to serotonin was attenuated from -20 +/- 5% to -4 +/- 6% (p <0.01). In contrast, the responses to bradykinin and isosorbide dinitrate were similar in the 2 groups. In group 1, plasma levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-6 and -8) were significantly enhanced. For all the patients studied, the effect of vitamin C on the response to serotonin was significantly correlated with the intimal thickening. In conclusion, at 1 year after transplantation, morphologic changes compatible with the early stage of the graft vasculopathy are accompanied by hypersensitivity to serotonin unresponsive to vitamin C, despite a relatively preserved endothelial function (unaltered response to bradykinin). PMID:16461057

  13. An open access thyroid ultrasound image database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedraza, Lina; Vargas, Carlos; Narváez, Fabián.; Durán, Oscar; Muñoz, Emma; Romero, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Computer aided diagnosis systems (CAD) have been developed to assist radiologists in the detection and diagnosis of abnormalities and a large number of pattern recognition techniques have been proposed to obtain a second opinion. Most of these strategies have been evaluated using different datasets making their performance incomparable. In this work, an open access database of thyroid ultrasound images is presented. The dataset consists of a set of B-mode Ultrasound images, including a complete annotation and diagnostic description of suspicious thyroid lesions by expert radiologists. Several types of lesions as thyroiditis, cystic nodules, adenomas and thyroid cancers were included while an accurate lesion delineation is provided in XML format. The diagnostic description of malignant lesions was confirmed by biopsy. The proposed new database is expected to be a resource for the community to assess different CAD systems.

  14. [Cardiac involvement in Churg-Strauss syndrome].

    PubMed

    Brucato, Antonio; Maestroni, Silvia; Masciocco, Gabriella; Ammirati, Enrico; Bonacina, Edgardo; Pedrotti, Patrizia

    2015-09-01

    Churg-Strauss syndrome, recently renamed eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA), is a rare form of systemic vasculitis, characterized by disseminated necrotizing vasculitis with extravascular granulomas occurring among patients with asthma and tissue eosinophilia. EGPA is classified as a small and medium-sized vessel vasculitis associated with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) and the hypereosinophilic syndrome. Typical clinical features include asthma, sinusitis, transient pulmonary infiltrates and neuropathy. Blood eosinophils are often >1500/µl or more than 10% on the differential leukocyte count. Blood eosinophils should always be tested in unexplained cardiac disorders, and may normalize even after low doses of corticosteroids. ANCA are positive in 40-60% of cases, mainly anti-myeloperoxidase. Heart involvement occurs in approximately 15-60% of EGPA patients, especially those who are ANCA negative. Any cardiac structure can be involved, and patients present with myocarditis, heart failure, pericarditis, arrhythmia, coronary arteritis, valvulopathy, intracavitary cardiac thrombosis. Although cardiovascular involvement is usually an early manifestation, it can also occur later in the course of the disease. A significant proportion of patients with cardiac involvement is asymptomatic. In the absence of symptoms and major ECG abnormalities, cardiac involvement may be detected in nearly 40% of the patients. All patients with EGPA should be studied not only with a detailed history of cardiac symptoms and ECG, but also with echocardiography; if abnormalities are detected, a cardiac magnetic resonance study should be performed. Coronary angiography and endomyocardial biopsy should be reserved to selected cases. Heart involvement carries a poor prognosis and causes 50% of the deaths of these patients. It is often insidious and underestimated. Optimal therapy is therefore important and based on high-dose corticosteroids plus immunosuppressive agents, particularly cyclophosphamide in case of myocardial inflammation. Thus, early diagnosis of cardiac involvement and subsequent therapy may prevent progression of cardiac disease. At present, the role of troponin and brain natriuretic peptide in monitoring and therapy remains unclear. Orthotopic heart transplantation is feasible in case of severe disease, even if the experience is limited in -EGPA, and optimal post-transplantation immunosuppressive strategy has yet to be defined. PMID:26418389

  15. Cardiac and Vascular Responses to Thigh Cuffs and Respiratory Maneuvers on Crewmembers of the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Douglas; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Garcia, Kathleen; Ebert, Douglas; Whitson, Peggy A.; Feiveson, Alan; Alferova, Irina V.; Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Matveev, Vladimir P.; Bogomolov, Valery V.; Duncan, J. Michael

    2011-01-01

    The transition to microgravity eliminates the hydrostatic gradients in the vascular system. The resulting fluid redistribution commonly manifests as facial edema, engorgement of the external neck veins, and a decrease in leg diameter. This experiment examined the responses to modified Valsalva and Mueller maneuvers measured by cardiac and vascular ultrasound (ECHO) in a baseline steady state and during preload reduction introduced with thigh occlusion cuffs used as a counter-measure device (Braslet cuffs) measured by cardiac and vascular ultrasound examinations. Methods: Nine International Space Station crewmember subjects (Expeditions 16 - 20) were examined in 15 experiment sessions 101 +/- 46.days after launch (mean +/- SD; 33 - 185). Twenty Seven cardiac and vascular parameters were obtained with/without respiratory maneuvers before and after tightening of the Braslet cuffs. Results: Non-physicians performed diagnostic-quality cardiac and vascular ultrasound examinations using remote guidance. Three of 27 combinations of maneuvers and Braslet or Braslet alone were identified as being significant changed when compared to baseline. Eleven of 81 differences between combinations of Mueller, Valsalva or baseline were significant and related to cardiac preload reduction or increase in lower extremity venous volume. Conclusions: Acute application of Braslet occlusion cuffs causes lower extremity fluid sequestration and exerts commensurate measurable effects on cardiac performance in microgravity. Ultrasound techniques to measure the hemodynamic effects of thigh cuffs in combination with respiratory maneuvers may serve as an invaluable tool in determining the volume status of the cardiac patient at the 'microgravity bedside'.

  16. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  17. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation?

    MedlinePLUS

    ANSWERS by heart Treatments + Tests What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? A cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) program takes place in a hospital or ... special help in making lifestyle changes. During your rehabilitation program you’ll… • Have a medical evaluation to ...

  18. Cardiac conduction system

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... cardiac muscle cells in the walls of the heart that send signals to the heart muscle causing it to contract. The main components ... the cardiac conduction system’s electrical activity in the heart.

  19. Safety of Microbubbles and Transcranial Ultrasound in Rabbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culp, William C.; Brown, Aliza T.; Hennings, Leah; Lowery, John; Culp, Benjamin C.; Erdem, Eren; Roberson, Paula; Matsunaga, Terry O.

    2007-05-01

    The object of this study was to evaluate the safety of large doses of microbubbles and ultrasound administered to the head of rabbits as if they were receiving acute stroke therapy of a similar nature. Materials and Methods: Female New Zealand White rabbits were used, N=24, in three groups 1] n=4 control (no treatment), 2] n=10 bubble control (ultrasound plus aspirin), and 3] n=10 target group (ultrasound plus aspirin plus MRX-815 microbubbles). Group 3 was infused with IV bubbles over 1 hour at 0.16cc/kg. Ultrasound was delivered to the dehaired side of the head during bubble infusion and for 1 additional hour at 0.8 W/cm2 20% pulsed wave. Rabbits survived for 22 to 24 hours, were imaged with computerized tomography and 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging including contrast studies, and sacrificed. Tetrazolium (TTC) and Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) sections were made for pathological examination. Results: All 24 animals showed absence of bleeding, endothelial damage, EKG abnormalities, stroke, blood-brain-barrier breakdown, or other acute abnormalities. CT and MRI showed no bleeding or signs of stroke, but two animals had mild hydrocephalus. The EKGs showed normal variation in QTc. Rabbit behavior was normal in all. Minimal chronic inflammation unrelated to the study was seen in 5. Two animals were excluded because of protocol violations and replaced during the study. Conclusion: The administered dose of microbubbles and ultrasound demonstrated no detrimental effects on the healthy rabbit animal model.

  20. Morphological abnormalities in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Moore, A B M

    2015-08-01

    A total of 10 abnormal free-swimming (i.e., post-birth) elasmobranchs are reported from The (Persian-Arabian) Gulf, encompassing five species and including deformed heads, snouts, caudal fins and claspers. The complete absence of pelvic fins in a milk shark Rhizoprionodon acutus may be the first record in any elasmobranch. Possible causes, including the extreme environmental conditions and the high level of anthropogenic pollution particular to The Gulf, are briefly discussed. PMID:25903257

  1. Chromosome abnormalities in glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.S.; Ramsay, D.A.; Fan, Y.S.

    1994-09-01

    Cytogenetic studies were performed in 25 patients with gliomas. An interesting finding was a seemingly identical abnormality, an extra band on the tip of the short arm of chromosome 1, add(1)(p36), in two cases. The abnormality was present in all cells from a patient with a glioblastoma and in 27% of the tumor cells from a patient with a recurrent irradiated anaplastic astrocytoma; in the latter case, 7 unrelated abnormal clones were identified except 4 of those clones shared a common change, -Y. Three similar cases have been described previously. In a patient with pleomorphic astrocytoma, the band 1q42 in both homologues of chromosome 1 was involved in two different rearrangements. A review of the literature revealed that deletion of the long arm of chromosome 1 including 1q42 often occurs in glioma. This may indicate a possible tumor suppressor gene in this region. Cytogenetic follow-up studies were carried out in two patients and emergence of unrelated clones were noted in both. A total of 124 clonal breakpoints were identified in the 25 patients. The breakpoints which occurred three times or more were: 1p36, 1p22, 1q21, 1q25, 3q21, 7q32, 8q22, 9q22, 16q22, and 22q13.

  2. [Congenital foot abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Delpont, M; Lafosse, T; Bachy, M; Mary, P; Alves, A; Vialle, R

    2015-03-01

    The foot may be the site of birth defects. These abnormalities are sometimes suspected prenatally. Final diagnosis depends on clinical examination at birth. These deformations can be simple malpositions: metatarsus adductus, talipes calcaneovalgus and pes supinatus. The prognosis is excellent spontaneously or with a simple orthopedic treatment. Surgery remains outstanding. The use of a pediatric orthopedist will be considered if malposition does not relax after several weeks. Malformations (clubfoot, vertical talus and skew foot) require specialized care early. Clubfoot is characterized by an equine and varus hindfoot, an adducted and supine forefoot, not reducible. Vertical talus combines equine hindfoot and dorsiflexion of the forefoot, which is performed in the midfoot instead of the ankle. Skew foot is suspected when a metatarsus adductus is resistant to conservative treatment. Early treatment is primarily orthopedic at birth. Surgical treatment begins to be considered after walking age. Keep in mind that an abnormality of the foot may be associated with other conditions: malposition with congenital hip, malformations with syndromes, neurological and genetic abnormalities. PMID:25524290

  3. Cardiac tamponade: atypical presentations after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Kirti, Ravi; Karadi, Rangaprasad

    2012-01-01

    We present two cases of cardiac tamponade presenting in the aftermath of cardiac surgery. We have briefly discussed the aetiology, presentation, diagnosis and management of the condition with emphasis on its atypical presentation in postoperative patients. A high index of suspicion and early access to echocardiography is necessary for prompt recognition and treatment of this life threatening emergency. PMID:22860267

  4. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  5. Classification of rotator cuff tendinopathy using high definition ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Hinsley, Hannah; Nicholls, Alex; Daines, Michael; Wallace, Gemma; Arden, Nigel; Carr, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: ultrasound is a valid cost effective tool in screening for rotator cuff pathology with high levels of accuracy in detecting full-thickness tears. To date there is no rotator cuff tendinopathy classification using ultrasound. The aims of this study are to define a valid high-definition ultrasound rotator cuff tendinopathy classification, which has discriminate validity between groups based upon anatomical principles. Methods: 464 women, aged 65–87, from an established general population cohort underwent bilateral shoulder ultrasound and musculoskeletal assessment. Sonographer accuracy was established in a separate study by comparing ultrasound findings to the gold standard intra-operative findings. Results: there were 510 normal tendons, 217 abnormal tendons, 77 partial tears, and 124 full-thickness tears. There was no statistical difference in age or the proportion with pain between the abnormal enthesis and partial tear groups, however both groups were statistically older (p<0.001) and had a greater proportion with pain (p<0.001 & p=0.050) than normal tendons. The full-thickness tears were statistically older than normal tendons (p<0.001), but not abnormal/partially torn tendons. The proportion with pain was significantly greater than both groups (p<0.001 & p=0.006). Symptomatic shoulders had a larger median tear size than asymptomatic shoulders (p=0.006). Using tear size as a predictor of pain likelihood, optimum sensitivity and specificity occurred when dividing tears into groups up to 2.5cm and >2.5cm, which corresponds with anatomical descriptions of the width of the supraspinatus tendon. Conclusion: the classification system is as follows: Normal Tendons; Abnormal enthesis/Partial-thickness tear; Single tendon full-thickness tears (0–2.5cm); Multi-tendon full-thickness tears (>2.5cm). PMID:25489559

  6. Depression and cardiac disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Celano, Christopher M; Huffman, Jeff C

    2011-01-01

    Depression is highly prevalent in cardiac patients, with 20% to 40% of patients meeting criteria for major depressive disorder or experiencing an elevation in depressive symptoms. These depressive symptoms are often chronic and persistent, and they have been associated with the development and progression of coronary artery disease, worse health-related quality of life, poor physical functioning, recurrent cardiac events, and a 2- to 2.5-fold increased risk of mortality. Impaired adherence to health behaviors and adverse physiological effects of depression, including inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, platelet hyperactivity, and autonomic nervous system abnormalities, may link depression with adverse cardiac outcomes. Pharmacologic and psychotherapeutic interventions appear to be safe and effective at reducing depressive symptoms in patients with cardiovascular disease and may impact cardiac outcomes. Unfortunately, depression often is unrecognized and untreated in this population, despite the availability of brief screening tools that can be used for this purpose. We recommend the routine screening of cardiac patients for depression when there are adequate mechanisms for management and referral, such as available consulting psychiatrists or care management programs that facilitate the delivery of pharmacologic and psychotherapeutic treatments in this vulnerable population. PMID:21464641

  7. Ultrasound of the fetal veins part 1: the intrahepatic venous system.

    PubMed

    Chaoui, R; Heling, K S; Karl, K

    2014-06-01

    Advances in high-resolution ultrasound combined with color Doppler and three-dimensional (3 D) rendering have contributed to an increasing understanding of the fetal venous circulation in recent years. Still the sonographic evaluation of the venous system in the fetus remains difficult. This article reviews the normal and abnormal intrahepatic venous system. Normal anatomy and abnormal findings of the umbilical vein (UV), the ductus venosus (DV), portal veins, hepatic veins and the inferior vena cava are demonstrated by grayscale, color Doppler and 3D ultrasound and explained by numerous schemes. Typical variants and abnormalities such as agenesis of the DV and portal venous system, persistence of the right UV, UV varix are explained and the clinical value of normal and abnormal Doppler findings in the DV is discussed. Many of these abnormal findings can be detected by a targeted examination of the intrahepatic vasculature with means of color Doppler. PMID:24871613

  8. Abnormal human sex chromosome constitutions

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 22, discusses abnormal human sex chromosome constitution. Aneuploidy of X chromosomes with a female phenotype, sex chromosome aneuploidy with a male phenotype, and various abnormalities in X chromosome behavior are described. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Internal Carotid Artery Web: Doppler Ultrasound with CT Angiography correlation

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Winnie; Crockett, Ann; Low, Gavin; Patel, Vimal

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of an internal carotid web, detected on duplex ultrasound and confirmed by CT angiography. To our knowledge, this is only the third reported ultrasound case in the imaging literature. This vascular abnormality can cause a clinically significant carotid stenosis and is a risk factor for recurrent embolic cerebrovascular events. Due to small size and poor awareness among radiologists, carotid webs are often under-diagnosed on non-invasive imaging modalities. Improved awareness including knowledge of salient imaging features is useful as early diagnosis leading to appropriate intervention can eliminate the risk of future cerebrovascular events.

  10. Cystic Fibrosis in a Female Infant with Cardiac, Ocular, and Musculoskeletal Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Farooqui, Azhar; Eldin, Susan Gamal; Ali, Muna Dawood; AlTalhi, Ali; AlDigheari, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) remains the most common hereditary disease in the western population. Its concomitant presence with other congenital abnormalities is a rare phenomenon with very little documentation. In this case report we describe a case of cystic fibrosis in a female infant with cardiac, ocular, and musculoskeletal abnormalities. A brief literature review is also provided. PMID:26693372

  11. Controlled Cardiac Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chenglin; Liu, Ying; Wang, Ge

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) has been a hot topic for years because of the clinical importance of cardiac diseases and the rapid evolution of CT systems. In this paper, we propose a novel strategy for controlled cardiac CT that may effectively reduce image artifacts due to cardiac and respiratory motions. Our approach is radically different from existing ones and is based on controlling the X-ray source rotation velocity and powering status in reference to the cardiac motion. We theoretically show that by such a control-based intervention the data acquisition process can be optimized for cardiac CT in the cases of periodic and quasiperiodic cardiac motions. Specifically, we formulate the corresponding coordination/control schemes for either exact or approximate matches between the ideal and actual source positions, and report representative simulation results that support our analytic findings. PMID:23165017

  12. Cardiac gated ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, C.W. III; Hoffman, E.A.

    1995-12-31

    There are several theoretic advantages to synchronizing positive pressure breaths with the cardiac cycle, including the potential for improving distribution of pulmonary and myocardial blood flow and enhancing cardiac output. The authors evaluated the effects of synchronizing respiration to the cardiac cycle using a programmable ventilator and electron beam CT (EBCT) scanning. The hearts of anesthetized dogs were imaged during cardiac gated respiration with a 50 msec scan aperture. Multi slice, short axis, dynamic image data sets spanning the apex to base of the left ventricle were evaluated to determine the volume of the left ventricular chamber at end-diastole and end-systole during apnea, systolic and diastolic cardiac gating. The authors observed an increase in cardiac output of up to 30% with inspiration gated to the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle in a non-failing model of the heart.

  13. Cardiac gated ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, C. William, III; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1995-05-01

    There are several theoretic advantages to synchronizing positive pressure breaths with the cardiac cycle, including the potential for improving distribution of pulmonary and myocardial blood flow and enhancing cardiac output. We evaluated the effects of synchronizing respiration to the cardiac cycle using a programmable ventilator and electron beam CT (EBCT) scanning. The hearts of anesthetized dogs were imaged during cardiac gated respiration with a 50msec scan aperture. Multislice, short axis, dynamic image data sets spanning the apex to base of the left ventricle were evaluated to determine the volume of the left ventricular chamber at end-diastole and end-systole during apnea, systolic and diastolic cardiac gating. We observed an increase in cardiac output of up to 30% with inspiration gated to the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle in a nonfailing model of the heart.

  14. Ultrasound—biophysics mechanisms†

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, William D.

    2007-01-01

    Ultrasonic biophysics is the study of mechanisms responsible for how ultrasound and biological materials interact. Ultrasound-induced bioeffect or risk studies focus on issues related to the effects of ultrasound on biological materials. On the other hand, when biological materials affect the ultrasonic wave, this can be viewed as the basis for diagnostic ultrasound. Thus, an understanding of the interaction of ultrasound with tissue provides the scientific basis for image production and risk assessment. Relative to the bioeffect or risk studies, that is, the biophysical mechanisms by which ultrasound affects biological materials, ultrasound-induced bioeffects are generally separated into thermal and nonthermal mechanisms. Ultrasonic dosimetry is concerned with the quantitative determination of ultrasonic energy interaction with biological materials. Whenever ultrasonic energy is propagated into an attenuating material such as tissue, the amplitude of the wave decreases with distance. This attenuation is due to either absorption or scattering. Absorption is a mechanism that represents that portion of ultrasonic wave that is converted into heat, and scattering can be thought of as that portion of the wave, which changes direction. Because the medium can absorb energy to produce heat, a temperature rise may occur as long as the rate of heat production is greater than the rate of heat removal. Current interest with thermally mediated ultrasound-induced bioeffects has focused on the thermal isoeffect concept. The non-thermal mechanism that has received the most attention is acoustically generated cavitation wherein ultrasonic energy by cavitation bubbles is concentrated. Acoustic cavitation, in a broad sense, refers to ultrasonically induced bubble activity occurring in a biological material that contains pre-existing gaseous inclusions. Cavitation-related mechanisms include radiation force, microstreaming, shock waves, free radicals, microjets and strain. It is more challenging to deduce the causes of mechanical effects in tissues that do not contain gas bodies. These ultrasonic biophysics mechanisms will be discussed in the context of diagnostic ultrasound exposure risk concerns. PMID:16934858

  15. Standards of the Polish Ultrasound Society – update. Pancreas examination

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound examination of the pancreas constitutes an integral part of the abdominal ultrasound. It is mostly indicated to diagnose pain in the epigastrium, discomfort and jaundice as well as to monitor the patients with acute pancreatitis. The assessment of this organ in an ultrasound examination may be problematic due to its anatomical location and the fact that it might be covered by gastric and duodenal contents as well as due to a number of possible pathological changes, including inflammation and benign or malignant neoplasms, which require differentiation. The basis for establishing a correct diagnosis is the knowledge of the examination technique, correct pancreas structure and images of individual pathologies. This paper presents the standards of ultrasound examination published in 2011 and updated with the current knowledge. The following are discussed: preparation of the patient for the examination, abnormal lesions in the pancreas, acute pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis, cystic lesions (benign and malignant cysts) and solid focal lesions. Ultrasound is also used to guide the drainage of fluid cisterns, abscesses and cysts. The prime role in the diagnosis and treatment of selected diseases of the upper gastrointestinal tract and parenchymal organs of the abdomen belongs to endosonography of the upper gastrointestinal tract, with the possibility to conduct a fine needle aspiration biopsy, and intraoperative or laparoscopic ultrasound. PMID:26676070

  16. Diagnosis of traumatic cardiac contusion

    SciTech Connect

    Waxman, K.; Soliman, M.H.; Braunstein, P.; Formosa, P.; Cohen, A.J.; Matsuura, P.; Mason, G.R.

    1986-06-01

    Cardiac contusion following blunt chest trauma remains a diagnostic problem because of a lack of sensitive diagnostic tests. This study evaluated thallous chloride Tl 201 single-photon-emission computed tomography in a series of 48 patients following blunt chest trauma. Of the 48 patients, 23 had normal scans. None of these patients proved to have serious arrhythmias during three days of continuous monitoring. Of 25 patients with abnormal or ambiguous studies, five (20%) developed serious arrhythmias requiring therapy. Single-photon-emission computed tomography scanning thus was sensitive in indicating that group of patients at risk of serious arrhythmias, and may therefore prove to be a useful screening test to determine the need for hospitalization and arrhythmia monitoring following blunt chest trauma.

  17. Gene therapy in cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Praveen, S V; Francis, Johnson; Venugopal, K

    2006-01-01

    Gene therapy has progressed from a dream to a bedside reality in quite a few human diseases. From its first application in adenosine deaminase deficiency, through the years, its application has evolved to vascular angiogenesis and cardiac arrhythmias. Gene based biological pacemakers using viral vectors or mesenchymal cells tested in animal models hold much promise. Induction of pacemaker activity within the left bundle branch can provide stable heart rates. Genetic modification of the AV node mimicking beta blockade can be therapeutic in the management of atrial fibrillation. G protein overexpression to modify the AV node also is experimental. Modification and expression of potassium channel genes altering the delayed rectifier potassium currents may permit better management of congenital long QT syndromes. Arrhythmias in a failing heart are due to abnormal calcium cycling. Potential targets for genetic modulation include the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium pump, calsequestrin and sodium calcium exchanger. Lastly the ethical concerns need to be addressed. PMID:16943902

  18. Sudden cardiac death in athletes.

    PubMed

    Schmied, C; Borjesson, M

    2014-02-01

    A 'paradox of sport' is that in addition to the undisputed health benefits of physical activity, vigorous exertion may transiently increase the risk of acute cardiac events. In general, the risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) approximately doubles during physical activity and is 2- to 3-fold higher in athletes compared to nonathletes. The incidence of SCD in young athletes is in fact very low, at around 1-3 per 100,000, but attracts much public attention. Variations in incidence figures may be explained by the methodology used for data collection and more importantly by differences between subpopulations of athletes. The incidence of SCD in older (? 35 years) athletes is higher and may be expected to rise, as more and older individuals take part in organized sports. SCD is often the first clinical manifestation of a potentially fatal underlying cardiovascular disorder and usually occurs in previously asymptomatic athletes. In the young (<35 years), SCD is mainly due to congenital/inherited cardiac abnormalities, whilst coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common cause in older athletes. Cardiac screening including family/personal history, physical examination and resting electrocardiogram (ECG) may identify individuals at risk and has the potential to decrease the risk of SCD in young athletes. Screening including the ECG has a high sensitivity for underlying disease in young athletes, but the specificity needs to be improved, whereas the sensitivity of screening without the use of ECG is very low. The screening modality recommended for young athletes is of limited value in older athletes, who should receive individualized screening with cardiac stress testing for patients with high risk of underlying CAD. As cardiovascular screening will never be able to identify all athletes at risk, adequate preparedness is vital in case of a potentially fatal event at the sporting arena/facility. Firstly, we will review the magnitude of the problem of SCD in athletes of different ages, as well as the aetiology. Secondly, we will focus on how to prevent SCD in athletes of all ages, reviewing cardiovascular screening recommendations as well as emergency preparedness and arena safety. PMID:24350833

  19. Intravascular ultrasound chirp imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maresca, D.; Jansen, K.; Renaud, G.; van Soest, G.; Li, X.; Zhou, Q.; de Jong, N.; Shung, K. K.; van der Steen, A. F. W.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) chirp imaging as well as chirp reversal ultrasound contrast imaging at intravascular ultrasound frequency. Chirp excitations were emitted with a 34 MHz single crystal intravascular transducer and compared to conventional Gaussian-shaped pulses of equal acoustic pressure. The signal to noise ratio of the chirp images was increased by up to 9 dB relative to the conventional images. Imaging of contrast microbubbles was implemented by chirp reversal, achieving a contrast to tissue ratio of 12 dB. The method shows potential for intravascular imaging of structures in and beyond coronary atherosclerotic plaques including vasa vasorum.

  20. A case of fetal intestinal tract distensions: prenatal biochemical and ultrasound evaluation.

    PubMed

    Stefos, T; Georgiou, I; Syrrou, M; Lollis, D

    1993-01-01

    Fetal intestinal tract abnormalities can be pregnancy complications at all maternal ages. There have been reports of ultrasound identification of these abnormalities, particularly of fetal intestinal obstructions. We report the first case to our knowledge of elevated levels of the intestinal isozyme, alkaline phosphatase, in the amniotic fluid and blood serum and also the presence of prealbumin in the amniotic fluid of a fetus with extensive intestinal distension and polyhydramnios. It was revealed that the alkaline phosphatase intestinal isozyme as well as protein electrophoresis for abnormal albumin bands in the amniotic fluid are valuable markers for the early diagnosis of the above-mentioned fetal abnormalities. PMID:8240697

  1. Measurements in ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, B.B.; Kurtz, A.B.; Goldberg, P.

    1988-01-01

    This book gathers all published and original data pertaining to anatomical measurements as projected on ultrasound scans. It covers all major anatomic regions and organ systems, including abdomen, pelvic, obstetrical, head and neck, and heart.

  2. Ultrasound Modulated Bioluminescence Tomography

    E-print Network

    Bal, Guillaume

    2013-01-01

    We propose a method to reconstruct the density of a luminescent source in a highly-scattering medium from ultrasound modulated optical measurements. Our approach is based on the solution to a hybrid inverse source problem for the diffusion equation.

  3. Ultrasound: Abdomen (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a safe and painless test that uses sound waves to make images of the abdomen (belly). During the examination, an ultrasound machine sends sound waves into the abdominal area and images are recorded ...

  4. Abdominal ultrasound (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    Abdominal ultrasound is a scanning technique used to image the interior of the abdomen. Like the X- ... use high frequency sound waves to produce an image and do not expose the individual to radiation. ...

  5. General Ultrasound Imaging

    MedlinePLUS

    ... collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ... types of Doppler ultrasound: Color Doppler uses a computer to convert Doppler measurements into an array of ...

  6. Ultrasound: Pelvis (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... pelvic area and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  7. Ultrasound: Head (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the head and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  8. Ultrasound: Infant Hip

    MedlinePLUS

    ... hip area, and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  9. Venous Ultrasound (Extremities)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the leg – a condition often referred to as deep vein thrombosis. Ultrasound does not use ionizing radiation ... leg. This condition is often referred to as deep vein thrombosis or DVT. These clots may break ...

  10. [Cardiac autonomic neuropathy in the diabetic patient].

    PubMed

    Llamas Esperón, G; García Ramos, G; Gaos, C; Jiménéz, J L; Villavicencio, R; Cueto, L; Arriaga Gracia, J

    1985-01-01

    The importance of cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) derives from its remarkable frequency and its clinical impact. The clinical features are postural hypotension and resting tachycardia, these abnormalities may be overlooked in a high number of patients asymptomatic. Although rarely life threatening, CAN causes considerable morbidity, which can be ameliorated by its identification and appropriate treatment. Circulatory reflexes were studied in 48 diabetic patients and 14 normal control subjects. Twenty-six of the diabetic patients had normal response. The remaining 22 had evidence of neuropathy and abnormal cardiac response during these tests. Only one patient had postural syncope but he had severe orthostatic hypotension. The others remained asymptomatic. All the control subjects had normal reflexes. Beat-to-beat variation with deep breathing (sinus arrhythmia), carotid body massage and mental stress, were important for the detection of CAN (86, 90 and 90% sensitivity respectively). The Valsalva maneuver and sinus arrhythmia showed 82 and 92% of specificity for the diagnosis of CAN. Our findings suggest that CAN in diabetic patients can be detected by these relatively simple test. We propose a rational approach to the diagnosis. Our method is applicable as a clinical routine examination for cardiac neuropathy. PMID:2932078

  11. Tubular Enhanced Geodesic Active Contours for Continuum Robot Detection using 3D Ultrasound

    E-print Network

    Dupont, Pierre

    - ing modality for minimally invasive robotic surgery. As the robots are typically metallic biopsies [6], prostate brachytherapy [7], and concentric tube robots in cardiac surgery [8], [9]. The mainTubular Enhanced Geodesic Active Contours for Continuum Robot Detection using 3D Ultrasound

  12. Cardiac Coordination and Mechanics 1 CARDIAC ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY*

    E-print Network

    Prestwich, Ken

    of the sympathetic nervous system. We will also see how to found cardiac output using A. The purpose of the heart's electrical system is to initiate muscle cells and does not come from the nervous system. Likewise, we can

  13. Stimulating endogenous cardiac repair

    PubMed Central

    Finan, Amanda; Richard, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    The healthy adult heart has a low turnover of cardiac myocytes. The renewal capacity, however, is augmented after cardiac injury. Participants in cardiac regeneration include cardiac myocytes themselves, cardiac progenitor cells, and peripheral stem cells, particularly from the bone marrow compartment. Cardiac progenitor cells and bone marrow stem cells are augmented after cardiac injury, migrate to the myocardium, and support regeneration. Depletion studies of these populations have demonstrated their necessary role in cardiac repair. However, the potential of these cells to completely regenerate the heart is limited. Efforts are now being focused on ways to augment these natural pathways to improve cardiac healing, primarily after ischemic injury but in other cardiac pathologies as well. Cell and gene therapy or pharmacological interventions are proposed mechanisms. Cell therapy has demonstrated modest results and has passed into clinical trials. However, the beneficial effects of cell therapy have primarily been their ability to produce paracrine effects on the cardiac tissue and recruit endogenous stem cell populations as opposed to direct cardiac regeneration. Gene therapy efforts have focused on prolonging or reactivating natural signaling pathways. Positive results have been demonstrated to activate the endogenous stem cell populations and are currently being tested in clinical trials. A potential new avenue may be to refine pharmacological treatments that are currently in place in the clinic. Evidence is mounting that drugs such as statins or beta blockers may alter endogenous stem cell activity. Understanding the effects of these drugs on stem cell repair while keeping in mind their primary function may strike a balance in myocardial healing. To maximize endogenous cardiac regeneration, a combination of these approaches could ameliorate the overall repair process to incorporate the participation of multiple cellular players. PMID:26484341

  14. A study on premature ventricular contractions caused by ultrasound exposure with microbubbles using cultured ventricular muscle cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, N.; Yokoyama, G.; Ikebuchi, M.; Okada, K.; Kawahara, K.; Yamamoto, K.

    2004-01-01

    It has been shown that diagnostic ultrasound examination using a contrast agent can cause premature ventricular contractions (PVCs). In this study, we investigated a usefulness of a new technique using cultured cardiac myocytes to study mechanisms of PVC production. Cardiac myocytes were isolated from neonatal rats and cultured on a cover glass. The cover glass was attached to an observation chamber in which it was possible to observe changes in myocytes during ultrasound exposure. In the experiments, cardiac myocytes were exposed to pulsed ultrasound in the presence and absence of microbubbles. The pressure amplitudes (peak-negative pressures) were set at 5 steps, -0.28, -0.55, -0.73, -0.92 and -1.1 MPa, and threshold pressure to produce a PVC was recorded. The results showed that the presence of microbubbles attached to a cell reduces threshold pressure for producing PVCs, and it was concluded that our method is useful for studying the mechanisms of PVC production.

  15. [Ultrasound in urogynecology].

    PubMed

    Peschers, U; Jundt, K

    2004-11-01

    Radiologic procedures such as lateral cystography have been substituted by ultrasound in urogynecology. The techniques are standardized and reproducible. Ultrasound is also useful for evaluating the bladder neck (funneling), the urethra (diverticula) and the paraurethral tissues (vaginal cysts, vaginal fibroids). The technique is limited in patients with genital prolapse beyond the hymenal ring. Advantages include the avoidance of x-rays and catherization. PMID:15502910

  16. Lung ultrasound in the critically ill

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Lung ultrasound is a basic application of critical ultrasound, defined as a loop associating urgent diagnoses with immediate therapeutic decisions. It requires the mastery of ten signs: the bat sign (pleural line), lung sliding (yielding seashore sign), the A-line (horizontal artifact), the quad sign, and sinusoid sign indicating pleural effusion, the fractal, and tissue-like sign indicating lung consolidation, the B-line, and lung rockets indicating interstitial syndrome, abolished lung sliding with the stratosphere sign suggesting pneumothorax, and the lung point indicating pneumothorax. Two more signs, the lung pulse and the dynamic air bronchogram, are used to distinguish atelectasis from pneumonia. All of these disorders were assessed using CT as the “gold standard” with sensitivity and specificity ranging from 90% to 100%, allowing ultrasound to be considered as a reasonable bedside “gold standard” in the critically ill. The BLUE-protocol is a fast protocol (<3 minutes), which allows diagnosis of acute respiratory failure. It includes a venous analysis done in appropriate cases. Pulmonary edema, pulmonary embolism, pneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, and pneumothorax yield specific profiles. Pulmonary edema, e.g., yields anterior lung rockets associated with lung sliding, making the “B-profile.” The FALLS-protocol adapts the BLUE-protocol to acute circulatory failure. It makes sequential search for obstructive, cardiogenic, hypovolemic, and distributive shock using simple real-time echocardiography (right ventricle dilatation, pericardial effusion), then lung ultrasound for assessing a direct parameter of clinical volemia: the apparition of B-lines, schematically, is considered as the endpoint for fluid therapy. Other aims of lung ultrasound are decreasing medical irradiation: the LUCIFLR program (most CTs in ARDS or trauma can be postponed), a use in traumatology, intensive care unit, neonates (the signs are the same than in adults), many disciplines (pulmonology, cardiology…), austere countries, and a help in any procedure (thoracentesis). A 1992, cost-effective gray-scale unit, without Doppler, and a microconvex probe are efficient. Lung ultrasound is a holistic discipline for many reasons (e.g., one probe, perfect for the lung, is able to scan the whole-body). Its integration can provide a new definition of priorities. The BLUE-protocol and FALLS-protocol allow simplification of expert echocardiography, a clear advantage when correct cardiac windows are missing. PMID:24401163

  17. Lung ultrasound in the critically ill.

    PubMed

    Lichtenstein, Daniel A

    2014-01-01

    Lung ultrasound is a basic application of critical ultrasound, defined as a loop associating urgent diagnoses with immediate therapeutic decisions. It requires the mastery of ten signs: the bat sign (pleural line), lung sliding (yielding seashore sign), the A-line (horizontal artifact), the quad sign, and sinusoid sign indicating pleural effusion, the fractal, and tissue-like sign indicating lung consolidation, the B-line, and lung rockets indicating interstitial syndrome, abolished lung sliding with the stratosphere sign suggesting pneumothorax, and the lung point indicating pneumothorax. Two more signs, the lung pulse and the dynamic air bronchogram, are used to distinguish atelectasis from pneumonia. All of these disorders were assessed using CT as the "gold standard" with sensitivity and specificity ranging from 90% to 100%, allowing ultrasound to be considered as a reasonable bedside "gold standard" in the critically ill. The BLUE-protocol is a fast protocol (<3 minutes), which allows diagnosis of acute respiratory failure. It includes a venous analysis done in appropriate cases. Pulmonary edema, pulmonary embolism, pneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, and pneumothorax yield specific profiles. Pulmonary edema, e.g., yields anterior lung rockets associated with lung sliding, making the "B-profile." The FALLS-protocol adapts the BLUE-protocol to acute circulatory failure. It makes sequential search for obstructive, cardiogenic, hypovolemic, and distributive shock using simple real-time echocardiography (right ventricle dilatation, pericardial effusion), then lung ultrasound for assessing a direct parameter of clinical volemia: the apparition of B-lines, schematically, is considered as the endpoint for fluid therapy. Other aims of lung ultrasound are decreasing medical irradiation: the LUCIFLR program (most CTs in ARDS or trauma can be postponed), a use in traumatology, intensive care unit, neonates (the signs are the same than in adults), many disciplines (pulmonology, cardiology…), austere countries, and a help in any procedure (thoracentesis). A 1992, cost-effective gray-scale unit, without Doppler, and a microconvex probe are efficient. Lung ultrasound is a holistic discipline for many reasons (e.g., one probe, perfect for the lung, is able to scan the whole-body). Its integration can provide a new definition of priorities. The BLUE-protocol and FALLS-protocol allow simplification of expert echocardiography, a clear advantage when correct cardiac windows are missing. PMID:24401163

  18. Abdominal Problems in Children with Congenital Cardiovascular Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Güney, Lütfi Hakan; Araz, Co?kun; Beyazp?nar, Deniz Sarp; Arda, ?rfan Serdar; Arslan, Esra Elif; Hiçsönmez, Akgün

    2015-01-01

    Background: Congenital cardiovascular abnormality is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in childhood. Both the type of congenital cardiovascular abnormality and cardiopulmonary bypass are responsible for gastrointestinal system problems. Aims: Intra-abdominal problems, such as paralytic ileus, necrotizing enterocolitis, and intestinal perforation, are common in patients who have been operated or who are being followed for congenital cardiovascular abnormalities. Besides the primary congenital cardiovascular abnormalities, ischemia secondary to cardiac catheterization or surgery contributes to the incidence of these problems. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: In this study, we aimed to screen the intra-abdominal problems seen in patients with congenital cardiovascular abnormalities who had undergone surgical or angiographical intervention(s). Patients with congenital cardiovascular abnormalities who had been treated medically or surgically between 2000 and 2014 were analyzed retrospectively in terms of intra-abdominal problems. The patients’ demographic data, type of congenital cardiovascular abnormalities, the intervention applied (surgical, angiographic), the incidence of intra-abdominal problem(s), the interventions applied for the intra-abdominal problems, and the results were evaluated. Results: Fourteen (Group I) of the 76 patients with congenital cardiovascular abnormalities diagnosis were operated due to intra-abdominal problems, and 62 (Group II) were followed-up clinically for intra-abdominal problems. In Group I (10 boys and 4 girls), 11 patients were aged between 0 and 12 months, and three patients were older than 12 months. Group II included 52 patients aged between 0 and 12 months and 10 patients older than 12 months. Cardiovascular surgical interventions had been applied to six patients in Group I and 40 patients in Group II. The most frequent intra-abdominal problems were necrotizing enterocolitis and intestinal perforation in Group I, and paralytic ileus in Group II. Seven of the Group I patients and 22 of the Group II patients died. The patients who died in both groups had more than three congenital cardiovascular abnormalities in the same patient, and 80% of these patients had been operated for congenital cardiovascular abnormalities. Conclusion: The gastrointestinal system is involved in important complications experienced by patients with congenital cardiovascular abnormalities. The mortality rate was higher in operated patients due to gastrointestinal complications. Gastrointestinal complications are more frequent in patients with cyanotic anomalies. The presence of more than one congenital cardiovascular abnormality in a patient increased the mortality rate. PMID:26185717

  19. A novel software-based technique for quantifying placental calcifications and infarctions from ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, John T.; McAuliffe, Fionnuala; Higgins, Mary; Stanton, Marie; Brennan, Patrick

    2008-03-01

    In obstetrics, antenatal ultrasound assessment of placental morphology comprises an important part of the estimation of fetal health. Ultrasound analysis of the placenta may reveal abnormalities such as placental calcification and infarcts. Current methods of quantification of these abnormalities are subjective and involve a grading system of Grannum stages I-III. The aim of this project is to develop a software tool that quantifies semi-automatically placental ultrasound images and facilitates the assessment of placental morphology. We have developed a 2D ultrasound imaging software tool that allows the obstetrician or sonographer to define the placental region of interest. A secondary reference map is created for use in our quantification algorithm. Using a slider technique the user can easily define an upper threshold based on high intensity for calcification classification and a lower threshold to define infarction regions based on low intensity within the defined region of interest. The percentage of the placental area that is calcified and also the percentage of infarction is calculated and this is the basis of our new metric. Ultrasound images of abnormal and normal placentas have been acquired to aid our software development. A full clinical prospective evaluation is currently being performed and we are currently applying this technology to the three-dimensional ultrasound domain. We have developed a novel software-based technique for calculating the extent of placental calcification and infarction, providing a new metric in this field. Our new metric may provide a more accurate measurement of placental calcification and infarction than current techniques.

