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1

Cardiac 4D Ultrasound Imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Volumetric cardiac ultrasound imaging has steadily evolved over the last 20 years from an electrocardiography (ECC) gated imaging technique to a true real-time imaging modality. Although the clinical use of echocardiography is still to a large extent based on conventional 2D ultrasound imaging it can be anticipated that the further developments in image quality, data visualization and interaction and image quantification of three-dimensional cardiac ultrasound will gradually make volumetric ultrasound the modality of choice. In this chapter, an overview is given of the technological developments that allow for volumetric imaging of the beating heart by ultrasound.

D'hooge, Jan

2

Echocardiographic abnormalities following cardiac radiation  

SciTech Connect

Five years or more after receiving cardiac radiation, 41 patients with Hodgkin's disease and seminoma in remission were subjected to echocardiography. The abnormalities detected included pericardial thickening in 70%, thickening of the aortic and/or mitral valves in 28%, right ventricular dilatation or hypokinesis in 39%, and left ventricular dysfunction in 39%. In the 23 patients treated by an upper mantle technique with shielding, the incidence of right ventricular abnormalities and valvular thickening was significantly lower than in patients treated with modified techniques. Although no symptoms were attributable to the observed abnormalities, longer follow-up time may reveal important functional implications.

Perrault, D.J.; Levy, M.; Herman, J.D.; Burns, R.J.; Bar Shlomo, B.Z.; Druck, M.N.; Wu, W.Q.; McLaughlin, P.R.; Gilbert, B.W.

1985-04-01

3

A multimodal (MRI/ultrasound) cardiac phantom for imaging experiments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A dynamic cardiac phantom can play a significant role in the evaluation and development of ultrasound and cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) motion tracking and registration methods. A four chamber multimodal cardiac phantom has been designed and built to simulate normal and pathologic hearts with different degrees of "infarction" and "scar tissues". In this set up, cardiac valves have been designed and modeled as well. The four-chamber structure can simulate the asymmetric ventricular, atrial and valve motions. Poly Vinyl Alcohol (PVA) is used as the principal material since it can simulate the shape, elasticity, and MR and ultrasound properties of the heart. The cardiac shape is simulated using a four-chamber mold made of polymer clay. An additional pathologic heart phantom containing stiff inclusions has been manufactured in order to simulate an infracted heart. The stiff inclusions are of different shapes and different degrees of elasticity and are able to simulate abnormal cardiac segments. The cardiac elasticity is adjusted based on freeze-thaw cycles of the PVA cryogel for normal and scarred regions. Ultrasound and MRI markers were inserted in the cardiac phantom as landmarks for validations. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first multimodal phantom that models a dynamic four-chamber human heart including the cardiac valve.

Tavakoli, Vahid; Kendrick, Michael; Shakeri, Mostafa; Alshaher, Motaz; Stoddard, Marcus F.; Amini, Amir

2013-03-01

4

3D Cardiac Deformation from Ultrasound Images  

Microsoft Academic Search

The quantitative estimation of regional cardiac deformation from 3D image sequences has important clinical implications for the assessment of viability in the heart wall. Such estimates have so far been obtained almost exclusively from Magnetic Resonance (MR) im- ages, speciflcally MR tagging. In this paper we describe a methodology for estimating cardiac deformations from 3D ultrasound images. The images are

Xenophon Papademetris; Albert J. Sinusas; Donald P. Dione; James S. Duncan

1999-01-01

5

Ultrasound image guidance of cardiac interventions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Surgical procedures often have the unfortunate side-effect of causing the patient significant trauma while accessing the target site. Indeed, in some cases the trauma inflicted on the patient during access to the target greatly exceeds that caused by performing the therapy. Heart disease has traditionally been treated surgically using open chest techniques with the patient being placed "on pump" - i.e. their circulation being maintained by a cardio-pulmonary bypass or "heart-lung" machine. Recently, techniques have been developed for performing minimally invasive interventions on the heart, obviating the formerly invasive procedures. These new approaches rely on pre-operative images, combined with real-time images acquired during the procedure. Our approach is to register intra-operative images to the patient, and use a navigation system that combines intra-operative ultrasound with virtual models of instrumentation that has been introduced into the chamber through the heart wall. This paper illustrates the problems associated with traditional ultrasound guidance, and reviews the state of the art in real-time 3D cardiac ultrasound technology. In addition, it discusses the implementation of an image-guided intervention platform that integrates real-time ultrasound with a virtual reality environment, bringing together the pre-operative anatomy derived from MRI or CT, representations of tracked instrumentation inside the heart chamber, and the intra-operatively acquired ultrasound images.

Peters, Terry M.; Pace, Danielle F.; Lang, Pencilla; Guiraudon, Gérard M.; Jones, Douglas L.; Linte, Cristian A.

2011-03-01

6

HIP ABNORMALITIES DETECTED BY ULTRASOUND IN CLINICALLY NORMAL NEWBORN INFANTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

e have followed the natural progress of newborn infants in whom ultrasound examination showed abnormalities in hips which appeared to be clinically normal. Over six years we saw 306 such children out of 9952 examined (31 per 1000 live births). The examination was repeated at two to three months and those who still showed an abnormality were followed up further.

TERJE TERJESEN; KETIL J. HOLEN; AGNAR TEGNANDER

7

Hip abnormalities detected by ultrasound in clinically normal newborn infants.  

PubMed

We have followed the natural progress of newborn infants in whom ultrasound examination showed abnormalities in hips which appeared to be clinically normal. Over six years we saw 306 such children out of 9952 examined (31 per 1000 live births). The examination was repeated at two to three months and those who still showed an abnormality were followed up further. At four to five months a standard radiograph was obtained, and treatment began if this and another ultrasound scan were both abnormal. At this stage, 291 infants had normal hips. In the 15 infants with abnormal hips there was no pronounced deterioration, none developed a frank dislocation, and all became normal after treatment in an abduction splint. Newborn infants with abnormal and suspicious ultrasound findings who are normal on clinical examination do not need treatment from birth; most of these hips will settle spontaneously. Treatment can be postponed until the age of four to five months unless clinical instability develops or ultrasound shows dislocation. The criteria for treatment should be based on measurements by both ultrasound and radiography: both should show an abnormality before intervention is considered necessary. PMID:8682834

Terjesen, T; Holen, K J; Tegnander, A

1996-07-01

8

Prenatal Ultrasound Screening for External Ear Abnormality in the Fetuses  

PubMed Central

Objectives. To investigate the best time of examination and section chosen of routine prenatal ultrasound screening for external ear abnormalities and evaluate the feasibility of examining the fetal external ear with ultrasonography. Methods. From July 2010 until August 2011, 42118 pregnant women with single fetus during 16–40 weeks of pregnancy were enrolled in the study. Fetal auricles and external auditory canal in the second trimester of pregnancy were evaluated by routine color Doppler ultrasound screening and systematic screening. Ultrasound images of fetal external ears were obtained on transverse-incline view at cervical vertebra level and mandible level and on parasagittal view and coronal view at external ear level. Results. Five fetuses had anomalous ears including bilateral malformed auricles with malformed external auditory canal, unilateral deformed external ear, and unilateral microtia. The detection rate of both auricles was negatively correlated with gestational age. Of the 5843 fetuses undergoing a routine ultrasound screening, 5797 (99.21%) had bilateral auricles. Of the 4955 fetuses following systematic screening, all fetuses (100%) had bilateral auricles. The best time for fetal auricles observation with ultrasonography is 20–24 weeks of pregnancy. Conclusions. Detection of external ear abnormalities may assist in the diagnosis of chromosomal abnormalities.

Wei, Jun; Ran, Suzhen; Yang, Zhengchun; Lin, Yun; Tang, Jing

2014-01-01

9

"Cataplexy" and muscle ultrasound abnormalities in Coffin-Lowry syndrome.  

PubMed Central

The Coffin-Lowry syndrome is a rare cause of mental retardation recognised by its distinctive facial and digital features. We have observed an unusual, non-epileptic, cataplexy-like phenomenon in three subjects with the syndrome and we speculate that this feature may go unrecognised. We also provide evidence of neuromuscular dysfunction as part of the phenotype by showing abnormalities on muscle ultrasound in four gene carriers. Images

Crow, Y J; Zuberi, S M; McWilliam, R; Tolmie, J L; Hollman, A; Pohl, K; Stephenson, J B

1998-01-01

10

Cardiac abnormalities in mixed connective tissue disease.  

PubMed

Sixteen patients with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) were studied using noninvasive cardiovascular techniques. Cardiovascular abnormalities including pericarditis, asymmetric septal hypertrophy, and LV dilatation were found in 38 percent of the study group. Borderline ECG and echocardiographic abnormalities were present in 31 percent of the study group, and the remaining 31 percent were normal by all study techniques. MCTD patients have a high prevalence of cardiovascular abnormalities when studied noninvasively. The most common clinical abnormality is a steroid-responsive pericarditis, present in 25 percent of our series. PMID:6822098

Oetgen, W J; Mutter, M L; Lawless, O J; Davia, J E

1983-02-01

11

Antibodies to cardiac conducting tissue and abnormalities of cardiac conduction in rheumatoid arthritis.  

PubMed Central

The prevalence of antibodies to cardiac conducting tissue and cardiac conduction electrocardiographic abnormalities were studied in 60 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Complete or incomplete right bundle branch block (RBBB) was found in 21 patients (35%). Antibodies to cardiac conducting tissue were found in 16 (76%) of the 21 with RBBB and in eight (21%) of the 39 without RBBB. Cardiac conducting tissue antibodies (CCTA) were found only in one of 42 patients with RBBB unrelated to RA and in two out of 60 normal subjects. This newly documented immunological abnormality is thus correlated with disorder of conducting tissue.

Villecco, A S; de Liberali, E; Bianchi, F B; Pisi, E

1983-01-01

12

Prenatal diagnostic testing of the Noonan syndrome genes in fetuses with abnormal ultrasound findings.  

PubMed

In recent studies on prenatal testing for Noonan syndrome (NS) in fetuses with an increased nuchal translucency (NT) and a normal karyotype, mutations have been reported in 9-16% of cases. In this study, DNA of 75 fetuses with a normal karyotype and abnormal ultrasound findings was tested in a diagnostic setting for mutations in (a subset of) the four most commonly mutated NS genes. A de novo mutation in either PTPN11, KRAS or RAF1 was detected in 13 fetuses (17.3%). Ultrasound findings were increased NT, distended jugular lymphatic sacs (JLS), hydrothorax, renal anomalies, polyhydramnios, cystic hygroma, cardiac anomalies, hydrops fetalis and ascites. A second group, consisting of anonymized DNA of 60 other fetuses with sonographic abnormalities, was tested for mutations in 10 NS genes. In this group, five possible pathogenic mutations have been identified (in PTPN11 (n=2), RAF1, BRAF and MAP2K1 (each n=1)). We recommend prenatal testing of PTPN11, KRAS and RAF1 in pregnancies with an increased NT and at least one of the following additional features: polyhydramnios, hydrops fetalis, renal anomalies, distended JLS, hydrothorax, cardiac anomalies, cystic hygroma and ascites. If possible, mutation analysis of BRAF and MAP2K1 should be considered. PMID:23321623

Croonen, Ellen A; Nillesen, Willy M; Stuurman, Kyra E; Oudesluijs, Gretel; van de Laar, Ingrid M B M; Martens, Liesbeth; Ockeloen, Charlotte; Mathijssen, Inge B; Schepens, Marga; Ruiterkamp-Versteeg, Martina; Scheffer, Hans; Faas, Brigitte H W; van der Burgt, Ineke; Yntema, Helger G

2013-09-01

13

The Role of Cardiac Ultrasound in Stem Cell Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The role of cardiac ultrasound in evaluating and treating patients with stem cell therapy is reviewed. A number of ultrasound\\u000a techniques can be used in the evaluation, therapy delivery, and follow-up of patients treated with stem cell therapy. These\\u000a techniques include evaluation of myocardial systolic and diastolic function, perfusion, ischemia, viability, synchrony, and\\u000a imaging targeted to specific cell types.

Andrew M. Kahn; Anthony N. DeMaria

2009-01-01

14

Cardiac abnormalities in end stage renal failure and anaemia.  

PubMed Central

Thirteen anaemic children on dialysis were assessed to determine the incidence of cardiac changes in end stage renal failure. Nine children had an increased cardiothoracic ratio on radiography. The electrocardiogram was abnormal in every case but no child had left ventricular hypertrophy as assessed by voltage criteria. However, left ventricular hypertrophy, often gross, was found on echocardiography in 12 children and affected the interventricular septum disproportionately. Cardiac index was increased in 10 patients as a result of an increased left ventricular stroke volume rather than heart rate. Left ventricular hypertrophy was significantly greater in those on treatment for hypertension and in those with the highest cardiac index. Abnormal diastolic ventricular function was found in 6/11 children. Children with end stage renal failure have significant cardiac abnormalities that are likely to contribute to the high cardiovascular mortality in this group. Anaemia and hypertension, or its treatment, probably contribute to these changes. Voltage criteria on electrocardiogram are of no value in detecting left ventricular hypertrophy. Echocardiography must be performed, with the results corrected for age and surface area, in order to detect and follow these abnormalities. Images

Morris, K P; Skinner, J R; Wren, C; Hunter, S; Coulthard, M G

1993-01-01

15

Segmenting Rodent Cardiac Ultrasound Images Using Direct Posterior Models  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lack of an accurate generative model makes it hard to use classical MAP segmentation algorithms to jointly segment the epi- and the endocardium in ultrasound rodent cardiac images. This paper proposes an alternate methodology for such segmentation. The methodology directly models the posterior probability of segmentation using penalized logistic models. A level-set segmentation algorithm is developed using direct posterior models.

Yong Yue; Hemant D. Tagare

2009-01-01

16

Using Reduced Interference Distribution to Analyze Abnormal Cardiac Signal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Due to the non-stationary, multicomponent nature of biomedical signals, the use of time-frequency analysis can be inevitable for these signals. The choice and selection of the proper Time-Frequency Distribution (TFD) that can reveal the exact multicomponent structure of biological signals is vital in many applications, including the diagnosis of medical abnormalities. In this paper, the instantaneous frequency techniques using two distribution functions are applied for analysis of biological signals. These distributions are the Wigner-Ville Distribution and the Bessel Distribution. The simulation performed on normaland abnormal cardiac signals show that the Bessel Distribution can clearly detect the QRS complexes. However, Wigner-Ville Distribution was able to detect the QRS complexes in the normal signa, but fails to detect these complexes in the abnormal cardiac signal.

Mousa, Allam; Saleem, Rashid

2011-05-01

17

[Cold-induced cardiac abnormalities in systemic sclerosis].  

PubMed

Cardiac abnormalities are frequent in patients with systemic sclerosis (SS). These abnormalities have been demonstrated in over 80% of patients with SS and there are some clues that suggest that an intermittent vascular spasm (i.e. coronary Raynaud's phenomenon) is one of the causes of myocardial dysfunction in this group of patients. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the ventricular performance and regional wall motion during exposure to cold in patients with SS and Raynaud's phenomenon without overt cardiac disease. Twenty-four patients and 10 normal volunteers underwent radionuclide ventriculograms (RV). In each subject the RV was done thrice: basal, 20 minutes after chilling with thermic blanket and post reheating. The left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) decreased during the cold test (p = 0.03) with reversible abnormalities in wall motion. Basal Right Ventricular Ejection Fraction (RVEF) was lower than that of normal subjects (p = 0.02) and decreased during the cold test (p = 0.04). Therefore, we were able to demonstrate an early cardiac dysfunction associated with impaired wall motion after corporal chilling. These findings suggest that coronary spasm in SS would be an early and frequent phenomenon that would precede the development of symptomatic cardiac disease in some patients with this illness. PMID:8728866

Rey, R H; Marrero, G; Chwojnik, A; Martínez Martínez, J; Maldonado Cocco, J; Rodrigué, S; Casabé, H

1995-01-01

18

Cardiac ultrasonography in structural abnormalities and arrhythmias. Recognition and treatment.  

PubMed Central

Fetal cardiac ultrasonography has become an important tool in the evaluation of fetuses at risk for cardiac anomalies. It can both guide prenatal treatment and assist the management and timing of delivery. We recommend that a fetal echocardiogram be done when there is a family history of congenital heart disease; maternal disease that may affect the fetus; a history of maternal drug use, either therapeutic or illegal; evidence of other fetal abnormalities; or evidence of fetal hydrops. The optimal timing of evaluation is 18 to 22 weeks' gestation. An entire range of structural cardiac defects can be visualized prenatally, including atrioventricular septal defect, ventricular septal defect, cardiomyopathy, ventricular outlet obstruction, and complex cardiac defects. The outcome for a fetus with a recognized abnormality is unfavourable, with less than 50% surviving the neonatal period. Fetal cardiac arrhythmias are also a common occurrence, 15% in the series described here. Premature atrial or ventricular contractions are most commonly seen and usually require no treatment. Supraventricular tachycardia can result in hydrops and require in utero treatment to prevent fetal demise. Complete heart block, particularly in association with structural heart disease, has a poor prognosis for fetal survival. Images

Brook, M M; Silverman, N H; Villegas, M

1993-01-01

19

Liver abnormalities in cardiac diseases and heart failure.  

PubMed

Heart failure (HF) is characterized by the inability of systemic perfusion to meet the body's metabolic demands and is usually caused by cardiac pump dysfunction and may occasionally present with symptoms of a noncardiac disorder such as hepatic dysfunction. The primary pathophysiology involved in hepatic dysfunction from HF is either passive congestion from increased filling pressures or low cardiac output and the consequences of impaired perfusion. Passive hepatic congestion due to increased central venous pressure may cause elevations of liver enzymes and both direct and indirect serum bilirubin. Impaired perfusion from decreased cardiac output may be associated with acute hepatocellular necrosis with marked elevations in serum aminotransferases. Cardiogenic ischemic hepatitis ("shock liver") may ensue following an episode of profound hypotension in patients with acute HF. We discuss pathophysiology and identification of liver abnormalities that are commonly seen in patients with HF. PMID:22942628

Alvarez, Alicia M; Mukherjee, Debabrata

2011-09-01

20

ECG patch monitors for assessment of cardiac rhythm abnormalities.  

PubMed

The primary goal of long-term monitoring is the improvement of diagnostic yield. Despite the clear utility of Holter monitoring in clinical cardiology, issues of relatively low diagnostic yield, cost and inconvenience have motivated the development of ultra-portable devices referred to as ECG patch monitors. Although the "gold standard" for assessing cardiac rhythm abnormalities remains a 12-lead Holter, there is an increasing interest in portable monitoring devices that provide the opportunity for evaluating cardiac rhythm in real-world environments such as the workplace or home. To facilitate patient acceptance these monitors underwent a radical miniaturization and redesign to include wireless communication, water proofing and a patch carrier for attaching devices directly to the skin. We review recent developments in the field of "patch" devices primarily designed for very long-term monitoring of cardiac arrhythmic events. As the body of supporting clinical validation data grows, these devices hold promise for a variety of cardiac monitoring applications. From a clinical and research standpoint, the capacity to obtain longitudinal cardiac activity data by patch devices may have significant implications for device selection, monitoring duration, and care pathways for arrhythmia evaluation and atrial fibrillation surveillance. From a research standpoint, the new devices may allow for the development of novel diagnostic algorithms with the goal of finding patterns and correlations with exercise and drug regimens. PMID:24215754

Lobodzinski, S Suave

2013-01-01

21

Cardiac malformations and myocardial abnormalities in podoplanin knockout mouse embryos: Correlation with abnormal epicardial development.  

PubMed

Epicardium and epicardium-derived cells have been shown to be necessary for myocardial differentiation. To elucidate the function of podoplanin in epicardial development and myocardial differentiation, we analyzed podoplanin knockout mouse embryos between embryonic day (E) 9.5 and E15.5 using immunohistochemical differentiation markers, morphometry, and three-dimensional reconstructions. Podoplanin null mice have an increased embryonic lethality, possibly of cardiac origin. Our study reveals impairment in the development of the proepicardial organ, epicardial adhesion, and spreading and migration of the epicardium-derived cells. Mutant embryos show a hypoplastic and perforated compact and septal myocardium, hypoplastic atrioventricular cushions resulting in atrioventricular valve abnormalities, as well as coronary artery abnormalities. The epicardial pathology is correlated with reduced epithelial-mesenchymal transformation caused by up-regulation of E-cadherin, normally down-regulated by podoplanin. Our results demonstrate a role for podoplanin in normal cardiac development based on epicardial-myocardial interaction. Abnormal epicardial differentiation and reduced epithelial-mesenchymal transformation result in deficient epicardium-derived cells leading to myocardial pathology and cardiac anomalies. PMID:18265012

Mahtab, Edris A F; Wijffels, Maurits C E F; Van Den Akker, Nynke M S; Hahurij, Nathan D; Lie-Venema, Heleen; Wisse, Lambertus J; Deruiter, Marco C; Uhrin, Pavel; Zaujec, Jan; Binder, Bernd R; Schalij, Martin J; Poelmann, Robert E; Gittenberger-De Groot, Adriana C

2008-03-01

22

Ultrasound and Cadaveric Prosections as Methods for Teaching Cardiac Anatomy: A Comparative Study  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article describes a study investigating the efficacy of two cardiac teaching modalities (ultrasound imaging and cadaver prosections) on learning cardiac gross anatomy. The methods and outcomes are discussed. A pre-post test was used in this study.

Michael Griksaitis (Durham University Pediatric Cardiology); Marina Sawdon (Durham University); Gabrielle Finn (Durham University)

2011-11-08

23

Mapping cardiac fiber orientations from high-resolution DTI to high-frequency 3D ultrasound  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The orientation of cardiac fibers affects the anatomical, mechanical, and electrophysiological properties of the heart. Although echocardiography is the most common imaging modality in clinical cardiac examination, it can only provide the cardiac geometry or motion information without cardiac fiber orientations. If the patient's cardiac fiber orientations can be mapped to his/her echocardiography images in clinical examinations, it may provide quantitative measures for diagnosis, personalized modeling, and image-guided cardiac therapies. Therefore, this project addresses the feasibility of mapping personalized cardiac fiber orientations to three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound image volumes. First, the geometry of the heart extracted from the MRI is translated to 3D ultrasound by rigid and deformable registration. Deformation fields between both geometries from MRI and ultrasound are obtained after registration. Three different deformable registration methods were utilized for the MRI-ultrasound registration. Finally, the cardiac fiber orientations imaged by DTI are mapped to ultrasound volumes based on the extracted deformation fields. Moreover, this study also demonstrated the ability to simulate electricity activations during the cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) process. The proposed method has been validated in two rat hearts and three canine hearts. After MRI/ultrasound image registration, the Dice similarity scores were more than 90% and the corresponding target errors were less than 0.25 mm. This proposed approach can provide cardiac fiber orientations to ultrasound images and can have a variety of potential applications in cardiac imaging.

Qin, Xulei; Wang, Silun; Shen, Ming; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wagner, Mary B.; Fei, Baowei

2014-03-01

24

Time course of cranial ultrasound abnormalities after arterial switch operation in neonates  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. The object of this study was to investigate the time course and fate of abnormal findings in cranial ultrasound after performing an arterial switch operation in neonates with transposition of the great arteries, and to analyze the relationship to cerebral cell damage.Methods. Cranial ultrasound was performed prospectively in 35 neonates with transposition of the great arteries before the operation

Matthias Sigler; Jaime F Vazquez-Jimenez; Ralph G Grabitz; Hedwig H Hövels-Gürich; Bruno J Messmer; Götz von Bernuth; Marie-Christine Seghaye

2001-01-01

25

Associations between Kidney Function and Subclinical Cardiac Abnormalities in CKD  

PubMed Central

Heart failure is a common consequence of CKD, and it portends high risk for mortality. However, among patients without known heart failure, the associations of different stages of estimated GFR (eGFR) with changes in cardiac structure and function are not well described. Here, we performed a cross-sectional analysis to study these associations among 3487 participants of the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study. We estimated GFR using cystatin C. The prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) assessed by echocardiography was 32%, 48%, 57%, and 75% for eGFR categories ?60, 45–59, 30–44, and <30 ml/min per 1.73 m2, respectively. In fully adjusted multivariable analyses, subjects with eGFR levels of <30 ml/min per 1.73 m2 had twofold higher odds of LVH (OR=2.20, 95% CI=1.40–3.40; P<0.001) relative to subjects with eGFR?60 ml/min per 1.73 m2. This reduction in kidney function also significantly associated with abnormal LV geometry but not diastolic or systolic dysfunction. An eGFR of 30–44 ml/min per 1.73 m2 also significantly associated with LVH and abnormal LV geometry compared with eGFR?60 ml/min per 1.73 m2. In summary, in this large CKD cohort, reduced kidney function associated with abnormal cardiac structure. We did not detect significant associations between kidney function and systolic or diastolic function after adjusting for potential confounding variables.

Hsu, Chi-yuan; Li, Yongmei; Mishra, Rakesh K.; Keane, Martin; Rosas, Sylvia E.; Dries, Daniel; Xie, Dawei; Chen, Jing; He, Jiang; Anderson, Amanda; Go, Alan S.; Shlipak, Michael G.

2012-01-01

26

Application of ultrasound dilution technology for cardiac output measurement: Cerebral and systemic hemodynamic consequences in a juvenile animal model  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: Analysis of cerebral and systemic hemodynamic consequences of ultrasound dilution cardiac output measurements. DESIGN: : Prospective, experimental piglet study. SETTING: Animal laboratory. SUBJECTS: Nine piglets. INTERVENTIONS: Ultrasound dilution cardiac output measurements were performed in ventilated, anesthetized piglets. Interventions that are required for ultrasound dilution cardiac output measurement were evaluated for its effect on cerebral and systemic circulation and oxygenation.

W. P. de Boode; A. F. J. van Heijst; J. C. W. Hopman; R. B. Tanke; J. G. van der Hoeven; K. D. Liem

2010-01-01

27

Parents' experiences of an abnormal ultrasound examination - vacillating between emotional confusion and sense of reality  

PubMed Central

Background An ultrasound examination is an important confirmation of the pregnancy and is accepted without reflection to any prenatal diagnostic aspects. An abnormal finding often comes unexpectedly and is a shock for the parents. The aim was to generate a theoretical understanding of parents' experiences of the situation when their fetus is found to have an abnormality at a routine ultrasound examination. Methods Sixteen parents, mothers and fathers, whose fetus had been diagnosed with an abnormality during an ultrasound scan in the second or third trimester, were interviewed. The study employed a grounded theory approach. Results The core category vacillating between the emotional confusion and sense of reality is related to the main concern assessment of the diagnosis impact on the well-being of the fetus. Two other categories Entering uncertainty and Involved in an ongoing change and adaptation have each five sub-categories. Conclusions Parents are aware of that ultrasound examination is a tool for identifying abnormalities prenatally. The information about the abnormality initially results in broken expectations and anxiety. Parents become involved in ongoing change and adaptation. They need information about the ultrasound findings and the treatment without prolonged delay and in a suitable environment. The examiner who performs the ultrasound examination must be aware of how anxiety can be intensified by environmental factors. All parents should to be offered a professional person to give them support as a part of the routine management of this situation.

2010-01-01

28

Evaluation of routine prenatal ultrasound examination in detecting fetal chromosomal abnormalities in a low risk population  

Microsoft Academic Search

Prenatal diagnosis performed by fetal ultrasound scan is now a routine part of antenatal care in many countries. We have used our registry of congenital malformations to determine how many fetal anomalies and consequently how many chromosomal abnormalities are detected by this procedure. In our region, evaluation of prenatal diagnosis of chromosomal abnormalities in women of 38 years and younger

Claude Stoll; Béatrice Dott; Yves Alembik; Marie-Paule Roth

1993-01-01

29

Ultrasound imaging of fetal brain abnormalities: three essential anatomical levels.  

PubMed

Prenatal ultrasound evaluation of the fetal brain requires documentation of specific structures according to guidelines set by the American College of Radiology and the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine. Among these required structures are: cerebellum, cisterna magna, lateral cerebral ventricles, choroid plexus, midline falx, and cavum septum pellucidum. All these structures can be visualized in three crucial planes of imaging that include cisterna magna/cerebellum, cavum septum pellucidum, and ventricular atria. A systematic approach can be achieved by instituting a protocol that includes these three basic levels of imaging of the fetal head. These anatomical levels should be incorporated in daily routine for complete obstetric ultrasound evaluation. PMID:16344747

Angtuaco, Teresita L

2005-12-01

30

Electrocardiographic abnormalities in very young Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients precede the onset of cardiac dysfunction.  

PubMed

Overt cardiac involvement in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) typically occurs later in the disease. The primary aim was to estimate the proportion of young (<6 years of age) DMD patients with manifestations of cardiac disease by electrocardiography (ECG). Secondary aims were to assess associations between ECG abnormalities and evidence of cardiac disease by echocardiography, as well as to estimate the relationship between dystrophin mutation site and an abnormal ECG. Seventy eight steroid-naive DMD patients <6 years of age were identified. ECG abnormalities were identified in 78%, with LV pathology being the most commonly identified pattern. Only one echocardiogram was abnormal. There was no statistically significant relationship identified between ECG abnormalities and dystrophin genotype. ECG abnormalities are common in very young DMD patients, signaling cardiac involvement well before the onset of clinical symptoms. PMID:21571532

James, Jeanne; Kinnett, Kathleen; Wang, Yu; Ittenbach, Richard F; Benson, D Woodrow; Cripe, Linda

2011-07-01

31

Cardiac activation mapping using ultrasound current source density imaging (UCSDI).  

PubMed

We describe the first mapping of biological current in a live heart using ultrasound current source density imaging (UCSDI). Ablation procedures that treat severe heart arrhythmias require detailed maps of the cardiac activation wave. The conventional procedure is time-consuming and limited by its poor spatial resolution (5-10 mm). UCSDI can potentially improve on existing mapping procedures. It is based on a pressure-induced change in resistivity known as the acousto-electric (AE) effect, which is spatially confined to the ultrasound focus. Data from 2 experiments are presented. A 540 kHz ultrasonic transducer (f/# = 1, focal length = 90 mm, pulse repetition frequency = 1600 Hz) was scanned over an isolated rabbit heart perfused with an excitation-contraction decoupler to reduce motion significantly while retaining electric function. Tungsten electrodes inserted in the left ventricle recorded simultaneously the AE signal and the low-frequency electrocardiogram (ECG). UCSDI displayed spatial and temporal patterns consistent with the spreading activation wave. The propagation velocity estimated from UCSDI was 0.25 +/- 0.05 mm/ms, comparable to the values obtained with the ECG signals. The maximum AE signal-to-noise ratio after filtering was 18 dB, with an equivalent detection threshold of 0.1 mA/ cm(2). This study demonstrates that UCSDI is a potentially powerful technique for mapping current flow and biopotentials in the heart. PMID:19411215

Olafsson, Ragnar; Witte, Russell S; Jia, Congxian; Huang, Sheng-Wen; Kim, Kang; O'Donnell, Matthew

2009-03-01

32

Methods, apparatus and articles of manufacture to process cardiac images to detect heart motion abnormalities  

US Patent & Trademark Office Database

Example methods, apparatus and articles of manufacture to process cardiac images to detect heart motion abnormalities are disclosed. A disclosed example method includes adapting a state of a state-space model based on a plurality of cardiac images to characterize motion of a heart, computing an information-theoretic metric from the state of the state-space model, and comparing the information-theoretic metric to a threshold to determine whether the motion of the heart is abnormal.

2013-07-02

33

Abnormal Cardiac Autonomic Regulation in Mice Lacking ASIC3  

PubMed Central

Integration of sympathetic and parasympathetic outflow is essential in maintaining normal cardiac autonomic function. Recent studies demonstrate that acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3) is a sensitive acid sensor for cardiac ischemia and prolonged mild acidification can open ASIC3 and evoke a sustained inward current that fires action potentials in cardiac sensory neurons. However, the physiological role of ASIC3 in cardiac autonomic regulation is not known. In this study, we elucidate the role of ASIC3 in cardiac autonomic function using Asic3?/? mice. Asic3?/? mice showed normal baseline heart rate and lower blood pressure as compared with their wild-type littermates. Heart rate variability analyses revealed imbalanced autonomic regulation, with decreased sympathetic function. Furthermore, Asic3?/? mice demonstrated a blunted response to isoproterenol-induced cardiac tachycardia and prolonged duration to recover to baseline heart rate. Moreover, quantitative RT-PCR analysis of gene expression in sensory ganglia and heart revealed that no gene compensation for muscarinic acetylcholines receptors and beta-adrenalin receptors were found in Asic3?/? mice. In summary, we unraveled an important role of ASIC3 in regulating cardiac autonomic function, whereby loss of ASIC3 alters the normal physiological response to ischemic stimuli, which reveals new implications for therapy in autonomic nervous system-related cardiovascular diseases.

Cheng, Ching-Feng; Kuo, Terry B. J.; Chen, Wei-Nan

2014-01-01

34

Abnormal Cardiac Autonomic Regulation in Mice Lacking ASIC3.  

PubMed

Integration of sympathetic and parasympathetic outflow is essential in maintaining normal cardiac autonomic function. Recent studies demonstrate that acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3) is a sensitive acid sensor for cardiac ischemia and prolonged mild acidification can open ASIC3 and evoke a sustained inward current that fires action potentials in cardiac sensory neurons. However, the physiological role of ASIC3 in cardiac autonomic regulation is not known. In this study, we elucidate the role of ASIC3 in cardiac autonomic function using Asic3 (-/-) mice. Asic3 (-/-) mice showed normal baseline heart rate and lower blood pressure as compared with their wild-type littermates. Heart rate variability analyses revealed imbalanced autonomic regulation, with decreased sympathetic function. Furthermore, Asic3 (-/-) mice demonstrated a blunted response to isoproterenol-induced cardiac tachycardia and prolonged duration to recover to baseline heart rate. Moreover, quantitative RT-PCR analysis of gene expression in sensory ganglia and heart revealed that no gene compensation for muscarinic acetylcholines receptors and beta-adrenalin receptors were found in Asic3 (-/-) mice. In summary, we unraveled an important role of ASIC3 in regulating cardiac autonomic function, whereby loss of ASIC3 alters the normal physiological response to ischemic stimuli, which reveals new implications for therapy in autonomic nervous system-related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24804235

Cheng, Ching-Feng; Kuo, Terry B J; Chen, Wei-Nan; Lin, Chao-Chieh; Chen, Chih-Cheng

2014-01-01

35

Cardiac abnormalities in Anderson-Fabry disease and Fabry's cardiomyopathy.  

PubMed

Fabry's disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disease most often associated with renal dysfunction and death due to renal failure in patients' fourth and fifth decades of life. However, cardiac manifestations including arrhythmias, angina and heart failure are common and probably underrecognized. Furthermore, Fabry's disease is now recognised as also affecting female carriers, who manifest signs later than males. A variant of Fabry's has been identified that only affects cardiac tissue, which presents as an unexplained hypertrophy of the left ventricle in middle-aged patients, possibly with women more affected than men. Given that epidemiological studies report a prevalence of Fabry's cardiomyopathy among middle-aged patients with cardiac hypertrophy to be anywhere from one to 12%, it is reasonable to screen these patients for alpha-galactosidase A deficiency. Although mortality data is lacking from randomised, controlled trials of galactosidase replacement therapy, there are some reports of improvement in cardiac endpoints. Therefore patients with known Fabry's disease should be screened early for cardiac involvement, as treatment benefit may not be seen once cardiac fibrosis has developed. PMID:21298206

Morrissey, R P; Philip, K J; Schwarz, E R

2011-01-01

36

Cardiac Motion Analysis from Ultrasound Sequences Using Non-rigid Registration  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article we propose a cardiac motion estimation tech- nique that uses non-rigid registration to compute the dense cardiac dis- placement field from 2D ultrasound sequences. Our method employs a semi-local deformation model which provides controlled smoothness. We apply a multiresolution optimization strategy for better speed and robustness. To further improve the accuracy, the sequence is registered in both

María J. Ledesma-carbayo; Jan Kybic; Manuel Desco; Andrés Santos; Michael Unser

2001-01-01

37

The association between anger-related personality trait and cardiac autonomic response abnormalities in elderly subjects  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cardiac autonomic response abnormality associated with trait anger has been recognized to elevate blood pressure in daily\\u000a life, leading to atherosclerotic progression and cardiovascular disease. To clarify the relationship between anger-related\\u000a personality traits and cardiac autonomic response in healthy elderly subjects, 54 volunteers consisting of 30 male (mean age\\u000a 62.2 ± 5.4) and 24 female (mean age 58.4 ± 4.6) subjects underwent testing of

Kosuke Narita; Tetsuhito Murata; Tetsuya Takahashi; Toshihiko Hamada; Hirotaka Kosaka; Haruyoshi Yoshida; Yuji Wada

2007-01-01

38

Mechanisms of Human Arrhythmia Syndromes: Abnormal Cardiac Macromolecular Interactions  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Many cardiac ion channels exist within macromolecular signaling complexes, comprised of pore-forming subunits that associate with auxiliary subunits, regulatory enzymes, and targeting proteins. This complex protein assembly ensures proper modulation of channel activity and ion homeostasis. The association of genetic defects in regulatory and targeting proteins to inherited arrhythmia syndromes has led to a better understanding of the critical role these proteins play in ion channel modulation.

2007-10-01

39

Cardiac abnormalities in young women with anorexia nervosa  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE--To identify the characteristics of cardiac involvement in the self-induced starvation phase of anorexia nervosa. METHODS--Doppler echocardiographic indices of left ventricular geometry, function, and filling were examined in 21 white women (mean (SD) 22 (5) years) with anorexia nervosa according to the DSMIII (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) criteria, 19 women (23 (2) years) of normal weight, and

G. de Simone; L. Scalfi; M. Galderisi; A. Celentano; G. Di Biase; P. Tammaro; M. Garofalo; G. F. Mureddu; O. de Divitiis; F. Contaldo

1994-01-01

40

Evaluation of a Cardiac Ultrasound Segmentation Algorithm Using a Phantom  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a This paper evaluates the performance of a level set algorithm for segmenting the endocardium in short-axis ultrasound images.\\u000a The evaluation is carried out using an anthropomorphic ultrasound phantom. Details of the phantom design, including comparison\\u000a of the ultrasound parameters with in-vitro measurements, are included.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a In addition to measuring segmentation accuracy, the effectiveness of the energy minimization scheme is also determined.

Yong Yue; Hemant D. Tagare; Ernest L. Madsen; Gary R. Frank; Maritza A. Hobson

2008-01-01

41

Abnormal Heart Rate Turbulence Predicts Cardiac Mortality in Low, Intermediate and High Risk Older Adults  

PubMed Central

Introduction We examined whether heart rate turbulence (HRT) adds to traditional risk factors for cardiac mortality in older adults at low, intermediate and high risk. Methods and Results N=1298, age ?65 years, with 24-hour Holter recordings were studied. HRT, which quantifies heart rate response to ventricular premature contractions, was categorized as: both turbulence onset (TO) and turbulence slope (TS) normal; TO abnormal; TS abnormal; or both abnormal. Independent risks for cardiac mortality associated with HRT or, for comparison, elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) (>3.0 mg/L), were calculated using Cox regression analysis adjusted for traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors and stratified by the presence of no, isolated subclinical (i.e., intermediate risk) or clinical CVD. Having both TS and TO abnormal compared to both normal was associated with cardiac mortality in the low risk group [HR 7.9, 95% CI 2.8–22.5, (p<0.001)]. In the high and intermediate risk groups, abnormal TS and TO ([HR 2.2, 95% CI 1.5–4.0, p=0.016] and [HR 2.7, 95% CI 1.2–5.9, p=0.012]), respectively, were also significantly associated with cardiac mortality. In contrast, elevated CRP was associated with increased cardiac mortality risk only in low risk individuals [HR 2.5, 95% CI 1.3–5.1, p=0.009]. In the low risk group, the c-statistic was 0.706 for the base model, 0.725 for the base model with CRP, and 0.767 for the base model with HRT. Conclusions Abnormal HRT independently adds to risk stratification of low, intermediate and high risk individuals but appears to add especially to the stratification of those considered at low risk.

Stein, Phyllis K.; Barzilay, Joshua I.

2011-01-01

42

Early abnormalities of cardiac function in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of diabetes and minor abnormalities of glucose homeostasis, such as impaired glucose tolerance, as determinants of cardiac function and structure in a working population. We studied a population-based sample of 64 telephone company employees (both sexes, mean age 58 years): 25 with normoglycemia, 15 with impaired glucose tolerance, and 24

Aldo Celentano; Olga Vaccaro; Paolo Tammaro; Maurizio Galderisi; Marina Crivaro; Michele Oliviero; Giuseppina Imperatore; Vittorio Palmieri; Vincenzo Iovino; Gabriele Riccardi; Oreste de Divitiis

1995-01-01

43

Crack Cocaine-Induced Cardiac Conduction Abnormalities Are Reversed by Sodium Bicarbonate Infusion  

PubMed Central

We report a dramatic case of a 19-year-old man with crack cocaine overdose with important clinical complications as cardiac arrest due to ventricular fibrillation and epileptics status. During this intoxication, electrocardiographic abnormalities similar to those found in tricyclic antidepressant poisoning were observed, and they were reversed by intravenous sodium bicarbonate infusion.

Miranda, Carlos Henrique; Pazin-Filho, Antonio

2013-01-01

44

Crack cocaine-induced cardiac conduction abnormalities are reversed by sodium bicarbonate infusion.  

PubMed

We report a dramatic case of a 19-year-old man with crack cocaine overdose with important clinical complications as cardiac arrest due to ventricular fibrillation and epileptics status. During this intoxication, electrocardiographic abnormalities similar to those found in tricyclic antidepressant poisoning were observed, and they were reversed by intravenous sodium bicarbonate infusion. PMID:23762070

Miranda, Carlos Henrique; Pazin-Filho, Antônio

2013-01-01

45

The role of surgeon-performed ultrasound in patients with possible cardiac wounds.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: The authors evaluate surgeon-performed ultrasound in determining the need for operation in patients with possible cardiac wounds. BACKGROUND DATA: Ultrasound quickly is becoming part of the surgeon's diagnostic armamentarium; however, its role for the patient with penetrating injury is less well-defined. Although accurate for the detection of hemopericardium, the lack of immediate availability of the cardiologist to perform the test may delay the diagnosis, adversely affecting patient outcome. To be an effective diagnostic test in trauma centers, ultrasound must be immediately available in the resuscitation area and performed and interpreted by surgeons. METHODS: Surgeons performed pericardial ultrasound examinations on patients with penetrating truncal wounds but no immediate indication for operation. The subcostal view detected hemopericardium, and patients with positive examinations underwent immediate operation by the same surgeon. Vital signs, base deficit, time from examination to operation, operative findings, treatment, and outcome were recorded. RESULTS: During 13 months, 247 patients had surgeon-performed ultrasound. There were 236 true-negative and 10 true-positive results, and no false-negative or false-positive results; however, the pericardial region could not be visualized in one patient. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 100%; mean examination time was 0.8 minute (246 patients). Of the ten true-positive examinations, three were hypotensive. The mean time (8 patients) from ultrasound to operation was 12.1 minutes; all survived. Operative findings (site of cardiac wounds) were: left ventricle (4), right ventricle (3), right atrium (2), right atrium/superior vena cava (1), and right atrium/inferior vena cava (1). CONCLUSIONS: Surgeon-performed ultrasound is a rapid and accurate technique for diagnosing hemopericardium. Delay times from admission to operating room are minimized when the surgeon performs the ultrasound examination. Images Figure 2. Figure 3.

Rozycki, G S; Feliciano, D V; Schmidt, J A; Cushman, J G; Sisley, A C; Ingram, W; Ansley, J D

1996-01-01

46

Hybrid ultrasound MRI for improved cardiac imaging and real-time respiration control.  

PubMed

A hybridized dual-imaging system combining real-time ultrasound imaging and MRI was utilized for cardiac imaging at 1.5 T and 3 T. The ultrasound scanner with a programmable software interface was connected via computer to the MRI scanner. Electronic noise was eliminated with electromagnetic shielding and grounding to the screen room. At 3 T, real-time prospective motion compensation in dynamic cine cardiac imaging was implemented using B-mode ultrasound imaging. The ultrasound technique avoided drawbacks such as signal saturation or steady-state interruption of the MR navigator gating. At 1.5 T, a low-latency real-time feedback to balanced steady state free precision MR imaging was performed in three normal volunteers. Results showed active tracking of the heart during respiratory motion and improvement in time-averaged cardiovascular images. Future studies can fully exploit the potential of the high-frequency position information provided by the ultrasound system for more advanced applications in real-time organ tracking. PMID:20025068

Feinberg, David A; Giese, Daniel; Bongers, D Andre; Ramanna, Sudhir; Zaitsev, Maxim; Markl, Michael; Günther, Matthias

2010-02-01

47

Cardiac motion analysis from ultrasound sequences using nonrigid registration: Validation against Doppler tissue velocity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Early detection of cardiac motion abnormalities is one of the main goals of quantitative cardiac image processing. This article presents a new method to compute the 2-D myocardial motion parameters from gray-scale 2-D echocardiographic sequences, making special emphasis on the validation of the proposed technique in comparison with Doppler tissue imaging. Myocardial motion is computed using a frame-to-frame nonrigid registration

M. J. Ledesma-Carbayo; P. Mahía-Casado; A. Santos; E. Pérez-David; M. A. García-Fernández; M. Desco

2006-01-01

48

Ultrasound Bio-Microscopic Image Segmentation for Evaluation of Zebrafish Cardiac Function  

PubMed Central

Zebrafish can fully regenerate their myocardium after ventricular resection without evidence of scars. This extraordinary regenerative ability provides an excellent model system to study the activation of the regenerative potential for human heart tissue. In addition to the morphology, it is vital to understand the cardiac function of zebrafish. To characterize adult zebrafish cardiac function, an ultrasound biomicroscope (UBM) was customized for real-time imaging of the zebrafish heart (about 1 mm in diameter) at a resolution of around 37 µm. Moreover, we developed an image segmentation algorithm to track the cardiac boundary and measure the dynamic size of the zebrafish heart for further quantification of zebrafish cardiac function. The effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed segmentation algorithm were verified on a tissue-mimicking phantom and in vivo zebrafish echocardiography. The quantitative evaluation demonstrated that the accuracy of the proposed algorithm is comparable to the manual delineation by experts.

Zhou, Xiaowei; Sun, Lei; Yu, Yanyan; Qiu, Weibao; Lien, Ching-Ling; Shung, K. Kirk; Yu, Weichuan

2013-01-01

49

Embryonic lethality and abnormal cardiac myocytes in mice lacking ryanodine receptor type 2.  

PubMed Central

The ryanodine receptor type 2 (RyR-2) functions as a Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release (CICR) channel on intracellular Ca2+ stores and is distributed in most excitable cells with the exception of skeletal muscle cells. RyR-2 is abundantly expressed in cardiac muscle cells and is thought to mediate Ca2+ release triggered by Ca2+ influx through the voltage-gated Ca2+ channel to constitute the cardiac type of excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling. Here we report on mutant mice lacking RyR-2. The mutant mice died at approximately embryonic day (E) 10 with morphological abnormalities in the heart tube. Prior to embryonic death, large vacuolate sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and structurally abnormal mitochondria began to develop in the mutant cardiac myocytes, and the vacuolate SR appeared to contain high concentrations of Ca2+. Fluorometric Ca2+ measurements showed that a Ca2+ transient evoked by caffeine, an activator of RyRs, was abolished in the mutant cardiac myocytes. However, both mutant and control hearts showed spontaneous rhythmic contractions at E9.5. Moreover, treatment with ryanodine, which locks RyR channels in their open state, did not exert a major effect on spontaneous Ca2+ transients in control cardiac myocytes at E9.5-11.5. These results suggest no essential contribution of the RyR-2 to E-C coupling in cardiac myocytes during early embryonic stages. Our results from the mutant mice indicate that the major role of RyR-2 is not in E-C coupling as the CICR channel in embryonic cardiac myocytes but it is absolutely required for cellular Ca2+ homeostasis most probably as a major Ca2+ leak channel to maintain the developing SR.

Takeshima, H; Komazaki, S; Hirose, K; Nishi, M; Noda, T; Iino, M

1998-01-01

50

Quantitative Ultrasound of the Calcaneus in Long-Term Liver or Cardiac Transplantation Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bone loss is one of the most common complications after solid-organ transplantation, but it is frequently under-diagnosed. Our purpose was to evaluate quantitative ultrasound of calcaneus (QUS) in comparison with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) to identify transplant recipients with osteoporosis. We have cross-sectionally evaluated 140 transplant recipients (85 liver and 55 cardiac transplantations; mean age: 53.6 years, time since transplantation:

Guillermo Martínez Díaz-Guerra; Lourdes Gil-Fraguas; Esteban Jódar; Juan Carlos Meneu; Elena García; Miguel Angel Gómez; Enrique Moreno; Federico Hawkins

2006-01-01

51

Therapeutic Ultrasound to Non-Invasively Create Intra-Cardiac Communications in an Intact Animal Model  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine if pulsed cavitational ultrasound therapy (histotripsy) can accurately and safely generate ventricular septal defects (VSDs) through the intact chest of a neonatal animal, with the eventual goal of developing a non-invasive technique of creating intra-cardiac communications in patients with congenital heart disease. Background Histotripsy is an innovative ultrasonic technique that generates demarcated, mechanical tissue fractionation utilizing high intensity ultrasound pulses. Previous work has shown that histotripsy can create atrial septal defects in a beating heart in an open-chest canine model. Methods Nine neonatal pigs were treated with transcutaneous histotripsy targeting the ventricular septum. Ultrasound pulses of 5?s duration at a peak negative pressure of 13 MPa and a pulse repetition frequency of 1 kHz were generated by a 1 MHz focused transducer. The procedure was guided by real-time ultrasound imaging. Results VSDs were created in all pigs with diameters ranging from 2–6.5mm. Six pigs were euthanized within 2 hrs of treatment, while 3 were recovered and maintained for 2–3 days to evaluate lesion maturation and clinical side effects. There were only transient clinical effects and pathology revealed mild collateral damage around the VSD with no significant damage to other cardiac or extra-cardiac structures. Conclusions Histotripsy can accurately and safely generate VSDs through the intact chest in a neonatal animal model. These results suggest that with further advances, histotripsy can be a useful, non-invasive technique to create intra-cardiac communications, which currently require invasive catheter-based or surgical procedures, to clinically stabilize newborn infants with complex congenital heart disease.