  20. Cardiac innervation and sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Keiichi; Kanazawa, Hideaki; Aizawa, Yoshiyasu; Ardell, Jeffrey L; Shivkumar, Kalyanam

    2015-06-01

    Afferent and efferent cardiac neurotransmission via the cardiac nerves intricately modulates nearly all physiological functions of the heart (chronotropy, dromotropy, lusitropy, and inotropy). Afferent information from the heart is transmitted to higher levels of the nervous system for processing (intrinsic cardiac nervous system, extracardiac-intrathoracic ganglia, spinal cord, brain stem, and higher centers), which ultimately results in efferent cardiomotor neural impulses (via the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves). This system forms interacting feedback loops that provide physiological stability for maintaining normal rhythm and life-sustaining circulation. This system also ensures that there is fine-tuned regulation of sympathetic-parasympathetic balance in the heart under normal and stressed states in the short (beat to beat), intermediate (minutes to hours), and long term (days to years). This important neurovisceral/autonomic nervous system also plays a major role in the pathophysiology and progression of heart disease, including heart failure and arrhythmias leading to sudden cardiac death. Transdifferentiation of neurons in heart failure, functional denervation, cardiac and extracardiac neural remodeling has also been identified and characterized during the progression of disease. Recent advances in understanding the cellular and molecular processes governing innervation and the functional control of the myocardium in health and disease provide a rational mechanistic basis for the development of neuraxial therapies for preventing sudden cardiac death and other arrhythmias. Advances in cellular, molecular, and bioengineering realms have underscored the emergence of this area as an important avenue of scientific inquiry and therapeutic intervention. PMID:26044253

  1. Electrocardiographic, cardiac enzymes, and magnesium in patients with severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Huang, LiYa; Ma, BinWu; He, Fang; Yang, ShaoQi

    2012-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) can lead to multiple-organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). Electrocardiographic (ECG), cardiac enzyme, and serum magnesium abnormalities occur after SAP. Electrocardiographic and cardiac enzyme abnormalities are described as variables in SAP patients, which contribute to the effects of MODS. Hypomagnesium is also closely associated with ECG abnormalities; therefore, hypomagnesium was also considered to be a variable in this study. A consecutive series of 54 patients admitted within 72 hours after SAP occurred was studied. A standard 12-lead ECG, cardiac enzyme, and serum magnesium measurement were routinely performed at admission. Linear correlation was used to analyze the relationship between hypomagnesemia and sinus tachycardia. The nonparametic binomial test was used to analyze dichotomized dependent variables (premature beat, atrial fibrillation, ST-segment depression, abnormal T wave, and long QT interval). Hypomagnesemia was present in 15 patients (28%), who subsequently had sinus tachycardia. There was a significant negative relationship (-1 < r <0) between hypomagnesemia and sinus tachycardia (p < .05). There were 14 (17%) premature beat, 7 (8%) atrial fibrillation, 21 (25%) ST-segment depression, 18 (21%) abnormal T wave, and 17 (31%) long QT-interval events in 54 SAP patients. Hypomagnesemia is a reason for ECG abnormalities. Electrocardiographic and cardiac enzyme abnormalities are considered to be transitory variables that are present in patients with SAP. PMID:22847284

  2. The role of tissue harmonic imaging ultrasound combined with power Doppler ultrasound in the diagnosis of childhood febrile urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    ?larslan, Nisa Eda Çullas; Fitöz, Ömer Suat; Öztuna, Derya Gökmen; Küçük, Nuriye Özlem; Yalç?nkaya, Fatma Fato?

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study assessed the ability of tissue harmonic imaging ultrasound combined with power Doppler ultrasound in the detection of childhood febrile urinary tract infections in comparison with the gold standard reference method: Tc-99m dimercaptosuccinicacid renal cortical scintigraphy. Material and Methods: This prospective study included 60 patients who were hospitalized with a first episode of febrile urinary tract infections. All children were examined with dimercaptosuccinicacid scan and tissue harmonic imaging ultrasound combined with power Doppler ultrasound within the first 3 days of admission. Results: Signs indicative of acute infection were observed in 29 patients according to the results of tissue harmonic imaging ultrasound combined with power Doppler ultrasound while dimercaptosuccinicacid scan revealed abnormal findings in 33 patients. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of tissue harmonic imaging combined with power Doppler ultrasound using dimercaptosuccinicacid scintigraphy as the reference method in patients diagnosed with first episode febrile urinary tract infections were calculated as 57.58% (95% confidence interval: 40.81%–72.76%); 62.96% (95% confidence interval: 44.23%–78.47%); 65.52% (95% confidence interval: 52.04%–77%); 54.84% (95% confidence interval: 41.54%–67.52%); respectively. Conclusions: Although current results exhibit inadequate success of power Doppler ultrasound, this practical and radiation-free method may soon be comprise a part of the routine ultrasonographic evaluation of febrile urinary tract infections of childhood if patients are evaluated early and under appropriate sedation. PMID:26265892

  3. [Applications of noninvasive high-resolution ultrasound imaging in ophthalmology].

    PubMed

    Berges, O

    2006-12-01

    While ultrasonography has been applied to eye examination since the beginning of medical applications of ultrasound, the use of high frequencies is relatively recent in this context. Recent developments since the 1990s have made devices available that are well suited for examining the anterior segment as well as the posterior pole, providing precise data for corneal lesions, iris, chamber angle, and ciliary body abnormalities, and lesions of the papilla and macula. PMID:17211310

  4. Cardiac Myxoma With Unusual Obstructive and Embolic Presentations

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Robert Jeen-Chen; Chou, Hsin-Hua; Tsai, Kuei-Ton; Shen, Ta-Chung; Hu, Chin-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We present a case of cardiac myxoma with atypical presentations of concurrent stroke and angiography-negative myocardial infarction. The case emphasizes the importance of basic echocardiography and timely surgery in the management of cardiac myxoma. An elderly woman presented to the emergency department in an unconscious state. Electrocardiogram and elevated cardiac enzymes suggested acute myocardial infarction; however, immediate coronary angiography proved patency. Basic echocardiography revealed an oscillating left atrial myxoma obstructing inflow through the mitral valve. After regaining consciousness while in the intensive care unit, the patient developed respiratory distress and shock, and emergent en bloc resection was performed. Ataxia was noted in her postoperative course and multiple small cerebellar infarcts were found on magnetic resonance imaging. After a 1-month period of rehabilitation, the patient recovered well and continues to be followed as an outpatient. Cardiac myxoma requires timely management and may be missed if not included in the differential diagnoses. Basic echocardiography, also called focused cardiac ultrasound, may aid in the diagnosing of perplexing cardiac cases. PMID:26402823

  5. Cardiac developmental toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Mahler, Gretchen J.; Butcher, Jonathan T.

    2013-01-01

    Congenital heart disease is a highly prevalent problem with mostly unknown origins. Many cases of CHD likely involve an environmental exposure coupled with genetic susceptibility, but practical and ethical considerations make nongenetic causes of CHD difficult to assess in humans. The development of the heart is highly conserved across all vertebrate species, making animal models an excellent option for screening potential cardiac teratogens. This review will discuss exposures known to cause cardiac defects, stages of heart development that are most sensitive to teratogen exposure, benefits and limitations of animal models of cardiac development, and future considerations for cardiac developmental toxicity research. PMID:22271678

  6. Validation of four-dimensional ultrasound for targeting in minimally-invasive beating-heart surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, Danielle F.; Wiles, Andrew D.; Moore, John; Wedlake, Chris; Gobbi, David G.; Peters, Terry M.

    2009-02-01

    Ultrasound is garnering significant interest as an imaging modality for surgical guidance, due to its affordability, real-time temporal resolution and ease of integration into the operating room. Minimally-invasive intracardiac surgery performed on the beating-heart prevents direct vision of the surgical target, and procedures such as mitral valve replacement and atrial septal defect closure would benefit from intraoperative ultrasound imaging. We propose that placing 4D ultrasound within an augmented reality environment, along with a patient-specific cardiac model and virtual representations of tracked surgical tools, will create a visually intuitive platform with sufficient image information to safely and accurately repair tissue within the beating heart. However, the quality of the imaging parameters, spatial calibration, temporal calibration and ECG-gating must be well characterized before any 4D ultrasound system can be used clinically to guide the treatment of moving structures. In this paper, we describe a comprehensive accuracy assessment framework that can be used to evaluate the performance of 4D ultrasound systems while imaging moving targets. We image a dynamic phantom that is comprised of a simple robot and a tracked phantom to which point-source, distance and spherical objects of known construction can be attached. We also follow our protocol to evaluate 4D ultrasound images generated in real-time by reconstructing ECG-gated 2D ultrasound images acquired from a tracked multiplanar transesophageal probe. Likewise, our evaluation framework allows any type of 4D ultrasound to be quantitatively assessed.

  7. Assessment of Regional Myocardial Strain using Cardiac Elastography: Distinguishing Infarcted from Non-Infarcted Myocardium

    E-print Network

    Konofagou, Elisa E.

    Assessment of Regional Myocardial Strain using Cardiac Elastography: Distinguishing Infarcted from in a patient with a known myocardial infarction. Envelope- detected sonographic data was used to estimate Non-Infarcted Myocardium Elisa E. Konofagou', Timothy Harrigan2 and Scott Solomon3 'Focused Ultrasound

  8. Tracking contrast agents using real-time 2D photoacoustic imaging system for cardiac applications

    E-print Network

    Witte, Russell S.

    Tracking contrast agents using real-time 2D photoacoustic imaging system for cardiac applications, University of Arizona, 1609 N Warren, Bldg 211, Tucson, AZ USA 85724 ABSTRACT Photoacoustic (PA) imaging for coronary artery disease. Keywords: photoacoustic, optoacoustic, ultrasound, coronary heart disease

  9. System for the diagnosis and monitoring of coronary artery disease, acute coronary syndromes, cardiomyopathy and other cardiac conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T. (Inventor); Arenare, Brian (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac electrical data are received from a patient, manipulated to determine various useful aspects of the ECG signal, and displayed and stored in a useful form using a computer. The computer monitor displays various useful information, and in particular graphically displays various permutations of reduced amplitude zones and kurtosis that increase the rapidity and accuracy of cardiac diagnoses. New criteria for reduced amplitude zones are defined that enhance the sensitivity and specificity for detecting cardiac abnormalities.

  10. Computational approaches to understand cardiac electrophysiology and arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Byron N.; Yang, Pei-Chi; Behrens, Steven B.; Moreno, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac rhythms arise from electrical activity generated by precisely timed opening and closing of ion channels in individual cardiac myocytes. These impulses spread throughout the cardiac muscle to manifest as electrical waves in the whole heart. Regularity of electrical waves is critically important since they signal the heart muscle to contract, driving the primary function of the heart to act as a pump and deliver blood to the brain and vital organs. When electrical activity goes awry during a cardiac arrhythmia, the pump does not function, the brain does not receive oxygenated blood, and death ensues. For more than 50 years, mathematically based models of cardiac electrical activity have been used to improve understanding of basic mechanisms of normal and abnormal cardiac electrical function. Computer-based modeling approaches to understand cardiac activity are uniquely helpful because they allow for distillation of complex emergent behaviors into the key contributing components underlying them. Here we review the latest advances and novel concepts in the field as they relate to understanding the complex interplay between electrical, mechanical, structural, and genetic mechanisms during arrhythmia development at the level of ion channels, cells, and tissues. We also discuss the latest computational approaches to guiding arrhythmia therapy. PMID:22886409

  11. The use of gated radionuclide angiography in the diagnosis of cardiac contusion

    SciTech Connect

    Fenner, J.E.; Knopp, R.; Lee, B.; dos Santos, P.A.; Wessel, R.J.; Dang, C.V.; Parks, S.N.

    1984-09-01

    No currently used diagnostic test is an accurate predictor of patients who will develop morbidity or mortality from cardiac contusion. In a prospective study we used gated cardiac radionuclide angiography to assess cardiac function in 30 patients with blunt chest trauma, and we compared the results of this test with those of other diagnostic studies for cardiac contusion to determine whether gated angiography is a more accurate predictor of serious cardiac injury. Diagnostic tests included the following: serial electrocardiograms (ECG), serial creatine phosphokinase muscle-brain isoenzyme (CPK-MB) and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) isoenzymes, gated cardiac radionuclide angiography, and technetium-99m (Tc-99m) pyrophosphate scintigraphy. Abnormal studies were present in 26 patients; 22 showed abnormalities in CPK-MB, 19 on ECG, and five on gated scan. No patient demonstrated an abnormal Tc-99m pyrophosphate scan or abnormal elevation of LDH isoenzyme. Although no diagnostic test was predictive of morbidity and mortality, CPK-MB isoenzyme was the only test to correlate with morbidity and mortality. Morbidity and mortality correlated most closely with the number of associated major injuries and the presence of hypotension or hypoxia.

  12. In vivo validation of cardiac output assessment in non-standard 3D echocardiographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nillesen, M. M.; Lopata, R. G. P.; de Boode, W. P.; Gerrits, I. H.; Huisman, H. J.; Thijssen, J. M.; Kapusta, L.; de Korte, C. L.

    2009-04-01

    Automatic segmentation of the endocardial surface in three-dimensional (3D) echocardiographic images is an important tool to assess left ventricular (LV) geometry and cardiac output (CO). The presence of speckle noise as well as the nonisotropic characteristics of the myocardium impose strong demands on the segmentation algorithm. In the analysis of normal heart geometries of standardized (apical) views, it is advantageous to incorporate a priori knowledge about the shape and appearance of the heart. In contrast, when analyzing abnormal heart geometries, for example in children with congenital malformations, this a priori knowledge about the shape and anatomy of the LV might induce erroneous segmentation results. This study describes a fully automated segmentation method for the analysis of non-standard echocardiographic images, without making strong assumptions on the shape and appearance of the heart. The method was validated in vivo in a piglet model. Real-time 3D echocardiographic image sequences of five piglets were acquired in radiofrequency (rf) format. These ECG-gated full volume images were acquired intra-operatively in a non-standard view. Cardiac blood flow was measured simultaneously by an ultrasound transit time flow probe positioned around the common pulmonary artery. Three-dimensional adaptive filtering using the characteristics of speckle was performed on the demodulated rf data to reduce the influence of speckle noise and to optimize the distinction between blood and myocardium. A gradient-based 3D deformable simplex mesh was then used to segment the endocardial surface. A gradient and a speed force were included as external forces of the model. To balance data fitting and mesh regularity, one fixed set of weighting parameters of internal, gradient and speed forces was used for all data sets. End-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were computed from the segmented endocardial surface. The cardiac output derived from this automatic segmentation was validated quantitatively by comparing it with the CO values measured from the volume flow in the pulmonary artery. Relative bias varied between 0 and -17%, where the nominal accuracy of the flow meter is in the order of 10%. Assuming the CO measurements from the flow probe as a gold standard, excellent correlation (r = 0.99) was observed with the CO estimates obtained from image segmentation.

  13. [Cardiac involvement in polymyositis].

    PubMed

    Romdhane, M B; Mahdhaoui, A; Khelifa, M B; Lagren, A; Hajri, S E; Bouraoui, H; Trimeche, B; Ghannouchi, N; Jeridi, G; Bahri, F

    2012-08-01

    Cardiovascular involvement in polymyositis constitutes a major cause of death. However, the cardiac location is rarely symptomatic and does not usually represent the principle clinical feature at the time of the initial presentation. We present here an unusual case of polymyositis with severe and polymorph cardiac disturbances that predominant the muscular signs. PMID:20709312

  14. abnormalities in infants and toddlers

    E-print Network

    Bellugi, Ursula

    , Akshoomoff 2000). Similarly, patients with fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) have decreased cerebellar volumesCerebellar abnormalities in infants and toddlers with Williams syndrome Wendy Jones* PhD, The Salk-mail: jones@crl.ucsd.edu One commonly observed neuroanatomical abnormality in adults with Williams syndrome

  15. Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

  16. Non-Invasive Measurement of Intracranial Pressure Pulsation using Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ueno, Toshiaki; Ballard, R. E.; Yost, W. T.; Hargens, A. R.

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to microgravity causes a cephalad fluid shift which may elevate intracranial pressure (ICP). Elevation in ICP may affect cerebral hemodynamics in astronauts during space flight. ICP is, however, a difficult parameter to measure due to the invasiveness of currently available techniques. We already reported our development of a non-invasive ultrasound device for measurement of ICP. We recently modified the device so that we might reproducibly estimate ICP changes in association with cardiac cycles. In the first experiment, we measured changes in cranial distance with the ultrasound device in cadavera while changing ICP by infusing saline into the lateral ventricle. In the second experiment, we measured changes in cranial distance in five healthy volunteers while placing them in 60 deg, 30 deg head-up tilt, supine, and 10 deg head-down tilt position. In the cadaver study, fast Fourier transformation revealed that cranial pulsation is clearly associated with ICP pulsation. The ratio of cranial distance and ICP pulsation is 1.3microns/mmHg. In the tilting study, the magnitudes of cranial pulsation are linearly correlated to tilt angles (r=0.87). The ultrasound device has sufficient sensitivity to detect cranial pulsation in association with cardiac cycles. By analyzing the magnitude of cranial pulsation, estimates of ICP during space flight are possible.

  17. SPECKLE DETECTION ULTRASOUND IMAGES USING

    E-print Network

    Drummond, Tom

    SPECKLE DETECTION ULTRASOUND IMAGES USING FIRST ORDER STATISTICS Prager, Gee, Treece Berman CUED England Email: rwp/ahg/gmt11 @eng.cam.ac.uk, lb@radiol.cam.ac.uk #12; #12; Speckle Detection Ultrasound Addenbrooke's Hospital Cambridge CB2 2QQ Abstract necessary identify speckled regions ultrasound images

  18. Renal ultrasound elastography.

    PubMed

    Grenier, N; Gennisson, J-L; Cornelis, F; Le Bras, Y; Couzi, L

    2013-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) incidence and prevalence are increasing in Western countries, due particularly to diabetes mellitus and hypertension-related nephropathies. CKD may lead to end-stage renal failure, with extensive morbidity, mortality and increasing health costs. Primary and secondary prevention requires a better knowledge of mechanisms underlying renal scarring, the development of specific therapies to slow down the progression of the disease and the development of non-invasive diagnostic tools to characterize the process. Ultrasound elastography is a new imaging technique under development that provides information about renal stiffness. Kidney elasticity measurements with ultrasound should be performed with a quantitative technique, such as Shearwave techniques. However kidney stiffness is not only related to fibrosis, as it also sensitive to mechanical and functional parameters such as anisotropy, vascularization, hydronephrosis and external pressure. This paper reviews the existing ultrasound elastography techniques. Elastography is a new tool under development for renal tissue characterization and needs further validation in clinical practice. PMID:23567180

  19. Ultrasound elastography in liver.

    PubMed

    Frulio, N; Trillaud, H

    2013-05-01

    Conventional imaging techniques cannot provide information about tissue mechanical properties. Many injuries can cause changes in tissue stiffness, especially tumors and fibrosis. In recent years, various non-invasive ultrasound methods have been developed to study tissue elasticity for a large number of applications (breast, thyroid, prostate, kidneys, blood vessels, liver…). For non-invasive assessment of liver diseases, several ultrasound elastography techniques have been investigated: Transient elastography (the most extensively used), Real Time Elastography (RTE), Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging (ARFI) and more recently Shear Wave Elastography (SWE). Even if evaluation of liver fibrosis in chronic liver disease remains the principal application, there are many others applications for liver: predicting cirrhosis-related complications; monitoring antiviral treatments in chronic viral liver disease; characterizing liver tumors; monitoring local treatments, etc. The aim of this article is to report on the different hepatic ultrasound elastography techniques, their advantages and disadvantages, their diagnostic accuracy, their applications in clinical practice. PMID:23623211

  20. Robotically assisted ultrasound interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jienan; Swerdlow, Dan; Wang, Shuxin; Wilson, Emmanuel; Tang, Jonathan; Cleary, Kevin

    2008-03-01

    The goal of this project is to develop a robotic system to assist the physician in minimally invasive ultrasound interventions. In current practice, the physician must manually hold the ultrasound probe in one hand and manipulate the needle with the other hand, which can be challenging, particularly when trying to target small lesions. To assist the physician, the robot should not only be capable of providing the spatial movement needed, but also be able to control the contact force between the ultrasound probe and patient. To meet these requirements, we are developing a prototype system based on a six degree of freedom parallel robot. The system will provide high bandwidth, precision motion, and force control. In this paper we report on our progress to date, including the development of a PC-based control system and the results of our initial experiments.

  1. Ultrasound of Peripheral Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Jung Im; Walker, Francis O.; Cartwright, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, neuromuscular ultrasound has emerged as a useful tool for the diagnosis of peripheral nerve disorders. This article reviews sonographic findings of normal nerves including key quantitative ultrasound measurements that are helpful in the evaluation of focal and possibly generalized peripheral neuropathies. It also discusses several recent papers outlining the evidence base for the use of this technology, as well as new findings in compressive, traumatic, and generalized neuropathies. Ultrasound is well suited for use in electrodiagnostic laboratories where physicians, experienced in both the clinical evaluation of patients and the application of hands-on technology, can integrate findings from the patient’s history, physical examination, electrophysiological studies, and imaging for diagnosis and management. PMID:23314937

  2. Functional cardiac tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Liau, Brian; Zhang, Donghui; Bursac, Nenad

    2013-01-01

    Heart attack remains the leading cause of death in both men and women worldwide. Stem cell-based therapies, including the use of engineered cardiac tissues, have the potential to treat the massive cell loss and pathological remodeling resulting from heart attack. Specifically, embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells are a promising source for generation of therapeutically relevant numbers of functional cardiomyocytes and engineering of cardiac tissues in vitro. This review will describe methodologies for successful differentiation of pluripotent stem cells towards the cardiovascular cell lineages as they pertain to the field of cardiac tissue engineering. The emphasis will be placed on comparing the functional maturation in engineered cardiac tissues and developing heart and on methods to quantify cardiac electrical and mechanical function at different spatial scales. PMID:22397609

  3. Differential diagnosis of cardiovascular symptoms: setting the expectations for the ultrasound examination and medical education.

    PubMed

    Fox, J Christian; Marino, Heather; Fischetti, Chanel

    2013-12-01

    Within the past several decades, dramatic changes have been made in the field of diagnostic imaging. Many of these changes have been with ultrasound, which has been transformative in the efficiency and accuracy of diagnostics. Emergency physicians, intensivists, and other acute care clinicians are using and relying on critical care ultrasound imaging to better triage and diagnose patients at the point of care. As this new frontier of medicine continues to forge forward using this new and improving technology, we strongly believe in integrating ultrasound training earlier into the medical education curriculum. This paper reviews and discusses the transformation of medical diagnostics within the last few decades and describes changes that should be expected as point-of-care cardiac ultrasound evolves within medical education. PMID:25690628

  4. Investigating the Mechanism of Hyperglycemia-Induced Fetal Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zheng-lai; Jia, Wei-jing; Wu, Xia; Wang, Xiao-yu; He, Mei-yao; Cheng, Xin; Li, Wei-jing; Yang, Xuesong; Liu, Guo-sheng

    2015-01-01

    Hyperglycemia in diabetic mothers enhances the risk of fetal cardiac hypertrophy during gestation. However, the mechanism of high-glucose-induced cardiac hypertrophy is not largely understood. In this study, we first demonstrated that the incidence rate of cardiac hypertrophy dramatically increased in fetuses of diabetic mothers using color ultrasound examination. In addition, human fetal cardiac hypertrophy was successfully mimicked in a streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes mouse model, in which mouse cardiac hypertrophy was diagnosed using type-M ultrasound and a histological assay. PH3 immunofluorescent staining of mouse fetal hearts and in vitro-cultured H9c2 cells indicated that cell proliferation decreased in E18.5, E15.5 and E13.5 mice, and cell apoptosis in H9c2 cells increased in the presence of high glucose in a dose-dependent manner. Next, we found that the individual cardiomyocyte size increased in pre-gestational diabetes mellitus mice and in response to high glucose exposure. Meanwhile, the expression of ?-MHC and BMP-10 was up-regulated. Nkx2.5 immunofluorescent staining showed that the expression of Nkx2.5, a crucial cardiac transcription factor, was suppressed in the ventricular septum, left ventricular wall and right ventricular wall of E18.5, E15.5 and E13.5 mouse hearts. However, cardiac hypertrophy did not morphologically occur in E13.5 mouse hearts. In cultured H9c2 cells exposed to high glucose, Nkx2.5 expression decreased, as detected by both immunostaining and western blotting, and the expression of KCNE1 and Cx43 was also restricted. Taken together, alterations in cell size rather than cell proliferation or apoptosis are responsible for hyperglycemia-induced fetal cardiac hypertrophy. The aberrant expression of Nkx2.5 and its regulatory target genes in the presence of high glucose could be a principal component of pathogenesis in the development of fetal cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:26418041

  5. International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation working formulation of a standardized nomenclature for cardiac allograft vasculopathy-2010.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Mandeep R; Crespo-Leiro, Maria G; Dipchand, Anne; Ensminger, Stephan M; Hiemann, Nicola E; Kobashigawa, Jon A; Madsen, Joren; Parameshwar, Jayan; Starling, Randall C; Uber, Patricia A

    2010-07-01

    The development of cardiac allograft vasculopathy remains the Achilles heel of cardiac transplantation. Unfortunately, the definitions of cardiac allograft vasculopathy are diverse, and there are no uniform international standards for the nomenclature of this entity. This consensus document, commissioned by the International Society of Heart and Lung Transplantation Board, is based on best evidence and clinical consensus derived from critical analysis of available information pertaining to angiography, intravascular ultrasound imaging, microvascular function, cardiac allograft histology, circulating immune markers, non-invasive imaging tests, and gene-based and protein-based biomarkers. This document represents a working formulation for an international nomenclature of cardiac allograft vasculopathy, similar to the development of the system for adjudication of cardiac allograft rejection by histology. PMID:20620917

  6. Ultrasound of the extrahepatic bile duct: issues of size.

    PubMed

    Horrow, Mindy M

    2010-06-01

    Ultrasound is a pivotal study for evaluation of the biliary tree. In particular, the size of the extrahepatic bile duct is a critical measurement and has been a contentious issue since the early days of diagnostic ultrasound. This article reviews the history and ongoing issues regarding sonography of the normal-size duct and a variety of factors that may affect its size, including age, prior surgery, congenital abnormalities, anatomical variations, and medications. Other related sonographic issues are discussed including abnormal nondilated ducts and abnormal intraluminal contents such as sludge or air that make evaluation of the duct more difficult, particularly in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis and prior liver transplantation. Ultimately, the luminal size of the extrahepatic duct should be considered as a single part of the entire assessment of the biliary tree that must also include the intrahepatic and pancreatic ducts, the pattern of dilatation (variable vs progressively dilated to a single point of obstruction), any wall thickening, intraluminal sludge, calculi or mass, and extraluminal compression. Clinical symptoms and abnormal laboratory values should prompt further evaluation despite a normal appearance of the bile duct, whereas pursuit of an isolated finding of an enlarged duct without supporting clinical data may not be warranted. PMID:20498562

  7. Metabolic abnormalities in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Mao, Zhiguo; Xie, Guoqiang; Ong, Albert C M

    2015-02-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common inherited kidney disorder and is known to affect all ethnic groups with a prevalence of 1:400-1:1000 live births. The kidney in ADKPD is characterized by the formation of numerous cysts which progressively expand and eventually destroy normal kidney structure and function. Cysts occur in other organs outside the kidney, most commonly in the liver, pancreas and spleen. Important non-cystic features include intracranial aneurysms and cardiac valve defects. Less well recognized are a range of metabolic abnormalities, which could be involved in cystic disease progression or be associated with other disease complications. In this review, we summarize the literature suggesting that metabolic abnormalities could be important under-recognised and under-treated features in ADPKD. PMID:24589722

  8. Congenital anomaly of combined tracheal and accessory cardiac bronchus.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Christopher R; Cox, Phillip D; Toth, Jennifer W; Kaifi, Jussuf T; Reed, Michael F

    2013-01-01

    The presence of congenital tracheobronchial abnormalities remain rare and have been reported to range from 0.1% to 2% in the literature. The most commonly described abnormalities are the tracheal bronchus and the accessory cardiac bronchus. We present the case of a 67-year-old man presenting for evaluation of interstitial lung disease, on computed tomography found to have presence of both the anomalies; the findings later confirmed on bronchoscopy. We believe this report is important as it adds more descriptive information regarding this unusual presentation, including bronchoscopic and computed tomographic images. We believe that it is imperative that bronchoscopists are cognizant of these congenital abnormalities and their combinations. Inability to properly characterize these abnormalities has a potential leading to unnecessary investigations of these relatively benign entities. PMID:23328152

  9. Analysis of left atrial respiratory and cardiac motion for cardiac ablation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettmann, M. E.; Holmes, D. R.; Johnson, S. B.; Lehmann, H. I.; Robb, R. A.; Packer, D. L.

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac ablation therapy is often guided by models built from preoperative computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. One of the challenges in guiding a procedure from a preoperative model is properly synching the preoperative models with cardiac and respiratory motion through computational motion models. In this paper, we describe a methodology for evaluating cardiac and respiratory motion in the left atrium and pulmonary veins of a beating canine heart. Cardiac catheters were used to place metal clips within and near the pulmonary veins and left atrial appendage under fluoroscopic and ultrasound guidance and a contrast-enhanced, 64-slice multidetector CT scan was collected with the clips in place. Each clip was segmented from the CT scan at each of the five phases of the cardiac cycle at both end-inspiration and end-expiration. The centroid of each segmented clip was computed and used to evaluate both cardiac and respiratory motion of the left atrium. A total of three canine studies were completed, with 4 clips analyzed in the first study, 5 clips in the second study, and 2 clips in the third study. Mean respiratory displacement was 0.2+/-1.8 mm in the medial/lateral direction, 4.7+/-4.4 mm in the anterior/posterior direction (moving anterior on inspiration), and 9.0+/-5.0 mm superior/inferior (moving inferior with inspiration). At end inspiration, the mean left atrial cardiac motion at the clip locations was 1.5+/-1.3 mm in the medial/lateral direction, and 2.1+/-2.0 mm in the anterior/posterior and 1.3+/-1.2 mm superior/inferior directions. At end expiration, the mean left atrial cardiac motion at the clip locations was 2.0+/-1.5mm in the medial/lateral direction, 3.0+/-1.8mm in the anterior/posterior direction, and 1.5+/-1.5 mm in the superior/inferior directions.

  10. Focused Ultrasound and Lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Teiichiro; Yoshizawa, Shin; Koizumi, Norihiro; Mitsuishi, Mamoru; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Shock wave lithotripsy has generally been a first choice for kidney stone removal. The shock wave lithotripter uses an order of microsecond pulse durations and up to a 100 MPa pressure spike triggered at approximately 0.5-2 Hz to fragment kidney stones through mechanical mechanisms. One important mechanism is cavitation. We proposed an alternative type of lithotripsy method that maximizes cavitation activity to disintegrate kidney stones using high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Here we outline the method according to the previously published literature (Matsumoto et al., Dynamics of bubble cloud in focused ultrasound. Proceedings of the second international symposium on therapeutic ultrasound, pp 290-299, 2002; Ikeda et al., Ultrasound Med Biol 32:1383-1397, 2006; Yoshizawa et al., Med Biol Eng Comput 47:851-860, 2009; Koizumi et al., A control framework for the non-invasive ultrasound the ragnostic system. Proceedings of 2009 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robotics and Systems (IROS), pp 4511-4516, 2009; Koizumi et al., IEEE Trans Robot 25:522-538, 2009). Cavitation activity is highly unpredictable; thus, a precise control system is needed. The proposed method comprises three steps of control in kidney stone treatment. The first step is control of localized high pressure fluctuation on the stone. The second step is monitoring of cavitation activity and giving feedback on the optimized ultrasound conditions. The third step is stone tracking and precise ultrasound focusing on the stone. For the high pressure control we designed a two-frequency wave (cavitation control (C-C) waveform); a high frequency ultrasound pulse (1-4 MHz) to create a cavitation cloud, and a low frequency trailing pulse (0.5 MHz) following the high frequency pulse to force the cloud into collapse. High speed photography showed cavitation collapse on a kidney stone and shock wave emission from the cloud. We also conducted in-vitro erosion tests of model and natural kidney stones. For the model stones, the erosion rate of the C-C waveform showed a distinct advantage with the combined high and low frequency waves over either wave alone. For optimization of the high frequency ultrasound intensity, we investigated the relationship between subharmonic emission from cavitation bubbles and stone erosion volume. For stone tracking we have also developed a non-invasive ultrasound theragnostic system (NIUTS) that compensates for kidney motion. Natural stones were eroded and most of the resulting fragments were less than 1 mm in diameter. The small fragments were small enough to pass through the urethra. The results demonstrate that, with the precise control of cavitation activity, focused ultrasound has the potential to be used to develop a less invasive and more controllable lithotripsy system. PMID:26486335

  11. Clinical cardiac safety profile of nilotinib

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Theo D.; le Coutre, Philipp; Schwarz, Michaela; Grille, Peggy; Levitin, Michal; Fateh-Moghadam, Suzanne; Giles, Francis J.; Dörken, Bernd; Haverkamp, Wilhelm; Köhncke, Clemens

    2012-01-01

    Background Nilotinib is a second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor with significant efficacy as first- or second-line treatment in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia. Despite preclinical evidence indicating a risk of prolongation of the QT interval, which was confirmed in clinical trials, detailed information on nilotinib’s cardiac safety profile is lacking. Design and Methods Here, we retrospectively assessed cardiovascular risk factors in 81 patients who were being or had previously been treated with nilotinib therapy and evaluated cardiovascular parameters by longitudinal monitoring of the QT interval and left ventricular ejection fraction. Detailed information on the occurrence and management of defined cardiac adverse events was extracted. Results The median duration of nilotinib therapy was 26 months (range, 1–72). The median QT interval at baseline was 413 msec (range, 368–499 msec). During follow-up, the median QT was not significantly different from the baseline value at any time-point. Sixteen of 81 patients (20%) had new electrocardiographic changes. Cardiac function, as assessed by measurement of left ventricular ejection fraction, did not change significantly from baseline at any time-point. During a median follow-up of 44 months (range, 2–73), seven patients (9%), all of whom had received prior imatinib therapy, developed 11 clinical cardiac adverse events requiring treatment. The median time from the start of nilotinib therapy to an event was 14.5 months (range, 2–68). Five of seven patients were able to continue nilotinib therapy with only one brief interruption. Conclusions Whereas new electrocardiographic abnormalities were recorded in 20% of all patients and some of them developed severe or even life-threatening coronary artery disease, QT prolongation, changes in left ventricular ejection fraction, and clinical cardiac adverse events were uncommon in patients treated with nilotinib. PMID:22271904

  12. Chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    The ability to analyze human sperm chromosome complements after penetration of zona pellucida-free hamster eggs provides the first opportunity to study the frequency and type of chromosomal abnormalities in human gametes. Two large-scale studies have provided information on normal men. We have studied 1,426 sperm complements from 45 normal men and found an abnormality rate of 8.9%. Brandriff et al. (5) found 8.1% abnormal complements in 909 sperm from 4 men. The distribution of numerical and structural abnormalities was markedly dissimilar in the 2 studies. The frequency of aneuploidy was 5% in our sample and only 1.6% in Brandriff's, perhaps reflecting individual variability among donors. The frequency of 24,YY sperm was low: 0/1,426 and 1/909. This suggests that the estimates of nondisjunction based on fluorescent Y body data (1% to 5%) are not accurate. We have also studied men at increased risk of sperm chromosomal abnormalities. The frequency of chromosomally unbalanced sperm in 6 men heterozygous for structural abnormalities varied dramatically: 77% for t11;22, 32% for t6;14, 19% for t5;18, 13% for t14;21, and 0% for inv 3 and 7. We have also studied 13 cancer patients before and after radiotherapy and demonstrated a significant dose-dependent increase of sperm chromosome abnormalities (numerical and structural) 36 months after radiation treatment.