Owens, Gabe E.; Miller, Ryan M.; Ensing, Greg; Ives, Kimberly; Gordon, David; Ludomirsky, Achi; Xu, Zhen

2010-01-01

52

Spatiotemporal non-rigid image registration for 3D ultrasound cardiac motion estimation  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a new method to evaluate 4D (3D + time) cardiac ultrasound data sets by nonrigid spatio-temporal image registration. First, a frame-to-frame registration is performed that yields a dense deformation field. The deformation field is used to calculate local spatiotemporal properties of the myocardium, such as the velocity, strain and strain rate. The field is also used to propagate

D. Loeckx; J. Ector; F. Maes; J. D'hooge; D. Vandermeulen; J.-U. Voigt; H. Heidbüchel; P. Suetens

2007-01-01

53

Online measurement of cardiac indices from frequency transformed TAV Doppler ultrasound signals  

Microsoft Academic Search

A system is described for the analysis of blood flow signals in the aortic artery which enables indices of stroke volume and\\u000a cardiac output to be derived. A commercial Doppler ultrasound monitor is used, the demodulated return signals are digitised,\\u000a and frequency analysis is performed in real time using an FFT signal processing circuit. A Z-80 microprocessor controls the\\u000a synchronisation

M. Lydon; C. I. Franks; I. L. Freeston

1986-01-01

54

Analysis of 2-d ultrasound cardiac strain imaging using joint probability density functions.  

PubMed

Ultrasound frame rates play a key role for accurate cardiac deformation tracking. Insufficient frame rates lead to an increase in signal de-correlation artifacts resulting in erroneous displacement and strain estimation. Joint probability density distributions generated from estimated axial strain and its associated signal-to-noise ratio provide a useful approach to assess the minimum frame rate requirements. Previous reports have demonstrated that bi-modal distributions in the joint probability density indicate inaccurate strain estimation over a cardiac cycle. In this study, we utilize similar analysis to evaluate a 2-D multi-level displacement tracking and strain estimation algorithm for cardiac strain imaging. The effect of different frame rates, final kernel dimensions and a comparison of radio frequency and envelope based processing are evaluated using echo signals derived from a 3-D finite element cardiac model and five healthy volunteers. Cardiac simulation model analysis demonstrates that the minimum frame rates required to obtain accurate joint probability distributions for the signal-to-noise ratio and strain, for a final kernel dimension of 1 ? by 3 A-lines, was around 42 Hz for radio frequency signals. On the other hand, even a frame rate of 250 Hz with envelope signals did not replicate the ideal joint probability distribution. For the volunteer study, clinical data was acquired only at a 34 Hz frame rate, which appears to be sufficient for radio frequency analysis. We also show that an increase in the final kernel dimensions significantly affect the strain probability distribution and joint probability density function generated, with a smaller effect on the variation in the accumulated mean strain estimated over a cardiac cycle. Our results demonstrate that radio frequency frame rates currently achievable on clinical cardiac ultrasound systems are sufficient for accurate analysis of the strain probability distribution, when a multi-level 2-D algorithm and kernel dimensions on the order of 1 ? by 3 A-lines or smaller are utilized. PMID:24613642

Ma, Chi; Varghese, Tomy

2014-06-01

55

Quantitative study of cardiac motion estimation and abnormality classification in emission computed tomography.  

PubMed

Quantitative description of cardiac motion is desirable to assist in detecting myocardial abnormalities from gated myocardial perfusion (GMP) emission computed tomography (ECT) images. While "optical flow" type of cardiac motion estimation (ME) techniques have been developed in the past, there has been no quantitative evaluation of their performance. Moreover, no investigation has been performed in terms of applying an ME technique to quantify cardiac motion abnormalities. Using the four-dimensional NCAT beating heart phantom with known built-in motion, the current work aimed at addressing the aforementioned two issues. A three-dimensional cardiac ME technique was developed to search for a motion vector field (MVF) that establishes voxel-by-voxel correspondence between two GMP ECT images. The weighted myocardial strain energy served as the constraint in the process to minimize the difference between one intensity image and the MVF warped other. We studied the convergence of the ME technique using different initial estimates and cost functions. The dependence of estimated MVF on the initialization was attributed to the tangential motion that is undetectable while not suppressed by the strain energy constraint. We optimized the strain energy constraint weighting using noise-free phantom images and noisy reconstructed images, the former against the known MVF and the later in the task of regional motion classification. While the results from the above two studies well coincide with each other, we also demonstrated that upon appropriate optimization the ME method has the capability of serving as a computer motion observer in separating simulated noisy reconstructed GMP SPECT images corresponding to hearts with and without regional motion abnormalities. PMID:21269868

Tang, Jing; Segars, W Paul; Lee, Taek-Soo; He, Xin; Rahmim, Arman; Tsui, Benjamin M W

2011-06-01

56

Exome sequencing improves genetic diagnosis of structural fetal abnormalities revealed by ultrasound.  

PubMed

The genetic etiology of non-aneuploid fetal structural abnormalities is typically investigated by karyotyping and array-based detection of microscopically detectable rearrangements, and submicroscopic copy-number variants (CNVs), which collectively yield a pathogenic finding in up to 10% of cases. We propose that exome sequencing may substantially increase the identification of underlying etiologies. We performed exome sequencing on a cohort of 30 non-aneuploid fetuses and neonates (along with their parents) with diverse structural abnormalities first identified by prenatal ultrasound. We identified candidate pathogenic variants with a range of inheritance models, and evaluated these in the context of detailed phenotypic information. We identified 35 de novo single-nucleotide variants (SNVs), small indels, deletions or duplications, of which three (accounting for 10% of the cohort) are highly likely to be causative. These are de novo missense variants in FGFR3 and COL2A1, and a de novo 16.8 kb deletion that includes most of OFD1. In five further cases (17%) we identified de novo or inherited recessive or X-linked variants in plausible candidate genes, which require additional validation to determine pathogenicity. Our diagnostic yield of 10% is comparable to, and supplementary to, the diagnostic yield of existing microarray testing for large chromosomal rearrangements and targeted CNV detection. The de novo nature of these events could enable couples to be counseled as to their low recurrence risk. This study outlines the way for a substantial improvement in the diagnostic yield of prenatal genetic abnormalities through the application of next-generation sequencing. PMID:24476948

Carss, Keren J; Hillman, Sarah C; Parthiban, Vijaya; McMullan, Dominic J; Maher, Eamonn R; Kilby, Mark D; Hurles, Matthew E

2014-06-15

57

Exome sequencing improves genetic diagnosis of structural fetal abnormalities revealed by ultrasound  

PubMed Central

The genetic etiology of non-aneuploid fetal structural abnormalities is typically investigated by karyotyping and array-based detection of microscopically detectable rearrangements, and submicroscopic copy-number variants (CNVs), which collectively yield a pathogenic finding in up to 10% of cases. We propose that exome sequencing may substantially increase the identification of underlying etiologies. We performed exome sequencing on a cohort of 30 non-aneuploid fetuses and neonates (along with their parents) with diverse structural abnormalities first identified by prenatal ultrasound. We identified candidate pathogenic variants with a range of inheritance models, and evaluated these in the context of detailed phenotypic information. We identified 35 de novo single-nucleotide variants (SNVs), small indels, deletions or duplications, of which three (accounting for 10% of the cohort) are highly likely to be causative. These are de novo missense variants in FGFR3 and COL2A1, and a de novo 16.8 kb deletion that includes most of OFD1. In five further cases (17%) we identified de novo or inherited recessive or X-linked variants in plausible candidate genes, which require additional validation to determine pathogenicity. Our diagnostic yield of 10% is comparable to, and supplementary to, the diagnostic yield of existing microarray testing for large chromosomal rearrangements and targeted CNV detection. The de novo nature of these events could enable couples to be counseled as to their low recurrence risk. This study outlines the way for a substantial improvement in the diagnostic yield of prenatal genetic abnormalities through the application of next-generation sequencing.

Carss, Keren J.; Hillman, Sarah C.; Parthiban, Vijaya; McMullan, Dominic J.; Maher, Eamonn R.; Kilby, Mark D.; Hurles, Matthew E.

2014-01-01

58

Association between elevated plasma norepinephrine levels and cardiac wall motion abnormality in poor-grade subarachnoid hemorrhage patients.  

PubMed

Patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) are frequently complicated by acute cardiac dysfunctions, including cardiac wall motion abnormality (WMA). Massive release of catecholamine into the systemic circulation after aneurysmal rupture is believed to result in WMA, and poor-grade SAH seems to be the most important risk factor. However, plasma catecholamine levels have rarely been measured in SAH patients with WMA, and previous studies indicated that the elevated levels might not necessarily predict WMA. The objective of this study is (1) to evaluate relationship between WMA and plasma catecholamine levels in poor-grade SAH patients in the acute phase and (2) to clarify clinical characteristics of SAH patients with WMA. Among 142 poor-grade (World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies grades IV and V) SAH patients, 48 underwent both transthoracic ultrasound and measurement of plasma catecholamine levels within 24 h of SAH onset. They were divided into WMA+ (n?=?23) and WMA- (n?=?25) groups, and intergroup comparison was made on demographics, plasma catecholamine levels, and outcomes. Plasma norepinephrine levels were significantly higher in WMA+ group than in WMA- group (2,098.4?±?1,773.4 vs. 962.9?±?838.9 pg/mL, p?=?0.02), and the former showed significantly worse outcomes 90 days after admission. There were no intergroup differences in the plasma levels of epinephrine. Plasma norepinephrine levels were inversely correlated with left ventricular ejection fraction. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that increased plasma norepinephrine levels were predictive of WMA, although age, female sex, and grade V SAH were not. This retrospective study highlights the role of norepinephrine in pathogenesis of SAH-induced WMA. PMID:22936520

Sugimoto, Keiko; Inamasu, Joji; Kato, Yoko; Yamada, Yasuhiro; Ganaha, Tsukasa; Oheda, Motoki; Hattori, Natsuki; Watanabe, Eiichi; Ozaki, Yukio; Hirose, Yuichi

2013-04-01

59

Elevated delta OD 450 due to transient abnormal myelopoiesis in a Down syndrome fetus with hepatosplenomegaly on ultrasound.  

PubMed

Transient abnormal myelopoiesis (TAM) is a relatively common finding in children with Down syndrome but has also been diagnosed prenatally, most often presenting with fetal hepatosplenomegaly. We report a case of TAM with hepatosplenomegaly found on ultrasound and associated with an increased amniotic fluid ? OD 450 value. TAM is most commonly transient but can be associated with fatality and therefore should be considered in the differential diagnosis when fetal hepatosplenomegaly is found on ultrasound. Amniocentesis with chromosomal analysis and a ? OD 450 may aid in diagnosing TAM and predicting the severity of the liver involvement. PMID:24353262

Mancuso, Abigail; Rijhsinghani, Asha

2014-03-01

60

An Experimental Model Using Cultured Cardiac Myocytes for a Study of the Generation of Premature Ventricular Contractions Under Ultrasound Exposure  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is known that use of a contrast agents in echocardiography increases the probability of generation of premature ventricular contractions (PVCs). As a basic study to elucidate the mechanisms and to reduce adverse effects, the generation of PVCs was investigated using cultured cardiac myocytes instead of the intact heart in vivo. Cardiac myocytes were isolated from neonatal rats and cultured on a cover slip. The myocyte sample was exposed to pulsed ultrasound with microbubbles adjacent to the myocytes, and generation of PVCs was examined with ultrasound exposure at various delay times after onset of myocyte contraction. The experimental results showed that generation of PVCs had a stable threshold delay time and that PVCs were generated only when myocytes were exposed to ultrasound with delay times longer than the threshold. The results indicate that the model used in this study is useful for revealing the mechanisms by which PVCs are induced by ultrasound exposure.

Kudo, Nobuki; Yamamoto, Masaya

2011-09-01

61

Obstetrical Ultrasound  

MedlinePLUS

... harmful effects on humans. top of page • Limitations Obstetric ultrasound cannot identify all fetal abnormalities. Consequently, when ... a Doppler ultrasound procedure on a ... Pelvic and Obstetric Ultrasound Explained placeholder Locate an ACR-accredited provider: ...

62

Ultrasound  

MedlinePLUS

Ultrasound is a type of imaging. It uses high-frequency sound waves to look at organs and ... liver, and other organs. During pregnancy, doctors use ultrasound to view the fetus. Unlike x-rays, ultrasound ...

63

Estimation of 3D cardiac deformation using spatio-temporal elastic registration of non-scanconverted ultrasound data  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current ultrasound methods for measuring myocardial strain are often limited to measurements in one or two dimensions. Spatio-temporal elastic registration of 3D cardiac ultrasound data can however be used to estimate the 3D motion and full 3D strain tensor. In this work, the spatio-temporal elastic registration method was validated for both non-scanconverted and scanconverted images. This was done using simulated

An Elen; Dirk Loeckx; Hon Fai Choi; Hang Gao; Piet Claus; Frederik Maes; Paul Suetens; Jan D'hooge

2008-01-01

64

Do thallium myocardial perfusion scan abnormalities predict survival in sarcoid patients without cardiac symptoms  

SciTech Connect

Whereas the total mortality rate for sarcoidosis is 0.2 per 100,000, the prognosis, when the heart is involved, is very much worse. The authors used the difference in mortality rate to infer whether thallium 201 myocardial perfusion scan abnormalities correspond to myocardial sarcoid by making the simplifying assumption that if they do, then patients with abnormal scans will be found to have a death rate similar to patients with sarcoid heart disease. The authors therefore analyzed complete survival data on 52 sarcoid patients without cardiac symptoms an average of eighty-nine months after they had been scanned as part of a protocol. By use of survival analysis (the Cox proportional hazards model), the only variable that was significantly associated with survival was age. The patients' scan pattern, treatment status, gender, and race were not significantly related to survival. The authors conclude that thallium myocardial perfusion scans cannot reliably be used to diagnose sarcoid heart disease in sarcoid patients without cardiac symptoms.

Kinney, E.L.; Caldwell, J.W. (Reed Institute, Miami, FL (USA))

1990-07-01

65

Automated estimation of fetal cardiac timing events from Doppler ultrasound signal using hybrid models.  

PubMed

In this paper, a new noninvasive method is proposed for automated estimation of fetal cardiac intervals from Doppler Ultrasound (DUS) signal. This method is based on a novel combination of empirical mode decomposition (EMD) and hybrid support vector machines-hidden Markov models (SVM/HMM). EMD was used for feature extraction by decomposing the DUS signal into different components (IMFs), one of which is linked to the cardiac valve motions, i.e. opening (o) and closing (c) of the Aortic (A) and Mitral (M) valves. The noninvasive fetal electrocardiogram (fECG) was used as a reference for the segmentation of the IMF into cardiac cycles. The hybrid SVM/HMM was then applied to identify the cardiac events, based on the amplitude and timing of the IMF peaks as well as the sequence of the events. The estimated timings were verified using pulsed doppler images. Results show that this automated method can continuously evaluate beat-to-beat valve motion timings and identify more than 91% of total events which is higher than previous methods. Moreover, the changes of the cardiac intervals were analyzed for three fetal age groups: 16-29, 30-35, and 36-41 weeks. The time intervals from Q-wave of fECG to Ac (Systolic Time Interval, STI), Ac to Mo (Isovolumic Relaxation Time, IRT), Q-wave to Ao (Preejection Period, PEP) and Ao to Ac (Ventricular Ejection Time, VET) were found to change significantly ( ) across these age groups. In particular, STI, IRT, and PEP of the fetuses with 36-41 week were significantly ( ) different from other age groups. These findings can be used as sensitive markers for evaluating the fetal cardiac performance. PMID:24144677

Marzbanrad, Faezeh; Kimura, Yoshitaka; Funamoto, Kiyoe; Sugibayashi, Rika; Endo, Miyuki; Ito, Takuya; Palaniswami, Marimuthu; Khandoker, Ahsan H

2014-07-01

66

Hybrid Ultrasound-MRI for Improved Cardiac Imaging and Real Time Respiration Control  

PubMed Central

A hybridized dual imaging system combining real-time ultrasound imaging and MRI was utilized for cardiac imaging at 1.5T and 3T. The ultrasound (US) scanner with a programmable software interface was connected via computer to the MRI scanner. Electronic noise was eliminated with electromagnetic shielding and grounding to the screen room. At 3T real-time prospective motion compensation in dynamic CINE cardiac imaging was implemented using B-mode US imaging. The US technique avoided drawbacks such as signal saturation or steady-state interruption of the MR navigator gating. At 1.5T a low-latency real-time feedback to balanced SSFP MR imaging was performed in 3 normal volunteers. Results showed active tracking of the heart during respiratory motion and improvement in time averaged cardiovascular images. Future studies can fully exploit the potential of the high frequency position information provided by the US system for more advanced applications in real time organ tracking.

Feinberg, D. A.; Giese, D.; Bongers, D A.; Ramanna, S.; Zaitsev, M.; Markl, M.; Gunther, M.

2009-01-01

67

Abnormal uterine bleeding as a presenting symptom is related to multiple uterine leiomyoma: an ultrasound-based study  

PubMed Central

Purpose To determine the prevalence of uterine leiomyomas, diagnosed by ultrasound, in a private health care setting located in the central eastern region of Portugal, and to explore the demographic and clinical factors related to diagnosis and symptomatology. Patients and methods The files of 624 patients attending a private clinic in Covilhã, Portugal, from January 2 to December 31, 2010 were retrieved for evaluation. Pelvic ultrasound record, age, weight, height, age at menarche, number of pregnancies and deliveries, marital status, menstrual cycles characteristic, and contraceptive method at consultation were included in the analysis. Results Uterine leiomyoma (UL) was diagnosed by ultrasonography in 161 (25.8%) patients. A single UL was diagnosed in 80 (49.7%) patients. In 79 (49.1%) patients, the largest leiomyoma had a dimension <20 mm. Prevalence of UL was age dependent: at 11.0% for women 20–39 years old; 45.4% for those aged 40–59 years; and 19.5% for women 60 years or older. Metrorrhagia was the most distressing presenting symptom. When menorrhagia was the presenting symptom, the probability of having an ultrasound diagnosis of UL was 73.3%. Metrorrhagia or menorrhagia, as presenting symptom, was significantly related to the ultrasound diagnosis of multiple ULs. Conclusion UL was especially prevalent in women aged between 40 and 59 years. Patients with multiple ULs had significantly more abnormal uterine bleeding. In patients with menorrhagia or metrorrhagia, special attention should be taken in searching for the presence of multiple ULs during ultrasound.

Fonseca-Moutinho, Jose Alberto; Barbosa, Ligia Silva; Torres, Daniel Goncalves; Nunes, Sara Morgado

2013-01-01

68

Comparison of cardiac output determined by an ultrasound velocity dilution cardiac output method and by the lithium dilution cardiac output method in juvenile horses with experimentally induced hypovolemia.  

PubMed

Objective-To assess the accuracy of an ultrasound velocity dilution cardiac output (UDCO) method, compared with that of the lithium dilution cardiac output (LiDCO) method, for determination of cardiac output (CO) in juvenile horses with experimentally induced hypovolemia. Animals-12 anesthetized 2- to 6-month-old horses. Procedures-For each anesthetized horse, CO was determined by the LiDCO and UDCO methods prior to any intervention (baseline state), after withdrawal of approximately 40% of the horse's blood volume (low CO state), after maintenance of hypovolemia and infusion of norepinephrine until mean arterial blood pressure was equal to baseline value (high CO state), and after further infusion of norepinephrine and back-transfusion of withdrawn blood (posttransfusion state). For each of the 4 hemodynamic situations, CO and calculated cardiac index (CI) values were obtained by each method in duplicate (8 pairs of measurements/horse); mean values for each horse and overall mean values across all horses were calculated. Agreement between CI determined by each method (96 paired values) was assessed by Bland-Altman analysis. Results-For the UDCO method-derived CI measurements among the 12 horses, mean ± SD bias was -4 ± 11.3 mL/kg/min (95% limits of agreement, -26.1 to 18.2 mL/kg/min) and mean relative bias was -10.4 ± 21.5% (95% limits of agreement, -52.6% to 31.8%). Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Results indicated that, compared with the LiDCO method, the UDCO method has acceptable clinical usefulness for determination of CO in foals. PMID:24866512

Shih, Andre C; Queiroz, Patricia; Vigani, Alessio; Da Cunha, Anderson; Pariaut, Romain; Ricco, Carolina; Bornkamp, Jennifer; Garcia-Pereira, Fernando; Bandt, Carsten

2014-06-01

69

Subclinical cardiac abnormalities in human immunodeficiency virus-infected men receiving antiretroviral therapy.  

PubMed

Although cardiotoxic effects of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) are a growing concern, there is a lack of prospective studies of subclinical involvement of the heart in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. This study evaluated noninvasively cardiac morphologic characteristics and function in HIV-positive (HIV(+)) men receiving HAART for > or =2 years with no clinical evidence of cardiovascular disease. Echocardiography at rest, including tissue Doppler imaging and exercise testing, were performed in 30 HIV(+) men (age 42.1 +/- 4.7 years, duration of HIV infection 10.4 +/- 4.7 years, duration of HAART 5.3 +/- 2.1 years) and 26 age-matched healthy controls. At rest, HIV(+) patients had similar left ventricular (LV) mass indexed to height(2.7) (40.6 +/- 9.5 vs 37.5 +/- 9.3 g/m; p >0.05), but a higher prevalence of LV diastolic dysfunction (abnormal relaxation or pseudonormal filling pattern in 64% of patients vs 12% of controls; p <0.001). LV systolic function indexes were significantly lower (ejection fraction 60.4 +/- 8.7% vs 66.9 +/- 6.9%; p <0.01, and tissue Doppler imaging peak systolic velocity 11.4 +/- 1.6 vs 13.5 +/- 2.2 cm/s; p <0.001). Pulmonary artery pressure was higher in patients compared with controls (32.1 +/- 5.4 vs 26.1 +/- 6.5 mm Hg; p <0.001). Exercise testing showed decreased exercise tolerance in HIV(+) patients, with no case of myocardial ischemia. In conclusion, subclinical cardiac abnormalities are frequently observed in HIV(+) patients on HAART. The usefulness of systematic noninvasive screening in this population should be considered. GECEM study no. 30: National Agency for AIDS Research (ANRS). PMID:18394461

Schuster, Iris; Thöni, Gilles Jacques; Edérhy, Stéphane; Walther, Guillaume; Nottin, Stéphane; Vinet, Agnès; Boccara, Franck; Khireddine, Mohamed; Girard, Pierre-Marie; Mauboussin, Jean-Marc; Rouanet, Isabelle; Dauzat, Michel; Cohen, Ariel; Messner-Pellenc, Patrick; Obert, Philippe

2008-04-15

70

Highly abnormal thermotests in familial dysautonomia suggest increased cardiac autonomic risk  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE—Patients with familial dysautonomia have an increased risk of sudden death. In some patients with familial dysautonomia, sympathetic cardiac dysfunction is indicated by prolongation of corrected QT (QTc) interval, especially during stress tests. As many patients do not tolerate physical stress, additional indices are needed to predict autonomic risk. In familial dysautonomia there is a reduction of both sympathetic neurons and peripheral small nerve fibres which mediate temperature perception. Consequently, quantitative thermal perception test results might correlate with QTc values. If this assumption is correct, quantitative thermotesting could contribute to predicting increased autonomic risk.?METHODS—To test this hypothesis, QTc intervals were determined in 12 male and eight female patients with familial dysautonomia, aged 10 to 41 years (mean 21.7 (SD 10.1) years), in supine and erect positions and postexercise and correlated with warm and cold perception thresholds assessed at six body sites using a Thermotest.?RESULTS—Due to orthostatic presyncope, six patients were unable to undergo erect and postexercise QTc interval assessment. The QTc interval was prolonged (>440 ms) in two patients when supine and in two additional patients when erect and postexercise. Supine QTc intervals correlated significantly with thermal threshold values at the six body sites and with the number of sites with abnormal thermal perception (Spearman's rank correlation p<0.05). Abnormal Thermotest results were more frequent in the four patients with QTc prolongation and the six patients with intolerance to stress tests.?CONCLUSION—The results suggest that impaired thermal perception correlates with cardiac sympathetic dysfunction in patients with familial dysautonomia. Thus thermotesting may provide an alternative, albeit indirect, means of assessing sympathetic dysfunction in autonomic disorders.??

Hilz, M.; Kolodny, E.; Neuner, I.; Stemper, B.; Axelrod, F.

1998-01-01

71

Cardiac ventricular dimensions predict cognitive decline and cerebral blood flow abnormalities in aging men  

PubMed Central

Background The aims of this study are to examine possible associations between left cardiac ventricular measures in sixth decade and cognitive performance, both cross sectionally and longitudinally, and to examine if left cardiac ventricular measures could predict future changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF). Methods 211 elderly men from a cohort of the population study “Men born in 1914” completed M-mode echocardiography and a cognitive test battery at age 68. The cognitive test battery was repeated at age 81. CBF was estimated with 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT in 72 survivors at age 83. Cognitive performance at baseline and at 1st follow up and CBF at 1st follow up were analysed in relation to left ventricular internal dimension in diastole (LVIDd mm/m2) and fractional shortening (FS). Results Subjects with enlarged LVIDd at age 68 had poorer results on verbal and speed-performance tests at baseline and on verbal and visuo-spatial tests 14 years later on. Low FS was associated with decreased results on visuo-spatial tests at baseline. There was an inverse relationship between LVIDd and both verbal and spatial ability at the baseline and after 14 years of follow-up. Normotensive men with lower FS had also decreased CBF in a majority of brain areas 14 years later. Conclusions Mild echocardiographic abnormalities in 68 ys.-old men, as increased LVIDd and lower FS, are associated with lower cognitive test results and may predict cognitive decline and silent cerebral perfusion abnormalities 14 years later.

2013-01-01

72

Prevalence of pre-transplant electrocardiographic abnormalities and post-transplant cardiac events in patients with liver cirrhosis  

PubMed Central

Background Although cardiovascular disease is thouht to be common in cirrhosis, there are no systematic investigations on the prevalence of electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities in these patients and data on the occurrence of post-transplant cardiac events in comparison with the general population are lacking. We aimed to study the prevalence and predictors of ECG abnormalities in patients with cirrhosis undergoing liver transplantation and to define the risk of cardiac events post-transplant compared to the general population. Methods Cirrhotic patients undergoing first-time liver transplantation between 1999–2007 were retrospectively enrolled. ECGs at pre-transplant evaluation were reviewed using the Minnesota classification and compared to healthy controls. Standardized incidence ratios for post-transplant cardiac events were calculated. Results 234 patients with cirrhosis were included, 186 with an available ECG (36% with alcoholic and 24% with viral cirrhosis; mean follow-up 4 years). Cirrhotics had a prolonged QTc interval, a Q wave, abnormal QRS axis deviation, ST segment depression and a pathologic T wave more frequently compared to controls (p?abnormalities. Compared to the general Swedish population, patients were 14 times more likely to suffer a cardiac event post-transplant (p?cardiac events (p?abnormalities are common in cirrhosis and are associated with cardiovascular risk factors and cirrhosis severity and etiology. Post-transplant cardiac events are more common than in the general population.

2014-01-01

73

Spinal cord stimulation normalizes abnormal cortical pain processing in patients with cardiac syndrome X.  

PubMed

Cardiac syndrome X (CSX) is characterized by effort angina, ST-segment depression during stress tests and normal coronary arteries. Abnormal nociception was suggested in these patients by studies showing a reduced cardiac pain threshold; furthermore, we recently found a lack of habituation to pain stimuli using recording of laser evoked potentials (LEPs). In CSX patients with severe angina, spinal cord stimulation (SCS) was shown to improve symptoms. In this study we investigated whether, in these patients, SCS has any effects on the excitability of the nociceptive system, assessed by LEPs recording. We studied 16 CSX patients (61.6+/-7 years; 4 men) who underwent SCS for refractory angina. Cortical LEPs were recorded during stimulation of the chest and right-hand during active SCS (SCS-ON) and in the absence of SCS (SCS-OFF), using a randomized cross-over design. Three sequences of painful stimuli were applied at each site during each test. During the first sequence of chest stimuli, the N2/P2 LEP amplitude was higher during the SCS-ON, compared to the SCS-OFF phase (18.2+/-7.8 vs. 11.5+/-4.4 microV, P=0.006). The N2/P2 amplitude did not change significantly across the three stimulation sequences during the SCS-OFF phase (P=0.22), whereas it decreased progressively during the second and third sequence (to 87.1+/-29.5% and 76.4+/-24.1%, respectively) compared with the first sequence, during the SCS-ON phase (P=0.014). Similar results were observed during right-hand stimulation. Our study shows that in CSX patients SCS is able to restore habituation to peripheral pain stimuli. This effect might contribute to restore the ability of CSX patients to better tolerate cardiac pain. PMID:18440702

Sestito, Alfonso; Lanza, Gaetano Antonio; Le Pera, Domenica; De Armas, Liala; Sgueglia, Gregory Angelo; Infusino, Fabio; Miliucci, Roberto; Tonali, Pietro Attilio; Crea, Filippo; Valeriani, Massimiliano

2008-09-30

74

Ultrasound  

MedlinePLUS

Sonogram ... An ultrasound machine creates images that allow various organs in the body to be examined. The machine sends out ... this test. The test is done in the ultrasound or radiology department. You will be lying down ...

75

Quantitative ultrasound of the calcaneus in long-term liver or cardiac transplantation patients.  

PubMed

Bone loss is one of the most common complications after solid-organ transplantation, but it is frequently under-diagnosed. Our purpose was to evaluate quantitative ultrasound of calcaneus (QUS) in comparison with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) to identify transplant recipients with osteoporosis. We have cross-sectionally evaluated 140 transplant recipients (85 liver and 55 cardiac transplantations; mean age: 53.6 years, time since transplantation: 67.9 months). Devices used were Hologic 4500 QDR for DXA measurements and Sahara Clinical Sonometer (Hologic Inc, Bedford, MA) for calcaneal QUS. Quantitative ultrasound index (QUI) was calculated from speed of sound (m/s) and broadband ultrasonic attenuation (dB/MHz). QUI T-score and bone mineral density (BMD) T-score (spine and hip) were obtained from Spanish normative data. According to World Health Organization criteria, defined either at lumbar spine or femoral neck, 61% of the females had osteopenia and 32% had osteoporosis, whereas 52% of the males had osteopenia and 11% had osteoporosis. Calcaneal QUS parameters (speed of sound, broadband ultrasonic attenuation, and QUI) were positively correlated with lumbar and femoral BMD (p<0.001). In receiver operator characteristic analysis, a T-score QUIcardiac transplant recipients. QUS could be recommended for screening of osteoporosis in long-term transplanted patients. PMID:17097534

Díaz-Guerra, Guillermo Martínez; Gil-Fraguas, Lourdes; Jódar, Esteban; Meneu, Juan Carlos; García, Elena; Gómez, Miguel Angel; Moreno, Enrique; Hawkins, Federico

2006-01-01

76

Ultrasound Screening of Periarticular Soft Tissue Abnormality Around Metal-on-Metal Bearings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although metal hypersensitivity or pseudotumors are concerns for metal-on-metal (MoM) bearings, detailed pathologies of patterns, severity, and incidence of periprosthetic soft tissue lesions are incompletely understood. We examined the potential of ultrasound for screening of periarticular soft tissue lesions around MoM bearings. Ultrasound examinations were conducted in 88 hips (79 patients) with MoM hip resurfacings or MoM total hip arthroplasties

Takashi Nishii; Takashi Sakai; Masaki Takao; Hideki Yoshikawa; Nobuhiko Sugano

77

Intravascular Ultrasound  

MedlinePLUS

Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) or intravascular echocardiography is a combination of echocardiography and a procedure called cardiac catheterization . IVUS uses ... IVUS uses high-frequency sound waves (also called ultrasound) that can provide a moving picture of your ...

78

Spatiotemporal non-rigid image registration for 3D ultrasound cardiac motion estimation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a new method to evaluate 4D (3D + time) cardiac ultrasound data sets by nonrigid spatio-temporal image registration. First, a frame-to-frame registration is performed that yields a dense deformation field. The deformation field is used to calculate local spatiotemporal properties of the myocardium, such as the velocity, strain and strain rate. The field is also used to propagate particular points and surfaces, representing e.g. the endo-cardial surface over the different frames. As such, the 4D path of these point is obtained, which can be used to calculate the velocity by which the wall moves and the evolution of the local surface area over time. The wall velocity is not angle-dependent as in classical Doppler imaging, since the 4D data allows calculating the true 3D motion. Similarly, all 3D myocardium strain components can be estimated. Combined they result in local surface area or volume changes which van be color-coded as a measure of local contractability. A diagnostic method that strongly benefits from this technique is cardiac motion and deformation analysis, which is an important aid to quantify the mechanical properties of the myocardium.

Loeckx, D.; Ector, J.; Maes, F.; D'hooge, J.; Vandermeulen, D.; Voigt, J.-U.; Heidbüchel, H.; Suetens, P.

2007-03-01

79

Short-lag spatial coherence imaging of cardiac ultrasound data: initial clinical results.  

PubMed

Short-lag spatial coherence (SLSC) imaging is a novel beamforming technique that reduces acoustic clutter in ultrasound images. A clinical study was conducted to investigate clutter reduction and endocardial border detection in cardiac SLSC images. Individual channel echo data were acquired from the left ventricle of 14 volunteers, after informed consent and institutional review board approval. Paired B-mode and SLSC images were created from these data. Contrast, contrast-to-noise, and signal-to-noise ratios were measured in paired images, and these metrics were improved with SLSC imaging in most cases. Three cardiology fellows rated the visibility of endocardial segments in randomly ordered B-mode and SLSC cine loops. SLSC imaging offered 22%-33% improvement (p < 0.05) in endocardial border visibility when B-mode image quality was poor (i.e., 80% or more of the endocardial segments could not be visualized by the three reviewers). The percentage of volunteers with poor-quality images was decreased from 21% to 7% with the SLSC beamformer. Results suggest that SLSC imaging has the potential to improve clinical cardiac assessments that are challenged by clutter. PMID:23932276

Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A; Goswami, Robi; Kisslo, Joseph A; Dahl, Jeremy J; Trahey, Gregg E

2013-10-01

80

High-frequency ultrasound M-mode monitoring of HIFU ablation in cardiac tissue  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Effective real-time HIFU lesion detection is important for expanded use of HIFU in interventional electrophysiology (e.g., epicardial ablation of cardiac arrhythmia). The goal of this study was to investigate rapid, high-frequency M-mode ultrasound imaging for monitoring spatiotemporal changes in tissue during HIFU application. The HIFU application (4.33 MHz, 1000 Hz PRF, 50% duty cycle, 1 s exposure, 6100 W/cm2) was perpendicularly applied to porcine cardiac tissue with a high-frequency imaging system (Visualsonics Vevo 770, 55 MHz, 4.5 mm focal distance) confocally aligned. Radiofrequency (RF) M-mode data (1 kHz PRF, 4 s × 7 mm) was acquired before, during, and after HIFU treatment. Gross lesions were compared with M-mode data to correlate lesion and cavity formation. Integrated backscatter, echo-decorrelation parameters, and their cumulative extrema over time were analyzed for automatically identifying lesion width and bubble formation. Cumulative maximum integrated backscatter showed the best results for identifying the final lesion width, and a criterion based on line-to-line decorrelation was proposed for identification of transient bubble activity.

Kumon, R. E.; Gudur, M. S. R.; Zhou, Y.; Deng, C. X.

2012-10-01

81

Adaptive volume rendering of cardiac 3D ultrasound images: utilizing blood pool statistics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper we introduce and investigate an adaptive direct volume rendering (DVR) method for real-time visualization of cardiac 3D ultrasound. DVR is commonly used in cardiac ultrasound to visualize interfaces between tissue and blood. However, this is particularly challenging with ultrasound images due to variability of the signal within tissue as well as variability of noise signal within the blood pool. Standard DVR involves a global mapping of sample values to opacity by an opacity transfer function (OTF). While a global OTF may represent the interface correctly in one part of the image, it may result in tissue dropouts, or even artificial interfaces within the blood pool in other parts of the image. In order to increase correctness of the rendered image, the presented method utilizes blood pool statistics to do regional adjustments of the OTF. The regional adaptive OTF was compared with a global OTF in a dataset of apical recordings from 18 subjects. For each recording, three renderings from standard views (apical 4-chamber (A4C), inverted A4C (IA4C) and mitral valve (MV)) were generated for both methods, and each rendering was tuned to the best visual appearance by a physician echocardiographer. For each rendering we measured the mean absolute error (MAE) between the rendering depth buffer and a validated left ventricular segmentation. The difference d in MAE between the global and regional method was calculated and t-test results are reported with significant improvements for the regional adaptive method (dA4C = 1.5 +/- 0.3 mm, dIA4C = 2.5 +/- 0.4 mm, dMV = 1.7 +/- 0.2 mm, d.f. = 17, all p < 0.001). This improvement by the regional adaptive method was confirmed through qualitative visual assessment by an experienced physician echocardiographer who concluded that the regional adaptive method produced rendered images with fewer tissue dropouts and less spurious structures inside the blood pool in the vast majority of the renderings. The algorithm has been implemented on a GPU, running an average of 16 fps with a resolution of 512x512x100 samples (Nvidia GTX460).

Åsen, Jon Petter; Steen, Erik; Kiss, Gabriel; Thorstensen, Anders; Rabben, Stein Inge

2012-02-01

82

Cardiac conduction abnormalities and rhythm changes after neonatal anatomical correction of transposition of the great arteries.  

PubMed Central

Seventy three infants who underwent neonatal anatomical correction for transposition of the great arteries with or without a ventricular septal defect were reviewed for evidence of conduction and rhythm abnormalities on preoperative and postoperative 12 lead electrocardiograms and during 24 hour Holter monitoring. There was a partial right bundle branch block pattern in 47% (29/62) of all patients and in 60% (24/40) of those with simple transposition. Complete right bundle branch block was noted in 21% including 5% with simple transposition. Holter monitoring showed sinus rhythm in all patients except three: one had episodes of supraventricular tachycardia, another an intermittent second degree heart block, and a third a complete heart block. Atrial extrasystoles were noted in 47% (29/62) of patients but were frequent in only three patients. Occasional unifocal ventricular extrasystoles were encountered in 37% (23/62) of patients and were frequent in a further 3% (2/62). Only one patient (2%) developed multifocal ventricular extrasystoles. The frequency of important cardiac arrhythmias after neonatal anatomical correction of transposition of the great arteries was 5%, significantly less than that reported after atrial inflow diversion for the same malformation.

Menahem, S; Ranjit, M S; Stewart, C; Brawn, W J; Mee, R B; Wilkinson, J L

1992-01-01

83

Brugada syndrome and right ventricle morphofunctional abnormalities on echocardiography in young male with family anamnesis of sudden cardiac death.  

PubMed

First presented by Brugada and Brugada in 1992, Brugada Syndrome (BrS) is a primary electrical disease of the heart that causes sudden cardiac death or life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. This disease is hereditary autosomic dominant transmitted and genetically determined. The syndrome has been linked to mutations in SCN5A, the gene encoding for the a-subunit of the sodium channel. Electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities indicating Brugada syndrome, include repolarization and depolarization abnormalities in the absence of identifiable structural cardiac abnormalities or other conditions or agents known to lead to ST-segment elevation in the right precordial leads (V1-V3). Intravenous administration of sodium channel blocking drugs may modify the ECG pattern. Ajmaline, flecainide, procainamide and propafenone exaggerate the ST-segment elevation or unmask it when it is initially absent. An implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) is the only proven effective device treatment for the disease. Although BrS is primary electrical disease, some authors have suggested the presence of morphological and functional abnormalities mainly located in the right ventricle (RV), notably in the outflow tract (RVOT). In this short report we will present a young male, with predisposition and positive family history of sudden cardiac death, with complete diagnostic procedure including propafenon testing unmasking Brugada syndrome. An echosonography revealed dilated apical right ventricle, suggesting BrS is not only electrical disorder, but may include morphofunctional abnormalities, described in previous reports. In addition, we reviewed the possible connection between Brugada syndrome and morphological abnormalities in RV. PMID:24851643

Steiner, Robert; Makarovic, Sandra; Makarovic, Zorin; Bilic-Curcic, Ines

2014-03-01

84

Ultrasound  

Cancer.gov

Ultrasound uses sound waves with frequencies above those humans can hear. A transducer sends sound waves traveling into the body which are reflected back from organs and tissues, allowing a picture to be made of the internal organs. Ultrasound can show

85

Estimation of 3D cardiac deformation using spatio-temporal elastic registration of non-scanconverted ultrasound data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Current ultrasound methods for measuring myocardial strain are often limited to measurements in one or two dimensions. Spatio-temporal elastic registration of 3D cardiac ultrasound data can however be used to estimate the 3D motion and full 3D strain tensor. In this work, the spatio-temporal elastic registration method was validated for both non-scanconverted and scanconverted images. This was done using simulated 3D pyramidal ultrasound data sets based on a thick-walled deforming ellipsoid and an adapted convolution model. A B-spline based frame-to-frame elastic registration method was applied to both the scanconverted and non-scanconverded data sets and the accuracy of the resulting deformation fields was quantified. The mean accuracy of the estimated displacement was very similar for the scanconverted and non-scanconverted data sets and thus, it was shown that 3D elastic registration to estimate the cardiac deformation from ultrasound images can be performed on non-scanconverted images, but that avoiding of the scanconversion step does not significantly improve the results of the displacement estimation.

Elen, An; Loeckx, Dirk; Choi, Hon Fai; Gao, Hang; Claus, Piet; Maes, Frederik; Suetens, Paul; D'hooge, Jan

2008-04-01

86

The use of in utero MRI to supplement ultrasound in the foetus at high risk of developmental brain or spine abnormality  

PubMed Central

Objectives It is widely accepted that the diagnosis of foetal central nervous system (CNS) abnormalities can be improved by performing MRI examinations in utero. Most of the published literature has concentrated on pregnancies in which a developmental abnormality has been detected (or suspected) on ultrasound in an otherwise low-risk pregnancy. In this paper, we test the hypothesis that in utero MRI of the foetal brain in high-risk pregnancies will detect abnormalities not shown by ultrasound at a rate that justifies its use in clinical practice. Methods 100 females were recruited into the study from foeto-maternal or clinical genetic departments. They all had a foetus/child with a CNS malformation from an earlier pregnancy, which led to an increased risk of recurrence being quoted for the present pregnancy. All in utero MRI examinations were performed on 1.5 T clinical MRI systems at 18 weeks gestational age or later. Results In 78% of cases, the ultrasound and MRI results agreed and showed no abnormality. In 13%, ultrasound and MRI described identical abnormal findings. In 9%, the ultrasound and MRI examinations had discrepant findings; in all these cases the MRI findings described more serious CNS pathology. The effects on management were judged to be major, by at least one assessor, in 7/9 of those cases. Conclusion As in many other situations involving antenatal detection of CNS abnormalities, in utero MRI should be considered in females with increased risk of foetal CNS malformation based on the results of an earlier pregnancy. Advances in knowledge In utero MRI of the foetus has an important role in antenatal diagnosis of females carrying a foetus with an increased risk of a brain abnormality.

Griffiths, P D; Porteous, M; Mason, G; Russell, S; Morris, J; Fanou, E M; Reeves, M J

2012-01-01

87

Feasibility of remote real-time guidance of a cardiac examination performed by novices using a pocket-sized ultrasound device.  

PubMed

Background. The potential of pocket-sized ultrasound devices (PUDs) to improve global healthcare delivery is limited by the lack of a suitable imaging protocol and trained users. Therefore, we investigated the feasibility of performing a brief, evidence-based cardiac limited ultrasound exam (CLUE) through wireless guidance of novice users. Methods. Three trainees applied PUDs on 27 subjects while directed by an off-site cardiologist to obtain a CLUE to screen for LV systolic dysfunction (LVSD), LA enlargement (LAE), ultrasound lung comets (ULC+), and elevated CVP (eCVP). Real-time remote audiovisual guidance and interpretation by the cardiologist were performed using the iPhone 4/iPod (FaceTime, Apple, Inc.) attached to the PUD and transmitted data wirelessly. Accuracy and technical quality of transmitted images were compared to on-site, gold-standard echo thresholds. Results. Novice versus sonographer imaging yielded technically adequate views in 122/135 (90%) versus 130/135 (96%) (P < 0.05). CLUE's combined SN, SP, and ACC were 0.67, 0.96, and 0.90. Technical adequacy (%) and accuracy for each abnormality (n) were LVSD (85%, 0.93, n = 5), LAE (89%, 0.74, n = 16), ULC+ (100%, 0.94, n = 5), and eCVP (78%, 0.91, n = 1). Conclusion. A novice can perform the CLUE using PUD when wirelessly guided by an expert. This method could facilitate PUD use for off-site bedside medical decision making and triaging of patients. PMID:24024032

Mai, Tuan V; Ahn, David T; Phillips, Colin T; Agan, Donna L; Kimura, Bruce J

2013-01-01

88

A transgenic zebrafish model of a human cardiac sodium channel mutation exhibits bradycardia, conduction-system abnormalities and early death.  

PubMed

The recent exponential increase in human genetic studies due to the advances of next generation sequencing has generated unprecedented numbers of new gene variants. Determining which of these are causative of human disease is a major challenge. In-vitro studies and murine models have been used to study inherited cardiac arrhythmias but have several limitations. Zebrafish models provide an attractive alternative for modeling human heart disease due to similarities in cardiac electrophysiology and contraction, together with ease of genetic manipulation, external development and optical transparency. Although zebrafish cardiac mutants and morphants have been widely used to study loss and knockdown of zebrafish gene function, the phenotypic effects of human dominant-negative gene mutations expressed in transgenic zebrafish have not been evaluated. The aim of this study was to generate and characterize a transgenic zebrafish arrhythmia model harboring the pathogenic human cardiac sodium channel mutation SCN5A-D1275N, that has been robustly associated with a range of cardiac phenotypes, including conduction disease, sinus node dysfunction, atrial and ventricular arrhythmias, and dilated cardiomyopathy in humans and in mice. Stable transgenic fish with cardiac expression of human SCN5A were generated using Tol2-mediated transgenesis and cardiac phenotypes were analyzed using video microscopy and ECG. Here we show that transgenic zebrafish expressing the SCN5A-D1275N mutation, but not wild-type SCN5A, exhibit bradycardia, conduction-system abnormalities and premature death. We furthermore show that SCN5A-WT, and to a lesser degree SCN5A-D1275N, are able to compensate the loss of endogenous zebrafish cardiac sodium channels, indicating that the basic pathways, through which SCN5A acts, are conserved in teleosts. This proof-of-principle study suggests that zebrafish may be highly useful in vivo models to differentiate functional from benign human genetic variants in cardiac ion channel genes in a time- and cost-efficient manner. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Na(+) Regulation in Cardiac Myocytes". PMID:23791817

Huttner, Inken G; Trivedi, Gunjan; Jacoby, Arie; Mann, Stefan A; Vandenberg, Jamie I; Fatkin, Diane

2013-08-01

89

Prevention of sudden cardiac death: return to sport considerations in athletes with identified cardiovascular abnormalities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sudden cardiac death in the athlete is uncommon but extremely visible. In athletes under age 30, genetic heart disease, including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, and ion channel disorders account for the majority of the deaths. Commotio cordis, involving blunt trauma to the chest leading to ventricular fibrillation, is also a leading cause of sudden cardiac death in young

M S Link

2009-01-01

90

Architecture design of the multi-functional wavelet-based ECG microprocessor for realtime detection of abnormal cardiac events.  

PubMed

Most of the abnormal cardiac events such as myocardial ischemia, acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and fatal arrhythmia can be diagnosed through continuous electrocardiogram (ECG) analysis. According to recent clinical research, early detection and alarming of such cardiac events can reduce the time delay to the hospital, and the clinical outcomes of these individuals can be greatly improved. Therefore, it would be helpful if there is a long-term ECG monitoring system with the ability to identify abnormal cardiac events and provide realtime warning for the users. The combination of the wireless body area sensor network (BASN) and the on-sensor ECG processor is a possible solution for this application. In this paper, we aim to design and implement a digital signal processor that is suitable for continuous ECG monitoring and alarming based on the continuous wavelet transform (CWT) through the proposed architectures--using both programmable RISC processor and application specific integrated circuits (ASIC) for performance optimization. According to the implementation results, the power consumption of the proposed processor integrated with an ASIC for CWT computation is only 79.4 mW. Compared with the single-RISC processor, about 91.6% of the power reduction is achieved. PMID:23366919

Cheng, Li-Fang; Chen, Tung-Chien; Chen, Liang-Gee

2012-01-01

91

A Dual-Chamber, Thick-Walled Cardiac Phantom for Use in Cardiac Motion and Deformation Imaging by Ultrasound  

Microsoft Academic Search

Determination of the mechanical properties of the myocardium is crucial for cardiac diagnosis. Cardiac strain and strain rate imaging may enable such quantification. To further develop these methodologies, an experimental setup allowing the recording of ultrasonic deformation data in a reproducible manner is necessary. Such setup with biventricular polyvinyl alcohol heart phantoms has been built. To test this setup, segmental

B. Lesniak-Plewinska; S. Cygan; K. Kaluzynski; J. D'hooge; J. Zmigrodzki; E. Kowalik; M. Kordybach; M. Kowalski

2010-01-01

92

Cardiac and extra-cardiac anomalies as indicators for trisomies 13 and 18: a prenatal ultrasound study.  

PubMed

The purpose of the present study was to establish sonographic markers for prenatal diagnosis of trisomies 13 and 18. Retrospective analysis of sonographic morphology was therefore carried out in seven fetuses with trisomy 13, and 16 fetuses with trisomy 18. Gestational age ranged between 17 and 39 weeks (median 28 weeks). Polyhydramnios and symmetrical growth retardation were present in 14 of 23 fetuses. A cardiac anomaly was diagnosed in all 23 fetuses, the majority representing a ventricular septal defect (n = 8) or double outlet right ventricle (n = 8). Extra-cardiac anomalies were characterized by a high incidence of limb deformities (polydactyly, clenched hands, club feet; n = 15) and omphalocele (n = 7). We conclude that the combined appearance of cardiac and extra-cardiac anomalies should prompt fetal karyotyping. Cardiac anomalies in combination with fetal limb deformities and omphalocele are suspicious for trisomies 13 and 18. PMID:2671976

Wladimiroff, J W; Stewart, P A; Reuss, A; Sachs, E S

1989-07-01

93

Ultrasound.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report deals with the technical issues in ultrasound, both for combat and civilian care, which are most likely to benefit from support from an agency like DARPA which is responsive to long-horizon problems requiring innovative technology. This report...

J. Cornwall H. Abarbanel W. Dally S. Flatte R. Westervelt

1996-01-01

94

Relation of autonomic and cardiac abnormalities to ventricular fibrillation in a rat model of epilepsy.  