  13. Haematological abnormalities in mitochondrial disorders

    PubMed Central

    Finsterer, Josef; Frank, Marlies

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This study aimed to assess the kind of haematological abnormalities that are present in patients with mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) and the frequency of their occurrence. METHODS The blood cell counts of a cohort of patients with syndromic and non-syndromic MIDs were retrospectively reviewed. MIDs were classified as ‘definite’, ‘probable’ or ‘possible’ according to clinical presentation, instrumental findings, immunohistological findings on muscle biopsy, biochemical abnormalities of the respiratory chain and/or the results of genetic studies. Patients who had medical conditions other than MID that account for the haematological abnormalities were excluded. RESULTS A total of 46 patients (‘definite’ = 5; ‘probable’ = 9; ‘possible’ = 32) had haematological abnormalities attributable to MIDs. The most frequent haematological abnormality in patients with MIDs was anaemia. 27 patients had anaemia as their sole haematological problem. Anaemia was associated with thrombopenia (n = 4), thrombocytosis (n = 2), leucopenia (n = 2), and eosinophilia (n = 1). Anaemia was hypochromic and normocytic in 27 patients, hypochromic and microcytic in six patients, hyperchromic and macrocytic in two patients, and normochromic and microcytic in one patient. Among the 46 patients with a mitochondrial haematological abnormality, 78.3% had anaemia, 13.0% had thrombopenia, 8.7% had leucopenia and 8.7% had eosinophilia, alone or in combination with other haematological abnormalities. CONCLUSION MID should be considered if a patient’s abnormal blood cell counts (particularly those associated with anaemia, thrombopenia, leucopenia or eosinophilia) cannot be explained by established causes. Abnormal blood cell counts may be the sole manifestation of MID or a collateral feature of a multisystem problem. PMID:26243978

  14. Recent advances in medical ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Lawrence

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasound has become one of the most widely used imaging modalities in medicine; yet, before ultrasound-imaging systems became available, high intensity ultrasound was used as early as the 1950s to ablate regions in the brains of human patients. Recently, a variety of novel applications of ultrasound have been developed that include site-specific and ultrasound-mediated drug delivery, acoustocautery, lipoplasty, histotripsy, tissue regeneration, and bloodless surgery, among many others. This lecture will review several new applications of therapeutic ultrasound and address some of the basic scientific questions and future challenges in developing these methods and technologies for general use in our society. We shall particularly emphasize the use of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) in the treatment of benign and malignant tumors.

  15. Functional imaging as an indicator of diagnostic information in cardiac magnetic-resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingler, Joseph W.; Andrews, Lee T.; Begeman, Michael S.; Zeiss, Jacob; Leighton, Richard F.

    1990-08-01

    Magnetic Resonance (MR) images of the human heart provide three dimensional geometric information about the location of cardiac structures throughout the cardiac cycle. Analysis of this four dimensional data set allows detection of abnormal cardiac function related to the presence of coronary artery disease. To assist in this analysis, quantitative measurements of cardiac performance are made from the MR data including ejection fractions, regional wall motion and myocardial wall thickening. Analysis of cardiac performance provided by quantitative analysis of MR data can be aided by computer graphics presentation techniques. Two and three dimensional functional images are computed to indicate regions of abnormality based on the previous methods. The two dimensional images are created using color graphics overlays on the original MR image to represent performance. Polygon surface modeling techniques are used to represent data which is three dimensional, such as blood pool volumes. The surface of these images are color encoded by regional ejection fraction, wall motion or wall thickening. A functional image sequence is constructed at each phase of the cardiac cycle and displayed as a movie loop for review by the physician. Selection of a region on the functional image allows visual interpretation of the original MR images, graphical plots of cardiac function and tabular results. Color encoding is based on absolute measurements and comparison to standard normal templates of cardiac performance.

  16. Prenatal-postnatal correlations of brain abnormalities: how lesions and diagnoses change over time

    PubMed Central

    Senapati, Gunjan; Levine, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    A combination of prenatal ultrasound and MRI can be used to detect and characterize many primary and secondary CNS abnormalities in the developing fetus. While this information is useful in prenatal patient counseling, it is important to understand the factors that can influence change in diagnosis and prognosis over time. The etiology of the abnormality, the conspicuity of associated findings, the change in appearance over time, and the opinion of subspecialty experts all can influence the diagnosis. Additionally, technical factors of imaging acquisition may allow the detection of an abnormality in the postnatal period and not prenatally. Having an understanding of the normal fetal central nervous system anatomy at varying gestational ages will aid in the imaging detection and interpretation of CNS pathology. Understanding how these appearances and diagnoses can change over time will aid in the discussion of prognosis with expectant parents, which is crucial in fetal CNS abnormalities. PMID:24078783

  17. Cardiac Arrest Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Guyette, Francis X; Reynolds, Joshua C; Frisch, Adam

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac arrest is a dynamic disease that tests the multitasking and leadership abilities of emergency physicians. Providers must simultaneously manage the logistics of resuscitation while searching for the cause of cardiac arrest. The astute clinician will also realize that he or she is orchestrating only one portion of a larger series of events, each of which directly affects patient outcomes. Resuscitation science is rapidly evolving, and emergency providers must be familiar with the latest evidence and controversies surrounding resuscitative techniques. This article reviews evidence, discusses controversies, and offers strategies to provide quality cardiac arrest resuscitation. PMID:26226873

  18. Altered mechanical state in the embryonic heart results in time-dependent decreases in cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Brennan; Bark, David; Van Herck, Ilse; Garrity, Deborah; Dasi, Lakshmi Prasad

    2015-11-01

    Proper blood flow patterns are critical for normal cardiac morphogenesis, a process that occurs rapidly in order to support further development of all tissue and organs. Previously, intracardiac fluid forces have been shown to play a critical role in cardiac morphogenesis. Altered blood flow in early development can result in an array of cardiac defects including ventricular septal defects, valve malformations, and impaired cardiac looping. However, given the dynamic and highly transient nature of cardiac morphogenesis, time dependency of the mechanical environment as an epigenetic factor in relation to intracardiac forces must be significant. Here, we show that abnormal cardiac loading adversely influences cardiac morphology only during certain time windows, thus confirming that mechanical factors are a time-dependent epigenetic factor. To illustrate this, groups of zebrafish embryos were spaced at 6-h increments from 24 to 48 h post-fertilization (hpf) in which embryos were centrifuged to generate a noninvasive alteration of cardiac preload in addition to an overall hypergravity environment. We found that earlier and later treatment groups responded with altered morphology and function, while the group with altered preload from 30 to 36 hpf had no effect. These results demonstrate the inherently time-dependent nature of epigenetic factors as pertaining to intracardiac forces and external mechanical factors. Further, it underscores the highly coupled nature of programmed biology and mechanical forces during cardiac morphogenesis. Future studies with respect to surgical correction during cardiac morphogenesis must consider timing to optimize therapeutic impact. PMID:25976479

  19. Detection of Subpubic Tumor Causing Bladder Outlet Obstruction by 3D?Perineal Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Albrich, S.; Steetskamp, J.; Rommens, K.; Porta, S.; Battista, M.; Hoffmann, G.; Skala, C.

    2015-01-01

    This case report shows that 3D?perineal ultrasound can be superior to clinical examination and routine 2D?perineal ultrasound in the detection of an unusual subpubic tumor. A 73-year-old female patient was referred to our urogynecological outpatient unit complaining of over-active bladder symptoms and voiding dysfunction for 3 years. Gynecological examination found no signs of pelvic organ prolapse or abnormality in the vaginal cavity. Routine 2D?perineal ultrasound showed substantial residual urine (ca. 300?ml on catheter) and limited bladder neck mobility, but no signs of pelvic organ prolapse. Use of standardized 3D?perineal ultrasound revealed a 24?×?26?×?32?mm spherical, hypoechoic tumor below the pubic symphysis between the distal urethra and the pubic bones. This structure was mistaken for the pubic symphysis in the midline on 2D?ultrasound performed earlier. At surgery, the tumor was completely excised through a vaginal incision between the urethra and the pubic symphysis. After an uneventful postoperative recovery the patient developed de-novo stress urinary incontinence, which was corrected successfully by the insertion of a retropubic tension-free suburethral sling after an interval of 8 weeks. After a further follow-up of 8 weeks the patient reported well-being, urinary continence and no voiding dysfunction; no abnormalities were found on examination. In conclusion, 3D?perineal ultrasound is a useful additional tool for the diagnostic workup of bladder outlet obstruction. PMID:26257409

  20. Ultrasound strain imaging for quantification of tissue function: cardiovascular applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Korte, Chris L.; Lopata, Richard G. P.; Hansen, Hendrik H. G.

    2013-03-01

    With ultrasound imaging, the motion and deformation of tissue can be measured. Tissue can be deformed by applying a force on it and the resulting deformation is a function of its mechanical properties. Quantification of this resulting tissue deformation to assess the mechanical properties of tissue is called elastography. If the tissue under interrogation is actively deforming, the deformation is directly related to its function and quantification of this deformation is normally referred as `strain imaging'. Elastography can be used for atherosclerotic plaques characterization, while the contractility of the heart or skeletal muscles can be assessed with strain imaging. We developed radio frequency (RF) based ultrasound methods to assess the deformation at higher resolution and with higher accuracy than commercial methods using conventional image data (Tissue Doppler Imaging and 2D speckle tracking methods). However, the improvement in accuracy is mainly achieved when measuring strain along the ultrasound beam direction, so 1D. We further extended this method to multiple directions and further improved precision by using compounding of data acquired at multiple beam steered angles. In arteries, the presence of vulnerable plaques may lead to acute events like stroke and myocardial infarction. Consequently, timely detection of these plaques is of great diagnostic value. Non-invasive ultrasound strain compounding is currently being evaluated as a diagnostic tool to identify the vulnerability of plaques. In the heart, we determined the strain locally and at high resolution resulting in a local assessment in contrary to conventional global functional parameters like cardiac output or shortening fraction.

  1. Shigeo Satomura: 60 years of Doppler ultrasound in medicine.

    PubMed

    Coman, Ioan M; Popescu, Bogdan A

    2015-01-01

    This year we celebrate 60 years since Shigeo Satomura published the first measurements of the Doppler shift of ultrasonic signals from a beating heart. He demonstrated that Doppler signals can be retrieved from heart movements when insonated with 3 MHz ultrasonic waves. Later, togheter with Ziro Kaneko, he constructed the first Doppler flowmeter to measure the blood flow velocities in peripheral and extracranial brain-supplying vessels using ultrasounds. They proved that ultrasonic Doppler signals from arteries and veins can be recorded from the surface of the skin and pioneered transcutaneous flow analysis in systole and diastole in both normal and diseased blood vessels. These were the first medical applications of Doppler sonography and impressive technologic innovations have been continuing ever since. Over time, Doppler techniques became a key player in diagnostic ultrasound for hemodynamic assessment, replacing cardiac catheterization in many clinical settings. PMID:26699126

  2. Fetal cardiac activity analysis during twin pregnancy using a multi-channel SQUID system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa Monteiro, E.; Schleussner, E.; Kausch, S.; Grimm, B.; Schneider, A.; Hall Barbosa, C.; Haueisen, J.

    2001-05-01

    The use of SQUID magnetometers for non-invasive in utero assessment of cardiac electrical disturbances has already been shown to be a valuable clinical tool. In this way, its applicability also for the complicated case of twin pregnancy, in which the proximity of the cardiac magnetic source of each fetus can hamper the individual analysis of cardiac electrical activity, is of clinical interest. In this paper, we present fetal magnetocardiography performed on a mother pregnant of twins with 26 weeks gestational age, measured inside a magnetically shielded room, by using two identical 31-channel low- Tc SQUID magnetometer systems. Each sensor array has been positioned over one of the fetuses, according to its heart position previously assessed with the aid of ultrasound measurements. The raw data is initially averaged in time and, afterwards, analyzed by means of time plots and isofield maps. The time recordings allow the study of the morphology of each fetus’ cardiac signal and the cardiac time intervals. The resultant equivalent dipole obtained from the isofield maps indicates the position and orientation of each fetus heart. The results agree with the ultrasound analysis performed immediately before the measurements and used to obtain the approximate location of the fetuses’ hearts. Since a distinct analysis of the cardiac electrical activity of each fetus could be achieved, the results indicate the potential of the fetal magnetocardiography in the individual antenatal diagnosis of each one of the fetuses of a twin pregnancy.

  3. Prenatal ultrasound diagnosis of fetal candida infection: a complication of a retained intrauterine contraceptive device.

    PubMed

    Silver, D A; Ashworth, M T; Andrews, H S

    1994-03-01

    A 32-year-old woman was referred complaining of abdominal pain and bleeding at 18 weeks' gestation. The striking finding on ultrasound examination was of symmetrically enlarged echogenic fetal lungs. In addition, mediastinal compression, increased echogenicity of the kidneys and bowel, an enlarged liver of decreased echogenicity, and hydrops fetalis, as evidenced by ascites and skin edema, were all present. The differential diagnosis included upper respiratory tract obstruction and cystic kidney disease. The presence of fetal hydrops together with the other findings suggested a poor outcome, and on these grounds therapeutic abortion was recommended and performed. Subsequent postmortem findings explained all the ultrasound abnormalities on the basis of extensive fetal candida infection. The presence of a retained intrauterine contraceptive device was considered to be the likely cause and the implications of this, together with the ultrasound abnormalities and differential diagnoses, are discussed. PMID:12797212

  4. Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Contents Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Exercises Related Articles Exercise for People with Multiple Sclerosis - Series II Focus on Secondary Condition Prevention: Walking Program to Reduce Secondary Conditions in Adolescents with Autism Volkssport: The Foundations for a Lifetime ...

  5. Depression and cardiac disease: epidemiology, mechanisms, and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Huffman, Jeff C; Celano, Christopher M; Beach, Scott R; Motiwala, Shweta R; Januzzi, James L

    2013-01-01

    In patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD), depression is common, persistent, and associated with worse health-related quality of life, recurrent cardiac events, and mortality. Both physiological and behavioral factors-including endothelial dysfunction, platelet abnormalities, inflammation, autonomic nervous system dysfunction, and reduced engagement in health-promoting activities-may link depression with adverse cardiac outcomes. Because of the potential impact of depression on quality of life and cardiac outcomes, the American Heart Association has recommended routine depression screening of all cardiac patients with the 2- and 9-item Patient Health Questionnaires. However, despite the availability of these easy-to-use screening tools and effective treatments, depression is underrecognized and undertreated in patients with CVD. In this paper, we review the literature on epidemiology, phenomenology, comorbid conditions, and risk factors for depression in cardiac disease. We outline the associations between depression and cardiac outcomes, as well as the mechanisms that may mediate these links. Finally, we discuss the evidence for and against routine depression screening in patients with CVD and make specific recommendations for when and how to assess for depression in this high-risk population. PMID:23653854

  6. Depression and Cardiac Disease: Epidemiology, Mechanisms, and Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Huffman, Jeff C.; Celano, Christopher M.; Beach, Scott R.; Motiwala, Shweta R.; Januzzi, James L.

    2013-01-01

    In patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD), depression is common, persistent, and associated with worse health-related quality of life, recurrent cardiac events, and mortality. Both physiological and behavioral factors—including endothelial dysfunction, platelet abnormalities, inflammation, autonomic nervous system dysfunction, and reduced engagement in health-promoting activities—may link depression with adverse cardiac outcomes. Because of the potential impact of depression on quality of life and cardiac outcomes, the American Heart Association has recommended routine depression screening of all cardiac patients with the 2- and 9-item Patient Health Questionnaires. However, despite the availability of these easy-to-use screening tools and effective treatments, depression is underrecognized and undertreated in patients with CVD. In this paper, we review the literature on epidemiology, phenomenology, comorbid conditions, and risk factors for depression in cardiac disease. We outline the associations between depression and cardiac outcomes, as well as the mechanisms that may mediate these links. Finally, we discuss the evidence for and against routine depression screening in patients with CVD and make specific recommendations for when and how to assess for depression in this high-risk population. PMID:23653854

  7. Concise Review: Cardiac Disease Modeling Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunbo; Al-Aama, Jumana; Stojkovic, Miodrag; Keavney, Bernard; Trafford, Andrew; Lako, Majlinda; Armstrong, Lyle

    2015-09-01

    Genetic cardiac diseases are major causes of morbidity and mortality. Although animal models have been created to provide some useful insights into the pathogenesis of genetic cardiac diseases, the significant species differences and the lack of genetic information for complex genetic diseases markedly attenuate the application values of such data. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patient-specific specimens and subsequent derivation of cardiomyocytes offer novel avenues to study the mechanisms underlying cardiac diseases, to identify new causative genes, and to provide insights into the disease aetiology. In recent years, the list of human iPSC-based models for genetic cardiac diseases has been expanding rapidly, although there are still remaining concerns on the level of functionality of iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes and their ability to be used for modeling complex cardiac diseases in adults. This review focuses on the development of cardiomyocyte induction from pluripotent stem cells, the recent progress in heart disease modeling using iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes, and the challenges associated with understanding complex genetic diseases. To address these issues, we examine the similarity between iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes and their ex vivo counterparts and how this relates to the method used to differentiate the pluripotent stem cells into a cardiomyocyte phenotype. We progress to examine categories of congenital cardiac abnormalities that are suitable for iPSC-based disease modeling. PMID:26033645

  8. Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cardiac Arrest ( SCA ) occurs when the heart stops beating, abruptly and without warning. If this happens, blood ... when SCA occurs. During SCA , the heart stops beating and no blood is pumped to the rest ...

  9. Cardiac ablation procedures

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for performing cardiac ablation: Radiofrequency ablation uses heat energy to eliminate the problem area. Cryoablation uses very ... is used to send electrical (or sometimes cold) energy to the problem area. This creates a small ...

  10. Cardiac Risk Assessment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... helpful? Formal name: Cardiac Risk Assessment Related tests: Lipid Profile , VLDL Cholesterol , hs-CRP , Lp(a) Overview | ... on Coronary artery disease: Tests and diagnosis .) The lipid profile is the most important blood test for ...

  11. Pulmonary Congestion Predicts Cardiac Events and Mortality in ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Torino, Claudia; Tripepi, Rocco; Tripepi, Giovanni; D’Arrigo, Graziella; Postorino, Maurizio; Gargani, Luna; Sicari, Rosa; Picano, Eugenio; Mallamaci, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary congestion is highly prevalent and often asymptomatic among patients with ESRD treated with hemodialysis, but whether its presence predicts clinical outcomes is unknown. Here, we tested the prognostic value of extravascular lung water measured by a simple, well validated ultrasound B-lines score (BL-US) in a multicenter study that enrolled 392 hemodialysis patients. We detected moderate-to-severe lung congestion in 45% and very severe congestion in 14% of the patients. Among those patients with moderate-to-severe lung congestion, 71% were asymptomatic or presented slight symptoms of heart failure. Compared with those patients having mild or no congestion, patients with very severe congestion had a 4.2-fold risk of death (HR=4.20, 95% CI=2.45–7.23) and a 3.2-fold risk of cardiac events (HR=3.20, 95% CI=1.75–5.88) adjusted for NYHA class and other risk factors. Including the degree of pulmonary congestion in the model significantly improved the risk reclassification for cardiac events by 10% (P<0.015). In summary, lung ultrasound can detect asymptomatic pulmonary congestion in hemodialysis patients, and the resulting BL-US score is a strong, independent predictor of death and cardiac events in this population. PMID:23449536

  12. Pulmonary congestion predicts cardiac events and mortality in ESRD.

    PubMed

    Zoccali, Carmine; Torino, Claudia; Tripepi, Rocco; Tripepi, Giovanni; D'Arrigo, Graziella; Postorino, Maurizio; Gargani, Luna; Sicari, Rosa; Picano, Eugenio; Mallamaci, Francesca

    2013-03-01

    Pulmonary congestion is highly prevalent and often asymptomatic among patients with ESRD treated with hemodialysis, but whether its presence predicts clinical outcomes is unknown. Here, we tested the prognostic value of extravascular lung water measured by a simple, well validated ultrasound B-lines score (BL-US) in a multicenter study that enrolled 392 hemodialysis patients. We detected moderate-to-severe lung congestion in 45% and very severe congestion in 14% of the patients. Among those patients with moderate-to-severe lung congestion, 71% were asymptomatic or presented slight symptoms of heart failure. Compared with those patients having mild or no congestion, patients with very severe congestion had a 4.2-fold risk of death (HR=4.20, 95% CI=2.45-7.23) and a 3.2-fold risk of cardiac events (HR=3.20, 95% CI=1.75-5.88) adjusted for NYHA class and other risk factors. Including the degree of pulmonary congestion in the model significantly improved the risk reclassification for cardiac events by 10% (P<0.015). In summary, lung ultrasound can detect asymptomatic pulmonary congestion in hemodialysis patients, and the resulting BL-US score is a strong, independent predictor of death and cardiac events in this population. PMID:23449536

  13. Missed cardiac tamponade

    PubMed Central

    Thomson-Moore, Alexandra Louise

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac tamponade can have an insidious onset, becoming life threatening when an adequate cardiac output can no longer be maintained. This case provides an example of a presentation where all the classic signs were present but unfortunately they were missed, in this way providing good revision of what these signs are. It gives some anaesthetic and procedure based perspectives for this rare presentation. It is noteworthy for the speed at which symptoms and signs resolved after the tamponade was relieved. PMID:22679253

  14. Cardiac Applications of Optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosi, Christina M.; Klimas, Aleksandra; Yu, Jinzhu; Entcheva, Emilia

    2014-01-01

    In complex multicellular systems, such as the brain or the heart, the ability to selectively perturb and observe the response of individual components at the cellular level and with millisecond resolution in time, is essential for mechanistic understanding of function. Optogenetics uses genetic encoding of light sensitivity (by the expression of microbial opsins) to provide such capabilities for manipulation, recording, and control by light with cell specificity and high spatiotemporal resolution. As an optical approach, it is inherently scalable for remote and parallel interrogation of biological function at the tissue level; with implantable miniaturized devices, the technique is uniquely suitable for in vivo tracking of function, as illustrated by numerous applications in the brain. Its expansion into the cardiac area has been slow. Here, using examples from published research and original data, we focus on optogenetics applications to cardiac electrophysiology, specifically dealing with the ability to manipulate membrane voltage by light with implications for cardiac pacing, cardioversion, cell communication, and arrhythmia research, in general. We discuss gene and cell delivery methods of inscribing light sensitivity in cardiac tissue, functionality of the light-sensitive ion channels within different types of cardiac cells, utility in probing electrical coupling between different cell types, approaches and design solutions to all-optical electrophysiology by the combination of optogenetic sensors and actuators, and specific challenges in moving towards in vivo cardiac optogenetics. PMID:25035999

  15. Cardiac applications of optogenetics.

    PubMed

    Ambrosi, Christina M; Klimas, Aleksandra; Yu, Jinzhu; Entcheva, Emilia

    2014-08-01

    In complex multicellular systems, such as the brain or the heart, the ability to selectively perturb and observe the response of individual components at the cellular level and with millisecond resolution in time, is essential for mechanistic understanding of function. Optogenetics uses genetic encoding of light sensitivity (by the expression of microbial opsins) to provide such capabilities for manipulation, recording, and control by light with cell specificity and high spatiotemporal resolution. As an optical approach, it is inherently scalable for remote and parallel interrogation of biological function at the tissue level; with implantable miniaturized devices, the technique is uniquely suitable for in vivo tracking of function, as illustrated by numerous applications in the brain. Its expansion into the cardiac area has been slow. Here, using examples from published research and original data, we focus on optogenetics applications to cardiac electrophysiology, specifically dealing with the ability to manipulate membrane voltage by light with implications for cardiac pacing, cardioversion, cell communication, and arrhythmia research, in general. We discuss gene and cell delivery methods of inscribing light sensitivity in cardiac tissue, functionality of the light-sensitive ion channels within different types of cardiac cells, utility in probing electrical coupling between different cell types, approaches and design solutions to all-optical electrophysiology by the combination of optogenetic sensors and actuators, and specific challenges in moving towards in vivo cardiac optogenetics. PMID:25035999

  16. Spontaneous Pneumomediastinum on Bedside Ultrasound: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Zachariah, Sybil; Gharahbaghian, Laleh; Perera, Phillips; Joshi, Nikita

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous pneumomediastinum is a rare disease process with no clear etiology, although it is thought to be related to changes in intrathoracic pressure causing chest pain and dyspnea. We present a case of a 17-year-old male with acute chest pain evaluated initially by bedside ultrasound, which showed normal lung sliding but poor visualization of the parasternal and apical cardiac views due to significant air artifact, representing air in the thoracic cavity. The diagnosis was later verified by chest radiograph. We present a case report on ultrasound-diagnosed pneumomediastinum, and we review the diagnostic modalities to date. PMID:25834681

  17. Abnormal Cervical Cancer Screening Test Results

    MedlinePLUS

    ... AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ187 GYNECOLOGIC PROBLEMS Abnormal Cervical Cancer Screening Test Results • What is cervical cancer screening? • What causes abnormal cervical cancer screening test ...

  18. Lung ultrasound in bronchiolitis: comparison with chest X-ray.

    PubMed

    Caiulo, Vito Antonio; Gargani, Luna; Caiulo, Silvana; Fisicaro, Andrea; Moramarco, Fulvio; Latini, Giuseppe; Picano, Eugenio

    2011-11-01

    The diagnosis of bronchiolitis is based mainly on the patient's medical history and physical examination. However, in severe cases, a further evaluation including chest X-ray (CXR) may be necessary. At present, lung ultrasound (LUS) is not included in the diagnostic work-up of bronchiolitis. This study aimed to compare the diagnostic accuracy of LUS and CXR in children with bronchiolitis, and to evaluate the correlation between clinical and ultrasound findings. Only patients with a diagnosis of bronchiolitis, who had undergone a CXR, were enrolled in the study. Fifty-two infants underwent LUS and CXR. LUS was also performed in 52 infants without clinical signs of bronchiolitis. LUS was positive for the diagnosis of bronchiolitis in 47/52 patients, whereas CXR was positive in 38/52. All patients with normal LUS examination had a normal CXR, whereas nine patients with normal CXR had abnormal LUS. In these patients, the clinical course was consistent with bronchiolitis. We found that LUS is a simple and reliable tool for the diagnosis and follow-up of bronchiolitis. It is more reliable than CXR, can be easily repeated at the patient's bedside, and carries no risk of irradiation. In some patients with bronchiolitis, LUS is able to identify lung abnormalities not revealed by CXR. Furthermore, there is a good correlation between clinical and ultrasound findings. Given the short time needed to get a US report, this technique could become the routine imaging modality for patients with bronchiolitis. PMID:21468639

  19. ULTRASOUND OF THE PECTORALIS MAJOR MUSCLE AFTER REVERSE SHOULDER ARTHROPLASTY: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Mascarinas, Angelie L.; Newman, Joel S.; Warner, Jon J.P.; Jain, Nitin B.

    2014-01-01

    Only a few reports exist in the literature for sonographic assessment of the pectoralis major muscle. We present a case of pectoralis major muscle atrophy as a cause of persistent internal rotation weakness diagnosed via ultrasound in a patient with multiple prior surgeries and contraindication to MRI due to a shoulder implant. This patient’s physical examination suggested an abnormal contour of the pectoralis major muscle on contraction, so he was referred for diagnostic ultrasound. The ultrasound was key to guiding the management of this patient since a surgical repair of a torn pectoralis major muscle was planned if this was found. No pectoralis major tear or rupture was seen on ultrasound, but there was evidence of pectoralis major muscle atrophy. Accordingly, surgery was avoided and the patient was able to continue with his physical therapy program. PMID:25251253

  20. Prevalence of Cysts in Seminal Tract and Abnormal Semen Parameters in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Torra, Roser; Sarquella, Joaquim; Calabia, Jordi; Martí, Jordi; Ars, Elisabet; Fernández-Llama, Patricia; Ballarin, Jose

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is a systemic disorder with a wide range of extrarenal involvement. The scope of this study was to analyze the prevalence of seminal cysts and to correlate these findings with the sperm parameters in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: A prospective study enrolled 30 adult men with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Of these 30 patients, 22 agreed to provide a semen sample for analysis, and 28 of 30 agreed to undergo an ultrasound rectal examination. Data obtained from the semen tests and from the ultrasound study were compared. Results: Cysts in the seminal tract were present in 10 (43.47%) of 28 individuals. Twenty of 22 patients showed abnormal semen parameters, with asthenozoospermia as the most common finding. No correlation between ultrasound findings and sperm abnormalities was observed. Conclusions: The presence of cysts in the seminal tract is remarkably high (43.47%); however, this finding does not correlate with sperm abnormalities, which are also a frequent finding, especially asthenozoospermia. This semen abnormality is probably related to the abnormal function of polycystins. More attention should be paid to reproductive aspects in the initial evaluation of patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease before their ability to conceive is further impaired by uremia. PMID:18322042

  1. Tomoregulin-1 prevents cardiac hypertrophy after pressure overload in mice by inhibiting TAK1-JNK pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Dan; Lu, Dan; Liu, Ning; Dong, Wei; Lu, Ying-Dong; Qin, Chuan; Zhang, Lian-Feng

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cardiac hypertrophy is associated with many forms of heart disease, and identifying important modifier genes involved in the pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy could lead to the development of new therapeutic strategies. Tomoregulin-1 is a growth factor that is primarily involved in embryonic development and adult central nervous system (CNS) function, and it is expressed abnormally in a variety of CNS pathologies. Tomoregulin-1 is also expressed in the myocardium. However, the effects of tomoregulin-1 on the heart, particularly on cardiac hypertrophy, remains unknown. The aim of the study is to examine whether and by what mechanism tomoregulin-1 regulates the development of cardiac hypertrophy induced by pressure overload. In this study, we found that tomoregulin-1 was significantly upregulated in two cardiac hypertrophy models: cTnTR92Q transgenic mice and thoracic aorta constriction (TAC)-induced cardiac hypertrophy mice. The transgenic overexpression of tomoregulin-1 increased the survival rate, improved the cardiac geometry and functional parameters of echocardiography, and decreased the degree of cardiac hypertrophy of the TAC mice, whereas knockdown of tomoregulin-1 expression resulted in an opposite phenotype and exacerbated phenotypes of cardiac hypertrophy induced by TAC. A possible mechanism by which tomoregulin-1 regulates the development of cardiac hypertrophy in TAC-induced cardiac hypertrophy is through inhibiting TGF? non-canonical (TAK1-JNK) pathways in the myocardium. Tomoregulin-1 plays a protective role in the modulation of adverse cardiac remodeling from pressure overload in mice. Tomoregulin-1 could be a therapeutic target to control the development of cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:26092120

  2. Biofouling control with ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Bott, T.R.

    2000-06-01

    Experiments have been carried out on a small-scale simulated cooling water system using a monoculture of Pseudomonas fluorescens to represent the slime-forming microbial community, to examine the opportunities for control using ultrasound. Glass tubes (18 mm I.D. x 1 m long) through which contaminated water flowed at 1 m/s were dosed with ultrasound along the tube axis. Glass tubes were employed to facilitate the use of infrared absorbance for biofilm accumulation assessment. The preliminary results demonstrate that control of biofilm formation and the removal of established biofilms on the inside of tubes may be achieved by the technology, but there may be some limitations with respect to removal.

  3. Transcranial ultrasound improves mood in human subjects

    E-print Network

    Lin, Kevin K.

    outgrowth in cultured cortical neurons8 Ultrasound can accelerate neuronal development Transcranial is generally considered safe when used for imaging, including fetal ultrasound. At the cellular level microtubules?) Conclusions · Ultrasound accelerates microtubule-related neuronal development · Low

  4. Microwave Treatment for Cardiac Arrhythmias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez-Moya, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    NASA seeks to transfer the NASA developed microwave ablation technology, designed for the treatment of ventricular tachycardia (irregular heart beat), to industry. After a heart attack, many cells surrounding the resulting scar continue to live but are abnormal electrically; they may conduct impulses unusually slowly or fire when they would typically be silent. These diseased areas might disturb smooth signaling by forming a reentrant circuit in the muscle. The objective of microwave ablation is to heat and kill these diseased cells to restore appropriate electrical activity in the heart. This technology is a method and apparatus that provides for propagating microwave energy into heart tissues to produce a desired temperature profile therein at tissue depths sufficient for thermally ablating arrhythmogenic cardiac tissue while preventing excessive heating of surrounding tissues, organs, and blood. A wide bandwidth double-disk antenna is effective for this purpose over a bandwidth of about six gigahertz. A computer simulation provides initial screening capabilities for an antenna such as antenna, frequency, power level, and power application duration. The simulation also allows optimization of techniques for specific patients or conditions. In comparison with other methods that involve direct-current pulses or radio frequencies below 1 GHz, this method may prove more effective in treating ventricular tachycardia. This is because the present method provides for greater control of the location, cross-sectional area, and depth of a lesion via selection of the location and design of the antenna and the choice of microwave power and frequency.

  5. Black Endobronchial Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Samjot S; Harris, Kassem; Ylagan, Lourdes

    2015-10-01

    The infrequent bronchoscopic finding of black airway pigmentation due to a variety of causes has been labeled as "Black Bronchoscopy." Black bronchioalveolar lavage has been sometimes described in tobacco, marijuana, and crack cocaine smokers. To add to this interesting panorama of bronchoscopic findings, we describe cases of black endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspirates due to metastatic melanoma and anthracotic lymph nodes. PMID:26348692

  6. Pelvic ultrasound in women.

    PubMed

    Sivyer, P

    2000-02-01

    High-resolution pelvic ultrasound (US) has much to offer the surgical assessment of female patients. Endovaginal and transperineal scanning as well as graded compression technique now supplement conventional transabdominal US. The application of duplex and color Doppler technology further enhances the information obtained, all contributing to improved diagnostic accuracy. The clinical indications for sonography as well as the salient features of common gynecologic, obstetric, and gastrointestinal disorders are discussed, as is the role of US guided intervention. PMID:10633146

  7. Tissue identification by ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lecroissette, D. H.; Heyser, R. C.; Gammell, P. M.; Wilson, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    The ultrasonic properties of animal and human soft tissue were measured over the frequency range of 1.5 to 10.0 MHz. The method employed a swept-frequency, coherent technique known as time delay spectrometry. Measurements of attenuation versus frequency on liver, backfat, kidney, pancreas, spleen, breast, and other tissue were made. Considerable attention was paid to tissue handling and in determining the effects of fixing on the attenuation of ultrasound in the tissue.

  8. Clinical ophthalmic ultrasound improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, J. B.; Piro, P. A.

    1981-01-01

    The use of digital synthetic aperture techniques to obtain high resolution ultrasound images of eye and orbit was proposed. The parameters of the switched array configuration to reduce data collection time to a few milliseconds to avoid eye motion problems in the eye itself were established. An assessment of the effects of eye motion on the performance of the system was obtained. The principles of synthetic techniques are discussed. Likely applications are considered.

  9. Prostate Focused Ultrasound Therapy.

    PubMed

    Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Rouvière, Olivier; Crouzet, Sébastien; Gelet, Albert

    2016-01-01

    The tremendous progress in engineering and computing power coupled with ultrasound transducer technology and imaging modalities over the past 20 years have encouraged a revival of clinical interest in ultrasound therapy, mainly in High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). So far, the most extensive results from HIFU obtained in urology involve transrectal prostate ablation, which appears to be an effective therapeutic alternative for patients with malignant prostate tumors. Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers in men. Several treatment options with different therapeutic approaches exist, including HIFU for localized PCa that has been in use for over 15 years. Since the early 2000s, two systems have been marketed for this application, and other devices are currently in clinical trials. HIFU treatment can be used either alone or in combination with (before- or after-) external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) (before or after HIFU) and can be repeated multiple times. HIFU treatment is performed under real-time monitoring with ultrasound or guided by MRI. Two indications are validated today: Primary care treatment and EBRT failure. The results of HIFU for primary care treatment are similar to standard conformal EBRT, even though no randomized comparative studies have been performed and no 10-year follow up data is yet available for HIFU. Salvage HIFU after EBRT failure is increasing with oncological outcomes, similar to those achieved with surgery but with the advantage of fewer adverse effects. HIFU is an evolving technology perfectly adapted for focal treatment. Thus, HIFU focal therapy is another pathway that must be explored when considering the accuracy and reliability for PCa mapping techniques. HIFU would be particularly suited for such a therapy since it is clear that HIFU outcomes and toxicity are relative to the volume of prostate treated. PMID:26486330

  10. A case of ultrasound-guided prenatal diagnosis of prune belly syndrome in Papua New Guinea – implications for management

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Prune belly syndrome is a rare congenital malformation of unknown aetiology and is characterised by abnormalities of the urinary tract, a deficiency of abdominal musculature and bilateral cryptorchidism in males. We report a case of prune belly syndrome from Papua New Guinea, which was suspected on pregnancy ultrasound scan and confirmed upon delivery. Case presentation A 26-year-old married woman, Gravida 3 Para 2, presented to antenatal clinic in Madang, Papua New Guinea, at 21+5 weeks’ gestation by dates. She was well with no past medical or family history of note. She gave consent to participate in a clinical trial on prevention of malaria in pregnancy and underwent repeated ultrasound examinations which revealed a live fetus with persistent megacystis and anhydramnios. Both mother and clinicians agreed on conservative management of the congenital abnormality. The mother spontaneously delivered a male fetus weighing 2010 grams at 34 weeks’ gestation with grossly abnormal genitalia including cryptorchidism, penile aplasia and an absent urethral meatus, absent abdominal muscles and hypoplastic lungs. The infant passed away two hours after delivery. This report discusses the implications of prenatal detection of severe congenital abnormalities in PNG. Conclusion This first, formally reported, case of prune belly syndrome from a resource-limited setting in the Oceania region highlights the importance of identifying and documenting congenital abnormalities. Women undergoing antenatal ultrasound examinations must be carefully counseled on the purpose and the limitations of the scan. The increasing use of obstetric ultrasound in PNG will inevitably result in a rise in prenatal detection of congenital abnormalities. This will need to be met with adequate training, referral mechanisms and better knowledge of women’s attitudes and beliefs on birth defects and ultrasound. National medicolegal guidance regarding induced abortion and resuscitation of a fetus with severe congenital abnormalities may be required. PMID:23651554

  11. Ultrasound mediated gene transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Rene G.; Apfel, Robert E.; Brandsma, Janet L.

    2002-05-01

    Gene therapy is a promising modality for the treatment of a variety of human diseases both inherited and acquired, such as cystic fibrosis and cancer. The lack of an effective, safe method for the delivery of foreign genes into the cells, a process known as transfection, limits this effort. Ultrasound mediated gene transfection is an attractive method for gene delivery since it is a noninvasive technique, does not introduce any viral particles into the host and can offer very good temporal and spatial control. Previous investigators have shown that sonication increases transfection efficiency with and without ultrasound contrast agents. The mechanism is believed to be via a cavitation process where collapsing bubble nuclei permeabilize the cell membrane leading to increased DNA transfer. The research is focused on the use of pulsed wave high frequency focused ultrasound to transfect DNA into mammalian cells in vitro and in vivo. A better understanding of the mechanism behind the transfection process is also sought. A summary of some in vitro results to date will be presented, which includes the design of a sonication chamber that allows us to model the in vivo case more accurately.

  12. Endovascular retrieval of an irrigation cannula from the thoracic aorta following cardiac surgery: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Biju K.; Elmore, James R.; Garvin, Robert P.; Ryer, Evan J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Endovascular techniques to retrieve intravascular foreign bodies are a necessary component of the Vascular surgeon's skill set. We report the successful retrieval of an embolized irrigation cannula from the thoracic aorta following aortic valve replacement. Presentation of case The patient is an 81 year old male who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting and aortic valve replacement. Prior to closure, the aortotomy was irrigated with heparinized saline using a syringe with an olive tip irrigation cannula. When the syringe was handed back to the nursing staff, the tip was noted to be missing but could not be found. Prior to closure of the sternum, the field was searched again for the tip and thus the chest was closed. The missing instrument then prompted an intraoperative chest radiograph that demonstrated a metal irrigation cannula superimposed on the cardiac silhouette. Additionally, a transesophageal echocardiogram was performed, which demonstrated the irrigation cannula within the descending thoracic aorta. Right common femoral artery was accessed and a thoracic aortogram was performed demonstrating the cannula to be lodged in the descending thoracic aorta. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) was performed to exclude an aortic abnormality preventing the caudad migration of the cannula. No aortic pathology was identified. A tri-lobed snare was used to grasp the cannula at its tip and withdrawn into the right external iliac artery. The cannula was successfully removed through a transverse arteriotomy in the distal right external iliac artery. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful. Conclusion Endovascular retrieval of intravascular foreign bodies is minimally invasive, relatively simple, and carries minimal morbidity compared to conventional open surgical techniques. This unusual case demonstrates the importance of a working knowledge of techniques and instruments requisite for retrieval of intravascular foreign bodies PMID:26521199

  13. Pediatric cardiac emergencies.

    PubMed

    Lee, C; Mason, L J

    2001-06-01

    Successful management of pediatric cardiac emergencies requires an accurate diagnosis to institute an appropriate plan of therapy. The diagnosis, however, is not always straightforward, as evidenced by the nonspecific clinical picture that can be presented by congenital heart defects. Entertaining the possibility of a cardiac problem in neonates with pulmonary symptoms unresponsive to standard therapies is crucial for successful management of patients with congenital heart disease. In addition to ventilatory support, prostaglandin E1 infusions or emergency interventional cardiac catheterization is often a life-saving initial measure in patients with acutely decompensated congenital cardiac lesions that require a patent ductus arteriosus for survival. Pericardial tamponade is associated with various acquired and iatrogenic causes. Emergent pericardiocentesis is mandatory when cardiovascular compromise occurs. The goal of anesthetic management is to maintain cardiac output. With the increasing use of central venous catheters in neonatal ICUs and the high mortality rate for central venous catheter-related cardiac tamponade, the diagnosis must be considered in any patient with a central venous catheter in situ who acutely develops unexplained hypotension, bradycardia, and diminished pulses. Arrhythmias also can cause hemodynamic instability in infants and children. Supraventricular tachycardia is by far the most common emergently presenting arrhythmia in the pediatric population. Unstable patients require immediate intravenous adenosine or synchronized cardioversion. Complete heart block is rare, but it can lead to congestive heart failure and occasionally to cardiovascular collapse and sudden death. Emergency treatment of complete heart block includes pharmacologic support and temporary or permanent pacemaker placement as indicated. In infants, congestive heart failure usually is related to congenital heart disease, whereas in older children, it tends to be secondary to an acquired cause. Supportive measures, fluid restriction, and inotropic support are the principles of initial treatment. Prompt recognition and initiation of appropriate therapy in pediatric cardiac emergencies are essential for favorable outcomes. PMID:11469066

  14. Errors and mistakes in ultrasound diagnostics of the thyroid gland

    PubMed Central

    J?drzejowski, Maciej; Jakubowski, Wies?aw; Trzebi?ska, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound examination of the thyroid gland permits to evaluate its size, echogenicity, margins, and stroma. An abnormal ultrasound image of the thyroid, accompanied by other diagnostic investigations, facilitates therapeutic decision-making. The ultrasound image of a normal thyroid gland does not change substantially with patient's age. Nevertheless, erroneous impressions in thyroid imaging reports are sometimes encountered. These are due to diagnostic pitfalls which cannot be prevented by either the continuing development of the imaging equipment, or the growing experience and skill of the practitioners. Our article discusses the most common mistakes encountered in US diagnostics of the thyroid, the elimination of which should improve the quality of both the ultrasound examination itself and its interpretation. We have outlined errors resulting from a faulty examination technique, the similarity of the neighboring anatomical structures, and anomalies present in the proximity of the thyroid gland. We have also pointed out the reasons for inaccurate assessment of a thyroid lesion image, such as having no access to clinical data or not taking them into account, as well as faulty qualification for a fine needle aspiration biopsy. We have presented guidelines aimed at limiting the number of misdiagnoses in thyroid diseases, and provided sonograms exemplifying diagnostic mistakes.

  15. Sudden cardiac death as a presentation of anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from pulmonary artery in a young adult.

    PubMed

    Pachon, Ronald; Bravo, Claudio; Niemiera, Mark

    2015-12-01

    Sudden cardiac death in 5-10% of cases is explained by patients with congenital abnormalities that include coronary artery malformations such as anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery (ALCAPA). We report a case of sudden cardiac death as the first presentation of ALCAPA in a young female with no history of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. PMID:25480366

  16. Cardiac overexpression of Mammalian enabled (Mena) exacerbates heart failure in mice

    PubMed Central

    Belmonte, Stephen L.; Ram, Rashmi; Mickelsen, Deanne M.; Gertler, Frank B.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian enabled (Mena) is a key regulator of cytoskeletal actin dynamics, which has been implicated in heart failure (HF). We have previously demonstrated that cardiac Mena deletion produced cardiac dysfunction with conduction abnormalities and hypertrophy. Moreover, elevated Mena expression correlates with HF in human and animal models, yet the precise role of Mena in cardiac pathophysiology is unclear. In these studies, we evaluated mice with cardiac myocyte-specific Mena overexpression (TTA/TgTetMena) comparable to that observed in cardiac pathology. We found that the hearts of TTA/TgTetMena mice were functionally and morphologically comparable to wild-type littermates, except for mildly increased heart mass in the transgenic mice. Interestingly, TTA/TgTetMena mice were particularly susceptible to cardiac injury, as these animals experienced pronounced decreases in ejection fraction and fractional shortening as well as heart dilatation and hypertrophy after transverse aortic constriction (TAC). By “turning off” Mena overexpression in TTA/TgTetMena mice either immediately prior to or immediately after TAC surgery, we discovered that normalizing Mena levels eliminated cardiac hypertrophy in TTA/TgTetMena animals but did not preclude post-TAC cardiac functional deterioration. These findings indicate that hearts with increased levels of Mena fare worse when subjected to cardiac injury and suggest that Mena contributes to HF pathophysiology. PMID:23832697

  17. American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... In | My Account | Renew | Join About Us Leadership History Awards Committees Mission & Constitution Join/Renew Communities Basic Science and Instrumentation Cardiovascular Ultrasound Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Dermatology ...

  18. Role of ultrasound in the labor ward.

    PubMed

    Barber, Miguel A; Gutierrez, Luisa; Plasencia, Walter; Valle, Leonor; Garcia-Hernandez, Jose A

    2010-08-01

    Intrapartum ultrasound is commonly used to evaluate fetal vitality, presentation and status as well as placental location. Health professionals are increasingly using intrapartum ultrasound for advanced applications that have not yet been shown to be effective by controlled research studies, using advanced ultrasound technologies such as bi-dimensional ultrasound, color ultrasound, pulsed Doppler ultrasound and three-dimensional ultrasound. This article reviews the current applications of intrapartum ultrasound and considers which advanced technologies can add to the standard of care in the delivery ward. PMID:20370328

  19. Retinal abnormalities in ?-thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Bhoiwala, Devang L; Dunaief, Joshua L

    2016-01-01

    Patients with beta (?)-thalassemia (?-TM: ?-thalassemia major, ?-TI: ?-thalassemia intermedia) have a variety of complications that may affect all organs, including the eye. Ocular abnormalities include retinal pigment epithelial degeneration, angioid streaks, venous tortuosity, night blindness, visual field defects, decreased visual acuity, color vision abnormalities, and acute visual loss. Patients with ?-thalassemia major are transfusion dependent and require iron chelation therapy to survive. Retinal degeneration may result from either retinal iron accumulation from transfusion-induced iron overload or retinal toxicity induced by iron chelation therapy. Some who were never treated with iron chelation therapy exhibited retinopathy, and others receiving iron chelation therapy had chelator-induced retinopathy. We will focus on retinal abnormalities present in individuals with ?-thalassemia major viewed in light of new findings on the mechanisms and manifestations of retinal iron toxicity. PMID:26325202

  20. Cardiac applications of PET.

    PubMed

    Sarikaya, Ismet

    2015-10-01

    Routine use of cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) applications has been increasing but has not replaced cardiac single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) studies yet. The majority of cardiac PET tracers, with the exception of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG), are not widely available, as they require either an onsite cyclotron or a costly generator for their production. 18F-FDG PET imaging has high sensitivity for the detection of hibernating/viable myocardium and has replaced Tl-201 SPECT imaging in centers equipped with a PET/CT camera. PET myocardial perfusion imaging with various tracers such as Rb-82, N-13 ammonia, and O-15 H2O has higher sensitivity and specificity than myocardial perfusion SPECT for the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD). In particular, quantitative PET measurements of myocardial perfusion help identify subclinical coronary stenosis, better define the extent and severity of CAD, and detect ischemia when there is balanced reduction in myocardial perfusion due to three-vessel or main stem CAD. Fusion images of PET perfusion and CT coronary artery calcium scoring or CT coronary angiography provide additional complementary information and improve the detection of CAD. PET studies with novel 18F-labeled perfusion tracers such as 18F-flurpiridaz and 18F-FBnTP have yielded high sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of CAD. These tracers are still being tested in humans, and, if approved for clinical use, they will be commercially and widely available. In addition to viability studies, 18F-FDG PET can also be utilized to detect inflammation/infection in various conditions such as endocarditis, sarcoidosis, and atherosclerosis. Some recent series have obtained encouraging results for the detection of endocarditis in patients with intracardiac devices and prosthetic valves. PET tracers for cardiac neuronal imaging, such as C-11 HED, help assess the severity of heart failure and post-transplant cardiac reinnervation, and understand the pathogenesis of arrhytmias. The other uncommon applications of cardiac PET include NaF imaging to identify calcium deposition in atherosclerotic plaques and ?-amyloid imaging to diagnose cardiac amyloid involvement. 18F-FDG imaging with a novel PET/MR camera has been reported to be very sensitive and specific for the differentiation between malignant and nonmalignant cardiac masses. The other potential applications of PET/MR are cardiac infectious/inflammatory conditions such as endocarditis. PMID:26035516

  1. Iatrogenic QT Abnormalities and Fatal Arrhythmias: Mechanisms and Clinical Significance.

    PubMed

    Cubeddu, Luigi X

    2009-08-01

    Severe and occasionally fatal arrhythmias, commonly presenting as Torsade de Pointes [TdP] have been reported with Class III-antiarrhythmics, but also with non-antiarrhythmic drugs. Most cases result from an action on K(+) channels encoded by the HERG gene responsible for the IKr repolarizing current, leading to a long QT and repolarization abnormalities. The hydrophobic central cavity of the HERG-K+ channels, allows a large number of structurally unrelated drugs to bind and cause direct channel inhibition. Some examples are dofetilide, quinidine, sotalol, erythromycin, grepafloxacin, cisapride, dolasetron, thioridazine, haloperidol, droperidol and pimozide. Other drugs achieve channel inhibition indirectly by impairing channel traffic from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cell membrane, decreasing channel membrane density (pentamidine, geldalamicin, arsenic trioxide, digoxin, and probucol). Whereas, ketoconazole, fluoxetine and norfluoxetine induce both direct channel inhibition and impaired channel trafficking. Congenital long QT syndrome, subclinical ion-channel mutations, subjects and relatives of subjects with previous history of drug-induced long QT or TdP, dual drug effects on cardiac repolarization [long QT plus increased QT dispersion], increased transmural dispersion of repolarization and T wave abnormalities, use of high doses, metabolism inhibitors and/or combinations of QT prolonging drugs, hypokalemia, structural cardiac disease, sympathomimetics, bradycardia, women and older age, have been shown to increase the risk for developing drug-induced TdP. Because most of these reactions are preventable, careful evaluation of risk factors and increased knowledge of drugs use associated with repolarization abnormalities is strongly recommended. Future genetic testing and development of practical and simple provocation tests are in route to prevent iatrogenic TdP. PMID:20676275

  2. Iatrogenic QT Abnormalities and Fatal Arrhythmias: Mechanisms and Clinical Significance

    PubMed Central

    Cubeddu, Luigi X

    2009-01-01

    Severe and occasionally fatal arrhythmias, commonly presenting as Torsade de Pointes [TdP] have been reported with Class III-antiarrhythmics, but also with non-antiarrhythmic drugs. Most cases result from an action on K+ channels encoded by the HERG gene responsible for the IKr repolarizing current, leading to a long QT and repolarization abnormalities. The hydrophobic central cavity of the HERG-K+ channels, allows a large number of structurally unrelated drugs to bind and cause direct channel inhibition. Some examples are dofetilide, quinidine, sotalol, erythromycin, grepafloxacin, cisapride, dolasetron, thioridazine, haloperidol, droperidol and pimozide. Other drugs achieve channel inhibition indirectly by impairing channel traffic from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cell membrane, decreasing channel membrane density (pentamidine, geldalamicin, arsenic trioxide, digoxin, and probucol). Whereas, ketoconazole, fluoxetine and norfluoxetine induce both direct channel inhibition and impaired channel trafficking. Congenital long QT syndrome, subclinical ion-channel mutations, subjects and relatives of subjects with previous history of drug-induced long QT or TdP, dual drug effects on cardiac repolarization [long QT plus increased QT dispersion], increased transmural dispersion of repolarization and T wave abnormalities, use of high doses, metabolism inhibitors and/or combinations of QT prolonging drugs, hypokalemia, structural cardiac disease, sympathomimetics, bradycardia, women and older age, have been shown to increase the risk for developing drug-induced TdP. Because most of these reactions are preventable, careful evaluation of risk factors and increased knowledge of drugs use associated with repolarization abnormalities is strongly recommended. Future genetic testing and development of practical and simple provocation tests are in route to prevent iatrogenic TdP. PMID:20676275

  3. Quantitative Ultrasound Assessment of Ultrasound Therapy in Rodent Mammary

    E-print Network

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    Quantitative Ultrasound Assessment of Ultrasound Therapy in Rodent Mammary Tumors: In Vivo and Ex as temperature monitoring in a rat model mammary tumor both in vivo and ex vivo. In the in vivo study, 40 rodent. These studies demonstrated increases in the BSC in rodent mammary tumors with therapy in both ex vivo, water

  4. Faulty cardiac repolarization reserve in alternating hemiplegia of childhood broadens the phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Jaffer, Fatima; Avbersek, Andreja; Vavassori, Rosaria; Fons, Carmen; Campistol, Jaume; Stagnaro, Michela; De Grandis, Elisa; Veneselli, Edvige; Rosewich, Hendrik; Gianotta, Melania; Zucca, Claudio; Ragona, Francesca; Granata, Tiziana; Nardocci, Nardo; Mikati, Mohamed; Helseth, Ashley R.; Boelman, Cyrus; Minassian, Berge A.; Johns, Sophia; Garry, Sarah I.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Gourfinkel-An, Isabelle; Carrilho, Ines; Aylett, Sarah E.; Parton, Matthew; Hanna, Michael G.; Houlden, Henry; Neville, Brian; Kurian, Manju A.; Novy, Jan; Sander, Josemir W.; Lambiase, Pier D.; Behr, Elijah R.; Schyns, Tsveta; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Cross, J. Helen; Kaski, Juan P.

    2015-01-01

    Alternating hemiplegia of childhood is a rare disorder caused by de novo mutations in the ATP1A3 gene, expressed in neurons and cardiomyocytes. As affected individuals may survive into adulthood, we use the term ‘alternating hemiplegia’. The disorder is characterized by early-onset, recurrent, often alternating, hemiplegic episodes; seizures and non-paroxysmal neurological features also occur. Dysautonomia may occur during hemiplegia or in isolation. Premature mortality can occur in this patient group and is not fully explained. Preventable cardiorespiratory arrest from underlying cardiac dysrhythmia may be a cause. We analysed ECG recordings of 52 patients with alternating hemiplegia from nine countries: all had whole-exome, whole-genome, or direct Sanger sequencing of ATP1A3. Data on autonomic dysfunction, cardiac symptoms, medication, and family history of cardiac disease or sudden death were collected. All had 12-lead electrocardiogram recordings available for cardiac axis, cardiac interval, repolarization pattern, and J-point analysis. Where available, historical and prolonged single-lead electrocardiogram recordings during electrocardiogram-videotelemetry were analysed. Half the cohort (26/52) had resting 12-lead electrocardiogram abnormalities: 25/26 had repolarization (T wave) abnormalities. These abnormalities were significantly more common in people with alternating hemiplegia than in an age-matched disease control group of 52 people with epilepsy. The average corrected QT interval was significantly shorter in people with alternating hemiplegia than in the disease control group. J wave or J-point changes were seen in six people with alternating hemiplegia. Over half the affected cohort (28/52) had intraventricular conduction delay, or incomplete right bundle branch block, a much higher proportion than in the normal population or disease control cohort (P = 0.0164). Abnormalities in alternating hemiplegia were more common in those ?16 years old, compared with those <16 (P = 0.0095), even with a specific mutation (p.D801N; P = 0.045). Dynamic, beat-to-beat or electrocardiogram-to-electrocardiogram, changes were noted, suggesting the prevalence of abnormalities was underestimated. Electrocardiogram changes occurred independently of seizures or plegic episodes. Electrocardiogram abnormalities are common in alternating hemiplegia, have characteristics reflecting those of inherited cardiac channelopathies and most likely amount to impaired repolarization reserve. The dynamic electrocardiogram and neurological features point to periodic systemic decompensation in ATP1A3-expressing organs. Cardiac dysfunction may account for some of the unexplained premature mortality of alternating hemiplegia. Systematic cardiac investigation is warranted in alternating hemiplegia of childhood, as cardiac arrhythmic morbidity and mortality are potentially preventable. PMID:26297560

  5. Faulty cardiac repolarization reserve in alternating hemiplegia of childhood broadens the phenotype.

    PubMed

    Jaffer, Fatima; Avbersek, Andreja; Vavassori, Rosaria; Fons, Carmen; Campistol, Jaume; Stagnaro, Michela; De Grandis, Elisa; Veneselli, Edvige; Rosewich, Hendrik; Gianotta, Melania; Zucca, Claudio; Ragona, Francesca; Granata, Tiziana; Nardocci, Nardo; Mikati, Mohamed; Helseth, Ashley R; Boelman, Cyrus; Minassian, Berge A; Johns, Sophia; Garry, Sarah I; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Gourfinkel-An, Isabelle; Carrilho, Ines; Aylett, Sarah E; Parton, Matthew; Hanna, Michael G; Houlden, Henry; Neville, Brian; Kurian, Manju A; Novy, Jan; Sander, Josemir W; Lambiase, Pier D; Behr, Elijah R; Schyns, Tsveta; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Cross, J Helen; Kaski, Juan P; Sisodiya, Sanjay M

    2015-10-01

    Alternating hemiplegia of childhood is a rare disorder caused by de novo mutations in the ATP1A3 gene, expressed in neurons and cardiomyocytes. As affected individuals may survive into adulthood, we use the term 'alternating hemiplegia'. The disorder is characterized by early-onset, recurrent, often alternating, hemiplegic episodes; seizures and non-paroxysmal neurological features also occur. Dysautonomia may occur during hemiplegia or in isolation. Premature mortality can occur in this patient group and is not fully explained. Preventable cardiorespiratory arrest from underlying cardiac dysrhythmia may be a cause. We analysed ECG recordings of 52 patients with alternating hemiplegia from nine countries: all had whole-exome, whole-genome, or direct Sanger sequencing of ATP1A3. Data on autonomic dysfunction, cardiac symptoms, medication, and family history of cardiac disease or sudden death were collected. All had 12-lead electrocardiogram recordings available for cardiac axis, cardiac interval, repolarization pattern, and J-point analysis. Where available, historical and prolonged single-lead electrocardiogram recordings during electrocardiogram-videotelemetry were analysed. Half the cohort (26/52) had resting 12-lead electrocardiogram abnormalities: 25/26 had repolarization (T wave) abnormalities. These abnormalities were significantly more common in people with alternating hemiplegia than in an age-matched disease control group of 52 people with epilepsy. The average corrected QT interval was significantly shorter in people with alternating hemiplegia than in the disease control group. J wave or J-point changes were seen in six people with alternating hemiplegia. Over half the affected cohort (28/52) had intraventricular conduction delay, or incomplete right bundle branch block, a much higher proportion than in the normal population or disease control cohort (P = 0.0164). Abnormalities in alternating hemiplegia were more common in those ?16 years old, compared with those <16 (P = 0.0095), even with a specific mutation (p.D801N; P = 0.045). Dynamic, beat-to-beat or electrocardiogram-to-electrocardiogram, changes were noted, suggesting the prevalence of abnormalities was underestimated. Electrocardiogram changes occurred independently of seizures or plegic episodes. Electrocardiogram abnormalities are common in alternating hemiplegia, have characteristics reflecting those of inherited cardiac channelopathies and most likely amount to impaired repolarization reserve. The dynamic electrocardiogram and neurological features point to periodic systemic decompensation in ATP1A3-expressing organs. Cardiac dysfunction may account for some of the unexplained premature mortality of alternating hemiplegia. Systematic cardiac investigation is warranted in alternating hemiplegia of childhood, as cardiac arrhythmic morbidity and mortality are potentially preventable. PMID:26297560

  6. Radiation from Cardiac Imaging Tests

    MedlinePLUS

    ... User Name Password Sign In Cardiology Patient Page Radiation From Cardiac Imaging Tests Questions You Should Ask ... cardiac imaging techniques computed tomography imaging nuclear medicine radiation Next Section Introduction Many patients are referred by ...

  7. Sphincter lesions observed on ultrasound after transanal endoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mora López, Laura; Serra-Aracil, Xavier; Navarro Soto, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the morphological impact of transanal endoscopic surgery on the sphincter apparatus using the modified Starck classification. METHODS: A prospective, observational study of 118 consecutive patients undergoing Transanal Endoscopic Operation/Transanal Endoscopic Microsurgery (TEO/TEM) from March 2013 to May 2014 was performed. All the patients underwent an endoanal ultrasound prior to surgery and one and four months postoperatively in order to measure sphincter width, identify sphincter defects and to quantify them in terms of the level, depth and size of the affected anal canal. To assess the lesions, we used the “modified” Starck classification, which incorporates the variable “sphincter fragmentation”. The results were correlated with the Wexner incontinence questionnaire. RESULTS: Of the 118 patients, twelve (sphincter lesions) were excluded. The results of the 106 patients were as follows after one month: 31 (29.2%) lesions found on ultrasound after one month, median overall Starck score of 4 (range 3-6); 10 (9.4%) defects in the internal anal sphincter (IAS) and 3 (2.8%) in the external anal sphincter (EAS); 17 patients (16%) had fragmentation of the sphincter apparatus with both sphincters affected in one case. At four months: 7 (6.6%) defects, all in the IAS, overall median Starck score of 4 (range 3-6). Mean IAS widths were 3.5 mm (SD 1.14) preoperatively, 4.38 mm (SD 2.1) one month postoperatively and 4.03 mm (SD 1.46) four months postoperatively. The only statistically significant difference in sphincter width in the IAS measurements was between preoperatively and one month postoperatively. No incontinence was reported, even in cases of ultrasound abnormalities. CONCLUSION: TEO/TEM may produce ultrasound abnormalities but this is not accompanied by clinical changes in continence. The modified Starck classification is useful for describing and managing these disorders. PMID:26674666

  8. Giant Cardiac Cavernous Hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Unger, Eric; Costic, Joseph; Laub, Glenn

    2015-07-01

    We report the case of an asymptomatic giant cardiac cavernous hemangioma in a 71-year-old man. The intracardiac mass was discovered incidentally during surveillance for his prostate cancer; however, the patient initially declined intervention. On presentation to our institution 7 years later, the lesion had enlarged significantly, and the patient consented to excision. At surgery, an 8 × 6.5 × 4.8 cm intracardiac mass located on the inferior heart border was excised with an intact capsule through a median sternotomy approach. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course. We discuss the diagnostic workup, treatment, and characteristics of this rare cardiac tumor. PMID:26140782

  9. Cardiac disease in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Nqayana, T; Moodley, J; Naidoo, DP

    2008-01-01

    Summary Summary This study was a retrospective review of patient charts of a relatively large number of patients with cardiac disease in pregnancy in a developing country. Ninety-five patients were evaluated; the majority (n = 36) were in the age group 21?25 years. Rheumatic heart disease was the commonest aetiology; eight women required balloon mitral valvuloplasty and one had a valve replacement at 32 weeks’ gestation. There were no maternal deaths but morbidity was high; 13 patients were admitted in cardiac failure, nine had atrial fibrillation and three required intensive-care management. There were 86 live births of the 97 deliveries. PMID:18568175

  10. Endogenous cardiac stem cells.

    PubMed

    Barile, Lucio; Messina, Elisa; Giacomello, Alessandro; Marbán, Eduardo

    2007-01-01

    In the past few years it has been established that the heart contains a reservoir of stem and progenitor cells. These cells are positive for various stem/progenitor cell markers (Kit, Sca-1, Isl-1, and Side Population (SP) properties). The relationship between the various cardiac stem cells (CSC) and progenitor cells described awaits clarification. Furthermore, they may open a new therapeutic strategies of cardiac repair based on the regeneration potential of cardiac stem cells. Currently, cellular cardiomyoplasty is actively explored as means of regenerating damaged myocardium using several different cell types. CSCs seem a logical cell source to exploit for cardiac regeneration therapy. Their presence into the heart, the frequent co-expression of early cardiac progenitor transcription factors, and the capability for ex vivo and in vivo differentiation toward the cardiac lineages offer promise of enhanced cardiogenicity compared to other cell sources. CSCs, when isolated from various animal models by selection based on c-Kit, Sca-1, and/or MDR1, have shown cardiac regeneration potential in vivo following injection in the infracted myocardium. Recently, we have successfully isolated CSCs from small biopsies of human myocardium and expanded them ex vivo by many folds without losing differentiation potential into cardiomyocytes and vascular cells, bringing autologous transplantation of CSCs closer to clinical evaluation. These cells are spontaneously shed from human surgical specimens and murine heart samples in primary culture. This heterogeneous population of cells forms multi-cellular clusters, dubbed cardiospheres (CSs), in suspension culture. CSs are composed of clonally-derived cells, consist of proliferating c-Kit positive cells primarily in their core and differentiating cells expressing cardiac and endothelial cell markers on their periphery. Although the intracardiac origin of adult myocytes has been unequivocally documented, the potential of an extracardiac source of cells, able to repopulate the lost CSCs in pathological conditions (infarct) cannot be excluded and will be discussed in this review. The delivery of human CSs or of CSs-derived cells into the injured heart of the SCID mouse resulted in engraftment, migration, myocardial regeneration and improvement of left ventricular function. Our method for ex vivo expansion of resident CSCs for subsequent autologous transplantation back into the heart, may give these cell populations, the resident and the transplanted one, the combined ability to mediate myocardial regeneration to an appreciable degree, and may change the way in which cardiovascular disease will be approached in the future. PMID:17631436

  11. Electrocardiograph abnormalities in intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Satoru; Nagatani, Kimihiro; Otani, Naoki; Wada, Kojiro; Mori, Kentaro

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the prevalence and type of electrocardiography (ECG) abnormalities, and their possible association with the clinical/radiological findings in 118 consecutive patients with non-traumatic, non-neoplastic intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). ECG frequently demonstrates abnormalities in patients with ischemic stroke and subarachnoid hemorrhage, but little is known of ECG changes in ICH patients. Clinical and radiological information was retrospectively reviewed. ECG recordings that were obtained within 24hours of the initial hemorrhage were analyzed. Sixty-six patients (56%) had one or more ECG abnormalities. The most frequent was ST depression (24%), followed by left ventricular hypertrophy (20%), corrected QT interval (QTc) prolongation (19%), and T wave inversion (19%). The logistic regression analysis demonstrated the following: insular involvement was an independent predictive factor of ST depression (p<0.001; odds ratio OR 10.18; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.84-36.57); insular involvement (p<0.001; OR 23.98; 95% CI 4.91-117.11) and presence of intraventricular hemorrhage (p<0.001; OR 8.72; 95% CI 2.69-28.29) were independent predictive factors of QTc prolongation; deep hematoma location (p<0.001; OR 19.12; 95% CI 3.82-95.81) and hematoma volume >30ml (p=0.001; OR 6.58; 95% CI 2.11-20.46) were independent predictive factors of T wave inversion. We demonstrate associations between ECG abnormalities and detailed characteristics of ICH. PMID:26365482

  12. Emergency Abnormal Conditions Emergency Evacuation

    E-print Network

    Davis, Lloyd M.

    1 Emergency Abnormal Conditions Emergency Evacuation a. In the event of an emergency situation it may be necessary to evacuate the building. Causes for evacuation may be fire, hazardous chemical evacuation alarm systems that include wall-mounted pull stations. Smoke and heat activated alarms are present

  13. Systematic review of accuracy of prenatal diagnosis for abnormal chromosome diseases by microarray technology.

    PubMed

    Xu, H B; Yang, H; Liu, G; Chen, H

    2014-01-01

    The accuracy of prenatal diagnosis for abnormal chromosome diseases by chromosome microarray technology and karyotyping were compared. A literature search was carried out in the MEDLINE database with the keywords "chromosome" and "karyotype" and "genetic testing" and "prenatal diagnosis" and "oligonucleotide array sequence". The studies obtained were filtered by using the QUADAS tool, and studies conforming to the quality standard were fully analyzed. There was one paper conforming to the QUADAS standards including 4406 gravidas with adaptability syndromes of prenatal diagnosis including elderly parturient women, abnormal structure by type-B ultrasound, and other abnormalities. Microarray technology yielded successful diagnoses in 4340 cases (98.8%), and there was no need for tissue culture in 87.9% of the samples. All aneuploids and non-parallel translocations in 4282 cases of non-chimera identified by karyotyping could be detected using microarray analysis technology, whereas parallel translocations and fetal triploids could not be detected by microarray analysis technology. In the samples with normal karyotyping results, type-B ultrasound showed that 6% of chromosomal deficiencies or chromosome duplications could be detected by microarray technology, and the same abnormal chromosomes were detected in 1.7% of elderly parturient women and samples with positive serology screening results. In the prenatal diagnosis test, compared with karyotyping, microarray technology could identify the extra cell genetic information with clinical significance, aneuploids, and non-parallel translocations; however, its disadvantage is that it could not identify parallel translocations and triploids. PMID:25366803

  14. IRF8 suppresses pathological cardiac remodelling by inhibiting calcineurin signalling

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ding-Sheng; Wei, Xiang; Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Ke; Gao, Lu; Zhou, Heng; Zhu, Xue-Hai; Liu, Peter P.; Bond Lau, Wayne; Ma, Xinliang; Zou, Yunzeng; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Fan, Guo-Chang; Li, Hongliang

    2014-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor 8 (IRF8) is known to affect the innate immune response, for example, by regulating the differentiation and function of immune cells. However, whether IRF8 can influence cardiac hypertrophy is unknown. Here we show that IRF8 levels are decreased in human dilated/hypertrophic cardiomyopathic hearts and in murine hypertrophic hearts. Mice overexpressing Irf8 specifically in the heart are resistant to aortic banding (AB)-induced cardiac hypertrophy, whereas mice lacking IRF8 either globally or specifically in cardiomyocytes develop an aggravated phenotype induced by pressure overload. Mechanistically, we show that IRF8 directly interacts with NFATc1 to prevent NFATc1 translocation and thus inhibits the hypertrophic response. Inhibition of NFATc1 ameliorates the cardiac abnormalities in IRF8?/? mice after AB. In contrast, constitutive activation of NFATc1 nullifies the protective effects of IRF8 on cardiac hypertrophy in IRF8-overexpressing mice. Our results indicate that IRF8 is a potential therapeutic target in pathological cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:24526256

  15. [The athletes' ECG and the exercise related sudden cardiac death].

    PubMed

    Trachsel, Lukas-Daniel; Wilhelm, Matthias

    2015-05-01

    Regular physical activity induces structural, electrical and functional cardiac adaptations. The main challenge for the athletes' physician is to distinguish abnormal structural changes of the heart from training-induced adaptations (so-called “athlete's heart”). In athletes with underlying cardiac disease, physical activity may be a trigger, not the cause of exercise-induced tachyarrhythmia's and sudden cardiac death (SCD). To identify athletes with cardiac diseases and increased risk for an SCD, the European society of cardiology (ESC) recommends a pre-participation screening in elite athletes which was adopted by the Swiss society of sports medicine. The screening includes a specific medical history, cardiac auscultation and a resting ECG. Due to the high number of false-positive cases of athletes' ECGs based on traditional criteria, the ESC assessment criteria were adjusted to account for training-related changes of the ECG. The sensitivity and especially the specificity could be improved in the “revised Seattle criteria” in 2014. During the last years main attention has been shifted to the early repolarization pattern: additionally to (endurance-) training there is a clear association with male gender, ethnicity, changes in autonomic nervous system activity and high QRS-voltage criteria PMID:26098068

  16. Innovative approaches in the perioperative care of the cardiac surgical patient in the operating room and intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Denault, André; Lamarche, Yoan; Rochon, Antoine; Cogan, Jennifer; Liszkowski, Mark; Lebon, Jean-Sébastien; Ayoub, Christian; Taillefer, Jean; Blain, Robert; Viens, Claudia; Couture, Pierre; Deschamps, Alain

    2014-12-01

    Perioperative care for cardiac surgery is undergoing rapid evolution. Many of the changes involve the application of novel technologies to tackle common challenges in optimizing perioperative management. Herein, we illustrate recent advances in perioperative management by focusing on a number of novel components that we judge to be particularly important. These include: the introduction of brain and somatic oximetry; transesophageal echocardiographic hemodynamic monitoring and bedside focused ultrasound; ultrasound-guided vascular access; point-of-care coagulation surveillance; right ventricular pressure monitoring; novel inhaled treatment for right ventricular failure; new approaches for postoperative pain management; novel approaches in specialized care procedures to ensure quality control; and specific approaches to optimize the management for postoperative cardiac arrest. Herein, we discuss the reasons that each of these components are particularly important in improving perioperative care, describe how they can be addressed, and their impact in the care of patients who undergo cardiac surgery. PMID:25432139

  17. Quantitative ultrasound molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Yeh, James Shue-Min; Sennoga, Charles A; McConnell, Ellen; Eckersley, Robert; Tang, Meng-Xing; Nourshargh, Sussan; Seddon, John M; Haskard, Dorian O; Nihoyannopoulos, Petros

    2015-09-01

    Ultrasound molecular imaging using targeting microbubbles is predominantly a semi-quantitative tool, thus limiting its potential diagnostic power and clinical applications. In the work described here, we developed a novel method for acoustic quantification of molecular expression. E-Selectin expression in the mouse heart was induced by lipopolysaccharide. Real-time ultrasound imaging of E-selectin expression in the heart was performed using E-selectin-targeting microbubbles and a clinical ultrasound scanner in contrast pulse sequencing mode at 14 MHz, with a mechanical index of 0.22-0.26. The level of E-selectin expression was quantified using a novel time-signal intensity curve analytical method based on bubble elimination, which consisted of curve-fitting the bi-exponential equation [Formula: see text] to the elimination phase of the myocardial time-signal intensity curve. Ar and Af represent the maximum signal intensities of the retained and freely circulating bubbles in the myocardium, respectively; ?r and ?f represent the elimination rate constants of the retained and freely circulating bubbles in the myocardium, respectively. Ar correlated strongly with the level of E-selectin expression (|r|>0.8), determined using reverse transcriptase real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and the duration of post-lipopolysaccharide treatment-both linearly related to cell surface E-selectin protein (actual bubble target) concentration in the expression range imaged. Compared with a conventional acoustic quantification method (which used retained bubble signal intensity at 20 min post-bubble injection), this new approach exhibited greater dynamic range and sensitivity and was able to simultaneously quantify other useful characteristics (e.g., the microbubble half-life). In conclusion, quantitative determination of the level of molecular expression is feasible acoustically using a time-signal intensity curve analytical method based on bubble elimination. PMID:26044707

  18. Ultrasound detection by clupeiform fishes.

    PubMed

    Mann, D A; Higgs, D M; Tavolga, W N; Souza, M J; Popper, A N

    2001-06-01

    It has previously been shown that at least one species of fish (the American shad) in the order clupeiforms (herrings, shads, and relatives) is able to detect sounds up to 180 kHz. However, it has not been clear whether other members of this order are also able to detect ultrasound. It is now demonstrated, using auditory brainstem response (ABR), that at least one additional species, the gulf menhaden (Brevoortia patronus), is able to detect ultrasound, while several other species including the bay anchovy (Anchoa mitchilli), scaled sardine (Harengula jaguana), and Spanish sardine (Sardinella aurita) only detect sounds to about 4 kHz. ABR is used to confirm ultrasonic hearing in the American shad. The results suggest that ultrasound detection may be limited to one subfamily of clupeiforms, the Alosinae. It is suggested that ultrasound detection involves the utricle of the inner ear and speculate as to why, despite having similar ear structures, only one group may detect ultrasound. PMID:11425147

  19. What's new in urologic ultrasound?

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Anupam; Naranje, Priyanka; Pavunesan, Santhosh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound is an imaging technology that has evolved swiftly and has come a long way since its beginnings. It is a commonly used initial diagnostic imaging modality as it is rapid, effective, portable, relatively inexpensive, and causes no harm to human health. In the last few decades, there have been significant technological improvements in the equipment as well as the development of contrast agents that allowed ultrasound to be even more widely adopted for urologic imaging. Ultrasound is an excellent guidance tool for an array of urologic interventional procedures and also has therapeutic application in the form of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for tumor ablation. This article focuses on the recent advances in ultrasound technology and its emerging clinical applications in urology. PMID:26166960

  20. Increase in the embedding dimension in the heart rate variability associated with left ventricular abnormalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrés, D. S.; Irurzun, I. M.; Mitelman, J.; Mola, E. E.

    2006-10-01

    In the present study, the authors report evidence that the existence of premature ventricular contractions increases the embedding dimension of the cardiac dynamics. They also analyze patients with congestive heart failure, a severe clinical condition associated with abnormal left ventricular function. Results also show an increase in the embedding dimension of the heart rate variability. They used electrocardiograms collected by themselves with quality standards that make them comparable with other databases.