PubMed

Cardiac autonomic, conduction, and structural changes may occur in epilepsy and may contribute to sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP), e.g. by increasing the risk for ventricular fibrillation (VF). In a model of chronic seizures in rats, we sought to study (1) cardiac and autonomic derangements that accompany the epileptic state, (2) whether chronically seizing rats experienced more significant cardiac effects after severe acute seizures, and (3) the susceptibility of chronically seizing rats to VF arising from autonomic and hypoxemic changes, which commonly occur during seizures. Sprague-Dawely rats were injected with saline or kainic acid to induce chronic seizures. At 2-3 months or 7-11 months after injection, these rats were studied with both 12-lead electrocardiography (to assess heart rate variability and QT dispersion) and echocardiography under ketamine/xylazine or urethane anesthesia. Hearts were subsequently excised, weighed, and examined histologically. Epileptic rats exhibited decreased vagal tone, increased QT dispersion, and eccentric cardiac hypertrophy without significant cardiac fibrosis, especially at 7-11 months post-injection. Of these three findings, vagal tone was inversely correlated with heart weights. Epileptic rats exhibited diminished systolic function compared to controls after severe acute seizures. However, animals with long-standing chronic seizures were less susceptible to autonomic/hypoxemia-driven VF, and their susceptibility inversely correlated with mean left ventricular wall thickness on histology. On the basis of this model, we conclude that cardiac changes accompany epilepsy and these can lead to significant seizure-associated cardiac performance decreases, but these cardiac changes actually lower the probability of VF. PMID:24286892

Naggar, Isaac; Lazar, Jason; Kamran, Haroon; Orman, Rena; Stewart, Mark

2014-01-01

95

[Obstetric ultrasound between the 11th and 14th weeks: beyond the screening for chromosomal abnormalities].  

PubMed

This is a traditional (narrative) review with the objective of highlighting the contribution of obstetric ultrasonography (US) between the 11th and 14th week of pregnancy, commonly called first trimester anomaly scan. In addition to being used for the screening of chromosomal anomalies, US can be employed during this period to confirm or determine gestational age, evaluate fetal anatomy, diagnose malformations, screen major structural abnormalities and genetic syndromes, define the prognosis of pregnancy, diagnose and characterize multiple pregnancies, and screen preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction. The most important studies about this subject published between 1990 and 2010 in the Cochrane and PubMed libraries were included. The selected studies can be classified with scientific levels I to III. PMID:21625794

Peralta, Cleisson Fábio Andrioli; Barini, Ricardo

2011-01-01

96

Reversibility of cardiac wall-motion abnormalities predicted by positron tomography  

SciTech Connect

Positron emission tomography (PET) can be used with nitrogen-13-ammonia (13NH3) to estimate regional myocardial blood flow, and with fluorine-18-deoxyglucose (18FDG) to measure exogenous glucose uptake by the myocardium. We used PET to predict whether preoperative abnormalities in left ventricular wall motion in 17 patients who underwent coronary-artery bypass surgery were reversible. The abnormalities were quantified by radionuclide or contrast angiography or both, before and after grafting. PET images were obtained preoperatively. Abnormal wall motion in regions in which PET images showed preserved glucose uptake was predicted to be reversible, whereas abnormal motion in regions with depressed glucose uptake was predicted to be irreversible. According to these criteria, abnormal contraction in 35 of 41 segments was correctly predicted to be reversible (85 percent predictive accuracy), and abnormal contraction in 4 of 26 regions was correctly predicted to be irreversible (92 percent predictive accuracy). In contrast, electrocardiograms showing pathological Q waves in the region of asynergy predicted irreversibility in only 43 percent of regions. We conclude that PET imaging with 13NH3 to assess blood flow and 18FDG to assess the metabolic viability of the myocardium is an accurate method of predicting potential reversibility of wall-motion abnormalities after surgical revascularization.

Tillisch, J.; Brunken, R.; Marshall, R.; Schwaiger, M.; Mandelkern, M.; Phelps, M.; Schelbert, H.

1986-04-03

97

Functional cardiovascular ultrasound imaging: Quantification of plaque vulnerability and cardiac function  

Microsoft Academic Search

With ultrasound strain imaging, the function of tissue and organs can be identified. The technique uses multiple images, acquired from tissue under different degrees of deformation. We developed techniques for cardiovascular applications. The displacement of tissue can be determined at micrometer scale using the raw (i.e., radio frequency, RF-) ultrasound data, containing the amplitude as well as the phase information.

C. L. de Korte; R. G. P. Lopata; H. H. G. Hansen; M. M. Nillesen; T. Idzenga; L. Kapusta; J. M. Thijssen

2011-01-01

98

Assessment of perfusion and wall-motion abnormalities and transient ischemic dilation in regadenoson stress cardiac magnetic resonance perfusion imaging.  

PubMed

Vasodilator first-pass stress cardiac magnetic resonance perfusion imaging [stress cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR)] is a reliable, noninvasive method for evaluating myocardial ischemia; however, it does not routinely evaluate metrics such as wall-motion abnormality (WMA) and transient ischemic dilation (TID). Using the new selective A2A adenosine receptor agonist regadenoson, we tested a novel protocol for assessing perfusion defects, WMA, and TID in a single stress CMR session. We evaluated 29 consecutive patients who presented for clinically indicated regadenoson stress CMR. Immediately before and after the regadenoson stress perfusion sequence, we obtained baseline and post-stress cine images in the short-axis orientation to detect worsening or newly developed WMAs. This approach also allowed evaluation of TID. Delayed-enhancement imaging was performed in the standard orientations. All patients tolerated the procedure well. Thirteen patients (45 %) had perfusion abnormalities, and four patients developed TID. Seven patients had WMAs, and three of them also had TID. Patients with TID ± WMAs had multivessel disease documented by coronary angiography. By using regadenoson to assess myocardial ischemia during stress CMR, perfusion defects, WMAs, and TID can be evaluated in a single imaging session. To our knowledge, we are the first to describe this novel approach in a vasodilator stress CMR study. PMID:24706255

Hojjati, Mohammad R; Muthupillai, Raja; Wilson, James M; Preventza, Ourania A; Cheong, Benjamin Y C

2014-06-01

99

Heart rate, conduction and ultrasound abnormalities in adults with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type.  

PubMed

Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (EDS-HT) are two clinically overlapping heritable connective tissue disorders strongly associating with pain, fatigue and other secondary aspects. Though not considered a diagnostic criterion for most EDS subtypes, cardiovascular involvement is a well-known complication in EDS. A case-control study was carried out on 28 adults with JHS/EDS-HT diagnosed according to current criteria, compared to 29 healthy subjects evaluating resting electrocardiographic (ECG), 24-h ECG and resting heart ultrasound data. Results obtained in the ECG studies showed a moderate excess in duration of the PR interval and P wave, an excess of heart conduction and rate abnormalities and an increased rate of mitral and tricuspid valve insufficiency often complicating with "true" mitral valve prolapse in the ecocardiographic study. These variable ECG subclinical anomalies reported in our sample may represent the resting surrogate of such a subnormal cardiovascular response to postural changes that are known to be present in patients with JHS/EDS-HT. Our findings indicate the usefulness of a full cardiologic evaluation of adults with JHS/EDS-HT for the correct management. PMID:24752348

Camerota, Filippo; Castori, Marco; Celletti, Claudia; Colotto, Marco; Amato, Silvia; Colella, Alessandra; Curione, Mario; Danese, Chiara

2014-07-01

100

[Ultrasound scan of the fetal thymus].  

PubMed

There is an increased interest nowadays on ultrasound analysis of the fetal thymus. Abnormal fetal thymic growth have been associated with DiGeorge syndrome, conotruncal cardiac malformations, chromosomal abnormalities and adverse outcome in different perinatal conditions as intrauterine growth restriction, preterm birth and others. Different methodologies that measure the fetal thymus by ultrasound have been published, however there is not a consensus of which one is the most useful. Our aim is to describe these methodologies and discuss their clinical applications. PMID:24701859

Gutiérrez, Mar Muñoz-Chápuli; Bravo Arribas, Coral; Gámez-Alderete, Francisco; Fernández-Pacheco, Ricardo Pérez; Ortiz-Quintana, Luis; De León-Luis, Juan

2014-01-01

101

Reversibility of cardiac wall-motion abnormalities predicted by positron tomography  

Microsoft Academic Search

Positron emission tomography (PET) can be used with nitrogen-13-ammonia (13NH3) to estimate regional myocardial blood flow, and with fluorine-18-deoxyglucose (18FDG) to measure exogenous glucose uptake by the myocardium. We used PET to predict whether preoperative abnormalities in left ventricular wall motion in 17 patients who underwent coronary-artery bypass surgery were reversible. The abnormalities were quantified by radionuclide or contrast angiography

J. Tillisch; R. Brunken; R. Marshall; M. Schwaiger; M. Mandelkern; M. Phelps; H. Schelbert

1986-01-01

102

Cathepsin S Deficiency Results in Abnormal Accumulation of Autophagosomes in Macrophages and Enhances Ang II-Induced Cardiac Inflammation  

PubMed Central

Background Cathepsin S (Cat S) is overexpressed in human atherosclerotic and aneurysmal tissues and may contributes to degradation of extracellular matrix, especially elastin, in inflammatory diseases. We aimed to define the role of Cat S in cardiac inflammation and fibrosis induced by angiotensin II (Ang II) in mice. Methods and Results Cat S-knockout (Cat S?/?) and littermate wild-type (WT) C57BL/6J mice were infused continuously with Ang II (750 ng/kg/min) or saline for 7 days. Cat S?/? mice showed severe cardiac fibrosis, including elevated expression of collagen I and ?-smooth muscle actin (?-SMA), as compared with WT mice. Moreover, macrophage infiltration and expression of inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor ?, transforming growth factor ? and interleukin 1?) were significantly greater in Cat S?/? than WT hearts. These Ang II-induced effects in Cat S?/? mouse hearts was associated with abnormal accumulation of autophagosomes and reduced clearance of damaged mitochondria, which led to increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-?B) in macrophages. Conclusion Cat S in lysosomes is essential for mitophagy processing in macrophages, deficiency in Cat S can increase damaged mitochondria and elevate ROS levels and NF-?B activity in hypertensive mice, so it regulates cardiac inflammation and fibrosis.

Pan, Lili; Li, Yulin; Jia, Lixin; Qin, Yanwen; Qi, Guanming; Cheng, Jizhong; Qi, Yongfen; Li, Huihua; Du, Jie

2012-01-01

103

Pretreatment with human serum butyrylcholinesterase alone prevents cardiac abnormalities, seizures, and death in Göttingen minipigs exposed to sarin vapor.  

PubMed

Human serum butyrylcholinesterase (Hu BChE) is a stoichiometric bioscavenger that is being developed as a prophylactic countermeasure against organophosphorus nerve agents. This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of Hu BChE against whole-body inhalation exposure to a lethal dose of sarin (GB) vapor. Male Göttingen minipigs were subjected to: air exposure, GB vapor exposure, or pretreatment with Hu BChE followed by GB vapor exposure. Hu BChE was administered by i.m. injection 24 h prior to exposure to 4.1 mg/m(3) of GB vapor for 60 min. Electrocardiograms (ECG), electroencephalograms (EEG), and pupil size were recorded throughout exposure. Blood drawn before and throughout exposure was analyzed for blood gases, electrolytes, metabolites, acetylcholinesterase and BChE activities, and amount of GB present. Untreated animals exposed to GB vapor exhibited cardiac abnormalities and generalized seizures, ultimately succumbing to respiratory failure. Pretreatment with 3.0 or 6.5 mg/kg of Hu BChE delayed blood gas and acid-base disturbances and the onset of cardiac and neural toxic signs, but failed to increase survivability. Pretreatment with 7.5 mg/kg of Hu BChE, however, completely prevented toxic signs, with blood chemistry and ECG and EEG parameters indistinguishable from control during and after GB exposure. GB bound in plasma was 200-fold higher than plasma from pigs that did not receive Hu BChE, suggesting that Hu BChE scavenged GB in blood and prevented it from reaching other tissues. Thus, prophylaxis with Hu BChE alone not only increased survivability, but also prevented cardiac abnormalities and neural toxicity in minipigs exposed to a lethal dose of GB vapor. PMID:21968035

Saxena, Ashima; Sun, Wei; Dabisch, Paul A; Hulet, Stanley W; Hastings, Nicholas B; Jakubowski, Edward M; Mioduszewski, Robert J; Doctor, Bhupendra P

2011-12-15

104

Cardiovascular abnormality detection method using cardiac sound characteristic waveform with data clustering technique  

Microsoft Academic Search

If life-style related diseases could not be monitored continuously during a long time some heart defects might be difficult to be diagnosed appropriately and detected in an early step. Furthermore, the need for the primary health care physicians to improve the cardiac auscultation skill is still very strong in the primary screening examination, and becomes stronger for the general users

Samjin Choi; Zhongwei Jiang; Il-Hwan Kim; Chan-Won Park

2007-01-01

105

Sodium sulfide prevents water diffusion abnormality in the brain and improves long term outcome after cardiac arrest in mice  

PubMed Central

Aim of the study Sudden cardiac arrest (CA) is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Previously we demonstrated that administration of sodium sulfide (Na2S), a hydrogen sulfide (H2S) donor, markedly improved the neurological outcome and survival rate at 24h after CA and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in mice. In this study, we sought to elucidate the mechanism responsible for the neuroprotective effects of Na2S and its impact on the long-term survival after CA/CPR in mice. Methods Adult male mice were subjected to potassium-induced CA for 7.5 min at 37°C whereupon CPR was performed with chest compression and mechanical ventilation. Mice received Na2S (0.55 mg/kg i.v.) or vehicle 1 min before CPR. Results Mice that were subjected to CA/CPR and received vehicle exhibited a poor 10-day survival rate (4/12) and depressed neurological function. Cardiac arrest and CPR induced abnormal water diffusion in the vulnerable regions of the brain, as demonstrated by hyperintense diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) 24h after CA/CPR. Extent of hyperintense DWI was associated with matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) activation, worse neurological outcomes, and poor survival rate at 10 days after CA/CPR. Administration of Na2S prevented the development of abnormal water diffusion and MMP-9 activation and markedly improved neurological function and long-term survival (9/12, P<0.05 vs. vehicle) after CA/CPR. Conclusion These results suggest that administration of Na2S 1 min before CPR improves neurological function and survival rate at 10 days after CA/CPR by preventing water diffusion abnormality in the brain potentially via inhibiting MMP-9 activation early after resuscitation.

Kida, Kotaro; Minamishima, Shizuka; Wang, Huifang; Ren, JiaQian; Yigitkanli, Kazim; Nozari, Ala; Mandeville, Joseph B.; Liu, Philip K.; Liu, Christina H.; Ichinose, Fumito

2012-01-01

106

Anderson's disease (chylomicron retention disease): a new mutation in the SARA2 gene associated with muscular and cardiac abnormalities.  

PubMed

Anderson's disease (AD) or chylomicron retention disease (CMRD) is a rare hereditary lipid malabsorption syndrome linked to SARA2 gene mutations. We report in this study a novel mutation in two sisters for which the Sar1b protein is predicted to be truncated by 32 amino acids at its carboxyl-terminus. Because the SARA2 gene is also expressed in the muscle, heart, liver and placenta, extraintestinal clinical manifestations may exist. For the first time, we describe in this study in the two sisters muscular as well as cardiac abnormalities that could be related to the reported expression of SARA2 in these tissues. We also evaluated six other patients for potential manifestations of the SARA2 mutation. The creatine phosphokinase levels were increased in all patients [1.5-9.4 x normal (N)] and transaminases were moderately elevated in five of the eight patients (1.2-2.6 x N), probably related to muscle disease rather than to liver dysfunction. A decreased ejection fraction occurred in one patient (40%, N: 60%). The muscle, liver and placental tissues that were examined had no specific abnormalities and, in particular, no lipid accumulation. These results suggest that myolysis and other extraintestinal abnormalities can occur in AD/CMRD and that the clinical evaluation of patients should reflect this. PMID:18786134

Silvain, M; Bligny, D; Aparicio, T; Laforêt, P; Grodet, A; Peretti, N; Ménard, D; Djouadi, F; Jardel, C; Bégué, J M; Walker, F; Schmitz, J; Lachaux, A; Aggerbeck, L P; Samson-Bouma, M E

2008-12-01

107

Short-term inhalation of particulate transition metals has little effect on the electrocardiograms of dogs having preexisting cardiac abnormalities.  

PubMed

There is growing epidemiological evidence for statistical associations between increases in air pollution, especially particulate matter, and increases in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Laboratory studies have shown that transition metals contribute strongly to the effects of high lung doses of model particles on changes in the electrocardiograms of animals. The present study evaluated the effects of short-term inhalation exposure to respirable particles of specific oxide and sulfate forms of transition metals on heart rate and the electrocardiogram of old dogs having preexisting cardiac abnormalities. Conscious beagle dogs were exposed by oral inhalation for 3 h on each of 3 successive days to aerosols of manganese, nickel, vanadium, iron, and copper oxides, and nickel and vanadium sulfates as single compounds at concentrations of 0.05 mg/m(3). Electrocardiograms were recorded and evaluated for exposure-related changes in heart rate, heart rate variability, and abnormalities of waveforms. Although the electrocardiograms of this population of dogs having potential age and cardiovascular susceptibility factors reflected their underlying clinical abnormalities, no significant effect of exposure to the transition metal aerosols was observed. PMID:12635004

Muggenburg, B A; Benson, J M; Barr, E B; Kubatko, J; Tilley, L P

2003-04-11

108

Cardiac Troponin I and N-Terminal Pro-Brain Natriuretic Peptide in Umbilical Artery Blood in Relation to Fetal Heart Rate Abnormalities During Labor  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   The use of continuous fetal heart rate (FHR) recordings to monitor fetal well-being during labor is standard clinical practice\\u000a in developed countries. Little is known about the relationship, if any, that exists between these FHR abnormalities and the\\u000a fetal cardiac musculature and function. The aim of this study was to investigate umbilical artery serum levels of cardiac\\u000a troponin I,

S. M. Fleming; T. O'Gorman; L. O'Byrne; H. Grimes; K. M. Daly; J. J. Morrison

2001-01-01

109

Ultrasound calibration using intensity-based image registration: for application in cardiac catheterization procedures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a novel method to calibrate a 3D ultrasound probe which has a 2D transducer array. By optically tracking a calibrated 3D probe we are able to produce extended field of view 3D ultrasound images. Tracking also enables us to register our ultrasound images to other tracked and calibrated surgical instruments or to other tracked and calibrated imaging devices. Our method applies rigid intensity-based image registration to three or more ultrasound images. These images can either be of a simple phantom, or could potentially be images of the patient. In this latter case we would have an automated calibration system which required no phantom, no image segmentation and was optimized to the patient's ultrasound characteristics i.e. speed of sound. We have carried out experiments using a simple calibration phantom and with ultrasound images of a volunteer's liver. Results are compared to an independent gold-standard. These showed our method to be accurate to 1.43mm using the phantom images and 1.56mm using the liver data, which is slightly better than the traditional point-based calibration method (1.7mm in our experiments).

Ma, Y. L.; Rhode, K. S.; Gao, G.; King, A. P.; Chinchapatnam, P.; Schaeffter, T.; Hawkes, D. J.; Razavi, R.; Penney, G. P.

2008-04-01

110

2H-2 Gradients in Radial Strain Across the Cardiac Wall Studied with Epicardial Ultrasound  

Microsoft Academic Search

Differences in radial deformation characteristics across the myocardial wall have been studied extensively in order to better understand cardiac mechanics and (patho-)physiology. To date, transmural gradients have typically been determined by invasive techniques as accurate non-invasive assessment remains a technical challenge. However, invasive methods require pericardial opening which is generally known to affect cardiac mechanics. The aim of this study

J. D'hooge; C. Missant; P. Claus; S. Rex; E. Eroglu; F. E. Rademakers; P. Wouters

2006-01-01

111

Measuring the acoustoelectric interaction constant in cardiac tissue using ultrasound current source density imaging  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper demonstrates the first measurement of the acoustoelectric (AE) interaction constant in cardiac tissue. Radiofrequency catheter ablation is performed in clinics as a standard treatment for cardiac arrhythmia with a high success rate. The procedure requires a detailed map of the heart's activation wave prior to treatment. Conventional electrical mapping techniques are slow, prone to registration errors and have

Qian Li; Ragnar Olafsson; Pier Ingram; Zhaohui Wang; Russell S. Witte

2010-01-01

112

Genetic Variation on 9p22 Is Associated with Abnormal Ovarian Ultrasound Results in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial  

PubMed Central

Background A recent ovarian cancer genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified a locus on 9p22 associated with reduced ovarian cancer risk. The single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers localize to the BNC2 gene, which has been associated with ovarian development. Methods We analyzed the association of 9p22 SNPs with transvaginal ultrasound (TVU) screening results and CA-125 blood levels from participants without ovarian cancer in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial (PLCO); 1,106 women with adequate ultrasound screening results and available genotyping information were included in the study. Results We observed a significantly increased risk of abnormal suspicious TVU results for seven SNPs on 9p22, with odds ratios between 1.68 (95% CI: 1.04–2.72) for rs4961501 and 2.10 (95% CI: 1.31–3.38) for rs12379183. Associations were restricted to abnormal suspicious findings at the first TVU screen. We did not observe an association between 9p22 SNPs and CA-125 levels. Conclusions Our findings suggest that 9p22 SNPs, which were found to be associated with decreased risk of ovarian cancer in a recent GWAS, are associated with sonographically detectable ovarian abnormalities. Our results corroborate the relevance of the 9p22 locus for ovarian biology. Further studies are required to understand the complex relationship between screening abnormalities and ovarian carcinogenesis and to evaluate whether this locus can influence the risk stratification of ovarian cancer screening.

Wentzensen, Nicolas; Black, Amanda; Jacobs, Kevin; Yang, Hannah P.; Berg, Christine D.; Caporaso, Neil; Peters, Ulrike; Ragard, Lawrence; Buys, Saundra S.; Chanock, Stephen; Hartge, Patricia

2011-01-01

113

Periodic Limb Movements in Sleep Contribute to Further Cardiac Structure Abnormalities in Hemodialysis Patients with Restless Legs Syndrome  

PubMed Central

Study Objectives: In hemodialysis (HD) patients, restless legs syndrome (RLS) and periodic limb movements in sleep (PLMS) constitute common sleep disorders. Recent findings indicate a role for PLMS as a risk factor in the development of new or the aggravation of existing cardiovascular disease. The aim of the current study was to investigate the association of PLMS with indices of cardiac morphology and function in HD patients with RLS as a potential pathway by which PLMS could alter cardiovascular risk. Methods: Based on PLMS diagnosis by an overnight polysomnographic evaluation, 19 stable HD-RLS patients were divided into the PLMS group (n = 10) and the non-PLMS group (n = 9). During the overnight assessment, nocturnal blood pressure (BP) indices were also assessed. Left ventricular (LV) dimensions were examined by M-mode echocardiography, whereas LV diastolic function was evaluated by conventional Doppler and tissue Doppler imaging the following day. Results: LV internal diameter in diastole was significantly increased in the PLMS group (4.96 ± 0.61 vs 4.19 ± 0.48 cm, p = 0.007), leading to a significantly increase in LV mass (202 ± 52 vs 150 ± 37 g, p = 0.026). In contrast, no between group differences were observed in diastolic function indices (p > 0.05). Conclusions: These are the first data to associate severe PLMS with further LV structure abnormalities in HD patients with RLS. Citation: Giannaki CD; Zigoulis P; Karatzaferi C; Hadjigeorgiou GM; George KP; Gourgoulianis K; Koutedakis Y; Stefanidis I; Sakkas GK. Periodic limb movements in sleep contribute to further cardiac structure abnormalities in hemodialysis patients with restless legs syndrome. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(2):147–153.

Giannaki, Christoforos D.; Zigoulis, Paris; Karatzaferi, Christina; Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios M.; George, Keith P.; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Stefanidis, Ioannis; Sakkas, Giorgos K.

2013-01-01

114

Sinus Node Dysfunction as the First Manifestation of Left Ventricular Noncompaction with Multiple Cardiac Abnormalities  

PubMed Central

Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) is a genetically heterogenous form of cardiomyopathy which may remain undiagnosed till adulthood due to the late presentation of typical symptoms such as dyspnea, congestion, ventricular arrhythmias and thromboembolism. Symptomatic bradycardia secondary to persistent sinus node dysfunction is very rare. Coexistent cardiac defects are common in children however in adults the disease is usually in isolated form. Here, we present a case of twenty-three year-old female LVNC patient with patent ductus arteriosus, bicuspid aortic valve and persistent sinus node dysfunction who presented with dizziness as the first manifestation of the disease.

Gungor, Baris; Alper, Ahmet T; Celebi, Ahmet; Bolca, Osman

2013-01-01

115

Cardiac troponin I is abnormally expressed in non-small cell lung cancer tissues and human cancer cells  

PubMed Central

Cardiac troponin I (cTnI) is the only sarcomeric protein identified to date that is expressed exclusively in cardiac muscle. Its expression in cancer tissues has not been reported. Herein, we examined cTnI expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissues, human adenocarcinoma cells SPCA-1 (lung) and BGC 823 (gastric) by immunohistochemistry, western blot analysis and real-time PCR. Immunopositivity for cTnI was demonstrated in 69.4% (34/49) NSCLC tissues evaluated, and was strong intensity in 35.3% (6/17) lung squamous cell carcinoma cases. The non-cancer-bearing lung tissues except tuberculosis (9/9, 100%) showed negative staining for cTnI. Seven monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against human cTnI were applied in immunofluorescence. The result showed that the staining pattern within SPCA-1 and BGC 823 was dependent on the epitope of the cTnI mAbs. The membrane and nucleus of cancer cells were stained by mAbs against N-terminal peptides of cTnI, and cytoplasm was stained by mAbs against the middle and C-terminal peptides of cTnI. A ~25 kD band was identified by anti-cTnI mAb in SPCA-1 and BGC 823 extracts by western blot, as well as in cardiomyocyte extracts. The cTnI mRNA expressions in SPCA-1 and BGC 823 cells were about ten thousand times less than that in cardiomyocytes. Our study shows for the first time that cTnI protein and mRNA were abnormally expressed in NSCLC tissues, SPCA-1 and BGC 823 cells. These findings challenge the conventional view of cTnI as a cardiac-specific protein, enabling the potential use of cTnI as a diagnostic marker or targeted therapy for cancer.

Chen, Chao; Liu, Jia-Bao; Bian, Zhi-Ping; Xu, Jin-Dan; Wu, Heng-Fang; Gu, Chun-Rong; Shi, Yi; Zhang, Ji-Nan; Chen, Xiang-Jian; Yang, Di

2014-01-01

116

Mechanical and non-mechanical functions of Dystrophin can prevent cardiac abnormalities in Drosophila.  

PubMed

Dystrophin-deficiency causes cardiomyopathies and shortens the life expectancy of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients. Restoring Dystrophin expression in the heart by gene transfer is a promising avenue to explore as a therapy. Truncated Dystrophin gene constructs have been engineered and shown to alleviate dystrophic skeletal muscle disease, but their potential in preventing the development of cardiomyopathy is not fully understood. In the present study, we found that either the mechanical or the signaling functions of Dystrophin were able to reduce the dilated heart phenotype of Dystrophin mutants in a Drosophila model. Our data suggest that Dystrophin retains some function in fly cardiomyocytes in the absence of a predicted mechanical link to the cytoskeleton. Interestingly, cardiac-specific manipulation of nitric oxide synthase expression also modulates cardiac function, which can in part be reversed by loss of Dystrophin function, further implying a signaling role of Dystrophin in the heart. These findings suggest that the signaling functions of Dystrophin protein are able to ameliorate the dilated cardiomyopathy, and thus might help to improve heart muscle function in micro-Dystrophin-based gene therapy approaches. PMID:24231130

Taghli-Lamallem, Ouarda; Jagla, Krzysztof; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S; Bodmer, Rolf

2014-01-01

117

Impact of lipid abnormalities in development and progression of transplant coronary disease: a serial intravascular ultrasound study  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVESWe sought to determine the role of conventional atherosclerosis risk factors in the development and progression of transplant coronary artery disease (CAD) using serial intravascular ultrasound imaging.BACKGROUNDTransplant artery disease is a combination of allograft vasculopathy and donor atherosclerosis. The clinical determinants for each of these disease processes are not well characterized. Intravascular ultrasound imaging is the most sensitive tool to

Samir R Kapadia; Steven E Nissen; Khaled M Ziada; Gustavo Rincon; Timothy D Crowe; Navdeep Boparai; James B Young; E. Murat Tuzcu

2001-01-01

118

Robust algorithmic detection of the developed cardiac pathologies and emerging or transient abnormalities from short periods of RR data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Numerous research efforts and clinical testing have confirmed validity of heart rate variability (HRV) analysis as one of the cardiac diagnostics modalities. The majority of HRV analysis tools currently used in practice are based on linear indicators. Methods from nonlinear dynamics (NLD) provide more natural modeling framework for adaptive biological systems with multiple feedback loops. Compared to linear indicators, many NLD-based measures are much less sensitive to data artifacts and non-stationarity. However, majority of NLD measures require long time series for stable calculation. Similar restrictions also apply for linear indicators. Such requirements could drastically limit practical usability of HRV analysis in many applications, including express diagnostics, early indication of subtle directional changes during personalization of medical treatment, and robust detection of emerging or transient abnormalities. Recently we have illustrated that these challenges could be overcome by using classification framework based on boosting-like ensemble learning techniques that are capable of discovering robust meta-indicators from existing HRV measures and other incomplete empirical knowledge. In this paper we demonstrate universality of such meta-indicators and discuss operational details of their practical usage. Using such pathology examples as congestive heart failure (CHF) and arrhythmias, we show that classifiers trained on short RR segments (down to several minutes) could achieve reasonable classification accuracy (~80-85% and higher). These indicators calculated from longer RR segments could be applicable for accurate diagnostics with classification accuracy approaching 100%. In addition, it is feasible to discover single ``normal-abnormal'' meta-classifier capable of detecting multiple abnormalities.

Gavrishchaka, Valeriy V.; Senyukova, Olga

2011-06-01

119

Clinical application of whole-genome array CGH during prenatal diagnosis: Study of 25 selected pregnancies with abnormal ultrasound findings or apparently balanced structural aberrations  

PubMed Central

Background The purpose of the study was the application and evaluation of array Comparative Genomic Hybridization (array CGH) in selected cases during prenatal diagnosis. Array CGH was applied in 25 fetal samples out of which 15 had normal karyotypes and abnormal ultrasound findings and 10 had apparently balanced structural aberrations with or without abnormal ultrasound findings. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood, chorionic villi samples (CV) and amniotic fluid. Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) array CGH (Cytochip, BlueGnome Ltd.) of 1 Mb was applied and results were confirmed with either Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH), Multiplex Ligation-dependant Probe Amplification (MLPA) or Real-Time PCR. Results Three out of 25 samples (12%), referred for prenatal array CGH, were found to carry copy number alterations. The number of cases with clinically significant alterations was 2/25 (8%), while one (4%) was of uncertain clinical significance. Two benign Copy Number Variations (CNVs) were also found in 1/25 cases (4%). Conclusions The outcome of this study indicates the ability of array CGH to identify chromosomal abnormalities which cannot be detected during routine prenatal cytogenetic analysis, therefore increasing the overall detection rate.

2010-01-01

120

Abnormal cardiac response to exercise in a murine model of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.  

PubMed

Clinical outcome in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) may be influenced by modifying factors such as exercise. Transgenic mice which overexpress the human disease-causing cTnI gene mutation, Gly203Ser (designated cTnI-G203S), develop all the characteristic phenotypic features of FHC. To study the modifying effect of exercise in early disease, mice underwent swimming exercise at an early age prior to the development of the FHC phenotype. In non-transgenic and cTnI-wt mice, swimming resulted in a significant increase in left ventricular wall thickness and contractility on echocardiography, consistent with a physiological hypertrophic response to exercise. In contrast, cTnI-G203S mice showed no increase in these parameters, indicating an abnormal response to exercise. The lack of a physiological response to exercise may indicate an important novel mechanistic insight into the role of exercise in triggering adverse events in FHC. PMID:17067697

Nguyen, Lan; Chung, Jessica; Lam, Lien; Tsoutsman, Tatiana; Semsarian, Christopher

2007-07-10

121

Contrast-enhanced ultrasound to evaluate changes in renal cortical perfusion around cardiac surgery: a pilot study  

PubMed Central

Introduction Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is a new technique that might enable portable and non-invasive organ perfusion quantification at the bedside. However, it has not yet been tested in critically ill patients. We sought to establish CEUS's feasibility, safety, reproducibility and potential diagnostic value in the assessment of renal cortical perfusion in the peri-operative period in cardiac surgery patients. Methods We recruited twelve patients deemed at risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) planned for elective cardiac surgery. We performed renal CEUS with destruction-replenishment sequences before the operation, on ICU arrival and the day following the admission. Enhancement was obtained with Sonovue® (Bracco, Milano, Italy) at an infusion rate of 1 ml/min. We collected hemodynamic parameters before, during and after contrast agent infusion. At each study time, we obtained five video sequences, which were analysed using dedicated software by two independent radiologists blinded to patient and time. The main output was a perfusion index (PI), corresponding to the ratio of relative blood volume (RBV) over mean transit time (mTT). Results All 36 renal CEUS studies, including 24 in the immediate post-operative period could be performed and were well tolerated. Correlation between readers for PI was excellent (R2 = 0.96, P < 0.0001). Compared with baseline, there was no overall difference in median PI's on ICU admission. However, the day after surgery, median PI's had decreased by 50% (P < 0.01) (22% decrease in RBV (P = 0.09); 48% increase in mTT (P = 0.04), both suggestive of decreased perfusion). These differences persisted after correction for haemoglobin; vasopressors use and mean arterial pressure. Four patients developed AKI in the post-operative period. Conclusions CEUS appears feasible and well-tolerated in patients undergoing cardiac surgery even immediately after ICU admission. CEUS derived-parameters suggest a decrease in renal perfusion occurring within 24 hours of surgery.

2013-01-01

122

Motion and deformation estimation of cardiac ultrasound sequences using an anatomical B-spline transformation model  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a novel method for tracking myocardial motion in 2D ultrasound sequences based on non-rigid registration using an anatomical free-form deformation (AFFD) model where the basis functions are locally oriented along the radial and circumferential direction of the left ventricle (LV). This formulation allows us to model the LV motion more naturally compared to previously proposed FFD's defined on

B. Heyde; P. Claus; R. Jasaityte; D. Barbosa; S. Bouchez; M. Vandenheuvel; P. Wouters; F. Maes; J. D'hooge

2012-01-01

123

Endurance exercise training normalizes repolarization and calcium-handling abnormalities, preventing ventricular fibrillation in a model of sudden cardiac death  

PubMed Central

The risk of sudden cardiac death is increased following myocardial infarction. Exercise training reduces arrhythmia susceptibility, but the mechanism is unknown. We used a canine model of sudden cardiac death (healed infarction, with ventricular tachyarrhythmias induced by an exercise plus ischemia test, VF+); we previously reported that endurance exercise training was antiarrhythmic in this model (Billman GE. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 297: H1171–H1193, 2009). A total of 41 VF+ animals were studied, after random assignment to 10 wk of endurance exercise training (EET; n = 21) or a matched sedentary period (n = 20). Following (>1 wk) the final attempted arrhythmia induction, isolated myocytes were used to test the hypotheses that the endurance exercise-induced antiarrhythmic effects resulted from normalization of cellular electrophysiology and/or normalization of calcium handling. EET prevented VF and shortened in vivo repolarization (P < 0.05). EET normalized action potential duration and variability compared with the sedentary group. EET resulted in a further decrement in transient outward current compared with the sedentary VF+ group (P < 0.05). Sedentary VF+ dogs had a significant reduction in repolarizing K+ current, which was restored by exercise training (P < 0.05). Compared with controls, myocytes from the sedentary VF+ group displayed calcium alternans, increased calcium spark frequency, and increased phosphorylation of S2814 on ryanodine receptor 2. These abnormalities in intracellular calcium handling were attenuated by exercise training (P < 0.05). Exercise training prevented ischemically induced VF, in association with a combination of beneficial effects on cellular electrophysiology and calcium handling.

Bonilla, Ingrid M.; Belevych, Andriy E.; Sridhar, Arun; Nishijima, Yoshinori; Ho, Hsiang-Ting; He, Quanhua; Kukielka, Monica; Terentyev, Dmitry; Terentyeva, Radmila; Liu, Bin; Long, Victor P.; Gyorke, Sandor; Billman, George E.

2012-01-01

124

Comparison of cardiac displacement and strain imaging using ultrasound radiofrequency and envelope signals  

PubMed Central

Echocardiographic strain imaging is a promising new method for quantifying and displaying the health of cardiac muscle. Accurate regional myocardial function analysis requires high spatial and temporal resolution in addition to fidelity to the underlying deformation. However, all current clinical approaches use speckle-tracking algorithms applied to B-mode images derived from envelope signals. Such approaches are inherently of lower spatial resolution, since they require larger data blocks for deformation tracking due to the absence of phase information. In this paper, we compare the strain estimation performance using B-mode, envelope and radiofrequency signals, utilizing data acquired from a uniformly elastic tissue mimicking phantom, cardiac simulation, and clinical in vivo data. Signal-to-noise ratio improvements using radiofrequency signals for linear and phased array geometries were 5.80 dB and 9.48 dB over that obtained with envelope signals (at peak strain) in phantom studies, respectively. Cardiac simulation studies demonstrate that when averaged over the two cardiac cycles, the mean standard deviation of estimated strain using envelope signals from two of the six segments for a short-axes view (anterior and anterolateral) were 48% and 44% higher than that obtained using radiofrequency signals. These segments were chosen since one was along while the other was situated lateral to the beam propagation direction. In a similar manner, in vivo analysis on a volunteer also indicate that the standard deviation of the estimated strain using B-mode and envelope signals were 16% and 42% higher than that obtained using radiofrequency signals in the anteroseptal segment, and 45% and 27% in the anterior segment. These results demonstrate the significant reduction in the variability of strain estimated along with improvements in the spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratios obtained using radiofrequency signals.

Ma, Chi; Varghese, Tomy

2012-01-01

125

The natural history of hip abnormalities detected by ultrasound in clinically normal newborns: a 6-8 year radiographic follow-up study of 93 children.  

PubMed

Ultrasound screening for hip dysplasia or dislocation has revealed a group of children with clinically normal hips, but with abnormal or suspicious ultrasound. During the 3-year period 1988-90, we found 170 children with this combination. We evaluated the natural history of these hips. 93 children were examined clinically and with standard radiography 6-8 years after birth. The center edge (CE) angle of Wiberg and migration percentage (MP) were measured on the radiographs. 87 children had not undergone any treatment, whereas treatment with an abduction orthosis had been initiated at approximately 4 months of age because of persisting dysplasia in 6 cases. All hips were radiographically normal at this follow-up. The mean CE value was 24 degrees (SD 6.5) and the mean MP was 13% (SD 5.2). 73 children had no complaints in their lower extremities, whereas 12 had intoeing gait, 1 had outtoeing gait, 2 had hip or knee pain, and 5 had other complaints not relevant to hip dysplasia. We conclude that infants with sonographically abnormal or suspicious hips, but with normal clinical findings, do not need immediate treatment because spontaneous resolution occurs in most of them. Postponement of treatment in the few with persistent dysplasia does not seem to affect the outcome. PMID:10569261

Tegnander, A; Holen, K J; Terjesen, T

1999-08-01

126

Ultrasound for the Anesthesiologists: Present and Future  

PubMed Central

Ultrasound is a safe, portable, relatively inexpensive, and easily accessible imaging modality, making it a useful diagnostic and monitoring tool in medicine. Anesthesiologists encounter a variety of emergent situations and may benefit from the application of such a rapid and accurate diagnostic tool in their routine practice. This paper reviews current and potential applications of ultrasound in anesthesiology in order to encourage anesthesiologists to learn and use this useful tool as an adjunct to physical examination. Ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blockade and vascular access represent the most popular ultrasound applications in anesthesiology. Ultrasound has recently started to substitute for CT scans and fluoroscopy in many pain treatment procedures. Although the application of airway ultrasound is still limited, it has a promising future. Lung ultrasound is a well-established field in point-of-care medicine, and it could have a great impact if utilized in our ORs, as it may help in rapid and accurate diagnosis in many emergent situations. Optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) measurement and transcranial color coded duplex (TCCD) are relatively new neuroimaging modalities, which assess intracranial pressure and cerebral blood flow. Gastric ultrasound can be used for assessment of gastric content and diagnosis of full stomach. Focused transthoracic (TTE) and transesophageal (TEE) echocardiography facilitate the assessment of left and right ventricular function, cardiac valve abnormalities, and volume status as well as guiding cardiac resuscitation. Thus, there are multiple potential areas where ultrasound can play a significant role in guiding otherwise blind and invasive interventions, diagnosing critical conditions, and assessing for possible anatomic variations that may lead to plan modification. We suggest that ultrasound training should be part of any anesthesiology training program curriculum.

Terkawi, Abdullah S.; Karakitsos, Dimitrios; Elbarbary, Mahmoud; Blaivas, Michael; Durieux, Marcel E.

2013-01-01

127

Abnormal gyration of the temporal lobe and megalencephaly are typical features of thanatophoric dysplasia and can be visualized prenatally by ultrasound.  

PubMed

Autopsies of fetuses with thanatophoric dysplasia (TD) have shown abnormal gyration of the temporal lobes. In addition, the head is relatively large compared with the abdomen. We evaluated by ultrasound six consecutive cases of TD at 19 + 0 to 19 + 6 gestational weeks based on last menstrual period. We observed abnormal and deep transverse sulci in the temporal lobes in all cases; these features were confirmed at autopsy. We performed biometric assessment, including biparietal diameter (BPD) and mean abdominal diameter (MAD). For each MAD value in the TD fetuses, we computed mean and SD of the corresponding BPD values from a population-based registry in the relevant age range, and used them to calculate Z-scores for each BPD/MAD ratio. In the general population, the average BPD/MAD ratio was 1.05. In the TD fetuses, the mean BPD was 51.5 (range, 49-54) mm, the MAD was 45 (range, 41-47) mm and the BPD/MAD ratio was 1.15 (range, 1.09-1.20). The average Z-score of the ratios for TD fetuses was 2.44 (range, 1.05-3.39). The ratios for the TD fetuses were significantly higher than were the population ratios (P = 0.016). At autopsy, the mean brain-to-body weight ratio was 20.6% (range, 15.4-24.1%), which was greater than the corresponding mean ratio of 14.9% in normal fetuses. We conclude that abnormal and deep transverse gyration of the temporal lobes can be visualized by ultrasound in mid-second-trimester fetuses with TD. Due to megalencephaly, fetuses with TD have significantly different body proportions, with a larger BPD compared with normal fetuses. PMID:22374812

Blaas, H-G K; Vogt, C; Eik-Nes, S H

2012-08-01

128

Abnormal amounts of intracellular calcium regulatory proteins in SHRSP.Z-Lepr(fa)/IzmDmcr rats with metabolic syndrome and cardiac dysfunction.  

PubMed

Metabolic syndrome is known to increase the risk of abnormal cardiac structure and function, which are considered to contribute to increased incidence of cardiovascular disease and mortality. We previously demonstrated that ventricular hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction occur in SHRSP.Z-Lepr(fa)/IzmDmcr (SHRSP fatty) rats with metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible mechanisms underlying abnormal heart function in SHRSP fatty rats. The amount of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) 2a, phospholamban (PLB) protein, and Ser(16)-phosphorylated PLB was decreased in cardiomyocytes from SHRSP fatty rats compared with those from control Wistar-Kyoto rats at 18 weeks of age, and the PLB-to-SERCA2a ratio was increased. Left ventricular developed pressure was unchanged, and coronary flow rate and maximum rate of left ventricular pressure decline (-dP/dt) was decreased in SHRSP fatty rats. Treatment with telmisartan reversed the abnormalities of PLB amount, coronary flow rate, and -dP/dt in SHRSP fatty rats. These results indicate that abnormal amounts of intracellular Ca(2+) regulatory proteins in cardiomyocytes, leading to reduced intracellular Ca(2+) reuptake into the sarcoplasmic reticulum, may play a role in the diastolic dysfunction in SHRSP fatty rats and that these effects are partially related to decreased coronary circulation. Telmisartan may be beneficial in protecting against disturbances in cardiac function associated with metabolic syndrome. PMID:23458196

Kagota, Satomi; Maruyama, Kana; Tada, Yukari; Wakuda, Hirokazu; Nakamura, Kazuki; Kunitomo, Masaru; Shinozuka, Kazumasa

2013-02-01

129

Crossed pulmonary arteries: a report on 20 cases with an emphasis on the clinical features and the genetic and cardiac abnormalities.  

PubMed

Crossed pulmonary arteries (CPAs) are a rare abnormality in which the ostium of the left pulmonary artery originates superior to the right pulmonary artery and to its right. Recognition of this rare pathology is important because it generally is accompanied by other congenital heart defects, extracardiac anomalies, and certain genetic problems. To date, only a few cases have been reported, and most of these cases have been associated with complex cardiac abnormalities. The authors detected 20 cases of CPA between June 2009 and November 2012 through their increasing awareness of this anomaly. Approximately 9,250 echocardiograms were performed during this period, and all of them also were checked for this anomaly. This report describes 20 cases of this CPA, with an emphasis on the clinical features and the genetic and cardiac abnormalities. The patients ranged in age from 1 day to 13 years at the time of the initial diagnosis. Four patients had complex cardiac pathologies such as tetralogy of Fallot, truncus arteriosus, transposition of the great arteries, and complete atrioventricular septal defect. Of the 20 patients, 11 had ventricular septal defects, and 12 had atrial septal defects. Pulmonary artery stenosis was detected in 12 (55 %) of the 20 patients. Aortic arch abnormalities such as interrupted aortic arch, right aortic arch, and coarctation of the aorta were detected in six patients. One patient had a left persistent superior vena cava. In 45 % of the cases, an associated genetic syndrome (DiGeorge-, Noonan-, Holt-Oram syndromes, vertebral, anal, cardiac, tracheal, esophageal, renal, limb anomalies [VACTERL] anomalies) was present. These syndromes were diagnosed based on their clinical features. Karyotype and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses for a 22q11 deletion were performed for 11 patients, with 10 patients found to have normal karyotype and FISH results. Only one patient had a 22q11 deletion. Six patients underwent successful operations. During the follow-up period, 3 of the 20 patients died. At this writing, the remaining patients are clinically stable and being followed without surgery. The authors believe that CPA is not a rare anomaly. If careful echocardiographic examination is performed, CPA will be diagnosed more frequently. Although this pathology usually is associated with genetic syndromes and other cardiac abnormalities, patients with CPA generally are asymptomatic. PMID:23660850

Babao?lu, Kadir; Altun, Gürkan; Binneto?lu, Köksal; Dönmez, Muhammed; Kayabey, Özlem; An?k, Yonca

2013-12-01

130

Detection and display of acoustic window for guiding and training cardiac ultrasound users  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Successful ultrasound data collection strongly relies on the skills of the operator. Among different scans, echocardiography is especially challenging as the heart is surrounded by ribs and lung tissue. Less experienced users might acquire compromised images because of suboptimal hand-eye coordination and less awareness of artifacts. Clearly, there is a need for a tool that can guide and train less experienced users to position the probe optimally. We propose to help users with hand-eye coordination by displaying lines overlaid on B-mode images. The lines indicate the edges of blockages (e.g., ribs) and are updated in real time according to movement of the probe relative to the blockages. They provide information about how probe positioning can be improved. To distinguish between blockage and acoustic window, we use coherence, an indicator of channel data similarity after applying focusing delays. Specialized beamforming was developed to estimate coherence. Image processing is applied to coherence maps to detect unblocked beams and the angle of the lines for display. We built a demonstrator based on a Philips iE33 scanner, from which beamsummed RF data and video output are transferred to a workstation for processing. The detected lines are overlaid on B-mode images and fed back to the scanner display to provide users real-time guidance. Using such information in addition to B-mode images, users will be able to quickly find a suitable acoustic window for optimal image quality, and improve their skill.

Huang, Sheng-Wen; Radulescu, Emil; Wang, Shougang; Thiele, Karl; Prater, David; Maxwell, Douglas; Rafter, Patrick; Dupuy, Clement; Drysdale, Jeremy; Erkamp, Ramon

2014-03-01

131

3D cardiac segmentation using temporal correlation of radio frequency ultrasound data.  

PubMed

Semi-automatic segmentation of the myocardium in 3D echographic images may substantially support clinical diagnosis of heart disease. Particularly in children with congenital heart disease, segmentation should be based on the echo features solely since a priori knowledge on the shape of the heart cannot be used. Segmentation of echocardiographic images is challenging because of the poor echogenicity contrast between blood and the myocardium in some regions and the inherent speckle noise from randomly backscattered echoes. Phase information present in the radio frequency (rf) ultrasound data might yield useful, additional features in these regions. A semi-3D technique was used to determine maximum temporal cross-correlation values locally from the rf data. To segment the endocardial surface, maximum cross-correlation values were used as additional external force in a deformable model approach and were tested against and combined with adaptive filtered, demodulated rf data. The method was tested on full volume images (Philips, iE33) of four healthy children and evaluated by comparison with contours obtained from manual segmentation. PMID:20426200

Nillesen, Maartje M; Lopata, Richard G P; Huisman, Henkjan J; Thijssen, Johan M; Kapusta, Livia; de Korte, Chris L

2009-01-01

132

AKAP13 Rho-GEF and PKD-Binding Domain Deficient Mice Develop Normally but Have an Abnormal Response to ?-Adrenergic-Induced Cardiac Hypertrophy  

PubMed Central

Background A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) are scaffolding molecules that coordinate and integrate G-protein signaling events to regulate development, physiology, and disease. One family member, AKAP13, encodes for multiple protein isoforms that contain binding sites for protein kinase A (PKA) and D (PKD) and an active Rho-guanine nucleotide exchange factor (Rho-GEF) domain. In mice, AKAP13 is required for development as null embryos die by embryonic day 10.5 with cardiovascular phenotypes. Additionally, the AKAP13 Rho-GEF and PKD-binding domains mediate cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in cell culture. However, the requirements for the Rho-GEF and PKD-binding domains during development and cardiac hypertrophy are unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings To determine if these AKAP13 protein domains are required for development, we used gene-trap events to create mutant mice that lacked the Rho-GEF and/or the protein kinase D-binding domains. Surprisingly, heterozygous matings produced mutant mice at Mendelian ratios that had normal viability and fertility. The adult mutant mice also had normal cardiac structure and electrocardiograms. To determine the role of these domains during ?-adrenergic-induced cardiac hypertrophy, we stressed the mice with isoproterenol. We found that heart size was increased similarly in mice lacking the Rho-GEF and PKD-binding domains and wild-type controls. However, the mutant hearts had abnormal cardiac contractility as measured by fractional shortening and ejection fraction. Conclusions These results indicate that the Rho-GEF and PKD-binding domains of AKAP13 are not required for mouse development, normal cardiac architecture, or ?-adrenergic-induced cardiac hypertrophic remodeling. However, these domains regulate aspects of ?-adrenergic-induced cardiac hypertrophy.

Spindler, Matthew J.; Burmeister, Brian T.; Huang, Yu; Hsiao, Edward C.; Salomonis, Nathan; Scott, Mark J.; Srivastava, Deepak; Carnegie, Graeme K.; Conklin, Bruce R.