  1. Determination of cardiac output in critically ill patients by dual beam Doppler echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Looyenga, D S; Liebson, P R; Bone, R C; Balk, R A; Messer, J V

    1989-02-01

    Recent technology in Doppler echocardiography has produced a dual beam Doppler instrument that is capable of insonating the total cross-sectional area of the ascending aorta. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of this instrument in measuring cardiac output in critically ill patients by comparing results with those of the thermodilution-derived cardiac output. A technically adequate Doppler cardiac output measurement was attained in 71 (91%) of 78 patients. The range of thermodilution-derived cardiac output measurements was from 1.58 to 11.70 liters/min. To maximize thermodilution cardiac output reliability, several measurements were made for each patient. Those patients in whom the difference between the highest and lowest measurement varied by less than 10% from the averaged results were accepted into the 50 patient study. There was significant correlation between dual beam Doppler- and thermodilution-derived cardiac output (r = 0.96, SEE = 0.55 liters/min, p less than 0.0001). This study demonstrates that dual beam Doppler ultrasound is a promising noninvasive method of measuring cardiac output in the critically ill patient. PMID:2913112

  2. An optical approach to validate ultrasound surface segmentation of the heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Schlaefer, Alexander; Zhang, Zhenxi

    2014-09-01

    The patient specific geometry of the heart is of interest for a number of diagnostic methods, e.g., when modeling the inverse electrocardiography (ECG) problem. One approach to get images of the heart is three-dimensional ultrasound. However, segmentation of the surface is complicated and segmentation methods are typically validated against manually drawn contours. This requires considerable expert knowledge. Hence, we have developed a setup that allows studying the accuracy of image segmentation from cardiac ultrasound. Using an optical tracking system, we have measured the three-dimensional surface of an isolated porcine heart. We studied whether the actual geometry can be reconstructed from both optical and ultrasound images. We illustrate the use of our approach in quantifying the segmentation result for a three-dimensional region-based active contour algorithm.

  3. The role of three-dimensional ultrasound in the diagnosis of fetal congenital anomalies: a review.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, G; Pietrolucci, M; Aiello, E; Mammarella, S; Bosi, C; Arduini, D

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this review was to establish whether three-dimensional (3D) and four dimensional (4D) ultrasonography adds diagnostic information to what is currently provided by two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound in the diagnosis of the most frequent fetal structural defects: congenital heart disease and central nervous system congenital anomalies. There are evidences suggesting that 3D ultrasound allows to reduce the operator dependency in the visualization of standard diagnostic planes, thus reducing the examination time require for the obstetric ultrasound examination, with minimal impact on the visualization quality of the anatomic landmarks. Furthermore, operators with minimal experience may record cardiac or brain volumes that can be successfully analyzed off-line locally or sent by internet to experts for remote review. As a consequence 3D ultrasonography promises to become the method of choice for diagnosis congenital structural defects. PMID:21926949

  4. Advanced Cardiac Life Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document contains materials for an advanced college course in cardiac life support developed for the State of Iowa. The course syllabus lists the course title, hours, number, description, prerequisites, learning activities, instructional units, required text, six references, evaluation criteria, course objectives by units, course…

  5. Long-term cardiac sequelae after treatment of malignant tumors with radiotherapy or cytostatics in childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Maekinen, L.M.; Maekipernaa, A.R.; Rautonen, J.; Heino, M.; Pyrhoenen, S.L.; Laitinen, L.A.; Siimes, M.A. )

    1990-05-01

    A series of 41 individuals were restudied after childhood cancer with a median follow-up time of 17 years after chest irradiation or treatment with cyclophosphamide or Adriamycin (doxorubicin). Radiotherapy of the chest had been used in 21 patients, and in 13 of these irradiation was also directed at the heart. Thirty-five patients received cyclophosphamide and five received Adriamycin therapy. All patients were investigated by a pediatric cardiologist. Investigations included an electrocardiogram (ECG), a chest radiographic film, an echocardiogram, an exercise test, and a 24-hour ECG. Altogether 20 patients (49%) showed some abnormality in cardiac tests. Each additional year of follow-up was associated with a 1.3-fold (95% confidence limits, 1.04-1.66; P less than 0.05) increase in the risk for pathologic cardiac findings. The risk for an abnormal cardiac test result in the 13 patients who had received cardiac irradiation was 12.8-fold (95% confidence limits, 1.8-90.8; P less than 0.02) that of the other patients. However, abnormalities in cardiac function were mild.

  6. Echocardiographic assessment of cardiac morphology and function in mutant dwarf rats.

    PubMed

    Longobardi, S; Cittadini, A; Strömer, H; Katz, S E; Grossman, J D; Clark, R G; Morgan, J P; Douglas, P S

    2000-10-01

    Although the mutant dwarf rat has been proposed as a model of growth hormone (GH) deficiency, few studies have addressed its cardiovascular abnormalities. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate cardiac structure and function in mutant dwarf rats in vivo before and after chronic GH administration, by means of transthoracic Doppler echocardiography. To this purpose, forty 90-day-old female dwarf rats were randomized to receive either GH treatment or placebo. Twenty age-and sex-matched Lewis rats (200-250 g) served as the control group. All rats underwent echocardiograms before receiving any drug and after 3 weeks of therapy. Echocardiographically detected left ventricular mass indexed to tibial length was reduced by 41% in dwarf rats compared to the control group. Such relative cardiac atrophy was also evident at the myocyte level, and was fully reversible after GH therapy. In contrast to the control group, dwarf rats also showed a reduction of left ventricular diastolic volumes normalized to tibial length and impaired cardiac performance as suggested by the reduction of cardiac index, abnormal stress-shortening relations, and a significant elevation of total peripheral vascular resistance. All these abnormalities were reversible upon GH therapy for 3 weeks. In conclusion, GH plays an important role in maintaining a normal cardiac structure and function. Since the observed changes are similar to those seen in GH-deficient men, the mutant dwarf rat represents a faithful animal model of GH deficiency. PMID:11042020

  7. Ultrasound-Mediated Local Drug and Gene Delivery Using Nanocarriers

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qiu-Lan; Chen, Zhi-Yi; Yang, Feng

    2014-01-01

    With the development of nanotechnology, nanocarriers have been increasingly used for curative drug/gene delivery. Various nanocarriers are being introduced and assessed, such as polymer nanoparticles, liposomes, and micelles. As a novel theranostic system, nanocarriers hold great promise for ultrasound molecular imaging, targeted drug/gene delivery, and therapy. Nanocarriers, with the properties of smaller particle size, and long circulation time, would be advantageous in diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Nanocarriers can pass through blood capillary walls and cell membrane walls to deliver drugs. The mechanisms of interaction between ultrasound and nanocarriers are not clearly understood, which may be related to cavitation, mechanical effects, thermal effects, and so forth. These effects may induce transient membrane permeabilization (sonoporation) on a single cell level, cell death, and disruption of tissue structure, ensuring noninvasive, targeted, and efficient drug/gene delivery and therapy. The system has been used in various tissues and organs (in vitro or in vivo), including tumor tissues, kidney, cardiac, skeletal muscle, and vascular smooth muscle. In this review, we explore the research progress and application of ultrasound-mediated local drug/gene delivery with nanocarriers. PMID:25202710

  8. CBME Seminar Seminar Title: Cardiac Flow Analysis Based on Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    E-print Network

    Balasuriya, Sanjeeva

    CBME Seminar Seminar Title: Cardiac Flow Analysis Based on Magnetic Resonance Imaging Presenter: Dr using a series of time dependent magnetic resonance images. An indication of flow vortices can resonance imaging (CMRI) provide a non-invasive approach for scanning humans with heart abnormalities

  9. Is Doppler ultrasound useful for evaluating gestational trophoblastic disease?

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lawrence H; Bernardes, Lisandra S; Hase, Eliane A; Fushida, Koji; Francisco, Rossana P V

    2015-01-01

    Doppler ultrasound is a non-invasive method for evaluating vascularization and is widely used in clinical practice. Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia includes a group of highly vascularized malignancies derived from placental cells. This review summarizes data found in the literature regarding the applications of Doppler ultrasound in managing patients with gestational trophoblastic neoplasia. The PubMed/Medline, Web of Science, Cochrane and LILACS databases were searched for articles published in English until 2014 using the following keywords: “Gestational trophoblastic disease AND Ultrasonography, Doppler.” Twenty-eight articles met the inclusion criteria and were separated into the 4 following groups according to the aim of the study. 1 Doppler ultrasound does not seem to be capable of differentiating partial from complete moles, but it might be useful when evaluating pregnancies in which a complete mole coexists with a normal fetus. 2 There is controversy in the role of uterine artery Doppler velocimetry in the prediction of development of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia. 3 Doppler ultrasound is a useful tool in the diagnosis of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia because abnormal myometrial vascularization and lower uterine artery Doppler indices seem to be correlated with invasive disease. 4 Lower uterine artery Doppler indices in the diagnosis of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia are associated with methotrexate resistance and might play a role in prognosis. CONCLUSION: Several studies support the importance of Doppler ultrasound in the management of patients with gestational trophoblastic neoplasia, particularly the role of Doppler velocimetry in the prediction of trophoblastic neoplasia and the chemoresistance of trophoblastic tumors. Doppler findings should be used as ancillary tools, along with human chorionic gonadotropin assessment, in the diagnosis of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia.

  10. Diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound for assessment of hemophilic arthropathy: MRI correlation.

    PubMed

    Doria, Andrea S; Keshava, Shyamkumar N; Mohanta, Arun; Jarrin, Jose; Blanchette, Victor; Srivastava, Alok; Moineddin, Rahim; Kavitha, M L; Hilliard, Pamela; Poonnoose, Pradeep; Gibikote, Sridhar

    2015-03-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this article is to assess the reliability of interpretation of ultrasound findings according to data blinding in maturing hemophilic joints and to determine the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound compared with MRI for assessing joint components. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. Ankles (n = 34) or knees (n = 25) of boys with hemophilia or von Willebrand disease (median age, 13 years; range, 5-17 years) were imaged by ultrasound, MRI, and radiography in two centers (Toronto, Canada, and Vellore, India). Ultrasound scans were performed by two operators (one blinded and one unblinded to MRI data) and were reviewed by four reviewers who were unblinded to corresponding MRI findings according to a proposed 0- to 14-item scale that matches 14 of 17 items of the corresponding MRI scale. MRI examinations were independently reviewed by two readers. RESULTS. When data were acquired by radiologists, ultrasound was highly reliable for assessing soft-tissue changes (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC], 0.98 for ankles and 0.97 for knees) and substantially to highly reliable for assessing osteochondral changes (ICC, 0.61 for ankles and 0.89 for knees). Ultrasound was highly sensitive (> 92%) for assessing synovial hypertrophy and hemosiderin in both ankles and knees but had borderline sensitivity for detecting small amounts of fluid in ankles (70%) in contrast to knees (93%) and variable sensitivity for evaluating osteochondral abnormalities (sensitivity range, 86-100% for ankles and 12-100% for knees). CONCLUSION. If it is performed by experienced radiologists using a standardized protocol, ultrasound is highly reliable for assessing soft-tissue abnormalities of ankles and knees and substantially to highly reliable for assessing osteochondral changes in these joints. PMID:25714320

  11. Endocavity Ultrasound Probe Manipulators

    PubMed Central

    Stoianovici, Dan; Kim, Chunwoo; Schäfer, Felix; Huang, Chien-Ming; Zuo, Yihe; Petrisor, Doru; Han, Misop

    2014-01-01

    We developed two similar structure manipulators for medical endocavity ultrasound probes with 3 and 4 degrees of freedom (DoF). These robots allow scanning with ultrasound for 3-D imaging and enable robot-assisted image-guided procedures. Both robots use remote center of motion kinematics, characteristic of medical robots. The 4-DoF robot provides unrestricted manipulation of the endocavity probe. With the 3-DoF robot the insertion motion of the probe must be adjusted manually, but the device is simpler and may also be used to manipulate external-body probes. The robots enabled a novel surgical approach of using intraoperative image-based navigation during robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP), performed with concurrent use of two robotic systems (Tandem, T-RALP). Thus far, a clinical trial for evaluation of safety and feasibility has been performed successfully on 46 patients. This paper describes the architecture and design of the robots, the two prototypes, control features related to safety, preclinical experiments, and the T-RALP procedure. PMID:24795525

  12. Aesthetic ultrasound therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthe, Peter G.; Slayton, Michael H.

    2012-10-01

    Ultrasound provides key benefits in aesthetic surgery compared to laser and RF based energy sources. We present results of research, development, pre-clinical and clinical studies, regulatory clearance and commercialization of a revolutionary non-invasive aesthetic ultrasound imaging and therapy system. Clinical applications for this platform include non-invasive face-lifts, brow-lifts, and neck-lifts achieved through fractionated treatment of the superficial musculoaponeurotic system (SMAS) and subcutaneous tissue. Treatment consists of placing a grid of micro-coagulative lesions on the order of 1 mm3 at depths in skin of 1 to 6 mm, source energy levels of 0.1 to 3 J, and spacing on the order of 1.5 mm, from 4 to 10 MHz dual-mode image/treat transducers. System details are described, as well as a regulatory pathway consisting of acoustic and bioheat simulations, source characterization (hydrophone, radiation force, and Schlieren), pre-clinical studies (porcine skin ex vivo, in vivo, and human cadaver), human safety studies (treat and resect) and efficacy trials which culminated in FDA clearance (2009) under a new device classification and world-wide usage. Clinical before and after photographs are presented which validate the clinical approach.

  13. [Ultrasound in thromboembolism].

    PubMed

    Mathis, Gebhard

    2015-09-16

    Imaging of pulmonary embolism (PTE) remains a great challange. Mortatity is even high. Possibilities of lung ultrasound, echocardiography, and compression leg vein sonography are discussed. Hemodynamic instable patients should achieve echocardiography at bed side with an accuracy of 90% and immeadiatly treated. In case of a suspected PTE, compression sonography of the leg veins is recommended. It can be performed within 2 min but, on average, yields a positive result in only one-half of the cases of PTE. During the last years, pulmonary sonography took root as a complementary method to MSCT either when the latter is not available or when it is contraindicated because of contrast agent allergy, renal insufficiency, or pregnancy. This method was able to provide evidence of subpleural pulmonary consolidations due to embolism in at least three-fourths of patients having a PTE. According to clinical presentation, combination of lung ultrasound, echocardiograpphy, and compression ultrasoud of the leg veins showed a sensitiviy of more than 90%. PMID:26373908

  14. Computerized Ultrasound Risk Evaluation (CURE) System: Development of Combined Transmission and Reflection Ultrasound with New Reconstruction Algorithms for Breast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Littrup, P J; Duric, N; Azevedo, S; Chambers, D; Candy, J V; Johnson, S; Auner, G; Rather, J; Holsapple, E T

    2001-09-07

    Our Computerized Ultrasound Risk Evaluation (CURE) system has been developed to the engineering prototype stage and generated unique data sets of both transmission and reflection ultrasound (US). This paper will help define the clinical underpinnings of the developmental process and interpret the imaging results from a similar perspective. The CURE project was designed to incorporate numerous diagnostic parameters to improve upon two major areas of early breast cancer detection. CURE may provide improved tissue characterization of breast masses and reliable detection of abnormal microcalcifications found in some breast cancers and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Current breast US is limited to mass evaluation, whereas mammography also detects and guides biopsy of malignant calcifications. Screening with CURE remains a distant goal, but improved follow-up of mammographic abnormalities may represent a feasible breakthrough. Improved tissue characterization could result in reduction of the estimated one million benign biopsies each year in the United States, costing up to several billion dollars. Most breast calcifications are benign and comprise-80% of stereotactic biopsies guided by mammography. Ultrasound has the capability of finding some groups of calcifications, but further improvements in resolution should also address tissue characterization to define the soft tissue filling of ducts by DCIS. In this manner, CURE may be able to more accurately identify the malignant calcifications associated with progression of DCIS or early cancers. Currently, high-resolution US images of the breast are performed in the reflection mode at higher frequencies, which also limits depth of penetration. Reconstruction of reflection ultrasound images relies upon acoustic impedance differences in the tissue and includes only direct backscatter of the ultrasound signal. Resolution and tissue contrast of current US continues to improve with denser transducer arrays and image processing, but the operator dependent nature of using a moveable transducer head remains a significant problem for thorough coverage of the entire breast. We have therefore undertaken the development of a whole breast (i.e., including auxiliary tail) system, with improved resolution and tissue characterization abilities. The extensive ultrasound physics considerations, engineering, materials process development and subsequent algorithm reconstruction are beyond the scope of this initial paper. The proprietary nature of these processes will be forthcoming as the intellectual property is fully secured. We will focus here on the imaging outcomes as they apply to eventual expansion into clinical use.

  15. Diagnosis of cardiovascular abnormalities from compressed ECG: a data mining-based approach.

    PubMed

    Sufi, Fahim; Khalil, Ibrahim

    2011-01-01

    Usage of compressed ECG for fast and efficient telecardiology application is crucial, as ECG signals are enormously large in size. However, conventional ECG diagnosis algorithms require the compressed ECG packets to be decompressed before diagnosis can be performed. This added step of decompression before performing diagnosis for every ECG packet introduces unnecessary delay, which is undesirable for cardiovascular diseased (CVD) patients. In this paper, we are demonstrating an innovative technique that performs real-time classification of CVD. With the help of this real-time classification of CVD, the emergency personnel or the hospital can automatically be notified via SMS/MMS/e-mail when a life-threatening cardiac abnormality of the CVD affected patient is detected. Our proposed system initially uses data mining techniques, such as attribute selection (i.e., selects only a few features from the compressed ECG) and expectation maximization (EM)-based clustering. These data mining techniques running on a hospital server generate a set of constraints for representing each of the abnormalities. Then, the patient's mobile phone receives these set of constraints and employs a rule-based system that can identify each of abnormal beats in real time. Our experimentation results on 50 MIT-BIH ECG entries reveal that the proposed approach can successfully detect cardiac abnormalities (e.g., ventricular flutter/fibrillation, premature ventricular contraction, atrial fibrillation, etc.) with 97% accuracy on average. This innovative data mining technique on compressed ECG packets enables faster identification of cardiac abnormality directly from the compressed ECG, helping to build an efficient telecardiology diagnosis system. PMID:21097383

  16. Ultra-high frequency ultrasound biomicroscopy and high throughput cardiovascular phenotyping in a large scale mouse mutagenesis screen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoqin; Francis, Richard; Tobita, Kimimasa; Kim, Andy; Leatherbury, Linda; Lo, Cecilia W.

    2013-02-01

    Ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) is ideally suited for phenotyping fetal mice for congenital heart disease (CHD), as imaging can be carried out noninvasively to provide both hemodynamic and structural information essential for CHD diagnosis. Using the UBM (Vevo 2100; 40Hz) in conjunction with the clinical ultrasound system (Acuson Sequioa C512; 15Hz), we developed a two-step screening protocol to scan thousands fetuses derived from ENU mutagenized pedigrees. A wide spectrum of CHD was detected by the UBM, which were subsequently confirmed with follow-up necropsy and histopathology examination with episcopic fluorescence image capture. CHD observed included outflow anomalies, left/right heart obstructive lesions, septal/valvular defects and cardiac situs anomalies. Meanwhile, various extracardiac defects were found, such as polydactyly, craniofacial defects, exencephaly, omphalocele-cleft palate, most of which were associated with cardiac defects. Our analyses showed the UBM was better at assessing cardiac structure and blood flow profiles, while conventional ultrasound allowed higher throughput low-resolution screening. Our study showed the integration of conventional clinical ultrasound imaging with the UBM for fetal mouse cardiovascular phenotyping can maximize the detection and recovery of CHD mutants.

  17. Droplets, Bubbles and Ultrasound Interactions.

    PubMed

    Shpak, Oleksandr; Verweij, Martin; de Jong, Nico; Versluis, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of droplets and bubbles with ultrasound has been studied extensively in the last 25 years. Microbubbles are broadly used in diagnostic and therapeutic medical applications, for instance, as ultrasound contrast agents. They have a similar size as red blood cells, and thus are able to circulate within blood vessels. Perfluorocarbon liquid droplets can be a potential new generation of microbubble agents as ultrasound can trigger their conversion into gas bubbles. Prior to activation, they are at least five times smaller in diameter than the resulting bubbles. Together with the violent nature of the phase-transition, the droplets can be used for local drug delivery, embolotherapy, HIFU enhancement and tumor imaging. Here we explain the basics of bubble dynamics, described by the Rayleigh-Plesset equation, bubble resonance frequency, damping and quality factor. We show the elegant calculation of the above characteristics for the case of small amplitude oscillations by linearizing the equations. The effect and importance of a bubble coating and effective surface tension are also discussed. We give the main characteristics of the power spectrum of bubble oscillations. Preceding bubble dynamics, ultrasound propagation is introduced. We explain the speed of sound, nonlinearity and attenuation terms. We examine bubble ultrasound scattering and how it depends on the wave-shape of the incident wave. Finally, we introduce droplet interaction with ultrasound. We elucidate the ultrasound-focusing concept within a droplets sphere, droplet shaking due to media compressibility and droplet phase-conversion dynamics. PMID:26486337

  18. MeCP2 regulation of cardiac fibroblast proliferation and fibrosis by down-regulation of DUSP5.

    PubMed

    Tao, Hui; Yang, Jing-Jing; Hu, Wei; Shi, Kai-Hu; Deng, Zi-Yu; Li, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac fibrosis is a complex pathological process that includes the abnormal proliferation of cardiac fibroblasts and deposition of the extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and collagens. Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is a multifunctional nuclear protein, and plays a key role in the fibrotic diseases. However, the potential role of MeCP2 in cardiac fibrosis remains unclear. We report that MeCP2 modulates cardiac fibrosis via down-regulation of dual-specificity phosphatase 5 (DUSP5), a nuclear phosphatase that negatively regulates prohypertrophic signaling by ERK1/2. MeCP2 is a critical participant in the epigenetic silencing of regulatory genes. Here, we found that down-regulation of DUSP5 in cardiac fibrosis is associated with MeCP2 over-expression. Treatment of cardiac fibroblasts with MeCP2-siRNA blocked proliferation. Knockdown of MeCP2 elevated DUSP5 expression in activated cardiac fibroblasts. Moreover, we investigated the effect of DUSP5 on the ERK1/2 activation. Our results demonstrated that MeCP2 modulates DUSP5 mediated activation of ERK1/2 in cardiac fibrosis. Taken together, these results indicated that MeCP2 acts as a key regulator of pathological cardiac fibrosis, promotes cardiac fibroblasts proliferation and fibrosis by down-regulation of DUSP5. PMID:26511729

  19. Value of Ultrasound in Rheumatologic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Taeyoung; Horton, Laura; Emery, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The use of musculoskeletal ultrasound in rheumatology clinical practice has rapidly increased over the past decade. Ultrasound has enabled rheumatologists to diagnose, prognosticate and monitor disease outcome. Although international standardization remains a concern still, the use of ultrasound in rheumatology is expected to grow further as costs fall and the opportunity to train in the technique improves. We present a review of value of ultrasound, focusing on major applications of ultrasound in rheumatologic diseases. PMID:23580002

  20. Ductus venosus in the first trimester: contribution to screening of chromosomal, cardiac defects and monochorionic twin complications.

    PubMed

    Maiz, Nerea; Nicolaides, Kypros H

    2010-01-01

    In the first trimester the ductus venosus can be easily identified with color Doppler and a ductus venosus waveform can be obtained by pulsed Doppler. At 11-13 weeks the prevalence of abnormal a-wave in the ductus venosus is inversely related to fetal crown-rump length and maternal serum pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A), increases with fetal nuchal translucency (NT) thickness and is more common in women of Black racial origin and in fetuses with abnormal karyotype or cardiac defects. Ductus venosus flow provides an independent contribution in the prediction of chromosomal abnormalities when combined with NT and the maternal serum markers of PAPP-A and free beta-hCG, increasing the detection rate to 96% at a false-positive rate of 2.6%. Abnormal ductus venosus flow increases the risk of cardiac defects in fetuses with NT above the 95th centile, and it may increase the risk in fetuses with normal NT. In twin pregnancies, abnormal ductus venosus flow is associated with chromosomal abnormalities and cardiac defects. In monochorionic twins, abnormal flow in the ductus venosus in at least 1 of the fetuses increases the risk of developing twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome. PMID:20571255

  1. Ultrasound imaging in the management of bleeding and pain in early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Knez, Jure; Day, Andrea; Jurkovic, Davor

    2014-07-01

    Bleeding and pain are experienced by 20% of women during the first trimester of pregnancy. Although most pregnancies complicated by pain and bleeding tend to progress normally, these symptoms are distressing for woman, and they are also associated with an increased risk of miscarriage and ectopic pregnancy. Ultrasound is the first and often the only diagnostic modality that is used to determine location of early pregnancy and to assess its health. Ultrasound is an accurate, safe, painless and relatively inexpensive diagnostic tool, which all contributed to its widespread use in early pregnancy. Pain and bleeding in early pregnancy are sometimes caused by concomitant gynaecological, gastrointestinal, and urological problems, which could also be detected on ultrasound scan. In women with suspected intra-abdominal bleeding, ultrasound scan can be used to detect the presence of blood and provide information about the extent of bleeding. In this chapter, we comprehensively review the use of ultrasound in the diagnosis and management of early pregnancy complications. We include information about the diagnosis of gynaecological and other pelvic abnormalities, which could cause pain or bleeding in pregnancy. We also provide a summary of the current views on the safety of ultrasound in early pregnancy. PMID:24841987

  2. Assessment of high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment of rodent mammary tumors using ultrasound backscatter

    E-print Network

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    Assessment of high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment of rodent mammary tumors using ultrasound of studies, liver tumors in rodents have been treated using focused ultrasound with outcomes ranging from

  3. Fibrosis, Connexin-43, and Conduction Abnormalities in the Brugada Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nademanee, Koonlawee; Raju, Hariharan; de Noronha, Sofia V.; Papadakis, Michael; Robinson, Laurence; Rothery, Stephen; Makita, Naomasa; Kowase, Shinya; Boonmee, Nakorn; Vitayakritsirikul, Vorapot; Ratanarapee, Samrerng; Sharma, Sanjay; van der Wal, Allard C.; Christiansen, Michael; Tan, Hanno L.; Wilde, Arthur A.; Nogami, Akihiko; Sheppard, Mary N.; Veerakul, Gumpanart; Behr, Elijah R.

    2015-01-01

    Background The right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) is acknowledged to be responsible for arrhythmogenesis in Brugada syndrome (BrS), but the pathophysiology remains controversial. Objectives This study assessed the substrate underlying BrS at post-mortem and in vivo, and the role for open thoracotomy ablation. Methods Six whole hearts from male post-mortem cases of unexplained sudden death (mean age 23.2 years) with negative specialist cardiac autopsy and familial BrS were used and matched to 6 homograft control hearts by sex and age (within 3 years) by random risk set sampling. Cardiac autopsy sections from cases and control hearts were stained with picrosirius red for collagen. The RVOT was evaluated in detail, including immunofluorescent stain for connexin-43 (Cx43). Collagen and Cx43 were quantified digitally and compared. An in vivo study was undertaken on 6 consecutive BrS patients (mean age 39.8 years, all men) during epicardial RVOT ablation for arrhythmia via thoracotomy. Abnormal late and fractionated potentials indicative of slowed conduction were identified, and biopsies were taken before ablation. Results Collagen was increased in BrS autopsy cases compared with control hearts (odds ratio [OR]: 1.42; p = 0.026). Fibrosis was greatest in the RVOT (OR: 1.98; p = 0.003) and the epicardium (OR: 2.00; p = 0.001). The Cx43 signal was reduced in BrS RVOT (OR: 0.59; p = 0.001). Autopsy and in vivo RVOT samples identified epicardial and interstitial fibrosis. This was collocated with abnormal potentials in vivo that, when ablated, abolished the type 1 Brugada electrocardiogram without ventricular arrhythmia over 24.6 ± 9.7 months. Conclusions BrS is associated with epicardial surface and interstitial fibrosis and reduced gap junction expression in the RVOT. This collocates to abnormal potentials, and their ablation abolishes the BrS phenotype and life-threatening arrhythmias. BrS is also associated with increased collagen throughout the heart. Abnormal myocardial structure and conduction are therefore responsible for BrS. PMID:26516000

  4. [Numerical modeling of ultrasound thermotherapy].

    PubMed

    Ginter, S; Liebler, M; Dreyer, T; Riedlinger, R E

    2002-01-01

    In ultrasound thermotherapy (USTT) high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is used for noninvasive thermal treatment of human tissue deep inside the body. In this paper a FDTD-model is presented to simulate USTT. It combines nonlinear ultrasound propagation and broadband tissue attenuation together with the bio-heat transfer equation for calculation of temperature distribution in tissue. The temperature dependence of parameters is integrated in the complete model. Simulation results demonstrate the potentialities of this simulation tool to analyze and optimize thermotherapy. PMID:12451833

  5. Fetal and umbilical Doppler ultrasound in high-risk pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Alfirevic, Zarko; Stampalija, Tamara; Gyte, Gillian ML

    2014-01-01

    Background Abnormal blood flow patterns in fetal circulation detected by Doppler ultrasound may indicate poor fetal prognosis. It is also possible false positive Doppler ultrasound findings could encourage inappropriate early delivery. Objectives The objective of this review was to assess the effects of Doppler ultrasound used to assess fetal well-being in high-risk pregnancies on obstetric care and fetal outcomes. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (September 2009) and the reference lists of identified studies. Selection criteria Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials of Doppler ultrasound for the investigation of umbilical and fetal vessels waveforms in high-risk pregnancies compared to no Doppler ultrasound. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently assessed the studies for inclusion, assessed risk of bias and carried out data extraction. Data entry was checked. Main results Eighteen completed studies involving just over 10,000 women were included. The trials were generally of unclear quality with some evidence of possible publication bias. The use of Doppler ultrasound in high-risk pregnancy was associated a reduction in perinatal deaths (risk ratio (RR) 0.71, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.52 to 0.98, 16 studies, 10,225 babies, 1.2% versus 1.7 %, numbers needed to treat = 203; 95%CI 103 to 4352). There were also fewer inductions of labour (average RR 0.89, 95% CI 0.80 to 0.99, 10 studies, 5633 women, random effects) and fewer caesarean sections (RR 0.90, 95% CI 0.84 to 0.97, 14 studies, 7918 women). No difference was found in operative vaginal births (RR 0.95, 95% CI 0.80 to 1.14, four studies, 2813 women) nor in Apgar scores less than seven at five minutes (RR 0.92, 95% CI 0.69 to 1.24, seven studies, 6321 babies). Authors’ conclusions Current evidence suggests that the use of Doppler ultrasound in high-risk pregnancies reduced the risk of perinatal deaths and resulted in less obstetric interventions. The quality of the current evidence was not of high quality, therefore, the results should be interpreted with some caution. Studies of high quality with follow-up studies on neurological development are needed. PMID:20091637

  6. Sudden cardiac death athletes: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Previous events evidence that sudden cardiac death (SCD) in athletes is still a reality and it keeps challenging cardiologists. Considering the importance of SCD in athletes and the requisite for an update of this matter, we endeavored to describe SCD in athletes. The Medline (via PubMed) and SciELO databases were searched using the subject keywords "sudden death, athletes and mortality". The incidence of SCD is expected at one case for each 200,000 young athletes per year. Overall it is resulted of complex dealings of factors such as arrhythmogenic substrate, regulator and triggers factors. In great part of deaths caused by heart disease in athletes younger than 35 years old investigations evidence cardiac congenital abnormalities. Athletes above 35 years old possibly die due to impairments of coronary heart disease, frequently caused by atherosclerosis. Myocardial ischemia and myocardial infarction are responsible for the most cases of SCD above this age (80%). Pre-participatory athletes' evaluation helps to recognize situations that may put the athlete's life in risk including cardiovascular diseases. In summary, cardiologic examinations of athletes' pre-competition routine is an important way to minimize the risk of SCD. PMID:20682064

  7. Spinal cord ischemia after cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, H; Ujike, Y; Asai, Y; Kaneko, M; Chiba, S

    1994-01-01

    Subsequent to cardiac arrest, a 58-year-old man with intractable dysrhythmia and severe arteriosclerosis developed flaccid paraplegia, depressed deep tendon reflexes, and showed no pain or temperature sensation caudal to Th-7 in spite of completely intact proprioception and vibration sensation. An echocardiogram showed no clots or vegetation on the prosthetic valve and no thrombus in the left atrium or left ventricle. The patient's paraplegia was permanent, at least through a follow-up period of 2 years. These findings suggest that the etiology was spinal cord ischemia due to blood supply in the area of the anterior spinal artery (ASA); however, magnetic resonance T2-weighted imaging demonstrated signal abnormalities throughout the gray matter and in the adjacent center white matter. Somatosensory-evoked potentials (SEP) measure neural transmission in the afferent spinal cord pathway, which is located in the lateral and posterior columns of the white matter; these showed a delay in latency between Th-6 and Th-7. The spinal cord is as vulnerable to transient ischemia as the brain. Spinal cord ischemia after cardiac arrest results from principal damage in the anterior horn of the gray matter, the so-called ASA syndrome; however, the pathways of SEP and pathogenesis of the spinal cord ischemia need further investigation. PMID:7884198

  8. Cardiac function and rejection following transplantation of the heart

    SciTech Connect

    Schober, O.; Schuler, S.; Gratz, K.; Warnecke, H.; Lang, W.; Hetzer, R.; Creutzig, H.

    1985-05-01

    It was the purpose of the study to evaluate the noninvasive detection of rejection following cardiac transplantation. Multigated cardiac blood pool imaging (MUGA) at rest with assessment of ejection fraction (EF) and regional wall motion was determined prospectively in 14 patients with 180 studies (follow up 5.1 +- 3.2 months) following orthotopic cardiac transplantation. The results were compared with histological examination of a percutaneous endocardial biopsy specimen (EMB) from the right ventricle. Diagnosis of rejection by EF measurement was defined by a decrease of 10% if EF < 70%, and 15% if EF > 70%. In 152 studies a normal MUGA study correlated with none rejection as defined by EMB. In 14 of 22 studies with moderate or severe rejection decrease of EF followed the rejection with a delay of 5 days. Septal wall motion abnormalities were typical. In 6 studies an abnormal temporal course of EF was not related to a similar finding in EMB. A sensitivity of 69% and a specifity of 96% can be estimated in the investigated group, in which all patients survived during the period of the study. It is concluded that rejection can be excluded by noninvasive MUGA (specifity 96%) and that MUGA is predictive of rejection (sensitivity 67%) mostly with a delay of 5 days.

  9. Radionuclide imaging and ultrasound in liver/spleen trauma: a prospective comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Froelich, J.W.; Simeone, J.F.; McKusick, K.A.; Winzelberg, G.G.; Strauss, H.W.

    1982-11-01

    In a prospective blind study of liver/spleen trauma, 32 consecutive patients were evaluated by radionuclide imaging (/sup 99m/Tc-sulfur colloid) and gray-scale ultrasound. Six patients (19%) had inadequate sonograms due to injuries and pain. Thirteen (41%) were normal, 13 (41%) were abnormal with one technique or the other, and there was a discrepancy in 2 (6%). Of the 13 abnormal patients, 1 had a lacerated spleen, 2 had angiographic confirmation of a subcapsular hematoma, and 10 showed resolution on follow-up. Two patients with left-sided trauma had abnormal radionuclide scans of the liver; sonograms were initially normal in one of them, but subsequent imaging confirmed the abnormality. The authors feel that imaging with /sup 99m/Tc-sulfur colloid should be the primary screening examination for liver/spleen trauma.

  10. Ultrasound-mediated microbubble destruction enhances the therapeutic effect of intracoronary transplantation of bone marrow stem cells on myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Xuefeng; Liu, Jiaqing; Liao, Xudong; Liu, Guohui

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The combination of intracoronary transplantation and ultrasound-mediated microbubble destruction may promote effective and accurate delivery of bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) into the infarct zone. To test this hypothesis in this study we examined the effectiveness of ultrasound-mediated microbubble destruction in combination with intracoronary transplantation of BMSCs for the treatment of myocardial infarction in canine model of acute myocardial infarction. Method: The dogs were randomly assigned to four groups: PBS, ultrasound-mediated microbubble destruction, BMSCs, BMSCs together with ultrasound-mediated microbubble destruction. At 28 days post-surgery, cardiac function and the percentage of perfusion defect area to total left ventricular perfusion area (DA%) were determined by myocardial contrast echocardiography. Nitro blue tetrazolium staining was performed to determine myocardial infarct size, hematoxylin and eosin staining for assessing microvascular injury, Masson’s staining for analyzing myocardial tissue collagen, immunohistochemical analysis of ?-actin to measure cardiac contractile function and of BrdU-labeled myocardial cells to measure the number of the BMSCs homing to the infarcted region. Results: The transplantation of BMSCs significantly improved heart function and DA% (P < 0.05). The group that received ultrasound-mediated microbubble destruction with BMSCs transplantation showed the most improvement in heart function and DA% (P < 0.05). This group also showed a denser deposition of BMSCs in the coronary artery and more BrdU positive cells in the infarcted region, had the maximum number of ?-actin positive cells, showed the smallest myocardial infarct area compared to other groups (P< 0.05). Conclusion: Ultrasound-mediated microbubble destruction increases the homing of BMSCs in the target area following intracoronary transplantation, which allows more BMSCs to differentiate into functional cardiomyocytes, thereby reducing myocardial infarct size and improving cardiac function. PMID:25973133

  11. Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Migliori, Albert (Santa Fe, NM)

    1991-01-01

    A resonant ultrasound spectroscopy method provides a unique characterization of an object for use in distinguishing similar objects having physical differences greater than a predetermined tolerance. A resonant response spectrum is obtained for a reference object by placing excitation and detection transducers at any accessible location on the object. The spectrum is analyzed to determine the number of resonant response peaks in a predetermined frequency interval. The distribution of the resonance frequencies is then characterized in a manner effective to form a unique signature of the object. In one characterization, a small frequency interval is defined and stepped though the spectrum frequency range. Subsequent objects are similarly characterized where the characterizations serve as signatures effective to distinguish objects that differ from the reference object by more than the predetermined tolerance.

  12. Ultrasound in placental disorders.

    PubMed

    D'Antonio, Francesco; Bhide, Amar

    2014-04-01

    The definition of placenta previa based on ultrasound findings is more practical, and the traditional definition (implantation of the placenta in the lower uterine segment) needs to be revised. The term 'placenta previa' should only be used when the placental edge overlaps or is within 2 cm of the internal cervical orifice in late pregnancy. If the placental edge is located further than 2 cm but within 3.5 cm from the internal cervical orifice, the placenta should be termed 'low-lying'. Unless the placental edge at least reaches the internal orifice at mid-trimester, symptomatic placenta previa in the third trimester will not be encountered. Caesarean section is the recommended mode of delivery for placenta previa at term. Attempt at vaginal delivery is appropriate for low-lying placenta, but the possibility of post-partum haemorrhage should be kept in mind. The incidence of invasive placentation, such as placenta accrete, has progressively risen in the past 3 decades, possibly as a consequence of increasing caesarean section rates. Ultrasound has a sensitivity of 91% and a specificity of 97% for the identification of all forms of invasive placentation. Chorioangiomas are benign non-trophoblastic placental tumours with excessive vascular proliferation within the stroma of chronic villi. They are usually asymptomatic, although occasionally can be associated with adverse fetal outcomes. Chorioangiomas usually appear as well-circumscribed, rounded, hypo-echoic lesions next to the chorionic surface. Iatrogenic delivery or prenatal intervention are two options, if fetal compromise is present. Prenatal detection leads to a dramatic increase in survival compared with those cases unsuspected antenatally. PMID:24461676

  13. Ultrasound-modulated bioluminescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bal, Guillaume; Schotland, John C.