2013-01-01

133

Focused cardiac ultrasound: a training course for pediatric intensivists and emergency physicians  

PubMed Central

Background Focused echocardiographic examinations performed by intensivists and emergency room physicians can be a valuable tool for diagnosing and managing the hemodynamic status of critically ill children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the learning curve achieved using a theoretical and practical training program designed to enable pediatric intensivists and emergency physicians to conduct targeted echocardiograms. Methods Theoretical and practical training sessions were conducted with 16 pediatric intensivist/emergency room physicians. The program included qualitative analyses of the left ventricular (LV) and right ventricular (RV) functions, evaluation of pericardial effusion/cardiac tamponade and valvular regurgitation and measurements of the distensibility index of the inferior vena cava (dIVC), ejection fraction (EF) and cardiac index (CI). The practical training sessions were conducted in the intensive care unit; each student performed 24 echocardiograms. The students in training were evaluated in a practical manner, and the results were compared with the corresponding examinations performed by experienced echocardiographers. The evaluations occurred after 8, 16 and 24 practical examinations. Results The concordance rates between the students and echocardiographers in the subjective analysis of the LV function were 81.3% at the first evaluation, 96.9% at the second evaluation and 100% at the third evaluation (p?

2014-01-01

134

Accuracy of quantitative ultrasound elastography for differentiation of malignant and benign breast abnormalities: a meta-analysis.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to systematically review recent literature on diagnostic performance of strain ratio and length ratio, two different strain measurements in ultrasound elastography, for differentiating benign and malignant breast masses. A literature search of PubMed and other medical and general purpose databases from inception through January 2012 was conducted. Published studies that evaluated the diagnostic performance of ultrasound elastography alone reporting either strain ratio or length ratio for characterization of focal breast lesions and using cytology (fine needle aspiration) or histology (core biopsy) as a reference standard were included. Summary diagnostic performance measures were assessed using bivariate generalized linear mixed modeling. Nine studies reported strain ratio for 2,087 breast masses (667 cancers, 1,420 benign lesions). Summary sensitivity and specificity were 88 % (95 % Credible Interval (CrI), 84-91 %), and 83 % (95 % CrI, 78-88 %), respectively. The positive and negative likelihood ratios (LR) were 5.57 (95 % CrI, 3.85-8.01) and 0.14 (95 % CrI, 0.09-0.20), respectively. The inconsistency index for heterogeneity was 6 % (95 % CrI, 1-22 %) for sensitivity and 8 % (95 % CrI, 3-24 %) for specificity. Analysis of three studies reporting length ratio for 450 breast masses demonstrated sensitivity and specificity of 98 % (95 % CrI, 93-99 %) and 72 % (95 % CrI, 31-96 %), respectively. Strain ratio and length ratio have good diagnostic performance for distinguishing benign from malignant breast masses. Although, this performance may not be incrementally superior to that of breast imaging reporting and data system (BIRADS) in B-mode ultrasound, the application of USE using strain ratio or length ratio in combination with USB may have the potential to benefit the patients, and this requires further comparative effectiveness and cost-effectiveness analyses. PMID:22418703

Sadigh, Gelareh; Carlos, Ruth C; Neal, Colleen H; Dwamena, Ben A

2012-08-01

135

Registration of 2D cardiac images to real-time 3D ultrasound volumes for 3D stress echocardiography  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Three-dimensional (3D) stress echocardiography is a novel technique for diagnosing cardiac dysfunction, by comparing wall motion of the left ventricle under different stages of stress. For quantitative comparison of this motion, it is essential to register the ultrasound data. We propose an intensity based rigid registration method to retrieve two-dimensional (2D) four-chamber (4C), two-chamber, and short-axis planes from the 3D data set acquired in the stress stage, using manually selected 2D planes in the rest stage as reference. The algorithm uses the Nelder-Mead simplex optimization to find the optimal transformation of one uniform scaling, three rotation, and three translation parameters. We compared registration using the SAD, SSD, and NCC metrics, performed on four resolution levels of a Gaussian pyramid. The registration's effectiveness was assessed by comparing the 3D positions of the registered apex and mitral valve midpoints and 4C direction with the manually selected results. The registration was tested on data from 20 patients. Best results were found using the NCC metric on data downsampled with factor two: mean registration errors were 8.1mm, 5.4mm, and 8.0° in the apex position, mitral valve position, and 4C direction respectively. The errors were close to the interobserver (7.1mm, 3.8mm, 7.4°) and intraobserver variability (5.2mm, 3.3mm, 7.0°), and better than the error before registration (9.4mm, 9.0mm, 9.9°). We demonstrated that the registration algorithm visually and quantitatively improves the alignment of rest and stress data sets, performing similar to manual alignment. This will improve automated analysis in 3D stress echocardiography.

Leung, K. Y. Esther; van Stralen, Marijn; Voormolen, Marco M.; van Burken, Gerard; Nemes, Attila; ten Cate, Folkert J.; Geleijnse, Marcel L.; de Jong, Nico; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.; Reiber, Johan H. C.; Bosch, Johan G.

2006-03-01

136

Ex vivo viscoelastic characterization of head and neck tissue abnormalities using ultrasound-stimulated vibro-acoustography (USVA)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the absence of an imaging technique that offers a highly dynamic range detection of malignant tissue intra-operatively, surgeons are often forced to excise excess healthy tissue to ensure clear margins of resection. Techniques that are currently used in the detection of tumor regions include palpation, optical coherence tomography (OCT) elastography, dye injections, and conventional ultrasound to pinpoint the affected area. However, these methods suffer from limitations such as minimal specificity, low contrast, and limited depth of penetration. Lack of specificity and low contrast result in the production of vague disease margins and fail to provide a reliable guidance tool for surgeons. The proposed work presents an alternative diagnostic technique, ultrasound-stimulated vibro-acoustography (USVA), which may potentially provide surgeons with detailed intra-operative imagery characterized by enhanced structural boundaries and well-defined borders based on the viscoelastic properties of tissues. We demonstrate selective imaging using ex vivo tissue samples of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) with the presence of both malignant and normal areas. Spatially resolved maps of varying acoustic properties were generated and show good contrast between the areas of interest. While the results are promising, determining the precision and sensitivity of the USVA imaging system in identifying boundary regions as well as intensities of ex vivo tissue targets may provide additional information to non-invasively assess confined regions of diseased tissues from healthy areas.

Maccabi, Ashkan; Garritano, James; Arshi, Armin; Saddik, George; Tajudeen, Bobby A.; St. John, Maie; Grundfest, Warren S.; Taylor, Zachary D.

2014-03-01

137

System and method for measuring cardiac output via thermal dilution using an implantable medical device with an external ultrasound power delivery system  

US Patent & Trademark Office Database

The implantable device is capable of performing thermal dilution analysis of the cardiac output of a patient using power delivered from an external source. By using power from an external source, the implantable device conserves its power resources for other purposes, such as for pacing or defibrillation therapy. In one example, an external programmer or bedside monitor provides power through a hand-held power delivery wand via electromagnetic induction, with the power routed from a subcutaneous coil to a heating element implanted in the right atrium, which heats blood as it passes through the right atrium. In another example, the heating element is formed of a material that generates heat in response to a beam of ultrasound provided by the wand. In either case, a downstream blood temperature profile is detected using a thermistor implanted in the pulmonary artery and cardiac output is then estimated by analyzing the temperature profile.

2009-12-15

138

Validation of On-Orbit Methodology for the Assessment of Cardiac Function and Changes in the Circulating Volume Using Ultrasound and Braslet-M Occlusion Cuffs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objective of this joint U.S. - Russian project was the development and validation of an in-flight methodology to assess a number of cardiac and vascular parameters associated with circulating volume and its manipulation in long-duration space flight. Responses to modified Valsalva and Mueller maneuvers were measured by cardiac and vascular ultrasound (US) before, during, and after temporary volume reduction by means of Braslet-M thigh occlusion cuffs (Russia). Materials and Methods: The study protocol was conducted in 14 sessions on 9 ISS crewmembers, with an average exposure to microgravity of 122 days. Baseline cardiovascular measurements were taken by echocardiography in multiple modes (including tissue Doppler of both ventricles) and femoral and jugular vein imaging on the International Space Station (ISS). The Braslet devices were then applied and measurements were repeated after >10 minutes. The cuffs were then released and the hemodynamic recovery process was monitored. Modified Valsalva and Mueller maneuvers were used throughout the protocol. All US data were acquired by the HDI-5000 ultrasound system aboard the ISS (ATL/Philips, USA) during remotely guided sessions. The study protocol, including the use of Braslet-M for this purpose, was approved by the ISS Human Research Multilateral Review Board (HRMRB). Results: The effects of fluid sequestration on a number of echocardiographic and vascular parameters were readily detectable by in-flight US, as were responses to respiratory maneuvers. The overall volume status assessment methodology appears to be valid and practical, with a decrease in left heart lateral E (tissue Doppler) as one of the most reliable measures. Increase in the femoral vein cross-sectional areas was consistently observed with Braslet application. Other significant differences and trends within the extensive cardiovascular data were also observed. (Decreased - RV and LV preload indices, Cardiac Output, LV E all maneuvers, LV Stroke Volume). Conclusions: This Study: 1) Addressed specific aspects of operational space medicine and space physiology, including assessment of circulating volume disturbances 2) Expanded the applications of diagnostic ultrasound imaging and Doppler techniques in microgravity. 3) Used respiratory maneuvers against the background of acute circulating volume manipulations which appear to enhance our ability to noninvasively detect volume-dependency in a number of cardiac and vascular parameters. 4) Determined that Tei index is not clinically changed therefore contractility not altered in the face of reduced preload. 5) Determined that increased Femoral Vein Area indicating blood being sequestered in lower extremities correlates with reduced preload and cardiac output. 6) That Braslet may be the only feasible means of acutely treating high pressure pulmonary edema in reduced gravity environments.

Hamilton, Douglas; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Ebert, Douglas; Duncan, Michael; Bogomolov, Valery V.; Alferova, Irina V.; Matveev, Vladimir P.; Dulchavsky, Scott A.

2010-01-01

139

Design and evaluation of a transesophageal HIFU probe for ultrasound-guided cardiac ablation: simulation of a HIFU mini-maze procedure and preliminary ex vivo trials.  

PubMed

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most frequent cardiac arrhythmia. Left atrial catheter ablation is currently performed to treat this disease. Several energy sources are used, such as radio-frequency or cryotherapy. The main target of this procedure is to isolate the pulmonary veins. However, significant complications caused by the invasive procedure are described, such as stroke, tamponade, and atrioesophageal fistula, and a second intervention is often needed to avoid atrial fibrillation recurrence. For these reasons, a minimally-invasive device allowing performance of more complex treatments is still needed. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) can cause deep tissue lesions without damaging intervening tissues. Left atrial ultrasound-guided transesophageal HIFU ablation could have the potential to become a new ablation technique. The goal of this study was to design and test a minimally-invasive ultrasound-guided transesophageal HIFU probe under realistic treatment conditions. First, numerical simulations were conducted to determine the probe geometry, and to validate the feasibility of performing an AF treatment using a HIFU mini-maze (HIFUMM) procedure. Then, a prototype was manufactured and characterized. The 18-mm-diameter probe head housing contained a 3-MHz spherical truncated HIFU transducer divided into 8 rings, with a 5-MHz commercial transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) transducer integrated in the center. Finally, ex vivo experiments were performed to test the impact of the esophagus layer between the probe and the tissue to treat, and also the influence of the lungs and the vascularization on lesion formation. First results show that this prototype successfully created ex vivo transmural myocardial lesions under ultrasound guidance, while preserving intervening tissues (such as the esophagus). Ultrasound-guided transesophageal HIFU can be a good candidate for treatment of AF in the future. PMID:24658718

Constanciel, Elodie; N'Djin, W Apoutou; Bessière, Francis; Chavrier, Françoise; Grinberg, Daniel; Vignot, Alexandre; Chevalier, Philippe; Chapelon, Jean Yves; Lafon, Cyril

2013-09-01

140

Accuracy of the EASI 12-lead electrocardiogram compared to the standard 12-lead electrocardiogram for diagnosing multiple cardiac abnormalities  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was performed to compare a derived 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) using a simple 5-electrode lead configuration (EASI 12-lead) with the standard ECG for multiple cardiac diagnoses. Accurate diagnosis of arrhythmias and ischemia often require analysis of multiple (ideally, 12) ECG leads; however, continuous 12-lead monitoring is impractical in hospital settings. EASI and standard ECGs were compared in 540 patients,

Barbara J Drew; Michele M Pelter; Shu-Fen Wung; Mary G Adams; Carrie Taylor; G. Thomas Evans; Elyse Foster

1999-01-01

141

Noninvasive assessment of cardiac abnormalities in experimental autoimmune myocarditis by magnetic resonance microscopy imaging in the mouse.  

PubMed

Myocarditis is an inflammation of the myocardium, but only ~10% of those affected show clinical manifestations of the disease. To study the immune events of myocardial injuries, various mouse models of myocarditis have been widely used. This study involved experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) induced with cardiac myosin heavy chain (Myhc)-? 334-352 in A/J mice; the affected animals develop lymphocytic myocarditis but with no apparent clinical signs. In this model, the utility of magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) as a non-invasive modality to determine the cardiac structural and functional changes in animals immunized with Myhc-? 334-352 is shown. EAM and healthy mice were imaged using a 9.4 T (400 MHz) 89 mm vertical core bore scanner equipped with a 4 cm millipede radio-frequency imaging probe and 100 G/cm triple axis gradients. Cardiac images were acquired from anesthetized animals using a gradient-echo-based cine pulse sequence, and the animals were monitored by respiration and pulse oximetry. The analysis revealed an increase in the thickness of the ventricular wall in EAM mice, with a corresponding decrease in the interior diameter of ventricles, when compared with healthy mice. The data suggest that morphological and functional changes in the inflamed hearts can be non-invasively monitored by MRM in live animals. In conclusion, MRM offers an advantage of assessing the progression and regression of myocardial injuries in diseases caused by infectious agents, as well as response to therapies. PMID:24998332

Massilamany, Chandirasegaran; Khalilzad-Sharghi, Vahid; Gangaplara, Arunakumar; Steffen, David; Othman, Shadi F; Reddy, Jay

2014-01-01

142

Complete atrioventricular block during cardiac catheterization: two cases reports in patients without pre-existing conduction abnormalities.  

PubMed

Third-degree atrioventricular block has been well documented during ventricular catheterization of patients with underlying conduction abnormalities. Two cases reported here describe patients with normal conduction at baseline who sustained complete heart block during ventricular catheterization. Catheterizing physicians should be aware of this risk, which has not been previously reported. PMID:2354513

Brachfeld, C A; Marshall, J; Volosin, K J; Groh, W C

1990-06-01

143

42 CFR 37.54 - Notification of abnormal radiographic findings.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...findings suggesting, abnormality of cardiac shape or size, tuberculosis, lung cancer, or any other significant abnormal findings...Readers to show an abnormality of cardiac shape or size, tuberculosis, cancer, complicated pneumoconiosis, and any other...

2013-10-01

144

Ultrasound in pregnancy (image)  

MedlinePLUS

The ultrasound has become a standard procedure used during pregnancy. It can demonstrate fetal growth and can detect increasing ... abnormalities, hydrocephalus, anencephaly, club feet, and other ... does not produce ionizing radiation and is considered ...

145

Women’s Expectations and Intention to Terminate Pregnancy in Case of Abnormal Findings at the Second Trimester Level II Ultrasound Scan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The aims of this study were: (1) to explore pregnant women’s background knowledge and expectations of 2nd trimester ultrasound screening, and (2) to investigate women’s intentions to proceed to pregnancy termination if fetal anomaly is detected at the 2nd trimester ultrasound screening. Methods: A prospective, cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study. 300 consecutive pregnant women served as a convenience sample for this

Apostolos P. Athanasiadis; Themistoklis Mikos; Konstantinos Pantazis; Efstratios Assimakopoulos; Filippos Tzevelekis; John N. Bontis

2009-01-01

146

A prospective study of the clinical utility of prenatal chromosomal microarray analysis in fetuses with ultrasound abnormalities and an exploration of a framework for reporting unclassified variants and risk factors.  

PubMed

Purpose:To evaluate the clinical utility of chromosomal microarrays for prenatal diagnosis by a prospective study of fetuses with abnormalities detected on ultrasound.Methods:Patients referred for prenatal diagnosis due to ultrasound anomalies underwent analysis by array comparative genomic hybridization as the first-tier diagnostic test.Results:A total of 383 prenatal samples underwent analysis by array comparative genomic hybridization. Array analysis revealed causal imbalances in a total of 9.6% of patients (n = 37). Submicroscopic copy-number variations were detected in 2.6% of patients (n = 10/37), and arrays added valuable information over conventional karyotyping in 3.9% of patients (n = 15/37). We highlight a novel advantage of arrays; a 500-kb paternal insertional translocation is the likely driver of a de novo unbalanced translocation, thus improving recurrence risk calculation in this family. Variants of uncertain significance were revealed in 1.6% of patients (n = 6/383).Conclusion:We demonstrate the added value of chromosomal microarrays for prenatal diagnosis in the presence of ultrasound anomalies. We advocate reporting back only copy-number variations with known pathogenic significance. Although this approach might be considered opposite to the ideal of full reproductive autonomy of the parents, we argue why providing all information to parents may result in a false sense of autonomy.Genet Med 16 6, 469-476. PMID:24177055

Brady, Paul Daniel; Delle Chiaie, Barbara; Christenhusz, Gabrielle; Dierickx, Kris; Van Den Bogaert, Kris; Menten, Bjorn; Janssens, Sandra; Defoort, Paul; Roets, Ellen; Sleurs, Elke; Keymolen, Kathelijn; De Catte, Luc; Deprest, Jan; de Ravel, Thomy; Van Esch, Hilde; Fryns, Jean Pierre; Devriendt, Koenraad; Vermeesch, Joris Robert

2014-06-01

147

Intravascular ultrasound  

MedlinePLUS

IVUS; Ultrasound - coronary artery; Endovascular ultrasound; Intravascular echocardiography ... A tiny ultrasound wand is attached to the top of a tiny tube called a catheter. This ultrasound catheter is inserted ...

148

Does the presence or absence of sonographically identified cardiac activity predict resuscitation outcomes of cardiac arrest patients?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study evaluated the ability of cardiac sonography performed by emergency physicians to predict resuscitation outcomes of cardiac arrest patients. A convenience sample of cardiac arrest patients prospectively underwent bedside cardiac sonography at 4 emergency medicine residency–affiliated EDs as part of the Sonography Outcomes Assessment Program. Cardiac arrest patients in pulseless electrical activity (PEA) and asystole underwent transthoracic cardiac ultrasound

Philip Salen; Larry Melniker; Carolyn Chooljian; John S. Rose; Janet Alteveer; James Reed; Michael Heller

2005-01-01

149

Role of ultrasound in the understanding and management of vasculitis.  

PubMed

Vasculitis is characterized by a circumferential vessel-wall thickening ('halo'), which can be visualized by modern imaging techniques. In particular, the resolution of ultrasound has increased to 0.1 mm. Ultrasound detects abnormalities that are pathognomonic even in arteries with a diameter below 1 mm. It is particularly helpful in the diagnosis of large-vessel vasculitides, such as classic temporal arteritis, large-vessel giant-cell arteritis (GCA), Takayasu arteritis and idiopathic aortitis. Echocardiography is important for determining cardiac involvement in Takayasu arteritis and also for examining the coronary arteries of children with suspected Kawasaki disease, which is a medium-vessel vasculitis. In small vessel vasculitides ultrasound has only a role for determining the distribution or organ involvement. Fast-track clinics for the diagnosis of GCA help to initiate treatment before complications such as blindness occur; patients receive appointments within 24 h in these clinics. Clinical examination and ultrasound of temporal and axillary arteries are performed by an experienced rheumatologist. In most cases this is able to determine if GCA is present. Temporal artery biopsy can be still carried out in ambivalent cases. The wall swelling of temporal arteries disappears after 2-3 weeks of glucocorticoid treatment. After 3 days of treatment, diagnosis becomes more difficult with ultrasound in some cases. In larger arteries, such as the axillary arteries, wall thickening disappears within months. It tends to be darker (more hypoechoic) in acute disease because of oedema. PMID:24688604

Schmidt, Wolfgang A

2014-04-01

150

Role of ultrasound in the understanding and management of vasculitis  

PubMed Central

Vasculitis is characterized by a circumferential vessel-wall thickening (‘halo’), which can be visualized by modern imaging techniques. In particular, the resolution of ultrasound has increased to 0.1 mm. Ultrasound detects abnormalities that are pathognomonic even in arteries with a diameter below 1 mm. It is particularly helpful in the diagnosis of large-vessel vasculitides, such as classic temporal arteritis, large-vessel giant-cell arteritis (GCA), Takayasu arteritis and idiopathic aortitis. Echocardiography is important for determining cardiac involvement in Takayasu arteritis and also for examining the coronary arteries of children with suspected Kawasaki disease, which is a medium-vessel vasculitis. In small vessel vasculitides ultrasound has only a role for determining the distribution or organ involvement. Fast-track clinics for the diagnosis of GCA help to initiate treatment before complications such as blindness occur; patients receive appointments within 24 h in these clinics. Clinical examination and ultrasound of temporal and axillary arteries are performed by an experienced rheumatologist. In most cases this is able to determine if GCA is present. Temporal artery biopsy can be still carried out in ambivalent cases. The wall swelling of temporal arteries disappears after 2–3 weeks of glucocorticoid treatment. After 3 days of treatment, diagnosis becomes more difficult with ultrasound in some cases. In larger arteries, such as the axillary arteries, wall thickening disappears within months. It tends to be darker (more hypoechoic) in acute disease because of oedema.

2014-01-01

151

Ultrasound biomicroscopy in mouse cardiovascular development  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The mouse is the preferred animal model for studying mammalian cardiovascular development and many human congenital heart diseases. Ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM), utilizing high-frequency (40-50-MHz) ultrasound, is uniquely capable of providing in vivo, real-time microimaging and Doppler blood velocity measurements in mouse embryos and neonates. UBM analyses of normal and abnormal mouse cardiovascular function will be described to illustrate the power of this microimaging approach. In particular, real-time UBM images have been used to analyze dimensional changes in the mouse heart from embryonic to neonatal stages. UBM-Doppler has been used recently to examine the precise timing of onset of a functional circulation in early-stage mouse embryos, from the first detectable cardiac contractions. In other experiments, blood velocity waveforms have been analyzed to characterize the functional phenotype of mutant mouse embryos having defects in cardiac valve formation. Finally, UBM has been developed for real-time, in utero image-guided injection of mouse embryos, enabling cell transplantation and genetic gain-of-function experiments with transfected cells and retroviruses. In summary, UBM provides a unique and powerful approach for in vivo analysis and image-guided manipulation in normal and genetically engineered mice, over a wide range of embryonic to neonatal developmental stages.

Turnbull, Daniel H.

2001-05-01

152

Quasi-Static Ultrasound Elastography  

PubMed Central

Elastography is a new imaging modality where elastic tissue parameters related to the structural organization of normal and pathological tissues are imaged. Basic principles underlying the quasi-static elastography concept and principles are addressed. The rationale for elastographic imaging is reinforced using data on elastic properties of normal and abnormal soft tissues. The several orders of magnitude difference between the elastic modulus of normal and abnormal tissues which is the primary contrast mechanism in elastographic imaging underlines the probability of success with this imaging modality. Recent advances enabling the clinical practice of elastographic imaging in real-time on clinical ultrasound systems is also discussed. In quasi-static elastography, radiofrequency echo signals acquired before and after a small (about 1%) of applied deformation are correlated to estimate tissue displacements. Local tissue displacement vector estimates between small segments of the pre- and post-deformation signals are estimated and the corresponding strain distribution imaged. Elastographic imaging techniques are based on the hypothesis that soft tissues deform more than stiffer tissue, and these differences can be quantified in images of the tissue strain tensor or the Young’s modulus. Clinical applications of quasi-static elastography have mushroomed over the last decade, with the most commonly imaged areas being the breast, prostate, thyroid, cardiac, treatment monitoring of ablation procedures and vascular imaging applications.

Varghese, Tomy

2010-01-01

153

Cardiac sarcoidosis.  

PubMed

Cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) is a rare and under-recognized clinical entity that requires a high level of suspicion and low threshold for screening in order to make the diagnosis. CS may manifest in a variety of ways, and its initial presentation can range from asymptomatic electrocardiographic abnormalities to overt heart failure to sudden cardiac death. The aim of this literature review is to provide a comprehensive overview of CS, with an emphasis on clinical manifestations and special diagnostic and management considerations, while highlighting recent studies that have provided new insights into this unique disease. PMID:24969032

Zipse, Matthew M; Sauer, William H

2014-08-01

154

Musculoskeletal Ultrasound  

MedlinePLUS

... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the probe through ...

155

Ultrasound -- Vascular  

MedlinePLUS

... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the probe through ...

156

Prostate Ultrasound  

MedlinePLUS

... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the probe through ...

157

Scrotal Ultrasound  

MedlinePLUS

... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the probe through ...

158

Hip Ultrasound  

MedlinePLUS

... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the probe through ...

159

Abdominal Ultrasound  

MedlinePLUS

... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the probe through ...

160

Cranial Ultrasound/Head Ultrasound  

MedlinePLUS

... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the probe through ...

161

Ultrasound in space  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Physiology of the human body in space has been a major concern for space-faring nations since the beginning of the space era. Ultrasound (US) is one of the most cost effective and versatile forms of medical imaging. As such, its use in characterizing microgravity-induced changes in physiology is being realized. In addition to the use of US in related ground-based studies, equipment has also been modified to fly in space. This involves alteration to handle the stresses of launch and different power and cooling requirements. Study protocols also have been altered to accommodate the microgravity environment. Ultrasound studies to date have shown a pattern of adaptation to microgravity that includes changes in cardiac chamber sizes and vertebral spacing. Ultrasound has been and will continue to be an important component in the investigation of physiological and, possibly, pathologic changes occurring in space or as a result of spaceflight.

Martin, David S.; South, Donna A.; Garcia, Kathleen M.; Arbeille, Philippe

2003-01-01

162

Quantifying myocardial deformation throughout the cardiac cycle: a comparison of ultrasound strain rate, grey-scale M-mode and magnetic resonance imaging  

Microsoft Academic Search

Strain rate imaging (SRI) is a new ultrasound (US) approach to the quantification of regional myocardial deformation. It previously has been validated in vitro and in vivo against other imaging techniques. However, in all such studies, only peak strain values were compared, and the temporal evolution of the strain curve was not studied. Yet, it is the temporal evolution of

L Herbots; F Maes; J D'hooge; P Claus; S Dymarkowski; P Mertens; L Mortelmans; B Bijnens; J Bogaert; F. E Rademakers; G. R Sutherland

2004-01-01

163

Ultrasound Despeckling for Contrast Enhancement  

PubMed Central

Images produced by ultrasound systems are adversely hampered by a stochastic process known as speckle. A despeckling method based upon removing outlier is proposed. The method is developed to contrast enhance B-mode ultrasound images. The contrast enhancement is with respect to decreasing pixel variations in homogeneous regions while maintaining or improving differences in mean values of distinct regions. A comparison of the proposed despeckling filter is compared with the other well known despeckling filters. The evaluations of despeckling performance are based upon improvements to contrast enhancement, structural similarity, and segmentation results on a Field II simulated image and actual B-mode cardiac ultrasound images captured in vivo.

Tay, Peter C.; Garson, Christopher D.; Acton, Scott T.; Hossack, John A.

2010-01-01

164

Walking abnormalities  

MedlinePLUS

Gait abnormalities ... of how a person walks is called the gait. Different types of walking problems occur without a ... Some walking abnormalities have been given names: Propulsive gait -- a stooped, stiff posture with the head and ...

165

Complex patterns of abnormal heartbeats  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Individuals having frequent abnormal heartbeats interspersed with normal heartbeats may be at an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. However, mechanistic understanding of such cardiac arrhythmias is limited. We present a visual and qualitative method to display statistical properties of abnormal heartbeats. We introduce dynamical ``heartprints'' which reveal characteristic patterns in long clinical records encompassing ~105 heartbeats and may provide information about underlying mechanisms. We test if these dynamics can be reproduced by model simulations in which abnormal heartbeats are generated (i) randomly, (ii) at a fixed time interval following a preceding normal heartbeat, or (iii) by an independent oscillator that may or may not interact with the normal heartbeat. We compare the results of these three models and test their limitations to comprehensively simulate the statistical features of selected clinical records. This work introduces methods that can be used to test mathematical models of arrhythmogenesis and to develop a new understanding of underlying electrophysiologic mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmia.

Schulte-Frohlinde, Verena; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Goldberger, Ary L.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Costa, Madalena; Morley-Davies, Adrian; Stanley, H. Eugene; Glass, Leon

2002-09-01

166

Complex patterns of abnormal heartbeats  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Individuals having frequent abnormal heartbeats interspersed with normal heartbeats may be at an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. However, mechanistic understanding of such cardiac arrhythmias is limited. We present a visual and qualitative method to display statistical properties of abnormal heartbeats. We introduce dynamical "heartprints" which reveal characteristic patterns in long clinical records encompassing approximately 10(5) heartbeats and may provide information about underlying mechanisms. We test if these dynamics can be reproduced by model simulations in which abnormal heartbeats are generated (i) randomly, (ii) at a fixed time interval following a preceding normal heartbeat, or (iii) by an independent oscillator that may or may not interact with the normal heartbeat. We compare the results of these three models and test their limitations to comprehensively simulate the statistical features of selected clinical records. This work introduces methods that can be used to test mathematical models of arrhythmogenesis and to develop a new understanding of underlying electrophysiologic mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmia.

Schulte-Frohlinde, Verena; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Goldberger, Ary L.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Costa, Madalena; Morley-Davies, Adrian; Stanley, H. Eugene; Glass, Leon

2002-01-01

167

Cardiac Catheterization Services, State of Maine.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The major issues concerning cardiac catherization services are examined. Following an introductory section, focus is on the following: the heart and abnormalities of the heart; methods for cardiac diagnosis and evaluation; the indications for coronary dia...

1979-01-01

168

Measurement of cardiac output before and after cardiopulmonary bypass: Comparison among aortic transit-time ultrasound, thermodilution, and noninvasive partial CO 2 rebreathing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: A noninvasive continuous cardiac output system (NICO) has been developed recently. NICO uses a ratio of the change in the end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure and carbon dioxide elimination in response to a brief period of partial rebreathing to measure CO. The aim of this study was to compare the agreement among NICO, bolus (TDCO), and continuous thermodilution (CCO),

Monica Botero; David Kirby; Emilio B. Lobato; Edward D. Staples; Nikolaus Gravenstein

2004-01-01

169

Thyroid ultrasound  

PubMed Central

Thyroid ultrasonography has established itself as a popular and useful tool in the evaluation and management of thyroid disorders. Advanced ultrasound techniques in thyroid imaging have not only fascinated the radiologists but also attracted the surgeons and endocrinologists who are using these techniques in their daily clinical and operative practice. This review provides an overview of indications for ultrasound in various thyroid diseases, describes characteristic ultrasound findings in these diseases, and illustrates major diagnostic pitfalls of thyroid ultrasound.

Chaudhary, Vikas; Bano, Shahina

2013-01-01

170

Ultrasound (Sonography)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) and the American College of Radiology (ACR) produce this website which provides information on 15 varieties of sonography including hysterosonography, obstetric ultrasound, and thyroid ultrasound. Sections on each variety of ultrasound provide information on common uses of the procedure, equipment, procedure results & interpretation, benefits and risks, and limitations. This is a great resource for instructors of courses related to diagnostic medical sonography and for the aspiring sonographer or ultrasound technician.

2007-04-30

171

Strain rate imaging of sinoatrial node by ultrasound  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sinoatrial node plays an important role in cardiac conduction system because it initiates the cardiac electrical activation, and sets the rate and rhythm of the heart. A method based on ultrasound strain rate imaging is proposed in this paper to reflect the local compression and expansion rates not affected by overall heart translation, or regional deformation during the cardiac cycle

Deyu Li; Shukui Zhao; Lixue Yin; Tianfu Wang; Changqiong Zheng; Yi Zheng

2001-01-01

172

A preliminary study on the evaluation of relationship between left ventricular torsion and cardiac cycle phase by two-dimensional ultrasound speckle tracking imaging  

Microsoft Academic Search

In normal subjects there is a certain corresponding relationship between the peak rotation angle of the apex and the base\\u000a with respect to the phase of the cardiac cycle. We hypothesized that the myocardial contractile force and the delay of conduction\\u000a may affect the correspondence of them. Our study aims to use speckle tracking imaging (STI) technique to analyze the

Xianghong Luo; Tiesheng Cao; Zhaojun Li; Yunyou Duan

2009-01-01

173

Diagnostic ultrasound features and outcome of restrictive foramen ovale in fetuses with structurally normal hearts.  

PubMed

Intrauterine foramen ovale (FO) restriction in association with congenital heart disease (CHD) carries a poor prognosis. However, in the absence of CHD, the clinical importance of restrictive FO in the fetus is not well understood. We evaluated the antenatal prevalence, clinical presentation, diagnostic ultrasound features, and outcome of restrictive FO in fetuses without CHD. We reviewed the echocardiographic and clinical records of 23 fetuses diagnosed with a restrictive FO and structurally normal heart between 2001 and 2012. The atrial septum, dimensions of cardiac structures, left and right cardiac output and Doppler interrogation of cardiac flows were examined. The clinical outcomes of all fetuses with restrictive FO were analysed. Restrictive FO was identified in 23 of 1,682 (1.4 %) fetuses with no CHD. Enlarged right heart structures (100 %), hypermobile or redundant primum atrial septum (91 %), increased right-to-left ventricular cardiac output ratio (91 %), and posteriorly angulated ductus arteriosus (68 %) were the most common echocardiographic findings associated with this rare phenomenon. Additional noncardiac systemic abnormalities were identified in 13 (56 %) babies. Seven (30 %) neonates developed persistent pulmonary hypertension, and 7 infants died. Antenatal restrictive FO is an underrecognised entity despite being a common cause of right heart dilatation in the fetus. In the absence of CHD, restrictive FO is well tolerated antenatally, but its frequent association with noncardiac abnormalities and pulmonary hypertension in the neonate are noteworthy. PMID:24585219

Uzun, Orhan; Babaoglu, Kadir; Ayhan, Yusuf I; Moselhi, Marsham; Rushworth, Fran; Morris, Sue; Beattie, Bryan; Wiener, Jarmilla; Lewis, Michael J

2014-08-01

174

American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine  

MedlinePLUS

... Preclinical Imaging Interventional-Intraoperative Ultrasound Musculoskeletal Ultrasound Neurosonology Obstetric Ultrasound Gynecologic Ultrasound Pediatric Ultrasound Sonography Therapeutic Ultrasound ...

175

Methodological approach for the assessment of ultrasound reproducibility of cardiac structure and function: a proposal of the study group of Echocardiography of the Italian Society of Cardiology (Ultra Cardia SIC) Part I  

PubMed Central

When applying echo-Doppler imaging for either clinical or research purposes it is very important to select the most adequate modality/technology and choose the most reliable and reproducible measurements. Quality control is a mainstay to reduce variability among institutions and operators and must be obtained by using appropriate procedures for data acquisition, storage and interpretation of echo-Doppler data. This goal can be achieved by employing an echo core laboratory (ECL), with the responsibility for standardizing image acquisition processes (performed at the peripheral echo-labs) and analysis (by monitoring and optimizing the internal intra- and inter-reader variability of measurements). Accordingly, the Working Group of Echocardiography of the Italian Society of Cardiology decided to design standardized procedures for imaging acquisition in peripheral laboratories and reading procedures and to propose a methodological approach to assess the reproducibility of echo-Doppler parameters of cardiac structure and function by using both standard and advanced technologies. A number of cardiologists experienced in cardiac ultrasound was involved to set up an ECL available for future studies involving complex imaging or including echo-Doppler measures as primary or secondary efficacy or safety end-points. The present manuscript describes the methodology of the procedures (imaging acquisition and measurement reading) and provides the documentation of the work done so far to test the reproducibility of the different echo-Doppler modalities (standard and advanced). These procedures can be suggested for utilization also in non referall echocardiographic laboratories as an "inside" quality check, with the aim at optimizing clinical consistency of echo-Doppler data.

2011-01-01

176

Trends in ultrasound examination in family practice  

PubMed Central

Background: Ultrasound examination is very frequently used for the evaluation of abnormalities in various organs of the body. Our aim was to determine whether the requests by family physicians (FPs) for ultrasound examinations were appropriate. Our secondary objective was to enumerate positive and negative ultrasound reports for various diagnostic indications. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted during the period of month between June and August 2010, at the Family Medicine Department of North West Armed Forces Prince Salman Hospital, Tabuk. We reviewed the ultrasound requests of all patients included in this study and the findings of the procedure. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL), version 16.0. Results: The requests and reports of 815 patients for ultrasound were reviewed. Females comprised 58.7% of the referred cases. The mean age of the sample at referral was 30 ± 18.5 for females and 34 ± 20.7 for males. Only 46% of the request forms contained conclusive information and instructions. Abdominal/pelvic ultrasounds were the most frequently requested; Nearly 71.2% of the ultrasound scans were normal. Abdominal/pelvis ultrasound was more likely to be reported as normal than ultrasound scans of other regions (P = 0.007). Patients aged 41-60 years were more likely to have an abnormal ultrasound (P = 0.02). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that FPs have to be educated about imaging referral protocols in order to achieve better outcomes.

Alamri, Ali F.; Khan, Israr; Baig, Mirza I. A.; Iftikhar, Rahila

2014-01-01

177

Interventional ultrasound  

SciTech Connect

This book discusses: Introduction to interventional ultrasound/handling of aspirated material/general principles of fine needle aspiration cytology/procedure and principles in ultrasonically guided puncture/puncture of focal liver lesions/intraoperative puncture of the liver guided by ultrasound/Interventional ultrasound in cancer therapy/Interventional echocardiography/Fine-needle aspiration biopsy: Are there any risks./Puncture of renal mass lesions/Intrauterine needle diagnosis/Percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

Holm, H.H.; Kristensen, J.K.

1985-01-01

178

Pregnancy ultrasound  

MedlinePLUS

Pregnancy sonogram; Obstetric ultrasonography; Obstetric sonogram; Ultrasound - pregnancy ... In: Gabbe SG, Niebyl JR, Simpson JL, eds. Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies . 5th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: ...

179

Cardiac Effects of Seizures  

PubMed Central

Seizures frequently affect the heart rate and rhythm. In most cases, seizure-related cardiac changes are transient and do not appear to cause clinically significant abnormalities for the patient. Great interest in this area of research has been generated because of a possible connection with sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). While there are clear, but rare complications from seizure-related cardiac arrhythmias, such as ictal asystole that causes syncope, the overall risk of seizures on cardiac status and any potential connection between seizures and SUDEP still remain uncertain.

Nei, Maromi

2009-01-01

180

Advances in Fetal Cardiac Imaging  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the past 25 years, two-dimensional imaging of the fetal heart has evolved into a sophisticated and widely practiced clinical tool, but most heart disease still goes undetected until sometime after birth, despite routine fetal ultrasound evaluations. Over the next 25 years, tremendous advances in fetal cardiac imaging, including three-dimensional imaging, promise to revolutionize both the prenatal detection and diagnosis

M. Sklansky

2004-01-01

181

Clinical Significance of Abnormal Electrocardiographic Patterns in Trained Athletes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background—The prevalence, clinical significance, and determinants of abnormal ECG patterns in trained athletes remain largely unresolved. Methods and Results—We compared ECG patterns with cardiac morphology (as assessed by echocardiography) in 1005 consecutive athletes (aged 2466 years; 75% male) who were participating in 38 sporting disciplines. ECG patterns were distinctly abnormal in 145 athletes (14%), mildly abnormal in 257 (26%), and

Antonio Pelliccia; Barry J. Maron; Franco Culasso; Fernando M. Di Paolo; Antonio Spataro; Alessandro Biffi; Giovanni Caselli; Paola Piovano

2010-01-01

182

Detection of microemboli by transcranial Doppler ultrasound.  

PubMed Central

Doppler ultrasound detection of abnormally high-pitched signals within the arterial waveform offers a new method for diagnosis, and potentially for prediction, of embolic complications in at-risk patients. The nature of Doppler "microembolic" signals is of particular interest in patients with prosthetic heart valves, where a high prevalence of these signals is observed. Monitoring the middle cerebral artery with 2-MHz transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TC-2000, Nicolet Biomedical; Warwick, UK), we looked for microemboli signals in 150 patients (95 women and 55 men), and found 1 or more signals during a 30-min recording in 89% of 70 patients with Bjork-Shiley valves (principally monostrut), 54% of 50 patients with Medtronic-Hall valves, and 50% of 30 patients with Carpentier-Edwards valves (p < 0.001, chi 2). In the patients with Bjork-Shiley valves, the mean number of signals per hour was 59 (range, 42-86; 95% confidence interval), which was significantly higher than the mean in patients with Medtronic-Hall and Carpentier-Edwards valves (1.5[range, 0.5-2.5] and 1 [range, 0-5.3], respectively; both p < 0.04, multiple comparisons. Bonferroni correction). In the patients undergoing serial pre- and postoperative studies, the causative role of the valve implant was emphasized. There was no correlation between the number of emboli signals and a prior history of neurologic deficit, cardiac rhythm, previous cardiac surgery, or the intensity of oral anticoagulation, in patients with prosthetic heart valves. In Bjork-Shiley patients, dual (mitral and aortic) valves were associated with more signals than were single valves. In Medtronic-Hall patients, the signal count was greater for valves in the aortic position than it was for valves in the mitral position. Comparative studies of Doppler emboli signals in other clinical settings suggest a difference in composition or size of the underlying maternal between prosthetic valve patients and patients with carotid stenosis. These studies also suggest that the signals are of gaseous origin in valve patients. The clinical significance of continuing microembolism remains to be determined.

Grosset, D G; Georgiadis, D; Kelman, A W; Cowburn, P; Stirling, S; Lees, K R; Faichney, A; Mallinson, A; Quin, R; Bone, I; Pettigrew, L; Brodie, E; MacKay, T; Wheatley, D J

1996-01-01

183

Ultrasound-guided tendon fenestration.  

PubMed

A potential treatment for chronic tendinosis or tendinopathy is percutaneous ultrasound-guided tendon fenestration, also termed dry needling or tenotomy. This procedure involves gently passing a needle through the abnormal tendon multiple times to change a chronic degenerative process into an acute condition that is more likely to heal. This article reviews the literature on tendon fenestration and describes the technical aspects of this procedure including postprocedural considerations. Although peer-reviewed literature on this topic is limited, studies to date have shown that ultrasound-guided tendon fenestration can improve patient symptoms. Several other percutaneous treatments for tendinopathy that include prolotherapy, autologous whole-blood injection, and autologous platelet-rich plasma injection are often performed in conjunction with fenestration. It is currently unknown if these other percutaneous procedures have any benefit over ultrasound-guided tendon fenestration alone. PMID:23487340

Chiavaras, Mary M; Jacobson, Jon A

2013-02-01

184

Enzyme replacement therapy for mucopolysaccharidosis VI: long-term cardiac effects of galsulfase (Naglazyme®) therapy.  

PubMed

Characteristic cardiac valve abnormalities and left ventricular hypertrophy are present in untreated patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type VI (MPS VI). Cardiac ultrasound was performed to investigate these findings in subjects during long-term enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with recombinant human arylsulfatase B (rhASB, rhN-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulfatase, galsulfase, Naglazyme®). Studies were conducted in 54 subjects before ERT was begun and at specific intervals for up to 96 weeks of weekly infusions of rhASB at 1 mg/kg during phase 1/2, phase 2, and phase 3 trials of rhASB. At baseline, mitral and aortic valve obstruction was present and was significantly greater in those ?12 years of age. Mild mitral and trace aortic regurgitation were present, the former being significantly greater in those <12 years. Left ventricular hypertrophy, with averaged z-scores ranging from 1.6-1.9 SD greater than normal, was present for ages both <12 and ?12 years. After 96 weeks of ERT, ventricular septal hypertrophy regressed in those <12 years. For those ?12 years, septal hypertrophy was unchanged, and aortic regurgitation increased statistically but not physiologically. Obstructive gradients across mitral and aortic valves remained unchanged. The results suggest that long-term ERT is effective in reducing intraventricular septal hypertrophy and preventing progression of cardiac valve abnormalities when administered to those <12 years of age. PMID:22669363

Braunlin, E; Rosenfeld, H; Kampmann, C; Johnson, J; Beck, M; Giugliani, R; Guffon, N; Ketteridge, D; Sá Miranda, C M; Scarpa, M; Schwartz, I V; Leão Teles, E; Wraith, J E; Barrios, P; Dias da Silva, E; Kurio, G; Richardson, M; Gildengorin, G; Hopwood, J J; Imperiale, M; Schatz, A; Decker, C; Harmatz, P

2013-03-01

185

Ultrasound microneurosurgery.  

PubMed

This work focuses on the use of an ultrasound neurosurgical unit which includes frequency generator and acoustic converter with different types of surgical attachments according to the surgical peculiarity. These attachments were designed to be used for ultrasonic resection, ultrasonic aspiration, ultrasonic disintegration and other applications. High cutting ability, possibility of local disintegration, specific hemostatic effects and other benefits of ultrasonic surgical tools (in the experimental level) were behind the efforts to create the ultrasound microneurosurgical unit with different attachments of cutting, disintegration, aspiration and separation tools. We used the ultrasound microneurosurgical unit during 299 operations involving meningiomas; acoustic neurinomas; gliomas; hordomas; pituitary adenomas; craniopharyngiomas; tuberculoma; paroxysmal pain in the patients with brachial plexus injuries, facial pain, phantom limb pain, intercostal neuralgia, post-mastectomy syndrome, syringomyelia and tumors of nerve trunks. The experience of using the surgical instruments based on ultrasound oscillation of the working edge showed their high efficiency and good perspective in experimental research as well as in practical application in different ramifications of surgery. PMID:10048059

Ramazanov, R; Dreval, O N; Akatov, O V; Zaretsky, A A

1999-01-01

186

Endobronchial Ultrasound  

Microsoft Academic Search

Complex technical problems interfered with the application of thoracic ultrasound (US) for studies and clinical research. Moreover, in contrast to radiologists, cardiologists, gastroenterologists, internists, obstetricians, gynecologists and others, pulmonologists were not trained in the basics of US images. However, endoscopic US methods were developed in the last 20 years and these methods also provided important results for pulmonologists. As soon

Franco Falcone; Flavio Fois; Daniele Grosso

2003-01-01

187

Sudden cardiac death in Athletes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The impact of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in athletes has been highlighted by increasing media coverage, as well as medical\\u000a and lay awareness of the entities associated with SCD. Common etiologies include cardiac abnormalities such as hypertrophic\\u000a cardiomyopathy (HCM), arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia\\/cardiomyopathy (ARVD), and coronary artery anomalies, each\\u000a with varying geographic incidence. New recommendations regarding noninvasive preparticipation screening have

Olaf Hedrich; Mark Estes; Mark S. Link

2006-01-01

188

ECG abnormalities in predicting secondary cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid haemorrhage  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  \\u000a Background. Electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities frequently occur after subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), and have been linked with\\u000a poor outcome. The pathogenesis behind this relation is unclear. We hypothesized that cardiac dysfunction may contribute to\\u000a the development of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) and investigated if electrocardiographic repolarization abnormalities on\\u000a admission, representing this cardiac dysfunction, are related to DCI. We also assessed the

W. J. Schuiling; A. Algra; A. W. de Weerd; P. Leemans; G. J. E. Rinkel

2006-01-01

189

Three-dimensional canine heart model for cardiac elastography  

PubMed Central

Purpose: A three-dimensional finite element analysis based canine heart model is introduced that would enable the assessment of cardiac function. Methods: The three-dimensional canine heart model is based on the cardiac deformation and motion model obtained from the Cardiac Mechanics Research Group at UCSD. The canine heart model is incorporated into ultrasound simulation programs previously developed in the laboratory, enabling the generation of simulated ultrasound radiofrequency data to evaluate algorithms for cardiac elastography. The authors utilize a two-dimensional multilevel hybrid method to estimate local displacements and strain from the simulated cardiac radiofrequency data. Results: Tissue displacements and strains estimated along both the axial and lateral directions (with respect to the ultrasound scan plane) are compared to the actual scatterer movement obtained using the canine heart model. Simulation and strain estimation algorithms combined with the three-dimensional canine heart model provide high resolution displacement and strain curves for improved analysis of cardiac function. The use of principal component analysis along parasternal cardiac short axis views is also presented. Conclusions: A 3D cardiac deformation model is proposed for evaluating displacement tracking and strain estimation algorithms for cardiac strain imaging. Validation of the model is shown using ultrasound simulations to generate axial and lateral displacement and strain curves that are similar to the actual axial and lateral displacement and strain curves.

Chen, Hao; Varghese, Tomy

2010-01-01

190

Portable Bladder Ultrasound  

PubMed Central

Executive Summary Objective The aim of this review was to assess the clinical utility of portable bladder ultrasound. Clinical Need: Target Population and Condition Data from the National Population Health Survey indicate prevalence rates of urinary incontinence are 2.5% in women and 1.4 % in men in the general population. Prevalence of urinary incontinence is higher in women than men and prevalence increases with age. Identified risk factors for urinary incontinence include female gender, increasing age, urinary tract infections (UTI), poor mobility, dementia, smoking, obesity, consuming alcohol and caffeine beverages, physical activity, pregnancy, childbirth, forceps and vacuum-assisted births, episiotomy, abdominal resection for colorectal cancer, and hormone replacement therapy. For the purposes of this review, incontinence populations will be stratified into the following; the elderly, urology patients, postoperative patients, rehabilitation settings, and neurogenic bladder populations. Urinary incontinence is defined as any involuntary leakage of urine. Incontinence can be classified into diagnostic clinical types that are useful in planning evaluation and treatment. The major types of incontinence are stress (physical exertion), urge (overactive bladder), mixed (combined urge and stress urinary incontinence), reflex (neurological impairment of the central nervous system), overflow (leakage due to full bladder), continuous (urinary tract abnormalities), congenital incontinence, and transient incontinence (temporary incontinence). Postvoid residual (PVR) urine volume, which is the amount of urine in the bladder immediately after urination, represents an important component in continence assessment and bladder management to provide quantitative feedback to the patient and continence care team regarding the effectiveness of the voiding technique. Although there is no standardized definition of normal PVR urine volume, measurements greater than 100 mL to 150 mL are considered an indication for urinary retention, requiring intermittent catheterization, whereas a PVR urine volume of 100 mL to 150 mL or less is generally considered an acceptable result of bladder training. Urinary retention has been associated with poor outcomes including UTI, bladder overdistension, and higher hospital mortality rates. The standard method of determining PVR urine volumes is intermittent catheterization, which is associated with increased risk of UTI, urethral trauma and discomfort. The Technology Being Reviewed Portable bladder ultrasound products are transportable ultrasound devices that use automated technology to register bladder volume digitally, including PVR volume, and provide three-dimensional images of the bladder. The main clinical use of portable bladder ultrasound is as a diagnostic aid. Health care professionals (primarily nurses) administer the device to measure PVR volume and prevent unnecessary catheterization. An adjunctive use of the bladder ultrasound device is to visualize the placement and removal of catheters. Also, portable bladder ultrasound products may improve the diagnosis and differentiation of urological problems and their management and treatment, including the establishment of voiding schedules, study of bladder biofeedback, fewer UTIs, and monitoring of potential urinary incontinence after surgery or trauma. Review Strategy To determine the effectiveness and clinical utility of portable bladder ultrasound as reported in the published literature, the Medical Advisory Secretariat used its standard search strategy to retrieve international health technology assessments and English-language journal articles from selected databases. Nonsystematic reviews, nonhuman studies, case reports, letters, editorials, and comments were excluded. Summary of Findings Of the 4 included studies that examined the clinical utility of portable bladder ultrasound in the elderly population, all found the device to be acceptable. One study reported that the device underestimated catheterized bladder volume In patients with urology

2006-01-01

191

Endobronchial Ultrasound  

PubMed Central

Endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) has emerged as a routinely performed procedure in diagnostic bronchoscopy. Extending the view beyond the airway wall, EBUS provides evaluation of tumor involvement of tracheobronchial wall and mediastinum and plays an essential role as a guidance technique for peripheral pulmonary diseases. The latest development is the EBUS-transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA) scope that allows performing real-time EBUS-TBNA of enlargerd hilar and mediastinal lymph nodes.

Gompelmann, Daniela; Eberhardt, Ralf; Herth, Felix JF

2012-01-01

192

Medical ultrasound education for bioengineers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The widespread adoption of ultrasound technologies in medicine has necessitated the development of educational programs to address the growing demand for trained expertise in both academia and industry. The demand has been especially great in the field of therapeutic ultrasound that has experienced a significant level of research and development activities in the past decade. The applications cover a wide range including cancer treatment, hemorrhage control, cardiac ablation, gene therapy, and cosmetic surgery. A comprehensive educational program in ultrasound is well suited for bioengineering departments at colleges and universities. Our educational program for students in Bioengineering at the University of Washington includes a year-long coursework covering theory and practice of ultrasound, conducting research projects, attending and presenting at weekly seminars on literature survey, presentations at scientific meetings, and attending specialized workshops offered by various institutions for specific topics. An important aspect of this training is its multi-disciplinary approach, encompassing science, engineering, and medicine. The students are required to build teams with expertise in these disciplines. Our experience shows that these students are well prepared for careers in academia, conducting cutting edge research, as well as industry, being involved in the transformation of research end-products to commercially viable technology.

Vaezy, Shahram

2005-04-01

193

Cardiovascular applications of therapeutic ultrasound.  

PubMed

Ultrasound (US) has gained widespread use in diagnostic cardiovascular applications. At amplitudes and frequencies typical of diagnostic use, its biomechanical effects on tissue are largely negligible. However, these parameters can be altered to harness US's thermal and non-thermal effects for therapeutic indications. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ECWT) are two therapeutic US modalities which have been investigated for treating cardiac arrhythmias and ischemic heart disease, respectively. Here, we review the biomechanical effects of HIFU and ECWT, their potential therapeutic mechanisms, and pre-clinical and clinical studies demonstrating their efficacy and safety limitations. Furthermore, we discuss other potential clinical applications of therapeutic US and areas in which future research is needed. PMID:24297498

Nazer, Babak; Gerstenfeld, Edward P; Hata, Akiko; Crum, Lawrence A; Matula, Thomas J

2014-04-01

194

Sources and impact of artifacts on clinical three-dimensional ultrasound imaging.  

PubMed

The purpose of this paper is to investigate, identify and discuss artifacts and their sources arising in three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US) in clinical practice in order to increase the awareness of clinicians and sonographers with respect to common 3D US artifacts and to use this increased awareness to avoid or reduce the occurrence of misdiagnosis in 3D US studies. Patient 3D US data were acquired using several different scanners and reviewed interactively on the scanner and graphics workstations. Artifacts were catalogued according to artifact origin. Two-dimensional ultrasound (2D US) artifacts were classified whether they were of a B-mode or color/power Doppler origin and their presentation in the original scan planes and the resulting volume re-sliced planes and rendered images was identified. Artifacts unique to 3D US were observed, noted and catalogued on the basis of whether they arose during acquisition, rendering or volume editing operations. Acoustic artifacts identified included drop-out, shadowing, etc. whose presentation depended on the relationship between slice and imaging plane orientation. Color/power Doppler artifacts were related to gain, aliasing, and flash which could add apparent structure or confusion to the volume images. Rendered images also demonstrated artifacts due to shadowing and motion of adjacent structures, cardiac motion or pulsatility of the cardiac septum or vessel walls. Editing artifacts potentially removed important structures. Three-dimensional ultrasound is prone to the same types of artifacts encountered in 2D US imaging plus others unique to volume acquisition and visualization. The consequences of these diagnostically significant artifacts include mimicking of abnormal development, masses, or missing structures thus requiring careful study before reaching a diagnosis. PMID:11169316

Nelson, T R; Pretorius, D H; Hull, A; Riccabona, M; Sklansky, M S; James, G

2000-09-01

195

Venous Ultrasound (Extremities)  

MedlinePLUS

... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the probe through ...

196

Breast biopsy - ultrasound  

MedlinePLUS

Biopsy - breast - ultrasound; Ultrasound-guided breast biopsy; Core needle breast biopsy - ultrasound ... following: Fine needle aspiration Hollow needle (called a core needle) Vacuum-powered device Both a hollow needle ...

197

Etiology of sudden cardiac death – risk groups  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary   The majority of sudden cardiac deaths are caused by acute fatal ventricular arrhythmias, such as ventricular tachycardia\\u000a or ventricular fibrillation. Some are based on bradyarrhythmias, asystole or electromechanical dissociation. Established etiologic\\u000a states provide the cardiac substrate for the genesis of fatal arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Virtually all structural\\u000a abnormalities can serve this function. The most common structural risk

P. Steinbigler; R. Haberl

2001-01-01

198

Ultrasound imaging of the lactating breast: methodology and application  

PubMed Central

Ultrasound imaging has been used extensively to detect abnormalities of the non-lactating breast. In contrast, the use of ultrasound for the investigation of pathology of the lactating breast is limited. Recent studies have re-examined the anatomy of the lactating breast highlighting features unique to this phase of breast development. These features should be taken into consideration along with knowledge of common lactation pathologies in order to make an accurate diagnosis when examining the lactating breast. Scanning techniques and ultrasound appearances of the normal lactating breast will be contrasted to those of the non-lactating breast. In addition ultrasound characteristics of common pathologies encountered during lactation will be described.

Geddes, Donna T

2009-01-01

199

Abnormal Uterine Bleeding  

MedlinePLUS

MENU Return to Web version Abnormal Uterine Bleeding Overview What is abnormal uterine bleeding? Abnormal uterine bleeding is any bleeding from the uterus (through your vagina) other than your normal monthly ...

200

Ultrasound annual, 1986  

SciTech Connect

This book provides an analyses of developments in the field of diagnostic ultrasound. Endoscopic ultrasound and ultrasound-guided aspiration of ovarian follicles for in vitro fertilization are addressed. The use of Doppler ultrasound to measure blood flow in obstetrics is also examined.

Sanders, R.C.; Hill, M.C.

1986-01-01

201

Correlative magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of aortic and pulmonary artery abnormalities  

SciTech Connect

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) yields excellent quality images of the cardiovascular system utilizing the inherent natural contrast between flowing blood and the surrounding anatomic structures. To evaluate the clinical usefulness of MRI in the noninvasive diagnosis of large vessel disorders, the authors have performed MRI on 40 pts with either aortic or pulmonary artery abnormalities (18 thoracic or abdominal aortic aneurysms, 8 aorto-occlusive disease, 6 dissecting aneurysms, 4 Marfan's syndrome, 2 pulmonary artery aneurysms 1 pulmonary artery occlusion, 1 aortic coarctation). Images were obtained in the transverse, coronal and sagital body planes utilizing a 0.6T superconductive magnet. Cardiac and/or respiratory gating was employed in most cases. Correlation was made for all studies with conventional or digital subtraction angiography, computed tomography, and/or ultrasound. The diagnostic information obtained by MRI equaled or exceeded that obtained by other imaging techniques except for the few cases where cardiac arrhythmias precluded adequate gated acquisition. All aneurysms and their relationships to adjacent structures were readily demonstrated as were the presence or absence of mural thrombi and dissecting intimal flaps. Angiographically demonstrated atherosclerotic plaques and luminal stenoses were seen by MRI in all patients without arrhythmias. The authors concluded that MRI is a powerful noninvasive diagnostic aid in the delineation of large vessel disorders, especially where knowledge of anatomic interrelationships can guide surgical or other interventional planning.

Risius, B.; O'Donnell, J.K.; Geisinger, M.A.; Zelch, M.G.; George, C.R.; Graor, R.A.; Moodie, D.S.

1985-05-01

202

Predictors of left ventricular regional wall motion abnormalities after subarachnoid hemorrhage  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction  Cardiac abnormalities that have been reported after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) include the release of cardiac biomarkers,\\u000a electrocardiographic changes, and left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction. The mechanisms of cardiac dysfunction after\\u000a SAH remain controversial. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of LV regional wall motion abnormalities (RWMA)\\u000a after SAH and to quantify the independent effects of specific

Avinash Kothavale; Nader M. Banki; Alexander Kopelnik; Sirisha Yarlagadda; Michael T. Lawton; Nerissa Ko; Wade S. Smith; Barbara Drew; Elyse Foster; Jonathan G. Zaroff

2006-01-01

203

Intracardiac ultrasound scanner using a micromachine (MEMS) actuator  

Microsoft Academic Search

Catheter-based intracardiac ultrasound offers the potential for improved guidance of interventional cardiac procedures. The objective of this research is the development of catheter-based mechanical sector scanners incorporating high frequency ultrasound transducers operating at frequencies up to 20 MHz. The authors' current transducer assembly consists of a single 1.75 mm by 1.75 mm, 20 MHz, PZT element mounted on a 2

Jason M. Zara; Stephen M. Bobbio; Scott Goodwin-Johansson; Stephen W. Smith

2000-01-01

204

Ultrasound in Space Medicine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation reviews the use of ultrasound as a diagnostic tool in microgravity environments. The goals of research in ultrasound usage in space environments are: (1) Determine accuracy of ultrasound in novel clinical conditions. (2) Determine optimal training methodologies, (3) Determine microgravity associated changes and (4) Develop intuitive ultrasound catalog to enhance autonomous medical care. Also uses of Ultrasound technology in terrestrial applications are reviewed.

Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Sargsyan, A.E.

2009-01-01

205

Cardiac sympathetic dysinnervation in Type 2 diabetes mellitus with and without ECG-based cardiac autonomic neuropathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

To evaluate the presence and extent of global and regional distributions of cardiac sympathetic dysinnervation in Type 2 diabetes mellitus I-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine (I-123-MIBG) scintigraphy was applied to 15 Type 2 (noninsulin-dependent) diabetic patients with ECG-based cardiac autonomic neuropathy (?two of five age-related cardiac reflex tests abnormal) and 15 clinically comparable Type 2 diabetic patients without ECG-based cardiac autonomic neuropathy. Myocardial perfusion

Oliver Schnell; Katja Hammer; Daniela Muhr-Becker; Anette-Gabriele Ziegler; Mayo Weiss; Klaus Tatsch; Eberhard Standl

2002-01-01

206

Cardiac Mechanics Evaluated by Speckle Tracking Echocardiography  

PubMed Central

Natural myocardial markers, or speckles, originated from constructive and destructive interference of ultrasound in the tissues may provide early diagnosis of myocardial changes and be used in the prediction of some cardiac events. Due to its relatively temporal stability, speckles can be tracked by dedicated software along the cardiac cycle, enabling the analysis of the systolic and diastolic function. They are identified by either conventional 2D grey scale and by 3D echo, conferring independence of the insonation angle, thus allowing assessment of cardiac mechanics in the three spatial planes: longitudinal, circumferential, and radial. The purposes of the present paper are: to discuss the role and the meaning of cardiac strain obtained by speckle tracking during the evaluation of cardiac physiology and to discuss clinical applications of this novel echocardiographic technology.

Abduch, Maria Cristina Donadio; Alencar, Adriano Mesquita; Mathias, Wilson; Vieira, Marcelo Luiz de Campos

2014-01-01

207

Ultrasound assessment of premenopausal bleeding.  

PubMed

Vaginal bleeding is the most common cause of emergency care in the first trimester of pregnancy and accounts for the majority of premenopausal bleeding cases. Ultrasound evaluation combined with a quantitative beta human chorionic gonadotropin test is an established diagnostic tool to assess these patients. Spontaneous abortion because of genetic abnormalities is the most common cause of vaginal bleeding; ectopic pregnancy and gestational trophoblastic disease are other important causes and in all patients presenting with first trimester bleeding, ectopic pregnancy should be suspected and excluded, as it is associated with significant maternal morbidity and mortality. A thorough knowledge of the normal sonographic appearance of intrauterine gestation is essential to understand the manifestations of an abnormal gestation. Arteriovenous malformation of the uterus is a rare but important cause of vaginal bleeding in the first trimester, as it has to be differentiated from the more common retained products of conception, with which it is often mistaken. PMID:21419330

Paspulati, Raj M; Turgut, Ahmet T; Bhatt, Shweta; Ergun, Elif; Dogra, Vikram S

2011-03-01

208

Ultrasound Annual, 1983  

SciTech Connect

The 1983 edition of Ultrasound Annual features a state-of-the-art assessment of real-time ultrasound technology and a look at improvements in real-time equipment. Chapters discuss important new obstetric applications of ultrasound in measuring fetal umbilical vein blood flow and monitoring ovarian follicular development in vivo and in vitro fertilization. Other topics covered include transrectal prostate ultrasound using a linear array system; ultrasound of the common bile duct; ultrasound in tropical diseases; prenatal diagnosis of craniospinal anomalies; scrotal ultrasonography; opthalmic ultrasonography; and sonography of the upper abdominal venous system.

Sanders, R.C.; Hill, M.C.

1983-01-01

209

Mechanical bioeffects of ultrasound.  

PubMed

Ultrasound is used widely in medicine as both a diagnostic and therapeutic tool. Through both thermal and nonthermal mechanisms, ultrasound can produce a variety of biological effects in tissues in vitro and in vivo. This chapter provides an overview of the fundamentals of key nonthermal mechanisms for the interaction of ultrasound with biological tissues. Several categories of mechanical bioeffects of ultrasound are then reviewed to provide insight on the range of ultrasound bioeffects in vivo, the relevance of these effects to diagnostic imaging, and the potential application of mechanical bioeffects to the design of new therapeutic applications of ultrasound in medicine. PMID:15255769

Dalecki, Diane

2004-01-01

210

[Cardiac manifestations of muscular dystrophies].  

PubMed

Muscular dystrophies (MD) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disease group. In the last few years, remarkable progress has been made in understanding the close und various relations between skeletal muscle disease and heart muscle disease. Cardiac involvement has been documented in a number of primary MDs and is even the dominant feature in some of them. The myocardium can be affected in the form of a dilated cardiomyopathy while the conduction system can be affected resulting in arrhythmias and conduction defects. Many patients with MD die because of cardiac complications like sudden cardiac death or congestive heart failure. Detailed clinical data about cardiac involvement are available for Duchenne/Becker MD, Emery-Dreifuss MD, myotonic dystrophy, and the different limb girdle MDs. Cardiac manifestations were also found in congenital MD, central core disease, proximal myotonic myopathy, and nemaline myopathy. No data about cardiac abnormalities are available in oculopharyngeal MD and rippling muscle disease. The heart of patients with primary MD should be carefully investigated because of the life-threatening events caused by cardiac complications. There is a strong need for a close collaboration between neurologists and cardiologists in order to provide optimal disease management for the affected patients. PMID:15868359

Perrot, A; Spuler, S; Geier, C; Dietz, R; Osterziel, K J

2005-05-01

211

About Cardiac Arrest  

MedlinePLUS

... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More About Cardiac Arrest Updated:Nov 25,2013 What is cardiac arrest? ... content was last reviewed on 02/26/2013. Cardiac Arrest • Home • About Cardiac Arrest • Warning Signs for Cardiac ...

212

Single ventricle cardiac defect.  

PubMed

Single ventricle heart is defined as a rare cardiac abnormality with a single ventricle chamber involving diverse functional and physiological defects. Our case is of a ten month-old baby boy who died shortly after admission to the hospital due to vomiting and diarrhoea. Autopsy findings revealed cyanosis of finger nails and ears. Internal examination revealed; large heart, weighing 60 grams, single ventricle, without a septum and upper membranous part. Single ventricle is a rare pathology, hence, this paper aims to discuss this case from a medico-legal point of view. PMID:20527615

Eren, Bulent; Turkmen, Nursel; Turkmen, Nurset; Fedakar, Recep; Senel, Berna; Cetin, Volkan; Cetin, Volkn

2010-05-01

213

Channelopathies from mutations in the cardiac sodium channel protein complex.  

PubMed

The cardiac sodium current underlies excitability in heart, and inherited abnormalities of the proteins regulating and conducting this current cause inherited arrhythmia syndromes. This review focuses on inherited mutations in non-pore forming proteins of sodium channel complexes that cause cardiac arrhythmia, and the deduced mechanisms by which they affect function and dysfunction of the cardiac sodium current. Defining the structure and function of these complexes and how they are regulated will contribute to understanding the possible roles for this complex in normal and abnormal physiology and homeostasis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Na(+) Regulation in Cardiac Myocytes". PMID:23557754

Adsit, Graham S; Vaidyanathan, Ravi; Galler, Carla M; Kyle, John W; Makielski, Jonathan C

2013-08-01

214

Review of Myocardial Motion Estimation Methods from Optical Flow Tracking on Ultrasound Data  

Microsoft Academic Search

Quantitative analysis of cardiac motion is of great clinical interest in assessment of ventricular function. Ultrasound imaging, especially matrix transducers acquiring real-time three dimensional data, provide valuable information, from which quantitative measures of cardiac function can be extracted via optical flow computation. Such analysis requires tracking of the image brightness patterns with underlying assumptions of visual persistency. We present a

Elsa D. Angelini; Olivier Gerard

2006-01-01

215

Medical Ultrasound Imaging.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explains the basic principles of ultrasound using everyday physics. Topics include the generation of ultrasound, basic interactions with material, and the measurement of blood flow using the Doppler effect. (Author/MM)

Hughes, Stephen

2001-01-01

216

Transvaginal ultrasound (image)  

MedlinePLUS

Transvaginal ultrasound is a method of imaging the genital tract in females. A hand held probe is inserted directly ... vaginal cavity to scan the pelvic structures, while ultrasound pictures are viewed on a monitor. The test ...

217

Skeletal limb abnormalities  

MedlinePLUS

Skeletal limb abnormalities refer to a variety of bone structure problems in the arms or legs (limbs). ... Skeletal limb abnormalities are most often used to describe defects in the legs or arms that are ...

218

Ultrasound appearance of a developing mole.  

PubMed

A 40-year-old primigravida at her 9th week of pregnancy presented with uterine bleeding and an ultrasound picture of a non-embryonic pregnancy with an empty gestational sac but a thickened base of high echogenicity. A week later this thickened area showed a placenta-like disc with a picture of early molar change. At ultrasound follow-up, this progressed to a full hydatidiform mole filling the whole of the uterine cavity; the empty gestational sac had disappeared. The molar pregnancy was confirmed histologically following suction evacuation of the uterus. Early ultrasound diagnosis of a non-embryonic pregnancy or a blighted ovum may not rule out the presence of abnormal trophoblast associated with hydatidiform mole. Failed early pregnancies should be evacuated immediately once diagnosed. PMID:8910085

Zaki, Z M; Bahar, A M

1996-10-01

219

Ultrasound in the diagnosis of spina bifida.  

PubMed

Three patients who were at risk of having a baby with a neural-tube defect were investigated by ultrasonic examination and alpha-fetoprotein (A;F.P.) estimation. In all three cases amniotic-fluid A.F.P. levels were significantly raised and pregnancy was terminated. In the first case ultrasound failed to detect a small lumbo-sacral meningocele; In the second case ultrasound successfully diagnosed a dorso-lumbar meningo-myelocele but did not recognise internal hydrocephalus. In the third case ultrasound did not define any lesion, and pathological examination of the fetus revealed no abnormality. It is concluded that ultrasonic examination is an important diagnostic technique in the antneatal investigation of spina bifida. PMID:48732

Campbell, S; Pryse-Davies, J; Coltart, T M; Seller, M J; Singer, J D

1975-05-10

220

Ultrasound Imaging System Video  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In this video, astronaut Peggy Whitson uses the Human Research Facility (HRF) Ultrasound Imaging System in the Destiny Laboratory of the International Space Station (ISS) to image her own heart. The Ultrasound Imaging System provides three-dimension image enlargement of the heart and other organs, muscles, and blood vessels. It is capable of high resolution imaging in a wide range of applications, both research and diagnostic, such as Echocardiography (ultrasound of the heart), abdominal, vascular, gynecological, muscle, tendon, and transcranial ultrasound.

2002-01-01

221

Advances in Ultrasound Elastography  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of elastography is to characterize from mechanical point of view a material (the soft biological tissues in the medical field). Ultrasound elastography is based on the comparison of ultrasound images, when the material is submitted under axial force (compression). This work presents the advances in the instrumentation of an ultrasound scanner, to acquire a sequence of images which

A. Basarab; J. F. Nava A; E. Royer; P. de Boissieu; P. Delachartre

2006-01-01

222

Cardiac rhabdomyosarcoma.  

PubMed

Cardiac sarcoma is a very rare neoplasm and is difficult to diagnose. The case of a 51-year-old man with a left atrial tumour, locally recurrent three months after its surgical removal, is presented. Computed tomography showed metastatic spread to the lung parenchyma. On revised histology, the mass extirpated was a sarcoma. Because of the metastatic spread, further therapy was symptomatic only; the patient died 15 months after the first manifestation of his problems. Immunohistochemical staining confirmed cardiac rhabdomyosarcoma with metastatic spread to the lungs. Difficulty in diagnosing and treating cardiac tumours is discussed. PMID:20428274

Chlumský, J; Holá, D; Hlavácek, K; Michal, M; Svec, A; Spatenka, J; Dusek, J

2001-01-01

223

Paradoxical Air Microembolism Induces Cerebral Bioelectrical Abnormalities and Occasionally Headache in Patent Foramen Ovale Patients With Migraine  

PubMed Central

Background Although controversial, paradoxical embolism via patent foramen ovale (PFO) may account for some of the migraine attacks in a subset of migraine with aura (MA) patients. Induction of MA attacks with air bubble injection during transcranial Doppler ultrasound in MA patients with PFO supports this view. It is likely that cerebral embolism in patients with right-to-left shunt induces bioelectrical abnormalities to initiate MA under some conditions. Methods and Results We investigated changes in cerebral bioelectrical activity after intravenous microbubble injection in 10 MA patients with large PFO and right-to-left cardiac shunt. Eight PFO patients without migraine but with large right-to-left shunt and 12 MA patients without PFO served as controls. Four MA patients with PFO were reexamined with sham injections of saline without microbubbles. Bioelectrical activity was evaluated using spectral electroencephalography and, passage of microbubbles through cerebral arteries was monitored with transcranial Doppler ultrasound. Microbubble embolism caused significant electroencephalographic power increase in MA+PFO patients but not in control groups including the sham-injected MA+PFO patients. Headache developed in 2 MA with PFO patients after microbubble injection. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that air microembolism through large PFOs may cause cerebral bioelectrical disturbances and, occasionally, headache in MA patients, which may reflect an increased reactivity of their brain to transient subclinical hypoxia–ischemia, and suggest that paradoxical embolism is not a common cause of migraine but may induce headache in the presence of a large PFO and facilitating conditions.

Sevgi, Eser Basak; Erdener, Sefik Evren; Demirci, Mehmet; Topcuoglu, Mehmet Akif; Dalkara, Turgay

2012-01-01

224

Pediatric imaging/doppler ultrasound of the chest: Extracardiac diagnosis  

SciTech Connect

In this book the author spells out new diagnostic applications in pediatrics for high resolution cross-sectional ultrasonography, and demonstrates the ways in which Doppler techniques complement the cross-sectional method. This reference presents practical, step-by-step methods for non-invasive ultrasound examination of extra-cardiac anatomy and assessment of vascular blood flow.

Huhta, J.C.

1986-01-01

225

Automated Analysis of Doppler Ultrasound Velocity Flow Diagrams  

Microsoft Academic Search

A highly automated method for the identification and quantization of maximum blood velocity curves from Doppler ultrasound flow diagrams is presented. The method uses an image processing scheme to analyze video-recorded image sequences of flow diagrams. The sequences are acquired, a sequence of images relating to chronological cardiac cycles is extracted, and a maximum blood velocity envelope is determined and

Juerg Tschirren; Ronald M. Lauer; Milan Sonka

2001-01-01

226

Smart Ultrasound Remote Guidance Experiment (SURGE) Preliminary Findings  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

To date, diagnostic quality ultrasound images were obtained aboard the International Space Station (ISS) using the ultrasound of the Human Research Facility (HRF) rack in the Laboratory module. Through the Advanced Diagnostic Ultrasound in Microgravity (ADUM) and the Braslet-M Occlusion Cuffs (BRASLET SDTO) studies, non-expert ultrasound operators aboard the ISS have performed cardiac, thoracic, abdominal, vascular, ocular, and musculoskeletal ultrasound assessments using remote guidance from ground-based ultrasound experts. With exploration class missions to the lunar and Martian surfaces on the horizon, crew medical officers will necessarily need to operate with greater autonomy given communication delays (round trip times of up to 5 seconds for the Moon and 90 minutes for Mars) and longer periods of communication blackouts (due to orbital constraints of communication assets). The SURGE project explored the feasibility and training requirements of having non-expert ultrasound operators perform autonomous ultrasound assessments in a simulated exploration mission outpost. The project aimed to identify experience, training, and human factors requirements for crew medical officers to perform autonomous ultrasonography. All of these aims pertained to the following risks from the NASA Bioastronautics Road Map: 1) Risk 18: Major Illness and Trauna; 2) Risk 20) Ambulatory Care; 3) Risk 22: Medical Informatics, Technologies, and Support Systems; and 4) Risk 23: Medical Skill Training and Maintenance.

Hurst, Victor; Dulchavsky, Scott; Garcia, Kathleen; Sargsyan, Ashot; Ebert, Doug

2009-01-01

227

Aicardi syndrome: Neonatal diagnosis by means of transfontanellar ultrasound  

PubMed Central

Aicardi syndrome is a rare genetic disease characterized by a characteristic classical trio of neurological clinical abnormalities (spasms), agenesis of the corpus callosum and ophthalmological abnormalities (chorioretinal lacunae). The diagnosis can be suspected by prenatal ultrasound with color Doppler identifying the agenesis of the corpus callosum. Usually, the diagnosis is confirmed in the neonate period by transfontanellar ultrasound and ophthalmological examination. We present a case of newborn with Aicardi syndrome, being the transfontanellar identified partial dysgenesis of the corpus callosum and a cyst in the inter-hemispheric fissure. Ophthalmological examination showed bilateral chorioretinal lacunae.

Pires, Claudio Rodrigues; Junior, Edward Araujo; Czapkowski, Adriano; Zanforlin Filho, Sebastiao Marques

2014-01-01

228

Cardiac Ochronosis  

PubMed Central

We report the case of 67-year-old woman who underwent aortic valve replacement and mitral valve repair due to ochronotic valvular disease (alkaptonuria), which was diagnosed incidentally during cardiac surgery.

Erek, Ersin; Casselman, Filip P.A.; Vanermen, Hugo

2004-01-01

229

Cardiac catheterization  

MedlinePLUS

... amyloidosis Causes of congestive heart failure or cardiomyopathy Coronary artery disease Heart defects that are present at birth ( ... include: Cardiac tamponade Heart attack Injury to a coronary artery Irregular heartbeat Low blood pressure Reaction to the ...

230

Cardiac Rehabilitation  

MedlinePLUS

Cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) is a medically supervised program to help people who have A heart attack Angioplasty or coronary artery bypass grafting for coronary heart disease A heart valve repair or replacement A ...

231

Cardiac MRI  

MedlinePLUS

... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cardiac MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a safe, noninvasive test that creates detailed ... and no instruments are inserted into your body. MRI uses radio waves, magnets, and a computer to ...

232

Image-Guided Surgery of Primary Breast Cancer Using Ultrasound Phased Arrays.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

High-intensity focus ultrasound (HIFU) is gaining wider acceptance in noninvasive or minimally invasive targeting of abnormal tissues (e.g. cancer) for destruction. Piezocomposite transducer technology, especially for phased arrays, is providing high-qual...

E. S. Ebbini

2004-01-01

233

Cardiac Angiosarcoma  

PubMed Central

Despite cardiac metastases are found in about 20% of cancer deaths, the presence of primary cardiac tumors is rare. Most primary tumors are benign, and malignant tumors comprise about 15%. We report a 21-year-old man with fever, dyspnea, and hemoptysis that was diagnosed with angiosarcoma of the right atrium and pulmonary metastasis. Patient was submitted to surgical tumor resection without adjuvant therapy and died four months after diagnosis.

Cardoso, Monique Esteves; Canale, Leonardo Secchin; Ramos, Rosana Grandelle; Salvador Junior, Edson da Silva; Lachtermacher, Stephan

2011-01-01

234

Drosophila Models of Cardiac Disease  

PubMed Central

The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has emerged as a useful model for cardiac diseases, both developmental abnormalities and adult functional impairment. Using the tools of both classical and molecular genetics, the study of the developing fly heart has been instrumental in identifying the major signaling events of cardiac field formation, cardiomyocyte specification, and the formation of the functioning heart tube. The larval stage of fly cardiac development has become an important model system for testing isolated preparations of living hearts for the effects of biological and pharmacological compounds on cardiac activity. Meanwhile, the recent development of effective techniques to study adult cardiac performance in the fly has opened new uses for the Drosophila model system. The fly system is now being used to study long-term alterations in adult performance caused by factors such as diet, exercise, and normal aging. The fly is a unique and valuable system for the study of such complex, long-term interactions, as it is the only invertebrate genetic model system with a working heart developmentally homologous to the vertebrate heart. Thus, the fly model combines the advantages of invertebrate genetics (such as large populations, facile molecular genetic techniques, and short lifespan) with physiological measurement techniques that allow meaningful comparisons with data from vertebrate model systems. As such, the fly model is well situated to make important contributions to the understanding of complicated interactions between environmental factors and genetics in the long-term regulation of cardiac performance.

Piazza, Nicole; Wessells, R.J.

2013-01-01

235

Relation between cyclic variation in echo amplitude and segmental contraction in normal and abnormal hearts.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE--To study the relation between cardiac systolic activity and cardiac cycle dependent variation in the ultrasound signal arising from within the myocardium. DESIGN--Regional echo amplitude was used as a measure of the myocardial ultrasound signal. Relative echo amplitude values were assigned by standardising echo gain using the posterior parietal pericardium as an in-vivo calibration. M mode measurements of the left ventricle were used to assess cardiac systolic activity. Subjects were studied prospectively. Analysis of echo amplitude was performed by investigators who were blinded to the results of the M mode analysis. The influence of impaired left ventricular performance and abnormal wall motion were assessed. PATIENTS--11 cardiomyopathy patients with impaired ventricular function, eight patients with severe pulmonary hypertension and reversed septal motion, and 19 healthy controls. SETTING--All subject studies were performed at Harefield Hospital. Echo amplitude analysis was performed at the Royal Brompton Hospital. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Cyclic variation in echo amplitude was determined as the change in echo amplitude from end diastole to end systole. Additionally, an index of cyclic variation defined as the ratio of the cyclic change in echo amplitude to end diastolic echo amplitude was measured. Both cyclic variation and the cyclic variation index were analysed to see whether they correlated with left ventricular dimensions, fractional shortening, and systolic wall thickening. RESULTS--Stepwise regression analysis showed systolic wall thickening to be the most significant independent variable that correlated with the cyclic variation index for both the septum and posterior wall (r = 0.68, p = 0.0001, septum; r = 0.69, p = 0.0001, posterior wall). The slopes and intercepts for both regression equations were similar (y = 0.005x + 0.006, septum; y = 0.006x + 0, posterior wall). Subgroup analysis showed that the healthy controls, patients with cardiomyopathy, and patients with pulmonary hypertension had similar slopes and intercepts for their individual regression equations. CONCLUSIONS--These data support the hypothesis of a quantitative relation between the extent of cyclic variation of echo amplitude and the degree of segmental myocardial shortening, as measured by systolic wall thickening, which is not significantly influenced by location within the myocardium, left ventricular performance, or wall motion. They provide further evidence of the usefulness of quantitative analysis of myocardial echo amplitude in the study of regional myocardial function in both normal and injured myocardium. Images

Lythall, D A; Logan-Sinclair, R B; Ilsley, C J; Kushwaha, S S; Yacoub, M H; Gibson, D G

1991-01-01

236

[Ultrasound imaging of normal fetal central nervous system at 8 to 12 weeks of gestation].  

PubMed

With ongoing evolution of advanced ultrasound diagnostic in prenatal care the trend is to detect potential fetal anomalies in the first trimester if possible. Complex knowledge of normal fetal anatomy, embryology and ultrasound anatomy is important to be able to identify subtle abnormalities. In this review we demonstrate the possibilities of ultrasound imaging of fetal brain at late first trimester and describe normal central nervous system development week by week. Original images are presented. PMID:22312839

Vojtech, J; Krofta, L; Urbánková, I; Dlouhá, K; Haaková, L; Feyereisl, J

2011-12-01

237

Spectrum of Echocardiographic Abnormalities among 168 Consecutive Referrals to an Urban Private Hospital in South-Western Nigeria  

PubMed Central

Trans-thoracic echocardiography (TTE) is an important non-invasive cardiac examination that provides structural and functional information. It is useful in the diagnosis of cardiac diseases and often guides the management and follow-up of patients with cardiovascular diseases (CVD). The study aimed to present an audit of the echocardiograms performed in an urban private hospital over a two-year period in order to define the pattern of cardiac diseases in our center. Echocardiogram reports of 168 consecutive patients performed between May 2011 and April 2013 at an organized private sector hospital in Lagos, south-west Nigeria were reviewed. Studies were performed with a Toshiba Nemio XG ultrasound machine. The data obtained were analyzed for mean age, sex, clinical indications, and echocardiographic diagnosis in the study subjects. A total of 168 echocardiography reports were examined, comprising of 92 males (54.8%) and 76 females (45.2%). The age range of the subjects was 10–76 years (mean 42.5 ± 12.1 years). The commonest indication for echocardiography was systemic hypertension and hypertension related causes (38.1%), followed by abnormal resting electrocardiogram (14.9%). Routine annual medical screening was the next most common indication, representing 13.1% of the indications for echocardiography. The other indications are as presented in Table 1. The echocardiogram was normal in 64.3% of the subjects. The commonest abnormality detected was hypertensive heart disease (HHD); accounting for 9.6% of the subjects studied. Isolated atrial enlargement (left, right, or bi-atrial) was the next most common abnormality accounting for 6% of the echocardiographic diagnosis. Pulmonary hypertension was the next most common diagnosis accounting for 4.8% of our findings. The other echocardiographic diagnoses are as listed in Table 2. Hypertension represents the commonest indication for echocardiography. Normal echocardiogram was the commonest echocardiographic finding while HHD was the commonest echocardiographic abnormality. The prevalence of ischemic heart disease by echocardiography was 2.4%. There was no case of rheumatic heart disease (RHD). The prevalence of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) was 1.2%. Ease of access to echocardiography may influence the findings in an echocardiographic audit and policy makers should incorporate appropriateness criteria into their guidelines for reimbursement.

Oyedeji, Adebayo T.; Akintunde, Adeseye A.; Owojori, Olukolade O.; Peter, Johnson O.

2014-01-01

238

MRI of fetal GI tract abnormalities.  

PubMed

We describe the magnetic resonance (MR) patterns of a variety of fetal gastrointestinal (GI) abnormalities. Thirty-two fetuses between 23 and 38 weeks' gestation with abnormal appearance of the GI tract by ultrasound underwent MR imaging with T1- and T2-weighted sequences. The MR aspect of intestinal atresia (duodenal atresia, one case; small bowel atresia, nine cases) included dilatation of the bowel loops, accurate assessment of the normal bowel distal to the atresia (except in the patient with multiple atresia and apple-peel syndrome), and micro-rectum with decreased T1 signal (except in the patient with duodenal atresia). Megacystis-microcolon-intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (one case) was indicated by an abnormal signal of the entire bowel and an abnormal pattern for the urinary tract. Meconium pseudocysts (two cases) were easily differentiated from enteric cysts (two cases). High anorectal malformations with (two cases) or without (one case) urinary fistula and cloacal malformation (one case) are described and MR findings are discussed. The capability of MR imaging to demonstrate the normal bowel with intraperitoneal anomalies (e.g., congenital diaphragmatic hernia, and sacrococcygeal teratoma) is emphasized. MR imaging is informative in the diagnosis of GI tract abnormalities, especially the severe malformations, with much more accuracy than sonography. PMID:15136891

Veyrac, C; Couture, A; Saguintaah, M; Baud, C

2004-01-01

239

Systematic training in focused cardiopulmonary ultrasound affects decision-making in the prehospital setting - two case reports.  

PubMed

We present two cases from the Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS) in Denmark, in which prehospital physicians trained in cardiac ultrasound (FATE) disclosed significant pathology that induced a radical change for the critical patient's course. PMID:24886932

Jakobsen, Louise Kollander; Bøtker, Morten Thingemann; Lawrence, Lars Peter; Sloth, Erik; Knudsen, Lars

2014-01-01

240

Systematic training in focused cardiopulmonary ultrasound affects decision-making in the prehospital setting - two case reports  

PubMed Central

Abstact We present two cases from the Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS) in Denmark, in which prehospital physicians trained in cardiac ultrasound (FATE) disclosed significant pathology that induced a radical change for the critical patient’s course.

2014-01-01

241

Strain rate imaging of sinoatrial node by ultrasound  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sinoatrial node plays an important role in cardiac conduction system because it initiates the cardiac electrical activation, and sets the rate and rhythm of the heart. A method based on ultrasound strain rate imaging is proposed in this paper to reflect the local compression and expansion rates not affected by overall heart translation, or regional deformation during the cardiac cycle under real physiological conditions. In this method, tissue Doppler motion information was first derived from Doppler tissue velocity images, and then the quantitative velocity values was mapped according to the color bar in the images. Strain rate was estimated from the velocity value according to the relation between velocity gradient and strain rate. Preliminary result of color-coded strain rate images of the sinoatrial node of a dog is given. Result shows a variable pattern in different cardiac phase within a cardiac cycle. Further study of the method may provide a new non-invasive way to observe and characterize sinoatrial node.

Li, Deyu; Zhao, Shukui; Yin, Lixue; Wang, Tianfu; Zheng, Changqiong; Zheng, Yi

2001-09-01

242

Potter syndrome with an unusual cardiac anomaly  

PubMed Central

Potter syndrome is a congenital anomaly characterised by bilateral renal agenesis, pulmonary hypoplasia, cardiac, skeletal abnormalities and maternal oligohydramnios. Here we report a case of Potter syndrome with bilateral renal agenesis, pulmonary hypoplasia and complete transposition of the great vessels, which had been identified during a post-mortem examination. Although cardiac anomalies are known to exist with Potter syndrome, complete transposition of the great vessels has not been reported in the literature.

Prabhu, Savit; Sigamani, Elanthenral; Das, Prasenjit; Sasi, Arun; Safaya, Rajni

2009-01-01

243

Treatment Related Cardiac Toxicity in Patients Treated for Breast Cancer.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

To determine the incidence, dose/time-dependence, and functional significance of regional cardiac perfusion abnormalities in patients with left- sided breast cancer treated with radiation therapy (RT) with and without doxorubicin; 153 patients underwent p...

L. B. Marks

2005-01-01

244

Facts about Sudden Cardiac Death in the Young  

MedlinePLUS

Sudden Arrhythmia Death Syndrome (SADS) Foundation 508 East South Temple Suite 20 Salt Lake City, Utah 84102 800-STOP-SAD or ... to heart rhythm abnormalities. Facts About Sudden Cardiac Death in the Young • Each year in the United ...

245

Cardiac manifestations in Fabry disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fabry disease is an X-linked recessive genetic disorder of glycosphingolipid metabolism, due to deficiency of the lysosomal\\u000a enzyme?-galactosidase A. The disease is characterized by the progressive intracellular lysosomal accumulation of neutral glycosphingolipids\\u000a throughout the body, including the cardiovascular system.\\u000a \\u000a It has been reported that cardiac involvement could be the sole manifestation of the disease in some patients. Myocardial\\u000a abnormalities are

A. Linhart; J.-C. Lubanda; T. Palecek; J. Bultas; D. Karetová; J. Ledvinová; M. Elleder; M. Aschermann

2001-01-01

246

Transvaginal colour Doppler ultrasound in normal and abnormal early pregnancy.  

PubMed

The value of transvaginal colour and pulse wave Doppler in the diagnosis of pathologic early intrauterine and tubal pregnancy was assessed. Forty-one normal pregnancies, 6 blighted ovum, 6 missed abortions, and 22 suspected ectopic pregnancies (13 proven tubal pregnancies) were examined. Single 5 MHz transvaginal colour and pulse wave Doppler probe was used and once clear signals from uterine vessels, umbilical artery or trophoblastic vessels were obtained. Resistance Index (peak systole--end diastole/peak systole, RI) from the corresponding waveforms was calculated. In 41 normal pregnancies (examined before termination of pregnancy) with gestational age ranged from 6 to 10 weeks mean RI in uterine artery was 0.81 (SD 0.06), in the umbilical artery 1 (SD 0), and 0.48 (0.08) in the trophoblastic vessels. Mean RI from uterine arteries in six pregnancies with blighted ovum and six with missed abortion were 0.77 (SD 0.11) and 0.69 (SD 0.13) respectively. In 2 out of 6 cases of blighted ovum and 4 out of 6 cases of missed abortion flow in trophoblastic vessels could not be detected. These findings suggest ineffective early placentation in pathologic pregnancy. Twenty-two patients with suspected ectopic pregnancy (raised serum beta HCG with empty uterus, amenorrhoea with abdominal pain and/or palpable abdominal mass) were examined. In 13 cases tubal pregnancy was confirmed by laparoscopy and/or laparotomy. In the remaining nine cases the diagnosis was excluded by means of laparoscopy or subsequent negative beta HCG. Doppler diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy was made when colour flow in adnexa with RI less than 0.56 was revealed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2200863

Alfirevic, Z; Kurjak, A

1990-01-01

247

The ultrasonic assessment of radial, longitudinal and circumferential cardiac strain in normal pigs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Ultrasound Strain Rate Imaging (SRI) is a technique that is used to assess regional myocardial function. To date, only the radial strain could be measured in a porcine model because the deformation could only be detected along the ultrasound image line in parasternal views. Nevertheless, the longitudinal and circumferential strain can contain a lot of information about cardiac (patho)

Stian Langeland; Sofie Coenen; Ming Wu; Frank Rademakers; J. D'hooge

2005-01-01

248

The technology and performance of 4D ultrasound.  

PubMed

Recent developments in 4D ultrasound imaging technology allow clinicians to obtain not only rich visual information but also quantitative data that can be used for diagnosis and treatment. Some argue that the extension of 2D ultrasound is unnecessary and does not offer any benefits to diagnosis, while others argue that it is possible to better assess an abnormality in 3D than 2D. Anatomy can be reconstructed in perspectives that were never seen with conventional 2D US imaging. Advanced rendering techniques in three dimensions can be customized to be sensitive to specific pathology, thus making diagnosis more accurate. Volume and function of certain anatomical components can be measured with greater accuracy. This article reviews physical principles behind the ultrasound technology, how they are applied to advance the field of ultrasound imaging, and maybe reach its limits. Advances in ultrasound technology make 4D ultrasound imaging faster and less dependent on the operator's expertise, thus opening up more research possibilities in the fields of data processing and visualization. Currently, 4D ultrasound is extensively used in the field of obstetrics and interven-tional radiology. The goal of 4D ultrasound is to overcome the limitations posed by its predecessor technology and to be more clinically useful as an imaging tool. PMID:19961427

Obruchkov, Sergei

2008-01-01

249

Dichotomous pattern of coronary atherosclerosis 1 to 9 years after transplantation: Insights from systematic intravascular ultrasound imaging  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives. The aim of this study was to evaluate the extent and distribution of coronary atherosclerosis after transplantation.Background. Transplant coronary artery disease is an important cause of death after cardiac transplantation. Unlike coronary angiography, intravascular ultrasound is a sensitive tool for detection and quantitation of this disease.Methods. We performed intravascular ultrasound imaging in 132 (106 men, 50 ± 10 years)

E. Murat Tuzcu; Anthony C. De Franco; Marlene Goormastic; Robert E. Hobbs; Gustavo Rincon; Corinne Bott-Silverman; Patrick McCarthy; Robert Stewart; Ellen Mayer; Steven E. Nissen

1996-01-01

250

[Magnetic resonance tomographic findings in cardiac tumors].  

PubMed

After ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the second noninvasive powerful method of examining the heart. The findings in 9 patients with cardiac tumors are reported, who were examined by means of MRI: There was little variance in the MRI signal behavior (with only one exception), although the tumor population examined was very heterogeneous. The MRI techniques used (T1-weighted spin echo, steady-state gradient echo) seem to allow no better tumor specification than ultrasound. Wince multiplanar reconstruction is possible with MRI, tumor size, localization, and the borders of the cardiac neoplasms can be depicted. The cine technique provides dynamic information. In addition, this method allows reliable discrimination between the flow effects and true space-occupying lesions. PMID:8480024

Guhl, L; Grawunder, H J; Arlart, I P

1993-03-01

251

Cardiac amyloidosis  

MedlinePLUS

... disorder caused by deposits of an abnormal protein (amyloid) in the heart tissue, which make it hard ... is a buildup of clumps of proteins called amyloids in body tissues and organs. These proteins slowly ...

252

Imaging techniques in the management of abnormal vaginal bleeding in non-pregnant women before and after menopause.  

PubMed

Transvaginal ultrasound plays a pivotal role in the management of non-pregnant women with abnormal vaginal bleeding. No other imaging technique has a role in the triage of these women. In women with postmenopausal bleeding, ultrasound is used to categorise women as at low or high risk of endometrial cancer, and the result of the ultrasound examination is the basis for further management. In women with abnormal vaginal bleeding before the menopause, the role of ultrasound is less clear. This is because some common causes of abnormal vaginal bleeding before the menopause cannot be diagnosed with ultrasound, such as infection, dysfunctional bleeding, or problems with intrauterine contraceptive devices or contraceptive pills. Nonetheless, transvaginal ultrasound may also sometimes be helpful in women with abnormal vaginal bleeding before the menopause. In this chapter, I present ultrasound findings in women with endometrial cancer, endometrial polyps, endometrial hyperplasia, adenomyosis, uterine myomas, including submucous myomas and leiomyosarcoma, and describe ultrasound-based triage of women with postmenopausal bleeding. PMID:24834911

Valentin, Lil

2014-07-01

253

Ultrasound of the Thyroid Gland  

MedlinePLUS

... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the probe through ...

254

Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging  

MedlinePLUS

... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the probe through ...

255

Doppler ultrasound--a valid and reliable tool to assess spondyloarthritis.  

PubMed

Enthesitis is the hallmark of spondyloarthritis and is observed in all subtypes. Namely, a wide information on spondyloarthritis abnormalities, including synovitis, bursitis, tendinitis, enthesitis and cortical bone abnormalities (erosions and enthesophytes), can be efficiently perceived by ultrasound power Doppler. Furthermore, several studies on imaging of enthesis showed that imaging techniques are better than clinical examination to detect pathology at asymptomatic enthesis. Vascularized enthesitis detected by ultrasound power Doppler appears to be a valuable diagnostic tool to confirm spondyloarthritis diagnosis. This article focuses on the validity and reliability of ultrasound enthesitis assessment in the management of spondyloarthritis patients. PMID:23348109

Falcão, Sandra; De Miguel, Eugenio; Castillo, Concepción; Branco, Jaime C; Martín-Mola, Emilio

2012-01-01

256

Urine - abnormal color  

MedlinePLUS

The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine may be cloudy, dark, or blood-colored. ... Abnormal urine color may be caused by infection, disease, medicines, or food you eat. Cloudy or milky urine is a sign ...

257

Intravascular ultrasound imaging  

SciTech Connect

This book will give vascular surgeons, cardiologists, radiologists, and technologists a complete working knowledge of intravascular ultrasound imaging and the crucial role of this new technology in endovascular diagnosis and therapy. The book reviews the essential principles of vascular pathology and ultrasound imaging and then provides state-of-the-art information on intraluminal ultrasound imaging devices and techniques, including practical guidelines for using catheters, optimizing image quality, and avoiding artifacts. Image interpretation and computerized image reconstruction are also discussed in detail. The first section explains the diagnostic, therapeutic, and experimental applications of intravascular ultrasound, particularly as a adjunct to angioplasty and other current interventional procedures.

Cavaye, D.M.; White, R.A. (UCLA School of Medicine in Los Angeles, CA (United States))

1992-01-01

258

Morphological abnormalities among lampreys  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The experimental control of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) in the Great Lakes has required the collection of thousands of lampreys. Representatives of each life stage of the four species of the Lake Superior basin were examined for structural abnormalities. The most common aberration was the presence of additional tails. The accessory tails were always postanal and smaller than the normal tail. The point of origin varied; the extra tails occurred on dorsal, ventral, or lateral surfaces. Some of the extra tails were misshaped and curled, but others were normal in shape and pigment pattern. Other abnormalities in larval sea lampreys were malformed or twisted tails and bodies. The cause of the structural abnormalities is unknown. The presence of extra caudal fins could be genetically controlled, or be due to partial amputation or injury followed by abnormal regeneration. Few if any lampreys with structural abnormalities live to sexual maturity.

Manion, Patrick J.

1967-01-01

259

Dystrophin gene abnormalities in two patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two new cases of dilated cardiomyopathy (DC) caused by dystrophinopathy are reported. One patient, a 24 year old man, had a family history of X linked DC, while the other, a 52 year old man, had sporadic disease. Each had abnormal dystrophin immunostaining in muscle or cardiac biopsy specimens, but neither had muscle weakness. Serum creatine kinase activity was raised

Francesco Muntoni; Andrea Di Lenarda; Maurizio Porcu; Gianfranco Sinagra; Anna Mateddu; Gianni Marrosu; Alessandra Ferlini; Milena Cau; Jelena Milasin; Maria Antonietta Melis; Maria Giovanna Marrosu; Carlo Cianchetti; Antonio Sanna; Arturo Falaschi; Fulvio Camerini; Mauro Giacca; Luisa Mestroni

1997-01-01

260

Mild liver enzyme abnormalities: eliminating hemochromatosis as cause  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic mild liver enzyme abnormalities are attribut- able to hereditary hemochromatosis in at least 3% of cases. Hemochromatosis formerly was diagnosed late with diabetes and hepatic and cardiac failure. Only recently have the autosomal recessive inheritance and subtle early presentations been understood. However, patients still wait many years and see many physicians before receiving a correct diagnosis. Increased serum transferrin

David L. Witte

1997-01-01

261

12-lead ECG in the athlete: physiological versus pathological abnormalities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Participation in sports activity and regular physical training is associated with physiological structural and electrical changes in the heart (athlete’s heart) that enable sustained increases in cardiac output for prolonged periods. Cardiovascular remodelling in the conditioned athlete is often associated with ECG changes. In rare cases, abnormalities of an athlete’s ECG may reflect an underlying heart disease which puts the

D Corrado; A Biffi; C Basso; A Pelliccia; G Thiene

2009-01-01

262

Abnormal muscle mechanosignaling triggers cardiomyopathy in mice with Marfan syndrome.  