    2014-03-01

    We propose a method to reconstruct the density of a luminescent source in a highly scattering medium from ultrasound-modulated optical measurements. Our approach is based on the solution to a hybrid inverse source problem for the diffusion equation.

  14. Cardiac outflow tract anomalies.

    PubMed

    Neeb, Zachary; Lajiness, Jacquelyn D; Bolanis, Esther; Conway, Simon J

    2013-07-01

    The mature outflow tract (OFT) is, in basic terms, a short conduit. It is a simple, although vital, connection situated between contracting muscular heart chambers and a vast embryonic vascular network. Unfortunately, it is also a focal point underlying many multifactorial congenital heart defects (CHDs). Through the use of various animal models combined with human genetic investigations, we are beginning to comprehend the molecular and cellular framework that controls OFT morphogenesis. Clear roles of neural crest cells (NCC) and second heart field (SHF) derivatives have been established during OFT formation and remodeling. The challenge now is to determine how the SHF and cardiac NCC interact, the complex reciprocal signaling that appears to be occurring at various stages of OFT morphogenesis, and finally how endocardial progenitors and primary heart field (PHF) communicate with both these colonizing extra-cardiac lineages. Although we are beginning to understand that this dance of progenitor populations is wonderfully intricate, the underlying pathogenesis and the spatiotemporal cell lineage interactions remain to be fully elucidated. What is now clear is that OFT alignment and septation are independent processes, invested via separate SHF and cardiac neural crest (CNC) lineages. This review will focus on our current understanding of the respective contributions of the SHF and CNC lineage during OFT development and pathogenesis. PMID:24014420

  15. Cardiac surgery for arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Cox, James L

    2004-02-01

    Cardiac arrhythmia surgery was initiated in 1968 with the first successful division of an accessory AV connection for the Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome. Subsequent surgical procedures included the left atrial isolation procedure and the right atrial isolation procedure for automatic atrial tachycardias, discrete cryosurgery of the AV node for AV nodal reentry tachycardia, the atrial transection procedure, corridor procedure and Maze procedure for atrial fibrillation, the right ventricular disconnection procedure for arrhythmogenic right ventricular tachycardia, the encircling endocardial ventriculotomy, subendocardial resection procedure, endocardial cryoablation, the Jatene procedure, and the Dor procedure for ischemic ventricular tachycardia. Because of monumental strides in the treatment of most refractory arrhythmias by endocardial catheter techniques during the past decade, the only remaining viable surgical procedures for cardiac arrhythmias are the Maze procedure for atrial fibrillation and the Dor procedure for ischemic ventricular tachycardia. Nevertheless, the 25-30 years of intense activity in the field of cardiac arrhythmia surgery provided the essential foundation for the development of these catheter techniques and represent one of the most exciting and productive eras in the history of medicine. In one short professional career, we have witnessed the birth of arrhythmia surgery, its adolescence as an "esoteric" specialty, its prime as an enlightening yet exhausting period, and finally its waning years as a source of knowledge and wisdom on which better methods of treatment have been founded. One could hardly ask for a more rewarding experience. PMID:14764186

  16. Cardiac surgery for arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Cox, James L

    2004-02-01

    Cardiac arrhythmia surgery was initiated in 1968 with the first successful division of an accessory AV connection for the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. Subsequent surgical procedures included the left atrial isolation procedure and right atrial isolation procedure for automatic atrial tachycardias, discrete cryosurgery of the AV node for AV nodal reentrant tachycardia, the atrial transection procedure, the corridor procedure, and the maze procedure for atrial fibrillation, the right ventricular disconnection procedure for arrhythmogenic right ventricular tachycardia, and the encircling endocardial ventriculotomy, subendocardial resection procedure, endocardial cryoablation, the Jatene procedure, and the Dor procedure for ischemic ventricular tachycardia. Because of monumental strides in the treatment of most refractory arrhythmias by endocardial catheter techniques during the past decade, the only remaining viable surgical procedures for cardiac arrhythmias are the maze procedure for atrial fibrillation and the Dor procedure for ischemic ventricular tachycardia. Nevertheless, the 25 to 30 years of intense activity in the field of cardiac arrhythmia surgery provided the essential foundation for the development of these catheter techniques and represent one of the most exciting and productive eras in the history of medicine. In one short professional career, we have witnessed the birth of arrhythmia surgery, its adolescence as an "esoteric" specialty, its prime as an enlightening yet exhausting period, and finally its waning years as a source of knowledge and wisdom upon which better methods of treatment have been founded. One could hardly ask for a more rewarding experience. PMID:15028063

  17. Cardiac surgery for arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Cox, James L

    2004-11-01

    Cardiac arrhythmia surgery was initiated in 1968 with the first successful division of an accessory AV connection for the Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome. Subsequent surgical procedures included the left atrial isolation procedure and the right atrial isolation procedure for automatic atrial tachycardias, discrete cryosurgery of the AV node for AV nodal reentry tachycardia, the atrial transection procedure, corridor procedure and Maze procedure for atrial fibrillation, the right ventricular disconnection procedure for arrhythmogenic right ventricular tachycardia, the encircling endocardial ventriculotomy, subendocardial resection procedure, endocardial cryoablation, the Jatene procedure, and the Dor procedure for ischemic ventricular tachycardia. Because of monumental strides in the treatment of most refractory arrhythmias by endocardial catheter techniques during the past decade, the only remaining viable surgical procedures for cardiac arrhythmias are the Maze procedure for atrial fibrillation and the Dor procedure for ischemic ventricular tachycardia. Nevertheless, the 25-30 years of intense activity in the field of cardiac arrhythmia surgery provided the essential foundation for the development of these catheter techniques and represent one of the most exciting and productive eras in the history of medicine. In one short professional career, we have witnessed the birth of arrhythmia surgery, its adolescence as an "esoteric" specialty, its prime as an enlightening yet exhausting period, and finally its waning years as a source of knowledge and wisdom on which better methods of treatment have been founded. One could hardly ask for a more rewarding experience. PMID:23570110

  18. Cardiac emergencies in children.

    PubMed

    Schamberger, M S

    1996-06-01

    Pediatric cardiac emergencies require very specific treatment in the emergency room setting. Considering the possibility of a cardiac problem as the cause for the presenting symptoms is the initial step in successful management. Many patients present with what is initially considered a primary pulmonary disorder such as pneumonia, asthma, or bronchiolitis. Airway stabilization and ventilatory support, if needed, remain the first steps in stabilizing the patient. Many neonates with acutely decompensating heart disease may require the patency of the ductus arteriosus for survival. Prostaglandin E given as continuous infusion is the treatment of choice. Congestive heart failure can present at any age. In older patients, it is often due to myocarditis and is characterized by low cardiac output. Supportive measures, fluid restriction, and inotropic support are the basic concepts for initial treatment. Supraventricular tachycardia is a frequent arrhythmia, especially in young children. If the patient is unstable, immediate intravenous administration of adenosine or synchronized cardioversion are the initial interventions. In stable patients, vagal maneuvers may be attempted to abort the arrhythmia. PMID:8793920

  19. Cardiac Signatures of Personality

    PubMed Central

    Koelsch, Stefan; Enge, Juliane; Jentschke, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Background There are well-established relations between personality and the heart, as evidenced by associations between negative emotions on the one hand, and coronary heart disease or chronic heart failure on the other. However, there are substantial gaps in our knowledge about relations between the heart and personality in healthy individuals. Here, we investigated whether amplitude patterns of the electrocardiogram (ECG) correlate with neurotisicm, extraversion, agreeableness, warmth, positive emotion, and tender-mindedness as measured with the Neuroticism-Extraversion-Openness (NEO) personality inventory. Specifically, we investigated (a) whether a cardiac amplitude measure that was previously reported to be related to flattened affectivity (referred to as values) would explain variance of NEO scores, and (b) whether correlations can be found between NEO scores and amplitudes of the ECG. Methodology/Principal Findings NEO scores and rest ECGs were obtained from 425 healthy individuals. Neuroticism and positive emotion significantly differed between individuals with high and low values. In addition, stepwise cross-validated regressions indicated correlations between ECG amplitudes and (a) agreeableness, as well as (b) positive emotion. Conclusions/Significance These results are the first to demonstrate that ECG amplitude patterns provide information about the personality of an individual as measured with NEO personality scales and facets. These findings open new perspectives for a more efficient personality assessment using cardiac measures, as well as for more efficient risk-stratification and pre-clinical diagnosis of individuals at risk for cardiac, affective and psychosomatic disorders. PMID:22363649

  20. Cardiac surgery 2014 reviewed.

    PubMed

    Doenst, Torsten; Strüning, Constanze; Moschovas, Alexandros; Gonzalez-Lopez, David; Valchanov, Ilija; Kirov, Hristo; Diab, Mahmoud; Faerber, Gloria

    2015-12-01

    For the year 2014, more than 17,000 published references can be found in Pubmed when entering the search term "cardiac surgery". The last year has been characterized by a vivid discussion in the fields where classic cardiac surgery and modern interventional techniques overlap. Specifically, there have been important contributions in the field of coronary revascularization with either percutaneous coronary intervention or bypass surgery as well as in the fields of interventional valve therapy. Here, the US core valve trial with the first demonstration of a survival advantage at 1 year with transcatheter valves compared to surgical aortic valve replacement or the 5-year outcome of the SYNTAX trial with significant advantages for bypass surgery has been the landmark. However, in addition to these most visible publications, there have been several highly relevant and interesting contributions. This review article will summarize the most pertinent publications in the fields of coronary revascularization, surgical treatment of valve disease, heart failure (i.e., transplantation and ventricular assist devices) and aortic surgery. This condensed summary will provide the reader with "solid ground" for up-to-date decision-making in cardiac surgery. PMID:26404007

  1. Ultrasound-Mediated Polymeric Micelle Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Xia, Hesheng; Zhao, Yue; Tong, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of multi-functional nanocarriers and the design of new stimuli-responsive means are equally important for drug delivery. Ultrasound can be used as a remote, non-invasive and controllable trigger for the stimuli-responsive release of nanocarriers. Polymeric micelles are one kind of potential drug nanocarrier. By combining ultrasound and polymeric micelles, a new modality (i.e., ultrasound-mediated polymeric micelle drug delivery) has been developed and has recently received increasing attention. A major challenge remaining in developing ultrasound-responsive polymeric micelles is the improvement of the sensitivity or responsiveness of polymeric micelles to ultrasound. This chapter reviews the recent advance in this field. In order to understand the interaction mechanism between ultrasound stimulus and polymeric micelles, ultrasound effects, such as thermal effect, cavitation effect, ultrasound sonochemistry (including ultrasonic degradation, ultrasound-initiated polymerization, ultrasonic in-situ polymerization and ultrasound site-specific degradation), as well as basic micellar knowledge are introduced. Ultrasound-mediated polymeric micelle drug delivery has been classified into two main streams based on the different interaction mechanism between ultrasound and polymeric micelles; one is based on the ultrasound-induced physical disruption of the micelle and reversible release of payload. The other is based on micellar ultrasound mechanochemical disruption and irreversible release of payload. PMID:26486348

  2. Ultrasound techniques in the evaluation of the mediastinum, part I: endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) and transcutaneous mediastinal ultrasound (TMUS), introduction into ultrasound techniques

    PubMed Central

    Annema, Jouke Tabe; Clementsen, Paul; Cui, Xin Wu; Borst, Mathias Maximilian; Jenssen, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging has gained importance in pulmonary medicine over the last decades including conventional transcutaneous ultrasound (TUS), endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), and endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS). Mediastinal lymph node staging affects the management of patients with both operable and inoperable lung cancer (e.g., surgery vs. combined chemoradiation therapy). Tissue sampling is often indicated for accurate nodal staging. Recent international lung cancer staging guidelines clearly state that endosonography (EUS and EBUS) should be the initial tissue sampling test over surgical staging. Mediastinal nodes can be sampled from the airways [EBUS combined with transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA)] or the esophagus [EUS fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA)]. EBUS and EUS have a complementary diagnostic yield and in combination virtually all mediastinal lymph nodes can be biopsied. Additionally endosonography has an excellent yield in assessing granulomas in patients suspected of sarcoidosis. The aim of this review, in two integrative parts, is to discuss the current role and future perspectives of all ultrasound techniques available for the evaluation of mediastinal lymphadenopathy and mediastinal staging of lung cancer. A specific emphasis will be on learning mediastinal endosonography. Part I is dealing with an introduction into ultrasound techniques, mediastinal lymph node anatomy and diagnostic reach of ultrasound techniques and part II with the clinical work up of neoplastic and inflammatory mediastinal lymphadenopathy using ultrasound techniques and how to learn mediastinal endosonography. PMID:26543620

  3. Naringenin attenuates pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, NING; YANG, ZHENG; YUAN, YUAN; LI, FANGFANG; LIU, YUAN; MA, ZHENGUO; LIAO, HAIHAN; BIAN, ZHOUYAN; ZHANG, YAO; ZHOU, HENG; DENG, WEI; ZHOU, MENGQIAO; TANG, QIZHU

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is characterized by abnormal enlargement of cardiomyocytes and disproportionate accumulation of extracellular interstitial fibrosis, which are major predictors of the development of coronary artery disease and heart failure. Naringenin is a bitter principle component of grapefruit that has numerous pharmacological effects, including anti-inflammatory, hypolipidemic, antithrombotic and antiatherogenic properties. In order to investigate whether naringenin is able to exert a protective effect against cardiac hypertrophy induced by pressure overload, aortic banding (AB) was performed to induce cardiac hypertrophy in mice, and naringenin was administered for 7 weeks. A total of 60 mice were allocated into four groups: Sham + vehicle, AB + vehicle, sham + naringenin and AB + naringenin. Naringenin treatment attenuated cardiac dysfunction, as indicated by the results of echocardiography and catheter-based measurements at 8 weeks post-surgery. The extent of cardiac hypertrophy was assessed by the heart weight/body weight, heart weight/tibial length and lung weight/body weight ratios, in addition to the cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area and the mRNA expression levels of hypertrophic maker, all of which were mitigated by naringenin administration. Naringenin also inhibited the expression of transforming growth factor-?1, connective tissue growth factor, collagen I? and collagen III?, and attenuated interstitial fibrosis. In addition, naringenin downregulated the activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt) signaling pathways. In conclusion, naringenin attenuated cardiac hypertrophy and interstitial fibrosis, in addition to improving left ventricular function in pressure-overloaded mice. The cardioprotective effect exerted by naringenin may be associated with the inhibition of PI3K/Akt, ERK and JNK signaling pathways.

  4. Cardiac sarcoidosis: a comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Sekhri, Vishal; Sanal, Shireen; DeLorenzo, Lawrence J.; Aronow, Wilbert S.; Maguire, George P.

    2011-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease of unknown etiology characterized by noncaseating granulomas in involved organs. Organs involved with sarcoidosis include lymph nodes, skin, lung, central nervous system, and eye. Only 40-50% of patients with cardiac sarcoidosis diagnosed at autopsy have the diagnosis made during their lifetime. Cardiac sarcoidosis can manifest itself as complete heart block, ventricular arrhythmias, congestive heart failure, pericardial effusion, pulmonary hypertension, and ventricular aneurysms. Diagnostic tests such as the electrocardiogram, two-dimensional echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography scan, radionuclide scan, and endomyocardial biopsy can be helpful in the early detection of cardiac sarcoidosis. Considering the increased risk of sudden death, cardiac sarcoidosis is an indication for early treatment with corticosteroids or other immunosuppressive agents. Other treatments include placement of a pacemaker or implantable defibrillator to prevent sudden death. In refractory cases, cardiac transplantation should be considered. PMID:22291785

  5. Sudden cardiac death and obesity.

    PubMed

    Plourde, Benoit; Sarrazin, Jean-François; Nault, Isabelle; Poirier, Paul

    2014-09-01

    For individuals and the society as a whole, the increased risk of sudden cardiac death in obese patients is becoming a major challenge, especially since obesity prevalence has been increasing steadily around the globe. Traditional risk factors and obesity often coexist. Hypertension, diabetes, obstructive sleep apnea and metabolic syndrome are well-known risk factors for CV disease and are often present in the obese patient. Although the bulk of evidence is circumstantial, sudden cardiac death and obesity share common traditional CV risk factors. Structural, functional and metabolic factors modulate and influence the risk of sudden cardiac death in the obese population. Other risk factors such as left ventricular hypertrophy, increased number of premature ventricular complexes, altered QT interval and reduced heart rate variability are all documented in both obese and sudden cardiac death populations. The present review focuses on out-of-hospital sudden cardiac death and potential mechanisms leading to sudden cardiac death in this population. PMID:25160995

  6. Ultrasound Fracture Diagnosis in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Amponsah, David; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Garcia, Kathleen M.; Hamilton, Douglas R.; vanHolsbeeck, Marnix

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: This ground-based investigation accumulated high-level clinical evidence on the sensitivity and specificity of point of care ultrasound performed by expert and novice users for the rapid diagnosis of musculoskeletal (MSK) injuries. We developed preliminary educational methodologies to provide just-in-time training of novice users by creating multi-media training tools and imaging procedures for non expert operators and evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of non-expert performed musculoskeletal ultrasound to diagnose acute injuries in a Level 1 Trauma Center. Methods: Patients with potential MSK injuries were identified in the emergency room. A focused MSK ultrasound was performed by expert operators and compared to standard radiographs. A repeat examination was performed by non-expert operators who received a short, just-in-time multimedia education aid. The sensitivity and specificity of the expert and novice ultrasound examinations were compared to gold standard radiography. Results: Over 800 patients were enrolled in this study. The sensitivity and specificity of expert performed ultrasound exceeded 98% for MSK injuries. Novice operators achieved 97% sensitivity and 99% specificity for targeted examinations with the greatest error in fractures involving the hand and foot. Conclusion: Point of care ultrasound is a sensitive and specific diagnostic test for MSK injury when performed by experts and just-in-time trained novice operators.

  7. Foot abnormalities of wild birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman, C.M.; Locke, L.N.; Clark, G.M.

    1962-01-01

    The various foot abnormalities that occur in birds, including pox, scaly-leg, bumble-foot, ergotism and freezing are reviewed. In addition, our findings at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center include pox from dove, mockingbird, cowbird, grackle and several species of sparrows. Scaly-leg has been particularly prevalent on icterids. Bumble foot has been observed in a whistling swan and in a group of captive woodcock. Ergotism is reported from a series of captive Canada geese from North Dakota. Several drug treatments recommended by others are presented.

  8. Impact of a 2-Day Critical Care Ultrasound Course during Fellowship Training: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Dinh, Vi Am; Giri, Paresh C.; Rathinavel, Inimai; Nguyen, Emilie; Hecht, David; Dorotta, Ihab; Nguyen, H. Bryant; Chrissian, Ara A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Despite the increasing utilization of point-of-care critical care ultrasonography (CCUS), standards establishing competency for its use are lacking. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a 2-day CCUS course implementation on ultrasound-naïve critical care medicine (CCM) fellows. Methods. Prospective evaluation of the impact of a two-day CCUS course on eight CCM fellows' attitudes, proficiency, and use of CCUS. Ultrasound competency on multiple organ systems was assessed including abdominal, pulmonary, vascular, and cardiac systems. Subjects served as self-controls and were assessed just prior to, within 1 week after, and 3 months after the course. Results. There was a significant improvement in CCM fellows' written test scores, image acquisition ability, and pathologic image interpretation 1 week after the course and it was retained 3 months after the course. Fellows also had self-reported increased confidence and usage of CCUS applications after the course. Conclusions. Implementation of a 2-day critical care ultrasound course covering general CCUS and basic critical care echocardiography using a combination of didactics, live models, and ultrasound simulators is effective in improving critical care fellows' proficiency and confidence with ultrasound use in both the short- and long-term settings. PMID:26346694

  9. GPU based real-time instrument tracking with three-dimensional ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Novotny, Paul M; Stoll, Jeff A; Vasilyev, Nikolay V; del Nido, Pedro J; Dupont, Pierre E; Zickler, Todd E; Howe, Robert D

    2007-10-01

    Real-time three-dimensional ultrasound enables new intracardiac surgical procedures, but the distorted appearance of instruments in ultrasound poses a challenge to surgeons. This paper presents a detection technique that identifies the position of the instrument within the ultrasound volume. The algorithm uses a form of the generalized Radon transform to search for long straight objects in the ultrasound image, a feature characteristic of instruments and not found in cardiac tissue. When combined with passive markers placed on the instrument shaft, the full position and orientation of the instrument is found in 3D space. This detection technique is amenable to rapid execution on the current generation of personal computer graphics processor units (GPU). Our GPU implementation detected a surgical instrument in 31 ms, sufficient for real-time tracking at the 25 volumes per second rate of the ultrasound machine. A water tank experiment found instrument orientation errors of 1.1 degrees and tip position errors of less than 1.8mm. Finally, an in vivo study demonstrated successful instrument tracking inside a beating porcine heart. PMID:17681483

  10. THE MECHANISM OF LESION FORMATION BY FOCUSED ULTRASOUND ABLATION CATHETER FOR TREATMENT OF ATRIAL FIBRILLATION

    PubMed Central

    Sinelnikov, Y.D.; Fjield, T.; Sapozhnikov, O.A.

    2009-01-01

    The application of therapeutic ultrasound for the treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) is investigated. The results of theoretical and experimental investigation of ultrasound ablation catheter are presented. The major components of the catheter are the high power cylindrical piezoelectric element and parabolic balloon reflector. Thermal elevation in the ostia of pulmonary veins is achieved by focusing the ultrasound beam in shape of a torus that transverses the myocardial tissue. High intensity ultrasound heating in the focal zone results in a lesion surrounding the pulmonary veins that creates an electrical conduction blocks and relief from AF symptoms. The success of the ablation procedure largely depends on the correct choice of reflector geometry and ultrasonic power. We present a theoretical model of the catheter’s acoustic field and bioheat transfer modeling of cardiac lesions. The application of an empirically derived relation between lesion formation and acoustic power is shown to correlate with the experimental data. Developed control methods combine the knowledge of theoretical acoustics and the thermal lesion formation simulations with experiment and thereby establish rigorous dosimetry that contributes to a safe and effective ultrasound ablation procedure. PMID:20161431

  11. [Sudden cardiac death in athletes].

    PubMed

    Parikka, Hannu

    2013-01-01

    Sudden deaths occurring during exercise are rare and are most commonly due to cardiac arrest. It is most commonly underlain by symptomless cardiomyopathy or coronary artery disease. Preventive work comes up against a diagnostic problem in distinguishing adaptational changes of the athletic heart from a heart disorder. To reveal the danger of cardiac arrest and reduce human tragedies international sports organizations and cardiologic expert groups recommend screening of cardiac disorders among competing athletes. PMID:24163971

  12. ECG abnormalities and stroke incidence.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Sunil K; Soliman, Elsayed Z

    2013-07-01

    In this review, the authors discuss the role of ECG in prediction of stroke. ECG plays an important role in detection of several stroke risk factors/predictors including atrial fibrillation and left ventricular hypertrophy; both are components of the Framingham Stroke Risk Score. Multiple other ECG traits have also emerged as potential predictors of stroke, namely cardiac electrical/structural remodeling--Q wave, QRS/QT duration, bundle blocks, P wave duration/amplitude/dispersion, other waveform angles and slopes; higher automaticity--ectopic beats; and re-entry--atrial tachyarrhythmia; and higher vulnerability to arrhythmia--heart rate and its variability. Most of these predictors are not ready for prime time yet; however, further research focusing on their role in risk stratification and prevention of stroke may be useful. In this article, the authors discuss the prevalence, mechanisms and clinical applications of traditional and novel ECG markers in the prevention and treatment of stroke. PMID:23895029

  13. MRI assessment of cardiac tumours: part 1, multiparametric imaging protocols and spectrum of appearances of histologically benign lesions

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, Muhammad; Ganeshan, Arul; Baijal, Shobhit; Simpson, Helen; Watkin, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the reference standard technique for assessment and characterization of a suspected cardiac tumour. It provides an unrestricted field of view, high temporal resolution and non-invasive tissue characterization based on multi-parametric assessment of the chemical micro-environment. MRI exploits differences in hydrogen proton density in conjunction with T1 and T2 relaxation properties of different tissues to help differentiation normal from abnormal and benign from malignant lesions. In this article we review specific cardiac MRI techniques, tumour protocol design and the appearance of the spectrum of histologically benign tumours. PMID:25525581

  14. Registry of Unexplained Cardiac Arrest

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-13

    Cardiac Arrest; Long QT Syndrome; Brugada Syndrome; Catecholaminergi Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia; Idiopathic VentricularFibrillation; Early Repolarization Syndrome; Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy

  15. Sudden cardiac death – Historical perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Abhilash, S.P.; Namboodiri, Narayanan

    2014-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is an unexpected death due to cardiac causes that occurs in a short time period (generally within 1 h of symptom onset) in a person with known or unknown cardiac disease. It is believed to be involved in nearly a quarter of human deaths, with ventricular fibrillation being the most common mechanism. It is estimated that more than 7 million lives per year are lost to SCD worldwide. Historical perspectives of SCD are analyzed with a brief description on how the developments in the management of sudden cardiac arrest evolved over time. PMID:24568828

  16. Combined Therapeutic and Monitoring Ultrasonic Catheter for Cardiac Ablation Therapies.

    PubMed

    Carias, Mathew; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the feasibility of a combined therapeutic and diagnostic ultrasonic catheter for cardiac ablation therapies. Ultrasound can be used to determine when diseased cardiac tissues have become fully coagulated through a method known as local harmonic motion imaging (LHMI). LHMI is an imaging modality for treatment monitoring that uses acoustic radiation force, displacement tracking and the different mechanical properties of viable and ablated tissues. In this study, we developed catheters that are capable of LHMI measurements. Experiments were conducted in phantoms, ex vivo cardiac samples and the in vivo beating hearts of healthy porcine subjects. In vivo experiments revealed that four of four epicardial sonications revealed a decrease in measured displacements from LHMI experiments and that when lower power was used, no lesions formed and there was no corresponding decrease in measured displacement amplitudes. In addition, two of three endocardial lesions were confirmed and corresponded to a decrease in the measured displacement amplitude. PMID:26431798

  17. Molecular and Metabolic Mechanisms of Cardiac Dysfunction in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mandavia, Chirag H.; Aroor, Annayya R.; DeMarco, Vincent G.; Sowers, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2DM) is a widespread chronic medical condition with prevalence bordering on the verge of an epidemic. It is of great concern that cardiovascular disease is more common in patients with diabetes than the non-diabetic population. While hypertensive and ischemic heart disease is more common in diabetic patients, there is another type of heart disease in diabetes that is not associated with hypertension or coronary artery disease. This muscle functional disorder is termed “diabetic cardiomyopathy”. Diastolic dysfunction characterized by impaired diastolic relaxation time and reduced contractility precedes systolic dysfunction and is the main pathogenic hallmark of this condition. Even though the pathogenesis of “diabetic cardiomyopathy” is still controversial, impaired cardiac insulin sensitivity and metabolic overload are emerging as major molecular and metabolic mechanisms for cardiac dysfunction. Systemic insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, dysregulation of adipokine secretion, increases in circulating levels of inflammatory mediators, aberrant activation of renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS), and increased oxidative stress contribute dysregulated insulin and metabolic signaling in the heart and development of diastolic dysfunction. In addition, maladaptive calcium homeostasis and endothelial cell dysregulation endoplasmic reticular stress play a potential role in cardiomyocyte fibrosis/diastolic dysfunction. In this review, we will focus on emerging molecular and metabolic pathways underlying cardiac dysfunction in diabetes. Elucidation of these mechanisms should provide a better understanding of the various cardiac abnormalities associated with diastolic dysfunction and its progression to systolic dysfunction and heart failure. PMID:23147391

  18. The anatomy of the cardiac veins in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ciszek, Bogdan; Skubiszewska, Daria; Ratajska, Anna

    2007-01-01

    Although the cardiac coronary system in mice has been the studied in detail by many research laboratories, knowledge of the cardiac veins remains poor. This is because of the difficulty in marking the venous system with a technique that would allow visualization of these large vessels with thin walls. Here we present the visualization of the coronary venous system by perfusion of latex dye through the right caudal vein. Latex injected intravenously does not penetrate into the capillary system. Murine cardiac veins consist of several principal branches (with large diameters), the distal parts of which are located in the subepicardium. We have described the major branches of the left atrial veins, the vein of the left ventricle, the caudal veins, the vein of the right ventricle and the conal veins forming the conal venous circle or the prepulmonary conal venous arch running around the conus of the right ventricle. The venous system of the heart drains the blood to the coronary sinus (the left cranial caval vein) to the right atrium or to the right cranial caval vein. Systemic veins such as the left cranial caval, the right cranial caval and the caudal vein open to the right atrium. Knowledge of cardiac vein location may help to elucidate abnormal vein patterns in certain genetic malformations. PMID:17553104

  19. Down's syndrome-like cardiac developmental defects in embryos of the transchromosomic Tc1 mouse

    PubMed Central

    Dunlevy, Louisa; Bennett, Mike; Slender, Amy; Lana-Elola, Eva; Tybulewicz, Victor L.; Fisher, Elizabeth M.C.; Mohun, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    Aims Cardiac malformations are prevalent in trisomies of human chromosome 21 [Down's syndrome (DS)], affecting normal chamber separation in the developing heart. Efforts to understand the aetiology of these defects have been severely hampered by the absence of an accurate mouse model. Such models have proved challenging to establish because synteny with human chromosome Hsa21 is distributed across three mouse chromosomes. None of those engineered so far accurately models the full range of DS cardiac phenotypes, in particular the profound disruptions resulting from atrioventricular septal defects (AVSDs). Here, we present analysis of the cardiac malformations exhibited by embryos of the transchromosomic mouse line Tc(Hsa21)1TybEmcf (Tc1) which contains more than 90% of chromosome Hsa21 in addition to the normal diploid mouse genome. Methods and results Using high-resolution episcopic microscopy and three-dimensional (3D) modelling, we show that Tc1 embryos exhibit many of the cardiac defects found in DS, including balanced AVSD with single and separate valvar orifices, membranous and muscular ventricular septal defects along with outflow tract and valve leaflet abnormalities. Frequencies of cardiac malformations (ranging from 38 to 55%) are dependent on strain background. In contrast, no comparable cardiac defects were detected in embryos of the more limited mouse trisomy model, Dp(16Cbr1-ORF9)1Rhr (Ts1Rhr), indicating that trisomy of the region syntenic to the Down's syndrome critical region, including the candidate genes DSCAM and DYRK1A, is insufficient to yield DS cardiac abnormalities. Conclusion The Tc1 mouse line provides a suitable model for studying the underlying genetic causes of the DS AVSD cardiac phenotype. PMID:20558441

  20. Predicting the onset of period-doubling bifurcations in noisy cardiac systems

    PubMed Central

    Quail, Thomas; Shrier, Alvin; Glass, Leon

    2015-01-01

    Biological, physical, and social systems often display qualitative changes in dynamics. Developing early warning signals to predict the onset of these transitions is an important goal. The current work is motivated by transitions of cardiac rhythms, where the appearance of alternating features in the timing of cardiac events is often a precursor to the initiation of serious cardiac arrhythmias. We treat embryonic chick cardiac cells with a potassium channel blocker, which leads to the initiation of alternating rhythms. We associate this transition with a mathematical instability, called a period-doubling bifurcation, in a model of the cardiac cells. Period-doubling bifurcations have been linked to the onset of abnormal alternating cardiac rhythms, which have been implicated in cardiac arrhythmias such as T-wave alternans and various tachycardias. Theory predicts that in the neighborhood of the transition, the system’s dynamics slow down, leading to noise amplification and the manifestation of oscillations in the autocorrelation function. Examining the aggregates’ interbeat intervals, we observe the oscillations in the autocorrelation function and noise amplification preceding the bifurcation. We analyze plots—termed return maps—that relate the current interbeat interval with the following interbeat interval. Based on these plots, we develop a quantitative measure using the slope of the return map to assess how close the system is to the bifurcation. Furthermore, the slope of the return map and the lag-1 autocorrelation coefficient are equal. Our results suggest that the slope and the lag-1 autocorrelation coefficient represent quantitative measures to predict the onset of abnormal alternating cardiac rhythms. PMID:26170301

  1. Disorders caused by chromosome abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Theisen, Aaron; Shaffer, Lisa G

    2010-01-01

    Many human genetic disorders result from unbalanced chromosome abnormalities, in which there is a net gain or loss of genetic material. Such imbalances often disrupt large numbers of dosage-sensitive, developmentally important genes and result in specific and complex phenotypes. Alternately, some chromosomal syndromes may be caused by a deletion or duplication of a single gene with pleiotropic effects. Traditionally, chromosome abnormalities were identified by visual inspection of the chromosomes under a microscope. The use of molecular cytogenetic technologies, such as fluorescence in situ hybridization and microarrays, has allowed for the identification of cryptic or submicroscopic imbalances, which are not visible under the light microscope. Microarrays have allowed for the identification of numerous new syndromes through a genotype-first approach in which patients with the same or overlapping genomic alterations are identified and then the phenotypes are described. Because many chromosomal alterations are large and encompass numerous genes, the ascertainment of individuals with overlapping deletions and varying clinical features may allow researchers to narrow the region in which to search for candidate genes. PMID:23776360

  2. The Importance of Screening and Prenatal Diagnosis in the Identification of the Numerical Chromosomal Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    NEAGOS, Daniela; CRETU, Ruxandra; SFETEA, Roxana Corina; BOHILTEA, Laurentiu Camil

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background and aims: The obstetric care of a pregnancy, as it is practiced today, includes non-invasive screening approaches as well as invasive procedures for the definitive prenatal diagnosis of fetal disorders correlations between indications for prenatal cytogenetic diagnosis and results of the chromosomal analysis made upon fetal cells. The aim of our study was to evaluate the correlations between the screening test results and results of chromosomal analysis on fetal cells. Methods: Amniotic fluid samples from 1159 pregnant women were studied with the rapid FISH method and the cytogenetic analysis (karyotype). The results from both methods were compared. Results: The indications to perform prenatal cytogenetic diagnosis for numerical chromosomal abnormalities were: abnormal results of double or triple test, advanced maternal age, fetal abnormality detected through ultrasound examination, and positive family history for chromosomal anomalies. In our study we identified 30 cases with abnormal numeric chromosomes (18 cases of trisomy 21, 4 cases of trisomy 18, 3 cases of trisomy X, 1 case of monosomy, 2 cases of trisomy XYY, 1 case of trisomy XXY and 1 case of triploidy). Conclusions: This report confirms the importance of screening and the cytogenetic diagnosis in the identification of the numerical chromosomal abnormalities. PMID:22368694

  3. Myocardin-related transcription factors are required for cardiac development and function.

    PubMed

    Mokalled, Mayssa H; Carroll, Kelli J; Cenik, Bercin K; Chen, Beibei; Liu, Ning; Olson, Eric N; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda

    2015-10-15

    Myocardin-Related Transcription Factors A and B (MRTF-A and MRTF-B) are highly homologous proteins that function as powerful coactivators of serum response factor (SRF), a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor essential for cardiac development. The SRF/MRTF complex binds to CArG boxes found in the control regions of genes that regulate cytoskeletal dynamics and muscle contraction, among other processes. While SRF is required for heart development and function, the role of MRTFs in the developing or adult heart has not been explored. Through cardiac-specific deletion of MRTF alleles in mice, we show that either MRTF-A or MRTF-B is dispensable for cardiac development and function, whereas deletion of both MRTF-A and MRTF-B causes a spectrum of structural and functional cardiac abnormalities. Defects observed in MRTF-A/B null mice ranged from reduced cardiac contractility and adult onset heart failure to neonatal lethality accompanied by sarcomere disarray. RNA-seq analysis on neonatal hearts identified the most altered pathways in MRTF double knockout hearts as being involved in cytoskeletal organization. Together, these findings demonstrate redundant but essential roles of the MRTFs in maintenance of cardiac structure and function and as indispensible links in cardiac cytoskeletal gene regulatory networks. PMID:26386146

  4. Cardiac contraction activates endocardial Notch signaling to modulate chamber maturation in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Samsa, Leigh Ann; Givens, Chris; Tzima, Eleni; Stainier, Didier Y R; Qian, Li; Liu, Jiandong

    2015-12-01

    Congenital heart disease often features structural abnormalities that emerge during development. Accumulating evidence indicates a crucial role for cardiac contraction and the resulting fluid forces in shaping the heart, yet the molecular basis of this function is largely unknown. Using the zebrafish as a model of early heart development, we investigated the role of cardiac contraction in chamber maturation, focusing on the formation of muscular protrusions called trabeculae. By genetic and pharmacological ablation of cardiac contraction, we showed that cardiac contraction is required for trabeculation through its role in regulating notch1b transcription in the ventricular endocardium. We also showed that Notch1 activation induces expression of ephrin b2a (efnb2a) and neuregulin 1 (nrg1) in the endocardium to promote trabeculation and that forced Notch activation in the absence of cardiac contraction rescues efnb2a and nrg1 expression. Using in vitro and in vivo systems, we showed that primary cilia are important mediators of fluid flow to stimulate Notch expression. Together, our findings describe an essential role for cardiac contraction-responsive transcriptional changes in endocardial cells to regulate cardiac chamber maturation. PMID:26628092

  5. Angiotensin type 1 receptor blockade prevents cardiac remodeling in mice with pregnancy-associated hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sakairi, Akira; Ishida, Junji; Honjo, Kaori; Inaba, Saki; Nakamura, Shoko; Sugiyama, Fumihiro; Yagami, Ken-Ichi; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi

    2008-12-01

    Pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) is a life-threatening disorder for both mother and fetus; cardiac dysfunction is the major complication and can result in further deterioration. Recently, it has been recognized that aberrant activation of angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1) signaling contributes to the pathogenesis of PIH, but the details of the relationship between cardiac injury and enhanced AT1 signaling in PIH are still unclear. We previously generated a transgenic mouse model of pregnancy-associated hypertension (PAH) via overproduction of angiotensin II, an endogenous ligand of AT1, in the maternal circulation during late pregnancy. In the present study, we administered olmesartan, an AT1 blocker, to suppress redundant AT1 signaling in PAH mice and evaluated the efficacy of this treatment in cardiac remodeling. Olmesartan treatment significantly lowered the blood pressure of PAH mice, and hypertrophy as well as increased plasma levels of cardiac injury markers were also markedly reduced. Histological analyses revealed that morphological abnormalities and fibrosis in the hearts of PAH mice recovered to the levels of normal pregnant wild-type mice after the administration of olmesartan. Moreover, in fibrotic regions of PAH hearts, olmesartan treatment significantly decreased the extent of cardiac injury and apoptosis. These results indicate that the activation of AT1 signaling pathways during maternal hypertension plays a critical role in cardiac remodeling in PAH mice, and suggest that treatment with an AT1 blocker could effectively ameliorate cardiac dysfunction during pregnancy with hypertension in vivo. PMID:19139606

  6. Congenital abnormalities and indicators of germinal mutations in the vicinity of an acrylonitrile producing factory.

    PubMed

    Czeizel, A E; Hegedüs, S; Tímár, L

    1999-06-30

    The results of an environmental mutation and teratologic epidemiological study are presented which was performed in inhabitants living in the surrounding region of an acrylonitrile factory in Nyergesújfalu. The endpoint of the study was congenital abnormalities in 46,326 infants born to mothers living in the 30 settlements of the study region within a 25 km radius of the acrylonitrile factory between 1980 and 1996. The ascertainment of cases with congenital abnormalities was based on the dataset of the Hungarian Congenital Abnormality Registry complemented with the review of pediatric, pathology and cytogenetic records. A particular attention was paid to the indicators of germinal mutations as sentinel anomalies, Down syndrome and unidentified multiple congenital abnormalities and the indicators of teratogens as the specific pattern of multiple congenital abnormalities. Three congenital abnormalities: pectus excavatum in Tata, 1990-1992 (OR with 95%CI: 78.5, 8.4-729.6), undescended testis in Nyergesújfalu between 1980 and 1983 (8.6, 1.4-54.3) and in Esztergom, 1981-1982 (4. 2, 1.3-13.5) and clubfoot in Tata, 1980-1981 (5.5, 1.5-20.3) showed significant time-space clusters in the study region. There was a decrease in risk of undescended testis with increasing distance from the acrylonitrile factory. An unusual increase was found in the combination of oral cleft and cardiac septal defects in multimalformed babies in Tatabánya, 1990. The detailed analysis of congenital abnormalities in all settlements of a given territory may help to detect clusters of congenital abnormalities and their possible relation to the environmental hazards. PMID:10393265

  7. Novel trends in transrectal ultrasound imaging of prostate gland carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nowicki, Andrzej; Zá?ura, František; Go??bek, Tomasz; Ch?osta, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Carcinoma of the prostate gland is the most common neoplasm in men. Its treatment depends on multiple factors among which local staging plays a significant role. The basic method is transrectal ultrasound imaging. This examination enables imaging of the prostate gland and its abnormalities, but it also allows ultrasound-guided biopsies to be conducted. A conventional gray-scale ultrasound examination enables assessment of the size, echostructure and outlines of the anatomic capsule, but in many cases, neoplastic lesions cannot be observed. For this reason, new sonographic techniques are implemented in order to facilitate detectability of cancer. The usage of contrast agents during transrectal ultrasound examination must be emphasized since, in combination with color Doppler, it facilitates detection of cancerous lesions by visualizing flow which is not observable without contrast enhancement. Elastography, in turn, is a different solution. It uses the differences in tissue elasticity between a neoplastic region and normal prostatic parenchyma that surrounds it. This technique facilitates detection of lesions irrespective of their echogenicity and thereby supplements conventional transrectal examinations. However, the size of the prostate gland and its relatively far location from the transducer may constitute limitations to the effectiveness of elastography. Moreover, the manner of conducting such an examination depends on the examiner and his or her subjective assessment. Another method, which falls within the novel, popular trend of combining imaging methods, is fusion of magnetic resonance imaging and transrectal sonography. The application of multidimensional magnetic resonance imaging, which is currently believed to be the best method for prostate cancer staging, in combination with the availability of a TRUS examination and the possibility of monitoring biopsies in real-time sonography is a promising alternative, but it is associated with higher costs and longer duration of the examination. This paper presents the most important novel trends in transrectal imaging in prostate cancer diagnosis based on the review of the articles available in the PubMed base and published after 2010.

  8. Resonant nonlinear ultrasound spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Paul A. (Santa Fe, NM); TenCate, James A. (Los Alamos, NM); Guyer, Robert A. (Amherst, MA); Van Den Abeele, Koen E. A. (Sint-Niklaas, BE)

    2001-01-01

    Components with defects are identified from the response to strains applied at acoustic and ultrasound frequencies. The relative resonance frequency shift .vertline..DELTA..function./.function..sub.0.vertline., is determined as a function of applied strain amplitude for an acceptable component, where .function..sub.0 is the frequency of the resonance peak at the lowest amplitude of applied strain and .DELTA..function. is the frequency shift of the resonance peak of a selected mode to determine a reference relationship. Then, the relative resonance frequency shift .vertline..DELTA..function./.function..sub.0 is determined as a function of applied strain for a component under test, where fo .function..sub.0 the frequency of the resonance peak at the lowest amplitude of applied strain and .DELTA..function. is the frequency shift of the resonance peak to determine a quality test relationship. The reference relationship is compared with the quality test relationship to determine the presence of defects in the component under test.

  9. Resonant ultrasound spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Migliori, Albert (Santa Fe, NM); Visscher, William M. (Los Alamos, NM); Fisk, Zachary (Santa Fe, NM)

    1990-01-01

    An ultrasound resonant spectrometer determines the resonant frequency spectrum of a rectangular parallelepiped sample of a high dissipation material over an expected resonant response frequency range. A sample holder structure grips corners of the sample between piezoelectric drive and receive transducers. Each transducer is mounted on a membrane for only weakly coupling the transducer to the holder structure and operatively contacts a material effective to remove system resonant responses at the transducer from the expected response range. i.e., either a material such as diamond to move the response frequencies above the range or a damping powder to preclude response within the range. A square-law detector amplifier receives the response signal and retransmits the signal on an isolated shield of connecting cabling to remove cabling capacitive effects. The amplifier also provides a substantially frequency independently voltage divider with the receive transducer. The spectrometer is extremely sensitive to enable low amplitude resonance to be detected for use in calculating the elastic constants of the high dissipation sample.

  10. Artifacts in ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Kremkau, F W; Taylor, K J

    1986-04-01

    Ultrasound imaging artifacts of acoustic origin relating to resolution, propagation path, and attenuation are reviewed. Lateral and axial resolution limitations are artifactual in nature since a failure to resolve means a loss of detail and two adjacent structures may be visualized as one. Apparent resolution close to the transducer (speckle) is not directly related to tissue texture but is a result of interference effects from the distribution of scatterers in the tissue. Reverberation produces a set of equally spaced artifactual echoes distal to the real reflectors. The mirror image artifact is the presentation of objects that are present on one side of a strong reflector, appearing on the other side as well. Shadowing and enhancement are useful artifacts for determining the nature of masses. Enhancement results from low attenuation objects in the sound path while shadowing results from strongly reflecting or strongly attenuating objects. Additional artifacts include section thickness, refraction, multipath, side lobe, grating lobe, focal enhancement, comet tail, ring down, speed error, and range ambiguity. PMID:3514956

  11. Antifungal-Associated Drug-Induced Cardiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Cleary, John D; Stover, Kayla R

    2015-12-01

    The etiology of cardiomyopathies are classified into 4 main groupings (dilated, hypertrophic, restrictive, and idiopathic) and can be mechanistically caused by myocarditis, conduction abnormalities, focal direct injury, or nutritional deficiency. Based on our review of this topic, evidence suggests that echinocandin-related cardiac dysfunction is a mitochondrial drug-induced disease caused by focal direct myocyte injury. With caspofungin or anidulafungin administration into the heart via central line, exposure is likely extreme enough to induce the acute toxicity. Chronic or low-dose exposure may lead to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy; however, only acute exposures have been explored to date. PMID:26567285

  12. Ultrasound Research Interface - Cancer Imaging Program

    Cancer.gov

    The ultrasound research interface permits extensive instrument parameter control of a commercially available scanner that allows access to, and export of, the beam-formed signal data while simultaneously displaying the ultrasound system-processed data as a clinical image.

  13. Broadband miniature fiber optic ultrasound generator.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiaotian; Wu, Nan; Tian, Ye; Wang, Xingwei

    2014-07-28

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and characterization of a broadband miniature fiber optic ultrasound generator based on photoacoustic (PA) ultrasound generation principle for biomedical ultrasound imaging and ultrasound non-destructive test (NDT) applications. A novel PA generation material, gold nanocomposite, was synthesized by directly reducing gold nanoparticles within polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) through a one-pot protocol. The fiber optic ultrasound generator was fabricated by coating the gold nanocomposite on the tip of the optical fiber. The efficiency of the PA generation using gold nanocomposite was increased 10(5) compared to using aluminum thin film and 10(3) compared to using graphite mixed within epoxy. The ultrasound profile and the acoustic distribution have been characterized. The amplitude of the generated ultrasound signal was as high as 0.64 MPa and the bandwidth was more than 20 MHz. This paper also demonstrated its capability for ultrasound imaging of a tissue specimen. PMID:25089431

  14. Ultrasound diagnosis and management of urethral stones.

    PubMed

    Solivetti, F M; D'Ascenzo, R; Orazi, C; Valenti, P

    1989-12-01

    The authors report three cases of urethral obstruction caused by stones. The diagnosis was made with ultrasound and the stones removed immediately by a transurethral catheter guided by ultrasound. PMID:2685346

  15. Ultrasound probe localization by tracking skin features

    E-print Network

    Sun, Shih-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound probe localization with respect to the human body is essential for freehand three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US), image-guided surgery, and longitudinal studies. Existing methods for probe localization, however, ...

  16. Ultrasound: Biological Effects and Industrial Hygiene Concerns

    SciTech Connect

    Wiernicki, C.

    1984-12-03

    This paper discusses biological effects associated with overexposure to ultrasound, exposure standards proposed for airborne and contact ultrasound, industrial hygiene controls that can be employed to minimize exposure, and the instrumentation that is required for evaluating exposures.

  17. Ultrasound : an alternative solution for removing tattoos

    E-print Network

    Teng, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    The recent influx of tattoos has been accompanied by a rise in demand for tattoo removals. Due to the recent success of ultrasound as a noninvasive alternative for multiple medical therapies, the feasibility of ultrasound-mediated ...

  18. [Scuba diving and the heart. Cardiac aspects of sport scuba diving].

    PubMed

    Muth, Claus-Martin; Tetzlaff, Kay

    2004-06-01

    Diving with self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (scuba) has become a popular recreational sports activity throughout the world. A high prevalence of cardiovascular disorders among the population makes it therefore likely that subjects suffering from cardiovascular problems may want to start scuba diving. Although scuba diving is not a competitive sport requiring athletic health conditions, a certain medical fitness is recommended because of the physical peculiarities of the underwater environment. Immersion alone will increase cardiac preload by central blood pooling with a rise in both cardiac output and blood pressure, counteracted by increased diuresis. Exposure to cold and increased oxygen partial pressure during scuba diving will additionally increase afterload by vasoconstrictive effects and may exert bradyarryhthmias in combination with breath-holds. Volumes of gas-filled body cavities will be affected by changing pressure (Figure 1), and inert gas components of the breathing gas mixture such as nitrogen in case of air breathing will dissolve in body tissues and venous blood with increasing alveolar inert gas pressure. During decompression a free gas phase may form in supersaturated tissues, resulting in the generation of inert gas microbubbles that are eliminated by the venous return to the lungs under normal circumstances. Certain cardiovascular conditions may have an impact on these physiological changes and pose the subject at risk of suffering adverse events from scuba diving. Arterial hypertension may be aggravated by underwater exercise and immersion. Symptomatic coronary artery disease and symptomatic heart rhythm disorders preclude diving. The occurrence of ventricular extrasystoles according to Lown classes I and II, and the presence of atrial fibrillation are considered relative contraindications in the absence of an aggravation following exercise. Asymptomatic subjects with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome may be allowed to dive, but in case of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia they must refrain from diving. Pacemakers will fail with increasing pressure, but some manufacturers have proven their products safe for pressure equivalents of up to 30 m of seawater, so that patients may dive uneventfully when staying within the 0-20 m depth range. Significant aortic or mitral valve stenosis will preclude diving, whereas regurgitation only will not be a problem. Right-to-left shunts have increasingly gained attention in diving medicine, since they may allow venous gas microbubbles to spill over to the arterial side of the circulation enabling the possibility of arterial gas embolism. Significant shunts thus preclude diving. The highly prevalent patent foramen ovale is considered a relative contraindication only when following certain recommendations for safe diving (Table 2). Metabolic disorders are of concern, since adiposity is associated with both, higher bubble grades in Doppler ultrasound detection after scuba dives when compared to normal subjects, and an increased epidemiologic risk of suffering from decompression illness. In conclusion, cardiovascular aspects are important in the assessment of fitness to dive, and certain cardiovascular conditions preclude scuba diving. Any history of cardiac disease or abnormalities detected during the routine medical examination should prompt to further evaluation and specialist referral. PMID:15241540

  19. [Phenomenology of abnormal body perceptions].

    PubMed

    Schäfer, M L

    1983-01-01

    The present paper deals with the problematic nature of the phenomenological grasping of the consciousness of the body and its pathological modifications. The reasoning is oriented by the doctrine of Husserl of the so-called sentiments as the fundamentals of the experience of the own body. This basic approach does not only seem to be basically for a psychology of the consciousness of the body, but also to give the theoretical-conceptual structure for a great number of psychopathological modifications. Subsequent to a criticism of the conventional use of the term 'hallucination of the body' we attempt to chart elements of a scheme of the abnormal consciousness of the body. PMID:6647887

  20. Abnormalities of the Erythrocyte Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Patrick G.

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis Primary abnormalities of the erythrocyte membrane, including the hereditary spherocytosis and hereditary elliptocytosis syndromes, are an important group of inherited hemolytic anemias. Classified by distinctive morphology on peripheral blood smear, these disorders are characterized by clinical, laboratory, and genetic heterogeneity. Among this group, hereditary spherocytosis patients are more likely to experience symptomatic anemia. Treatment of hereditary spherocytosis with splenectomy is curative in most patients. Once considered routine, growing recognition of the longterm risks of splenectomy, including cardiovascular disease, thrombotic disorders, and pulmonary hypertension, as well as the emergence of penicillin-resistant pneumococci, a concern for infection in overwhelming postsplenectomy infection, have led to re-evaluation of the role of splenectomy. Current management guidelines acknowledge these important considerations when entertaining splenectomy and recommend detailed discussion between health care providers, patient, and family. The hereditary elliptocytosis syndromes are the most common primary disorders of erythrocyte membrane proteins. However, most elliptocytosis patients are asymptomatic and do not require therapy. PMID:24237975

  1. Health Instruction Packages: Cardiac Anatomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Gwen; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in these five learning modules to instruct nurses, students, and other health care professionals in cardiac anatomy and functions and in fundamental electrocardiographic techniques. The first module, "Cardiac Anatomy and Physiology: A Review" by Gwen Phillips, teaches the learner to draw and label…

  2. GPCR signaling and cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Capote, Leany A; Mendez Perez, Roberto; Lymperopoulos, Anastasios

    2015-09-15

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), such as ?-adrenergic and angiotensin II receptors, located in the membranes of all three major cardiac cell types, i.e. myocytes, fibroblasts and endothelial cells, play crucial roles in regulating cardiac function and morphology. Their importance in cardiac physiology and disease is reflected by the fact that, collectively, they represent the direct targets of over a third of the currently approved cardiovascular drugs used in clinical practice. Over the past few decades, advances in elucidation of their structure, function and the signaling pathways they elicit, specifically in the heart, have led to identification of an increasing number of new molecular targets for heart disease therapy. Here, we review these signaling modalities employed by GPCRs known to be expressed in the cardiac myocyte membranes and to directly modulate cardiac contractility. We also highlight drugs and drug classes that directly target these GPCRs to modulate cardiac function, as well as molecules involved in cardiac GPCR signaling that have the potential of becoming novel drug targets for modulation of cardiac function in the future. PMID:25981298

  3. Redox Control of Cardiac Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Nitin T.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been associated with various human diseases, and considerable attention has been paid to investigate their physiological effects. Various ROS are synthesized in the mitochondria and accumulate in the cytoplasm if the cellular antioxidant defense mechanism fails. The critical balance of this ROS synthesis and antioxidant defense systems is termed the redox system of the cell. Various cardiovascular diseases have also been affected by redox to different degrees. ROS have been indicated as both detrimental and protective, via different cellular pathways, for cardiac myocyte functions, electrophysiology, and pharmacology. Mostly, the ROS functions depend on the type and amount of ROS synthesized. While the literature clearly indicates ROS effects on cardiac contractility, their effects on cardiac excitability are relatively under appreciated. Cardiac excitability depends on the functions of various cardiac sarcolemal or mitochondrial ion channels carrying various depolarizing or repolarizing currents that also maintain cellular ionic homeostasis. ROS alter the functions of these ion channels to various degrees to determine excitability by affecting the cellular resting potential and the morphology of the cardiac action potential. Thus, redox balance regulates cardiac excitability, and under pathological regulation, may alter action potential propagation to cause arrhythmia. Understanding how redox affects cellular excitability may lead to potential prophylaxis or treatment for various arrhythmias. This review will focus on the studies of redox and cardiac excitation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 432–468. PMID:22897788

  4. Ultrasound Echoes as Biometric Navigators

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Benjamin M.; McDannold, Nathan J.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a new method of using ultrasound data to achieve prospective motion compensation in MRI, especially for respiratory motion during interventional MRI procedures in moving organs such as the liver. The method relies on fingerprint-like biometrically distinct ultra-sound echo patterns produced by different locations in tissue, which are collated with geometrical information from MRI during a training stage to form a mapping table that relates ultrasound measurements to positions. During prospective correction, the system makes frequent ultrasound measurements and uses the map to determine the corresponding position. Results in motorized linear motion phantoms and freely breathing animals indicate that the system performs well. Apparent motion is reduced by up to 97.8%, and motion artifacts are reduced or eliminated in 2D Spoiled Gradient-Echo images. The motion compensation is sufficient to permit MRI thermometry of focused ultrasound heating during respiratory-like motion, with results similar to those obtained in the absence of motion. This new technique may have applications for MRI thermometry and other dynamic imaging in the abdomen during free breathing. PMID:22648783

  5. Ultrasound echoes as biometric navigators.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Benjamin M; McDannold, Nathan J

    2013-04-01

    We demonstrate a new method of using ultrasound data to achieve prospective motion compensation in MRI, especially for respiratory motion during interventional MRI procedures in moving organs such as the liver. The method relies on fingerprint-like biometrically distinct ultrasound echo patterns produced by different locations in tissue, which are collated with geometrical information from MRI during a training stage to form a mapping table that relates ultrasound measurements to positions. During prospective correction, the system makes frequent ultrasound measurements and uses the map to determine the corresponding position. Results in motorized linear motion phantoms and freely breathing animals indicate that the system performs well. Apparent motion is reduced by up to 97.8%, and motion artifacts are reduced or eliminated in two-dimensional spoiled gradient-echo images. The motion compensation is sufficient to permit MRI thermometry of focused ultrasound heating during respiratory-like motion, with results similar to those obtained in the absence of motion. This new technique may have applications for MRI thermometry and other dynamic imaging in the abdomen during free breathing. PMID:22648783

  6. [Ultrasound assessment in renal infections].

    PubMed

    Granata, Antonio; Floccari, Fulvio; Insalaco, Monica; Clementi, Anna; Di Lullo, Luca; D'Amelio, Alessandro; Zamboli, Pasquale; Logias, Francesco; Romano, Marcello; Fiorini, Fulvio

    2012-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a common clinical problem, especially among women. Ultrasound assessment is indicated in case of complicated UTIs, in particular in children, pregnant women and patients with chronic kidney disease. Even though B-mode imaging alone is rarely diagnostic in case of particular kidney infections such as focal and multifocal acute pyelonephritis, Doppler and power-Doppler (PD) techniques are able to increase its sensitivity. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) further improves the signal-to-noise ratio, thus increasing the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound in case of renal infectious disease. Recent studies performed on kidney transplant recipients have indeed demonstrated the high sensitivity and specificity of CEUS in diagnosing acute pyelonephritis. Moreover, ultrasonography is a useful diagnostic tool in case of kidney abscesses, emphysematous pyelonephritis, early phases of pyonephrosis, and in the evaluation and monitoring of echinococcal cysts. Ultrasound imaging is less specific in diagnosing xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis, malacoplakia and renal tuberculosis. Finally, several authors recommend routine ultrasound assessment in HIV patients, given the high incidence of renal complications in this population of patients. PMID:23229529

  7. Noninvasive detection of fetal subchromosomal abnormalities by semiconductor sequencing of maternal plasma DNA.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ai-Hua; Peng, Chun-Fang; Zhao, Xin; Caughey, Bennett A; Yang, Jie-Xia; Liu, Jian; Huang, Wei-Wei; Liu, Chang; Luo, Dong-Hong; Liu, Hai-Liang; Chen, Yang-Yi; Wu, Jing; Hou, Rui; Zhang, Mindy; Ai, Michael; Zheng, Lianghong; Xue, Rachel Q; Mai, Ming-Qin; Guo, Fang-Fang; Qi, Yi-Ming; Wang, Dong-Mei; Krawczyk, Michal; Zhang, Daniel; Wang, Yu-Nan; Huang, Quan-Fei; Karin, Michael; Zhang, Kang

    2015-11-24

    Noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) using sequencing of fetal cell-free DNA from maternal plasma has enabled accurate prenatal diagnosis of aneuploidy and become increasingly accepted in clinical practice. We investigated whether NIPT using semiconductor sequencing platform (SSP) could reliably detect subchromosomal deletions/duplications in women carrying high-risk fetuses. We first showed that increasing concentration of abnormal DNA and sequencing depth improved detection. Subsequently, we analyzed plasma from 1,456 pregnant women to develop a method for estimating fetal DNA concentration based on the size distribution of DNA fragments. Finally, we collected plasma from 1,476 pregnant women with fetal structural abnormalities detected on ultrasound who also underwent an invasive diagnostic procedure. We used SSP of maternal plasma DNA to detect subchromosomal abnormalities and validated our results with array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). With 3.5 million reads, SSP detected 56 of 78 (71.8%) subchromosomal abnormalities detected by aCGH. With increased sequencing depth up to 10 million reads and restriction of the size of abnormalities to more than 1 Mb, sensitivity improved to 69 of 73 (94.5%). Of 55 false-positive samples, 35 were caused by deletions/duplications present in maternal DNA, indicating the necessity of a validation test to exclude maternal karyotype abnormalities. This study shows that detection of fetal subchromosomal abnormalities is a viable extension of NIPT based on SSP. Although we focused on the application of cell-free DNA sequencing for NIPT, we believe that this method has broader applications for genetic diagnosis, such as analysis of circulating tumor DNA for detection of cancer. PMID:26554006

  8. Sterile working in ultrasonography: the use of dedicated ultrasound covers and sterile ultrasound gel.

    PubMed

    Marhofer, Peter; Fritsch, Gerhard

    2015-11-01

    Ultrasound is currently an important tool for diagnostic and interventional procedures. Ultrasound imaging provides significant advantages as compared to other imaging methods. The widespread use of ultrasound also carries the risk of drawbacks such as cross-infections. A large body of literature reports this possibly life-threatening side effect and specific patient populations are particularly at risk (e.g., neonates). Various methods of ultrasound probe disinfection are described; however, none of the mechanical or chemical probe disinfection procedures is optimal and, in particular, disinfection with high concentration of alcohol might be associated with ultrasound probe damage. The preparation of ultrasound probes with dedicated probe covers is a useful alternative for sterile working conditions. One ultrasound probe cover discussed in this paper is directly glued on to the ultrasound probe without the use of ultrasound coupling gel. By the use of sterile ultrasound coupling gel at the outer surface, additional effects on aseptic working conditions can be obtained. PMID:26325163

  9. Ultrasound Current Source Density Imaging in live rabbit hearts using clinical intracardiac catheter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qian

    Ultrasound Current Source Density Imaging (UCSDI) is a noninvasive modality for mapping electrical activities in the body (brain and heart) in 4-dimensions (space + time). Conventional cardiac mapping technologies for guiding the radiofrequency ablation procedure for treatment of cardiac arrhythmias have certain limitations. UCSDI can potentially overcome these limitations and enhance the electrophysiology mapping of the heart. UCSDI exploits the acoustoelectric (AE) effect, an interaction between ultrasound pressure and electrical resistivity. When an ultrasound beam intersects a current path in a material, the local resistivity of the material is modulated by the ultrasonic pressure, and a change in voltage signal can be detected based on Ohm's Law. The degree of modulation is determined by the AE interaction constant K. K is a fundamental property of any type of material, and directly affects the amplitude of the AE signal detected in UCSDI. UCSDI requires detecting a small AE signal associated with electrocardiogram. So sensitivity becomes a major challenge for transferring UCSDI to the clinic. This dissertation will determine the limits of sensitivity and resolution for UCSDI, balancing the tradeoff between them by finding the optimal parameters for electrical cardiac mapping, and finally test the optimized system in a realistic setting. This work begins by describing a technique for measuring K, the AE interaction constant, in ionic solution and biological tissue, and reporting the value of K in excised rabbit cardiac tissue for the first time. K was found to be strongly dependent on concentration for the divalent salt CuSO4, but not for the monovalent salt NaCl, consistent with their different chemical properties. In the rabbit heart tissue, K was determined to be 0.041 +/- 0.012 %/MPa, similar to the measurement of K in physiologic saline: 0.034 +/- 0.003 %/MPa. Next, this dissertation investigates the sensitivity limit of UCSDI by quantifying the relation between the recording electrode distance and the measured AE signal amplitude in gel phantoms and excised porcine heart tissue using a clinical intracardiac catheter. Sensitivity of UCSDI with catheter was 4.7 microV/mA (R2 = 0.999) in cylindrical gel (0.9% NaCl), and 3.2 microV/mA (R2 = 0.92) in porcine heart tissue. The AE signal was detectable more than 25 mm away from the source in cylindrical gel (0.9% NaCl). Effect of transducer properties on UCSDI sensitivity is also investigated using simulation. The optimal ultrasound transducer parameters chosen for cardiac imaging are center frequency = 0.5 MHz and f/number = 1.4. Last but not least, this dissertation shows the result of implementing the optimized ultrasound parameters in live rabbit heart preparation, the comparison of different recording electrode configuration and multichannel UCSDI recording and reconstruction. The AE signal detected using the 0.5 MHz transducer was much stronger (2.99 microV/MPa) than the 1.0 MHz transducer (0.42 microV/MPa). The clinical lasso catheter placed on the epicardium exhibited excellent sensitivity without being too invasive. 3-dimensional cardiac activation maps of the live rabbit heart using only one pair of recording electrodes were also demonstrated for the first time. Cardiac conduction velocity for atrial (1.31 m/s) and apical (0.67 m/s) pacing were calculated based on the activation maps. The future outlook of this dissertation includes integrating UCSDI with 2-dimensional ultrasound transducer array for fast imaging, and developing a multi-modality catheter with 4-dimensional UCSDI, multi-electrode recording and echocardiography capacity.

  10. Endoscopic ultrasound guided vascular access and therapy (with videos)

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Payal; Lakhtakia, Sundeep

    2015-01-01

    The continued need to develop minimally invasive alternatives to surgical and radiologic interventions has driven the development of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided treatments. EUS has now stepped into the therapeutic arena. EUS provides the unique advantage of both real-time imaging and access to structures within and adjacent to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Hence, EUS-guided therapeutic techniques continue to evolve in several directions enabling a variety of minimally invasive therapies for pancreatic and biliary pathologies. Furthermore, the close proximity of the GI tract to vascular structures in the mediastinum and abdomen permits EUS-guided vascular access and therapy. Studies have demonstrated several EUS-guided vascular interventions by using standard endoscopic accessories and available tools from the interventional radiology armamentarium. This article provides an overview of the literature including clinical and nonclinical studies for the management of nonvariceal and variceal GI bleeding, formation of intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (IPSS), and EUS-guided cardiac access and therapy. PMID:26374574

  11. Shearwave dispersion ultrasound vibrometry applied to in vivo myocardium.

    PubMed

    Pislaru, Cristina; Urban, Matthew W; Nenadic, Ivan; Greenleaf, James F

    2009-01-01

    Diastolic properties of the myocardium are important for normal cardiac function and may contribute to the condition of heart failure. Measuring the viscoelastic properties of the left ventricular myocardium is difficult in vivo using noninvasive methods. In this study, we used a mechanical actuator to create harmonic, propagating mechanical waves in the myocardial tissue in vivo. The motion was measured using ultrasound imaging techniques. The wave propagation velocities were measured over the 50-350 Hz frequency range. The dispersion curves were fit with an asymmetrical Lamb wave model to obtain estimates of the shear elasticity and viscosity of the myocardial tissue. The method was applied to estimate viscoelastic properties of the myocardium during diastole and systole. PMID:19964051

  12. Correlation of cognitive function with ultrasound strain indices in carotid plaque.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Jackson, Daren C; Varghese, Tomy; Mitchell, Carol C; Hermann, Bruce P; Kliewer, Mark A; Dempsey, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    Instability in carotid vulnerable plaque can generate cerebral micro-emboli, which may be related to both stroke and eventual cognitive abnormality. Strain imaging to detect plaque vulnerability based on regions with large strain fluctuations, with arterial pulsation, may be able to determine the risk of cognitive impairment. Plaque instability may be characterized by increased strain variations over a cardiac cycle. Radiofrequency signals for ultrasound strain imaging were acquired from the carotid arteries of 24 human patients using a Siemens Antares with a VFX 13-5 linear array transducer. These patients underwent standardized cognitive assessment (Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status [RBANS]). Plaque regions were segmented by a radiologist at end-diastole using the Medical Imaging Interaction Toolkit. A hierarchical block-matching motion tracking algorithm was used to estimate the cumulated axial, lateral and shear strains within the imaging plane. The maximum, minimum and peak-to-peak strain indices in the plaque computed from the mean cumulated strain over a small region of interest in the plaque with large deformations were obtained. The maximum and peak-to-peak mean cumulated strain indices over the entire plaque region were also computed. All strain indices were then correlated with RBANS Total performance. Overall cognitive performance (RBANS Total) was negatively associated with values of the maximum strain and the peak-to-peak for axial and lateral strains, respectively. There was no significant correlation between the RBANS Total score and shear strain and strain indices averaged over the entire identified plaque for this group of patients. However, correlation of maximum lateral strain was higher for symptomatic patients (r = -0.650, p = 0.006) than for asymptomatic patients (r = -0.115, p = 0.803). On the other hand, correlation of maximum axial strain averaged over the entire plaque region was significantly higher for asymptomatic patients (r = -0.817, p = 0.016) than for symptomatic patients (r = -0.224, p = 0.402). The results reveal a direct relationship between the maximum axial and lateral strain indices in carotid plaque and cognitive impairment. PMID:24120415

  13. Leadership in cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Rao, Christopher; Patel, Vanash; Ibrahim, Michael; Ahmed, Kamran; Wong, Kathie A; Darzi, Ara; von Segesser, Ludwig K; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2011-06-01

    Despite the efficacy of cardiac surgery, less invasive interventions with more uncertain long-term outcomes are increasingly challenging surgery as first-line treatment for several congenital, degenerative and ischemic cardiac diseases. The specialty must evolve if it is to ensure its future relevance. More importantly, it must evolve to ensure that future patients have access to treatments with proven long-term effectiveness. This cannot be achieved without dynamic leadership; however, our contention is that this is not enough. The demands of a modern surgical career and the importance of the task at hand are such that the serendipitous emergence of traditional charismatic leadership cannot be relied upon to deliver necessary change. We advocate systematic analysis and strategic leadership at a local, national and international level in four key areas: Clinical Care, Research, Education and Training, and Stakeholder Engagement. While we anticipate that exceptional individuals will continue to shape the future of our specialty, the creation of robust structures to deliver collective leadership in these key areas is of paramount importance. PMID:20884217

  14. Cardiac Remodeling in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    ABEL, E. DALE; LITWIN, SHELDON E.; SWEENEY, GARY

    2010-01-01

    The dramatic increase in the prevalence of obesity and its strong association with cardiovascular disease have resulted in unprecedented interest in understanding the effects of obesity on the cardiovascular system. A consistent, but puzzling clinical observation is that obesity confers an increased susceptibility to the development of cardiac disease, while at the same time affording protection against subsequent mortality (termed the obesity paradox). In this review we focus on evidence available from human and animal model studies and summarize the ways in which obesity can influence structure and function of the heart. We also review current hypotheses regarding mechanisms linking obesity and various aspects of cardiac remodeling. There is currently great interest in the role of adipokines, factors secreted from adipose tissue, and their role in the numerous cardiovascular complications of obesity. Here we focus on the role of leptin and the emerging promise of adiponectin as a cardioprotective agent. The challenge of understanding the association between obesity and heart failure is complicated by the multifaceted interplay between various hemodynamic, metabolic, and other physiological factors that ultimately impact the myocardium. Furthermore, the end result of obesity-associated changes in the myocardial structure and function may vary at distinct stages in the progression of remodeling, may depend on the individual pathophysiology of heart failure, and may even remain undetected for decades before clinical manifestation. Here we summarize our current knowledge of this complex yet intriguing topic. PMID:18391168

  15. Decoding the Cardiac Message

    PubMed Central

    Dorn, Gerald W

    2012-01-01

    This review reflects and expands upon the contents of the author’s presentation at The Thomas W. Smith Memorial Lecture at AHA Scientific Sessions, 2011. “Decoding the cardiac message” refers to accumulating results from ongoing microRNA research that is altering longstanding concepts of the mechanisms for, and consequences of, messenger RNA (mRNA) regulation in the heart. First, I provide a brief historical perspective of the field of molecular genetics, touching upon seminal research that paved the way for modern molecular cardiovascular research and helped establish the foundation for current concepts of mRNA regulation in the heart. I follow with some interesting details about the specific research that led to the discovery and appreciation of microRNAs as highly conserved pivotal regulators of RNA expression and translation. Finally, I provide a personal viewpoint as to how agnostic genome-wide techniques for measuring microRNAs, their mRNA targets, and their protein products can be applied in an integrated multi-systems approach to uncover direct and indirect effects of microRNAs. Experimental designs integrating next-generation sequencing and global proteomics have the potential to address unanswered questions regarding microRNA-mRNA interactions in cardiac disease, how disease alters mRNA targeting by specific microRNAs, and how mutational and polymorphic nucleotide variation in microRNAs can affect end-organ function and stress-response. PMID:22383710

  16. Ultrasound technology: A decision-making tool

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An ultrasound demonstration was conducted for participants (~ 110 people) of the Arkansas Cattle Grower’s Conference, Hope, AR. Evaluation of live animals with ultrasound technology allows beef producers the ability to make selection and management decisions. Specifically, ultrasound at the conclu...

  17. Medical Imaging with Ultrasound: Some Basic Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosling, R.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed are medical applications of ultrasound. The physics of the wave nature of ultrasound including its propagation and production, return by the body, spatial and contrast resolution, attenuation, image formation using pulsed echo ultrasound techniques, measurement of velocity and duplex scanning are described. (YP)

  18. SPECKLE DETECTION IN ULTRASOUND IMAGES USING

    E-print Network

    Drummond, Tom

    SPECKLE DETECTION IN ULTRASOUND IMAGES USING FIRST ORDER STATISTICS R. W. Prager, A. H. Gee, G. M;#12;Speckle Detection in Ultrasound Images using First Order Statistics Richard Prager, Andrew Gee, Graham to identify speckled regions in ultrasound images to control adaptive speckle suppression algorithms

  19. 3D ULTRASOUND PROBE CALIBRATION WITHOUT A

    E-print Network

    Drummond, Tom

    to locate features accurately in 3D space. For 3D ultrasound reconstruction, errors in probe calibration3D ULTRASOUND PROBE CALIBRATION WITHOUT A POSITION SENSOR A. H. Gee, N. E. Houghton, G. M. Treece Ultrasound Probe Calibration Without a Position Sensor Andrew Gee, Neil Houghton, Graham Treece and Richard

  20. Abnormal heart rate recovery and chronotropic incompetence on exercise in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mansi; Bansal, Vishal; Chhabra, Sunil K

    2013-08-01

    Chronotropic incompetence (CI; failure to reach the targeted heart rate (HR) on exercise) and a delayed HR recovery (HRR; ?12 beats decline within the first minute after cessation) reflect autonomic dysfunction (AD) and predict adverse cardiac prognosis. As chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is known to be associated with AD, we hypothesized that these patients may manifest these responses on exercise. The prevalence and predictors of these responses in COPD and their association with its severity have not been evaluated. Normoxemic, stable male patients with COPD (n = 39) and 11 healthy controls underwent lung function testing and incremental leg ergometry. HR responses were monitored during exercise and recovery to compute the HRR and CI. Of all the patients, 33 (84.6%) had at least one of the two exercise responses as abnormal, with the majority (23, 58.9%) having both an abnormal HRR and CI. The frequency of abnormal responses increased with increasing Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stage and body mass index, airflow obstruction, dyspnoea and exercise capacity index. After adjusting for smoking history and post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second, only a reduced diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide predicted abnormal HRR, though weakly. We concluded that abnormal HRR and CI are common in patients with COPD. These responses are observed with increasing frequency as the severity of disease increases. PMID:23785062

  1. Altered patterns of cardiac intercellular junction distribution in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Sepp, R.; Severs, N. J.; Gourdie, R. G.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the distribution pattern of intercellular junctions (the mechanically coupling desmosomes and the electrically coupling gap junctions) in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) hearts showing myofibre disarray. DESIGN: Samples from six necropsied hearts were studied, representing the interventricular septum and the free walls of the left and right ventricles. Immunohistochemical labelling of desmoplakin was used as a marker for desmosomes, and of connexin43 as a marker for gap junctions, in single and double stainings. The slides were examined by confocal laser scanning microscopy. RESULTS: Marked disorganisation of intercalated discs was observed in areas featuring myofibre disarray. Besides overall derangement, localised abnormalities in desmosome organisation were evident, which included: (1) the formation of abnormally enlarged megadiscs; (2) the presence of intersecting disc structures; and (3) aberrant side to side desmosomal connections. Gap junctional abnormalities included: (1) random distribution of gap junctions over the surface of myocytes, rather than localisation to intercalated discs; (2) abundant side to side gap junction connections between adjacent myocytes; and (3) formation of abnormally shaped gap junctions. Circles of myocytes continuously interconnected by gap junctions were also observed. Regions of the diseased hearts lacking myofibre disarray, and control hearts of normal patients and patients with other cardiac diseases, did not show these alterations. CONCLUSIONS: The disorganisation of the intercellular junctions associated with myofibre disarray in HCM may play an important role in the pathophysiological manifestations of the disease. The remodelling of gap junction distribution may underlie the formation of an arrhythmogenic substrate, thereby contributing to the generation and maintenance of cardiac arrhythmias associated with HCM. Images PMID:8944586

  2. Progress in medical ultrasound exposimetry.

    PubMed

    Harris, Gerald R

    2005-05-01

    Biomedical applications of ultrasound have experienced tremendous growth over the past 50 years. Early work in thermal therapy and surgery soon was followed by diagnostic imaging and Doppler. Because patient safety was an important issue from the beginning, the study of methods for measuring exposure levels, and their relationship to possible biological effects, paralleled the growth of the various therapeutic and diagnostic techniques. The diverse conditions of use have presented a range of exposure measurement challenges, and the sensors and techniques used to evaluate ultrasound fields have had to evolve as new or expanded clinical applications have emerged. In this paper some of the more notable of these developments are presented and discussed. Topics covered include devices and techniques, methods of calibration, progress in standardization, and current problem areas, including the effects of nonlinear propagation. Some early methods are described, but emphasis is given to more recent work applicable to present and future uses of ultrasound in medicine and biology. PMID:16048175

  3. Ultrasound tissue analysis and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufhold, John; Chan, Ray C.; Karl, William C.; Castanon, David A.