PubMed

Patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS), a multisystem disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding the extracellular matrix (ECM) protein fibrillin 1, are unusually vulnerable to stress-induced cardiac dysfunction. The prevailing view is that MFS-associated cardiac dysfunction is the result of aortic and/or valvular disease. Here, we determined that dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in fibrillin 1-deficient mice is a primary manifestation resulting from ECM-induced abnormal mechanosignaling by cardiomyocytes. MFS mice displayed spontaneous emergence of an enlarged and dysfunctional heart, altered physical properties of myocardial tissue, and biochemical evidence of chronic mechanical stress, including increased angiotensin II type I receptor (AT1R) signaling and abated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activity. Partial fibrillin 1 gene inactivation in cardiomyocytes was sufficient to precipitate DCM in otherwise phenotypically normal mice. Consistent with abnormal mechanosignaling, normal cardiac size and function were restored in MFS mice treated with an AT1R antagonist and in MFS mice lacking AT1R or ?-arrestin 2, but not in MFS mice treated with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or lacking angiotensinogen. Conversely, DCM associated with abnormal AT1R and FAK signaling was the sole abnormality in mice that were haploinsufficient for both fibrillin 1 and ?1 integrin. Collectively, these findings implicate fibrillin 1 in the physiological adaptation of cardiac muscle to elevated workload. PMID:24531548

Cook, Jason R; Carta, Luca; Bénard, Ludovic; Chemaly, Elie R; Chiu, Emily; Rao, Satish K; Hampton, Thomas G; Yurchenco, Peter; Costa, Kevin D; Hajjar, Roger J; Ramirez, Francesco

2014-03-01

263

A prospective evaluation of computed tomography and ultrasound of the pancreas  

SciTech Connect

A prospective cooperative study was performed to assess the relative efficacy of computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound in detecting and identifying pancreatic lesions. Of the 279 patients in the study, 146 were found to have a normal pancreas, and 133 had an abnormal pancreas. All patients underwent both CT and ultrasound examinations. Forty-four ultrasound examinations were technically unsatisfactory. When these suboptimal examinations were excluded, CT had a sensitivity of 0.87 and a specificity of 0.90 in detecting an abnormal pancreas. Ultrasound had a sensitivity of 0.69 and a specificity of 0.82. In detecting a lesion and identifying it as malignant or inflammatory, CT had a sensitivity of 0.84 and ultrasound had a sensitivity of 0.56. It is concluded that CT is the method of choice for detecting a pancreatic lesion, assessing its extent, and defining its etiology.

Hessel, J.J. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA); Siegelman, S.S.; McNeil, B.J.; Sanders, R.; Adams, D.F.; Alderson, P.O.; Finberg, H.J.; Abrams, H.L.

1982-04-01

264

Effects of hemodialysis on cardiac function  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hemodialysis (HD) patients are subject to an enormous excess of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This appears to be largely driven by factors that are different from those at play in the general population. Chronic HD patients are already primed by a large number of structural and functional peripheral vascular and cardiac abnormalities to experience demand myocardial ischemia. Conventional HD is

Christopher W McIntyre

2009-01-01

265

Review What is ultrasound?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper is based on material presented at the start of a Health Protection Agency meeting on ultrasound and infrasound. In answering the question 'what is ultrasound?', it shows that the simple description of a wave which transports mechanical energy through the local vibration of particles at frequencies of 20 kHz or more, with no net transport of the particles

Timothy G. Leighton

266

What is ultrasound?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper is based on material presented at the start of a Health Protection Agency meeting on ultrasound and infrasound. In answering the question ‘what is ultrasound?’, it shows that the simple description of a wave which transports mechanical energy through the local vibration of particles at frequencies of 20kHz or more, with no net transport of the particles themselves,

Timothy G. Leighton

2007-01-01

267

Ultrasound thermometry in hyperthermia  

Microsoft Academic Search

A hyperthermia thermometry system using an ultrasound nonlinear effect caused by superposed pulses was developed. A feasibility study was made to obtain temperature mapping of tissue phantoms and of anesthetized pigs heated by an ultrasound applicator. The thermometry system consists of a mechanical sector scanner and a mainframe with a color monitor. The distribution of the temperature rise is calculated

S. Ueno; M. Hashimoto; H. Fukukita; T. Yano

1990-01-01

268

Bioeffects of Ultrasound.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Results are reported of a study using intense ultrasound to destroy a solid tumor implanted in the hamster flank. Animals were irradiated with ultrasound as the sole mediating agent or in combination with a well-known chemotherapeutic agent, BCNU. Irradia...

F. J. Fry L. K. Johnson

1978-01-01

269

Ultrasound for hip assessment in the newborn.  

PubMed

The hips of 1000 newborn babies were examined clinically and by ultrasonography. The ultrasound assessment was based on measurements of the coverage of the femoral head by the bony acetabular roof, and this parameter was called the Bony Rim Percentage (BRP). The mean BRP was 55.3% in girls and 57.2% in boys, a significant difference. Clinical instability occurred in 0.7% of the newborn babies, and all of the unstable hips had a BRP below the lower limit of normal. All infants with normal clinical findings and suspected abnormal hips based on ultrasound were followed up; in all but two the hips became normal spontaneously. We conclude that ultrasonography, using the measurements of femoral head coverage, is appropriate for screening the newborn, is reliable in differentiating between a true and a false positive Ortolani sign, and that hip dysplasia which is not clinically demonstrable at birth can be detected by ultrasound. Ultrasound should replace radiography as the routine method of following up high-risk infants and those with suspicious signs. PMID:2684989

Terjesen, T; Bredland, T; Berg, V

1989-11-01

270

Myocardial perfusion abnormalities in asymptomatic patients with systemic lupus erythematosus  

SciTech Connect

Accelerated coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction in young patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is well documented; however, the prevalence of coronary involvement is unknown. Accordingly, 26 patients with systemic lupus were selected irrespective of previous cardiac history to undergo exercise thallium-201 cardiac scintigraphy. Segmental perfusion abnormalities were present in 10 of the 26 studies (38.5 percent). Five patients had reversible defects suggesting ischemia, four patients had persistent defects consistent with scar, and one patient had both reversible and persistent defects in two areas. There was no correlation between positive thallium results and duration of disease, amount of corticosteroid treatment, major organ system involvement or age. Only a history of pericarditis appeared to be associated with positive thallium-201 results (p less than 0.05). It is concluded that segmental myocardial perfusion abnormalities are common in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Whether this reflects large-vessel coronary disease or small-vessel abnormalities remains to be determined.

Hosenpud, J.D.; Montanaro, A.; Hart, M.V.; Haines, J.E.; Specht, H.D.; Bennett, R.M.; Kloster, F.E.

1984-08-01

271

Bedside ultrasound in the diagnosis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease  

PubMed Central

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease in the United States. While the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases guidelines define NAFLD as hepatic steatosis detected either on histology or imaging without a secondary cause of abnormal hepatic fat accumulation, no imaging modality is recommended as standard of care for screening or diagnosis. Bedside ultrasound has been evaluated as a non-invasive method of diagnosing NAFLD with the presence of characteristic sonographic findings. Prior studies suggest characteristic sonographic findings for NAFLD include bright hepatic echoes, increased hepatorenal echogenicity, vascular blurring of portal or hepatic vein and subcutaneous tissue thickness. These sonographic characteristics have not been shown to aid bedside clinicians easily identify potential cases of NAFLD. While sonographic findings such as attenuation of image, diffuse echogenicity, uniform heterogeneous liver, thick subcutaneous depth, and enlarged liver filling of the entire field could be identified by clinicians from bedside ultrasound. The accessibility, ease of use, and low-side effect profile of ultrasound make bedside ultrasound an appealing imaging modality in the detection of hepatic steatosis. When used with appropriate clinical risk factors and steatosis involves greater than 33% of the liver, ultrasound can reliably diagnose NAFLD. Despite the ability of ultrasound in detecting moderate hepatic steatosis, it cannot replace liver biopsy in staging the degree of fibrosis. The purpose of this review is to examine the diagnostic accuracy, utility, and limitations of ultrasound in the diagnosis of NAFLD and its potential use by clinicians in routine practices.

Khov, Nancy; Sharma, Amol; Riley, Thomas R

2014-01-01

272

Postnatal evaluation of infants with an abnormal antenatal renal sonogram  

PubMed Central

Purpose of review Antenatally detected renal abnormalities are frequently encountered. Recommended postnatal evaluation of these infants has evolved to minimize invasive testing while maximizing detection of significant abnormalities. Recent findings There is a low rate of detectable renal abnormalities in infants with a normal postnatal sonogram at 4–6 weeks of age. Routine prophylactic antibiotics are not indicated in infants with isolated antenatal hydronephrosis. Infants with a multicystic dysplastic kidney and a normal contralateral kidney on renal ultrasound do not require further evaluation. Parents of these children should be counseled on symptoms of urinary tract infections to allow prompt diagnosis. Summary All infants with abnormalities on antenatal sonogram should undergo postnatal evaluation with a sonogram after birth and at 4–6 weeks of age. Further evaluation can be safely limited when the postnatal sonogram is normal at 6 weeks of age.

Becker, Amy M.

2009-01-01

273

Chromosome abnormality incidence in fetuses with cerebral ventriculomegaly.  

PubMed

Abstract Ventriculomegaly (VM) is a marker of aneuploidy and warrants a detailed examination of fetal anatomy. Chromosomal abnormalities worsen the fetal and neonatal prognosis significantly and karyotyping of fetuses is critically important when accompanying anomalies are detected. Here, we report the genetic results of 140 fetuses with isolated and non-isolated VM detected during a second trimester ultrasound examination followed by invasive in utero diagnostic procedures for karyotyping. VM was diagnosed in seven (5%) fetuses with abnormal karyotype and the chromosomal abnormality incidence was higher in severe VM (6.8%) than mild (4.2%). Higher chromosomal abnormality rates were detected when VM was isolated (8.6%), rather than associated with any anomaly (3.8%). These results suggest that karyotype analysis should be offered to all patients with any degree of VM, regardless of its association with structural anomalies. PMID:24678817

Gezer, C; Ekin, A; Ozeren, M; Taner, C E; Ozer, O; Koc, A; Bilgin, M; Gezer, N S

2014-07-01

274

Diagnostic ultrasound: early detection of fetal neural tube defects.  

PubMed

In a series of 366 patients identified as at risk for a fetal neural tube defect (NTD) before the 24th week of pregnancy, 64 had an abnormal fetus. The abnormalities included anencephaly (39), open spinal defect (17), closed spinal defect (2), encephalocele (1), and a miscellany of other abnormalities (5). An ultrasound examinaton prior to diagnostic anmiocentesis positively identified all anencephalic fetuses, the fetus with the encephalocele, and 15 of the 19 fetuses with spina bifida. The spinal defects in 3 of the remaining 4 fetuses were demonstrated at a second examination. Since both amniotic fluid alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) assays and ultrasound examination have been shown to give false results in the diagnosis of NTDs, the importance of using 2 independent diagnostic techniques is stressed. In patients with elevated levels of maternal serum AFP, a careful ultrasound examination, in addition to identifying the majority of cases associated with an abnormal fetus, provided a good explanation for the elevation in over half of the remainder. In this series more than half the patients (40/69) who underwent amniocentesis because of raised maternal serum AFP levels were shown to have an abnormal fetus. PMID:6160439

Robinson, H P; Hood, V D; Adam, A H; Gibson, A A; Ferguson-Smith, M A

1980-12-01

275

Abnormal menstrual periods (image)  

MedlinePLUS

... may have a variety of causes, such as endometrial hyperplasia, endometrial polyps, uterine fibroids, and abnormal thyroid or ... the endometrium becomes unusually thick it is called endometrial ... Hyperplasia may cause profuse or extended menstrual bleeding.

276

Abnormal haemoglobins: detection & characterization  

PubMed Central

Haemoglobin (Hb) abnormalities though quite frequent, are generally detected in populations during surveys and programmes run for prevention of Hb disorders. Several methods are now available for detection of Hb abnormalities. In this review, the following are discussed: (i) the methods used for characterization of haemoglobin disorders; (ii) the problems linked to diagnosis of thalassaemic trait; (iii) the strategy for detection of common Hb variants; and (iv) the difficulties in identification of rare variants. The differences between developing and industrialized countries for the strategies employed in the diagnosis of abnormal haemoglobins are considered. We mention the limits and pitfalls for each approach and the necessity to characterize the abnormalities using at least two different methods. The recommended strategy is to use a combination of cation-exchange high performance chromatography (CE-HPLC), capillary electrophoresis (CE) and when possible isoelectric focusing (IEF). Difficult cases may demand further investigations requiring specialized protein and/or molecular biology techniques.

Wajcman, Henri; Moradkhani, Kamran

2011-01-01

277

Tooth - abnormal colors  

MedlinePLUS

Abnormal tooth color is any color other than the white to yellowish-white of normal teeth. ... things can cause tooth discoloration. The change in color may affect the entire tooth, or just appear ...

278

Epigenetic mechanisms underlying cardiac degeneration and regeneration.  

PubMed

Epigenetic modifications which are defined by DNA methylation, histone modifications and microRNA mediated gene regulation, have been found to be associated with cardiac dysfunction and cardiac regeneration but the mechanisms are unclear. MicroRNA therapies have been proposed for cardiac regeneration and proliferation of stem cells into cardiomyocytes. Cardiovascular disorders are represented by abnormal methylation of CpG islands and drugs that inhibit DNA methyltransferases such as 5-methyl Aza cytidine are under trials. Histone modifications which include acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation, ADP ribosylation, sumoylation and biotinylation are represented within abnormal phenotypes of cardiac hypertrophy, cardiac development and contractility. MicroRNAs have been used efficiently to epigenetically reprogram fibroblasts into cardiomyocytes. MicroRNAs represent themselves as potential biomarkers for early detection of cardiac disorders which are difficult to diagnose and are captured at later stages. Because microRNAs regulate circadian genes, for example a nocturnin gene of circadian clockwork is regulated by miR122, they have a profound role in regulating biological clock and this may explain the high cardiovascular risk during the morning time. This review highlights the role of epigenetics which can be helpful in disease management strategies. PMID:24636549

Chaturvedi, Pankaj; Tyagi, Suresh C

2014-04-15

279

Prenatal ultrasound diagnosis of neural tube defects. Pictorial essay.  

PubMed

Neural tube defects (NTD) are a heterogeneous group of malformations resulting from failure of normal neural tube closure before the fourth and fifth week of embryologic development. The three most common forms of NTD are: anencephaly, encephalocele and spinal dysraphism. Less common forms of neural tube defects include iniencephaly, amniotic bands and other types of spinal abnormalities including scoliosis/cyphosis, sacral agenesis, limb-body wall complex, diastematomyelia. The most part of these abnormalities are accessible to the ultrasound diagnosis in the midtrimester and sometimes even in the late first trimester of the pregnancy. This kind of abnormalities can occur in isolation or in association with other anomalies, which can also be characterized with ultrasound. In this pictorial essay the ultrasonographic aspects of the NTD will be discussed. PMID:22675716

R?dulescu, Micaela; Ulmeanu, Emil Coriolan; Nedelea, Mihaela; Oncescu, Andrei

2012-06-01

280

Chromosomal Abnormalities and Schizophrenia  

PubMed Central

Schizophrenia is a common and serious psychiatric illness with strong evidence for genetic causation, but no specific loci yet identified. Chromosomal abnormalities associated with schizophrenia may help to understand the genetic complexity of the illness. This paper reviews the evidence for associations between chromosomal abnormalities and schizophrenia and related disorders. The results indicate that 22q11.2 microdeletions detected by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) are significantly associated with schizophrenia. Sex chromosome abnormalities seem to be increased in schizophrenia but insufficient data are available to indicate whether schizophrenia or related disorders are increased in patients with sex chromosome aneuploidies. Other reports of chromosomal abnormalities associated with schizophrenia have the potential to be important adjuncts to linkage studies in gene localization. Advances in molecular cytogenetic techniques (i.e., FISH) have produced significant increases in rates of identified abnormalities in schizophrenia, particularly in patients with very early age at onset, learning difficulties or mental retardation, or dysmorphic features. The results emphasize the importance of considering behavioral phenotypes, including adult onset psychiatric illnesses, in genetic syndromes and the need for clinicians to actively consider identifying chromosomal abnormalities and genetic syndromes in selected psychiatric patients.

BASSETT, ANNE S.; CHOW, EVA W.C.; WEKSBERG, ROSANNA

2011-01-01

281

Cardiac optogenetics  

PubMed Central

Optogenetics is an emerging technology for optical interrogation and control of biological function with high specificity and high spatiotemporal resolution. Mammalian cells and tissues can be sensitized to respond to light by a relatively simple and well-tolerated genetic modification using microbial opsins (light-gated ion channels and pumps). These can achieve fast and specific excitatory or inhibitory response, offering distinct advantages over traditional pharmacological or electrical means of perturbation. Since the first demonstrations of utility in mammalian cells (neurons) in 2005, optogenetics has spurred immense research activity and has inspired numerous applications for dissection of neural circuitry and understanding of brain function in health and disease, applications ranging from in vitro to work in behaving animals. Only recently (since 2010), the field has extended to cardiac applications with less than a dozen publications to date. In consideration of the early phase of work on cardiac optogenetics and the impact of the technique in understanding another excitable tissue, the brain, this review is largely a perspective of possibilities in the heart. It covers the basic principles of operation of light-sensitive ion channels and pumps, the available tools and ongoing efforts in optimizing them, overview of neuroscience use, as well as cardiac-specific questions of implementation and ideas for best use of this emerging technology in the heart.

2013-01-01

282

Cardiac optogenetics.  

PubMed

Optogenetics is an emerging technology for optical interrogation and control of biological function with high specificity and high spatiotemporal resolution. Mammalian cells and tissues can be sensitized to respond to light by a relatively simple and well-tolerated genetic modification using microbial opsins (light-gated ion channels and pumps). These can achieve fast and specific excitatory or inhibitory response, offering distinct advantages over traditional pharmacological or electrical means of perturbation. Since the first demonstrations of utility in mammalian cells (neurons) in 2005, optogenetics has spurred immense research activity and has inspired numerous applications for dissection of neural circuitry and understanding of brain function in health and disease, applications ranging from in vitro to work in behaving animals. Only recently (since 2010), the field has extended to cardiac applications with less than a dozen publications to date. In consideration of the early phase of work on cardiac optogenetics and the impact of the technique in understanding another excitable tissue, the brain, this review is largely a perspective of possibilities in the heart. It covers the basic principles of operation of light-sensitive ion channels and pumps, the available tools and ongoing efforts in optimizing them, overview of neuroscience use, as well as cardiac-specific questions of implementation and ideas for best use of this emerging technology in the heart. PMID:23457014

Entcheva, Emilia

2013-05-01

283

CO(2)-Dependent vasomotor reactivity of cerebral arteries in patients with severe traumatic brain injury: time course and effect of augmentation of cardiac output with dobutamine.  

PubMed

Failing cerebral blood flow (CBF) autoregulation may contribute to cerebral damage after traumatic brain injury (TBI). The purpose of this study was to describe the time course of CO(2)-dependent vasoreactivity, measured as CBF velocity in response to hyperventilation (vasomotor reactivity [VMR] index). We included 13 patients who had had severe TBI, 8 of whom received norepinephrine (NE) based on clinical indication. In these patients, measurements were also performed after dobutamine administration, with a goal of increasing cardiac output by 30%. Blood flow velocity was measured with transcranial Doppler ultrasound in both hemispheres. All patients except one had an abnormal VMR index in at least one hemisphere within the first 24?h after TBI. In those patients who did not receive catecholamines, mean VMR index recovered within the first 48 to 72?h. In contrast, in patients who received NE within the first 48?h period, VMR index did not recover on the second day. Cardiac output and mean CBF velocity increased significantly during dobutamine administration, but VMR index did not change significantly. In conclusion, CO(2) vasomotor reactivity was abnormal in the first 24?h after TBI in most of the patients, but recovered within 48?h in those patients who did not receive NE, in contrast to those eventually receiving the drug. Addition of dobutamine to NE had variable but overall insignificant effects on CO(2) vasomotor reactivity. PMID:21501044

Haenggi, Matthias; Andermatt, Anna; Anthamatten, Claudia; Galimanis, Aikaterini; Mono, Marie-Luise; Alfieri, Alexander; Fung, Christian; Takala, Jukka; Jakob, Stephan M

2012-06-10

284

Transthoracic Cardiac Ultrasonic Stimulation Induces a Negative Chronotropic Effect  

PubMed Central

The objective of this study is to investigate cardiac bioeffects resulting from ultrasonic stimulation using a specific set of acoustical parameters. Ten Sprague–Dawley rats were anesthetized and exposed to 1-MHz ultrasound pulses of 3-MPa peak rarefactional pressure and approximately 1% duty factor. The pulse repetition frequency started slightly above the heart rate and was decreased by 1 Hz every 10 s, for a total exposure duration of 30 s. The control group was composed of five rats. Two-way analysis of variance for repeated measures and Bonferroni post hoc tests were used to compare heart rate and ejection fraction, which was used as an index of myocardial contractility. It was demonstrated for the first time that transthoracic ultrasound has the potential to decrease the heart rate by ~20%. The negative chronotropic effect lasted for at least 15 min after ultrasound exposure and there was no apparent gross damage to the cardiac tissue.

Buiochi, Elaine Belassiano; Miller, Rita J.; Hartman, Emily; Buiochi, Flavio; Bassani, Rosana A.; Costa, Eduardo T.; O'Brien, William D.

2013-01-01

285

Travels through the time-frequency zone: advanced Doppler ultrasound processing techniques  

Microsoft Academic Search

Doppler ultrasound echoes from cardiac structures is rich in detail and highly nonstationary. The goal of time frequency analysis is to extract features from these echo signals for high confidence visual and machine classification of cardiovascular condition. Presented are side-by-side comparisons of numerous time-frequency representations (TFRs) of Doppler ultrasound data. The techniques illustrated include the short-time Fourier transform, the wavelet

L. Marple; T. Brotherton; R. Barton; E. Lugo; D. Jones

1993-01-01

286

Ultrasound--biophysics mechanisms†  

PubMed Central

Ultrasonic biophysics is the study of mechanisms responsible for how ultrasound and biological materials interact. Ultrasound-induced bioeffect or risk studies focus on issues related to the effects of ultrasound on biological materials. On the other hand, when biological materials affect the ultrasonic wave, this can be viewed as the basis for diagnostic ultrasound. Thus, an understanding of the interaction of ultrasound with tissue provides the scientific basis for image production and risk assessment. Relative to the bioeffect or risk studies, that is, the biophysical mechanisms by which ultrasound affects biological materials, ultrasound-induced bioeffects are generally separated into thermal and nonthermal mechanisms. Ultrasonic dosimetry is concerned with the quantitative determination of ultrasonic energy interaction with biological materials. Whenever ultrasonic energy is propagated into an attenuating material such as tissue, the amplitude of the wave decreases with distance. This attenuation is due to either absorption or scattering. Absorption is a mechanism that represents that portion of ultrasonic wave that is converted into heat, and scattering can be thought of as that portion of the wave, which changes direction. Because the medium can absorb energy to produce heat, a temperature rise may occur as long as the rate of heat production is greater than the rate of heat removal. Current interest with thermally mediated ultrasound-induced bioeffects has focused on the thermal isoeffect concept. The non-thermal mechanism that has received the most attention is acoustically generated cavitation wherein ultrasonic energy by cavitation bubbles is concentrated. Acoustic cavitation, in a broad sense, refers to ultrasonically induced bubble activity occurring in a biological material that contains pre-existing gaseous inclusions. Cavitation-related mechanisms include radiation force, microstreaming, shock waves, free radicals, microjets and strain. It is more challenging to deduce the causes of mechanical effects in tissues that do not contain gas bodies. These ultrasonic biophysics mechanisms will be discussed in the context of diagnostic ultrasound exposure risk concerns.

O'Brien, William D.

2007-01-01

287

Bedside ocular ultrasound.  

PubMed

Many ocular emergencies are difficult to diagnose in the emergency setting with conventional physical examination tools. Additionally, persistent efforts to re-examine the eye may be deleterious to a patient's overall condition. Ultrasound is an important tool because it affords physicians a rapid, portable, accurate, and dynamic tool for evaluation of a variety of ocular and orbital diseases. The importance of understanding orbital anatomy, with attention to the firm attachment points of the various layers of the eye, cannot be understated. This article describes the relevant eye anatomy, delves into the ultrasound technique, and illustrates a variety of orbital pathologies detectable by bedside ultrasound. PMID:24606775

Roque, Pedro J; Hatch, Nicholas; Barr, Laurel; Wu, Teresa S

2014-04-01

288

[Ultrasound for abdominal lymphadenopathy].  

PubMed

This CME-review is about the clinical importance of the abdominal lymph node diagnostic with special attention to various ultrasound techniques. This includes innovative techniques like contrast enhanced ultrasound and elastography. The clinical importance of ultrasound in relation to cross sectional imaging will be the target of the article as well as anatomic- topographic aspects. The article deals as well with endosonographic techniques because of the upmost importance of the technique for diagnosing mediastinal and abdominal lymphnode swellings. In conclusion of the article different clinical scenarios and clinical algorithms are presented to help the reader to diagnose abdominal lymphadenopathy correctly in an efficient way. PMID:23633280

Dietrich, C F; Hocke, M; Jenssen, C

2013-05-01

289

Safety of Microbubbles and Transcranial Ultrasound in Rabbits  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The object of this study was to evaluate the safety of large doses of microbubbles and ultrasound administered to the head of rabbits as if they were receiving acute stroke therapy of a similar nature. Materials and Methods: Female New Zealand White rabbits were used, N=24, in three groups 1] n=4 control (no treatment), 2] n=10 bubble control (ultrasound plus aspirin), and 3] n=10 target group (ultrasound plus aspirin plus MRX-815 microbubbles). Group 3 was infused with IV bubbles over 1 hour at 0.16cc/kg. Ultrasound was delivered to the dehaired side of the head during bubble infusion and for 1 additional hour at 0.8 W/cm2 20% pulsed wave. Rabbits survived for 22 to 24 hours, were imaged with computerized tomography and 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging including contrast studies, and sacrificed. Tetrazolium (TTC) and Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) sections were made for pathological examination. Results: All 24 animals showed absence of bleeding, endothelial damage, EKG abnormalities, stroke, blood-brain-barrier breakdown, or other acute abnormalities. CT and MRI showed no bleeding or signs of stroke, but two animals had mild hydrocephalus. The EKGs showed normal variation in QTc. Rabbit behavior was normal in all. Minimal chronic inflammation unrelated to the study was seen in 5. Two animals were excluded because of protocol violations and replaced during the study. Conclusion: The administered dose of microbubbles and ultrasound demonstrated no detrimental effects on the healthy rabbit animal model.

Culp, William C.; Brown, Aliza T.; Hennings, Leah; Lowery, John; Culp, Benjamin C.; Erdem, Eren; Roberson, Paula; Matsunaga, Terry O.

2007-05-01

290

Volumetric ultrasound system for left ventricle motion imaging  

Microsoft Academic Search

An external ultrasound oscillating probe has been developed for the purpose of visualizing dynamically the left cardiac ventricle three-dimensional (3D) movements and deformations. The fundamental principle of this probe is to maintain in continuous oscillation a classical one-dimensional (1D) transducer array around its axis at a maximum oscillation rate of 3 degrees per millisecond. A global medical system, including hardware

Raphael Canals; Guy Lamarque; Pascal Chatain

1999-01-01

291

Real-time 4D Ultrasound Mosaicing and Visualization  

PubMed Central

Intra-cardiac 3D ultrasound imaging has enabled new minimally invasive procedures. Its narrow field of view, however, limits its efficacy in guiding beating heart procedures where geometrically complex and spatially extended moving anatomic structures are often involved. In this paper, we present a system that performs electrocardiograph gated 4D mosaicing and visualization of 3DUS volumes. Real-time operation is enabled by GPU implementation. The method is validated on phantom and porcine heart data.

Brattain, Laura J; Howe, Robert D

2011-01-01

292

General Ultrasound Imaging  

MedlinePLUS

... collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ... types of Doppler ultrasound: Color Doppler uses a computer to convert Doppler measurements into an array of ...

293

[Basics of emergency ultrasound].  

PubMed

Focused ultrasound is a key methodology of critical care medicine. By referencing few ultrasound differential diagnosis, it is possible to identifying in real-time the reason of the critical state of a patient. Therefore typical focused ultrasound protocols were developed. The well known Focused Assessment with Sonography for trauma (FAST) was incorporated into the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) for shock room. Focused echocardiographic evaluation in life support (FEEL) has been designed to be conformed with the universal Advanced Life Support (ALS) algorithm and to identify treatable conditions such as acute right ventricular pressure overload in pulmonary embolism, hypovolemia, or pericardial effusion/tamponade. Using lung ultrasound one can differentiate pulmonary edema, pleural effusion or pneumothorax. PMID:22945815

Schellhaas, S; Breitkreutz, R

2012-09-01

294

Models of Abnormal Scarring  

PubMed Central

Keloids and hypertrophic scars are thick, raised dermal scars, caused by derailing of the normal scarring process. Extensive research on such abnormal scarring has been done; however, these being refractory disorders specific to humans, it has been difficult to establish a universal animal model. A wide variety of animal models have been used. These include the athymic mouse, rats, rabbits, and pigs. Although these models have provided valuable insight into abnormal scarring, there is currently still no ideal model. This paper reviews the models that have been developed.

Seo, Bommie F.; Lee, Jun Yong; Jung, Sung-No

2013-01-01

295

Teaching ultrasound professionalism.  

PubMed

Professionalism is part of the milestone program instituted by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and the American Board of Radiology. A unique feature of ultrasound professionalism is the relationship between the radiologist and the sonographer. Because this relationship is important for sonographic quality and ultimately patient outcome, residents should be trained to achieve an optimal professional relationship with sonographers. This article describes milestones for ultrasound professionalism and suggests methods of implementation. PMID:24850024

Hashimoto, Beverly E; Kasales, Claudia; Wall, Darci; McDowell, Jennifer; Lee, Marie; Hamper, Ulrike M

2014-06-01

296

What is ultrasound?  

PubMed

This paper is based on material presented at the start of a Health Protection Agency meeting on ultrasound and infrasound. In answering the question 'what is ultrasound?', it shows that the simple description of a wave which transports mechanical energy through the local vibration of particles at frequencies of 20 kHz or more, with no net transport of the particles themselves, can in every respect be misleading or even incorrect. To explain the complexities responsible for this, the description of ultrasound is first built up from the fundamental properties of these local particle vibrations. This progresses through an exposition of the characteristics of linear waves, in order to explain the propensity for, and properties of, the nonlinear propagation which occurs in many practical ultrasonic fields. Given the Health Protection environment which framed the original presentation, explanation and examples are given of how these complexities affect issues of practical importance. These issues include the measurement and description of fields and exposures, and the ability of ultrasound to affect tissue (through microstreaming, streaming, cavitation, heating, etc.). It is noted that there are two very distinct regimes, in terms of wave characteristics and potential for bioeffect. The first concerns the use of ultrasound in liquids/solids, for measurement or material processing. For biomedical applications (where these two processes are termed diagnosis and therapy, respectively), the issue of hazard has been studied in depth, although this has not been done to such a degree for industrial uses of ultrasound in liquids/solids (sonar, non-destructive testing, ultrasonic processing etc.). However, in the second regime, that of the use of ultrasound in air, although the waves in question tend to be of much lower intensities than those used in liquids/solids, there is a greater mismatch between the extent to which hazard has been studied, and the growth in commercial applications for airborne ultrasound. PMID:17045633

Leighton, Timothy G

2007-01-01

297

History of intraoperative ultrasound  

Microsoft Academic Search

Intraoperative ultrasound (IOUS) using A-mode or non-real-time B-mode imaging started in the 1960s; however, it was not widely accepted mainly because of difficulty in image interpretation. In the late 1970s, IOUS became one of the topics in the surgical communities upon the introduction of high-frequency real-time B-mode ultrasound. Special probes for operative use were developed. In the 1980s, all over

Masatoshi Makuuchi; Guido Torzilli; Junji Machi

1998-01-01

298

Biofouling control with ultrasound  

Microsoft Academic Search

Experiments have been carried out on a small-scale simulated cooling water system using a monoculture of Pseudomonas fluorescens to represent the slime-forming microbial community, to examine the opportunities for control using ultrasound. Glass tubes (18 mm I.D. x 1 m long) through which contaminated water flowed at 1 m\\/s were dosed with ultrasound along the tube axis. Glass tubes were

T. R. Bott

2000-01-01

299

Warning Signs for Cardiac Arrest  

MedlinePLUS

... Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Warning Signs for Cardiac Arrest Updated:Oct 5,2011 Cardiac arrest strikes immediately ... content was last reviewed on 07/12/2011." Cardiac Arrest • Home • About Cardiac Arrest • Warning Signs for Cardiac ...

300

Real-time ultrasound-guided catheterisation of the internal jugular vein: a prospective comparison with the landmark technique in critical care patients  

PubMed Central

Introduction Central venous cannulation is crucial in the management of the critical care patient. This study was designed to evaluate whether real-time ultrasound-guided cannulation of the internal jugular vein is superior to the standard landmark method. Methods In this randomised study, 450 critical care patients who underwent real-time ultrasound-guided cannulation of the internal jugular vein were prospectively compared with 450 critical care patients in whom the landmark technique was used. Randomisation was performed by means of a computer-generated random-numbers table, and patients were stratified with regard to age, gender, and body mass index. Results There were no significant differences in gender, age, body mass index, or side of cannulation (left or right) or in the presence of risk factors for difficult venous cannulation such as prior catheterisation, limited sites for access attempts, previous difficulties during catheterisation, previous mechanical complication, known vascular abnormality, untreated coagulopathy, skeletal deformity, and cannulation during cardiac arrest between the two groups of patients. Furthermore, the physicians who performed the procedures had comparable experience in the placement of central venous catheters (p = non-significant). Cannulation of the internal jugular vein was achieved in all patients by using ultrasound and in 425 of the patients (94.4%) by using the landmark technique (p < 0.001). Average access time (skin to vein) and number of attempts were significantly reduced in the ultrasound group of patients compared with the landmark group (p < 0.001). In the landmark group, puncture of the carotid artery occurred in 10.6% of patients, haematoma in 8.4%, haemothorax in 1.7%, pneumothorax in 2.4%, and central venous catheter-associated blood stream infection in 16%, which were all significantly increased compared with the ultrasound group (p < 0.001). Conclusion The present data suggest that ultrasound-guided catheterisation of the internal jugular vein in critical care patients is superior to the landmark technique and therefore should be the method of choice in these patients.

Karakitsos, Dimitrios; Labropoulos, Nicolaos; De Groot, Eric; Patrianakos, Alexandros P; Kouraklis, Gregorios; Poularas, John; Samonis, George; Tsoutsos, Dimosthenis A; Konstadoulakis, Manousos M; Karabinis, Andreas

2006-01-01

301

Clinicopathologic abnormalities associated with snake envenomation in domestic animals.  

PubMed

Envenomation of domestic animals by snakes occurs frequently in certain geographic areas. However, reports describing clinical signs, clinicopathologic abnormalities, therapeutic approaches, and outcomes are sparse. This review summarizes various snake families, venom types associated with harmful snakes, and the significant hematologic, hemostatic, and biochemical abnormalities associated with envenomation. Hematologic abnormalities include RBC membrane abnormalities, hemolysis, hemoconcentration, leukogram changes, and platelet abnormalities, specifically thrombocytopenia. Coagulopathies associated with snake envenomation are well described in human medicine, and many studies have demonstrated properties of venoms that lead to both procoagulation and anticoagulation. As expected, similar abnormalities have been described in domestic animals. Biochemical abnormalities are associated with the effects of venom on tissues such as liver, skeletal and cardiac muscle, vascular endothelium, and kidney as well as effects on protein components and cholesterol. This comprehensive review of clinicopathologic abnormalities associated with envenomation and their relationships to characterized venom constituents should be useful both in the diagnosis and management of envenomation and should serve as a foundation for future research in this field. PMID:21827516

Goddard, Amelia; Schoeman, Johan P; Leisewitz, Andrew L; Nagel, Salome S; Aroch, Itamar

2011-09-01

302

Abnormality, rationality, and sanity.  

PubMed

A growing body of studies suggests that neurological and mental abnormalities foster conformity to norms of rationality that are widely endorsed in economics and psychology, whereas normality stands in the way of rationality thus defined. Here, we outline the main findings of these studies, discuss their implications for experimental design, and consider how 'sane' some benchmarks of rationality really are. PMID:24055170

Hertwig, Ralph; Volz, Kirsten G

2013-11-01

303

Ultrasound contrast agents: properties, principles of action, tolerance, and artifacts.  

PubMed

The concept of contrast imaging was introduced to ultrasound almost 30 years ago. The development of ultrasound contrast agents (USCAs), initially slowed by technical limitations, has become more dynamic during the past decade. The ideal USCA should be non-toxic, injectable intravenously, capable of crossing the pulmonary capillary bed after a peripheral injection, and stable enough to achieve enhancement for the duration of the examination. While satisfying cost-benefit requirements, it should provide not only Doppler but also gray-scale enhancement. Already, Doppler examinations are improved by using USCAs when studying deep and small vessels, vessels with low or slow flow, or vessels with a non-optimal insonation angle. Ultrasound contrast agents also enhance detection of flow within abnormal vessels, including tumor vascularization and stenotic vessels, and provide better delineation of ischemic areas. Research is focusing on the development of specific contrast imaging sequences that allow detection of tissue enhancement similar to that obtained with CT or MRI. These sequences take advantage of the nonlinear behavior of the microbubbles within the ultrasound field, bringing real-time perfusion imaging for liver, kidney, and the myocardium into reach. New objectives include targeted agents that could further widen USCA applications to specific delivery of active drugs such as anticoagulants or cytotoxic compounds. The combination of new generations of USCAs and new ultrasound image sequences appears to be very promising and currently represents a significant part of ultrasound research. PMID:11519538

Correas, J M; Bridal, L; Lesavre, A; Méjean, A; Claudon, M; Hélénon, O

2001-01-01

304

High-frequency ultrasound in parotid gland disease.  

PubMed

Parotid gland is involved in many inflammatory and neoplastic conditions. Many a times, it is difficult to ascertain the type of swelling by clinical examination. The anatomy and various abnormalities of the glands are very easily visualized by high-frequency ultrasound. Ultrasound can confirm the presence of the mass with sensitivity up to 100%. It can demonstrate whether a lesion is located in the parotid gland or outside. It can help in differentiating benign from malignant neoplasms and local staging of the mass in malignant lesions. In addition, ultrasound can identify those entities that may not need surgical intervention. The glands appear enlarged and show altered echopattern in acute inflammation and may be normal or reduce in size in chronic inflammation. Other pathologies that involve salivary glands are sialolithiasis and various benign and malignant neoplasms. Ultrasound many times suggests final diagnosis or supplies important differential diagnosis. In this article, the use of high-frequency ultrasound in parotid disease is discussed, and sonographic features of different parotid pathologies are reviewed with examples illustrated. High-frequency ultrasound is the first and many a times the only imaging investigation done for evaluation of parotid glands. PMID:24263755

Onkar, Prashant Madhukar; Ratnaparkhi, Chetana; Mitra, Kajal

2013-12-01

305

Ultrasound of the fetal veins part 1: the intrahepatic venous system.  

PubMed

Advances in high-resolution ultrasound combined with color Doppler and three-dimensional (3 D) rendering have contributed to an increasing understanding of the fetal venous circulation in recent years. Still the sonographic evaluation of the venous system in the fetus remains difficult. This article reviews the normal and abnormal intrahepatic venous system. Normal anatomy and abnormal findings of the umbilical vein (UV), the ductus venosus (DV), portal veins, hepatic veins and the inferior vena cava are demonstrated by grayscale, color Doppler and 3D ultrasound and explained by numerous schemes. Typical variants and abnormalities such as agenesis of the DV and portal venous system, persistence of the right UV, UV varix are explained and the clinical value of normal and abnormal Doppler findings in the DV is discussed. Many of these abnormal findings can be detected by a targeted examination of the intrahepatic vasculature with means of color Doppler. PMID:24871613

Chaoui, R; Heling, K S; Karl, K

2014-06-01

306

Lung ultrasound in the critically ill.  

PubMed

Lung ultrasound is a basic application of critical ultrasound, defined as a loop associating urgent diagnoses with immediate therapeutic decisions. It requires the mastery of ten signs: the bat sign (pleural line), lung sliding (yielding seashore sign), the A-line (horizontal artifact), the quad sign, and sinusoid sign indicating pleural effusion, the fractal, and tissue-like sign indicating lung consolidation, the B-line, and lung rockets indicating interstitial syndrome, abolished lung sliding with the stratosphere sign suggesting pneumothorax, and the lung point indicating pneumothorax. Two more signs, the lung pulse and the dynamic air bronchogram, are used to distinguish atelectasis from pneumonia. All of these disorders were assessed using CT as the "gold standard" with sensitivity and specificity ranging from 90% to 100%, allowing ultrasound to be considered as a reasonable bedside "gold standard" in the critically ill. The BLUE-protocol is a fast protocol (<3 minutes), which allows diagnosis of acute respiratory failure. It includes a venous analysis done in appropriate cases. Pulmonary edema, pulmonary embolism, pneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, and pneumothorax yield specific profiles. Pulmonary edema, e.g., yields anterior lung rockets associated with lung sliding, making the "B-profile." The FALLS-protocol adapts the BLUE-protocol to acute circulatory failure. It makes sequential search for obstructive, cardiogenic, hypovolemic, and distributive shock using simple real-time echocardiography (right ventricle dilatation, pericardial effusion), then lung ultrasound for assessing a direct parameter of clinical volemia: the apparition of B-lines, schematically, is considered as the endpoint for fluid therapy. Other aims of lung ultrasound are decreasing medical irradiation: the LUCIFLR program (most CTs in ARDS or trauma can be postponed), a use in traumatology, intensive care unit, neonates (the signs are the same than in adults), many disciplines (pulmonology, cardiology…), austere countries, and a help in any procedure (thoracentesis). A 1992, cost-effective gray-scale unit, without Doppler, and a microconvex probe are efficient. Lung ultrasound is a holistic discipline for many reasons (e.g., one probe, perfect for the lung, is able to scan the whole-body). Its integration can provide a new definition of priorities. The BLUE-protocol and FALLS-protocol allow simplification of expert echocardiography, a clear advantage when correct cardiac windows are missing. PMID:24401163

Lichtenstein, Daniel A

2014-01-01

307

Dilemmas associated with antenatally detected urinary tract abnormalities.  

PubMed Central

Over a five year period 55 fetuses had abnormalities of the urinary tract detected by antenatal ultrasound scan. The incidence was 1:935 total births during a one year prospective study. Intrauterine intervention was undertaken in five for suspected obstructive uropathy, which was confirmed in only two. Of 51 live born infants, five died (two with renal failure), and only 18 (35%) had a clinically detectable abnormality at birth. Twenty seven patients underwent postnatal operations, the remainder being treated conservatively. Antenatal counseling was seldom undertaken by those responsible for the postnatal care. There were many instances of prospective parents receiving little or inappropriate information. Greater cooperation is required between all the staff concerned particularly as the natural history and appropriate postnatal management of some urinary tract abnormalities are still not known.

Watson, A R; Readett, D; Nelson, C S; Kapila, L; Mayell, M J

1988-01-01

308

Sudden Cardiac Death.  

PubMed

Sudden cardiac death is often due to a ventricular arrhythmia. When a patient presents with a malignant arrhythmia unrelated to a transient reversible cause, there is a high probability of recurrent arrhythmia and sudden death. Clinical trials have shown a uniform survival benefit from implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapy in survivors of a malignant arrhythmia when compared with drug therapy. However, only 1% to 5% of patients survive an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, emphasizing the need for primary prevention of sudden death. Clinical trial data available in this regard are largely limited to patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Mortality can be reduced by the ICD in patients with CAD and depressed left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) less than 30%. If left ventricular function is only moderately depressed (LVEF between 30% and 40%), the presence of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia with inducible ventricular arrhythmia at electrophysiologic testing identifies patients who benefit from an ICD. The role of the ICD in primary prevention of sudden death in patients with nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy is less clear at this time. Preliminary data indicate that the presence of heart failure symptoms in this population increases risk of sudden death that can be prevented by an ICD. Antiarrhythmic drugs have little role in prevention of sudden death; however, drugs that block the effects of beta-adrenergic stimulation, angiotensin, and aldosterone reduce mortality partly through their salutary effects on sudden death. Finally, a number of inherited defects of genes coding for ion channels, contractile sarcomeric proteins, and cell-to-cell junction proteins can result in primary electrical abnormalities and sudden death. The ICD is effective for secondary prevention, but its role in primary prevention is controversial and should be based on individual risk factors. PMID:15324610

John, Roy M.

2004-10-01

309

Origins of Cardiac Fibroblasts  

PubMed Central

Cardiac fibroblasts play a critical role in maintenance of normal cardiac function. They are indispensable for damage control and tissue remodeling on myocardial injury and principal mediators of pathological cardiac remodeling and fibrosis. Despite their manyfold functions, cardiac fibroblasts remain poorly characterized in molecular terms. Evidence is evolving that cardiac fibroblasts are a heterogeneous population and likely derive from various distinct tissue niches in health and disease. Here, we review our emerging understanding of where cardiac fibroblasts come from, as well as how we can possibly use this knowledge to develop novel therapies for cardiac fibrosis.

Zeisberg, Elisabeth M.; Kalluri, Raghu

2011-01-01

310

Medical ultrasound systems  

PubMed Central

Medical ultrasound imaging has advanced dramatically since its introduction only a few decades ago. This paper provides a short historical background, and then briefly describes many of the system features and concepts required in a modern commercial ultrasound system. The topics addressed include array beam formation, steering and focusing; array and matrix transducers; echo image formation; tissue harmonic imaging; speckle reduction through frequency and spatial compounding, and image processing; tissue aberration; Doppler flow detection; and system architectures. It then describes some of the more practical aspects of ultrasound system design necessary to be taken into account for today's marketplace. It finally discusses the recent explosion of portable and handheld devices and their potential to expand the clinical footprint of ultrasound into regions of the world where medical care is practically non-existent. Throughout the article reference is made to ways in which ultrasound imaging has benefited from advances in the commercial electronics industry. It is meant to be an overview of the field as an introduction to other more detailed papers in this special issue.

Powers, Jeff; Kremkau, Frederick

2011-01-01

311

Medical ultrasound systems.  

PubMed

Medical ultrasound imaging has advanced dramatically since its introduction only a few decades ago. This paper provides a short historical background, and then briefly describes many of the system features and concepts required in a modern commercial ultrasound system. The topics addressed include array beam formation, steering and focusing; array and matrix transducers; echo image formation; tissue harmonic imaging; speckle reduction through frequency and spatial compounding, and image processing; tissue aberration; Doppler flow detection; and system architectures. It then describes some of the more practical aspects of ultrasound system design necessary to be taken into account for today's marketplace. It finally discusses the recent explosion of portable and handheld devices and their potential to expand the clinical footprint of ultrasound into regions of the world where medical care is practically non-existent. Throughout the article reference is made to ways in which ultrasound imaging has benefited from advances in the commercial electronics industry. It is meant to be an overview of the field as an introduction to other more detailed papers in this special issue. PMID:22866226

Powers, Jeff; Kremkau, Frederick

2011-08-01

312

AMUM LECTURE: Therapeutic ultrasound  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The use of ultrasound in medicine is now quite commonplace, especially with the recent introduction of small, portable and relatively inexpensive, hand-held diagnostic imaging devices. Moreover, ultrasound has expanded beyond the imaging realm, with methods and applications extending to novel therapeutic and surgical uses. These applications broadly include: tissue ablation, acoustocautery, lipoplasty, site-specific and ultrasound mediated drug activity, extracorporeal lithotripsy, and the enhancement of natural physiological functions such as wound healing and tissue regeneration. A particularly attractive aspect of this technology is that diagnostic and therapeutic systems can be combined to produce totally non-invasive, imageguided therapy. This general lecture will review a number of these exciting new applications of ultrasound and address some of the basic scientific questions and future challenges in developing these methods and technologies for general use in our society. We shall particularly emphasize the use of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) in the treatment of benign and malignant tumors as well as the introduction of acoustic hemostasis, especially in organs which are difficult to treat using conventional medical and surgical techniques.

Crum, Lawrence A.

2004-01-01

313

Liver abnormalities in pregnancy.  

PubMed

Abnormalities of liver function (notably rise in alkaline phosphatase and fall in serum albumin) are common in normal pregnancy, whereas rise in serum bilirubin and aminotransferase suggest either exacerbation of underlying pre-existing liver disease, liver disease related to pregnancy or liver disease unrelated to pregnancy. Pregnant women appear to have a worse outcome when infected with Hepatitis E virus. Liver diseases associated with pregnancy include abnormalities associated hyperemesis gravidarum, acute fatty liver disease, pre-eclampsia, cholestasis of pregnancy and HELLP syndrome. Prompt investigation and diagnosis is important in ensuring a successful maternal and foetal outcome. In general, prompt delivery is the treatment of choice for acute fatty liver, pre-eclampsia and HELLP syndrome and ursodeoxycholic acid is used for cholestasis of pregnancy although it is not licenced for this indication. PMID:24090943

Than, Nwe Ni; Neuberger, James

2013-08-01

314

Value of routine ultrasound scanning at 19 weeks: a four year study of 8849 deliveries  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE--To evaluate the effectiveness of routine ultrasound scanning at 19 weeks' gestation in an unselected population in terms of accuracy of detection of fetal structural abnormality and the effect on obstetric and neonatal care. DESIGN--Prospective study over four years. Scans performed by radiographers with overall supervision by a radiologist. SETTING--Ultrasound department of district general hospital. SUBJECTS--All pregnant women were offered

C. A. Luck

1992-01-01

315

Basic Physics of Ultrasound Imaging.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Presents a history of ultrasound, explaining the principles of transducer design and operation. Focuses on the physics of sound, the basic interactions of sound and tissue, sound detection and imaging and imaging instruments. Primary audience: ultra-sound...

1994-01-01

316

[Use of a temporal cardiac pacemaker in patients undergoing a major non-cardiac surgery].  