    1999-07-01

    On the battlefield of the future, it may become feasible for medics to perform, via application of new biomedical technologies, more sophisticated diagnoses and surgery than is currently practiced. Emerging biomedical technology may enable the medic to perform laparoscopic surgical procedures to remove, for example, shrapnel from injured soldiers. Battlefield conditions constrain the types of medical image acquisition and interpretation which can be performed. Ultrasound is the only viable biomedical imaging modality appropriate for deployment on the battlefield -- which leads to image interpretation issues because of the poor quality of ultrasound imagery. To help overcome these issues, we develop and implement a method of image enhancement which could aid non-experts in the rapid interpretation and use of ultrasound imagery. We describe an energy minimization approach to finding boundaries in medical images and show how prior information on edge orientation can be incorporated into this framework to detect tissue boundaries oriented at a known angle.

  4. Neuromuscular Ultrasound of Cranial Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Tawfik, Eman A.; Cartwright, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound of cranial nerves is a novel subdomain of neuromuscular ultrasound (NMUS) which may provide additional value in the assessment of cranial nerves in different neuromuscular disorders. Whilst NMUS of peripheral nerves has been studied, NMUS of cranial nerves is considered in its initial stage of research, thus, there is a need to summarize the research results achieved to date. Detailed scanning protocols, which assist in mastery of the techniques, are briefly mentioned in the few reference textbooks available in the field. This review article focuses on ultrasound scanning techniques of the 4 accessible cranial nerves: optic, facial, vagus and spinal accessory nerves. The relevant literatures and potential future applications are discussed. PMID:25851889

  5. Ultrasound: From Earth to Space

    PubMed Central

    Law, Jennifer; Macbeth, Paul. B.

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasonography is a versatile imaging modality that offers many advantages over radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. On Earth, the use of ultrasound has become standard in many areas of medicine including diagnosis of medical and surgical diseases, management of obstetric and gynecologic conditions, assessment of critically ill patients, and procedural guidance. Advances in telecommunications have enabled remotely-guided ultrasonography for both geographically isolated populations and astronauts aboard the International Space Station. While ultrasound has traditionally been used in spaceflight to study anatomical and physiological adaptations to microgravity and evaluate countermeasures, recent years have seen a growth of applications adapted from terrestrial techniques. Terrestrial, remote, and space applications for ultrasound are reviewed in this paper. PMID:22399873

  6. Human Internal Jugular Valve M-mode Ultrasound Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Menegatti, Erica; Tessari, Mirko; Gianesini, Sergio; Vannini, Maria Elena; Sisini, Francesco; Zamboni, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    In humans the mechanism governing the internal jugular vein (IJV) valve opening and closure is still unclear. M-mode is used in echo-cardiology for the heart valves assessment. Sometimes it was performed also in deep peripheral veins and in vena cava assessment, but never in the IJV valve. Aim of the present study is to investigate the IJV valves physiology in healthy volunteers, by means of both B and M-mode ultrasound. Eighty-three (83) healthy volunteers (35 Male, 48 Female, 25.7±6.7 y.o.), for a total of 166 IJVs, were enrolled. The entire cohort underwent IJVs high-resolution B and M-mode evaluation, in standardized postural and respiratory conditions. Presence, motility, and number of cusps, as well as their opening and closure mechanism have been assessed. Bilateral valve absence occurred in 13/83 (16%), whereas at least a one side absence was recorded in 38/83 (46‰ of the cohort) (p<0.0356). Valve leaflets were always mobile and respectively bi-cusps in 34%, or mono-cusp in 27%. The latter was significantly more frequent on the left side (35%) than on the right side (19%) (p<0.0013). In supine, M-mode valve opening was synchronous with the cardiac cycle. To the contrary, in an upright position, the valve remained always open and saddled to the wall, independently from the cardiac cycle. In healthy subjects, the IJV valve leaflets are always mobile, but the significant rate of mono and bilateral absence could suggest a progressive phylogenetic importance loss of such apparatus. M-mode ultrasound enhances the characterization of IJV valve, for this reason it should be taken into consideration to routinely add it to the cerebral venous return investigation. PMID:24712644

  7. Human internal jugular valve M-mode ultrasound characterization.

    PubMed

    Menegatti, Erica; Tessari, Mirko; Gianesini, Sergio; Vannini, Maria Elena; Sisini, Francesco; Zamboni, Paolo

    2014-05-01

    In humans the mechanism governing the internal jugular vein (IJV) valve opening and closure is still unclear. M-mode is used in echo-cardiology for the heart valves assessment. Sometimes it was performed also in deep peripheral veins and in vena cava assessment, but never in the IJV valve. Aim of the present study is to investigate the IJV valves physiology in healthy volunteers, by means of both B and M-mode ultrasound. Eighty-three (83) healthy volunteers (35 Male, 48 Female, 25.7±6.7 y.o.), for a total of 166 IJVs, were enrolled. The entire cohort underwent IJVs high-resolution B and M-mode evaluation, in standardized postural and respiratory conditions. Presence, motility, and number of cusps, as well as their opening and closure mechanism have been assessed. Bilateral valve absence occurred in 13/83 (16%), whereas at least a one side absence was recorded in 38/83 (46% of the cohort) (p<0.0356). Valve leaflets were always mobile and respectively bi-cusps in 34%, or mono-cusp in 27%. The latter was significantly more frequent on the left side (35%) than on the right side (19%) (p<0.0013). In supine, M-mode valve opening was synchronous with the cardiac cycle. To the contrary, in an upright position, the valve remained always open and saddled to the wall, independently from the cardiac cycle. In healthy subjects, the IJV valve leaflets are always mobile, but the significant rate of mono and bilateral absence could suggest a progressive phylogenetic importance loss of such apparatus. M-mode ultrasound enhances the characterization of IJV valve, for this reason it should be taken into consideration to routinely add it to the cerebral venous return investigation. PMID:24712644

  8. MRI and FDG PET/CT Imaging Manifestations of Cardiac Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yang; Sweiss, Nadera J

    2015-12-01

    A 52-year-old man had biopsy-proven sarcoidosis of mediastinal lymph nodes. Cardiac sarcoidosis was confirmed on cardiac MRI with typical imaging features as delayed gadolinium enhancement. Follow-up FDG PET/CT with a 3-day pretest diet modification showed suppression of overall myocardial uptake of FDG but with multifocal abnormal FDG uptake in the myocardium regions corresponding to the previous MRI findings. Additional noncardiac active sarcoidosis involving multiple organ and lymph nodes were also visualized on FDG PET/CT. PMID:26544904

  9. Advanced computer techniques for inverse modeling of electric current in cardiac tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, S.A.; Romero, L.A.; Diegert, C.F.

    1996-08-01

    For many years, ECG`s and vector cardiograms have been the tools of choice for non-invasive diagnosis of cardiac conduction problems, such as found in reentrant tachycardia or Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome. Through skillful analysis of these skin-surface measurements of cardiac generated electric currents, a physician can deduce the general location of heart conduction irregularities. Using a combination of high-fidelity geometry modeling, advanced mathematical algorithms and massively parallel computing, Sandia`s approach would provide much more accurate information and thus allow the physician to pinpoint the source of an arrhythmia or abnormal conduction pathway.

  10. HYPOTHALAMIC DYSFUNCTION—A Review of Experimental and Clinical Observations of Cardiac and Renal Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, S. J.

    1952-01-01

    The nuclear cell masses of the hypothalamus act as autonomic regulators for visceromotor function. Through the correlation of impulses arising in or about the hypothalamus with the changes in cellular chemistry, there is provided, by mediation of the endocrines, a balanced control of water metabolism, renal function and cardiac action. Derangement of hypothalamic regulation causes specific clinical syndromes described by the general term “diencephalohypophyseal dystrophy.” Cardiac abnormalities attributable to hypothalamic dysfunction include alterations in rate and various arrhythmias. Alteration in renal function includes hematuria, polyuria or relative anuria, and specific effects on electrolyte and nitrogen output. PMID:13009469

  11. Radiologic atlas of pulmonary abnormalities in children

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, E.B.; Wagner, M.L.; Dutton, R.V.

    1988-01-01

    This book is an atlas about thoracic abnormalities in infants and children. The authors include computed tomographic, digital subtraction angiographic, ultrasonographic, and a few magnetic resonance (MR) images. They recognize and discuss how changes in the medical treatment of premature infants and the management of infection and pediatric tumors have altered some of the appearances and considerations in these diseases. Oriented toward all aspects of pulmonary abnormalities, the book starts with radiographic techniques and then discusses the normal chest, the newborn, infections, tumors, and pulmonary vascular diseases. There is comprehensive treatment of mediastinal abnormalities and a discussion of airway abnormalities.

  12. Endometrial Cancer: Hidden Pathology in a Patient with Abnormal Uterine Bleeding and Known Leiomyoma.

    PubMed

    Sri, Trisha; Steren, Albert J; Stratton, Pamela

    2015-12-01

    Uterine leiomyomas and endometrial pathology are both associated with abnormal uterine bleeding. We report a case in which a nulliparous woman with heavy uterine bleeding and leiomyomas had undergone two prior hysteroscopic myomectomies for benign leiomyomas. She was evaluated, but was ineligible for a clinical trial of a novel Magnetic Resonance guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (MRgx200B;HIFU) device. The 8 cm, prolapsed submucosal leiomyoma hindered endometrial sampling and was inaccessible to HIFU treatment. Preoperatively, neither endometrial sampling nor saline sonohysterography was technically feasible. She underwent hysterectomy, and on histological examination of specimen, stage 1A grade 1 endometrial carcinoma was found on the endometrial side of the prolapsing fibroid. Endometrial pathology is an important consideration in the evaluation of abnormal uterine bleeding, even in women with large prolapsing leiomyoma. PMID:25634727

  13. Enzyme activity determination using ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, M. J.; Southworth, T.; Watson, N. G.; Povey, M. J. W.

    2014-04-01

    Here are presented the results of a novel approach to the measurement of enzyme reaction rates in which ultrasound velocity measurement is used. Our results show enzyme activity is observable, in the acoustic context, and that furthermore this offers the potential to estimate the rate of reaction over different substrate concentrations and temperatures. Findings are corroborated with optical microscopy and rheological measurements. Ultrasound velocity measurement can be performed without the need for aliquot extraction and offers an efficient, non-invasive and dynamic method to monitor enzyme activity.

  14. Ultrasound Imaging and Its Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Jorgen A.

    Modern medical ultrasound scanners are used to image nearly all soft tissue structures in the body. The anatomy can be studied from gray-scale B-mode images, where the reflectivity and scattering strength of the tissues are displayed. The imaging is performed in real time with 20 to 100 images per second. The technique is widely used, since it does not use ionizing radiation and is safe and painless for the patient. This chapter gives a short introduction to modern ultrasound imaging using array transducers. It includes a description of the different imaging methods, the beam-forming strategies used, and the resulting fields and their modeling.

  15. Ultrasound Diagnosis of Penile Fracture.

    PubMed

    Nizamani, Waseem Mehmood; Ali, Syed Imtiaz; Vaswani, Aneel Kumar; Shahani, Bhesham Kumar

    2015-10-01

    Arare but possibly underreported urological emergency is penile fracture which results from tear in the tunica albuginea of the penis. The proposed etiology is forceful manipulation of an erect penis or secondary to blunt trauma. We would like to report a case of young patient presenting with large penile shaft hematoma and deformity. The patient did not provide obvious history of trauma or sexual intercourse. The ultrasound of penis was performed which suggested the diagnosis of penile fracture and ultrasound findings were correlated with peroperative findings. PMID:26522196

  16. Mesothelial/monocytic incidental cardiac excrescence mimicking cardiac tumor.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Saumyaranjan; Arava, Sudheer; Muthukumaran, Subramanian; Sharma, Bhavna; Choudhary, Shiv Kumar; Ray, Ruma

    2016-01-01

    Mesothelial incidental cardiac excrescence is a non-neoplastic tumor-like lesion commonly occurring in the intracardiac region. The exact etiology is unclear. A 32-year-old woman presented with respiratory distress on exertion. Echocardiography showed severe aortic, mitral, and tricuspid regurgitation, for which triple-valve replacement was performed. A small cardiac excrescence was found over the aortic valve, measuring 0.6?×?0.3?×?0.3-cm, which on microscopy showed features of mesothelial/monocytic incidental cardiac excrescence. This condition is very rare but it must be recognized because it mimics a metastatic malignancy. PMID:24838237

  17. Measuring Ascending Aortic Stiffness In Vivo in Mice Using Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Maggie M.; Barodka, Viachaslau; Abraham, Theodore P.; Steppan, Jochen; Shoukas, Artin A.; Butlin, Mark; Avolio, Alberto; Berkowitz, Dan E.; Santhanam, Lakshmi

    2014-01-01

    We present a protocol for measuring in vivo aortic stiffness in mice using high-resolution ultrasound imaging. Aortic diameter is measured by ultrasound and aortic blood pressure is measured invasively with a solid-state pressure catheter. Blood pressure is raised then lowered incrementally by intravenous infusion of vasoactive drugs phenylephrine and sodium nitroprusside. Aortic diameter is measured for each pressure step to characterize the pressure-diameter relationship of the ascending aorta. Stiffness indices derived from the pressure-diameter relationship can be calculated from the data collected. Calculation of arterial compliance is described in this protocol. This technique can be used to investigate mechanisms underlying increased aortic stiffness associated with cardiovascular disease and aging. The technique produces a physiologically relevant measure of stiffness compared to ex vivo approaches because physiological influences on aortic stiffness are incorporated in the measurement. The primary limitation of this technique is the measurement error introduced from the movement of the aorta during the cardiac cycle. This motion can be compensated by adjusting the location of the probe with the aortic movement as well as making multiple measurements of the aortic pressure-diameter relationship and expanding the experimental group size. PMID:25489936

  18. Measuring tissue blood flow using ultrasound modulated diffused light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ron, A.; Racheli, N.; Breskin, I.; Metzger, Y.; Silman, Z.; Kamar, M.; Nini, A.; Shechter, R.; Balberg, M.

    2012-02-01

    We demonstrate the ability of a novel device employing ultrasound modulation of near infrared light (referred as "Ultrasound tagged light" or UTL) to perform non-invasive monitoring of blood flow in the microvascular level in tissue. Monitoring microcirculatory blood flow is critical in clinical situations affecting flow to different organs, such as the brain or the limbs. . However, currently there are no non-invasive devices that measure microcirculatory blood flow in deep tissue continuously. Our prototype device (Ornim Medical, Israel) was used to monitor tissue blood flow on anesthetized swine during controlled manipulations of increased and decreased blood flow. Measurements were done on the calf muscle and forehead of the animal and compared with Laser Doppler (LD). ROC analysis of the sensitivity and specificity for detecting an increase in blood flow on the calf muscle, demonstrated AUC = 0.951 for 23 systemic manipulations of cardiac output by Epinephrine injection, which is comparable to AUC = 0.943 using laser Doppler. Some examples of cerebral blood flow monitoring are presented, along with their individual ROC curves. UTL flowmetry is shown to be effective in detecting changes in cerebral and muscle blood flow in swine, and has merit in clinical applications.

  19. CT and Ultrasound Guided Stereotactic High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU)

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Bradford J.; Frenkel, V.; Viswanathan, A.; Dromi, S.; Oh, K.; Kam, A.; Li, K. C. P.; Yanof, J.; Bauer, C.; Kruecker, J.; Seip, R.

    2006-05-08

    To demonstrate the feasibility of CT and B-mode Ultrasound (US) targeted HIFU, a prototype coaxial focused ultrasound transducer was registered and integrated to a CT scanner. CT and diagnostic ultrasound were used for HIFU targeting and monitoring, with the goals of both thermal ablation and non-thermal enhanced drug delivery. A 1 megahertz coaxial ultrasound transducer was custom fabricated and attached to a passive position-sensing arm and an active six degree-of-freedom robotic arm via a CT stereotactic frame. The outer therapeutic transducer with a 10 cm fixed focal zone was coaxially mounted to an inner diagnostic US transducer (2-4 megahertz, Philips Medical Systems). This coaxial US transducer was connected to a modified commercial focused ultrasound generator (Focus Surgery, Indianapolis, IN) with a maximum total acoustic power of 100 watts. This pre-clinical paradigm was tested for ability to heat tissue in phantoms with monitoring and navigation from CT and live US. The feasibility of navigation via image fusion of CT with other modalities such as PET and MRI was demonstrated. Heated water phantoms were tested for correlation between CT numbers and temperature (for ablation monitoring). The prototype transducer and integrated CT/US imaging system enabled simultaneous multimodality imaging and therapy. Pre-clinical phantom models validated the treatment paradigm and demonstrated integrated multimodality guidance and treatment monitoring. Temperature changes during phantom cooling corresponded to CT number changes. Contrast enhanced or non-enhanced CT numbers may potentially be used to monitor thermal ablation with HIFU. Integrated CT, diagnostic US, and therapeutic focused ultrasound bridges a gap between diagnosis and therapy. Preliminary results show that the multimodality system may represent a relatively inexpensive, accessible, and simple method of both targeting and monitoring HIFU effects. Small animal pre-clinical models may be translated to large animals and humans for HIFU-induced ablation and drug delivery. Integrated CT-guided focused ultrasound holds promise for tissue ablation, enhancing local drug delivery, and CT thermometry for monitoring ablation in near real-time.

  20. Trends in Cardiac Pacemaker Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Mallela, Venkateswara Sarma; Ilankumaran, V; Rao, N.Srinivasa

    2004-01-01

    Batteries used in Implantable cardiac pacemakers-present unique challenges to their developers and manufacturers in terms of high levels of safety and reliability. In addition, the batteries must have longevity to avoid frequent replacements. Technological advances in leads/electrodes have reduced energy requirements by two orders of magnitude. Micro-electronics advances sharply reduce internal current drain concurrently decreasing size and increasing functionality, reliability, and longevity. It is reported that about 600,000 pacemakers are implanted each year worldwide and the total number of people with various types of implanted pacemaker has already crossed 3 million. A cardiac pacemaker uses half of its battery power for cardiac stimulation and the other half for housekeeping tasks such as monitoring and data logging. The first implanted cardiac pacemaker used nickel-cadmium rechargeable battery, later on zinc-mercury battery was developed and used which lasted for over 2 years. Lithium iodine battery invented and used by Wilson Greatbatch and his team in 1972 made the real impact to implantable cardiac pacemakers. This battery lasts for about 10 years and even today is the power source for many manufacturers of cardiac pacemakers. This paper briefly reviews various developments of battery technologies since the inception of cardiac pacemaker and presents the alternative to lithium iodine battery for the near future. PMID:16943934

  1. Repair of a Complex Congenital Cardiac Defect

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... 00:00:14 ANNOUNCER: Over the next hour, live from Children's Hospital Boston's cardiac OR, see cardiac surgeons repair a complex congenital cardiac defect. Each year the pediatric cardiac surgery program provides surgical care to approximately 1,100 patients, including more than 700 cases of open ...

  2. Effects of dietary vitamin D on calcium and magnesium levels in mice with abnormal calcium metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Spurlock, B.G.; West, W.L.; Knight, E.M. )

    1991-03-11

    In previous studies vitamin D has been used to induce cardiac calcium overload in laboratory animals. Interrelationships between calcium and magnesium metabolism are also documented. The authors have investigated the effect of varying vitamin D in the diet on calcium and magnesium levels in plasma, kidney and heart of DBA mice which exhibit genetic abnormalities in cardiac calcium metabolism. Weanling DBA mice were maintained for 28 days on an AIN-76 diet containing either 1,000 I.U. of vitamin D{sub 3} per kg of diet (control); 4,000 I.U. of vitamin D{sub 3} per kg of diet; or no vitamin D. When compared to controls, supplemented animals showed significantly higher plasma magnesium, kidney calcium and kidney magnesium levels; animals receiving the vitamin D-deficient diet exhibited increases in cardiac calcium levels. The authors results support previous findings that vitamin D deficiency increases cardiac calcium uptake and suggest a possible role of vitamin D in magnesium metabolism.

  3. Cardiac cone-beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Manzke, Robert . E-mail: robert.manzke@philips.com

    2005-10-15

    This doctoral thesis addresses imaging of the heart with retrospectively gated helical cone-beam computed tomography (CT). A thorough review of the CT reconstruction literature is presented in combination with a historic overview of cardiac CT imaging and a brief introduction to other cardiac imaging modalities. The thesis includes a comprehensive chapter about the theory of CT reconstruction, familiarizing the reader with the problem of cone-beam reconstruction. The anatomic and dynamic properties of the heart are outlined and techniques to derive the gating information are reviewed. With the extended cardiac reconstruction (ECR) framework, a new approach is presented for the heart-rate-adaptive gated helical cardiac cone-beam CT reconstruction. Reconstruction assessment criteria such as the temporal resolution, the homogeneity in terms of the cardiac phase, and the smoothness at cycle-to-cycle transitions are developed. Several reconstruction optimization approaches are described: An approach for the heart-rate-adaptive optimization of the temporal resolution is presented. Streak artifacts at cycle-to-cycle transitions can be minimized by using an improved cardiac weighting scheme. The optimal quiescent cardiac phase for the reconstruction can be determined automatically with the motion map technique. Results for all optimization procedures applied to ECR are presented and discussed based on patient and phantom data. The ECR algorithm is analyzed for larger detector arrays of future cone-beam systems throughout an extensive simulation study based on a four-dimensional cardiac CT phantom. The results of the scientific work are summarized and an outlook proposing future directions is given. The presented thesis is available for public download at www.cardiac-ct.net.

  4. Semen abnormalities with SSRI antidepressants.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of widespread use, the adverse effect profile of "selective" serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants has still not been fully elucidated. Studies in male animals have shown delayed sexual development and reduced fertility. Three prospective cohort studies conducted in over one hundred patients exposed to an SSRI for periods ranging from 5 weeks to 24 months found altered semen param-eters after as little as 3 months of exposure: reduced sperm concentration, reduced sperm motility, a higher percentage of abnormal spermatozoa, and increased levels of sperm DNA fragmentation. One clinical trial showed growth retardation in children considered depressed who were exposed to SSRls. SSRls may have endocrine disrupting properties. Dapoxetine is a short-acting serotonin reuptake inhibitor that is chemically related to fluoxetine and marketed in the European Union for men complaining of premature ejaculation. But the corresponding European summary of product characteristics does not mention any effects on fertility. In practice, based on the data available as of mid-2014, the effects of SSRI exposure on male fertility are unclear. However, it is a risk that should be taken into account and pointed out to male patients who would like to father a child or who are experiencing fertility problems. PMID:25729824

  5. Determination of vascular impedance in the peripheral circulation by transcutaneous pulsed Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Solomon, S; Katz, S D; Stevenson-Smith, W; Yellin, E L; LeJemtel, T H

    1995-08-01

    Instantaneous blood flow velocity characteristics and vascular impedance spectra derived noninvasively by pulsed Doppler ultrasound and invasively by electromagnetic flow probe were compared in the canine common femoral artery to validate the pulsed Doppler technique for determination of vascular impedance in the peripheral circulation. Although Doppler ultrasonography is routinely performed to evaluate blood flow velocity patterns in the human peripheral circulation; the validity of this technique to derive peripheral vascular impedance has yet to be investigated. Simultaneous measurements of blood flow velocity were determined by both noninvasive pulsed Doppler ultrasound and surgically implanted electromagnetic flow probe in the common femoral artery of eight dogs and compared in both time and frequency domains. Vascular impedance spectra derived from measurements of blood flow velocity determined by Doppler ultrasound and electromagnetic flow probe and simultaneous measurement of arterial pressure by a micromanometer-tipped catheter were obtained at baseline and after intra-arterial injection of acetylcholine in five additional dogs. During the first 10 to 20% of the cardiac cycle, Doppler ultrasound blood flow velocity was transiently greater than the simultaneously recorded electromagnetic blood flow velocity. During the remainder of the cardiac cycle, the two blood flow velocity waveforms were nearly superimposable. The frequency spectra of the blood flow velocity waveforms derived from Doppler ultrasound and electromagnetic flow probes were similar for harmonies less than 10 Hz. Vascular impedance spectra derived from measurements of blood flow velocity determined by Doppler ultrasound and electromagnetic flow probe with simultaneous measurement of arterial pressure by a micromanometer-tipped catheter were similar at baseline and after regional administration of acetylcholine. Mean vascular resistance (impedance at 0 Hz), characteristic impedance, and the first minima of the impedance modulus derived from Doppler ultrasound and electromagnetic flow probe blood flow velocity measurements were closely correlated at baseline and after dilation with acetylcholine (r > or = 0.89, p < 0.05 for all correlations). Doppler ultrasonography is a convenient and accurate technique for determination of vascular impedance in the peripheral circulation. PMID:7634892

  6. Physics of Cardiac Arrhythmogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karma, Alain

    2013-04-01

    A normal heartbeat is orchestrated by the stable propagation of an excitation wave that produces an orderly contraction. In contrast, wave turbulence in the ventricles, clinically known as ventricular fibrillation (VF), stops the heart from pumping and is lethal without prompt defibrillation. I review experimental, computational, and theoretical studies that have shed light on complex dynamical phenomena linked to the initiation, maintenance, and control of wave turbulence. I first discuss advances made to understand the precursor state to a reentrant arrhythmia where the refractory period of cardiac tissue becomes spatiotemporally disordered; this is known as an arrhythmogenic tissue substrate. I describe observed patterns of transmembrane voltage and intracellular calcium signaling that can contribute to this substrate, and symmetry breaking instabilities to explain their formation. I then survey mechanisms of wave turbulence and discuss novel methods that exploit electrical pacing stimuli to control precursor patterns and low-energy pulsed electric fields to control turbulence.

  7. Cardiac action potential imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Qinghai; Lipp, Peter; Kaestner, Lars

    2013-06-01

    Action potentials in cardiac myocytes have durations in the order of magnitude of 100 milliseconds. In biomedical investigations the documentation of the occurrence of action potentials is often not sufficient, but a recording of the shape of an action potential allows a functional estimation of several molecular players. Therefore a temporal resolution of around 500 images per second is compulsory. In the past such measurements have been performed with photometric approaches limiting the measurement to one cell at a time. In contrast, imaging allows reading out several cells at a time with additional spatial information. Recent developments in camera technologies allow the acquisition with the required speed and sensitivity. We performed action potential imaging on isolated adult cardiomyocytes of guinea pigs utilizing the fluorescent membrane potential sensor di-8-ANEPPS and latest electron-multiplication CCD as well as scientific CMOS cameras of several manufacturers. Furthermore, we characterized the signal to noise ratio of action potential signals of varying sets of cameras, dye concentrations and objective lenses. We ensured that di-8-ANEPPS itself did not alter action potentials by avoiding concentrations above 5 ?M. Based on these results we can conclude that imaging is a reliable method to read out action potentials. Compared to conventional current-clamp experiments, this optical approach allows a much higher throughput and due to its contact free concept leaving the cell to a much higher degree undisturbed. Action potential imaging based on isolated adult cardiomyocytes can be utilized in pharmacological cardiac safety screens bearing numerous advantages over approaches based on heterologous expression of hERG channels in cell lines.

  8. Role of Oxidative Stress in Thyroid Hormone-Induced Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy and Associated Cardiac Dysfunction: An Undisclosed Story

    PubMed Central

    Elnakish, Mohammad T.; Ahmed, Amany A. E.; Mohler, Peter J.; Janssen, Paul M. L.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is the most documented cardiomyopathy following hyperthyroidism in experimental animals. Thyroid hormone-induced cardiac hypertrophy is described as a relative ventricular hypertrophy that encompasses the whole heart and is linked with contractile abnormalities in both right and left ventricles. The increase in oxidative stress that takes place in experimental hyperthyroidism proposes that reactive oxygen species are key players in the cardiomyopathy frequently reported in this endocrine disorder. The goal of this review is to shed light on the effects of thyroid hormones on the development of oxidative stress in the heart along with the subsequent cellular and molecular changes. In particular, we will review the role of thyroid hormone-induced oxidative stress in the development of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and associated cardiac dysfunction, as well as the potential effectiveness of antioxidant treatments in attenuating these hyperthyroidism-induced abnormalities in experimental animal models. PMID:26146529

  9. Videoscope-assisted cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Robert Jeen-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Videoscope-assisted cardiac surgery (VACS) offers a minimally invasive platform for most cardiac operations such as coronary and valve procedures. It includes robotic and thoracoscopic approaches and each has strengths and weaknesses. The success depends on appropriate hardware setup, staff training, and troubleshooting efficiency. In our institution, we often use VACS for robotic left-internal-mammary-artery takedown, mitral valve repair, and various intra-cardiac operations such as tricuspid valve repair, combined Maze procedure, atrial septal defect repair, ventricular septal defect repair, etc. Hands-on reminders and updated references are provided for reader’s further understanding of the topic. PMID:24455172

  10. Videoscope-assisted cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Kuan-Ming; Chen, Robert Jeen-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Videoscope-assisted cardiac surgery (VACS) offers a minimally invasive platform for most cardiac operations such as coronary and valve procedures. It includes robotic and thoracoscopic approaches and each has strengths and weaknesses. The success depends on appropriate hardware setup, staff training, and troubleshooting efficiency. In our institution, we often use VACS for robotic left-internal-mammary-artery takedown, mitral valve repair, and various intra-cardiac operations such as tricuspid valve repair, combined Maze procedure, atrial septal defect repair, ventricular septal defect repair, etc. Hands-on reminders and updated references are provided for reader's further understanding of the topic. PMID:24455172

  11. Epigenetic regulation in cardiac fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Li-Ming; Xu, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac fibrosis represents an adoptive response in the heart exposed to various stress cues. While resolution of the fibrogenic response heralds normalization of heart function, persistent fibrogenesis is usually associated with progressive loss of heart function and eventually heart failure. Cardiac fibrosis is regulated by a myriad of factors that converge on the transcription of genes encoding extracellular matrix proteins, a process the epigenetic machinery plays a pivotal role. In this mini-review, we summarize recent advances regarding the epigenetic regulation of cardiac fibrosis focusing on the role of histone and DNA modifications and non-coding RNAs. PMID:26635926

  12. Double Bolus Thrombolysis for Suspected Massive Pulmonary Embolism during Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Gerard; Fitzpatrick, Gareth; Gilligan, Peadar

    2015-01-01

    More than 70% of cardiac arrest cases are caused by acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or pulmonary embolism (PE). Although thrombolytic therapy is a recognised therapy for both AMI and PE, its indiscriminate use is not routinely recommended during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We present a case describing the successful use of double dose thrombolysis during cardiac arrest caused by pulmonary embolism. Notwithstanding the relative lack of high-level evidence, this case suggests a scenario in which recombinant tissue Plasminogen Activator (rtPA) may be beneficial in cardiac arrest. In addition to the strong clinical suspicion of pulmonary embolism as the causative agent of the patient's cardiac arrest, the extremely low end-tidal CO2 suggested a massive PE. The absence of dilatation of the right heart on subxiphoid ultrasound argued against the diagnosis of PE, but not conclusively so. In the context of the circulatory collapse induced by cardiac arrest, this aspect was relegated in terms of importance. The second dose of rtPA utilised in this case resulted in return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and did not result in haemorrhage or an adverse effect.

  13. Benefit of Cardiac Sonography for Estimating The Early Term Survival of The Cardiopulmonary Arrest Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cebicci, H; Salt, O; Gurbuz, S; Koyuncu, S; Bol, O

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is the most important intervention that connects the cardiopulmonary arrests (CPA), to life. Ultrasonography  (USG) is used to detect the presence of cardiac activity during CPR. Methods: Files of the patiens, admitted to Kayseri Training and Research Hospital during one calendar year (2011) and suffered CPA were retrospectively evaluated by using hospital information management system. Patients enrolled in the study should have arrival electrocardiogram and cardiac ultrasound performed and  recorded. Results: A total of 410 patients were included in the study. When we examined the cardiac rhythm on arrival, 290 patients (70.7%) had asystole, 45 (11%) patients had ventricular fibrillation/ pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VF/pVT) and 75 (18.3%) patients had pulseless electrical activity (PEA). Twenty-four hour survival rates of the groups that the cardiac activity was detected with USG on arrival to the Emergency Department were: 2 patients in asystole group,  35 patients in VF/pVT group and  44 patients in PEA group. Conclusions: Usage of USG during CPR in order to evaluate cardiac contractility, increases the success rate of accomplished CPR. PMID:25336874

  14. Intra-Cardiac 2D US to 3D CT Image Registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xishi; Hill, Nicholas A.; Ren, Jing; Guiraudon, Gerard; Peters, Terry M.

    2007-03-01

    Intra-cardiac echocardiography (ICE) is commonly used to guide intra-cardiac procedures, such as the treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF). However, effective surgical navigation based on ICE images is not trivial, due to the low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and limited field of view of ultrasound (US) images. The interpretation of ICE can be significantly improved if correctly placed in the context of three-dimensional magnetic resonance (MR) or computed tomography (CT) images by simultaneously presenting the complementary anatomical information from the two modalities. The purpose of this research is to demonstrate the feasibility of multimodality image registration of 2D intra-cardiac US images with 3D computed tomography (CT) images. In our previous work, a two-step registration procedure has been proposed to register US images with MR images and was validated on a patient dataset. In this work, we extend the two-step method to intra-cardiac procedures and provide a detailed assessment of registration accuracy by determining the target registration errors (TRE) on a heart phantom, which had fiducial markers affixed to the surface to facilitate evaluation of registration accuracy. The resultant TRE on the heart phantom was 3.7 mm. This result is considered to be acceptable for guiding a probe in the heart during ablative therapy for atrial fibrillation. To our knowledge, there is no previous report describing multimodality registration of 2D intra-cardiac US to high-resolution 3D CT.

  15. Molecular cytogenetic studies in structural abnormalities of chromosome 13

    SciTech Connect

    Lozzio, C.B.; Bamberger, E.; Anderson, I.

    1994-09-01

    A partial trisomy 13 was detected prenatally in an amniocentesis performed due to the following ultrasound abnormalities: open sacral neural tube defect (NTD), a flattened cerebellum, and lumbar/thoracic hemivertebrae. Elevated AFP and positive acetylcholinesterase in amniotic fluid confirmed the open NTD. Chromosome analysis showed an extra acrocentric chromosome marker. FISH analysis with the painting probe 13 showed that most of the marker was derived from this chromosome. Chromosomes on the parents revealed that the mother had a balanced reciprocal translocation t(2;13)(q23;q21). Dual labeling with painting chromosomes 2 and 13 on cells from the mother and from the amniotic fluid identified the marker as a der(13)t(2;13)(p23;q21). Thus, the fetus had a partial trisomy 13 and a small partial trisomy 2p. The maternal grandfather was found to be a carrier for this translocation. Fetal demise occurred a 29 weeks of gestation. The fetus had open lumbar NTD and showed dysmorphic features, overlapping fingers and imperforate anus. This woman had a subsequent pregnancy and chorionic villi sample showed that this fetus was normal. Another case with an abnormal chromosome 13 was a newborn with partial monosomy 13 due to the presence of a ring chromosome 13. This infant had severe intrauterine growth retardation, oligohydramnios, dysmorphic features and multiple congenital microphthalmia, congenital heart disease, absent thumbs and toes and cervical vertebral anomalies. Chromosome studies in blood and skin fibroblast cultures showed that one chromosome 3 was replaced by a ring chromosome of various sizes. This ring was confirmed to be derived from chromosome 13 using the centromeric 21/13 probe.

  16. Measurement of Nuchal Translucency Thickness for Detection of Chromosomal Abnormalities using First Trimester Ultrasound Fetal Images

    E-print Network

    Nirmala, S

    2010-01-01

    The Nuchal Translucency thickness measurement is made to identify the Down Syndrome in screening first trimester fetus and presented in this paper. The mean shift analysis and canny operators are utilized for segmenting the nuchal translucency region and the exact thickness has been estimated using Blob analysis. It is observed from the results that the fetus in the 14th week of Gestation is expected to have a nuchal translucency thickness of 1.87 plus or minus 0.25mm.

  17. An Abnormal Psychology Community Based Interview Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Geoffry D.

    1977-01-01

    A course option in abnormal psychology involves students in interviewing and observing the activities of individuals in the off-campus community who are concerned with some aspect of abnormal psychology. The technique generates student interest in the field when they interview people about topics such as drug abuse, transsexualism, and abuse of…

  18. Immune Abnormalities in Patients with Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Reed P.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A study of 31 autistic patients (3-28 years old) has revealed several immune-system abnormalities, including decreased numbers of T lymphocytes and an altered ratio of helper-to-suppressor T cells. Immune-system abnormalities may be directly related to underlying biologic processes of autism or an indirect reflection of the actual pathologic…

  19. Multiparametric tissue abnormality characterization using manifold regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batmanghelich, Kayhan; Wu, Xiaoying; Zacharaki, Evangelia; Markowitz, Clyde E.; Davatzikos, Christos; Verma, Ragini

    2008-03-01

    Tissue abnormality characterization is a generalized segmentation problem which aims at determining a continuous score that can be assigned to the tissue which characterizes the extent of tissue deterioration, with completely healthy tissue being one end of the spectrum and fully abnormal tissue such as lesions, being on the other end. Our method is based on the assumptions that there is some tissue that is neither fully healthy or nor completely abnormal but lies in between the two in terms of abnormality; and that the voxel-wise score of tissue abnormality lies on a spatially and temporally smooth manifold of abnormality. Unlike in a pure classification problem which associates an independent label with each voxel without considering correlation with neighbors, or an absolute clustering problem which does not consider a priori knowledge of tissue type, we assume that diseased and healthy tissue lie on a manifold that encompasses the healthy tissue and diseased tissue, stretching from one to the other. We propose a semi-supervised method for determining such as abnormality manifold, using multi-parametric features incorporated into a support vector machine framework in combination with manifold regularization. We apply the framework towards the characterization of tissue abnormality to brains of multiple sclerosis patients.

  20. [CHROMOSOMAL ABNORMALITIES IN PATIENTS WITH INFERTILITY].

    PubMed

    Pylyp, L Y; Spinenko, L O; Verhoglyad, N V; Kashevarova, O O; Zukin, V D

    2015-01-01

    To assess the frequency and structure of chromosomal abnormalities in patients with infertility, a retrospective analysis of cytogenetic studies of 3414 patients (1741 females and 1673 males), referred to the Clinic of reproductive medicine "Nadiya" from 2007 to 2012, was performed. Chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 2.37% patients: 2.79% in males and 1.95% in females. Balanced structural chromosomal abnormalities prevailed over numerical abnormalities and corresponded to 80.2% of all chromosomal abnormalities detected in the studied group. Sex chromosome abnormalities made up 23.5% of chromosomal pathology (19/81) and included gonosomal aneuploidies in 84% of cases (16/19) and structural abnormalities of chromosome Y in 16% of cases (3/19). The low level sex chromosome mosaicism was detected with the frequency of 0.55%. Our results highlight the importance of cytogenetic studies in patients seeking infertility treatment by assisted reproductive technologies, since an abnormal finding not only provide a firm diagnosis to couples with infertility, but also influences significantly the approach to infertility treatment in such patients. PMID:26214903