PubMed

This is a report of the use of transvenous temporal pacemaker in 18 patients, with an average age of 59.3 years, that under want non cardiac major surgery. They did not have cardiac simptoms but had conduction abnormalities in the preoperative electrocardiogram. A pacemaker was implanted as a prophylaxis against arrythmia during the transoperative and postoperative periods. There was no incidence of transoperative arrythmia. Three patients died in the immediate postoperative period, two due to duffuse carcinomatosis and one due to diabetic acidosis. The average duration of the implanted pacemaker was 12.7 days, and three patients required a permanent pacemaker. Case five is exemplificative of the benefits of the temporal pacemaker, he had a preoperative electrocardiogram showing trifascicular block, he was taken to the operating room and anesthesia was induced, the patient had a cardiac arrest but recovered without secuela; latter on a temporal pacemaker was inserted and the patient had surgery without cardiac problems. PMID:757608

Robles González, L; Vázquez Cabrales, A; Chiw Castillo, G; Sánchez Ibarra, J H; Pérez Redondo, H

1978-01-01

317

Oedema in obesity; role of structural lymphatic abnormalities.  

PubMed

Oedema is a common finding in obesity and its cause is not always clear. Possible causes include impairment of cardiac, respiratory and/or renal function, chronic venous insufficiency and lymphatic problems. Lymphoscintigraphy is the best method to detect structural lymphatic abnormalities that can cause lymphoedema. We reviewed 49 female subjects with pitting oedema who had undergone lymphoscintigraphy, divided in three groups. The first group was comprised of severely obese patients in whom cardiorespiratory causes for oedema had been excluded. The second group consisted of non-obese patients with recognized causes for oedema and the third group was non-obese patients with 'idiopathic' oedema. A standard classification was used to interpret lymphoscintigraphy results. The frequency and severity of lymphoscintigraphic abnormalities was greatest in patients with clinical diagnoses of oedema related to 'recognized causes' (any abnormality in 50% of legs with obstruction in 22%). Obese patients and those with 'idiopathic'oedema had fewer (P=0.02 for both) and milder lymphoscintographic abnormalities (any abnormality 32 and 25%, respectively, obstruction 5 and 3%, respectively), and although the clinical oedema was invariably bilateral, the lymphoscintigraphy abnormalities were usually unilateral. In conclusion, structural lymphoscintigraphic abnormalities are uncommon in obesity and do not closely correlate with the clinical pattern of oedema. PMID:21266949

Vasileiou, A-M; Bull, R; Kitou, D; Alexiadou, K; Garvie, N J; Coppack, S W

2011-09-01

318

Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena  

USGS Publications Warehouse

So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

Neuzil, C. E.

1995-01-01

319

Clinical utility of gray scale renal ultrasound in acute kidney injury  

PubMed Central

Background Acute kidney injury occurs commonly in hospitalized patients and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Although renal ultrasound is often performed, its clinical utility in determining of the cause of acute kidney injury, particularly the detection of urinary tract obstruction, is not established. Methods Retrospective cohort study of all adult inpatients that underwent renal ultrasound for acute kidney injury over a 3-year period at a large university teaching hospital. The frequency of renal ultrasound abnormalities and clinical characteristics that predicted the finding of urinary tract obstruction was determined. Results Over the 3-year period, 1471 renal ultrasounds were performed of which 55% (810) were for evaluation of acute kidney injury. Renal ultrasound was normal in 62% (500 of 810) of patients. Hydronephrosis was detected in only 5% (42 of 810) of studies and in only 2.3% (19 of 810) of the cases was obstructive uropathy considered the cause of acute kidney injury. The majority of these patients (14 of 19) had a medical history suggestive of urinary tract obstruction. Less than 1% of patients (5 of 810) had urinary tract obstruction on ultrasound without a suggestive medical history. Most other ultrasound findings were incidental and did not establish an etiology for the acute kidney injury. Conclusions Renal ultrasound for evaluation of acute kidney injury is indicated if there is medical history suggestive of urinary tract obstruction. Otherwise, renal ultrasound is unlikely to yield useful results and should be used more selectively based on patients’ medical history.

2013-01-01

320

Robotically assisted ultrasound interventions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The goal of this project is to develop a robotic system to assist the physician in minimally invasive ultrasound interventions. In current practice, the physician must manually hold the ultrasound probe in one hand and manipulate the needle with the other hand, which can be challenging, particularly when trying to target small lesions. To assist the physician, the robot should not only be capable of providing the spatial movement needed, but also be able to control the contact force between the ultrasound probe and patient. To meet these requirements, we are developing a prototype system based on a six degree of freedom parallel robot. The system will provide high bandwidth, precision motion, and force control. In this paper we report on our progress to date, including the development of a PC-based control system and the results of our initial experiments.

Ding, Jienan; Swerdlow, Dan; Wang, Shuxin; Wilson, Emmanuel; Tang, Jonathan; Cleary, Kevin

2008-04-01

321

Ultrasound of Peripheral Nerves  

PubMed Central

Over the last decade, neuromuscular ultrasound has emerged as a useful tool for the diagnosis of peripheral nerve disorders. This article reviews sonographic findings of normal nerves including key quantitative ultrasound measurements that are helpful in the evaluation of focal and possibly generalized peripheral neuropathies. It also discusses several recent papers outlining the evidence base for the use of this technology, as well as new findings in compressive, traumatic, and generalized neuropathies. Ultrasound is well suited for use in electrodiagnostic laboratories where physicians, experienced in both the clinical evaluation of patients and the application of hands-on technology, can integrate findings from the patient’s history, physical examination, electrophysiological studies, and imaging for diagnosis and management.

Suk, Jung Im; Walker, Francis O.; Cartwright, Michael S.

2013-01-01

322

Ultrasound in analytical chemistry.  

PubMed

Ultrasound is a type of energy which can help analytical chemists in almost all their laboratory tasks, from cleaning to detection. A generic view of the different steps which can be assisted by ultrasound is given here. These steps include preliminary operations usually not considered in most analytical methods (e.g. cleaning, degassing, and atomization), sample preparation being the main area of application. In sample preparation ultrasound is used to assist solid-sample treatment (e.g. digestion, leaching, slurry formation) and liquid-sample preparation (e.g. liquid-liquid extraction, emulsification, homogenization) or to promote heterogeneous sample treatment (e.g. filtration, aggregation, dissolution of solids, crystallization, precipitation, defoaming, degassing). Detection techniques based on use of ultrasonic radiation, the principles on which they are based, responses, and the quantities measured are also discussed. PMID:17103146

Priego Capote, F; Luque de Castro, M D

2007-01-01

323

Thrombolysis by ultrasound.  

PubMed

1. A new method of destroying thrombi in blood vessels by ultrasound and simultaneously removing them is reported. 2. Experiments were performed in twenty dogs with artificial thrombi in the iliac and femoral arteries and veins. The length of the thrombi ranged from 4 to 5 cm and the age from 12 h to 10 days. The unit used consisted of a generator, a frequency counter, an ultrasonic transducer with the hollow waveguide and a vacuum pump. For protection of the vessel wall the guide is surrounded by a plastic tube. The ultrasonic frequency is 26-5 kHz, the amplitude 25-30 micronm. The time needed to destroy the thrombus by ultrasound and suck out the thrombotic material ranged from 2-5 to 5 min. 3. To check side effects, experiments were performed in forty-four dogs. No significant changes were seen in the fibrinolytic system or microscopic structure of the vessel wall after ultrasound. PMID:1071713

Trübestein, G; Engel, C; Etzel, F; Sobbe, A; Cremer, H; Stumpff, U

1976-12-01

324

Advances in Ultrasound Elastography  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of elastography is to characterize from mechanical point of view a material (the soft biological tissues in the medical field). Ultrasound elastography is based on the comparison of ultrasound images, when the material is submitted under axial force (compression). This work presents the advances in the instrumentation of an ultrasound scanner, to acquire a sequence of images which will be processed in the aim of elastography. First, motion estimation between two or more images is processed. The estimated displacement gives the possibility to obtain detailed deformation elastograms. Thus, the presence of a hard inclusion (that simulates a tumor a pathological tissue) within a phantom mimicking soft tissues can be more easily detected, which may lead to a better cancer diagnosis.

Basarab, A.; Nava A., J. F.; Royer, E.; de Boissieu, P.; Delachartre, P.

2006-09-01

325

Renal ultrasound elastography.  

PubMed

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) incidence and prevalence are increasing in Western countries, due particularly to diabetes mellitus and hypertension-related nephropathies. CKD may lead to end-stage renal failure, with extensive morbidity, mortality and increasing health costs. Primary and secondary prevention requires a better knowledge of mechanisms underlying renal scarring, the development of specific therapies to slow down the progression of the disease and the development of non-invasive diagnostic tools to characterize the process. Ultrasound elastography is a new imaging technique under development that provides information about renal stiffness. Kidney elasticity measurements with ultrasound should be performed with a quantitative technique, such as Shearwave techniques. However kidney stiffness is not only related to fibrosis, as it also sensitive to mechanical and functional parameters such as anisotropy, vascularization, hydronephrosis and external pressure. This paper reviews the existing ultrasound elastography techniques. Elastography is a new tool under development for renal tissue characterization and needs further validation in clinical practice. PMID:23567180

Grenier, N; Gennisson, J-L; Cornelis, F; Le Bras, Y; Couzi, L

2013-05-01

326

Ultrasound elastography in liver.  

PubMed

Conventional imaging techniques cannot provide information about tissue mechanical properties. Many injuries can cause changes in tissue stiffness, especially tumors and fibrosis. In recent years, various non-invasive ultrasound methods have been developed to study tissue elasticity for a large number of applications (breast, thyroid, prostate, kidneys, blood vessels, liver…). For non-invasive assessment of liver diseases, several ultrasound elastography techniques have been investigated: Transient elastography (the most extensively used), Real Time Elastography (RTE), Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging (ARFI) and more recently Shear Wave Elastography (SWE). Even if evaluation of liver fibrosis in chronic liver disease remains the principal application, there are many others applications for liver: predicting cirrhosis-related complications; monitoring antiviral treatments in chronic viral liver disease; characterizing liver tumors; monitoring local treatments, etc. The aim of this article is to report on the different hepatic ultrasound elastography techniques, their advantages and disadvantages, their diagnostic accuracy, their applications in clinical practice. PMID:23623211

Frulio, N; Trillaud, H

2013-05-01

327

Cardiac ankyrins in health and disease  

PubMed Central

Ankyrins are critical components of ion channel and transporter signaling complexes in the cardiovascular system. Over the past five years, ankyrin dysfunction has been linked with abnormal ion channel and transporter membrane organization and fatal human arrhythmias. Loss-of-function variants in the ankyrin-B gene (ANK2) cause “ankyrin-B syndrome” (previously called type 4 long QT syndrome), manifested by a complex cardiac phenotype including ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. More recently, dysfunction in the ankyrin-B-based targeting pathway has been linked with a highly penetrant and severe form of human sinus node disease. Ankyrin-G (a second ankyrin gene product) is required for normal expression, membrane localization, and biophysical function of the primary cardiac voltage-gated sodium channel, Nav1.5. Loss of the ankyrin-G/Nav1.5 interaction is associated with human cardiac arrhythmia (Brugada syndrome). Finally, in the past year ankyrin dysfunction has been associated with more common arrhythmia and cardiovascular disease phenotypes. Specifically, large animal studies reveal striking remodeling of ankyrin-B and associated proteins following myocardial infarction. Additionally, the ANK2 locus has been linked with QTc interval variability in the general human population. Together, these findings identify a host of unanticipated and exciting roles for ankyrin polypeptides in cardiac function. More broadly, these findings illustrate the importance of local membrane organization for normal cardiac physiology.

Hashemi, Seyed M.; Hund, Thomas J.; Mohler, Peter J.

2009-01-01

328

CHILDREN, GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX AND ULTRASOUND  

Microsoft Academic Search

While a few studies have excluded ultrasound as a reliable diagnostic tool in screening for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in infant and children, others have referred to ultrasound as the screening test of choice in symptomatic patients and for patients follow-up. In this study, we evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of ultrasound in diagnosing GERD in children. This case ??

G. Fallahi; H. Saneian; M. Mahdizadeh; F. Farahmand

329

Ultrasound in synthetic organic chemistry  

Microsoft Academic Search

High-power ultrasound can generate cavitation within a liquid and through cavitation provide a source of energy which can be used to enhance a wide range of chemical processes. Such uses of ultrasound have been grouped under the general name sonochemistry. This review will concen- trate on applications in organic synthesis where ultrasound seems to provide a distinct alternative to other,

Timothy J. Mason

1997-01-01

330

Forty years of nonlinear ultrasound  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nonlinear ultrasound forms an integrated discipline of nonlinear acoustics founded in 1755. A short outline of the state-of-the-art in nonlinear ultrasound in 1960 forms the introduction to this paper. Some of the most important contributions to the development in the theoretical, analytical and numerical basis of nonlinear ultrasound and in experimental investigations of nonlinear ultrasonic processes published during the period

Leif Bjørnø

2002-01-01

331

A novel software-based technique for quantifying placental calcifications and infarctions from ultrasound  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In obstetrics, antenatal ultrasound assessment of placental morphology comprises an important part of the estimation of fetal health. Ultrasound analysis of the placenta may reveal abnormalities such as placental calcification and infarcts. Current methods of quantification of these abnormalities are subjective and involve a grading system of Grannum stages I-III. The aim of this project is to develop a software tool that quantifies semi-automatically placental ultrasound images and facilitates the assessment of placental morphology. We have developed a 2D ultrasound imaging software tool that allows the obstetrician or sonographer to define the placental region of interest. A secondary reference map is created for use in our quantification algorithm. Using a slider technique the user can easily define an upper threshold based on high intensity for calcification classification and a lower threshold to define infarction regions based on low intensity within the defined region of interest. The percentage of the placental area that is calcified and also the percentage of infarction is calculated and this is the basis of our new metric. Ultrasound images of abnormal and normal placentas have been acquired to aid our software development. A full clinical prospective evaluation is currently being performed and we are currently applying this technology to the three-dimensional ultrasound domain. We have developed a novel software-based technique for calculating the extent of placental calcification and infarction, providing a new metric in this field. Our new metric may provide a more accurate measurement of placental calcification and infarction than current techniques.

Ryan, John T.; McAuliffe, Fionnuala; Higgins, Mary; Stanton, Marie; Brennan, Patrick

2008-04-01

332

Rib detection for whole breast ultrasound image  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recently, the whole breast ultrasound (US) is a new advanced screening technique for detecting breast abnormalities. Because a lot of images are acquired for a case, the computer-aided system is needed to help the physicians to reduce the diagnosis time. In the automatic whole breast US, the ribs are the pivotal landmark just like the pectoral muscle in the mammography. In this paper, we develop an automatic rib detection method for the whole breast ultrasound. The ribs could be helpful to define the screening area of a CAD system to reduce the tumor detection time and could be used to register different passes for a case. In the proposed rib detection system, the whole breast images are subsampled at first in order to reduce the computation of rib detection without reducing the detection performance. Due to the shadowing is occurred under the rib in the whole breast ultrasound images and is the sheet-like structure, the Hessian analysis and sheetness function are adopted to enhance the sheet-like structure. Then, the orientation thresholding is adopted to segment the sheet-like structures. In order to remove the non-rib components in the segmented sheet-like structures, some features of ribs in whole breast ultrasound are used. Thus, the connected component labeling is applied and then some characteristics such as orientation, length and radius are calculated. Finally, some criteria are applied to remove non-rib components. In our experiments, there are 65 ribs in 15 test cases and the 62 ribs have been detected by the proposed system with the detection ratio 95.38%. The ratio of position difference under 5 mm is 87.10 % and the ratio of length difference under 10 mm is 85.48 %. The results show that the proposed system almost could detect the ribs in the breast US images and has a good accuracy.

Chang, Ruey-Feng; Shen, Yi-Wei; Chen, Jiayu; Chou, Yi-Hong; Huang, Chiun-Sheng

2008-04-01

333

Cardiac tamponade--still a difficult clinical diagnosis.  

PubMed

A 51-year-old man with multiple risk factors for ischaemic heart disease attended the emergency department (ED) with sudden-onset chest pain, dizziness and breathlessness. He was tachycardic but had normal heart sounds and normal QRS complexes on ECG. Bedside ultrasound was performed, revealing a pericardial effusion. Emergent pericardiocentesis was performed with excellent outcome. This case highlights the importance of early detection of cardiac tamponade as well as the role of bedside ultrasound in diagnosis and management of the condition. PMID:24997706

Ni Leidhin, Caoilfhionn; Moran, Suzanne; MacLean, Alastair

2014-01-01

334

Color Doppler Imaging of Cardiac Catheters Using Vibrating Motors  

PubMed Central

We attached a miniature motor rotating at 11,000 rpm onto the proximal end of cardiac electrophysiological (EP) catheters in order to produce vibrations at the tip which were then visualized by color Doppler on ultrasound scanners. We imaged the catheter tip within a vascular graft submerged in a water tank using the Volumetrics Medical Imaging 3D scanner, the Siemens Sonoline Antares 2D scanner, and the Philips ie33 3D ultrasound scanner with TEE probe. The vibrating catheter tip was visualized in each case though results varied with the color Doppler properties of the individual scanner.

Reddy, Kalyan E.; Light, Edward D.; Rivera, Danny J.; Kisslo, Joseph A.; Smith, Stephen W.

2010-01-01

335

Use of ultrasound imaging to map propagating action potential waves in the heart  

Microsoft Academic Search

Presently, the nature of action potential propagation deep within myocardial tissue is unclear. As a result, a complete understanding of cardiac dynamics remains elusive. Here we present a technique using ultrasound and electromechanical modeling that has the potential to unlock this mystery. We also present information suggesting tension in the heart behaves as a long-range force incapable of being captured

N. F. Otani; R. Singh; A. Neumann; F. H. Fenton; D. W. Infanger; J. Butcher; S. Luther; RF Gilmour Jr

2009-01-01

336

Challenges and implementation of radiation-force imaging with an intracardiac ultrasound transducer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) has been demonstrated to be an effective imaging modality for the guidance of several cardiac procedures, including radiofrequency ablation (RFA). However, assessing lesion size during the ablation with conventional ultrasound has been limited, as the associated changes within the B-mode images often are subtle. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging is a promising modality to monitor RFAs

Stephen J. Hsu; Brian J. Fahey; Douglas M. Dumont; Patrick D. Wolf; Gregg E. Trahey

2007-01-01

337

Ultrasound strain imaging: From nano-scale motion detection to macro-scale functional imaging  

Microsoft Academic Search

With ultrasound strain imaging, the function of tissue and organs can be identified. The technique uses multiple images, acquired from tissue under different degrees of deformation. We recently applied this technique on hearts and skeletal muscles. Cardiac data was acquired in dogs with a valvar aorta stenosis. Muscle data was acquired from the orbicular oral muscle in the upper lip.

Chris L. De Korte; Richard G. P. Lopata; Maartje M. Nillesen; Gert Weijers; Nancy J. Van Hees; Inge H. Gerrits; Christos Katsaros; Livia Kapusta; Johan M. Thijssen

2008-01-01

338

Controlled spatio-temporal heating patterns using a commercial, diagnostic ultrasound system  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thermal ultrasound therapy is being investi- gated as a non-invasive surgical tool with applications in soft tissue tumor and cardiac ablation; as a method for hemostasis; and in the control of thermally-activated drug delivery vehicles. The success of localized ultrasonic thermal therapy depends on image guidance, typically done with a separate imaging transducer, but alignment of these trans- ducers is

Kristin Frinkley; Mark Palmeri; Kathryn Nightingale

2005-01-01

339

Left Ventricular Myocardial Impairment in Subclinical Hypothyroidism Assessed by a New Ultrasound Tool: Pulsed Tissue Doppler  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pulsed tissue Doppler (TD) is a new ultrasound tool that al- lows quantification of myocardial regional wall motion. To investigate the cardiac effects of subclinical hypothyroidism (SH), the present study assessed left ventricular (LV) myocar- dial regional function in SH by pulsed TD. Twenty women with SH and 20 healthy women underwent standard Doppler echocardiograms and pulsed TD, placing a

GIOVANNI VITALE; MAURIZIO GALDERISI; GELSY ARIANNA LUPOLI; ALDO CELENTANO; ILARIA PIETROPAOLO; NICOLA PARENTI; ORESTE DE DIVITIIS; GIOVANNI LUPOLI

340

Routine Diagnostic Venous Ultrasound and LAS for Leg Edema of Unknown Cause  

PubMed Central

Objective: To verify the diagnostic efficiency of venous duplex ultrasound and lymphangioscintigraphy (LAS) in establishing the cause of leg edema and to clarify the pathology of these leg edemas. Materials and Methods: Between April 2009, and March 2010, 62 patients with leg edema of unknown origin were referred to the Edema Clinic of the Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine. All patients underwent a venous duplex ultrasound scan and LAS. Results: Of 62 patients, lymphatic insufficiency, venous insufficiency or both was diagnosed in 42 (68%), and lymphedema, in 29 (47%). Venous duplex ultrasound detected obvious venous disorders in only 13 (21%), and for 20 patients, the ultrasound and LAS did not reveal any abnormalities; however, for 15 of the 20 (24% of all patients), venous edema was attributed to functional causes. Conclusion: Venous duplex ultrasound and LAS assisted in the diagnosis of leg edema of unknown origin and also proved useful in establishing treatment strategies.

2010-01-01

341

Intracranial hemorrhage with electrocardiographic abnormalities and troponin elevation.  

PubMed

Electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities and cardiac troponin I elevation are seen in addition to the classic clinical symptoms and signs of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We aimed to show that, in patients with ST elevation, troponin elevation, and altered consciousness, the reason may be SAH. A 36-year-old man presented to emergency service with ECG abnormalities, high level of cardiac troponin I, and neurologic symptoms. In the patient's initial ECG, there were sinus arrhythmia, bradycardia, T-wave inversions inferiorly, and concave ST elevations in V1 to V4. Three hours later, his ECG showed increased ST-segment elevations with normal heart rate. The patient's troponin I value was 10 mg/L. Ejection fraction was 60%, and there were no wall motion abnormalities on echocardiography. Computed tomographic scan of the brain demonstrated SAH with falx sign and midline cerebellar hematoma (3 × 4 cm in size) in the occipital region. The patient died on the 10th day of follow-up because of severe metabolic acidosis, multiorgan failure, and bradycardia. Cardiac evaluation is recommended in patients with intracranial hemorrhage in many studies. In our opinion, if there are neurologic symptoms or signs in patients diagnosed as acute myocardial infarction with ECG changes and troponin elevation, requesting threshold of brain computed tomography should be low before the thrombolytic therapy. PMID:22809772

Saritemur, Murat; Akoz, Ayhan; Kalkan, Kamuran; Emet, Mucahit

2013-01-01

342

MitoQ administration prevents endotoxin-induced cardiac dysfunction.  

PubMed

Sepsis elicits severe alterations in cardiac function, impairing cardiac mitochondrial and pressure-generating capacity. Currently, there are no therapies to prevent sepsis-induced cardiac dysfunction. We tested the hypothesis that administration of a mitochondrially targeted antioxidant, 10-(6'-ubiquinonyl)-decyltriphenylphosphonium (MitoQ), would prevent endotoxin-induced reductions in cardiac mitochondrial and contractile function. Studies were performed on adult rodents (n = 52) given either saline, endotoxin (8 mg x kg(-1) x day(-1)), saline + MitoQ (500 microM), or both endotoxin and MitoQ. At 48 h animals were killed and hearts were removed for determination of either cardiac mitochondrial function (using polarography) or cardiac pressure generation (using the Langendorf technique). We found that endotoxin induced reductions in mitochondrial state 3 respiration rates, the respiratory control ratio, and ATP generation. Moreover, MitoQ administration prevented each of these endotoxin-induced abnormalities, P < 0.001. We also found that endotoxin produced reductions in cardiac pressure-generating capacity, reducing the systolic pressure-diastolic relationship. MitoQ also prevented endotoxin-induced reductions in cardiac pressure generation, P < 0.01. One potential link between mitochondrial and contractile dysfunction is caspase activation; we found that endotoxin increased cardiac levels of active caspases 9 and 3 (P < 0.001), while MitoQ prevented this increase (P < 0.01). These data demonstrate that MitoQ is a potent inhibitor of endotoxin-induced mitochondrial and cardiac abnormalities. We speculate that this agent may prove a novel therapy for sepsis-induced cardiac dysfunction. PMID:19657095

Supinski, G S; Murphy, M P; Callahan, L A

2009-10-01

343

CARDIAC MUSCLE  

PubMed Central

With light and electron microscopy a comparison has been made of the morphology of ventricular (V) and Purkinje (P) fibers of the hearts of guinea pig, rabbit, cat, dog, goat, and sheep. The criteria, previously established for the rabbit heart, that V fibers are distinguished from P fibers by the respective presence and absence of transverse tubules is shown to be true for all animals studied. No evidence was found of a permanent connection between the sarcoplasmic reticulum and the extracellular space. The sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of V fibers formed couplings with the sarcolemma of a transverse tubule (interior coupling) and with the peripheral sarcolemma (peripheral coupling), whereas in P fibers the SR formed only peripheral couplings. The forms of the couplings were identical. The significance, with respect to excitation-contraction coupling, of the difference in the form of the couplings in cardiac versus skeletal muscle is discussed together with the electrophysiological implications of the differing geometries of bundles of P fibers from different animals.

Sommer, Joachim R.; Johnson, Edward A.

1968-01-01

344

USEFUL: Ultrasound Exam for Underlying Lesions Incorporated into Physical Exam  

PubMed Central

Introduction: The Ultrasound Screening Exam for Underlying Lesions (USEFUL) was developed in an attempt to establish a role for bedside ultrasound in the primary and preventive care setting. It is the purpose of our pilot study to determine if students were first capable of performing all of the various scans required of our USEFUL while defining such an ultrasound-assisted physical exam that would supplement the standard hands-on physical exam in the same head-to-toe structure. We also aimed to assess the time needed for an adequate exam and analyze if times improved with repetition and previous ultrasound training. Methods: Medical students with ranging levels of ultrasound training received a 25-minute presentation on our USEFUL followed by a 30-minute hands-on session. Following the hands-on session, the students were asked to perform a timed USEFUL on 2–3 standardized subjects. All images were documented as normal or abnormal with the understanding that an official detailed exam would be performed if an abnormality were to be found. All images were read and deemed adequate by board eligible emergency medicine ultrasound fellows. Results: Twenty-six exams were performed by 9 students. The average time spent by all students per USEFUL was 11 minutes and 19 seconds. Students who had received the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine's integrated ultrasound curriculum performed the USEFUL significantly faster (p< 0.0025). The time it took to complete the USEFUL ranged from 6 minutes and 32 seconds to 17 minutes, and improvement was seen with each USEFUL performed. The average time to complete the USEFUL on the first standardized patient was 13 minutes and 20 seconds, while 11 minutes and 2 seconds, and 9 minutes and 20 seconds were spent performing the exam on the second and third patient, respectively. Conclusion: Students were able to effectively complete all scans required by the USEFUL in a timely manner. Students who have been a part of the integrated ultrasound in medicine curriculum performed the USEFUL significantly faster than students who had not. Students were able to significantly improve upon the time it took them to complete the USEFUL with successive attempts. Future endpoints are aimed at assessing the feasibility and outcomes of an ultrasound-assisted physical exam in a primary care setting and the exam's effect on doctor-patient satisfaction. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(3):260–266.

Steller, Jon; Russell, Bianca; Lotfipour, Shahram; Maldonado, Graciela; Siepel, Tim; Jakle, Halsey; Hata, Stacy; Chiem, Alan; Fox, John Christian

2014-01-01

345

Roentgenologic Abnormalities in Down's Syndrome.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Roentgenograms of 28 patients with Down's syndrome were reviewed with emphasis on all previously reported abnormalities and any possible additional ones. Most of the abnormalities occurred with the same frequency as previously reported, but some less freq...

T. Higuchi W. J. Russell M. Komatsuda S. Neriishi

1968-01-01

346

Cardiac and Vascular Responses to Thigh Cuffs and Respiratory Maneuvers on Crewmembers of the International Space Station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The transition to microgravity eliminates the hydrostatic gradients in the vascular system. The resulting fluid redistribution commonly manifests as facial edema, engorgement of the external neck veins, and a decrease in leg diameter. This experiment examined the responses to modified Valsalva and Mueller maneuvers measured by cardiac and vascular ultrasound (ECHO) in a baseline steady state and during preload reduction introduced with thigh occlusion cuffs used as a counter-measure device (Braslet cuffs) measured by cardiac and vascular ultrasound examinations. Methods: Nine International Space Station crewmember subjects (Expeditions 16 - 20) were examined in 15 experiment sessions 101 +/- 46.days after launch (mean +/- SD; 33 - 185). Twenty Seven cardiac and vascular parameters were obtained with/without respiratory maneuvers before and after tightening of the Braslet cuffs. Results: Non-physicians performed diagnostic-quality cardiac and vascular ultrasound examinations using remote guidance. Three of 27 combinations of maneuvers and Braslet or Braslet alone were identified as being significant changed when compared to baseline. Eleven of 81 differences between combinations of Mueller, Valsalva or baseline were significant and related to cardiac preload reduction or increase in lower extremity venous volume. Conclusions: Acute application of Braslet occlusion cuffs causes lower extremity fluid sequestration and exerts commensurate measurable effects on cardiac performance in microgravity. Ultrasound techniques to measure the hemodynamic effects of thigh cuffs in combination with respiratory maneuvers may serve as an invaluable tool in determining the volume status of the cardiac patient at the 'microgravity bedside'.

Hamilton, Douglas; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Garcia, Kathleen; Ebert, Douglas; Whitson, Peggy A.; Feiveson, Alan; Alferova, Irina V.; Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Matveev, Vladimir P.; Bogomolov, Valery V.; Duncan, J. Michael

2011-01-01

347

Cardiac involvement in systemic autoimmune diseases  

Microsoft Academic Search

The heart and the vascular system are frequent and characteristic targets of several systemic autoimmune diseases, in particular\\u000a Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and Systemic Sclerosis (SSc). In this chapter we review the\\u000a classic cardiac abnormalities and the more recent data about cardiovascular involvement as part of a major disease complication\\u000a determining a substantial morbidity and mortality.\\u000a \\u000a In

Piersandro Riboldi; Maria Gerosa; Cristina Luzzana; Luca Catelli

2002-01-01

348

Cardiac Progenitors and the Embryonic Cell Cycle  

PubMed Central

Despite the critical importance of proper cell cycle regulation in establishing the correct morphology of organs and tissues during development, relatively little is known about how cell proliferation is regulated in a tissue-specific manner. The control of cell proliferation within the developing heart is of considerable interest, given the high prevalence of congenital cardiac abnormalities among humans, and recent interest in the isolation of cardiac progenitor populations. We therefore review studies exploring the contribution of cell proliferation to overall cardiac morphology and the molecular mechanisms regulating this process. In addition, we also review recent studies that have identified progenitor cell populations within the adult myocardium, as well as those exploring the capability of differentiated myocardial cells to proliferate post-natally. Thus, the exploration of cardiomyoctye cell cycle regulation, both during development as well as in the adult heart, promises to yield many exciting and important discoveries over the coming years.

Goetz, Sarah C.; Conlon, Frank L.

2009-01-01

349

Transient cardiac ballooning--the syndrome.  

PubMed

Transient cardiac ballooning is usually a reversible clinical entity. A patient typically presents with chest pain, electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities like ST-segment elevation (most commonly reported) or depression, and elevated cardiac enzymes, but has no or nonobstructive coronary artery disease. Left ventriculography reveals transient akinesis of the involved portion of the myocardial wall with compensatory hyperkinesis of the remaining myocardium, leading to ballooning of the noncontracting myocardial wall during systole. Acute regional myocardial dysfunction ensues, which normalizes on average within 1 to 6 weeks. The hypotheses for these pathophysiologic changes range from direct cardiac myocyte injury to postischemic myocardial stunning to neurotransmitter actions. The objective of this article is to present a succinct description of a small case series accompanied with various recently reported presentations and morphology by left ventriculogram and a detailed review of available data on underlying pathophysiology. In addition, a discussion on current diagnostic guidelines, treatment, prognosis, and potential future investigations is included. PMID:19938049

Gupta, Raghav; Sech, Candice; Lazzara, Ralph

2009-11-01

350

Epilepsy and chromosomal abnormalities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Many chromosomal abnormalities are associated with Central Nervous System (CNS) malformations and other neurological alterations,\\u000a among which seizures and epilepsy. Some of these show a peculiar epileptic and EEG pattern. We describe some epileptic syndromes\\u000a frequently reported in chromosomal disorders.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Detailed clinical assessment, electrophysiological studies, survey of the literature.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Results  In some of these congenital syndromes the clinical presentation and EEG

Giovanni Sorge; Anna Sorge

2010-01-01

351

[Ultrasound in testicular torsion].  

PubMed

Thirty-two patients were evaluated by scrotal ultrasound prior to examination due to testicular torsion. Typical ultrasonographic patterns of testicular torsion were obtained in 100% within the first 6 hours, 25% between 6-12 hours, and 91.6% after 12 hours; the overall percentage was 84.4% for all cases. PMID:8720999

Granados, E A; Martí, J; de la Torre, P

1996-01-01

352

Ultrasound energy for biomedicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

For removing tissues and fragmenting stones, removing clots from blood vessels and other undesirable derivatives which can occur in a person's body, it is possible to use the ultrasound energy. Usually the energy generated to the environment by the waveguide is transmitted in the form of intensive acoustic waves of high frequency; tissues are destroyed under their influence, under the

A. Bubulis; V. Jurenas; V. Minchenya

2012-01-01

353

History of intraoperative ultrasound.  

PubMed

Intraoperative ultrasound (IOUS) using A-mode or non-real-time B-mode imaging started in the 1960s; however, it was not widely accepted mainly because of difficulty in image interpretation. In the late 1970s, IOUS became one of the topics in the surgical communities upon the introduction of high-frequency real-time B-mode ultrasound. Special probes for operative use were developed. In the 1980s, all over the world the use of IOUS spread to a variety of surgical fields, such as hepatobiliary pancreatic surgery, neurosurgery, and cardiovascular surgery. IOUS changed hepatic surgery dramatically because IOUS was the only modality that was capable of delineating and examining the interior of the liver during surgery. After 1990, color Doppler imaging and laparoscopic ultrasound were incorporated into IOUS. Currently, IOUS is considered an indispensable operative procedure for intraoperative decision-making and guidance of surgical procedures. For better surgical practice, education of surgeons in the use of ultrasound is the most important issue. PMID:10385947

Makuuchi, M; Torzilli, G; Machi, J

1998-11-01

354

Ultrasound assisted microwave digestion.  

PubMed

Simultaneous microwave and ultrasound irradiation is shown as a new technique for digestion of solid and liquid samples suitable for chemical and food analysis. Its application in analytical chemistry has been shown by decreases in digestion time: determination of copper in edible oils and total Kjeldahl nitrogen. PMID:14624979

Chemat, Smain; Lagha, Ahcene; Ait Amar, Hamid; Chemat, Farid

2004-01-01

355

Convex Probe Endobronchial Ultrasound  

Microsoft Academic Search

Endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) is a promising new modality first introduced in the early 1990s. The radial probe EBUS was initially developed in the search for high resolution imaging of processes within the airway wall and also outside the airways. The structure of special importance was lymph nodes, walls of the central airways and the mediastinum. After the development of miniaturized

Kazuhiro Yasufuku; Takahiro Nakajima

2009-01-01

356

Bronchoscopy\\/Endobronchial Ultrasound  

Microsoft Academic Search

Endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) has emerged as a new diagnostic tool that allows the bronchoscopist to see beyond the airway. The radial probe EBUS was first introduced to evaluate the airway structure, which has been shown to be useful for identifying the extent of tumor invasion in the central airway. The newest development is the convex EBUS-TBNA scope with a curvilinear

Felix J. F. Herth

2010-01-01

357

Benign breast lesions: Ultrasound  

PubMed Central

Benign breast diseases constitute a heterogeneous group of lesions arising in the mammary epithelium or in other mammary tissues, and they may also be linked to vascular, inflammatory or traumatic pathologies. Most lesions found in women consulting a physician are benign. Ultrasound (US) diagnostic criteria indicating a benign lesion are described as well as US findings in the most frequent benign breast lesions.

Masciadri, N.; Ferranti, C.

2011-01-01

358

Tracked ultrasound elastography (TRUE)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Medical ultrasound research has experienced a renaissance in the past decade leading to innovations in flow mapping, elasticity and thermal imaging, measurement of optical properties, beamforming, and image enhancement. In this thesis, we focus on ultrasound elastography, an emerging imaging modality with great potential to become a part of several ultrasound diagnostic applications. Elastography images the stiffness of soft tissue by applying a mechanical stimulus and estimating the disturbance created by this stimulus. In freehand elastography, soft tissue is palpated by hand using the ultrasound transducer. The elastography image is generated by comparing the pre- and post-compression images to form a displacement map which is then differentiated to produce the final strain map. To achieve the best result in freehand elastography, the sonographer must compress and decompress the tissue uniformly in a specific direction with adequate compression. This can be a difficult task even for trained users. A small rotational or out-of-plane motion in the collected ultrasound frames can render them unusable for elastography. This has made freehand elastography highly qualitative and user-dependent. We tackle this issue by incorporating the extra information from a position sensor attached to the ultrasound transducer. Our aim is to show that the localization information of ultrasound images may be utilized to improve the quality and reliability of freehand elastography. For this purpose, we have developed a frame selection scheme that finds pairs of images with optimal compression and minimal lateral and out-of-plane displacement. Relying on the localization information, our algorithm merges multiple strain images computed from the selected frame pairs. This method is applicable to both 2D and 3D elastography. Our 3D elastography does not require for the transducer to be held still during the acquisition of each volume. Instead, the sonographer freely palpates the tissue similar to the 2D case while a series of volumes are being collected. For applications such as needle ablation therapy, it is also possible to palpate the tissue internally using the ablation needle. In this case, we have assessed the feasibility of incorporating the localization information about the tip of the needle in elastography. We have evaluated these methods using tissue mimicking phantom, animal, and patient experiments. Our results suggest that in challenging clinical conditions, the proposed methods are capable of producing high-quality strain images.

Foroughi, Pezhman

359

Thoracic duct injury resulting in abnormal newborn screen.  

PubMed

Measurement of T-cell receptor excision circles (TREC) in neonates has allowed for population-based screening of severe combined immunodeficiency and other disorders associated with T-cell lymphopenia. In addition to primary T-cell lymphopenic disorders, secondary causes of T-cell lymphopenia can be diagnosed with TREC analysis. We discuss the diagnostic evaluation of a patient with normal TREC analysis at birth that became abnormal after cardiac surgery. TREC analysis was performed by the Florida State Laboratory. Diagnostic evaluation and treatment were performed at All Children's Hospital, St Petersburg, Florida. We identified a 38-day-old female patient with thoracic duct injury, which caused chylothorax and chylous ascites diagnosed after an abnormal newborn screen. Chylothorax was secondary to thoracic duct injury after cardiac surgery and led to severe lymphopenia and hypogammaglobulinemia. Thoracic duct ligation led to improved lymphocyte counts and normalization of immunoglobulin levels. Secondary causes of lymphopenia are detected with TREC assay that lead to abnormal newborn screen results. Many secondary causes of lymphopenia can be acquired with normal initial newborn screens that become abnormal over time. PMID:24565704

Tillipman Ladinsky, Hava; Gillispie, Miriah; Sriaroon, Panida; Leiding, Jennifer W

2013-01-01

360

Cardiovascular Abnormalities in Sickle Cell Disease  

PubMed Central

Sickle cell disease is characterized by recurrent episodes of ischemia-reperfusion injury to multiple vital organ systems and a chronic hemolytic anemia, both contributing to progressive organ dysfunction. The introduction of treatments that induce protective fetal hemoglobin and reduce infectious complications has greatly prolonged survival. However, with increased longevity, cardiovascular complications are increasingly evident, with the notable development of a progressive proliferative systemic vasculopathy, pulmonary hypertension (PH) and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction. Pulmonary hypertension is reported in autopsy studies and numerous clinical studies have shown that increased pulmonary pressures are an important risk marker for mortality in these patients. In epidemiological studies, the development of PH is associated with intravascular hemolysis, cutaneous leg ulceration, renal insufficiency, iron overload and liver dysfunction. Chronic anemia in sickle cell disease results in cardiac chamber dilation and a compensatory increase in left ventricular mass. This is often accompanied by left ventricular diastolic dysfunction which has also been a strong independent predictor of mortality patients with sickle cell disease. Both PH and diastolic dysfunction are associated with marked abnormalities in exercise capacity in these patients. Sudden death is an increasingly recognized problem and further cardiac investigations are necessary to recognize and treat high-risk patients.

Gladwin, Mark T.; Sachdev, Vandana

2013-01-01

361

Cardiac arrhythmia and thyroid dysfunction: a novel genetic link.  

PubMed

Inherited Long QT Syndrome (LQTS), a cardiac arrhythmia that predisposes to the often lethal ventricular fibrillation, is commonly linked to mutations in KCNQ1. The KCNQ1 voltage-gated K(+) channel ? subunit passes ventricular myocyte K(+) current that helps bring a timely end to each heart-beat. KCNQ1, like many K(+) channel ? subunits, is regulated by KCNE ? subunits, inherited mutations in which also associate with LQTS. KCNQ1 and KCNE mutations are also associated with atrial fibrillation. It has long been known that thyroid status strongly influences cardiac function, and that thyroid dysfunction causes abnormal cardiac structure and rhythm. We recently discovered that KCNQ1 and KCNE2 form a thyroid-stimulating hormone-stimulated K(+) channel in the thyroid that is required for normal thyroid hormone biosynthesis. Here, we review this novel genetic link between cardiac and thyroid physiology and pathology, and its potential influence upon future therapeutic strategies in cardiac and thyroid disease. PMID:20688187

Purtell, Kerry; Roepke, Torsten K; Abbott, Geoffrey W

2010-11-01

362

Cardiac arrhythmia and thyroid dysfunction: a novel genetic link  

PubMed Central

Inherited Long QT Syndrome, a cardiac arrhythmia that predisposes to the often lethal ventricular fibrillation, is commonly linked to mutations in KCNQ1. The KCNQ1 voltage-gated K+ channel ? subunit passes ventricular myocyte K+ current that helps bring a timely end to each heart-beat. KCNQ1, like many K+ channel ? subunits, is regulated by KCNE ? subunits, inherited mutations in which also associate with Long QT Syndrome. KCNQ1 and KCNE mutations are also associated with atrial fibrillation. It has long been known that thyroid status strongly influences cardiac function, and that thyroid dysfunction causes abnormal cardiac structure and rhythm. We recently discovered that KCNQ1 and KCNE2 form a thyroid-stimulating hormone-stimulated K+ channel in the thyroid that is required for normal thyroid hormone biosynthesis. Here, we review this novel genetic link between cardiac and thyroid physiology and pathology, and its potential influence upon future therapeutic strategies in cardiac and thyroid disease.

Purtell, Kerry; Roepke, Torsten K.; Abbott, Geoffrey W.

2010-01-01

363

Intracellular aggregation of multimodal silica nanoparticles for ultrasound-guided stem cell implantation.  

PubMed

The promises of cardiac stem cell therapy have yet to be fully realized, in part because of poor survival and engraftment efficacy of implanted cells. Cells die after implantation owing to ischemia, inflammation, immune response, as well as mis-injection or implantation into fibrotic tissue. Imaging tools can help implant cells in areas of the heart most receptive to stem cell therapy and monitor the efficacy of treatment by reporting the viability, location, and number of implanted stem cells. We describe a multimodal, silica-based nanoparticle that can be used for cell sorting (fluorescence), real-time guided cell implantation ultrasound, and high-resolution, long-term monitoring by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The nanoparticle agent increased the ultrasound and MRI contrast of labeled human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) 700 and 200% versus unlabeled cells, respectively, and allowed cell imaging in animal models for 13 days after implantation. The agent had no significant impact on hMSC cell metabolic activity, proliferation, or pluripotency, and it increased the production of many paracrine factors implicated in cardiac repair. Electron microscopy and ultrasound imaging suggest that the mechanism of action is in vivo aggregation of the 300-nm silica nanoparticles into larger silica frameworks that amplify the ultrasound backscatter. The detection limit in cardiac tissue was 250,000 hMSCs via MRI and 70,000 via ultrasound. This ultrasound-guided cell delivery and multimodal optical/ultrasound/MRI intracardiac cell-tracking platform could improve cell therapy in the clinic by minimizing misdelivery or implantation into fibrotic tissue. PMID:23515077

Jokerst, Jesse V; Khademi, Christine; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

2013-03-20

364

Retrieval of cardiac phase from IVUS sequences  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Most of the quantitative measures from Intravascular Ultrasound (IVUS) images vary with the cardiac cycle. Although ECG-gated acquisition can prevent the pulsations from influencing the measurements, it may extend the acquisition time, and furthermore, very few IVUS systems currently in clinical use incorporate ECG-gated function. In this paper, we present a practical method to retrieve cardiac phase information directly from in vivo clinical IVUS image sequences. In an IVUS image that contains a cross-section of coronary artery, there are three regions annularly distributed from the center of the image - catheter, lumen, and part of the vessel wall. The catheter region exhibits virtually no change from frame to frame during the catheter pullback. While the lumen is a dark region, the vessel wall region appears bright. The change in lumen size and position that accompanies the pulse causes the image intensity of the IVUS images to exhibit a periodic variation along the pullback path. By extracting this signal attributed to the cardiac cycle, a subsequence of frames during pullback at the same phase of the cardiac cycle can be selected. The method was tested by the IVUS images of both a coronary phantom and a patient.

Zhu, Hui; Oakeson, Kevin D.; Friedman, Morton H.

2003-05-01

365

Cardiac Muscarinic Receptor Overexpression in Sudden Infant Death Syndrome  

PubMed Central

Background Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) remains the leading cause of death among infants less than 1 year of age. Disturbed expression of some neurotransmitters and their receptors has been shown in the central nervous system of SIDS victims but no biological abnormality of the peripheral vago-cardiac system has been demonstrated to date. The present study aimed to seek vago-cardiac abnormalities in SIDS victims. The cardiac level of expression of muscarinic receptors, as well as acetylcholinesterase enzyme activity were investigated. Methodology/Principal Findings Left ventricular samples and blood samples were obtained from autopsies of SIDS and children deceased from non cardiac causes. Binding experiments performed with [3H]NMS, a selective muscarinic ligand, in cardiac membrane preparations showed that the density of cardiac muscarinic receptors was increased as shown by a more than doubled Bmax value in SIDS (n?=?9 SIDS versus 8 controls). On average, the erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase enzyme activity was also significantly increased (n?=?9 SIDS versus 11 controls). Conclusions In the present study, it has been shown for the first time that cardiac muscarinic receptor overexpression is associated with SIDS. The increase of acetylcholinesterase enzyme activity appears as a possible regulatory mechanism.

Livolsi, Angelo; Niederhoffer, Nathalie; Dali-Youcef, Nassim; Rambaud, Caroline; Olexa, Catherine; Mokni, Walid; Gies, Jean-Pierre; Bousquet, Pascal

2010-01-01

366

Non-invasive assessment of choledocholithiasis in patients with gallstones and abnormal liver function  

PubMed Central

AIM: To find a non-invasive strategy for detecting choledocholithiasis before cholecystectomy, with an acceptable negative rate of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. METHODS: All patients with symptomatic gallstones were included in the study. Patients with abnormal liver functions and common bile duct abnormalities on ultrasound were referred for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Patients with normal ultrasound were referred to magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography. All those who had a negative magnetic resonance or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy with intraoperative cholangiography. RESULTS: Seventy-eight point five percent of patients had laparoscopic cholecystectomy directly with no further investigations. Twenty-one point five percent had abnormal liver function tests, of which 52.8% had normal ultrasound results. This strategy avoided unnecessary magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography in 47.2% of patients with abnormal liver function tests with a negative endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography rate of 10%. It also avoided un-necessary endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in 35.2% of patients with abnormal liver function. CONCLUSION: This strategy reduces the cost of the routine use of magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, in the diagnosis and treatment of common bile duct stones before laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

Al-Jiffry, Bilal O; Elfateh, Abdeen; Chundrigar, Tariq; Othman, Bassem; AlMalki, Owaid; Rayza, Fares; Niyaz, Hashem; Elmakhzangy, Hesham; Hatem, Mohammed

2013-01-01

367

The role of vitamin D in left ventricular hypertrophy and cardiac function  

Microsoft Academic Search

The role of vitamin D in left ventricular hypertrophy and cardiac function. Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Traditional cardiac risk factors, as well as other factors specific to the ESRD population such as hyperphosphatemia, elevated calcium and phosphate product, abnormal lipid metabolism, hyperhomocysteinemia, and chronic inflammation play a role in

Steven G. Achinger; JUAN CARLOS AYUS

2005-01-01

368

Detection of benign cardiac fibroma on thallium-201 imaging in an adult.  

PubMed

A rare case of benign cardiac fibroma causing a focal defect on Tl-201 imaging in an adult patient is presented. The abnormalities on the Tl-201 scan are correlated with other studies performed on the same patient. The usefulness of the Tl-201 myocardial perfusion scan as an early, noninvasive test in cardiac workup is stressed. PMID:3581621

Helmer, S; Abghari, R; Stone, A J; Lee, C C

1987-05-01

369

Factors associated with the development of cardiac allograft vasculopathy--a systematic review of observational studies.  

PubMed

Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) is a significant factor impacting outcomes after heart transplant. We performed a systematic review of risk factors for the development of CAV. A search of electronic databases was performed. The eligibility criteria included cohort and case-control studies with more than 50 adult patients submitted to a heart transplant. The outcome should be CAV diagnosed by angiography and/or intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). Two reviewers performed study selection, data abstraction, and quality assessment. Of 2514 citations, 66 articles were included--46 had 200 participants or less; 61 were single-center; and 44 were retrospective cohorts. The most used definition of CAV using angiography was the detection of any degree of abnormality (21 studies of 58). In studies using IVUS, an intimal thickness ?0.5 mm was the most used definition (five of eight studies). Quality assessment revealed an inadequate description of patient selection, attrition, and accounting of potential confounders. Donor age, recipient age, recipient gender, etiology of heart failure, ischemic time, human leukocyte antigen matching, cytomegalovirus, lipid profile, and rejection episodes were the most studied factors. Our review indicates that the current evidence is not consistent across different studies. The definite contribution of risk factors for the development of CAV is still to be determined. PMID:22168269

Braga, J R; Santos, I S O; McDonald, M; Shah, P S; Ross, H J

2012-01-01

370

Cardiac Risk Assessment  

MedlinePLUS

... website will be limited. Search Help? Cardiac Risk Assessment Share this page: Was this page helpful? Formal ... Questions | Related Pages What is a cardiac risk assessment? This is a group of tests and health ...

371

Applications of Control Theory to the Dynamics and Propagation of Cardiac Action Potentials  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sudden cardiac arrest is a widespread cause of death in the industrialized world. Most cases of sudden cardiac arrest are\\u000a due to ventricular fibrillation (VF), a lethal cardiac arrhythmia. Electrophysiological abnormalities such as alternans (a\\u000a beat-to-beat alternation in action potential duration) and conduction block have been suspected to contribute to the onset\\u000a of VF. This study focuses on the use

Laura M. Muñoz; Jonathan F. Stockton; Niels F. Otani

2010-01-01

372

Parameterization of real-time 3D speckle tracking framework for cardiac strain assessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cross-correlation based 3D speckle tracking algorithm can be used to automatically track myocardial motion on three dimensional real-time (RT3D) echocardiography. The goal of this study was to experimentally investigate the effects of different parameters associated with such algorithm to ensure accurate cardiac strain measurements. The investigation was performed on 10 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease RT3DE cardiac ultrasound images. The following

Auranuch Lorsakul; Qi Duan; Ming Jack Po; Elsa Angelini; Shunichi Homma; Andrew F. Laine

2011-01-01

373

Cardiac sodium channelopathies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cardiac sodium channel are protein complexes that are expressed in the sarcolemma of cardiomyocytes to carry a large inward\\u000a depolarizing current (INa) during phase 0 of the cardiac action potential. The importance of INa for normal cardiac electrical activity is reflected by the high incidence of arrhythmias in cardiac sodium channelopathies,\\u000a i.e., arrhythmogenic diseases in patients with mutations in SCN5A,

Ahmad S. Amin; Alaleh Asghari-Roodsari; Hanno L. Tan

2010-01-01

374

Understanding cardiac output  

PubMed Central

Cardiac output is the amount of blood the heart pumps in 1 minute, and it is dependent on the heart rate, contractility, preload, and afterload. Understanding of the applicability and practical relevance of each of these four components is important when interpreting cardiac output values. In the present article, we use a simple analogy comparing cardiac output with the speed of a bicycle to help appreciate better the effects of various disease processes and interventions on cardiac output and its four components.

Vincent, Jean-Louis

2008-01-01

375

Eye movement abnormalities.  

PubMed

Generation and control of eye movements requires the participation of the cortex, basal ganglia, cerebellum and brainstem. The signals of this complex neural network finally converge on the ocular motoneurons of the brainstem. Infarct or hemorrhage at any level of the oculomotor system (though more frequent in the brain-stem) may give rise to a broad spectrum of eye movement abnormalities (EMAs). Consequently, neurologists and particularly stroke neurologists are routinely confronted with EMAs, some of which may be overlooked in the acute stroke setting and others that, when recognized, may have a high localizing value. The most complex EMAs are due to midbrain stroke. Horizontal gaze disorders, some of them manifesting unusual patterns, may occur in pontine stroke. Distinct varieties of nystagmus occur in cerebellar and medullary stroke. This review summarizes the most representative EMAs from the supratentorial level to the brainstem. PMID:22377853

Moncayo, Jorge; Bogousslavsky, Julien

2012-01-01

376

Adult cardiac anaesthesia.  

PubMed

The widespread increase in adult cardiac surgery over the last decade has meant that many more junior anaesthetists have become involved in the management of anaesthesia for cardiac surgery before they have taken the final part of the FRCA examination. Although cardiac anaesthesia is still a specialized area, FRCA candidates are expected to have a working knowledge of the principles involved. PMID:8826042

Freeman, J M; Clutton-Brock, T H

377

3D cardiac motion estimation using RF signal decorrelation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mouse cardiac ultrasound imaging is generally acquired as sets of 2D B-mode video or RF data. The high signal bandwidth and frame rate (>100 Hz) required for real-time 3D mouse heart scanning presents a major challenge making it unlikely that direct capture of finely sampled real-time 3D data will be achieved in the near future. Collecting and registering image sets

Christopher D. Garson; Yinbo Li; John A. Hossack

2008-01-01

378

Trichloroethylene Exposure during Cardiac Valvuloseptal Morphogenesis Alters Cushion Formation and Cardiac Hemodynamics in the Avian Embryo  

PubMed Central

It is controversial whether trichloroethylene (TCE) is a cardiac teratogen. We exposed chick embryos to 0, 0.4, 8, or 400 ppb TCE/egg during the period of cardiac valvuloseptal morphogenesis (2–3.3 days’ incubation). Embryo survival, valvuloseptal cellularity, and cardiac hemodynamics were evaluated at times thereafter. TCE at 8 and 400 ppb/egg reduced embryo survival to day 6.25 incubation by 40–50%. At day 4.25, increased proliferation and hypercellularity were observed within the atrioventricular and outflow tract primordia after 8 and 400 ppb TCE. Doppler ultrasound revealed that the dorsal aortic and atrioventricular blood flows were reduced by 23% and 30%, respectively, after exposure to 8 ppb TCE. Equimolar trichloroacetic acid (TCA) was more potent than TCE with respect to increasing mortality and causing valvuloseptal hypercellularity. These results independently confirm that TCE disrupts cardiac development of the chick embryo and identifies valvuloseptal development as a period of sensitivity. The hypercellular valvuloseptal profile is consistent with valvuloseptal heart defects associated with TCE exposure. This is the first report that TCA is a cardioteratogen for the chick and the first report that TCE exposure depresses cardiac function. Valvuloseptal hypercellularity may narrow the cardiac orifices, which reduces blood flow through the heart, thereby compromising cardiac output and contributing to increased mortality. The altered valvuloseptal formation and reduced hemodynamics seen here are consistent with such an outcome. Notably, these effects were observed at a TCE exposure (8 ppb) that is only slightly higher than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum containment level for drinking water (5 ppb).

Drake, Victoria J.; Koprowski, Stacy L.; Lough, John; Hu, Norman; Smith, Susan M.

2006-01-01

379

[The ultrasonic diagnosis of an early abnormal pregnancy].  

PubMed

During the period of January 1993 to February 1994, 70 pregnant women had an ultrasonic diagnosis of abnormal pregnancy. 111 ultrasound examinations were made--mean 1.6 of each woman. The ultrasonic diagnosis up to 70 women was: missed abortion--35 women (50%), blighted ovum--30 women (42.9%), other diagnosis--5 women (7.1%). Histological examination of material was made with 64 women (91.4%). Comparing the ultrasonic diagnosis to histological results, authors do not recommend a final diagnosis before eight gestation week. PMID:9254554

Penev, I; Vlasova, D; Blagoeva, V; Brankova, M; Marinov, B; Nalbanski, B; Dukovski, A

1996-01-01

380

The grown-up congenital cardiac patient.  

PubMed

Long-term survival of patients with congenital heart disease has dramatically improved during the last 50 years and the number of adults with congenital heart disease is therefore increasing in all developed countries. Grown-up patients with congenital heart disease (GUCH) often present difficult and challenging problems. Patients with both native unoperated and operated malformations contribute to the GUCH population. Survivors without surgical treatment mainly have simple malformations; but a few have complex diseases, and some have survived with secondary pulmonary hypertension. Among operated malformations there are patients with a 'complete' repair (anatomical and physiological), others with a definitive palliation (physiological repair) and some with a simple palliation. The clinical spectrum is obviously diversified, depending on the underlying anomaly, surgical outcome, presence of residua, sequelae and/or complications, length of follow-up, comorbidities. Arrhythmias, bacterial endocarditis, cyanosis, polycythemia, heart failure, anomalies of pulmonary circulation, deterioration or malfunction of devices, need of cardiac and non-cardiac surgery, intercurrent non-cardiac diseases, and a need for cardiac and non-cardiac diagnostic procedures are common problems of adults with congenital heart disease. Physiological events such as pregnancy and childbearing deserve a careful multidisciplinary approach. While most simple native and well corrected GUCH do not require very specialized treatments throughout their life, the abnormalities and complexities of postoperative anatomy are often beyond the expertise of the adult cardiologist, requiring multidisciplinary competence in specialized tertiary centers. The problem is still unresolved and involves cultural, medical, technological and economically relevant issues. PMID:17255822

Borghi, Adele; Ciuffreda, Matteo; Quattrociocchi, Maria; Preda, Laura

2007-01-01

381

The Neural Crest in Cardiac Congenital Anomalies  

PubMed Central

This review discusses the function of neural crest as they relate to cardiovascular defects. The cardiac neural crest cells are a subpopulation of cranial neural crest discovered nearly 30 years ago by ablation of premigratory neural crest. The cardiac neural crest cells are necessary for normal cardiovascular development. We begin with a description of the crest cells in normal development, including their function in remodeling the pharyngeal arch arteries, outflow tract septation, valvulogenesis, and development of the cardiac conduction system. The cells are also responsible for modulating signaling in the caudal pharynx, including the second heart field. Many of the molecular pathways that are known to influence specification, migration, patterning and final targeting of the cardiac neural crest cells are reviewed. The cardiac neural crest cells play a critical role in the pathogenesis of various human cardiocraniofacial syndromes such as DiGeorge, Velocardiofacial, CHARGE, Fetal Alcohol, Alagille, LEOPARD, and Noonan syndromes, as well as Retinoic Acid Embryopathy. The loss of neural crest cells or their dysfunction may not always directly cause abnormal cardiovascular development, but are involved secondarily because crest cells represent a major component in the complex tissue interactions in the head, pharynx and outflow tract. Thus many of the human syndromes linking defects in the heart, face and brain can be better understood when considered within the context of a single cardiocraniofacial developmental module with the neural crest being a key cell type that interconnects the regions.

Keyte, Anna; Hutson, Mary Redmond

2012-01-01

382

Magnetic resonance imaging of abnormal ventricular septal motion in heart diseases: a pictorial review  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this article is to illustrate the usefulness of MR imaging in the clinical evaluation of congenital and acquired\\u000a cardiac diseases characterised by ventricular septal wall motion abnormality. Recognition of the features of abnormal ventricular\\u000a septal motion in MR images is important to evaluate the haemodynamic status in patients with congenital and acquired heart\\u000a diseases in routine clinical

Cristina Méndez; Rafaela Soler; Esther Rodriguez; Marisol López; Lucia Álvarez; Noela Fernández; Lorenzo Montserrat

383

Multiple organ pathology, metabolic abnormalities and impaired homeostasis of reactive oxygen species in Epas1?\\/? mice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) transcription factors respond to multiple environmental stressors, including hypoxia and hypoglycemia. We report that mice lacking the HIF family member HIF-2? (encoded by Epas1) have a syndrome of multiple-organ pathology, biochemical abnormalities and altered gene expression patterns. Histological and ultrastructural analyses showed retinopathy, hepatic steatosis, cardiac hypertrophy, skeletal myopathy, hypocellular bone marrow, azoospermia and mitochondrial abnormalities in

Marzia Scortegagna; Kan Ding; Yavuz Oktay; Arti Gaur; Frederick Thurmond; Liang-Jun Yan; Brett T Marck; Alvin M Matsumoto; John M Shelton; James A Richardson; Michael J Bennett; Joseph A Garcia

2003-01-01

384

Magnetocardiography and cardiac risk.  

PubMed

Risk evaluation is a challenging problem in clinical cardiology. Recently, the development of new therapeutic strategies for malignant cardiac arrhythmias and ischemia has urged the need for more accurate screening methods of risk patients The purpose of this review is to summarize the current scientific evidence on the applicability of a new method, high-resolution magnetocardiography (HR-MCG), in identification of cardiac patients at risk of malignant ventricular arrhythmias and ischemic episodes. In recent years different methods for recognizing the electromagnetic abnormalities indicating the increased risk have been used with promising results. At present, the following conclusions can be made: 1) MCG can reliably identify patients prone to malignant ventricular arrhythmias after myocardial infarction as well as in cardiomyopathy, in long QT syndrome, and in operated congenital heart disease. 2) Several analysis methods seem to work: high-pass filtering, relative smoothness score and magnetic field map trajectory plots. 3) Detection and localization of acute and chronic ischemia seems technically feasible and may be one of the most important new clinical applications of the method. 4) Larger clinical series are needed to optimize these techniques and to evaluate their feasibility in the clinics. 5) Prognostic studies should also be started as soon as possible. There are already many multichannel MCG measurement systems available in hospitals to enable clinical studies.ZUSAMMENFASSUNG: Die Risikoabschätzung stellt in der klinischen Kardiologie ein schwieriges Problem dar. Kürzlich hat die Entwicklung neuer Strategien bei malignen kardialen Arrhythmien und der Ischämie die, Notwendigkeit an exakteren Untersuchungsmethoden bei Risikopatienten unterstrichen. Diese Ubersicht soll dem Zweck dienen, die derzeitige wissenschaftliche Anwendbarkeit einer neuen Methode, der hochauflösenden Magnetokardiographie (HR-MCG) bei Herzpatienten nachzuweisen, bei denen ein Risiko des Auftretens maligner Kammerarrhythmien und ischämischen Episoden beseht. Im Verlauf der letzten Jahre sind mit vielversprechenden Resultaten verschiedene Methoden zum Nachweis elektromagnetischer Störungen entwickelt worden, die auf ein erhöhtes Risiko hinweisen. Momentan können daraus die folgenden Schlussfolgerungen gezogen werden: 1) Die MCG kann das erhöhte Risiko bei den Patienten zuverlässig aufzeigen, die einen Herzinfarkt durchgemacht haben oder an einer Kardiomyopathie, einem langen QT-Syndrom oder einer operierten, kongenitalen Herzerkrankung leiden. 2) Es scheinen verschiedene Auswertungsmethoden zu funktionieren: Hochpassfiltrierung, Relative Smoothness Score und Magnetkarten-Trajektaufzeichnungen. 3) Nachweis und Lokalisation der akuten und chronischen Ischämie erscheinen technisch möglich zu sein und können eine der wichtigsten neuen klinischen Untersuchungsmethoden darstellen. 4) Umfangreichere klinische Studien sind erforderlich, um die Optimierung dieser Methoden zu erreichen und ihre Eignung unter klinischen Bedingungen aufzuzeigen. 5) So bald als möglich sollten ausserdem prognostische Studien eingeleitet werden. Es existieren in Krankenhäusern bereits einige Multikanal-MCG-Messgeräte, die sich zur Durchführung klinischer Studien eignen. PMID:19484514

Mäkijärvi, M

1997-09-01

385

Sparsity driven ultrasound imaginga)  

PubMed Central

An image formation framework for ultrasound imaging from synthetic transducer arrays based on sparsity-driven regularization functionals using single-frequency Fourier domain data is proposed. The framework involves the use of a physics-based forward model of the ultrasound observation process, the formulation of image formation as the solution of an associated optimization problem, and the solution of that problem through efficient numerical algorithms. The sparsity-driven, model-based approach estimates a complex-valued reflectivity field and preserves physical features in the scene while suppressing spurious artifacts. It also provides robust reconstructions in the case of sparse and reduced observation apertures. The effectiveness of the proposed imaging strategy is demonstrated using experimental data.

Tuysuzoglu, Ahmet; Kracht, Jonathan M.; Cleveland, Robin O.; C,etin, Mujdat; Karl, W. Clem

2012-01-01

386

Scrotal ultrasound in adults.  

PubMed

Scrotal ultrasound (US) is the technique of choice for imaging the scrotal contents. US is widely used in the characterization of scrotal pathologies as a supplement to the clinical examination. Modern US equipment, precise technical performance, and knowledge of sonographic anatomy and pathology, as in any US examination, are the basis for a correct diagnosis. New techniques, including elastography and contrast-enhanced US, may have an added value to the diagnosis. PMID:23768892

Appelbaum, Liat; Gaitini, Diana; Dogra, Vikram S

2013-06-01

387

Linear Endoscopic Ultrasound  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The widespread acceptance of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has largely been due to the emergence of the linear array echoendoscope.\\u000a Once endosonographers familiarized themselves with images obtained from the radial echoendoscope with correlative gastrointestinal\\u000a and extraintestinal anatomy, they reached a certain plateau. Elegant descriptions of lesions and superior staging abilities\\u000a were soon met by the obvious reality of the need for

Jason D. Conway; Girish Mishra

388

Ultrasound-Guided Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Utilizing-high frequency sound waves to define internal structures, ultrasound (US) provides an opportunity not only to diagnose\\u000a disease but also to target treatment to malignant tumors. US has several advantages over other radiology-assisted techniques\\u000a that highlight its important role as a component of anticancer therapy. US provides an opportunity to administer therapy with\\u000a real-time guidance. In other words, the physician

Robert F. Wong; Amanjit S. Gill; Manoop S. Bhutani

389

Therapeutic Endoscopic Ultrasound  

PubMed Central

Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is a viable and often preferred alternative to interventional and radiologic procedures, and the therapeutic applications of EUS continue to evolve. This evolution was catalyzed by the introduction of linear echoendoscopes that provide continuous imaging and observation of needles and by therapeutic devices that pass through large-caliber working channels. In this paper, we will discuss the spectrum of EUS-guided interventions that are currently available and in development.

Abu Dayyeh, Barham K.

2012-01-01

390

Clinical ophthalmic ultrasound improvements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The use of digital synthetic aperture techniques to obtain high resolution ultrasound images of eye and orbit was proposed. The parameters of the switched array configuration to reduce data collection time to a few milliseconds to avoid eye motion problems in the eye itself were established. An assessment of the effects of eye motion on the performance of the system was obtained. The principles of synthetic techniques are discussed. Likely applications are considered.

Garrison, J. B.; Piro, P. A.

1981-01-01

391

Ultrasound volumetry in hematometrocolpos.  

PubMed

Sonographic measurements of the volume of blood collecting in hematometrocolpos has been carried out in 6 cases of imperforate hymen. Sonometry gave estimates of the amount of retained blood, which were 4% to 28% more than that actually evacuated. The vaginal collection was 5 times or more than the uterine collection. Ultrasound gives characteristic diagnostic features, and the quantitative capabilities may provide information on volume and on the natural history of this condition. PMID:2497144

Ali, G M; Kordorff, R; Franke, D

1989-05-01

392

Ultrasound in Paediatric Trauma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Investigation of paediatric skeletal trauma requires careful consideration of not only the site of injury, but the proposed\\u000a mechanism of trauma and the age of the child. Ultrasound is increasingly being used to detect and delineate musculoskeletal\\u000a injury, either as the primary imaging modality or as an adjunct to other modalities, particularly magnetic resonance imaging\\u000a (MRI). The advent of high

James Teh

393

Resonant nonlinear ultrasound spectroscopy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Components with defects are identified from the response to strains applied at acoustic and ultrasound frequencies. The relative resonance frequency shift .vertline..DELTA..function.\\/.function..sub.0.vertline., is determined as a function of applied strain amplitude for an acceptable component, where .function..sub.0 is the frequency of the resonance peak at the lowest amplitude of applied strain and .DELTA..function. is the frequency shift of the resonance

Paul A. Johnson; James A. TenCate; Robert A. Guyer; Koen E. A. Van Den Abeele

2001-01-01

394

Driving delivery vehicles with ultrasound ?  

PubMed Central

Therapeutic applications of ultrasound have been considered for over 40 years, with the mild hyperthermia and associated increases in perfusion produced by ultrasound harnessed in many of the earliest treatments. More recently, new mechanisms for ultrasound-based or ultrasound-enhanced therapies have been described, and there is now great momentum and enthusiasm for the clinical translation of these techniques. This dedicated issue of Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews, entitled “Ultrasound for Drug and Gene Delivery,” addresses the mechanisms by which ultrasound can enhance local drug and gene delivery and the applications that have been demonstrated at this time. In this commentary, the identified mechanisms, delivery vehicles, applications and current bottlenecks for translation of these techniques are summarized.

Ferrara, Katherine W.

2009-01-01

395

Ultrasound mediated gene transfection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Gene therapy is a promising modality for the treatment of a variety of human diseases both inherited and acquired, such as cystic fibrosis and cancer. The lack of an effective, safe method for the delivery of foreign genes into the cells, a process known as transfection, limits this effort. Ultrasound mediated gene transfection is an attractive method for gene delivery since it is a noninvasive technique, does not introduce any viral particles into the host and can offer very good temporal and spatial control. Previous investigators have shown that sonication increases transfection efficiency with and without ultrasound contrast agents. The mechanism is believed to be via a cavitation process where collapsing bubble nuclei permeabilize the cell membrane leading to increased DNA transfer. The research is focused on the use of pulsed wave high frequency focused ultrasound to transfect DNA into mammalian cells in vitro and in vivo. A better understanding of the mechanism behind the transfection process is also sought. A summary of some in vitro results to date will be presented, which includes the design of a sonication chamber that allows us to model the in vivo case more accurately.

Williamson, Rene G.; Apfel, Robert E.; Brandsma, Janet L.

2002-05-01

396

Preoperative HO-1 Levels as Prognostic Factor for Adverse Cardiac Events in Elder Patients Undergoing Non-Cardiac Surgery  

PubMed Central

Background Hypoxia-inducible factor-1? (HIF-1?) and heme oxygenase-1(HO-1) are involved in the tissue hypoxic response. Hypothesis HIF-1? and HO-1 levels may predict cardiac ischemia and adverse cardiac events during non-cardiac surgery. Methods HIF-1? and HO-1 levels were determined in elderly patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery preoperatively and at 30 minutes, 48 and 72 hours postoperatively. Results were analyzed with respect to the occurrence of adverse cardiac events. Results A total of 380 patients with a mean age of 65.3 years were included, and 54 (14.2%) who had adverse cardiac events during or after the surgery. HIF-1? and HO-1 levels in the adverse cardiac event group were significantly higher than in the group without adverse cardiac events at each time point (all, P<0.05). In multivariates regression analysis, the odds of an adverse cardiac event was increased by every 1-year increase in age (odd ratio [OR] 1.39, P<0.001), abnormal ECG at baseline (OR 2.27, P?=?0.048), myocardial infarction history (OR 3.18, P?=?0.015), and positive baseline cTnI level were associated with an increased likelihood of an adverse cardiac event (OR 8.78, P?=?0.019), and for every 1 unit increase of HO-1, the odds of an adverse cardiac event increased by 1.30 (P?=?0.002). Conclusion Determination of preoperative HO-1 levels may aid in identifying patients at risk of developing ischemic cardiac events.

Zheng, Hong; Ma, Hai-Ping; Wang, Jiang; Ma, Ming

2013-01-01

397

Ultrasound-mediated drug delivery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although ultrasound-based drug delivery has only seen limited clinical use for transdermal drug delivery, there has been considerable momentum in research aimed at using ultrasound for a wide variety of medical applications. Ultrasound-mediated gene therapy using sonoporation and targeted delivery has progressed from in vitro proof-of-concept studies to produce biological effects in angiogenesis and diabetes studies. These techniques have also

ERIC C. PUA; Pei Zhong

2009-01-01

398

Augmentation mammoplasty: normal and abnormal findings with mammography and US.  

PubMed

A retrospective review of 133 patients who had undergone augmentation mammoplasty (n = 122), reconstructive mammoplasty (n = 10), and silicone injections (n = 1) was undertaken to establish the normal appearance of various types of implants, to establish a range of normal variations (wrinkles, valves, minor bulges), and to recognize true implant complications (collapse of a saline prosthesis, leakage of silicone gel, capsular contracture, capsular calcification, and deformities). The detection and evaluation of breast parenchymal abnormalities in the presence of a radiopaque implant are more difficult, and frequently ultrasound (US) or special mammographic views in conjunction with physical examination are required. Coned-down compression spot views are suggested for asymmetric opacities or ill-defined mammographic masses, and magnification views are recommended for microcalcifications: Both should be obtained with the Eklund implant displacement technique. Tangential or other special views combined with US are best for the evaluation of palpable abnormalities and suspected silicone implant rupture. PMID:1561417

Ganott, M A; Harris, K M; Ilkhanipour, Z S; Costa-Greco, M A

1992-03-01

399

Remarkable thickening of right atrial wall in subjects with cardiac amyloidosis complicated with sick sinus syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

We observed a 63-year old male with cardiac amyloidosis who presented with the clinical symptoms of sick sinus syndrome and dyspnea and abnormal thickening of the right atrial wall, which extended to the junction of the superior vena cava. This may explain the relationship of abnormal thickening of the right atrium which extends to the junction of the superior vena

Hiroya Narumi; Nobusada Funabashi; Hiroyuki Takano; Tai Sekine; Marehiko Ueda; Yasuhiko Hori; Taisuke Fukawa; Tohru Minamino; Yoshio Kobayashi; Issei Komuro

2007-01-01

400

Ultrasound Characteristics of In Utero Infection  

PubMed Central

In utero infection of the fetus has become recognized as an important cause of fetal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Since both anatomic and functional abnormalities have been described in the fetus related to various infections, ultrasonography may be a valuable diagnostic tool in this regard. A complete review of the current literature was undertaken to report available information on this topic. Common pathogens or clinical conditions were selected. The identified data were confounded by the way in which each case originally presented for study. Although certain anomalies were frequently associated with individual organisms, their incidence could not be determined, nor were most specific to that infectious agent. Representative ultrasound images are presented for common and unusual cases.

Treadwell, Marjorie C.; Gonik, Bernard

1997-01-01

401

Robotic ultrasound systems in medicine.  

PubMed

Robots ultrasound (RUS) can be defined as the combination of ultrasound imaging with a robotic system in medical interventions. With their potential for high precision, dexterity, and repeatability, robots are often uniquely suited for ultrasound integration. Although the field is relatively young, it has already generated a multitude of robotic systems for application in dozens of medical procedures. This paper reviews the robotic ultrasound systems that have been developed over the past two decades and describes their potential impact on modern medicine. The RUS projects reviewed include extracorporeal devices, needle guidance systems, and intraoperative systems. PMID:23475917

Priester, Alan M; Natarajan, Shyam; Culjat, Martin O

2013-03-01

402

Evaluation of nail abnormalities.  

PubMed

Knowledge of the anatomy and function of the nail apparatus is essential when performing the physical examination. Inspection may reveal localized nail abnormalities that should be treated, or may provide clues to an underlying systemic disease that requires further workup. Excessive keratinaceous material under the nail bed in a distal and lateral distribution should prompt an evaluation for onychomycosis. Onychomycosis may be diagnosed through potassium hydroxide examination of scrapings. If potassium hydroxide testing is negative for the condition, a nail culture or nail plate biopsy should be performed. A proliferating, erythematous, disruptive mass in the nail bed should be carefully evaluated for underlying squamous cell carcinoma. Longitudinal melanonychia (vertical nail bands) must be differentiated from subungual melanomas, which account for 50 percent of melanomas in persons with dark skin. Dystrophic longitudinal ridges and subungual hematomas are local conditions caused by trauma. Edema and erythema of the proximal and lateral nail folds are hallmark features of acute and chronic paronychia. Clubbing may suggest an underlying disease such as cirrhosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or celiac sprue. Koilonychia (spoon nail) is commonly associated with iron deficiency anemia. Splinter hemorrhages may herald endocarditis, although other causes should be considered. Beau lines can mark the onset of a severe underlying illness, whereas Muehrcke lines are associated with hypoalbuminemia. A pincer nail deformity is inherited or acquired and can be associated with beta-blocker use, psoriasis, onychomycosis, tumors of the nail apparatus, systemic lupus erythematosus, Kawasaki disease, and malignancy. PMID:22534387

Tully, Amber S; Trayes, Kathryn P; Studdiford, James S

2012-04-15

403

Elastography, progression factor in liver ultrasound.  

PubMed

Elastography is a method which, using ultrasound, obtains images and measurements of tissue elasticity when applying a force on it. As an imaging method it was developed to quantify objectively the pathological changes related to the presence of an abnormal tissue, compared to the surrounding tissues, giving information about the elasticity/stiffness of the examined tissue, the degree of fibrosis, the degree of stiffness compared to tumor free tissue. The tissue analysis can be done through a compression technology "eSie touch elasticity imaging" (with applications for the surface elastography) or ARFI technology--"acoustic radiation force imaging" (the diffusion impulse of the acoustic force). The ARFI method allows valid, accurate and flexible evaluation of liver stiffness and it is correlates with the fibrosis stage. The liver elastosonography, through new technologies available, has reached the level of the fibro-elastoscanner and magnetic resonance imaging. The ultrasound elastography application quickly advances, starting with the researches in this field. At present, it has analised the most various fields of application, from the breast, prostate, thyroid, pancreas imaging to the study of abdominal lymphnodes and peripheral vessels, gastrointestinal stromal tumors, primary and secondary liver tumors, the evaluation of uterine cervix, from cardiology to gastroenterology and urology, both in adults and in pediatrics. PMID:21235119

M?rginean, Cristina Oana; Br?nzaniuc, Klara; M?rginean, C; Azamfirei, L; Pitea, Ana-Maria

2010-01-01

404

Comparison of tongue functions between mature and tongue-thrust swallowing—an ultrasound investigation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many studies have proved that tongue thrusting plays a significant role in the etiology of some orofacial deformities. To learn more about the relationship between tongue function and the form of orofacial structures, it is important to recognize patients with abnormal swallowing patterns. A cushion scanning technique in combination with M-mode ultrasound was applied to measure and compare tongue movements

Chien-Lun Peng; Paul-Georg Jost-Brinkmann; Noriaki Yoshida; Hsin-Hua Chou; Che-Tong Lin

2004-01-01

405

Automatic lesion detection and segmentation algorithm on 2D breast ultrasound images  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although X-ray mammography (MG) is the dominant imaging modality, ultrasonography (US), with recent advances in technologies, has proven very useful in the evaluation of breast abnormalities. But radiologist should investigate a lot of images for proper diagnosis unlike MG. This paper proposes the automatic algorithm of detecting and segmenting lesions on 2D breast ultrasound images to help radiologist. The detecting

Donghoon Yu; Sooyeul Lee; Jeong Won Lee; Seunghwan Kim

2011-01-01

406

EVALUATION OF DOPPLER ULTRASOUND STUDY IN FIRST TRIMESTER THREATENED ABORTION AND ANEMBRYONIC PREGNANCY  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, aimed to evaluate changes in utero-placental circulation in normal as well as abnormal pregnancies, 25 women with first trimester threatened abortion with a living embryo, 5 women with anembryonic pregnancy (Blighted ovum), in addition to 30 women with normal pregnancies were included. In all women, trans-abdominal colour Doppler ultrasound study was performed including measurement of systolic \\/

Faiz A. J. Al-Waeely

407

Herbal supplement attenuation of cardiac fibrosis in rats with CCl?-induced liver cirrhosis.  

PubMed

Previously we found carbon tetrachloride (CCl?) induced cirrhosis associated cardiac hypertrophy and apoptosis. The purpose of this study is to determine whether further CCl? treatment would induce cardiac cell fibrosis. The cardiac tissues were analyzed by H&E. histological staining, Trichrome Masson staining and Western blotting. The results showed that the CCl?-treated-only group exhibits more trichrome staining, meaning that more fibrosis is present. Moreover, CCl? could further induce cardiac-fibrosis via TGF-?-p-Smad2/3-CTGF pathway. However, our data showed that the CCl?- indcued cardiac abnormalities were attenuated by Ocimum gratissimum extract (OGE) and silymarin co- treatments. In conclusion, our results indicated that the OGE and silymarin may be a potential traditional herb for the protection of cardiac tissues from the CCl4 induced cirrhosis associated cardiac fibrosis through modulating the TGF-? signaling pathway. PMID:24621337

Chang, Hsiao-Chuan; Chiu, Yung-Wei; Lin, Yueh-Min; Chen, Ray-Jade; Lin, James A; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Tsai, Chang-Hai; Kuo, Yu-Chun; Liu, Jer-Yuh; Huang, Chih-Yang

2014-02-28

408

An artificial vector model for generating abnormal electrocardiographic rhythms.  

PubMed

We present generalizations of our previously published artificial models for generating multi-channel ECG to provide simulations of abnormal cardiac rhythms. Using a three-dimensional vectorcardiogram (VCG) formulation, we generate the normal cardiac dipole for a patient using a sum of Gaussian kernels, fitted to real VCG recordings. Abnormal beats are specified either as perturbations to the normal dipole or as new dipole trajectories. Switching between normal and abnormal beat types is achieved using a first-order Markov chain. Probability transitions can be learned from real data or modeled by coupling to heart rate and sympathovagal balance. Natural morphology changes from beat-to-beat are incorporated by varying the angular frequency of the dipole as a function of the inter-beat (RR) interval. The RR interval time series is generated using our previously described model whereby time- and frequency-domain heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability characteristics can be specified. QT-HR hysteresis is simulated by coupling the Gaussian kernels associated with the T-wave in the model with a nonlinear factor related to the local HR (determined from the last n RR intervals). Morphology changes due to respiration are simulated by introducing a rotation matrix couple to the respiratory frequency. We demonstrate an example of the use of this model by simulating HR-dependent T-wave alternans (TWA) with and without phase-switching due to ectopy. Application of our model also reveals previously unreported effects of common TWA estimation methods. PMID:20308774

Clifford, Gari D; Nemati, Shamim; Sameni, Reza

2010-05-01

409

Chromosomal abnormalities and mental illness  

Microsoft Academic Search

Linkage studies of mental illness have provided suggestive evidence of susceptibility loci over many broad chromosomal regions. Pinpointing causative gene mutations by conventional linkage strategies alone is problematic. The breakpoints of chromosomal abnormalities occurring in patients with mental illness may be more direct pointers to the relevant gene locus. Publications that describe patients where chromosomal abnormalities co-exist with mental illness

D J MacIntyre; D H R Blackwood; D J Porteous; B S Pickard; W J Muir

2003-01-01

410

Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

Law, B. E.; Spencer, C. W.

1998-01-01

411

Aerobic exercise during pregnancy influences fetal cardiac autonomic control of heart rate and heart rate variability  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundPrevious studies using ultrasound technology showed that fetal heart rate (HR) may be responsive to maternal aerobic exercise. Although it is recognized that cardiac autonomic control may be influenced by the intrauterine environment, little is known about how maternal exercise affects fetal heart development.

Linda E. May; Alan Glaros; Hung-Wen Yeh; James F. Clapp III; Kathleen M. Gustafson

2010-01-01

412

Medical and ethical considerations in twin pregnancies discordant for serious cardiac disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective:Prenatal ultrasound has led to the early diagnosis of major anomalies. However, the ready availability of this technology has led to increasing challenges for physicians counseling affected parents, which is all the more difficult in a twin pregnancy with only one affected fetus. This paper reviews the medical and ethical considerations in twin pregnancies discordant for a serious cardiac condition.Study

A Malhotra; S Menahem; P Shekleton; L Gillam

2009-01-01

413

Ultrasound scanning and 99mTc sulphur colloid scintigraphy in diagnosis of Budd-Chiari syndrome.  

PubMed Central

Ultrasound scanning and 99mTc sulphur colloid scintigraphy are widely used in the diagnosis of the Budd-Chiari syndrome and have been compared at the time of presentation in 18 patients in whom the diagnosis was subsequently confirmed by histology and hepatic venography. Ultrasound was diagnostic in 16 (87%). The findings seen most often included hepatic vein abnormalities, caudate lobe hypertrophy with decreased reflectivity and compression of the inferior vena cava. Additional information not shown by scintigraphy included intracaval tumour, or thrombosis, and concomitant portal vein thrombosis. Although scintigraphic abnormalities were present in all patients, only in three (17%) was the 'classical' appearance of increased uptake and/or enlargement of the caudate lobe present. In one patient with nonspecific abnormalities on ultrasound, scintigraphy gave a positive diagnosis and it is in such cases that scintigraphy should continue to be used. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5

Powell-Jackson, P R; Karani, J; Ede, R J; Meire, H; Williams, R

1986-01-01

414

Characterising acute gynaecological pathology with ultrasound: an overview and case examples.  

PubMed

This article summarises the ultrasound features of a number of gynaecological emergencies: ectopic pregnancy, haemorrhagic corpus luteum, twisted adnexa, pelvic inflammatory disease, acute myoma necrosis, haematocolpos and haematometra. The basis of all diagnosis in women with acute gynaecological conditions is history and clinical examination. An ultrasound examination should only be performed if it is likely to provide information that would change the likelihood of the diagnosis suspected on the basis of clinical data. If ultrasound findings are abnormal, then it is important to thoroughly evaluate if they do explain the woman's symptoms or if they are merely an incidental finding. If ultrasound findings are completely normal, then the risk of significant pelvic pathology is probably small. PMID:19403338

Valentin, Lil

2009-10-01

415

Environmental applications of ultrasound  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The application of ultrasound to environmental problems relies on the process of acoustic cavitation: the formation, growth, and implosive collapse of bubbles in a liquid. The collapse of such bubbles creates hot spots with temperatures as high as 5000 K, pressures up to 800 atm, and cooling rates in excess of 1010K/s. This thesis describes the use of ultrasound for the dissolution of gas into water, an investigation the sonochemistry of ionic liquids, and the sonochemical preparation of nanostructured materials for the catalytic hydrodehalogenation of organic halides. A variety of ultrasonic methods and configurations were designed and tested for the dispersion and dissolution of O2 in water. Ultrasonic methods examined include 20 kHz Ti horns, 336 to 1.41 MHz transducers, specially designed ultrasonic gas dispersion cell including the hollow horn extensions, Ti frits, and a modified 20 kHz cup horn. Most methods increased the dispersion rate when compared to non-ultrasonic control runs. Room-temperature ionic liquids were examined for their potential application as green solvents for sonochemical reactions. The effects of ultrasound on room-temperature ionic liquids were investigated using butylmethyl imidazolium chloride (BuMeImCl), butylmethyl imidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BuMeImBF 4), and decylmethyl imidazolium tetraphenylborate. Gas-chromatography mass-spectrometry head-gas analysis and multibubble sonoluminescence were used to show that room-temperature ionic liquids decomposed in the presence of ultrasound. As previously reported, molybdenum carbonyl and tungsten carbonyl were decomposed sonochemically in hexadecane to form porous aggregates of 2--3 nm high surface area Mo2C and W2C particles. The activity of these materials was studied for the catalytic hydrodehalogenation of aliphatic and aromatic halocarbons at low temperatures (T = 200--300°C). Both catalysts were selective, active, and stable for all substrates tested. The HDH of substrates bearing aliphatic C-Cl bonds occurs faster than those with aryl C-Cl bonds. Characterization of post catalytic materials with x-ray diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed no change in the bulk structure of the catalyst and chlorination of the surface metal species, respectively.

Oxley, James Dean

416

Imaging By Ultrasound  

PubMed Central

Imaging by ultrasound has dramatically changed the investigation and management of many clinical problems. It is useful in many different parts of the body. In this brief discussion, the following topics are considered: hepatic lesions, bleeding in early pregnancy, gynecological pathology (adnexal lesions), aortic aneurysms, thyroid nodules and scrotal masses. The usefulness of duplex carotid sonography, which combines ultrasonic imaging and Doppler studies, is also discussed. Other topics (gallstones, biliary obstruction, renal calculi, hydronephrosis) are discussed in the appropriate sections. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4

Kidney, Maria R.

1986-01-01

417

[Ultrasound determination of leg length].  

PubMed

A diagnostic method is presented for measuring the leg length and the difference in leg lengths with ultrasound. A special device for holding and moving the ultrasound transducer was constructed. The measuring points on the hip, knee, and upper ankle can be visualized with a 5- or 7.5-MHz linear scanner. The measuring device gives the distance of the points in centimeters so that the difference corresponds to the real length of the leg, femur, and tibia. Tests conducted on corpses and clinical examples show that ultrasound in combination with our special device is an ideal method for determining the exact length of the leg. Ultrasound measurement of the leg length offers a reliable, noninvasive, and easily performed method. Because ultrasound is not limited by radiation hazards, our technique can be used for clinical screening. PMID:12017860

Konermann, W; Gruber, G

2002-03-01

418

Dystrophin gene abnormalities in two patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy  

PubMed Central

Two new cases of dilated cardiomyopathy (DC) caused by dystrophinopathy are reported. One patient, a 24 year old man, had a family history of X linked DC, while the other, a 52 year old man, had sporadic disease. Each had abnormal dystrophin immunostaining in muscle or cardiac biopsy specimens, but neither had muscle weakness. Serum creatine kinase activity was raised only in the patient with familial disease. Analysis of dystrophin gene mutations showed a deletion of exons 48-49 in the patient with familial DC and of exons 49-51 in the other. Dystrophin transcription in cardiac tissue from the patient with sporadic disease showed abundant expression, predominantly of the muscle isoform. This study, together with previous reports, suggests that some patients with DC have a dystrophinopathy that can be diagnosed using a combination of biochemical and genetic analyses.?? Keywords: dilated cardiomyopathy;  dystrophin;  Becker muscular dystrophy

Muntoni, F.; Di, L; Porcu, M.; Sinagra, G.; Mateddu, A.; Marrosu, G.; Ferlini, A.; Cau, M.; Milasin, J.; Melis, M. A.; Marrosu, M. G.; Cianchetti, C.; Sanna, A.; Falaschi, A.; Camerini, F.; Giacca, M.; Mestroni, L.

1997-01-01

419

Cardiac sodium channelopathies.  

PubMed

Cardiac sodium channel are protein complexes that are expressed in the sarcolemma of cardiomyocytes to carry a large inward depolarizing current (INa) during phase 0 of the cardiac action potential. The importance of INa for normal cardiac electrical activity is reflected by the high incidence of arrhythmias in cardiac sodium channelopathies, i.e., arrhythmogenic diseases in patients with mutations in SCN5A, the gene responsible for the pore-forming ion-conducting alpha-subunit, or in genes that encode the ancillary beta-subunits or regulatory proteins of the cardiac sodium channel. While clinical and genetic studies have laid the foundation for our understanding of cardiac sodium channelopathies by establishing links between arrhythmogenic diseases and mutations in genes that encode various subunits of the cardiac sodium channel, biophysical studies (particularly in heterologous expression systems and transgenic mouse models) have provided insights into the mechanisms by which INa dysfunction causes disease in such channelopathies. It is now recognized that mutations that increase INa delay cardiac repolarization, prolong action potential duration, and cause long QT syndrome, while mutations that reduce INa decrease cardiac excitability, reduce electrical conduction velocity, and induce Brugada syndrome, progressive cardiac conduction disease, sick sinus syndrome, or combinations thereof. Recently, mutation-induced INa dysfunction was also linked to dilated cardiomyopathy, atrial fibrillation, and sudden infant death syndrome. This review describes the structure and function of the cardiac sodium channel and its various subunits, summarizes major cardiac sodium channelopathies and the current knowledge concerning their genetic background and underlying molecular mechanisms, and discusses recent advances in the discovery of mutation-specific therapies in the management of these channelopathies. PMID:20091048

Amin, Ahmad S; Asghari-Roodsari, Alaleh; Tan, Hanno L

2010-07-01

420

Asphyxial Cardiac Arrest  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sudden cardiac arrest is a significant source of morbidity and mortality, with neurological injury affecting the majority\\u000a of persons who initially have restoration of pulses. The rat asphyxial cardiac arrest is an established model for neurological\\u000a injury after cardiac arrest. This model reproduces many aspects of neurological injury observed in humans — transient coma,\\u000a evolving motor deficits and persistent sensorimotor

Clifton W. Callaway; Eric S. Logue

421

Hypocalcaemic cardiac failure.  

PubMed Central

A 35-year-old patient who presented with recurrent chest infection, pulmonary oedema and cardiac failure was found to be grossly hypocalcaemic owing to previously undiagnosed hypoparathyroidism. The cardiac failure was not easily relieved by digoxin and diuretics but it quickly responded when the plasma calcium was restored to normal with dihydrotachysterol. With dihydrotachysterol as sole treatment for more than 2.5 years he had normal exercise tolerance and no features of cardiac failure. Images Fig. 1

Brenton, D. P.; Gonzales, J.; Pollard, A. B.

1978-01-01

422

Three-dimensional filamentous human diseased cardiac tissue model.  

PubMed

A human in vitro cardiac tissue model would be a significant advancement for understanding, studying, and developing new strategies for treating cardiac arrhythmias and related cardiovascular diseases. We developed an in vitro model of three-dimensional (3D) human cardiac tissue by populating synthetic filamentous matrices with cardiomyocytes derived from healthy wild-type volunteer (WT) and patient-specific long QT syndrome type 3 (LQT3) induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS-CMs) to mimic the condensed and aligned human ventricular myocardium. Using such a highly controllable cardiac model, we studied the contractility malfunctions associated with the electrophysiological consequences of LQT3 and their response to a panel of drugs. By varying the stiffness of filamentous matrices, LQT3 iPS-CMs exhibited different level of contractility abnormality and susceptibility to drug-induced cardiotoxicity. PMID:24268663

Ma, Zhen; Koo, Sangmo; Finnegan, Micaela A; Loskill, Peter; Huebsch, Nathaniel; Marks, Natalie C; Conklin, Bruce R; Grigoropoulos, Costas P; Healy, Kevin E

2014-02-01

423

Endocavity Ultrasound Probe Manipulators  

PubMed Central

We developed two similar structure manipulators for medical endocavity ultrasound probes with 3 and 4 degrees of freedom (DoF). These robots allow scanning with ultrasound for 3-D imaging and enable robot-assisted image-guided procedures. Both robots use remote center of motion kinematics, characteristic of medical robots. The 4-DoF robot provides unrestricted manipulation of the endocavity probe. With the 3-DoF robot the insertion motion of the probe must be adjusted manually, but the device is simpler and may also be used to manipulate external-body probes. The robots enabled a novel surgical approach of using intraoperative image-based navigation during robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP), performed with concurrent use of two robotic systems (Tandem, T-RALP). Thus far, a clinical trial for evaluation of safety and feasibility has been performed successfully on 46 patients. This paper describes the architecture and design of the robots, the two prototypes, control features related to safety, preclinical experiments, and the T-RALP procedure.

Stoianovici, Dan; Kim, Chunwoo; Schafer, Felix; Huang, Chien-Ming; Zuo, Yihe; Petrisor, Doru; Han, Misop

2014-01-01

424

Aesthetic ultrasound therapy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ultrasound provides key benefits in aesthetic surgery compared to laser and RF based energy sources. We present results of research, development, pre-clinical and clinical studies, regulatory clearance and commercialization of a revolutionary non-invasive aesthetic ultrasound imaging and therapy system. Clinical applications for this platform include non-invasive face-lifts, brow-lifts, and neck-lifts achieved through fractionated treatment of the superficial musculoaponeurotic system (SMAS) and subcutaneous tissue. Treatment consists of placing a grid of micro-coagulative lesions on the order of 1 mm3 at depths in skin of 1 to 6 mm, source energy levels of 0.1 to 3 J, and spacing on the order of 1.5 mm, from 4 to 10 MHz dual-mode image/treat transducers. System details are described, as well as a regulatory pathway consisting of acoustic and bioheat simulations, source characterization (hydrophone, radiation force, and Schlieren), pre-clinical studies (porcine skin ex vivo, in vivo, and human cadaver), human safety studies (treat and resect) and efficacy trials which culminated in FDA clearance (2009) under a new device classification and world-wide usage. Clinical before and after photographs are presented which validate the clinical approach.

Barthe, Peter G.; Slayton, Michael H.

2012-10-01

425

Cardiac manifestations of Pallister-Killian syndrome.  

PubMed

Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS) is a sporadic multisystem genetic diagnosis characterized by facial dysmorphia, variable developmental delay and intellectual impairment, hypotonia, hearing loss, seizures, differences in skin pigmentation, temporal alopecia, diaphragmatic hernia, congenital heart defects, and other systemic abnormalities. Although congenital heart defects have been described in association with PKS, the full spectrum of heart disease is still not entirely known. Here, we describe the pattern of cardiac findings of 81 probands with PKS who have had at least one cardiac evaluation, demonstrating structural heart difference in 37% of our cohort (n?=?30). Septal defects such as atrial or ventricular septal defects (n?=?12) were the most commonly seen congenital heart differences. Additional findings included the occasional occurrence of bicuspid aortic valve, aortic dilatation, and cardiac hypertrophy/cardiomyopathy. We suggest cardiac evaluation for all individuals with PKS at the time of diagnosis as well as subsequent longitudinal follow-up to monitor for the development of cardiomyopathy and aortic dilatation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24504854

Tilton, Richard K; Wilkens, Alisha; Krantz, Ian D; Izumi, Kosuke

2014-05-01

426

Mutations in the cardiac transcription factor NKX2.5 affect diverse cardiac developmental pathways  

PubMed Central

Heterozygous mutations in NKX2.5, a homeobox transcription factor, were reported to cause secundum atrial septal defects and result in atrioventricular (AV) conduction block during postnatal life. To further characterize the role of NKX2.5 in cardiac morphogenesis, we sought additional mutations in groups of probands with cardiac anomalies and first-degree AV block, idiopathic AV block, or tetralogy of Fallot. We identified 7 novel mutations by sequence analysis of the NKX2.5-coding region in 26 individuals. Associated phenotypes included AV block, which was the primary manifestation of cardiac disease in nearly a quarter of affected individuals, as well as atrial septal defect and ventricular septal defect. Ventricular septal defect was associated with tetralogy of Fallot or double-outlet right ventricle in 3 individuals. Ebstein’s anomaly and other tricuspid valve abnormalities were also present. Mutations in human NKX2.5 cause a variety of cardiac anomalies and may account for a clinically significant portion of tetralogy of Fallot and idiopathic AV block. The coinheritance of NKX2.5 mutations with various congenital heart defects suggests that this transcription factor contributes to diverse cardiac developmental pathways. J. Clin. Invest. 104:1567–1573 (1999).

Benson, D. Woodrow; Silberbach, G. Michael; Kavanaugh-McHugh, Ann; Cottrill, Carol; Zhang, Yizhong; Riggs, Steve; Smalls, Octavia; Johnson, Mark C.; Watson, Michael S.; Seidman, J.G.; Seidman, Christine E.; Plowden, John; Kugler, John D.

1999-01-01

427

In vivo validation of cardiac output assessment in non-standard 3D echocardiographic images  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Automatic segmentation of the endocardial surface in three-dimensional (3D) echocardiographic images is an important tool to assess left ventricular (LV) geometry and cardiac output (CO). The presence of speckle noise as well as the nonisotropic characteristics of the myocardium impose strong demands on the segmentation algorithm. In the analysis of normal heart geometries of standardized (apical) views, it is advantageous to incorporate a priori knowledge about the shape and appearance of the heart. In contrast, when analyzing abnormal heart geometries, for example in children with congenital malformations, this a priori knowledge about the shape and anatomy of the LV might induce erroneous segmentation results. This study describes a fully automated segmentation method for the analysis of non-standard echocardiographic images, without making strong assumptions on the shape and appearance of the heart. The method was validated in vivo in a piglet model. Real-time 3D echocardiographic image sequences of five piglets were acquired in radiofrequency (rf) format. These ECG-gated full volume images were acquired intra-operatively in a non-standard view. Cardiac blood flow was measured simultaneously by an ultrasound transit time flow probe positioned around the common pulmonary artery. Three-dimensional adaptive filtering using the characteristics of speckle was performed on the demodulated rf data to reduce the influence of speckle noise and to optimize the distinction between blood and myocardium. A gradient-based 3D deformable simplex mesh was then used to segment the endocardial surface. A gradient and a speed force were included as external forces of the model. To balance data fitting and mesh regularity, one fixed set of weighting parameters of internal, gradient and speed forces was used for all data sets. End-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were computed from the segmented endocardial surface. The cardiac output derived from this automatic segmentation was validated quantitatively by comparing it with the CO values measured f